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Sample records for flow soil filter

  1. Ensemble kalman filtering to perform data assimilation with soil water content probes and pedotransfer functions in modeling water flow in variably saturated soils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Data from modern soil water contents probes can be used for data assimilation in soil water flow modeling, i.e. continual correction of the flow model performance based on observations. The ensemble Kalman filter appears to be an appropriate method for that. The method requires estimates of the unce...

  2. Concentric Split Flow Filter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stapleton, Thomas J. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A concentric split flow filter may be configured to remove odor and/or bacteria from pumped air used to collect urine and fecal waste products. For instance, filter may be designed to effectively fill the volume that was previously considered wasted surrounding the transport tube of a waste management system. The concentric split flow filter may be configured to split the air flow, with substantially half of the air flow to be treated traveling through a first bed of filter media and substantially the other half of the air flow to be treated traveling through the second bed of filter media. This split flow design reduces the air velocity by 50%. In this way, the pressure drop of filter may be reduced by as much as a factor of 4 as compare to the conventional design.

  3. Remediation of groundwater contaminated with MTBE and benzene: the potential of vertical-flow soil filter systems.

    PubMed

    van Afferden, Manfred; Rahman, Khaja Z; Mosig, Peter; De Biase, Cecilia; Thullner, Martin; Oswald, Sascha E; Müller, Roland A

    2011-10-15

    Field investigations on the treatment of MTBE and benzene from contaminated groundwater in pilot or full-scale constructed wetlands are lacking hugely. The aim of this study was to develop a biological treatment technology that can be operated in an economic, reliable and robust mode over a long period of time. Two pilot-scale vertical-flow soil filter eco-technologies, a roughing filter (RF) and a polishing filter (PF) with plants (willows), were operated independently in a single-stage configuration and coupled together in a multi-stage (RF+PF) configuration to investigate the MTBE and benzene removal performances. Both filters were loaded with groundwater from a refinery site contaminated with MTBE and benzene as the main contaminants, with a mean concentration of 2970±816 and 13,966±1998 μg L(-1), respectively. Four different hydraulic loading rates (HLRs) with a stepwise increment of 60, 120, 240 and 480 L m(-2) d(-1) were applied over a period of 388 days in the single-stage operation. At the highest HLR of 480 L m(-2) d(-1), the mean concentrations of MTBE and benzene were found to be 550±133 and 65±123 μg L(-1) in the effluent of the RF. In the effluent of the PF system, respective mean MTBE and benzene concentrations of 49±77 and 0.5±0.2 μg L(-1) were obtained, which were well below the relevant MTBE and benzene limit values of 200 and 1 μg L(-1) for drinking water quality. But a dynamic fluctuation in the effluent MTBE concentration showed a lack of stability in regards to the increase in the measured values by nearly 10%, which were higher than the limit value. Therefore, both (RF+PF) filters were combined in a multi-stage configuration and the combined system proved to be more stable and effective with a highly efficient reduction of the MTBE and benzene concentrations in the effluent. Nearly 70% of MTBE and 98% of benzene were eliminated from the influent groundwater by the first vertical filter (RF) and the remaining amount was almost

  4. Performance of system consisting of vertical flow trickling filter and horizontal flow multi-soil-layering reactor for treatment of rural wastewater.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi; Cheng, Yan; Yang, Chunping; Luo, Wei; Zeng, Guangming; Lu, Li

    2015-10-01

    In order to improve nitrogen removal for rural wastewater, a novel two-stage hybrid system, consisting of a vertical flow trickling filter (VFTF) and a horizontal flow multi-soil-layering (HFMSL) bioreactor was developed. The performance of the apparatus was observed under various carbon-nitrogen ratios and water spraying frequencies separately. The maximum removal efficiency of total nitrogen (TN) for the hybrid system was 92.8% while the removal rates of CODCr, ammonium (NH4(+)-N), and total phosphorus (TP) were 94.1%, 96.1%, 92.0% respectively, and the corresponding effluent concentrations were 3.61, 21.20, 1.91, and 0.33 mg L(-1). The horizontal flow mode for MSL led the system to denitrifying satisfactorily as it ensured relatively long hydraulic retention time (HRT), ideal anoxic condition and adequate organic substrates supply. Also, higher water spraying frequency benefited intermittent feeding system for pollutants removal. Shock loading test indicated that the hybrid system could operate well even at hydraulic shock loadings. PMID:26151854

  5. Performance of system consisting of vertical flow trickling filter and horizontal flow multi-soil-layering reactor for treatment of rural wastewater.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi; Cheng, Yan; Yang, Chunping; Luo, Wei; Zeng, Guangming; Lu, Li

    2015-10-01

    In order to improve nitrogen removal for rural wastewater, a novel two-stage hybrid system, consisting of a vertical flow trickling filter (VFTF) and a horizontal flow multi-soil-layering (HFMSL) bioreactor was developed. The performance of the apparatus was observed under various carbon-nitrogen ratios and water spraying frequencies separately. The maximum removal efficiency of total nitrogen (TN) for the hybrid system was 92.8% while the removal rates of CODCr, ammonium (NH4(+)-N), and total phosphorus (TP) were 94.1%, 96.1%, 92.0% respectively, and the corresponding effluent concentrations were 3.61, 21.20, 1.91, and 0.33 mg L(-1). The horizontal flow mode for MSL led the system to denitrifying satisfactorily as it ensured relatively long hydraulic retention time (HRT), ideal anoxic condition and adequate organic substrates supply. Also, higher water spraying frequency benefited intermittent feeding system for pollutants removal. Shock loading test indicated that the hybrid system could operate well even at hydraulic shock loadings.

  6. Compact bypass-flow filter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swift, W. G.; Ulanovsky, J. M.

    1979-01-01

    Annular filter consisting of stacked rings separates particulates from bypass fluid passing through it in radial direction without slowing down main flow across unimpeded flow of fluid through its center. Applications include fluidized bed reactors, equipment for catalyst operations, and water purification.

  7. DEMONSTRATION BULLETIN: COLLOID POLISHING FILTER METHOD - FILTER FLOW TECHNOLOGY, INC.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Filter Flow Technology, Inc. (FFT) Colloid Polishing Filter Method (CPFM) was tested as a transportable, trailer mounted, system that uses sorption and chemical complexing phenomena to remove heavy metals and nontritium radionuclides from water. Contaminated waters can be pro...

  8. Particle Filter with Nudging in Soil Hydrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berg, D.; Bauser, H. H.; Roth, K.

    2015-12-01

    The Ensemble Kalman Filter (EnKF) is widely employed in soil hydrology but is challenged by the characteristics of the processes there. These are highly nonlinear and state variables occasionally show sharp fronts and discontinuities across layer boundaries. This leads to sometimes strongly non-gaussian probability distributions, which is at odds with the EnFK's basic assumption. Therefore, we explore particle filters, which are able to handle such situations. However, standard particle filters with resampling suffer from the curse of dimensionality. They are thus not applicable to high-dimensional systems as they are encountered with soil water dynamics. A particle filter that may be able to lift this curse was proposed by van Leeuwen (2010). He introduced a nudging term based on the freedom of the proposal density. This particle filter has been applied in oceanography and showed promising results. While oceanography focuses on state estimation, soil hydrology in addition aims at parameter estimation. Therefore, we test the applicability of this filter for a one-dimensional test case, where we estimate states and parameters simultaneously. We generate synthetic data that correspond to water content measurements as they would be available from time domain reflectometry (TDR) probes. The results are compared with the true parameters and water contents. Finally, the performance of this filter (with different nudging terms) is compared with an EnKF and a particle filter without nudging.

  9. Combined assimilation of soil moisture and streamflow data by an ensemble Kalman filter in a coupled model of surface-subsurface flow.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camporese, M.; Paniconi, C.; Putti, M.; Salandin, P.

    2007-12-01

    Hydrologic models can largely benefit from the use of data assimilation algorithms, which allow to update the modeled system state incorporating in the solution of the model itself information coming from experimental measurements of various quantities, as soon as the data become available. In this context, data assimilation seems to be well fit for coupled surface--subsurface models, which, considering the watershed as the ensemble of surface and subsurface domains, allow a more accurate description of the hydrological processes at the catchment scale, where soil moisture largely influences the partitioning of rain between runoff and infiltration and thus controls the flow at the outlet. The need for a better determination of the variables of interest (streamflow at the outlet section, water table, soil water content, etc.) has led to a many efforts focused on the development of coupled numerical models, together with field and laboratory observations. Nevertheless, uncertainty in the schematic description of physical processes and inaccuracies on source data collection induce errors in the model predictions. The ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) represents an extension to nonlinear problems of the classic Kalman filter by means of a Monte Carlo approach. A sequential assimilation procedure based on EnKF is developed and integrated in a process-based numerical model, which couples a three-dimensional finite element Richards equation solver for variably saturated porous media and a finite difference diffusion wave approximation based on a digital elevation data for surface water dynamics. A detailed analysis of the data assimilation algorithm behavior within the coupled model has been carried out on a synthetic 1D test case in order to verify the correct implementation and derive a series of fundamental parameters, such as the minimum ensemble size that can ensure a sufficient accuracy in the statistical estimates. The assimilation frequency, as well as the effects

  10. A Filtering Method For Gravitationally Stratified Flows

    SciTech Connect

    Gatti-Bono, Caroline; Colella, Phillip

    2005-04-25

    Gravity waves arise in gravitationally stratified compressible flows at low Mach and Froude numbers. These waves can have a negligible influence on the overall dynamics of the fluid but, for numerical methods where the acoustic waves are treated implicitly, they impose a significant restriction on the time step. A way to alleviate this restriction is to filter out the modes corresponding to the fastest gravity waves so that a larger time step can be used. This paper presents a filtering strategy of the fully compressible equations based on normal mode analysis that is used throughout the simulation to compute the fast dynamics and that is able to damp only fast gravity modes.

  11. Spin selective filtering of polariton condensate flow

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, T.; Antón, C.; Martín, M. D.; Liew, T. C. H.; Hatzopoulos, Z.; Viña, L.; Eldridge, P. S.; Savvidis, P. G.

    2015-07-06

    Spin-selective spatial filtering of propagating polariton condensates, using a controllable spin-dependent gating barrier, in a one-dimensional semiconductor microcavity ridge waveguide is reported. A nonresonant laser beam provides the source of propagating polaritons, while a second circularly polarized weak beam imprints a spin dependent potential barrier, which gates the polariton flow and generates polariton spin currents. A complete spin-based control over the blocked and transmitted polaritons is obtained by varying the gate polarization.

  12. Hot gas cross flow filtering module

    DOEpatents

    Lippert, Thomas E.; Ciliberti, David F.

    1988-01-01

    A filter module for use in filtering particulates from a high temperature gas has a central gas duct and at least one horizontally extending support mount affixed to the duct. The support mount supports a filter element thereon and has a chamber therein, which communicates with an inner space of the duct through an opening in the wall of the duct, and which communicates with the clean gas face of the filter element. The filter element is secured to the support mount over an opening in the top wall of the support mount, with releasable securement provided to enable replacement of the filter element when desired. Ceramic springs may be used in connection with the filter module either to secure a filter element to a support mount or to prevent delamination of the filter element during blowback.

  13. Method and apparatus for measuring flow velocity using matched filters

    DOEpatents

    Raptis, A.C.

    1983-09-06

    An apparatus and method for measuring the flow velocities of individual phase flow components of a multiphase flow utilizes matched filters. Signals arising from flow noise disturbance are extracted from the flow, at upstream and downstream locations. The signals are processed through pairs of matched filters which are matched to the flow disturbance frequency characteristics of the phase flow component to be measured. The processed signals are then cross-correlated to determine the transit delay time of the phase flow component between sensing positions. 8 figs.

  14. Method and apparatus for measuring flow velocity using matched filters

    DOEpatents

    Raptis, Apostolos C.

    1983-01-01

    An apparatus and method for measuring the flow velocities of individual phase flow components of a multiphase flow utilizes matched filters. Signals arising from flow noise disturbance are extracted from the flow, at upstream and downstream locations. The signals are processed through pairs of matched filters which are matched to the flow disturbance frequency characteristics of the phase flow component to be measured. The processed signals are then cross-correlated to determine the transit delay time of the phase flow component between sensing positions.

  15. Modeling Flow Past a Tilted Vena Cava Filter

    SciTech Connect

    Singer, M A; Wang, S L

    2009-06-29

    Inferior vena cava filters are medical devices used to prevent pulmonary embolism (PE) from deep vein thrombosis. In particular, retrievable filters are well-suited for patients who are unresponsive to anticoagulation therapy and whose risk of PE decreased with time. The goal of this work is to use computational fluid dynamics to evaluate the flow past an unoccluded and partially occluded Celect inferior vena cava filter. In particular, the hemodynamic response to thrombus volume and filter tilt is examined, and the results are compared with flow conditions that are known to be thrombogenic. A computer model of the filter inside a model vena cava is constructed using high resolution digital photographs and methods of computer aided design. The models are parameterized using the Overture software framework, and a collection of overlapping grids is constructed to discretize the flow domain. The incompressible Navier-Stokes equations are solved, and the characteristics of the flow (i.e., velocity contours and wall shear stresses) are computed. The volume of stagnant and recirculating flow increases with thrombus volume. In addition, as the filter increases tilt, the cava wall adjacent to the tilted filter is subjected to low velocity flow that gives rise to regions of low wall shear stress. The results demonstrate the ease of IVC filter modeling with the Overture software framework. Flow conditions caused by the tilted Celect filter may elevate the risk of intrafilter thrombosis and facilitate vascular remodeling. This latter condition also increases the risk of penetration and potential incorporation of the hook of the filter into the vena caval wall, thereby complicating filter retrieval. Consequently, severe tilt at the time of filter deployment may warrant early clinical intervention.

  16. SSDA code to apply data assimilation in soil water flow modeling: Documentation and user manual

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil water flow models are based on simplified assumptions about the mechanisms, processes, and parameters of water retention and flow. That causes errors in soil water flow model predictions. Data assimilation (DA) with the ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) corrects modeling results based on measured s...

  17. Method of producing monolithic ceramic cross-flow filter

    DOEpatents

    Larsen, D.A.; Bacchi, D.P.; Connors, T.F.; Collins, E.L. III

    1998-02-10

    Ceramic filter of various configuration have been used to filter particulates from hot gases exhausted from coal-fired systems. Prior ceramic cross-flow filters have been favored over other types, but those previously have been assemblies of parts somehow fastened together and consequently subject often to distortion or delamination on exposure hot gas in normal use. The present new monolithic, seamless, cross-flow ceramic filters, being of one-piece construction, are not prone to such failure. Further, these new products are made by a novel casting process which involves the key steps of demolding the ceramic filter green body so that none of the fragile inner walls of the filter is cracked or broken. 2 figs.

  18. Method of producing monolithic ceramic cross-flow filter

    DOEpatents

    Larsen, David A.; Bacchi, David P.; Connors, Timothy F.; Collins, III, Edwin L.

    1998-01-01

    Ceramic filter of various configuration have been used to filter particulates from hot gases exhausted from coal-fired systems. Prior ceramic cross-flow filters have been favored over other types, but those previously horn have been assemblies of parts somehow fastened together and consequently subject often to distortion or delamination on exposure hot gas in normal use. The present new monolithic, seamless, cross-flow ceramic filters, being of one-piece construction, are not prone to such failure. Further, these new products are made by novel casting process which involves the key steps of demolding the ceramic filter green body so that none of the fragile inner walls of the filter is cracked or broken.

  19. Particle flow for nonlinear filters with log-homotopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daum, Fred; Huang, Jim

    2008-04-01

    We describe a new nonlinear filter that is vastly superior to the classic particle filter. In particular, the computational complexity of the new filter is many orders of magnitude less than the classic particle filter with optimal estimation accuracy for problems with dimension greater than 2 or 3. We consider nonlinear estimation problems with dimensions varying from 1 to 20 that are smooth and fully coupled (i.e. dense not sparse). The new filter implements Bayes' rule using particle flow rather than with a pointwise multiplication of two functions; this avoids one of the fundamental and well known problems in particle filters, namely "particle collapse" as a result of Bayes' rule. We use a log-homotopy to derive the ODE that describes particle flow. This paper was written for normal engineers, who do not have homotopy for breakfast.

  20. Granular flow in Dorfan Impingo filter for gas cleanup

    SciTech Connect

    Hsiau, S.S.; Smid, J.; Tsai, H.H.; Kuo, J.T.; Chou, C.S.

    1999-07-01

    Inside a two-dimensional model of the louvered Drofan Impingo panel with transparent front and rear walls, the velocity fields of filter granules without gas cross flow were observed. The PE beads with diameter of 6 mm were used as filter granules. The filter bed was filled with beads continuously and circulated until the granular flows inside the panel reached the steady state condition. In the moving granular bed, there is a central fast flowing core of filter granules surrounded by large quasi-stagnant zones located close to the louver walls. The existence of quasi-stagnant zones may result in the dust plugging problems. The velocity fields of filter granules are plotted for three different louver geometries.

  1. SITE TECHNOLOGY CAPSULE: FILTER FLOW TECHNOLOGY, INC. - COLLOID POLISHING FILTER METHOD

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Filter Flow Technology, Inc. (FFT) Coloid Polishing Filter Method (CPFM) was demonstrated at the U.S Department of Energy's (DOE) Rock Flats Plant (RFP) as part of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Superfund and Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) program. ...

  2. [Removal of microorganisms by soil filters for bathing ponds].

    PubMed

    Grunert, A; Arndt, C; Bartel, Hartmut; Dizer, H; Kock, M; Kubs, M; López-Pila, Juan Manuel

    2009-02-01

    "Bathing ponds" are artificial outdoor water pools without disinfection. Whereas in conventional pools, chlorine promptly kills pathogens shed by bathers, such quick inactivation is missing in bathing ponds. We have explored the retention of indicator bacteria and viruses by a vertically operated, reed grown soil filter. After continuously running the filter with wastewater-spiked surface water, we found that the filter retains more than 99 % of the indicator organisms. It has been reported in the literature that the "spontaneous" inactivation of pathogens in water might be very variable depending on sunlight irradiation, water turbidity, etc. On the contrary, the performance of a filter like the one reported here allows filtering the water so as to reliably eliminate 90 % of the spiked microorganisms from the pool water within 24 hours.

  3. Electrically heated particulate filter with zoned exhaust flow control

    SciTech Connect

    Gonze, Eugene V

    2012-06-26

    A system includes a particulate matter (PM) filter that includes X zones. An electrical heater includes Y heater segments that are associated with respective ones of the X zones. The electrical heater is arranged upstream from and proximate with the PM filter. A valve assembly includes Z sections that are associated with respective ones of the X zones. A control module adjusts flow through each of the Z sections during regeneration of the PM filter via control of the valve assembly. X, Y and Z are integers.

  4. Direction of fluid flow and the properties of fibrous filters

    SciTech Connect

    Pich, J.; Spurny, K.

    1991-01-01

    The influence of the fluid flow direction (downflow and upflow) on the filtration properties of filters that have a fibrous structure is investigated. It is concluded that selectivity of these filters (dependence of the filter efficiency on the particle size) in the case of upflow is changed - in comparison with the case of downflow - in three ways: the position of the minimum of this dependence is shifted to larger particle sizes, and the whole selectivity is decreased and simultaneously deformed. Corresponding equations for this shift and changes are derived and analyzed. Theoretical predictions are compared with available experimental data. In all cases qualitative agreement and in some cases quantitative agreement is found.

  5. Development of a monolithic ceramic cross flow filter

    SciTech Connect

    Larsen, D.A.

    1995-12-01

    High-temperature, high-pressure particulate control is required to protect turbine equipment and to meet environmental stack emissions standards in coal-fueled power systems. Ceramic cross flow filters have high surface area per unit volume for removing particulates from these hot gas streams. A one-piece monolithic ceramic cross flow filter is needed. Mullite bonded, porous, permeable alumina ceramics were made on a lab scale with the Blasch injection forming process. Permeability and other initial targeted property requirements were achieved: >200 cd (<1 iwg/fpm), room temperature modulus of rupture >1000 psi, particle size 100/200 mesh, pore size 20 microns. It is concluded that it is feasible to use the proprietary Blasch process to form cross flow filters.

  6. Cross flow filter for AEPSC: TIDD slipstream HGCU project preliminary design package for Westinghouse cross flow filter system

    SciTech Connect

    Haldipur, G.B.; Lippert, T.E.

    1989-06-16

    The Westinghouse ceramic cross-flow filter element is constructed of multiple layers of thin, porous ceramic plates that contain ribs to form gas flow channels. Consecutive layers of the ceramic plates are oriented such that the channels of alternating plates are at an angle of 90 degrees ( cross flow'') to each other. The current size of a ceramic cross flow filter element is 12 in. {times} 12 in. {times} 14 in. Both sides of the short channels (4 in.) are exposed to the particle-laden coal gas. One end of the long (12 in.) channels is sealed while the other end of the long channel is mounted to the clean gas plenum. The particle-laden coal gas flows through the roof and floor'' of the porous ceramic plates that comprise the short, dirty side'' channels. The gas flows through the porous plates to the long, clean side'' channels. The gas flows through the porous plates to the long, clean side'' channels and finally to the clean gas plenum. The dust cake on the dirty side'' channels is periodically removed by applying a high-pressure reverse pulse of dry, clean gas through the clean gas plenum. For the TIDD plant filter slipstream, air will be utilized for filter cleaning.

  7. Cross flow filter for AEPSC: TIDD slipstream HGCU project preliminary design package for Westinghouse cross flow filter system. Final submittal

    SciTech Connect

    Haldipur, G.B.; Lippert, T.E.

    1989-06-16

    The Westinghouse ceramic cross-flow filter element is constructed of multiple layers of thin, porous ceramic plates that contain ribs to form gas flow channels. Consecutive layers of the ceramic plates are oriented such that the channels of alternating plates are at an angle of 90 degrees (``cross flow``) to each other. The current size of a ceramic cross flow filter element is 12 in. {times} 12 in. {times} 14 in. Both sides of the short channels (4 in.) are exposed to the particle-laden coal gas. One end of the long (12 in.) channels is sealed while the other end of the long channel is mounted to the clean gas plenum. The particle-laden coal gas flows through the ``roof and floor`` of the porous ceramic plates that comprise the short, ``dirty side`` channels. The gas flows through the porous plates to the long, ``clean side`` channels. The gas flows through the porous plates to the long, ``clean side`` channels and finally to the clean gas plenum. The dust cake on the ``dirty side`` channels is periodically removed by applying a high-pressure reverse pulse of dry, clean gas through the clean gas plenum. For the TIDD plant filter slipstream, air will be utilized for filter cleaning.

  8. Absorption Filter Based Optical Diagnostics in High Speed Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samimy, Mo; Elliott, Gregory; Arnette, Stephen

    1996-01-01

    Two major regimes where laser light scattered by molecules or particles in a flow contains significant information about the flow are Mie scattering and Rayleigh scattering. Mie scattering is used to obtain only velocity information, while Rayleigh scattering can be used to measure both the velocity and the thermodynamic properties of the flow. Now, recently introduced (1990, 1991) absorption filter based diagnostic techniques have started a new era in flow visualization, simultaneous velocity and thermodynamic measurements, and planar velocity measurements. Using a filtered planar velocimetry (FPV) technique, we have modified the optically thick iodine filter profile of Miles, et al., and used it in the pressure-broaden regime which accommodates measurements in a wide range of velocity applications. Measuring velocity and thermodynamic properties simultaneously, using absorption filtered based Rayleigh scattering, involves not only the measurement of the Doppler shift, but also the spectral profile of the Rayleigh scattering signal. Using multiple observation angles, simultaneous measurement of one component velocity and thermodynamic properties in a supersonic jet were measured. Presently, the technique is being extended for simultaneous measurements of all three components of velocity and thermodynamic properties.

  9. Filtering requirements for gradient-based optical flow measurement.

    PubMed

    Christmas, W J

    2000-01-01

    The accuracy of gradient-based optical flow algorithms depends on the ability to measure intensity gradients accurately. We show how the temporal gradient can be compromised by temporal aliasing arising from motion and how appropriate post-sampling spatial filtering improves the situation. We also demonstrate a benefit of using higher-order gradient estimators.

  10. Assessment of existing roadside swales with engineered filter soil: II. Treatment efficiency and in situ mobilization in soil columns.

    PubMed

    Ingvertsen, Simon T; Cederkvist, Karin; Jensen, Marina B; Magid, Jakob

    2012-01-01

    Use of roadside infiltration systems using engineered filter soil for optimized treatment has been common practice in Germany for decades, but little documentation is available regarding their long-term treatment performance. Here we present the results of laboratory leaching experiments with intact soil columns (15 cm i.d., 25-30 cm length) collected from two German roadside infiltration swales constructed in 1997. The columns were irrigated with synthetic solutions of unpolluted or polluted (dissolved heavy metals and fine suspended solids) road runoff, as well as a soluble nonreactive tracer (bromide) and a dye (brilliant blue). The experiments were performed at two irrigation rates corresponding to catchment rainfall intensities of approximately 5.1 and 34 mm/h. The bromide curves indicated that preferential flow was more pronounced at high irrigation rates, which was supported by the flow patterns revealed in the dye tracing experiment. Nonetheless, the soils seemed to be capable of retaining most of the dissolved heavy metals from the polluted road runoff at both low and high irrigation rates, except for Cr, which appears to pass through the soil as chromate. Fluorescent microspheres (diameter = 5 μm) used as surrogates for fine suspended solids were efficiently retained by the soils (>99%). However, despite promising treatment abilities, internal mobilization of heavy metals and P from the soil was observed, resulting in potentially critical effluent concentrations of Cu, Zn, and Pb. This is mainly ascribed to high concentrations of in situ mobilized dissolved organic carbon (DOC). Suggestions are provided for possible improvements and further research to minimize DOC mobilization in engineered filter soils. PMID:23128754

  11. Assessment of two-filter technique for correlating actinium-227 concentrations in soils

    SciTech Connect

    Fraizer, W.K.; Patch, K.D.; Reynolds, B.A.

    1980-02-01

    Concentrations of actinium-227 in soil samples from waste-disposal sites for uranium procession plants were successfully correlated with radon-219 measurements obtained by the two-filter technique, thus avoiding time-consuming and difficult radiochemical analyses. A flow-through sampling device and procedure were developed which determined actinium levels with a precision of 2 pCi/g +- 50%. Theoretical relations for the production of radon from actinium, the decay of radon, and the decay and diffusion of radon daughters in the two-filter apparatus were formulated. Measurements indicated that the emanation fraction for radon-219 was about 15%. Sampling filters collected radon daughters with a 93% efficiency while radon could be scrubbed from air samples by use of an activated-charcoal canister.

  12. Oxygen profile and clogging in vertical flow sand filters for on-site wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Petitjean, A; Forquet, N; Boutin, C

    2016-04-01

    13 million people (about 20% of the population) use on-site wastewater treatment in France. Buried vertical sand filters are often built, especially when the soil permeability is not sufficient for septic tank effluent infiltration in undisturbed soil. Clogging is one of the main problems deteriorating the operation of vertical flow filters for wastewater treatment. The extent of clogging is not easily assessed, especially in buried vertical flow sand filters. We suggest examining two possible ways of detecting early clogging: (1) NH4-N/NO3-N outlet concentration ratio, and (2) oxygen measurement within the porous media. Two pilot-scale filters were equipped with probes for oxygen concentration measurements and samples were taken at different depths for pollutant characterization. Influent and effluent grab-samples were taken three times a week. The systems were operated using batch-feeding of septic tank effluent. Qualitative description of oxygen transfer processes under unclogged and clogged conditions is presented. NH4-N outlet concentration appears to be useless for early clogging detection. However, NO3-N outlet concentration and oxygen content allows us to diagnose the early clogging of the system.

  13. Oxygen profile and clogging in vertical flow sand filters for on-site wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Petitjean, A; Forquet, N; Boutin, C

    2016-04-01

    13 million people (about 20% of the population) use on-site wastewater treatment in France. Buried vertical sand filters are often built, especially when the soil permeability is not sufficient for septic tank effluent infiltration in undisturbed soil. Clogging is one of the main problems deteriorating the operation of vertical flow filters for wastewater treatment. The extent of clogging is not easily assessed, especially in buried vertical flow sand filters. We suggest examining two possible ways of detecting early clogging: (1) NH4-N/NO3-N outlet concentration ratio, and (2) oxygen measurement within the porous media. Two pilot-scale filters were equipped with probes for oxygen concentration measurements and samples were taken at different depths for pollutant characterization. Influent and effluent grab-samples were taken three times a week. The systems were operated using batch-feeding of septic tank effluent. Qualitative description of oxygen transfer processes under unclogged and clogged conditions is presented. NH4-N outlet concentration appears to be useless for early clogging detection. However, NO3-N outlet concentration and oxygen content allows us to diagnose the early clogging of the system. PMID:26775157

  14. Numerical and experimental approaches to study soil transport and clogging in granular filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanarska, Y.; Smith, J. J.; Ezzedine, S. M.; Lomov, I.; Glascoe, L. G.

    2012-12-01

    Failure of a dam by erosion ranks among the most serious accidents in civil engineering. The best way to prevent internal erosion is using adequate granular filters in the transition areas where important hydraulic gradients can appear. In case of cracking and erosion, if the filter is capable of retaining the eroded particles, the crack will seal and the dam safety will be ensured. Numerical modeling has proved to be a cost-effective tool for improving our understanding of physical processes. Traditionally, the consideration of flow and particle transport in porous media has focused on treating the media as continuum. Practical models typically address flow and transport based on the Darcy's law as a function of a pressure gradient and a medium-dependent permeability parameter. Additional macroscopic constitutes describe porosity, and permeability changes during the migration of a suspension through porous media. However, most of them rely on empirical correlations, which often need to be recalibrated for each application. Grain-scale modeling can be used to gain insight into scale dependence of continuum macroscale parameters. A finite element numerical solution of the Navier-Stokes equations for fluid flow together with Lagrange multiplier technique for solid particles was applied to the simulation of soil filtration in the filter layers of gravity dam. The numerical approach was validated through comparison of numerical simulations with the experimental results of base soil particle clogging in the filter layers performed at ERDC. The numerical simulation correctly predicted flow and pressure decay due to particle clogging. The base soil particle distribution was almost identical to those measured in the laboratory experiment. It is believed that the agreement between simulations and experimental data demonstrates the applicability of the proposed approach for prediction of the soil transport and clogging in embankment dams. To get more precise understanding of

  15. High-order filtering for control volume flow simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Stefano, G.; Denaro, F. M.; Riccardi, G.

    2001-12-01

    A general methodology is presented in order to obtain a hierarchy of high-order filter functions, starting from the standard top-hat filter, naturally linked to control volumes flow simulations. The goal is to have a new filtered variable better represented in its high resolved wavenumber components by using a suitable deconvolution. The proposed formulation is applied to the integral momentum equation, that is the evolution equation for the top-hat filtered variable, by performing a spatial reconstruction based on the approximate inversion of the averaging operator. A theoretical analysis for the Burgers' model equation is presented, demonstrating that the local de-averaging is an effective tool to obtain a higher-order accuracy. It is also shown that the subgrid-scale term, to be modeled in the deconvolved balance equation, has a smaller absolute importance in the resolved wavenumber range for increasing deconvolution order. A numerical analysis of the procedure is presented, based on high-order upwind and central fluxes reconstruction, leading to congruent control volume schemes. Finally, the features of the present high-order conservative formulation are tested in the numerical simulation of a sample turbulent flow: the flow behind a backward-facing step. Copyright

  16. Site technology capsule: Filter Flow Technology, Inc. , Colloid polishing filter method

    SciTech Connect

    Ball, T.

    1994-07-01

    The Filter Flow Technology, Inc. (FFT), Colloid Polishing Filter Method (CPFM) was demonstrated at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Rocky Flats Plant (RFP) as part of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) program. The CPFM system is designed to remove ionic, colloidal, and complexed radionuclides and heavy metals from water. Pollutants are removed from water predominantly via sorption or chemical complexing. The purpose of the demonstration was to evaluate the ability of the CPFM system to remove low levels of uranium and gross alpha contamination from RFP groundwater.

  17. Imaging flow cytometer using computation and spatially coded filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Yuanyuan; Lo, Yu-Hwa

    2016-03-01

    Flow cytometry analyzes multiple physical characteristics of a large population of single cells as cells flow in a fluid stream through an excitation light beam. Flow cytometers measure fluorescence and light scattering from which information about the biological and physical properties of individual cells are obtained. Although flow cytometers have massive statistical power due to their single cell resolution and high throughput, they produce no information about cell morphology or spatial resolution offered by microscopy, which is a much wanted feature missing in almost all flow cytometers. In this paper, we invent a method of spatial-temporal transformation to provide flow cytometers with cell imaging capabilities. The method uses mathematical algorithms and a specially designed spatial filter as the only hardware needed to give flow cytometers imaging capabilities. Instead of CCDs or any megapixel cameras found in any imaging systems, we obtain high quality image of fast moving cells in a flow cytometer using photomultiplier tube (PMT) detectors, thus obtaining high throughput in manners fully compatible with existing cytometers. In fact our approach can be applied to retrofit traditional flow cytometers to become imaging flow cytometers at a minimum cost. To prove the concept, we demonstrate cell imaging for cells travelling at a velocity of 0.2 m/s in a microfluidic channel, corresponding to a throughput of approximately 1,000 cells per second.

  18. On the structural limitations of recursive digital filters for base flow estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Chun-Hsu; Costelloe, Justin F.; Peterson, Tim J.; Western, Andrew W.

    2016-06-01

    Recursive digital filters (RDFs) are widely used for estimating base flow from streamflow hydrographs, and various forms of RDFs have been developed based on different physical models. Numerical experiments have been used to objectively evaluate their performance, but they have not been sufficiently comprehensive to assess a wide range of RDFs. This paper extends these studies to understand the limitations of a generalized RDF method as a pathway for future field calibration. Two formalisms are presented to generalize most existing RDFs, allowing systematic tuning of their complexity. The RDFs with variable complexity are evaluated collectively in a synthetic setting, using modeled daily base flow produced by Li et al. (2014) from a range of synthetic catchments simulated with HydroGeoSphere. Our evaluation reveals that there are optimal RDF complexities in reproducing base flow simulations but shows that there is an inherent physical inconsistency within the RDF construction. Even under the idealized setting where true base flow data are available to calibrate the RDFs, there is persistent disagreement between true and estimated base flow over catchments with small base flow components, low saturated hydraulic conductivity of the soil and larger surface runoff. The simplest explanation is that low base flow "signal" in the streamflow data is hard to distinguish, although more complex RDFs can improve upon the simpler Eckhardt filter at these catchments.

  19. Isothermal vapour flow in extremely dry soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todman, L. C.; Ireson, A. M.; Butler, A. P.; Templeton, M. R.

    2012-04-01

    In dry soils hydraulic connectivity within the liquid water phase decreases and vapour flow becomes a significant transport mechanism for water. The temperature or solute concentration of the liquid phase affects the vapour pressure of the surrounding air, thus temperature or solute gradients can drive vapour flows. However, in extremely dry soils where water is retained by adsorptive forces rather than capillarity, vapour flows can also occur. In such soils tiny changes in water content significantly affect the equilibrium vapour pressure in the soil, and hence small differences in water content can initiate vapour pressure gradients. In many field conditions this effect may be negligible compared to vapour flows driven by other factors. However, flows of this type are particularly significant in a new type of subsurface irrigation system which uses pervaporation, via a polymer tubing, as the mechanism for water supply. In this system, water enters the soil in vapour phase. Experiments were performed in laboratory conditions using marine sand that had previously been oven dried and cooled. This dry sand was used to represent the desert conditions in which this irrigation system is intended for use. Experimental results show that isothermal vapour flows can significantly affect the performance of such irrigation systems due to the rapid transport of water through the soil via the vapour phase. When the irrigation pipe was buried at a depth of 10cm a vapour flow from the soil surface was observed in less than 2 hours. These flows therefore affect the loss of mass into the atmosphere and thus must be considered when evaluating the availability of water for the irrigated crop. The experiments also provide a rare opportunity to observe isothermal vapour flows initiating from a subsurface source. Such experiments allow the significance of these flows to be quantified and potentially applied to other areas of arid zone hydrology.

  20. Ultrasonic Mastering of Filter Flow and Antifouling of Renewable Resources.

    PubMed

    Radziuk, Darya; Möhwald, Helmuth

    2016-04-01

    Inadequate access to pure water and sanitation requires new cost-effective, ergonomic methods with less consumption of energy and chemicals, leaving the environment cleaner and sustainable. Among such methods, ultrasound is a unique means to control the physics and chemistry of complex fluids (wastewater) with excellent performance regarding mass transfer, cleaning, and disinfection. In membrane filtration processes, it overcomes diffusion limits and can accelerate the fluid flow towards the filter preventing antifouling. Here, we outline the current state of knowledge and technological design, with a focus on physicochemical strategies of ultrasound for water cleaning. We highlight important parameters of ultrasound for the delivery of a fluid flow from a technical perspective employing principles of physics and chemistry. By introducing various ultrasonic methods, involving bubbles or cavitation in combination with external fields, we show advancements in flow acceleration and mass transportation to the filter. In most cases we emphasize the main role of streaming and the impact of cavitation with a perspective to prevent and remove fouling deposits during the flow. We also elaborate on the deficiencies of present technologies and on problems to be solved to achieve a wide-spread application. PMID:26601628

  1. Ultrasonic Mastering of Filter Flow and Antifouling of Renewable Resources.

    PubMed

    Radziuk, Darya; Möhwald, Helmuth

    2016-04-01

    Inadequate access to pure water and sanitation requires new cost-effective, ergonomic methods with less consumption of energy and chemicals, leaving the environment cleaner and sustainable. Among such methods, ultrasound is a unique means to control the physics and chemistry of complex fluids (wastewater) with excellent performance regarding mass transfer, cleaning, and disinfection. In membrane filtration processes, it overcomes diffusion limits and can accelerate the fluid flow towards the filter preventing antifouling. Here, we outline the current state of knowledge and technological design, with a focus on physicochemical strategies of ultrasound for water cleaning. We highlight important parameters of ultrasound for the delivery of a fluid flow from a technical perspective employing principles of physics and chemistry. By introducing various ultrasonic methods, involving bubbles or cavitation in combination with external fields, we show advancements in flow acceleration and mass transportation to the filter. In most cases we emphasize the main role of streaming and the impact of cavitation with a perspective to prevent and remove fouling deposits during the flow. We also elaborate on the deficiencies of present technologies and on problems to be solved to achieve a wide-spread application.

  2. Bioconversion of petroleum hydrocarbons in soil using apple filter cake

    PubMed Central

    Medaura, M. Cecilia; Ércoli, Eduardo C.

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the feasibility of using apple filter cake, a fruit-processing waste to enhance the bioremediation of petroleum contaminated soil. A rotating barrel system was used to study the bioconversion of the xenobiotic compound by natural occurring microbial population. The soil had been accidentally polluted with a total petroleum hydrocarbon concentration of 41,000 ppm. Although this global value was maintained during the process, microbial intervention was evidenced through transformation of the petroleum fractions. Thus, fractions that represent a risk for the environment (GRO, Gasoline Range Organics i.e., C6 to C10–12; DRO, Diesel Range Organics i.e., C8–12 to C24–26 and RRO, Residual Range Organics i.e., C25 to C35) were significantly reduced, from 2.95% to 1.39%. On the contrary, heavier weight fraction from C35 plus other organics increased in value from 1.15% to 3.00%. The noticeable diminution of low molecular weight hydrocarbons content and hence environmental risk by the process plus the improvement of the physical characteristics of the soil, are promising results with regard to future application at large scale. PMID:24031241

  3. Coupled continuum and molecular model of flow through fibrous filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Shunliu; Povitsky, Alex

    2013-11-01

    A coupled approach combining the continuum boundary singularity method (BSM) and the molecular direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) is developed and validated using Taylor-Couette flow and the flow about a single fiber confined between two parallel walls. In the proposed approach, the DSMC is applied to an annular region enclosing the fiber and the BSM is employed in the entire flow domain. The parameters used in the DSMC and the coupling procedure, such as the number of simulated particles, the cell size, and the size of the coupling zone are determined by inspecting the accuracy of pressure drop obtained for the range of Knudsen numbers between zero and unity. The developed approach is used to study flowfield of fibrous filtration flows. It is observed that in the partial-slip flow regime, Kn ⩽ 0.25, the results obtained by the proposed coupled BSM-DSMC method match the solution by BSM combined with the heuristic partial-slip boundary conditions. For transition molecular-to-continuum Knudsen numbers, 0.25 < Kn ⩽ 1, the difference in pressure drop and velocity between these two approaches is significant. This difference increases with the Knudsen number that confirms the usefulness of coupled continuum and molecular methods in numerical modeling of transition low Reynolds number flows in fibrous filters.

  4. Flow Partitioning in Fully Saturated Soil Aggregates

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Xiaofan; Richmond, Marshall C.; Scheibe, Timothy D.; Perkins, William A.; Resat, Haluk

    2014-03-30

    Microbes play an important role in facilitating organic matter decomposition in soils, which is a major component of the global carbon cycle. Microbial dynamics are intimately coupled to environmental transport processes, which control access to labile organic matter and other nutrients that are needed for the growth and maintenance of microorganisms. Transport of soluble nutrients in the soil system is arguably most strongly impacted by preferential flow pathways in the soil. Since the physical structure of soils can be characterized as being formed from constituent micro aggregates which contain internal porosity, one pressing question is the partitioning of the flow among the “inter-aggregate” and “intra-aggregate” pores and how this may impact overall solute transport within heterogeneous soil structures. The answer to this question is particularly important in evaluating assumptions to be used in developing upscaled simulations based on highly-resolved mechanistic models. We constructed a number of diverse multi-aggregate structures with different packing ratios by stacking micro-aggregates containing internal pores and varying the size and shape of inter-aggregate pore spacing between them. We then performed pore-scale flow simulations using computational fluid dynamics methods to determine the flow patterns in these aggregate-of-aggregates structures and computed the partitioning of the flow through intra- and inter-aggregate pores as a function of the spacing between the aggregates. The results of these numerical experiments demonstrate that soluble nutrients are largely transported via flows through inter-aggregate pores. Although this result is consistent with intuition, we have also been able to quantify the relative flow capacity of the two domains under various conditions. For example, in our simulations, the flow capacity through the aggregates (intra-aggregate flow) was less than 2% of the total flow when the spacing between the aggregates

  5. Flow Characteristics of Pulse Cleaning System in Ceramic Filter

    SciTech Connect

    Zhongli, J.; Peng, S.; Chen, H.; Shi, M.

    2002-09-19

    The rigid ceramic filters have been recognized to be a most promising kind of equipment for the gas-solid separation and the cleaning of hot gases due to their unique properties and higher separation efficiency for larger than 5 {micro}m particles, which will well meet downstream system component protection and environmental standards. They have potential for increased efficiency in advanced coal-fired power generation systems like pressurized fluidized bed combustion (PFBC) and integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) process, and petrochemical process such as fluid catalyst cracking (FCC) Process. In the commercial utilization of rigid ceramic filters, the performance of pulse cleaning systems has crucial effects on the long-term structural durability and reliability of the entire design. In order to get a clear insight into the nature of this cleaning process and provide a solid basis for the industrial applications, the transient flow characteristics of the rigid ceramic candle filter during the whole pulse cleaning process should be completely analyzed.

  6. Tracking low SNR targets using particle filter with flow control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moshtagh, Nima; Romberg, Paul M.; Chan, Moses W.

    2014-06-01

    In this work we study the problem of detecting and tracking challenging targets that exhibit low signal-to-noise ratios (SNR). We have developed a particle filter-based track-before-detect (TBD) algorithm for tracking such dim targets. The approach incorporates the most recent state estimates to control the particle flow accounting for target dynamics. The flow control enables accumulation of signal information over time to compensate for target motion. The performance of this approach is evaluated using a sensitivity analysis based on varying target speed and SNR values. This analysis was conducted using high-fidelity sensor and target modeling in realistic scenarios. Our results show that the proposed TBD algorithm is capable of tracking targets in cluttered images with SNR values much less than one.

  7. Wastewater renovation using constructed soil filter (CSF): a novel approach.

    PubMed

    Nemade, P D; Kadam, A M; Shankar, H S

    2009-10-30

    Constructed soil filter (CSF) also known as Soil Biotechnology (SBT) is a process for water renovation which makes use of formulated media with culture of soil macro- and microorganisms. CSF combines sedimentation, infiltration and biodegradation processes to remove oxidizable organics and inorganics of wastewater in a single facility. Operating experience shows hydraulic loading in the range of 0.05-0.25 m(3)/m(2) h and organic loading up to 200-680 g/m(2) d. The results show increase in dissolved oxygen levels, COD removal (from 352 mg/l to 20 mg/l); BOD removal (from 211 mg/l to 7.0 mg/l); suspended solids removal (from 293 mg/l to 16 mg/l); turbidity reduction (from 145 NTU to 5.3 NTU); iron (from 5 mg/l to 0.3 mg/l); arsenic (from 500 microg/l to 10 microg/l); total coliform and fecal coliform removal (from 145 x 10(5) to 55 CFU/100 mL and 150 x 10(8) to 110 CFU/100 mL respectively), with desired pathogen levels as per WHO standards, i.e. < or =10(3) CFU/100 mL. CSF reveals advantages such as low HRT (0.5-2.0 h), low energy requirement (0.04 kWh/m(3)), no pre-treatment, high dissolved oxygen levels in the effluent, no biosludge production, no mechanical aeration and no odor, fish compatible water quality and evergreen ambience. PMID:19501460

  8. Filter-matrix lattice Boltzmann model for incompressible thermal flows.

    PubMed

    Zhuo, Congshan; Zhong, Chengwen; Cao, Jun

    2012-04-01

    In this study, a new filter-matrix lattice Boltzmann (FMLB) model is proposed and extended to include incompressible thermal flows. A new equilibrium solution is found in the improved FMLB model, which is derived from the Hermite expansion. As a result, the velocity-dependent pressure is removed, which is an inherent defect of Somers's FMLB model. In addition, the improved model is extended to include incompressible thermal flows by introducing a class of temperature-distribution function for evaluating the temperature field. Two different temperature-distribution functions are discussed. The improved FMLB model and the temperature-evaluation equation are combined into one coupled model. Numerical simulations are performed on the two-dimensional (2D) lid-driven square cavity flow and the 2D natural convection flow in a square cavity using the improved FMLB model and the two coupled models, respectively. The numerical results of the 2D lid-driven square cavity flow show that the improved FMLB model is superior to the lattice Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook (LBGK) model in terms of both accuracy and stability. When compared with the multi-relaxation-time (MRT) model, the similar accuracy and slightly enhanced stability can be obtained by the improved model. The advantage of the improved model is that it no longer relies on difficult selection of the free parameters requested by the MRT model; in addition, the force term is already included in the collision operator of the improved model. In the case of 2D natural convection flow, the numerical results of the two present models are almost the same, and both exhibit good agreement with the benchmark solution.

  9. Filter-matrix lattice Boltzmann model for incompressible thermal flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuo, Congshan; Zhong, Chengwen; Cao, Jun

    2012-04-01

    In this study, a new filter-matrix lattice Boltzmann (FMLB) model is proposed and extended to include incompressible thermal flows. A new equilibrium solution is found in the improved FMLB model, which is derived from the Hermite expansion. As a result, the velocity-dependent pressure is removed, which is an inherent defect of Somers's FMLB model. In addition, the improved model is extended to include incompressible thermal flows by introducing a class of temperature-distribution function for evaluating the temperature field. Two different temperature-distribution functions are discussed. The improved FMLB model and the temperature-evaluation equation are combined into one coupled model. Numerical simulations are performed on the two-dimensional (2D) lid-driven square cavity flow and the 2D natural convection flow in a square cavity using the improved FMLB model and the two coupled models, respectively. The numerical results of the 2D lid-driven square cavity flow show that the improved FMLB model is superior to the lattice Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook (LBGK) model in terms of both accuracy and stability. When compared with the multi-relaxation-time (MRT) model, the similar accuracy and slightly enhanced stability can be obtained by the improved model. The advantage of the improved model is that it no longer relies on difficult selection of the free parameters requested by the MRT model; in addition, the force term is already included in the collision operator of the improved model. In the case of 2D natural convection flow, the numerical results of the two present models are almost the same, and both exhibit good agreement with the benchmark solution.

  10. Influence of air flow rate and backwashing on the hydraulic behaviour of a submerged filter.

    PubMed

    Cobos-Becerra, Yazmin Lucero; González-Martínez, Simón

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate backwashing effects on the apparent porosity of the filter media and on the hydraulic behaviour of a pilot scale submerged filter, prior to biofilm colonization, under different hydraulic retention times, and different air flow rates. Tracer curves were analysed with two mathematical models for ideal and non-ideal flow (axial dispersion and Wolf and Resnick models). The filter media was lava stones sieved to 4.5 mm. Backwashing causes attrition of media particles, decreasing the void volume of the filter media and, consequently, the tracer flow is more uniform. The eroded media presented lower dead volumes (79% for the filter with aeration and 8% for the filter without aeration) compared with the new media (83% for the filter with aeration and 22% for the filter without aeration). The flow patterns of eroded and new media were different because the more regular shape of the particles decreases the void volume of the filter media. The dead volume is attributed, in the case of the filter with aeration, to the turbulence caused by the air bubbles that generate preferential channelling of the bulk liquid along the filter media, creating large zones of stagnant liquid and, for the filter without aeration, to the channels formed due to the irregular shaped media.

  11. Flow regions of granules in Dorfan Impingo filter for gas cleanup

    SciTech Connect

    Kuo, J.T.; Smid, J.; Hsiau, S.S.; Tsai, S.S.; Chou, C.S.

    1999-07-01

    Inside a two-dimensional model of the louvered Dorfan Impingo panel with transparent front and rear walls the flow region of filter granules without gas cross flow were observed. The white PE beads were used as filter granules. Colored PE beads served as tracers. Filter granules were discharged and circulated to the bed. The flow rate of filter medium was controlled by the belt conveyor. The image processing system including a Frame Grabber and JVC videocamera was used to record the granular flow. Every image of motion was digitized and stored in a file. The flow patterns and the quasi-stagnant zones history in the moving granular bed were evaluated. The experiment showed fast central moving region (flowing core) of filter granules and quasi-stagnant zones close to louver walls.

  12. A Graphical Filter/Flow Representation of Boolean Queries: A Prototype Implementation and Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Degi; Shneiderman, Ben

    1993-01-01

    Literature showing the disadvantages of Boolean logic in online searching is reviewed, and research comparing the Filter/Flow visual interface (i.e., a graphical representation of Boolean operators) with a text-only interface is described. A significant difference in the total number of correct queries is reported that favored Filter/Flow. (16…

  13. Survey monitoring results on the reduction of micropollutants, bacteria, bacteriophages and TSS in retention soil filters.

    PubMed

    Tondera, Katharina; Koenen, Stefan; Pinnekamp, Johannes

    2013-01-01

    A main source of surface water pollution in Western Europe stems from combined sewer overflow. One of the few technologies available to reduce this pollution is the retention soil filter. In this research project, we evaluated the cleaning efficiency of retention soil filters measuring the concentration ratio of standard wastewater parameters and bacteria according to factors limiting efficiency, such as long dry phases or phases of long-lasting retention. Furthermore, we conducted an initial investigation on how well retention soil filters reduce certain micropollutants on large-scale plants. There was little precipitation during the 1-year sampling phase, which led to fewer samples than expected. Nevertheless, we could verify how efficiently retention soil filters clean total suspended solids. Our results show that retention soil filters are not only able to eliminate bacteria, but also to retain some of the micropollutants investigated here. As the filters were able to reduce diclofenac, bisphenol A and metoprolol by a median rate of almost 75%, we think that further investigations should be made into the reduction processes in the filter. At this point, a higher accuracy in the results could be achieved by conducting bench-scale experiments. PMID:24037150

  14. Investigations into the application of a combination of bioventing and biotrickling filter technologies for soil decontamination processes--a transition regime between bioventing and soil vapour extraction.

    PubMed

    Magalhães, S M C; Ferreira Jorge, R M; Castro, P M L

    2009-10-30

    Bioventing has emerged as one of the most cost-effective in situ technologies available to address petroleum light-hydrocarbon spills, one of the most common sources of soil pollution. However, the major drawback associated with this technology is the extended treatment time often required. The present study aimed to illustrate how an intended air-injection bioventing technology can be transformed into a soil vapour extraction effort when the air flow rates are pushed to a stripping mode, thus leading to the treatment of the off-gas resulting from volatilisation. As such, a combination of an air-injection bioventing system and a biotrickling filter was applied for the treatment of contaminated soil, the latter aiming at the treatment of the emissions resulting from the bioventing process. With a moisture content of 10%, soil contaminated with toluene at two different concentrations, namely 2 and 14 mg g soil(-1), were treated successfully using an air-injection bioventing system at a constant air flow rate of ca. 0.13 dm(3) min(-1), which led to the removal of ca. 99% toluene, after a period of ca. 5 days of treatment. A biotrickling filter was simultaneously used to treat the outlet gas emissions, which presented average removal efficiencies of ca. 86%. The proposed combination of biotechnologies proved to be an efficient solution for the decontamination process, when an excessive air flow rate was applied, reducing both the soil contamination and the outlet gas emissions, whilst being able to reduce the treatment time required by bioventing only.

  15. Steerable filters as a tool to determine the orientation of fibers in flowing suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlsson, Allan; Lundell, Fredrik; Söderberg, L. Daniel

    2008-11-01

    Fiber suspension flows are found in industrial applications such as paper manufacturing and polymer processing. In order to experimentally study fiber motions in such suspensions it is essential to be able to determine the position and orientation of fibers as a function of time. One method to extract this information from captured images is to use image filtering. The image filtering is based on computing convolutions of the images with a filter matrix that resembles a fiber. Steerable filters represent a class of filters where an arbitrary orientation of the filter can be obtained from a linear combination of a limited set of basis filters. Since the basis filters are not orientation dependent this makes it possible to eliminate the orientation dependency from the convolutions. Here a specific steerable filter is evaluated for functionality of finding the position and orientation of fibers in a flowing suspension. Through application of the filter on artificially generated test images with known fiber orientation it is possible to show that the error is less than 1 degree. A good agreement is also found when comparing the orientation distribution with a robust, but computationally more expensive, method on a real flow case where fibers are suspended in a shear flow.

  16. Assimilating Remotely Sensed Surface Soil Moisture into SWAT using Ensemble Kalman Filter

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In this study, a 1-D Ensemble Kalman Filter has been used to update the soil moisture states of the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) model. Experiments were conducted for the Cobb Creek Watershed in southeastern Oklahoma for 2006-2008. Assimilation of in situ data proved limited success in the ...

  17. Computational Modeling of Blood Flow in the TrapEase Inferior Vena Cava Filter

    SciTech Connect

    Singer, M A; Henshaw, W D; Wang, S L

    2008-02-04

    To evaluate the flow hemodynamics of the TrapEase vena cava filter using three dimensional computational fluid dynamics, including simulated thrombi of multiple shapes, sizes, and trapping positions. The study was performed to identify potential areas of recirculation and stagnation and areas in which trapped thrombi may influence intrafilter thrombosis. Computer models of the TrapEase filter, thrombi (volumes ranging from 0.25mL to 2mL, 3 different shapes), and a 23mm diameter cava were constructed. The hemodynamics of steady-state flow at Reynolds number 600 was examined for the unoccluded and partially occluded filter. Axial velocity contours and wall shear stresses were computed. Flow in the unoccluded TrapEase filter experienced minimal disruption, except near the superior and inferior tips where low velocity flow was observed. For spherical thrombi in the superior trapping position, stagnant and recirculating flow was observed downstream of the thrombus; the volume of stagnant flow and the peak wall shear stress increased monotonically with thrombus volume. For inferiorly trapped spherical thrombi, marked disruption to the flow was observed along the cava wall ipsilateral to the thrombus and in the interior of the filter. Spherically shaped thrombus produced a lower peak wall shear stress than conically shaped thrombus and a larger peak stress than ellipsoidal thrombus. We have designed and constructed a computer model of the flow hemodynamics of the TrapEase IVC filter with varying shapes, sizes, and positions of thrombi. The computer model offers several advantages over in vitro techniques including: improved resolution, ease of evaluating different thrombus sizes and shapes, and easy adaptation for new filter designs and flow parameters. Results from the model also support a previously reported finding from photochromic experiments that suggest the inferior trapping position of the TrapEase IVC filter leads to an intra-filter region of recirculating

  18. Divergence Free High Order Filter Methods for Multiscale Non-ideal MHD Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yee, H. C.; Sjoegreen, Bjoern

    2003-01-01

    Low-dissipative high order filter finite difference methods for long time wave propagation of shock/turbulence/combustion compressible viscous MHD flows has been constructed. Several variants of the filter approach that cater to different flow types are proposed. These filters provide a natural and efficient way for the minimization of the divergence of the magnetic field (Delta . B) numerical error in the sense that no standard divergence cleaning is required. For certain 2-D MHD test problems, divergence free preservation of the magnetic fields of these filter schemes has been achieved.

  19. Joint assimilation of soil moisture and eddy covariance data with the particle filter in the HYDRUS model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kessomkiat, Wittaya; Montzka, Carsten; Weihermüller, Lutz; Vereecken, Harry; Hendricks Franssen, Harrie-Jan

    2013-04-01

    Observational data are assimilated in land surface models to improve model predictions and parameter estimation. The assimilation of latent heat flux measured by the eddy covariance method is not yet very common, and therefore the value of eddy covariance data is explored in this study. The sequential importance resampling (SIR) particle filter is used here to test in a synthetic experiment the assimilation of eddy covariance data and/or soil moisture data in the HYDRUS model. The advantage of using the particle filter for the assimilation of eddy covariance data is that EC data can be incorporated directly without the need for a linearization step. HYDRUS simulates flow in the unsaturated zone by solving the Richard's equation with a Mualem-van Genuchten parameterization. Our analysis focused on the characterization of soil moisture and evapotranspiration, and the estimation of soil hydraulic parameters. In data assimilation experiments, both model forcings and soil hydraulic parameters (the Mualem-van Genuchten parameters α, and n, besides hydraulic conductivity (Ks)) were uncertain. EC-measurement errors were modeled using an error model (based on the extended two-tower approach) applied on real EC-data. Studies were carried out for three homogeneous soil types (loamy sand, silt and loam) and two different layered soils from the Rollesbroich site and Selhausen site (North-Rhine Westphalia, Germany). Results show that EC-data contribute to characterization of soil hydraulic parameters, especially under dry conditions. Best results are obtained for the joint assimilation of EC-data and soil moisture data. Results are relatively insensitive to the EC-measurement error.

  20. Data Assimilation for Vadose Zone Flow Modeling Using the Ensemble Kalman Filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y.; Schaap, M. G.; Zha, Y.; Xue, L.

    2015-12-01

    The natural system is open and complex and the hydraulic parameters needed for describing flow and transport in the vadose zone are often poorly known, making it prone to multiple interpretations, mathematical descriptions and uncertainty. Quite often a reasonable "handle" on a sites flow characteristics can be gained only through direct observation of the flow processes itself, determination of the spatial- and probability distributions of material properties combined with computationally expensive inversions of the Richards equation. In groundwater systems, the ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) has proven to be an effective alternative to model inversions by assimilating observations directly into an ensemble of groundwater models from which time and/or space-variable variable probabilistic quantities of the flow process can be derived. Application of EnKF to Richards equation-type unsaturated flow problems, however, is more challenging than in groundwater systems because the relation of state and model parameters is strongly nonlinear. In addition, the type of functional dependence of moisture content and hydraulic conductivity on matric potential leads to high-dimensional (in the parameter space) problems even under conditions where closed-form expressions of these models such as van Genuchten-Mualem formulations are used. In this study, we updated soil water retention parameters and hydraulic conductivity together and used Restart EnKF, which rerun the nonlinear model from the initial time to obtain the updated state variables, in synthetic cases to explore the factors that may influence estimation results, including the initial estimate, the ensemble size, the observation error, and the assimilation interval. We embedded the EnKF into the Bayesian model averaging framework to enhance the model reliability and reduce predictive uncertainties. This approach is evaluated from a 15 m deep semi-arid highly heterogeneous and anisotropic vadose zone site at the

  1. Flow-through rates and evaluation of solids separation of compost filter socks versus silt fence in sediment control applications.

    PubMed

    Keener, Harold M; Faucette, Britt; Klingman, Michael H

    2007-01-01

    Soil loss rates from construction sites can be 1000 times the average of natural soil erosion rates and 20 times that from agricultural lands. Silt fence (SF) is the current industry standard used to control sediment originating from construction activities. Silt fences are designed to act as miniature detention ponds. Research has indicated that SF sediment filtering efficiency is related to its ability to detain and pond water, not necessarily the filtration ability of the fabric. Design capacity and spacing is based on flow-through rate and design height. In addition, increased detention of runoff and pressure from ponding may increase the likelihood of overtopping or failure of SF in field application. Testing was conducted on compost silt socks (SS) and SF to determine sediment filtering efficiency, flow-through rate, ponding depth, overtopping point, design height, and design capacity. Results indicate flow-through rate changes with time, as does ponding depth, due to the accumulation of solids on/in the sediment filters. Changes in depth with time were a linear function of flow rate after 10 min of flow, up to the time the sediment filter is overtopped. Predicting the capacity of SF and SS to handle runoff without the filter being overtopped requires consideration of both runoff rate and length of runoff time. Data show SS half the heights of SF were less likely to overtop than SF when sediment-laden runoff water flow rates are less than 1.03 L(-1) s(-1) m(-1) (5 gpm/ft, gal per minute per lineal foot). Ponded depth behind a 61.0-cm (24 in) SF increased more rapidly than behind a 30.5-cm diam. (12 in) SS, and at the end of the thirty minutes, the depth behind the SF was 75% greater than that behind the SS. Removal of solids by the SF and the SS were not shown to be statistically different. Results were used to create a Microsoft Excel-based interactive design tool to assist engineers and erosion and sediment control planners on how to specify compost SS

  2. Calculation and Verification of the Behaviour of Vertical Fluid Flow Using the Multifunctional Fluid Filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujiwara, Kuniyo; Ukita, Yoshiaki; Asano, Toshifumi; Matsui, Katsuhiro; Takeo, Masahiro; Negoro, Seiji; Utsumi, Yuuichi

    The vertical fluid flow operation and multifunctional fluid filter for the operation were proposed. We calculated the flow behaviour by FLUENT of the CFD software. The CFD analysis estimated the threshold pressure of flow transmission and efficiency of mixing and the results indicated that the vertical liquid transportation is useful and the good multi function as channel , valve , mixer and micro reactor of the filter we proposed. So we fabricated the filter by SR lithography and performed the flow transmission experiment. As the result, the calculated threshold pressure configurate the measured pressure. We demonstrated ring-opening reaction of the Catechol by Catechol 2,3-dioxygenase as the catalyst to evaluate the performance of mixing. It shows that the filter mixes the fluid efficiently and is enough to mix at five times transportation.

  3. Design and Initial Development of Monolithic Cross-Flow Ceramic Hot-Gas Filters

    SciTech Connect

    Barra, C.; Limaye, S.; Stinton, D.P.; Vaubert, V.M.

