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Sample records for flow pressure-driven flow

  1. Pressure-driven peristaltic flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mingalev, S. V.; Lyubimov, D. V.; Lyubimova, T. P.

    2013-03-01

    The peristaltic motion of an incompressible fluid in two-dimensional channel is investigated. Instead of fixing the law of wall's coordinate variation, the law of pressure variation on the wall is fixed and the border's coordinate changes to provide the law of pressure variation on the wall. In case of small amplitude of pressure-variation on the wall A, expansion wave propagates along the length of channel and the wave results in the peristaltic transport of fluid. In the case of large A, the channel divides into two parts. The small pulsating part in the end of the tube creates the flow as a human heart, while the other big part loses this function. The solution of problem for the first peristaltic mode is stable, while the solution for the second "heart" mode is unstable and depends heavily on boundary conditions.

  2. Pressure driven flow in porous tubular membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tilton, Nils; Martinand, Denis; Serre, Eric; Lueptow, Richard

    2011-11-01

    We consider the steady laminar flow of a Newtonian incompressible fluid in a porous tubular membrane with pressure-driven transmembrane flow. Due to its fundamental importance to membrane filtration systems, this flow has been studied extensively both analytically and numerically, yet a robust analytic solution has not been found. The problem is challenging due to the coupling between the transmembrane pressure and velocity with the simultaneous coupling between the axial pressure gradient and the axial velocity. We present a robust analytical solution which incorporates Darcy's law on the membrane surface. The solution is in the form of an asymptotic expansion about a small parameter related to the membrane permeability. We verify the analytical solution with comparison to 2-D spectral direct numerical simulations of ultrafiltration and microfiltration systems with typical operating conditions, as well as extreme cases of cross-flow reversal and axial flow exhaustion. In all cases, the agreement between the analytical and numerical results is excellent. Finally, we use the analytical and numerical results to provide guidelines about when common simplifying assumptions about the permeate flow may be made. Specifically, the assumptions of a parabolic axial velocity profile and uniform transmembrane velocity are valid only for small permeabilities.

  3. Pressure-Driven Flow of Solid Helium

    SciTech Connect

    Day, James; Beamish, John

    2006-03-17

    The recent torsional oscillator results of Kim and Chan show an anomalous mass decoupling, interpreted by the authors as a supersolid phase transition, in solid {sup 4}He. We have used a piezoelectrically driven diaphragm to study the flow of solid helium through an array of capillaries. Our measurements showed no indication of low temperature flow, placing stringent restrictions on supersolid flow in response to a pressure difference. The average flow speed at low temperatures was less than 1.2x10{sup -14} m/s, corresponding to a supersolid velocity at least 7 orders of magnitude smaller than the critical velocities inferred from the torsional oscillator measurements.

  4. Pressure-driven suspension flow near jamming.

    PubMed

    Oh, Sangwon; Song, Yi-qiao; Garagash, Dmitry I; Lecampion, Brice; Desroches, Jean

    2015-02-27

    We report here magnetic resonance imaging measurements performed on suspensions with a bulk solid volume fraction (ϕ_{0}) up to 0.55 flowing in a pipe. We visualize and quantify spatial distributions of ϕ and velocity across the pipe at different axial positions. For dense suspensions (ϕ_{0}>0.5), we found a different behavior compared to the known cases of lower ϕ_{0}. Our experimental results demonstrate compaction within the jammed region (characterized by a zero macroscopic shear rate) from the jamming limit ϕ_{m}≈0.58 at its outer boundary to the random close packing limit ϕ_{rcp}≈0.64 at the center. Additionally, we show that ϕ and velocity profiles can be fairly well captured by a frictional rheology accounting for both further compaction of jammed regions as well as normal stress differences. PMID:25768782

  5. Pressure-driven flow in a channel with porous walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Qianlong; Prosperetti, Andrea

    2010-11-01

    The finite-Reynolds-number three-dimensional flow in a channel bounded by one and two parallel porous walls is studied numerically. The porous medium is modelled by spheres in a simple cubic arrangement. The results for the slip velocity at the surface of the porous layers are compared with the phenomenological Beavers-Joseph model. It is found that the value of the slip coefficient is different for pressure-driven and shear-driven flow. A modification of the relation is suggested to deal with this feature. Furthermore, detailed results on the flow structure and the hydrodynamic forces and couple acting on the sphere layer bounding the porous medium are reported and their dependence on the Reynolds number illustrated. It is shown that, at finite Reynolds numbers, a lift force acts on the spheres, which may be expected to contribute to the the mobilization of bottom sediments.

  6. Combined electroosmotically and pressure driven flow in soft nanofluidics.

    PubMed

    Matin, Meisam Habibi; Ohshima, Hiroyuki

    2015-12-15

    The present study is devoted to the analysis of mixed electroosmotic and pressure driven flows through a soft charged nanochannel considering boundary slip and constant charge density on the walls of the slit channel. The sources of the fluid flow are the pressure gradient along the channel axis and the electrokinetic effects that trigger an electroosmotic flow under the influence of a uniformly applied electric field. The polyelectrolyte layer (PEL) is denoted as a fixed charge layer (FCL) and the electrolyte ions can be present both inside and outside the PEL i.e., the PEL-electrolyte interface acts as a semi-penetrable membrane. The Poisson-Boltzmann equation is solved assuming the Debye-Hückel linearization for the low electric potential to provide us with analytical closed form solutions for the conservation equations. The conservation equations are solved to obtain the electric potential and velocity distributions in terms of governing dimensionless parameters. The results for the dimensionless electric potential, the dimensionless velocity and Poiseuille number are presented graphically and discussed in detail. PMID:26385594

  7. A flux monitoring method for easy and accurate flow rate measurement in pressure-driven flows.

    PubMed

    Siria, Alessandro; Biance, Anne-Laure; Ybert, Christophe; Bocquet, Lydéric

    2012-03-01

    We propose a low-cost and versatile method to measure flow rate in microfluidic channels under pressure-driven flows, thereby providing a simple characterization of the hydrodynamic permeability of the system. The technique is inspired by the current monitoring method usually employed to characterize electro-osmotic flows, and makes use of the measurement of the time-dependent electric resistance inside the channel associated with a moving salt front. We have successfully tested the method in a micrometer-size channel, as well as in a complex microfluidic channel with a varying cross-section, demonstrating its ability in detecting internal shape variations.

  8. Measurement and control of pressure driven flows in microfluidic devices using an optofluidic flow sensor

    PubMed Central

    Cheri, Mohammad Sadegh; Shahraki, Hamidreza; Sadeghi, Jalal; Moghaddam, Mohammadreza Salehi; Latifi, Hamid

    2014-01-01

    Measurement and control of pressure-driven flow (PDF) has a great potential to enhance the performance of chemical and biological experiments in Lab on a Chip technology. In this paper, we present an optofluidic flow sensor for real-time measurement and control of PDF. The optofluidic flow sensor consists of an on-chip micro Venturi and two optical Fabry-Pérot (FP) interferometers. Flow rate was measured from the fringe shift of FP interferometers resulted from movement fluid in the on-chip micro Venturi. The experimental results show that the optofluidic flow sensor has a minimum detectable flow change of 5 nl/min that is suitable for real time monitoring and control of fluids in many chemical and biological experiments. A Finite Element Method is used to solve the three dimensional (3D) Navier–Stokes and continuity equations to validate the experimental results. PMID:25584118

  9. Stability of a jet in confined pressure-driven biphasic flows at low reynolds numbers.

    PubMed

    Guillot, Pierre; Colin, Annie; Utada, Andrew S; Ajdari, Armand

    2007-09-01

    Motivated by its importance for microfluidic applications, we study the stability of jets formed by pressure-driven concentric biphasic flows in cylindrical capillaries. The specificity of this variant of the classical Rayleigh-Plateau instability is the role of the geometry which imposes confinement and Poiseuille flow profiles. We experimentally evidence a transition between situations where the flow takes the form of a jet and regimes where drops are produced. We describe this as the transition from convective to absolute instability, within a simple linear analysis using lubrication theory for flows at low Reynolds number, and reach remarkable agreement with the data.

  10. Separation of ions in nanofluidic channels with combined pressure-driven and electro-osmotic flow.

    PubMed

    Gillespie, Dirk; Pennathur, Sumita

    2013-03-01

    Separation of ionic species with the same electrophoretic mobility but different valence in electrolyte systems can occur within nanometer-scale channels with finite electrical double layers (EDLs). This is because EDL thicknesses are a significant fraction of slit height in such channels and can create transverse analyte concentration profiles that allow for unique separation modalities when combined with axial fluid flow. Previous work has shown such separation to occur using either pressure-driven flow or electro-osmotic flow separately. Here, we develop a Poisson-Boltzmann model to compare the separation of such ions using the combination of both pressure-driven and electro-osmotic flow. Applying a pressure gradient in the opposite direction of electro-osmotic flow can allow for zero or infinite retention of analyte species, which we investigate using three different wall boundary conditions. Furthermore, we determine conditions in fused silica nanochannels with which to generate optimal separation between two analytes of different charge but the same mobility. We also give simple rules of thumb to achieve the best separation efficacy in nanochannel systems.

  11. Molecular simulation of pressure-driven fluid flow in nanoporous membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takaba, Hiromitsu; Onumata, Yasushi; Nakao, Shin-ichi

    2007-08-01

    An extended nonequilibrium molecular dynamics technique has been developed to investigate the transport properties of pressure-driven fluid flow in thin nanoporous membranes. Our simulation technique allows the simulation of the pressure-driven permeation of liquids through membranes while keeping a constant driving pressure using fluctuating walls. The flow of argon in the liquid state was simulated on applying an external pressure difference of 2.4×106Pa through the slitlike and cylindrical pores. The volume flux and velocity distribution in the membrane pores were examined as a function of pore size, along with the interaction with the pore walls, and these were compared with values estimated using the Hagen-Poiseuille flow. The calculated velocity strongly depends on the strength of the interaction between the fluid and the atoms in the wall when the pore size is approximately <20σ. The calculated volume flux also shows a dependence on the interaction between the fluid and the atoms in the wall. The Hagen-Poiseuille law overestimates or underestimates the flux depending on the interaction. From the analysis of calculated results, a good linear correlation between the density of the fluid in the membrane pores and the deviation of the flux estimated from the Hagen-Poiseuille flow was found. This suggests that the flux deviation in nanopore from the Hagen-Poiseuille flow can be predicted based on the fluid density in the pores.

  12. Stability of pressure-driven creeping flows in channels lined with a nonlinear elastic solid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gkanis, Vasileios; Kumar, Satish

    2004-11-01

    The effect of pressure gradients on the stability of creeping flows of Newtonian fluids in channels lined with an incompressible and impermeable neo-Hookean material is examined in this work. Three different configurations are considered: (i) pressure-driven flow between a rigid wall and a wall lined with a neo-Hookean material, (ii) pressure-driven flow between neo-Hookean-lined walls, and (iii) combined Couette-Poiseuille flow between a rigid wall and a neo-Hookean-lined wall. In each case, a first normal stress difference whose magnitude depends on depth arises in the base state for the solid, and linear stability analysis reveals that this leads to a shortwave instability that is removed by the presence of interfacial tension. For sufficiently thick solids, low wavenumber modes become unstable first as the applied strain increases above a critical value, whereas for sufficiently thin solids, high wavenumber modes becomes unstable first instead. Comparison of the dimensionless critical strains shows that configurations (i) and (ii) are more difficult to destabilize than Couette flow past a neo-Hookean solid. The mechanisms underlying the behavior of the critical strains are explained through an analysis of the interfacial boundary conditions.

  13. Stability of pressure-driven creeping flows in channels lined with a nonlinear elastic solid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gkanis, Vasileios; Kumar, Satish

    2005-02-01

    The effect of pressure gradients on the stability of creeping flows of Newtonian fluids in channels lined with an incompressible and impermeable neo-Hookean material is examined in this work. Three different configurations are considered: (i) pressure-driven flow between a rigid wall and a wall lined with a neo-Hookean material; (ii) pressure-driven flow between neo-Hookean-lined walls; and (iii) combined Couette-Poiseuille flow between a rigid wall and a neo-Hookean-lined wall. In each case, a first normal stress difference whose magnitude depends on depth arises in the base state for the solid, and linear stability analysis reveals that this leads to a short-wave instability which is removed by the presence of interfacial tension. For sufficiently thick solids, low-wavenumber modes become unstable first as the applied strain increases above a critical value, whereas for sufficiently thin solids, high-wavenumber modes becomes unstable first. Comparison of the dimensionless critical strains shows that configurations (i) and (ii) are more difficult to destabilize than Couette flow past a neo-Hookean solid. For configuration (iii), the nonlinear elasticity of the solid leads to two physically distinct critical conditions, in contrast to what happens when a linear elastic material is used. The mechanisms underlying the behaviour of the critical strains are explained through an analysis of the interfacial boundary conditions.

  14. Predicting the pressure driven flow of gases through micro-capillaries and micro-orifices

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, B.L.; Carlson, R.W.; Fischer, L.E.

    1994-11-01

    A large body of experimentally measured gas flow rates were obtained from the literature and then compared to the predictions obtained with constitutive flow equations. This was done to determine whether the equations apply to the predictions of gas flow rates from leaking containment vessels used to transport radioactive materials. The experiments consisted of measuring the volumetric pressure-driven flow of gases through micro-capillaries and micro-orifices. The experimental results were compared to the predictions obtained with the equations given in ANSI N14.5 the American National Standard for Radioactive Materials-Leakage Tests on Package for Shipment. The equations were applied to both (1) the data set according to the recommendations given in ANSI N14.5 and (2) globally to the complete data set. It was found that: The continuum and molecular flow equation provided good agreement between the experimental and calculated flow rates for flow rates less than about 1 atm{center_dot}cm{sup 3}/s. The choked flow equation resulted in over-prediction of the flow rates for flow rates less than about 1 atm-cm{sup 3}/s. For flow rates higher than 1 atm{center_dot}cm{sup 3}/s, the molecular and continuum flow equation over-predicted the measured flow rates and the predictions obtained with the choked flow equation agreed well with the experimental values. Since the flow rates of interest for packages used to transport radioactive materials are almost always less than 1 atm{center_dot}cm{sup 3}/s, it is suggested that the continuum and molecular flow equation be used for gas flow rate predictions related to these applications.

  15. Ultra-sensitive flow measurement in individual nanopores through pressure--driven particle translocation.

    PubMed

    Gadaleta, Alessandro; Biance, Anne-Laure; Siria, Alessandro; Bocquet, Lyderic

    2015-05-01

    A challenge for the development of nanofluidics is to develop new instrumentation tools, able to probe the extremely small mass transport across individual nanochannels. Such tools are a prerequisite for the fundamental exploration of the breakdown of continuum transport in nanometric confinement. In this letter, we propose a novel method for the measurement of the hydrodynamic permeability of nanometric pores, by diverting the classical technique of Coulter counting to characterize a pressure-driven flow across an individual nanopore. Both the analysis of the translocation rate, as well as the detailed statistics of the dwell time of nanoparticles flowing across a single nanopore, allow us to evaluate the permeability of the system. We reach a sensitivity for the water flow down to a few femtoliters per second, which is more than two orders of magnitude better than state-of-the-art alternative methods.

  16. Transverse migration of a polyelectrolyte driven by electric and pressure-driven flow fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ladd, Tony; Kekre, Rahul; Butler, Jason

    2010-03-01

    Capillary electrophoresis experiments show that a flexible polyelectrolyte migrates under the combined action of electric and pressure-driven-flow fields [1]. When the fields act in conjunction, the polymer migrates to the center of the channel, but when the pressure gradient and external force act in opposite directions, the polymer migrates towards the boundaries. We have previously proposed that this is caused by long-range dipolar interactions between segments of the polyelectrolyte chain [2]. Due to the stretching and orientation of the chain by the local shear flow, there is a net motion transverse to the flow and field lines. Here I will describe a coarse-grained simulation of polyelectrolyte migration, including hydrodynamic interactions from the imposed flow and electric fields. The effects of the no-slip condition on the walls are included by regularized Green's functions. Our results explain the experimentally observed migration under different combinations of flow and electric field. [1] J. Zheng and E. S. Yeung. Anal. Chem., 74:4536, 2002; 75:3675, 2003. [2] O. B. Usta, J. E. Butler and A. J. C. Ladd. Phys. Rev. Lett., 98:098301, 2007.

  17. Dispersion reduction in open-channel liquid electrochromatographic columns via pressure-driven back flow.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Debashis; Leighton, David T

    2003-07-15

    Application of electrokinetic forces to drive the mobile phase diminishes analyte dispersion in open-channel liquid chromatographic columns due to minimization of shear in the flow field. However, the retentive layer coating the inner walls of such devices slows down the average convective velocity of solute molecules in its vicinity, inherently causing dispersion of analyte bands. In this article, we explore the possibility of reducing such dispersion in electrochromatographic columns by imposing a pressure-driven back flow in the system. Analysis shows that although such a strategy introduces shear in the flow field, the overall dispersion in the mobile phase is reduced. This occurs as the streamline velocity in such a system is greater near the channel walls than that in the center of the conduit, thereby allowing fluid dispersion to counteract wall retention effects. For an optimally chosen magnitude of the back flow, hydrodynamic dispersion of any target species in the mobile phase may be shown to diminish by a factor of 3 and 10/3 in a circular tube and a parallel-plate geometry, respectively. A similar reduction in slug dispersion is also realized in rectangular conduits for all aspect ratios. In trapezoidal geometries with large wedge angles or isotropically etched profiles, this reduction factor may attain values of 10 or greater.

  18. Thermal transport characteristics of combined electroosmotic and pressure driven flow in soft nanofluidics.

    PubMed

    Matin, M H; Ohshima, H

    2016-08-15

    The present study deals with thermal transport characteristics of an electrolyte solution flowing through a slit nanochannel with polyelectrolyte walls, known as soft nanochannel. The sources of the fluid flow are the pressure gradient along the channel axis and the electrokinetic effects that trigger an electroosmotic flow under the impact of a uniformly applied electric field. The polyelectrolyte layer (PEL) is denoted as a fixed charge layer (FCL) and the electrolyte ions can be present both inside and outside the PEL. Therefore, the PEL-electrolyte interface acts as a semi-penetrable membrane. To the best of our knowledge, the thermal analysis of mixed electrokinetically and pressure driven flow in such soft nanochannels has never been addressed. The Poisson-Boltzmann equation is solved assuming the Debye-Huckel linearization for the low electric potential to provide us with analytical closed form solutions for the conservation equations. The conservation equations are solved to obtain the electric potential; velocity and temperature distributions in terms of governing dimensionless parameters. Also results for the Nusselt number are presented and discussed in detail. PMID:27214147

  19. Kinetic theory of a confined polymer driven by an external force and pressure-driven flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butler, Jason E.; Usta, O. Berk; Kekre, Rahul; Ladd, Anthony J. C.

    2007-11-01

    Kinetic theory is used to investigate the mechanisms causing cross-stream migration of confined polymers and polyelectrolytes under the influence of external forces and flow fields. Numerical simulations and experiments have demonstrated that confined polymers migrate towards the center of the channel in response to both external forces and uniaxial flows. Yet, migration towards the walls has been observed with combinations of external force and flow. In this paper, the kinetic theory for an elastic dumbbell developed by Ma and Graham [Phys. Fluids 17, 083103 (2005)] has been extended to account for the effects of an external force. Further modifications account for counterion screening within a Debye-Hückel approximation. This enables qualitative comparison with experimental results [Zheng and Yeung, Anal. Chem. 75, 3675 (2003)] on DNA migration under combined electric and pressure-driven flow fields. The comparison supports the contention [Long et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 76, 3858 (1996)] that the hydrodynamic interactions in polyelectrolytes decay algebraically, as 1/r3, rather than exponentially. The theory qualitatively reproduces results of both simulations and experiments for the migration of neutral polymers and polyelectrolytes. Concentration profiles similar to those found in numerical simulations are observed, but the Peclet numbers differ by factors of 2-3.

  20. Scaling Law for Cross-stream Diffusion in Microchannels under Combined Electroosmotic and Pressure Driven Flow.

    PubMed

    Song, Hongjun; Wang, Yi; Pant, Kapil

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents an analytical study of the cross-stream diffusion of an analyte in a rectangular microchannel under combined electroosmotic flow (EOF) and pressure driven flow to investigate the heterogeneous transport behavior and spatially-dependent diffusion scaling law. An analytical model capable of accurately describing 3D steady-state convection-diffusion in microchannels with arbitrary aspect ratios is developed based on the assumption of the thin Electric Double Layer (EDL). The model is verified against high-fidelity numerical simulation in terms of flow velocity and analyte concentration profiles with excellent agreement (<0.5% relative error). An extensive parametric analysis is then undertaken to interrogate the effect of the combined flow velocity field on the transport behavior in both the positive pressure gradient (PPG) and negative pressure gradient (NPG) cases. For the first time, the evolution from the spindle-shaped concentration profile in the PPG case, via the stripe-shaped profile (pure EOF), and finally to the butterfly-shaped profile in the PPG case is obtained using the analytical model along with a quantitative depiction of the spatially-dependent diffusion layer thickness and scaling law across a wide range of the parameter space.

  1. Scaling Law for Cross-stream Diffusion in Microchannels under Combined Electroosmotic and Pressure Driven Flow.

    PubMed

    Song, Hongjun; Wang, Yi; Pant, Kapil

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents an analytical study of the cross-stream diffusion of an analyte in a rectangular microchannel under combined electroosmotic flow (EOF) and pressure driven flow to investigate the heterogeneous transport behavior and spatially-dependent diffusion scaling law. An analytical model capable of accurately describing 3D steady-state convection-diffusion in microchannels with arbitrary aspect ratios is developed based on the assumption of the thin Electric Double Layer (EDL). The model is verified against high-fidelity numerical simulation in terms of flow velocity and analyte concentration profiles with excellent agreement (<0.5% relative error). An extensive parametric analysis is then undertaken to interrogate the effect of the combined flow velocity field on the transport behavior in both the positive pressure gradient (PPG) and negative pressure gradient (NPG) cases. For the first time, the evolution from the spindle-shaped concentration profile in the PPG case, via the stripe-shaped profile (pure EOF), and finally to the butterfly-shaped profile in the PPG case is obtained using the analytical model along with a quantitative depiction of the spatially-dependent diffusion layer thickness and scaling law across a wide range of the parameter space. PMID:23554584

  2. Pressure-driven occlusive flow of a confined red blood cell.

    PubMed

    Savin, Thierry; Bandi, M M; Mahadevan, L

    2016-01-14

    When red blood cells (RBCs) move through narrow capillaries in the microcirculation, they deform as they flow. In pathophysiological processes such as sickle cell disease and malaria, RBC motion and flow are severely restricted. To understand this threshold of occlusion, we use a combination of experiment and theory to study the motion of a single swollen RBC through a narrow glass capillary of varying inner diameter. By tracking the movement of the squeezed cell as it is driven by a controlled pressure drop, we measure the RBC velocity as a function of the pressure gradient as well as the local capillary diameter, and find that the effective blood viscosity in this regime increases with both decreasing RBC velocity and tube radius by following a power-law that depends upon the length of the confined cell. Our observations are consistent with a simple elasto-hydrodynamic model and highlight the role of lateral confinement in the occluded pressure-driven slow flow of soft confined objects. PMID:26497051

  3. Solute dispersion under electric and pressure driven flows; pore scale processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shuai; Raoof, Amir; Schotting, Ruud

    2014-09-01

    Solute dispersion is one of the major mixing mechanisms in transport through porous media, originating from velocity variations at different scales, starting from the pore scale. Different driving forces, such as pressure driven flow (PDF) and electro-osmotic flow (EOF), establish different velocity profiles within individual pores, resulting in different spreading of solutes at this scale. While the velocity profile in PDF is parabolic due to the wall friction effects, the velocity in EOF is typically plug flow, due to the wall charge effects. In this study, we applied a pore network modeling formulation to simulate the velocity field driven by pressure and electric potential to calculate and compare the corresponding average solute dispersivity values. The influence of different driving forces on the hydrodynamic dispersion of a tracer solute is investigated. Applying the pore network modeling, we could capture the velocity variations among different pores, which is the main contribution for the dispersion coefficient. The correlation between pore velocities against pore sizes is found to be different for EOF and PDF, causing different solute dispersion coefficients. The results can provide insight into modeling of electrokinetic remediation for contaminant cleanup in low permeable soils.

  4. Aquaporin-1 facilitates pressure-driven water flow across the aortic endothelium

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Tieuvi; Toussaint, Jimmy; Xue, Yan; Raval, Chirag; Cancel, Limary; Russell, Stewart; Shou, Yixin; Sedes, Omer; Sun, Yu; Yakobov, Roman; Tarbell, John M.; Jan, Kung-ming

    2015-01-01

    Aquaporin-1, a ubiquitous water channel membrane protein, is a major contributor to cell membrane osmotic water permeability. Arteries are the physiological system where hydrostatic dominates osmotic pressure differences. In the present study, we show that the walls of large conduit arteries constitute the first example where hydrostatic pressure drives aquaporin-1-mediated transcellular/transendothelial flow. We studied cultured aortic endothelial cell monolayers and excised whole aortas of male Sprague-Dawley rats with intact and inhibited aquaporin-1 activity and with normal and knocked down aquaporin-1 expression. We subjected these systems to transmural hydrostatic pressure differences at zero osmotic pressure differences. Impaired aquaporin-1 endothelia consistently showed reduced engineering flow metrics (transendothelial water flux and hydraulic conductivity). In vitro experiments with tracers that only cross the endothelium paracellularly showed that changes in junctional transport cannot explain these reductions. Percent reductions in whole aortic wall hydraulic conductivity with either chemical blocking or knockdown of aquaporin-1 differed at low and high transmural pressures. This observation highlights how aquaporin-1 expression likely directly influences aortic wall mechanics by changing the critical transmural pressure at which its sparse subendothelial intima compresses. Such compression increases transwall flow resistance. Our endothelial and historic erythrocyte membrane aquaporin density estimates were consistent. In conclusion, aquaporin-1 significantly contributes to hydrostatic pressure-driven water transport across aortic endothelial monolayers, both in culture and in whole rat aortas. This transport, and parallel junctional flow, can dilute solutes that entered the wall paracellularly or through endothelial monolayer disruptions. Lower atherogenic precursor solute concentrations may slow their intimal entrainment kinetics. PMID:25659484

  5. Nonlinear wave evolution in pressure-driven stratified flow of Newtonian and Herschel-Bulkley fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valluri, Prashant; Sahu, Kirti; Ding, Hang; Spelt, Peter; Matar, Omar; Lawrence, Chris

    2007-11-01

    Pressure-driven stratified channel flow of a Newtonian fluid flowing over a Herschel-Bulkley (HB) fluid is considered. The effects of yield stress and shear-thinning rheology on the nonlinear wave evolution are studied using numerical simulations; the HB rheology is regularized at low shear rates using a bi-viscosity formulation. Two different numerical methods were used to carry out the computations: a level-set method (based on that by Spelt, J. Comput. Phys. 2005) and a diffuse-interface method (based on that by Ding et al., J. Comput. Phys., in press). The simulations, which account for fluid inertia, surface tension and gravity are validated against linear theory predictions at early times. The results at later times show the spatio-temporal evolution into the nonlinear regime wherein waves are strongly deformed, leading to the onset of drop entrainment. It is shown that the apparent viscosity in the region of the HB fluid directly involved in the onset of entrainment is almost constant; unyielded regions are confined to wave troughs at late stages of the nonlinear evolution.

  6. The deformation of flexible PDMS microchannels under a pressure driven flow.

    PubMed

    Hardy, Brian S; Uechi, Kawika; Zhen, Janet; Pirouz Kavehpour, H

    2009-04-01

    Poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) microchannels are commonly used microfluidic structures that have a wide variety of biological testing applications, including the simulation of blood vessels to study the mechanics of vascular disease. In these studies in particular, the deformation of the channel due to the pressure inside is a critical parameter. We describe a method for using fluorescence microscopy to quantify the deformation of such channels under pressure driven flow. Additionally, the relationship between wall thickness and channel deformation is investigated. PDMS microchannels of varying top wall thickness were created using a soft lithography process. A solution of fluorescent dye is pumped through the channels at constant volume flow rates and illuminated. Pressure and fluorescence intensity are measured at five positions along the length of the channel. Fluorescence measurements are then used to determine deformation, using the linear relationship of dye layer thickness and intensity. A linear relationship between pressure and microchannel deformation is measured. Pressure drops and deformations closely correspond to values predicted by the model in most cases. Additionally, measured pressure drops are found to be up to 35% less than the pressure drop in a rigid-walled channel, and channel wall thickness is found to have an increasing effect as the channel wall thickness decreases. PMID:19294304

  7. Capillary electrophoresis: Imaging of electroosmotic and pressure driven flow profiles in fused silica capillaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, George O., Jr.

    1996-01-01

    This study is a continuation of the summer of 1994 NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program. This effort is a portion of the ongoing work by the Biophysics Branch of the Marshall Space Flight Center. The work has focused recently on the separation of macromolecules using capillary electrophoresis (CE). Two primary goals were established for the effort this summer. First, we wanted to use capillary electrophoresis to study the electrohydrodynamics of a sample stream. Secondly, there was a need to develop a methodology for using CE for separation of DNA molecules of various sizes. In order to achieve these goals we needed to establish a procedure for detection of a sample plug under the influence of an electric field Detection of the sample with the microscope and image analysis system would be helpful in studying the electrohydrodynamics of this stream under load. Videotaping this process under the influence of an electric field in real time would also be useful. Imaging and photography of the sample/background electrolyte interface would be vital to this study. Finally, detection and imaging of electroosmotic flow and pressure driven flow must be accomplished.

  8. Theoretical analysis of molecular diffusion in pressure-driven laminar flow in microfluidic channels.

    PubMed Central

    Kamholz, A E; Yager, P

    2001-01-01

    The T-sensor is a microfluidic analytical device that operates at low Reynolds numbers to ensure entirely laminar flow. Diffusion of molecules between streams flowing side by side may be observed directly. The pressure-driven velocity profile in the duct-shaped device influences diffusive transport in ways that affect the use of the T-sensor to measure molecular properties. The primary effect is a position-dependent variation in the extent of diffusion that occurs due to the distribution of residence time among different fluid laminae. A more detailed characterization reveals that resultant secondary concentration gradients yield variations in the scaling behavior between diffusive displacement and elapsed time in different regions of the channel. In this study, the time-dependent evolution of analyte distribution has been quantified using a combination of one- and two-dimensional models. The results include an accurate portrayal of the shape of the interdiffusion region in a representative T-sensor assay, calculation of the diffusive scaling law across the width of the channel, and quantification of artifacts that occur when making diffusion coefficient measurements in the T-sensor. PMID:11159391

  9. Continuous particle separation using pressure-driven flow-induced miniaturizing free-flow electrophoresis (PDF-induced μ-FFE)

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Hyungkook; Kim, Youngkyu; Lim, Geunbae

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we introduce pressure-driven flow-induced miniaturizing free-flow electrophoresis (PDF-induced μ-FFE), a novel continuous separation method. In our separation system, the external flow and electric field are applied to particles, such that particle movement is affected by pressure-driven flow, electroosmosis, and electrophoresis. We then analyzed the hydrodynamic drag force and electrophoretic force applied to the particles in opposite directions. Based on this analysis, micro- and nano-sized particles were separated according to their electrophoretic mobilities with high separation efficiency. Because the separation can be achieved in a simple T-shaped microchannel, without the use of internal electrodes, it offers the advantages of low-cost, simple device fabrication and bubble-free operation, compared with conventional μ-FFE methods. Therefore, we expect the proposed separation method to have a wide range of filtering/separation applications in biochemical analysis. PMID:26819221

  10. An analysis of pressure driven cross-flow through a long slot connecting two parallel channels

    SciTech Connect

    Shadday, M.A. Jr.

    1992-12-31

    Cross-flow between two parallel channels that were connected by a long narrow slot has been measured. The data was presented primarily in terms of transverse resistance coefficients. This data has been analyzed with momentum balances applied to both the axial and transverse components of the slot flow. The importance of wall friction to the slot flow and the necessity of calculating the axial component of the slot flow is demonstrated.

  11. Pressure driven flow studies of superfluid helium-4 through single, high aspect ratio nanopipes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Botimer, Jeffrey; Taborek, Peter

    We have measured flow rates of helium-4 through high aspect ratio (>10,000) single glass nanopipes and etched nanopores under the influence of a pressure drop. The initial diameter of the glass pipes is 200nm while the initial diameter of the nanopores is approximately 80nm; the diameter of both types of nanopipe were reduced using atomic layer deposition(ALD) of Al2O3. Flow rates were measured for a wide range of temperatures (0.8K to 3.0K), pressures (up to 40 atm), and pipe lengths (0.8 mm to 30 mm). We observed flow velocities in the range of 1-6 m/s which has a power law dependence on pressure. Flow appears to be governed by turbulence at low temperatures. We have found evidence for a critical pressure above which turbulent flow is eliminated. This critical pressure appears to depend on temperature.

  12. A stochastic two-scale model for pressure-driven flow between rough surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Larsson, Roland; Lundström, Staffan; Wall, Peter; Almqvist, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Seal surface topography typically consists of global-scale geometric features as well as local-scale roughness details and homogenization-based approaches are, therefore, readily applied. These provide for resolving the global scale (large domain) with a relatively coarse mesh, while resolving the local scale (small domain) in high detail. As the total flow decreases, however, the flow pattern becomes tortuous and this requires a larger local-scale domain to obtain a converged solution. Therefore, a classical homogenization-based approach might not be feasible for simulation of very small flows. In order to study small flows, a model allowing feasibly-sized local domains, for really small flow rates, is developed. Realization was made possible by coupling the two scales with a stochastic element. Results from numerical experiments, show that the present model is in better agreement with the direct deterministic one than the conventional homogenization type of model, both quantitatively in terms of flow rate and qualitatively in reflecting the flow pattern. PMID:27436975

  13. Characterization of the physical parameters in a process of magnetic separation and pressure-driven flow of a magnetic fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cunha, F. R.; Sobral, Y. D.

    2004-11-01

    The equations governing the motion of a magnetic fluid are presented. These equations are non-linear and give rise to non-Newtonian effects attributable to the magnetization of the fluid. The equations are made dimensionless and the physical parameters of the coupled hydrodynamic-magnetic problem identified. The study is first applied to describe the motion of a magnetic droplet freely suspended in a viscous fluid undergoing a permanent magnetic field. A first-order theory is developed for the regime of small drop deformation in which viscous forces dominate inertial hydrodynamic force. At this regime, it is shown that the drift velocity of a magnetic drop scales with the square of the applied magnetic field and the deformation of the drop scales linearly with the applied field. Experiments are carried out and the range of validity of the small deformation analysis determined. The pressure-driven flow of a magnetic fluid is solved by a regular asymptotic expansion for two cases: a Poiseuille flow of a single magnetic fluid and a core pipe flow with a magnetic fluid adjacent to the tube wall. The theory is used to predict the volume rate of a viscous magnetic fluid separated from a non-magnetic viscous fluid by the action of a magnetic field. The apparent viscosity of a magnetic fluid as a function of magnetic parameters is also examined from our theory. A possible application of the present theoretical studies is on the remediation technology addressed to oil spills in natural environments.

  14. On the displacement of three-dimensional fluid droplets adhering to a plane wall in viscous pressure-driven flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimitrakopoulos, P.; Higdon, J. J. L.

    2001-05-01

    The yield conditions for the displacement of three-dimensional fluid droplets adhering to a plane solid boundary in pressure-driven flows are studied through a series of numerical computations. The study considers low-Reynolds-number flows between two parallel plates and includes interfacial forces with constant surface tension. A comprehensive study is conducted, covering a wide range of viscosity ratio [lambda], capillary number Ca, advancing and receding contact angles, [theta]A and [theta]R, and dimensionless plate separation H/h (where H is the plate spacing and h is the unperturbed droplet height). This study seeks the optimal shape of the contact line which yields the maximum flow rate (or Ca) for which a droplet can adhere to the surface. The critical shear rates are presented as functions Ca([lambda], H/h, [theta]A, [Delta][theta]) where [Delta][theta] = [theta]A [minus sign] [theta]R is the contact angle hysteresis. The numerical solutions are based on an efficient, three-dimensional Newton method for the determination of equilibrium free surfaces and an optimization algorithm which is combined with the Newton iteration to solve the nonlinear optimization problem. The critical shear rate is found to be sensitive to viscosity ratio with qualitatively different results for viscous and inviscid droplets. As the viscosity of a droplet increases, the critical flow rate decreases, facilitating the displacement. This is consistent with our previous results for shear flows (Dimitrakopoulos & Higdon 1997, 1998), which represent the limit of infinite plate spacing. As the plate spacing is reduced, the critical flow rate increases until a maximum value is reached. Further reduction in the plate spacing decreases the critical flow rate. The effects of both viscosity ratio and plate separation are much more pronounced for high contact angles. Inviscid droplets (or bubbles) show behaviour dramatically different from that of viscous droplets. For these droplets, a

  15. Gas-bubble snap-off under pressure driven flow in constricted noncircular capillaries

    SciTech Connect

    Kovscek, A.R.; Radke, C.J.

    1996-04-01

    A model for snap-off of a gas thread in a constricted cornered pore is developed. The time for wetting liquid to accumulate at a pore throat into an unstable collar is examined, as for the resulting pore-spanning lens to be displaced from the pore so that snap-off is the time may repeat. A comer-flow hydrodynamic analysis for the accumulation rate of wetting liquid due to both gradients in interfacial curvature and in applied liquid-phase pressure reveals that wetting-phase pressure gradients significantly increase the frequency of liquid accumulation for snap-off as compared to liquid rearrangement driven only by differences in pore-wall curvature. For moderate and large pressure gradients, the frequency of accumulation increases linearly with pressure gradient because of the increased rate of wetting liquid flow along pore comers. Pore topology is important to the theory, for pores with relatively small throats connected to large bodies demonstrate excellent ability to snapoff gas threads even when the initial capillary pressure is high or equivalently when the liquid saturation is low. A macroscopic momentum balance across the lens resulting from snap-off reveals that lens displacement rates are not linear with the imposed pressure drop. Instead, the frequency of lens displacement scales with powers between 0.5 and 0.6 for pores with dimensionless constriction radii between 0.15 and 0.40. Statistical percolation arguments are employed to form a generation rate expression and connect pore-level foam generation events to macroscopic pressure gradients in porous media. The rate of foam generation by capillary snap-off increases linearly with the liquid-phase pressure gradient and according to a power-law relationship with respect to the imposed gas-phase pressure gradient.

  16. X-ray evidence for capillary pressure driven flow in preserved core from The Geysers

    SciTech Connect

    Bonner, B.P.; Roberts, J.J.; Schneberk, D.J.

    1997-03-01

    Improved understanding of fluid storage and transport mechanisms relevant to The Geysers reservoir is fundamental to efficient and economic long term production of steam. X-ray computed tomographs of core from research borehole SB-15D made within 72 hours of drilling show characteristic x-ray attenuation profiles that can only be explained by imbibition of drilling fluid at reservoir conditions. The shape of the profile is highly diagnostic. Early time scans, when interpreted taking into account independent measurements of pore size distribution, permeabilities and capillary pressures for the rock matrix sampled by SB-15D, are consistent with strong capillary suctions for the recovered rocks. This indirect indication of imbibition under reservoir conditions, along with detailed analysis of x-ray attenuation in recovered core, suggests that water content was low in much of the preserved core. These measurements are part of a series of laboratory experiments monitored by x-ray methods intended to evaluate movement of various fluids to determine the relative importance capillarity, Darcy flow and vapor phase diffusion.

  17. Numerical studies of continuous nutrient delivery for tumour spheroid culture in a microchannel by electrokinetically-induced pressure-driven flow.

    PubMed

    Movahed, Saeid; Li, Dongqing

    2010-12-01

    Continuous nutrient delivery to cells by pressure-driven flow is desirable for cell culture in lab-on-a-chip devices. An innovative method is proposed to generate an induced pressure-driven flow by using an electrokinetically-driven pump in a H-shape microchannel. A three-dimensional numerical model is developed to study the effectiveness of the proposed mechanism. It is shown that the average velocity of the generated pressure-driven flow is linearly dependent on the applied voltage. Considering the culture of a multicellular tumour spheroid (MTS) in such a microfluidic system, numerical simulations based on EMT6/Ro tumour cells is performed to find the effects of the nutrient distribution (oxygen and glucose), bulk velocity and channel size on the cell growth. Using an empirical formula, the growth of the tumour cell is studied. For low nutrient concentrations and low speed flows, it is found that the MTS grows faster in larger channels. It is also shown that, for low nutrient concentrations, a higher bulk liquid velocity provide better environment for MTS to grow. For lower velocities, it is found that the local MTS growth along the flow direction deviates from the average growth. PMID:20689992

  18. Dispersion of a passive tracer in the pressure-driven flow of a non-colloidal suspension.

    PubMed

    Nirmal, Ghata M; Ramachandran, Arun

    2016-10-14

    This paper numerically quantifies the dispersion of a solute, and in particular, the Taylor dispersion, in the pressure-driven flow of a non-colloidal suspension at moderately high volume fractions (0.2 to 0.5) through conduits of different cross-sectional shapes. An obvious intuition is that the Taylor dispersivity should increase owing to a decrease in the molecular diffusivity of the solute in the presence of particles impermeable to the solute; however, this is true only at low volume fractions. At higher volume fractions, three other physical effects become important, all of which lead to a reduction in Taylor dispersivity relative to a Newtonian fluid. The first is the blunting of the velocity profile resulting from particle migration into the low shear-stress regions, an effect that has been alluded to in the past by Roht et al. [J. Contam. Hydrol., 2013, 14, 10] and is important only at low Péclet numbers (Pe). At higher Pe, the two stronger effects are shear-induced solute self-diffusion, which arises due to shear-induced particle-particle interactions, and secondary convection, which is observed in non-axisymmetric cross-sections as a result of the second normal stress differences exhibited by concentrated suspensions. For a given volume fraction and cross-sectional geometry, a regime map, developed using a scaling analysis, delineates five regimes of dispersion involving one or a combination of the mass transfer mechanisms mentioned above. Our analysis also suggests that the cross-sectional shape can be exploited to enhance or suppress solute dispersion by modifying the secondary current strength and profile. PMID:27537698

  19. Stability of a jet in confined pressure-driven biphasic flows at low Reynolds number in various geometries.

    PubMed

    Guillot, Pierre; Colin, Annie; Ajdari, Armand

    2008-07-01

    We adress the question of the stability of a confined coflowing jet at low Reynolds number in various geometries. Our study is motivated by recent experiments in microfluidic devices. When immiscible fluids flow in microchannels, either monodisperse droplets or parallel flows are obtained depending upon the flow rate of the aqueous phase and the oil phase. In these experiments, the confining and the shape of the geometry play a fundamental role. In a previous paper [Guillot, Phys. Rev. Lett 99, 104502 (2007)], we analyzed the stability of the jet in the framework of the lubrication approximation at low Reynolds number in a cylindrical geometry, and we related the transition between the droplets regime and the jet regime to the absolute-convective transition of the Rayleigh plateau instability. In this work, the effect of the channel geometry and the jet position within the microfluidic device are discussed. New flow patterns are pointed out. Bidimensional jets are encountered in square and rectangular geometry. Contrary to jets occuring in circular geometry, these two-dimensional jets are absolutely stable. Focusing on situations where the inner fluid is more viscous than the outer one, we evidence a range of parameters where droplets are produced through a blocking and pinching mechanism. In this particular case, the flow is unstable, the growing perturbations are convected upstream. This induces the clogging of the channel by the internal phase and its pinching by the external one. In a future presentation we will give a comparison between this model and experimental data.

  20. Influence of Hall Current and Viscous Dissipation on Pressure Driven Flow of Pseudoplastic Fluid with Heat Generation: A Mathematical Study.

    PubMed

    Noreen, Saima; Qasim, Muhammad

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we study the influence of heat sink (or source) on the peristaltic motion of pseudoplastic fluid in the presence of Hall current, where channel walls are non-conducting in nature. Flow analysis has been carried out under the approximations of a low Reynolds number and long wavelength. Coupled equations are solved using shooting method for numerical solution for the axial velocity function, temperature and pressure gradient distributions. We analyze the influence of various interesting parameters on flow quantities. The present study can be considered as a mathematical presentation of the dynamics of physiological organs with stones.

  1. Influence of Hall Current and Viscous Dissipation on Pressure Driven Flow of Pseudoplastic Fluid with Heat Generation: A Mathematical Study

    PubMed Central

    Noreen, Saima; Qasim, Muhammad

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we study the influence of heat sink (or source) on the peristaltic motion of pseudoplastic fluid in the presence of Hall current, where channel walls are non-conducting in nature. Flow analysis has been carried out under the approximations of a low Reynolds number and long wavelength. Coupled equations are solved using shooting method for numerical solution for the axial velocity function, temperature and pressure gradient distributions. We analyze the influence of various interesting parameters on flow quantities. The present study can be considered as a mathematical presentation of the dynamics of physiological organs with stones. PMID:26083027

  2. Partitioned fluid-solid coupling for cardiovascular blood flow: validation study of pressure-driven fluid-domain deformation.

    PubMed

    Krittian, Sebastian; Schenkel, Torsten; Janoske, Uwe; Oertel, Herbert

    2010-08-01

    The Karlsruhe Heart Model (KaHMo) is a patient-specific simulation tool for a three-dimensional blood flow evaluation inside the human heart. Whereas KaHMo MRT is based on geometry movement identified from MRT data, KaHMo FSI allows the consideration of structural properties and the analysis of FSI. Previous investigations by Oertel et al. have shown the ability of KaHMo to gain insight into different intra-ventricular fluid mechanics of both healthy and diseased hearts. However, the in vivo validation of the highly dynamic cavity flow pattern has been a challenging task in recent years. As a first step, the focus of this study is on an artificial ventricular experiment, derived from real heart anatomy. Fluid domain deformation and intra-ventricular flow dynamics are enforced by an outer surface pressure distribution. The pure geometrical representation of KaHMo MRT can now be complemented by constitutive properties, pressure forces, and interaction effects using KaHMo FSI's partitioned code-coupling approach. For the first time, fluid domain deformation and intra-ventricular flow of KaHMo FSI has been compared with experimental data. With a good overall agreement, the proof of KaHMo's validity represents an important step from feasibility study toward patient-specific analysis.

  3. Alterations in streaming potential in presence of time periodic pressure-driven flow of a power law fluid in narrow confinements with nonelectrostatic ion-ion interactions.

    PubMed

    Dhar, Jayabrata; Ghosh, Uddipta; Chakraborty, Suman

    2014-03-01

    We study the coupled effect of electrokinetic phenomena and fluid rheology in altering the induced streaming potential in narrow fluidic confinements, which is manifested by establishing a time periodic pressure-driven flow in presence of electrical double layer phenomenon. However, in sharp contrast with reported literature, we take into account nonelectrostatic ion-ion interactions toward estimating the same in addition to electrostatic interactions and steric effects. We employ power law based rheological model for estimating the induced streaming potential. We bring out an intricate interaction between nonelectrostatic interactions and fluid rheology on the concerned electrokinetic phenomena, bearing immense consequences toward designing of integrated lab-on-a-chip-based microdevices and nanodevices.

  4. Pressure-driven one-step solid phase-based on-chip sample preparation on a microfabricated plastic device and integration with flow-through polymerase chain reaction (PCR).

    PubMed

    Tran, Hong Hanh; Trinh, Kieu The Loan; Lee, Nae Yoon

    2013-10-01

    In this study, we fabricate a monolithic poly(methylmethacrylate) (PMMA) microdevice on which solid phase-based DNA preparation and flow-through polymerase chain reaction (PCR) units were functionally integrated for one-step sample preparation and amplification operated by pressure. Chelex resin, which is used as a solid support for DNA preparation, can capture denatured proteins but releases DNA, and the purified DNA can then be used as a template in a subsequent amplification process. Using the PMMA microdevices, DNA was successfully purified from both Escherichia coli and human hair sample, and the plasmid vector inserted in E. coli and the D1S80 locus in human genomic DNA were successfully amplified from on-chip purified E. coli and human hair samples. Furthermore, the integration potential of the proposed sample preparation and flow-through PCR units was successfully demonstrate on a monolithic PMMA microdevice with a seamless flow, which could pave the way for a pressure-driven, simple one-step sample preparation and amplification with greatly decreased manufacture cost and enhanced device disposability.

  5. Flow Meter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1990-01-01

    Hedland Flow Meters manufactures a complete line of flow meters used in industrial operations to monitor the flow of oil, water or other liquids, air and other compressed gases, including caustics or corrosive liquids/gases. The company produces more than 1,000 types of flow meters featuring rugged construction, simplicity of installation and the ability to operate in any position.

  6. Oscillatory Magnetogasdynamic Slip Flow in a Microchannel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agarwal, Ramesh

    2009-11-01

    The problem of pressure driven Magnetogasdynamic (MGD) slip flow with small rarefaction through a long micro-channel is considered. The flow is driven by steady or oscillatory pressure gradient. The study of MGD flows in microchannels is of great interest since they occur in magnetic thin films and other electromagnetic micro-scale devices. In obtaining the micro-fluidic solutions in the presence of a magnetic field, some additional physical, mathematical and numerical issues need to be considered. These issues deal with the scaling laws for micro-scale MHD flows and the relevant parameters such as Mach number, Reynolds number, Hartmann number, magnetic Reynolds number, and Knudsen number. For planar constant area micro-channel, it is possible to obtain the analytical solutions for both steady and oscillatory pressure driven flows. As physically expected, the higher value of the magnetic field (higher Hartmann number) flattens the velocity profile in the channel.

  7. Flow Calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    Flow Technology Inc. worked with Lewis Research Center to develop a system for monitoring two different propellants being supplied to a spacecraft rocket thruster. They then commercialized the technology in the Microtrack, an extremely precise low-flow calibration system. Moog Inc., one of the device's primary users, measures the flow rate or the speed at which hydraulic oil flows through pin sized holes in disc shaped sapphires with the Microtrack. Using this data, two orifices with exactly the same flow rate can be matched as a pair and used as masters in servovalve production. The microtrack can also be used to calibrate other equipment.

  8. A microfluidic device for performing pressure-driven separations.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Debashis; Ramsey, J Michael

    2011-09-21

    Microchannels in microfluidic devices are frequently chemically modified to introduce specific functional elements or operational modalities. In this work, we describe a miniaturized hydraulic pump created by coating selective channels in a glass microfluidic manifold with a polyelectrolyte multilayer (PEM) that alters the surface charge of the substrate. Pressure-driven flow is generated due to a mismatch in the electroosmotic flow (EOF) rates induced upon the application of an electric field to a tee channel junction that has one arm coated with a positively charged PEM and the other arm left uncoated in its native state. In this design, the channels that generate the hydraulic pressure are interconnected via the third arm of the tee to a field-free analysis channel for performing pressure-driven separations. We have also shown that modifications in the cross-sectional area of the channels in the pumping unit can enhance the hydrodynamic flow through the separation section of the manifold. The integrated device has been demonstrated by separating Coumarin dyes in the field-free analysis channel using open-channel liquid chromatography under pressure-driven flow conditions. PMID:21789335

  9. Rock flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matveyev, S. N.

    1986-01-01

    Rock flows are defined as forms of spontaneous mass movements, commonly found in mountainous countries, which have been studied very little. The article considers formations known as rock rivers, rock flows, boulder flows, boulder stria, gravel flows, rock seas, and rubble seas. It describes their genesis as seen from their morphological characteristics and presents a classification of these forms. This classification is based on the difference in the genesis of the rubbly matter and characterizes these forms of mass movement according to their source, drainage, and deposit areas.

  10. Multiscale analysis of turbulent Couette-Poiseuille flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Tie

    2004-11-01

    It is well known that the turbulent Couette-Poiseuille flow has both shear driven and pressure driven mechanisms. The pure pressure driven Poiseuille flow and the pure shear driven Couette flow are just the two extremes of Couette-Poiseuille flow. Here the mean momentum balance equation of the fully developed turbulent Couette-Poiseuille flow is studied using a new multiscale analysis. The analysis reveals a close relation between the structure of Couette-Poiseuille flow and the hierarchy structures of boundary layer identified by Fife et al. (2004). The skin friction coefficient of Couette-Poiseuille flow is presented in a new way based on the analysis, showing the close relation between Poiseuille, Couette and Couette-Poiseuille flows. The maximum Reynolds shear stresses locations and values, the shape of the Reynolds shear stress, and the relation between the zero Reynolds shear stress location and the maximum velocity location are also presented.

  11. Turbulence modeling for separated flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durbin, Paul A.

    1994-01-01

    Two projects are described in this report. The first involves assessing turbulence models in separated flow. The second addresses the anomalous behavior of certain turbulence models in stagnation point flow. The primary motivation for developing turbulent transport models is to provide tools for computing non-equilibrium, or complex, turbulent flows. Simple flows can be analyzed using data correlations or algebraic eddy viscosities, but in more complicated flows such as a massively separated boundary layer, a more elaborate level of modeling is required. It is widely believed that at least a two-equation transport model is required in such cases. The transport equations determine the evolution of suitable velocity and time-scales of the turbulence. The present study included assessment of second-moment closures in several separated flows, including sharp edge separation; smooth wall, pressure driven separation; and unsteady vortex shedding. Flows with mean swirl are of interest for their role in enhancing mixing both by turbulent and mean motion. The swirl can have a stabilizing effect on the turbulence. An axi-symmetric extension to the INS-2D computer program was written adding the capability of computing swirling flow. High swirl can produce vortex breakdown on the centerline of the jet and it occurs in various combustors.

