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Sample records for flow microfluorometric approaches

  1. Microfluorometric analyses of glycogen in freshly dissected, single skeletal muscle fibres of the cane toad using a mechanically skinned fibre preparation.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, L T; Stephenson, D G; Stephenson, G M

    1998-08-01

    The main objective of this study was to analyse glycogen in single muscle fibres, using a recently developed microfluorometric method which detects subpicomol amounts of NADPH, glucose and glycogen (as glucosyl units) (detection limit 0.16-0.17 pmol in a 25 nl sample) without fluorochrome amplification. The fibres were freshly dissected from the twitch region of the iliofibularis muscle of the cane toad (Bufo marinus), and were mechanically skinned under paraffin oil to gain access to the intracellular compartments. The results show that (1) glycogen concentrations in toad skeletal muscle fibres range between 25.8 and 369 mmol glucosyl units/litre fibre volume; (2) there is a large variation in glycogen content between individual fibres from the iliofibularis muscle of one animal; (3) there are seasonal differences in the glycogen content of toad single muscle fibres; (4) the total amount of glycogen in single muscle fibres of the toad does not decrease significantly when storing the tissue, under paraffin oil, at 20-25 degree C for up to 6 h or at 4 degree C for up to 24 h; and (5) 15-26% of fibre glycogen can be washed in an aqueous solution at pH 5-7, within 5 min, while 74-85% of fibre glycogen remains associated with the washed skinned fibre, even after 40 min exposure of the skinned fibre preparation to the aqueous environment. The retention of most glycogen in the fibre preparation after mechanical removal of the plasma membrane and extensive washing indicates that in toad skeletal muscle fibres the largest proportion of glycogen is tightly bound to intracellular structures. The results also show that the skinned muscle fibre preparation is well suited for microfluorometric glycogen determination, since low molecular weight non-glycogen contributors to the fluorescence signal can be removed from the myoplasmic space prior to the glycogen hydrolysis step.

  2. Lattice Boltzmann approach for complex nonequilibrium flows.

    PubMed

    Montessori, A; Prestininzi, P; La Rocca, M; Succi, S

    2015-10-01

    We present a lattice Boltzmann realization of Grad's extended hydrodynamic approach to nonequilibrium flows. This is achieved by using higher-order isotropic lattices coupled with a higher-order regularization procedure. The method is assessed for flow across parallel plates and three-dimensional flows in porous media, showing excellent agreement of the mass flow with analytical and numerical solutions of the Boltzmann equation across the full range of Knudsen numbers, from the hydrodynamic regime to ballistic motion.

  3. Multidomain approach for calculating compressible flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cambier, L.; Chazzi, W.; Veuillot, J. P.; Viviand, H.

    1982-01-01

    A multidomain approach for calculating compressible flows by using unsteady or pseudo-unsteady methods is presented. This approach is based on a general technique of connecting together two domains in which hyperbolic systems (that may differ) are solved with the aid of compatibility relations associated with these systems. Some examples of this approach's application to calculating transonic flows in ideal fluids are shown, particularly the adjustment of shock waves. The approach is then applied to treating a shock/boundary layer interaction problem in a transonic channel.

  4. Multigrid Approach to Incompressible Viscous Cavity Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, William A.

    1996-01-01

    Two-dimensional incompressible viscous driven-cavity flows are computed for Reynolds numbers on the range 100-20,000 using a loosely coupled, implicit, second-order centrally-different scheme. Mesh sequencing and three-level V-cycle multigrid error smoothing are incorporated into the symmetric Gauss-Seidel time-integration algorithm. Parametrics on the numerical parameters are performed, achieving reductions in solution times by more than 60 percent with the full multigrid approach. Details of the circulation patterns are investigated in cavities of 2-to-1, 1-to-1, and 1-to-2 depth to width ratios.

  5. Mixture modeling approach to flow cytometry data.

    PubMed

    Boedigheimer, Michael J; Ferbas, John

    2008-05-01

    Flow Cytometry has become a mainstay technique for measuring fluorescent and physical attributes of single cells in a suspended mixture. These data are reduced during analysis using a manual or semiautomated process of gating. Despite the need to gate data for traditional analyses, it is well recognized that analyst-to-analyst variability can impact the dataset. Moreover, cells of interest can be inadvertently excluded from the gate, and relationships between collected variables may go unappreciated because they were not included in the original analysis plan. A multivariate non-gating technique was developed and implemented that accomplished the same goal as traditional gating while eliminating many weaknesses. The procedure was validated against traditional gating for analysis of circulating B cells in normal donors (n = 20) and persons with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (n = 42). The method recapitulated relationships in the dataset while providing for an automated and objective assessment of the data. Flow cytometry analyses are amenable to automated analytical techniques that are not predicated on discrete operator-generated gates. Such alternative approaches can remove subjectivity in data analysis, improve efficiency and may ultimately enable construction of large bioinformatics data systems for more sophisticated approaches to hypothesis testing.

  6. A new numerical approach for compressible viscous flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, J. C.; Lekoudis, S. G.

    1982-01-01

    A numerical approach for computing unsteady compressible viscous flows was developed. This approach offers the capability of confining the region of computation to the viscous region of the flow. The viscous region is defined as the region where the vorticity is nonnegligible and the difference in dilatation between the potential flow and the real flow around the same geometry is also nonnegligible. The method was developed and tested. Also, an application of the procedure to the solution of the steady Navier-Stokes equations for incompressible internal flows is presented.

  7. Validation of Modeling Flow Approaching Navigation Locks

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-08-01

    instrumentation, direction vernier . ........................................................................ 8  Figure 11. Plan A lock approach, upstream approach...13-9 8 Figure 9. Tools and instrumentation, bracket attached to rail. Figure 10. Tools and instrumentation, direction vernier . Numerical model

  8. Combined AIE/EBE/GMRES approach to incompressible flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liou, J.; Tezduyar, T. E.

    Adaptive implicit-explicit (AIE), grouped element-by-element (GEBE), and generalized minimum residuals (GMRES) solution techniques for incompressible flows are combined. In this approach, the GEBE and GMRES iteration methods are employed to solve the equation systems resulting from the implicitly treated elements, and therefore no direct solution effort is involved. The benchmarking results demonstrate that this approach can substantially reduce the CPU time and memory requirements in large-scale flow problems. Although the description of the concepts and the numerical demonstration are based on the incompressible flows, the approach presented here is applicable to larger class of problems in computational mechanics.

  9. Magnetohydrodynamic equilibria with incompressible flows: Symmetry approach

    SciTech Connect

    Cicogna, G.; Pegoraro, F.

    2015-02-15

    We identify and discuss a family of azimuthally symmetric, incompressible, magnetohydrodynamic plasma equilibria with poloidal and toroidal flows in terms of solutions of the Generalized Grad Shafranov (GGS) equation. These solutions are derived by exploiting the incompressibility assumption, in order to rewrite the GGS equation in terms of a different dependent variable, and the continuous Lie symmetry properties of the resulting equation and, in particular, a special type of “weak” symmetries.

  10. A Logical Approach to the Statement of Cash Flows

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petro, Fred; Gean, Farrell

    2014-01-01

    Of the three financial statements in financial reporting, the Statement of Cash Flows (SCF) is perhaps the most challenging. The most difficult aspect of the SCF is in developing an understanding of how previous transactions are finalized in this document. The purpose of this paper is to logically explain the indirect approach of cash flow whereby…

  11. Subsurface Flow and Transport: A Stochastic Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desbarats, Alexandre

    Anyone who has examined core or petrophysical logs from well bores has wondered at the rhythmic successions of sedimentary fades and has puzzled at their sudden disruption or reappearance. Such wonderment is no doubt shared by those who have stood at a quarry face gazing up at the intricate hierarchy of depositional patterns and the varied textures of sediments. A fortunate few have even slogged along a mine drift and observed at close hand the perplexing relationship between the geological fabric of a rock mass and occurrences of groundwater inflow. Happily, the heterogeneity of geological materials is now widely recognized and efforts over the last 20 years have been concerned with its incorporation into models of fluid flow and solute transport in the subsurface. These research efforts are, at least in part, driven by acute societal concerns over the contamination of groundwater resources and proposed plans for the disposal of nuclear and other toxic wastes in the subsurface.

  12. An active, collaborative approach to learning skills in flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Fuller, Kathryn; Linden, Matthew D; Lee-Pullen, Tracey; Fragall, Clayton; Erber, Wendy N; Röhrig, Kimberley J

    2016-06-01

    Advances in science education research have the potential to improve the way students learn to perform scientific interpretations and understand science concepts. We developed active, collaborative activities to teach skills in manipulating flow cytometry data using FlowJo software. Undergraduate students were given compensated clinical flow cytometry listmode output (FCS) files and asked to design a gating strategy to diagnose patients with different hematological malignancies on the basis of their immunophenotype. A separate cohort of research trainees was given uncompensated data files on which they performed their own compensation, calculated the antibody staining index, designed a sequential gating strategy, and quantified rare immune cell subsets. Student engagement, confidence, and perceptions of flow cytometry were assessed using a survey. Competency against the learning outcomes was assessed by asking students to undertake tasks that required understanding of flow cytometry dot plot data and gating sequences. The active, collaborative approach allowed students to achieve learning outcomes not previously possible with traditional teaching formats, for example, having students design their own gating strategy, without forgoing essential outcomes such as the interpretation of dot plots. In undergraduate students, favorable perceptions of flow cytometry as a field and as a potential career choice were correlated with student confidence but not the ability to perform flow cytometry data analysis. We demonstrate that this new pedagogical approach to teaching flow cytometry is beneficial for student understanding and interpretation of complex concepts. It should be considered as a useful new method for incorporating complex data analysis tasks such as flow cytometry into curricula.

  13. A flow cytometric approach to quantify biofilms.

    PubMed

    Kerstens, Monique; Boulet, Gaëlle; Van Kerckhoven, Marian; Clais, Sofie; Lanckacker, Ellen; Delputte, Peter; Maes, Louis; Cos, Paul

    2015-07-01

    Since biofilms are important in many clinical, industrial, and environmental settings, reliable methods to quantify these sessile microbial populations are crucial. Most of the currently available techniques do not allow the enumeration of the viable cell fraction within the biofilm and are often time consuming. This paper proposes flow cytometry (FCM) using the single-stain viability dye TO-PRO(®)-3 iodide as a fast and precise alternative. Mature biofilms of Candida albicans and Escherichia coli were used to optimize biofilm removal and dissociation, as a single-cell suspension is needed for accurate FCM enumeration. To assess the feasibility of FCM quantification of biofilms, E. coli and C. albicans biofilms were analyzed using FCM and crystal violet staining at different time points. A combination of scraping and rinsing proved to be the most efficient technique for biofilm removal. Sonicating for 10 min eliminated the remaining aggregates, resulting in a single-cell suspension. Repeated FCM measurements of biofilm samples revealed a good intraday precision of approximately 5 %. FCM quantification and the crystal violet assay yielded similar biofilm growth curves for both microorganisms, confirming the applicability of our technique. These results show that FCM using TO-PRO(®)-3 iodide as a single-stain viability dye is a valid fast alternative for the quantification of viable cells in a biofilm.

  14. An approach to versatile highly-uniform MOVPE growth: the flow controlled stagnation point flow reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondo, Makoto; Kuramata, Akito; Fujii, Takuya; Anayama, Chikashi; Okazaki, Jiro; Sekiguchi, Hiroshi; Tanahashi, Toshiyuki; Yamazaki, Susumu; Nakajima, Kazuo

    1992-11-01

    We present an approach to versatile highly-uniform MOVPE growth using the controlled stagnation point flow reactor. Our approach for uniform growth involves two concepts: (1) realizing the stagnation point flow condition in a vertical reactor configuration and (2) introducing a method for versatile flow-field control using the flow-controlled multiple gas-injector technique. The versatility of the flow-control technique was investigated by evaluating how radial deposition rate uniformity is affected by variation in several hydrodynamic and reactor configuration factors: the inlet flow rate, operating pressure, susceptor temperature, susceptor rotation speed, and the inlet and susceptor separation. We confirmed that a spatially uniform deposition rate can be obtained over a wide range of hydrodynamic and configuration parameters, demonstrating that the flow-control technique can provide a stable stagnation point flow field. Even when the ideal stagnation point flow-field is disturbed, for example, by high temperature susceptor heating, it could be completely compensated by adjusting the flow rate ratio for multiple injectors, showing our technique's ability to control flow-fields. By using this technique, we obtained excellent uniformities in both layer thickness and alloy composition for two important materials - GaInAsP and AlGaInP - in the same reactor.

  15. Steady shear flow thermodynamics based on a canonical distribution approach.

    PubMed

    Taniguchi, Tooru; Morriss, Gary P

    2004-11-01

    A nonequilibrium steady-state thermodynamics to describe shear flow is developed using a canonical distribution approach. We construct a canonical distribution for shear flow based on the energy in the moving frame using the Lagrangian formalism of the classical mechanics. From this distribution, we derive the Evans-Hanley shear flow thermodynamics, which is characterized by the first law of thermodynamics dE=TdS-Qdgamma relating infinitesimal changes in energy E, entropy S, and shear rate gamma with kinetic temperature T. Our central result is that the coefficient Q is given by Helfand's moment for viscosity. This approach leads to thermodynamic stability conditions for shear flow, one of which is equivalent to the positivity of the correlation function for Q. We show the consistency of this approach with the Kawasaki distribution function for shear flow, from which a response formula for viscosity is derived in the form of a correlation function for the time-derivative of Q. We emphasize the role of the external work required to sustain the steady shear flow in this approach, and show theoretically that the ensemble average of its power W must be non-negative. A nonequilibrium entropy, increasing in time, is introduced, so that the amount of heat based on this entropy is equal to the average of W. Numerical results from nonequilibrium molecular-dynamics simulation of two-dimensional many-particle systems with soft-core interactions are presented which support our interpretation.

  16. A perturbation-theoretic approach to Lagrangian flow networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujiwara, Naoya; Kirchen, Kathrin; Donges, Jonathan F.; Donner, Reik V.

    2017-03-01

    Complex network approaches have been successfully applied for studying transport processes in complex systems ranging from road, railway, or airline infrastructures over industrial manufacturing to fluid dynamics. Here, we utilize a generic framework for describing the dynamics of geophysical flows such as ocean currents or atmospheric wind fields in terms of Lagrangian flow networks. In this approach, information on the passive advection of particles is transformed into a Markov chain based on transition probabilities of particles between the volume elements of a given partition of space for a fixed time step. We employ perturbation-theoretic methods to investigate the effects of modifications of transport processes in the underlying flow for three different problem classes: efficient absorption (corresponding to particle trapping or leaking), constant input of particles (with additional source terms modeling, e.g., localized contamination), and shifts of the steady state under probability mass conservation (as arising if the background flow is perturbed itself). Our results demonstrate that in all three cases, changes to the steady state solution can be analytically expressed in terms of the eigensystem of the unperturbed flow and the perturbation itself. These results are potentially relevant for developing more efficient strategies for coping with contaminations of fluid or gaseous media such as ocean and atmosphere by oil spills, radioactive substances, non-reactive chemicals, or volcanic aerosols.

  17. Computational approach for probing the flow through artificial heart devices.

    PubMed

    Kiris, C; Kwak, D; Rogers, S; Chang, I D

    1997-11-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) has become an indispensable part of aerospace research and design. The solution procedure for incompressible Navier-Stokes equations can be used for biofluid mechanics research. The computational approach provides detailed knowledge of the flowfield complementary to that obtained by experimental measurements. This paper illustrates the extension of CFD techniques to artificial heart flow simulation. Unsteady incompressible Navier-Stokes equations written in three-dimensional generalized curvilinear coordinates are solved iteratively at each physical time step until the incompressibility condition is satisfied. The solution method is based on the pseudocompressibility approach. It uses an implicit upwind-differencing scheme together with the Gauss-Seidel line-relaxation method. The efficiency and robustness of the time-accurate formulation of the numerical algorithm are tested by computing the flow through model geometries. A channel flow with a moving indentation is computed and validated by experimental measurements and other numerical solutions. In order to handle the geometric complexity and the moving boundary problems, a zonal method and an overlapped grid embedding scheme are employed, respectively. Steady-state solutions for the flow through a tilting-disk heart valve are compared with experimental measurements. Good agreement is obtained. Aided by experimental data, the flow through an entire Penn State artificial heart model is computed.

  18. A Galerkin least squares approach to viscoelastic flow.

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, Rekha R.; Schunk, Peter Randall

    2015-10-01

    A Galerkin/least-squares stabilization technique is applied to a discrete Elastic Viscous Stress Splitting formulation of for viscoelastic flow. From this, a possible viscoelastic stabilization method is proposed. This method is tested with the flow of an Oldroyd-B fluid past a rigid cylinder, where it is found to produce inaccurate drag coefficients. Furthermore, it fails for relatively low Weissenberg number indicating it is not suited for use as a general algorithm. In addition, a decoupled approach is used as a way separating the constitutive equation from the rest of the system. A Pressure Poisson equation is used when the velocity and pressure are sought to be decoupled, but this fails to produce a solution when inflow/outflow boundaries are considered. However, a coupled pressure-velocity equation with a decoupled constitutive equation is successful for the flow past a rigid cylinder and seems to be suitable as a general-use algorithm.

  19. A novel approach for Doppler blood flow measurement.

    PubMed

    McNamara, D M; Goli, A; Ziarani, A K

    2008-01-01

    A new approach to frequency estimation for the velocity estimation in Doppler ultrasound blood flow analysis is presented. The basis of the approach is an adaptive sinusoid-tracking algorithm which is effective in extracting nonstationary signals from within noise and estimating their time-varying parameters, such as the frequency, over time. The preliminary studies conducted using simulated signals show the potential of this approach in estimating Doppler frequency shifts under noisy conditions. A qualitative comparison with the short-time Fourier transform (STFT) is presented to show the advantages of the proposed technique over the STFT. The proposed approach offers advantages over conventional time-frequency analysis techniques in terms of high time-frequency resolution and high noise immunity.

  20. A Shallow Layer Approach for Geo-flow emplacement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, A.; Folch, A.; Mecedonio, G.

    2009-04-01

    Geophysical flows such as lahars or lava flows severely threat the communities located on or near the volcano flanks. Risks and damages caused by the propagation of this kind of flows require a quantitative description of this phenomenon and reliable tools for forecasting their emplacement. Computational models are a valuable tool for planning risk mitigation countermeasures, such as human intervention to force flow diversion, artificial barriers, and allow for significant economical and social benefits. A FORTRAN 90 code based on a Shallow Layer Approach for Geo-flows (SLAG) for describing transport and emplacement of diluted lahars, water and lava was developed in both serial and parallel version. Three rheological models, such as those describing i) a viscous, ii) a turbulent, and iii) a dilatant flow respectively, were implemented in order to describe transport of lavas, water and diluted lahars. The code was made user-friendly by creating some interfaces that allow the user to easily define the problem, extract and interpolate the topography of the simulation domain. Moreover SLAG outputs can be written in both GRD format (e.g., Surfer), NetCDF format, or visualized directly in GoogleEarth. In SLAG the governing equations were treated using a Godunov splitting method following George (2008) algorithm based on a Riemann solver for the shallow water equations that decomposes an augmented state variable the depth, momentum, momentum flux, and bathymetry into four propagating discontinuities or waves. For our application, the algorithm was generalized for solving the energy equation. For validating the code in simulating real geophysical flows, we performed few simulations the lava flow event of the the 3rd and 4th January 1992 Etna eruption, the July 2001 Etna lava flows, January 2002 Nyragongo lava flows and few test cases for simulating transport of diluted lahars. Ref: George, D.L. (2008), Augmented Riemann Solvers for the Shallow Water Equations over Variable

  1. A conservative approach for flow field calculations on multiple grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kathong, Monchai; Tiwari, Surendra N.

    1988-01-01

    In the computation of flow fields about complex configurations, it is very difficult to construct body-fitted coordinate systems. An alternative approach is to use several grids at once, each of which is generated independently. This procedure is called the multiple grids or zonal grids approach and its applications are investigated in this study. The method follows the conservative approach and provides conservation of fluxes at grid interfaces. The Euler equations are solved numerically on such grids for various configurations. The numerical scheme used is the finite-volume technique with a three-state Runge-Kutta time integration. The code is vectorized and programmed to run on the CDC VPS-32 computer. Some steady state solutions of the Euler equations are presented and discussed.

  2. A hybrid particle/continuum approach for nonequilibrium hypersonic flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wen-Lan

    A hybrid particle-continuum computational framework is developed and presented for simulating nonequilibrium hypersonic flows, aimed to be more accurate than conventional continuum methods and faster than particle methods. The frame work consists of the direct simulation Monte Carlo-Information Preservation (DSMC-IP) method coupled with a Navier-Stokes solver. Since the DSMC-IP method provides the macroscopic information at each time step, determination of the continuum fluxes across the interface between the particle and continuum domains becomes straightforward. Buffer and reservoir calls are introduced in the continuum domain and work as an extension of the particle domain. At the end of the particle movement phase, particles in either particle or buffer cells are retained. All simulated particles in the reservoir cells are first deleted for each time, step and re-generated based on the local cell values. The microscopic velocities for the newly generated particles are initialized to the Chapman-Enskog distribution using an acceptance-rejection scheme. Continuum breakdown in a flow is defined as when the continuum solution departs from the particle solution to at least 5%. Numerical investigations show that a Knudsen-number-like parameter can best predict the continuum breakdown in the flows of interest. Numerical experiments of hypersonic flows over a simple blunted cone and a much more complex hollow cylinder/flare are conducted. The solutions for the two geometries considered from the hybrid framework are compared with experimental data and pure particle solutions. Generally speaking, it is concluded that the hybrid approach works quite well. In the blunted cone flow, numerical accuracy is improved when 10 layers of buffer cells are employed and the continuum breakdown cut-off value is set to be 0.03. In the hollow cylinder/flare hybrid simulation, the size of the separation zone near the conjunction of the cylinder and flare is improved from the initial

  3. A hydrometeorological forecasting approach for basins with complex flow regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zarkadoulas, Akis; Mantesi, Konstantina; Efstratiadis, Andreas; Koussis, Antonis; Mazi, Aikaterini; Katsanos, Demetris; Koukouvinos, Antonis; Koutsoyiannis, Demetris

    2015-04-01

    The combined use of weather forecasting models and hydrological models in flood risk estimations is an established technique, with several successful applications worldwide. However, most known hydrometeorological forecasting systems have been established in large rivers with perpetual flow. Experience from small- and medium-scale basins, which are often affected by flash floods, is very limited. In this work we investigate the perspectives of hydrometeorological forecasting, by emphasizing two issues: (a) which modelling approach can credibly represent the complex dynamics of basins with highly variable runoff (intermittent or ephemeral); and (b) which transformation of point-precipitation forecasts provides the most reliable estimations of spatially aggregated data, to be used as inputs to semi-distributed hydrological models. Using as case studies the Sarantapotamos river basin, in Eastern Greece (145 km2), and the Nedontas river basin, in SW Peloponnese (120 km2), we demonstrate the advantages of continuous simulation through the HYDROGEIOS model. This employs conjunctive modelling of surface and groundwater flows and their interactions (percolation, infiltration, underground losses), which are key processes in river basins characterized by significantly variability of runoff. The model was calibrated against hourly flow data at two and three hydrometric stations, respectively, for a 3-year period (2011-2014). Next we attempted to reproduce the most intense flood events of that period, by substituting observed rainfall by forecast scenarios. In this respect, we used consecutive point forecasts of a 6-hour lead time, provided by the numerical weather prediction model WRF (Advanced Research version), dynamically downscaled from the ~1° forecast of GSF-NCEP/NOAA successively first to ~18 km, then to ~6 km and ultimately at the horizontal grid resolution of 2x2 km2. We examined alternative spatial integration approaches, using as reference the rainfall stations

  4. Approaches to the simulation of unconfined flow and perched groundwater flow in MODFLOW.

    PubMed

    Bedekar, Vivek; Niswonger, Richard G; Kipp, Kenneth; Panday, Sorab; Tonkin, Matthew

    2012-01-01

    Various approaches have been proposed to manage the nonlinearities associated with the unconfined flow equation and to simulate perched groundwater conditions using the MODFLOW family of codes. The approaches comprise a variety of numerical techniques to prevent dry cells from becoming inactive and to achieve a stable solution focused on formulations of the unconfined, partially-saturated, groundwater flow equation. Keeping dry cells active avoids a discontinuous head solution which in turn improves the effectiveness of parameter estimation software that relies on continuous derivatives. Most approaches implement an upstream weighting of intercell conductance and Newton-Raphson linearization to obtain robust convergence. In this study, several published approaches were implemented in a stepwise manner into MODFLOW for comparative analysis. First, a comparative analysis of the methods is presented using synthetic examples that create convergence issues or difficulty in handling perched conditions with the more common dry-cell simulation capabilities of MODFLOW. Next, a field-scale three-dimensional simulation is presented to examine the stability and performance of the discussed approaches in larger, practical, simulation settings.

  5. Approaches to the simulation of unconfined flow and perched groundwater flow in MODFLOW

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bedekar, Vivek; Niswonger, Richard G.; Kipp, Kenneth; Panday, Sorab; Tonkin, Matthew

    2012-01-01

    Various approaches have been proposed to manage the nonlinearities associated with the unconfined flow equation and to simulate perched groundwater conditions using the MODFLOW family of codes. The approaches comprise a variety of numerical techniques to prevent dry cells from becoming inactive and to achieve a stable solution focused on formulations of the unconfined, partially-saturated, groundwater flow equation. Keeping dry cells active avoids a discontinuous head solution which in turn improves the effectiveness of parameter estimation software that relies on continuous derivatives. Most approaches implement an upstream weighting of intercell conductance and Newton-Raphson linearization to obtain robust convergence. In this study, several published approaches were implemented in a stepwise manner into MODFLOW for comparative analysis. First, a comparative analysis of the methods is presented using synthetic examples that create convergence issues or difficulty in handling perched conditions with the more common dry-cell simulation capabilities of MODFLOW. Next, a field-scale three-dimensional simulation is presented to examine the stability and performance of the discussed approaches in larger, practical, simulation settings.

  6. Compositional Space Parameterization Approach for Reservoir Flow Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voskov, D.

    2011-12-01

    Phase equilibrium calculations are the most challenging part of a compositional flow simulation. For every gridblock and at every time step, the number of phases and their compositions must be computed for the given overall composition, temperature, and pressure conditions. The conventional approach used in petroleum industry is based on performing a phase-stability test, and solving the fugacity constraints together with the coupled nonlinear flow equations when the gridblock has more than one phase. The multi-phase compositional space can be parameterized in terms of tie-simplexes. For example, a tie-triangle can be used such that its interior encloses the three-phase region, and the edges represent the boundary with specific two-phase regions. The tie-simplex parameterization can be performed for pressure, temperature, and overall composition. The challenge is that all of these parameters can change considerably during the course of a simulation. It is possible to prove that the tie-simplexes change continuously with respect to pressure, temperature, and overall composition. The continuity of the tie-simplex parameterization allows for interpolation using discrete representations of the tie-simplex space. For variations of composition, a projection to the nearest tie-simplex is used, and if the tie-simplex is within a predefined tolerance, it can be used directly to identify the phase-state of this composition. In general, our parameterization approach can be seen as the generalization of negative flash idea for systems with two or more phases. Theory of dispersion-free compositional displacements, as well as computational experience of general-purpose compositional flow simulation indicates that the displacement path in compositional space is determined by a limited number of tie-simplexes. Therefore, only few tie-simplex tables are required to parameterize the entire displacement. The small number of tie-simplexes needed in a course of a simulation motivates

  7. Cryogenic parallel, single phase flows: an analytical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eichhorn, R.

    2017-02-01

    Managing the cryogenic flows inside a state-of-the-art accelerator cryomodule has become a demanding endeavour: In order to build highly efficient modules, all heat transfers are usually intercepted at various temperatures. For a multi-cavity module, operated at 1.8 K, this requires intercepts at 4 K and at 80 K at different locations with sometimes strongly varying heat loads which for simplicity reasons are operated in parallel. This contribution will describe an analytical approach, based on optimization theories.

  8. Transformation approaches for simulating flow in variably saturated porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Glenn A.; Miller, Cass T.; Kelley, C. T.

    2000-04-01

    Sharp fronts with rapid changes in fluid saturations over short distance and timescales often exist in multiphase flow in subsurface systems. Such highly nonlinear problems are notoriously difficult to solve, and standard solution approaches are often inefficient and unreliable. We summarize four existing and one new transformation method (IT2) for solving Richards'; equation within a common framework and compare performance for a range of medium properties and simulation conditions. The new IT2 transform is defined as a linear combination of volumetric water fraction of the aqueous phase and integrated hydraulic conductivity terms. We show that transformation methods can significantly improve solution efficiency and robustness compared to standard solution approaches; optimal transformation parameters depend upon auxiliary conditions, medium properties, and spatial and temporal discretization and are difficult to evaluate a priori; and IT2 compares favorably with existing transforms.

  9. A scalable approach for high throughput branch flow filtration.

    PubMed

    Inglis, David W; Herman, Nick

    2013-05-07

    Microfluidic continuous flow filtration methods have the potential for very high size resolution using minimum feature sizes that are larger than the separation size, thereby circumventing the problem of clogging. Branch flow filtration is particularly promising because it has an unlimited dynamic range (ratio of largest passable particle to the smallest separated particle) but suffers from very poor volume throughput because when many branches are used, they cannot be identical if each is to have the same size cut-off. We describe a new iterative approach to the design of branch filtration devices able to overcome this limitation without large dead volumes. This is demonstrated by numerical modelling, fabrication and testing of devices with 20 branches, with dynamic ranges up to 6.9, and high filtration ratios (14-29%) on beads and fungal spores. The filters have a sharp size cutoff (10× depletion for 12% size difference), with large particle rejection equivalent to a 20th order Butterworth low pass filter. The devices are fully scalable, enabling higher throughput and smaller cutoff sizes and they are compatible with ultra low cost fabrication.

  10. Solving the power flow equations: a monotone operator approach

    SciTech Connect

    Dvijotham, Krishnamurthy; Low, Steven; Chertkov, Michael

    2015-07-21

    The AC power flow equations underlie all operational aspects of power systems. They are solved routinely in operational practice using the Newton-Raphson method and its variants. These methods work well given a good initial “guess” for the solution, which is always available in normal system operations. However, with the increase in levels of intermittent generation, the assumption of a good initial guess always being available is no longer valid. In this paper, we solve this problem using the theory of monotone operators. We show that it is possible to compute (using an offline optimization) a “monotonicity domain” in the space of voltage phasors. Given this domain, there is a simple efficient algorithm that will either find a solution in the domain, or provably certify that no solutions exist in it. We validate the approach on several IEEE test cases and demonstrate that the offline optimization can be performed tractably and the computed “monotonicity domain” includes all practically relevant power flow solutions.

  11. Flow cytometric and laser scanning microscopic approaches in epigenetics research.

    PubMed

    Szekvolgyi, Lorant; Imre, Laszlo; Minh, Doan Xuan Quang; Hegedus, Eva; Bacso, Zsolt; Szabo, Gabor

    2009-01-01

    Our understanding of epigenetics has been transformed in recent years by the advance of technological possibilities based primarily on a powerful tool, chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP). However, in many cases, the detection of epigenetic changes requires methods providing a high-throughput (HTP) platform. Cytometry has opened a novel approach for the quantitative measurement of molecules, including PCR products, anchored to appropriately addressed microbeads (Pataki et al. 2005. Cytometry 68, 45-52). Here we show selected examples for the utility of two different cytometry-based platforms of epigenetic analysis: ChIP-on-beads, a flow-cytometric test of local histone modifications (Szekvolgyi et al. 2006. Cytometry 69, 1086-1091), and the laser scanning cytometry-based measurement of global epigenetic modifications that might help predict clinical behavior in different pathological conditions. We anticipate that such alternative tools may shortly become indispensable in clinical practice, translating the systematic screening of epigenetic tags from basic research into routine diagnostics of HTP demand.

  12. Unsteady flow phenomena in human undulatory swimming: a numerical approach.

    PubMed

    Pacholak, Steffen; Hochstein, Stefan; Rudert, Alexander; Brücker, Christoph

    2014-06-01

    The undulatory underwater sequence is one of the most important phases in competitive swimming. An understanding of the recurrent vortex dynamics around the human body and their generation could therefore be used to improve swimming techniques. In order to produce a dynamic model, we applied human joint kinematics to three-dimensional (3D) body scans of a female swimmer. The flow around this dynamic model was then calculated using computational fluid dynamics with the aid of moving 3D meshes. Evaluation of the numerical results delivered by the various motion cycles identified characteristic vortex structures for each of the cycles, which exhibited increasing intensity and drag influence. At maximum thrust, drag forces appear to be 12 times higher than those of a passive gliding swimmer. As far as we know, this is the first disclosure of vortex rings merging into vortex tubes in the wake after vortex recapturing. All unsteady structures were visualized using a modified Q-criterion also incorporated into our methods. At the very least, our approach is likely to be suited to further studies examining swimmers engaging in undulatory swimming during training or competition.

  13. Hydrodynamic radius determination with asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation using decaying cross-flows. Part I. A theoretical approach.

    PubMed

    Håkansson, Andreas; Magnusson, Emma; Bergenståhl, Björn; Nilsson, Lars

    2012-08-31

    Direct determination of hydrodynamic radius from retention time is an advantage of the field-flow fractionation techniques. However, this is not always completely straight forward since non-idealities exist and assumptions have been made in deriving the retention equations. In this study we investigate the effect on accuracy from two factors: (1) level of sophistication of the equations used to determine channel height from a calibration experiment and (2) the influence of secondary relaxation on the accuracy of hydrodynamic radius determination. A new improved technique for estimating the channel height from calibration experiments is suggested. It is concluded that severe systematic error can arise if the most common channel height equations are used and an alternative more rigorous approach is described. For secondary relaxation it is concluded that this effect increases with the cross-flow decay rate. The secondary relaxation effect is quantified for different conditions. This is part one of two. In the second part the determination of hydrodynamic radius are evaluated experimentally under similar conditions.

  14. Flow field design development using the segmented cell approach

    SciTech Connect

    Bender, G.; Ramsey, J. C.

    2002-01-01

    We report on fuel cell flow-field development employing two-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (2-D CFD). Simulation of the flow distribution of a parallel channel flow-field, with a simple one-channel manifold, predicted inhomogeneous performance distribution within the cell. Further modeling, focusing on modification of the inlet and outlet flow fields, was used to predict a more homogeneous flow distribution in the flow-field. Attempts were made to verify the theoretical predictions experimentally by application of the segmented cell system. Measurements of the current distribution and CO transient response supported the 2-D CFD predictions. However, the margin of error between predicted and experimental results was considered insufficient to be of practical use. Future work will involve the evaluation of 3-D CFD to achieve the appropriate level of accuracy.

  15. Novel approaches to analysis by flow injection gradient titration.

    PubMed

    Wójtowicz, Marzena; Kozak, Joanna; Kościelniak, Paweł

    2007-09-26

    Two novel procedures for flow injection gradient titration with the use of a single stock standard solution are proposed. In the multi-point single-line (MP-SL) method the calibration graph is constructed on the basis of a set of standard solutions, which are generated in a standard reservoir and subsequently injected into the titrant. According to the single-point multi-line (SP-ML) procedure the standard solution and a sample are injected into the titrant stream from four loops of different capacities, hence four calibration graphs are able to be constructed and the analytical result is calculated on the basis of a generalized slope of these graphs. Both approaches have been tested on the example of spectrophotometric acid-base titration of hydrochloric and acetic acids with using bromothymol blue and phenolphthalein as indicators, respectively, and sodium hydroxide as a titrant. Under optimized experimental conditions the analytical results of precision less than 1.8 and 2.5% (RSD) and of accuracy less than 3.0 and 5.4% (relative error (RE)) were obtained for MP-SL and SP-ML procedures, respectively, in ranges of 0.0031-0.0631 mol L(-1) for samples of hydrochloric acid and of 0.1680-1.7600 mol L(-1) for samples of acetic acid. The feasibility of both methods was illustrated by applying them to the total acidity determination in vinegar samples with precision lower than 0.5 and 2.9% (RSD) for MP-SL and SP-ML procedures, respectively.

  16. An Active, Collaborative Approach to Learning Skills in Flow Cytometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fuller, Kathryn; Linden, Matthew D.; Lee-Pullen, Tracey; Fragall, Clayton; Erber, Wendy N.; Röhrig, Kimberley J.

    2016-01-01

    Advances in science education research have the potential to improve the way students learn to perform scientific interpretations and understand science concepts. We developed active, collaborative activities to teach skills in manipulating flow cytometry data using FlowJo software. Undergraduate students were given compensated clinical flow…

  17. A Riparian Approach to Dendrochronological Flow Reconstruction, Yellowstone River, Montana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schook, D. M.; Rathburn, S. L.; Friedman, J. M.

    2015-12-01

    Tree ring-based flow reconstructions can reveal river discharge variability over durations far exceeding the gauged record, building perspective for both the measured record and future flows. We use plains cottonwood (Populus deltoides subsp. monilifera) tree rings collected from four rivers to reconstruct flow history of the Yellowstone River near its confluence with the Missouri River. Upland trees in dry regions are typically used in flow reconstruction because their annual growth is controlled by the same precipitation that drives downstream flow, but our study improves flow reconstruction by including floodplain trees that are directly affected by the river. Cores from over 1000 cottonwoods along the Yellowstone, Powder, Little Missouri, and Redwater Rivers were collected from within a 170 km radius to reconstruct flows using the Age Curve Standardization technique in a multiple regression analysis. The large sample from trees spanning many age classes allows us to use only the rings that were produced when each tree was less than 50 years old and growth was most strongly correlated to river discharge. Using trees from a range of rivers improves our ability to differentiate between growth resulting from local precipitation and river flow, and we show that cottonwood growth differs across these neighboring rivers having different watersheds. Using the program Seascorr, tree growth is found to better correlated to seasonal river discharge (R = 0.69) than to local precipitation (R = 0.45). Our flow reconstruction reveals that the most extreme multi-year or multi-decade drought periods of the last 250 years on either the Yellowstone (1817-1821) or Powder (1846-1865) Rivers are missed by the gauged discharge record. Across all sites, we document increased growth in the 20th century compared to the 19th, a finding unattainable with conventional methods but having important implications for flow management.

  18. A Bayesian approach to flow record infilling and extension for reservoir design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, D. A.; Sene, K. J.

    A Bayesian approach is described for dealing with the problem of infilling and generating stochastic flow sequences using rainfall data to guide the flow generation process, and including bounded (censored) observed flow and rainfall data to provide additional information. Solutions are obtained using a Gibbs sampling procedure. Particular problems discussed include developing new procedures for fitting transformations when bounded values are available, coping with additional information in the form of values, or bounds, for totals of flows across several sites, and developing relationships between annual flow and rainfall data. Examples are shown of both infilled values of unknown past river flows, with assessment of uncertainty, and realisations of flows representative of what might occur in the future. Several procedures for validating the model output are described and the central estimates of flows, taken as a surrogate for historical observed flows, are compared with long term regional flow and rainfall data.

  19. Three Dimensional Alveolar Flow Phenomena Using a CFD Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sznitman, Josue

    2005-11-01

    Respiratory flows in the lung periphery are characterized by low Reynolds numbers (typically Re<1) in sub-millimeter airways marked by the presence of alveoli (gas exchange units). We present for realistic breathing conditions using CFD simulations (CFX-5.7.1), 3D velocity fields and flow patterns induced by the expansion/contraction of alveoli and acinar ducts during oscillatory flow. Based on anatomical data, the alveolus and airway are modeled as a spherical cap connected to a cylindrical duct, both subject to moving wall boundary conditions simulating respiration. The resulting 3D flow patterns are complex and governed by the ratio of the alveolar to ductal flow rates. This ratio describes the interplay between alveolar recirculation, induced by the ductal shear flow over the alveolus opening, and alveolar radial flow, induced by the expansion/contraction motion. Our 3D results are in good agreement with 2D simulations reported in the literature. Although convection mechanisms may transport gas along acinar ducts and deeper into the acinus, velocity fields within alveoli predict that upon gas entering them, transport is then solely dominated by diffusion mechanisms.

  20. A Lagrangian-Eulerian Approach to Modeling Homogeneous Condensation in High Density Flows (POSTPRINT)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    DSMC) method17 was used to compute the gas flow . A Lagrangian technique was applied to model cluster evolution. Similar to Ref. 7, new clusters were...Eulerian approach for monomer gas flow based on the solution of Euler/Navier–Stokes equations, with the Lagrangian approach for cluster formation and...method is to cal- culate gas flow solving the compressible Euler or Navier– Stokes equation, model the nucleation process starting from the dimer

  1. A Risk-Based Ecohydrological Approach to Assessing Environmental Flow Regimes.

    PubMed

    Mcgregor, Glenn B; Marshall, Jonathan C; Lobegeiger, Jaye S; Holloway, Dean; Menke, Norbert; Coysh, Julie

    2017-03-27

    For several decades there has been recognition that water resource development alters river flow regimes and impacts ecosystem values. Determining strategies to protect or restore flow regimes to achieve ecological outcomes is a focus of water policy and legislation in many parts of the world. However, consideration of existing environmental flow assessment approaches for application in Queensland identified deficiencies precluding their adoption. Firstly, in managing flows and using ecosystem condition as an indicator of effectiveness, many approaches ignore the fact that river ecosystems are subjected to threatening processes other than flow regime alteration. Secondly, many focus on providing flows for responses without considering how often they are necessary to sustain ecological values in the long-term. Finally, few consider requirements at spatial-scales relevant to the desired outcomes, with frequent focus on individual places rather than the regions supporting sustainability. Consequently, we developed a risk-based ecohydrological approach that identifies ecosystem values linked to desired ecological outcomes, is sensitive to flow alteration and uses indicators of broader ecosystem requirements. Monitoring and research is undertaken to quantify flow-dependencies and ecological modelling is used to quantify flow-related ecological responses over an historical flow period. The relative risk from different flow management scenarios can be evaluated at relevant spatial-scales. This overcomes the deficiencies identified above and provides a robust and useful foundation upon which to build the information needed to support water planning decisions. Application of the risk assessment approach is illustrated here by two case studies.

  2. A sensitivity equation approach to shape optimization in fluid flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borggaard, Jeff; Burns, John

    1994-01-01

    A sensitivity equation method to shape optimization problems is applied. An algorithm is developed and tested on a problem of designing optimal forebody simulators for a 2D, inviscid supersonic flow. The algorithm uses a BFGS/Trust Region optimization scheme with sensitivities computed by numerically approximating the linear partial differential equations that determine the flow sensitivities. Numerical examples are presented to illustrate the method.

  3. A novel approach to improve operation and performance in flow field-flow fractionation.

    PubMed

    Johann, Christoph; Elsenberg, Stephan; Roesch, Ulrich; Rambaldi, Diana C; Zattoni, Andrea; Reschiglian, Pierluigi

    2011-07-08

    A new system design and setup are proposed for the combined use of asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation (AF4) and hollow-fiber flow field-flow fractionation (HF5) within the same instrumentation. To this purpose, three innovations are presented: (a) a new flow control scheme where focusing flow rates are measured in real time allowing to adjust the flow rate ratio as desired; (b) a new HF5 channel design consisting of two sets of ferrule, gasket and cap nut used to mount the fiber inside a tube. This design provides a mechanism for effective and straightforward sealing of the fiber; (c) a new AF4 channel design with only two fluid connections on the upper plate. Only one pump is needed to deliver the necessary flow rates. In the focusing/relaxation step the two parts of the focusing flow and a bypass flow flushing the detectors are created with two splits of the flow from the pump. In the elution mode the cross-flow is measured and controlled with a flow controller device. This leads to reduced pressure pulsations in the channel and improves signal to noise ratio in the detectors. Experimental results of the separation of bovine serum albumin (BSA) and of a mix of four proteins demonstrate a significant improvement in the HF5 separation performance, in terms of efficiency, resolution, and run-to-run reproducibility compared to what has been reported in the literature. Separation performance in HF5 mode is shown to be comparable to the performance in AF4 mode using a channel with two connections in the upper plate.

  4. Numerical and Experimental Approaches Toward Understanding Lava Flow Heat Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rumpf, M.; Fagents, S. A.; Hamilton, C.; Crawford, I. A.

    2013-12-01

    We have performed numerical modeling and experimental studies to quantify the heat transfer from a lava flow into an underlying particulate substrate. This project was initially motivated by a desire to understand the transfer of heat from a lava flow into the lunar regolith. Ancient regolith deposits that have been protected by a lava flow may contain ancient solar wind, solar flare, and galactic cosmic ray products that can give insight into the history of our solar system, provided the records were not heated and destroyed by the overlying lava flow. In addition, lava-substrate interaction is an important aspect of lava fluid dynamics that requires consideration in lava emplacement models Our numerical model determines the depth to which the heat pulse will penetrate beneath a lava flow into the underlying substrate. Rigorous treatment of the temperature dependence of lava and substrate thermal conductivity and specific heat capacity, density, and latent heat release are imperative to an accurate model. Experiments were conducted to verify the numerical model. Experimental containers with interior dimensions of 20 x 20 x 25 cm were constructed from 1 inch thick calcium silicate sheeting. For initial experiments, boxes were packed with lunar regolith simulant (GSC-1) to a depth of 15 cm with thermocouples embedded at regular intervals. Basalt collected at Kilauea Volcano, HI, was melted in a gas forge and poured directly onto the simulant. Initial lava temperatures ranged from ~1200 to 1300 °C. The system was allowed to cool while internal temperatures were monitored by a thermocouple array and external temperatures were monitored by a Forward Looking Infrared (FLIR) video camera. Numerical simulations of the experiments elucidate the details of lava latent heat release and constrain the temperature-dependence of the thermal conductivity of the particulate substrate. The temperature-dependence of thermal conductivity of particulate material is not well known

  5. Laminar flow transition: A large-eddy simulation approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biringen, S.

    1982-01-01

    A vectorized, semi-implicit code was developed for the solution of the time-dependent, three dimensional equations of motion in plane Poiseuille flow by the large-eddy simulation technique. The code is tested by comparing results with those obtained from the solutions of the Orr-Sommerfeld equation. Comparisons indicate that finite-differences employed along the cross-stream direction act as an implicit filter. This removes the necessity of explicit filtering along this direction (where a nonhomogeneous mesh is used) for the simulation of laminar flow transition into turbulence in which small scale turbulence will be accounted for by a subgrid scale turbulence model.

  6. A new approach to highly resolved measurements of turbulent flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puczylowski, J.; Hölling, A.; Peinke, J.; Bhiladvala, R.; Hölling, M.

    2015-05-01

    In this paper we present the design and principle of a new anemometer, namely the 2d-Laser Cantilever Anemometer (2d-LCA), which has been developed for highly resolved flow speed measurements of two components (2d) under laboratory conditions. We will explain the working principle and demonstrate the sensor’s performance by means of comparison measurements of wake turbulence with a commercial X-wire. In the past we have shown that the 2d-LCA is capable of being applied in liquid and particle-laden domains, but we also believe that other challenging areas of operation such as near-wall flows can become accessible.

  7. A continuum mechanical approach to the flow equations for membrane transport. I. Water flow.

    PubMed

    Mikulecky, D C

    1972-12-01

    A concept is presented for modeling flows through membranes using continuum mechanics. Viscous interactions (due to velocity gradients) are explicitly incorporated and position-dependent local water-membrane interactions are taken into account before obtaining slab averages. This is in distinction to other treatments where strictly one-dimensional force balance equations are written using slab average friction coefficients which are really composite functions of local interactions. It is shown that the viscous and other frictional interactions do not simply form linear combinations in the solutions to the equations of motion. Flow profiles for pressure-driven flows ranging from Poiseuille's flow to "diffusion" flow are obtained depending on the strength and extent of the water-membrane interaction. The model is also applied to self-diffusion flows and the measurement of "equivalent pore size." It is shown that for a fixed pore size the ratio of filtration flow to self-diffusion flow for equal driving forces is able to vary over a wide range depending on the water-membrane interaction.

  8. A new approach to flow simulation using hybrid models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solgi, Abazar; Zarei, Heidar; Nourani, Vahid; Bahmani, Ramin

    2017-01-01

    The necessity of flow prediction in rivers, for proper management of water resource, and the need for determining the inflow to the dam reservoir, designing efficient flood warning systems and so forth, have always led water researchers to think about models with high-speed response and low error. In the recent years, the development of Artificial Neural Networks and Wavelet theory and using the combination of models help researchers to estimate the river flow better and better. In this study, daily and monthly scales were used for simulating the flow of Gamasiyab River, Nahavand, Iran. The first simulation was done using two types of ANN and ANFIS models. Then, using wavelet theory and decomposing input signals of the used parameters, sub-signals were obtained and were fed into the ANN and ANFIS to obtain hybrid models of WANN and WANFIS. In this study, in addition to the parameters of precipitation and flow, parameters of temperature and evaporation were used to analyze their effects on the simulation. The results showed that using wavelet transform improved the performance of the models in both monthly and daily scale. However, it had a better effect on the monthly scale and the WANFIS was the best model.

  9. A Maximal Flow Approach to Dynamic Routing in Communication Networks,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-05-01

    of nodes. In Appendix B we provide a computer program in Fortran for finding the maximal flow in these networks, based on the algorithm of Edmons and... Edmons and Karp is implemented by a Fortran Subroutine called MAXFL. The algorithm finds the shortest path between source and destination on which an

  10. Rheological flow laws for multiphase magmas: An empirical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pistone, Mattia; Cordonnier, Benoît; Ulmer, Peter; Caricchi, Luca

    2016-07-01

    The physical properties of magmas play a fundamental role in controlling the eruptive dynamics of volcanoes. Magmas are multiphase mixtures of crystals and gas bubbles suspended in a silicate melt and, to date, no flow laws describe their rheological behaviour. In this study we present a set of equations quantifying the flow of high-viscosity (> 105 Pa·s) silica-rich multiphase magmas, containing both crystals (24-65 vol.%) and gas bubbles (9-12 vol.%). Flow laws were obtained using deformation experiments performed at high temperature (673-1023 K) and pressure (200-250 MPa) over a range of strain-rates (5 · 10- 6 s- 1 to 4 · 10- 3 s- 1), conditions that are relevant for volcanic conduit processes of silica-rich systems ranging from crystal-rich lava domes to crystal-poor obsidian flows. We propose flow laws in which stress exponent, activation energy, and pre-exponential factor depend on a parameter that includes the volume fraction of weak phases (i.e. melt and gas bubbles) present in the magma. The bubble volume fraction has opposing effects depending on the relative crystal volume fraction: at low crystallinity bubble deformation generates gas connectivity and permeability pathways, whereas at high crystallinity bubbles do not connect and act as ;lubricant; objects during strain localisation within shear bands. We show that such difference in the evolution of texture is mainly controlled by the strain-rate (i.e. the local stress within shear bands) at which the experiments are performed, and affect the empirical parameters used for the flow laws. At low crystallinity (< 44 vol.%) we observe an increase of viscosity with increasing strain-rate, while at high crystallinity (> 44 vol.%) the viscosity decreases with increasing strain-rate. Because these behaviours are also associated with modifications of sample textures during the experiment and, thus, are not purely the result of different deformation rates, we refer to ;apparent shear-thickening; and

  11. Design considerations for pulsed-flow comprehensive two-dimensional GC: dynamic flow model approach.

    PubMed

    Harvey, Paul McA; Shellie, Robert A; Haddad, Paul R

    2010-04-01

    A dynamic flow model, which maps carrier gas pressures and carrier gas flow rates through the first dimension separation column, the modulator sample loop, and the second dimension separation column(s) in a pulsed-flow modulation comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography (PFM-GCxGC) system is described. The dynamic flow model assists design of a PFM-GCxGC modulator and leads to rapid determination of pneumatic conditions, timing parameters, and the dimensions of the separation columns and connecting tubing used to construct the PFM-GCxGC system. Three significant innovations are introduced in this manuscript, which were all uncovered by using the dynamic flow model. A symmetric flow path modulator improves baseline stability, appropriate selection of the flow restrictors in the first dimension column assembly provides a generally more stable and robust system, and these restrictors increase the modulation period flexibility of the PFM-GCxGC system. The flexibility of a PFM-GCxGC system resulting from these innovations is illustrated using the same modulation interface to analyze Special Antarctic Blend (SAB) diesel using 3 s and 9 s modulation periods.

  12. A power law approach to orifice flow rate calibration.

    PubMed

    Rhinehart, R Russell; Gebreyohannes, Solomon; Sridhar, Upasana Manimegalai; Patrachari, Anirudh; Rahaman, M S

    2011-04-01

    Although standards for orifice flow meter design, installation, and calibration are supported herein, noncompliant devices exist in many pilot-, lab-scale, and on-board applications. For these, a common calibration practice is to preserve the ideal square root relation and determine a device specific discharge coefficient value. This work provides theoretical and empirical analyses to support relaxing the square root relation between orifice pressure drop and flow rate for noncompliant devices. The resulting power law relation is shown to improve accuracy, precision, and rangeability. Whether a device specific square root or power law model is used, it requires off-line or in-line calibration data. As such, a power law calibration model may only be useful for on-board and small-scale applications.

  13. A Cartesian grid approach with hierarchical refinement for compressible flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quirk, James J.

    1994-01-01

    Many numerical studies of flows that involve complex geometries are limited by the difficulties in generating suitable grids. We present a Cartesian boundary scheme for two-dimensional, compressible flows that is unfettered by the need to generate a computational grid and so it may be used, routinely, even for the most awkward of geometries. In essence, an arbitrary-shaped body is allowed to blank out some region of a background Cartesian mesh and the resultant cut-cells are singled out for special treatment. This is done within a finite-volume framework and so, in principle, any explicit flux-based integration scheme can take advantage of this method for enforcing solid boundary conditions. For best effect, the present Cartesian boundary scheme has been combined with a sophisticated, local mesh refinement scheme, and a number of examples are shown in order to demonstrate the efficacy of the combined algorithm for simulations of shock interaction phenomena.

  14. Hydrodynamical Approach to Vehicular Flow in the Urban Street Canyon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duras, Maciej M.

    2001-06-01

    The vehicular flow in the urban street canyon is considered. The classical field description is used in the modelling of the vehicular movement and of gaseous mixture in generic urban street canyon. The dynamical variables include vehicular densities, velocities, and emissivities: of pollutants, heat and exhaust gases, as well as standard mixture components' variables: densities, velocities, temperature, pressures. The local balances' equations predict the dynamics of the complex system. The automatic control of the vehicular flow is attained by the sets of coordinated traffic lights. The automatic control is aimed at minimization of traffic ecological costs by the application of variational calculus (Lagrange's and Bolz's problems). The theoretical description is accompanied by numerical examples of computer fluid dynamics based on real traffic data.

  15. A quantitative comparison between the flow factor approach model and the molecular dynamics simulation results for the flow of a confined molecularly thin fluid film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yongbin

    2015-06-01

    Quantitative comparisons were made between the flow factor approach model and the molecular dynamics simulation (MDS) results both of which describe the flow of a molecularly thin fluid film confined between two solid walls. Although these two approaches, respectively, calculate the flow of a confined molecularly thin fluid film by different ways, very good agreements were found between them when the Couette and Poiseuille flows, respectively, calculated from them were compared. It strongly indicates the validity of the flow factor approach model in modeling the flow of a confined molecularly thin fluid film.

  16. Joint conditional simulations and the spectral approach for flow modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutjahr, A.; Bullard, B.; Hatch, S.; Hughson, L.

    1994-03-01

    The use of data to condition single random fields has a well-established history. However, the joint use of data from several cross-correlated random fields is not as well developed. For example, the use of both transmissivity and head data in a steady state 2-d stochastic flow problem is essentially an inverse problem that is very important for both flow and transport predictions. This problem is addressed here by using a combination of numerical simulation and analytical methods and its application illustrated. The type of information conveyed by the different data categories is explored. The results presented are especially interesting in that head and transmissivity each give different information: Head values would appear to constrain the geometry of the paths while transmissivity data yields information about travel times. The linearized model is expanded to an iterative procedure and the “true” conditional distribution at several locations is compared with the iterative solution. The problem mentioned above is one with a special transfer function specified by the flow equation. In the second part of the paper a Fast Fourier Transform method for generation and conditioning of two or more random fields is introduced. This procedure is simple to implement, fast and very flexible.

  17. Non-isothermal flow in low permeable porous media: A comparison of Richards' and two-phase flow approaches

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, W.; Rutqvist, J.; Gorke, U.-J.; Birkholzer, J.T.; Kolditz, O.

    2010-03-15

    The present work compares the performance of two alternative flow models for the simulation of thermal-hydraulic coupled processes in low permeable porous media: non-isothermal Richards and two-phase flow concepts. Both models take vaporization processes into account: however, the Richards model neglects dynamic pressure variations and bulk flow of the gaseous phase. For the comparison of the two approaches first published data from a laboratory experiment is studied involving thermally driven moisture flow in a partially saturated bentonite sample. Then a benchmark test of longer-term thermal-hydraulic behavior in the engineered barrier system of a geological nuclear waste repository is analyzed (DECOVALEX project). It was found that both models can be used to reproduce the vaporization process if the intrinsic permeability is relative high. However, when a thermal-hydraulic coupled problem has the same low intrinsic permeability for both the liquid and the gas phase, only the two-phase flow approach provides reasonable results.

  18. Data-driven approach to design of passive flow control strategies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez, F.; Blackburn, H. M.

    2017-02-01

    An approach to designing passive devices for control of unsteady flows is presented. The method requires only snapshots of the flow to be controlled as inputs. A temporal correlation based on proper orthogonal decomposition of both fluctuating velocity and nonlinear forcing serves to identify the spatial locations in which the forcing drives the different unsteady flow features. The installation of a passive device in these spatial locations inhibits the fluctuating motion. The potential of the methodology is demonstrated via the suppression of vortex shedding in flow past a square cylinder, paving the way to the control of more complex flows using passive devices. Connections in agreement with previous studies targeting the same flow using different passive flow control strategies are provided.

  19. Simulation of platelets suspension flowing through a stenosis model using a dissipative particle dynamics approach.

    PubMed

    Soares, Joao S; Gao, Chao; Alemu, Yared; Slepian, Marvin; Bluestein, Danny

    2013-11-01

    Stresses on blood cellular constituents induced by blood flow can be represented by a continuum approach down to the μm level; however, the molecular mechanisms of thrombosis and platelet activation and aggregation are on the order of nm. The coupling of the disparate length and time scales between molecular and macroscopic transport phenomena represents a major computational challenge. In order to bridge the gap between macroscopic flow scales and the cellular scales with the goal of depicting and predicting flow induced thrombogenicity, multi-scale approaches based on particle methods are better suited. We present a top-scale model to describe bulk flow of platelet suspensions: we employ dissipative particle dynamics to model viscous flow dynamics and present a novel and general no-slip boundary condition that allows the description of three-dimensional viscous flows through complex geometries. Dissipative phenomena associated with boundary layers and recirculation zones are observed and favorably compared to benchmark viscous flow solutions (Poiseuille and Couette flows). Platelets in suspension, modeled as coarse-grained finite-sized ensembles of bound particles constituting an enclosed deformable membrane with flat ellipsoid shape, show self-orbiting motions in shear flows consistent with Jeffery's orbits, and are transported with the flow, flipping and colliding with the walls and interacting with other platelets.

  20. A kinetic-theory approach to turbulent chemically reacting flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chung, P. M.

    1976-01-01

    The paper examines the mathematical and physical foundations for the kinetic theory of reactive turbulent flows, discussing the differences and relation between the kinetic and averaged equations, and comparing some solutions of the kinetic equations obtained by the Green's function method with those obtained by the approximate bimodal method. The kinetic method described consists essentially in constructing the probability density functions of the chemical species on the basis of solutions of the Langevin stochastic equation for the influence of eddies on the behavior of fluid elements. When the kinetic equations are solved for the structure of the diffusion flame established in a shear layer by the bimodal method, discontinuities in gradients of the mean concentrations at the two flame edges appear. This is a consequence of the bimodal approximation of all distribution functions by two dissimilar half-Maxwellian functions, which is a very crude approximation. These discontinuities do not appear when the solutions are constructed by the Green's function method described here.

  1. Visual guidance based on optic flow: a biorobotic approach.

    PubMed

    Franceschini, Nicolas

    2004-01-01

    This paper addresses some basic questions as to how vision links up with action and serves to guide locomotion in both biological and artificial creatures. The thorough knowledge gained during the past five decades on insects' sensory-motor abilities and the neuronal substrates involved has provided us with a rich source of inspiration for designing tomorrow's self-guided vehicles and micro-vehicles, which will be able to cope with unforeseen events on the ground, under water, in the air, in space, on other planets, and inside the human body. Insects can teach us some useful tricks for designing agile autonomous robots. Since constructing a "biorobot" first requires exactly formulating the biological principles presumably involved, it gives us a unique opportunity of checking the soundness and robustness of these principles by bringing them face to face with the real physical world. "Biorobotics" therefore goes one step beyond computer simulation. It leads to experimenting with real physical robots which have to pass the stringent test of the real world. Biorobotics provide us with a new tool, which can help neurobiologists and neuroethologists to identify and investigate worthwhile issues in the field of sensory-motor control. Here we describe some of the visually guided terrestrial and aerial robots we have developed since 1985 on the basis of our biological findings. All these robots behave in response to the optic flow, i.e., they work by measuring the slip speed of the retinal image. Optic flow is sensed on-board by miniature electro-optical velocity sensors. The very principle of these sensors was based on studies in which we recorded the responses of single identified neurons to single photoreceptor stimulation in a model visual system: the fly's compound eye.

  2. Approaches and Applications of Physically-based, Spatially-distributed Integrated surface / subsurface flow modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panday, S.; Huyakorn, P. S.

    2004-12-01

    Physically-based, spatially-distributed (PBSD) modeling of integrated surface water and groundwater flow is necessary for evaluating the complex processes of runoff, recharge, evapotranspiration, subsurface flow, and baseflow, to comprehensively manage water resources for diverse and competing needs such as conjunctive use, aquifer storage and recovery, flood protection, wetland restoration and minimum flow evaluation. Some current approaches to PBSD modeling of integrated surface and subsurface flow will be discussed. Challenges to PBSD integrated modeling will be presented, and application case studies will be presented.

  3. Spatial dynamics of ecosystem service flows: a comprehensive approach to quantifying actual services

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bagstad, Kenneth J.; Johnson, Gary W.; Voigt, Brian; Villa, Ferdinando

    2013-01-01

    Recent ecosystem services research has highlighted the importance of spatial connectivity between ecosystems and their beneficiaries. Despite this need, a systematic approach to ecosystem service flow quantification has not yet emerged. In this article, we present such an approach, which we formalize as a class of agent-based models termed “Service Path Attribution Networks” (SPANs). These models, developed as part of the Artificial Intelligence for Ecosystem Services (ARIES) project, expand on ecosystem services classification terminology introduced by other authors. Conceptual elements needed to support flow modeling include a service's rivalness, its flow routing type (e.g., through hydrologic or transportation networks, lines of sight, or other approaches), and whether the benefit is supplied by an ecosystem's provision of a beneficial flow to people or by absorption of a detrimental flow before it reaches them. We describe our implementation of the SPAN framework for five ecosystem services and discuss how to generalize the approach to additional services. SPAN model outputs include maps of ecosystem service provision, use, depletion, and flows under theoretical, possible, actual, inaccessible, and blocked conditions. We highlight how these different ecosystem service flow maps could be used to support various types of decision making for conservation and resource management planning.

  4. Adsorbed polymers under flow. A stochastic dynamical system approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armstrong, Robert; Jhon, Myung S.

    1985-09-01

    Recent experiments have shown that porous filters preadsorbed with polymer molecules exhibit an anomalously high pressure drop at high rates of flow. We have modeled the adsorbed polymers as dynamical systems and have found that the introduction of hydrodynamic interaction between molecules destabilizes at a high applied shear. As a direct result this instability will cause the molecules to unravel and stretch far into the cross section of the pore, and thus by inference, cause the observed anomalously high pressure drop. Although much of this paper is devoted to the stability characteristics of the deterministic system, Brownian motion is also considered, and an account of the statistics of the Brownian system when the deterministic system becomes unstable is given. The examples revealed in this paper are not of sufficient complexity to calculate with any accuracy the magnitude of this anomalous pressure drop. We simply present a procedure by which a large variety of more complex models could be undertaken and their ultimate effect clearly understood.

  5. A SPATIOTEMPORAL APPROACH FOR HIGH RESOLUTION TRAFFIC FLOW IMPUTATION

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Lee; Chin, Shih-Miao; Hwang, Ho-Ling

    2016-01-01

    Along with the rapid development of Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS), traffic data collection technologies have been evolving dramatically. The emergence of innovative data collection technologies such as Remote Traffic Microwave Sensor (RTMS), Bluetooth sensor, GPS-based Floating Car method, automated license plate recognition (ALPR) (1), etc., creates an explosion of traffic data, which brings transportation engineering into the new era of Big Data. However, despite the advance of technologies, the missing data issue is still inevitable and has posed great challenges for research such as traffic forecasting, real-time incident detection and management, dynamic route guidance, and massive evacuation optimization, because the degree of success of these endeavors depends on the timely availability of relatively complete and reasonably accurate traffic data. A thorough literature review suggests most current imputation models, if not all, focus largely on the temporal nature of the traffic data and fail to consider the fact that traffic stream characteristics at a certain location are closely related to those at neighboring locations and utilize these correlations for data imputation. To this end, this paper presents a Kriging based spatiotemporal data imputation approach that is able to fully utilize the spatiotemporal information underlying in traffic data. Imputation performance of the proposed approach was tested using simulated scenarios and achieved stable imputation accuracy. Moreover, the proposed Kriging imputation model is more flexible compared to current models.

  6. Numerical simulation of biofilm growth in flow channels using a cellular automaton approach coupled with a macro flow computation.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Takehiro; Ueda, Shuya

    2013-01-01

    Biofilm is a slime-like complex aggregate of microorganisms and their products, extracellular polymer substances, that grows on a solid surface. The growth phenomenon of biofilm is relevant to the corrosion and clogging of water pipes, the chemical processes in a bioreactor, and bioremediation. In these phenomena, the behavior of the biofilm under flow has an important role. Therefore, controlling the biofilm behavior in each process is important. To provide a computational tool for analyzing biofilm growth, the present study proposes a computational model for the simulation of biofilm growth in flows. This model accounts for the growth, decay, detachment and adhesion of biofilms. The proposed model couples the computation of the surrounding fluid flow, using the finite volume method, with the simulation of biofilm growth, using the cellular automaton approach, a relatively low-computational-cost method. Furthermore, a stochastic approach for considering the adhesion process is proposed. Numerical simulations for the biofilm growth on a planar wall and that in an L-shaped rectangular channel were carried out. A variety of biofilm structures were observed depending on the strength of the flow. Moreover, the importance of the detachment and adhesion processes was confirmed.

  7. How fruit developmental biology makes use of flow cytometry approaches.

    PubMed

    Pirrello, Julien; Bourdon, Matthieu; Cheniclet, Catherine; Bourge, Mickaël; Brown, Spencer C; Renaudin, Jean-Pierre; Frangne, Nathalie; Chevalier, Christian

    2014-02-01

    Fleshy fruit species such as tomato are important because of their nutritional and economic value. Several stages of fruit development such as ovary formation, fruit set, and fruit maturation have already been the subject of many developmental studies. However, fruit growth per se has been much less addressed. Fruit growth like all plant organs depends upon the developmental processes of cell division and cell expansion. The activity of cell divisions sets the number of cells that will compose the fruit; the cell expansion activity then determines its final size. Among the various mechanisms that may influence the determination of cell size, endopolyploidy by the means of endoreduplication, i.e. genome amplification in the absence of mitosis, appears to be of great importance in fleshy fruits. In tomato fruit, endoreduplication is associated with DNA-dependent cell expansion: cell size can reach spectacular levels such as hundreds of times its initial size (e.g. >0.5 mm in diameter), with as much as a 256-fold increase in nuclear DNA content. Using tomato fruit development as a model, recent investigations combining the use of flow cytometry, cellular imaging and molecular analyses have provided new data in favor of the long-standing karyoplasmic ratio theory, stating that cells tend to adjust their cytoplasmic volume to the nuclear DNA content. By establishing a highly structured cellular system where multiple physiological functions are integrated, endoreduplication acts as a morphogenetic factor supporting cell growth during tomato fruit development. In the context of plant breeding, deciphering the mechanisms controlling fruit growth, in particular those connecting the process of nuclear endoreduplication with modulation of gene expression, the regulation of cell size and final fruit size and composition, is necessary to understand better the establishment of fleshy fruit quality traits.