    1999-06-06

    Advanced, coal-fueled, power generation systems utilizing pressurized fluidized bed combustion (PFBC) and integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) technologies are currently being developed for high-efficiency, low emissions, and low-cost power generation. In spite of the advantages of these promising technologies, the severe operating environment often leads to material degradation and loss of performance in the barrier filters used for particle entrapment. To address this problem, LoTEC Inc., and Oak Ridge National Laboratory are jointly designing and developing a monolithic cross-flow ceramic hot-gas filter. The filter concept involves a truly monolithic cross-flow design that is resistant to delamination, can be easily fabricated, and offers flexibility of geometry and material make-up. During Phase I of the program, a thermo-mechanical analysis was performed to determine how a cross-flow filter would respond both thermally and mechanically to a series of thermal and mechanical loads. The cross-flow filter mold was designed accordingly, and the materials selection was narrowed down to Ca{sub 0.5}Sr{sub 0.5}Zr{sub 4}P{sub 6}O{sub 24} (CS-50) and 2Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-3SiO{sub 2} (mullite). A fabrication process was developed using gelcasting technology and monolithic cross-flow filters were fabricated. The program focuses on obtaining optimum filter permeability and testing the corrosion resistance of the candidate materials.

  4. Hydrocyclone/Filter for Concentrating Biomarkers from Soil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponce, Adrian; Obenhuber, Donald

    2008-01-01

    The hydrocyclone-filtration extractor (HFE), now undergoing development, is a simple, robust apparatus for processing large amounts of soil to extract trace amounts of microorganisms, soluble organic compounds, and other biomarkers from soil and to concentrate the extracts in amounts sufficient to enable such traditional assays as cell culturing, deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) analysis, and isotope analysis. Originally intended for incorporation into a suite of instruments for detecting signs of life on Mars, the HFE could also be used on Earth for similar purposes, including detecting trace amounts of biomarkers or chemical wastes in soils.

  5. Filtering effect of wind flow turbulence on atmospheric pollutant dispersion.

    PubMed

    Yassin, Mohamed F

    2012-06-01

    This paper presents a model for coupling the statistics of wind velocity distribution and atmospheric pollutant dispersion. The effect of wind velocity distribution is modeled as a three-dimensional finite-impulse response (3D-FIR) filter. A phase space representation of the 3D-FIR filter window is discussed. The resulting pollutant dispersion is the multiplication in the phase space of the 3-D Fourier transform of the pollutant concentration and the volume described by the filter window coefficients. The shape of the filter window in the phase space enables representing such effects as vortex shedding thermal currents, etc. The impact of spatial distribution of the sensors on the resulting pollutant spatial distribution and the 3-D FIR filter model employed also discuss. The case of a neutrally buoyant plume emitted from an elevated point source in a turbulent boundary layer considers. The results show that wind turbulence is an important factor in the pollutant dispersion and introduces expected random fluctuations in pollutant distribution and leads to spreading the distribution due to wind mixing.

  6. Activated soil filters (bio filters) for the elimination of xenobiotics (micro-pollutants) from storm- and waste waters.

    PubMed

    Bester, Kai; Schäfer, Daniel

    2009-06-01

    A technical scale (0.12 m3) activated soil filter (bio filter) has been used to eliminate diverse xenobiotics (organic micro-pollutants) such as organophosphate flame retardants, and -plasticisers, musk fragrances, DEHP, benzothiazoles and triclosan from water. Model experiments to treat combined sewer overflow, storm water and a post treatment of waste water were performed in controlled laboratory experiments. The indicator compounds were typical for waste water. Diverse chemical compound groups and a wide spectrum from the lipophilic (pKow=5.9) to the hydrophilic (pKow=2.6) were included. The system consisted of a layer with high organic content (with vegetation to prevent clogging), a sand filter and a gravel drainage layer. The organic layer was spiked with activated sludge to enhance biomass and biodegradation potential. Usually the elimination rates varied from 64% to 99%, with only one compound reaching as little as 17%. For a technical suitability assessment it was calculated how long these filters would be stable in eliminating organic compounds from water. The estimated operating times for such systems was found to be about 100 years for a stack height of 2 m a year in regard to most compounds in this study.

  7. Fractal Analysis of Laplacian Pyramidal Filters Applied to Segmentation of Soil Images

    PubMed Central

    de Castro, J.; Méndez, A.; Tarquis, A. M.

    2014-01-01

    The laplacian pyramid is a well-known technique for image processing in which local operators of many scales, but identical shape, serve as the basis functions. The required properties to the pyramidal filter produce a family of filters, which is unipara metrical in the case of the classical problem, when the length of the filter is 5. We pay attention to gaussian and fractal behaviour of these basis functions (or filters), and we determine the gaussian and fractal ranges in the case of single parameter a. These fractal filters loose less energy in every step of the laplacian pyramid, and we apply this property to get threshold values for segmenting soil images, and then evaluate their porosity. Also, we evaluate our results by comparing them with the Otsu algorithm threshold values, and conclude that our algorithm produce reliable test results. PMID:25114957

  8. Fractal analysis of laplacian pyramidal filters applied to segmentation of soil images.

    PubMed

    de Castro, J; Ballesteros, F; Méndez, A; Tarquis, A M

    2014-01-01

    The laplacian pyramid is a well-known technique for image processing in which local operators of many scales, but identical shape, serve as the basis functions. The required properties to the pyramidal filter produce a family of filters, which is unipara metrical in the case of the classical problem, when the length of the filter is 5. We pay attention to gaussian and fractal behaviour of these basis functions (or filters), and we determine the gaussian and fractal ranges in the case of single parameter a. These fractal filters loose less energy in every step of the laplacian pyramid, and we apply this property to get threshold values for segmenting soil images, and then evaluate their porosity. Also, we evaluate our results by comparing them with the Otsu algorithm threshold values, and conclude that our algorithm produce reliable test results. PMID:25114957

  9. Hydraulic parameter estimation by remotely-sensed top soil moisture observations with the particle filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montzka, Carsten; Moradkhani, Hamid; Weihermüller, Lutz; Franssen, Harrie-Jan Hendricks; Canty, Morton; Vereecken, Harry

    2011-03-01

    SummaryIn a synthetic study we explore the potential of using surface soil moisture measurements obtained from different satellite platforms to retrieve soil moisture profiles and soil hydraulic properties using a sequential data assimilation procedure and a 1D mechanistic soil water model. Four different homogeneous soil types were investigated including loamy sand, loam, silt, and clayey soils. The forcing data including precipitation and potential evapotranspiration were taken from the meteorological station of Aachen (Germany). With the aid of the forward model run, a synthetic data set was designed and observations were generated. The virtual top soil moisture observations were then assimilated to update the states and hydraulic parameters of the model by means of a particle filtering data assimilation method. Our analyses include the effect of assimilation strategy, measurement frequency, accuracy in surface soil moisture measurements, and soils differing in textural and hydraulic properties. With this approach we were able to assess the value of periodic spaceborne observations of top soil moisture for soil moisture profile estimation and identify the adequate conditions (e.g. temporal resolution and measurement accuracy) for remotely sensed soil moisture data assimilation. Updating of both hydraulic parameters and state variables allowed better predictions of top soil moisture contents as compared with updating of states only. An important conclusion is that the assimilation of remotely-sensed top soil moisture for soil hydraulic parameter estimation generates a bias depending on the soil type. Results indicate that the ability of a data assimilation system to correct the soil moisture state and estimate hydraulic parameters is driven by the non linearity between soil moisture and pressure head.

  10. Preferential Flow and Transport of Biocolloids in Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harter, T.; Atwill, E. R.; Hou, L.; Carle, B.

    2006-12-01

    We develop a conceptual model of the physics of flow and transport in packed, tilted, and vegetated soil boxes during and immediately after simulated rainfall events and apply it to 54 experiments implemented for three different soils at three different slopes and two different rainfall rates. By simple parameter estimation, we show that a significant amount of the subsurface outflow from the soil boxes is due to preferential macropore flow. The effective hydraulic properties of the macropore space were obtained by calibration of a simple two-domain flow and transport model that accounts for coupled flow in the matrix and in the macropores of the soils. While the macropore hydraulic properties are highly variable, linear mixed effects (LME) modeling showed significant association with soil bulk density and with the rainfall rate. Macropore flow is shown to be responsible for both, tracer (bromide) and C. parvum transport through the soil into the underlying pore space observed during the 4-hour experiments. Over a 20 cm thick soil horizon, the soil attenuation rate for C. parvum due to straining in the soil matrix and due to filtration to the macropore surfaces is 0.6 (half an order of magnitude). The LME and logistic regression models developed from the soil box experiments provide a basis for estimating macropore hydraulic properties and the risk of C. parvum transport through shallow soils from bulk density, precipitation, and subflow rates.

  11. Uncertainty evaluation of coliform bacteria removal from vegetated filter strip under overland flow condition.

    PubMed

    Guber, A K; Yakirevich, A M; Sadeghi, A M; Pachepsky, Y A; Shelton, D R

    2009-01-01

    Vegetated filter strips (VFS) have become an important component of water quality improvement by reducing sediment and nutrients transport to surface water. This management practice is also beneficial for controlling manure-borne pathogen transport to surface water. The objective of this work was to assess the VFS efficiency and evaluate the uncertainty in predicting the microbial pollutant removal from overland flow in VFS. We used the kinematic wave overland flow model as implemented in KINEROS2 coupled with the convective-dispersive overland transport model which accounts for the reversible attachment-detachment and surface straining of infiltrating bacteria. The model was successfully calibrated with experimental data obtained from a series of simulated rainfall experiments at vegetated and bare sandy loam and clay loam plots, where fecal coliforms were released from manure slurry applied on the top of the plots. The calibrated model was then used to assess the sensitivity of the VFS efficiency to the model parameters, rainfall duration, and intensity for a case study with a 6-m VFS placed at the edge of 200-m long field. The Monte Carlo simulations were also performed to evaluate the uncertainty associated with the VFS efficiency given the uncertainty in the model parameters and key inputs. The VFS efficiency was found to be <95% in 25%, <75% in 23%, and <25% in 20% of cases. Relatively long high-intensity rainfalls, low hydraulic conductivities, low net capillary drives of soil, and high soil moisture contents before rainfalls caused the partial failure of VFS to retain coliforms from the infiltration excess runoff.

  12. [Design Method Analysis and Performance Comparison of Wall Filter for Ultrasound Color Flow Imaging].

    PubMed

    Wang, Lutao; Xiao, Jun; Chai, Hua

    2015-08-01

    The successful suppression of clutter arising from stationary or slowly moving tissue is one of the key issues in medical ultrasound color blood imaging. Remaining clutter may cause bias in the mean blood frequency estimation and results in a potentially misleading description of blood-flow. In this paper, based on the principle of general wall-filter, the design process of three classes of filters, infinitely impulse response with projection initialization (Prj-IIR), polynomials regression (Pol-Reg), and eigen-based filters are previewed and analyzed. The performance of the filters was assessed by calculating the bias and variance of a mean blood velocity using a standard autocorrelation estimator. Simulation results show that the performance of Pol-Reg filter is similar to Prj-IIR filters. Both of them can offer accurate estimation of mean blood flow speed under steady clutter conditions, and the clutter rejection ability can be enhanced by increasing the ensemble size of Doppler vector. Eigen-based filters can effectively remove the non-stationary clutter component, and further improve the estimation accuracy for low speed blood flow signals. There is also no significant increase in computation complexity for eigen-based filters when the ensemble size is less than 10.

  13. Performance Evaluation of Axial Flow AG-1 FC and Prototype FM (High Strength) HEPA Filters - 13123

    SciTech Connect

    Giffin, Paxton K.; Parsons, Michael S.; Wilson, John A.; Waggoner, Charles A.

    2013-07-01

    High efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters are routinely used in DOE nuclear containment activities. The Nuclear Air Cleaning Handbook (NACH) stipulates that air cleaning devices and equipment used in DOE nuclear applications must meet the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Code on Nuclear Air and Gas Treatment (AG-1) standard. This testing activity evaluates two different axial flow HEPA filters, those from AG-1 Sections FC and FM. Section FM is under development and has not yet been added to AG-1 due to a lack of qualification data available for these filters. Section FC filters are axial flow units that utilize a fibrous glass filtering medium. The section FM filters utilize a similar fibrous glass medium, but also have scrim backing. The scrim-backed filters have demonstrated the ability to endure pressure impulses capable of completely destroying FC filters. The testing activities presented herein will examine the total lifetime loading for both FC and FM filters under ambient conditions and at elevated conditions of temperature and relative humidity. Results will include loading curves, penetration curves, and testing condition parameters. These testing activities have been developed through collaborations with representatives from the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), DOE Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM), New Mexico State University, and Mississippi State University. (authors)

  14. Comparison of NOM removal and microbial properties in up-flow/down-flow BAC filter.

    PubMed

    Han, Lineng; Liu, Wenjun; Chen, Mo; Zhang, Minglu; Liu, Shuming; Sun, Ruilin; Fei, Xiangqin

    2013-09-15

    The removal of natural organic matter (NOM) in term of CODMn by up-flow biologically activated carbon filter (UBACF) and down-flow biologically activated carbon filter (DBACF) was investigated in a pilot-scale test. The impacts of the molecular weight distribution of NOM on its degradation by the UBACF and DBACF were evaluated. The relationship between biodegradation and the microbial properties in the UBACF and DBACF were approached as well. The feed water of the UBACF and DBACF were pumped from the effluent of the rapid sand filtration (RSF) of Chengnan Drinking Water Treatment Plant (CDWTP), Huaian, Jiangsu Province, China. When the adsorption was the dominant mechanism of NOM removal at the initial stage of operation, the CODMn removal efficiency by the UBACF was lower than the DBACF. However, with the microbes gradually accumulated and biofilm formed, the removal of CODMn by the UBACF increased correspondingly to 25.3%, at the steady-state operation and was approximately 10% higher than that by the DBACF. Heterotrophy plate count (HPC) in the finished water of the UBACF was observed 30% higher than that of the DBACF. The UBACF effluent had higher concentration of detached bacteria whereas the DBACF harbored more attached biomass. The highest attached biomass concentration of the UBACF was found in the middle of the GAC bed. On the contrary, the highest attached biomass concentration of the DBACF was found on the top of the GAC bed. Furthermore, a total of 9479 reads by pyrosequencing was obtained from samples of the UBACF and DBACF effluents. The UBACF effluent had a more diverse microbial community and more even distribution of species than the DBACF effluent did. Alphaproteobacteria and Betaproteobacteria were the dominant groups in the finished water of the UBACF and DBACF. The higher organic matter removal by the UBACF was attributed to the presence of its higher biologically activity.

  15. N95 and p100 respirator filter efficiency under high constant and cyclic flow.

    PubMed

    Eshbaugh, Jonathan P; Gardner, Paul D; Richardson, Aaron W; Hofacre, Kent C

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of high flow conditions on aerosol penetration and the relationship between penetration at constant and cyclic flow conditions. National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH)-approved N95 and P100 filtering facepiece respirators and cartridges were challenged with inert solid and oil aerosols. A combination of monodisperse aerosol and size-specific aerosol measurement equipment allowed count-based penetration measurement of particles with nominal diameters ranging from 0.02 to 2.9 microm. Three constant flow conditions (85, 270, and 360 L/min) were selected to match the minute, inhalation mean, and inhalation peak flows of the four cyclic flow conditions (40, 85, 115, and 135 L/min) tested. As expected, penetration was found to increase under increased constant and cyclic flow conditions. The most penetrating particle size (MPPS) generally ranged from 0.05 to 0.2 microm for P100 filters and was approximately 0.05 microm for N95 filters. Although penetration increased at the high flow conditions, the MPPS was relatively unaffected by flow. Of the constant flows tested, the flows equivalent to cyclic inhalation mean and peak flows best approximated the penetration measurements of the corresponding cyclic flows. PMID:19012163

  16. [Simulation of cropland soil moisture based on an ensemble Kalman filter].

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhao; Zhou, Yan-Lian; Ju, Wei-Min; Gao, Ping

    2011-11-01

    By using an ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) to assimilate the observed soil moisture data, the modified boreal ecosystem productivity simulator (BEPS) model was adopted to simulate the dynamics of soil moisture in winter wheat root zones at Xuzhou Agro-meteorological Station, Jiangsu Province of China during the growth seasons in 2000-2004. After the assimilation of observed data, the determination coefficient, root mean square error, and average absolute error of simulated soil moisture were in the ranges of 0.626-0.943, 0.018-0.042, and 0.021-0.041, respectively, with the simulation precision improved significantly, as compared with that before assimilation, indicating the applicability of data assimilation in improving the simulation of soil moisture. The experimental results at single point showed that the errors in the forcing data and observations and the frequency and soil depth of the assimilation of observed data all had obvious effects on the simulated soil moisture.

  17. On-farm treatment of dairy soiled water using aerobic woodchip filters.

    PubMed

    Ruane, Eimear M; Murphy, Paul N C; Healy, Mark G; French, Padraig; Rodgers, Michael

    2011-12-15

    Dairy soiled water (DSW) is produced on dairy farms through the washing-down of milking parlours and holding areas, and is generally applied to land. However, there is a risk of nutrient loss to surface and ground waters from land application. The aim of this study was to use aerobic woodchip filters to remove organic matter, suspended solids (SS) and nutrients from DSW. This novel treatment method would allow the re-use of the final effluent from the woodchip filters to wash down yards, thereby reducing water usage and environmental risks associated with land spreading. Three replicate 100 m(2) farm-scale woodchip filters, each 1 m deep, were constructed and operated to treat DSW from 300 cows over an 11-month study duration. The filters were loaded at a hydraulic loading rate of 30 L m(-2) d(-1), applied in four doses through a network of pipes on the filter surface. Average influent concentrations of chemical oxygen demand (COD), SS and total nitrogen (TN) of 5750 ± 1441 mg L(-1), 602 ± 303 mg L(-1) and 357 ± 100 mg L(-1), respectively, were reduced by 66, 86 and 57% in the filters. Effluent nutrient concentrations remained relatively stable over the study period, indicating the effectiveness of the filter despite increasing and/or fluctuating influent concentrations. Woodchip filters are a low cost, minimal maintenance treatment system, using a renewable resource that can be easily integrated into existing farm infrastructure.

  18. Thermal/chemical degradation of ceramic cross-flow filter materials

    SciTech Connect

    Alvin, M.A.; Lane, J.E.; Lippert, T.E.

    1989-11-01

    This report summarizes the 14-month, Phase 1 effort conducted by Westinghouse on the Thermal/Chemical Degradation of Ceramic Cross-Flow Filter Materials program. In Phase 1 expected filter process conditions were identified for a fixed-bed, fluid-bed, and entrained-bed gasification, direct coal fired turbine, and pressurized fluidized-bed combustion system. Ceramic cross-flow filter materials were also selected, procured, and subjected to chemical and physical characterization. The stability of each of the ceramic cross-flow materials was assessed in terms of potential reactions or phase change as a result of process temperature, and effluent gas compositions containing alkali and fines. In addition chemical and physical characterization was conducted on cross-flow filters that were exposed to the METC fluid-bed gasifier and the New York University pressurized fluidized-bed combustor. Long-term high temperature degradation mechanisms were proposed for each ceramic cross-flow material at process operating conditions. An experimental bench-scale test program is recommended to be conducted in Phase 2, generating data that support the proposed cross-flow filter material thermal/chemical degradation mechanisms. Papers on the individual subtasks have been processed separately for inclusion on the data base.

  19. Assessment of intermittently loaded woodchip and sand filters to treat dairy soiled water.

    PubMed

    Murnane, J G; Brennan, R B; Healy, M G; Fenton, O

    2016-10-15

    Land application of dairy soiled water (DSW) is expensive relative to its nutrient replacement value. The use of aerobic filters is an effective alternative method of treatment and potentially allows the final effluent to be reused on the farm. Knowledge gaps exist concerning the optimal design and operation of filters for the treatment of DSW. To address this, 18 laboratory-scale filters, with depths of either 0.6 m or 1 m, were intermittently loaded with DSW over periods of up to 220 days to evaluate the impacts of depth (0.6 m versus 1 m), organic loading rates (OLRs) (50 versus 155 g COD m(-2) d(-1)), and media type (woodchip versus sand) on organic, nutrient and suspended solids (SS) removals. The study found that media depth was important in contaminant removal in woodchip filters. Reductions of 78% chemical oxygen demand (COD), 95% SS, 85% total nitrogen (TN), 82% ammonium-nitrogen (NH4N), 50% total phosphorus (TP), and 54% dissolved reactive phosphorus (DRP) were measured in 1 m deep woodchip filters, which was greater than the reductions in 0.6 m deep woodchip filters. Woodchip filters also performed optimally when loaded at a high OLR (155 g COD m(-2) d(-1)), although the removal mechanism was primarily physical (i.e. straining) as opposed to biological. When operated at the same OLR and when of the same depth, the sand filters had better COD removals (96%) than woodchip (74%), but there was no significant difference between them in the removal of SS and NH4N. However, the likelihood of clogging makes sand filters less desirable than woodchip filters. Using the optimal designs of both configurations, the filter area required per cow for a woodchip filter is more than four times less than for a sand filter. Therefore, this study found that woodchip filters are more economically and environmentally effective in the treatment of DSW than sand filters, and optimal performance may be achieved using woodchip filters with a depth of at least 1

  20. Assessment of intermittently loaded woodchip and sand filters to treat dairy soiled water.

    PubMed

    Murnane, J G; Brennan, R B; Healy, M G; Fenton, O

    2016-10-15

    Land application of dairy soiled water (DSW) is expensive relative to its nutrient replacement value. The use of aerobic filters is an effective alternative method of treatment and potentially allows the final effluent to be reused on the farm. Knowledge gaps exist concerning the optimal design and operation of filters for the treatment of DSW. To address this, 18 laboratory-scale filters, with depths of either 0.6 m or 1 m, were intermittently loaded with DSW over periods of up to 220 days to evaluate the impacts of depth (0.6 m versus 1 m), organic loading rates (OLRs) (50 versus 155 g COD m(-2) d(-1)), and media type (woodchip versus sand) on organic, nutrient and suspended solids (SS) removals. The study found that media depth was important in contaminant removal in woodchip filters. Reductions of 78% chemical oxygen demand (COD), 95% SS, 85% total nitrogen (TN), 82% ammonium-nitrogen (NH4N), 50% total phosphorus (TP), and 54% dissolved reactive phosphorus (DRP) were measured in 1 m deep woodchip filters, which was greater than the reductions in 0.6 m deep woodchip filters. Woodchip filters also performed optimally when loaded at a high OLR (155 g COD m(-2) d(-1)), although the removal mechanism was primarily physical (i.e. straining) as opposed to biological. When operated at the same OLR and when of the same depth, the sand filters had better COD removals (96%) than woodchip (74%), but there was no significant difference between them in the removal of SS and NH4N. However, the likelihood of clogging makes sand filters less desirable than woodchip filters. Using the optimal designs of both configurations, the filter area required per cow for a woodchip filter is more than four times less than for a sand filter. Therefore, this study found that woodchip filters are more economically and environmentally effective in the treatment of DSW than sand filters, and optimal performance may be achieved using woodchip filters with a depth of at least 1

  1. Modeling Flow Past a TrapEase Inferior Vena Cava Filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singer, Michael; Henshaw, William; Wang, Stephen

    2008-11-01

    This study uses three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics to evaluate the efficacy of the TrapEase inferior vena cava (IVC) filter. Hemodynamics of the unoccluded and partially occluded filter are examined, and the clinical implications are assessed. The IVC, which is the primary vein that drains the legs, is modeled as a straight pipe, and a geometrically accurate model of the filter is constructed using computer aided design. Blood is modeled as a homogeneous, incompressible, Newtonian fluid, and the method of overset grids is used to solve the Navier-Stokes equations. Results are corroborated with in-vitro studies. Flow around the unoccluded filter demonstrates minimal disruption, but spherical clots in the downstream trapping position lead to regions of stagnant and recirculating flow that may promote further clotting. The volume of stagnant flow and the peak wall shear stress increase with clot volume. For clots trapped in the upstream trapping position, flow is disrupted along the cava wall downstream of the clot and within the filter. The shape and location of trapped clots also effect the peak wall shear stress and may impact the efficacy of the filter.

  2. Using Tracer Experiments To Study Phosphorus Transfer From Soil To Overland Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vollmer, T.; Stamm, C.; Schaerer, M.; Sinaj, S.; Frossard, E.; Fluehler, H.

    Diffuse phosphorus (P) losses from agricultural land contribute to the eutrophication of surface water bodies in Switzerland. Grassland soils in areas of high animal stock densities are often prone to high P losses due to over-fertilization and a strong accumu- lation of P in the topsoil. In order to understand the effects of management practices and remediation measures on P transfer into runoff water at a small scale it is impor- tant to localize the sources of this phosphorus within the soil profile and to describe the water flows within the topsoil­overland flow system. We are studying the effects of remediation measures on P availability in the soil and on P concentrations in overland flow in a field experiment. We are using tracer exper- iments to examine the mixing behavior of water applied with a sprinkling device onto the soil surface with pre-event soil water and to trace the contribution of those two water sources to overland flow. Two plots were pre-irrigated with a solution of KBr in order to label the soil solu- tion. After a few days of equilibration, two fluorescent dyes were applied to different areas of the plots at a constant rate of 40 mm h-1. Surface runoff was analyzed for tracer concentrations. Small soil monoliths (0.35 * 0.25 *0.20 m3) were excavated and the tracer distribution within the blocks was mapped using a digital camera, optical filters, and tracer specific excitation light source. This tracing technique allowed for independent mapping of the distribution of two simultaneously applied tracers. The experiments demonstrated heterogenous infiltration of the dyes, negligible lat- eral translocation of the dyes within the soil, minimal transfer of the pre-applied Br- into overland flow, early breakthrough of the dye tracers in overland flow which was independent of the tracers sorption properties and a recovery of the dyes that corre- sponded to the runoff ratio. In all, the experiments indicate a very restricted interac- tion between

  3. Combined assimilation of streamflow and satellite soil moisture with the particle filter and geostatistical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Hongxiang; Moradkhani, Hamid

    2016-08-01

    Assimilation of satellite soil moisture and streamflow data into a distributed hydrologic model has received increasing attention over the past few years. This study provides a detailed analysis of the joint and separate assimilation of streamflow and Advanced Scatterometer (ASCAT) surface soil moisture into a distributed Sacramento Soil Moisture Accounting (SAC-SMA) model, with the use of recently developed particle filter-Markov chain Monte Carlo (PF-MCMC) method. Performance is assessed over the Salt River Watershed in Arizona, which is one of the watersheds without anthropogenic effects in Model Parameter Estimation Experiment (MOPEX). A total of five data assimilation (DA) scenarios are designed and the effects of the locations of streamflow gauges and the ASCAT soil moisture on the predictions of soil moisture and streamflow are assessed. In addition, a geostatistical model is introduced to overcome the significantly biased satellite soil moisture and also discontinuity issue. The results indicate that: (1) solely assimilating outlet streamflow can lead to biased soil moisture estimation; (2) when the study area can only be partially covered by the satellite data, the geostatistical approach can estimate the soil moisture for those uncovered grid cells; (3) joint assimilation of streamflow and soil moisture from geostatistical modeling can further improve the surface soil moisture prediction. This study recommends that the geostatistical model is a helpful tool to aid the remote sensing technique and the hydrologic DA study.

  4. Construction of Low Dissipative High Order Well-Balanced Filter Schemes for Non-Equilibrium Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Wei; Yee, H. C.; Sjogreen, Bjorn; Magin, Thierry; Shu, Chi-Wang

    2009-01-01

    The goal of this paper is to generalize the well-balanced approach for non-equilibrium flow studied by Wang et al. [26] to a class of low dissipative high order shock-capturing filter schemes and to explore more advantages of well-balanced schemes in reacting flows. The class of filter schemes developed by Yee et al. [30], Sjoegreen & Yee [24] and Yee & Sjoegreen [35] consist of two steps, a full time step of spatially high order non-dissipative base scheme and an adaptive nonlinear filter containing shock-capturing dissipation. A good property of the filter scheme is that the base scheme and the filter are stand alone modules in designing. Therefore, the idea of designing a well-balanced filter scheme is straightforward, i.e., choosing a well-balanced base scheme with a well-balanced filter (both with high order). A typical class of these schemes shown in this paper is the high order central difference schemes/predictor-corrector (PC) schemes with a high order well-balanced WENO filter. The new filter scheme with the well-balanced property will gather the features of both filter methods and well-balanced properties: it can preserve certain steady state solutions exactly; it is able to capture small perturbations, e.g., turbulence fluctuations; it adaptively controls numerical dissipation. Thus it shows high accuracy, efficiency and stability in shock/turbulence interactions. Numerical examples containing 1D and 2D smooth problems, 1D stationary contact discontinuity problem and 1D turbulence/shock interactions are included to verify the improved accuracy, in addition to the well-balanced behavior.

  5. Flow Of Groundwater From Soil To Crystalline Rock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olofsson, B.

    1994-03-01

    Knowledge of groundwater flow from soil or surface water to crystalline bedrock has usually been derived from indirect studies of drawdown in soil due to underground constructions, as well as from analysis of water chemistry and from tracer experiments. Infiltration into the bedrock occurs at specific sites where suitable combinations of geological and hydrological variables exist. Flow from soil to rock in the saturated zone occurs where conductors in the bedrock, such as fractures and fracture zones, are hydraulically connected to a groundwater reservoir in permeable soil or to horizons of permeable and constructive material in heterogeneous soil. Of particular importance for infiltration are the hydraulic conditions of the contact zone between soil and rock. A thin layer of silt on the bedrock surface often blocks the water flow. The micro-topography of the bedrock surface is important since fracture zones usually give depressions in the surface, in which accumulations of sorted and conductive material often can be found. A strong heterogeneity in the infiltration from soil to rock is evidenced by statistical analyses of the flow related to various geological and hydrogeological variables, as well as from analyses of groundwater chemistry and tracer experiments. In order to estimate the infiltration from soil to rock and to carry out mathematical modelling of the groundwater flow, it is necessary to have a good knowledge of the hydraulic conditions of the superficial rock and soil as well as of the conditions at the soil/bedrock contact zone. Information on the saturated flow from soil to rock is essential for calculation of water budgets, for assessments of spread of pollutants and for estimations of leakage into underground constructions.

  6. Electroosmotic flow behaviour of metal contaminated expansive soil.

    PubMed

    Sivapullaiah, P V; Prakash, B S Nagendra

    2007-05-17

    It is important to study the flow behaviour through soil during electrokinetic extraction of contaminants to understand their removal mechanism. The flow through the expansive soil containing montmorillonite is monitored during laboratory electrokinetic extraction of heavy metal contaminants. The permeability of soil, which increases due to the presence of contaminants, is further enhanced during electrokinetic extraction of contaminants due to osmotic permeability. The variations in flow rates through the soil while the extracting fluid is changed to dilute acetic acid (used to control the increase of pH) and EDTA solution (used to desorb the metal ions from soil) are studied. The trends of removal of contaminants vis-a-vis the changes in the flow through the soil during different phases of electrokinetic extraction are established. Chromium ions are removed by flushing of water through the soil and increased osmotic flow is beneficial. Removal of iron ions is enhanced by induced osmotic flow and desorption of ions by electrokinetic processes. PMID:17276001

  7. A novel method for estimating the track-soil parameters based on Kalman and improved strong tracking filters.

    PubMed

    Yao, Yu; Cheng, Kai; Zhou, Zhi-Jie; Zhang, Bang-Cheng; Dong, Chao; Zheng, Sen

    2015-11-01

    A tracked vehicle has been widely used in exploring unknown environments and military fields. In current methods for suiting soil conditions, soil parameters need to be given and the traction performance cannot always be satisfied on soft soil. To solve the problem, it is essential to estimate track-soil parameters in real-time. Therefore, a detailed mathematical model is proposed for the first time. Furthermore, a novel algorithm which is composed of Kalman filter (KF) and improved strong tracking filter (STF) is developed for online track-soil estimation and named as KF-ISTF. By this method, the KF is used to estimate slip parameters, and the ISTF is used to estimate motion states. Then the key soil parameters can be estimated by using a suitable soil model. The experimental results show that equipped with the estimation algorithm, the proposed model can be used to estimate the track-soil parameters, and make the traction performance satisfied with soil conditions.

  8. Evaluation of N95 filtering facepiece respirator efficiency with cyclic and constant flows.

    PubMed

    Bahloul, Ali; Mahdavi, Alireza; Haghighat, Fariborz; Ostiguy, Claude

    2014-01-01

    An increasing demand for protecting workers against harmful inhalable ultrafine particles (UFPs), by means of filtering facepiece respirators (FFRs), necessitates assessing the efficiency of FFRs. This article evaluates the penetration of particles, mostly in the ultrafine range, through one model of N95 FFRs exposed to cyclic and constant flows, simulating breathing for moderate to heavy work loads. The generated particles were poly-dispersed NaCl, within the range of 10-205.4 nm. The tests were performed for several cyclic flows, with mean inhalation flows (MIFs) ranging from 42 to 360 L/min, and constant flows with the same range. The measurements were based on filter penetration and did not consider particle leakage. With the penetrations recorded for the selected constant and cyclic flows, the worst-case scenario penetrations at the most penetrating particle size (MPPS) were obtained. The MPPS penetrations measured with the cyclic and constant flows equivalent to minute volume, MIF and peak inhalation flow (PIF) of the cyclic flows were then compared. It was indicated that the constant flows equivalent to the minute volume or PIF of the cyclic flow could not accurately represent the penetration of the corresponding cyclic flow: the constant flow equal to the minute volume of the cyclic flow significantly underestimated the MPPS penetration of the corresponding cyclic flow, while the constant flow equal to the PIF of the cyclic flow overestimated it. On the other hand, for the constant flow equal to the MIF of the cyclic flow, the MPPS penetrations were almost equal for both the constant and cyclic flows, for the lower flow rates (42 to 170 L/min). For higher flow rates (230 to 360 L/min), however, the MPPS penetration was exceeded under the constant flows, compared with the corresponding cyclic flows. It was therefore concluded that the constant flow equal to the MIF of the cyclic flow could better predict the results of corresponding cyclic flow, since it

  9. Measurement of Flow and Transport in Macroporous Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Köhne, J. M.; Mohanty, B. P.; Castiglione, P.

    2002-12-01

    Preferential flow in agricultural regions poses a serious environmental threat by allowing chemicals to bypass the soil matrix and to be channeled into ground water. Although a long-known phenomenon, our understanding of and ability to predict macropore flow and transport remain far from complete. To analyze the processes that control macropore flow in soil, we have built large (25 cm diam., 80 cm length) repacked soil columns with different macropore/matrix domain configurations: (i) In column I, multiple macropores were created in one-half cross-section. Water flow and chloride transport experiments were performed for macropores open to the atmosphere and buried-macropores. Measurements at the bottom boundary as well as across the profile consistently revealed the higher degree of preferential flow in open macropores as compared to the buried macropores. (ii) In column II, a single cylindrical macropore was located in the center of the surrounding soil matrix. We conducted experiments of water flow and solute transport using KBr as a conservative tracer. In the soil matrix, TDR-probes measure soil water content and solute concentration, and mini-tensiometers register matric potential. In and adjacent to the macropore-system, TDR-coil probes (diam. 0.3 cm, length of copper coil 1.5 cm) and mini-tensiometers (ceramic cup diam. 0.1-0.2 cm) monitored macropore flow and provided information to quantify inter-region water transfer. Bromide specific electrodes measured the bromide concentration in the effluent of the macropore region and of the matrix region as well as directly inside the soil matrix. The experimental setup seems promising for analyzing basic flow and transport processes in macroporous soils. In future experimental analyses, the complexity of the macropore configuration will be systematically increased in terms of macropore number, geometry, continuity, and physical properties of macropore walls.

  10. Modelling susceptibility of grassland soil to macropore flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alaoui, Abdallah

    2015-06-01

    Investigating preferential flow, including macropore flow, is crucial to predicting and preventing point sources of contamination in soil, for example in the vicinity of pumping wells. With a view to advancing groundwater protection, this study aimed (i) to quantify the strength of macropore flow in four representative natural grassland soils on the Swiss plateau, and (ii) to define the parameters that significantly control macropore flow in grassland soil. For each soil type we selected three measurement points on which three successive irrigation experiments were carried out, resulting in a total of 36 irrigations. The strength of macropore flow, parameterized as the cumulated water volume flowing from macropores at a depth of 1 m in response to an irrigation of 60 mm h-1 intensity and 1 h duration, was simulated using the dual-permeability MACRO model. The model calibration was based on the key soil parameters and fine measurements of water content at different depths. Modelling results indicate high performance of macropore flow in all investigated soil types except in gleysols. The volume of water that flowed from macropores and was hence expected to reach groundwater varied between 81% and 94% in brown soils, 59% and 67% in para-brown soils, 43% and 56% in acid brown soils, and 22% and 35% in gleysols. These results show that spreading pesticides and herbicides in pumping well protection zones poses a high risk of contamination and must be strictly prohibited. We also found that organic carbon content was not correlated with the strength of macropore flow, probably due to its very weak variation in our study, while saturated water content showed a negative correlation with macropore flow. The correlation between saturated hydraulic conductivity (Ks) and macropore flow was negative as well, but weak. Macropore flow appears to be controlled by the interaction between the bulk density of the uppermost topsoil layer (0-0.10 m) and the macroporosity of the soil

  11. File-Based Data Flow in the CMS Filter Farm

    SciTech Connect

    Andre, J.M.; et al.

    2015-12-23

    During the LHC Long Shutdown 1, the CMS Data Acquisition system underwent a partial redesign to replace obsolete network equipment, use more homogeneous switching technologies, and prepare the ground for future upgrades of the detector front-ends. The software and hardware infrastructure to provide input, execute the High Level Trigger (HLT) algorithms and deal with output data transport and storage has also been redesigned to be completely file- based. This approach provides additional decoupling between the HLT algorithms and the input and output data flow. All the metadata needed for bookkeeping of the data flow and the HLT process lifetimes are also generated in the form of small “documents” using the JSON encoding, by either services in the flow of the HLT execution (for rates etc.) or watchdog processes. These “files” can remain memory-resident or be written to disk if they are to be used in another part of the system (e.g. for aggregation of output data). We discuss how this redesign improves the robustness and flexibility of the CMS DAQ and the performance of the system currently being commissioned for the LHC Run 2.

  12. File-based data flow in the CMS Filter Farm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andre, J.-M.; Andronidis, A.; Bawej, T.; Behrens, U.; Branson, J.; Chaze, O.; Cittolin, S.; Darlea, G.-L.; Deldicque, C.; Dobson, M.; Dupont, A.; Erhan, S.; Gigi, D.; Glege, F.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Hegeman, J.; Holzner, A.; Jimenez-Estupiñán, R.; Masetti, L.; Meijers, F.; Meschi, E.; Mommsen, R. K.; Morovic, S.; Nunez-Barranco-Fernandez, C.; O'Dell, V.; Orsini, L.; Paus, C.; Petrucci, A.; Pieri, M.; Racz, A.; Roberts, P.; Sakulin, H.; Schwick, C.; Stieger, B.; Sumorok, K.; Veverka, J.; Zaza, S.; Zejdl, P.

    2015-12-01

    During the LHC Long Shutdown 1, the CMS Data Acquisition system underwent a partial redesign to replace obsolete network equipment, use more homogeneous switching technologies, and prepare the ground for future upgrades of the detector front-ends. The software and hardware infrastructure to provide input, execute the High Level Trigger (HLT) algorithms and deal with output data transport and storage has also been redesigned to be completely file- based. This approach provides additional decoupling between the HLT algorithms and the input and output data flow. All the metadata needed for bookkeeping of the data flow and the HLT process lifetimes are also generated in the form of small “documents” using the JSON encoding, by either services in the flow of the HLT execution (for rates etc.) or watchdog processes. These “files” can remain memory-resident or be written to disk if they are to be used in another part of the system (e.g. for aggregation of output data). We discuss how this redesign improves the robustness and flexibility of the CMS DAQ and the performance of the system currently being commissioned for the LHC Run 2.

  13. Investigations of soil cracking and preferential flow in a weighing lysimeter filled with cracking clay soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greve, A.; Andersen, M. S.; Acworth, R. I.

    2010-10-01

    SummaryAn improved understanding of deep drainage processes in irrigated cracking soils is needed for sustainable irrigation management. To investigate the effect of crack dynamics and macropore flow on drainage in cracking soils, a series of irrigation experiments was carried out in a weighing lysimeter. Subsurface soil cracks of the initially very dry soil were investigated with a videoscope and changes in the surface expression of cracks in response to irrigation events were monitored by time-lapse photography. A bromide tracer was applied to one irrigation event. Variations in the combined soil and moisture mass and the volume of drainage out of the soil column was logged and the drainage EC and bromide content were determined. No drainage occurred out of the soil column during the first 3 out of 6 irrigation events, even though substantial surface runoff into the cracks occurred and, at least initially, soil cracks provided an uninterrupted flow path through the profile. The breakthrough of the bromide tracer, as well as an initially low EC of the drainage water indicate that preferential flow accounted for a substantial part of the first of the two drainage events, even though the soil cracks were sealed on the surface at the onset of the irrigation causing the drainage. The results show that lateral infiltration of macropore flow into the soil matrix can be substantial and should not be neglected while simulating macropore flow and deep drainage in cracking soils. The results also indicate that soil cracks can remain pathways for preferential flow even after they are closed at the soil surface. The type of water application appears to have an impact on the location of crack formation, with flood irrigation favouring reappearance of cracks at previous crack locations and simulated rainfall resulting in shifting crack locations.

  14. Contribution of breathing frequency and inhalation flow rate on performance of N95 filtering facepiece respirators.

    PubMed

    Mahdavi, Alireza; Bahloul, Ali; Haghighat, Fariborz; Ostiguy, Claude

    2014-03-01

    The investigation of particle penetration through filtering facepiece respirators under cyclic flows is very necessary because cyclic flows represent actual breathing flow patterns. This article reports the development of a procedure to investigate the individual impact of breathing frequency and flow rate on the performance of N95 filtering facepiece respirators. Experiments were performed for two peak inhalation flows (PIFs; 135 and 360 l min(-1)) and two breathing frequencies [24 and 42 breaths per minute (BPM)] for a total of four cyclic flows (Flow A: 135 l min(-1) and 24 BPM; Flow B: 135 l min(-1) and 42 BPM; Flow C: 360 l min(-1) and 24 BPM; and Flow D: 360 l min(-1) and 42 BPM). Each experiment was performed using two different set-ups: the first set-up included both inhalations and exhalations through the filter media and test chamber, while with the second set-up, only inhalation flows were considered. The results showed that, for the most penetrating particle size range, an increase in both PIF and breathing frequency could potentially enhance the penetration with both set-ups; however, the effect of PIF was observed to be much more pronounced than that of frequency. The results indicated that with both set-ups, when the PIF was increased from 135 to 360 l min(-1) (for the given frequency: 24 or 42 BPM), an increase of up to 139-152% in penetration was observed. On the other hand, only a 10-16% increase in penetration occurred when the frequency was changed from 24 to 42 BPM (for a given PIF: 135 or 360 l min(-1)). This suggests that, from low to high respiratory efforts, a huge portion of penetration enhancement is due to PIF variations and only a small portion is contributed by frequency variations. PMID:24148765

  15. Performance of Improved High-Order Filter Schemes for Turbulent Flows with Shocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kotov, Dmitry Vladimirovich; Yee, Helen M C.

    2013-01-01

    The performance of the filter scheme with improved dissipation control ? has been demonstrated for different flow types. The scheme with local ? is shown to obtain more accurate results than its counterparts with global or constant ?. At the same time no additional tuning is needed to achieve high accuracy of the method when using the local ? technique. However, further improvement of the method might be needed for even more complex and/or extreme flows.

  16. Effects of Temperature, Humidity and Air Flow on Fungal Growth Rate on Loaded Ventilation Filters.

    PubMed

    Tang, W; Kuehn, T H; Simcik, Matt F

    2015-01-01

    This study compares the fungal growth ratio on loaded ventilation filters under various temperature, relative humidity (RH), and air flow conditions in a controlled laboratory setting. A new full-size commercial building ventilation filter was loaded with malt extract nutrients and conidia of Cladosporium sphaerospermum in an ASHRAE Standard 52.2 filter test facility. Small sections cut from this filter were incubated under the following conditions: constant room temperature and a high RH of 97%; sinusoidal temperature (with an amplitude of 10°C, an average of 23°C, and a period of 24 hr) and a mean RH of 97%; room temperature and step changes between 97% and 75% RH, 97% and 43% RH, and 97% and 11% RH every 12 hr. The biomass on the filter sections was measured using both an elution-culture method and by ergosterol assay immediately after loading and every 2 days up to 10 days after loading. Fungal growth was detected earlier using ergosterol content than with the elution-culture method. A student's t-test indicated that Cladosporium sphaerospermum grew better at the constant room temperature condition than at the sinusoidal temperature condition. By part-time exposure to dry environments, the fungal growth was reduced (75% and 43% RH) or even inhibited (11% RH). Additional loaded filters were installed in the wind tunnel at room temperature and an RH greater than 95% under one of two air flow test conditions: continuous air flow or air flow only 9 hr/day with a flow rate of 0.7 m(3)/s (filter media velocity 0.15 m/s). Swab tests and a tease mount method were used to detect fungal growth on the filters at day 0, 5, and 10. Fungal growth was detected for both test conditions, which indicates that when temperature and relative humidity are optimum, controlling the air flow alone cannot prevent fungal growth. In real applications where nutrients are less sufficient than in this laboratory study, fungal growth rate may be reduced under the same operating conditions.

  17. Radial Flow Fludized Filter Finds Niche as a Pretreatment System for Surface Water in Small Communities

    EPA Science Inventory

    An emerging technology called radial flow fluidized filter (R3f) has been developed as a low cost simplistic filtration technology for small communities of less than 10,000 people. Fouling is a major impediment to the sustainability of membrane technology particularly for small ...

  18. Soil pipe flow tracer experiments: 1. Connectivity and transport characteristics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Much debate has occurred in catchment hydrology regarding the connectivity of flow paths from upslope areas to catchment outlets. This study was conducted in two catchments, one with three upper branches, in a loess soil with a fragipan that fosters lateral flow and exhibits an extensive distributio...

  19. Wastewater reuse in on-site wastewater treatment: bacteria and virus movement in unsaturated flow through sand filter.

    PubMed

    Sélas, B; Lakel, A; Andres, Y; Le Cloirec, P

    2003-01-01

    In on-site wastewater treatment plants, effluents are pre-treated by septic tank and treated by soil infiltration or sand filtration systems, with unsaturated flow conditions. These systems remove efficiently carbon, nitrogen and suspended solids. But for microbial pollution, the treatment efficiency depends on the hydrodynamic behaviour and filtering media characteristics. Contamination of superficial water and groundwater due to pathogenic viruses and pathogenic bacteria is responsible for many diseases. The objective of this study is to approach the mechanisms and operating conditions to control bacteria and virus release in the environment. Experiments were carried out on reactors of different length packed with sand. Hydraulic load of 90 cm x d(-1) with a pulse periodic flow was used. The influence of chemical composition of the solution on the treatment efficiency has also been studied. For the first time, the residence time distribution (RTD) has been studied using a conservative tracer (KI), to determine the main hydrodynamic parameters. For the second time, the RTD with bacterial and viral tracers (E. coli, bacteriophage MS2) was applied, with the aim to define microbial behaviour in filtering media, including adsorption and filtration phenomena. This work allowed us to determine retardation factors according to the hydraulic loads and chemical composition.

  20. Environmental Filtering of Microbial Communities in Agricultural Soil Shifts with Crop Growth.

    PubMed

    Hargreaves, Sarah K; Williams, Ryan J; Hofmockel, Kirsten S

    2015-01-01

    Plant and soil properties cooperatively structure soil microbial communities, with implications for ecosystem functioning. However, the extent to which each factor contributes to community structuring is not fully understood. To quantify the influence of plants and soil properties on microbial diversity and composition in an agricultural context, we conducted an experiment within a corn-based annual cropping system and a perennial switchgrass cropping system across three topographic positions. We sequenced barcoded 16S ribosomal RNA genes from whole soil three times throughout a single growing season and across two years in July. To target the belowground effects of plants, we also sampled rhizosphere soil in July. We hypothesized that microbial community α-diversity and composition (β-diversity) would be more sensitive to cropping system effects (annual vs. perennial inputs) than edaphic differences among topographic positions, with greater differences occurring in the rhizosphere compared to whole soil. We found that microbial community composition consistently varied with topographic position, and cropping system and the rhizosphere influenced α-diversity. In July, cropping system and rhizosphere structured a small but specific group of microbes implying a subset of microbial taxa, rather than broad shifts in community composition, may explain previously observed differences in resource cycling between treatments. Using rank abundance analysis, we detected enrichment of Saprospirales and Actinomycetales, including cellulose and chitin degraders, in the rhizosphere soil and enrichment of Nitrospirales, Syntrophobacterales, and MND1 in the whole soil. Overall, these findings support environmental filtering for the soil microbial community first by soil and second by the rhizosphere. Across cropping systems, plants selected for a general rhizosphere community with evidence for plant-specific effects related to time of sampling.

  1. Demonstration and Analysis of Filtered Rayleigh Scattering Flow Field Diagnostic System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forkey, Joseph N.; Lempert, Walter R.; Miles, Richard B.

    1996-01-01

    Filtered Rayleigh Scattering (FRS) is a diagnostic technique which measures velocity, temperature, and pressure by determining Doppler shift, total intensity, and spectral line shape of laser induced Rayleigh-Brillouin scattering. In the work reported here, this is accomplished by using a narrow line width, injection seeded Nd-YAG laser sheet to induce Rayleigh-Brillouin scattering from a gas flow. This light is passed through an optical notch filter, and transmitted light is imaged onto an intensified charge coupled display (CCD) camera. By monitoring the grayscale value at a particular pixel while the laser frequency is tuned, the convolution between the Rayleigh-Brillouin scattering profile and the filter transmission profile is attained. Since the filter profile can be independently measured, it can be deconvolved from the measuring signal, yielding the Rayleigh-Brillouin scattering profile. From this profile, flow velocity, temperature, and pressure are determined. In this paper the construction and characterization of the optical notch filter and a newly developed frequency apparatus are discussed.

  2. Niche Filtering of Bacteria in Soil and Rock Habitats of the Colorado Plateau Desert, Utah, USA

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kevin C.; Archer, Stephen D. J.; Boyle, Rachel H.; Lacap-Bugler, Donnabella C.; Belnap, Jayne; Pointing, Stephen B.

    2016-01-01

    A common feature of microbial colonization in deserts is biological soil crusts (BSCs), and these comprise a complex community dominated by Cyanobacteria. Rock substrates, particularly sandstone, are also colonized by microbial communities. These are separated by bare sandy soil that also supports microbial colonization. Here we report a high-throughput sequencing study of BSC and cryptoendolith plus adjacent bare soil communities in the Colorado Plateau Desert, Utah, USA. Bare soils supported a community with low levels of recoverable DNA and high evenness, whilst BSC yielded relatively high recoverable DNA, and reduced evenness compared to bare soil due to specialized crust taxa. The cryptoendolithic community displayed the greatest evenness but the lowest diversity, reflecting the highly specialized nature of these communities. A strong substrate-dependent pattern of community assembly was observed, and in particular cyanobacterial taxa were distinct. Soils were virtually devoid of photoautotrophic signatures, BSC was dominated by a closely related group of Microcoleus/Phormidium taxa, whilst cryptoendolithic colonization in sandstone supported almost exclusively a single genus, Chroococcidiopsis. We interpret this as strong evidence for niche filtering of taxa in communities. Local inter-niche recruitment of photoautotrophs may therefore be limited and so communities likely depend significantly on cyanobacterial recruitment from distant sources of similar substrate. We discuss the implication of this finding in terms of conservation and management of desert microbiota. PMID:27725810

  3. The role of pressure drop and flow redistribution on modeling mercury control using sorbent injection in baghouse filters

    SciTech Connect

    Joseph R.V. Flora; Richard A. Hargis; William J. O'Dowd; Andrew Karash; Henry W. Pennline; Radisav D. Vidic

    2006-03-15

    A mathematical model based on simple cake filtration theory was coupled to a previously developed two-stage mathematical model for mercury (Hg) removal from coal combustion using powdered activated carbon injection upstream of a baghouse filter. Values of the average permeability of the filter cake and the filter resistance extracted from the model were 4.4 x 10{sup -13}m{sup 2} and 2.5 x 10{sup -4}m{sup -1}, respectively. The flow is redistributed during partial cleaning of the filter, with flows higher across the newly cleaned filter section. The calculated average Hg removal efficiency from the baghouse is lower because of the high mass flux of Hg exiting the filter in the newly cleaned section. The model shows that calculated average Hg removal is affected by permeability, filter resistance, fraction of the baghouse cleaned, and cleaning interval. 17 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. Modeling soil detachment capacity by rill flow using hydraulic parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dongdong; Wang, Zhanli; Shen, Nan; Chen, Hao

    2016-04-01

    The relationship between soil detachment capacity (Dc) by rill flow and hydraulic parameters (e.g., flow velocity, shear stress, unit stream power, stream power, and unit energy) at low flow rates is investigated to establish an accurate experimental model. Experiments are conducted using a 4 × 0.1 m rill hydraulic flume with a constant artificial roughness on the flume bed. The flow rates range from 0.22 × 10-3 m2 s-1 to 0.67 × 10-3 m2 s-1, and the slope gradients vary from 15.8% to 38.4%. Regression analysis indicates that the Dc by rill flow can be predicted using the linear equations of flow velocity, stream power, unit stream power, and unit energy. Dc by rill flow that is fitted to shear stress can be predicted with a power function equation. Predictions based on flow velocity, unit energy, and stream power are powerful, but those based on shear stress, especially on unit stream power, are relatively poor. The prediction based on flow velocity provides the best estimates of Dc by rill flow because of the simplicity and availability of its measurements. Owing to error in measuring flow velocity at low flow rates, the predictive abilities of Dc by rill flow using all hydraulic parameters are relatively lower in this study compared with the results of previous research. The measuring accuracy of experiments for flow velocity should be improved in future research.

  5. Analysis of up-flow aerated biological activated carbon filter technology in drinking water treatment.

    PubMed

    Lu, Shaoming; Liu, Jincui; Li, Shaowen; Biney, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    Problems have been found in the traditional post-positioned down-flow biological activated carbon filter (DBACF), such as microorganism leakage and low biodegradability. A pilot test was carried out to place a BACF between the sediment tank and the sand filter; a new technology of dual media up-flow aerated biological activated carbon filter (UBACF) was developed. Results showed that in terms of the new process, the up-flow mode was better than the down-flow. Compared with the DBACF, the problem of microorganism leakage could be well resolved with the UBACF process by adding disinfectant before the sand filtration, and a similar adsorption effect could be obtained. For the tested raw water, the COD(Mn) and NH3-N removal rate was 54.6% and 85.0%, respectively, similar to the waterworks with the DBACF process. The UBACF greatly enhanced oxygen supply capability and mass transfer rate via aeration, and the NH3-N removal ability was significantly improved from 1.5 mg/L to more than 3 mg/L. Influent to the UBACF with higher turbidity could be coped with through the primary filtration of the ceramisite layer combined with fluid-bed technology, which gave the carbon bed a low-turbidity environment of less than 1.0 NTU. The backwashing parameters and carbon abrasion rate of the two processes were almost the same.

  6. Model simulation and experiments of flow and mass transport through a nano-material gas filter

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Xiaofan; Zheng, Zhongquan C.; Winecki, Slawomir; Eckels, Steve

    2013-11-01

    A computational model for evaluating the performance of nano-material packed-bed filters was developed. The porous effects of the momentum and mass transport within the filter bed were simulated. For the momentum transport, an extended Ergun-type model was employed and the energy loss (pressure drop) along the packed-bed was simulated and compared with measurement. For the mass transport, a bulk dsorption model was developed to study the adsorption process (breakthrough behavior). Various types of porous materials and gas flows were tested in the filter system where the mathematical models used in the porous substrate were implemented and validated by comparing with experimental data and analytical solutions under similar conditions. Good agreements were obtained between experiments and model predictions.

  7. A Wiener-Wavelet-Based filter for de-noising satellite soil moisture retrievals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massari, Christian; Brocca, Luca; Ciabatta, Luca; Moramarco, Tommaso; Su, Chun-Hsu; Ryu, Dongryeol; Wagner, Wolfgang

    2014-05-01

    The reduction of noise in microwave satellite soil moisture (SM) retrievals is of paramount importance for practical applications especially for those associated with the study of climate changes, droughts, floods and other related hydrological processes. So far, Fourier based methods have been used for de-noising satellite SM retrievals by filtering either the observed emissivity time series (Du, 2012) or the retrieved SM observations (Su et al. 2013). This contribution introduces an alternative approach based on a Wiener-Wavelet-Based filtering (WWB) technique, which uses the Entropy-Based Wavelet de-noising method developed by Sang et al. (2009) to design both a causal and a non-causal version of the filter. WWB is used as a post-retrieval processing tool to enhance the quality of observations derived from the i) Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer for the Earth observing system (AMSR-E), ii) the Advanced SCATterometer (ASCAT), and iii) the Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) satellite. The method is tested on three pilot sites located in Spain (Remedhus Network), in Greece (Hydrological Observatory of Athens) and in Australia (Oznet network), respectively. Different quantitative criteria are used to judge the goodness of the de-noising technique. Results show that WWB i) is able to improve both the correlation and the root mean squared differences between satellite retrievals and in situ soil moisture observations, and ii) effectively separates random noise from deterministic components of the retrieved signals. Moreover, the use of WWB de-noised data in place of raw observations within a hydrological application confirms the usefulness of the proposed filtering technique. Du, J. (2012), A method to improve satellite soil moisture retrievals based on Fourier analysis, Geophys. Res. Lett., 39, L15404, doi:10.1029/ 2012GL052435 Su,C.-H.,D.Ryu, A. W. Western, and W. Wagner (2013), De-noising of passive and active microwave satellite soil moisture time

  8. A Fast Network Flow Model is used in conjunction with Measurements of Filter Permeability to calculate the Performance of Hot Gas Filters

    SciTech Connect

    VanOsdol, J.G.; Chiang, T-K.

    2002-09-19

    Two different technologies that are being considered for generating electric power on a large scale by burning coal are Pressurized Fluid Bed Combustion (PFBC) systems and Integrated Gasification and Combined Cycle (IGCC) systems. Particulate emission regulations that have been proposed for future systems may require that these systems be fitted with large scale Hot Gas Clean-Up (HGCU) filtration systems that would remove the fine particulate matter from the hot gas streams that are generated by PFBC and IGCC systems. These hot gas filtration systems are geometrically and aerodynamically complex. They typically are constructed with large arrays of ceramic candle filter elements (CFE). The successful design of these systems require an accurate assessment of the rate at which mechanical energy of the gas flow is dissipated as it passes through the filter containment vessel and the individual candle filter elements that make up the system. Because the filtration medium is typically made of a porous ceramic material having open pore sizes that are much smaller than the dimensions of the containment vessel, the filtration medium is usually considered to be a permeable medium that follows Darcy's law. The permeability constant that is measured in the lab is considered to be a function of the filtration medium only and is usually assumed to apply equally to all the filters in the vessel as if the flow were divided evenly among all the filter elements. In general, the flow of gas through each individual CFE will depend not only on the geometrical characteristics of the filtration medium, but also on the local mean flows in the filter containment vessel that a particular filter element sees. The flow inside the CFE core, through the system manifolds, and inside the containment vessel itself will be coupled to the flow in the filter medium by various Reynolds number effects. For any given filter containment vessel, since the mean flows are different in different locations

  9. High efficiency collection of fly ash in a parallel flow, moving granular bed filter. Paper 81. 64. 2

    SciTech Connect

    Sundstrom, G.; Leith, D.

    1981-01-01

    A moving granular bed filter which removes particles from hot gas streams was modified in order to reduce resuspension at the gas outlet. Cocurrent beds offer several advantages for fly ash collection, particularly large particles and agglomerates. This device is known as a parallel flow filter, as gas first flows vertically downward through a cocurrent bed, and then turns and flows vertically upward through a countercurrent bed. 15 refs.

  10. Alternative filter media for phosphorous removal in a horizontal subsurface flow constructed wetland.

    PubMed

    Vohla, Christina; Põldvere, Elar; Noorvee, Alar; Kuusemets, Valdo; Mander, Ulo

    2005-01-01

    During the study period from 1997 to 2002 the purification efficiency of phosphorus in the horizontal subsurface flow (HSSF) constructed wetland (CW) in Kodijärve, has been quite high (63-95%). However, slowly increasing trend in outlet P concentrations and decreasing annual P removal rate are obviously the indicators that show possible saturation processes in filter media. To search for potential filter media with high phosphorus sorption capacity, sorption characteristics and particle size distribution of several local sands, gravels, glauconite-sandstone, LWA, and calcareous waste products from oil-shale industry were investigated. The average P sorption capacity for best materials (crashed ash block, oil, shale fly ash and the sediment from oil shale ash plateau) was higher than 96% and estimated design capacity was around 4-5 g P kg(-1). According to results, sediment from oil shale ash plateau was considered as perspective filter media for P retention. In Summer 2002 experimental sedimentation filter, filled with the sediment from oil shale ash plateau, was installed in the outlet from the Kodijärve HSSF CW. According to preliminary results the average P removal in the sedimentation filter was 52%. PMID:15921280

  11. Laser Doppler anemometry and fibreoptical spatial filter anemometry - A comparison for the multiphase flow measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrak, D.; Haedrich, T.

    The paper presents a comparison between the fiber-optical spatial filter anemometry (FOA) and LDA for the particle velocity measurement in a two-phase flow. An LDA two beam anemometer and a differential-type optical fiber array spatial filter were used for the velocity measurements on glass particles with a mean diameter of 116 microns in a horizontal channel air flow. Two different probe pipe constructions were investigated. In general the results show that the FOA-probe signals have a low signal-to-noise ratio in comparison with the LDA-signals and that the mean FOA-particle velocity is smaller than the mean LDA-particle velocity. A FOA-system with a probe construction like a Pitot tube is preferred for the application.

  12. Revisiting Atmospheric Lead in NYC - Comparison of Archived Air Filters to Urban Park Sediments and Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chillrud, S. N.; Ross, J. M.; Yan, B.; Bopp, R.

    2015-12-01

    Urban lake sediments have the potential to be used for reconstructing history of aerosols, providing data before the start of urban air quality monitoring. In a previous study, the similarity between radionuclide and excess Pb inventories (57 g/m^2) in Central Park Lake (CPL) sediments and those same parameters in Central Park soils (CPS) was interpreted to indicate that urban lake sediment cores from CPL represent deposition of atmospheric aerosols over the history of the park, which was constructed in the 1860s. Furthermore, metal ratios and metal chronologies indicated that incineration was the major source of Pb to the NYC atmosphere over the 20th century. In this report, we compare the lake chronologies for metals to a set of archived air filters collected by the Department of Energy's Environmental Measurement Lab (EML). These weekly filters of total suspended particulates (TSP) were collected by a high volume sampler located in lower Manhattan for radionuclides as part of the program focused on documenting radioactive fallout from nuclear weapons testing. Metal concentrations measured in subsamples of the EML filters collected between the 1970s to 1990s showed Pb decreasing more slowly than the records of Pb added to gasoline. Metal ratios in the filters were similar to the ratios measured in CPL sediments; the Pb to Sn ratios were roughly 20:1 and the Pb to Zn ratios were in close to 1. The similarity of the ratios provides additional solid support that the CP Lake sediment cores reflect atmospheric inputs. The enrichment of Pb in the large aerosol particle fraction (TSP), relative to fine PM2.5 fraction, demonstrates that the resuspended NYC soils and their historical contaminant burden, are the primary, current source of Pb to NYC air.