  12. The effect of sheared toroidal rotation on pressure driven magnetic islands in toroidal plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hegna, C. C.

    2016-05-01

    The impact of sheared toroidal rotation on the evolution of pressure driven magnetic islands in tokamak plasmas is investigated using a resistive magnetohydrodynamics model augmented by a neoclassical Ohm's law. Particular attention is paid to the asymptotic matching data as the Mercier indices are altered in the presence of sheared flow. Analysis of the nonlinear island Grad-Shafranov equation shows that sheared flows tend to amplify the stabilizing pressure/curvature contribution to pressure driven islands in toroidal tokamaks relative to the island bootstrap current contribution. As such, sheared toroidal rotation tends to reduce saturated magnetic island widths.

  13. Optimal disturbances in shearing and swirling flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daly, Conor

    2011-11-01

    Over the past twenty years transient energy density growth of linearly stable disturbances has shown to be the likely instigator for transition to turbulence in parallel shear flows. In this vein, optimal linear perturbations are calculated for two flows which have a mixture of forces acting on the fluid body. These are; rotating plane Couette flow (RPCF), which combines pressure-driven shear and swirl, and cylindrical Couette-Poiseuille flow (CCPF), which combines pressure-driven and Couette shear. Contours are presented of the maximum achievable linear transient growth, G, over the full range of wavenumbers within the linearly stable parameter regimes. Reference is made to experimental works on each flow and we examine the role that optimal disturbances have in the different transition phenomena that are observed. It is found that the contours of G fall qualitatively alongside the points of transition in the two flows, in support of the notion that large linear transient growth can act a precursor to transition. Despite the combination of effects acting on each fluid, transition in both flows falls in the range 102 < G <10 2 . 5 suggesting that in both flows the same mechanism may be at work. This work is funded by EPSRC.

  14. Flow cytometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinkamp, John A.

    1984-09-01

    Flow cytometry instrumentation developed from early efforts to count cells and particles in liquid suspension as they passed through a sensing device. Since the mid-1960's sophisticated instruments have been designed for analyzing cells based on various cytological, biochemical, and functional properties. These instruments have revolutionized automated cell analysis methods in that measurements are made at high speed, multiparameter data is correlated on each cell, statistical precision is high, and cells are separated in high purity from heterogeneous mixtures for identification and functional analysis. Advanced instruments capable of measuring cell volume, surface area, multicolor fluorescence, fluorescence polarization, light scatter within various angular regions, and axial light loss (extinction) at different wavelengths are being used in biomedical research for analyzing and sorting normal and abnormal cell populations. This article reviews the development of flow cytometers, the conceptual basis of flow measurements, and discusses some of the numerous applications of the technology in biology and medicine.

  15. FLOW GATING

    DOEpatents

    Poppelbaum, W.J.

    1962-12-01

    BS>This invention is a fast gating system for eiectronic flipflop circuits. Diodes connect the output of one circuit to the input of another, and the voltage supply for the receiving flip-flop has two alternate levels. When the supply is at its upper level, no current can flow through the diodes, but when the supply is at its lower level, current can flow to set the receiving flip- flop to the same state as that of the circuit to which it is connected. (AEC)

  16. Pressure Calculations in Nanochannel Gas Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, J. H.; Frijns, A. J. H.; Nedea, S. V.; van Steenhoven, A. A.

    2012-05-01

    In this research, pressure driven flow within a nanochannel is studied for argon in rarefied gas states. A Molecular Dynamics simulation is used to resolve the density and stress variations. Normal stress calculations are based on Irving-Kirkwood method, which divides the stress tensor into its kinetic and virial parts. The kinetic component recovers pressure based on the ideal-gas law. The particle-particle virial increases with increased density. The kinetic part and the virial part of the pressure is studied from Kn = 0.1 to Kn = 0.5 at 300 K. This pressure calculation was also compared with a simulation for a static fluid. Pressure driven gas flow gives a different result compared to static situation, which has a uniform particle distribution across the system. For a flow situation, the virial part is no longer the same. This can also be predicted from the virial equation and by the fact that the compressible fluid flow causes a temperature and density difference along the flow direction. The relation between the virial and distribution of particles has been studied further to understand the nature of virial component along the flow direction in compressible flows.

  17. Flow cytometer

    DOEpatents

    Van den Engh, G.

    1995-11-07

    A Faraday cage is described which encloses the flow chamber of a cytometer. Ground planes associated with each field deflection plate inhibit electric fields from varying the charge on designated events/droplets and further concentrates. They also increase forces applied to a passing charged event for accurate focus while concomitantly inhibiting a potential shock hazard. 4 figs.

  18. Flow cytometer

    DOEpatents

    van den Engh, Ger

    1995-01-01

    A Faraday cage enclosing the flow chamber of a cytometer and ground planes associated with each field deflection plate in concert therewith inhibit electric fields from varying the charge on designated events/droplets and further concentrates and increases forces applied to a charged event passing therethrough for accurate focus thereof while concomitantly inhibiting a potential shock hazard.

  19. Lubrication Flows.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Papanastasiou, Tasos C.

    1989-01-01

    Discusses fluid mechanics for undergraduates including the differential Navier-Stokes equations, dimensional analysis and simplified dimensionless numbers, control volume principles, the Reynolds lubrication equation for confined and free surface flows, capillary pressure, and simplified perturbation techniques. Provides a vertical dip coating…

  20. Cosmic Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tully, Brent; Courtois, Helene; Freedman, Wendy; Jarrett, Tom; Madore, Barry; Persson, Eric; Seibert, Mark; Shaya, Ed

    2011-05-01

    It is astonishing that only 30% of the motion of our Galaxy is understood, a fact that highlights a fundamental deficiency in our understanding of the composition of the Universe. Spitzer Cosmic Flows is the photometric component of a program to map the peculiar motions and large-scale flows of galaxies out to 200 Mpc in order to constrain the distribution of mass. This task requires measuring the peculiar velocity of galaxies, a response to the distribution of both baryonic and dark matter, densely sampled over the full sky. With an independent distance measurement, an observed galaxy redshift can be separated into cosmic expansion and peculiar velocity components. Spitzer Cosmic Flows will use IRAC 3.6 micron imaging to obtain independent distances using the correlation between galaxy luminosity and rotation rate (the mid-IR Tully-Fisher relation). The rotational velocity data is being acquired through the Cosmic Flows Large Program on the NRAO Green Bank Telescope and a complementary program of southern targets with the Parkes Telescope. Spitzer Cosmic Flows consists of five distinct samples totaling 4642 galaxies. New observations are required for 3531 galaxies and archival data exists for 1111 galaxies. Each of the samples serves a distinct purpose and/or domain while overlapping to assure a connectivity over a wide range of distances. The photometry of galaxies directly drives the peculiar velocity accuracy of this program. Spitzer IRAC 3.6 micron imaging provides the ability of a single instrument to perform the required imaging over the full sky with exquisite quality. The mid-IR traces the dominant stellar population with negligible extinction. Most importantly, the backgrounds are low from space enabling surface photometry to be extended to many exponential scale-lengths, capturing essentially all the light from the target.

  1. Yield Hardening of Electrorheological Fluids in Channel Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helal, Ahmed; Qian, Bian; McKinley, Gareth H.; Hosoi, A. E.

    2016-06-01

    Electrorheological fluids offer potential for developing rapidly actuated hydraulic devices where shear forces or pressure-driven flow are present. In this study, the Bingham yield stress of electrorheological fluids with different particle volume fractions is investigated experimentally in wall-driven and pressure-driven flow modes using measurements in a parallel-plate rheometer and a microfluidic channel, respectively. A modified Krieger-Dougherty model can be used to describe the effects of the particle volume fraction on the yield stress and is in good agreement with the viscometric data. However, significant yield hardening in pressure-driven channel flow is observed and attributed to an increase and eventual saturation of the particle volume fraction in the channel. A phenomenological physical model linking the densification and consequent microstructure to the ratio of the particle aggregation time scale compared to the convective time scale is presented and used to predict the enhancement in yield stress in channel flow, enabling us to reconcile discrepancies in the literature between wall-driven and pressure-driven flows.

  2. Systolic flow

    SciTech Connect

    Tsay, J.C.; Yuan, S. )

    1990-03-01

    This paper presents a formal algebraic notation to express the global data interacting activities of a systolic array. The notation we use is the generating function. Using generating functions, we can describe the velocity and the moving path of a data stream at any time. Several generating functions can be grouped together to form a systolic flow which can aid the specification, design, and verification of a systolic array.

  3. Channel Flow of Wormlike Micellar Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cromer, Michael; Cook, Pam; McKinley, Gareth

    2009-11-01

    We examine the inhomogeneous response of the VCM model (Vasquez, Cook, McKinley 2006) in steady pressure-driven channel flow. The VCM model, a microstructural network model, was developed to describe concentrated solutions of wormlike micelles. The model comprises of a set of coupled partial differential equations, which incorporate breakage and reforming of two micellar species (a long species `A' and a shorter species `B') in addition to reptative and Rousian stress-relaxation mechanisms. We examine pressure-driven flow in microfluidic devices with rectangular cross-sections as well as with hyperbolic converging/diverging walls. The velocity profile predicted by the VCM model in Poiseuille flow deviates from the parabolic profile expected for a constant viscosity fluid and exhibits strong shear bands near channel walls. This shear-banding is analogous to that seen in circular Taylor-Couette flow and in good qualitative agreement with experimental observations in microfluidic channels. The hyperbolic planar contraction is of special interest due to the dominant contribution of extensional flow along the centerline and the proposed use of such flows as microfluidic extensional rheometers. The model predictions are compared with birefringence measurements of the evolution in the local microstructural orientation of CTAB and CPyCl-based micellar solutions.

  4. Electroosmotic Entry Flow with Joule Heating Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prabhakaran, Rama; Kale, Akshay; Xuan, Xiangchun

    Electrokinetic flow, which transports liquids by electroosmosis and samples by electrophoresis, is the transport method of choice in microfluidic chips over traditional pressure-driven flows. Studies on electrokinetic flows have so far been almost entirely limited to inside microchannels. Very little work has been done on the electroosmotic fluid entry from a reservoir to a microchannel, which is the origin of all fluid and sample motions in microchips. We demonstrate in this talk that strong vortices of opposite circulating directions can be generated in electroosmotic entry flows. We also develop a two-dimensional depth-averaged numerical model of the entire microchip to predict and understand the fluid temperature and flow fields at the reservoir-microchannel junction.

  5. Pressure-driven gas flow in heated, partially-saturated porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Dodge, F.T.; Green, R.T.

    1994-12-31

    Calculations have been made at the Center for Nuclear Waste Regulatory Analyses (CNWRA) to assess the importance of the various driving mechanisms of heat and mass transport at a high-level nuclear waste (HLW) repository located in the unsaturated zone. Scoping measurements of the relative importance of vapor movement by buoyancy forces and by advective forces have been made for a proposed laboratory-scale experiment to be conducted at CNWRA and for a proposed field-scale heater experiment by U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) at Fran Ridge. These scoping measurements are made using a set of dimensionless terms assembled for this analysis. Numerical simulations of the same laboratory- and field-scale experiments are made using VTOUGH. These calculations will be used to predict (and design in the case of the laboratory-scale experiment) the redistribution of moisture in response to the imposition of heat on the two experiments.

  6. Lava Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Context image for PIA03658 Lava Flows

    These relatively young lava flows are part of Arsia Mons.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -22.5N, Longitude 242.3E. 17 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  7. Apparent Viscosity of Active Nematics in Poiseuille Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Zhenlu; Su, Jianbing; Zeng, Xiaoming

    2015-09-01

    A Leslie-Erickson continuum hydrodynamic for flowing active nematics has been used to characterize active particle systems such as bacterial suspensions. The behavior of such a system under a plane pressure-driven Poiseuille flow is analyzed. When plate anchoring is tangential and normal, we find the apparent viscosity formula indicating a significant difference between tangential anchoring and normal anchoring conditions for both active rodlike and discoid nematics.

  8. Unsteady flow motions in the supraglottal region during phonation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Haoxiang; Dai, Hu

    2008-11-01

    The highly unsteady flow motions in the larynx are not only responsible for producing the fundamental frequency tone in phonation, but also have a significant contribution to the broadband noise in the human voice. In this work, the laryngeal flow is modeled either as an incompressible pulsatile jet confined in a two-dimensional channel, or a pressure-driven flow modulated by a pair of viscoelastic vocal folds through the flow--structure interaction. The flow in the supraglottal region is found to be dominated by large-scale vortices whose unsteady motions significantly deflect the glottal jet. In the flow--structure interaction, a hybrid model based on the immersed-boundary method is developed to simulate the flow-induced vocal fold vibration, which involves a three-dimensional vocal fold prototype and a two-dimensional viscous flow. Both the flow behavior and the vibratory characteristics of the vocal folds will be presented.

  9. Environment Flow Assessment with Flow Regime Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, J.; Ho, C. C.; Chang, L. C.

    2015-12-01

    To avoid worsen river and estuarine ecosystems cause by overusing water resources, environmental flows conservation is applied to reduce the impact of river environment. Environmental flows refer to water provided within a river, wetland or coastal zone to sustain ecosystems and benefits to human wellbeing. Environment flow assessment is now widely accepted that a naturally variable flow regime, rather than just a minimum low flow. In this study, we propose four methods, experience method, Tenant method, hydraulic method and habitat method to assess the environmental flow of base flow, flush flow and overbank flow with different discharge, frequency and occurrence period. Dahan River has been chosen as a case to demonstrate the assessment mechanism. The alternatives impact analysis of environment and human water used provides a reference for stakeholders when holding an environmental flow consultative meeting.

  10. Flow distances on open flow networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Liangzhu; Lou, Xiaodan; Shi, Peiteng; Wang, Jun; Huang, Xiaohan; Zhang, Jiang

    2015-11-01

    An open flow network is a weighted directed graph with a source and a sink, depicting flux distributions on networks in the steady state mode of an open flow system. Energetic food webs, economic input-output networks, and international trade networks are open flow network models of energy flows between species, money or value flows between industrial sectors, and goods flows between countries, respectively. An open flow network is different from a closed flow network because it considers the flows from or to the environment (the source and the sink). For instance, in energetic food webs, species obtain energy not only from other species but also from the environment (sunlight), and species also dissipate energy to the environment. Flow distances between any two nodes i and j are defined as the average number of transition steps of a random walker along the network from i to j. The conventional method for the calculation of the random walk distance on closed flow networks cannot be applied to open flow networks. Therefore, we derive novel explicit expressions for flow distances of open flow networks according to their underlying Markov matrix of the network in this paper. We apply flow distances to two types of empirical open flow networks, including energetic food webs and economic input-output networks. In energetic food webs, we visualize the trophic level of each species and compare flow distances with other distance metrics on the graph. In economic input-output networks, we rank sectors according to their average flow distances and cluster sectors into different industrial groups with strong connections. Other potential applications and mathematical properties are also discussed. To summarize, flow distance is a useful and powerful tool to study open flow systems.

  11. Variable orifice flow regulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christianson, Rollin C. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A flow regulator for high-pressure fluids at elevated temperatures includes a body having a flow passage extending between inlet and outlet openings. First and second orifice members are arranged in the flow passage so at least one of the orifice members can be moved transversely in relation to the flow passage between one operating position where the two orifice openings are aligned for establishing a maximum flow rate of fluids flowing through the flow passage and at least one other operating position in which the two openings are moderately misaligned with one another for establishing a predetermined reduced flow rate of fluids flowing through the flow passage.

  12. Flow direction determination of lava flows.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, E. I.; Rhodes, R. C.

    1972-01-01

    The flow direction technique, previously applied to ash-flow sheets, can be used to determine direction of movement and locate eruptive centers for lava flows. The method provides statistically stronger and more consistent flow direction data for lava than ash-flow tuff. The accuracy and reliability of the technique was established on the porphyritic basaltic andesite of Mount Taylor, New Mexico, which erupted from a known center, the Mount Taylor Amphitheater. The technique was then applied to volcanic units with unknown sources: the John Kerr Peak Quartz Latite and mid-Tertiary andesite flows in the Mogollon Mountains, both in southwestern New Mexico. The flow direction technique indicated flow patterns and suggested source areas for each rock unit. In the Mogollon Mountains flow direction measurements were supported by independent directional criteria such as dips of cross beds, stratigraphic thickening, facies changes, and megascopic textures.-

  13. Plasma flow structures as analytical solution of a magneto-hydro-dynamic model with pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paccagnella, R.

    2012-03-01

    In this work starting from a set of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equations that describe the dynamical evolution for the pressure driven resistive/interchange modes in a magnetic confinement system, global solutions for the plasma flow relevant for toroidal pinches like tokamaks and reversed field pinches (RFPs) are derived. Analytical solutions for the flow stream function associated with the dominant modes are presented.

  14. Low volume flow meter

    DOEpatents

    Meixler, Lewis D.

    1993-01-01

    The low flow monitor provides a means for determining if a fluid flow meets a minimum threshold level of flow. The low flow monitor operates with a minimum of intrusion by the flow detection device into the flow. The electrical portion of the monitor is externally located with respect to the fluid stream which allows for repairs to the monitor without disrupting the flow. The electronics provide for the adjustment of the threshold level to meet the required conditions. The apparatus can be modified to provide an upper limit to the flow monitor by providing for a parallel electronic circuit which provides for a bracketing of the desired flow rate.

  15. Resistive interchange modes and plasma flow structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paccagnella, Roberto

    2011-10-01

    Interchange modes are ubiquitous in magnetic confinement systems and are likely to determine or influence their transport properties. For example a good agreement between theory predictions for linear interchange modes and experimental results has been found recently in a Reverse Field Pinch device. In this work a set of magneto-hydro-dynamic (MHD) equations that describe the dynamical evolution for the pressure driven interchange modes in a magnetic confinement system are studied. Global and local solutions relevant for tokamaks and Reversed Field Pinches (RFPs) configurations are considered. The emphasis is especially in the characterization of the plasma flow structures associated with the dominant modes.

  16. Laminar Flow Aircraft Certification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Louis J. (Compiler)

    1986-01-01

    Various topics telative to laminar flow aircraft certification are discussed. Boundary layer stability, flaps for laminar flow airfoils, computational wing design studies, manufacturing requirements, windtunnel tests, and flow visualization are among the topics covered.

  17. Multiphase flow calculation software

    DOEpatents

    Fincke, James R.

    2003-04-15

    Multiphase flow calculation software and computer-readable media carrying computer executable instructions for calculating liquid and gas phase mass flow rates of high void fraction multiphase flows. The multiphase flow calculation software employs various given, or experimentally determined, parameters in conjunction with a plurality of pressure differentials of a multiphase flow, preferably supplied by a differential pressure flowmeter or the like, to determine liquid and gas phase mass flow rates of the high void fraction multiphase flows. Embodiments of the multiphase flow calculation software are suitable for use in a variety of applications, including real-time management and control of an object system.

  18. Relaminarization of fluid flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Narasimha, R.; Sreenivasan, K. R.

    1979-01-01

    The mechanisms of the relaminarization of turbulent flows are investigated with a view to establishing any general principles that might govern them. Three basic archetypes of reverting flows are considered: the dissipative type, the absorptive type, and the Richardson type exemplified by a turbulent boundary layer subjected to severe acceleration. A number of other different reverting flows are then considered in the light of the analysis of these archetypes, including radial Poiseuille flow, convex boundary layers, flows reverting by rotation, injection, and suction, as well as heated horizontal and vertical gas flows. Magnetohydrodynamic duct flows are also examined. Applications of flow reversion for turbulence control are discussed.

  19. Viscous analyses for flow through subsonic and supersonic intakes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Povinelli, Louis A.; Towne, Charles E.

    1986-01-01

    A parabolized Navier-Stokes code was used to analyze a number of diffusers typical of a modern inlet design. The effect of curvature of the diffuser centerline and transitioning cross sections was evaluated to determine the primary cause of the flow distortion in the duct. Results are presented for S-shaped intakes with circular and transitioning cross sections. Special emphasis is placed on verification of the analysis to accurately predict distorted flow fields resulting from pressure-driven secondary flows. The effect of vortex generators on reducing the distortion of intakes is presented. Comparisons of the experimental and analytical total pressure contours at the exit of the intake exhibit good agreement. In the case of supersonic inlets, computations of the inlet flow field reveal that large secondary flow regions may be generated just inside of the intake. These strong flows may lead to separated flow regions and cause pronounced distortions upstream of the compressor.

  20. Flow structure in continuous flow electrophoresis chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deiber, J. A.; Saville, D. A.

    1982-01-01

    There are at least two ways that hydrodynamic processes can limit continiuous flow electrophoresis. One arises from the sensitivity of the flow to small temerature gradients, especially at low flow rates and power levels. This sensitivity can be suppressed, at least in principle, by providing a carefully tailored, stabilizing temperature gradient in the cooling system that surrounds the flow channel. At higher power levels another limitation arises due to a restructuring of the main flow. This restructuring is caused by buoyancy, which is in turn affected by the electro-osmotic crossflow. Approximate solutions to appropriate partial differential equations have been computed by finite difference methods. One set of results is described here to illustrate the strong coupling between the structure of the main (axial) flow and the electro-osmotic flow.

  1. Portable peak flow meters.

    PubMed

    McNaughton, J P

    1997-02-01

    There are several portable peak flow meters available. These instruments vary in construction and performance. Guidelines are recommended for minimum performance and testing of portable peak flow meters, with the aim of establishing a procedure for standardizing all peak flow meters. Future studies to clarify the usefulness of mechanical test apparatus and clinical trials of peak flow meters are also recommended. PMID:9098706

  2. Freshwater Flow Charts - 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Kaiper, G V

    2003-11-21

    This report covers the following: (1) Explanation of Charts Showing Freshwater Flow in 1995; (2) Estimated U.S. Freshwater Flow in 1995 (chart); (3) Estimated California Freshwater Flow in 1995 (chart); (4) Estimated New Mexico Freshwater Flow in 1995 (chart); and (5) Web locations and credits.

  3. Brain-Flow Writing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Robert J.

    The brain-flow writing technique, which might also be called the "fast flow" technique, offers a particularly useful means of helping adults overcome writer's block. It also offers some bonuses in the form of enhanced creativity, improved thought-flow, and much faster writing output. There are six steps to brain-flow writing. In the first, or…

  4. Portable wastewater flow meter

    DOEpatents

    Hunter, Robert M.

    1999-02-02

    A portable wastewater flow meter particularly adapted for temporary use at a single location in measuring the rate of liquid flow in a circular entrance conduit of a sewer manhole both under free flow and submerged, open channel conditions and under fill pipe, surcharged conditions, comprising an apparatus having a cylindrical external surface and an inner surface that constricts the flow through the apparatus in such a manner that a relationship exists between (1) the difference between the static pressure head of liquid flowing through the entrance of the apparatus and the static pressure head of liquid flowing through the constriction, and (2) the rate of liquid flow through the apparatus.

  5. Portable wastewater flow meter

    DOEpatents

    Hunter, Robert M.

    1990-01-01

    A portable wastewater flow meter particularly adapted for temporary use at a single location in measuring the rate of liquid flow in a circular entrance conduit of a sewer manhole both under free flow and submerged, open channel conditions and under full pipe, surcharged conditions, comprising an apparatus having a cylindrical external surface and an inner surface that constricts the flow through the apparatus in such a manner that a relationship exists between (1) the difference between the static pressure head of liquid flowing through the entrance of the apparatus and the static pressure head of liquid flowing through the constriction, and (2) the rate of liquid flow through the apparatus.

  6. Intelligent Flow Control Valve

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelley, Anthony R (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    The present invention is an intelligent flow control valve which may be inserted into the flow coming out of a pipe and activated to provide a method to stop, measure, and meter flow coming from the open or possibly broken pipe. The intelligent flow control valve may be used to stop the flow while repairs are made. Once repairs have been made, the valve may be removed or used as a control valve to meter the amount of flow from inside the pipe. With the addition of instrumentation, the valve may also be used as a variable area flow meter and flow controller programmed based upon flowing conditions. With robotic additions, the valve may be configured to crawl into a desired pipe location, anchor itself, and activate flow control or metering remotely.

  7. Flow visualization around axial flow fan blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawaguchi, K.; Matsui, K.

    1986-02-01

    The flow around the blades of an axial flow fan was visualized by using a drum camera. The distribution of the flow velocity about the blades was determined by combining the spark tracing method with the smoke wire method, making it possible to determine the blade element efficiency. The efficiencies and noise levels of radiator cooling fans can be determined using this technique. The method was applied to two types of fans with different performances, and the flow around the wing was correlated with the wing tip efficiency. The effect of tip vortex on the total fan noise was quantified.

  8. Submicron flow of polymer solutions: slippage reduction due to confinement.

    PubMed

    Cuenca, Amandine; Bodiguel, Hugues

    2013-03-01

    Pressure-driven flows of high molecular weight polyacrylamide solutions are examined in nanoslits using fluorescence photobleaching. The effective viscosity of polymer solutions decreases when the channel height decreases below the micron scale. In addition, the apparent slippage of the solutions is characterized macroscopically on similar surfaces. Though slippage can explain qualitatively the effective viscosity reduction, a quantitative comparison shows that the slip length is greatly reduced below the micron scale. This result indicates that chain migration is suppressed in confined geometries.

  9. Flow through rotating rectangular ducts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nandakumar, K.; Raszillier, H.; Durst, F.

    1991-05-01

    The bifurcation structure of two-dimensional, pressure-driven flows through a rectangular duct that is rotating about an axis perpendicular to its own is examined at a fixed Ekman number (Ek=ν/b2Ω) of 0.01. The solution structure for flow through a square duct (aspect ratio γ=1) is determined for Rossby numbers (Ro=U/bΩ) in the range of 0-5 using a computational scheme based on the arclength continuation method. The structure is much more complicated than reported earlier by Kheshgi and Scriven [Phys. Fluids 28, 2968 (1985)]. The primary branch with two limit points in Rossby number and a hysteresis behavior between the two- and four-cell flow structure that was computed by Kheshgi and Scriven is confirmed. An additional symmetric solution branch, which is disconnected from the primary branch (or rather connected via an asymmetric solution branch), is found. This has a two-cell flow structure at one end, a four-cell flow structure at the other and three limit points are located on the path. Two asymmetric solution branches emanating from symmetry breaking bifurcation points are also found for a square duct. Thus even within a Rossby number range of 0-5 a much richer solutions structure is found with up to five solutions at Ro=5. An eigenvalue calculation indicates that all two-dimensional solutions develop some form of unstable mode by the time Ro is increased to 5.0. In particular, the four-cell solution becomes unstable to asymmetric perturbations as found in a related problem of flow through a curved duct. The paths of the singular points are tracked with respect to variation in the aspect ratio using the fold following algorithm. A transcritical point is found at an aspect ratio of 0.815 and below which the four-cell solution is no longer on the primary branch. When the channel cross section is tilted even slightly (1°) with respect to the axis of rotation, the bifurcation points unfold and the two-cell solution evolves smoothly as Rossby number is

  10. Mass Transfers for Pressure and Boundary Driven Periodic Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Aaron M.; Narayanan, R.

    1997-11-01

    Enhancing the mass transfer of species from one reservoir to another can be achieved by imposing a periodic flow to the system. Periodic flow is obtained using two different mechanisms: an oscillating pressure drop or oscillating the boundary of the system to produce either a periodic Poiseuille or Couette flow, respectively. A simple calculation of an oscillating flat plate in a semi-infinite fluid reveals the process to be dependent on the viscous and mass transfer boundary layers. For gases, the mass transfer of the lighter species is greater than the heavier species, whereas for liquids, the mass transfer of the lighter species is less than the heavier species. In modeling a finite system of parallel plates with either an imposed periodic pressure drop from a piston or oscillating the plates at the same frequency, it is calculated that the mass transfer of the pressure driven system is higher than that for the boundary driven system for all scaled frequencies. However, more power is required to drive the pressure driven system than the boundary driven system, and we find that the mass transfer per power of the pressure driven and boundary driven system are equal to one another.

  11. Weak measure expansive flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Keonhee; Oh, Jumi

    2016-01-01

    A notion of measure expansivity for flows was introduced by Carrasco-Olivera and Morales in [3] as a generalization of expansivity, and they proved that there were no measure expansive flows on closed surfaces. In this paper we introduce a concept of weak measure expansivity for flows which is really weaker than that of measure expansivity, and show that there is a weak measure expansive flow on a closed surface. Moreover we show that any C1 stably weak measure expansive flow on a C∞ closed manifold M is Ω-stable, and any C1 stably measure expansive flow on M satisfies both Axiom A and the quasi-transversality condition.

  12. Air flow visualization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    Smoke Flow Visualization shows the flow of air around a model airfoil at 100 feet per second. Photograph and caption published in Winds of Change, 75th Anniversary NASA publication (page xi), by James Schultz.

  13. Electroanalytical flow measurements.

    PubMed

    Trojanowicz, Marek

    2005-06-01

    A review based on 94 cited original papers describes recent achievements in application of different electrochemical detection in flow analysis, injection techniques of flow analysis, liquid chromatography and capillary electrophoresis.

  14. Flow over glycocalyx covered endothelial cells.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waters, Sarah L.; Liu, Shu Q.; Grotberg, James B.

    1997-11-01

    Blood vessels are lined with a monolayer of endothelial cells that interact with the blood flow. Two structural features of the endothelial membrane may influence the fluid dynamics over the endothelium: 1) the endothelial membrane bumpiness; and 2) the porous glycocalyx layer covering the cell surface. The bumpiness of the endothelium may induce regions of recirculation, and the glycocalyx may effect the flow pattern at the cell surface. An analytical study is presented for pressure driven blood flow in the microcirculation. The vessel is modeled as a rigid, impermeable, symmetric two--dimensional channel, which has sinusoidally wavy walls. The vessel has two regions: 1) the glycocalyx layer which is modeled as a uniformly thick poroelastic deformable wall layer using biphasic mixture theory; and 2) the free lumen where the Navier--Stokes equations of motion apply. Analytical results are obtained by making the long wavelength approximation. The model predicts the fluid flow and hence the shear stress exerted by the flow on the individual endothelial cells and at the glycocalyx--lumen interface. Implications of the results for biological events such as molecular transport and signal transduction are considered.

  15. Ultrasonic flow metering system

    DOEpatents

    Gomm, Tyler J.; Kraft, Nancy C.; Mauseth, Jason A.; Phelps, Larry D.; Taylor, Steven C.

    2002-01-01

    A system for determining the density, flow velocity, and mass flow of a fluid comprising at least one sing-around circuit that determines the velocity of a signal in the fluid and that is correlatable to a database for the fluid. A system for determining flow velocity uses two of the inventive circuits with directional transmitters and receivers, one of which is set at an angle to the direction of flow that is different from the others.

  16. Integer Equal Flows

    SciTech Connect

    Meyers, C A; Schulz, A S

    2009-01-07

    The integer equal flow problem is an NP-hard network flow problem, in which all arcs in given sets R{sub 1}, ..., R{sub {ell}} must carry equal flow. We show this problem is effectively inapproximable, even if the cardinality of each set R{sub k} is two. When {ell} is fixed, it is solvable in polynomial time.

  17. Elbow mass flow meter

    DOEpatents

    McFarland, Andrew R.; Rodgers, John C.; Ortiz, Carlos A.; Nelson, David C.

    1994-01-01

    Elbow mass flow meter. The present invention includes a combination of an elbow pressure drop generator and a shunt-type mass flow sensor for providing an output which gives the mass flow rate of a gas that is nearly independent of the density of the gas. For air, the output is also approximately independent of humidity.

  18. Blood Flow in Arteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ku, David N.

    Blood flow in arteries is dominated by unsteady flow phenomena. The cardiovascular system is an internal flow loop with multiple branches in which a complex liquid circulates. A nondimensional frequency parameter, the Womersley number, governs the relationship between the unsteady and viscous forces. Normal arterial flow is laminar with secondary flows generated at curves and branches. The arteries are living organs that can adapt to and change with the varying hemodynamic conditions. In certain circumstances, unusual hemodynamic conditions create an abnormal biological response. Velocity profile skewing can create pockets in which the direction of the wall shear stress oscillates. Atherosclerotic disease tends to be localized in these sites and results in a narrowing of the artery lumena stenosis. The stenosis can cause turbulence and reduce flow by means of viscous head losses and flow choking. Very high shear stresses near the throat of the stenosis can activate platelets and thereby induce thrombosis, which can totally block blood flow to the heart or brain. Detection and quantification of stenosis serve as the basis for surgical intervention. In the future, the study of arterial blood flow will lead to the prediction of individual hemodynamic flows in any patient, the development of diagnostic tools to quantify disease, and the design of devices that mimic or alter blood flow. This field is rich with challenging problems in fluid mechanics involving three-dimensional, pulsatile flows at the edge of turbulence.

  19. Microfluidic flow counterbalanced capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Xia, Ling; Dutta, Debashis

    2013-04-01

    Flow counterbalanced capillary electrophoresis (FCCE) offers a powerful approach to realizing difficult charge based separations in compact microchip devices with application of relatively small electrical voltages. The need for dynamically controlling the pressure-gradient in the FCCE column however presents a significant challenge in implementing this technique on the microchip platform. In this article, we report the use of a simple on-chip pumping unit that allows precise introduction of a periodic pressure-driven backflow into a microfluidic separation channel enabling an FCCE analysis. The backflow in our device was produced by fabricating a shallow segment (0.5 μm deep) downstream of the analysis column (5 μm deep) and applying an electric field across it. A mismatch in the electroosmotic transport rate at the interface of this segment was shown to yield a pressure-gradient that could reverse the flow of the analyte bands without inverting the direction of the electric field. Although such a pressure-gradient also led to additional band broadening in the system, overall, the separation resolution of our device was observed to improve with an increasing number of back-and-forth sample passes through the analysis channel. For our current design, the corresponding improvement in the effective separation length was as much as 52% of the actual distance travelled by the chosen FITC-labeled amino acid samples. The reported device is well suited for further miniaturization of the FCCE method to the nanofluidic length scale which likely would improve its performance, and is easily integrable to other analytical procedures on the microchip platform for lab-on-a-chip applications. PMID:23420375

  20. Computation of viscous flow in curved ducts and comparison with experimental data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Towne, C. E.

    1983-01-01

    A three dimensional analysis for fully viscous subsonic internal flow is evaluated. The analysis, designated PEPSIG, solves an approximate form of the Navier-Stokes equations by an implicit spatial marching procedure. Results of calculations are presented for laminar flow through two different circular cross-sectioned 180 degree bends, and for laminar and turbulent flow through circular and square cross-sectioned 22.5 to 22.5 degree S-ducts. Quantitative comparisons with experimental data are shown for all cases. Special emphasis is placed on verifying the ability of the analysis to accurately predict the distorted flow fields resulting from pressure-driven secondary flows.

  1. Weakly nonlinear simulation of planar stratified flows

    SciTech Connect

    King, Michael R.; McCready, Mark J.

    2000-01-01

    The interfacial behavior of two-fluid, planar flows is studied by numerical integration of weakly-nonlinear amplitude equations derived via eigenfunction expansion of the governing equations. This study extends the range of classic Stuart-Landau theories by the inclusion of a spectrum of modes allowing all possible quadratic and cubic interactions. Results are obtained for four cases where linear and Stuart-Landau theories do not give a complete description; gas-liquid and oil-water pressure driven flow, matched-density liquid-liquid Couette flow, and the region of gas-liquid flow near resonance that switches from supercritical to subcritical. It is found that integration of amplitude equations gives better qualitative and quantitative agreement with experiments than Stuart-Landau theory. Further, the distinctively different behaviors of these systems can be understood in terms of the spectrum of nonlinear coefficients. In gas-liquid channel flow a low wave number wave is destabilized through quadratic interaction with the mean flow mode. For liquid-liquid Poiseuille flow, a low wave number wave is destabilized through cubic interactions with higher modes. For depth and viscosity ratios where liquid-liquid Couette flow is unstable to long waves and for which the growth rates are not too large, simulation results predict that the waves grow to a statistically steady state where there is no preferred wave number. Stabilization is provided by an apparently self-similar cascade of energy to higher modes that are linearly stable, explaining why no visible waves occur in experiments done in this region. While Stuart-Landau theory provides no prediction of wave amplitude above criticality for subcritical cases, simulations show that wave saturation at small amplitude is possible and suggests that subcritical predictions may not mean that steady waves do not exist. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics.

  2. Direct force wall shear measurements in pressure-driven three-dimensional turbulent boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcallister, J. E.; Tennant, M. H.; Pierce, F. J.

    1982-01-01

    Unique, simultaneous direct measurements of the magnitude and direction of the local wall shear stress in a pressure-driven three-dimensional turbulent boundary layer are presented. The flow is also described with an oil streak wall flow pattern, a map of the wall shear stress-wall pressure gradient orientations, a comparison of the wall shear stress directions relative to the directions of the nearest wall velocity as measured with a typical, small boundary layer directionally sensitive claw probe, as well as limiting wall streamline directions from the oil streak patterns, and a comparison of the freestream streamlines and the wall flow streamlines. A review of corrections for direct force sensing shear meters for two-dimensional flows is presented with a brief discussion of their applicability to three-dimensional devices.

  3. Lateral flow strip assay

    DOEpatents

    Miles, Robin R.; Benett, William J.; Coleman, Matthew A.; Pearson, Francesca S.; Nasarabadi, Shanavaz L.

    2011-03-08

    A lateral flow strip assay apparatus comprising a housing; a lateral flow strip in the housing, the lateral flow strip having a receiving portion; a sample collection unit; and a reagent reservoir. Saliva and/or buccal cells are collected from an individual using the sample collection unit. The sample collection unit is immersed in the reagent reservoir. The tip of the lateral flow strip is immersed in the reservoir and the reagent/sample mixture wicks up into the lateral flow strip to perform the assay.

  4. Fundamentals of flow measurement

    SciTech Connect

    De Carlo, J.P.

    1984-01-01

    This book provides an understanding of flow measurement methods. Twelve separate units are designed to introduce the two basic approaches to flow measurement. ''Energy Extractive'' and ''Energy Additive,'' the general classes and types of flowmeters, the terminology associated with flow measurement, special techniques, mass flow measurement and the methodology for flowmeter selection. It explains the basic approaches to flow measurement and the different classes of flowmeters; flowmeter terminology; the basic theory of operation of different flowmeters; choosing the correct approach, class type, and particular device to satisfy the specified requirement; and sizing a flowmeter to satisfy the requirements of an installation.

  5. Estimating hyperconcentrated flow discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balcerak, Ernie

    2012-02-01

    Determining flow discharge in torrential mountain floods can help in managing flood risk. However, standard methods of estimating discharge have significant uncertainties. To reduce these uncertainties, Bodoque et al. developed an iterative methodological approach to flow estimation based on a method known as the critical depth method along with paleoflood evidence. They applied the method to study a flash flood that occurred on 17 December 1997 in the Arroyo Cabrera catchment in central Spain. This large flow event, triggered by torrential rains, was complex and included hyperconcentrated flows, which are flows of water mixed with significant amounts of sediment.

  6. Highly sensitive contactless conductivity microchips based on concentric electrodes for flow analysis.

    PubMed

    Lima, Renato S; Piazzetta, Maria H O; Gobbi, Angelo L; Segato, Thiago P; Cabral, Murilo F; Machado, Sergio A S; Carrilho, Emanuel

    2013-12-18

    In this communication, we describe for the first time the integration of concentric electrodes (wrapping around the microchannel) in microchips. The use of such electrodes has been shown to be effective towards improvement of the sensitivity and detectability in pressure-driven flow platforms incorporating C(4)D.

  7. Low flow fume hood

    DOEpatents

    Bell, Geoffrey C.; Feustel, Helmut E.; Dickerhoff, Darryl J.

    2002-01-01

    A fume hood is provided having an adequate level of safety while reducing the amount of air exhausted from the hood. A displacement flow fume hood works on the principal of a displacement flow which displaces the volume currently present in the hood using a push-pull system. The displacement flow includes a plurality of air supplies which provide fresh air, preferably having laminar flow, to the fume hood. The displacement flow fume hood also includes an air exhaust which pulls air from the work chamber in a minimally turbulent manner. As the displacement flow produces a substantially consistent and minimally turbulent flow in the hood, inconsistent flow patterns associated with contaminant escape from the hood are minimized. The displacement flow fume hood largely reduces the need to exhaust large amounts of air from the hood. It has been shown that exhaust air flow reductions of up to 70% are possible without a decrease in the hood's containment performance. The fume hood also includes a number of structural adaptations which facilitate consistent and minimally turbulent flow within a fume hood.

  8. Flow separation detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mateer, G. C.; Brosh, A. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    An arrangement for sensing the fluid separation along a surface which employs a thermally insulating element having a continuous surface blending into and forming a part of the fluid flow surface is described. A sudden decrease in the temperature of the downstream sensor conductor and concomitant increase in the temperature of the upstream sensor conductor is an indication of the separation. When the temperatures are returned to the state achieved during normal flow, the indicator thereby indicates the normal, attached fluid flow. The conductors may be, for example, wires or thin films, and should be within the viscous sub-layer of the expected fluid flow. A single heater and several pairs of sensors and corresponding sensor conductors may be used to detect not only the fluid flow and the separation, but the direction of the fluid flow, over the fluid flow surface.

  9. Pressure-driven brine migration in a salt repository

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, Y.; Chambre, P.L.; Pigford, T.H.; Lee, W.W.L.

    1989-01-01

    The traditional view is that salt is the ideal rock for isolation of nuclear waste because it is ''dry'' and probably ''impermeable.'' The existence of salt through geologic time is prima facie evidence of such properties. Experiments and experience at potential salt sites for geologic repositories have indicated that while porosity and permeability of salt are low, the salt may be saturated with brine. If this hypothesis is correct, then it is possible to have brine flow due to pressure differences within the salt. If there is pressure-driven brine migration in salt repositories then it is paramount to know the magnitude of such flow because inward brine flow would affect the corrosion rate of nuclear waste containers and outward brine flow might affect radionuclide transport rates. Brine exists in natural salt as inclusions in salt crystals and in grain boundaries. Brine inclusions in crystals move to nearby grain boundaries when subjected to a temperature gradient, because of temperature-dependent solubility of salt. Brine in grain boundaries moves under the influence of a pressure gradient. When salt is mined to create a waste repository, brine from grain boundaries will migrate into the rooms, tunnels and boreholes because these cavities are at atmospheric pressure. After a heat-emitting waste package is emplaced and backfilled, the heat will impose a temperature gradient in the surrounding salt that will cause inclusions in the nearby salt to migrate to grain boundaries within a few years, adding to the brine that was already present in the grain boundaries. The formulation of brine movement with salt as a thermoelastic porous medium, in the context of the continuum theory of mixtures, has been described. In this report we show the mathematical details and discuss the results predicted by this analysis.

  10. 46 CFR 154.546 - Excess flow valve: Closing flow.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Excess flow valve: Closing flow. 154.546 Section 154.546... and Process Piping Systems § 154.546 Excess flow valve: Closing flow. (a) The rated closing flow of vapor or liquid cargo for an excess flow valve must be specially approved by the Commandant (CG-522)....

  11. 46 CFR 154.546 - Excess flow valve: Closing flow.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Excess flow valve: Closing flow. 154.546 Section 154.546... and Process Piping Systems § 154.546 Excess flow valve: Closing flow. (a) The rated closing flow of vapor or liquid cargo for an excess flow valve must be specially approved by the Commandant (CG-522)....

  12. 46 CFR 154.546 - Excess flow valve: Closing flow.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Excess flow valve: Closing flow. 154.546 Section 154.546... and Process Piping Systems § 154.546 Excess flow valve: Closing flow. (a) The rated closing flow of vapor or liquid cargo for an excess flow valve must be specially approved by the Commandant (CG-ENG)....

  13. 46 CFR 154.546 - Excess flow valve: Closing flow.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Excess flow valve: Closing flow. 154.546 Section 154.546... and Process Piping Systems § 154.546 Excess flow valve: Closing flow. (a) The rated closing flow of vapor or liquid cargo for an excess flow valve must be specially approved by the Commandant (CG-ENG)....

  14. Make peak flow a habit!

    MedlinePlus

    Asthma - make peak flow a habit; Reactive airway disease - peak flow; Bronchial asthma - peak flow ... your airways are narrowed and blocked due to asthma, your peak flow values drop. You can check ...

  15. Aerosound from corner flow and flap flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meecham, W. C.

    1982-01-01

    Noise generation at the edge of a wing flap is analyzed. The phenomenon as a single vortex moving around a corner in an incompressible, potential flow is modelled. Vortex image retarding effects are proposed as an explanation for small Strouhal numbers. The model surface pressures, sound pressures (using Curle's theory), and Mach number dependencies agree with wind tunnel experiments. A double pressure peak is found in the model (credited to image action) which is qualitatively similar to measured sound correlations. Incompressible flow aerosound calculations are discussed. The effects of a series of vortices moving in the same idealized potential flow are also studied. The vortices are assumed to be statistically independent so their intensities can be added. The frequency of appearance of the vortices are determined from measurements. Diffraction effects caused by the presence of the wing near the dipole sound radiators on the flap surfaces are included.

  16. New plane shear flows

    SciTech Connect

    Conley, A.

    1994-12-31

    A classical problem in fluid dynamics is the study of the stability of plane Couette flow. This flow experimentally sustains turbulence for Reynolds numbers greater than 1440 {+-} 40. (The Reynolds number is based on channel width and wall velocity difference). Since plane Couette flow is linearly stable for all Reynolds numbers, obtaining non-trivial mathematical solutions to the plane Couette flow equations is difficult. However, M. Nagata finds a non-trivial number solution of the plane Couette flow equations at low Reynolds number. We confirm these solutions. We compute the minimum Reynolds number at which they exist. We study their stability. We also study the effect of a Coriolis force on plane Poiseuille flow.

  17. Concentric Split Flow Filter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stapleton, Thomas J. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A concentric split flow filter may be configured to remove odor and/or bacteria from pumped air used to collect urine and fecal waste products. For instance, filter may be designed to effectively fill the volume that was previously considered wasted surrounding the transport tube of a waste management system. The concentric split flow filter may be configured to split the air flow, with substantially half of the air flow to be treated traveling through a first bed of filter media and substantially the other half of the air flow to be treated traveling through the second bed of filter media. This split flow design reduces the air velocity by 50%. In this way, the pressure drop of filter may be reduced by as much as a factor of 4 as compare to the conventional design.

  18. Two phase potential flow

    SciTech Connect

    Wallis, G.B.

    1991-06-01

    New results for the flow of a dispersion of particles in an inviscid irrotational flow are reported. Equations of motion for an isotropic assembly have been derived and applied to several example problems. Theorems have been derived relating the macroscopic (averaged) properties of flows composed of unit cells. The effective conductivity of a suspension has been obtained in new ways, using the method of images, and related to forces exerted by a fluid on particles when there is relative motion. 11 refs.

  19. Solids mass flow determination

    DOEpatents

    Macko, Joseph E.

    1981-01-01

    Method and apparatus for determining the mass flow rate of solids mixed with a transport fluid to form a flowing mixture. A temperature differential is established between the solids and fluid. The temperature of the transport fluid prior to mixing, the temperature of the solids prior to mixing, and the equilibrium temperature of the mixture are monitored and correlated in a heat balance with the heat capacities of the solids and fluid to determine the solids mass flow rate.

  20. Microparticle Flow Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, Dennis R.

    2005-01-01

    The microparticle flow sensor (MFS) is a system for identifying and counting microscopic particles entrained in a flowing liquid. The MFS includes a transparent, optoelectronically instrumented laminar-flow chamber (see figure) and a computer for processing instrument-readout data. The MFS could be used to count microparticles (including micro-organisms) in diverse applications -- for example, production of microcapsules, treatment of wastewater, pumping of industrial chemicals, and identification of ownership of liquid products.

  1. Polyoxometalate flow battery

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Travis M.; Pratt, Harry D.

    2016-03-15

    Flow batteries including an electrolyte of a polyoxometalate material are disclosed herein. In a general embodiment, the flow battery includes an electrochemical cell including an anode portion, a cathode portion and a separator disposed between the anode portion and the cathode portion. Each of the anode portion and the cathode portion comprises a polyoxometalate material. The flow battery further includes an anode electrode disposed in the anode portion and a cathode electrode disposed in the cathode portion.

  2. Dynamics of spheroid particles in channel flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Wenbin; Alexeev, Alexander

    2012-11-01

    The effect of inertia on the dynamics of rigid spheroid microparticles in a pressure-driven channel flow is studied using a hybrid lattice Boltzmann and lattice spring method. We find distinctive behaviors of particles depending on the particle shape, initial orientation, and ratio of particle size to the channel size. Two possible stable modes of motion are found for prolate spheroids. Particles either tumble in a shear plane or spin with the axis parallel to the vortex direction. We present a phase diagram showing the transition between these two modes. Cross-stream migration and equilibrium trajectories of particles are also investigated and found to depend on the particle shape and mode of motion. The simulations results are compared with experimental data showing favorable agreement. Our results will be useful for separating biological and synthetic particles by size and shape.

  3. Do Ions Flow Freely Through Confined DNA?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azad, Zubair; Riehn, Robert

    Double-stranded DNA in an aqueous solution is characterized by a strongly localized counter-ion cloud. Classical experiments have shown that the mobility of large DNA coils is independent of the number of basepairs, leading to an interpretation that the molecule can be understood as a collection of segments with constant mobility whose interactions are effectively screened from each other. This ``free-draining'' assumption posits that DNA and other electrolytes will not influence each other's mobility. In this talk, we call this assumption into question when the local concentration of DNA is increased beyond that of a self-avoiding random walk by nanoconfinement. We present translocation of DNA and fluorescent tracer ions under established chemical gradients, pressure-driven flow, and electrophoresis in nanochannels with cross sections that are 100 nm x 100 nm. We present evidence that interactions between the DNA and ionic tracers are a non-linear function of the applied fields.

  4. Numerical Simulation and Quantitative Uncertainty Assessment of Microchannel Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debusschere, Bert; Najm, Habib; Knio, Omar; Matta, Alain; Ghanem, Roger; Le Maitre, Olivier

    2002-11-01

    This study investigates the effect of uncertainty in physical model parameters on computed electrokinetic flow of proteins in a microchannel with a potassium phosphate buffer. The coupled momentum, species transport, and electrostatic field equations give a detailed representation of electroosmotic and pressure-driven flow, including sample dispersion mechanisms. The chemistry model accounts for pH-dependent protein labeling reactions as well as detailed buffer electrochemistry in a mixed finite-rate/equilibrium formulation. To quantify uncertainty, the governing equations are reformulated using a pseudo-spectral stochastic methodology, which uses polynomial chaos expansions to describe uncertain/stochastic model parameters, boundary conditions, and flow quantities. Integration of the resulting equations for the spectral mode strengths gives the evolution of all stochastic modes for all variables. Results show the spatiotemporal evolution of uncertainties in predicted quantities and highlight the dominant parameters contributing to these uncertainties during various flow phases. This work is supported by DARPA.

  5. Multiple sort flow cytometer

    DOEpatents

    Engh, G. van den; Esposito, R.J.

    1996-01-09

    A flow cytometer utilizes multiple lasers for excitation and respective fluorescence of identified dyes bonded to specific cells or events to identify and verify multiple events to be sorted from a sheath flow and droplet stream. Once identified, verified and timed in the sheath flow, each event is independently tagged upon separation from the flow by an electrical charge of +60, +120, or +180 volts and passed through oppositely charged deflection plates with ground planes to yield a focused six way deflection of at least six events in a narrow plane. 8 figs.

  6. Microtronic Flow Transducer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sundberg, Gale R.; Henderson, H. T.; Hsieh, M. Walter

    1989-01-01

    Novel microelectronic airflow and gas-flow transducer developed. Has no moving parts and constructed by use of variation on ordinary technology for processing of planar silicon microelectronics, where hundreds or thousands of identical devices concurrently produced on single chip as easily as can one. Gas-flow transducer based upon integrated Wheatstone bridge in silicon chip. Legs doped with gold and isolated thermally by etching away surrounding material (except corners). Because of small size, sensitivity, and good directional capability of new transducer, numerous potential applications in measurement of vortexes, flows in inlets to pipes, and other complicated flows.

  7. Excess flow shutoff valve

    DOEpatents

    Kiffer, Micah S.; Tentarelli, Stephen Clyde

    2016-02-09

    Excess flow shutoff valve comprising a valve body, a valve plug, a partition, and an activation component where the valve plug, the partition, and activation component are disposed within the valve body. A suitable flow restriction is provided to create a pressure difference between the upstream end of the valve plug and the downstream end of the valve plug when fluid flows through the valve body. The pressure difference exceeds a target pressure difference needed to activate the activation component when fluid flow through the valve body is higher than a desired rate, and thereby closes the valve.

  8. Multiple sort flow cytometer

    DOEpatents

    Van den Engh, Ger; Esposito, Richard J.

    1996-01-01

    A flow cytometer utilizes multiple lasers for excitation and respective fluorescence of identified dyes bonded to specific cells or events to identify and verify multiple events to be sorted from a sheath flow and droplet stream. Once identified, verified and timed in the sheath flow, each event is independently tagged upon separation from the flow by an electrical charge of +60, +120, or +180 volts and passed through oppositely charged deflection plates with ground planes to yield a focused six way deflection of at least six events in a narrow plane.