  8. Combination of material flow analysis and substance flow analysis: a powerful approach for decision support in waste management.

    PubMed

    Stanisavljevic, Nemanja; Brunner, Paul H

    2014-08-01

    The novelty of this paper is the demonstration of the effectiveness of combining material flow analysis (MFA) with substance flow analysis (SFA) for decision making in waste management. Both MFA and SFA are based on the mass balance principle. While MFA alone has been applied often for analysing material flows quantitatively and hence to determine the capacities of waste treatment processes, SFA is more demanding but instrumental in evaluating the performance of a waste management system regarding the goals "resource conservation" and "environmental protection". SFA focuses on the transformations of wastes during waste treatment: valuable as well as hazardous substances and their transformations are followed through the entire waste management system. A substance-based approach is required because the economic and environmental properties of the products of waste management - recycling goods, residues and emissions - are primarily determined by the content of specific precious or harmful substances. To support the case that MFA and SFA should be combined, a case study of waste management scenarios is presented. For three scenarios, total material flows are quantified by MFA, and the mass flows of six indicator substances (C, N, Cl, Cd, Pb, Hg) are determined by SFA. The combined results are compared to the status quo in view of fulfilling the goals of waste management. They clearly point out specific differences between the chosen scenarios, demonstrating potentials for improvement and the value of the combination of MFA/SFA for decision making in waste management.

  9. Examining the Bernstein global optimization approach to optimal power flow problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patil, Bhagyesh V.; Sampath, L. P. M. I.; Krishnan, Ashok; Ling, K. V.; Gooi, H. B.

    2016-10-01

    This work addresses a nonconvex optimal power flow problem (OPF). We introduce a `new approach' in the context of OPF problem based on the Bernstein polynomials. The applicability of the approach is studied on a real-world 3-bus power system. The numerical results obtained with this new approach for a 3-bus system reveal a satisfactory improvement in terms of optimality. The results are found to be competent with generic global optimization solvers BARON and COUENNE.

  10. A comparative assessment of two different debris flow propagation approaches - blind simulations on a real debris flow event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stancanelli, L. M.; Foti, E.

    2015-04-01

    A detailed comparison between the performances of two different approaches to debris flow modelling was carried out. In particular, the results of a mono-phase Bingham model (FLO-2D) and that of a two-phase model (TRENT-2D) obtained from a blind test were compared. As a benchmark test the catastrophic event of 1 October 2009 which struck Sicily causing several fatalities and damage was chosen. The predicted temporal evolution of several parameters of the debris flow (such as flow depth and propagation velocity) was analysed in order to investigate the advantages and disadvantages of the two models in reproducing the global dynamics of the event. An analysis between the models' results with survey data have been carried out, not only for the determination of statistical indicators of prediction accuracy, but also for the application of the Receiver Operator Characteristic (ROC) approach. Provided that the proper rheological parameters and boundary conditions are assigned, both models seem capable of reproducing the inundation areas in a reasonably accurate way. However, the main differences in the application rely on the choice of such rheological parameters. Indeed, within the more user-friendly FLO-2D model the tuning of the parameters must be done empirically, with no evidence of the physics of the phenomena. On the other hand, for the TRENT-2D the parameters are physically based and can be estimated from the properties of the solid material, thus reproducing more reliable results. A second important difference between the two models is that in the first method the debris flow is treated as a homogeneous flow, in which the total mass is kept constant from its initiation in the upper part of the basin to the deposition in a debris fan. In contrast, the second approach is suited to reproduce the erosion and deposition processes and the displaced mass can be directly related to the rainfall event. Application of both models in a highly urbanized area reveals the

  11. A comparative assessment of two different debris flow propagation approaches - blind simulations on a real debris flow event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stancanelli, L. M.; Foti, E.

    2014-11-01

    A detailed comparison between the performances of two different approaches to debris flow modelling has been carried out. In particular, the results of a mono-phase Bingham model (FLO-2D) and these of a two phase model (TRENT-2D) obtained from a blind test have been compared. As a benchmark test the catastrophic event of 1 October 2009 which struck Sicily causing several fatalities and damages has been chosen. The predicted temporal evolution of several parameters of the debris flow (as the flow depths and the propagation velocities) has been analyzed in order to investigate the advantages and disadvantages of the two models in reproducing the global dynamics of the event. Analysis between the models results with survey data have been carried out, not only for the determination of statistical indicators of prediction accuracy, but also for the application of the Receiver Operator Characteristic (ROC) approach. Provided that the proper rheological parameters and boundary conditions are assigned, both models seem capable of reproducing the inundation areas in a fairly good way. However, the main differences in the application rely in the choice of such rheological parameters. Indeed, within the more user friendly FLO-2D model the tuning of the parameters must be done empirically, with no evidence of the physics of the phenomena. On the other hand, for the TRENT-2D the parameters are physically based and can be estimated from the properties of the solid material, thus reproducing more reliable results. A second important difference between the two models is that in the first method the debris flow is treated as homogeneous flow, in which the total mass is kept constant from initiation in the upper part of the basin up to the deposition on debris fan. On the contrary, the second approach is suite to reproduce the erosion and deposition processes and the displaced mass can be directly related to the rainfall event. Application of both models in an highly urbanized area

  12. Modeling flow and transport in unsaturated fractured rock: An evaluation of the continuum approach

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Hui-Hai; Haukwa, Charles B.; Ahlers, C. Fredrik; Bodvarsson, Gudmundur S.; Flint, Alan L.; Guertal, William B.

    2002-09-01

    Because the continuum approach is relatively simple and straightforward to implement, it has been commonly used in modeling flow and transport in unsaturated fractured rock. However, the usefulness of this approach can be questioned in terms of its adequacy for representing fingering flow and transport in unsaturated fractured rock. The continuum approach thus needs to be evaluated carefully by comparing simulation results with field observations directly related to unsaturated flow and transport processes. This paper reports on such an evaluation, based on a combination of model calibration and prediction, using data from an infiltration test carried out in a densely fractured rock within the unsaturated zone of Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Comparisons between experimental and modeling results show that the continuum approach may be able to capture important features of flow and transport processes observed from the test. The modeling results also show that matrix diffusion may have a significant effect on the overall transport behavior in unsaturated fractured rocks, which can be used to estimate effective fracture-matrix interface areas based on tracer transport data. While more theoretical, numerical, and experimental studies are needed to provide a conclusive evaluation, this study suggests that the continuum approach is useful for modeling flow and transport in unsaturated, densely fractured rock.

  13. Modeling flow and transport in unsaturated fractured rock: an evaluation of the continuum approach.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hui-Hai; Haukwa, Charles B; Ahlers, C Fredrik; Bodvarsson, Gudmundur S; Flint, Alan L; Guertal, William B

    2003-01-01

    Because the continuum approach is relatively simple and straightforward to implement, it has been commonly used in modeling flow and transport in unsaturated fractured rock. However, the usefulness of this approach can be questioned in terms of its adequacy for representing fingering flow and transport in unsaturated fractured rock. The continuum approach thus needs to be evaluated carefully by comparing simulation results with field observations directly related to unsaturated flow and transport processes. This paper reports on such an evaluation, based on a combination of model calibration and prediction, using data from an infiltration test carried out in a densely fractured rock within the unsaturated zone of Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Comparisons between experimental and modeling results show that the continuum approach may be able to capture important features of flow and transport processes observed from the test. The modeling results also show that matrix diffusion may have a significant effect on the overall transport behavior in unsaturated fractured rocks, which can be used to estimate effective fracture-matrix interface areas based on tracer transport data. While more theoretical, numerical, and experimental studies are needed to provide a conclusive evaluation, this study suggests that the continuum approach is useful for modeling flow and transport in unsaturated, densely fractured rock.

  14. Modeling flow and transport in unsaturated fractured rock: An evaluation of the continuum approach

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Liu, H.-H.; Haukwa, C.B.; Ahlers, C.F.; Bodvarsson, G.S.; Flint, A.L.; Guertal, W.B.

    2003-01-01

    Because the continuum approach is relatively simple and straightforward to implement, it has been commonly used in modeling flow and transport in unsaturated fractured rock. However, the usefulness of this approach can be questioned in terms of its adequacy for representing fingering flow and transport in unsaturated fractured rock. The continuum approach thus needs to be evaluated carefully by comparing simulation results with field observations directly related to unsaturated flow and transport processes. This paper reports on such an evaluation, based on a combination of model calibration and prediction, using data from an infiltration test carried out in a densely fractured rock within the unsaturated zone of Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Comparisons between experimental and modeling results show that the continuum approach may be able to capture important features of flow and transport processes observed from the test. The modeling results also show that matrix diffusion may have a significant effect on the overall transport behavior in unsaturated fractured rocks, which can be used to estimate effective fracture-matrix interface areas based on tracer transport data. While more theoretical, numerical, and experimental studies are needed to provide a conclusive evaluation, this study suggests that the continuum approach is useful for modeling flow and transport in unsaturated, densely fractured rock. ?? 2002 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. A Mixed Approach for Modeling Blood Flow in Brain Microcirculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peyrounette, M.; Sylvie, L.; Davit, Y.; Quintard, M.

    2014-12-01

    We have previously demonstrated [1] that the vascular system of the healthy human brain cortex is a superposition of two structural components, each corresponding to a different spatial scale. At small-scale, the vascular network has a capillary structure, which is homogeneous and space-filling over a cut-off length. At larger scale, veins and arteries conform to a quasi-fractal branched structure. This structural duality is consistent with the functional duality of the vasculature, i.e. distribution and exchange. From a modeling perspective, this can be viewed as the superposition of: (a) a continuum model describing slow transport in the small-scale capillary network, characterized by a representative elementary volume and effective properties; and (b) a discrete network approach [2] describing fast transport in the arterial and venous network, which cannot be homogenized because of its fractal nature. This problematic is analogous to modeling problems encountered in geological media, e.g, in petroleum engineering, where fast conducting channels (wells or fractures) are embedded in a porous medium (reservoir rock). An efficient method to reduce the computational cost of fractures/continuum simulations is to use relatively large grid blocks for the continuum model. However, this also makes it difficult to accurately couple both structural components. In this work, we solve this issue by adapting the "well model" concept used in petroleum engineering [3] to brain specific 3-D situations. We obtain a unique linear system of equations describing the discrete network, the continuum and the well model coupling. Results are presented for realistic geometries and compared with a non-homogenized small-scale network model of an idealized periodic capillary network of known permeability. [1] Lorthois & Cassot, J. Theor. Biol. 262, 614-633, 2010. [2] Lorthois et al., Neuroimage 54 : 1031-1042, 2011. [3] Peaceman, SPE J. 18, 183-194, 1978.

  16. A Biomass Flow Approach to Population Models and Food Webs

    PubMed Central

    Getz, Wayne M.

    2011-01-01

    The dominant differential equation paradigm for modeling the population dynamics of species interacting in the framework of a food web retains at its core the basic prey-predator and competition models formulation by Alfred J. Lotka (1880–1945) and Vito Volterra (1860–1940) nearly nine decades ago. This paradigm lacks a trophic-level-independent formulation of population growth leading to ambiguities in how to treat populations that are simultaneously both prey and predator. Also, this paradigm does not fundamentally include inertial (i.e. change resisting) processes needed to account for the response of populations to fluctuating resource environments. Here I present an approach that corrects both these deficits and provides a unified framework for accounting for biomass transformation in food webs that include both live and dead components of all species in the system. This biomass transformation formulation (BTW) allows for a unified treatment of webs that include consumers of both live and dead material—both carnivores and carcasivores, herbivores and detritivores—and incorporates scavengers, parasites, and other neglected food web consumption categories in a coherent manner. I trace how BTW is an outgrowth of the metaphysiological growth modeling paradigm and I provide a general compact formulation of BTW in terms of a three-variable differential equation formulation for each species in the food web: viz. live biomass, dead biomass, and a food-intake-related measure called deficit-stress. I then illustrate the application of this new paradigm to provide insights into two-species competition in variable environments and discuss application of BTW to food webs that incorporate parasites and pathogens. PMID:27688596

  17. A Biomass Flow Approach to Population Models and Food Webs.

    PubMed

    Getz, Wayne M

    2012-02-01

    The dominant differential equation paradigm for modeling the population dynamics of species interacting in the framework of a food web retains at its core the basic prey-predator and competition models formulation by Alfred J. Lotka (1880-1945) and Vito Volterra (1860-1940) nearly nine decades ago. This paradigm lacks a trophic-level-independent formulation of population growth leading to ambiguities in how to treat populations that are simultaneously both prey and predator. Also, this paradigm does not fundamentally include inertial (i.e. change resisting) processes needed to account for the response of populations to fluctuating resource environments. Here I present an approach that corrects both these deficits and provides a unified framework for accounting for biomass transformation in food webs that include both live and dead components of all species in the system. This biomass transformation formulation (BTW) allows for a unified treatment of webs that include consumers of both live and dead material-both carnivores and carcasivores, herbivores and detritivores-and incorporates scavengers, parasites, and other neglected food web consumption categories in a coherent manner. I trace how BTW is an outgrowth of the metaphysiological growth modeling paradigm and I provide a general compact formulation of BTW in terms of a three-variable differential equation formulation for each species in the food web: viz. live biomass, dead biomass, and a food-intake-related measure called deficit-stress. I then illustrate the application of this new paradigm to provide insights into two-species competition in variable environments and discuss application of BTW to food webs that incorporate parasites and pathogens.

  18. A new finite element approach for prediction of aerothermal loads - Progress in inviscid flow computations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bey, K. S.; Thornton, E. A.; Dechaumphai, P.; Ramakrishnan, R.

    1985-01-01

    Recent progress in the development of finite element methodology for the prediction of aerothermal loads is described. Two dimensional, inviscid computations are presented, but emphasis is placed on development of an approach extendable to three dimensional viscous flows. Research progress is described for: (1) utilization of a commercially available program to construct flow solution domains and display computational results, (2) development of an explicit Taylor-Galerkin solution algorithm, (3) closed form evaluation of finite element matrices, (4) vector computer programming strategies, and (5) validation of solutions. Two test problems of interest to NASA Langley aerothermal research are studied. Comparisons of finite element solutions for Mach 6 flow with other solution methods and experimental data validate fundamental capabilities of the approach for analyzing high speed inviscid compressible flows.

  19. A New Finite Element Approach for Prediction of Aerothermal Loads: Progress in Inviscid Flow Computations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bey, K. S.; Thornton, E. A.; Dechaumphai, P.; Ramakrishnan, R.

    1985-01-01

    Recent progress in the development of finite element methodology for the prediction of aerothermal loads is described. Two dimensional, inviscid computations are presented, but emphasis is placed on development of an approach extendable to three dimensional viscous flows. Research progress is described for: (1) utilization of a commerically available program to construct flow solution domains and display computational results, (2) development of an explicit Taylor-Galerkin solution algorithm, (3) closed form evaluation of finite element matrices, (4) vector computer programming strategies, and (5) validation of solutions. Two test problems of interest to NASA Langley aerothermal research are studied. Comparisons of finite element solutions for Mach 6 flow with other solution methods and experimental data validate fundamental capabilities of the approach for analyzing high speed inviscid compressible flows.

  20. A Hybrid URANS/LES Approach Used for Simulations of Turbulent Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraňa, Karel; Stiller, Jörg

    A hybrid model based on the unsteady Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes approach represented by the one-equation Spalart-Allmaras model and the Large Eddy Simulation called Detached Eddy Simulation (DES) was applied for turbulent flow simulations. This turbulent approach was implemented into the flow solver based on the Finite-Element Method with pressure stabilized and streamlines upwind Petrov-Galerkin stabilization techniques. The effectiveness and robustness of this updated solver is successfully demonstrated at benchmark calculation represented by an unsteady turbulent flow past a cylinder at Reynolds number 3900. Results such as velocity fields and the flow periodicity, Reynolds stress tensor and eddy viscosity and pressure coefficient distributions are discussed and relatively good agreement was found to direct numerical simulations and experiments.

  1. Exploring Inflated Pahohoe Lava Flow Morphologies and the Effects of Cooling Using a New Simulation Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glaze, L. S.; Baloga, S. M.

    2014-01-01

    Pahoehoe lavas are recognized as an important landform on Earth, Mars and Io. Observations of such flows on Earth (e.g., Figure 1) indicate that the emplacement process is dominated by random effects. Existing models for lobate a`a lava flows that assume viscous fluid flow on an inclined plane are not appropriate for dealing with the numerous random factors present in pahoehoe emplacement. Thus, interpretation of emplacement conditions for pahoehoe lava flows on Mars requires fundamentally different models. A new model that implements a simulation approach has recently been developed that allows exploration of a variety of key influences on pahoehoe lobe emplacement (e.g., source shape, confinement, slope). One important factor that has an impact on the final topographic shape and morphology of a pahoehoe lobe is the volumetric flow rate of lava, where cooling of lava on the lobe surface influences the likelihood of subsequent breakouts.

  2. Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian approach in reduced order modeling of a flow with a moving boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stankiewicz, W.; Roszak, R.; Morzyński, M.

    2013-06-01

    Flow-induced deflections of aircraft structures result in oscillations that might turn into such a dangerous phenomena like flutter or buffeting. In this paper the design of an aeroelastic system consisting of Reduced Order Model (ROM) of the flow with a moving boundary is presented. The model is based on Galerkin projection of governing equation onto space spanned by modes obtained from high-fidelity computations. The motion of the boundary and mesh is defined in Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) approach and results in additional convective term in Galerkin system. The developed system is demonstrated on the example of a flow around an oscillating wing.

  3. Unified fractional differential approach for transient interporosity flow in naturally fractured media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babak, Petro; Azaiez, Jalel

    2014-12-01

    A unified approach to modeling flows of slightly compressible fluids through naturally fractured media is presented. The unified fractional differential model is derived by combining the flow at micro scale for matrix blocks and macro scale for fractures, using the transient interporosity flow behavior at the interface between matrix blocks and fractures. The derived model is able to unify existing transient interporosity flow models formulated for different shapes of matrix blocks in any medium dimensions. The model is formulated in the form of a fractional order partial differential equation that involves Caputo derivative of order 1/2 with respect to time. Explicit solutions for the unified model are derived for different axisymmetrical spatial domains using Hankel or Hankel-Weber finite or infinite transforms. Comparisons between the predictions of the unified model and those obtained from existing transient interporosity flow models for matrix blocks in the form of slabs, spheres and cylinders are presented. It is shown that the unified fractional derivative model leads to solutions that are very close to those of transient interporosity flow models for fracture-dominant and transitional fracture-to-matrix dominant flow regimes. An analysis of the results of the unified model reveals that the pressure varies linearly with the logarithm of time for different flow regimes, with half slope for the transitional fracture-to-matrix dominant flow regime vs. the fracture and matrix dominant flow regimes. In addition, a new re-scaling that involves the characteristic length in the form of matrix block volume to surface area ratio is derived for the transient interporosity flow models for matrix blocks of different shapes. It is shown that the re-scaled transient interporosity flow models are governed by two dimensionless parameters Θ and Λ compared to only one dimensionless parameter Θ for the unified model. It is shown that the solutions of the transient

  4. Multi-compartment approach to identify minimal flow and maximal recreational use of a lowland river

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pusch, Martin; Lorenz, Stefan

    2013-04-01

    Most approaches to establish a minimum flow rate for river sections subjected to water abstraction focus on flow requirements of fish and benthic invertebrates. However, artificial reduction of river flow will always affect additional key ecosystem features, as sediment properties and the metabolism of matter in these ecosystems as well, and may even influence adjacent floodplains. Thus, significant effects e.g. on the dissolved oxygen content of river water, on habitat conditions in the benthic zone, and on water levels in the floodplain are to be expected. Thus, we chose a multiple compartment method to identify minimum flow requirements in a lowland River in northern Germany (Spree River), selecting the minimal required flow level out of all compartments studied. Results showed that minimal flow levels necessary to keep key ecosystem features at a 'good' state depended significantly on actual water quality and on river channel morphology. Thereby, water quality of the Spree is potentially influenced by recreational boating activity, which causes mussels to stop filter-feeding, and thus impedes self-purification. Disturbance of mussel feeding was shown to directly depend on boat type and speed, with substantial differences among mussel species. Thus, a maximal recreational boating intensity could be derived that does not significantly affect self purification. We conclude that minimal flow levels should be identified not only based on flow preferences of target species, but also considering channel morphology, ecological functions, and the intensity of other human uses of the river section.

  5. A new approach to flow through a region bounded by two ellipses of the same ellipticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lal, K.; Chorlton, F.

    1981-05-01

    A new approach is presented to calculate steady flow of a laminar viscous incompressible fluid through a channel whose cross section is bounded by two ellipses with the same ellipticity. The Milne-Thomas approach avoids the stream function and is similar to the Rayleigh-Ritz approximation process of the calculus of variations in its first satisfying boundary conditions and then adjusting constants or multiplying functions to fit the differential equation.

  6. A Vocabulary Approach to Partial Streamline Matching and Exploratory Flow Visualization.

    PubMed

    Tao, Jun; Wang, Chaoli; Shene, Ching-Kuang; Shaw, Raymond A

    2016-05-01

    Measuring the similarity of integral curves is fundamental to many important flow data analysis and visualization tasks such as feature detection, pattern querying, streamline clustering, and hierarchical exploration. In this paper, we introduce FlowString, a novel vocabulary approach that extracts shape invariant features from streamlines and utilizes a string-based method for exploratory streamline analysis and visualization. Our solution first resamples streamlines by considering their local feature scales. We then classify resampled points along streamlines based on the shape similarity around their local neighborhoods. We encode each streamline into a string of well-selected shape characters, from which we construct meaningful words for querying and retrieval. A unique feature of our approach is that it captures intrinsic streamline similarity that is invariant under translation, rotation and scaling. We design an intuitive interface and user interactions to support flexible querying, allowing exact and approximate searches for partial streamline matching. Users can perform queries at either the character level or the word level, and define their own characters or words conveniently for customized search. We demonstrate the effectiveness of FlowString with several flow field data sets of different sizes and characteristics. We also extend FlowString to handle multiple data sets and perform an empirical expert evaluation to confirm the usefulness of this approach.

  7. Analyzing Unsatirated Flow Patterns in Fractured Rock Using an Integrated Modeling Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Y.S. Wu; G. Lu; K. Zhang; L. Pan; G.S. Bodvarsson

    2006-08-03

    Characterizing percolation patterns in unsaturated fractured rock has posed a greater challenge to modeling investigations than comparable saturated zone studies, because of the heterogeneous nature of unsaturated media and the great number of variables impacting unsaturated flow. This paper presents an integrated modeling methodology for quantitatively characterizing percolation patterns in the unsaturated zone of Yucca Mountain, Nevada, a proposed underground repository site for storing high-level radioactive waste. The modeling approach integrates a wide variety of moisture, pneumatic, thermal, and isotopic geochemical field data into a comprehensive three-dimensional numerical model for modeling analyses. It takes into account the coupled processes of fluid and heat flow and chemical isotopic transport in Yucca Mountain's highly heterogeneous, unsaturated fractured tuffs. Modeling results are examined against different types of field-measured data and then used to evaluate different hydrogeological conceptualizations and their results of flow patterns in the unsaturated zone. In particular, this model provides a much clearer understanding of percolation patterns and flow behavior through the unsaturated zone, both crucial issues in assessing repository performance. The integrated approach for quantifying Yucca Mountain's flow system is demonstrated to provide a practical modeling tool for characterizing flow and transport processes in complex subsurface systems.

  8. Analyzing flow patterns in unsaturated fractured rock of YuccaMountain using an integrated modeling approach

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Yu-Shu; Lu, Guoping; Zhang, Keni; Pan, Lehua; Bodvarsson,Gudmundur S.

    2003-11-03

    This paper presents a series of modeling investigations to characterize percolation patterns in the unsaturated zone of Yucca Mountain, Nevada, a proposed underground repository site for storing high-level radioactive waste. The investigations are conducted using a modeling approach that integrates a wide variety of moisture, pneumatic, thermal, and isotopic geochemical field data into a comprehensive three-dimensional numerical model through model calibration. This integrated modeling approach, based on a dual-continuum formulation, takes into account the coupled processes of fluid and heat flow and chemical isotopic transport in Yucca Mountain's highly heterogeneous, unsaturated fractured tuffs. In particular, the model results are examined against different types of field-measured data and used to evaluate different hydrogeological conceptual models and their effects on flow patterns in the unsaturated zone. The objective of this work to provide understanding of percolation patterns and flow behavior through the unsaturated zone, which is a crucial issue in assessing repository performance.

  9. Two Experiments to Approach the Boltzmann Factor: Chemical Reaction and Viscous Flow

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fazio, Claudio; Battaglia, Onofrio R.; Guastella, Ivan

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we discuss a pedagogical approach aimed at pointing out the role played by the Boltzmann factor in describing phenomena usually perceived as regulated by different mechanisms of functioning. Experimental results regarding some aspects of a chemical reaction and of the viscous flow of some liquids are analysed and described in terms…

  10. Some Approaches Towards Constructing Optimally Efficient Multigrid Solvers for the Inviscid Flow Equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sidilkover, David

    1997-01-01

    Some important advances took place during the last several years in the development of genuinely multidimensional upwind schemes for the compressible Euler equations. In particular, a robust, high-resolution genuinely multidimensional scheme which can be used for any of the flow regimes computations was constructed. This paper summarizes briefly these developments and outlines the fundamental advantages of this approach.

  11. A Novel Laboratory Approach for the Demonstration of Hemodynamic Principles: The Arterial Blood Flow Reflection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Djelic, Marina; Mazic, Sanja; Zikic, Dejan

    2013-01-01

    In the frame of a laboratory training course for medicine students, a new approach for laboratory exercises has been applied to teach the phenomena of circulation. The exercise program included measurements of radial artery blood flow waveform for different age groups using a noninvasive optical sensor. Arterial wave reflection was identified by…

  12. Innovative Approaches for Urban Watershed Wet-Weather Flow Management and Control

    EPA Science Inventory

    The “Innovative Approaches for Urban Watershed Wet-Weather Flow Management and Control: State of the Technology” project investigated a range of innovative technology and management strategies emerging outside the normal realm of business within the continental United States, fo...

  13. Flow equation approach to one-body and many-body localization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quito, Victor; Bhattacharjee, Paraj; Pekker, David; Refael, Gil

    2014-03-01

    We study one-body and many-body localization using the flow equation technique applied to spin-1/2 Hamiltonians. This technique, first introduced by Wegner, allows us to exact diagonalize interacting systems by solving a set of first-order differential equations for coupling constants. Besides, by the flow of individual operators we also compute physical properties, such as correlation and localization lengths, by looking at the flow of probability distributions of couplings in the Hilbert space. As a first example, we analyze the one-body localization problem written in terms of spins, the disordered XY model with a random transverse field. We compare the results obtained in the flow equation approach with the diagonalization in the fermionic language. For the many-body problem, we investigate the physical properties of the disordered XXZ Hamiltonian with a random transverse field in the z-direction.

  14. A knowledge-based approach to automated flow-field zoning for computational fluid dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vogel, Alison Andrews

    1989-01-01

    An automated three-dimensional zonal grid generation capability for computational fluid dynamics is shown through the development of a demonstration computer program capable of automatically zoning the flow field of representative two-dimensional (2-D) aerodynamic configurations. The applicability of a knowledge-based programming approach to the domain of flow-field zoning is examined. Several aspects of flow-field zoning make the application of knowledge-based techniques challenging: the need for perceptual information, the role of individual bias in the design and evaluation of zonings, and the fact that the zoning process is modeled as a constructive, design-type task (for which there are relatively few examples of successful knowledge-based systems in any domain). Engineering solutions to the problems arising from these aspects are developed, and a demonstration system is implemented which can design, generate, and output flow-field zonings for representative 2-D aerodynamic configurations.

  15. River flow forecasting: use of phase-space reconstruction and artificial neural networks approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivakumar, B.; Jayawardena, A. W.; Fernando, T. M. K. G.

    2002-08-01

    The use of two non-linear black-box approaches, phase-space reconstruction (PSR) and artificial neural networks (ANN), for forecasting river flow dynamics is studied and a comparison of their performances is made. This is done by attempting 1-day and 7-day ahead forecasts of the daily river flow from the Nakhon Sawan station at the Chao Phraya River basin in Thailand. The results indicate a reasonably good performance of both approaches for both 1-day and 7-day ahead forecasts. However, the performance of the PSR approach is found to be consistently better than that of ANN. One reason for this could be that in the PSR approach the flow series in the phase-space is represented step by step in local neighborhoods, rather than a global approximation as is done in ANN. Another reason could be the use of the multi-layer perceptron (MLP) in ANN, since MLPs may not be most appropriate for forecasting at longer lead times. The selection of training set for the ANN may also contribute to such results. A comparison of the optimal number of variables for capturing the flow dynamics, as identified by the two approaches, indicates a large discrepancy in the case of 7-day ahead forecasts (1 and 7 variables, respectively), though for 1-day ahead forecasts it is found to be consistent (3 variables). A possible explanation for this could be the influence of noise in the data, an observation also made from the 1-day ahead forecast results using the PSR approach. The present results lead to observation on: (1) the use of other neural networks for runoff forecasting, particularly at longer lead times; (2) the influence of training set used in the ANN; and (3) the effect of noise on forecast accuracy, particularly in the PSR approach.

  16. Deterministic approach for unsteady rarefied flow simulations in complex geometries and its application to gas flows in microsystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chigullapalli, Sruti

    Micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) are widely used in automotive, communications and consumer electronics applications with microactuators, micro gyroscopes and microaccelerometers being just a few examples. However, in areas where high reliability is critical, such as in aerospace and defense applications, very few MEMS technologies have been adopted so far. Further development of high frequency microsystems such as resonators, RF MEMS, microturbines and pulsed-detonation microengines require improved understanding of unsteady gas dynamics at the micro scale. Accurate computational simulation of such flows demands new approaches beyond the conventional formulations based on the macroscopic constitutive laws. This is due to the breakdown of the continuum hypothesis in the presence of significant non-equilibrium and rarefaction because of large gradients and small scales, respectively. More generally, the motion of molecules in a gas is described by the kinetic Boltzmann equation which is valid for arbitrary Knudsen numbers. However, due to the multidimensionality of the phase space and the complex non-linearity of the collision term, numerical solution of the Boltzmann equation is challenging for practical problems. In this thesis a fully deterministic, as opposed to a statistical, finite volume based three-dimensional solution of Boltzmann ES-BGK model kinetic equation is formulated to enable simulations of unsteady rarefied flows. The main goal of this research is to develop an unsteady rarefied solver integrated with finite volume method (FVM) solver in MEMOSA (MEMS Overall Simulation Administrator) developed by PRISM: NNSA center for Prediction of Reliability, Integrity and Survivability of Microsystems (PRISM) at Purdue and apply it to study micro-scale gas damping. Formulation and verification of finite volume method for unsteady rarefied flow solver based on Boltzmann-ESBGK equations in arbitrary three-dimensional geometries are presented. The solver is

  17. A dual flowing continuum approach to model denitrification experiments in porous media colonized by biofilms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delay, Frederick; Porel, Gilles; Chatelier, Marion

    2013-07-01

    We present a modeling exercise of solute transport and biodegradation in a coarse porous medium widely colonized by a biofilm phase. Tracer tests in large laboratory columns using both conservative (fluorescein) and biodegradable (nitrate) solutes are simulated by means of a dual flowing continuum approach. The latter clearly distinguishes concentrations in a flowing porous phase from concentrations conveyed in the biofilm. With this conceptual setting, it becomes possible to simulate the sharp front of concentrations at early times and the flat tail of low concentrations at late times observed on the experimental breakthrough curves. Thanks to the separation of flow in two phases at different velocities, dispersion coefficients in both flowing phases keep reasonable values with some physical meaning. This is not the case with simpler models based on a single continuum (eventually concealing dead-ends), for which inferred dispersivity may reach the unphysical value of twice the size of the columns. We also show that the behavior of the dual flowing continuum is mainly controlled by the relative fractions of flow passing in each phase and the rate of mass transfer between phases. These parameters also condition the efficiency of nitrate degradation, the degradation rate in a well-seeded medium being a weakly sensitive parameter. Even though the concept of dual flowing continuum appears promising for simulating transport in complex porous media, its inversion onto experimental data really benefits from attempts with simpler models providing a rough pre-evaluation of parameters such as porosity and mean fluid velocity in the system.

  18. Linking river flow regimes to riparian plant guilds: a community-wide modeling approach.

    PubMed

    Lytle, David A; Merritt, David M; Tonkin, Jonathan D; Olden, Julian D; Reynolds, Lindsay V

    2017-03-06

    Modeling riparian plant dynamics along rivers is complicated by the fact that plants have different edaphic and hydrologic requirements at different life-stages. With intensifying human demands for water and continued human alteration of rivers, there is a growing need for predicting responses of vegetation to flow alteration, including responses related to climate change and river flow management. We developed a coupled structured population model that coombines stage-specific responses of plant guilds with specific attributes of river hydrologic regime. The model uses information on the vital rates of guilds as they relate to different hydrologic conditions (flood, drought, and baseflow), but deliberately omits biotic interactions from the structure ("interaction neutral"). Our intent was to: 1) consolidate key vital rates concerning plant population dynamics and to incorporate these data into a quantitative framework, 2) determine whether complex plant stand dynamics, including biotic interactions, can be predicted from basic vital rates and river hydrology, and 3) project how altered flow regimes might affect riparian communities. We illustrated the approach using five flow-response guilds that encompass much of the river floodplain community: hydroriparian tree, xeroriparian shrub, hydroriparian shrub, mesoriparian meadow, and desert shrub. We also developed novel network-based tools for predicting community-wide effects of climate-driven shifts and deliberately altered flow regimes. The model recovered known patterns of hydroriparian tree vs. xeroriparian shrub dominance, including the relative proportion of these two guilds as a function of river flow modification. By simulating flow alteration scenarios ranging from increased drought to shifts in flood timing, the model predicted that mature hydroriparian forest should be most abundant near the observed natural flow regime. Multiguild sensitivity analysis identified substantial network connectivity (many

  19. Pneumatic and Percussive Penetration Approaches for Heat Flow Probe Emplacement on Robotic Lunar Missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zacny, K.; Nagihara, S.; Hedlund, M.; Paulsen, G.; Shasho, J.; Mumm, E.; Kumar, N.; Szwarc, T.; Chu, P.; Craft, J.; Taylor, P.; Milam, M.

    2013-11-01

    In this paper, the development of heat flow probes for measuring the geothermal gradient and conductivity of lunar regolith are presented. These two measurements are the required information for determining the heat flow of a planetary body. Considering the Moon as an example, heat flow properties are very important information for studying the radiogenic isotopes, the thermal evolution and differentiation history, and the mechanical properties of the interior. In order to obtain the best measurements, the sensors must be extended to a depth of at least 3 m, i.e. beyond the depth of significant thermal cycles. Two approaches to heat flow deployment and measurement are discussed in this paper: a percussive approach and a pneumatic approach. The percussive approach utilizes a high frequency hammer to drive a cone penetrometer into the lunar simulant. Ring-like thermal sensors (heaters and temperature sensors) on the penetrometer rod are deployed into the simulant every 30 cm as the penetrometer penetrates to the required 3 m depth. Once the target depth has been achieved, the deployment rod is removed from the simulant, eliminating any thermal path to the lander. The pneumatic approach relies on pressurized gas to excavate, using a cone-shaped nozzle to penetrate the simulant. The nozzle is attached to a coiled stem with thermal sensors embedded along the length of the stem. As the simulant is being lofted out of the hole by the escaping gas, the stem is progressively reeled out from a spool, thus moving the cone deeper into the hole. Thermal conductivity is measured using a needle probe attached to the end of the cone. Breadboard prototypes of these two heat flow probe systems have been constructed and successfully tested under lunar-like conditions to approximately 70 cm, which was the maximum possible depth allowed by the size of the test bin and the chamber.

  20. Eulerian Mapping Closure Approach for Probability Density Function of Concentration in Shear Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    He, Guowei; Bushnell, Dennis M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The Eulerian mapping closure approach is developed for uncertainty propagation in computational fluid mechanics. The approach is used to study the Probability Density Function (PDF) for the concentration of species advected by a random shear flow. An analytical argument shows that fluctuation of the concentration field at one point in space is non-Gaussian and exhibits stretched exponential form. An Eulerian mapping approach provides an appropriate approximation to both convection and diffusion terms and leads to a closed mapping equation. The results obtained describe the evolution of the initial Gaussian field, which is in agreement with direct numerical simulations.

  1. Building Common Ground for Environmental Flows using Traditional Techniques and Novel Engagement Approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mott Lacroix, Kelly E.; Xiu, Brittany C.; Megdal, Sharon B.

    2016-04-01

    Despite increased understanding of the science of environmental flows, identification and implementation of effective environmental flow policies remains elusive. Perhaps the greatest barrier to implementing flow policies is the framework for water management. An alternative management approach is needed when legal rights for environmental flows do not exist, or are ineffective at protecting ecosystems. The research presented here, conducted in the U.S. state of Arizona, provides an empirical example of engagement to promote social learning as an approach to finding ways to provide water for the environment where legal rights for environmental flows are inadequate. Based on our engagement process we propose that identifying and then building common ground require attention to the process of analyzing qualitative data and the methods for displaying complex information, two aspects not frequently discussed in the social learning or stakeholder engagement literature. The results and methods from this study can help communities develop an engagement process that will find and build common ground, increase stakeholder involvement, and identify innovative solutions to provide water for the environment that reflect the concerns of current water users.

  2. Building Common Ground for Environmental Flows using Traditional Techniques and Novel Engagement Approaches.

    PubMed

    Mott Lacroix, Kelly E; Xiu, Brittany C; Megdal, Sharon B

    2016-04-01

    Despite increased understanding of the science of environmental flows, identification and implementation of effective environmental flow policies remains elusive. Perhaps the greatest barrier to implementing flow policies is the framework for water management. An alternative management approach is needed when legal rights for environmental flows do not exist, or are ineffective at protecting ecosystems. The research presented here, conducted in the U.S. state of Arizona, provides an empirical example of engagement to promote social learning as an approach to finding ways to provide water for the environment where legal rights for environmental flows are inadequate. Based on our engagement process we propose that identifying and then building common ground require attention to the process of analyzing qualitative data and the methods for displaying complex information, two aspects not frequently discussed in the social learning or stakeholder engagement literature. The results and methods from this study can help communities develop an engagement process that will find and build common ground, increase stakeholder involvement, and identify innovative solutions to provide water for the environment that reflect the concerns of current water users.

  3. Simulations of Injection, Mixing, and Combustion in Supersonic Flow Using a Hybrid RANS/LES Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, David Michael

    There is a great need for accurate and reliable numerical simulation of injection, mixing, and combustion in supersonic combustion ramjet engines. This study seeks to improve the accuracy and reliability which these flow can be simulated with by investigating the use of recent improvements in turbulence modeling and numerical methods. The present numerical simulations use implicit time integration and low-dissipation flux evaluation schemes in an unstructured grid framework. A hybrid Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes and large-eddy simulation approach is used to model turbulence. The large-scale turbulent structure of the flow is resolved, while the near-wall structure is fully modeled. The effects of numerics, grid resolution, and boundary conditions are investigated. The simulation approach is thoroughly validated against available experimental data at a variety of flow conditions. The simulations focus on the injection of fuel through circular injector ports that are oriented either normal to the supersonic crossflow, or at a low angle with respect to the crossflow. The instantaneous flow structure resolved by the simulations is qualitatively compared to experimental flowfield visualization. Quantitative comparisons are made to mean wall pressure, mean velocity, turbulence quantities, and mean mixing data. The simulations are found to do very well at predicting the mean flowfield as well as fluctuations in velocity and injectant concentration. The simulation approach is then used to simulate the flow within a model supersonic combustor. The focus is on the non-reacting case. The simulation results are found to agree well with experimental measurements of temperature and species concentrations. The flow is examined to improve understanding of the mixing within the model combustor. Preliminary results for a simulation including hydrogen combustion are also presented.

  4. Electrification : A New Approach To Evaluate Slip Velocity During Flow Instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores, Fabrice; Allal, Ahmed; Guerret-Piècourt, Christelle

    2007-04-01

    The original feature of this work consists in the parallel study, in extrusion, of the polymer electrification and flow instabilities. On one hand, the Mhetar and Archer model has been used to predict the evolution of slip velocity versus shear stress and on the other hand, the double layer theory seem to be the better theory to explain electrification. We have shown that electrification measurements allow us to measure the slip velocity. The slip velocity values calculated via double layer theory are consistent with those calculated with the Methar and Archer model and allow us to validate our approach. The conclusion is that it's possible to determine the slip velocity during flow instabilities.

  5. High-energy ions produced by two approaching flow fronts in the magnetotail

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchino, H.; Ieda, A.; Machida, S.; Imada, S.

    2015-12-01

    During a substorm event in 2009, THEMIS probes observed high-energy (≲ 1MeV) ions and characteristic time evolution of the differential flux. The high-energy ions seem to be produced in the magnetotail, but existing acceleration theories cannot explain the production of such high-energy ions due to the limitation of dawn-dusk (DD) flow scale. We propose that if two approaching flow fronts exist simultaneously in the magnetotail, the production of high-energy ions can be achieved. Namely, some ideal ions are repeatedly reflected by the two fronts and accelerated to high energies, exceeding the energy-limit given by the product of the duskward electric field and DD scale length of the flows. In addition, this acceleration model similar to "first-order Fermi acceleration" can produce the observed differential flux change. We have analytically calculated the energy-gain of each ion between two approaching flow fronts, and roughly estimated the efficiency of the acceleration and the spectrum change. In order to include the DD flow scale, we have further performed a spatially 1-D (2-D in velocity) test particle simulation where a couple of flow fronts approach each other. Using the simulation, we have confirmed the production of high-energy ions as well as the change of the energy spectrum of ions associated with the acceleration. The simulation result shows that high-energy ions can be produced with shorter DD scale length compared to that of the simple acceleration for trapped particles in the flow front. If we assume that the DD scale length of the flow is 10Re, the simulated ion maximum energy near 1MeV and differential flux change are similar to those of the observation. This scale length is less than half of the length needed for the product with the duskward electric field to produce 1MeV ions. This estimated 10Re flow scale in that event does not contradict previous studies.

  6. A computational approach for flow-acoustic coupling in closed side branches.

    PubMed

    Radavich, P M; Selamet, A; Novak, J M

    2001-04-01

    The quarter-wave resonator, which produces a narrow band of high acoustic attenuation at regularly spaced frequency intervals, is a common type of silencer used in ducts. The presence of mean flow in the main duct, however, is likely to promote an interaction between these acoustic resonances and the flow. The coupling for some discrete flow conditions leads to the production of both large wave amplitudes in the side branch and high noise levels in the main duct, thereby transforming the quarter-wave silencer into a noise generator. The present approach employs computational fluid dynamics (CFD) to model this complex interaction between the flow and acoustic resonances at low Mach number by solving the unsteady, turbulent, and compressible Navier-Stokes equations. Comparisons between the present computations and the experiments of Ziada [PVP-Vol. 258, ASME, 35-59 (1993)] for a system with two coaxial side branches show that the method is capable of reproducing the physics of the flow-acoustic coupling and predicting the flow conditions when the coupling occurs. The theory of Howe [IMA J. Appl. Math. 32, 187-209 (1984)] is then employed to determine the location and timing of the acoustic power production during a cycle.

  7. Modelling forces and flow features in flapping wings: a POD based approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raiola, Marco; Discetti, Stefano; Ianiro, Andrea

    2016-11-01

    A novel POD-based approach to decompose the aerodynamic forces acting on a flapping wing along with the most relevant flow features is proposed. The method is applied to experimental data including PIV and force measurements at Re = 3600 and St = 0 . 2 . An actuated 2D flapping wing with a NACA 0012 airfoil is designed to produce independent heaving and pitching motion. The wing is equipped with a 6 Degrees-Of-Freedom balance, providing aerodynamic force measurements. Planar PIV measurements are carried out to obtain a phase-locked flow features description in the wing near field. The PIV phase-averaged flow fields are transformed into flow fields in the reference frame fixed with respect to the moving wing. The POD performed on the vorticity field provides a time basis, constituted by the vorticity time coefficients, on which it is possible to project both the flow fields and the forces in order to assess the force contribution of each POD mode. The force generation is mostly ascribed to the first 4 modes. A satisfactory description of the measured forces is achieved through a truncation to the first 6 modes. A more detailed analysis of the flow field projections is useful to determine the force generation mechanism. This work has been supported by the Spanish MINECO under Grant TRA2013-41103-P.

  8. A new approach to wall modeling in LES of incompressible flow via function enrichment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krank, Benjamin; Wall, Wolfgang A.

    2016-07-01

    A novel approach to wall modeling for the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations including flows of moderate and large Reynolds numbers is presented. The basic idea is that a problem-tailored function space allows prediction of turbulent boundary layer gradients with very coarse meshes. The proposed function space consists of a standard polynomial function space plus an enrichment, which is constructed using Spalding's law-of-the-wall. The enrichment function is not enforced but "allowed" in a consistent way and the overall methodology is much more general and also enables other enrichment functions. The proposed method is closely related to detached-eddy simulation as near-wall turbulence is modeled statistically and large eddies are resolved in the bulk flow. Interpreted in terms of a three-scale separation within the variational multiscale method, the standard scale resolves large eddies and the enrichment scale represents boundary layer turbulence in an averaged sense. The potential of the scheme is shown applying it to turbulent channel flow of friction Reynolds numbers from Reτ = 590 and up to 5,000, flow over periodic constrictions at the Reynolds numbers ReH = 10 , 595 and 19,000 as well as backward-facing step flow at Reh = 5 , 000, all with extremely coarse meshes. Excellent agreement with experimental and DNS data is observed with the first grid point located at up to y1+ = 500 and especially under adverse pressure gradients as well as in separated flows.

  9. Sequential approach to joint flow-seismic inversion for improved characterization of fractured media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Peter K.; Zheng, Yingcai; Fang, Xinding; Wojcik, Rafal; McLaughlin, Dennis; Brown, Stephen; Fehler, Michael C.; Burns, Daniel R.; Juanes, Ruben

    2016-02-01

    Seismic interpretation of subsurface structures is traditionally performed without any account of flow behavior. Here we present a methodology for characterizing fractured geologic reservoirs by integrating flow and seismic data. The key element of the proposed approach is the identification—within the inversion—of the intimate relation between fracture compliance and fracture transmissivity, which determine the acoustic and flow responses of a fractured reservoir, respectively. Owing to the strong (but highly uncertain) dependence of fracture transmissivity on fracture compliance, the modeled flow response in a fractured reservoir is highly sensitive to the geophysical interpretation. By means of synthetic models, we show that by incorporating flow data (well pressures and tracer breakthrough curves) into the inversion workflow, we can simultaneously reduce the error in the seismic interpretation and improve predictions of the reservoir flow dynamics. While the inversion results are robust with respect to noise in the data for this synthetic example, the applicability of the methodology remains to be tested for more complex synthetic models and field cases.

  10. The Hawaiian Volcano Observatory's current approach to forecasting lava flow hazards (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kauahikaua, J. P.

    2013-12-01

    Hawaiian Volcanoes are best known for their frequent basaltic eruptions, which typically start with fast-moving channelized `a`a flows fed by high eruptions rates. If the flows continue, they generally transition into pahoehoe flows, fed by lower eruption rates, after a few days to weeks. Kilauea Volcano's ongoing eruption illustrates this--since 1986, effusion at Kilauea has mostly produced pahoehoe. The current state of lava flow simulation is quite advanced, but the simplicity of the models mean that they are most appropriately used during the first, most vigorous, days to weeks of an eruption - during the effusion of `a`a flows. Colleagues at INGV in Catania have shown decisively that MAGFLOW simulations utilizing satellite-derived eruption rates can be effective at estimating hazards during the initial periods of an eruption crisis. However, the algorithms do not simulate the complexity of pahoehoe flows. Forecasts of lava flow hazards are the most common form of volcanic hazard assessments made in Hawai`i. Communications with emergency managers over the last decade have relied on simple steepest-descent line maps, coupled with empirical lava flow advance rate information, to portray the imminence of lava flow hazard to nearby communities. Lavasheds, calculated as watersheds, are used as a broader context for the future flow paths and to advise on the utility of diversion efforts, should they be contemplated. The key is to communicate the uncertainty of any approach used to formulate a forecast and, if the forecast uses simple tools, these communications can be fairly straightforward. The calculation of steepest-descent paths and lavasheds relies on the accuracy of the digital elevation model (DEM) used, so the choice of DEM is critical. In Hawai`i, the best choice is not the most recent but is a 1980s-vintage 10-m DEM--more recent LIDAR and satellite radar DEM are referenced to the ellipsoid and include vegetation effects. On low-slope terrain, steepest

  11. Some Approaches to Modeling Diffuse Flow at Mid-Ocean Ridges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farough, A.; Lowell, R. P.; Craft, K.; Germanovich, L. N.

    2011-12-01

    To obtain a sound understanding of subsurface temperatures and the extent of the subsurface biosphere in young oceanic crust, one must understand the mechanisms of diffuse flow at oceanic spreading centers. Mathematical modeling of diffuse flow at oceanic spreading centers has received relatively little attention compared to high-temperature black smoker discharge, in part because the temperature and fluid flow data required to constrain the models are scarce. We review a number of different approaches to modelling diffuse flow: (1) The simplest method considers 1-D steady-state uniform upflow from below subject to a heat transfer boundary condition at the surface, which represents the effects of mixing of hydrothermal fluid with seawater. These models, in which the heat transfer coefficient and the velocity of the ascending fluid are constrained by observed diffuse flow vent temperature and heat flux, typically result in a steep temperature gradient near the seafloor and subsurface biological activity may be limited to the upper few cm of the crust. (2) A related method uses data on the partitioning of heat flux between focused and diffuse flow and chemical data from the focused and diffuse flow components in a two-limb single pass modeling approach to determine the fraction of high-temperature fluid that is incorporated in the diffuse flow. Using data available from EPR 950', the Main Endeavour Field, and ASHES vent field at Axial Volcano on the Juan de Fuca Ridge in conjunction with Mg as a passive tracer, we find that the mixing ratio of high temperature in diffuse flow is <10%. The high-temperature contribution to the diffuse heat flux remains large, however, and high-temperature vent fluid ultimately contributes ~ 90% of the total heat output from the vent field. In these models mixing between high-temperature fluid and seawater may occur over a considerable depth, and the subsurface biosphere may be ~ 100 m deep beneath diffuse flow sites. (3) Finally, in

  12. Navier-Stokes simulation of transonic wing flow fields using a zonal grid approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chaderjian, Neal M.

    1988-01-01

    The transonic Navier-Stokes code was used to simulate flow fields about isolated wings for workshop wind-tunnel and free-air cases using the thin-layer Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations. An implicit finite-difference scheme based on a diagonal version of the Beam-Warming algorithm was used to integrate the governing equations. A zonal grid approach was used to allow efficient grid refinement near the wing surface. The flow field was sensitive to the turbulent transition model, and flow unsteadiness was observed for a wind-tunnel case but not for the corresponding free-air case. The specification of experimental pressure at the wind-tunnel exit plane is the primary reason for the difference of these two numerical solutions.

  13. A scalable approach to modeling groundwater flow on massively parallel computers

    SciTech Connect

    Ashby, S.F.; Falgout, R.D.; Tompson, A.F.B.

    1995-12-01

    We describe a fully scalable approach to the simulation of groundwater flow on a hierarchy of computing platforms, ranging from workstations to massively parallel computers. Specifically, we advocate the use of scalable conceptual models in which the subsurface model is defined independently of the computational grid on which the simulation takes place. We also describe a scalable multigrid algorithm for computing the groundwater flow velocities. We axe thus able to leverage both the engineer`s time spent developing the conceptual model and the computing resources used in the numerical simulation. We have successfully employed this approach at the LLNL site, where we have run simulations ranging in size from just a few thousand spatial zones (on workstations) to more than eight million spatial zones (on the CRAY T3D)-all using the same conceptual model.

  14. A simplified approach for the computation of steady two-phase flow in inverted siphons.

    PubMed

    Diogo, A Freire; Oliveira, Maria C

    2016-01-15

    Hydraulic, sanitary, and sulfide control conditions of inverted siphons, particularly in large wastewater systems, can be substantially improved by continuous air injection in the base of the inclined rising branch. This paper presents a simplified approach that was developed for the two-phase flow of the rising branch using the energy equation for a steady pipe flow, based on the average fluid fraction, observed slippage between phases, and isothermal assumption. As in a conventional siphon design, open channel steady uniform flow is assumed in inlet and outlet chambers, corresponding to the wastewater hydraulic characteristics in the upstream and downstream sewers, and the descending branch operates in steady uniform single-phase pipe flow. The proposed approach is tested and compared with data obtained in an experimental siphon setup with two plastic barrels of different diameters operating separately as in a single-barrel siphon. Although the formulations developed are very simple, the results show a good adjustment for the set of the parameters used and conditions tested and are promising mainly for sanitary siphons with relatively moderate heights of the ascending branch.

  15. Evaluating the spore genome sizes of ferns and lycophytes: a flow cytometry approach.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Li-Yaung; Huang, Yi-Jia; Chang, JenYu; Chiou, Wen-Liang; Huang, Yao-Moan

    2017-03-01

    Ferns and lycophytes produce spores to initiate the gametophyte stage for sexual reproduction. Approximately 10% of these seedless vascular plants are apomictic, and produce genomic unreduced spores. Genome size comparisons between spores and leaves are a reliable, and potentially easier way to determine their reproductive mode compared to traditional approaches. However, estimation of the spore genome sizes of these plants has not been attempted. We attempted to evaluate the spore genome sizes of ferns and lycophytes using flow cytometry, collected spores from selected species representing different spore physical properties and taxonomic groups, and sought to optimize bead-vortexing conditions. By evaluating the spore and sporophyte genome sizes, we examined whether reproductive modes could be ascertained from these flow cytometry results. We proposed two separate sets of optimized bead-vortexing conditions for the nuclear extraction of green and nongreen spores. We further successfully extracted spore nuclei of 19 families covering most orders, and the qualities and quantities of these extractions satisfied the C-value criteria. These evaluated genome sizes further supported the reproductive modes reported previously. In the current study, flow cytometry was used for the first time to evaluate the spore genome sizes of ferns and lycophytes. This use of spore flow cytometry provides a new, efficient approach to ascertaining the reproductive modes of these plants.

  16. A genetic algorithm-based approach to flexible flow-line scheduling with variable lot sizes.

    PubMed

    Lee, I; Sikora, R; Shaw, M J

    1997-01-01

    Genetic algorithms (GAs) have been used widely for such combinatorial optimization problems as the traveling salesman problem (TSP), the quadratic assignment problem (QAP), and job shop scheduling. In all of these problems there is usually a well defined representation which GA's use to solve the problem. We present a novel approach for solving two related problems-lot sizing and sequencing-concurrently using GAs. The essence of our approach lies in the concept of using a unified representation for the information about both the lot sizes and the sequence and enabling GAs to evolve the chromosome by replacing primitive genes with good building blocks. In addition, a simulated annealing procedure is incorporated to further improve the performance. We evaluate the performance of applying the above approach to flexible flow line scheduling with variable lot sizes for an actual manufacturing facility, comparing it to such alternative approaches as pair wise exchange improvement, tabu search, and simulated annealing procedures. The results show the efficacy of this approach for flexible flow line scheduling.

  17. A new approach in cascade flow analysis using the finite element method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baskharone, E.; Hamed, A.

    1980-01-01

    A new approach in analyzing the potential flow past cascades and single airfoils using the finite element method is developed. In this analysis the circulation around the airfoil is not externally imposed but is directly computed in the numerical solution. Different finite element discretization patterns, orders of piecewise approximation, and grid sizes are used in the solution. The results obtained are compared with existing experimental measurements and exact solutions in cascades and single airfoils.

  18. Advanced digital methods for blood flow flux analysis using µPIV approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurochkin, Maxim A.; Timoshina, Polina A.; Fedosov, Ivan V.; Tuchin, Valery V.

    2015-03-01

    A digital optical system focused on work with laboratory animals for intravital capillaroscopy has been developed. It implements the particle image velocimetry (PIV) based approach for measurements of red blood cells velocity in laboratory rat stomach capillaries. We propose a method of involuntary displacement compensation of the capillary network images. Image stabilization algorithm is based on correlation of feature tracking. The efficiency of designed image stabilization algorithm was experimentally demonstrated. The results of capillary blood flow analysis are demonstrated.

  19. A new approach to high-speed flow measurements using constant voltage anemometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mangalam, S. M.; Sarma, G. R.; Kuppa, S.; Kubendran, L. R.

    1992-01-01

    The paper addresses the basic features of conventional instrumentation, such as the constant temperature (CTA) and the constant current (CCA) anemometers, their limitations, and describes a totally new approach to high-speed dynamic measurements using a constant voltage anemometer (CVA). The paper describes the design features of a newly developed CVA and compares preliminary results obtained with CVA and conventional anemometry in low- and high-speed flows.

  20. A computational approach to modeling cellular-scale blood flow in complex geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balogh, Peter; Bagchi, Prosenjit

    2017-04-01

    We present a computational methodology for modeling cellular-scale blood flow in arbitrary and highly complex geometry. Our approach is based on immersed-boundary methods, which allow modeling flows in arbitrary geometry while resolving the large deformation and dynamics of every blood cell with high fidelity. The present methodology seamlessly integrates different modeling components dealing with stationary rigid boundaries of complex shape, moving rigid bodies, and highly deformable interfaces governed by nonlinear elasticity. Thus it enables us to simulate 'whole' blood suspensions flowing through physiologically realistic microvascular networks that are characterized by multiple bifurcating and merging vessels, as well as geometrically complex lab-on-chip devices. The focus of the present work is on the development of a versatile numerical technique that is able to consider deformable cells and rigid bodies flowing in three-dimensional arbitrarily complex geometries over a diverse range of scenarios. After describing the methodology, a series of validation studies are presented against analytical theory, experimental data, and previous numerical results. Then, the capability of the methodology is demonstrated by simulating flows of deformable blood cells and heterogeneous cell suspensions in both physiologically realistic microvascular networks and geometrically intricate microfluidic devices. It is shown that the methodology can predict several complex microhemodynamic phenomena observed in vascular networks and microfluidic devices. The present methodology is robust and versatile, and has the potential to scale up to very large microvascular networks at organ levels.

  1. Creating a Simple Single Computational Approach to Modeling Rarefied and Continuum Flow About Aerospace Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, David B.; Varghese, Philip L.

    1997-01-01

    We proposed to create a single computational code incorporating methods that can model both rarefied and continuum flow to enable the efficient simulation of flow about space craft and high altitude hypersonic aerospace vehicles. The code was to use a single grid structure that permits a smooth transition between the continuum and rarefied portions of the flow. Developing an appropriate computational boundary between the two regions represented a major challenge. The primary approach chosen involves coupling a four-speed Lattice Boltzmann model for the continuum flow with the DSMC method in the rarefied regime. We also explored the possibility of using a standard finite difference Navier Stokes solver for the continuum flow. With the resulting code we will ultimately investigate three-dimensional plume impingement effects, a subject of critical importance to NASA and related to the work of Drs. Forrest Lumpkin, Steve Fitzgerald and Jay Le Beau at Johnson Space Center. Below is a brief background on the project and a summary of the results as of the end of the grant.

  2. Study of downward annular pipe flow using combined laser-based approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Jae Sik; Cherdantsev, Andrey; Zadrazil, Ivan; Matar, Omar; Markides, Christos

    2016-11-01

    In downward annular flow, the liquid phase flows as a film along the pipe wall and the gas flows in the core of the pipe. The liquid free-surface is covered by a complex multiscale system of waves. The interaction dynamics of the interfacial waves with each other and with the gas stream exert a significant influence on the pressure drop, heat transfer and mass interchange between the phases. The complexity of the interface requires the application of measurement techniques with high spatiotemporal resolution. In this work, two approaches based on the principle of laser-induced fluorescence, namely planar LIF and brightness-based LIF, are applied simultaneously to study interfacial phenomena in these flows, while simultaneous LIF and PIV are used to obtain velocity field information in the liquid phase underneath the waves. Sources of measurement bias are then analysed: total internal reflection at the out-of-plane interface; steep longitudinal slopes and transverse wave curvature; presence of gas bubbles in the liquid film. Although each method has its own limitations, a combined technique can provide reliable spatiotemporal measurements of film thickness to accompany the velocity information. Finally, flow development is studied in a moving frame of reference over long lengths. EPSRC UK Programme Grant MEMPHIS (EP/K003976/1).

  3. A network theory approach for a better understanding of overland flow connectivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masselink, Rens; Heckmann, Tobias; Temme, Arnaud; Anders, Niels; Keesstra, Saskia

    2016-04-01

    Hydrological connectivity describes the physical coupling, or linkages of different elements within a landscape regarding (sub)surface flows. A firm understanding of hydrological connectivity is important for catchment management applications, for e.g. habitat and species protection, and for flood resistance and resilience improvement. Thinking about (geomorphological) systems as networks can lead to new insights, which has been recognised within the scientific community as well, seeing the recent increase in the use of network (graph) theory within the geosciences. Network theory supports the analysis and understanding of complex systems by providing data structures for modelling objects and their linkages, and a versatile toolbox to quantitatively appraise network structure and properties. The objective of this study was to characterise overland flow connectivity dynamics on hillslopes in a humid sub-Mediterranean environment by using a combination of high-resolution digital-terrain models, overland flow sensors and a network approach. Results showed that there are significant differences between overland flow on agricultural areas and semi-natural shrubs areas. Positive correlations between connectivity and precipitation characteristics were found, while negative correlations between connectivity and soil moisture were found, probably due to soil water repellency. The combination of a structural network to determine potential connectivity with dynamic networks to determine the actual connectivity proved a powerful tool in analysing overland flow connectivity.

  4. Two-phase flow in complex geometries: A diffuse domain approach

    PubMed Central

    Aland, S.; Voigt, A.

    2011-01-01

    We present a new method for simulating two-phase flows in complex geometries, taking into account contact lines separating immiscible incompressible components. We combine the diffuse domain method for solving PDEs in complex geometries with the diffuse-interface (phase-field) method for simulating multiphase flows. In this approach, the complex geometry is described implicitly by introducing a new phase-field variable, which is a smooth approximation of the characteristic function of the complex domain. The fluid and component concentration equations are reformulated and solved in larger regular domain with the boundary conditions being implicitly modeled using source terms. The method is straightforward to implement using standard software packages; we use adaptive finite elements here. We present numerical examples demonstrating the effectiveness of the algorithm. We simulate multiphase flow in a driven cavity on an extended domain and find very good agreement with results obtained by solving the equations and boundary conditions in the original domain. We then consider successively more complex geometries and simulate a droplet sliding down a rippled ramp in 2D and 3D, a droplet flowing through a Y-junction in a microfluidic network and finally chaotic mixing in a droplet flowing through a winding, serpentine channel. The latter example actually incorporates two different diffuse domains: one describes the evolving droplet where mixing occurs while the other describes the channel. PMID:21918638

  5. A Dual Model-Reduction Approach to Groundwater Flow and Solute Transport Simulations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanko, Z.; Boyce, S. E.; Yeh, W. W. G.

    2014-12-01

    Mathematical-model reduction using singular value decomposition (SVD) has been shown to be an effective method for reducing the computer runtime of linear and nonlinear groundwater-flow models without sacrificing accuracy. The discrete empirical interpolation method (DEIM) is an alternate method of model reduction better suited for nonlinear systems. In this research, both methods are applied simultaneously to reduce the dimensionality of a 3-D unconfined groundwater-flow model: SVD to reduce the column space and DEIM to reduce the row space. The results of the dimensional reduction can approach several orders of magnitude, resulting in significantly faster simulation runtimes. The implementation and benefit of SVD/DEIM model reduction is demonstrated through its application to a synthetic, groundwater-flow and solute-transport model with groundwater extraction wells that influence of seawater intrusion. The developed methodology identifies the dominant locations (i.e. the discrete points) of the model that have the most influence on the water levels and saltwater concentrations. The result is a reduced model constructed from fewer equations (row dimension) and is projected into a reduced subspace (column dimension). The methodology first independently constructs the reduced flow and transport models such that their errors are minimized for a flow-only model and transport-only model, respectively. Once the two reduced models have been established, a density-dependent flow simulation is preformed by iterating between the flow and transport models for each time step. Further analysis of the SVD/DEIM method illustrates the tradeoff between magnitude of the reduced dimension and corresponding errors in model output, with respect to the unreduced and independently reduced models. The application of this method shows that runtime can be significantly decreased for models of this type while still maintaining control of desired model accuracy.

  6. Stochastic analysis of bounded unsaturated flow in heterogeneous aquifers: Spectral/perturbation approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Ching-Min; Yeh, Hund-Der

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes a stochastic analysis of steady state flow in a bounded, partially saturated heterogeneous porous medium subject to distributed infiltration. The presence of boundary conditions leads to non-uniformity in the mean unsaturated flow, which in turn causes non-stationarity in the statistics of velocity fields. Motivated by this, our aim is to investigate the impact of boundary conditions on the behavior of field-scale unsaturated flow. Within the framework of spectral theory based on Fourier-Stieltjes representations for the perturbed quantities, the general expressions for the pressure head variance, variance of log unsaturated hydraulic conductivity and variance of the specific discharge are presented in the wave number domain. Closed-form expressions are developed for the simplified case of statistical isotropy of the log hydraulic conductivity field with a constant soil pore-size distribution parameter. These expressions allow us to investigate the impact of the boundary conditions, namely the vertical infiltration from the soil surface and a prescribed pressure head at a certain depth below the soil surface. It is found that the boundary conditions are critical in predicting uncertainty in bounded unsaturated flow. Our analytical expression for the pressure head variance in a one-dimensional, heterogeneous flow domain, developed using a nonstationary spectral representation approach [Li S-G, McLaughlin D. A nonstationary spectral method for solving stochastic groundwater problems: unconditional analysis. Water Resour Res 1991;27(7):1589-605; Li S-G, McLaughlin D. Using the nonstationary spectral method to analyze flow through heterogeneous trending media. Water Resour Res 1995; 31(3):541-51], is precisely equivalent to the published result of Lu et al. [Lu Z, Zhang D. Analytical solutions to steady state unsaturated flow in layered, randomly heterogeneous soils via Kirchhoff transformation. Adv Water Resour 2004;27:775-84].

  7. A landscape lake flow pattern design approach based on automated CFD simulation and parallel multiple objective optimization.

    PubMed

    Guo, Hao; Tian, Yimei; Shen, Hailiang; Wang, Yi; Kang, Mengxin

    A design approach for determining the optimal flow pattern in a landscape lake is proposed based on FLUENT simulation, multiple objective optimization, and parallel computing. This paper formulates the design into a multi-objective optimization problem, with lake circulation effects and operation cost as two objectives, and solves the optimization problem with non-dominated sorting genetic algorithm II. The lake flow pattern is modelled in FLUENT. The parallelization aims at multiple FLUENT instance runs, which is different from the FLUENT internal parallel solver. This approach: (1) proposes lake flow pattern metrics, i.e. weighted average water flow velocity, water volume percentage of low flow velocity, and variance of flow velocity, (2) defines user defined functions for boundary setting, objective and constraints calculation, and (3) parallels the execution of multiple FLUENT instances runs to significantly reduce the optimization wall-clock time. The proposed approach is demonstrated through a case study for Meijiang Lake in Tianjin, China.

  8. A general approach for modeling the motion of rigid and deformable ellipsoids in ductile flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Dazhi

    2012-01-01

    A general approach for modeling the motion of rigid or deformable objects in viscous flows is presented. It is shown that the rotation of a 3D object in a viscous fluid, regardless of the mechanical property and shape of the object, is defined by a common and simple differential equation, dQ/dt=-Θ˜Q, where Q is a matrix defined by the orientation of the object and Θ˜ is the angular velocity tensor of the object. The difference between individual cases lies only in the formulation for the angular velocity. Thus the above equation, together with Jeffery's theory for the angular velocity of rigid ellipsoids, describes the motion of rigid ellipsoids in viscous flows. The same equation, together with Eshelby's theory for the angular velocity of deformable ellipsoids, describes the motion of deformable ellipsoids in viscous flows. Both problems are solved here numerically by a general approach that is much simpler conceptually and more economic computationally, compared to previous approaches that consider the problems separately and require numerical solutions to coupled differential equations about Euler angles or spherical (polar coordinate) angles. A Runge-Kutta approximation is constructed for solving the above general differential equation. Singular cases of Eshelby's equations when the object is spheroidal or spherical are handled in this paper in a much simpler way than in previous work. The computational procedure can be readily implemented in any modern mathematics application that handles matrix operations. Four MathCad Worksheets are provided for modeling the motion of a single rigid or deformable ellipsoid immersed in viscous fluids, as well as the evolution of a system of noninteracting rigid or deformable ellipsoids embedded in viscous flows.