  13. Fibrous filter efficiency and pressure drop in the viscous-inertial transition flow regime.

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez, Andres L.; Brockmann, John E.; Dellinger, Jennifer Gwynne; Lucero, Daniel A.; Hubbard, Joshua A.; Servantes, Brandon Lee

    2011-10-01

    Fibrous filter pressure drop and aerosol collection efficiency were measured at low air pressures (0.2 to 0.8 atm) and high face velocities (5 to 20 meters per second) to give fiber Reynolds numbers in the viscous-inertial transition flow regime (1 to 16). In this regime, contemporary filtration theory based on Kuwabara's viscous flow through an ensemble of fibers under-predicts single fiber impaction by several orders of magnitude. Streamline curvature increases substantially as inertial forces become dominant. Dimensionless pressure drop measurements followed the viscous-inertial theory of Robinson and Franklin rather than Darcy's linear pressure-velocity relationship (1972). Sodium chloride and iron nano-agglomerate test aerosols were used to evaluate the effects of particle density and shape factor. Total filter efficiency collapsed when plotted against the particle Stokes and fiber Reynolds numbers. Efficiencies were then fitted with an impactor type equation where the cutpoint Stokes number and a steepness parameter described data well in the sharply increasing portion of the curve (20% to 80% efficiency). The cutpoint Stokes number was a linearly decreasing function of fiber Reynolds number. Single fiber efficiencies were calculated from total filter efficiencies and compared to contemporary viscous flow impaction theory (Stechkina et al. 1969), and numerical simulations from the literature. Existing theories under-predicted measured single fiber efficiencies although the assumption of uniform flow conditions for each successive layer of fibers is questionable; the common exponential relationship between single fiber efficiency and total filter efficiency may not be appropriate in this regime.

  14. Large particle penetration through N95 respirator filters and facepiece leaks with cyclic flow.

    PubMed

    Cho, Kyungmin Jacob; Reponen, Tiina; McKay, Roy; Shukla, Rakesh; Haruta, Hiroki; Sekar, Padmini; Grinshpun, Sergey A

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate respirator filter and faceseal penetration of particles representing bacterial and fungal spore size ranges (0.7-4 mum). First, field experiments were conducted to determine workplace protection factors (WPFs) for a typical N95 filtering facepiece respirator (FFR). These data (average WPF = 515) were then used to position the FFR on a manikin to simulate realistic donning conditions for laboratory experiments. Filter penetration was also measured after the FFR was fully sealed on the manikin face. This value was deducted from the total penetration (obtained from tests with the partially sealed FFR) to determine the faceseal penetration. All manikin experiments were repeated using three sinusoidal breathing flow patterns corresponding to mean inspiratory flow rates of 15, 30, and 85 l min(-1). The faceseal penetration varied from 0.1 to 1.1% and decreased with increasing particle size (P < 0.001) and breathing rate (P < 0.001). The fractions of aerosols penetrating through the faceseal leakage varied from 0.66 to 0.94. In conclusion, even for a well-fitting FFR respirator, most particle penetration occurs through faceseal leakage, which varies with breathing flow rate and particle size.

  15. A novel retinal vessel extraction algorithm based on matched filtering and gradient vector flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Lei; Xia, Mingliang; Xuan, Li

    2013-10-01

    The microvasculature network of retina plays an important role in the study and diagnosis of retinal diseases (age-related macular degeneration and diabetic retinopathy for example). Although it is possible to noninvasively acquire high-resolution retinal images with modern retinal imaging technologies, non-uniform illumination, the low contrast of thin vessels and the background noises all make it difficult for diagnosis. In this paper, we introduce a novel retinal vessel extraction algorithm based on gradient vector flow and matched filtering to segment retinal vessels with different likelihood. Firstly, we use isotropic Gaussian kernel and adaptive histogram equalization to smooth and enhance the retinal images respectively. Secondly, a multi-scale matched filtering method is adopted to extract the retinal vessels. Then, the gradient vector flow algorithm is introduced to locate the edge of the retinal vessels. Finally, we combine the results of matched filtering method and gradient vector flow algorithm to extract the vessels at different likelihood levels. The experiments demonstrate that our algorithm is efficient and the intensities of vessel images exactly represent the likelihood of the vessels.

  16. Large particle penetration through N95 respirator filters and facepiece leaks with cyclic flow.

    PubMed

    Cho, Kyungmin Jacob; Reponen, Tiina; McKay, Roy; Shukla, Rakesh; Haruta, Hiroki; Sekar, Padmini; Grinshpun, Sergey A

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate respirator filter and faceseal penetration of particles representing bacterial and fungal spore size ranges (0.7-4 mum). First, field experiments were conducted to determine workplace protection factors (WPFs) for a typical N95 filtering facepiece respirator (FFR). These data (average WPF = 515) were then used to position the FFR on a manikin to simulate realistic donning conditions for laboratory experiments. Filter penetration was also measured after the FFR was fully sealed on the manikin face. This value was deducted from the total penetration (obtained from tests with the partially sealed FFR) to determine the faceseal penetration. All manikin experiments were repeated using three sinusoidal breathing flow patterns corresponding to mean inspiratory flow rates of 15, 30, and 85 l min(-1). The faceseal penetration varied from 0.1 to 1.1% and decreased with increasing particle size (P < 0.001) and breathing rate (P < 0.001). The fractions of aerosols penetrating through the faceseal leakage varied from 0.66 to 0.94. In conclusion, even for a well-fitting FFR respirator, most particle penetration occurs through faceseal leakage, which varies with breathing flow rate and particle size. PMID:19700488

  17. Enhanced Kalman Filtering for a 2D CFD NS Wind Farm Flow Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doekemeijer, B. M.; van Wingerden, J. W.; Boersma, S.; Pao, L. Y.

    2016-09-01

    Wind turbines are often grouped together for financial reasons, but due to wake development this usually results in decreased turbine lifetimes and power capture, and thereby an increased levelized cost of energy (LCOE). Wind farm control aims to minimize this cost by operating turbines at their optimal control settings. Most state-of-the-art control algorithms are open-loop and rely on low fidelity, static flow models. Closed-loop control relying on a dynamic model and state observer has real potential to further decrease wind's LCOE, but is often too computationally expensive for practical use. In this paper two time-efficient Kalman filter (KF) variants are outlined incorporating the medium fidelity, dynamic flow model “WindFarmSimulator” (WFSim). This model relies on a discretized set of Navier-Stokes equations in two dimensions to predict the flow in wind farms at low computational cost. The filters implemented are an Ensemble KF and an Approximate KF. Simulations in which a high fidelity simulation model represents the true wind farm show that these filters are 101 —102 times faster than a regular KF with comparable or better performance, correcting for wake dynamics that are not modeled in WFSim (noticeably, wake meandering and turbine hub effects). This is a first big step towards real-time closed-loop control for wind farms.

  18. Root-soil air gap and resistance to water flow at the soil-root interface of Robinia pseudoacacia.

    PubMed

    Liu, X P; Zhang, W J; Wang, X Y; Cai, Y J; Chang, J G

    2015-12-01

    During periods of water deficit, growing roots may shrink, retaining only partial contact with the soil. In this study, known mathematical models were used to calculate the root-soil air gap and water flow resistance at the soil-root interface, respectively, of Robinia pseudoacacia L. under different water conditions. Using a digital camera, the root-soil air gap of R. pseudoacacia was investigated in a root growth chamber; this root-soil air gap and the model-inferred water flow resistance at the soil-root interface were compared with predictions based on a separate outdoor experiment. The results indicated progressively greater root shrinkage and loss of root-soil contact with decreasing soil water potential. The average widths of the root-soil air gap for R. pseudoacacia in open fields and in the root growth chamber were 0.24 and 0.39 mm, respectively. The resistance to water flow at the soil-root interface in both environments increased with decreasing soil water potential. Stepwise regression analysis demonstrated that soil water potential and soil temperature were the best predictors of variation in the root-soil air gap. A combination of soil water potential, soil temperature, root-air water potential difference and soil-root water potential difference best predicted the resistance to water flow at the soil-root interface.

  19. Carbon black retention in saturated natural soils: Effects of flow conditions, soil surface roughness and soil organic matter.

    PubMed

    Lohwacharin, J; Takizawa, S; Punyapalakul, P

    2015-10-01

    We evaluated factors affecting the transport, retention, and re-entrainment of carbon black nanoparticles (nCBs) in two saturated natural soils under different flow conditions and input concentrations using the two-site transport model and Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM). Soil organic matter (SOM) was found to create unfavorable conditions for the retention. Despite an increased flow velocity, the relative stability of the estimated maximum retention capacity in soils may suggest that flow-induced shear stress forces were insufficient to detach nCB. The KPFM observation revealed that nCBs were retained at the grain boundary and on surface roughness, which brought about substantial discrepancy between theoretically-derived attachment efficiency factors and the ones obtained by the experiments using the two-site transport model. Thus, decreasing ionic strength and increasing solution pH caused re-entrainment of only a small fraction of retained nCB in the soil columns.

  20. Influence of soil pH in vegetative filter strips for reducing soluble nutrient transport.

    PubMed

    Rahmana, Atikur; Rahmana, Shafiqur; Cihacek, Larry

    2014-08-01

    Low efficacy of vegetative filter strips (VFS) in reducing soluble nutrients has been reported in research articles. Solubility of phosphorus and nitrogen compounds is largely affected by pH of soil. Changing soil pH may result in a decrease in soluble nutrient transportation through VFS. This study was conducted to evaluate the effect of pH levels of VFS soil on soluble nutrient transport reduction from manure-borne runoff. Soil (loamy sand texture; bulk density 1.3 g cm-3) was treated with calcium carbonate to change pH at different pH treatment levels (5.5-6.5, 6.5-7.5, and 7.5-8.5), soil was packed into galvanized metal boxes, and tall fescue grasses were established in the boxes to simulate VFS. Boxes were placed in an open environment, tilted to a 3.0% slope, and 44.0 L manure-amended water was applied through the VFS by a pump at a rate of 1.45 L min-1. Water samples were collected at the inlet and outlet as well as from the leachate. Samples were analysed for ortho-phosphorus, ammonium nitrogen, nitrate nitrogen, and potassium. Highest transport reductions in ortho-phosphorus (42.4%) and potassium (20.5%) were observed at pH range 7.5-8.5. Ammonium nitrogen transport reduction was the highest at pH level of 6.5-7.5 and was 26.1%. Surface transport reduction in nitrate nitrogen was 100%, but leachate had the highest concentration of nitrate nitrogen. Mass transport reduction also suggested that higher pH in the VFS soil are effective in reducing some soluble nutrients transport.

  1. Cross-flow, filter-sorbent catalyst for particulate, SO sub 2 and NO sub x control

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-03-01

    This synopsis describes a new concept for integrated pollutant control: a cross-flow filter comprised of layered, gas permeable membranes that act as a particulate filter, an SO{sub 2} sorbent, and a NO{sub x} reduction catalyst.

  2. Long-term durability testing of ceramic cross-flow filter. Final report, September 29, 1987--December 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Lippert, T.E.; Smeltzer, E.E.; Alvin, M.A.; Bachovchin, D.M.

    1993-08-01

    Long term durability testing of the cross flow filter is described. Two high temperature, high pressure test facilities were built and operated. The facilities were designed to simulate dirty gas environments typical of Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustion (PFBC) and coal gasification. Details of the design and operation of the test facilities and filter testing results are described.

  3. Viable viral efficiency of N95 and P100 respirator filters at constant and cyclic flow.

    PubMed

    Gardner, Paul D; Eshbaugh, Jonathan P; Harpest, Shannon D; Richardson, Aaron W; Hofacre, Kent C

    2013-01-01

    The growing threat of an influenza pandemic presents a unique challenge to healthcare workers, emergency responders, and the civilian population. The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) recommends National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH)-approved respirators to provide protection against infectious airborne viruses in various workplace settings. The filtration efficiency of selected NIOSH-approved particulate N95 and P100 filtering facepiece respirators (FFRs) and filter cartridges was investigated against the viable MS2 virus, a non-pathogenic bacteriophage, aerosolized from a liquid suspension. Tests were performed under two cyclic flow conditions (minute volumes of 85 and 135 L/min) and two constant flow rates (85 and 270 L/min). The mean penetrations of viable MS2 through the N95 and P100 FFRs/cartridges were typically less than 2 and 0.03%, respectively, under all flow conditions. All N95 and P100 FFR and cartridge models assessed in this study, therefore, met or exceeded their respective efficiency ratings of 95 and 99.97% against the viable MS2 test aerosol, even under the very high flow conditions. These NIOSH-approved FFRs and particulate respirators equipped with these cartridges can be anticipated to achieve expected levels of protection (consistent with their assigned protection factor) against airborne viral agents, provided that they are properly selected, fitted, worn, and maintained. PMID:24011377

  4. Stability of uniform vertical flow through a close porous filter in the presence of solute immobilization.

    PubMed

    Maryshev, Boris S; Lyubimova, Tatyana P

    2016-06-01

    In the present paper we consider slow filtration of a mixture through a close porous filter. The heavy solute penetrates slowly into the porous filter due to the external vertical filtration flow and diffusion. This process is accompanied by the formation of the domain with heavy fluid near the upper boundary of the filter. The developed stratification, at which the heavy fluid is located above the light fluid, is unstable. When the mass of the heavy fluid exceeds the critical value, one can observe the onset of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability. Due to the above peculiarities we can distinguish between two regimes of vertical filtration: 1) homogeneous seepage and 2) convective filtration. When considering the filtration process it is necessary to take into account the diffusion accompanied by the immobilization effect (or sorption) of the solute. The immobilization is described by the linear MIM (mobile/immobile media) model. It has been shown that the immobilization slows down the process of forming the unstable stratification. The purpose of the paper is to find the stability conditions for homogeneous vertical seepage of he solute into the close porous filter. The linear stability problem is solved using the quasi-static approach. The critical times of instability are estimated. The stability maps are plotted in the space of system parameters. The applicability of quasi-static approach is substantiated by direct numerical simulation of the full nonlinear equations. PMID:27349555

  5. Denitrification in tertiary filtration: application of an up-flow filter.

    PubMed

    Farabegoli, G; Gavasci, R; Lombardi, F; Romani, F

    2003-01-01

    The present paper shows the results obtained through an experimental work performed at the wastewater treatment plant of Rome, aimed at studying the performances of a tertiary filter regarding combined removal of suspended solids, COD, and nitrates. The up-flow sand filter was fed by the effluent coming from the secondary settling tank of the plant. The filter bed height was of 80 cm of silica sand. After a start up period, a study of particulate and soluble COD removal process was made, to establish the need of methanol in the denitrification process. Total COD removal efficiency was 60% on average, 55% due by soluble COD removal and 5% by particulate one. In the last phase of the experimental activity methanol was fed as carbon source, sodium sulfite was supplied to produce anoxic environment within the filter and the denitrification efficiency was studied. Nitrates removal rates after an acclimation period of 10 days increased up to 60%, with an effluent NO3-N of 8 mg/L. Denitrification rate was 2.4 kg/m3 d for water temperatures of 25 degrees C. Regarding methanol demand and biologic kinetics, the biomass yield coefficient was 0.3 kg(COD-X)/kg(me). Consequently 2.7 kg of methanol was required per kilogram of denitrified nitrogen.

  6. Data assimilation for unsaturated flow models with restart adaptive probabilistic collocation based Kalman filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Man, Jun; Li, Weixuan; Zeng, Lingzao; Wu, Laosheng

    2016-06-01

    The ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) has gained popularity in hydrological data assimilation problems. As a Monte Carlo based method, a sufficiently large ensemble size is usually required to guarantee the accuracy. As an alternative approach, the probabilistic collocation based Kalman filter (PCKF) employs the polynomial chaos expansion (PCE) to represent and propagate the uncertainties in parameters and states. However, PCKF suffers from the so-called "curse of dimensionality". Its computational cost increases drastically with the increasing number of parameters and system nonlinearity. Furthermore, PCKF may fail to provide accurate estimations due to the joint updating scheme for strongly nonlinear models. Motivated by recent developments in uncertainty quantification and EnKF, we propose a restart adaptive probabilistic collocation based Kalman filter (RAPCKF) for data assimilation in unsaturated flow problems. During the implementation of RAPCKF, the important parameters are identified and active PCE basis functions are adaptively selected at each assimilation step; the "restart" scheme is utilized to eliminate the inconsistency between updated model parameters and states variables. The performance of RAPCKF is systematically tested with numerical cases of unsaturated flow models. It is shown that the adaptive approach and restart scheme can significantly improve the performance of PCKF. Moreover, RAPCKF has been demonstrated to be more efficient than EnKF with the same computational cost.

  7. Performance evaluation of a ceramic cross-flow filter on a bench-scale coal gasifier, Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    Lippert, T.E.; Bachovchin, D.M.; Smeltzer, E.E.; Meyer, J.H.; Vidt, E.J.

    1989-09-01

    This final report describes work conducted on the development of the ceramic cross flow filter for high temperature gas cleaning. This work was conducted from October 1984 through December 1988. Volume 1 provides an overall discussion of the program results. Volume 2 consists of Appendices that are referenced in Volume 1. Electricity costs, flow diagrams of the gasifier, and a model which describes the cleaning of the filter is included.

  8. Large aperture focus stacking with max-gradient flow by anchored rolling filtering.

    PubMed

    Yin, Xuanwu; Wang, Guijin; Li, Wentao; Liao, Qingmin

    2016-07-10

    Focus stacking is a computational technique to extend the depth of field through combining multiple images taken at various focus distances. However, in the large aperture case, there are always defects caused by the large blur scale, which, to the best of our knowledge, has not been well studied. In our work, we propose a max-gradient flow-based method to reduce artifacts and obtain a high-quality all-in-focus image by anchored rolling filtering. First, we define a max-gradient flow to describe the gradient propagation in the stack. The points are divided into trivial and source points with this flow. The source points are extracted as true edge points and are utilized as anchors to refine the depth map and the composited all-in-focus image iteratively. The experiments show that our method can effectively suppress the incorrect depth estimations and give a high-quality all-in-focus image. PMID:27409303

  9. Results from Evaluation of Representative ASME AG-1 Section FK Radial Flow Dimple Pleated HEPA Filters Under Elevated Conditions - 12002

    SciTech Connect

    Giffin, Paxton K.; Parsons, Michael S.; Rickert, Jaime G.; Waggoner, Charles A.

    2012-07-01

    The American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) has recently added Section FK establishing requirements for radial flow HEPA filters to the Code on Nuclear Air and Gas Treatment (AG-1). Section FK filters are expected to be a major element in the HEPA filtration systems across the US Department of Energy (DOE) complex. Radial flow filters have been used in Europe for some time, however a limited amount of performance evaluation data exists with respect to these new AG-1 Section FK units. In consultation with a technical working group, the Institute for Clean Energy Technology (ICET) at Mississippi State University (MSU)has evaluated a series of representative AG-1 Section FK dimple pleated radial flow HEPA filters. The effects of elevated relative humidity and temperature conditions on these filters are particularly concerning. Results from the evaluation of Section FK filters under ambient conditions have been presented at the 2011 waste management conference. Additions to the previous test stand to enable high temperature and high humidity testing, a review of the equipment used, the steps taken to characterize the new additions, and the filter test results are presented in this study. Test filters were evaluated at a volumetric flow rate of 56.6 m{sup 3}/min (2000 cfm) and were challenged under ambient conditions with Alumina, Al(OH){sub 3}, until reaching a differential pressure of 1 kPa (4 in. w.c.), at which time the filters were tested, unchallenged with aerosol, at 54 deg. C (130 deg. F) for approximately 1 hour. At the end of that hour water was sprayed near the heat source to maximize vaporization exposing the filter to an elevated relative humidity up to 95%. Collected data include differential pressure, temperature, relative humidity, and volumetric flow rate versus time. (authors)

  10. Effect of Post-Reconstruction Gaussian Filtering on Image Quality and Myocardial Blood Flow Measurement with N-13 Ammonia PET

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyeon Sik; Cho, Sang-Geon; Kim, Ju Han; Kwon, Seong Young; Lee, Byeong-il; Bom, Hee-Seung

    2014-01-01

    Objective(s): In order to evaluate the effect of post-reconstruction Gaussian filtering on image quality and myocardial blood flow (MBF) measurement by dynamic N-13 ammonia positron emission tomography (PET), we compared various reconstruction and filtering methods with image characteristics. Methods: Dynamic PET images of three patients with coronary artery disease (male-female ratio of 2:1; age: 57, 53, and 76 years) were reconstructed, using filtered back projection (FBP) and ordered subset expectation maximization (OSEM) methods. OSEM reconstruction consisted of OSEM_2I, OSEM_4I, and OSEM_6I with 2, 4, and 6 iterations, respectively. The images, reconstructed and filtered by Gaussian filters of 5, 10, and 15 mm, were obtained, as well as non-filtered images. Visual analysis of image quality (IQ) was performed using a 3-grade scoring system by 2 independent readers, blinded to the reconstruction and filtering methods of stress images. Then, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) was calculated by noise and contrast recovery (CR). Stress and rest MBF and coronary flow reserve (CFR) were obtained for each method. IQ scores, stress and rest MBF, and CFR were compared between the methods, using Chi-square and Kruskal-Wallis tests. Results: In the visual analysis, IQ was significantly higher by 10 mm Gaussian filtering, compared to other sizes of filter (P<0.001 for both readers). However, no significant difference of IQ was found between FBP and various numbers of iteration in OSEM (P=0.923 and 0.855 for readers 1 and 2, respectively). SNR was significantly higher in 10 mm Gaussian filter. There was a significant difference in stress and rest MBF between several vascular territories. However CFR was not significantly different according to various filtering methods. Conclusion: Post-reconstruction Gaussian filtering with a filter size of 10 mm significantly enhances the IQ of N-13 ammonia PET-CT, without changing the results of CFR calculation. PMID:27408866

  11. Soil bacterial communities are shaped by temporal and environmental filtering: evidence from a long-term chronosequence.

    PubMed

    Freedman, Zachary; Zak, Donald R

    2015-09-01

    Soil microbial communities are abundant, hyper-diverse and mediate global biogeochemical cycles, but we do not yet understand the processes mediating their assembly. Current hypothetical frameworks suggest temporal (e.g. dispersal limitation) and environmental (e.g. soil pH) filters shape microbial community composition; however, there is limited empirical evidence supporting this framework in the hyper-diverse soil environment, particularly at large spatial (i.e. regional to continental) and temporal (i.e. 100 to 1000 years) scales. Here, we present evidence from a long-term chronosequence (4000 years) that temporal and environmental filters do indeed shape soil bacterial community composition. Furthermore, nearly 20 years of environmental monitoring allowed us to control for potentially confounding environmental variation. Soil bacterial communities were phylogenetically distinct across the chronosequence. We determined that temporal and environmental factors accounted for significant portions of bacterial phylogenetic structure using distance-based linear models. Environmental factors together accounted for the majority of phylogenetic structure, namely, soil temperature (19%), pH (17%) and litter carbon:nitrogen (C:N; 17%). However, of all individual factors, time since deglaciation accounted for the greatest proportion of bacterial phylogenetic structure (20%). Taken together, our results provide empirical evidence that temporal and environmental filters act together to structure soil bacterial communities across large spatial and long-term temporal scales.

  12. Performance evaluation of a ceramic cross-flow filter on a bench-scale coal gasifier

    SciTech Connect

    Ciliberti, D.F.; Lippert, T.E.

    1985-01-01

    The Department of Energy is currently sporting a program that will aid in the development of cross flow filtration technology as applied to combined cycle power generation with coal gasification. The stated overall goal is to gain information on both the operational and economic feasibility of the implementation of cross flow filtration in various gasifier options. Westinghouse has prepared a comprehensive program that will lead directly to these program goals in an efficient manner. the proposed program is composed of three major technical task. Task 1 is directed at the design and actual test of a cross flow filter at a DOE bench scale gasifier. Task 2 is composed of several smaller theoretical and experimental efforts that are intended to firm up areas where engineering and design principles are lacking or considered inadequate. The third task is intended to integrate the results of the first two tasks in a conceptual design and cost analysis such that proper economic perspective for the filter concept can be gained. A brief summary of the approach taken in the technical tasks is presented in the following discussion.

  13. Performance evaluation of a ceramic cross-flow filter on a bench-scale coal gasifier

    SciTech Connect

    Ciliberti, D.F.; Lippert, T.E.

    1985-01-01

    The Department of Energy is currently supporting a program that will aid in the development of cross flow filtration technology as applied to combined cycle power generation with coal gasification. The stated overall goal is to gain information on both the operational and economic feasibility of the implementation of cross flow filtration in various gasifier options. Westinghouse has prepared a comprehensive program that will lead directly to these program goals in an efficient manner. The proposed program is composed of three major technical tasks. Task 1 is directed at the design and actual test of a cross flow filter at a DOE bench scale gasifier. Task 2 is composed of several smaller theoretical and experimental efforts that are intended to firm up areas where engineering and design principles are lacking or considered inadequate. The third task is intended to integrate the results of the first two tasks in a conceptual design and cost analysis such that proper economic perspective for the filter concept can be gained. A brief summary of the approach taken in the technical tasks is presented in the following discussion.

  14. Performance evaluation of a ceramic cross-flow filter on a bench- scale coal gasifier

    SciTech Connect

    Ciliberti, D.F.; Lippert, T.E.

    1985-01-01

    The Department of Energy is currently supporting a program that will aid in the development of cross flow filtration technology as applied to combined cycle power generation with coal gasification. The stated overall goal is to gain information on both the operational and economic feasibility of the implementation of cross flow filtration in various gasifier options. Westinghouse has prepared a comprehensive program that will lead directly to these program goals in an efficient manner. The proposed program is composed of three major technical tasks. Task 1 is directed at the design and actual test of a cross flow filter at a DOE bench scale gasifier. Task 2 is composed of several smaller theoretical and experimental efforts that are intended to firm up areas where engineering and design principles are lacking or considered inadequate. The third task is intended to integrate the results of the first two tasks in a conceptual design and cost analysis such that proper economic perspective for the filter concept can be gained. A brief summary of the approach taken in the technical tasks is presented in the following discussion. (VC)

  15. Define and Quantify the Physics of Air Flow, Pressure Drop and Aerosol Collection in Nuclear Grade HEPA Filters

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, Murray E.

    2015-02-23

    Objective: Develop a set of peer-review and verified analytical methods to adjust HEPA filter performance to different flow rates, temperatures and altitudes. Experimental testing will measure HEPA filter flow rate, pressure drop and efficiency to verify the analytical approach. Nuclear facilities utilize HEPA (High Efficiency Particulate Air) filters to purify air flow for workspace ventilation. However, the ASME AG-1 technical standard (Code on Nuclear Air and Gas Treatment) does not adequately describe air flow measurement units for HEPA filter systems. Specifically, the AG-1 standard does not differentiate between volumetric air flow in ACFM (actual cubic feet per minute)compared to mass flow measured in SCFM (standard cubic feet per minute). More importantly, the AG-1 standard has an overall deficiency for using HEPA filter devices at different air flow rates, temperatures, and altitudes. Technical Approach: The collection efficiency and pressure drops of 18 different HEPA filters will be measured over a range of flow rates, temperatures and altitudes. The experimental results will be compared to analytical scoping calculations. Three manufacturers have allocated six HEPA filters each for this effort. The 18 filters will be tested at two different flow rates, two different temperatures and two different altitudes. The 36 total tests will be conducted at two different facilities: the ATI Test facilities (Baltimore MD) and the Los Alamos National Laboratory (Los Alamos NM). The Radiation Protection RP-SVS group at Los Alamos has an aerosol wind tunnel that was originally designed to evaluate small air samplers. In 2010, modifications were started to convert the wind tunnel for HEPA filter testing. (Extensive changes were necessary for the required aerosol generators, HEPA test fixtures, temperature control devices and measurement capabilities.) To this date, none of these modification activities have been funded through a specific DOE or NNSA program. This is

  16. A review of model applications for structured soils: a) Water flow and tracer transport.

    PubMed

    Köhne, John Maximilian; Köhne, Sigrid; Simůnek, Jirka

    2009-02-16

    Although it has many positive effects, soil structure may adversely affect the filtering function of the vadose zone that protects natural water resources from various sources of pollution. Physically based models have been developed to analyze the impacts of preferential water flow (PF) and physical non-equilibrium (PNE) solute transport on soil and water resources. This review compiles results published over the past decade on the application of such models for simulating PF and PNE non-reactive tracer transport for scales ranging from the soil column to the catchment area. Recent progress has been made in characterizing the hydraulically relevant soil structures, dynamic flow conditions, inverse parameter and uncertainty estimations, independent model parameterizations, stochastic descriptions of soil heterogeneity, and 2D or 3D extensions of PNE models. Two-region models are most widely used across all scales; as a stand-alone approach to be used up to the field scale, or as a component of distributed, larger scale models. Studies at all scales suggest that inverse identification of parameters related to PF is generally not possible based on a hydrograph alone. Information on flux-averaged and spatially distributed local resident concentrations is jointly required for quantifying PNE transport. At the column and soil profile scale, model predictions of PF are becoming increasingly realistic through the implementation of the 3D soil structure as derived from hydrogeophysical and tracer techniques. At the field scale, integrating effects of the soil structure and its spatial variability has been attempted by combining 1D PNE approaches with stochastic parameter sampling. At the catchment area scale, the scarcity of data makes validation of PF related model components a task yet to be accomplished. The quest for easily measurable proxy variables, as 'the missing link' between soil structure and model parameters, continues in order to improve the practical

  17. Effect of antecedent soil moisture on preferential flow in a texture-contrast soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardie, Marcus A.; Cotching, William E.; Doyle, Richard B.; Holz, Greg; Lisson, Shaun; Mattern, Kathrin

    2011-02-01

    SummaryThe effect of soil moisture status on preferential flow in a texture-contrast soil was investigated by applying 25 mm Brilliant Blue dye tracer to soil profiles at high and low antecedent soil moisture. Differences in soil morphology and chemistry between soil profiles had little effect on the depth of dye infiltration and dye distribution down the profile. Antecedent soil moisture strongly influenced the type, depth and rate of dye tracer movement. In the wet treatment, the dye tracer infiltrated to depths between 0.24 and 0.40 m, at an average rate of 120 mm h -1. Whilst in the dry treatment, the same volume of dye tracer infiltrated to between 0.85 and 1.19 m depth at an average rate of 1160 mm h -1. In dry antecedent conditions, finger flow developed in the A1 horizon as a result of water repellency. In the wet treatment, the wetting front developed permutations but did not break into fingers. Despite similar particle size distributions, flow in the A2 e was slower than the A1 horizon, due to the absence of macropores. In the dry treatment, the dye tracer ponded on the upper surface of the B21 horizon, which then spilled down the sides of the large clay columns as rivulets, at rates of between 2000 and 3000 mm h -1. The dye tracer accumulated at the base of the columns resulting in backfilling of the inter column shrinkage cracks, at an estimated rate of 750 mm h -1. In the subsoil, water movement occurred via shrinkage cracks which resulted in flow by-passing 99% of the soil matrix in the B21 horizon and 94% of the soil matrix in the B22 horizon. Evidence of rapid and deep infiltration in 'dry' texture-contrast soils has implications for water and solute management. This knowledge could be used to: (i) improve irrigation and fertilizer efficiency (ii) explain variations in crop yield (iii) reduce salinity through improved leaching practices, (iv) reduce the risk of agrochemicals contaminating shallow groundwater.

  18. Accumulation and filtering of nanoparticles in microchannels using electrohydrodynamically induced vortical flows.

    PubMed

    Felten, Maika; Staroske, Wolfgang; Jaeger, Magnus S; Schwille, Petra; Duschl, Claus

    2008-07-01

    We present an approach for the accumulation and filtering of nano- and microparticles in microfluidic devices that is based on the generation of electric traveling waves in the radio-frequency range. Upon application of the electric field via a microelectrode array, complex particle trajectories and particle accumulation are observed in well-defined regions in a microchannel. Through the quantitative mapping of the 3-D flow pattern using two-focus fluorescence cross-correlation spectroscopy, two vortices could be identified as one of the sources of the force field that induces the formation of particle clouds. Dielectrophoretic forces that directly act on the particles are the second source of the force field. A thorough 2-D finite element analysis identifies the electric traveling wave mechanism as the cause for the unexpected flow behavior observed. Based on these findings, strategies are discussed, first, for avoiding the vortices to optimize electrohydrodynamic micropumps and, secondly, for utilizing the vortices in the development of microdevices for efficient particle accumulation, separation, and filtering. Such devices may find numerous biomedical applications when highly diluted nano- and microsuspensions have to be processed.

  19. Coupling of stochastic moment equations and Ensemble Kalman Filter for groundwater flow data assimilation (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guadagnini, A.; Panzeri, M.; Riva, M.; Neuman, S. P.

    2013-12-01

    We embed stochastic groundwater flow moment equations (MEs) in the Ensemble Kalman Filter (EnKF) in a way that obviates the need for Monte Carlo (MC) simulation. The MEs yield approximate conditional ensemble means and covariances of hydraulic heads and fluxes in randomly heterogeneous media. Embedding these in EnKF allows updating of conductivity and head predictors as new data become available without the need for MC. The approach is well suited for cases in which real-time measurements allow sequential (as opposed to simultaneous) updating of flow parameters. We discuss and compare the accuracies and computational efficiencies of our newly proposed ME-based EnKF approach and the traditional MC-based EnKF approach for the case of a pumping well in a two-dimensional randomly heterogeneous aquifer. We analyze a number of settings and investigate the impact on parameters estimates of (a) the number of head measurements assimilated, (b) the error variance associated with head and log conductivity measurements and (c) the initial hydraulic head field. We demonstrate the computational feasibility and accuracy of our methodology and show that hydraulic conductivity estimates are more sensitive to early than to later head values, improving with increased assimilation frequency at early time. Our approach mitigates issues of filter inbreeding and spurious covariances often plaguing standard EnKF.

  20. Anaerobic treatment of cassava starch extraction wastewater using a horizontal flow filter with bamboo as support.

    PubMed

    Colin, X; Farinet, J-L; Rojas, O; Alazard, D

    2007-05-01

    Small-scale sour starch agroindustry in Colombia suffer from absence of water treatment. Although starch processing plants produce diluted wastewater, it is a source of pollution and cause environmental problems to the nearby rural population. A laboratory scale anaerobic horizontal flow filter packed with bamboo pieces was evaluated for the treatment of cassava starch extraction wastewater. The wastewater used in the experimentation was the draining water of the starch sedimentation basin. The reactor was operated for 6 months. It was inoculated with a semi-granular sludge from an anaerobic UASB reactor of a slaughterhouse. Maximum organic loading rate (OLR) applied was 11.8g COD/L d without dilution of the wastewater. At steady state and maximum OLR applied, 87% of the COD was removed and a gas productivity of 3.7L/L d was achieved. The average biogas yield was 0.36L/g COD removed. Methane content in the biogas was in the range of 69-81%. The total suspended solids (TSS) removed were 67%. The relative high lactic acid content did not negatively influence the performance of the reactor. No perturbation due to cyanide (3-5mg/L) was observed during the reactor operation. The results obtained indicated that the anaerobic horizontal flow filter could be used efficiently for the treatment of wastewater from Colombian starch processing small-scale agroindustry.

  1. Anaerobic treatment of cassava starch extraction wastewater using a horizontal flow filter with bamboo as support.

    PubMed

    Colin, X; Farinet, J-L; Rojas, O; Alazard, D

    2007-05-01

    Small-scale sour starch agroindustry in Colombia suffer from absence of water treatment. Although starch processing plants produce diluted wastewater, it is a source of pollution and cause environmental problems to the nearby rural population. A laboratory scale anaerobic horizontal flow filter packed with bamboo pieces was evaluated for the treatment of cassava starch extraction wastewater. The wastewater used in the experimentation was the draining water of the starch sedimentation basin. The reactor was operated for 6 months. It was inoculated with a semi-granular sludge from an anaerobic UASB reactor of a slaughterhouse. Maximum organic loading rate (OLR) applied was 11.8g COD/L d without dilution of the wastewater. At steady state and maximum OLR applied, 87% of the COD was removed and a gas productivity of 3.7L/L d was achieved. The average biogas yield was 0.36L/g COD removed. Methane content in the biogas was in the range of 69-81%. The total suspended solids (TSS) removed were 67%. The relative high lactic acid content did not negatively influence the performance of the reactor. No perturbation due to cyanide (3-5mg/L) was observed during the reactor operation. The results obtained indicated that the anaerobic horizontal flow filter could be used efficiently for the treatment of wastewater from Colombian starch processing small-scale agroindustry. PMID:16973355

  2. Disk filter

    DOEpatents

    Bergman, W.

    1985-01-09

    An electric disk filter provides a high efficiency at high temperature. A hollow outer filter of fibrous stainless steel forms the ground electrode. A refractory filter material is placed between the outer electrode and the inner electrically isolated high voltage electrode. Air flows through the outer filter surfaces through the electrified refractory filter media and between the high voltage electrodes and is removed from a space in the high voltage electrode.

  3. Disk filter

    DOEpatents

    Bergman, Werner

    1986-01-01

    An electric disk filter provides a high efficiency at high temperature. A hollow outer filter of fibrous stainless steel forms the ground electrode. A refractory filter material is placed between the outer electrode and the inner electrically isolated high voltage electrode. Air flows through the outer filter surfaces through the electrified refractory filter media and between the high voltage electrodes and is removed from a space in the high voltage electrode.

  4. Finite-Element Analysis of Multiphase Immiscible Flow Through Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuppusamy, T.; Sheng, J.; Parker, J. C.; Lenhard, R. J.

    1987-04-01

    A finite-element model is developed for multiphase flow through soil involving three immiscible fluids: namely, air, water, and a nonaqueous phase liquid (NAPL). A variational method is employed for the finite-element formulation corresponding to the coupled differential equations governing flow in a three-fluid phase porous medium system with constant air phase pressure. Constitutive relationships for fluid conductivities and saturations as functions of fluid pressures, which are derived in a companion paper by J. C. Parker et al. (this issue) and which may be calibrated from two-phase laboratory measurements, are employed in the finite-element program. The solution procedure uses backward time integration with iteration by a modified Picard method to handle the nonlinear properties. Laboratory experiments involving water displacement from soil columns by p cymene (a benzene-derivative hydrocarbon) under constant pressure were simulated by the finite-element program to validate the numerical model and formulation for constitutive properties. Transient water outflow predicted using independently measured saturation-capillary head data agreed with observed outflow data within the limits of precision of the predictions as estimated by a first-order Taylor series approximation considering parameter uncertainty due to experimental reproducability and constitutive model accuracy. Two-dimensional simulations are presented for a hypothetical field case involving introduction of NAPL near the soil surface due to leakage from an underground storage tank. Subsequent transport of NAPL in the variably saturated vadose and groundwater zones is analyzed.

  5. Effects of near soil surface characteristics on soil detachment by overland flow in a natural succession grassland

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Vegetation restoration probably has great effects on the process of soil detachment. This study was conducted to investigate the effects of near soil surface characteristics on soil detachment by overland flow in a 7-year naturally restored grassland. Four treatments were designed to characterize th...

  6. Similar Processes but Different Environmental Filters for Soil Bacterial and Fungal Community Composition Turnover on a Broad Spatial Scale

    PubMed Central

    Chemidlin Prévost-Bouré, Nicolas; Dequiedt, Samuel; Thioulouse, Jean; Lelièvre, Mélanie; Saby, Nicolas P. A.; Jolivet, Claudy; Arrouays, Dominique; Plassart, Pierre; Lemanceau, Philippe; Ranjard, Lionel

    2014-01-01

    Spatial scaling of microorganisms has been demonstrated over the last decade. However, the processes and environmental filters shaping soil microbial community structure on a broad spatial scale still need to be refined and ranked. Here, we compared bacterial and fungal community composition turnovers through a biogeographical approach on the same soil sampling design at a broad spatial scale (area range: 13300 to 31000 km2): i) to examine their spatial structuring; ii) to investigate the relative importance of environmental selection and spatial autocorrelation in determining their community composition turnover; and iii) to identify and rank the relevant environmental filters and scales involved in their spatial variations. Molecular fingerprinting of soil bacterial and fungal communities was performed on 413 soils from four French regions of contrasting environmental heterogeneity (LandesSoil Quality Monitoring Network to evaluate the communities’ composition turnovers. The relative importance of processes and filters was assessed by distance-based redundancy analysis. This study demonstrates significant community composition turnover rates for soil bacteria and fungi, which were dependent on the region. Bacterial and fungal community composition turnovers were mainly driven by environmental selection explaining from 10% to 20% of community composition variations, but spatial variables also explained 3% to 9% of total variance. These variables highlighted significant spatial autocorrelation of both communities unexplained by the environmental variables measured and could partly be explained by dispersal limitations. Although the identified filters and their hierarchy were dependent on the region and organism, selection was systematically based on a common group of environmental variables: pH, trophic resources, texture and land use. Spatial autocorrelation was also important at coarse (80 to

  7. Simulating nitrate leaching under winter wheat grown on a structured clay soil considering bypass flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ragab, R.; Coopers, D. M.; Harris, G. L.; Catt, J. A.

    1996-07-01

    Nitrate leaching from drained plots of structured clay soil under winter wheat is simulated for one growing season using the SOILN model. Results are compared with field measurements from two replicate plots. Soil water movement is simulated both with and without a bypass flow component using the SOIL model. Flow to field drains and soil water content in the root zone are simulated better when bypass flow is included. The results emphasise the importance of considering bypass flow in modelling leaching from structured clay soils. Simulations of nitrate leaching using the SOILN model show that the model captures the main features of the cumulative loss of nitrate over the year.

  8. Stem-root flow effect on soil-atmosphere interactions and uncertainty assessments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, Tzu-Hsien; Chen, Jen-Ping; Xue, Yongkang

    2016-04-01

    Rainfall that reaches the soil surface can rapidly move into deeper layers in the form of bulk flow through the stem-root flow mechanism. This study developed the stem-root flow parameterization scheme and coupled this scheme with the Simplified Simple Biosphere model (SSiB) to analyze its effects on land-atmospheric interactions. The SSiB model was tested in a single-column mode using the Lien Hua Chih (LHC) measurements conducted in Taiwan and HAPEX-Mobilhy (HAPEX) measurements in France. The results show that stem-root flow generally caused a decrease in soil moisture in the top soil layer and moistened the deeper soil layers. Such soil moisture redistribution results in substantial changes in heat flux exchange between land and atmosphere. In the humid environment at LHC, the stem-root flow effect on transpiration was minimal, and the main influence on energy flux was through reduced soil evaporation that led to higher soil temperature and greater sensible heat flux. In the Mediterranean environment of HAPEX, the stem-root flow substantially affected plant transpiration and soil evaporation, as well as associated changes in canopy and soil temperatures. However, the effect on transpiration could be either positive or negative depending on the relative changes in the soil moisture of the top soil vs. deeper soil layers due to stem-root flow and soil moisture diffusion processes.

  9. Subpilot scale gasifier evaluation of ceramic cross flow filter. Final report, February 1, 1988--December 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Lippert, T.E.; Alvin, M.A.; Smeltzer, E.E.; Bachovchin, D.M.; Meyer, J.H.

    1993-08-01

    The operating characteristics, performance and durability of a hot gas cross flow filter system were evaluated at the Texaco 15 tpd, entrained-bed gasifier pilot plant facility that is located at their Montebello Research Facilities (MRL) in California. A candle filter unit was also tested for comparative purposes. A wide range of operating test conditions were experienced. This report summarizes the results of eleven different test runs that occurred from April 1989 through August 1992. Differences between filter operation on the entrained gasifier and prior experience on fluid bed combustion are discussed.

  10. Determining the frequency, depth and velocity of preferential flow by high frequency soil moisture monitoring.

    PubMed

    Hardie, Marcus; Lisson, Shaun; Doyle, Richard; Cotching, William

    2013-01-01

    Preferential flow in agricultural soils has been demonstrated to result in agrochemical mobilisation to shallow ground water. Land managers and environmental regulators need simple cost effective techniques for identifying soil - land use combinations in which preferential flow occurs. Existing techniques for identifying preferential flow have a range of limitations including; often being destructive, non in situ, small sampling volumes, or are subject to artificial boundary conditions. This study demonstrated that high frequency soil moisture monitoring using a multi-sensory capacitance probe mounted within a vertically rammed access tube, was able to determine the occurrence, depth, and wetting front velocity of preferential flow events following rainfall. Occurrence of preferential flow was not related to either rainfall intensity or rainfall amount, rather preferential flow occurred when antecedent soil moisture content was below 226 mm soil moisture storage (0-70 cm). Results indicate that high temporal frequency soil moisture monitoring may be used to identify soil type - land use combinations in which the presence of preferential flow increases the risk of shallow groundwater contamination by rapid transport of agrochemicals through the soil profile. However use of high frequency based soil moisture monitoring to determine agrochemical mobilisation risk may be limited by, inability to determine the volume of preferential flow, difficulty observing macropore flow at high antecedent soil moisture content, and creation of artificial voids during installation of access tubes in stony soils. PMID:23159761

  11. Determining the frequency, depth and velocity of preferential flow by high frequency soil moisture monitoring.

    PubMed

    Hardie, Marcus; Lisson, Shaun; Doyle, Richard; Cotching, William

    2013-01-01

    Preferential flow in agricultural soils has been demonstrated to result in agrochemical mobilisation to shallow ground water. Land managers and environmental regulators need simple cost effective techniques for identifying soil - land use combinations in which preferential flow occurs. Existing techniques for identifying preferential flow have a range of limitations including; often being destructive, non in situ, small sampling volumes, or are subject to artificial boundary conditions. This study demonstrated that high frequency soil moisture monitoring using a multi-sensory capacitance probe mounted within a vertically rammed access tube, was able to determine the occurrence, depth, and wetting front velocity of preferential flow events following rainfall. Occurrence of preferential flow was not related to either rainfall intensity or rainfall amount, rather preferential flow occurred when antecedent soil moisture content was below 226 mm soil moisture storage (0-70 cm). Results indicate that high temporal frequency soil moisture monitoring may be used to identify soil type - land use combinations in which the presence of preferential flow increases the risk of shallow groundwater contamination by rapid transport of agrochemicals through the soil profile. However use of high frequency based soil moisture monitoring to determine agrochemical mobilisation risk may be limited by, inability to determine the volume of preferential flow, difficulty observing macropore flow at high antecedent soil moisture content, and creation of artificial voids during installation of access tubes in stony soils.

  12. Baleen wear reveals intraoral water flow patterns of mysticete filter feeding.

    PubMed

    Werth, Alexander J; Straley, Janice M; Shadwick, Robert E

    2016-04-01

    A survey of macroscopic and microscopic wear patterns in the baleen of eight whale species (Cetacea: Mysticeti) discloses structural, functional, and life history properties of this neomorphic keratinous tissue, including evidence of intraoral water flow patterns involved in filter feeding. All baleen demonstrates wear, particularly on its medial and ventral edges, as flat outer layers of cortical keratin erode to reveal horn tubes, also of keratin, which emerge as hair-like fringes. This study quantified five additional categories of specific wear: pitting of plates, scratching of plates, scuffing of fringes, shortening of fringes, and reorientation of fringes (including fringes directed between plates to the exterior of the mouth). Blue whale baleen showed the most pitting and sei whale baleen the most scratching; gray whale baleen had the most fringe wear. The location of worn baleen within the mouth suggests that direct contact with the tongue is not responsible for most wear, and that flowing water as well as abrasive prey or sediment carried by the flowing water likely causes pitting and scratching of plates as well as fringe fraying, scuffing, shortening, and reorientation. Baleen also has elevated vertical and horizontal ridges that are unrelated to wear; these are probably related to growth and may allow for age determination. PMID:26825852

  13. Baleen wear reveals intraoral water flow patterns of mysticete filter feeding.

    PubMed

    Werth, Alexander J; Straley, Janice M; Shadwick, Robert E

    2016-04-01

    A survey of macroscopic and microscopic wear patterns in the baleen of eight whale species (Cetacea: Mysticeti) discloses structural, functional, and life history properties of this neomorphic keratinous tissue, including evidence of intraoral water flow patterns involved in filter feeding. All baleen demonstrates wear, particularly on its medial and ventral edges, as flat outer layers of cortical keratin erode to reveal horn tubes, also of keratin, which emerge as hair-like fringes. This study quantified five additional categories of specific wear: pitting of plates, scratching of plates, scuffing of fringes, shortening of fringes, and reorientation of fringes (including fringes directed between plates to the exterior of the mouth). Blue whale baleen showed the most pitting and sei whale baleen the most scratching; gray whale baleen had the most fringe wear. The location of worn baleen within the mouth suggests that direct contact with the tongue is not responsible for most wear, and that flowing water as well as abrasive prey or sediment carried by the flowing water likely causes pitting and scratching of plates as well as fringe fraying, scuffing, shortening, and reorientation. Baleen also has elevated vertical and horizontal ridges that are unrelated to wear; these are probably related to growth and may allow for age determination.

  14. Design of jitter compensation algorithm for robot vision based on optical flow and Kalman filter.

    PubMed

    Wang, B R; Jin, Y L; Shao, D L; Xu, Y

    2014-01-01

    Image jitters occur in the video of the autonomous robot moving on bricks road, which will reduce robot operation precision based on vision. In order to compensate the image jitters, the affine transformation kinematics were established for obtaining the six image motion parameters. The feature point pair detecting method was designed based on Eigen-value of the feature windows gradient matrix, and the motion parameters equation was solved using the least square method and the matching point pairs got based on the optical flow. The condition number of coefficient matrix was proposed to quantificationally analyse the effect of matching errors on parameters solving errors. Kalman filter was adopted to smooth image motion parameters. Computing cases show that more point pairs are beneficial for getting more precise motion parameters. The integrated jitters compensation software was developed with feature points detecting in subwindow. And practical experiments were conducted on two mobile robots. Results show that the compensation costing time is less than frame sample time and Kalman filter is valid for robot vision jitters compensation. PMID:24600320

  15. Chemical cleaning of porous stainless steel cross-flow filter elements for nuclear waste applications

    SciTech Connect

    Billing, Justin M.; Daniel, Richard C.; Hallen, Richard T.; Schonewill, Philip P.; Shimskey, Rick W.; Peterson, Reid A.

    2011-05-10

    The Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) currently under construction for treatment of High-Level Waste (HLW) at the Hanford Site will rely on cross-flow ultrafiltration to provide solids-liquid separation as a core part of the treatment process. To optimize process throughput, periodic chemical cleaning of the porous stainless steel filter elements has been incorporated into the design of the plant. It is currently specified that chemical cleaning with nitric acid will occur after significant irreversible membrane fouling is observed. Irreversible fouling is defined as fouling that cannot be removed by backpulsing the filter. PNNL has investigated chemical cleaning processes as part of integrated tests with HLW simulants and with actual Hanford tank wastes. To quantify the effectiveness of chemical cleaning, the residual membrane resistance after cleaning was compared against the initial membrane resistance for each test in a series of long-term fouling tests. The impact of the small amount of residual resistance in these tests could not be separated from other parameters and the historical benchmark of >1 GPM/ft2 for clean water flux was determined to be an adequate metric for chemical cleaning. Using the results from these tests, a process optimization strategy is presented suggesting that for the simulant material under test, the value of chemical cleaning may be suspect. The period of enhanced filtration may not be enough to offset the down time required for chemical cleaning, without respect to the other associated costs.

  16. Design of jitter compensation algorithm for robot vision based on optical flow and Kalman filter.

    PubMed

    Wang, B R; Jin, Y L; Shao, D L; Xu, Y

    2014-01-01

    Image jitters occur in the video of the autonomous robot moving on bricks road, which will reduce robot operation precision based on vision. In order to compensate the image jitters, the affine transformation kinematics were established for obtaining the six image motion parameters. The feature point pair detecting method was designed based on Eigen-value of the feature windows gradient matrix, and the motion parameters equation was solved using the least square method and the matching point pairs got based on the optical flow. The condition number of coefficient matrix was proposed to quantificationally analyse the effect of matching errors on parameters solving errors. Kalman filter was adopted to smooth image motion parameters. Computing cases show that more point pairs are beneficial for getting more precise motion parameters. The integrated jitters compensation software was developed with feature points detecting in subwindow. And practical experiments were conducted on two mobile robots. Results show that the compensation costing time is less than frame sample time and Kalman filter is valid for robot vision jitters compensation.

  17. Design of Jitter Compensation Algorithm for Robot Vision Based on Optical Flow and Kalman Filter

    PubMed Central

    Wang, B. R.; Jin, Y. L.; Shao, D. L.; Xu, Y.

    2014-01-01

    Image jitters occur in the video of the autonomous robot moving on bricks road, which will reduce robot operation precision based on vision. In order to compensate the image jitters, the affine transformation kinematics were established for obtaining the six image motion parameters. The feature point pair detecting method was designed based on Eigen-value of the feature windows gradient matrix, and the motion parameters equation was solved using the least square method and the matching point pairs got based on the optical flow. The condition number of coefficient matrix was proposed to quantificationally analyse the effect of matching errors on parameters solving errors. Kalman filter was adopted to smooth image motion parameters. Computing cases show that more point pairs are beneficial for getting more precise motion parameters. The integrated jitters compensation software was developed with feature points detecting in subwindow. And practical experiments were conducted on two mobile robots. Results show that the compensation costing time is less than frame sample time and Kalman filter is valid for robot vision jitters compensation. PMID:24600320

  18. Fuzzy State Transition and Kalman Filter Applied in Short-Term Traffic Flow Forecasting

    PubMed Central

    Ming-jun, Deng; Shi-ru, Qu

    2015-01-01

    Traffic flow is widely recognized as an important parameter for road traffic state forecasting. Fuzzy state transform and Kalman filter (KF) have been applied in this field separately. But the studies show that the former method has good performance on the trend forecasting of traffic state variation but always involves several numerical errors. The latter model is good at numerical forecasting but is deficient in the expression of time hysteretically. This paper proposed an approach that combining fuzzy state transform and KF forecasting model. In considering the advantage of the two models, a weight combination model is proposed. The minimum of the sum forecasting error squared is regarded as a goal in optimizing the combined weight dynamically. Real detection data are used to test the efficiency. Results indicate that the method has a good performance in terms of short-term traffic forecasting. PMID:26779258

  19. Fuzzy State Transition and Kalman Filter Applied in Short-Term Traffic Flow Forecasting.

    PubMed

    Deng, Ming-jun; Qu, Shi-ru

    2015-01-01

    Traffic flow is widely recognized as an important parameter for road traffic state forecasting. Fuzzy state transform and Kalman filter (KF) have been applied in this field separately. But the studies show that the former method has good performance on the trend forecasting of traffic state variation but always involves several numerical errors. The latter model is good at numerical forecasting but is deficient in the expression of time hysteretically. This paper proposed an approach that combining fuzzy state transform and KF forecasting model. In considering the advantage of the two models, a weight combination model is proposed. The minimum of the sum forecasting error squared is regarded as a goal in optimizing the combined weight dynamically. Real detection data are used to test the efficiency. Results indicate that the method has a good performance in terms of short-term traffic forecasting. PMID:26779258

  20. Fuzzy State Transition and Kalman Filter Applied in Short-Term Traffic Flow Forecasting.

    PubMed

    Deng, Ming-jun; Qu, Shi-ru

    2015-01-01

    Traffic flow is widely recognized as an important parameter for road traffic state forecasting. Fuzzy state transform and Kalman filter (KF) have been applied in this field separately. But the studies show that the former method has good performance on the trend forecasting of traffic state variation but always involves several numerical errors. The latter model is good at numerical forecasting but is deficient in the expression of time hysteretically. This paper proposed an approach that combining fuzzy state transform and KF forecasting model. In considering the advantage of the two models, a weight combination model is proposed. The minimum of the sum forecasting error squared is regarded as a goal in optimizing the combined weight dynamically. Real detection data are used to test the efficiency. Results indicate that the method has a good performance in terms of short-term traffic forecasting.

  1. Investigations on phosphorus recovery and reuse as soil amendment from electric arc furnace slag filters.

    PubMed

    Bird, Simon C; Drizo, Aleksandra

    2009-11-01

    Electric arc furnace (EAF) steel slag has been identified as an effective filter material for the removal of phosphorus (P) from both point and non-point sources. To determine the feasibility of land-applying P saturated EAF steel slag this study was undertaken to investigate (i) saturated EAF steel slag material's potential as a P fertilizer or soil amendment and (ii) P desorption and metals leachate from saturated EAF steel slag material to surface runoff. Medicago sativa (alfalfa) was planted in a nutrient depleted washed sand media. Phosphorus was added either as saturated EAF steel slag or as a standard commercial phosphate fertilizer in order to assess the plant availability of the P from saturated EAF steel slag. Four different P application levels were tested: a low (20 lbs acre furrow slice(-1) (5.5 g P m(-3))) two medium (40 and 60 lbs. acre f.s.(-1) (11 and 16.5 g P m(-3))) and a high (120 lbs. acre f.s.(-1) (33 g P m(-3))). The above-ground biomass of half of the plants was harvested after 5 weeks and the second half at 10 weeks. All treatments regardless of the P source used showed high rates of germination. At the first harvest period (5 weeks) significantly higher above-ground biomass (p < 0.01) was seen at the 3 highest P amendment rates in treatments with triple super phosphate fertilizer (TSP) than with EAF steel slag. However, by the second harvest (10 weeks) only the highest amendment rate of TSP showed a significantly higher amount of biomass (p < 0.01), suggesting that EAF steel slag might be an effective slow release P source. In a second experiment, a rain simulator was used to assess desorption of DRP, TP and metals from a saturated and semi-saturated EAF steel slag. The results revealed that the total amounts of DRP and TP released to surface runoff from EAF steel slag were negligible when compared to the total quantities of P retained by this material. Overall the results from this study demonstrated that once the EAF steel slag filter

  2. Investigations on phosphorus recovery and reuse as soil amendment from electric arc furnace slag filters.

    PubMed

    Bird, Simon C; Drizo, Aleksandra

    2009-11-01

    Electric arc furnace (EAF) steel slag has been identified as an effective filter material for the removal of phosphorus (P) from both point and non-point sources. To determine the feasibility of land-applying P saturated EAF steel slag this study was undertaken to investigate (i) saturated EAF steel slag material's potential as a P fertilizer or soil amendment and (ii) P desorption and metals leachate from saturated EAF steel slag material to surface runoff. Medicago sativa (alfalfa) was planted in a nutrient depleted washed sand media. Phosphorus was added either as saturated EAF steel slag or as a standard commercial phosphate fertilizer in order to assess the plant availability of the P from saturated EAF steel slag. Four different P application levels were tested: a low (20 lbs acre furrow slice(-1) (5.5 g P m(-3))) two medium (40 and 60 lbs. acre f.s.(-1) (11 and 16.5 g P m(-3))) and a high (120 lbs. acre f.s.(-1) (33 g P m(-3))). The above-ground biomass of half of the plants was harvested after 5 weeks and the second half at 10 weeks. All treatments regardless of the P source used showed high rates of germination. At the first harvest period (5 weeks) significantly higher above-ground biomass (p < 0.01) was seen at the 3 highest P amendment rates in treatments with triple super phosphate fertilizer (TSP) than with EAF steel slag. However, by the second harvest (10 weeks) only the highest amendment rate of TSP showed a significantly higher amount of biomass (p < 0.01), suggesting that EAF steel slag might be an effective slow release P source. In a second experiment, a rain simulator was used to assess desorption of DRP, TP and metals from a saturated and semi-saturated EAF steel slag. The results revealed that the total amounts of DRP and TP released to surface runoff from EAF steel slag were negligible when compared to the total quantities of P retained by this material. Overall the results from this study demonstrated that once the EAF steel slag filter

  3. Real-time groundwater flow modeling with the Ensemble Kalman Filter: Joint estimation of states and parameters and the filter inbreeding problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendricks Franssen, H. J.; Kinzelbach, W.

    2008-09-01

    Real-time groundwater flow modeling with filter methods is interesting for dynamical groundwater flow systems, for which measurement data in real-time are available. The Ensemble Kalman Filter (EnKF) approach is used here to update states together with parameters by adopting an augmented state vector approach. The performance of EnKF is investigated in a synthetic study with a two-dimensional transient groundwater flow model where (1) only the recharge rate is spatiotemporally variable, (2) only transmissivity is spatially variable with σlnT2 = 1.0 or (3) with σlnT2 = 2.7, and (4) both recharge rate and transmissivity are uncertain (a combination of (1) and (3)). The performance of EnKF for simultaneous state and parameter estimation in saturated groundwater flow problems is investigated in dependence of the number of stochastic realizations, the updating frequency and updating intensity of log-transmissivity, the amount of measurements in space and time, and the method (iterative versus noniterative EnKF), among others. Satisfactory results were also obtained if both transmissivity and recharge rate were uncertain. However, it was found that filter inbreeding is much more severe if hydraulic heads and transmissivities are jointly updated than if only hydraulic heads are updated. The filter inbreeding problem was investigated in more detail and could be strongly reduced with help of a damping parameter, which limits the intensity of the perturbation of the log-transmissivity field. An additional reduction of filter inbreeding could be achieved by combining two measures: (1) inflating the elements of the predicted state covariance matrix on the basis of a comparison between the model uncertainty and the observed errors at the measurement points and (2) starting the flow simulations with a very large number of realizations and then sampling the desired number of realizations after one simulation time step by minimizing the differences between the local cpdfs (and

  4. Soil pipe flow tracer experiments: 2. Application of a transient storage zone model

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil pipes, defined here as discrete preferential flow paths generally parallel to the slope, are important subsurface flow pathways that play a role in many soil erosion phenomena. However, limited research has been performed on quantifying and characterizing their flow and transport characteristic...

  5. Flow Cell Sampling Technique: A new approach to analyze physical soil and particle surface properties of undisturbed soil samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krueger, Jiem; Leue, Martin; Heinze, Stefanie; Bachmann, Jörg

    2016-04-01

    During unsaturated water conditions, water flow occurs in the soil mainly by water film flow and depends on moisture content and pore surface properties. More attention is attributed to coatings enclosing soil particles and thus may affect wetting properties as well as hydraulic soil functions. Particle coatings are most likely responsible for many adsorption processes and are expected to favor local heterogeneous microstructure with enhanced biological activity. Many of the effects described cannot be detected on the basis of conventional soil column experiments, which were usually made to study soil hydraulic processes or surface - soil solution exchange processes. The general objective of this study was to develop a new field sampling method to unravel heterogeneous flow processes on small scales in an undisturbed soil under controlled lab conditions. This will be done by using modified flow cells (Plexiglas). Beside the measurements within a flow cell as breakthrough curves, the developed technique has several additional advantages in contrast to common columns or existing flow chamber/cell designs. The direct modification from the sampling frame to the flow cell provides the advantage to combine several analyses. The new technique enables to cut up to 5 thin undisturbed soil slices (quasi-replicates) down to 10 and/or 5 mm. Relative large particles, for instance, may limit this sampling method. The large observation area of up to 150 cm2 allows the characterization of particle surface properties in a high spatial resolution within an undisturbed soil sample. This sampling technique, as shown in our study, has the opportunity to link soil wetting hydraulic and several particle surface properties to spatial soil heterogeneities. This was shown with tracer experiments, small-scale contact angle measurements and analyses of the spatial distribution of functional groups of soil organic matter via DRIFT mapping.