  9. Flow rate measuring devices for gas flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonfig, K. W.

    1985-07-01

    Flowrate measuring devices are described: volume meter with fixed or mobile walls; turbine meter; throttling procedure; ultrasonic and Doppler methods; vortex method; rotary flowmeter; and swinging body flow measuring procedure. Flowrate can also be measured from the force exerted on bodies immersed in a fluid or based on thermodynamical principles. The characteristics and operating envelope of each device/method are given.

  10. Analysis of Self-Terminated Pressure-Driven Quantum Point Contacts with Ultrafast Optical Pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soltani, Fatemeh; Wlasenko, Alex; Steeves, Geoff

    2009-05-01

    A self-terminated electrochemical method was used to fabricate atomic-scale contacts between two Au electrodes in a microfluidic channel. The conductance of the contacts varies in a stepwise fashion. The mechanism works by a pressure-driven flow parallel with a pair of Au electrodes with a 100 μm gap in an electrolyte of HCl. Without applied flow, dendrite growth and dense branching morphology were typically observed at the cathode. The addition of applied pressure-driven flow resulted in a densely packed gold structure that filled the channel. The electrochemical fabrication approach introduces large variance in the formation and location of individual junctions. Understanding and controlling this process will enable the precise positioning of reproducible geometries into nano-electronic devices. To investigate the high speed behaviour of a QPC, it can be integrated with a transmission line structure patterned on a photoconductive GaAs substrate. The nonlinear conductance of the QPC (due to the finite density of states of the conductors) can be examined and compared with recent theoretical studies. Samples are fabricated in situ using an electrochemical procedure to produce QPCs along the transmission line structure. This method may provide insight into Terahertz Optoelectronic devices and ultrafast communication systems.

  11. Near-wall similarity in a pressure-driven three-dimensional turbulent boundary layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierce, F. J.; Mcallister, J. E.

    1980-01-01

    Mean velocity, measured wall pressure and wall shear stress fields were made in a three dimensional pressure-driven turbulent boundary layer created by a cylinder with trailing edge placed normal to a flat plate floor. The direct force wall shear stress measurements were made with floating element direct force sensing shear meter that responded to both the magnitude and direction of the local wall shear stress. The ability of 10 near wall similarity models to describe the near wall velocity field for the measured flow under a wide range of skewing conditions and a variety of pressure gradient and wall shear vector orientations was used.

  12. Turbulence in Compressible Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Lecture notes for the AGARD Fluid Dynamics Panel (FDP) Special Course on 'Turbulence in Compressible Flows' have been assembled in this report. The following topics were covered: Compressible Turbulent Boundary Layers, Compressible Turbulent Free Shear Layers, Turbulent Combustion, DNS/LES and RANS Simulations of Compressible Turbulent Flows, and Case Studies of Applications of Turbulence Models in Aerospace.

  13. Flow compensating pressure regulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baehr, E. F. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    An apparatus for regulating pressure of treatment fluid during ophthalmic procedures is described. Flow sensing and pressure regulating diaphragms are used to modulate a flow control valve. The pressure regulating diaphragm is connected to the flow control valve to urge the valve to an open position due to pressure being applied to the diaphragm by bias means such as a spring. The flow sensing diaphragm is mechanically connected to the flow control valve and urges it to an opened position because of the differential pressure on the diaphragm generated by a flow of incoming treatment fluid through an orifice in the diaphragm. A bypass connection with a variable restriction is connected in parallel relationship to the orifice to provide for adjusting the sensitivity of the flow sensing diaphragm. A multiple lever linkage system is utilized between the center of the second diaphragm and the flow control valve to multiply the force applied to the valve by the other diaphragm and reverse the direction of the force.

  14. Field-Flow Fractionation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caldwell, Karin D.

    1988-01-01

    Describes a technique for separating samples that range over 15 orders of magnitude in molecular weight. Discusses theory, apparatus, and sample preparation techniques. Lists several types of field-flow fractionation (FFF) and their uses: sedimentation FFF, thermal FFF, flow FFF, electrical FFF, and steric FFF. (ML)

  15. Growing with the Flows

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Durkin, Dorothy

    2010-01-01

    People live and work in an era of transformation and uncertainty; they know that things are changing, but they are not sure where they are headed. One of the key forces of change is the enormous flow of information that individuals and institutions consume and produce. Awareness of knowledge flow is essential, but so is the sense that neither…

  16. Microelectromechanical flow control apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Okandan, Murat

    2009-06-02

    A microelectromechanical (MEM) flow control apparatus is disclosed which includes a fluid channel formed on a substrate from a first layer of a nonconducting material (e.g. silicon nitride). A first electrode is provided on the first layer of the nonconducting material outside the flow channel; and a second electrode is located on a second layer of the nonconducting material above the first layer. A voltage applied between the first and second electrodes deforms the fluid channel to increase its cross-sectional size and thereby increase a flow of a fluid through the channel. In certain embodiments of the present invention, the fluid flow can be decreased or stopped by applying a voltage between the first electrode and the substrate. A peristaltic pumping of the fluid through the channel is also possible when the voltage is applied in turn between a plurality of first electrodes and the substrate. A MEM flow control assembly can also be formed by providing one or more MEM flow control devices on a common substrate together with a submicron filter. The MEM flow control assembly can optionally include a plurality of pressure sensors for monitoring fluid pressure and determining flow rates through the assembly.

  17. Traffic Flow Estimates.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hart, Vincent G.

    1981-01-01

    Two examples are given of ways traffic engineers estimate traffic flow. The first, Floating Car Method, involves some basic ideas and the notion of relative velocity. The second, Maximum Traffic Flow, is viewed to involve simple applications of calculus. The material provides insight into specialized applications of mathematics. (MP)

  18. Flow cytometry of sperm

    SciTech Connect

    Gledhill, B.L.

    1987-09-21

    This brief paper summarizes automated flow cytometric determination of sperm morphology and flow cytometry/sorting of sperm with application to sex preselection. In the latter context, mention is made of results of karyotypic determination of sex chromosome ratios in albumin-processed human sperm. 23 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  19. AUTO-EXPANSIVE FLOW

    EPA Science Inventory

    Physics suggests that the interplay of momentum, continuity, and geometry in outward radial flow must produce density and concomitant pressure reductions. In other words, this flow is intrinsically auto-expansive. It has been proposed that this process is the key to understanding...

  20. Lava Flow Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, G. Jeffrey

    1996-01-01

    This grant originally had four major tasks, all of which were addressed to varying extents during the course of the research: (1) Measure the fractal dimensions of lava flows as a function of topography, substrate, and rheology; (2) The nature of lava tube systems and their relation to flow fields; (3) A quantitative assessment of lava flow dynamics in light of the fractal nature of lava flow margins; and (4) Development and application of a new remote sensing tool based on fractal properties. During the course of the research, the project expanded to include the following projects: (1) A comparison of what we can-learn from remote sensing studies of lava flow morphology and from studies of samples of lava flows; (2) Study of a terrestrial analog of the nakhlites, one of the groups of meteorites from Mars; and (3) Study of the textures of Hawaiian basalts as an aid in understanding the dynamics (flow rates, inflation rates, thermal history) of flow interiors. In addition, during the first year an educational task (development and writing of a teacher's guide and activity set to accompany the lunar sample disk when it is sent to schools) was included.

  1. Elbow mass flow meter

    DOEpatents

    McFarland, A.R.; Rodgers, J.C.; Ortiz, C.A.; Nelson, D.C.

    1994-08-16

    The present invention includes a combination of an elbow pressure drop generator and a shunt-type mass flow sensor for providing an output which gives the mass flow rate of a gas that is nearly independent of the density of the gas. For air, the output is also approximately independent of humidity. 3 figs.

  2. Hanford basalt flow mineralogy

    SciTech Connect

    Ames, L.L.

    1980-09-01

    Mineralogy of the core samples from five core wells was examined in some detail. The primary mineralogy study included an optical examination of polished mounts, photomicrographs, chemical analyses of feldspars, pyroxenes, metallic oxides and microcrystalline groundmasses and determination from the chemical analyses of the varieties of feldspars, pyroxenes and metallic oxides. From the primary mineralogy data, a firm understanding of the average Hanford basalt flow primary mineralogy emerged. The average primary feldspar was a laboradorite, the average pyroxene was an augite and the average metallic oxide was a solid solution of ilmenite and magnetite. Secondary mineralization consisted of vug filling and joint coating, chiefly with a nontronite-beidellite clay, several zeolites, quartz, calcite, and opal. Specific flow units also were examined to determine the possibility of using the mineralogy to trace flows between core wells. These included units of the Pomona, the Umatilla and a high chromium flow just below the Huntzinger. In the Umatilla, or high barium flow, the compositional variation of the feldspars was unique in range. The pyroxenes in the Pomona were relatively highly zoned and accumulated chromium. The high chromium flow contained chromium spinels that graded in chromium content into simple magnetites very low in chromium content. A study of the statistical relationships of flow unit chemical constituents showed that flow unit constituents could be roughly correlated between wells. The probable cause of the correlation was on-going physical-chemical changes in the source magma.

  3. Flows around bacterial swarms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dauparas, Justas; Lauga, Eric

    2015-11-01

    Flagellated bacteria on nutrient-rich substrates can differentiate into a swarming state and move in dense swarms across surfaces. A recent experiment (HC Berg, Harvard University) measured the flow in the fluid around the swarm. A systematic chiral flow was observed in the clockwise direction (when viewed from above) ahead of a E.coli swarm with flow speeds of about 10 μm/s, about 3 times greater than the radial velocity at the edge of the swarm. The working hypothesis is that this flow is due to the flagella of cells stalled at the edge of a colony which extend their flagellar filaments outwards, moving fluid over the virgin agar. In this talk we quantitatively test his hypothesis. We first build an analytical model of the flow induced by a single flagellum in a thin film and then use the model, and its extension to multiple flagella, to compare with experimental measurements.

  4. Vortex flow hysteresis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cunningham, A. M., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    An experimental study was conducted to quantify the hysteresis associated with various vortex flow transition points and to determine the effect of planform geometry. The transition points observed consisted of the appearance (or disappearance) of trailing edge vortex burst and the transition to (or from) flat plate or totally separated flows. Flow visualization with smoke injected into the vortices was used to identify the transitions on a series of semi-span models tested in a low speed tunnel. The planforms tested included simple deltas (55 deg to 80 deg sweep), cranked wings with varying tip panel sweep and dihedral, and a straked wing. High speed movies at 1000 frames per second were made of the vortex flow visualization in order to better understand the dynamics of vortex flow, burst and transition.

  5. Single Molecule Visualization of DNA in Pure Shear Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Connie; Duggal, Rajat; Pasquali, Matteo

    2003-03-01

    Polymers are ever-present in society from plastic bottles to DNA. The study of single molecule dynamics will provide the opportunity for advances in fields from synthetic polymer coatings to gene therapy. Many applications involve flow of dilute polymer solutions in viscous solvents. These long, flexible polymer chains (DNA) are coiled at rest in solution. The configuration of the molecules is altered by the applied flow which, in turn, affects the dynamics of the flow. Control of flow allows for manipulation of the DNA molecules. Our apparatus consists of a rectangular channel that has been plasma etched into a silicon wafer with pressure driven flow (pulse-free syringe pump). The dynamics of the DNA molecules in flow are monitored using fluorescence microscopy and digital imaging. The flow channel was designed to allow for visualization of the molecules in the plane defined by velocity and velocity gradient instead of the plane identified by the velocity and the vorticity (previously studied by Smith et al (1999) and LeDuc et al (1999)). Moreover, we can visualize the DNA in a flow where the velocity gradient is not uniform. The individual and average conformations (size and orientation) of the flowing DNA molecules are being studied as a function of the Weissenberg number (product of strain rate and DNA relaxation time) and distance from the channel walls.

  6. Red blood cell in simple shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chien, Wei; Hew, Yayu; Chen, Yeng-Long

    2013-03-01

    The dynamics of red blood cells (RBC) in blood flow is critical for oxygen transport, and it also influences inflammation (white blood cells), thrombosis (platelets), and circulatory tumor migration. The physical properties of a RBC can be captured by modeling RBC as lipid membrane linked to a cytoskeletal spectrin network that encapsulates cytoplasm rich in hemoglobin, with bi-concave equilibrium shape. Depending on the shear force, RBC elasticity, membrane viscosity, and cytoplasm viscosity, RBC can undergo tumbling, tank-treading, or oscillatory motion. We investigate the dynamic state diagram of RBC in shear and pressure-driven flow using a combined immersed boundary-lattice Boltzmann method with a multi-scale RBC model that accurately captures the experimentally established RBC force-deformation relation. It is found that the tumbling (TU) to tank-treading (TT) transition occurs as shear rate increases for cytoplasm/outer fluid viscosity ratio smaller than 0.67. The TU frequency is found to be half of the TT frequency, in agreement with experiment observations. Larger viscosity ratios lead to the disappearance of stable TT phase and unstable complex dynamics, including the oscillation of the symmetry axis of the bi-concave shape perpendicular to the flow direction. The dependence on RBC bending rigidity, shear modulus, the order of membrane spectrin network and fluid field in the unstable region will also be discussed.

  7. Aeroacoustic flow sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shakkottai, P.; Kwack, E. Y.; Back, L. H.

    1991-01-01

    A theoretical analysis of standing waves in a pipe with flow was conducted aimed toward the development of a flowmeter based on a measurement of phase difference between two points on the circumference of a pipe separated axially by an integral multiple of half sound wavelength. Effects of nonzero Mach number, variable ratios of upstream and downstream running waves, choice of location of the sensing pressure taps, and the incorrect spacings were examined numerically. Calculations were also made for steam flow where the maximum Mach number is much smaller than in cold air flows. For an industrial application where steam flow velocities are below 50 m/s, a very accurate sensor is shown to be possible. Experimental data were obtained by using an active aeroacoustic source over the range of 50 m/s to zero in an air flow. Experimental phase plots obtained from several coast-down tests have been compared with analytical results. The agreement with theory is excellent when the spacings are near N(lambda)/2 and the sensing locations are near the pressure antinodes. Otherwise, some zero shifts are introduced. Theory predicts that for steam flow much better results can be expected because the maximum Mach number is much smaller. Effects due to the (1-M-squared) factor would be imperceptible for steam flow.

  8. Rotating Bondi Accretion Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Myeong-Gu; Han, Du-Hwan

    2016-06-01

    The characteristics of accretion flow onto a black hole are determined by the physical condition of gas at large radius. When the gas has no angular momentum and is polytropic, the accretion flow becomes the classic Bondi flow. The mass accretion rate in such case is an eigenvalue and uniquely determined by the density and the temperature of the surrounding gas for a given black hole mass. When the gas has angular momentum above some critical value, the angular momentum of the gas should be removed by viscosity to reach the black hole horizon. We study, within the slim disk approximation, rotating polytropic accretion flow with alpha viscosity as an an extension of the Bondi flow. The characteristics of the accretion flow are now determined by the temperature, density, and angular momentum of the gas at the outer boundary. We explore the effects of the viscosity parameter and the outer boundary radius on the physical characteristic of the flow, especially on the mass accretion rate, and compare the result with previous works of Park (2009) and Narayan & Fabian (2011).

  9. Counting RG flows

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Gukov, Sergei

    2016-01-05

    Here, interpreting renormalization group flows as solitons interpolating between different fixed points, we ask various questions that are normally asked in soliton physics but not in renormalization theory. Can one count RG flows? Are there different "topological sectors" for RG flows? What is the moduli space of an RG flow, and how does it compare to familiar moduli spaces of (supersymmetric) dowain walls? Analyzing these questions in a wide variety of contexts -- from counting RG walls to AdS/CFT correspondence | will not only provide favorable answers, but will also lead us to a unified general framework that is powerfulmore » enough to account for peculiar RG flows and predict new physical phenomena. Namely, using Bott's version of Morse theory we relate the topology of conformal manifolds to certain properties of RG flows that can be used as precise diagnostics and "topological obstructions" for the strong form of the C-theorem in any dimension. Moreover, this framework suggests a precise mechanism for how the violation of the strong C-theorem happens and predicts "phase transitions" along the RG flow when the topological obstruction is non-trivial. Along the way, we also find new conformal manifolds in well-known 4d CFT's and point out connections with the superconformal index and classifying spaces of global symmetry groups.« less

  10. Studies of shear flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kline, S. J.; Johnston, J. P.; Moffat, R. J.

    1986-03-01

    The objective of the work reported is construction of zonal models for accurate prediction of turbulent flows in rapid-running computer programs. The work follows the ideas set down in the discussion of zonal modeling by S. J. Kline in Vol. 2 of the Proceedings of the 1980-81 AFOSR-Stanford Conference on Complex Turbulent Flows. This discussion noted that the fast-running models available lack sufficient span to predict all classes of turbulent flows of engineering importance in a standard, invariant form. It therefore suggested that the models be treated as zonal. In the zonal approach, the constants in th models are adjusted for each important zone of the flow, where the word zone implies a region with a particular type of flow physics. In the proposal for the work, it was also noted that the parametrization of the flows and the selection of appropriate constants would ultimately need to be guided by the domain over which accurate results could be obtained, and that might well be different from pre-conceptions embodied in conventional taxonomies of the flows.

  11. AFE base flow computations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venkatapathy, Ethiraj; Prabhu, Dinesh K.; Palmer, Grant

    1991-01-01

    Hypersonic wake flows behind the Aeroassist Flight Experiment (AFE) geometry are analyzed using two Navier-Stokes flow solvers. Many of the AFE wake features observed in ballistic-range shadowgraphs are simulated using a simple, two-dimensional semicylinder geometry at moderate angles of attack. At free-stream conditions corresponding to a Hypersonic Free Flight Facility (HFFF) AFE experiment, the three-dimensional base flow for the AFE geometry is computed using an ideal-gas, Navier-Stokes solver. The computed results agree reasonably well with the shadowgraphs taken at the HFFF. An ideal-gas and a nonequilibrium Navier-Stokes solver have been coupled and applied to the complete flow around the AFE vehicle at the free-stream conditions corresponding to a nomial trajectory point. Limitations of the coupled ideal-gas and nonequilibrium solution are discussed. The nonequilibrium base flow solution is analyzed for the wake radiation and the radiation profiles along various lines of sight are compared. Finally, the wake unsteadiness is predicted using experimental correlations and the numerical solutions. An adaptive grid code, SAGE, has been used in all the simulations to enhance the solution accuracy. The grid adaptation is found to be necessary in obtaining base flow solutions with accurate flow features.

  12. Lava flows are fractals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruno, B. C.; Taylor, G. J.; Rowland, S. K.; Lucey, P. G.; Self, S.

    1992-01-01

    Results are presented of a preliminary investigation of the fractal nature of the plan-view shapes of lava flows in Hawaii (based on field measurements and aerial photographs), as well as in Idaho and the Galapagos Islands (using aerial photographs only). The shapes of the lava flow margins are found to be fractals: lava flow shape is scale-invariant. This observation suggests that nonlinear forces are operating in them because nonlinear systems frequently produce fractals. A'a and pahoehoe flows can be distinguished by their fractal dimensions (D). The majority of the a'a flows measured have D between 1.05 and 1.09, whereas the pahoehoe flows generally have higher D (1.14-1.23). The analysis is extended to other planetary bodies by measuring flows from orbital images of Venus, Mars, and the moon. All are fractal and have D consistent with the range of terrestrial a'a and have D consistent with the range of terrestrial a'a and pahoehoe values.

  13. Aeroacoustic flow sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shakkottai, P.; Kwack, E. Y.; Back, L. H.

    1991-09-01

    A theoretical analysis of standing waves in a pipe with flow was conducted aimed toward the development of a flowmeter based on a measurement of phase difference between two points on the circumference of a pipe separated axially by an integral multiple of half sound wavelength. Effects of nonzero Mach number, variable ratios of upstream and downstream running waves, choice of location of the sensing pressure taps, and the incorrect spacings were examined numerically. Calculations were also made for steam flow where the maximum Mach number is much smaller than in cold air flows. For an industrial application where steam flow velocities are below 50 m/s, a very accurate sensor is shown to be possible. Experimental data were obtained by using an active aeroacoustic source over the range of 50 m/s to zero in an air flow. Experimental phase plots obtained from several coast-down tests have been compared with analytical results. The agreement with theory is excellent when the spacings are near N(lambda)/2 and the sensing locations are near the pressure antinodes. Otherwise, some zero shifts are introduced. Theory predicts that for steam flow much better results can be expected because the maximum Mach number is much smaller. Effects due to the (1-M-squared) factor would be imperceptible for steam flow.

  14. Flow of two immiscible fluids in a periodically constricted tube: Transitions to stratified, segmented, churn, spray, or segregated flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraggedakis, D.; Kouris, Ch.; Dimakopoulos, Y.; Tsamopoulos, J.

    2015-08-01

    We study the flow of two immiscible, Newtonian fluids in a periodically constricted tube driven by a constant pressure gradient. Our volume-of-fluid algorithm is used to solve the governing equations. First, the code is validated by comparing its predictions to previously reported results for stratified and pulsing flow. Then, it is used to capture accurately all the significant topological changes that take place. Initially, the fluids have a core-annular arrangement, which is found to either remain the same or change to a different arrangement depending on the fluid properties, the pressure driving the flow, or the flow geometry. The flow-patterns that appear are the core-annular, segmented, churn, spray, and segregated flow. The predicted scalings near pinching of the core fluid concur with similarity predictions and earlier numerical results [I. Cohen et al., "Two fluid drop snap-off problem: Experiments and theory," Phys. Rev. Lett. 83, 1147-1150 (1999)]. Flow-pattern maps are constructed in terms of the Reynolds and Weber numbers. Our result provides deeper insights into the mechanism of the pattern transitions and is in agreement with previous studies on core-annular flow [Ch. Kouris and J. Tsamopoulos, "Core-annular flow in a periodically constricted circular tube, I. Steady state, linear stability and energy analysis," J. Fluid Mech. 432, 31-68 (2001) and Ch. Kouris et al., "Comparison of spectral and finite element methods applied to the study of interfacial instabilities of the core-annular flow in an undulating tube," Int. J. Numer. Methods Fluids 39(1), 41-73 (2002)], segmented flow [E. Lac and J. D. Sherwood, "Motion of a drop along the centreline of a capillary in a pressure-driven flow," J. Fluid Mech. 640, 27-54 (2009)], and churn flow [R. Y. Bai et al., "Lubricated pipelining—Stability of core annular-flow. 5. Experiments and comparison with theory," J. Fluid Mech. 240, 97-132 (1992)].

  15. Stochastic Flow Cascades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eliazar, Iddo I.; Shlesinger, Michael F.

    2012-01-01

    We introduce and explore a Stochastic Flow Cascade (SFC) model: A general statistical model for the unidirectional flow through a tandem array of heterogeneous filters. Examples include the flow of: (i) liquid through heterogeneous porous layers; (ii) shocks through tandem shot noise systems; (iii) signals through tandem communication filters. The SFC model combines together the Langevin equation, convolution filters and moving averages, and Poissonian randomizations. A comprehensive analysis of the SFC model is carried out, yielding closed-form results. Lévy laws are shown to universally emerge from the SFC model, and characterize both heavy tailed retention times (Noah effect) and long-ranged correlations (Joseph effect).

  16. Shroud leakage flow discouragers

    DOEpatents

    Bailey, Jeremy Clyde; Bunker, Ronald Scott

    2002-01-01

    A turbine assembly includes a plurality of rotor blades comprising a root portion, an airfoil having a pressure sidewall and a suction sidewall, and a top portion having a cap. An outer shroud is concentrically disposed about said rotor blades, said shroud in combination with said tip portions defining a clearance gap. At least one circumferential shroud leakage discourager is disposed within the shroud. The leakage discourager(s) increase the flow resistance and thus reduce the flow of hot gas flow leakage for a given pressure differential across the clearance gap to improve overall turbine efficiency.

  17. Flow-induced vibration

    SciTech Connect

    Blevins, R.D.

    1990-01-01

    This book reports on dimensional analysis; ideal fluid models; vortex-induced vibration; galloping and flutter; instability of tube and cylinder arrays; vibrations induced by oscillating flow; vibration induced by turbulence and sound; damping of structures; sound induced by vortex shedding; vibrations of a pipe containing a fluid flow; indices. It covers the analysis of the vibrations of structures exposed to fluid flows; explores applications for offshore platforms and piping; wind-induced vibration of buildings, bridges, and towers; and acoustic and mechanical vibration of heat exchangers, power lines, and process ducting.

  18. Bypass Flow Study

    SciTech Connect

    Richard Schultz

    2011-09-01

    The purpose of the fluid dynamics experiments in the MIR (Matched Index of-Refraction) flow system at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is to develop benchmark databases for the assessment of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) solutions of the momentum equations, scalar mixing, and turbulence models for the flow ratios between coolant channels and bypass gaps in the interstitial regions of typical prismatic standard fuel element (SFE) or upper reflector block geometries of typical Modular High-temperature Gas-cooled Reactors (MHTGR) in the limiting case of negligible buoyancy and constant fluid properties. The experiments use Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) to measure the velocity fields that will populate the bypass flow study database.

  19. Tank depletion flow controller

    DOEpatents

    Georgeson, Melvin A.

    1976-10-26

    A flow control system includes two bubbler tubes installed at different levels within a tank containing such as radioactive liquid. As the tank is depleted, a differential pressure transmitter monitors pressure differences imparted by the two bubbler tubes at a remote, shielded location during uniform time intervals. At the end of each uniform interval, balance pots containing a dense liquid are valved together to equalize the pressures. The resulting sawtooth-shaped signal generated by the differential pressure transmitter is compared with a second sawtooth signal representing the desired flow rate during each time interval. Variations in the two signals are employed by a control instrument to regulate flow rate.

  20. Aircraft Laminar Flow Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joslin, Ronald D.

    1998-01-01

    Aircraft laminar flow control (LFC) from the 1930's through the 1990's is reviewed and the current status of the technology is assessed. Examples are provided to demonstrate the benefits of LFC for subsonic and supersonic aircraft. Early studies related to the laminar boundary-layer flow physics, manufacturing tolerances for laminar flow, and insect-contamination avoidance are discussed. LFC concept studies in wind-tunnel and flight experiments are the major focus of the paper. LFC design tools are briefly outlined for completeness.

  1. Initiation of slug flow

    SciTech Connect

    Hanratty, T.J.; Woods, B.D.

    1995-12-31

    The initiation of slug flow in a horizontal pipe can be predicted either by considering the stability of a slug or by considering the stability of a stratified flow. Measurements of the shedding rate of slugs are used to define necessary conditions for the existence of a slug. Recent results show that slugs develop from an unstable stratified flow through the evolution of small wavelength waves into large wavelength waves that have the possibility of growing to form a slug. The mechanism appears to be quite different for fluids with viscosities close to water than for fluids with large viscosities (20 centipoise).

  2. Numerical calculations of flow fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, D.; Vogel, J. M.

    1973-01-01

    Numerical calculations were made of flow fields generated by various aerodynamic configurations. Data cover flow fields generated by a finitely thick lifting three dimensional wing with subsonic tips moving at supersonic speeds, cross flow instability associated with lifting delta wing configurations such as space shuttles, and flow fields produced by a lifting elliptic cone. Finite difference techniques were used to determine elliptic cone flow.

  3. Gating of a mechanosensitive channel due to cellular flows.

    PubMed

    Pak, On Shun; Young, Y-N; Marple, Gary R; Veerapaneni, Shravan; Stone, Howard A

    2015-08-11

    A multiscale continuum model is constructed for a mechanosensitive (MS) channel gated by tension in a lipid bilayer membrane under stresses due to fluid flows. We illustrate that for typical physiological conditions vesicle hydrodynamics driven by a fluid flow may render the membrane tension sufficiently large to gate a MS channel open. In particular, we focus on the dynamic opening/closing of a MS channel in a vesicle membrane under a planar shear flow and a pressure-driven flow across a constriction channel. Our modeling and numerical simulation results quantify the critical flow strength or flow channel geometry for intracellular transport through a MS channel. In particular, we determine the percentage of MS channels that are open or closed as a function of the relevant measure of flow strength. The modeling and simulation results imply that for fluid flows that are physiologically relevant and realizable in microfluidic configurations stress-induced intracellular transport across the lipid membrane can be achieved by the gating of reconstituted MS channels, which can be useful for designing drug delivery in medical therapy and understanding complicated mechanotransduction.

  4. Velocity Profiles for Turbulent Couette-Poiseuille Flow.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panton, Ronald

    1998-11-01

    Flow in a channel with one moving wall and an applied pressure gradient is considered. This flow is of interest because of the two different mechanisms that drive the turbulence, Poiseuille dominated flows have a maximum velocity that does not coincide with the point of zero Reynolds stress. Couette dominated flows have an inflection point with a finite Reynolds stress. In a special case the stress on one wall is zero while the flow above the wall is turbulent. At high Re the flow consists of a turbulent core bounded by two wall layers. The velocity in the wall layers is assumed to follow the usual shear driven law-of-the-wall. Correspondingly, there is a law-of-the-wall for the Reynolds stress. This law has been determined from correlating experiments and DNS results of pressure driven pipe and channel flows. The Reynolds stress in the core is found analytically and a uniformly valid composite expansion formed. Integration of the exact momentum equation yields the velocity profiles. Results are compared to experiments for a variety of flow parameters. Influences of the Reynolds number are quantified.

  5. Flow and evaporation in single micrometer and nanometer scale pipes

    SciTech Connect

    Velasco, A. E.; Yang, C.; Siwy, Z. S.; Taborek, P.; Toimil-Molares, M. E.

    2014-07-21

    We report measurements of pressure driven flow of fluids entering vacuum through a single pipe of micrometer or nanometer scale diameter. Nanopores were fabricated by etching a single ion track in polymer or mica foils. A calibrated mass spectrometer was used to measure the flow rates of nitrogen and helium through pipes with diameter ranging from 10 μm to 31 nm. The flow of gaseous and liquid nitrogen was studied near 77 K, while the flow of helium was studied from the lambda point (2.18 K) to above the critical point (5.2 K). Flow rates were controlled by changing the pressure drop across the pipe in the range 0–31 atm. When the pressure in the pipe reached the saturated vapor pressure, an abrupt flow transition was observed. A simple viscous flow model is used to determine the position of the liquid/vapor interface in the pipe. The observed mass flow rates are consistent with no slip boundary conditions.

  6. New Spectral State of Supercritical Accretion Flow with Comptonizing Outflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawashima, Tomohisa; Ohsuga, Ken; Mineshige, Shin; Heinzeller, Dominikus; Takabe, Hideaki; Matsumoto, Ryoji

    2009-08-01

    Supercritical accretion flows inevitably produce radiation-pressure driven outflows, which Compton up-scatter soft photons from the underlying accretion flow, thereby making hard emission. We performed two-dimensional radiation hydrodynamic simulations of supercritical accretion flows and outflows, while incorporating such Compton scattering effects, and demonstrated that there appears a new hard spectral state at higher photon luminosities than that of the slim-disk state. In this state, as the photon luminosity increases, the photon index decreases and the fraction of the hard emission increases. The Compton y-parameter is on the order of unity (and thus the photon index will be ˜2) when the apparent photon luminosity is ˜30LE (with LE being the Eddington luminosity) for nearly face-on sources. This explains the observed spectral hardening of the ULX NGC 1313 X-2 in its brightening phase, and thus supports the model of supercritical accretion onto stellar-mass black holes in this ULX.

  7. Low pressure stagnation flow reactor with a flow barrier

    DOEpatents

    Vosen, Steven R.

    2001-01-01

    A flow barrier disposed at the periphery of a workpiece for achieving uniform reaction across the surface of the workpiece, such as a semiconductor wafer, in a stagnation flow reactor operating under the conditions of a low pressure or low flow rate. The flow barrier is preferably in the shape of annulus and can include within the annular structure passages or flow channels for directing a secondary flow of gas substantially at the surface of a semiconductor workpiece. The flow barrier can be constructed of any material which is chemically inert to reactive gases flowing over the surface of the semiconductor workpiece.

  8. Parallel flow diffusion battery

    DOEpatents

    Yeh, H.C.; Cheng, Y.S.

    1984-01-01

    A parallel flow diffusion battery for determining the mass distribution of an aerosol has a plurality of diffusion cells mounted in parallel to an aerosol stream, each diffusion cell including a stack of mesh wire screens of different density.

  9. Parallel flow diffusion battery

    DOEpatents

    Yeh, Hsu-Chi; Cheng, Yung-Sung

    1984-08-07

    A parallel flow diffusion battery for determining the mass distribution of an aerosol has a plurality of diffusion cells mounted in parallel to an aerosol stream, each diffusion cell including a stack of mesh wire screens of different density.

  10. Cash Flow Planning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Littman, George W., III

    1979-01-01

    Proper cash flow planning allows a school business administrator to determine the availability of cash for operating expenses, the need for bank loans to cover these expenses, and the availability of idle cash for investment. (Author)

  11. Laminar-flow airfoil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Somers, Dan M. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    An airfoil having a fore airfoil element, an aft airfoil element, and a slot region in between them. These elements induce laminar flow over substantially all of the fore airfoil element and also provide for laminar flow in at least a portion of the slot region. The method of the invention is one for inducing natural laminar flow over an airfoil. In the method, a fore airfoil element, having a leading and trailing edge, and an aft airfoil element define a slot region. Natural laminar flow is induced over substantially all of the fore airfoil element, by inducing the pressures on both surfaces of the fore airfoil element to decrease to a location proximate the trailing edge of the fore airfoil element using pressures created by the aft airfoil element.

  12. The Flow of Sand.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yersel, Metin

    2000-01-01

    Describes a simple demonstration of the flow of sand through an orifice at the bottom of a sandbox. Advocates the experiment's use with dimensional analysis for students in an introductory physics course. (WRM)

  13. Complex Flow Workshop Report

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2012-05-01

    This report documents findings from a workshop on the impacts of complex wind flows in and out of wind turbine environments, the research needs, and the challenges of meteorological and engineering modeling at regional, wind plant, and wind turbine scales.

  14. Cryogenic Flows on Ceres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krohn, K.; Jaumann, R.; Otto, K. A.; von der Gahten, I.; Matz, K.-D.; Buczkowski, D. L.; Williams, D. A.; Pieters, C. M.; Preusker, F.; Roatsch, T.; Stephan, K.; Wagner, R. J.; Russell, C. T.; Raymond, C. A.

    2016-08-01

    Cereś surface is affected by numerous impact craters and some of them show features such as channels or multiple flow events forming a smooth, less cratered surface, indicating possible post-impact resurfacing.

  15. Comprehensive Faculty Flow Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bloomfield, Stefan D.

    1977-01-01

    A comprehensive faculty flow model developed to forecast a "committed resources index" analyzes the future flexibility of a university. The model's construction, implementation, and assessment are described. (Editor/LBH)

  16. Simulation of turbomachinery flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adamczyk, John J.

    1989-01-01

    Significant advancements have been made in the last five years in the ability to model turbomachinery flows of engineering interest. This advancement can be directly attributed to the second generation of supercomputers like the Cray XMP and Cray 2 and advanced instrumentation techniques. Early on, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Lewis Research Center recognized the potential gains in turbomachinery performance and life that could be achieved by taking advantage of this technology and instituted a comprehensive research program in turbomachinery flow modeling. This activity combined the areas of fluid flow analysis, computational fluid dynamics, and experimental fluid mechanics. As a result of this activity, Lewis has become an internationally recognized leader in turbomachinery flow modeling. Many of the research activities conducted under this program are utilized by industry. The presentation gives an overview of this program and provides sample illustration of simulation performed to date.

  17. Greenland Ice Flow

    NASA Video Gallery

    Greenland looks like a big pile of snow seen from space using a regular camera. But satellite radar interferometry helps us detect the motion of ice beneath the snow. Ice starts flowing from the fl...

  18. Digital work-flow

    PubMed Central

    MARSANGO, V.; BOLLERO, R.; D’OVIDIO, N.; MIRANDA, M.; BOLLERO, P.; BARLATTANI, A.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Objective. The project presents a clinical case in which the digital work-flow procedure was applied for a prosthetic rehabilitation in natural teeth and implants. Materials. Digital work-flow uses patient’s photo for the aesthetic’s planning, digital smile technology for the simulation of the final restoration and real time scanning to register the two arches. Than the scanning are sent to the laboratory that proceed with CAD-CAM production. Results. Digital work-flow offers the opportunities to easily speak with laboratory and patients, gives better clinical results and demonstrated to be a less invasiveness method for the patient. Conclusion. Intra-oral scanner, digital smile design, preview using digital wax-up, CAD-CAM production, are new predictable opportunities for prosthetic team. This work-flow, compared with traditional methods, is faster, more precise and predictable. PMID:25694797

  19. Air Entraining Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prosperetti, Andrea

    2001-11-01

    Air entraining flows are frequently encountered in Nature (e.g. breaking waves, waterfalls, rain over water bodies) and in technological applications (gas-liquid chemical reactors, water treatment, aquaculture, and others). Superficially, one may distinguish between transient events, such as a breaking wave, and steady situations, e.g. a falling jet. However, when viscosity is not important, the process of air entrainment turns out to be the consequence of local transient events even in steady flows. For example, surface disturbances convected by a nominally steady jet impact the receiving liquid, create a deep depression, which collapses entraining an air pocket. (In practice this basic mechanism is complicated by the presence of waves, vortical flows, and other factors.) This talk will describe several examples of air-entraining flows illustrating the fluid mechanic principles involved with high-speed movies and numerical computations.

  20. Multiplex Flow Assays

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Lateral flow or dipstick assays (e.g., home pregnancy tests), where an analyte solution is drawn through a porous membrane and is detected by localization onto a capture probe residing at a specific site on the flow strip, are the most commonly and extensively used type of diagnostic assay. However, after over 30 years of use, these assays are constrained to measuring one or a few analytes at a time. Here, we describe a completely general method, in which any single-plex lateral flow assay is transformed into a multiplex assay capable of measuring an arbitrarily large number of analytes simultaneously. Instead of identifying the analyte by its localization onto a specific geometric location in the flow medium, the analyte-specific capture probe is identified by its association with a specific optically encoded region within the flow medium. The capture probes for nucleic acids, antigens, or antibodies are attached to highly porous agarose beads, which have been encoded using multiple lanthanide emitters to create a unique optical signature for each capture probe. The optically encoded capture probe-derivatized beads are placed in contact with the analyte-containing porous flow medium and the analytes are captured onto the encoded regions as the solution flows through the porous medium. To perform a multiplex diagnostic assay, a solution comprising multiple analytes is passed through the flow medium containing the capture probe-derivatized beads, and the captured analyte is treated with a suitable fluorescent reporter. We demonstrate this multiplex analysis technique by simultaneously measuring DNA samples, antigen–antibody pairs, and mixtures of multiple nucleic acids and antibodies.

  1. Entropy of stochastic flows

    SciTech Connect

    Dorogovtsev, Andrei A

    2010-06-29

    For sets in a Hilbert space the concept of quadratic entropy is introduced. It is shown that this entropy is finite for the range of a stochastic flow of Brownian particles on R. This implies, in particular, the fact that the total time of the free travel in the Arratia flow of all particles that started from a bounded interval is finite. Bibliography: 10 titles.

  2. Cryogenic Flow Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Justak, John

    2010-01-01

    An acousto-optic cryogenic flow sensor (CFS) determines mass flow of cryogens for spacecraft propellant management. The CFS operates unobtrusively in a high-pressure, high-flowrate cryogenic environment to provide measurements for fluid quality as well as mass flow rate. Experimental hardware uses an optical plane-of-light (POL) to detect the onset of two-phase flow, and the presence of particles in the flow of water. Acousto-optic devices are used in laser equipment for electronic control of the intensity and position of the laser beam. Acousto-optic interaction occurs in all optical media when an acoustic wave and a laser beam are present. When an acoustic wave is launched into the optical medium, it generates a refractive index wave that behaves like a sinusoidal grating. An incident laser beam passing through this grating will diffract the laser beam into several orders. Its angular position is linearly proportional to the acoustic frequency, so that the higher the frequency, the larger the diffracted angle. If the acoustic wave is traveling in a moving fluid, the fluid velocity will affect the frequency of the traveling wave, relative to a stationary sensor. This frequency shift changes the angle of diffraction, hence, fluid velocity can be determined from the diffraction angle. The CFS acoustic Bragg grating data test indicates that it is capable of accurately determining flow from 0 to 10 meters per second. The same sensor can be used in flow velocities exceeding 100 m/s. The POL module has successfully determined the onset of two-phase flow, and can distinguish vapor bubbles from debris.

  3. Electrochemical flow capacitors

    SciTech Connect

    Gogotsi, Yury; Presser, Volker; Kumbur, Emin Caglan

    2015-10-27

    The present invention generally relates to devices for energy storage technologies, and more particularly to electrochemical flow capacitor systems and applications. In some aspects, these flow capacitors have at least one electrode comprising a non-stationary solid or semi-solid composition comprising supercapacitive particles and an electrolytic solvent in electrical communication with at least one current collector, and energy is stored and/or released by charging and/or discharging the electrode(s).

  4. Holographic subsonic flow visualization.

    PubMed

    Reinheimer, C J; Wiswall, C E; Schmiege, R A; Harris, R J; Dueker, J E

    1970-09-01

    A pulsed ruby laser holographic interferometer was used to detect density gradients in the airflow around an airfoil at subsonic speeds in a low speed wind tunnel. These experiments proved that vibration of the optical components or object between exposures of the interferometric hologram does not destroy the detection of density gradients but actually can aid in the flow visualization. The density gradients determined from the fringe pattern analysis are consistent with the anticipated flow pattern.

  5. High Speed Vortex Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, Richard M.; Wilcox, Floyd J., Jr.; Bauer, Steven X. S.; Allen, Jerry M.

    2000-01-01

    A review of the research conducted at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Langley Research Center (LaRC) into high-speed vortex flows during the 1970s, 1980s, and 1990s is presented. The data reviewed is for flat plates, cavities, bodies, missiles, wings, and aircraft. These data are presented and discussed relative to the design of future vehicles. Also presented is a brief historical review of the extensive body of high-speed vortex flow research from the 1940s to the present in order to provide perspective of the NASA LaRC's high-speed research results. Data are presented which show the types of vortex structures which occur at supersonic speeds and the impact of these flow structures to vehicle performance and control is discussed. The data presented shows the presence of both small- and large scale vortex structures for a variety of vehicles, from missiles to transports. For cavities, the data show very complex multiple vortex structures exist at all combinations of cavity depth to length ratios and Mach number. The data for missiles show the existence of very strong interference effects between body and/or fin vortices and the downstream fins. It was shown that these vortex flow interference effects could be both positive and negative. Data are shown which highlights the effect that leading-edge sweep, leading-edge bluntness, wing thickness, location of maximum thickness, and camber has on the aerodynamics of and flow over delta wings. The observed flow fields for delta wings (i.e. separation bubble, classical vortex, vortex with shock, etc.) are discussed in the context of' aircraft design. And data have been shown that indicate that aerodynamic performance improvements are available by considering vortex flows as a primary design feature. Finally a discussing of a design approach for wings which utilize vortex flows for improved aerodynamic performance at supersonic speed is presented.

  6. Magnetically stimulated fluid flow patterns

    ScienceCinema

    Martin, Jim; Solis, Kyle

    2016-07-12

    Sandia National Laboratories' Jim Martin and Kyle Solis explain research on the effects of magnetic fields on fluid flows and how they stimulate vigorous flows. Fluid flow is a necessary phenomenon in everything from reactors to cooling engines in cars.

  7. Yamabe flow on Berwald manifolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azami, Shahroud; Razavi, Asadollah

    2015-12-01

    Studying the geometric flow plays a powerful role in mathematics and physics. We introduce the Yamabe flow on Finsler manifolds and we will prove the existence and uniqueness for solution of Yamabe flow on Berwald manifolds.

  8. Magnetically stimulated fluid flow patterns

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Jim; Solis, Kyle

    2014-03-06

    Sandia National Laboratories' Jim Martin and Kyle Solis explain research on the effects of magnetic fields on fluid flows and how they stimulate vigorous flows. Fluid flow is a necessary phenomenon in everything from reactors to cooling engines in cars.

  9. Sperm Motility in Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guasto, Jeffrey; Juarez, Gabriel; Stocker, Roman

    2012-11-01

    A wide variety of plants and animals reproduce sexually by releasing motile sperm that seek out a conspecific egg, for example in the reproductive tract for mammals or in the water column for externally fertilizing organisms. Sperm are aided in their quest by chemical cues, but must also contend with hydrodynamic forces, resulting from laminar flows in reproductive tracts or turbulence in aquatic habitats. To understand how velocity gradients affect motility, we subjected swimming sperm to a range of highly-controlled straining flows using a cross-flow microfluidic device. The motion of the cell body and flagellum were captured through high-speed video microscopy. The effects of flow on swimming are twofold. For moderate velocity gradients, flow simply advects and reorients cells, quenching their ability to cross streamlines. For high velocity gradients, fluid stresses hinder the internal bending of the flagellum, directly inhibiting motility. The transition between the two regimes is governed by the Sperm number, which compares the external viscous stresses with the internal elastic stresses. Ultimately, unraveling the role of flow in sperm motility will lead to a better understanding of population dynamics among aquatic organisms and infertility problems in humans.

  10. Conjugate flow action functionals

    SciTech Connect

    Venturi, Daniele

    2013-11-15

    We present a new general framework to construct an action functional for a non-potential field theory. The key idea relies on representing the governing equations relative to a diffeomorphic flow of curvilinear coordinates which is assumed to be functionally dependent on the solution field. Such flow, which will be called the conjugate flow, evolves in space and time similarly to a physical fluid flow of classical mechanics and it can be selected in order to symmetrize the Gâteaux derivative of the field equations with respect to suitable local bilinear forms. This is equivalent to requiring that the governing equations of the field theory can be derived from a principle of stationary action on a Lie group manifold. By using a general operator framework, we obtain the determining equations of such manifold and the corresponding conjugate flow action functional. In particular, we study scalar and vector field theories governed by second-order nonlinear partial differential equations. The identification of transformation groups leaving the conjugate flow action functional invariant could lead to the discovery of new conservation laws in fluid dynamics and other disciplines.

  11. Flow between eccentric cylinders: a shear-extensional controllable flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Guoqiang; Wang, Mengmeng; Wang, Xiaolin; Jin, Gang

    2016-05-01

    In this work the non-Newtonian fluid between eccentric cylinders is simulated with finite element method. The flow in the annular gap between the eccentric rotating cylinders was found to be a shear-extensional controllable flow. The influence of rotating speed, eccentricity as well as the radius ratio on the extensional flow in the vicinity of the minimum gap between the inner and outer cylinder was quantitatively investigated. It was found that both the strengths of shear flow and extensional flow could be adjusted by changing the rotating speed. In respect to extensional flow, it was also observed that the eccentricity and radius ratio exert significant influences on the ratio of extensional flow. And it should be noted that the ratio of extensional flow in the mix flow could be increased when increasing the eccentricity and the ratio of shear flow in the mix flow could be increased when increasing the radius ratio.

  12. Pressure-driven fast reaction and recovery of peptide receptor for an electronic nose application

    SciTech Connect

    Yoo, Yong Kyoung; Lee, Sang-Myung; Chae, Myung-Sic; Yoon Kang, Ji; Song Kim, Tae; Seon Hwang, Kyo E-mail: jhlee@kw.ac.kr; Hoon Lee, Jeong E-mail: jhlee@kw.ac.kr

    2014-02-24

    Combining a highly sensitive sensor platform with highly selective recognition elements is essential for micro/nanotechnology-based electronic nose applications. Particularly, the regeneration sensor surface and its conditions are key issues for practical e-nose applications. We propose a highly sensitive piezoelectric-driven microcantilever array chip with highly selective peptide receptors. By utilizing the peptide receptor, which was discovered by a phase display screening process, we immobilized a dinitrotoluene (DNT) specific peptide as well as a DNT nonspecific peptide on the surface of the cantilever array. The delivery of DNT gas via pressure-driven flow led to a greater instant response of ∼30 Hz, compared to diffusion only (∼15 Hz for 15 h). Using a simple pressure-driven air flow of ∼50 sccm, we confirmed that a ratio of ∼70% of the specific-bounded sites from DNT gas molecules could be regenerated, showing re-usability of the peptide receptor in on-site monitoring for electronic nose applications.

  13. Pressure-driven fast reaction and recovery of peptide receptor for an electronic nose application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoo, Yong Kyoung; Lee, Sang-Myung; Chae, Myung-Sic; Yoon Kang, Ji; Song Kim, Tae; Seon Hwang, Kyo; Hoon Lee, Jeong

    2014-02-01

    Combining a highly sensitive sensor platform with highly selective recognition elements is essential for micro/nanotechnology-based electronic nose applications. Particularly, the regeneration sensor surface and its conditions are key issues for practical e-nose applications. We propose a highly sensitive piezoelectric-driven microcantilever array chip with highly selective peptide receptors. By utilizing the peptide receptor, which was discovered by a phase display screening process, we immobilized a dinitrotoluene (DNT) specific peptide as well as a DNT nonspecific peptide on the surface of the cantilever array. The delivery of DNT gas via pressure-driven flow led to a greater instant response of ˜30 Hz, compared to diffusion only (˜15 Hz for 15 h). Using a simple pressure-driven air flow of ˜50 sccm, we confirmed that a ratio of ˜70% of the specific-bounded sites from DNT gas molecules could be regenerated, showing re-usability of the peptide receptor in on-site monitoring for electronic nose applications.

  14. Which Way Is the Flow?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kao, David

    1999-01-01

    The line integral convolution (LIC) technique has been known to be an effective tool for depicting flow patterns in a given vector field. There have been many extensions to make it run faster and reveal useful flow information such as velocity magnitude, motion, and direction. There are also extensions to unsteady flows and 3D vector fields. Surprisingly, none of these extensions automatically highlight flow features, which often represent the most important and interesting physical flow phenomena. In this sketch, a method for highlighting flow direction in LIC images is presented. The method gives an intuitive impression of flow direction in the given vector field and automatically reveals saddle points in the flow.

  15. Physics of Zonal Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itoh, Kimitaka

    2005-10-01

    This talk describes an overview of zonal flow physics, covering the theory, simulation and experiment. The zonal flows are excited nonlinearly by drift wave fluctuations, and suppress the turbulence and transport, so as to realize a self-regulating state for turbulence and mesoscale structure. This recognition is the central of recent paradigm shift in plasma physics, i.e., the preceding linear, local and deterministic pictures of instability and transport have been taken over by the new nonlinear, nonlocal (in real and wavenumber spaces) and statistical pictures of them. The zonal flow phenomenon, i.e., the global axial vector fields are generated by the release of global free energy in scalar fields through exciting turbulence, is a typical example of the fundamental issues in modern physics. In this review, the progresses made by theory and simulations, such as the linear damping rate, nonlinear mechanisms for growth and saturation, law of energy partition between turbulence and flow, life time of zonal flow, and so on, are explained. The transport by drift wave fluctuations, which are dressed by zonal flows, is discussed. Then experimental observations and verifications, which have been piled up rapidly in basic plasma experiments and confinement research, are explained, highlighting the integration with theory and simulation. Generalization to include magnetic field (zonal field) is addressed, in the light of the study of dynamo. Zonal flows in both laboratory and planetary-solar circumstances are discussed as well. This presentation illustrates the fast evolution of the physics of turbulence and structure formation of plasmas in the nature and laboratory. In collaboration with S.-I. Itoh, P. H. Diamond, T. S. Hahm, A. Fujisawa, G. R. Tynan and M. Yagi.

  16. Planetary heat flow measurements.

    PubMed

    Hagermann, Axel

    2005-12-15

    The year 2005 marks the 35th anniversary of the Apollo 13 mission, probably the most successful failure in the history of manned spaceflight. Naturally, Apollo 13's scientific payload is far less known than the spectacular accident and subsequent rescue of its crew. Among other instruments, it carried the first instrument designed to measure the flux of heat on a planetary body other than Earth. The year 2005 also should have marked the launch of the Japanese LUNAR-A mission, and ESA's Rosetta mission is slowly approaching comet Churyumov-Gerasimenko. Both missions carry penetrators to study the heat flow from their target bodies. What is so interesting about planetary heat flow? What can we learn from it and how do we measure it?Not only the Sun, but all planets in the Solar System are essentially heat engines. Various heat sources or heat reservoirs drive intrinsic and surface processes, causing 'dead balls of rock, ice or gas' to evolve dynamically over time, driving convection that powers tectonic processes and spawns magnetic fields. The heat flow constrains models of the thermal evolution of a planet and also its composition because it provides an upper limit for the bulk abundance of radioactive elements. On Earth, the global variation of heat flow also reflects the tectonic activity: heat flow increases towards the young ocean ridges, whereas it is rather low on the old continental shields. It is not surprising that surface heat flow measurements, or even estimates, where performed, contributed greatly to our understanding of what happens inside the planets. In this article, I will review the results and the methods used in past heat flow measurements and speculate on the targets and design of future experiments. PMID:16286290

  17. Planetary heat flow measurements.

    PubMed

    Hagermann, Axel

    2005-12-15

    The year 2005 marks the 35th anniversary of the Apollo 13 mission, probably the most successful failure in the history of manned spaceflight. Naturally, Apollo 13's scientific payload is far less known than the spectacular accident and subsequent rescue of its crew. Among other instruments, it carried the first instrument designed to measure the flux of heat on a planetary body other than Earth. The year 2005 also should have marked the launch of the Japanese LUNAR-A mission, and ESA's Rosetta mission is slowly approaching comet Churyumov-Gerasimenko. Both missions carry penetrators to study the heat flow from their target bodies. What is so interesting about planetary heat flow? What can we learn from it and how do we measure it?Not only the Sun, but all planets in the Solar System are essentially heat engines. Various heat sources or heat reservoirs drive intrinsic and surface processes, causing 'dead balls of rock, ice or gas' to evolve dynamically over time, driving convection that powers tectonic processes and spawns magnetic fields. The heat flow constrains models of the thermal evolution of a planet and also its composition because it provides an upper limit for the bulk abundance of radioactive elements. On Earth, the global variation of heat flow also reflects the tectonic activity: heat flow increases towards the young ocean ridges, whereas it is rather low on the old continental shields. It is not surprising that surface heat flow measurements, or even estimates, where performed, contributed greatly to our understanding of what happens inside the planets. In this article, I will review the results and the methods used in past heat flow measurements and speculate on the targets and design of future experiments.