  9. A velocity tracking approach for the data assimilation problem in blood flow simulations.

    PubMed

    Tiago, J; Guerra, T; Sequeira, A

    2016-11-24

    Several advances have been made in data assimilation techniques applied to blood flow modeling. Typically, idealized boundary conditions, only verified in straight parts of the vessel, are assumed. We present a general approach, on the basis of a Dirichlet boundary control problem, that may potentially be used in different parts of the arterial system. The relevance of this method appears when computational reconstructions of the 3D domains, prone to be considered sufficiently extended, are either not possible, or desirable, because of computational costs. On the basis of taking a fully unknown velocity profile as the control, the approach uses a discretize then optimize methodology to solve the control problem numerically. The methodology is applied to a realistic 3D geometry representing a brain aneurysm. The results show that this data assimilation approach may be preferable to a pressure control strategy and that it can significantly improve the accuracy associated to typical solutions obtained using idealized velocity profiles.

  10. Different approaches to assess the volume of debris-flows deposits: are results comparable?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michelini, T.; Bertoldi, G.; D'Agostino, V.

    2012-04-01

    Debris-flow hazard planning is heavily dependent on the sediment-volume estimation along with its expected frequency. The reliable determination of this variable allows debris-flow simulation and derives from several methods: statistical elaboration of maximum rainfall/runoff/sediment volumes series, empirical approaches based on catchment morphology, and field surveys on the potential sediment availability. The historical series analysis should be one of the best solution to assess debris-flow magnitude and frequency, especially for unlimited sediment supply basins. Nevertheless this task is difficult due to the lack or non homogeneity of data. Over last decades some Alpine catchments authorities have initiated to systematically record the event features by means of post-event measures, but there is not yet a definitive standard method. An analysis on the variable estimation of volumes of debris-flow deposits volume is here presented. Study area is located in Italian Central Alps and deals with three neighboring small catchments (<5 square kilometers) characterized by unaltered and almost natural fans at the left side of the Sarca river of 'Val Genova' (Trentino Region, Italy). The investigated catchments, Dosson, Cercen and Gabbiolo, have an unlimited sediment supply which causes granular debris flows made of granitic cobbles and boulders in a sandy matrix. Five recent debris flows events have been studied: two occurred on the 11th of July 2010 and on the 20th of September 1999 in the Dosson torrent, one occurred on the 24th-25th of August 1987 in the Cercen torrent, and two on the 25th of September 2006 and on the 20th of September 1999 in the Gabbiolo torrent. The integration of digital terrain model analysis, information about soil geomorphology and forestry cover, and field observations has allowed mapping the debris-flow deposits. Furthermore, data about deposit thicknesses and angles of deposition at the fan surface were measured. Thanks to these data some

  11. A scenario neutral approach to assess low flow sensitivity to climate change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sauquet, Eric; Prudhomme, Christel

    2015-04-01

    Most impact studies of climate change on river flow regime are performed following top-down approaches, where changes in hydrological characteristics are obtained from rainfall-runoff models forced by downscaled projections provided by GCMs. However, such approaches are not always considered robust enough to bridge the gap between climate research and stake holders needs to develop relevant adaptation strategy (Wilby et al., 2014). Alternatively, 'bottom-up' approaches can be applied to climate change impact studies on water resources to assess the intrinsic vulnerability of the catchments and ultimately help to prioritize adaptation actions for areas highly sensitive to small deviations from the present-day climate conditions. A general framework combining the scenario-neutral methodology developed by Prudhomme et al. (2010) and climate elasticity analyses (Sankarasubramanian et al., 2001) is presented and applied to measure the vulnerability of low flows and droughts on a large dataset of more than 400 French gauged basins. The different steps involved in the suggested framework are: - Calibration of the GR5J rainfall runoff model (Pushpalatha et al., 2011) against observations, - Identification of the main climate factors influencing low flows, - Definition of the sensitivity domain for precipitation (P), temperature (T) and potential evapotranspiration (PE) scenarios consistent with most recent climate change projections, - Derivation of the response surface describing changes in low flow and drought regime in terms of severity, duration and seasonality (Catalogne, 2012), - Uncertainty assessment. Results are the basis for a classification of river basins according to their sensitivity at national scale and for discussions on adaptation requirements with stakeholders. Catalogne C (2012) Amélioration des méthodes de prédétermination des débits de référence d'étiage en sites peu ou pas jaugés. PHD thesis, Université Joseph Fourier, Grenoble, 285 pp

  12. Hydrologic and geochemical approaches for determining ground-water flow components

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hjalmarson, H.W.; Robertson, F.N.

    1991-01-01

    Lyman Lake is an irrigation-storage reservoir on the Little Colorado River near St. Johns, Arizona. The main sources of water for the lake are streamflow in the Little Colorado River and ground-water inflow from the underlying Coconino aquifer. Two approaches, a hydrologic analysis and a geochemical analysis, were used to compute the quantity of ground-water flow to and from Lyman Lake. Hydrologic data used to calculate a water budget were precipitation on the lake, evaporation from the lake, transpiration from dense vegetation, seepage through the dam, streamflow in and out of the lake, and changes in lake storage. Geochemical data used to calculate the ground-water flow components were major ions, trace elements, and the stable isotopes of hydrogen and oxygen. During the study, the potentiometric level of the Coconino aquifer was above the lake level at the upstream end of the lake and below the lake level at the downstream end. Hydrologic and geochemical data indicate that about 10 percent and 8 percent, respectively, of the water in the lake is ground-water inflow and that about 35 percent of the water in the Little Colorado River 6 miles downgradient from the lake near Salado Springs is ground water. These independent estimates of ground-water flow derived from each approach are in agreement and support a conceptual model of the water budget.

  13. An Aerial-Image Dense Matching Approach Based on Optical Flow Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Wei; Chen, Shiyu; Zhang, Yong; Gong, Jianya; Shibasaki, Ryosuke

    2016-06-01

    Dense matching plays an important role in many fields, such as DEM (digital evaluation model) producing, robot navigation and 3D environment reconstruction. Traditional approaches may meet the demand of accuracy. But the calculation time and out puts density is hardly be accepted. Focus on the matching efficiency and complex terrain surface matching feasibility an aerial image dense matching method based on optical flow field is proposed in this paper. First, some high accurate and uniformed control points are extracted by using the feature based matching method. Then the optical flow is calculated by using these control points, so as to determine the similar region between two images. Second, the optical flow field is interpolated by using the multi-level B-spline interpolation in the similar region and accomplished the pixel by pixel coarse matching. Final, the results related to the coarse matching refinement based on the combined constraint, which recognizes the same points between images. The experimental results have shown that our method can achieve per-pixel dense matching points, the matching accuracy achieves sub-pixel level, and fully meet the three-dimensional reconstruction and automatic generation of DSM-intensive matching's requirements. The comparison experiments demonstrated that our approach's matching efficiency is higher than semi-global matching (SGM) and Patch-based multi-view stereo matching (PMVS) which verifies the feasibility and effectiveness of the algorithm.

  14. Review of numerical models of cavitating flows with the use of the homogeneous approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niedźwiedzka, Agnieszka; Schnerr, Günter H.; Sobieski, Wojciech

    2016-06-01

    The focus of research works on cavitation has changed since the 1960s; the behaviour of a single bubble is no more the area of interest for most scientists. Its place was taken by the cavitating flow considered as a whole. Many numerical models of cavitating flows came into being within the space of the last fifty years. They can be divided into two groups: multi-fluid and homogeneous (i.e., single-fluid) models. The group of homogenous models contains two subgroups: models based on transport equation and pressure based models. Several works tried to order particular approaches and presented short reviews of selected studies. However, these classifications are too rough to be treated as sufficiently accurate. The aim of this paper is to present the development paths of numerical investigations of cavitating flows with the use of homogeneous approach in order of publication year and with relatively detailed description. Each of the presented model is accompanied by examples of the application area. This review focuses not only on the list of the most significant existing models to predict sheet and cloud cavitation, but also on presenting their advantages and disadvantages. Moreover, it shows the reasons which inspired present authors to look for new ways of more accurate numerical predictions and dimensions of cavitation. The article includes also the division of source terms of presented models based on the transport equation with the use of standardized symbols.

  15. An implicit and adaptive nonlinear frequency domain approach for periodic viscous flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosahebi, A.; Nadarajah, S.

    2014-12-01

    An implicit nonlinear Lower-Upper symmetric Gauss-Seidel (LU-SGS) solver has been extended to the adaptive Nonlinear Frequency Domain method (adaptive NLFD) for periodic viscous flows. The discretized equations are linearized in both spatial and temporal directions, yielding an innovative segregate approach, where the effects of the neighboring cells are transferred to the right-hand-side and are updated iteratively. This property of the solver is aligned with the adaptive NLFD concept, in which different cells have different number of modes; hence, should be treated individually. The segregate analysis of the modal equations prevents assembling and inversion of a large left-hand-side matrix, when high number of modes are involved. This is an important characteristic for a selected flow solver of the adaptive NLFD method, where a high modal content may be required in highly unsteady parts of the flow field. The implicit nonlinear LU-SGS solver has demonstrated to be both robust and computationally efficient as the number of modes is increased. The developed solver is thoroughly validated for the laminar vortex shedding behind a stationary cylinder, high angle of attack NACA0012 airfoil, and a plunging NACA0012 airfoil. An order of magnitude improvement in the computational time is observed through the developed implicit approach over the classical modified 5-stage Runge-Kutta method.

  16. Molecule-based approach for computing chemical-reaction rates in upper atmosphere hypersonic flows.

    SciTech Connect

    Gallis, Michail A.; Bond, Ryan Bomar; Torczynski, John Robert

    2009-08-01

    This report summarizes the work completed during FY2009 for the LDRD project 09-1332 'Molecule-Based Approach for Computing Chemical-Reaction Rates in Upper-Atmosphere Hypersonic Flows'. The goal of this project was to apply a recently proposed approach for the Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method to calculate chemical-reaction rates for high-temperature atmospheric species. The new DSMC model reproduces measured equilibrium reaction rates without using any macroscopic reaction-rate information. Since it uses only molecular properties, the new model is inherently able to predict reaction rates for arbitrary nonequilibrium conditions. DSMC non-equilibrium reaction rates are compared to Park's phenomenological non-equilibrium reaction-rate model, the predominant model for hypersonic-flow-field calculations. For near-equilibrium conditions, Park's model is in good agreement with the DSMC-calculated reaction rates. For far-from-equilibrium conditions, corresponding to a typical shock layer, the difference between the two models can exceed 10 orders of magnitude. The DSMC predictions are also found to be in very good agreement with measured and calculated non-equilibrium reaction rates. Extensions of the model to reactions typically found in combustion flows and ionizing reactions are also found to be in very good agreement with available measurements, offering strong evidence that this is a viable and reliable technique to predict chemical reaction rates.

  17. Optimized Structure of the Traffic Flow Forecasting Model With a Deep Learning Approach.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hao-Fan; Dillon, Tharam S; Chen, Yi-Ping Phoebe

    2016-07-20

    Forecasting accuracy is an important issue for successful intelligent traffic management, especially in the domain of traffic efficiency and congestion reduction. The dawning of the big data era brings opportunities to greatly improve prediction accuracy. In this paper, we propose a novel model, stacked autoencoder Levenberg-Marquardt model, which is a type of deep architecture of neural network approach aiming to improve forecasting accuracy. The proposed model is designed using the Taguchi method to develop an optimized structure and to learn traffic flow features through layer-by-layer feature granulation with a greedy layerwise unsupervised learning algorithm. It is applied to real-world data collected from the M6 freeway in the U.K. and is compared with three existing traffic predictors. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time that an optimized structure of the traffic flow forecasting model with a deep learning approach is presented. The evaluation results demonstrate that the proposed model with an optimized structure has superior performance in traffic flow forecasting.

  18. High Detailed Debris Flows Hazard Maps by a Cellular Automata Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lupiano, V.; Lucà, F.; Robustelli, G.; Rongo, R.; D'Ambrosio, D.; Spataro, W.; Avolio, M. V.

    2012-04-01

    The individuation of areas that are more likely to be interested by new debris flows in regions that are particularly exposed to such kind of phenomena is of fundamental relevance for mitigating possible consequences, both in terms of loss of human lives and material properties. Here we show the adaption of a recent methodology, already successfully applied to lava flows, for defining flexible high-detailed and reliable hazard maps. The methodology relies on both an adequate knowledge of the study area, assessed by an accurate analysis of its past behavior, together with a reliable numerical model for simulating debris flows on present topographic data (the Cellular Automata model SCIDDICA, in the present case). Furthermore, High Performance Parallel Computing is employed for increasing computational efficiency, due to the great number of simulations of hypothetical events that are required for characterizing the susceptibility to flow invasion of the study area. The application of the presented methodology to the case of Gragnano (Italy) pointed out the goodness of the proposed approach, suggesting its appropriateness for land use planning and Civil Defense applications.

  19. Ar^+ recombination with negative ions in a flowing afterglow: A new approach.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Thomas M.; Viggiano, A. A.

    2006-05-01

    Ion-ion recombination (mutual neutralization) has been previously studied in a flowing-afterglow Langmuir-probe apparatus, using the probe to measure the positive-ion and negative-ion densities as a function of distance (time) along the flow tube axis.^1 A different approach has been taken in the present work, applicable to Ar^+ (or Kr^+ and Xe^+) recombination reactions. A flowing electron-Ar^+ afterglow plasma is first established, and the ambipolar diffusion frequency is measured. Then, an electron attaching gas is added to the afterglow, and the electron attachment rate constant and product ion branching fractions are measured in the usual manner.^2 Finally, the reactant gas concentration is reduced enough that the attachment reaction has not gone to completion by the end of the flow tube. Modeling of the diffusion, attachment, and recombination processes allows us to determine rate constants for each negative ion type recombining with Ar^+. For example, Ar^+ neutralized by Cl^-, Cl2^-, and CCl2O^- produced in attachment to oxalyl chloride,^2 shows that Cl2^- recombines at about half the rate constant of CCl2O^-, and Cl^- + Ar^+ recombination is negligible. ^1D. Smith and N. G. Adams, in Physics of Ion-Ion and Electron-Ion Collisions, Ed. F. Brouillard and J. W. McGowan (Plenum, New York, 1983). ^2J. M. Van Doren, T. M. Miller, and A. A. Viggiano, J. Chem. Phys. (submitted).

  20. Approaches to large scale unsaturated flow in heterogeneous, stratified, and fractured geologic media

    SciTech Connect

    Ababou, R.

    1991-08-01

    This report develops a broad review and assessment of quantitative modeling approaches and data requirements for large-scale subsurface flow in radioactive waste geologic repository. The data review includes discussions of controlled field experiments, existing contamination sites, and site-specific hydrogeologic conditions at Yucca Mountain. Local-scale constitutive models for the unsaturated hydrodynamic properties of geologic media are analyzed, with particular emphasis on the effect of structural characteristics of the medium. The report further reviews and analyzes large-scale hydrogeologic spatial variability from aquifer data, unsaturated soil data, and fracture network data gathered from the literature. Finally, various modeling strategies toward large-scale flow simulations are assessed, including direct high-resolution simulation, and coarse-scale simulation based on auxiliary hydrodynamic models such as single equivalent continuum and dual-porosity continuum. The roles of anisotropy, fracturing, and broad-band spatial variability are emphasized. 252 refs.

  1. Application of the mobility power flow approach to structural response from distributed loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuschieri, J. M.

    1988-01-01

    The problem of the vibration power flow through coupled substructures when one of the substructures is subjected to a distributed load is addressed. In all the work performed thus far, point force excitation was considered. However, in the case of the excitation of an aircraft fuselage, distributed loading on the whole surface of a panel can be as important as the excitation from directly applied forces at defined locations on the structures. Thus using a mobility power flow approach, expressions are developed for the transmission of vibrational power between two coupled plate substructures in an L configuration, with one of the surfaces of one of the plate substructures being subjected to a distributed load. The types of distributed loads that are considered are a force load with an arbitrary function in space and a distributed load similar to that from acoustic excitation.

  2. Strongly coupled partitioned approach for fluid structure interaction in free surface flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Facci, Andrea Luigi; Ubertini, Stefano

    2016-06-01

    In this paper we describe and validate a methodology for the numerical simulation of the fluid structure interaction in free surface flows. Specifically, this study concentrates on the vertical impact of a rigid body on the water surface, (i.e. on the hull slamming problem). The fluid flow is modeled through the volume of fluid methodology, and the structure dynamics is described by the Newton's second law. An iterative algorithm guarantees the tight coupling between the fluid and solid solvers, allowing the simulations of lightweight (i.e. buoyant) structures. The methodology is validated comparing numerical results to experimental data on the free fall of different rigid wedges. The correspondence between numerical results and independent experimental findings from literature evidences the reliability and the accuracy of the proposed approach.

  3. Exact Solutions for Stokes' Flow of a Non-Newtonian Nanofluid Model: A Lie Similarity Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aziz, Taha; Aziz, A.; Khalique, C. M.

    2016-07-01

    The fully developed time-dependent flow of an incompressible, thermodynamically compatible non-Newtonian third-grade nanofluid is investigated. The classical Stokes model is considered in which the flow is generated due to the motion of the plate in its own plane with an impulsive velocity. The Lie symmetry approach is utilised to convert the governing nonlinear partial differential equation into different linear and nonlinear ordinary differential equations. The reduced ordinary differential equations are then solved by using the compatibility and generalised group method. Exact solutions for the model equation are deduced in the form of closed-form exponential functions which are not available in the literature before. In addition, we also derived the conservation laws associated with the governing model. Finally, the physical features of the pertinent parameters are discussed in detail through several graphs.

  4. A time-dependent approach for calculating steady inverse boundary-layer flows with separation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cebeci, T.

    1983-01-01

    An unsteady inverse boundary-layer method is developed which can be used to calculate steady flows with separation. Two versions of Keller's box method with the Mechul function formulation developed by Cebeci (1976) are employed, depending on the complexity of the flow. The regular box is employed in regions of positive streamwise velocity component u, whereas the zigzag box is employed in regions where u becomes negative (t greater than 0). The regular box with the FLARE approximation is employed when t = 0 and u becomes negative in some region across the layer. Results of calculations show that the use of a time-dependent inverse boundary-layer method in which time is used as an iteration parameter provides a good approach in improving the accuracy of the solutions obtained from the FLARE approximation.

  5. A hybrid least squares support vector machines and GMDH approach for river flow forecasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samsudin, R.; Saad, P.; Shabri, A.

    2010-06-01

    This paper proposes a novel hybrid forecasting model, which combines the group method of data handling (GMDH) and the least squares support vector machine (LSSVM), known as GLSSVM. The GMDH is used to determine the useful input variables for LSSVM model and the LSSVM model which works as time series forecasting. In this study the application of GLSSVM for monthly river flow forecasting of Selangor and Bernam River are investigated. The results of the proposed GLSSVM approach are compared with the conventional artificial neural network (ANN) models, Autoregressive Integrated Moving Average (ARIMA) model, GMDH and LSSVM models using the long term observations of monthly river flow discharge. The standard statistical, the root mean square error (RMSE) and coefficient of correlation (R) are employed to evaluate the performance of various models developed. Experiment result indicates that the hybrid model was powerful tools to model discharge time series and can be applied successfully in complex hydrological modeling.

  6. Analysis of dense particulate flow dynamics using a Euler-Lagrange approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desjardins, Olivier; Pepiot, Perrine

    2009-11-01

    Thermochemical conversion of biomass to biofuels relies heavily on dense particulate flows to enhance heat and mass transfers. While CFD tools can provide very valuable insights on reactor design and optimization, accurate simulations of these flows remain extremely challenging due to the complex coupling between the gas and solid phases. In this work, Lagrangian particle tracking has been implemented in the arbitrarily high order parallel LES/DNS code NGA [Desjardins et al., JCP, 2008]. Collisions are handled using a soft-sphere model, while a combined least squares/mollification approach is adopted to accurately transfer data between the Lagrangian particles and the Eulerian gas phase mesh, regardless of the particle diameter to mesh size ratio. The energy conservation properties of the numerical scheme are assessed and a detailed statistical analysis of the dynamics of a periodic fluidized bed with a uniform velocity inlet is conducted.

  7. Numerical solution of transonic wing flows using an Euler/Navier-Stokes zonal approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holst, T. L.; Gundy, K. L.; Thomas, S. D.; Chaderjian, N. M.; Flores, J.

    1985-01-01

    Transonic flow fields about wing geometries are computed using an Euler/Navier-Stokes approach in which the flow field is divided into several zones. The grid zones immediately adjacent to the wing surface are suitably clustered and solved with the Navier-Stokes equations. Grid zones removed from the wing are less finely clustered and are solved with the Euler equations. Wind tunnel wall effects are easily and accurately modeled with the new grid-zoning algorithm because the wind tunnel grid is constructed as an exact subset of the corresponding free-air grid. Solutions are obtained that are in good agreement with experiment, including cases with significant wind tunnel wall effects and shock-induced separation on the upper wing surface.

  8. Thick plate bending wave transmission using a mobility power flow approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccollum, M. D.; Cuschieri, J. M.

    1990-01-01

    The mobility power flow (MPF) approach is used in this paper to describe the flexural behavior of an L-shaped plate structure consisting of thick plates with rotary inertia and shear deformation effects included in the analysis. The introduction of the thick plate effects significantly increases the complexity of the structural mobility functions used in the definitions of the power flow terms; however, because of the substructuring that is used in the MPF approach, the complexity of the problem is significantly reduced as compared to solving for the global structure. Additionally, with the MPF approach the modal behavior is described. The MPF analysis of the L-shaped plate is performed for the case of point force excitation on one plate, with the two plates being identical in both size and thickness. The results of this analysis are compared to results from the finite-element analysis (FEA) and the statistical energy analysis (SEA) and show very good agreement in the low- and high-frequency regimes, respectively.

  9. Computation of transonic separated wing flows using an Euler/Navier-Stokes zonal approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaynak, Uenver; Holst, Terry L.; Cantwell, Brian J.

    1986-01-01

    A computer program called Transonic Navier Stokes (TNS) has been developed which solves the Euler/Navier-Stokes equations around wings using a zonal grid approach. In the present zonal scheme, the physical domain of interest is divided into several subdomains called zones and the governing equations are solved interactively. The advantages of the Zonal Grid approach are as follows: (1) the grid for any subdomain can be generated easily; (2) grids can be, in a sense, adapted to the solution; (3) different equation sets can be used in different zones; and, (4) this approach allows for a convenient data base organization scheme. Using this code, separated flows on a NACA 0012 section wing and on the NASA Ames WING C have been computed. First, the effects of turbulence and artificial dissipation models incorporated into the code are assessed by comparing the TNS results with other CFD codes and experiments. Then a series of flow cases is described where data are available. The computed results, including cases with shock-induced separation, are in good agreement with experimental data. Finally, some futuristic cases are presented to demonstrate the abilities of the code for massively separated cases which do not have experimental data.

  10. A three-pillar approach to assessing climate impacts on low flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laaha, Gregor; Parajka, Juraj; Viglione, Alberto; Koffler, Daniel; Haslinger, Klaus; Schöner, Wolfgang; Zehetgruber, Judith; Blöschl, Günter

    2016-09-01

    The objective of this paper is to present a framework for assessing climate impacts on future low flows that combines different sources of information, termed pillars. To illustrate the framework three pillars are chosen: (a) extrapolation of observed low-flow trends into the future, (b) rainfall-runoff projections based on climate scenarios and (c) extrapolation of changing stochastic rainfall characteristics into the future combined with rainfall-runoff modelling. Alternative pillars could be included in the overall framework. The three pillars are combined by expert judgement based on a synoptic view of data, model outputs and process reasoning. The consistency/inconsistency between the pillars is considered an indicator of the certainty/uncertainty of the projections. The viability of the framework is illustrated for four example catchments from Austria that represent typical climate conditions in central Europe. In the Alpine region where winter low flows dominate, trend projections and climate scenarios yield consistently increasing low flows, although of different magnitudes. In the region north of the Alps, consistently small changes are projected by all methods. In the regions in the south and south-east, more pronounced and mostly decreasing trends are projected but there is disagreement in the magnitudes of the projected changes. The process reasons for the consistencies/inconsistencies are discussed. For an Alpine region such as Austria the key to understanding low flows is whether they are controlled by freezing and snowmelt processes, or by the summer moisture deficit associated with evaporation. It is argued that the three-pillar approach offers a systematic framework of combining different sources of information aimed at more robust projections than that obtained from each pillar alone.

  11. Quantification of non-stormwater flow entries into storm drains using a water balance approach.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zuxin; Yin, Hailong; Li, Huaizheng

    2014-07-15

    To make decisions about correcting illicit or inappropriate connections to storm drains, quantification of non-stormwater entries into storm drains was performed using a water flow balance approach, based on data analysis from 2008 to 2011 in a separate storm drainage system in a Shanghai downtown area of 374 ha. The study revealed severe sewage connections to storm drains; meanwhile, misconnections between surface water and storm drains were found to drive frequent non-stormwater pumping discharges at the outfall, producing a much larger volume of outfall flows in a short period. This paper presented a methodology to estimate quantities of inappropriate sewage flow, groundwater infiltration and river water backflow into the storm drains. It was concluded that inappropriate sewage discharge and groundwater seepage into storm drains were approximately 17,860 m(3)/d (i.e., up to 51% of the total sewage flow in the catchment) and 3,624 m(3)/d, respectively, and surface water backflow was up to an average 28,593 m(3)/d. On the basis of this work, end-of-storm pipe interceptor sewers of 0.25 m(3)/s (i.e., 21,600 m(3)/d) would be effective to tackle the problem of sewage connections and groundwater seepage to storm drains. Under this circumstance, the follow-up non-stormwater outfall pumping events indicate misconnections between surface water and storm drains, featuring pumping discharge equivalent to surface water backflow; hence the misconnections should be repaired. The information provided here is helpful in estimating the magnitude of non-stormwater flow entries into storm drains and designing the necessary pollution control activities, as well as combating city floods in storm events.

  12. Traffic flow characteristics in a mixed traffic system consisting of ACC vehicles and manual vehicles: A hybrid modelling approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Yao-Ming; Jiang, Rui; Hu, Mao-Bin; Wu, Qing-Song; Wang, Ruili

    2009-06-01

    In this paper, we have investigated traffic flow characteristics in a traffic system consisting of a mixture of adaptive cruise control (ACC) vehicles and manual-controlled (manual) vehicles, by using a hybrid modelling approach. In the hybrid approach, (i) the manual vehicles are described by a cellular automaton (CA) model, which can reproduce different traffic states (i.e., free flow, synchronised flow, and jam) as well as probabilistic traffic breakdown phenomena; (ii) the ACC vehicles are simulated by using a car-following model, which removes artificial velocity fluctuations due to intrinsic randomisation in the CA model. We have studied the traffic breakdown probability from free flow to congested flow, the phase transition probability from synchronised flow to jam in the mixed traffic system. The results are compared with that, where both ACC vehicles and manual vehicles are simulated by CA models. The qualitative and quantitative differences are indicated.

  13. A Multiblock Approach for Calculating Incompressible Fluid Flows on Unstructured Grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheng, Chunhua; Whitfield, David L.; Anderson, W. Kyle

    1997-01-01

    A multiblock approach is presented for solving two-dimensional incompressible turbulent flows on unstructured grids. The artificial compressibility form of the governing equations is solved by a vertex-centered, finite-volume implicit scheme which uses a backward Euler time discretization. Point Gauss-Seidel relaxations are used to solve the linear system of equations at each time step. This work introduces a multiblock strategy to the solution procedure, which greatly improves the efficiency of the algorithm by significantly reducing the memory requirements while not increasing the CPU time. Results presented in this work shows that the current multiblock algorithm requires 70% less memory than the single block algorithm.

  14. Coordinated Sampling: An Efficient, Network-Wide Approach for Flow Monitoring

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-07-16

    corresponding PoP-level paths. For Internet2 and GÉANT we rely on the publicly available static IS-IS weights and for the Rocketfuel-based topologies we...13225 80 320 AS2914 70 4900 51 204 AS3356 63 3969 46 196 AS1239 52 2704 37 148 AS1221 44 1936 32 128 AS3257 41 1681 32 218 GÉANT 22 484 16 64 Internet2 ...cial ISPs, we take the following approach. Taking 8 million IP flows (per 5-minute interval)5 as the baseline traffic volume for Internet2 , for each the

  15. Computing 3-D steady supersonic flow via a new Lagrangian approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loh, C. Y.; Liou, M.-S.

    1993-01-01

    The new Lagrangian method introduced by Loh and Hui (1990) is extended for 3-D steady supersonic flow computation. Details of the conservation form, the implementation of the local Riemann solver, and the Godunov and the high resolution TVD schemes are presented. The new approach is robust yet accurate, capable of handling complicated geometry and reactions between discontinuous waves. It keeps all the advantages claimed in the 2-D method of Loh and Hui, e.g., crisp resolution for a slip surface (contact discontinuity) and automatic grid generation along the stream.

  16. DCT-TCI: Real Gas Characterization of Plasma Flow Control - An Integrated Approach

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-12-23

    code) 23-12-2011 Final 1 June 2009 - 30 November 2011 DCT- TCI : Real Gas Characterization of Plasma Flow Control-An Integrated Approach FA9550-09-1...Geometry, Multi-Barrier Plasma Actuators, Stereo PIV Experiment, MIG Plasma Kinetic Simulation U U U U 18 Dr. S Roy 352-392-9823 Reset 1 DCT- TCI ...chamber shown in FIG. 6a. The floor of the chamber is connected to a single axis manual traverse (Velmex A1503P40-S1.5), which allows the floor to

  17. State of the Art High-Throughput Approaches to Genotoxicity: Flow Micronucleus, Ames II, GreenScreen and Comet

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    State of the Art High-Throughput Approaches to Genotoxicity: Flow Micronucleus, Ames II, GreenScreen and Comet (Presented by Dr. Marilyn J. Aardema, Chief Scientific Advisor, Toxicology, Dr. Leon Stankowski, et. al. (6/28/2012)

  18. a Novel Approach for Analyzing Supersonic High Reynolds Number Flows with Separation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Power, Gregory Dan

    A phenomenon which can have a significant impact on the performance of supersonic and hypersonic vehicles and their propulsion systems is the strong interaction which occurs between the viscous and inviscid regions of high Reynolds number, laminar flows. Strong interaction is characterized by the presence of "upstream influence" and often results in flow separation. Since strong viscous/inviscid interaction can significantly alter the flow field and degrade the performance of airframe and propulsion systems, accurately predicting these flows is essential to the aerodynamic design process. The goal of the present study is to develop a physically based computational technique to solve the steady Navier-Stokes equations for the above class of problems. This goal is accomplished by tailoring the analysis to reflect the dominant mechanism of strong viscous/inviscid interaction as determined from experimental observations and mathematical theories. A reduced set of composite equations, derived from the full Navier-Stokes equations, is solved in a globally -iterated, space-marching manner where upstream influence is modelled through the introduction of the stream function along a single line oriented in the streamwise direction and located within the viscous region. This novel technique for solving the composite equations represents an extension of established two-layer interacting viscous-layer approaches and should be applicable to a broader range of flow conditions than the two-layer methods while providing a comparable level of efficiency and thus could provide an effective alternative to time-marching algorithms. Computational results are presented for the cases of normal slot injection into a supersonic stream and shock/boundary -layer interaction with and without separation. These results compare favorably with results computed using an asymptotic analysis, results computed using a time-marching Navier -Stokes procedure, and available experimental data. In addition

  19. Horizontal annular flow modelling using a compositional based interface capturing approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlidis, Dimitrios; Xie, Zhizhua; Percival, James; Gomes, Jefferson; Pain, Chris; Matar, Omar

    2014-11-01

    Progress on a consistent approach for interface-capturing in which each component represents a different phase/fluid is described. The aim is to develop a general multi-phase modelling approach based on fully-unstructured meshes that can exploit the latest mesh adaptivity methods, and in which each fluid phase may have a number of components. The method is compared against experimental results for a collapsing water column test case and a convergence study is performed. A number of numerical test cases are undertaken to demonstrate the method's ability to model arbitrary numbers of phases with arbitrary equations of state. The method is then used to simulate horizontal annular flows. EPSRC Programme Grant, MEMPHIS, EP/K0039761/1.

  20. Physical Organic Approach to Persistent, Cyclable, Low-Potential Electrolytes for Flow Battery Applications.

    PubMed

    Sevov, Christo S; Hickey, David P; Cook, Monique E; Robinson, Sophia G; Barnett, Shoshanna; Minteer, Shelley D; Sigman, Matthew S; Sanford, Melanie S

    2017-03-01

    The deployment of nonaqueous redox flow batteries for grid-scale energy storage has been impeded by a lack of electrolytes that undergo redox events at as low (anolyte) or high (catholyte) potentials as possible while exhibiting the stability and cycling lifetimes necessary for a battery device. Herein, we report a new approach to electrolyte design that uses physical organic tools for the predictive targeting of electrolytes that possess this combination of properties. We apply this approach to the identification of a new pyridinium-based anolyte that undergoes 1e(-) electrochemical charge-discharge cycling at low potential (-1.21 V vs Fc/Fc(+)) to a 95% state-of-charge without detectable capacity loss after 200 cycles.

  1. Exploring the velocity distribution of debris flows: An iteration algorithm based approach for complex cross-sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Zheng; Chen, Guangqi; Li, Yange; Wang, Wei; Zhang, Hong

    2015-07-01

    The estimation of debris-flow velocity in a cross-section is of primary importance due to its correlation to impact force, run up and superelevation. However, previous methods sometimes neglect the observed asymmetric velocity distribution, and consequently underestimate the debris-flow velocity. This paper presents a new approach for exploring the debris-flow velocity distribution in a cross-section. The presented approach uses an iteration algorithm based on the Riemann integral method to search an approximate solution to the unknown flow surface. The established laws for vertical velocity profile are compared and subsequently integrated to analyze the velocity distribution in the cross-section. The major benefit of the presented approach is that natural channels typically with irregular beds and superelevations can be taken into account, and the resulting approximation by the approach well replicates the direct integral solution. The approach is programmed in MATLAB environment, and the code is open to the public. A well-documented debris-flow event in Sichuan Province, China, is used to demonstrate the presented approach. Results show that the solutions of the flow surface and the mean velocity well reproduce the investigated results. Discussion regarding the model sensitivity and the source of errors concludes the paper.

  2. Bubble-induced turbulence study in homogeneous turbulent flow using DNS approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Jinyong; Bolotnov, Igor

    2015-11-01

    The effect of a single bubble on the energy transfer to a homogeneous turbulent flow using DNS approach is investigated for various conditions. The single-phase turbulence is numerically generated by pressure-gradient driven uniform flow through a fully resolved turbulence generating grid. The turbulent intensity measured is uniform normal to the flow direction. The decay rate of the turbulent kinetic energy is validated against analytical power law. The collected instantaneous velocity is used as inflow condition for single-bubble simulations to study the bubble-induced turbulence (BIT). In interface-resolved two-phase simulation the bubble is kept at fixed positions by using a proportional-integral-derivative controller. This simulation set allows estimating the turbulent kinetic energy before and after the bubble, quantifying the BIT. Effects of bubble deformability, velocity and turbulent intensity are separately studied. We observe that for a nearly spherical bubble, the bubble-induced turbulence is positive, increasing the level of turbulent kinetic energy in the liquid phase. BIT is influenced by the other studied parameters and the presented work will contribute to the closure BIT model development in multiphase computational fluid dynamics modeling. The work is supported by NSF-CBET-Fluid Dynamics, Award #1333993.

  3. Runoff modelling using radar data and flow measurements in a stochastic state space approach.

    PubMed

    Krämer, S; Grum, M; Verworn, H R; Redder, A

    2005-01-01

    In urban drainage the estimation of runoff with the help of models is a complex task. This is in part due to the fact that rainfall, the most important input to urban drainage modelling, is highly uncertain. Added to the uncertainty of rainfall is the complexity of performing accurate flow measurements. In terms of deterministic modelling techniques these are needed for calibration and evaluation of the applied model. Therefore, the uncertainties of rainfall and flow measurements have a severe impact on the model parameters and results. To overcome these problems a new methodology has been developed which is based on simple rain plane and runoff models that are incorporated into a stochastic state space model approach. The state estimation is done by using the extended Kalman filter in combination with a maximum likelihood criterion and an off-line optimization routine. This paper presents the results of this new methodology with respect to the combined consideration of uncertainties in distributed rainfall derived from radar data and uncertainties in measured flows in an urban catchment within the Emscher river basin, Germany.

  4. Estimation of turbulent channel flow based on the wall measurement with a statistical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasegawa, Yosuke; Suzuki, Takao

    2016-11-01

    A turbulent channel flow at Ret au = 100 with periodic boundary conditions is estimated with linear stochastic estimation only based on the wall measurement, i.e. the shear-stress in the streamwise and spanwise directions as well as the pressure over the entire wavenumbers. The results reveal that instantaneous measurement on the wall governs the success of the estimation in y+ < 20. Degrees of agreement are equivalent to those reported by Chevalier et al. (2006) using a data-assimilation approach. This suggests that the instantaneous wall information dictates the estimation rather than the estimator solving the dynamical system. We feed the velocity components from the linear stochastic estimation via the body-force term into the Navier-Stokes system; however, the estimation slightly improves in the log layer, indicating some benefit of involving a dynamical system but over-suppression of turbulent kinetic energy beyond the viscous sublayer by the linear stochastic estimation. Motions inaccurately estimated in the buffer layer prevent from further reconstruction toward the centerline even if we relax the feedback forcing and let the flow evolve nonlinearly through the estimator. We also argue the inherent limitation of turbulent flow estimation based on the wall measurement.

  5. Detecting the existence of gene flow between Spanish and North African goats through a coalescent approach.

    PubMed

    Martínez, Amparo; Manunza, Arianna; Delgado, Juan Vicente; Landi, Vincenzo; Adebambo, Ayotunde; Ismaila, Muritala; Capote, Juan; El Ouni, Mabrouk; Elbeltagy, Ahmed; Abushady, Asmaa M; Galal, Salah; Ferrando, Ainhoa; Gómez, Mariano; Pons, Agueda; Badaoui, Bouabid; Jordana, Jordi; Vidal, Oriol; Amills, Marcel

    2016-12-14

    Human-driven migrations are one of the main processes shaping the genetic diversity and population structure of domestic species. However, their magnitude and direction have been rarely analysed in a statistical framework. We aimed to estimate the impact of migration on the population structure of Spanish and African goats. To achieve this goal, we analysed a dataset of 1,472 individuals typed with 23 microsatellites. Population structure of African and Spanish goats was moderate (mean FST = 0.07), with the exception of the Canarian and South African breeds that displayed a significant differentiation when compared to goats from North Africa and Nigeria. Measurement of gene flow with Migrate-n and IMa coalescent genealogy samplers supported the existence of a bidirectional gene flow between African and Spanish goats. Moreover, IMa estimates of the effective number of migrants were remarkably lower than those calculated with Migrate-n and classical approaches. Such discrepancies suggest that recent divergence, rather than extensive gene flow, is the main cause of the weak population structure observed in caprine breeds.

  6. Detecting the existence of gene flow between Spanish and North African goats through a coalescent approach

    PubMed Central

    Martínez, Amparo; Manunza, Arianna; Delgado, Juan Vicente; Landi, Vincenzo; Adebambo, Ayotunde; Ismaila, Muritala; Capote, Juan; El Ouni, Mabrouk; Elbeltagy, Ahmed; Abushady, Asmaa M.; Galal, Salah; Ferrando, Ainhoa; Gómez, Mariano; Pons, Agueda; Badaoui, Bouabid; Jordana, Jordi; Vidal, Oriol; Amills, Marcel

    2016-01-01

    Human-driven migrations are one of the main processes shaping the genetic diversity and population structure of domestic species. However, their magnitude and direction have been rarely analysed in a statistical framework. We aimed to estimate the impact of migration on the population structure of Spanish and African goats. To achieve this goal, we analysed a dataset of 1,472 individuals typed with 23 microsatellites. Population structure of African and Spanish goats was moderate (mean FST = 0.07), with the exception of the Canarian and South African breeds that displayed a significant differentiation when compared to goats from North Africa and Nigeria. Measurement of gene flow with Migrate-n and IMa coalescent genealogy samplers supported the existence of a bidirectional gene flow between African and Spanish goats. Moreover, IMa estimates of the effective number of migrants were remarkably lower than those calculated with Migrate-n and classical approaches. Such discrepancies suggest that recent divergence, rather than extensive gene flow, is the main cause of the weak population structure observed in caprine breeds. PMID:27966592

  7. Use split-flow approach to speed patients to needed care, eliminate inefficiencies and duplication.

    PubMed

    2013-05-01

    To address time and space challenges in the midst of surging demand, the ED at St. Mary Medical Center in Langhorne, PA, turned to the split-flow model, an evidence-based practice that relies heavily on the queuing theory to improve patient throughput. In less than one year, the approach has enabled administrators to reduce door-to-physician times from an average of 47 minutes to 23.5 minutes, and overall length-of-stay in the ED for discharged patients has been slashed by 21 minutes. Under the split-flow system implemented at St. Mary, an expedited triage/assessment process directs patients to prompt care, pediatric care, acute care, or an expedited treatment area (ETA) where patients will undergo further testing or procedures. This initial assessment typically takes about three minutes. Patients sent to the ETA remain there for no longer than 30 minutes.They may then be moved to a holding area while awaiting test results. Patients are constantly moving in the split-flow model, so it is important to pay close attention to handoffs. Patients will begin the process with one nurse and finish with another.

  8. Numerical flow Simulation around a flat plate during heavy rainfall using Lagrangian Eulerian approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhir, Gaurav; Suman, Sawan

    2015-11-01

    Experimental evidence shows that aircrafts operating under heavy rainfall conditions face deterioration of lift and increase in drag. This scenario can be a critical design challenge especially for slow moving vehicles such as airships. Effective roughening of airfoil surface caused by an uneven water film, loss of flow momentum and the loss of vehicle momentum due to its collision with the raindrops are the primary reasons causing the drag to increase. Our work focuses primarily on the numerical quantification of boundary layer momentum loss caused due to raindrops. The collision of raindrops with a solid surface leads to formation of an ejecta fog of splashed back droplets with their sizes being of the order of micrometers and their acceleration leads to boundary layer momentum loss. We model the airflow within a flat plate boundary layer using a Lagrangian-Eulerian approach with the raindrops being considered as non-deformable, non-spinning and non-interacting droplets. We employ an inter-phase coupling term to account for the interaction between the boundary layer flow and the droplets. Our presentation will focus on several comparisons (velocity field, lift and drag at various angles of attack) with the results of the standard (rain-free) Prandtl boundary layer flow. Indian Institute of Technology, Delhi.

  9. An adaptive level set approach for incompressible two-phase flows

    SciTech Connect

    Sussman, M.; Almgren, A.S.; Bell, J.B.

    1997-04-01

    In Sussman, Smereka and Osher, a numerical method using the level set approach was formulated for solving incompressible two-phase flow with surface tension. In the level set approach, the interface is represented as the zero level set of a smooth function; this has the effect of replacing the advection of density, which has steep gradients at the interface, with the advection of the level set function, which is smooth. In addition, the interface can merge or break up with no special treatment. The authors maintain the level set function as the signed distance from the interface in order to robustly compute flows with high density ratios and stiff surface tension effects. In this work, they couple the level set scheme to an adaptive projection method for the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations, in order to achieve higher resolution of the interface with a minimum of additional expense. They present two-dimensional axisymmetric and fully three-dimensional results of air bubble and water drop computations.

  10. Solution-Adaptive Cartesian Cell Approach for Viscous and Inviscid Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coirier, William J.; Powell, Kenneth G.

    1996-01-01

    A Cartesian cell-based approach for adaptively refined solutions of the Euler and Navier-Stokes equations in two dimensions is presented. Grids about geometrically complicated bodies are generated automatically, by the recursive subdivision of a single Cartesian cell encompassing the entire flow domain. Where the resulting cells intersect bodies, polygonal cut cells are created using modified polygon-clipping algorithms. The grid is stored in a binary tree data structure that provides a natural means of obtaining cell-to-cell connectivity and of carrying out solution-adaptive mesh refinement. The Euler and Navier-Stokes equations are solved on the resulting grids using a finite volume formulation. The convective terms are upwinded: A linear reconstruction of the primitive variables is performed, providing input states to an approximate Riemann solver for computing the fluxes between neighboring cells. The results of a study comparing the accuracy and positivity of two classes of cell-centered, viscous gradient reconstruction procedures is briefly summarized. Adaptively refined solutions of the Navier-Stokes equations are shown using the more robust of these gradient reconstruction procedures, where the results computed by the Cartesian approach are compared to theory, experiment, and other accepted computational results for a series of low and moderate Reynolds number flows.

  11. Quantifying Vadose Zone Flow and Transport Uncertainties Using a Unified, Hierarchical Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, Philip D.; Murray, Christopher J.; Rockhold, Mark L.; Schaap, Marcel

    2002-06-01

    The objective of this research is to develop and demonstrate a general approach for modeling flow and transport in the heterogeneous vadose zone. The approach uses similar media scaling, geostatistics, and conditional simulation methods to estimate soil hydraulic parameters at unsampled locations from field-measured water content data and scale-mean hydraulic parameters determined from available site characterization data. Neural network methods are being developed to estimate soil hydraulic parameters from more easily measured physical property data such as bulk density, organic matter content, and percentages of sand, silt, and clay (or particle-size distributions). Field water content distributions are being estimated using various geophysical methods including neutron moderation, ground-penetrating radar, and electrical resistance tomography. One of the primary goals of this research is to determine relationships between the type of data used in model parameterization, the quantity of data available, the scale of the measurement, and the uncertainty in predictions of flow and transport using these methods. Evaluation of the relationships between available data, scale, and uncertainty are using data from a large-scale, controlled field experiment.

  12. Quantifying Vadose Zone Flow and Transport Uncertainties Using a Unified, Hierarchical Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, Philip D.; Murray, Chris J.; Rockhold, Mark L.

    2001-06-01

    The objective of this research is to develop and demonstrate a general approach for modeling flow and transport in the heterogeneous vadose zone. The approach uses similar media scaling, geostatistics, and conditional simulation methods to estimate soil hydraulic parameters at unsampled locations from field-measured water content data and scale-mean hydraulic parameters determined from available site characterization data. Neural network methods are being developed to estimate soil hydraulic parameters from more easily measured physical property data such as bulk density, organic matter content, and percentages of sand, silt, and clay (or particle-size distributions). Field water content distributions are being estimated using various geophysical methods including neutron moderation, ground-penetrating radar, and electrical resistance tomography. One of the primary goals of this research is to determine relationships between the type of data used in model parameterization, th e quantity of data available, the scale of the measurement, and the uncertainty in predictions of flow and transport using these methods. Evaluation of the relationships between available data, scale, and uncertainty will use primarily existing data from large-scale, controlled experiments.

  13. Gene-Splitting Technology: A Novel Approach for the Containment of Transgene Flow in Nicotiana tabacum

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Ning; Jia, Shi-Rong; Tang, Qiao-Ling; Wang, Zhi-Xing

    2014-01-01

    The potential impact of transgene escape on the environment and food safety is a major concern to the scientists and public. This work aimed to assess the effect of intein-mediated gene splitting on containment of transgene flow. Two fusion genes, EPSPSn-In and Ic-EPSPSc, were constructed and integrated into N. tabacum, using Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation. EPSPSn-In encodes the first 295 aa of the herbicide resistance gene 5-enolpyruvyl shikimate-3-phosphate synthase (EPSPS) fused with the first 123 aa of the Ssp DnaE intein (In), whereas Ic-EPSPSc encodes the 36 C-terminal aa of the Ssp DnaE intein (Ic) fused to the rest of EPSPS C terminus peptide sequences. Both EPSPSn-In and Ic-EPSPSc constructs were introduced into the same N. tabacum genome by genetic crossing. Hybrids displayed resistance to the herbicide N-(phosphonomethyl)-glycine (glyphosate). Western blot analysis of protein extracts from hybrid plants identified full-length EPSPS. Furthermore, all hybrid seeds germinated and grew normally on glyphosate selective medium. The 6-8 leaf hybrid plants showed tolerance of 2000 ppm glyphosate in field spraying. These results indicated that functional EPSPS protein was reassembled in vivo by intein-mediated trans-splicing in 100% of plants. In order to evaluate the effect of the gene splitting technique for containment of transgene flow, backcrossing experiments were carried out between hybrids, in which the foreign genes EPSPSn-In and Ic-EPSPSc were inserted into different chromosomes, and non-transgenic plants NC89. Among the 2812 backcrossing progeny, about 25% (664 plantlets) displayed glyphosate resistance. These data indicated that transgene flow could be reduced by 75%. Overall, our findings provide a new and highly effective approach for biological containment of transgene flow. PMID:24915192

  14. A Bayesian Hierarchical Modeling Approach to Predicting Flow in Ungauged Basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gronewold, A.; Alameddine, I.; Anderson, R. M.

    2009-12-01

    Recent innovative approaches to identifying and applying regression-based relationships between land use patterns (such as increasing impervious surface area and decreasing vegetative cover) and rainfall-runoff model parameters represent novel and promising improvements to predicting flow from ungauged basins. In particular, these approaches allow for predicting flows under uncertain and potentially variable future conditions due to rapid land cover changes, variable climate conditions, and other factors. Despite the broad range of literature on estimating rainfall-runoff model parameters, however, the absence of a robust set of modeling tools for identifying and quantifying uncertainties in (and correlation between) rainfall-runoff model parameters represents a significant gap in current hydrological modeling research. Here, we build upon a series of recent publications promoting novel Bayesian and probabilistic modeling strategies for quantifying rainfall-runoff model parameter estimation uncertainty. Our approach applies alternative measures of rainfall-runoff model parameter joint likelihood (including Nash-Sutcliffe efficiency, among others) to simulate samples from the joint parameter posterior probability density function. We then use these correlated samples as response variables in a Bayesian hierarchical model with land use coverage data as predictor variables in order to develop a robust land use-based tool for forecasting flow in ungauged basins while accounting for, and explicitly acknowledging, parameter estimation uncertainty. We apply this modeling strategy to low-relief coastal watersheds of Eastern North Carolina, an area representative of coastal resource waters throughout the world because of its sensitive embayments and because of the abundant (but currently threatened) natural resources it hosts. Consequently, this area is the subject of several ongoing studies and large-scale planning initiatives, including those conducted through the United

  15. Microfluorometric Detection of Catecholamines with Multiphoton-Excited Fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balaji, J.; Reddy, Chandra S.; Kaushalya, S. K.; Maiti, Sudipta

    2004-04-01

    We demonstrate sensitive spatially resolved detection of physiological chromophores that emit in the ultraviolet (less than 330 nm). An atypical laser source (a visible wavelength femtosecond optical parametric oscillator), and an unconventional collection geometry (a lensless detector that detects the forward-emitted fluorescence) enable this detection. We report the excitation spectra of the catecholamines dopamine and norepinephrine, together with near-UV emitters serotonin and tryptophan, in the range of 550-595 nm. We estimate the molecular two-photon action cross section of dopamine, norepinephrine, and serotonin to be 1.2 mGM (1 GM, or Goppert Mayor, is equal to 10^-58 m^4 s^-1 photon^-1), 2 mGM, and 43 mGM, respectively, at 560 nm. The sensitivity achieved by this method holds promise for the microscopic imaging of vesicular catecholamines in live cells.

  16. A dual-permeability approach to preferential water flow and solute transport in shrinking soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coppola, Antonio; dragonetti, giovanna; Comegna, Alessandro; Gerke, Horst H.; Basile, Angelo

    2016-04-01

    The pore systems in most natural soils is dynamically changing due to alternating swelling and shrinkage processes, which induces changes in pore volume and pore size distribution including deformations in pore geometry. This is a serious difficulty for modeling flow and transport in dual permeability approaches, as it will also require that the geometrical deformation of both the soil matrix and the fracture porous systems be taken into account, as well as the dynamics of soil hydraulic properties in response to the domain deformations. This study follows up a previous work by the same authors extending the classical rigid (RGD) approach formerly proposed by Gerke and van Genuchten, to account for shrinking effects (SHR) in modeling water flow and solute transport in dual-permeability porous media. In this study we considered three SHR scenarios, assuming that aggregate shrinkage may change either: (i) the hydraulic properties of the two pore domains, (ii) their relative fractions, and (iii) both, hydraulic properties and fractions of the two domains. The objective was to compare simulation results obtained under the RGD and the SHR assumptions to illustrate the impact of matrix volume changes on water storage, water fluxes and solute concentrations during: 1) An infiltration process bringing an initially dry soil to saturation, 2) A drainage process starting from an initially saturated soil. For an infiltration process, the simulated wetting front and the solute concentration propagation velocity, as well as the water fluxes, water and solute exchange rates, for the three SHR scenarios significantly deviated from the RGD. By contrast, relatively similar water content profiles evolved under all scenarios during drying. Overall, compared to the RGD approach, the effect of changing the hydraulic properties and the weight of the two domains according to the shrinkage behavior of the soil aggregates induced a much more rapid response in terms of water fluxes and

  17. Simulation of axi-symmetric flow towards wells: A finite-difference approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Louwyck, Andy; Vandenbohede, Alexander; Bakker, Mark; Lebbe, Luc

    2012-07-01

    A detailed finite-difference approach is presented for the simulation of transient radial flow in multi-layer systems. The proposed discretization scheme simulates drawdown within the well more accurately than commonly applied schemes. The solution is compared to existing (semi) analytical models for the simulation of slug tests and pumping tests with constant discharge in single- and multi-layer systems. For all cases, it is concluded that the finite-difference model approximates drawdown to acceptable accuracy. The main advantage of finite-difference approaches is the ability to account for the varying saturated thickness in unconfined top layers. Additionally, it is straightforward to include radial variation of hydraulic parameters, which is useful to simulate the effect of a finite-thickness well skin. Aquifer tests with variable pumping rate and/or multiple wells may be simulated by superposition. The finite-difference solution is implemented in MAxSym, a MATLAB tool which is designed specifically to simulate axi-symmetric flow. Alternatively, the presented equations can be solved using a standard finite-difference model. A procedure is outlined to apply the same approach with MODFLOW. The required modifications to the input parameters are much larger for MODFLOW than for MAxSym, but the results are virtually identical. The presented finite-difference solution may be used, for example, as a forward model in parameter estimation algorithms. Since it is applicable to multi-layer systems, its use is not limited to the simulation of traditional pumping and slug tests, but also includes advanced aquifer tests, such as multiple pumping tests or multi-level slug tests.

  18. Dispositional Flow as a Mediator of the Relationships between Attentional Control and Approaches to Studying during Academic Examination Preparation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cermakova, Lucie; Moneta, Giovanni B.; Spada, Marcantonio M.

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated how attentional control and study-related dispositional flow influence students' approaches to studying when preparing for academic examinations. Based on information-processing theories, it was hypothesised that attentional control would be positively associated with deep and strategic approaches to studying, and…

  19. A connectivity-based modeling approach for representing hysteresis in macroscopic two-phase flow properties

    SciTech Connect

    Cihan, Abdullah; Birkholzer, Jens; Trevisan, Luca; Bianchi, Marco; Zhou, Quanlin; Illangasekare, Tissa

    2014-12-31

    During CO2 injection and storage in deep reservoirs, the injected CO2 enters into an initially brine saturated porous medium, and after the injection stops, natural groundwater flow eventually displaces the injected mobile-phase CO2, leaving behind residual non-wetting fluid. Accurate modeling of two-phase flow processes are needed for predicting fate and transport of injected CO2, evaluating environmental risks and designing more effective storage schemes. The entrapped non-wetting fluid saturation is typically a function of the spatially varying maximum saturation at the end of injection. At the pore-scale, distribution of void sizes and connectivity of void space play a major role for the macroscopic hysteresis behavior and capillary entrapment of wetting and non-wetting fluids. This paper presents development of an approach based on the connectivity of void space for modeling hysteretic capillary pressure-saturation-relative permeability relationships. The new approach uses void-size distribution and a measure of void space connectivity to compute the hysteretic constitutive functions and to predict entrapped fluid phase saturations. Two functions, the drainage connectivity function and the wetting connectivity function, are introduced to characterize connectivity of fluids in void space during drainage and wetting processes. These functions can be estimated through pore-scale simulations in computer-generated porous media or from traditional experimental measurements of primary drainage and main wetting curves. The hysteresis model for saturation-capillary pressure is tested successfully by comparing the model-predicted residual saturation and scanning curves with actual data sets obtained from column experiments found in the literature. A numerical two-phase model simulator with the new hysteresis functions is tested against laboratory experiments conducted in a quasi-two-dimensional flow cell (91.4cm×5.6cm×61cm

  20. A connectivity-based modeling approach for representing hysteresis in macroscopic two-phase flow properties

    DOE PAGES

    Cihan, Abdullah; Birkholzer, Jens; Trevisan, Luca; ...

    2014-12-31

    During CO2 injection and storage in deep reservoirs, the injected CO2 enters into an initially brine saturated porous medium, and after the injection stops, natural groundwater flow eventually displaces the injected mobile-phase CO2, leaving behind residual non-wetting fluid. Accurate modeling of two-phase flow processes are needed for predicting fate and transport of injected CO2, evaluating environmental risks and designing more effective storage schemes. The entrapped non-wetting fluid saturation is typically a function of the spatially varying maximum saturation at the end of injection. At the pore-scale, distribution of void sizes and connectivity of void space play a major role formore » the macroscopic hysteresis behavior and capillary entrapment of wetting and non-wetting fluids. This paper presents development of an approach based on the connectivity of void space for modeling hysteretic capillary pressure-saturation-relative permeability relationships. The new approach uses void-size distribution and a measure of void space connectivity to compute the hysteretic constitutive functions and to predict entrapped fluid phase saturations. Two functions, the drainage connectivity function and the wetting connectivity function, are introduced to characterize connectivity of fluids in void space during drainage and wetting processes. These functions can be estimated through pore-scale simulations in computer-generated porous media or from traditional experimental measurements of primary drainage and main wetting curves. The hysteresis model for saturation-capillary pressure is tested successfully by comparing the model-predicted residual saturation and scanning curves with actual data sets obtained from column experiments found in the literature. A numerical two-phase model simulator with the new hysteresis functions is tested against laboratory experiments conducted in a quasi-two-dimensional flow cell (91.4cm×5.6cm×61cm), packed with homogeneous and

  1. An objective and parsimonious approach for classifying natural flow regimes at a continental scale

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Archfield, Stacey A.; Kennen, Jonathan G.; Carlisle, Daren M.; Wolock, David M.

    2014-01-01

    Hydro-ecological stream classification-the process of grouping streams by similar hydrologic responses and, by extension, similar aquatic habitat-has been widely accepted and is considered by some to be one of the first steps towards developing ecological flow targets. A new classification of 1543 streamgauges in the contiguous USA is presented by use of a novel and parsimonious approach to understand similarity in ecological streamflow response. This novel classification approach uses seven fundamental daily streamflow statistics (FDSS) rather than winnowing down an uncorrelated subset from 200 or more ecologically relevant streamflow statistics (ERSS) commonly used in hydro-ecological classification studies. The results of this investigation demonstrate that the distributions of 33 tested ERSS are consistently different among the classification groups derived from the seven FDSS. It is further shown that classification based solely on the 33 ERSS generally does a poorer job in grouping similar streamgauges than the classification based on the seven FDSS. This new classification approach has the additional advantages of overcoming some of the subjectivity associated with the selection of the classification variables and provides a set of robust continental-scale classes of US streamgauges. Published 2013. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  2. AWSCS-A System to Evaluate Different Approaches for the Automatic Composition and Execution of Web Services Flows.

    PubMed

    Tardiole Kuehne, Bruno; Estrella, Julio Cezar; Nunes, Luiz Henrique; Martins de Oliveira, Edvard; Hideo Nakamura, Luis; Gomes Ferreira, Carlos Henrique; Carlucci Santana, Regina Helena; Reiff-Marganiec, Stephan; Santana, Marcos José

    2015-01-01

    This paper proposes a system named AWSCS (Automatic Web Service Composition System) to evaluate different approaches for automatic composition of Web services, based on QoS parameters that are measured at execution time. The AWSCS is a system to implement different approaches for automatic composition of Web services and also to execute the resulting flows from these approaches. Aiming at demonstrating the results of this paper, a scenario was developed, where empirical flows were built to demonstrate the operation of AWSCS, since algorithms for automatic composition are not readily available to test. The results allow us to study the behaviour of running composite Web services, when flows with the same functionality but different problem-solving strategies were compared. Furthermore, we observed that the influence of the load applied on the running system as the type of load submitted to the system is an important factor to define which approach for the Web service composition can achieve the best performance in production.

  3. A Flow Cytometric and Computational Approaches to Carbapenems Affinity to the Different Types of Carbapenemases

    PubMed Central

    Pina-Vaz, Cidália; Silva, Ana P.; Faria-Ramos, Isabel; Teixeira-Santos, Rita; Moura, Daniel; Vieira, Tatiana F.; Sousa, Sérgio F.; Costa-de-Oliveira, Sofia; Cantón, Rafael; Rodrigues, Acácio G.

    2016-01-01

    The synergy of carbapenem combinations regarding Enterobacteriaceae producing different types of carbapenemases was study through different approaches: flow cytometry and computational analysis. Ten well characterized Enterobacteriaceae (KPC, verona integron-encoded metallo-β-lactamases –VIM and OXA-48-like enzymes) were selected for the study. The cells were incubated with a combination of ertapenem with imipenem, meropenem, or doripenem and killing kinetic curves performed with and without reinforcements of the drugs. A cephalosporin was also used in combination with ertapenem. A flow cytometric assay with DiBAC4-(3), a membrane potential dye, was developed in order to evaluate the cellular lesion after 2 h incubation. A chemical computational study was performed to understand the affinity of the different drugs to the different types of enzymes. Flow cytometric analysis and time-kill assays showed a synergic effect against KPC and OXA-48 producing-bacteria with all combinations; only ertapenem with imipenem was synergic against VIM producing-bacteria. A bactericidal effect was observed in OXA-48-like enzymes. Ceftazidime plus ertapenem was synergic against ESBL-negative KPC producing-bacteria. Ertapenem had the highest affinity for those enzymes according to chemical computational study. The synergic effect between ertapenem and others carbapenems against different carbapenemase-producing bacteria, representing a therapeutic choice, was described for the first time. Easier and faster laboratorial methods for carbapenemase characterization are urgently needed. The design of an ertapenem derivative with similar affinity to carbapenemases but exhibiting more stable bonds was demonstrated as highly desirable. PMID:27555844

  4. An optimization approach for large scale simulations of discrete fracture network flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berrone, Stefano; Pieraccini, Sandra; Scialò, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    In recent papers [1,2] the authors introduced a new method for simulating subsurface flow in a system of fractures based on a PDE-constrained optimization reformulation, removing all difficulties related to mesh generation and providing an easily parallel approach to the problem. In this paper we further improve the method removing the constraint of having on each fracture a non-empty portion of the boundary with Dirichlet boundary conditions. This way, Dirichlet boundary conditions are prescribed only on a possibly small portion of DFN boundary. The proposed generalization of the method in [1,2] relies on a modified definition of control variables ensuring the non-singularity of the operator on each fracture. A conjugate gradient method is also introduced in order to speed up the minimization process.

  5. An acoustic-convective splitting-based approach for the Kapila two-phase flow model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ten Eikelder, M. F. P.; Daude, F.; Koren, B.; Tijsseling, A. S.

    2017-02-01

    In this paper we propose a new acoustic-convective splitting-based numerical scheme for the Kapila five-equation two-phase flow model. The splitting operator decouples the acoustic waves and convective waves. The resulting two submodels are alternately numerically solved to approximate the solution of the entire model. The Lagrangian form of the acoustic submodel is numerically solved using an HLLC-type Riemann solver whereas the convective part is approximated with an upwind scheme. The result is a simple method which allows for a general equation of state. Numerical computations are performed for standard two-phase shock tube problems. A comparison is made with a non-splitting approach. The results are in good agreement with reference results and exact solutions.

  6. A hybrid FEM-DEM approach to the simulation of fluid flow laden with many particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casagrande, Marcus V. S.; Alves, José L. D.; Silva, Carlos E.; Alves, Fábio T.; Elias, Renato N.; Coutinho, Alvaro L. G. A.

    2017-04-01

    In this work we address a contribution to the study of particle laden fluid flows in scales smaller than TFM (two-fluid models). The hybrid model is based on a Lagrangian-Eulerian approach. A Lagrangian description is used for the particle system employing the discrete element method (DEM), while a fixed Eulerian mesh is used for the fluid phase modeled by the finite element method (FEM). The resulting coupled DEM-FEM model is integrated in time with a subcycling scheme. The aforementioned scheme is applied in the simulation of a seabed current to analyze which mechanisms lead to the emergence of bedload transport and sediment suspension, and also quantify the effective viscosity of the seabed in comparison with the ideal no-slip wall condition. A simulation of a salt plume falling in a fluid column is performed, comparing the main characteristics of the system with an experiment.

  7. A minimally diffusive interface function steepening approach for compressible multiphase flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regele, Jonathan

    2015-11-01

    Interface capturing methods for contacts and shocks are commonly used in compressible multiphase flows. Artificial diffusion is inherently necessary to stabilize jump discontinuities across shocks and contacts. Contacts suffer from diffusion more severely than shock waves because their characteristics are not convergent like shocks. Interface steepening procedures are commonly used to counteract numerical diffusion necessary to maintain a sharp interface function. In this work, a modification to the sharpening approach used in Shukla, Pantano, and Freund [J. Comp. Phys, 229, 2010] is developed that minimizes the artificial diffusion across the interface while maintaining a monotonic interface function. The method requires fewer iterations for convergence and provides a steeper interface function. Examples in one and two dimensions demonstrate the method's performance.

  8. Difference equation approach to two-thermocouple sensor characterization in constant velocity flow environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hung, P. C.; Irwin, G.; Kee, R.; McLoone, S.

    2005-02-01

    Thermocouples are one of the most popular devices for temperature measurement due to their robustness, ease of manufacture and installation, and low cost. However, when used in certain harsh environments, for example, in combustion systems and engine exhausts, large wire diameters are required, and consequently the measurement bandwidth is reduced. This article discusses a software compensation technique to address the loss of high frequency fluctuations based on measurements from two thermocouples. In particular, a difference equation (DE) approach is proposed and compared with existing methods both in simulation and on experimental test rig data with constant flow velocity. It is found that the DE algorithm, combined with the use of generalized total least squares for parameter identification, provides better performance in terms of time constant estimation without any a priori assumption on the time constant ratios of the thermocouples.

  9. A triple-continuum approach for modeling flow and transportprocesses in fractured rock

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Yu-Shu; Liu, H.H.; Bodvarsson, G.S; Zellmer, K .E.

    2001-08-31

    This paper presents a triple-continuum conceptual model forsimulating flow and transport processes in fractured rock. Field datacollected from the unsaturated zone of Yucca Mountain, a repository siteof high-level nuclear waste, show a large number of small-scalefractures. The effect of these small fractures has not been considered inprevious modeling investigations within the context of a continuumapproach. A new triple-continuum model (consisting of matrix,small-fracture, and large-fracture continua) has been developed toinvestigate the effect of these small fractures. This paper derives themodel formulation and discusses the basic triple-continuum behavior offlow and transport processes under different conditions, using bothanalytical solutions and numerical approaches. The simulation resultsfrom the site-scale model of the unsaturated zone of Yucca Mountainindicate that these small fractures may have an important effect onradionuclide transport within the mountain

  10. Fluid migration in the subduction zone: a coupled fluid flow approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hongliang; Huismans, Ritske; Rondenay, Stéphane

    2016-04-01

    Subduction zone are the main entry point of water into earth's mantle and play an important role in the global water cycle. The progressive release of water by metamorphic dehydration induce important physical-chemical process in the subduction zone, such as hydrous melting, hydration and weakening of the mantle wedge, creation of pore fluid pressures that may weaken the subduction interface and induce earthquakes. Most previous studies on the role of fluids in subduction zones assume vertical migration or migration according to the dynamic pressure in the solid matrix without considering the pore fluid pressure effect on the deformation of the solid matrix. Here we investigate this interaction by explicitly modeling two-phase coupled poro-plastic flow during subduction. In this approach, the fluid migrates by compaction and decompaction of the solid matrix and affects the subduction dynamics through pore fluid pressure dependent frictional-plastic yield. Our preliminary results indicate that: 1) the rate of fluid migration depends strongly on the permeability and the bulk viscosity of the solid matrix, 2) fluid transfer occurs preferentially along the slab and then propagates into the mantle wedge by viscous compaction driven fluid flow, 3) fluid transport from the surface to depth is a prerequisite for producing high fluid pore pressures and associated hydration induced weakening of the subduction zone interface.