  6. Vegetative filter strips efficiency controlling soil loss and trapping herbicides in two olive orchards at the short-term

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Luna, Elena; Guzmán, Gema; Gómez, José A.

    2014-05-01

    The optimization of water use in a semi-arid climate is based on an optimal use of rainwater adopting management practices that prevent and/or control runoff. This is a key point for increasing the economic and environmental sustainability of agriculture due to the minimization of diffuse pollution associated to runoff and to sediment and chemical transport. One strategy is the establishment of vegetative filters strips that prevent pesticides (Stehle et al. 2011), herbicides (Vianello et al. 2005), fertilizers (Withers et al. 2009) and runoff-sediment (Campo-Bescós et al. 2013) from entering streams or surface water reservoirs. To evaluate the short-term risks associated with the use of herbicides a trial was designed in two olive groves located in Benacazón (Sevilla) and Cabra (Córdoba) both with an average steepness of 11%. Two different management systems were evaluated, bare soil and bare soil with vegetative filter strips. Pre-emergence herbicides were applied and analysed at the beginning of the trial by chromatography GC-MS and after each rainfall event both in soil and sediment. Runoff and soil losses were measured, as well. The results obtained from this study show that soil management practices such as, the use of vegetative filter strips results in a reduction of soil losses and runoff. This it is translated in the improvement of soil quality and a reduction of water pollution caused by the use of herbicides. This information will improve the understanding of insufficiently known aspects and it will help to increase the knowledge for a better implementation of sustainable management practices at a farm scale and at larger temporal scale. References: Campo-Bescós, M. A., Muñoz-Carpena, R., & Kiker, G. (2013) Influencia del suelo en la eficiencia de la implantación de filtros verdes en un distrito de riego por superficie en medio árido. En Estudios de la Zona no Saturada del Suelo, Vol. XI: 183-187. Stehle, S., Elsaesser, D., Gregoire, C., Imfeld

  7. Water Filters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    A compact, lightweight electrolytic water filter generates silver ions in concentrations of 50 to 100 parts per billion in the water flow system. Silver ions serve as effective bactericide/deodorizers. Ray Ward requested and received from NASA a technical information package on the Shuttle filter, and used it as basis for his own initial development, a home use filter.

  8. Retention of pharmaceutical residues and microorganisms at the Altendorf retention soil filter.

    PubMed

    Christoffels, E; Mertens, F M; Kistemann, T; Schreiber, C

    2014-01-01

    A study has been conducted on a retention soil filter (RSF) to test its effectiveness in removing pharmaceutical residues and microorganisms from combined sewer overflows (CSOs). Efficient removal of solids, nutrients and heavy metals has already been proven. The possibility that organic micropollutants and microorganisms are also retained by the use of RSFs has been identified, but data are lacking. Results obtained in this study, in which testing for removal by a RSF of numerous micro-pollutant substances was performed, are most promising. The pharmaceuticals diclofenac and ibuprofen are presented in detail as examples of such micropollutants. Both showed a reduction in positive samples of more than 55% as well as a significant reduction in median and maximum concentrations. For microorganisms such as Escherichia coli, coliphages and Giardia lamblia (cysts), an average reduction in concentrations by three logarithmic steps (99.9%) was achieved. These results add to the evidence that using a RSF in the advanced treatment of wastewater from CSOs reduces the exposure of water-courses to pharmaceutical residues and microbial contamination. PMID:25401314

  9. Improving Simulated Soil Moisture Fields Through Assimilation of AMSR-E Soil Moisture Retrievals with an Ensemble Kalman Filter and a Mass Conservation Constraint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Bailing; Toll, David; Zhan, Xiwu; Cosgrove, Brian

    2011-01-01

    Model simulated soil moisture fields are often biased due to errors in input parameters and deficiencies in model physics. Satellite derived soil moisture estimates, if retrieved appropriately, represent the spatial mean of soil moisture in a footprint area, and can be used to reduce model bias (at locations near the surface) through data assimilation techniques. While assimilating the retrievals can reduce model bias, it can also destroy the mass balance enforced by the model governing equation because water is removed from or added to the soil by the assimilation algorithm. In addition, studies have shown that assimilation of surface observations can adversely impact soil moisture estimates in the lower soil layers due to imperfect model physics, even though the bias near the surface is decreased. In this study, an ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) with a mass conservation updating scheme was developed to assimilate the actual value of Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer (AMSR-E) soil moisture retrievals to improve the mean of simulated soil moisture fields by the Noah land surface model. Assimilation results using the conventional and the mass conservation updating scheme in the Little Washita watershed of Oklahoma showed that, while both updating schemes reduced the bias in the shallow root zone, the mass conservation scheme provided better estimates in the deeper profile. The mass conservation scheme also yielded physically consistent estimates of fluxes and maintained the water budget. Impacts of model physics on the assimilation results are discussed.

  10. Stem-root flow effect on soil-atmosphere interactions and uncertainty assessments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, T.-H.; Chen, J.-P.; Xue, Y.

    2015-11-01

    Soil water can rapidly enter deeper layers via vertical redistribution of soil water through the stem-root flow mechanism. This study develops the stem-root flow parameterization scheme and coupled this scheme with the Simplified Simple Biosphere model (SSiB) to analyze its effects on land-atmospheric interactions. The SSiB model was tested in a single column mode using the Lien Hua Chih (LHC) measurements conducted in Taiwan and HAPEX-Mobilhy (HAPEX) measurements in France. The results show that stem-root flow generally caused a decrease in the moisture content at the top soil layer and moistened the deeper soil layers. Such soil moisture redistribution results in significant changes in heat flux exchange between land and atmosphere. In the humid environment at LHC, the stem-root flow effect on transpiration was minimal, and the main influence on energy flux was through reduced soil evaporation that led to higher soil temperature and greater sensible heat flux. In the Mediterranean environment of HAPEX, the stem-root flow significantly affected plant transpiration and soil evaporation, as well as associated changes in canopy and soil temperatures. However, the effect on transpiration could either be positive or negative depending on the relative changes in the moisture content of the top soil vs. deeper soil layers due to stem-root flow and soil moisture diffusion processes.

  11. Flow Cytometric Assessment of Bacterial Abundance in Soils, Sediments and Sludge.

    PubMed

    Frossard, Aline; Hammes, Frederik; Gessner, Mark O

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial abundance is a fundamental measure in microbiology, but its assessment is often tedious, especially for soil, and sediment samples. To overcome this limitation, we adopted a time-efficient flow-cytometric (FCM) counting method involving cell detachment and separation from matrix particles by centrifugation in tubes receiving sample suspensions and Histodenz(®) solution. We used this approach to assess bacterial abundances in diverse soils (natural and agricultural), sediments (streams and lakes) and sludge from sand-filters in a drinking water treatment plant and compared the results to bacterial abundances determined by two established methods, epifluorescence microscopy (EM) and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) quantification. Cell abundances determined by FCM and EM correlated fairly well, although absolute cell abundances were generally lower when determined by FCM. FCM also showed significant relations with cell counts converted from ATP concentrations, although estimates derived from ATP determinations were typically higher, indicating the presence of ATP sources other than bacteria. Soil and sediment organic matter (OM) content influenced the goodness of fit between counts obtained with EM and FCM. In particular, bacterial abundance determined by FCM in samples containing less than 10% OM, such as stream sediment, was particularly well correlated with the cell counts assessed by EM. Overall, these results suggest that FCM following cell detachment and purification is a useful approach to increase sample throughput for determining bacterial abundances in soils, sediments and sludge. However, notable scatter and only partial concordance among the FCM and reference methods suggests that protocols require further improvement for assessments requiring high precision, especially when OM contents in samples are high.

  12. Flow Cytometric Assessment of Bacterial Abundance in Soils, Sediments and Sludge

    PubMed Central

    Frossard, Aline; Hammes, Frederik; Gessner, Mark O.

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial abundance is a fundamental measure in microbiology, but its assessment is often tedious, especially for soil, and sediment samples. To overcome this limitation, we adopted a time-efficient flow-cytometric (FCM) counting method involving cell detachment and separation from matrix particles by centrifugation in tubes receiving sample suspensions and Histodenz® solution. We used this approach to assess bacterial abundances in diverse soils (natural and agricultural), sediments (streams and lakes) and sludge from sand-filters in a drinking water treatment plant and compared the results to bacterial abundances determined by two established methods, epifluorescence microscopy (EM) and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) quantification. Cell abundances determined by FCM and EM correlated fairly well, although absolute cell abundances were generally lower when determined by FCM. FCM also showed significant relations with cell counts converted from ATP concentrations, although estimates derived from ATP determinations were typically higher, indicating the presence of ATP sources other than bacteria. Soil and sediment organic matter (OM) content influenced the goodness of fit between counts obtained with EM and FCM. In particular, bacterial abundance determined by FCM in samples containing less than 10% OM, such as stream sediment, was particularly well correlated with the cell counts assessed by EM. Overall, these results suggest that FCM following cell detachment and purification is a useful approach to increase sample throughput for determining bacterial abundances in soils, sediments and sludge. However, notable scatter and only partial concordance among the FCM and reference methods suggests that protocols require further improvement for assessments requiring high precision, especially when OM contents in samples are high. PMID:27379043

  13. Flow Cytometric Assessment of Bacterial Abundance in Soils, Sediments and Sludge.

    PubMed

    Frossard, Aline; Hammes, Frederik; Gessner, Mark O

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial abundance is a fundamental measure in microbiology, but its assessment is often tedious, especially for soil, and sediment samples. To overcome this limitation, we adopted a time-efficient flow-cytometric (FCM) counting method involving cell detachment and separation from matrix particles by centrifugation in tubes receiving sample suspensions and Histodenz(®) solution. We used this approach to assess bacterial abundances in diverse soils (natural and agricultural), sediments (streams and lakes) and sludge from sand-filters in a drinking water treatment plant and compared the results to bacterial abundances determined by two established methods, epifluorescence microscopy (EM) and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) quantification. Cell abundances determined by FCM and EM correlated fairly well, although absolute cell abundances were generally lower when determined by FCM. FCM also showed significant relations with cell counts converted from ATP concentrations, although estimates derived from ATP determinations were typically higher, indicating the presence of ATP sources other than bacteria. Soil and sediment organic matter (OM) content influenced the goodness of fit between counts obtained with EM and FCM. In particular, bacterial abundance determined by FCM in samples containing less than 10% OM, such as stream sediment, was particularly well correlated with the cell counts assessed by EM. Overall, these results suggest that FCM following cell detachment and purification is a useful approach to increase sample throughput for determining bacterial abundances in soils, sediments and sludge. However, notable scatter and only partial concordance among the FCM and reference methods suggests that protocols require further improvement for assessments requiring high precision, especially when OM contents in samples are high. PMID:27379043

  14. Application of Filtered Spherical Harmonics Radiation Transport to High-Speed Reactive Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houim, Ryan; Oran, Elaine

    2015-11-01

    Radiative heat transfer is an important, but often neglected, process in high-speed reacting and multiphase flow applications. Some scenarios, such as dust explosions in coal mines, can have regions that are nearly transparent and other regions with high dust concentration that are optically thick. Most approximations to the radiative transfer equation (RTE) are not valid in both limits simultaneously. Issues also arise when solving approximations to the RTE that can often require the solution of elliptic equations. Many compressible hydrodynamic codes use explicit time-marching and block-structured adaptive-mesh-refinement algorithms. Adapting these codes to solve elliptic equations is not always straightforward. Recently, filtered spherical harmonics (FPN) approximations to the RTE have been developed. The FPN equations are hyperbolic and, as a result, can be solved using algorithms that are similar Godunov's method for compressible fluid flow. The FPN model is also valid in optically thick and thin situations provided that the order, N, is high enough. We show that the FPN equations are a promising alternative to traditional RTE approximations. Challenging test cases that involve both free-streaming and optically thick regions will be presented.

  15. Simplified groundwater flow modeling: an application of Kalman filter based identification

    SciTech Connect

    Pimentel, K.D.; Candy, J.V.; Azevedo, S.G.; Doerr, T.A.

    1980-05-01

    The need exists for methods to simplify groundwater contaminant transport models. Reduced-order models are needed in risk assessments for licensing and regulating long-term nuclear waste repositories. Such models will be used in Monte Carlo simulations to generate probabilities of nuclear waste migration in aquifers at candidate repository sites in the United States. In this feasibility study we focused on groundwater flow rather than contaminant transport because the flow problem is more simple. A pump-drawdown test is modeled with a reduced-order set of ordinary differential equations obtained by differencing the partial differential equation. We determined the accuracy of the reduced model by comparing it with the analytic solution for the drawdown test. We established an accuracy requirement of 2% error at the single observation well and found that a model with only 21 states satisfied that criterion. That model was used in an extended Kalman filter with synthesized measurement data from one observation well to identify transmissivity within 1% error and storage coefficient within 10% error. We used several statistical tests to assess the performance of the estimator/identifier and found it to be satisfactory for this application.

  16. Assessing the fate of biodegradable volatile organic contaminants in unsaturated soil filter systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thullner, Martin; de Biase, Cecilia; Hanzel, Joanna; Reger, Daniel; Wick, Lukas; Oswald, Sascha; van Afferden, Manfred; Schmidt, Axel; Reiche, Nils; Jechalke, Sven

    2010-05-01

    The assessment of contaminant biodegradation in the subsurface is challenged by various abiotic processes leading to a reduction of contaminant concentration without a destructive mass removal of the contaminant. In unsaturated porous media, this interplay of processes is further complicated by volatilization. Many organic contaminants are sufficiently volatile to allow for significant fluxes from the water phase into the soil air, which can eventually lead to an emission of contaminants into the atmosphere. Knowledge of the magnitude of these emissions is thus required to evaluate the efficiency of bioremediation in such porous media and to estimate potential risks due to these emissions. In the present study, vertical flow constructed wetlands were investigated at the pilot scale as part of the SAFIRA II project. The investigated wetland system is intermittently irrigated by contaminated groundwater containing the volatile compounds benzene and MTBE. Measured concentration at the in- and outflow of the system demonstrate a high mass removal rate, but the highly transient flow and transport processes in the system challenge the quantification of biodegradation and volatilization and their contribution to the observed mass removal. By a combination of conservative solute tracer tests, stable isotope fractionation and measurements of natural radon concentration is the treated groundwater is was possible to determine the contribution of biodegradation and volatilization to total mass removal. The results suggest that for the investigated volatile compounds biodegradation is the dominating mass removal process with volatilization contributing only to minor or negligible amounts. These results can be confirmed by reactive transport simulations and were further supported by laboratory studies showing that also gas phase gradients of volatile compounds can be affected by biodegradation suggesting the unsaturated zone to act as a biofilter for contaminants in the soil air.

  17. Colloid Mobilization in a Fractured Soil: Effect of Pore-Water Exchange between Preferential Flow Paths and Soil Matrix.

    PubMed

    Mohanty, Sanjay K; Saiers, James E; Ryan, Joseph N

    2016-03-01

    Exchange of water and solutes between contaminated soil matrix and bulk solution in preferential flow paths has been shown to contribute to the long-term release of dissolved contaminants in the subsurface, but whether and how this exchange can affect the release of colloids in a soil are unclear. To examine this, we applied rainfall solutions of different ionic strength on an intact soil core and compared the resulting changes in effluent colloid concentration through multiple sampling ports. The exchange of water between soil matrix and the preferential flow paths leading to each port was characterized on the basis of the bromide (conservative tracer) breakthrough time at the port. At individual ports, two rainfalls of a certain ionic strength mobilized different amounts of colloids when the soil was pre-exposed to a solution of lower or higher ionic strength. This result indicates that colloid mobilization depended on rainfall solution history, which is referred as colloid mobilization hysteresis. The extent of hysteresis was increased with increases in exchange of pore water and solutes between preferential flow paths and matrix. The results indicate that the soil matrix exchanged the old water from the previous infiltration with new infiltrating water during successive infiltration and changed the pore water chemistry in the preferential flow paths, which in turn affected the release of soil colloids. Therefore, rainfall solution history and soil heterogeneity must be considered to assess colloid mobilization in the subsurface. These findings have implications for the release of colloids, colloid-associated contaminants, and pathogens from soils.

  18. Phosphorus Speciation and Sorption Processes in Preferential flow paths and Soil Matrix in Forested Podzolic Till Soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saastamoinen, S.; Laine-Kaulio, H.; Klöve, B.

    2009-04-01

    The importance of preferential flow paths in nutrient leaching and subsurface transport has been identified in several studies mainly on agricultural soils. In forest soils research, decayed root channels, stone surfaces and other secondary soil structures have shown to affect unsaturated flow in glacial till soil. Until recently, the focus has been on nitrogen and carbon dynamics in the preferential flow paths. Preferential flow may also have a fundamental role in phosphorus (P) sorption processes and transport from forested till soils to surface waters. The main objectives of this study were to determine how preferential flow paths affect to P speciation, sorption and leaching in forested podzolic till soil. Field experiments were conducted in mixed coniferous forest, with soil type of glacial sandy till classified as Haplic Podzol. The first experiment was conducted in Ranua, Northern Finland. The preferential flow paths were identified by introducing Acid Blue 9 dye tracer to a 1 m2 study plot. The soil profile was vertically sliced and samples were collected from the stained preferential flow paths and unstained soil matrix. Ammonium-oxalate extracted trace elements and P, total and inorganic P, inorganic P fractions and organic P forms (31P-NMR spectroscopy) were analyzed from the samples. In the second experiment in Sotkamo, Eastern Finland, three 1 m2 study plots were selected from a forested hillslope: top, middle and bottom slope. The detection of preferential flow paths and the sampling procedure was identical to the first plot experiment. Samples were analyzed for ammonium-oxalate extracted trace elements and P. Also, the effect of reaction time, P concentration and temperature on the sorption process in preferential flow paths and soil matrix was studied by kinetic batch-type sorption experiments. Stone surfaces were the most dominant preferential flow paths and contained lower oxalate-extracted and total P concentrations than the soil matrix in all

  19. Heterogeneous soil water flow and macropores described with combined tracers of dye and iodine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Kang; Zhang, Renduo

    2011-01-01

    SummaryThe objectives of this study were to examine applicability of the iodine-starch method to visualize heterogenous soil water flow and to investigate relationships between soil water heterogeneity and macropore structure vs. measurement scale as well as hydraulic boundaries. The food-grade dye pigment Brilliant Blue FCF dye and iodine-starch staining patterns were used to visualize soil macropore and soil water flow patterns, respectively. Totally 10 infiltration experiments were performed in the field, among which three were used to examine the iodine-starch method and seven were for various boundary conditions (i.e., the different initial ponding depths on the soil surface) and measurement scales (i.e., the soil surface areas covered initially by the tracer solutions). The cluster analysis method was used to distinguish preferential flow regions, while information measures were applied to quantify heterogeneity information content and complexity of macropores and flow systems. Results showed that the iodine-starch method was applicable to visualize soil water flow. Heterogeneous soil water flow contained more heterogeneity information than soil macropores. With a low infiltration amount, flow patterns were similar to the macropore patterns and controlled mainly by the macropores. As the infiltration amount increased, flow patterns were influenced by both macropores and boundary conditions. As the measurement scales increased, the preferential regions were more developed.

  20. Attenuation of aqueous benzene in soils under saturated flow conditions.

    PubMed

    Kim, S-B; Kim, D-J; Yun, S-T

    2006-01-01

    The fate of aqueous benzene in subsurface was investigated in this study, focusing on the role of sorption and biodegradation on the benzene attenuation under dynamic flow conditions. Two sets of column tests were conducted in Plexiglass flow cells packed uniformly with sandy aquifer materials. The first set of the experiment was conducted with a step-type injection of benzene with different powder activated carbon (PAC) contents: (1) PAC = 0 %; (2) PAC = 0.5 %; (3) PAC = 2.0%. The second set was performed as a pulse-type with different test conditions: (4) benzene; (5) benzene and bacteria (Pseudomonas aeruginosa); (6) benzene and bacteria (P. aeruginosa) with hydrogen peroxide. In addition, numerical experiments were performed to examine the role of sorption processes on the benzene attenuation. In the step mode experiments, the KCl breakthrough curves (BTCs) reached the input concentration while the benzene BTCs were considerably lower than those of KCl with slight retardation for all cases, indicating that both reversible/retardation and irreversible sorption occurred. The pulse type tests showed that attenuation of benzene increased in the presence of bacteria due to biodegradation. The benzene attenuation by microbial degradation increased furthermore in the presence of hydrogen peroxide owing to sufficient supply of dissolved oxygen in soil column. Numerical experiments demonstrated that retardation could not contribute to the attenuation of benzene in soils but could only extend its breakthrough time. Experimental results indicated that aqueous benzene could be attenuated by irreversible sorption and biodegradation during transport through the subsurface. Additionally, the attenuation of aqueous benzene is closely related to organic carbon content and oxygen level existing in contaminated aquifers.

  1. The inextricable link between hillslope scale hydrologic flow paths and soil morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gannon, J. P.; McGuire, K. J.; Bailey, S. W.

    2013-12-01

    Five morphologically distinct soil units have been identified in watershed 3 at the Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest in New Hampshire, USA and used to classify over 175 soil profiles developed in glacial till. It is hypothesized that the morphology of several of these soils has resulted from hydrologically controlled soil forming processes beyond those of vertical unsaturated flow. While soils in the watershed had previously been described as well-drained, we have detected frequent to persistent water table development within the solum of several soil units. From these observations we further hypothesize that the soil units can be used to indicate specific water table regimes and flow path orientations. We tested this hypothesis by comparing 2 years of 10-minute shallow groundwater records from 25 wells distributed through the 5 soil units and pore pressure records from tensiometer arrays at 3 soil unit transitions. Patterns in saturated and unsaturated water flux and water table fluctuations showed distinct differences between soil units, consistent with observed soil formation patterns along transects. Median depth to water table, variation, and duration all showed significant differences between soil units. Additionally, water flux angles were dominantly downslope in soil units hypothesized to be laterally developed. Furthermore, the spatial organization of these soil units follows geomorphic gradients within the catchment leading to predictable patterns of soil distribution. Together these results suggest that subsurface flow processes can be spatially delineated utilizing known or predicted patterns of soil morphology. Feedbacks between soil development and subsurface flow processes have implications for soil and water quality in headwater catchments. They can improve our understanding of runoff generation processes, biogeochemical activity, and the mechanisms controlling the delivery of solutes to surface waters.

  2. Assessing the performance of the ensemble Kalman filter for subsurface flow data integration under variogram uncertainty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jafarpour, B.; Tarrahi, Mohammadali

    2011-05-01

    The ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) has recently been proposed as a promising parameter estimation approach for constraining the description of rock flow properties, such as permeability and porosity, to reproduce flow measurements that are modeled as nonlinear functions of these properties. One of the key factors that strongly affect the performance of the EnKF is the quality or representativeness of the prior ensemble of property fields used to initialize the EnKF assimilation procedure. The initial ensemble is commonly constructed by assuming a known geological continuity model such as a variogram. However, geologic continuity models are derived from incomplete information and imperfect modeling assumptions, which can introduce a significant level of uncertainty into the produced models. Neglecting this important source of uncertainty can lead to systematic errors and questionable estimation results. In this paper, we investigate the performance of the EnKF under varying levels of uncertainty in the variogram model parameters. We first attempt to directly estimate variogram model parameters from flow data and show that the complex and nonunique relation they have with the flow data provides little sensitivity for an effective inversion with the EnKF. We then assess the performance of the EnKF for estimation of permeability values under uncertain and incorrect initial variogram parameters and show that any bias in specifying variogram parameters tends to persist throughout the EnKF analysis even though locally reasonable permeability updates may be obtained near observation points. More importantly, we show that when variogram parameters are specified probabilistically to account for the full range of structural variability in the initial permeability ensemble, the EnKF update results are quite promising. The results suggest that under uncertain geologic continuity, the EnKF tends to perform better if a very diverse set of property fields is used to form the

  3. Diurnal fluctuations of water and heat flows in a bare soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schelde, K.; Thomsen, A.; Heidmann, T.; SchjøNning, P.; Jansson, P.-E.

    1998-11-01

    The complexity of coupled transport of heat and moisture at the soil surface necessitates a combination of field and numerical experiments to evaluate the interactions between liquid and vapor phase flow. The near-surface moisture and temperature conditions of a bare soil were investigated experimentally and by using the SOIL model to assess the importance of water vapor flow. During a 1-month period in early fall, intensive measurements of water content, water tension, and temperature were made in a bare soil plot. Soil thermal conductivity, measured on soil cores extracted for laboratory analysis, was found to agree with estimates based on the Kersten equation. Simulated water content and soil temperature agreed well with observations. Modeled soil vapor flow was significant compared to liquid flow only during the initial dry days when the inclusion of vapor flow improved the predicted diurnal variation in water tension. Model predictions were sensitive to an accurate representation of the soil surface energy balance, including the consideration of steep gradients in tension near the soil surface, and to the enhancement of vapor flow.

  4. Does unsaturated flow drive soil carbon residence times?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawrence, C. R.; Mnich, M.; Druhan, J. L.; Schulz, M. S.; Stonestrom, D. A.; Maher, K.; Harden, J. W.

    2015-12-01

    Soil moisture is widely recognized as a driver of many important biogeochemical processes. For example, ecosystem productivity, microbial lifecycles, soil organic matter decomposition, soil secondary mineralogy, the development and persistence of redox gradients, and the export of dissolved carbon are all sensitive to soil-water content and potential. In turn, each of these processes is recognized as an important control on the turnover of soil organic carbon. These dependencies raise a key question: Is the flux of water through unsaturated soils the dominant driver of soil organic carbon turnover across broad spatial scales? To better characterize the importance of soil moisture fluxes, we synthesize data from a number of soil studies to evaluate how total soil carbon storage, carbon residence time, and depth dependent gradients vary in relation to soil hydrologic fluxes. Specifically, we compare soil carbon storage and stability to measured and/or modeled infiltration ([precipitation + condensation] - [evapotranspiration + runoff]) and long-term soil water flux estimates from chloride mass balance, or other techniques. Additionally, we consider the interaction of soil age and hydrology, as the development of secondary mineral horizons during pedogenesis represents a critical threshold in both soil water flux and soil organic carbon turnover. We focus on data from 3 previously descried soil chronosequences, including the Santa Cruz, Mattole, and Merced terraces, which together span a wide range of age and soil moisture conditions. Across these sites, organic carbon accumulates to greater depths in the soils with highest infiltration but the relationship between turnover and soil moisture is not as straightforward. To help interpret these results, we compare field data against simulations of biogeochemical reactions involving soil carbon and the resulting isotopic gradients using the reactive transport model CrunchTope. Overall, this effort provides for an improved

  5. Optical flow based Kalman filter for body joint prediction and tracking using HOG-LBP matching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nair, Binu M.; Kendricks, Kimberley D.; Asari, Vijayan K.; Tuttle, Ronald F.

    2014-03-01

    We propose a real-time novel framework for tracking specific joints in the human body on low resolution imagery using optical flow based Kalman tracker without the need of a depth sensor. Body joint tracking is necessary for a variety of surveillance based applications such as recognizing gait signatures of individuals, identifying the motion patterns associated with a particular action and the corresponding interactions with objects in the scene to classify a certain activity. The proposed framework consists of two stages; the initialization stage and the tracking stage. In the initialization stage, the joints to be tracked are either manually marked or automatically obtained from other joint detection algorithms in the first few frames within a window of interest and appropriate image descriptions of each joint are computed. We employ the use of a well-known image coding scheme known as the Local Binary Patterns (LBP) to represent the joint local region where this image coding removes the variance to non-uniform lighting conditions as well as enhances the underlying edges and corner. The image descriptions of the joint region would then include a histogram computed from the LBP-coded ROI and a HOG (Histogram of Oriented Gradients) descriptor to represent the edge information. Next the tracking stage can be divided into two phases: Optical flow based detection of joints in corresponding frames of the sequence and prediction /correction phases of Kalman tracker with respect to the joint coordinates. Lucas Kanade optical flow is used to locate the individual joints in consecutive frames of the video based on their location in the previous frame. But more often, mismatches can occur due to the rotation of the joint region and the rotation variance of the optical flow matching technique. The mismatch is then determined by comparing the joint region descriptors using Chi-squared metric between a pair of frames and depending on this statistic, either the prediction

  6. [Surrounding characteristics of preferential flow in cultivated typical black soils of northeast China].

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xiao-jin; Wang, En-heng; Chen, Xiang-wei; Xia, Xiang-you; Shi, Chang-ting

    2010-12-01

    Taking the cultivated soils in typical black soil region of Northeast China as test objects, and by using dye tracer and double-ring infiltrometer techniques and photograph interpretation method, this paper measured and analyzed the dye-stained width and dye-stained coverage of soil transverse and longitudinal sections as well as the field maximum dye-stained depth, aimed to approach the water flow movement pattern and distribution characteristics in test soils. At soil depth 0-15 cm, matrix flow was the main soil water flow movement pattern; at depth 15-20 cm, lateral flow was observed, and the average dye-stained width and dye-stained coverage reached their maximum, being 23 cm and 20.73%, respectively. At depth 20-67 cm, the main soil water flow movement pattern was macro-pore flow, with cracks and macro-pores as the main preferential routes. The cracks at depth 20-35 cm made the preferential flow have distinct surrounding characteristics, and the macro-pores at depth 40-67 cm were the main preferential routes. Due to the existence of the preferential routes of cracks and macro-pores, the migration velocity of water in soil increased by 4.5 times, which could not only cause water loss, but also accelerate the migration of pesticides to ground water. It was suggested that these preferential routes should be decreased or eliminated during the cultivation and management on cultivated typical black soils. PMID:21442999

  7. [Surrounding characteristics of preferential flow in cultivated typical black soils of northeast China].

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xiao-jin; Wang, En-heng; Chen, Xiang-wei; Xia, Xiang-you; Shi, Chang-ting

    2010-12-01

    Taking the cultivated soils in typical black soil region of Northeast China as test objects, and by using dye tracer and double-ring infiltrometer techniques and photograph interpretation method, this paper measured and analyzed the dye-stained width and dye-stained coverage of soil transverse and longitudinal sections as well as the field maximum dye-stained depth, aimed to approach the water flow movement pattern and distribution characteristics in test soils. At soil depth 0-15 cm, matrix flow was the main soil water flow movement pattern; at depth 15-20 cm, lateral flow was observed, and the average dye-stained width and dye-stained coverage reached their maximum, being 23 cm and 20.73%, respectively. At depth 20-67 cm, the main soil water flow movement pattern was macro-pore flow, with cracks and macro-pores as the main preferential routes. The cracks at depth 20-35 cm made the preferential flow have distinct surrounding characteristics, and the macro-pores at depth 40-67 cm were the main preferential routes. Due to the existence of the preferential routes of cracks and macro-pores, the migration velocity of water in soil increased by 4.5 times, which could not only cause water loss, but also accelerate the migration of pesticides to ground water. It was suggested that these preferential routes should be decreased or eliminated during the cultivation and management on cultivated typical black soils.

  8. [Effect of grass barrier-combined filter strips on the reduction of nitrogen and phosphorus concentration under concentrated flow of varying densities].

    PubMed

    Du, Qin; Wang, Jin-ye; Li, Hai-fang

    2015-09-01

    Vegetative barrier-combined filter strips are defined as grass barriers set up before filter strips. They could make concentrated water flow disperse, which exerts the function of grass barriers (i.e., existence of grass barriers improves the performance of filter strips in the purification of pollutants). In this regards, grass barriers are generally considered to be effective in the purification of pollutants when the density of concentrated flow is low, whereas little was known about this effect with an increasing density of concentrated flow. In this study, we constructed Miscanthus floridulus barrier before Vitex negundo filter strip with three densities of concentrated flow (low: one concentrated flow channel; middle: three channels; high: five channels). The aim of work was to identify the effect of M. floridulus combined V. negundo filter strips in reducing nitrogen and phosphorus concentration under three concentrated water flow levels. Our results showed that the combined filter strips had a higher performance in the reduction in the total N, NH(4+)-N, NO(3-)-N and total P compared to those in the V. negundo (P < 0.05), regardless of the water flow level. There was no significant difference in the reduction of total N, NH(4+)-N, NO(3-)-N and total P among three water flow levels (P > 0.05). We concluded that M. floridulus combined V. negundo filter strips could improve the reduction of nutrients, which couldn' t be influenced by varying density of concentrated flow level.

  9. [Effect of grass barrier-combined filter strips on the reduction of nitrogen and phosphorus concentration under concentrated flow of varying densities].

    PubMed

    Du, Qin; Wang, Jin-ye; Li, Hai-fang

    2015-09-01

    Vegetative barrier-combined filter strips are defined as grass barriers set up before filter strips. They could make concentrated water flow disperse, which exerts the function of grass barriers (i.e., existence of grass barriers improves the performance of filter strips in the purification of pollutants). In this regards, grass barriers are generally considered to be effective in the purification of pollutants when the density of concentrated flow is low, whereas little was known about this effect with an increasing density of concentrated flow. In this study, we constructed Miscanthus floridulus barrier before Vitex negundo filter strip with three densities of concentrated flow (low: one concentrated flow channel; middle: three channels; high: five channels). The aim of work was to identify the effect of M. floridulus combined V. negundo filter strips in reducing nitrogen and phosphorus concentration under three concentrated water flow levels. Our results showed that the combined filter strips had a higher performance in the reduction in the total N, NH(4+)-N, NO(3-)-N and total P compared to those in the V. negundo (P < 0.05), regardless of the water flow level. There was no significant difference in the reduction of total N, NH(4+)-N, NO(3-)-N and total P among three water flow levels (P > 0.05). We concluded that M. floridulus combined V. negundo filter strips could improve the reduction of nutrients, which couldn' t be influenced by varying density of concentrated flow level. PMID:26785568

  10. Penetration of fiber versus spherical particles through filter media and faceseal leakage of N95 filtering facepiece respirators with cyclic flow.

    PubMed

    Cho, Kyungmin Jacob; Turkevich, Leonid; Miller, Matthew; McKay, Roy; Grinshpun, Sergey A; Ha, KwonChul; Reponen, Tiina

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated differences in penetration between fibers and spherical particles through faceseal leakage of an N95 filtering facepiece respirator. Three cyclic breathing flows were generated corresponding to mean inspiratory flow rates (MIF) of 15, 30, and 85 L/min. Fibers had a mean diameter of 1 μm and a median length of 4.9 μm (calculated aerodynamic diameter, d(ae) = 1.73 μm). Monodisperse polystyrene spheres with a mean physical diameter of 1.01 μm (PSI) and 1.54 μm (PSII) were used for comparison (calculated d(ae) = 1.05 and 1.58 μm, respectively). Two optical particle counters simultaneously determined concentrations inside and outside the respirator. Geometric means (GMs) for filter penetration of the fibers were 0.06, 0.09, and 0.08% at MIF of 15, 30, and 85 L/min, respectively. Corresponding values for PSI were 0.07, 0.12, and 0.12%. GMs for faceseal penetration of fibers were 0.40, 0.14, and 0.09% at MIF of 15, 30, and 85 L/min, respectively. Corresponding values for PSI were 0.96, 0.41, and 0.17%. Faceseal penetration decreased with increased breathing rate for both types of particles (p ≤ 0.001). GMs of filter and faceseal penetration of PSII at an MIF of 30 L/min were 0.14% and 0.36%, respectively. Filter penetration and faceseal penetration of fibers were significantly lower than those of PSI (p < 0.001) and PSII (p < 0.003). This confirmed that higher penetration of PSI was not due to slightly smaller aerodynamic diameter, indicating that the shape of fibers rather than their calculated mean aerodynamic diameter is a prevailing factor on deposition mechanisms through the tested respirator. In conclusion, faceseal penetration of fibers and spherical particles decreased with increasing breathing rate, which can be explained by increased capture by impaction. Spherical particles had 2.0-2.8 times higher penetration through faceseal leaks and 1.1-1.5 higher penetration through filter media than fibers, which can be attributed to

  11. Penetration of fiber versus spherical particles through filter media and faceseal leakage of N95 filtering facepiece respirators with cyclic flow.

    PubMed

    Cho, Kyungmin Jacob; Turkevich, Leonid; Miller, Matthew; McKay, Roy; Grinshpun, Sergey A; Ha, KwonChul; Reponen, Tiina

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated differences in penetration between fibers and spherical particles through faceseal leakage of an N95 filtering facepiece respirator. Three cyclic breathing flows were generated corresponding to mean inspiratory flow rates (MIF) of 15, 30, and 85 L/min. Fibers had a mean diameter of 1 μm and a median length of 4.9 μm (calculated aerodynamic diameter, d(ae) = 1.73 μm). Monodisperse polystyrene spheres with a mean physical diameter of 1.01 μm (PSI) and 1.54 μm (PSII) were used for comparison (calculated d(ae) = 1.05 and 1.58 μm, respectively). Two optical particle counters simultaneously determined concentrations inside and outside the respirator. Geometric means (GMs) for filter penetration of the fibers were 0.06, 0.09, and 0.08% at MIF of 15, 30, and 85 L/min, respectively. Corresponding values for PSI were 0.07, 0.12, and 0.12%. GMs for faceseal penetration of fibers were 0.40, 0.14, and 0.09% at MIF of 15, 30, and 85 L/min, respectively. Corresponding values for PSI were 0.96, 0.41, and 0.17%. Faceseal penetration decreased with increased breathing rate for both types of particles (p ≤ 0.001). GMs of filter and faceseal penetration of PSII at an MIF of 30 L/min were 0.14% and 0.36%, respectively. Filter penetration and faceseal penetration of fibers were significantly lower than those of PSI (p < 0.001) and PSII (p < 0.003). This confirmed that higher penetration of PSI was not due to slightly smaller aerodynamic diameter, indicating that the shape of fibers rather than their calculated mean aerodynamic diameter is a prevailing factor on deposition mechanisms through the tested respirator. In conclusion, faceseal penetration of fibers and spherical particles decreased with increasing breathing rate, which can be explained by increased capture by impaction. Spherical particles had 2.0-2.8 times higher penetration through faceseal leaks and 1.1-1.5 higher penetration through filter media than fibers, which can be attributed to

  12. Assembly Processes under Severe Abiotic Filtering: Adaptation Mechanisms of Weed Vegetation to the Gradient of Soil Constraints

    PubMed Central

    Nikolic, Nina; Böcker, Reinhard; Kostic-Kravljanac, Ljiljana; Nikolic, Miroslav

    2014-01-01

    Questions Effects of soil on vegetation patterns are commonly obscured by other environmental factors; clear and general relationships are difficult to find. How would community assembly processes be affected by a substantial change in soil characteristics when all other relevant factors are held constant? In particular, can we identify some functional adaptations which would underpin such soil-induced vegetation response? Location Eastern Serbia: fields partially damaged by long-term and large-scale fluvial deposition of sulphidic waste from a Cu mine; subcontinental/submediterranean climate. Methods We analysed the multivariate response of cereal weed assemblages (including biomass and foliar analyses) to a strong man-made soil gradient (from highly calcareous to highly acidic, nutrient-poor soils) over short distances (field scale). Results The soil gradient favoured a substitution of calcicoles by calcifuges, and an increase in abundance of pseudometallophytes, with preferences for Atlantic climate, broad geographical distribution, hemicryptophytic life form, adapted to low-nutrient and acidic soils, with lower concentrations of Ca, and very narrow range of Cu concentrations in leaves. The trends of abundance of the different ecological groups of indicator species along the soil gradient were systematically reflected in the maintenance of leaf P concentrations, and strong homeostasis in biomass N:P ratio. Conclusion Using annual weed vegetation at the field scale as a fairly simple model, we demonstrated links between gradients in soil properties (pH, nutrient availability) and floristic composition that are normally encountered over large geographic distances. We showed that leaf nutrient status, in particular the maintenance of leaf P concentrations and strong homeostasis of biomass N:P ratio, underpinned a clear functional response of vegetation to mineral stress. These findings can help to understand assembly processes leading to unusual, novel combinations

  13. Grid-Independent Large-Eddy Simulation in Turbulent Channel Flow using Three-Dimensional Explicit Filtering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gullbrand, Jessica

    2003-01-01

    In this paper, turbulence-closure models are evaluated using the 'true' LES approach in turbulent channel flow. The study is an extension of the work presented by Gullbrand (2001), where fourth-order commutative filter functions are applied in three dimensions in a fourth-order finite-difference code. The true LES solution is the grid-independent solution to the filtered governing equations. The solution is obtained by keeping the filter width constant while the computational grid is refined. As the grid is refined, the solution converges towards the true LES solution. The true LES solution will depend on the filter width used, but will be independent of the grid resolution. In traditional LES, because the filter is implicit and directly connected to the grid spacing, the solution converges towards a direct numerical simulation (DNS) as the grid is refined, and not towards the solution of the filtered Navier-Stokes equations. The effect of turbulence-closure models is therefore difficult to determine in traditional LES because, as the grid is refined, more turbulence length scales are resolved and less influence from the models is expected. In contrast, in the true LES formulation, the explicit filter eliminates all scales that are smaller than the filter cutoff, regardless of the grid resolution. This ensures that the resolved length-scales do not vary as the grid resolution is changed. In true LES, the cell size must be smaller than or equal to the cutoff length scale of the filter function. The turbulence-closure models investigated are the dynamic Smagorinsky model (DSM), the dynamic mixed model (DMM), and the dynamic reconstruction model (DRM). These turbulence models were previously studied using two-dimensional explicit filtering in turbulent channel flow by Gullbrand & Chow (2002). The DSM by Germano et al. (1991) is used as the USFS model in all the simulations. This enables evaluation of different reconstruction models for the RSFS stresses. The DMM

  14. Soil detachment by overland flow under different vegetation restoration models in the loess plateau of China

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Land use change has significant effects on soil properties and vegetation cover and thus probably affects soil detachment by overland flow. Few studies were conducted to evaluate the effect of restoration models on the soil detachment process in the Loess Plateau in the past decade during which a Gr...

  15. Performance evaluation of a ceramic cross-flow filter on a bench-scale coal gasifier

    SciTech Connect

    Lippert, T.E.; Bachovchin, D.M.; Smeltzer, E.E.; Meyer, J.H.; Vidt, E.J.

    1989-09-01

    The ceramic cross-flow filter (CXF) system is a promising method to be used in advanced coal based power systems for high temperature, high pressure (HTHP) particle removal. Using a subpilot scale pressurized fluid-bed combustor (PFBC) at Argonne National Laboratory and various PFBC simulators, prior projects have indicated that CXF systems can be used in oxidizing environments at PFBC conditions. To extend the use of CXF systems, this project completed an economic analysis comparing the cost of various oxygen and air blown gasification systems with the CXF system incorporated, initiated the scaleup of the CXF element from development to commercial size, predicted the characteristics of gasifier dust cake, evaluated cleaning pulse characteristics in a large multielement simulation, upgraded pulse cleaning mathematical model, and completed additional testing of the CXF elements under gasification (reducing) and PFBC conditions. Coors Ceramic Company and GTE Products Corporation were integrally involved in this program through the development and fabrication of the CXF elements. 39 figs., 23 tabs.

  16. Hot gas cleanup using ceramic cross flow membrane filters. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Ciliberti, D.F.; Smeltzer, E.E.; Alvin, M.A.; Keairns, D.L.; Bachovchin, D.M.

    1983-12-01

    The single unresolved technical issue in the commercialization of pressurized fluid-bed combustion (PPBC) for electric power production is the hot gas cleaning problem. In this technology, high-temperature and -pressure (HTHP), dust-laden flue gases from the combustor must be cleaned enough to reduce expansion turbine blade erosion to an economically acceptable level. Additionally, the level of particulate emission must be compatible with the New Source Performance Standards (NSPS) for environmental acceptability. The Department of Energy (DOE) has sponsored a wide range of research and development programs directed at the solution of this problem. These programs were divided into two classifications, one dealing with more advanced concepts where testing was to be done at relatively large scale and a second group of less advanced, novel concepts where the testing was to be carried out at a bench scale. The cross-flow ceramic membrane filter program described in this report is a member of the small-scale, novel concept group.

  17. Modeling the Air Flow in the 3410 Building Filtered Exhaust Stack System

    SciTech Connect

    Recknagle, Kurtis P.; Barnett, J. Matthew; Suffield, Sarah R.

    2013-01-23

    Additional ventilation capacity has been designed for the 3410 Building filtered exhaust stack system. The updated system will increase the number of fans from two to three and will include ductwork to incorporate the new fan into the existing stack. Stack operations will involve running various two-fan combinations at any given time. The air monitoring system of the existing two-fan stack was previously found to be in compliance with the ANSI/HPS N13.1-1999 standard, however it is not known if the modified (three-fan) system will comply. Subsequently, a full-scale three-dimensional (3-D) computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model of the modified stack system has been created to examine the sampling location for compliance with the standard. The CFD modeling results show good agreement with testing data collected from the existing 3410 Building stack and suggest that velocity uniformity and flow angles will remain well within acceptance criteria when the third fan and associated ductwork is installed. This includes two-fan flow rates up to 31,840 cfm for any of the two-fan combinations. For simulation cases in which tracer gas and particles are introduced in the main duct, the model predicts that both particle and tracer gas coefficients of variance (COVs) may be larger than the acceptable 20 percent criterion of the ANSI/HPS N13.1-1999 standard for each of the two-fan, 31,840 cfm combinations. Simulations in which the tracers are introduced near the fans result in improved, though marginally acceptable, COV values for the tracers. Due to the remaining uncertainty that the stack will qualify with the addition of the third fan and high flow rates, a stationary air blender from Blender Products, Inc. is considered for inclusion in the stack system. A model of the air blender has been developed and incorporated into the CFD model. Simulation results from the CFD model that includes the air blender show striking improvements in tracer gas mixing and tracer particle

  18. Improved design and optimization of subsurface flow constructed wetlands and sand filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brovelli, A.; Carranza-Díaz, O.; Rossi, L.; Barry, D. A.

    2010-05-01

    Subsurface flow constructed wetlands and sand filters are engineered systems capable of eliminating a wide range of pollutants from wastewater. These devices are easy to operate, flexible and have low maintenance costs. For these reasons, they are particularly suitable for small settlements and isolated farms and their use has substantially increased in the last 15 years. Furthermore, they are also becoming used as a tertiary - polishing - step in traditional treatment plants. Recent work observed that research is however still necessary to understand better the biogeochemical processes occurring in the porous substrate, their mutual interactions and feedbacks, and ultimately to identify the optimal conditions to degrade or remove from the wastewater both traditional and anthropogenic recalcitrant pollutants, such as hydrocarbons, pharmaceuticals, personal care products. Optimal pollutant elimination is achieved if the contact time between microbial biomass and the contaminated water is sufficiently long. The contact time depends on the hydraulic residence time distribution (HRTD) and is controlled by the hydrodynamic properties of the system. Previous reports noted that poor hydrodynamic behaviour is frequent, with water flowing mainly through preferential paths resulting in a broad HRTD. In such systems the flow rate must be decreased to allow a sufficient proportion of the wastewater to experience the minimum residence time. The pollutant removal efficiency can therefore be significantly reduced, potentially leading to the failure of the system. The aim of this work was to analyse the effect of the heterogeneous distribution of the hydraulic properties of the porous substrate on the HRTD and treatment efficiency, and to develop an improved design methodology to reduce the risk of system failure and to optimize existing systems showing poor hydrodynamics. Numerical modelling was used to evaluate the effect of substrate heterogeneity on the breakthrough curves of

  19. Evaluation of probabilistic flow in two unsaturated soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boateng, Samuel

    2001-11-01

    A variably saturated flow model is coupled to a first-order reliability algorithm to simulate unsaturated flow in two soils. The unsaturated soil properties are considered as uncertain variables with means, standard deviations, and marginal probability distributions. Thus, each simulation constitutes an unsaturated probability flow event. Sensitivities of the uncertain variables are estimated for each event. The unsaturated hydraulic properties of a fine-textured soil and a coarse-textured soil are used. The properties are based on the van Genuchten model. The flow domain has a recharge surface, a seepage boundary along the bottom, and a no-flow boundary along the sides. The uncertain variables are saturated water content, residual water content, van Genuchten model parameters alpha (α) and n, and saturated hydraulic conductivity. The objective is to evaluate the significance of each uncertain variable to the probabilistic flow. Under wet conditions, saturated water content and residual water content are the most significant uncertain variables in the sand. For dry conditions in the sand, however, the van Genuchten model parameters α and n are the most significant. Model parameter n and saturated hydraulic conductivity are the most significant for the wet clay loam. Saturated water content is most significant for the dry clay loam. Résumé. Un modèle d'écoulement variable en milieu saturé est couplé à un algorithme d'exactitude de premier ordre pour simuler les écoulements en milieu non saturé dans deux sols. Les propriétés des sols non saturés sont considérés comme des variables incertaines avec des moyennes, des écarts-types et des distributions de probabilité marginale. Ainsi chaque simulation constitue un événement d'écoulement non saturé probable. La sensibilité des variables incertaines est estimée pour chaque événement. Les propriétés hydrauliques non saturées d'un sol à texture fine et d'un sol à texture grossière sont utilis

  20. Host and habitat filtering in seedling root-associated fungal communities: taxonomic and functional diversity are altered in 'novel' soils.

    PubMed

    Pickles, Brian J; Gorzelak, Monika A; Green, D Scott; Egger, Keith N; Massicotte, Hugues B

    2015-10-01

    Climatic and land use changes have significant consequences for the distribution of tree species, both through natural dispersal processes and following management prescriptions. Responses to these changes will be expressed most strongly in seedlings near current species range boundaries. In northern temperate forest ecosystems, where changes are already being observed, ectomycorrhizal fungi contribute significantly to successful tree establishment. We hypothesised that communities of fungal symbionts might therefore play a role in facilitating, or limiting, host seedling range expansion. To test this hypothesis, ectomycorrhizal communities of interior Douglas-fir and interior lodgepole pine seedlings were analysed in a common greenhouse environment following growth in five soils collected along an ecosystem gradient. Currently, Douglas-fir's natural distribution encompasses three of the five soils, whereas lodgepole pine's extends much further north. Host filtering was evident amongst the 29 fungal species encountered: 7 were shared, 9 exclusive to Douglas-fir and 13 exclusive to lodgepole pine. Seedlings of both host species formed symbioses with each soil fungal community, thus Douglas-fir did so even where those soils came from outside its current distribution. However, these latter communities displayed significant taxonomic and functional differences to those found within the host distribution, indicative of habitat filtering. In contrast, lodgepole pine fungal communities displayed high functional similarity across the soil gradient. Taxonomic and/or functional shifts in Douglas-fir fungal communities may prove ecologically significant during the predicted northward migration of this species; especially in combination with changes in climate and management operations, such as seed transfer across geographical regions for forestry purposes. PMID:25694036

  1. Catchment travel time distributions and water flow in soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rinaldo, A.; Beven, K. J.; Bertuzzo, E.; Nicotina, L.; Davies, J.; Fiori, A.; Russo, D.; Botter, G.

    2011-07-01

    Many details about the flow of water in soils in a hillslope are unknowable given current technologies. One way of learning about the bulk effects of water velocity distributions on hillslopes is through the use of tracers. However, this paper will demonstrate that the interpretation of tracer information needs to become more sophisticated. The paper reviews, and complements with mathematical arguments and specific examples, theory and practice of the distribution(s) of the times water particles injected through rainfall spend traveling through a catchment up to a control section (i.e., "catchment" travel times). The relevance of the work is perceived to lie in the importance of the characterization of travel time distributions as fundamental descriptors of catchment water storage, flow pathway heterogeneity, sources of water in a catchment, and the chemistry of water flows through the control section. The paper aims to correct some common misconceptions used in analyses of travel time distributions. In particular, it stresses the conceptual and practical differences between the travel time distribution conditional on a given injection time (needed for rainfall-runoff transformations) and that conditional on a given sampling time at the outlet (as provided by isotopic dating techniques or tracer measurements), jointly with the differences of both with the residence time distributions of water particles in storage within the catchment at any time. These differences are defined precisely here, either through the results of different models or theoretically by using an extension of a classic theorem of dynamic controls. Specifically, we address different model results to highlight the features of travel times seen from different assumptions, in this case, exact solutions to a lumped model and numerical solutions of the 3-D flow and transport equations in variably saturated, physically heterogeneous catchment domains. Our results stress the individual characters of the

  2. Investigation of flow and transport processes at the MADE site using ensemble Kalman filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Gaisheng; Chen, Yan; Zhang, Dongxiao

    2008-07-01

    In this work the ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) is applied to investigate the flow and transport processes at the macro-dispersion experiment (MADE) site in Columbus, MS. The EnKF is a sequential data assimilation approach that adjusts the unknown model parameter values based on the observed data with time. The classic advection-dispersion (AD) and the dual-domain mass transfer (DDMT) models are employed to analyze the tritium plume during the second MADE tracer experiment. The hydraulic conductivity ( K), longitudinal dispersivity in the AD model, and mass transfer rate coefficient and mobile porosity ratio in the DDMT model, are estimated in this investigation. Because of its sequential feature, the EnKF allows for the temporal scaling of transport parameters during the tritium concentration analysis. Inverse simulation results indicate that for the AD model to reproduce the extensive spatial spreading of the tritium observed in the field, the K in the downgradient area needs to be increased significantly. The estimated K in the AD model becomes an order of magnitude higher than the in situ flowmeter measurements over a large portion of media. On the other hand, the DDMT model gives an estimation of K that is much more comparable with the flowmeter values. In addition, the simulated concentrations by the DDMT model show a better agreement with the observed values. The root mean square (RMS) between the observed and simulated tritium plumes is 0.77 for the AD model and 0.45 for the DDMT model at 328 days. Unlike the AD model, which gives inconsistent K estimates at different times, the DDMT model is able to invert the K values that consistently reproduce the observed tritium concentrations through all times.

  3. Investigation of flow and transport processes at the MADE site using ensemble Kalman filter

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Liu, Gaisheng; Chen, Y.; Zhang, Dongxiao

    2008-01-01

    In this work the ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) is applied to investigate the flow and transport processes at the macro-dispersion experiment (MADE) site in Columbus, MS. The EnKF is a sequential data assimilation approach that adjusts the unknown model parameter values based on the observed data with time. The classic advection-dispersion (AD) and the dual-domain mass transfer (DDMT) models are employed to analyze the tritium plume during the second MADE tracer experiment. The hydraulic conductivity (K), longitudinal dispersivity in the AD model, and mass transfer rate coefficient and mobile porosity ratio in the DDMT model, are estimated in this investigation. Because of its sequential feature, the EnKF allows for the temporal scaling of transport parameters during the tritium concentration analysis. Inverse simulation results indicate that for the AD model to reproduce the extensive spatial spreading of the tritium observed in the field, the K in the downgradient area needs to be increased significantly. The estimated K in the AD model becomes an order of magnitude higher than the in situ flowmeter measurements over a large portion of media. On the other hand, the DDMT model gives an estimation of K that is much more comparable with the flowmeter values. In addition, the simulated concentrations by the DDMT model show a better agreement with the observed values. The root mean square (RMS) between the observed and simulated tritium plumes is 0.77 for the AD model and 0.45 for the DDMT model at 328 days. Unlike the AD model, which gives inconsistent K estimates at different times, the DDMT model is able to invert the K values that consistently reproduce the observed tritium concentrations through all times. ?? 2008 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Subsurface flow in a soil-mantled subtropical dolomite karst slope: A field rainfall simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Z. Y.; Chen, H. S.; Zhang, W.; Xu, Q. X.; Wang, S.; Wang, K. L.

    2015-12-01

    Soil and epikarst co-evolve resulting in complex structures, but their coupled structural effects on hydrological processes are poorly understood in karst regions. This study examined the plot-scale subsurface flow characteristics from an integrated soil-epikarst system perspective in a humid subtropical cockpit karst region of Southwest China. A trench was excavated to the epikarst lower boundary for collecting individual subsurface flows in five sections with different soil thicknesses. Four field rainfall simulation experiments were carried out under different initial moisture conditions (dry and wet) and rainfall intensities (114 mm h- 1 (high) and 46 mm h- 1 (low) on average). The soil-epikarst system was characterized by shallow soil overlaying a highly irregular epikarst surface with a near-steady infiltration rate of about 35 mm h- 1. The subsurface flows occurred mainly along the soil-epikarst interface and were dominated by preferential flow. The subsurface flow hydrographs showed strong spatial variability and had high steady-state coefficients (0.52 and 0.36 for high and low rainfall intensity events). Irregular epikarst surface combining with high vertical drainage capacity resulted in high threshold rainfall depths for subsurface flows: 67 mm and 263 mm for initial wet and dry conditions, respectively. The above results evidenced that the irregular and permeable soil-epikarst interface was a crucial component of soil-epikarst architecture and consequently should be taken into account in the hydrological modeling for karst regions.

  5. Numerical Modeling of Coupled Water Flow and Heat Transport in Soil and Snow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelleners, T.

    2015-12-01

    A numerical model is developed to calculate coupled water flow and heat transport in seasonally frozen soil and snow. Both liquid water flow and water vapor flow are included. The effect of dissolved ions on soil water freezing point depression is included by combining an expression for osmotic head with the Clapeyron equation and the van Genuchten soil water retention function. The coupled water flow and heat transport equations are solved using the Thomas algorithm and Picard iteration. Ice pressure is always assumed zero and frost heave is neglected. The new model is tested using data from a high-elevation rangeland soil that is subject to significant soil freezing and a mountainous forest soil that is snow-covered for about 8 months of the year. Soil hydraulic parameters are mostly based on measurements and only vegetation parameters are fine-tuned to match measured and calculated soil water content, soil & snow temperature, and snow height. Modeling statistics for both systems show good performance for temperature, intermediate performance for snow height, and relatively low performance for soil water content, in accordance with earlier results with an older version of the model.

  6. Three-dimensional soil moisture profile retrieval by assimilation of near-surface measurements: Simplified Kalman filter covariance forecasting and field application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Jeffrey P.; Willgoose, Garry R.; Kalma, Jetse D.

    2002-12-01

    The Kalman filter data assimilation technique is applied to a distributed three-dimensional soil moisture model for retrieval of the soil moisture profile in a 6 ha catchment using near-surface soil moisture measurements. A simplified Kalman filter covariance forecasting methodology is developed based on forecasting of the state correlations and imposed state variances. This covariance forecasting technique, termed the modified Kalman filter, was then used in a 1 month three-dimensional field application. Two updating scenarios were tested: (1) updating every 2 to 3 days and (2) a single update. The data used were from the Nerrigundah field site, near Newcastle, Australia. This study demonstrates the feasibility of data assimilation in a quasi three-dimensional distributed soil moisture model, provided simplified covariance forecasting techniques are used. It also identifies that (1) the soil moisture profile cannot be retrieved from near-surface soil moisture measurements when the near-surface and deep soil layers become decoupled, such as during extreme drying events; (2) if simulation of the soil moisture profile is already good, the assimilation can result in a slight degradation, but if the simulation is poor, assimilation can yield a significant improvement; (3) soil moisture profile retrieval results are independent of initial conditions; and (4) the required update frequency is a function of the errors in model physics and forcing data.

  7. Scaling and pedotransfer in numerical simulations of flow and transport in soils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Flow and transport parameters of soils in numerical simulations need to be defined at the support scale of computational grid cells. Such support scale can substantially differ from the support scale in laboratory or field measurements of flow and transport parameters. The scale-dependence of flow a...

  8. Colloid Mobilization in a Fractured Soil: Effect of Pore-Water Exchange between Preferential Flow Paths and Soil Matrix.

    PubMed

    Mohanty, Sanjay K; Saiers, James E; Ryan, Joseph N

    2016-03-01

    Exchange of water and solutes between contaminated soil matrix and bulk solution in preferential flow paths has been shown to contribute to the long-term release of dissolved contaminants in the subsurface, but whether and how this exchange can affect the release of colloids in a soil are unclear. To examine this, we applied rainfall solutions of different ionic strength on an intact soil core and compared the resulting changes in effluent colloid concentration through multiple sampling ports. The exchange of water between soil matrix and the preferential flow paths leading to each port was characterized on the basis of the bromide (conservative tracer) breakthrough time at the port. At individual ports, two rainfalls of a certain ionic strength mobilized different amounts of colloids when the soil was pre-exposed to a solution of lower or higher ionic strength. This result indicates that colloid mobilization depended on rainfall solution history, which is referred as colloid mobilization hysteresis. The extent of hysteresis was increased with increases in exchange of pore water and solutes between preferential flow paths and matrix. The results indicate that the soil matrix exchanged the old water from the previous infiltration with new infiltrating water during successive infiltration and changed the pore water chemistry in the preferential flow paths, which in turn affected the release of soil colloids. Therefore, rainfall solution history and soil heterogeneity must be considered to assess colloid mobilization in the subsurface. These findings have implications for the release of colloids, colloid-associated contaminants, and pathogens from soils. PMID:26829659

  9. How to unravel relationships between soil structure and preferential flow in structured soils with fast tomography at the continuum scale?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sammartino, S.; Lissy, A. S.; Bogner, C.; Cornu, S.

    2015-12-01

    The modeling of water flow in the vadose zone and the understanding of processes and mechanisms that control preferential flow is still a challenge for many environmental issues. Since a long time, tridimensional X-ray images have been used to characterize the structures of intact soil cores. Conversely, imaging of water dynamics in soil structures was scarcely developed except on quite small samples in the order of a few centimeters to a few millimeters. As soil structure is a key-controlling factor, the understanding of the complex relationships between the topology and morphology of the pore space on flow distribution and hydraulic properties cannot be undertaken on such small samples. Therefore, we recently proposed the visualization and characterization of flow processes at the core scale (soil volumes of dimensions above 10 cm) with 3D image sequences acquired in a X-ray medical scanner. Last generation of these scanners combining a helical acquisition mode to the multislice capability can now provide very short acquisition times in the order of few seconds for a decimeter column. The 3D image sequences acquired during simulated rainfall events within the scanner were processed and analyzed with new ad hoc tools. Results will focus on 1) the recognition of the functional part of the macropore network related to the flow distribution, 2) its comparison to the entire structure and 3) the estimation of the macroscopic surface exchange between the active macropore network and the soil matrix obtained during the recording of water infiltration.

  10. Influence of lateral subsurface flow and connectivity on soil water storage in land surface modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jonggun; Mohanty, Binayak P.

