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Sample records for flow microfluorometric approaches

  1. Flow microfluorometric analysis of phagocyte degranulation in bacteria-infected whole human blood cell cultures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kravtsov, Alexander L.; Bobyleva, Elena V.; Grebenyukova, Tatyana P.; Kuznetsov, Oleg S.; Kulyash, Youri V.

    2002-07-01

    A quantitative flow microfluorometric method was used to study the intensity of human blood phagocyte degranulation in response to viable staphylococcus aureus or Yersinia pestis cells. Microorganisms were added directly to defibrinated whole blood. Uninfected and infected blood samples were incubated at 37 degrees C to 8 h. The results were recorded in dynamics after the staining of whole blood with acridine orange solution. Lymphocytes with a low azurophilic granule per cell content were discriminated from phagocytes by the measurement of single cell red cytoplasmic granule fluorescence. 30,000 cells in each sample were examined. S. aureus cells caused a dose-dependent decrease in the number of phagocytes having a high red cytoplasmic fluorescence intensity and a corresponding increase in the weakly fluorescence cell population. In the presence of an initial S. aureus-to-phagocyte ratio more than 1:1, degranulation was measured after 3 h of incubation and to 8 h the percentage of degranulated phagocytes was at least 100 percent Y. pestis cells grown for 48 h at 28 degrees C caused at same condition as the degranulation only about 50 percent of cells. Y.pestis EV cells preincubated in broth for 12 h at 37 degrees C did no stimulate the phahocyte degranulation. The results of these studies suggest that analysis of cell populations via flow microfluorimeter technology may be a powerful tool in analysis bacterial infection.

  2. Flow Analysis: A Novel Approach For Classification.

    PubMed

    Vakh, Christina; Falkova, Marina; Timofeeva, Irina; Moskvin, Alexey; Moskvin, Leonid; Bulatov, Andrey

    2016-09-01

    We suggest a novel approach for classification of flow analysis methods according to the conditions under which the mass transfer processes and chemical reactions take place in the flow mode: dispersion-convection flow methods and forced-convection flow methods. The first group includes continuous flow analysis, flow injection analysis, all injection analysis, sequential injection analysis, sequential injection chromatography, cross injection analysis, multi-commutated flow analysis, multi-syringe flow injection analysis, multi-pumping flow systems, loop flow analysis, and simultaneous injection effective mixing flow analysis. The second group includes segmented flow analysis, zone fluidics, flow batch analysis, sequential injection analysis with a mixing chamber, stepwise injection analysis, and multi-commutated stepwise injection analysis. The offered classification allows systematizing a large number of flow analysis methods. Recent developments and applications of dispersion-convection flow methods and forced-convection flow methods are presented.

  3. Flow Analysis: A Novel Approach For Classification.

    PubMed

    Vakh, Christina; Falkova, Marina; Timofeeva, Irina; Moskvin, Alexey; Moskvin, Leonid; Bulatov, Andrey

    2016-09-01

    We suggest a novel approach for classification of flow analysis methods according to the conditions under which the mass transfer processes and chemical reactions take place in the flow mode: dispersion-convection flow methods and forced-convection flow methods. The first group includes continuous flow analysis, flow injection analysis, all injection analysis, sequential injection analysis, sequential injection chromatography, cross injection analysis, multi-commutated flow analysis, multi-syringe flow injection analysis, multi-pumping flow systems, loop flow analysis, and simultaneous injection effective mixing flow analysis. The second group includes segmented flow analysis, zone fluidics, flow batch analysis, sequential injection analysis with a mixing chamber, stepwise injection analysis, and multi-commutated stepwise injection analysis. The offered classification allows systematizing a large number of flow analysis methods. Recent developments and applications of dispersion-convection flow methods and forced-convection flow methods are presented. PMID:26364745

  4. Multidomain approach for calculating compressible flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cambier, L.; Chazzi, W.; Veuillot, J. P.; Viviand, H.

    1982-01-01

    A multidomain approach for calculating compressible flows by using unsteady or pseudo-unsteady methods is presented. This approach is based on a general technique of connecting together two domains in which hyperbolic systems (that may differ) are solved with the aid of compatibility relations associated with these systems. Some examples of this approach's application to calculating transonic flows in ideal fluids are shown, particularly the adjustment of shock waves. The approach is then applied to treating a shock/boundary layer interaction problem in a transonic channel.

  5. Multigrid Approach to Incompressible Viscous Cavity Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, William A.

    1996-01-01

    Two-dimensional incompressible viscous driven-cavity flows are computed for Reynolds numbers on the range 100-20,000 using a loosely coupled, implicit, second-order centrally-different scheme. Mesh sequencing and three-level V-cycle multigrid error smoothing are incorporated into the symmetric Gauss-Seidel time-integration algorithm. Parametrics on the numerical parameters are performed, achieving reductions in solution times by more than 60 percent with the full multigrid approach. Details of the circulation patterns are investigated in cavities of 2-to-1, 1-to-1, and 1-to-2 depth to width ratios.

  6. PDF approach for compressible turbulent reacting flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, A. T.; Tsai, Y.-L. P.; Raju, M. S.

    1993-01-01

    The objective of the present work is to develop a probability density function (pdf) turbulence model for compressible reacting flows for use with a CFD flow solver. The probability density function of the species mass fraction and enthalpy are obtained by solving a pdf evolution equation using a Monte Carlo scheme. The pdf solution procedure is coupled with a compressible CFD flow solver which provides the velocity and pressure fields. A modeled pdf equation for compressible flows, capable of capturing shock waves and suitable to the present coupling scheme, is proposed and tested. Convergence of the combined finite-volume Monte Carlo solution procedure is discussed, and an averaging procedure is developed to provide smooth Monte-Carlo solutions to ensure convergence. Two supersonic diffusion flames are studied using the proposed pdf model and the results are compared with experimental data; marked improvements over CFD solutions without pdf are observed. Preliminary applications of pdf to 3D flows are also reported.

  7. A new numerical approach for compressible viscous flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, J. C.; Lekoudis, S. G.

    1982-01-01

    A numerical approach for computing unsteady compressible viscous flows was developed. This approach offers the capability of confining the region of computation to the viscous region of the flow. The viscous region is defined as the region where the vorticity is nonnegligible and the difference in dilatation between the potential flow and the real flow around the same geometry is also nonnegligible. The method was developed and tested. Also, an application of the procedure to the solution of the steady Navier-Stokes equations for incompressible internal flows is presented.

  8. Unsteady separated flows - Novel experimental approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krothapalli, A.; Lourenco, L.

    1987-01-01

    A novel experimental technique, commonly referred to as laser speckle velocimetry or particle image displacement velocimetry (PIDV), is developed for the measurement of instantaneous velocity fields in unsteady and steady flows. The main advantage of this technique is the fact that the velocity field is measured with sufficient accuracy so that the distribution of vorticity can be calculated with accuracy. The PIDV technique, which is ideally suited for the study of unsteady separated flows, has been utilized to measure the development of the separated flow field generated by a high angle-of-attack (alpha = 30 deg) NACA 0012 airfoil, started impulsively from rest.

  9. The pdf approach to turbulent flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kollmann, W.

    1990-01-01

    This paper provides a detailed discussion of the theory and application of probability density function (pdf) methods, which provide a complete statistical description of turbulent flow fields at a single point or a finite number of points. The basic laws governing the flow of Newtonian fluids are set up in the Eulerian and the Lagrangian frame, and the exact and linear equations for the characteristic functionals in those frames are discussed. Pdf equations in both frames are derived as Fourier transforms of the equations of the characteristic functions. Possible formulations for the nonclosed terms in the pdf equation are discussed, their properties are assessed, and closure modes for the molecular-transport and the fluctuating pressure-gradient terms are reviewed. The application of pdf methods to turbulent combustion flows, supersonic flows, and the interaction of turbulence with shock waves is discussed.

  10. Parametric and experimental analysis using a power flow approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuschieri, J. M.

    1990-01-01

    A structural power flow approach for the analysis of structure-borne transmission of vibrations is used to analyze the influence of structural parameters on transmitted power. The parametric analysis is also performed using the Statistical Energy Analysis approach and the results are compared with those obtained using the power flow approach. The advantages of structural power flow analysis are demonstrated by comparing the type of results that are obtained by the two analytical methods. Also, to demonstrate that the power flow results represent a direct physical parameter that can be measured on a typical structure, an experimental study of structural power flow is presented. This experimental study presents results for an L shaped beam for which an available solution was already obtained. Various methods to measure vibrational power flow are compared to study their advantages and disadvantages.

  11. Magnetohydrodynamic equilibria with incompressible flows: Symmetry approach

    SciTech Connect

    Cicogna, G.; Pegoraro, F.

    2015-02-15

    We identify and discuss a family of azimuthally symmetric, incompressible, magnetohydrodynamic plasma equilibria with poloidal and toroidal flows in terms of solutions of the Generalized Grad Shafranov (GGS) equation. These solutions are derived by exploiting the incompressibility assumption, in order to rewrite the GGS equation in terms of a different dependent variable, and the continuous Lie symmetry properties of the resulting equation and, in particular, a special type of “weak” symmetries.

  12. Annular flow optimization: A new integrated approach

    SciTech Connect

    Maglione, R.; Robotti, G.; Romagnoli, R.

    1997-07-01

    During the drilling stage of an oil and gas well the hydraulic circuit of the mud assumes great importance with respect to most of the numerous and various constituting parts (mostly in the annular sections). Each of them has some points to be satisfied in order to guarantee both the safety of the operations and the performance optimization of each of the single elements of the circuit. The most important tasks for the annular part of the drilling hydraulic circuit are the following: (1) Maximum available pressure to the last casing shoe; (2) avoid borehole wall erosions; and (3) guarantee the hole cleaning. A new integrated system considering all the elements of the annular part of the drilling hydraulic circuit and the constraints imposed from each of them has been realized. In this way the family of the flow parameters (mud rheology and pump rate) satisfying simultaneously all the variables of the annular section has been found. Finally two examples regarding a standard and narrow annular section (slim hole) will be reported, showing briefly all the steps of the calculations until reaching the optimum flow parameters family (for that operational condition of drilling) that satisfies simultaneous all the flow parameters limitations imposed by the elements of the annular section circuit.

  13. A forward modeling approach for interpreting impeller flow logs.

    PubMed

    Parker, Alison H; West, L Jared; Odling, Noelle E; Bown, Richard T

    2010-01-01

    A rigorous and practical approach for interpretation of impeller flow log data to determine vertical variations in hydraulic conductivity is presented and applied to two well logs from a Chalk aquifer in England. Impeller flow logging involves measuring vertical flow speed in a pumped well and using changes in flow with depth to infer the locations and magnitudes of inflows into the well. However, the measured flow logs are typically noisy, which leads to spurious hydraulic conductivity values where simplistic interpretation approaches are applied. In this study, a new method for interpretation is presented, which first defines a series of physical models for hydraulic conductivity variation with depth and then fits the models to the data, using a regression technique. Some of the models will be rejected as they are physically unrealistic. The best model is then selected from the remaining models using a maximum likelihood approach. This balances model complexity against fit, for example, using Akaike's Information Criterion.

  14. Receptivity in parallel flows: An adjoint approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, D. Christopher

    1993-01-01

    Linear receptivity studies in parallel flows are aimed at understanding how external forcing couples to the natural unstable motions which a flow can support. The vibrating ribbon problem models the original Schubauer and Skramstad boundary layer experiment and represents the classic boundary layer receptivity problem. The process by which disturbances are initiated in convectively-unstable jets and shear layers has also received attention. Gaster was the first to handle the boundary layer analysis with the recognition that spatial modes, rather than temporal modes, were relevant when studying convectively-unstable flows that are driven by a time-harmonic source. The amplitude of the least stable spatial mode, far downstream of the source, is related to the source strength by a coupling coefficient. The determination of this coefficient is at the heart of this type of linear receptivity study. The first objective of the present study was to determine whether the various wave number derivative factors, appearing in the coupling coefficients for linear receptivity problems, could be reexpressed in a simpler form involving adjoint eigensolutions. Secondly, it was hoped that the general nature of this simplification could be shown; indeed, a rather elegant characterization of the receptivity properties of spatial instabilities does emerge. The analysis is quite distinct from the usual Fourier-inversion procedures, although a detailed knowledge of the spectrum of the Orr-Sommerfeld equation is still required. Since the cylinder wake analysis proved very useful in addressing control considerations, the final objective was to provide a foundation upon which boundary layer control theory may be developed.

  15. A Logical Approach to the Statement of Cash Flows

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petro, Fred; Gean, Farrell

    2014-01-01

    Of the three financial statements in financial reporting, the Statement of Cash Flows (SCF) is perhaps the most challenging. The most difficult aspect of the SCF is in developing an understanding of how previous transactions are finalized in this document. The purpose of this paper is to logically explain the indirect approach of cash flow whereby…

  16. Traffic flow forecasting: Comparison of modeling approaches

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, B.L.; Demetsky, M.J.

    1997-08-01

    The capability to forecast traffic volume in an operational setting has been identified as a critical need for intelligent transportation systems (ITS). In particular, traffic volume forecasts will support proactive, dynamic traffic control. However, previous attempts to develop traffic volume forecasting models have met with limited success. This research effort focused on developing traffic volume forecasting models for two sites on Northern Virginia`s Capital Beltway. Four models were developed and tested for the freeway traffic flow forecasting problem, which is defined as estimating traffic flow 15 min into the future. They were the historical average, time-series, neural network, and nonparametric regression models. The nonparametric regression model significantly outperformed the other models. A Wilcoxon signed-rank test revealed that the nonparametric regression model experienced significantly lower errors than the other models. In addition, the nonparametric regression model was easy to implement, and proved to be portable, performing well at two distinct sites. Based on its success, research is ongoing to refine the nonparametric regression model and to extend it to produce multiple interval forecasts.

  17. Modern flow cytometry: a practical approach.

    PubMed

    Tung, James W; Heydari, Kartoosh; Tirouvanziam, Rabin; Sahaf, Bita; Parks, David R; Herzenberg, Leonard A; Herzenberg, Leonore A

    2007-09-01

    The demonstration that CD T-cell counts can be used to monitor HIV disease progression opened the way to the first clinical application for fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS) technology. Modern FACS methodologies such multicolor staining and sorting has opened the way to new and constructive therapeutic and clinical applications. This article outlines approaches in which current users can use to improve the quality of their FACS work without undue effort. FACS technology development and the emergence of new software support for this technology are cooperating in this effort.

  18. A flow cytometric approach to quantify biofilms.

    PubMed

    Kerstens, Monique; Boulet, Gaëlle; Van Kerckhoven, Marian; Clais, Sofie; Lanckacker, Ellen; Delputte, Peter; Maes, Louis; Cos, Paul

    2015-07-01

    Since biofilms are important in many clinical, industrial, and environmental settings, reliable methods to quantify these sessile microbial populations are crucial. Most of the currently available techniques do not allow the enumeration of the viable cell fraction within the biofilm and are often time consuming. This paper proposes flow cytometry (FCM) using the single-stain viability dye TO-PRO(®)-3 iodide as a fast and precise alternative. Mature biofilms of Candida albicans and Escherichia coli were used to optimize biofilm removal and dissociation, as a single-cell suspension is needed for accurate FCM enumeration. To assess the feasibility of FCM quantification of biofilms, E. coli and C. albicans biofilms were analyzed using FCM and crystal violet staining at different time points. A combination of scraping and rinsing proved to be the most efficient technique for biofilm removal. Sonicating for 10 min eliminated the remaining aggregates, resulting in a single-cell suspension. Repeated FCM measurements of biofilm samples revealed a good intraday precision of approximately 5 %. FCM quantification and the crystal violet assay yielded similar biofilm growth curves for both microorganisms, confirming the applicability of our technique. These results show that FCM using TO-PRO(®)-3 iodide as a single-stain viability dye is a valid fast alternative for the quantification of viable cells in a biofilm.

  19. An active, collaborative approach to learning skills in flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Fuller, Kathryn; Linden, Matthew D; Lee-Pullen, Tracey; Fragall, Clayton; Erber, Wendy N; Röhrig, Kimberley J

    2016-06-01

    Advances in science education research have the potential to improve the way students learn to perform scientific interpretations and understand science concepts. We developed active, collaborative activities to teach skills in manipulating flow cytometry data using FlowJo software. Undergraduate students were given compensated clinical flow cytometry listmode output (FCS) files and asked to design a gating strategy to diagnose patients with different hematological malignancies on the basis of their immunophenotype. A separate cohort of research trainees was given uncompensated data files on which they performed their own compensation, calculated the antibody staining index, designed a sequential gating strategy, and quantified rare immune cell subsets. Student engagement, confidence, and perceptions of flow cytometry were assessed using a survey. Competency against the learning outcomes was assessed by asking students to undertake tasks that required understanding of flow cytometry dot plot data and gating sequences. The active, collaborative approach allowed students to achieve learning outcomes not previously possible with traditional teaching formats, for example, having students design their own gating strategy, without forgoing essential outcomes such as the interpretation of dot plots. In undergraduate students, favorable perceptions of flow cytometry as a field and as a potential career choice were correlated with student confidence but not the ability to perform flow cytometry data analysis. We demonstrate that this new pedagogical approach to teaching flow cytometry is beneficial for student understanding and interpretation of complex concepts. It should be considered as a useful new method for incorporating complex data analysis tasks such as flow cytometry into curricula.

  20. Parametric and experimental analysis using a power flow approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuschieri, J. M.

    1988-01-01

    Having defined and developed a structural power flow approach for the analysis of structure-borne transmission of structural vibrations, the technique is used to perform an analysis of the influence of structural parameters on the transmitted energy. As a base for comparison, the parametric analysis is first performed using a Statistical Energy Analysis approach and the results compared with those obtained using the power flow approach. The advantages of using structural power flow are thus demonstrated by comparing the type of results obtained by the two methods. Additionally, to demonstrate the advantages of using the power flow method and to show that the power flow results represent a direct physical parameter that can be measured on a typical structure, an experimental investigation of structural power flow is also presented. Results are presented for an L-shaped beam for which an analytical solution has already been obtained. Furthermore, the various methods available to measure vibrational power flow are compared to investigate the advantages and disadvantages of each method.

  1. An engineering based approach for hydraulic computations in river flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Francesco, S.; Biscarini, C.; Pierleoni, A.; Manciola, P.

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents an engineering based approach for hydraulic risk evaluation. The aim of the research is to identify a criteria for the choice of the simplest and appropriate model to use in different scenarios varying the characteristics of main river channel. The complete flow field, generally expressed in terms of pressure, velocities, accelerations can be described through a three dimensional approach that consider all the flow properties varying in all directions. In many practical applications for river flow studies, however, the greatest changes occur only in two dimensions or even only in one. In these cases the use of simplified approaches can lead to accurate results, with easy to build and faster simulations. The study has been conducted taking in account a dimensionless parameter of channels (ratio of curvature radius and width of the channel (R/B).

  2. Hydrokinetic approach to large-scale cardiovascular blood flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melchionna, Simone; Bernaschi, Massimo; Succi, Sauro; Kaxiras, Efthimios; Rybicki, Frank J.; Mitsouras, Dimitris; Coskun, Ahmet U.; Feldman, Charles L.

    2010-03-01

    We present a computational method for commodity hardware-based clinical cardiovascular diagnosis based on accurate simulation of cardiovascular blood flow. Our approach leverages the flexibility of the Lattice Boltzmann method to implementation on high-performance, commodity hardware, such as Graphical Processing Units. We developed the procedure for the analysis of real-life cardiovascular blood flow case studies, namely, anatomic data acquisition, geometry and mesh generation, flow simulation and data analysis and visualization. We demonstrate the usefulness of our computational tool through a set of large-scale simulations of the flow patterns associated with the arterial tree of a patient which involves two hundred million computational cells. The simulations show evidence of a very rich and heterogeneous endothelial shear stress pattern (ESS), a quantity of recognized key relevance to the localization and progression of major cardiovascular diseases, such as atherosclerosis, and set the stage for future studies involving pulsatile flows.

  3. An active, collaborative approach to learning skills in flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Fuller, Kathryn; Linden, Matthew D; Lee-Pullen, Tracey; Fragall, Clayton; Erber, Wendy N; Röhrig, Kimberley J

    2016-06-01

    Advances in science education research have the potential to improve the way students learn to perform scientific interpretations and understand science concepts. We developed active, collaborative activities to teach skills in manipulating flow cytometry data using FlowJo software. Undergraduate students were given compensated clinical flow cytometry listmode output (FCS) files and asked to design a gating strategy to diagnose patients with different hematological malignancies on the basis of their immunophenotype. A separate cohort of research trainees was given uncompensated data files on which they performed their own compensation, calculated the antibody staining index, designed a sequential gating strategy, and quantified rare immune cell subsets. Student engagement, confidence, and perceptions of flow cytometry were assessed using a survey. Competency against the learning outcomes was assessed by asking students to undertake tasks that required understanding of flow cytometry dot plot data and gating sequences. The active, collaborative approach allowed students to achieve learning outcomes not previously possible with traditional teaching formats, for example, having students design their own gating strategy, without forgoing essential outcomes such as the interpretation of dot plots. In undergraduate students, favorable perceptions of flow cytometry as a field and as a potential career choice were correlated with student confidence but not the ability to perform flow cytometry data analysis. We demonstrate that this new pedagogical approach to teaching flow cytometry is beneficial for student understanding and interpretation of complex concepts. It should be considered as a useful new method for incorporating complex data analysis tasks such as flow cytometry into curricula. PMID:27068992

  4. A spectrally refined interface approach for simulating multiphase flows

    SciTech Connect

    Desjardins, Olivier Pitsch, Heinz

    2009-03-20

    This paper presents a novel approach to phase-interface transport based on pseudo-spectral sub-grid refinement of a level set function. In each flow solver grid cell, a set of quadrature points is introduced on which the value of the level set function is known. This methodology allows to define a polynomial reconstruction of the level set function in each cell. The transport is performed using a semi-Lagrangian technique, removing all constraints on the time step size. Such an approach provides sub-cell resolution of the phase-interface and leads to excellent accuracy in the transport, while a reasonable cost is obtained by pre-computing some of the metrics associated with the polynomials. To couple this approach with a flow solver, an converging curvature computation is introduced. First, a second order explicit distance to the sub-grid interface is reconstructed on the flow solver mesh. Then, a least squares approach is employed to extract the curvature from this distance function. This technique is found to combine the high accuracy and good conservation found in the particle level set method with the converging curvature usually obtained with classical high order PDE transport of the level set function. Tests are presented for both transport as well as two-phase flows, that suggest that this technique is capable of retaining the thin liquid structures that are expected in turbulent atomization of liquids.

  5. A Galerkin least squares approach to viscoelastic flow.

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, Rekha R.; Schunk, Peter Randall

    2015-10-01

    A Galerkin/least-squares stabilization technique is applied to a discrete Elastic Viscous Stress Splitting formulation of for viscoelastic flow. From this, a possible viscoelastic stabilization method is proposed. This method is tested with the flow of an Oldroyd-B fluid past a rigid cylinder, where it is found to produce inaccurate drag coefficients. Furthermore, it fails for relatively low Weissenberg number indicating it is not suited for use as a general algorithm. In addition, a decoupled approach is used as a way separating the constitutive equation from the rest of the system. A Pressure Poisson equation is used when the velocity and pressure are sought to be decoupled, but this fails to produce a solution when inflow/outflow boundaries are considered. However, a coupled pressure-velocity equation with a decoupled constitutive equation is successful for the flow past a rigid cylinder and seems to be suitable as a general-use algorithm.

  6. A Shallow Layer Approach for Geo-flow emplacement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, A.; Folch, A.; Mecedonio, G.

    2009-04-01

    Geophysical flows such as lahars or lava flows severely threat the communities located on or near the volcano flanks. Risks and damages caused by the propagation of this kind of flows require a quantitative description of this phenomenon and reliable tools for forecasting their emplacement. Computational models are a valuable tool for planning risk mitigation countermeasures, such as human intervention to force flow diversion, artificial barriers, and allow for significant economical and social benefits. A FORTRAN 90 code based on a Shallow Layer Approach for Geo-flows (SLAG) for describing transport and emplacement of diluted lahars, water and lava was developed in both serial and parallel version. Three rheological models, such as those describing i) a viscous, ii) a turbulent, and iii) a dilatant flow respectively, were implemented in order to describe transport of lavas, water and diluted lahars. The code was made user-friendly by creating some interfaces that allow the user to easily define the problem, extract and interpolate the topography of the simulation domain. Moreover SLAG outputs can be written in both GRD format (e.g., Surfer), NetCDF format, or visualized directly in GoogleEarth. In SLAG the governing equations were treated using a Godunov splitting method following George (2008) algorithm based on a Riemann solver for the shallow water equations that decomposes an augmented state variable the depth, momentum, momentum flux, and bathymetry into four propagating discontinuities or waves. For our application, the algorithm was generalized for solving the energy equation. For validating the code in simulating real geophysical flows, we performed few simulations the lava flow event of the the 3rd and 4th January 1992 Etna eruption, the July 2001 Etna lava flows, January 2002 Nyragongo lava flows and few test cases for simulating transport of diluted lahars. Ref: George, D.L. (2008), Augmented Riemann Solvers for the Shallow Water Equations over Variable

  7. A conservative approach for flow field calculations on multiple grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kathong, Monchai; Tiwari, Surendra N.

    1988-01-01

    In the computation of flow fields about complex configurations, it is very difficult to construct body-fitted coordinate systems. An alternative approach is to use several grids at once, each of which is generated independently. This procedure is called the multiple grids or zonal grids approach and its applications are investigated in this study. The method follows the conservative approach and provides conservation of fluxes at grid interfaces. The Euler equations are solved numerically on such grids for various configurations. The numerical scheme used is the finite-volume technique with a three-state Runge-Kutta time integration. The code is vectorized and programmed to run on the CDC VPS-32 computer. Some steady state solutions of the Euler equations are presented and discussed.

  8. A hybrid particle/continuum approach for nonequilibrium hypersonic flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wen-Lan

    A hybrid particle-continuum computational framework is developed and presented for simulating nonequilibrium hypersonic flows, aimed to be more accurate than conventional continuum methods and faster than particle methods. The frame work consists of the direct simulation Monte Carlo-Information Preservation (DSMC-IP) method coupled with a Navier-Stokes solver. Since the DSMC-IP method provides the macroscopic information at each time step, determination of the continuum fluxes across the interface between the particle and continuum domains becomes straightforward. Buffer and reservoir calls are introduced in the continuum domain and work as an extension of the particle domain. At the end of the particle movement phase, particles in either particle or buffer cells are retained. All simulated particles in the reservoir cells are first deleted for each time, step and re-generated based on the local cell values. The microscopic velocities for the newly generated particles are initialized to the Chapman-Enskog distribution using an acceptance-rejection scheme. Continuum breakdown in a flow is defined as when the continuum solution departs from the particle solution to at least 5%. Numerical investigations show that a Knudsen-number-like parameter can best predict the continuum breakdown in the flows of interest. Numerical experiments of hypersonic flows over a simple blunted cone and a much more complex hollow cylinder/flare are conducted. The solutions for the two geometries considered from the hybrid framework are compared with experimental data and pure particle solutions. Generally speaking, it is concluded that the hybrid approach works quite well. In the blunted cone flow, numerical accuracy is improved when 10 layers of buffer cells are employed and the continuum breakdown cut-off value is set to be 0.03. In the hollow cylinder/flare hybrid simulation, the size of the separation zone near the conjunction of the cylinder and flare is improved from the initial

  9. New approach to MHD spectral theory of stationary plasma flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goedbloed, Hans

    2009-11-01

    The basic equations of MHD spectral theory date back to 1958 for static plasmas (Bernstein et al.) and to 1960 for stationary plasma flows (Frieman and Rotenberg). The number of papers on the two subjects appears to be inversely proportional to their complexity, with the vast majority of contributions to MHD stability of tokamaks being restricted to static equilibria and stationary equilibrium flows mostly being discussed analytically for trivial equilibria or numerically for complicated geometries. The problem with the latter is not that numerical approaches are inaccurate, but that they suffer from lack of analytical guidance concerning the structure of the spectrum. One of the reasons is the usual misnomer of ``non-self adjointness'' of the stationary flow problem. In fact, self-adjointness of the two occurring operators was proved right away. Based on the two quadratic forms corresponding to these operators, (a) we constructed an effective method to compute the eigenvalues in the complex plane, (b) we found the counterpart of the oscillation theorem for eigenvalues of static equilibria (Goedbloed and Sakanaka, 1974) for the eigenvalues of stationary flows, enabling one to map out sequences of eigenvalues in the complex plane. Examples will be given for Rayleigh-Taylor, Kelvin-Helmholtz and magneto-rotational instabilities.

  10. A hydrometeorological forecasting approach for basins with complex flow regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zarkadoulas, Akis; Mantesi, Konstantina; Efstratiadis, Andreas; Koussis, Antonis; Mazi, Aikaterini; Katsanos, Demetris; Koukouvinos, Antonis; Koutsoyiannis, Demetris

    2015-04-01

    The combined use of weather forecasting models and hydrological models in flood risk estimations is an established technique, with several successful applications worldwide. However, most known hydrometeorological forecasting systems have been established in large rivers with perpetual flow. Experience from small- and medium-scale basins, which are often affected by flash floods, is very limited. In this work we investigate the perspectives of hydrometeorological forecasting, by emphasizing two issues: (a) which modelling approach can credibly represent the complex dynamics of basins with highly variable runoff (intermittent or ephemeral); and (b) which transformation of point-precipitation forecasts provides the most reliable estimations of spatially aggregated data, to be used as inputs to semi-distributed hydrological models. Using as case studies the Sarantapotamos river basin, in Eastern Greece (145 km2), and the Nedontas river basin, in SW Peloponnese (120 km2), we demonstrate the advantages of continuous simulation through the HYDROGEIOS model. This employs conjunctive modelling of surface and groundwater flows and their interactions (percolation, infiltration, underground losses), which are key processes in river basins characterized by significantly variability of runoff. The model was calibrated against hourly flow data at two and three hydrometric stations, respectively, for a 3-year period (2011-2014). Next we attempted to reproduce the most intense flood events of that period, by substituting observed rainfall by forecast scenarios. In this respect, we used consecutive point forecasts of a 6-hour lead time, provided by the numerical weather prediction model WRF (Advanced Research version), dynamically downscaled from the ~1° forecast of GSF-NCEP/NOAA successively first to ~18 km, then to ~6 km and ultimately at the horizontal grid resolution of 2x2 km2. We examined alternative spatial integration approaches, using as reference the rainfall stations

  11. Temporal volume flow: an approach to tracking failure recovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jianfei; Subramanian, Kalpathi R.; Yoo, Terry S.

    2011-03-01

    The simultaneous use of pre-segmented CT colonoscopy images and optical colonoscopy images during routine endoscopic procedures provides useful clinical information to the gastroenterologist. Blurry images in the video stream can cause the tracking system to fail during the procedure, due to the endoscope touching the colon wall or a polyp. The ability to recover from such failures is necessary to continually track images, and goes towards building a robust tracking system. Identifying similar images before and after the blurry sequence is central to this task. In this work, we propose a Temporal Volume Flow(TVF) based approach to search for a similar image pair before and after blurry sequences in the optical colonoscopy video. TVF employs nonlinear intensity and gradient constancy models, as well as a discontinuity-preserving smoothness constraint to formulate an energy function; minimizing this function between two temporal volumes before and after the blurry sequence results in an estimate of TVF. A voting approach is then used to determine an image pair with the maximum number of point correspondences. Region flow algorithm10 is applied to the selected image pair to determine camera motion parameters. We applied our algorithm to three optical colonoscopy sequences. The first sequence had 235 images in the ascending colon, and 12 blurry images. The image pair selected by TVF decreases the rotation error of the tracking results using the region flow algorithm. Similar results were observed in the second patient in the descending colon, containing 535 images and 24 blurry images. The third sequence contained 580 images in the descending colon and 172 blurry images. Region flow method failed in this case due to improper image pair selection; using TVF to determine the image pair allowed the system to successfully recover from the blurry sequence.

  12. Approaches to the simulation of unconfined flow and perched groundwater flow in MODFLOW

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bedekar, Vivek; Niswonger, Richard G.; Kipp, Kenneth; Panday, Sorab; Tonkin, Matthew

    2012-01-01

    Various approaches have been proposed to manage the nonlinearities associated with the unconfined flow equation and to simulate perched groundwater conditions using the MODFLOW family of codes. The approaches comprise a variety of numerical techniques to prevent dry cells from becoming inactive and to achieve a stable solution focused on formulations of the unconfined, partially-saturated, groundwater flow equation. Keeping dry cells active avoids a discontinuous head solution which in turn improves the effectiveness of parameter estimation software that relies on continuous derivatives. Most approaches implement an upstream weighting of intercell conductance and Newton-Raphson linearization to obtain robust convergence. In this study, several published approaches were implemented in a stepwise manner into MODFLOW for comparative analysis. First, a comparative analysis of the methods is presented using synthetic examples that create convergence issues or difficulty in handling perched conditions with the more common dry-cell simulation capabilities of MODFLOW. Next, a field-scale three-dimensional simulation is presented to examine the stability and performance of the discussed approaches in larger, practical, simulation settings.

  13. A new simulation approach for modeling inflated pahoehoe lava flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baloga, S. M.; Glaze, L. S.; Hamilton, C.

    2013-12-01

    Pahoehoe lavas are recognized as an important landform on Earth, Mars and Io. Observations of such flows on Earth indicate that when flow rates are very low and emplacement occurs on very low slopes, the process is dominated by random effects. Existing models for lobate a`a lava flows that assume viscous fluid flow on an inclined plane are not appropriate for dealing with the numerous random factors present in pahoehoe emplacement. We present a new model that incorporates a simulation approach to quantifying the influence of random and ambient factors on the evolving three-dimensional shape and morphology of pahoehoe lobes. To simulate pahoehoe lava emplacement, we consider the movement of small parcels of lava with a volume equal to the size of a typical toe (70 x 70 x 20 cm3). The model develops a set of probabilistic rules for determining the location and direction of movement for each parcel. Unlike the classical random walk of Brownian motion, many parcels may remain dormant, but fluid, for multiple time steps. The net effect of this approach is that parcels tend to accumulate preferentially within the lobe producing cross-sectional topographic profiles with a medial ridge. The randomness of parcel volume transfers within the lobe interior as well as at the margins qualitatively reflects inflation processes observed in the field. This new model predicts that greater than 75% of pahoehoe lobe volume is contributed through inflation for typical lobes. The influences on planform shape and topographic cross-sectional profiles of total volume, source area and shape, topographic confinement, and sequential breakouts at the lobe margins, have been explored with the stochastic model. The model provides a means for assessing the relative importance of these processes through comparisons with field data. A major conclusion of this work is that sequential breakouts at the lobe margins are an important process controlling the final topographic distribution of observed

  14. An improved approach for flow-based cloud point extraction.

    PubMed

    Frizzarin, Rejane M; Rocha, Fábio R P

    2014-04-11

    Novel strategies are proposed to circumvent the main drawbacks of flow-based cloud point extraction (CPE). The surfactant-rich phase (SRP) was directly retained into the optical path of the spectrophotometric cell, thus avoiding its dilution previously to the measurement and yielding higher sensitivity. Solenoid micro-pumps were exploited to improve mixing by the pulsed flow and also to modulate the flow-rate for retention and removal of the SRP, thus avoiding the elution step, often carried out with organic solvents. The heat released and the increase of the salt concentration provided by an on-line neutralization reaction were exploited to induce the cloud point without an external heating device. These innovations were demonstrated by the spectrophotometric determination of iron, yielding a linear response from 10 to 200 μg L(-1) with a coefficient of variation of 2.3% (n=7). Detection limit and sampling rate were estimated at 5 μg L(-1) (95% confidence level) and 26 samples per hour, respectively. The enrichment factor was 8.9 and the procedure consumed only 6 μg of TAN and 390 μg of Triton X-114 per determination. At the 95% confidence level, the results obtained for freshwater samples agreed with the reference procedure and those obtained for digests of bovine muscle, rice flour, brown bread and tort lobster agreed with the certified reference values. The proposed procedure thus shows advantages in relation to previously proposed approaches for flow-based CPE, being a fast and environmental friendly alternative for on-line separation and pre-concentration.

  15. Solving the power flow equations: a monotone operator approach

    SciTech Connect

    Dvijotham, Krishnamurthy; Low, Steven; Chertkov, Michael

    2015-07-21

    The AC power flow equations underlie all operational aspects of power systems. They are solved routinely in operational practice using the Newton-Raphson method and its variants. These methods work well given a good initial “guess” for the solution, which is always available in normal system operations. However, with the increase in levels of intermittent generation, the assumption of a good initial guess always being available is no longer valid. In this paper, we solve this problem using the theory of monotone operators. We show that it is possible to compute (using an offline optimization) a “monotonicity domain” in the space of voltage phasors. Given this domain, there is a simple efficient algorithm that will either find a solution in the domain, or provably certify that no solutions exist in it. We validate the approach on several IEEE test cases and demonstrate that the offline optimization can be performed tractably and the computed “monotonicity domain” includes all practically relevant power flow solutions.

  16. A Mixed Approach for Modeling Blood Flow in Brain Microcirculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorthois, Sylvie; Peyrounette, Myriam; Davit, Yohan; Quintard, Michel; Groupe d'Etude sur les Milieux Poreux Team

    2015-11-01

    Consistent with its distribution and exchange functions, the vascular system of the human brain cortex is a superposition of two components. At small-scale, a homogeneous and space-filling mesh-like capillary network. At large scale, quasi-fractal branched veins and arteries. From a modeling perspective, this is the superposition of: (a) a continuum model resulting from the homogenization of slow transport in the small-scale capillary network; and (b) a discrete network approach describing fast transport in the arteries and veins, which cannot be homogenized because of their fractal nature. This problematic is analogous to fast conducting wells embedded in a reservoir rock in petroleum engineering. An efficient method to reduce the computational cost is to use relatively large grid blocks for the continuum model. This makes it difficult to accurately couple both components. We solve this issue by adapting the ``well model'' concept used in petroleum engineering to brain specific 3D situations. We obtain a unique linear system describing the discrete network, the continuum and the well model. Results are presented for realistic arterial and venous geometries. The mixed approach is compared with full network models including various idealized capillary networks of known permeability. ERC BrainMicroFlow GA615102.

  17. A new approach to blood flow simulation in vascular networks.

    PubMed

    Tamaddon, Houman; Behnia, Mehrdad; Behnia, Masud; Kritharides, Leonard

    2016-01-01

    A proper analysis of blood flow is contingent upon accurate modelling of the branching pattern and vascular geometry of the network of interest. It is challenging to reconstruct the entire vascular network of any organ experimentally, in particular the pulmonary vasculature, because of its very high number of vessels, complexity of the branching pattern and poor accessibility in vivo. The objective of our research is to develop an innovative approach for the reconstruction of the full pulmonary vascular tree from available morphometric data. Our method consists of the use of morphometric data on those parts of the pulmonary vascular tree that are too small to reconstruct by medical imaging methods. This method is a three-step technique that reconstructs the entire pulmonary arterial tree down to the capillary bed. Vessels greater than 2 mm are reconstructed from direct volume and surface analysis using contrast-enhanced computed tomography. Vessels smaller than 2 mm are reconstructed from available morphometric and distensibility data and rearranged by applying Murray's laws. Implementation of morphometric data to reconstruct the branching pattern and applying Murray's laws to every vessel bifurcation simultaneously leads to an accurate vascular tree reconstruction. The reconstruction algorithm generates full arterial tree topography down to the first capillary bifurcation. Geometry of each order of the vascular tree is generated separately to minimize the construction and simulation time. The node-to-node connectivity along with the diameter and length of every vessel segment is established and order numbers, according to the diameter-defined Strahler system, are assigned. In conclusion, the present model provides a morphological foundation for future analysis of blood flow in the pulmonary circulation.

  18. Augmenting the diagnostic power of flow-based approaches to functional reasoning

    SciTech Connect

    Chittaro, L.; Ranon, R.

    1996-12-31

    In this paper, we consider flow-based approaches to functional diagnosis. First, we contrast the existing approaches, pointing out the major limitations of each. Then, we choose one of them and extend it in order to overcome the identified limitations. Finally, we show how the proposed extension can be introduced into the other flow-based approaches.

  19. Flow Equation Approach to the Statistics of Nonlinear Dynamical Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marston, J. B.; Hastings, M. B.

    2005-03-01

    The probability distribution function of non-linear dynamical systems is governed by a linear framework that resembles quantum many-body theory, in which stochastic forcing and/or averaging over initial conditions play the role of non-zero . Besides the well-known Fokker-Planck approach, there is a related Hopf functional methodootnotetextUriel Frisch, Turbulence: The Legacy of A. N. Kolmogorov (Cambridge University Press, 1995) chapter 9.5.; in both formalisms, zero modes of linear operators describe the stationary non-equilibrium statistics. To access the statistics, we investigate the method of continuous unitary transformationsootnotetextS. D. Glazek and K. G. Wilson, Phys. Rev. D 48, 5863 (1993); Phys. Rev. D 49, 4214 (1994). (also known as the flow equation approachootnotetextF. Wegner, Ann. Phys. 3, 77 (1994).), suitably generalized to the diagonalization of non-Hermitian matrices. Comparison to the more traditional cumulant expansion method is illustrated with low-dimensional attractors. The treatment of high-dimensional dynamical systems is also discussed.

  20. Flow cytometric and laser scanning microscopic approaches in epigenetics research.

    PubMed

    Szekvolgyi, Lorant; Imre, Laszlo; Minh, Doan Xuan Quang; Hegedus, Eva; Bacso, Zsolt; Szabo, Gabor

    2009-01-01

    Our understanding of epigenetics has been transformed in recent years by the advance of technological possibilities based primarily on a powerful tool, chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP). However, in many cases, the detection of epigenetic changes requires methods providing a high-throughput (HTP) platform. Cytometry has opened a novel approach for the quantitative measurement of molecules, including PCR products, anchored to appropriately addressed microbeads (Pataki et al. 2005. Cytometry 68, 45-52). Here we show selected examples for the utility of two different cytometry-based platforms of epigenetic analysis: ChIP-on-beads, a flow-cytometric test of local histone modifications (Szekvolgyi et al. 2006. Cytometry 69, 1086-1091), and the laser scanning cytometry-based measurement of global epigenetic modifications that might help predict clinical behavior in different pathological conditions. We anticipate that such alternative tools may shortly become indispensable in clinical practice, translating the systematic screening of epigenetic tags from basic research into routine diagnostics of HTP demand.

  1. Review of present approaches to two-phase flow problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolf, L.

    Experimental data and computational results of interest in the context of major technological hazards are reviewed. The discussed areas of two-phase flow include pipe break flow, vessel depressurization, flow through safety relief valves, and two-phase flow jet formation and impingement. Although most data stems from nuclear reactor safety research, important conclusions may be drawn for other technical areas. Data and simulations from models of different sophistication are shown. The applicability of the individual two-phase models and associated codes are discussed.

  2. Novel approaches to analysis by flow injection gradient titration.

    PubMed

    Wójtowicz, Marzena; Kozak, Joanna; Kościelniak, Paweł

    2007-09-26

    Two novel procedures for flow injection gradient titration with the use of a single stock standard solution are proposed. In the multi-point single-line (MP-SL) method the calibration graph is constructed on the basis of a set of standard solutions, which are generated in a standard reservoir and subsequently injected into the titrant. According to the single-point multi-line (SP-ML) procedure the standard solution and a sample are injected into the titrant stream from four loops of different capacities, hence four calibration graphs are able to be constructed and the analytical result is calculated on the basis of a generalized slope of these graphs. Both approaches have been tested on the example of spectrophotometric acid-base titration of hydrochloric and acetic acids with using bromothymol blue and phenolphthalein as indicators, respectively, and sodium hydroxide as a titrant. Under optimized experimental conditions the analytical results of precision less than 1.8 and 2.5% (RSD) and of accuracy less than 3.0 and 5.4% (relative error (RE)) were obtained for MP-SL and SP-ML procedures, respectively, in ranges of 0.0031-0.0631 mol L(-1) for samples of hydrochloric acid and of 0.1680-1.7600 mol L(-1) for samples of acetic acid. The feasibility of both methods was illustrated by applying them to the total acidity determination in vinegar samples with precision lower than 0.5 and 2.9% (RSD) for MP-SL and SP-ML procedures, respectively.

  3. Lattice kinetic approach to non-equilibrium flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montessori, A.; Prestininzi, P.; La Rocca, M.; Falcucci, G.; Succi, S.

    2016-06-01

    We present a Lattice Boltzmann method for the simulation of a wide range of Knudsen regimes. The method is assessed in terms of normalised discharge for flow across parallel plates and three-dimensional flows in porous media. Available analytical solutions are well reproduced, supporting the the method as an appealing candidate to bridge the gap between the hydrodynamic regime and free molecular motion.

  4. A Field Course Based on the Community Energy Flow Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Townsend, Colin; Phillipson, John

    1977-01-01

    The concept of community energy flow provides a basis for a field course. This paper describes the methodology used in a field course for estimating parameters and for monitoring physical environmental variables. The paper culminates in the construction of a model of energy flow through the community. (Author/MA)

  5. An Active, Collaborative Approach to Learning Skills in Flow Cytometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fuller, Kathryn; Linden, Matthew D.; Lee-Pullen, Tracey; Fragall, Clayton; Erber, Wendy N.; Röhrig, Kimberley J.

    2016-01-01

    Advances in science education research have the potential to improve the way students learn to perform scientific interpretations and understand science concepts. We developed active, collaborative activities to teach skills in manipulating flow cytometry data using FlowJo software. Undergraduate students were given compensated clinical flow…

  6. A Riparian Approach to Dendrochronological Flow Reconstruction, Yellowstone River, Montana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schook, D. M.; Rathburn, S. L.; Friedman, J. M.

    2015-12-01

    Tree ring-based flow reconstructions can reveal river discharge variability over durations far exceeding the gauged record, building perspective for both the measured record and future flows. We use plains cottonwood (Populus deltoides subsp. monilifera) tree rings collected from four rivers to reconstruct flow history of the Yellowstone River near its confluence with the Missouri River. Upland trees in dry regions are typically used in flow reconstruction because their annual growth is controlled by the same precipitation that drives downstream flow, but our study improves flow reconstruction by including floodplain trees that are directly affected by the river. Cores from over 1000 cottonwoods along the Yellowstone, Powder, Little Missouri, and Redwater Rivers were collected from within a 170 km radius to reconstruct flows using the Age Curve Standardization technique in a multiple regression analysis. The large sample from trees spanning many age classes allows us to use only the rings that were produced when each tree was less than 50 years old and growth was most strongly correlated to river discharge. Using trees from a range of rivers improves our ability to differentiate between growth resulting from local precipitation and river flow, and we show that cottonwood growth differs across these neighboring rivers having different watersheds. Using the program Seascorr, tree growth is found to better correlated to seasonal river discharge (R = 0.69) than to local precipitation (R = 0.45). Our flow reconstruction reveals that the most extreme multi-year or multi-decade drought periods of the last 250 years on either the Yellowstone (1817-1821) or Powder (1846-1865) Rivers are missed by the gauged discharge record. Across all sites, we document increased growth in the 20th century compared to the 19th, a finding unattainable with conventional methods but having important implications for flow management.

  7. Limiting flows of a viscous fluid with stationary separation zones with Re approaching infinity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taganov, G. I.

    1982-01-01

    The limiting flows of a viscous noncondensable fluid, which are approached by flows with stationary separation zones behind planar symmetrical bodies, with an unlimited increase in the Reynolds number are studied. Quantitative results are obtained in the case of a circulation flow inside of a separation zone.

  8. Comparative study of various approaches for modeling transitional hypersonic rarefied gas flows over blunt bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brykina, I. G.; Rogov, B. V.; Tirskiy, G. A.; Titarev, V. A.; Utyuzhnikov, S. V.

    2012-11-01

    The hypersonic rarefied gas flow over blunt bodies in the transitional flow regime, typical of the reentry flight of space vehicles at altitudes higher 90-100 km, is investigated. As an example, the problem of hypersonic flows over long blunt wings and axisymmetric bodies is considered. It is analyzed in a wide range of the free stream Knudsen number by using various approaches: the continuum approach - numerical and analytical solutions, the direct simulation Monte Carlo method and the direct numerical solution of the Boltzmann kinetic equation with the S-model collision integral. The efficiency, domain of applicability, advantages and disadvantages of various approaches in the transitional flow regime are considered.

  9. A sensitivity equation approach to shape optimization in fluid flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borggaard, Jeff; Burns, John

    1994-01-01

    A sensitivity equation method to shape optimization problems is applied. An algorithm is developed and tested on a problem of designing optimal forebody simulators for a 2D, inviscid supersonic flow. The algorithm uses a BFGS/Trust Region optimization scheme with sensitivities computed by numerically approximating the linear partial differential equations that determine the flow sensitivities. Numerical examples are presented to illustrate the method.

  10. Structural characteristics of cohesive flow deposits, and a sedimentological approach on their flow mechanisms.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripsanas, E. K.; Bryant, W. R.; Prior, D. B.

    2003-04-01

    A large number of Jumbo Piston cores (up to 20 m long), acquired from the continental slope and rise of the Northwest Gulf of Mexico (Bryant Canyon area and eastern Sigsbee Escarpment), have recovered various mass-transport deposits. The main cause of slope instabilities over these areas is oversteepening of the slopes due to the seaward mobilization of the underlying allochthonous salt masses. Cohesive flow deposits were the most common recoveries in the sediment cores. Four types of cohesive flow deposits have been recognized: a) fluid debris flow, b) mud flow, c) mud-matrix dominated debris flow, and d) clast-dominated debris flow deposits. The first type is characterized by its relatively small thickness (less than 1 m), a mud matrix with small (less than 0.5 cm) and soft mud-clasts, and a faint layering. The mud-clasts reveal a normal grading and become more abundant towards the base of each layer. That reveals that their deposition resulted by several successive surges/pulses, developed in the main flow, than the sudden “freezing” of the whole flow. The main difference between mud flow and mud-matrix dominated debris flow deposits is the presence of small to large mud-clasts in the later. Both deposits consist of a chaotic mud-matrix, and a basal shear laminated zone, where the strongest shearing of the flow was exhibited. Convolute laminations, fault-like surfaces, thrust faults, and microfaults are interpreted as occurring during the “freezing” of the flows and/or by adjustments of the rested deposits. Clast-dominated debris flow deposits consist of three zones: a) an upper plug-zone, characterized by large interlocked clasts, b) a mid-zone, of higher reworked, inversely graded clasts, floating in a mud-matrix, and c) a lower shear laminated zone. The structure of the last three cohesive flow deposits indicate that they represent deposition of typical Bingham flows, consisting of an upper plug-zone in which the yield stress is not exceeded and an

  11. Numerical and Experimental Approaches Toward Understanding Lava Flow Heat Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rumpf, M.; Fagents, S. A.; Hamilton, C.; Crawford, I. A.

    2013-12-01

    We have performed numerical modeling and experimental studies to quantify the heat transfer from a lava flow into an underlying particulate substrate. This project was initially motivated by a desire to understand the transfer of heat from a lava flow into the lunar regolith. Ancient regolith deposits that have been protected by a lava flow may contain ancient solar wind, solar flare, and galactic cosmic ray products that can give insight into the history of our solar system, provided the records were not heated and destroyed by the overlying lava flow. In addition, lava-substrate interaction is an important aspect of lava fluid dynamics that requires consideration in lava emplacement models Our numerical model determines the depth to which the heat pulse will penetrate beneath a lava flow into the underlying substrate. Rigorous treatment of the temperature dependence of lava and substrate thermal conductivity and specific heat capacity, density, and latent heat release are imperative to an accurate model. Experiments were conducted to verify the numerical model. Experimental containers with interior dimensions of 20 x 20 x 25 cm were constructed from 1 inch thick calcium silicate sheeting. For initial experiments, boxes were packed with lunar regolith simulant (GSC-1) to a depth of 15 cm with thermocouples embedded at regular intervals. Basalt collected at Kilauea Volcano, HI, was melted in a gas forge and poured directly onto the simulant. Initial lava temperatures ranged from ~1200 to 1300 °C. The system was allowed to cool while internal temperatures were monitored by a thermocouple array and external temperatures were monitored by a Forward Looking Infrared (FLIR) video camera. Numerical simulations of the experiments elucidate the details of lava latent heat release and constrain the temperature-dependence of the thermal conductivity of the particulate substrate. The temperature-dependence of thermal conductivity of particulate material is not well known

  12. A General Approach to Time Periodic Incompressible Viscous Fluid Flow Problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geissert, Matthias; Hieber, Matthias; Nguyen, Thieu Huy

    2016-06-01

    This article develops a general approach to time periodic incompressible fluid flow problems and semilinear evolution equations. It yields, on the one hand, a unified approach to various classical problems in incompressible fluid flow and, on the other hand, gives new results for periodic solutions to the Navier-Stokes-Oseen flow, the Navier-Stokes flow past rotating obstacles, and, in the geophysical setting, for Ornstein-Uhlenbeck and various diffusion equations with rough coefficients. The method is based on a combination of interpolation and topological arguments, as well as on the smoothing properties of the linearized equation.

  13. Extended 3D Approach for Quantification of Abnormal Ascending Aortic Flow

    PubMed Central

    Sigovan, Monica; Dyverfeldt, Petter; Wrenn, Jarrett; Tseng, Elaine E.; Saloner, David; Hope, Michael D.

    2015-01-01

    Background Flow displacement quantifies eccentric flow, a potential risk factor for aneurysms in the ascending aorta, but only at a single anatomic location. The aim of this study is to extend flow displacement analysis to 3D in patients with aortic and aortic valve pathologies. Methods 43 individuals were studied with 4DFlow MRI in 6 groups: healthy, tricuspid aortic valve (TAV) with aortic stenosis (AS) but no dilatation, TAV with dilatation but no AS, and TAV with both AS and dilatation, BAV without AS or dilatation, BAV without AS but with dilation. The protocol was approved by our institutional review board, and informed consent was obtained. Flow displacement was calculated for multiple planes along the ascending aorta, and 2D and 3D analyses were compared. Results Good correlation was found between 2D flow displacement and both maximum and average 3D values (r>0.8). Healthy controls had significantly lower flow displacement values with all approaches (p<0.05). The highest flow displacement was seen with stenotic TAV and aortic dilation (0.24±0.02 with maximum flow displacement). The 2D approach underestimated the maximum flow displacement by more than 20% in 13 out of 36 patients (36%). Conclusions The extended 3D flow displacement analysis offers a more comprehensive quantitative evaluation of abnormal systolic flow in the ascending aorta than 2D analysis. Differences between patient subgroups are better demonstrated, and maximum flow displacement is more reliable assessed. PMID:25721998

  14. Rheological flow laws for multiphase magmas: An empirical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pistone, Mattia; Cordonnier, Benoît; Ulmer, Peter; Caricchi, Luca

    2016-07-01

    The physical properties of magmas play a fundamental role in controlling the eruptive dynamics of volcanoes. Magmas are multiphase mixtures of crystals and gas bubbles suspended in a silicate melt and, to date, no flow laws describe their rheological behaviour. In this study we present a set of equations quantifying the flow of high-viscosity (> 105 Pa·s) silica-rich multiphase magmas, containing both crystals (24-65 vol.%) and gas bubbles (9-12 vol.%). Flow laws were obtained using deformation experiments performed at high temperature (673-1023 K) and pressure (200-250 MPa) over a range of strain-rates (5 · 10- 6 s- 1 to 4 · 10- 3 s- 1), conditions that are relevant for volcanic conduit processes of silica-rich systems ranging from crystal-rich lava domes to crystal-poor obsidian flows. We propose flow laws in which stress exponent, activation energy, and pre-exponential factor depend on a parameter that includes the volume fraction of weak phases (i.e. melt and gas bubbles) present in the magma. The bubble volume fraction has opposing effects depending on the relative crystal volume fraction: at low crystallinity bubble deformation generates gas connectivity and permeability pathways, whereas at high crystallinity bubbles do not connect and act as "lubricant" objects during strain localisation within shear bands. We show that such difference in the evolution of texture is mainly controlled by the strain-rate (i.e. the local stress within shear bands) at which the experiments are performed, and affect the empirical parameters used for the flow laws. At low crystallinity (< 44 vol.%) we observe an increase of viscosity with increasing strain-rate, while at high crystallinity (> 44 vol.%) the viscosity decreases with increasing strain-rate. Because these behaviours are also associated with modifications of sample textures during the experiment and, thus, are not purely the result of different deformation rates, we refer to "apparent shear-thickening" and

  15. A Cartesian grid approach with hierarchical refinement for compressible flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quirk, James J.

    1994-01-01

    Many numerical studies of flows that involve complex geometries are limited by the difficulties in generating suitable grids. We present a Cartesian boundary scheme for two-dimensional, compressible flows that is unfettered by the need to generate a computational grid and so it may be used, routinely, even for the most awkward of geometries. In essence, an arbitrary-shaped body is allowed to blank out some region of a background Cartesian mesh and the resultant cut-cells are singled out for special treatment. This is done within a finite-volume framework and so, in principle, any explicit flux-based integration scheme can take advantage of this method for enforcing solid boundary conditions. For best effect, the present Cartesian boundary scheme has been combined with a sophisticated, local mesh refinement scheme, and a number of examples are shown in order to demonstrate the efficacy of the combined algorithm for simulations of shock interaction phenomena.

  16. Hydrodynamical Approach to Vehicular Flow in the Urban Street Canyon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duras, Maciej M.

    2001-06-01

    The vehicular flow in the urban street canyon is considered. The classical field description is used in the modelling of the vehicular movement and of gaseous mixture in generic urban street canyon. The dynamical variables include vehicular densities, velocities, and emissivities: of pollutants, heat and exhaust gases, as well as standard mixture components' variables: densities, velocities, temperature, pressures. The local balances' equations predict the dynamics of the complex system. The automatic control of the vehicular flow is attained by the sets of coordinated traffic lights. The automatic control is aimed at minimization of traffic ecological costs by the application of variational calculus (Lagrange's and Bolz's problems). The theoretical description is accompanied by numerical examples of computer fluid dynamics based on real traffic data.

  17. New approach to magnetohydrodynamics spectral theory of stationary plasma flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    (Hans Goedbloed, J. P.

    2011-07-01

    While the basic equations of MHD spectral theory date back to 1958 for static plasmas (Bernstein et al 1958 Proc. R. Soc. A 244 17) and to 1960 for stationary plasma flows (Frieman and Rotenberg 1960 Rev. Mod. Phys. 32 898), progress on the latter subject has been slow since it suffers from lack of analytical insight concerning the structure of the spectrum. One of the reasons is the usual misnomer of 'non-self adjointness' of the stationary flow problem. Actually, self-adjointness of the occurring operators, namely the generalized force operator and the Doppler-Coriolis gradient operator -iρv·∇, was proved right away by Frieman and Rotenberg. Based on the reality of the two quadratic forms corresponding to these operators, we here construct (a) an effective method to compute the solution paths in the complex ω plane on which the eigenvalues are situated, (b) the counterpart of the oscillation theorem for eigenvalues of static equilibria (Goedbloed and Sakanaka 1974 Phys. Fluids 17 908) for the eigenvalues of stationary flows, based on the monotonicity of the alternating ratio, or alternator, of the boundary values of the displacement ξ and the total pressure perturbation Π. This enables one to map out the complete spectrum of eigenvalues in the complex ω-plane. The intricate topology of the solution paths is discussed for the fundamental examples of Rayleigh-Taylor, Kelvin-Helmholtz and combined instabilities.

  18. Assessment of flow regime alterations over a spectrum of temporal scales using wavelet-based approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Fu-Chun; Chang, Ching-Fu; Shiau, Jenq-Tzong

    2015-05-01

    The full range of natural flow regime is essential for sustaining the riverine ecosystems and biodiversity, yet there are still limited tools available for assessment of flow regime alterations over a spectrum of temporal scales. Wavelet analysis has proven useful for detecting hydrologic alterations at multiple scales via the wavelet power spectrum (WPS) series. The existing approach based on the global WPS (GWPS) ratio tends to be dominated by the rare high-power flows so that alterations of the more frequent low-power flows are often underrepresented. We devise a new approach based on individual deviations between WPS (DWPS) that are root-mean-squared to yield the global DWPS (GDWPS). We test these two approaches on the three reaches of the Feitsui Reservoir system (Taiwan) that are subjected to different classes of anthropogenic interventions. The GDWPS reveal unique features that are not detected with the GWPS ratios. We also segregate the effects of individual subflow components on the overall flow regime alterations using the subflow GDWPS. The results show that the daily hydropeaking waves below the reservoir not only intensified the flow oscillations at daily scale but most significantly eliminated subweekly flow variability. Alterations of flow regime were most severe below the diversion weir, where the residual hydropeaking resulted in a maximum impact at daily scale while the postdiversion null flows led to large hydrologic alterations over submonthly scales. The smallest impacts below the confluence reveal that the hydrologic alterations at scales longer than 2 days were substantially mitigated with the joining of the unregulated tributary flows, whereas the daily-scale hydrologic alteration was retained because of the hydropeaking inherited from the reservoir releases. The proposed DWPS approach unravels for the first time the details of flow regime alterations at these intermediate scales that are overridden by the low-frequency high-power flows when

  19. Field theoretical approach for bio-membrane coupled with flow field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oya, Y.; Kawakatsu, T.

    2013-02-01

    Shape deformation of bio-membranes in flow field is well known phenomenon in biological systems, for example red blood cell in blood vessel. To simulate such deformation with use of field theoretical approach, we derived the dynamical equation of phase field for shape of membrane and coupled the equation with Navier-Stokes equation for flow field. In 2-dimensional simulations, we found that a bio-membrane in a Poiseuille flow takes a parachute shape similar to the red blood cells.

  20. Quantifying Flow Resistance of Mountain Streams Using the HHT Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, L.; Fu, X.

    2014-12-01

    This study quantifies the flow resistance of mountain streams with gravel bed and remarkable bed forms. The motivation is to follow the previous ideas (Robert, A. 1990) that the bed surface can be divided into micro-scale and macro-scale roughness, respectively. We processed the field data of longitudinal bed profiles of the Longxi River, Sichuan Province, China, using the Hilbert-Huang Transformation Method (HHT). Each longitudinal profile was decomposed into a set of curves with different frequencies of spatial fluctuation. The spectrogram was accordingly obtained. We supposed that a certain high and low frequency curves correspond to the micro- and macro-roughness of stream bed, respectively. We specified the characteristic height and length with the spectrogram, which represent the macro bed form accounting for bed form roughness. We then estimated the bed form roughness as being proportional to the ratio of the height to length multiplied by the height(Yang et al,2005). We also assumed the parameter, Sp, defined as the sinuosity of the highest frequency curve as the measure of the micro-scale roughness. We then took into account the effect of bed material sizes through using the product of d50/R and Sp, where d50 is the sediment median size and R is the hydraulic radius. The macro- and micro-scale roughness parameters were merged together nonlinearly to evaluate the flow resistance caused by the interplaying friction and form drag forces. Validation results show that the square of the determinant coefficient can reach as high as 0.84 in the case of the Longxi River. Future studies will focus on the verification against more field data as well as the combination of skin friction and form drag. Key words: flow resistance; roughness; HHT; spectrogram; form drag Robert, A. (1990), Boundary roughness in coarse-grained channels, Prog. Phys. Geogr., 14(1), 42-69. Yang, S.-Q., S.-K. Tan, and S.-Y. Lim. (2005), Flow resistance and bed form geometry in a wide alluvial

  1. Non-isothermal flow in low permeable porous media: A comparison of Richards' and two-phase flow approaches

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, W.; Rutqvist, J.; Gorke, U.-J.; Birkholzer, J.T.; Kolditz, O.

    2010-03-15

    The present work compares the performance of two alternative flow models for the simulation of thermal-hydraulic coupled processes in low permeable porous media: non-isothermal Richards and two-phase flow concepts. Both models take vaporization processes into account: however, the Richards model neglects dynamic pressure variations and bulk flow of the gaseous phase. For the comparison of the two approaches first published data from a laboratory experiment is studied involving thermally driven moisture flow in a partially saturated bentonite sample. Then a benchmark test of longer-term thermal-hydraulic behavior in the engineered barrier system of a geological nuclear waste repository is analyzed (DECOVALEX project). It was found that both models can be used to reproduce the vaporization process if the intrinsic permeability is relative high. However, when a thermal-hydraulic coupled problem has the same low intrinsic permeability for both the liquid and the gas phase, only the two-phase flow approach provides reasonable results.

  2. Comparison of Lorentzian and Guassian based approaches for laser speckle imaging of blood flow dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramirez-San-Juan, Julio C.; Nelson, J. Stuart; Choi, Bernard

    2006-02-01

    Since blood flow is tightly coupled to the health status of biological tissue, several instruments have been developed to monitor blood flow and perfusion dynamics. One such instrument is laser speckle imaging (LSI). The objective of this work is to evaluate an LSI instrument employing two statistically based approaches to calculate the speckle flow index (SFI). To study the relation between SFI and the actual flow rate for the two statistical approaches, speckle images were acquired from a 0.5% blood filled tube embedded within a 5 mm thick agar gel. A syringe based infusion pump was used to inject the blood at flow rates between 0 and 5 mm/sec. We found a linear relationship between SFI and actual flow rate for both the Gaussian and Lorentzian based approaches. With the Gaussian based approach, the SFI dynamic range was up to six times larger than with the Lorentzian based approach. The Gaussian based approach is a good alternative for computation of SFI using LSI.

  3. Simulation of platelets suspension flowing through a stenosis model using a dissipative particle dynamics approach.

    PubMed

    Soares, Joao S; Gao, Chao; Alemu, Yared; Slepian, Marvin; Bluestein, Danny

    2013-11-01

    Stresses on blood cellular constituents induced by blood flow can be represented by a continuum approach down to the μm level; however, the molecular mechanisms of thrombosis and platelet activation and aggregation are on the order of nm. The coupling of the disparate length and time scales between molecular and macroscopic transport phenomena represents a major computational challenge. In order to bridge the gap between macroscopic flow scales and the cellular scales with the goal of depicting and predicting flow induced thrombogenicity, multi-scale approaches based on particle methods are better suited. We present a top-scale model to describe bulk flow of platelet suspensions: we employ dissipative particle dynamics to model viscous flow dynamics and present a novel and general no-slip boundary condition that allows the description of three-dimensional viscous flows through complex geometries. Dissipative phenomena associated with boundary layers and recirculation zones are observed and favorably compared to benchmark viscous flow solutions (Poiseuille and Couette flows). Platelets in suspension, modeled as coarse-grained finite-sized ensembles of bound particles constituting an enclosed deformable membrane with flat ellipsoid shape, show self-orbiting motions in shear flows consistent with Jeffery's orbits, and are transported with the flow, flipping and colliding with the walls and interacting with other platelets. PMID:23695489

  4. Simulation of platelets suspension flowing through a stenosis model using a dissipative particle dynamics approach

    PubMed Central

    Soares, Joao S.; Gao, Chao; Alemu, Yared; Slepian, Marvin; Bluestein, Danny

    2013-01-01

    Stresses on blood cellular constituents induced by blood flow can be represented by a continuum approach down to the μm level; however, the molecular mechanisms of thrombosis and platelet activation and aggregation are on the order of nm. The coupling of the disparate length and time scales between molecular and macroscopic transport phenomena represent a major computational challenge. In order to bridge the gap between macroscopic flow scales and the cellular scales with the goal of depicting and predicting flow induced thrombogenicity, multi-scale approaches based on particle methods are better suited. We present a top-scale model to describe bulk flow of platelet suspensions: we employ dissipative particle dynamics to model viscous flow dynamics and present a novel and general no-slip boundary condition that allows the description of three-dimensional viscous flows through complex geometries. Dissipative phenomena associated with boundary layers and recirculation zones are observed and favorably compared to benchmark viscous flow solutions (Poiseuille and Couette flows). Platelets in suspension, modeled as coarse-grained finite-sized ensembles of bound particles constituting an enclosed deformable membrane with flat ellipsoid shape, show self-orbiting motions in shear flows consistent with Jeffery's orbits, and are transported with the flow, flipping and colliding with the walls and interacting with other platelets. PMID:23695489

  5. Neural network approach to classification of traffic flow states

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, H.; Qiao, F.

    1998-11-01

    The classification of traffic flow states in China has traditionally been based on the Highway Capacity Manual, published in the United States. Because traffic conditions are generally different from country to country, though, it is important to develop a practical and useful classification method applicable to Chinese highway traffic. In view of the difficulty and complexity of a mathematical and physical realization, modern pattern recognition methods are considered practical in fulfilling this goal. This study applies a self-organizing neural network pattern recognition method to classify highway traffic states into some distinctive cluster centers. A small scale test with actual data is conducted, and the method is found to be potentially applicable in practice.

  6. A kinetic-theory approach to turbulent chemically reacting flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chung, P. M.

    1976-01-01

    The paper examines the mathematical and physical foundations for the kinetic theory of reactive turbulent flows, discussing the differences and relation between the kinetic and averaged equations, and comparing some solutions of the kinetic equations obtained by the Green's function method with those obtained by the approximate bimodal method. The kinetic method described consists essentially in constructing the probability density functions of the chemical species on the basis of solutions of the Langevin stochastic equation for the influence of eddies on the behavior of fluid elements. When the kinetic equations are solved for the structure of the diffusion flame established in a shear layer by the bimodal method, discontinuities in gradients of the mean concentrations at the two flame edges appear. This is a consequence of the bimodal approximation of all distribution functions by two dissimilar half-Maxwellian functions, which is a very crude approximation. These discontinuities do not appear when the solutions are constructed by the Green's function method described here.

  7. Visual guidance based on optic flow: a biorobotic approach.

    PubMed

    Franceschini, Nicolas

    2004-01-01

    This paper addresses some basic questions as to how vision links up with action and serves to guide locomotion in both biological and artificial creatures. The thorough knowledge gained during the past five decades on insects' sensory-motor abilities and the neuronal substrates involved has provided us with a rich source of inspiration for designing tomorrow's self-guided vehicles and micro-vehicles, which will be able to cope with unforeseen events on the ground, under water, in the air, in space, on other planets, and inside the human body. Insects can teach us some useful tricks for designing agile autonomous robots. Since constructing a "biorobot" first requires exactly formulating the biological principles presumably involved, it gives us a unique opportunity of checking the soundness and robustness of these principles by bringing them face to face with the real physical world. "Biorobotics" therefore goes one step beyond computer simulation. It leads to experimenting with real physical robots which have to pass the stringent test of the real world. Biorobotics provide us with a new tool, which can help neurobiologists and neuroethologists to identify and investigate worthwhile issues in the field of sensory-motor control. Here we describe some of the visually guided terrestrial and aerial robots we have developed since 1985 on the basis of our biological findings. All these robots behave in response to the optic flow, i.e., they work by measuring the slip speed of the retinal image. Optic flow is sensed on-board by miniature electro-optical velocity sensors. The very principle of these sensors was based on studies in which we recorded the responses of single identified neurons to single photoreceptor stimulation in a model visual system: the fly's compound eye. PMID:15477039

  8. Visual guidance based on optic flow: a biorobotic approach.

    PubMed

    Franceschini, Nicolas

    2004-01-01

    This paper addresses some basic questions as to how vision links up with action and serves to guide locomotion in both biological and artificial creatures. The thorough knowledge gained during the past five decades on insects' sensory-motor abilities and the neuronal substrates involved has provided us with a rich source of inspiration for designing tomorrow's self-guided vehicles and micro-vehicles, which will be able to cope with unforeseen events on the ground, under water, in the air, in space, on other planets, and inside the human body. Insects can teach us some useful tricks for designing agile autonomous robots. Since constructing a "biorobot" first requires exactly formulating the biological principles presumably involved, it gives us a unique opportunity of checking the soundness and robustness of these principles by bringing them face to face with the real physical world. "Biorobotics" therefore goes one step beyond computer simulation. It leads to experimenting with real physical robots which have to pass the stringent test of the real world. Biorobotics provide us with a new tool, which can help neurobiologists and neuroethologists to identify and investigate worthwhile issues in the field of sensory-motor control. Here we describe some of the visually guided terrestrial and aerial robots we have developed since 1985 on the basis of our biological findings. All these robots behave in response to the optic flow, i.e., they work by measuring the slip speed of the retinal image. Optic flow is sensed on-board by miniature electro-optical velocity sensors. The very principle of these sensors was based on studies in which we recorded the responses of single identified neurons to single photoreceptor stimulation in a model visual system: the fly's compound eye.