  18. A Cartesian grid finite-difference method for 2D incompressible viscous flows in irregular geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanmiguel-Rojas, Enrique; Ortega-Casanova, Joaquin; del Pino, Carlos; Fernandez-Feria, Ramon

    2004-11-01

    A method for generating a non-uniform cartesian grid for irregular two-dimensional (2D) geometries such that all the boundary points are regular mesh points is given. The resulting non-uniform grid is used to discretize the Navier-Stokes equations for 2D incompressible viscous flows using finite difference approximations. To that end, finite-difference approximations of the derivatives on a non-uniform mesh are given. We test the method with two different examples: the shallow water flow on a lake with irregular contour, and the pressure driven flow through an irregular array of circular cylinders.

  19. Hybrid continuum–molecular modelling of multiscale internal gas flows

    SciTech Connect

    Patronis, Alexander; Lockerby, Duncan A.; Borg, Matthew K.; Reese, Jason M.

    2013-12-15

    We develop and apply an efficient multiscale method for simulating a large class of low-speed internal rarefied gas flows. The method is an extension of the hybrid atomistic–continuum approach proposed by Borg et al. (2013) [28] for the simulation of micro/nano flows of high-aspect ratio. The major new extensions are: (1) incorporation of fluid compressibility; (2) implementation using the direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method for dilute rarefied gas flows, and (3) application to a broader range of geometries, including periodic, non-periodic, pressure-driven, gravity-driven and shear-driven internal flows. The multiscale method is applied to micro-scale gas flows through a periodic converging–diverging channel (driven by an external acceleration) and a non-periodic channel with a bend (driven by a pressure difference), as well as the flow between two eccentric cylinders (with the inner rotating relative to the outer). In all these cases there exists a wide variation of Knudsen number within the geometries, as well as substantial compressibility despite the Mach number being very low. For validation purposes, our multiscale simulation results are compared to those obtained from full-scale DSMC simulations: very close agreement is obtained in all cases for all flow variables considered. Our multiscale simulation is an order of magnitude more computationally efficient than the full-scale DSMC for the first and second test cases, and two orders of magnitude more efficient for the third case.

  20. Through flow analysis within axial flow turbomachinery blade rows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girigoswami, H.

    1986-09-01

    Using Katsanis' Through Flow Code, inviscid flow through an axial flow compressor rotor blade as well as flow through inlet guide vanes are analyzed and the computed parameters such as meridional velocity distribution, axial velocity distribution along radial lines, and velocity distribution over blade surfaces are presented.

  1. Heat flow in Oklahoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cranganu, Constantin

    Twenty new heat flow values are incorporated, along with 40 previously published data, into a heat flow map of Oklahoma. The new heat flow data were estimated using previous temperature measurements in boreholes made by American Petroleum Institute researchers and 1,498 thermal conductivity measurements on drill cuttings. The mean of 20 average thermal gradients is 30.50sp°C/km. In general, thermal gradients increase from SW (14.11sp°C/km) to NE (42.24sp°C/km). The range of 1,498 in situ thermal conductivity measurements (after corrections for anisotropy, in situ temperature, and porosity) is 0.90-6.1 W/m-K; the average is 1.68 W/m-K. Estimated near-surface heat flow (±20%) at 20 new sites in Oklahoma varies between 22 ± 4 mW/msp2 and 86 ± 17 mW/msp2; the average is 50 mW/msp2. Twenty-seven new heat-generation estimates, along with 22 previously published data, are used to create a heat generation map of Oklahoma. The range of heat production estimates is 1.1-3.5 muW/msp3, with an average of 2.5 muW/msp3. The heat flow regime in Oklahoma is primarily conductive in nature, except for a zone in northeast. Transient effects due to sedimentary processes and metamorphic/igneous activity, as well as past climatic changes, do not significantly influence the thermal state of the Oklahoma crust. Heat flow near the margins of the Arkoma and Anadarko Basins may be depressed or elevated by 5-13 mW/msp2 by refraction of heat from sedimentary rocks of relatively low thermal conductivity (1-2 W/m-K) into crystalline basement rocks of relatively high thermal conductivity (˜3-4 W/m-K). The heat generation-heat flow relationship shows a modest correlation. The relatively high heat flow (˜70-80 mW/msp2) in part of northeastern Oklahoma suggests that the thermal regime there may be perturbed by regional groundwater flow originating in the fractured outcrops of the Arbuckle-Simpson aquifer in the Arbuckle Mountains.

  2. Micromodel foam flow study

    SciTech Connect

    Chambers, K.T.; Radke, C.J.

    1990-10-01

    Foams are often utilized as part of enhanced oil recovery techniques. This report presents the results of a micromodel foam flow study. Micromodels are valuable tools in uncovering capillary phenomena responsible for lamellae generation and coalescence during foam flow in porous media. Among the mechanisms observed are snap-off, weeping-flow breakup, and lamella division and leave behind. Coalescence mechanisms include dynamic capillary-pressure-induced lamella drainage and gas diffusion. These phenomena are sensitive to the mode of injection, the local capillary environment, and the geometry of the pore structure. An important consideration in presenting a tractable model of foam flow behavior is the ability to identify the pore-level mechanisms having the greatest impact on foam texture. The predominant mechanisms will vary depending upon the application for foam as an enhanced oil recovery (EOR) fluid. Both simultaneous gas and surfactant injection and surfactant alternating with gas injection (SAG) have been used to create foam for mobility control in EOR projects. The model developed is based on simultaneous gas and surfactant injection during steady-state conditions into a Berea sandstone core. The lamellae generation and coalescence mechanisms included in this model are snap-off, lamella division, and dynamic capillary-pressure-induced lamella drainage. This simplified steady-state model serves as a foundation for developing more complete rate expressions and for extending the population balance to handle transient foam flow behavior. 70 refs., 30 figs.

  3. Chemical reacting flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mularz, Edward J.; Sockol, Peter M.

    1990-01-01

    Future aerospace propulsion concepts involve the combustion of liquid or gaseous fuels in a highly turbulent internal airstream. Accurate predictive computer codes which can simulate the fluid mechanics, chemistry, and turbulence-combustion interaction of these chemical reacting flows will be a new tool that is needed in the design of these future propulsion concepts. Experimental and code development research is being performed at LeRC to better understand chemical reacting flows with the long-term goal of establishing these reliable computer codes. Our approach to understand chemical reacting flows is to look at separate, more simple parts of this complex phenomenon as well as to study the full turbulent reacting flow process. As a result, we are engaged in research on the fluid mechanics associated with chemical reacting flows. We are also studying the chemistry of fuel-air combustion. Finally, we are investigating the phenomenon of turbulence-combustion interaction. Research, both experimental and analytical, is highlighted in each of these three major areas.

  4. Flocking in Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouellette, Nicholas; Khurana, Nidhi

    2013-03-01

    Models of active, self-propelled particles with simple interaction rules have long been shown to produce large-scale emergent behavior reminiscent of collective animal motion seen in nature. Such model flocks can be shown to be robust against random noise terms added to the equations. But real animals, such as birds, fish, or insects, live in fluid environments, where the background flow field is nonzero and is often turbulent. In this case, the fluctuations experienced by the individuals in the aggregation are not random, but rather are correlated in space and time. We explore the impact of such spatiotemporally correlated perturbations on flocking by numerically simulating the behavior of a simple flocking model in a turbulent-like flow field produced by a kinematic simulation. The introduction of flow strongly changes the flock formation dynamics. Additionally, we find that under some conditions the background flow tends to break stable flocks into smaller units. We study these clusters, and discuss their relation to the underlying flow field.

  5. Marte Vallis Platy Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    MGS MOC Release No. MOC2-442, 4 August 2003

    The Marte Vallis system, located east of Cerberus and west of Amazonis Planitia, is known for its array of broken, platy flow features. This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a close-up view of some of these plates; they appear to be like puzzle pieces that have been broken apart and moved away from each other. The Mars science community has been discussing these features for the past several years--either the flows in Marte Vallis are lava flows, or mud flows. In either case, the material was very fluid and had a thin crust on its surface. As the material continued to flow through the valley system, the crust broke up into smaller plates that were then rafted some distance down the valley. This picture is located near 6.9oN, 182.8oW. It is illuminated by sunlight from the left.

  6. Piezoelectric axial flow microvalve

    DOEpatents

    Gemmen, Randall; Thornton, Jimmy; Vipperman, Jeffrey S.; Clark, William W.

    2007-01-09

    This invention is directed to a fuel cell operable with a quantity of fuel and a quantity of an oxidizer to produce electrical power, the fuel cell including a fuel cell body including a labyrinth system structured to permit the fuel and the oxidizer to flow therethrough; at least a first catalyst in fluid communication with the labyrinth; and at least a first microvalve operably disposed within at least a portion of the labyrinth. The microvalve utilizes a deflectable member operable upon the application of a voltage from a voltage source. The microvalve includes an elongated flow channel formed therein and extending substantially longitudinally between the first and second ends to permit substantially longitudinal flow of the fluid therethrough and between the first and second ends; and the deflectable member disposed on the valve body, the deflectable member including at least a first piezoelectric portion that is piezoelectrically operable to deflect the deflectable member between an open position and a closed position upon the application of a voltage, the deflectable member in the closed position being operable to resist the flow of the fluid through the flow channel.

  7. Hospital free cash flow.

    PubMed

    Kauer, R T; Silvers, J B

    1991-01-01

    Hospital managers may find it difficult to admit their investments have been suboptimal, but such investments often lead to poor returns and less future cash. Inappropriate use of free cash flow produces large transaction costs of exit. The relative efficiency of investor-owned and tax-exempt hospitals in the product market for hospital services is examined as the free cash flow theory is used to explore capital-market conditions of hospitals. Hypotheses concerning the current competitive conditions in the industry are set forth, and the implications of free cash flow for risk, capital-market efficiency, and the cost of capital to tax-exempt institution is compared to capital-market norms.

  8. Steady Capillary Driven Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weislogel, Mark M.

    1996-01-01

    A steady capillary driven flow is developed for a liquid index in a circular tube which is partially coated with a surface modifier to produce a discontinuous wetting condition from one side of the tube to the other. The bulk flow is novel in that it is truly steady, and controlled solely by the physics associated with dynamic wetting. The influence of gravity on the flow is minimized through the use of small diameter tubes approximately O(1 mm) tested horizontally in a laboratory and larger tubes approximately O(10 mm) tested in the low gravity environment of a drop tower. Average steady velocities are predicted and compared against a large experimental data set which includes the effects of tube dimensions and fluid properties. The sensitivity of the velocity to surface cleanliness is dramatic and the advantages of experimentation in a microgravity environment are discussed.

  9. Alkaline quinone flow battery.

    PubMed

    Lin, Kaixiang; Chen, Qing; Gerhardt, Michael R; Tong, Liuchuan; Kim, Sang Bok; Eisenach, Louise; Valle, Alvaro W; Hardee, David; Gordon, Roy G; Aziz, Michael J; Marshak, Michael P

    2015-09-25

    Storage of photovoltaic and wind electricity in batteries could solve the mismatch problem between the intermittent supply of these renewable resources and variable demand. Flow batteries permit more economical long-duration discharge than solid-electrode batteries by using liquid electrolytes stored outside of the battery. We report an alkaline flow battery based on redox-active organic molecules that are composed entirely of Earth-abundant elements and are nontoxic, nonflammable, and safe for use in residential and commercial environments. The battery operates efficiently with high power density near room temperature. These results demonstrate the stability and performance of redox-active organic molecules in alkaline flow batteries, potentially enabling cost-effective stationary storage of renewable energy. PMID:26404834

  10. Rarefied-flow aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Potter, J. Leith

    1992-01-01

    Means for relatively simple and quick procedures are examined for estimating aerodynamic coefficients of lifting reentry vehicles. The methods developed allow aerospace designers not only to evaluate the aerodynamics of specific shapes but also to optimize shapes under given constraints. The analysis was also studied of the effect of thermomolecular flow on pressures measured by an orifice near the nose of a Space Shuttle Orbiter at altitudes above 75 km. It was shown that pressures corrected for thermomolecular flow effect are in good agreement with values predicted by independent theoretical methods. An incidental product was the insight gained about the free molecular thermal accommodation coefficient applicable under 'real' conditions of high speed flow in the Earth's atmosphere. The results are presented as abstracts of referenced papers. One reference paper is presented in its entirety.

  11. Paraelectric gas flow accelerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sherman, Daniel M. (Inventor); Wilkinson, Stephen P. (Inventor); Roth, J. Reece (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A substrate is configured with first and second sets of electrodes, where the second set of electrodes is positioned asymmetrically between the first set of electrodes. When a RF voltage is applied to the electrodes sufficient to generate a discharge plasma (e.g., a one-atmosphere uniform glow discharge plasma) in the gas adjacent to the substrate, the asymmetry in the electrode configuration results in force being applied to the active species in the plasma and in turn to the neutral background gas. Depending on the relative orientation of the electrodes to the gas, the present invention can be used to accelerate or decelerate the gas. The present invention has many potential applications, including increasing or decreasing aerodynamic drag or turbulence, and controlling the flow of active and/or neutral species for such uses as flow separation, altering heat flow, plasma cleaning, sterilization, deposition, etching, or alteration in wettability, printability, and/or adhesion.

  12. Mechanics of blood flow.

    PubMed

    Skalak, R; Keller, S R; Secomb, T W

    1981-05-01

    The historical development of the mechanics of blood flow can be traced from ancient times, to Leonardo da Vinci and Leonhard Euler and up to the present times with increasing biological knowledge and mathematical analysis. In the last two decades, quantitative and numerical methods have steadily given more complete and precise understanding. In the arterial system wave propagation computations based on nonlinear one-dimensional modeling have given the best representation of pulse wave propagation. In the veins, the theory of unsteady flow in collapsible tubes has recently been extensively developed. In the last decade, progress has been made in describing the blood flow at junctions, through stenoses, in bends and in capillary blood vessels. The rheological behavior of individual red blood cells has been explored. A working model consists of an elastic membrane filled with viscous fluid. This model forms a basis for understanding the viscous and viscoelastic behavior of blood. PMID:7024641

  13. Hospital free cash flow.

    PubMed

    Kauer, R T; Silvers, J B

    1991-01-01

    Hospital managers may find it difficult to admit their investments have been suboptimal, but such investments often lead to poor returns and less future cash. Inappropriate use of free cash flow produces large transaction costs of exit. The relative efficiency of investor-owned and tax-exempt hospitals in the product market for hospital services is examined as the free cash flow theory is used to explore capital-market conditions of hospitals. Hypotheses concerning the current competitive conditions in the industry are set forth, and the implications of free cash flow for risk, capital-market efficiency, and the cost of capital to tax-exempt institution is compared to capital-market norms. PMID:1743965

  14. Alkaline quinone flow battery.

    PubMed

    Lin, Kaixiang; Chen, Qing; Gerhardt, Michael R; Tong, Liuchuan; Kim, Sang Bok; Eisenach, Louise; Valle, Alvaro W; Hardee, David; Gordon, Roy G; Aziz, Michael J; Marshak, Michael P

    2015-09-25

    Storage of photovoltaic and wind electricity in batteries could solve the mismatch problem between the intermittent supply of these renewable resources and variable demand. Flow batteries permit more economical long-duration discharge than solid-electrode batteries by using liquid electrolytes stored outside of the battery. We report an alkaline flow battery based on redox-active organic molecules that are composed entirely of Earth-abundant elements and are nontoxic, nonflammable, and safe for use in residential and commercial environments. The battery operates efficiently with high power density near room temperature. These results demonstrate the stability and performance of redox-active organic molecules in alkaline flow batteries, potentially enabling cost-effective stationary storage of renewable energy.

  15. Microwave fluid flow meter

    DOEpatents

    Billeter, Thomas R.; Philipp, Lee D.; Schemmel, Richard R.

    1976-01-01

    A microwave fluid flow meter is described utilizing two spaced microwave sensors positioned along a fluid flow path. Each sensor includes a microwave cavity having a frequency of resonance dependent upon the static pressure of the fluid at the sensor locations. The resonant response of each cavity with respect to a variation in pressure of the monitored fluid is represented by a corresponding electrical output which can be calibrated into a direct pressure reading. The pressure drop between sensor locations is then correlated as a measure of fluid velocity. In the preferred embodiment the individual sensor cavities are strategically positioned outside the path of fluid flow and are designed to resonate in two distinct frequency modes yielding a measure of temperature as well as pressure. The temperature response can then be used in correcting for pressure responses of the microwave cavity encountered due to temperature fluctuations.

  16. Natural convective mixing flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramos, Eduardo; de La Cruz, Luis; del Castillo, Luis

    1998-11-01

    Natural convective mixing flows. Eduardo Ramos and Luis M. de La Cruz, National University of Mexico and Luis Del Castillo San Luis Potosi University. The possibility of mixing a fluid with a natural convective flow is analysed by solving numerically the mass, momentum and energy equations in a cubic container. Two opposite vertical walls of the container are assumed to have temperatures that oscillate as functions of time. The phase of the oscillations is chosen in such a way that alternating corrotating vortices are formed in the cavity. The mixing efficiency of this kind of flow is examined with a Lagrangian tracking technique. This work was partially financed by CONACyT-Mexico project number GE0044

  17. Evaluation of flow hood measurements for residential register flows

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, I.S.; Wray, C.P.; Dickerhoff, D.J.; Sherman, M.H.

    2001-09-01

    Flow measurement at residential registers using flow hoods is becoming more common. These measurements are used to determine if the HVAC system is providing adequate comfort, appropriate flow over heat exchangers and in estimates of system energy losses. These HVAC system performance metrics are determined by using register measurements to find out if individual rooms are getting the correct airflow, and in estimates of total air handler flow and duct air leakage. The work discussed in this paper shows that commercially available flow hoods are poor at measuring flows in residential systems. There is also evidence in this and other studies that flow hoods can have significant errors even when used on the non-residential systems they were originally developed for. The measurement uncertainties arise from poor calibrations and the sensitivity of exiting flow hoods to non-uniformity of flows entering the device. The errors are usually large--on the order of 20% of measured flow, which is unacceptably high for most applications. Active flow hoods that have flow measurement devices that are insensitive to the entering airflow pattern were found to be clearly superior to commercially available flow hoods. In addition, it is clear that current calibration procedures for flow hoods may not take into account any field application problems and a new flow hood measurement standard should be developed to address this issue.

  18. Flow Distribution in Hydraulic Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, S. N.

    1983-01-01

    General Flow Distribution Program analyzes pressure drops and flow distribution in closed and open hydraulic systems. Analyzes system on basis of incompressible flow though system may contain either compressible or incompressible fluid. Program solves fixed or variable flow problems for series, parallel, or series/parallel systems.

  19. Interactive Flow in Exercise Pedagogy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lloyd, Rebecca; Smith, Stephen

    2006-01-01

    A phenomenology of the bodily experience of interactive flow adds to Csikszentmihalyi's flow theory. Whereas Csikszentmihalyi attended to teachers' and students' experiences of flow separately, this inquiry explores flow through three water-inspired layers of physical interaction between fitness professionals and their clients. Teaching fitness is…

  20. Characterizing Branched Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drury, Byron; Klales, Anna; Heller, Eric

    2014-03-01

    Branched flow appears in a variety of physical systems spanning length scales from microns to thousands of kilometers. For instance, it plays an important role in both electron transport in two dimensional electron gases and the propagation of tsunamis in the ocean. Branches have typically been identified with caustics in the theoretical literature, but concentrations of flux recognizable as branches can arise from other mechanisms. We propose a generalized definition of branching based on a local measure of the stability of trajectories. We analytically and numerically study the characteristics of Hamiltonian flow in phase space and characterize the relationship between branch formation and trajectory stability.

  1. Flow in cyclic cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Kinney, William H.; Dizgah, Azadeh Moradinezhad

    2010-10-15

    In this paper, we use a known duality between expanding and contracting cosmologies to construct a dual of the inflationary flow hierarchy applicable to contracting cosmologies such as ekpyrotic and cyclic models. We show that the inflationary flow equations are invariant under the duality and therefore apply equally well to inflation or to cyclic cosmology. We construct a self-consistent small-parameter approximation dual to the slow-roll approximation in inflation, and calculate the power spectrum of perturbations in this limit. We also recover the matter-dominated contracting solution of Wands, and the recently proposed adiabatic ekpyrosis solution.

  2. Flow line sampler

    DOEpatents

    Nicholls, Colin I.

    1992-07-14

    An on-line product sampling apparatus and method for measuring product samples from a product stream (12) in a flow line (14) having a sampling aperture (11), includes a sampling tube (18) for containing product samples removed from flow line (14). A piston (22) removes product samples from the product stream (12) through the sampling aperture (11) and returns samples to product stream (12). A sensor (20) communicates with sample tube (18), and senses physical properties of samples while the samples are within sample tube (18). In one embodiment, sensor (20) comprises a hydrogen transient nuclear magnetic resonance sensor for measuring physical properties of hydrogen molecules.

  3. Flow transition behavior between the film flow and rivulet flow on an inclined wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iso, Yoshiyuki; Chen, Xi

    2010-11-01

    Gas-liquid two-phase flows on the wall like liquid film flows, which are the so-called wetted wall flows, are observed in many industrial processes such as absorption, desorption, distillation and others. For the optimum design of packed columns widely used in those kind of processes, the accurate predictions of the wetted wall flow behavior in packing elements are important, especially in order to enhance the mass transfer between the gas and liquid and to prevent flooding and channeling of the liquid flow. The present study focused on the effects of the change of liquid flow rate and the wall surface texture treatments on the characteristics of wetted wall flows which have the drastic flow transition between the film flow and rivulet flow. In this paper, gas-liquid two-phase flow simulation by using the volume of fluid (VOF) model is applied into wetted wall flows. Firstly, present results showed that the hysteresis of the flow transition between the film flow and rivulet flow arose against the increasing or decreasing stages of the liquid flow rate. It was supposed that this transition phenomenon depends on the history of flow pattern as the change of curvature of interphase surface which leads to the surface tension. Secondary, the present simulations showed that surface texture treatments added on the wall can improve the prevention of liquid channeling and can increase the wetted area.

  4. Siphon flows in isolated magnetic flux tubes. II - Adiabatic flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montesinos, Benjamin; Thomas, John H.

    1989-01-01

    This paper extends the study of steady siphon flows in isolated magnetic flux tubes surrounded by field-free gas to the case of adiabatic flows. The basic equations governing steady adiabatic siphon flows in a thin, isolated magnetic flux tube are summarized, and qualitative features of adiabatic flows in elevated, arched flux tubes are discussed. The equations are then cast in nondimensional form and the results of numerical computations of adiabatic siphon flows in arched flux tubes are presented along with comparisons between isothermal and adiabatic flows. The effects of making the interior of the flux tube hotter or colder than the surrounding atmosphere at the upstream footpoint of the arch is considered. In this case, is it found that the adiabatic flows are qualitatively similar to the isothermal flows, with adiabatic cooling producing quantitative differences. Critical flows can produce a bulge point in the rising part of the arch and a concentration of magnetic flux above the bulge point.

  5. Siphon flows in isolated magnetic flux tubes. II. Adiabatic flows

    SciTech Connect

    Montesinos, B.; Thomas, J.H.

    1989-02-01

    This paper extends the study of steady siphon flows in isolated magnetic flux tubes surrounded by field-free gas to the case of adiabatic flows. The basic equations governing steady adiabatic siphon flows in a thin, isolated magnetic flux tube are summarized, and qualitative features of adiabatic flows in elevated, arched flux tubes are discussed. The equations are then cast in nondimensional form and the results of numerical computations of adiabatic siphon flows in arched flux tubes are presented along with comparisons between isothermal and adiabatic flows. The effects of making the interior of the flux tube hotter or colder than the surrounding atmosphere at the upstream footpoint of the arch is considered. In this case, is it found that the adiabatic flows are qualitatively similar to the isothermal flows, with adiabatic cooling producing quantitative differences. Critical flows can produce a bulge point in the rising part of the arch and a concentration of magnetic flux above the bulge point. 15 references.

  6. Flow cytometry apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Pinkel, Daniel

    1991-01-01

    An obstruction across the flow chamber creates a one dimensional convergence of a sheath fluid. A passageway in the construction directs flat cells near to the area of one dimensional convergence in the sheath fluid to provide proper orientation of flat cells at fast rates.

  7. Terminal Air Flow Planning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Denery, Dallas G.; Erzberger, Heinz; Edwards, Thomas A. (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    The Center TRACON Automation System (CTAS) will be the basis for air traffic planning and control in the terminal area. The system accepts arriving traffic within an extended terminal area and optimizes the flow based on current traffic and airport conditions. The operational use of CTAS will be presented together with results from current operations.

  8. Hovering in oscillatory flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yangyang; Nitsche, Monika; Kanso, Eva

    2016-10-01

    We investigate the hovering dynamics of rigid bodies with up-down asymmetry placed in oscillating background flows. Recent experiments on inanimate pyramid-shaped objects in oscillating flows with zero mean component demonstrate that the resulting aerodynamic forces are sufficient to keep the object aloft. The mechanisms responsible for this lift production are fundamentally unsteady and depend on the shed vorticity. Here, we consider a model system of a two-dimensional flyer and compute the unsteady, two-way coupling between the flyer and the surrounding fluid in the context of the vortex sheet model. We examine in detail the flow properties (frequency and speed) required for hovering and their dependence on the flyer's characteristics (mass and geometry). We find that the aerodynamic effort required to hover is an intrinsic property of the flyer itself: a given flyer requires a constant amount of effort to hover, irrespective of the frequency and speed of the oscillating flow. This physical insight will potentially have significant implications on the design of unmanned air vehicles as well as on understanding active hovering of live organisms that can manipulate their flapping motion to favor a larger oscillation amplitude or frequency.

  9. Flow control using ferrofluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornat, Francois; Beck, David; Jacobi, Ian; Stone, Howard

    2013-11-01

    A novel flow control technique is proposed which employs a ferrofluidic lubricant infused in a micro-patterned substrate as a ``morphing surface'' for control of wall-bounded flows. Traditionally, morphing surfaces produce dynamic changes in the curvature and roughness of solid substrates for active control of high Reynolds number flow features such as boundary layer separation and turbulent streaks. We show how these surface modifications can be achieved with a thin liquid layer in the presence of a normal magnetic field. By impregnating a chemically-treated, micro-patterned surface with a fluorinated ferrofluid, the fluid is maintained as a thin super-hydrophobic film and can be redistributed on the substrate by magnetic forces to dynamically reveal or conceal the underlying surface roughness. Moreover, the surface topography of the ferrofluid film itself can be modified to produce an enhanced roughness, beyond the scale of the underlying substrate pattern. Both types of ferrofluidic surface modifications are studied in micro- and macro- scale channels in order to assess the feasibility of flow modification at low to moderate Reynolds numbers.

  10. Flow cytometry apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Pinkel, D.

    1987-11-30

    An obstruction across the flow chamber creates a one-dimensional convergence of a sheath fluid. A passageway in the obstruction directs flat cells near to the area of one-dimensional convergence in the sheath fluid to provide proper orientation of flat cells at fast rates. 6 figs.

  11. Studies on reactive flows

    SciTech Connect

    Sheu, Wenjenn.

    1989-01-01

    Theoretical, numerical and experimental studies are presented on the upstream interactions between premixed flamelets in turbulent combustions, the effect of centrifugal acceleration due to the rotation on Bunsen flames, extinction of counterflow diffusion flames in a counter-rotating finite jet, and nonplanar flame configurations in stagnation point flow. The processes during the upstream flame interactions are numerically investigated using two ozone decomposition planar flames propagating towards each other. The flame temperature and speed during the whole interaction process are also analyzed. One basic kind of rotational effects on the shape and stability of the premixed flames stabilized in Bunsen burner is theoretically and experimentally studied. The relation between the flame stabilization by the burner rim and rotation across the flame is examined. In addition the stable and unstable flame configuration are identified. In the study of the extinction characteristics of diffusion flames in opposed-jet flows with angular velocities which are equal in magnitude but opposite in directions, the extinction characteristics with vorticity in the flow were explored. The general configurations of premixed flame fronts in a stagnation point flow is pursued. Some flame shapes other than planar flames were verified. A simple mathematical model is given to provide the explicit expressions of flame fronts. The implications of these studies to the modeling of turbulent combustion are discussed.

  12. Modeling and flow theory

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-10-01

    (1) We recommend the establishment of an experimental test facility, appropriately instrumented, dedicated to research on theoretical modeling concepts. Validation of models for the various flow regimes, and establishment of the limitations or concepts used in the construction of models, are sorely needed areas of research. There exists no mechanism currently for funding of such research on a systematic basis. Such a facility would provide information fundamental to progress in the physics of turbulent multi-phase flow, which would also have impact on the understanding of coal utilization processes; (2) combustion research appears to have special institutional barriers to information exchange because it is an established, commercial ongoing effort, with heavy reliance on empirical data for proprietary configurations; (3) for both gasification and combustion reactors, current models appear to handle adequately some, perhaps even most, gross aspects of the reactors such as overall efficiency and major chemical output constituents. However, new and more stringent requirements concerning NOX, SOX and POX (small paticulate) production require greater understanding of process details and spatial inhomogenities, hence refinement of current models to include some greater detail is necessary; (4) further progress in the theory of single-phase turbulent flow would benefit our understanding of both combustors and gasifiers; and (5) another area in which theoretical development would be extremely useful is multi-phase flow.

  13. Is flow verification necessary

    SciTech Connect

    Beetle, T.M.

    1986-01-01

    Safeguards test statistics are used in an attempt to detect diversion of special nuclear material. Under assumptions concerning possible manipulation (falsification) of safeguards accounting data, the effects on the statistics due to diversion and data manipulation are described algebraically. A comprehensive set of statistics that is capable of detecting any diversion of material is defined in terms of the algebraic properties of the effects. When the assumptions exclude collusion between persons in two material balance areas, then three sets of accounting statistics are shown to be comprehensive. Two of the sets contain widely known accountancy statistics. One of them does not require physical flow verification - comparisons of operator and inspector data for receipts and shipments. The third set contains a single statistic which does not require physical flow verification. In addition to not requiring technically difficult and expensive flow verification, this single statistic has several advantages over other comprehensive sets of statistics. This algebraic approach as an alternative to flow verification for safeguards accountancy is discussed in this paper.

  14. A heat flow calorimeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, W. V.

    1973-01-01

    Reaction mechanism for nickel-cadmium cell is not known well enough to allow calculation of heat effects. Calorimeter can measure heat absorbed or evolved in cell, by determining amount of external heat that must be supplied to calorimeter to maintain constant flow isothermal heat sink.

  15. Wet solids flow enhancement

    SciTech Connect

    Caram, H.S.; Agrawal, D.K.; Foster, N.

    1997-07-01

    The objective was to visualize the flow of granular materials in the silo using Nuclear Magnetic Resonance. This was done by introducing traces. Mustard seeds and poppy seeds were used as trace particles. The region sampled was a cylinder 25 mm in diameter and 40 mm in length. Eight slices containing 128 by 128 to 256 by 256 pixels were generated for each image.

  16. Flow-type carburetor

    SciTech Connect

    Diaz, L.A.R.

    1984-02-14

    An improved flow-type carburetor is disclosed for an internal combustion engine comprising an exhaust gas conduit and port for introducing exhaust gas into the area of the carburetor defined between the venturi and the throttle valve and two or more ports for introducing additional air into the area of the carburetor between the venturi and throttle valve.

  17. Epiglottal Flow Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollard, Andrew; Shinneeb, Abdul-Monsif

    2011-11-01

    PIV measurements have been made at three locations in the pharynx/larynx region in the ETA model, one along the central sagittal plane and two cross-sectional planes. The measurements were made at a flow rate of 9.04 l/min which corresponds approximately to 10 l/min in the prototype. The corresponding Reynolds number Re based on the inlet condition is 716. Two thousand images were acquired at each location at a framing rate of 2 Hz. The mean velocity fields were then calculated. In addition,the data was analysed by the proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) technique to expose vortical structures. Only few modes were used for the POD reconstruction which recovered about 60% of the turbulent kinetic energy. The results showed that the flow is characterised by regions of re-circulation, jet-like, and sink-like flows. In addition, the POD-reconstructed fields revealed some interesting features that occur in the human pharynx/larynx region near the epiglottis such as tearing and pairing processes, as well as the interaction between the flows induced by the structures. Funded by NSERC.

  18. Sinuous flow in metals

    PubMed Central

    Yeung, Ho; Viswanathan, Koushik; Compton, Walter Dale; Chandrasekar, Srinivasan

    2015-01-01

    Annealed metals are surprisingly difficult to cut, involving high forces and an unusually thick “chip.” This anomaly has long been explained, based on ex situ observations, using a model of smooth plastic flow with uniform shear to describe material removal by chip formation. Here we show that this phenomenon is actually the result of a fundamentally different collective deformation mode—sinuous flow. Using in situ imaging, we find that chip formation occurs via large-amplitude folding, triggered by surface undulations of a characteristic size. The resulting fold patterns resemble those observed in geophysics and complex fluids. Our observations establish sinuous flow as another mesoscopic deformation mode, alongside mechanisms such as kinking and shear banding. Additionally, by suppressing the triggering surface undulations, sinuous flow can be eliminated, resulting in a drastic reduction of cutting forces. We demonstrate this suppression quite simply by the application of common marking ink on the free surface of the workpiece material before the cutting. Alternatively, prehardening a thin surface layer of the workpiece material shows similar results. Besides obvious implications to industrial machining and surface generation processes, our results also help unify a number of disparate observations in the cutting of metals, including the so-called Rehbinder effect. PMID:26216980

  19. The Student Flow System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Madonna, Louis A.

    Simple continuity is applied with graph theory to generate a student flow model with multiple inputs and outputs. A graph of all semesters or nodes is laid out along with an input block for transfers in and an output block for transfers out. Arcs are connected from the zero node to the graduation node and these are placed in a time-forward…

  20. Quaternions and ideal flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eshraghi, H.; Gibbon, J. D.

    2008-08-01

    After a review of some of the recent works by Holm and Gibbon on quaternions and their application to Lagrangian flows, particularly the incompressible Euler equations and the equations of ideal MHD, this paper investigates the compressible and relativistic Euler equations using these methods.

  1. Miniaturized Electrochemical Flow Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sahlin, Eskil; Halle, Alexandra ter; Schaefer, Kathleen; Horn, Jeffery; Then, Matthew; Weber, Stephen G.

    2006-01-01

    Several novel types of miniaturized electrochemical flow cells are described. The flow cells are fabricated in fluorinated ethylene propylene using a novel technique where channels with inner diameters down to 13 μm are integrated with electrodes. The channel is formed by shrinking and simultaneous melting of a heat shrink/melt tubing around a channel template (a tungsten wire) and electrodes followed by removal of the channel template. The technique allows incorporation of different electrode materials of different sizes. The electrode configuration consists of one or two working electrodes inside the channel and a counter electrode located in the channel outlet reservoir. Electrode configurations with different channel and working electrode sizes, different electrode materials including carbon fibers, glassy carbon rods, poly(tetrafluoroethylene)/carbon composite material, and platinum wires, and different arrangements have been assembled. Hydrodynamic voltammograms in dual-electrode (generator–collector) experiments indicate good potential control for cells with 25-μm channels, while there is some iR drop in cells with 13-μm channels. Cells prepared with a cylindrical working electrode tangent and perpendicular to a flow channel show a flow rate dependence consistent with thin-layer cell behavior. Electrode areas can be made in the range of 10−10–10−8 m2. PMID:12622401

  2. Flow-induced channel formation in the cytoplasm of motile cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guy, Robert D.; Nakagaki, Toshiyuki; Wright, Grady B.

    2011-07-01

    A model is presented to explain the development of flow channels within the cytoplasm of the plasmodium of the giant amoeba Physarum polycephalum. The formation of channels is related to the development of a self-organizing tubular network in large cells. Experiments indicate that the flow of cytoplasm is involved in the development and organization of these networks, and the mathematical model proposed here is motivated by recent experiments involving the observation of development of flow channel in small cells. A model of pressure-driven flow through a polymer network is presented in which the rate of flow increases the rate of depolymerization. Numerical solutions and asymptotic analysis of the model in one spatial dimension show that under very general assumptions this model predicts the formation of channels in response to flow.

  3. Axisymmetric instability of the Poiseuille-Couette flow between concentric cylinders at high Reynolds numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savenkov, I. V.

    2015-02-01

    For the pressure-driven flow in an annular channel with a wall moving in the axial direction, its linear instability with respect to axisymmetric perturbations at high Reynolds numbers is investigated within the framework of the triple-deck theory. When the gap between the cylinders is sufficiently small (as compared to the radii of the cylinders), it is shown that the perturbations can split into two wave packets, the first of which grows faster and moves at a higher velocity.

  4. Oscillating laminar electrokinetic flow in infinitely extended circular microchannels.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharyya, A; Masliyah, J H; Yang, J

    2003-05-01

    This article addresses the problem of oscillating laminar electrokinetic liquid flow in an infinitely extended circular microchannel. Based on the Debye-Huckel approximation for low surface potential at the channel wall, a complex variable approach is used to obtain an analytical solution for the flow. The complex counterparts of the flow rate and the current are linearly dependent on the pressure gradient and the external electric field. This property is used to show that Onsager's principle of reciprocity continues to be valid (involving the complex quantities) for the stated problem. During oscillating pressure-driven flow, the electroviscous effect for a given value of the normalized reciprocal electrical double-layer (EDL) thickness is observed to attain a maximum at a certain normalized frequency. In general, an increasing normalized frequency results in a reduction of EDL effects, leading to (i). a volumetric flow rate in the case of streaming potential approaching that predicted by the theory without EDL effects, and (ii). a reduction in the volumetric flow rate in the case of electroosmosis. PMID:12725819

  5. Physics of Traffic Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, L. C.

    2015-03-01

    The Texas A&M Transportation Institute estimated that traffic congestion cost the United States 121 billion in 2011 (the latest data available). The cost is due to wasted time and fuel. In addition to accidents and road construction, factors contributing to congestion include large demand, instability of high-density free flow and selfish behavior of drivers, which produces self-organized traffic bottlenecks. Extensive data collected on instrumented highways in various countries have led to a better understanding of traffic dynamics. From these measurements, Boris Kerner and colleagues developed a new theory called three-phase theory. They identified three major phases of flow observed in the data: free flow, synchronous flow and wide moving jams. The intermediate phase is called synchronous because vehicles in different lanes tend to have similar velocities. This congested phase, characterized by lower velocities yet modestly high throughput, frequently occurs near on-ramps and lane reductions. At present there are only two widely used methods of congestion mitigation: ramp metering and the display of current travel-time information to drivers. To find more effective methods to reduce congestion, researchers perform large-scale simulations using models based on the new theories. An algorithm has been proposed to realize Wardrop equilibria with real-time route information. Such equilibria have equal travel time on alternative routes between a given origin and destination. An active area of current research is the dynamics of connected vehicles, which communicate wirelessly with other vehicles and the surrounding infrastructure. These systems show great promise for improving traffic flow and safety.

  6. Ultrasensitive flow cytometric analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Jett, J.H.; Cram, L.S.; Keller, R.A.; Martin, J.C.; Saunders, G.C.; Sklar, L.A.; Steinkamp, J.A.

    1993-01-01

    New techniques and approaches to cellular analysis being developed at the Los Alamos National Flow Cytometry Resource can be divided into those that improve sensitivity and those that move the technology into new areas by refining existing approaches. An example of the first category is a flow cytometric system capable of measuring the phase shift of fluorescence emitted by fluorophors bound to cells is being assembled. This phase sensitive cytometer is be capable of quantifying fluorescence life time on a cell-by-cell basis as well as using the phase sensitive detection to separate fluorescence emissions that overlap spectrally but have different lifetimes. A Fourier transform flow cytometer capable of measuring the fluorescence emission spectrum of individual labeled cells at rates approaching several hundred per second is also in the new technology category. The current implementation is capable of resolving the visible region of the spectrum into 8 bands. With this instrument, it is possible to resolve the contributions of fluorophors with overlapping emission spectra and to determine the emission spectra of dyes such as calcium concentration indicators that are sensitive to the physiological environment. Flow cytometric techniques have been refined to the point that it is possible to detect individual fluorescent molecules in solution as they flow past a laser beam. This capability has lead to a rapid DNA sequencing project. The goal of the project is to develop a technique that is capable of sequencing long strands of DNA (40,000 kb) at a rate of between 100 and 1,000 bases per second.

  7. Coherent Flow Structures in Basaltic Lava Flows - Flow Dynamics and Rheology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cashman, K. V.; Grant, G. E.

    2011-12-01

    Basaltic lavas form multiphase flows with variable proportions of liquid (silicate melt), solid (silicate crystals) and gas bubbles. The hydraulics of these flows is poorly understood, in large part because of the difficulties involved in making direct measurements on large hot lava streams. For example, although surface flow velocity and width can be measured given sufficient logistical support in the field, even as simple a parameter as flow depth must be estimated, and thus generates large uncertainties in instantaneous effusion rate, the lava flow analog for stream discharge. Additionally, there is a dramatic down-flow change in rheology caused by gas loss and solidification that is difficult to characterize without extensive along-flow sampling and analysis. For these reasons, the dynamics of basaltic lava flows are poorly understood. However, distinctive flow features such as standing waves and lateral shocks have been observed in some basaltic lava flows; we suggest that these structures offer a novel approach for calculating key flow parameters and effusion rates. Specifically, we argue that such structures suggest that lava flows can attain transcritical flow regimes (Froude Number [Fr] ≈ 1), similar to high gradient streamflows. This hypothesis is supported by measurements of Hawaiian lava flows from Mauna Loa during the 1984 eruption, where surface flow velocities (measured by timing the advance of surface fragments) and flow depths (estimated by assuming neutral buoyancy for solidified lava "boats") show diminishing velocities and Fr with distance from the vent. Near-vent Fr are supercritical but approach 1.0 at a distance of 3-4 km. Corresponding photographic observations of standing waves, hydraulic jumps and shocks in these flows confirm the correspondence between flow structures and measured hydraulics. In contrast to stream flows, however, these coherent flow structures occur under laminar flow conditions that reflect the moderate Reynolds

  8. Flow-induced deformation of poroelastic tissues and gels: a new perspective on equilibrium pressure-flow-thickness relations.

    PubMed

    Quinn, Thomas M

    2013-01-01

    Hydrostatic pressure-driven flows through soft tissues and gels cause deformations of the solid network to occur, due to drag from the flowing fluid. This phenomenon occurs in many contexts including physiological flows and infusions through soft tissues, in mechanically stimulated engineered tissues, and in direct permeation measurements of hydraulic permeability. Existing theoretical descriptions are satisfactory in particular cases, but none provide a description which is easy to generalize for the design and interpretation of permeation experiments involving a range of different boundary conditions and gel properties. Here a theoretical description of flow-induced permeation is developed using a relatively simple approximate constitutive law for strain-dependent permeability and an assumed constant elastic modulus, using dimensionless parameters which emerge naturally. Analytical solutions are obtained for relationships between fundamental variables, such as flow rate and pressure drop, which were not previously available. Guidelines are provided for assuring that direct measurements of hydraulic permeability are performed accurately, and suggestions emerge for alternative measurement protocols. Insights obtained may be applied to interpretation of flow-induced deformation and related phenomena in many contexts.

  9. How to use your peak flow meter

    MedlinePlus

    Peak flow meter - how to use; Asthma - peak flow meter; Reactive airway disease - peak flow meter; Bronchial asthma - peak flow meter ... your airways are narrowed and blocked due to asthma, your peak flow values drop. You can check ...

  10. Young and Old Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Released 9 April 2004 The Odyssey spacecraft has completed a full Mars year of observations of the red planet. For the next several weeks the Image of the Day will look back over this first mars year. It will focus on four themes: 1) the poles -- with the seasonal changes seen in the retreat and expansion of the caps; 2) craters - with a variety of morphologies relating to impact materials and later alteration, both infilling and exhumation; 3) channels -- the clues to liquid surface flow; and 4) volcanic flow features. While some images have helped answer questions about the history of Mars, many have raised new questions that are still being investigated as Odyssey continues collecting data as it orbits Mars.

    This daytime infrared image was collected Aug. 13, 2003 during southern spring. The upper part of the image shows the relatively young volcanic flows from Arsia Mons, while the bottom exhibits the flow front texture of older flows. The older flows are most likely also from Arsia Mons.

    Image information: IR instrument. Latitude -27.8, Longitude 237.5 East (122.5 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip

  11. Marangoni Flow of Soluble Amphiphiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roché, Matthieu; Li, Zhenzhen; Griffiths, Ian M.; Le Roux, Sébastien; Cantat, Isabelle; Saint-Jalmes, Arnaud; Stone, Howard A.

    2014-05-01

    Surfactant distribution heterogeneities at a fluid-fluid interface trigger the Marangoni effect, i.e., a bulk flow due to a surface tension gradient. The influence of surfactant solubility in the bulk on these flows remains incompletely characterized. Here we study Marangoni flows sustained by injection of hydrosoluble surfactants at the air-water interface. We show that these flows have a finite size that increases with a decrease of the critical micelle concentration of the surfactants. We document the universality of the surface velocity field of these finite flows and predict scaling laws based on hydrodynamics and surfactant physical chemistry that capture the flow features.

  12. Structural power flow measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Falter, K.J.; Keltie, R.F.

    1988-12-01

    Previous investigations of structural power flow through beam-like structures resulted in some unexplained anomalies in the calculated data. In order to develop structural power flow measurement as a viable technique for machine tool design, the causes of these anomalies needed to be found. Once found, techniques for eliminating the errors could be developed. Error sources were found in the experimental apparatus itself as well as in the instrumentation. Although flexural waves are the carriers of power in the experimental apparatus, at some frequencies longitudinal waves were excited which were picked up by the accelerometers and altered power measurements. Errors were found in the phase and gain response of the sensors and amplifiers used for measurement. A transfer function correction technique was employed to compensate for these instrumentation errors.

  13. Lateral flow assays.

    PubMed

    Koczula, Katarzyna M; Gallotta, Andrea

    2016-06-30

    Lateral flow assays (LFAs) are the technology behind low-cost, simple, rapid and portable detection devices popular in biomedicine, agriculture, food and environmental sciences. This review presents an overview of the principle of the method and the critical components of the assay, focusing on lateral flow immunoassays. This type of assay has recently attracted considerable interest because of its potential to provide instantaneous diagnosis directly to patients. The range and interpretation of results and parameters used for evaluation of the assay will also be discussed. The main advantages and disadvantages of LFAs will be summarized and relevant future improvements to testing devices and strategies will be proposed. Finally, the major recent advances and future diagnostic applications in the LFA field will be explored. PMID:27365041

  14. The Flow of Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Znidarsic, F.; Robertson, G. A.

    In this paper, the flow of energy in materials is presented as mechanical waves with a distinct velocity or speed of transition. This speed of transition came about through the observations of cold fusion experiments, i.e., Low Energy Nuclear Reactions (LENR) and superconductor gravity experiments, both assumed speculative by mainstream science. In consideration of superconductor junctions, the LENR experiments have a similar speed of transition, which seems to imply that the reactions in the LENR experiment are discrete quantized reactions (energy - burst vs. continuous). Here an attempt is made to quantify this new condition as it applies to electrons; toward the progression of quantized energy flows (discrete energy burst) as a new source of clean energy and force mechanisms (i.e, propulsion).

  15. Wet solids flow enhancemant

    SciTech Connect

    Caram, H.S.; Foster, N.; Wildman, D.J.

    1996-12-31

    WE used glass beads of different sizes as.a model system to study the flow enhancing properties of Octadecyltrichlorosilane (OTS). 0TS provides Si(CH{sub 2}){sub 17}CH{sub 3} groups that bind with the surface hydrox groups to make it hydrophobic. Experimental data showed, indeed, that surface hydrophobicity promotes the flow of wet granular materials. Mixtures of different percentage of silanized/unsilanized particles were prepared for tensile strength measurements. The tensile strength decreased as more silanized particles were added to the samples. The relationship between dimensionless tensile strength and void fraction followed the correlation found by Pierrat (1994). Contact angles were larger for the silanized particles, as compared with unsilanized ones.

  16. An orographic flow diagramme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Opsanger Jonassen, Marius; Ólafsson, Haraldur; Ágústsson, Hálfdán

    2016-04-01

    Motivated by the need to relate some key features of atmospheric flow over mountains to the elevation of the inversion and wind speed, many numerical experiments are made in order to create a diagramme a la Vosper (2004). The simulations are carried out with the WRF model and stationary boundary-conditions. A neutral boundary-layer is capped by a 10K inversion, of which the height varies. The mountain is 1 km high and the incoming winds are 10,15 or 20 m/s. The surface has zo=0.1m. Vortices, vortex shedding, lee waves and hydraulic jump are detected and related to values of the height of the inversion and the Froude number. Cases of real flow are compared to the idealized results.

  17. Modelling pulmonary blood flow

    PubMed Central

    Tawhai, Merryn H.; Burrowes, Kelly S.

    2008-01-01

    Computational model analysis is a method that has been used widely to understand and interpret complexity of interactions in the pulmonary system. Pulmonary blood transport is a multi-scale phenomenon that involves scale-dependent structure and function, therefore requiring different model assumptions for the microcirculation and the arterial or venous flows. The blood transport systems interact with the surrounding lung tissue, and are dependent on hydrostatic pressure gradients, control of vasoconstriction, and the topology and material composition of the vascular trees. This review focuses on computational models that have been developed to study the different mechanisms contributing to regional perfusion of the lung. Different models for the microcirculation and the pulmonary arteries are considered, including fractal approaches and anatomically-based methods. The studies that are reviewed illustrate the different complementary approaches that can be used to address the same physiological question of flow heterogeneity. PMID:18434260

  18. Lateral flow assays

    PubMed Central

    Koczula, Katarzyna M.

    2016-01-01

    Lateral flow assays (LFAs) are the technology behind low-cost, simple, rapid and portable detection devices popular in biomedicine, agriculture, food and environmental sciences. This review presents an overview of the principle of the method and the critical components of the assay, focusing on lateral flow immunoassays. This type of assay has recently attracted considerable interest because of its potential to provide instantaneous diagnosis directly to patients. The range and interpretation of results and parameters used for evaluation of the assay will also be discussed. The main advantages and disadvantages of LFAs will be summarized and relevant future improvements to testing devices and strategies will be proposed. Finally, the major recent advances and future diagnostic applications in the LFA field will be explored. PMID:27365041

  19. Oahu Groundwater Flow Model

    DOE Data Explorer

    Nicole Lautze

    2015-01-01

    Groundwater flow model for the island of Oahu. Data is from the following sources: Rotzoll, K., A.I. El-Kadi. 2007. Numerical Ground-Water Flow Simulation for Red Hill Fuel Storage Facilities, NAVFAC Pacific, Oahu, Hawaii - Prepared TEC, Inc. Water Resources Research Center, University of Hawaii, Honolulu.; Whittier, R.B., K. Rotzoll, S. Dhal, A.I. El-Kadi, C. Ray, G. Chen, and D. Chang. 2004. Hawaii Source Water Assessment Program Report – Volume VII – Island of Oahu Source Water Assessment Program Report. Prepared for the Hawaii Department of Health, Safe Drinking Water Branch. University of Hawaii, Water Resources Research Center. Updated 2008.; and Whittier, R. and A.I. El-Kadi. 2009. Human and Environmental Risk Ranking of Onsite Sewage Disposal Systems – Final. Prepared by the University of Hawaii, Dept. of Geology and Geophysics for the State of Hawaii Dept. of Health, Safe Drinking Water Branch. December 2009.

  20. KSC's work flow assistant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkinson, John; Johnson, Earl

    1991-01-01

    The work flow assistant (WFA) is an advanced technology project under the shuttle processing data management system (SPDMS) at Kennedy Space Center (KSC). It will be utilized for short range scheduling, controlling work flow on the floor, and providing near real-time status for all major space transportation systems (STS) work centers at KSC. It will increase personnel and STS safety and improve productivity through deeper active scheduling that includes tracking and correlation of STS and ground support equipment (GSE) configuration and work. It will also provide greater accessibility to this data. WFA defines a standards concept for scheduling data which permits both commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) scheduling tools and WFA developed applications to be reused. WFA will utilize industry standard languages and workstations to achieve a scalable, adaptable, and portable architecture which may be used at other sites.