    2016-01-01

    Lateral surface/subsurface flow and their connectivity play a significant role in redistributing soil water, which has a direct effect on biological, chemical, and geomorphological processes in the root zone (~1 m). However, most of the land surface models neglect the horizontal exchanges of water at the grid or subgrid scales, focusing only on the vertical exchanges of water as one-dimensional process. To develop better hydrologic understanding and modeling capability in complex landscapes, in this study we added connectivity-based lateral subsurface flow algorithms in the Community Land Model. To demonstrate the impact of lateral flow and connectivity on soil water storage we designed three cases including the following: (1) with complex surface topography only, (2) with complex surface topography in upper soil layers and soil hydraulic properties with uniform anisotropy. and (3) with complex surface topography and soil hydraulic properties with spatially varying anisotropy. The connectivity was considered as an indicator for the variation of anisotropy in the case 3, which was created by wetness conditions or geophysical controls (e.g., soil type, normalized difference vegetation index, and topographic index). These cases were tested in two study sites (ER 5 field and ER-sub watershed in Oklahoma) comparing to the field (gravimetric and remote sensing) soil moisture observations. Through the analysis of spatial patterns and temporal dynamics of soil moisture predictions from the study cases, surface topography was found to be a crucial control in demonstrating the variation of near surface soil moisture, but not significantly affected the subsurface flow in deeper soil layers. In addition, we observed the best performance in case 3 representing that the lateral connectivity can contribute effectively to quantify the anisotropy and redistributing soil water in the root zone. Hence, the approach with connectivity-based lateral subsurface flow was able to better

  11. Intensity transform and Wiener filter in measurement of blood flow in arteriography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nunes, Polyana F.; Franco, Marcelo L. N.; Filho, João. B. D.; Patrocínio, Ana C.

    2015-03-01

    Using the arteriography examination, it is possible to check anomalies in blood vessels and diseases such as stroke, stenosis, bleeding and especially in the diagnosis of Encephalic Death in comatose individuals. Encephalic death can be diagnosed only when there is complete interruption of all brain functions, and hence the blood stream. During the examination, there may be some interference on the sensors, such as environmental factors, poor maintenance of equipment, patient movement, among other interference, which can directly affect the noise produced in angiography images. Then, we need to use digital image processing techniques to minimize this noise and improve the pixel count. Therefore, this paper proposes to use median filter and enhancement techniques for transformation of intensity using the sigmoid function together with the Wiener filter so you can get less noisy images. It's been realized two filtering techniques to remove the noise of images, one with the median filter and the other with the Wiener filter along the sigmoid function. For 14 tests quantified, including 7 Encephalic Death and 7 other cases, the technique that achieved a most satisfactory number of pixels quantified, also presenting a lesser amount of noise, is the Wiener filter sigmoid function, and in this case used with 0.03 cuttof.

  12. Modeling preferential water flow and solute transport in unsaturated soil using the active region model

    SciTech Connect

    Sheng, F.; Wang, K.; Zhang, R.; Liu, H.H.

    2009-03-15

    Preferential flow and solute transport are common processes in the unsaturated soil, in which distributions of soil water content and solute concentrations are often characterized as fractal patterns. An active region model (ARM) was recently proposed to describe the preferential flow and transport patterns. In this study, ARM governing equations were derived to model the preferential soil water flow and solute transport processes. To evaluate the ARM equations, dye infiltration experiments were conducted, in which distributions of soil water content and Cl{sup -} concentration were measured. Predicted results using the ARM and the mobile-immobile region model (MIM) were compared with the measured distributions of soil water content and Cl{sup -} concentration. Although both the ARM and the MIM are two-region models, they are fundamental different in terms of treatments of the flow region. The models were evaluated based on the modeling efficiency (ME). The MIM provided relatively poor prediction results of the preferential flow and transport with negative ME values or positive ME values less than 0.4. On the contrary, predicted distributions of soil water content and Cl- concentration using the ARM agreed reasonably well with the experimental data with ME values higher than 0.8. The results indicated that the ARM successfully captured the macroscopic behavior of preferential flow and solute transport in the unsaturated soil.

  13. Cross-flow, filter-sorbent catalyst for particulate, SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} control. First quarterly technical progress report, 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-03-01

    This synopsis describes a new concept for integrated pollutant control: a cross-flow filter comprised of layered, gas permeable membranes that act as a particulate filter, an SO{sub 2} sorbent, and a NO{sub x} reduction catalyst.

  14. Coupled Water Flow and Heat Transport in Seasonally Frozen Soils with Snow Accumulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, J. M.; Kasurak, A.; Kelly, R. E.; Duguay, C. R.; Derksen, C.

    2011-12-01

    A numerical model is developed to calculate coupled water flow and heat transport in seasonally frozen soil and snow. Separate equations are used to describe both unsaturated and saturated soil water flow. The effect of dissolved ions on soil water freezing point depression is included by combining an expression for osmotic head with the Clapeyron equation and the van Genuchten soil water retention function. The coupled water flow and heat transport equations are solved using the Thomas algorithm and Picard iteration. Ice pressure is always assumed zero and frost heave is neglected. The new model is tested using data from an existing laboratory soil column freezing experiment and an ongoing field experiment in a high-elevation rangeland soil. A dimensionless impedance factor describing the effect of ice pore blocking on soil hydraulic conductivity is treated as a calibration parameter for both cases. Calculated values of total water content for the laboratory soil column freezing experiment compare well with measured values, especially during the early stages of the experiment, as is also found by others. Modeling statistics for the rangeland field experiment show varied performance for soil water content and excellent performance for soil temperature, in accordance with earlier results with an older version of the model.

  15. Coupled Water Flow and Heat Transport in Seasonally Frozen Soils with Snow Accumulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    kelleners, T.

    2013-12-01

    A numerical model is developed to calculate coupled water flow and heat transport in seasonally frozen soil and snow. Separate equations are used to describe both unsaturated and saturated soil water flow. The effect of dissolved ions on soil water freezing point depression is included by combining an expression for osmotic head with the Clapeyron equation and the van Genuchten soil water retention function. The coupled water flow and heat transport equations are solved using the Thomas algorithm and Picard iteration. Ice pressure is always assumed zero and frost heave is neglected. The new model is tested using data from an existing laboratory soil column freezing experiment and an ongoing field experiment in a high-elevation rangeland soil. A dimensionless impedance factor describing the effect of ice pore blocking on soil hydraulic conductivity is treated as a calibration parameter for both cases. Calculated values of total water content for the laboratory soil column freezing experiment compare well with measured values, especially during the early stages of the experiment, as is also found by others. Modeling statistics for the rangeland field experiment show varied performance for soil water content and excellent performance for soil temperature, in accordance with earlier results with an older version of the model.

  16. Transport and survival of bacterial and viral tracers through submerged-flow constructed wetland and sand-filter system.

    PubMed

    Vega, Everardo; Lesikar, Bruce; Pillai, Suresh D

    2003-08-01

    Untreated or improperly treated wastewater has often been cited as the primary contamination source of groundwater. The use of decentralized wastewater treatment systems has applicability around the world since it obviates the need for extensive infrastructure development and expenditures. The use of a submerged flow constructed wetland (CW) and a sand filter to remove bacterial and viral pathogens from wastewater streams was evaluated in this study Salmonella sp. and a bacteriophages tracer were used in conjunction with the conservative bromide tracer to understand the fate and transport of these organisms in these treatment systems. Viral breakthrough numbers in the sand filter and CW were similar with a Spearman Rank correlation of 0.8 (P<0.05). In the CW, the virus exhibited almost a 3-log reduction, while in the sand filter, the viruses exhibited a 2-log reduction. The bacterial tracers, however, did not exhibit similar reductions. Low numbers of bacteria and viruses were still detectable in the effluent streams suggesting that disinfection of the effluent is critical. The survival of the tracer bacteria and viruses was as expected dependent on the biotic and abiotic conditions existing within the wastewater. The results suggest that the microbial removal characteristics of decentralized wastewater treatment systems can vary and depend on factors such as adsorption, desorption and inactivation which in turn depend on the design specifics such as filter media characteristics and local climatic conditions.

  17. Transport and survival of bacterial and viral tracers through submerged-flow constructed wetland and sand-filter system.

    PubMed

    Vega, Everardo; Lesikar, Bruce; Pillai, Suresh D

    2003-08-01

    Untreated or improperly treated wastewater has often been cited as the primary contamination source of groundwater. The use of decentralized wastewater treatment systems has applicability around the world since it obviates the need for extensive infrastructure development and expenditures. The use of a submerged flow constructed wetland (CW) and a sand filter to remove bacterial and viral pathogens from wastewater streams was evaluated in this study Salmonella sp. and a bacteriophages tracer were used in conjunction with the conservative bromide tracer to understand the fate and transport of these organisms in these treatment systems. Viral breakthrough numbers in the sand filter and CW were similar with a Spearman Rank correlation of 0.8 (P<0.05). In the CW, the virus exhibited almost a 3-log reduction, while in the sand filter, the viruses exhibited a 2-log reduction. The bacterial tracers, however, did not exhibit similar reductions. Low numbers of bacteria and viruses were still detectable in the effluent streams suggesting that disinfection of the effluent is critical. The survival of the tracer bacteria and viruses was as expected dependent on the biotic and abiotic conditions existing within the wastewater. The results suggest that the microbial removal characteristics of decentralized wastewater treatment systems can vary and depend on factors such as adsorption, desorption and inactivation which in turn depend on the design specifics such as filter media characteristics and local climatic conditions. PMID:12676500

  18. Groundwater flow inverse modeling in non-MultiGaussian media: performance assessment of the normal-score Ensemble Kalman Filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, L.; Zhou, H.; Hendricks Franssen, H. J.; Gómez-Hernández, J. J.

    2011-07-01

    The normal-score ensemble Kalman filter (NS-EnKF) is tested on a synthetic aquifer characterized by the presence of channels with a bimodal distribution of its hydraulic conductivities. Fourteen scenarios are analyzed which differ among them in one or various of the following aspects: the prior random function model, the boundary conditions of the flow problem, the number of piezometers used in the assimilation process, or the use of covariance localization in the implementation of the Kalman filter. The performance of the NS-EnKF is evaluated through the ensemble mean and variance maps, the connectivity patterns of the individual conductivity realizations and the degree of reproduction of the piezometric heads. The results show that (i) the localized NS-EnKF can identify correctly the channels when a large number of conditioning piezometers are used even when an erroneous prior random function model is used, (ii) localization plays an important role to prevent filter inbreeding and results in a better logconductivity characterization, and (iii) the NS-EnKF works equally well under very different flow configurations.

  19. Groundwater flow inverse modeling in non-MultiGaussian media: performance assessment of the normal-score Ensemble Kalman Filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, L.; Zhou, H.; Hendricks Franssen, H. J.; Gómez-Hernández, J. J.

    2012-02-01

    The normal-score ensemble Kalman filter (NS-EnKF) is tested on a synthetic aquifer characterized by the presence of channels with a bimodal distribution of its hydraulic conductivities. This is a clear example of an aquifer that cannot be characterized by a multiGaussian distribution. Fourteen scenarios are analyzed which differ among them in one or various of the following aspects: the prior random function model, the boundary conditions of the flow problem, the number of piezometers used in the assimilation process, or the use of covariance localization in the implementation of the Kalman filter. The performance of the NS-EnKF is evaluated through the ensemble mean and variance maps, the connectivity patterns of the individual conductivity realizations and the degree of reproduction of the piezometric heads. The results show that (i) the localized NS-EnKF can characterize the non-multiGaussian underlying hydraulic distribution even when an erroneous prior random function model is used, (ii) localization plays an important role to prevent filter inbreeding and results in a better logconductivity characterization, and (iii) the NS-EnKF works equally well under very different flow configurations.

  20. The preferential flow of soil: A widespread phenomenon in pedological perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yinghu; Zhang, Mingxiang; Niu, Jianzhi; Zheng, Haijin

    2016-06-01

    The article provides an overview of studies about the preferential flow phenomenon. This phenomenon is one of the types of the transportation of water solution through the soil profile by preferential channels (pathways) with a relatively high speed and with a slight change in the chemical composition of the solution. Interest in this phenomenon has risen sharply in the last two decades due to the observed fast transportation of contaminants from soil surface into groundwater level. On the basis of the literature data, the authors give the definition of this phenomenon, consider its types, degree, features, mechanisms, methods and models and research perspectives, in particular the interaction between preferential flow and soil matrix flow. The article considers the aspects of the movement of soil water carrying heavy metals and pesticides; hence, it concerns the protection of environment and people's health. It provides the thorough review of the studies on the preferential flow, and describes the research directions and their development.

  1. Effects of soil stratigraphy on pore-water flow in a creek-marsh system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xin, Pei; Kong, Jun; Li, Ling; Barry, D. A.

    2012-12-01

    SummaryIn coastal marshes, low-permeability mud is often found overlying high permeability sandy deposits. A recently developed 3D creek-marsh model was used to investigate the effects of soil stratigraphy (a mud layer overlying a sandy-loam layer) on pore-water flow in the marsh. Simulation results showed significant modifications of tide-induced pore-water flow due to the layered soil. The presence of the lower sandy-loam layer with a relatively high hydraulic conductivity not only increased the pore-water flow speed but also changed the flow direction, particularly in the upper mud layer where enhanced vertical flow dominated. Particle tracking revealed large changes in the overall pore-water circulation pattern, and associated particle travel path and time due to the influence of the soil stratigraphy. While the amount of water exchange between the marsh soil and tidal water increased, the residence time of particles in both soil layers was reduced. Sensitivity analysis showed the importance of soil compressibility, capillary rise and hydraulic conductivity contrast between the soil layers in modulating the effect of soil stratigraphy. In particular, the total net influx and efflux across the marsh surface (including the creek/channel bank and bed) increased proportionally with the square root of the lower layer's hydraulic conductivity. These results demonstrated the interplay of tides, marsh topography and soil stratigraphy in controlling the pore-water flow characteristics, which underpin solute transport and transformation as well as the aeration condition in the marsh soil.

  2. Universality of Preferential Flow in Field Soils across Scales: Theoretical Perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, H.

    2009-12-01

    Preferential flow (PF) is a fundamentally important soil hydrologic process that directly links to hydrological connectivity across scales. Based on three connected theories and extensive published experimental evidence, this paper attempts to justify the universality of PF in natural soils--meaning that PF can potentially occur in any soil anywhere in nature. First, we examine non-equilibrium thermodynamics as applied to the open dissipative system of field soils with continuous energy inputs. This provides a theoretical foundation for explaining the genesis and evolution of ubiquitous structured heterogeneity in soils that leads to widespread potential for PF occurrence. A dual-partitioning of pedogenesis results in ΔSsoil = ΔSmatrix + ΔSstructure, where ΔSmatrix is the entropy change related to dissipative processes and soil matrix formation, while ΔSstructure is the entropy exchange with the surrounding that is associated with organizing processes and soil structure formation. Second, we explore constructal theory to explain universal dual-flow regimes in natural soils--one with high resistivity (Darcy flow) and the other with low resistivity (PF)--together, they form natural PF configuration that provides the least global resistance to flow. While limited chronologic data suggest reduction in subsoil saturated hydraulic conductivity as soil ages, constructal theory appears to partially explain some general characteristics of weathering process. Third, the theory of evolving networks sheds light on diverse flow networks in soils that increase the efficiency or effectiveness of matter or energy transfer in the subsurface, because networks are part of the organization resulting from minimum energy dissipation and far-from-equilibrium thermodynamics. All the three theories discussed support the notion that PF is universal in natural soils.

  3. Distribution flow: A general process in the top layer of water repellent soils

    SciTech Connect

    Ritsema, C.J.; Dekker, L.W.

    1995-05-01

    Water and solute input rates on the soil surface may vary considerably from place to place. Distribution flow, i.e., the process of water and solute flow in a lateral direction over and through the very first millimeter or centimeter of the soil profile, is an extremely important process in distributing the rainfall toward places where vertical transport occurs. This study was carried out to quantify the process the distribution flow and its underlying process mechanism. A KBr tracer was applied on two water repellent sandy soils to follow the actual flow paths of water and solutes in the upper part of the profile. On both experimental fields, distribution flow actually displaced the applied bromide laterally through a very thin layer on the top of the soil profile, referred to as the {open_quotes}distribution layer.{close_quotes} Distribution flow was directed to locations within the 0- to 2.5- cm layer, where the soil was the least water repellent. On these relatively wet areas, the highest concentrations of bromide could be found. There was an acceleration in the vertical transport of water and bromide on these sites. Effects of distribution flow on the local concentration of water and solutes can be expected to be even more pronounced in uneven terrains, where lateral displacements may increase from the millimeter-centimeter scale to tens of meters. Implications for modeling field-scale water and solute flow are outlined. 71 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. Distribution Flow: A General Process in the Top Layer of Water Repellent Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritsema, Coen J.; Dekker, Louis W.

    1995-05-01

    Water and solute input rates on the soil surface may vary considerably from place to place. Distribution flow, i.e., the process of water and solute flow in a lateral direction over and through the very first millimeter or centimeter of the soil profile, is an extremely important process in distributing the rainfall toward places where vertical transport occurs. This study was carried out to quantify the process of distribution flow and its underlying process mechanism. A KBr tracer was applied on two water repellent sandy soils to follow the actual flow paths of water and solutes in the upper part of the profile. On both experimental fields, distribution flow actually displaced the applied bromide laterally through a very thin layer on the top of the soil profile, referred to here as the "distribution layer." Distribution flow was directed to locations within the 0- to 2.5-cm layer, where the soil was the least water repellent. On these relatively wet areas, the highest concentrations of bromide could be found. There was an acceleration in the vertical transport of water and bromide on these sites. Effects of distribution flow on the local concentration of water and solutes can be expected to be even more pronounced in uneven terrains, where lateral displacements may increase from the millimeter-centimeter scale to tens of meters. Implications for modeling field-scale water and solute flow are outlined.

  5. The impact of mass flow and masking on the pressure drop of air filter in heavy-duty diesel engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoseeinzadeh, Sepideh; Gorji-Bandpy, Mofid

    2012-04-01

    This paper presents a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) calculation approach to predict and evaluate the impact of the mass-flow inlet on the pressure drop of turbocharger`s air filtfer in heavy-duty diesel engine. The numerical computations were carried out using a commercial CFD program whereas the inlet area of the air filter consisted of several holes connected to a channel. After entering through the channel, the air passes among the holes and enters the air filter. The effect of masking holes and hydraulic diameter is studied and investigated on pressure drop. The results indicate that pressure drop increase with decreasing of hydraulic diameter and masking of the holes has considerable affect on the pressure drop.

  6. Soil Heat Flow. Physical Processes in Terrestrial and Aquatic Ecosystems, Transport Processes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simpson, James R.

    These materials were designed to be used by life science students for instruction in the application of physical theory to ecosystem operation. Most modules contain computer programs which are built around a particular application of a physical process. Soil heat flow and the resulting soil temperature distributions have ecological consequences…

  7. Overland flow generation mechanisms affected by topsoil treatment: Application to soil conservation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hueso-González, P.; Ruiz-Sinoga, J. D.; Martínez-Murillo, J. F.; Lavee, H.

    2015-01-01

    Hortonian overland-flow is responsible for significant amounts of soil loss in Mediterranean geomorphological systems. Restoring the native vegetation is the most effective way to control runoff and sediment yield. During the seeding and plant establishment, vegetation cover may be better sustained if soil is amended with an external source. Four amendments were applied in an experimental set of plots: straw mulching (SM); mulch with chipped branches of Aleppo Pine (Pinus halepensis L.) (PM); TerraCottem hydroabsorbent polymer (HP); and sewage sludge (RU). Plots were afforested following the same spatial pattern, and amendments were mixed with the soil at the rate 10 Mg ha- 1. This research demonstrates the role played by the treatments in overland flow generation mechanism. On one hand, the high macroporosity of SM and PM, together with the fact that soil moisture increased with depth, explains weak overland flow and thus low sediment yield due to saturation conditions. Therefore, regarding overland flow and sediment yield, RU behaves similarly to SM and PM. On the other hand, when HP was applied, overland flow developed quickly with relatively high amounts. This, together with the decrease downward in soil moisture along the soil profile, proved that mechanisms of overland flow are of the Hortonian type.

  8. Improving Efficiency of a Counter-Current Flow Moving Bed Granular Filter

    SciTech Connect

    Colver, G.M.; Brown, R.C.; Shi, H.; Soo, D.S-C.

    2002-09-18

    The goal of this research is to improve the performance of moving bed granular filters for gas cleaning at high temperatures and pressures. A second goal of the research is to optimize the performances of both solids and gas filtering processes through appropriate use of granular bed materials, particle sizes, feed rates etc. in a factorial study. These goals are directed toward applications of advanced coal-fired power cycles under development by the U.S. Department of Energy including pressurized fluidized bed combustion and integrated gasification/combined cycles based on gas turbines and fuel cells. Only results for particulate gas cleaning are reported here.

  9. Pressure-Velocity-Scalar Filtered Mass Density Function for Large Eddy Simulation of Compressible Turbulent Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nouri Gheimassi, Arash; Givi, Peyman; Nik, Mehdi B.; Pope, Stephen B.

    2015-11-01

    A new model is developed which accounts for the effects of subgrid scale pressure in the context of the filtered density function (FDF) formulation. This results in a pressure-velocity-scalar filtered mass density function (PVS-FMDF), which is suitable for large eddy simulation of compressible turbulence. Following its mathematical definition, an exact transport equation is derived for the PVS-FMDF. This equation is modeled in a probabilistic manner by a system of stochastic differential equations (SDEs). The consistency and the predictive capability of the model are established by conducting LES of a three-dimensional compressible mixing layer, and comparison with direct numerical simulation (DNS) data.

  10. Use of sugarcane filter cake and nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium fertilization in the process of bioremediation of soil contaminated with diesel.

    PubMed

    Tellechea, Fernando Reynel Fundora; Martins, Marco Antônio; da Silva, Alexsandro Araujo; da Gama-Rodrigues, Emanuela Forestieri; Martins, Meire Lelis Leal

    2016-09-01

    This study evaluated the use of sugarcane filter cake and nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium (NPK) fertilization in the bioremediation of a soil contaminated with diesel fuel using a completely randomized design. Five treatments (uncontaminated soil, T1; soil contaminated with diesel, T2; soil contaminated with diesel and treated with 15 % (wt) filter cake, T3; soil contaminated with diesel and treated with NPK fertilizer, T4; and soil contaminated with diesel and treated with 15 % (wt) filter cake and NPK fertilizer, T5) and four evaluation periods (1, 60, 120, and 180 days after the beginning of the experiment) were used according to a 4 × 5 factorial design to analyze CO2 release. The variables total organic carbon (TOC) and total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) remaining in the soil were analyzed using a 5 × 2 factorial design, with the same treatments described above and two evaluation periods (1 and 180 days after the beginning of the experiment). In T3 and T5, CO2 release was significantly higher, compared with the other treatments. Significant TPH removal was observed on day 180, when percent removal values were 61.9, 70.1, 68.2, and 75.9 in treatments T2, T3, T4, and T5, respectively, compared with the initial value (T1).

  11. Use of sugarcane filter cake and nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium fertilization in the process of bioremediation of soil contaminated with diesel.

    PubMed

    Tellechea, Fernando Reynel Fundora; Martins, Marco Antônio; da Silva, Alexsandro Araujo; da Gama-Rodrigues, Emanuela Forestieri; Martins, Meire Lelis Leal

    2016-09-01

    This study evaluated the use of sugarcane filter cake and nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium (NPK) fertilization in the bioremediation of a soil contaminated with diesel fuel using a completely randomized design. Five treatments (uncontaminated soil, T1; soil contaminated with diesel, T2; soil contaminated with diesel and treated with 15 % (wt) filter cake, T3; soil contaminated with diesel and treated with NPK fertilizer, T4; and soil contaminated with diesel and treated with 15 % (wt) filter cake and NPK fertilizer, T5) and four evaluation periods (1, 60, 120, and 180 days after the beginning of the experiment) were used according to a 4 × 5 factorial design to analyze CO2 release. The variables total organic carbon (TOC) and total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) remaining in the soil were analyzed using a 5 × 2 factorial design, with the same treatments described above and two evaluation periods (1 and 180 days after the beginning of the experiment). In T3 and T5, CO2 release was significantly higher, compared with the other treatments. Significant TPH removal was observed on day 180, when percent removal values were 61.9, 70.1, 68.2, and 75.9 in treatments T2, T3, T4, and T5, respectively, compared with the initial value (T1). PMID:27255323

  12. Soil erosion on upland areas by rainfall and overland flow

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil erosion in agricultural watersheds is a systemic problem that has plagued mankind ever since the practice of agriculture began some 9,000 years ago. It is a worldwide problem, the severity of which varies from location to location depending on weather, soil type, topography, cropping practices,...

  13. A Mathematical Model for Predicting Moisture Flow in an Unsaturated Soil Under Hydraulic and Temperature Gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dakshanamurthy, V.; Fredlund, D. G.

    1981-06-01

    A theoretical model is presented to predict the moisture flow in an unsaturated soil as the result of hydraulic and temperature gradients. A partial differential heat flow equation (for above-freezing conditions) and the two partial differential transient flow equations (one for the water phase and the other for the air phase), are derived in this paper and solved using a finite difference technique. Darcy's law is used to describe the flow in the water phase, while Pick's law is used for the air phase. The constitutive equations proposed by Fredlund and Morgenstern are used to define the volume change of an unsaturated soil. The simultaneous solution of the partial differential equations gives the temperature, the pore water pressure, and the pore air pressure distribution with space and time in an unsaturated soil. The pressure changes can, in turn, be used to compute the quantity of moisture flow.

  14. Renin release and autoregulation of blood flow in a new model of non-filtering non-transporting kidney.

    PubMed

    Sanowski, J; Wocial, B

    1977-04-01

    1. A recently developed model of a non-filtering, non-transporting dog kidney, obtained by an in situ filling of tubules with low-viscosity oil, was applied for studies of renin release and autoregulation of renal blood flow (RBF). 2. Renal blood flow was partially autoregulated after oil blockade of tubules, as indicated by a mean autoregulation index (Semple-de Wardener (1959) of 0-5. This was comparable to autoregulation of the stop-flow kidney (index 0-6) and contrasted with abolition of autoregulation after hypertonic mannitol loading at stop-flow conditions (index 1-1). 3. The aortic construction at a suprarenal level, which decreased renal perfusion pressure of the oil-blocked kidney 35 +/- (S.E. of mean) 6 mmHg, produced an increase in arterial plasma renin activity of 1-8 +/- 0-1 ng. ml.-1 (P less than 0-02). Renin secretion rate decreased 33 to 70 ng.min-1 in three dogs in which renal perfusion pressure was reduced to 60--66 mmHg, but increased 110 +/- 41 ng.min-1 when pressure reductions were kept within the renal blood flow autoregulation range (n=8, P less than 0-025). 4. These results suggest that signals from the tubular receptor (macula densa) are not necessary for stimulation of renin release or autoregulation of renal blood flow.

  15. Extended Kalman filter method for state of charge estimation of vanadium redox flow battery using thermal-dependent electrical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Binyu; Zhao, Jiyun; Wei, Zhongbao; Skyllas-Kazacos, Maria

    2014-09-01

    State of charge (SOC) estimation is a key issue for battery management since an accurate estimation method can ensure safe operation and prevent the over-charge/discharge of a battery. Traditionally, open circuit voltage (OCV) method is utilized to estimate the stack SOC and one open flow cell is needed in each battery stack [1,2]. In this paper, an alternative method, extended Kalman filter (EKF) method, is proposed for SOC estimation for VRBs. By measuring the stack terminal voltages and applied currents, SOC can be predicted with a state estimator instead of an additional open circuit flow cell. To implement EKF estimator, an electrical model is required for battery analysis. A thermal-dependent electrical circuit model is proposed to describe the charge/discharge characteristics of the VRB. Two scenarios are tested for the robustness of the EKF. For the lab testing scenarios, the filtered stack voltage tracks the experimental data despite the model errors. For the online operation, the simulated temperature rise is observed and the maximum SOC error is within 5.5%. It is concluded that EKF method is capable of accurately predicting SOC using stack terminal voltages and applied currents in the absence of an open flow cell for OCV measurement.

  16. Comparative toxicity in earthworms Eisenia fetida and Lumbricus terrestris exposed to cadmium nitrate using artificial soil and filter paper protocols

    SciTech Connect

    Fitzpatrick, L.C.; Goven, A.J.; Muratti-Ortiz, J.F.

    1996-07-01

    Earthworms are ideal soil organisms for use in terrestrial ecotoxicology. As such, several earthworm protocols have been developed for testing toxic potential of chemicals and contaminated soils. Of these, the 48-h filter paper contact (FP) and the 14-d artificial soil exposure (AS) protocols, using mortality (LC50) as the toxic endpoint and Eisenia fetida as the test species, have received the most attention, with the latter being adopted by both OECD and EEC in Europe and the Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) in the United States. Although the FP technique, adopted by EEC, provides for inexpensive reproducible toxicity screening for chemicals (i.e. establishing relative toxicities), it has been criticized for lacking the ecotoxicological relevance of the AS protocol. Choice of earthworm species for laboratory testing also has been controversial. The manure worm, E. fetida, is criticized for not being sufficiently sensitive to chemicals or representative of {open_quotes}typical{close_quotes} earthworms. Lumbricus terrestris and Apporectodea caliginosa have been suggested as more sensitive and ecologically relevant earthworms by Dean-Ross and Martin, respectively. This paper compares the AS and FP protocols in assessing toxicity of cadminum to L. terrestris and E. fetida using LC50s and LC50s. 19 refs., 2 tabs.

  17. Evaluating uncertainties in multi-layer soil moisture estimation with support vector machines and ensemble Kalman filtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Di; Mishra, Ashok K.; Yu, Zhongbo

    2016-07-01

    This paper examines the combination of support vector machines (SVM) and the dual ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) technique to estimate root zone soil moisture at different soil layers up to 100 cm depth. Multiple experiments are conducted in a data rich environment to construct and validate the SVM model and to explore the effectiveness and robustness of the EnKF technique. It was observed that the performance of SVM relies more on the initial length of training set than other factors (e.g., cost function, regularization parameter, and kernel parameters). The dual EnKF technique proved to be efficient to improve SVM with observed data either at each time step or at a flexible time steps. The EnKF technique can reach its maximum efficiency when the updating ensemble size approaches a certain threshold. It was observed that the SVM model performance for the multi-layer soil moisture estimation can be influenced by the rainfall magnitude (e.g., dry and wet spells).

  18. Water flow in soil and plants: the importance of good contacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carminati, A.

    2009-04-01

    Water flow in unsaturated porous media is controlled by the continuity of the liquid phase through the pore system. In many cases, the pore system is composed of regions with different material properties separated by interfaces containing macro-pores or gaps that are easily drained. When these gaps are drained the continuity of the liquid flow path may break, with a consequent decrease in the conductivity of the medium. We present two examples demonstrating the controlling role of interfaces on water flow. The first example describes an aggregated soil. Due to the aggregate roughness, the inter-aggregate contacts contain macro-pores which are rapidly drained. The hydraulic behavior of contacts varies from highly conductive when water fills the contact to a bottle-neck to flow as water pressure drops and contact asperities rapidly drained. The conductivity of the system is determined by the water-filled contact area between aggregates, rather then by the average volumetric water content. The second example refers to the contacts between soil and roots. By means of X-ray tomography we showed that during periods of drought, roots shrink and may lose contact with the soil, with a consequent reduction in water uptake. When the soil is irrigated again, roots swell partially refilling the gaps. Opening and closing of gaps may help plant to optimize water use, to prevent water loss when soil dries, and to restore the soil-root continuity after irrigation. Additionally, soil-root continuity is improved by root exudates and root hairs, which make the soil-root interface a complex and dynamic biomaterial with specific and unique properties. These two examples show that interfaces between heterogeneous media can have a big impact on water flow in porous media and demonstrate that volumetric averaging for predicting transport properties can lead to wrong results. An approach based on flow cross sections and interfacial properties may be the way to a deeper understanding and

  19. Treatment of petrochemical secondary effluent by an up-flow biological aerated filter (BAF).

    PubMed

    Fu, L Y; Wu, C Y; Zhou, Y X; Zuo, J E; Ding, Y

    2016-01-01

    In this study, petrochemical secondary effluent was treated by a 55 cm diameter pilot-scale biological aerated filter (BAF) with a media depth of 220 cm. Volcanic rock grains were filled as the BAF media. Median removal efficiency of chemical oxygen demand (COD) and ammonia nitrogen (NH3-N) was 29.35 and 57.98%, respectively. Moreover, the removal profile of the COD, NH3-N, total nitrogen and total organic carbon demonstrated that the filter height of 140 cm made up to 90% of the total removal efficiency of the final effluent. By gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, removal efficiencies of 2-chloromethyl-1,3-dioxolane, and benzonitrile, indene and naphthalene were obtained, ranging from 30.12 to 63.01%. The biomass and microbial activity of the microorganisms on the filter media were in general reduced with increasing filter height, which is consistent with the removal profile of the contaminants. The detected genera Defluviicoccus, Betaproteobacteria_unclassified and the Blastocatella constituted 1.86-6.75% of the identified gene, enhancing the COD and nitrogen removal in BAF for treating petrochemical secondary effluent. PMID:27120658

  20. Treatment of petrochemical secondary effluent by an up-flow biological aerated filter (BAF).

    PubMed

    Fu, L Y; Wu, C Y; Zhou, Y X; Zuo, J E; Ding, Y

    2016-01-01

    In this study, petrochemical secondary effluent was treated by a 55 cm diameter pilot-scale biological aerated filter (BAF) with a media depth of 220 cm. Volcanic rock grains were filled as the BAF media. Median removal efficiency of chemical oxygen demand (COD) and ammonia nitrogen (NH3-N) was 29.35 and 57.98%, respectively. Moreover, the removal profile of the COD, NH3-N, total nitrogen and total organic carbon demonstrated that the filter height of 140 cm made up to 90% of the total removal efficiency of the final effluent. By gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, removal efficiencies of 2-chloromethyl-1,3-dioxolane, and benzonitrile, indene and naphthalene were obtained, ranging from 30.12 to 63.01%. The biomass and microbial activity of the microorganisms on the filter media were in general reduced with increasing filter height, which is consistent with the removal profile of the contaminants. The detected genera Defluviicoccus, Betaproteobacteria_unclassified and the Blastocatella constituted 1.86-6.75% of the identified gene, enhancing the COD and nitrogen removal in BAF for treating petrochemical secondary effluent.

  1. [Performance of cross flow trickling filter for H2S gas treatment].

    PubMed

    Liu, Chun-Jing; Li, Jian; Liu, Jia; Peng, Shu-Jing; Li, Chao; Chen, Ying; He, Hong

    2012-09-01

    A grading cross bio-trickling filter was designed for H2S removal. Mixed microorganisms domesticated from the former experiment were immobilized to start up the trickling filter. Removal performances during starting up period and different loadings were investigated. Results showed that the immobilization of the trickling filter was completed within 3 d. The removal efficiency was higher than 99% when the inlet concentration was in the range of 110 mg x m(-3) to 230 mg x m(-3) (EBRT 30 s). At low inlet loadings, the front part of the trickling filter played a major role in H2S degradation, accounting for about 85%. Microbial diversity and population of the front part were superior to the tail one. At higher loadings, microbial diversity and population of the tail part increased significantly, from 4.5 x 10(7) cells x g (-1) to 5.17 x 10(8) cells x g(-1), and the elimination capacity was also improved,from 0.04 g x h(-1) to 0.67 g x h(-1). Rod-shaped bacteria were the dominant microorganisms on the surface of ceramics in the steady state as observed by SEM. The surfaces of ceramics were covered by a lot of microbial metabolites at high loadings. Analysis of the metabolites indicated that the majority of H2S was oxidized to sulfur and only a small portion was converted to sulfate.

  2. Andic soil features and debris flows in Italy. New perspective towards prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scognamiglio, Solange; Calcaterra, Domenico; Iamarino, Michela; Langella, Giuliano; Orefice, Nadia; Vingiani, Simona; Terribile, Fabio

    2016-04-01

    Debris flows are dangerous hazards causing fatalities and damage. Previous works have demonstrated that the materials involved by debris flows in Campania (southern Italy) are soils classified as Andosols. These soils have peculiar chemical and physical properties which make them fertile but also vulnerable to landslide. In Italy, andic soil properties are found both in volcanic and non-volcanic mountain ecosystems (VME and NVME). Here, we focused on the assessment of the main chemical and physical properties of the soils in the detachment areas of eight debris flows occurred in NVME of Italy in the last 70 years. Such landslides were selected by consulting the official Italian geodatabase (IFFI Project). Andic properties (by means of ammonium oxalate extractable Fe, Si and Al forms for the calculation of Alo+1/2Feo) were also evaluated and a comparison with soils of VME was performed to assess possible common features. Landslide source areas were characterised by slope gradient ranging from 25° to 50° and lithological heterogeneity of the bedrock. The soils showed similar, i.e. all were very deep, had a moderately thick topsoil with a high organic carbon (OC) content decreasing regularly with depth. The cation exchange capacity trend was generally consistent with the OC and the pH varied from extremely to slightly acid, but increased with depth. Furthermore, the soils had high water retention values both at saturation (0.63 to 0.78 cm3 cm‑3) and in the dryer part of the water retention curve, and displayed a prevalent loamy texture. Such properties denote the chemical and physical fertility of the investigated ecosystems. The values of Alo+1/2Feoindicated that the soils had vitric or andic features and can be classified as Andosols. The comparison between NVME soils and those of VME showed similar depth, thickness of soil horizons, and family texture, whereas soil pH, degree of development of andic properties and allophane content were higher for VME soils

  3. Andic soil features and debris flows in Italy. New perspective towards prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scognamiglio, Solange; Calcaterra, Domenico; Iamarino, Michela; Langella, Giuliano; Orefice, Nadia; Vingiani, Simona; Terribile, Fabio

    2016-04-01

    Debris flows are dangerous hazards causing fatalities and damage. Previous works have demonstrated that the materials involved by debris flows in Campania (southern Italy) are soils classified as Andosols. These soils have peculiar chemical and physical properties which make them fertile but also vulnerable to landslide. In Italy, andic soil properties are found both in volcanic and non-volcanic mountain ecosystems (VME and NVME). Here, we focused on the assessment of the main chemical and physical properties of the soils in the detachment areas of eight debris flows occurred in NVME of Italy in the last 70 years. Such landslides were selected by consulting the official Italian geodatabase (IFFI Project). Andic properties (by means of ammonium oxalate extractable Fe, Si and Al forms for the calculation of Alo+1/2Feo) were also evaluated and a comparison with soils of VME was performed to assess possible common features. Landslide source areas were characterised by slope gradient ranging from 25° to 50° and lithological heterogeneity of the bedrock. The soils showed similar, i.e. all were very deep, had a moderately thick topsoil with a high organic carbon (OC) content decreasing regularly with depth. The cation exchange capacity trend was generally consistent with the OC and the pH varied from extremely to slightly acid, but increased with depth. Furthermore, the soils had high water retention values both at saturation (0.63 to 0.78 cm3 cm-3) and in the dryer part of the water retention curve, and displayed a prevalent loamy texture. Such properties denote the chemical and physical fertility of the investigated ecosystems. The values of Alo+1/2Feoindicated that the soils had vitric or andic features and can be classified as Andosols. The comparison between NVME soils and those of VME showed similar depth, thickness of soil horizons, and family texture, whereas soil pH, degree of development of andic properties and allophane content were higher for VME soils. Such

  4. Fluid Flow in Porous Media for Soil-Water Retention

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cejas, Cesare; Selva, Bertrand; Beaufret, Raphael; Hough, Larry; Fretigny, Christian; Dreyfus, Remi; CNRS / Rhodia / UPenn UMI 3254 Team

    2011-11-01

    The study aims to understand the mechanisms that determine the behavior of water in soil. In developing a better comprehension of the coupling between the various fluxes (e.g. evaporation, drainage) in soil and the surrounding environment, we elaborate strategies that permit to understand and improve particularly the water absorption by the roots. Our first approach, through direct visualization, focuses on evaporation out of a 2D model soil consisting of monolayer glass beads. Evaporation from porous media exhibits an abrupt transition from capillary-supported regime 1 to diffusion-controlled regime 2. Varying the wettability of the model soil suggests that the duration of regime 1evaporation and drying front formation in hydrophobic media are shorter than in hydrophilic media due to the absence of hydraulic continuity towards the evaporating surface. We then study how evaporation couples in the presence of roots in the model soil while being subjected to various treatment conditions (e.g. physical additives, etc.). Through this study, we would be able to quantify how the physico-chemical soil treatments affect these phenomena and inspire solutions for improving soil water retention.

  5. Using soil moisture and spatial yield patterns to identify subsurface flow pathways.

    PubMed

    Gish, T J; Walthall, C L; Daughtry, C S T; Kung, K-J S

    2005-01-01

    Subsurface soil water dynamics can influence crop growth and the fate of surface-applied fertilizers and pesticides. Recently, a method was proposed using only ground-penetrating radar (GPR) and digital elevation maps (DEMs) to identify locations where subsurface water converged into discrete pathways. For this study, the GPR protocol for identifying horizontal subsurface flow pathways was extended to a 3.2-ha field, uncertainty is discussed, and soil moisture and yield patterns are presented as confirming evidence of the extent of the subsurface flow pathways. Observed soil water contents supported the existence of discrete preferential funnel flow processes occurring near the GPR-identified preferential flow pathways. Soil moisture also played a critical role in the formation of corn (Zea mays L.) grain yield patterns with yield spatial patterns being similar for mild and severe drought conditions. A buffer zone protocol was introduced that allowed the impact of subsurface flow pathways on corn grain yield to be quantified. Results indicate that when a GPR-identified subsurface clay layer was within 2 m of the soil surface, there was a beneficial impact on yield during a drought year. Furthermore, the buffer zone analysis demonstrated that corn grain yields decreased as the horizontal distance from the GPR-identified subsurface flow pathways increased during a drought year. Averaged real-time soil moisture contents at 0.1 m also decreased with increasing distance from the GPR-identified flow pathways. This research suggests that subsurface flow pathways exist and influence soil moisture and corn grain yield patterns.

  6. Effects of rainfall and surface flow on chemical diffusion from soil to runoff water

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Although basic processes of diffusion and convection have been used to quantify chemical transport from soil to surface runoff, there are little research results actually showing how these processes were affected by rainfall and surface flow. We developed a laboratory flow cell and a sequence of exp...

  7. Characterisation of flow paths and saturated conductivity in a soil block in relation to chloride breakthrough

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deeks, L. K.; Bengough, A. G.; Stutter, M. I.; Young, I. M.; Zhang, X. X.

    2008-01-01

    SummaryThe nature of flow paths, determined by soil structural features, may greatly influence solute breakthrough in a soil profile. We compared two contrasting methods of characterising flow within an upland soil with distinct organic and mineral horizons: saturated conductivity measured on cores sampled destructively; and breakthrough measurements for chloride in 2.4 × 3.4 × 1 m in situ lysimeter. Chloride tracer was applied to the soil surface, and soil solution samples collected at 20 known locations using suction cup samplers. Breakthrough curves were classified into statistically distinct pathway types using Principal Coordinate Analysis, according to peak concentration and the time to peak concentration. Of the 20 locations, two exhibited rapid macropore flow, two intermediate mesopore flow, and seven slower micropore flow. The remaining nine samplers did not register breakthrough within the 16-day duration of the experiment. Destructive core (6 cm diameter by 6 cm deep) sampling was used to characterise saturated hydraulic conductivity at 116 locations within the soil block. Solute breakthrough speed was linearly related to kriged values of saturated conductivity for the meso and micropore flow paths ( r = 0.88 for initial breakthrough; r = 0.85 for peak concentration breakthrough), but not for macropore flow. This indicates that kriged saturated conductivities provided good prediction of the speed of the meso and micro flow paths. Frequency distributions of saturated hydraulic conductivities and breakthrough speeds did not differ significantly, although the breakthrough speed distribution was truncated by the limited duration of the lysimeter experiment. Lysimeter breakthrough for macropore pathways was faster than predicted from the core conductivities, indicating that the locations of these fast flow paths were not predicted accurately by the kriged saturated conductivities. Longer duration lysimeter experiments would be required to characterise

  8. One-dimensional soil temperature simulation with Common Land Model by assimilating in situ observations and MODIS LST with the ensemble particle filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Zhongbo; Fu, Xiaolei; Luo, Lifeng; Lü, Haishen; Ju, Qin; Liu, Di; Kalin, Dresden A.; Huang, Dui; Yang, Chuanguo; Zhao, Lili

    2014-08-01

    Soil temperature plays an important role in hydrology, agriculture, and meteorology. In order to improve the accuracy of soil temperature simulation, a soil temperature data assimilation system was developed based on the Ensemble Particle Filter (EnPF) and the Common Land Model (CLM), and then applied in the Walnut Gulch Experimental Watershed (WGEW) in Arizona, United States. Surface soil temperature in situ observations and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer Land Surface Temperature (MODIS LST) data were assimilated into the system. In this study, four different assimilation experiments were conducted: (1) assimilating in situ observations of instantaneous surface soil temperature each hour, (2) assimilating in situ observations of instantaneous surface soil temperature once per day, (3) assimilating verified MODIS LST once per day, and (4) assimilating original MODIS LST once per day. These four experiments reflect a transition from high-quality and more frequent in situ observations to lower quality and less frequent remote sensing data in the data assimilation system. The results from these four experiments show that the assimilated results are better than the simulated results without assimilation at all layers except the bottom layer, while the superiority gradually diminishes as the quality and frequency of the observations decrease. This demonstrates that remote sensing data can be assimilated using the ensemble particle filter in poorly gauged catchments to obtain highly accurate soil variables (e.g., soil moisture, soil temperature). Meanwhile, the results also demonstrate that the ensemble particle filter is effective in assimilating soil temperature observations to improve simulations, but the performance of the data assimilation method is affected by the frequency of assimilation and the quality of the input data.

  9. Analysing flow patterns in degraded peat soils using TiO2 dye

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Haojie; Lennartz, Bernd

    2014-05-01

    Dye tracing is a valuable method for studying the flow patterns in soils. However, limited information is available on water flow and solute transport pathways in dark colored peat soils because the frequently used Brilliant Blue FCF dye does not visibly stain the soil. In this study, we were aiming at testing the suitability of Titanium dioxide (TiO2) as a dye tracer for dark peat soils. The objectives were to quantify the physical properties of different degraded peat soils and visualize the flow patterns. Soil samples were collected from two low-lying fen sites, where the top soil was highly degraded, while lower horizons were less decomposed. Dye tracer experiments were conducted at both sites by applying a TiO2 suspension (10 g/l) with a pulse of 40 mm. Soil profiles were prepared for photo documentation the following day. It was found that the physical and hydraulic properties of peat were significantly influenced by the degree of peat decomposition and degradation. Higher decomposed and degraded peat soils had a higher bulk density, lower organic matter content and lower porosity. Moreover, higher decomposition and degradation resulted in a lower saturated hydraulic conductivity as long as investigated samples originated from the same site. In addition, degraded peat soils showed less anisotropy than un-degraded peat. It turned out that TiO2 is a suitable dye tracer to visualize the flow paths in peat soils. Although dye patterns differed within the same plot and between different plots, most of the flow patterns indicated a preferential flow situation. The distribution of TiO2 in the soil profile, as analyzed from 5 by 5 cm grid cells, compared to the distribution of bromide, which was applied along with the dye confirming the suitability of the dye tracer. Un-decomposed plant structures, such as wood branches and leaves, were identified as the major preferential flow path in un-degraded peat. For degraded peat, bio-pores, such as root and earthworm

  10. The moving boundary approach to modeling gravity-driven stable and unstable flow in soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brindt, Naaran; Wallach, Rony

    2016-04-01

    Many field and laboratory studies in the last 40 years have found that water flow in homogeneous soil profiles may occur in preferential flow pathways rather than in a laterally uniform wetting front, as expected from classical soil physics theory and expressed by the Richards equation. The water-content distribution within such gravity-driven fingers was found to be nonmonotonic due to water accumulation behind a sharp wetting front (denoted as saturation overshoot). The unstable flow was first related to soil coarseness. However, its appearance in water-repellent soils led the authors to hypothesize that gravity-driven unstable flow formation is triggered by a non-zero contact angle between water and soil particles. Despite its widespread occurrence, a macroscopic-type model describing the nonmonotonic water distribution and sharp wetting front is still lacking. The moving boundary approach, which divides the flow domain into two well-defined subdomains with a sharp change in fluid saturation between them, is suggested to replace the classical approach of solving the Richards equation for the entire flow domain. The upper subdomain consists of water and air, whose relationship varies with space and time following the imposed boundary condition at the soil surface as calculated by the Richards equation. The lower subdomain also consists of water and air, but their relationship remains constant following the predetermined initial condition. The moving boundary between the two subdomains is the sharp wetting front, whose location is part of the solution. As such, the problem is inherently nonlinear. The wetting front's movement is controlled by the dynamic water-entry pressure of the soil, which depends on soil wettability and the front's propagation rate. A lower soil wettability, which hinders the spontaneous invasion of dry pores and increases the water-entry pressure, induces a sharp wetting front and water accumulation behind it. The wetting front starts to

  11. ASCAT soil moisture data assimilation through the Ensemble Kalman Filter for improving streamflow simulation in Mediterranean catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loizu, Javier; Massari, Christian; Álvarez-Mozos, Jesús; Casalí, Javier; Goñi, Mikel

    2016-04-01

    Assimilation of Surface Soil Moisture (SSM) observations obtained from remote sensing techniques have been shown to improve streamflow prediction at different time scales of hydrological modeling. Different sensors and methods have been tested for their application in SSM estimation, especially in the microwave region of the electromagnetic spectrum. The available observation devices include passive microwave sensors such as the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer - Earth Observation System (AMSR-E) onboard the Aqua satellite and the Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) mission. On the other hand, active microwave systems include Scatterometers (SCAT) onboard the European Remote Sensing satellites (ERS-1/2) and the Advanced Scatterometer (ASCAT) onboard MetOp-A satellite. Data assimilation (DA) include different techniques that have been applied in hydrology and other fields for decades. These techniques include, among others, Kalman Filtering (KF), Variational Assimilation or Particle Filtering. From the initial KF method, different techniques were developed to suit its application to different systems. The Ensemble Kalman Filter (EnKF), extensively applied in hydrological modeling improvement, shows its capability to deal with nonlinear model dynamics without linearizing model equations, as its main advantage. The objective of this study was to investigate whether data assimilation of SSM ASCAT observations, through the EnKF method, could improve streamflow simulation of mediterranean catchments with TOPLATS hydrological complex model. The DA technique was programmed in FORTRAN, and applied to hourly simulations of TOPLATS catchment model. TOPLATS (TOPMODEL-based Land-Atmosphere Transfer Scheme) was applied on its lumped version for two mediterranean catchments of similar size, located in northern Spain (Arga, 741 km2) and central Italy (Nestore, 720 km2). The model performs a separated computation of energy and water balances. In those balances, the soil

  12. Preferential flow in connected soil structures and the principle of "maximum energy dissipation": A thermodynamic perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zehe, E.; Blume, T.; Bloeschl, G.

    2009-04-01

    "There is preferential flow at all scales"? This was a key message in a talk on ?Idle thoughts on a unifying theory of catchment hydrology? given by Bloeschl (2006). In this context ?preferential flow? was used to address rapid water flow along spatially connected flow paths of minimum flow resistance. Preferential flow seems in fact rather the rule than the exception. It occurs locally in non capillary macropores, at the hillslope scale in surface rills or through subsurface pipes. Rapid flow in connected biopores or sometimes shrinkage cracks is today accepted to play a key role for transport of agrochemicals in cohesive soils. The spatial distribution of worm burrows in the landscape may, furthermore, exert crucial control on rainfall runoff response and sediment yields at the hillslope and catchment scales. However, even if the population of connected biopores/macropores is known in soil we struggle in predicting onset, timing and strength of preferential flow events. Preferential flow is an intermittent, threshold phenomenon. Onset and intensity seems to be determined by the strength of the rainfall forcing and the wetness state of the soil. Furthermore, burrows of deep digging aenecic earthworms can ? even when being abandoned ? persist over decades as suggested by accumulation of clay particles or even radio nuclides. Thus, these structures ?survive? severe rainfall and subsurface flow events and still remain functional in the hydrological system. Why is it sometimes ?favourable? to take flow paths of minimum flow resistance and sometimes not? Why do these flow paths/ structures persist such a long time? Following Kleidon and Schimansky (2008) we suggest that a thermodynamic perspective ? looking at soil water flow as dissipative process in an open, non equilibrium thermodynamic system ? may help unrevealing these questions. However, we suggest a complementary perspective on soil water flow focusing rather on entropy production but on dissipation of

  13. Interception of Vapor Flow near Soil Surface for Water Conservation and Drought Alleviation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Z.; Wang, Y.; Gao, Z.; Hishida, K.; Zhang, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Liquid and vapor flow of water in soil and the eventual vaporization of all waters near the soil surface are mechanisms controlling the near-surface evaporation. Interception and prevention of the vapor form of flow is critical for soil water conservation and drought alleviation in the arid and semiarid regions. Researches are conducted to quantify the amount of near-surface vapor flow in the semi-arid Loess Plateau of China and the central California of USA. Quantitative leaf water absorption and desorption functions were derived and tested based on laboratory experiments. Results show that plant leaves absorb and release water at different speeds depending on species and varieties. The "ideal" native plants in the dry climates can quickly absorb water and slowly release it. This water-holding capacity of a plant is characterized by the plant's water retention curves. Field studies are conducted to measure the dynamic water movements from the soil surface to ten meters below the surface in an attempt to quantify the maximum depths of water extraction due to different vegetation types and mulching measures at the surface. Results show that condensation is usually formed on soil surface membranes during the daily hours when the temperature gradients are inverted toward the soil surface. The soil temperature becomes stable at 13 Degree Celsius below the 4-meter depth in the Loess Plateau of China thus vapor flow is not likely deriving from deeper layers. However, the liquid flow may move in and out depending on water potential gradients and hydraulic conductivity of the layers. The near-surface vapor flow can be effectively intercepted by various mulching measures including gravel-and-sand cover, plant residue and plastic membranes. New studies are attempted to quantify the role of vapor flow for the survival of giant sequoias in the southern Sierra Nevada Mountains of California.

  14. Soil volume estimation in debris flow areas using lidar data in the 2014 Hiroshima, Japan rainstorm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miura, H.

    2015-10-01

    Debris flows triggered by the rainstorm in Hiroshima, Japan on August 20th, 2014 produced extensive damage to the built-up areas in the northern part of Hiroshima city. In order to consider various emergency response activities and early-stage recovery planning, it is important to evaluate the distribution of the soil volumes in the debris flow areas immediately after the disaster. In this study, automated nonlinear mapping technique is applied to light detection and ranging (LiDAR)-derived digital elevation models (DEMs) observed before and after the disaster to quickly and accurately correct geometric locational errors of the data. The soil volumes generated from the debris flows are estimated by subtracting the pre- and post-event DEMs. The geomorphologic characteristics in the debris flow areas are discussed from the distribution of the estimated soil volumes.

  15. An active region model for capturing fractal flow patterns in unsaturated soils: model development.

    PubMed

    Liu, H H; Zhang, R; Bodvarsson, G S

    2005-11-01

    Preferential flow commonly observed in unsaturated soils allows rapid movement of solute from the soil surface or vadose zone to the groundwater, bypassing a significant volume of unsaturated soil and increasing the risk of groundwater contamination. A variety of evidence indicates that complex preferential patterns observed from fields are fractals. In this study, we developed a relatively simple active region model to incorporate the fractal flow pattern into the continuum approach. In the model, the flow domain is divided into active and inactive regions. Flow occurs preferentially in the active region (characterized by fractals), and inactive region is simply bypassed. A new constitutive relationship (the portion of the active region as a function of saturation) was derived. The validity of the proposed model is demonstrated by the consistency between field observations and the new constitutive relationship.

  16. An Active Region Model for Capturing Fractal Flow Patterns inUnsaturated Soils: Model Development

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Hui-Hai; Zhang, R.; Bodvarsson, Gudmundur S.

    2005-06-11

    Preferential flow commonly observed in unsaturated soils allows rapid movement of solute from the soil surface or vadose zone to the groundwater, bypassing a significant volume of unsaturated soil and increasing the risk of groundwater contamination. A variety of evidence indicates that complex preferential patterns observed from fields are fractals. In this study, we developed a relatively simple active region model to incorporate the fractal flow pattern into the continuum approach. In the model, the flow domain is divided into active and inactive regions. Flow occurs preferentially in the active region (characterized by fractals), and inactive region is simply bypassed. A new constitutive relationship (the portion of the active region as a function of saturation) was derived. The validity of the proposed model is demonstrated by the consistency between field observations and the new constitutive relationship.

  17. Divergent habitat filtering of root and soil fungal communities in temperate beech forests.

    PubMed

    Goldmann, Kezia; Schröter, Kristina; Pena, Rodica; Schöning, Ingo; Schrumpf, Marion; Buscot, François; Polle, Andrea; Wubet, Tesfaye

    2016-01-01

    Distance decay, the general reduction in similarity of community composition with increasing geographical distance, is known as predictor of spatial variation and distribution patterns of organisms. However, changes in fungal communities along environmental gradients are little known. Here we show that distance decays of soil-inhabiting and root-associated fungal assemblages differ, and identify explanatory environmental variables. High-throughput sequencing analysis of fungal communities of beech-dominated forests at three study sites across Germany shows that root-associated fungi are recruited from the soil fungal community. However, distance decay is substantially weaker in the root-associated than in the soil community. Variance partitioning of factors contributing to the observed distance decay patterns support the hypothesis that host trees stabilize the composition of root-associated fungi communities, relative to soil communities. Thus, they not only have selective impacts on associated communities, but also buffer effects of changes in microclimatic and environmental variables that directly influence fungal community composition. PMID:27511465

  18. Divergent habitat filtering of root and soil fungal communities in temperate beech forests

    PubMed Central

    Goldmann, Kezia; Schröter, Kristina; Pena, Rodica; Schöning, Ingo; Schrumpf, Marion; Buscot, François; Polle, Andrea; Wubet, Tesfaye

    2016-01-01

    Distance decay, the general reduction in similarity of community composition with increasing geographical distance, is known as predictor of spatial variation and distribution patterns of organisms. However, changes in fungal communities along environmental gradients are little known. Here we show that distance decays of soil-inhabiting and root-associated fungal assemblages differ, and identify explanatory environmental variables. High-throughput sequencing analysis of fungal communities of beech-dominated forests at three study sites across Germany shows that root-associated fungi are recruited from the soil fungal community. However, distance decay is substantially weaker in the root-associated than in the soil community. Variance partitioning of factors contributing to the observed distance decay patterns support the hypothesis that host trees stabilize the composition of root-associated fungi communities, relative to soil communities. Thus, they not only have selective impacts on associated communities, but also buffer effects of changes in microclimatic and environmental variables that directly influence fungal community composition. PMID:27511465

  19. The potential of 2D Kalman filtering for soil moisture data assimilation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We examine the potential for parameterizing a two-dimensional (2D) land data assimilation system using spatial error auto-correlation statistics gleaned from a triple collocation analysis and the triplet of: (1) active microwave-, (2) passive microwave- and (3) land surface model-based surface soil ...

  20. Long-term flow rates and biomat zone hydrology in soil columns receiving septic tank effluent.

    PubMed

    Beal, C D; Gardner, E A; Kirchhof, G; Menzies, N W

    2006-07-01

    Soil absorption systems (SAS) are used commonly to treat and disperse septic tank effluent (STE). SAS can hydraulically fail as a result of the low permeable biomat zone that develops on the infiltrative surface. The objectives of this experiment were to compare the hydraulic properties of biomats grown in soils of different textures, to investigate the long-term acceptance rates (LTAR) from prolonged application of STE, and to assess if soils were of major importance in determining LTAR. The STE was applied to repacked sand, Oxisol and Vertisol soil columns over a period of 16 months, at equivalent hydraulic loading rates of 50, 35 and 8L/m(2)/d, respectively. Infiltration rates, soil matric potentials, and biomat hydraulic properties were measured either directly from the soil columns or calculated using established soil physics theory. Biomats 1 to 2 cm thick developed in all soils columns with hydraulic resistances of 27 to 39 d. These biomats reduced a 4 order of magnitude variation in saturated hydraulic conductivity (K(s)) between the soils to a one order of magnitude variation in LTAR. A relationship between biomat resistance and organic loading rate was observed in all soils. Saturated hydraulic conductivity influenced the rate and extent of biomat development. However, once the biomat was established, the LTAR was governed by the resistance of the biomat and the sub-biomat soil unsaturated flow regime induced by the biomat. Results show that whilst initial soil K(s) is likely to be important in the establishment of the biomat zone in a trench, LTAR is determined by the biomat resistance and the unsaturated soil hydraulic conductivity, not the K(s) of a soil. The results call into question the commonly used approach of basing the LTAR, and ultimately trench length in SAS, on the initial K(s) of soils.

  1. Long-term flow rates and biomat zone hydrology in soil columns receiving septic tank effluent.

    PubMed

    Beal, C D; Gardner, E A; Kirchhof, G; Menzies, N W

    2006-07-01

    Soil absorption systems (SAS) are used commonly to treat and disperse septic tank effluent (STE). SAS can hydraulically fail as a result of the low permeable biomat zone that develops on the infiltrative surface. The objectives of this experiment were to compare the hydraulic properties of biomats grown in soils of different textures, to investigate the long-term acceptance rates (LTAR) from prolonged application of STE, and to assess if soils were of major importance in determining LTAR. The STE was applied to repacked sand, Oxisol and Vertisol soil columns over a period of 16 months, at equivalent hydraulic loading rates of 50, 35 and 8L/m(2)/d, respectively. Infiltration rates, soil matric potentials, and biomat hydraulic properties were measured either directly from the soil columns or calculated using established soil physics theory. Biomats 1 to 2 cm thick developed in all soils columns with hydraulic resistances of 27 to 39 d. These biomats reduced a 4 order of magnitude variation in saturated hydraulic conductivity (K(s)) between the soils to a one order of magnitude variation in LTAR. A relationship between biomat resistance and organic loading rate was observed in all soils. Saturated hydraulic conductivity influenced the rate and extent of biomat development. However, once the biomat was established, the LTAR was governed by the resistance of the biomat and the sub-biomat soil unsaturated flow regime induced by the biomat. Results show that whilst initial soil K(s) is likely to be important in the establishment of the biomat zone in a trench, LTAR is determined by the biomat resistance and the unsaturated soil hydraulic conductivity, not the K(s) of a soil. The results call into question the commonly used approach of basing the LTAR, and ultimately trench length in SAS, on the initial K(s) of soils. PMID:16764900

  2. The role of loading rate, backwashing, water and air velocities in an up-flow nitrifying tertiary filter.

    PubMed

    Vigne, Emmanuelle; Choubert, Jean-Marc; Canler, Jean-Pierre; Heduit, Alain; Sørensen, Kim Helleshøj; Lessard, Paul

    2011-01-01

    The vertical distribution of nitrification performances in an up-flow biological aerated filter operated at tertiary nitrification stage is evaluated in this paper. Experimental data were collected from a semi-industrial pilot-plant under various operating conditions. The actual and the maximum nitrification rates were measured at different levels inside the up-flow biofilter. A nitrogen loading rate higher than 1.0 kg NH4-Nm(-3)_mediad(-1) is necessary to obtain nitrification activity over all the height of the biofilter. The increase in water and air velocities from 6 to 10 m h(-1) and 10 to 20 m h(-1) has increased the nitrification rate by 80% and 20% respectively. Backwashing decreases the maximum nitrification rate in the media by only 3-14%. The nitrification rate measured at a level of 0.5 m above the bottom of the filter is four times higher than the applied daily average volumetric nitrogen loading rate up to 1.5 kg NH4-N m(-3)_mediad(-1). Finally, it is shown that 58% of the available nitrification activity is mobilized in steady-state conditions while up to 100% is used under inflow-rate increase.