  11. An Integrated Design approach to Power Systems: from Power Flows to Electricity Markets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bose, Subhonmesh

    Power system is at the brink of change. Engineering needs, economic forces and environmental factors are the main drivers of this change. The vision is to build a smart electrical grid and a smarter market mechanism around it to fulfill mandates on clean energy. Looking at engineering and economic issues in isolation is no longer an option today; it needs an integrated design approach. In this thesis, I shall revisit some of the classical questions on the engineering operation of power systems that deals with the nonconvexity of power flow equations. Then I shall explore some issues of the interaction of these power flow equations on the electricity markets to address the fundamental issue of market power in a deregulated market environment. Finally, motivated by the emergence of new storage technologies, I present an interesting result on the investment decision problem of placing storage over a power network. The goal of this study is to demonstrate that modern optimization and game theory can provide unique insights into this complex system. Some of the ideas carry over to applications beyond power systems.

  12. An Efficacious Multi-Objective Fuzzy Linear Programming Approach for Optimal Power Flow Considering Distributed Generation

    PubMed Central

    Warid, Warid; Hizam, Hashim; Mariun, Norman; Abdul-Wahab, Noor Izzri

    2016-01-01

    This paper proposes a new formulation for the multi-objective optimal power flow (MOOPF) problem for meshed power networks considering distributed generation. An efficacious multi-objective fuzzy linear programming optimization (MFLP) algorithm is proposed to solve the aforementioned problem with and without considering the distributed generation (DG) effect. A variant combination of objectives is considered for simultaneous optimization, including power loss, voltage stability, and shunt capacitors MVAR reserve. Fuzzy membership functions for these objectives are designed with extreme targets, whereas the inequality constraints are treated as hard constraints. The multi-objective fuzzy optimal power flow (OPF) formulation was converted into a crisp OPF in a successive linear programming (SLP) framework and solved using an efficient interior point method (IPM). To test the efficacy of the proposed approach, simulations are performed on the IEEE 30-busand IEEE 118-bus test systems. The MFLP optimization is solved for several optimization cases. The obtained results are compared with those presented in the literature. A unique solution with a high satisfaction for the assigned targets is gained. Results demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed MFLP technique in terms of solution optimality and rapid convergence. Moreover, the results indicate that using the optimal DG location with the MFLP algorithm provides the solution with the highest quality. PMID:26954783

  13. Sheath-flow microfluidic approach for combined surface enhanced Raman scattering and electrochemical detection.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Matthew R; Pentecost, Amber M; Selimovic, Asmira; Martin, R Scott; Schultz, Zachary D

    2015-04-21

    The combination of hydrodynamic focusing with embedded capillaries in a microfluidic device is shown to enable both surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) and electrochemical characterization of analytes at nanomolar concentrations in flow. The approach utilizes a versatile polystyrene device that contains an encapsulated microelectrode and fluidic tubing, which is shown to enable straightforward hydrodynamic focusing onto the electrode surface to improve detection. A polydimethyslsiloxane (PDMS) microchannel positioned over both the embedded tubing and SERS active electrode (aligned ∼200 μm from each other) generates a sheath flow that confines the analyte molecules eluting from the embedded tubing over the SERS electrode, increasing the interaction between the Riboflavin (vitamin B2) and the SERS active electrode. The microfluidic device was characterized using finite element simulations, amperometry, and Raman experiments. This device shows a SERS and amperometric detection limit near 1 and 100 nM, respectively. This combination of SERS and amperometry in a single device provides an improved method to identify and quantify electroactive analytes over either technique independently.

  14. Modern approaches to processing large hyperspectral and multispectral aerospace data flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bondur, V. G.

    2014-12-01

    We consider approaches to processing large hyperspectral and multispectral imaging flows produced in aerospace monitoring for solving a wide range of problems of management of natural resources, environmental security, prevention of natural disasters and technogenic accidents, as well as problems of real economy, and basic and applied sciences. We analyze the specific features of the phases of hyperspectral data analysis and describe a software and hardware system that uses new and improved methods and algorithms for processing large flows of hyperspectral and other aerospace data and has a high-performance computer. This system contains different types of software for identifying the types of given objects by solving inverse problems of remote sensing as well as by analyzing their qualitative and quantitative characteristics, combined multiparameter processing of hyperspectral aerospace data, tracking the local changes including those related to changes in meteorological conditions and vegetation periods, detecting and identifying the types of small objects on the basis of analysis of individual parts of the image, detecting and identifying heat sources, etc. We bring examples of processing of hyperspectral and multispectral satellite images with the help of software and hardware tools developed.

  15. Evaluating the morphology of erythrocyte population: An approach based on atomic force microscopy and flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Sayari; Chakraborty, Ishita; Chakraborty, Monojit; Mukhopadhyay, Ashis; Mishra, Raghwendra; Sarkar, Debasish

    2016-04-01

    Erythrocyte morphology is gaining importance as a powerful pathological index in identifying the severity of any blood related disease. However, the existing technique of quantitative microscopy is highly time consuming and prone to personalized bias. On the other hand, relatively unexplored, complementary technique based on flow cytometry has not been standardized till date, particularly due to the lack of a proper morphological scoring scale. In this article, we have presented a new approach to formulate a non-empirical scoring scale based on membrane roughness (R(rms)) data obtained from atomic force microscopy. Subsequently, the respective morphological quantifier of the whole erythrocyte population, commonly known as morphological index, was expressed as a function of highest correlated statistical parameters of scattered signal profiles generated by flow cytometry. Feed forward artificial neural network model with multilayer perceptron architecture was used to develop the intended functional form. High correlation coefficient (R(2) = 0.95), even for model-formulation exclusive samples, clearly indicates the universal validity of the proposed model. Moreover, a direct pathological application of the proposed model has been illustrated in relation to patients, diagnosed to be suffering from a wide variety of cancer.

  16. Engineering approach to the prediction of shock patterns in bounded high-speed flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Azevedo, D. J.; Liu, Ching Shi

    1993-01-01

    A two-dimensional symmetric wedge configuration representative of a single high-speed intake in steady flow was investigated. The analysis presented here is intended as an engineering approach for estimating certain features of the internal shock system. The primary interest here is the prediction of the size and location of the almost-normal shock wave that develops when the leading-edge shocks intersect at angles above a certain critical value that is less than the wedge detachment angle. The almost-normal shock wave is frequently referred to as the 'Mach stem', Parametric studies enabled the sensitivity of the Mach stem height to various flowfield parameters to be examined, thus indicating how accurately these parameters must be measured in a given experiment. Results of these predictions were compared with those of a steady-flow experiment performed at nominal freestream Mach numbers from 2.8 to 5. The predicted stem heights were consistently lower than the mean experimental values, attributable both to experimental uncertainties and to certain simplifying assumptions used in the analysis. Modification of these assumptions to better represent the test environment improved the analytical results.

  17. An Efficacious Multi-Objective Fuzzy Linear Programming Approach for Optimal Power Flow Considering Distributed Generation.

    PubMed

    Warid, Warid; Hizam, Hashim; Mariun, Norman; Abdul-Wahab, Noor Izzri

    2016-01-01

    This paper proposes a new formulation for the multi-objective optimal power flow (MOOPF) problem for meshed power networks considering distributed generation. An efficacious multi-objective fuzzy linear programming optimization (MFLP) algorithm is proposed to solve the aforementioned problem with and without considering the distributed generation (DG) effect. A variant combination of objectives is considered for simultaneous optimization, including power loss, voltage stability, and shunt capacitors MVAR reserve. Fuzzy membership functions for these objectives are designed with extreme targets, whereas the inequality constraints are treated as hard constraints. The multi-objective fuzzy optimal power flow (OPF) formulation was converted into a crisp OPF in a successive linear programming (SLP) framework and solved using an efficient interior point method (IPM). To test the efficacy of the proposed approach, simulations are performed on the IEEE 30-busand IEEE 118-bus test systems. The MFLP optimization is solved for several optimization cases. The obtained results are compared with those presented in the literature. A unique solution with a high satisfaction for the assigned targets is gained. Results demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed MFLP technique in terms of solution optimality and rapid convergence. Moreover, the results indicate that using the optimal DG location with the MFLP algorithm provides the solution with the highest quality.

  18. Discrepancies between two measurements and two model approaches for liquid water flow in snow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wever, N.; Schmid, L.; Heilig, A.; Fierz, C. G.; Lehning, M.

    2014-12-01

    Liquid water flow in snowpacks is a complicated process to measure or to simulate in snowpack models, although it is important for assessing, for example, soil moisture variations, streamflow discharge or wet snow avalanche formation. The measurement site Weissfluhjoch (WFJ) is equipped with instruments recording meteorological conditions and snowpack properties, including a snow lysimeter and an upward looking ground penetrating radar (upGPR). The upGRP, among other capabilities, is able to track the progress of the melt water front through the seasonal snowpack at WFJ, whereas the snow lysimeter only records liquid water runoff from the snowpack. The 1 dimensional physics-based snowpack model SNOWPACK has recently been extended with a solver for Richards equation, which provides a demonstrable improvement in simulating snowpack runoff, especially on the hourly time scale, when compared to a simpler bucket-type approach. Here, we compare the two measurement methods and the two snowpack simulations for four snow seasons with respect to the progress of the melt water front through the snowpack and snowpack runoff. We show that in the studied period, snowpack runoff in the melt season starts before the arrival of the melt water front at the bottom of the snowpack as detected by the upGPR. This discrepancy is in the order of several days to 1-2 weeks. The agreement between measured and modeled snowpack runoff is higher, although modeled snowpack runoff is still lagging several days from observed runoff, depending on the used water transport scheme. This demonstrates that the early start of snowpack runoff is likely associated with the existence of preferential flow paths. The modeled progress of the melt water front is faster than observed in the upGPR data. This contributes to a better predicition of the onset of snowpack runoff, but may have consequences for the representation of the internal snowpack in the model. The study highlights the extreme difficulties in

  19. Kinetic approach to the formation of 3D electromagnetic structures in flows of expanding plasma coronas. II. flow anisotropy parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gubchenko, V. M.

    2015-12-01

    The formation of magnetic structures in moving hot solar coronal plasma and hot collisionless laser-produced plasma, as determined by nonlinear criteria for weak and strong magnetization on the basis of the friction parameter Γ B and Alfven number M A, is considered within the Vlasov and Maxwell equations in the second part of the work. The flow velocities are lower then the thermal electron velocity. The energy and pulse anisotropy parameters of a flow, which determine its electromagnetic properties in the Cherenkov resonance line, are calculated by shape of particle distribution function (PDF). The ratio of these parameters is the Q-factor G V ; it characterizes the electromagnetic properties of a plasma flow and is expressed via the ratio of diamagnetic and resistive current densities or via the ratio of irregular and diamagnetic plasma scales. A particle flow is similar to a conductive medium at G V ≪ 1 and a diamagnetic medium at G V ≫ 1. The following cases are considered. (1) A plasma flow is specified by an isotropic PDF and interacts with distributed magnetization. Expressions for anisotropy parameters are derived, 3D field structures in the tail wake are found, and a possibility of topological reconstruction into a compact state under variation in the parameter G V is shown. (2) A plasma flow is specified by an isotropic PDF; a steady-state diamagnetic current layer, characterized by an anisotropic PDF, is immersed inside it. The system is in the diamagnetic state G ≫ 1. The generalized anisotropy parameter is calculated and a possibility of the excitation of three types of diamagnetic structures with low resistive currents is shown. (3) The nonlinear dynamics of anisotropic quasi-current-free plasma ( G =-1), in which the diamagnetic and resistive current densities locally compensate each other in the phase space of particle velocities, is studied. This dynamics is implemented in the long wavelength limit in plasma with an anisotropic PDF.

  20. Teaching Interactions between Foreign Exchange Markets and Balance-of-Payments Flows: An Alternative Graphical Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaske, Dan

    1992-01-01

    Provides a graphical framework for presenting interactions among current account flows, capital account flows, and exchange rates. Suggests that the two type of flows must be considered separately in discussions of foreign exchange equilibrium and balance of payments flows. Supplies sample graphs and instructions for applying the framework to real…

  1. An Airway Network Flow Assignment Approach Based on an Efficient Multiobjective Optimization Framework

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Xiangmin; Zhang, Xuejun; Zhu, Yanbo; Sun, Dengfeng; Lei, Jiaxing

    2015-01-01

    Considering reducing the airspace congestion and the flight delay simultaneously, this paper formulates the airway network flow assignment (ANFA) problem as a multiobjective optimization model and presents a new multiobjective optimization framework to solve it. Firstly, an effective multi-island parallel evolution algorithm with multiple evolution populations is employed to improve the optimization capability. Secondly, the nondominated sorting genetic algorithm II is applied for each population. In addition, a cooperative coevolution algorithm is adapted to divide the ANFA problem into several low-dimensional biobjective optimization problems which are easier to deal with. Finally, in order to maintain the diversity of solutions and to avoid prematurity, a dynamic adjustment operator based on solution congestion degree is specifically designed for the ANFA problem. Simulation results using the real traffic data from China air route network and daily flight plans demonstrate that the proposed approach can improve the solution quality effectively, showing superiority to the existing approaches such as the multiobjective genetic algorithm, the well-known multiobjective evolutionary algorithm based on decomposition, and a cooperative coevolution multiobjective algorithm as well as other parallel evolution algorithms with different migration topology. PMID:26180840

  2. Transversally enriched pipe element method (TEPEM): An effective numerical approach for blood flow modeling.

    PubMed

    Mansilla Alvarez, Luis; Blanco, Pablo; Bulant, Carlos; Dari, Enzo; Veneziani, Alessandro; Feijóo, Raúl

    2017-04-01

    In this work, we present a novel approach tailored to approximate the Navier-Stokes equations to simulate fluid flow in three-dimensional tubular domains of arbitrary cross-sectional shape. The proposed methodology is aimed at filling the gap between (cheap) one-dimensional and (expensive) three-dimensional models, featuring descriptive capabilities comparable with the full and accurate 3D description of the problem at a low computational cost. In addition, this methodology can easily be tuned or even adapted to address local features demanding more accuracy. The numerical strategy employs finite (pipe-type) elements that take advantage of the pipe structure of the spatial domain under analysis. While low order approximation is used for the longitudinal description of the physical fields, transverse approximation is enriched using high order polynomials. Although our application of interest is computational hemodynamics and its relevance to pathological dynamics like atherosclerosis, the approach is quite general and can be applied in any internal fluid dynamics problem in pipe-like domains. Numerical examples covering academic cases as well as patient-specific coronary arterial geometries demonstrate the potentialities of the developed methodology and its performance when compared against traditional finite element methods. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. A robust approach to chance constrained optimal power flow with renewable generation

    SciTech Connect

    Lubin, Miles; Dvorkin, Yury; Backhaus, Scott N.

    2016-09-01

    Optimal Power Flow (OPF) dispatches controllable generation at minimum cost subject to operational constraints on generation and transmission assets. The uncertainty and variability of intermittent renewable generation is challenging current deterministic OPF approaches. Recent formulations of OPF use chance constraints to limit the risk from renewable generation uncertainty, however, these new approaches typically assume the probability distributions which characterize the uncertainty and variability are known exactly. We formulate a robust chance constrained (RCC) OPF that accounts for uncertainty in the parameters of these probability distributions by allowing them to be within an uncertainty set. The RCC OPF is solved using a cutting-plane algorithm that scales to large power systems. We demonstrate the RRC OPF on a modified model of the Bonneville Power Administration network, which includes 2209 buses and 176 controllable generators. In conclusion, deterministic, chance constrained (CC), and RCC OPF formulations are compared using several metrics including cost of generation, area control error, ramping of controllable generators, and occurrence of transmission line overloads as well as the respective computational performance.

  4. A robust approach to chance constrained optimal power flow with renewable generation

    DOE PAGES

    Lubin, Miles; Dvorkin, Yury; Backhaus, Scott N.

    2016-09-01

    Optimal Power Flow (OPF) dispatches controllable generation at minimum cost subject to operational constraints on generation and transmission assets. The uncertainty and variability of intermittent renewable generation is challenging current deterministic OPF approaches. Recent formulations of OPF use chance constraints to limit the risk from renewable generation uncertainty, however, these new approaches typically assume the probability distributions which characterize the uncertainty and variability are known exactly. We formulate a robust chance constrained (RCC) OPF that accounts for uncertainty in the parameters of these probability distributions by allowing them to be within an uncertainty set. The RCC OPF is solved usingmore » a cutting-plane algorithm that scales to large power systems. We demonstrate the RRC OPF on a modified model of the Bonneville Power Administration network, which includes 2209 buses and 176 controllable generators. In conclusion, deterministic, chance constrained (CC), and RCC OPF formulations are compared using several metrics including cost of generation, area control error, ramping of controllable generators, and occurrence of transmission line overloads as well as the respective computational performance.« less

  5. Estimating construction and demolition debris generation using a materials flow analysis approach.

    PubMed

    Cochran, K M; Townsend, T G

    2010-11-01

    The magnitude and composition of a region's construction and demolition (C&D) debris should be understood when developing rules, policies and strategies for managing this segment of the solid waste stream. In the US, several national estimates have been conducted using a weight-per-construction-area approximation; national estimates using alternative procedures such as those used for other segments of the solid waste stream have not been reported for C&D debris. This paper presents an evaluation of a materials flow analysis (MFA) approach for estimating C&D debris generation and composition for a large region (the US). The consumption of construction materials in the US and typical waste factors used for construction materials purchasing were used to estimate the mass of solid waste generated as a result of construction activities. Debris from demolition activities was predicted from various historical construction materials consumption data and estimates of average service lives of the materials. The MFA approach estimated that approximately 610-78 × 10(6)Mg of C&D debris was generated in 2002. This predicted mass exceeds previous estimates using other C&D debris predictive methodologies and reflects the large waste stream that exists.

  6. Simulating groundwater flow in karst aquifers with distributed parameter models—Comparison of porous-equivalent media and hybrid flow approaches

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kuniansky, Eve L.

    2016-09-22

    been developed that incorporate the submerged conduits as a one-dimensional pipe network within the aquifer rather than as discrete, extremely transmissive features in a porous-equivalent medium; these submerged conduit models are usually referred to as hybrid models and may include the capability to simulate both laminar and turbulent flow in the one-dimensional pipe network. Comparisons of the application of a porous-equivalent media model with and without turbulence (MODFLOW-Conduit Flow Process mode 2 and basic MODFLOW, respectively) and a hybrid (MODFLOW-Conduit Flow Process mode 1) model to the Woodville Karst Plain near Tallahassee, Florida, indicated that for annual, monthly, or seasonal average hydrologic conditions, all methods met calibration criteria (matched observed groundwater levels and average flows). Thus, the increased effort required, such as the collection of data on conduit location, to develop a hybrid model and its increased computational burden, is not necessary for simulation of average hydrologic conditions (non-laminar flow effects on simulated head and spring discharge were minimal). However, simulation of a large storm event in the Woodville Karst Plain with daily stress periods indicated that turbulence is important for matching daily springflow hydrographs. Thus, if matching streamflow hydrographs over a storm event is required, the simulation of non-laminar flow and the location of conduits are required. The main challenge in application of the methods and approaches for developing hybrid models relates to the difficulty of mapping conduit networks or having high-quality datasets to calibrate these models. Additionally, hybrid models have long simulation times, which can preclude the use of parameter estimation for calibration. Simulation of contaminant transport that does not account for preferential flow through conduits or extremely permeable zones in any approach is ill-advised. Simulation results in other karst aquifers or other

  7. Ensuring the consistancy of Flow Direction Curve reconstructions: the 'quantile solidarity' approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poncelet, Carine; Andreassian, Vazken; Oudin, Ludovic

    2015-04-01

    Flow Duration Curves (FDCs) are a hydrologic tool describing the distribution of streamflows at a catchment outlet. FDCs are usually used for calibration of hydrological models, managing water quality and classifying catchments, among others. For gauged catchments, empirical FDCs can be computed from streamflow records. For ungauged catchments, on the other hand, FDCs cannot be obtained from streamflow records and must therefore be obtained in another manner, for example through reconstructions. Regression-based reconstructions are methods relying on the evaluation of quantiles separately from catchments' attributes (climatic or physical features).The advantage of this category of methods is that it is informative about the processes and it is non-parametric. However, the large number of parameters required can cause unwanted artifacts, typically reconstructions that do not always produce increasing quantiles. In this paper we propose a new approach named Quantile Solidarity (QS), which is applied under strict proxy-basin test conditions (Klemes, 1986) to a set of 600 French catchments. Half of the catchments are considered as gauged and used to calibrate the regression and compute residuals of the regression. The QS approach consists in a three-step regionalization scheme, which first links quantile values to physical descriptors, then reduces the number of regression parameters and finally exploits the spatial correlation of the residuals. The innovation is the utilisation of the parameters continuity across the quantiles to dramatically reduce the number of parameters. The second half of catchment is used as an independent validation set over which we show that the QS approach ensures strictly growing FDC reconstructions in ungauged conditions. Reference: V. KLEMEŠ (1986) Operational testing of hydrological simulation models, Hydrological Sciences Journal, 31:1, 13-24

  8. Processes, mechanisms, parameters, and modeling approaches for partially saturated flow in soil and rock media; Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J.S.Y.; Narasimhan, T.N.

    1993-06-01

    This report discusses conceptual models and mathematical equations, analyzes distributions and correlations among hydrological parameters of soils and tuff, introduces new path integration approaches, and outlines scaling procedures to model potential-driven fluid flow in heterogeneous media. To properly model the transition from fracture-dominated flow under saturated conditions to matrix-dominated flow under partially saturated conditions, characteristic curves and permeability functions for fractures and matrix need to be improved and validated. Couplings from two-phase flow, heat transfer, solute transport, and rock deformation to liquid flow are also important. For stochastic modeling of alternating units of welded and nonwelded tuff or formations bounded by fault zones, correlations and constraints on average values of saturated permeability and air entry scaling factor between different units need to be imposed to avoid unlikely combinations of parameters and predictions. Large-scale simulations require efficient and verifiable numerical algorithms. New path integration approaches based on postulates of minimum work and mass conservation to solve flow geometry and potential distribution simultaneously are introduced. This verifiable integral approach, together with fractal scaling procedures to generate statistical realizations with parameter distribution, correlation, and scaling taken into account, can be used to quantify uncertainties and generate the cumulative distribution function for groundwater travel times.

  9. Reversible logic gates based on enzyme-biocatalyzed reactions and realized in flow cells: a modular approach.

    PubMed

    Fratto, Brian E; Katz, Evgeny

    2015-05-18

    Reversible logic gates, such as the double Feynman gate, Toffoli gate and Peres gate, with 3-input/3-output channels are realized using reactions biocatalyzed with enzymes and performed in flow systems. The flow devices are constructed using a modular approach, where each flow cell is modified with one enzyme that biocatalyzes one chemical reaction. The multi-step processes mimicking the reversible logic gates are organized by combining the biocatalytic cells in different networks. This work emphasizes logical but not physical reversibility of the constructed systems. Their advantages and disadvantages are discussed and potential use in biosensing systems, rather than in computing devices, is suggested.

  10. Allocation of river flows for restoration of floodplain forest ecosystems: a review of approaches and their applicability in Europe.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Francine M R; Rood, Stewart B

    2003-07-01

    Floodplain forests are flood-dependent ecosystems. They rely on well-timed, periodic floods for the provision of regeneration sites and on tapered flood recession curves for the successful establishment of seedlings. These overbank flood events are described as "regeneration flows." Once floodplain forest trees are established, in order to grow they also require adequate, although variable, river stage levels or "maintenance flows" throughout the year. Regeneration flows are often synonymous with flood flows and only occur periodically. There is a disparity between this need for varied interannual flows over the decadal time frame and the usual annual cycle of flow management currently used by most river management agencies. Maintenance flows are often closer to established minimum flows and much easier to provide by current operational practices.A number of environmental flow methodologies, developed in North America, Australia, and South Africa are described in this review. They include the needs of the floodplain environment in the management and allocation of river flows. In North America, these methodologies have been put into practice in a number of river basins specifically to restore floodplain forest ecosystems. In Australia and South Africa, a series of related "holistic approaches" have been developed that include the needs of floodplain ecosystems as well as in-channel ecosystems. In most European countries, restoration of floodplain forests takes place at a few localized restoration sites, more often as part of a flood-defense scheme and usually not coordinated with flow allocation decisions throughout the river basin. The potential to apply existing environmental flow methodologies to the management of European floodplain forests is discussed.

  11. A graphical approach to characterize sub-daily flow regimes and evaluate its alterations due to hydropeaking.

    PubMed

    Alonso, Carlos; Román, Alfonso; Bejarano, Maria Dolores; Garcia de Jalon, Diego; Carolli, Mauro

    2017-01-01

    Most flow regime characterizations focus on long time scale flow patterns, which are not precise enough to capture key components of short-term flow fluctuations. Recent proposed methods describing sub-daily flow fluctuations are focused on limited components of the flow regime being unable to fully represent it, or on the identification of peaking events based on subjectively defined thresholds, being unsuitable for evaluations of short-term flow regime alterations through comparisons between regulated and free-flowing rivers. This study aims to launch an innovative approach based on the visual display of quantitative information to address the challenge of the short-term hydrologic characterization and evaluation of alteration resulting from hydropeaking. We propose a graphical method to represent a discrete set of ecologically relevant indices that characterize and evaluate the alteration of sub-daily flow regimes. The frequency of occurrence of classified values of a descriptive hydrological variable is represented in a map-like graph where longitude, latitude and altitude represent the Julian day, the value of the variable and the frequency of occurrence, respectively. Subsequently, we tested the method on several rivers, both free-flowing and subjected to hydropower production. The advantages of our approach compared to other analytical methods are: (i) it displays a great amount of information without oversimplification; (ii) it takes into account changes in the intensity, timing and frequency of the sub-daily flows, without needing a priori defined thresholds to identify hydropeaking events; and (iii) it supports the Water Framework Directive goal. Specifically, results from applications of our graphical method agree with Sauterleute and Charmasson (2014) analytical method.

  12. Flow-volume loops derived from three-dimensional echocardiography: a novel approach to the assessment of left ventricular hemodynamics

    PubMed Central

    Shahgaldi, Kambiz; Söderqvist, Emil; Gudmundsson, Petri; Winter, Reidar; Nowak, Jacek; Brodin, Lars-Åke

    2008-01-01

    Background This study explores the feasibility of non-invasive evaluation of left ventricular (LV) flow-volume dynamics using 3-dimensional (3D) echocardiography, and the capacity of such an approach to identify altered LV hemodynamic states caused by valvular abnormalities. Methods Thirty-one patients with moderate-severe aortic (AS) and mitral (MS) stenoses (21 and 10 patients, respectively) and 10 healthy volunteers underwent 3D echocardiography with full volume acquisition using Philips Sonos 7500 equipment. The digital 3D data were post- processed using TomTec software. LV flow-volume loops were subsequently constructed for each subject by plotting instantaneous LV volume data sampled throughout the cardiac cycle vs. their first derivative representing LV flow. After correction for body surface area, an average flow-volume loop was calculated for each subject group. Results Flow-volume loops were obtainable in all subjects, except 3 patients with AS. The flow-volume diagrams displayed clear differences in the form and position of the loops between normal individuals and the respective patient groups. In patients with AS, an "obstructive" pattern was observed, with lower flow values during early systole and larger end-systolic volume. On the other hand, patients with MS displayed a "restrictive" flow-volume pattern, with reduced diastolic filling and smaller end-diastolic volume. Conclusion Non-invasive evaluation of LV flow-volume dynamics using 3D-echocardiographic data is technically possible and the approach has a capacity to identify certain specific types of alteration of LV flow-volume pattern caused by valvular abnormalities, thus reflecting underlying hemodynamic states specific for these abnormalities. PMID:18394157

  13. Comparison of different approaches in the Trefftz method for analysis of fluid flow between regular bundles of cylindrical fibres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mierzwiczak, M.; Grabski, J. K.; Kołodziej, J. A.

    2016-10-01

    In the paper three different approaches for the Trefftz method are compared in analysis of the fluid flow between regular bundles of cylindrical fibres. The approximate solution is a linear combination of such trial functions which fulfil exactly the governing equations. The trial functions can be defined in the Cartesian coordinate system (the first approach), in the cylindrical coordinate system (and can fulfil also some boundary conditions - the second approach) or be defined as a fundamental solutions (the third approach - the method of fundamental solutions).The average velocity and the product of the friction factor and the Reynolds number ƒ ṡ Re are compared for selected parameters of a considered region.

  14. Modelling transverse turbulent mixing in a shallow flow by using an eddy viscosity approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gualtieri, C.

    2009-04-01

    The mixing of contaminants in streams and rivers is a significant problem in environmental fluid mechanics and rivers engineering since to understand the impact and the fate of pollutants in these water bodies is a primary goal of water quality management. Since most rivers have a high aspect ratio, that is the width to depth ratio, discharged pollutants become vertically mixed within a short distance from the source and vertical mixing is only important in the so-called near-field. As a rule of thumb, neutrally buoyant solute becomes fully mixed vertically within 50-75 depths from the source. Notably, vertical mixing analysis relies on well-known theoretical basis, that is Prandtl mixing length model, which assumes the hypothesis of plane turbulent shear flow and provides theoretical predictions of the vertical turbulent diffusivity which closely match experimental results. In the mid-field, the vertical concentration gradients are negligible and both subsequent transverse and longitudinal changes of the depth-averaged concentrations of the pollutants should be addressed. In the literature, for the application of one-dimensional water quality models the majority of research efforts were devoted to estimate the rate of longitudinal mixing of a contaminant, that is the development of a plume resulting from a temporally varying pollutant source once it has become cross-sectionally well-mixed, in the far-field. Although transverse mixing is a significant process in river engineering when dealing with the discharge of pollutants from point sources or the mixing of tributary inflows, no theoretical basis exists for the prediction of its rate, which is indeed based upon the results of experimental works carried on in laboratory channels or in streams and rivers. Turbulence models based on the eddy viscosity approach, such as the k-ɛ model, k-? and their variation are the most widely used turbulence models and this is largely due to their ease in implementation

  15. Improved Performances in Subsonic Flows of an SPH Scheme with Gradients Estimated Using an Integral Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valdarnini, R.

    2016-11-01

    In this paper, we present results from a series of hydrodynamical tests aimed at validating the performance of a smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) formulation in which gradients are derived from an integral approach. We specifically investigate the code behavior with subsonic flows, where it is well known that zeroth-order inconsistencies present in standard SPH make it particularly problematic to correctly model the fluid dynamics. In particular, we consider the Gresho-Chan vortex problem, the growth of Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities, the statistics of driven subsonic turbulence and the cold Keplerian disk problem. We compare simulation results for the different tests with those obtained, for the same initial conditions, using standard SPH. We also compare the results with the corresponding ones obtained previously with other numerical methods, such as codes based on a moving-mesh scheme or Godunov-type Lagrangian meshless methods. We quantify code performances by introducing error norms and spectral properties of the particle distribution, in a way similar to what was done in other works. We find that the new SPH formulation exhibits strongly reduced gradient errors and outperforms standard SPH in all of the tests considered. In fact, in terms of accuracy, we find good agreement between the simulation results of the new scheme and those produced using other recently proposed numerical schemes. These findings suggest that the proposed method can be successfully applied for many astrophysical problems in which the presence of subsonic flows previously limited the use of SPH, with the new scheme now being competitive in these regimes with other numerical methods.

  16. Optimizing neural networks for river flow forecasting - Evolutionary Computation methods versus the Levenberg-Marquardt approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piotrowski, Adam P.; Napiorkowski, Jarosław J.

    2011-09-01

    SummaryAlthough neural networks have been widely applied to various hydrological problems, including river flow forecasting, for at least 15 years, they have usually been trained by means of gradient-based algorithms. Recently nature inspired Evolutionary Computation algorithms have rapidly developed as optimization methods able to cope not only with non-differentiable functions but also with a great number of local minima. Some of proposed Evolutionary Computation algorithms have been tested for neural networks training, but publications which compare their performance with gradient-based training methods are rare and present contradictory conclusions. The main goal of the present study is to verify the applicability of a number of recently developed Evolutionary Computation optimization methods, mostly from the Differential Evolution family, to multi-layer perceptron neural networks training for daily rainfall-runoff forecasting. In the present paper eight Evolutionary Computation methods, namely the first version of Differential Evolution (DE), Distributed DE with Explorative-Exploitative Population Families, Self-Adaptive DE, DE with Global and Local Neighbors, Grouping DE, JADE, Comprehensive Learning Particle Swarm Optimization and Efficient Population Utilization Strategy Particle Swarm Optimization are tested against the Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm - probably the most efficient in terms of speed and success rate among gradient-based methods. The Annapolis River catchment was selected as the area of this study due to its specific climatic conditions, characterized by significant seasonal changes in runoff, rapid floods, dry summers, severe winters with snowfall, snow melting, frequent freeze and thaw, and presence of river ice - conditions which make flow forecasting more troublesome. The overall performance of the Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm and the DE with Global and Local Neighbors method for neural networks training turns out to be superior to other

  17. Balancing practicality and hydrologic realism: a parsimonious approach for simulating rapid groundwater recharge via unsaturated-zone preferential flow

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mirus, Benjamin B.; Nimmo, J.R.

    2013-01-01

    The impact of preferential flow on recharge and contaminant transport poses a considerable challenge to water-resources management. Typical hydrologic models require extensive site characterization, but can underestimate fluxes when preferential flow is significant. A recently developed source-responsive model incorporates film-flow theory with conservation of mass to estimate unsaturated-zone preferential fluxes with readily available data. The term source-responsive describes the sensitivity of preferential flow in response to water availability at the source of input. We present the first rigorous tests of a parsimonious formulation for simulating water table fluctuations using two case studies, both in arid regions with thick unsaturated zones of fractured volcanic rock. Diffuse flow theory cannot adequately capture the observed water table responses at both sites; the source-responsive model is a viable alternative. We treat the active area fraction of preferential flow paths as a scaled function of water inputs at the land surface then calibrate the macropore density to fit observed water table rises. Unlike previous applications, we allow the characteristic film-flow velocity to vary, reflecting the lag time between source and deep water table responses. Analysis of model performance and parameter sensitivity for the two case studies underscores the importance of identifying thresholds for initiation of film flow in unsaturated rocks, and suggests that this parsimonious approach is potentially of great practical value.

  18. Balancing practicality and hydrologic realism: A parsimonious approach for simulating rapid groundwater recharge via unsaturated-zone preferential flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirus, Benjamin B.; Nimmo, John R.

    2013-03-01

    The impact of preferential flow on recharge and contaminant transport poses a considerable challenge to water-resources management. Typical hydrologic models require extensive site characterization, but can underestimate fluxes when preferential flow is significant. A recently developed source-responsive model incorporates film-flow theory with conservation of mass to estimate unsaturated-zone preferential fluxes with readily available data. The term source-responsive describes the sensitivity of preferential flow in response to water availability at the source of input. We present the first rigorous tests of a parsimonious formulation for simulating water table fluctuations using two case studies, both in arid regions with thick unsaturated zones of fractured volcanic rock. Diffuse flow theory cannot adequately capture the observed water table responses at both sites; the source-responsive model is a viable alternative. We treat the active area fraction of preferential flow paths as a scaled function of water inputs at the land surface then calibrate the macropore density to fit observed water table rises. Unlike previous applications, we allow the characteristic film-flow velocity to vary, reflecting the lag time between source and deep water table responses. Analysis of model performance and parameter sensitivity for the two case studies underscores the importance of identifying thresholds for initiation of film flow in unsaturated rocks, and suggests that this parsimonious approach is potentially of great practical value.

  19. Thermography-based blood flow imaging in human skin of the hands and feet: a spectral filtering approach.

    PubMed

    Sagaidachnyi, A A; Fomin, A V; Usanov, D A; Skripal, A V

    2017-02-01

    The determination of the relationship between skin blood flow and skin temperature dynamics is the main problem in thermography-based blood flow imaging. Oscillations in skin blood flow are the source of thermal waves propagating from micro-vessels toward the skin's surface, as assumed in this study. This hypothesis allows us to use equations for the attenuation and dispersion of thermal waves for converting the temperature signal into the blood flow signal, and vice versa. We developed a spectral filtering approach (SFA), which is a new technique for thermography-based blood flow imaging. In contrast to other processing techniques, the SFA implies calculations in the spectral domain rather than in the time domain. Therefore, it eliminates the need to solve differential equations. The developed technique was verified within 0.005-0.1 Hz, including the endothelial, neurogenic and myogenic frequency bands of blood flow oscillations. The algorithm for an inverse conversion of the blood flow signal into the skin temperature signal is addressed. The examples of blood flow imaging of hands during cuff occlusion and feet during heating of the back are illustrated. The processing of infrared (IR) thermograms using the SFA allowed us to restore the blood flow signals and achieve correlations of about 0.8 with a waveform of a photoplethysmographic signal. The prospective applications of the thermography-based blood flow imaging technique include non-contact monitoring of the blood supply during engraftment of skin flaps and burns healing, as well the use of contact temperature sensors to monitor low-frequency oscillations of peripheral blood flow.

  20. A Many-Task Parallel Approach for Multiscale Simulations of Subsurface Flow and Reactive Transport

    SciTech Connect

    Scheibe, Timothy D.; Yang, Xiaofan; Schuchardt, Karen L.; Agarwal, Khushbu; Chase, Jared M.; Palmer, Bruce J.; Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.

    2014-12-16

    Continuum-scale models have long been used to study subsurface flow, transport, and reactions but lack the ability to resolve processes that are governed by pore-scale mixing. Recently, pore-scale models, which explicitly resolve individual pores and soil grains, have been developed to more accurately model pore-scale phenomena, particularly reaction processes that are controlled by local mixing. However, pore-scale models are prohibitively expensive for modeling application-scale domains. This motivates the use of a hybrid multiscale approach in which continuum- and pore-scale codes are coupled either hierarchically or concurrently within an overall simulation domain (time and space). This approach is naturally suited to an adaptive, loosely-coupled many-task methodology with three potential levels of concurrency. Each individual code (pore- and continuum-scale) can be implemented in parallel; multiple semi-independent instances of the pore-scale code are required at each time step providing a second level of concurrency; and Monte Carlo simulations of the overall system to represent uncertainty in material property distributions provide a third level of concurrency. We have developed a hybrid multiscale model of a mixing-controlled reaction in a porous medium wherein the reaction occurs only over a limited portion of the domain. Loose, minimally-invasive coupling of pre-existing parallel continuum- and pore-scale codes has been accomplished by an adaptive script-based workflow implemented in the Swift workflow system. We describe here the methods used to create the model system, adaptively control multiple coupled instances of pore- and continuum-scale simulations, and maximize the scalability of the overall system. We present results of numerical experiments conducted on NERSC supercomputing systems; our results demonstrate that loose many-task coupling provides a scalable solution for multiscale subsurface simulations with minimal overhead.

  1. Nonstationary approximation error approach to imaging of three-dimensional pipe flow: experimental evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipponen, A.; Seppänen, A.; Kaipio, J. P.

    2011-10-01

    In this paper, we consider nonstationary estimation in imaging of three-dimensional fluid flow. More specifically, we experimentally evaluate the feasibility of a recently invented approximation error method to recovering from modelling errors in imaging of nonstationary targets. In nonstationary estimation, both the observations and the time evolution of the target distribution are modelled, and the image reconstruction problem is written in the form of a state estimation problem. The state estimates rely on these models and the observations carried out during the evolution of the target. If the associated modelling errors are not accounted for, state estimation can lead to heavily biased reconstructions. In the approximation error approach, the model inaccuracies and uncertainties are modelled statistically. In this experimental study, we consider a case of rapidly moving fluid in a pipeline, and model the target with the convection-diffusion equation. Electrical impedance tomography (EIT) is used as the imaging modality. In the nonstationary approximation error scheme, we model the errors due to truncation of the computational domain, discretization, unknown contact impedances of electrodes used in EIT measurements and partly unknown boundary conditions in the convection-diffusion model. The results verify that enhancing the state-space representation with the approximation error models can yield a significant improvement in the reconstructions.

  2. Combined SERS and flow linear dichroism approach to monitoring the interaction of pharmaceuticals with their target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ianoul, Anatoli I.; Fleury, Fabrice; Duval, Olivier; Jardillier, Jean-Claude; Alix, Alain J.; Nabiev, Igor R.

    1999-04-01

    Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS) spectroscopy and Flow Linear Dichroism (FLD) technique have been employed to study the anticancer agent fagaronine and its derivative ethoxidine - double inhibitors of DNA topoisomerases I and II. Cooperative use of two methods permitted (i) to determine the molecular determinants of the drug-DNA interactions; (ii) to monitor in real time the process of topo I inhibition by these anticancer agents. FLD technique allowed us to identify the mode of drug interactions with the DNA as a 'major groove intercalation' and to determine orientation of the drugs chromophores within the complexes. Using SERS spectroscopy we have determined the drugs molecular determinants interacting with the DNA. FLD was also used for real time monitoring of the process of sc DNA relaxation by topo I and of inhibition of relaxation with the pharmaceuticals. Ethoxidine was found to exhibit the same activity of inhibition of sc DNA relaxation as fagaronine at the 10-fold less concentration. The proposed SERS-FLD combined approach demonstrates the new perspectives for screening new pharmaceuticals due to its relative simplicity and low expense, high sensitivity and selectivity, and, finally, possibility of real-time monitoring of the structure-function correlation within the series of drug derivatives.

  3. Vibration transmission through periodic structures using a mobility power flow approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuschieri, J. M.

    1990-01-01

    The transmission of vibrational power (time averaged) through multiple coupled (periodic) structures is examined. The analysis is performed in the frequency domain and the coupling between the sub-elements of the periodic structure is expressed in terms of structural mobility functions for the junction points and between the junction points of the sub-elements. Equal length spans between stiffeners or supports of the periodic structure are considered. Through the use of the mobility power flow approach, the influence of sub-element and junction parameters, including damping at the joints, can be investigated. The results from the analysis can be in the form of either structural intensity or alternatively structural power content for each of the sub-elements. The examples discussed are for a thin, perfectly periodic beam with a finite number of spans with different types of stiffeners and/or supports between the spans. The excitation of the structure is by a point load located midway along the first span.

  4. An approximate viscous shock layer approach to calculating hypersonic flows about blunt-nosed bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheatwood, F. MCN.; Dejarnette, F. R.

    1991-01-01

    An approximate axisymmetric method has been developed which can reliably calculate fully viscous hypersonic flows over blunt-nosed bodies. By substituting Maslen's second order pressure expression for the normal momentum equation, a simplified form of the viscous shock layer (VSL) equations is obtained. This approach can solve both the subsonic and supersonic regions of the shock layer without a starting solution for the shock shape. Since the method is fully viscous, the problems associated with coupling a boundary-layer solution with an inviscid-layer solution are avoided. This procedure is significantly faster than the parabolized Navier-Stokes (PNS) or VSL solvers and would be useful in a preliminary design environment. Problems associated with a previously developed approximate VSL technique are addressed. Surface heat transfer and pressure predictions are comparable to both VSL results and experimental data. The present technique generates its own shock shape as part of its solution, and therefore could be used to provide more accurate initial shock shapes for higher-order procedures which require starting solutions.

  5. Space station electrical power distribution analysis using a load flow approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emanuel, Ervin M.

    1987-01-01

    The space station's electrical power system will evolve and grow in a manner much similar to the present terrestrial electrical power system utilities. The initial baseline reference configuration will contain more than 50 nodes or busses, inverters, transformers, overcurrent protection devices, distribution lines, solar arrays, and/or solar dynamic power generating sources. The system is designed to manage and distribute 75 KW of power single phase or three phase at 20 KHz, and grow to a level of 300 KW steady state, and must be capable of operating at a peak of 450 KW for 5 to 10 min. In order to plan far into the future and keep pace with load growth, a load flow power system analysis approach must be developed and utilized. This method is a well known energy assessment and management tool that is widely used throughout the Electrical Power Utility Industry. The results of a comprehensive evaluation and assessment of an Electrical Distribution System Analysis Program (EDSA) is discussed. Its potential use as an analysis and design tool for the 20 KHz space station electrical power system is addressed.

  6. Stokes flow singularities in a two-dimensional channel: a novel transform approach with application to microswimming.

    PubMed

    Crowdy, Darren G; Davis, Anthony M J

    2013-09-08

    A transform method for determining the flow generated by the singularities of Stokes flow in a two-dimensional channel is presented. The analysis is based on a general approach to biharmonic boundary value problems in a simply connected polygon formulated by Crowdy & Fokas in this journal. The method differs from a traditional Fourier transform approach in entailing a simultaneous spectral analysis in the independent variables both along and across the channel. As an example application, we find the evolution equations for a circular treadmilling microswimmer in the channel correct to third order in the swimmer radius. Significantly, the new transform method is extendible to the analysis of Stokes flows in more complicated polygonal microchannel geometries.

  7. Stokes flow singularities in a two-dimensional channel: a novel transform approach with application to microswimming

    PubMed Central

    Crowdy, Darren G.; Davis, Anthony M. J.

    2013-01-01

    A transform method for determining the flow generated by the singularities of Stokes flow in a two-dimensional channel is presented. The analysis is based on a general approach to biharmonic boundary value problems in a simply connected polygon formulated by Crowdy & Fokas in this journal. The method differs from a traditional Fourier transform approach in entailing a simultaneous spectral analysis in the independent variables both along and across the channel. As an example application, we find the evolution equations for a circular treadmilling microswimmer in the channel correct to third order in the swimmer radius. Significantly, the new transform method is extendible to the analysis of Stokes flows in more complicated polygonal microchannel geometries. PMID:24062624

  8. A Hybrid Geophysical Fluid Dynamics and Fully 3D Fluid Dynamics Approach to Simulate Multiphysics Coastal Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, H.; Qu, K.

    2014-12-01

    A hybrid method that couples a geophysical fluid dynamics model to a fully 3D fluid dynamics model is the most feasible and promising approach to simulate coastal ocean flow phenomena that involve multiple types of physics spanning a vast range of temporal and spatial scales. We propose such a hybrid method that couples the Finite Volume Coastal Ocean Model (FVCOM) with the Solver for Incompressible Flow on Overset Meshes (SIFOM); the former is used to simulate large-scale estuary flows, and the latter is employed to capture small-scale local processes. The coupling involves distinct governing equations, different numerical algorithms, and dissimilar grids, and it is two-way and realized using the Schwartz alternative iteration. In this presentation, the proposed method will be outlined, and a few applications that are newly produced by it but cannot be handled by other conventional approaches will be presented.

  9. Material flow analysis of NdFeB magnets for Denmark: a comprehensive waste flow sampling and analysis approach.

    PubMed

    Habib, Komal; Schibye, Peter Klausen; Vestbø, Andreas Peter; Dall, Ole; Wenzel, Henrik

    2014-10-21

    Neodymium-iron-boron (NdFeB) magnets have become highly desirable for modern hi-tech applications. These magnets, in general, contain two key rare earth elements (REEs), i.e., neodymium (Nd) and dysprosium (Dy), which are responsible for the very high strength of these magnets, allowing for considerable size and weight reduction in modern applications. This study aims to explore the current and future potential of a secondary supply of neodymium and dysprosium from recycling of NdFeB magnets. For this purpose, material flow analysis (MFA) has been carried out to perform the detailed mapping of stocks and flows of NdFeB magnets in Denmark. A novel element of this study is the value added to the traditionally practiced MFAs at national and/or global levels by complementing them with a comprehensive sampling and elemental analysis of NdFeB magnets, taken out from a sample of 157 different products representing 18 various product types. The results show that the current amount of neodymium and dysprosium in NdFeB magnets present in the Danish waste stream is only 3 and 0.2 Mg, respectively. However, this number is estimated to increase to 175 Mg of neodymium and 11.4 Mg of dysprosium by 2035. Nevertheless, efficient recovery of these elements from a very diverse electronic waste stream remains a logistic and economic challenge.

  10. Continuous monitoring of a large active earth flow using an integrated GPS - automatic total station approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corsini, A.

    2009-04-01

    Landslide monitoring has evolved as a crucial tool in civil protection to mitigate and prevent disasters. The research presents an approach to continuous monitoring of a large-scale active earth flow using a system that integrates surface measurements obtained by a GPS and an automatic total station. With the data obtained from the system the landslide can be monitored in near-real-time and surface displacements can be directly utilized to provide early warning of slope movements and to study the behavior of the landslide, e.g. to predict timing and mechanisms of future failure. The Valoria landslide located in the northern Apennines of Italy was reactivated in 2001, 2005 and 2007 damaging roads and endangering houses. A monitoring system was installed in 2007-2008 in the frame of a civil protection plan aimed at risk mitigation. The system consists of an automatic total station measuring about 40 prisms located in the landslide to a maximum distance of 1.800 km; one double-frequency GPS receiver connects in streaming by wireless communication with 4 single-frequency GPS in side the flow. Until December 2007 the monitoring network was operated with periodic static surveying followed by the data post-processing. From September 2007 until March 2008 the landslide deformation was evaluated by periodic surveys with the total station and the GPS system. This first measure showed that the displacements were influenced by the rainfall events and by the snow melting. The total displacements measured vary from centimeter scale in the crown zone, where retrogressive movements were in progress, to over 50 m in the flow track zone. Starting in March 2008 data acquisition by the total station system and GPS were automated in order to allow continuous and near-real-time data processing. The displacement data collected in one and a half year of continuous operation show different acceleration and deceleration phases as a result of the pore water pressure distribution inside the

  11. Total synthesis of feglymycin based on a linear/convergent hybrid approach using micro-flow amide bond formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuse, Shinichiro; Mifune, Yuto; Nakamura, Hiroyuki; Tanaka, Hiroshi

    2016-11-01

    Feglymycin is a naturally occurring, anti-HIV and antimicrobial 13-mer peptide that includes highly racemizable 3,5-dihydroxyphenylglycines (Dpgs). Here we describe the total synthesis of feglymycin based on a linear/convergent hybrid approach. Our originally developed micro-flow amide bond formation enabled highly racemizable peptide chain elongation based on a linear approach that was previously considered impossible. Our developed approach will enable the practical preparation of biologically active oligopeptides that contain highly racemizable amino acids, which are attractive drug candidates.

  12. Flow-Solution-Liquid-Solid Growth of Semiconductor Nanowires: A Novel Approach for Controlled Synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Hollingsworth, Jennifer A.; Palaniappan, Kumaranand; Laocharoensuk, Rawiwan; Smith, Nickolaus A.; Dickerson, Robert M.; Casson, Joanna L.; Baldwin, Jon K.

    2012-06-07

    Semiconductor nanowires (SC-NWs) have potential applications in diverse technologies from nanoelectronics and photonics to energy harvesting and storage due to their quantum-confined opto-electronic properties coupled with their highly anisotropic shape. Here, we explore new approaches to an important solution-based growth method known as solution-liquid-solid (SLS) growth. In SLS, molecular precursors are reacted in the presence of low-melting metal nanoparticles that serve as molten fluxes to catalyze the growth of the SC-NWs. The mechanism of growth is assumed to be similar to that of vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) growth, with the clear distinctions of being conducted in solution in the presence of coordinating ligands and at relatively lower temperatures (<300 C). The resultant SC-NWs are soluble in common organic solvents and solution processable, offering advantages such as simplified processing, scale-up, ultra-small diameters for quantum-confinement effects, and flexible choice of materials from group III-V to groups II-VI, IV-VI, as well as truly ternary I-III-VI semiconductors as we recently demonstrates. Despite these advantages of SLS growth, VLS offers several clear opportunities not allowed by conventional SLS. Namely, VLS allows sequential addition of precursors for facile synthesis of complex axial heterostructures. In addition, growth proceeds relatively slowly compared to SLS, allowing clear assessments of growth kinetics. In order to retain the materials and processing flexibility afforded by SLS, but add the elements of controlled growth afforded by VLS, we transformed SLS into a flow based method by adapting it to synthesis in a microfluidic system. By this new method - so-called 'flow-SLS' (FSLS) - we have now demonstrated unprecedented fabrication of multi-segmented SC-NWs, e.g., 8-segmented CdSe/ZnSe defined by either compositionally abrupt or alloyed interfaces as a function of growth conditions. In addition, we have studied growth rates as a

  13. Estimating ungauged catchment flows from Lake Tana floodplains, Ethiopia: an isotope hydrological approach.

    PubMed

    Kebede, Seifu; Admasu, Girum; Travi, Yves

    2011-03-01

    The isotope balance approach, which used (18)O content of waters, has been used as an independent tool to estimate inflow to Lake Tana of surface water flows from ungauged catchment of Lake Tana (50% of the total area) and evaporative water loss in the vast plains adjoining the lake. Sensitivity analysis has been conducted to investigate the effects of changes in the input parameters on the estimated flux. Surface water inflow from ungauged catchment is determined to be in the order of 1.698×10(9) m(3)a(-1). Unaccounted water loss from the lake has been estimated at 454×10(6) m(3)a(-1) (equivalent to 5% of the total via surface water). Since the lake is water tight to groundwater outflow, the major error introduced into the water balance computation is related to evaporative water loss in water from the flood plains. If drained, the water which is lost to evaporation can be used as an additional water resource for socio-economic development in the region (tourism, agriculture, hydropower, and navigation). Hydrological processes taking place in the vast flood plains of Lake Tana (origin of salinity, groundwater surface water interaction, origin of flood plain waters) have been investigated using isotopes of water and geochemistry as tracers. The salinity of shallow groundwaters in the flood plains is related to dissolution of salts accumulated in sediments covering former evaporation pools and migration of trace salt during recharge. The waters in the flood plains originate from local rainfall and river overflows and the effect of backwater flow from the lake is excluded. Minimum linkage exists between the surface waters in the flood plains and shallow groundwaters in alluvio lacustrine sediments suggesting the disappearance of flood waters following the rainy season, which is related to complete evaporation or drainage than seepage to the subsurface. There is no groundwater outflow from the lake. Inflow of groundwater cannot be ruled out. Discharge of groundwater

  14. An adaptive three-dimensional Cartesian approach for the parallel computation of inviscid flow about static and dynamic configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunt, Jason Daniel

    An adaptive three-dimensional Cartesian approach for the parallel computation of compressible flow about static and dynamic configurations has been developed and validated. This is a further step towards a goal that remains elusive for CFD codes: the ability to model complex dynamic-geometry problems in a quick and automated manner. The underlying flow-solution method solves the three-dimensional Euler equations using a MUSCL-type finite-volume approach to achieve higher-order spatial accuracy. The flow solution, either steady or unsteady, is advanced in time via a two-stage time-stepping scheme. This basic solution method has been incorporated into a parallel block-adaptive Cartesian framework, using a block-octtree data structure to represent varying spatial resolution, and to compute flow solutions in parallel. The ability to represent static geometric configurations has been introduced by cutting a geometric configuration out of a background block-adaptive Cartesian grid, then solving for the flow on the resulting volume grid. This approach has been extended for dynamic geometric configurations: components of a given configuration were permitted to independently move, according to prescribed rigid-body motion. Two flow-solver difficulties arise as a result of introducing static and dynamic configurations: small time steps; and the disappearance/appearance of cell volume during a time integration step. Both of these problems have been remedied through cell merging. The concept of cell merging and its implementation within the parallel block-adaptive method is described. While the parallelization of certain grid-generation and cell-cutting routines resulted from this work, the most significant contribution was developing the novel cell-merging paradigm that was incorporated into the parallel block-adaptive framework. Lastly, example simulations both to validate the developed method and to demonstrate its full capabilities have been carried out. A simple, steady

  15. Regional based modeling approach for rainfall-induced debris flows in the continental-climatic Northern Tien Shan (SE Kazakhstan)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, Thomas; Küfmann, Carola; Haas, Florian; Baume, Otfried; Becht, Michael

    2013-04-01

    The high mountain systems of Central Asia (Hindukush, Pamir and Tien Shan) are dominated by continental-climatic conditions. Nevertheless, westerly maritime air circulation and convective rainfalls during the summer season result in high rainfall intensities. In combination with a high availability of unconsolidated material rainfall triggered debris flows are prominent and intensive geomorphologic processes in these mountain areas. The presented study aims to figure out a regional based modeling approach for rainfall-induced debris flow processes based on combination of a disposition model for debris flow starting zones with process-flow models. The investigation area has a size of about 700 square kilometers and is situated in the Northern Tien Shan mountains in SE Kazakhstan (investigation areas: valleys of Prochadnaja, Big Almatinka, Little Almatinka and Left Talgar). The area is characterized by mountain forest zone, alpine meadows and high-alpine glaciated areas with the highest peaks at 4500m. In a first step the disposition (point of process triggering) of actual debris flows was analyzed. Due to different triggering mechanisms, the processes were divided into channel-type and slope-type debris flows. Detailed mapping of actual debris flows initiation areas and a GIS-based geostatistical disposition analysis are used to identify the main geofactor-variables and geofactor combinations which enhance the triggering of rainfall-induced debris flows. It can be shown that both, longtime variable geofactors (such as local geomorphology and hydrology) plays a significant role for triggering debris flows, as well as mid- and short time variable geofactors. Especially actual permafrost distribution and degradation plus glacier retreat comes into the focus of interest. This is most notably for rainfall induced slope-type debris flows which primarily are triggered in the discontinuous and continuous permafrost areas eroding younger unconsolidated material from actual

  16. Parametric distribution approach for flow availability in small hydro potential analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdullah, Samizee; Basri, Mohd Juhari Mat; Jamaluddin, Zahrul Zamri; Azrulhisham, Engku Ahmad; Othman, Jamel

    2016-10-01

    Small hydro system is one of the important sources of renewable energy and it has been recognized worldwide as clean energy sources. Small hydropower generation system uses the potential energy in flowing water to produce electricity is often questionable due to inconsistent and intermittent of power generated. Potential analysis of small hydro system which is mainly dependent on the availability of water requires the knowledge of water flow or stream flow distribution. This paper presented the possibility of applying Pearson system for stream flow availability distribution approximation in the small hydro system. By considering the stochastic nature of stream flow, the Pearson parametric distribution approximation was computed based on the significant characteristic of Pearson system applying direct correlation between the first four statistical moments of the distribution. The advantage of applying various statistical moments in small hydro potential analysis will have the ability to analyze the variation shapes of stream flow distribution.

  17. Modeling Low-Flow Sensitivity to Climate Variability and Forest Harvesting in the Willamette Basin: A Multi-scale Approach.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choate, J.; Tague, C.; Grant, G.

    2002-12-01

    In the mountainous region of the Pacific Northwest, underlying geologic and vegetation patterns, forest management practices and climate regimes at different elevations mediate the response of low flows occurring in late summer. Low-stream flow conditions, occurring during the warm, dry summers are critical to river ecosystem function and crucial to many aquatic and riparian species life cycles as well as human uses of streams. Understanding the different controls on low flow variability in this region requires a multi-scale perspective. This particular study is part of a larger strategy designed to use both empirical analysis and physically based, hydro-ecological modeling to disentangle the role that climate, geology and forest harvesting play in controlling low flows in 1st to 5th order watersheds within the Willamette basin. Our empirical analysis of summer low flow for a range of streams has shown that summer, unit-area discharge volumes are significantly lower for streams in the geologically distinct and low elevation Western Cascade versus High Cascade areas. This empirical analysis outlines large-scale regional variability. To assess and compare this with smaller scale variability, we use the RHESSys model (Regional Hydro-Ecologic Simulation System) to assess low flow behavior for small 1st order streams within the Western Cascade region. The goal is to examine low flow variability due to both climate and forest harvesting and recovery and place this in the context of regional scale analysis. We use multiple simulations to predict low flow volumes under cut and uncut conditions for wet/dry and warm/cool climate scenarios. Future work will replicate this study to examine 1st order watershed sensitivity within the contrasting High Cascade geologic region. The combined multi-scale empirical and modeling approach will then be used to provide a more comprehensive assessment of low flow patterns and sensitivity within this region.

  18. Acute Portal Hypertension Models in Dogs: Low- and High-Flow Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Dave, Jaydev K; Liu, Ji-Bin; Halldorsdottir, Valgerdur G; Eisenbrey, John R; Merton, Daniel A; Machado, Priscilla; Zhao, Hongjia; Altemus, Joseph; Needleman, Laurence; Brown, Daniel B; Forsberg, Flemming

    2012-01-01

    Effective animal models are needed to evaluate the feasibility of new techniques to assess portal hypertension (PH). Here we developed 2 canine models of acute PH by increasing intrasinusoidal resistance and by increasing the portal vein (PV) flow volume to test the efficacy of a noninvasive technique to evaluate PH. The acute low-flow PH model was based on embolization of liver circulation by using a gelatin sponge material. The acute high-flow PH model was based on increasing the PV flow volume by using an arteriovenous (A-V) shunt from the femoral artery and saline infusion. PV pressures and diameters were assessed before and after inducing PH. Pressure values and diameters were obtained from the inferior vena cava in 3 unmanipulated controls. The low-flow model of PH was repeatable and successfully increased PV pressure by an average of 16.5 mm Hg within 15 min. The high-flow model of PH failed to achieve increased PV pressures. However, saline supplementation of the portal circulation in the high-flow model led to mean increases in PV pressures of 12.8 mm Hg within 20 min. Pulsatility in the PV was decreased in the low-flow model and increased in the high-flow model relative to baseline. No changes in PV diameter were noted in either model. These acute PH models are relatively straightforward to implement and may facilitate the evaluation of new techniques to assess PH. PMID:23114046

  19. Acute portal hypertension models in dogs: low- and high-flow approaches.

    PubMed

    Dave, Jaydev K; Liu, Ji-Bin; Halldorsdottir, Valgerdur G; Eisenbrey, John R; Merton, Daniel A; Machado, Priscilla; Zhao, Hongjia; Altemus, Joseph; Needleman, Laurence; Brown, Daniel B; Forsberg, Flemming

    2012-10-01

    Effective animal models are needed to evaluate the feasibility of new techniques to assess portal hypertension (PH). Here we developed 2 canine models of acute PH by increasing intrasinusoidal resistance and by increasing the portal vein (PV) flow volume to test the efficacy of a noninvasive technique to evaluate PH. The acute low-flow PH model was based on embolization of liver circulation by using a gelatin sponge material. The acute high-flow PH model was based on increasing the PV flow volume by using an arteriovenous (A-V) shunt from the femoral artery and saline infusion. PV pressures and diameters were assessed before and after inducing PH. Pressure values and diameters were obtained from the inferior vena cava in 3 unmanipulated controls. The low-flow model of PH was repeatable and successfully increased PV pressure by an average of 16.5 mm Hg within 15 min. The high-flow model of PH failed to achieve increased PV pressures. However, saline supplementation of the portal circulation in the high-flow model led to mean increases in PV pressures of 12.8 mm Hg within 20 min. Pulsatility in the PV was decreased in the low-flow model and increased in the high-flow model relative to baseline. No changes in PV diameter were noted in either model. These acute PH models are relatively straightforward to implement and may facilitate the evaluation of new techniques to assess PH.

  20. Sum-of-squares of polynomials approach to nonlinear stability of fluid flows: an example of application

    PubMed Central

    Tutty, O.

    2015-01-01

    With the goal of providing the first example of application of a recently proposed method, thus demonstrating its ability to give results in principle, global stability of a version of the rotating Couette flow is examined. The flow depends on the Reynolds number and a parameter characterizing the magnitude of the Coriolis force. By converting the original Navier–Stokes equations to a finite-dimensional uncertain dynamical system using a partial Galerkin expansion, high-degree polynomial Lyapunov functionals were found by sum-of-squares of polynomials optimization. It is demonstrated that the proposed method allows obtaining the exact global stability limit for this flow in a range of values of the parameter characterizing the Coriolis force. Outside this range a lower bound for the global stability limit was obtained, which is still better than the energy stability limit. In the course of the study, several results meaningful in the context of the method used were also obtained. Overall, the results obtained demonstrate the applicability of the recently proposed approach to global stability of the fluid flows. To the best of our knowledge, it is the first case in which global stability of a fluid flow has been proved by a generic method for the value of a Reynolds number greater than that which could be achieved with the energy stability approach. PMID:26730219

  1. A machine-learning approach for computation of fractional flow reserve from coronary computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Itu, Lucian; Rapaka, Saikiran; Passerini, Tiziano; Georgescu, Bogdan; Schwemmer, Chris; Schoebinger, Max; Flohr, Thomas; Sharma, Puneet; Comaniciu, Dorin

    2016-07-01

    Fractional flow reserve (FFR) is a functional index quantifying the severity of coronary artery lesions and is clinically obtained using an invasive, catheter-based measurement. Recently, physics-based models have shown great promise in being able to noninvasively estimate FFR from patient-specific anatomical information, e.g., obtained from computed tomography scans of the heart and the coronary arteries. However, these models have high computational demand, limiting their clinical adoption. In this paper, we present a machine-learning-based model for predicting FFR as an alternative to physics-based approaches. The model is trained on a large database of synthetically generated coronary anatomies, where the target values are computed using the physics-based model. The trained model predicts FFR at each point along the centerline of the coronary tree, and its performance was assessed by comparing the predictions against physics-based computations and against invasively measured FFR for 87 patients and 125 lesions in total. Correlation between machine-learning and physics-based predictions was excellent (0.9994, P < 0.001), and no systematic bias was found in Bland-Altman analysis: mean difference was -0.00081 ± 0.0039. Invasive FFR ≤ 0.80 was found in 38 lesions out of 125 and was predicted by the machine-learning algorithm with a sensitivity of 81.6%, a specificity of 83.9%, and an accuracy of 83.2%. The correlation was 0.729 (P < 0.001). Compared with the physics-based computation, average execution time was reduced by more than 80 times, leading to near real-time assessment of FFR. Average execution time went down from 196.3 ± 78.5 s for the CFD model to ∼2.4 ± 0.44 s for the machine-learning model on a workstation with 3.4-GHz Intel i7 8-core processor.

  2. Approaches to Modeling Coupled Flow and Reaction in a 2-D Cementation Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Steefel, Carl; Cochepin, B.; Trotignon, L.; Bildstein, O.; Steefel, C.; Lagneau, V.; van der Lee, J.

    2008-04-01

    Porosity evolution at reactive interfaces is a key process that governs the evolution and performances of many engineered systems that have important applications in earth and environmental sciences. This is the case, for example, at the interface between cement structures and clays in deep geological nuclear waste disposals. Although in a different transport regime, similar questions arise for permeable reactive barriers used for biogeochemical remediation in surface environments. The COMEDIE project aims at investigating the coupling between transport, hydrodynamics and chemistry when significant variations of porosity occur. The present work focuses on a numerical benchmark used as a design exercise for the future COMEDIE-2D experiment. The use of reactive transport simulation tools like Hytec and Crunch provides predictions of the physico-chemical evolutions that are expected during the future experiments in laboratory. Focus is given in this paper on the evolution during the simulated experiment of precipitate, permeability and porosity fields. A first case is considered in which the porosity is constant. Results obtained with Crunch and Hytec are in relatively good agreement. Differences are attributable to the models of reactive surface area taken into account for dissolution/precipitation processes. Crunch and Hytec simulations taking into account porosity variations are then presented and compared. Results given by the two codes are in qualitative agreement, with differences attributable in part to the models of reactive surface area for dissolution/precipitation processes. As a consequence, the localization of secondary precipitates predicted by Crunch leads to lower local porosities than for predictions obtained by Hytec and thus to a stronger coupling between flow and chemistry. This benchmark highlights the importance of the surface area model employed to describe systems in which strong porosity variations occur as a result of dissolution

  3. Assessment of the Partially Resolved Numerical Simulation (PRNS) Approach in the National Combustion Code (NCC) for Turbulent Nonreacting and Reacting Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shih, Tsan-Hsing; Liu, Nan-Suey

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes an approach which aims at bridging the gap between the traditional Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) approach and the traditional large eddy simulation (LES) approach. It has the characteristics of the very large eddy simulation (VLES) and we call this approach the partially-resolved numerical simulation (PRNS). Systematic simulations using the National Combustion Code (NCC) have been carried out for fully developed turbulent pipe flows at different Reynolds numbers to evaluate the PRNS approach. Also presented are the sample results of two demonstration cases: nonreacting flow in a single injector flame tube and reacting flow in a Lean Direct Injection (LDI) hydrogen combustor.

  4. Global 2D stability analysis of the cross lid-driven cavity flow with a streamfunction-vorticity approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gogoi, Bidyut B.