  1. Vortex flow aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, J. H. B.; Campbell, J. F.; Young, A. D. (Editor)

    1992-01-01

    The principal emphasis of the meeting was to be on the understanding and prediction of separation-induced vortex flows and their effects on vehicle performance, stability, control, and structural design loads. This report shows that a substantial amount of the papers covering this area were received from a wide range of countries, together with an attendance that was even more diverse. In itself, this testifies to the current interest in the subject and to the appropriateness of the Panel's choice of topic and approach. An attempt is made to summarize each paper delivered, and to relate the contributions made in the papers and in the discussions to some of the important aspects of vortex flow aerodynamics. This reveals significant progress and important clarifications, but also brings out remaining weaknesses in predictive capability and gaps in understanding. Where possible, conclusions are drawn and areas of continuing concern are identified.

  2. Unsteady Turbopump Flow Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Centin, Kiris C.; Kwak, Dochan

    2001-01-01

    The objective of the current effort is two-fold: 1) to provide a computational framework for design and analysis of the entire fuel supply system of a liquid rocket engine; and 2) to provide high-fidelity unsteady turbopump flow analysis capability to support the design of pump sub-systems for advanced space transportation vehicle. Since the space launch systems in the near future are likely to involve liquid propulsion system, increasing the efficiency and reliability of the turbopump components is an important task. To date, computational tools for design/analysis of turbopump flow are based on relatively lower fidelity methods. Unsteady, three-dimensional viscous flow analysis tool involving stationary and rotational components for the entire turbopump assembly has not been available, at least, for real-world engineering applications. Present effort is an attempt to provide this capability so that developers of the vehicle will be able to extract such information as transient flow phenomena for start up, impact of non-uniform inflow, system vibration and impact on the structure. Those quantities are not readily available from simplified design tools. In this presentation, the progress being made toward complete turbo-pump simulation capability for a liquid rocket engine is reported. Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) turbo-pump is used as a test case for the performance evaluation of the hybrid MPI/Open-MP and MLP versions of the INS3D code. Relative motion of the grid system for rotor-stator interaction was obtained by employing overset grid techniques. Time-accuracy of the scheme has been evaluated by using simple test cases. Unsteady computations for SSME turbopump, which contains 106 zones with 34.5 Million grid points, are currently underway on Origin 2000 systems at NASA Ames Research Center. Results from these time-accurate simulations with moving boundary capability and the performance of the parallel versions of the code will be presented.

  3. Tissue blood flow mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nilsson, G. E.

    1997-01-01

    The operating principles of Laser Doppler Perfusion Imaging (LDPI) for visualization of the tissue blood perfusion are explained. Using this emerging technology skin perfusion has been investigated in healthy volunteers and in patients with various conditions that affect skin blood flow. LDPI is anticipated to be particularly useful in evaluation of peripheral circulation in diabetics, as an objective tool in irritancy patch testing, assessment of burnt skin and visualization of spot-wise hyperperfusion in breast skin in association with carcinoma.

  4. Photoacoustic flow cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Galanzha, Ekaterina I.; Zharov, Vladimir P.

    2016-01-01

    Conventional flow cytometry using scattering and fluorescent detection methods has been a fundamental tool of biological discoveries for many years. Invasive extraction of cells from a living organism, however, may lead to changes in cell properties and prevents the long-term study of cells in their native environment. Here, we summarize recent advances of new generation flow cytometry for in vivo noninvasive label-free or targeted detection of cells in blood, lymph, bone, cerebral and plant vasculatures using photoacoustic (PA) detection techniques, multispectral high-pulse-repetition-rate lasers, tunable ultrasharp (up to 0.8 nm) rainbow plasmonic nanoprobes, positive and negative PA contrasts, in vivo magnetic enrichment, time-of-flight cell velocity measurement, PA spectral analysis, and integration of PA, photothermal (PT), fluorescent, and Raman methods. Unique applications of this tool are reviewed with a focus on ultrasensitive detection of normal blood cells at different functional states (e.g., apoptotic and necrotic) and rare abnormal cells including circulating tumor cells (CTCs), cancer stem cells, pathogens, clots, sickle cells as well as pharmokinetics of nanoparticles, dyes, microbubbles and drug nanocarriers. Using this tool we discovered that palpation, biopsy, or surgery can enhance CTC release from primary tumors, increasing the risk of metastasis. The novel fluctuation flow cytometry provided the opportunity for the dynamic study of blood rheology including red blood cell aggregation and clot formation in different medical conditions (e.g., blood disorders, cancer, or surgery). Theranostics, as a combination of PA diagnosis and PT nanobubble-amplified multiplex therapy, was used for eradication of CTCs, purging of infected blood, and thrombolysis of clots using PA guidance to control therapy efficiency. In vivo flow cytometry using a portable fiber-based devices can provide a breakthrough platform for early diagnosis of cancer, infection and

  5. F-106 Flow Visualization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Convair F-106B Delta Dart: As the last piloted Convair F-106 anywhere, NASA 816 saw service at Langley researching storm hazards, experimenting with an Off-Surface flow visualization system and testing a vortex flap. The Delta Dart was not turned over for target drone duty as were the vast majority of F-106s, but retired to the Virginia Air & Space Center in Hampton, Virginia.

  6. FLOW SYSTEM FOR REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Zinn, W.H.

    1963-06-11

    A reactor is designed with means for terminating the reaction when returning coolant is below a predetermined temperature. Coolant flowing from the reactor passes through a heat exchanger to a lower reservoir, and then circulates between the lower reservoir and an upper reservoir before being returned to the reactor. Means responsive to the temperature of the coolant in the return conduit terminate the chain reaction when the temperature reaches a predetermined minimum value. (AEC)

  7. TEP process flow diagram

    SciTech Connect

    Wilms, R Scott; Carlson, Bryan; Coons, James; Kubic, William

    2008-01-01

    This presentation describes the development of the proposed Process Flow Diagram (PFD) for the Tokamak Exhaust Processing System (TEP) of ITER. A brief review of design efforts leading up to the PFD is followed by a description of the hydrogen-like, air-like, and waterlike processes. Two new design values are described; the mostcommon and most-demanding design values. The proposed PFD is shown to meet specifications under the most-common and mostdemanding design values.

  8. Flow-batch miniaturization.

    PubMed

    Monte-Filho, Severino S; Lima, Marcelo B; Andrade, Stéfani I E; Harding, David P; Fagundes, Yebá N M; Santos, Sergio R B; Lemos, Sherlan G; Araújo, Mario C U

    2011-10-30

    This study introduces the first micro-flow-batch analyzer (μFBA). A simple, low-cost, deep urethane-acrylate photo-resist ultraviolet-lithographic technique was used in its development. Details of the microfabrication process are presented including; the use of two superimposed photo-masks to improve the micro-channel and stop chamber border definition, as well as integration of an LED/phototransistor photometric pair, while using an open nylon-thread (fishing line) micro-mixing system for solutions homogenization. The system was used for photometric determination of Fe(II) in oral solution iron supplements employing the well-known 1,10-phenanthroline method, with instantaneously prepared micro-chamber calibration solutions. All analytical processes were accomplished by simply changing the timing parameters in the control software. It must be emphasized here that there was no outside preparation of the standard calibration solutions; the mixing was all done in-chamber/in-line, with all solutions maintained flowing while being proportioned for the measurement processes. The μFBA results were acceptable when compared to the reference method, and comparable to normal flow-batch systems. It was possible both to project and build a low-cost probe with high sample throughput (about 120 h(-1)), low relative standard deviations (about 1.1%), and reduced reagent consumption (30 times less than the reference method). The μFBA system based on urethane-acrylate presented satisfactory physical and chemical properties while keeping the flexibility, versatility, robustness, and multi-task characteristics of normal flow-batch analyzers. The μFBA system contributes to the advance of micro-analytical instrumentation, while realizing the basic principles of "Green Chemistry". PMID:22063532

  9. Complex Flows by Nanohydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Alley, E; Covello, P; Alder, B

    2004-03-01

    The study of complex flows by particle simulations is speeded up over molecular dynamics (MD) by more than two orders of magnitude by employing a stochastic collision dynamics method (DSMC) extended to high density (CBA). As a consequence, a picture generated on a single processor shows the typical features of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability and is in quantitative agreement with the experimentally found long time behavior.

  10. Convective heat flow probe

    DOEpatents

    Dunn, James C.; Hardee, Harry C.; Striker, Richard P.

    1985-01-01

    A convective heat flow probe device is provided which measures heat flow and fluid flow magnitude in the formation surrounding a borehole. The probe comprises an elongate housing adapted to be lowered down into the borehole; a plurality of heaters extending along the probe for heating the formation surrounding the borehole; a plurality of temperature sensors arranged around the periphery of the probe for measuring the temperature of the surrounding formation after heating thereof by the heater elements. The temperature sensors and heater elements are mounted in a plurality of separate heater pads which are supported by the housing and which are adapted to be radially expanded into firm engagement with the walls of the borehole. The heat supplied by the heater elements and the temperatures measured by the temperature sensors are monitored and used in providing the desired measurements. The outer peripheral surfaces of the heater pads are configured as segments of a cylinder and form a full cylinder when taken together. A plurality of temperature sensors are located on each pad so as to extend along the length and across the width thereof, with a heating element being located in each pad beneath the temperature sensors. An expansion mechanism driven by a clamping motor provides expansion and retraction of the heater pads and expandable packer-type seals are provided along the probe above and below the heater pads.

  11. Convective heat flow probe

    DOEpatents

    Dunn, J.C.; Hardee, H.C.; Striker, R.P.

    1984-01-09

    A convective heat flow probe device is provided which measures heat flow and fluid flow magnitude in the formation surrounding a borehole. The probe comprises an elongate housing adapted to be lowered down into the borehole; a plurality of heaters extending along the probe for heating the formation surrounding the borehole; a plurality of temperature sensors arranged around the periphery of the probe for measuring the temperature of the surrounding formation after heating thereof by the heater elements. The temperature sensors and heater elements are mounted in a plurality of separate heater pads which are supported by the housing and which are adapted to be radially expanded into firm engagement with the walls of the borehole. The heat supplied by the heater elements and the temperatures measured by the temperature sensors are monitored and used in providing the desired measurements. The outer peripheral surfaces of the heater pads are configured as segments of a cylinder and form a full cylinder when taken together. A plurality of temperature sensors are located on each pad so as to extend along the length and across the width thereof, with a heating element being located in each pad beneath the temperature sensors. An expansion mechanism driven by a clamping motor provides expansion and retraction of the heater pads and expandable packet-type seals are provided along the probe above and below the heater pads.

  12. Virtual Flow Simulator

    SciTech Connect

    Calderer, Antoni; Yang, Xiaolei; Angelidis, Dionysios; Khosronejad, Ali; Le, Trung; Kang, Seokkoo; Gilmanov, Anvar; Ge, Liang; Borazjani, Iman

    2015-10-05

    Virtual Flow Simulator (VFS) is a state-of-the-art computational fluid mechanics (CFD) package that is capable of simulating multi-physics/multi-phase flows with the most advanced turbulence models (RANS, LES) over complex terrains. The flow solver is based on the Curvilinear Immersed Boundary (CURVIB) method to handle geometrically complex and moving domains. Different modules of the VFS package can provide different simulation capabilities for specific applications ranging from the fluid-structure interaction (FSI) of solid and deformable bodies, the two-phase free surface flow solver based on the level set method for ocean waves, sediment transport models in rivers and the large-scale models of wind farms based on actuator lines and surfaces. All numerical features of VFS package have been validated with known analytical and experimental data as reported in the related journal articles. VFS package is suitable for a broad range of engineering applications within different industries. VFS has been used in different projects with applications in wind and hydrokinetic energy, offshore and near-shore ocean studies, cardiovascular and biological flows, and natural streams and river morphodynamics. Over the last decade, the development of VFS has been supported and assisted with the help of various United States companies and federal agencies that are listed in the sponsor lists. In this version, VFS-Wind contains all the necessary modeling tools for wind energy applications, including land-based and offshore wind farms. VFS is highly scalable to run on either desktop computers or high performance clusters (up to 16,000 CPUs). This released version comes with a detailed user’s manual and a set of case studies designed to facilitate the learning of the various aspects of the code in a comprehensive manner. The included documentation and support material has been elaborated in a collaboration effort with Sandia National Labs under the contract DE-EE0005482. The VFS

  13. Virtual Flow Simulator

    2015-10-05

    Virtual Flow Simulator (VFS) is a state-of-the-art computational fluid mechanics (CFD) package that is capable of simulating multi-physics/multi-phase flows with the most advanced turbulence models (RANS, LES) over complex terrains. The flow solver is based on the Curvilinear Immersed Boundary (CURVIB) method to handle geometrically complex and moving domains. Different modules of the VFS package can provide different simulation capabilities for specific applications ranging from the fluid-structure interaction (FSI) of solid and deformable bodies, themore » two-phase free surface flow solver based on the level set method for ocean waves, sediment transport models in rivers and the large-scale models of wind farms based on actuator lines and surfaces. All numerical features of VFS package have been validated with known analytical and experimental data as reported in the related journal articles. VFS package is suitable for a broad range of engineering applications within different industries. VFS has been used in different projects with applications in wind and hydrokinetic energy, offshore and near-shore ocean studies, cardiovascular and biological flows, and natural streams and river morphodynamics. Over the last decade, the development of VFS has been supported and assisted with the help of various United States companies and federal agencies that are listed in the sponsor lists. In this version, VFS-Wind contains all the necessary modeling tools for wind energy applications, including land-based and offshore wind farms. VFS is highly scalable to run on either desktop computers or high performance clusters (up to 16,000 CPUs). This released version comes with a detailed user’s manual and a set of case studies designed to facilitate the learning of the various aspects of the code in a comprehensive manner. The included documentation and support material has been elaborated in a collaboration effort with Sandia National Labs under the contract DE-EE0005482

  14. Asymmetric reactions in continuous flow

    PubMed Central

    Mak, Xiao Yin; Laurino, Paola

    2009-01-01

    Summary An overview of asymmetric synthesis in continuous flow and microreactors is presented in this review. Applications of homogeneous and heterogeneous asymmetric catalysis as well as biocatalysis in flow are discussed. PMID:19478913

  15. Radial flow pulse jet mixer

    SciTech Connect

    VanOsdol, John G.

    2013-06-25

    The disclosure provides a pulse jet mixing vessel for mixing a plurality of solid particles. The pulse jet mixing vessel is comprised of a sludge basin, a flow surface surrounding the sludge basin, and a downcoming flow annulus between the flow surface and an inner shroud. The pulse jet mixing vessel is additionally comprised of an upper vessel pressurization volume in fluid communication with the downcoming flow annulus, and an inner shroud surge volume separated from the downcoming flow annulus by the inner shroud. When the solid particles are resting on the sludge basin and a fluid such as water is atop the particles and extending into the downcoming flow annulus and the inner shroud surge volume, mixing occurs by pressurization of the upper vessel pressurization volume, generating an inward radial flow over the flow surface and an upwash jet at the center of the sludge basin.

  16. Vortex generator for flow control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, Jr., Earl R. (Inventor); Marner, Wilbur J. (Inventor); Rohatgi, Naresh K. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    Fluidics flow control of a multiphase supply using a cylindrical chamber is achieved by introducing the supply flow radially into the chamber. The supply flow exits through a port in the center at the chamber. A control fluid is then introduced tangentially about 90.degree. upstream from the supply port. A second control fluid port may be added about 90.degree. upstream from the first control fluid port, but preferably two sets of supply and control ports are added with like ports diametrically opposite each other. The control fluid flows against the circular wall of the control chamber, which introduces a vortex in the flow of the supply flow that decays into a spiral path to the exit port in the center of the chamber. The control flow rate may thus be used to control the spiral path, and therefore the supply flow rate through the exit port.

  17. FAITH Water Channel Flow Visualization

    NASA Video Gallery

    Water channel flow visualization experiments are performed on a three dimensional model of a small hill. This experiment was part of a series of measurements of the complex fluid flow around the hi...

  18. Flow Boiling and Condensation Experiment

    NASA Video Gallery

    The Flow Boiling and Condensation Experiment is another investigation that examines the flow of a mixture of liquids and the vapors they produce when in contact with hot space system equipment. Coo...

  19. A pneumatic pressure-driven multi-throughput microfluidic circulation culture system.

    PubMed

    Satoh, T; Narazaki, G; Sugita, R; Kobayashi, H; Sugiura, S; Kanamori, T

    2016-06-21

    Here, we report a pneumatic pressure-driven microfluidic device capable of multi-throughput medium circulation culture. The circulation culture system has the following advantages for application in drug discovery: (i) simultaneous operation of multiple circulation units, (ii) use of a small amount of circulating medium (3.5 mL), (iii) pipette-friendly liquid handling, and (iv) a detachable interface with pneumatic pressure lines via sterile air-vent filters. The microfluidic device contains three independent circulation culture units, in which human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were cultured under physiological shear stress induced by circulation of the medium. Circulation of the medium in the three culture units was generated by programmed sequentially applied pressure from two pressure-control lines. HUVECs cultured in the microfluidic device were aligned under a one-way circulating flow with a shear stress of 10 dyn cm(-2); they exhibited a randomly ordered alignment under no shear stress and under reciprocating flow with a shear stress of 10 dyn cm(-2). We also observed 2.8- to 4.9-fold increases in expression of the mRNAs of endothelial nitric oxide synthase and thrombomodulin under one-way circulating flow with a shear stress of 10 dyn cm(-2) compared with conditions of no shear stress or reciprocating flow. PMID:27229626

  20. Simulation of multistage turbine flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adamczyk, John J.; Mulac, Richard A.

    1987-01-01

    A flow model has been developed for analyzing multistage turbomachinery flows. This model, referred to as the average passage flow model, describes the time-averaged flow field with a typical passage of a blade row embedded within a multistage configuration. Computer resource requirements, supporting empirical modeling, formulation code development, and multitasking and storage are discussed. Illustrations from simulations of the space shuttle main engine (SSME) fuel turbine performed to date are given.

  1. Description of secondary flows in radial flow machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van den Braembussche, R.

    Detailed measurements by Moore (1973) have revealed that the jet wake formation in radial flow turbomachines is essentially a three-dimensional phenomenon governed by streamwise vorticity; the boundary layers in question make an important contribution to the behavior of low energy fluid transport to a wake region. Secondary flows also contribute to distorted diffuser inlet conditions, which in turn are responsible for important downstream perturbations. Attention is presently given to blade pressure and suction side boundary layers, secondary flow velocity vectors, meridional velocity variation, secondary flow velocity vectors, and secondary flows in diffusers.

  2. Bulk flow scaling for turbulent channel and pipe flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xi; Hussain, Fazle; She, Zhen-Su

    2016-08-01

    We report a theory deriving bulk flow scaling for canonical wall-bounded flows. The theory accounts for the symmetries of boundary geometry (flat plate channel vs. circular pipe) by a variational calculation for a large-scale energy length, which characterizes its bulk flow scaling by a simple exponent, i.e., m = 4 for the channel and 5 for the pipe. The predicted mean velocity shows excellent agreement with several dozen sets of quality empirical data for a wide range of the Reynolds number (Re), with a universal bulk flow constant κ≈0.45 . Predictions for dissipation and turbulent transport in the bulk flow are also given, awaiting data verification.

  3. Compact fluid-flow restrictor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheere, R. W.

    1970-01-01

    Fluid-flow restrictor has degree of restriction easily and accurately controlled during manufacture. Restrictor's flow channel is machined square thread around a solid slug which is shrink-fitted to cylindrical case. One end of case is closed, open end capped, and both ends tapped for tube fittings for fluid flow.

  4. Bellows flow-induced vibrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tygielski, P. J.; Smyly, H. M.; Gerlach, C. R.

    1983-01-01

    The bellows flow excitation mechanism and results of comprehensive test program are summarized. The analytical model for predicting bellows flow induced stress is refined. The model includes the effects of an upstream elbow, arbitrary geometry, and multiple piles. A refined computer code for predicting flow induced stress is described which allows life prediction if a material S-N diagram is available.

  5. COMPRESSIBLE FLOW, ENTRAINMENT, AND MEGAPLUME

    EPA Science Inventory

    It is generally believed that low Mach number, i.e., low-velocity, flow may be assumed to be incompressible flow. Under steady-state conditions, an exact equation of continuity may then be used to show that such flow is non-divergent. However, a rigorous, compressible fluid-dynam...

  6. Liquid/Gas Flow Mixers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fabris, Gracio

    1994-01-01

    Improved devices mix gases and liquids into bubbly or foamy flows. Generates flowing, homogeneous foams or homogeneous dispersions of small, noncoalescing bubbles entrained in flowing liquids. Mixers useful in liquid-metal magnetohydrodynamic electric-power generator, froth flotation in mining industry, wastewater treatment, aerobic digestion, and stripping hydrocarbon contaminants from ground water.

  7. Fluorescent Particles For Flow Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonnell, Jeremy L.; Stern, Susan M.; Torkelson, Jan R.

    1995-01-01

    Small alumina spheres coated with fluorescent dye used in flow testing of transparent plastic model of check valve. Entrained fluroescent particles make flows visible. After completion of flow test, particles remaining in valve easily detectable and removed for measurement of their sizes.

  8. Prototype of calorimetric flow microsensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sazhin, Oleg

    2012-11-01

    An analytical model of calorimetric flow sensor has been developed. The results of the application of this model are utilized to develop a calorimetric flow microsensor with optimal functional characteristics. The technology to manufacture the microsensor is described. A prototype of the microsensor suitable to be used in the mass air flow meter has been designed. The basic characteristics of the microsensor are presented.

  9. Potential of flow-counterbalanced capillary electrophoresis for analytical and micropreparative separations.

    PubMed

    Chankvetadze, B; Burjanadze, N; Bergenthal, D; Blaschke, G

    1999-09-01

    The potential of flow-counterbalanced capillary electrophoresis (FCCE) in chiral and achiral separations was investigated in this work. Unlimited increase of the separation selectivity can be achieved for binary mixtures using FCCE. This was shown for the enantioseparation of (+/-)-chlorpheniramine (CHL) with carboxymethyl-beta-cyclodextrin (CM-beta-CD) as chiral selector. The other example is the separation of alpha- and beta-isomers of a dipeptide aspartame (AS). The carrier ability of the (chiral) selector or pseudostationary phase, the electroosmotic flow (EOF), the pressure-driven flow or hydrodynamic flow can be used as a counterbalancing flow to the electrophoretic mobility of the analyte or vice versa. This mechanism can also be used for micropreparative purposes. FCCE also bears the potential for stepwise separation and fraction collection of multicomponent mixtures.

  10. Interfacial wave behavior in oil-water channel flows: Prospects for a general understanding

    SciTech Connect

    McCready, M.J.; Uphold, D.D.; Gifford, K.A.

    1997-12-31

    Oil-water pressure driven channel flow is examined as a model for general two-layer flows where interfacial disturbances are important. The goal is to develop sufficient understanding of this system so that the utility and limitations of linear and nonlinear theories can be known a priori. Experiments show that sometimes linear stability is useful at predicting the steady or dominant evolving waves. However in other situations there is no agreement between the linearly fastest growing wave and the spectral peak. An interesting preliminary result is that the bifurcation to interfacial waves is supercritical for all conditions that were studied for an oil-water channel flow, gas-liquid channel flow and two-liquid Couette flow. However, three different mechanisms are dominant for each of these three situations.

  11. Modeling shrouded stator cavity flows in axial-flow compressors

    SciTech Connect

    Wellborn, S.R.; Tolchinsky, I.; Okiishi, T.H.

    2000-01-01

    Experiments and computational analyses were completed to understand the nature of shrouded stator cavity flows. From this understanding, a one-dimensional model of the flow through shrouded stator cavities was developed. This model estimates the leakage mass flow, temperature rise, and angular momentum increase through the cavity, given geometry parameters and the flow conditions at the interface between the cavity and primary flow path. This cavity model consists of two components, one that estimates the flow characteristics through the labyrinth seals and the other that predicts the transfer of momentum due to windage. A description of the one-dimensional model is given. The incorporation and use of the one-dimensional model in a multistage compressor primary flow analysis tool is described. The combination of this model and the primary flow solver was used to reliably simulate the significant impact on performance of the increase of hub seal leakage in a twelve-stage axial-flow compressor. Observed higher temperatures of the hub region fluid, different stage matching, and lower overall efficiencies and core flow than expected could be correctly linked to increased hub seal clearance with this new technique. The importance of including these leakage flows in compressor simulations is shown.

  12. Gas flow meter and method for measuring gas flow rate

    DOEpatents

    Robertson, Eric P.

    2006-08-01

    A gas flow rate meter includes an upstream line and two chambers having substantially equal, fixed volumes. An adjustable valve may direct the gas flow through the upstream line to either of the two chambers. A pressure monitoring device may be configured to prompt valve adjustments, directing the gas flow to an alternate chamber each time a pre-set pressure in the upstream line is reached. A method of measuring the gas flow rate measures the time required for the pressure in the upstream line to reach the pre-set pressure. The volume of the chamber and upstream line are known and fixed, thus the time required for the increase in pressure may be used to determine the flow rate of the gas. Another method of measuring the gas flow rate uses two pressure measurements of a fixed volume, taken at different times, to determine the flow rate of the gas.

  13. Flow Along Valley Floors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Released 9 May 2003

    Lines indicative of flow in a valley floor (east to west) cut across similar lines in a slightly smaller valley (southeast to northwest), indicating both that material flowed along the valley floor (as opposed to across it) and that relative flow ages may be determined from crosscutting relationships.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 39.6, Longitude 31.1East (328.9). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  14. Turbulent supersonic channel flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lechner, Richard; Sesterhenn, Jörn; Friedrich, Rainer

    2001-01-01

    The effects of compressibility are studied in low Reynolds number turbulent supersonic channel flow via a direct numerical simulation. A pressure-velocity-entropy formulation of the compressible Navier-Stokes equations which is cast in a characteristic, non-conservative form and allows one to specify exact wall boundary conditions, consistent with the field equations, is integrated using a fifth-order compact upwind scheme for the Euler part, a fourth-order Padé scheme for the viscous terms and a third-order low-storage Runge-Kutta time integration method. Coleman et al fully developed supersonic channel flow at M?=?1.5 and Re?=?3000 is used to test the method. The nature of fluctuating variables is investigated in detail for the wall layer and the core region based on scatter plots. Fluctuations conditioned on sweeps and ejections in the wall layer are especially instructive, showing that positive temperature, entropy and total temperature fluctuations are mainly due to sweep events in this specific situation of wall cooling. The effect of compressibility on the turbulence structure is in many respects similar to that found in homogeneous shear turbulence and in mixing layers. The normal components of the Reynolds stress anisotropy tensor are increased due to compressibility, while the shear stress component is slightly reduced. Characteristic of the Reynolds stress transport is a suppression of the production of the longitudinal and the shear stress component, a suppression of all velocity-pressure-gradient correlations and most of the dissipation rates. Comparison with incompressible channel flow data reveals that compressibility effects manifest themselves in the wall layer only.

  15. Tailoring of electron flow current in magnetically insulated transmission lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, J. P.; Savage, M. E.; Pointon, T. D.; Gilmore, M. A.

    2009-03-01

    It is desirable to optimize (minimizing both the inductance and electron flow) the magnetically insulated vacuum sections of low impedance pulsed-power drivers. The goal of low inductance is understandable from basic efficiency arguments. The goal of low electron flow results from two observations: (1) flowing electrons generally do not deliver energy to (or even reach) most loads, and thus constitute a loss mechanism; (2) energetic electrons deposited in a small area can cause anode damage and anode plasma formation. Low inductance and low electron flow are competing goals; an optimized system requires a balance of the two. While magnetically insulated systems are generally forgiving, there are times when optimization is crucial. For example, in large pulsed-power drivers used to energize high energy density physics loads, the electron flow as a fraction of total current is small, but that flow often reaches the anode in relatively small regions. If the anode temperature becomes high enough to desorb gas, the resulting plasma initiates a gap closure process that can impact system performance. Magnetic-pressure driven (z pinches and material equation of state) loads behave like a fixed inductor for much of the drive pulse. It is clear that neither fixed gap nor constant-impedance transmission lines are optimal for driving inductive loads. This work shows a technique for developing the optimal impedance profile for the magnetically insulated section of a high-current driver. Particle-in-cell calculations are used to validate the impedance profiles developed in a radial disk magnetically insulated transmission line geometry. The input parameters are the spacing and location of the minimum gap, the effective load inductance, and the desired electron flow profile. The radial electron flow profiles from these simulations are in good agreement with theoretical predictions when driven at relatively high voltage (i.e., V≥2MV).

  16. Continuous flow photochemistry.

    PubMed

    Gilmore, Kerry; Seeberger, Peter H

    2014-06-01

    Due to the narrow width of tubing/reactors used, photochemistry performed in micro- and mesoflow systems is significantly more efficient than when performed in batch due to the Beer-Lambert Law. Owing to the constant removal of product and facility of flow chemical scalability, the degree of degradation observed is generally decreased and the productivity of photochemical processes is increased. In this Personal Account, we describe a wide range of photochemical transformations we have examined using both visible and UV light, covering cyclizations, intermolecular couplings, radical polymerizations, as well as singlet oxygen oxygenations. PMID:24890908

  17. Plug Flow Reactor Simulator

    SciTech Connect

    Larson, Richard S.

    1996-07-30

    PLUG is a computer program that solves the coupled steady state continuity, momentum, energy, and species balance equations for a plug flow reactor. Both homogeneous (gas-phase) and heterogenous (surface) reactions can be accommodated. The reactor may be either isothermal or adiabatic or may have a specified axial temperature or heat flux profile; alternatively, an ambient temperature and an overall heat-transfer coefficient can be specified. The crosssectional area and surface area may vary with axial position, and viscous drag is included. Ideal gas behavior and surface site conservation are assumed.

  18. Continuous flow photochemistry.

    PubMed

    Gilmore, Kerry; Seeberger, Peter H

    2014-06-01

    Due to the narrow width of tubing/reactors used, photochemistry performed in micro- and mesoflow systems is significantly more efficient than when performed in batch due to the Beer-Lambert Law. Owing to the constant removal of product and facility of flow chemical scalability, the degree of degradation observed is generally decreased and the productivity of photochemical processes is increased. In this Personal Account, we describe a wide range of photochemical transformations we have examined using both visible and UV light, covering cyclizations, intermolecular couplings, radical polymerizations, as well as singlet oxygen oxygenations.

  19. Combustion in supersonic flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Northam, G. B.

    1985-01-01

    A workshop on combustion in supersonic flow was held in conjunction with the 21st JANNAF Combustion Meeting at Laurel, Maryland on October 3 to 4 1984. The objective of the workshop was to establish the level of current understanding of supersonic combustion. The workshop was attended by approximately fifty representatives from government laboratories, engine companies, and universities. Twenty different speakers made presentations in their area of expertise during the first day of the workshop. On the second day, the presentations were discussed, deficiencies in the current understanding defined, and a list of recommended programs generated to address these deficiencies. The agenda for the workshop is given.

  20. Bondi flow revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Datta, Satadal

    2016-08-01

    Newtonian spherically symmetric transonic accretion is studied by including the mass of the accreting matter, while considering the growth of the accretor itself to be negligibly small. A novel iterative method is introduced to accomplish that task. It is demonstrated that the inclusion of the mass of the fluid changes the critical properties of the flow as well as the topological phase portraits of the stationary integral solution. The changes are small in the framework of this methodology. It is shown that to get large changes one has to develop a new method.

  1. Plug Flow Reactor Simulator

    1996-07-30

    PLUG is a computer program that solves the coupled steady state continuity, momentum, energy, and species balance equations for a plug flow reactor. Both homogeneous (gas-phase) and heterogenous (surface) reactions can be accommodated. The reactor may be either isothermal or adiabatic or may have a specified axial temperature or heat flux profile; alternatively, an ambient temperature and an overall heat-transfer coefficient can be specified. The crosssectional area and surface area may vary with axial position,more » and viscous drag is included. Ideal gas behavior and surface site conservation are assumed.« less

  2. WET SOLIDS FLOW ENHANCEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Hugo S. Caram; Natalie Foster

    1997-03-31

    The objective was to visualize the flow of granular materials in flat bottomed silo. This was done by for dry materials introducing mustard seeds and poppy seeds as tracer particles and imaging them using Nuclear Magnetic Resonance. The region sampled was a cylinder 25 mm in diameter and 40 mm in length. Eight slices containing 128*128 to 256*256 pixels were generated for each image. The size of the silo was limited by the size of the high resolution NMR imager available. Cross-sections of 150mm flat bottomed silos, with the tracer layers immobilized by a gel, showed similar qualitative patterns for both dry and wet granular solids.

  3. Incompressible Flows Free Surfaces

    1992-02-01

    NASA-VOF3D is a three-dimensional, transient, free surface, incompressible fluid dynamics program. It is specifically designed to calculate confined flows in a low gravity environment in which surface physics must be accurately treated. It allows multiple free surfaces with surface tension and wall adhesion and includes a partial cell treatment that allows curved boundaries and internal obstacles. Variable mesh spacing is permitted in all three coordinate directions. Boundary conditions available are rigid free-slip wall, rigid no-slipmore » wall, continuative, periodic, and specified pressure outflow boundary.« less

  4. Potential flow in engine valves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eck, Bruno

    1925-01-01

    The extensive applicability of the hydrodynamic theory to the problems of engine construction is clearly shown in the following attempt to determine by exact methods the nature of the flow in valves under variously restricted conditions. Observation shows that two principal kinds of flow occur in simple flat-seated valves. For small valve lifts, the flow is along the horizontal wall and is therefore deflected 90 degrees, but for greater valve lifts the flow separates and forms a free stream, whose angle of deflection naturally increases with increasing lift. Both these kinds of flow can, in fact, be theoretically explained

  5. Heat exchanger with oscillating flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scotti, Stephen J. (Inventor); Blosser, Max L. (Inventor); Camarda, Charles J. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    Various heat exchange apparatuses are described in which an oscillating flow of primary coolant is used to dissipate an incident heat flux. The oscillating flow may be imparted by a reciprocating piston, a double action twin reciprocating piston, fluidic oscillators or electromagnetic pumps. The oscillating fluid flows through at least one conduit in either an open loop or a closed loop. A secondary flow of coolant may be used to flow over the outer walls of at least one conduit to remove heat transferred from the primary coolant to the walls of the conduit.

  6. Heat exchanger with oscillating flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scotti, Stephen J. (Inventor); Blosser, Max L. (Inventor); Camarda, Charles J. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    Various heat exchange apparatuses are described in which an oscillating flow of primary coolant is used to dissipate an incident heat flux. The oscillating flow may be imparted by a reciprocating piston, a double action twin reciprocating piston, fluidic oscillators, or electromagnetic pumps. The oscillating fluid flows through at least one conduit in either an open loop or a closed loop. A secondary flow of coolant may be used to flow over the outer walls of at least one conduit to remove heat transferred from the primary coolant to the walls of the conduit.

  7. Lunar ash flows - Isothermal approximation.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pai, S. I.; Hsieh, T.; O'Keefe, J. A.

    1972-01-01

    Suggestion of the ash flow mechanism as one of the major processes required to account for some features of lunar soil. First the observational background and the gardening hypothesis are reviewed, and the shortcomings of the gardening hypothesis are shown. Then a general description of the lunar ash flow is given, and a simple mathematical model of the isothermal lunar ash flow is worked out with numerical examples to show the differences between the lunar and the terrestrial ash flow. The important parameters of the ash flow process are isolated and analyzed. It appears that the lunar surface layer in the maria is not a residual mantle rock (regolith) but a series of ash flows due, at least in part, to great meteorite impacts. The possibility of a volcanic contribution is not excluded. Some further analytic research on lunar ash flows is recommended.

  8. Monolithic Continuous-Flow Bioreactors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephanopoulos, Gregory; Kornfield, Julia A.; Voecks, Gerald A.

    1993-01-01

    Monolithic ceramic matrices containing many small flow passages useful as continuous-flow bioreactors. Ceramic matrix containing passages made by extruding and firing suitable ceramic. Pores in matrix provide attachment medium for film of cells and allow free movement of solution. Material one not toxic to micro-organisms grown in reactor. In reactor, liquid nutrients flow over, and liquid reaction products flow from, cell culture immobilized in one set of channels while oxygen flows to, and gaseous reaction products flow from, culture in adjacent set of passages. Cells live on inner surfaces containing flowing nutrient and in pores of walls of passages. Ready access to nutrients and oxygen in channels. They generate continuous high yield characteristic of immobilized cells, without large expenditure of energy otherwise incurred if necessary to pump nutrient solution through dense biomass as in bioreactors of other types.

  9. Static Flow Characteristics of a Mass Flow Injecting Valve

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mattern, Duane; Paxson, Dan

    1995-01-01

    A sleeve valve is under development for ground-based forced response testing of air compression systems. This valve will be used to inject air and to impart momentum to the flow inside the first stage of a multi-stage compressor. The valve was designed to deliver a maximum mass flow of 0.22 lbm/s (0.1 kg/s) with a maximum valve throat area of 0.12 sq. in (80 sq. mm), a 100 psid (689 KPA) pressure difference across the valve and a 68 F, (20 C) air supply. It was assumed that the valve mass flow rate would be proportional to the valve orifice area. A static flow calibration revealed a nonlinear valve orifice area to mass flow relationship which limits the maximum flow rate that the valve can deliver. This nonlinearity was found to be caused by multiple choking points in the flow path. A simple model was used to explain this nonlinearity and the model was compared to the static flow calibration data. Only steady flow data is presented here. In this report, the static flow characteristics of a proportionally controlled sleeve valve are modelled and validated against experimental data.

  10. Radial flow heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Valenzuela, Javier

    2001-01-01

    A radial flow heat exchanger (20) having a plurality of first passages (24) for transporting a first fluid (25) and a plurality of second passages (26) for transporting a second fluid (27). The first and second passages are arranged in stacked, alternating relationship, are separated from one another by relatively thin plates (30) and (32), and surround a central axis (22). The thickness of the first and second passages are selected so that the first and second fluids, respectively, are transported with laminar flow through the passages. To enhance thermal energy transfer between first and second passages, the latter are arranged so each first passage is in thermal communication with an associated second passage along substantially its entire length, and vice versa with respect to the second passages. The heat exchangers may be stacked to achieve a modular heat exchange assembly (300). Certain heat exchangers in the assembly may be designed slightly differently than other heat exchangers to address changes in fluid properties during transport through the heat exchanger, so as to enhance overall thermal effectiveness of the assembly.

  11. Annular flow diverter valve

    DOEpatents

    Rider, Robert L.

    1980-01-01

    A valve for diverting flow from the center of two concentric tubes to the annulus between the tubes or, operating in the reverse direction, for mixing fluids from concentric tubes into a common tube and for controlling the volume ratio of said flow consists of a toroidal baffle disposed in sliding engagement with the interior of the inner tube downstream of a plurality of ports in the inner tube, a plurality of gates in sliding engagement with the interior of the inner tube attached to the baffle for movement therewith, a servomotor having a bullet-shaped plug on the downstream end thereof, and drive rods connecting the servomotor to the toroidal baffle, the servomotor thereby being adapted to move the baffle into mating engagement with the bullet-shaped plug and simultaneously move the gates away from the ports in the inner tube and to move the baffle away from the bullet-shaped plug and simultaneously move the gates to cover the ports in the inner tube.

  12. Fluid flow monitoring device

    DOEpatents

    McKay, Mark D.; Sweeney, Chad E.; Spangler, Jr., B. Samuel

    1993-01-01

    A flow meter and temperature measuring device comprising a tube with a body centered therein for restricting flow and a sleeve at the upper end of the tube to carry several channels formed longitudinally in the sleeve to the appropriate axial location where they penetrate the tube to allow pressure measurements and temperature measurements with thermocouples. The high pressure measurement is made using a channel penetrating the tube away from the body and the low pressure measurement is made at a location at the widest part of the body. An end plug seals the end of the device and holes at its upper end allow fluid to pass from the interior of the tube into a plenum. The channels are made by cutting grooves in the sleeve, the grooves widened at the surface of the sleeve and then a strip of sleeve material is welded to the grooves closing the channels. Preferably the sleeve is packed with powdered graphite before cutting the grooves and welding the strips.

  13. Ellipsoidal cell flow system

    DOEpatents

    Salzman, Gary C.; Mullaney, Paul F.

    1976-01-01

    The disclosure relates to a system incorporating an ellipsoidal flow chamber having light reflective walls for low level light detection in practicing cellular analysis. The system increases signal-to-noise ratio by a factor of ten over prior art systems. In operation, laser light passes through the primary focus of the ellipsoid. A controlled flow of cells simultaneously passes through this focus so that the laser light impinges on the cells and is modulated by the cells. The reflective walls of the ellipsoid reflect the cell-modulated light to the secondary focus of the ellipsoid. A tapered light guide at the secondary focus picks up a substantial portion of modulated reflective light and directs it onto a light detector to produce a signal. The signal is processed to obtain the intensity distribution of the modulated light and hence sought after characteristics of the cells. In addition, cells may be dyed so as to fluoresce in response to the laser light and their fluorescence may be processed as cell-modulated light above described. A light discriminating filter would be used to distinguish reflected modulated laser light from reflected fluorescent light.

  14. Fluid flow monitoring device

    DOEpatents

    McKay, M.D.; Sweeney, C.E.; Spangler, B.S. Jr.

    1993-11-30

    A flow meter and temperature measuring device are described comprising a tube with a body centered therein for restricting flow and a sleeve at the upper end of the tube to carry several channels formed longitudinally in the sleeve to the appropriate axial location where they penetrate the tube to allow pressure measurements and temperature measurements with thermocouples. The high pressure measurement is made using a channel penetrating the tube away from the body and the low pressure measurement is made at a location at the widest part of the body. An end plug seals the end of the device and holes at its upper end allow fluid to pass from the interior of the tube into a plenum. The channels are made by cutting grooves in the sleeve, the grooves widened at the surface of the sleeve and then a strip of sleeve material is welded to the grooves closing the channels. Preferably the sleeve is packed with powdered graphite before cutting the grooves and welding the strips. 7 figures.

  15. Internal Surface Water Flows

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Murray, Mitchell H.

    1999-01-01

    Introduction The South Florida Ecosystem Restoration Program is an intergovernmental effort to reestablish and maintain the ecosystem of south Florida. One element of the restoration effort is the development of a firm scientific basis for resource decision making.The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) provides scientitic information as part of the South Florida Ecosystem Restoration Program. The USGS began its own project, called the South Florida Ecosystem Project in fiscal year 1995 for the purpose of gathering hydrologic, cartographic, and geologic data that relate to the mainland of south Florida, Florida Bay, and the Florida Keys and Reef ecosystems. Historical changes in water-management practices to accommodate a large and rapidly growing urban population along the Atlantic coast, as well as intensive agricultural activities, have resulted in a highly managed hydrologic system with canals, levees, and pumping stations. These structures have altered the hydology of the Everglades ecosystem on both coastal and interior lands. Surface-water flows in a direction south of Lake Okeechobee have been regulated by an extensive canal network, begun in the 1940's, to provide for drainage, flood control, saltwater intrusion control, agricultural requirements, and various environmental needs. Much of the development and subsequent monitoring of canal and river discharge south of Lake Okeechobee has traditionally emphasized the eastern coastal areas of Florida. Recently, more emphasis has been placed on providing a more accurate water budget for internal canal flows.

  16. Prediction of Geophysical Flow Mobility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cagnoli, B.; Piersanti, A.

    2014-12-01

    The prediction of the mobility of geophysical flows to assess their hazards is one of the main research goals in the earth sciences. Our laboratory experiments and numerical simulations are carried out to understand the effects of grain size and flow volume on the mobility of the centre of mass of dry granular flows of angular rock fragments that have pyroclastic flows and rock avalanches as counterpart in nature. We focus on the centre of mass because it provides information about the intrinsic ability of a flow to dissipate more or less energy as a function of its own features. We show that the grain size and flow volume effects can be expressed by a linear relationship between scaling parameters where the finer the grain size or the smaller the flow volume, the more mobile the centre of mass of the granular flow. The grain size effect is the result of the decrease of particle agitation per unit of flow mass, and thus, the decrease of energy dissipation per unit of travel distance, as grain size decreases. In this sense, flows with different grain sizes are like cars with engines with different fuel efficiencies. The volume effect is the result of the fact that the deposit accretes backward during its formation on a slope change (either gradual or abrupt). We adopt for the numerical simulations a 3D discrete element modeling which confirms the grain size and flow volume effects shown by the laboratory experiments. This confirmation is obtained without prior fine tuning of the parameter values to get the desired output. The numerical simulations reveal also that the larger the initial compaction of the granular mass before release, the more mobile the flow. This behaviour must be taken into account to prevent misinterpretation of laboratory and field data. Discrete element modeling predicts the correct effects of grain size and flow volume because it takes into consideration particle interactions that are responsible for the energy dissipated by the flows.

  17. Lava Flows in Eastern Tharsis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    (Released 31 May 2002) This image may at first appear somewhat bland -- there is little contrast in the surface materials due to dust cover, and there are few impact craters -- but there are some very interesting geologic features here. The great Tharsis volcanoes have produced vast fields of lava flows, such as those shown in this image, to the east of Tharsis Tholus. The flows in this image have moved from west to east, down the regional topographic slope. The lobate edges of the flows are distinctive, and permit the discrimination of many overlapping individual flows that may represent tens, hundreds, thousands, or even millions of years worth of volcanic activity (overlapping relationships are especially evident at the bottom of the image). Viewed at full resolution, the image reveals interesting patterns and textures on the top surfaces of these flows. In particular, at the top of the image, there are numerous parallel curved ridges visible on the upper surfaces of the lava flows. These ridges make the flow surface look somewhat ropy, and at smaller scales this flow might be referred to as pahoehoe, indicative of a relatively fluid type of lava flow. At the scales observed here, however, these features are probably better referred to as pressure ridges. Pressure ridges form on the surface of a lava flow when the upper part of the flow is exposed to air, freezing it, but the insulated unfrozen interior of the flow continues to move down slope (and more material is pushed forward from behind), causing the surface to compress and pile up like a rug. Rough-looking flows with less distinct (more random) patterns on their surfaces may be flows that are more like terrestrial a'a flows, which are distinguished from pahoehoe flows by their higher viscosities and effusion rates. Near the center of the image there is an east-west trending, smooth-floored depression. The somewhat continuous width of this depression suggests that it is not simply formed by the edges of two

  18. Extreme negative pressure does not cause erythrocyte damage in flowing blood.

    PubMed

    Chambers, S D; Ceccio, S L; Annich, G A; Bartlett, R H

    1999-01-01

    In extracorporeal circulation, negative pressure is thought to be a source of hemolysis. This study was designed to investigate the effects of extreme negative pressure on flowing blood. The study model was pipe flow. The hemolysis generated by negative pressure driven flow was compared with that generated by positive pressure driven flow of equal magnitude to control for the hemolytic effect of shear stress. A series of pressures (720, 600, 500, -500, -600, and -720 mm Hg; n = 8) was tested for pipe diameters of 0.04 and 0.16 cm, with a length-to-diameter ratio of 500. The pressure difference across the pipe (deltaP) was equal to the magnitude of the applied pressure. The hemolysis was quantified by the modified index of hemolysis (MIH). For both pipe diameters, MIH was found to not depend on the deltaP or the blood collection day (multiple regression analysis, p = 0.50 and p = 0.63, respectively). There was no statistically significant difference between the MIH for equal deltaP generated by positive or negative pressure (p = 0.50) for both pipe diameters tested. MIH did depend upon the pipe diameter, with 0.04 cm having higher MIH at all pressures (p = 0.0003). Thus, negative pressure is not a significant hemolytic factor in flowing blood.

  19. Eddy Current Minimizing Flow Plug for Use in Flow Conditioning and Flow Metering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    England, John Dwight (Inventor); Kelley, Anthony R. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    An eddy-current-minimizing flow plug has open flow channels formed between the plug's inlet and outlet. Each open flow channel includes (i) a first portion that originates at the inlet face and converges to a location within the plug that is downstream of the inlet, and (ii) a second portion that originates within the plug and diverges to the outlet. The diverging second portion is approximately twice the length of the converging first portion. The plug is devoid of planar surface regions at its inlet and outlet, and in fluid flow planes of the plug that are perpendicular to the given direction of a fluid flowing therethrough.

  20. Radioisotopic flow scanning for portal blood flow and portal hypertension

    SciTech Connect

    Hesdorffer, C.S.; Bezwoda, W.R.; Danilewitz, M.D.; Esser, J.D.; Tobias, M.

    1987-08-01

    The use of a simple, noninvasive, isotope scanning technique for the determination of relative portal blood flow and detection of portal hypertension is described. Using this technique the presence of portal hypertension was demonstrated in seven of nine patients known to have elevated portal venous pressure. By contrast, esophageal varices were demonstrated in only five of these patients, illustrating the potential value of the method. Furthermore, this technique has been adapted to the study of portal blood flow in patients with myeloproliferative disorders with splenomegaly but without disturbances in hepatic architecture. Results demonstrate that the high relative splenic flow resulting from the presence of splenomegaly may in turn be associated with elevated relative portal blood flow and portal hypertension. The theoretic reasons for the development of flow-related portal hypertension and its relationship to splenic blood flow are discussed.

  1. Flow Simulation of Solid Rocket Motors. 2; Sub-Scale Air Flow Simulation of Port Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeh, Y. P.; Ramandran, N.; Smith, A. W.; Heaman, J. P.

    2000-01-01

    The injection-flow issuing from a porous medium in the cold-flow simulation of internal port flows in solid rocket motors is characterized by a spatial instability termed pseudoturbulence that produces a rather non-uniform (lumpy) injection-velocity profile. The objective of this study is to investigate the interaction between the injection- and the developing axial-flows. The findings show that this interaction generally weakens the lumpy injection profile and affects the subsequent development of the axial flow. The injection profile is found to depend on the material characteristics, and the ensuing pseudoturbulence is a function of the injection velocity, the axial position and the distance from the porous wall. The flow transition (from laminar to turbulent) of the axial-flow is accelerated in flows emerging from smaller pores primarily due to the higher pseudoturbulence produced by the smaller pores in comparison to that associated with larger pores. In flows with rather uniform injection-flow profiles (weak or no pseudoturbulence), the axial and transverse velocity components in the porous duct are found to satisfy the sine/cosine analytical solutions derived from inviscid assumptions. The transition results from the present study are compared with previous results from surveyed literature, and detailed flow development measurements are presented in terms of the blowing fraction, and characterizing Reynolds numbers.

  2. Drag Measurements in Laminar Flows over Superhydrophobic Porous Membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozsun, Ozgur; Yakhot, Victor; Ekinci, Kamil L.

    2012-02-01

    An anomalous hydrodynamic response has recently been observed in oscillating flows on mesh-like porous superhydrophobic membranes.ootnotetextS. Rajauria, O. Ozsun, J. Lawall, V. Yakhot, and K. L. Ekinci, Phys. Rev. Lett. 107, 174501 (2011) This effect was attributed to a stable Knudsen layer of gas at the solid-liquid interface. In this study, we investigate laminar channel flow over these porous superhydrophobic membranes. We have fabricated surfaces with solid area fraction φs, which can maintain intimate contact with both air and water reservoirs on either side. Typical structures have linear dimensions of 1.5 mm x 15 mm x 1 μm and pore area of 10 μm x 10 μm. The surfaces are enclosed with precisely machined plastic microchannels, where pressure driven flow of DI water is generated. Pressure drop across the microchannels is measured as a function of flow rate. Slip lengths are inferred from the Poiseuille relation as a function of φs and compared to that of similar standard superhydrophobic surfaces, which lack intimate contact with an air reservoir.

  3. Evanescent wave-based particle tracking velocimetry for nanochannel flows.

    PubMed

    Kazoe, Yutaka; Iseki, Keizo; Mawatari, Kazuma; Kitamori, Takehiko

    2013-11-19

    Understanding fluid flows in 10-1000 nm space, which we call extended nanospace, is important for novel nanofluidic devices in analytical chemistry. This study therefore developed a particle tracking velocimetry for measuring velocity distribution in nanochannel flows, by using the evanescent wave illumination. 64 nm fluorescent nanoparticles were used as flow tracer. The particle position was determined from fluorescent intensity by the evanescent wave field, with a spatial resolution smaller than light wavelengths. The time resolution of 260 μs was achieved to make error by the Brownian diffusion of the tracer small to be neglected. An image processing by multitime particle tracking was established to detect the tracer nanoparticles of weak fluorescent intensity. Though the measurement region was affected by nonuniform particle distribution with the electrostatic interactions, pressure-driven flows of water in a nanochannel of 50 μm width and 410 nm depth were successfully measured. The results of the velocity distribution in the depth-wise direction approximately showed agreement with the fluid dynamics with the bulk liquid properties from the macroscopic view, however, suggested slip velocities even in the hydrophilic channel. We suggest a possibility of appearance of molecular behavior in the fluid near the wall within 10 nm-order scale.

  4. Graphics and Flow Visualization of Computer Generated Flow Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kathong, M.; Tiwari, S. N.

    1987-01-01

    Flow field variables are visualized using color representations described on surfaces that are interpolated from computational grids and transformed to digital images. Techniques for displaying two and three dimensional flow field solutions are addressed. The transformations and the use of an interactive graphics program for CFD flow field solutions, called PLOT3D, which runs on the color graphics IRIS workstation are described. An overview of the IRIS workstation is also described.

  5. Numerical analysis of flows of rarefied gases in long channels with octagonal cross section shapes

    SciTech Connect

    Szalmas, L.