  9. Spatial dynamics of ecosystem service flows: a comprehensive approach to quantifying actual services

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bagstad, Kenneth J.; Johnson, Gary W.; Voigt, Brian; Villa, Ferdinando

    2013-01-01

    Recent ecosystem services research has highlighted the importance of spatial connectivity between ecosystems and their beneficiaries. Despite this need, a systematic approach to ecosystem service flow quantification has not yet emerged. In this article, we present such an approach, which we formalize as a class of agent-based models termed “Service Path Attribution Networks” (SPANs). These models, developed as part of the Artificial Intelligence for Ecosystem Services (ARIES) project, expand on ecosystem services classification terminology introduced by other authors. Conceptual elements needed to support flow modeling include a service's rivalness, its flow routing type (e.g., through hydrologic or transportation networks, lines of sight, or other approaches), and whether the benefit is supplied by an ecosystem's provision of a beneficial flow to people or by absorption of a detrimental flow before it reaches them. We describe our implementation of the SPAN framework for five ecosystem services and discuss how to generalize the approach to additional services. SPAN model outputs include maps of ecosystem service provision, use, depletion, and flows under theoretical, possible, actual, inaccessible, and blocked conditions. We highlight how these different ecosystem service flow maps could be used to support various types of decision making for conservation and resource management planning.

  10. A SPATIOTEMPORAL APPROACH FOR HIGH RESOLUTION TRAFFIC FLOW IMPUTATION

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Lee; Chin, Shih-Miao; Hwang, Ho-Ling

    2016-01-01

    Along with the rapid development of Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS), traffic data collection technologies have been evolving dramatically. The emergence of innovative data collection technologies such as Remote Traffic Microwave Sensor (RTMS), Bluetooth sensor, GPS-based Floating Car method, automated license plate recognition (ALPR) (1), etc., creates an explosion of traffic data, which brings transportation engineering into the new era of Big Data. However, despite the advance of technologies, the missing data issue is still inevitable and has posed great challenges for research such as traffic forecasting, real-time incident detection and management, dynamic route guidance, and massive evacuation optimization, because the degree of success of these endeavors depends on the timely availability of relatively complete and reasonably accurate traffic data. A thorough literature review suggests most current imputation models, if not all, focus largely on the temporal nature of the traffic data and fail to consider the fact that traffic stream characteristics at a certain location are closely related to those at neighboring locations and utilize these correlations for data imputation. To this end, this paper presents a Kriging based spatiotemporal data imputation approach that is able to fully utilize the spatiotemporal information underlying in traffic data. Imputation performance of the proposed approach was tested using simulated scenarios and achieved stable imputation accuracy. Moreover, the proposed Kriging imputation model is more flexible compared to current models.

  11. Diffuse-interface approach to rotating Hele-Shaw flows.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ching-Yao; Huang, Yu-Sheng; Miranda, José A

    2011-10-01

    When two fluids of different densities move in a rotating Hele-Shaw cell, the interface between them becomes centrifugally unstable and deforms. Depending on the viscosity contrast of the system, distinct types of complex patterns arise at the fluid-fluid boundary. Deformations can also induce the emergence of interfacial singularities and topological changes such as droplet pinch-off and self-intersection. We present numerical simulations based on a diffuse-interface model for this particular two-phase displacement that capture a variety of pattern-forming behaviors. This is implemented by employing a Boussinesq Hele-Shaw-Cahn-Hilliard approach, considering the whole range of possible values for the viscosity contrast, and by including inertial effects due to the Coriolis force. The role played by these two physical contributions on the development of interface singularities is illustrated and discussed. PMID:22181256

  12. A comparative assessment of two different debris flow propagation approaches - blind simulations on a real debris flow event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stancanelli, L. M.; Foti, E.

    2015-04-01

    A detailed comparison between the performances of two different approaches to debris flow modelling was carried out. In particular, the results of a mono-phase Bingham model (FLO-2D) and that of a two-phase model (TRENT-2D) obtained from a blind test were compared. As a benchmark test the catastrophic event of 1 October 2009 which struck Sicily causing several fatalities and damage was chosen. The predicted temporal evolution of several parameters of the debris flow (such as flow depth and propagation velocity) was analysed in order to investigate the advantages and disadvantages of the two models in reproducing the global dynamics of the event. An analysis between the models' results with survey data have been carried out, not only for the determination of statistical indicators of prediction accuracy, but also for the application of the Receiver Operator Characteristic (ROC) approach. Provided that the proper rheological parameters and boundary conditions are assigned, both models seem capable of reproducing the inundation areas in a reasonably accurate way. However, the main differences in the application rely on the choice of such rheological parameters. Indeed, within the more user-friendly FLO-2D model the tuning of the parameters must be done empirically, with no evidence of the physics of the phenomena. On the other hand, for the TRENT-2D the parameters are physically based and can be estimated from the properties of the solid material, thus reproducing more reliable results. A second important difference between the two models is that in the first method the debris flow is treated as a homogeneous flow, in which the total mass is kept constant from its initiation in the upper part of the basin to the deposition in a debris fan. In contrast, the second approach is suited to reproduce the erosion and deposition processes and the displaced mass can be directly related to the rainfall event. Application of both models in a highly urbanized area reveals the

  13. A comparative assessment of two different debris flow propagation approaches - blind simulations on a real debris flow event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stancanelli, L. M.; Foti, E.

    2014-11-01

    A detailed comparison between the performances of two different approaches to debris flow modelling has been carried out. In particular, the results of a mono-phase Bingham model (FLO-2D) and these of a two phase model (TRENT-2D) obtained from a blind test have been compared. As a benchmark test the catastrophic event of 1 October 2009 which struck Sicily causing several fatalities and damages has been chosen. The predicted temporal evolution of several parameters of the debris flow (as the flow depths and the propagation velocities) has been analyzed in order to investigate the advantages and disadvantages of the two models in reproducing the global dynamics of the event. Analysis between the models results with survey data have been carried out, not only for the determination of statistical indicators of prediction accuracy, but also for the application of the Receiver Operator Characteristic (ROC) approach. Provided that the proper rheological parameters and boundary conditions are assigned, both models seem capable of reproducing the inundation areas in a fairly good way. However, the main differences in the application rely in the choice of such rheological parameters. Indeed, within the more user friendly FLO-2D model the tuning of the parameters must be done empirically, with no evidence of the physics of the phenomena. On the other hand, for the TRENT-2D the parameters are physically based and can be estimated from the properties of the solid material, thus reproducing more reliable results. A second important difference between the two models is that in the first method the debris flow is treated as homogeneous flow, in which the total mass is kept constant from initiation in the upper part of the basin up to the deposition on debris fan. On the contrary, the second approach is suite to reproduce the erosion and deposition processes and the displaced mass can be directly related to the rainfall event. Application of both models in an highly urbanized area

  14. Modeling flow and transport in unsaturated fractured rock: An evaluation of the continuum approach

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Hui-Hai; Haukwa, Charles B.; Ahlers, C. Fredrik; Bodvarsson, Gudmundur S.; Flint, Alan L.; Guertal, William B.

    2002-09-01

    Because the continuum approach is relatively simple and straightforward to implement, it has been commonly used in modeling flow and transport in unsaturated fractured rock. However, the usefulness of this approach can be questioned in terms of its adequacy for representing fingering flow and transport in unsaturated fractured rock. The continuum approach thus needs to be evaluated carefully by comparing simulation results with field observations directly related to unsaturated flow and transport processes. This paper reports on such an evaluation, based on a combination of model calibration and prediction, using data from an infiltration test carried out in a densely fractured rock within the unsaturated zone of Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Comparisons between experimental and modeling results show that the continuum approach may be able to capture important features of flow and transport processes observed from the test. The modeling results also show that matrix diffusion may have a significant effect on the overall transport behavior in unsaturated fractured rocks, which can be used to estimate effective fracture-matrix interface areas based on tracer transport data. While more theoretical, numerical, and experimental studies are needed to provide a conclusive evaluation, this study suggests that the continuum approach is useful for modeling flow and transport in unsaturated, densely fractured rock.

  15. Modeling flow and transport in unsaturated fractured rock: an evaluation of the continuum approach.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hui-Hai; Haukwa, Charles B; Ahlers, C Fredrik; Bodvarsson, Gudmundur S; Flint, Alan L; Guertal, William B

    2003-01-01

    Because the continuum approach is relatively simple and straightforward to implement, it has been commonly used in modeling flow and transport in unsaturated fractured rock. However, the usefulness of this approach can be questioned in terms of its adequacy for representing fingering flow and transport in unsaturated fractured rock. The continuum approach thus needs to be evaluated carefully by comparing simulation results with field observations directly related to unsaturated flow and transport processes. This paper reports on such an evaluation, based on a combination of model calibration and prediction, using data from an infiltration test carried out in a densely fractured rock within the unsaturated zone of Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Comparisons between experimental and modeling results show that the continuum approach may be able to capture important features of flow and transport processes observed from the test. The modeling results also show that matrix diffusion may have a significant effect on the overall transport behavior in unsaturated fractured rocks, which can be used to estimate effective fracture-matrix interface areas based on tracer transport data. While more theoretical, numerical, and experimental studies are needed to provide a conclusive evaluation, this study suggests that the continuum approach is useful for modeling flow and transport in unsaturated, densely fractured rock. PMID:12714290

  16. Modeling flow and transport in unsaturated fractured rock: An evaluation of the continuum approach

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Liu, H.-H.; Haukwa, C.B.; Ahlers, C.F.; Bodvarsson, G.S.; Flint, A.L.; Guertal, W.B.

    2003-01-01

    Because the continuum approach is relatively simple and straightforward to implement, it has been commonly used in modeling flow and transport in unsaturated fractured rock. However, the usefulness of this approach can be questioned in terms of its adequacy for representing fingering flow and transport in unsaturated fractured rock. The continuum approach thus needs to be evaluated carefully by comparing simulation results with field observations directly related to unsaturated flow and transport processes. This paper reports on such an evaluation, based on a combination of model calibration and prediction, using data from an infiltration test carried out in a densely fractured rock within the unsaturated zone of Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Comparisons between experimental and modeling results show that the continuum approach may be able to capture important features of flow and transport processes observed from the test. The modeling results also show that matrix diffusion may have a significant effect on the overall transport behavior in unsaturated fractured rocks, which can be used to estimate effective fracture-matrix interface areas based on tracer transport data. While more theoretical, numerical, and experimental studies are needed to provide a conclusive evaluation, this study suggests that the continuum approach is useful for modeling flow and transport in unsaturated, densely fractured rock. ?? 2002 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. A Mixed Approach for Modeling Blood Flow in Brain Microcirculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peyrounette, M.; Sylvie, L.; Davit, Y.; Quintard, M.

    2014-12-01

    We have previously demonstrated [1] that the vascular system of the healthy human brain cortex is a superposition of two structural components, each corresponding to a different spatial scale. At small-scale, the vascular network has a capillary structure, which is homogeneous and space-filling over a cut-off length. At larger scale, veins and arteries conform to a quasi-fractal branched structure. This structural duality is consistent with the functional duality of the vasculature, i.e. distribution and exchange. From a modeling perspective, this can be viewed as the superposition of: (a) a continuum model describing slow transport in the small-scale capillary network, characterized by a representative elementary volume and effective properties; and (b) a discrete network approach [2] describing fast transport in the arterial and venous network, which cannot be homogenized because of its fractal nature. This problematic is analogous to modeling problems encountered in geological media, e.g, in petroleum engineering, where fast conducting channels (wells or fractures) are embedded in a porous medium (reservoir rock). An efficient method to reduce the computational cost of fractures/continuum simulations is to use relatively large grid blocks for the continuum model. However, this also makes it difficult to accurately couple both structural components. In this work, we solve this issue by adapting the "well model" concept used in petroleum engineering [3] to brain specific 3-D situations. We obtain a unique linear system of equations describing the discrete network, the continuum and the well model coupling. Results are presented for realistic geometries and compared with a non-homogenized small-scale network model of an idealized periodic capillary network of known permeability. [1] Lorthois & Cassot, J. Theor. Biol. 262, 614-633, 2010. [2] Lorthois et al., Neuroimage 54 : 1031-1042, 2011. [3] Peaceman, SPE J. 18, 183-194, 1978.

  18. A Biomass Flow Approach to Population Models and Food Webs

    PubMed Central

    Getz, Wayne M.

    2011-01-01

    The dominant differential equation paradigm for modeling the population dynamics of species interacting in the framework of a food web retains at its core the basic prey-predator and competition models formulation by Alfred J. Lotka (1880–1945) and Vito Volterra (1860–1940) nearly nine decades ago. This paradigm lacks a trophic-level-independent formulation of population growth leading to ambiguities in how to treat populations that are simultaneously both prey and predator. Also, this paradigm does not fundamentally include inertial (i.e. change resisting) processes needed to account for the response of populations to fluctuating resource environments. Here I present an approach that corrects both these deficits and provides a unified framework for accounting for biomass transformation in food webs that include both live and dead components of all species in the system. This biomass transformation formulation (BTW) allows for a unified treatment of webs that include consumers of both live and dead material—both carnivores and carcasivores, herbivores and detritivores—and incorporates scavengers, parasites, and other neglected food web consumption categories in a coherent manner. I trace how BTW is an outgrowth of the metaphysiological growth modeling paradigm and I provide a general compact formulation of BTW in terms of a three-variable differential equation formulation for each species in the food web: viz. live biomass, dead biomass, and a food-intake-related measure called deficit-stress. I then illustrate the application of this new paradigm to provide insights into two-species competition in variable environments and discuss application of BTW to food webs that incorporate parasites and pathogens.

  19. A New Finite Element Approach for Prediction of Aerothermal Loads: Progress in Inviscid Flow Computations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bey, K. S.; Thornton, E. A.; Dechaumphai, P.; Ramakrishnan, R.

    1985-01-01

    Recent progress in the development of finite element methodology for the prediction of aerothermal loads is described. Two dimensional, inviscid computations are presented, but emphasis is placed on development of an approach extendable to three dimensional viscous flows. Research progress is described for: (1) utilization of a commerically available program to construct flow solution domains and display computational results, (2) development of an explicit Taylor-Galerkin solution algorithm, (3) closed form evaluation of finite element matrices, (4) vector computer programming strategies, and (5) validation of solutions. Two test problems of interest to NASA Langley aerothermal research are studied. Comparisons of finite element solutions for Mach 6 flow with other solution methods and experimental data validate fundamental capabilities of the approach for analyzing high speed inviscid compressible flows.

  20. Development of a configurable unsteady compressible flow analysis using a generic programming approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noll, Christopher Thomas

    The development of an unsteady compressible flow analysis and configurable code design is presented. The design is based on the generic programming approach and is implemented using the C++ programming language. The generic programming approach heralds a revolution in software engineering, when high-performance programs will be assembled rapidly from readily available, mass-produced software components and generic algorithms. Using this approach, researchers will be able to share the burden of software development across research groups and disciplines allowing more difficult problems and more complex numerical methods to be used than previously practical. The computational fluid dynamics code design presented here consists of numerous component types (concepts) and specifications for the way that they interact in an assembled program (generic algorithms). The generic nature of the design allows for numerous flow codes to be developed from it using components specific to the particular task at hand. Numerous elliptic grid generation and flow codes were developed from this design, which allows for various numerical methods to be used interchangeably. The application of particular codes, assembled using this design, to problems of interest to the fluid dynamicist is discussed. The cases include the unsteady flow simulation for flow past a circular cylinder, flow past a maneuvering airfoil, and flow generated by a multi-finned mixer geometry. A commonly used approach for generating elliptic grids is shown to be overdetermined. This analysis is corrected and used as the basis of an improved automatic elliptic grid generation system. Grid generation codes based on this system are used to generate the grids necessary for the flow simulations.

  1. Exploring Inflated Pahohoe Lava Flow Morphologies and the Effects of Cooling Using a New Simulation Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glaze, L. S.; Baloga, S. M.

    2014-01-01

    Pahoehoe lavas are recognized as an important landform on Earth, Mars and Io. Observations of such flows on Earth (e.g., Figure 1) indicate that the emplacement process is dominated by random effects. Existing models for lobate a`a lava flows that assume viscous fluid flow on an inclined plane are not appropriate for dealing with the numerous random factors present in pahoehoe emplacement. Thus, interpretation of emplacement conditions for pahoehoe lava flows on Mars requires fundamentally different models. A new model that implements a simulation approach has recently been developed that allows exploration of a variety of key influences on pahoehoe lobe emplacement (e.g., source shape, confinement, slope). One important factor that has an impact on the final topographic shape and morphology of a pahoehoe lobe is the volumetric flow rate of lava, where cooling of lava on the lobe surface influences the likelihood of subsequent breakouts.

  2. Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian approach in reduced order modeling of a flow with a moving boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stankiewicz, W.; Roszak, R.; Morzyński, M.

    2013-06-01

    Flow-induced deflections of aircraft structures result in oscillations that might turn into such a dangerous phenomena like flutter or buffeting. In this paper the design of an aeroelastic system consisting of Reduced Order Model (ROM) of the flow with a moving boundary is presented. The model is based on Galerkin projection of governing equation onto space spanned by modes obtained from high-fidelity computations. The motion of the boundary and mesh is defined in Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) approach and results in additional convective term in Galerkin system. The developed system is demonstrated on the example of a flow around an oscillating wing.

  3. Flow unit concept - integrated approach to reservoir description for engineering projects

    SciTech Connect

    Ebanks, W.J. Jr.

    1987-05-01

    The successful application of secondary and tertiary oil recovery technology requires an accurate understanding of the internal architecture of the reservoir. Engineers have difficulty incorporating geological heterogeneity in their numerical models for simulating reservoir behavior. The concept of flow units has been developed to integrate geological and engineering data into a system for reservoir description. A flow unit is a volume of the total reservoir rock within which geological and petrophysical properties that affect fluid flow are internally consistent and predictably different from properties of other rock volumes (i.e., flow units). Flow units are defined by geological properties, such as texture, mineralogy, sedimentary structures, bedding contacts, and the nature of permeability barriers, combined with quantitative petrophysical properties, such as porosity, permeability, capillarity, and fluid saturations. Studies in the subsurface and in surface outcrops have shown that flow units do not always coincide with geologic lithofacies. The flow unit approach provides a means of uniquely subdividing reservoirs into volumes that approximate the architecture of a reservoir at a scale consistent with reservoir simulations. Thus, reservoir engineers can incorporate critical geological information into a reservoir simulation without greatly increasing the complexity of their models. This approach has advantages over more traditional methods of reservoir zonation whereby model layers are determined on the basis of vertical distributions of permeability and porosity from core analyses and wireline logs.

  4. A general approach for the prediction of localized instability generation in boundary layer flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choudhari, Meelan; Ng, Lian; Streett, Craig L.

    1991-01-01

    The present approach to the prediction of instability generation that is due to the interaction of freestream disturbances with regions of subscale variations in surface boundary conditions can account for the finite Reynolds number effects, while furnishing a framework for the study of receptivity in compressible flow and in 3D boundary layers. The approach is illustrated for the case of Tollmien-Schlichting wave generation in a Blasius boundary layer, due to the interaction of a freestream acoustic wave with a localized wall inhomogeneity. Results are presented for the generation of viscous and inviscid instabilities in adverse pressure-gradient boundary layers, supersonic boundary layer instabilities, and cross-flow vortex instabilities.

  5. A numerical approach for flow-induced vibration of pipe structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ting, E. C.; Hosseinipour, A.

    1983-06-01

    A structural impedance approach is extended for the dynamic analysis of pipe structures conveying fluid flow. The method is efficient in computation and convenient for studying transient responses. Thus, it is possible to study the transition from a stable condition to an unstable condition of the pipe structure as the flow speed increases. The structure may also exhibit different modes of instability. The present approach predicts the mode without prior assumption. Numerical examples are given for a hanging cantilever and a simply supported pipe. The critical speed associated with the dynamic stability is calculated and compared with available analytical and experimental results.

  6. Turbulent structure of three-dimensional flow behind a model car: 1. Exposed to uniform approach flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozaka, Orçun E.; Özkan, Gökhan; Özdemir, Bedii I.

    2004-01-01

    Turbulent structure of flow behind a model car is investigated with local velocity measurements with emphasis on large structures and their relevance to aerodynamic forces. Results show that two counter-rotating helical vortices, which are formed within the inner wake region, play a key role in determining the flux of kinetic energy. The turbulence is generated within the outermost shear layers due to the instabilities, which also seem to be the basic drive for these relatively organized structures. The measured terms of the turbulent kinetic energy production, which are only part of the full expression, indicate that vortex centres act similar to the manifolds draining the energy in the streamwise direction. As the approach velocity increases, the streamwise convection becomes the dominant means of turbulent transport and, thus, the acquisition of turbulence by relatively non-turbulent flow around the wake region is suppressed.

  7. Development of a dual approach to assess powder flow from avalanching behavior.

    PubMed

    Lee, Y S; Poynter, R; Podczeck, F; Newton, J M

    2000-07-21

    The purposes of this investigation were to develop a method to evaluate flow properties of powders from avalanching tests and to detect similarities and relationships between these data and conventional powder flow properties. The API AeroFlow automated flowability analyzer was tested using 6 pharmaceutical excipients. Data were presented as mean time to avalanche (MTA), scatter, and a classification based on the type of motion of the powder bed. Powders were also characterized in terms of particle size, particle shape, loss of weight on drying, Carr's compressibility index, and critical orifice diameter to prevent ratholing. A dual approach, which combines visual observation of the type of motion of the powder bed in the rotating drum with numerical descriptors such as MTA and scatter, was found to be more accurate in the assessment of powder flow than the current practice of using only MTA and scatter values. Statistical analysis established that there are relationships and similarities between the ranking of powder flow properties obtained from the avalanching test and Carr's compressibility index and the critical orifice diameter. An interaction between particle size and shape, both influencing powder flow, when evaluated with these methods was found. The assessment of the flowability of powders on the basis of avalanching tests should include both the determination of numerical descriptors of flow such as MTA and scatter, and a determination of the type of motion of the powder bed in order to increase the sensitivity of the method to small changes in powder flow properties.

  8. Multi-compartment approach to identify minimal flow and maximal recreational use of a lowland river

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pusch, Martin; Lorenz, Stefan

    2013-04-01

    Most approaches to establish a minimum flow rate for river sections subjected to water abstraction focus on flow requirements of fish and benthic invertebrates. However, artificial reduction of river flow will always affect additional key ecosystem features, as sediment properties and the metabolism of matter in these ecosystems as well, and may even influence adjacent floodplains. Thus, significant effects e.g. on the dissolved oxygen content of river water, on habitat conditions in the benthic zone, and on water levels in the floodplain are to be expected. Thus, we chose a multiple compartment method to identify minimum flow requirements in a lowland River in northern Germany (Spree River), selecting the minimal required flow level out of all compartments studied. Results showed that minimal flow levels necessary to keep key ecosystem features at a 'good' state depended significantly on actual water quality and on river channel morphology. Thereby, water quality of the Spree is potentially influenced by recreational boating activity, which causes mussels to stop filter-feeding, and thus impedes self-purification. Disturbance of mussel feeding was shown to directly depend on boat type and speed, with substantial differences among mussel species. Thus, a maximal recreational boating intensity could be derived that does not significantly affect self purification. We conclude that minimal flow levels should be identified not only based on flow preferences of target species, but also considering channel morphology, ecological functions, and the intensity of other human uses of the river section.

  9. Analyzing Unsatirated Flow Patterns in Fractured Rock Using an Integrated Modeling Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Y.S. Wu; G. Lu; K. Zhang; L. Pan; G.S. Bodvarsson

    2006-08-03

    Characterizing percolation patterns in unsaturated fractured rock has posed a greater challenge to modeling investigations than comparable saturated zone studies, because of the heterogeneous nature of unsaturated media and the great number of variables impacting unsaturated flow. This paper presents an integrated modeling methodology for quantitatively characterizing percolation patterns in the unsaturated zone of Yucca Mountain, Nevada, a proposed underground repository site for storing high-level radioactive waste. The modeling approach integrates a wide variety of moisture, pneumatic, thermal, and isotopic geochemical field data into a comprehensive three-dimensional numerical model for modeling analyses. It takes into account the coupled processes of fluid and heat flow and chemical isotopic transport in Yucca Mountain's highly heterogeneous, unsaturated fractured tuffs. Modeling results are examined against different types of field-measured data and then used to evaluate different hydrogeological conceptualizations and their results of flow patterns in the unsaturated zone. In particular, this model provides a much clearer understanding of percolation patterns and flow behavior through the unsaturated zone, both crucial issues in assessing repository performance. The integrated approach for quantifying Yucca Mountain's flow system is demonstrated to provide a practical modeling tool for characterizing flow and transport processes in complex subsurface systems.

  10. Effects of approaching flow types on the performances of straight conical diffusers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimizu, Y.; Kuzuhara, S.; Nagafusa, M.

    1982-10-01

    The effect on straight conical diffusers of various types of approaching flow are described, with a view to the relationships among inlet boundary layer thickness, inlet swirl components and diffuser flow. Tests were conducted for diffusers with total divergence angles ranging from 6 to 18 deg, with diffuser area ratios ranging from 2.1 to 15.9. Superior performance was obtained where the approaching flow had a symmetric axial velocity profile with a one-dimensional swirl component or a distorted axial velocity profile with a double-spiral swirl component. Inferior performance resulted from a simple, distorted axial velocity profile without swirl components or with a one-directional swirl component.

  11. Analyzing flow patterns in unsaturated fractured rock of YuccaMountain using an integrated modeling approach

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Yu-Shu; Lu, Guoping; Zhang, Keni; Pan, Lehua; Bodvarsson,Gudmundur S.

    2003-11-03

    This paper presents a series of modeling investigations to characterize percolation patterns in the unsaturated zone of Yucca Mountain, Nevada, a proposed underground repository site for storing high-level radioactive waste. The investigations are conducted using a modeling approach that integrates a wide variety of moisture, pneumatic, thermal, and isotopic geochemical field data into a comprehensive three-dimensional numerical model through model calibration. This integrated modeling approach, based on a dual-continuum formulation, takes into account the coupled processes of fluid and heat flow and chemical isotopic transport in Yucca Mountain's highly heterogeneous, unsaturated fractured tuffs. In particular, the model results are examined against different types of field-measured data and used to evaluate different hydrogeological conceptual models and their effects on flow patterns in the unsaturated zone. The objective of this work to provide understanding of percolation patterns and flow behavior through the unsaturated zone, which is a crucial issue in assessing repository performance.

  12. A Novel Laboratory Approach for the Demonstration of Hemodynamic Principles: The Arterial Blood Flow Reflection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Djelic, Marina; Mazic, Sanja; Zikic, Dejan

    2013-01-01

    In the frame of a laboratory training course for medicine students, a new approach for laboratory exercises has been applied to teach the phenomena of circulation. The exercise program included measurements of radial artery blood flow waveform for different age groups using a noninvasive optical sensor. Arterial wave reflection was identified by…

  13. Some Approaches Towards Constructing Optimally Efficient Multigrid Solvers for the Inviscid Flow Equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sidilkover, David

    1997-01-01

    Some important advances took place during the last several years in the development of genuinely multidimensional upwind schemes for the compressible Euler equations. In particular, a robust, high-resolution genuinely multidimensional scheme which can be used for any of the flow regimes computations was constructed. This paper summarizes briefly these developments and outlines the fundamental advantages of this approach.

  14. Two different approaches for creating a prescribed opposed-flow velocity field for flame spread experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carmignani, Luca; Celniker, Greg; Bussett, Kyle; Paolini, Christopher; Bhattacharjee, Subrata

    2015-05-01

    Opposed-flow flame spread over solid fuels is a fundamental area of research in fire science. Typically combustion wind tunnels are used to generate the opposing flow of oxidizer against which a laminar flame spread occurs along the fuel samples. The spreading flame is generally embedded in a laminar boundary layer, which interacts with the strong buoyancy-induced flow to affect the mechanism of flame spread. In this work, two different approaches for creating the opposed-flow are compared. In the first approach, a vertical combustion tunnel is used where a thin fuel sample, thin acrylic or ashless filter paper, is held vertically along the axis of the test-section with the airflow controlled by controlling the duty cycles of four fans. As the sample is ignited, a flame spreads downward in a steady manner along a developing boundary layer. In the second approach, the sample is held in a movable cart placed in an eight-meter tall vertical chamber filled with air. As the sample is ignited, the cart is moved downward (through a remote-controlled mechanism) at a prescribed velocity. The results from the two approaches are compared to establish the boundary layer effect on flame spread over thin fuels.

  15. Two Experiments to Approach the Boltzmann Factor: Chemical Reaction and Viscous Flow

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fazio, Claudio; Battaglia, Onofrio R.; Guastella, Ivan

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we discuss a pedagogical approach aimed at pointing out the role played by the Boltzmann factor in describing phenomena usually perceived as regulated by different mechanisms of functioning. Experimental results regarding some aspects of a chemical reaction and of the viscous flow of some liquids are analysed and described in terms…

  16. Innovative Approaches for Urban Watershed Wet-Weather Flow Management and Control

    EPA Science Inventory

    The “Innovative Approaches for Urban Watershed Wet-Weather Flow Management and Control: State of the Technology” project investigated a range of innovative technology and management strategies emerging outside the normal realm of business within the continental United States, fo...

  17. An algorithm for fast DNS cavitating flows simulations using homogeneous mixture approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Žnidarčič, A.; Coutier-Delgosha, O.; Marquillie, M.; Dular, M.

    2015-12-01

    A new algorithm for fast DNS cavitating flows simulations is developed. The algorithm is based on Kim and Moin projection method form. Homogeneous mixture approach with transport equation for vapour volume fraction is used to model cavitation and various cavitation models can be used. Influence matrix and matrix diagonalisation technique enable fast parallel computations.

  18. Deterministic approach for unsteady rarefied flow simulations in complex geometries and its application to gas flows in microsystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chigullapalli, Sruti

    Micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) are widely used in automotive, communications and consumer electronics applications with microactuators, micro gyroscopes and microaccelerometers being just a few examples. However, in areas where high reliability is critical, such as in aerospace and defense applications, very few MEMS technologies have been adopted so far. Further development of high frequency microsystems such as resonators, RF MEMS, microturbines and pulsed-detonation microengines require improved understanding of unsteady gas dynamics at the micro scale. Accurate computational simulation of such flows demands new approaches beyond the conventional formulations based on the macroscopic constitutive laws. This is due to the breakdown of the continuum hypothesis in the presence of significant non-equilibrium and rarefaction because of large gradients and small scales, respectively. More generally, the motion of molecules in a gas is described by the kinetic Boltzmann equation which is valid for arbitrary Knudsen numbers. However, due to the multidimensionality of the phase space and the complex non-linearity of the collision term, numerical solution of the Boltzmann equation is challenging for practical problems. In this thesis a fully deterministic, as opposed to a statistical, finite volume based three-dimensional solution of Boltzmann ES-BGK model kinetic equation is formulated to enable simulations of unsteady rarefied flows. The main goal of this research is to develop an unsteady rarefied solver integrated with finite volume method (FVM) solver in MEMOSA (MEMS Overall Simulation Administrator) developed by PRISM: NNSA center for Prediction of Reliability, Integrity and Survivability of Microsystems (PRISM) at Purdue and apply it to study micro-scale gas damping. Formulation and verification of finite volume method for unsteady rarefied flow solver based on Boltzmann-ESBGK equations in arbitrary three-dimensional geometries are presented. The solver is

  19. Flow equation approach to one-body and many-body localization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quito, Victor; Bhattacharjee, Paraj; Pekker, David; Refael, Gil

    2014-03-01

    We study one-body and many-body localization using the flow equation technique applied to spin-1/2 Hamiltonians. This technique, first introduced by Wegner, allows us to exact diagonalize interacting systems by solving a set of first-order differential equations for coupling constants. Besides, by the flow of individual operators we also compute physical properties, such as correlation and localization lengths, by looking at the flow of probability distributions of couplings in the Hilbert space. As a first example, we analyze the one-body localization problem written in terms of spins, the disordered XY model with a random transverse field. We compare the results obtained in the flow equation approach with the diagonalization in the fermionic language. For the many-body problem, we investigate the physical properties of the disordered XXZ Hamiltonian with a random transverse field in the z-direction.

  20. A knowledge-based approach to automated flow-field zoning for computational fluid dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vogel, Alison Andrews

    1989-01-01

    An automated three-dimensional zonal grid generation capability for computational fluid dynamics is shown through the development of a demonstration computer program capable of automatically zoning the flow field of representative two-dimensional (2-D) aerodynamic configurations. The applicability of a knowledge-based programming approach to the domain of flow-field zoning is examined. Several aspects of flow-field zoning make the application of knowledge-based techniques challenging: the need for perceptual information, the role of individual bias in the design and evaluation of zonings, and the fact that the zoning process is modeled as a constructive, design-type task (for which there are relatively few examples of successful knowledge-based systems in any domain). Engineering solutions to the problems arising from these aspects are developed, and a demonstration system is implemented which can design, generate, and output flow-field zonings for representative 2-D aerodynamic configurations.

  1. Issues and approach to develop validated analysis tools for hypersonic flows: One perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deiwert, George S.

    1992-01-01

    Critical issues concerning the modeling of low-density hypervelocity flows where thermochemical nonequilibrium effects are pronounced are discussed. Emphasis is on the development of validated analysis tools. A description of the activity in the Ames Research Center's Aerothermodynamics Branch is also given. Inherent in the process is a strong synergism between ground test and real-gas computational fluid dynamics (CFD). Approaches to develop and/or enhance phenomenological models and incorporate them into computational flow-field simulation codes are discussed. These models have been partially validated with experimental data for flows where the gas temperature is raised (compressive flows). Expanding flows, where temperatures drop, however, exhibit somewhat different behavior. Experimental data for these expanding flow conditions are sparse; reliance must be made on intuition and guidance from computational chemistry to model transport processes under these conditions. Ground-based experimental studies used to provide necessary data for model development and validation are described. Included are the performance characteristics of high-enthalpy flow facilities, such as shock tubes and ballistic ranges.

  2. Pneumatic and Percussive Penetration Approaches for Heat Flow Probe Emplacement on Robotic Lunar Missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zacny, K.; Nagihara, S.; Hedlund, M.; Paulsen, G.; Shasho, J.; Mumm, E.; Kumar, N.; Szwarc, T.; Chu, P.; Craft, J.; Taylor, P.; Milam, M.

    2013-11-01

    In this paper, the development of heat flow probes for measuring the geothermal gradient and conductivity of lunar regolith are presented. These two measurements are the required information for determining the heat flow of a planetary body. Considering the Moon as an example, heat flow properties are very important information for studying the radiogenic isotopes, the thermal evolution and differentiation history, and the mechanical properties of the interior. In order to obtain the best measurements, the sensors must be extended to a depth of at least 3 m, i.e. beyond the depth of significant thermal cycles. Two approaches to heat flow deployment and measurement are discussed in this paper: a percussive approach and a pneumatic approach. The percussive approach utilizes a high frequency hammer to drive a cone penetrometer into the lunar simulant. Ring-like thermal sensors (heaters and temperature sensors) on the penetrometer rod are deployed into the simulant every 30 cm as the penetrometer penetrates to the required 3 m depth. Once the target depth has been achieved, the deployment rod is removed from the simulant, eliminating any thermal path to the lander. The pneumatic approach relies on pressurized gas to excavate, using a cone-shaped nozzle to penetrate the simulant. The nozzle is attached to a coiled stem with thermal sensors embedded along the length of the stem. As the simulant is being lofted out of the hole by the escaping gas, the stem is progressively reeled out from a spool, thus moving the cone deeper into the hole. Thermal conductivity is measured using a needle probe attached to the end of the cone. Breadboard prototypes of these two heat flow probe systems have been constructed and successfully tested under lunar-like conditions to approximately 70 cm, which was the maximum possible depth allowed by the size of the test bin and the chamber.

  3. Eulerian Mapping Closure Approach for Probability Density Function of Concentration in Shear Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    He, Guowei; Bushnell, Dennis M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The Eulerian mapping closure approach is developed for uncertainty propagation in computational fluid mechanics. The approach is used to study the Probability Density Function (PDF) for the concentration of species advected by a random shear flow. An analytical argument shows that fluctuation of the concentration field at one point in space is non-Gaussian and exhibits stretched exponential form. An Eulerian mapping approach provides an appropriate approximation to both convection and diffusion terms and leads to a closed mapping equation. The results obtained describe the evolution of the initial Gaussian field, which is in agreement with direct numerical simulations.

  4. Pressure from particle image velocimetry for convective flows: a Taylor’s hypothesis approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Kat, R.; Ganapathisubramani, B.

    2013-02-01

    Taylor’s hypothesis is often applied in turbulent flow analysis to map temporal information into spatial information. Recent efforts in deriving pressure from particle image velocimetry (PIV) have proposed multiple approaches, each with its own weakness and strength. Application of Taylor’s hypothesis allows us to counter the weakness of an Eulerian approach that is described by de Kat and van Oudheusden (2012 Exp. Fluids 52 1089-106). Two different approaches of using Taylor’s hypothesis in determining planar pressure are investigated: one where pressure is determined from volumetric PIV data and one where pressure is determined from time-resolved stereoscopic PIV data. A performance assessment on synthetic data shows that application of Taylor’s hypothesis can improve determination of pressure from PIV data significantly compared with a time-resolved volumetric approach. The technique is then applied to time-resolved PIV data taken in a cross-flow plane of a turbulent jet (Ganapathisubramani et al 2007 Exp. Fluids 42 923-39). Results appear to indicate that pressure can indeed be obtained from PIV data in turbulent convective flows using the Taylor’s hypothesis approach, where there are no other methods to determine pressure. The role of convection velocity in determination of pressure is also discussed.

  5. Comparison of two inlet boundary approaches in numerical simulation of car ventilation outlet flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talanda, Tomáš; Niedoba, Pavel; Lízal, František; Jícha, Miroslav

    2016-03-01

    The paper is concerned with the comparison of two inlet boundary approaches of numerical simulations. The first approach is based on the simulation of a sufficiently long duct upstream the area of interest with known volumetric flow rate. The second approach rests on the experimental measurement of the section closer to the area of interest. The experimental measurement provides velocity profile and in addition turbulent intensity compared to the first approach where only a velocity profile can be computed according to known volumetric flow rate. A simplified model of car ventilation outlet was chosen as a test case. The model consists of circular and rectangular duct, area of interest (closing flap, vertical slats and horizontal slats) and outlet box. We have compared the two mentioned inlet boundary approaches for two distinct values of volumetric flow rate for which the experimental data of the section upstream of the area of interest are available. The velocity and the turbulent kinetic energy profiles downstream of the area of interest were chosen as comparative characteristics.

  6. Building Common Ground for Environmental Flows using Traditional Techniques and Novel Engagement Approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mott Lacroix, Kelly E.; Xiu, Brittany C.; Megdal, Sharon B.

    2016-04-01

    Despite increased understanding of the science of environmental flows, identification and implementation of effective environmental flow policies remains elusive. Perhaps the greatest barrier to implementing flow policies is the framework for water management. An alternative management approach is needed when legal rights for environmental flows do not exist, or are ineffective at protecting ecosystems. The research presented here, conducted in the U.S. state of Arizona, provides an empirical example of engagement to promote social learning as an approach to finding ways to provide water for the environment where legal rights for environmental flows are inadequate. Based on our engagement process we propose that identifying and then building common ground require attention to the process of analyzing qualitative data and the methods for displaying complex information, two aspects not frequently discussed in the social learning or stakeholder engagement literature. The results and methods from this study can help communities develop an engagement process that will find and build common ground, increase stakeholder involvement, and identify innovative solutions to provide water for the environment that reflect the concerns of current water users.

  7. Building Common Ground for Environmental Flows using Traditional Techniques and Novel Engagement Approaches.

    PubMed

    Mott Lacroix, Kelly E; Xiu, Brittany C; Megdal, Sharon B

    2016-04-01

    Despite increased understanding of the science of environmental flows, identification and implementation of effective environmental flow policies remains elusive. Perhaps the greatest barrier to implementing flow policies is the framework for water management. An alternative management approach is needed when legal rights for environmental flows do not exist, or are ineffective at protecting ecosystems. The research presented here, conducted in the U.S. state of Arizona, provides an empirical example of engagement to promote social learning as an approach to finding ways to provide water for the environment where legal rights for environmental flows are inadequate. Based on our engagement process we propose that identifying and then building common ground require attention to the process of analyzing qualitative data and the methods for displaying complex information, two aspects not frequently discussed in the social learning or stakeholder engagement literature. The results and methods from this study can help communities develop an engagement process that will find and build common ground, increase stakeholder involvement, and identify innovative solutions to provide water for the environment that reflect the concerns of current water users.

  8. Multiphase fluid flow and subsequent geochemical transport invariably saturated fractured rocks: 1. Approaches

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Tianfu; Pruess, Karsten

    2000-08-08

    Reactive fluid flow and geochemical transport in unsaturated fractured rocks has received increasing attention for studies of contaminant transport, groundwater quality, waste disposal, acid mine drainage remediation, mineral deposits, sedimentary diagenesis, and fluid-rock interactions in hydrothermal systems. This paper presents methods for modeling geochemical systems that emphasize: (1) involvement of the gas phase in addition to liquid and solid phases in fluid flow, mass transport and chemical reactions, (2) treatment of physically and chemically heterogeneous and fractured rocks, (3) the effect of heat on fluid flow and reaction properties and processes, and (4) the kinetics of fluid-rock interaction. The physical and chemical process model is embodied in a system of partial differential equations for flow and transport, coupled to algebraic equations and ordinary differential equations for chemical interactions. For numerical solution, the continuum equations are discretized in space and time. Space discretization is based on a flexible integral finite difference approach that can use irregular gridding to model geologic structure; time is discretized fully implicitly as a first-order finite difference. Heterogeneous and fractured media are treated with a general multiple interacting continua method that includes double-porosity, dual-permeability, and multi-region models as special cases. A sequential iteration approach is used to treat the coupling between fluid flow and mass transport on the one hand, chemical reactions on the other. Applications of the methods developed here to variably saturated geochemical systems are presented in a companion paper (part 2, this issue).

  9. Building Common Ground for Environmental Flows using Traditional Techniques and Novel Engagement Approaches.

    PubMed

    Mott Lacroix, Kelly E; Xiu, Brittany C; Megdal, Sharon B

    2016-04-01

    Despite increased understanding of the science of environmental flows, identification and implementation of effective environmental flow policies remains elusive. Perhaps the greatest barrier to implementing flow policies is the framework for water management. An alternative management approach is needed when legal rights for environmental flows do not exist, or are ineffective at protecting ecosystems. The research presented here, conducted in the U.S. state of Arizona, provides an empirical example of engagement to promote social learning as an approach to finding ways to provide water for the environment where legal rights for environmental flows are inadequate. Based on our engagement process we propose that identifying and then building common ground require attention to the process of analyzing qualitative data and the methods for displaying complex information, two aspects not frequently discussed in the social learning or stakeholder engagement literature. The results and methods from this study can help communities develop an engagement process that will find and build common ground, increase stakeholder involvement, and identify innovative solutions to provide water for the environment that reflect the concerns of current water users. PMID:26768733

  10. Preferential Water Flow in a Frozen Soil - a Two-Domain Model Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stähli, Manfred; Jansson, Per-Erik; Lundin, Lars-Christer

    1996-10-01

    Earlier modelling studies have shown the difficulty of accurately simulating snowmelt infiltration into frozen soil using the hydraulic model approach. Comparison of model outputs and field measurements have inferred the occurrence of rapid flow even during periods when the soil is still partly frozen. A one-dimensional, physically based soil water and heat model (SOIL) has been complemented with a new two-domain approach option to simulate preferential flow through frozen layers. The ice is assumed to be first formed at the largest water filled pore upon freezing. Infiltrating water may be conducted rapidly through previously air-filled pores which are not occupied by ice. A minor fraction of water is slowly transferred within the liquid water domain, which is absorbed by the solid particles. A model validation with field measurements at a location in the middle-east of Sweden indicated that the two-domain approach was suitable for improving the prediction of drainage during snowmelting. In particular, the correlation between simulated and observed onset of drainage in spring was improved. The validation also showed that the effect of the high flow domain was highly sensitive to the degree of saturation in the topsoil during freezing, as well as to the hydraulic properties at the lower frost boundary regulating the upward water flow to the frozen soil and ice formation.

  11. A new approach to wall modeling in LES of incompressible flow via function enrichment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krank, Benjamin; Wall, Wolfgang A.

    2016-07-01

    A novel approach to wall modeling for the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations including flows of moderate and large Reynolds numbers is presented. The basic idea is that a problem-tailored function space allows prediction of turbulent boundary layer gradients with very coarse meshes. The proposed function space consists of a standard polynomial function space plus an enrichment, which is constructed using Spalding's law-of-the-wall. The enrichment function is not enforced but "allowed" in a consistent way and the overall methodology is much more general and also enables other enrichment functions. The proposed method is closely related to detached-eddy simulation as near-wall turbulence is modeled statistically and large eddies are resolved in the bulk flow. Interpreted in terms of a three-scale separation within the variational multiscale method, the standard scale resolves large eddies and the enrichment scale represents boundary layer turbulence in an averaged sense. The potential of the scheme is shown applying it to turbulent channel flow of friction Reynolds numbers from Reτ = 590 and up to 5,000, flow over periodic constrictions at the Reynolds numbers ReH = 10 , 595 and 19,000 as well as backward-facing step flow at Reh = 5 , 000, all with extremely coarse meshes. Excellent agreement with experimental and DNS data is observed with the first grid point located at up to y1+ = 500 and especially under adverse pressure gradients as well as in separated flows.

  12. Issues and approach to develop validated analysis tools for hypersonic flows: One perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deiwert, George S.

    1993-01-01

    Critical issues concerning the modeling of low density hypervelocity flows where thermochemical nonequilibrium effects are pronounced are discussed. Emphasis is on the development of validated analysis tools, and the activity in the NASA Ames Research Center's Aerothermodynamics Branch is described. Inherent in the process is a strong synergism between ground test and real gas computational fluid dynamics (CFD). Approaches to develop and/or enhance phenomenological models and incorporate them into computational flowfield simulation codes are discussed. These models were partially validated with experimental data for flows where the gas temperature is raised (compressive flows). Expanding flows, where temperatures drop, however, exhibit somewhat different behavior. Experimental data for these expanding flow conditions is sparse and reliance must be made on intuition and guidance from computational chemistry to model transport processes under these conditions. Ground based experimental studies used to provide necessary data for model development and validation are described. Included are the performance characteristics of high enthalpy flow facilities, such as shock tubes and ballistic ranges.

  13. The Hawaiian Volcano Observatory's current approach to forecasting lava flow hazards (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kauahikaua, J. P.

    2013-12-01

    Hawaiian Volcanoes are best known for their frequent basaltic eruptions, which typically start with fast-moving channelized `a`a flows fed by high eruptions rates. If the flows continue, they generally transition into pahoehoe flows, fed by lower eruption rates, after a few days to weeks. Kilauea Volcano's ongoing eruption illustrates this--since 1986, effusion at Kilauea has mostly produced pahoehoe. The current state of lava flow simulation is quite advanced, but the simplicity of the models mean that they are most appropriately used during the first, most vigorous, days to weeks of an eruption - during the effusion of `a`a flows. Colleagues at INGV in Catania have shown decisively that MAGFLOW simulations utilizing satellite-derived eruption rates can be effective at estimating hazards during the initial periods of an eruption crisis. However, the algorithms do not simulate the complexity of pahoehoe flows. Forecasts of lava flow hazards are the most common form of volcanic hazard assessments made in Hawai`i. Communications with emergency managers over the last decade have relied on simple steepest-descent line maps, coupled with empirical lava flow advance rate information, to portray the imminence of lava flow hazard to nearby communities. Lavasheds, calculated as watersheds, are used as a broader context for the future flow paths and to advise on the utility of diversion efforts, should they be contemplated. The key is to communicate the uncertainty of any approach used to formulate a forecast and, if the forecast uses simple tools, these communications can be fairly straightforward. The calculation of steepest-descent paths and lavasheds relies on the accuracy of the digital elevation model (DEM) used, so the choice of DEM is critical. In Hawai`i, the best choice is not the most recent but is a 1980s-vintage 10-m DEM--more recent LIDAR and satellite radar DEM are referenced to the ellipsoid and include vegetation effects. On low-slope terrain, steepest

  14. Some Approaches to Modeling Diffuse Flow at Mid-Ocean Ridges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farough, A.; Lowell, R. P.; Craft, K.; Germanovich, L. N.

    2011-12-01

    To obtain a sound understanding of subsurface temperatures and the extent of the subsurface biosphere in young oceanic crust, one must understand the mechanisms of diffuse flow at oceanic spreading centers. Mathematical modeling of diffuse flow at oceanic spreading centers has received relatively little attention compared to high-temperature black smoker discharge, in part because the temperature and fluid flow data required to constrain the models are scarce. We review a number of different approaches to modelling diffuse flow: (1) The simplest method considers 1-D steady-state uniform upflow from below subject to a heat transfer boundary condition at the surface, which represents the effects of mixing of hydrothermal fluid with seawater. These models, in which the heat transfer coefficient and the velocity of the ascending fluid are constrained by observed diffuse flow vent temperature and heat flux, typically result in a steep temperature gradient near the seafloor and subsurface biological activity may be limited to the upper few cm of the crust. (2) A related method uses data on the partitioning of heat flux between focused and diffuse flow and chemical data from the focused and diffuse flow components in a two-limb single pass modeling approach to determine the fraction of high-temperature fluid that is incorporated in the diffuse flow. Using data available from EPR 950', the Main Endeavour Field, and ASHES vent field at Axial Volcano on the Juan de Fuca Ridge in conjunction with Mg as a passive tracer, we find that the mixing ratio of high temperature in diffuse flow is <10%. The high-temperature contribution to the diffuse heat flux remains large, however, and high-temperature vent fluid ultimately contributes ~ 90% of the total heat output from the vent field. In these models mixing between high-temperature fluid and seawater may occur over a considerable depth, and the subsurface biosphere may be ~ 100 m deep beneath diffuse flow sites. (3) Finally, in

  15. The moving boundary approach to modeling gravity-driven stable and unstable flow in soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brindt, Naaran; Wallach, Rony

    2016-04-01

    Many field and laboratory studies in the last 40 years have found that water flow in homogeneous soil profiles may occur in preferential flow pathways rather than in a laterally uniform wetting front, as expected from classical soil physics theory and expressed by the Richards equation. The water-content distribution within such gravity-driven fingers was found to be nonmonotonic due to water accumulation behind a sharp wetting front (denoted as saturation overshoot). The unstable flow was first related to soil coarseness. However, its appearance in water-repellent soils led the authors to hypothesize that gravity-driven unstable flow formation is triggered by a non-zero contact angle between water and soil particles. Despite its widespread occurrence, a macroscopic-type model describing the nonmonotonic water distribution and sharp wetting front is still lacking. The moving boundary approach, which divides the flow domain into two well-defined subdomains with a sharp change in fluid saturation between them, is suggested to replace the classical approach of solving the Richards equation for the entire flow domain. The upper subdomain consists of water and air, whose relationship varies with space and time following the imposed boundary condition at the soil surface as calculated by the Richards equation. The lower subdomain also consists of water and air, but their relationship remains constant following the predetermined initial condition. The moving boundary between the two subdomains is the sharp wetting front, whose location is part of the solution. As such, the problem is inherently nonlinear. The wetting front's movement is controlled by the dynamic water-entry pressure of the soil, which depends on soil wettability and the front's propagation rate. A lower soil wettability, which hinders the spontaneous invasion of dry pores and increases the water-entry pressure, induces a sharp wetting front and water accumulation behind it. The wetting front starts to

  16. Approaching a universal scaling relationship between fracture stiffness and fluid flow.

    PubMed

    Pyrak-Nolte, Laura J; Nolte, David D

    2016-01-01

    A goal of subsurface geophysical monitoring is the detection and characterization of fracture alterations that affect the hydraulic integrity of a site. Achievement of this goal requires a link between the mechanical and hydraulic properties of a fracture. Here we present a scaling relationship between fluid flow and fracture-specific stiffness that approaches universality. Fracture-specific stiffness is a mechanical property dependent on fracture geometry that can be monitored remotely using seismic techniques. A Monte Carlo numerical approach demonstrates that a scaling relationship exists between flow and stiffness for fractures with strongly correlated aperture distributions, and continues to hold for fractures deformed by applied stress and by chemical erosion as well. This new scaling relationship provides a foundation for simulating changes in fracture behaviour as a function of stress or depth in the Earth and will aid risk assessment of the hydraulic integrity of subsurface sites. PMID:26868649

  17. Approaching a universal scaling relationship between fracture stiffness and fluid flow

    PubMed Central

    Pyrak-Nolte, Laura J.; Nolte, David D.

    2016-01-01

    A goal of subsurface geophysical monitoring is the detection and characterization of fracture alterations that affect the hydraulic integrity of a site. Achievement of this goal requires a link between the mechanical and hydraulic properties of a fracture. Here we present a scaling relationship between fluid flow and fracture-specific stiffness that approaches universality. Fracture-specific stiffness is a mechanical property dependent on fracture geometry that can be monitored remotely using seismic techniques. A Monte Carlo numerical approach demonstrates that a scaling relationship exists between flow and stiffness for fractures with strongly correlated aperture distributions, and continues to hold for fractures deformed by applied stress and by chemical erosion as well. This new scaling relationship provides a foundation for simulating changes in fracture behaviour as a function of stress or depth in the Earth and will aid risk assessment of the hydraulic integrity of subsurface sites. PMID:26868649

  18. A simplified approach for the computation of steady two-phase flow in inverted siphons.

    PubMed

    Diogo, A Freire; Oliveira, Maria C

    2016-01-15

    Hydraulic, sanitary, and sulfide control conditions of inverted siphons, particularly in large wastewater systems, can be substantially improved by continuous air injection in the base of the inclined rising branch. This paper presents a simplified approach that was developed for the two-phase flow of the rising branch using the energy equation for a steady pipe flow, based on the average fluid fraction, observed slippage between phases, and isothermal assumption. As in a conventional siphon design, open channel steady uniform flow is assumed in inlet and outlet chambers, corresponding to the wastewater hydraulic characteristics in the upstream and downstream sewers, and the descending branch operates in steady uniform single-phase pipe flow. The proposed approach is tested and compared with data obtained in an experimental siphon setup with two plastic barrels of different diameters operating separately as in a single-barrel siphon. Although the formulations developed are very simple, the results show a good adjustment for the set of the parameters used and conditions tested and are promising mainly for sanitary siphons with relatively moderate heights of the ascending branch.

  19. A simplified approach for the computation of steady two-phase flow in inverted siphons.

    PubMed

    Diogo, A Freire; Oliveira, Maria C

    2016-01-15

    Hydraulic, sanitary, and sulfide control conditions of inverted siphons, particularly in large wastewater systems, can be substantially improved by continuous air injection in the base of the inclined rising branch. This paper presents a simplified approach that was developed for the two-phase flow of the rising branch using the energy equation for a steady pipe flow, based on the average fluid fraction, observed slippage between phases, and isothermal assumption. As in a conventional siphon design, open channel steady uniform flow is assumed in inlet and outlet chambers, corresponding to the wastewater hydraulic characteristics in the upstream and downstream sewers, and the descending branch operates in steady uniform single-phase pipe flow. The proposed approach is tested and compared with data obtained in an experimental siphon setup with two plastic barrels of different diameters operating separately as in a single-barrel siphon. Although the formulations developed are very simple, the results show a good adjustment for the set of the parameters used and conditions tested and are promising mainly for sanitary siphons with relatively moderate heights of the ascending branch. PMID:26517278

  20. A genetic algorithm-based approach to flexible flow-line scheduling with variable lot sizes.

    PubMed

    Lee, I; Sikora, R; Shaw, M J

    1997-01-01

    Genetic algorithms (GAs) have been used widely for such combinatorial optimization problems as the traveling salesman problem (TSP), the quadratic assignment problem (QAP), and job shop scheduling. In all of these problems there is usually a well defined representation which GA's use to solve the problem. We present a novel approach for solving two related problems-lot sizing and sequencing-concurrently using GAs. The essence of our approach lies in the concept of using a unified representation for the information about both the lot sizes and the sequence and enabling GAs to evolve the chromosome by replacing primitive genes with good building blocks. In addition, a simulated annealing procedure is incorporated to further improve the performance. We evaluate the performance of applying the above approach to flexible flow line scheduling with variable lot sizes for an actual manufacturing facility, comparing it to such alternative approaches as pair wise exchange improvement, tabu search, and simulated annealing procedures. The results show the efficacy of this approach for flexible flow line scheduling. PMID:18255838

  1. A genetic algorithm-based approach to flexible flow-line scheduling with variable lot sizes.

    PubMed

    Lee, I; Sikora, R; Shaw, M J

    1997-01-01

    Genetic algorithms (GAs) have been used widely for such combinatorial optimization problems as the traveling salesman problem (TSP), the quadratic assignment problem (QAP), and job shop scheduling. In all of these problems there is usually a well defined representation which GA's use to solve the problem. We present a novel approach for solving two related problems-lot sizing and sequencing-concurrently using GAs. The essence of our approach lies in the concept of using a unified representation for the information about both the lot sizes and the sequence and enabling GAs to evolve the chromosome by replacing primitive genes with good building blocks. In addition, a simulated annealing procedure is incorporated to further improve the performance. We evaluate the performance of applying the above approach to flexible flow line scheduling with variable lot sizes for an actual manufacturing facility, comparing it to such alternative approaches as pair wise exchange improvement, tabu search, and simulated annealing procedures. The results show the efficacy of this approach for flexible flow line scheduling.

  2. A new approach to high-speed flow measurements using constant voltage anemometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mangalam, S. M.; Sarma, G. R.; Kuppa, S.; Kubendran, L. R.

    1992-01-01

    The paper addresses the basic features of conventional instrumentation, such as the constant temperature (CTA) and the constant current (CCA) anemometers, their limitations, and describes a totally new approach to high-speed dynamic measurements using a constant voltage anemometer (CVA). The paper describes the design features of a newly developed CVA and compares preliminary results obtained with CVA and conventional anemometry in low- and high-speed flows.

  3. Advanced digital methods for blood flow flux analysis using µPIV approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurochkin, Maxim A.; Timoshina, Polina A.; Fedosov, Ivan V.; Tuchin, Valery V.

    2015-03-01

    A digital optical system focused on work with laboratory animals for intravital capillaroscopy has been developed. It implements the particle image velocimetry (PIV) based approach for measurements of red blood cells velocity in laboratory rat stomach capillaries. We propose a method of involuntary displacement compensation of the capillary network images. Image stabilization algorithm is based on correlation of feature tracking. The efficiency of designed image stabilization algorithm was experimentally demonstrated. The results of capillary blood flow analysis are demonstrated.

  4. A new approach for empirical runout prediction of alpine debris flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheidl, C.; Rickenmann, D.

    2009-04-01

    A new technique to forecast the runout of a debris flow event is introduced. First, processes of recorded, past torrential alpine events in Austria, Switzerland and Northern Italy are identified, using common classification techniques. Similarly to previous studies, we apply an empirical equation based on the planimetric area and volume to our dataset, and we compare it's the obtained mobility coefficients with published results based on other data. We present a new empirical approach to determine the mobility coefficient which is a key parameter to predict the runout behaviour of debris flows. It is based on geomorphologic catchment parameters. The predictive equation is implemented in a GIS based simulation program and combined with a simple flow routing algorithm, in order to determine the potential runout area covered by debris-flow deposits. The simulation uses the ARC-Objects environment of ESRI© and is adapted to run with high resolution (2.5m x 2.5 m grid) elevation models, generated from LiDAR data. The program called TopRunDF is tested with debris flow events of 1987 and 2005 in Switzerland for areas where LiDAR generated elevation models are available.

  5. Two-phase flow in complex geometries: A diffuse domain approach

    PubMed Central

    Aland, S.; Voigt, A.

    2011-01-01

    We present a new method for simulating two-phase flows in complex geometries, taking into account contact lines separating immiscible incompressible components. We combine the diffuse domain method for solving PDEs in complex geometries with the diffuse-interface (phase-field) method for simulating multiphase flows. In this approach, the complex geometry is described implicitly by introducing a new phase-field variable, which is a smooth approximation of the characteristic function of the complex domain. The fluid and component concentration equations are reformulated and solved in larger regular domain with the boundary conditions being implicitly modeled using source terms. The method is straightforward to implement using standard software packages; we use adaptive finite elements here. We present numerical examples demonstrating the effectiveness of the algorithm. We simulate multiphase flow in a driven cavity on an extended domain and find very good agreement with results obtained by solving the equations and boundary conditions in the original domain. We then consider successively more complex geometries and simulate a droplet sliding down a rippled ramp in 2D and 3D, a droplet flowing through a Y-junction in a microfluidic network and finally chaotic mixing in a droplet flowing through a winding, serpentine channel. The latter example actually incorporates two different diffuse domains: one describes the evolving droplet where mixing occurs while the other describes the channel. PMID:21918638

  6. Creating a Simple Single Computational Approach to Modeling Rarefied and Continuum Flow About Aerospace Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, David B.; Varghese, Philip L.

    1997-01-01

    We proposed to create a single computational code incorporating methods that can model both rarefied and continuum flow to enable the efficient simulation of flow about space craft and high altitude hypersonic aerospace vehicles. The code was to use a single grid structure that permits a smooth transition between the continuum and rarefied portions of the flow. Developing an appropriate computational boundary between the two regions represented a major challenge. The primary approach chosen involves coupling a four-speed Lattice Boltzmann model for the continuum flow with the DSMC method in the rarefied regime. We also explored the possibility of using a standard finite difference Navier Stokes solver for the continuum flow. With the resulting code we will ultimately investigate three-dimensional plume impingement effects, a subject of critical importance to NASA and related to the work of Drs. Forrest Lumpkin, Steve Fitzgerald and Jay Le Beau at Johnson Space Center. Below is a brief background on the project and a summary of the results as of the end of the grant.

  7. A network theory approach for a better understanding of overland flow connectivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masselink, Rens; Heckmann, Tobias; Temme, Arnaud; Anders, Niels; Keesstra, Saskia

    2016-04-01

    Hydrological connectivity describes the physical coupling, or linkages of different elements within a landscape regarding (sub)surface flows. A firm understanding of hydrological connectivity is important for catchment management applications, for e.g. habitat and species protection, and for flood resistance and resilience improvement. Thinking about (geomorphological) systems as networks can lead to new insights, which has been recognised within the scientific community as well, seeing the recent increase in the use of network (graph) theory within the geosciences. Network theory supports the analysis and understanding of complex systems by providing data structures for modelling objects and their linkages, and a versatile toolbox to quantitatively appraise network structure and properties. The objective of this study was to characterise overland flow connectivity dynamics on hillslopes in a humid sub-Mediterranean environment by using a combination of high-resolution digital-terrain models, overland flow sensors and a network approach. Results showed that there are significant differences between overland flow on agricultural areas and semi-natural shrubs areas. Positive correlations between connectivity and precipitation characteristics were found, while negative correlations between connectivity and soil moisture were found, probably due to soil water repellency. The combination of a structural network to determine potential connectivity with dynamic networks to determine the actual connectivity proved a powerful tool in analysing overland flow connectivity.

  8. Astrium Approach For Plume Flow And Impingement Of 10 N Bipropellant Thruster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theroude, Christophe; Scremin, G.; Wartelski, Matias

    2011-05-01

    Plume impingement on spacecraft surfaces due to chemical propulsion is a major concern during satellite operations. Indeed, thrusters plume induces disturbing forces and torques, contamination as well as thermal fluxes on sensitive surfaces. These effects, that have to be accurately predicted, influence the satellite design: thrusters orientation, MLI design, instruments protections, etc. In order to implement an efficient process of analysis, Astrium uses a two steps approach: first the thruster undisturbed flow field is computed, then the impingement on spacecraft surfaces is evaluated. In this paper, Plumflow, the Astrium Satellites software for undisturbed thrusters’ plume computation, is presented. This software is made of several modules in order to accurately compute the flow field in the different parts of the plume. A first module computes the chemistry in the chamber, then Navier-Stokes equations are solved inside the nozzle where the flow is continuous. After that a DSMC code is used for the transitional regime near the thruster lip and finally an hybrid TPMC/source-flow method computes the free molecular far flow field. The studied case is the Astrium GmbH 10 N bipropellant thruster. Some comparisons are presented between Plumflow and Professor G.A. Bird DSMC software DS2V and with DLR experimental data. These comparisons have shown very satisfactory results. Finally, aiming at computing plume impingement, the plume flow field generated with Plumflow has been interfaced with Professor G.A. Bird 3D DSMC software DS3V. The plume impingement simulation is performed by introducing the undisturbed flow field at a boundary of DS3V computational domain. It allows us to evaluate thermal flux distribution due to Astrium 10 N thruster on a plate adjacent to the thruster and to compare with the Astrium plume impingement software.

  9. Integrated approach to model decomposed flow hydrograph using artificial neural network and conceptual techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Ashu; Srinivasulu, Sanaga

    2006-02-01

    This paper presents the findings of a study aimed at decomposing a flow hydrograph into different segments based on physical concepts in a catchment, and modelling different segments using different technique viz. conceptual and artificial neural networks (ANNs). An integrated modelling framework is proposed capable of modelling infiltration, base flow, evapotranspiration, soil moisture accounting, and certain segments of the decomposed flow hydrograph using conceptual techniques and the complex, non-linear, and dynamic rainfall-runoff process using ANN technique. Specifically, five different multi-layer perceptron (MLP) and two self-organizing map (SOM) models have been developed. The rainfall and streamflow data derived from the Kentucky River catchment were employed to test the proposed methodology and develop all the models. The performance of all the models was evaluated using seven different standard statistical measures. The results obtained in this study indicate that (a) the rainfall-runoff relationship in a large catchment consists of at least three or four different mappings corresponding to different dynamics of the underlying physical processes, (b) an integrated approach that models the different segments of the decomposed flow hydrograph using different techniques is better than a single ANN in modelling the complex, dynamic, non-linear, and fragmented rainfall runoff process, (c) a simple model based on the concept of flow recession is better than an ANN to model the falling limb of a flow hydrograph, and (d) decomposing a flow hydrograph into the different segments corresponding to the different dynamics based on the physical concepts is better than using the soft decomposition employed using SOM.

  10. A Stochastic Differential Equation Approach To Multiphase Flow In Porous Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dean, D.; Russell, T.

    2003-12-01

    The motivation for using stochastic differential equations in multiphase flow systems stems from our work in developing an upscaling methodology for single phase flow. The long term goals of this project include: I. Extending this work to a nonlinear upscaling methodology II. Developing a macro-scale stochastic theory of multiphase flow and transport that accounts for micro-scale heterogeneities and interfaces. In this talk, we present a stochastic differential equation approach to multiphase flow, a typical example of which is flow in the unsaturated domain. Specifically, a two phase problem is studied which consists of a wetting phase and a non-wetting phase. The approach given results in a nonlinear stochastic differential equation describing the position of the non-wetting phase fluid particle. Our fundamental assumption is that the flow of fluid particles is described by a stochastic process and that the positions of the fluid particles over time are governed by the law of the process. It is this law which we seek to determine. The nonlinearity in the stochastic differential equation arises because both the drift and diffusion coefficients depend on the volumetric fraction of the phase which in turn depends on the position of the fluid particles in the experimental domain. The concept of a fluid particle is central to the development of the model described in this talk. Expressions for both saturation and volumetric fraction are developed using the fluid particle concept. Darcy's law and the continuity equation are then used to derive a Fokker-Planck equation using these expressions. The Ito calculus is then applied to derive a stochastic differential equation for the non-wetting phase. This equation has both drift and diffusion terms which depend on the volumetric fraction of the non-wetting phase. Standard stochastic theories based on the Ito calculus and the Wiener process and the equivalent Fokker-Planck PDE's are typically used to model dispersion

  11. A landscape lake flow pattern design approach based on automated CFD simulation and parallel multiple objective optimization.

    PubMed

    Guo, Hao; Tian, Yimei; Shen, Hailiang; Wang, Yi; Kang, Mengxin

    2016-01-01

    A design approach for determining the optimal flow pattern in a landscape lake is proposed based on FLUENT simulation, multiple objective optimization, and parallel computing. This paper formulates the design into a multi-objective optimization problem, with lake circulation effects and operation cost as two objectives, and solves the optimization problem with non-dominated sorting genetic algorithm II. The lake flow pattern is modelled in FLUENT. The parallelization aims at multiple FLUENT instance runs, which is different from the FLUENT internal parallel solver. This approach: (1) proposes lake flow pattern metrics, i.e. weighted average water flow velocity, water volume percentage of low flow velocity, and variance of flow velocity, (2) defines user defined functions for boundary setting, objective and constraints calculation, and (3) parallels the execution of multiple FLUENT instances runs to significantly reduce the optimization wall-clock time. The proposed approach is demonstrated through a case study for Meijiang Lake in Tianjin, China.

  12. A landscape lake flow pattern design approach based on automated CFD simulation and parallel multiple objective optimization.

    PubMed

    Guo, Hao; Tian, Yimei; Shen, Hailiang; Wang, Yi; Kang, Mengxin

    2016-01-01

    A design approach for determining the optimal flow pattern in a landscape lake is proposed based on FLUENT simulation, multiple objective optimization, and parallel computing. This paper formulates the design into a multi-objective optimization problem, with lake circulation effects and operation cost as two objectives, and solves the optimization problem with non-dominated sorting genetic algorithm II. The lake flow pattern is modelled in FLUENT. The parallelization aims at multiple FLUENT instance runs, which is different from the FLUENT internal parallel solver. This approach: (1) proposes lake flow pattern metrics, i.e. weighted average water flow velocity, water volume percentage of low flow velocity, and variance of flow velocity, (2) defines user defined functions for boundary setting, objective and constraints calculation, and (3) parallels the execution of multiple FLUENT instances runs to significantly reduce the optimization wall-clock time. The proposed approach is demonstrated through a case study for Meijiang Lake in Tianjin, China. PMID:27642835

  13. On the use of the calibration-based approach for debris-flow forward-analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pirulli, M.

    2010-05-01

    In the present paper the problem of modeling the propagation of potential debris flows is tackled resorting to a numerical approach. In particular, numerical analyses are carried out with the RASH3D code, based on a single-phase depth-averaged continuum mechanics approach. Since each numerical analysis requires the selection of a rheology and the setting of the rheological input parameters, a calibration-based approach, where the rheological parameters are constrained by systematic adjustment during trial-and-error back-analysis of full-scale events, has been assumed. The back-analysis of a 1000 m3 debris flow, located at Tate's Cairn, Hong Kong, and the forward-analysis of a 10 000 m3 potential debris flow, located in the same basin have been used to investigate the transferability of back-calculated rheological parameters from one case to another. Three different rheologies have been tested: Frictional, Voellmy and Quadratic. From obtained results it emerges that 1) the back-calculation of a past event with different rheologies can help in selecting the rheology that better reproduces the runout of the analysed event and, on the basis of that selection, can give some indication about the dynamics of the investigated flow, 2) the use of back-calculated parameters for forward purposes requires that past and potential events have similar characteristics, some of which are a function of the assumed rheology. Among tested rheologies, it is observed that the Quadratic rheology is more influenced by volume size than Frictional and Voellmy rheologies and consequently its application requires that events are also similar in volume.

  14. Improving power plant efficiency and safety through better knowledge of flow-rates: The EDF approach

    SciTech Connect

    Piguet, M.