  3. TOMOGRAPHY OF PLASMA FLOWS IN THE UPPER SOLAR CONVECTION ZONE USING TIME-DISTANCE INVERSION COMBINING RIDGE AND PHASE-SPEED FILTERING

    SciTech Connect

    Svanda, Michal

    2013-09-20

    The consistency of time-distance inversions for horizontal components of the plasma flow on supergranular scales in the upper solar convection zone is checked by comparing the results derived using two k-{omega} filtering procedures-ridge filtering and phase-speed filtering-commonly used in time-distance helioseismology. I show that both approaches result in similar flow estimates when finite-frequency sensitivity kernels are used. I further demonstrate that the performance of the inversion improves (in terms of a simultaneously better averaging kernel and a lower noise level) when the two approaches are combined together in one inversion. Using the combined inversion, I invert for horizontal flows in the upper 10 Mm of the solar convection zone. The flows connected with supergranulation seem to be coherent only for the top {approx}5 Mm; deeper down there is a hint of change of the convection scales toward structures larger than supergranules.

  4. Progress Toward Affordable High Fidelity Combustion Simulations Using Filtered Density Functions for Hypersonic Flows in Complex Geometries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drozda, Tomasz G.; Quinlan, Jesse R.; Pisciuneri, Patrick H.; Yilmaz, S. Levent

    2012-01-01

    Significant progress has been made in the development of subgrid scale (SGS) closures based on a filtered density function (FDF) for large eddy simulations (LES) of turbulent reacting flows. The FDF is the counterpart of the probability density function (PDF) method, which has proven effective in Reynolds averaged simulations (RAS). However, while systematic progress is being made advancing the FDF models for relatively simple flows and lab-scale flames, the application of these methods in complex geometries and high speed, wall-bounded flows with shocks remains a challenge. The key difficulties are the significant computational cost associated with solving the FDF transport equation and numerically stiff finite rate chemistry. For LES/FDF methods to make a more significant impact in practical applications a pragmatic approach must be taken that significantly reduces the computational cost while maintaining high modeling fidelity. An example of one such ongoing effort is at the NASA Langley Research Center, where the first generation FDF models, namely the scalar filtered mass density function (SFMDF) are being implemented into VULCAN, a production-quality RAS and LES solver widely used for design of high speed propulsion flowpaths. This effort leverages internal and external collaborations to reduce the overall computational cost of high fidelity simulations in VULCAN by: implementing high order methods that allow reduction in the total number of computational cells without loss in accuracy; implementing first generation of high fidelity scalar PDF/FDF models applicable to high-speed compressible flows; coupling RAS/PDF and LES/FDF into a hybrid framework to efficiently and accurately model the effects of combustion in the vicinity of the walls; developing efficient Lagrangian particle tracking algorithms to support robust solutions of the FDF equations for high speed flows; and utilizing finite rate chemistry parametrization, such as flamelet models, to reduce

  5. Simulated formation and flow of microemulsions during surfactant flushing of contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Ouyan, Ying; Cho, Jong Soo; Mansell, Robert S

    2002-01-01

    Contamination of groundwater resources by non-aqueous phase liquids (NAPLs) has become an issue of increasing environmental concern. This study investigated the formation and flow of microemulsions during surfactant flushing of NAPL-contaminated soil using the finite difference model UTCHEM, which was verified with our laboratory experimental data. Simulation results showed that surfactant flushing of NAPLs (i.e., trichloroethylene and tetrachloroethylene) from the contaminated soils was an emulsion-driven process. Formation of NAPL-in-water microemulsions facilitated the removal of NAPLs from contaminated soils. Changes in soil saturation pressure were used to monitor the mobilization and entrapment of NAPLs during surface flushing process. In general, more NAPLs were clogged in soil pores when the soil saturation pressure increased. Effects of aquifer salinity on the formation and flow of NAPL-in-water microemulsions were significant. This study suggests that the formation and flow of NAPL-in-water microemulsions through aquifer systems are complex physical-chemical phenomena that are critical to effective surfactant flushing of contaminated soils.

  6. Effects of soil water repellency on infiltration rate and flow instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Z.; Wu, Q. J.; Wu, L.; Ritsema, C. J.; Dekker, L. W.; Feyen, J.

    2000-05-01

    Laboratory infiltration experiments were carried out to quantify the effects of soil water-repellency on infiltration rate and the wetting front instability. A two-dimensional transparent chamber (41.5 cm wide, 50 cm high and 2.8 cm thick) was constructed for infiltration experiments using three water-repellent Ouddorp sands (The Netherlands) and a wettable silicon sand. The results showed that if the water-ponding depth ( h0) at the soil surface was lower than the water-entry value ( hwe) of repellent sands, infiltration would not start until the water drop penetration time (WDPT) is exceeded; and contrary to infiltration in wettable soils, the infiltration rate increased with time. However, infiltration could immediately start at any time when h0> hwe. The wetting front was unconditionally unstable for h0< hwe, resulting in fingered flow. However, the flow was conditionally stable for h0> hwe if the soil was not layered in a fine-over-coarse or wettable-over-repellent configuration, and if soil air was not compressed during infiltration. The occurrence of stable and unstable flow in repellent soils was consistent with the prediction based on a linear instability analysis. The findings can be used to improve irrigation efficiencies in water repellent soils, e.g. using high-ponding irrigation methods.

  7. Flow pathways of bromide and Brilliant Blue FCF tracers in caliche soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nobles, M. M.; Wilding, L. P.; Lin, H. S.

    2010-10-01

    Land use of caliche soils in limestone regions of Texas is increasingly shifting from traditional ranchland to residential and industrial development. However, little information is available on water flow and solute transport through soils of these landscapes, or their potential suitability for wastewater disposal and bioremediation. This study determined the impacts of landscape position on soil hydrologic functions by using Brilliant Blue FCF and Br - tracers to characterize flow pathways through soils of stepped terrains. Aqueous tracer solution was applied to surface (and in some cases subsurface) horizons of selected riser, tread, floodplain, and upland summit sites. Brilliant Blue FCF and Br - pathways were analyzed based on vertical sections excavated through each application site. While Brilliant Blue FCF demonstrated preferential flow along macropores, Br - moved through soil matrix primarily in piston flow pattern. In most cases, Br - was less retarded and moved to greater vertical and horizontal distances than Brilliant Blue FCF. Cemented Bk, Bkm, C, Cr, Crk, and R horizons acted as aquitards, resulting in considerable horizontal transport of both tracers beyond the direct infiltration zone. Significant volumes of limestone rock clasts, together with soil, were involved in solute transport and thus contributed to the soil's ability to serve as bioremediation and moisture storage media. High limestone gravel content and rapid solute transport through subsurface horizons to aquitards in deep riser soils indicate that they may serve as hydrological recharge sites with potential for ephemeral water tables, increased water storage and greater bioremediation potential. Shallow tread sites may be capable of producing seasonal saturation above restrictive horizons and increased surface runoff, becoming local hydrological discharge sites. This could conceivably lead to surface water contamination; however, these locales are hydrologically buffered by recharge

  8. Simulating Water Flow in Variably Saturated Soils - Exploring the Advantage of Three-dimensional Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopp, L.; Ivanov, V. Y.

    2010-12-01

    There is still a debate in rainfall-runoff modeling over the advantage of using three-dimensional models based on partial differential equations describing variably saturated flow vs. models with simpler infiltration and flow routing algorithms. Fully explicit 3D models are computationally demanding but allow the representation of spatially complex domains, heterogeneous soils, conditions of ponded infiltration, and solute transport, among others. Models with simpler infiltration and flow routing algorithms provide faster run times and are likely to be more versatile in the treatment of extreme conditions such as soil drying but suffer from underlying assumptions and ad-hoc parameterizations. In this numerical study, we explore the question of whether these two model strategies are competing approaches or if they complement each other. As a 3D physics-based model we use HYDRUS-3D, a finite element model that numerically solves the Richards equation for variably-saturated water flow. As an example of a simpler model, we use tRIBS+VEGGIE that solves the 1D Richards equation for vertical flow and applies Dupuit-Forchheimer approximation for saturated lateral exchange and gravity-driven flow for unsaturated lateral exchange. The flow can be routed using either the D-8 (steepest descent) or D-infinity flow routing algorithms. We study lateral subsurface stormflow and moisture dynamics at the hillslope-scale, using a zero-order basin topography, as a function of storm size, antecedent moisture conditions and slope angle. The domain and soil characteristics are representative of a forested hillslope with conductive soils in a humid environment, where the major runoff generating process is lateral subsurface stormflow. We compare spatially integrated lateral subsurface flow at the downslope boundary as well as spatial patterns of soil moisture. We illustrate situations where both model approaches perform equally well and identify conditions under which the application of a

  9. Soil moisture assimilation using a modified ensemble transform Kalman filter with water balance constraint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Guocan; Zheng, Xiaogu; Dan, Bo

    2016-04-01

    The shallow soil moisture observations are assimilated into Common Land Model (CoLM) to estimate the soil moisture in different layers. The forecast error is inflated to improve the analysis state accuracy and the water balance constraint is adopted to reduce the water budget residual in the assimilation procedure. The experiment results illustrate that the adaptive forecast error inflation can reduce the analysis error, while the proper inflation layer can be selected based on the -2log-likelihood function of the innovation statistic. The water balance constraint can result in reducing water budget residual substantially, at a low cost of assimilation accuracy loss. The assimilation scheme can be potentially applied to assimilate the remote sensing data.

  10. Recirculating electric air filter

    DOEpatents

    Bergman, W.

    1985-01-09

    An electric air filter cartridge has a cylindrical inner high voltage electrode, a layer of filter material, and an outer ground electrode formed of a plurality of segments moveably connected together. The outer electrode can be easily opened to remove or insert filter material. Air flows through the two electrodes and the filter material and is exhausted from the center of the inner electrode.

  11. Recirculating electric air filter

    DOEpatents

    Bergman, Werner

    1986-01-01

    An electric air filter cartridge has a cylindrical inner high voltage eleode, a layer of filter material, and an outer ground electrode formed of a plurality of segments moveably connected together. The outer electrode can be easily opened to remove or insert filter material. Air flows through the two electrodes and the filter material and is exhausted from the center of the inner electrode.

  12. Application of flow field-flow fractionation and laser sizing to characterize soil colloids in drained and undrained lysimeters.

    PubMed

    Gimbert, Laura J; Haygarth, Philip M; Worsfold, Paul J

    2008-01-01

    This paper reports the use of a new technique, flow field-flow fractionation (FlFFF), for the characterization of soil sampled under grassland. FlFFF can be used to determine the fine colloidal material in the <1 microm fraction obtained by gravitational settling of 1% m/v soil suspensions. The aim of this work was to determine the potential of FIFFF to characterize soil colloids in drained and undrained field lysimeters from soil cores sampled at different depths. Two different grassland lysimeter plots of 1 ha, one drained and one undrained, were investigated, and the soil was sampled at 20-m intervals along a single diagonal transect at three different depths (0-2, 10-12, and 30-32 cm). The results showed that there was a statistically significant (P = 0.05) increase in colloidal material at 30- to 32-cm depth along the transect under the drained lysimeter, which correlates with disturbance of the soil at this depth due to the installation of tile drains at 85-cm depth backfilled to 30-cm depth with gravel. Laser sizing was also used to determine the particles in the size range 1 to 2000 microm and complement the data obtained using FlFFF because laser sizing lacks resolution for the finer colloidal material (0.1-1.0 microm). The laser sizing data showed increased heterogeneity at 30- to 32-cm depth, particularly in the 50 to 250 microm size fraction. Therefore FIFFF characterized the finer material and laser sizing the coarser soil fraction (<2000 microm) at depth in drained and undrained grassland. This is of importance as colloidal material is more mobile than the larger material and consequently an important vector for contaminant transport from agricultural land to catchments.

  13. Rate of flow of leachate through clay soil liners

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel, D.E.; Shackelford, C.D.; Liao, W.P.; Liljestrand, H.M.

    1991-06-01

    The objective of the research was to measure the time of travel (TOT) of inorganic solutes through laboratory columns of compacted clay, to determine the physical and geochemical parameters that controlled solute transport through the soil columns, and to compare measured and predicted TOT's. Two clay soils were used: kaolinite (a low-plasticity, commercially-produced clay) and Lufkin clay (a highly plastic, naturally-occurring clay soil). Anionic tracers were chloride and bromide; potassium and zinc were the cationic tracers. Diffusion cells were designed, constructed, and used to measure the effective diffusion coefficient of the tracers in the two soils. Diffusion coefficients for anions were typically 0.000002 to 0.000007 sq cm/s; somewhat lower values were determined for cations. Column tests showed that the effective porosity ratio (defined as effective divided by total porosity) increased with increasing hydraulic gradient in kaolinite from a low of about 0.25 at a gradient of 1 to a high of 1 at a gradient of 20. With Lufkin clay, the effective porosity ratio was between 0.02 and 0.16. Breakthrough times were controlled much more by the low effective porosities than by molecular diffusion. The computer program SOILINER predicted times of travel that were larger than actual TOT's by a factor of up to 52. The failure to account for effective porosity ratios less than 1 was the cause for the poor predictions from SOILINER.

  14. Performance evaluation of a ceramic cross-flow filter on a bench- scale coal gasifier

    SciTech Connect

    Ciliberti, D.F.; Lippert, T.E.

    1985-01-01

    The Department of Energy is currently supporting a program that will aid in the development of cross flow filtration technology as applied to combined cycle power generation with coal gasification. The stated overall goal is to gain information on both the operational and economic feasibility of the implementation of cross flow filtration in various gasifier options. Westinghouse has prepared a comprehensive program that will lead directly to these program goals in an efficient manner.

  15. Performance evaluation of a ceramic cross-flow filter on a bench- scale coal gasifier

    SciTech Connect

    Ciliberti, D.F.; Lippert, T.E.

    1984-01-01

    The Department of Energy is currently supporting a program that will aid in the development of cross flow filtration technology as applied to combined cycle power generation with coal gasification. The stated overall goal is to gain information on both the operational and economic feasibility of the implementation of cross flow filtration in various gasifier options. Westinghouse has prepared a comprehensive program that will lead directly to these program goals in an efficient manner.

  16. Performance evaluation of a ceramic cross-flow filter on a bench- scale coal gasifier

    SciTech Connect

    Ciliberti, D.F.; Lippert, T.E.

    1986-01-01

    The Department of Energy is currently supporting a program that will aid in the development of cross flow filtration technology as applied to combined cycle power generation with coal gasification. The stated overall goal is to gain information on both the operational and economic feasibility of the implementation of cross flow filtration in various gasifier options. Westinghouse has prepared a comprehensive program that will lead directly to these program goals in an efficient manner.

  17. Analysis on Experimental Investigation and Mathematical Modeling of Incompressible Flow Through Ceramic Foam Filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akbarnejad, Shahin; Jonsson, Lage Tord Ingemar; Kennedy, Mark William; Aune, Ragnhild Elizabeth; Jönsson, Pӓr Göran

    2016-08-01

    This paper presents experimental results of pressure drop measurements on 30, 50, and 80 pores per inch (PPI) commercial alumina ceramic foam filters (CFF) and compares the obtained pressure drop profiles to numerically modeled values. In addition, it is aimed at investigating the adequacy of the mathematical correlations used in the analytical and the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations. It is shown that the widely used correlations for predicting pressure drop in porous media continuously under-predict the experimentally obtained pressure drop profiles. For analytical predictions, the negative deviations from the experimentally obtained pressure drop using the unmodified Ergun and Dietrich equations could be as high as 95 and 74 pct, respectively. For the CFD predictions, the deviation to experimental results is in the range of 84.3 to 88.5 pct depending on filter PPI. Better results can be achieved by applying the Forchheimer second-order drag term instead of the Brinkman-Forchheimer drag term. Thus, the final deviation of the CFD model estimates lie in the range of 0.3 to 5.5 pct compared to the measured values.

  18. Estimating soil hydraulic parameters from transient flow experiments in a centrifuge using parameter optimization technique

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Simunek, J.; Nimmo, J.R.

    2005-01-01

    A modified version of the Hydrus software package that can directly or inversely simulate water flow in a transient centrifugal field is presented. The inverse solver for parameter estimation of the soil hydraulic parameters is then applied to multirotation transient flow experiments in a centrifuge. Using time-variable water contents measured at a sequence of several rotation speeds, soil hydraulic properties were successfully estimated by numerical inversion of transient experiments. The inverse method was then evaluated by comparing estimated soil hydraulic properties with those determined independently using an equilibrium analysis. The optimized soil hydraulic properties compared well with those determined using equilibrium analysis and steady state experiment. Multirotation experiments in a centrifuge not only offer significant time savings by accelerating time but also provide significantly more information for the parameter estimation procedure compared to multistep outflow experiments in a gravitational field. Copyright 2005 by the American Geophysical Union.

  19. Multiple support excitations of open-plane frames by a filtered white noise and soil-structure interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allam, Mehter M.

    2010-09-01

    Seismic structural design is essentially the estimation of structural response to a forced motion, which may be deterministic or stochastic, imposed on the ground. The assumption that the same ground motion acts at every point of the base of the structure (or at every support) is not always justifiable; particularly in case of very large structures when considerable spatial variability in ground motion can exist over significant distances—example long span bridges. This variability is partly due to the delay in arrival of the excitation at different supports (which is called the wave passage effect) and due to heterogeneity in the ground medium which results in incoherency and local effects. The current study examines the influence of the wave passage effect (in terms of delay in arrival of horizontal ground excitation at different supports and neglecting transmission through the structure) on the response of a few open-plane frame building structures with soil-structure interaction. The ground acceleration has been modeled by a suitably filtered white noise. As a special case, the ground excitation at different supports has also been treated as statistically independent to model the extreme case of incoherence due to local effects and due to modifications to the ground motion resulting from wave reflections and refractions in heterogeneous soil media. The results indicate that, even for relatively short spanned building frames, wave passage effect can be significant. In the absence of soil-structure interaction, it can significantly increase the root mean square (rms) value of the shear in extreme end columns for the stiffer frames but has negligible effect on the flexible frames when total displacements are considered. It is seen that pseudo-static displacements increasingly contribute to the rms value of column shear as the time delay increases both for the stiffer and for the more flexible frames. When soil-structure interaction is considered, wave passage

  20. Land-use change impacts on soil hydrological properties and overland flow in Mediterranean periurban areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira, Carla S. S.; Ferreira, António J. D.; Walsh, Rory P. D.; Steenhuis, Tammo S.; Coelho, Celeste O. A.

    2014-05-01

    Urbanization leads to significant land-surface changes that affect soil properties and hydrological processes. Understanding landscape pattern and its impact on flow connectivity is still a challenge. In relation to a catchment undergoing active peri-urbanization, this paper aims to: 1) assess the spatiotemporal variability of soil hydrological properties in different land-uses; 2) understand how overland flow processes and spatial patterns change with season and weather; 3) discuss the impact of landscape pattern on flow connectivity and urban planning in order to prevent flood hazards. The study has been carried out in a Portuguese periurban catchment (620ha) with a sub-humid Mediterranean climate and part-limestone, part-sandstone lithology. Due to its proximity to the expanding city of Coimbra, the urban area increased from 6% to 30% between 1958 and 2009, and this trend is expected to continue. Currently the catchment is dominated by forest (62%), with only 8% under agriculture. Repeat field surveys and hydrological monitoring provided data to assess spatiotemporal dynamics of overland flow for different land-uses. Measurements of moisture content, hydrophobicity and infiltration capacity were carried out at 31 sites under different land-uses on nine occasions over a one-year period. Overland flow in eucalypt, oak and scrub forest was measured using 8mx2m runoff plots from Autumn 2010 (3 plots per forest type). Five raingauges and nine water-level recorders provided continuous records of hydrological data for upstream sub-catchments and the catchment outlet. The results showed spatiotemporal variations in hydrological processes and responses with land-use and geology. In dry weather, urban soils were hydrophilic and soil matrix infiltration capacity reached 12mm/h, while soils under forest and agriculture were hydrophobic and infiltration capacities were only 3-6 mm/h. In agricultural and scrub areas, hydrophobicity was easier to break down after rainfall

  1. The Experiment and Simulation for Water Movement of Preferential Flow in Soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Xiaohui; Li, Qilong

    A large number of lab and field experiments have showed preferential flow is a ubiquitous phenomenon. Through analysis on the field dye experiment, precipitation and infliltration data in the Experimental Station in Zhengzhou and percolation test data in lab and field experiment, the paper analyze the characterization of preferential flow by a method of statistical analysis and discuss the form mechanism together with influencing factor in soil. The results show the field dye experiment of silt loam in Zhumadian, precipitation and infliltration data and the percolation test in the Experimental Station have showed the opore caused by the root and wormhole greatly develops in the upper soil layer, tortuose and decreases with the depth. However, the cranny caused by dry shrinkage comparatively develops in the deep soil layer, the opore has good connectivity, and therefore preferential flow easily occurs in silt loam than sand silt in Kaifeng.

  2. Changes in Flow and Transport Patterns in Fen Peat as a Result of Soil Degradation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Haojie; Janssen, Manon; Lennartz, Bernd

    2016-04-01

    The preferential movement of water and transport of substances play an important role in soils and are not yet fully understood especially in degraded peat soils. In this study, we aimed at deducing changes in flow and transport patterns in the course of soil degradation as resulting from peat drainage, using titanium dioxide (TiO2) as a dye tracer. The dye tracer experiments were conducted on columns of eight types of differently degraded peat soils from three sites taken both in vertical and horizontal directions. The titanium dioxide suspension (average particle size of 0.3 μm; 10 g l‑1) was applied in a pulse of 40 mm to each soil core. Twenty-four hours after the application of the tracer, cross sections of the soil cores were prepared for photo documentation. In addition, the saturated hydraulic conductivity (Ks) was determined. Preferential flow occurred in all investigated peat types. From the stained soil structural elements, we concluded that undecomposed plant remains are the major preferential flow pathways in less degraded peat. For more strongly degraded peat, bio-pores, such as root and earthworm channels, operated as the major transport domain. Results show that Ks and the effective pore network in less degraded peat soils are anisotropic. With increasing peat degradation, the Ks and cross section of effective pore network decreased. The results also indicate a strong positive relationship between Ks and number of macropores as well as pore continuity. Hence, we conclude that changes in flow and transport pathways as well as Ks with an increasing peat degradation are due to the disintegration of the peat forming plant material and decrement of number and continuity of macropores after drainage.

  3. Changes in Flow and Transport Patterns in Fen Peat as a Result of Soil Degradation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Haojie; Janssen, Manon; Lennartz, Bernd

    2016-04-01

    The preferential movement of water and transport of substances play an important role in soils and are not yet fully understood especially in degraded peat soils. In this study, we aimed at deducing changes in flow and transport patterns in the course of soil degradation as resulting from peat drainage, using titanium dioxide (TiO2) as a dye tracer. The dye tracer experiments were conducted on columns of eight types of differently degraded peat soils from three sites taken both in vertical and horizontal directions. The titanium dioxide suspension (average particle size of 0.3 μm; 10 g l-1) was applied in a pulse of 40 mm to each soil core. Twenty-four hours after the application of the tracer, cross sections of the soil cores were prepared for photo documentation. In addition, the saturated hydraulic conductivity (Ks) was determined. Preferential flow occurred in all investigated peat types. From the stained soil structural elements, we concluded that undecomposed plant remains are the major preferential flow pathways in less degraded peat. For more strongly degraded peat, bio-pores, such as root and earthworm channels, operated as the major transport domain. Results show that Ks and the effective pore network in less degraded peat soils are anisotropic. With increasing peat degradation, the Ks and cross section of effective pore network decreased. The results also indicate a strong positive relationship between Ks and number of macropores as well as pore continuity. Hence, we conclude that changes in flow and transport pathways as well as Ks with an increasing peat degradation are due to the disintegration of the peat forming plant material and decrement of number and continuity of macropores after drainage.

  4. Dual-permeability model for water flow and solute transport in shrinking soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coppola, Antonio; Gerke, Horst; Comegna, Alessandro; Basile, Angelo

    2014-05-01

    A dual-permeability approach was extended to describe preferential water flow and solute transport in shrinking soils. In the approach, the soil is treated as a dual-permeability bulk porous medium consisting of dynamic interacting matrix and fractures pore domains. Water flow and solute transport in both the domains are described by the Richards' equation and advection-dispersion equation, respectively. In the model the contributions of the two regions to water flow and solute transport is changed dynamically according to the shrinkage characteristic exhibited under soil drying. Aggregate deformation during wetting/drying cycles is assumed to change only the relative proportions of voids in the fractures and in the aggregates, while the total volume of pores (and thus the layer thickness) remains unchanged. Thus, the partial contributions of the fracture and aggregate domains, are now a function of the water content (or the pressure head h), while their sum, the bulk porosity, is assumed to be constant. Any change in the aggregate contribution to total porosity is directly converted into a proportional change in the fracture porosity. This means that bulk volume change during shrinkage is mainly determined by change in crack volume rather than by change in layer thickness. This simplified approach allows dealing with an expansive soil as with a macroscopically rigid soil. The model was already tested by investigating whether and how well hydraulic characteristics obtained under the assumption of "dynamic" dual-permeability hydraulic parameterizations, or, alternatively, assuming the rigidity of the porous medium, reproduced measured soil water contents in a shrinking soil. Here we will discuss theoretical implications of the model in terms of relative importance of the parameters involved. The relative importance will be evaluated for different flow and transport processes and for different initial and top boundary conditions. Key words: Preferential flow and

  5. Variations in soil detachment rates after wildfire as a function of soil depth, flow properties, and root properties

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moody, John A.; Nyman, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Wildfire affects hillslope erosion through increased surface runoff and increased sediment availability, both of which contribute to large post-fire erosion events. Relations between soil detachment rate, soil depth, flow and root properties, and fire impacts are poorly understood and not represented explicitly in commonly used post-fire erosion models. Detachment rates were measured on intact soil cores using a modified tilting flume. The cores were mounted flush with the flume-bed and a measurement was made on the surface of the core. The core was extruded upward, cut off, and another measurement was repeated at a different depth below the original surface of the core. Intact cores were collected from one site burned by the 2010 Fourmile Canyon (FMC) fire in Colorado and from one site burned by the 2010 Pozo fire in California. Each site contained contrasting vegetation and soil types. Additional soil samples were collected alongside the intact cores and were analyzed in the laboratory for soil properties (organic matter, bulk density, particle-size distribution) and for root properties (root density and root-length density). Particle-size distribution and root properties were different between sites, but sites were similar in terms of bulk density and organic matter. Soil detachment rates had similar relations with non-uniform shear stress and non-uniform unit stream power. Detachment rates within single sampling units displayed a relatively weak and inconsistent relation to flow variables. When averaged across all clusters, the detachment rate displayed a linear relation to shear stress, but variability in soil properties meant that the shear stress accounted for only a small proportion of the overall variability in detachment rates (R2 = 0.23; R2 is the coefficient of determination). Detachment rate was related to root-length density in some clusters (R2 values up to 0.91) and unrelated in others (R2 values 2 value improved and the range of exponents became

  6. Modeling fingered flow of water in soils owing to wetting front instability: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Rooij, G. H.

    2000-05-01

    Fingered flow in the unsaturated zone caused by wetting front instability enhances solute leaching to the groundwater. This paper reviews recent progress in fingered flow research, focusing on theoretical results and model development. A variety of stability criteria have been derived to predict wetting front instability, mainly through linear, and sometimes non-linear, stability analysis, but also by theoretically analyzing infiltration into dry soils, and by stochastic methods that take into account random variations of the soil properties, fluid pressure, and front location. These stability criteria are discussed and compared. Eight expressions for finger size are presented. They fall into three categories based on the dependence on the ratio of the infiltration rate to the soil hydraulic conductivity in the finger. Next, the modeling of finger growth is discussed. Because of its relevance to solute transport, recent advances in the measurement and modeling of finger behavior in moist soils are thoroughly reviewed. Various models (ranging from easily applied closed-form equations for risk assessment to sophisticated transient numerical codes) have been developed over the past 15 years. These are discussed and selected results are shown. Finally, some remaining gaps in our understanding are given. Among these are the role of the initial water content, the nature of the flow in the distribution zone above the fingers, the effect of soil heterogeneity on wetting front instability, and the combined effect of soil heterogeneity and wetting front instability on field-scale solute transport.

  7. Preferential flow effects on transport and fate of chemicals and microorganisms in soils irrigated with wastewater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puddu, Rita; Corrias, Roberto; Dessena, Maria Antonietta; Ferralis, Marcella; Marras, Gabriele; Pin, Paola; Spanu, Paola

    2010-05-01

    This work is part of a multidisciplinary research properly planned by the ENAS (Cagliari-Sardinia-Italy) to verify the consequences of urban wastewater reuse in irrigation practices on chemical, biological and hydrological behavior of agricultural soils of the Had as Soualem area (Morocco). The area consists of Fluventic Haploxerept soils, according to USDA Soil Taxonomy. Undisturbed large soil columns, 70 cm height and 20 cm diameter, were collected from plots, the locations of which were preliminarily individuated through a prior pedological study. The soils are characterized by an apparent structure, suggesting that preferential flow processes may occur in the study area, which may impact usable groundwater at depth. Wastewater reuse for irrigation simultaneously solves water shortage and wastewater disposal problems. Unfortunately, wastewaters generally contain high concentrations of suspended and dissolved solids, both organic and inorganic, and microbial contaminants (virus and bacteria) added to wastewater during domestic and industrial usage. Most of these contaminants are only partially removed during conventional sewage treatment so they remain in the irrigation water. Although adsorbing ions and microbes are relatively immobile within porous media, preferential flow and adsorption to mobile colloids can enhance their transport. There is limited knowledge regarding the role of preferential flow and colloidal transport on adsorbing contaminants. The main aim of this research is to determine the influence of preferential flow and colloids on wastewater contaminant transport. Leaching rates and arrival time of wastewater contaminants will be determined using field and laboratory measurements at the study sites in combination with preferential flow numerical modeling. To achieve these objectives the soil columns were analyzed for physical, chemical, and microbial characterization. At the laboratory, an experimental facility was set up and sensors for

  8. Simulating Water Flow and Heat Transfer in Arid Soil Using Weighing Lysimeter Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dijkema, Jelle; Koonce, Jeremy; Ghezzehei, Teamrat; Berli, Markus; van der Ploeg, Martine; (Rien) van Genuchten, Martinus

    2015-04-01

    Deserts cover about one third of the Earth's land surface. Rather little though is known about the physics of desert soils and their implications for the ecology and hydrology of arid environments. The recently constructed weighing lysimeters located in Boulder City, Nevada, were designed to improve our understanding of the physical processes and properties of arid soils at the meter scale. In this study, we developed a HYDRUS-1D model to simulate water infiltration, hydraulic redistribution, and heat transfer for one of the lysimeters. HYDRUS-1D solves the coupled equations for water flow and heat transfer in variably saturated soil. Soil hydraulic and thermal properties were initialized based on prior knowledge and characterizations of the lysimeter soil. Soil hydraulic and thermal parameters were further refined by inverse simulation using a subset of the soil water content, water potential and temperature measurements at various depths. The model was validated using a separate portion of the soil moisture and temperature data set that was not used for calibration. The calibrated model provides a tool to virtually test future experiments in the lysimeters such as changes in the irrigation regime or the incorporation of plants. The model will also help to assess the impact of the placement of physical structures (such as solar panels) on the water and heat balance of desert soils.

  9. Preferential Water Flow in a Frozen Soil - a Two-Domain Model Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stähli, Manfred; Jansson, Per-Erik; Lundin, Lars-Christer

    1996-10-01

    Earlier modelling studies have shown the difficulty of accurately simulating snowmelt infiltration into frozen soil using the hydraulic model approach. Comparison of model outputs and field measurements have inferred the occurrence of rapid flow even during periods when the soil is still partly frozen. A one-dimensional, physically based soil water and heat model (SOIL) has been complemented with a new two-domain approach option to simulate preferential flow through frozen layers. The ice is assumed to be first formed at the largest water filled pore upon freezing. Infiltrating water may be conducted rapidly through previously air-filled pores which are not occupied by ice. A minor fraction of water is slowly transferred within the liquid water domain, which is absorbed by the solid particles. A model validation with field measurements at a location in the middle-east of Sweden indicated that the two-domain approach was suitable for improving the prediction of drainage during snowmelting. In particular, the correlation between simulated and observed onset of drainage in spring was improved. The validation also showed that the effect of the high flow domain was highly sensitive to the degree of saturation in the topsoil during freezing, as well as to the hydraulic properties at the lower frost boundary regulating the upward water flow to the frozen soil and ice formation.

  10. Data Assimilation in a Solar Dynamo Model Using Ensemble Kalman Filters: Sensitivity and Robustness in Reconstruction of Meridional Flow Speed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dikpati, Mausumi; Anderson, Jeffrey L.; Mitra, Dhrubaditya

    2016-09-01

    We implement an Ensemble Kalman Filter procedure using the Data Assimilation Research Testbed for assimilating “synthetic” meridional flow-speed data in a Babcock-Leighton-type flux-transport solar dynamo model. By performing several “observing system simulation experiments,” we reconstruct time variation in meridional flow speed and analyze sensitivity and robustness of reconstruction. Using 192 ensemble members including 10 observations, each with 4% error, we find that flow speed is reconstructed best if observations of near-surface poloidal fields from low latitudes and tachocline toroidal fields from midlatitudes are assimilated. If observations include a mixture of poloidal and toroidal fields from different latitude locations, reconstruction is reasonably good for ≤slant 40 % error in low-latitude data, even if observational error in polar region data becomes 200%, but deteriorates when observational error increases in low- and midlatitude data. Solar polar region observations are known to contain larger errors than those in low latitudes; our forward operator (a flux-transport dynamo model here) can sustain larger errors in polar region data, but is more sensitive to errors in low-latitude data. An optimal reconstruction is obtained if an assimilation interval of 15 days is used; 10- and 20-day assimilation intervals also give reasonably good results. Assimilation intervals \\lt 5 days do not produce faithful reconstructions of flow speed, because the system requires a minimum time to develop dynamics to respond to flow variations. Reconstruction also deteriorates if an assimilation interval \\gt 45 days is used, because the system’s inherent memory interferes with its short-term dynamics during a substantially long run without updating.

  11. Characterizing soil preferential flow using iodine--starch staining experiments and the active region model

    SciTech Connect

    Sheng, Feng; Wang, Kang; Zhang, Renduo; Liu, Hui-Hai

    2009-03-01

    Thirteen iodine-starch staining experiments with different boundary conditions and measurement scales were conducted at two sites to study preferential flow processes in natural unsaturated soils. Digital imaging analyses were implemented to obtain the corresponding preferential flow patterns. The test results are used to evaluate a recently proposed active region model in terms of its usefulness and robustness for characterizing unsaturated flow processes at field scale. Test results provide useful insights into flow patterns in unsaturated soils. They show that flow pattern depends on the top boundary condition. As the total infiltrating-water depth increased form 20 mm to 80 mm for the 100 x 100 cm{sup 2} plots, the corresponding flow pattern changed from few preferential flow paths associated with a relatively small degree of stained coverage and a small infiltration depth, to a pattern characterized by a higher stained coverage and a larger infiltration depth, and to (finally) a relatively homogeneous flow pattern with few unstained area and a much larger infiltration depth. Test results also show that the preferential flow pattern became generally more heterogeneous and complex for a larger measurement scale (or size of infiltration plot). These observations support the general idea behind the active region model that preferential flow pattern in unsaturated soils are dynamic and depend on water flow conditions. Further analyses of the test results indicate that the active-region model is able to capture the major features of the observed flow pattern at the scale of interest, and the determined parameter values do not significantly depend on the test conditions (initial water content and total amount of infiltrating water) for a given test site. This supports the validity of the active region model that considers that parameter to be a property of the corresponding unsaturated soil. Results also show that some intrinsic relation seems to exist between active

  12. Filter assay technique and quench-flow experiments: examples of receptor-mediated transmembrane ion-exchange measured with membrane vesicles.

    PubMed

    Cash, D J; Subbarao, K; Bradbury, J R; Mayes, G M

    1991-09-01

    Modifications to a quench-flow apparatus are described which allow a rapid, in-line filter assay with immediate washing, in conditions to give minimum background. A design for an effluent spout is presented, which decelerates the liquid by a large factor, prevents splashes, limits the area of the filter exposed to the sample and allows an immediate wash over a larger area. A design for a filter assay funnel for general use is also presented. These devices feature minimal contact of the funnels with the filter disc. Examples are given in which in-line filtration was used to follow transmembrane ion flux in membrane vesicle preparations. In measurements of transmembrane flux with membrane vesicles and radioisotope the filter assay background can be resolved into three components. These are, (1) the uptake of radioactivity by the filter, (2) the radioactivity inside the vesicles not taking part in the specific measurement and (3) the occlusion of radioactivity in aggregated membrane particles on the filter. These different components depend on the conditions in different ways. Techniques for minimizing the background in filter assays are discussed. The importance of rapid filtration and immediate washing is demonstrated. The examples given illustrate that the function of the acetylcholine receptor from E. electricus is not affected by diisopropylfluorophosphate in the conditions used, and that added GABA is not removed from solution in a brain membrane preparation by the GABA uptake mechanisms in the short times of the experiments. PMID:1658108

  13. Effects of soil aggregates on debris-flow mobilization: Results from ring-shear experiments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Iverson, Neal R.; Mann, Janet E.; Iverson, Richard M.

    2010-01-01

    Rates and styles of landslide motion are sensitive to pore-water pressure changes caused by changes in soil porosity accompanying shear deformation. Soil may either contract or dilate upon shearing, depending upon whether its initial porosity is greater or less, respectively, than a critical-state porosity attained after sufficiently high strain. We observed complications in this behavior, however, during rate-controlled (0.02 m s−1) ring-shear experiments conducted on naturally aggregated dense loamy sand at low confining stresses (10.6 and 40 kPa). The aggregated soil first dilated and then contracted to porosities less than initial values, whereas the same soil with its aggregates destroyed monotonically dilated. We infer that aggregates persisted initially during shear and caused dilation before their eventual breakdown enabled net contraction. An implication of this contraction, demonstrated in experiments in which initial soil porosity was varied, is that the value of porosity distinguishing initially contractive from dilative behavior can be significantly larger than the critical-state porosity, which develops only after disaggregation ceases at high strains. In addition, post-dilative contraction may produce excess pore pressures, thereby reducing frictional strength and facilitating debris-flow mobilization. We infer that results of triaxial tests, which generally produce strains at least a factor of ∼ 4 smaller than those we observed at the inception of post-dilative contraction, do not allow soil contraction to be ruled out as a mechanism for debris-flow mobilization in dense soils containing aggregates.

  14. A method of adaptive wavelet filtering of the peripheral blood flow oscillations under stationary and non-stationary conditions.

    PubMed

    Tankanag, Arina V; Chemeris, Nikolay K

    2009-10-01

    The paper describes an original method for analysis of the peripheral blood flow oscillations measured with the laser Doppler flowmetry (LDF) technique. The method is based on the continuous wavelet transform and adaptive wavelet theory and applies an adaptive wavelet filtering to the LDF data. The method developed allows one to examine the dynamics of amplitude oscillations in a wide frequency range (from 0.007 to 2 Hz) and to process both stationary and non-stationary short (6 min) signals. The capabilities of the method have been demonstrated by analyzing LDF signals registered in the state of rest and upon humeral occlusion. The paper shows the main advantage of the method proposed, which is the significant reduction of 'border effects', as compared to the traditional wavelet analysis. It was found that the low-frequency amplitudes obtained by adaptive wavelets are significantly higher than those obtained by non-adaptive ones. The method suggested would be useful for the analysis of low-frequency components of the short-living transitional processes under the conditions of functional tests. The method of adaptive wavelet filtering can be used to process stationary and non-stationary biomedical signals (cardiograms, encephalograms, myograms, etc), as well as signals studied in the other fields of science and engineering.

  15. Direct estimation of mass flow and diffusion of nitrogen compounds in solution and soil.

    PubMed

    Oyewole, Olusegun Ayodeji; Inselsbacher, Erich; Näsholm, Torgny

    2014-02-01

    Plant nutrient uptake from soil is mainly governed by diffusion and transpirationally induced mass flow, but the current methods for assessing the relative importance of these processes are indirect. We developed a microdialysis method using solutions of different osmotic potentials as perfusates to simulate diffusion and mass flow processes, and assessed how induced mass flow affected fluxes of nitrogen (N) compounds in solution and in boreal forest soil. Varying the osmotic potential of perfusates induced vertical fluxes in the direction of the dialysis membranes at rates of between 1 × 10(-8) and 3 × 10(-7)  m s(-1) , thus covering the estimated range of water velocities perpendicular to root surfaces and induced by transpiration. Mass flow increased N fluxes in solution but even more so in soil. This effect was explained by an indirect effect of mass flow on rates of diffusive fluxes, possibly caused by the formation of steeper gradients in concentrations of N compounds from membrane surfaces out in the soil. Our results suggest that transpiration may be an essential driver of plant N acquisition.

  16. Direct estimation of mass flow and diffusion of nitrogen compounds in solution and soil.

    PubMed

    Oyewole, Olusegun Ayodeji; Inselsbacher, Erich; Näsholm, Torgny

    2014-02-01

    Plant nutrient uptake from soil is mainly governed by diffusion and transpirationally induced mass flow, but the current methods for assessing the relative importance of these processes are indirect. We developed a microdialysis method using solutions of different osmotic potentials as perfusates to simulate diffusion and mass flow processes, and assessed how induced mass flow affected fluxes of nitrogen (N) compounds in solution and in boreal forest soil. Varying the osmotic potential of perfusates induced vertical fluxes in the direction of the dialysis membranes at rates of between 1 × 10(-8) and 3 × 10(-7)  m s(-1) , thus covering the estimated range of water velocities perpendicular to root surfaces and induced by transpiration. Mass flow increased N fluxes in solution but even more so in soil. This effect was explained by an indirect effect of mass flow on rates of diffusive fluxes, possibly caused by the formation of steeper gradients in concentrations of N compounds from membrane surfaces out in the soil. Our results suggest that transpiration may be an essential driver of plant N acquisition. PMID:24134319

  17. A modified hood infiltrometer to estimate the soil hydraulic properties from transient water flow measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moret-Fernández, David; Latorrre, Borja; Peña, Carolina; González-Cebollada, Cesar

    2015-04-01

    In-situ measurements of soil hydraulic properties on cover soil surfaces are of paramount importance in many agronomic or hydrological researches. The hydraulic properties can be estimated form the cumulative infiltration curve measured with tension infiltrometers. Transient water flow analysis, which means shorter experiments, facilitates its use for in situ field application. This paper presents a portable and modified design of the hood infiltrometer, the hat infiltrometer (HI), which applied on covered soil surfaces, allows estimating the soil hydraulic properties from the measured transient cumulative infiltration curve. The HI consists of a water-supply reservoir jointed to a hat base placed on the soil surface. The base of the hat is closed by a sticks plus plasticine ring system. The HI was tested on two different soils at saturated conditions, and the estimated soprtivity (S) and hydraulic conductivity (K) were compared to the corresponding values obtained with a disc infiltrometer (DI). An additional field experiment was performed to compare the hydraulic properties measured with HI on a bare and a plant-covered soil. Results demonstrated that this design allows hermetically closing the base of the hat without soils surface disturbing. No significant differences between the K and S values estimated with DI and the HI were observed. The S values measured with HI on the covers soil were significantly higher than that measured on the adjacent bare soil. These results indicate that HI can be a viable alternative to estimate the soil hydraulic properties of cover soil surfaces from the measured transient infiltration curve.

  18. Simulation of underresolved turbulent flows by adaptive filtering using the high order discontinuous Galerkin spectral element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flad, David; Beck, Andrea; Munz, Claus-Dieter

    2016-05-01

    Scale-resolving simulations of turbulent flows in complex domains demand accurate and efficient numerical schemes, as well as geometrical flexibility. For underresolved situations, the avoidance of aliasing errors is a strong demand for stability. For continuous and discontinuous Galerkin schemes, an effective way to prevent aliasing errors is to increase the quadrature precision of the projection operator to account for the non-linearity of the operands (polynomial dealiasing, overintegration). But this increases the computational costs extensively. In this work, we present a novel spatially and temporally adaptive dealiasing strategy by projection filtering. We show this to be more efficient for underresolved turbulence than the classical overintegration strategy. For this novel approach, we discuss the implementation strategy and the indicator details, show its accuracy and efficiency for a decaying homogeneous isotropic turbulence and the transitional Taylor-Green vortex and compare it to the original overintegration approach and a state of the art variational multi-scale eddy viscosity formulation.

  19. Spatial variation in microbial controls on soil organic matter turnover relative to preferential flow paths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masue-Slowey, Y.; Dhiman, K.; McMurdie, P. J.; Fendorf, S.; Chadwick, O.

    2012-12-01

    Soil is one of the largest dynamic stocks of C on earth. Within soils, nearly 70% of total soil organic C resides below 30 cm depth, and subsurface C typically has much longer turnover time (i.e. thousands of years) than near-surface C. Currently, predicting CO2 emission from subsurface soils is difficult as little is known about the stability and bioavailability of subsurface C. Physical structure (architecture) is a critical feature dictating the flow of solutes and gas within soils. Owing to the contrast in advective-dominated transport along preferential flow paths in comparison to diffusive-dominated transport within the soil matrix, O2 gradients develop, and, as a consequence, a diversity of anaerobic metabolisms emerge even in seemingly aerated soil. Currently, we lack a detailed understanding of how soil physical structure influences chemical environments, which in turn control microbial processing of C. Here we examine soil C stabilization mechanisms within subsurface soils that maintain their native structure and test whether metabolic constraints impact net soil carbon turnover time. Our study site, Pu'u Eke forest on Kohala Mountain, Hawaii receives 3 m of rain annually and exhibits heterogeneity in flow paths due to the shrink-swell properties of hydrated short-range ordered minerals. Carbon becomes progressively older (more depleted in 14C) as a function of distance from the flow path regardless of sampling depth within the B horizons. Near edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy as well as Fourier transform inferred (FTIR) spectroscopy show no significant difference in C chemistry orthogonal to the flow paths. Even as C becomes older toward the interior of peds (soil matrix), the permanganate oxidizable fraction increases slightly. Mineralogy, inclusive of poorly crystalline Fe and Al oxide abundance, also does not vary significantly as a function of the distance from flow paths based on X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), X

  20. Modeling of Water Flow Processes in the Soil-Plant-Atmosphere System: The Soil-Tree-Atmosphere Continuum Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massoud, E. C.; Vrugt, J. A.

    2015-12-01

    Trees and forests play a key role in controlling the water and energy balance at the land-air surface. This study reports on the calibration of an integrated soil-tree-atmosphere continuum (STAC) model using Bayesian inference with the DREAM algorithm and temporal observations of soil moisture content, matric head, sap flux, and leaf water potential from the King's River Experimental Watershed (KREW) in the southern Sierra Nevada mountain range in California. Water flow through the coupled system is described using the Richards' equation with both the soil and tree modeled as a porous medium with nonlinear soil and tree water relationships. Most of the model parameters appear to be reasonably well defined by calibration against the observed data. The posterior mean simulation reproduces the observed soil and tree data quite accurately, but a systematic mismatch is observed between early afternoon measured and simulated sap fluxes. We will show how this points to a structural error in the STAC-model and suggest and test an alternative hypothesis for root water uptake that alleviates this problem.

  1. Insect-Inspired Self-Motion Estimation with Dense Flow Fields—An Adaptive Matched Filter Approach

    PubMed Central

    Strübbe, Simon; Stürzl, Wolfgang; Egelhaaf, Martin

    2015-01-01

    The control of self-motion is a basic, but complex task for both technical and biological systems. Various algorithms have been proposed that allow the estimation of self-motion from the optic flow on the eyes. We show that two apparently very different approaches to solve this task, one technically and one biologically inspired, can be transformed into each other under certain conditions. One estimator of self-motion is based on a matched filter approach; it has been developed to describe the function of motion sensitive cells in the fly brain. The other estimator, the Koenderink and van Doorn (KvD) algorithm, was derived analytically with a technical background. If the distances to the objects in the environment can be assumed to be known, the two estimators are linear and equivalent, but are expressed in different mathematical forms. However, for most situations it is unrealistic to assume that the distances are known. Therefore, the depth structure of the environment needs to be determined in parallel to the self-motion parameters and leads to a non-linear problem. It is shown that the standard least mean square approach that is used by the KvD algorithm leads to a biased estimator. We derive a modification of this algorithm in order to remove the bias and demonstrate its improved performance by means of numerical simulations. For self-motion estimation it is beneficial to have a spherical visual field, similar to many flying insects. We show that in this case the representation of the depth structure of the environment derived from the optic flow can be simplified. Based on this result, we develop an adaptive matched filter approach for systems with a nearly spherical visual field. Then only eight parameters about the environment have to be memorized and updated during self-motion. PMID:26308839

  2. Insect-Inspired Self-Motion Estimation with Dense Flow Fields--An Adaptive Matched Filter Approach.

    PubMed

    Strübbe, Simon; Stürzl, Wolfgang; Egelhaaf, Martin

    2015-01-01

    The control of self-motion is a basic, but complex task for both technical and biological systems. Various algorithms have been proposed that allow the estimation of self-motion from the optic flow on the eyes. We show that two apparently very different approaches to solve this task, one technically and one biologically inspired, can be transformed into each other under certain conditions. One estimator of self-motion is based on a matched filter approach; it has been developed to describe the function of motion sensitive cells in the fly brain. The other estimator, the Koenderink and van Doorn (KvD) algorithm, was derived analytically with a technical background. If the distances to the objects in the environment can be assumed to be known, the two estimators are linear and equivalent, but are expressed in different mathematical forms. However, for most situations it is unrealistic to assume that the distances are known. Therefore, the depth structure of the environment needs to be determined in parallel to the self-motion parameters and leads to a non-linear problem. It is shown that the standard least mean square approach that is used by the KvD algorithm leads to a biased estimator. We derive a modification of this algorithm in order to remove the bias and demonstrate its improved performance by means of numerical simulations. For self-motion estimation it is beneficial to have a spherical visual field, similar to many flying insects. We show that in this case the representation of the depth structure of the environment derived from the optic flow can be simplified. Based on this result, we develop an adaptive matched filter approach for systems with a nearly spherical visual field. Then only eight parameters about the environment have to be memorized and updated during self-motion.

  3. Soil morphology of a debris flow chronosequence in a coniferous forest, southern California, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Turk, J.K.; Goforth, B.R.; Graham, R.C.; Kendrick, K.J.

    2008-01-01

    Soils on a series of debris flow deposits, ranging from < 1 to 244??years old, were described and sampled in order to investigate the early stages of soil development. The parent material at the site is debris flow regolith, composed mainly of gneiss, the soil moisture regime is xeric, and the vegetation is mixed coniferous forest. Ages of the deposits were assessed using dendrochronology. Morphologic trends in the organic horizons included a thickening of the humus form over time, along with the development of Fm and Hr horizons. The humus forms underwent a progression from Mormodors (20??years old), to Hemimors (26-101??years old), and finally Lignomors (163??years old) and Resimors (184-244??years old). Changes in physical properties of the uppermost mineral horizons as a function of increasing age included a decrease in the volume of coarse fragments, a linear decrease in bulk density, and a darkening and reddening of the soil color. No significant soil development took place in the subsoil during the time span of this chronosequence. The soils described were classified as Typic Xerofluvents and Typic Xerorthents (Regosols and Leptosols). Buried A horizons were observed in many of the soils. Where the A horizons could be linked to dendrochronology to assess the age of the buried surface, we found that the properties of the buried A horizons do not serve as a good indicator of the age of the surface. This study suggests rapid development of the humus form profile (organic horizons and A horizon) following debris flow deposition and rapid degradation of these horizons when the debris flow surface is buried. ?? 2008 Elsevier B.V.

  4. Perennial filter strips reduce nitrate levels in soil and shallow groundwater after grassland-to-cropland conversion.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiaobo; Helmers, Matthew J; Asbjornsen, Heidi; Kolka, Randy; Tomer, Mark D

    2010-01-01

    Many croplands planted to perennial grasses under the Conservation Reserve Program are being returned to crop production, and with potential consequences for water quality. The objective of this study was to quantify the impact of grassland-to-cropland conversion on nitrate-nitrogen (NO3-N) concentrations in soil and shallow groundwater and to assess the potential for perennial filter strips (PFS) to mitigate increases in NO3-N levels. The study, conducted at the Neal Smith National Wildlife Refuge (NSNWR) in central Iowa, consisted of a balanced incomplete block design with 12 watersheds and four watershed-scale treatments having different proportions and topographic positions of PFS planted in native prairie grasses: 100% rowcrop, 10% PFS (toeslope position), 10% PFS (distributed on toe and as contour strips), and 20 PFS (distributed on toe and as contour strips). All treatments were established in fall 2006 on watersheds that were under bromegrass (Bromus L.) cover for at least 10 yr. Nonperennial areas were maintained under a no-till 2-yr corn (Zea mays L.)--soybean [Glycine max. (L.) Merr.] rotation since spring 2007. Suction lysimeter and shallow groundwater wells located at upslope and toeslope positions were sampled monthly during the growing season to determine NO3-N concentration from 2005 to 2008. The results indicated significant increases in NO3-N concentration in soil and groundwater following grassland-to-cropland conversion. Nitrate-nitrogen levels in the vadose zone and groundwater under PFS were lower compared with 100% cropland, with the most significant differences occurring at the toeslope position. During the years following conversion, PFS mitigated increases in subsurface nitrate, but long-term monitoring is needed to observe and understand the full response to land-use conversion.

  5. Perennial filter strips reduce nitrate levels in soil and shallow groundwater after grassland-to-cropland conversion.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiaobo; Helmers, Matthew J; Asbjornsen, Heidi; Kolka, Randy; Tomer, Mark D

    2010-01-01

    Many croplands planted to perennial grasses under the Conservation Reserve Program are being returned to crop production, and with potential consequences for water quality. The objective of this study was to quantify the impact of grassland-to-cropland conversion on nitrate-nitrogen (NO3-N) concentrations in soil and shallow groundwater and to assess the potential for perennial filter strips (PFS) to mitigate increases in NO3-N levels. The study, conducted at the Neal Smith National Wildlife Refuge (NSNWR) in central Iowa, consisted of a balanced incomplete block design with 12 watersheds and four watershed-scale treatments having different proportions and topographic positions of PFS planted in native prairie grasses: 100% rowcrop, 10% PFS (toeslope position), 10% PFS (distributed on toe and as contour strips), and 20 PFS (distributed on toe and as contour strips). All treatments were established in fall 2006 on watersheds that were under bromegrass (Bromus L.) cover for at least 10 yr. Nonperennial areas were maintained under a no-till 2-yr corn (Zea mays L.)--soybean [Glycine max. (L.) Merr.] rotation since spring 2007. Suction lysimeter and shallow groundwater wells located at upslope and toeslope positions were sampled monthly during the growing season to determine NO3-N concentration from 2005 to 2008. The results indicated significant increases in NO3-N concentration in soil and groundwater following grassland-to-cropland conversion. Nitrate-nitrogen levels in the vadose zone and groundwater under PFS were lower compared with 100% cropland, with the most significant differences occurring at the toeslope position. During the years following conversion, PFS mitigated increases in subsurface nitrate, but long-term monitoring is needed to observe and understand the full response to land-use conversion. PMID:21284298

  6. Overland flow generation mechanisms affected by topsoil treatment: Application to soil conservation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González Paloma, Hueso; Juan Francisco, Martinez-Murillo; Damian, Ruiz-Sinoga Jose; Hanoch, Lavee

    2015-04-01

    Hortonian overland-flow is responsible for significant amounts of soil loss in Mediterranean geomorphological systems. Restoring the native vegetation is the most effective way to control runoff and sediment yield. During the seeding and plant establishment, vegetation cover may be better sustained if soil is amended with an external source. Four amendments were applied in an experimental set of plots: straw mulching (SM); mulch with chipped branches of Aleppo Pine (Pinus halepensis L.) (PM); TerraCotten hydroabsobent polymers (HP); sewage sludge (RU); and control (C). Plots were afforested following the same spatial pattern, and amendments were mixed with the soil at the rate 10 Mg ha-1. This research demonstrates the role played by the treatments in overland flow generation mechanism (runoff, overland flow and soil moisture along the soil profile). The general overland flow characteristics showed that in the C plots the average overland flow was 8.0 ± 22.0 l per event, and the HP plots produced a similar mean value (8.1 ± 20.1 l). The average overland flow per event was significantly less for soil amended with SM, PM or RU (2.7 ± 8.3 l; 1.3 ± 3.5 l and 2.2 ± 5.9 l, respectively). There was a similar trend with respect to the maximum overland flow. The mean sediment yield per event was relatively high in the C and HP plots (8.6 ± 27.8 kg and 14.8 ± 43.4 kg, respectively), while significantly lower values were registered in the SM, PM and RU plots (0.4 ± 1.0 kg; 0.2 ± 0.3 kg and 0.2 ± 0.3 kg, respectively). Very similar trends were found for the maximum sediment yield. Regarding to the soil moisture values, there was a difference in the trends between the C and HP plots and the SM, PM and RU plots. In the C and HP plots the general trend was for a decrease in soil moisture downward through the soil profile, while in the SM, PM and RU plots the soil moisture remained relatively constant or increased, except for the RU treatment in which the soil moisture

  7. Effects of soil data resolution on SWAT model stream flow and water quality predictions.

    PubMed

    Geza, Mengistu; McCray, John E

    2008-08-01

    The prediction accuracy of agricultural nonpoint source pollution models such as Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) depends on how well model input spatial parameters describe the characteristics of the watershed. The objective of this study was to assess the effects of different soil data resolutions on stream flow, sediment and nutrient predictions when used as input for SWAT. SWAT model predictions were compared for the two US Department of Agriculture soil databases with different resolution, namely the State Soil Geographic database (STATSGO) and the Soil Survey Geographic database (SSURGO). Same number of sub-basins was used in the watershed delineation. However, the number of HRUs generated when STATSGO and SSURGO soil data were used is 261 and 1301, respectively. SSURGO, with the highest spatial resolution, has 51 unique soil types in the watershed distributed in 1301 HRUs, while STATSGO has only three distributed in 261 HRUS. As a result of low resolution STATSGO assigns a single classification to areas that may have different soil types if SSURGO were used. SSURGO included Hydrologic Response Units (HRUs) with soil types that were generalized to one soil group in STATSGO. The difference in the number and size of HRUs also has an effect on sediment yield parameters (slope and slope length). Thus, as a result of the discrepancies in soil type and size of HRUs stream flow predicted was higher when SSURGO was used compared to STATSGO. SSURGO predicted less stream loading than STATSGO in terms of sediment and sediment-attached nutrients components, and vice versa for dissolved nutrients. When compared to mean daily measured flow, STATSGO performed better relative to SSURGO before calibration. SSURGO provided better results after calibration as evaluated by R(2) value (0.74 compared to 0.61 for STATSGO) and the Nash-Sutcliffe coefficient of Efficiency (NSE) values (0.70 and 0.61 for SSURGO and STATSGO, respectively) although both are in the same satisfactory

  8. Rigid porous filter

    DOEpatents

    Chiang, Ta-Kuan; Straub, Douglas L.; Dennis, Richard A.

    2000-01-01

    The present invention involves a porous rigid filter including a plurality of concentric filtration elements having internal flow passages and forming external flow passages there between. The present invention also involves a pressure vessel containing the filter for the removal of particulates from high pressure particulate containing gases, and further involves a method for using the filter to remove such particulates. The present filter has the advantage of requiring fewer filter elements due to the high surface area-to-volume ratio provided by the filter, requires a reduced pressure vessel size, and exhibits enhanced mechanical design properties, improved cleaning properties, configuration options, modularity and ease of fabrication.

  9. Manifestation of Preferential Flow and Nitrate Transport in Central European Soils on Acid Crystalline Rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolezal, F.; Cislerova, M.; Vogel, T.; Zavadil, J.; Vacek, J.; Kvitek, T.; Prazak, P.; Nechvatal, M.; Bayer, T.

    2006-12-01

    Large areas of Central Europe are occupied by highlands and peneplains of medium altitudes, built by acid crystalline rocks. The soils overlying them are typically of medium textures. They are neither markedly water- repellent nor greatly swelling and shrinking. These landscapes are characterized by high vulnerability of water bodies, both surface and subsurface. The existing methodologies of vulnerability assessment regard the heavier among these soils as little vulnerable to diffuse pollution, while in reality they may be virtually equally vulnerable, because of the short-circuiting effect of preferential flow and transport. Our experiment site was Valeèov (49° 38' 40" N, 14° 30' 25" E, 461 m a.s.l.) in the Bohemo-Moravian highland, with average annual precipitation 660 mm and average annual air temperature 7.2 ° C. The field trials, starting from 2001, were focused on growing potato under different conditions. Soil moisture content was measured by Theta- probe capacitance sensors, soil water suction by Watermark sensors and tensiometers. Nitrate leaching was monitored by soil solution sampling with ceramic suction cups and zero-tension lysimeters. The hydraulic conductivity of the soil was measured on small cores and by suction and pressure infiltrometers. The following preferential flow manifestations are analyzed and quantified: a) the spatial variability of soil moisture content and suction after rainstorms, b) the spatial and temporal variability of soil's hydraulic conductivity and its dependence on soil moisture content, c) the spatial variability of percolation volumes in parallel lysimeters, d) the variability of nitrate concentrations in the lysimeter leachate, e) the apparent absence of correlation between leachate volumes and leachate concentrations in lysimeters, f) the lower mean and higher variance of leachate concentrations in lysimeters, in comparison with those in suction cups.

  10. Water movement and isoproturon behaviour in a drained heavy clay soil: 1. Preferential flow processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haria, A. H.; Johnson, A. C.; Bell, J. P.; Batchelor, C. H.

    1994-12-01

    The processes and mechanisms that control pesticide transport from drained heavy clay catchments are being studied at Wytham Farm (Oxford University) in southern England. In the first field season field-drain water contained high concentrations of pesticide. Soil studies demonstrated that the main mechanism for pesticide translocation was by preferential flow processes, both over the soil surface and through the soil profile via a macropore system that effectively by-passed the soil matrix. This macropore system included worm holes, shrinkage cracks and cracks resulting from ploughing. Rainfall events in early winter rapidly created a layer of saturation in the A horizon perched above a B horizon of very low hydraulic conductivity. Drain flow was initiated when the saturated layer in the A horizon extended into the upper 0.06m of the soil profile; thereafter water moved down slope via horizontal macropores possibly through a band of incorporated straw residues. These horizontal pathways for water movement connected with the fracture system of the mole drains, thus feeding the drains. Overland flow occurred infrequently during the season.