    2016-07-01

    We have recently analyzed the global two-dimensional (2D) stability of the staggered lid-driven cavity (LDC) flow with a higher order compact (HOC) approach. In the analysis, critical parameters are determined for both the parallel and anti-parallel motion of the lids and a detailed analysis has been carried out on either side of the critical values. In this article, we carry out an investigation of flow stabilities inside a two-sided cross lid-driven cavity with a pair of opposite lids moving in both parallel and anti-parallel directions. On discretization, the governing 2D Navier-Stokes (N-S) equations describing the steady flow and flow perturbations results in a generalized eigenvalue problem which is solved for determining the critical parameters on four different grids. Elaborate computation is performed for a wide range of Reynolds numbers (Re) on either side of the critical values in the range 200 ⩽ Re ⩽ 10000. For flows below the critical Reynolds number Rec, our numerical results are compared with established steady-state results and excellent agreement is obtained in all the cases. For Reynolds numbers above Rec, phase plane and spectral density analysis confirmed the existence of periodic, quasi-periodic, and stable flow patterns.

  5. MODELING AIR FLOW DYNAMICS IN RADON MITIGATION SYSTEMS: A SIMPLIFIED APPROACH

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper refines and extends an earlier study--relating to the design of optimal radon mitigation systems based on subslab depressurization-- that suggested that subslab air flow induced by a central suction point be treated as radial air flow through a porous bed contained betw...

  6. A new modeling approach for simulating microtopography-dominated, discontinuous overland flow on infiltrating surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jun; Chu, Xuefeng

    2015-04-01

    Realistic modeling of discontinuous overland flow on irregular topographic surfaces has been proven to be a challenge. This study is aimed to develop a new modeling framework to simulate the discontinuous puddle-to-puddle (P2P) overland flow dynamics for infiltrating surfaces with various microtopographic characteristics. In the P2P model, puddles were integrated in a well-delineated, cascaded drainage system to facilitate explicit simulation of their dynamic behaviors and interactions. Overland flow and infiltration were respectively simulated by using the diffusion wave model and a modified Green-Ampt model for the DEM-derived flow drainage network that consisted of a series of puddle-based units (PBUs). The P2P model was tested by using a series of data from laboratory overland flow experiments for various microtopography, soil, and rainfall conditions. The modeling results indicated that the hierarchical relationships and microtopographic properties of puddles significantly affected their connectivity, filling-spilling dynamics, and the associated threshold flow. Surface microtopography and rainfall characteristics also exhibited strong influences on the spatio-temporal distributions of infiltration rates, runoff fluxes, and unsaturated flow. The model tests demonstrated its applicability in simulating microtopography-dominated overland flow on infiltrating surfaces.

  7. Microparticle image velocimetry approach to flow measurements in isolated contracting lymphatic vessels.

    PubMed

    Margaris, Konstantinos N; Nepiyushchikh, Zhanna; Zawieja, David C; Moore, James; Black, Richard A

    2016-02-01

    We describe the development of an optical flow visualization method for resolving the flow velocity vector field in lymphatic vessels in vitro. The aim is to develop an experimental protocol for accurately estimating flow parameters, such as flow rate and shear stresses, with high spatial and temporal resolution. Previous studies in situ have relied on lymphocytes as tracers, but their low density resulted in a reduced spatial resolution whereas the assumption that the flow was fully developed in order to determine the flow parameters of interest may not be valid, especially in the vicinity of the valves, where the flow is undoubtedly more complex. To overcome these issues, we have applied the time-resolved microparticle image velocimetry (μ -PIV) technique, a well-established method that can provide increased spatial and temporal resolution that this transient flow demands. To that end, we have developed a custom light source, utilizing high-power light-emitting diodes, and associated control and image processing software. This paper reports the performance of the system and the results of a series of preliminary experiments performed on vessels isolated from rat mesenteries, demonstrating, for the first time, the successful application of the μ -PIV technique in these vessels.

  8. Microparticle image velocimetry approach to flow measurements in isolated contracting lymphatic vessels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margaris, Konstantinos N.; Nepiyushchikh, Zhanna; Zawieja, David C.; Moore, James; Black, Richard A.

    2016-02-01

    We describe the development of an optical flow visualization method for resolving the flow velocity vector field in lymphatic vessels in vitro. The aim is to develop an experimental protocol for accurately estimating flow parameters, such as flow rate and shear stresses, with high spatial and temporal resolution. Previous studies in situ have relied on lymphocytes as tracers, but their low density resulted in a reduced spatial resolution whereas the assumption that the flow was fully developed in order to determine the flow parameters of interest may not be valid, especially in the vicinity of the valves, where the flow is undoubtedly more complex. To overcome these issues, we have applied the time-resolved microparticle image velocimetry (μ-PIV) technique, a well-established method that can provide increased spatial and temporal resolution that this transient flow demands. To that end, we have developed a custom light source, utilizing high-power light-emitting diodes, and associated control and image processing software. This paper reports the performance of the system and the results of a series of preliminary experiments performed on vessels isolated from rat mesenteries, demonstrating, for the first time, the successful application of the μ-PIV technique in these vessels.

  9. The Current Status of Unsteady CFD Approaches for Aerodynamic Flow Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, Mark H.; Singer, Bart A.; Yamaleev, Nail; Vatsa, Veer N.; Viken, Sally A.; Atkins, Harold L.

    2002-01-01

    An overview of the current status of time dependent algorithms is presented. Special attention is given to algorithms used to predict fluid actuator flows, as well as other active and passive flow control devices. Capabilities for the next decade are predicted, and principal impediments to the progress of time-dependent algorithms are identified.

  10. AWSCS-A System to Evaluate Different Approaches for the Automatic Composition and Execution of Web Services Flows

    PubMed Central

    Tardiole Kuehne, Bruno; Estrella, Julio Cezar; Nunes, Luiz Henrique; Martins de Oliveira, Edvard; Hideo Nakamura, Luis; Gomes Ferreira, Carlos Henrique; Carlucci Santana, Regina Helena; Reiff-Marganiec, Stephan; Santana, Marcos José

    2015-01-01

    This paper proposes a system named AWSCS (Automatic Web Service Composition System) to evaluate different approaches for automatic composition of Web services, based on QoS parameters that are measured at execution time. The AWSCS is a system to implement different approaches for automatic composition of Web services and also to execute the resulting flows from these approaches. Aiming at demonstrating the results of this paper, a scenario was developed, where empirical flows were built to demonstrate the operation of AWSCS, since algorithms for automatic composition are not readily available to test. The results allow us to study the behaviour of running composite Web services, when flows with the same functionality but different problem-solving strategies were compared. Furthermore, we observed that the influence of the load applied on the running system as the type of load submitted to the system is an important factor to define which approach for the Web service composition can achieve the best performance in production. PMID:26068216

  11. The gravitational signature of internal flows in giant planets: Comparing the thermal wind approach with barotropic potential-surface methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaspi, Y.; Davighi, J. E.; Galanti, E.; Hubbard, W. B.

    2016-09-01

    The upcoming Juno and Cassini gravity measurements of Jupiter and Saturn, respectively, will allow probing the internal dynamics of these planets through accurate analysis of their gravity spectra. To date, two general approaches have been suggested for relating the flow velocities and gravity fields. In the first, barotropic potential surface models, which naturally take into account the oblateness of the planet, are used to calculate the gravity field. However, barotropicity restricts the flows to be constant along cylinders parallel to the rotation axis. The second approach, calculated in the reference frame of the rotating planet, assumes that due to the large scale and rapid rotation of these planets, the winds are to leading order in geostrophic balance. Therefore, thermal wind balance relates the wind shear to the density gradients. While this approach can take into account any internal flow structure, it is limited to only calculating the dynamical gravity contributions, and has traditionally assumed spherical symmetry. This study comes to relate the two approaches both from a theoretical perspective, showing that they are analytically identical in the barotropic limit, and numerically, through systematically comparing the different model solutions for the gravity harmonics. For the barotropic potential surface models we employ two independent solution methods - the potential-theory and Maclaurin spheroid methods. We find that despite the sphericity assumption, in the barotropic limit the thermal wind solutions match well the barotropic oblate potential-surface solutions.

  12. The unified power flow controller: A new approach to power transmission control

    SciTech Connect

    Gyugyi, L.; Schauder, C.D.; Williams, S.L.; Rietman, T.R.; Torgerson, D.R.; Edris, A.

    1995-04-01

    This paper shows that the Unified Power Flow Controller (UPFC) is able to control both the transmitted real power and, independently, the reactive power flows at the sending-and the receiving-end of the transmission line. The unique capabilities of the UPFC in multiple line compensation are integrated into a generalized power flow controller that is able to maintain prescribed, and independently controllable, real power and reactive power flow in the line. The paper describes the basic concepts of the proposed generalized P and Q controller and compares it to the more conventional, but related power flow controller, such as the Thyristor-Controlled Series Capacitor and Thyristor-Controlled Phase Angle Regulator. The paper also presents results of computer simulations showing the performance of the UPFC under different system conditions.

  13. Dynamics and friction drag behavior of viscoelastic flows in complex geometries: A multiscale simulation approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koppol, Anantha Padmanabha Rao

    Flows of viscoelastic polymeric fluids are of great fundamental and practical interest as polymeric materials for commodity and value-added products are processed typically in a fluid state. The nonlinear coupling between fluid motion and microstructure, which results in highly non-Newtonian theology, memory/relaxation and normal stress development or tension along streamlines, greatly complicates the analysis, design and control of such flows. This has posed tremendous challenges to researchers engaged in developing first principles models and simulations that can accurately and robustly predict the dynamical behavior of polymeric flows. Despite this, the past two decades have witnessed several significant advances towards accomplishing this goal. Yet a problem of fundamental and great pragmatic interest has defied solution to years of ardent research by several groups, namely the relationship between friction drag and flow rate in inertialess flows of highly elastic polymer solutions in complex kinematics flows. First principles-based solution of this long-standing problem in non-Newtonian fluid mechanics is the goal of this research. To achieve our objective, it is essential to develop the capability to perform large-scale multiscale simulations, which integrate continuum-level finite element solvers for the conservation of mass and momentum with fast integrators of stochastic differential equations that describe the evolution of polymer configuration. Hence, in this research we have focused our attention on development of a parallel, multiscale simulation algorithm that is capable of robustly and efficiently simulating complex kinematics flows of dilute polymeric solutions using the first principles based bead-spring chain description of the polymer molecules. The fidelity and computational efficiency of the algorithm has been demonstrated via three benchmark flow problems, namely, the plane Couette flow, the Poiseuille flow and the 4:1:4 axisymmetric

  14. An Approach for Assessing Turbulent Flow Damage to Blood in Medical Devices.

    PubMed

    Ozturk, Mesude; Papavassiliou, Dimitrios V; O'Rear, Edgar A

    2017-01-01

    In this work, contributing factors for red blood cell (RBC) damage in turbulence are investigated by simulating jet flow experiments. Results show that dissipative eddies comparable or smaller in size to the red blood cells cause hemolysis and that hemolysis corresponds to the number and, more importantly, the surface area of eddies that are associated with Kolmogorov length scale (KLS) smaller than about 10 μm. The size distribution of Kolmogorov scale eddies is used to define a turbulent flow extensive property with eddies serving as a means to assess the turbulence effectiveness in damaging cells, and a new hemolysis model is proposed. This empirical model is in agreement with hemolysis results for well-defined systems that exhibit different exposure times and flow conditions, in Couette flow viscometer, capillary tube, and jet flow experiments.

  15. A hydrogeologic approach to identify land uses that overlie ground-water flow paths, Broward County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sonenshein, R.S.

    1995-01-01

    A hydrogeologic approach that integrates the use of hydrogeologic and spatial tools aids in the identification of land uses that overlie ground- water flow paths and permits a better understanding of ground-water flow systems. A mathematical model was used to simulate the ground-water flow system in Broward County, particle-tracking software was used to determine flow paths leading to the monitor wells in Broward County, and a Geographic Information System was used to identify which land uses overlie the flow paths. A procedure using a geographic information system to evaluate the output from a ground-water flow model has been documented. The ground-water flow model was used to represent steady-state conditions during selected wet- and dry-season months, and an advective flow particle- tracking program was used to simulate the direction of ground-water flow in the aquifer system. Digital spatial data layers were created from the particle pathlines that lead to the vicinity of the open interval of selected wells in the Broward County ground-water quality monitoring network. Buffer zone data layers were created, surrounding the particle pathlines to represent the area of contribution to the water sampled from the monitor wells. Spatial data layers, combined with a land-use data layer, were used to identify the land uses that overlie the ground-water flow paths leading to the monitor wells. The simulation analysis was performed on five Broward County wells with different hydraulic parameters to determine the source of ground-water stress, determine selected particle pathlines, and identify land use in buffer zones in the vicinity of the wells. The flow paths that lead to the grid cells containing wells G-2355, G-2373, and G-2373A did not vary between the wet- and dry-season conditions. Changes in the area of contribution for wells G-2345X and G-2369 were attributed to variations in rainfall patterns, well-field pumpage, and surface-water management practices

  16. A multiple-point geostatistical approach to quantifying uncertainty for flow and transport simulation in geologically complex environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cronkite-Ratcliff, C.; Phelps, G. A.; Boucher, A.

    2011-12-01

    In many geologic settings, the pathways of groundwater flow are controlled by geologic heterogeneities which have complex geometries. Models of these geologic heterogeneities, and consequently, their effects on the simulated pathways of groundwater flow, are characterized by uncertainty. Multiple-point geostatistics, which uses a training image to represent complex geometric descriptions of geologic heterogeneity, provides a stochastic approach to the analysis of geologic uncertainty. Incorporating multiple-point geostatistics into numerical models provides a way to extend this analysis to the effects of geologic uncertainty on the results of flow simulations. We present two case studies to demonstrate the application of multiple-point geostatistics to numerical flow simulation in complex geologic settings with both static and dynamic conditioning data. Both cases involve the development of a training image from a complex geometric description of the geologic environment. Geologic heterogeneity is modeled stochastically by generating multiple equally-probable realizations, all consistent with the training image. Numerical flow simulation for each stochastic realization provides the basis for analyzing the effects of geologic uncertainty on simulated hydraulic response. The first case study is a hypothetical geologic scenario developed using data from the alluvial deposits in Yucca Flat, Nevada. The SNESIM algorithm is used to stochastically model geologic heterogeneity conditioned to the mapped surface geology as well as vertical drill-hole data. Numerical simulation of groundwater flow and contaminant transport through geologic models produces a distribution of hydraulic responses and contaminant concentration results. From this distribution of results, the probability of exceeding a given contaminant concentration threshold can be used as an indicator of uncertainty about the location of the contaminant plume boundary. The second case study considers a

  17. Deposition and fine particle production during dynamic flow in a dry powder inhaler: a CFD approach.

    PubMed

    Milenkovic, J; Alexopoulos, A H; Kiparissides, C

    2014-01-30

    In this work the dynamic flow as well as the particle motion and deposition in a commercial dry powder inhaler, DPI (i.e., Turbuhaler) is described using computational fluid dynamics, CFD. The dynamic flow model presented here is an extension of a steady flow model previously described in Milenkovic et al. (2013). The model integrates CFD simulations for dynamic flow, an Eulerian-fluid/Lagrangian-particle description of particle motion as well as a particle/wall interaction model providing the sticking efficiency of particles colliding with the DPI walls. The dynamic flow is imposed by a time varying outlet pressure and the particle injections into the DPI are assumed to occur instantaneously and follow a prescribed particle size distribution, PSD. The total particle deposition and the production of fine particles in the DPI are determined for different peak inspiratory flow rates, PIFR, flow increase rates, FIR, and particle injection times. The simulation results for particle deposition are found to agree well with available experimental data for different values of PIFR and FIR. The predicted values of fine particle fraction are in agreement with available experimental results when the mean size of the injected PSD is taken to depend on the PIFR.

  18. A combined experimental-numerical approach for two-phase flow boiling in a minichannel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hożejowska, Sylwia; Grabowski, Mirosław

    2016-03-01

    The paper addresses experimental and numerical modeling of the two-phase flows in an asymmetrically heated horizontal minichannel. Experimental measurements concerned flows of evaporating ethanol in a minichannel with rectangular cross section 1.8mm × 2 mm. In order to observe the flows, measuring system was designed and built. The system measured and recorded basic heat and flow parameters of flowing fluid, and the temperature of external surface of the heater by using infrared camera and recorded images of flow with high-speed camera. The second aim of the paper was to formulate appropriate flow boiling heat transfer model, which would minimises the use of experimentally determined constants. The procedure of calculating the temperature of the ethanol is coupled with concurrent process of determining the temperature distributions in the isolating foil and the heating surface. The two-dimensional temperature distributions in three subsequent domains were calculated with Trefftz method. Due to the Robin condition, heat transfer coefficient at the heating surface-ethanol interface was calculated based on the known temperature distributions of the foil and liquid. Additionally, the paper describes the relation between two sets of functions used in the calculation. Numerical calculations made by Trefftz method were performed with using experimental data.

  19. A frequency domain linearized Navier-Stokes equations approach to acoustic propagation in flow ducts with sharp edges.

    PubMed

    Kierkegaard, Axel; Boij, Susann; Efraimsson, Gunilla

    2010-02-01

    Acoustic wave propagation in flow ducts is commonly modeled with time-domain non-linear Navier-Stokes equation methodologies. To reduce computational effort, investigations of a linearized approach in frequency domain are carried out. Calculations of sound wave propagation in a straight duct are presented with an orifice plate and a mean flow present. Results of transmission and reflections at the orifice are presented on a two-port scattering matrix form and are compared to measurements with good agreement. The wave propagation is modeled with a frequency domain linearized Navier-Stokes equation methodology. This methodology is found to be efficient for cases where the acoustic field does not alter the mean flow field, i.e., when whistling does not occur.

  20. Three-dimensional simulations of pressure-driven displacement flow of two immiscible liquids using a multiphase Lattice Boltzmann approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redapangu, Prasanna R.; Sahu, Kirti Chandra; Vanka, S. P.

    2013-11-01

    A three-dimensional multiphase lattice Boltzmann approach is used to study the pressure-driven displacement flow of two immiscible liquids of different densities and viscosities in an inclined square duct. A three-dimensional-fifteen-velocity (D3Q15) lattice model is used. The simulations are performed on a graphics processing unit (GPU) based machine. The effects of channel inclination, viscosity and density contrasts are investigated. The contours of the density and the average viscosity profiles in different planes are plotted and compared with two dimensional simulations. We demonstrate that the flow dynamics in three-dimensional channel is quite different as compared to that of two-dimensional channel. In particular, we found that the flow is relatively more coherent in three-dimensional channel than that in two-dimensional channel. A new screw-type instability is seen in the three-dimensional channel which cannot be observed in two-dimensional simulations.

  1. Highly selective deuteration of pharmaceutically relevant nitrogen-containing heterocycles: a flow chemistry approach.

    PubMed

    Ötvös, Sándor B; Mándity, István M; Fülöp, Ferenc

    2011-08-01

    A simple and efficient flow-based technique is reported for the catalytic deuteration of several model nitrogen-containing heterocyclic compounds which are important building blocks of pharmacologically active materials. A continuous flow reactor was used in combination with on-demand pressure-controlled electrolytic D(2) production. The D(2) source was D(2)O, the consumption of which was very low. The experimental set-up allows the fine-tuning of pressure, temperature, and flow rate so as to determine the optimal conditions for the deuteration reactions. The described procedure lacks most of the drawbacks of the conventional batch deuteration techniques, and additionally is highly selective and reproducible.

  2. LPMLE3: A novel 1-D approach to study water flow in streambeds using heat as a tracer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneidewind, U.; van Berkel, M.; Anibas, C.; Vandersteen, G.; Schmidt, C.; Joris, I.; Seuntjens, P.; Batelaan, O.; Zwart, H. J.

    2016-08-01

    We introduce LPMLE3, a new 1-D approach to quantify vertical water flow components at streambeds using temperature data collected in different depths. LPMLE3 solves the partial differential equation for coupled water flow and heat transport in the frequency domain. Unlike other 1-D approaches it does not assume a semi-infinite halfspace with the location of the lower boundary condition approaching infinity. Instead, it uses local upper and lower boundary conditions. As such, the streambed can be divided into finite subdomains bound at the top and bottom by a temperature-time series. Information from a third temperature sensor within each subdomain is then used for parameter estimation. LPMLE3 applies a low order local polynomial to separate periodic and transient parts (including the noise contributions) of a temperature-time series and calculates the frequency response of each subdomain to a known temperature input at the streambed top. A maximum-likelihood estimator is used to estimate the vertical component of water flow, thermal diffusivity, and their uncertainties for each streambed subdomain and provides information regarding model quality. We tested the method on synthetic temperature data generated with the numerical model STRIVE and demonstrate how the vertical flow component can be quantified for field data collected in a Belgian stream. We show that by using the results in additional analyses, nonvertical flow components could be identified and by making certain assumptions they could be quantified for each subdomain. LPMLE3 performed well on both simulated and field data and can be considered a valuable addition to the existing 1-D methods.

  3. A Combined Approach to Model Reduction for Nonlinear Groundwater Flow and Solute Transport Simulations Using POD and DEIM.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanko, Z.; Boyce, S. E.; Yeh, W. W. G.

    2015-12-01

    Model reduction techniques using proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) have been very effective in applications to confined groundwater flow models. These techniques consist of performing a projection of the solution of the full model onto a reduced basis. POD combined with the snapshot approach has been successfully applied to highly discretized linear models. In many cases, the reduced model is orders of magnitude smaller than the full model and runs 1,000 times faster. For nonlinear models, such as the unconfined groundwater flow, direct application of POD requires additional calls to the full model to generate additional snapshots. This is time consuming and increases the dimension of the reduced model. The discrete empirical interpolation method (DEIM) is a technique that avoids the additional full model calls and captures the dynamics of the nonlinear term while reducing the dimensions. Here, POD and DEIM are combined to reduce both the nonlinear unconfined groundwater flow and solute transport equations. To prove the concept, simple one-dimensional models are created for MODFLOW and MT3DMS separately. The dual approach is then tested on a density-dependent flow and transport simulation using the LMT package developed for MODFLOW. For each iteration of the nonlinear flow solver and the transport solver, the respective reduced models are solved instead. Numerical experiments show that significant reduction is obtainable before errors become too large. This method is well suited for a coastal aquifer seawater intrusion scenario, where nonlinearities only exist in small subregions of the model domain. A fine discretization can be utilized and POD will effectively eliminate unnecessary parameterization by projecting the full model system matrix onto a subspace with fewer column dimensions. DEIM can then reduce the row dimension of the original system by using only those state variable nodes with the most influence. This combined approach allows for full

  4. A unified approach to fluid-flow, geomechanical, and seismic modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yarushina, Viktoriya; Minakov, Alexander

    2016-04-01

    The perturbations of pore pressure can generate seismicity. This is supported by observations from human activities that involve fluid injection into rocks at high pressure (hydraulic fracturing, CO2 storage, geothermal energy production) and natural examples such as volcanic earthquakes. Although the seismic signals that emerge during geotechnical operations are small both in amplitude and duration when compared to natural counterparts. A possible explanation for the earthquake source mechanism is based on a number of in situ stress measurements suggesting that the crustal rocks are close to its plastic yield limit. Hence, a rapid increase of the pore pressure decreases the effective normal stress, and, thus, can trigger seismic shear deformation. At the same time, little attention has been paid to the fact that the perturbation of fluid pressure itself represents an acoustic source. Moreover, non-double-couple source mechanisms are frequently reported from the analysis of microseismicity. A consistent formulation of the source mechanism describing microseismic events should include both a shear and isotropic component. Thus, improved understanding of the interaction between fluid flow and seismic deformation is needed. With this study we aim to increase the competence in integrating real-time microseismic monitoring with geomechanical modelling such that there is a feedback loop between monitored deformation and stress field modelling. We propose fully integrated seismic, geomechanical and reservoir modelling. Our mathematical formulation is based on fundamental set of force balance, mass balance, and constitutive poro-elastoplastic equations for two-phase media consisting of deformable solid rock frame and viscous fluid. We consider a simplified 1D modelling setup for consistent acoustic source and wave propagation in poro-elastoplastic media. In this formulation the seismic wave is generated due to local changes of the stress field and pore pressure induced by

  5. Interfacial-tension-force model for the wavy stratified liquid-liquid flow pattern transition: The usage of two different approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Castro, Marcelo Souza; Rodriguez, Oscar Mauricio Hernandez

    2016-06-01

    The study of the hydrodynamic stability of flow patterns is important in the design of equipment and pipelines for multiphase flows. The maintenance of a particular flow pattern becomes important in many applications, e.g., stratified flow pattern in heavy oil production avoiding the formation of emulsions because of the separation of phases and annular flow pattern in heat exchangers which increases the heat transfer coefficient. Flow maps are drawn to orientate engineers which flow pattern is present in a pipeline, for example. The ways how these flow maps are drawn have changed from totally experimental work, to phenomenological models, and then to stability analysis theories. In this work an experimental liquid-liquid flow map, with water and viscous oil as work fluids, drawn via subjective approach with high speed camera was used to compare to approaches of the same theory: the interfacial-tension-force model. This theory was used to drawn the wavy stratified flow pattern transition boundary. This paper presents a comparison between the two approaches of the interfacial-tension-force model for transition boundaries of liquid-liquid flow patterns: (i) solving the wave equation for the wave speed and using average values for wave number and wave speed; and (ii) solving the same equation for the wave number and then using a correlation for the wave speed. The results show that the second approach presents better results.

  6. A noninvasive approach to quantitative measurement of flow through CSF shunts. Technical note.

    PubMed

    Stein, S C; Apfel, S

    1981-04-01

    A method of measuring flow rate through cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) shunts is reported. It consists of two thermistors in series applied to the skin over the shunt tubing. The thermistors respond by a drop in measured temperature following application of an ice cube placed on the skin overlying the proximal shunt tube. The time required for the thermal response to travel between the two thermistors is related to the velocity of flow through the shunt tubing. Flow rate can then be calculated using the internal diameter of the tubing. A series of animal experiments employing a constant infusion of mock CSF through subcutaneously implanted shunt tubing showed excellent correlation between calculated flow rates and actual infusion rates. The device is noninvasive and easily adapted to use in patients. The measurements are readily repeatable.

  7. Instability of cooperative adaptive cruise control traffic flow: A macroscopic approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ngoduy, D.

    2013-10-01

    This paper proposes a macroscopic model to describe the operations of cooperative adaptive cruise control (CACC) traffic flow, which is an extension of adaptive cruise control (ACC) traffic flow. In CACC traffic flow a vehicle can exchange information with many preceding vehicles through wireless communication. Due to such communication the CACC vehicle can follow its leader at a closer distance than the ACC vehicle. The stability diagrams are constructed from the developed model based on the linear and nonlinear stability method for a certain model parameter set. It is found analytically that CACC vehicles enhance the stabilization of traffic flow with respect to both small and large perturbations compared to ACC vehicles. Numerical simulation is carried out to support our analytical findings. Based on the nonlinear stability analysis, we will show analytically and numerically that the CACC system better improves the dynamic equilibrium capacity over the ACC system. We have argued that in parallel to microscopic models for CACC traffic flow, the newly developed macroscopic will provide a complete insight into the dynamics of intelligent traffic flow.

  8. Flow visualization and numerical analysis of a coflowing jet - A three-dimensional approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agui, Juan C.; Hesselink, Lambertus

    1988-01-01

    The instabilities of an acoustically excited coflowing jet are investigated by using a time series of cross-sections of large-scale structures present in the flow and by a fully three-dimensional numerical simulation via the vortex-element method. These structures are first revealed by a flow-visualization technique based on smoke seeding the inner jet flow and observing the flow cross-sections as the structures are convected past a stationary sheet of laser light. Usage of image-processing techniques along with computer graphics allows the full three-dimensional reconstruction of the structure. The general morphology of the flow is determined from the reconstructed views and shows that the vorticity is mainly concentrated into a single large-scale vortex ring. Hypotheses regarding the nature and origin of the longitudinal instabilities observed in the flow can be drawn from the reconstructed views, and are supported by the numerical simulations. Quantitative values such as the surface-to-volume ratio and the entrainment level are also obtained from the experimental data. The onset of streamwise vorticity and its distribution are derived from the numerical calculations as well. Three-dimensional views and a holographic display of a characteristic eddy are also presented.

  9. Wetland Restoration as a Tool for Peak Flow Mitigation: Combining Watershed Scale Modeling with a Genetic Algorithm Approach.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalzell, B. J.; Gassman, P. W.; Kling, C.

    2015-12-01

    In the Minnesota River Basin, sediments originating from failing stream banks and bluffs account for the majority of the riverine load and contribute to water quality impairments in the Minnesota River as well as portions of the Mississippi River upstream of Lake Pepin. One approach for mitigating this problem may be targeted wetland restoration in Minnesota River Basin tributaries in order to reduce the magnitude and duration of peak flow events which contribute to bluff and stream bank failures. In order to determine effective arrangements and properties of wetlands to achieve peak flow reduction, we are employing a genetic algorithm approach coupled with a SWAT model of the Cottonwood River, a tributary of the Minnesota River. The genetic algorithm approach will evaluate combinations of basic wetland features as represented by SWAT: surface area, volume, contributing area, and hydraulic conductivity of the wetland bottom. These wetland parameters will be weighed against economic considerations associated with land use trade-offs in this agriculturally productive landscape. Preliminary results show that the SWAT model is capable of simulating daily hydrology very well and genetic algorithm evaluation of wetland scenarios is ongoing. Anticipated results will include (1) combinations of wetland parameters that are most effective for reducing peak flows, and (2) evaluation of economic trade-offs between wetland restoration, water quality, and agricultural productivity in the Cottonwood River watershed.

  10. Modeling of Quasi-Four-Phase Flow in Continuous Casting Mold Using Hybrid Eulerian and Lagrangian Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhongqiu; Sun, Zhenbang; Li, Baokuan

    2016-12-01

    Lagrangian tracking model combined with Eulerian multi-phase model is employed to predict the time-dependent argon-steel-slag-air quasi-four-phase flow inside a slab continuous casting mold. The Eulerian approach is used for the description of three phases (molten steel, liquid slag, and air at the top of liquid slag layer). The dispersed argon bubble injected from the SEN is treated in the Lagrangian way. The complex interfacial momentum transfers between various phases are considered. Validation is supported by the measurement data of cold model experiments and industrial practice. Close agreements were achieved for the gas volume fraction, liquid flow pattern, level fluctuation, and exposed slag eye phenomena. Many known phenomena and new predictions were successfully reproduced using this model. The vortex slag entrapment phenomenon at the slag-steel interface was obtained using this model, some small slag drops are sucked deep into the liquid pool of molten steel. Varying gas flow rates have a large effect on the steel flow pattern in the upper recirculation zone. Three typical flow patterns inside the mold with different argon gas flow rates have been obtained: double roll, three roll, and single roll. Effects of argon gas flow rate, casting speed, and slag layer thickness on the exposed slag eye and level fluctuation at the slag-steel interface were studied. A dimensionless value of H ave/h was proposed to describe the time-averaged level fluctuation of slag-steel interface. The exposed slag eye near the SEN would be formed when the value of H ave/h is larger than 0.4.

  11. Modeling of Quasi-Four-Phase Flow in Continuous Casting Mold Using Hybrid Eulerian and Lagrangian Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhongqiu; Sun, Zhenbang; Li, Baokuan

    2017-04-01

    Lagrangian tracking model combined with Eulerian multi-phase model is employed to predict the time-dependent argon-steel-slag-air quasi-four-phase flow inside a slab continuous casting mold. The Eulerian approach is used for the description of three phases (molten steel, liquid slag, and air at the top of liquid slag layer). The dispersed argon bubble injected from the SEN is treated in the Lagrangian way. The complex interfacial momentum transfers between various phases are considered. Validation is supported by the measurement data of cold model experiments and industrial practice. Close agreements were achieved for the gas volume fraction, liquid flow pattern, level fluctuation, and exposed slag eye phenomena. Many known phenomena and new predictions were successfully reproduced using this model. The vortex slag entrapment phenomenon at the slag-steel interface was obtained using this model, some small slag drops are sucked deep into the liquid pool of molten steel. Varying gas flow rates have a large effect on the steel flow pattern in the upper recirculation zone. Three typical flow patterns inside the mold with different argon gas flow rates have been obtained: double roll, three roll, and single roll. Effects of argon gas flow rate, casting speed, and slag layer thickness on the exposed slag eye and level fluctuation at the slag-steel interface were studied. A dimensionless value of H ave/ h was proposed to describe the time-averaged level fluctuation of slag-steel interface. The exposed slag eye near the SEN would be formed when the value of H ave/ h is larger than 0.4.

  12. Towards a new approach for generating probabilistic hazard maps for pyroclastic flows during lava dome eruptions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calder, E. S.; Pitman, B.; Wolpert, R.; Bayarri, S.; Spiller, E.; Berger, J.

    2009-05-01

    It is increasingly being understood that development of mathematical models of a geophysical phenomena, while a fundamental step, is only part of the process of modeling and predicting inundation limits for natural hazards. In this work we combine data from hundreds of observed pyroclastic flows at the Soufriere Hills Volcano, Montserrat, a geophysical flow model, and statistical modeling to derive a new methodology for generating probabilistic hazard maps. The initial step consists of estimating probabilities of inundation at particular discrete points of interest (e.g. airport and Plymouth). The methodology starts with a computer model of the geophysical process, in this case the TITAN2D model that has been developed for modeling geophysical mass flows. A key input to the computer model is the probability distribution for the initial volume and direction of the flows based on observed data. An important limitation is that for modeling purposes, the observations represent relatively scarce datasets, while from a volcanological perspective datasets such as those from the prolonged and relatively well-monitored eruption of the Soufriere Hills Volcano, are as complete as can be realistically obtained. By combining flow event data, probability modeling and statistical methods, a probability distribution of severity and frequency of flow events is derived. Understanding and predicting the effects of volcanic hazards involves understanding the extreme event tail (the largest flow events) but this is notoriously difficult, especially with the limited data and prohibitively expensive to compute.. Instead a statistical emulator (or surrogate of the computer model) is used, a computationally cheap response surface approximating the output of the flow simulations, which is constructed based on carefully chosen computer model runs. The speed of the emulator then allows to 'solve the inverse problem': that is, to determine regions of inputs values (characteristics of the flow

  13. Breakdown of Burton Prim Slichter approach and lateral solute segregation in radially converging flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Priede, J.; Gerbeth, G.

    2005-11-01

    A theoretical study is presented of the effect of a radially converging melt flow, which is directed away from the solidification front, on the radial solute segregation in simple solidification models. We show that the classical Burton-Prim-Slichter (BPS) solution describing the effect of a diverging flow on the solute incorporation into the solidifying material breaks down for the flows converging along the solidification front. The breakdown is caused by a divergence of the integral defining the effective boundary layer thickness which is the basic concept of the BPS theory. Although such a divergence can formally be avoided by restricting the axial extension of the melt to a layer of finite height, radially uniform solute distributions are possible only for weak melt flows with an axial velocity away from the solidification front comparable to the growth rate. There is a critical melt velocity for each growth rate at which the solution passes through a singularity and becomes physically inconsistent for stronger melt flows. To resolve these inconsistencies we consider a solidification front presented by a disk of finite radius R0 subject to a strong converging melt flow and obtain an analytic solution showing that the radial solute concentration depends on the radius r as ˜ln(R0/r) and ˜ln(R0/r) close to the rim and at large distances from it. The logarithmic increase of concentration is limited in the vicinity of the symmetry axis by the diffusion becoming effective at a distance comparable to the characteristic thickness of the solute boundary layer. The converging flow causes a solute pile-up forming a logarithmic concentration peak at the symmetry axis which might be an undesirable feature for crystal growth processes.

  14. Shear-scaling-based approach for irreversible energy loss estimation in stenotic aortic flow - An in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Gülan, Utku; Binter, Christian; Kozerke, Sebastian; Holzner, Markus

    2017-03-12

    Today, the functional and risk assessment of stenosed arteries is mostly based on ultrasound Doppler blood flow velocity measurements or catheter pressure measurements, which rely on several assumptions. Alternatively, blood velocity including turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) may be measured using MRI. The aim of the present study is to validate a TKE-based approach that relies on the fact that turbulence production is dominated by the flow's shear to determine the total irreversible energy loss from MRI scans. Three-dimensional particle tracking velocimetry (3D-PTV) and phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging (PC-MRI) simulations were performed in an anatomically accurate, compliant, silicon aortic phantom. We found that measuring only the laminar viscous losses does not reflect the true losses of stenotic flows since the contribution of the turbulent losses to the total loss become more dominant for more severe stenosis types (for example, the laminar loss is 0.0094±0.0015W and the turbulent loss is 0.0361±0.0015W for the Remax=13,800 case, where Remax is the Reynolds number based on the velocity in the vena-contracta). We show that the commonly used simplified and modified Bernoulli's approaches overestimate the total loss, while the new TKE-based method proposed here, referred to as "shear scaling" approach, results in a good agreement between 3D-PTV and simulated PC-MRI (mean error is around 10%). In addition, we validated the shear scaling approach on a geometry with post-stenotic dilatation using numerical data by Casas et al. (2016). The shear scaling-based method may hence be an interesting alternative for irreversible energy loss estimation to replace traditional approaches for clinical use. We expect that our results will evoke further research, in particular patient studies for clinical implementation of the new method.

  15. A new hierarchical Bayesian approach to analyse environmental and climatic influences on debris flow occurrence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jomelli, Vincent; Pavlova, Irina; Eckert, Nicolas; Grancher, Delphine; Brunstein, Daniel

    2015-12-01

    How can debris flow occurrences be modelled at regional scale and take both environmental and climatic conditions into account? And, of the two, which has the most influence on debris flow activity? In this paper, we try to answer these questions with an innovative Bayesian hierarchical probabilistic model that simultaneously accounts for how debris flows respond to environmental and climatic variables. In it, full decomposition of space and time effects in occurrence probabilities is assumed, revealing an environmental and a climatic trend shared by all years/catchments, respectively, clearly distinguished from residual "random" effects. The resulting regional and annual occurrence probabilities evaluated as functions of the covariates make it possible to weight the respective contribution of the different terms and, more generally, to check the model performances at different spatio-temporal scales. After suitable validation, the model can be used to make predictions at undocumented sites and could be used in further studies for predictions under future climate conditions. Also, the Bayesian paradigm easily copes with missing data, thus making it possible to account for events that may have been missed during surveys. As a case study, we extract 124 debris flow event triggered between 1970 and 2005 in 27 catchments located in the French Alps from the French national natural hazard survey and model their variability of occurrence considering environmental and climatic predictors at the same time. We document the environmental characteristics of each debris flow catchment (morphometry, lithology, land cover, and the presence of permafrost). We also compute 15 climate variables including mean temperature and precipitation between May and October and the number of rainy days with daily cumulative rainfall greater than 10/15/20/25/30/40 mm day- 1. Application of our model shows that the combination of environmental and climatic predictors explained 77% of the overall

  16. Kinetics-based phase change approach for VOF method applied to boiling flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cifani, Paolo; Geurts, Bernard; Kuerten, Hans

    2014-11-01

    Direct numerical simulations of boiling flows are performed to better understand the interaction of boiling phenomena with turbulence. The multiphase flow is simulated by solving a single set of equations for the whole flow field according to the one-fluid formulation, using a VOF interface capturing method. Interface terms, related to surface tension, interphase mass transfer and latent heat, are added at the phase boundary. The mass transfer rate across the interface is derived from kinetic theory and subsequently coupled with the continuum representation of the flow field. The numerical model was implemented in OpenFOAM and validated against 3 cases: evaporation of a spherical uniformly heated droplet, growth of a spherical bubble in a superheated liquid and two dimensional film boiling. The computational model will be used to investigate the change in turbulence intensity in a fully developed channel flow due to interaction with boiling heat and mass transfer. In particular, we will focus on the influence of the vapor bubble volume fraction on enhancing heat and mass transfer. Furthermore, we will investigate kinetic energy spectra in order to identify the dynamics associated with the wakes of vapor bubbles. Department of Applied Mathematics, 7500 AE Enschede, NL.

  17. Unsteady Hartmann Two-Phase Flow: The Riemann-Sum Approximation Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jha, B. K.; Babila, C. T.; Isa, S.

    2016-12-01

    We consider the time dependent Hartmann flow of a conducting fluid in a channel formed by two horizontal parallel plates of infinite extent, there being a layer of a non-conducting fluid between the conducting fluid and the upper channel wall. The flow formation of conducting and non-conducting fluids is coupled by equating the velocity and shear stress at the interface. The unsteady flow formation inside the channel is caused by a sudden change in the pressure gradient. The relevant partial differential equations capturing the present physical situation are transformed into ordinary differential equations using the Laplace transform technique. The ordinary differential equations are then solved analytically and the Riemann-sum approximation method is used to invert the Laplace domain into time domain. The solution obtained is validated by comparisons with the closed form solutions obtained for steady states which have been derived separately and also by the implicit finite difference method. The variation of velocity, mass flow rate and skin-friction on both plates for various physical parameters involved in the problem are reported and discussed with the help of line graphs. It was found that the effect of changes of the electric load parameter is to aid or oppose the flow as compared to the short-circuited case.

  18. Population Balance Modeling of Polydispersed Bubbly Flow in Continuous-Casting Using Multiple-Size-Group Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhongqiu; Li, Linmin; Qi, Fengsheng; Li, Baokuan; Jiang, Maofa; Tsukihashi, Fumitaka

    2015-02-01

    A population balance model based on the multiple-size-group (MUSIG) approach has been developed to investigate the polydispersed bubbly flow inside the slab continuous-casting mold and bubble behavior including volume fraction, breakup, coalescence, and size distribution. The Eulerian-Eulerian approach is used to describe the equations of motion of the two-phase flow. All the non-drag forces (lift force, virtual mass force, wall lubrication force, and turbulent dispersion force) and drag force are incorporated in this model. Sato and Sekiguchi model is used to account for the bubble-induced turbulence. Luo and Svendsen model and Prince and Blanch model are used to describe the bubbles breakup and coalescence behavior, respectively. A 1/4th water model of the slab continuous-casting mold was applied to investigate the distribution and size of bubbles by injecting air through a circumferential inlet chamber which was made of the specially-coated samples of mullite porous brick, which is used for the actual upper nozzle. Against experimental data, numerical results showed good agreement for the gas volume fraction and local bubble Sauter mean diameter. The bubble Sauter mean diameter in the upper recirculation zone decreases with increasing water flow rate and increases with increasing gas flow rate. The distribution of bubble Sauter mean diameter along the width direction of the upper mold increases first, and then gradually decreases from the SEN to the narrow wall. Close agreements between the predictions and measurements demonstrate the capability of the MUSIG model in modeling bubbly flow inside the continuous-casting mold.

  19. An Approach to the Constrained Design of Natural Laminar Flow Airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Bradford E.

    1997-01-01

    A design method has been developed by which an airfoil with a substantial amount of natural laminar flow can be designed, while maintaining other aerodynamic and geometric constraints. After obtaining the initial airfoil's pressure distribution at the design lift coefficient using an Euler solver coupled with an integral turbulent boundary layer method, the calculations from a laminar boundary layer solver are used by a stability analysis code to obtain estimates of the transition location (using N-Factors) for the starting airfoil. A new design method then calculates a target pressure distribution that will increase the laminar flow toward the desired amount. An airfoil design method is then iteratively used to design an airfoil that possesses that target pressure distribution. The new airfoil's boundary layer stability characteristics are determined, and this iterative process continues until an airfoil is designed that meets the laminar flow requirement and as many of the other constraints as possible.

  20. An approach to the constrained design of natural laminar flow airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Bradford Earl

    1995-01-01

    A design method has been developed by which an airfoil with a substantial amount of natural laminar flow can be designed, while maintaining other aerodynamic and geometric constraints. After obtaining the initial airfoil's pressure distribution at the design lift coefficient using an Euler solver coupled with an integml turbulent boundary layer method, the calculations from a laminar boundary layer solver are used by a stability analysis code to obtain estimates of the transition location (using N-Factors) for the starting airfoil. A new design method then calculates a target pressure distribution that will increase the larninar flow toward the desired amounl An airfoil design method is then iteratively used to design an airfoil that possesses that target pressure distribution. The new airfoil's boundary layer stability characteristics are determined, and this iterative process continues until an airfoil is designed that meets the laminar flow requirement and as many of the other constraints as possible.

  1. Flow rate estimation by optical coherence tomography using contrast dilution approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Štohanzlová, Petra; Kolář, Radim

    2015-07-01

    This paper describes experiments and methodology for flow rate estimation using optical coherence tomography and dilution method in single fiber setup. The single fiber is created from custom made glass capillary and polypropylene hollow fiber. As a data source, measurements on single fiber phantom with continuous flow of carrier medium and bolus of Intralipid solution as a contrast agent were used using Thorlabs OCT OCS1300SS. The measured data were processed by methods of image processing, in order to precisely align the individual images in the sequence and extract dilution curves from the area inside the fiber. An experiment proved that optical coherence tomography can be used for flow rate estimation by the dilution method with precision around 7%.

  2. Flow Visualization at Cryogenic Conditions Using a Modified Pressure Sensitive Paint Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watkins, A. Neal; Goad, William K.; Obara, Clifford J.; Sprinkle, Danny R.; Campbell, Richard L.; Carter, Melissa B.; Pendergraft, Odis C., Jr.; Bell, James H.; Ingram, JoAnne L.; Oglesby, Donald M.

    2005-01-01

    A modification to the Pressure Sensitive Paint (PSP) method was used to visualize streamlines on a Blended Wing Body (BWB) model at full-scale flight Reynolds numbers. In order to achieve these conditions, the tests were carried out in the National Transonic Facility operating under cryogenic conditions in a nitrogen environment. Oxygen is required for conventional PSP measurements, and several tests have been successfully completed in nitrogen environments by injecting small amounts (typically < 3000 ppm) of oxygen into the flow. A similar technique was employed here, except that air was purged through pressure tap orifices already existent on the model surface, resulting in changes in the PSP wherever oxygen was present. The results agree quite well with predicted results obtained through computational fluid dynamics analysis (CFD), which show this to be a viable technique for visualizing flows without resorting to more invasive procedures such as oil flow or minitufts.

  3. A hybrid computational approach for the interactions between river flow and porous sediment bed covered with large roughness elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, X.

    2013-12-01

    In many natural and human-impacted rivers, the porous sediment beds are either fully or partially covered by large roughness elements, such as gravels and boulders. The existence of these large roughness elements, which are in direct contact with the turbulent river flow, changes the dynamics of mass and momentum transfer across the river bed. It also impacts the overall hydraulics in the river channel and over time, indirectly influences the geomorphological evolution of the system. Ideally, one should resolve each of these large roughness elements in a computational fluid model. This approach is apparently not feasible due to the prohibitive computational cost. Considering a typical river bed with armoring, the distribution of sediment sizes usually shows significant vertical variations. Computationally, it poses great challenge to resolve all the size scales. Similar multiscale problem exists in the much broader porous media flow field. To cope with this, we propose a hybrid computational approach where the large surface roughness elements are resolved using immersed boundary method and sediment layers below (usually finer) are modeled by adding extra drag terms in momentum equations. Large roughness elements are digitized using a 3D laser scanner. They are put into the computational domain using the collision detection and rigid body dynamics algorithms which guarantees realistic and physically-correct spatial arrangement of the surface elements. Simulation examples have shown the effectiveness of the hybrid approach which captures the effect of the surface roughness on the turbulent flow as well as the hyporheic flow pattern in and out of the bed.

  4. An Approach to Adaptive Correction Factors in Depth-Averaged Model for Debris Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tai, Yih-Chin; Cheng, Chin-Kai; Lai, Guan-Cen

    2016-04-01

    In modeling the debris flows, the governing equations are often given in depth-averaged form, where scaling analysis is employed to reduce the complexity and expense in computation. As a result, the non-uniform distributions of the sediment concentration and velocity along the flow thickness bring the correction parameters into the equation system. Since the flows are generally not at steady state, these distributions vary dynamically, so that the values of the correction factors should not be given by constant values. With the concept of two-phase mixture, we revisit the depth-averaged balance equations, where four correction factors are present and inevitable in the resultant model equations if the distributions of the sediment concentration and velocity along the flow thickness are non-uniform. Through theoretical analysis and experimental investigation, we found that a piecewise-linear distribution for velocity and a linear distribution of sediment concentration in the immature debris flows (where the clear water exists) seem plausible. This assumption may significantly simplify the complicated determination of the correction factors. In the resultant model equations, the correcting parameters due to the non-uniform distributions are present, which are of significant impacts on the characteristic of the equation system, and play crucial roles in performing the numerical simulation. In this study, the values of these factors with respect to the corresponding profiles are investigated. By means of numerical examples, we shall illustrate their impacts on the flow behaviors, such as the concentration variation, the geometry of the deposit and the maximum run-out distance.

  5. Attenuated Vector Tomography -- An Approach to Image Flow Vector Fields with Doppler Ultrasonic Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Qiu; Peng, Qiyu; Huang, Bin; Cheryauka, Arvi; Gullberg, Grant T.

    2008-05-15

    The measurement of flow obtained using continuous wave Doppler ultrasound is formulated as a directional projection of a flow vector field. When a continuous ultrasound wave bounces against a flowing particle, a signal is backscattered. This signal obtains a Doppler frequency shift proportional to the speed of the particle along the ultrasound beam. This occurs for each particle along the beam, giving rise to a Doppler velocity spectrum. The first moment of the spectrum provides the directional projection of the flow along theultrasound beam. Signals reflected from points further away from the detector will have lower amplitude than signals reflected from points closer to the detector. The effect is very much akin to that modeled by the attenuated Radon transform in emission computed tomography.A least-squares method was adopted to reconstruct a 2D vector field from directional projection measurements. Attenuated projections of only the longitudinal projections of the vector field were simulated. The components of the vector field were reconstructed using the gradient algorithm to minimize a least-squares criterion. This result was compared with the reconstruction of longitudinal projections of the vector field without attenuation. Ifattenuation is known, the algorithm was able to accurately reconstruct both components of the full vector field from only one set of directional projection measurements. A better reconstruction was obtained with attenuation than without attenuation implying that attenuation provides important information for the reconstruction of flow vector fields.This confirms previous work where we showed that knowledge of the attenuation distribution helps in the reconstruction of MRI diffusion tensor fields from fewer than the required measurements. In the application of ultrasound the attenuation distribution is obtained with pulse wave transmission computed tomography and flow information is obtained with continuous wave Doppler.

  6. Multi-objective two-stage multiprocessor flow shop scheduling - a subgroup particle swarm optimisation approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Rong-Hwa; Yang, Chang-Lin; Hsu, Chun-Ting

    2015-12-01

    Flow shop production system - compared to other economically important production systems - is popular in real manufacturing environments. This study focuses on the flow shop with multiprocessor scheduling problem (FSMP), and develops an improved particle swarm optimisation heuristic to solve it. Additionally, this study designs an integer programming model to perform effectiveness and robustness testing on the proposed heuristic. Experimental results demonstrate a 10% to 50% improvement in the effectiveness of the proposed heuristic in small-scale problem tests, and a 10% to 40% improvement in the robustness of the heuristic in large-scale problem tests, indicating extremely satisfactory performance.

  7. A control systems approach to quantify wall shear stress normalization by flow-mediated dilation in the brachial artery.

    PubMed

    van Bussel, Frank C G; van Bussel, Bas C T; Hoeks, Arnold P G; Op 't Roodt, Jos; Henry, Ronald M A; Ferreira, Isabel; Vanmolkot, Floris H M; Schalkwijk, Casper G; Stehouwer, Coen D A; Reesink, Koen D

    2015-01-01

    Flow-mediated dilation is aimed at normalization of local wall shear stress under varying blood flow conditions. Blood flow velocity and vessel diameter are continuous and opposing influences that modulate wall shear stress. We derived an index FMDv to quantify wall shear stress normalization performance by flow-mediated dilation in the brachial artery. In 22 fasting presumed healthy men, we first assessed intra- and inter-session reproducibilities of two indices pFMDv and mFMDv, which consider the relative peak and relative mean hyperemic change in flow velocity, respectively. Second, utilizing oral glucose loading, we evaluated the tracking performance of both FMDv indices, in comparison with existing indices [i.e., the relative peak diameter increase (%FMD), the peak to baseline diameter ratio (Dpeak/Dbase), and the relative peak diameter increase normalized to the full area under the curve of blood flow velocity with hyperemia (FMD/shearAUC) or with area integrated to peak hyperemia (FMD/shearAUC_peak)]. Inter-session and intra-session reproducibilities for pFMDv, mFMDv and %FMD were comparable (intra-class correlation coefficients within 0.521-0.677 range). Both pFMDv and mFMDv showed more clearly a reduction after glucose loading (reduction of ~45%, p≤0.001) than the other indices (% given are relative reductions): %FMD (~11%, p≥0.074); Dpeak/Dbase (~11%, p≥0.074); FMD/shearAUC_peak (~20%, p≥0.016) and FMD/shearAUC (~38%, p≤0.038). Further analysis indicated that wall shear stress normalization under normal (fasting) conditions is already far from ideal (FMDv < 1), which (therefore) does not materially change with glucose loading. Our approach might be useful in intervention studies to detect intrinsic changes in shear stress normalization performance in conduit arteries.

  8. Novel flow cytometry approach to identify bronchial epithelial cells from healthy human airways

    PubMed Central

    Maestre-Batlle, Danay; Pena, Olga M.; Hirota, Jeremy A.; Gunawan, Evelyn; Rider, Christopher F.; Sutherland, Darren; Alexis, Neil E.; Carlsten, Chris

    2017-01-01

    Sampling various compartments within the lower airways to examine human bronchial epithelial cells (HBEC) is essential for understanding numerous lung diseases. Conventional methods to identify HBEC in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) and wash (BW) have throughput limitations in terms of efficiency and ensuring adequate cell numbers for quantification. Flow cytometry can provide high-throughput quantification of cell number and function in BAL and BW samples, while requiring low cell numbers. To date, a flow cytometric method to identify HBEC recovered from lower human airway samples is unavailable. In this study we present a flow cytometric method identifying HBEC as CD45 negative, EpCAM/pan-cytokeratin (pan-CK) double-positive population after excluding debris, doublets and dead cells from the analysis. For validation, the HBEC panel was applied to primary HBEC resulting in 98.6% of live cells. In healthy volunteers, HBEC recovered from BAL (2.3% of live cells), BW (32.5%) and bronchial brushing samples (88.9%) correlated significantly (p = 0.0001) with the manual microscopy counts with an overall Pearson correlation of 0.96 across the three sample types. We therefore have developed, validated, and applied a flow cytometric method that will be useful to interrogate the role of the respiratory epithelium in multiple lung diseases. PMID:28165060

  9. Innovative Approaches for Urban Watershed Management Wet-Weather Flow Management and Control

    EPA Science Inventory

    The overall objective of this project was to identify innovative strategies for managing the effects of wet-weather flow (WWF) control and failing infrastructure in an urban setting. The intent was to establish areas where external information can benefit US Environmental Protec...

  10. Pipe Flow Simulation Software: A Team Approach to Solve an Engineering Education Problem.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Engel, Renata S.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    A computer simulation program for use in the study of fluid mechanics is described. The package is an interactive tool to explore the fluid flow characteristics of a pipe system by manipulating the physical construction of the system. The motivation, software design requirements, and specific details on how its objectives were met are presented.…

  11. Analysis of pulsatile blood flow in constricted bifurcated arteries with vorticity-stream function approach.

    PubMed

    Chakravarty, S; Sen, S

    2008-01-01

    This theoretical investigation deals with an analysis of pulsatile blood flow in a model bifurcated artery having a stenosis in the parent arterial lumen. The geometry of the bifurcated arterial segment with an implanted stenosis in the parent duct is given an appropriate mathematical shape with the introduction of suitable curvature at the lateral junction and the flow divider. The vascular wall deformability is duly accounted for although the development of atherosclerosis in the arteries reduces its elastic property to some extent. The streaming blood contained in the bifurcated artery is treated to be Newtonian. The flow dynamic analysis applies two-dimensional unsteady incompressible nonlinear Navier-Stokes equations rewritten in the vorticity-stream function formulation. Following a radial coordinate transformation, these equations are solved numerically by a finite difference scheme with the approximate choice of the inlet and boundary conditions in concert with the biophysical point of view. The final numerical results are highlighted at the end of the paper through the exhibition of the wall shear stress and several time-variant patterns of streamlines and vorticity contours of the flow phenomena, which are highly influenced by the severity of the stenosis and the angle of bifurcation. The applicability of the present model is thus established.

  12. A MULTIPLE GRID APPROACH FOR OPEN CHANNEL FLOWS WITH STRONG SHOCKS. (R825200)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract

    Explicit finite difference schemes are being widely used for modeling open channel flows accompanied with shocks. A characteristic feature of explicit schemes is the small time step, which is limited by the CFL stability condition. To overcome this limitation,...

  13. Atmospheric Flow over a Mountainous Region by a One-Way Coupled Approach Based on Reynolds-Averaged Turbulence Modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, C. Veiga; Palma, J. M. L. M.; Rodrigues, Á. H.

    2016-05-01

    The atmospheric flow over a mountainous region has been simulated using a model-chain approach, whereby the flow in a larger region was simulated using a mesoscale model with three nesting levels, down to a 3-km horizontal resolution, within which a fourth nesting level was set with a microscale flow solver and a domain with varying horizontal resolution, around 300 m at the site of interest. Two periods in the summer (July) and autumn (November-December) 2005, each with a duration of two weeks, were selected to test the present approach. Two sites were chosen, comprising a total of seven meteorological masts with wind vanes and anemometers at two heights. The microscale solver improved the wind-speed prediction of the mesoscale model in 10 of the 14 anemometers and replicated the high wind speeds, which were under-predicted in the mesoscale model. The wind conditions in summer varied with the daily cycle, related to regional-scale sea breezes and their interaction with local circulations induced by the topography. Regarding the turbulence intensity, the predicted decay with wind-speed increase was in agreement with the measurements. This study shows the need of both models: the microscale model captures the details of the boundary-layer physics, which would not be possible without the boundary conditions provided by the mesoscale model.

  14. Directional fabric measurements: an investigative approach to transport and depositional mechanisms in pyroclastic flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capaccioni, Bruno; Nappi, Giovanni; Valentini, Laura

    2001-07-01

    Computer-assisted image analysis data of rock fabrics from two quaternary ignimbrites in the Vulsini and Cimini Volcanic Districts of Central Italy are interpreted in terms of transport and depositional mechanisms. Samples were collected vertically at m spaces up two sections through each deposit. The Orvieto-Bagnoregio ignimbrite (OBI) is a non-welded ignimbrite that shows both fluctuations in the mean particle orientation values of up to approximately ±60°, and large variations in the strength of particle iso-orientation with height. The circular frequency distributions of particle orientations are almost always anisotropic and unimodal, in line with a theoretical Von Mises distribution (the circular equivalent of a unimodal, log-normal distribution). In contrast, the welded Cimina ignimbrite (CI) shows vertical homogeneities in mean orientation values with height, and generally lower degrees of anisotropy. Such differences are interpreted as being the results of different depositional mechanisms: incremental deposition at the base of a density-stratified, partially turbulent flow for the OBI; deposition of a laminar mass flow for the CI. In the former case, during transport particles under solidus temperature are subjected to a frictional regime, particles gliding and dispersive pressures, which finally produce size-inverse grading and variable fabric development, depending on the residence time of particles at the basal shear conditions. In the latter case, elongated particles, supported in a laminar flowing viscous matrix, undergo periodic motions which tend to develop parallel-to-flow iso-orientation. Fabric data in the deposit suggest vertical constancy in the rheological properties of the flow, absence of rheological decoupling and (shearing pervasively during transport) a minor importance of plug horizons.

  15. Turbulent separated shear flow control by surface plasma actuator: experimental optimization by genetic algorithm approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benard, N.; Pons-Prats, J.; Periaux, J.; Bugeda, G.; Braud, P.; Bonnet, J. P.; Moreau, E.

    2016-02-01

    The potential benefits of active flow control are no more debated. Among many others applications, flow control provides an effective mean for manipulating turbulent separated flows. Here, a nonthermal surface plasma discharge (dielectric barrier discharge) is installed at the step corner of a backward-facing step ( U 0 = 15 m/s, Re h = 30,000, Re θ = 1650). Wall pressure sensors are used to estimate the reattaching location downstream of the step (objective function #1) and also to measure the wall pressure fluctuation coefficients (objective function #2). An autonomous multi-variable optimization by genetic algorithm is implemented in an experiment for optimizing simultaneously the voltage amplitude, the burst frequency and the duty cycle of the high-voltage signal producing the surface plasma discharge. The single-objective optimization problems concern alternatively the minimization of the objective function #1 and the maximization of the objective function #2. The present paper demonstrates that when coupled with the plasma actuator and the wall pressure sensors, the genetic algorithm can find the optimum forcing conditions in only a few generations. At the end of the iterative search process, the minimum reattaching position is achieved by forcing the flow at the shear layer mode where a large spreading rate is obtained by increasing the periodicity of the vortex street and by enhancing the vortex pairing process. The objective function #2 is maximized for an actuation at half the shear layer mode. In this specific forcing mode, time-resolved PIV shows that the vortex pairing is reduced and that the strong fluctuations of the wall pressure coefficients result from the periodic passages of flow structures whose size corresponds to the height of the step model.

  16. A full-Bayesian approach to the inverse problem for steady-state groundwater flow and heat transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Yefang; Woodbury, Allan D.

    2006-12-01

    The full (hierarchal) Bayesian approach proposed by Woodbury & Ulrych and Jiang et al. is extended to the inverse problem for 2-D steady-state groundwater flow and heat transport. A stochastic conceptual framework for the heat flow and groundwater flow is adopted. A perturbation of both the groundwater flow and the advection-conduction heat transport equations leads to a linear formulation between heads, temperature and logarithm transmissivity [denoted as ln (T)]. A Bayesian updating procedure similar to that of Woodbury & Ulrych can then be performed. This new algorithm is examined against a generic example through simulations. The prior mean, variance and integral scales of ln (T) (hyperparameters) are treated as random variables and their pdfs are determined from maximum entropy considerations. It is also assumed that the statistical properties of the noise in the hydraulic head and temperature measurements are also uncertain. Uncertainties in all pertinent hyperparameters are removed by marginalization. It is found that the use of temperature measurements is showed to further improve the ln (T) estimates for the test case in comparison to the updated ln (T) field conditioned on ln (T) and head data; the addition of temperature data without hydraulic head data to the update also aids refinement of the ln (T) field compared to simply interpolating ln (T) data alone these results suggest that temperature measurements are a promising data source for site characterization for heterogeneous aquifer, which can be accomplished through the full-Bayesian methodology.

  17. Flow Characteristics of Lid-Driven Cavities with Particle Suspensions using an Eulerian-Lagrangian Modeling Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adesemowo, Morakinyo; Shelton, John

    2016-11-01

    Previous experimental and numerical investigations involving lid-driven cavity flows with particle suspensions have primarily focused on particle tracking and the visualization of complex three-dimensional structures that compose the flow field. However, these particle suspensions and their resulting particle-particle interactions could also be viewed as a system of time-dependent perturbation equations to the steady-state Navier-Stokes equations and could affect both the stability and steady-state characteristics of the two-dimensional lid-driven cavity system. In this investigation, an Eulerian-Lagrangian approach to modeling particle suspensions in the lid-driven cavity is utilized in FV-CFD simulations to investigate the effect particle density, area fraction, and Reynolds number have on the two-dimensional flow characteristics of a laminar fluid. Observations have indicated that the development of the primary vortex in the lid-driven cavity varies according to the area fraction of particle suspensions in the system; transitioning from development via an adverse pressure gradient at the top-right corner of the cavity towards particle-laden behavior where particle-particle interactions dominate the development of the primary vortex. Dynamic responses were also observed for particle systems of less dense particles. Finally, a comparison between flows perturbed using disturbance velocities and from particle interactions was performed.

  18. Analysis of Lagrangian stretching in turbulent channel flow using a database task-parallel particle tracking approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meneveau, Charles; Johnson, Perry; Hamilton, Stephen; Burns, Randal

    2016-11-01

    An intrinsic property of turbulent flows is the exponential deformation of fluid elements along Lagrangian paths. The production of enstrophy by vorticity stretching follows from a similar mechanism in the Lagrangian view, though the alignment statistics differ and viscosity prevents unbounded growth. In this paper, the stretching properties of fluid elements and vorticity along Lagrangian paths are studied in a channel flow at Reτ = 1000 and compared with prior, known results from isotropic turbulence. To track Lagrangian paths in a public database containing Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) results, the task-parallel approach previously employed in the isotropic database is extended to the case of flow in a bounded domain. It is shown that above 100 viscous units from the wall, stretching statistics are equal to their isotropic values, in support of the local isotropy hypothesis. Normalized by dissipation rate, the stretching in the buffer layer and below is less efficient due to less favorable alignment statistics. The Cramér function characterizing cumulative Lagrangian stretching statistics shows that overall the channel flow has about half of the stretching per unit dissipation compared with isotropic turbulence. Supported by a National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship Program under Grant No. DGE-1232825, and by National Science Foundation Grants CBET-1507469, ACI-1261715, OCI-1244820 and by JHU IDIES.

  19. Combined AIE/EBE/GMRES approach to incompressible flows. [Adaptive Implicit-Explicit/Grouped Element-by-Element/Generalized Minimum Residuals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liou, J.; Tezduyar, T. E.

    1990-01-01

    Adaptive implicit-explicit (AIE), grouped element-by-element (GEBE), and generalized minimum residuals (GMRES) solution techniques for incompressible flows are combined. In this approach, the GEBE and GMRES iteration methods are employed to solve the equation systems resulting from the implicitly treated elements, and therefore no direct solution effort is involved. The benchmarking results demonstrate that this approach can substantially reduce the CPU time and memory requirements in large-scale flow problems. Although the description of the concepts and the numerical demonstration are based on the incompressible flows, the approach presented here is applicable to larger class of problems in computational mechanics.

  20. The FLOWLENS: a focus-and-context visualization approach for exploration of blood flow in cerebral aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Gasteiger, Rocco; Neugebauer, Mathias; Beuing, Oliver; Preim, Bernhard

    2011-12-01

    Blood flow and derived data are essential to investigate the initiation and progression of cerebral aneurysms as well as their risk of rupture. An effective visual exploration of several hemodynamic attributes like the wall shear stress (WSS) and the inflow jet is necessary to understand the hemodynamics. Moreover, the correlation between focus-and-context attributes is of particular interest. An expressive visualization of these attributes and anatomic information requires appropriate visualization techniques to minimize visual clutter and occlusions. We present the FLOWLENS as a focus-and-context approach that addresses these requirements. We group relevant hemodynamic attributes to pairs of focus-and-context attributes and assign them to different anatomic scopes. For each scope, we propose several FLOWLENS visualization templates to provide a flexible visual filtering of the involved hemodynamic pairs. A template consists of the visualization of the focus attribute and the additional depiction of the context attribute inside the lens. Furthermore, the FLOWLENS supports local probing and the exploration of attribute changes over time. The FLOWLENS minimizes visual cluttering, occlusions, and provides a flexible exploration of a region of interest. We have applied our approach to seven representative datasets, including steady and unsteady flow data from CFD simulations and 4D PC-MRI measurements. Informal user interviews with three domain experts confirm the usefulness of our approach.

  1. A massively parallel computational approach to coupled thermoelastic/porous gas flow problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shia, David; Mcmanus, Hugh L.

    1995-01-01

    A new computational scheme for coupled thermoelastic/porous gas flow problems is presented. Heat transfer, gas flow, and dynamic thermoelastic governing equations are expressed in fully explicit form, and solved on a massively parallel computer. The transpiration cooling problem is used as an example problem. The numerical solutions have been verified by comparison to available analytical solutions. Transient temperature, pressure, and stress distributions have been obtained. Small spatial oscillations in pressure and stress have been observed, which would be impractical to predict with previously available schemes. Comparisons between serial and massively parallel versions of the scheme have also been made. The results indicate that for small scale problems the serial and parallel versions use practically the same amount of CPU time. However, as the problem size increases the parallel version becomes more efficient than the serial version.

  2. The design/analysis of flows through turbomachinery: A viscous/inviscid approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, D. P.; Reddy, D. R.