    1998-07-01

    The flow-rate is an important parameter in power plant operation for both performance and safety purposes. As an example, in nuclear and fossil power plants, the uncertainty concerning thermal and electrical powers is directly connected to the uncertainty of the feedwater flow. In real conditions, the flow-rate is often incorrectly determined due to various phenomena among which are incorrect installation conditions, wrong calibrations and drift, erosion or fouling of the flowmeters. These phenomena may lead to systematic errors which can represent several percents of the measured value and which can induce a critical loss of profit. This paper presents the strategy and means of EDF's R and D Division to improve actual accuracy of flowmeters used in power plants. The experimental approach has always been an efficient way to investigate and make a diagnosis of real situations. The EVEREST loop is a dedicated rig within EDF for the study of liquid flow metering problems. It enables to calibrate industrial flowmeters, evaluate prototypes and study the specific installation conditions of flowmeters. It is often noticed that flowmeters do not respect the standards in terms of straight lengths upstream from the meter. A practical example (1,300 MW unit feedwater flow) illustrates the possibility the EVEREST loop offers to reproduce the geometry of the hydraulic circuit and flow conditions. The impact of the actual installation conditions on the flowmeter accuracy can be thus determined and the flowmeter can be possibly recalibrated in order to reduce or correct a systematic bias. The EDF tool is presented with examples of accuracy and experimental and numerical modeling.

  15. A scenario neutral approach to assess low flow sensitivity to climate change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sauquet, Eric; Prudhomme, Christel

    2015-04-01

    Most impact studies of climate change on river flow regime are performed following top-down approaches, where changes in hydrological characteristics are obtained from rainfall-runoff models forced by downscaled projections provided by GCMs. However, such approaches are not always considered robust enough to bridge the gap between climate research and stake holders needs to develop relevant adaptation strategy (Wilby et al., 2014). Alternatively, 'bottom-up' approaches can be applied to climate change impact studies on water resources to assess the intrinsic vulnerability of the catchments and ultimately help to prioritize adaptation actions for areas highly sensitive to small deviations from the present-day climate conditions. A general framework combining the scenario-neutral methodology developed by Prudhomme et al. (2010) and climate elasticity analyses (Sankarasubramanian et al., 2001) is presented and applied to measure the vulnerability of low flows and droughts on a large dataset of more than 400 French gauged basins. The different steps involved in the suggested framework are: - Calibration of the GR5J rainfall runoff model (Pushpalatha et al., 2011) against observations, - Identification of the main climate factors influencing low flows, - Definition of the sensitivity domain for precipitation (P), temperature (T) and potential evapotranspiration (PE) scenarios consistent with most recent climate change projections, - Derivation of the response surface describing changes in low flow and drought regime in terms of severity, duration and seasonality (Catalogne, 2012), - Uncertainty assessment. Results are the basis for a classification of river basins according to their sensitivity at national scale and for discussions on adaptation requirements with stakeholders. Catalogne C (2012) Amélioration des méthodes de prédétermination des débits de référence d'étiage en sites peu ou pas jaugés. PHD thesis, Université Joseph Fourier, Grenoble, 285 pp

  16. Eccentricity fluctuations in an integrated hybrid approach: Influence on elliptic flow

    SciTech Connect

    Petersen, Hannah; Bleicher, Marcus

    2010-04-15

    The effects of initial state fluctuations on elliptic flow are investigated within a (3+1)-dimensional Boltzmann+hydrodynamics transport approach. The spatial eccentricity (epsilon{sub RP} and epsilon{sub part}) is calculated for initial conditions generated by a hadronic transport approach (ultrarelativistic quantum molecular dynamics). Elliptic flow results as a function of impact parameter, beam energy, and transverse momentum for two different equations of state and for averaged initial conditions or a full event-by-event setup are presented. These investigations allow the conclusion that in mid-central (b=5-9 fm) heavy-ion collisions the final elliptic flow is independent of the initial state fluctuations and the equation of state. Furthermore, it is demonstrated that most of the v{sub 2} is built up during the hydrodynamic stage of the evolution. Therefore, the use of averaged initial profiles does not contribute to the uncertainties of the extraction of transport properties of hot and dense QCD matter based on viscous hydrodynamic calculations.

  17. Review of numerical models of cavitating flows with the use of the homogeneous approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niedźwiedzka, Agnieszka; Schnerr, Günter H.; Sobieski, Wojciech

    2016-06-01

    The focus of research works on cavitation has changed since the 1960s; the behaviour of a single bubble is no more the area of interest for most scientists. Its place was taken by the cavitating flow considered as a whole. Many numerical models of cavitating flows came into being within the space of the last fifty years. They can be divided into two groups: multi-fluid and homogeneous (i.e., single-fluid) models. The group of homogenous models contains two subgroups: models based on transport equation and pressure based models. Several works tried to order particular approaches and presented short reviews of selected studies. However, these classifications are too rough to be treated as sufficiently accurate. The aim of this paper is to present the development paths of numerical investigations of cavitating flows with the use of homogeneous approach in order of publication year and with relatively detailed description. Each of the presented model is accompanied by examples of the application area. This review focuses not only on the list of the most significant existing models to predict sheet and cloud cavitation, but also on presenting their advantages and disadvantages. Moreover, it shows the reasons which inspired present authors to look for new ways of more accurate numerical predictions and dimensions of cavitation. The article includes also the division of source terms of presented models based on the transport equation with the use of standardized symbols.

  18. Hydrologic and geochemical approaches for determining ground-water flow components

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hjalmarson, H.W.; Robertson, F.N.

    1991-01-01

    Lyman Lake is an irrigation-storage reservoir on the Little Colorado River near St. Johns, Arizona. The main sources of water for the lake are streamflow in the Little Colorado River and ground-water inflow from the underlying Coconino aquifer. Two approaches, a hydrologic analysis and a geochemical analysis, were used to compute the quantity of ground-water flow to and from Lyman Lake. Hydrologic data used to calculate a water budget were precipitation on the lake, evaporation from the lake, transpiration from dense vegetation, seepage through the dam, streamflow in and out of the lake, and changes in lake storage. Geochemical data used to calculate the ground-water flow components were major ions, trace elements, and the stable isotopes of hydrogen and oxygen. During the study, the potentiometric level of the Coconino aquifer was above the lake level at the upstream end of the lake and below the lake level at the downstream end. Hydrologic and geochemical data indicate that about 10 percent and 8 percent, respectively, of the water in the lake is ground-water inflow and that about 35 percent of the water in the Little Colorado River 6 miles downgradient from the lake near Salado Springs is ground water. These independent estimates of ground-water flow derived from each approach are in agreement and support a conceptual model of the water budget.

  19. An Aerial-Image Dense Matching Approach Based on Optical Flow Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Wei; Chen, Shiyu; Zhang, Yong; Gong, Jianya; Shibasaki, Ryosuke

    2016-06-01

    Dense matching plays an important role in many fields, such as DEM (digital evaluation model) producing, robot navigation and 3D environment reconstruction. Traditional approaches may meet the demand of accuracy. But the calculation time and out puts density is hardly be accepted. Focus on the matching efficiency and complex terrain surface matching feasibility an aerial image dense matching method based on optical flow field is proposed in this paper. First, some high accurate and uniformed control points are extracted by using the feature based matching method. Then the optical flow is calculated by using these control points, so as to determine the similar region between two images. Second, the optical flow field is interpolated by using the multi-level B-spline interpolation in the similar region and accomplished the pixel by pixel coarse matching. Final, the results related to the coarse matching refinement based on the combined constraint, which recognizes the same points between images. The experimental results have shown that our method can achieve per-pixel dense matching points, the matching accuracy achieves sub-pixel level, and fully meet the three-dimensional reconstruction and automatic generation of DSM-intensive matching's requirements. The comparison experiments demonstrated that our approach's matching efficiency is higher than semi-global matching (SGM) and Patch-based multi-view stereo matching (PMVS) which verifies the feasibility and effectiveness of the algorithm.

  20. Molecule-based approach for computing chemical-reaction rates in upper atmosphere hypersonic flows.

    SciTech Connect

    Gallis, Michail A.; Bond, Ryan Bomar; Torczynski, John Robert

    2009-08-01

    This report summarizes the work completed during FY2009 for the LDRD project 09-1332 'Molecule-Based Approach for Computing Chemical-Reaction Rates in Upper-Atmosphere Hypersonic Flows'. The goal of this project was to apply a recently proposed approach for the Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method to calculate chemical-reaction rates for high-temperature atmospheric species. The new DSMC model reproduces measured equilibrium reaction rates without using any macroscopic reaction-rate information. Since it uses only molecular properties, the new model is inherently able to predict reaction rates for arbitrary nonequilibrium conditions. DSMC non-equilibrium reaction rates are compared to Park's phenomenological non-equilibrium reaction-rate model, the predominant model for hypersonic-flow-field calculations. For near-equilibrium conditions, Park's model is in good agreement with the DSMC-calculated reaction rates. For far-from-equilibrium conditions, corresponding to a typical shock layer, the difference between the two models can exceed 10 orders of magnitude. The DSMC predictions are also found to be in very good agreement with measured and calculated non-equilibrium reaction rates. Extensions of the model to reactions typically found in combustion flows and ionizing reactions are also found to be in very good agreement with available measurements, offering strong evidence that this is a viable and reliable technique to predict chemical reaction rates.

  1. An implicit and adaptive nonlinear frequency domain approach for periodic viscous flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosahebi, A.; Nadarajah, S.

    2014-12-01

    An implicit nonlinear Lower-Upper symmetric Gauss-Seidel (LU-SGS) solver has been extended to the adaptive Nonlinear Frequency Domain method (adaptive NLFD) for periodic viscous flows. The discretized equations are linearized in both spatial and temporal directions, yielding an innovative segregate approach, where the effects of the neighboring cells are transferred to the right-hand-side and are updated iteratively. This property of the solver is aligned with the adaptive NLFD concept, in which different cells have different number of modes; hence, should be treated individually. The segregate analysis of the modal equations prevents assembling and inversion of a large left-hand-side matrix, when high number of modes are involved. This is an important characteristic for a selected flow solver of the adaptive NLFD method, where a high modal content may be required in highly unsteady parts of the flow field. The implicit nonlinear LU-SGS solver has demonstrated to be both robust and computationally efficient as the number of modes is increased. The developed solver is thoroughly validated for the laminar vortex shedding behind a stationary cylinder, high angle of attack NACA0012 airfoil, and a plunging NACA0012 airfoil. An order of magnitude improvement in the computational time is observed through the developed implicit approach over the classical modified 5-stage Runge-Kutta method.

  2. High Detailed Debris Flows Hazard Maps by a Cellular Automata Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lupiano, V.; Lucà, F.; Robustelli, G.; Rongo, R.; D'Ambrosio, D.; Spataro, W.; Avolio, M. V.

    2012-04-01

    The individuation of areas that are more likely to be interested by new debris flows in regions that are particularly exposed to such kind of phenomena is of fundamental relevance for mitigating possible consequences, both in terms of loss of human lives and material properties. Here we show the adaption of a recent methodology, already successfully applied to lava flows, for defining flexible high-detailed and reliable hazard maps. The methodology relies on both an adequate knowledge of the study area, assessed by an accurate analysis of its past behavior, together with a reliable numerical model for simulating debris flows on present topographic data (the Cellular Automata model SCIDDICA, in the present case). Furthermore, High Performance Parallel Computing is employed for increasing computational efficiency, due to the great number of simulations of hypothetical events that are required for characterizing the susceptibility to flow invasion of the study area. The application of the presented methodology to the case of Gragnano (Italy) pointed out the goodness of the proposed approach, suggesting its appropriateness for land use planning and Civil Defense applications.

  3. An integrated approach to the study of catastrophic debris-flows: geological hazard and human influence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Ventisette, C.; Garfagnoli, F.; Ciampalini, A.; Battistini, A.; Gigli, G.; Moretti, S.; Casagli, N.

    2012-09-01

    On 1 October 2009, a prolonged and intense rainstorm triggered hundreds of landslides (predominantly debris flows) in an area of about 50 km2 in the north-eastern sector of Sicily (Italy). Debris flows swept the highest parts of many villages and passed over the SS114 state highway and the Messina-Catania railway, causing more than 30 fatalities. This region has a high relief, due to recent uplift. The peculiar geological and geomorphological framework represents one of the most common predisposing causes of rainstorm-triggered debris flows. This paper deals with the geological and hydro-geomorphological studies performed as a part of the post-disaster activities operated in collaboration with Civil Protection Authority, with the aim at examining landslides effects and mechanisms. The data were elaborated into a GIS platform, to evaluate the influence of urbanisation on the drainage pattern, and were correlated with the lithological and structural framework of the area. Our study points at the evaluation of the volume involved, the detection of triggering mechanisms and the precise reconstruction of the influence of urbanisation as fundamental tools for understanding the dynamics of catastrophic landslides. This kind of analysis, including all the desirable approaches for the correct management of debris flow should be the starting point for robust urban planning.

  4. Application of the mobility power flow approach to structural response from distributed loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuschieri, J. M.

    1988-01-01

    The problem of the vibration power flow through coupled substructures when one of the substructures is subjected to a distributed load is addressed. In all the work performed thus far, point force excitation was considered. However, in the case of the excitation of an aircraft fuselage, distributed loading on the whole surface of a panel can be as important as the excitation from directly applied forces at defined locations on the structures. Thus using a mobility power flow approach, expressions are developed for the transmission of vibrational power between two coupled plate substructures in an L configuration, with one of the surfaces of one of the plate substructures being subjected to a distributed load. The types of distributed loads that are considered are a force load with an arbitrary function in space and a distributed load similar to that from acoustic excitation.

  5. Numerical solution of transonic wing flows using an Euler/Navier-Stokes zonal approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holst, T. L.; Gundy, K. L.; Thomas, S. D.; Chaderjian, N. M.; Flores, J.

    1985-01-01

    Transonic flow fields about wing geometries are computed using an Euler/Navier-Stokes approach in which the flow field is divided into several zones. The grid zones immediately adjacent to the wing surface are suitably clustered and solved with the Navier-Stokes equations. Grid zones removed from the wing are less finely clustered and are solved with the Euler equations. Wind tunnel wall effects are easily and accurately modeled with the new grid-zoning algorithm because the wind tunnel grid is constructed as an exact subset of the corresponding free-air grid. Solutions are obtained that are in good agreement with experiment, including cases with significant wind tunnel wall effects and shock-induced separation on the upper wing surface.

  6. Emergency department overcrowding and long wait times: taking a corporate approach to improving patient flow.

    PubMed

    Bandiera, Glen; Gaunt, Karen; Sinclair, Douglas; Trafford, Anne

    2014-01-01

    Emergency department (ED) overcrowding and long wait times are major concerns in health systems the world over. Many ED-focused innovations--such as revising staff mix, improving internal processes and exploiting decision-support software--have been implemented to address these complex problems, often with limited success. Beginning in 2008, St. Michael's Hospital in Toronto, which had some of the most challenging ED overcrowding and longest wait times in Ontario, has charted a different course. By taking an organization-wide corporate approach to the challenge of patient flow throughout the hospital, St. Michael's has significantly improved key ED flow metrics for both its admitted and non-admitted patients. PMID:25906463

  7. A hybrid least squares support vector machines and GMDH approach for river flow forecasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samsudin, R.; Saad, P.; Shabri, A.

    2010-06-01

    This paper proposes a novel hybrid forecasting model, which combines the group method of data handling (GMDH) and the least squares support vector machine (LSSVM), known as GLSSVM. The GMDH is used to determine the useful input variables for LSSVM model and the LSSVM model which works as time series forecasting. In this study the application of GLSSVM for monthly river flow forecasting of Selangor and Bernam River are investigated. The results of the proposed GLSSVM approach are compared with the conventional artificial neural network (ANN) models, Autoregressive Integrated Moving Average (ARIMA) model, GMDH and LSSVM models using the long term observations of monthly river flow discharge. The standard statistical, the root mean square error (RMSE) and coefficient of correlation (R) are employed to evaluate the performance of various models developed. Experiment result indicates that the hybrid model was powerful tools to model discharge time series and can be applied successfully in complex hydrological modeling.

  8. Exact Solutions for Stokes' Flow of a Non-Newtonian Nanofluid Model: A Lie Similarity Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aziz, Taha; Aziz, A.; Khalique, C. M.

    2016-07-01

    The fully developed time-dependent flow of an incompressible, thermodynamically compatible non-Newtonian third-grade nanofluid is investigated. The classical Stokes model is considered in which the flow is generated due to the motion of the plate in its own plane with an impulsive velocity. The Lie symmetry approach is utilised to convert the governing nonlinear partial differential equation into different linear and nonlinear ordinary differential equations. The reduced ordinary differential equations are then solved by using the compatibility and generalised group method. Exact solutions for the model equation are deduced in the form of closed-form exponential functions which are not available in the literature before. In addition, we also derived the conservation laws associated with the governing model. Finally, the physical features of the pertinent parameters are discussed in detail through several graphs.

  9. Analysis of dense particulate flow dynamics using a Euler-Lagrange approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desjardins, Olivier; Pepiot, Perrine

    2009-11-01

    Thermochemical conversion of biomass to biofuels relies heavily on dense particulate flows to enhance heat and mass transfers. While CFD tools can provide very valuable insights on reactor design and optimization, accurate simulations of these flows remain extremely challenging due to the complex coupling between the gas and solid phases. In this work, Lagrangian particle tracking has been implemented in the arbitrarily high order parallel LES/DNS code NGA [Desjardins et al., JCP, 2008]. Collisions are handled using a soft-sphere model, while a combined least squares/mollification approach is adopted to accurately transfer data between the Lagrangian particles and the Eulerian gas phase mesh, regardless of the particle diameter to mesh size ratio. The energy conservation properties of the numerical scheme are assessed and a detailed statistical analysis of the dynamics of a periodic fluidized bed with a uniform velocity inlet is conducted.

  10. Approaches to large scale unsaturated flow in heterogeneous, stratified, and fractured geologic media

    SciTech Connect

    Ababou, R.

    1991-08-01

    This report develops a broad review and assessment of quantitative modeling approaches and data requirements for large-scale subsurface flow in radioactive waste geologic repository. The data review includes discussions of controlled field experiments, existing contamination sites, and site-specific hydrogeologic conditions at Yucca Mountain. Local-scale constitutive models for the unsaturated hydrodynamic properties of geologic media are analyzed, with particular emphasis on the effect of structural characteristics of the medium. The report further reviews and analyzes large-scale hydrogeologic spatial variability from aquifer data, unsaturated soil data, and fracture network data gathered from the literature. Finally, various modeling strategies toward large-scale flow simulations are assessed, including direct high-resolution simulation, and coarse-scale simulation based on auxiliary hydrodynamic models such as single equivalent continuum and dual-porosity continuum. The roles of anisotropy, fracturing, and broad-band spatial variability are emphasized. 252 refs.

  11. Strongly coupled partitioned approach for fluid structure interaction in free surface flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Facci, Andrea Luigi; Ubertini, Stefano

    2016-06-01

    In this paper we describe and validate a methodology for the numerical simulation of the fluid structure interaction in free surface flows. Specifically, this study concentrates on the vertical impact of a rigid body on the water surface, (i.e. on the hull slamming problem). The fluid flow is modeled through the volume of fluid methodology, and the structure dynamics is described by the Newton's second law. An iterative algorithm guarantees the tight coupling between the fluid and solid solvers, allowing the simulations of lightweight (i.e. buoyant) structures. The methodology is validated comparing numerical results to experimental data on the free fall of different rigid wedges. The correspondence between numerical results and independent experimental findings from literature evidences the reliability and the accuracy of the proposed approach.

  12. Alignment of direct detection device micrographs using a robust Optical Flow approach.

    PubMed

    Abrishami, Vahid; Vargas, Javier; Li, Xueming; Cheng, Yifan; Marabini, Roberto; Sorzano, Carlos Óscar Sánchez; Carazo, José María

    2015-03-01

    The introduction of direct detection devices in cryo-EM has shown that specimens present beam-induced motion (BIM). Consequently, in this work, we develop a BIM correction method at the image level, resulting in an integrated image in which the in-plane BIM blurring is compensated prior to particle picking. The methodology is based on a robust Optical Flow (OF) approach that can efficiently correct for local movements in a rapid manner. The OF works particularly well if the BIM pattern presents a substantial degree of local movements, which occurs in our data sets for Falcon II data. However, for those cases in which the BIM pattern corresponds to global movements, we have found it advantageous to first run a global motion correction approach and to subsequently apply OF. Additionally, spatial analysis of the Optical Flow allows for quantitative analysis of the BIM pattern. The software that incorporates the new approach is available in XMIPP (http://xmipp.cnb.csic.es).

  13. Computation of transonic separated wing flows using an Euler/Navier-Stokes zonal approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaynak, Uenver; Holst, Terry L.; Cantwell, Brian J.

    1986-01-01

    A computer program called Transonic Navier Stokes (TNS) has been developed which solves the Euler/Navier-Stokes equations around wings using a zonal grid approach. In the present zonal scheme, the physical domain of interest is divided into several subdomains called zones and the governing equations are solved interactively. The advantages of the Zonal Grid approach are as follows: (1) the grid for any subdomain can be generated easily; (2) grids can be, in a sense, adapted to the solution; (3) different equation sets can be used in different zones; and, (4) this approach allows for a convenient data base organization scheme. Using this code, separated flows on a NACA 0012 section wing and on the NASA Ames WING C have been computed. First, the effects of turbulence and artificial dissipation models incorporated into the code are assessed by comparing the TNS results with other CFD codes and experiments. Then a series of flow cases is described where data are available. The computed results, including cases with shock-induced separation, are in good agreement with experimental data. Finally, some futuristic cases are presented to demonstrate the abilities of the code for massively separated cases which do not have experimental data.

  14. Thick plate bending wave transmission using a mobility power flow approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccollum, M. D.; Cuschieri, J. M.

    1990-01-01

    The mobility power flow (MPF) approach is used in this paper to describe the flexural behavior of an L-shaped plate structure consisting of thick plates with rotary inertia and shear deformation effects included in the analysis. The introduction of the thick plate effects significantly increases the complexity of the structural mobility functions used in the definitions of the power flow terms; however, because of the substructuring that is used in the MPF approach, the complexity of the problem is significantly reduced as compared to solving for the global structure. Additionally, with the MPF approach the modal behavior is described. The MPF analysis of the L-shaped plate is performed for the case of point force excitation on one plate, with the two plates being identical in both size and thickness. The results of this analysis are compared to results from the finite-element analysis (FEA) and the statistical energy analysis (SEA) and show very good agreement in the low- and high-frequency regimes, respectively.

  15. Experimental and modeling study of unsaturated solute flow in soils: from classical to discrete approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerke, K.

    2012-04-01

    Most dye staining experiments in natural soils result in highly heterogeneous flow patterns which are usually explained with presence of preferential flow paths or different kinds of flow instabilities. It is quite logic that soil structure is one of the main factors affecting infiltrations regimes, however the degree of flow stochasticity is not studied enough. In this contribution a substantial amount of large scale (2-4 m lateral excavations) field experiment data is considered (including forested hillslopes and agricultural fields) with special attention to sprinkling of two different staining substances with different dyeing mechanisms (common dye is visible both in adsorbed and in solution states; fluorescent dye - only in solution). The latter method allows an estimation of the flow stability (stochasticity). Most staining field experiments are supported by undisturbed sample collections (laboratory measurements for hydraulic conductivity, water retention curves, X-ray microtomography scans, grain size distributions, etc.). Preliminary results strongly support the evidence of stability of flow under similar precipitation and moisture conditions. Infiltration also correlated with soil structure and microproperties. Numerical modeling using classical approach (single-porosity coupled Richard's and advection-dispersion equations, random hydraulic properties based on log-normal experimentally obtained distribution) fails to describe experimentally obtained staining patterns. Multi-porosity models may provide better tools to account for different soil heterogeneities, but their parameters can not be obtained experimentally. Small scale solutions using pore-network or lattice-Botzmann methods based on microtomography scans are accurate, but computationally expensive (volumes around tens of cm3). Based on field observations a simple cellular automata approach to model staining patterns is developed and tested on experimental data. Our results are much better then

  16. A three-pillar approach to assessing climate impacts on low flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laaha, Gregor; Parajka, Juraj; Viglione, Alberto; Koffler, Daniel; Haslinger, Klaus; Schöner, Wolfgang; Zehetgruber, Judith; Blöschl, Günter

    2016-09-01

    The objective of this paper is to present a framework for assessing climate impacts on future low flows that combines different sources of information, termed pillars. To illustrate the framework three pillars are chosen: (a) extrapolation of observed low-flow trends into the future, (b) rainfall-runoff projections based on climate scenarios and (c) extrapolation of changing stochastic rainfall characteristics into the future combined with rainfall-runoff modelling. Alternative pillars could be included in the overall framework. The three pillars are combined by expert judgement based on a synoptic view of data, model outputs and process reasoning. The consistency/inconsistency between the pillars is considered an indicator of the certainty/uncertainty of the projections. The viability of the framework is illustrated for four example catchments from Austria that represent typical climate conditions in central Europe. In the Alpine region where winter low flows dominate, trend projections and climate scenarios yield consistently increasing low flows, although of different magnitudes. In the region north of the Alps, consistently small changes are projected by all methods. In the regions in the south and south-east, more pronounced and mostly decreasing trends are projected but there is disagreement in the magnitudes of the projected changes. The process reasons for the consistencies/inconsistencies are discussed. For an Alpine region such as Austria the key to understanding low flows is whether they are controlled by freezing and snowmelt processes, or by the summer moisture deficit associated with evaporation. It is argued that the three-pillar approach offers a systematic framework of combining different sources of information aimed at more robust projections than that obtained from each pillar alone.

  17. Quantification of non-stormwater flow entries into storm drains using a water balance approach.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zuxin; Yin, Hailong; Li, Huaizheng

    2014-07-15

    To make decisions about correcting illicit or inappropriate connections to storm drains, quantification of non-stormwater entries into storm drains was performed using a water flow balance approach, based on data analysis from 2008 to 2011 in a separate storm drainage system in a Shanghai downtown area of 374 ha. The study revealed severe sewage connections to storm drains; meanwhile, misconnections between surface water and storm drains were found to drive frequent non-stormwater pumping discharges at the outfall, producing a much larger volume of outfall flows in a short period. This paper presented a methodology to estimate quantities of inappropriate sewage flow, groundwater infiltration and river water backflow into the storm drains. It was concluded that inappropriate sewage discharge and groundwater seepage into storm drains were approximately 17,860 m(3)/d (i.e., up to 51% of the total sewage flow in the catchment) and 3,624 m(3)/d, respectively, and surface water backflow was up to an average 28,593 m(3)/d. On the basis of this work, end-of-storm pipe interceptor sewers of 0.25 m(3)/s (i.e., 21,600 m(3)/d) would be effective to tackle the problem of sewage connections and groundwater seepage to storm drains. Under this circumstance, the follow-up non-stormwater outfall pumping events indicate misconnections between surface water and storm drains, featuring pumping discharge equivalent to surface water backflow; hence the misconnections should be repaired. The information provided here is helpful in estimating the magnitude of non-stormwater flow entries into storm drains and designing the necessary pollution control activities, as well as combating city floods in storm events.

  18. Soil Moisture Flow and Nitrate Movement Simulation through Deep and Heterogeneous Vadose Zone using Dual-porosity Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadav, B. K.; Tomar, J.; Harter, T.

    2014-12-01

    We investigate nitrate movement from non-point sources in deep, heterogeneous vadose zones, using multi-dimensional variably saturated flow and transport simulations. We hypothesize that porous media heterogeneity causes saturation variability that leads to preferential flow systems such that a significant portion of the vadose zone does not significantly contribute to flow. We solve Richards' equation and the advection-dispersion equation to simulate soil moisture and nitrate transport regimes in plot-scale experiments conducted in the San Joaquin Valley, California. We compare equilibrium against non-equilibrium (dual-porosity) approaches. In the equilibrium approach we consider each soil layer to have unique hydraulic properties as a whole, while in the dual-porosity approach we assume that large fractions of the porous flow domain are immobile. However we consider exchange of water and solute between mobile and immobile zone using the appropriate mass transfer terms. The results indicate that flow and transport in a nearly 16 m deep stratified vadose zone comprised of eight layers of unconsolidated alluvium experiences highly non-uniform, localized preferential flow and transport patterns leading to accelerated nitrate transfer. The equilibrium approach largely under-predicted the leaching of nitrate to groundwater while the dual-porosity approach showed higher rates of nitrate leaching, consistent with field observations. The dual-porosity approach slightly over-predicted nitrogen storage in the vadose zone, which may be the result of limited matrix flow or denitrification not accounted for in the model. Results of this study may be helpful to better predict fertilizer and pesticide retention times in deep vadose zone, prior to recharge into the groundwater flow system. Keywords: Nitrate, Preferential flow, Heterogeneous vadose zone, Dual-porosity approach

  19. Rheology and particle dynamics near the flow-arrest transition: a constant stress and pressure approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Mu; Brady, John

    2015-11-01

    We use Brownian dynamics to investigate the relation between the rheology and the microscopic particle dynamics in dense colloidal dispersions at constant stress and pressure. For each imposed stress/pressure pair, the suspension exhibits distinct strain rate distributions depending on the observation time. We measure the long-time self-diffusivity (LTSD) corresponding to the strain rate (inverse shear viscosity) and find that the LTSD results at different imposed stresses collapse to master curves that depends only on the imposed pressure. For low-pressure suspensions, the stress-scaled LTSD diverges at a finite scaled strain rate due to its liquid-like behavior, while at high pressures the scaled LTSD emerges from zero due to the flow-arrest transition. On the other hand, we discover that the particle friction coefficient--the ratio of the particle shear stress to the particle (osmotic) pressure--is proportional to the strain rate scaled by the LTSD for all flowing suspensions. Our results demonstrate the effectiveness of the constant stress and pressure approach for dense suspension rheology, and show that, although the flow of amorphous materials is inherently far-from-equilibrium without a linear response regime, a mean-field description should remain valid.

  20. A Lagrangian approach to study flow topology around a flapping flat-plate wing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishna, Swathi; Mulleners, Karen; Green, Melissa

    2015-11-01

    The incredible flight performance of insects can be attributed in part to the generation and maintenance of stable regions of vorticity, which is achieved by manipulating the wing kinematics. Along with the prolonged attachment of the leading edge vortex during translation of the wing, the rotational motion at the end of the stroke is critical as it generates large amounts of lift required for the insect to remain air-borne while hovering. The wing reversal entails a change in the flow-field around the wing which is closely tied to variations in force production. Based on phase-averaged particle image velocimetry data we analyze the effect of a shift in the rotational phase of a flapping wing on the flow characteristics. A topological study is conducted using Lagrangian vortex detection techniques in order to characterize the shear layer formation, vortex interactions and flow separation. The Lagrangian analysis includes the calculation of Finite Time Lyapunov Exponents based on particle trajectories. An objective approach is employed to trace the location of separation or attachment points as an indication for changes in the strength, stability and shedding frequencies of vortices. These trajectories are correlated with fluctuations in aerodynamic force coefficients.

  1. Numerical flow Simulation around a flat plate during heavy rainfall using Lagrangian Eulerian approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhir, Gaurav; Suman, Sawan

    2015-11-01

    Experimental evidence shows that aircrafts operating under heavy rainfall conditions face deterioration of lift and increase in drag. This scenario can be a critical design challenge especially for slow moving vehicles such as airships. Effective roughening of airfoil surface caused by an uneven water film, loss of flow momentum and the loss of vehicle momentum due to its collision with the raindrops are the primary reasons causing the drag to increase. Our work focuses primarily on the numerical quantification of boundary layer momentum loss caused due to raindrops. The collision of raindrops with a solid surface leads to formation of an ejecta fog of splashed back droplets with their sizes being of the order of micrometers and their acceleration leads to boundary layer momentum loss. We model the airflow within a flat plate boundary layer using a Lagrangian-Eulerian approach with the raindrops being considered as non-deformable, non-spinning and non-interacting droplets. We employ an inter-phase coupling term to account for the interaction between the boundary layer flow and the droplets. Our presentation will focus on several comparisons (velocity field, lift and drag at various angles of attack) with the results of the standard (rain-free) Prandtl boundary layer flow. Indian Institute of Technology, Delhi.

  2. Runoff modelling using radar data and flow measurements in a stochastic state space approach.

    PubMed

    Krämer, S; Grum, M; Verworn, H R; Redder, A

    2005-01-01

    In urban drainage the estimation of runoff with the help of models is a complex task. This is in part due to the fact that rainfall, the most important input to urban drainage modelling, is highly uncertain. Added to the uncertainty of rainfall is the complexity of performing accurate flow measurements. In terms of deterministic modelling techniques these are needed for calibration and evaluation of the applied model. Therefore, the uncertainties of rainfall and flow measurements have a severe impact on the model parameters and results. To overcome these problems a new methodology has been developed which is based on simple rain plane and runoff models that are incorporated into a stochastic state space model approach. The state estimation is done by using the extended Kalman filter in combination with a maximum likelihood criterion and an off-line optimization routine. This paper presents the results of this new methodology with respect to the combined consideration of uncertainties in distributed rainfall derived from radar data and uncertainties in measured flows in an urban catchment within the Emscher river basin, Germany.

  3. Exploring the velocity distribution of debris flows: An iteration algorithm based approach for complex cross-sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Zheng; Chen, Guangqi; Li, Yange; Wang, Wei; Zhang, Hong

    2015-07-01

    The estimation of debris-flow velocity in a cross-section is of primary importance due to its correlation to impact force, run up and superelevation. However, previous methods sometimes neglect the observed asymmetric velocity distribution, and consequently underestimate the debris-flow velocity. This paper presents a new approach for exploring the debris-flow velocity distribution in a cross-section. The presented approach uses an iteration algorithm based on the Riemann integral method to search an approximate solution to the unknown flow surface. The established laws for vertical velocity profile are compared and subsequently integrated to analyze the velocity distribution in the cross-section. The major benefit of the presented approach is that natural channels typically with irregular beds and superelevations can be taken into account, and the resulting approximation by the approach well replicates the direct integral solution. The approach is programmed in MATLAB environment, and the code is open to the public. A well-documented debris-flow event in Sichuan Province, China, is used to demonstrate the presented approach. Results show that the solutions of the flow surface and the mean velocity well reproduce the investigated results. Discussion regarding the model sensitivity and the source of errors concludes the paper.

  4. Solution-Adaptive Cartesian Cell Approach for Viscous and Inviscid Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coirier, William J.; Powell, Kenneth G.

    1996-01-01

    A Cartesian cell-based approach for adaptively refined solutions of the Euler and Navier-Stokes equations in two dimensions is presented. Grids about geometrically complicated bodies are generated automatically, by the recursive subdivision of a single Cartesian cell encompassing the entire flow domain. Where the resulting cells intersect bodies, polygonal cut cells are created using modified polygon-clipping algorithms. The grid is stored in a binary tree data structure that provides a natural means of obtaining cell-to-cell connectivity and of carrying out solution-adaptive mesh refinement. The Euler and Navier-Stokes equations are solved on the resulting grids using a finite volume formulation. The convective terms are upwinded: A linear reconstruction of the primitive variables is performed, providing input states to an approximate Riemann solver for computing the fluxes between neighboring cells. The results of a study comparing the accuracy and positivity of two classes of cell-centered, viscous gradient reconstruction procedures is briefly summarized. Adaptively refined solutions of the Navier-Stokes equations are shown using the more robust of these gradient reconstruction procedures, where the results computed by the Cartesian approach are compared to theory, experiment, and other accepted computational results for a series of low and moderate Reynolds number flows.

  5. Quantifying Vadose Zone Flow and Transport Uncertainties Using a Unified, Hierarchical Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, Philip D.; Murray, Christopher J.; Rockhold, Mark L.; Schaap, Marcel

    2002-06-01

    The objective of this research is to develop and demonstrate a general approach for modeling flow and transport in the heterogeneous vadose zone. The approach uses similar media scaling, geostatistics, and conditional simulation methods to estimate soil hydraulic parameters at unsampled locations from field-measured water content data and scale-mean hydraulic parameters determined from available site characterization data. Neural network methods are being developed to estimate soil hydraulic parameters from more easily measured physical property data such as bulk density, organic matter content, and percentages of sand, silt, and clay (or particle-size distributions). Field water content distributions are being estimated using various geophysical methods including neutron moderation, ground-penetrating radar, and electrical resistance tomography. One of the primary goals of this research is to determine relationships between the type of data used in model parameterization, the quantity of data available, the scale of the measurement, and the uncertainty in predictions of flow and transport using these methods. Evaluation of the relationships between available data, scale, and uncertainty are using data from a large-scale, controlled field experiment.

  6. Quantifying Vadose Zone Flow and Transport Uncertainties Using a Unified, Hierarchical Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, Philip D.; Murray, Chris J.; Rockhold, Mark L.

    2001-06-01

    The objective of this research is to develop and demonstrate a general approach for modeling flow and transport in the heterogeneous vadose zone. The approach uses similar media scaling, geostatistics, and conditional simulation methods to estimate soil hydraulic parameters at unsampled locations from field-measured water content data and scale-mean hydraulic parameters determined from available site characterization data. Neural network methods are being developed to estimate soil hydraulic parameters from more easily measured physical property data such as bulk density, organic matter content, and percentages of sand, silt, and clay (or particle-size distributions). Field water content distributions are being estimated using various geophysical methods including neutron moderation, ground-penetrating radar, and electrical resistance tomography. One of the primary goals of this research is to determine relationships between the type of data used in model parameterization, th e quantity of data available, the scale of the measurement, and the uncertainty in predictions of flow and transport using these methods. Evaluation of the relationships between available data, scale, and uncertainty will use primarily existing data from large-scale, controlled experiments.

  7. A two-dimensional approach to modelling the short timescale zonal flow in Earth's core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    More, C.; Dumberry, M.

    2015-12-01

    Reconstructions of flow in Earth's outer core based on surface magnetic data predict mean zonal accelerations on several timescales. Since accelerations in the core couple to the angular momentum of the mantle, their existence has been confirmed by length-of-day observations. Recent studies suggest that free modes of torsional oscillations are responsible for relatively weak signals with a 5-6 year period. The mechanisms responsible for stronger decadal signals are less well understood.To address the problem, we construct a quasi-geostrophic model of magnetoconvection, with thermally-driven flows perturbing a steady, imposed background magnetic field. This approach is justified by the Taylor-Proudman theorem, in which velocities in a rapidly rotating system vary little parallel to the rotational axis. Using only two dimensions allows a much more rapid exploration of parameter space than traditional three-dimensional approaches.Our model is capable of producing mean zonal accelerations similar to those predicted by the geomagnetic reconstructions of Earth. In particular, we see a clear separation in period between the free modes (short) and forced modes (long) of torsional oscillations. We then systematically run the model with a variety of parameters, attempting to extrapolate our results to the conditions found in Earth's core.

  8. An adaptive level set approach for incompressible two-phase flows

    SciTech Connect

    Sussman, M.; Almgren, A.S.; Bell, J.B.

    1997-04-01

    In Sussman, Smereka and Osher, a numerical method using the level set approach was formulated for solving incompressible two-phase flow with surface tension. In the level set approach, the interface is represented as the zero level set of a smooth function; this has the effect of replacing the advection of density, which has steep gradients at the interface, with the advection of the level set function, which is smooth. In addition, the interface can merge or break up with no special treatment. The authors maintain the level set function as the signed distance from the interface in order to robustly compute flows with high density ratios and stiff surface tension effects. In this work, they couple the level set scheme to an adaptive projection method for the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations, in order to achieve higher resolution of the interface with a minimum of additional expense. They present two-dimensional axisymmetric and fully three-dimensional results of air bubble and water drop computations.

  9. Gene-splitting technology: a novel approach for the containment of transgene flow in Nicotiana tabacum.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xu-Jing; Jin, Xi; Dun, Bao-Qing; Kong, Ning; Jia, Shi-Rong; Tang, Qiao-Ling; Wang, Zhi-Xing

    2014-01-01

    The potential impact of transgene escape on the environment and food safety is a major concern to the scientists and public. This work aimed to assess the effect of intein-mediated gene splitting on containment of transgene flow. Two fusion genes, EPSPSn-In and Ic-EPSPSc, were constructed and integrated into N. tabacum, using Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation. EPSPSn-In encodes the first 295 aa of the herbicide resistance gene 5-enolpyruvyl shikimate-3-phosphate synthase (EPSPS) fused with the first 123 aa of the Ssp DnaE intein (In), whereas Ic-EPSPSc encodes the 36 C-terminal aa of the Ssp DnaE intein (Ic) fused to the rest of EPSPS C terminus peptide sequences. Both EPSPSn-In and Ic-EPSPSc constructs were introduced into the same N. tabacum genome by genetic crossing. Hybrids displayed resistance to the herbicide N-(phosphonomethyl)-glycine (glyphosate). Western blot analysis of protein extracts from hybrid plants identified full-length EPSPS. Furthermore, all hybrid seeds germinated and grew normally on glyphosate selective medium. The 6-8 leaf hybrid plants showed tolerance of 2000 ppm glyphosate in field spraying. These results indicated that functional EPSPS protein was reassembled in vivo by intein-mediated trans-splicing in 100% of plants. In order to evaluate the effect of the gene splitting technique for containment of transgene flow, backcrossing experiments were carried out between hybrids, in which the foreign genes EPSPSn-In and Ic-EPSPSc were inserted into different chromosomes, and non-transgenic plants NC89. Among the 2812 backcrossing progeny, about 25% (664 plantlets) displayed glyphosate resistance. These data indicated that transgene flow could be reduced by 75%. Overall, our findings provide a new and highly effective approach for biological containment of transgene flow. PMID:24915192

  10. Gene-splitting technology: a novel approach for the containment of transgene flow in Nicotiana tabacum.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xu-Jing; Jin, Xi; Dun, Bao-Qing; Kong, Ning; Jia, Shi-Rong; Tang, Qiao-Ling; Wang, Zhi-Xing

    2014-01-01

    The potential impact of transgene escape on the environment and food safety is a major concern to the scientists and public. This work aimed to assess the effect of intein-mediated gene splitting on containment of transgene flow. Two fusion genes, EPSPSn-In and Ic-EPSPSc, were constructed and integrated into N. tabacum, using Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation. EPSPSn-In encodes the first 295 aa of the herbicide resistance gene 5-enolpyruvyl shikimate-3-phosphate synthase (EPSPS) fused with the first 123 aa of the Ssp DnaE intein (In), whereas Ic-EPSPSc encodes the 36 C-terminal aa of the Ssp DnaE intein (Ic) fused to the rest of EPSPS C terminus peptide sequences. Both EPSPSn-In and Ic-EPSPSc constructs were introduced into the same N. tabacum genome by genetic crossing. Hybrids displayed resistance to the herbicide N-(phosphonomethyl)-glycine (glyphosate). Western blot analysis of protein extracts from hybrid plants identified full-length EPSPS. Furthermore, all hybrid seeds germinated and grew normally on glyphosate selective medium. The 6-8 leaf hybrid plants showed tolerance of 2000 ppm glyphosate in field spraying. These results indicated that functional EPSPS protein was reassembled in vivo by intein-mediated trans-splicing in 100% of plants. In order to evaluate the effect of the gene splitting technique for containment of transgene flow, backcrossing experiments were carried out between hybrids, in which the foreign genes EPSPSn-In and Ic-EPSPSc were inserted into different chromosomes, and non-transgenic plants NC89. Among the 2812 backcrossing progeny, about 25% (664 plantlets) displayed glyphosate resistance. These data indicated that transgene flow could be reduced by 75%. Overall, our findings provide a new and highly effective approach for biological containment of transgene flow.

  11. A nonlinear modeling approach using weighted piecewise series and its applications to predict unsteady flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Weigang; Liou, Meng-Sing

    2016-08-01

    To preserve nonlinearity of a full-order system over a range of parameters of interest, we propose an accurate and robust nonlinear modeling approach by assembling a set of piecewise linear local solutions expanded about some sampling states. The work by Rewienski and White [1] on micromachined devices inspired our use of piecewise linear local solutions to study nonlinear unsteady aerodynamics. These local approximations are assembled via nonlinear weights of radial basis functions. The efficacy of the proposed procedure is validated for a two-dimensional airfoil moving with different pitching motions, specifically AGARD's CT2 and CT5 problems [27], in which the flows exhibit different nonlinear behaviors. Furthermore, application of the developed aerodynamic model to a two-dimensional aero-elastic system proves the approach is capable of predicting limit cycle oscillations (LCOs) by using AGARD's CT6 [28] as a benchmark test. All results, based on inviscid solutions, confirm that our nonlinear model is stable and accurate, against the full model solutions and measurements, and for predicting not only aerodynamic forces but also detailed flowfields. Moreover, the model is robust for inputs that considerably depart from the base trajectory in form and magnitude. This modeling provides a very efficient way for predicting unsteady flowfields with varying parameters because it needs only a tiny fraction of the cost of a full-order modeling for each new condition-the more cases studied, the more savings rendered. Hence, the present approach is especially useful for parametric studies, such as in the case of design optimization and exploration of flow phenomena.

  12. A dual-permeability approach to preferential water flow and solute transport in shrinking soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coppola, Antonio; dragonetti, giovanna; Comegna, Alessandro; Gerke, Horst H.; Basile, Angelo

    2016-04-01

    The pore systems in most natural soils is dynamically changing due to alternating swelling and shrinkage processes, which induces changes in pore volume and pore size distribution including deformations in pore geometry. This is a serious difficulty for modeling flow and transport in dual permeability approaches, as it will also require that the geometrical deformation of both the soil matrix and the fracture porous systems be taken into account, as well as the dynamics of soil hydraulic properties in response to the domain deformations. This study follows up a previous work by the same authors extending the classical rigid (RGD) approach formerly proposed by Gerke and van Genuchten, to account for shrinking effects (SHR) in modeling water flow and solute transport in dual-permeability porous media. In this study we considered three SHR scenarios, assuming that aggregate shrinkage may change either: (i) the hydraulic properties of the two pore domains, (ii) their relative fractions, and (iii) both, hydraulic properties and fractions of the two domains. The objective was to compare simulation results obtained under the RGD and the SHR assumptions to illustrate the impact of matrix volume changes on water storage, water fluxes and solute concentrations during: 1) An infiltration process bringing an initially dry soil to saturation, 2) A drainage process starting from an initially saturated soil. For an infiltration process, the simulated wetting front and the solute concentration propagation velocity, as well as the water fluxes, water and solute exchange rates, for the three SHR scenarios significantly deviated from the RGD. By contrast, relatively similar water content profiles evolved under all scenarios during drying. Overall, compared to the RGD approach, the effect of changing the hydraulic properties and the weight of the two domains according to the shrinkage behavior of the soil aggregates induced a much more rapid response in terms of water fluxes and

  13. A Novel Approach to the Representation of Groundwater Flow and Transport with Epistemic Parameter Uncertainty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozbek, M. M.; Pinder, G. F.

    2006-12-01

    There is a growing need in hydrologic and environmental modeling and management to segregate uncertainty, whether it occurs in input parameters or in possible alternative models, into aleatory uncertainty (i.e., irreducible or stochastic) and epistemic uncertainty (i.e., reducible or due to lack of knowledge). While aleatory uncertainty has been known and used as the only source of uncertainty in the hydrologic community for a long time, the notion of epistemic uncertainty is relatively new and it can be due several reasons including 1) field and laboratory methods used in the measurement of parameters, 2) techniques used to interpolate measured values at selected locations, and more importantly, 3) subjective expert opinion interpreting data available to augment existing prior parametric information. A natural framework to quantify epistemic uncertainty has been fuzzy set theory. In this paper, we use the extension principle of fuzzy set theory to simulate groundwater flow and transport with fuzzy model parameters. Our novel implementation of the principle involves two major steps: 1) a tessellation of the parameter space that results in simplexes over which the state variable is approximated by means of trial functions, followed by 2) the optimization of degrees of membership for the state variable in each simplex where the trial functions and the fuzzy parameter membership functions are used as the constraints of the optimization algorithm. We compare our approach to other known approaches to using the extension principle to address groundwater flow and transport in the saturated zone, and highlight features of our approach that apply to any physically based model with fuzzy parameter input.

  14. Asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation coupled with multiple detections: A complementary approach in the characterization of egg yolk plasma.

    PubMed

    Dou, Haiyang; Li, Yueqiu; Choi, Jaeyeong; Huo, Shuying; Ding, Liang; Shen, Shigang; Lee, Seungho

    2016-09-23

    The capability of asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation (AF4) coupled with UV/VIS, multiangle light scattering (MALS) and quasi-elastic light scattering (QELS) (AF4-UV-MALS-QELS) for separation and characterization of egg yolk plasma was evaluated. The accuracy of hydrodynamic radius (Rh) obtained from QELS and AF4 theory (using both simplified and full expression of AF4 retention equations) was discussed. The conformation of low density lipoprotein (LDL) and its aggregates in egg yolk plasma was discussed based on the ratio of radius of gyration (Rg) to Rh together with the results from bio-transmission electron microscopy (Bio-TEM). The results indicate that the full retention equation is more relevant than simplified version for the Rh determination at high cross flow rate. The Rh from online QELS is reliable only at a specific range of sample concentration. The effect of programmed cross flow rate (linear and exponential decay) on the analysis of egg yolk plasma was also investigated. It was found that the use of an exponentially decaying cross flow rate not only reduces the AF4 analysis time of the egg yolk plasma, but also provides better resolution than the use of either a constant or linearly decaying cross flow rate. A combination of an exponentially decaying cross flow AF4-UV-MALS-QELS and the utilization of full retention equation was proved to be a useful method for the separation and characterization of egg yolk plasma. PMID:27582461

  15. Asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation coupled with multiple detections: A complementary approach in the characterization of egg yolk plasma.

    PubMed

    Dou, Haiyang; Li, Yueqiu; Choi, Jaeyeong; Huo, Shuying; Ding, Liang; Shen, Shigang; Lee, Seungho

    2016-09-23

    The capability of asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation (AF4) coupled with UV/VIS, multiangle light scattering (MALS) and quasi-elastic light scattering (QELS) (AF4-UV-MALS-QELS) for separation and characterization of egg yolk plasma was evaluated. The accuracy of hydrodynamic radius (Rh) obtained from QELS and AF4 theory (using both simplified and full expression of AF4 retention equations) was discussed. The conformation of low density lipoprotein (LDL) and its aggregates in egg yolk plasma was discussed based on the ratio of radius of gyration (Rg) to Rh together with the results from bio-transmission electron microscopy (Bio-TEM). The results indicate that the full retention equation is more relevant than simplified version for the Rh determination at high cross flow rate. The Rh from online QELS is reliable only at a specific range of sample concentration. The effect of programmed cross flow rate (linear and exponential decay) on the analysis of egg yolk plasma was also investigated. It was found that the use of an exponentially decaying cross flow rate not only reduces the AF4 analysis time of the egg yolk plasma, but also provides better resolution than the use of either a constant or linearly decaying cross flow rate. A combination of an exponentially decaying cross flow AF4-UV-MALS-QELS and the utilization of full retention equation was proved to be a useful method for the separation and characterization of egg yolk plasma.

  16. Modelling of unsaturated water flow in double porosity media. An integrated approach.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewandowska, J.

    2009-04-01

    "Multi-scale, multi-components, multi-phases" are the key words that characterize the double porosity media, like fissured rocks or aggregated soils, subject to geo-environmental conditions. In relation to this context we present an integrated upscaling approach to the modelling of unsaturated water flow in double porosity media. This approach combines three issues: theoretical, numerical and experimental. In the theoretical part, the macroscopic model is derived by using the asymptotic homogenization method. It is assumed that the microstructure of the medium is composed of two porous domains of contrasted hydraulic parameters (macro- and micro-porosity), so that the water capillary pressure reaches equilibrium much faster in the highly than in the weakly conducting domain. Consequently, large local-scale pressure gradients arise, which significantly influence the macroscopic behaviour of the medium (local non-equilibrium). In this case, the macroscopic model consists of two coupled non-linear equations that have to be solved simultaneously. The homogenization model offers a complete description of the problem, including the definition of the effective parameters (in a general case anisotropic) and the domain of validity of the model. By the latter term we understand the set of underlying assumptions on the microstructure of the medium, the considered spatial and time scales, and the relations between the local hydraulic parameters and the forces driving the flow. All these assumptions are explicitly introduced via the estimation of the dimensionless parameters and the formulation of the appropriate boundary and interface conditions at the microscopic scale. For practical applications the model was generalized to take into account all possible situations (and the appropriate models) that can occurs during a flow process (local equilibrium/local non-equilibrium). The numerical implementation of double-porosity model requires a particular strategy, allowing for the

  17. A connectivity-based modeling approach for representing hysteresis in macroscopic two-phase flow properties

    SciTech Connect

    Cihan, Abdullah; Birkholzer, Jens; Trevisan, Luca; Bianchi, Marco; Zhou, Quanlin; Illangasekare, Tissa

    2014-12-31

    During CO2 injection and storage in deep reservoirs, the injected CO2 enters into an initially brine saturated porous medium, and after the injection stops, natural groundwater flow eventually displaces the injected mobile-phase CO2, leaving behind residual non-wetting fluid. Accurate modeling of two-phase flow processes are needed for predicting fate and transport of injected CO2, evaluating environmental risks and designing more effective storage schemes. The entrapped non-wetting fluid saturation is typically a function of the spatially varying maximum saturation at the end of injection. At the pore-scale, distribution of void sizes and connectivity of void space play a major role for the macroscopic hysteresis behavior and capillary entrapment of wetting and non-wetting fluids. This paper presents development of an approach based on the connectivity of void space for modeling hysteretic capillary pressure-saturation-relative permeability relationships. The new approach uses void-size distribution and a measure of void space connectivity to compute the hysteretic constitutive functions and to predict entrapped fluid phase saturations. Two functions, the drainage connectivity function and the wetting connectivity function, are introduced to characterize connectivity of fluids in void space during drainage and wetting processes. These functions can be estimated through pore-scale simulations in computer-generated porous media or from traditional experimental measurements of primary drainage and main wetting curves. The hysteresis model for saturation-capillary pressure is tested successfully by comparing the model-predicted residual saturation and scanning curves with actual data sets obtained from column experiments found in the literature. A numerical two-phase model simulator with the new hysteresis functions is tested against laboratory experiments conducted in a quasi-two-dimensional flow cell (91.4cm×5.6cm×61cm

  18. A connectivity-based modeling approach for representing hysteresis in macroscopic two-phase flow properties

    DOE PAGES

    Cihan, Abdullah; Birkholzer, Jens; Trevisan, Luca; Bianchi, Marco; Zhou, Quanlin; Illangasekare, Tissa

    2014-12-31

    During CO2 injection and storage in deep reservoirs, the injected CO2 enters into an initially brine saturated porous medium, and after the injection stops, natural groundwater flow eventually displaces the injected mobile-phase CO2, leaving behind residual non-wetting fluid. Accurate modeling of two-phase flow processes are needed for predicting fate and transport of injected CO2, evaluating environmental risks and designing more effective storage schemes. The entrapped non-wetting fluid saturation is typically a function of the spatially varying maximum saturation at the end of injection. At the pore-scale, distribution of void sizes and connectivity of void space play a major role formore » the macroscopic hysteresis behavior and capillary entrapment of wetting and non-wetting fluids. This paper presents development of an approach based on the connectivity of void space for modeling hysteretic capillary pressure-saturation-relative permeability relationships. The new approach uses void-size distribution and a measure of void space connectivity to compute the hysteretic constitutive functions and to predict entrapped fluid phase saturations. Two functions, the drainage connectivity function and the wetting connectivity function, are introduced to characterize connectivity of fluids in void space during drainage and wetting processes. These functions can be estimated through pore-scale simulations in computer-generated porous media or from traditional experimental measurements of primary drainage and main wetting curves. The hysteresis model for saturation-capillary pressure is tested successfully by comparing the model-predicted residual saturation and scanning curves with actual data sets obtained from column experiments found in the literature. A numerical two-phase model simulator with the new hysteresis functions is tested against laboratory experiments conducted in a quasi-two-dimensional flow cell (91.4cm×5.6cm×61cm), packed with homogeneous and

  19. Dispositional Flow as a Mediator of the Relationships between Attentional Control and Approaches to Studying during Academic Examination Preparation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cermakova, Lucie; Moneta, Giovanni B.; Spada, Marcantonio M.

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated how attentional control and study-related dispositional flow influence students' approaches to studying when preparing for academic examinations. Based on information-processing theories, it was hypothesised that attentional control would be positively associated with deep and strategic approaches to studying, and…

  20. An objective and parsimonious approach for classifying natural flow regimes at a continental scale

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Archfield, Stacey A.; Kennen, Jonathan G.; Carlisle, Daren M.; Wolock, David M.

    2014-01-01

    Hydro-ecological stream classification-the process of grouping streams by similar hydrologic responses and, by extension, similar aquatic habitat-has been widely accepted and is considered by some to be one of the first steps towards developing ecological flow targets. A new classification of 1543 streamgauges in the contiguous USA is presented by use of a novel and parsimonious approach to understand similarity in ecological streamflow response. This novel classification approach uses seven fundamental daily streamflow statistics (FDSS) rather than winnowing down an uncorrelated subset from 200 or more ecologically relevant streamflow statistics (ERSS) commonly used in hydro-ecological classification studies. The results of this investigation demonstrate that the distributions of 33 tested ERSS are consistently different among the classification groups derived from the seven FDSS. It is further shown that classification based solely on the 33 ERSS generally does a poorer job in grouping similar streamgauges than the classification based on the seven FDSS. This new classification approach has the additional advantages of overcoming some of the subjectivity associated with the selection of the classification variables and provides a set of robust continental-scale classes of US streamgauges. Published 2013. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  1. Numerical modeling of geophysical granular flows: 1. A comprehensive approach to granular rheologies and geophysical multiphase flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dartevelle, SéBastien

    2004-08-01

    Geophysical granular materials display a wide variety of behaviors and features. Typically, granular flows (1) are multiphase flows, (2) are very dissipative over many different scales, (3) display a wide range of grain concentrations, and (4), as a final result of these previous features, display complex nonlinear, nonuniform, and unsteady rheologies. Therefore the objectives of this manuscript are twofold: (1) setting up a hydrodynamic model which acknowledges the multiphase nature of granular flows and (2) defining a comprehensive rheological model which accounts for all the different forms of viscous dissipations within granular flows at any concentration. Hence three important regimes within granular flows must be acknowledged: kinetic (pure free flights of grain), kinetic-collisional, and frictional. The momentum and energy transfer will be different according to the granular regimes, i.e., strain rate dependent in the kinetic and kinetic-collisional cases and strain rate independent in the frictional case. A "universal" granular rheological model requires a comprehensive unified stress tensor able to adequately describe viscous stress within the flow for any of these regimes, and without imposing a priori what regime will dominate over the others. The kinetic-collisional viscous regime is defined from a modified Boltzmann's kinetic theory of dense gas. The frictional viscous regime is defined from the plastic potential and the critical state theories which account for compressibility of granular matter (e.g., dilatancy, consolidation, and critical state). In the companion paper [, 2004] we will introduce a multiphase computer code, (G)MFIX, which accounts for all the granular regimes and rheology and present typical simulations of diluted (e.g., plinian clouds) and concentrated geophysical granular flows (i.e., pyroclastic flows and surges).

  2. A Flow Cytometric and Computational Approaches to Carbapenems Affinity to the Different Types of Carbapenemases.

    PubMed

    Pina-Vaz, Cidália; Silva, Ana P; Faria-Ramos, Isabel; Teixeira-Santos, Rita; Moura, Daniel; Vieira, Tatiana F; Sousa, Sérgio F; Costa-de-Oliveira, Sofia; Cantón, Rafael; Rodrigues, Acácio G

    2016-01-01

    The synergy of carbapenem combinations regarding Enterobacteriaceae producing different types of carbapenemases was study through different approaches: flow cytometry and computational analysis. Ten well characterized Enterobacteriaceae (KPC, verona integron-encoded metallo-β-lactamases -VIM and OXA-48-like enzymes) were selected for the study. The cells were incubated with a combination of ertapenem with imipenem, meropenem, or doripenem and killing kinetic curves performed with and without reinforcements of the drugs. A cephalosporin was also used in combination with ertapenem. A flow cytometric assay with DiBAC4-(3), a membrane potential dye, was developed in order to evaluate the cellular lesion after 2 h incubation. A chemical computational study was performed to understand the affinity of the different drugs to the different types of enzymes. Flow cytometric analysis and time-kill assays showed a synergic effect against KPC and OXA-48 producing-bacteria with all combinations; only ertapenem with imipenem was synergic against VIM producing-bacteria. A bactericidal effect was observed in OXA-48-like enzymes. Ceftazidime plus ertapenem was synergic against ESBL-negative KPC producing-bacteria. Ertapenem had the highest affinity for those enzymes according to chemical computational study. The synergic effect between ertapenem and others carbapenems against different carbapenemase-producing bacteria, representing a therapeutic choice, was described for the first time. Easier and faster laboratorial methods for carbapenemase characterization are urgently needed. The design of an ertapenem derivative with similar affinity to carbapenemases but exhibiting more stable bonds was demonstrated as highly desirable. PMID:27555844

  3. A Flow Cytometric and Computational Approaches to Carbapenems Affinity to the Different Types of Carbapenemases

    PubMed Central

    Pina-Vaz, Cidália; Silva, Ana P.; Faria-Ramos, Isabel; Teixeira-Santos, Rita; Moura, Daniel; Vieira, Tatiana F.; Sousa, Sérgio F.; Costa-de-Oliveira, Sofia; Cantón, Rafael; Rodrigues, Acácio G.

    2016-01-01

    The synergy of carbapenem combinations regarding Enterobacteriaceae producing different types of carbapenemases was study through different approaches: flow cytometry and computational analysis. Ten well characterized Enterobacteriaceae (KPC, verona integron-encoded metallo-β-lactamases –VIM and OXA-48-like enzymes) were selected for the study. The cells were incubated with a combination of ertapenem with imipenem, meropenem, or doripenem and killing kinetic curves performed with and without reinforcements of the drugs. A cephalosporin was also used in combination with ertapenem. A flow cytometric assay with DiBAC4-(3), a membrane potential dye, was developed in order to evaluate the cellular lesion after 2 h incubation. A chemical computational study was performed to understand the affinity of the different drugs to the different types of enzymes. Flow cytometric analysis and time-kill assays showed a synergic effect against KPC and OXA-48 producing-bacteria with all combinations; only ertapenem with imipenem was synergic against VIM producing-bacteria. A bactericidal effect was observed in OXA-48-like enzymes. Ceftazidime plus ertapenem was synergic against ESBL-negative KPC producing-bacteria. Ertapenem had the highest affinity for those enzymes according to chemical computational study. The synergic effect between ertapenem and others carbapenems against different carbapenemase-producing bacteria, representing a therapeutic choice, was described for the first time. Easier and faster laboratorial methods for carbapenemase characterization are urgently needed. The design of an ertapenem derivative with similar affinity to carbapenemases but exhibiting more stable bonds was demonstrated as highly desirable. PMID:27555844

  4. A hybrid FEM-DEM approach to the simulation of fluid flow laden with many particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casagrande, Marcus V. S.; Alves, José L. D.; Silva, Carlos E.; Alves, Fábio T.; Elias, Renato N.; Coutinho, Alvaro L. G. A.

    2016-01-01

    In this work we address a contribution to the study of particle laden fluid flows in scales smaller than TFM (two-fluid models). The hybrid model is based on a Lagrangian-Eulerian approach. A Lagrangian description is used for the particle system employing the discrete element method (DEM), while a fixed Eulerian mesh is used for the fluid phase modeled by the finite element method (FEM). The resulting coupled DEM-FEM model is integrated in time with a subcycling scheme. The aforementioned scheme is applied in the simulation of a seabed current to analyze which mechanisms lead to the emergence of bedload transport and sediment suspension, and also quantify the effective viscosity of the seabed in comparison with the ideal no-slip wall condition. A simulation of a salt plume falling in a fluid column is performed, comparing the main characteristics of the system with an experiment.

  5. A minimally diffusive interface function steepening approach for compressible multiphase flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regele, Jonathan

    2015-11-01

    Interface capturing methods for contacts and shocks are commonly used in compressible multiphase flows. Artificial diffusion is inherently necessary to stabilize jump discontinuities across shocks and contacts. Contacts suffer from diffusion more severely than shock waves because their characteristics are not convergent like shocks. Interface steepening procedures are commonly used to counteract numerical diffusion necessary to maintain a sharp interface function. In this work, a modification to the sharpening approach used in Shukla, Pantano, and Freund [J. Comp. Phys, 229, 2010] is developed that minimizes the artificial diffusion across the interface while maintaining a monotonic interface function. The method requires fewer iterations for convergence and provides a steeper interface function. Examples in one and two dimensions demonstrate the method's performance.

  6. A prescribed wake rotor inflow and flow field prediction analysis, user's manual and technical approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Egolf, T. A.; Landgrebe, A. J.

    1982-01-01

    A user's manual is provided which includes the technical approach for the Prescribed Wake Rotor Inflow and Flow Field Prediction Analysis. The analysis is used to provide the rotor wake induced velocities at the rotor blades for use in blade airloads and response analyses and to provide induced velocities at arbitrary field points such as at a tail surface. This analysis calculates the distribution of rotor wake induced velocities based on a prescribed wake model. Section operating conditions are prescribed from blade motion and controls determined by a separate blade response analysis. The analysis represents each blade by a segmented lifting line, and the rotor wake by discrete segmented trailing vortex filaments. Blade loading and circulation distributions are calculated based on blade element strip theory including the local induced velocity predicted by the numerical integration of the Biot-Savart Law applied to the vortex wake model.

  7. An Efficacious Multi-Objective Fuzzy Linear Programming Approach for Optimal Power Flow Considering Distributed Generation

    PubMed Central

    Warid, Warid; Hizam, Hashim; Mariun, Norman; Abdul-Wahab, Noor Izzri

    2016-01-01

    This paper proposes a new formulation for the multi-objective optimal power flow (MOOPF) problem for meshed power networks considering distributed generation. An efficacious multi-objective fuzzy linear programming optimization (MFLP) algorithm is proposed to solve the aforementioned problem with and without considering the distributed generation (DG) effect. A variant combination of objectives is considered for simultaneous optimization, including power loss, voltage stability, and shunt capacitors MVAR reserve. Fuzzy membership functions for these objectives are designed with extreme targets, whereas the inequality constraints are treated as hard constraints. The multi-objective fuzzy optimal power flow (OPF) formulation was converted into a crisp OPF in a successive linear programming (SLP) framework and solved using an efficient interior point method (IPM). To test the efficacy of the proposed approach, simulations are performed on the IEEE 30-busand IEEE 118-bus test systems. The MFLP optimization is solved for several optimization cases. The obtained results are compared with those presented in the literature. A unique solution with a high satisfaction for the assigned targets is gained. Results demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed MFLP technique in terms of solution optimality and rapid convergence. Moreover, the results indicate that using the optimal DG location with the MFLP algorithm provides the solution with the highest quality. PMID:26954783

  8. An Efficacious Multi-Objective Fuzzy Linear Programming Approach for Optimal Power Flow Considering Distributed Generation.

    PubMed

    Warid, Warid; Hizam, Hashim; Mariun, Norman; Abdul-Wahab, Noor Izzri

    2016-01-01

    This paper proposes a new formulation for the multi-objective optimal power flow (MOOPF) problem for meshed power networks considering distributed generation. An efficacious multi-objective fuzzy linear programming optimization (MFLP) algorithm is proposed to solve the aforementioned problem with and without considering the distributed generation (DG) effect. A variant combination of objectives is considered for simultaneous optimization, including power loss, voltage stability, and shunt capacitors MVAR reserve. Fuzzy membership functions for these objectives are designed with extreme targets, whereas the inequality constraints are treated as hard constraints. The multi-objective fuzzy optimal power flow (OPF) formulation was converted into a crisp OPF in a successive linear programming (SLP) framework and solved using an efficient interior point method (IPM). To test the efficacy of the proposed approach, simulations are performed on the IEEE 30-busand IEEE 118-bus test systems. The MFLP optimization is solved for several optimization cases. The obtained results are compared with those presented in the literature. A unique solution with a high satisfaction for the assigned targets is gained. Results demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed MFLP technique in terms of solution optimality and rapid convergence. Moreover, the results indicate that using the optimal DG location with the MFLP algorithm provides the solution with the highest quality. PMID:26954783

  9. Evaluating the morphology of erythrocyte population: An approach based on atomic force microscopy and flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Sayari; Chakraborty, Ishita; Chakraborty, Monojit; Mukhopadhyay, Ashis; Mishra, Raghwendra; Sarkar, Debasish

    2016-04-01

    Erythrocyte morphology is gaining importance as a powerful pathological index in identifying the severity of any blood related disease. However, the existing technique of quantitative microscopy is highly time consuming and prone to personalized bias. On the other hand, relatively unexplored, complementary technique based on flow cytometry has not been standardized till date, particularly due to the lack of a proper morphological scoring scale. In this article, we have presented a new approach to formulate a non-empirical scoring scale based on membrane roughness (R(rms)) data obtained from atomic force microscopy. Subsequently, the respective morphological quantifier of the whole erythrocyte population, commonly known as morphological index, was expressed as a function of highest correlated statistical parameters of scattered signal profiles generated by flow cytometry. Feed forward artificial neural network model with multilayer perceptron architecture was used to develop the intended functional form. High correlation coefficient (R(2) = 0.95), even for model-formulation exclusive samples, clearly indicates the universal validity of the proposed model. Moreover, a direct pathological application of the proposed model has been illustrated in relation to patients, diagnosed to be suffering from a wide variety of cancer.

  10. Assessing skin blood flow dynamics in older adults using a modified sample entropy approach.

    PubMed

    Liao, Fuyuan; Jan, Yih-Kuen

    2014-01-01

    The aging process may result in attenuated microvascular reactivity in response to environmental stimuli, which can be evaluated by analyzing skin blood flow (SBF) signals. Among various methods for analyzing physiological signals, sample entropy (SE) is commonly used to quantify the degree of regularity of time series. However, we found that for temporally correlated data, SE value depends on the sampling rate. When data are oversampled, SE may give misleading results. To address this problem, we propose to modify the definition of SE by using time-lagged vectors in the calculation of the conditional probability that any two vectors of successive data points are within a tolerance r for m points remain within the tolerance at the next point. The lag could be chosen as the first minimum of the auto mutual information function. We tested the performance of modified SE using simulated signals and SBF data. The results showed that modified SE is able to quantify the degree of regularity of the signals regardless of sampling rate. Using this approach, we observed a more regular behavior of blood flow oscillations (BFO) during local heating-induced maximal vasodilation period compared to the baseline in young and older adults and a more regular behavior of BFO in older adults compared to young adults. These results suggest that modified SE may be useful in the study of SBF dynamics.

  11. Sheath-Flow Microfluidic Approach for Combined Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering and Electrochemical Detection

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The combination of hydrodynamic focusing with embedded capillaries in a microfluidic device is shown to enable both surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) and electrochemical characterization of analytes at nanomolar concentrations in flow. The approach utilizes a versatile polystyrene device that contains an encapsulated microelectrode and fluidic tubing, which is shown to enable straightforward hydrodynamic focusing onto the electrode surface to improve detection. A polydimethyslsiloxane (PDMS) microchannel positioned over both the embedded tubing and SERS active electrode (aligned ∼200 μm from each other) generates a sheath flow that confines the analyte molecules eluting from the embedded tubing over the SERS electrode, increasing the interaction between the Riboflavin (vitamin B2) and the SERS active electrode. The microfluidic device was characterized using finite element simulations, amperometry, and Raman experiments. This device shows a SERS and amperometric detection limit near 1 and 100 nM, respectively. This combination of SERS and amperometry in a single device provides an improved method to identify and quantify electroactive analytes over either technique independently. PMID:25815795

  12. Weakly nonlinear stability analysis of magnetohydrodynamic channel flow using an efficient numerical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagan, Jonathan; Priede, Jānis

    2013-12-01

    We analyze weakly nonlinear stability of a flow of viscous conducting liquid driven by pressure gradient in the channel between two parallel walls subject to a transverse magnetic field. Using a non-standard numerical approach, we compute the linear growth rate correction and the first Landau coefficient, which in a sufficiently strong magnetic field vary with the Hartmann number as μ 1˜ (0.814-i19.8)× 10^{-3}textit {Ha} and μ 2˜ (2.73-i1.50)× 10^{-5}textit {Ha}^{-4}. These coefficients describe a subcritical transverse velocity perturbation with the equilibrium amplitude |A|2=Re [μ 1]/Re [μ 2](textit {Re}c-textit {Re})˜ 29.8textit {Ha}5(textit {Re}c-textit {Re}), which exists at Reynolds numbers below the linear stability threshold textit {Re}c˜ 4.83× 104textit {Ha}. We find that the flow remains subcritically unstable regardless of the magnetic field strength. Our method for computing Landau coefficients differs from the standard one by the application of the solvability condition to the discretized rather than continuous problem. This allows us to bypass both the solution of the adjoint problem and the subsequent evaluation of the integrals defining the inner products, which results in a significant simplification of the method.