  11. Scaling preferential flow processes in agricultural soils affected by tillage and trafficking at the field scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filipović, Vilim; Coquet, Yves

    2016-04-01

    There is an accumulation of experimental evidences that agricultural soils, at least the top horizons affected by tillage practices, are not homogeneous and present a structure that is strongly dependent on farming practices like tillage and trafficking. Soil tillage and trafficking can create compacted zones in the soil with hydraulic properties and porosity which are different from those of the non-compacted zones. This spatial variability can strongly influence transport processes and initiate preferential flow. Two or three dimensional models can be used to account for spatial variability created by agricultural practices, but such models need a detailed assessment of spatial heterogeneity which can be rather impractical to provide. This logically raises the question whether and how one dimensional model may be designed and used to account for the within-field spatial variability in soil structure created by agricultural practices. Preferential flow (dual-permeability) modelling performed with HYDRUS-1D will be confronted to classical modelling based on the Richards and convection-dispersion equations using HYDRUS-2D taking into account the various soil heterogeneities created by agricultural practices. Our goal is to derive one set of equivalent 1D soil hydraulic parameters from 2D simulations which accounts for soil heterogeneities created by agricultural operations. A field experiment was carried out in two phases: infiltration and redistribution on a plot by uniform sprinkle irrigation with water or bromide solution. Prior to the field experiment the soil structure of the tilled layer was determined along the face of a large trench perpendicular to the tillage direction (0.7 m depth and 3.1 m wide). Thirty TDR probes and tensiometers were installed in different soil structural zones (Δ compacted soil and Γ macroporous soil) which ensured soil water monitoring throughout the experiment. A map of bromide was constructed from small core samples (4 cm diam

  12. Modeling Transport of Escherichia coli from Soil into Overland Flow Under Raindrop Impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, C.; Walter, M. T.; Parlange, J. Y.

    2014-12-01

    Raindrop impacted transport of Escherichia coli (E. coli) from soil into overland flow is an important but poorly understood process. Research has focused on the attachment of E. coli to solids, E. coli transport in percolating water through soil, in overland flow over bare ground or through vegetation, and of E. coli release from cowpats during rainfall. However, E. coli transport from soil under splash erosion has not been well studied. A small scale rainfall experiment was conducted in which E. coli was mixed with simple soils composed either entirely of sand (250-300 μm) or a 9:1 sand-clay mixture. A variation on the conceptual Hairsine-Rose erosion model was applied to the experiment to help understand the transport processes. Although previous research has documented E. coli attachment to dislodged soil during rainfall, the presence of clay in our experiments did not noticeably affect the total amount or timing of E. coli ejected from the soil; we were not able to determine bacterial attachment to the clay. Our findings suggest that best management practices used to reduce the energy of raindrop impact, such as vegetated buffers, are likely effective for reducing E. coli as well.

  13. A Lattice Boltzmann model for simulating water flow at pore scale in unsaturated soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaoxian; Crawford, John W.; Young, Iain M.

    2016-07-01

    The Lattice Boltzmann (LB) method is an established prominent model for simulating water flow at pore scale in saturated porous media. However, its application in unsaturated soil is less satisfactory because of the difficulties associated with most two-phase LB models in simulating immiscible fluids, such as water and air, which have contrasting densities and viscosities. While progress has been made in developing LB models for fluids with high density ratio, they are still prone to numerical instability and cannot accurately describe the interfacial friction on water-air interface in unsaturated media. Considering that one important application of the LB model in porous materials is to calculate their hydraulic properties when flow is at steady state, we develop a simple LB model to simulate steady water flow at pore scale in unsaturated soils. The method consists of two steps. The first one is to determine water distribution within the soil structure using a morphological model; once the water distribution is known, its interfaces with air are fixed. The second step is to use a single-phase LB model to simulate water flow by treating the water-air interfaces as free-flow boundaries where the shear resistance of air to water flow is assumed to be negligible. We propose a method to solve such free-flow boundaries, and validate the model against analytical solutions of flows of water film over non-slip walls in both two and three dimensions. We then apply the model to calculate water retention and hydraulic properties of a medium acquired using X-ray computed tomography at resolution of 6 μm. The model is quasi-static, similar to the porous network model, but is an improvement as it directly simulates water flow in the pore geometries acquired by tomography without making any further simplifications.

  14. Relationships between basic soils-engineering equations and basic ground-water flow equations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jorgensen, Donald G.

    1980-01-01

    The many varied though related terms developed by ground-water hydrologists and by soils engineers are useful to each discipline, but their differences in terminology hinder the use of related information in interdisciplinary studies. Equations for the Terzaghi theory of consolidation and equations for ground-water flow are identical under specific conditions. A combination of the two sets of equations relates porosity to void ratio and relates the modulus of elasticity to the coefficient of compressibility, coefficient of volume compressibility, compression index, coefficient of consolidation, specific storage, and ultimate compaction. Also, transient ground-water flow is related to coefficient of consolidation, rate of soil compaction, and hydraulic conductivity. Examples show that soils-engineering data and concepts are useful to solution of problems in ground-water hydrology.

  15. Weathering rates as a function of flow through an alpine soil

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clow, D.W.; Drever, J.I.

    1996-01-01

    The effect of flow on release rates of solutes from soil in a 39-m2 alpine catchment in the Colorado Rockies was measured during the summers of 1990-1994. Flow rates through the soil were varied by augmenting natural rainfall with deionized irrigation water. Daily water inputs averaged between 96 and 216 1 day-1 during the five field seasons, and mean discharge (inputs minus evapotranspiration) varied from 35 to 175 1 day-1. Volume-weighted mean concentrations of base cations and silica decreased only moderately in response to the increased water inputs. Input fluxes of solutes in precipitation were similar in each of the study seasons, but output fluxes of base cations and silica in surface outflow increased substantially in conjunction with the average water input rate for the season. Weathering rates calculated from the chemical fluxes increased substantially in response to increases in water input rates. The increases appear to be largely attributable to enhanced transport of solutes from the soil matrix under high flow conditions. At high flow, physical flushing of micropores presumably occurs to a greater extent than during low-flow periods because of greater soil wetness and higher hydrologic head. Increased flushing would also cause an increased rate of diffusion of solutes from microcracks in mineral surfaces and constricted pore spaces in response to an increased concentration gradient between those regions and adjacent areas in the soil matrix. Another consequence of the increased flushing that occurs during periods of high flow is that concentrations throughout the soil matrix tend to be lower, which might increase chemical weathering rates of some silicate minerals such as microcline, which are relatively close to saturation. Decreased Si concentrations under high-flow conditions appear to promote dissolution of amorphous aluminosilicates or desorption of Si from mineral surfaces, buffering Si concentrations in the soil solutions. Thus, both physical

  16. Experimental investigation of infiltration in soil with occurrence of preferential flow and air trapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snehota, Michal; Jelinkova, Vladimira; Sacha, Jan; Cislerova, Milena

    2015-04-01

    Recently, a number of infiltration experiments have not proved the validity of standard Richards' theory of the flow in soils with wide pore size distribution. Water flow in such soils under near-saturated conditions often exhibits preferential flow and temporal instability of the saturated hydraulic conductivity. An intact sample of coarse sandy loam from Cambisol series containing naturally developed vertically connected macropore was investigated during recurrent ponding infiltration (RPI) experiments conducted during period of 30 hours. RPI experiment consisted of two ponded infiltration runs, each followed by free gravitational draining of the sample. Three-dimensional neutron tomography (NT) image of the dry sample was acquired before the infiltration begun. The dynamics of the wetting front advancement was investigated by a sequence of neutron radiography (NR) images. Analysis of NR showed that water front moved preferentially through the macropore at the approximate speed of 2 mm/sec, which was significantly faster pace than the 0.3 mm/sec wetting advancement in the surrounding soil matrix. After the water started to flow out of the sample, changes in the local water content distribution were evaluated quantitatively by subtracting the NT image of the dry sample from subsequent tomography images. As a next stage, the experiment was repeated on a composed sample packed of ceramic and coarse sand. Series of infiltration runs was conducted in the sample with different initial water contents. The neutron tomography data quantitatively showed that both in natural soil sample containing the macropore and in the composed sample air was gradually transported from the region of fine soil matrix to the macropores or to the coarser material. The accumulation of the air bubbles in the large pores affected the hydraulic conductivity of the sample reducing it up to 50% of the initial value. This supports the hypothesis on strong influence of entrapped air amount and

  17. Fractionation of arsenic in soil by a continuous-flow sequential extraction method.

    PubMed

    Shiowatana, J; McLaren, R G; Chanmekha, N; Samphao, A

    2001-01-01

    Batch sequential extraction techniques for fractionating metals or metalloids in soils are time consuming and subject to several potential errors. The development of a continuous-flow sequential extraction method for soil As is described and assessed, having the benefits of simplicity, rapidity, less risk of contamination, and less vulnerability to changes in extraction conditions compared with traditional batch methods. The validated method was used to fractionate soil As using water, NaHCO3, NaOH, and HCl, followed by digestion of the residue with HNO3 and HF acids. The extracts and digests were analyzed for As by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry. Good recoveries of total soil As (97-115%) were obtained and fractionation data generally comparable with those obtained using conventional batch techniques. Soils from a tin-mining area in Thailand and soils from As-contaminated cattle (Bos taurus) dip sites in Australia were used to test the applicability of the method, and to demonstrate the usefulness of the extractogram obtained. The ability to produce detailed extractograms for As and other elements (Al, Fe, and Ca) enabled an examination of elemental associations in individual fractions. With the exception of As extracted with HCl, the extractograms generally support previous suggestions of the likely forms or associations of As present in the different soil fractions. PMID:11790000

  18. Hydrologic filtering of fish life history strategies across the United States: implications for stream flow alteration

    SciTech Connect

    McManamay, Ryan A.; Frimpong, Emmanuel A.

    2015-01-01

    Lotic fish have developed life history strategies adapted to the natural variation in stream flow regimes. The natural timing, duration, and magnitude of flow events has contributed to the diversity, production, and composition of fish assemblages over time. Studies evaluating the role of hydrology in structuring fish assemblages have been more common at the local or regional scale with very few studies conducted at the continental scale. Furthermore, quantitative linkages between natural hydrologic patterns and fish assemblages are rarely used to make predictions of ecological consequences of hydrologic alterations. We ask two questions: (1) what is the relative role of hydrology in structuring fish assemblages at large scales? and (2) can relationships between fish assemblages and natural hydrology be utilized to predict fish assemblage responses to hydrologic disturbance? We developed models to relate fish life histories and reproductive strategies to landscape and hydrologic variables separately and then combined. Models were then used to predict the ecological consequences of altered hydrology due to dam regulation. Although hydrology plays a considerable role in structuring fish assemblages, the performance of models using only hydrologic variables was lower than that of models constructed using landscape variables. Isolating the relative importance of hydrology in structuring fish assemblages at the continental scale is difficult since hydrology is interrelated to many landscape factors. By applying models to dam-regulated hydrologic data, we observed some consistent predicted responses in fish life history strategies and modes of reproduction. In agreement with existing literature, equilibrium strategists are predicted to increase following dam regulation, whereas opportunistic and periodic species are predicted to decrease. In addition, dam regulation favors the selection of reproductive strategies with extended spawning seasons and preference for stable

  19. Hydrologic filtering of fish life history strategies across the United States: implications for stream flow alteration

    DOE PAGES

    McManamay, Ryan A.; Frimpong, Emmanuel A.

    2015-01-01

    Lotic fish have developed life history strategies adapted to the natural variation in stream flow regimes. The natural timing, duration, and magnitude of flow events has contributed to the diversity, production, and composition of fish assemblages over time. Studies evaluating the role of hydrology in structuring fish assemblages have been more common at the local or regional scale with very few studies conducted at the continental scale. Furthermore, quantitative linkages between natural hydrologic patterns and fish assemblages are rarely used to make predictions of ecological consequences of hydrologic alterations. We ask two questions: (1) what is the relative role ofmore » hydrology in structuring fish assemblages at large scales? and (2) can relationships between fish assemblages and natural hydrology be utilized to predict fish assemblage responses to hydrologic disturbance? We developed models to relate fish life histories and reproductive strategies to landscape and hydrologic variables separately and then combined. Models were then used to predict the ecological consequences of altered hydrology due to dam regulation. Although hydrology plays a considerable role in structuring fish assemblages, the performance of models using only hydrologic variables was lower than that of models constructed using landscape variables. Isolating the relative importance of hydrology in structuring fish assemblages at the continental scale is difficult since hydrology is interrelated to many landscape factors. By applying models to dam-regulated hydrologic data, we observed some consistent predicted responses in fish life history strategies and modes of reproduction. In agreement with existing literature, equilibrium strategists are predicted to increase following dam regulation, whereas opportunistic and periodic species are predicted to decrease. In addition, dam regulation favors the selection of reproductive strategies with extended spawning seasons and preference for

  20. Water flow and retention in coarse soil pockets in the shallow subsurface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakaki, T.; Limsuwat, A.; Illangasekare, T. H.

    2010-12-01

    Soil moisture processes in the near-land-surface subsurface, referred to here as the shallow subsurface, plays a crucial role in the hydrologic cycle and global water budget. In addition, this critical zone is associated with emerging problems in hydrology, climate, the environment and relates to multiple direct and tangential short- and long-term national security interests. Some of the problems associated with the shallow subsurface such as detection of buried landmines and evaporation from disturbed soils require the understanding of spatial distribution of soil moisture at much higher spatial resolutions than what is needed in traditional soil physics applications. In landmine detection in naturally heterogeneous shallow subsurface, where soil properties change at smaller scales, soil moisture as measured by remote sensing techniques may provide anomalies that result in falsely interpreted sensing signals to conclude that a mine is present. To improve our fundamental understanding of how variation of soil properties at small scales affect soil moisture distribution, the water flow and retention behaviors in a heterogeneous system with two pockets of different sands that are coarser than the background sand were investigated. Drainage was slowly induced in a two-dimensional test sand tank, followed by wetting, secondary drainage, and precipitation cycles. Throughout the experiments, water and air pressures and water content were continuously monitored at 25 locations on the tank. To monitor air pressure in highly wet soils, we used newly-developed hydrophobic tensiometers. In the primary drainage cycle, the pockets of coarse sands drained rapidly when air reached the coarse-fine interface. During the rapid drainage, air pressure in the pockets suddenly became negative as the water was released. In the wetting cycle, water bypassed through fine sand and air was trapped in the pockets. At the top portion of the coarse pocket, significant amount of air was trapped

  1. Macropore Flow in Soil Columns: Investigations with Computer Tomography and Lattice Boltzmann Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaap, M. G.; Tuller, M.; Guber, A.; Martin, M. A.; Martinez, F. S.; Pachepsky, Y.

    2007-12-01

    Soil structure greatly affects the ability of soil to transmit and to retain water, chemicals, and colloidal particles that can carry contaminants or be contaminants themselves, e.g. pathogenic microorganisms. No theory or empirical relationships have been developed to date to quantitatively relate parameters of soil structure and parameters of the contaminant transport in soils. The absence of theoretical advances in this area seriously hampers the ability to address issues of public concern, e.g. spread of contaminants introduced in the environment by agricultural activities. Recently, computer tomography of soils has become available to generate detailed images of soil pore space with high resolution and density. Successful applications of computer tomography in medical and material sciences show the great potential of this technique to create an exhaustive characterization of soil structure heterogeneity. In this presentation we investigate saturated flow through twelve undisturbed macroporous soil columns (7.62- cm sample diameter and 18-cm length) with lattice Boltzmann simulations. Saturated flow was measured for the complete columns, as well as on 2 cm sections for selected columns. Computed X-Ray tomography was performed on each of the columns, using the 420 kV X-ray source of a HYTEC FlashCT high-speed industrial CT scanner. The resolution was 116 microns per voxel, yielding a final tomography image of 656x656x1482 (~ 6.3 10E8) voxels. X-Ray CT observations typically provide "gray-scale" representations of the imaged object that must be segmented to yield discrete pore and particle geometry. Many segmentation algorithms are available, each yielding different final pore geometries thus potentially creating uncertainties in subsequent flow analyses. Lattice Boltzmann (LB) simulations will be presented only for some of the columns as the simulations are extremely computationally intensive (each simulation requires ~ 60 GB of computer RAM at the observed

  2. Unsaturated flow patterns observed in mine soils with embedded porous fragments using neutron radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badorreck, A.; Gerke, H. H.; Vontobel, P.

    2009-04-01

    Mine soils represent a typical dual-porosity medium characterized by porous fragments (e.g., lignitic or clayey clods) that are embedded in a coarser-textured sand-dust matrix. Effects of heterogeneously-distributed embedded fragments of various sizes and shapes on flow are largely unknown. The objective of this study is to identify water flow paths using neutron radiography and imaging techniques. Experiments were carried out at the Swiss Spallation Neutron Source SINQ (PSI, Villigen). Neutron radiography (at the NEUTRA instrument) was used to observe unsaturated water movement under different flow conditions. For 2D-steady-state flow experiments, we used a double-membrane setup to infiltrate water (H2O) in slap-type undisturbed soil samples. Before the experiments, most of the water that was initially present in the samples has been exchanged by deuterium oxide (D2O). The 2D radiography series' show the dynamics of the spatial changes in water contents during the unsaturated flow process at defined matric potentials. In addition, we conducted multistep in- and outflow experiments to observe the 3D spatial distribution of the water content during the stationary phases at different steps of imposed pressure heads. Two minature tensiometers, one in the sandy matrix and the other in lignitic fragments, monitored the equilibration of soil water matric potentials in the dual-porosity medium. Our observations basically confirm that flow patterns are strongly related to the local-scale structures and that a more continuous pore region exists in the vicinity of fragments for the imposed moisture conditions. This continuous pore domain allows for preferential flow within a relatively small fraction of the otherwise coarse-textured porous medium. The geometries and hydraulic properties of the porous fragments are additionally modifying the flow patterns.

  3. Determination of filter-cake thicknesses from on-line flow measurements and gas/particle transport modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D.H.; Powell, V.; Ibrahim, E.; Ferer, M.; Ahmadi, G.

    1996-12-31

    The use of cylindrical candle filters to remove fine ({approx}0.005 mm) particles from hot ({approx}500- 900{degrees}C) gas streams currently is being developed for applications in advanced pressurized fluidized bed combustion (PFBC) and integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) technologies. Successfully deployed with hot-gas filtration, PFBC and IGCC technologies will allow the conversion of coal to electrical energy by direct passage of the filtered gases into non-ruggedized turbines and thus provide substantially greater conversion efficiencies with reduced environmental impacts. In the usual approach, one or more clusters of candle filters are suspended from a tubesheet in a pressurized (P {approx_lt}1 MPa) vessel into which hot gases and suspended particles enter, the gases pass through the walls of the cylindrical filters, and the filtered particles form a cake on the outside of each filter. The cake is then removed periodically by a backpulse of compressed air from inside the filter, which passes through the filter wall and filter cake. In various development or demonstration systems the thickness of the filter cake has proved to be an important, but unknown, process parameter. This paper describes a physical model for cake and pressure buildups between cleaning backpulses, and for longer term buildups of the ``baseline`` pressure drop, as caused by incomplete filter cleaning and/or re-entrainment. When combined with operating data and laboratory measurements of the cake porosity, the model may be used to calculate the (average) filter permeability, the filter-cake thickness and permeability, and the fraction of filter-cake left on the filter by the cleaning backpulse or re-entrained after the backpulse. When used for a variety of operating conditions (e.g., different coals, sorbents, temperatures, etc.), the model eventually may provide useful information on how the filter-cake properties depend on the various operating parameters.

  4. Investigating the quasi-steady state flow instabilities in structured soil by neutron tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snehota, M.; Sobotkova, M.; Cislerova, M.; Hovind, J.; Vontobel, P.

    2011-12-01

    Preferential flow in structured soils may be accompanied by significant temporal variation of quasi saturated hydraulic conductivity (Kqs). Variations are often ascribed to changing amount of entrapped air in soil and are not considered in standard theory of water flow in porous media. We were able to reproduce variation of quasi steady state flow during ponded infiltration experiment on one small undisturbed sample of coarse sandy loam and to visualize the process by neutron imaging (NI). Two main flow irregularities were detected during recurrent ponding experiment: (1) outflow rates during the first infiltration run, started in dry soil, were gradually decreasing, while the boundary condition remained unchanged during the experiment, and (2) the outflow rate at the beginning of second infiltration was even lower that at the end of first run. Series of NI tomography images of the sample taken during quasi steady state stage of the first infiltration run showed air trapping in many of large pores and cavities in the sample. Furthermore, many of entrapped air bubbles increased in volume during the course of the first infiltration run. Further entrapped air redistribution has been detected during the second run. The fraction of the entrapped air was calculated from the neutron tomography images and was plotted against the measured Kqs. The increase of entrapped air bubbles volumetric fraction by only 0.005 was accompanied by decrease of quasi-saturated hydraulic conductivity to 50% of the initial value. The experimental results support the hypothesis stated earlier (Snehota et al., 2010) that the effect of the gradual decrease of the flow rates is caused by entrapped air redistribution and gradual build-up of bubbles in preferential pathways. The air comes probably from the soil matrix where residual air encapsulated during the primary fast breakthrough of gravitational water near the edges of large pores is being gradually replaced by water attracted to fine pores

  5. A field study of the effects of soil structure and irrigation method on preferential flow of pesticides in unsaturated soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghodrati, Masoud; Jury, William A.

    1992-10-01

    A large number of field plot experiments were performed to characterize the downward flow of three pesticides (atrazine, napropamide and prometryn) and a water tracer (chloride) under various soil water regimes and soil surface conditions. Each experiment consisted of the uniform application of a 0.4-cm pulse of a solution containing a mixture of the four chemicals to the surface of a 1.5 × 1.5-m plot. The plot was then irrigated with 12 cm of water and soil samples were collected and analyzed to a depth of 150 cm. In all, 64 different plots were employed to study individual as well as interactive effects of such variables as irrigation method (continuous or intermittent sprinkling or ponding), pesticide formulation method (technical grade dissolved in water, wettable powder, or emulsifiable concentrate), and tillage (undisturbed or tilled and repacked surface layer) on pesticide transport. While all three pesticides were expected to be retained in the top 10-20 cm, there was considerable movement below this zone. When averaged over all the treatments, 18.8% of the recovered mass of atrazine, 9.4% of the prometryn and 16.4% of the napropamide were found between 30- and 150cm depth. Moreover, all pesticides were highly mobile in the surface 30 cm regardless of their adsorption coefficient. There were occureences of extreme mobility or "preferential flow" of pesticide under every experimental condition except where the pesticides were applied in wettable powder form to plots which had their surface tilled and repacked. This finding implies that there may be fine preferential flow pathways through which solution may move but particulates may not.

  6. Experimental support and estimate of the accuracy of the water flow model in structured soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikulina, M.

    2003-04-01

    The set of models of water flow and solute transport was developed. It takes into account spatial and time variability of soil properties and a complex structure of a soil pore space. However, its limited by physically justified methods of experimental definition of parameters. The important stage of the work with the models is checking their adequacy to described processes. It is possible only at a presence of the qualitative experi-mental data received under conditions, reproduced by model. According to this, the aim of the work is the support of methods of experimental maintenance of water flow models with taking into account of structure of soil porosity and evaluation of conditions of application of mathematical models of a dif-ferent level. The field experiments were conducted in Suzdal (Russia, Vladimirskaja oblast), in June and July 1997. The soil cover of this region has high complexity, in which grey forest soils are dominant. Genetic horizons of the grey forest soils are well structured, this causes the presence in soil profile the macropores. The field investigation consisted of three big parts: (1) the morphological research of the genetic horizons of the grey forest soil; (2) investigation of the soil filtration properties by the tube with a constant head and vacuum-infiltrometer methods; (3) study of water movement at different intensity of the irrigation. Experiments were conducted on three sets called <А>, <В > and <С>. The plots had 1m x 1m a size and were equipped with the hole for measurement of soil water content by the neutron hygrometer and by the tensiometers. In labo-ratory conditions the following properties of soil were determined: density of soil, texture, porosity of the aggregates, shrinkage characteristics of soil fraction in diameter of 3-5 mm. For the simulation the model "MACRO" (Jarvis et al, 1991) was used in the work. Adequacy of the model descriptions of the field data were estimated by visual comparison of measured and

  7. Overland Flow Generation and Soil Hydraulic Properties in Two Catchments in Central Panama

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godsey, S.; Elsenbeer, H.; Stallard, R.

    2003-12-01

    Land management decisions in the Panama Canal watershed directly impact the hydrological functioning of the canal itself. Knowledge of the hydrological conditions in the forested portions of the watershed provides a baseline comparison for future land use changes. We chose to work on two streams on Barro Colorado Island that are representative of large regions of the watershed. These two streams respond differently to the same storm events: Conrad Trail Stream exhibits a fairly subdued and delayed response and Lutz Creek stream is flashier. In order to understand these differences, we investigated the soil saturated hydraulic conductivity (Ks) of the two catchments and studied the frequency of overland flow generation. The Ks measurements in dominant geologies in Lutz Creek as well as in Conrad Trail Stream are great enough at shallow depths (median Ks = 29.7, 65.6 and 38.3 mm/hr) that Hortonian overland flow is rare, but a marked decrease in Ks in Lutz Creek catchment at 30 cm (to 1.4 and 5.8 mm/hr) indicates that a perched water table leading to saturated overland flow is the likely runoff mechanism in Lutz Creek. In Conrad, Ks does not decrease as markedly with soil depth, and a perched water table would form at about 60 cm below the surface (median Ks = 0.7 mm/hr). Therefore, more water is able to infiltrate into the soil in Conrad Trail Stream and saturated overland flow is less common. Overland flow was generated much more frequently in Lutz Creek than in Conrad Trail Stream, with lower thresholds of storm magnitude, duration, antecedent wetness and intensity required to generate overland flow. We also quantified the importance of microtopographic features such as concentrated flow lines and the results have implications for experimental design at other field sites. The Lutz Creek and Conrad Trail stream information will provide a useful baseline for land management decisions.

  8. Evaluating the Performance of a Surface Barrier on Reducing Soil-Water Flow

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Z. F.; Strickland, Christopher E.; Field, Jim G.; Parker, Danny L.; Clayton, Ray E.

    2012-08-31

    One of the most common effective techniques for contaminant remediation in the vadose zone is to use a surface barrier to reduce or eliminate soil-water flow to reduce the contaminant flux to the underlying groundwater. Confirming the reduction of the soil-water flux rate is challenging because of the difficulty of determining the very low soil-water flux beneath the barrier. We propose a hydraulic-conductivity factor, fK, as a conservative indicator for quantifying the reduction of soil-water flow. The factor can be calculated using the measured soil-water content or pressure but does not require the knowledge of the saturated hydraulic conductivity or the hydraulic gradient. The formulas were tested by comparing with changes in hydraulic conductivity, K, from a drainage experiment. The pressure-based formula was further applied to evaluate the performance of the interim surface barrier at T Tank Farm on Hanford Site. Three years after barrier emplacement, the hydraulic conductivity decreased by a factor between 3.8 and 13.0 at the 1-, 2- and 5-m depths. The difference between the conductivity-reduction factor and the flux-rate-reduction factor, fq, was quantified with a numerical simulation. With the calculated fK, the numerically determined fK/fq ratio, and the assumed pre-barrier soil-water flux rate of 100 mm yr-1, the estimated soil-water flux rate 3 years after barrier emplacement was no more than 8.5 mm yr-1 at or above the 5-m depth.

  9. Air filtration in the free molecular flow regime: a review of high-efficiency particulate air filters based on carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Li, Peng; Wang, Chunya; Zhang, Yingying; Wei, Fei

    2014-11-01

    Air filtration in the free molecular flow (FMF) regime is important and challenging because a higher filtration efficiency and lower pressure drop are obtained when the fiber diameter is smaller than the gas mean free path in the FMF regime. In previous studies, FMF conditions have been obtained by increasing the gas mean free path through reducing the pressure and increasing the temperature. In the case of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with nanoscale diameters, it is possible to filtrate in the FMF regime under normal conditions. This paper reviews recent progress in theoretical and experimental studies of air filtration in the FMF regime. Typical structure models of high-efficiency particulate (HEPA) air filters based on CNTs are introduced. The pressure drop in air filters operated in the FMF regime is less than that predicted by the conventional air filtration theory. The thinnest HEPA filters fabricated from single-walled CNT films have an extremely low pressure drop. CNT air filters with a gradient nanostructure are shown to give a much better filtration performance in dynamic filtration. CNT air filters with a hierarchical structure and an agglomerated CNT fluidized bed air filter are also introduced. Finally, the challenges and opportunities for the application of CNTs in air filtration are discussed.

  10. Air filtration in the free molecular flow regime: a review of high-efficiency particulate air filters based on carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Li, Peng; Wang, Chunya; Zhang, Yingying; Wei, Fei

    2014-11-01

    Air filtration in the free molecular flow (FMF) regime is important and challenging because a higher filtration efficiency and lower pressure drop are obtained when the fiber diameter is smaller than the gas mean free path in the FMF regime. In previous studies, FMF conditions have been obtained by increasing the gas mean free path through reducing the pressure and increasing the temperature. In the case of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with nanoscale diameters, it is possible to filtrate in the FMF regime under normal conditions. This paper reviews recent progress in theoretical and experimental studies of air filtration in the FMF regime. Typical structure models of high-efficiency particulate (HEPA) air filters based on CNTs are introduced. The pressure drop in air filters operated in the FMF regime is less than that predicted by the conventional air filtration theory. The thinnest HEPA filters fabricated from single-walled CNT films have an extremely low pressure drop. CNT air filters with a gradient nanostructure are shown to give a much better filtration performance in dynamic filtration. CNT air filters with a hierarchical structure and an agglomerated CNT fluidized bed air filter are also introduced. Finally, the challenges and opportunities for the application of CNTs in air filtration are discussed. PMID:25288476

  11. Investigation of the flow-field in the upper respiratory system when wearing N95 filtering facepiece respirator.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaotie; Li, Hui; Shen, Shengnan; Cai, Mang

    2016-01-01

    This article presents a reverse modeling of the headform when wearing a filtering facepiece respirator (FFR) and a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation based on the modeling. The whole model containing the upper respiratory airway, headform, and FFR was directly recorded by computed tomography (CT) scanning, and a medical contrast medium was used to make the FFR "visible." The FFR was normally worn by the subject during CT scanning so that the actual deformation of both the FFR and the face muscles during contact can be objectively conserved. The reverse modeling approach was introduced to rebuild the geometric model and convert it into a CFD solvable model. In this model, we conducted a transient numerical simulation of air flow containing carbon dioxide, thermal dynamics, and pressure and wall shear stress distribution in the respiratory system taking into consideration an individual wearing a FFR. The breathing cycle was described as a time-dependent profile of the air velocity through the respiratory airway. The result shows that wearing the N95 FFR results in CO2 accumulation, an increase in temperature and pressure elevation inside the FFR cavity. The volume fraction of CO2 reaches 1.2% after 7 breathing cycles and then is maintained at 3.04% on average. The wearers re-inhale excessive CO2 in every breathing cycle from the FFR cavity. The air temperature in the FFR cavity increases rapidly at first and then stays close to the exhaled temperature. Compared to not wearing an FFR, wearers have to increase approximately 90 Pa more pressure to keep the same breathing flow rate of 30.54 L/min after wearing an FFR. The nasal vestibule bears more wall shear stress than any other area in the airway. PMID:26653154

  12. Investigation of the flow-field in the upper respiratory system when wearing N95 filtering facepiece respirator.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaotie; Li, Hui; Shen, Shengnan; Cai, Mang

    2016-01-01

    This article presents a reverse modeling of the headform when wearing a filtering facepiece respirator (FFR) and a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation based on the modeling. The whole model containing the upper respiratory airway, headform, and FFR was directly recorded by computed tomography (CT) scanning, and a medical contrast medium was used to make the FFR "visible." The FFR was normally worn by the subject during CT scanning so that the actual deformation of both the FFR and the face muscles during contact can be objectively conserved. The reverse modeling approach was introduced to rebuild the geometric model and convert it into a CFD solvable model. In this model, we conducted a transient numerical simulation of air flow containing carbon dioxide, thermal dynamics, and pressure and wall shear stress distribution in the respiratory system taking into consideration an individual wearing a FFR. The breathing cycle was described as a time-dependent profile of the air velocity through the respiratory airway. The result shows that wearing the N95 FFR results in CO2 accumulation, an increase in temperature and pressure elevation inside the FFR cavity. The volume fraction of CO2 reaches 1.2% after 7 breathing cycles and then is maintained at 3.04% on average. The wearers re-inhale excessive CO2 in every breathing cycle from the FFR cavity. The air temperature in the FFR cavity increases rapidly at first and then stays close to the exhaled temperature. Compared to not wearing an FFR, wearers have to increase approximately 90 Pa more pressure to keep the same breathing flow rate of 30.54 L/min after wearing an FFR. The nasal vestibule bears more wall shear stress than any other area in the airway.

  13. Bacterial community involved in the nitrogen cycle in a down-flow sponge-based trickling filter treating UASB effluent.

    PubMed

    Mac Conell, E F A; Almeida, P G S; Martins, K E L; Araújo, J C; Chernicharo, C A L

    2015-01-01

    The bacterial community composition of a down-flow sponge-based trickling filter treating upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) effluent was investigated by pyrosequencing. Bacterial community composition considerably changed along the reactor and over the operational period. The dominant phyla detected were Proteobacteria, Verrucomicrobia, and Planctomycetes. The abundance of denitrifiers decreased from the top to the bottom and it was consistent with the organic matter concentration gradients. At lower loadings (organic and nitrogen loading rates), the abundance of anammox bacteria was higher than that of the ammonium-oxidizing bacteria in the upper portion of the reactor, suggesting that aerobic and anaerobic ammonium oxidation occurred. Nitrification occurred in all the compartments, while anammox bacteria prominently appeared even in the presence of high organic carbon to ammonia ratios (around 1.0-2.0 gCOD gN(-1)). The results suggest that denitrifiers, nitrifiers, and anammox bacteria coexisted in the reactor; thus, different metabolic pathways were involved in ammonium removal in the post-UASB reactor sponge-based.

  14. Field-scale application of Ensemble Kalman filter assimilation of transient groundwater flow data via stochastic moment equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panzeri, Marco; Riva, Monica; Guadagnini, Alberto; Neuman, Shlomo P.

    2014-05-01

    The ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) enables one to assimilate newly available data in transient groundwater and other temporal earth system models through real-time Bayesian updating of system states (e.g., hydraulic heads) and parameters (e.g., hydraulic conductivities). It has become common to treat spatially varying hydraulic conductivities as autocorrelated random fields conditioned on measured conductivities and/or heads. Doing so renders the corresponding groundwater flow equations stochastic. Assimilating data in such equations via traditional EnKF entails computationally intensive Monte Carlo (MC) simulation. We have previously illustrated a methodology to circumvent the need for MC. Our methodology is grounded on (1) an approximate direct solution of nonlocal (integrodifferential) equations that govern the space-time evolution of conditional ensemble means (statistical expectations) and covariances of hydraulic heads and fluxes and (2) the embedding of these moments in EnKF. This provides sequential updates of conductivity and head estimates throughout the space-time domain of interest, does not suffer from inbreeding issues and, as an additional benefit, obviates the need for computationally intensive batch inverse solution of the moment equations as we have been doing previously. We compare the performance of our new EnKF approach based on stochastic moment equation and of the traditional Monte Carlo approach. We do so for a field scale scenario involving a sequence of pumping tests performed in a heterogeneous alluvial test site located near the city of Tuebingen, Germany.

  15. Enhanced azo dye removal in a continuously operated up-flow anaerobic filter packed with henna plant biomass.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jingang; Wu, Mengke; Chen, Jianjun; Liu, Xiuyan; Chen, Tingting; Wen, Yue; Tang, Junhong; Xie, Zhengmiao

    2015-12-15

    Effects of henna plant biomass (stem) packed in an up-flow anaerobic bio-filter (UAF) on an azo dye (AO7) removal were investigated. AO7 removal, sulfanilic acid (SA) formation, and pseudo first-order kinetic constants for these reactions (kAO7 and kSA) were higher in the henna-added UAF (R2) than in the control UAF without henna (R1). The maximum kAO7 in R1 and R2 were 0.0345 and 0.2024 cm(-1), respectively, on day 18; the corresponding molar ratios of SA formation to AO7 removal were 0.582 and 0.990. Adsorption and endogenous bio-reduction were the main AO7 removal pathways in R1, while in R2 bio-reduction was the dominant. Organics in henna could be released and fermented to volatile fatty acids, acting as effective electron donors for AO7 reduction, which was accelerated by soluble and/or fixed lawsone. Afterwards, the removal process weakened over time, indicating the demand of electron donation and lawsone-releasing during the long-term operation of UAF.

  16. Bacterial community involved in the nitrogen cycle in a down-flow sponge-based trickling filter treating UASB effluent.

    PubMed

    Mac Conell, E F A; Almeida, P G S; Martins, K E L; Araújo, J C; Chernicharo, C A L

    2015-01-01

    The bacterial community composition of a down-flow sponge-based trickling filter treating upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) effluent was investigated by pyrosequencing. Bacterial community composition considerably changed along the reactor and over the operational period. The dominant phyla detected were Proteobacteria, Verrucomicrobia, and Planctomycetes. The abundance of denitrifiers decreased from the top to the bottom and it was consistent with the organic matter concentration gradients. At lower loadings (organic and nitrogen loading rates), the abundance of anammox bacteria was higher than that of the ammonium-oxidizing bacteria in the upper portion of the reactor, suggesting that aerobic and anaerobic ammonium oxidation occurred. Nitrification occurred in all the compartments, while anammox bacteria prominently appeared even in the presence of high organic carbon to ammonia ratios (around 1.0-2.0 gCOD gN(-1)). The results suggest that denitrifiers, nitrifiers, and anammox bacteria coexisted in the reactor; thus, different metabolic pathways were involved in ammonium removal in the post-UASB reactor sponge-based. PMID:26114279

  17. Preferential Flow Paths Allow Deposition of Mobile Organic Carbon Deep into Soil B Horizons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marin-Spiotta, E.; Chadwick, O.; Kramer, M. G.

    2009-12-01

    Most of our understanding of soil carbon (C) dynamics derives from the top 10 to 20 cm, although globally the majority of the bulk soil C pool is found below those depths. Mineral associated C in deep soil is more stable than that held in surface horizons, and its long-term persistence may contribute to sequestration of anthropogenic C. Carbon can enter deep soil horizons in multiple ways: through biologically-mediated or abiotic physical mixing, illuviation, root inputs, or through a physical disturbance that would cause the burial of an originally shallow organic horizon. In this study, we investigated the role of dissolved organic matter (DOM) in the transport and stabilization of soil C in tropical rainforest volcanic soils, where high rainfall, a highly productive forest, and dominance of highly reactive, non-crystalline minerals contribute to large soil C stocks at depth with long mean residence times. DOM plays an important role in many biological and chemical processes in soils, including nutrient transfer within and across ecosystems. Carbon storage in these soils is linked to movement of both DOC and particulate organic C along infiltration pathways. Climate and soil mineralogical properties create the right conditions for C to be pumped from the organic horizons where microbial activity is highest, to deep mineral horizons, where the potential for stabilization is greatest. High rainfall preserves hydrated short-range order minerals that are subject to strong shrinkage during occasional drought periods. The resulting cracks in subsurface B horizons become pathways for DOM complexed with Fe and Al moving in soil solution during subsequent wet periods. Preferential flow of these organically rich solutes and/or colloids moves C to depth where C, Fe and Al are preferentially deposited on near-vertical crack surfaces and along near-horizonal flow surfaces at horizon boundaries. Long-term deposition forms discontinuous Fe- and OM-cemented lamella that serve to

  18. Preferential flow and transport of nitrate and bromide in claypan soil

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kelly, B.P.; Pomes, M.L.

    1998-01-01

    The in situ measurement of water flow and chemical transport through claypan soils is crucial to understanding potential water contamination from agricultural sources. It is important due to the large areal extent of these soils in agricultural regions of the midwestern United States and because of preferential flowpaths caused by desiccation cracks, worm burrowing, and root development. A study plot at the Missouri Management Systems Evaluation Area near Centralia, Missouri, was instrumented to determine the rate of preferential flow of water and transport of NO3-1 fertilizer in the unsaturated zone through a claypan soil using 15N-NO3-1 and Br-1 tracers. The areal distribution of preferential flowpaths was between 2 and 20% in the topsoil. Gravity lysimeter flow caused by preferential flow through the claypan was as much as 150 times greater than the estimated average rate of vertical recharge. As much as 2.4% of the volume of the sod below the claypan may be occupied by preferential flowpaths. The 15N-NO3-1 concentrations in ground water indicate that substantial quantifies of fertilizer-derived NO3-1 were transported to ground water through the claypan during the first recharge event following fertilizer application even though that event occurred six months after application. Hydraulic conductivity, measured at three scales, ranged from 6.2 x 10-8 to 7.5 x 10-3 cm/s. The observed increase of calculated hydraulic conductivity with each increase in scale was attributed to the inclusion of more and larger preferential flowpaths within the volume over which the measurement was made, indicating hydraulic conductivity measured at one scale may not describe flow and transport at another scale.The in situ measurement of water flow and chemical transport through claypan soils is crucial to understanding potential water contamination from agricultural sources. It is important due to the large areal extent of these soils in agricultural regions of the midwestern United

  19. Burning management in the tallgrass prairie affects root decomposition, soil food web structure and carbon flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, E. A.; Denef, K.; Milano de Tomasel, C.; Cotrufo, M. F.; Wall, D. H.

    2015-09-01

    Root litter decomposition is a major component of carbon (C) cycling in grasslands, where it provides energy and nutrients for soil microbes and fauna. This is especially important in grasslands where fire is a common management practice and removes aboveground litter accumulation. In this study, we investigated whether fire affects root decomposition and C flow through the belowground food web. In a greenhouse experiment, we applied 13C-enriched big bluestem (Andropogon gerardii) root litter to intact tallgrass prairie soil cores collected from annually burned (AB) and infrequently burned (IB) treatments at the Konza Prairie Long Term Ecological Research (LTER) site. Incorporation of 13C into microbial phospholipid fatty acids and nematode trophic groups was measured on six occasions during a 180-day decomposition study to determine how C was translocated through the soil food web. Results showed significantly different soil communities between treatments and higher microbial abundance for IB. Root decomposition occurred rapidly and was significantly greater for AB. Microbes and their nematode consumers immediately assimilated root litter C in both treatments. Root litter C was preferentially incorporated in a few groups of microbes and nematodes, but depended on burn treatment: fungi, Gram-negative bacteria, Gram-positive bacteria, and fungivore nematodes for AB and only omnivore nematodes for IB. The overall microbial pool of root litter-derived C significantly increased over time but was not significantly different between burn treatments. The nematode pool of root litter-derived C also significantly increased over time, and was significantly higher for the AB treatment at 35 and 90 days after litter addition. In conclusion, the C flow from root litter to microbes to nematodes is not only measurable, but significant, indicating that higher nematode trophic levels are critical components of C flow during root decomposition which, in turn, is significantly

  20. Optimality and Conductivity for Water Flow: From Landscapes, to Unsaturated Soils, to Plant Leaves

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, H.H.

    2012-02-23

    Optimality principles have been widely used in many areas. Based on an optimality principle that any flow field will tend toward a minimum in the energy dissipation rate, this work shows that there exists a unified form of conductivity relationship for three different flow systems: landscapes, unsaturated soils and plant leaves. The conductivity, the ratio of water flux to energy gradient, is a power function of water flux although the power value is system dependent. This relationship indicates that to minimize energy dissipation rate for a whole system, water flow has a small resistance (or a large conductivity) at a location of large water flux. Empirical evidence supports validity of the relationship for landscape and unsaturated soils (under gravity dominated conditions). Numerical simulation results also show that the relationship can capture the key features of hydraulic structure for a plant leaf, although more studies are needed to further confirm its validity. Especially, it is of interest that according to this relationship, hydraulic conductivity for gravity-dominated unsaturated flow, unlike that defined in the classic theories, depends on not only capillary pressure (or saturation), but also the water flux. Use of the optimality principle allows for determining useful results that are applicable to a broad range of areas involving highly non-linear processes and may not be possible to obtain from classic theories describing water flow processes.

  1. Characterization of preferential flow in undisturbed, structured soil columns using a vertical TDR probe.

    PubMed

    Lee, J; Horton, R; Noborio, K; Jaynes, D B

    2001-10-01

    Rapid movement of agricultural chemicals through soil to groundwater via preferential flow pathways is one cause of water contamination. Previous studies have shown that time domain reflectometry (TDR) could be used to characterize solute transport in soil. However, previous studies have only scarcely addressed preferential flow. This study presents an extended application of TDR for determining preferential flow properties. A TDR method was tested in carefully controlled laboratory experiments using 20-cm long and 12-cm diameter undisturbed, structured soil columns. The method used a vertically installed TDR probe and a short pulse of tracer application to obtain residual mass (RM) breakthrough curves (BTC). The RM BTC obtained from TDR were used to estimate mobile/immobile model (MIM) parameters that were compared to the parameter estimates from effluent data. A conventional inverse curve fitting method (CXTFIT) was used to estimate parameters. The TDR-determined parameters were then used to generate calculated effluent BTC for comparison with observed effluent BTC for the same soil columns. Time moments of the calculated and observed BTC were calculated to quantitatively evaluate the calculated BTC. Overall, the RM BTC obtained from TDR were similar to the RM BTC obtained from effluent data. The TDR-determined parameters corresponded well to the parameters obtained from the effluent data, although they were not within the 95% confidence intervals. Correlation coefficients between the parameters obtained from TDR and from effluent data for the immobile water fraction (theta im/theta), mass exchange coefficient (alpha), and dispersion coefficient (Dm) were 0.95, 0.95, and 0.99, respectively. For three of the four soil cores, theta im/theta ranged from 0.42 to 0.82, indicating considerable preferential flow. The TDR-calculated effluent BTC also were similar to the observed effluent BTC having an average coefficient of determination of 0.94. Time moments obtained

  2. Dual-permeability model for flow in shrinking soil with dominant horizontal deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coppola, Antonio; Gerke, Horst H.; Comegna, Alessandro; Basile, Angelo; Comegna, Vincenzo

    2012-08-01

    In this study, a dual-permeability approach is discussed for modeling preferential flow in shrinking soils by accounting for shrinking effects on macropore and matrix domain hydraulic properties. Conceptually, the soil is treated as a dual-permeability bulk porous medium consisting of two dynamic interacting pore domains: (1) the fracture (from shrinkage) pore domain and (2) the aggregate (interparticles plus structural) or matrix pore domain. The model assumes that the swell-shrink dynamics is represented by the inversely proportional volume changes of the fracture and matrix domains, while the overall porosity of the total soil, and hence the layer thickness, remains constant. This assumption can be justified for soils with dominant horizontal soil deformation in the swelling-shrinkage process (shrinkage geometry factor,rs> 3). The swell-shrink dynamics was included in a one-dimensional dual-permeability model in which water flow in both domains was described with the Richards' equation. Swell-shrink dynamics was incorporated in the model partly by changing the coupled domain-specific hydraulic properties according to the shrinkage characteristics of the matrix and partly by allowing the fractional contribution of the two domains to change with the pressure head. As a first step, the hysteresis in the swell-shrink dynamics was not included. We also assumed that the aggregate behavior and its hydraulic properties depend only on the average aggregate water content and not on its internal real distribution. The model proved, describing successfully effects of shrinkage on the spatial and temporal evolution of water contents measured in a silty loam soil in the field.

  3. A dual-permeability approach to preferential water flow and solute transport in shrinking soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coppola, Antonio; dragonetti, giovanna; Comegna, Alessandro; Gerke, Horst H.; Basile, Angelo

    2016-04-01

    The pore systems in most natural soils is dynamically changing due to alternating swelling and shrinkage processes, which induces changes in pore volume and pore size distribution including deformations in pore geometry. This is a serious difficulty for modeling flow and transport in dual permeability approaches, as it will also require that the geometrical deformation of both the soil matrix and the fracture porous systems be taken into account, as well as the dynamics of soil hydraulic properties in response to the domain deformations. This study follows up a previous work by the same authors extending the classical rigid (RGD) approach formerly proposed by Gerke and van Genuchten, to account for shrinking effects (SHR) in modeling water flow and solute transport in dual-permeability porous media. In this study we considered three SHR scenarios, assuming that aggregate shrinkage may change either: (i) the hydraulic properties of the two pore domains, (ii) their relative fractions, and (iii) both, hydraulic properties and fractions of the two domains. The objective was to compare simulation results obtained under the RGD and the SHR assumptions to illustrate the impact of matrix volume changes on water storage, water fluxes and solute concentrations during: 1) An infiltration process bringing an initially dry soil to saturation, 2) A drainage process starting from an initially saturated soil. For an infiltration process, the simulated wetting front and the solute concentration propagation velocity, as well as the water fluxes, water and solute exchange rates, for the three SHR scenarios significantly deviated from the RGD. By contrast, relatively similar water content profiles evolved under all scenarios during drying. Overall, compared to the RGD approach, the effect of changing the hydraulic properties and the weight of the two domains according to the shrinkage behavior of the soil aggregates induced a much more rapid response in terms of water fluxes and

  4. Experimental and modeling study of unsaturated solute flow in soils: from classical to discrete approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerke, K.

    2012-04-01

    Most dye staining experiments in natural soils result in highly heterogeneous flow patterns which are usually explained with presence of preferential flow paths or different kinds of flow instabilities. It is quite logic that soil structure is one of the main factors affecting infiltrations regimes, however the degree of flow stochasticity is not studied enough. In this contribution a substantial amount of large scale (2-4 m lateral excavations) field experiment data is considered (including forested hillslopes and agricultural fields) with special attention to sprinkling of two different staining substances with different dyeing mechanisms (common dye is visible both in adsorbed and in solution states; fluorescent dye - only in solution). The latter method allows an estimation of the flow stability (stochasticity). Most staining field experiments are supported by undisturbed sample collections (laboratory measurements for hydraulic conductivity, water retention curves, X-ray microtomography scans, grain size distributions, etc.). Preliminary results strongly support the evidence of stability of flow under similar precipitation and moisture conditions. Infiltration also correlated with soil structure and microproperties. Numerical modeling using classical approach (single-porosity coupled Richard's and advection-dispersion equations, random hydraulic properties based on log-normal experimentally obtained distribution) fails to describe experimentally obtained staining patterns. Multi-porosity models may provide better tools to account for different soil heterogeneities, but their parameters can not be obtained experimentally. Small scale solutions using pore-network or lattice-Botzmann methods based on microtomography scans are accurate, but computationally expensive (volumes around tens of cm3). Based on field observations a simple cellular automata approach to model staining patterns is developed and tested on experimental data. Our results are much better then

  5. Soil organic phosphorus flows to water via critical and non-critical hydrological source areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ying; Surridge, Ben; Haygarth, Phil

    2015-04-01

    Soil organic phosphorus flows to water via critical and non-critical hydrological source areas Ying Wang, Ben W.J. Surridge, Philip M. Haygarth Lancaster Environment Centre, Lancaster University, LA1 4YQ, UK Critical source areas (CSAs) are zones in the landscape where easily connected hydrology coincides with a phosphorus (P) sources in the soil. The P export risks in CSAs are hypothesised to be higher compared with non-critical source areas (Non-CSAs) and specifically that the magnitudes of P forms in CSA areas were higher than Non-CSAs. Past research on CSAs has often neglected forms of organic P, such as DNA and phospholipids which are among the most potentially biodegradable organic P compounds. The objectives of this study were i) to quantify the magnitude of organic P compounds in agricultural soils and specifically determine whether these magnitudes differed significantly between CSAs and Non-CSAs; ii) determine the variation of P magnitude between and within individual fields; iii) identify the P delivery concentrations in soil solution after raining events in CSAs. The study focussed on soils collected from the Morland sub-catchment of the River Eden catchment in Cumbria, northern England. CSA and Non-CSA pairs were identified using the SCIMAP modelling and field assessment providing five CSA - Non-CSA pairs in total. The results showed that there are significant differences in the total P (TP) concentrations, the proportions of DNA-P, WETP (water extractable total P), WERP (water extractable reactive P) and WEUP (water extractable unreactive P) between CSA and Non-CSA. We also found that the concentrations of all the P forms showed distribution variation between fields or even within the same field. Liable organic P such as DNA-P and PLD-P was presented considerable proportions of total P in soil, especially DNA-P which had a good correlation with TP. DNA-P in the ten areas accounted for a considerable proportion of soil TP (4.9 to 16.6%). Given the

  6. Compartmental modeling of PAH transport in soil column experiments under variably-saturated flow conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sartori, F.; Sericano, J. L.; Wade, T. L.; Mohanty, B. P.

    2012-12-01

    Knowledge about the mobilization of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) from PAH-laden soils or sediments is important to understand their bioavailability, and ultimately assess the environmental risk of PAH transport from surface soils into the groundwater. The transport and kinetics of three PAH from a spiked soil layer (2-3 cm soil depth), Phenanthrene-d10 (1900 ng/g), Naphthalene-d8 (1500 ng/g), and Pyrene-d10 (1800 ng/g), were investigated by performing a series of 8 rainfall events during 25 days in two large, replicate soil columns (length: 35 cm; diameter: 14.5 cm; 1 Pore Volume [PV]=2.29 L) under variably-saturated flow conditions. The water-methanol displacing solutions were at volumetric fractions of 0.3 and 0.6 during day 1 (E1) through E8 and E12-E22, respectively. Soil matric potential (h) was monitored at 5-cm and 20-cm depth and volumetric water content (θ) at 12.5-cm and 27.5-cm depth. Soil solution was sampled at 5 cm- (n=46) and 27.5-cm depth (n=46), and the effluent at the bottom of the column (n=163). HYDRUS-1D was used for inverse modeling of h and θ data and to predict θ at specific times and soil depth increments. First-order kinetics, compartmental models describing the transfer of PAH from the soil compartment to the soil solution compartment (desorption) and vice versa (sorption), were used to estimate mass transfer rates (φs, sorption; φd, desorption; φe, elimination), PAH mass in each compartment, and partition coefficients (Kd). Phenanthrene breakthrough curve could be interpreted through a two-parameter, two-compartment model corresponding to the common two-site sorption model, whose parameter estimates (and 95% confidence intervals) were φd=2.72 (2.31, 3.19) PV-1 and φe=4.67 (3.82, 5.7 ) PV-1. Naphthalene breakthrough curve followed a simple one-compartment elimination model, φe=2.0 (1.9, 2.1) PV-1, and that of Pyrene a three-parameter, two-compartment model, φs=0.0454 (0.00853, 0.0603) PV-1, φd=0.165 (0.0319, 0.855) PV

  7. Preferential flow in heterogeneous, forest-reclaimed lignitic mine soil. III. 1- and 2-dimensional modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buczko, U.; Gerke, H. H.; Hangen, E.; Hüttl, R. F.

    2003-04-01

    Water balances of forest sites are often estimated using 1-dimensional numerical models and tensiometer data from different depths. The magnitude of groundwater recharge calculated in such a way in most cases cannot be verified experimentally. In heterogeneous soils, water flows are spatially highly variable. The objective of this contribution is to compare the flow and deep percolation within a reclaimed mine soil which was calculated with a 1D numerical model, with seepage water collected, spatially-resolved, in-situ. Further, it is aimed at improving the methodology for calculating water balances and element budgets on heterogeneous mine soils, using 2D models with spatial variability. At the study site “Bärenbrück” near Cottbus, a lignitic mine soil afforested in 1982 with Pinus nigra, the components of the water balance were simulated with a 1D numerical model (SOIL/COUP) for a period from May 1995 to September 2001, using meteorological data and measured water tensions in soil depths 15, 60, and 100 cm. At the same site, soil water percolates were extracted continually in-situ at a soil depth of 110 cm from June 2000 until September 2001 within the framework of a cell-lysimeter study. 2D simulations were performed with the numerical model HYDRUS-2D, using evapotranspiration data obtained with the 1D-model. In the balance period between 4/96 and 3/99, the simulated deep percolation ranges between 30.4 and 35.2 mm per year, whereas during the dryer years 6/1999 5/2000 and 6/2000 5/2001 it amounts to 6.6 mm and 1.5 mm, respectively. The average deep percolation based on the in-situ suction plate data during the same period was 11 mm for the period 6/1999 5/2000 and 24.3 mm for 6/2000 5/2001, although spatially highly variable. Consequently, for the period 6/2000 5/2001, groundwater recharge based on measured in-situ data is by one order of magnitude higher than those simulated with the 1D model. The 2D numerical simulations are used to explain this

  8. Spatial Mapping of Flow-Induced Molecular Alignment in a Noncrystalline Biopolymer Fluid Using Double Quantum Filtered (DQF) (23)Na MRI.

    PubMed

    Pavlovskaya, Galina E; Meersmann, Thomas

    2014-08-01

    Flow-induced molecular alignment was observed experimentally in a non-liquid-crystalline bioplymeric fluid during developed tubular flow. The fluid was comprised of rigid rods of the polysaccharide xanthan and exhibited shear-thinning behavior. Without a requirement for optical transparency or the need for an added tracer, (23)Na magic angle (MA) double quantum filtered (DQF) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) enabled the mapping of the anisotropic molecular arrangement under flow conditions. A regional net molecular alignment was found in areas of high shear values in the vicinity of the tube wall. Furthermore, the xanthan molecules resumed random orientations after the cessation of flow. The observed flow-induced molecular alignment was correlated with the rheological properties of the fluid. The work demonstrates the ability of (23)Na MA DQF magnetic resonance to provide a valuable molecular-mechanical link. PMID:26277955

  9. Particle loading time and humidity effects on the efficiency of an N95 filtering facepiece respirator model under constant and inhalation cyclic flows.

    PubMed

    Mahdavi, Alireza; Haghighat, Fariborz; Bahloul, Ali; Brochot, Clothilde; Ostiguy, Claude

    2015-06-01

    It is necessary to investigate the efficiencies of filtering facepiece respirators (FFRs) exposed to ultrafine particles (UFPs) for long periods of time, since the particle loading time may potentially affect the efficiency of FFRs. This article aims to investigate the filtration efficiency for a model of electrostatic N95 FFRs with constant and 'inhalation-only' cyclic flows, in terms of particle loading time effect, using different humidity conditions. Filters were exposed to generated polydisperse NaCl particles. Experiments were performed mimicking an 'inhalation-only' scenario with a cyclic flow of 85 l min(-1) as the minute volume [or 170 l min(-1) as mean inhalation flow (MIF)] and for two constant flows of 85 and 170 l min(-1), under three relative humidity (RH) levels of 10, 50, and 80%. Each test was performed for loading time periods of 6h and the particle penetration (10-205.4nm in electrical mobility diameter) was measured once every 2h. For a 10% RH, the penetration of smaller size particles (<80nm), including the most penetrating particle size (MPPS), decreased over time for both constant and cyclic flows. For 50 and 80% RH levels, the changes in penetration were typically observed in an opposite direction with less magnitude. The penetrations at MPPS increased with respect to loading time under constant flow conditions (85 and 170 l min(-1)): it did not substantially increase under cyclic flows. The comparison of the cyclic flow (85 l min(-1) as minute volume) and constant flow equal to the cyclic flow minute volume indicated that, for all conditions the penetration was significantly less for the constant flow than that of cyclic flow. The comparison between the cyclic (170 l min(-1) as MIF) and constant flow equal to cyclic flow MIF indicated that, for the initial stage of loading, the penetrations were almost equal, but they were different for the final stages of the loading time. For a 10% RH, the penetration of a wide range of sizes was observed

  10. Particle loading time and humidity effects on the efficiency of an N95 filtering facepiece respirator model under constant and inhalation cyclic flows.

    PubMed

    Mahdavi, Alireza; Haghighat, Fariborz; Bahloul, Ali; Brochot, Clothilde; Ostiguy, Claude

    2015-06-01

    It is necessary to investigate the efficiencies of filtering facepiece respirators (FFRs) exposed to ultrafine particles (UFPs) for long periods of time, since the particle loading time may potentially affect the efficiency of FFRs. This article aims to investigate the filtration efficiency for a model of electrostatic N95 FFRs with constant and 'inhalation-only' cyclic flows, in terms of particle loading time effect, using different humidity conditions. Filters were exposed to generated polydisperse NaCl particles. Experiments were performed mimicking an 'inhalation-only' scenario with a cyclic flow of 85 l min(-1) as the minute volume [or 170 l min(-1) as mean inhalation flow (MIF)] and for two constant flows of 85 and 170 l min(-1), under three relative humidity (RH) levels of 10, 50, and 80%. Each test was performed for loading time periods of 6h and the particle penetration (10-205.4nm in electrical mobility diameter) was measured once every 2h. For a 10% RH, the penetration of smaller size particles (<80nm), including the most penetrating particle size (MPPS), decreased over time for both constant and cyclic flows. For 50 and 80% RH levels, the changes in penetration were typically observed in an opposite direction with less magnitude. The penetrations at MPPS increased with respect to loading time under constant flow conditions (85 and 170 l min(-1)): it did not substantially increase under cyclic flows. The comparison of the cyclic flow (85 l min(-1) as minute volume) and constant flow equal to the cyclic flow minute volume indicated that, for all conditions the penetration was significantly less for the constant flow than that of cyclic flow. The comparison between the cyclic (170 l min(-1) as MIF) and constant flow equal to cyclic flow MIF indicated that, for the initial stage of loading, the penetrations were almost equal, but they were different for the final stages of the loading time. For a 10% RH, the penetration of a wide range of sizes was observed

  11. Modeling Water Flow and Bromide Transport in a Two-Scale-Structured Lignitic Mine Soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dusek, J.; Gerke, H. H.; Vogel, T.; Maurer, T.; Buczko, U.

    2008-12-01

    Two-dimensional single- and dual-permeability simulations are used to analyze water and solute fluxes in heterogeneous lignitic mine soil at a forest-reclaimed mine spoil heap. The soil heterogeneity on this experimental site "Barenbrucker Hohe" resulted from inclined dumping structures and sediment mixtures that consist of sand with lignitic dust and embedded lignitic fragments. Observations on undisturbed field suction- cell lysimeters including tracer experiments revealed funneling-type preferential flow with lateral water and bromide movement along inclined sediment structures. The spatial distribution of soil structures and fragment distributions was acquired by a digital camera and identified by a supervised classification of the digital profile image. First, a classical single-domain modeling approach was proposed with spatially variable scaling factors inferred from image analyses. In the next step, a two-continuum scenario was constructed to examine additional effects of nonequilibrium on the flow regime. The scaling factors used for the preferential flow domain are here obtained from the gradient of the grayscale images. So far, the single domain scenarios failed to predict the bromide leaching patterns although water effluent could be described. Dual-permeability model allows the incorporation of structural effects and can be used as a tool to further testing other approaches that account for structure effects. The numerical study suggests that additional experiments are required to obtain better understanding of the highly complex transport processes on this experimental site.

  12. ARRANGEMENT FOR REPLACING FILTERS

    DOEpatents

    Blomgren, R.A.; Bohlin, N.J.C.

    1957-08-27

    An improved filtered air exhaust system which may be continually operated during the replacement of the filters without the escape of unfiltered air is described. This is accomplished by hermetically sealing the box like filter containers in a rectangular tunnel with neoprene covered sponge rubber sealing rings coated with a silicone impregnated pneumatic grease. The tunnel through which the filters are pushed is normal to the exhaust air duct. A number of unused filters are in line behind the filters in use, and are moved by a hydraulic ram so that a fresh filter is positioned in the air duct. The used filter is pushed into a waiting receptacle and is suitably disposed. This device permits a rapid and safe replacement of a radiation contaminated filter without interruption to the normal flow of exhaust air.