    2014-12-09

    Isothermal, pressure driven rarefied gas flows through long channels with octagonal cross section shapes are analyzed computationally. The capillary is between inlet and outlet reservoirs. The cross section is constant along the axial direction. The boundary condition at the solid-gas interface is assumed to be diffuse reflection. Since the channel is long, the gaseous velocity is small compared to the average molecular speed. Consequently, a linearized description can be used. The flow is described by the linearized Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook kinetic model. The solution of the problem is divided into two stages. First, the local flow field is determined by assuming the local pressure gradient. Secondly, the global flow behavior is deduced by the consideration of the conservation of the mass along the axis of the capillary. The kinetic equation is solved by the discrete velocity method on the cross section. Both spatial and velocity spaces are discretized. A body fitted rectangular grid is used for the spatial space. Near the boundary, first-order, while in the interior part of the flow domain, second-order finite-differences are applied to approximate the spatial derivatives. This combination results into an efficient and straightforward numerical treatment. The velocity space is represented by a Gauss-Legendre quadrature. The kinetic equation is solved in an iterative manner. The local dimensionless flow rate is calculated and tabulated for a wide range of the gaseous rarefaction for octagonal cross sections with various geometrical parameters. It exhibits the Knudsen minimum phenomenon. The flow rates in the octagonal channel are compared to those through capillaries with circular and square cross sections. Typical velocity profiles are also shown. The mass flow rate and the distribution of the pressure are determined and presented for global pressure driven flows.

  6. Underestimation of access flow by ultrasound dilution flow measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bos, Clemens; Smits, Johannes H. M.; Zijlstra, Jan J.; Blankestijn, Peter J.; Bakker, Chris J. G.; Viergever, Max A.

    2002-02-01

    For hemodialysis access surveillance, flow measurements are increasingly considered important because they identify accesses at risk of thrombosis. Usually these flow measurements are performed with the ultrasound dilution technique. In a previous patient study it was observed that the resulting flow values were systematically low as compared to magnetic resonance flow measurements, but a satisfactory explanation was lacking. In the present study, we will demonstrate by hemodynamic calculations and in vitro experiments that this discrepancy can be explained by a temporary reduction of the access flow rate, caused by the reversed needle configuration during ultrasound dilution flow measurements. In this configuration, blood is injected retrogressively at one needle and flow between the needles is increased, causing an increased dissipation of energy. The proposed explanation is subsequently confirmed in a patient with a loop graft, by measuring the blood velocity by Doppler ultrasound as a function of reversed dialyzer flow rate. Apart from the ultrasound dilution technique, these findings are applicable to other recently proposed methods for measuring access flow that employ the reversed needle configuration.

  7. Flow rate limitation in open capillary channel flows.

    PubMed

    Haake, Dennis; Rosendahl, Uwe; Ohlhoff, Antje; Dreyer, Michael E

    2006-09-01

    This paper reports the experimental and theoretical investigations of forced liquid flows through open capillary channels under reduced gravity conditions. An open capillary channel is a structure that establishes a liquid flow path at low Bond numbers, when the capillary pressure caused by the surface tension force dominates in comparison to the hydrostatic pressure induced by gravitational or residual accelerations. In case of steady flow through the channel, the capillary pressure of the free surface balances the pressure difference between the liquid and the surrounding constant-pressure gas phase. Because of convective and viscous momentum transport, the pressure along the flow path decreases and causes the free surface to bend inward. The maximum flow rate is achieved when the free surface collapses and gas ingestion occurs at the outlet. This critical flow rate depends on the geometry of the channel and the properties of the liquid. In this paper we present a comparison of the theoretical and experimental critical flow rates and surface profiles for convective dominated flows. For the prediction of the critical flow rate a one-dimensional theoretical model taking into account the entrance pressure loss and the frictional pressure loss in the channel is developed.

  8. Molecular vibrational energy flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruebele, M.; Bigwood, R.

    This article reviews some recent work in molecular vibrational energy flow (IVR), with emphasis on our own computational and experimental studies. We consider the problem in various representations, and use these to develop a family of simple models which combine specific molecular properties (e.g. size, vibrational frequencies) with statistical properties of the potential energy surface and wavefunctions. This marriage of molecular detail and statistical simplification captures trends of IVR mechanisms and survival probabilities beyond the abilities of purely statistical models or the computational limitations of full ab initio approaches. Of particular interest is IVR in the intermediate time regime, where heavy-atom skeletal modes take over the IVR process from hydrogenic motions even upon X H bond excitation. Experiments and calculations on prototype heavy-atom systems show that intermediate time IVR differs in many aspects from the early stages of hydrogenic mode IVR. As a result, IVR can be coherently frozen, with potential applications to selective chemistry.

  9. Turbulent flow through screens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehta, R. D.

    1984-01-01

    A detailed experimental investigation has been carried out on the effects of different types of screens on turbulent flow, in particular turbulent boundary layers. The effect of a screen on a turbulent boundary layer is to give it a 'new lease of life'. The boundary layer turbulence is reorganized and the thickness reduced, thus making it less susceptible to separation. The aerodynamic properties of plastic screens are found to differ significantly from those of the conventional metal screens, evidently because of differences in the weaving properties. The 'overshoot' in mean velocity profile near the boudnary layer edge is shown to be a result of the effect of screen inclination on pressure drop coefficient. A more accurate formulation for the deflection coefficient of a screen is also proposed.

  10. Expedition automated flow fluorometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krikun, V. A.; Salyuk, P. A.

    2015-11-01

    This paper describes an apparatus and operation of automated flow-through dual-channel fluorometer for studying the fluorescence of dissolved organic matter, and the fluorescence of phytoplankton cells with open and closed reaction centers in sea areas with oligotrophic and eutrophic water type. The step-by step excitation by two semiconductor lasers or two light-emitting diodes is realized in the current device. The excitation wavelengths are 405nm and 532nm in the default configuration. Excitation radiation of each light source can be changed with different durations, intensities and repetition rate. Registration of the fluorescence signal carried out by two photo-multipliers with different optical filters of 580-600 nm and 680-700 nm band pass diapasons. The configuration of excitation sources and spectral diapasons of registered radiation can be changed due to decided tasks.

  11. Lateral Flow Immunoassay.

    PubMed

    Ching, Kathryn H

    2015-01-01

    Lateral flow immunoassays (LFIAs) are a staple in the field of rapid diagnostics. These small handheld devices require no specialized training or equipment to operate, and generate a result within minutes of sample application. They are an ideal format for many types of home test kits, for emergency responders and for food manufacturers and producers looking for a quick evaluation of a given sample. LFIAs rely on high quality monoclonal antibodies that recognize the analyte of interest. As monoclonal antibody technology becomes more accessible to smaller laboratories, there has been increased interest in developing LFIA prototypes for potential commercial manufacture. In this chapter, the basics of designing and building an LFIA prototype are described. PMID:26160571

  12. Space station data flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    The results of the space station data flow study are reported. Conceived is a low cost interactive data dissemination system for space station experiment data that includes facility and personnel requirements and locations, phasing requirements and implementation costs. Each of the experiments identified by the operating schedule is analyzed and the support characteristics identified in order to determine data characteristics. Qualitative and quantitative comparison of candidate concepts resulted in a proposed data system configuration baseline concept that includes a data center which combines the responsibility of reprocessing, archiving, and user services according to the various agencies and their responsibility assignments. The primary source of data is the space station complex which provides through the Tracking Data Relay Satellite System (TDRS) and by space shuttle delivery data from experiments in free flying modules and orbiting shuttles as well as from the experiments in the modular space station itself.

  13. Kauai Groundwater Flow Model

    DOE Data Explorer

    Nicole Lautze

    2015-01-01

    Groundwater flow model for Kauai. Data is from the following sources: Whittier, R. and A.I. El-Kadi. 2014. Human and Environmental Risk Ranking of Onsite Sewage Disposal Systems For the Hawaiian Islands of Kauai, Molokai, Maui, and Hawaii – Final. Prepared by the University of Hawaii, Dept. of Geology and Geophysics for the State of Hawaii Dept. of Health, Safe Drinking Water Branch. September 2014.; and Whittier, R.B., K. Rotzoll, S. Dhal, A.I. El-Kadi, C. Ray, G. Chen, and D. Chang. 2004. Hawaii Source Water Assessment Program Report – Volume IV – Island of Kauai Source Water Assessment Program Report. Prepared for the Hawaii Department of Health, Safe Drinking Water Branch. University of Hawaii, Water Resources Research Center. Updated 2015.

  14. Instability of canopy flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zampogna, Giuseppe A.; Pluvinage, Franck; Kourta, Azeddine; Bottaro, Alessandro

    2016-07-01

    Honami and monami waves are caused by large-scale coherent vortex structures which form in shear layers generated by canopies. In order to reach new insights on the onset of such waves, the instability of these shear layers is studied. Two different approaches are used. In the first approach, the presence of the canopy is modeled via a drag coefficient, taken to vary along the canopy as by experimental indications. The second approach considers the canopy as a porous medium and different governing equations for the fluid flow are deduced. In this second case, the anisotropy of the canopy, composed by rigid cylindrical elements, is accounted for via an apparent permeability tensor. The results obtained with the latter approach approximate better experimental correlations for the synchronous oscillations of the canopy.

  15. Organizing boundary RG flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fredenhagen, Stefan

    2003-06-01

    We show how a large class of boundary RG flows in two-dimensional conformal field theories can be summarized in a single rule. This rule is a generalization of the 'absorption of the boundary spin'-principle of Affleck and Ludwig and applies to all theories which have a description as a coset model. We give a formulation for coset models with arbitrary modular invariant partition function and present evidence for the conjectured rule. The second half of the article contains an illustrated section of examples where the rule is applied to unitary minimal models of the A- and D-series, in particular, the 3-state Potts model, and to parafermion theories. We demonstrate how the rule can be used to compute brane charge groups in the example of N=2 minimal models.

  16. Preserving Flow Variability in Watershed Model Calibrations

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background/Question/Methods Although watershed modeling flow calibration techniques often emphasize a specific flow mode, ecological conditions that depend on flow-ecology relationships often emphasize a range of flow conditions. We used informal likelihood methods to investig...

  17. Flow Analysis: A Novel Approach For Classification.

    PubMed

    Vakh, Christina; Falkova, Marina; Timofeeva, Irina; Moskvin, Alexey; Moskvin, Leonid; Bulatov, Andrey

    2016-09-01

    We suggest a novel approach for classification of flow analysis methods according to the conditions under which the mass transfer processes and chemical reactions take place in the flow mode: dispersion-convection flow methods and forced-convection flow methods. The first group includes continuous flow analysis, flow injection analysis, all injection analysis, sequential injection analysis, sequential injection chromatography, cross injection analysis, multi-commutated flow analysis, multi-syringe flow injection analysis, multi-pumping flow systems, loop flow analysis, and simultaneous injection effective mixing flow analysis. The second group includes segmented flow analysis, zone fluidics, flow batch analysis, sequential injection analysis with a mixing chamber, stepwise injection analysis, and multi-commutated stepwise injection analysis. The offered classification allows systematizing a large number of flow analysis methods. Recent developments and applications of dispersion-convection flow methods and forced-convection flow methods are presented.

  18. Flow Analysis: A Novel Approach For Classification.

    PubMed

    Vakh, Christina; Falkova, Marina; Timofeeva, Irina; Moskvin, Alexey; Moskvin, Leonid; Bulatov, Andrey

    2016-09-01

    We suggest a novel approach for classification of flow analysis methods according to the conditions under which the mass transfer processes and chemical reactions take place in the flow mode: dispersion-convection flow methods and forced-convection flow methods. The first group includes continuous flow analysis, flow injection analysis, all injection analysis, sequential injection analysis, sequential injection chromatography, cross injection analysis, multi-commutated flow analysis, multi-syringe flow injection analysis, multi-pumping flow systems, loop flow analysis, and simultaneous injection effective mixing flow analysis. The second group includes segmented flow analysis, zone fluidics, flow batch analysis, sequential injection analysis with a mixing chamber, stepwise injection analysis, and multi-commutated stepwise injection analysis. The offered classification allows systematizing a large number of flow analysis methods. Recent developments and applications of dispersion-convection flow methods and forced-convection flow methods are presented. PMID:26364745

  19. Radiation Pressure-Driven Magnetic Disk Winds in Broad Absorption Line Quasi-Stellar Objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeKool, Martin; Begelman, Mitchell C.

    1995-01-01

    We explore a model in which QSO broad absorption lines (BALS) are formed in a radiation pressure-driven wind emerging from a magnetized accretion disk. The magnetic field threading the disk material is dragged by the flow and is compressed by the radiation pressure until it is dynamically important and strong enough to contribute to the confinement of the BAL clouds. We construct a simple self-similar model for such radiatively driven magnetized disk winds, in order to explore their properties. It is found that solutions exist for which the entire magnetized flow is confined to a thin wedge over the surface of the disk. For reasonable values of the mass-loss rate, a typical magnetic field strength such that the magnetic pressure is comparable to the inferred gas pressure in BAL clouds, and a moderate amount of internal soft X-ray absorption, we find that the opening angle of the flow is approximately 0.1 rad, in good agreement with the observed covering factor of the broad absorption line region.

  20. Uranyl Nitrate Flow Loop

    SciTech Connect

    Ladd-Lively, Jennifer L

    2008-10-01

    The objectives of the work discussed in this report were to: (1) develop a flow loop that would simulate the purified uranium-bearing aqueous stream exiting the solvent extraction process in a natural uranium conversion plant (NUCP); (2) develop a test plan that would simulate normal operation and disturbances that could be anticipated in an NUCP; (3) use the flow loop to test commercially available flowmeters for use as safeguards monitors; and (4) recommend a flowmeter for production-scale testing at an NUCP. There has been interest in safeguarding conversion plants because the intermediate products [uranium dioxide (UO{sub 2}), uranium tetrafluoride (UF{sub 4}), and uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6})] are all suitable uranium feedstocks for producing special nuclear materials. Furthermore, if safeguards are not applied virtually any nuclear weapons program can obtain these feedstocks without detection by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). Historically, IAEA had not implemented safeguards until the purified UF{sub 6} product was declared as feedstock for enrichment plants. H. A. Elayat et al. provide a basic definition of a safeguards system: 'The function of a safeguards system on a chemical conversion plant is in general terms to verify that no useful nuclear material is being diverted to use in a nuclear weapons program'. The IAEA now considers all highly purified uranium compounds as candidates for safeguarding. DOE is currently interested in 'developing instruments, tools, strategies, and methods that could be of use to the IAEA in the application of safeguards' for materials found in the front end of the nuclear fuel cycle-prior to the production of the uranium hexafluoride or oxides that have been the traditional starting point for IAEA safeguards. Several national laboratories, including Oak Ridge, Los Alamos, Lawrence Livermore, and Brookhaven, have been involved in developing tools or techniques for safeguarding conversion plants. This study

  1. Magnetic heat pump flow director

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, Frank S. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A fluid flow director is disclosed. The director comprises a handle body and combed-teeth extending from one side of the body. The body can be formed of a clear plastic such as acrylic. The director can be used with heat exchangers such as a magnetic heat pump and can minimize the undesired mixing of fluid flows. The types of heat exchangers can encompass both heat pumps and refrigerators. The director can adjust the fluid flow of liquid or gas along desired flow directions. A method of applying the flow director within a magnetic heat pump application is also disclosed where the comb-teeth portions of the director are inserted into the fluid flow paths of the heat pump.

  2. Supersonic laminar flow control research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lo, Ching F.

    1994-01-01

    The objective of the research is to understand supersonic laminar flow stability, transition, and active control. Some prediction techniques will be developed or modified to analyze laminar flow stability. The effects of supersonic laminar flow with distributed heating and cooling on active control will be studied. The primary tasks of the research applying to the NASA/Ames Proof of Concept (POC) Supersonic Wind Tunnel and Laminar Flow Supersonic Wind Tunnel (LFSWT) nozzle design with laminar flow control are as follows: (1) predictions of supersonic laminar boundary layer stability and transition, (2) effects of wall heating and cooling for supersonic laminar flow control, and (3) performance evaluation of POC and LFSWT nozzles design with wall heating and cooling effects applying at different locations and various length.

  3. Lava crusts and flow dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kilburn, C. R. J.

    1993-01-01

    Lava flows can be considered as hot viscous cores within thinner, solidified crusts. Interaction between crust and core determines a flow's morphological and dynamical evolution. When the lava core dominates, flow advance approaches a steady state. When crusts are the limiting factor, advance is more irregular. These two conditions can be distinguished by a timescale ratio comparing rates of core deformation and crustal formation. Aa and budding pahoehoe lavas are used as examples of core- and crustal-dominated flows, respectively. A simple model describes the transition between pahoehoe and aa flow in terms of lava discharge rate, underlying slope, and either the thickness or velocity of the flow front. The model shows that aa morphologies are characterized by higher discharge rates and frontal velocities and yields good quantitative agreement with empirical relations distinguishing pahoehoe and aa emplacement on Hawaii.

  4. Flow, affect and visual creativity.

    PubMed

    Cseh, Genevieve M; Phillips, Louise H; Pearson, David G

    2015-01-01

    Flow (being in the zone) is purported to have positive consequences in terms of affect and performance; however, there is no empirical evidence about these links in visual creativity. Positive affect often--but inconsistently--facilitates creativity, and both may be linked to experiencing flow. This study aimed to determine relationships between these variables within visual creativity. Participants performed the creative mental synthesis task to simulate the creative process. Affect change (pre- vs. post-task) and flow were measured via questionnaires. The creativity of synthesis drawings was rated objectively and subjectively by judges. Findings empirically demonstrate that flow is related to affect improvement during visual creativity. Affect change was linked to productivity and self-rated creativity, but no other objective or subjective performance measures. Flow was unrelated to all external performance measures but was highly correlated with self-rated creativity; flow may therefore motivate perseverance towards eventual excellence rather than provide direct cognitive enhancement.

  5. Endovascular blood flow measurement system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khe, A. K.; Cherevko, A. A.; Chupakhin, A. P.; Krivoshapkin, A. L.; Orlov, K. Yu

    2016-06-01

    In this paper an endovascular measurement system used for intraoperative cerebral blood flow monitoring is described. The system is based on a Volcano ComboMap Pressure and Flow System extended with analogue-to-digital converter and PC laptop. A series of measurements performed in patients with cerebrovascular pathologies allows us to introduce “velocity-pressure” and “flow rate-energy flow rate” diagrams as important characteristics of the blood flow. The measurement system presented here can be used as an additional instrument in neurosurgery for assessment and monitoring of the operation procedure. Clinical data obtained with the system are used for construction of mathematical models and patient-specific simulations. The monitoring of the blood flow parameters during endovascular interventions was approved by the Ethics Committee at the Meshalkin Novosibirsk Research Institute of Circulation Pathology and included in certain surgical protocols for pre-, intra- and postoperative examinations.

  6. Flow analysis system and method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, Wayne S. (Inventor); Barck, Bruce N. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    A non-invasive flow analysis system and method wherein a sensor, such as an acoustic sensor, is coupled to a conduit for transmitting a signal which varies depending on the characteristics of the flow in the conduit. The signal is amplified and there is a filter, responsive to the sensor signal, and tuned to pass a narrow band of frequencies proximate the resonant frequency of the sensor. A demodulator generates an amplitude envelope of the filtered signal and a number of flow indicator quantities are calculated based on variations in amplitude of the amplitude envelope. A neural network, or its equivalent, is then used to determine the flow rate of the flow in the conduit based on the flow indicator quantities.

  7. Flow development through interturbine diffusers

    SciTech Connect

    Dominy, R.G.; Kirkham, D.A.; Smith, A.D.

    1998-04-01

    Interturbine diffusers offer the potential advantage of reducing the flow coefficient in the following stages, leading to increased efficiency. The flows associated with these ducts differ from those in simple annular diffusers both as a consequence of their high-curvature S-shaped geometry and of the presence of wakes created by the upstream turbine. Experimental data and numerical simulations clearly reveal the generation of significant secondary flows as the flow develops through the diffuser in the presence of cross-passage pressure gradients. The further influence of inlet swirl is also demonstrated. Data from experimental measurements with and without an upstream turbine are discussed and computational simulations are shown not only to give a good prediction of the flow development within the diffuser but also to demonstrate the importance of modeling the fully three-dimensional nature of the flow.

  8. Interphase Chromosome Flow-FISH.

    PubMed

    Keyvanfar, Keyvan; Weed, Jason; Swamy, Prashanth; Kajigaya, Sachiko; Calado, Rodrigo T; Young, Neal S

    2012-10-11

    A 2-day method using flow cytometry and FISH for interphase cells was developed to detect monosomy 7 cells in myelodysplastic syndrome patients. The method, Interphase Chromosome Flow-FISH (IC Flow-FISH), involves fixation of leukocytes from blood, membrane permeabilization, hybridization of cellular DNA with peptide nucleic acid probes with cells intact, and analysis by flow cytometry. Hundreds to thousands of monosomy 7 cells were consistently detected from 10-20 mL of blood in patients with monosomy 7. Proportions of monosomy 7 cells detected in IC Flow-FISH were compared with results from conventional cytogenetics; identification of monosomy 7 populations was verified with FACS; and patient and donor cells were mixed to test for sensitivity. IC Flow-FISH allows for detecting monosomy 7 without requiring bone marrow procurement or the necessity of metaphase spreads, and wider applications to other chromosomal abnormalities are in development. PMID:22932794

  9. Active combustion flow modulation valve

    DOEpatents

    Hensel, John Peter; Black, Nathaniel; Thorton, Jimmy Dean; Vipperman, Jeffrey Stuart; Lambeth, David N; Clark, William W

    2013-09-24

    A flow modulation valve has a slidably translating hollow armature with at least one energizable coil wound around and fixably attached to the hollow armature. The energizable coil or coils are influenced by at least one permanent magnet surrounding the hollow armature and supported by an outer casing. Lorentz forces on the energizable coils which are translated to the hollow armature, increase or decrease the flow area to provide flow throttling action. The extent of hollow armature translation depends on the value of current supplied and the direction of translation depends on the direction of current flow. The compact nature of the flow modulation valve combined with the high forces afforded by the actuator design provide a flow modulation valve which is highly responsive to high-rate input control signals.

  10. Coherent structures in reacting flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahoney, John; Mitchell, Kevin

    2013-11-01

    Our goal is to characterize the nature of reacting flows by identifying important ``coherent'' structures. We follow the recent work by Haller, Beron-Vera, and Farazmand which formalized the the notion of lagrangian coherent structures (LCSs) in fluid flows. In this theory, LCSs were derived from the Cauchy-Green strain tensor. We adapt this perspective to analogously define coherent structures in reacting flows. By this we mean a fluid flow with a reaction front propagating through it such that the propagation does not affect the underlying flow. A reaction front might be chemical (Belousov-Zhabotinsky, flame front, etc.) or some other type of front (electromagnetic, acoustic, etc.). While the recently developed theory of burning invariant manifolds (BIMs) describes barriers to front propagation in time-periodic flows, this current work provides an important complement by extending to the aperiodic setting. The present work was supported by the US National Science Foundation under grants PHY- 0748828 and CMMI-1201236.

  11. A preferential flow model based on flow variability in macropores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiler, M.

    2004-12-01

    Simulating infiltration in soils containing macropores still provides unsatisfactory results, as existing models seem not to capture all relevant processes. Recent studies of macropore flow initiation in natural soils containing earthworm channels revealed a distinct flow rate variability in the macropores depending on the initiation process (Weiler & Naef, 2003, J of Hydrology, 273: 139-154). When macropore flow was initiated at the soil surface, most of the macropores received very little water while a few macropores received a large proportion of the total inflow. In contrast, when macropore flow was initiated from a saturated or nearly saturated soil layer, macropore flow rate variation was much lower. The objective of this study was to develop and test a model, which combines the macropore flow variability with several established approaches to model dual permeability soils. We then evaluate the INfiltration-INitiation-INteraction Model (IN3M) as a tool to explore the influence of macropore flow variability on infiltration behavior by performing a sensitivity analysis and applying IN3M to sprinkling and dye tracer experiments at various field sites with different macropore and soil matrix properties. The sensitivity analysis showed that the flow variability in macropores reduces interaction between the macropores and the surrounding soil matrix and thus increases bypass flow, especially for surface initiation of macropore flow and at higher rainfall intensities. The model application shows reasonable agreement between IN3M simulations and field data in terms of water balance, water content change, and dye patterns. The influence of macropore flow variability on the hydrological response of the soil was considerable and especially pronounced for soils where initiation occurs at the soil surface.

  12. Surface-Streamline Flow Visualization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Langston, L.; Boyle, M.

    1985-01-01

    Matrix of ink dots covers matte surface of polyester drafting film. Film placed against wind-tunnel wall. Layer of methyl salicylate (oil of wintergreen) sprayed over dotted area. Ink dot streaklines show several characteristics of flow, including primary saddle point of separations, primary horseshoe vortex and smaller vortex at cylinder/ endwall junction. Surface streamline flow visualization technique suitable for use in low-speed windtunnels or other low-speed gas flows.

  13. Subchannel analysis with flow blockages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabotinov, L.

    1985-05-01

    The steady state single-phase three-dimensional flow in the rod bundle geometry of a nuclear pressurized water reactor was calculated with the PHOENICS 84 program. Flow blockages, which may occur under accident conditions, are simulated. Results show that PHOENICS-84 can be applied to calculation of the three-dimensional fields of velocities in fuel rod bundles containing complete flow blockages in cells. The code can treat recirculation zones.

  14. Centrifuge modelling of granular flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabrera, Miguel Angel; Wu, Wei

    2015-04-01

    A common characteristic of mass flows like debris flows, rock avalanches and mudflows is that gravity is their main driving force. Gravity defines the intensity and duration of the main interactions between particles and their surrounding media (particle-particle, particle-fluid, fluid-fluid). At the same time, gravity delimits the occurrence of phase separation, inverse segregation, and mass consolidation, among other phenomena. Therefore, in the understanding of the flow physics it is important to account for the scaling of gravity in scaled models. In this research, a centrifuge model is developed to model free surface granular flows down an incline at controlled gravity conditions. Gravity is controlled by the action of an induced inertial acceleration field resulting from the rotation of the model in a geotechnical centrifuge. The characteristics of the induced inertial acceleration field during flow are discussed and validated via experimental data. Flow heights, velocity fields, basal pressure and impact forces are measured for a range of channel inclinations and gravity conditions. Preliminary results enlighten the flow characteristics at variable gravity conditions and open a discussion on the simulation of large scale processes at a laboratory scale. Further analysis on the flow physics brings valuable information for the validation of granular flows rheology.

  15. Flow visualization using moving textures

    SciTech Connect

    Max, N.; Becker, B.

    1995-04-01

    An intuitive way to visualize a flow is to watch particles or textures move in the flow. In this paper, the authors show how texture mapping hardware can produce near-real-time texture motion, using a polygon grid, and one fixed texture. However, the authors make no attempt to indicate the flow direction in a still frame. As discussed here, any anisotropic stretching comes from the velocity gradient, not the velocity itself. The basic idea is to advect the texture by the flow field. In a cited paper, they gave an indication of the wind velocity by advecting the 3D texture coordinates on the polygon vertices of a cloudiness contour surface in a climate simulation. This was slow, because the 3D texture was rendered in software, and because advecting the texture was difficult for time-varying flows. In this paper, they replace the 3D textures by 2D texture maps compatible with hardware rendering, and give techniques for handling time-varying flows more efficiently. The next section gives their technique for the case of 2D steady flows, and the following one discusses the problems of texture distortion. Then they discuss the problems with extending method to time-varying flows, and two solutions. Next they develop compositing methods for visualizing 3D flows. The final section gives their results and conclusions.

  16. UZ Flow Models and Submodels

    SciTech Connect

    P. Dixon

    2004-02-11

    The purpose of this Model Report is to document the unsaturated zone (UZ) fluid flow and tracer transport models and submodels as well as the flow fields generated utilizing the UZ Flow and Transport Model of Yucca Mountain (UZ Model), Nevada. This work was planned in ''Technical Work Plan (TWP) for: Performance Assessment Unsaturated Zone'' (BSC 2002 [160819], Section 1.10, Work Package AUZM06). The UZ Model has revised, updated, and enhanced the previous UZ Flow Model REV 00 ICN 01 (BSC 2001 [158726]) by incorporation of the conceptual repository design with new grids, recalibration of property sets, and more comprehensive validation effort. The flow fields describe fracture-fracture, matrix-matrix, and fracture-matrix liquid flow rates and their spatial distributions as well as moisture conditions in the UZ system. These 3-D UZ flow fields are used directly by Performance Assessment (PA). The model and submodels evaluate important hydrogeologic processes in the UZ as well as geochemistry and geothermal conditions. These provide the necessary framework to test conceptual hypotheses of flow and transport at different scales and predict flow and transport behavior under a variety of climatic conditions. In addition, this Model Report supports several PA activities, including abstractions, particle-tracking transport simulations, and the UZ Radionuclide Transport Model.

  17. Ferrofluid flow for TOUGH2

    SciTech Connect

    Oldenburg, Curtis; Moridis, George

    1998-03-24

    We have developed EOS7M, a ferrofluid flow and transport module for TOUGH2. EOS7M calculates the magnetic forces on ferrofluid caused by an external magnetic field and allows simulation of flow and advective transport of ferrofluid-water mixtures through porous media. Such flow problems are strongly coupled and well suited to the TOUGH2 framework. Preliminary applications of EOS7M to some simple pressure and flow problems for which experiments were carried out in the lab show good qualitative agreement with the laboratory results.

  18. Precipitated silica as flow regulator.

    PubMed

    Müller, Anne-Kathrin; Ruppel, Joanna; Drexel, Claus-Peter; Zimmermann, Ingfried

    2008-08-01

    Flow regulators are added to solid pharmaceutical formulations to improve the flow properties of the powder mixtures. The primary particles of the flow regulators exist in the form of huge agglomerates which are broken down into smaller aggregates during the blending process. These smaller aggregates adsorb at the surface of the solid's grains and thus diminish attractive Van-der-Waals-forces by increasing the roughness of the host's surface. In most cases amorphous silica is used as flow additive but material properties like particle size or bond strength influence the desagglomeration tendency of the agglomerates and thus the flow regulating potency of each silica. For some silica types we will show that the differences in their flow regulating potency are due to the rate and extent by which they are able to cover the surface of the host particles. Binary powder mixtures consisting of a pharmaceutical excipient and an added flow regulator were blended in a Turbula mixer for a defined period of time. As pharmaceutical excipient corn starch was used. The flow regulators were represented by a selection of amorphous silicon dioxide types like a commercial fumed silica and various types of SIPERNAT precipitated silica provided by Evonik-Degussa GmbH, Hanau, Germany. Flowability parameters of the mixtures were characterized by means of a tensile strength tester. The reduction of tensile strength with the blending time can be correlated with an increase in fragmentation of the flow regulator. PMID:18595668

  19. Efficiency of osmotic pipe flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haaning, Louise Sejling; Jensen, Kaare Hartvig; Hélix-Nielsen, Claus; Berg-Sørensen, Kirstine; Bohr, Tomas

    2013-05-01

    We present experiments and theory for flows of sugar or salt solutions in cylindrical tubes with semipermeable walls (hollow fiber membranes) immersed in water, quantifying the strength of the osmotic driving force in relation to the dimensionless parameters that specify the system. The pumping efficiency of these flows is limited by the presence of “unstirred” concentration boundary layers near the tube walls, and our primary aim is to understand and quantify these layers and their effect on the flow. We measure the outlet flow rate Qout while varying the inlet flow rate Q*, concentration c*, and tube length L, and map out the dependence of the flow rate gain γ=Qout/Q*-1 on these parameters. A theoretical analysis based on (1) the known velocity field for slow flow in cylindrical porous tubes and (2) a parabolic concentration profile allows us to compute analytically how the flow gain depends on the relative magnitude of radial diffusion and advection as well as the ratio of the osmotic velocity to pumping velocity, in very good agreement with experiments and with no adjustable parameters. Our analysis provides criteria that are useful for optimizing osmotic flow processes in, e.g., water purification devices.

  20. Computation of viscous incompressible flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kwak, Dochan

    1989-01-01

    Incompressible Navier-Stokes solution methods and their applications to three-dimensional flows are discussed. A brief review of existing methods is given followed by a detailed description of recent progress on development of three-dimensional generalized flow solvers. Emphasis is placed on primitive variable formulations which are most promising and flexible for general three-dimensional computations of viscous incompressible flows. Both steady- and unsteady-solution algorithms and their salient features are discussed. Finally, examples of real world applications of these flow solvers are given.

  1. Optic flow and autonomous navigation.

    PubMed

    Campani, M; Giachetti, A; Torre, V

    1995-01-01

    Many animals, especially insects, compute and use optic flow to control their motion direction and to avoid obstacles. Recent advances in computer vision have shown that an adequate optic flow can be computed from image sequences. Therefore studying whether artificial systems, such as robots, can use optic flow for similar purposes is of particular interest. Experiments are reviewed that suggest the possible use of optic flow for the navigation of a robot moving in indoor and outdoor environments. The optic flow is used to detect and localise obstacles in indoor scenes, such as corridors, offices, and laboratories. These routines are based on the computation of a reduced optic flow. The robot is usually able to avoid large obstacles such as a chair or a person. The avoidance performances of the proposed algorithm critically depend on the optomotor reaction of the robot. The optic flow can be used to understand the ego-motion in outdoor scenes, that is, to obtain information on the absolute velocity of the moving vehicle and to detect the presence of other moving objects. A critical step is the correction of the optic flow for shocks and vibrations present during image acquisition. The results obtained suggest that optic flow can be successfully used by biological and artificial systems to control their navigation. Moreover, both systems require fast and accurate optomotor reactions and need to compensate for the instability of the viewed world. PMID:7617428

  2. Small lasers in flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Telford, William G

    2004-01-01

    Laser technology has made tremendous advances in recent years, particularly in the area of diode and diode-pumped solid state sources. Flow cytometry has been a direct beneficiary of these advances, as these small, low-maintenance, inexpensive lasers with reasonable power outputs are integrated into flow cytometers. In this chapter we review the contribution and potential of solid-state lasers to flow cytometry, and show several examples of these novel sources integrated into production flow cytometers. Technical details and critical parameters for successful application of these lasers for biomedical analysis are reviewed. PMID:14976380

  3. Module bay with directed flow

    DOEpatents

    Torczynski, John R.

    2001-02-27

    A module bay requires less cleanroom airflow. A shaped gas inlet passage can allow cleanroom air into the module bay with flow velocity preferentially directed toward contaminant rich portions of a processing module in the module bay. Preferential gas flow direction can more efficiently purge contaminants from appropriate portions of the module bay, allowing a reduced cleanroom air flow rate for contaminant removal. A shelf extending from an air inlet slit in one wall of a module bay can direct air flowing therethrough toward contaminant-rich portions of the module bay, such as a junction between a lid and base of a processing module.

  4. Optic flow and autonomous navigation.

    PubMed

    Campani, M; Giachetti, A; Torre, V

    1995-01-01

    Many animals, especially insects, compute and use optic flow to control their motion direction and to avoid obstacles. Recent advances in computer vision have shown that an adequate optic flow can be computed from image sequences. Therefore studying whether artificial systems, such as robots, can use optic flow for similar purposes is of particular interest. Experiments are reviewed that suggest the possible use of optic flow for the navigation of a robot moving in indoor and outdoor environments. The optic flow is used to detect and localise obstacles in indoor scenes, such as corridors, offices, and laboratories. These routines are based on the computation of a reduced optic flow. The robot is usually able to avoid large obstacles such as a chair or a person. The avoidance performances of the proposed algorithm critically depend on the optomotor reaction of the robot. The optic flow can be used to understand the ego-motion in outdoor scenes, that is, to obtain information on the absolute velocity of the moving vehicle and to detect the presence of other moving objects. A critical step is the correction of the optic flow for shocks and vibrations present during image acquisition. The results obtained suggest that optic flow can be successfully used by biological and artificial systems to control their navigation. Moreover, both systems require fast and accurate optomotor reactions and need to compensate for the instability of the viewed world.

  5. Fluid flow in free flow electrophoresis chamber in microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bello, Michail S.; Polezhaev, V. I.

    1990-05-01

    The paper is devoted to the approximate analysis and computer simulations of the viscous incompressible fluid flow in the free-flow electrophoresis chamber, parameters of which are similar to those of the Hele-Shaw cell. The buoyancy effects are assumed to be negligible and do not affect the fluid flow. Such a case corresponds to either electrophoretic separation in microgravity environment or to the electrophoresis in a rather thin chamber. The investigation is based on the Navier-Stokes equations averaged over the transverse coordinate. The streamlines of the steady flow were calculated for various values of the parameter alpha and the relative size of the inlet opening s. The parameter alpha characterizes the ratio of the fluid friction forces against chamber walls to the inertia forces. Three different regimes of the steady flow in the chamber could occur: irrotational flow and jetlike flow with and without secondary flows. The dependence of the entrance region length on the parameters alpha and s was obtained.

  6. Feasibility study of laminar flow bodies in fully turbulent flow

    SciTech Connect

    Sarkar, T.; Sayer, P.G.; Fraser, S.M.

    1994-12-31

    One of the most important design requirements of long range autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs) is to minimize propulsive power. An important and relatively easy way of achieving this is by careful selection of hull shape. Two main schools of thought in this respect are: if laminar flow can be maintained for a long length of the body, the effective drag can be reduced; it is not possible to maintain laminar flow for a significant length of the body and hull design should be based on turbulent flow conditions. In this paper, a feasibility study of laminar flow designs is undertaken under the assumption that flow will be turbulent over the entire length. For comparison two laminar flow designs X-35 and F-57 are selected and results are compared with those of two typical torpedo shaped bodies, namely AFTERBODY1 and AFTERBODY2 of DTNSRDC. It has been shown that laminar flow bodies have 10--15% higher drag when flow is turbulent over the entire length. Hence there is some hydrodynamic risk involved in adopting such laminar bodies without further consideration.

  7. 46 CFR 154.546 - Excess flow valve: Closing flow.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Excess flow valve: Closing flow. 154.546 Section 154.546 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SAFETY STANDARDS FOR SELF-PROPELLED VESSELS CARRYING BULK LIQUEFIED GASES Design, Construction and Equipment Cargo and Process Piping Systems §...

  8. Flow simulation and analysis of high-power flow batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knudsen, E.; Albertus, P.; Cho, K. T.; Weber, A. Z.; Kojic, A.

    2015-12-01

    The cost of a flow battery system can be reduced by increasing its power density and thereby reducing its stack area. If per-pass utilizations are held constant, higher battery power densities can only be achieved using higher flow rates. Here, a 3D computational fluid dynamics model of a flow battery flow field and electrode is used to analyze the implications of increasing flow rates to high power density operating conditions. Interdigitated and serpentine designs, and cell sizes ranging from 10 cm2 to 400 cm2, are simulated. The results quantify the dependence of pressure loss on cell size and design, demonstrating that the details of the passages that distribute flow between individual channels and the inlet and outlet have a major impact on pressure losses in larger cells. Additionally, in-cell flow behavior is analyzed as a function of cell size and design. Flow structures are interrogated to show how and where electrode parameters influence pressure drops, and how regions where transport is slow are correlated with the presence of experimentally observed cell degradation.

  9. Experimental Flow Characterization of a Flow Diverting Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sparrow, Eph; Chow, Ricky; Campbell, Gary; Divani, Afshin; Sheng, Jian

    2012-11-01

    Flow diverters, such as the Pipeline Embolization Device, are a new class of endovascular devices for the treatment of intracranial aneurysms. While clinical studies have demonstrated safety and efficacy, their impact on intra-aneurysmal flow is not confirmed experimentally. As such, optimization of the flow diversion behavior is not currently possible. A quasi-3D PIV technique was developed and applied in various glass models at Re = 275 and 550 to determine the changes to flow characteristics due to the deployment of a flow diverter across the aneurysm neck. Outcomes such as mean velocity, wall shear stress, and others metrics will be presented. Glass models with varying radii of curvature and aneurysm locations will be examined. Experiments were performed in a fully index-matched flow facility using ~10 μm diameter polystyrene particles doped with Rhodium 6G dye. The particles were illuminated with a 532nm laser sheet and observed with a CCD camera and a 592nm +/-43 nm bandpass filter. A quasi 3D flow field was reconstructed from multiple orthogonal planes (spaced 0.4mm apart) encompassing the entire glass model. Wall stresses were evaluated from the near-wall flow viscous stresses.

  10. An analytic description of electrodynamic dispersion in free-flow zone electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Debashis

    2015-07-24

    The present work analyzes the electrodynamic dispersion of sample streams in a free-flow zone electrophoresis (FFZE) chamber resulting due to partial or complete blockage of electroosmotic flow (EOF) across the channel width by the sidewalls of the conduit. This blockage of EOF has been assumed to generate a pressure-driven backflow in the transverse direction for maintaining flow balance in the system. A parallel-plate based FFZE device with the analyte stream located far away from the channel side regions has been considered to simplify the current analysis. Applying a method-of-moments formulation, an analytic expression was derived for the variance of the sample zone at steady state as a function of its position in the separation chamber under these conditions. It has been shown that the increase in stream broadening due to the electrodynamic dispersion phenomenon is additive to the contributions from molecular diffusion and sample injection, and simply modifies the coefficient for the hydrodynamic dispersion term for a fixed lateral migration distance of the sample stream. Moreover, this dispersion mechanism can dominate the overall spatial variance of analyte zones when a significant fraction of the EOF is blocked by the channel sidewalls. The analysis also shows that analyte streams do not undergo any hydrodynamic broadening due to unwanted pressure-driven cross-flows in an FFZE chamber in the absence of a transverse electric field. The noted results have been validated using Monte Carlo simulations which further demonstrate that while the sample concentration profile at the channel outlet approaches a Gaussian distribution only in FFZE chambers substantially longer than the product of the axial pressure-driven velocity and the characteristic diffusion time in the system, the spatial variance of the exiting analyte stream is well described by the Taylor-Aris dispersion limit even in analysis ducts much shorter than this length scale.

  11. An analytic description of electrodynamic dispersion in free-flow zone electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Debashis

    2015-07-24

    The present work analyzes the electrodynamic dispersion of sample streams in a free-flow zone electrophoresis (FFZE) chamber resulting due to partial or complete blockage of electroosmotic flow (EOF) across the channel width by the sidewalls of the conduit. This blockage of EOF has been assumed to generate a pressure-driven backflow in the transverse direction for maintaining flow balance in the system. A parallel-plate based FFZE device with the analyte stream located far away from the channel side regions has been considered to simplify the current analysis. Applying a method-of-moments formulation, an analytic expression was derived for the variance of the sample zone at steady state as a function of its position in the separation chamber under these conditions. It has been shown that the increase in stream broadening due to the electrodynamic dispersion phenomenon is additive to the contributions from molecular diffusion and sample injection, and simply modifies the coefficient for the hydrodynamic dispersion term for a fixed lateral migration distance of the sample stream. Moreover, this dispersion mechanism can dominate the overall spatial variance of analyte zones when a significant fraction of the EOF is blocked by the channel sidewalls. The analysis also shows that analyte streams do not undergo any hydrodynamic broadening due to unwanted pressure-driven cross-flows in an FFZE chamber in the absence of a transverse electric field. The noted results have been validated using Monte Carlo simulations which further demonstrate that while the sample concentration profile at the channel outlet approaches a Gaussian distribution only in FFZE chambers substantially longer than the product of the axial pressure-driven velocity and the characteristic diffusion time in the system, the spatial variance of the exiting analyte stream is well described by the Taylor-Aris dispersion limit even in analysis ducts much shorter than this length scale. PMID:26044384

  12. An Analytic Description of Electrodynamic Dispersion in Free-Flow Zone Electrophoresis

    PubMed Central

    Dutta, Debashis

    2015-01-01

    The present work analyzes the electrodynamic dispersion of sample streams in a free-flow zone electrophoresis (FFZE) chamber resulting due to partial or complete blockage of electroosmotic flow (EOF) across the channel width by the sidewalls of the conduit. This blockage of EOF has been assumed to generate a pressure-driven backflow in the transverse direction for maintaining flow balance in the system. A parallel-plate based FFZE device with the analyte stream located far away from the channel side regions has been considered to simplify the current analysis. Applying a method-of-moments formulation, an analytic expression was derived for the variance of the sample zone at steady state as a function of its position in the separation chamber under these conditions. It has been shown that the increase in stream broadening due to the electrodynamic dispersion phenomenon is additive to the contributions from molecular diffusion and sample injection, and simply modifies the coefficient for the hydrodynamic dispersion term for a fixed lateral migration distance of the sample stream. Moreover, this dispersion mechanism can dominate the overall spatial variance of analyte zones when a significant fraction of the EOF is blocked by the channel sidewalls. The analysis also shows that analyte streams do not undergo any hydrodynamic broadening due to unwanted pressure-driven cross-flows in an FFZE chamber in the absence of a transverse electric field. The noted results have been validated using Monte Carlo simulations which further demonstrate that while the sample concentration profile at the channel outlet approaches a Gaussian distribution only in FFZE chambers substantially longer than the product of the axial pressure-driven velocity and the characteristic diffusion time in the system, the spatial variance of the exiting analyte stream is well described by the Taylor-Aris dispersion limit even in analysis ducts much shorter than this length scale. PMID:26044384

  13. Hypervelocity flow over spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Chihyung

    The nature of the nonequilibrium flow of dissociating gases over spheres was investigated experimentally, numerically and theoretically. A series of experiments with three different gases, nitrogen, air and carbon dioxide, was performed in the shock tunnel T5 at GALCIT. Five spheres of different radii equipped with thermocouples for surface heat flux measurements were used. The state-of-the-art numerical method by Candler (1988) was used to conduct a parallel study which strongly complemented the experimental and theoretical efforts.Experimental heat flux measurements are presented. Good agreement was observed among the measured stagnation point heat transfer rates, computational results and Fay and Riddell's theoretical predictions. For nitrogen and air, the measured heat flux distributions were also in good agreement with numerical computation results and Lees' theory. For carbon dioxide, large deviations were observed. Early transition tripped by surface roughness is a possible cause for the deviation of heat flux distribution from the theory. The experimental differential interferograms were compared with the images constructed from computational flowfields. Good agreement of fringe pattern and shock shape was observed.An analytical solution is obtained for inviscid hypervelocity dissociating flow over spheres. The solution explains the correlation between the dimensionless stand-off distance and the dimensionless reaction rate parameter previously observed by Hornung (1972) for nitrogen. The physics of the correlation can be shown as the binary scaling. Based on the solution, a new dimensionless reaction rate parameter is defined to generalize Hornung's correlation for more complex gases than nitrogen. Experimental and numerical results confirm the new correlation.The effect of nonequilibrium recombination downstream of a curved two-dimensional shock was also addressed. An analytical solution for an ideal dissociating gas was obtained, giving an expression for

  14. Rapid fabrication of pressure-driven open-channel microfluidic devices in omniphobic R(F) paper.

    PubMed

    Glavan, Ana C; Martinez, Ramses V; Maxwell, E Jane; Subramaniam, Anand Bala; Nunes, Rui M D; Soh, Siowling; Whitesides, George M

    2013-08-01

    This paper describes the fabrication of pressure-driven, open-channel microfluidic systems with lateral dimensions of 45-300 microns carved in omniphobic paper using a craft-cutting tool. Vapor phase silanization with a fluorinated alkyltrichlorosilane renders paper omniphobic, but preserves its high gas permeability and mechanical properties. When sealed with tape, the carved channels form conduits capable of guiding liquid transport in the low-Reynolds number regime (i.e. laminar flow). These devices are compatible with complex fluids such as droplets of water in oil. The combination of omniphobic paper and a craft cutter enables the development of new types of valves and switches, such as "fold valves" and "porous switches," which provide new methods to control fluid flow.

  15. Continuous flow nanoparticle concentration using alternating current-electroosmotic flow.

    PubMed

    Hoettges, Kai F; McDonnell, Martin B; Hughes, Michael P

    2014-02-01

    Achieving real-time detection of environmental pathogens such as viruses and bacterial spores requires detectors with both rapid action and a suitable detection threshold. However, most biosensors have detection limits of an order of magnitude or more above the potential infection threshold, limiting their usefulness. This can be improved through the use of automated sample preparation techniques such as preconcentration. In this paper, we describe the use of AC electroosmosis to concentrate nanoparticles from a continuous flow. Electrodes at an optimized angle across a flow cell, and energized by a 1 kHz signal, were used to push nanoparticles to one side of a flow cell, and to extract the resulting stream with a high particle concentration from that side of the flow cell. A simple model of the behavior of particles in the flow cell has been developed, which shows good agreement with experimental results. The method indicates potential for higher concentration factors through cascading devices. PMID:24166772

  16. Effect of flow fluctuations and nonflow on elliptic flow methods

    SciTech Connect

    Ollitrault, Jean-Yves; Poskanzer, Arthur M.; Voloshin, Sergei A.

    2009-04-16

    We discuss how the different estimates of elliptic flow are influenced by flow fluctuations and nonflow effects. It is explained why the event-plane method yields estimates between the two-particle correlation methods and the multiparticle correlation methods. It is argued that nonflow effects and fluctuations cannot be disentangled without other assumptions. However, we provide equations where, with reasonable assumptions about fluctuations and nonflow, all measured values of elliptic flow converge to a unique mean v_2,PP elliptic flow in the participant plane and, with a Gaussian assumption on eccentricity fluctuations, can be converted to the mean v_2,RP in the reaction plane. Thus, the 20percent spread in observed elliptic flow measurements from different analysis methods is no longer mysterious.

  17. Basic flow structure in saccular aneurysms: a flow visualization study.

    PubMed

    Steiger, H J; Poll, A; Liepsch, D; Reulen, H J

    1987-01-01

    Basic flow patterns were investigated in a set of glass aneurysm models by means of flow visualization methods. Dye injection and streaming double refraction were used to visualize flow. The circulation inside lateral aneurysms arising at a 90 degree angle from a straight parent conduit could not be visualized by the dye-injection technique but could be demonstrated by streaming double refraction. The inflow was seen to arise from the downstream lip of the orifice and to project to the dome of the aneurysm. Backflow to the parent conduit took place along the walls of the aneurysm. In aneurysms located at bifurcations, flow characteristics depended on the geometry of the bifurcation and the flow ratio between the branches. Relatively little intra-aneurysmal flow was demonstrated in side branch-related aneurysms arising distal to an asymmetric 90 degrees bifurcation of the type encountered at the junction of the internal carotid and posterior communicating arteries. Stagnation of flow at the neck and little intra-aneurysmal circulation were found with terminal aneurysms of the basilar bifurcation type if the outflow through the branches was symmetric. With asymmetric outflow, however, or if the axis of the aneurysm did not coincide with that of the afferent vessel, an active rotation developed in these aneurysms. The size of the aneurysm had no influence on the basic pattern of intra-aneurysmal circulation. The use of pulsatile perfusion did not significantly alter the basic flow patterns observed with steady flow. Locally disturbed laminar flow was observed in certain models at physiological Reynold's numbers, but there were no signs of fully developed turbulence.

  18. Aero-acoustics of Drag Generating Swirling Exhaust Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shah, P. N.; Mobed, D.; Spakovszky, Z. S.; Brooks, T. F.; Humphreys, W. M. Jr.

    2007-01-01

    Aircraft on approach in high-drag and high-lift configuration create unsteady flow structures which inherently generate noise. For devices such as flaps, spoilers and the undercarriage there is a strong correlation between overall noise and drag such that, in the quest for quieter aircraft, one challenge is to generate drag at low noise levels. This paper presents a rigorous aero-acoustic assessment of a novel drag concept. The idea is that a swirling exhaust flow can yield a steady, and thus relatively quiet, streamwise vortex which is supported by a radial pressure gradient responsible for pressure drag. Flows with swirl are naturally limited by instabilities such as vortex breakdown. The paper presents a first aero-acoustic assessment of ram pressure driven swirling exhaust flows and their associated instabilities. The technical approach combines an in-depth aerodynamic analysis, plausibility arguments to qualitatively describe the nature of acoustic sources, and detailed, quantitative acoustic measurements using a medium aperture directional microphone array in combination with a previously established Deconvolution Approach for Mapping of Acoustic Sources (DAMAS). A model scale engine nacelle with stationary swirl vanes was designed and tested in the NASA Langley Quiet Flow Facility at a full-scale approach Mach number of 0.17. The analysis shows that the acoustic signature is comprised of quadrupole-type turbulent mixing noise of the swirling core flow and scattering noise from vane boundary layers and turbulent eddies of the burst vortex structure near sharp edges. The exposed edges are the nacelle and pylon trailing edge and the centerbody supporting the vanes. For the highest stable swirl angle setting a nacelle area based drag coefficient of 0.8 was achieved with a full-scale Overall Sound Pressure Level (OASPL) of about 40dBA at the ICAO approach certification point.

  19. Full Multigrid Flow Solver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mineck, Raymond E.; Thomas, James L.; Biedron, Robert T.; Diskin, Boris

    2005-01-01

    FMG3D (full multigrid 3 dimensions) is a pilot computer program that solves equations of fluid flow using a finite difference representation on a structured grid. Infrastructure exists for three dimensions but the current implementation treats only two dimensions. Written in Fortran 90, FMG3D takes advantage of the recursive subroutine feature, dynamic memory allocation, and structured-programming constructs of that language. FMG3D supports multi-block grids with three types of block-to-block interfaces: periodic, C-zero, and C-infinity. For all three types, grid points must match at interfaces. For periodic and C-infinity types, derivatives of grid metrics must be continuous at interfaces. The available equation sets are as follows: scalar elliptic equations, scalar convection equations, and the pressure-Poisson formulation of the Navier-Stokes equations for an incompressible fluid. All the equation sets are implemented with nonzero forcing functions to enable the use of user-specified solutions to assist in verification and validation. The equations are solved with a full multigrid scheme using a full approximation scheme to converge the solution on each succeeding grid level. Restriction to the next coarser mesh uses direct injection for variables and full weighting for residual quantities; prolongation of the coarse grid correction from the coarse mesh to the fine mesh uses bilinear interpolation; and prolongation of the coarse grid solution uses bicubic interpolation.