    1991-01-01

    The development of a design/analysis flow solver at NASA Lewis Research Center is discussed. The solver is axisymmetric and can be run inviscidly with assumed or calculated blockages, or with the viscous terms computed. The blade forces for each blade row are computed from blade-to-blade solutions, correlated data or force model, or from a full three dimensional solution. Codes currently under development can be separated into three distinct elements: the turbomachinery interactive grid generator energy distribution restart code (TIGGERC), the interactive blade element geometry generator (IBEGG), and the viscous/inviscid multi-blade-row average passage flow solver (VIADAC). Several experimental test cases were run to validate the VIADAC code. The tests, representative of typical axial turbomachinery duct axisymmetric wind tunnel body problems, were conducted on an SR7 Spinner axisymmetric body, a NASA Rotor 67 Fan test bed, and a transonic boatail body. The results show the computations to be in good agreement with test data.

  3. A nonlinear optimization approach for UPFC power flow control and voltage security

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalyani, Radha Padma

    This dissertation provides a nonlinear optimization algorithm for the long term control of Unified Power Flow Controller (UPFC) to remove overloads and voltage violations by optimized control of power flows and voltages in the power network. It provides a control strategy for finding the long term control settings of one or more UPFCs by considering all the possible settings and all the (N-1) topologies of a power network. Also, a simple evolutionary algorithm (EA) has been proposed for the placement of more than one UPFC in large power systems. In this publication dissertation, Paper 1 proposes the algorithm and provides the mathematical and empirical evidence. Paper 2 focuses on comparing the proposed algorithm with Linear Programming (LP) based corrective method proposed in literature recently and mitigating cascading failures in larger power systems. EA for placement along with preliminary results of the nonlinear optimization is given in Paper 3.

  4. Similarity transformation approach for ferromagnetic mixed convection flow in the presence of chemically reactive magnetic dipole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayat, Tasawar; Ijaz Khan, Muhammad; Imtiaz, Maria; Alsaedi, Ahmed; Waqas, Muhammad

    2016-10-01

    A simple model of chemical reactions for two dimensional ferrofluid flows is constructed. The impact of magnetic dipole and mixed convection is further analyzed. Flow is caused by linear stretching of the sheet. Similarity transformation is adopted to convert the partial differential equations into ordinary differential equations and then solved by Euler's explicit method. The characteristics of sundry parameters on the velocity, temperature, and concentration fields are graphically elaborated. It is noted that the impact of magneto-thermomechanical interaction is to slow down the fluid motion. The skin friction coefficient enhances and affects the rate of heat transfer. For higher values of ferrohydrodynamics, the interaction velocity shows decreasing behavior. Further the Prandtl number on temperature has opposite behavior when compared with thermal radiation and ferrohydrodynamics interaction.

  5. Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy (HCM): How Flow Analysis May Drive Medical Management and Surgical Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abraham, Theodore P.

    2011-11-01

    Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy (HCM) is the most common inherited heart disease and occurs in 1 in 500 persons worldwide regardless of race, age and gender. It is the most common cause of sudden death in the young and also causes heart failure and cardiac arrhythmias. The primary anatomic abnormality is thickening of certain walls, or sometimes global thickening of the left or right ventricle. The patterns of thickening along with increased ventricular stiffness lead to suboptimal ventricular filling and inefficient ejection of blood from the ventricle. Treatment for HCM can be medical or surgical. The choice of therapy is driven by the presence and severity of outflow obstruction. Flow analysis could provide sophisticated information about outflow and inflow ventricular dynamics. These flow dynamics features may enable better medical choices and provide information that would allow superior surgical planning. Associate Professor of Medicine & Director, Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy Clinic

  6. A Bayesian Hierarchical Modeling Approach to Predicting Flow in Ungauged Basins

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recent innovative approaches to identifying and applying regression-based relationships between land use patterns (such as increasing impervious surface area and decreasing vegetative cover) and rainfall-runoff model parameters represent novel and promising improvements to predic...

  7. Cold flow simulation of an internal combustion engine with vertical valves using layering approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinas, G.; Cupsa, O. S.; Stan, L. C.; Arsenie, A.

    2015-11-01

    Complying with emission requirements and fuel consumption efficiency are the points which drive any development of internal combustion engine. Refinement of the process of combustion and mixture formation, together with in-cylinder flow refinement, is a requirement, valves and piston bowl and intake exhaust port design optimization is essential. In order to reduce the time for design optimization cycle it is used Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD). Being time consuming and highly costly caring out of experiment using flow bench testing this methods start to become less utilized. Air motion inside the intake manifold is one of the important factors, which govern the engine performance and emission of multi-cylinder diesel engines. Any cold flow study on IC is targeting the process of identifying and improving the fluid flow inside the ports and the combustion chamber. This is only the base for an optimization process targeting to increase the volume of air accessing the combustion space and to increase the turbulence of the air at the end of the compression stage. One of the first conclusions will be that the valve diameter is a fine tradeoff between the need for a bigger diameter involving a greater mass of air filling the cylinder, and the need of a smaller diameter in order to reduce the blind zone. Here there is room for optimization studies. The relative pressure indicates a suction effect coming from the moving piston. The more the shape of the inlet port is smoother and the diameter of the piston is bigger, the aerodynamic resistance of the geometry will be smaller so that the difference of inlet port pressure and the pressure near to piston face will be smaller. Here again there is enough room for more optimization studies.

  8. An outflow boundary condition and algorithm for incompressible two-phase flows with phase field approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, S.

    2014-06-01

    We present an effective outflow boundary condition, and an associated numerical algorithm, within the phase-field framework for dealing with two-phase outflows or open boundaries. The set of two-phase outflow boundary conditions for the phase-field and flow variables are designed to prevent the un-controlled growth in the total energy of the two-phase system, even in situations where strong backflows or vortices may be present at the outflow boundaries. We also present an additional boundary condition for the phase field function, which together with the usual Dirichlet condition can work effectively as the phase-field inflow conditions. The numerical algorithm for dealing with these boundary conditions is developed on top of a strategy for de-coupling the computations of all flow variables and for overcoming the performance bottleneck caused by variable coefficient matrices associated with variable density/viscosity. The algorithm contains special constructions, for treating the variable dynamic viscosity in the outflow boundary condition, and for preventing a numerical locking at the outflow boundaries for time-dependent problems. Extensive numerical tests with incompressible two-phase flows involving inflow and outflow boundaries demonstrate that, the two-phase outflow boundary conditions and the numerical algorithm developed herein allow for the fluid interface and the two-phase flow to pass through the outflow or open boundaries in a smooth and seamless fashion, and that our method produces stable simulations when large density ratios and large viscosity ratios are involved and when strong backflows are present at the outflow boundaries.

  9. Field, laboratory and numerical approaches to studying flow through mangrove pneumatophores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chua, V. P.

    2014-12-01

    The circulation of water in riverine mangrove swamps is expected to be influenced by mangrove roots, which in turn affect the nutrients, pollutants and sediments transport in these systems. Field studies were carried out in mangrove areas along the coastline of Singapore where Avicennia marina and Sonneratia alba pneumatophore species are found. Geometrical properties, such as height, diameter and spatial density of the mangrove roots were assessed through the use of photogrammetric methods. Samples of these roots were harvested from mangrove swamps and their material properties, such as bending strength and Young's modulus were determined in the laboratory. It was found that the pneumatophores under hydrodynamic loadings in a mangrove environment could be regarded as fairly rigid. Artificial root models of pneumatophores were fabricated from downscaling based on field observations of mangroves. Flume experiments were performed and measurements of mean flow velocities, Reynolds stress and turbulent kinetic energy were made. The boundary layer formed over the vegetation patch is fully developed after x = 6 m with a linear mean velocity profile. High shear stresses and turbulent kinetic energy were observed at the interface between the top portion of the roots and the upper flow. The experimental data was employed to calibrate and validate three-dimensional simulations of flow in pneumatophores. The simulations were performed with the Delft3D-FLOW model, where the vegetation effect is introduced by adding a depth-distributed resistance force and modifying the k-ɛ turbulence model. The model-predicted profiles for mean velocity, turbulent kinetic energy and concentration were compared with experimental data. The model calibration is performed by adjusting the horizontal and vertical eddy viscosities and diffusivities. A skill assessment of the model is performed using statistical measures that include the Pearson correlation coefficient (r), the mean absolute error

  10. Continuum Approaches for Describing Solid-Gas and Solid-Liquid Flow

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-02-01

    architecture, cellular automata , etc.) as they become available. These computer simulations can be used to evaluate the rheological properties and, hence, be...avalanches and sand- dune formation, in addition to its relevance for solid transport e.g., circulating fluidized beds. Simple kinetic theories of particle...Real flowing sand forms sandpiles (or sand dunes ) stabilized by sliding friction as the velocity becomes small, yet a continuum fluid model of the

  11. Application of an asymmetric flow field flow fractionation multi-detector approach for metallic engineered nanoparticle characterization--prospects and limitations demonstrated on Au nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Hagendorfer, Harald; Kaegi, Ralf; Traber, Jacqueline; Mertens, Stijn F L; Scherrers, Roger; Ludwig, Christian; Ulrich, Andrea

    2011-11-14

    In this work we discuss about the method development, applicability and limitations of an asymmetric flow field flow fractionation (A4F) system in combination with a multi-detector setup consisting of UV/vis, light scattering, and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS). The overall aim was to obtain a size dependent-, element specific-, and quantitative method appropriate for the characterization of metallic engineered nanoparticle (ENP) dispersions. Thus, systematic investigations of crucial method parameters were performed by employing well characterized Au nanoparticles (Au-NPs) as a defined model system. For good separation performance, the A4F flow-, membrane-, and carrier conditions were optimized. To obtain reliable size information, the use of laser light scattering based detectors was evaluated, where an online dynamic light scattering (DLS) detector showed good results for the investigated Au-NP up to a size of 80 nm in hydrodynamic diameter. To adapt large sensitivity differences of the various detectors, as well as to guarantee long term stability and minimum contamination of the mass spectrometer a split-flow concept for coupling ICPMS was evaluated. To test for reliable quantification, the ICPMS signal response of ionic Au standards was compared to that of Au-NP. Using proper stabilization with surfactants, no difference for concentrations of 1-50 μg Au L(-1) in the size range from 5 to 80 nm for citrate stabilized dispersions was observed. However, studies using different A4F channel membranes showed unspecific particle-membrane interaction resulting in retention time shifts and unspecific loss of nanoparticles, depending on the Au-NP system as well as membrane batch and type. Thus, reliable quantification and discrimination of ionic and particular species was performed using ICPMS in combination with ultracentrifugation instead of direct quantification with the A4F multi-detector setup. Figures of merit were obtained, by comparing the

  12. Biomimetic approaches for green tribology: from the lotus effect to blood flow control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maani, Nazanin; Rayz, Vitaliy S.; Nosonovsky, Michael

    2015-09-01

    The research in Green tribology combines several areas including biomimetic tribomaterials and surfaces for controlled adhesion. Biomimetic surfaces mimic living nature and thus they are eco-friendly. The most famous biomimetic surface effect is the Lotus effect (reduction of water adhesion to a solid surface due to micro/nanostructuring of the solid surface). Several extensions of the Lotus effect have been discussed in the literature including the oleophobicity (repelling organic liquids such as oils), underwater oleophobicity to reduce fouling, and the shark skin effect (flow drag reduction due to specially oriented micro-riblets). Here we suggest a potentially important application of micro/nanostructured surfaces in the biomedical area: the micro/nanostructure controlled adhesion in blood flow. Blood is a suspension, and its adhesion properties are different from those of water and oil. For many cardiovascular applications, it is desirable to reduce stagnation and clotting of blood. Therefore, both the underwater oleophobicuity and shark-skin effect can be used. We discuss how computational fluid dynamics models can be used to investigate the structure-property relationships of surface pattern-controlled blood flow adhesion.

  13. An ALE Finite Element Approach for Two-Phase Flow with Phase Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gros, Erik; Anjos, Gustavo; Thome, John; Ltcm Team; Gesar Team

    2016-11-01

    In this work, two-phase flow with phase change is investigated through the Finite Element Method (FEM) in the Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) framework. The equations are discretized on an unstructured mesh where the interface between the phases is explicitly defined as a sub-set of the mesh. The two-phase interface position is described by a set of interconnected nodes which ensures a sharp representation of the boundary, including the role of the surface tension. The methodology proposed for computing the curvature leads to very accurate results with moderate programming effort and computational costs. Such a methodology can be employed to study accurately many two-phase flow and heat transfer problems in industry such as oil extraction and refinement, design of refrigeration systems, modelling of microfluidic and biological systems and efficient cooling of electronics for computational purposes. The latter is the principal aim of the present research. The numerical results are discussed and compared to analytical solutions and reference results, thereby revealing the capability of the proposed methodology as a platform for the study of two-phase flow with phase change.

  14. Approaches to myosin modelling in a two-phase flow model for cell motility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimpton, L. S.; Whiteley, J. P.; Waters, S. L.; Oliver, J. M.

    2016-04-01

    A wide range of biological processes rely on the ability of cells to move through their environment. Mathematical models have been developed to improve our understanding of how cells achieve motion. Here we develop models that explicitly track the cell's distribution of myosin within a two-phase flow framework. Myosin is a small motor protein which is important for contracting the cell's actin cytoskeleton and enabling cell motion. The two phases represent the actin network and the cytosol in the cell. We start from a fairly general description of myosin kinetics, advection and diffusion in the two-phase flow framework, then identify a number of sub-limits of the model that may be relevant in practice, two of which we investigate further via linear stability analyses and numerical simulations. We demonstrate that myosin-driven contraction of the actin network destabilizes a stationary steady state leading to cell motion, but that rapid diffusion of myosin and rapid unbinding of myosin from the actin network are stabilizing. We use numerical simulation to investigate travelling-wave solutions relevant to a steadily gliding cell and we consider a reduction of the model in which the cell adheres strongly to the substrate on which it is crawling. This work demonstrates that a number of existing models for the effect of myosin on cell motility can be understood as different sub-limits of our two-phase flow model.

  15. A first-order time-domain Green's function approach to supersonic unsteady flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freedman, M. I.; Tseng, K.

    1985-01-01

    A time-domain Green's Function Method for unsteady supersonic potential flow around complex aircraft configurations is presented. The focus is on the supersonic range wherein the linear potential flow assumption is valid. The Green's function method is employed in order to convert the potential-flow differential equation into an integral one. This integral equation is then discretized, in space through standard finite-element technique, and in time through finite-difference, to yield a linear algebraic system of equations relating the unknown potential to its prescribed co-normalwash (boundary condition) on the surface of the aircraft. The arbitrary complex aircraft configuration is discretized into hyperboloidal (twisted quadrilateral) panels. The potential and co-normalwash are assumed to vary linearly within each panel. Consistent with the spatial linear (first-order) finite-element approximations, the potential and co-normalwash are assumed to vary linearly in time. The long range goal of our research is to develop a comprehensive theory for unsteady supersonic potential aerodynamics which is capable of yielding accurate results even in the low supersonic (i.e., high transonic) range.

  16. A flow cytometric approach to the study of crustacean cellular immunity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cardenas, W.; Jenkins, J.A.; Dankert, J.R.

    2000-01-01

    Responses of hemocytes from the crayfish Procambarus zonangulus to stimulation by fungal cell walls (Zymosan A) were measured by flow cytometry. Changes in hemocyte physical characteristics were assessed flow cytometrically using forward- and sidescatter light parameters, and viability was measured by two-color fluorescent staining with calcein-AM and ethidium homodimer 1. The main effects of zymosan A on crayfish hemocytes were reduction in cell size and viability compared to control mixtures (hemocytes in buffer only). Adding diethyldithiocarbamic acid, an inhibitor of phenoloxidase, to hemocyte to zymosan mixtures delayed the time course of cell size reduction and cell death compared to zymosan-positive controls. The inclusion of trypsin inhibitor in reaction mixtures further delayed the reduction in hemocyte size and cell death, thereby indicating that a proteolytic cascade, along with prophenoloxidase activation, played a key role in generating signal molecules which mediate these cellular responses. In addition to traditional methods such as microscopy and protein chemistry, flow cytometry can provide a simple, reproducible, and sensitve method for evaluating invertebrate hemocyte responses to immunological stimuli.

  17. Estimation of flow properties using surface deformation and head data: A trajectory-based approach

    SciTech Connect

    Vasco, D.W.

    2004-07-12

    A trajectory-based algorithm provides an efficient and robust means to infer flow properties from surface deformation and head data. The algorithm is based upon the concept of an ''arrival time'' of a drawdown front, which is defined as the time corresponding to the maximum slope of the drawdown curve. The technique involves three steps: the inference of head changes as a function of position and time, the use of the estimated head changes to define arrival times, and the inversion of the arrival times for flow properties. Trajectories, computed from the output of a numerical simulator, are used to relate the drawdown arrival times to flow properties. The inversion algorithm is iterative, requiring one reservoir simulation for each iteration. The method is applied to data from a set of 14 tiltmeters, located at the Raymond Quarry field site in California. Using the technique, I am able to image a high-conductivity channel which extends to the south of the pumping well. The presence of th is permeable pathway is supported by an analysis of earlier cross-well transient pressure test data.

  18. Effects of modified pharmacologic stress approaches on hyperemic myocardial blood flow

    SciTech Connect

    Czernin, J.; Auerbach, M.; Sun, K.T.

    1995-04-01

    Pharmacologic stress testing with 0.56 mg/kg of intravenous dipyridamole is frequently used to noninvasively detect coronary artery disease (CAD). However, high-dose dipyridamole (0.80 mg/kg) or the combination of standard-dose dipyridamole (0.56 mg/kg) with the isometric handgrip maneuver might evoke a greater coronary hyperemic response. To evaluate the effect of modified pharmacologic stress tests, myocardial blood flow was quantified in 11 male subjects (mean age: 27 {plus_minus} 7 yr) during standard-dose dipyridamole (0.56 mg/kg), high-dose dipyridamole (0.80 mg/kg) and standard-dose dipyridamole combined with the isometric handgrip exercise using dynamic PET and a two-compartment model for {sup 13}N-ammonia. Systolic blood pressure, heart rate and rate pressure product remained unchanged from standard to high-dose dipyridamole but increased with the addition of the isometric handgrip. Myocardial blood flow was unchanged from standard to high-dose dipyridamole but was lower with the addition of the isometric handgrip. The hyperemic response induced by standard-dose dipyridamole cannot be further enhanced by high-dose dipyridamole. The addition of the isometric handgrip exercise results in a modest, but significant decline in hyperemic blood flow possibly due to increased extravascular resistive forces or an increase in a mediated coronary vasoconstriction associated with exercise. 31 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  19. A non-statistical regularization approach and a tensor product decomposition method applied to complex flow data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Larcher, Thomas; Blome, Therese; Klein, Rupert; Schneider, Reinhold; Wolf, Sebastian; Huber, Benjamin

    2016-04-01

    Handling high-dimensional data sets like they occur e.g. in turbulent flows or in multiscale behaviour of certain types in Geosciences are one of the big challenges in numerical analysis and scientific computing. A suitable solution is to represent those large data sets in an appropriate compact form. In this context, tensor product decomposition methods currently emerge as an important tool. One reason is that these methods often enable one to attack high-dimensional problems successfully, another that they allow for very compact representations of large data sets. We follow the novel Tensor-Train (TT) decomposition method to support the development of improved understanding of the multiscale behavior and the development of compact storage schemes for solutions of such problems. One long-term goal of the project is the construction of a self-consistent closure for Large Eddy Simulations (LES) of turbulent flows that explicitly exploits the tensor product approach's capability of capturing self-similar structures. Secondly, we focus on a mixed deterministic-stochastic subgrid scale modelling strategy currently under development for application in Finite Volume Large Eddy Simulation (LES) codes. Advanced methods of time series analysis for the databased construction of stochastic models with inherently non-stationary statistical properties and concepts of information theory based on a modified Akaike information criterion and on the Bayesian information criterion for the model discrimination are used to construct surrogate models for the non-resolved flux fluctuations. Vector-valued auto-regressive models with external influences form the basis for the modelling approach [1], [2], [4]. Here, we present the reconstruction capabilities of the two modeling approaches tested against 3D turbulent channel flow data computed by direct numerical simulation (DNS) for an incompressible, isothermal fluid at Reynolds number Reτ = 590 (computed by [3]). References [1] I

  20. A comparison of the coupled fresh water-salt water flow and the Ghyben-Herzberg sharp interface approaches to modeling of transient behavior in coastal aquifer systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Essaid, H.I.

    1986-01-01

    A quasi-three dimensional finite difference model which simulates coupled, fresh water and salt water flow, separated by a sharp interface, is used to investigate the effects of storage characteristics, transmissivity, boundary conditions and anisotropy on the transient responses of such flow systems. The magnitude and duration of the departure of aquifer response from the behavior predicted using the Ghyben-Herzberg, one-fluid approach is a function of the ease with which flow can be induced in the salt water region. In many common hydrogeologic settings short-term fresh water head responses, and transitional responses between short-term and long-term, can only be realistically reproduced by including the effects of salt water flow on the dynamics of coastal flow systems. The coupled fresh water-salt water flow modeling approach is able to reproduce the observed annual fresh water head response of the Waialae aquifer of southeastern Oahu, Hawaii. ?? 1986.

  1. Calculations of unsteady flows around high-lift configurations based on a zonal approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosnyakov, S.; Kursakov, I.; Mikhaylov, S.; Vlasenko, V.

    2015-06-01

    Zonal approach for unsteady Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (URANS) problem solution is described. Original feature of this approach is to use Courant-Friedrichs-Levi number CFL ˜ 1 in the main part of calculation domain excluding thin part of boundary layer. It is achieved by using explicit numerical scheme with fractional time stepping in the main part of calculation domain. In the near-wall zone of boundary layer, implicit dual stepping method is used. In addition to zonal approach, fully implicit method with dual stepping technology is also implemented. The methods are verified in comparison with the results of test case data obtained by consortium participants within DeSiReH FP-7 project.

  2. A two-stage approach for a multi-objective component assignment problem for a stochastic-flow network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yi-Kuei; Yeh, Cheng-Ta

    2013-03-01

    Many real-life systems, such as computer systems, manufacturing systems and logistics systems, are modelled as stochastic-flow networks (SFNs) to evaluate network reliability. Here, network reliability, defined as the probability that the network successfully transmits d units of data/commodity from an origin to a destination, is a performance indicator of the systems. Network reliability maximization is a particular objective, but is costly for many system supervisors. This article solves the multi-objective problem of reliability maximization and cost minimization by finding the optimal component assignment for SFN, in which a set of multi-state components is ready to be assigned to the network. A two-stage approach integrating Non-dominated Sorting Genetic Algorithm II and simple additive weighting are proposed to solve this problem, where network reliability is evaluated in terms of minimal paths and recursive sum of disjoint products. Several practical examples related to computer networks are utilized to demonstrate the proposed approach.

  3. Computation of the inviscid supersonic flow about cones at large angles of attack by a floating discontinuity approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daywitt, J.; Kutler, P.; Anderson, D.

    1977-01-01

    The technique of floating shock fitting is adapted to the computation of the inviscid flowfield about circular cones in a supersonic free stream at angles of attack that exceed the cone half-angle. The resulting equations are applicable over the complete range of free-stream Mach numbers, angles of attack and cone half-angles for which the bow shock is attached. A finite difference algorithm is used to obtain the solution by an unsteady relaxation approach. The bow shock, embedded cross-flow shock, and vortical singularity in the leeward symmetry plane are treated as floating discontinuities in a fixed computational mesh. Where possible, the flowfield is partitioned into windward, shoulder, and leeward regions with each region computed separately to achieve maximum computational efficiency. An alternative shock fitting technique which treats the bow shock as a computational boundary is developed and compared with the floating-fitting approach. Several surface boundary condition schemes are also analyzed.

  4. Evaluation of municipal solid waste management performance by material flow analysis: Theoretical approach and case study.

    PubMed

    Zaccariello, Lucio; Cremiato, Raffaele; Mastellone, Maria Laura

    2015-10-01

    The main role of a waste management plan is to define which is the combination of waste management strategies and method needed to collect and manage the waste in such a way to ensure a given set of targets is reached. Objectives have to be sustainable and realistic, consistent with the environmental policies and regulations and monitored to verify the progressive achievement of the given targets. To get the aim, the setting up and quantification of indicators can allow the measurement of efficiency of a waste management system. The quantification of efficiency indicators requires the developing of a material flow analysis over the system boundary, from waste collection to secondary materials selling, processing and disposal. The material flow analysis has been carried out with reference to a case study for which a reliable, time- and site-specific database was available. The material flow analysis allowed the evaluation of the amount of materials sent to recycling, to landfilling and to waste-to-energy, by highlighting that the sorting of residual waste can further increase the secondary materials amount. The utilisation of energy recovery to treat the low-grade waste allows the maximisation of waste diversion from landfill with a low production of hazardous ash. A preliminary economic balance has been carried out to define the gate fee of the waste management system that was in the range of 84-145 € t(-1) without including the separate collection cost. The cost of door-by-door separate collection, designed to ensure the collection of five separate streams, resulted in 250 € t(-1) ±30%.

  5. A Constructive Approach to Regularity of Lagrangian Trajectories for Incompressible Euler Flow in a Bounded Domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Besse, Nicolas; Frisch, Uriel

    2017-01-01

    The 3D incompressible Euler equations are an important research topic in the mathematical study of fluid dynamics. Not only is the global regularity for smooth initial data an open issue, but the behaviour may also depend on the presence or absence of boundaries. For a good understanding, it is crucial to carry out, besides mathematical studies, high-accuracy and well-resolved numerical exploration. Such studies can be very demanding in computational resources, but recently it has been shown that very substantial gains can be achieved first, by using Cauchy's Lagrangian formulation of the Euler equations and second, by taking advantage of analyticity results of the Lagrangian trajectories for flows whose initial vorticity is Hölder-continuous. The latter has been known for about 20 years (Serfati in J Math Pures Appl 74:95-104, 1995), but the combination of the two, which makes use of recursion relations among time-Taylor coefficients to obtain constructively the time-Taylor series of the Lagrangian map, has been achieved only recently (Frisch and Zheligovsky in Commun Math Phys 326:499-505, 2014; Podvigina et al. in J Comput Phys 306:320-342, 2016 and references therein). Here we extend this methodology to incompressible Euler flow in an impermeable bounded domain whose boundary may be either analytic or have a regularity between indefinite differentiability and analyticity. Non-constructive regularity results for these cases have already been obtained by Glass et al. (Ann Sci Éc Norm Sup 45:1-51, 2012). Using the invariance of the boundary under the Lagrangian flow, we establish novel recursion relations that include contributions from the boundary. This leads to a constructive proof of time-analyticity of the Lagrangian trajectories with analytic boundaries, which can then be used subsequently for the design of a very high-order Cauchy-Lagrangian method.

  6. FISH-Flow: a quantitative molecular approach for describing mixed clade communities of Symbiodinium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McIlroy, S. E.; Smith, G. J.; Geller, J. B.

    2014-03-01

    Our understanding of reef corals and their fate in a changing climate is limited by our ability to monitor the diversity and abundance of the dinoflagellate endosymbionts that sustain them. This study combined two well-known methods in tandem: fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) for genotype-specific labeling of Symbiodinium and flow cytometry to quantify the abundance of each symbiont clade in a sample. This technique (FISH-Flow) was developed with cultured Symbiodinium representing four distinct clades (based on large subunit rDNA) and was used to distinguish and quantify these types with high efficiency and few false positives. This technique was also applied to freshly isolated symbionts of Orbicella faveolata and Orbicella annularis. Isolates from acutely bleached coral tissues had significantly lower labeling efficiency; however, isolates from healthy tissue had efficiencies comparable to cultured Symbiodinium trials. RNA degradation in bleaching samples may have interfered with labeling of cells. Nevertheless, we were able to determine that, with and without thermal stress, experimental columns of the coral O. annularis hosted a majority of clade B and B/C symbionts on the top and side of the coral column, respectively. We demonstrated that, for cultured Symbiodinium and Symbiodinium freshly isolated from healthy host tissues, the relative ratio of clades could be accurately determined for clades present at as low as 7 % relative abundance. While this method does not improve upon PCR-based techniques in identifying clades at background levels, FISH-Flow provides a high precision, flexible system for targeting, quantifying and isolating Symbiodinium genotypes of interest.

  7. A regression approach to the analysis of serial peak flow among fuel oil ash exposed workers.

    PubMed

    Hauser, R; Daskalakis, C; Christiani, D C

    1996-10-01

    We investigated the association between exposure to fuel oil ash and acute airway obstruction in 31 boilermakers and 31 utility workers during the overhaul of a large oil-fired boiler. Air flow was assessed with self-recorded serial peak expiratory flow rate measurements (PEFR) using a mini-Wright meter. Exposure to thoracic particulates with an aerodynamic diameter of 10 gm or smaller (PM10) was assessed using personal sampling devices and detailed work diaries. All subjects were male, with an average age of 43 yr, and an average of 18 yr at their current trade. Average PM10 exposure on work days was 2.75 mg/m3 for boilermakers and 0.57 mg/m3 for utility workers. Three daily PEFR measurements (start-of-shift, end-of-shift, and bed-time) were analyzed simultaneously, using Huber linear regression. After adjustment for job title, welder status, age, height, smoking, and weld-years, for each mg/m3 increase in PM10, the estimated decline in PEFR was 13.2 L/min (p = 0.008) for end-of-shift, 9.9 L/min (p = 0.045) for bed-time, and 6.6 L/min (p = 0.26) for start-of-shift of the following day. This decline of the exposure effect over the 24-h period that follows was statistically significant (p = 0.004). No other factors were found to significantly modify the effect of exposure. Our results suggest that occupational exposure to fuel oil ash is associated with significant acute decrements in peak flow.

  8. A Constructive Approach to Regularity of Lagrangian Trajectories for Incompressible Euler Flow in a Bounded Domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Besse, Nicolas; Frisch, Uriel

    2017-04-01

    The 3D incompressible Euler equations are an important research topic in the mathematical study of fluid dynamics. Not only is the global regularity for smooth initial data an open issue, but the behaviour may also depend on the presence or absence of boundaries. For a good understanding, it is crucial to carry out, besides mathematical studies, high-accuracy and well-resolved numerical exploration. Such studies can be very demanding in computational resources, but recently it has been shown that very substantial gains can be achieved first, by using Cauchy's Lagrangian formulation of the Euler equations and second, by taking advantage of analyticity results of the Lagrangian trajectories for flows whose initial vorticity is Hölder-continuous. The latter has been known for about 20 years (Serfati in J Math Pures Appl 74:95-104, 1995), but the combination of the two, which makes use of recursion relations among time-Taylor coefficients to obtain constructively the time-Taylor series of the Lagrangian map, has been achieved only recently (Frisch and Zheligovsky in Commun Math Phys 326:499-505, 2014; Podvigina et al. in J Comput Phys 306:320-342, 2016 and references therein). Here we extend this methodology to incompressible Euler flow in an impermeable bounded domain whose boundary may be either analytic or have a regularity between indefinite differentiability and analyticity. Non-constructive regularity results for these cases have already been obtained by Glass et al. (Ann Sci Éc Norm Sup 45:1-51, 2012). Using the invariance of the boundary under the Lagrangian flow, we establish novel recursion relations that include contributions from the boundary. This leads to a constructive proof of time-analyticity of the Lagrangian trajectories with analytic boundaries, which can then be used subsequently for the design of a very high-order Cauchy-Lagrangian method.

  9. Field-tracing approach to determine flow velocity and hydraulic conductivity in saturated peat soils

    SciTech Connect

    Gafni, A.

    1986-01-01

    A tracing methodology based on the point dilution concept was developed to quantify groundwater velocities in saturated peat soils. Groundwater velocity was measured in four different peatlands. The steepest hydraulic gradient and the dominant direction of groundwater flow were determined for each peatland. The hydraulic conductivity (K) of selected peat layers was estimated from measured groundwater velocity and hydraulic gradient using Darcy's equation. The effective porosity of three peat layers was determined using the pressure plate technique. The estimated hydraulic parameters of one of the bags were further evaluated by analyzing a rainfall-runoff event that exhibited groundwater discharge.

  10. Numerical experiments on breaking waves on contrasting beaches using a two-phase flow approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakhtyar, R.; Barry, D. A.; Kees, C. E.

    2012-11-01

    A mechanistic understanding of beach environments needs to account for interactions of oceanic forcing and beach materials, in particular the role of waves on the evolution of the beach profile. A fully coupled two-phase flow model was used to simulate nearshore fluid-sediment turbulent flow in the cross-shore direction. It includes the Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes equations and turbulent stress closures for each phase, and accounts for inter-granular stresses. The model has previously been validated using laboratory-scale data, so the results are likely more reliable for that scale. It was used to simulate wave breaking and the ensuing hydrodynamics and sediment transport processes in the surf/swash zones. Numerical experiments were conducted to investigate the effects of varying beach and wave characteristics (e.g., beach slope, sediment grain size, wave periods and heights) on the foreshore profile changes. Spilling and plunging breakers occur on dissipative and intermediate beaches, respectively. The impact of these wave/beach types on nearshore zone hydrodynamics and beach morphology was determined. The numerical results showed that turbulent kinetic energy, sediment concentrations and transport rate are greater on intermediate than on dissipative beaches. The results confirmed that wave energy, beach grain size and bed slope are main factors for sediment transport and beach morphodynamics. The location of the maximum sediment transport is near the breaking point for both beach types. Coarse- and fine-sand beaches differ significantly in their erosive characteristics (e.g., foreshore profile evolutions are erosive and accretionary on the fine and coarse sand beaches, respectively). In addition, a new parameter (based on main driving factors) is proposed that can characterize the sediment transport in the surf and swash zones. The results are consistent with existing physical observations, suggesting that the two-phase flow model is suitable for the

  11. Enhancing Knowledge Flow in a Health Care Context: A Mobile Computing Approach

    PubMed Central

    Souza, Diego Da Silva; de Lima, Patrícia Zudio; da Silveira, Pedro C; de Souza, Jano Moreira

    2014-01-01

    Background Advances in mobile computing and wireless communication have allowed people to interact and exchange knowledge almost anywhere. These technologies support Medicine 2.0, where the health knowledge flows among all involved people (eg, patients, caregivers, doctors, and patients’ relatives). Objective Our paper proposes a knowledge-sharing environment that takes advantage of mobile computing and contextual information to support knowledge sharing among participants within a health care community (ie, from patients to health professionals). This software environment enables knowledge exchange using peer-to-peer (P2P) mobile networks based on users’ profiles, and it facilitates face-to-face interactions among people with similar health interests, needs, or goals. Methods First, we reviewed and analyzed relevant scientific articles and software apps to determine the current state of knowledge flow within health care. Although no proposal was capable of addressing every aspect in the Medicine 2.0 paradigm, a list of requirements was compiled. Using this requirement list and our previous works, a knowledge-sharing environment was created integrating Mobile Exchange of Knowledge (MEK) and the Easy to Deploy Indoor Positioning System (EDIPS), and a twofold qualitative evaluation was performed. Second, we analyzed the efficiency and reliability of the knowledge that the integrated MEK-EDIPS tool provided to users according to their interest topics, and then performed a proof of concept with health professionals to determine the feasibility and usefulness of using this solution in a real-world scenario. Results . Using MEK, we reached 100% precision and 80% recall in the exchange of files within the peer-to-peer network. The mechanism that facilitated face-to-face interactions was evaluated by the difference between the location indicated by the EDIPS tool and the actual location of the people involved in the knowledge exchange. The average distance error was <6

  12. Insect-Inspired Self-Motion Estimation with Dense Flow Fields--An Adaptive Matched Filter Approach.

    PubMed

    Strübbe, Simon; Stürzl, Wolfgang; Egelhaaf, Martin

    2015-01-01

    The control of self-motion is a basic, but complex task for both technical and biological systems. Various algorithms have been proposed that allow the estimation of self-motion from the optic flow on the eyes. We show that two apparently very different approaches to solve this task, one technically and one biologically inspired, can be transformed into each other under certain conditions. One estimator of self-motion is based on a matched filter approach; it has been developed to describe the function of motion sensitive cells in the fly brain. The other estimator, the Koenderink and van Doorn (KvD) algorithm, was derived analytically with a technical background. If the distances to the objects in the environment can be assumed to be known, the two estimators are linear and equivalent, but are expressed in different mathematical forms. However, for most situations it is unrealistic to assume that the distances are known. Therefore, the depth structure of the environment needs to be determined in parallel to the self-motion parameters and leads to a non-linear problem. It is shown that the standard least mean square approach that is used by the KvD algorithm leads to a biased estimator. We derive a modification of this algorithm in order to remove the bias and demonstrate its improved performance by means of numerical simulations. For self-motion estimation it is beneficial to have a spherical visual field, similar to many flying insects. We show that in this case the representation of the depth structure of the environment derived from the optic flow can be simplified. Based on this result, we develop an adaptive matched filter approach for systems with a nearly spherical visual field. Then only eight parameters about the environment have to be memorized and updated during self-motion.

  13. Insect-Inspired Self-Motion Estimation with Dense Flow Fields—An Adaptive Matched Filter Approach

    PubMed Central

    Strübbe, Simon; Stürzl, Wolfgang; Egelhaaf, Martin

    2015-01-01

    The control of self-motion is a basic, but complex task for both technical and biological systems. Various algorithms have been proposed that allow the estimation of self-motion from the optic flow on the eyes. We show that two apparently very different approaches to solve this task, one technically and one biologically inspired, can be transformed into each other under certain conditions. One estimator of self-motion is based on a matched filter approach; it has been developed to describe the function of motion sensitive cells in the fly brain. The other estimator, the Koenderink and van Doorn (KvD) algorithm, was derived analytically with a technical background. If the distances to the objects in the environment can be assumed to be known, the two estimators are linear and equivalent, but are expressed in different mathematical forms. However, for most situations it is unrealistic to assume that the distances are known. Therefore, the depth structure of the environment needs to be determined in parallel to the self-motion parameters and leads to a non-linear problem. It is shown that the standard least mean square approach that is used by the KvD algorithm leads to a biased estimator. We derive a modification of this algorithm in order to remove the bias and demonstrate its improved performance by means of numerical simulations. For self-motion estimation it is beneficial to have a spherical visual field, similar to many flying insects. We show that in this case the representation of the depth structure of the environment derived from the optic flow can be simplified. Based on this result, we develop an adaptive matched filter approach for systems with a nearly spherical visual field. Then only eight parameters about the environment have to be memorized and updated during self-motion. PMID:26308839

  14. Pyrite oxidation in saturated and Unsaturated Porous Media Flow: AComparison of alternative mathematical modeling approaches

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Tianfu; White, Stephen P.; Pruess, Karsten

    1998-02-15

    Pyrite (FeS{sub 2}) is one of the most common naturally occurring minerals that is present in many subsurface environments. It plays an important role in the genesis of enriched ore deposits through weathering reactions, is the most abundant sulfide mineral in many mine tailings, and is the primary source of acid drainage from mines and waste rock piles. The pyrite oxidation reaction serves as a prototype for oxidative weathering processes with broad significance for geoscientific, engineering, and environmental applications. Mathematical modeling of these processes is extremely challenging because aqueous concentrations of key species vary over an enormous range, oxygen inventory and supply are typically small in comparison to pyrite inventory, and chemical reactions are complex, involving kinetic control and microbial catalysis. We present the mathematical formulation of a general multi-phase advective-diffusive reactive transport model for redox processes. Two alternative implementations were made in the TOUGHREACT and TOUGH2-CHEM simulation codes which use sequential iteration and simultaneous solution, respectively. The simulators are applied to reactive consumption of pyrite in (1) saturated flow of oxidizing water, and (2) saturated-unsaturated flow in which oxygen transport occurs in both aqueous and gas phases. Geochemical evolutions predicted from different process models are compared, and issues of numerical accuracy and efficiency are discussed.

  15. A different approach on the onset of separation in the flow around a circular cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malamataris, Nikolaos; Sarris, I.; Pazis, D.; Liakos, A.

    2016-11-01

    The onset of separation in the flow around a cylinder is revisited with new insight. The goal of the research is to compute the smallest Reynolds number where the separation actual occurs rather than computing small eddies and extrapolating to the value of the Reynolds number where separation may occur. To this purpose, an accurate home made code is designed with Galerkin finite elements. The computational domain is chosen as the laboratory experiments by Taneda. It is found that in all six different choices of Taneda's diameters of the cylinders he used, separation is not observed for Re < 6 . 1 . Actually, separation is computed in all of his six cases for Re = 6 . 14 . Images of this smallest eddy are shown for the first time where all characteristics of eddies are recognisable (vortex centre, separation length etc). The vorticity of the flow is computed along the cylinder surface and it is shown that, at separation, vorticity changes sign. Byproducts of this research is the computation of the drag coefficient for Reynolds numbers starting from 1 .10-5 up to 40. In addition, the separation angle (point where vorticity changes sign) is computed for 6 . 14 <= Re <= 40 . This research aims to be the most thorough work done on that subject so far.

  16. Modelling Cavitating Flows using an Eulerian-Lagrangian Approach and a Nucleation Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Jingsen; Hsiao, Chao-Tsung; Chahine, Georges L.

    2015-12-01

    An Eulerian/Lagrangian multi-scale two-phase flow model is developed to simulate the various types of cavitation including bubble, sheet, and tip vortex cavitation. Sheet cavitation inception, unsteady breakup, and cloud shedding on a hydrofoil are used as an example here. No assumptions are needed on mass transfer between phases; instead, the method tracks bubble nuclei, which are in the bulk of the liquid and those generated by nucleation from solid boundaries and this is- sufficient to accurately capture the sheet dynamics. The multi-scale model includes a micro-scale model for tracking the bubbles, a macro-scale model for describing large cavity dynamics and a transition scheme to bridge the micro and macro scales. Nuclei are treated as flow singularities until they grow into large bubbles, which eventually merge to form a large scale discretised sheet cavity. The sheet performs large scale oscillations with a periodic reentrant jet forming under the sheet cavity, traveling upstream, and breaking the cavity. This results in bubble cloud formation and in high pressure peaks as the broken pockets shrink and collapse while travelling downstream. The results for a NACA0015 foil are in good agreement with the experimental data.

  17. Spectral SP: A New Approach to Mapping Reservoir Flow and Permeability

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, Donald M.; Lienert, Barry R.; Wallin, Erin L.; Gasperikova, Erika

    2014-05-27

    Our objectives for the current project were to develop an innovative inversion and analysis procedure for magnetotelluric field data and time variable self-potentials that will enable us to map not only the subsurface resistivity structure of a geothermal prospect but to also delineate the permeability distribution within the field. Hence, the ultimate objective were to provide better targeting information for exploratory and development drilling of a geothermal prospect. Field data were collected and analyzed from the Kilauea Summit, Kilauea East Rift Zone, and the Humuula Saddle between Mauna Loa and Mauna Kea volcanoes. All of these areas were known or suspected to have geothermal activity of varying intensities. Our results provided evidence for significant long-term coordinated changes in spontaneous potential that could be associated with subsurface flows, significant interferences were encountered that arose from surface environmental changes (rainfall, temperature) that rendered it nearly impossible to unequivocally distinguish between deep fluid flow changes and environmental effects. Further, the analysis of the inferred spontaneous potential changes in the context of depth of the signals, and hence, permeability horizons, were unable to be completed in the time available.

  18. Assessing population structure and gene flow in Montana wolverines (Gulo gulo) using assignment-based approaches.

    PubMed

    Cegelski, C C; Waits, L P; Anderson, N J

    2003-11-01

    In North America, wolverines once occupied a continuous range from Alaska southward to New Mexico. In the lower 48 states, small remnant populations remain only in the northwestern United States. Among these remnant populations, the Montana population has the highest probability of long-term persistence given its size and proximity to healthy populations in Canada. In this study, we evaluate population genetic structure and gene flow among Montana wolverines using 10 polymorphic microsatellite loci. Bayesian and frequency-based assignment tests revealed significant population substructure and provide support for at least three subpopulations in Montana. FST values between subpopulations ranged from 0.08 to 0.10 and provide evidence for male-biased dispersal. The high degree of population substructure and low levels of gene flow contrast results from wolverine population genetic studies in less fragmented landscapes of Alaska and Canada. This study provides additional support for the hypothesis that large carnivore populations of Montana are becoming increasingly fragmented due to human development and disturbance.

  19. Two-phase flow properties in aperture-based fractures under normal deformation conditions: Analytical approach and numerical simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Zuyang; Liu, Hui-Hai; Jiang, Qinghui; Liu, Yanzhang; Cheng, Aiping

    2017-02-01

    A systematic method has been proposed to estimate the two-phase flow properties of horizontal fractures under normal deformation condition. Based on Gaussian aperture distributions and the assumption of local parallel plate model, a simple model was obtained in closed form to predict the capillary pressure-saturation relationships for both wetting and non-wetting phases. Three conceptual models were also developed to characterize the relative permeability behaviors. In order to investigate the effect of normal deformation on two-phase flow properties, the normal deformation could be represented with the maximum void space closure on the basis of penetration model. A rigorous successive random addition (SRA) method was used to generate the aperture-based fractures and a numerical approach based on invasion percolation (IP) model was employed to model capillary-dominated displacements between wetting and non-wetting phases. The proposed models were partially verified by a laboratory dataset and numerical calculations without consideration of deformation. Under large normal deformations, it was found that the macroscopic model is in better agreement with simulated observations. The simulation results demonstrated that the two-phase flow properties including the relationships between capillary pressure, relative permeability and saturation, phase interference, phase structures, residual-saturation-rated parameters and tortuosity factor, were highly sensitive to the spatial correlation of aperture distribution and normal deformation.

  20. A data-driven approach for modeling post-fire debris-flow volumes and their uncertainty

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Friedel, M.J.

    2011-01-01

    This study demonstrates the novel application of genetic programming to evolve nonlinear post-fire debris-flow volume equations from variables associated with a data-driven conceptual model of the western United States. The search space is constrained using a multi-component objective function that simultaneously minimizes root-mean squared and unit errors for the evolution of fittest equations. An optimization technique is then used to estimate the limits of nonlinear prediction uncertainty associated with the debris-flow equations. In contrast to a published multiple linear regression three-variable equation, linking basin area with slopes greater or equal to 30 percent, burn severity characterized as area burned moderate plus high, and total storm rainfall, the data-driven approach discovers many nonlinear and several dimensionally consistent equations that are unbiased and have less prediction uncertainty. Of the nonlinear equations, the best performance (lowest prediction uncertainty) is achieved when using three variables: average basin slope, total burned area, and total storm rainfall. Further reduction in uncertainty is possible for the nonlinear equations when dimensional consistency is not a priority and by subsequently applying a gradient solver to the fittest solutions. The data-driven modeling approach can be applied to nonlinear multivariate problems in all fields of study. ?? 2011.

  1. Towards a dynamic assessment of raw materials criticality: linking agent-based demand--with material flow supply modelling approaches.

    PubMed

    Knoeri, Christof; Wäger, Patrick A; Stamp, Anna; Althaus, Hans-Joerg; Weil, Marcel

    2013-09-01

    Emerging technologies such as information and communication-, photovoltaic- or battery technologies are expected to increase significantly the demand for scarce metals in the near future. The recently developed methods to evaluate the criticality of mineral raw materials typically provide a 'snapshot' of the criticality of a certain material at one point in time by using static indicators both for supply risk and for the impacts of supply restrictions. While allowing for insights into the mechanisms behind the criticality of raw materials, these methods cannot account for dynamic changes in products and/or activities over time. In this paper we propose a conceptual framework intended to overcome these limitations by including the dynamic interactions between different possible demand and supply configurations. The framework integrates an agent-based behaviour model, where demand emerges from individual agent decisions and interaction, into a dynamic material flow model, representing the materials' stocks and flows. Within the framework, the environmental implications of substitution decisions are evaluated by applying life-cycle assessment methodology. The approach makes a first step towards a dynamic criticality assessment and will enhance the understanding of industrial substitution decisions and environmental implications related to critical metals. We discuss the potential and limitation of such an approach in contrast to state-of-the-art methods and how it might lead to criticality assessments tailored to the specific circumstances of single industrial sectors or individual companies.

  2. Directed flow in relativistic heavy-ion collisions within the PHSD transport approach and 3FD hydrodynamical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konchakovski, V. P.; Cassing, W.; Ivanov, Y. B.; Toneev, V. D.

    2015-05-01

    We analyze recent STAR data for the directed flow of protons, antiprotons and charged pions obtained within the beam energy scan program within the Parton-Hadron-String- Dynamics (PHSD) transport model and the 3-Fluid hydroDynamics (3FD) approach. We clarify the role of partonic degrees of freedom in the kinetic PHSD approach. The PHSD results, simulating a partonic phase and its coexistence with a hadronic one, are roughly consistent with data. The hydrodynamic results are obtained for two EoS, a pure hadronic EoS and an EoS with a crossover type transition. The latter case is favored by the STAR experimental data. Special attention is paid to the description of antiproton directed flow based on the balance of pp\\bar annihilation and the inverse processes for Np\\bar pair creation from multi-meson interactions. Generally, a semi-qualitative agreement between the measured data and model results supports the idea of a crossover type quark-hadron transition which softens the nuclear EoS.

  3. Analysis and minimization of power flow in a mechanical vibration isolation system using a hybrid (active/passive) approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herdic, Peter C.; Houston, Brian H.; Corsaro, Robert D.; Judge, John A.

    2002-11-01

    Implementation of active control techniques in mechanical vibration isolation systems has been a challenging problem for a number of years where numerous physical control laws have been explored. An energy-based approach to the problem involving the energy transfer or power flow through the mount into the base structure is a first-principles approach to developing control laws and evaluating the system performance. A lumped-parameter model of a passive-active hybrid isolation mount has been developed and validated with experimental data. The mount device has a conventional passive compliant spring, embedded force and velocity sensors, and a piezoceramic actuation layer. This study investigates a complete set of possible layer configurations, that is, the optimal placement of sensors and actuator relative to the passive compliant isolator element. A number of different local physical control laws are examined and the level of power flow through the mount is used to evaluate the performance for the matrix of possible implementations. These results will be discussed with particular emphasis placed on the optimal control configuration and laws, and the related physics. a)Also with SFA, Inc., Largo, MD 20774.

  4. An analytical approach for the simulation of flow in a heterogeneous confined aquifer with a parameter zonation structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Ching-Sheng; Yeh, Hund-Der

    2016-11-01

    This study introduces an analytical approach to estimate drawdown induced by well extraction in a heterogeneous confined aquifer with an irregular outer boundary. The aquifer domain is divided into a number of zones according to the zonation method for representing the spatial distribution of a hydraulic parameter field. The lateral boundary of the aquifer can be considered under the Dirichlet, Neumann or Robin condition at different parts of the boundary. Flow across the interface between two zones satisfies the continuities of drawdown and flux. Source points, each of which has an unknown volumetric rate representing the boundary effect on the drawdown, are allocated around the boundary of each zone. The solution of drawdown in each zone is expressed as a series in terms of the Theis equation with unknown volumetric rates from the source points. The rates are then determined based on the aquifer boundary conditions and the continuity requirements. The estimated aquifer drawdown by the present approach agrees well with a finite element solution developed based on the Mathematica function NDSolve. As compared with the existing numerical approaches, the present approach has a merit of directly computing the drawdown at any given location and time and therefore takes much less computing time to obtain the required results in engineering applications.

  5. Channelized debris flow hazard mitigation through the use of flexible barriers: a simplified computational approach for a sensitivity analysis.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Segalini, Andrea; Ferrero, Anna Maria; Brighenti, Roberto

    2013-04-01

    A channelized debris flow is usually represented by a mixture of solid particles of various sizes and water, flowing along a laterally confined inclined channel-shaped region up to an unconfined area where it slow down its motion and spreads out into a flat-shaped mass. The study of these phenomena is very difficult due to their short duration and unpredictability, lack of historical data for a given basin and complexity of the involved mechanical phenomena. The post event surveys allow for the identification of some depositional features and provide indication about the maximum flow height; however they lack information about development of the phenomena with time. For this purpose the monitoring of recursive events has been carried out by several Authors. Most of the studies, aimed at the determination of the characteristic features of a debris flow, were carried out in artificial channels, where the main involved variables were measured and other where controlled during the tests; however, some uncertainties remained and other scaled models where developed to simulate the deposition mechanics as well as to analyze the transportation mechanics and the energy dissipation. The assessment of the mechanical behavior of the protection structures upon impact with the flow as well as the energy associated to it are necessary for the proper design of such structures that, in densely populated area, can avoid victims and limit the destructive effects of such a phenomenon. In this work a simplified structural model, developed by the Authors for the safety assessment of retention barrier against channelized debris flow, is presented and some parametric cases are interpreted through the proposed approach; this model is developed as a simplified and efficient tool to be used for the verification of the supporting cables and foundations of a flexible debris flow barrier. The present analytical and numerical-based approach has a different aim of a FEM model. The computational

  6. Vortical flows in strongly coupled Yukawa liquids under external forcing - A molecular dynamics approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganesh, Rajaraman; Charan, Harish

    2016-07-01

    Understanding vortical flows under external forcing in two dimensional (2D) fluids is a fundamental paradigm for structure formation in driven, dissipative systems. Considering Yukawa liquid as a prototype for strongly correlated or strongly coupled plasmas characterized by coupling strength (Γ, the ratio of average potential to kinetic energy per particle) and screening parameter (κ, ratio of mean inter-particle distance to shielding length), we address two important problems: 1. Onset of Rayleigh Benard convection cell (RBCC) in 2D Yukawa liquids subject to gravity and external temperature gradient 2. Onset of von Karman vortices in 2D Yukawa liquid under external pressure head, using large scale, first principles molecular dynamics simulations. For typical values of (Γ,κ), existence of a critical external temperature difference is demonstrated, beyond which RBCC are seen to set in. Beyond this critical external temperature difference, the strength of the maximum convective flow velocity is shown to exhibit a new, hitherto unsuspected linear relationship with external temperature difference and with a slope independent of (Γ,κ). The time taken for the transients to settle down to a steady state RBCC τ_s, is found to be maximum close to the above said critical external temperature difference and is seen to reduce with increasing external temperature difference. For the range of values of (Γ, κ) considered here, τ_s ≃ 10 000-20 000;ω^{-1}_{pd}, where ω_{pd} is dust plasma frequency. As Γ is increased to very high values, due to strong coupling effects, RBC cells are seen to be in a transient state without attaining a steady state for as long as 100 000;ω^{-1}_{pd}, even for a very high external temperature difference. In the second part, we address the existence of universal relation between Strouhal (St) and Rayleigh (Ry) numbers for Yukawa liquid using first principles based classical molecular dynamics. The flow past an obstacle is seen to indeed

  7. Combining the Monotonic Lagrangian Grid with Direct Simulation Monte Carlo; a New Approach for Low-Density Flows.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cybyk, Bohdan Zynowij

    Accurate and affordable numerical methods play a vital role in the design and development of practical hypersonic vehicles. Existing analysis tools that provide aerothermodynamic properties for the high-altitude portion of a hypersonic vehicle's flight path are capable but expensive. This dissertation describes the development, validation, and application of a new tool aimed at expanding the practical analysis envelope of high Knudsen number flows. The present work is the first to combine the Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) methodology with a Lagrangian data structure, the Monotonic Lagrangian Grid (MLG). The result is a numerical approach for transition regime flows that automatically adjusts grid resolution to time-varying densities in the flow. The DSMC method is a direct particle simulation technique widely used in predicting flows of dilute gases. The MLG algorithm combines an efficient tracking and sorting scheme with a monotonic data structure for indexing and storing physical attributes of the moving particles. Monotonicity features of the MLG ensure that particles close in physical space are stored in adjacent array locations so that particle interactions may be restricted to a 'template' of near neighbors. The MLG templates provide a time-varying grid network that automatically adapts to local number densities within the flowfield. The majority of MLG and DSMC logic is inherently parallel, enabling extremely efficient application on parallel computer architectures. Computational advantages and disadvantages of this new MLG-based implementation are demonstrated by a series of test problems. The effects of MLG sorting parameters on computational performance are investigated, and results from sensitivity studies on grid size and template size are presented. The combination of DSMC and MLG results in a new tool with several significant benefits, including an automatically adapting grid, improved prediction accuracy for a given grid size, and decreased

  8. New approach to the exact solution of viscous flow due to stretching (shrinking) and porous sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Azhar; Khan Marwat, Dil Nawaz; Asghar, S.

    Exact analytical solutions for the generalized stretching (shrinking) of a porous surface, for the variable suction (injection) velocity, is presented in this paper. The solution is generalized in the sense that the existing solutions that correspond to various stretching velocities are recovered as a special case of this study. A suitable similarity transformation is introduced to find self-similar solution of the non-linear governing equations. The flow is characterized by a few non-dimensional parameters signifying the problem completely. These parameters are such that the whole range of stretching (shrinking) problems discussed earlier can be recovered by assigning appropriate values to these parameters. A key point of the whole narrative is that a number of earlier works can be abridged into one generalized problem through the introduction of a new similarity transformation and finding its exact solution encompassing all the earlier solutions.

  9. Two-layer interfacial flows beyond the Boussinesq approximation: a Hamiltonian approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camassa, R.; Falqui, G.; Ortenzi, G.

    2017-02-01

    The theory of integrable systems of Hamiltonian PDEs and their near-integrable deformations is used to study evolution equations resulting from vertical-averages of the Euler system for two-layer stratified flows in an infinite two-dimensional channel. The Hamiltonian structure of the averaged equations is obtained directly from that of the Euler equations through the process of Hamiltonian reduction. Long-wave asymptotics together with the Boussinesq approximation of neglecting the fluids’ inertia is then applied to reduce the leading order vertically averaged equations to the shallow-water Airy system, albeit in a non-trivial way. The full non-Boussinesq system for the dispersionless limit can then be viewed as a deformation of this well known equation. In a perturbative study of this deformation, a family of approximate constants of the motion are explicitly constructed and used to find local solutions of the evolution equations by means of hodograph-like formulae.

  10. Valuation of imaging centers: alternative methods and detailed description of the discounted cash flow approach.

    PubMed

    Russell, Philip J

    2007-01-01

    Medical imaging centers are an increasingly integral part of the medical services landscape in America. There are many instances in which owners and potential buyers of these enterprises want to ascertain the value of the businesses. There is an industry of professionals who provide expert valuation services for many types of businesses using various recognized alternative methods, some of which are more appropriate than others when valuing an imaging center. The federal government has prescribed parameters for all valuations if they lead to transactions in which fair market value is mandated, and it also expects transactions to adhere to more generalized laws relating to entities that provide services to Medicare patients. Radiologists who own, or who are contemplating ownership of, imaging center operations need to understand the principles of valuation, specifically the factors that are involved in a discounted cash flow determination of fair market value.

  11. OMFP: An Approach for Online Mass Flow Prediction in CFB Boilers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Žliobaitė, Indrė; Bakker, Jorn; Pechenizkiy, Mykola

    Fuel feeding and inhomogeneity of fuel typically cause process fluctuations in the circulating fluidized bed (CFB) boilers. If control systems fail to compensate the fluctuations, the whole plant will suffer from fluctuations that are reinforced by the closed-loop controls. Accurate estimates of fuel consumption among other factors are needed for control systems operation. In this paper we address a problem of online mass flow prediction. Particularly, we consider the problems of (1) constructing the ground truth, (2) handling noise and abrupt concept drift, and (3) learning an accurate predictor. Last but not least we emphasize the importance of having the domain knowledge concerning the considered case. We demonstrate the performance of OMPF using real data sets collected from the experimental CFB boiler.

  12. An automatic system for acidity determination based on sequential injection titration and the monosegmented flow approach.

    PubMed

    Kozak, Joanna; Wójtowicz, Marzena; Gawenda, Nadzieja; Kościelniak, Paweł

    2011-06-15

    An automatic sequential injection system, combining monosegmented flow analysis, sequential injection analysis and sequential injection titration is proposed for acidity determination. The system enables controllable sample dilution and generation of standards of required concentration in a monosegmented sequential injection manner, sequential injection titration of the prepared solutions, data collecting, and handling. It has been tested on spectrophotometric determination of acetic, citric and phosphoric acids with sodium hydroxide used as a titrant and phenolphthalein or thymolphthalein (in the case of phosphoric acid determination) as indicators. Accuracy better than |4.4|% (RE) and repeatability better than 2.9% (RSD) have been obtained. It has been applied to the determination of total acidity in vinegars and various soft drinks. The system provides low sample (less than 0.3 mL) consumption. On average, analysis of a sample takes several minutes.

  13. Maximizing protein translation rate in the non-homogeneous ribosome flow model: a convex optimization approach.

    PubMed

    Poker, Gilad; Zarai, Yoram; Margaliot, Michael; Tuller, Tamir

    2014-11-06

    Translation is an important stage in gene expression. During this stage, macro-molecules called ribosomes travel along the mRNA strand linking amino acids together in a specific order to create a functioning protein. An important question, related to many biomedical disciplines, is how to maximize protein production. Indeed, translation is known to be one of the most energy-consuming processes in the cell, and it is natural to assume that evolution shaped this process so that it maximizes the protein production rate. If this is indeed so then one can estimate various parameters of the translation machinery by solving an appropriate mathematical optimization problem. The same problem also arises in the context of synthetic biology, namely, re-engineer heterologous genes in order to maximize their translation rate in a host organism. We consider the problem of maximizing the protein production rate using a computational model for translation-elongation called the ribosome flow model (RFM). This model describes the flow of the ribosomes along an mRNA chain of length n using a set of n first-order nonlinear ordinary differential equations. It also includes n + 1 positive parameters: the ribosomal initiation rate into the mRNA chain, and n elongation rates along the chain sites. We show that the steady-state translation rate in the RFM is a strictly concave function of its parameters. This means that the problem of maximizing the translation rate under a suitable constraint always admits a unique solution, and that this solution can be determined using highly efficient algorithms for solving convex optimization problems even for large values of n. Furthermore, our analysis shows that the optimal translation rate can be computed based only on the optimal initiation rate and the elongation rate of the codons near the beginning of the ORF. We discuss some applications of the theoretical results to synthetic biology, molecular evolution, and functional genomics.

  14. Impact of Geological Characterization Uncertainties on Subsurface Flow & Transport Using a Stochastic Discrete Fracture Network Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ezzedine, S. M.

    2009-12-01

    Fractures and fracture networks are the principal pathways for transport of water and contaminants in groundwater systems, enhanced geothermal system fluids, migration of oil and gas, carbon dioxide leakage from carbon sequestration sites, and of radioactive and toxic industrial wastes from underground storage repositories. A major issue to overcome when characterizing a fractured reservoir is that of data limitation due to accessibility and affordability. Moreover, the ability to map discontinuities in the rock with available geological and geophysical tools tends to decrease particularly as the scale of the discontinuity goes down. Geological characterization data include measurements of fracture density, orientation, extent, and aperture, and are based on analysis of outcrops, borehole optical and acoustic televiewer logs, aerial photographs, and core samples, among other techniques. All of these measurements are taken at the field scale through a very sparse limited number of deep boreholes. These types of data are often reduced to probability distribution functions for predictive modeling and simulation in a stochastic framework such as a stochastic discrete fracture network. Stochastic discrete fracture network models enable, through Monte Carlo realizations and simulations, probabilistic assessment of flow and transport phenomena that are not adequately captured using continuum models. Despite the fundamental uncertainties inherited within the probabilistic reduction of the sparse data collected, very little work has been conducted on quantifying uncertainty on the reduced probabilistic distribution functions. In the current study, using nested Monte Carlo simulations, we present the impact of parameter uncertainties of the distribution functions of fracture density, orientation, aperture and size on the flow and transport using topological measures such as fracture connectivity, physical characteristics such as effective hydraulic conductivity tensors, and

  15. Numerical Simulation of Hot Accretion Flows. III. Revisiting Wind Properties Using the Trajectory Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Feng; Gan, Zhaoming; Narayan, Ramesh; Sadowski, Aleksander; Bu, Defu; Bai, Xue-Ning

    2015-05-01

    Previous MHD simulations have shown that wind must exist in black hole hot accretion flows. In this paper, we continue our study by investigating the detailed properties of wind and the mechanism of wind production. For this aim, we make use of a 3D general relativistic MHD simulation of hot accretion flows around a Schwarzschild black hole. To distinguish real wind from turbulent outflows, we track the trajectories of the virtual Lagrangian particles from simulation data. We find two types of real outflows, i.e., a jet and a wind. The mass flux of wind is very significant, and its radial profile can be described by {{\\dot{M}}wind}≈ {{\\dot{M}}BH}≤ft( r/20 {{r}s} \\right), with {{\\dot{M}}BH} being the mass accretion rate at the black hole horizon and rs being the Schwarzschild radius. The poloidal wind speed almost remains constant once they are produced, but the flux-weighted wind speed roughly follows {{v}p,wind}(r)≈ 0.25{{v}k}(r), with vk(r) being the Keplerian speed at radius r. The mass flux of the jet is much lower, but the speed is much higher, {{v}p,jet} ˜ (0.3-0.4)c. Consequently, both the energy and momentum fluxes of the wind are much larger than those of the jet. The wind is produced and accelerated primarily by the combination of centrifugal force and magnetic pressure gradient, while the jet is mainly accelerated by the magnetic pressure gradient. Finally, we find that the wind production efficiency {{ɛ }wind}\\equiv {{\\dot{E}}wind}/{{\\dot{M}}BH}{{c}2}˜ 1/1000 is in good agreement with the value required from large-scale galaxy simulations with active galactic nucleus feedback.

  16. Riemann–Hilbert problem approach for two-dimensional flow inverse scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Agaltsov, A. D.; Novikov, R. G.

    2014-10-15

    We consider inverse scattering for the time-harmonic wave equation with first-order perturbation in two dimensions. This problem arises in particular in the acoustic tomography of moving fluid. We consider linearized and nonlinearized reconstruction algorithms for this problem of inverse scattering. Our nonlinearized reconstruction algorithm is based on the non-local Riemann–Hilbert problem approach. Comparisons with preceding results are given.

  17. Crustal flow at the margin of high plateaux: A lithospheric-scale experimental approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bajolet, Flora; Chardon, Dominique; Gapais, Denis; Martinod, Joseph; Kermarrec, Jean-Jacques

    2010-05-01

    reverse shear zone acting as the ramp accommodating subduction of the CL mantle below the HP. Injection of PMLC induces far field horizontal displacements of lower crust of the CL towards the foreland. The main foreland-verging thrusts affecting the CL form at that time. After a certain amount of injection and amplification, the roof of the antiform is horizontally sheared backward (i.e., toward the HP) along a flat shear zone whose upper wall coincides with the brittle-ductile transition. This shear zone emerges as the latest back thrust developed in the model, which bounds the outermost pop-down formed in the HP. These results suggest the amplification of a domal antiform resulting in injection of a non-cylindrical channel of PMLC from under HP into the crust of the CL, producing large finite exhumation of the PMLC even in the absence of erosion at the margin of HP. Erosion would favour greater exhumation ending with the formation of a dome of PMLC at the surface, accompanied by back tilting (and consecutive reorganization) of the flat shear zone accommodating return flow of mid/upper crust toward the HP above the channel. Analogy with the Himalayan-Tibet orogen suggests the South Tibetan detachment system may result from such a late reorganization in the exhumation of the Higher Himalaya Crystalline. The experiments provide constraints on the initiation stages of crustal flow at the margin of HP and may allow refining the channel flow model.

  18. Drag phenomena within a torque converter driven automotive transmission - laminar flow approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexa, O.; Marinescu, M.; Olaru, Gh; Costache, D.; Ilie, C. O.; Vinturis, V.

    2015-11-01

    When discussing a torque converter driven, automotive transmission with respect to the vehicle's coasting mode, automotive engineers have to take into account the slip between the converter's propeller and turbine. If the turbine isn't locked to the propellers during coasting process, drag phenomena within the converter's fluid occur and they have to be properly assessed when computing the coasting process dynamics. The best way to make the needed evaluation is to have a separate torque converter and test it on a test bench, if the data provided by the manufacturer, in this respect, weren't available. But there are several issues that could baffle this action. Among them, one could find the lack of information from the manufacturer, missing (bankrupted) manufacturer, classified information, old (out of date) products and so on. An even more challenging situation consists in dealing with a military special vehicle. Actually, the vehicle that would be subjected to the following topic is a military tracked, heavy vehicle (MBT) with a planetary driveline, driven by its engine via a hydraulic torque converter. In the attempt to assess its’ coasting dynamic performances, we faced the problem of the reverse rotation of the torque converter that strongly influences the general drag of the vehicle's motion. Hence, this paper tries to provide a method to determine the transmission overall drag considering the torque converter as being its main contributor. The method is based on the experimental research our team has performed in the last several months. Using high-quality software and adjacent mathematics while assuming a certain sort of flow type within the torque converter, we aimed at determining the parameter of interest of the flow. The method can be successfully used for all type of hydrodynamic components of the transmission under the condition of developing the necessary experimental research. As far as the test were concerned, they were the typical ones designed

  19. Review of modeling approaches for emergency department patient flow and crowding research.

    PubMed

    Wiler, Jennifer L; Griffey, Richard T; Olsen, Tava

    2011-12-01

    Emergency department (ED) crowding is an international phenomenon that continues to challenge operational efficiency. Many statistical modeling approaches have been offered to describe, and at times predict, ED patient load and crowding. A number of formula-based equations, regression models, time-series analyses, queuing theory-based models, and discrete-event (or process) simulation (DES) models have been proposed. In this review, we compare and contrast these modeling methodologies, describe the fundamental assumptions each makes, and outline the potential applications and limitations for each with regard to usability in ED operations and in ED operations and crowding research.