  13. Fluid migration in the subduction zone: a coupled fluid flow approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hongliang; Huismans, Ritske; Rondenay, Stéphane

    2016-04-01

    Subduction zone are the main entry point of water into earth's mantle and play an important role in the global water cycle. The progressive release of water by metamorphic dehydration induce important physical-chemical process in the subduction zone, such as hydrous melting, hydration and weakening of the mantle wedge, creation of pore fluid pressures that may weaken the subduction interface and induce earthquakes. Most previous studies on the role of fluids in subduction zones assume vertical migration or migration according to the dynamic pressure in the solid matrix without considering the pore fluid pressure effect on the deformation of the solid matrix. Here we investigate this interaction by explicitly modeling two-phase coupled poro-plastic flow during subduction. In this approach, the fluid migrates by compaction and decompaction of the solid matrix and affects the subduction dynamics through pore fluid pressure dependent frictional-plastic yield. Our preliminary results indicate that: 1) the rate of fluid migration depends strongly on the permeability and the bulk viscosity of the solid matrix, 2) fluid transfer occurs preferentially along the slab and then propagates into the mantle wedge by viscous compaction driven fluid flow, 3) fluid transport from the surface to depth is a prerequisite for producing high fluid pore pressures and associated hydration induced weakening of the subduction zone interface.

  14. An Efficacious Multi-Objective Fuzzy Linear Programming Approach for Optimal Power Flow Considering Distributed Generation.

    PubMed

    Warid, Warid; Hizam, Hashim; Mariun, Norman; Abdul-Wahab, Noor Izzri

    2016-01-01

    This paper proposes a new formulation for the multi-objective optimal power flow (MOOPF) problem for meshed power networks considering distributed generation. An efficacious multi-objective fuzzy linear programming optimization (MFLP) algorithm is proposed to solve the aforementioned problem with and without considering the distributed generation (DG) effect. A variant combination of objectives is considered for simultaneous optimization, including power loss, voltage stability, and shunt capacitors MVAR reserve. Fuzzy membership functions for these objectives are designed with extreme targets, whereas the inequality constraints are treated as hard constraints. The multi-objective fuzzy optimal power flow (OPF) formulation was converted into a crisp OPF in a successive linear programming (SLP) framework and solved using an efficient interior point method (IPM). To test the efficacy of the proposed approach, simulations are performed on the IEEE 30-busand IEEE 118-bus test systems. The MFLP optimization is solved for several optimization cases. The obtained results are compared with those presented in the literature. A unique solution with a high satisfaction for the assigned targets is gained. Results demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed MFLP technique in terms of solution optimality and rapid convergence. Moreover, the results indicate that using the optimal DG location with the MFLP algorithm provides the solution with the highest quality.

  15. A Novel Analytical Approach to Pulsatile Blood Flow in the Arterial Network.

    PubMed

    Flores, Joaquín; Alastruey, Jordi; Corvera Poiré, Eugenia

    2016-10-01

    Haemodynamic simulations using one-dimensional (1-D) computational models exhibit many of the features of the systemic circulation under normal and diseased conditions. We propose a novel linear 1-D dynamical theory of blood flow in networks of flexible vessels that is based on a generalized Darcy's model and for which a full analytical solution exists in frequency domain. We assess the accuracy of this formulation in a series of benchmark test cases for which computational 1-D and 3-D solutions are available. Accordingly, we calculate blood flow and pressure waves, and velocity profiles in the human common carotid artery, upper thoracic aorta, aortic bifurcation, and a 20-artery model of the aorta and its larger branches. Our analytical solution is in good agreement with the available solutions and reproduces the main features of pulse waveforms in networks of large arteries under normal physiological conditions. Our model reduces computational time and provides a new approach for studying arterial pulse wave mechanics; e.g.,  the analyticity of our model allows for a direct identification of the role played by physical properties of the cardiovascular system on the pressure waves.

  16. In silico approaches to study mass and energy flows in microbial consortia: a syntrophic case study

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Three methods were developed for the application of stoichiometry-based network analysis approaches including elementary mode analysis to the study of mass and energy flows in microbial communities. Each has distinct advantages and disadvantages suitable for analyzing systems with different degrees of complexity and a priori knowledge. These approaches were tested and compared using data from the thermophilic, phototrophic mat communities from Octopus and Mushroom Springs in Yellowstone National Park (USA). The models were based on three distinct microbial guilds: oxygenic phototrophs, filamentous anoxygenic phototrophs, and sulfate-reducing bacteria. Two phases, day and night, were modeled to account for differences in the sources of mass and energy and the routes available for their exchange. Results The in silico models were used to explore fundamental questions in ecology including the prediction of and explanation for measured relative abundances of primary producers in the mat, theoretical tradeoffs between overall productivity and the generation of toxic by-products, and the relative robustness of various guild interactions. Conclusion The three modeling approaches represent a flexible toolbox for creating cellular metabolic networks to study microbial communities on scales ranging from cells to ecosystems. A comparison of the three methods highlights considerations for selecting the one most appropriate for a given microbial system. For instance, communities represented only by metagenomic data can be modeled using the pooled method which analyzes a community's total metabolic potential without attempting to partition enzymes to different organisms. Systems with extensive a priori information on microbial guilds can be represented using the compartmentalized technique, employing distinct control volumes to separate guild-appropriate enzymes and metabolites. If the complexity of a compartmentalized network creates an unacceptable computational

  17. An Airway Network Flow Assignment Approach Based on an Efficient Multiobjective Optimization Framework

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Xiangmin; Zhang, Xuejun; Zhu, Yanbo; Sun, Dengfeng; Lei, Jiaxing

    2015-01-01

    Considering reducing the airspace congestion and the flight delay simultaneously, this paper formulates the airway network flow assignment (ANFA) problem as a multiobjective optimization model and presents a new multiobjective optimization framework to solve it. Firstly, an effective multi-island parallel evolution algorithm with multiple evolution populations is employed to improve the optimization capability. Secondly, the nondominated sorting genetic algorithm II is applied for each population. In addition, a cooperative coevolution algorithm is adapted to divide the ANFA problem into several low-dimensional biobjective optimization problems which are easier to deal with. Finally, in order to maintain the diversity of solutions and to avoid prematurity, a dynamic adjustment operator based on solution congestion degree is specifically designed for the ANFA problem. Simulation results using the real traffic data from China air route network and daily flight plans demonstrate that the proposed approach can improve the solution quality effectively, showing superiority to the existing approaches such as the multiobjective genetic algorithm, the well-known multiobjective evolutionary algorithm based on decomposition, and a cooperative coevolution multiobjective algorithm as well as other parallel evolution algorithms with different migration topology. PMID:26180840

  18. Comparison of two different approaches for the control of convectively unstable flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juillet, Fabien; Schmid, Peter; McKeon, Beverley; Huerre, Patrick

    2011-11-01

    The probably most widely used control strategy in the literature is based on the Linear Quadratic Gaussian (LQG) framework. However, this approach seems to be difficult to apply to some fluid systems. In particular, due to their high sensitivity to external noise, amplifier flows are hard to control and the classical LQG compensator may be unable to describe the noise with sufficient accuracy. Another strategy aims at directly measuring these noise sources through a sensor called ``spy.'' The LQG and the spy approaches will be presented and compared using the Ginzburg-Landau equation as a model. It will be shown that the use of a spy is particularly relevant for convectively unstable systems. In addition, the ability of Subspace Identification Methods to provide satisfactory models is demonstrated. Finally, the findings from the Ginzburg-Landau investigation are generalized and applied to a more realistic system, namely a backward-facing step at Re = 350 . Support from Ecole Polytechnique and the Partner University Fund (PUF) is gratefully acknowledged.

  19. An Airway Network Flow Assignment Approach Based on an Efficient Multiobjective Optimization Framework.

    PubMed

    Guan, Xiangmin; Zhang, Xuejun; Zhu, Yanbo; Sun, Dengfeng; Lei, Jiaxing

    2015-01-01

    Considering reducing the airspace congestion and the flight delay simultaneously, this paper formulates the airway network flow assignment (ANFA) problem as a multiobjective optimization model and presents a new multiobjective optimization framework to solve it. Firstly, an effective multi-island parallel evolution algorithm with multiple evolution populations is employed to improve the optimization capability. Secondly, the nondominated sorting genetic algorithm II is applied for each population. In addition, a cooperative coevolution algorithm is adapted to divide the ANFA problem into several low-dimensional biobjective optimization problems which are easier to deal with. Finally, in order to maintain the diversity of solutions and to avoid prematurity, a dynamic adjustment operator based on solution congestion degree is specifically designed for the ANFA problem. Simulation results using the real traffic data from China air route network and daily flight plans demonstrate that the proposed approach can improve the solution quality effectively, showing superiority to the existing approaches such as the multiobjective genetic algorithm, the well-known multiobjective evolutionary algorithm based on decomposition, and a cooperative coevolution multiobjective algorithm as well as other parallel evolution algorithms with different migration topology. PMID:26180840

  20. Cold Flow as Versatile Approach for Stable and Highly Luminescent Quantum Dot-Salt Composites.

    PubMed

    Benad, Albrecht; Guhrenz, Chris; Bauer, Christoph; Eichler, Franziska; Adam, Marcus; Ziegler, Christoph; Gaponik, Nikolai; Eychmüller, Alexander

    2016-08-24

    Since the beginning of the 1980s, colloidally synthesized quantum dots (QDs) have been in the focus of interest due to their possible implementation for color conversion, luminescent light concentrators, and lasing. For all these applications, the QDs benefit from being embedded into a host matrix to ensure stability and usability. Many different host materials used for this purpose still have their individual shortcomings. Here, we present a universal, fast, and flexible approach for the direct incorporation of a wide range of QDs into inorganic ionic crystals using cold flow. The QD solution is mixed with a finely milled salt, followed by the removal of the solvent under vacuum. Under high pressure (GPa), the salt powder loaded with QDs transforms into transparent pellets. This effect is well-known for many inorganic salts (e.g., KCl, KBr, KI, NaCl, CsI, AgCl) from, e.g., sample preparation for IR spectroscopy. With this approach, we are able to obtain strongly luminescent QD-salt composites, have precise control over the loading, and provide a chemically robust matrix ensuring long-term stability of the embedded QDs. Furthermore, we show the photo-, chemical, and thermal stability of the composite materials and their use as color conversion layers for a white light-emitting diode (w-LED). The method presented can potentially be used for all kinds of nanoparticles synthesized in organic as well as in aqueous media. PMID:27482755

  1. A robust approach to chance constrained optimal power flow with renewable generation

    DOE PAGES

    Lubin, Miles; Dvorkin, Yury; Backhaus, Scott N.

    2015-11-20

    Optimal Power Flow (OPF) dispatches controllable generation at minimum cost subject to operational constraints on generation and transmission assets. The uncertainty and variability of intermittent renewable generation is challenging current deterministic OPF approaches. Recent formulations of OPF use chance constraints to limit the risk from renewable generation uncertainty, however, these new approaches typically assume the probability distributions which characterize the uncertainty and variability are known exactly. We formulate a robust chance constrained (RCC) OPF that accounts for uncertainty in the parameters of these probability distributions by allowing them to be within an uncertainty set. The RCC OPF is solved usingmore » a cutting-plane algorithm that scales to large power systems. We demonstrate the RRC OPF on a modified model of the Bonneville Power Administration network, which includes 2209 buses and 176 controllable generators. In conclusion, deterministic, chance constrained (CC), and RCC OPF formulations are compared using several metrics including cost of generation, area control error, ramping of controllable generators, and occurrence of transmission line overloads as well as the respective computational performance.« less

  2. A robust approach to chance constrained optimal power flow with renewable generation

    SciTech Connect

    Lubin, Miles; Dvorkin, Yury; Backhaus, Scott N.

    2015-11-20

    Optimal Power Flow (OPF) dispatches controllable generation at minimum cost subject to operational constraints on generation and transmission assets. The uncertainty and variability of intermittent renewable generation is challenging current deterministic OPF approaches. Recent formulations of OPF use chance constraints to limit the risk from renewable generation uncertainty, however, these new approaches typically assume the probability distributions which characterize the uncertainty and variability are known exactly. We formulate a robust chance constrained (RCC) OPF that accounts for uncertainty in the parameters of these probability distributions by allowing them to be within an uncertainty set. The RCC OPF is solved using a cutting-plane algorithm that scales to large power systems. We demonstrate the RRC OPF on a modified model of the Bonneville Power Administration network, which includes 2209 buses and 176 controllable generators. In conclusion, deterministic, chance constrained (CC), and RCC OPF formulations are compared using several metrics including cost of generation, area control error, ramping of controllable generators, and occurrence of transmission line overloads as well as the respective computational performance.

  3. Estimating construction and demolition debris generation using a materials flow analysis approach.

    PubMed

    Cochran, K M; Townsend, T G

    2010-11-01

    The magnitude and composition of a region's construction and demolition (C&D) debris should be understood when developing rules, policies and strategies for managing this segment of the solid waste stream. In the US, several national estimates have been conducted using a weight-per-construction-area approximation; national estimates using alternative procedures such as those used for other segments of the solid waste stream have not been reported for C&D debris. This paper presents an evaluation of a materials flow analysis (MFA) approach for estimating C&D debris generation and composition for a large region (the US). The consumption of construction materials in the US and typical waste factors used for construction materials purchasing were used to estimate the mass of solid waste generated as a result of construction activities. Debris from demolition activities was predicted from various historical construction materials consumption data and estimates of average service lives of the materials. The MFA approach estimated that approximately 610-78 × 10(6)Mg of C&D debris was generated in 2002. This predicted mass exceeds previous estimates using other C&D debris predictive methodologies and reflects the large waste stream that exists.

  4. Fluid flow paths discrimination in tight sand gas reservoirs using the Hydraulic Flow unit approach with an example from the Algerian Sahara

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokhal, Abdellah; Bougandoura, Adel; Ouadfeul, Sid-Ali

    2015-04-01

    In this work, fluid flow paths are discriminated from standard well logs and core data through the utilization of Hydraulic Flow Units Approach (HFU) and an intelligent network. Firstly, the flow zone indicator (FZI), which is a unique parameter for each hydraulic unit, was used to characterize each rock type. The number of hydraulic flow units and mean values of FZI for each HFU were calculated from porosity and permeability measured from core-rocks. Application to data of a borehole located in the Algerian Sahara shows the existence of three HFUs and a correlation coefficient greater than 0.9 in each HFU was observed. Some FZI were attributed for un-cored wells using the Fuzzy Logic system (FL). Well-logs data that are used as an input to train the fuzzy system are the neutron porosity, the bulk density, the slowness of the P wave, the resistivity of the shallow and the deep zones and the natural gamma ray. The calculated FZI associated to these depths interval are used as an output. The presented methodology was successfully applied to a large data set of laboratory and well logging measurements from the Hassi D'zaabat field. Keywords: Fluid flow; FZI, Hydraulic Flow Unit (HFU); Fuzzy logic.

  5. Lava Flow Hazard Assessment for the Idaho National Laboratory: A Probabilistic Approach to Modeling Lava Flow Inundation with MOLASSES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallant, E.; Connor, C.; Richardson, J. A.; Wetmore, P. H.; Connor, L.

    2015-12-01

    We present the results of a lava flow hazard assessment for the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) using a new lava flow code, MOLASSES (MOdular LAva Simulation Software for Earth Science). INL is a nuclear research and development facility located on the eastern Snake River Plain with the potential for lava flow inundation from both monogenetic and polygenetic basaltic eruptions. Previously published inventories of observed surface vents and vents that are buried by younger lava flows and inferred from interpretation of borehole stratigraphy were used to created spatial density maps of vents within the INL region. Monte carlo simulations were run using the MOLASSES code to compare the difference between events initiated using only surface vents and events initiated using both the surface and the buried vents. We find that the inclusion of the buried vent locations drastically increases the number of site inundations and events initiating within INL boundaries. This highlights the need to seek out a more complete eruption record in an area of heavy prehistoric activity to better assess future hazard and associated risk.

  6. Simulating Groundwater Flow in Karst Aquifers with Distributed Parameter Models—Comparison of Porous-Equivalent Media and Hybrid Flow Approaches

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kuniansky, Eve L.

    2016-09-22

    been developed that incorporate the submerged conduits as a one-dimensional pipe network within the aquifer rather than as discrete, extremely transmissive features in a porous-equivalent medium; these submerged conduit models are usually referred to as hybrid models and may include the capability to simulate both laminar and turbulent flow in the one-dimensional pipe network. Comparisons of the application of a porous-equivalent media model with and without turbulence (MODFLOW-Conduit Flow Process mode 2 and basic MODFLOW, respectively) and a hybrid (MODFLOW-Conduit Flow Process mode 1) model to the Woodville Karst Plain near Tallahassee, Florida, indicated that for annual, monthly, or seasonal average hydrologic conditions, all methods met calibration criteria (matched observed groundwater levels and average flows). Thus, the increased effort required, such as the collection of data on conduit location, to develop a hybrid model and its increased computational burden, is not necessary for simulation of average hydrologic conditions (non-laminar flow effects on simulated head and spring discharge were minimal). However, simulation of a large storm event in the Woodville Karst Plain with daily stress periods indicated that turbulence is important for matching daily springflow hydrographs. Thus, if matching streamflow hydrographs over a storm event is required, the simulation of non-laminar flow and the location of conduits are required. The main challenge in application of the methods and approaches for developing hybrid models relates to the difficulty of mapping conduit networks or having high-quality datasets to calibrate these models. Additionally, hybrid models have long simulation times, which can preclude the use of parameter estimation for calibration. Simulation of contaminant transport that does not account for preferential flow through conduits or extremely permeable zones in any approach is ill-advised. Simulation results in other karst aquifers or other

  7. Simulating groundwater flow in karst aquifers with distributed parameter models—Comparison of porous-equivalent media and hybrid flow approaches

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kuniansky, Eve L.

    2016-09-22

    been developed that incorporate the submerged conduits as a one-dimensional pipe network within the aquifer rather than as discrete, extremely transmissive features in a porous-equivalent medium; these submerged conduit models are usually referred to as hybrid models and may include the capability to simulate both laminar and turbulent flow in the one-dimensional pipe network. Comparisons of the application of a porous-equivalent media model with and without turbulence (MODFLOW-Conduit Flow Process mode 2 and basic MODFLOW, respectively) and a hybrid (MODFLOW-Conduit Flow Process mode 1) model to the Woodville Karst Plain near Tallahassee, Florida, indicated that for annual, monthly, or seasonal average hydrologic conditions, all methods met calibration criteria (matched observed groundwater levels and average flows). Thus, the increased effort required, such as the collection of data on conduit location, to develop a hybrid model and its increased computational burden, is not necessary for simulation of average hydrologic conditions (non-laminar flow effects on simulated head and spring discharge were minimal). However, simulation of a large storm event in the Woodville Karst Plain with daily stress periods indicated that turbulence is important for matching daily springflow hydrographs. Thus, if matching streamflow hydrographs over a storm event is required, the simulation of non-laminar flow and the location of conduits are required. The main challenge in application of the methods and approaches for developing hybrid models relates to the difficulty of mapping conduit networks or having high-quality datasets to calibrate these models. Additionally, hybrid models have long simulation times, which can preclude the use of parameter estimation for calibration. Simulation of contaminant transport that does not account for preferential flow through conduits or extremely permeable zones in any approach is ill-advised. Simulation results in other karst aquifers or other

  8. Processes, mechanisms, parameters, and modeling approaches for partially saturated flow in soil and rock media; Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J.S.Y.; Narasimhan, T.N.

    1993-06-01

    This report discusses conceptual models and mathematical equations, analyzes distributions and correlations among hydrological parameters of soils and tuff, introduces new path integration approaches, and outlines scaling procedures to model potential-driven fluid flow in heterogeneous media. To properly model the transition from fracture-dominated flow under saturated conditions to matrix-dominated flow under partially saturated conditions, characteristic curves and permeability functions for fractures and matrix need to be improved and validated. Couplings from two-phase flow, heat transfer, solute transport, and rock deformation to liquid flow are also important. For stochastic modeling of alternating units of welded and nonwelded tuff or formations bounded by fault zones, correlations and constraints on average values of saturated permeability and air entry scaling factor between different units need to be imposed to avoid unlikely combinations of parameters and predictions. Large-scale simulations require efficient and verifiable numerical algorithms. New path integration approaches based on postulates of minimum work and mass conservation to solve flow geometry and potential distribution simultaneously are introduced. This verifiable integral approach, together with fractal scaling procedures to generate statistical realizations with parameter distribution, correlation, and scaling taken into account, can be used to quantify uncertainties and generate the cumulative distribution function for groundwater travel times.

  9. Reversible logic gates based on enzyme-biocatalyzed reactions and realized in flow cells: a modular approach.

    PubMed

    Fratto, Brian E; Katz, Evgeny

    2015-05-18

    Reversible logic gates, such as the double Feynman gate, Toffoli gate and Peres gate, with 3-input/3-output channels are realized using reactions biocatalyzed with enzymes and performed in flow systems. The flow devices are constructed using a modular approach, where each flow cell is modified with one enzyme that biocatalyzes one chemical reaction. The multi-step processes mimicking the reversible logic gates are organized by combining the biocatalytic cells in different networks. This work emphasizes logical but not physical reversibility of the constructed systems. Their advantages and disadvantages are discussed and potential use in biosensing systems, rather than in computing devices, is suggested. PMID:25778455

  10. A new approach to model weakly nonhydrostatic shallow water flows in open channels with smoothed particle hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Tsang-Jung; Chang, Kao-Hua; Kao, Hong-Ming

    2014-11-01

    A new approach to model weakly nonhydrostatic shallow water flows in open channels is proposed by using a Lagrangian meshless method, smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH). The Lagrangian form of the Boussinesq equations is solved through SPH to merge the local and convective derivatives as the material derivative. In the numerical SPH procedure, the present study uses a predictor-corrector method, in which the pure space derivative terms (the hydrostatic and source terms) are explicitly solved and the mixed space and time derivatives term (the material term of B1 and B2) is computed with an implicit scheme. It is thus a convenient tool in the processes of the space discretization compared to other Eulerian approaches. Four typical benchmark problems in weakly nonhydrostatic shallow water flows, including solitary wave propagation, nonlinear interaction of two solitary waves, dambreak flow propagation, and undular bore development, are selected to employ model validation under the closed and open boundary conditions. Numerical results are compared with the analytical solutions or published laboratory and numerical results. It is found that the proposed approach is capable of resolving weakly nonhydrostatic shallow water flows. Thus, the proposed SPH approach can supplement the lack of the SPH-Boussinesq researches in the literatures, and provide an alternative to model weakly nonhydrostatic shallow water flows in open channels.

  11. Optimizing neural networks for river flow forecasting - Evolutionary Computation methods versus the Levenberg-Marquardt approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piotrowski, Adam P.; Napiorkowski, Jarosław J.

    2011-09-01

    SummaryAlthough neural networks have been widely applied to various hydrological problems, including river flow forecasting, for at least 15 years, they have usually been trained by means of gradient-based algorithms. Recently nature inspired Evolutionary Computation algorithms have rapidly developed as optimization methods able to cope not only with non-differentiable functions but also with a great number of local minima. Some of proposed Evolutionary Computation algorithms have been tested for neural networks training, but publications which compare their performance with gradient-based training methods are rare and present contradictory conclusions. The main goal of the present study is to verify the applicability of a number of recently developed Evolutionary Computation optimization methods, mostly from the Differential Evolution family, to multi-layer perceptron neural networks training for daily rainfall-runoff forecasting. In the present paper eight Evolutionary Computation methods, namely the first version of Differential Evolution (DE), Distributed DE with Explorative-Exploitative Population Families, Self-Adaptive DE, DE with Global and Local Neighbors, Grouping DE, JADE, Comprehensive Learning Particle Swarm Optimization and Efficient Population Utilization Strategy Particle Swarm Optimization are tested against the Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm - probably the most efficient in terms of speed and success rate among gradient-based methods. The Annapolis River catchment was selected as the area of this study due to its specific climatic conditions, characterized by significant seasonal changes in runoff, rapid floods, dry summers, severe winters with snowfall, snow melting, frequent freeze and thaw, and presence of river ice - conditions which make flow forecasting more troublesome. The overall performance of the Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm and the DE with Global and Local Neighbors method for neural networks training turns out to be superior to other

  12. Improved Performances in Subsonic Flows of an SPH Scheme with Gradients Estimated Using an Integral Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valdarnini, R.

    2016-11-01

    In this paper, we present results from a series of hydrodynamical tests aimed at validating the performance of a smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) formulation in which gradients are derived from an integral approach. We specifically investigate the code behavior with subsonic flows, where it is well known that zeroth-order inconsistencies present in standard SPH make it particularly problematic to correctly model the fluid dynamics. In particular, we consider the Gresho–Chan vortex problem, the growth of Kelvin–Helmholtz instabilities, the statistics of driven subsonic turbulence and the cold Keplerian disk problem. We compare simulation results for the different tests with those obtained, for the same initial conditions, using standard SPH. We also compare the results with the corresponding ones obtained previously with other numerical methods, such as codes based on a moving-mesh scheme or Godunov-type Lagrangian meshless methods. We quantify code performances by introducing error norms and spectral properties of the particle distribution, in a way similar to what was done in other works. We find that the new SPH formulation exhibits strongly reduced gradient errors and outperforms standard SPH in all of the tests considered. In fact, in terms of accuracy, we find good agreement between the simulation results of the new scheme and those produced using other recently proposed numerical schemes. These findings suggest that the proposed method can be successfully applied for many astrophysical problems in which the presence of subsonic flows previously limited the use of SPH, with the new scheme now being competitive in these regimes with other numerical methods.

  13. Balancing practicality and hydrologic realism: a parsimonious approach for simulating rapid groundwater recharge via unsaturated-zone preferential flow

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mirus, Benjamin B.; Nimmo, J.R.

    2013-01-01

    The impact of preferential flow on recharge and contaminant transport poses a considerable challenge to water-resources management. Typical hydrologic models require extensive site characterization, but can underestimate fluxes when preferential flow is significant. A recently developed source-responsive model incorporates film-flow theory with conservation of mass to estimate unsaturated-zone preferential fluxes with readily available data. The term source-responsive describes the sensitivity of preferential flow in response to water availability at the source of input. We present the first rigorous tests of a parsimonious formulation for simulating water table fluctuations using two case studies, both in arid regions with thick unsaturated zones of fractured volcanic rock. Diffuse flow theory cannot adequately capture the observed water table responses at both sites; the source-responsive model is a viable alternative. We treat the active area fraction of preferential flow paths as a scaled function of water inputs at the land surface then calibrate the macropore density to fit observed water table rises. Unlike previous applications, we allow the characteristic film-flow velocity to vary, reflecting the lag time between source and deep water table responses. Analysis of model performance and parameter sensitivity for the two case studies underscores the importance of identifying thresholds for initiation of film flow in unsaturated rocks, and suggests that this parsimonious approach is potentially of great practical value.

  14. Computation of viscous flows over airfoils, including separation, with a coupling approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leballeur, J. C.

    1983-01-01

    Viscous incompressible flows over single or multiple airfoils, with or without separation, were computed using an inviscid flow calculation, with modified boundary conditions, and by a method providing calculation and coupling for boundary layers and wakes, within conditions of strong viscous interaction. The inviscid flow is calculated with a method of singularities, the numerics of which were improved by using both source and vortex distributions over profiles, associated with regularity conditions for the fictitious flows inside of the airfoils. The viscous calculation estimates the difference between viscous flow and inviscid interacting flow, with a direct or inverse integral method, laminar or turbulent, with or without reverse flow. The numerical method for coupling determines iteratively the boundary conditions for the inviscid flow. For attached viscous layers regions, an underrelaxation is locally calculated to insure stability. For separated or separating regions, a special semi-inverse algorithm is used. Comparisons with experiments are presented.

  15. A Many-Task Parallel Approach for Multiscale Simulations of Subsurface Flow and Reactive Transport

    SciTech Connect

    Scheibe, Timothy D.; Yang, Xiaofan; Schuchardt, Karen L.; Agarwal, Khushbu; Chase, Jared M.; Palmer, Bruce J.; Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.

    2014-12-16

    Continuum-scale models have long been used to study subsurface flow, transport, and reactions but lack the ability to resolve processes that are governed by pore-scale mixing. Recently, pore-scale models, which explicitly resolve individual pores and soil grains, have been developed to more accurately model pore-scale phenomena, particularly reaction processes that are controlled by local mixing. However, pore-scale models are prohibitively expensive for modeling application-scale domains. This motivates the use of a hybrid multiscale approach in which continuum- and pore-scale codes are coupled either hierarchically or concurrently within an overall simulation domain (time and space). This approach is naturally suited to an adaptive, loosely-coupled many-task methodology with three potential levels of concurrency. Each individual code (pore- and continuum-scale) can be implemented in parallel; multiple semi-independent instances of the pore-scale code are required at each time step providing a second level of concurrency; and Monte Carlo simulations of the overall system to represent uncertainty in material property distributions provide a third level of concurrency. We have developed a hybrid multiscale model of a mixing-controlled reaction in a porous medium wherein the reaction occurs only over a limited portion of the domain. Loose, minimally-invasive coupling of pre-existing parallel continuum- and pore-scale codes has been accomplished by an adaptive script-based workflow implemented in the Swift workflow system. We describe here the methods used to create the model system, adaptively control multiple coupled instances of pore- and continuum-scale simulations, and maximize the scalability of the overall system. We present results of numerical experiments conducted on NERSC supercomputing systems; our results demonstrate that loose many-task coupling provides a scalable solution for multiscale subsurface simulations with minimal overhead.

  16. Variable pump flow-based Doppler ultrasound method: a novel approach to the measurement of access flow in hemodialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chih-Ching; Chang, Chao-Fu; Chiou, Hong-Jen; Sun, Ying-Chou; Chiang, Shou-Shan; Lin, Ming-Wei; Lee, Pui-Ching; Yang, Wu-Chang

    2005-01-01

    Decreasing vascular access flow (Qa) is an important predictor of future access thrombosis and malfunction for hemodialysis (HD) patients. Among all of the methods for determining Qa, the variable pump flow (VPF) Doppler method measures Qa according to the change in Doppler signal between the arterial and the venous needles under different pump flow. After this technique was combined with spectral analysis of Duplex Doppler imaging, the variable pump flow-based Doppler ultrasound method (VPFDUM) for Qa measurement was developed. This study compared the reproducibility and correlation of Qa measurements for three different methods-VPFDUM, ultrasound dilution method (UDM), and conventional Doppler ultrasound method (CDUM)-in 55 HD patients. The mean value of Qa by VPFDUM (870.8 +/- 412.0 ml/min) was close to that by UDM (868.6 +/- 417.9 ml/min) but higher than that by CDUM (either of the above values versus 685.1 +/- 303.6 ml/min; P < 0.005). The mean values of coefficient of variation were similar by VPFDUM (1.6%) and UDM (1.4%) but lower than that by CDUM (either of the above values versus 6.8%; P < 0.01). The correlation coefficient and intraclass correlation coefficient of the repeated Qa measurements by VPFDUM (0.985 and 0.993; P < 0.001) were also similar to those by UDM (0.992 and 0.995; P < 0.001) but slightly higher than those by CDUM (0.917 and 0.948; P < 0.005). Either the reproducibility of VPFDUM (r=0.98, P < 0.0001) or the correlation between VPFDUM and UDM (r=0.99, P < 0.0001) in Qa measurements is good. The unassisted patency of vascular access at 6 mo was significantly poorer in patients with Qa <500 ml/min than those with Qa >500 ml/min (13.6% versus 92.2%; P < 0.0001). In conclusion, VPFDUM is a noninvasive, accurate, and reliable procedure for Qa measurement and prediction of the prognosis of vascular access in HD patients.

  17. Space station electrical power distribution analysis using a load flow approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emanuel, Ervin M.

    1987-01-01

    The space station's electrical power system will evolve and grow in a manner much similar to the present terrestrial electrical power system utilities. The initial baseline reference configuration will contain more than 50 nodes or busses, inverters, transformers, overcurrent protection devices, distribution lines, solar arrays, and/or solar dynamic power generating sources. The system is designed to manage and distribute 75 KW of power single phase or three phase at 20 KHz, and grow to a level of 300 KW steady state, and must be capable of operating at a peak of 450 KW for 5 to 10 min. In order to plan far into the future and keep pace with load growth, a load flow power system analysis approach must be developed and utilized. This method is a well known energy assessment and management tool that is widely used throughout the Electrical Power Utility Industry. The results of a comprehensive evaluation and assessment of an Electrical Distribution System Analysis Program (EDSA) is discussed. Its potential use as an analysis and design tool for the 20 KHz space station electrical power system is addressed.

  18. Material flow analysis of NdFeB magnets for Denmark: a comprehensive waste flow sampling and analysis approach.

    PubMed

    Habib, Komal; Schibye, Peter Klausen; Vestbø, Andreas Peter; Dall, Ole; Wenzel, Henrik

    2014-10-21

    Neodymium-iron-boron (NdFeB) magnets have become highly desirable for modern hi-tech applications. These magnets, in general, contain two key rare earth elements (REEs), i.e., neodymium (Nd) and dysprosium (Dy), which are responsible for the very high strength of these magnets, allowing for considerable size and weight reduction in modern applications. This study aims to explore the current and future potential of a secondary supply of neodymium and dysprosium from recycling of NdFeB magnets. For this purpose, material flow analysis (MFA) has been carried out to perform the detailed mapping of stocks and flows of NdFeB magnets in Denmark. A novel element of this study is the value added to the traditionally practiced MFAs at national and/or global levels by complementing them with a comprehensive sampling and elemental analysis of NdFeB magnets, taken out from a sample of 157 different products representing 18 various product types. The results show that the current amount of neodymium and dysprosium in NdFeB magnets present in the Danish waste stream is only 3 and 0.2 Mg, respectively. However, this number is estimated to increase to 175 Mg of neodymium and 11.4 Mg of dysprosium by 2035. Nevertheless, efficient recovery of these elements from a very diverse electronic waste stream remains a logistic and economic challenge.

  19. Continuous monitoring of a large active earth flow using an integrated GPS - automatic total station approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corsini, A.

    2009-04-01

    Landslide monitoring has evolved as a crucial tool in civil protection to mitigate and prevent disasters. The research presents an approach to continuous monitoring of a large-scale active earth flow using a system that integrates surface measurements obtained by a GPS and an automatic total station. With the data obtained from the system the landslide can be monitored in near-real-time and surface displacements can be directly utilized to provide early warning of slope movements and to study the behavior of the landslide, e.g. to predict timing and mechanisms of future failure. The Valoria landslide located in the northern Apennines of Italy was reactivated in 2001, 2005 and 2007 damaging roads and endangering houses. A monitoring system was installed in 2007-2008 in the frame of a civil protection plan aimed at risk mitigation. The system consists of an automatic total station measuring about 40 prisms located in the landslide to a maximum distance of 1.800 km; one double-frequency GPS receiver connects in streaming by wireless communication with 4 single-frequency GPS in side the flow. Until December 2007 the monitoring network was operated with periodic static surveying followed by the data post-processing. From September 2007 until March 2008 the landslide deformation was evaluated by periodic surveys with the total station and the GPS system. This first measure showed that the displacements were influenced by the rainfall events and by the snow melting. The total displacements measured vary from centimeter scale in the crown zone, where retrogressive movements were in progress, to over 50 m in the flow track zone. Starting in March 2008 data acquisition by the total station system and GPS were automated in order to allow continuous and near-real-time data processing. The displacement data collected in one and a half year of continuous operation show different acceleration and deceleration phases as a result of the pore water pressure distribution inside the

  20. Estimating ungauged catchment flows from Lake Tana floodplains, Ethiopia: an isotope hydrological approach.

    PubMed

    Kebede, Seifu; Admasu, Girum; Travi, Yves

    2011-03-01

    The isotope balance approach, which used (18)O content of waters, has been used as an independent tool to estimate inflow to Lake Tana of surface water flows from ungauged catchment of Lake Tana (50% of the total area) and evaporative water loss in the vast plains adjoining the lake. Sensitivity analysis has been conducted to investigate the effects of changes in the input parameters on the estimated flux. Surface water inflow from ungauged catchment is determined to be in the order of 1.698×10(9) m(3)a(-1). Unaccounted water loss from the lake has been estimated at 454×10(6) m(3)a(-1) (equivalent to 5% of the total via surface water). Since the lake is water tight to groundwater outflow, the major error introduced into the water balance computation is related to evaporative water loss in water from the flood plains. If drained, the water which is lost to evaporation can be used as an additional water resource for socio-economic development in the region (tourism, agriculture, hydropower, and navigation). Hydrological processes taking place in the vast flood plains of Lake Tana (origin of salinity, groundwater surface water interaction, origin of flood plain waters) have been investigated using isotopes of water and geochemistry as tracers. The salinity of shallow groundwaters in the flood plains is related to dissolution of salts accumulated in sediments covering former evaporation pools and migration of trace salt during recharge. The waters in the flood plains originate from local rainfall and river overflows and the effect of backwater flow from the lake is excluded. Minimum linkage exists between the surface waters in the flood plains and shallow groundwaters in alluvio lacustrine sediments suggesting the disappearance of flood waters following the rainy season, which is related to complete evaporation or drainage than seepage to the subsurface. There is no groundwater outflow from the lake. Inflow of groundwater cannot be ruled out. Discharge of groundwater

  1. Flow-Solution-Liquid-Solid Growth of Semiconductor Nanowires: A Novel Approach for Controlled Synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Hollingsworth, Jennifer A.; Palaniappan, Kumaranand; Laocharoensuk, Rawiwan; Smith, Nickolaus A.; Dickerson, Robert M.; Casson, Joanna L.; Baldwin, Jon K.

    2012-06-07

    Semiconductor nanowires (SC-NWs) have potential applications in diverse technologies from nanoelectronics and photonics to energy harvesting and storage due to their quantum-confined opto-electronic properties coupled with their highly anisotropic shape. Here, we explore new approaches to an important solution-based growth method known as solution-liquid-solid (SLS) growth. In SLS, molecular precursors are reacted in the presence of low-melting metal nanoparticles that serve as molten fluxes to catalyze the growth of the SC-NWs. The mechanism of growth is assumed to be similar to that of vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) growth, with the clear distinctions of being conducted in solution in the presence of coordinating ligands and at relatively lower temperatures (<300 C). The resultant SC-NWs are soluble in common organic solvents and solution processable, offering advantages such as simplified processing, scale-up, ultra-small diameters for quantum-confinement effects, and flexible choice of materials from group III-V to groups II-VI, IV-VI, as well as truly ternary I-III-VI semiconductors as we recently demonstrates. Despite these advantages of SLS growth, VLS offers several clear opportunities not allowed by conventional SLS. Namely, VLS allows sequential addition of precursors for facile synthesis of complex axial heterostructures. In addition, growth proceeds relatively slowly compared to SLS, allowing clear assessments of growth kinetics. In order to retain the materials and processing flexibility afforded by SLS, but add the elements of controlled growth afforded by VLS, we transformed SLS into a flow based method by adapting it to synthesis in a microfluidic system. By this new method - so-called 'flow-SLS' (FSLS) - we have now demonstrated unprecedented fabrication of multi-segmented SC-NWs, e.g., 8-segmented CdSe/ZnSe defined by either compositionally abrupt or alloyed interfaces as a function of growth conditions. In addition, we have studied growth rates as a

  2. A nonlinear approach for two-dimensional bubbly flows around a thin body

    SciTech Connect

    Al Assa`ad, A.

    1994-12-31

    This paper deals with the study of the flow of a liquid containing small gas bubbles around a thin body. For the sake of simplicity, attention is focused on plane-parallel flow, with the aim of assessing the dynamic effects of the bubble growth. Limiting themselves to the case of supersonic flows, the original system of field equations obtained in their previous work is treated by the reductive pertubation method. Its shown that when the flow around the body takes place at zero angle of incidence, the flow is determined by the solutions of a Korteweg-deVries equation. The boundary value problem in velocity potential is presented. To determine the general qualitative nature of the flow behind the body, self-similar solutions are considered and similarity conditions are specified. It is seen that soliton-like solutions can be found under some conditions, and their typical features are outlined.

  3. Regional based modeling approach for rainfall-induced debris flows in the continental-climatic Northern Tien Shan (SE Kazakhstan)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, Thomas; Küfmann, Carola; Haas, Florian; Baume, Otfried; Becht, Michael

    2013-04-01

    The high mountain systems of Central Asia (Hindukush, Pamir and Tien Shan) are dominated by continental-climatic conditions. Nevertheless, westerly maritime air circulation and convective rainfalls during the summer season result in high rainfall intensities. In combination with a high availability of unconsolidated material rainfall triggered debris flows are prominent and intensive geomorphologic processes in these mountain areas. The presented study aims to figure out a regional based modeling approach for rainfall-induced debris flow processes based on combination of a disposition model for debris flow starting zones with process-flow models. The investigation area has a size of about 700 square kilometers and is situated in the Northern Tien Shan mountains in SE Kazakhstan (investigation areas: valleys of Prochadnaja, Big Almatinka, Little Almatinka and Left Talgar). The area is characterized by mountain forest zone, alpine meadows and high-alpine glaciated areas with the highest peaks at 4500m. In a first step the disposition (point of process triggering) of actual debris flows was analyzed. Due to different triggering mechanisms, the processes were divided into channel-type and slope-type debris flows. Detailed mapping of actual debris flows initiation areas and a GIS-based geostatistical disposition analysis are used to identify the main geofactor-variables and geofactor combinations which enhance the triggering of rainfall-induced debris flows. It can be shown that both, longtime variable geofactors (such as local geomorphology and hydrology) plays a significant role for triggering debris flows, as well as mid- and short time variable geofactors. Especially actual permafrost distribution and degradation plus glacier retreat comes into the focus of interest. This is most notably for rainfall induced slope-type debris flows which primarily are triggered in the discontinuous and continuous permafrost areas eroding younger unconsolidated material from actual

  4. An experimental/computational approach for examining unconfined cohesive powder flow.

    PubMed

    Faqih, AbdulMobeen; Chaudhuri, Bodhisattwa; Alexander, Albert W; Davies, Clive; Muzzio, Fernando J; Silvina Tomassone, M

    2006-11-01

    This paper describes a new method to quantitatively measure the flow characteristics of unconfined cohesive powders in a rotating drum. Cohesion plays an important role, affecting flow properties/characteristics, mixing rates, and segregation tendencies. The method relies on measuring the change in center of mass of the powder bed as it avalanches in the vessel, using a load cell that is sampled continuously. Filtering and analysis of the signal is done using Fast-Fourier transform into the frequency domain, where noise is eliminated using signal processing methods. The filtered data is transformed back to the time domain by using an inverse Fast-Fourier transform to give quantitative information on the powder flow characteristics. In order to understand the nature of the forces controlling powder flow behavior, a computational model was developed to estimate the relationship between inter-particle cohesive strength and experimental measurements. A "flow index" generated by the method correlates well with the degree of bed expansion (dynamic dilation) of the cohesive powders. The flow index also predicts the dynamics of flow through hoppers. As the flow index increases it becomes increasingly difficult for the powder to flow through the hoppers.

  5. Acute Portal Hypertension Models in Dogs: Low- and High-Flow Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Dave, Jaydev K; Liu, Ji-Bin; Halldorsdottir, Valgerdur G; Eisenbrey, John R; Merton, Daniel A; Machado, Priscilla; Zhao, Hongjia; Altemus, Joseph; Needleman, Laurence; Brown, Daniel B; Forsberg, Flemming

    2012-01-01

    Effective animal models are needed to evaluate the feasibility of new techniques to assess portal hypertension (PH). Here we developed 2 canine models of acute PH by increasing intrasinusoidal resistance and by increasing the portal vein (PV) flow volume to test the efficacy of a noninvasive technique to evaluate PH. The acute low-flow PH model was based on embolization of liver circulation by using a gelatin sponge material. The acute high-flow PH model was based on increasing the PV flow volume by using an arteriovenous (A-V) shunt from the femoral artery and saline infusion. PV pressures and diameters were assessed before and after inducing PH. Pressure values and diameters were obtained from the inferior vena cava in 3 unmanipulated controls. The low-flow model of PH was repeatable and successfully increased PV pressure by an average of 16.5 mm Hg within 15 min. The high-flow model of PH failed to achieve increased PV pressures. However, saline supplementation of the portal circulation in the high-flow model led to mean increases in PV pressures of 12.8 mm Hg within 20 min. Pulsatility in the PV was decreased in the low-flow model and increased in the high-flow model relative to baseline. No changes in PV diameter were noted in either model. These acute PH models are relatively straightforward to implement and may facilitate the evaluation of new techniques to assess PH. PMID:23114046

  6. A machine-learning approach for computation of fractional flow reserve from coronary computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Itu, Lucian; Rapaka, Saikiran; Passerini, Tiziano; Georgescu, Bogdan; Schwemmer, Chris; Schoebinger, Max; Flohr, Thomas; Sharma, Puneet; Comaniciu, Dorin

    2016-07-01

    Fractional flow reserve (FFR) is a functional index quantifying the severity of coronary artery lesions and is clinically obtained using an invasive, catheter-based measurement. Recently, physics-based models have shown great promise in being able to noninvasively estimate FFR from patient-specific anatomical information, e.g., obtained from computed tomography scans of the heart and the coronary arteries. However, these models have high computational demand, limiting their clinical adoption. In this paper, we present a machine-learning-based model for predicting FFR as an alternative to physics-based approaches. The model is trained on a large database of synthetically generated coronary anatomies, where the target values are computed using the physics-based model. The trained model predicts FFR at each point along the centerline of the coronary tree, and its performance was assessed by comparing the predictions against physics-based computations and against invasively measured FFR for 87 patients and 125 lesions in total. Correlation between machine-learning and physics-based predictions was excellent (0.9994, P < 0.001), and no systematic bias was found in Bland-Altman analysis: mean difference was -0.00081 ± 0.0039. Invasive FFR ≤ 0.80 was found in 38 lesions out of 125 and was predicted by the machine-learning algorithm with a sensitivity of 81.6%, a specificity of 83.9%, and an accuracy of 83.2%. The correlation was 0.729 (P < 0.001). Compared with the physics-based computation, average execution time was reduced by more than 80 times, leading to near real-time assessment of FFR. Average execution time went down from 196.3 ± 78.5 s for the CFD model to ∼2.4 ± 0.44 s for the machine-learning model on a workstation with 3.4-GHz Intel i7 8-core processor.

  7. Fluid flow in the osteocyte mechanical environment: a fluid-structure interaction approach.

    PubMed

    Verbruggen, Stefaan W; Vaughan, Ted J; McNamara, Laoise M

    2014-01-01

    Osteocytes are believed to be the primary sensor of mechanical stimuli in bone, which orchestrate osteoblasts and osteoclasts to adapt bone structure and composition to meet physiological loading demands. Experimental studies to quantify the mechanical environment surrounding bone cells are challenging, and as such, computational and theoretical approaches have modelled either the solid or fluid environment of osteocytes to predict how these cells are stimulated in vivo. Osteocytes are an elastic cellular structure that deforms in response to the external fluid flow imposed by mechanical loading. This represents a most challenging multi-physics problem in which fluid and solid domains interact, and as such, no previous study has accounted for this complex behaviour. The objective of this study is to employ fluid-structure interaction (FSI) modelling to investigate the complex mechanical environment of osteocytes in vivo. Fluorescent staining of osteocytes was performed in order to visualise their native environment and develop geometrically accurate models of the osteocyte in vivo. By simulating loading levels representative of vigorous physiological activity ([Formula: see text] compression and 300 Pa pressure gradient), we predict average interstitial fluid velocities [Formula: see text] and average maximum shear stresses [Formula: see text] surrounding osteocytes in vivo. Interestingly, these values occur in the canaliculi around the osteocyte cell processes and are within the range of stimuli known to stimulate osteogenic responses by osteoblastic cells in vitro. Significantly our results suggest that the greatest mechanical stimulation of the osteocyte occurs in the cell processes, which, cell culture studies have indicated, is the most mechanosensitive area of the cell. These are the first computational FSI models to simulate the complex multi-physics mechanical environment of osteocyte in vivo and provide a deeper understanding of bone mechanobiology.

  8. A semi-intrusive deterministic approach to uncertainty quantification in non-linear fluid flow problems

    SciTech Connect

    Abgrall, Rémi; Congedo, Pietro Marco

    2013-02-15

    This paper deals with the formulation of a semi-intrusive (SI) method allowing the computation of statistics of linear and non linear PDEs solutions. This method shows to be very efficient to deal with probability density function of whatsoever form, long-term integration and discontinuities in stochastic space. Given a stochastic PDE where randomness is defined on Ω, starting from (i) a description of the solution in term of a space variables, (ii) a numerical scheme defined for any event ω∈Ω and (iii) a (family) of random variables that may be correlated, the solution is numerically described by its conditional expectancies of point values or cell averages and its evaluation constructed from the deterministic scheme. One of the tools is a tessellation of the random space as in finite volume methods for the space variables. Then, using these conditional expectancies and the geometrical description of the tessellation, a piecewise polynomial approximation in the random variables is computed using a reconstruction method that is standard for high order finite volume space, except that the measure is no longer the standard Lebesgue measure but the probability measure. This reconstruction is then used to formulate a scheme on the numerical approximation of the solution from the deterministic scheme. This new approach is said semi-intrusive because it requires only a limited amount of modification in a deterministic solver to quantify uncertainty on the state when the solver includes uncertain variables. The effectiveness of this method is illustrated for a modified version of Kraichnan–Orszag three-mode problem where a discontinuous pdf is associated to the stochastic variable, and for a nozzle flow with shocks. The results have been analyzed in terms of accuracy and probability measure flexibility. Finally, the importance of the probabilistic reconstruction in the stochastic space is shown up on an example where the exact solution is computable, the viscous

  9. Approaches to Modeling Coupled Flow and Reaction in a 2-D Cementation Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Steefel, Carl; Cochepin, B.; Trotignon, L.; Bildstein, O.; Steefel, C.; Lagneau, V.; van der Lee, J.

    2008-04-01

    Porosity evolution at reactive interfaces is a key process that governs the evolution and performances of many engineered systems that have important applications in earth and environmental sciences. This is the case, for example, at the interface between cement structures and clays in deep geological nuclear waste disposals. Although in a different transport regime, similar questions arise for permeable reactive barriers used for biogeochemical remediation in surface environments. The COMEDIE project aims at investigating the coupling between transport, hydrodynamics and chemistry when significant variations of porosity occur. The present work focuses on a numerical benchmark used as a design exercise for the future COMEDIE-2D experiment. The use of reactive transport simulation tools like Hytec and Crunch provides predictions of the physico-chemical evolutions that are expected during the future experiments in laboratory. Focus is given in this paper on the evolution during the simulated experiment of precipitate, permeability and porosity fields. A first case is considered in which the porosity is constant. Results obtained with Crunch and Hytec are in relatively good agreement. Differences are attributable to the models of reactive surface area taken into account for dissolution/precipitation processes. Crunch and Hytec simulations taking into account porosity variations are then presented and compared. Results given by the two codes are in qualitative agreement, with differences attributable in part to the models of reactive surface area for dissolution/precipitation processes. As a consequence, the localization of secondary precipitates predicted by Crunch leads to lower local porosities than for predictions obtained by Hytec and thus to a stronger coupling between flow and chemistry. This benchmark highlights the importance of the surface area model employed to describe systems in which strong porosity variations occur as a result of dissolution

  10. Sum-of-squares of polynomials approach to nonlinear stability of fluid flows: an example of application

    PubMed Central

    Tutty, O.

    2015-01-01

    With the goal of providing the first example of application of a recently proposed method, thus demonstrating its ability to give results in principle, global stability of a version of the rotating Couette flow is examined. The flow depends on the Reynolds number and a parameter characterizing the magnitude of the Coriolis force. By converting the original Navier–Stokes equations to a finite-dimensional uncertain dynamical system using a partial Galerkin expansion, high-degree polynomial Lyapunov functionals were found by sum-of-squares of polynomials optimization. It is demonstrated that the proposed method allows obtaining the exact global stability limit for this flow in a range of values of the parameter characterizing the Coriolis force. Outside this range a lower bound for the global stability limit was obtained, which is still better than the energy stability limit. In the course of the study, several results meaningful in the context of the method used were also obtained. Overall, the results obtained demonstrate the applicability of the recently proposed approach to global stability of the fluid flows. To the best of our knowledge, it is the first case in which global stability of a fluid flow has been proved by a generic method for the value of a Reynolds number greater than that which could be achieved with the energy stability approach. PMID:26730219

  11. A continuous flow cold vapour procedure for mercury determination by atomic emission using the reverse flow injection approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Andrade, João Carlos; Bueno, Maria Izabel M. S.

    1994-07-01

    An experimental set-up for on-line Hg 2+ reduction and determination was devised using the reverse flow injection analysis (r-FIA) concept and the cold vapour (CV) technique, injecting an acidic Sn 2+ solution into the mercury sample line. The elemental mercury generated is separated from the reacting mixture by a 100 ml min -1 helium stream, which passes through a gas-liquid separator connected to a permeation cell. This gas stream is used as the plasma medium. The permeated Hg° is then concentrated on a 0.3 g gold foil placed inside a quartz tube connected to an 11 W He de discharge plasma chamber. The mercury retained on the gold surface is released by resistive heating and the emission intensity is observed at the 253.7 nm mercury line. For an injection cycle of 30 s, the calibration graphs are linear up to 50 ng ml -1(itr 2 = 0.999). An injection frequency of 120 h -1 is achieved, with negligible carry-over. The calculated relative standard deviation of the transient peaks is 1.6%. Higher sensitivities can be achieved using longer injection cycles. Samples of Human Hair Certified Reference Material were used to determine the accuracy of the method.

  12. Assessment of the Partially Resolved Numerical Simulation (PRNS) Approach in the National Combustion Code (NCC) for Turbulent Nonreacting and Reacting Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shih, Tsan-Hsing; Liu, Nan-Suey

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes an approach which aims at bridging the gap between the traditional Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) approach and the traditional large eddy simulation (LES) approach. It has the characteristics of the very large eddy simulation (VLES) and we call this approach the partially-resolved numerical simulation (PRNS). Systematic simulations using the National Combustion Code (NCC) have been carried out for fully developed turbulent pipe flows at different Reynolds numbers to evaluate the PRNS approach. Also presented are the sample results of two demonstration cases: nonreacting flow in a single injector flame tube and reacting flow in a Lean Direct Injection (LDI) hydrogen combustor.

  13. An arbitrary lagrangian-eulerian finite element approach to non-steady state fluid flows. Application to mould filling

    SciTech Connect

    Gaston, L.; Glut, B.; Bellet, M.; Chenot, J.L.

    1995-12-31

    This paper presents a two-dimensional lagrangian-eulerian finite element approach of non-steady state Navier-Stokes fluid flows with free surfaces, like those occurring during the mould filling stage in casting processes. The proposed model is based on a mixed velocity-pressure finite element formulation, including an augmented Lagrangian technique and an iterative solver of Uzawa type. Mesh updating is carried out through an arbitrary lagrangian-eulerian method in order to describe properly the free surface evolution. Heat transfer through the fluid flow is solved by a convection-diffusion splitting technique. The efficiency of the method is illustrated on an example of gravity casting.

  14. Three-dimensional passive mantle flow beneath mid-ocean ridges: an analytical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ligi, Marco; Cuffaro, Marco; Chierici, Francesco; Calafato, Antonino

    2008-11-01

    We discuss theoretical and computational method on plate-driven mantle flow beneath mid-ocean ridges. We consider a steady-state flow induced by motion of overlying rigid plates in an incompressible viscous mantle beneath a generic ridge-transform-ridge plate boundary. No assumption of orthogonal and symmetric spreading at ridge axis is made. Analytical solutions for viscosity flow in a half-space and in a layered viscosity mantle beneath an infinitesimal thickness lithosphere and beneath plates that thicken with increasing age, are presented. Numerical calculations were carried out using a standard fast Fourier transform algorithm. The difficulty of using standard Fourier methods to predict accurately the mantle flow field in the proximity of the plate boundaries is overcome by applying the Gegenbauer reconstruction post-processing technique to the Fourier pseudo-spectral solutions. Finally, we present some examples of flow computations. We consider, for both models, two different ridge-transform-ridge geometries consisting of 100 and 1000 km offsets of two ridge segments spreading at 15 mm/yr half rate. We found a significant difference in the flow structure between the two flow models close to ridge axis and ridge-transform intersections. The proposed model and methods are useful for fast mantle flow calculations to investigate melting processes beneath spreading centres, and to predict the relationship between mantle temperature, crustal thickness and geochemistry of the oceanic crust.

  15. Microparticle image velocimetry approach to flow measurements in isolated contracting lymphatic vessels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margaris, Konstantinos N.; Nepiyushchikh, Zhanna; Zawieja, David C.; Moore, James; Black, Richard A.

    2016-02-01

    We describe the development of an optical flow visualization method for resolving the flow velocity vector field in lymphatic vessels in vitro. The aim is to develop an experimental protocol for accurately estimating flow parameters, such as flow rate and shear stresses, with high spatial and temporal resolution. Previous studies in situ have relied on lymphocytes as tracers, but their low density resulted in a reduced spatial resolution whereas the assumption that the flow was fully developed in order to determine the flow parameters of interest may not be valid, especially in the vicinity of the valves, where the flow is undoubtedly more complex. To overcome these issues, we have applied the time-resolved microparticle image velocimetry (μ-PIV) technique, a well-established method that can provide increased spatial and temporal resolution that this transient flow demands. To that end, we have developed a custom light source, utilizing high-power light-emitting diodes, and associated control and image processing software. This paper reports the performance of the system and the results of a series of preliminary experiments performed on vessels isolated from rat mesenteries, demonstrating, for the first time, the successful application of the μ-PIV technique in these vessels.

  16. Microparticle image velocimetry approach to flow measurements in isolated contracting lymphatic vessels.

    PubMed

    Margaris, Konstantinos N; Nepiyushchikh, Zhanna; Zawieja, David C; Moore, James; Black, Richard A

    2016-02-01

    We describe the development of an optical flow visualization method for resolving the flow velocity vector field in lymphatic vessels in vitro. The aim is to develop an experimental protocol for accurately estimating flow parameters, such as flow rate and shear stresses, with high spatial and temporal resolution. Previous studies in situ have relied on lymphocytes as tracers, but their low density resulted in a reduced spatial resolution whereas the assumption that the flow was fully developed in order to determine the flow parameters of interest may not be valid, especially in the vicinity of the valves, where the flow is undoubtedly more complex. To overcome these issues, we have applied the time-resolved microparticle image velocimetry (μ -PIV) technique, a well-established method that can provide increased spatial and temporal resolution that this transient flow demands. To that end, we have developed a custom light source, utilizing high-power light-emitting diodes, and associated control and image processing software. This paper reports the performance of the system and the results of a series of preliminary experiments performed on vessels isolated from rat mesenteries, demonstrating, for the first time, the successful application of the μ -PIV technique in these vessels.

  17. An Approach to Student Flow Analysis: An Application of the NCHEMS Costing and Data Management System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Michael E.; Haight, Michael J.

    An analytic system for colleges that involves student flow calculation, an historical curriculum matrix, and departmental workload forecasts is examined. The conceptual base, uses of the data, technical issues, and implementation are covered. The student flow calculation uses enrollment trends to develop the probability of a student with a given…

  18. MODELING AIR FLOW DYNAMICS IN RADON MITIGATION SYSTEMS: A SIMPLIFIED APPROACH

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper refines and extends an earlier study--relating to the design of optimal radon mitigation systems based on subslab depressurization-- that suggested that subslab air flow induced by a central suction point be treated as radial air flow through a porous bed contained betw...

  19. The Current Status of Unsteady CFD Approaches for Aerodynamic Flow Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, Mark H.; Singer, Bart A.; Yamaleev, Nail; Vatsa, Veer N.; Viken, Sally A.; Atkins, Harold L.

    2002-01-01

    An overview of the current status of time dependent algorithms is presented. Special attention is given to algorithms used to predict fluid actuator flows, as well as other active and passive flow control devices. Capabilities for the next decade are predicted, and principal impediments to the progress of time-dependent algorithms are identified.

  20. Global 2D stability analysis of the cross lid-driven cavity flow with a streamfunction-vorticity approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gogoi, Bidyut B.

    2016-07-01

    We have recently analyzed the global two-dimensional (2D) stability of the staggered lid-driven cavity (LDC) flow with a higher order compact (HOC) approach. In the analysis, critical parameters are determined for both the parallel and anti-parallel motion of the lids and a detailed analysis has been carried out on either side of the critical values. In this article, we carry out an investigation of flow stabilities inside a two-sided cross lid-driven cavity with a pair of opposite lids moving in both parallel and anti-parallel directions. On discretization, the governing 2D Navier-Stokes (N-S) equations describing the steady flow and flow perturbations results in a generalized eigenvalue problem which is solved for determining the critical parameters on four different grids. Elaborate computation is performed for a wide range of Reynolds numbers (Re) on either side of the critical values in the range 200 ⩽ Re ⩽ 10000. For flows below the critical Reynolds number Rec, our numerical results are compared with established steady-state results and excellent agreement is obtained in all the cases. For Reynolds numbers above Rec, phase plane and spectral density analysis confirmed the existence of periodic, quasi-periodic, and stable flow patterns.

  1. An approach to assess the marginal environmental costs for flow regulation: an example in three European rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Jalon Diego, Garcia; de Jalon Silvestre, Garcia; Tanago Marta, Gonzalez

    2015-04-01

    In the last decades there has been a growing concern about water environmental costs. 'Polluter should pay' has been a phrase repeated in numerous policy-making processes. Water abstraction for Irrigation, Hydropower or water supply for Domestic or Industrial porpoises alters natural flow regimes impacting severely fluvial Ecosystems. The objective of this paper is to develop an evaluation of the marginal environmental costs for flow regulation. This approach is based on the idea 'who regulates flows should pay' and the amount to be paid should be proportional on the intensity, duration and frequency of the resulting regulated flows. The methodology proposed includes three separated steps: (i) estimating the natural flow regime of a river segment through studying the hydrologic conditions before the river is affected by a determined anthropogenic impact, (ii) assessing the hydrologic alteration of the river segment according to the estimated natural flow regime, and (iii) calculating marginal environmental costs of water supply. The three different case studies where the methodology was applied were the Esla River (Spain), the Upper River Tyne (England) and the Marna River (Norway).

  2. A multiobjective ant colony optimization approach for scheduling environmental flow management alternatives with application to the River Murray, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szemis, J. M.; Dandy, G. C.; Maier, H. R.

    2013-10-01

    In regulated river systems, such as the River Murray in Australia, the efficient use of water to preserve and restore biota in the river, wetlands, and floodplains is of concern for water managers. Available management options include the timing of river flow releases and operation of wetland flow control structures. However, the optimal scheduling of these environmental flow management alternatives is a difficult task, since there are generally multiple wetlands and floodplains with a range of species, as well as a large number of management options that need to be considered. Consequently, this problem is a multiobjective optimization problem aimed at maximizing ecological benefit while minimizing water allocations within the infrastructure constraints of the system under consideration. This paper presents a multiobjective optimization framework, which is based on a multiobjective ant colony optimization approach, for developing optimal trade-offs between water allocation and ecological benefit. The framework is applied to a reach of the River Murray in South Australia. Two studies are formulated to assess the impact of (i) upstream system flow constraints and (ii) additional regulators on this trade-off. The results indicate that unless the system flow constraints are relaxed, there is limited additional ecological benefit as allocation increases. Furthermore the use of regulators can increase ecological benefits while using less water. The results illustrate the utility of the framework since the impact of flow control infrastructure on the trade-offs between water allocation and ecological benefit can be investigated, thereby providing valuable insight to managers.

  3. Measuring transient water flow in unsaturated municipal solid waste - A new experimental approach

    SciTech Connect

    Capelo, J. Castro, M.A.H. de

    2007-07-01

    This research investigated transient water flow in unsaturated municipal solid waste (MSW) packed in columns using neutron scattering. The method developed was able to measure absolute moisture content and moisture variation in a sample of MSW produced in the city of Fortaleza (Brazil) during a simulated tropical rain event. The technique was proven to be efficient, showing that channeling flow accounts for most of the unsaturated flow conditions. The most important effect of micro-porous flow was on water accumulation and small long-term outflow. Furthermore, the definition of field capacity used in soil sciences does not seem to apply to flow in unsaturated MSW; the MSW layers kept increasing in moisture content long after water was allowed through. Finally, the long-term draining experiment demonstrated that the macro-porous matrix may not be a continuous medium, which makes experimental procedures that rely on matrix potential in specific points of the solid waste mass inaccurate.

  4. AWSCS-A System to Evaluate Different Approaches for the Automatic Composition and Execution of Web Services Flows

    PubMed Central

    Tardiole Kuehne, Bruno; Estrella, Julio Cezar; Nunes, Luiz Henrique; Martins de Oliveira, Edvard; Hideo Nakamura, Luis; Gomes Ferreira, Carlos Henrique; Carlucci Santana, Regina Helena; Reiff-Marganiec, Stephan; Santana, Marcos José

    2015-01-01

    This paper proposes a system named AWSCS (Automatic Web Service Composition System) to evaluate different approaches for automatic composition of Web services, based on QoS parameters that are measured at execution time. The AWSCS is a system to implement different approaches for automatic composition of Web services and also to execute the resulting flows from these approaches. Aiming at demonstrating the results of this paper, a scenario was developed, where empirical flows were built to demonstrate the operation of AWSCS, since algorithms for automatic composition are not readily available to test. The results allow us to study the behaviour of running composite Web services, when flows with the same functionality but different problem-solving strategies were compared. Furthermore, we observed that the influence of the load applied on the running system as the type of load submitted to the system is an important factor to define which approach for the Web service composition can achieve the best performance in production. PMID:26068216

  5. The gravitational signature of internal flows in giant planets: Comparing the thermal wind approach with barotropic potential-surface methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaspi, Y.; Davighi, J. E.; Galanti, E.; Hubbard, W. B.

    2016-09-01

    The upcoming Juno and Cassini gravity measurements of Jupiter and Saturn, respectively, will allow probing the internal dynamics of these planets through accurate analysis of their gravity spectra. To date, two general approaches have been suggested for relating the flow velocities and gravity fields. In the first, barotropic potential surface models, which naturally take into account the oblateness of the planet, are used to calculate the gravity field. However, barotropicity restricts the flows to be constant along cylinders parallel to the rotation axis. The second approach, calculated in the reference frame of the rotating planet, assumes that due to the large scale and rapid rotation of these planets, the winds are to leading order in geostrophic balance. Therefore, thermal wind balance relates the wind shear to the density gradients. While this approach can take into account any internal flow structure, it is limited to only calculating the dynamical gravity contributions, and has traditionally assumed spherical symmetry. This study comes to relate the two approaches both from a theoretical perspective, showing that they are analytically identical in the barotropic limit, and numerically, through systematically comparing the different model solutions for the gravity harmonics. For the barotropic potential surface models we employ two independent solution methods - the potential-theory and Maclaurin spheroid methods. We find that despite the sphericity assumption, in the barotropic limit the thermal wind solutions match well the barotropic oblate potential-surface solutions.

  6. A hydrogeologic approach to identify land uses that overlie ground-water flow paths, Broward County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sonenshein, R.S.

    1995-01-01

    A hydrogeologic approach that integrates the use of hydrogeologic and spatial tools aids in the identification of land uses that overlie ground- water flow paths and permits a better understanding of ground-water flow systems. A mathematical model was used to simulate the ground-water flow system in Broward County, particle-tracking software was used to determine flow paths leading to the monitor wells in Broward County, and a Geographic Information System was used to identify which land uses overlie the flow paths. A procedure using a geographic information system to evaluate the output from a ground-water flow model has been documented. The ground-water flow model was used to represent steady-state conditions during selected wet- and dry-season months, and an advective flow particle- tracking program was used to simulate the direction of ground-water flow in the aquifer system. Digital spatial data layers were created from the particle pathlines that lead to the vicinity of the open interval of selected wells in the Broward County ground-water quality monitoring network. Buffer zone data layers were created, surrounding the particle pathlines to represent the area of contribution to the water sampled from the monitor wells. Spatial data layers, combined with a land-use data layer, were used to identify the land uses that overlie the ground-water flow paths leading to the monitor wells. The simulation analysis was performed on five Broward County wells with different hydraulic parameters to determine the source of ground-water stress, determine selected particle pathlines, and identify land use in buffer zones in the vicinity of the wells. The flow paths that lead to the grid cells containing wells G-2355, G-2373, and G-2373A did not vary between the wet- and dry-season conditions. Changes in the area of contribution for wells G-2345X and G-2369 were attributed to variations in rainfall patterns, well-field pumpage, and surface-water management practices

  7. Deposition and fine particle production during dynamic flow in a dry powder inhaler: a CFD approach.

    PubMed

    Milenkovic, J; Alexopoulos, A H; Kiparissides, C

    2014-01-30

    In this work the dynamic flow as well as the particle motion and deposition in a commercial dry powder inhaler, DPI (i.e., Turbuhaler) is described using computational fluid dynamics, CFD. The dynamic flow model presented here is an extension of a steady flow model previously described in Milenkovic et al. (2013). The model integrates CFD simulations for dynamic flow, an Eulerian-fluid/Lagrangian-particle description of particle motion as well as a particle/wall interaction model providing the sticking efficiency of particles colliding with the DPI walls. The dynamic flow is imposed by a time varying outlet pressure and the particle injections into the DPI are assumed to occur instantaneously and follow a prescribed particle size distribution, PSD. The total particle deposition and the production of fine particles in the DPI are determined for different peak inspiratory flow rates, PIFR, flow increase rates, FIR, and particle injection times. The simulation results for particle deposition are found to agree well with available experimental data for different values of PIFR and FIR. The predicted values of fine particle fraction are in agreement with available experimental results when the mean size of the injected PSD is taken to depend on the PIFR.

  8. A unified approach to fluid-flow, geomechanical, and seismic modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yarushina, Viktoriya; Minakov, Alexander

    2016-04-01

    The perturbations of pore pressure can generate seismicity. This is supported by observations from human activities that involve fluid injection into rocks at high pressure (hydraulic fracturing, CO2 storage, geothermal energy production) and natural examples such as volcanic earthquakes. Although the seismic signals that emerge during geotechnical operations are small both in amplitude and duration when compared to natural counterparts. A possible explanation for the earthquake source mechanism is based on a number of in situ stress measurements suggesting that the crustal rocks are close to its plastic yield limit. Hence, a rapid increase of the pore pressure decreases the effective normal stress, and, thus, can trigger seismic shear deformation. At the same time, little attention has been paid to the fact that the perturbation of fluid pressure itself represents an acoustic source. Moreover, non-double-couple source mechanisms are frequently reported from the analysis of microseismicity. A consistent formulation of the source mechanism describing microseismic events should include both a shear and isotropic component. Thus, improved understanding of the interaction between fluid flow and seismic deformation is needed. With this study we aim to increase the competence in integrating real-time microseismic monitoring with geomechanical modelling such that there is a feedback loop between monitored deformation and stress field modelling. We propose fully integrated seismic, geomechanical and reservoir modelling. Our mathematical formulation is based on fundamental set of force balance, mass balance, and constitutive poro-elastoplastic equations for two-phase media consisting of deformable solid rock frame and viscous fluid. We consider a simplified 1D modelling setup for consistent acoustic source and wave propagation in poro-elastoplastic media. In this formulation the seismic wave is generated due to local changes of the stress field and pore pressure induced by

  9. Genotoxic mode of action predictions from a multiplexed flow cytometric assay and a machine learning approach.

    PubMed

    Bryce, Steven M; Bernacki, Derek T; Bemis, Jeffrey C; Dertinger, Stephen D

    2016-04-01

    Several endpoints associated with cellular responses to DNA damage as well as overt cytotoxicity were multiplexed into a miniaturized, "add and read" type flow cytometric assay. Reagents included a detergent to liberate nuclei, RNase and propidium iodide to serve as a pan-DNA dye, fluorescent antibodies against γH2AX, phospho-histone H3, and p53, and fluorescent microspheres for absolute nuclei counts. The assay was applied to TK6 cells and 67 diverse reference chemicals that served as a training set. Exposure was for 24 hrs in 96-well plates, and unless precipitation or foreknowledge about cytotoxicity suggested otherwise, the highest concentration was 1 mM. At 4- and 24-hrs aliquots were removed and added to microtiter plates containing the reagent mix. Following a brief incubation period robotic sampling facilitated walk-away data acquisition. Univariate analyses identified biomarkers and time points that were valuable for classifying agents into one of three groups: clastogenic, aneugenic, or non-genotoxic. These mode of action predictions were optimized with a forward-stepping process that considered Wald test p-values, receiver operator characteristic curves, and pseudo R(2) values, among others. A particularly high performing multinomial logistic regression model was comprised of four factors: 4 hr γH2AX and phospho-histone H3 values, and 24 hr p53 and polyploidy values. For the training set chemicals, the four-factor model resulted in 94% concordance with our a priori classifications. Cross validation occurred via a leave-one-out approach, and in this case 91% concordance was observed. A test set of 17 chemicals that were not used to construct the model were evaluated, some of which utilized a short-term treatment in the presence of a metabolic activation system, and in 16 cases mode of action was correctly predicted. These initial results are encouraging as they suggest a machine learning strategy can be used to rapidly and reliably predict new chemicals

  10. A Combined Approach to Model Reduction for Nonlinear Groundwater Flow and Solute Transport Simulations Using POD and DEIM.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanko, Z.; Boyce, S. E.; Yeh, W. W. G.