  20. Filthy flows the Ganga.

    PubMed

    D'monte, D

    1996-01-01

    The Ganga rises in the Himalayas and flows eastward, passing through Bangladesh, into the sea. It brings sustenance to the Indo-Gangetic plain and its basin inhabited by a little over a third of India's population. For the Indians, this river symbolizes its ancient culture and spirituality, but is treated with disrespect physically. Although devout Hindus still pay obeisance to this holiest of rivers, it has become almost synonymous with pollution and filth. A total of 27 major towns dump millions of liters of sewage and industrial waste into the river every day, which is compounded by the age-old belief that the Ganga has some magical self-cleansing properties, absorbing any amount of contamination. Some of the pollution contributors include tanneries emptying toxic chrome into the river, funeral pyres and half-burnt bodies, irrigation and siltation. To combat the pollution of the river, the Ganga Action Plan was launched a decade ago. However, this has failed because of the major reason of nonparticipation of people along the river. The participation of the community is needed to achieve success. In addition, there is a poor record of administration, reflected in the indifferent progress made in cleaning up the Ganga.

  1. US energy flow, 1981

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briggs, C. K.; Borg, I. Y.

    1982-10-01

    Flow diagrams to describe the US energy situation are given. In 1981 the energy consumption was 73 quads (or 73 times 10 to the 15th power Btu). Use was down from 75 quads in 1980. Oil continues to dominate the picture as it comprises 45% of the total energy used. Net oil use (exclusive of oil purchased for the Strategic Petroleum Reserve and Exports) fell 8%; oil imports declined 14%. In contrast to oil, use of natural gas and coal remained at 1980 levels. Decreased use of residual oils, principally for electric power generating, account for much of the drop in oil use. Increased use of coal and nuclear energy for power generation almost compensated for the decrease in use of oil in that end use. Transmitted power remained at 1980 levels. The remainder of the drop in energy usage is attributed to price driven conservation, increased efficiencies in end use and the recession that prevailed during most of the year. The share of the energy drop attributable to the recession is estimated by various analysts to be on the order of 40 to 50%.

  2. Surface Erosion and Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Released 7 April 2003

    The mottled surface texture and flow features observed in this THEMIS image suggest materials may be, or have been, mixed with ice. There is also evidence in some areas for infilling of sediments as crater rims and ridges appear covered.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 45.3, Longitude 48.8 East (311.2 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

  3. Serial Network Flow Monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, Julie A.; Tate-Brown, Judy M.

    2009-01-01

    Using a commercial software CD and minimal up-mass, SNFM monitors the Payload local area network (LAN) to analyze and troubleshoot LAN data traffic. Validating LAN traffic models may allow for faster and more reliable computer networks to sustain systems and science on future space missions. Research Summary: This experiment studies the function of the computer network onboard the ISS. On-orbit packet statistics are captured and used to validate ground based medium rate data link models and enhance the way that the local area network (LAN) is monitored. This information will allow monitoring and improvement in the data transfer capabilities of on-orbit computer networks. The Serial Network Flow Monitor (SNFM) experiment attempts to characterize the network equivalent of traffic jams on board ISS. The SNFM team is able to specifically target historical problem areas including the SAMS (Space Acceleration Measurement System) communication issues, data transmissions from the ISS to the ground teams, and multiple users on the network at the same time. By looking at how various users interact with each other on the network, conflicts can be identified and work can begin on solutions. SNFM is comprised of a commercial off the shelf software package that monitors packet traffic through the payload Ethernet LANs (local area networks) on board ISS.

  4. Wicking flow through microchannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehrabian, Hadi; Gao, Peng; Feng, James J.

    2011-12-01

    We report numerical simulations of wicking through micropores of two types of geometries, axisymmetric tubes with contractions and expansions of the cross section, and two-dimensional planar channels with a Y-shaped bifurcation. The aim is to gain a detailed understanding of the interfacial dynamics in these geometries, with an emphasis on the motion of the three-phase contact line. We adopt a diffuse-interface formalism and use Cahn-Hilliard diffusion to model the moving contact line. The Stokes and Cahn-Hilliard equations are solved by finite elements with adaptive meshing. The results show that the liquid meniscus undergoes complex deformation during its passage through contraction and expansion. Pinning of the interface at protruding corners limits the angle of expansion into which wicking is allowed. For sufficiently strong contractions, the interface negotiates the concave corners, thanks to its diffusive nature. Capillary competition between branches downstream of a Y-shaped bifurcation may result in arrest of wicking in the wider branch. Spatial variation of wettability in one branch may lead to flow reversal in the other.

  5. Active region flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foukal, Peter

    1987-01-01

    A wide range of observations has shown that active region phenomena in the photospheric, chromospheric and coronal temperature regimes are dynamical in nature. At the photosphere, recent observations of full line profiles place an upper limit of about + or - 20/msec on any downflows at supergranule cell edges. Observations of the full Stokes 5 profiles in the network show no evidence for downflows in magnetic flux tubes. In the area of chromospheric dynamics, several models were put forward recently to reproduce the observed behavior of spicules. However, it is pointed out that these adiabatic models do not include the powerful radiative dissipation which tend to damp out the large amplitude disturbances that produce the spicular acceleration in the models. In the corona, loop flows along field lines clearly transport mass and energy at rates important for the dynamics of these structures. However, advances in understanding the heating and mass balance of the loop structures seem to require new kinds of observations. Some results are presented using a remote sensing diagnostic of the intensity and orientation of macroscopic plasma electric fields predicted by models of reconnective heating and also wave heating.

  6. Biomimetic Flow Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anders, John B.

    2000-01-01

    Biologic flight has undoubtedly intrigued man for thousands of years, yet it has been only the last 100 years or so that any serious challenge has been mounted to the pre-eminence of birds. Although present-day large-scale aircraft are now clearly able to fly higher, faster and farther than any bird or insect, it is obvious that these biological creatures have a mastery of low Reynolds number, unsteady flows that is unrivaled by man-made systems. This paper suggests that biological flight should be examined for mechanisms that may apply to engineered flight systems, especially in the emerging field of small-scale, uninhabited aerial vehicles (UAV). This paper discusses the kinematics and aerodynamics of bird and insect flight, including some aspects of unsteady aerodynamics. The dynamics of flapping wing flight is briefly examined, including gait selection, flapping frequency and amplitude selection, as well as wing planform and angle-of-attack dynamics. Unsteady aerodynamic mechanisms as practiced by small birds and insects are reviewed. Drag reduction morphologies of birds and marine animals are discussed and fruitful areas of research are suggested.

  7. Intelligent Flow Friction Estimation

    PubMed Central

    Brkić, Dejan; Ćojbašić, Žarko

    2016-01-01

    Nowadays, the Colebrook equation is used as a mostly accepted relation for the calculation of fluid flow friction factor. However, the Colebrook equation is implicit with respect to the friction factor (λ). In the present study, a noniterative approach using Artificial Neural Network (ANN) was developed to calculate the friction factor. To configure the ANN model, the input parameters of the Reynolds Number (Re) and the relative roughness of pipe (ε/D) were transformed to logarithmic scales. The 90,000 sets of data were fed to the ANN model involving three layers: input, hidden, and output layers with, 2, 50, and 1 neurons, respectively. This configuration was capable of predicting the values of friction factor in the Colebrook equation for any given values of the Reynolds number (Re) and the relative roughness (ε/D) ranging between 5000 and 108 and between 10−7 and 0.1, respectively. The proposed ANN demonstrates the relative error up to 0.07% which had the high accuracy compared with the vast majority of the precise explicit approximations of the Colebrook equation. PMID:27127498

  8. Turbomachinery Flows Modeled

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adamczyk, John J.

    1997-01-01

    Last year, researchers at the NASA Lewis Research Center used the average passage code APNASA to complete the largest three-dimensional simulation of a multistage axial flow compressor to date. Consisting of 29 blade rows, the configuration is typical of those found in aeroengines today. The simulation, which was executed on the High Performance Computing and Communications (HPCC) Program IBM SP2 parallel computer located at the NASA Ames Research Center, took nearly 90 hr to complete. Since the completion of this activity, a fine-grain, parallel version of APNASA has been written by a team of researchers from General Electric, NASA Lewis, and NYMA. Timing studies performed on the SP2 have shown that, with eight processors assigned to each blade row, the simulation time is reduced by a factor of six. For this configuration, the simulation time would be 15 hr. The reduction in computing time indicates that an overnight turnaround of a multistage configuration simulation is feasible. In addition, average passage forms of two-equation turbulence models were formulated. These models are currently being incorporated into APNASA.

  9. A polyoxometalate flow battery

    SciTech Connect

    Pratt, Harry D.; Hudak, Nicholas S.; Fang, Xikui; Anderson, Travis M.

    2013-08-01

    A redox flow battery utilizing two, three-electron polyoxometalate redox couples (SiVV3WVI9O407–/SiVIV3WVI9O4010- and SiVIV3WVI9O4010-/SiVIV3WV3WVI6O4013-) was investigated for use in stationary storage in either aqueous or non-aqueous conditions. The aqueous battery had coulombic efficiencies greater than 95% with relatively low capacity fading over 100 cycles. Infrared studies showed there was no decomposition of the compound under these conditions. The non-aqueous analog had a higher operating voltage but at the expense of coulombic efficiency. The spontaneous formation of these clusters by self-assembly facilitates recovery of the battery after being subjected to reversed polarity. Polyoxometalates offer a new approach to stationary storage materials because they are capable of undergoing multi-electron reactions and are stable over a wide range of pH values and temperatures.

  10. Intelligent Flow Friction Estimation.

    PubMed

    Brkić, Dejan; Ćojbašić, Žarko

    2016-01-01

    Nowadays, the Colebrook equation is used as a mostly accepted relation for the calculation of fluid flow friction factor. However, the Colebrook equation is implicit with respect to the friction factor (λ). In the present study, a noniterative approach using Artificial Neural Network (ANN) was developed to calculate the friction factor. To configure the ANN model, the input parameters of the Reynolds Number (Re) and the relative roughness of pipe (ε/D) were transformed to logarithmic scales. The 90,000 sets of data were fed to the ANN model involving three layers: input, hidden, and output layers with, 2, 50, and 1 neurons, respectively. This configuration was capable of predicting the values of friction factor in the Colebrook equation for any given values of the Reynolds number (Re) and the relative roughness (ε/D) ranging between 5000 and 10(8) and between 10(-7) and 0.1, respectively. The proposed ANN demonstrates the relative error up to 0.07% which had the high accuracy compared with the vast majority of the precise explicit approximations of the Colebrook equation.

  11. Intelligent Flow Friction Estimation.

    PubMed

    Brkić, Dejan; Ćojbašić, Žarko

    2016-01-01

    Nowadays, the Colebrook equation is used as a mostly accepted relation for the calculation of fluid flow friction factor. However, the Colebrook equation is implicit with respect to the friction factor (λ). In the present study, a noniterative approach using Artificial Neural Network (ANN) was developed to calculate the friction factor. To configure the ANN model, the input parameters of the Reynolds Number (Re) and the relative roughness of pipe (ε/D) were transformed to logarithmic scales. The 90,000 sets of data were fed to the ANN model involving three layers: input, hidden, and output layers with, 2, 50, and 1 neurons, respectively. This configuration was capable of predicting the values of friction factor in the Colebrook equation for any given values of the Reynolds number (Re) and the relative roughness (ε/D) ranging between 5000 and 10(8) and between 10(-7) and 0.1, respectively. The proposed ANN demonstrates the relative error up to 0.07% which had the high accuracy compared with the vast majority of the precise explicit approximations of the Colebrook equation. PMID:27127498

  12. Cross Flow Parameter Calculation for Aerodynamic Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norman, David, Jr. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A system and method for determining a cross flow angle for a feature on a structure. A processor unit receives location information identifying a location of the feature on the structure, determines an angle of the feature, identifies flow information for the location, determines a flow angle using the flow information, and determines the cross flow angle for the feature using the flow angle and the angle of the feature. The flow information describes a flow of fluid across the structure. The flow angle comprises an angle of the flow of fluid across the structure for the location of the feature.

  13. Hydration rind dates rhyolite flows.

    PubMed

    Friedman, I

    1968-02-23

    Hydration of obsidian has been used to date rhyolite flows, containing obsidian or porphyritic glass, at Glass Mountain (Medicine Lake Highlands) and Mono Lake, California. The method is simple and rapid and can be used to date flows that erupted between 200 and approximately 200,000 years ago. PMID:17768978

  14. Eliminating Wind Tunnel Flow Breakdown

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hackett, J. E.

    1983-01-01

    Undesirable vortexes near floor in small wind tunnels suppressed by simple device that alters flow pattern there. Air is injected along floor and interacts with backflow from wind-tunnel model. Results in smoother, more correct air-flow and to more-reliable wind-tunnel data.

  15. Modeling of curvilinear suspension flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, Jeffrey F.; Boulay, Fabienne

    1996-11-01

    The curvilinear parallel-plate and cone-and-plate rheometric flows of monodisperse noncolloidal suspensions have been modeled. Although nonuniform in shear rate, dotγ, the parallel-plate flow has been shown experimentally(A. W. Chow, S. W. Sinton, J. H. Iwayima & T. S. Stephens 1994 Phys. Fluids) 6, 2561. not to exhibit particle migration, contrary to predictions of prior suspension-flow modeling. Predictions of nonuniform particle volume fraction, φ, by the suspension-balance model(P. R. Nott & J. F. Brady 1994 J. Fluid Mech.) 275, 157. for parallel-plate and cone-and-plate flow without normal stress differences are presented. The ``nonmigration'' in parallel-plate flow may be attributed to bulk suspension normal stress differences: assuming the bulk stress has the form Σ ~ η dotγ Q(φ) with η the fluid viscosity, nonmigration is predicted for parallel-plate flow provided that Q_33 = (1/2) Q_11 at the bulk φ of interest, with 1 the flow direction and 3 the vorticity direction. Extending the model to include normal stress differences satisfying this requirement, a range of migration behavior is predicted for the cone-and-plate flow depending upon the ratio Q_11/Q_22.

  16. Redox Flow Batteries, a Review

    SciTech Connect

    Knoxville, U. Tennessee; U. Texas Austin; U, McGill; Weber, Adam Z.; Mench, Matthew M.; Meyers, Jeremy P.; Ross, Philip N.; Gostick, Jeffrey T.; Liu, Qinghua

    2011-07-15

    Redox flow batteries are enjoying a renaissance due to their ability to store large amounts of electrical energy relatively cheaply and efficiently. In this review, we examine the components of redox flow batteries with a focus on understanding the underlying physical processes. The various transport and kinetic phenomena are discussed along with the most common redox couples.

  17. Apparatus for measuring fluid flow

    DOEpatents

    Smith, J.E.; Thomas, D.G.

    Flow measuring apparatus includes a support loop having strain gages mounted thereon and a drag means which is attached to one end of the support loop and which bends the sides of the support loop and induces strains in the strain gages when a flow stream impacts thereon.

  18. Secondary flow induced by riblets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldstein, D. B.; Tuan, T.-C.

    1998-05-01

    The effects of riblets on one wall of a channel bounding fully developed turbulent flow are investigated. Various perturbation elements including wires, fins and slots are modelled in order to understand the effects of riblets. It is found that widely spaced riblets, fins and wires create a substantial increase in turbulent activity just above the element. These elements are also found to produce a remarkable pattern of secondary mean flows consisting of matched pairs of streamwise vortices. The secondary flows occur only if the bulk flow is turbulent and their characteristics depend on element geometry. It is suggested that these secondary flows are strongly linked with the increase in drag experienced by widely spaced riblets in experimental studies. The secondary flows are probably caused by two-dimensional spanwise sloshing of the flow, inherent in a turbulent boundary layer, interacting with the stream-aligned element. This two-dimensional mechanism is investigated with a series of two-dimensional simulations of sloshing flow over isolated elements. Grid resolution and domain size checks are made throughout the investigation.

  19. Apparatus for measuring fluid flow

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Jack E.; Thomas, David G.

    1984-01-01

    Flow measuring apparatus includes a support loop having strain gages mounted thereon and a drag means which is attached to one end of the support loop and which bends the sides of the support loop and induces strains in the strain gages when a flow stream impacts thereon.

  20. Traffic flow theory and characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    Hauer, E.; Pagitsas, E.; Shin, B.T.; Maze, T.H.; Hurley, J.W. Jr.

    1981-01-01

    Estimation of turning flows from automatic counts; a probabilistic model of gap acceptance behavior; sensitivity of fuel-consumption and delay values from traffic simulation; traffic data acquisition from small-format photography; decentralized control of congested street networks; improved estimation of traffic flow for real-time control; Maxband, a program for setting signals on arteries and triangular networks are discussed.

  1. Group Flow and Group Genius

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sawyer, Keith

    2015-01-01

    Keith Sawyer views the spontaneous collaboration of group creativity and improvisation actions as "group flow," which organizations can use to function at optimum levels. Sawyer establishes ideal conditions for group flow: group goals, close listening, complete concentration, being in control, blending egos, equal participation, knowing…

  2. Compact bypass-flow filter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swift, W. G.; Ulanovsky, J. M.

    1979-01-01

    Annular filter consisting of stacked rings separates particulates from bypass fluid passing through it in radial direction without slowing down main flow across unimpeded flow of fluid through its center. Applications include fluidized bed reactors, equipment for catalyst operations, and water purification.

  3. Polygonal instability of Marangoni flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roché, Matthieu; Labousse, Matthieu; El Hadj Maiga, Baba; Nya, Loïc; Le Roux, Sébastien; Cantat, Isabelle; Saint-Jalmes, Arnaud

    2015-11-01

    The transport of pepper grains floating at the surface of a bowl of water after the release of a drop of dishwashing liquid is a classical experiment to demonstrate the Marangoni effect, i.e. the flow of a liquid layer induced by interfacial tension gradients at its surface. In this case, the interfacial tension gradient results from a surfactant interfacial concentration gradient. Recently, we showed that continuous injection of an aqueous solution of hydrosoluble surfactants at the surface of a cm-thick pure water layer induced finite-size Marangoni flows surrounded by a region characterized by the presence of several pairs of interfacial vortices arranged along the the vertices of polygons. During this talk, I will show that we can understand the flow structure induced by these Marangoni flows, in particular their tendency to have polygonal shapes. I will describe how flow features such as the number of interfacial vortices or bulk recirculation flows depend on flow geometry. Finally, I will compare these results to a model that explains similar polygonal instabilities in other flows such as the hydraulic jump.

  4. Local Control of Blood Flow

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clifford, Philip S.

    2011-01-01

    Organ blood flow is determined by perfusion pressure and vasomotor tone in the resistance vessels of the organ. Local factors that regulate vasomotor tone include myogenic and metabolic autoregulation, flow-mediated and conducted responses, and vasoactive substances released from red blood cells. The relative importance of each of these factors…

  5. Inverted annular flow experimental study

    SciTech Connect

    De Jarlais, G.; Ishii, M.

    1985-04-01

    Steady-state inverted annular flow of Freon 113 in up flow was established in a transparent test section. Using a special inlet configuration consisting of long aspect-ratio liquid nozzles coaxially centered within a heated quartz tube, idealized inverted annular flow initial geometry (cylindrical liquid core surrounded by coaxial annulus of gas) could be established. Inlet liquid and gas flowrates, liquid subcooling, and gas density (using various gas species) were measured and varied systematically. The hydrodynamic behavior of the liquid core, and the subsequent downstream break-up of this core into slugs, ligaments and/or droplets of various sizes, was observed. In general, for low inlet liquid velocities it was observed that after the initial formation of roll waves on the liquid core surface, an agitated region of high surface area, with attendant high momentum and energy transfers, occurs. This agitated region appears to propagate downsteam in a quasi-periodic pattern. Increased inlet liquid flow rates, and high gas annulus flow rates tend to diminish the significance of this agitated region. Observed inverted annular flow (and subsequent downstream flow pattern) hydrodynamic behavior is reported, and comparisons are drawn to data generated by previous experimenters studying post-CHF flow.

  6. Microfluidic Stamping on Sheath Flow.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Dong Hyun; Tanaka, Daiki; Sekiguchi, Tetsushi; Shoji, Shuichi

    2016-06-01

    A microfluidic stamping method to form functional shapes on a cross section in fiber-shaped flow is proposed. Microfluidic stamping and overstamping allow various cross sectional shapes on the 3D flow. The shapes can be controlled by a change in combination of structures and fluidic conditions which correspond to stamp type and stamping force. PMID:27149895

  7. Integrated flow field (IFF) structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pien, Shyhing M. (Inventor); Warshay, Marvin (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    The present disclosure relates in part to a flow field structure comprising a hydrophilic part and a hydrophobic part communicably attached to each other via a connecting interface. The present disclosure further relates to electrochemical cells comprising the aforementioned flow fields.

  8. Hydration rind dates rhyolite flows.

    PubMed

    Friedman, I

    1968-02-23

    Hydration of obsidian has been used to date rhyolite flows, containing obsidian or porphyritic glass, at Glass Mountain (Medicine Lake Highlands) and Mono Lake, California. The method is simple and rapid and can be used to date flows that erupted between 200 and approximately 200,000 years ago.

  9. Hydration rind dates rhyolite flows

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Friedman, I.

    1968-01-01

    Hydration of obsidian has been used to date rhyolite flows, containing obsidian or porphyritic glass, at Glass Mountain (Medicine Lake Highlands) and Mono Lake, California. The method is simple and rapid and can be used to date flows that erupted between 200 and approximately 200,000 years ago.

  10. Flow properties of concentrated suspensions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hattori, K.; Izumi, K.

    1984-01-01

    The viscosity and flow behavior of a concentrated suspension, with special emphasis on fresh concrete containing a superplasticizer, is analyzed according to Newton's law of viscosity. The authors interpreted Newton's law in a new way, and explain non-Newton flow from Newton's law. The outline of this new theory is given. Viscosity of suspensions, and the effect of dispersants are analyzed.

  11. Measuring sap flow in plants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sap flow measurements provide a powerful tool for quantifying plant water use and monitoring qualitative physiological responses of plants to environmental conditions. As such, sap flow methods are widely employed to invesitgate the agronomic, ecological and hydrological outcomes of plant growth. T...

  12. Direct flow crystal growth system

    DOEpatents

    Montgomery, Kenneth E.; Milanovich, Fred P.

    1992-01-01

    A crystal is grown in a constantly filtered solution which is flowed directly into the growing face of a crystal. In a continuous flow system, solution at its saturation temperature is removed from a crystal growth tank, heated above its saturation temperature, filtered, cooled back to its saturation temperature, and returned to the tank.

  13. Granular flows in volcanic environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capra, Lucia

    2006-11-01

    Volcaniclastic flows, which include from sediment-water to dry granular flow, are multiphase-system flows that involve some combination of solid, liquid and air. Their behavior in response to applied shear stress is a function of the proportion of these components, grain-size distribution and finally the physical and chemical properties of the solid components. They are generically classified as non-newtonian fluid, from pseudoplasic to dilatant with yield value (generically defined as Bingham fluid). Rheologic threshold can be defined on the base of grain-size distribution. Granular flows (i.e. debris avalanches originated from volcanic collapses) generally contain less than 10 percent in vol. of interstitial fluids which do not constitute a continuous phase in transporting solid fragments. Different mechanisms of granular fluidization have been achieved for such type of flows and particles collision/friction are dominant mechanisms acting during transport. For granular flows less than 1 km3 in volume, the mobility is not directly related with the mass volume and their runout depends on grain-size distribution, clast composition, and type of sliding surface. Textural and morphological characteristics of particles at different flow depths and their variation down-flow are important indicator of the mechanism of emplacement, which can vary from friction to collision-dominated regime. Several examples from Mexican active volcanoes will be here presented.

  14. Debris Flows and Related Phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ancey, C.

    Torrential floods are a major natural hazard, claiming thousands of lives and millions of dollars in lost property each year in almost all mountain areas on the Earth. After a catastrophic eruption of Mount St. Helen in the USA in May 1980, water from melting snow, torrential rains from the eruption cloud, and water displaced from Spirit Lake mixed with deposited ash and debris to produce very large debris flows and cause extensive damage and loss of life [1]. During the 1985 eruption of Nevado del Ruiz in Colombia, more than 20,000 people perished when a large debris flow triggered by the rapid melting of snow and ice at the volcano summit, swept through the town of Armero [2]. In 1991, the eruption of Pinatubo volcano in the Philippines disperses more than 5 cubic kilometres of volcanic ash into surrounding valleys. Much of that sediment has subsequently been mobilised as debris flows by typhoon rains and has devastated more than 300 square kilometres of agricultural land. Even, in Eur opean countries, recent events that torrential floods may have very destructive effects (Sarno and Quindici in southern Italy in May 1998, where approximately 200 people were killed). The catastrophic character of these floods in mountainous watersheds is a consequence of significant transport of materials associated with water flows. Two limiting flow regimes can be distinguished. Bed load and suspension refer to dilute transport of sediments within water. This means that water is the main agent in the flow dynamics and that the particle concentration does not exceed a few percent. Such flows are typically two-phase flows. In contrast, debris flows are mas s movements of concentrated slurries of water, fine solids, rocks and boulders. As a first approximation, debris flows can be treated as one-phase flows and their flow properties can be studied using classical rheological methods. The study of debris flows is a very exciting albeit immature science, made up of disparate elements

  15. Supersonic Laminar Flow Control Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lo, Ching F.; Wiberg, Clark G.

    1996-01-01

    The objective of this research is to understand supersonic laminar flow stability, transition and active control. Some prediction techniques will be developed or modified to analyze laminar flow stability. The effects of distributed heating and cooling as an active boundary layer control technique will be studied. The primary tasks of the research apply to the NASA/Ames PoC and LFSWT's nozzle design with laminar flow control and are listed as follows: Predictions of supersonic laminar boundary layer stability and transition; Effects of wall heating and cooling on supersonic laminar flow control on a flat plate; Performance evaluation of the PoC and LFSWT nozzle designs with wall heating and cooling applied at different locations and various lengths; Effects of a conducted-vs-pulse wall temperature distribution for the LFSWT; and Application of wall heating and/or cooling to laminar boundary layer and flow separation control of airfoils and investigation of related active control techniques.

  16. Vertical flow chemical detection portal

    DOEpatents

    Linker, K.L.; Hannum, D.W.; Conrad, F.J.

    1999-06-22

    A portal apparatus is described for screening objects or persons for the presence of trace amounts of chemical substances such as illicit drugs or explosives. The apparatus has a test space, in which a person may stand, defined by two generally upright sides spanned by a horizontal transom. One or more fans in the transom generate a downward air flow (uni-directional) within the test space. The air flows downwardly from a high pressure upper zone, past the object or person to be screened. Air moving past the object dislodges from the surface thereof both volatile and nonvolatile particles of the target substance. The particles are entrained into the air flow which continues flowing downward to a lower zone of reduced pressure, where the particle-bearing air stream is directed out of the test space and toward preconcentrator and detection components. The sides of the portal are specially configured to partially contain and maintain the air flow. 3 figs.

  17. Vertical flow chemical detection portal

    DOEpatents

    Linker, Kevin L.; Hannum, David W.; Conrad, Frank James

    1999-01-01

    A portal apparatus for screening objects or persons for the presence of trace amounts of chemical substances such as illicit drugs or explosives. The apparatus has a test space, in which a person may stand, defined by two generally upright sides spanned by a horizontal transom. One or more fans in the transom generate a downward air flow (uni-directional) within the test space. The air flows downwardly from a high pressure upper zone, past the object or person to be screened. Air moving past the object dislodges from the surface thereof both volatile and nonvolatile particles of the target substance. The particles are entrained into the air flow which continues flowing downward to a lower zone of reduced pressure, where the particle-bearing air stream is directed out of the test space and toward preconcentrator and detection components. The sides of the portal are specially configured to partially contain and maintain the air flow.

  18. Mixing enhancement using axial flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papamoschou, Dimitri (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    A method and an apparatus for enhancing fluid mixing. The method comprises the following: (a) configuring a duct to have an effective outer wall, an effective inner wall, a cross-sectional shape, a first cross-sectional area and an exit area, the first cross-sectional area and the exit area being different in size; (b) generating a first flow at the first cross-sectional area, the first flow having a total pressure and a speed equal to or greater than a local speed of sound; and (c) generating a positive streamwise pressure gradient in a second flow in proximity of the exit area. The second flow results from the first flow. Fluid mixing is enhanced downstream from the duct exit area.

  19. Disorders of cochlear blood flow.

    PubMed

    Nakashima, Tsutomu; Naganawa, Shinji; Sone, Michihiko; Tominaga, Mitsuo; Hayashi, Hideo; Yamamoto, Hiroshi; Liu, Xiuli; Nuttall, Alfred L

    2003-09-01

    The cochlea is principally supplied from the inner ear artery (labyrinthine artery), which is usually a branch of the anterior inferior cerebellar artery. Cochlear blood flow is a function of cochlear perfusion pressure, which is calculated as the difference between mean arterial blood pressure and inner ear fluid pressure. Many otologic disorders such as noise-induced hearing loss, endolymphatic hydrops and presbycusis are suspected of being related to alterations in cochlear blood flow. However, the human cochlea is not easily accessible for investigation because this delicate sensory organ is hidden deep in the temporal bone. In patients with sensorineural hearing loss, magnetic resonance imaging, laser-Doppler flowmetry and ultrasonography have been used to investigate the status of cochlear blood flow. There have been many reports of hearing loss that were considered to be caused by blood flow disturbance in the cochlea. However, direct evidence of blood flow disturbance in the cochlea is still lacking in most of the cases.

  20. Low-flow, base-flow, and mean-flow regression equations for Pennsylvania streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stuckey, Marla H.

    2006-01-01

    Low-flow, base-flow, and mean-flow characteristics are an important part of assessing water resources in a watershed. These streamflow characteristics can be used by watershed planners and regulators to determine water availability, water-use allocations, assimilative capacities of streams, and aquatic-habitat needs. Streamflow characteristics are commonly predicted by use of regression equations when a nearby streamflow-gaging station is not available. Regression equations for predicting low-flow, base-flow, and mean-flow characteristics for Pennsylvania streams were developed from data collected at 293 continuous- and partial-record streamflow-gaging stations with flow unaffected by upstream regulation, diversion, or mining. Continuous-record stations used in the regression analysis had 9 years or more of data, and partial-record stations used had seven or more measurements collected during base-flow conditions. The state was divided into five low-flow regions and regional regression equations were developed for the 7-day, 10-year; 7-day, 2-year; 30-day, 10-year; 30-day, 2-year; and 90-day, 10-year low flows using generalized least-squares regression. Statewide regression equations were developed for the 10-year, 25-year, and 50-year base flows using generalized least-squares regression. Statewide regression equations were developed for harmonic mean and mean annual flow using weighted least-squares regression. Basin characteristics found to be significant explanatory variables at the 95-percent confidence level for one or more regression equations were drainage area, basin slope, thickness of soil, stream density, mean annual precipitation, mean elevation, and the percentage of glaciation, carbonate bedrock, forested area, and urban area within a basin. Standard errors of prediction ranged from 33 to 66 percent for the n-day, T-year low flows; 21 to 23 percent for the base flows; and 12 to 38 percent for the mean annual flow and harmonic mean, respectively. The

  1. Segregation dynamics in debris flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, K. M.; Fei, M.

    2014-12-01

    Debris flows are massive flows consisting of mixtures of particles of different sizes and interstitial fluids such as water and mud. In sheared mixtures of different-sized (same density) particles, it is well known that larger particles tend to go up (toward the free surface), and the smaller particles, down, commonly referred to as the "Brazil-nut problem" or "kinetic sieving". When kinetic sieving fluxes are combined with advection in flows, they can give rise to a spectacular range of segregation patterns. These segregation / advection dynamics are recognized as playing a role in the coarsening of a debris flow front (its "snout") and the coarsening of the self-formed channel sides or levees. Since particle size distribution influences the flow dynamics including entrainment of bed materials, modeling segregation dynamics in debris flows is important for modeling the debris flows themselves. In sparser systems, the Brazil-nut segregation is well-modeled using kinetic theory applied to dissipative systems, where an underlying assumption involves random, uncorrelated collisions. In denser systems, where kinetic theory breaks down we have recently developed a new mixture model that demonstrates the segregation fluxes are driven by two effects associated with the kinetic stress or granular temperature (the kinetic energy associated with velocity fluctuations): (1) the difference between the partitioning of kinetic and contact stresses among the species in the mixture and (2) a kinetic stress gradient. Both model frameworks involve the temperature gradient as a driving force for segregation, but kinetic theory sends larger particles toward lower temperatures, and our mixture model sends larger particles away from lower temperatures. Which framework works under what conditions appears to depend on correlations in the flow such as those manifested in clusters and force chains. We discuss the application of each theoretical framework to representing segregation dynamics

  2. Characterization of Blood Flow in Capillaries by Numerical Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Tong; Xing, Zhongwen

    2011-03-01

    We presents a numerical investigation of the axisymmetric, pressure driven motion of single file erythrocyte (i.e., red blood cell) suspensions flowing in capillaries of diameter 8- 11 μ m. The governing Navier-Stokes equations are discretized using the operator splitting technique and solved by the finite element method. The study takes consideration the particulate nature of the blood. The red blood cell (RBC) is modeled as a closed membrane filled with a Newtonian fluid which has the same viscosity as the surrounding plasma. The cell membrane is described by a spring model so that the deformability of the cells can be considered. An immersed boundary method is also developed for dealing with the cell/fluid interaction in the flow. Our study successfully recreates several important in vivo hemodynamic and hemorheological properties of microscopic blood flow, such as parachute shape of the cells, blunt velocity profile, and the Fahraeus effect, and they have been shown to have strong dependence on cell deformability, hematocrit and vessel size.

  3. Recurrent flow analysis in spatiotemporally chaotic 2-dimensional Kolmogorov flow

    SciTech Connect

    Lucas, Dan Kerswell, Rich R.

    2015-04-15

    Motivated by recent success in the dynamical systems approach to transitional flow, we study the efficiency and effectiveness of extracting simple invariant sets (recurrent flows) directly from chaotic/turbulent flows and the potential of these sets for providing predictions of certain statistics of the flow. Two-dimensional Kolmogorov flow (the 2D Navier-Stokes equations with a sinusoidal body force) is studied both over a square [0, 2π]{sup 2} torus and a rectangular torus extended in the forcing direction. In the former case, an order of magnitude more recurrent flows are found than previously [G. J. Chandler and R. R. Kerswell, “Invariant recurrent solutions embedded in a turbulent two-dimensional Kolmogorov flow,” J. Fluid Mech. 722, 554–595 (2013)] and shown to give improved predictions for the dissipation and energy pdfs of the chaos via periodic orbit theory. Analysis of the recurrent flows shows that the energy is largely trapped in the smallest wavenumbers through a combination of the inverse cascade process and a feature of the advective nonlinearity in 2D. Over the extended torus at low forcing amplitudes, some extracted states mimic the statistics of the spatially localised chaos present surprisingly well recalling the findings of Kawahara and Kida [“Periodic motion embedded in plane Couette turbulence: Regeneration cycle and burst,” J. Fluid Mech. 449, 291 (2001)] in low-Reynolds-number plane Couette flow. At higher forcing amplitudes, however, success is limited highlighting the increased dimensionality of the chaos and the need for larger data sets. Algorithmic developments to improve the extraction procedure are discussed.

  4. Flow Pattern Phenomena in Two-Phase Flow in Microchannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keska, Jerry K.; Simon, William E.

    2004-02-01

    Space transportation systems require high-performance thermal protection and fluid management techniques for systems ranging from cryogenic fluid management devices to primary structures and propulsion systems exposed to extremely high temperatures, as well as for other space systems such as cooling or environment control for advanced space suits and integrated circuits. Although considerable developmental effort is being expended to bring potentially applicable technologies to a readiness level for practical use, new and innovative methods are still needed. One such method is the concept of Advanced Micro Cooling Modules (AMCMs), which are essentially compact two-phase heat exchangers constructed of microchannels and designed to remove large amounts of heat rapidly from critical systems by incorporating phase transition. The development of AMCMs requires fundamental technological advancement in many areas, including: (1) development of measurement methods/systems for flow-pattern measurement/identification for two-phase mixtures in microchannels; (2) development of a phenomenological model for two-phase flow which includes the quantitative measure of flow patterns; and (3) database development for multiphase heat transfer/fluid dynamics flows in microchannels. This paper focuses on the results of experimental research in the phenomena of two-phase flow in microchannels. The work encompasses both an experimental and an analytical approach to incorporating flow patterns for air-water mixtures flowing in a microchannel, which are necessary tools for the optimal design of AMCMs. Specifically, the following topics are addressed: (1) design and construction of a sensitive test system for two-phase flow in microchannels, one which measures ac and dc components of in-situ physical mixture parameters including spatial concentration using concomitant methods; (2) data acquisition and analysis in the amplitude, time, and frequency domains; and (3) analysis of results

  5. US energy flow, 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Borg, I.Y.; Briggs, C.K.

    1987-08-18

    Although growth in the gross national product as well as total energy consumption in 1986 remained at 1985 levels, in detail there were notable changes in 1986. Industrial energy use fell to historical lows recorded in 1983 and all years prior to 1968. The drop is related to increases in end-use efficiencies and to changes in the make-up of the US industrial sector. Imports of goods and services increased as well as crude oil. The consumption of fuels for transportation increased for the third year by an amount approximately equal to the decline in industrial usage. Crude oil imports compensated for a slump in domestic oil production prompted by a downswing in worldwide oil prices. In contrast to the previous decade when the countries in the Middle East and Africa were the most important sources of imported oil and refinery products, in 1986 the three principal sources were Canada, Venezuela and Mexico. Petroleum products comprised a larger share of total oil imports from principal suppliers. Transmitted electricity increased slightly in the 1986 which was made possible by new nuclear capacity that came on line during the year. Cogeneration of electricity and process steam by industrial complexes continued to grow in part because of depressed domestic and Canadian natural gas prices and the favorable rates paid by the utilities for power that are assured by the Public Utilities Regulatory Act of 1978. Alternate sources of fuel for power production (geothermal, wind, solar, etc.) remained at 1985 levels and thus made only a small contribution to the total. The 1986 energy flow - supply and demand - is shown in graphical form using Department of Energy data.

  6. Sub-Grid Modeling of Electrokinetic Effects in Micro Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, C. P.

    2005-01-01

    Advances in micro-fabrication processes have generated tremendous interests in miniaturizing chemical and biomedical analyses into integrated microsystems (Lab-on-Chip devices). To successfully design and operate the micro fluidics system, it is essential to understand the fundamental fluid flow phenomena when channel sizes are shrink to micron or even nano dimensions. One important phenomenon is the electro kinetic effect in micro/nano channels due to the existence of the electrical double layer (EDL) near a solid-liquid interface. Not only EDL is responsible for electro-osmosis pumping when an electric field parallel to the surface is imposed, EDL also causes extra flow resistance (the electro-viscous effect) and flow anomaly (such as early transition from laminar to turbulent flow) observed in pressure-driven microchannel flows. Modeling and simulation of electro-kinetic effects on micro flows poses significant numerical challenge due to the fact that the sizes of the double layer (10 nm up to microns) are very thin compared to channel width (can be up to 100 s of m). Since the typical thickness of the double layer is extremely small compared to the channel width, it would be computationally very costly to capture the velocity profile inside the double layer by placing sufficient number of grid cells in the layer to resolve the velocity changes, especially in complex, 3-d geometries. Existing approaches using "slip" wall velocity and augmented double layer are difficult to use when the flow geometry is complicated, e.g. flow in a T-junction, X-junction, etc. In order to overcome the difficulties arising from those two approaches, we have developed a sub-grid integration method to properly account for the physics of the double layer. The integration approach can be used on simple or complicated flow geometries. Resolution of the double layer is not needed in this approach, and the effects of the double layer can be accounted for at the same time. With this

  7. Subsonic Flows through S-Ducts with Flow Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yi

    An inlet duct of an aircraft connects the air intake mounted on the fuselage to the engine within the aircraft body. The ideal outflow quality of the duct is steady, uniform and of high total pressure. Recently compact S-shaped inlet ducts are drawing more attention in the design of UAVs with short propulsion system. Compact ducts usually involve strong streamwise adverse pressure gradient and transverse secondary flow, leading to large-scale harmful vortical structures in the outflow. To improve the outflow quality modern flow control techniques have to be applied. Before designing successful flow control methods a solid understanding of the baseline flow field with the duct is crucial. In this work the fundamental mechanism of how the three dimensional flow topology evolves when the relevant parameters such as the duct geometry and boundary layer thickness are varied, is studied carefully. Two distinct secondary-flow patterns are identified. For the first time the sensitivity of the flow topology to the inflow boundary layer thickness in long ducts is clearly addressed. The interaction between the transverse motion induced by the transverse pressure gradient and the streamwise separation is revealed as the crucial reason for the various flow patterns existing in short ducts. A non-symmetric flow pattern is identified for the first time in both experiments and simulations in short ducts in which the intensity of the streamwise separation and the transverse invasion are in the same order of magnitude. A theory of energy accumulation and solution bifurcation is used to give a reasonable explanation for this non-symmetry. After gaining the knowledge of where and how the harmful vortical structures are generated several flow control techniques are tested to achieve a better outflow quality. The analysis of the flow control cases also provides a deeper insight into the behavior of the three-dimensional flow within the ducts. The conventional separation control method

  8. Flow Rate Measurements Using Flow-Induced Pipe Vibration

    SciTech Connect

    R. P. Evans; Jonathan D. Blotter; Alan G. Stephens

    2004-03-01

    This paper focuses on the possibility of a non-intrusive, low cost, flow rate measurement technique. The technique is based on signal noise from an accelerometer attached to the surface of the pipe. The signal noise is defined as the standard deviation of the frequency averaged time series signal. Experimental results are presented that indicate a nearly quadratic relationship between the signal noise and mass flow rate in the pipe. It is also shown that the signal noise - flow rate relationship is dependant on the pipe material and diameter.

  9. Lava flows and volcanic landforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarquini, Simone

    2016-04-01

    Lava flows constitute a large portion of the edifice of basaltic volcanoes. The substantial difference existing between the emplacement dynamics of different basaltic lava flows suggests a relation between the dominant flow dynamic and the overall shape of the ensuing volcano. Starting from the seminal works of Walker (1971, 1973) it is proposed that the rate of heat dissipation per unit volume of lava can be the founding principium at the roots of the emplacement dynamics of lava flows. Within the general framework of the thermodynamics of irreversible processes, a conceptual model is presented, in which the dynamic of lava flows can evolve in a linear or in a nonlinear regime on the basis of the constraint active on the system: a low constraint promotes a linear dynamic (i.e. fluctuations are damped), a high constraint a nonlinear one (i.e. fluctuations are enhanced). Two cases are considered as end-members for a linear and a nonlinear dynamic in lava flows: the typical "Hawaiian" sheet flow and the classic "Etnean" channelized flow (respectively). In lava flows, the active constraint is directly proportional to the slope of the topography and to the thermal conductivity and thermal capacity of the surrounding environment, and is inversely proportional to the lava viscosity and to the supply rate. The constraint indicates the distance from the equilibrium conditions of the system, and determines the rate of heat dissipation per unit volume. In subaerial flows, the heat dissipated during the emplacement is well approximated by the heat lost through radiation, which can be retrieved through remote-sensing techniques and can be used to correlate dynamic and dissipation. The model presented recombines previously unrelated concepts regarding the dynamics and the thermal regimes observed in different lava flows, providing a global consistent picture. References Walker GPL (1971) Compound and simple lava flows and flood basalts. Bull Volcanol 35:579-590 Walker GPL (1973

  10. Lava Flows of Daedalia Planum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    This THEMIS image captures a portion of several lava flows in Daedalia Planum southwest of the Arsia Mons shield volcano. Textures characteristic of the variable surface roughness associated with different lava flows in this region are easily seen. The lobate edges of the flows are distinctive, and permit the discrimination of many overlapping individual flows. The surfaces of some flows look wrinkly and ropy, probably indicating a relatively fluid type of lava flow referred to as pahoehoe. The surface textures of lava flows can thus sometimes be used for comparative purposes to infer lava viscosity and effusion rates. Numerous parallel curved ridges are visible on the upper surfaces of some of the lava flows. These ridges make the flow surface look somewhat ropy, and at smaller scales this flow might be referred to as pahoehoe, however, these features are probably better referred to as pressure ridges. Pressure ridges form on the surface of a lava flow when the upper part of the flow is exposed to air, cooling it, but the insulated much warmer interior of the flow continues to move down slope (and more material is pushed forward from behind), causing the surface to compress and pile up like a rug.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with

  11. Eddy Current Minimizing Flow Plug for Use in Flow Conditioning and Flow Metering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    England, John Dwight (Inventor); Kelley, Anthony R. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    An eddy-current-minimizing flow plug has an outer radial wall with open flow channels formed between the plug's inlet and outlet. The plug has a central region coupled to the inner surface of the outer radial wall. Each open flow channel includes (i) a first portion originating at the inlet and converging to a location in the plug where convergence is contributed to by changes in thickness of the outer radial wall and divergence of the central region, and (ii) a second portion originating in the plug and diverging to the outlet where divergence is contributed to by changes in thickness of the outer radial wall and convergence of the central region. For at least a portion of the open flow channels, a central axis passing through the first and second portions is non-parallel with respect to the given direction of the flow.

  12. The physics of debris flows

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Iverson, R.M.

    1997-01-01

    Recent advances in theory and experimentation motivate a thorough reassessment of the physics of debris flows. Analyses of flows of dry, granular solids and solid-fluid mixtures provide a foundation for a comprehensive debris flow theory, and experiments provide data that reveal the strengths and limitations of theoretical models. Both debris flow materials and dry granular materials can sustain shear stresses while remaining static; both can deform in a slow, tranquil mode characterized by enduring, frictional grain contacts; and both can flow in a more rapid, agitated mode characterized by brief, inelastic grain collisions. In debris flows, however, pore fluid that is highly viscous and nearly incompressible, composed of water with suspended silt and clay, can strongly mediate intergranular friction and collisions. Grain friction, grain collisions, and viscous fluid flow may transfer significant momentum simultaneously. Both the vibrational kinetic energy of solid grains (measured by a quantity termed the granular temperature) and the pressure of the intervening pore fluid facilitate motion of grains past one another, thereby enhancing debris flow mobility. Granular temperature arises from conversion of flow translational energy to grain vibrational energy, a process that depends on shear rates, grain properties, boundary conditions, and the ambient fluid viscosity and pressure. Pore fluid pressures that exceed static equilibrium pressures result from local or global debris contraction. Like larger, natural debris flows, experimental debris flows of ???10 m3 of poorly sorted, water-saturated sediment invariably move as an unsteady surge or series of surges. Measurements at the base of experimental flows show that coarse-grained surge fronts have little or no pore fluid pressure. In contrast, finer-grained, thoroughly saturated debris behind surge fronts is nearly liquefied by high pore pressure, which persists owing to the great compressibility and moderate

  13. The physics of debris flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iverson, Richard M.

    1997-08-01

    Recent advances in theory and experimentation motivate a thorough reassessment of the physics of debris flows. Analyses of flows of dry, granular solids and solid-fluid mixtures provide a foundation for a comprehensive debris flow theory, and experiments provide data that reveal the strengths and limitations of theoretical models. Both debris flow materials and dry granular materials can sustain shear stresses while remaining static; both can deform in a slow, tranquil mode characterized by enduring, frictional grain contacts; and both can flow in a more rapid, agitated mode characterized by brief, inelastic grain collisions. In debris flows, however, pore fluid that is highly viscous and nearly incompressible, composed of water with suspended silt and clay, can strongly mediate intergranular friction and collisions. Grain friction, grain collisions, and viscous fluid flow may transfer significant momentum simultaneously. Both the vibrational kinetic energy of solid grains (measured by a quantity termed the granular temperature) and the pressure of the intervening pore fluid facilitate motion of grains past one another, thereby enhancing debris flow mobility. Granular temperature arises from conversion of flow translational energy to grain vibrational energy, a process that depends on shear rates, grain properties, boundary conditions, and the ambient fluid viscosity and pressure. Pore fluid pressures that exceed static equilibrium pressures result from local or global debris contraction. Like larger, natural debris flows, experimental debris flows of ˜10 m³ of poorly sorted, water-saturated sediment invariably move as an unsteady surge or series of surges. Measurements at the base of experimental flows show that coarse-grained surge fronts have little or no pore fluid pressure. In contrast, finer-grained, thoroughly saturated debris behind surge fronts is nearly liquefied by high pore pressure, which persists owing to the great compressibility and moderate

  14. Hydroplaning and submarine debris flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Blasio, Fabio V.; Engvik, Lars; Harbitz, Carl B.; ElverhøI, Anders

    2004-01-01

    Examination of submarine clastic deposits along the continental margins reveals the remnants of holocenic or older debris flows with run-out distances up to hundreds of kilometers. Laboratory experiments on subaqueous debris flows, where typically one tenth of a cubic meter of material is dropped down a flume, also show high velocities and long run-out distances compared to subaerial debris flows. Moreover, they show the tendency of the head of the flow to run out ahead of the rest of the body. The experiments reveal the possible clue to the mechanism of long run-out. This mechanism, called hydroplaning, begins as the dynamic pressure at the front of the debris flow becomes of the order of the pressure exerted by the weight of the sediment. In such conditions a layer of water can intrude under the sediment with a lubrication effect and a decrease in the resistance forces between the sediment and the seabed. A physical-mathematical model of hydroplaning is presented and investigated numerically. The model is applied to both laboratory- and field-scale debris flows. Agreement with laboratory experiments makes us confident in the extrapolation of our model to natural flows and shows that long run-out distances can be naturally attained.

  15. Turbine blade tip flow discouragers

    SciTech Connect

    Bunker, R.S.

    2000-02-22

    A turbine assembly comprises a plurality of rotating blade portions in a spaced relation with a stationery shroud. The rotating blade portions comprise a root section, a tip portion and an airfoil. The tip portion has a pressure side wall and a suction side wall. A number of flow discouragers are disposed on the blade tip portion. In one embodiment, the flow discouragers extend circumferentially from the pressure side wall to the suction side wall so as to be aligned generally parallel to the direction of rotation. In an alternative embodiment, the flow discouragers extend circumferentially from the pressure side wall to the suction side wall so as to be aligned at an angle in the range between about 0{degree} to about 60{degree} with respect to a reference axis aligned generally parallel to the direction of rotation. The flow discouragers increase the flow resistance and thus reduce the flow of hot gas flow leakage for a given pressure differential across the blade tip portion so as to improve overall turbine efficiency.

  16. Cerebrospinal fluid flow in adults.

    PubMed

    Bradley, William G; Haughton, Victor; Mardal, Kent-Andre

    2016-01-01

    This chapter uses magnetic resonance imaging phase-contrast cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow measurements to predict which clinical normal-pressure hydrocephalus (NPH) patients will respond to shunting as well as which patients with Chiari I are likely to develop symptoms of syringomyelia. Symptomatic NPH patients with CSF flow (measured as the aqueductal CSF stroke volume) which is shown to be hyperdynamic (defined as twice normal) are quite likely to respond to ventriculoperitoneal shunting. The hyperdynamic CSF flow results from normal systolic brain expansion compressing the enlarged ventricles. When atrophy occurs, there is less brain expansion, decreased aqueductal CSF flow, and less likelihood of responding to shunting. It appears that NPH is a "two-hit" disease, starting as benign external hydrocephalus in infancy, followed by deep white-matter ischemia in late adulthood, which causes increased resistance to CSF outflow through the extracellular space of the brain. Using computational flow dynamics (CFD), CSF flow can be modeled at the foramen magnum and in the upper cervical spine. As in the case of NPH, hyperdynamic CSF flow appears to cause the signs and symptoms in Chiari I and can provide an additional indication for surgical decompression. CFD can also predict CSF pressures over the cardiac cycle. It has been hypothesized that elevated pressure pulses may be a significant etiologic factor in some cases of syringomyelia. PMID:27432684

  17. Simulation of Multistage Turbine Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Celestina, M. L.; Mulac, R. A.; Adamczyk, J. J.

    1985-01-01

    The numerical simulation of turbine flows serves to enhance the understanding of the flow phenomena within multistage turbomachinery components. The direct benefit of this activity is improved modeling capability, which can be used to improve component efficiency and durability. A hierarchy of equations was formulated to assess the difficulty in analyzing the flow field within multistage turbomachinery components. The Navier-Stokes equations provides the most complete description. The simplest description is given by a set of equations that govern the quasi-one-dimensional flow. The number of unknowns to be solved for increases monotonically above the number of equations. The development of the additional set of equations needed to mathematically close the system of equations forms the closure problem associated with that level of description. For the Navier-Stokes equation there is no closure problem. For the quasi-one-dimensional equation set random flow fluctuations, unsteady fluctuations, nonaxisymmetric flow variations, and hub-to-shroud variations on the quasi-one-dimensional flow must be accounted for.