  20. Prediction of Groundwater Flow and Transport Processes in an Urban Area: A Combined Approach of Field Testing and Numerical Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popp, Andrea; Moeck, Christian; Radny, Dirk; Borer, Paul; Affolter, Annette; Epting, Jannis; Huggenberger, Peter; Auckenthaler, Adrian; Schirmer, Mario

    2015-04-01

    Drinking water supply in urban areas is challenging due to different kinds of water use and potential groundwater contamination. We investigate an area where drinking water production is close to different contaminated sites. The study site is characterized by a high complexity of the tectonic and geological setting with a gravel and a karstic aquifer. The two aquifers are partly connected, partly disconnected by an aquitard. To avoid drinking water contamination, artificial groundwater recharge with surface water into the gravel aquifer is used to create a hydraulic barrier between the contaminated sites and the water abstraction wells. Trace compounds, that were found in former times in the surface water but not nowadays, are still detected in the extracted drinking water. Different studies have been performed such as numerical modeling, intensive groundwater monitoring and investigation of drilling cores to get a differentiated overview of the distribution of the contaminants. Back-diffusion from the matrix due to changing hydraulic boundary was stated to be the reason for the actual distribution of the contaminants. In a first approach due to the lack of experimental data or evidence from field measurements, the permeabilities of the karstic aquifer were assumed as homogeneous. In our study, we seek to identify the flow and transport processes within the system including the fracture network in a combined approach of field work and 3D modeling with FEFLOW. During a field campaign we acquired water samples for the analysis of stable water isotopes as well as organic and inorganic compounds. Furthermore, tritium and helium samples were taken to estimate water ages and to determine the flow through the fracture networks. A combination of existing and recently obtained data was used to build and validate a 3D flow and transport model. The simulation of different scenarios such as the water flow for varying injection and extraction rates as well as particle

  1. Development of a novel flow cytometric approach to evaluate fish sperm chromatin using fixed samples

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jenkins, Jill A.

    2013-01-01

    The integrity of the paternal DNA is essential for the accurate transmission of genetic information, yet fertilization is not inhibited by chromatin breakage. Some methods are available for the sensitive detection of DNA damage and can be applied in studies of environmental toxicology, carcinogenesis, aging, and assisted reproduction techniques in both clinical and experimental settings. Because semen samples obtained from remote locations undergo chromatin damage prior to laboratory assessment, the present study was undertaken to evaluate treatments for effective chromatin staining in the development of a DNA fragmentation assay using fixed milt from yellow perch (Perca flavescens). Similar to the sperm chromatin structure assay (SCSA), susceptibility of nuclear DNA to acid-induced denaturation was measured by flow cytometry (FCM). Use of 10% buffered formalin for milt fixation allowed easier peak discrimination than 4% paraformaldehyde. The effects of time and temperature of incubation in 0.08 N HCl were evaluated in order to determine the ideal conditions for promoting DNA decondensation and making strand breaks more available for staining and detection by FCM. The best results were obtained with incubation at 37°C for 1 minute, followed by cold propidium iodide staining for 30 minutes.

  2. Merging elemental and macronutrient approaches for a comprehensive study of energy and nutrient flows.

    PubMed

    Wilder, Shawn M; Jeyasingh, Punidan D

    2016-11-01

    Global warming and predation risk can have important impacts on animal physiology and life histories that can have consequences for ecosystem function. Zhang et al. () recently tested the separate and interactive effects of warming and predation risk on the body composition of Daphnia magna. By measuring both the elemental and biochemical composition of individuals, they showed that D. magna body elemental composition responded opposite to theoretical predictions and previous studies but that these changes were explained by adaptive life-history shifts in allocation to protein in eggs versus body lipid reserves. Photograph by Joachim Mergeay. Zhang, C., Jansen, M., De Meester, L. & Stoks, R. (2016) Energy storage and fecundity explain deviations from ecological stoichiometry predictions under global warming and size-selective predation. Journal of Animal Ecology 85, 1431-1441. Understanding the mechanisms through which energy and nutrients flow through ecosystems is critical to predicting and mitigating the consequences of climate change and other ecological disturbances. Ecological stoichiometry and nutritional geometry, using data on elements and macromolecules, respectively, have independently made major contributions towards this goal. Zhang et al. () provide data demonstrating that these two major frameworks can provide complementary insight into the consequences of global warming and predation risk for the physiology and life-history traits of a key aquatic herbivore, Daphnia magna. This study should catalyse further work to unite these two parallel and complementary frameworks.

  3. A diffuse interface approach to injection-driven flow of different miscibility in heterogeneous porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ching-Yao; Yan, Pei-Yu

    2015-08-01

    Miscible and immiscible injection flows in heterogeneous porous media, for which the permeability is characterized by a log Gaussian distribution, are simulated by a robust diffuse-interface formulation. The robust numerical method enables direct qualitative and quantitative comparisons regarding pattern formations in various fluid miscibility conditions. For miscible injections, the typical size of fingering structures depends strongly on the correlation length and forms tapered fingers with sharper tips. On the other hand, the typical size of immiscible fingers is affected less significantly by the permeability heterogeneity, and wide spreading tips are retained in the fingering patterns. Prominence of fingering instability is quantitatively evaluated by the channeling width and the interfacial length. The channeling width shows strong and monotonic dependences on the heterogeneous variance. On the contrary, maximum channeling width occurs at intermediate correlation length due to local resonant effect between the faster penetrating fingers and permeability heterogeneity. On the other hand, effects of the correlation length and the permeability variance on the interfacial lengths are generally consistent. Longer interfacial length is perturbed by smaller correlation length or higher variance. Interesting invariant evolutions of interfacial lengths are revealed regardless of the permeability variance in sufficiently large correlation length under all miscibility conditions. In addition, the regime of slower growth of interfacial length at later times experimentally observed in homogeneous miscible injection is verified in heterogeneous porous media as well.

  4. An investigation of sulfate production in clouds using a flow-through chemical reactor model approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hong, M. S.; Carmichael, G. R.

    1983-01-01

    A flow-through chemical reactor model is developed to describe the mass transfer and chemical processes that atmospheric gases undergo in clouds. The model includes the simultaneous absorption of SO2, NH3, O3, NO(x), HNO3, CO2 and H2O2, the accompanying dissociation and oxidation reactions in cloud water, considers electrical neutrality, and includes qualitative parameterization of cloud microphysics. The model is used to assess the importance of the oxidation reactions H2O2-S(IV), O3-S(IV), and S(IV)-Mn(2+) catalysis, and the effects of cloud parameters such as drop size, rain intensity, liquid water content, and updraft velocity. Both precipitating and nonprecipitating clouds are studied. Model results predict sulfate production rates varying from 3 percent/hr to 230 percent/hr. The actual rate is highly dependent on the chemical composition of the uptake air and the physical conditions of the cloud. Model results also show that both the H2O2 and the O3 oxidation reactions can be significant.

  5. Non-Newtonian particulate flow simulation: A direct-forcing immersed boundary-lattice Boltzmann approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amiri Delouei, A.; Nazari, M.; Kayhani, M. H.; Kang, S. K.; Succi, S.

    2016-04-01

    In the current study, a direct-forcing immersed boundary-non-Newtonian lattice Boltzmann method (IB-NLBM) is developed to investigate the sedimentation and interaction of particles in shear-thinning and shear-thickening fluids. In the proposed IB-NLBM, the non-linear mechanics of non-Newtonian particulate flows is detected by combination of the most desirable features of immersed boundary and lattice Boltzmann methods. The noticeable roles of non-Newtonian behavior on particle motion, settling velocity and generalized Reynolds number are investigated by simulating benchmark problem of one-particle sedimentation under the same generalized Archimedes number. The effects of extra force due to added accelerated mass are analyzed on the particle motion which have a significant impact on shear-thinning fluids. For the first time, the phenomena of interaction among the particles, such as Drafting, Kissing, and Tumbling in non-Newtonian fluids are investigated by simulation of two-particle sedimentation and twelve-particle sedimentation. The results show that increasing the shear-thickening behavior of fluid leads to a significant increase in the kissing time. Moreover, the transverse position of particles for shear-thinning fluids during the tumbling interval is different from Newtonian and the shear-thickening fluids. The present non-Newtonian particulate study can be applied in several industrial and scientific applications, like the non-Newtonian sedimentation behavior of particles in food industrial and biological fluids.

  6. A new approach to calibrate steady groundwater flow models with time series of head observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obergfell, C.; Bakker, M.; Maas, C.

    2012-04-01

    We developed a new method to calibrate aquifer parameters of steady-state well field models using measured time series of head fluctuations. Our method is an alternative to standard pumping tests and is based on time series analysis using parametric impulse response functions. First, the pumping influence is isolated from the overall groundwater fluctuation observed at monitoring wells around the well field, and response functions are determined for each individual well. Time series parameters are optimized using a quasi-Newton algorithm. For one monitoring well, time series model parameters are also optimized by means of SCEM-UA, a Markov Chain Monte Carlo algorithm, as a control on the validity of the parameters obtained by the faster quasi-Newton method. Subsequently, the drawdown corresponding to an average yearly pumping rate is calculated from the response functions determined by time series analysis. The drawdown values estimated with acceptable confidence intervals are used as calibration targets of a steady groundwater flow model. A case study is presented of the drinking water supply well field of Waalwijk (Netherlands). In this case study, a uniform aquifer transmissivity is optimized together with the conductance of ditches in the vicinity of the well field. Groundwater recharge or boundary heads do not have to be entered, which eliminates two import sources of uncertainty. The method constitutes a cost-efficient alternative to pumping tests and allows the determination of pumping influences without changes in well field operation.

  7. Unstructured grid approach to numerical simulation of viscous flow around multielement airfoils

    SciTech Connect

    Sakovich, V.S.; Sorokin, A.M.

    1996-12-31

    The new direct action scheme is elaborated for approximation of two-dimensional Navier-Stokes equations on high cell aspect ratio (CAR) unstructured grids. This scheme employs the Voronoi cells as control volumes. For convective and viscous terms the scheme produces the conventional cross-type scheme on triangulated rectangular grids. The scheme approximates the additional integral representing the conservation of angular momentum. An accuracy of approximation of direct action scheme can be estimated by error functional specified at each grid point. This functional estimates the quality of unstructured grid for direct action scheme. The matrix dissipation is used for dumping odd-even instability of centered scheme. It combines the accuracy of upwind schemes with robustness and efficiency of centered ones. The construction of highly stretched Delaunay triangulations consists of two steps. At the first step nearly orthogonal structured high CAR grid is generated near bodies and wakes. At the second step this grid is smoothly continued inside the computational domain by incremental insertion technique. The calculation of turbulent viscous flows around single and multielement airfoils were performed by the presented method with Spalart-Allmaras one equation turbulence model incorporated in it.

  8. A generation-attraction model for renewable energy flows in Italy: A complex network approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valori, Luca; Giannuzzi, Giovanni Luca; Facchini, Angelo; Squartini, Tiziano; Garlaschelli, Diego; Basosi, Riccardo

    2016-10-01

    In recent years, in Italy, the trend of the electricity demand and the need to connect a large number of renewable energy power generators to the power-grid, developed a novel type of energy transmission/distribution infrastructure. The Italian Transmission System Operator (TSO) and the Distribution System Operator (DSO), worked on a new infrastructural model, based on electronic meters and information technology. In pursuing this objective it is crucial importance to understand how even more larger shares of renewable energy can be fully integrated, providing a constant and reliable energy background over space and time. This is particularly true for intermittent sources as photovoltaic installations due to the fine-grained distribution of them across the Country. In this work we use an over-simplified model to characterize the Italian power grid as a graph whose nodes are Italian municipalities and the edges cross the administrative boundaries between a selected municipality and its first neighbours, following a Delaunay triangulation. Our aim is to describe the power flow as a diffusion process over a network, and using open data on the solar irradiation at the ground level, we estimate the production of photovoltaic energy in each node. An attraction index was also defined using demographic data, in accordance with average per capita energy consumption data. The available energy on each node was calculated by finding the stationary state of a generation-attraction model.

  9. Systematic study of the elliptic flow parameter using a transport approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasim, Md.; Mohanty, Bedangadas

    2015-04-01

    Elliptic flow parameter, v2 is considered as a sensitive probe for early dynamics of the heavy-ion collision. In this work, we have discussed the effect of detector efficiency, procedure of centrality determination, effect of resonance decay and the procedure to correct event plane resolution on the measured v2 by standard event plane method within the framework of a transport model. The measured value of v2 depends on the efficiency in particle number counting by the detector. The effect of centrality determination is found to be negligible. The new method of event plane resolution correction for wide centrality bin yields results in v2 values closer to the true value of the v2. The contributions from the resonance decay seems to decrease the value of v2 of π and K within the Ultra relativistic Quantum Molecular Dynamics (UrQMD) model based calculation. We also propose a procedure to correct for an event bias effect on v2 arising while comparing the minimum bias collision centrality v2 values for different multi-strange hadrons. Finally, we have presented a model based confirmation of the recently proposed relation between v2 obtained using event plane method and scalar product method to the true value of v2.

  10. The National Ecological Observatory Network's Automated Terrestrial Measurements: Data Flow and Quality Control Approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, J. R.; Loescher, H. W.; Berukoff, S. J.; Ayres, E.; Luo, H.

    2011-12-01

    The National Ecological Observatory Network's Fundamental Instrument Unit (NEON-FIU) is responsible for making automated terrestrial observations at 60 different sites across the continent. FIU will provide data on key local physical, climate and chemical forcings, as well as the biotic responses (CO2, H2O and energy exchanges). The sheer volume of data that will be generated far exceeds that of any other ecological network or agency, (i.e., > 45 Tb/year from 10's of thousands of remotely deployed sensors). We address the question of how to develop and implement a large ecological observatory that can accommodate such a large volume of data while maintaining high quality. Here, we describe our quality assurance and quality control (QA/QC) program to produce quality data while leveraging cyber infrastructure tools and optimizing technician time. Results focus on novel approaches that advance the principles and dataflows used historically (DOE ARM, AmeriFlux, USDA ARS, OK Mesonet) to new state-of-the-art functionality. These automated and semi-automated approaches are also used to inform automated problem tracking to efficiently deploy field. The overarching philosophy relies on attaining the highest levels of accuracy, precision, and operational time, while efficiently optimizing the effort needed to produce quality data products. NEON will define its own standards for QA/QC maintenance by building upon these existing frameworks. Our preliminary results address the challenges associated with automated implementation of sensor command/control, plausibility testing, despiking, and data verification of FIU observations.

  11. Coriolis effects on rotating Hele-Shaw flows: a conformal-mapping approach.

    PubMed

    Miranda, José A; Gadêlha, Hermes; Dorsey, Alan T

    2010-12-01

    The zero surface tension fluid-fluid interface dynamics in a radial Hele-Shaw cell driven by both injection and rotation is studied by a conformal-mapping approach. The situation in which one of the fluids is inviscid and has negligible density is analyzed. When Coriolis force effects are ignored, exact solutions of the zero surface tension rotating Hele-Shaw problem with injection reveal suppression of cusp singularities for sufficiently high rotation rates. We study how the Coriolis force affects the time-dependent solutions of the problem, and the development of finite time singularities. By employing Richardson's harmonic moments approach we obtain conformal maps which describe the time evolution of the fluid boundary. Our results demonstrate that the inertial Coriolis contribution plays an important role in determining the time for cusp formation. Moreover, it introduces a phase drift that makes the evolving patterns rotate. The Coriolis force acts against centrifugal effects, promoting (inhibiting) cusp breakdown if the more viscous and dense fluid lies outside (inside) the interface. Despite the presence of Coriolis effects, the occurrence of finger bending events has not been detected in the exact solutions.

  12. A graded approach to flow and transport modeling to support decommissioning activities at the Savannah river site.

    PubMed

    Dixon, Kenneth L; Lee, Patricia L; Flach, Gregory P

    2008-05-01

    A graded approach to flow and transport modeling has been used as a cost effective solution to evaluating potential groundwater risk in support of Deactivation and Decommissioning activities at the United States Department of Energy's Savannah River Site (SRS) in Aiken, South Carolina. This approach balances modeling complexity with potential risk and has been successfully used at SRS to reduce costs and accelerate schedule without compromising human health or the environment. The approach incorporates both simple spreadsheet calculations (i.e., screening models) and complex numerical modeling to evaluate the threat to human health posed by contaminants leaching from decommissioned concrete building slabs. Simple spreadsheet calculations were used to produce generic slab concentration limits for a suite of radiological and non-radiological contaminants for a chemical separations area at SRS. These limits, which are based upon the United States Environmental Protection Agency Soil Screening Guidance, were used to eliminate most building slabs from further risk assessment, thereby limiting the time and associated cost of the more rigorous assessment to higher risk facilities. Of the more than 58 facilities located in the area, to date only one slab has been found to have a contaminant concentration in excess of the area specific slab limit. For this slab, a more rigorous numerical modeling effort was undertaken which eliminated some of the simplifying and conservative assumptions inherent in the spreadsheet calculations. Results from the more sophisticated numerical model show that the remaining contaminant of concern would not likely impact groundwater above drinking water standards.

  13. Second principle approach to the analysis of unsteady flow and heat transfer in a tube with arc-shaped corrugation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pagliarini, G.; Vocale, P.; Mocerino, A.; Rainieri, S.

    2017-01-01

    Passive convective heat transfer enhancement techniques are well known and widespread tool for increasing the efficiency of heat transfer equipment. In spite of the ability of the first principle approach to forecast the macroscopic effects of the passive techniques for heat transfer enhancement, namely the increase of both the overall heat exchanged and the head losses, a first principle analysis based on energy, momentum and mass local conservation equations is hardly able to give a comprehensive explanation of how local modifications in the boundary layers contribute to the overall effect. A deeper insight on the heat transfer enhancement mechanisms can be instead obtained within a second principle approach, through the analysis of the local exergy dissipation phenomena which are related to heat transfer and fluid flow. To this aim, the analysis based on the second principle approach implemented through a careful consideration of the local entropy generation rate seems the most suitable, since it allows to identify more precisely the cause of the loss of efficiency in the heat transfer process, thus providing a useful guide in the choice of the most suitable heat transfer enhancement techniques.

  14. An Integrated Approach on Groundwater Flow and Heat/Solute Transport for Sustainable Groundwater Source Heat Pump (GWHP) System Operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, D. K.; Bae, G. O.; Joun, W.; Park, B. H.; Park, J.; Park, I.; Lee, K. K.

    2015-12-01

    The GWHP system uses a stable temperature of groundwater for cooling and heating in buildings and thus has been known as one of the most energy-saving and cost-efficient renewable energy techniques. A GWHP facility was installed at an island located at the confluence of North Han and South Han rivers, Korea. Because of well-developed alluvium, the aquifer is suitable for application of this system, extracting and injecting a large amount of groundwater. However, the numerical experiments under various operational conditions showed that it could be vulnerable to thermal interference due to the highly permeable gravel layer, as a preferential path of thermal plume migration, and limited space for well installation. Thus, regional groundwater flow must be an important factor of consideration for the efficient operation under these conditions but was found to be not simple in this site. While the groundwater level in this site totally depends on the river stage control of Paldang dam, the direction and velocity of the regional groundwater flow, observed using the colloidal borescope, have been changed hour by hour with the combined flows of both the rivers. During the pumping and injection tests, the water discharges in Cheongpyeong dam affected their respective results. Moreover, the measured NO3-N concentrations might imply the effect of agricultural activities around the facility on the groundwater quality along the regional flow. It is obvious that the extraction and injection of groundwater during the facility operation will affect the fate of the agricultural contaminants. Particularly, the gravel layer must also be a main path for contaminant migration. The simulations for contaminant transport during the facility operation showed that the operation strategy for only thermal efficiency could be unsafe and unstable in respect of groundwater quality. All these results concluded that the integrated approach on groundwater flow and heat/solute transport is necessary

  15. Development of the Large Eddy Simulation Approach for Modeling Turbulent Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, R. C.; Smith, T. M.; DesJardin, P. E.; Voth, T. E.; Christon, M. A.

    2002-03-01

    This report describes research and development of the large eddy simulation (LES) turbulence modeling approach conducted as part of Sandia's laboratory directed research and development (LDRD) program. The emphasis of the work described here has been toward developing the capability to perform accurate and computationally affordable LES calculations of engineering problems using unstructured-grid codes, in wall-bounded geometries and for problems with coupled physics. Specific contributions documented here include (1) the implementation and testing of LES models in Sandia codes, including tests of a new conserved scalar--laminar flamelet SGS combustion model that does not assume statistical independence between the mixture fraction and the scalar dissipation rate, (2) the development and testing of statistical analysis and visualization utility software developed for Exodus II unstructured grid LES, and (3) the development and testing of a novel new LES near-wall subgrid model based on the one-dimensional Turbulence (ODT) model.

  16. Shape and Topology Optimization in Stokes Flow with a Phase Field Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Garcke, Harald Hecht, Claudia

    2016-02-15

    In this paper we introduce a new formulation for shape optimization problems in fluids in a diffuse interface setting that can in particular handle topological changes. By adding the Ginzburg–Landau energy as a regularization to the objective functional and relaxing the non-permeability outside the fluid region by introducing a porous medium approach we hence obtain a phase field problem where the existence of a minimizer can be guaranteed. This problem is additionally related to a sharp interface problem, where the permeability of the non-fluid region is zero. In both the sharp and the diffuse interface setting we can derive necessary optimality conditions using only the natural regularity of the minimizers. We also pass to the limit in the first order conditions.

  17. Time-Dependent Simulation of Incompressible Flow in a Turbopump Using Overset Grid Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiris, Cetin; Kwak, Dochan

    2001-01-01

    This paper reports the progress being made towards complete unsteady turbopump simulation capability by using overset grid systems. A computational model of a turbo-pump impeller is used as a test case for the performance evaluation of the MPI, hybrid MPI/Open-MP, and MLP versions of the INS3D code. Relative motion of the grid system for rotor-stator interaction was obtained by employing overset grid techniques. Unsteady computations for a turbo-pump, which contains 114 zones with 34.3 Million grid points, are performed on Origin 2000 systems at NASA Ames Research Center. The approach taken for these simulations, and the performance of the parallel versions of the code are presented.

  18. Investigating redox processes under diffusive and advective flow conditions using a coupled omics and synchrotron approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kemner, K. M.; Boyanov, M.; Flynn, T. M.; O'Loughlin, E. J.; Antonopoulos, D. A.; Kelly, S.; Skinner, K.; Mishra, B.; Brooks, S. C.; Watson, D. B.; Wu, W. M.

    2015-12-01

    FeIII- and SO42--reducing microorganisms and the mineral phases they produce have profound implications for many processes in aquatic and terrestrial systems. In addition, many of these microbially-catalysed geochemical transformations are highly dependent upon introduction of reactants via advective and diffusive hydrological transport. We have characterized microbial communities from a set of static microcosms to test the effect of ethanol diffusion and sulfate concentration on UVI-contaminated sediment. The spatial distribution, valence states, and speciation of both U and Fe were monitored in situ throughout the experiment by synchrotron x-ray absorption spectroscopy, in parallel with solution measurements of pH and the concentrations of sulfate, ethanol, and organic acids. After reaction initiation, a ~1-cm thick layer of sediment near the sediment-water (S-W) interface became visibly dark. Fe XANES spectra of the layer were consistent with the formation of FeS. Over the 4 year duration of the experiment, U LIII-edge XANES indicated reduction of U, first in the dark layer and then throughout the sediment. Next, the microcosms were disassembled and samples were taken from the overlying water and different sediment regions. We extracted DNA and characterized the microbial community by sequencing 16S rRNA gene amplicons with the Illumina MiSeq platform and found that the community evolved from its originally homogeneous composition, becoming significantly spatially heterogeneous. We have also developed an x-ray accessible column to probe elemental transformations as they occur along the flow path in a porous medium with the purpose of refining reactive transport models (RTMs) that describe coupled physical and biogeochemical processes in environmental systems. The elemental distribution dynamics and the RTMs of the redox driven processes within them will be presented.

  19. Impaired cerebral blood flow networks in temporal lobe epilepsy with hippocampal sclerosis: A graph theoretical approach.

    PubMed

    Sone, Daichi; Matsuda, Hiroshi; Ota, Miho; Maikusa, Norihide; Kimura, Yukio; Sumida, Kaoru; Yokoyama, Kota; Imabayashi, Etsuko; Watanabe, Masako; Watanabe, Yutaka; Okazaki, Mitsutoshi; Sato, Noriko

    2016-09-01

    Graph theory is an emerging method to investigate brain networks. Altered cerebral blood flow (CBF) has frequently been reported in temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE), but graph theoretical findings of CBF are poorly understood. Here, we explored graph theoretical networks of CBF in TLE using arterial spin labeling imaging. We recruited patients with TLE and unilateral hippocampal sclerosis (HS) (19 patients with left TLE, and 21 with right TLE) and 20 gender- and age-matched healthy control subjects. We obtained all participants' CBF maps using pseudo-continuous arterial spin labeling and analyzed them using the Graph Analysis Toolbox (GAT) software program. As a result, compared to the controls, the patients with left TLE showed a significantly low clustering coefficient (p=0.024), local efficiency (p=0.001), global efficiency (p=0.010), and high transitivity (p=0.015), whereas the patients with right TLE showed significantly high assortativity (p=0.046) and transitivity (p=0.011). The group with right TLE also had high characteristic path length values (p=0.085), low global efficiency (p=0.078), and low resilience to targeted attack (p=0.101) at a trend level. Lower normalized clustering coefficient (p=0.081) in the left TLE and higher normalized characteristic path length (p=0.089) in the right TLE were found also at a trend level. Both the patients with left and right TLE showed significantly decreased clustering in similar areas, i.e., the cingulate gyri, precuneus, and occipital lobe. Our findings revealed differing left-right network metrics in which an inefficient CBF network in left TLE and vulnerability to irritation in right TLE are suggested. The left-right common finding of regional decreased clustering might reflect impaired default-mode networks in TLE.

  20. Dynamic flow-through approach to evaluate readily bioaccessible antioxidants in solid food samples.

    PubMed

    Maia, Miguel A; Soares, Tânia R P; Mota, Ana I P; Rosende, María; Magalhães, Luís M; Miró, Manuel; Segundo, Marcela A

    2017-05-01

    Release of bioactive compounds from food matrices is regarded as the first step towards their human bioavailability. The objective of this work was the implementation of an affordable and robust flow-through device for expedient dynamic leaching experiments aiming at the assessment of readily bioaccessible antioxidant compounds in solid food commodities. A simple configuration is proposed using commercially available devices containing regenerated cellulose filters placed in polypropylene holders to entrap the solid sample, featuring a disposable, single use extraction chamber. The kinetic extraction profile of fast leachable antioxidants from different food matrices was evaluated using the ABTS (2,2'-azino-bis-(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid)) assay, fitting a first-order reaction model for readily bioaccessible compounds (R>0.9). The leaching rate constant values associated to the fast leachable antioxidant compounds were 0.060-0.446min(-1) and 0.105-0.210min(-1) for water and ethanol/water (1:1, v/v) applied as extractants, respectively. Furthermore, no statistically significant differences were found between the estimated values of bioaccessible antioxidant compounds by the kinetic model and the values attained using conventional batch-wise extraction methodology, ranging from 3.37 to 60.3 µmol of Trolox ((±)-6-hydroxy-2,5,7,8-tetramethylchromane-2-carboxylic acid) per g of sample. Extension of the method using U. S. Pharmacopeia surrogate biological media (stomach (pH 1.2) and intestinal (pH 7.5) fluids without enzymes) to NIST-1570a spinach leaves provided gastrointestinal compartment-dependent kinetic leaching rates (0.120 and 0.198min(-1), respectively) and total antioxidant content (45.5 and 52.5µmol of Trolox per g of sample, respectively).

  1. Tracing carbon flow through coral reef food webs using a compound-specific stable isotope approach.

    PubMed

    McMahon, Kelton W; Thorrold, Simon R; Houghton, Leah A; Berumen, Michael L

    2016-03-01

    Coral reefs support spectacularly productive and diverse communities in tropical and sub-tropical waters throughout the world's oceans. Debate continues, however, on the degree to which reef biomass is supported by new water column production, benthic primary production, and recycled detrital carbon (C). We coupled compound-specific stable C isotope ratio (δ(13)C) analyses with Bayesian mixing models to quantify C flow from primary producers to coral reef fishes across multiple feeding guilds and trophic positions in the Red Sea. Analyses of reef fishes with putative diets composed primarily of zooplankton (Amblyglyphidodon indicus), benthic macroalgae (Stegastes nigricans), reef-associated detritus (Ctenochaetus striatus), and coral tissue (Chaetodon trifascialis) confirmed that δ(13)C values of essential amino acids from all baseline C sources were both isotopically diagnostic and accurately recorded in consumer tissues. While all four source end-members contributed to the production of coral reef fishes in our study, a single-source end-member often dominated dietary C assimilation of a given species, even for highly mobile, generalist top predators. Microbially reworked detritus was an important secondary C source for most species. Seascape configuration played an important role in structuring resource utilization patterns. For instance, Lutjanus ehrenbergii showed a significant shift from a benthic macroalgal food web on shelf reefs (71 ± 13 % of dietary C) to a phytoplankton-based food web (72 ± 11 %) on oceanic reefs. Our work provides insights into the roles that diverse C sources play in the structure and function of coral reef ecosystems and illustrates a powerful fingerprinting method to develop and test nutritional frameworks for understanding resource utilization.

  2. Identifiability of sorption parameters in stirred flow-through reactor experiments and their identification with a Bayesian approach.

    PubMed

    Nicoulaud-Gouin, V; Garcia-Sanchez, L; Giacalone, M; Attard, J C; Martin-Garin, A; Bois, F Y

    2016-10-01

    This paper addresses the methodological conditions -particularly experimental design and statistical inference- ensuring the identifiability of sorption parameters from breakthrough curves measured during stirred flow-through reactor experiments also known as continuous flow stirred-tank reactor (CSTR) experiments. The equilibrium-kinetic (EK) sorption model was selected as nonequilibrium parameterization embedding the Kd approach. Parameter identifiability was studied formally on the equations governing outlet concentrations. It was also studied numerically on 6 simulated CSTR experiments on a soil with known equilibrium-kinetic sorption parameters. EK sorption parameters can not be identified from a single breakthrough curve of a CSTR experiment, because Kd,1 and k(-) were diagnosed collinear. For pairs of CSTR experiments, Bayesian inference allowed to select the correct models of sorption and error among sorption alternatives. Bayesian inference was conducted with SAMCAT software (Sensitivity Analysis and Markov Chain simulations Applied to Transfer models) which launched the simulations through the embedded simulation engine GNU-MCSim, and automated their configuration and post-processing. Experimental designs consisting in varying flow rates between experiments reaching equilibrium at contamination stage were found optimal, because they simultaneously gave accurate sorption parameters and predictions. Bayesian results were comparable to maximum likehood method but they avoided convergence problems, the marginal likelihood allowed to compare all models, and credible interval gave directly the uncertainty of sorption parameters θ. Although these findings are limited to the specific conditions studied here, in particular the considered sorption model, the chosen parameter values and error structure, they help in the conception and analysis of future CSTR experiments with radionuclides whose kinetic behaviour is suspected.

  3. Three-Dimensional Incompressible Navier-Stokes Flow Computations about Complete Configurations Using a Multiblock Unstructured Grid Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheng, Chunhua; Hyams, Daniel G.; Sreenivas, Kidambi; Gaither, J. Adam; Marcum, David L.; Whitfield, David L.

    2000-01-01

    A multiblock unstructured grid approach is presented for solving three-dimensional incompressible inviscid and viscous turbulent flows about complete configurations. The artificial compressibility form of the governing equations is solved by a node-based, finite volume implicit scheme which uses a backward Euler time discretization. Point Gauss-Seidel relaxations are used to solve the linear system of equations at each time step. This work employs a multiblock strategy to the solution procedure, which greatly improves the efficiency of the algorithm by significantly reducing the memory requirements by a factor of 5 over the single-grid algorithm while maintaining a similar convergence behavior. The numerical accuracy of solutions is assessed by comparing with the experimental data for a submarine with stem appendages and a high-lift configuration.

  4. Micro reactor integrated μ-PEM fuel cell system: a feed connector and flow field free approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balakrishnan, A.; Mueller, C.; Reinecke, H.

    2013-12-01

    A system level microreactor concept for hydrogen generation with Sodium Borohydride (NaBH4) is demonstrated. The uniqueness of the system is the transport and distribution feature of fuel (hydrogen) to the anode of the fuel cell without any external feed connectors and flow fields. The approach here is to use palladium film instead of feed connectors and the flow fields; palladium's property to adsorb and desorb the hydrogen at ambient and elevated condition. The proof of concept is demonstrated with a polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) based complete system integration which includes microreactor, palladium transport layer and the self-breathing polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell. The hydrolysis of NaBH4 was carried out in the presence of platinum supported by nickel (NiPt). The prototype functionality is tested with NaBH4 chemical hydride. The characterization of the integrated palladium layer and fuel cell is tested with constant and switching load. The presented integrated fuel cell is observed to have a maximum power output and current of 60 mW and 280 mA respectively.

  5. Theoretical and numerical approaches to the forward problem and sensitivity calculation of a novel contactless inductive flow tomography (CIFT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, W.; Peyton, A. J.; Stefani, F.; Gerbeth, G.

    2009-10-01

    A completely contactless flow measurement technique based on the principle of EM induction measurements—contactless inductive flow tomography (CIFT)—has been previously reported by a team based at Forschungszentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (FZD). This technique is suited to the measurement of velocity fields in high conductivity liquids, and the possible applications range from monitoring metal casting and silicon crystal growth in industry to gaining insights into the working of the geodynamo. The forward problem, i.e. calculating the induced magnetic field from a known velocity profile, can be described as a linear relationship when the magnetic Reynolds number is small. Previously, an integral equation method was used to formulate the forward problem; however, although the sensitivity matrices were calculated, they were not explicitly expressed and computation involved the solution of an ill-conditioned system of equations using a so-called deflation method. In this paper, we present the derivation of the sensitivity matrix directly from electromagnetic field theory and the results are expressed very concisely as the cross product of two field vectors. A numerical method based on a finite difference method has also been developed to verify the formulation. It is believed that this approach provides a simple yet fast route to the forward solution of CIFT. Furthermore, a method for sensor design selection based on eigenvalue analysis is presented.

  6. Analysis of heat transfer and fluid flow through a spirally fluted tube using a porous substrate approach

    SciTech Connect

    Srinivasan, V.; Vafai, K.; Christensen, R.N. )

    1994-08-01

    An innovative approach was opted for modeling the flow and heat transfer through spirally fluted tubes. The model divided the flow domain into two regions. The flutes were modeled as a porous substrate with direction-dependent permeabilities. This enabled modeling the swirl component in the fluted tube. The properties of the porous substrate such as its thickness, porosity, and ratio of the direction-dependent permeabilities were obtained from the geometry of the fluted tube. Experimental data on laminar Nusselt numbers and friction factors for different types of fluted tubes representing a broad range of flute geometry were available. Experimental data from a few of the tubes tested were used to propose a relationship between the permeability of the porous substrate and the flute parameters, particularly the flute spacing. The governing equations were discretized using the Finite Element Method. The model was verified and applied to the other tubes in the test matrix. Very good agreement was found between the numerical predictions and the experimental data. 20 refs., 13 figs., 4 tabs.

  7. The novel selected-ion flow tube approach to trace gas analysis of air and breath.

    PubMed

    Smith, D; Spanel, P

    1996-01-01

    We present an overview of the development and use of our selected-ion flow tube (SIFT) technique as a sensitive, quantitative method for the rapid, real-time analysis of the trace gas content of atmospheric air and human breath, presenting some pilot data from various research areas in which this method will find valuable application. We show that it is capable of detecting and quantifying trace gases, in complex mixtures such as breath, which are present at partial pressures down to about 10 parts per billion. Following discussions of the principles involved in this SIFT method of analysis, of the experiments which we have carried out to establish its quantitative validity, and of the air and breath sampling techniques involved, we present sample data on the detection and quantification of trace gases on the breath of healthy people and of patients suffering from renal failure and diabetes. We also show how breath ammonia can be accurately quantified from a single breath exhalation and used as an indicator of the presence in the stomach of the bacterium Helicobacter pylori. Health and safety applications are exemplified by analyses of the gases of the gases of cigarette smoke and on the breath of smokers. The value of this analytical method in environmental science is demonstrated by the analyses of petrol vapour, car exhaust emissions and the trace organic vapours detected in town air near a busy road. Final examples of the value of this analytical method are the detection and quantification of the gases emitted from crushed garlic and from breath following the chewing of a mint, which demonstrate its potential in food and flavour research. Throughout the paper we stress the advantages of this SIFT method compared to conventional mass spectrometry for trace gas analysis of complex mixtures, emphasizing its selectivity, sensitivity and real-time analysis capability. Finally, we note that whilst the current SIFT is strictly laboratory based, both transportable and

  8. Hydrochemical evolution and groundwater flow processes in the Galilee and Eromanga basins, Great Artesian Basin, Australia: a multivariate statistical approach.

    PubMed

    Moya, Claudio E; Raiber, Matthias; Taulis, Mauricio; Cox, Malcolm E

    2015-03-01

    The Galilee and Eromanga basins are sub-basins of the Great Artesian Basin (GAB). In this study, a multivariate statistical approach (hierarchical cluster analysis, principal component analysis and factor analysis) is carried out to identify hydrochemical patterns and assess the processes that control hydrochemical evolution within key aquifers of the GAB in these basins. The results of the hydrochemical assessment are integrated into a 3D geological model (previously developed) to support the analysis of spatial patterns of hydrochemistry, and to identify the hydrochemical and hydrological processes that control hydrochemical variability. In this area of the GAB, the hydrochemical evolution of groundwater is dominated by evapotranspiration near the recharge area resulting in a dominance of the Na-Cl water types. This is shown conceptually using two selected cross-sections which represent discrete groundwater flow paths from the recharge areas to the deeper parts of the basins. With increasing distance from the recharge area, a shift towards a dominance of carbonate (e.g. Na-HCO3 water type) has been observed. The assessment of hydrochemical changes along groundwater flow paths highlights how aquifers are separated in some areas, and how mixing between groundwater from different aquifers occurs elsewhere controlled by geological structures, including between GAB aquifers and coal bearing strata of the Galilee Basin. The results of this study suggest that distinct hydrochemical differences can be observed within the previously defined Early Cretaceous-Jurassic aquifer sequence of the GAB. A revision of the two previously recognised hydrochemical sequences is being proposed, resulting in three hydrochemical sequences based on systematic differences in hydrochemistry, salinity and dominant hydrochemical processes. The integrated approach presented in this study which combines different complementary multivariate statistical techniques with a detailed assessment of the

  9. A New Approach to Sap Flow Measurement Using 3D Printed Gauges and Open-source Electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ham, J. M.; Miner, G. L.; Kluitenberg, G. J.

    2015-12-01

    A new type of sap flow gauge was developed to measure transpiration from herbaceous plants using a modified heat pulse technique. Gauges were fabricated using 3D-printing technology and low-cost electronics to keep the materials cost under $20 (U.S.) per sensor. Each gauge consisted of small-diameter needle probes fastened to a 3D-printed frame. One needle contained a resistance heater to provide a 6 to 8 second heat pulse while the other probes measured the resultant temperature increase at two distances from the heat source. The data acquisition system for the gauges was built from a low-cost Arduino microcontroller. The system read the gauges every 10 minutes and stored the results on a SD card. Different numerical techniques were evaluated for estimating sap velocity from the heat pulse data - including analytical solutions and parameter estimation approaches . Prototype gauges were tested in the greenhouse on containerized corn and sunflower. Sap velocities measured by the gauges were compared to independent gravimetric measurements of whole plant transpiration. Results showed the system could measure daily transpiration to within 3% of the gravimetric measurements. Excellent agreement was observed when two gauges were attached the same stem. Accuracy was not affected by rapidly changing transpiration rates observed under partly cloudy conditions. The gauge-based estimates of stem thermal properties suggested the system may also detect the onset of water stress. A field study showed the gauges could run for 1 to 2 weeks on a small battery pack. Sap flow measurements on multiple corn stems were scaled up by population to estimate field-scale transpiration. During full canopy cover, excellent agreement was observed between the scaled-up sap flow measurements and reference crop evapotranspiration calculated from weather data. Data also showed promise as a way to estimate real-time canopy resistance required for model verification and development. Given the low

  10. Comparison of Strongly Coupled Diffuse and Sharp Interface Fluid-Structure Interaction Approaches for Particle-Laden Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohaghegh, Fazlolah; Udaykumar, H. S.

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this study is to find a proper method for the simulation of blood as a particulate flow. Since the blood cell density is almost the same as plasma, the high added mass effect necessitates implementation of a strongly coupled FSI method in the numerical simulation. Therefore, three different FSI approaches are compared, two Smoothed Profile Methods (SPM) with one and two projection steps as diffuse interface approaches and the Sharp Interface Method (SIM). Stable FSI computations can be achieved by using sub-iterations within each time step, i.e. by updating the fluid and structure and their boundary conditions at each time step multiple times to reach a desired tolerance as the convergence criteria. Various cases were used to benchmark the methods, including particles motion in a channel and particles sedimentation. The results show that the number of sub-iterations plays a key role in the efficiency. While use of SPM with two projection steps has the most expensive sub-iteration process, it has the best efficiency as it requires the lowest number of sub-iterations within each time step. Moreover, the method is more stable than SIM and the SPM with one projection. SIM is faster than SPM with one projection and it has better stability. PhD Candidate-Department of Mechanical Engineering.

  11. A meshfree approach to non-Newtonian free surface ice flow: Application to the Haut Glacier d'Arolla

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahlkrona, Josefin; Shcherbakov, Victor

    2017-02-01

    Numerical models of glacier and ice sheet dynamics traditionally employ finite difference or finite element methods. Although these are highly developed and mature methods, they suffer from some drawbacks, such as inability to handle complex geometries (finite differences) or a costly assembly procedure for nonlinear problems (finite elements). Additionally, they are mesh-based, and therefore moving domains become a challenge. In this paper, we introduce a novel meshfree approach based on a radial basis function (RBF) method. The meshfree nature of RBF methods enables efficient handling of moving margins and free ice surface. RBF methods are also accurate, easy to implement, and allow for reduction the computational cost associated with the linear system assembly, since stated in strong form. To demonstrate the global RBF method we model the velocity field of ice flow in the Haut Glacier d'Arolla, which is governed by the nonlinear Stokes equations. We test the method for different basal conditions and for a free moving surface. We also compare the global RBF method with its localized counterpart-the RBF partition of unity method (RBF-PUM)-that allows for a significant gain in the computational efficiency. Both RBF methods are compared with the classical finite element method in terms of accuracy and efficiency. We find that the RBF methods are more efficient than the finite element method and well suited for ice dynamics modeling, especially the partition of unity approach.

  12. A cut-cell finite volume – finite element coupling approach for fluid–structure interaction in compressible flow

    SciTech Connect

    Pasquariello, Vito; Hammerl, Georg; Örley, Felix; Hickel, Stefan; Danowski, Caroline; Popp, Alexander; Wall, Wolfgang A.; Adams, Nikolaus A.

    2016-02-15

    We present a loosely coupled approach for the solution of fluid–structure interaction problems between a compressible flow and a deformable structure. The method is based on staggered Dirichlet–Neumann partitioning. The interface motion in the Eulerian frame is accounted for by a conservative cut-cell Immersed Boundary method. The present approach enables sub-cell resolution by considering individual cut-elements within a single fluid cell, which guarantees an accurate representation of the time-varying solid interface. The cut-cell procedure inevitably leads to non-matching interfaces, demanding for a special treatment. A Mortar method is chosen in order to obtain a conservative and consistent load transfer. We validate our method by investigating two-dimensional test cases comprising a shock-loaded rigid cylinder and a deformable panel. Moreover, the aeroelastic instability of a thin plate structure is studied with a focus on the prediction of flutter onset. Finally, we propose a three-dimensional fluid–structure interaction test case of a flexible inflated thin shell interacting with a shock wave involving large and complex structural deformations.

  13. An ecological approach to measuring the evolutionary consequences of gene flow from crops to wild or weedy relatives1

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Lesley G.; Lee, David; Shukla, Kruti; Waite, Thomas A.; Bartsch, Detlef

    2016-01-01

    Premise of the study: Agricultural practices routinely create opportunities for crops to hybridize with wild relatives, leading to crop gene introgression into wild genomes. Conservationists typically worry this introgression could lead to genetic homogenization of wild populations, over and above the central concern of transgene escape. Alternatively, viewing introgression as analogous to species invasion, we suggest that increased genetic diversity may likewise be an undesirable outcome. Methods: Here, we compare the sensitivity of conventional population genetic metrics with species diversity indices as indicators of the impact of gene flow on genetic diversity. We illustrate this novel approach using multilocus genotype data (12 allozyme loci) from 10 wild (Beta vulgaris subsp. maritima) and eight putative crop–wild hybrid beet populations (B. vulgaris subsp. vulgaris × B. vulgaris subsp. maritima) scattered throughout Europe. Results: Conventional population genetic metrics mostly failed to detect shifts in genetic composition of putative hybrid populations. By contrast, species diversity indices unambiguously revealed increased genetic diversity in putative hybrid populations. Discussion: We encourage other workers to explore the utility of our more sensitive approach for risk assessment prior to the release of transgenic crops, with a view toward widespread adoption of our method in studies aimed at detecting allelic invasion. PMID:27011898

  14. Flow cytometry in myelodysplastic syndrome: analysis of diagnostic utility using maturation pattern-based and quantitative approaches.

    PubMed

    Chopra, Anita; Pati, Haraprasad; Mahapatra, Manoranjan; Mishra, Pravas; Seth, Tulika; Kumar, Suman; Singh, Saroj; Pandey, Sangita; Kumar, Rajive

    2012-09-01

    Flow cytometry (FCM) is being increasingly evaluated for the diagnosis of myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). We employed multiple FCM approaches to assess MDS. Five-color FCM, morphology blind, was done on bone marrow aspirates of 57 suspected MDS and 31 normal controls. Maturation pattern, quantitative FCM for low-grade MDS that awards FCM score, and expression of selected antigens on erythroid cells and CD34(+) blasts were evaluated. FCM results were correlated with clinical and laboratory workup. Patients (n = 57) included proven MDS (n = 14), suspected MDS (n = 13), and non-MDS (n = 30). By pattern-based approach, all proven cases were FCM positive. In suspected MDS, 11 (84.61 %) were positive including morphology-negative cases, and two (15.38 %) were intermediate. In non-MDS cases, 27 of 30 (90 %) were FCM negative, 2 of 30 (6.67 %) intermediate, and 1 of 30 (3.33 %) a hematinic-responsive case, positive. Quantitative parameters that characterized MDS included FCM score of >3, percentage CD34(+) B cells, and expression of CD11b, CD15, and CD56 on myeloblasts. CD71 MFI on CD235a(+) erythroblasts and CD38 MFI on myeloblasts were significantly lower in MDS. The former was present in FCM-intermediate suspected MDS but not FCM-intermediate non-MDS cases. Used in the overall clinical context, both maturation pattern recognition and quantitative approaches, the latter for low-grade MDS, are sensitive methods of diagnosing MDS, including cases negative by morphology and cytogenetics, especially if combined with evaluation of selected antigens, CD71 on CD235a(+) cells and CD38 on CD34(+) cells. The value of FCM in morphology-negative cases needs better definition of specificity through more extensive evaluation of secondary dyspoiesis.

  15. Evaluation of Pleistocene groundwater flow through fractured tuffs using a U-series disequilibrium approach, Pahute Mesa, Nevada, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Paces, James B.; Nichols, Paul J.; Neymark, Leonid A.; Rajaram, Harihar

    2013-01-01

    Groundwater flow through fractured felsic tuffs and lavas at the Nevada National Security Site represents the most likely mechanism for transport of radionuclides away from underground nuclear tests at Pahute Mesa. To help evaluate fracture flow and matrix–water exchange, we have determined U-series isotopic compositions on more than 40 drill core samples from 5 boreholes that represent discrete fracture surfaces, breccia zones, and interiors of unfractured core. The U-series approach relies on the disruption of radioactive secular equilibrium between isotopes in the uranium-series decay chain due to preferential mobilization of 234U relative to 238U, and U relative to Th. Samples from discrete fractures were obtained by milling fracture surfaces containing thin secondary mineral coatings of clays, silica, Fe–Mn oxyhydroxides, and zeolite. Intact core interiors and breccia fragments were sampled in bulk. In addition, profiles of rock matrix extending 15 to 44 mm away from several fractures that show evidence of recent flow were analyzed to investigate the extent of fracture/matrix water exchange. Samples of rock matrix have 234U/238U and 230Th/238U activity ratios (AR) closest to radioactive secular equilibrium indicating only small amounts of groundwater penetrated unfractured matrix. Greater U mobility was observed in welded-tuff matrix with elevated porosity and in zeolitized bedded tuff. Samples of brecciated core were also in secular equilibrium implying a lack of long-range hydraulic connectivity in these cases. Samples of discrete fracture surfaces typically, but not always, were in radioactive disequilibrium. Many fractures had isotopic compositions plotting near the 230Th-234U 1:1 line indicating a steady-state balance between U input and removal along with radioactive decay. Numerical simulations of U-series isotope evolution indicate that 0.5 to 1 million years are required to reach steady-state compositions. Once attained, disequilibrium 234U/238U

  16. The role of sediment-transport evaluations for development of modeled instream flows: policy and approach in Texas.

    PubMed

    Heitmuller, Franklin T; Raphelt, Nolan

    2012-07-15

    Instream-flow scientists embrace streamflow as the master variable driving aquatic and riparian ecosystems, and that natural flow variability is imperative for river conservation and restoration efforts. Sediment transport, which is critical for maintenance of physical habitats in rivers and floodplains, has received less direct attention from instream-flow practitioners. This article serves to highlight the roles of sediment-transport evaluations in modifying or verifying instream-flow prescriptions based on hydrology alone. Two examples of sediment-transport evaluations are discussed in relation to the Texas Senate Bill 3 Environmental Flows allocation process, a mandate to "develop environmental flow analyses and a recommended flow regime" that "maintain(s) the viability of the state's streams, rivers, and bay and estuary systems" using "reasonably available science". The first example provides an evaluation of effective discharge of suspended-sediment load of the lower Brazos River. The magnitude and frequency of effective discharge occurs between typical high-flow pulses and overbank flows, indicating that hydrologic and physical processes are not optimally coupled in some flow-regime models. The second example utilizes the Hydrology-Based Environmental Flow Regime (HEFR) model to prescribe instream flows for the lower Sabine River, and compares modeled bed-material loads for observed and HEFR-prescribed flow regimes. Results indicate that annual water and sediment yields are greatly reduced for the modeled flow regime. It should be noted, however, that different input variables to the HEFR model would have resulted in different computations of water and sediment yields, reinforcing that instream-flow practitioners should exercise great caution when applying rule-of-thumb procedures to generate flow prescriptions.

  17. Habitat availability and gene flow influence diverging local population trajectories under scenarios of climate change: a place-based approach.

    PubMed

    Schwalm, Donelle; Epps, Clinton W; Rodhouse, Thomas J; Monahan, William B; Castillo, Jessica A; Ray, Chris; Jeffress, Mackenzie R

    2016-04-01

    Ecological niche theory holds that species distributions are shaped by a large and complex suite of interacting factors. Species distribution models (SDMs) are increasingly used to describe species' niches and predict the effects of future environmental change, including climate change. Currently, SDMs often fail to capture the complexity of species' niches, resulting in predictions that are generally limited to climate-occupancy interactions. Here, we explore the potential impact of climate change on the American pika using a replicated place-based approach that incorporates climate, gene flow, habitat configuration, and microhabitat complexity into SDMs. Using contemporary presence-absence data from occupancy surveys, genetic data to infer connectivity between habitat patches, and 21 environmental niche variables, we built separate SDMs for pika populations inhabiting eight US National Park Service units representing the habitat and climatic breadth of the species across the western United States. We then predicted occurrence probability under current (1981-2010) and three future time periods (out to 2100). Occurrence probabilities and the relative importance of predictor variables varied widely among study areas, revealing important local-scale differences in the realized niche of the American pika. This variation resulted in diverse and - in some cases - highly divergent future potential occupancy patterns for pikas, ranging from complete extirpation in some study areas to stable occupancy patterns in others. Habitat composition and connectivity, which are rarely incorporated in SDM projections, were influential in predicting pika occupancy in all study areas and frequently outranked climate variables. Our findings illustrate the importance of a place-based approach to species distribution modeling that includes fine-scale factors when assessing current and future climate impacts on species' distributions, especially when predictions are intended to manage and

  18. Numerical investigation of water-based nanofluid subcooled flow boiling by three-phase Euler-Euler, Euler-Lagrange approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valizadeh, Ziba; Shams, Mehrzad

    2016-08-01

    A numerical scheme for simulating the subcooled flow boiling of water and water-based nanofluids was developed. At first, subcooled flow boiling of water was simulated by the Eulerian multiphase scheme. Then the simulation results were compared with previous experimental data and a good agreement was observed. In the next step, subcooled flow boiling of water-based nanofluid was modeled. In the previous studies in this field, the nanofluid assumed as a homogeneous liquid and the two-phase scheme was used to simulate its boiling. In the present study, a new scheme was used to model the nanofluid boiling. In this scheme, to model the nanofluid flow boiling, three phases, water, vapor and nanoparticles were considered. The Eulerian-Eulerian approach was used for modeling water-vapor interphase and Eulerian-Lagrangian scheme was selected to observe water-nanoparticle interphase behavior. The results from the nanofluid boiling modeling were validated with an experimental investigation. The results of the present work and experimental data were consistent. The addition of 0.0935 % volume fraction of nanoparticles in pure liquid boiling flow increases the vapor volume fraction at the outlet almost by 40.7 %. The results show the three-phase model is a good approach to simulate the nanofluid boiling flow.

  19. An implicit wetting and drying approach for non-hydrostatic baroclinic flows in high aspect ratio domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Candy, A. S.

    2017-04-01

    A new approach to modelling free surface flows is developed that enables, for the first time, 3D consistent non-hydrostatic baroclinic physics that wets and drys in the large aspect ratio spatial domains that characterise geophysical systems. This is key in the integration of physical models to permit seamless simulation in a single consistent arbitrarily unstructured multiscale and multi-physics dynamical model. A high order continuum representation is achieved through a general Galerkin finite element formulation that guarantees local and global mass conservation, and consistent tracer advection. A flexible spatial discretisation permits conforming domain bounds and a variable spatial resolution, whilst atypical use of fully implicit time integration ensures computational efficiency. Notably this brings the natural inclusion of non-hydrostatic baroclinic physics and a consideration of vertical inertia to flood modelling in the full 3D domain. This has application in improving modelling of inundation processes in geophysical domains, where dynamics proceeds over a large range of horizontal extents relative to vertical resolution, such as in the evolution of a tsunami, or in urban environments containing complex geometric structures at a range of scales.

  20. Simulation of a Wall-Bounded Flow using a Hybrid LES/RAS Approach with Turbulence Recycling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quinlan, Jesse R.; Mcdaniel, James; Baurle, Robert A.

    2012-01-01

    Simulations of a supersonic recessed-cavity flow are performed using a hybrid large-eddy/ Reynolds-averaged simulation approach utilizing an inflow turbulence recycling procedure and hybridized inviscid flux scheme. Calorically perfect air enters the three-dimensional domain at a free stream Mach number of 2.92. Simulations are performed to assess grid sensitivity of the solution, efficacy of the turbulence recycling, and effect of the shock sensor used with the hybridized inviscid flux scheme. Analysis of the turbulent boundary layer upstream of the rearward-facing step for each case indicates excellent agreement with theoretical predictions. Mean velocity and pressure results are compared to Reynolds-averaged simulations and experimental data for each case, and these comparisons indicate good agreement on the finest grid. Simulations are repeated on a coarsened grid, and results indicate strong grid density sensitivity. The effect of turbulence recycling on the solution is illustrated by performing coarse grid simulations with and without inflow turbulence recycling. Two shock sensors, one of Ducros and one of Larsson, are assessed for use with the hybridized inviscid flux reconstruction scheme.

  1. Self-organizing thermal fluid flow in fractured crystalline rock: a geochemical and theoretical approach to evaluating fluid flow in the southern Idaho batholith, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayo, Alan L.; Himes, Scott A.; Tingey, David G.

    2013-12-01

    Thermal springs in the Idaho batholith (USA) discharge at discrete locations along a 50+ km reach of the Middle Fork of the Boise River (MFBR). Recharge water flows through Basin and Range extension fractures where it is heated by the geothermal gradient and ultimately discharges from the damage zone of the trans-Challis faults located near the bottom of the MFBR. Stable isotopes of water, 14C groundwater ages, fracture and fault orientations, fracture volume changes due to chemical evolution, and recharge area calculations suggest that the thermal springs issue from individual hydrothermal systems and that they are self-organizing. Water evolves chemically along flow paths, dissolving feldspars and precipitating secondary minerals. Secondary minerals accumulate in less-efficient fractures and are flushed from the more efficient ones. Flow-area calculations using heat-flow, exponential decay-of-porosity, and curve-intersection methods show that many of the thermal systems extend beyond their immediate topographic watershed, and that some capture water from adjacent watersheds. Geochemical/flow feedback loops that provide a mechanism for self-organization are modeled using PHREEQC, and positive and negative fracture volume changes are calculated. Criteria for identifying self-organizing granitoid thermal groundwater systems are suggested.

  2. Acoustic Camera Evaluation of Juvenile Salmonid Approach and Fate at Surface Flow Outlets of Two Hydropower Dams

    SciTech Connect

    Ploskey, Gene R.; Johnson, Gary E.; Weiland, Mark A.; Khan, Fenton; Mueller, Robert P.; Serkowski, John A.; Rakowski, Cynthia L.; Hedgepeth, J.; Skalski, John R.; Ebberts, Blaine D.; Klatte, Bernard A.

    2006-08-04

    The objective of this study was to estimate and compare fate probabilities for juvenile salmon approaching two surface flow outlets (SFOs) to identify effective design characteristics. The SFOs differed principally in forebay location, depth, discharge, and water velocity over a sharp-crested weir. Both outlets were about 20 ft wide. The 22-ft deep Bonneville Powerhouse 2 Corner Collector (B2CC) was located in the southwest corner of the forebay and passed 5,000 ft3/s of water at normal-pool elevation. In contrast, The Dalles Dam ice and trash sluiceway outlet above Main Unit 1-3 (TDITC) was not located in a forebay corner, was only 7-ft deep, and discharged about 933 ft3/s at normal-pool elevation. The linear velocity of water over the weir was about 15 ft/s at the B2CC and 5 ft/s at the TDITC. We used a Dual-Frequency Identification Sonar (DIDSON) to record movements of fish within about 65 ft of the B2CC and within 35 ft of the TDITC. We actively tracked fish by manually adjusting pan and tilt rotator angles to keep targets in view. Contrary to expectations, active tracking did not provide a predominance of long tracks that clearly indicated fish fate because most tracks were incomplete. Active tracking did increase error in fish-position estimation, which complicated data processing, so we plan to sample multiple fixed zones in the future. The probability of fish entering each SFO was estimated by a Markov chain analysis, which did not require complete fish tracks. At the B2CC, we tracked 7,943 juvenile salmonids and most of them entered the B2CC. Fish moving south 40 to 60 ft upstream of the dam face were more likely to enter the eddy at the south end of the powerhouse than to enter the B2CC. At the TDITC, we tracked 2,821 smolts. Fish movement was complex with active swimming toward and away from the entrance. The high entrance probability zone (EPZ), where over 90% of tracked fish entered the SFO, extended 32 ft out at the B2CC and only 8 ft out at the TDITC

  3. An adaptive Lagrangian boundary element approach for three-dimensional transient free-surface Stokes flow as applied to extrusion, thermoforming, and rheometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khayat, Roger E.; Genouvrier, Delphine

    2001-05-01

    An adaptive (Lagrangian) boundary element approach is proposed for the general three-dimensional simulation of confined free-surface Stokes flow. The method is stable as it includes remeshing capabilities of the deforming free surface and thus can handle large deformations. A simple algorithm is developed for mesh refinement of the deforming free-surface mesh. Smooth transition between large and small elements is achieved without significant degradation of the aspect ratio of the elements in the mesh. Several flow problems are presented to illustrate the utility of the approach, particularly as encountered in polymer processing and rheology. These problems illustrate the transient nature of the flow during the processes of extrusion and thermoforming, the elongation of a fluid sample in an extensional rheometer, and the coating of a sphere. Surface tension effects are also explored. Copyright

  4. Investigation of Gas and Liquid Multiphase Flow in the Rheinsahl-Heraeus (RH) Reactor by Using the Euler-Euler Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Gujun; He, Shengping; Li, Yugang; Guo, Yintao; Wang, Qian

    2016-08-01

    In the present work, a mathematical model was developed to understand the multiphase flow behavior in a Rheinsahl-Heraeus (RH) reactor by using the Euler-Euler approach, and the effects of initial bubble diameter, nonequilibrium expansion of bubble caused by sudden thermal effect and sharp pressure drop, and various interphase forces were considered and clarified. The simulation results of mixing time, liquid circulation rate, and local liquid velocity in RH agree well with the measured results. The result indicates that the initial bubble diameter has a weak impact on the multiphase flow but that the bubble expansion has a tremendous impact on it for an actual RH. Meanwhile, the drag force and turbulent dispersion force strongly influence the multiphase flow, whereas the lift force and virtual mass force only have negligible influence on it. Furthermore, the turbulent dispersion force should be responsible for reasonable prediction of multiphase flow behavior in the RH reactor.

  5. Using Concatenated Profiles from High-Speed Laser Profile Scanners to Estimate Debris-Flow Characteristics: A Novel Approach Based on Particle Image Velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacquemart, M. F.; Meier, L.; Graf, C.; Morsdorf, F.

    2015-12-01

    We use globally unique datasets from paired laser profile scanners to measure debris-flow height, velocity and discharge in two well-known debris-flow channels in Switzerland. Since 2011, these scanners have been scanning passing debris flows at rates of up to 75 Hz, acquiring millions of cross-bed profiles. The profiles can be concatenated through time, generating unique 2.5D representations of passing debris flows. Applying a large-scale Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) approach to these datasets has proven successful to measure surface flow velocities. Flow height can also be estimated from the laser scanners, and thus a discharge estimate can be given. To account for changes to the channel bed due to erosion and deposition during the debris flow, we compute two flow height estimates using a pre-event as well as a post-event channel geometry in order to visualize discharge variability.Velocity outliers need to be excluded to provide reliable estimates of peak discharge, and changes to the channel bed are assumed to be the largest source of uncertainty. However, the latter problem is inherent to all debris-flow discharge measurements, and we have found the new system to offer distinct advantages over the conventional system relying on geophones and a radar gauge. The wide scan angle of up to 190° renders the scanners insensitive to changes of the flow path, and the point density of roughly 20 points per meter offer unprecedented spatial coverage.In addition, the geometries of the cross-bed profiles have been analyzed, revealing distinct changes of cross-flow convexity between the front and the tail of the flows in several cases. This is assumed to indicate changes of debris-flow mixtures, but further research is needed to better understand this signal.We hope that our preliminary analysis and toolbox will facilitate working with these kinds of datasets so as to further improve debris-flow understanding, monitoring and modeling efforts in the future.

  6. Flow Cytometry Approach to Quantify the Viability of Milk Somatic Cell Counts after Various Physico-Chemical Treatments

    PubMed Central

    Li, Na; Richoux, Romain; Perruchot, Marie-Hélène; Boutinaud, Marion; Mayol, Jean-François; Gagnaire, Valérie

    2015-01-01

    Flow cytometry has been used as a routine method to count somatic cells in milk, and to ascertain udder health and milk quality. However, few studies investigate the viability of somatic cells and even fewer at a subpopulation level to follow up how the cells can resist to various stresses that can be encountered during technological processes. To address this issue, a flow cytometry approach was used to simultaneously identify cell types of bovine milk using cell-specific antibodies and to measure the cell viability among the identified subpopulations by using a live/dead cell viability kit. Confirmation of the cell viability was performed by using conventional microscopy. Different physico-chemical treatments were carried out on standardized cell samples, such as heat treatment, various centrifugation rates and storage in milk or in PBS pH 7.4 for three days. Cytometry gating strategy was developed by using blood cell samples stored at 4°C in PBS and milk cell samples heat-treated at 80°C for 30 min as a control for the maximum (95.9%) and minimum (0.7%) values of cell viability respectively. Cell viability in the initial samples was 39.5% for all cells and varied for each cell population from 26.7% for PMNs, to 32.6% for macrophages, and 58.3% for lymphocytes. Regarding the physico-chemical treatments applied, somatic cells did not sustain heat treatment at 60°C and 80°C in contrast to changes in centrifugation rates, for which only the higher level, i.e. 5000×g led to a cell viability decrease, down to 9.4%, but no significant changes within the cell subpopulation distribution were observed. Finally, the somatic cells were better preserved in milk after 72h storage, in particular PMNs, that maintained a viability of 34.0 ± 2.9% compared to 4.9±1.9% in PBS, while there was almost no changes for macrophages (41.7 ± 5.7% in milk vs 31.2 ± 2.4% in PBS) and lymphocytes (25.3 ± 3.0% in milk vs 11.4 ± 3.1% in PBS). This study provides a new array to better

  7. Flow Cytometric and Cytokine ELISpot Approaches To Characterize the Cell-Mediated Immune Response in Ferrets following Influenza Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    DiPiazza, Anthony; Richards, Katherine; Batarse, Frances; Lockard, Laura; Zeng, Hui; García-Sastre, Adolfo; Albrecht, Randy A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Influenza virus infections represent a significant socioeconomic and public health burden worldwide. Although ferrets are considered by many to be ideal for modeling human responses to influenza infection and vaccination, efforts to understand the cellular immune response have been severely hampered by a paucity of standardized procedures and reagents. In this study, we developed flow cytometric and T cell enzyme-linked immunosorbent spot (ELISpot) approaches to characterize the leukocyte composition and antigen-specific T cell response within key lymphoid tissues following influenza virus infection in ferrets. Through a newly designed and implemented set of serological reagents, we used multiparameter flow cytometry to directly quantify the frequency of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, Ig+ B cells, CD11b+ myeloid-derived cells, and major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II-positive antigen-presenting cells (APCs) both prior to and after intranasal infection with A/California/04/09 (H1N1). We found that the leukocyte composition was altered at 10 days postinfection, with notable gains in the frequency of T cells and myeloid cells within the draining lymph node. Furthermore, these studies revealed that the antigen specificity of influenza virus-reactive CD4 and CD8 T cells was very broad, with recognition of the viral HA, NA, M1, NS1, and NP proteins, and that total reactivity to influenza virus postinfection represented approximately 0.1% of the circulating peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). Finally, we observed distinct patterns of reactivity between individual animals, suggesting heterogeneity at the MHC locus in ferrets within commercial populations, a finding of considerable interest in efforts to move the ferret model forward for influenza vaccine and challenge studies. IMPORTANCE Ferrets are an ideal animal model to study transmission, diseases, and vaccine efficacies of respiratory viruses because of their close anatomical and physiological

  8. Numerical simulation of perfect fluid flows around complex 3D configurations by a multidomain solver using the MUSCL approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillen, Ph.; Borrel, M.; Dormieux, M.

    1990-10-01

    A numerical scheme of the MUSCL type used for the numerical simulation of gas flow of different types around complex configurations is described. Approximate Riemann solvers of the Van Leer, Roc, and Osher types, developed for perfect gas flows are used. These solvers have been extended to non-reactive mixtures of two species and real gas flows by Abgrall, Montagne and Vinokur. The architecture of the code, dictated by constraints in geometrical considerations, computational aspects, the specific nature of the flow, and ergonomy, is described.