    2015-12-01

    Model reduction techniques using proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) have been very effective in applications to confined groundwater flow models. These techniques consist of performing a projection of the solution of the full model onto a reduced basis. POD combined with the snapshot approach has been successfully applied to highly discretized linear models. In many cases, the reduced model is orders of magnitude smaller than the full model and runs 1,000 times faster. For nonlinear models, such as the unconfined groundwater flow, direct application of POD requires additional calls to the full model to generate additional snapshots. This is time consuming and increases the dimension of the reduced model. The discrete empirical interpolation method (DEIM) is a technique that avoids the additional full model calls and captures the dynamics of the nonlinear term while reducing the dimensions. Here, POD and DEIM are combined to reduce both the nonlinear unconfined groundwater flow and solute transport equations. To prove the concept, simple one-dimensional models are created for MODFLOW and MT3DMS separately. The dual approach is then tested on a density-dependent flow and transport simulation using the LMT package developed for MODFLOW. For each iteration of the nonlinear flow solver and the transport solver, the respective reduced models are solved instead. Numerical experiments show that significant reduction is obtainable before errors become too large. This method is well suited for a coastal aquifer seawater intrusion scenario, where nonlinearities only exist in small subregions of the model domain. A fine discretization can be utilized and POD will effectively eliminate unnecessary parameterization by projecting the full model system matrix onto a subspace with fewer column dimensions. DEIM can then reduce the row dimension of the original system by using only those state variable nodes with the most influence. This combined approach allows for full

  11. Modular approach to fabrication of three-dimensional microchannel systems in PDMS-application to sheath flow microchips.

    PubMed

    Hofmann, O; Niedermann, P; Manz, A

    2001-12-01

    A modular approach to fabrication of three-dimensional microchannel systems in polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) is presented. It is based on building blocks with microstructuring on up to three faces. The assembled 3D-microchip consists of three building blocks in two layers. For assembly of the bottom layer two building blocks are joined horizontally, whereby the side structuring of the first is sealed against the flat side surface of the other. This results in the formation of a vertical interconnection opening between the building blocks to supplement the microstructuring on the lower faces. The 3D microchannel system is completed by placing a third building block, with microstructuring only on its lower face, on top of the assembled layer. While plasma assisted bonding is used between the two building blocks of the bottom layer, inherent adhesion is sufficient between the layers and for attaching the assembled 3D-microchip to a substrate. This modular approach was applied to the fabrication of a 3D-sheath flow microchip. It comprises a 20 microm deep microchannel system with sample inlet, open sensing area and outlet in the bottom layer and sheath flow inlet in the top layer. 100 microM fluorescein at 6 microL min(-1) was used as sample flow and water at increasing flow rates as sheath flow. With ratios of sheath to sample flow up to 20:1 sample layers down to 1 microm thickness could be generated. Sample layer thickness was determined via volume detection on an epi-fluorescence microscope followed by image analysis.

  12. A sectional coupling approach for the simulation of multi-phase reacting flow in a bent reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, S.L.; Lottes, S.A.; Bouillard, J.X.; Petrick, M.

    1996-04-01

    Multi-phase reacting flows of a bent fluidized catalytic cracking (FCC) reactor have been simulated using the ICRKFLO code. A new sectional coupling approach has been developed to handle the complex geometry, which divides the bent reactor into two sections and computations are performed for the two sections successively. The computational results show that the ICRKFLO incorporated with the new sectional coupling approach can predict product yields very well compared with experimental data and can be used to identify critical processes and parameters which may be modified to improve the quality and quantity of the FCC products.

  13. Computational approach to estimating the effects of blood properties on changes in intra-stent flow.

    PubMed

    Benard, Nicolas; Perrault, Robert; Coisne, Damien

    2006-08-01

    In this study various blood rheological assumptions are numerically investigated for the hemodynamic properties of intra-stent flow. Non-newtonian blood properties have never been implemented in blood coronary stented flow investigation, although its effects appear essential for a correct estimation and distribution of wall shear stress (WSS) exerted by the fluid on the internal vessel surface. Our numerical model is based on a full 3D stent mesh. Rigid wall and stationary inflow conditions are applied. Newtonian behavior, non-newtonian model based on Carreau-Yasuda relation and a characteristic newtonian value defined with flow representative parameters are introduced in this research. Non-newtonian flow generates an alteration of near wall viscosity norms compared to newtonian. Maximal WSS values are located in the center part of stent pattern structure and minimal values are focused on the proximal stent wire surface. A flow rate increase emphasizes fluid perturbations, and generates a WSS rise except for interstrut area. Nevertheless, a local quantitative analysis discloses an underestimation of WSS for modelisation using a newtonian blood flow, with clinical consequence of overestimate restenosis risk area. Characteristic viscosity introduction appears to present a useful option compared to rheological modelisation based on experimental data, with computer time gain and relevant results for quantitative and qualitative WSS determination. PMID:16799830

  14. Interfacial-tension-force model for the wavy stratified liquid-liquid flow pattern transition: The usage of two different approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Castro, Marcelo Souza; Rodriguez, Oscar Mauricio Hernandez

    2016-06-01

    The study of the hydrodynamic stability of flow patterns is important in the design of equipment and pipelines for multiphase flows. The maintenance of a particular flow pattern becomes important in many applications, e.g., stratified flow pattern in heavy oil production avoiding the formation of emulsions because of the separation of phases and annular flow pattern in heat exchangers which increases the heat transfer coefficient. Flow maps are drawn to orientate engineers which flow pattern is present in a pipeline, for example. The ways how these flow maps are drawn have changed from totally experimental work, to phenomenological models, and then to stability analysis theories. In this work an experimental liquid-liquid flow map, with water and viscous oil as work fluids, drawn via subjective approach with high speed camera was used to compare to approaches of the same theory: the interfacial-tension-force model. This theory was used to drawn the wavy stratified flow pattern transition boundary. This paper presents a comparison between the two approaches of the interfacial-tension-force model for transition boundaries of liquid-liquid flow patterns: (i) solving the wave equation for the wave speed and using average values for wave number and wave speed; and (ii) solving the same equation for the wave number and then using a correlation for the wave speed. The results show that the second approach presents better results.

  15. Wetland Restoration as a Tool for Peak Flow Mitigation: Combining Watershed Scale Modeling with a Genetic Algorithm Approach.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalzell, B. J.; Gassman, P. W.; Kling, C.

    2015-12-01

    In the Minnesota River Basin, sediments originating from failing stream banks and bluffs account for the majority of the riverine load and contribute to water quality impairments in the Minnesota River as well as portions of the Mississippi River upstream of Lake Pepin. One approach for mitigating this problem may be targeted wetland restoration in Minnesota River Basin tributaries in order to reduce the magnitude and duration of peak flow events which contribute to bluff and stream bank failures. In order to determine effective arrangements and properties of wetlands to achieve peak flow reduction, we are employing a genetic algorithm approach coupled with a SWAT model of the Cottonwood River, a tributary of the Minnesota River. The genetic algorithm approach will evaluate combinations of basic wetland features as represented by SWAT: surface area, volume, contributing area, and hydraulic conductivity of the wetland bottom. These wetland parameters will be weighed against economic considerations associated with land use trade-offs in this agriculturally productive landscape. Preliminary results show that the SWAT model is capable of simulating daily hydrology very well and genetic algorithm evaluation of wetland scenarios is ongoing. Anticipated results will include (1) combinations of wetland parameters that are most effective for reducing peak flows, and (2) evaluation of economic trade-offs between wetland restoration, water quality, and agricultural productivity in the Cottonwood River watershed.

  16. A Semi-Implicit, Fourier-Galerkin/B-Spline Collocation Approach for DNS of Compressible, Reacting, Wall-Bounded Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliver, Todd; Ulerich, Rhys; Topalian, Victor; Malaya, Nick; Moser, Robert

    2013-11-01

    A discretization of the Navier-Stokes equations appropriate for efficient DNS of compressible, reacting, wall-bounded flows is developed and applied. The spatial discretization uses a Fourier-Galerkin/B-spline collocation approach. Because of the algebraic complexity of the constitutive models involved, a flux-based approach is used where the viscous terms are evaluated using repeated application of the first derivative operator. In such an approach, a filter is required to achieve appropriate dissipation at high wavenumbers. We formulate a new filter source operator based on the viscous operator. Temporal discretization is achieved using the SMR91 hybrid implicit/explicit scheme. The linear implicit operator is chosen to eliminate wall-normal acoustics from the CFL constraint while also decoupling the species equations from the remaining flow equations, which minimizes the cost of the required linear algebra. Results will be shown for a mildly supersonic, multispecies boundary layer case inspired by the flow over the ablating surface of a space capsule entering Earth's atmosphere. This work is supported by the Department of Energy [National Nuclear Security Administration] under Award Number [DE-FC52-08NA28615].

  17. Impacts of urbanization on river flow frequency: A controlled experimental modeling-based evaluation approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, M. L.; Knouft, J. H.; Ghulam, A.; Guzman, J. A.; Pan, Z.

    2013-07-01

    Changes in land use are likely to cause a non-linear response in watershed hydrology. Specifically, small increases in urban expansion may greatly increase surface runoff while decreasing infiltration, impacting aquifer recharge and changing streamflow regimes. Quantifying the effects of urbanization on streamflow is crucial to the development of plans to mitigate the effects of anthropogenic changes on watershed processes. This study focused on quantifying the potential effects of varying degrees of urban expansion on the frequency of discharge, velocity, and water depth using the physically-based watershed model, MIKE-SHE, and the 1D hydrodynamic river model, MIKE-11. Five land cover scenarios corresponding to varying degrees of urban expansion were used to determine the sensitivity of these flow variables in the Big River watershed located in east central Missouri, in which urban areas have increased by more than 300% in the last 15 years (1992-2006). Differences in the frequency distributions of the flow variables under each scenario were quantified using a Smirnov test. Results indicated a potential increase in the frequency of high flow events to more than 140% while decreasing the frequency of low flow events by up to 100% if the current rate of urbanization continues. In general, the frequency of low flow events decreased as urban expansion increased while the frequency of average and high-flow events increased as urbanization increased. An increase in frequency of high-flow events is expected to impact the safety of structures, sediment load, water quality, and the riparian ecosystem. This research will be valuable to assess mitigation strategies in order to protect the ecosystem, infrastructure, and livelihood in the watershed where urban development is inevitable.

  18. Direct numerical simulations of turbulent flow over a permeable wall using a direct and a continuum approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breugem, W. P.; Boersma, B. J.

    2005-02-01

    A direct numerical simulation (DNS) has been performed of turbulent channel flow over a three-dimensional Cartesian grid of 30×20×9 cubes in, respectively, the streamwise, spanwise, and wall-normal direction. The grid of cubes mimics a permeable wall with a porosity of 0.875. The flow field is resolved with 600×400×400 mesh points. To enforce the no-slip and no-penetration conditions on the cubes, an immersed boundary method is used. The results of the DNS are compared with a second DNS in which a continuum approach is used to model the flow through the grid of cubes. The continuum approach is based on the volume-averaged Navier-Stokes (VANS) equations [S. Whitaker, "The Forchheimer equation: a theoretical development," Transp. Porous Media 25, 27 (1996)] for the volume-averaged flow field. This method has the advantage that it requires less computational power than the direct simulation of the flow through the grid of cubes. More in general, for complex porous media one is usually forced to use the VANS equations, because a direct simulation would not be possible with present-day computer facilities. A disadvantage of the continuum approach is that in order to solve the VANS equations, closures are needed for the drag force and the subfilter-scale stress. For porous media, the latter can often be neglected. In the present work, a relation for the drag force is adopted based on the Irmay ["Modèles théoriques d'écoulement dans les corps poreux," Bulletin Rilem 29, 37 (1965)] and the Burke-Plummer model [R. B. Bird, W. E. Stewart, and E. N. Lightfoot, Transport Phenomena (Wiley, New York, 2002)], with the model coefficients determined from simulations reported by W. P. Breugem, B. J. Boersma, and R. E. Uittenbogaard ["Direct numerical simulation of plane channel flow over a 3D Cartesian grid of cubes," Proceedings of the Second International Conference on Applications of Porous Media, edited by A. H. Reis and A. F. Miguel (Évora Geophysics Center,

  19. Pore Topology Method: A General and Fast Pore-Scale Modeling Approach to Simulate Fluid Flow in Porous Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riasi, M. S.; Huang, G.; Montemagno, C.; Yeghiazarian, L.

    2014-12-01

    Micro-scale modeling of multiphase flow in porous media is critical to characterize porous materials. Several modeling techniques have been implemented to date, but none can be used as a general strategy for all porous media applications due to challenges presented by non-smooth high-curvature and deformable solid surfaces, and by a wide range of pore sizes and porosities. Finite approaches like the finite volume method require a high quality, problem-dependent mesh, while particle-based approaches like the lattice Boltzmann require too many particles to achieve a stable meaningful solution. Both come at a large computational cost. Other methods such as pore network modeling (PNM) have been developed to accelerate the solution process by simplifying the solution domain, but so far a unique and straightforward methodology to implement PNM is lacking. Pore topology method (PTM) is a new topologically consistent approach developed to simulate multiphase flow in porous media. The core of PTM is to reduce the complexity of the 3-D void space geometry by working with its medial surface as the solution domain. Medial surface is capable of capturing all the corners and surface curvatures in a porous structure, and therefore provides a topologically consistent representative geometry for porous structure. Despite the simplicity and low computational cost, PTM provides a fast and straightforward approach for micro-scale modeling of fluid flow in all types of porous media irrespective of their porosity and pore size distribution. In our previous work, we developed a non-iterative fast medial surface finder algorithm to determine a voxel-wide medial surface of the void space of porous media as well as a set of simple rules to determine the capillary pressure-saturation curves for a porous system assuming quasi-static two-phase flow with a planar w-nw interface. Our simulation results for a highly porous fibrous material and polygonal capillary tubes were in excellent agreement

  20. A new hierarchical Bayesian approach to analyse environmental and climatic influences on debris flow occurrence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jomelli, Vincent; Pavlova, Irina; Eckert, Nicolas; Grancher, Delphine; Brunstein, Daniel

    2015-12-01

    How can debris flow occurrences be modelled at regional scale and take both environmental and climatic conditions into account? And, of the two, which has the most influence on debris flow activity? In this paper, we try to answer these questions with an innovative Bayesian hierarchical probabilistic model that simultaneously accounts for how debris flows respond to environmental and climatic variables. In it, full decomposition of space and time effects in occurrence probabilities is assumed, revealing an environmental and a climatic trend shared by all years/catchments, respectively, clearly distinguished from residual "random" effects. The resulting regional and annual occurrence probabilities evaluated as functions of the covariates make it possible to weight the respective contribution of the different terms and, more generally, to check the model performances at different spatio-temporal scales. After suitable validation, the model can be used to make predictions at undocumented sites and could be used in further studies for predictions under future climate conditions. Also, the Bayesian paradigm easily copes with missing data, thus making it possible to account for events that may have been missed during surveys. As a case study, we extract 124 debris flow event triggered between 1970 and 2005 in 27 catchments located in the French Alps from the French national natural hazard survey and model their variability of occurrence considering environmental and climatic predictors at the same time. We document the environmental characteristics of each debris flow catchment (morphometry, lithology, land cover, and the presence of permafrost). We also compute 15 climate variables including mean temperature and precipitation between May and October and the number of rainy days with daily cumulative rainfall greater than 10/15/20/25/30/40 mm day- 1. Application of our model shows that the combination of environmental and climatic predictors explained 77% of the overall

  1. Flow Visualization at Cryogenic Conditions Using a Modified Pressure Sensitive Paint Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watkins, A. Neal; Goad, William K.; Obara, Clifford J.; Sprinkle, Danny R.; Campbell, Richard L.; Carter, Melissa B.; Pendergraft, Odis C., Jr.; Bell, James H.; Ingram, JoAnne L.; Oglesby, Donald M.

    2005-01-01

    A modification to the Pressure Sensitive Paint (PSP) method was used to visualize streamlines on a Blended Wing Body (BWB) model at full-scale flight Reynolds numbers. In order to achieve these conditions, the tests were carried out in the National Transonic Facility operating under cryogenic conditions in a nitrogen environment. Oxygen is required for conventional PSP measurements, and several tests have been successfully completed in nitrogen environments by injecting small amounts (typically < 3000 ppm) of oxygen into the flow. A similar technique was employed here, except that air was purged through pressure tap orifices already existent on the model surface, resulting in changes in the PSP wherever oxygen was present. The results agree quite well with predicted results obtained through computational fluid dynamics analysis (CFD), which show this to be a viable technique for visualizing flows without resorting to more invasive procedures such as oil flow or minitufts.

  2. Cooperativity flows and shear-bandings: a statistical field theory approach.

    PubMed

    Benzi, R; Sbragaglia, M; Bernaschi, M; Succi, S; Toschi, F

    2016-01-14

    Cooperativity effects have been proposed to explain the non-local rheology in the dynamics of soft jammed systems. Based on the analysis of the free-energy model proposed by L. Bocquet, A. Colin and A. Ajdari, Phys. Rev. Lett., 2009, 103, 036001, we show that cooperativity effects resulting from the non-local nature of the fluidity (inverse viscosity) are intimately related to the emergence of shear-banding configurations. This connection materializes through the onset of inhomogeneous compact solutions (compactons), wherein the fluidity is confined to finite-support subregions of the flow and strictly zero elsewhere. The compacton coexistence with regions of zero fluidity ("non-flowing vacuum") is shown to be stabilized by the presence of mechanical noise, which ultimately shapes up the equilibrium distribution of the fluidity field, the latter acting as an order parameter for the flow-noflow transitions occurring in the material. PMID:26486875

  3. An approach to the constrained design of natural laminar flow airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Bradford Earl

    1995-01-01

    A design method has been developed by which an airfoil with a substantial amount of natural laminar flow can be designed, while maintaining other aerodynamic and geometric constraints. After obtaining the initial airfoil's pressure distribution at the design lift coefficient using an Euler solver coupled with an integml turbulent boundary layer method, the calculations from a laminar boundary layer solver are used by a stability analysis code to obtain estimates of the transition location (using N-Factors) for the starting airfoil. A new design method then calculates a target pressure distribution that will increase the larninar flow toward the desired amounl An airfoil design method is then iteratively used to design an airfoil that possesses that target pressure distribution. The new airfoil's boundary layer stability characteristics are determined, and this iterative process continues until an airfoil is designed that meets the laminar flow requirement and as many of the other constraints as possible.

  4. An Approach to the Constrained Design of Natural Laminar Flow Airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Bradford E.

    1997-01-01

    A design method has been developed by which an airfoil with a substantial amount of natural laminar flow can be designed, while maintaining other aerodynamic and geometric constraints. After obtaining the initial airfoil's pressure distribution at the design lift coefficient using an Euler solver coupled with an integral turbulent boundary layer method, the calculations from a laminar boundary layer solver are used by a stability analysis code to obtain estimates of the transition location (using N-Factors) for the starting airfoil. A new design method then calculates a target pressure distribution that will increase the laminar flow toward the desired amount. An airfoil design method is then iteratively used to design an airfoil that possesses that target pressure distribution. The new airfoil's boundary layer stability characteristics are determined, and this iterative process continues until an airfoil is designed that meets the laminar flow requirement and as many of the other constraints as possible.

  5. A fully coupled porous flow and geomechanics model for fluid driven cracks: a peridynamics approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouchi, Hisanao; Katiyar, Amit; York, Jason; Foster, John T.; Sharma, Mukul M.

    2015-03-01

    A state-based non-local peridynamic formulation is presented for simulating fluid driven fractures in an arbitrary heterogeneous poroelastic medium. A recently developed peridynamic formulation of porous flow has been coupled with the existing peridynamic formulation of solid and fracture mechanics resulting in a peridynamic model that for the first time simulates poroelasticity and fluid-driven fracture propagation. This coupling is achieved by modeling the role of pore pressure on the deformation of porous media and vice versa through porosity variation with medium deformation, pore pressure and total mean stress. The poroelastic model is verified by simulating the one-dimensional consolidation of fluid saturated rock. An additional porous flow equation with material permeability dependent on fracture width is solved to simulate fluid flow in the fractured region. Finally, single fluid-driven fracture propagation with a two-dimensional plane strain assumption is simulated and verified against the corresponding classical analytical solution.

  6. A combined kinetic and thermodynamic approach for the interpretation of continuous-flow heterogeneous catalytic processes.

    PubMed

    Bortolini, Olga; Cavazzini, Alberto; Giovannini, Pier Paolo; Greco, Roberto; Marchetti, Nicola; Massi, Alessandro; Pasti, Luisa

    2013-06-10

    The heterogeneous proline-catalyzed aldol reaction was investigated under continuous-flow conditions by means of a packed-bed microreactor. Reaction-progress kinetic analysis (RPKA) was used in combination with nonlinear chromatography for the interpretation, under synthetically relevant conditions, of important mechanistic aspects of the heterogeneous catalytic process at a molecular level. The information gathered by RPKA and nonlinear chromatography proved to be highly complementary and allowed for the assessment of optimal operating variables. In particular, the determination of the rate-determining step was pivotal for optimizing the feed composition. On the other hand, the competitive product inhibition was responsible for the unexpected decrease in the reaction yield following an apparently obvious variation in the feed composition. The study was facilitated by a suitable 2D instrumental arrangement for simultaneous flow reaction and online flow-injection analysis. PMID:23589216

  7. Population Balance Modeling of Polydispersed Bubbly Flow in Continuous-Casting Using Multiple-Size-Group Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhongqiu; Li, Linmin; Qi, Fengsheng; Li, Baokuan; Jiang, Maofa; Tsukihashi, Fumitaka

    2014-09-01

    A population balance model based on the multiple-size-group (MUSIG) approach has been developed to investigate the polydispersed bubbly flow inside the slab continuous-casting mold and bubble behavior including volume fraction, breakup, coalescence, and size distribution. The Eulerian-Eulerian approach is used to describe the equations of motion of the two-phase flow. All the non-drag forces (lift force, virtual mass force, wall lubrication force, and turbulent dispersion force) and drag force are incorporated in this model. Sato and Sekiguchi model is used to account for the bubble-induced turbulence. Luo and Svendsen model and Prince and Blanch model are used to describe the bubbles breakup and coalescence behavior, respectively. A 1/4th water model of the slab continuous-casting mold was applied to investigate the distribution and size of bubbles by injecting air through a circumferential inlet chamber which was made of the specially-coated samples of mullite porous brick, which is used for the actual upper nozzle. Against experimental data, numerical results showed good agreement for the gas volume fraction and local bubble Sauter mean diameter. The bubble Sauter mean diameter in the upper recirculation zone decreases with increasing water flow rate and increases with increasing gas flow rate. The distribution of bubble Sauter mean diameter along the width direction of the upper mold increases first, and then gradually decreases from the SEN to the narrow wall. Close agreements between the predictions and measurements demonstrate the capability of the MUSIG model in modeling bubbly flow inside the continuous-casting mold.

  8. Population Balance Modeling of Polydispersed Bubbly Flow in Continuous-Casting Using Multiple-Size-Group Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhongqiu; Li, Linmin; Qi, Fengsheng; Li, Baokuan; Jiang, Maofa; Tsukihashi, Fumitaka

    2015-02-01

    A population balance model based on the multiple-size-group (MUSIG) approach has been developed to investigate the polydispersed bubbly flow inside the slab continuous-casting mold and bubble behavior including volume fraction, breakup, coalescence, and size distribution. The Eulerian-Eulerian approach is used to describe the equations of motion of the two-phase flow. All the non-drag forces (lift force, virtual mass force, wall lubrication force, and turbulent dispersion force) and drag force are incorporated in this model. Sato and Sekiguchi model is used to account for the bubble-induced turbulence. Luo and Svendsen model and Prince and Blanch model are used to describe the bubbles breakup and coalescence behavior, respectively. A 1/4th water model of the slab continuous-casting mold was applied to investigate the distribution and size of bubbles by injecting air through a circumferential inlet chamber which was made of the specially-coated samples of mullite porous brick, which is used for the actual upper nozzle. Against experimental data, numerical results showed good agreement for the gas volume fraction and local bubble Sauter mean diameter. The bubble Sauter mean diameter in the upper recirculation zone decreases with increasing water flow rate and increases with increasing gas flow rate. The distribution of bubble Sauter mean diameter along the width direction of the upper mold increases first, and then gradually decreases from the SEN to the narrow wall. Close agreements between the predictions and measurements demonstrate the capability of the MUSIG model in modeling bubbly flow inside the continuous-casting mold.

  9. Attenuated Vector Tomography -- An Approach to Image Flow Vector Fields with Doppler Ultrasonic Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Qiu; Peng, Qiyu; Huang, Bin; Cheryauka, Arvi; Gullberg, Grant T.

    2008-05-15

    The measurement of flow obtained using continuous wave Doppler ultrasound is formulated as a directional projection of a flow vector field. When a continuous ultrasound wave bounces against a flowing particle, a signal is backscattered. This signal obtains a Doppler frequency shift proportional to the speed of the particle along the ultrasound beam. This occurs for each particle along the beam, giving rise to a Doppler velocity spectrum. The first moment of the spectrum provides the directional projection of the flow along theultrasound beam. Signals reflected from points further away from the detector will have lower amplitude than signals reflected from points closer to the detector. The effect is very much akin to that modeled by the attenuated Radon transform in emission computed tomography.A least-squares method was adopted to reconstruct a 2D vector field from directional projection measurements. Attenuated projections of only the longitudinal projections of the vector field were simulated. The components of the vector field were reconstructed using the gradient algorithm to minimize a least-squares criterion. This result was compared with the reconstruction of longitudinal projections of the vector field without attenuation. Ifattenuation is known, the algorithm was able to accurately reconstruct both components of the full vector field from only one set of directional projection measurements. A better reconstruction was obtained with attenuation than without attenuation implying that attenuation provides important information for the reconstruction of flow vector fields.This confirms previous work where we showed that knowledge of the attenuation distribution helps in the reconstruction of MRI diffusion tensor fields from fewer than the required measurements. In the application of ultrasound the attenuation distribution is obtained with pulse wave transmission computed tomography and flow information is obtained with continuous wave Doppler.

  10. Thermodynamically Constrained Averaging Theory Approach for Modeling Flow and Transport Phenomena in Porous Medium Systems: 4. Species Transport Fundamentals

    PubMed Central

    Gray, William G.

    2008-01-01

    This work is the fourth in a series of papers on the thermodynamically constrained averaging theory (TCAT) approach for modeling flow and transport phenomena in multiscale porous medium systems. The general TCAT framework and the mathematical foundation presented in previous works are built upon by formulating macroscale models for conservation of mass, momentum, and energy, and the balance of entropy for a species in a phase volume, interface, and common curve. In addition, classical irreversible thermodynamic relations for species in entities are averaged from the microscale to the macroscale. Finally, we comment on alternative approaches that can be used to connect species and entity conservation equations to a constrained system entropy inequality, which is a key component of the TCAT approach. The formulations detailed in this work can be built upon to develop models for species transport and reactions in a variety of multiphase systems. PMID:19255613

  11. Simulation of flow through nanochannels: a novel multi-scale approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaeger, Frederike; Wray, Alex; Muller, Erich; Poesio, Pietro; Matar, Omar

    2015-11-01

    A novel method for the simulation of flow through nanochannels is proposed. We use molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to determine relations between the pressure, shear and bulk viscosities and the density, as well as the slip length for different fluid-wall combinations. These relations are then plugged into a steady, two-dimensional continuum-scale model that allows the simulation of a compressible (Lennard-Jones) fluid through channels. No restrictive assumptions are made on the nature of the fluid and its flow behaviour (e.g. fully-developed, parabolic velocity profiles for incompressible fluids). Direct comparisons between the MD and the continuum-scale predictions for the channel flow show good agreement. A major advantage of the proposed method is its computational efficiency, which allows for complex flow geometries to be studied whilst still retaining the accuracy of MD-based simulations. Furthermore, through the use of the statistical fluid associating theory (SAFT), more complex fluids can be modelled, providing a computational framework capable of representing realistic experimental set-ups. EPSRC through TSM-CDT (FJ), DPF (AWW), MEMPHIS (EP/K003976/1, OKM), MACIPH (EP/L020564/1, EAM, OKM); Royal Society International Exchange Scheme (PP, OKM).

  12. Fluid flows in nano/micro network configurations: a multiscale molecular-continuum approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borg, Matthew; Lockerby, Duncan; Reese, Jason

    2012-11-01

    We present a new hybrid molecular-continuum methodology for resolving multiscale flows emergent in nano-/micro-scale networks, in particular for NEMS/MEMS applications. The method models junction and channel components of the network using independent MD micro elements. Long channels with uniform or gradually varying nano-scale sections along the direction of flow, contribute the most towards the highest computational savings, by replacing them with much smaller MD simulations. Junction components, however, do not exhibit any length-scale separation and are modelled in their entirety. All micro elements are coupled together in one hybrid simulation using standard continuum fluid-dynamics equations, that dictate the overall macroscopic flow in the network. In the case of isothermal, incompressible, low-speed flows we use the conservative continuity and momentum equations. An iterative algorithm is presented that computes at each iteration the new constraints on the pressure differences applied to individual micro elements, in addition to enforcing overall continuity in the network. We show that the hybrid simulation of various small network cases converge quickly to the result of a full MD simulation over just a few iterations, with significant computational savings. This work is financially supported by the EPSRC Programme Grant EP/I011927/1.

  13. URBAN WET-WEATHER FLOW MICROBIAL CONTAMINATION: HIGH-RATE TREATMENT APPROACHES

    EPA Science Inventory

    fThis presentation is on high-rate disinfection of wet-weather flow (WWF) and pretreatment processes of suspended solids to enhance the disinfection. A discussion of pretreatment processes and of the newest disinfection technologies used for WWF is included, along with the feasib...

  14. An Approach for Modeling Rock Discontinuous Mechanical Behavior Under Multiphase Fluid Flow Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Peng-Zhi; Rutqvist, Jonny; Feng, Xia-Ting; Yan, Fei

    2014-03-01

    In this paper, the two computer codes TOUGH2 and RDCA (for "rock discontinuous cellular automaton") are integrated for coupled hydromechanical analysis of multiphase fluid flow and discontinuous mechanical behavior in heterogeneous rock. TOUGH2 is a well-established code for geohydrological analysis involving multiphase, multicomponent fluid flow and heat transport; RDCA is a numerical model developed for simulating the nonlinear and discontinuous geomechanical behavior of rock. The RDCA incorporates the discontinuity of a fracture independently of the mesh, such that the fracture can be arbitrarily located within an element, while the fluid pressure calculated by TOUGH2 can be conveniently applied to fracture surfaces. We verify and demonstrate the coupled TOUGH-RDCA simulator by modeling a number of simulation examples related to coupled multiphase flow and geomechanical processes associated with the deep geological storage of carbon dioxide—including modeling of ground surface uplift, stress-dependent permeability, and the coupled multiphase flow and geomechanical behavior of fractures intersecting the caprock.

  15. Relief of nonhemispheric symptoms in low flow states by anterior circulation revascularization: a physiologic approach

    SciTech Connect

    Yonas, H.; Steed, D.L.; Latchaw, R.E.; Gur, D.; Peitzman, A.B.; Webster, M.W.

    1987-02-01

    Operative intervention remains controversial for patients with transient nonhemispheric symptoms with occlusive disease of both the anterior and posterior cerebral circulations. In addition to the standard evaluation of these patients, we have used stable xenon-enhanced computed tomographic mapping of cerebral blood flow (Xe/CT CBF). This relatively new and potentially widely available CBF methodology, by measuring approximately 30,000 CBF values within each of three CT levels, provides a readily interpretable means of evaluating extremes of hemodynamic compromise within any or all vascular territories. In the past 30 months, Xe/CT CBF studies in 300 patients with occlusive vascular disease have identified nine patients with global low flow and nonhemispheric symptoms (vertigo, lightheadedness, and/or blurred vision). Blood pressures determined by ocular pneumoplethysmography of Gee were markedly abnormal with reduced ocular/brachial ratios. Each patient had a combination of both segmental carotid and vertebrobasilar occlusive disease. Each patient had a flow-augmenting procedure performed on the anterior circulation in an attempt to improve global flow: carotid endarterectomy (two patients), subclavian-external carotid bypass (one patient), and superficial temporal artery-middle cerebral artery bypass (six patients). In each case disabling transient symptoms were relieved. There were no operative deaths, but one stroke occurred, probably as a result of a brief period of postoperative hypotension. Postoperative Xe/CT CBF studies show a long-term improved global CBF in all patients.

  16. A wall-function approach to incorporating Knudsen-layer effects in gas micro flow simulations.

    SciTech Connect

    Gallis, Michail A.; Lockerby, Duncan A.; Reese, Jason M.

    2004-07-01

    For gas flows in microfluidic configurations, the Knudsen layer close to the wall can comprise a substantial part of the entire flowfield and has a major effect on quantities such as the mass flow rate through micro devices. The Knudsen layer itself is characterized by a highly nonlinear relationship between the viscous stress and the strain rate of the gas, so even if the Navier-Stokes equations can be used to describe the core gas flow they are certainly inappropriate for the Knudsen layer itself. In this paper we propose a 'wall-function' model for the stress/strain rate relations in the Knudsen layer. The constitutive structure of the Knudsen layer has been derived from results from kinetic theory for isothermal shear flow over a planar surface. We investigate the ability of this simplified model to predict Knudsen-layer effects in a variety of configurations. We further propose a semi-empirical Knudsen-number correction to this wall function, based on high-accuracy DSMC results, to extend the predictive capabilities of the model to greater degrees of rarefaction.

  17. Pipe Flow Simulation Software: A Team Approach to Solve an Engineering Education Problem.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Engel, Renata S.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    A computer simulation program for use in the study of fluid mechanics is described. The package is an interactive tool to explore the fluid flow characteristics of a pipe system by manipulating the physical construction of the system. The motivation, software design requirements, and specific details on how its objectives were met are presented.…

  18. How to Prevent Pressure Oscillations in Multicomponent Flow Calculations: A Quasi Conservative Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abgrall, Rémi

    1996-04-01

    A new numerical scheme for computing multicomponent flows is presented. It is able to handle strong shocks, is pressure oscillation free through the contact discontinuities, and guarantees the posi_tivity of mass fractions. Some numerical experiments on shock tubes indicate the convergence to the correct weak solution. Comparisons with classical finite volume schemes are also proposed.

  19. A MULTIPLE GRID APPROACH FOR OPEN CHANNEL FLOWS WITH STRONG SHOCKS. (R825200)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract

    Explicit finite difference schemes are being widely used for modeling open channel flows accompanied with shocks. A characteristic feature of explicit schemes is the small time step, which is limited by the CFL stability condition. To overcome this limitation,...

  20. Innovative Approaches for Urban Watershed Management Wet-Weather Flow Management and Control

    EPA Science Inventory

    The overall objective of this project was to identify innovative strategies for managing the effects of wet-weather flow (WWF) control and failing infrastructure in an urban setting. The intent was to establish areas where external information can benefit US Environmental Protec...

  1. Paleointensity results for 0 and 3 ka from Hawaiian lava flows: a new approach to sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cromwell, G.; Tauxe, L.; Staudigel, H.; Ron, H.; Trusdell, F.

    2011-12-01

    Paleointensity data are typically generated from core samples drilled out of the massive parts of lava flows. During Thellier-Thellier type experiments, these massive samples suffer from very low success rates (~20%), as shown by failure to meet statistical criteria. Low success generally occurs for two reasons: 1) alteration of the sample during the heating process, and 2) multi-domain behavior of massive material. Moreover, recent studies of historical lava flows show that massive samples may not accurately reflect the intensity of the magnetic field even when they are successful (Valet et al., 2010). Alternatively, submarine basaltic glasses (SBG) produce high success rates (~80%) for Thellier-Thellier type experiments, likely due to near instantaneous cooling rates which produce single-domain magnetic grains. In addition, SBG have been proven to produce accurate records of the magnetic field (e.g., Pick and Tauxe, 1993). In this study we investigate the success of paleointensity experiments on subaerial quenched basalts from Hawaii in the quest for single domain, rapidly cooled subaerial analogs to SBG. We also examine the effects of grain size and cooling rate on the accuracy of paleointensity results. During March 2011, we collected samples from 31 dated lava flows (0-3360 BP), including the [historical] 1950 C.E. and 2010 C.E. flows. Each lava flow was additionally subsampled when unique cooling structures within the unit could be identified. Results from the 1950 and 2010 glasses accurately record the expected geomagnetic field strength. We will present results of a comprehensive data set of Hawaiian paleointensity focused on about the last 3 ka.

  2. Atmospheric Flow over a Mountainous Region by a One-Way Coupled Approach Based on Reynolds-Averaged Turbulence Modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, C. Veiga; Palma, J. M. L. M.; Rodrigues, Á. H.

    2016-05-01

    The atmospheric flow over a mountainous region has been simulated using a model-chain approach, whereby the flow in a larger region was simulated using a mesoscale model with three nesting levels, down to a 3-km horizontal resolution, within which a fourth nesting level was set with a microscale flow solver and a domain with varying horizontal resolution, around 300 m at the site of interest. Two periods in the summer (July) and autumn (November-December) 2005, each with a duration of two weeks, were selected to test the present approach. Two sites were chosen, comprising a total of seven meteorological masts with wind vanes and anemometers at two heights. The microscale solver improved the wind-speed prediction of the mesoscale model in 10 of the 14 anemometers and replicated the high wind speeds, which were under-predicted in the mesoscale model. The wind conditions in summer varied with the daily cycle, related to regional-scale sea breezes and their interaction with local circulations induced by the topography. Regarding the turbulence intensity, the predicted decay with wind-speed increase was in agreement with the measurements. This study shows the need of both models: the microscale model captures the details of the boundary-layer physics, which would not be possible without the boundary conditions provided by the mesoscale model.

  3. The RiverFish Approach to Business Process Modeling: Linking Business Steps to Control-Flow Patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuliane, Devanir; Oikawa, Marcio K.; Malkowski, Simon; Alcazar, José Perez; Ferreira, João Eduardo

    Despite the recent advances in the area of Business Process Management (BPM), today’s business processes have largely been implemented without clearly defined conceptual modeling. This results in growing difficulties for identification, maintenance, and reuse of rules, processes, and control-flow patterns. To mitigate these problems in future implementations, we propose a new approach to business process modeling using conceptual schemas, which represent hierarchies of concepts for rules and processes shared among collaborating information systems. This methodology bridges the gap between conceptual model description and identification of actual control-flow patterns for workflow implementation. We identify modeling guidelines that are characterized by clear phase separation, step-by-step execution, and process building through diagrams and tables. The separation of business process modeling in seven mutually exclusive phases clearly delimits information technology from business expertise. The sequential execution of these phases leads to the step-by-step creation of complex control-flow graphs. The process model is refined through intuitive table and diagram generation in each phase. Not only does the rigorous application of our modeling framework minimize the impact of rule and process changes, but it also facilitates the identification and maintenance of control-flow patterns in BPM-based information system architectures.

  4. Do conservative and reactive tracers take the same water flow pathways? An experimental approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasteel, Roy; Koestel, Johannes; Vereecken, Harry

    2010-05-01

    Reactive transport modelling heavily relies on the assumption that the soil's hydraulic behavior, i.e. the solute transport volume (water content) and the water flow pathways (dispersivity), can be characterized by the use of a conservative tracer. However, there exits ample experimental evidence in the literature whether this assumption holds, mainly because of the lack of detection methods that are able to monitor solute transport with a high resolution in space and time. Time-lapse electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) supplies three-dimensional spatio-temporally resolved image data through minimally invasive measurements. ERT has proved to be a valuable tool for imaging solute transport processes in the subsurface and has the potential to resolve the above-mentioned issue. The goals of this study are to verify to what extent ERT can be used to compare flow pathways of a conservative tracer (chloride) and a reactive tracer (food-dye Brilliant Blue) in the same large soil monolith filled with an undisturbed loamy sand and eventually address the question whether they take the same flow pathways. A constant water flow field was established in the soil monolith by means of an irrigation device. The tracers chloride and Brilliant Blue were successively added to the irrigation water. The negative charge of both tracer provides an electrical conductivity contrast that can be detected by means of ERT. Time-lapse ERT provides a qualitative comparison between both tracers, by visualizing the three-dimensional transport behavior. A quantitative analysis was performed by parameterizing the voxel-scale breakthrough curves using the convection-dispersion equation, which includes retardation and sorption kinetics for the reactive tracer. At the voxel-scale, heterogeneous water flow was observed, identified by regions with different pore-water velocities. In the subsoil, these regions were aligned to soil structural features of the plough pan. We discuss the comparison of the

  5. Determining the physical vulnerability of roads to debris flow by means of an expert judgement approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winter, M. G.; Smith, J. T.; Fotopoulou, S.; Pitlakis, K.; Mavrouli, O.-C.; Corominas, J.; Argyroudis, S.

    2012-04-01

    The physical vulnerability of roads to debris flow is expressed through fragility functions that relate flow volume to damage probabilities. Fragility relationships are essential components of quantitative risk assessments (QRA) as they allow for the estimation of risk within a consequence-based framework. To the best of the Authors' knowledge this is the first time that fragility curves have been produced in order to provide the conditional probability for a road to be in, or to exceed, a certain damage state for a given debris flow volume. Preliminary assessments were undertaken by means of a detailed questionnaire. A total of 47 returns were received from experts in 17 countries: 32% academia, 51% the commercial sector and 17% governments. Fragility curves have been defined for three damage states (limited damage, serious damage and destroyed) for each of low speed and high speed roads in order to cover the typical characteristics of roads vulnerable to debris flow. The probability of any given damage state being met or exceeded by a debris flow of a given volume (10 to 100,000m3) was derived from the mean of the responses received. Inevitably there was a degree of scatter in the results and the treatment of such variation, or 'experimental errors', was crucial to understanding the data and to developing the fragility curves. Both qualitative and quantitative methods of arriving at these preliminary fragility curves were utilised. The nature of the data is such that unless all respondents return that value the average probability at the largest flow volume cannot reach unity; as a result the upper ends of each curve were forced to unity and in order to account for larger potential volumes manual extrapolation was undertaken to 1,000,000m3. In addition to an assessment of the probabilities of given damage states being exceeded respondents to the questionnaire were polled as to their level of experience and confidence in their ability to provide a valid and

  6. A Finite-Element Approach for Modeling Inviscid and Viscous Compressible Flows using Prismatic Grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pandya, S. A.; Hefez, M.

    2000-01-01

    The Galerkin finite-element method is used to solve the Euler and Navier-Stokes equations on prismatic meshes. It is shown that the prismatic grid is advantageous for correctly and efficiently capturing the boundary layers in high Reynolds number flows. It can be captured accurately because of the ability to cluster grid points normal to the body. The efficiency derives from the implicit treatment of the normal direction. To treat the normal direction implicitly, a semi-implicit Runge-Kutta time stepping scheme is developed. The semi-implicit algorithm is validated on simple geometries for inviscid and viscous flows and its convergence history is compared to that of the explicit Runge-Kutta scheme. The semi-implicit scheme is shown to be a factor of 3 to 4 faster in terms of CPU time to convergence.

  7. The design/analysis of flows through turbomachinery: A viscous/inviscid approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, D. P.; Reddy, D. R.

    1991-01-01

    The development of a design/analysis flow solver at NASA Lewis Research Center is discussed. The solver is axisymmetric and can be run inviscidly with assumed or calculated blockages, or with the viscous terms computed. The blade forces for each blade row are computed from blade-to-blade solutions, correlated data or force model, or from a full three dimensional solution. Codes currently under development can be separated into three distinct elements: the turbomachinery interactive grid generator energy distribution restart code (TIGGERC), the interactive blade element geometry generator (IBEGG), and the viscous/inviscid multi-blade-row average passage flow solver (VIADAC). Several experimental test cases were run to validate the VIADAC code. The tests, representative of typical axial turbomachinery duct axisymmetric wind tunnel body problems, were conducted on an SR7 Spinner axisymmetric body, a NASA Rotor 67 Fan test bed, and a transonic boatail body. The results show the computations to be in good agreement with test data.

  8. A massively parallel computational approach to coupled thermoelastic/porous gas flow problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shia, David; Mcmanus, Hugh L.

    1995-01-01

    A new computational scheme for coupled thermoelastic/porous gas flow problems is presented. Heat transfer, gas flow, and dynamic thermoelastic governing equations are expressed in fully explicit form, and solved on a massively parallel computer. The transpiration cooling problem is used as an example problem. The numerical solutions have been verified by comparison to available analytical solutions. Transient temperature, pressure, and stress distributions have been obtained. Small spatial oscillations in pressure and stress have been observed, which would be impractical to predict with previously available schemes. Comparisons between serial and massively parallel versions of the scheme have also been made. The results indicate that for small scale problems the serial and parallel versions use practically the same amount of CPU time. However, as the problem size increases the parallel version becomes more efficient than the serial version.

  9. A fast approach to designing airfoils from given pressure distribution in compressible flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daripa, Prabir

    1987-01-01

    A new inverse method for aerodynamic design of airfols is presented for subcritical flows. The pressure distribution in this method can be prescribed as a function of the arc length of the as-yet unknown body. This inverse problem is shown to be mathematically equivalent to solving only one nonlinear boundary value problem subject to known Dirichlet data on the boundary. The solution to this problem determines the airfoil, the freestream Mach number, and the upstream flow direction. The existence of a solution to a given pressure distribution is discussed. The method is easy to implement and extremely efficient. A series of results for which comparisons are made with the known airfoils is presented.

  10. Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy (HCM): How Flow Analysis May Drive Medical Management and Surgical Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abraham, Theodore P.

    2011-11-01

    Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy (HCM) is the most common inherited heart disease and occurs in 1 in 500 persons worldwide regardless of race, age and gender. It is the most common cause of sudden death in the young and also causes heart failure and cardiac arrhythmias. The primary anatomic abnormality is thickening of certain walls, or sometimes global thickening of the left or right ventricle. The patterns of thickening along with increased ventricular stiffness lead to suboptimal ventricular filling and inefficient ejection of blood from the ventricle. Treatment for HCM can be medical or surgical. The choice of therapy is driven by the presence and severity of outflow obstruction. Flow analysis could provide sophisticated information about outflow and inflow ventricular dynamics. These flow dynamics features may enable better medical choices and provide information that would allow superior surgical planning. Associate Professor of Medicine & Director, Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy Clinic

  11. A Bayesian Hierarchical Modeling Approach to Predicting Flow in Ungauged Basins

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recent innovative approaches to identifying and applying regression-based relationships between land use patterns (such as increasing impervious surface area and decreasing vegetative cover) and rainfall-runoff model parameters represent novel and promising improvements to predic...

  12. Separation-bubble flow solution using Euler/Navier-Stokes zonal approach with downstream compatibility conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, C. H.; Wong, T. C.; Kandil, O. A.

    1988-01-01

    The two-dimensional flow over a blunt leading-edge plate is simulated on the basis of an Euler/Navier-Stokes zonal scheme. The scheme uses an implicit upwind finite-volume scheme, which is based on the van Leer flux-vector splitting. It is shown that the Euler/Navier-Stokes zonal scheme with downstream boundary-layer compatibility conditions is accurate and efficient.

  13. Cold flow simulation of an internal combustion engine with vertical valves using layering approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinas, G.; Cupsa, O. S.; Stan, L. C.; Arsenie, A.

    2015-11-01

    Complying with emission requirements and fuel consumption efficiency are the points which drive any development of internal combustion engine. Refinement of the process of combustion and mixture formation, together with in-cylinder flow refinement, is a requirement, valves and piston bowl and intake exhaust port design optimization is essential. In order to reduce the time for design optimization cycle it is used Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD). Being time consuming and highly costly caring out of experiment using flow bench testing this methods start to become less utilized. Air motion inside the intake manifold is one of the important factors, which govern the engine performance and emission of multi-cylinder diesel engines. Any cold flow study on IC is targeting the process of identifying and improving the fluid flow inside the ports and the combustion chamber. This is only the base for an optimization process targeting to increase the volume of air accessing the combustion space and to increase the turbulence of the air at the end of the compression stage. One of the first conclusions will be that the valve diameter is a fine tradeoff between the need for a bigger diameter involving a greater mass of air filling the cylinder, and the need of a smaller diameter in order to reduce the blind zone. Here there is room for optimization studies. The relative pressure indicates a suction effect coming from the moving piston. The more the shape of the inlet port is smoother and the diameter of the piston is bigger, the aerodynamic resistance of the geometry will be smaller so that the difference of inlet port pressure and the pressure near to piston face will be smaller. Here again there is enough room for more optimization studies.

  14. Field, laboratory and numerical approaches to studying flow through mangrove pneumatophores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chua, V. P.

    2014-12-01

    The circulation of water in riverine mangrove swamps is expected to be influenced by mangrove roots, which in turn affect the nutrients, pollutants and sediments transport in these systems. Field studies were carried out in mangrove areas along the coastline of Singapore where Avicennia marina and Sonneratia alba pneumatophore species are found. Geometrical properties, such as height, diameter and spatial density of the mangrove roots were assessed through the use of photogrammetric methods. Samples of these roots were harvested from mangrove swamps and their material properties, such as bending strength and Young's modulus were determined in the laboratory. It was found that the pneumatophores under hydrodynamic loadings in a mangrove environment could be regarded as fairly rigid. Artificial root models of pneumatophores were fabricated from downscaling based on field observations of mangroves. Flume experiments were performed and measurements of mean flow velocities, Reynolds stress and turbulent kinetic energy were made. The boundary layer formed over the vegetation patch is fully developed after x = 6 m with a linear mean velocity profile. High shear stresses and turbulent kinetic energy were observed at the interface between the top portion of the roots and the upper flow. The experimental data was employed to calibrate and validate three-dimensional simulations of flow in pneumatophores. The simulations were performed with the Delft3D-FLOW model, where the vegetation effect is introduced by adding a depth-distributed resistance force and modifying the k-ɛ turbulence model. The model-predicted profiles for mean velocity, turbulent kinetic energy and concentration were compared with experimental data. The model calibration is performed by adjusting the horizontal and vertical eddy viscosities and diffusivities. A skill assessment of the model is performed using statistical measures that include the Pearson correlation coefficient (r), the mean absolute error

  15. Modelling the Transport of Nanoparticles under Blood Flow using an Agent-based Approach

    PubMed Central

    Fullstone, Gavin; Wood, Jonathan; Holcombe, Mike; Battaglia, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Blood-mediated nanoparticle delivery is a new and growing field in the development of therapeutics and diagnostics. Nanoparticle properties such as size, shape and surface chemistry can be controlled to improve their performance in biological systems. This enables modulation of immune system interactions, blood clearance profile and interaction with target cells, thereby aiding effective delivery of cargo within cells or tissues. Their ability to target and enter tissues from the blood is highly dependent on their behaviour under blood flow. Here we have produced an agent-based model of nanoparticle behaviour under blood flow in capillaries. We demonstrate that red blood cells are highly important for effective nanoparticle distribution within capillaries. Furthermore, we use this model to demonstrate how nanoparticle size can selectively target tumour tissue over normal tissue. We demonstrate that the polydispersity of nanoparticle populations is an important consideration in achieving optimal specificity and to avoid off-target effects. In future this model could be used for informing new nanoparticle design and to predict general and specific uptake properties under blood flow. PMID:26058969

  16. Approaches to myosin modelling in a two-phase flow model for cell motility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimpton, L. S.; Whiteley, J. P.; Waters, S. L.; Oliver, J. M.

    2016-04-01

    A wide range of biological processes rely on the ability of cells to move through their environment. Mathematical models have been developed to improve our understanding of how cells achieve motion. Here we develop models that explicitly track the cell's distribution of myosin within a two-phase flow framework. Myosin is a small motor protein which is important for contracting the cell's actin cytoskeleton and enabling cell motion. The two phases represent the actin network and the cytosol in the cell. We start from a fairly general description of myosin kinetics, advection and diffusion in the two-phase flow framework, then identify a number of sub-limits of the model that may be relevant in practice, two of which we investigate further via linear stability analyses and numerical simulations. We demonstrate that myosin-driven contraction of the actin network destabilizes a stationary steady state leading to cell motion, but that rapid diffusion of myosin and rapid unbinding of myosin from the actin network are stabilizing. We use numerical simulation to investigate travelling-wave solutions relevant to a steadily gliding cell and we consider a reduction of the model in which the cell adheres strongly to the substrate on which it is crawling. This work demonstrates that a number of existing models for the effect of myosin on cell motility can be understood as different sub-limits of our two-phase flow model.

  17. Effects of modified pharmacologic stress approaches on hyperemic myocardial blood flow

    SciTech Connect

    Czernin, J.; Auerbach, M.; Sun, K.T.

    1995-04-01

    Pharmacologic stress testing with 0.56 mg/kg of intravenous dipyridamole is frequently used to noninvasively detect coronary artery disease (CAD). However, high-dose dipyridamole (0.80 mg/kg) or the combination of standard-dose dipyridamole (0.56 mg/kg) with the isometric handgrip maneuver might evoke a greater coronary hyperemic response. To evaluate the effect of modified pharmacologic stress tests, myocardial blood flow was quantified in 11 male subjects (mean age: 27 {plus_minus} 7 yr) during standard-dose dipyridamole (0.56 mg/kg), high-dose dipyridamole (0.80 mg/kg) and standard-dose dipyridamole combined with the isometric handgrip exercise using dynamic PET and a two-compartment model for {sup 13}N-ammonia. Systolic blood pressure, heart rate and rate pressure product remained unchanged from standard to high-dose dipyridamole but increased with the addition of the isometric handgrip. Myocardial blood flow was unchanged from standard to high-dose dipyridamole but was lower with the addition of the isometric handgrip. The hyperemic response induced by standard-dose dipyridamole cannot be further enhanced by high-dose dipyridamole. The addition of the isometric handgrip exercise results in a modest, but significant decline in hyperemic blood flow possibly due to increased extravascular resistive forces or an increase in a mediated coronary vasoconstriction associated with exercise. 31 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  18. A flow cytometric approach to the study of crustacean cellular immunity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cardenas, W.; Jenkins, J.A.; Dankert, J.R.

    2000-01-01

    Responses of hemocytes from the crayfish Procambarus zonangulus to stimulation by fungal cell walls (Zymosan A) were measured by flow cytometry. Changes in hemocyte physical characteristics were assessed flow cytometrically using forward- and sidescatter light parameters, and viability was measured by two-color fluorescent staining with calcein-AM and ethidium homodimer 1. The main effects of zymosan A on crayfish hemocytes were reduction in cell size and viability compared to control mixtures (hemocytes in buffer only). Adding diethyldithiocarbamic acid, an inhibitor of phenoloxidase, to hemocyte to zymosan mixtures delayed the time course of cell size reduction and cell death compared to zymosan-positive controls. The inclusion of trypsin inhibitor in reaction mixtures further delayed the reduction in hemocyte size and cell death, thereby indicating that a proteolytic cascade, along with prophenoloxidase activation, played a key role in generating signal molecules which mediate these cellular responses. In addition to traditional methods such as microscopy and protein chemistry, flow cytometry can provide a simple, reproducible, and sensitve method for evaluating invertebrate hemocyte responses to immunological stimuli.

  19. An improved parallel SPH approach to solve 3D transient generalized Newtonian free surface flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Jinlian; Jiang, Tao; Lu, Weigang; Li, Gang

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, a corrected parallel smoothed particle hydrodynamics (C-SPH) method is proposed to simulate the 3D generalized Newtonian free surface flows with low Reynolds number, especially the 3D viscous jets buckling problems are investigated. The proposed C-SPH method is achieved by coupling an improved SPH method based on the incompressible condition with the traditional SPH (TSPH), that is, the improved SPH with diffusive term and first-order Kernel gradient correction scheme is used in the interior of the fluid domain, and the TSPH is used near the free surface. Thus the C-SPH method possesses the advantages of two methods. Meanwhile, an effective and convenient boundary treatment is presented to deal with 3D multiple-boundary problem, and the MPI parallelization technique with a dynamic cells neighbor particle searching method is considered to improve the computational efficiency. The validity and the merits of the C-SPH are first verified by solving several benchmarks and compared with other results. Then the viscous jet folding/coiling based on the Cross model is simulated by the C-SPH method and compared with other experimental or numerical results. Specially, the influences of macroscopic parameters on the flow are discussed. All the numerical results agree well with available data, and show that the C-SPH method has higher accuracy and better stability for solving 3D moving free surface flows over other particle methods.

  20. A first-order time-domain Green's function approach to supersonic unsteady flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freedman, M. I.; Tseng, K.

    1985-01-01

    A time-domain Green's Function Method for unsteady supersonic potential flow around complex aircraft configurations is presented. The focus is on the supersonic range wherein the linear potential flow assumption is valid. The Green's function method is employed in order to convert the potential-flow differential equation into an integral one. This integral equation is then discretized, in space through standard finite-element technique, and in time through finite-difference, to yield a linear algebraic system of equations relating the unknown potential to its prescribed co-normalwash (boundary condition) on the surface of the aircraft. The arbitrary complex aircraft configuration is discretized into hyperboloidal (twisted quadrilateral) panels. The potential and co-normalwash are assumed to vary linearly within each panel. Consistent with the spatial linear (first-order) finite-element approximations, the potential and co-normalwash are assumed to vary linearly in time. The long range goal of our research is to develop a comprehensive theory for unsteady supersonic potential aerodynamics which is capable of yielding accurate results even in the low supersonic (i.e., high transonic) range.

  1. Biomimetic approaches for green tribology: from the lotus effect to blood flow control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maani, Nazanin; Rayz, Vitaliy S.; Nosonovsky, Michael

    2015-09-01

    The research in Green tribology combines several areas including biomimetic tribomaterials and surfaces for controlled adhesion. Biomimetic surfaces mimic living nature and thus they are eco-friendly. The most famous biomimetic surface effect is the Lotus effect (reduction of water adhesion to a solid surface due to micro/nanostructuring of the solid surface). Several extensions of the Lotus effect have been discussed in the literature including the oleophobicity (repelling organic liquids such as oils), underwater oleophobicity to reduce fouling, and the shark skin effect (flow drag reduction due to specially oriented micro-riblets). Here we suggest a potentially important application of micro/nanostructured surfaces in the biomedical area: the micro/nanostructure controlled adhesion in blood flow. Blood is a suspension, and its adhesion properties are different from those of water and oil. For many cardiovascular applications, it is desirable to reduce stagnation and clotting of blood. Therefore, both the underwater oleophobicuity and shark-skin effect can be used. We discuss how computational fluid dynamics models can be used to investigate the structure-property relationships of surface pattern-controlled blood flow adhesion.

  2. Thin-coating as an alternative approach to improve flow properties of ibuprofen powder.

    PubMed

    Genina, Natalja; Räikkönen, Heikki; Ehlers, Henrik; Heinämäki, Jyrki; Veski, Peep; Yliruusi, Jouko

    2010-03-15

    In the present study, thin-coating as a potential method for improving flow properties of cohesive ibuprofen powder was introduced. Briefly, the technique was based on the successive deposition of ultrasound-assisted fine polymer mist onto the surface of the powdered active pharmaceutical ingredient (API), producing individual particles with a hydrophilic thin-coat. A 0.15% m/V aqueous solution of hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC) was used. Particle size and surface analysis revealed a decrease in the cohesiveness of ibuprofen powder and an increase in the homogeneity of particle surfaces as a result of polymer treatment. Superficial changes caused a substantial improvement on the flowing characteristics of coated substance over uncoated. The enhancement in flow rate proceeded as the uniformity of the HPMC layer increased. In conclusion, the proposed technique is a simple and effective method that can be used as a continuous process to modify API particle surface properties, which in turn improve the handling of poorly flowable powder.

  3. Application of an asymmetric flow field flow fractionation multi-detector approach for metallic engineered nanoparticle characterization--prospects and limitations demonstrated on Au nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Hagendorfer, Harald; Kaegi, Ralf; Traber, Jacqueline; Mertens, Stijn F L; Scherrers, Roger; Ludwig, Christian; Ulrich, Andrea

    2011-11-14

    In this work we discuss about the method development, applicability and limitations of an asymmetric flow field flow fractionation (A4F) system in combination with a multi-detector setup consisting of UV/vis, light scattering, and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS). The overall aim was to obtain a size dependent-, element specific-, and quantitative method appropriate for the characterization of metallic engineered nanoparticle (ENP) dispersions. Thus, systematic investigations of crucial method parameters were performed by employing well characterized Au nanoparticles (Au-NPs) as a defined model system. For good separation performance, the A4F flow-, membrane-, and carrier conditions were optimized. To obtain reliable size information, the use of laser light scattering based detectors was evaluated, where an online dynamic light scattering (DLS) detector showed good results for the investigated Au-NP up to a size of 80 nm in hydrodynamic diameter. To adapt large sensitivity differences of the various detectors, as well as to guarantee long term stability and minimum contamination of the mass spectrometer a split-flow concept for coupling ICPMS was evaluated. To test for reliable quantification, the ICPMS signal response of ionic Au standards was compared to that of Au-NP. Using proper stabilization with surfactants, no difference for concentrations of 1-50 μg Au L(-1) in the size range from 5 to 80 nm for citrate stabilized dispersions was observed. However, studies using different A4F channel membranes showed unspecific particle-membrane interaction resulting in retention time shifts and unspecific loss of nanoparticles, depending on the Au-NP system as well as membrane batch and type. Thus, reliable quantification and discrimination of ionic and particular species was performed using ICPMS in combination with ultracentrifugation instead of direct quantification with the A4F multi-detector setup. Figures of merit were obtained, by comparing the

  4. Application of an asymmetric flow field flow fractionation multi-detector approach for metallic engineered nanoparticle characterization--prospects and limitations demonstrated on Au nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Hagendorfer, Harald; Kaegi, Ralf; Traber, Jacqueline; Mertens, Stijn F L; Scherrers, Roger; Ludwig, Christian; Ulrich, Andrea

    2011-11-14

    In this work we discuss about the method development, applicability and limitations of an asymmetric flow field flow fractionation (A4F) system in combination with a multi-detector setup consisting of UV/vis, light scattering, and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS). The overall aim was to obtain a size dependent-, element specific-, and quantitative method appropriate for the characterization of metallic engineered nanoparticle (ENP) dispersions. Thus, systematic investigations of crucial method parameters were performed by employing well characterized Au nanoparticles (Au-NPs) as a defined model system. For good separation performance, the A4F flow-, membrane-, and carrier conditions were optimized. To obtain reliable size information, the use of laser light scattering based detectors was evaluated, where an online dynamic light scattering (DLS) detector showed good results for the investigated Au-NP up to a size of 80 nm in hydrodynamic diameter. To adapt large sensitivity differences of the various detectors, as well as to guarantee long term stability and minimum contamination of the mass spectrometer a split-flow concept for coupling ICPMS was evaluated. To test for reliable quantification, the ICPMS signal response of ionic Au standards was compared to that of Au-NP. Using proper stabilization with surfactants, no difference for concentrations of 1-50 μg Au L(-1) in the size range from 5 to 80 nm for citrate stabilized dispersions was observed. However, studies using different A4F channel membranes showed unspecific particle-membrane interaction resulting in retention time shifts and unspecific loss of nanoparticles, depending on the Au-NP system as well as membrane batch and type. Thus, reliable quantification and discrimination of ionic and particular species was performed using ICPMS in combination with ultracentrifugation instead of direct quantification with the A4F multi-detector setup. Figures of merit were obtained, by comparing the

  5. A non-statistical regularization approach and a tensor product decomposition method applied to complex flow data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Larcher, Thomas; Blome, Therese; Klein, Rupert; Schneider, Reinhold; Wolf, Sebastian; Huber, Benjamin

    2016-04-01

    Handling high-dimensional data sets like they occur e.g. in turbulent flows or in multiscale behaviour of certain types in Geosciences are one of the big challenges in numerical analysis and scientific computing. A suitable solution is to represent those large data sets in an appropriate compact form. In this context, tensor product decomposition methods currently emerge as an important tool. One reason is that these methods often enable one to attack high-dimensional problems successfully, another that they allow for very compact representations of large data sets. We follow the novel Tensor-Train (TT) decomposition method to support the development of improved understanding of the multiscale behavior and the development of compact storage schemes for solutions of such problems. One long-term goal of the project is the construction of a self-consistent closure for Large Eddy Simulations (LES) of turbulent flows that explicitly exploits the tensor product approach's capability of capturing self-similar structures. Secondly, we focus on a mixed deterministic-stochastic subgrid scale modelling strategy currently under development for application in Finite Volume Large Eddy Simulation (LES) codes. Advanced methods of time series analysis for the databased construction of stochastic models with inherently non-stationary statistical properties and concepts of information theory based on a modified Akaike information criterion and on the Bayesian information criterion for the model discrimination are used to construct surrogate models for the non-resolved flux fluctuations. Vector-valued auto-regressive models with external influences form the basis for the modelling approach [1], [2], [4]. Here, we present the reconstruction capabilities of the two modeling approaches tested against 3D turbulent channel flow data computed by direct numerical simulation (DNS) for an incompressible, isothermal fluid at Reynolds number Reτ = 590 (computed by [3]). References [1] I

  6. Development of regionalisation procedures using a multi-model approach for flow simulation in an ungauged catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goswami, M.; O'Connor, K. M.; Bhattarai, K. P.

    2007-02-01

    SummaryFlow simulation in ungauged catchments is presently regarded as one of the most challenging tasks in surface water hydrology. Many of the ungauged catchments are located in the headwaters of rivers in mountainous regions of the world having enormous potential for sustainable water resource development. However, due to inaccessibility, rugged and inhospitable terrain, and historical lack of foresight concerning the need to have these headwaters adequately gauged, their potential is not readily realizable. Many downstream sites also suffer from non-availability of site-specific data as even in countries having extensive networks of gauged stations data may not be available at sites where these are most needed. As predictive tools for water resources, water quality, natural hazard mitigation and water availability assessment are generally data-driven, the lack of adequate hydrometric records poses difficult problems for planners, engineers, managers, and stake-holders alike. In this study, a methodology is developed for flow simulation in ungauged catchments using a regionalisation and multi-model approach involving a suite of rainfall-runoff models and combination techniques. Daily observed hydrometeorological data for 12 French catchments are used for illustrating the procedures. Following a preliminary investigation of the regional homogeneity of that group of catchments, three regional flow simulation techniques are applied. Although all 12 catchments are gauged, initially each catchment is successively considered as being ungauged for the purpose of flow simulation in that catchment, their actual discharges being subsequently used for evaluating the performance of the flow estimation procedures for the catchment. The Nash-Sutcliffe efficiency index ( R2) is used for assessing and ranking the relative performances of the regionalisation-model couples to identify the most appropriate couple for the region. The final step of applying that couple to a truly

  7. Open system degassing, bubble rise and flow dynamics within volcanic conduits- an experimental approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pioli, L.; Azzopardi, B. J.; Bonadonna, C.; Marchetti, E.; Ripepe, M.

    2009-12-01

    Open conduit basaltic volcanoes are characterized by frequent eruptions, usually consisting in mild Strombolian and Hawaiian explosions, alternating years to months of quiescence periods, with degassing activity from the central conduit. Recent improvements of thermal, video, radar and acoustic monitoring techniques have provided new powerful tools for the study of degassing processes and made available geophysical and geochemical datasets for many central volcanoes, such as Stromboli, Etna (Italy), Kilauea (Hawaii), Villarrica (Chile). These studies revealed that degassing is an unsteady, often pulsatory process, characterized by fluctuations in both intensity and composition of the emitted gases. Unambiguous interpretation of monitoring data of surface activity in terms of conduit dynamics and flow processes is, however, not possible, due to partial knowledge of the physical processes controlling the dynamics of two-phase flows in magmas. We performed a series of experiments to gain further insights on the dynamics of the gas-bubble rise in magmas within a cylindrical conduit, their ability to segregate and coalesce and the effect of these processes on the degassing dynamics. The experiments consisted in generating fluxes at variable intensities of air through stagnant water or glucose syrup in a bubble column apparatus 6.5 m high and with a diameter of 24 cm diameter. Glucose syrup and water are Newtonian liquids with viscosity ranging from 2.4 to 204.0 Pa*s and from 1.7 to 0.2 10 -3 Pa*s respectively, depending on temperature. Air was inserted at the base of the column through a variable number (1 to 25) of 5mm-diameter nozzles reaching surficial gas velocities of up to 0.5 m/s. The activity of the bubble column was monitored through temperature, pressure, void fraction and acoustic measurements and filmed by a high-speed camera with maximum resolution of 800x600 pixels. Pressure fluctuations, vesicularity and acoustic signal were then analyzed and correlated

  8. Improved treatment of asthenosphere flow and melting in 2D numerical solutions for continental rifting: embedded vs nested modeling approaches.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Monserrat, Albert; Morgan, Jason P.; Taramón, Jorge M.; Hall, Robert

    2016-04-01

    This work focuses on improving current 2D numerical approaches to modeling the boundary conditions associated with computing accurate deformation and melting associated with continental rifting. Recent models primarily use far-field boundary conditions that have been used for decades with little assessment of their effects on asthenospheric flow beneath the rifting region. All are extremely oversimplified. All are likely to significantly shape the pattern of asthenospheric flow beneath the stretching lithosphere which is associated with pressure-release melting and rift volcanism. The choice of boundary conditions may lead to different predictions of asthenospheric flow and melting associated with lithospheric stretching and breakup. We also find that they may affect the mode of crustal stretching. Here we discuss a suite of numerical experiments using a Lagrangian formulation, that compare these choices to likely more realistic boundary condition choices like the analytical solution for flow associated with two diverging plates stretching over a finite-width region. We also compare embedded and nested meshes with a high-resolution 2-D region within a cartesian 'whole mantle cross-section' box. Our initial results imply that the choice of far-field boundary conditions does indeed significantly influence predicted melting distributions and melt volumes associated with continental breakup. For calculations including asthenospheric melting, the 'finite width plate spreading' and embedded rifting boundary condition treatments lead to significantly smaller BC-influenced signals when using high-resolution calculation regions of order ~1000 km wide and 600 km deep within a lower resolution box of the order of >5000 km wide and 2800 km. We recommend their use when models are attempting to resolve the effects of asthenosphere flow and melting. We also discuss several examples of typical numerical 'artifacts' related to 'edge convection' at the sides of the stretching region

  9. A comparison of the coupled fresh water-salt water flow and the Ghyben-Herzberg sharp interface approaches to modeling of transient behavior in coastal aquifer systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Essaid, H.I.