  18. Two-Photon Flow Cytometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhog, Cheng Frank; Ye, Jing Yong; Norris, Theodore B.; Myc, Andrzej; Cao, Zhengyl; Bielinska, Anna; Thomas, Thommey; Baker, James R., Jr.

    2004-01-01

    Flow cytometry is a powerful technique for obtaining quantitative information from fluorescence in cells. Quantitation is achieved by assuring a high degree of uniformity in the optical excitation and detection, generally by using a highly controlled flow such as is obtained via hydrodynamic focusing. In this work, we demonstrate a two-beam, two- channel detection and two-photon excitation flow cytometry (T(sup 3)FC) system that enables multi-dye analysis to be performed very simply, with greatly relaxed requirements on the fluid flow. Two-photon excitation using a femtosecond near-infrared (NIR) laser has the advantages that it enables simultaneous excitation of multiple dyes and achieves very high signal-to-noise ratio through simplified filtering and fluorescence background reduction. By matching the excitation volume to the size of a cell, single-cell detection is ensured. Labeling of cells by targeted nanoparticles with multiple fluorophores enables normalization of the fluorescence signal and thus ratiometric measurements under nonuniform excitation. Quantitative size measurements can also be done even under conditions of nonuniform flow via a two-beam layout. This innovative detection scheme not only considerably simplifies the fluid flow system and the excitation and collection optics, it opens the way to quantitative cytometry in simple and compact microfluidics systems, or in vivo. Real-time detection of fluorescent microbeads in the vasculature of mouse ear demonstrates the ability to do flow cytometry in vivo. The conditions required to perform quantitative in vivo cytometry on labeled cells will be presented.

  19. Turbine blade tip flow discouragers

    DOEpatents

    Bunker, Ronald Scott

    2000-01-01

    A turbine assembly comprises a plurality of rotating blade portions in a spaced relation with a stationery shroud. The rotating blade portions comprise a root section, a tip portion and an airfoil. The tip portion has a pressure side wall and a suction side wall. A number of flow discouragers are disposed on the blade tip portion. In one embodiment, the flow discouragers extend circumferentially from the pressure side wall to the suction side wall so as to be aligned generally parallel to the direction of rotation. In an alternative embodiment, the flow discouragers extend circumferentially from the pressure side wall to the suction side wall so as to be aligned at an angle in the range between about 0.degree. to about 60.degree. with respect to a reference axis aligned generally parallel to the direction of rotation. The flow discouragers increase the flow resistance and thus reduce the flow of hot gas flow leakage for a given pressure differential across the blade tip portion so as to improve overall turbine efficiency.

  20. Fluid Flow Phenomena during Welding

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Wei

    2011-01-01

    MOLTEN WELD POOLS are dynamic. Liquid in the weld pool in acted on by several strong forces, which can result in high-velocity fluid motion. Fluid flow velocities exceeding 1 m/s (3.3 ft/s) have been observed in gas tungsten arc (GTA) welds under ordinary welding conditions, and higher velocities have been measured in submerged arc welds. Fluid flow is important because it affects weld shape and is related to the formation of a variety of weld defects. Moving liquid transports heat and often dominates heat transport in the weld pool. Because heat transport by mass flow depends on the direction and speed of fluid motion, weld pool shape can differ dramatically from that predicted by conductive heat flow. Temperature gradients are also altered by fluid flow, which can affect weld microstructure. A number of defects in GTA welds have been attributed to fluid flow or changes in fluid flow, including lack of penetration, top bead roughness, humped beads, finger penetration, and undercutting. Instabilities in the liquid film around the keyhole in electron beam and laser welds are responsible for the uneven penetration (spiking) characteristic of these types of welds.

  1. Visualization of entry flow separation for oscillating flow in tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Qiu, Songgang; Simon, Terence W.

    1992-01-01

    Neutrally buoyant helium-filled soap bubbles with laser illumination are used to document entry flow separation for oscillating flow in tubes. For a symmetric entry case, the size of the separation zone appears to mildly depend on Reynolds number in the acceleration phase, but is roughly Reynolds number independent in the deceleration phase. For the asymmetric entry case, the separation zone was larger and appeared to grow somewhat during the deceleration phase. The separation zones for both entry geometry cases remain relatively small throughout the cycle. This is different from what would be observed in all-laminar, oscillator flows and is probably due to the high turbulence of the flow, particularly during the deceleration phase of the cycle.

  2. Review of Constructed Subsurface Flow vs. Surface Flow Wetlands

    SciTech Connect

    HALVERSON, NANCY

    2004-09-01

    The purpose of this document is to use existing documentation to review the effectiveness of subsurface flow and surface flow constructed wetlands in treating wastewater and to demonstrate the viability of treating effluent from Savannah River Site outfalls H-02 and H-04 with a subsurface flow constructed wetland to lower copper, lead and zinc concentrations to within National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) Permit limits. Constructed treatment wetlands are engineered systems that have been designed and constructed to use the natural functions of wetlands for wastewater treatment. Constructed wetlands have significantly lower total lifetime costs and often lower capital costs than conventional treatment systems. The two main types of constructed wetlands are surface flow and subsurface flow. In surface flow constructed wetlands, water flows above ground. Subsurface flow constructed wetlands are designed to keep the water level below the top of the rock or gravel media, thus minimizing human and ecological exposure. Subsurface flow wetlands demonstrate higher rates of contaminant removal per unit of land than surface flow (free water surface) wetlands, therefore subsurface flow wetlands can be smaller while achieving the same level of contaminant removal. Wetlands remove metals using a variety of processes including filtration of solids, sorption onto organic matter, oxidation and hydrolysis, formation of carbonates, formation of insoluble sulfides, binding to iron and manganese oxides, reduction to immobile forms by bacterial activity, and uptake by plants and bacteria. Metal removal rates in both subsurface flow and surface flow wetlands can be high, but can vary greatly depending upon the influent concentrations and the mass loading rate. Removal rates of greater than 90 per cent for copper, lead and zinc have been demonstrated in operating surface flow and subsurface flow wetlands. The constituents that exceed NPDES limits at outfalls H-02 a nd H

  3. Homotopy between plane Couette flow and Pipe flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagata, Masato; Deguchi, Kengo

    2014-11-01

    In order to investigate symmetry connections between two canonical shear flows, i.e. plane Couette (PCF) and pipe flow (PF), which are linearly stable for all Reynolds numbers and therefore undergo subcritical transition, we take annular Poiseuille-Couette flow (APCF) as an intermediary Although PCF and PF are very different geometrically, APCF recovers PCF by taking the narrow gap limit, and also PF by taking the limit of vanishing inner cylinder where a homotopy of the basis functions from no-slip to regular conditions at the centre is considered. We show that the double-layered mirror-symmetric solutions in sliding Couette flow (APCF without axial pressure gradient) found by Deguchi & Nagata (2011) can be traced back to the mirror-symmetric solutions in PCF. Also we show that only the double-layered solution successfully reaches the PF limit, reproducing the mirror-symmetric solution in PF classified as M1 by Pringle & Kerswell (2007).

  4. Downstream Effects on Orbiter Leeside Flow Separation for Hypersonic Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buck, Gregory M.; Pulsonetti, Maria V.; Weilmuenster, K. James

    2005-01-01

    Discrepancies between experiment and computation for shuttle leeside flow separation, which came to light in the Columbia accident investigation, are resolved. Tests were run in the Langley Research Center 20-Inch Hypersonic CF4 Tunnel with a baseline orbiter model and two extended trailing edge models. The extended trailing edges altered the wing leeside separation lines, moving the lines toward the fuselage, proving that wing trailing edge modeling does affect the orbiter leeside flow. Computations were then made with a wake grid. These calculations more closely matched baseline experiments. Thus, the present findings demonstrate that it is imperative to include the wake flow domain in CFD calculations in order to accurately predict leeside flow separation for hypersonic vehicles at high angles of attack.

  5. HYDROGEN ELECTROLYZER FLOW DISTRIBUTOR MODEL

    SciTech Connect

    Shadday, M

    2006-09-28

    The hybrid sulfur process (HyS) hydrogen electrolyzer consists of a proton exchange membrane (PEM) sandwiched between two porous graphite layers. An aqueous solution of sulfuric acid with dissolved SO{sub 2} gas flows parallel to the PEM through the porous graphite layer on the anode side of the electrolyzer. A flow distributor, consisting of a number of parallel channels acting as headers, promotes uniform flow of the anolyte fluid through the porous graphite layer. A numerical model of the hydraulic behavior of the flow distributor is herein described. This model was developed to be a tool to aid the design of flow distributors. The primary design objective is to minimize spatial variations in the flow through the porous graphite layer. The hydraulic data from electrolyzer tests consists of overall flowrate and pressure drop. Internal pressure and flow distributions are not measured, but these details are provided by the model. The model has been benchmarked against data from tests of the current electrolyzer. The model reasonably predicts the viscosity effect of changing the fluid from water to an aqueous solution of 30 % sulfuric acid. The permeability of the graphite layer was the independent variable used to fit the model to the test data, and the required permeability for a good fit is within the range literature values for carbon paper. The model predicts that reducing the number of parallel channels by 50 % will substantially improve the uniformity of the flow in the porous graphite layer, while maintaining an acceptable pressure drop across the electrolyzer. When the size of the electrolyzer is doubled from 2.75 inches square to 5.5 inches square, the same number of channels as in the current design will be adequate, but it is advisable to increase the channel cross-sectional flow area. This is due to the increased length of the channels.

  6. Wavy flow cooling concept for turbine airfoils

    DOEpatents

    Liang, George

    2010-08-31

    An airfoil including an outer wall and a cooling cavity formed therein. The cooling cavity includes a leading edge flow channel located adjacent a leading edge of the airfoil and a trailing edge flow channel located adjacent a trailing edge of the airfoil. Each of the leading edge and trailing edge flow channels define respective first and second flow axes located between pressure and suction sides of the airfoil. A plurality of rib members are located within each of the flow channels, spaced along the flow axes, and alternately extending from opposing sides of the flow channels to define undulating flow paths through the flow channels.

  7. Simulation of water flow in terrestrial systems

    2008-12-18

    ParFlow is a parallel, variabley saturated groundwater flow code that is especially suitable for large scale problem. ParFlow simulates the three-dimensional saturated and variably saturated subsurface flow in heterogeneous porous media in three spatial dimensions. ParFlow's developemt and appkication has been on-ging for more than 10 uear. ParFlow has recently been extended to coupled surface-subsurface flow to enabel the simulation of hillslope runoff and channel routing in a truly integrated fashion. ParFlow simulates the three-dimensionalmore » varably saturated subsurface flow in strongly heterogeneous porous media in three spatial dimension.« less

  8. Hysteresis in Pressure-Driven DNA Denaturation

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-Lemus, Enrique; Nicasio-Collazo, Luz Adriana; Castañeda-Priego, Ramón

    2012-01-01

    In the past, a great deal of attention has been drawn to thermal driven denaturation processes. In recent years, however, the discovery of stress-induced denaturation, observed at the one-molecule level, has revealed new insights into the complex phenomena involved in the thermo-mechanics of DNA function. Understanding the effect of local pressure variations in DNA stability is thus an appealing topic. Such processes as cellular stress, dehydration, and changes in the ionic strength of the medium could explain local pressure changes that will affect the molecular mechanics of DNA and hence its stability. In this work, a theory that accounts for hysteresis in pressure-driven DNA denaturation is proposed. We here combine an irreversible thermodynamic approach with an equation of state based on the Poisson-Boltzmann cell model. The latter one provides a good description of the osmotic pressure over a wide range of DNA concentrations. The resulting theoretical framework predicts, in general, the process of denaturation and, in particular, hysteresis curves for a DNA sequence in terms of system parameters such as salt concentration, density of DNA molecules and temperature in addition to structural and configurational states of DNA. Furthermore, this formalism can be naturally extended to more complex situations, for example, in cases where the host medium is made up of asymmetric salts or in the description of the (helical-like) charge distribution along the DNA molecule. Moreover, since this study incorporates the effect of pressure through a thermodynamic analysis, much of what is known from temperature-driven experiments will shed light on the pressure-induced melting issue. PMID:22496765

  9. Transient eddy current flow metering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forbriger, J.; Stefani, F.

    2015-10-01

    Measuring local velocities or entire flow rates in liquid metals or semiconductor melts is a notorious problem in many industrial applications, including metal casting and silicon crystal growth. We present a new variant of an old technique which relies on the continuous tracking of a flow-advected transient eddy current that is induced by a pulsed external magnetic field. This calibration-free method is validated by applying it to the velocity of a spinning disk made of aluminum. First tests at a rig with a flow of liquid GaInSn are also presented.

  10. Thermocapillary flow on superhydrophobic surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baier, Tobias; Steffes, Clarissa; Hardt, Steffen

    2010-09-01

    A liquid in Cassie-Baxter state above a structured superhydrophobic surface is ideally suited for surface driven transport due to its large free surface fraction in close contact to a solid. We investigate thermal Marangoni flow over a superhydrophobic array of fins oriented parallel or perpendicular to an applied temperature gradient. In the Stokes limit we derive an analytical expression for the bulk flow velocity above the surface and compare it with numerical solutions of the Navier-Stokes equation. Even for moderate temperature gradients comparatively large flow velocities are induced, suggesting to utilize this principle for microfluidic pumping.

  11. PHYSICAL MODELING OF CONTRACTED FLOW.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, Jonathan K.

    1987-01-01

    Experiments on steady flow over uniform grass roughness through centered single-opening contractions were conducted in the Flood Plain Simulation Facility at the U. S. Geological Survey's Gulf Coast Hydroscience Center near Bay St. Louis, Miss. The experimental series was designed to provide data for calibrating and verifying two-dimensional, vertically averaged surface-water flow models used to simulate flow through openings in highway embankments across inundated flood plains. Water-surface elevations, point velocities, and vertical velocity profiles were obtained at selected locations for design discharges ranging from 50 to 210 cfs. Examples of observed water-surface elevations and velocity magnitudes at basin cross-sections are presented.

  12. Exploration EVA Purge Flow Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Navarro, Moses; Conger, Bruce; Campbell, Colin

    2011-01-01

    An advanced future spacesuit will require properly sized suit and helmet purge flow rates in order to sustain a crew member with a failed Portable Life Support System (PLSS) during an Extravehicular Activity (EVA). A computational fluid dynamics evaluation was performed to estimate the helmet purge flow rate required to washout carbon dioxide and to prevent the condensing ("fogging") of water vapor on the helmet visor. An additional investigation predicted the suit purge flow rate required to provide sufficient convective cooling to keep the crew member comfortable. This paper summarizes the results of these evaluations.

  13. Exploration EVA Purge Flow Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Navarro, Moses; Conger, Bruce

    2010-01-01

    An advanced future spacesuit will require properly sized suit and helmet purge flow rates in order to sustain a crew member with a failed Portable Life Support System (PLSS) during an Extravehicular Activity (EVA). A computational fluid dynamics evaluation was performed to estimate the helmet purge flow rate required to washout carbon dioxide and to prevent the condensing ("fogging") of water vapor on the helmet visor. An additional investigation predicted the suit purge flow rate required to provide sufficient convective cooling to keep the crew member comfortable. This paper summarizes the results of these evaluations.

  14. Overview of Laminar Flow Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joslin, Ronald D.

    1998-01-01

    The history of Laminar Flow Control (LFC) from the 1930s through the 1990s is reviewed and the current status of the technology is assessed. Early studies related to the natural laminar boundary-layer flow physics, manufacturing tolerances for laminar flow, and insect-contamination avoidance are discussed. Although most of this publication is about slot-, porous-, and perforated-suction LFC concept studies in wind tunnel and flight experiments, some mention is made of thermal LFC. Theoretical and computational tools to describe the LFC aerodynamics are included for completeness.

  15. Studies of two phase flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Witte, Larry C.

    1994-01-01

    The development of instrumentation for the support of research in two-phase flow in simulated microgravity conditions was performed. The funds were expended in the development of a technique for characterizing the motion and size distribution of small liquid droplets dispersed in a flowing gas. Phenomena like this occur in both microgravity and normal earth gravity situations inside of conduits that are carrying liquid-vapor mixtures at high flow rates. Some effort to develop a conductance probe for the measurement of liquid film thickness was also expended.

  16. Flow Friction or Spontaneous Ignition?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoltzfus, Joel M.; Gallus, Timothy D.; Sparks, Kyle

    2012-01-01

    "Flow friction," a proposed ignition mechanism in oxygen systems, has proved elusive in attempts at experimental verification. In this paper, the literature regarding flow friction is reviewed and the experimental verification attempts are briefly discussed. Another ignition mechanism, a form of spontaneous combustion, is proposed as an explanation for at least some of the fire events that have been attributed to flow friction in the literature. In addition, the results of a failure analysis performed at NASA Johnson Space Center White Sands Test Facility are presented, and the observations indicate that spontaneous combustion was the most likely cause of the fire in this 2000 psig (14 MPa) oxygen-enriched system.

  17. Zonal flow as pattern formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, Jeffrey B.; Krommes, John A.

    2013-10-01

    Zonal flows are well known to arise spontaneously out of turbulence. We show that for statistically averaged equations of the stochastically forced generalized Hasegawa-Mima model, steady-state zonal flows, and inhomogeneous turbulence fit into the framework of pattern formation. There are many implications. First, the wavelength of the zonal flows is not unique. Indeed, in an idealized, infinite system, any wavelength within a certain continuous band corresponds to a solution. Second, of these wavelengths, only those within a smaller subband are linearly stable. Unstable wavelengths must evolve to reach a stable wavelength; this process manifests as merging jets.

  18. Tuki, a data flow processor

    SciTech Connect

    French, E.; Glaser, H.

    1983-03-01

    An important feature of the Japanese fifth generation initiative is the investigation of novel computer architectures. One promising field of interest is that of data flow architectures inspired by the work at MIT and Manchester University. Having recognised the connection between functional programming and data flow, the work at Westfield has concentrated on the design of high level applicative languages. In this paper the authors describe a data flow architecture that was designed to support the language Cajole. They discuss a single processor architecture, a prototype of which has been built, and that can now be used as the building block for a closely-coupled distributed system. 14 references.

  19. Zonal flow as pattern formation

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, Jeffrey B.; Krommes, John A.

    2013-10-15

    Zonal flows are well known to arise spontaneously out of turbulence. We show that for statistically averaged equations of the stochastically forced generalized Hasegawa-Mima model, steady-state zonal flows, and inhomogeneous turbulence fit into the framework of pattern formation. There are many implications. First, the wavelength of the zonal flows is not unique. Indeed, in an idealized, infinite system, any wavelength within a certain continuous band corresponds to a solution. Second, of these wavelengths, only those within a smaller subband are linearly stable. Unstable wavelengths must evolve to reach a stable wavelength; this process manifests as merging jets.

  20. Lava flow superposition: the reactivation of flow units in compound flow fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Applegarth, Jane; Pinkerton, Harry; James, Mike; Calvari, Sonia

    2010-05-01

    Long-lived basaltic eruptions often produce compound `a`ā lava flow fields that are constructed of many juxtaposed and superposed flow units. We have examined the processes that result from superposition when the underlying flows are sufficiently young to have immature crusts and deformable cores. It has previously been recognised that the time elapsed between the emplacement of two units determines the fate of the underlying flow[1], because it controls the rheological contrast between the units. If the time interval is long, the underlying flow is able to cool, degas and develop a rigid crust, so that it shows no significant response to loading, and the two units are easily discernable stratigraphically. If the interval is short, the underlying flow has little time to cool, so the two units may merge and cool as a single unit, forming a ‘multiple' flow[1]. In this case, the individual units are more difficult to distinguish post-eruption. The effects of superposition in intermediate cases, when underlying flows have immature roofs, are less well understood, and have received relatively little attention in the literature, possibly due to the scarcity of observations. However, the lateral and vertical coalescence of lava tubes has been described on Mt. Etna, Sicily[2], suggesting that earlier tubes can be reactivated and lengthened as a result of superposition. Through our recent analysis of images taken by INGV Catania during the 2001 eruption of Mt. Etna (Sicily), we have observed that the emplacement of new surface flows can reactivate underlying units by squeezing the still-hot flow core away from the site of loading. We have identified three different styles of reactivation that took place during that eruption, which depend on the time interval separating the emplacement of the two flows, and hence the rheological contrast between them. For relatively long time intervals (> 2 days), hence high rheological contrasts, superposition can cause an overpressure

  1. Scaling laws in granular flow and pedestrian flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shumiao; Alonso-Marroquin, Fernando; Busch, Jonathan; Hidalgo, Raúl Cruz; Sathianandan, Charmila; Ramírez-Gómez, Álvaro; Mora, Peter

    2013-06-01

    We use particle-based simulations to examine the flow of particles through an exit. Simulations involve both gravity-driven particles (representing granular material) and velocity-driven particles (mimicking pedestrian dynamics). Contact forces between particles include elastic, viscous, and frictional forces; and simulations use bunker geometry. Power laws are observed in the relation between flow rate and exit width. Simulations of granular flow showed that the power law has little dependence on the coefficient of friction. Polydisperse granular systems produced higher flow rates than those produced by monodisperse ones. We extend the particle model to include the main features of pedestrian dynamics: thoracic shape, shoulder rotation, and desired velocity oriented towards the exit. Higher desired velocity resulted in higher flow rate. Granular simulations always give higher flow rate than pedestrian simulations, despite the values of aspect ratio of the particles. In terms of force distribution, pedestrians and granulates share similar properties with the non-democratic distribution of forces that poses high risks of injuries in a bottleneck situation.

  2. Experimental investigation of certain internal condensing and boiling flows: Their sensitivity to pressure fluctuations and heat transfer enhancements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kivisalu, Michael Toomas

    Space-based (satellite, scientific probe, space station, etc.) and millimeter -- to -- micro-scale (such as are used in high power electronics cooling, weapons cooling in aircraft, etc.) condensers and boilers are shear/pressure driven. They are of increasing interest to system engineers for thermal management because flow boilers and flow condensers offer both high fluid flow-rate-specific heat transfer capacity and very low thermal resistance between the fluid and the heat exchange surface, so large amounts of heat may be removed using reasonably-sized devices without the need for excessive temperature differences. However, flow stability issues and degredation of performance of shear/pressure driven condensers and boilers due to non-desireable flow morphology over large portions of their lengths have mostly prevented their use in these applications. This research is part of an ongoing investigation seeking to close the gap between science and engineering by analyzing two key innovations which could help address these problems. First, it is recommended that the condenser and boiler be operated in an innovative flow configuration which provides a non-participating core vapor stream to stabilize the annular flow regime throughout the device length, accomplished in an energy-efficient manner by means of ducted vapor re-circulation. This is demonstrated experimentally.. Second, suitable pulsations applied to the vapor entering the condenser or boiler (from the re-circulating vapor stream) greatly reduce the thermal resistance of the already effective annular flow regime. For experiments reported here, application of pulsations increased time-averaged heat-flux up to 900 % at a location within the flow condenser and up to 200 % at a location within the flow boiler, measured at the heat-exchange surface. Traditional fully condensing flows, reported here for comparison purposes, show similar heat-flux enhancements due to imposed pulsations over a range of frequencies

  3. A study of the compressible flow through a diffusing S-duct

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wellborn, Steven R.; Okiishi, Theodore H.; Reichert, Bruce A.

    1993-01-01

    Benchmark aerodynamic data are presented for compressible flow through a representative S-duct configuration. A numerical prediction of the S-duct flow field, obtained from a subsonic parabolized Navier-Stokes algorithm, is also shown. The experimental and numerical results are compared. Measurements of the three-dimensional velocity field, total pressures, and static pressures were obtained at five cross-sectional planes. Aerodynamic data were gathered with calibrated pneumatic probes. Surface static pressure and surface flow visualization data were also acquired. All reported tests were conducted with an inlet centerline Mach number of 0.6. The Reynolds number, based on the inlet centerline velocity and duct inlet diameter, was 2.6 x 10(exp 6). Thin inlet turbulent boundary layers existed. The collected data should be beneficial to aircraft inlet designers and the measurements are suitable for the validation of computational codes. The results show that a region of streamwise flow separation occurred within the duct. Details about the separated flow region, including mechanisms which drive this complicated flow phenomenon, are discussed. Results also indicate that the duct curvature induces strong pressure driven secondary flows. The cross flows evolve into counter-rotating vortices. These vortices convect low momentum fluid of the boundary layer toward the center of the duct, degrading both the uniformity and magnitude of the total pressure profile.

  4. An experimental investigation of the flow in a diffusing S-duct

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wellborn, Steven R.; Reichert, Bruce A.; Okiishi, Theodore H.

    1992-01-01

    Compressible, subsonic flow through a diffusing S-duct has been experimentally investigated. Benchmark aerodynamic data are presented for flow through a representative S-duct configuration. The collected data would be beneficial to aircraft inlet designers and is suitable for the validation of computational codes. Measurements of the 3D velocity field and total and static pressures were obtained at five cross-sectional planes. Surface static pressures and flow visualization also helped to reveal flow field characteristics. All reported tests were conducted with an inlet centerline Mach number of 0.6 and a Reynolds number, based on the inlet centerline velocity and duct inlet diameter, of 2.6 x 10(exp 6). The results show that a larger region of streamwise flow separation occurred within the duct. Details about the separated flow region, including mechanisms which drive this complicated flow phenomenon, are discussed. Transverse velocity components indicate that the duct curvature induces strong pressure driven secondary flows, which evolve into a large pair of counter-rotating vortices. These vortices convect the low momentum fluid of the boundary layer towards the center of the duct, degrading both the uniformity and magnitude of the total pressure profile.

  5. Magnetic structure and origin of counter-streaming mass flows in solar prominences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Yuandeng

    2015-08-01

    The magnetic structure and origin of counter-streaming mass flows in solar prominences are hitherto unknown, however, these issues are vitally important for understanding the instability and eruption of solar and stellar prominences, as well as the associated coronal mass ejections (CMEs). Here we report high-resolution observations of a quiescent solar prominence that clearly manifests the magnetic structure and origin of counter-streaming mass flows in solar prominences. Based on the observational results, we propose a new prominence model in the present paper, which can reconcile many discrepancies in previous studies, for example, the distribution of magnetic fields in solar prominences, the relationship between the photospheric magnetic fields and the ends of prominence feet, as well as the origin of counterstreaming mass flows in solar prominences. In addition, we also find that the photospheric pressure-driven three and five minutes oscillations can effectively modulate the kinematics of solar prominences.

  6. Flow instability and flow reversal in heated annular multichannels with initial downward flow

    SciTech Connect

    Guerrero, H.N.; Hart, C.M.

    1992-01-01

    Experimental and theoretical results are presented regarding the stability of initial downward flow of single phase water in parallel annular channels of the Savannah River Site (SRS) fuel assembly. The test was performed on an electrically heated prototypic mockup of a Mark-22 fuel assembly. The test conditions consisted of mass fluxes, from 98--294 kg/m[sup 2]-sec, and inlet water temperatures of 25[degrees]C and 40[degrees]C. With increased power to the heaters, flow instability was detected, characterized by flow fluctuations and flow redistribution among subchannels of the outer flow channel. With increased power, a condition was observed indicating local subchannel flow reversals where certain subchannel fluid temperatures were high at the inlet and low at the exit. With additional power increased, a critical heat flux condition was observed indicating local subchannel flow reversals where certain subchannel fluid temperatures were high at the inlet and low at the exit. With additional power increases, a critical heat flux condition was reached in the outer channel.

  7. Flow instability and flow reversal in heated annular multichannels with initial downward flow

    SciTech Connect

    Guerrero, H.N.; Hart, C.M.

    1992-12-31

    Experimental and theoretical results are presented regarding the stability of initial downward flow of single phase water in parallel annular channels of the Savannah River Site (SRS) fuel assembly. The test was performed on an electrically heated prototypic mockup of a Mark-22 fuel assembly. The test conditions consisted of mass fluxes, from 98--294 kg/m{sup 2}-sec, and inlet water temperatures of 25{degrees}C and 40{degrees}C. With increased power to the heaters, flow instability was detected, characterized by flow fluctuations and flow redistribution among subchannels of the outer flow channel. With increased power, a condition was observed indicating local subchannel flow reversals where certain subchannel fluid temperatures were high at the inlet and low at the exit. With additional power increased, a critical heat flux condition was observed indicating local subchannel flow reversals where certain subchannel fluid temperatures were high at the inlet and low at the exit. With additional power increases, a critical heat flux condition was reached in the outer channel.

  8. Empiric formulae combustor flow losses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Mingqi

    1991-07-01

    Approaches to calculation of the flow losses in components of the combustor, such as diffuser, swirler, and flame tube and the flow losses in combustor under combustion conditions are investigated. The empiric formulas are derived from tests. They feature simplicity and sufficient accuracy and are applicable to design and redesign of combustor. The tests were conducted on the models of four types of diffusers, ten kinds of swirlers, seven types of flame tubes, and seven simulators of inlet flowfield distortion. In comparison with the existing methods, the presented method considerably improves the calculation of the flow losses in the diffuser. For the swirler, the correlation between flow resistance and the discharge coefficient and the formula for heating losses are determined.

  9. Flow-compensating pressure regulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baehr, E. F.

    1979-01-01

    Pressure regulator developed for use with cataract-surgery instrument controls intraocular pressure during substantial variations in flow rate of infusion fluid. Device may be applicable to variety of eye-surgery instruments.

  10. Surface flow measurements from drones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tauro, Flavia; Porfiri, Maurizio; Grimaldi, Salvatore

    2016-09-01

    Drones are transforming the way we sense and interact with the environment. However, despite their increased capabilities, the use of drones in geophysical sciences usually focuses on image acquisition for generating high-resolution maps. Motivated by the increasing demand for innovative and high performance geophysical observational methodologies, we posit the integration of drone technology and optical sensing toward a quantitative characterization of surface flow phenomena. We demonstrate that a recreational drone can be used to yield accurate surface flow maps of sub-meter water bodies. Specifically, drone's vibrations do not hinder surface flow observations, and velocity measurements are in agreement with traditional techniques. This first instance of quantitative water flow sensing from a flying drone paves the way to novel observations of the environment.

  11. 2007 Estimated International Energy Flows

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, C A; Belles, R D; Simon, A J

    2011-03-10

    An energy flow chart or 'atlas' for 136 countries has been constructed from data maintained by the International Energy Agency (IEA) and estimates of energy use patterns for the year 2007. Approximately 490 exajoules (460 quadrillion BTU) of primary energy are used in aggregate by these countries each year. While the basic structure of the energy system is consistent from country to country, patterns of resource use and consumption vary. Energy can be visualized as it flows from resources (i.e. coal, petroleum, natural gas) through transformations such as electricity generation to end uses (i.e. residential, commercial, industrial, transportation). These flow patterns are visualized in this atlas of 136 country-level energy flow charts.

  12. Vortex Flow Aerodynamics, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, J. F. (Editor); Osborn, R. F. (Editor); Foughner, J. T., Jr. (Editor)

    1986-01-01

    Vortex modeling techniques and experimental studies of research configurations utilizing vortex flows are discussed. Also discussed are vortex flap investigations using generic and airplane research models and vortex flap theoretical analysis and design studies.

  13. Brain Function and Blood Flow

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lassen, Niels A.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Discusses the use of radioactive isotopes to graphically represent changes in the amount of blood flowing in areas of the human cerebral cortex, reflecting changes in the activity of those areas. Numerous illustrations are included. (Author/MA)

  14. Supersonic laminar flow control research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lo, Ching F.; Wiberg, Clark G.

    1995-01-01

    The objective of this research is to understand supersonic laminar flow stability, transition and active control. Some prediction techniques will be developed or modified to analyze laminar flow stability. The effects of distributed heating and cooling as an active boundary layer control technique will be studied. The primary tasks of the research apply to the NASA/Ames PoC and LFSWT's nozzle design with laminar flow control and are listed as follows: (1) predictions of supersonic laminar boundary layer stability and transition; (2) effects of wall heating and cooling on supersonic laminar flow control; (3) performance evaluation of the PoC and LFSWT nozzle designs with wall heating and cooling applied at different locations and various lengths; and (4) effects of a conducted -vs- pulse wall temperature distribution for the LFSWT.

  15. Flow stabilization by subsurface phonons

    PubMed Central

    Hussein, M. I.; Biringen, S.; Bilal, O. R.; Kucala, A.

    2015-01-01

    The interaction between a fluid and a solid surface in relative motion represents a dynamical process that is central to the problem of laminar-to-turbulent transition (and consequent drag increase) for air, sea and land vehicles, as well as long-range pipelines. This problem may in principle be alleviated via a control stimulus designed to impede the generation and growth of instabilities inherent in the flow. Here, we show that phonon motion underneath a surface may be tuned to passively generate a spatio-temporal elastic deformation profile at the surface that counters these instabilities. We theoretically demonstrate this phenomenon and the underlying mechanism of frequency-dependent destructive interference of the unstable flow waves. The converse process of flow destabilization is illustrated as well. This approach provides a condensed-matter physics treatment to fluid–structure interaction and a new paradigm for flow control. PMID:27547095

  16. Vortical flow past a sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattner, Trent; Chong, Min; Joubert, Peter

    2000-11-01

    Vortical flow past a sphere in a constant diameter pipe was studied experimentally in a guide vane apparatus similar to those used in fundamental experimental studies of vortex breakdown. The initial effect of swirl was to shorten the downstream separation bubble. For a small range of the swirl intensity, an almost stagnant upstream separation bubble formed. As the swirl intensity was increased, the bubble became unstable and an unsteady spiral formed. At high swirl intensity there was a mean recirculation region which penetrated far upstream while the flow on the downstream hemisphere was attached. Measurements of the velocity field were obtained using laser Doppler velocimetry. Analysis of these results suggests that the onset of upstream separation is associated with the formation of a negative azimuthal vorticity component which slows the axial flow near the axis of symmetry. This is consistent with inviscid distortion of the vortex filaments in the diverging flow approaching the sphere.

  17. The Dynamics of Flowing Waters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mattingly, Rosanna L.

    1987-01-01

    Describes a series of activities designed to help students understand the dynamics of flowing water. Includes investigations into determining water discharge, calculating variable velocities, utilizing flood formulas, graphing stream profiles, and learning about the water cycle. (TW)

  18. Organized motion in turbulent flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cantwell, B. J.

    A review of organized motion in turbulent flow indicates that the transport properties of most shear flows are dominated by large-scale vortex nonrandom motions. The mean velocity profile of a turbulent boundary layer consists of a viscous sublayer, buffer layer, and a logarithmic outer layer; an empirical formula of Coles (1956) applies to various pressure gradients. The boundary layer coherent structure was isolated by the correlation methods of Townsend (1956) and flow visualization by direct observations of complex unsteady turbulent motions. The near-wall studies of Willmart and Wooldridge (1962) used the space-time correlation for pressure fluctuations at the wall under a thick turbulent boundary layer; finally, organized motion in free shear flows and transition-control of mixing demonstrated that the Reynolds number invariance of turbulence shows wide scatter.

  19. Technical Seminar: Exploring Hypersonic Flow

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA Aeronautics is developing a method for 2D and 3D imaging of hypersonic flows, called Nitric Oxide Planar Laser-Induced Fluorescence (NO-PLIF). NO-PLIF has been used to study basic transition f...

  20. Electroosmotic shear flow in microchannels.

    PubMed

    Mampallil, Dileep; van den Ende, Dirk

    2013-01-15

    We generate and study electroosmotic shear flow in microchannels. By chemically or electrically modifying the surface potential of the channel walls a shear flow component with controllable velocity gradient can be added to the electroosmotic flow caused by double layer effects at the channel walls. Chemical modification is obtained by treating the channel wall with a cationic polymer. In case of electric modification, we used gate electrodes embedded in the channel wall. By applying a voltage to the gate electrode, the zeta potential can be varied and a controllable, uniform shear stress can be applied to the liquid in the channel. The strength of the shear stress depends on both the gate voltage and the applied field which drives the electroosmotic shear flow. Although the stress range is still limited, such a microchannel device can be used in principle as an in situ micro-rheometer for lab on a chip purposes. PMID:23089595

  1. Miniaturized flow injection analysis system

    DOEpatents

    Folta, James A.

    1997-01-01

    A chemical analysis technique known as flow injection analysis, wherein small quantities of chemical reagents and sample are intermixed and reacted within a capillary flow system and the reaction products are detected optically, electrochemically, or by other means. A highly miniaturized version of a flow injection analysis system has been fabricated utilizing microfabrication techniques common to the microelectronics industry. The microflow system uses flow capillaries formed by etching microchannels in a silicon or glass wafer followed by bonding to another wafer, commercially available microvalves bonded directly to the microflow channels, and an optical absorption detector cell formed near the capillary outlet, with light being both delivered and collected with fiber optics. The microflow system is designed mainly for analysis of liquids and currently measures 38.times.25.times.3 mm, but can be designed for gas analysis and be substantially smaller in construction.

  2. Miniaturized flow injection analysis system

    DOEpatents

    Folta, J.A.

    1997-07-01

    A chemical analysis technique known as flow injection analysis is described, wherein small quantities of chemical reagents and sample are intermixed and reacted within a capillary flow system and the reaction products are detected optically, electrochemically, or by other means. A highly miniaturized version of a flow injection analysis system has been fabricated utilizing microfabrication techniques common to the microelectronics industry. The microflow system uses flow capillaries formed by etching microchannels in a silicon or glass wafer followed by bonding to another wafer, commercially available microvalves bonded directly to the microflow channels, and an optical absorption detector cell formed near the capillary outlet, with light being both delivered and collected with fiber optics. The microflow system is designed mainly for analysis of liquids and currently measures 38{times}25{times}3 mm, but can be designed for gas analysis and be substantially smaller in construction. 9 figs.

  3. Solid-gas critical flow

    SciTech Connect

    Gidaspow, D.; Syamlal, M.

    1985-01-01

    Maximum solid-gas transport rates have been computed using several hydrodynamic models. In the limit of zero gas density, the critical velocity equals the square root of a compressibility modulus of the powder divided by its density. Compressibility waves move with this velocity through the powder. Part II of this paper deals with homogeneous critical powder flow for which a useful expression for maximum flow has been derived and compared to an experiment from the literature.

  4. Cavitation in flowing superfluid helium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daney, D. E.

    1988-01-01

    Flowing superfluid helium cavitates much more readily than normal liquid helium, and there is a marked difference in the cavitation behavior of the two fluids as the lambda point is traversed. Examples of cavitation in a turbine meter and centrifugal pump are given, together with measurements of the cavitation strength of flowing superfluid helium. The unusual cavitation behavior of superfluid helium is attributed to its immense thermal conductivity .

  5. Flow-induced vibrations-1987

    SciTech Connect

    Au-Yang, M.K.; Chen, S.S.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains 20 selections. Some of the titles are: Acoustic resonance in heat exchanger tube bundles--Part 1. Physical nature of the phenomenon; Theoretical and experimental studies on heat exchanger U-bend tube bundle vibration characteristics; Experimental model analysis of metallic pipeline conveying fluid; Leakage flow-induced vibration of an eccentric tube-in-tube slip joint; and A study on the vibrations of pipelines caused by internal pulsating flows.

  6. Multistage Turbomachinery Flows Simulated Numerically

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hathaway, Michael D.; Adamczyk, John J.; Shabbir, Aamir; Wellborn, Steven R.

    1999-01-01

    At the NASA Lewis Research Center, a comprehensive assessment was made of the predictive capability of the average passage flow model as applied to multistage axial-flow compressors. This model, which describes the time-averaged flow field within a typical passage of a blade row embedded in a multistage configuration, is being widely used throughout U.S. aircraft industry as an integral part of their design systems. Rotor flow-angle deviation. In this work, detailed data taken within a four and one-half stage large low-speed compressor were used to assess the weaknesses and strengths of the predictive capabilities of the average passage flow model. The low-speed compressor blading is of modern design and employs stator end-bends. Measurements were made with slow- and high response instrumentation. The high-response measurements revealed the velocity components of both the rotor and stator wakes. From the measured wake profiles, we found that the flow exiting the rotors deviated from the rotor exit metal angle to a lesser degree than was predicted by the average passage flow model. This was found to be due to blade boundary layer transition, which recently has been shown to exist on multistage axial compressor rotor and stator blades, but was not accounted for in the average passage model. Consequently, a model that mimics the effects of blade boundary layer transition, Shih k-epsilon model, was incorporated into the average passage model. Simulations that incorporated this transition model showed a dramatic improvement in agreement with data. The altered model thus improved predictive capability for multistage axial-flow compressors, and this was verified by detailed experimental measurement.

  7. Grain Flow at High Stresses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McSaveney, M. J.

    2015-12-01

    The transport mechanism of rapid long-runout rock avalanches was a hotly debated topic when I came on the scene in 1967. So how come it is still debated today? My explanation is that it is the expected outcome of peer review, poor comprehension, and technological advances outpacing intellectual advances. Why think about the problem when we can model it! So let us think about the problem. Shreve thought that rock avalanches fell upon and trapped a layer of air. What physics was he thinking about? It is how feathers and tissue papers fall. When my rock avalanches fly, they fly like unlubricated bricks using the physics of projectiles and ballistics. But the main transport mechanism is not flight. The dominant impression from watching a rock avalanche in motion is of fluid flow, as Heim described it in 1882. A rock avalanche is a very large grain flow. Bagnold studied dispersive grain flows, but why should one assume that rock avalanches are dispersive grain flows as many do. The more common grain flow type is a dense grain flow and rock avalanches are dense grain flows in which the weight can and does generate very high stresses at grain contacts. Brittle rock deforms elastically up to its compressive strength, whereupon it breaks, releasing elastic strain as transient elastic strain (seismic energy to a seismologist, acoustic energy to a physicist). Melosh and others have shown that acoustic energy can fluidize a grain mass. There is no exotic physics behind grain flow at high stress. When grains break, the released elastic strain has to go somewhere, and it goes somewhere principally by transmission though grain contacts. Depending on the state of stress at the grain contact, the contact will pass the stress or will slip at conventional values of Coulomb friction. Enough thinking! A physical model of the entire process is too big for any laboratory. So whose numerical model will do it?

  8. Analysis of flow reversal test

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, L.Y.; Tichler, P.R.

    1996-03-01

    A series of tests has been conducted to measure the dryout power associated with a flow transient whereby the coolant in a heated channel undergoes a change in flow direction. An analysis of the test was made with the aid of a system code, RELAP5. A dryout criterion was developed in terms of a time-averaged void fraction calculated by RELAP5 for the heated channel. The dryout criterion was also compared with several CHF correlations developed for the channel geometry.

  9. Flows In Model Human Femoral Arteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Back, Lloyd H.; Kwack, Eug Y.; Crawford, Donald W.

    1990-01-01

    Flow is visualized with dye traces, and pressure measurements made. Report describes experimental study of flow in models of human femoral artery. Conducted to examine effect of slight curvature of artery on flow paths and distribution of pressure.

  10. Natural gas flow through critical nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, R. C.

    1969-01-01

    Empirical method for calculating both the mass flow rate and upstream volume flow rate through critical flow nozzles is determined. Method requires knowledge of the composition of natural gas, and of the upstream pressure and temperature.

  11. Insertable fluid flow passage bridgepiece and method

    DOEpatents

    Jones, Daniel O.

    2000-01-01

    A fluid flow passage bridgepiece for insertion into an open-face fluid flow channel of a fluid flow plate is provided. The bridgepiece provides a sealed passage from a columnar fluid flow manifold to the flow channel, thereby preventing undesirable leakage into and out of the columnar fluid flow manifold. When deployed in the various fluid flow plates that are used in a Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) fuel cell, bridgepieces of this invention prevent mixing of reactant gases, leakage of coolant or humidification water, and occlusion of the fluid flow channel by gasket material. The invention also provides a fluid flow plate assembly including an insertable bridgepiece, a fluid flow plate adapted for use with an insertable bridgepiece, and a method of manufacturing a fluid flow plate with an insertable fluid flow passage bridgepiece.

  12. Laminar flow in twisted ducts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kheshgi, Haroon S.

    1993-11-01

    Fully developed flow of an incompressible Newtonian fluid through a duct in which the orientation of the cross section is twisted about an axis parallel to an imposed pressure gradient is analyzed here with the aid of the penalty/Galerkin/finite element method. When the axis of twist is located within the duct, flow approaches limits at low and high torsion, the spatial frequency τ by which the duct is twisted. For small torsion, flow is nearly rectilinear and solutions approach previous asymptotic results for an elliptical cross section. For large torsion, flow exhibits an internal layer structure: a rotating circular-cylinder core with a nearly parabolic axial velocity profile, an internal layer of thickness τ-1 along the perimeter of the largest circular cylinder that can be inscribed in the duct, and nearly quiescent flow outside of the circular cylinder. The maximum rate of swirl in the core of a square duct is found to be at moderate torsion. The primary effect of inertia is an increase in pressure with distance from the axis, due to centrifugal acceleration. When the duct is offset from the axis of twist, inertia leads to one, two, or three primary vortices without apparent bifurcation of steady states, although stability of steady flows is lost beyond detected Hopf points.

  13. Flow Diverters for Intracranial Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Alderazi, Yazan J.; Kass-Hout, Tareq; Prestigiacomo, Charles J.; Gandhi, Chirag D.

    2014-01-01

    Flow diverters (pipeline embolization device, Silk flow diverter, and Surpass flow diverter) have been developed to treat intracranial aneurysms. These endovascular devices are placed within the parent artery rather than the aneurysm sac. They take advantage of altering hemodynamics at the aneurysm/parent vessel interface, resulting in gradual thrombosis of the aneurysm occurring over time. Subsequent inflammatory response, healing, and endothelial growth shrink the aneurysm and reconstruct the parent artery lumen while preserving perforators and side branches in most cases. Flow diverters have already allowed treatment of previously untreatable wide neck and giant aneurysms. There are risks with flow diverters including in-stent thrombosis, perianeurysmal edema, distant and delayed hemorrhages, and perforator occlusions. Comparative efficacy and safety against other therapies are being studied in ongoing trials. Antiplatelet therapy is mandatory with flow diverters, which has highlighted the need for better evidence for monitoring and tailoring antiplatelet therapy. In this paper we review the devices, their uses, associated complications, evidence base, and ongoing studies. PMID:24967131

  14. Columbus Payloads Flow Rate Anomalies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quaranta, Albino; Bufano, Gaetana; DePalo, Savino; Holt, James M.; Szigetvari, Zoltan; Palumberi, Sergio; Hinderer, S.

    2011-01-01

    The Columbus Active Thermal Control System (ATCS) is the main thermal bus for the pressurized racks working inside the European laboratory. One of the ATCS goals is to provide proper water flow rate to each payload (P/L) by controlling actively the pressure drop across the common plenum distribution piping. Overall flow measurement performed by the Water Pump Assembly (WPA) is the only flow rate monitor available at system level and is not part of the feedback control system. At rack activation the flow rate provided by the system is derived on ground by computing the WPA flow increase. With this approach, several anomalies were raised during these 3 years on-orbit, with the indication of low flow rate conditions on the European racks FSL, BioLab, EDR and EPM. This paper reviews the system and P/Ls calibration approach, the anomalies occurred, the engineering evaluation on the measurement approach and the accuracy improvements proposed, the on-orbit test under evaluation with NASA and finally discusses possible short and long term solutions in case of anomaly confirmation.

  15. Tracer-monitored flow titrations.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Milton K; Rocha, Diogo L; Rocha, Fábio R P; Zagatto, Elias A G

    2016-01-01

    The feasibility of implementing tracer-monitored titrations in a flow system is demonstrated. A dye tracer is used to estimate the instant sample and titrant volumetric fractions without the need for volume, mass or peak width measurements. The approach was applied to spectrophotometric flow titrations involving variations of sample and titrant flow-rates (i.e. triangle programmed technique) or concentration gradients established along the sample zone (i.e. flow injection system). Both strategies required simultaneous monitoring of two absorbing species, namely the titration indicator and the dye tracer. Mixing conditions were improved by placing a chamber with mechanical stirring in the analytical path aiming at to minimize diffusional effects. Unlike most of flow-based titrations, the innovation is considered as a true titration, as it does not require a calibration curve thus complying with IUPAC definition. As an application, acidity evaluation in vinegars involving titration with sodium hydroxide was selected. Phenolphthalein and brilliant blue FCF were used as indicator and dye tracer, respectively. Effects of sample volume, titrand/titrant concentrations and flow rates were investigated aiming at improved accuracy and precision. Results were reliable and in agreement with those obtained by a reference titration procedure.

  16. NASA Dryden flow visualization facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delfrate, John H.

    1995-01-01

    This report describes the Flow Visualization Facility at NASA Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. This water tunnel facility is used primarily for visualizing and analyzing vortical flows on aircraft models and other shapes at high-incidence angles. The tunnel is used extensively as a low-cost, diagnostic tool to help engineers understand complex flows over aircraft and other full-scale vehicles. The facility consists primarily of a closed-circuit water tunnel with a 16- x 24-in. vertical test section. Velocity of the flow through the test section can be varied from 0 to 10 in/sec; however, 3 in/sec provides optimum velocity for the majority of flow visualization applications. This velocity corresponds to a unit Reynolds number of 23,000/ft and a turbulence level over the majority of the test section below 0.5 percent. Flow visualization techniques described here include the dye tracer, laser light sheet, and shadowgraph. Limited correlation to full-scale flight data is shown.

  17. Regulation of pulpal blood flow

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, S.

    1985-04-01

    The regulation of blood flow of the dental pulp was investigated in dogs and rats anesthetized with sodium pentobarbital. Pulpal blood flow was altered by variations of local and systemic hemodynamics. Macrocirculatory blood flow (ml/min/100 g) in the dental pulp was measured with both the /sup 133/Xe washout and the 15-microns radioisotope-labeled microsphere injection methods on the canine teeth of dogs, to provide a comparison of the two methods in the same tooth. Microcirculatory studies were conducted in the rat incisor tooth with microscopic determination of the vascular pattern, RBC velocity, and intravascular volumetric flow distribution. Pulpal resistance vessels have alpha- and beta-adrenergic receptors. Activation of alpha-receptors by intra-arterial injection of norepinephrine (NE) caused both a reduction in macrocirculatory Qp in dogs and decreases in arteriolar and venular diameters and intravascular volumetric flow (Qi) in rats. These responses were blocked by the alpha-antagonist PBZ. Activation of beta-receptors by intra-arterial injection of isoproterenal (ISO) caused a paradoxical reduction of Qp in dogs. In rats, ISO caused a transient increase in arteriolar Qi followed by a flow reduction; arteriolar dilation was accompanied by venular constriction. These macrocirculatory and microcirculatory responses to ISO were blocked by the alpha-antagonist propranolol.

  18. High speed flow past wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norstrud, H.

    1973-01-01

    The analytical solution to the transonic small perturbation equation which describes steady compressible flow past finite wings at subsonic speeds can be expressed as a nonlinear integral equation with the perturbation velocity potential as the unknown function. This known formulation is substituted by a system of nonlinear algebraic equations to which various methods are applicable for its solution. Due to the presence of mathematical discontinuities in the flow solutions, however, a main computational difficulty was to ensure uniqueness of the solutions when local velocities on the wing exceeded the speed of sound. For continuous solutions this was achieved by embedding the algebraic system in an one-parameter operator homotopy in order to apply the method of parametric differentiation. The solution to the initial system of equations appears then as a solution to a Cauchy problem where the initial condition is related to the accompanying incompressible flow solution. In using this technique, however, a continuous dependence of the solution development on the initial data is lost when the solution reaches the minimum bifurcation point. A steepest descent iteration technique was therefore, added to the computational scheme for the calculation of discontinuous flow solutions. Results for purely subsonic flows and supersonic flows with and without compression shocks are given and compared with other available theoretical solutions.

  19. Investigations of Arcjet Flow Thermochemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fletcher, Douglas G.; Wercinski, Paul (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    An experimental and numerical investigation of the thermochemical state of arcjet flows is currently being conducted at NASA Ames Research Center. The experimental approach relies on the use of laser- and emission-spectroscopic diagnostic techniques in three regions of the flow. A fiber optic sensor is used to record spectrally resolved emission signals from the electrode package region, where the flow is most likely to be in thermochemical equilibrium. A second emission diagnostic measurement is made in the shock layer formed over a blunt-body test article placed in the stream, and a CCD camera is used to simultaneously record spectral emission from several measurement locations along the stagnation streamline. Downstream of the nozzle exit, but upstream of the test article, Laser-Induced Fluorescence (LIF) of atomic nitrogen is used to assess the nonequilibrium distribution of flow enthalpy in the free stream. Results from the measurements are compared with predictions from a two-temperature, axisymmetric flow model that solves the nozzle and shock-layer flows.

  20. Supersonic Laminar Flow Control Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lo, C. F.; Wiberg, Clark G.

    1996-01-01

    The objective of this research is to understand supersonic laminar flow stability, transition and active control. Some prediction techniques are developed or modified to analyze laminar flow stability. The effects of distributed heating and cooling as an active boundary layer control technique are studied. The primary tasks of the research apply to the NASA/Ames Proof-of-Concept (PoC) and the Laminar Flow Supersonic Wind Tunnel's (LFSWT's) nozzle design with laminar flow control and are listed as follows: (1) Predictions of supersonic laminar boundary layer stability and transition; (2) Effects of wall heating and cooling on supersonic laminar flow control on a flat plate; (3) Performance evaluation of the PoC and LFSWT nozzle designs with wall heating and cooling applied at different locations and various lengths; (4) Effects of a conducted -vs- pulse wall temperature distribution for the LFSWT; and (5) Application of wall heating and/or cooling to laminar boundary layer and flow separation control of airfoils and investigation of related active control techniques.