  9. Application of a novel metabolomic approach based on atmospheric pressure photoionization mass spectrometry using flow injection analysis for the study of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    González-Domínguez, Raúl; García-Barrera, Tamara; Gómez-Ariza, José Luis

    2015-01-01

    The use of atmospheric pressure photoionization is not widespread in metabolomics, despite its considerable potential for the simultaneous analysis of compounds with diverse polarities. This work considers the development of a novel analytical approach based on flow injection analysis and atmospheric pressure photoionization mass spectrometry for rapid metabolic screening of serum samples. Several experimental parameters were optimized, such as type of dopant, flow injection solvent, and their flows, given that a careful selection of these variables is mandatory for a comprehensive analysis of metabolites. Toluene and methanol were the most suitable dopant and flow injection solvent, respectively. Moreover, analysis in negative mode required higher solvent and dopant flows (100 µl min(-1) and 40 µl min(-1), respectively) compared to positive mode (50 µl min(-1) and 20 µl min(-1)). Then, the optimized approach was used to elucidate metabolic alterations associated with Alzheimer's disease. Thereby, results confirm the increase of diacylglycerols, ceramides, ceramide-1-phosphate and free fatty acids, indicating membrane destabilization processes, and reduction of fatty acid amides and several neurotransmitters related to impairments in neuronal transmission, among others. Therefore, it could be concluded that this metabolomic tool presents a great potential for analysis of biological samples, considering its high-throughput screening capability, fast analysis and comprehensive metabolite coverage.

  10. Linking pore-scale chemical processes to continuum-scale flow properties: an experimental and theoretical reactive transport approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tutolo, B. M.; Luhmann, A. J.; Kong, X.; Seyfried, W. E.; Saar, M. O.

    2012-12-01

    the experimental system. Significantly, the application of these rate laws to feldspathic systems requires accurate thermodynamic data for primary and secondary aluminum-bearing minerals and aqueous species, particularly when modeling the transition from far-from-equilibrium to near-equilibrium rates as the experiment progresses. Overall, the reactive transport modeling approach presented here strengthens predictions of subsurface response to CO2 injection by integrating advanced characterization methods, accurate thermodynamic and kinetic data, and properly scaled geochemical and physical flow models.

  11. Combining flow cytometry and 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing: a promising approach for drinking water monitoring and characterization.

    PubMed

    Prest, E I; El-Chakhtoura, J; Hammes, F; Saikaly, P E; van Loosdrecht, M C M; Vrouwenvelder, J S

    2014-10-15

    The combination of flow cytometry (FCM) and 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing data was investigated for the purpose of monitoring and characterizing microbial changes in drinking water distribution systems. High frequency sampling (5 min intervals for 1 h) was performed at the outlet of a treatment plant and at one location in the full-scale distribution network. In total, 52 bulk water samples were analysed with FCM, pyrosequencing and conventional methods (adenosine-triphosphate, ATP; heterotrophic plate count, HPC). FCM and pyrosequencing results individually showed that changes in the microbial community occurred in the water distribution system, which was not detected with conventional monitoring. FCM data showed an increase in the total bacterial cell concentrations (from 345 ± 15 × 10(3) to 425 ± 35 × 10(3) cells mL(-1)) and in the percentage of intact bacterial cells (from 39 ± 3.5% to 53 ± 4.4%) during water distribution. This shift was also observed in the FCM fluorescence fingerprints, which are characteristic of each water sample. A similar shift was detected in the microbial community composition as characterized with pyrosequencing, showing that FCM and genetic fingerprints are congruent. FCM and pyrosequencing data were subsequently combined for the calculation of cell concentration changes for each bacterial phylum. The results revealed an increase in cell concentrations of specific bacterial phyla (e.g., Proteobacteria), along with a decrease in other phyla (e.g., Actinobacteria), which could not be concluded from the two methods individually. The combination of FCM and pyrosequencing methods is a promising approach for future drinking water quality monitoring and for advanced studies on drinking water distribution pipeline ecology.

  12. A new analytical approach based on asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation coupled to ultraviolet spectrometry and light scattering detection for SWCNT aqueous dispersion studies.

    PubMed

    Gigault, Julien; Grassl, Bruno; Lespes, Gaëtane

    2012-02-21

    This work demonstrates the potential of asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation (A4F) coupled to Ultraviolet spectrometry (UV) and multi-angle light scattering (MALS) for the study of single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) dispersion in aqueous solutions containing a surfactant. The results indicate that this technique is a powerful analytical tool that is able to evaluate SWCNT dispersion states in aqueous media and, more importantly, determine the presence or absence of aggregates, the numbers and sizes of different SWCNT populations and the SWCNT size distribution. Dynamic light scattering was employed to complete and demonstrate the relevance of the data that were obtained via A4F-UV-MALS. Two different anionic surfactants that are used to disperse SWCNTs were then studied. The dispersing powers of the surfactants were experimentally evaluated based on their structural organizations. This study demonstrates that surfactant concentration and sonication energy are key parameters that control the SWCNT dispersion state and SWCNT structural integrity therein.

  13. Flow patterns of precipitation and soil water beneath forest canopies: An experimental approach to assessing water flow heterogeneity with high resolution measurements.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metzger, Johanna Clara; Dalla Valle, Nicolas; Wutzler, Thomas; Filipzik, Janett; Grauer, Christoph; Schelhorn, Danny; Weckmüller, Josef; Hildebrandt, Anke

    2015-04-01

    Due to the mechanisms of interception, stemflow and canopy throughfall, precipitation reaches a forest soil surface in an altered temporal and spatial distribution. It is characterized by a strong heterogeneity. The retention of water by canopies is contrasted by the formation of dynamic hotspots, which channel rain water down to the soil: canopy dripping points and stemflow. This poster introduces a new experimental site established within the collaborative research center of AquaDiva, where we aim to investigate the flow paths of water from the top of the canopy through the soil below the main rooting zone in an intensive field study. The study site, sized one hectare, is located in Thuringia in an unmanaged Central European beech forest on limestone, and complemented by measurements in an adjacent grassland site. A soil moisture sensor network (SoilNet) has been established for monitoring soil water content at high temporal (3 min interval) and spatial (420 sensors per ha) resolution. During field campaigns in spring and early summer, the spatial distribution of net precipitation is measured. Vegetation properties and soil physical and scientific characteristics have been surveyed. Using this setup, we plan to determine, whether and during which conditions spatial patterns of net precipitation persist in soil moisture and fluxes. Using the high-resolution soil water content data we aim to discover flow dynamics and thus identify preferential flow paths in the soil. Geostatistical analysis will yield information about spatial distribution and the relationship of above- and subsurface flow patterns and impact factors. In this poster we will present first results of net precipitation composition and statistical characteristics of throughfall and soil moisture data.

  14. An efficient and more sustainable one-step continuous-flow multicomponent synthesis approach to chromene derivatives

    EPA Science Inventory

    A simple and rapid one-step continuous-flow synthesis route has been developed for the preparation of chromene derivatives from the reaction of aromatic aldehydes, α-cyanomethylene compounds and naphthols. In this contribution, a one-step continuous-flow protocol in a continuous ...

  15. An Experimental Approach to the Functional Analysis of Text Building Behaviour. Part II. The Information Flow. No. 48.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bierschenk, Bernhard

    In contrast to the mass-related verbal flow description given in part I, this report focuses on the cooperative interaction of textual agents and objectives in the production of information flows. Perspective Text Analysis (PTA) is used with the purpose of establishing their physical and functional significance in a non-mass based description of…

  16. A Unified Two-Dimensional Approach to the Calculation of Three- Dimensional Hypersonic Flows, with Application to Bodies of Revolution

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1955-01-01

    8217rinRE-DifMENSONAL HtYPERtSONIC 15.W indicated-flow-separation oin the leewardl side of (lie body for excellent agreemelnt in tlie plano of symmlletry...REIMARKS b~ound~ary layers may, inl like imanner, prove useful il- pie - A mnethod of characteristics employing p)ressure and-flow deigdrednesoa

  17. Effect of Curvature Parameter on Non-Darcy Mixed Convective Flow in a Vertical Annulus: A LTNE Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhowmik, Moumita; Bera, Premananda

    The influence of curvature parameter on fully developed mixed convective flow in a vertical annulus filled with porous medium under local thermal non-equilibrium (LTNE) state has been addressed here. Since the curvature parameter (C) describes the size of the enclosure, therefore the main emphasize is given to understand its impact on other controlling parameters. Based on computational results, C has a significant impact on both heat transfer rate as well as flow profiles for stably stratified flow. It has a tendency to reduce the magnitude of the maximum velocity. It is also observed that depending on other parameters, increment in C may have tendency to make the velocity profile free from back flow. The heat transfer rate is obtained maximum at a small value of C which is independent of media permeability and converges asymptotically on increasing C. At the end, the linear stability analysis based on normal mode technique has been used to verify the results obtained from basic flow study. Overall, from both basic flow as well as linear stability results, it is found that increment in C makes the flow profile smooth which means C has tendency to stabilize the flow.

  18. Incompressible laminar flow through hollow fibers: a general study by means of a two-scale approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borsi, Iacopo; Farina, Angiolo; Fasano, Antonio

    2011-08-01

    We study the laminar flow of an incompressible Newtonian fluid in a hollow fiber, whose walls are porous. We write the Navier-Stokes equations for the flow in the inner channel and Darcy's law for the flow in the fiber, coupling them by means of the Beavers-Joseph condition which accounts for the (possible) slip at the membrane surface. Then, we introduce a small parameter {\\varepsilon ≪ 1} (the ratio between the radius and the length of the fiber) and expand all relevant quantities in powers of ɛ. Averaging over the fiber cross section, we find the velocity profiles for the longitudinal flow and for the cross-flow, and eventually, we determine the explicit expression of the permeability of the system. This work is also preliminary to the study of more complex systems comprising a large number of identical fibers (e.g., ultrafiltration modules and dialysis).

  19. Rainfall-runoff modelling in a catchment with a complex groundwater flow system: application of the Representative Elementary Watershed (REW) approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, G. P.; Savenije, H. H. G.

    2005-09-01

    Based on the Representative Elementary Watershed (REW) approach, the modelling tool REWASH (Representative Elementary WAterShed Hydrology) has been developed and applied to the Geer river basin. REWASH is deterministic, semi-distributed, physically based and can be directly applied to the watershed scale. In applying REWASH, the river basin is divided into a number of sub-watersheds, so called REWs, according to the Strahler order of the river network. REWASH describes the dominant hydrological processes, i.e. subsurface flow in the unsaturated and saturated domains, and overland flow by the saturation-excess and infiltration-excess mechanisms. The coupling of surface and subsurface flow processes in the numerical model is realised by simultaneous computation of flux exchanges between surface and subsurface domains for each REW. REWASH is a parsimonious tool for modelling watershed hydrological response. However, it can be modified to include more components to simulate specific processes when applied to a specific river basin where such processes are observed or considered to be dominant. In this study, we have added a new component to simulate interception using a simple parametric approach. Interception plays an important role in the water balance of a watershed although it is often disregarded. In addition, a refinement for the transpiration in the unsaturated zone has been made. Finally, an improved approach for simulating saturation overland flow by relating the variable source area to both the topography and the groundwater level is presented. The model has been calibrated and verified using a 4-year data set, which has been split into two for calibration and validation. The model performance has been assessed by multi-criteria evaluation. This work represents a complete application of the REW approach to watershed rainfall-runoff modelling in a real watershed. The results demonstrate that the REW approach provides an alternative blueprint for physically

  20. A Laboratory Approach Relating Complex Resistivity Observations to Flow and Transport in Saturated and Unsaturated Hydrologic Regimes

    SciTech Connect

    Martins, S A; Daily, W D; Ramirez, A L

    2002-01-31

    used to solve for the electrical conductivity distribution in the region bounded by the electrode arrays. Groundwater movement resulting from a leak or surface spill will produce measurable conductivity changes that have been imaged using ERT or EIT. The kind of laboratory scale experiments supported by this work will help us to better understand the connection between imaged conductivity anomalies and the groundwater or contaminant flow that causes them. This work will also help to demonstrate the feasibility or value of doing lab experiments in imaging that can be applied to interpreting field-scale experiments. A secondary objective of this study was to initiate a collaboration with researchers at the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI; Troyl NY) who are also participants in the newly created NSF Center for Subsurface Imaging and Sensing Systems (CenSSIS) which is managed in part by RPI. During the course of this study C.R. Carrigan and W. Daily visited the electromagnetic imaging lab at RPI to initiate discussions on subsurface imaging technology with Professors David Isaacson, Jon Newell, Gary Salunier and their research graduate students. A major goal of CenSSIS is to promote collaborations among researchers with imaging backgrounds in different disciplines (geosciences, biomedical, civil engineering and biomedical) that will lead to new solutions of common subsurface imaging problems. The geophysical test section constructed for this study included electrode arrays that resemble biomedical array distributions. Comparing images of the same target produced with the 4-array geophysical approach and with the biomedical imaging approach will help us to better understand differences and advantages that are characteristic of the two imaging methods. Our initial interactions with the researchers at RPI concluded that this was a viable problem to consider. The support for this subsequent research will come from a 3-year Office of Basic Energy Sciences (BES) proposal

  1. Prediction of separation flows around a 6:1 prolate spheroid using RANS/LES hybrid approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Zhixiang; Zhang, Yufei; Huang, Jingbo; Chen, Haixin; Fu, Song

    2007-08-01

    This paper presents hybrid Reynolds-averaged Navier Stokes (RANS) and large-eddy-simulation (LES) methods for the separated flows at high angles of attack around a 6:1 prolate spheroid. The RANS/LES hybrid methods studied in this work include the detached eddy simulation (DES) based on Spalart Allmaras (S A), Menter’s k ω shear-stress-transport (SST) and k ω with weakly nonlinear eddy viscosity formulation (Wilcox Durbin+, WD+) models and the zonal-RANS/LES methods based on the SST and WD+ models. The switch from RANS near the wall to LES in the core flow region is smooth through the implementation of a flow-dependent blending function for the zonal hybrid method. All the hybrid methods are designed to have a RANS mode for the attached flows and have a LES behavior for the separated flows. The main objective of this paper is to apply the hybrid methods for the high Reynolds number separated flows around prolate spheroid at high-incidences. A fourth-order central scheme with fourth-order artificial viscosity is applied for spatial differencing. The fully implicit lower upper symmetric-Gauss Seidel with pseudo time sub-iteration is taken as the temporal differentiation. Comparisons with available measurements are carried out for pressure distribution, skin friction, and profiles of velocity, etc. Reasonable agreement with the experiments, accounting for the effect on grids and fundamental turbulence models, is obtained for the separation flows.

  2. CFD analysis of multiphase blood flow within aorta and its thoracic branches of patient with coarctation of aorta using multiphase Euler - Euler approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostrowski, Z.; Melka, B.; Adamczyk, W.; Rojczyk, M.; Golda, A.; Nowak, A. J.

    2016-09-01

    In the research a numerical Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) model of the pulsatile blood flow was created and analyzed. A real geometry of aorta and its thoracic branches of 8-year old patient diagnosed with a congenital heart defect - coarctation of aorta was used. The inlet boundary condition were implemented as the User Define Function according to measured values of volumetric blood flow. The blood flow was treated as multiphase: plasma, set as the primary fluid phase, was dominant with volume fraction of 0.585 and morphological elements of blood were treated in Euler-Euler approach as dispersed phases (with 90% Red Blood Cells and White Blood Cells as remaining solid volume fraction).

  3. An energy-based approach to estimate seismic attenuation due to wave-induced fluid flow in heterogeneous poroelastic media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solazzi, Santiago G.; Rubino, J. Germán; Müller, Tobias M.; Milani, Marco; Guarracino, Luis; Holliger, Klaus

    2016-11-01

    Wave-induced fluid flow (WIFF) due to the presence of mesoscopic heterogeneities is considered as one of the main seismic attenuation mechanisms in the shallower parts of the Earth's crust. For this reason, several models have been developed to quantify seismic attenuation in the presence of heterogeneities of varying complexity, ranging from periodically layered media to rocks containing fractures and highly irregular distributions of fluid patches. Most of these models are based on Biot's theory of poroelasticity and make use of the assumption that the upscaled counterpart of a heterogeneous poroelastic medium can be represented by a homogeneous viscoelastic solid. Under this dynamic-equivalent viscoelastic medium (DEVM) assumption, attenuation is quantified in terms of the ratio of the imaginary and real parts of a frequency-dependent, complex-valued viscoelastic modulus. Laboratory measurements on fluid-saturated rock samples also rely on this DEVM assumption when inferring attenuation from the phase shift between the applied stress and the resulting strain. However, whether it is correct to use an effective viscoelastic medium to represent the attenuation arising from WIFF at mesoscopic scales in heterogeneous poroelastic media remains largely unexplored. In this work, we present an alternative approach to estimate seismic attenuation due to WIFF. It is fully rooted in the framework of poroelasticity and is based on the quantification of the dissipated power and stored strain energy resulting from numerical oscillatory relaxation tests. We employ this methodology to compare different definitions of the inverse quality factor for a set of pertinent scenarios, including patchy saturation and fractured rocks. This numerical analysis allows us to verify the correctness of the DEVM assumption in the presence of different kinds of heterogeneities. The proposed methodology has the key advantage of providing the local contributions of energy dissipation to the overall

  4. Vibrational Energy Flow Analysis Using a Substructure Approach: the Application of Receptance Theory to Fea and Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shankar, K.; Keane, A. J.

    1997-04-01

    A method for studying the vibrational energy flows through structures based on receptance theory is presented. The structures are considered to be made up of subsystems, which may, in turn, be substructures modelled by using finite element analysis (FEA), each having been separately analyzed for its eigenvalues and eigenvectors. The method may be classified as a form of substructuring using free{puen}free interface conditions. It differs significantly from traditional substructuring in its use of matrices composed of the substructure Green functions, evaluated as summations over their uncoupled modes, to obtain the displacement contributions of the external and boundary coupling forces; also, the method can readily take into account variations in substructure damping. The proposed method can readily take into account variations in substructure damping. The proposed method additionally calculates the time averaged substructure vibrational energy levels by evaluating the balance between input and dissipated energies and the energy transfers through coupling nodes. It is therefore of particular interest when using FEA substructures to carry out statistical energy analysis (SEA) studies, since the resulting energy data can be readily applied to evaluate SEA parameters such as coupling loss factors.The formulation developed has been implemented as a computer program which uses substructure modal information from a commercial FEA package and then combines this to predict the response of the global model. Two simple examples involving two- and three-dimensional FEA models built from beam elements are presented, which show that there is good agreement between the substructure based predictions and the equivalent global models. Moreover, the method presented is computationally more efficient than using global FEA models, even when all the substructure modes are used. The method is then applied to study the SEA coupling loss factors of two further example structures: first

  5. An approach to automatic blood vessel image registration of microcirculation for blood flow analysis on nude mice.

    PubMed

    Lin, Wen-Chen; Wu, Chih-Chieh; Zhang, Geoffrey; Wu, Tung-Hsin; Lin, Yang-Hsien; Huang, Tzung-Chi; Liu, Ren-Shyan; Lin, Kang-Ping

    2011-04-01

    Image registration is often a required and a time-consuming step in blood flow analysis of large microscopic video sequences in vivo. In order to obtain stable images for blood flow analysis, frame-to-frame image matching as a preprocessing step is a solution to the problem of movement during image acquisition. In this paper, microscopic system analysis without fluorescent labelling is performed to provide precise and continuous quantitative data of blood flow rate in individual microvessels of nude mice. The performance properties of several matching metrics are evaluated through simulated image registrations. An automatic image registration programme based on Powell's optimisation search method with low calculation redundancy was implemented. The matching method by variance of ratio is computationally efficient and improves the registration robustness and accuracy in practical application of microcirculation registration. The presented registration method shows acceptable results in close requisition to analyse red blood cell velocities, confirming the scientific potential of the system in blood flow analysis.

  6. Non-invasive diffuse correlation tomography reveals spatial and temporal blood flow differences in murine bone grafting approaches

    PubMed Central

    Han, Songfeng; Proctor, Ashley R.; Vella, Joseph B.; Benoit, Danielle S. W.; Choe, Regine

    2016-01-01

    Longitudinal blood flow during murine bone graft healing was monitored non-invasively using diffuse correlation tomography. The system utilized spatially dense data from a scanning set-up, non-linear reconstruction, and micro-CT anatomical information. Weekly in vivo measurements were performed. Blood flow changes in autografts, which heal successfully, were localized to graft regions and consistent across mice. Poor healing allografts showed heterogeneous blood flow elevation and high inter-subject variabilities. Allografts with tissue-engineered periosteum showed responses intermediate to both autografts and allografts, consistent with healing observed. These findings suggest that spatiotemporal blood flow changes can be utilized to differentiate the degree of bone graft healing. PMID:27699097

  7. Quantifying flow retention due to vegetation in an earthen experimental channel using the Aggregated Dead Zone (ADZ) dilution approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carling, Paul; Kleinhans, Maarten; Leyland, Julian; Besozzi, Louison; Duranton, Pierre; Trieu, Hai; Teske, Roy

    2014-05-01

    Understanding of flow resistance of forested floodplains is essential for floodplain flow routing and floodplain reforestation projects. Although the flow resistance of grass-lined channels is well-known, flow retention due to flow-blocking by trees is poorly understood. Flow behaviour through tree-filled channels or over forested floodplain surfaces has largely been addressed using laboratory studies of artificial surfaces and vegetation. Herein we take advantage of a broad, shallow earthen experimental outdoor channel with headwater and tailwater controls. The channel was disused and left undisturbed for more than 20 years. During this time period, small deciduous trees and a soil cover of grass, herbs and leaf-litter established naturally. We measured flow resistance and fluid retention in fifteen controlled water discharge experiments for the following conditions: (a) natural cover of herbs and trees; (b) trees only and; (c) earthen channel only. In the b-experiments the herbaceous groundcover was first removed carefully and in the c-experiments the trees were first cut flush with the earthen channel floor. Rhodamine-B dye was used to tag the flow and the resultant fluorescence of water samples were systematically assayed through time at two stations along the length of the channel. Dilution-curve data were analysed within the Aggregated Dead Zone (ADZ) framework to yield bulk flow parameters including dispersion, fluid retention and flow resistance parameters after the procedure of Richardson & Carling (2006). The primary response of the bulk flow to vegetation removal was an increase in bulk velocity, with depth and wetted width decreasing imperceptibly at the resolution of measurement. An overall reduction in flow resistance and retention occurred as discharge increased in all experiments and flow retention. Retentiveness was more prominent during low flow and for all three experimental conditions tended to converge on a constant low value for high

  8. Debris flow reconstruction - geomorphologic and numerical approach. A case study from the Selvetta event in Valtellina, Italy, July 2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blahut, J.; Luna, B. Quan; Akbas, S. O.; van Westen, C. J.

    2009-04-01

    On Sunday morning of 13th July 2008, after more than two days of intense rainfall, several debris and mud flows were released in the central part of Valtellina valley between Morbegno and Berbenno. One of the largest debris flows occurred in Selvetta, a fraction of Colorina municipality. The debris flow event was reconstructed after extensive field work and interviews with local inhabitants and civil protection teams. At first several rock blocks about 2 m3 in size fell down from the direction of the torrent. The blocks were followed by a wave of debris and mud that immediately destroyed one building and caused damage to other nine houses. A stream flow following the debris flow consisting of fine mud with high water content that partially washed away the accumulation of deposits from the debris phase could also be distinguished. Geomorphologic investigations allowed identification of five main sections of the flow: 1) the proper scarp; 2) path in the forested area; 3) path on the alpine meadows; 4) accelerating section; 5) accumulation area. The initiation area of the flow is situated at 1760 m. a.s.l. (1480 m above the deposition zone) in a coniferous forest. The proper scarp consisted of an area of approximately 20 m2 in size, and a height of about 0.8 m. The final volume of the debris was estimated by field mapping to be between 12 000 and 15 000 m3. It was observed that erosion and entrainment played an important role in the development of the debris flow. The Selvetta event was modelled with the FLO2D program. FLO2D is an Eulerian formulation with a finite differences numerical scheme that requires the specification of an input hydrograph. The internal stresses are isotropic and the basal shear stresses are calculated using a quadratic model. Entrainment was modeled at each section of the flow, and different hydrographs were produced in agreement with the behavior of the debris flow during its course. The significance of calculated values of pressure and

  9. Generalized Roughness Effects on Turbulent Boundary Layer Heat Transfer. A Discrete Element Predictive Approach for Turbulent Flow Over Rough Surfaces

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-11-01

    element u.-lei is readily applied to such flows. For lully developed flow V = 0, and U and H are functions of y only (i.e., J ■ U(y) and H ■ H(y...included, application of the basic momentum theorem yields T b |£| . / w+ Jb \\ T r ’dx’ I W < s,av where T is the average shear stress

  10. Experimental Approach to Visualize Flow in a Stacked Hollow Fiber Bundle of an Artificial Lung With Particle Image Velocimetry.

    PubMed

    Kaesler, Andreas; Schlanstein, Peter C; Hesselmann, Felix; Büsen, Martin; Klaas, Michael; Roggenkamp, Dorothee; Schmitz-Rode, Thomas; Steinseifer, Ulrich; Arens, Jutta

    2016-12-07

    Flow distribution is key in artificial lungs, as it directly influences gas exchange performance as well as clot forming and blood damaging potential. The current state of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) in artificial lungs can only give insight on a macroscopic level due to model simplification applied to the fiber bundle. Based on our recent work on wound fiber bundles, we applied particle image velocimetry (PIV) to the model of an artificial lung prototype intended for neonatal use to visualize flow distribution in a stacked fiber bundle configuration to (i) evaluate the feasibility of PIV for artificial lungs, (ii) validate CFD in the fiber bundle of artificial lungs, and (iii) give a suggestion how to incorporate microscopic aspects into mainly macroscopic CFD studies. To this end, we built a fully transparent model of an artificial lung prototype. To increase spatial resolution, we scaled up the model by a factor of 5.8 compared with the original size. Similitude theory was applied to ensure comparability of the flow distribution between the device of original size and the scaled-up model. We focused our flow investigation on an area (20 × 70 × 43 mm) in a corner of the model with a Stereo-PIV setup. PIV data was compared to CFD data of the original sized artificial lung. From experimental PIV data, we were able to show local flow acceleration and declaration in the fiber bundle and meandering flow around individual fibers, which is not possible using state-of-the-art macroscopic CFD simulations. Our findings are applicable to clinically used artificial lungs with a similar stacked fiber arrangement (e.g., Novalung iLa and Maquet QUADROX-I). With respect to some limitations, we found PIV to be a feasible experimental flow visualization technique to investigate blood-sided flow in the stacked fiber arrangement of artificial lungs.

  11. An Approach for Quantitative Forecasting of Turbulent Flow over an Urban Area by Coupling Numerical Weather Prediction and Large-Eddy Simulation Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takemi, T.; Nakayama, H.

    2010-12-01

    Atmospheric flows in urban areas are highly turbulent owing not only to meteorological disturbances but also to complex and complicated distribution of roughness obstacles (i.e., buildings). Numerical modeling is an important research tool for this purpose. In previous meteorological models, urban areas are regarded as a very rough surface that has either a large roughness length or a slab of resistant layer. This type of simplified approaches is useful in cases of flows over urban areas with sparsely-distributed, low-rise buildings with uniform heights. However, recent urbanization makes urban surfaces covered with densely-distributed, high-rise buildings with variable heights. In order to numerically examine flows over such highly rough urban surfaces, a large-eddy simulation (LES) approach is promising. Recent studies have demonstrated that a numerical weather prediction (NWP) model such as the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model is capable of performing LESs for turbulent flows in free convective regimes. However, the NWP models cannot easily perform LESs of flows in a neutral or a stable environment. In order to ensure the turbulent nature of flows in urban areas, an LES approach with a proper turbulence-generation technique is necessary. The present study proposes an approach to quantitatively simulate turbulent flows in a densely-built environment with the mixture of high-rise and low-rise buildings by coupling the WRF model and an LES model. The NWP model used here is the Advanced Research WRF (ARW) model, while the LES model is based on a filtered Navier-Stokes equation and a filtered continuity equation for incompressible flow without any thermal effects. The subgrid-scale eddy viscosity is parameterized by the standard Smagorinsky model. The LES model incorporates the information of building height over Tokyo as its lower boundary. The buildings are represented as an external forcing. The cases examined here are strong wind events over Tokyo: a

  12. Kinetic and fluid dynamic modeling, numerical approaches of flowing-gas diode-pumped alkali vapor amplifiers.

    PubMed

    Shen, Binglin; Pan, Bailiang; Jiao, Jian; Xia, Chunsheng

    2015-07-27

    Comprehensive analysis of kinetic and fluid dynamic processes in flowing-gas diode-pumped alkali vapor amplifiers is reported. Taking into account effects of the temperature, the amplified spontaneous emission, the saturation power, the excitation of the alkali atoms to high electronic levels and the ionization, a detailed physical model is established to simulate the output performance of flowing-gas diode-pumped alkali vapor amplifiers. Influences of the flow velocity and the pump power on the amplified power are calculated and analyzed. Comparisons between single and double amplifier, longitudinal and transverse flow are made. Results show that end-pumped cascaded amplifier can provide higher output power under the same total pump power and the cell length, while output powers achieved by single- and double-end pumped, double-side pumped amplifiers with longitudinal or transverse flow have a complicated but valuable relation. Thus the model is extremely helpful for designing high-power flowing-gas diode-pumped alkali vapor amplifiers.

  13. Rainfall-runoff modelling in a catchment with a complex groundwater flow system: application of the Representative Elementary Watershed (REW) approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, G. P.; Savenije, H. H. G.

    2005-05-01

    Based on the Representative Elementary Watershed (REW) approach, the modelling tool REWASH (Representative Elementary WAterShed Hydrology) has been developed and applied to the Geer river basin. REWASH is deterministic, semi-distributed, physically based and can be directly applied to the watershed scale. In applying REWASH, the river basin is divided into a number of sub-watersheds, so called REWs, according to the Strahler order of the river network. REWASH describes the dominant hydrological processes, i.e. subsurface flow in the unsaturated and saturated domains, and overland flow by the saturation-excess and infiltration-excess mechanisms. Through flux exchanges among the different spatial domains of the REW, surface and subsurface water interactions are fully coupled. REWASH is a parsimonious tool for modelling watershed hydrological response. However, it can be modified to include more components to simulate specific processes when applied to a specific river basin where such processes are observed or considered to be dominant. In this study, we have added a new component to simulate interception using a simple parametric approach. Interception plays an important role in the water balance of a watershed although it is often disregarded. In addition, a refinement for the transpiration in the unsaturated zone has been made. Finally, an improved approach for simulating saturation overland flow by relating the variable source area to both the topography and the groundwater level is presented. The model has been calibrated and verified using a 4-year data set, which has been split into two for calibration and validation. The model performance has been assessed by multi-criteria evaluation. This work is the first full application of the REW approach to watershed rainfall-runoff modelling in a real watershed. The results demonstrate that the REW approach provides an alternative blueprint for physically based hydrological modelling.

  14. A Green's Function Approach to PIV Pressure Estimates with an Application to Micro Energy Harvesters in Turbulent and Vortical Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goushcha, Oleg

    In the present work we demonstrate the feasibility to harness energy from fluid flows by using piezoelectric generators. These ac-coupled devices convert fluid kinetic energy, which otherwise would be wasted, into electrical energy. The available power density in a flowing fluid is proportional to the cube of its velocity and if it is properly harvested can be used for continuously powering very small electronic devices or can be rectified and stored for intermittent use. A key quantity in these applications which affects the performance is the forcing which the fluid exerts on the harvesters. An analytical solution is presented for the Pressure Poisson Equation (PPE) that uses Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) field data to find the pressure in a flow domain and to calculate the pressure and therefore the force exerted by the fluid on the solid surface. The solution provides a favorable method of calculating pressure field from PIV data as it eliminates the need to compute higher order derivatives of velocity on the domain that are present in viscous terms as well as eliminates the need to integrate Navier-Stokes equations to find the pressure along the boundaries of interest. The solution is validated against a theoretical solution for a pressure distribution inside a tornado-like vortex; pressure solutions obtained by derivative momentum transform method for a vortex flow and some experimental results for the pressure distribution inside a turbulent boundary layer. Several experiments were carried out in which pressure was calculated using PPE: i) a discrete vortex passing over a simple cantilever beam harvester ii) a simple cantilever harvester placed in the boundary layer iii) a self-excited harvester placed in the free stream flow. In a discrete vortex experiment, the self-propelled vortex is passed over the cantilever beam. The pressure distribution and the net force of the beam are calculated by solving PPE as the vortex passes over the beam. In a boundary

  15. Importance of the vertical component of groundwater flow: a hydrogeochemical approach in the valley of San Luis Potosi, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrillo-Rivera, J. J.; Cardona, A.; Moss, D.

    1996-11-01

    Fractured volcanics exert a control on groundwater flow in the San Luis Potosi (SLP) valley. The chemical composition and temperature of water pumped from boreholes partially penetrating the fractured volcanics indicate that the produced water originates from an upward vertical flow. Most of the thermal groundwater has been detected in areas related to regional faults and lineaments. Intensive and uncontrolled pumping from the upper {1}/{4} of the aquifer (total depth > 1500 m) causes the rise of water from a deep regional flow system that mixes with the shallower waters. The deep waters contain high fluoride concentrations that contaminate the mixture and cause substantial health related effects. The recharge controls on the regional flow system require further research; however, hydrogeochemical evidence supports the view that the origin of this recharge is limited to the western bounding Sierra Madre Occidental. Higher levels of dissolved Na +, Li +, F - (and SO 4-2) derived from Tertiary volcanics have been introduced into the exploited region; the concentrations indicate lengthy and deep circulation flow. Li + concentration was used as an indicator of groundwater residence time, and therefore of the length of the groundwater flow path. Hydrogeochemical interpretation indicates the presence of three flow systems: a shallow local one controlled by a clay layer that subcrops most of the valley floor, an intermediate system in which water infiltrates just beyond the boundary of the clay layer, and a deep regional system which originates outside the surface catchment. The local and intermediate systems circulate through materials with comparatively low hydraulic conductivity. Low Cl - concentrations suggest rapid flow in the regional system. Concentrations of Li + and F - can be used to calculate percentages of waters in mixtures of regional and intermediate flows. Concentrations of Na +, Ca 2+ and SO 4-2 appear to be controlled by water-rock reactions

  16. A novel approach to model dynamic flow interactions between storm sewer system and overland surface for different land covers in urban areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Tsang-Jung; Wang, Chia-Ho; Chen, Albert S.

    2015-05-01

    In this study, we developed a novel approach to simulate dynamic flow interactions between storm sewers and overland surface for different land covers in urban areas. The proposed approach couples the one-dimensional (1D) sewer flow model (SFM) and the two-dimensional (2D) overland flow model (OFM) with different techniques depending on the land cover type of the study areas. For roads, pavements, plazas, and so forth where rainfall becomes surface runoff before entering the sewer system, the rainfall-runoff process is simulated directly in the 2D OFM, and the runoff is drained to the sewer network via inlets, which is regarded as the input to 1D SFM. For green areas on which rainfall falls into the permeable ground surface and the generated direct runoff traverses terrain, the deduction rate is applied to the rainfall for reflecting the soil infiltration in the 2D OFM. For flat building roofs with drainage facilities allowing rainfall to drain directly from the roof to sewer networks, the rainfall-runoff process is simulated using the hydrological module in the 1D SFM where no rainfall is applied to these areas in the 2D OFM. The 1D SFM is used for hydraulic simulations in the sewer network. Where the flow in the drainage network exceeds its capacity, a surcharge occurs and water may spill onto the ground surface if the pressure head in a manhole exceeds the ground elevation. The overflow discharge from the sewer system is calculated by the 1D SFM and considered a point source in the 2D OFM. The overland flow will return into the sewer network when it reaches an inlet that connects to an un-surcharged manhole. In this case, the inlet is considered as a point sink in the 2D OFM and an inflow to a manhole in the 1D SFM. The proposed approach was compared to other five urban flood modelling techniques with four rainfall events that had previously recorded inundation areas. The merits and drawbacks of each modelling technique were compared and discussed. Based on the

  17. A water framework directive (WFD) compliant determination of eologically acceptable flows in alpine rivers - a river type specific approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jäger, Paul; Zitek, Andreas

    2010-05-01

    Currently the EU-Water Framework Directive (WFD) represents the driving force behind the assessment for rehabilitation and conservation of aquatic resources throughout Europe. Hydropower production, often considered as "green energy", in the past has put significant pressures on river systems like fragmentation by weirs, impoundment, hydropeaking and water abstraction. Due to the limited availability of data for determining ecologically acceptable flow for rivers at water abstraction sites, a special monitoring program was conducted in the federal state of Salzburg in Austria from 2006 to 2009. Water abstraction sites at 19 hydropower plants, mostly within the trout region of the River Salzach catchment, were assessed in detail with regard to the effect of water abstraction on fish and macrozoobenthos. Based on a detailed assessment of the specific local hydro-morphological and biological situations, the validity of natural low flow criteria (Absolute Minimum Flow - AMF, the lowest daily average flow ever measured and Mean Annual Daily Low Flow - MADLF) as starting points for the determination of an ecologically acceptable flow was tested. It was assessed, if a good ecological status in accordance with the EU-WFD can be maintained at natural AMF. Additionally it was tested, if important habitat parameters describing connectivity, river type specific flow variability and river type specific habitats are maintained at this discharge. Habitat modelling was applied in some situations. Hydraulic results showed that at AMF the highest flow velocity classes were lost in most situations. When AMF was significantly undercut, flow velocities between 0,0 - 0,4 m/s became dominant, describing the loss of the river type specific flow character, leading to a loss of river type specific flow variability and habitats and increased sedimentation of fines. Furthermore limits for parameters describing connectivity for fish like maximum depth at the pessimum profile and minimum flow

  18. Surface Tension-Driven Melt Flow in the Upper Mantle: An Experimental and Modeling Approach to Studying Capillary Flow of Silicate Melt Through an Olivine Matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parsons, R. A.; Nimmo, F.; Hustoft, J. W.; Holtzman, B. K.; Kohlstedt, D. L.

    2006-12-01

    The flow of melt in partially-molten rocks has important implications for the geochemical and geophysical evolution of planetary bodies over a wide range of length scales. Surface tension is usually ignored in favor of differential stresses and buoyancy forces, but may still distribute melt over geologically interesting distances [1], particularly in small bodies such as asteroids. We have investigated experimentally the role of surface tension in the redistribution of melt. Shear deformation of synthetic mantle-type rocks composed of 76 vol% olivine, 20 vol% chromite, and 4 vol% mid-ocean ridge basalt (MORB) at upper mantle temperature and pressure conditions (1523 K, 300 MPa) produces anastomosing networks of melt-enriched (MORB) regions separated by melt-depleted lenses [2]. After the deformation phase of the experiment, each of three samples were statically annealed at 1523 K for 0, 10, or 100 hours to allow some MORB to redistribute back into the melt-depleted olivine plus chromite matrix via surface tension-driven capillary flow.". We modeled melt redistribution resulting from surface tension during the static anneal [3]. Using sample measurements of dihedral angle, and values for MORB and olivine viscosity from the literature (10 Pas [4] and 8x10^{12} Pas [5], [6], respectively), we are able to constrain the sample permeability by matching the model results to the experiments. Permeability is given by κ = d2φn/b. The model uses an exponential melt-dependent viscosity relation of the form ηo*10-α φ where ηo is the dry olivine viscosity, α = 25 [5], and φ is the melt fraction. We find that a permeability on the order of 10-18 m2, corresponding to n = 2 ± 0.2 and b = 7000 ± 2000, gives the best fit to the the experimental anneals. The relatively high value of b is probably due to clogging of melt paths by chromite grains (see Appendix A of Holtzmann et al.). [1] Stevenson D. J. (1986) GRL, 13, 1149-1152. [2] Holtzman B. K. et al. (2003) Science, 301

  19. Comparative Tensile Flow and Work-Hardening Behavior of 9 Pct Chromium Ferritic-Martensitic Steels in the Framework of the Estrin-Mecking Internal-Variable Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choudhary, B. K.; Christopher, J.

    2016-06-01

    The comparative tensile flow and work-hardening behavior of P9 steel in two different product forms, normalized and tempered plate and thick section tube plate forging, and P91 steel were investigated in the framework of the dislocation dynamics based Estrin-Mecking (E-M) one-internal-variable approach. The analysis indicated that the flow behavior of P9 and P91 steels was adequately described by the E-M approach in a wide range of temperatures. It was suggested that dislocation dense martensite lath/cell boundaries and precipitates together act as effective barriers to dislocation motion in P9 and P91 steels. At room and intermediate temperatures, the evolution of the internal-state variable, i.e., the dislocation density with plastic strain, exhibited insignificant variations with respect to temperature. At high temperatures, a rapid evolution of dislocation density with plastic strain toward saturation with increasing temperature was observed. The softer P9 steel tube plate forging exhibited higher work hardening in terms of larger gains in the dislocation density and flow stress contribution from dislocations than the P9 steel plate and P91 steel at temperatures ranging from 300 K to 873 K (27 °C to 600 °C). The evaluation of activation energy suggests that the deformation is controlled by cross-slip of dislocations at room and intermediate temperatures, and climb of dislocations at high temperatures. The relative influence of initial microstructure on flow and work-hardening parameters associated with the E-M approach was discussed in the three temperature regimes displayed by P9 and P91 steels.

  20. A joint stochastic-deterministic approach for long-term and short-term modelling of monthly flow rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stojković, Milan; Kostić, Srđan; Plavšić, Jasna; Prohaska, Stevan

    2017-01-01

    The authors present a detailed procedure for modelling of mean monthly flow time-series using records of the Great Morava River (Serbia). The proposed procedure overcomes a major challenge of other available methods by disaggregating the time series in order to capture the main properties of the hydrologic process in both long-run and short-run. The main assumption of the conducted research is that a time series of monthly flow rates represents a stochastic process comprised of deterministic, stochastic and random components, the former of which can be further decomposed into a composite trend and two periodic components (short-term or seasonal periodicity and long-term or multi-annual periodicity). In the present paper, the deterministic component of a monthly flow time-series is assessed by spectral analysis, whereas its stochastic component is modelled using cross-correlation transfer functions, artificial neural networks and polynomial regression. The results suggest that the deterministic component can be expressed solely as a function of time, whereas the stochastic component changes as a nonlinear function of climatic factors (rainfall and temperature). For the calibration period, the results of the analysis infers a lower value of Kling-Gupta Efficiency in the case of transfer functions (0.736), whereas artificial neural networks and polynomial regression suggest a significantly better match between the observed and simulated values, 0.841 and 0.891, respectively. It seems that transfer functions fail to capture high monthly flow rates, whereas the model based on polynomial regression reproduces high monthly flows much better because it is able to successfully capture a highly nonlinear relationship between the inputs and the output. The proposed methodology that uses a combination of artificial neural networks, spectral analysis and polynomial regression for deterministic and stochastic components can be applied to forecast monthly or seasonal flow rates.

  1. A note on the solutions of some nonlinear equations arising in third-grade fluid flows: an exact approach.

    PubMed

    Aziz, Taha; Mahomed, F M

    2014-01-01

    In this communication, we utilize some basic symmetry reductions to transform the governing nonlinear partial differential equations arising in the study of third-grade fluid flows into ordinary differential equations. We obtain some simple closed-form steady-state solutions of these reduced equations. Our solutions are valid for the whole domain [0,∞) and also satisfy the physical boundary conditions. We also present the numerical solutions for some of the underlying equations. The graphs corresponding to the essential physical parameters of the flow are presented and discussed.

  2. A Note on the Solutions of Some Nonlinear Equations Arising in Third-Grade Fluid Flows: An Exact Approach

    PubMed Central

    Mahomed, F. M.

    2014-01-01

    In this communication, we utilize some basic symmetry reductions to transform the governing nonlinear partial differential equations arising in the study of third-grade fluid flows into ordinary differential equations. We obtain some simple closed-form steady-state solutions of these reduced equations. Our solutions are valid for the whole domain [0,∞) and also satisfy the physical boundary conditions. We also present the numerical solutions for some of the underlying equations. The graphs corresponding to the essential physical parameters of the flow are presented and discussed. PMID:25143962

  3. Using noble gas tracers to constrain a groundwater flow model with recharge elevations: A novel approach for mountainous terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doyle, Jessica M.; Gleeson, Tom; Manning, Andrew H.; Mayer, K. Ulrich

    2015-10-01

    Environmental tracers provide information on groundwater age, recharge conditions, and flow processes which can be helpful for evaluating groundwater sustainability and vulnerability. Dissolved noble gas data have proven particularly useful in mountainous terrain because they can be used to determine recharge elevation. However, tracer-derived recharge elevations have not been utilized as calibration targets for numerical groundwater flow models. Herein, we constrain and calibrate a regional groundwater flow model with noble-gas-derived recharge elevations for the first time. Tritium and noble gas tracer results improved the site conceptual model by identifying a previously uncertain contribution of mountain block recharge from the Coast Mountains to an alluvial coastal aquifer in humid southwestern British Columbia. The revised conceptual model was integrated into a three-dimensional numerical groundwater flow model and calibrated to hydraulic head data in addition to recharge elevations estimated from noble gas recharge temperatures. Recharge elevations proved to be imperative for constraining hydraulic conductivity, recharge location, and bedrock geometry, and thus minimizing model nonuniqueness. Results indicate that 45% of recharge to the aquifer is mountain block recharge. A similar match between measured and modeled heads was achieved in a second numerical model that excludes the mountain block (no mountain block recharge), demonstrating that hydraulic head data alone are incapable of quantifying mountain block recharge. This result has significant implications for understanding and managing source water protection in recharge areas, potential effects of climate change, the overall water budget, and ultimately ensuring groundwater sustainability.

  4. The "Function-to-Flow" Model: An Interdisciplinary Approach to Assessing Movement within and beyond the Context of Climbing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lloyd, Rebecca

    2015-01-01

    Background: Physical Education (PE) programmes are expanding to include alternative activities yet what is missing is a conceptual model that facilitates how the learning process may be understood and assessed beyond the dominant sport-technique paradigm. Purpose: The purpose of this article was to feature the emergence of a Function-to-Flow (F2F)…

  5. A balanced-force finite-element method for surface-tension-driven interfacial flows using interface-capturing approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Zhihua; Pavlidis, Dimitrios; Percival, James; Gomes, Jefferson; Pain, Christopher; Matar, Omar

    2013-11-01

    Interfacial flows with surface tension are often found in industrial and practical engineering applications, including bubbles, droplets, liquid film and jets. Accurate modelling of such flows is challenging due to their highly complex dynamics, which often involve changes of interfacial topology. We present a balanced-force finite-element method with adaptive unstructured meshes for interfacial flows. The method uses a mixed control-volume and finite element formulation, which ensures the surface tension forces, and the resulting pressure gradients, are exactly balanced, minimising the spurious velocities often found in numerical simulations of such flows. A volume-of-fluid-type method is employed for interface capturing based on a compressive control-volume advection method, and second-order finite element methods. A distance function is reconstructed from the volume fraction on the unstructured meshes, which provides accurate estimation of the curvature. Numerical examples of an equilibrium drop and dynamics of bubbles (droplets) are presented to demonstrate the capability of this method.

  6. Teaching the Indirect Method of the Statement of Cash Flows in Introductory Financial Accounting: A Comprehensive, Problem-Based Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brickner, Daniel R.; McCombs, Gary B.

    2004-01-01

    In this article, the authors provide an instructional resource for presenting the indirect method of the statement of cash flows (SCF) in an introductory financial accounting course. The authors focus primarily on presenting a comprehensive example that illustrates the "why" of SCF preparation and show how journal entries and T-accounts can be…

  7. Using noble gas tracers to constrain a groundwater flow model with recharge elevations: A novel approach for mountainous terrain

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Doyle, Jessica M.; Gleeson, Tom; Manning, Andrew H.; Mayer, K. Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    Environmental tracers provide information on groundwater age, recharge conditions, and flow processes which can be helpful for evaluating groundwater sustainability and vulnerability. Dissolved noble gas data have proven particularly useful in mountainous terrain because they can be used to determine recharge elevation. However, tracer-derived recharge elevations have not been utilized as calibration targets for numerical groundwater flow models. Herein, we constrain and calibrate a regional groundwater flow model with noble-gas-derived recharge elevations for the first time. Tritium and noble gas tracer results improved the site conceptual model by identifying a previously uncertain contribution of mountain block recharge from the Coast Mountains to an alluvial coastal aquifer in humid southwestern British Columbia. The revised conceptual model was integrated into a three-dimensional numerical groundwater flow model and calibrated to hydraulic head data in addition to recharge elevations estimated from noble gas recharge temperatures. Recharge elevations proved to be imperative for constraining hydraulic conductivity, recharge location, and bedrock geometry, and thus minimizing model nonuniqueness. Results indicate that 45% of recharge to the aquifer is mountain block recharge. A similar match between measured and modeled heads was achieved in a second numerical model that excludes the mountain block (no mountain block recharge), demonstrating that hydraulic head data alone are incapable of quantifying mountain block recharge. This result has significant implications for understanding and managing source water protection in recharge areas, potential effects of climate change, the overall water budget, and ultimately ensuring groundwater sustainability.

  8. An Experimental Approach to the Functional Analysis of Text Building Behaviour. Part I. The Verbal Flow. No. 47.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bierschenk, Bernhard

    This presentation is based on a method for analyzing the verbal flow in text-building behavior. The method is called Perspective Text Analysis (PTA). It locates and makes use of the discontinuities in produced text. Its task is to characterize the mechanism that governs language production and to foster an understanding of the actual processes of…

  9. Innovative Approaches for Urban Watershed Wet-Weather Flow Management and Control: State of Technology Review Report

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report documents initial efforts to identify innovative strategies for managing the effects of wet-weather flow in an urban setting. It served as a communication tool and a starting point for discussion with experts. As such, the document is a compilation of literature rev...

  10. Field-flow fractionation: An efficient approach for matrix removal of soil extract for inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sangsawong, Supharart; Waiyawat, Weerawan; Shiowatana, Juwadee; Siripinyanond, Atitaya

    2011-06-01

    An on-line coupling between a continuous-flow sequential extraction (CFSE) unit and flow field-flow fractionation with cross flow matrix removal (FlFFF/CFM) with ICP-OES detection was developed for determination of metal leachability from soil. The use of high concentration of Mg(NO 3) 2 in exchangeable phase can cause undesirable matrix effects by shifting ionization equilibrium in the plasma, etc., resulting in a clear need for matrix removal. Therefore, the capability of FlFFF/CFM to remove Mg matrix ion from soil extract was evaluated. Poly(ethylene imine) (PEI) having molecular weight of 25,000 Da was added to form complexes with analyte elements (Cu, Mn, Pb, and Zn) but not the matrix element (Mg). The free Mg matrix ions were then removed by filtering off through the ultrafiltration membrane, having a 1000-Da molecular weight cut-off, inside the FlFFF channel. With the use of FlFFF/CFM, matrix removal efficiency was approximately 83.5%, which was equivalent to approximately 6-fold dilution of the matrix ion. The proposed hyphenated system of CFSE and FlFFF/CFM with ICP-OES detection was examined for its reliability by checking with SRM 2710 (a highly contaminated soil from Montana). The metal contents determined by the proposed method were not significantly different (at 95% confidence) from the certified values.

  11. 3D numerical modelling of the steady-state thermal regime constrained by surface heat flow data: a Monte Carlo approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mather, B.; Moresi, L. N.; Cruden, A. R.

    2014-12-01

    Uncertainty of the lithospheric thermal regime greatly increases with depth. Measurements of temperature gradient and crustal rheology are concentrated in the upper crust, whereas the majority of the lithospheric measurements are approximated using empirical depth-dependent functions. We have applied a Monte Carlo approach to test the variation of crustal heat flow with temperature-dependent conductivity and the redistribution of heat-producing elements. The dense population of precision heat flow data in Victoria, Southeast Australia offers the ideal environment to test the variation of heat flow. A stochastically consistent anomalous zone of impossibly high Moho temperatures in the 3D model (> 900°C) correlates well with a zone of low teleseismic velocity and high electrical conductivity. This indicates that transient heat transfer has perturbed the thermal gradient and therefore a steady-state approach to 3D modelling is inappropriate in this zone. A spatial correlation between recent intraplate volcanic eruption points (< 5 Ma) and elevated Moho temperatures is a potential origin for additional latent heat in the crust.

  12. A Warning System for Rainfall-Induced Debris Flows: A Integrated Remote Sensing and Data Mining Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elkadiri, R.; Sultan, M.; Nurmemet, I.; Al Harbi, H.; Youssef, A.; Elbayoumi, T.; Zabramwi, Y.; Alzahrani, S.; Bahamil, A.

    2014-12-01

    We developed methodologies that heavily rely on observations extracted from a wide-range of remote sensing data sets (TRMM, Landsat ETM, ENVISAT, ERS, SPOT, Orbview, GeoEye) to develop a warning system for rainfall-induced debris flows in the Jazan province in the Red Sea Hills. The developed warning system integrates static controlling factors and dynamic triggering factors. The algorithm couples a susceptibility map with a rainfall I-D curve, both are developed using readily available remote sensing datasets. The static susceptibility map was constructed as follows: (1) an inventory was compiled for debris flows identified from high spatial resolution datasets and field verified; (2) 10 topographical and land cover predisposing factors (i.e. slope angle, slope aspect, normalized difference vegetation index, topographical position index, stream power index, flow accumulation, distance to drainage line, soil weathering index, elevation and topographic wetness index) were generated; (3) an artificial neural network model (ANN) was constructed, optimized and validated; (4) a debris-flow susceptibility map was generated using the ANN model and refined (using differential backscatter coefficient radar images). The rainfall threshold curve was derived as follows: (1) a spatial database was generated to host temporal co-registered and radiometrically and atmospherically corrected Landsat images; (2) temporal change detection images were generated for pairs of successively acquired Landsat images and criteria were established to identify "the change" related to debris flows, (3) the duration and intensity of the precipitation event that caused each of the identified debris flow events was assumed to be that of the most intense event within the investigated period; and (4) the I-D curve was extracted using data (intensity and duration of precipitation) for the inventoried events. Our findings include: (1) the spatial controlling factors with the highest predictive power of

  13. Absolute paleointensity determinations by using of conventional double-heating and multispecimen approaches on a Pliocene lava flow sequence from the Lesser Caucasus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goguitchaichvili, Avto; Caccavari, Ana; Calvo-Rathert, Manuel; Morales, Juan; Solano, Miguel Cervantes; Vashakidze, Goga; Huaiyu, He; Vegas, Néstor

    2016-08-01

    We report 28 successful Thellier type absolute geomagnetic paleointensity determinations from a Pleistocene lava sequence composed of 39 successive flows in the Djavakheti Highland (Lesser Caucasus, Georgia). Additionally, multispecimen technique provided the estimation of geomagnetic field strength for 12 independent cooling units. Paleointensity studies were performed using both Thellier type double heating and multispecimen techniques. Samples selection was mainly based on uni-vectorial remanent magnetization, thermal stability and domain size of the samples. Flow-mean Thellier paleointensity values range from 16.3 ± 5.2 to 71.0 ± 0.3 μT, while intensities obtained using multispecimen approach vary from17.2 ± 2.3 to 69.3 ± 7.9 μT. One of the flows is located near a possible discontinuity in the sequence and yields a rather low Thellier absolute intensity (16.3 ± 5.2) suggesting a transitional regime and the onset of the Matuyama-Olduvai polarity transition, which does not appear on the directional record. Multispecimen paleointensities from the same flow, however, yield higher, close to present day values which makes untenable the hypothesis of occurrence of transitional field. Thus the whole sequence was emplaced in a short time between the Olduvai chron and 1.73 ± 0.03 Ma, as suggested by available radiometric and paleomagnetic data (Caccavari et al., 2014).

  14. Chemiluminescence method for the assay of perphenazine in drug formulation using permanganate in sulphuric acid with flow injection technique and a chemometrical optimization approach.

    PubMed

    Sultan, S M; Abdennabi, A M; Almuaibed, A M

    1999-08-09

    An accurate selective flow injection chemiluminescence (CL) method for the assay of perphenazine was explored. In the method 394 ppm permanganate solution was used as a chemiluminogenic reagent in 0.289 mol dm(-3) sulphuric acid media. A photomultiplier tube was used as a detector at a total flow rate of 4.94 ml/min. Perphenazine was determined by a linear calibration plot of the following equation in the range 50-350 ppm: mV=-4.488+0.1162C, with a correlation coefficient of 0.9989 for five measurements and a relative standard deviation less than 2.33. A sampling frequency not less than 110 samples h(-1) was established. Three factors namely, the flow rate, sulphuric acid and permanganate concentrations were found to have an influence on the amount of chemiluminescence intensity produced. Therefore, their interaction effects were thoroughly investigated by employing the 2(3) factorial design chemometrical approach and the results obtained revealed a higher interaction between sulphuric acid and permanganate and a less significant interaction for both reagents with the flow rate. The interaction of variables observed necessitated the conduct of the super modified simplex optimization procedure which has resulted in offering the proper optimum conditions as stated above and led to the quantitative assay of perphenazine. An interference study indicated that the method was suitable for application in pharmaceutical preparations.

  15. Integrated water flow model and modflow-farm process: A comparison of theory, approaches, and features of two integrated hydrologic models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dogrul, Emin C.; Schmid, Wolfgang; Hanson, Randall T.; Kadir, Tariq; Chung, Francis

    2016-01-01

    Effective modeling of conjunctive use of surface and subsurface water resources requires simulation of land use-based root zone and surface flow processes as well as groundwater flows, streamflows, and their interactions. Recently, two computer models developed for this purpose, the Integrated Water Flow Model (IWFM) from the California Department of Water Resources and the MODFLOW with Farm Process (MF-FMP) from the US Geological Survey, have been applied to complex basins such as the Central Valley of California. As both IWFM and MFFMP are publicly available for download and can be applied to other basins, there is a need to objectively compare the main approaches and features used in both models. This paper compares the concepts, as well as the method and simulation features of each hydrologic model pertaining to groundwater, surface water, and landscape processes. The comparison is focused on the integrated simulation of water demand and supply, water use, and the flow between coupled hydrologic processes. The differences in the capabilities and features of these two models could affect the outcome and types of water resource problems that can be simulated.

  16. A Probabilistic Approach of Hazard Mapping for flow-type phenomena. An example of application at Mt. Etna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bongolan, Vena Pearl; Iovine, Giulio; D'Ambrosio, Donato; Rongo, Rocco; Spataro, William

    2014-05-01

    The hazard induced by dangerous flow-type phenomena like lava flows, debris flows and debris avalanches can be usefully assessed by analysing a proper set of simulations of hypothetical events characterized in probability. In particular, to map lava-flow hazard, simulations can be performed by assuming a number of nodes from a regular grid of potential vents, selected to uniformly covering the study area. A probability of occurrence can then be assigned to each simulation, based on statistics of historical events and location of each vent with respect to the volcano. In this study, different hazard scenarios for Mt. Etna (Italy) have been realized, based on computer simulations of lava flows generated by a non-uniform grid of sources. The adopted grid covers the volcano with a variable density of nodes. Five macro-areas can in fact be recognised, in which at higher densities of nodes correspond higher probabilities of vent activation. Moreover, 4 distinct temporal frames have been considered (next 1, 25, 50 and 100 years) and related hazard scenarios have been computed. In addition, the topographic effects of the expected simulation within the considered temporal frames have been analysed, aiming at evaluating hazard trends due to natural morphological changes. Model parameters, e.g. the probability distribution function for vent activation and for types of eruption (distinguished into classes by duration and volume), have been derived by analysing the past 400-years volcanic history at Mt. Etna. Probabilities of vent activation for the 4 considered scenarios have been computed in terms of total number of expected events per each temporal frame. The actual number of events to be simulated per each scenario has been obtained by considering a Poisson distribution, with the number of expected events in that frame being the mean of the obtained probabilities. For each frame, a total of 240 runs have been performed. Each run is made of the set of simulations expected

  17. Theoretical and experimental internal flow characteristics of a 13.97-centimeter-diameter inlet at STOL takeoff and approach conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albers, J. A.

    1973-01-01

    The theoretical and experimental internal flow characteristics of a 13.97-cm-diam inlet with centerbody retracted and extended are presented at STOL takeoff and approach operating conditions. The theoretical results were obtained from incompressible potential flow corrected for compressibility and boundary layer. Comparisons between theoretical internal surface static-pressure distributions and experimental data are presented for free-stream velocities of 0, 24, 32, and 45 m/sec for a range of inlet incidence angles from 0 to 50 deg. Surface static-pressure distributions are illustrated at circumferential locations of 0, 60, 120, and 180 deg. Surface Mach number distributions from the stagnation point to the diffuser exit are presented along with turbulent boundary-layer shape factors. In general, good agreement was found between the theoretical and experimental surface static pressure distributions.

  18. An enhanced bacterial foraging algorithm approach for optimal power flow problem including FACTS devices considering system loadability.

    PubMed

    Belwin Edward, J; Rajasekar, N; Sathiyasekar, K; Senthilnathan, N; Sarjila, R

    2013-09-01

    Obtaining optimal power flow solution is a strenuous task for any power system engineer. The inclusion of FACTS devices in the power system network adds to its complexity. The dual objective of OPF with fuel cost minimization along with FACTS device location for IEEE 30 bus is considered and solved using proposed Enhanced Bacterial Foraging algorithm (EBFA). The conventional Bacterial Foraging Algorithm (BFA) has the difficulty of optimal parameter selection. Hence, in this paper, BFA is enhanced by including Nelder-Mead (NM) algorithm for better performance. A MATLAB code for EBFA is developed and the problem of optimal power flow with inclusion of FACTS devices is solved. After several run with different initial values, it is found that the inclusion of FACTS devices such as SVC and TCSC in the network reduces the generation cost along with increased voltage stability limits. It is also observed that, the proposed algorithm requires lesser computational time compared to earlier proposed algorithms.

  19. Numerical investigation on boiling flow of liquid nitrogen in a vertical tube using bubble number density approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Xuefeng; Li, Xiangdong; Wang, Rongshun

    2016-04-01

    An average bubble number density (ABND) model was formulated and numerically resolved for the subcooled flow boiling of liquid nitrogen. The effects of bubble coalescence and breakup were taken into account. Some new closure correlations describing bubble nucleation and departure on the heating surface were selected as well. For the purpose of comparison, flow boiling of liquid nitrogen was also numerically simulated using a modified two-fluid model. The results show that the simulations performed by using the ABND model achieve encouraging improvement in accuracy in predicting heat flux and wall temperature of a vertical tube. Moreover, the influence of the bubble coalescence and breakup is shown to be great on predicting overall pressure beyond the transition point.

  20. Groundwater flow dynamics in the complex aquifer system of Gidabo River Basin (Ethiopian Rift): a multi-proxy approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mechal, Abraham; Birk, Steffen; Dietzel, Martin; Leis, Albrecht; Winkler, Gerfried; Mogessie, Aberra; Kebede, Seifu

    2017-03-01

    Hydrochemical and isotope data in conjunction with hydraulic head and spring discharge observations were used to characterize the regional groundwater flow dynamics and the role of the tectonic setting in the Gidabo River Basin, Ethiopian Rift. Both groundwater levels and hydrochemical and isotopic data indicate groundwater flow from the major recharge area in the highland and escarpment into deep rift floor aquifers, suggesting a deep regional flow system can be distinguished from the shallow local aquifers. The δ18O and δ2H values of deep thermal (≥30 °C) groundwater are depleted relative to the shallow (<60 m below ground level) groundwater in the rift floor. Based on the δ18O values, the thermal groundwater is found to be recharged in the highland around 2,600 m a.s.l. and on average mixed with a proportion of 30 % shallow groundwater. While most groundwater samples display diluted solutions, δ13C data of dissolved inorganic carbon reveal that locally the thermal groundwater near fault zones is loaded with mantle CO2, which enhances silicate weathering and leads to anomalously high total dissolved solids (2,000-2,320 mg/l) and fluoride concentrations (6-15 mg/l) exceeding the recommended guideline value. The faults are generally found to act as complex conduit leaky barrier systems favoring vertical mixing processes. Normal faults dipping to the west appear to facilitate movement of groundwater into deeper aquifers and towards the rift floor, whereas those dipping to the east tend to act as leaky barriers perpendicular to the fault but enable preferential flow parallel to the fault plane.

  1. Dielectric approach to investigation of erythrocyte aggregation. II. Kinetics of erythrocyte aggregation-disaggregation in quiescent and flowing blood.

    PubMed

    Pribush, A; Meiselman, H J; Meyerstein, D; Meyerstein, N

    2000-01-01

    A method based on dielectric properties of dispersed systems was applied to investigate the kinetics of RBC aggregation and the break-up of the aggregates. Experimentally, this method consists of measuring the capacitance at a frequency in the beginning of the beta-dispersion. Two experimental protocols were used to investigate the aggregation process. In the first case, blood samples were fully dispersed and then the flow was decreased or stopped to promote RBC aggregation. It was found that the initial phases of RBC aggregation are not affected by the shear rate. This finding indicates that RBC aggregation is a slow coagulation process. In the second case, RBCs aggregated under flow conditions at different shear rates and after the capacitance reached plateau levels, the flow was ceased. The steady-state capacitance of the quiescent blood and the kinetics of RBC aggregation after stoppage of shearing depend on the prior shear rate. To clarify the reasons for this effect, the kinetics of the disaggregation process was studied. In these experiments, time courses of the capacitance were recorded under different flow conditions and then a higher shear stress was applied to break up RBC aggregates. It was found that the kinetics of the disaggregation process depend on both the prior and current shear stresses. Results obtained in this study and their analysis show that the kinetics of RBC aggregation in stasis consists of two consecutive phases: At the onset, red blood cells interact face-to-face to form linear aggregates and then, after an accumulation of an appropriate concentration of these aggregates, branched rouleaux are formed via reactions of ends of the linear rouleaux with sides of other rouleaux (face-to-side interactions). Branching points are broken by low shear stresses whereas dispersion of the linear rouleaux requires significantly higher energy.

  2. A first-order Green's function approach to supersonic oscillatory flow: A mixed analytic and numeric treatment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freedman, M. I.; Sipcic, S.; Tseng, K.

    1985-01-01

    A frequency domain Green's Function Method for unsteady supersonic potential flow around complex aircraft configurations is presented. The focus is on the supersonic range wherein the linear potential flow assumption is valid. In this range the effects of the nonlinear terms in the unsteady supersonic compressible velocity potential equation are negligible and therefore these terms will be omitted. The Green's function method is employed in order to convert the potential flow differential equation into an integral one. This integral equation is then discretized, through standard finite element technique, to yield a linear algebraic system of equations relating the unknown potential to its prescribed co-normalwash (boundary condition) on the surface of the aircraft. The arbitrary complex aircraft configuration (e.g., finite-thickness wing, wing-body-tail) is discretized into hyperboloidal (twisted quadrilateral) panels. The potential and co-normalwash are assumed to vary linearly within each panel. The long range goal is to develop a comprehensive theory for unsteady supersonic potential aerodynamic which is capable of yielding accurate results even in the low supersonic (i.e., high transonic) range.

  3. The role of porous matrix in water flow regulation within a karst unsaturated zone: an integrated hydrogeophysical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrière, Simon D.; Chalikakis, Konstantinos; Danquigny, Charles; Davi, Hendrik; Mazzilli, Naomi; Ollivier, Chloé; Emblanch, Christophe

    2016-11-01

    Some portions of the porous rock matrix in the karst unsaturated zone (UZ) can contain large volumes of water and play a major role in water flow regulation. The essential results are presented of a local-scale study conducted in 2011 and 2012 above the Low Noise Underground Laboratory (LSBB - Laboratoire Souterrain à Bas Bruit) at Rustrel, southeastern France. Previous research revealed the geological structure and water-related features of the study site and illustrated the feasibility of specific hydrogeophysical measurements. In this study, the focus is on hydrodynamics at the seasonal and event timescales. Magnetic resonance sounding (MRS) measured a high water content (more than 10 %) in a large volume of rock. This large volume of water cannot be stored in fractures and conduits within the UZ. MRS was also used to measure the seasonal variation of water stored in the karst UZ. A process-based model was developed to simulate the effect of vegetation on groundwater recharge dynamics. In addition, electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) monitoring was used to assess preferential water pathways during a rain event. This study demonstrates the major influence of water flow within the porous rock matrix on the UZ hydrogeological functioning at both the local (LSBB) and regional (Fontaine de Vaucluse) scales. By taking into account the role of the porous matrix in water flow regulation, these findings may significantly improve karst groundwater hydrodynamic modelling, exploitation, and sustainable management.

  4. Continuous-flow synthesis of CdSe quantum dots: a size-tunable and scalable