    1986-01-01

    A quasi-three dimensional finite difference model which simulates coupled, fresh water and salt water flow, separated by a sharp interface, is used to investigate the effects of storage characteristics, transmissivity, boundary conditions and anisotropy on the transient responses of such flow systems. The magnitude and duration of the departure of aquifer response from the behavior predicted using the Ghyben-Herzberg, one-fluid approach is a function of the ease with which flow can be induced in the salt water region. In many common hydrogeologic settings short-term fresh water head responses, and transitional responses between short-term and long-term, can only be realistically reproduced by including the effects of salt water flow on the dynamics of coastal flow systems. The coupled fresh water-salt water flow modeling approach is able to reproduce the observed annual fresh water head response of the Waialae aquifer of southeastern Oahu, Hawaii. ?? 1986.

  10. Evaluation of municipal solid waste management performance by material flow analysis: Theoretical approach and case study.

    PubMed

    Zaccariello, Lucio; Cremiato, Raffaele; Mastellone, Maria Laura

    2015-10-01

    The main role of a waste management plan is to define which is the combination of waste management strategies and method needed to collect and manage the waste in such a way to ensure a given set of targets is reached. Objectives have to be sustainable and realistic, consistent with the environmental policies and regulations and monitored to verify the progressive achievement of the given targets. To get the aim, the setting up and quantification of indicators can allow the measurement of efficiency of a waste management system. The quantification of efficiency indicators requires the developing of a material flow analysis over the system boundary, from waste collection to secondary materials selling, processing and disposal. The material flow analysis has been carried out with reference to a case study for which a reliable, time- and site-specific database was available. The material flow analysis allowed the evaluation of the amount of materials sent to recycling, to landfilling and to waste-to-energy, by highlighting that the sorting of residual waste can further increase the secondary materials amount. The utilisation of energy recovery to treat the low-grade waste allows the maximisation of waste diversion from landfill with a low production of hazardous ash. A preliminary economic balance has been carried out to define the gate fee of the waste management system that was in the range of 84-145 € t(-1) without including the separate collection cost. The cost of door-by-door separate collection, designed to ensure the collection of five separate streams, resulted in 250 € t(-1) ±30%. PMID:26253498

  11. Evaluation of municipal solid waste management performance by material flow analysis: Theoretical approach and case study.

    PubMed

    Zaccariello, Lucio; Cremiato, Raffaele; Mastellone, Maria Laura

    2015-10-01

    The main role of a waste management plan is to define which is the combination of waste management strategies and method needed to collect and manage the waste in such a way to ensure a given set of targets is reached. Objectives have to be sustainable and realistic, consistent with the environmental policies and regulations and monitored to verify the progressive achievement of the given targets. To get the aim, the setting up and quantification of indicators can allow the measurement of efficiency of a waste management system. The quantification of efficiency indicators requires the developing of a material flow analysis over the system boundary, from waste collection to secondary materials selling, processing and disposal. The material flow analysis has been carried out with reference to a case study for which a reliable, time- and site-specific database was available. The material flow analysis allowed the evaluation of the amount of materials sent to recycling, to landfilling and to waste-to-energy, by highlighting that the sorting of residual waste can further increase the secondary materials amount. The utilisation of energy recovery to treat the low-grade waste allows the maximisation of waste diversion from landfill with a low production of hazardous ash. A preliminary economic balance has been carried out to define the gate fee of the waste management system that was in the range of 84-145 € t(-1) without including the separate collection cost. The cost of door-by-door separate collection, designed to ensure the collection of five separate streams, resulted in 250 € t(-1) ±30%.

  12. FISH-Flow: a quantitative molecular approach for describing mixed clade communities of Symbiodinium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McIlroy, S. E.; Smith, G. J.; Geller, J. B.

    2014-03-01

    Our understanding of reef corals and their fate in a changing climate is limited by our ability to monitor the diversity and abundance of the dinoflagellate endosymbionts that sustain them. This study combined two well-known methods in tandem: fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) for genotype-specific labeling of Symbiodinium and flow cytometry to quantify the abundance of each symbiont clade in a sample. This technique (FISH-Flow) was developed with cultured Symbiodinium representing four distinct clades (based on large subunit rDNA) and was used to distinguish and quantify these types with high efficiency and few false positives. This technique was also applied to freshly isolated symbionts of Orbicella faveolata and Orbicella annularis. Isolates from acutely bleached coral tissues had significantly lower labeling efficiency; however, isolates from healthy tissue had efficiencies comparable to cultured Symbiodinium trials. RNA degradation in bleaching samples may have interfered with labeling of cells. Nevertheless, we were able to determine that, with and without thermal stress, experimental columns of the coral O. annularis hosted a majority of clade B and B/C symbionts on the top and side of the coral column, respectively. We demonstrated that, for cultured Symbiodinium and Symbiodinium freshly isolated from healthy host tissues, the relative ratio of clades could be accurately determined for clades present at as low as 7 % relative abundance. While this method does not improve upon PCR-based techniques in identifying clades at background levels, FISH-Flow provides a high precision, flexible system for targeting, quantifying and isolating Symbiodinium genotypes of interest.

  13. A regression approach to the analysis of serial peak flow among fuel oil ash exposed workers.

    PubMed

    Hauser, R; Daskalakis, C; Christiani, D C

    1996-10-01

    We investigated the association between exposure to fuel oil ash and acute airway obstruction in 31 boilermakers and 31 utility workers during the overhaul of a large oil-fired boiler. Air flow was assessed with self-recorded serial peak expiratory flow rate measurements (PEFR) using a mini-Wright meter. Exposure to thoracic particulates with an aerodynamic diameter of 10 gm or smaller (PM10) was assessed using personal sampling devices and detailed work diaries. All subjects were male, with an average age of 43 yr, and an average of 18 yr at their current trade. Average PM10 exposure on work days was 2.75 mg/m3 for boilermakers and 0.57 mg/m3 for utility workers. Three daily PEFR measurements (start-of-shift, end-of-shift, and bed-time) were analyzed simultaneously, using Huber linear regression. After adjustment for job title, welder status, age, height, smoking, and weld-years, for each mg/m3 increase in PM10, the estimated decline in PEFR was 13.2 L/min (p = 0.008) for end-of-shift, 9.9 L/min (p = 0.045) for bed-time, and 6.6 L/min (p = 0.26) for start-of-shift of the following day. This decline of the exposure effect over the 24-h period that follows was statistically significant (p = 0.004). No other factors were found to significantly modify the effect of exposure. Our results suggest that occupational exposure to fuel oil ash is associated with significant acute decrements in peak flow. PMID:8887594

  14. Pharmacological Approaches That Slow Lymphatic Flow As a Snakebite First Aid

    PubMed Central

    van Helden, Dirk F.; Thomas, Paul A.; Dosen, Peter J.; Imtiaz, Mohammad S.; Laver, Derek R.; Isbister, Geoffrey K.

    2014-01-01

    Background This study examines the use of topical pharmacological agents as a snakebite first aid where slowing venom reaching the circulation prevents systemic toxicity. It is based on the fact that toxin molecules in most snake venoms are large molecules and generally first enter and traverse the lymphatic system before accessing the circulation. It follows on from a previous study where it was shown that topical application of a nitric oxide donor slowed lymph flow to a similar extent in humans and rats as well as increased the time to respiratory arrest for subcutaneous injection of an elapid venom (Pseudonaja textilis, Ptx; Eastern brown snake) into the hind feet of anaesthetized rats. Methodology/Principal Findings The effects of topical application of the L-type Ca2+ channel antagonist nifedipine and the local anesthetic lignocaine in inhibiting lymph flow and protecting against envenomation was examined in an anaesthetized rat model. The agents significantly increased dye-measured lymph transit times by 500% and 390% compared to controls and increased the time to respiratory arrest to foot injection of a lethal dose of Ptx venom by 60% and 40% respectively. The study also examined the effect of Ptx venom dose over the lethal range of 0.4 to 1.5 mg/kg finding a negative linear relationship between increase in venom dose and time to respiratory arrest. Conclusions/Significance The findings suggest that a range of agents that inhibit lymphatic flow could potentially be used as an adjunct treatment to pressure bandaging with immobilization (PBI) in snakebite first aid. This is important given that PBI (a snakebite first aid recommended by the Australian National Health and Medical research Council) is often incorrectly applied. The use of a local anesthetic would have the added advantage of reducing pain. PMID:24587472

  15. A regression approach to the analysis of serial peak flow among fuel oil ash exposed workers.

    PubMed

    Hauser, R; Daskalakis, C; Christiani, D C

    1996-10-01

    We investigated the association between exposure to fuel oil ash and acute airway obstruction in 31 boilermakers and 31 utility workers during the overhaul of a large oil-fired boiler. Air flow was assessed with self-recorded serial peak expiratory flow rate measurements (PEFR) using a mini-Wright meter. Exposure to thoracic particulates with an aerodynamic diameter of 10 gm or smaller (PM10) was assessed using personal sampling devices and detailed work diaries. All subjects were male, with an average age of 43 yr, and an average of 18 yr at their current trade. Average PM10 exposure on work days was 2.75 mg/m3 for boilermakers and 0.57 mg/m3 for utility workers. Three daily PEFR measurements (start-of-shift, end-of-shift, and bed-time) were analyzed simultaneously, using Huber linear regression. After adjustment for job title, welder status, age, height, smoking, and weld-years, for each mg/m3 increase in PM10, the estimated decline in PEFR was 13.2 L/min (p = 0.008) for end-of-shift, 9.9 L/min (p = 0.045) for bed-time, and 6.6 L/min (p = 0.26) for start-of-shift of the following day. This decline of the exposure effect over the 24-h period that follows was statistically significant (p = 0.004). No other factors were found to significantly modify the effect of exposure. Our results suggest that occupational exposure to fuel oil ash is associated with significant acute decrements in peak flow.

  16. Enhancing Knowledge Flow in a Health Care Context: A Mobile Computing Approach

    PubMed Central

    Souza, Diego Da Silva; de Lima, Patrícia Zudio; da Silveira, Pedro C; de Souza, Jano Moreira

    2014-01-01

    Background Advances in mobile computing and wireless communication have allowed people to interact and exchange knowledge almost anywhere. These technologies support Medicine 2.0, where the health knowledge flows among all involved people (eg, patients, caregivers, doctors, and patients’ relatives). Objective Our paper proposes a knowledge-sharing environment that takes advantage of mobile computing and contextual information to support knowledge sharing among participants within a health care community (ie, from patients to health professionals). This software environment enables knowledge exchange using peer-to-peer (P2P) mobile networks based on users’ profiles, and it facilitates face-to-face interactions among people with similar health interests, needs, or goals. Methods First, we reviewed and analyzed relevant scientific articles and software apps to determine the current state of knowledge flow within health care. Although no proposal was capable of addressing every aspect in the Medicine 2.0 paradigm, a list of requirements was compiled. Using this requirement list and our previous works, a knowledge-sharing environment was created integrating Mobile Exchange of Knowledge (MEK) and the Easy to Deploy Indoor Positioning System (EDIPS), and a twofold qualitative evaluation was performed. Second, we analyzed the efficiency and reliability of the knowledge that the integrated MEK-EDIPS tool provided to users according to their interest topics, and then performed a proof of concept with health professionals to determine the feasibility and usefulness of using this solution in a real-world scenario. Results . Using MEK, we reached 100% precision and 80% recall in the exchange of files within the peer-to-peer network. The mechanism that facilitated face-to-face interactions was evaluated by the difference between the location indicated by the EDIPS tool and the actual location of the people involved in the knowledge exchange. The average distance error was <6

  17. A two-stage approach for a multi-objective component assignment problem for a stochastic-flow network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yi-Kuei; Yeh, Cheng-Ta

    2013-03-01

    Many real-life systems, such as computer systems, manufacturing systems and logistics systems, are modelled as stochastic-flow networks (SFNs) to evaluate network reliability. Here, network reliability, defined as the probability that the network successfully transmits d units of data/commodity from an origin to a destination, is a performance indicator of the systems. Network reliability maximization is a particular objective, but is costly for many system supervisors. This article solves the multi-objective problem of reliability maximization and cost minimization by finding the optimal component assignment for SFN, in which a set of multi-state components is ready to be assigned to the network. A two-stage approach integrating Non-dominated Sorting Genetic Algorithm II and simple additive weighting are proposed to solve this problem, where network reliability is evaluated in terms of minimal paths and recursive sum of disjoint products. Several practical examples related to computer networks are utilized to demonstrate the proposed approach.

  18. Computation of the inviscid supersonic flow about cones at large angles of attack by a floating discontinuity approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daywitt, J.; Kutler, P.; Anderson, D.

    1977-01-01

    The technique of floating shock fitting is adapted to the computation of the inviscid flowfield about circular cones in a supersonic free stream at angles of attack that exceed the cone half-angle. The resulting equations are applicable over the complete range of free-stream Mach numbers, angles of attack and cone half-angles for which the bow shock is attached. A finite difference algorithm is used to obtain the solution by an unsteady relaxation approach. The bow shock, embedded cross-flow shock, and vortical singularity in the leeward symmetry plane are treated as floating discontinuities in a fixed computational mesh. Where possible, the flowfield is partitioned into windward, shoulder, and leeward regions with each region computed separately to achieve maximum computational efficiency. An alternative shock fitting technique which treats the bow shock as a computational boundary is developed and compared with the floating-fitting approach. Several surface boundary condition schemes are also analyzed.

  19. Insect-Inspired Self-Motion Estimation with Dense Flow Fields—An Adaptive Matched Filter Approach

    PubMed Central

    Strübbe, Simon; Stürzl, Wolfgang; Egelhaaf, Martin

    2015-01-01

    The control of self-motion is a basic, but complex task for both technical and biological systems. Various algorithms have been proposed that allow the estimation of self-motion from the optic flow on the eyes. We show that two apparently very different approaches to solve this task, one technically and one biologically inspired, can be transformed into each other under certain conditions. One estimator of self-motion is based on a matched filter approach; it has been developed to describe the function of motion sensitive cells in the fly brain. The other estimator, the Koenderink and van Doorn (KvD) algorithm, was derived analytically with a technical background. If the distances to the objects in the environment can be assumed to be known, the two estimators are linear and equivalent, but are expressed in different mathematical forms. However, for most situations it is unrealistic to assume that the distances are known. Therefore, the depth structure of the environment needs to be determined in parallel to the self-motion parameters and leads to a non-linear problem. It is shown that the standard least mean square approach that is used by the KvD algorithm leads to a biased estimator. We derive a modification of this algorithm in order to remove the bias and demonstrate its improved performance by means of numerical simulations. For self-motion estimation it is beneficial to have a spherical visual field, similar to many flying insects. We show that in this case the representation of the depth structure of the environment derived from the optic flow can be simplified. Based on this result, we develop an adaptive matched filter approach for systems with a nearly spherical visual field. Then only eight parameters about the environment have to be memorized and updated during self-motion. PMID:26308839

  20. Insect-Inspired Self-Motion Estimation with Dense Flow Fields--An Adaptive Matched Filter Approach.

    PubMed

    Strübbe, Simon; Stürzl, Wolfgang; Egelhaaf, Martin

    2015-01-01

    The control of self-motion is a basic, but complex task for both technical and biological systems. Various algorithms have been proposed that allow the estimation of self-motion from the optic flow on the eyes. We show that two apparently very different approaches to solve this task, one technically and one biologically inspired, can be transformed into each other under certain conditions. One estimator of self-motion is based on a matched filter approach; it has been developed to describe the function of motion sensitive cells in the fly brain. The other estimator, the Koenderink and van Doorn (KvD) algorithm, was derived analytically with a technical background. If the distances to the objects in the environment can be assumed to be known, the two estimators are linear and equivalent, but are expressed in different mathematical forms. However, for most situations it is unrealistic to assume that the distances are known. Therefore, the depth structure of the environment needs to be determined in parallel to the self-motion parameters and leads to a non-linear problem. It is shown that the standard least mean square approach that is used by the KvD algorithm leads to a biased estimator. We derive a modification of this algorithm in order to remove the bias and demonstrate its improved performance by means of numerical simulations. For self-motion estimation it is beneficial to have a spherical visual field, similar to many flying insects. We show that in this case the representation of the depth structure of the environment derived from the optic flow can be simplified. Based on this result, we develop an adaptive matched filter approach for systems with a nearly spherical visual field. Then only eight parameters about the environment have to be memorized and updated during self-motion.

  1. Mapping patient flow in a regional Australian emergency department: a model driven approach.

    PubMed

    Martin, Mary; Champion, Robert; Kinsman, Leigh; Masman, Kevin

    2011-04-01

    Unified Modelling Language (UML) models of the patient journey in a regional Australian emergency department (ED) were used to develop an accurate, complete representation of ED processes and drive the collection of comprehensive quantitative and qualitative service delivery and patient treatment data as an evidence base for hospital service planning. The focus was to identify bottle-necks that contribute to over-crowding. Data was collected entirely independently of the routine hospital data collection system. The greatest source of delay in patient flow was the waiting time from a bed request to exit from the ED for hospital admission. It represented 61% of the time that these patients occupied ED cubicles. The physical layout of the triage area was identified as counterproductive to efficient triaging, and the results of investigations were often observed to be available for some time before clinical staff became aware. The use of independent primary data to construct UML models of the patient journey was effective in identifying sources of delay in patient flow, and aspects of ED activity that could be improved. The findings contributed to recent department re-design and informed an initiative to develop a business intelligence system for predicting impending occurrence of access block. PMID:21459349

  2. Mapping patient flow in a regional Australian emergency department: a model driven approach.

    PubMed

    Martin, Mary; Champion, Robert; Kinsman, Leigh; Masman, Kevin

    2011-04-01

    Unified Modelling Language (UML) models of the patient journey in a regional Australian emergency department (ED) were used to develop an accurate, complete representation of ED processes and drive the collection of comprehensive quantitative and qualitative service delivery and patient treatment data as an evidence base for hospital service planning. The focus was to identify bottle-necks that contribute to over-crowding. Data was collected entirely independently of the routine hospital data collection system. The greatest source of delay in patient flow was the waiting time from a bed request to exit from the ED for hospital admission. It represented 61% of the time that these patients occupied ED cubicles. The physical layout of the triage area was identified as counterproductive to efficient triaging, and the results of investigations were often observed to be available for some time before clinical staff became aware. The use of independent primary data to construct UML models of the patient journey was effective in identifying sources of delay in patient flow, and aspects of ED activity that could be improved. The findings contributed to recent department re-design and informed an initiative to develop a business intelligence system for predicting impending occurrence of access block.

  3. Pyrite oxidation in saturated and Unsaturated Porous Media Flow: AComparison of alternative mathematical modeling approaches

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Tianfu; White, Stephen P.; Pruess, Karsten

    1998-02-15

    Pyrite (FeS{sub 2}) is one of the most common naturally occurring minerals that is present in many subsurface environments. It plays an important role in the genesis of enriched ore deposits through weathering reactions, is the most abundant sulfide mineral in many mine tailings, and is the primary source of acid drainage from mines and waste rock piles. The pyrite oxidation reaction serves as a prototype for oxidative weathering processes with broad significance for geoscientific, engineering, and environmental applications. Mathematical modeling of these processes is extremely challenging because aqueous concentrations of key species vary over an enormous range, oxygen inventory and supply are typically small in comparison to pyrite inventory, and chemical reactions are complex, involving kinetic control and microbial catalysis. We present the mathematical formulation of a general multi-phase advective-diffusive reactive transport model for redox processes. Two alternative implementations were made in the TOUGHREACT and TOUGH2-CHEM simulation codes which use sequential iteration and simultaneous solution, respectively. The simulators are applied to reactive consumption of pyrite in (1) saturated flow of oxidizing water, and (2) saturated-unsaturated flow in which oxygen transport occurs in both aqueous and gas phases. Geochemical evolutions predicted from different process models are compared, and issues of numerical accuracy and efficiency are discussed.

  4. Modelling Cavitating Flows using an Eulerian-Lagrangian Approach and a Nucleation Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Jingsen; Hsiao, Chao-Tsung; Chahine, Georges L.

    2015-12-01

    An Eulerian/Lagrangian multi-scale two-phase flow model is developed to simulate the various types of cavitation including bubble, sheet, and tip vortex cavitation. Sheet cavitation inception, unsteady breakup, and cloud shedding on a hydrofoil are used as an example here. No assumptions are needed on mass transfer between phases; instead, the method tracks bubble nuclei, which are in the bulk of the liquid and those generated by nucleation from solid boundaries and this is- sufficient to accurately capture the sheet dynamics. The multi-scale model includes a micro-scale model for tracking the bubbles, a macro-scale model for describing large cavity dynamics and a transition scheme to bridge the micro and macro scales. Nuclei are treated as flow singularities until they grow into large bubbles, which eventually merge to form a large scale discretised sheet cavity. The sheet performs large scale oscillations with a periodic reentrant jet forming under the sheet cavity, traveling upstream, and breaking the cavity. This results in bubble cloud formation and in high pressure peaks as the broken pockets shrink and collapse while travelling downstream. The results for a NACA0015 foil are in good agreement with the experimental data.

  5. Flow modeling of alkaline dissolution by a thermodynamic or by a kinetic approach

    SciTech Connect

    Labrid, J.; Bazin, B. )

    1993-05-01

    This paper presents a calculation of the propagation of basic pH in a reservoir rock based on either a kinetically controlled reaction or a thermodynamic equilibrium assumption. Results demonstrate that the kinetic approach is the only way to analyze the interactions of alkaline chemicals with clayey sandstones properly.

  6. Dynamic gas slippage: A unique dual-mechanism approach to the flow of gas in tight formations

    SciTech Connect

    Ertekin; King, G.R.; Schwerer, F.C.

    1983-10-01

    A mathematical formulation, applicable to both numerical simulation and transient well analysis, describing the flow of gas in very tight (k < 0.1 md) porous media has been developed. Unique to this formulation is the dual-mechanism transport of gas. In this formulation gas is assumed to be traveling under the influence of two fields: a concentration field and a pressure field. Transport through the concentration field is a Knudsen flow process and is modeled with Fick's Law of diffusion. Transport through the pressure field is a laminar process and is modeled with Darcy's law (inertial-turbulent effects are ignored). The combination of these two flow mechanisms rigorously yields a composition, pressure and saturation dependent slippage factor. The pressure dependence arises from treating the gas as a real gas. The dynamic slippage derived from this formulation is found to be most applicable in reservoirs with permeabilities less than or equal to 0.01 md. The results from this study indicate that in reservoirs of this type, differences between recoveries after ten years of production using the dynamic slip described in this paper and constant slip approaches were as great as 10% depending on the initial gas saturation. If an economic production rate is considered, differences as great as 30 can be expected.

  7. Dynamic gas slippage: A unique dual-mechanism approach to the flow of gas in tight formations

    SciTech Connect

    Ertekin, T.; King, G.R.; Schwerer, F.C.

    1986-02-01

    A mathematical formulation, applicable to both numerical simulation and transient well analysis that describes the flow of gas in very tight porous media and includes a dual-mechanism transport of gas is developed. Gas is assumed to be traveling under the influence of a concentration field and a pressure field. Transport through the concentration field is a Knudsen flow process and is modeled with Fick's law of diffusion. Transport through the pressure field is a laminar process and is modeled with Darcy's law (inertial/turbulent effects are ignored). The combination of these two flow mechanisms rigorously yields a composition-, pressure-, and saturation-dependent slippage factor. The pressure dependence arises from treating the gas as a real gas. The derived dynamic slippage is most applicable in reservoirs with permeabilities less than or equal to0.01 md. The results indicate that in reservoirs of this type, differences between recoveries after 10 years of production with the dynamic-slip and constant-slip approaches were as great as 10%, depending on the initial gas saturation. If an economic production rate is considered, differences as great as 30% can be expected.

  8. A new approach to the solution of large, full matrix equations: A two-dimensional potential flow feasibility study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, R. M.; Clark, R. W.

    1979-01-01

    An approach to the solution of matrix problems resulting from integral equations of mathematical physics is presented. Based on the inherent smoothness in such equations, the problem is reformulated using a set of orthogonal basis vectors, leading to an equivalent coefficient problem which can be of lower order without significantly impairing the accuracy of the solution. This approach was evaluated using a two-dimensional Neumann problem describing the inviscid, incompressible flow over an airfoil. Two different kinds of mode functions were investigated, namely eigenfunction series and Fourier series. The method using Fourier series was found preferable. It uses all of the coefficients from a Fast Fourier Transform algorithm in an approximate method which exploits the known structure of the transformed coefficient matrix and very promising results for the flow over a realistic airfoil are obtained. On the basis of the results presented here, an order of magnitude reduction in this computer time can be expected for such problems as compared with the time for a direct matrix solution.

  9. A data-driven approach for modeling post-fire debris-flow volumes and their uncertainty

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Friedel, M.J.

    2011-01-01

    This study demonstrates the novel application of genetic programming to evolve nonlinear post-fire debris-flow volume equations from variables associated with a data-driven conceptual model of the western United States. The search space is constrained using a multi-component objective function that simultaneously minimizes root-mean squared and unit errors for the evolution of fittest equations. An optimization technique is then used to estimate the limits of nonlinear prediction uncertainty associated with the debris-flow equations. In contrast to a published multiple linear regression three-variable equation, linking basin area with slopes greater or equal to 30 percent, burn severity characterized as area burned moderate plus high, and total storm rainfall, the data-driven approach discovers many nonlinear and several dimensionally consistent equations that are unbiased and have less prediction uncertainty. Of the nonlinear equations, the best performance (lowest prediction uncertainty) is achieved when using three variables: average basin slope, total burned area, and total storm rainfall. Further reduction in uncertainty is possible for the nonlinear equations when dimensional consistency is not a priority and by subsequently applying a gradient solver to the fittest solutions. The data-driven modeling approach can be applied to nonlinear multivariate problems in all fields of study. ?? 2011.

  10. Vortical flows in strongly coupled Yukawa liquids under external forcing - A molecular dynamics approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganesh, Rajaraman; Charan, Harish

    2016-07-01

    Understanding vortical flows under external forcing in two dimensional (2D) fluids is a fundamental paradigm for structure formation in driven, dissipative systems. Considering Yukawa liquid as a prototype for strongly correlated or strongly coupled plasmas characterized by coupling strength (Γ, the ratio of average potential to kinetic energy per particle) and screening parameter (κ, ratio of mean inter-particle distance to shielding length), we address two important problems: 1. Onset of Rayleigh Benard convection cell (RBCC) in 2D Yukawa liquids subject to gravity and external temperature gradient 2. Onset of von Karman vortices in 2D Yukawa liquid under external pressure head, using large scale, first principles molecular dynamics simulations. For typical values of (Γ,κ), existence of a critical external temperature difference is demonstrated, beyond which RBCC are seen to set in. Beyond this critical external temperature difference, the strength of the maximum convective flow velocity is shown to exhibit a new, hitherto unsuspected linear relationship with external temperature difference and with a slope independent of (Γ,κ). The time taken for the transients to settle down to a steady state RBCC τ_s, is found to be maximum close to the above said critical external temperature difference and is seen to reduce with increasing external temperature difference. For the range of values of (Γ, κ) considered here, τ_s ≃ 10 000-20 000;ω^{-1}_{pd}, where ω_{pd} is dust plasma frequency. As Γ is increased to very high values, due to strong coupling effects, RBC cells are seen to be in a transient state without attaining a steady state for as long as 100 000;ω^{-1}_{pd}, even for a very high external temperature difference. In the second part, we address the existence of universal relation between Strouhal (St) and Rayleigh (Ry) numbers for Yukawa liquid using first principles based classical molecular dynamics. The flow past an obstacle is seen to indeed

  11. An inverse modeling approach for the characterization of unsaturated water flow in an organic forest floor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosugi, K.; Mori, K.; Yasuda, H.

    2001-06-01

    Although the retention of rain-water by a forest floor consisting of vegetation litter has large hydrological and geomorphological effects in a forested catchment, its physical processes have not yet been clarified. For the purpose of examining the applicability of Richards equation to unsaturated water flow in forest floor, results of artificial rainfall experiments were analyzed by the inverse method. Forest floor samples were collected from a beech-stand, an oak-stand, a cedar-stand and a mixed-stand of coniferous and broad-leaved trees. The samples were piled up to make long columns of 20.6 cm in inner diameter and about 50 cm in height, with which step-wise drainage experiments and random-rainfall experiments were conducted. Parameters in water retention and hydraulic conductivity functions were optimized by comparing the observed versus computed discharge rates for the step-wise drainage experiments. The derived retention and conductivity functions succeeded to reproduce the observed drainage hydrographs during the random-rainfall experiments, indicating that Richards equation can describe the unsaturated water flow in all the forest floor studied. The derived retention functions suggested that the forest floors have a small water capacity except for the very wet range where the matric pressure head, ψ, is greater than -5 cm. The conductivity functions of all the forest floors exhibited a sharp drop in the range of ψ>-5 cm, and decreased gradually as ψ decreased further. The forest floors at the beech-stand and the oak-stand had larger water capacities and smaller conductivity values than the forest floors at the cedar-stand and the mixed-stand. Consequently, the discharge hydrographs of the forest floors at the beech-stand and the oak-stand were characterized by more gradual responses to rainfall than the forest floors at the cedar-stand and the mixed-stand. Overall, the proposed inverse technique was effective to characterize the unsaturated water flow

  12. An explicit approach to capture diffusive effects in finite water-content method for solving vadose zone flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jianting; Ogden, Fred L.; Lai, Wencong; Chen, Xiangfeng; Talbot, Cary A.

    2016-04-01

    Vadose zone flow problems are usually solved from the Richards equation. Solution to the Richards equation is generally challenging because the hydraulic conductivity and diffusivity in the equation are strongly non-linear functions of water content. The finite water-content method was proposed as an alternative general solution method of the vadose zone flow problem for infiltration, falling slugs, and vadose zone response to water table dynamics based on discretizing the water content domain into numerous bins instead of the traditional spatial discretization. In this study, we develop an improved approach to the original finite water-content method (referred to as TO method hereinafter) that better simulates diffusive effects but retains the robustness of the TO method. The approach treats advection and diffusion separately and considers diffusion on a bin by bin basis. After discretizing into water content bins, we treat the conductivity and diffusivity in individual bins as water content dependent constant evaluated at given water content corresponding to each bin. For each bin, we can solve the flow equations analytically since the hydraulic conductivity and diffusivity can be treated as a constant. We then develop solutions for each bin to determine the diffusive water amounts at each time step. The water amount ahead of the convective front for each bin is redistributed among water content bins to account for diffusive effects. The application of developed solution is straightforward only involving algebraic manipulations at each time step. The method can mainly improve water content profiles, but has no significant difference for the total infiltration rate and cumulative infiltration compared to the TO method. Although the method separately deals with advection and diffusion, it can account for the coupling effects of advection and diffusion reasonably well.

  13. Unsteady MHD Couette Flows in an Annuli: The Riemann-Sum Approximation Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jha, Basant K.; Apere, Clement A.

    2010-12-01

    The unsteady MHD Couette flow of a viscous incompressible electrically conducting fluid between two concentric horizontal cylinders of infinite length have been analysed when the outer cylinder has been set into uniform accelerated motion. A unified closed form expressions are derived corresponding to the cases of the magnetic field fixed relative to the fluid or to the accelerated outer cylinder. The well known Laplace transform technique is applied to solve the time-dependent governing equations, while the method of Riemann-sum approximation is employed to invert the Laplace domain to the time domain in order to obtain the velocity and the skin friction. The variations of the velocity and the skin friction with respect to the Hartmann number and time have been discussed.

  14. An automatic system for acidity determination based on sequential injection titration and the monosegmented flow approach.

    PubMed

    Kozak, Joanna; Wójtowicz, Marzena; Gawenda, Nadzieja; Kościelniak, Paweł

    2011-06-15

    An automatic sequential injection system, combining monosegmented flow analysis, sequential injection analysis and sequential injection titration is proposed for acidity determination. The system enables controllable sample dilution and generation of standards of required concentration in a monosegmented sequential injection manner, sequential injection titration of the prepared solutions, data collecting, and handling. It has been tested on spectrophotometric determination of acetic, citric and phosphoric acids with sodium hydroxide used as a titrant and phenolphthalein or thymolphthalein (in the case of phosphoric acid determination) as indicators. Accuracy better than |4.4|% (RE) and repeatability better than 2.9% (RSD) have been obtained. It has been applied to the determination of total acidity in vinegars and various soft drinks. The system provides low sample (less than 0.3 mL) consumption. On average, analysis of a sample takes several minutes. PMID:21641455

  15. OMFP: An Approach for Online Mass Flow Prediction in CFB Boilers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Žliobaitė, Indrė; Bakker, Jorn; Pechenizkiy, Mykola

    Fuel feeding and inhomogeneity of fuel typically cause process fluctuations in the circulating fluidized bed (CFB) boilers. If control systems fail to compensate the fluctuations, the whole plant will suffer from fluctuations that are reinforced by the closed-loop controls. Accurate estimates of fuel consumption among other factors are needed for control systems operation. In this paper we address a problem of online mass flow prediction. Particularly, we consider the problems of (1) constructing the ground truth, (2) handling noise and abrupt concept drift, and (3) learning an accurate predictor. Last but not least we emphasize the importance of having the domain knowledge concerning the considered case. We demonstrate the performance of OMPF using real data sets collected from the experimental CFB boiler.

  16. Impact of Geological Characterization Uncertainties on Subsurface Flow & Transport Using a Stochastic Discrete Fracture Network Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ezzedine, S. M.

    2009-12-01

    Fractures and fracture networks are the principal pathways for transport of water and contaminants in groundwater systems, enhanced geothermal system fluids, migration of oil and gas, carbon dioxide leakage from carbon sequestration sites, and of radioactive and toxic industrial wastes from underground storage repositories. A major issue to overcome when characterizing a fractured reservoir is that of data limitation due to accessibility and affordability. Moreover, the ability to map discontinuities in the rock with available geological and geophysical tools tends to decrease particularly as the scale of the discontinuity goes down. Geological characterization data include measurements of fracture density, orientation, extent, and aperture, and are based on analysis of outcrops, borehole optical and acoustic televiewer logs, aerial photographs, and core samples, among other techniques. All of these measurements are taken at the field scale through a very sparse limited number of deep boreholes. These types of data are often reduced to probability distribution functions for predictive modeling and simulation in a stochastic framework such as a stochastic discrete fracture network. Stochastic discrete fracture network models enable, through Monte Carlo realizations and simulations, probabilistic assessment of flow and transport phenomena that are not adequately captured using continuum models. Despite the fundamental uncertainties inherited within the probabilistic reduction of the sparse data collected, very little work has been conducted on quantifying uncertainty on the reduced probabilistic distribution functions. In the current study, using nested Monte Carlo simulations, we present the impact of parameter uncertainties of the distribution functions of fracture density, orientation, aperture and size on the flow and transport using topological measures such as fracture connectivity, physical characteristics such as effective hydraulic conductivity tensors, and

  17. Riemann–Hilbert problem approach for two-dimensional flow inverse scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Agaltsov, A. D.; Novikov, R. G.

    2014-10-15

    We consider inverse scattering for the time-harmonic wave equation with first-order perturbation in two dimensions. This problem arises in particular in the acoustic tomography of moving fluid. We consider linearized and nonlinearized reconstruction algorithms for this problem of inverse scattering. Our nonlinearized reconstruction algorithm is based on the non-local Riemann–Hilbert problem approach. Comparisons with preceding results are given.

  18. Groundwater origin and flow dynamics in active rift systems - A multi-isotope approach in the Main Ethiopian Rift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bretzler, Anja; Osenbrück, Karsten; Gloaguen, Richard; Ruprecht, Janina S.; Kebede, Seifu; Stadler, Susanne

    2011-05-01

    SummaryThis study aims to investigate groundwater recharge and flow patterns in tectonically active rift systems, exemplified by a case study in the Main Ethiopian Rift. The chosen approach includes the investigation of hydrochemical parameters and environmental isotopes ( 3H, δ 2H, δ 18O, δ 13C-DIC, 14C-DIC, 87Sr/ 86Sr). Apparent groundwater ages were determined by radiocarbon dating after correction of 14C-DIC using a modified δ 13C-mixing model and further validation using geochemical modelling with NETPATH. Hydrochemical and isotopic data indicate an evolutionary trend existing from the escarpments towards the Rift floor. Groundwater evolves from tritium-containing and hence recently recharged Ca-HCO 3-type water on the escarpments to tritium-free Na-HCO 3 groundwater dominating deep Rift floor aquifers. Correspondingly, rising pH and HCO3- values coupled with increasingly enriched δ 13C signatures point to hydrochemical evolution of DIC and beginning dilution of the carbon isotope signature by other carbon sources, related to a diffuse influx of mantle CO 2 into the groundwater system. Especially thermal groundwater sampled near the most recent fault zones in the Fantale/Beseka region displays clear influence of mantle CO 2 and increased water-rock interaction, indicated by a shift in δ 13C and 87Sr/ 86Sr signatures. The calculation of apparent groundwater ages revealed an age increase of deep groundwater from the escarpments to the Rift floor, complying with hydrochemical evolution. Within the Rift, samples show a relatively uniform distribution of apparent 14C ages of ˜1800 to ˜2800 years, with the expected down-gradient aging trend lacking, contradicting the predominant intra-rift groundwater flow described in existing transect-based models of groundwater flow. By combining hydrochemical and new isotopic data with knowledge of the structural geology of the Rift, we improve the existing groundwater flow model and propose a new conceptual model by

  19. Drag phenomena within a torque converter driven automotive transmission - laminar flow approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexa, O.; Marinescu, M.; Olaru, Gh; Costache, D.; Ilie, C. O.; Vinturis, V.

    2015-11-01

    When discussing a torque converter driven, automotive transmission with respect to the vehicle's coasting mode, automotive engineers have to take into account the slip between the converter's propeller and turbine. If the turbine isn't locked to the propellers during coasting process, drag phenomena within the converter's fluid occur and they have to be properly assessed when computing the coasting process dynamics. The best way to make the needed evaluation is to have a separate torque converter and test it on a test bench, if the data provided by the manufacturer, in this respect, weren't available. But there are several issues that could baffle this action. Among them, one could find the lack of information from the manufacturer, missing (bankrupted) manufacturer, classified information, old (out of date) products and so on. An even more challenging situation consists in dealing with a military special vehicle. Actually, the vehicle that would be subjected to the following topic is a military tracked, heavy vehicle (MBT) with a planetary driveline, driven by its engine via a hydraulic torque converter. In the attempt to assess its’ coasting dynamic performances, we faced the problem of the reverse rotation of the torque converter that strongly influences the general drag of the vehicle's motion. Hence, this paper tries to provide a method to determine the transmission overall drag considering the torque converter as being its main contributor. The method is based on the experimental research our team has performed in the last several months. Using high-quality software and adjacent mathematics while assuming a certain sort of flow type within the torque converter, we aimed at determining the parameter of interest of the flow. The method can be successfully used for all type of hydrodynamic components of the transmission under the condition of developing the necessary experimental research. As far as the test were concerned, they were the typical ones designed

  20. Sensitive immunochemical approaches for quantitative (FPIA) and qualitative (lateral flow tests) determination of gentamicin in milk.

    PubMed

    Beloglazova, N V; Shmelin, P S; Eremin, S A

    2016-01-01

    Three kinds of immunoassays for the determination of gentamicin in milk samples were developed and validated. First, a fast and easily-performed fluorescence polarization immunoassay was used for characterization of the employed polyclonal antibody. The calculated Kaff were (1.9±0.4)×10(9)М(-1) and (6.0±0.2)×10(6)М(-1) for the high- and low-affinity fractions respectively. The assay was characterized with a good sensitivity, the limit of detection being 5μgkg(-1). Two different kinds of detection labels, i.e. colloidal gold (CG) and quantum dots (QDs), were evaluated for use in lateral-flow format with respect to rapid visual on-site testing. The cut-off levels for both qualitative formats were selected based on the maximum level for gentamicin in milk established by the European Commission, 100μgkg(-1), resulting in a 10μgkg(-1) cut-off considering sample dilution. The intra-laboratory validation was performed with sterilized milk samples artificially spiked with gentamicin at concentrations less than, equal to, and greater than the cut-off level. It was shown that milk products could be analyzed without any sample preparation, except for dilution with the buffer solution. The rates of false-positive and false-negative results were below 5% for both labels. The different developed immunoassays were tested towards gentamicin determination in artificially-spiked and naturally contaminated milk samples.

  1. An Experimenting Field Approach for the Numerical Solution of Multiphase Flow in Porous Media.

    PubMed

    Salama, Amgad; Sun, Shuyu; Bao, Kai

    2016-03-01

    In this work, we apply the experimenting pressure field technique to the problem of the flow of two or more immiscible phases in porous media. In this technique, a set of predefined pressure fields are introduced to the governing partial differential equations. This implies that the velocity vector field and the divergence at each cell of the solution mesh can be determined. However, since none of these fields is the true pressure field entailed by the boundary conditions and/or the source terms, the divergence at each cell will not be the correct one. Rather the residue which is the difference between the true divergence and the calculated one is obtained. These fields are designed such that these residuals are used to construct the matrix of coefficients of the pressure equation and the right-hand side. The experimenting pressure fields are generated in the solver routine and are fed to the different routines, which may be called physics routines, which return to the solver the elements of the matrix of coefficients. Therefore, this methodology separates the solver routines from the physics routines and therefore results in simpler, easy to construct, maintain, and update algorithms.

  2. A mathematical approach enabling the calculation of the total endolymph flow in the semicircular ducts.

    PubMed

    Muller, M; Verhagen, J H

    1988-10-21

    1. A mathematical treatment of the flow inside the vertebrate labyrinth is given. The main difference to former theories (e.g. the "torsion pendulum" theory) is that the entire system formed by the three semicircular ducts, interconnected by the crus commune and the utriculus, is considered, instead of a single duct circuit. 2. The theory consists of a geometrical description of a labyrinth rotating in space, the solution of the continuity equation, determination of the initial velocities in all the ducts in a "cupulometry" experiment and derivation of the equation of motion (e.o.m.). 3. Equations for a system consisting of two ducts and for the classical single-duct system are special cases of the three-duct system. 4. Three different methods for the solution of the e.o.m. are described: an analytical one, a Runge-Kutta simulation and an "asymptotic" method. The last method includes approximations of the solution of the e.o.m. on a long and a short time scale. Its advantage is that it gives an insight based on rather manageable formulae. 5. The physiological basis of the presented theory, biological applications and verification are given in a separate paper (Muller & Verhagen, 1988).

  3. Development of a novel flow cytometric approach to evaluate fish sperm chromatin using fixed samples

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jenkins, Jill A.

    2013-01-01

    The integrity of the paternal DNA is essential for the accurate transmission of genetic information, yet fertilization is not inhibited by chromatin breakage. Some methods are available for the sensitive detection of DNA damage and can be applied in studies of environmental toxicology, carcinogenesis, aging, and assisted reproduction techniques in both clinical and experimental settings. Because semen samples obtained from remote locations undergo chromatin damage prior to laboratory assessment, the present study was undertaken to evaluate treatments for effective chromatin staining in the development of a DNA fragmentation assay using fixed milt from yellow perch (Perca flavescens). Similar to the sperm chromatin structure assay (SCSA), susceptibility of nuclear DNA to acid-induced denaturation was measured by flow cytometry (FCM). Use of 10% buffered formalin for milt fixation allowed easier peak discrimination than 4% paraformaldehyde. The effects of time and temperature of incubation in 0.08 N HCl were evaluated in order to determine the ideal conditions for promoting DNA decondensation and making strand breaks more available for staining and detection by FCM. The best results were obtained with incubation at 37°C for 1 minute, followed by cold propidium iodide staining for 30 minutes.

  4. An investigation of sulfate production in clouds using a flow-through chemical reactor model approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hong, M. S.; Carmichael, G. R.

    1983-01-01

    A flow-through chemical reactor model is developed to describe the mass transfer and chemical processes that atmospheric gases undergo in clouds. The model includes the simultaneous absorption of SO2, NH3, O3, NO(x), HNO3, CO2 and H2O2, the accompanying dissociation and oxidation reactions in cloud water, considers electrical neutrality, and includes qualitative parameterization of cloud microphysics. The model is used to assess the importance of the oxidation reactions H2O2-S(IV), O3-S(IV), and S(IV)-Mn(2+) catalysis, and the effects of cloud parameters such as drop size, rain intensity, liquid water content, and updraft velocity. Both precipitating and nonprecipitating clouds are studied. Model results predict sulfate production rates varying from 3 percent/hr to 230 percent/hr. The actual rate is highly dependent on the chemical composition of the uptake air and the physical conditions of the cloud. Model results also show that both the H2O2 and the O3 oxidation reactions can be significant.

  5. Non-Newtonian particulate flow simulation: A direct-forcing immersed boundary-lattice Boltzmann approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amiri Delouei, A.; Nazari, M.; Kayhani, M. H.; Kang, S. K.; Succi, S.

    2016-04-01

    In the current study, a direct-forcing immersed boundary-non-Newtonian lattice Boltzmann method (IB-NLBM) is developed to investigate the sedimentation and interaction of particles in shear-thinning and shear-thickening fluids. In the proposed IB-NLBM, the non-linear mechanics of non-Newtonian particulate flows is detected by combination of the most desirable features of immersed boundary and lattice Boltzmann methods. The noticeable roles of non-Newtonian behavior on particle motion, settling velocity and generalized Reynolds number are investigated by simulating benchmark problem of one-particle sedimentation under the same generalized Archimedes number. The effects of extra force due to added accelerated mass are analyzed on the particle motion which have a significant impact on shear-thinning fluids. For the first time, the phenomena of interaction among the particles, such as Drafting, Kissing, and Tumbling in non-Newtonian fluids are investigated by simulation of two-particle sedimentation and twelve-particle sedimentation. The results show that increasing the shear-thickening behavior of fluid leads to a significant increase in the kissing time. Moreover, the transverse position of particles for shear-thinning fluids during the tumbling interval is different from Newtonian and the shear-thickening fluids. The present non-Newtonian particulate study can be applied in several industrial and scientific applications, like the non-Newtonian sedimentation behavior of particles in food industrial and biological fluids.

  6. A Comparison of Model Reduction Approaches for Feedback Control Design of Thermal Flows in Buildings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borggaard, Jeff; Ahuja, Sunil; Burns, John; Cliff, Eugene; Surana, Amit

    2010-11-01

    The application of distributed parameter control to spatiotemporal thermo-fluid systems requires the use of model reduction methods. The form of the optimal feedback control can inform design decisions, such as sensor and actuator selection and placement. A number of model reduction approaches for fluid systems have been put forward that are based on the proper orthogonal decomposition (POD). In this talk, we examine three approaches, the traditional POD-Galerkin model, the POD-Sensitivity model, and the Balanced-POD models. Our work is motivated by the building indoor environment control problem. Energy performance in building cooling and heating systems can be substantially improved by exploiting spatial temperature stratification and buoyancy that are prevalent in passive systems. We consider the control of airflow in a room with a passively cooled radiant ceiling and displacement ventilation provided near the room floor. For this problem, we approximate the full-order solution to compute the control gains, develop reduced-order models and associated controllers, and simulate the full-order closed-loop system for comparison with the reduced-order model-based control design.

  7. Predictions of axisymmetric free turbulent shear flows using a generalized eddy-viscosity approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgenthaler, J. H.

    1973-01-01

    The generalized eddy viscosity approach is described and results are presented of test cases which show that predictions obtained by this approach are adequate for most engineering applications. Because of the importance of starting computations from the injection station where experimentally determined mean and turbulence parameters are rarely available, a very simple core model applicable to simple step-type (slug) profiles was developed. Agreement between predicted and experimental mean profiles was generally almost as good for calculations made by using this model throughout the core region and the transition model for all subsequent regions as predictions made by starting from experimental profiles in the transition region. The generalized eddy-viscosity model, which was developed in part through correlation of turbulence parameters, successfully predicted turbulent shear stress, turbulent intensity, and mean velocity profiles for a 0.040-inch-diameter microjet. Therefore, successful scaling by the model was demonstrated since data used in its development was for jet areas up to 90,000 times as large as the microjet and velocities only 1/20th as high.

  8. Coriolis effects on rotating Hele-Shaw flows: a conformal-mapping approach.

    PubMed

    Miranda, José A; Gadêlha, Hermes; Dorsey, Alan T

    2010-12-01

    The zero surface tension fluid-fluid interface dynamics in a radial Hele-Shaw cell driven by both injection and rotation is studied by a conformal-mapping approach. The situation in which one of the fluids is inviscid and has negligible density is analyzed. When Coriolis force effects are ignored, exact solutions of the zero surface tension rotating Hele-Shaw problem with injection reveal suppression of cusp singularities for sufficiently high rotation rates. We study how the Coriolis force affects the time-dependent solutions of the problem, and the development of finite time singularities. By employing Richardson's harmonic moments approach we obtain conformal maps which describe the time evolution of the fluid boundary. Our results demonstrate that the inertial Coriolis contribution plays an important role in determining the time for cusp formation. Moreover, it introduces a phase drift that makes the evolving patterns rotate. The Coriolis force acts against centrifugal effects, promoting (inhibiting) cusp breakdown if the more viscous and dense fluid lies outside (inside) the interface. Despite the presence of Coriolis effects, the occurrence of finger bending events has not been detected in the exact solutions.

  9. Prediction of Groundwater Flow and Transport Processes in an Urban Area: A Combined Approach of Field Testing and Numerical Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popp, Andrea; Moeck, Christian; Radny, Dirk; Borer, Paul; Affolter, Annette; Epting, Jannis; Huggenberger, Peter; Auckenthaler, Adrian; Schirmer, Mario

    2015-04-01

    Drinking water supply in urban areas is challenging due to different kinds of water use and potential groundwater contamination. We investigate an area where drinking water production is close to different contaminated sites. The study site is characterized by a high complexity of the tectonic and geological setting with a gravel and a karstic aquifer. The two aquifers are partly connected, partly disconnected by an aquitard. To avoid drinking water contamination, artificial groundwater recharge with surface water into the gravel aquifer is used to create a hydraulic barrier between the contaminated sites and the water abstraction wells. Trace compounds, that were found in former times in the surface water but not nowadays, are still detected in the extracted drinking water. Different studies have been performed such as numerical modeling, intensive groundwater monitoring and investigation of drilling cores to get a differentiated overview of the distribution of the contaminants. Back-diffusion from the matrix due to changing hydraulic boundary was stated to be the reason for the actual distribution of the contaminants. In a first approach due to the lack of experimental data or evidence from field measurements, the permeabilities of the karstic aquifer were assumed as homogeneous. In our study, we seek to identify the flow and transport processes within the system including the fracture network in a combined approach of field work and 3D modeling with FEFLOW. During a field campaign we acquired water samples for the analysis of stable water isotopes as well as organic and inorganic compounds. Furthermore, tritium and helium samples were taken to estimate water ages and to determine the flow through the fracture networks. A combination of existing and recently obtained data was used to build and validate a 3D flow and transport model. The simulation of different scenarios such as the water flow for varying injection and extraction rates as well as particle

  10. A graded approach to flow and transport modeling to support decommissioning activities at the Savannah river site.

    PubMed

    Dixon, Kenneth L; Lee, Patricia L; Flach, Gregory P

    2008-05-01

    A graded approach to flow and transport modeling has been used as a cost effective solution to evaluating potential groundwater risk in support of Deactivation and Decommissioning activities at the United States Department of Energy's Savannah River Site (SRS) in Aiken, South Carolina. This approach balances modeling complexity with potential risk and has been successfully used at SRS to reduce costs and accelerate schedule without compromising human health or the environment. The approach incorporates both simple spreadsheet calculations (i.e., screening models) and complex numerical modeling to evaluate the threat to human health posed by contaminants leaching from decommissioned concrete building slabs. Simple spreadsheet calculations were used to produce generic slab concentration limits for a suite of radiological and non-radiological contaminants for a chemical separations area at SRS. These limits, which are based upon the United States Environmental Protection Agency Soil Screening Guidance, were used to eliminate most building slabs from further risk assessment, thereby limiting the time and associated cost of the more rigorous assessment to higher risk facilities. Of the more than 58 facilities located in the area, to date only one slab has been found to have a contaminant concentration in excess of the area specific slab limit. For this slab, a more rigorous numerical modeling effort was undertaken which eliminated some of the simplifying and conservative assumptions inherent in the spreadsheet calculations. Results from the more sophisticated numerical model show that the remaining contaminant of concern would not likely impact groundwater above drinking water standards. PMID:18403957

  11. An Integrated Approach on Groundwater Flow and Heat/Solute Transport for Sustainable Groundwater Source Heat Pump (GWHP) System Operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, D. K.; Bae, G. O.; Joun, W.; Park, B. H.; Park, J.; Park, I.; Lee, K. K.

    2015-12-01

    The GWHP system uses a stable temperature of groundwater for cooling and heating in buildings and thus has been known as one of the most energy-saving and cost-efficient renewable energy techniques. A GWHP facility was installed at an island located at the confluence of North Han and South Han rivers, Korea. Because of well-developed alluvium, the aquifer is suitable for application of this system, extracting and injecting a large amount of groundwater. However, the numerical experiments under various operational conditions showed that it could be vulnerable to thermal interference due to the highly permeable gravel layer, as a preferential path of thermal plume migration, and limited space for well installation. Thus, regional groundwater flow must be an important factor of consideration for the efficient operation under these conditions but was found to be not simple in this site. While the groundwater level in this site totally depends on the river stage control of Paldang dam, the direction and velocity of the regional groundwater flow, observed using the colloidal borescope, have been changed hour by hour with the combined flows of both the rivers. During the pumping and injection tests, the water discharges in Cheongpyeong dam affected their respective results. Moreover, the measured NO3-N concentrations might imply the effect of agricultural activities around the facility on the groundwater quality along the regional flow. It is obvious that the extraction and injection of groundwater during the facility operation will affect the fate of the agricultural contaminants. Particularly, the gravel layer must also be a main path for contaminant migration. The simulations for contaminant transport during the facility operation showed that the operation strategy for only thermal efficiency could be unsafe and unstable in respect of groundwater quality. All these results concluded that the integrated approach on groundwater flow and heat/solute transport is necessary

  12. A thermodynamic approach to link self-organization, preferential flow and rainfall-runoff behaviour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zehe, E.; Ehret, U.; Blume, T.; Kleidon, A.; Scherer, U.; Westhoff, M.

    2013-11-01

    This study investigates whether a thermodynamically optimal hillslope structure can, if existent, serve as a first guess for uncalibrated predictions of rainfall-runoff. To this end we propose a thermodynamic framework to link rainfall-runoff processes and dynamics of potential energy, kinetic energy and capillary binding energy in catchments and hillslopes. The starting point is that hydraulic equilibrium in soil corresponds to local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE), characterized by a local maximum entropy/minimum of free energy of soil water. Deviations from LTE occur either due to evaporative losses, which increase absolute values of negative capillary binding energy of soil water and reduce its potential energy, or due to infiltration of rainfall, which increases potential energy of soil water and reduces the strength of capillary binding energy. The amplitude and relaxation time of these deviations depend on climate, vegetation, soil hydraulic functions, topography and density of macropores. Based on this framework we analysed the free energy balance of hillslopes within numerical experiments that perturbed model structures with respect to the surface density of macropores. These model structures have been previously shown to allow successful long-term simulations of the water balances of the Weiherbach and the Malalcahuello catchments, which are located in distinctly different pedological and climatic settings. Our findings offer a new perspective on different functions of preferential flow paths depending on the pedological setting. Free energy dynamics of soil water in the cohesive soils of the Weiherbach is dominated by dynamics of capillary binding energy. Macropores act as dissipative wetting structures by enlarging water flows against steep gradients in soil water potential after long dry spells. This implies accelerated depletion of these gradients and faster relaxation back towards LTE. We found two local optima in macropore density that maximize

  13. Molecular nanoshearing: an innovative approach to shear off molecules with AC-induced nanoscopic fluid flow.

    PubMed

    Shiddiky, Muhammad J A; Vaidyanathan, Ramanathan; Rauf, Sakandar; Tay, Zhikai; Trau, Matt

    2014-01-16

    Early diagnosis of disease requires highly specific measurement of molecular biomarkers from femto to pico-molar concentrations in complex biological (e.g., serum, blood, etc.) samples to provide clinically useful information. While reaching this detection limit is challenging in itself, these samples contain numerous other non-target molecules, most of which have a tendency to adhere to solid surfaces via nonspecific interactions. Herein, we present an entirely new methodology to physically displace nonspecifically bound molecules from solid surfaces by utilizing a newly discovered "tuneable force", induced by an applied alternating electric field, which occurs within few nanometers of an electrode surface. This methodology thus offers a unique ability to shear-off loosely bound molecules from the solid/liquid interface. Via this approach, we achieved a 5-fold reduction in nonspecific adsorption of non-target protein molecules and a 1000-fold enhancement for the specific capture of HER2 protein in human serum.

  14. Operator splitting approach applied to oscillatory flow and heat transfer in a tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Widura, R.; Lehn, M.; Muralidhar, K.; Scherer, R.

    2008-02-01

    The method of operator splitting is applied to an advection-diffusion model as it occurs in a pulse tube. Firstly, the governing equations of the simplified model are studied and the mathematical description is derived. Then the splitting approach is used to separate the advection and the diffusion part. Now it turns out that the advective part can be solved analytically and therefore the computational cost are reduced and the accuracy is increased. It is shown that the method can model an effect called Taylor dispersion. Applying a domain decomposition strategy, the solution process can be decoupled, reducing the numerical cost even more. This procedure allows to study the relevant parameters within the model with the goal to maximize the amount of energy stored within the tube wall. As a measure of efficiency, the amount of energy transferred between the fluid phase and the wall is chosen.

  15. Time-Dependent Simulation of Incompressible Flow in a Turbopump Using Overset Grid Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiris, Cetin; Kwak, Dochan

    2001-01-01

    This paper reports the progress being made towards complete unsteady turbopump simulation capability by using overset grid systems. A computational model of a turbo-pump impeller is used as a test case for the performance evaluation of the MPI, hybrid MPI/Open-MP, and MLP versions of the INS3D code. Relative motion of the grid system for rotor-stator interaction was obtained by employing overset grid techniques. Unsteady computations for a turbo-pump, which contains 114 zones with 34.3 Million grid points, are performed on Origin 2000 systems at NASA Ames Research Center. The approach taken for these simulations, and the performance of the parallel versions of the code are presented.

  16. Development of the Large Eddy Simulation Approach for Modeling Turbulent Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, R. C.; Smith, T. M.; DesJardin, P. E.; Voth, T. E.; Christon, M. A.

    2002-03-01

    This report describes research and development of the large eddy simulation (LES) turbulence modeling approach conducted as part of Sandia's laboratory directed research and development (LDRD) program. The emphasis of the work described here has been toward developing the capability to perform accurate and computationally affordable LES calculations of engineering problems using unstructured-grid codes, in wall-bounded geometries and for problems with coupled physics. Specific contributions documented here include (1) the implementation and testing of LES models in Sandia codes, including tests of a new conserved scalar--laminar flamelet SGS combustion model that does not assume statistical independence between the mixture fraction and the scalar dissipation rate, (2) the development and testing of statistical analysis and visualization utility software developed for Exodus II unstructured grid LES, and (3) the development and testing of a novel new LES near-wall subgrid model based on the one-dimensional Turbulence (ODT) model.

  17. On the Development of the Large Eddy Simulation Approach for Modeling Turbulent Flow: LDRD Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    SCHMIDT, RODNEY C.; SMITH, THOMAS M.; DESJARDIN, PAUL E.; VOTH, THOMAS E.; CHRISTON, MARK A.; KERSTEIN, ALAN R.; WUNSCH, SCOTT E.

    2002-03-01

    This report describes research and development of the large eddy simulation (LES) turbulence modeling approach conducted as part of Sandia's laboratory directed research and development (LDRD) program. The emphasis of the work described here has been toward developing the capability to perform accurate and computationally affordable LES calculations of engineering problems using unstructured-grid codes, in wall-bounded geometries and for problems with coupled physics. Specific contributions documented here include (1) the implementation and testing of LES models in Sandia codes, including tests of a new conserved scalar--laminar flamelet SGS combustion model that does not assume statistical independence between the mixture fraction and the scalar dissipation rate, (2) the development and testing of statistical analysis and visualization utility software developed for Exodus II unstructured grid LES, and (3) the development and testing of a novel new LES near-wall subgrid model based on the one-dimensional Turbulence (ODT) model.

  18. Molecular Nanoshearing: An Innovative Approach to Shear off Molecules with AC-Induced Nanoscopic Fluid Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiddiky, Muhammad J. A.; Vaidyanathan, Ramanathan; Rauf, Sakandar; Tay, Zhikai; Trau, Matt

    2014-01-01

    Early diagnosis of disease requires highly specific measurement of molecular biomarkers from femto to pico-molar concentrations in complex biological (e.g., serum, blood, etc.) samples to provide clinically useful information. While reaching this detection limit is challenging in itself, these samples contain numerous other non-target molecules, most of which have a tendency to adhere to solid surfaces via nonspecific interactions. Herein, we present an entirely new methodology to physically displace nonspecifically bound molecules from solid surfaces by utilizing a newly discovered ``tuneable force'', induced by an applied alternating electric field, which occurs within few nanometers of an electrode surface. This methodology thus offers a unique ability to shear-off loosely bound molecules from the solid/liquid interface. Via this approach, we achieved a 5-fold reduction in nonspecific adsorption of non-target protein molecules and a 1000-fold enhancement for the specific capture of HER2 protein in human serum.

  19. Impaired cerebral blood flow networks in temporal lobe epilepsy with hippocampal sclerosis: A graph theoretical approach.

    PubMed

    Sone, Daichi; Matsuda, Hiroshi; Ota, Miho; Maikusa, Norihide; Kimura, Yukio; Sumida, Kaoru; Yokoyama, Kota; Imabayashi, Etsuko; Watanabe, Masako; Watanabe, Yutaka; Okazaki, Mitsutoshi; Sato, Noriko

    2016-09-01

    Graph theory is an emerging method to investigate brain networks. Altered cerebral blood flow (CBF) has frequently been reported in temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE), but graph theoretical findings of CBF are poorly understood. Here, we explored graph theoretical networks of CBF in TLE using arterial spin labeling imaging. We recruited patients with TLE and unilateral hippocampal sclerosis (HS) (19 patients with left TLE, and 21 with right TLE) and 20 gender- and age-matched healthy control subjects. We obtained all participants' CBF maps using pseudo-continuous arterial spin labeling and analyzed them using the Graph Analysis Toolbox (GAT) software program. As a result, compared to the controls, the patients with left TLE showed a significantly low clustering coefficient (p=0.024), local efficiency (p=0.001), global efficiency (p=0.010), and high transitivity (p=0.015), whereas the patients with right TLE showed significantly high assortativity (p=0.046) and transitivity (p=0.011). The group with right TLE also had high characteristic path length values (p=0.085), low global efficiency (p=0.078), and low resilience to targeted attack (p=0.101) at a trend level. Lower normalized clustering coefficient (p=0.081) in the left TLE and higher normalized characteristic path length (p=0.089) in the right TLE were found also at a trend level. Both the patients with left and right TLE showed significantly decreased clustering in similar areas, i.e., the cingulate gyri, precuneus, and occipital lobe. Our findings revealed differing left-right network metrics in which an inefficient CBF network in left TLE and vulnerability to irritation in right TLE are suggested. The left-right common finding of regional decreased clustering might reflect impaired default-mode networks in TLE. PMID:27497065

  20. Investigating redox processes under diffusive and advective flow conditions using a coupled omics and synchrotron approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kemner, K. M.; Boyanov, M.; Flynn, T. M.; O'Loughlin, E. J.; Antonopoulos, D. A.; Kelly, S.; Skinner, K.; Mishra, B.; Brooks, S. C.; Watson, D. B.; Wu, W. M.

    2015-12-01

    FeIII- and SO42--reducing microorganisms and the mineral phases they produce have profound implications for many processes in aquatic and terrestrial systems. In addition, many of these microbially-catalysed geochemical transformations are highly dependent upon introduction of reactants via advective and diffusive hydrological transport. We have characterized microbial communities from a set of static microcosms to test the effect of ethanol diffusion and sulfate concentration on UVI-contaminated sediment. The spatial distribution, valence states, and speciation of both U and Fe were monitored in situ throughout the experiment by synchrotron x-ray absorption spectroscopy, in parallel with solution measurements of pH and the concentrations of sulfate, ethanol, and organic acids. After reaction initiation, a ~1-cm thick layer of sediment near the sediment-water (S-W) interface became visibly dark. Fe XANES spectra of the layer were consistent with the formation of FeS. Over the 4 year duration of the experiment, U LIII-edge XANES indicated reduction of U, first in the dark layer and then throughout the sediment. Next, the microcosms were disassembled and samples were taken from the overlying water and different sediment regions. We extracted DNA and characterized the microbial community by sequencing 16S rRNA gene amplicons with the Illumina MiSeq platform and found that the community evolved from its originally homogeneous composition, becoming significantly spatially heterogeneous. We have also developed an x-ray accessible column to probe elemental transformations as they occur along the flow path in a porous medium with the purpose of refining reactive transport models (RTMs) that describe coupled physical and biogeochemical processes in environmental systems. The elemental distribution dynamics and the RTMs of the redox driven processes within them will be presented.

  1. The response of migratory populations to phenological change: a Migratory Flow Network modelling approach.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Caz M; Laughlin, Andrew J; Hall, Richard J

    2016-05-01

    Declines in migratory species have been linked to anthropogenic climate change through phenological mismatch, which arises due to asynchronies between the timing of life-history events (such as migration) and the phenology of available resources. Long-distance migratory species may be particularly vulnerable to phenological change in their breeding ranges, since the timing of migration departure is based on environmental cues at distant non-breeding sites. Migrants may, however, be able to adjust migration speed en route to the breeding grounds, and thus, ability of migrants to update their timing of migration may depend critically on stopover frequency during migration; however, understanding how migratory strategy influences population dynamics is hindered by a lack of predictive models explicitly linking habitat quality to demography and movement patterns throughout the migratory cycle. Here, we present a novel modelling framework, the Migratory Flow Network (MFN), in which the seasonally varying attractiveness of breeding, winter and stopover regions drives the direction and timing of migration based on a simple general flux law. We use the MFN to investigate how populations respond to shifts in breeding site phenology based on their frequency of stopover and ability to detect and adapt to these changes. With perfect knowledge of advancing phenology, 'jump' migrants (low-frequency stopover) require more adaptation for populations to recover than 'hop' and 'skip' (high or medium frequency stopover) migrants. If adaptation depends on proximity, hop and skip migrants' populations can recover but jump migrants cannot adjust and decline severely. These results highlight the importance of understanding migratory strategies and maintaining high-quality stopover habitat to buffer migratory populations from climate-induced mismatch. We discuss how MFNs could be applied to diverse migratory taxa and highlight the potential of MFNs as a tool for exploring how migrants

  2. Impaired cerebral blood flow networks in temporal lobe epilepsy with hippocampal sclerosis: A graph theoretical approach.

    PubMed

    Sone, Daichi; Matsuda, Hiroshi; Ota, Miho; Maikusa, Norihide; Kimura, Yukio; Sumida, Kaoru; Yokoyama, Kota; Imabayashi, Etsuko; Watanabe, Masako; Watanabe, Yutaka; Okazaki, Mitsutoshi; Sato, Noriko

    2016-09-01

    Graph theory is an emerging method to investigate brain networks. Altered cerebral blood flow (CBF) has frequently been reported in temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE), but graph theoretical findings of CBF are poorly understood. Here, we explored graph theoretical networks of CBF in TLE using arterial spin labeling imaging. We recruited patients with TLE and unilateral hippocampal sclerosis (HS) (19 patients with left TLE, and 21 with right TLE) and 20 gender- and age-matched healthy control subjects. We obtained all participants' CBF maps using pseudo-continuous arterial spin labeling and analyzed them using the Graph Analysis Toolbox (GAT) software program. As a result, compared to the controls, the patients with left TLE showed a significantly low clustering coefficient (p=0.024), local efficiency (p=0.001), global efficiency (p=0.010), and high transitivity (p=0.015), whereas the patients with right TLE showed significantly high assortativity (p=0.046) and transitivity (p=0.011). The group with right TLE also had high characteristic path length values (p=0.085), low global efficiency (p=0.078), and low resilience to targeted attack (p=0.101) at a trend level. Lower normalized clustering coefficient (p=0.081) in the left TLE and higher normalized characteristic path length (p=0.089) in the right TLE were found also at a trend level. Both the patients with left and right TLE showed significantly decreased clustering in similar areas, i.e., the cingulate gyri, precuneus, and occipital lobe. Our findings revealed differing left-right network metrics in which an inefficient CBF network in left TLE and vulnerability to irritation in right TLE are suggested. The left-right common finding of regional decreased clustering might reflect impaired default-mode networks in TLE.

  3. Tracing carbon flow through coral reef food webs using a compound-specific stable isotope approach.

    PubMed

    McMahon, Kelton W; Thorrold, Simon R; Houghton, Leah A; Berumen, Michael L

    2016-03-01

    Coral reefs support spectacularly productive and diverse communities in tropical and sub-tropical waters throughout the world's oceans. Debate continues, however, on the degree to which reef biomass is supported by new water column production, benthic primary production, and recycled detrital carbon (C). We coupled compound-specific stable C isotope ratio (δ(13)C) analyses with Bayesian mixing models to quantify C flow from primary producers to coral reef fishes across multiple feeding guilds and trophic positions in the Red Sea. Analyses of reef fishes with putative diets composed primarily of zooplankton (Amblyglyphidodon indicus), benthic macroalgae (Stegastes nigricans), reef-associated detritus (Ctenochaetus striatus), and coral tissue (Chaetodon trifascialis) confirmed that δ(13)C values of essential amino acids from all baseline C sources were both isotopically diagnostic and accurately recorded in consumer tissues. While all four source end-members contributed to the production of coral reef fishes in our study, a single-source end-member often dominated dietary C assimilation of a given species, even for highly mobile, generalist top predators. Microbially reworked detritus was an important secondary C source for most species. Seascape configuration played an important role in structuring resource utilization patterns. For instance, Lutjanus ehrenbergii showed a significant shift from a benthic macroalgal food web on shelf reefs (71 ± 13 % of dietary C) to a phytoplankton-based food web (72 ± 11 %) on oceanic reefs. Our work provides insights into the roles that diverse C sources play in the structure and function of coral reef ecosystems and illustrates a powerful fingerprinting method to develop and test nutritional frameworks for understanding resource utilization.

  4. Tracing carbon flow through coral reef food webs using a compound-specific stable isotope approach.

    PubMed

    McMahon, Kelton W; Thorrold, Simon R; Houghton, Leah A; Berumen, Michael L

    2016-03-01

    Coral reefs support spectacularly productive and diverse communities in tropical and sub-tropical waters throughout the world's oceans. Debate continues, however, on the degree to which reef biomass is supported by new water column production, benthic primary production, and recycled detrital carbon (C). We coupled compound-specific stable C isotope ratio (δ(13)C) analyses with Bayesian mixing models to quantify C flow from primary producers to coral reef fishes across multiple feeding guilds and trophic positions in the Red Sea. Analyses of reef fishes with putative diets composed primarily of zooplankton (Amblyglyphidodon indicus), benthic macroalgae (Stegastes nigricans), reef-associated detritus (Ctenochaetus striatus), and coral tissue (Chaetodon trifascialis) confirmed that δ(13)C values of essential amino acids from all baseline C sources were both isotopically diagnostic and accurately recorded in consumer tissues. While all four source end-members contributed to the production of coral reef fishes in our study, a single-source end-member often dominated dietary C assimilation of a given species, even for highly mobile, generalist top predators. Microbially reworked detritus was an important secondary C source for most species. Seascape configuration played an important role in structuring resource utilization patterns. For instance, Lutjanus ehrenbergii showed a significant shift from a benthic macroalgal food web on shelf reefs (71 ± 13 % of dietary C) to a phytoplankton-based food web (72 ± 11 %) on oceanic reefs. Our work provides insights into the roles that diverse C sources play in the structure and function of coral reef ecosystems and illustrates a powerful fingerprinting method to develop and test nutritional frameworks for understanding resource utilization. PMID:26590916

  5. General approach to polymer chains confined by interacting boundaries. II. Flow through a cylindrical nano-tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freed, Karl F.; Wu, Chi

    2011-10-01

    The Laplace-Green's function methods of Paper I are extended to describe polymers confined in interacting, impenetrable cylindrical geometries, whose treatment is far more challenging than the slit and box geometries considered in Paper I. The general methods are illustrated with calculations (as a function of the polymer-surface interaction) of the free energy of confinement, the radial density profile, and the average of the drag force in the free draining limit, quantities that will be used elsewhere to analyze experiments of Wu and co-workers involving the flow of polymers through nanopores. All these properties are evaluated by numerical inverse Laplace transforms of closed form analytical expressions, a significant savings over the traditional eigenfunction approaches. The example of the confinement free energy for a 3-arm star polymer illustrates the treatment when a closed form expression for the Laplace transform is unavailable.

  6. A level set approach for left ventricle detection in CT images using shape segmentation and optical flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brieva, Jorge; Moya-Albor, Ernesto; Escalante-Ramírez, Boris

    2015-01-01

    The left ventricle (LV) segmentation plays an important role in a subsequent process for the functional analysis of the LV. Typical segmentation of the endocardium wall in the ventricle excludes papillary muscles which leads to an incorrect measure of the ejected volume in the LV. In this paper we present a new variational strategy using a 2D level set framework that includes a local term for enhancing the low contrast structures and a 2D shape model. The shape model in the level set method is propagated to all image sequences corresponding to the cardiac cycles through the optical flow approach using the Hermite transform. To evaluate our strategy we use the Dice index and the Hausdorff distance to compare the segmentation results with the manual segmentation carried out by the physician.

  7. Assessment of reaction-rate predictions of a collision-energy approach for chemical reactions in atmospheric flows.

    SciTech Connect

    Gallis, Michail A.; Bond, Ryan Bomar; Torczynski, John Robert

    2010-06-01

    A recently proposed approach for the Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method to calculate chemical-reaction rates is assessed for high-temperature atmospheric species. The new DSMC model reproduces measured equilibrium reaction rates without using any macroscopic reaction-rate information. Since it uses only molecular properties, the new model is inherently able to predict reaction rates for arbitrary non-equilibrium conditions. DSMC non-equilibrium reaction rates are compared to Park's phenomenological nonequilibrium reaction-rate model, the predominant model for hypersonic-flow-field calculations. For near-equilibrium conditions, Park's model is in good agreement with the DSMC-calculated reaction rates. For far-from-equilibrium conditions, corresponding to a typical shock layer, significant differences can be found. The DSMC predictions are also found to be in very good agreement with measured and calculated non-equilibrium reaction rates, offering strong evidence that this is a viable and reliable technique to predict chemical reaction rates.

  8. New Approach to Study the Ignition Processes of Organic Coal-Water Fuels in an Oxidizer Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valiullin, T. R.; Dmitrienko, M. A.; Strizhak, P. A.

    2016-02-01

    To converge the conditions of organic water-coal fuel composition combustion in the typical power equipment we developed a new approach and installed an experimental setup, eliminating the traditional fixing the fuel droplets on the thermocouples or rods. Specialized cone-shaped chamber was used to implement the process of lingering of organic water-coal fuel droplets. Necessary and sufficient conditions for the lingering of organic water-coal fuel droplets were established. We determined the parameters of the system (droplet size of 0.4-0.6 mm, temperatures 823-903 K and the velocity of the oxidizer flow 1.5-6 m/s) at which the droplets were consistently ignited in the process of lingering. Minimum temperatures and ignition delay times of organic water-coal fuel droplets based on brown coal, used motor, turbine, transformer oils, kerosene, gasoline and water were defined.

  9. Three-Dimensional Incompressible Navier-Stokes Flow Computations about Complete Configurations Using a Multiblock Unstructured Grid Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheng, Chunhua; Hyams, Daniel G.; Sreenivas, Kidambi; Gaither, J. Adam; Marcum, David L.; Whitfield, David L.

    2000-01-01

    A multiblock unstructured grid approach is presented for solving three-dimensional incompressible inviscid and viscous turbulent flows about complete configurations. The artificial compressibility form of the governing equations is solved by a node-based, finite volume implicit scheme which uses a backward Euler time discretization. Point Gauss-Seidel relaxations are used to solve the linear system of equations at each time step. This work employs a multiblock strategy to the solution procedure, which greatly improves the efficiency of the algorithm by significantly reducing the memory requirements by a factor of 5 over the single-grid algorithm while maintaining a similar convergence behavior. The numerical accuracy of solutions is assessed by comparing with the experimental data for a submarine with stem appendages and a high-lift configuration.

  10. [THE NEW APPROACH TO EVALUATION OF ENDOTHELIUM DYSFUNCTION: DETECTION OF NUMBER OF CIRCULATING ENDOTHELIUM CELLS USING FLOW CYTOMETRY TECHNIQUE].

    PubMed

    Feoktistova, V S; Vavilkova, T V; Sirotkina, O V; Boldueva, S A; Gaikovaia, L B; Leonova, I A; Laskovets, A B; Ermakov, A I

    2015-04-01

    The endothelium dysfunction takes leading place in pathogenesis of development of cardiovascular diseases. The circulating endothelium cells of peripheral blood can act as a direct cell marker of damage and remodeling of endothelium. The study was carried out to develop a new approach to diagnose of endothelium dysfunction by force of determination of number of circulating endothelium cells using flow cytometry technique and to apply determination of circulating endothelium cells for evaluation of risk of development of ischemic heart disease in women of young and middle age. The study embraced 62 female patients with angiography confirmed ischemic heart disease, exertional angina pectoris at the level of functional class I-II (mean age 51 ± 6 years) and 49 women without anamnesis of ischemic heart disease (mean age 52 ± 9 years). The occurrence of more than three circulating endothelium cells by 3 x 105 leukocytes in peripheral blood increases relative risk of development of ischemic heart disease up to 4 times in women of young and middle age and risk of development of acute myocardial infarction up to 8 times in women with ischemic heart disease. The study demonstrated possibility to apply flow cytometry technique to quantitatively specify circulating endothelium cells in peripheral blood and forecast risk of development of ischemic heart disease in women of young and middle age depending on level of circulating endothelium cells.

  11. Analysis of heat transfer and fluid flow through a spirally fluted tube using a porous substrate approach

    SciTech Connect

    Srinivasan, V.; Vafai, K.; Christensen, R.N. )

    1994-08-01

    An innovative approach was opted for modeling the flow and heat transfer through spirally fluted tubes. The model divided the flow domain into two regions. The flutes were modeled as a porous substrate with direction-dependent permeabilities. This enabled modeling the swirl component in the fluted tube. The properties of the porous substrate such as its thickness, porosity, and ratio of the direction-dependent permeabilities were obtained from the geometry of the fluted tube. Experimental data on laminar Nusselt numbers and friction factors for different types of fluted tubes representing a broad range of flute geometry were available. Experimental data from a few of the tubes tested were used to propose a relationship between the permeability of the porous substrate and the flute parameters, particularly the flute spacing. The governing equations were discretized using the Finite Element Method. The model was verified and applied to the other tubes in the test matrix. Very good agreement was found between the numerical predictions and the experimental data. 20 refs., 13 figs., 4 tabs.

  12. Micro reactor integrated μ-PEM fuel cell system: a feed connector and flow field free approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balakrishnan, A.; Mueller, C.; Reinecke, H.

    2013-12-01

    A system level microreactor concept for hydrogen generation with Sodium Borohydride (NaBH4) is demonstrated. The uniqueness of the system is the transport and distribution feature of fuel (hydrogen) to the anode of the fuel cell without any external feed connectors and flow fields. The approach here is to use palladium film instead of feed connectors and the flow fields; palladium's property to adsorb and desorb the hydrogen at ambient and elevated condition. The proof of concept is demonstrated with a polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) based complete system integration which includes microreactor, palladium transport layer and the self-breathing polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell. The hydrolysis of NaBH4 was carried out in the presence of platinum supported by nickel (NiPt). The prototype functionality is tested with NaBH4 chemical hydride. The characterization of the integrated palladium layer and fuel cell is tested with constant and switching load. The presented integrated fuel cell is observed to have a maximum power output and current of 60 mW and 280 mA respectively.

  13. Hydrochemical evolution and groundwater flow processes in the Galilee and Eromanga basins, Great Artesian Basin, Australia: a multivariate statistical approach.

    PubMed

    Moya, Claudio E; Raiber, Matthias; Taulis, Mauricio; Cox, Malcolm E

    2015-03-01

    The Galilee and Eromanga basins are sub-basins of the Great Artesian Basin (GAB). In this study, a multivariate statistical approach (hierarchical cluster analysis, principal component analysis and factor analysis) is carried out to identify hydrochemical patterns and assess the processes that control hydrochemical evolution within key aquifers of the GAB in these basins. The results of the hydrochemical assessment are integrated into a 3D geological model (previously developed) to support the analysis of spatial patterns of hydrochemistry, and to identify the hydrochemical and hydrological processes that control hydrochemical variability. In this area of the GAB, the hydrochemical evolution of groundwater is dominated by evapotranspiration near the recharge area resulting in a dominance of the Na-Cl water types. This is shown conceptually using two selected cross-sections which represent discrete groundwater flow paths from the recharge areas to the deeper parts of the basins. With increasing distance from the recharge area, a shift towards a dominance of carbonate (e.g. Na-HCO3 water type) has been observed. The assessment of hydrochemical changes along groundwater flow paths highlights how aquifers are separated in some areas, and how mixing between groundwater from different aquifers occurs elsewhere controlled by geological structures, including between GAB aquifers and coal bearing strata of the Galilee Basin. The results of this study suggest that distinct hydrochemical differences can be observed within the previously defined Early Cretaceous-Jurassic aquifer sequence of the GAB. A revision of the two previously recognised hydrochemical sequences is being proposed, resulting in three hydrochemical sequences based on systematic differences in hydrochemistry, salinity and dominant hydrochemical processes. The integrated approach presented in this study which combines different complementary multivariate statistical techniques with a detailed assessment of the

  14. Hydrochemical evolution and groundwater flow processes in the Galilee and Eromanga basins, Great Artesian Basin, Australia: a multivariate statistical approach.

    PubMed

    Moya, Claudio E; Raiber, Matthias; Taulis, Mauricio; Cox, Malcolm E

    2015-03-01

    The Galilee and Eromanga basins are sub-basins of the Great Artesian Basin (GAB). In this study, a multivariate statistical approach (hierarchical cluster analysis, principal component analysis and factor analysis) is carried out to identify hydrochemical patterns and assess the processes that control hydrochemical evolution within key aquifers of the GAB in these basins. The results of the hydrochemical assessment are integrated into a 3D geological model (previously developed) to support the analysis of spatial patterns of hydrochemistry, and to identify the hydrochemical and hydrological processes that control hydrochemical variability. In this area of the GAB, the hydrochemical evolution of groundwater is dominated by evapotranspiration near the recharge area resulting in a dominance of the Na-Cl water types. This is shown conceptually using two selected cross-sections which represent discrete groundwater flow paths from the recharge areas to the deeper parts of the basins. With increasing distance from the recharge area, a shift towards a dominance of carbonate (e.g. Na-HCO3 water type) has been observed. The assessment of hydrochemical changes along groundwater flow paths highlights how aquifers are separated in some areas, and how mixing between groundwater from different aquifers occurs elsewhere controlled by geological structures, including between GAB aquifers and coal bearing strata of the Galilee Basin. The results of this study suggest that distinct hydrochemical differences can be observed within the previously defined Early Cretaceous-Jurassic aquifer sequence of the GAB. A revision of the two previously recognised hydrochemical sequences is being proposed, resulting in three hydrochemical sequences based on systematic differences in hydrochemistry, salinity and dominant hydrochemical processes. The integrated approach presented in this study which combines different complementary multivariate statistical techniques with a detailed assessment of the

  15. A New Approach to Sap Flow Measurement Using 3D Printed Gauges and Open-source Electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ham, J. M.; Miner, G. L.; Kluitenberg, G. J.

    2015-12-01

    A new type of sap flow gauge was developed to measure transpiration from herbaceous plants using a modified heat pulse technique. Gauges were fabricated using 3D-printing technology and low-cost electronics to keep the materials cost under $20 (U.S.) per sensor. Each gauge consisted of small-diameter needle probes fastened to a 3D-printed frame. One needle contained a resistance heater to provide a 6 to 8 second heat pulse while the other probes measured the resultant temperature increase at two distances from the heat source. The data acquisition system for the gauges was built from a low-cost Arduino microcontroller. The system read the gauges every 10 minutes and stored the results on a SD card. Different numerical techniques were evaluated for estimating sap velocity from the heat pulse data - including analytical solutions and parameter estimation approaches . Prototype gauges were tested in the greenhouse on containerized corn and sunflower. Sap velocities measured by the gauges were compared to independent gravimetric measurements of whole plant transpiration. Results showed the system could measure daily transpiration to within 3% of the gravimetric measurements. Excellent agreement was observed when two gauges were attached the same stem. Accuracy was not affected by rapidly changing transpiration rates observed under partly cloudy conditions. The gauge-based estimates of stem thermal properties suggested the system may also detect the onset of water stress. A field study showed the gauges could run for 1 to 2 weeks on a small battery pack. Sap flow measurements on multiple corn stems were scaled up by population to estimate field-scale transpiration. During full canopy cover, excellent agreement was observed between the scaled-up sap flow measurements and reference crop evapotranspiration calculated from weather data. Data also showed promise as a way to estimate real-time canopy resistance required for model verification and development. Given the low

  16. Quadrature-based moment closures for non-equilibrium flows: Hard-sphere collisions and approach to equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Icardi, M.; Asinari, P.; Marchisio, D. L.; Izquierdo, S.; Fox, R. O.

    2012-08-01

    Recently the Quadrature Method of Moments (QMOM) has been extended to solve several kinetic equations, in particular for gas-particle flows and rarefied gases in which the non-equilibrium effects can be important. In this work QMOM is tested as a closure for the dynamics of the Homogeneous Isotropic Boltzmann Equation (HIBE) with a realistic description for particle collisions, namely the hard-sphere model. The behaviour of QMOM far away and approaching the equilibrium is studied. Results are compared to other techniques such as the Grad's moment method (GM) and the off-Lattice Boltzmann Method (oLBM). Comparison with a more accurate and computationally expensive approach, based on the Discrete Velocity Method (DVM), is also carried out. Our results show that QMOM describes very well the evolution when it is far away from equilibrium, without the drawbacks of the GM and oLBM or the computational costs of DVM, but it is not able to accurately reproduce equilibrium and the dynamics close to it. Static and dynamic corrections to cure this behaviour are here proposed and tested.

  17. A cut-cell finite volume - finite element coupling approach for fluid-structure interaction in compressible flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasquariello, Vito; Hammerl, Georg; Örley, Felix; Hickel, Stefan; Danowski, Caroline; Popp, Alexander; Wall, Wolfgang A.; Adams, Nikolaus A.

    2016-02-01

    We present a loosely coupled approach for the solution of fluid-structure interaction problems between a compressible flow and a deformable structure. The method is based on staggered Dirichlet-Neumann partitioning. The interface motion in the Eulerian frame is accounted for by a conservative cut-cell Immersed Boundary method. The present approach enables sub-cell resolution by considering individual cut-elements within a single fluid cell, which guarantees an accurate representation of the time-varying solid interface. The cut-cell procedure inevitably leads to non-matching interfaces, demanding for a special treatment. A Mortar method is chosen in order to obtain a conservative and consistent load transfer. We validate our method by investigating two-dimensional test cases comprising a shock-loaded rigid cylinder and a deformable panel. Moreover, the aeroelastic instability of a thin plate structure is studied with a focus on the prediction of flutter onset. Finally, we propose a three-dimensional fluid-structure interaction test case of a flexible inflated thin shell interacting with a shock wave involving large and complex structural deformations.

  18. A GRADED APPROACH TO FLOW AND TRANSPORT MODELING TO SUPPORT DECOMMISSIONING ACTIVITIES AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE, AIKEN SC

    SciTech Connect

    Dixon, K; Patricia Lee, P; Gregory Flach, G

    2007-06-07

    A graded approach to flow and transport modeling has been used as a cost effective solution to evaluating potential groundwater risk in support of Deactivation and Decommissioning activities at the United States Department of Energy's Savannah River Site. This approach incorporates both simple spreadsheet calculations and complex numerical modeling to evaluate the threat to human health posed by contaminants leaching from decommissioned concrete building slabs. Simple spread sheet calculations were used to produce generic slab concentration limits for a suite of radiological and non-radiological contaminants for a chemical separations area at Savannah River Site. These limits, which are based upon the United States Environmental Protection Agency Soil Screening guidance, were used to eliminate most building slabs from further risk assessment. Of the more than 58 facilities located in the area, to date only one slab has been found to have a contaminant concentration in excess of the area specific slab limit. For this slab, a more rigorous numerical modeling effort was undertaken reducing the conservatisms inherent in the spreadsheet calculations. Using the more sophisticated numerical model, it was possible to show that the remaining contaminant of concern would not likely impact groundwater above drinking water standards.

  19. An ecological approach to measuring the evolutionary consequences of gene flow from crops to wild or weedy relatives1

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Lesley G.; Lee, David; Shukla, Kruti; Waite, Thomas A.; Bartsch, Detlef

    2016-01-01

    Premise of the study: Agricultural practices routinely create opportunities for crops to hybridize with wild relatives, leading to crop gene introgression into wild genomes. Conservationists typically worry this introgression could lead to genetic homogenization of wild populations, over and above the central concern of transgene escape. Alternatively, viewing introgression as analogous to species invasion, we suggest that increased genetic diversity may likewise be an undesirable outcome. Methods: Here, we compare the sensitivity of conventional population genetic metrics with species diversity indices as indicators of the impact of gene flow on genetic diversity. We illustrate this novel approach using multilocus genotype data (12 allozyme loci) from 10 wild (Beta vulgaris subsp. maritima) and eight putative crop–wild hybrid beet populations (B. vulgaris subsp. vulgaris × B. vulgaris subsp. maritima) scattered throughout Europe. Results: Conventional population genetic metrics mostly failed to detect shifts in genetic composition of putative hybrid populations. By contrast, species diversity indices unambiguously revealed increased genetic diversity in putative hybrid populations. Discussion: We encourage other workers to explore the utility of our more sensitive approach for risk assessment prior to the release of transgenic crops, with a view toward widespread adoption of our method in studies aimed at detecting allelic invasion. PMID:27011898

  20. Numerical study of the flow of granular materials down an inclined plane using a model based on a kinetic theory approach. Quarterly report, April 1--June 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Rajagopal, K.R.

    1993-11-01

    In the previous report the linearized stability results for the flow of granular materials down an inclined plane, modeled by a constitutive theory based on the kinetic theory approach were presented. In this report, the authors derive the governing equations for the flow of granular materials down an inclined plane, modeled by the constitutive theory proposed by Boyle and Massoudi (1990). The governing equations obtained will be solved numerically to obtain the basic solutions.

  1. Galaxy secular mass flow rate determination using the potential-density phase shift approach: Application to six nearby spiral galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaolei; Buta, Ronald J.

    2015-01-01

    Using the potential-density phase shift approach developed by the present authors in earlier publications, we estimate the magnitude of radial mass accretion/excretion rates across the disks of six nearby spiral galaxies (NGC 628, NGC 3351, NGC 3627, NGC 4321, NGC 4736, and NGC 5194) having a range of Hubble types. Our goal is to examine these rates in the context of bulge building and secular morphological evolution along the Hubble sequence. Stellar surface density maps of the sample galaxies are derived from SINGS 3.6 μm and SDSS i-band images using colors as an indicator of mass-to-light ratios. Corresponding molecular and atomic gas surface densities are derived from published CO (1-0) and HI interferometric observations of the BIMA SONG, THINGS, and VIVA surveys. The mass flow rate calculations utilize a volume-type torque integral to calculate the angular momentum exchange rate between the basic state disk matter and what we assume to be density wave modes in the observed galaxies. This volume-type integral contains the contributions from both the gravitational surface torque couple and the advective surface torque couple at the nonlinear, quasi-steady state of the wave modes, in sharp contrast to its behavior in the linear regime, where it contains only the contribution from the gravitational surface torque couple used by Lynden-Bell & Kalnajs in 1972. The potential-density phase shift approach yields angular momentum transport rates several times higher than those estimated using the Lynden-Bell and Kalnajs approach. And unlike Lynden-Bell and Kalnajs, whose approach predicts zero mass redistribution across the majority of the disk surface (apart from the isolated locations of wave-particle resonances) for quasi-steady waves, the current approach leads to predictions of significant mass redistribution induced by the quasi-steady density wave modes, enough for the morphological types of disks to evolve substantially within its lifetime. This difference

  2. Evaluation of Pleistocene groundwater flow through fractured tuffs using a U-series disequilibrium approach, Pahute Mesa, Nevada, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Paces, James B.; Nichols, Paul J.; Neymark, Leonid A.; Rajaram, Harihar

    2013-01-01

    Groundwater flow through fractured felsic tuffs and lavas at the Nevada National Security Site represents the most likely mechanism for transport of radionuclides away from underground nuclear tests at Pahute Mesa. To help evaluate fracture flow and matrix–water exchange, we have determined U-series isotopic compositions on more than 40 drill core samples from 5 boreholes that represent discrete fracture surfaces, breccia zones, and interiors of unfractured core. The U-series approach relies on the disruption of radioactive secular equilibrium between isotopes in the uranium-series decay chain due to preferential mobilization of 234U relative to 238U, and U relative to Th. Samples from discrete fractures were obtained by milling fracture surfaces containing thin secondary mineral coatings of clays, silica, Fe–Mn oxyhydroxides, and zeolite. Intact core interiors and breccia fragments were sampled in bulk. In addition, profiles of rock matrix extending 15 to 44 mm away from several fractures that show evidence of recent flow were analyzed to investigate the extent of fracture/matrix water exchange. Samples of rock matrix have 234U/238U and 230Th/238U activity ratios (AR) closest to radioactive secular equilibrium indicating only small amounts of groundwater penetrated unfractured matrix. Greater U mobility was observed in welded-tuff matrix with elevated porosity and in zeolitized bedded tuff. Samples of brecciated core were also in secular equilibrium implying a lack of long-range hydraulic connectivity in these cases. Samples of discrete fracture surfaces typically, but not always, were in radioactive disequilibrium. Many fractures had isotopic compositions plotting near the 230Th-234U 1:1 line indicating a steady-state balance between U input and removal along with radioactive decay. Numerical simulations of U-series isotope evolution indicate that 0.5 to 1 million years are required to reach steady-state compositions. Once attained, disequilibrium 234U/238U

  3. Meta-analysis of postruminal microbial nitrogen flows in dairy cattle. II. Approaches to and implications of more mechanistic prediction.

    PubMed

    White, Robin R; Roman-Garcia, Yairanex; Firkins, Jeffrey L

    2016-10-01

    Several attempts have been made to quantify microbial protein flow from the rumen; however, few studies have evaluated tradeoffs between empirical equations (microbial N as a function of diet composition) and more mechanistic equations (microbial N as a function of ruminal carbohydrate digestibility). Although more mechanistic approaches have been touted because they represent more of the biology and thus might behave more appropriately in extreme scenarios, their precision is difficult to evaluate. The objective of this study was to derive equations describing starch, neutral detergent fiber (NDF), and organic matter total-tract and ruminal digestibilities; use these equations as inputs to equations predicting microbial N (MicN) production; and evaluate the implications of the different calculation methods in terms of their precision and accuracy. Models were evaluated based on root estimated variance σˆe and concordance correlation coefficients (CCC). Ruminal digestibility of NDF was positively associated with DMI and concentrations of NDF and CP and was negatively associated with concentration of starch and the ratio of acid detergent fiber to NDF (CCC=0.946). Apparent ruminal starch digestibility was increased by omasal sampling (compared with duodenal sampling), was positively associated with forage NDF and starch concentrations, and was negatively associated with wet forage DMI and total dietary DMI (CCC=0.908). Models were further evaluated by calculating fit statistics from a common data set, using stochastic simulation, and extreme scenario testing. In the stochastic simulation, variance in input variables were drawn from a multi-variate random normal distribution reflective of input measurement errors and predicting MicN while accounting for the measurement errors. Extreme scenario testing evaluated each MicN model against a data subset. When compared against an identical data set, predicting MicN empirically had the lowest prediction error, though

  4. The role of sediment-transport evaluations for development of modeled instream flows: policy and approach in Texas.

    PubMed

    Heitmuller, Franklin T; Raphelt, Nolan

    2012-07-15

    Instream-flow scientists embrace streamflow as the master variable driving aquatic and riparian ecosystems, and that natural flow variability is imperative for river conservation and restoration efforts. Sediment transport, which is critical for maintenance of physical habitats in rivers and floodplains, has received less direct attention from instream-flow practitioners. This article serves to highlight the roles of sediment-transport evaluations in modifying or verifying instream-flow prescriptions based on hydrology alone. Two examples of sediment-transport evaluations are discussed in relation to the Texas Senate Bill 3 Environmental Flows allocation process, a mandate to "develop environmental flow analyses and a recommended flow regime" that "maintain(s) the viability of the state's streams, rivers, and bay and estuary systems" using "reasonably available science". The first example provides an evaluation of effective discharge of suspended-sediment load of the lower Brazos River. The magnitude and frequency of effective discharge occurs between typical high-flow pulses and overbank flows, indicating that hydrologic and physical processes are not optimally coupled in some flow-regime models. The second example utilizes the Hydrology-Based Environmental Flow Regime (HEFR) model to prescribe instream flows for the lower Sabine River, and compares modeled bed-material loads for observed and HEFR-prescribed flow regimes. Results indicate that annual water and sediment yields are greatly reduced for the modeled flow regime. It should be noted, however, that different input variables to the HEFR model would have resulted in different computations of water and sediment yields, reinforcing that instream-flow practitioners should exercise great caution when applying rule-of-thumb procedures to generate flow prescriptions. PMID:22425877

  5. The role of sediment-transport evaluations for development of modeled instream flows: policy and approach in Texas.

    PubMed

    Heitmuller, Franklin T; Raphelt, Nolan

    2012-07-15

    Instream-flow scientists embrace streamflow as the master variable driving aquatic and riparian ecosystems, and that natural flow variability is imperative for river conservation and restoration efforts. Sediment transport, which is critical for maintenance of physical habitats in rivers and floodplains, has received less direct attention from instream-flow practitioners. This article serves to highlight the roles of sediment-transport evaluations in modifying or verifying instream-flow prescriptions based on hydrology alone. Two examples of sediment-transport evaluations are discussed in relation to the Texas Senate Bill 3 Environmental Flows allocation process, a mandate to "develop environmental flow analyses and a recommended flow regime" that "maintain(s) the viability of the state's streams, rivers, and bay and estuary systems" using "reasonably available science". The first example provides an evaluation of effective discharge of suspended-sediment load of the lower Brazos River. The magnitude and frequency of effective discharge occurs between typical high-flow pulses and overbank flows, indicating that hydrologic and physical processes are not optimally coupled in some flow-regime models. The second example utilizes the Hydrology-Based Environmental Flow Regime (HEFR) model to prescribe instream flows for the lower Sabine River, and compares modeled bed-material loads for observed and HEFR-prescribed flow regimes. Results indicate that annual water and sediment yields are greatly reduced for the modeled flow regime. It should be noted, however, that different input variables to the HEFR model would have resulted in different computations of water and sediment yields, reinforcing that instream-flow practitioners should exercise great caution when applying rule-of-thumb procedures to generate flow prescriptions.

  6. Habitat availability and gene flow influence diverging local population trajectories under scenarios of climate change: a place-based approach.

    PubMed

    Schwalm, Donelle; Epps, Clinton W; Rodhouse, Thomas J; Monahan, William B; Castillo, Jessica A; Ray, Chris; Jeffress, Mackenzie R

    2016-04-01

    Ecological niche theory holds that species distributions are shaped by a large and complex suite of interacting factors. Species distribution models (SDMs) are increasingly used to describe species' niches and predict the effects of future environmental change, including climate change. Currently, SDMs often fail to capture the complexity of species' niches, resulting in predictions that are generally limited to climate-occupancy interactions. Here, we explore the potential impact of climate change on the American pika using a replicated place-based approach that incorporates climate, gene flow, habitat configuration, and microhabitat complexity into SDMs. Using contemporary presence-absence data from occupancy surveys, genetic data to infer connectivity between habitat patches, and 21 environmental niche variables, we built separate SDMs for pika populations inhabiting eight US National Park Service units representing the habitat and climatic breadth of the species across the western United States. We then predicted occurrence probability under current (1981-2010) and three future time periods (out to 2100). Occurrence probabilities and the relative importance of predictor variables varied widely among study areas, revealing important local-scale differences in the realized niche of the American pika. This variation resulted in diverse and - in some cases - highly divergent future potential occupancy patterns for pikas, ranging from complete extirpation in some study areas to stable occupancy patterns in others. Habitat composition and connectivity, which are rarely incorporated in SDM projections, were influential in predicting pika occupancy in all study areas and frequently outranked climate variables. Our findings illustrate the importance of a place-based approach to species distribution modeling that includes fine-scale factors when assessing current and future climate impacts on species' distributions, especially when predictions are intended to manage and

  7. A flow-cytometric method for quantification of neurolipofuscin and comparison with existing histological and biochemical approaches.

    PubMed

    Sheehy, M R J

    2002-01-01

    The ability to measure lipofuscin accumulation accurately is essential for understanding its role in physiological ageing and human disease, and for its recent use as an ecological tool for age determination. Existing quantification methods are problematic. In situ histological measurement by microscopy can be very precise but is labour intensive. Spectrofluorimetric measurement of whole lipid extracts is rapid but not sufficiently specific. A recent HPLC assay for the retinal pigment epithelium lipofuscin fluorophore, A2-E, is potentially both precise and rapid but not applicable to lipofuscin in other tissues, or from fixed samples. In this study, I explore the use of flow cytometry or fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS) for specific quantification of lipofuscin granules in formalin-fixed CNS homogenates from lobsters (Homarus gammarus). Free neurolipofuscin granules were discriminated in FACS samples by their size distribution (forward scatter), distinctive orange autofluorescence (FL3) and refractive internal structure (side scatter). A quantitative neurolipofuscin index was developed, which was highly correlated with the microscopically measured neurolipofuscin concentration in the same tissue. Sample-processing rate was at least an order of magnitude greater for FACS than for quantitative microscopy but the latter yielded a much more precise estimate of neurolipofuscin concentration. While the FACS approach may be ideal where rapid handling and only semiquantitative results are required, loss of precision will preclude use in many ecological studies where the highest available resolution is needed. Further refinements to the FACS approach are possible but advanced histological methods for neurolipofuscin quantification remain the most reliable at this time. PMID:14764326

  8. Quadrature--based moment closures for non--equilibrium flows: hard--spheres collisions and approach to equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Icardi, Matteo; Asinari, Pietro; Marchisio, Daniele; Izquierdo, Salvador; Fox, Rodney

    2011-11-01

    Recently the Quadrature Method of Moments (QMOM) has been extended to solve several kinetic equations, in particular for gas-particle flows and rarefied gases. This method is usually coupled with simplified linear models for particle collisions. In this work QMOM is tested as a closure for the dynamics of high-order moments with a more realistic collision model namely the hard-spheres model in the Homogeneous Isotropic Boltzmann Equation. The behavior of QMOM far away and approaching the equilibrium is studied. Results are compared to other techniques such as the Lattice-Boltzmann (LBM) and the Grad's expansion (GM) methods. Comparison with a more accurate and computationally expensive model, based on the Discrete Velocity Method (DVM), is also carried out. Our results show that QMOM describes very well the evolution when it is far away from equilibrium, without the drawbacks of the GM and LBM or the computational costs of DVM but it is not able to accurately reproduce the equilibrium and the dynamics close to it. Corrections to cure this behavior are proposed and tested.

  9. Simulation of a Wall-Bounded Flow using a Hybrid LES/RAS Approach with Turbulence Recycling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quinlan, Jesse R.; Mcdaniel, James; Baurle, Robert A.

    2012-01-01

    Simulations of a supersonic recessed-cavity flow are performed using a hybrid large-eddy/ Reynolds-averaged simulation approach utilizing an inflow turbulence recycling procedure and hybridized inviscid flux scheme. Calorically perfect air enters the three-dimensional domain at a free stream Mach number of 2.92. Simulations are performed to assess grid sensitivity of the solution, efficacy of the turbulence recycling, and effect of the shock sensor used with the hybridized inviscid flux scheme. Analysis of the turbulent boundary layer upstream of the rearward-facing step for each case indicates excellent agreement with theoretical predictions. Mean velocity and pressure results are compared to Reynolds-averaged simulations and experimental data for each case, and these comparisons indicate good agreement on the finest grid. Simulations are repeated on a coarsened grid, and results indicate strong grid density sensitivity. The effect of turbulence recycling on the solution is illustrated by performing coarse grid simulations with and without inflow turbulence recycling. Two shock sensors, one of Ducros and one of Larsson, are assessed for use with the hybridized inviscid flux reconstruction scheme.

  10. Numerical investigation of water-based nanofluid subcooled flow boiling by three-phase Euler-Euler, Euler-Lagrange approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valizadeh, Ziba; Shams, Mehrzad

    2016-08-01

    A numerical scheme for simulating the subcooled flow boiling of water and water-based nanofluids was developed. At first, subcooled flow boiling of water was simulated by the Eulerian multiphase scheme. Then the simulation results were compared with previous experimental data and a good agreement was observed. In the next step, subcooled flow boiling of water-based nanofluid was modeled. In the previous studies in this field, the nanofluid assumed as a homogeneous liquid and the two-phase scheme was used to simulate its boiling. In the present study, a new scheme was used to model the nanofluid boiling. In this scheme, to model the nanofluid flow boiling, three phases, water, vapor and nanoparticles were considered. The Eulerian-Eulerian approach was used for modeling water-vapor interphase and Eulerian-Lagrangian scheme was selected to observe water-nanoparticle interphase behavior. The results from the nanofluid boiling modeling were validated with an experimental investigation. The results of the present work and experimental data were consistent. The addition of 0.0935 % volume fraction of nanoparticles in pure liquid boiling flow increases the vapor volume fraction at the outlet almost by 40.7 %. The results show the three-phase model is a good approach to simulate the nanofluid boiling flow.

  11. Self-organizing thermal fluid flow in fractured crystalline rock: a geochemical and theoretical approach to evaluating fluid flow in the southern Idaho batholith, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayo, Alan L.; Himes, Scott A.; Tingey, David G.

    2013-12-01

    Thermal springs in the Idaho batholith (USA) discharge at discrete locations along a 50+ km reach of the Middle Fork of the Boise River (MFBR). Recharge water flows through Basin and Range extension fractures where it is heated by the geothermal gradient and ultimately discharges from the damage zone of the trans-Challis faults located near the bottom of the MFBR. Stable isotopes of water, 14C groundwater ages, fracture and fault orientations, fracture volume changes due to chemical evolution, and recharge area calculations suggest that the thermal springs issue from individual hydrothermal systems and that they are self-organizing. Water evolves chemically along flow paths, dissolving feldspars and precipitating secondary minerals. Secondary minerals accumulate in less-efficient fractures and are flushed from the more efficient ones. Flow-area calculations using heat-flow, exponential decay-of-porosity, and curve-intersection methods show that many of the thermal systems extend beyond their immediate topographic watershed, and that some capture water from adjacent watersheds. Geochemical/flow feedback loops that provide a mechanism for self-organization are modeled using PHREEQC, and positive and negative fracture volume changes are calculated. Criteria for identifying self-organizing granitoid thermal groundwater systems are suggested.

  12. Acoustic Camera Evaluation of Juvenile Salmonid Approach and Fate at Surface Flow Outlets of Two Hydropower Dams

    SciTech Connect

    Ploskey, Gene R.; Johnson, Gary E.; Weiland, Mark A.; Khan, Fenton; Mueller, Robert P.; Serkowski, John A.; Rakowski, Cynthia L.; Hedgepeth, J.; Skalski, John R.; Ebberts, Blaine D.; Klatte, Bernard A.

    2006-08-04

    The objective of this study was to estimate and compare fate probabilities for juvenile salmon approaching two surface flow outlets (SFOs) to identify effective design characteristics. The SFOs differed principally in forebay location, depth, discharge, and water velocity over a sharp-crested weir. Both outlets were about 20 ft wide. The 22-ft deep Bonneville Powerhouse 2 Corner Collector (B2CC) was located in the southwest corner of the forebay and passed 5,000 ft3/s of water at normal-pool elevation. In contrast, The Dalles Dam ice and trash sluiceway outlet above Main Unit 1-3 (TDITC) was not located in a forebay corner, was only 7-ft deep, and discharged about 933 ft3/s at normal-pool elevation. The linear velocity of water over the weir was about 15 ft/s at the B2CC and 5 ft/s at the TDITC. We used a Dual-Frequency Identification Sonar (DIDSON) to record movements of fish within about 65 ft of the B2CC and within 35 ft of the TDITC. We actively tracked fish by manually adjusting pan and tilt rotator angles to keep targets in view. Contrary to expectations, active tracking did not provide a predominance of long tracks that clearly indicated fish fate because most tracks were incomplete. Active tracking did increase error in fish-position estimation, which complicated data processing, so we plan to sample multiple fixed zones in the future. The probability of fish entering each SFO was estimated by a Markov chain analysis, which did not require complete fish tracks. At the B2CC, we tracked 7,943 juvenile salmonids and most of them entered the B2CC. Fish moving south 40 to 60 ft upstream of the dam face were more likely to enter the eddy at the south end of the powerhouse than to enter the B2CC. At the TDITC, we tracked 2,821 smolts. Fish movement was complex with active swimming toward and away from the entrance. The high entrance probability zone (EPZ), where over 90% of tracked fish entered the SFO, extended 32 ft out at the B2CC and only 8 ft out at the TDITC

  13. Surge Across the Chambo: Entrainment, topographical influences, and flow transformation of pyroclastic density currents using a combined field and multiphase modeling approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benage, M. C.; Dufek, J.; Geist, D.; Harpp, K. S.

    2011-12-01

    simulations in concert with detailed measurements of these flows from both up flow and down flow from the transformation to document the process of dense to dilute flow transition. The field characterization includes mapping of the flows, grain size analysis, documenting flow direction indicators, comminution rounding, thermal proxies for air entrainment, and bed form documentation. We used a three-dimensional, multiphase (Eulerian-Eulerian-Lagrangian, EEL) modeling approach to describe size sorting, concentration gradients, and stresses in these evolving flows using the topography of the near Chambo River crossing (Dufek and Bergantz, 2007). The numerical models reveal extensive entrainment in the surge-generating phase of the flow, and secondary plume generation as fine ash in transported by hot gases higher into the atmosphere. Granular waves develop in the confined channels of the dense flow resulting bed shear stress perturbations. These granular instabilities and entrainment result in pulsing conditions in the surge, accounting for much of the unsteady behavior that results in fluctuations in grain size and bed form in the surge deposits.

  14. Investigation of Gas and Liquid Multiphase Flow in the Rheinsahl-Heraeus (RH) Reactor by Using the Euler-Euler Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Gujun; He, Shengping; Li, Yugang; Guo, Yintao; Wang, Qian

    2016-08-01

    In the present work, a mathematical model was developed to understand the multiphase flow behavior in a Rheinsahl-Heraeus (RH) reactor by using the Euler-Euler approach, and the effects of initial bubble diameter, nonequilibrium expansion of bubble caused by sudden thermal effect and sharp pressure drop, and various interphase forces were considered and clarified. The simulation results of mixing time, liquid circulation rate, and local liquid velocity in RH agree well with the measured results. The result indicates that the initial bubble diameter has a weak impact on the multiphase flow but that the bubble expansion has a tremendous impact on it for an actual RH. Meanwhile, the drag force and turbulent dispersion force strongly influence the multiphase flow, whereas the lift force and virtual mass force only have negligible influence on it. Furthermore, the turbulent dispersion force should be responsible for reasonable prediction of multiphase flow behavior in the RH reactor.

  15. Flow Cytometry Approach to Quantify the Viability of Milk Somatic Cell Counts after Various Physico-Chemical Treatments

    PubMed Central

    Li, Na; Richoux, Romain; Perruchot, Marie-Hélène; Boutinaud, Marion; Mayol, Jean-François; Gagnaire, Valérie

    2015-01-01

    Flow cytometry has been used as a routine method to count somatic cells in milk, and to ascertain udder health and milk quality. However, few studies investigate the viability of somatic cells and even fewer at a subpopulation level to follow up how the cells can resist to various stresses that can be encountered during technological processes. To address this issue, a flow cytometry approach was used to simultaneously identify cell types of bovine milk using cell-specific antibodies and to measure the cell viability among the identified subpopulations by using a live/dead cell viability kit. Confirmation of the cell viability was performed by using conventional microscopy. Different physico-chemical treatments were carried out on standardized cell samples, such as heat treatment, various centrifugation rates and storage in milk or in PBS pH 7.4 for three days. Cytometry gating strategy was developed by using blood cell samples stored at 4°C in PBS and milk cell samples heat-treated at 80°C for 30 min as a control for the maximum (95.9%) and minimum (0.7%) values of cell viability respectively. Cell viability in the initial samples was 39.5% for all cells and varied for each cell population from 26.7% for PMNs, to 32.6% for macrophages, and 58.3% for lymphocytes. Regarding the physico-chemical treatments applied, somatic cells did not sustain heat treatment at 60°C and 80°C in contrast to changes in centrifugation rates, for which only the higher level, i.e. 5000×g led to a cell viability decrease, down to 9.4%, but no significant changes within the cell subpopulation distribution were observed. Finally, the somatic cells were better preserved in milk after 72h storage, in particular PMNs, that maintained a viability of 34.0 ± 2.9% compared to 4.9±1.9% in PBS, while there was almost no changes for macrophages (41.7 ± 5.7% in milk vs 31.2 ± 2.4% in PBS) and lymphocytes (25.3 ± 3.0% in milk vs 11.4 ± 3.1% in PBS). This study provides a new array to better

  16. A rational approach to the use of Prandtl's mixing length model in free turbulent shear flow calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rudy, D. H.; Bushnell, D. M.

    1973-01-01

    Prandtl's basic mixing length model was used to compute 22 test cases on free turbulent shear flows. The calculations employed appropriate algebraic length scale equations and single values of mixing length constant for planar and axisymmetric flows, respectively. Good agreement with data was obtained except for flows, such as supersonic free shear layers, where large sustained sensitivity changes occur. The inability to predict the more gradual mixing in these flows is tentatively ascribed to the presence of a significant turbulence-induced transverse static pressure gradient which is neglected in conventional solution procedures. Some type of an equation for length scale development was found to be necessary for successful computation of highly nonsimilar flow regions such as jet or wake development from thick wall flows.

  17. Non-invasive diffuse correlation tomography reveals spatial and temporal blood flow differences in murine bone grafting approaches

    PubMed Central

    Han, Songfeng; Proctor, Ashley R.; Vella, Joseph B.; Benoit, Danielle S. W.; Choe, Regine

    2016-01-01

    Longitudinal blood flow during murine bone graft healing was monitored non-invasively using diffuse correlation tomography. The system utilized spatially dense data from a scanning set-up, non-linear reconstruction, and micro-CT anatomical information. Weekly in vivo measurements were performed. Blood flow changes in autografts, which heal successfully, were localized to graft regions and consistent across mice. Poor healing allografts showed heterogeneous blood flow elevation and high inter-subject variabilities. Allografts with tissue-engineered periosteum showed responses intermediate to both autografts and allografts, consistent with healing observed. These findings suggest that spatiotemporal blood flow changes can be utilized to differentiate the degree of bone graft healing.

  18. Linking pore-scale chemical processes to continuum-scale flow properties: an experimental and theoretical reactive transport approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tutolo, B. M.; Luhmann, A. J.; Kong, X.; Seyfried, W. E.; Saar, M. O.

    2012-12-01

    the experimental system. Significantly, the application of these rate laws to feldspathic systems requires accurate thermodynamic data for primary and secondary aluminum-bearing minerals and aqueous species, particularly when modeling the transition from far-from-equilibrium to near-equilibrium rates as the experiment progresses. Overall, the reactive transport modeling approach presented here strengthens predictions of subsurface response to CO2 injection by integrating advanced characterization methods, accurate thermodynamic and kinetic data, and properly scaled geochemical and physical flow models.

  19. Combining flow cytometry and 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing: a promising approach for drinking water monitoring and characterization.

    PubMed

    Prest, E I; El-Chakhtoura, J; Hammes, F; Saikaly, P E; van Loosdrecht, M C M; Vrouwenvelder, J S

    2014-10-15

    The combination of flow cytometry (FCM) and 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing data was investigated for the purpose of monitoring and characterizing microbial changes in drinking water distribution systems. High frequency sampling (5 min intervals for 1 h) was performed at the outlet of a treatment plant and at one location in the full-scale distribution network. In total, 52 bulk water samples were analysed with FCM, pyrosequencing and conventional methods (adenosine-triphosphate, ATP; heterotrophic plate count, HPC). FCM and pyrosequencing results individually showed that changes in the microbial community occurred in the water distribution system, which was not detected with conventional monitoring. FCM data showed an increase in the total bacterial cell concentrations (from 345 ± 15 × 10(3) to 425 ± 35 × 10(3) cells mL(-1)) and in the percentage of intact bacterial cells (from 39 ± 3.5% to 53 ± 4.4%) during water distribution. This shift was also observed in the FCM fluorescence fingerprints, which are characteristic of each water sample. A similar shift was detected in the microbial community composition as characterized with pyrosequencing, showing that FCM and genetic fingerprints are congruent. FCM and pyrosequencing data were subsequently combined for the calculation of cell concentration changes for each bacterial phylum. The results revealed an increase in cell concentrations of specific bacterial phyla (e.g., Proteobacteria), along with a decrease in other phyla (e.g., Actinobacteria), which could not be concluded from the two methods individually. The combination of FCM and pyrosequencing methods is a promising approach for future drinking water quality monitoring and for advanced studies on drinking water distribution pipeline ecology.

  20. Application of a novel metabolomic approach based on atmospheric pressure photoionization mass spectrometry using flow injection analysis for the study of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    González-Domínguez, Raúl; García-Barrera, Tamara; Gómez-Ariza, José Luis

    2015-01-01

    The use of atmospheric pressure photoionization is not widespread in metabolomics, despite its considerable potential for the simultaneous analysis of compounds with diverse polarities. This work considers the development of a novel analytical approach based on flow injection analysis and atmospheric pressure photoionization mass spectrometry for rapid metabolic screening of serum samples. Several experimental parameters were optimized, such as type of dopant, flow injection solvent, and their flows, given that a careful selection of these variables is mandatory for a comprehensive analysis of metabolites. Toluene and methanol were the most suitable dopant and flow injection solvent, respectively. Moreover, analysis in negative mode required higher solvent and dopant flows (100 µl min(-1) and 40 µl min(-1), respectively) compared to positive mode (50 µl min(-1) and 20 µl min(-1)). Then, the optimized approach was used to elucidate metabolic alterations associated with Alzheimer's disease. Thereby, results confirm the increase of diacylglycerols, ceramides, ceramide-1-phosphate and free fatty acids, indicating membrane destabilization processes, and reduction of fatty acid amides and several neurotransmitters related to impairments in neuronal transmission, among others. Therefore, it could be concluded that this metabolomic tool presents a great potential for analysis of biological samples, considering its high-throughput screening capability, fast analysis and comprehensive metabolite coverage.

  1. Three-dimensional, three-vector-component velocimetry of cilia-driven fluid flow using correlation-based approaches in optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Brendan K.; Gamm, Ute A.; Bhandari, Vineet; Khokha, Mustafa K.; Choma, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    Microscale quantification of cilia-driven fluid flow is an emerging area in medical physiology, including pulmonary and central nervous system physiology. Cilia-driven fluid flow is most completely described by a three-dimensional, three-component (3D3C) vector field. Here, we generate 3D3C velocimetry measurements by synthesizing higher dimensional data from lower dimensional measurements obtained using two separate optical coherence tomography (OCT)-based approaches: digital particle image velocimetry (DPIV) and dynamic light scattering (DLS)-OCT. Building on previous work, we first demonstrate directional DLS-OCT for 1D2C velocimetry measurements in the sub-1 mm/s regime (sub-2.5 inch/minute regime) of cilia-driven fluid flow in Xenopus epithelium, an important animal model of the ciliated respiratory tract. We then extend our analysis toward 3D3C measurements in Xenopus using both DLS-OCT and DPIV. We demonstrate the use of DPIV-based approaches towards flow imaging of Xenopus cerebrospinal fluid and mouse trachea, two other important ciliary systems. Both of these flows typically fall in the sub-100 μm/s regime (sub-0.25 inch/minute regime). Lastly, we develop a framework for optimizing the signal-to-noise ratio of 3D3C flow velocity measurements synthesized from 2D2C measures in non-orthogonal planes. In all, 3D3C OCT-based velocimetry has the potential to comprehensively characterize the flow performance of biological ciliated surfaces. PMID:26417520

  2. Three-dimensional, three-vector-component velocimetry of cilia-driven fluid flow using correlation-based approaches in optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Huang, Brendan K; Gamm, Ute A; Bhandari, Vineet; Khokha, Mustafa K; Choma, Michael A

    2015-09-01

    Microscale quantification of cilia-driven fluid flow is an emerging area in medical physiology, including pulmonary and central nervous system physiology. Cilia-driven fluid flow is most completely described by a three-dimensional, three-component (3D3C) vector field. Here, we generate 3D3C velocimetry measurements by synthesizing higher dimensional data from lower dimensional measurements obtained using two separate optical coherence tomography (OCT)-based approaches: digital particle image velocimetry (DPIV) and dynamic light scattering (DLS)-OCT. Building on previous work, we first demonstrate directional DLS-OCT for 1D2C velocimetry measurements in the sub-1 mm/s regime (sub-2.5 inch/minute regime) of cilia-driven fluid flow in Xenopus epithelium, an important animal model of the ciliated respiratory tract. We then extend our analysis toward 3D3C measurements in Xenopus using both DLS-OCT and DPIV. We demonstrate the use of DPIV-based approaches towards flow imaging of Xenopus cerebrospinal fluid and mouse trachea, two other important ciliary systems. Both of these flows typically fall in the sub-100 μm/s regime (sub-0.25 inch/minute regime). Lastly, we develop a framework for optimizing the signal-to-noise ratio of 3D3C flow velocity measurements synthesized from 2D2C measures in non-orthogonal planes. In all, 3D3C OCT-based velocimetry has the potential to comprehensively characterize the flow performance of biological ciliated surfaces.

  3. An efficient and more sustainable one-step continuous-flow multicomponent synthesis approach to chromene derivatives

    EPA Science Inventory

    A simple and rapid one-step continuous-flow synthesis route has been developed for the preparation of chromene derivatives from the reaction of aromatic aldehydes, α-cyanomethylene compounds and naphthols. In this contribution, a one-step continuous-flow protocol in a continuous ...

  4. Effect of Curvature Parameter on Non-Darcy Mixed Convective Flow in a Vertical Annulus: A LTNE Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhowmik, Moumita; Bera, Premananda

    The influence of curvature parameter on fully developed mixed convective flow in a vertical annulus filled with porous medium under local thermal non-equilibrium (LTNE) state has been addressed here. Since the curvature parameter (C) describes the size of the enclosure, therefore the main emphasize is given to understand its impact on other controlling parameters. Based on computational results, C has a significant impact on both heat transfer rate as well as flow profiles for stably stratified flow. It has a tendency to reduce the magnitude of the maximum velocity. It is also observed that depending on other parameters, increment in C may have tendency to make the velocity profile free from back flow. The heat transfer rate is obtained maximum at a small value of C which is independent of media permeability and converges asymptotically on increasing C. At the end, the linear stability analysis based on normal mode technique has been used to verify the results obtained from basic flow study. Overall, from both basic flow as well as linear stability results, it is found that increment in C makes the flow profile smooth which means C has tendency to stabilize the flow.

  5. Incompressible laminar flow through hollow fibers: a general study by means of a two-scale approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borsi, Iacopo; Farina, Angiolo; Fasano, Antonio

    2011-08-01

    We study the laminar flow of an incompressible Newtonian fluid in a hollow fiber, whose walls are porous. We write the Navier-Stokes equations for the flow in the inner channel and Darcy's law for the flow in the fiber, coupling them by means of the Beavers-Joseph condition which accounts for the (possible) slip at the membrane surface. Then, we introduce a small parameter {\\varepsilon ≪ 1} (the ratio between the radius and the length of the fiber) and expand all relevant quantities in powers of ɛ. Averaging over the fiber cross section, we find the velocity profiles for the longitudinal flow and for the cross-flow, and eventually, we determine the explicit expression of the permeability of the system. This work is also preliminary to the study of more complex systems comprising a large number of identical fibers (e.g., ultrafiltration modules and dialysis).

  6. A Simple Approach to Characterize Gas-Aqueous Liquid Two-phase Flow Configuration Based on Discrete Solid-Liquid Contact Electrification.

    PubMed

    Choi, Dongwhi; Lee, Donghyeon; Kim, Dong Sung

    2015-10-14

    In this study, we first suggest a simple approach to characterize configuration of gas-aqueous liquid two-phase flow based on discrete solid-liquid contact electrification, which is a newly defined concept as a sequential process of solid-liquid contact and successive detachment of the contact liquid from the solid surface. This approach exhibits several advantages such as simple operation, precise measurement, and cost-effectiveness. By using electric potential that is spontaneously generated by discrete solid-liquid contact electrification, the configurations of the gas-aqueous liquid two-phase flow such as size of a gas slug and flow rate are precisely characterized. According to the experimental and numerical analyses on parameters that affect electric potential, gas slugs have been verified to behave similarly to point electric charges when the measuring point of the electric potential is far enough from the gas slug. In addition, the configuration of the gas-aqueous liquid two-phase microfluidic system with multiple gas slugs is also characterized by using the presented approach. For a proof-of-concept demonstration of using the proposed approach in a self-triggered sensor, a gas slug detector with a counter system is developed to show its practicality and applicability.

  7. A Simple Approach to Characterize Gas-Aqueous Liquid Two-phase Flow Configuration Based on Discrete Solid-Liquid Contact Electrification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Dongwhi; Lee, Donghyeon; Sung Kim, Dong

    2015-10-01

    In this study, we first suggest a simple approach to characterize configuration of gas-aqueous liquid two-phase flow based on discrete solid-liquid contact electrification, which is a newly defined concept as a sequential process of solid-liquid contact and successive detachment of the contact liquid from the solid surface. This approach exhibits several advantages such as simple operation, precise measurement, and cost-effectiveness. By using electric potential that is spontaneously generated by discrete solid-liquid contact electrification, the configurations of the gas-aqueous liquid two-phase flow such as size of a gas slug and flow rate are precisely characterized. According to the experimental and numerical analyses on parameters that affect electric potential, gas slugs have been verified to behave similarly to point electric charges when the measuring point of the electric potential is far enough from the gas slug. In addition, the configuration of the gas-aqueous liquid two-phase microfluidic system with multiple gas slugs is also characterized by using the presented approach. For a proof-of-concept demonstration of using the proposed approach in a self-triggered sensor, a gas slug detector with a counter system is developed to show its practicality and applicability.

  8. A Simple Approach to Characterize Gas-Aqueous Liquid Two-phase Flow Configuration Based on Discrete Solid-Liquid Contact Electrification

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Dongwhi; Lee, Donghyeon; Sung Kim, Dong

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we first suggest a simple approach to characterize configuration of gas-aqueous liquid two–phase flow based on discrete solid-liquid contact electrification, which is a newly defined concept as a sequential process of solid-liquid contact and successive detachment of the contact liquid from the solid surface. This approach exhibits several advantages such as simple operation, precise measurement, and cost-effectiveness. By using electric potential that is spontaneously generated by discrete solid–liquid contact electrification, the configurations of the gas-aqueous liquid two-phase flow such as size of a gas slug and flow rate are precisely characterized. According to the experimental and numerical analyses on parameters that affect electric potential, gas slugs have been verified to behave similarly to point electric charges when the measuring point of the electric potential is far enough from the gas slug. In addition, the configuration of the gas-aqueous liquid two-phase microfluidic system with multiple gas slugs is also characterized by using the presented approach. For a proof-of-concept demonstration of using the proposed approach in a self-triggered sensor, a gas slug detector with a counter system is developed to show its practicality and applicability. PMID:26462437

  9. A Laboratory Approach Relating Complex Resistivity Observations to Flow and Transport in Saturated and Unsaturated Hydrologic Regimes

    SciTech Connect

    Martins, S A; Daily, W D; Ramirez, A L

    2002-01-31

    used to solve for the electrical conductivity distribution in the region bounded by the electrode arrays. Groundwater movement resulting from a leak or surface spill will produce measurable conductivity changes that have been imaged using ERT or EIT. The kind of laboratory scale experiments supported by this work will help us to better understand the connection between imaged conductivity anomalies and the groundwater or contaminant flow that causes them. This work will also help to demonstrate the feasibility or value of doing lab experiments in imaging that can be applied to interpreting field-scale experiments. A secondary objective of this study was to initiate a collaboration with researchers at the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI; Troyl NY) who are also participants in the newly created NSF Center for Subsurface Imaging and Sensing Systems (CenSSIS) which is managed in part by RPI. During the course of this study C.R. Carrigan and W. Daily visited the electromagnetic imaging lab at RPI to initiate discussions on subsurface imaging technology with Professors David Isaacson, Jon Newell, Gary Salunier and their research graduate students. A major goal of CenSSIS is to promote collaborations among researchers with imaging backgrounds in different disciplines (geosciences, biomedical, civil engineering and biomedical) that will lead to new solutions of common subsurface imaging problems. The geophysical test section constructed for this study included electrode arrays that resemble biomedical array distributions. Comparing images of the same target produced with the 4-array geophysical approach and with the biomedical imaging approach will help us to better understand differences and advantages that are characteristic of the two imaging methods. Our initial interactions with the researchers at RPI concluded that this was a viable problem to consider. The support for this subsequent research will come from a 3-year Office of Basic Energy Sciences (BES) proposal

  10. Modeling of dispersed flow film boiling with two flow, five field Eulerian-Eulerian approach and effects of spacer grids on heat transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ergun, Sule

    In the case of a postulated loss of coolant accident (LOCA) in a nuclear reactor, an accurate prediction of clad temperature is needed to determine the safety margins. The large break LOCA analyses can be divided in to three time periods. These periods are blowdown, refill and reflood. During the blowdown and reflood phases of the LOCA, when the local void fraction is greater than 80% and the wall is at a temperature above minimum film boiling temperature (Tmin), heat is transferred from the fuel rod to a continuous vapor flow with dispersed droplets. The high void fraction mixture of droplets and vapor provide cooling to prevent the clad temperature from exceeding the safety limit. The heat transfer process for high void fraction mixture is called dispersed flow film boiling (DFFB). This thesis has been modeled DFFB in the reflood phase of a LOCA in a pressurized water reactor (PWR) rod bundle. In this study, the modifications and modification requirements for the COBRA-TF code to obtain a five field Eulerian - Eulerian modeling for two-phase DFFB is described. COBRA-TF is a best estimate code developed for the rod bundle analysis and has four fields, namely, vapor, entrained drop and continuous liquid film. COBRA-TF has a detailed reflood package which takes effect of spacer grids on heat transfer into account. This study has a detailed description of code's solution scheme and the models used for dispersed flow film boiling. The dispersed flow film boiling heat transfer model of the COBRA-TF code has been modified by adding a small droplet field to the code as the fifth field. The effect of smaller, thermally more active droplets on heat, mass and momentum transfer during DFFB has been modeled. Since the large drop break up due to spacer grids is one of the reasons for small droplet generation, the spacer grid models of the COBRA-TF have been revised and modified. In addition to small droplet generation, the spacer grid rewet is an important aspect of heat

  11. An energy-based approach to estimate seismic attenuation due to wave-induced fluid flow in heterogeneous poroelastic media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solazzi, Santiago G.; Rubino, J. Germán; Müller, Tobias M.; Milani, Marco; Guarracino, Luis; Holliger, Klaus

    2016-11-01

    Wave-induced fluid flow (WIFF) due to the presence of mesoscopic heterogeneities is considered as one of the main seismic attenuation mechanisms in the shallower parts of the Earth's crust. For this reason, several models have been developed to quantify seismic attenuation in the presence of heterogeneities of varying complexity, ranging from periodically layered media to rocks containing fractures and highly irregular distributions of fluid patches. Most of these models are based on Biot's theory of poroelasticity and make use of the assumption that the upscaled counterpart of a heterogeneous poroelastic medium can be represented by a homogeneous viscoelastic solid. Under this dynamic-equivalent viscoelastic medium (DEVM) assumption, attenuation is quantified in terms of the ratio of the imaginary and real parts of a frequency-dependent, complex-valued viscoelastic modulus. Laboratory measurements on fluid-saturated rock samples also rely on this DEVM assumption when inferring attenuation from the phase shift between the applied stress and the resulting strain. However, whether it is correct to use an effective viscoelastic medium to represent the attenuation arising from WIFF at mesoscopic scales in heterogeneous poroelastic media remains largely unexplored. In this work, we present an alternative approach to estimate seismic attenuation due to WIFF. It is fully rooted in the framework of poroelasticity and is based on the quantification of the dissipated power and stored strain energy resulting from numerical oscillatory relaxation tests. We employ this methodology to compare different definitions of the inverse quality factor for a set of pertinent scenarios, including patchy saturation and fractured rocks. This numerical analysis allows us to verify the correctness of the DEVM assumption in the presence of different kinds of heterogeneities. The proposed methodology has the key advantage of providing the local contributions of energy dissipation to the overall

  12. An energy-based approach to estimate seismic attenuation due to wave-induced fluid flow in heterogeneous poroelastic media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solazzi, Santiago G.; Rubino, J. Germán; Müller, Tobias M.; Milani, Marco; Guarracino, Luis; Holliger, Klaus

    2016-08-01

    Wave-induced fluid flow (WIFF) due to the presence of mesoscopic heterogeneities is considered as one of the main seismic attenuation mechanisms in the shallower parts of the Earth's crust. For this reason, several models have been developed to quantify seismic attenuation in the presence of heterogeneities of varying complexity, ranging from periodically-layered media to rocks containing fractures and highly-irregular distributions of fluid patches. Most of these models are based on Biot's theory of poroelasticity and make use of the assumption that the upscaled counterpart of a heterogeneous poroelastic medium can be represented by a homogeneous viscoelastic solid. Under this dynamic-equivalent viscoelastic medium (DEVM) assumption, attenuation is quantified in terms of the ratio of the imaginary and real parts of a frequency-dependent, complex-valued viscoelastic modulus. Laboratory measurements on fluid-saturated rock samples also rely on this DEVM assumption when inferring attenuation from the phase shift between the applied stress and the resulting strain. However, whether it is correct to use an effective viscoelastic medium to represent the attenuation arising from WIFF at mesoscopic scales in heterogeneous poroelastic media remains largely unexplored. In this work, we present an alternative approach to estimate seismic attenuation due to WIFF. It is fully rooted in the framework of poroelasticity and is based on the quantification of the dissipated power and stored strain energy resulting from numerical oscillatory relaxation tests. We employ this methodology to compare different definitions of the inverse quality factor for a set of pertinent scenarios, including patchy saturation and fractured rocks. This numerical analysis allows us to verify the correctness of the DEVM assumption in the presence of different kinds of heterogeneities. The proposed methodology has the key advantage of providing the local contributions of energy dissipation to the overall

  13. Non-invasive diffuse correlation tomography reveals spatial and temporal blood flow differences in murine bone grafting approaches

    PubMed Central

    Han, Songfeng; Proctor, Ashley R.; Vella, Joseph B.; Benoit, Danielle S. W.; Choe, Regine

    2016-01-01

    Longitudinal blood flow during murine bone graft healing was monitored non-invasively using diffuse correlation tomography. The system utilized spatially dense data from a scanning set-up, non-linear reconstruction, and micro-CT anatomical information. Weekly in vivo measurements were performed. Blood flow changes in autografts, which heal successfully, were localized to graft regions and consistent across mice. Poor healing allografts showed heterogeneous blood flow elevation and high inter-subject variabilities. Allografts with tissue-engineered periosteum showed responses intermediate to both autografts and allografts, consistent with healing observed. These findings suggest that spatiotemporal blood flow changes can be utilized to differentiate the degree of bone graft healing. PMID:27699097

  14. Quantifying flow retention due to vegetation in an earthen experimental channel using the Aggregated Dead Zone (ADZ) dilution approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carling, Paul; Kleinhans, Maarten; Leyland, Julian; Besozzi, Louison; Duranton, Pierre; Trieu, Hai; Teske, Roy

    2014-05-01

    Understanding of flow resistance of forested floodplains is essential for floodplain flow routing and floodplain reforestation projects. Although the flow resistance of grass-lined channels is well-known, flow retention due to flow-blocking by trees is poorly understood. Flow behaviour through tree-filled channels or over forested floodplain surfaces has largely been addressed using laboratory studies of artificial surfaces and vegetation. Herein we take advantage of a broad, shallow earthen experimental outdoor channel with headwater and tailwater controls. The channel was disused and left undisturbed for more than 20 years. During this time period, small deciduous trees and a soil cover of grass, herbs and leaf-litter established naturally. We measured flow resistance and fluid retention in fifteen controlled water discharge experiments for the following conditions: (a) natural cover of herbs and trees; (b) trees only and; (c) earthen channel only. In the b-experiments the herbaceous groundcover was first removed carefully and in the c-experiments the trees were first cut flush with the earthen channel floor. Rhodamine-B dye was used to tag the flow and the resultant fluorescence of water samples were systematically assayed through time at two stations along the length of the channel. Dilution-curve data were analysed within the Aggregated Dead Zone (ADZ) framework to yield bulk flow parameters including dispersion, fluid retention and flow resistance parameters after the procedure of Richardson & Carling (2006). The primary response of the bulk flow to vegetation removal was an increase in bulk velocity, with depth and wetted width decreasing imperceptibly at the resolution of measurement. An overall reduction in flow resistance and retention occurred as discharge increased in all experiments and flow retention. Retentiveness was more prominent during low flow and for all three experimental conditions tended to converge on a constant low value for high

  15. Thermodynamically Constrained Averaging Theory Approach for Modeling Flow and Transport Phenomena in Porous Medium Systems: 5. Single-Fluid-Phase Transport

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Cass T.

    2009-01-01

    This work is the fifth in a series of papers on the thermodynamically constrained averaging theory (TCAT) approach for modeling flow and transport phenomena in multiscale porous medium systems. The general TCAT framework and the mathematical foundation presented in previous works are used to develop models that describe species transport and single-fluid-phase flow through a porous medium system in varying physical regimes. Classical irreversible thermodynamics formulations for species in fluids, solids, and interfaces are developed. Two different approaches are presented, one that makes use of a momentum equation for each entity along with constitutive relations for species diffusion and dispersion, and a second approach that makes use of a momentum equation for each species in an entity. The alternative models are developed by relying upon different approaches to constrain an entropy inequality using mass, momentum, and energy conservation equations. The resultant constrained entropy inequality is simplified and used to guide the development of closed models. Specific instances of dilute and non-dilute systems are examined and compared to alternative formulation approaches. PMID:22563137

  16. Kinetic and fluid dynamic modeling, numerical approaches of flowing-gas diode-pumped alkali vapor amplifiers.

    PubMed

    Shen, Binglin; Pan, Bailiang; Jiao, Jian; Xia, Chunsheng

    2015-07-27

    Comprehensive analysis of kinetic and fluid dynamic processes in flowing-gas diode-pumped alkali vapor amplifiers is reported. Taking into account effects of the temperature, the amplified spontaneous emission, the saturation power, the excitation of the alkali atoms to high electronic levels and the ionization, a detailed physical model is established to simulate the output performance of flowing-gas diode-pumped alkali vapor amplifiers. Influences of the flow velocity and the pump power on the amplified power are calculated and analyzed. Comparisons between single and double amplifier, longitudinal and transverse flow are made. Results show that end-pumped cascaded amplifier can provide higher output power under the same total pump power and the cell length, while output powers achieved by single- and double-end pumped, double-side pumped amplifiers with longitudinal or transverse flow have a complicated but valuable relation. Thus the model is extremely helpful for designing high-power flowing-gas diode-pumped alkali vapor amplifiers.

  17. Thermodynamically Constrained Averaging Theory Approach for Modeling Flow and Transport Phenomena in Porous Medium Systems: 7. Single-Phase Megascale Flow Models

    PubMed Central

    Gray, William G.; Miller, Cass T.

    2009-01-01

    This work is the seventh in a series that introduces and employs the thermodynamically constrained averaging theory (TCAT) for modeling flow and transport in multiscale porous medium systems. This paper expands the previous analyses in the series by developing models at a scale where spatial variations within the system are not considered. Thus the time variation of variables averaged over the entire system is modeled in relation to fluxes at the boundary of the system. This implementation of TCAT makes use of conservation equations for mass, momentum, and energy as well as an entropy balance. Additionally, classical irreversible thermodynamics is assumed to hold at the microscale and is averaged to the megascale, or system scale. The fact that the local equilibrium assumption does not apply at the megascale points to the importance of obtaining closure relations that account for the large-scale manifestation of small-scale variations. Example applications built on this foundation are suggested to stimulate future work. PMID:20436941

  18. Flow Cell Sampling Technique: A new approach to analyze physical soil and particle surface properties of undisturbed soil samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krueger, Jiem; Leue, Martin; Heinze, Stefanie; Bachmann, Jörg

    2016-04-01

    During unsaturated water conditions, water flow occurs in the soil mainly by water film flow and depends on moisture content and pore surface properties. More attention is attributed to coatings enclosing soil particles and thus may affect wetting properties as well as hydraulic soil functions. Particle coatings are most likely responsible for many adsorption processes and are expected to favor local heterogeneous microstructure with enhanced biological activity. Many of the effects described cannot be detected on the basis of conventional soil column experiments, which were usually made to study soil hydraulic processes or surface - soil solution exchange processes. The general objective of this study was to develop a new field sampling method to unravel heterogeneous flow processes on small scales in an undisturbed soil under controlled lab conditions. This will be done by using modified flow cells (Plexiglas). Beside the measurements within a flow cell as breakthrough curves, the developed technique has several additional advantages in contrast to common columns or existing flow chamber/cell designs. The direct modification from the sampling frame to the flow cell provides the advantage to combine several analyses. The new technique enables to cut up to 5 thin undisturbed soil slices (quasi-replicates) down to 10 and/or 5 mm. Relative large particles, for instance, may limit this sampling method. The large observation area of up to 150 cm2 allows the characterization of particle surface properties in a high spatial resolution within an undisturbed soil sample. This sampling technique, as shown in our study, has the opportunity to link soil wetting hydraulic and several particle surface properties to spatial soil heterogeneities. This was shown with tracer experiments, small-scale contact angle measurements and analyses of the spatial distribution of functional groups of soil organic matter via DRIFT mapping.

  19. A Green's Function Approach to PIV Pressure Estimates with an Application to Micro Energy Harvesters in Turbulent and Vortical Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goushcha, Oleg

    In the present work we demonstrate the feasibility to harness energy from fluid flows by using piezoelectric generators. These ac-coupled devices convert fluid kinetic energy, which otherwise would be wasted, into electrical energy. The available power density in a flowing fluid is proportional to the cube of its velocity and if it is properly harvested can be used for continuously powering very small electronic devices or can be rectified and stored for intermittent use. A key quantity in these applications which affects the performance is the forcing which the fluid exerts on the harvesters. An analytical solution is presented for the Pressure Poisson Equation (PPE) that uses Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) field data to find the pressure in a flow domain and to calculate the pressure and therefore the force exerted by the fluid on the solid surface. The solution provides a favorable method of calculating pressure field from PIV data as it eliminates the need to compute higher order derivatives of velocity on the domain that are present in viscous terms as well as eliminates the need to integrate Navier-Stokes equations to find the pressure along the boundaries of interest. The solution is validated against a theoretical solution for a pressure distribution inside a tornado-like vortex; pressure solutions obtained by derivative momentum transform method for a vortex flow and some experimental results for the pressure distribution inside a turbulent boundary layer. Several experiments were carried out in which pressure was calculated using PPE: i) a discrete vortex passing over a simple cantilever beam harvester ii) a simple cantilever harvester placed in the boundary layer iii) a self-excited harvester placed in the free stream flow. In a discrete vortex experiment, the self-propelled vortex is passed over the cantilever beam. The pressure distribution and the net force of the beam are calculated by solving PPE as the vortex passes over the beam. In a boundary

  20. Importance of the vertical component of groundwater flow: a hydrogeochemical approach in the valley of San Luis Potosi, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrillo-Rivera, J. J.; Cardona, A.; Moss, D.

    1996-11-01

    Fractured volcanics exert a control on groundwater flow in the San Luis Potosi (SLP) valley. The chemical composition and temperature of water pumped from boreholes partially penetrating the fractured volcanics indicate that the produced water originates from an upward vertical flow. Most of the thermal groundwater has been detected in areas related to regional faults and lineaments. Intensive and uncontrolled pumping from the upper {1}/{4} of the aquifer (total depth > 1500 m) causes the rise of water from a deep regional flow system that mixes with the shallower waters. The deep waters contain high fluoride concentrations that contaminate the mixture and cause substantial health related effects. The recharge controls on the regional flow system require further research; however, hydrogeochemical evidence supports the view that the origin of this recharge is limited to the western bounding Sierra Madre Occidental. Higher levels of dissolved Na +, Li +, F - (and SO 4-2) derived from Tertiary volcanics have been introduced into the exploited region; the concentrations indicate lengthy and deep circulation flow. Li + concentration was used as an indicator of groundwater residence time, and therefore of the length of the groundwater flow path. Hydrogeochemical interpretation indicates the presence of three flow systems: a shallow local one controlled by a clay layer that subcrops most of the valley floor, an intermediate system in which water infiltrates just beyond the boundary of the clay layer, and a deep regional system which originates outside the surface catchment. The local and intermediate systems circulate through materials with comparatively low hydraulic conductivity. Low Cl - concentrations suggest rapid flow in the regional system. Concentrations of Li + and F - can be used to calculate percentages of waters in mixtures of regional and intermediate flows. Concentrations of Na +, Ca 2+ and SO 4-2 appear to be controlled by water-rock reactions

  1. Development of regression models to estimate flow duration statistics at ungaged streams in Oklahoma using a regional approach

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Esralew, R.A.

    2009-01-01

    Multiple-regression analysis was used to develop equations for estimating annual and seasonal flow-duration statistics at ungaged streams in and near Oklahoma that are not substantially affected by human alteration. Ordinary least-squares and left-censored (Tobit) multiple-regression techniques were used to develop equations that relate these statistics, from continuous streamflow data at gaged locations with 10 or more years of record, to physical and climatic basin characteristics. Separate equations were developed to estimate these statistics for stations within similar hydrologic and geologic regions. Use of separate regressions by region substantially improved the accuracy of the estimate for streams in eastern and central Oklahoma when compared with estimating equations developed for the entire State, especially for regressions estimating lower flow duration values. For all regions, the equations were more reliable for estimating higher flow duration values. The accuracy of regressions for estimating flow duration statistics in western Oklahoma was very poor, especially for lower flow duration values. ?? 2009 ASCE.

  2. A water framework directive (WFD) compliant determination of eologically acceptable flows in alpine rivers - a river type specific approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jäger, Paul; Zitek, Andreas

    2010-05-01

    Currently the EU-Water Framework Directive (WFD) represents the driving force behind the assessment for rehabilitation and conservation of aquatic resources throughout Europe. Hydropower production, often considered as "green energy", in the past has put significant pressures on river systems like fragmentation by weirs, impoundment, hydropeaking and water abstraction. Due to the limited availability of data for determining ecologically acceptable flow for rivers at water abstraction sites, a special monitoring program was conducted in the federal state of Salzburg in Austria from 2006 to 2009. Water abstraction sites at 19 hydropower plants, mostly within the trout region of the River Salzach catchment, were assessed in detail with regard to the effect of water abstraction on fish and macrozoobenthos. Based on a detailed assessment of the specific local hydro-morphological and biological situations, the validity of natural low flow criteria (Absolute Minimum Flow - AMF, the lowest daily average flow ever measured and Mean Annual Daily Low Flow - MADLF) as starting points for the determination of an ecologically acceptable flow was tested. It was assessed, if a good ecological status in accordance with the EU-WFD can be maintained at natural AMF. Additionally it was tested, if important habitat parameters describing connectivity, river type specific flow variability and river type specific habitats are maintained at this discharge. Habitat modelling was applied in some situations. Hydraulic results showed that at AMF the highest flow velocity classes were lost in most situations. When AMF was significantly undercut, flow velocities between 0,0 - 0,4 m/s became dominant, describing the loss of the river type specific flow character, leading to a loss of river type specific flow variability and habitats and increased sedimentation of fines. Furthermore limits for parameters describing connectivity for fish like maximum depth at the pessimum profile and minimum flow

  3. A novel approach to model dynamic flow interactions between storm sewer system and overland surface for different land covers in urban areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Tsang-Jung; Wang, Chia-Ho; Chen, Albert S.

    2015-05-01

    In this study, we developed a novel approach to simulate dynamic flow interactions between storm sewers and overland surface for different land covers in urban areas. The proposed approach couples the one-dimensional (1D) sewer flow model (SFM) and the two-dimensional (2D) overland flow model (OFM) with different techniques depending on the land cover type of the study areas. For roads, pavements, plazas, and so forth where rainfall becomes surface runoff before entering the sewer system, the rainfall-runoff process is simulated directly in the 2D OFM, and the runoff is drained to the sewer network via inlets, which is regarded as the input to 1D SFM. For green areas on which rainfall falls into the permeable ground surface and the generated direct runoff traverses terrain, the deduction rate is applied to the rainfall for reflecting the soil infiltration in the 2D OFM. For flat building roofs with drainage facilities allowing rainfall to drain directly from the roof to sewer networks, the rainfall-runoff process is simulated using the hydrological module in the 1D SFM where no rainfall is applied to these areas in the 2D OFM. The 1D SFM is used for hydraulic simulations in the sewer network. Where the flow in the drainage network exceeds its capacity, a surcharge occurs and water may spill onto the ground surface if the pressure head in a manhole exceeds the ground elevation. The overflow discharge from the sewer system is calculated by the 1D SFM and considered a point source in the 2D OFM. The overland flow will return into the sewer network when it reaches an inlet that connects to an un-surcharged manhole. In this case, the inlet is considered as a point sink in the 2D OFM and an inflow to a manhole in the 1D SFM. The proposed approach was compared to other five urban flood modelling techniques with four rainfall events that had previously recorded inundation areas. The merits and drawbacks of each modelling technique were compared and discussed. Based on the

  4. Surface Tension-Driven Melt Flow in the Upper Mantle: An Experimental and Modeling Approach to Studying Capillary Flow of Silicate Melt Through an Olivine Matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parsons, R. A.; Nimmo, F.; Hustoft, J. W.; Holtzman, B. K.; Kohlstedt, D. L.

    2006-12-01

    The flow of melt in partially-molten rocks has important implications for the geochemical and geophysical evolution of planetary bodies over a wide range of length scales. Surface tension is usually ignored in favor of differential stresses and buoyancy forces, but may still distribute melt over geologically interesting distances [1], particularly in small bodies such as asteroids. We have investigated experimentally the role of surface tension in the redistribution of melt. Shear deformation of synthetic mantle-type rocks composed of 76 vol% olivine, 20 vol% chromite, and 4 vol% mid-ocean ridge basalt (MORB) at upper mantle temperature and pressure conditions (1523 K, 300 MPa) produces anastomosing networks of melt-enriched (MORB) regions separated by melt-depleted lenses [2]. After the deformation phase of the experiment, each of three samples were statically annealed at 1523 K for 0, 10, or 100 hours to allow some MORB to redistribute back into the melt-depleted olivine plus chromite matrix via surface tension-driven capillary flow.". We modeled melt redistribution resulting from surface tension during the static anneal [3]. Using sample measurements of dihedral angle, and values for MORB and olivine viscosity from the literature (10 Pas [4] and 8x10^{12} Pas [5], [6], respectively), we are able to constrain the sample permeability by matching the model results to the experiments. Permeability is given by κ = d2φn/b. The model uses an exponential melt-dependent viscosity relation of the form ηo*10-α φ where ηo is the dry olivine viscosity, α = 25 [5], and φ is the melt fraction. We find that a permeability on the order of 10-18 m2, corresponding to n = 2 ± 0.2 and b = 7000 ± 2000, gives the best fit to the the experimental anneals. The relatively high value of b is probably due to clogging of melt paths by chromite grains (see Appendix A of Holtzmann et al.). [1] Stevenson D. J. (1986) GRL, 13, 1149-1152. [2] Holtzman B. K. et al. (2003) Science, 301

  5. Flux Limiter Lattice Boltzmann Scheme Approach to Compressible Flows with Flexible Specific-Heat Ratio and Prandtl Number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gan, Yan-Biao; Xu, Ai-Guo; Zhang, Guang-Cai; Li, Ying-Jun

    2011-09-01

    We further develop the lattice Boltzmann (LB) model [Physica A 382 (2007) 502] for compressible flows from two aspects. Firstly, we modify the Bhatnagar—Gross—Krook (BGK) collision term in the LB equation, which makes the model suitable for simulating flows with different Prandtl numbers. Secondly, the flux limiter finite difference (FLFD) scheme is employed to calculate the convection term of the LB equation, which makes the unphysical oscillations at discontinuities be effectively suppressed and the numerical dissipations be significantly diminished. The proposed model is validated by recovering results of some well-known benchmarks, including (i) The thermal Couette flow; (ii) One- and two-dimensional Riemann problems. Good agreements are obtained between LB results and the exact ones or previously reported solutions. The flexibility, together with the high accuracy of the new model, endows the proposed model considerable potential for tracking some long-standing problems and for investigating nonlinear nonequilibrium complex systems.

  6. Laser-induced fluorescence of flowing samples as an approach to single-molecule detection in liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Dovichi, N.J.; Martin, J.C.; Jett, J.H.; Trkula, M.; Keller, R.A.

    1984-03-01

    A flow cytometer system was used to detect aqueous rhodamine 6G by laser-induced fluorescence. Best results were obtained with careful spectral and spatial filtering. At the detection limit, the probability of a rhodamine 6G molecule being present in the detector's probed volume of 11 pL is about 0.6 . With a flow rate of 0.42 ..mu..L/s, a detection limit of 8.9 x 10/sup -14/ M was obtained for a 1-s time constant. At the detection limit, 18 ag or 22,000 molecules of rhodamine 6G flowed through the probed volume during the signal integration period. Signal linearity extends over greater than 5 orders of magnitude limited only by saturation of the detection electronics at high concentration. The results presented here allow a projection to single-molecule detection with reasonable improvements to the apparatus. 25 references, 5 figures, 7 tables.

  7. Dynamic gas slippage: a unique dual-mechanism approach to the flow of gas in tight formations

    SciTech Connect

    Ertekin, T.; King, G.R.; Schwerer, F.C.

    1983-01-01

    A mathematical formulation, applicable to both numeric simulation and transient well analysis, describing the flow of gas in very tight porous media has been developed. Unique to this formulation is the dual- mechanism transport of gas. In this formulation, gas is assumed to be traveling under the influence of 2 fields: a concentration field and a pressure field. Transport through the concentration field is a Knudsen flow process and is modeled with Fick's Law of diffusion. Transport through the pressure field is a laminar process and is modeled with Darcy's Law (inertial-turbulent effects are ignored). The combination of these 2 flow mechanisms rigorously yields a composition, pressure, and saturation dependent slippage factor. 21 references.

  8. An inverse modeling approach to estimate groundwater flow and transport model parameters at a research site at Vandenberg AFB, CA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasa, E.; Foglia, L.; Mackay, D. M.; Ginn, T. R.; Scow, K. M.

    2009-12-01

    A numerical groundwater fate and transport model was developed for analyses of data from field experiments evaluating the impacts of ethanol on the natural attenuation of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes (BTEX) and methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) at Vandenberg Air Force Base, Site 60. We used the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) groundwater flow (MODFLOW2000) and transport (MT3DMS) models in conjunction with the USGS universal inverse modeling code (UCODE) to jointly determine flow and transport parameters using bromide tracer data from multiple experiments in the same location. The key flow and transport parameters include hydraulic conductivity of aquifer and aquitard layers, porosity, and transverse and longitudinal dispersivity. Aquifer and aquitard layers were assumed homogenous in this study. Therefore, the calibration parameters were not spatially variable within each layer. A total of 162 monitoring wells in seven transects perpendicular to the mean flow direction were monitored over the course of ten months, resulting in 1,766 bromide concentration data points and 149 head values used as observations for the inverse modeling. The results showed the significance of the concentration observation data in predicting the flow model parameters and indicated the sensitivity of the hydraulic conductivity of different zones in the aquifer including the excavated former contaminant zone. The model has already been used to evaluate alternative designs for further experiments on in situ bioremediation of the tert-butyl alcohol (TBA) plume remaining at the site. We describe the recent applications of the model and future work, including adding reaction submodels to the calibrated flow model.

  9. Comparative Tensile Flow and Work-Hardening Behavior of 9 Pct Chromium Ferritic-Martensitic Steels in the Framework of the Estrin-Mecking Internal-Variable Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choudhary, B. K.; Christopher, J.

    2016-06-01

    The comparative tensile flow and work-hardening behavior of P9 steel in two different product forms, normalized and tempered plate and thick section tube plate forging, and P91 steel were investigated in the framework of the dislocation dynamics based Estrin-Mecking (E-M) one-internal-variable approach. The analysis indicated that the flow behavior of P9 and P91 steels was adequately described by the E-M approach in a wide range of temperatures. It was suggested that dislocation dense martensite lath/cell boundaries and precipitates together act as effective barriers to dislocation motion in P9 and P91 steels. At room and intermediate temperatures, the evolution of the internal-state variable, i.e., the dislocation density with plastic strain, exhibited insignificant variations with respect to temperature. At high temperatures, a rapid evolution of dislocation density with plastic strain toward saturation with increasing temperature was observed. The softer P9 steel tube plate forging exhibited higher work hardening in terms of larger gains in the dislocation density and flow stress contribution from dislocations than the P9 steel plate and P91 steel at temperatures ranging from 300 K to 873 K (27 °C to 600 °C). The evaluation of activation energy suggests that the deformation is controlled by cross-slip of dislocations at room and intermediate temperatures, and climb of dislocations at high temperatures. The relative influence of initial microstructure on flow and work-hardening parameters associated with the E-M approach was discussed in the three temperature regimes displayed by P9 and P91 steels.

  10. A comprehensive approach to improving patient flow in our hospitals--the 'left to right, over and under' concept.

    PubMed

    Ardagh, Michael

    2015-08-21

    It is essential we manage the capacity of our hospitals so that acute demand can be accommodated without developing queues for care and backlogs of work. This paper presents a comprehensive model for improving patient flow in our hospitals by attending carefully to both the demand and capacity states of the hospital and maximising efficient flow of our acute patient journeys. The model includes attention to the patient journey as the central focus, with an overarching governance structure and an underpinning sophisticated operations structure.

  11. The "Function-to-Flow" Model: An Interdisciplinary Approach to Assessing Movement within and beyond the Context of Climbing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lloyd, Rebecca

    2015-01-01

    Background: Physical Education (PE) programmes are expanding to include alternative activities yet what is missing is a conceptual model that facilitates how the learning process may be understood and assessed beyond the dominant sport-technique paradigm. Purpose: The purpose of this article was to feature the emergence of a Function-to-Flow (F2F)…

  12. Teaching the Indirect Method of the Statement of Cash Flows in Introductory Financial Accounting: A Comprehensive, Problem-Based Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brickner, Daniel R.; McCombs, Gary B.

    2004-01-01

    In this article, the authors provide an instructional resource for presenting the indirect method of the statement of cash flows (SCF) in an introductory financial accounting course. The authors focus primarily on presenting a comprehensive example that illustrates the "why" of SCF preparation and show how journal entries and T-accounts can be…

  13. Using noble gas tracers to constrain a groundwater flow model with recharge elevations: A novel approach for mountainous terrain

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Doyle, Jessica M.; Gleeson, Tom; Manning, Andrew H.; Mayer, K. Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    Environmental tracers provide information on groundwater age, recharge conditions, and flow processes which can be helpful for evaluating groundwater sustainability and vulnerability. Dissolved noble gas data have proven particularly useful in mountainous terrain because they can be used to determine recharge elevation. However, tracer-derived recharge elevations have not been utilized as calibration targets for numerical groundwater flow models. Herein, we constrain and calibrate a regional groundwater flow model with noble-gas-derived recharge elevations for the first time. Tritium and noble gas tracer results improved the site conceptual model by identifying a previously uncertain contribution of mountain block recharge from the Coast Mountains to an alluvial coastal aquifer in humid southwestern British Columbia. The revised conceptual model was integrated into a three-dimensional numerical groundwater flow model and calibrated to hydraulic head data in addition to recharge elevations estimated from noble gas recharge temperatures. Recharge elevations proved to be imperative for constraining hydraulic conductivity, recharge location, and bedrock geometry, and thus minimizing model nonuniqueness. Results indicate that 45% of recharge to the aquifer is mountain block recharge. A similar match between measured and modeled heads was achieved in a second numerical model that excludes the mountain block (no mountain block recharge), demonstrating that hydraulic head data alone are incapable of quantifying mountain block recharge. This result has significant implications for understanding and managing source water protection in recharge areas, potential effects of climate change, the overall water budget, and ultimately ensuring groundwater sustainability.

  14. Innovative Approaches for Urban Watershed Wet-Weather Flow Management and Control: State of Technology Review Report

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report documents initial efforts to identify innovative strategies for managing the effects of wet-weather flow in an urban setting. It served as a communication tool and a starting point for discussion with experts. As such, the document is a compilation of literature rev...

  15. Carbon flows in Baltic Sea food webs — a re-evaluation using a mass balance approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandberg, J.; Elmgren, R.; Wulff, F.

    2000-07-01

    The brackish Baltic Sea has been seen as particularly suitable for studies of food webs. Compared to fully marine ecosystems, it has low species diversity, which means fewer trophic linkages to analyse. The Baltic Sea is also one of the best-studied areas of the world, suggesting that most data requirements for food web models should be fulfilled. Nevertheless, the influence of physical and biological factors on trophic interactions and biogeochemical patterns varies spatially in the Baltic Sea, adding considerable complexity to food web studies. Food web structure and processes can be described and compared quantitatively between areas by estimating the flow of matter or energy through the organisms. Most such models have been based on carbon, though studies of complementary flows of other elements limiting production, such as nitrogen and phosphorus would be desirable. However, since ratios between carbon and other elements are used in calculating these flows, it is crucial, as a first step, to quantify the flows of carbon as accurately as possible. In this study, we used the EcopathII software (ver 3.1) to analyse models of carbon flow through the food webs in the three main areas of the Baltic Sea; the Baltic proper, Bothnian Sea and Bothnian Bay. A previously published study on carbon flow in the Baltic Sea [Elmgren, R. 1984. Trophic dynamics in the enclosed, brackish Baltic Sea. Rapp. P.-V. Reun. — Cons. Int. Explor. Mer. (183) 152-169.] was complemented with the data on respiration and flow to detritus [Wulff, F., Ulanowicz, R. 1989. A comparative anatomy of the Baltic Sea and Chesapeeake Bay ecosystems. In: F. Wulff, J.G. Field, K.H. Mann (Eds.), Flow Analysis of Marine Ecosystems: Theory and Practice. New York: Springer-Verlag.] in order to present complete mass balance models of carbon. The purpose of re-evaluating previous models with new analytic tools was to check how well their carbon flows balance, and to provide a basis for improved mass balance

  16. Quantifying ozone uptake at the canopy level of spruce, pine and larch trees at the alpine timberline: an approach based on sap flow measurement.

    PubMed

    Wieser, G; Matyssek, R; Köstner, B; Oberhuber, W

    2003-01-01

    Micro-climatic and ambient ozone data were combined with measurements of sap flow through tree trunks in order to estimate whole-tree ozone uptake of adult Norway spruce (Picea abies), cembran pine (Pinus cembra), and European larch (Larix decidua) trees. Sap flow was monitored by means of the heat balance approach in two trees of each species during the growing season of 1998. In trees making up the stand canopy, the ozone uptake by evergreen foliages was significantly higher than by deciduous ones, when scaled to the ground area. However, if expressed per unit of whole-tree foliage area, ozone flux through the stomata into the needle mesophyll was 1.09, 1.18 and 1.40 nmol m(-2) s(-1) in Picea abies, Pinus cembra and Larix decidua, respectively. These fluxes are consistent with findings from measurements of needle gas exchange, published from the same species at the study site. It is concluded that the sap flow-based approach offers an inexpensive, spatially and temporally integrating way for estimating ozone uptake at the whole-tree and stand level, intrinsicly covering the effect of boundary layers on ozone flux.

  17. Numerical modelling of rapid, flow-like landslides across 3-D terrains: a Tsunami Squares approach to El Picacho landslide, El Salvador, September 19, 1982

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jiajia; Ward, Steven N.; Xiao, Lili

    2015-06-01

    Flow-like landslides are rapidly moving fluid-solid mixtures that can cause significant destruction along paths that run far from their original sources. Existing models for run out prediction and motion simulation of flow-like landslides have many limitations. In this paper, we develop a new method named `Tsunami Squares' to simulate the generation, propagation and stoppage of flow-like landslides based on conservation of volume and momentum. Landslide materials in the new method form divisible squares that are displaced, then further fractured. The squares move under the influence of gravity-driven acceleration and suffer decelerations due to basal and dynamic frictions. Distinctively, this method takes into account solid and fluid mechanics, particle interactions and flow regime transitions. We apply this approach to simulate the 1982 El Picacho landslide in San Salvador, capital city of El Salvador. Landslide products from Tsunami Squares such as run out distance, velocities, erosion and deposition depths and impacted area agree well with field investigated and eyewitness data.

  18. Absolute paleointensity determinations by using of conventional double-heating and multispecimen approaches on a Pliocene lava flow sequence from the Lesser Caucasus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goguitchaichvili, Avto; Caccavari, Ana; Calvo-Rathert, Manuel; Morales, Juan; Solano, Miguel Cervantes; Vashakidze, Goga; Huaiyu, He; Vegas, Néstor

    2016-08-01

    We report 28 successful Thellier type absolute geomagnetic paleointensity determinations from a Pleistocene lava sequence composed of 39 successive flows in the Djavakheti Highland (Lesser Caucasus, Georgia). Additionally, multispecimen technique provided the estimation of geomagnetic field strength for 12 independent cooling units. Paleointensity studies were performed using both Thellier type double heating and multispecimen techniques. Samples selection was mainly based on uni-vectorial remanent magnetization, thermal stability and domain size of the samples. Flow-mean Thellier paleointensity values range from 16.3 ± 5.2 to 71.0 ± 0.3 μT, while intensities obtained using multispecimen approach vary from17.2 ± 2.3 to 69.3 ± 7.9 μT. One of the flows is located near a possible discontinuity in the sequence and yields a rather low Thellier absolute intensity (16.3 ± 5.2) suggesting a transitional regime and the onset of the Matuyama-Olduvai polarity transition, which does not appear on the directional record. Multispecimen paleointensities from the same flow, however, yield higher, close to present day values which makes untenable the hypothesis of occurrence of transitional field. Thus the whole sequence was emplaced in a short time between the Olduvai chron and 1.73 ± 0.03 Ma, as suggested by available radiometric and paleomagnetic data (Caccavari et al., 2014).

  19. Signal flow graph approach to multiphoton analysis and transient characteristics of mode-locked far infrared lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, H.K.

    1981-01-01

    The signal flow graph application to the analysis of multiphoton interactions has been developed in this study. It is shown that the Schroedinger equation for the multiphoton interactions can be represented as signal flow graphs in the semiclassical limit. A few examples are given to illustrate the construction, manipulation and application of the graphs. Also, the generation of temporally short far infrared pulses and their evolution in time and space have been examined experimentally and theoretically. It is shown that the far infrared pulsewidth can be as short as one-half the pump pulsewidth which is already shorter than the molecular relaxation times. In particular, the far infrared pulse energy is found to be scaled in z as e..sqrt..gz, contrary to the Beer's law growth, e/sup gz/.

  20. Role of Induced Magnetic Field on Transient Natural Convection Flow in a Vertical Channel: The Riemann Sum Approximation Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jha, B. K.; Sani, I.

    2015-02-01

    This paper investigates the role of induced magnetic field on a transient natural convection flow of an electrically conducting, incompressible and viscous fluid in a vertical channel formed by two infinite vertical parallel plates. The transient flow formation inside the channel is due to sudden asymmetric heating of channel walls. The time dependent momentum, energy and magnetic induction equations are solved semi-analytically using the Laplace transform technique along with the Riemann-sum approximation method. The solutions obtained are validated by comparisons with the closed form solutions obtained for the steady states which have been derived separately and also by the implicit finite difference method. Graphical results for the temperature, velocity, induced magnetic field, current density, and skin-friction based on the semi-analytical solutions are presented and discussed.

  1. Numerical investigation on boiling flow of liquid nitrogen in a vertical tube using bubble number density approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Xuefeng; Li, Xiangdong; Wang, Rongshun

    2016-04-01

    An average bubble number density (ABND) model was formulated and numerically resolved for the subcooled flow boiling of liquid nitrogen. The effects of bubble coalescence and breakup were taken into account. Some new closure correlations describing bubble nucleation and departure on the heating surface were selected as well. For the purpose of comparison, flow boiling of liquid nitrogen was also numerically simulated using a modified two-fluid model. The results show that the simulations performed by using the ABND model achieve encouraging improvement in accuracy in predicting heat flux and wall temperature of a vertical tube. Moreover, the influence of the bubble coalescence and breakup is shown to be great on predicting overall pressure beyond the transition point.

  2. An enhanced bacterial foraging algorithm approach for optimal power flow problem including FACTS devices considering system loadability.

    PubMed

    Belwin Edward, J; Rajasekar, N; Sathiyasekar, K; Senthilnathan, N; Sarjila, R

    2013-09-01

    Obtaining optimal power flow solution is a strenuous task for any power system engineer. The inclusion of FACTS devices in the power system network adds to its complexity. The dual objective of OPF with fuel cost minimization along with FACTS device location for IEEE 30 bus is considered and solved using proposed Enhanced Bacterial Foraging algorithm (EBFA). The conventional Bacterial Foraging Algorithm (BFA) has the difficulty of optimal parameter selection. Hence, in this paper, BFA is enhanced by including Nelder-Mead (NM) algorithm for better performance. A MATLAB code for EBFA is developed and the problem of optimal power flow with inclusion of FACTS devices is solved. After several run with different initial values, it is found that the inclusion of FACTS devices such as SVC and TCSC in the network reduces the generation cost along with increased voltage stability limits. It is also observed that, the proposed algorithm requires lesser computational time compared to earlier proposed algorithms.

  3. A first-order Green's function approach to supersonic oscillatory flow: A mixed analytic and numeric treatment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freedman, M. I.; Sipcic, S.; Tseng, K.

    1985-01-01

    A frequency domain Green's Function Method for unsteady supersonic potential flow around complex aircraft configurations is presented. The focus is on the supersonic range wherein the linear potential flow assumption is valid. In this range the effects of the nonlinear terms in the unsteady supersonic compressible velocity potential equation are negligible and therefore these terms will be omitted. The Green's function method is employed in order to convert the potential flow differential equation into an integral one. This integral equation is then discretized, through standard finite element technique, to yield a linear algebraic system of equations relating the unknown potential to its prescribed co-normalwash (boundary condition) on the surface of the aircraft. The arbitrary complex aircraft configuration (e.g., finite-thickness wing, wing-body-tail) is discretized into hyperboloidal (twisted quadrilateral) panels. The potential and co-normalwash are assumed to vary linearly within each panel. The long range goal is to develop a comprehensive theory for unsteady supersonic potential aerodynamic which is capable of yielding accurate results even in the low supersonic (i.e., high transonic) range.

  4. A new methodology for pixel-quantitative precipitation nowcasting using a pyramid Lucas Kanade optical flow approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yu; Xi, Du-Gang; Li, Zhao-Liang; Hong, Yang

    2015-10-01

    Short-term high-resolution Quantitative Precipitation Nowcasting (QPN) has important implications for navigation, flood forecasting, and other hydrological and meteorological concerns. This study proposes a new algorithm called Pixel-based QPN using the Pyramid Lucas-Kanade Optical Flow method (PPLK), which comprises three steps: employing a Pyramid Lucas-Kanade Optical Flow method (PLKOF) to estimate precipitation advection, projecting rainy clouds by considering the advection and evolution pixel by pixel, and interpolating QPN imagery based on the space-time continuum of cloud patches. The PPLK methodology was evaluated with 2338 images from the geostationary meteorological satellite Fengyun-2F (FY-2F) of China and compared with two other advection-based methods, i.e., the maximum correlation method and the Horn-Schunck Optical Flow scheme. The data sample covered all intensive observations since the launch of FY-2F, despite covering a total of only approximately 10 days. The results show that the PPLK performed better than the algorithms used for comparison, demonstrating less time expenditure, more effective cloud tracking, and improved QPN accuracy.

  5. The role of porous matrix in water flow regulation within a karst unsaturated zone: an integrated hydrogeophysical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrière, Simon D.; Chalikakis, Konstantinos; Danquigny, Charles; Davi, Hendrik; Mazzilli, Naomi; Ollivier, Chloé; Emblanch, Christophe

    2016-05-01

    Some portions of the porous rock matrix in the karst unsaturated zone (UZ) can contain large volumes of water and play a major role in water flow regulation. The essential results are presented of a local-scale study conducted in 2011 and 2012 above the Low Noise Underground Laboratory (LSBB - Laboratoire Souterrain à Bas Bruit) at Rustrel, southeastern France. Previous research revealed the geological structure and water-related features of the study site and illustrated the feasibility of specific hydrogeophysical measurements. In this study, the focus is on hydrodynamics at the seasonal and event timescales. Magnetic resonance sounding (MRS) measured a high water content (more than 10 %) in a large volume of rock. This large volume of water cannot be stored in fractures and conduits within the UZ. MRS was also used to measure the seasonal variation of water stored in the karst UZ. A process-based model was developed to simulate the effect of vegetation on groundwater recharge dynamics. In addition, electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) monitoring was used to assess preferential water pathways during a rain event. This study demonstrates the major influence of water flow within the porous rock matrix on the UZ hydrogeological functioning at both the local (LSBB) and regional (Fontaine de Vaucluse) scales. By taking into account the role of the porous matrix in water flow regulation, these findings may significantly improve karst groundwater hydrodynamic modelling, exploitation, and sustainable management.

  6. Propagation of photoinduced signals with the cytoplasmic flow along Characean internodes: evidence from changes in chloroplast fluorescence and surface pH.

    PubMed

    Bulychev, Alexander A; Alova, Anna V; Rubin, Andrey B

    2013-06-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that cytoplasmic streaming can regulate the plasma-membrane H(+) transport and photosynthetic electron flow. Microfluorometric and surface pH measurements on Chara corallina internodes revealed the transmission of photoinduced signals by the cytoplasmic flow for a distance of few millimeters from the site of stimulus application. When a 30-s pulse of bright light was locally applied, the downstream cell regions responded with either release or enhancement of non-photochemical quenching of chlorophyll fluorescence, depending on the background irradiance of the analyzed cell area. Under dim background irradiance (<20 μmol m(-2) s(-1)), the arrival of the distant signal from the brightly illuminated 400-μm-wide zone elevated the maximal fluorescence F m (') in the analyzed downstream area, whereas at higher background irradiances it induced strong quenching of F m (') . At intermediate irradiances the increase and decrease in F m (') appeared as two successive waves. The transition between the F m (') responses of opposite polarities occurred at a narrow threshold range of irradiances. This indicates that inevitable slight variations in irradiance at the bottom chloroplast layer combined with the cyclosis-transmitted signals may contribute to the formation of a photosynthetic activity pattern. The rapid cyclosis-mediated release of non-photochemical quenching, unlike the delayed response of opposite polarity, was associated with opening of H(+) (OH(-))-conducting plasma membrane channels, as evidenced by the concurrent alkaline pH shift on the cell surface. It is proposed that the initial increase in F m (') after application of a distant photostimulus is determined, among other factors, by the wave of alkaline cytoplasmic pH.

  7. Propagation of photoinduced signals with the cytoplasmic flow along Characean internodes: evidence from changes in chloroplast fluorescence and surface pH.

    PubMed

    Bulychev, Alexander A; Alova, Anna V; Rubin, Andrey B

    2013-06-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that cytoplasmic streaming can regulate the plasma-membrane H(+) transport and photosynthetic electron flow. Microfluorometric and surface pH measurements on Chara corallina internodes revealed the transmission of photoinduced signals by the cytoplasmic flow for a distance of few millimeters from the site of stimulus application. When a 30-s pulse of bright light was locally applied, the downstream cell regions responded with either release or enhancement of non-photochemical quenching of chlorophyll fluorescence, depending on the background irradiance of the analyzed cell area. Under dim background irradiance (<20 μmol m(-2) s(-1)), the arrival of the distant signal from the brightly illuminated 400-μm-wide zone elevated the maximal fluorescence F m (') in the analyzed downstream area, whereas at higher background irradiances it induced strong quenching of F m (') . At intermediate irradiances the increase and decrease in F m (') appeared as two successive waves. The transition between the F m (') responses of opposite polarities occurred at a narrow threshold range of irradiances. This indicates that inevitable slight variations in irradiance at the bottom chloroplast layer combined with the cyclosis-transmitted signals may contribute to the formation of a photosynthetic activity pattern. The rapid cyclosis-mediated release of non-photochemical quenching, unlike the delayed response of opposite polarity, was associated with opening of H(+) (OH(-))-conducting plasma membrane channels, as evidenced by the concurrent alkaline pH shift on the cell surface. It is proposed that the initial increase in F m (') after application of a distant photostimulus is determined, among other factors, by the wave of alkaline cytoplasmic pH. PMID:23467782

  8. Adaptive particle-based pore-level modeling of incompressible fluid flow in porous media: a direct and parallel approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ovaysi, S.; Piri, M.

    2009-12-01

    We present a three-dimensional fully dynamic parallel particle-based model for direct pore-level simulation of incompressible viscous fluid flow in disordered porous media. The model was developed from scratch and is capable of simulating flow directly in three-dimensional high-resolution microtomography images of naturally occurring or man-made porous systems. It reads the images as input where the position of the solid walls are given. The entire medium, i.e., solid and fluid, is then discretized using particles. The model is based on Moving Particle Semi-implicit (MPS) technique. We modify this technique in order to improve its stability. The model handles highly irregular fluid-solid boundaries effectively. It takes into account viscous pressure drop in addition to the gravity forces. It conserves mass and can automatically detect any false connectivity with fluid particles in the neighboring pores and throats. It includes a sophisticated algorithm to automatically split and merge particles to maintain hydraulic connectivity of extremely narrow conduits. Furthermore, it uses novel methods to handle particle inconsistencies and open boundaries. To handle the computational load, we present a fully parallel version of the model that runs on distributed memory computer clusters and exhibits excellent scalability. The model is used to simulate unsteady-state flow problems under different conditions starting from straight noncircular capillary tubes with different cross-sectional shapes, i.e., circular/elliptical, square/rectangular and triangular cross-sections. We compare the predicted dimensionless hydraulic conductances with the data available in the literature and observe an excellent agreement. We then test the scalability of our parallel model with two samples of an artificial sandstone, samples A and B, with different volumes and different distributions (non-uniform and uniform) of solid particles among the processors. An excellent linear scalability is

  9. The Importance of Ablation on ice Flow and Meteorite Exhumation: the Physical Modeling Approach at Frontier Mountain, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeoli, A.; Folco, L.; Corti, G.

    2008-12-01

    The highest concentration of meteorites yet discovered on Earth is found in the ice sheet covering Antarctica. Major meteorite accumulation zones often occur in front of submerged or emerged bedrock obstacles, where the meteorite-bearing ice slows down, is uplifted by the buttressing effect and exhumed and concentrated by wind ablation ("ice-flow model"). Meteorite traps have also been discovered in the downstream side of major emerged bedrock barriers, as in the Frontier Mountain (FM) region, a nunatak outcropping in the Northern Victoria Land, Antarctica, 250 km from the Italian Terra Nova Base. However, recent detailed glaciological analyses indicate that also for this site the "ice-flow model" remains the best concentration explanation, being present an important submerged barrier in the main blue-ice field. A this site, during the last fifteen years, more than 1000 meteorites have been there collected. During the various field expeditions, different data were acquired to allow a detailed study of the local glaciodynamics. This large data set was used to constrain boundary conditions for performing a set of physical experiments reproducing the main glaciodynamics characteristics of the FM region. In addition to previous result, now we performed a series of experiments that consider also the ablation effect in order to better reproduce the natural environment. Analog experiments were performed at the Tectonic Modelling Laboratory of the CNR-IGG (Florence, Italy). Polydimethilsyloxane (PDMS) is used to simulate glacial flow in analog models; this material properly simulates the rheological behaviour of ice (Corti et al, 2003; Corti et al, 2008). Models are built inside a Plexiglas box with dimensions of 70cm x 20cm x 10cm. The models are scaled to nature conditions allowing a comparison between laboratories and natural models. The geometrical scaling ratio was of 2*10-5, such that 1 cm in the model represented about 500 m in nature. In order to measure the

  10. A new approach to monitoring spatial distribution and dynamics of wetlands and associated flows of Australian Great Artesian Basin springs using QuickBird satellite imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Davina C.; Lewis, Megan M.

    2011-09-01

    SummaryThis study develops an expedient digital mapping technique using Very High Resolution satellite imagery to monitor the temporal response of permanent wetland vegetation to changes in spring flow rates from the Australian Great Artesian Basin at Dalhousie Springs Complex, South Australia. Three epochs of QuickBird satellite multispectral imagery acquired between 2006 and 2010 were analysed using the Normalised Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI). A regression of 2009 NDVI values against vegetation cover from field botanical survey plots provided a relationship of increasing NDVI with increased vegetation cover ( R2 = 0.86; p < 0.001). On the basis of this relationship a vegetation threshold was determined (NDVI ⩾ 0.35), which discriminated perennial and ephemeral wetland vegetation from surrounding dryland vegetation in the imagery. The extent of wetlands for the entire Dalhousie Springs Complex mapped from the imagery increased from 607 ha in December 2006 to 913 ha in May 2009 and 1285 ha in May 2010. Comparison of the three NDVI images showed considerable localised change in wetland vegetation greenness, distribution and extent in response to fires, alien vegetation removal, rainfall and fluctuations in spring flow. A strong direct relationship ( R2 = 0.99; p < 0.001) was exhibited between spring flow rate and the area of associated wetland vegetation for eight individual springs. This relationship strongly infers that wetland area is an indicator of spring flow and can be used for monitoring purposes. This method has the potential to determine the sensitivity of spring wetland vegetation extent and distribution to associated changes in spring flow rates due to land management and aquifer extractions. Furthermore, this approach is timely and provides reliable and repeatable monitoring, particularly needed given the projected increased demand for groundwater extractions from the GAB for mining operations.

  11. The significance of water co-transport for sustaining transpirational water flow in plants: a quantitative approach.

    PubMed

    Fricke, Wieland

    2015-02-01

    In a recent Opinion paper, Wegner (Journal of Experimental Botany 65, 381-392, 2014) adapts a concept developed for water flow in animal tissues to propose a model, which can explain the loading of water into the root xylem against a difference in water potential (Ψ) between the xylem parenchyma cell (more negative Ψ) and the xylem vessel (less negative Ψ). In this model, the transport of water is energized through the co-transport of ions such as K(+) and Cl(-) through plasma membrane-located transporters. The emphasis of the model is on the thermodynamic feasibility of the co-transport mechanism per se. However, what is lacking is a quantitative evaluation of the energy input required at the organismal level to sustain such a co-transport mechanism in the face of considerable net (transpirational) flows of water through the system. Here, we use a ratio of 500 water molecules being co-transported for every pair of K(+) and Cl(-) ions, as proposed for the animal system, to calculate the energy required to sustain daytime and night-time transpirational water flow in barley plants through a water co-transport mechanism. We compare this energy with the total daily net input of energy through photosynthetic carbon assimilation. Water co-transport can facilitate the filling of xylem against a difference in Ψ of 1.0MPa and puts a minor drain on the energy budget of the plant. Based on these findings it cannot be excluded that water co-transport in plants contributes significantly to xylem filling during night-time and possibly also daytime transpiration.

  12. Achieving Peak Flow and Sediment Loading Reductions through Increased Water Storage in the Le Sueur Watershed, Minnesota: A Modeling Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, N. A.; Gran, K. B.; Cho, S. J.; Dalzell, B. J.; Kumarasamy, K.

    2015-12-01

    A combination of factors including climate change, land clearing, and artificial drainage have increased many agricultural regions' stream flows and rates at which channel banks and bluffs are eroded. Increasing erosion rates within the Minnesota River Basin have contributed to higher sediment-loading rates, excess turbidity levels, and increases in sedimentation rates in Lake Pepin further downstream. Water storage sites (e.g., wetlands) have been discussed as a means to address these issues. This study uses the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) to assess a range of water retention site (WRS) implementation scenarios in the Le Sueur watershed in south-central Minnesota, a subwatershed of the Minnesota River Basin. Sediment loading from bluffs was assessed through an empirical relationship developed from gauging data. Sites were delineated as topographic depressions with specific land uses, minimum areas (3000 m2), and high compound topographic index values. Contributing areas for the WRS were manually measured and used with different site characteristics to create 210 initial WRS scenarios. A generalized relationship between WRS area and contributing area was identified from measurements, and this relationship was used with different site characteristics (e.g., depth, hydraulic conductivity (K), and placement) to create 225 generalized WRS scenarios. Reductions in peak flow volumes and sediment-loading rates are generally maximized by placing site with high K values in the upper half of the watershed. High K values allow sites to lose more water through seepage, emptying their storages between precipitation events and preventing frequent overflowing. Reductions in peak flow volumes and sediment-loading rates also level off at high WRS extents due to the decreasing frequencies of high-magnitude events. The generalized WRS scenarios were also used to create a simplified empirical model capable of generating peak flows and sediment-loading rates from near

  13. Approaches and algorithms for groundwater flow modeling in support of site investigations and safety assessment of the Forsmark site, Sweden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartley, Lee; Joyce, Steven

    2013-09-01

    The Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company (SKB) has in 2011 finalized a safety assessment project, SR-Site, with the objective to assess the long term safety of a final repository for spent nuclear fuel at Forsmark in Northern Uppland of Sweden. Prior to the safety assessment, comprehensive site investigations were conducted at the Forsmark site to build understanding and characterize the site. An essential part of the site investigations were to describe hydrological properties and characteristics of the site and use this to assess the groundwater pathway. The geological structural context of the crystalline bedrock at Forsmark implied a fracture network concept was the natural description for interpreting site data and assessing the groundwater pathway. Of primary importance to the description of the fracture system was the assignment of down-borehole flow-logging measurements to individual fractures identified by imaging techniques, providing the basis to relate hydrogeological characteristics such as anisotropy and heterogeneity to the geological structural framework. Also, the key input quantities to the assessment of long-term safety can be closely related to the derived fracture flow-rate distributions. Key success factors for this project were to develop and test strategies for modeling methodologies, as described in this paper, from an early stage, hand-in-hand with the planning and phased acquisition of site data as well as successive safety assessments.

  14. Design of Helical Capacitance Sensor for Holdup Measurement in Two-Phase Stratified Flow: A Sinusoidal Function Approach

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Lam Ghai; Pao, William K. S.; Hamid, Nor Hisham; Tang, Tong Boon

    2016-01-01

    A 360° twisted helical capacitance sensor was developed for holdup measurement in horizontal two-phase stratified flow. Instead of suppressing nonlinear response, the sensor was optimized in such a way that a ‘sine-like’ function was displayed on top of the linear function. This concept of design had been implemented and verified in both software and hardware. A good agreement was achieved between the finite element model of proposed design and the approximation model (pure sinusoidal function), with a maximum difference of ±1.2%. In addition, the design parameters of the sensor were analysed and investigated. It was found that the error in symmetry of the sinusoidal function could be minimized by adjusting the pitch of helix. The experiments of air-water and oil-water stratified flows were carried out and validated the sinusoidal relationship with a maximum difference of ±1.2% and ±1.3% for the range of water holdup from 0.15 to 0.85. The proposed design concept therefore may pose a promising alternative for the optimization of capacitance sensor design. PMID:27384567

  15. Concepts of diffusion theory and a graphic approach to the description of the epidemic flow of contagious disease.

    PubMed Central

    Angulo, J J; Pederneiras, C A; Ebner, W; Kimura, E M; Megale, P

    1980-01-01

    Concepts used to analyze sociological, geographic, and economic processes were adapted to an examination of the diffusion of contagious disease. The example used in applying these concepts was an epidemic of variola minor which continued for 12 months in an area of 1,006 square kilometers centered on the city of Bragança Paulista, Sao Paulo State (Brazil). A graphic procedure is proposed that depicts aspects of the epidemic flow of person-to-person transmission. Spatial, temporal, and sociological characteristics of the epidemic flow are disclosed in sequential diagrams. They represent geographic areas as well as schools and agglomerates of households affected by the epidemic at a given time, the mode of diffusion, and the source of the infection. The procedure yielded indirect evidence of the role of school pupils as introducers of variola minor into households and school classes. All subdivisions of the city, six of the seven rural districts, and four of the five elementary schools were affected through hierarchical (between-areas) diffusion. Subsequently, there was neighborhood (within-area) diffusion, and this resulted in new interactions between areas. PMID:7422812

  16. A simple, quantitative approach to the coupling of photophosphorylation to electron flow in terms of proton fluxes.

    PubMed

    McCarty, R E; Portis, A R

    1976-11-16

    A simple relationship between observed phosphorylation efficiencies (P/e ratios) and internal proton concentration in spinach chloroplast thylakoids has been derived. P/e ratios, varked by either changing the light intensity or by adding the energy transfer inhibitor, 4'-deoxyphlorizin, were found to change with internal proton concentration in accordance with this relationship. A quantitative prediction of the effect of uncouplers on the P/e ratio can probably also be made. By extrapolation of plots of observed P/e ratios against internal proton concentration divided by the overall rate of electron flow, a maximum intrinsic P/e of about 0.66 is obtained. Assuming that two protons appear inside thylakoids per electron transferred, a P/e ratio of 0.66 suggests that three internal protons are consumed for each ATP formed. Internal protons may be considered to be substrates for the phosphorylation reaction. Hill plots of phosphorylation rate vs. internal proton concentration also indicate that three protons are consumed for each ATP synthesized. Thus, the H+ concentration gradient behaves quantitatively, as well as qualitatively, as if it is the connecting link between electron flow and phosphorylation in illuminated thylakoids.

  17. Design of Helical Capacitance Sensor for Holdup Measurement in Two-Phase Stratified Flow: A Sinusoidal Function Approach.

    PubMed

    Lim, Lam Ghai; Pao, William K S; Hamid, Nor Hisham; Tang, Tong Boon

    2016-07-04

    A 360° twisted helical capacitance sensor was developed for holdup measurement in horizontal two-phase stratified flow. Instead of suppressing nonlinear response, the sensor was optimized in such a way that a 'sine-like' function was displayed on top of the linear function. This concept of design had been implemented and verified in both software and hardware. A good agreement was achieved between the finite element model of proposed design and the approximation model (pure sinusoidal function), with a maximum difference of ±1.2%. In addition, the design parameters of the sensor were analysed and investigated. It was found that the error in symmetry of the sinusoidal function could be minimized by adjusting the pitch of helix. The experiments of air-water and oil-water stratified flows were carried out and validated the sinusoidal relationship with a maximum difference of ±1.2% and ±1.3% for the range of water holdup from 0.15 to 0.85. The proposed design concept therefore may pose a promising alternative for the optimization of capacitance sensor design.

  18. Design of Helical Capacitance Sensor for Holdup Measurement in Two-Phase Stratified Flow: A Sinusoidal Function Approach.

    PubMed

    Lim, Lam Ghai; Pao, William K S; Hamid, Nor Hisham; Tang, Tong Boon

    2016-01-01

    A 360° twisted helical capacitance sensor was developed for holdup measurement in horizontal two-phase stratified flow. Instead of suppressing nonlinear response, the sensor was optimized in such a way that a 'sine-like' function was displayed on top of the linear function. This concept of design had been implemented and verified in both software and hardware. A good agreement was achieved between the finite element model of proposed design and the approximation model (pure sinusoidal function), with a maximum difference of ±1.2%. In addition, the design parameters of the sensor were analysed and investigated. It was found that the error in symmetry of the sinusoidal function could be minimized by adjusting the pitch of helix. The experiments of air-water and oil-water stratified flows were carried out and validated the sinusoidal relationship with a maximum difference of ±1.2% and ±1.3% for the range of water holdup from 0.15 to 0.85. The proposed design concept therefore may pose a promising alternative for the optimization of capacitance sensor design. PMID:27384567

  19. Swimming performance of upstream migrant fishes in open-channel flow: A new approach to predicting passage through velocity barriers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Haro, A.; Castro-Santos, T.; Noreika, J.; Odeh, M.

    2004-01-01

    The ability to traverse barriers of high-velocity flow limits the distributions of many diadromous and other migratory fish species, yet very few data exist that quantify this ability. We provide a detailed analysis of sprint swimming ability of six migratory fish species (American shad (Alosa sapidissima), alewife (Alosa pseudoharengus), blueback herring (Alosa aestivalis), striped bass (Morone saxatilis), walleye (Stizostedion vitreum), and white sucker (Catostomus commersoni)) against controlled water velocities of 1.5-4.5 m??s-1 in a large, open-channel flume. Performance was strictly voluntary: no coercive incentives were used to motivate fish to sprint. We used these data to generate models of maximum distance traversed, taking into account effects of flow velocity, body length, and temperature. Although the maximum distance traversed decreased with increasing velocity, the magnitude of this effect varied among species. Other covariate effects were likewise variable, with divergent effects of temperature and nonuniform length effects. These effects do not account for all of the variability in performance, however, and behavioral traits may account for observed interspecific differences. We propose the models be used to develop criteria for fish passage structures, culverts, and breached dams.

  20. [Molecular and immunological approach to hematological disease: detection and analysis of intracellular modified nucleosides by flow cytometry].

    PubMed

    Hoshino, A; Honda, I; Ishimori, A; Itoh, K; Mizugaki, M; Nose, M

    1990-07-01

    Modified nucleosides are components of ribosomal RNA (rRNA), transfer RNA (tRNA) and messenger RNA (mRNA). 1-methyladenosine and pseudouridine are members of those modified nucleosides. The urinary concentration of 1-methyladenosine and pseudouridine of cancer patients are higher than that of healthy controls, and those compounds were reduced after effective chemotherapy. Thus those compounds might be expected to use as tumor markers. In this study cellular origin of 1-methyladenosine and pseudouridine were analysed about two tumor cell lines (HUT-102, THP-1), peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) from healthy adult and PBL under the phytohemagglutinin stimulation, by flow cytometric analysis and immunofluorescent staining of cellular RNA using monoclonal antibodies specific for 1-methyladenosine (AMA) and pseudouridine (APU). Both 1-methyladenosine and pseudouridine were detected in more than 90% of tumor cells above the thresholds of flow cytometric detection (Spectrum III, Ortho). The PBL under the PHA stimulation also tended to take the same way of the tumor cell lines, whereas few of the PBL contained 1-methyladenosine above the thresholds. According to the DNA analysis of those cell lines, high contents of the modified nucleosides in the cell might follow DNA synthesis, this leads to one reason for high levels of the urinary excretion of the modified nucleosides in cancer patient.

  1. Mechanisms before Reactions: A Mechanistic Approach to the Organic Chemistry Curriculum Based on Patterns of Electron Flow

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flynn, Alison B.; Ogilvie, William W.

    2015-01-01

    A significant redesign of the introductory organic chemistry curriculum at the authors' institution is described. There are two aspects that differ greatly from a typical functional group approach. First, organic reaction mechanisms and the electron-pushing formalism are taught before students have learned a single reaction. The conservation of…

  2. A Domain Decomposition Approach for Large-Scale Simulations of Flow Processes in Hydrate-Bearing Geologic Media

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Keni; Moridis, G.J.; Wu, Y.-S.; Pruess, K.

    2008-07-01

    Simulation of the system behavior of hydrate-bearing geologic media involves solving fully coupled mass- and heat-balance equations. In this study, we develop a domain decomposition approach for large-scale gas hydrate simulations with coarse-granularity parallel computation. This approach partitions a simulation domain into small subdomains. The full model domain, consisting of discrete subdomains, is still simulated simultaneously by using multiple processes/processors. Each processor is dedicated to following tasks of the partitioned subdomain: updating thermophysical properties, assembling mass- and energy-balance equations, solving linear equation systems, and performing various other local computations. The linearized equation systems are solved in parallel with a parallel linear solver, using an efficient interprocess communication scheme. This new domain decomposition approach has been implemented into the TOUGH+HYDRATE code and has demonstrated excellent speedup and good scalability. In this paper, we will demonstrate applications for the new approach in simulating field-scale models for gas production from gas-hydrate deposits.

  3. Effects of atrazine on the proliferation and cytotoxicity of murine lymphocytes with the use of carboxyfluorescein succinimidyl ester-based flow cytometric approaches.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jinyao; Huo, Jiao; Jia, Zhenchao; Song, Yang; Li, Yan; Zhang, Lishi

    2015-02-01

    Atrazine (ATZ) is one of the most commonly applied herbicides worldwide. ATZ has been associated with adverse effects on the immune system; however, the mechanism of its immunotoxicity has not been completely elucidated. In this study, the immunotoxic effects of ATZ on murine splenic lymphocytes and magnetic bead-enriched NK cells were investigated in vitro with the use of carboxyfluorescein succinimidyl ester (CFDA-SE)-based flow cytometric approaches. Proliferation responses, NK cell activity, and T-cell early activation were determined with CFDA-SE loading, CFDA-SE/propidium iodide (PI) staining, and CD69+ expression, respectively. Cell apoptosis/cycle, reactive oxygen species (ROS), and mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) were evaluated using PI, 2',7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate, and rhodamine 123, respectively. The intracellular expressions of apoptosis-related Bcl-2 and caspase-3 were analyzed through intracellular staining and flow cytometry. Results showed that proliferation and NK cell activity were suppressed by ATZ treatment. Such suppression might be associated with the cell apoptosis induced by increased ROS and declined MMP. The underlying mechanism might be the induced caspase-3 expression and decreased Bcl-2 expression. ATZ could elicit immunotoxic effects on murine lymphocytes; its presence in the environment might compromise immune function in organisms. The flow cytometric methods presented in this study should be further investigated in immunotoxicology.

  4. Approach of Computational Fluid Dynamics of VOF Model in Two Phase flow through Porous Medium under Microgravity Condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasan, Raisul

    2016-07-01

    In this research paper firstly theoretical analysis and design of the porous matrix for filtration and selection of associated liquid (highly viscous and low viscous liquid) is carried out. Hence, porosity of the bed has been found out followed by a detailed CFD analysis of the flow to identify displacement structure (fingering: due to the nonlinear interactions among viscous, capillary and gravitational forces). Moreover, an experiment will be with synthetic porous medium consists of a single layer of glass beads which are then positioned homogeneously or non-homogeneously between two Perspex sheets and then fluid displacement structure/fingering will be photographed. Then the effort will be made to validate results with the experiment based photograph and then the CFD model will be extended to microgravity condition KEYWORDS: CFD, Fingering, microgravity, Non-homogeneously, Capillary .

  5. Analytical and Numerical Approaches to Squeezing Flow and Heat Transfer between Two Parallel Disks with Velocity Slip and Temperature Jump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amjad, Hussain; Syed Tauseef, Mohyud-Din; Taqi, Ahmed Cheema

    2012-11-01

    Analytic and numerical techniques are presented to analyze the influence of temperature and wall slip conditions on the unsteady flow and heat transfer via viscous fluid squeezed between two parallel disks in the presence of an applied magnetic field. The governing partial differential equations for momentum and heat transfer are reduced to a system of coupled nonlinear ordinary differential equations using similarity transformations. The homotopy analysis method (HAM) is then utilized to find explicit series solution of the resulting problem. The convergence of the obtained solution is carefully analyzed. To check the reliability of the method the same problem is also solved by using the shooting method and an excellent agreement is observed between the two sets of results. Influence of various parameters of practical importance on the velocity and temperature profiles is studied and portrayed graphically. Values of skin friction coefficient and local Nusselt number are tabulated by assigning different values to various emerging parameters.

  6. A kinetic-theory approach for computing chemical-reaction rates in upper-atmosphere hypersonic flows.

    PubMed

    Gallis, Michael A; Bond, Ryan B; Torczynski, John R

    2009-09-28

    Recently proposed molecular-level chemistry models that predict equilibrium and nonequilibrium reaction rates using only kinetic theory and fundamental molecular properties (i.e., no macroscopic reaction-rate information) are investigated for chemical reactions occurring in upper-atmosphere hypersonic flows. The new models are in good agreement with the measured Arrhenius rates for near-equilibrium conditions and with both measured rates and other theoretical models for far-from-equilibrium conditions. Additionally, the new models are applied to representative combustion and ionization reactions and are in good agreement with available measurements and theoretical models. Thus, molecular-level chemistry modeling provides an accurate method for predicting equilibrium and nonequilibrium chemical-reaction rates in gases.

  7. An efficient approach to study the pulsatile blood flow in femoral and coronary arteries by Differential Quadrature Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghasemi, Seiyed E.; Hatami, M.; Hatami, J.; Sahebi, S. A. R.; Ganji, D. D.

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, flow analysis for a non-Newtonian third grade blood in coronary and femoral arteries is simulated numerically. Blood is considered as the third grade non-Newtonian fluid under periodic body acceleration motion and pulsatile pressure gradient. Differential Quadrature Method (DQM) and Crank Nicholson Method (CNM) are used to solve the Partial Differential Equation (PDE) governing equation by which a good agreement between them was observed in the results. The influences of some physical parameters such as amplitude, lead angle and body acceleration frequency on non-dimensional velocity and profiles are considered. For instance, the results show that increasing the amplitude, Ag, and reducing the lead angle of body acceleration, ϕ, make higher velocity profiles in the center line of both arteries.

  8. A new automated approach to determine monosodium glutamate in dehydrated broths by using the flow-batch methodology.

    PubMed

    Acebal, Carolina C; Insausti, Matías; Pistonesi, Marcelo F; Lista, Adriana G; Band, Beatriz S Fernández

    2010-04-15

    The advantages of the flow-batch methodology were exploited to implement a simple system with nephelometric detection for the determination of monosodium glutamate (MSG) in food samples. The method is based on the inhibitory effect of the MSG over the crystallization of L-lysine in an isopropanol/acetone mixture. The calibration curve was prepared on-line. The method was linear over the range of 2.8 x 10(-3) to 1.1 x 10(-2)gL(-1) and a detection limit of 9.7 x 10(-5)gL(-1) was achieved. It was successfully applied to determine the MSG concentration in food samples, without a previous treatment. A recovery study was carried out on real samples and the percentages were between 98 and 106%.

  9. Understanding consumption-related sucralose emissions - A conceptual approach combining substance-flow analysis with sampling analysis.

    PubMed

    Neset, Tina-Simone Schmid; Singer, Heinz; Longrée, Philipp; Bader, Hans-Peter; Scheidegger, Ruth; Wittmer, Anita; Andersson, Jafet Clas Martin

    2010-07-15

    This paper explores the potential of combining substance-flow modelling with water and wastewater sampling to trace consumption-related substances emitted through the urban wastewater. The method is exemplified on sucralose. Sucralose is a chemical sweetener that is 600 times sweeter than sucrose and has been on the European market since 2004. As a food additive, sucralose has recently increased in usage in a number of foods, such as soft drinks, dairy products, candy and several dietary products. In a field campaign, sucralose concentrations were measured in the inflow and outflow of the local wastewater treatment plant in Linköping, Sweden, as well as upstream and downstream of the receiving stream and in Lake Roxen. This allows the loads emitted from the city to be estimated. A method consisting of solid-phase extraction followed by liquid chromatography and high resolution mass spectrometry was used to quantify the sucralose in the collected surface and wastewater samples. To identify and quantify the sucralose sources, a consumption analysis of households including small business enterprises was conducted as well as an estimation of the emissions from the local food industry. The application of a simple model including uncertainty and sensitivity analysis indicates that at present not one large source but rather several small sources contribute to the load coming from households, small business enterprises and industry. This is in contrast to the consumption pattern seen two years earlier, which was dominated by one product. The inflow to the wastewater treatment plant decreased significantly from other measurements made two years earlier. The study shows that the combination of substance-flow modelling with the analysis of the loads to the receiving waters helps us to understand consumption-related emissions. PMID:20447681

  10. Using the PPML approach for constructing a low-dissipation, operator-splitting scheme for numerical simulations of hydrodynamic flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulikov, Igor; Vorobyov, Eduard

    2016-07-01

    An approach for constructing a low-dissipation numerical method is described. The method is based on a combination of the operator-splitting method, Godunov method, and piecewise-parabolic method on the local stencil. Numerical method was tested on a standard suite of hydrodynamic test problems. In addition, the performance of the method is demonstrated on a global test problem showing the development of a spiral structure in a gravitationally unstable gaseous galactic disk.

  11. Managing Environmental Flows for Impounded Rivers in Semi-Arid Regions- A Habitat Suitability Index (HSI) Approach for the Assessment of River Habitat for Salmonid Populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pai, H.; Sivakumaran, K.; Villamizar, S. R.; Flanagan, J.; Guo, Q.; Harmon, T. C.

    2013-12-01

    Balancing ecosystem health in water-scarce, agriculturally dominated river basins remains a challenge. In dry water years, maintaining conditions for restored and sustained indigenous fish populations (a frequently used indicator for ecosystem health) is particularly challenging. Competing human demands include urban and agricultural water supplies, hydropower, and flood control. In many semi-arid regions, increasing drought intensity and frequency under future climate scenarios will combine with population increases to water scarcity. The goal of this work is to better understand how reservoir releases affect fish habitat and overall river aquatic ecosystem quality. Models integrating a diverse array of physical and biological processes and system state are used to forecast the river ecosystem response to changing drivers. We propose a distributed parameter-based Habitat Suitability Index (HSI) approach for assessing fish habitat quality. Our river ecosystem HSI maps are based on a combination of the following: (1) In situ data describing stream flow and water quality conditions; (2) Spatial observations, including surveyed cross-sections, aerial imagery and digital elevation maps (DEM) of the river and its riparian corridor; and (3) Simulated spatially distributed water depths, flow velocities, and temperatures estimated from 1D and 2D river flow and temperature models (HEC-RAS and CE-QUAL-W2, respectively). With respect to (2), image processing schemes are used to classify and map key habitat features, namely riparian edge and shallow underwater vegetation. HSI maps can be modified temporally to address specific life cycle requirements of indicator fish species. Results are presented for several reaches associated with the San Joaquin River Restoration Project, focusing on several components of the Chinook salmon life cycle. HSI maps and interpretations are presented in the context of a range of prescribed reservoir release hydrographs linked to California water

  12. Multi-parameter flow cytometry as a process analytical technology (PAT) approach for the assessment of bacterial ghost production.

    PubMed

    Langemann, Timo; Mayr, Ulrike Beate; Meitz, Andrea; Lubitz, Werner; Herwig, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Flow cytometry (FCM) is a tool for the analysis of single-cell properties in a cell suspension. In this contribution, we present an improved FCM method for the assessment of E-lysis in Enterobacteriaceae. The result of the E-lysis process is empty bacterial envelopes-called bacterial ghosts (BGs)-that constitute potential products in the pharmaceutical field. BGs have reduced light scattering properties when compared with intact cells. In combination with viability information obtained from staining samples with the membrane potential-sensitive fluorescent dye bis-(1,3-dibutylarbituric acid) trimethine oxonol (DiBAC4(3)), the presented method allows to differentiate between populations of viable cells, dead cells, and BGs. Using a second fluorescent dye RH414 as a membrane marker, non-cellular background was excluded from the data which greatly improved the quality of the results. Using true volumetric absolute counting, the FCM data correlated well with cell count data obtained from colony-forming units (CFU) for viable populations. Applicability of the method to several Enterobacteriaceae (different Escherichia coli strains, Salmonella typhimurium, Shigella flexneri 2a) could be shown. The method was validated as a resilient process analytical technology (PAT) tool for the assessment of E-lysis and for particle counting during 20-l batch processes for the production of Escherichia coli Nissle 1917 BGs. PMID:26521248

  13. Energy flow prediction in built-up structures through a hybrid finite element/wave and finite element approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Y.; Collet, M.; Ichchou, M.; Li, L.; Bareille, O.; Dimitrijevic, Z.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a rapid and accurate numerical tool for the energy flow evaluation in a periodic substructure from the near-field to the far-field domain. Here we suppose that the near-field part contains a point source characterized by the injected power in the structure. The near-field part is then modeled by Finite Element Method (FEM) while the periodic structure and the far-field part are regarded as waveguides and modeled by an enhanced Wave and Finite Element Method (WFEM). Enhancements are made on the eigenvalue scheme, the condensation of the unit cell and the consideration of a reduced wave basis. Efforts are made to adapt substructures modeled by different strategies in a multi-scale manner such that the final matrices dimensions of the built-up structure are largely reduced. The method is then validated numerically and theoretically. An application is presented, where a structural dynamical system coupled with periodic resistive piezoelectric shunts is discussed.

  14. Multi-parameter flow cytometry as a process analytical technology (PAT) approach for the assessment of bacterial ghost production.

    PubMed

    Langemann, Timo; Mayr, Ulrike Beate; Meitz, Andrea; Lubitz, Werner; Herwig, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Flow cytometry (FCM) is a tool for the analysis of single-cell properties in a cell suspension. In this contribution, we present an improved FCM method for the assessment of E-lysis in Enterobacteriaceae. The result of the E-lysis process is empty bacterial envelopes-called bacterial ghosts (BGs)-that constitute potential products in the pharmaceutical field. BGs have reduced light scattering properties when compared with intact cells. In combination with viability information obtained from staining samples with the membrane potential-sensitive fluorescent dye bis-(1,3-dibutylarbituric acid) trimethine oxonol (DiBAC4(3)), the presented method allows to differentiate between populations of viable cells, dead cells, and BGs. Using a second fluorescent dye RH414 as a membrane marker, non-cellular background was excluded from the data which greatly improved the quality of the results. Using true volumetric absolute counting, the FCM data correlated well with cell count data obtained from colony-forming units (CFU) for viable populations. Applicability of the method to several Enterobacteriaceae (different Escherichia coli strains, Salmonella typhimurium, Shigella flexneri 2a) could be shown. The method was validated as a resilient process analytical technology (PAT) tool for the assessment of E-lysis and for particle counting during 20-l batch processes for the production of Escherichia coli Nissle 1917 BGs.

  15. Single-phase and two-phase flow properties of mesaverde tight sandstone formation; random-network modeling approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bashtani, Farzad; Maini, Brij; Kantzas, Apostolos

    2016-08-01

    3D random networks are constructed in order to represent the tight Mesaverde formation which is located in north Wyoming, USA. The porous-space is represented by pore bodies of different shapes and sizes which are connected to each other by pore throats of varying length and diameter. Pore bodies are randomly distributed in space and their connectivity varies based on the connectivity number distribution which is used in order to generate the network. Network representations are then validated using publicly available mercury porosimetry experiments. The network modeling software solves the fundamental equations of two-phase immiscible flow incorporating wettability and contact angle variability. Quasi-static displacement is assumed. Single phase macroscopic properties (porosity, permeability) are calculated and whenever possible are compared to experimental data. Using this information drainage and imbibition capillary pressure, and relative permeability curves are predicted and (whenever possible) compared to experimental data. The calculated information is grouped and compared to available literature information on typical behavior of tight formations. Capillary pressure curve for primary drainage process is predicted and compared to experimental mercury porosimetry in order to validate the virtual porous media by history matching. Relative permeability curves are also calculated and presented.

  16. Flow Injection Photosensitized Chemiluminescence of Luminol with Cu(II)-Rose Bengal: Mechanistic Approach and Vitamin A and C Determination

    PubMed Central

    Asgher, Muhammad; Yaqoob, Mohammad; Nabi, Abdul; Siddiqi, Abdul Rauf

    2014-01-01

    Rose Bengal photosensitized flow injection chemiluminescence method is reported using luminol-Cu(II) for the determination of vitamins A and C in pharmaceutical formulations. The reaction is based on the enhancement effect of analyte in the production of anion radicals of Rose Bengal (RB•−) which rapidly interact with dissolved oxygen and generate superoxide anions radicals (O2•−) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Highly reactive hydroxyl radicals (•OH) were produced via dismutation of H2O2 by catalyst (Cu2+). The generated superoxide anions radicals and hydroxyl radicals thus oxidize luminol in alkaline medium to generate strong chemiluminescence. The limit of detection (3s of the blank, n = 6) of vitamins A and C and RB was found to be 0.008, 0.005, and 0.05 μg mL−1, respectively. The sample throughput of 70 h−1 for vitamins A and C and 30 h−1 for RB was found. Calibration curve was linear in the range of 0.05–15, 0.01–20, and 0.1–50 μg mL−1 for vitamins A and C and RB, respectively, with relative standard deviations (RSDs; n = 3) in the range 1.6–3.6%. The method was successfully applied to pharmaceutical formulations and the results obtained were in good agreement with the labeled values. PMID:25614739

  17. An integrated, multi-sensing approach to describe the dynamic relations between turbulence, fluid-forces, and reconfiguration of a submerged plant model in steady flows.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henry, Pierre-Yves; Aberle, Jochen; Dijkstra, Jasper; Myrhaug, Dag

    2016-04-01

    Aquatic vegetation plays a vital role in ecohydrological systems regulating many physical, chemical, and biological processes across a wide range of spatial and temporal scales. As a consequence, plant-flow interactions are of particular interest to a wide range of disciplines. While early studies of the interactions between vegetation and flowing water employed simplified and non-flexible structures such as rigid cylinders, recent studies have included flexible plants to identify the main characteristics of the hydrodynamics of vegetated flows. However, the description of plant reconfiguration has often been based on a static approach, i.e. considering the plant's deformation under a static load and neglecting turbulent fluctuations. Correlations between drag fluctuations, plant movements, and upstream turbulence were recently established showing that shear layer turbulence at the surface of the different plant elements (such as blades or stems) can contribute significantly to the dynamic behaviour of the plant. However, the relations between plant movement and force fluctuations might change under varying flow velocities, and although this point is crucial for mixing processes and plant dislodgement by fatigue, these aspects of fluid-structure interactions applied to aquatic vegetation remain largely unexplored. Using an innovative combination of sensing techniques in one set of experiments, this study investigates the relations between turbulence, fluctuating fluid forces and movements of a flexible cylindrical plant surrogate. A silicone-based flexible cylinder was attached at the bottom of a 1m wide flume in fully-developed uniform flow. The lower 22 cm of the plant surrogate were made of plain flexible silicone, while the higher 13cm included a casted rigid sensor, measuring accelerations at the tip of the surrogate. Forces were sampled at high frequencies at the surrogate's base by a 6-degrees-of-freedom force/torque sensor measuring down to the gram

  18. An integrated approach (remote sensing, geophysics, field) to assess the structural control of groundwater flow in Wadi Feiran basement complex, Sinai, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohamed, L.; Sultan, M.; Ahmed, M.; Zaki, A.

    2013-12-01

    The groundwater flow and potentiality for groundwater accumulation in the fractured basement rocks and the overlaying alluvial deposits were examined in Wadi Feiran basin using remote sensing (Landsat ETM, Ikonos, and Envisat, TRMM, and SIR-C radar images), field (well location, depth to water table), and geophysical (Very Low Frequency [VLF], magnetic) datasets. Our approach encompassed the following steps: (1) head data from 52 wells was utilized to build an approximate potentiometric surface map for the basin; (2) Landsat ETM, 3D, hill shade, Ikonos and SIR-C radar images were used to delineate structures in the study area including faults and dikes; (3) major precipitation events were identified from three-hourly TRMM data; and (4) false color composite images were generated from pairs of multi-temporal Envisat images acquired before and after a precipitation event (17th and 18th of January 2010) to identify structures (faults and dykes) that show an increase in moisture content and radar reflectivity following precipitation events and persisting for periods of days to months. Examination of the radar images revealed: (1) a network of highly reflective interconnected structures and channels (wadis) that are here interpreted to indicate preferred groundwater flow direction in the study area; and (2) many of the ide