  13. Effects of linking a soil-water-balance model with a groundwater-flow model.

    PubMed

    Stanton, Jennifer S; Ryter, Derek W; Peterson, Steven M

    2013-01-01

    A previously published regional groundwater-flow model in north-central Nebraska was sequentially linked with the recently developed soil-water-balance (SWB) model to analyze effects to groundwater-flow model parameters and calibration results. The linked models provided a more detailed spatial and temporal distribution of simulated recharge based on hydrologic processes, improvement of simulated groundwater-level changes and base flows at specific sites in agricultural areas, and a physically based assessment of the relative magnitude of recharge for grassland, nonirrigated cropland, and irrigated cropland areas. Root-mean-squared (RMS) differences between the simulated and estimated or measured target values for the previously published model and linked models were relatively similar and did not improve for all types of calibration targets. However, without any adjustment to the SWB-generated recharge, the RMS difference between simulated and estimated base-flow target values for the groundwater-flow model was slightly smaller than for the previously published model, possibly indicating that the volume of recharge simulated by the SWB code was closer to actual hydrogeologic conditions than the previously published model provided. Groundwater-level and base-flow hydrographs showed that temporal patterns of simulated groundwater levels and base flows were more accurate for the linked models than for the previously published model at several sites, particularly in agricultural areas.

  14. Effects of linking a soil-water-balance model with a groundwater-flow model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stanton, Jennifer S.; Ryter, Derek W.; Peterson, Steven M.

    2013-01-01

    A previously published regional groundwater-flow model in north-central Nebraska was sequentially linked with the recently developed soil-water-balance (SWB) model to analyze effects to groundwater-flow model parameters and calibration results. The linked models provided a more detailed spatial and temporal distribution of simulated recharge based on hydrologic processes, improvement of simulated groundwater-level changes and base flows at specific sites in agricultural areas, and a physically based assessment of the relative magnitude of recharge for grassland, nonirrigated cropland, and irrigated cropland areas. Root-mean-squared (RMS) differences between the simulated and estimated or measured target values for the previously published model and linked models were relatively similar and did not improve for all types of calibration targets. However, without any adjustment to the SWB-generated recharge, the RMS difference between simulated and estimated base-flow target values for the groundwater-flow model was slightly smaller than for the previously published model, possibly indicating that the volume of recharge simulated by the SWB code was closer to actual hydrogeologic conditions than the previously published model provided. Groundwater-level and base-flow hydrographs showed that temporal patterns of simulated groundwater levels and base flows were more accurate for the linked models than for the previously published model at several sites, particularly in agricultural areas.

  15. Interactions between seagrass complexity, hydrodynamic flow and biomixing alter food availability for associated filter-feeding organisms.

    PubMed

    González-Ortiz, Vanessa; Egea, Luis G; Jiménez-Ramos, Rocio; Moreno-Marín, Francisco; Pérez-Lloréns, José L; Bouma, Tjeed J; Brun, Fernando G

    2014-01-01

    Seagrass shoots interact with hydrodynamic forces and thereby a positively or negatively influence the survival of associated species. The modification of these forces indirectly alters the physical transport and flux of edible particles within seagrass meadows, which will influence the growth and survivorship of associated filter-feeding organisms. The present work contributes to gaining insight into the mechanisms controlling the availability of resources for filter feeders inhabiting seagrass canopies, both from physical (influenced by seagrass density and patchiness) and biological (regulated by filter feeder density) perspectives. A factorial experiment was conducted in a large racetrack flume, which combined changes in hydrodynamic conditions, chlorophyll a concentration in the water and food intake rate (FIR) in a model active filter-feeding organism (the cockle). Results showed that seagrass density and patchiness modified both hydrodynamic forces and availability of resources for filter feeders. Chlorophyll a water content decreased to 50% of the initial value when densities of both seagrass shoots and cockles were high. Also, filter feeder density controlled resource availability within seagrass patches, depending on its spatial position within the racetrack flume. Under high density of filter-feeding organisms, chlorophyll a levels were lower between patches. This suggests that the pumping activity of cockles (i.e. biomixing) is an emergent key factor affecting both resource availability and FIR for filter feeders in dense canopies. Applying our results to natural conditions, we suggest the existence of a direct correlation between habitat complexity (i.e. shoot density and degree of patchiness) and filter feeders density. Fragmented and low-density patches seem to offer both greater protection from hydrodynamic forces and higher resource availability. In denser patches, however, resources are allocated mostly within the canopy, which would benefit

  16. Interactions between Seagrass Complexity, Hydrodynamic Flow and Biomixing Alter Food Availability for Associated Filter-Feeding Organisms

    PubMed Central

    González-Ortiz, Vanessa; Egea, Luis G.; Jiménez-Ramos, Rocio; Moreno-Marín, Francisco; Pérez-Lloréns, José L.; Bouma, Tjeed J.; Brun, Fernando G.

    2014-01-01

    Seagrass shoots interact with hydrodynamic forces and thereby a positively or negatively influence the survival of associated species. The modification of these forces indirectly alters the physical transport and flux of edible particles within seagrass meadows, which will influence the growth and survivorship of associated filter-feeding organisms. The present work contributes to gaining insight into the mechanisms controlling the availability of resources for filter feeders inhabiting seagrass canopies, both from physical (influenced by seagrass density and patchiness) and biological (regulated by filter feeder density) perspectives. A factorial experiment was conducted in a large racetrack flume, which combined changes in hydrodynamic conditions, chlorophyll a concentration in the water and food intake rate (FIR) in a model active filter-feeding organism (the cockle). Results showed that seagrass density and patchiness modified both hydrodynamic forces and availability of resources for filter feeders. Chlorophyll a water content decreased to 50% of the initial value when densities of both seagrass shoots and cockles were high. Also, filter feeder density controlled resource availability within seagrass patches, depending on its spatial position within the racetrack flume. Under high density of filter-feeding organisms, chlorophyll a levels were lower between patches. This suggests that the pumping activity of cockles (i.e. biomixing) is an emergent key factor affecting both resource availability and FIR for filter feeders in dense canopies. Applying our results to natural conditions, we suggest the existence of a direct correlation between habitat complexity (i.e. shoot density and degree of patchiness) and filter feeders density. Fragmented and low-density patches seem to offer both greater protection from hydrodynamic forces and higher resource availability. In denser patches, however, resources are allocated mostly within the canopy, which would benefit

  17. Interactions between seagrass complexity, hydrodynamic flow and biomixing alter food availability for associated filter-feeding organisms.

    PubMed

    González-Ortiz, Vanessa; Egea, Luis G; Jiménez-Ramos, Rocio; Moreno-Marín, Francisco; Pérez-Lloréns, José L; Bouma, Tjeed J; Brun, Fernando G

    2014-01-01

    Seagrass shoots interact with hydrodynamic forces and thereby a positively or negatively influence the survival of associated species. The modification of these forces indirectly alters the physical transport and flux of edible particles within seagrass meadows, which will influence the growth and survivorship of associated filter-feeding organisms. The present work contributes to gaining insight into the mechanisms controlling the availability of resources for filter feeders inhabiting seagrass canopies, both from physical (influenced by seagrass density and patchiness) and biological (regulated by filter feeder density) perspectives. A factorial experiment was conducted in a large racetrack flume, which combined changes in hydrodynamic conditions, chlorophyll a concentration in the water and food intake rate (FIR) in a model active filter-feeding organism (the cockle). Results showed that seagrass density and patchiness modified both hydrodynamic forces and availability of resources for filter feeders. Chlorophyll a water content decreased to 50% of the initial value when densities of both seagrass shoots and cockles were high. Also, filter feeder density controlled resource availability within seagrass patches, depending on its spatial position within the racetrack flume. Under high density of filter-feeding organisms, chlorophyll a levels were lower between patches. This suggests that the pumping activity of cockles (i.e. biomixing) is an emergent key factor affecting both resource availability and FIR for filter feeders in dense canopies. Applying our results to natural conditions, we suggest the existence of a direct correlation between habitat complexity (i.e. shoot density and degree of patchiness) and filter feeders density. Fragmented and low-density patches seem to offer both greater protection from hydrodynamic forces and higher resource availability. In denser patches, however, resources are allocated mostly within the canopy, which would benefit

  18. Fire affects root decomposition, soil food web structure, and carbon flow in tallgrass prairie

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, E. Ashley; Denef, Karolien; Milano de Tomasel, Cecilia; Cotrufo, M. Francesca; Wall, Diana H.

    2016-05-01

    Root litter decomposition is a major component of carbon (C) cycling in grasslands, where it provides energy and nutrients for soil microbes and fauna. This is especially important in grasslands where fire is common and removes aboveground litter accumulation. In this study, we investigated whether fire affects root decomposition and C flow through the belowground food web. In a greenhouse experiment, we applied 13C-enriched big bluestem (Andropogon gerardii) root litter to intact tallgrass prairie soil cores collected from annually burned (AB) and infrequently burned (IB) treatments at the Konza Prairie Long Term Ecological Research (LTER) site. Incorporation of 13C into microbial phospholipid fatty acids and nematode trophic groups was measured on six occasions during a 180-day decomposition study to determine how C was translocated through the soil food web. Results showed significantly different soil communities between treatments and higher microbial abundance for IB. Root decomposition occurred rapidly and was significantly greater for AB. Microbes and their nematode consumers immediately assimilated root litter C in both treatments. Root litter C was preferentially incorporated in a few groups of microbes and nematodes, but depended on burn treatment: fungi, Gram-negative bacteria, Gram-positive bacteria, and fungivore nematodes for AB and only omnivore nematodes for IB. The overall microbial pool of root-litter-derived C significantly increased over time but was not significantly different between burn treatments. The nematode pool of root-litter-derived C also significantly increased over time, and was significantly higher for the AB treatment at 35 and 90 days after litter addition. In conclusion, the C flow from root litter to microbes to nematodes is not only measurable but also significant, indicating that higher nematode trophic levels are critical components of C flow during root decomposition, which, in turn, is significantly affected by fire. Not

  19. A note on the forest soil as a biological filter in the sanitary purification of municipal waste water evaluated on the basis of Escherichia coli titre.

    PubMed

    Kermen, J; Janota-Bassalik, L

    1987-01-01

    The paper presents the results of a 10-year study on waste water purification in forest soil, under conditions of lysimeters and in the field, using pine-, larch- and osier cultures. The investigation has shown that, under test conditions, treatment with waste water does not endanger the sanitary state of the soil and ground water. In weakly podzolised sandy soil of loose texture, at the soil profile depth of at least 150 cm, the watering dose of 25 mm, i.e. 25 l/m2, was found to be safe, when applied 4 times monthly during the vegetation season, from May to September, for the first 4 years of the experiment (annual dose of 500 mm). Initially the waste water had pH equal to 6.8-7.2, BOD5 of about 220 mg O2/l and an Escherichia coli cells number mostly 10(5) per ml, but after filtering through the soil, the E. coli cells number was 10 or less per 1 ml. After a lapse of 4 years the single waste water dose could be increased up to 50 mm (annual dose 1000 mm) without any detriment to the degree of sanitary purification of waste water.

  20. Comparative study on nutrient removal of agricultural non-point source pollution for three filter media filling schemes in eco-soil reactors.

    PubMed

    Du, Fuyi; Xie, Qingjie; Fang, Longxiang; Su, Hang

    2016-08-01

    Nutrients (nitrogen and phosphorus) from agricultural non-point source (NPS) pollution have been increasingly recognized as a major contributor to the deterioration of water quality in recent years. The purpose of this article is to investigate the discrepancies in interception of nutrients in agricultural NPS pollution for eco-soil reactors using different filling schemes. Parallel eco-soil reactors of laboratory scale were created and filled with filter media, such as grit, zeolite, limestone, and gravel. Three filling schemes were adopted: increasing-sized filling (I-filling), decreasing-sized filling (D-filling), and blend-sized filling (B-filling). The systems were intermittent operations via simulated rainstorm runoff. The nutrient removal efficiency, biomass accumulation and vertical dissolved oxygen (DO) distribution were defined to assess the performance of eco-soil. The results showed that B-filling reactor presented an ideal DO for partial nitrification-denitrification across the eco-soil, and B-filling was the most stable in the change of bio-film accumulation trends with depth in the three fillings. Simultaneous and highest removals of NH4(+)-N (57.74-70.52%), total nitrogen (43.69-54.50%), and total phosphorus (42.50-55.00%) were obtained in the B-filling, demonstrating the efficiency of the blend filling schemes of eco-soil for oxygen transfer and biomass accumulation to cope with agricultural NPS pollution. PMID:27441855

  1. Effect of filter media size, mass flow rate and filtration stage number in a moving-bed granular filter on the yield and properties of bio-oil from fast pyrolysis of biomass.

    PubMed

    Paenpong, Chaturong; Inthidech, Sudsakorn; Pattiya, Adisak

    2013-07-01

    Fast pyrolysis of cassava rhizome was performed in a bench-scale fluidised-bed reactor unit incorporated with a cross-flow moving-bed granular filter. The objective of this research was to examine several process parameters including the granular size (425-1160 μm) and mass flow rate (0-12 g/min) as well as the number of the filtration stages (1-2 stages) on yields and properties of bio-oil. The results showed that the bio-oil yield decreased from 57.7 wt.% to 42.0-49.2 wt.% when increasing the filter media size, the mass flow rate and the filtration stage number. The effect of the process parameters on various properties of bio-oil is thoroughly discussed. In general, the bio-oil quality in terms of the solids content, ash content, initial viscosity, viscosity change and ageing rate could be enhanced by the hot vapour granular filtration. Therefore, bio-oil of high stability could be produced by the pyrolysis reactor configuration designed in this work.

  2. Effects of pulsed and oscillatory flow on water vapor removal from a laboratory soil column. Final report, November 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Morrow, K.E.

    1993-05-01

    Subsurface contamination by volatile organic contaminants (VOC`s) in the vadose zone and groundwater is primarily due to leaking underground storage tanks and industrial spills. Soil vapor extraction is a technique that is being used successfully to remove VOC`s from the subsurface. A flow of air is established through the soil to remove the vapor phase component of the contaminant. Soil vapor extraction will initially remove high levels of contaminant that is already present in the macropores. The concentration will start to decline as the removal from the soil matrix becomes limited by diffusion of contaminant from regions away from the air flow paths. This study examines potential methods of overcoming the diffusion limitation by adding an oscillatory component to the steady air flow and by pulsed flow, which involves turning air flow on and off at predetermined intervals. The study considered only the removal of water from the soil to try to establish general vapor behavior in the soil under the imposed conditions. Based on a statistical analysis, both the oscillatory and pulsed flow showed an improved water removal rate over the steady state flow. The effect of oscillatory flow was only examined at higher frequencies. The literature indicates that oscillations at lower frequencies may be more effective. Pulsed flow showed the most efficient removal of water compared to steady state conditions. The pulsed flow was most efficient because rather than reducing the diffusion limitation, the system would shut down and wait for diffusion to occur. This optimizes energy consumption, but does not reduce treatment time. The oscillatory flow actually reduced the diffusion limitation within the column which could result in a shorter treatment time.

  3. Inverse estimation of parameters for multidomain flow models in soil columns with different macropore densities.

    PubMed

    Arora, Bhavna; Mohanty, Binayak P; McGuire, Jennifer T

    2011-04-01

    Soil and crop management practices have been found to modify soil structure and alter macropore densities. An ability to accurately determine soil hydraulic parameters and their variation with changes in macropore density is crucial for assessing potential contamination from agricultural chemicals. This study investigates the consequences of using consistent matrix and macropore parameters in simulating preferential flow and bromide transport in soil columns with different macropore densities (no macropore, single macropore, and multiple macropores). As used herein, the term"macropore density" is intended to refer to the number of macropores per unit area. A comparison between continuum-scale models including single-porosity model (SPM), mobile-immobile model (MIM), and dual-permeability model (DPM) that employed these parameters is also conducted. Domain-specific parameters are obtained from inverse modeling of homogeneous (no macropore) and central macropore columns in a deterministic framework and are validated using forward modeling of both low-density (3 macropores) and high-density (19 macropores) multiple-macropore columns. Results indicate that these inversely modeled parameters are successful in describing preferential flow but not tracer transport in both multiple-macropore columns. We believe that lateral exchange between matrix and macropore domains needs better accounting to efficiently simulate preferential transport in the case of dense, closely spaced macropores. Increasing model complexity from SPM to MIM to DPM also improved predictions of preferential flow in the multiple-macropore columns but not in the single-macropore column. This suggests that the use of a more complex model with resolved domain-specific parameters is recommended with an increase in macropore density to generate forecasts with higher accuracy. PMID:24511165

  4. Inverse estimation of parameters for multidomain flow models in soil columns with different macropore densities

    PubMed Central

    Arora, Bhavna; Mohanty, Binayak P.; McGuire, Jennifer T.

    2013-01-01

    Soil and crop management practices have been found to modify soil structure and alter macropore densities. An ability to accurately determine soil hydraulic parameters and their variation with changes in macropore density is crucial for assessing potential contamination from agricultural chemicals. This study investigates the consequences of using consistent matrix and macropore parameters in simulating preferential flow and bromide transport in soil columns with different macropore densities (no macropore, single macropore, and multiple macropores). As used herein, the term“macropore density” is intended to refer to the number of macropores per unit area. A comparison between continuum-scale models including single-porosity model (SPM), mobile-immobile model (MIM), and dual-permeability model (DPM) that employed these parameters is also conducted. Domain-specific parameters are obtained from inverse modeling of homogeneous (no macropore) and central macropore columns in a deterministic framework and are validated using forward modeling of both low-density (3 macropores) and high-density (19 macropores) multiple-macropore columns. Results indicate that these inversely modeled parameters are successful in describing preferential flow but not tracer transport in both multiple-macropore columns. We believe that lateral exchange between matrix and macropore domains needs better accounting to efficiently simulate preferential transport in the case of dense, closely spaced macropores. Increasing model complexity from SPM to MIM to DPM also improved predictions of preferential flow in the multiple-macropore columns but not in the single-macropore column. This suggests that the use of a more complex model with resolved domain-specific parameters is recommended with an increase in macropore density to generate forecasts with higher accuracy. PMID:24511165

  5. Use of a novel new irrigation system to observe and model water vapor flow through dry soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todman, L. C.; Ireson, A. M.; Butler, A. P.; Templeton, M.

    2013-12-01

    In dry soils hydraulic connectivity within the liquid water phase decreases and vapor flow becomes a significant transport mechanism for water. The temperature or solute concentration of the liquid phase affects the vapor pressure of the surrounding air, thus temperature or solute gradients can drive vapor flows. However, in extremely dry soils where water is retained by adsorption rather than capillarity, vapor flows can also occur. In such soils tiny changes in water content significantly affect the equilibrium vapor pressure in the soil, and hence small differences in water content can initiate vapor pressure gradients. In many field conditions this effect may be negligible compared to vapor flows driven by other factors. However, flows of this type are particularly significant in a new type of subsurface irrigation system which uses pervaporation, via a polymer tubing, as the mechanism for water supply. In this system, water enters the soil in vapor phase. Experiments using this system therefore provide a rare opportunity to observe vapor flows initiating from a subsurface source without significant injection of heat. A model was developed to simulate water flow through the soil in liquid and vapor phase. In this model it was assumed that the two phases were in equilibrium. The equilibrium relationship was defined by a new mathematical expression that was developed to fit experimental data collected to characterize the sorption isotherm of three soils (sand, saline sand and top soil). The osmotic potential of the saline sand was defined as a function of water content using a continuous mathematical expression. The model was then calibrated to fit the data from laboratory experiments, in which the vapor flow into and out of the soil were quantified. The model successfully reproduced experimental observations of the total water flux, relative humidity and water content distribution in three soil types. This suggests that the model, including the proposed

  6. After the lava flow: The importance of external soil sources for plant colonization of recent lava flows in the central Oregon Cascades, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deligne, Natalia I.; Cashman, Katharine V.; Roering, Joshua J.

    2013-11-01

    Effusive volcanic eruptions repave landscapes rapidly with lava flows, resetting broad areas of the underlying landscape and ecosystem. The unique physical properties of lava pose interesting challenges for ecologic recovery, as lava is dense, sterile, and generally inhospitable towards life. In this study we examine two sites of recent volcanism in the central Oregon Cascades, notable for the juxtaposition of barren exposed lava and mature forests on lava flows of the same or roughly the same age. We use a combination of LiDAR analyses, field observations, and soil characterization to examine soil and vegetation at these two sites, and find that the presence of an external sediment or soil source, particularly flood-borne deposits or syn- or post-eruptive tephra, greatly facilitates plant establishment, growth, and survival. The nature of the external sources of sediment or soil dictates the geographic extent of forests on these young lava flows: flood-borne deposits cover localized regions near river channels, while tephra can cover large regions. In general, our results suggest that external sources of soil provide a substrate for plants to grow in along with key nutrients and sufficient moisture retention. We conclude that external sources of soil source are key for the initial recovery following an effusive volcanic disturbance, in particular in temperate climates. Thus, unrelated geomorphic processes, such as past glaciations that provide local sources of mobile sediments, or concurrent volcanic processes, such as tephra production, dictate the presence or absence of forests on young lava flows.

  7. Inversely estimating the vertical profile of the soil CO2 production rate in a deciduous broadleaf forest using a particle filtering method.

    PubMed

    Sakurai, Gen; Yonemura, Seiichiro; Kishimoto-Mo, Ayaka W; Murayama, Shohei; Ohtsuka, Toshiyuki; Yokozawa, Masayuki

    2015-01-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) efflux from the soil surface, which is a major source of CO2 from terrestrial ecosystems, represents the total CO2 production at all soil depths. Although many studies have estimated the vertical profile of the CO2 production rate, one of the difficulties in estimating the vertical profile is measuring diffusion coefficients of CO2 at all soil depths in a nondestructive manner. In this study, we estimated the temporal variation in the vertical profile of the CO2 production rate using a data assimilation method, the particle filtering method, in which the diffusion coefficients of CO2 were simultaneously estimated. The CO2 concentrations at several soil depths and CO2 efflux from the soil surface (only during the snow-free period) were measured at two points in a broadleaf forest in Japan, and the data were assimilated into a simple model including a diffusion equation. We found that there were large variations in the pattern of the vertical profile of the CO2 production rate between experiment sites: the peak CO2 production rate was at soil depths around 10 cm during the snow-free period at one site, but the peak was at the soil surface at the other site. Using this method to estimate the CO2 production rate during snow-cover periods allowed us to estimate CO2 efflux during that period as well. We estimated that the CO2 efflux during the snow-cover period (about half the year) accounted for around 13% of the annual CO2 efflux at this site. Although the method proposed in this study does not ensure the validity of the estimated diffusion coefficients and CO2 production rates, the method enables us to more closely approach the "actual" values by decreasing the variance of the posterior distribution of the values.

  8. Droplet infiltration dynamics on intact surfaces of preferential flow paths in structured soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerke, Horst H.; Leue, Martin; Ellerbrock, Ruth H.

    2010-05-01

    The surfaces of preferential flow paths in structured soils can be formed by clay-organic coatings (i.e., cutanes) on soil aggregates or by linings on biopores (i.e., worm burrows and decayed root channels). The outermost layer of such coatings are mostly covered by organic matter (OM), which finally controls wettability, mass transfer, and sorption properties that are relevant for flow and transport along the flow paths. However, the local hydraulic properties along such surfaces are largely unknown to date mainly because of problems to analyze it without disturbing the coating layer surface. The objective of this study is to compare the droplet infiltration dynamics with that of the local distribution of OM composition at intact aggregate and biopore surfaces. The OM composition is determined using Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy in diffuse reflectance mode (DRIFT) in terms of the ratios of CH/CO functional groups. Intact surfaces of aggregated soil samples are scanned using a DRIFT mapping procedure in a 1 mm by 1 mm grid. Droplet infiltration dynamic is observed by means of volume change and contact angle measurements using a Goniometer with a high-speed camera. The aggregate sample surfaces can be distinguished into regions of earthworm burrows, root channels, and clay-organic coatings. Organic coatings on worm burrows and root channels correspond with relatively lower CH/CO-ratios. For the same locations, relatively high CH/CO-ratios generally corresponds with higher degrees of water repellence in term of larger droplet infiltration times. However, the droplet infiltration depends on both the capillarity of the pores and the wettability of the coatings. The temporal changes of contact angles and drop volumes seem to be characteristic for the surface properties. We will present the dynamic behaviour of contact angle and volume of the water droplet at different sample surfaces. The results indicate yet unknown implications for preferential flow and

  9. Role of water flow in modeling methane emissions from flooded paddy soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rizzo, A.; Boano, F.; Revelli, R.; Ridolfi, L.

    2013-02-01

    Methane (CH4) is a potent greenhouse gas that is emitted from paddy fields, and the large CH4 fluxes represent a worldwide issue for the rice production eco-compatibility. In this work a model is proposed to investigate the role of water flows on CH4 emissions from flooded paddy soils. The model is based on a system of partial differential mass balance equations of the chemical species affecting CH4 fate, and water flows are modeled by the Darcy equation. Moreover, in order to properly model the dynamics of CH4, a number of physico-chemical processes and features not included in currently available CH4 emission models are considered: paddy soil stratigraphy; nutrient adsorption and root water uptake; gas transport and respiration within root aerenchyma compartment. The proposed model allows to simulate the spatio-temporal dynamics of chemical compounds within paddy soil as well as to quantify the influence of different processes on nutrient input/output budgets. Simulations without water flow have shown a considerable overestimation of CH4 emissions due to a different spatio-temporal dynamics of dissolved organic matter (DOC - source of energy for CH4 production). In particular, when water fluxes have not been modeled the overestimation can reach 54%, 41% and 67% of daily minimum, daily maximum, and total over the whole growing season CH4 emission, respectively. Moreover, the model results suggest that roots influence CH4 dynamics principally due to their nutrient uptake, while root effect on advective flow plays a minor role. Finally, the analysis of CH4 transport fluxes has shown the limiting effect of upward dispersive transport fluxes on the downward CH4 percolation.

  10. Effect of gas-liquid flow pattern and microbial diversity analysis of a pilot-scale biotrickling filter for anoxic biogas desulfurization.

    PubMed

    Almenglo, Fernando; Bezerra, Tercia; Lafuente, Javier; Gabriel, David; Ramírez, Martín; Cantero, Domingo

    2016-08-01

    Hydrogen sulfide removal from biogas was studied under anoxic conditions in a pilot-scale biotrickling filter operated under counter- and co-current gas-liquid flow patterns. The best performance was found under counter-current conditions (maximum elimination capacity of 140 gS m(-3) h(-1)). Nevertheless, switching conditions between co- and counter-current flow lead to a favorable redistribution of biomass and elemental sulfur along the bed height. Moreover, elemental sulfur was oxidized to sulfate when the feeding biogas was disconnected and the supply of nitrate (electron acceptor) was maintained. Removal of elemental sulfur was important to prevent clogging in the packed bed and, thereby, to increase the lifespan of the packed bed between maintenance episodes. The larger elemental sulfur removal rate during shutdowns was 59.1 gS m(-3) h(-1). Tag-encoded FLX amplicon pyrosequencing was used to study the diversity of bacteria under co-current flow pattern with liquid recirculation and counter-current mode with a single-pass flow of the liquid phase. The main desulfurizing bacteria were Sedimenticola while significant role of heterotrophic, opportunistic species was envisaged. Remarkable differences between communities were found when a single-pass flow of industrial water was fed to the biotrickling filter.

  11. Effect of gas-liquid flow pattern and microbial diversity analysis of a pilot-scale biotrickling filter for anoxic biogas desulfurization.

    PubMed

    Almenglo, Fernando; Bezerra, Tercia; Lafuente, Javier; Gabriel, David; Ramírez, Martín; Cantero, Domingo

    2016-08-01

    Hydrogen sulfide removal from biogas was studied under anoxic conditions in a pilot-scale biotrickling filter operated under counter- and co-current gas-liquid flow patterns. The best performance was found under counter-current conditions (maximum elimination capacity of 140 gS m(-3) h(-1)). Nevertheless, switching conditions between co- and counter-current flow lead to a favorable redistribution of biomass and elemental sulfur along the bed height. Moreover, elemental sulfur was oxidized to sulfate when the feeding biogas was disconnected and the supply of nitrate (electron acceptor) was maintained. Removal of elemental sulfur was important to prevent clogging in the packed bed and, thereby, to increase the lifespan of the packed bed between maintenance episodes. The larger elemental sulfur removal rate during shutdowns was 59.1 gS m(-3) h(-1). Tag-encoded FLX amplicon pyrosequencing was used to study the diversity of bacteria under co-current flow pattern with liquid recirculation and counter-current mode with a single-pass flow of the liquid phase. The main desulfurizing bacteria were Sedimenticola while significant role of heterotrophic, opportunistic species was envisaged. Remarkable differences between communities were found when a single-pass flow of industrial water was fed to the biotrickling filter. PMID:27231880

  12. Filter desulfation system and method

    DOEpatents

    Lowe, Michael D.; Robel, Wade J.; Verkiel, Maarten; Driscoll, James J.

    2010-08-10

    A method of removing sulfur from a filter system of an engine includes continuously passing an exhaust flow through a desulfation leg of the filter system during desulfation. The method also includes sensing at least one characteristic of the exhaust flow and modifying a flow rate of the exhaust flow during desulfation in response to the sensing.

  13. [Macropore characteristics and its relationships with the preferential flow in broadleaved forest soils of Simian Mountains].

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Zhang, Hong-jiang; Cheng, Jin-hua; Wu, Yu-he; Du, Shi-cai; Wang, Ran

    2010-05-01

    Brilliant blue dyeing and water breakthrough curve were applied to study the number and distribution of macropores and their relations to the preferential flow in typical sub-tropic broad-leaved forest soils of Simian Mountains. The radii of the macropores were mainly between 0. 3 and 3.0 mm, with the macroporosities in the range of 6.3% to 10.5%, and the macropores were always distributed in aggregation with increasing soil depth. The number of the macropores in each radius interval of dye-stained areas was tenfold increase than that of blank areas. The number of the macropores with radius larger than 0.3 mm, especially larger than 1.5 mm, was the most important factor affecting the occurrence of preferential flow. Significant correlations were found between the number of macropores and the water steady effluent volume, with the highest correlation coefficients of 0.842 and 0.879 for the radii intervals of 0.7-1.5 mm and 1.5-3.0 mm, respectively. Macro-pore continuity in dye-stained areas was better than that in blank areas, especially in the radius interval of 1.5-3.0 mm, with the biggest difference of 78.31%. In dye-stained areas, the number of macropores decreased gradually with soil depth. The filler-like distribution of macropores formed an effective water pressure gradient, which resulted in the preferential transport of water. PMID:20707104

  14. UNSAT-H Version 2. 0: Unsaturated soil water and heat flow model

    SciTech Connect

    Fayer, M.J.; Jones, T.L.

    1990-04-01

    This report documents UNSAT-H Version 2.0, a model for calculating water and heat flow in unsaturated media. The documentation includes the bases for the conceptual model and its numerical implementation, benchmark test cases, example simulations involving layered soils and plant transpiration, and the code listing. Waste management practices at the Hanford Site have included disposal of low-level wastes by near-surface burial. Predicting the future long-term performance of any such burial site in terms of migration of contaminants requires a model capable of simulating water flow in the unsaturated soils above the buried waste. The model currently used to meet this need is UNSAT-H. This model was developed at Pacific Northwest Laboratory to assess water dynamics of near-surface, waste-disposal sites at the Hanford Site. The code is primarily used to predict deep drainage as a function of such environmental conditions as climate, soil type, and vegetation. UNSAT-H is also used to simulate the effects of various practices to enhance isolation of wastes. 66 refs., 29 figs., 7 tabs.

  15. A Unified Multi-Scale Model for Pore-Scale Flow Simulations in Soils

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Xiaofan; Liu, Chongxuan; Shang, Jianying; Fang, Yilin; Bailey, Vanessa L.

    2014-01-30

    Pore-scale simulations have received increasing interest in subsurface sciences to provide mechanistic insights into the macroscopic phenomena of water flow and reactive transport processes. The application of the pore scale simulations to soils and sediments is, however, challenged because of the characterization limitation that often only allows partial resolution of pore structure and geometry. A significant proportion of the pore space in soils and sediments is below the spatial resolution, forming a mixed media of pore and porous domains. Here we reported a unified multi-scale model (UMSM) that can be used to simulate water flow and transport in mixed media of pore and porous domains under both saturated and unsaturated conditions. The approach modifies the classic Navier-Stokes equation by adding a Darcy term to describe fluid momentum and uses a generalized mass balance equation for saturated and unsaturated conditions. By properly defining physical parameters, the UMSM can be applied in both pore and porous domains. This paper describes the set of equations for the UMSM, a series of validation cases under saturated or unsaturated conditions, and a real soil case for the application of the approach.

  16. Chemical speciation studies on DU contaminated soils using flow field flow fractionation linked to inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (FlFFF-ICP-MS).

    PubMed

    Brittain, S R; Cox, A G; Tomos, A D; Paterson, E; Siripinyanond, A; McLeod, C W

    2012-03-01

    Flow field flow fractionation (FlFFF) in combination with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) was used to study the chemical speciation of U and trace metals in depleted uranium (DU) contaminated soils. A chemical extraction procedure using sodium pyrophosphate, followed by isolation of humic and fulvic substances was applied to two dissimilar DU contaminated sample types (a sandy soil and a clay-rich soil), in addition to a control soil. The sodium pyrophosphate fractions of the firing range soils (Eskmeals and Kirkcudbright) were found to contain over 50% of the total U (measured after aqua regia digestion), compared to approximately 10% for the control soil. This implies that the soils from the contaminated sites contained a large proportion of the U within more easily mobile soil fractions. Humic and fulvic acid fractions each gave characteristic peak maxima for analytes of interest (Mn, Fe, Cu, Zn, Pb and U), with the fulvic acid fraction eluting at a smaller diameter (approximately 2.1 nm on average) than the humic fraction (approximately 2.4 nm on average). DU in the fulvic acid fraction gave a bimodal peak, not apparent for other trace elements investigated, including natural U. This implies that DU interacts with the fulvic acid fraction in a different way to all other elements studied. PMID:22237634

  17. A novel flow-based procedure for automation of respirometric assays in soils.

    PubMed

    Silva, Claudineia R; Oliveira, Eliezer; Zagatto, Elias A G; Henriquez, Camelia

    2016-09-01

    A flow-based strategy involving a gas-diffusion sampling probe was proposed for evaluating the respiration rate in soils. The amount of CO2 collected after a pre-defined time interval was proportional to the free CO2 released by the soil ecosystem. The 500-mL incubation flasks typically used for soil respirometric assays were adapted and a special cover was designed for connecting a tubular gas diffusion membrane, a fan, and a septum for adding the CO2(g) standards required for calibration. The method relied on the pH-dependent absorbance variations resulting from the CO2 collection. A 1.3mmolL(-1) bromothymol blue solution (pH 7.0) acted as both acceptor and carrier streams. In order to widen the dynamical working range to 0.003-0.2mmol CO2, two analytical curves were obtained, each related to a different time interval for the CO2 collection. Kinetic curves related to CO2 release by the soil samples were straightforwardly attained. Repeatability and detection limit were estimated as 2.0% and 0.001mmol CO2 (n=10), and accuracy was assessed in relation to a recommended titrimetric procedure. PMID:27343572

  18. An Inverse Method to Estimate Unsaturated Hydraulic Conductivity in Seepage Flow in Non-isothermal Soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izumi, Tomoki; Takeuchi, Junichiro; Kawachi, Toshihiko; Fujihara, Masayuki

    An inverse method to estimate the unsaturated hydraulic conductivity in seepage flow from field observations is presented. Considering the water movement in soil significantly affected by the soil temperature, the soil column of interest is assumed to be non-isothermal, and therefore the problem is based on coupled 1D water movement and thermal conduction equations. Since the saturated hydraulic conductivity could be definitely known, the inverse problem associated with the unsaturated hydraulic conductivity is reduced to that of identifying the relative hydraulic conductivity (RHC) from the hydro-geological information available. For functional representation of RHC, the free-form parameterized function is employed in lieu of the conventional fixed-form function. Values of the parameters included in the functions are optimally determined according to a simulation-optimization algorithm. For easy application of the method, a utilitarian observation system with simple instrumentation is specially contrived which implements collection of the hydro-geological data relatively easily in-situ available. Validity of the method developed is examined through its practical application to a real soil column in an upland crop field. The results show that the water movement model provides the forward solutions of high reproducibility, when coupled with thermal conduction model and calibrated through identifying the RHC by use of a free-form function.

  19. Quantitative passive soil vapor sampling for VOCs--Part 4: Flow-through cell.

    PubMed

    McAlary, Todd; Groenevelt, Hester; Seethapathy, Suresh; Sacco, Paolo; Crump, Derrick; Tuday, Michael; Schumacher, Brian; Hayes, Heidi; Johnson, Paul; Parker, Louise; Górecki, Tadeusz

    2014-05-01

    This paper presents a controlled experiment comparing several quantitative passive samplers for monitoring concentrations of volatile organic compound (VOC) vapors in soil gas using a flow-through cell. This application is simpler than conventional active sampling using adsorptive tubes because the flow rate does not need to be precisely measured and controlled, which is advantageous because the permeability of subsurface materials affects the flow rate and the permeability of geologic materials is highly variable. Using passive samplers in a flow-through cell, the flow rate may not need to be known exactly, as long as it is sufficient to purge the cell in a reasonable time and minimize any negative bias attributable to the starvation effect. An experiment was performed in a 500 mL flow-through cell using a two-factor, one-half fraction fractional factorial test design with flow rates of 80, 670 and 930 mL min(-1) and sample durations of 10, 15 and 20 minutes for each of five different passive samplers (passive Automatic Thermal Desorption Tube, Radiello®, SKC Ultra, Waterloo Membrane Sampler™ and 3M™ OVM 3500). A Summa canister was collected coincident with each passive sampler and analyzed by EPA Method TO-15 to provide a baseline for comparison of the passive sampler concentrations. The passive sampler concentrations were within a factor of 2 of the Summa canister concentrations in 32 of 35 cases. Passive samples collected at the low flow rate and short duration showed low concentrations, which is likely attributable to insufficient purging of the cell after sampler placement.

  20. The principle of 'maximum energy dissipation': a novel thermodynamic perspective on rapid water flow in connected soil structures.

    PubMed

    Zehe, Erwin; Blume, Theresa; Blöschl, Günter

    2010-05-12

    Preferential flow in biological soil structures is of key importance for infiltration and soil water flow at a range of scales. In the present study, we treat soil water flow as a dissipative process in an open non-equilibrium thermodynamic system, to better understand this key process. We define the chemical potential and Helmholtz free energy based on soil physical quantities, parametrize a physically based hydrological model based on field data and simulate the evolution of Helmholtz free energy in a cohesive soil with different populations of worm burrows for a range of rainfall scenarios. The simulations suggest that flow in connected worm burrows allows a more efficient redistribution of water within the soil, which implies a more efficient dissipation of free energy/higher production of entropy. There is additional evidence that the spatial pattern of worm burrow density at the hillslope scale is a major control of energy dissipation. The pattern typically found in the study is more efficient in dissipating energy/producing entropy than other patterns. This is because upslope run-off accumulates and infiltrates via the worm burrows into the dry soil in the lower part of the hillslope, which results in an overall more efficient dissipation of free energy. PMID:20368256

  1. The principle of ‘maximum energy dissipation’: a novel thermodynamic perspective on rapid water flow in connected soil structures

    PubMed Central

    Zehe, Erwin; Blume, Theresa; Blöschl, Günter

    2010-01-01

    Preferential flow in biological soil structures is of key importance for infiltration and soil water flow at a range of scales. In the present study, we treat soil water flow as a dissipative process in an open non-equilibrium thermodynamic system, to better understand this key process. We define the chemical potential and Helmholtz free energy based on soil physical quantities, parametrize a physically based hydrological model based on field data and simulate the evolution of Helmholtz free energy in a cohesive soil with different populations of worm burrows for a range of rainfall scenarios. The simulations suggest that flow in connected worm burrows allows a more efficient redistribution of water within the soil, which implies a more efficient dissipation of free energy/higher production of entropy. There is additional evidence that the spatial pattern of worm burrow density at the hillslope scale is a major control of energy dissipation. The pattern typically found in the study is more efficient in dissipating energy/producing entropy than other patterns. This is because upslope run-off accumulates and infiltrates via the worm burrows into the dry soil in the lower part of the hillslope, which results in an overall more efficient dissipation of free energy. PMID:20368256

  2. Unidirectional gas flow in soil porosity resulting from barometric pressure cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neeper, Donald A.; Stauffer, Philip

    2005-08-01

    During numerical simulation of air flow in the vadose zone, it was noticed that a small sinusoidal pressure would cause a gradual one-way migration of the pore gas. This was found to be a physical phenomenon, not a numerical artifact of the finite element simulation. The one-way migration occurs because the atmospheric pressure, and hence the air density, is slightly greater when air is flowing into the ground than when air is flowing out of the ground. A simple analytic theory of the phenomenon is presented, together with analytic calculations using actual barometric pressure data. In soil of one Darcy permeability, the one-way migration is of the order of a few tenths of a meter per year for either plane flow from ground surface or for radial flow from an open borehole. The migration is sufficiently small that it will have no practical consequences in most circumstances; however, investigators who conduct detailed numerical modeling should recognize that this phenomenon is not a numerical artifact in an apparently linear system.

  3. Shallow soil CO2 flow along the San Andreas and Calaveras Faults, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lewicki, J.L.; Evans, William C.; Hilley, G.E.; Sorey, M.L.; Rogie, J.D.; Brantley, S.L.

    2003-01-01

    We evaluate a comprehensive soil CO2 survey along the San Andreas fault (SAF) in Parkfield, and the Calaveras fault (CF) in Hollister, California, in the context of spatial and temporal variability, origin, and transport of CO2 in fractured terrain. CO2 efflux was measured within grids with portable instrumentation and continously with meteorological parameters at a fixed station, in both faulted and unfaulted areas. Spatial and temporal variability of surface CO2 effluxes was observed to be higher at faulted SAF and CF sites, relative to comparable background areas. However, ??13C (-23.3 to - 16.4???) and ??14C (75.5 to 94.4???) values of soil CO2 in both faulted and unfaulted areas are indicative of biogenic CO2, even though CO2 effluxes in faulted areas reached values as high as 428 g m-2 d-1. Profiles of soil CO2 concentration as a function of depth were measured at multiple sites within SAF and CF grids and repeatedly at two locations at the SAF grid. Many of these profiles suggest a surprisingly high component of advective CO2 flow. Spectral and correlation analysis of SAF CO2 efflux and meteorological parameter time series indicates that effects of wind speed variations on atmospheric air flow though fractures modulate surface efflux of biogenic CO2. The resulting areal patterns in CO2 effluxes could be erroneously attributed to a deep gas source in the absence of isotopic data, a problem that must be addressed in fault zone soil gas studies.

  4. Investigation of interactive effects on water flow and solute transport in sandy loam soil using time domain reflectometry.

    PubMed

    Merdun, Hasan

    2012-01-01

    Surface-applied chemicals move through the unsaturated zone with complex flow and transport processes due to soil heterogeneity and reach the saturated zone, resulting in groundwater contamination. Such complex processes need to be studied by advanced measurement and modeling techniques to protect soil and water resources from contamination. In this study, the interactive effects of factors like soil structure, initial soil water content (SWC), and application rate on preferential flow and transport were studied in a sandy loam field soil using measurement (by time domain reflectometry (TDR)) and modeling (by MACRO and VS2DTI) techniques. In addition, statistical analyses were performed to compare the means of the measured and modeled SWC and EC, and solute transport parameters (pore water velocity and dispersion coefficient) in 12 treatments. Research results showed that even though the effects of soil structural conditions on water and solute transport were not so clear, the applied solution moved lower depths in the profiles of wet versus dry initial SWC and high application rate versus low application rates. The effects of soil structure and initial SWC on water and solute movement could be differentiated under the interactive conditions, but the effects of the application rates were difficult to differentiate under different soil structural and initial SWC conditions. Modeling results showed that MACRO had somewhat better performance than VS2DTI in the estimation of SWC and EC with space and time, but overall both models had relatively low performances. The means of SWC, EC, and solute transport parameters of the 12 treatments were divided into some groups based on the statistical analyses, indicating different flow and transport characteristics or a certain degree nonuniform or preferential flow and transport in the soil. Conducting field experiments with more interactive factors and applying the models with different approaches may allow better understanding

  5. Investigation of Interactive Effects on Water Flow and Solute Transport in Sandy Loam Soil Using Time Domain Reflectometry

    PubMed Central

    Merdun, Hasan

    2012-01-01

    Surface-applied chemicals move through the unsaturated zone with complex flow and transport processes due to soil heterogeneity and reach the saturated zone, resulting in groundwater contamination. Such complex processes need to be studied by advanced measurement and modeling techniques to protect soil and water resources from contamination. In this study, the interactive effects of factors like soil structure, initial soil water content (SWC), and application rate on preferential flow and transport were studied in a sandy loam field soil using measurement (by time domain reflectometry (TDR)) and modeling (by MACRO and VS2DTI) techniques. In addition, statistical analyses were performed to compare the means of the measured and modeled SWC and EC, and solute transport parameters (pore water velocity and dispersion coefficient) in 12 treatments. Research results showed that even though the effects of soil structural conditions on water and solute transport were not so clear, the applied solution moved lower depths in the profiles of wet versus dry initial SWC and high application rate versus low application rates. The effects of soil structure and initial SWC on water and solute movement could be differentiated under the interactive conditions, but the effects of the application rates were difficult to differentiate under different soil structural and initial SWC conditions. Modeling results showed that MACRO had somewhat better performance than VS2DTI in the estimation of SWC and EC with space and time, but overall both models had relatively low performances. The means of SWC, EC, and solute transport parameters of the 12 treatments were divided into some groups based on the statistical analyses, indicating different flow and transport characteristics or a certain degree nonuniform or preferential flow and transport in the soil. Conducting field experiments with more interactive factors and applying the models with different approaches may allow better understanding

  6. Investigation of interactive effects on water flow and solute transport in sandy loam soil using time domain reflectometry.

    PubMed

    Merdun, Hasan

    2012-01-01

    Surface-applied chemicals move through the unsaturated zone with complex flow and transport processes due to soil heterogeneity and reach the saturated zone, resulting in groundwater contamination. Such complex processes need to be studied by advanced measurement and modeling techniques to protect soil and water resources from contamination. In this study, the interactive effects of factors like soil structure, initial soil water content (SWC), and application rate on preferential flow and transport were studied in a sandy loam field soil using measurement (by time domain reflectometry (TDR)) and modeling (by MACRO and VS2DTI) techniques. In addition, statistical analyses were performed to compare the means of the measured and modeled SWC and EC, and solute transport parameters (pore water velocity and dispersion coefficient) in 12 treatments. Research results showed that even though the effects of soil structural conditions on water and solute transport were not so clear, the applied solution moved lower depths in the profiles of wet versus dry initial SWC and high application rate versus low application rates. The effects of soil structure and initial SWC on water and solute movement could be differentiated under the interactive conditions, but the effects of the application rates were difficult to differentiate under different soil structural and initial SWC conditions. Modeling results showed that MACRO had somewhat better performance than VS2DTI in the estimation of SWC and EC with space and time, but overall both models had relatively low performances. The means of SWC, EC, and solute transport parameters of the 12 treatments were divided into some groups based on the statistical analyses, indicating different flow and transport characteristics or a certain degree nonuniform or preferential flow and transport in the soil. Conducting field experiments with more interactive factors and applying the models with different approaches may allow better understanding

  7. Influence of soil structure on unsaturated water flow including root uptake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhlmann, Anna; Neuweiler, Insa; van der Zee, Sjoerd; Helmig, Rainer

    2010-05-01

    The development of effective irrigation strategies is of great importance as the scarcity of water during extended dry periods in aride areas leads to limited water uptake by roots and thus to restricted growth and eventually to wilting of plants. To approach this goal a broad understanding of the factors which influence the distribution of the water potential and the interactions with root uptake is crucial. Soil structure is supposed to have a large impact on water flow especially under dry conditions when the variability of soil parameters is increased. For field applications, predictions of the water flow are needed for large scales where the scarcity of measurements leads to a high level of uncertainty about the detailed distribution of soil parameters. Thus stochastic methods in which heterogeneity of soil is described by a random parameter field are used. In this presentation, the interrelation of root uptake and heterogeneity is analyzed using numerical simulations. Random parameter fields with Gaussian and non-Gaussian dependence were parameterized according to the Las Cruces Trench Site dataset and used as input for the numerical model. Transpiration is considered in a macroscopic way as a sink term with a prescribed potential extraction rate at each node, determined by the density distribution of the plants and with restricted uptake due to unfavorable conditions as lack of water and oxygen (modeled according to the Feddes - Function). With this basic model, water flow in two dimensional random fields has been investigated under dry conditions. It was observed that dry spots - regions in which roots dry up to the wilting point form when the structure shows isolated high extreme values in conductivity. In these dry regions, roots take up a decreased amount of water such that the total potential demand is not met anymore. This seems rather unrealistic as sufficient water is available at other locations of the domain. Thus two other approaches are analyzed

  8. Lateral Preferential Flow in Soil Pipes on Hillslopes in the Catskill Mountains, New York, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harpold, A. A.; Steenhuis, T. S.; Dahlke, H. E.

    2006-12-01

    Lateral preferential flow has been shown to be a significant factor controlling the timing and volume of hillslope runoff. In addition, preferential flow, including pipeflow, can reduce the contact time of contaminants with the soil matrix and thus profoundly alter runoff chemistry. This study examines the importance of soil pipes on hydrologic response and runoff chemistry from a hillslope in the Catskill Mountains of New York State. The pipes examined are unique in location, depth, and flow characteristics from previously published studies in North America. The implications of pipeflow on hydrologic process understanding and land management in both agricultural and pristine watersheds in the Catskills are numerous. Therefore, chemical tracers and hydrometric techniques are used to determine the hydrologic response characteristics, contributing area, and nutrient transport capacity of the pipes and non-invasive geophysical methods are used to investigate the morphology of the pipes and their importance in landscape formation. This study was conducted on a hillslope in the Town Brook watershed in the Catskill Mountains. Soil pipes were initially identified by visual and auditory reconnaissance. Soil pipe locations and frequency were further defined using ground penetrating radar (GPR). Additional pipe characteristics were estimated using simple tracer studies (using dye and salt) and by measuring the size of particles ejected by the pipe. After identification, the hillslope was instrumented with equipment capable of measuring the hydrologic response of the pipe, including a weir and tipping buckets measuring pipe outflow, a network of piezometers and tensiometers, and automated rain gauge. Water quality measurements were collected using automated samplers and event-based grab samples at several locations: upslope surface water, soil moisture (using a cluster of lysimeters), rainfall, pipe outflow, and stream water at the outlet of the subcatchment. Mixing models

  9. Noninvasive imaging methods in a study of preferential flow in structured soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Votrubová, J.; Císlerová, M.; Amin, M. G.; Hall, L. D.

    2003-04-01

    Two non-invasive imaging methods were combined to study hydraulic phenomena in structured heterogeneous soil. Two undisturbed samples (5.4-cm diameter and 9-cm height) of coarse sandy loam from Korkusova Hut, CR, were examined. The internal structure of the samples was visualized by means of X-ray computed tomography (CT). The distribution of water within the samples during a recurrent ponded infiltration (RPI) was monitored using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Hydraulic behaviour of the soil type studied is characterized by fast preferential flow and a decrease of the effective hydraulic conductivity as observed during the two infiltration runs of RPI. Present research is aimed at identifying the source of these phenomena. Regarding the two samples studied, the behaviour of interest was fully pronounced only in one of them. This difference was related to the difference of the internal structure of the samples as determined by CT. Moreover, it was clearly reflected in the MRI results, providing base for linking the specific features of the MRI results to the specific hydraulic phenomena. Use of the MRI technique in studies water in natural soils is complicated by the properties of the soil material, primarily by the high content of paramagnetic particles. Although the image intensity is related to the amount of water in the respective volume, it is also influenced by the geometry of the water-filled space and thus a quantitative analysis of the relationship becomes unfeasible. Joint analysis of the water distribution information obtained by MRI and the internal structure information produced by CT is prevented due to MRI image distortion originating in the heterogeneity of the magnetic properties of the soil-water-air system studied. Nevertheless, the qualitative analysis of the results is instructive. Specifically, it is demonstrated that MRI detects only water in regions of low local density. As these can be assumed to represent potential preferential pathways

  10. Subsurface Transport and Mobilization of Pathogenic Microbes and Microspheres: Effect of Microbe Size, Soil Physical Heterogeneity, and Intermittent Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulicek, M. C.; Metge, D. W.; Mohanty, S. K.; Harvey, R. W.; Ryan, J. N.

    2013-12-01

    Intermittent flows of rainwater frequently mobilize pathogenic microbes attached to subsurface soils, thereby causing groundwater contamination. The potential of intermittent rainfall to mobilize diverse pathogens (e.g., size, shape, taxa) remains understudied for heterogeneous soil systems. This study investigates the combined effects of microbe size and shape, intermittent flow, and soil physical heterogeneity on the transport, retention and mobilization of microbes through an intact, fractured shale saprolite core. Microbes, including MS-2 bacteriophage (~26 nm), Pseudomonas stutzeri bacteria (~1 μm), and Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts (3.6 μm), and 0.5 μm fluorescent microspheres (FMS), preceded by a bromide tracer, were applied to the core to obtain breakthrough. After breakthrough, the core was subjected to intermittent rainfalls to mobilize the attached microbes and FMS. Water samples were collected using 19 spatially-arranged outlet ports at the core base to resolve the effect of soil physical heterogeneity. Water infiltrated through only eight of 19 total sampling ports, which indicated water partially bypassed soil matrices and infiltrated through macropores. Bromide recovery was less than 100%, which indicated diffusion of bromide into the soil matrix. Macropores and the soil matrix dominated flow were characterized based on the cumulative bromide recovery within individual sampling ports. Thus, lower recovery was attributed to increased matrix diffusion and higher recovery indicated the presence of macropores. Intermittent flow mobilized previously sequestered microbes and FMS; however, mobilization varied with the size of microbes/FMS and sampling ports. Greater mobilization occurred through macropores compared to soil matrices. Mobilization of larger, spherical C. parvum oocysts was greater than that of the smaller, spherical MS-2 bacteriophage and the rod-shaped P. stutzeri bacteria during intermittent flow. This suggested shear forces mobilize

  11. Water Filter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    A compact, lightweight electrolytic water sterilizer available through Ambassador Marketing, generates silver ions in concentrations of 50 to 100 parts per billion in water flow system. The silver ions serve as an effective bactericide/deodorizer. Tap water passes through filtering element of silver that has been chemically plated onto activated carbon. The silver inhibits bacterial growth and the activated carbon removes objectionable tastes and odors caused by addition of chlorine and other chemicals in municipal water supply. The three models available are a kitchen unit, a "Tourister" unit for portable use while traveling and a refrigerator unit that attaches to the ice cube water line. A filter will treat 5,000 to 10,000 gallons of water.

  12. Prehistoric Agriculture and Soil Fertility on Lava Flows in Northern Arizona, USA: Results from the San Francisco Volcanic Field REU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broadman, E.; Anderson, K. C.

    2013-12-01

    The San Francisco Volcanic Field in northern Arizona is home to ~600 cinder cones, the youngest of which is Sunset Crater (erupted ~AD 1100). This study documents trends in available phosphate and nitrate content with time, testing whether lowered soil pH from the addition of Sunset cinders increased soil fertility and became a factor in Anasazi agricultural success. Soil fertility is examined both before and after Sunset's eruption in soils of different ages that have developed from eolian deposition on top of lava flows. An increase in phosphate and nitrate levels following acidification would suggest that the presence of Sunset cinders brought the soils to the optimal pH for mobilization of these nutrients. The combined effects of the cinder layer retaining nutrients and water, wetter climates, and increases in phosphate and nitrate (both limiting nutrients for plant growth), would have contributed to Anasazi agricultural success after Sunset's eruption. Samples for this study were taken from eolian-derived soils of different ages atop lava flows in the San Francisco Volcanic Field. OSL data from these soils on Strawberry and SP Craters' lava flows yielded age estimates of ~12.3 ka (Strawberry) and ~32.7 ka (SP), on which a soil chronosequence was based. Results from the chronosequence supported these OSL ages, indicating that soils on the SP flow are older than those on the Strawberry flow. Field descriptions, Harden Development Indices, particle size analysis, and nutrient content analysis were used for this aspect of the project. An experimental acid wash method will be used to simulate the addition of Sunset's acidic cinders, and will yield data for phosphate and nitrate content after Sunset erupted. Preliminary results indicate that phosphate and nitrate accumulate in upper, eolian-derived horizons (Av, Bw) and in more deeply buried carbonate horizons (Bk). Higher concentrations of phosphate and nitrate were found in older (SP) soils than younger

  13. Interactions between soil texture and placement of dairy slurry application: I. Flow characteristics and leaching of nonreactive components.

    PubMed

    Glaesner, Nadia; Kjaergaard, Charlotte; Rubaek, Gitte H; Magid, Jakob

    2011-01-01

    Land application of manure can exacerbate nutrient and contaminant transfers to the aquatic environment. This study examined the effect of injecting a dairy cattle (Bostaurus L.) manure slurry on mobilization and leaching of dissolved, nonreactive slurry components across a range of agricultural soils. We compared leaching of slurry-applied bromide through intact soil columns (20 cm diam., 20 cm high) of differing textures following surface application or injection of slurry. The volumetric fraction of soil pores >30 microm ranged from 43% in a loamy sand to 28% in a sandy loam and 15% in a loam-textured soil. Smaller active flow volumes and higher proportions of preferential flow were observed with increasing soil clay content. Injection of slurry in the loam soil significantly enhanced diffusion of applied bromide into the large fraction of small pores compared with surface application. The resulting physical protection against leaching of bromide was reflected by 60.2% of the bromide tracer was recovered in the effluent after injection, compared with 80.6% recovery after surface application. No effect of slurry injection was observed in the loamy sand and sandy loam soils. Our findings point to soil texture as an important factor influencing leaching of dissolved, nonreactive slurry components in soils amended with manure slurry. PMID:21520740

  14. Interactions between soil texture and placement of dairy slurry application: I. Flow characteristics and leaching of nonreactive components.

    PubMed

    Glaesner, Nadia; Kjaergaard, Charlotte; Rubaek, Gitte H; Magid, Jakob

    2011-01-01

    Land application of manure can exacerbate nutrient and contaminant transfers to the aquatic environment. This study examined the effect of injecting a dairy cattle (Bostaurus L.) manure slurry on mobilization and leaching of dissolved, nonreactive slurry components across a range of agricultural soils. We compared leaching of slurry-applied bromide through intact soil columns (20 cm diam., 20 cm high) of differing textures following surface application or injection of slurry. The volumetric fraction of soil pores >30 microm ranged from 43% in a loamy sand to 28% in a sandy loam and 15% in a loam-textured soil. Smaller active flow volumes and higher proportions of preferential flow were observed with increasing soil clay content. Injection of slurry in the loam soil significantly enhanced diffusion of applied bromide into the large fraction of small pores compared with surface application. The resulting physical protection against leaching of bromide was reflected by 60.2% of the bromide tracer was recovered in the effluent after injection, compared with 80.6% recovery after surface application. No effect of slurry injection was observed in the loamy sand and sandy loam soils. Our findings point to soil texture as an important factor influencing leaching of dissolved, nonreactive slurry components in soils amended with manure slurry.

  15. Non-invasive methods to study flow and transport at the soil core and lysimeter scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vereecken, H.

    2004-12-01

    Non-invasive methods offer a great potential to study flow and transport processes at the core to the field and regional scale. In this contribution we will focus on the application of selected techniques such as MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging), X-Ray-Tomography (X-RT), MERIT (Magnetic Electrical Resistivity Imaging Technique), GPR (Ground Penetrating Radar) and Spectral Induced Polarisation (SIP) at the core to lysimeter scale. MRI is a powerful tool to derive local scale transport parameters. Based on the imaging of the 3-D temporal evolution of the spatial moments of a solute transport in a soil core, the local scale dispersivity of the soil can be derived. We also use MRI to image the root distribution inside a packed soil column. We employ the effect that the transverse relaxation time of water in the porous medium is considerably smaller than in the root tissue of rizinus communis. Different MRI pulse sequences were tested showing that the best contrast is obtainable by the strongly T2* weighted method CISS. X-RT provides information on the structure of the porous media. By parametrizing this structural information we may obtain an improved description of solute transport in undisturbed soil cores. GPR allows to map the spatial and temporal distribution of soil moisture in large undisturbed lysimeters. Combined with outflow data, this provides unique information to evaluate and improve mathematical models. New developments like MERIT are on their way which additionally exploits the magnetic information inherent in Electrical Resistivity Tomography-experiments to improve the spatial distribution of solute concentrations at lysimeter scale. SIP methods may be used to derive local scale pore size distribution and hydraulic conductivity. The single relaxation times, deduced from a measured phase spectrum either via multi-Cole-Cole-fits or as a whole relaxation time distribution, are a function of the relaxation length, which is connected to pore space

  16. Field Evaluation of Preferential Flow in Agricultural Soil of the Mississippi Delta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perkins, K. S.; Nimmo, J. R.; Rose, C. E.; Coupe, R.

    2009-12-01

    In the Bogue Phalia basin in the Delta region of northwestern Mississippi, as in many farmed areas, intensive use of agricultural chemicals raises water quality concerns. The soils are fine textured and often exhibit surface ponding and runoff after irrigation and rainfall. There is extensive surface cracking during extended dry periods. Fields are typically land-formed to promote surface flow into irrigation ditches and streams that feed into larger river ecosystems. Deep percolation below the root zone has been considered to be minimal in this area; however, unsaturated zone processes, including the effects of a declining water table, are not well understood, and there are few measured unsaturated zone data relevant to deep percolation. In this study we assessed solute transport mechanisms within and below the root zone of a fallow soybean field by performing a 2-m ring infiltration experiment. Ponding continued for 67 hours using bromide and rhodamine tracers and subsurface instruments for measuring soil-water content, matric pressure, and solution sampling. Water percolated rapidly below the pond reaching 1 m depth in as little as 30 minutes, indicating preferential flow through the root zone, possibly related to shrink/swell features. Extensive lateral flow of water at shallow depths was apparent as the surface wetted outward to several meters from the pond in all directions with some evidence of preferentiality along slope toward the drainage ditch. Deeper lateral flow was detected at solution samplers 3 m from the pond edge at 5 m depth within a few weeks. Tracer was not detected in the unsaturated zone below 5 m however; the tracer was detected at the water table 12 m below land surface within 10 weeks of the experiment with concentrations increasing over a period of 10 months. A tracer mass balance also suggests the possibility for deep preferential transport of agricultural chemicals within the Bogue Phalia basin.

  17. Application and advantages of novel clay ceramic particles (CCPs) in an up-flow anaerobic bio-filter (UAF) for wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Han, Wei; Yue, Qinyan; Wu, Suqing; Zhao, Yaqin; Gao, Baoyu; Li, Qian; Wang, Yan

    2013-06-01

    Utilization of clay ceramic particles (CCPs) as the novel filter media employed in an up-flow anaerobic bio-filter (UAF) was investigated. After a series of tests and operations, CCPs have presented higher total porosity and roughness, meanwhile lower bulk and grain density. When CCPs were utilized as fillers, the reactor had a shorter start up period of 45 days comparing with conventional reactors, and removal rate of chemical oxygen demand (COD) still reached about 76% at a relatively lower temperature during the stable state. In addition, degradation of COD and ammonia nitrogen (NH4-N) at different media height along the reactor was evaluated, and the dates showed that the main reduction process happened within the first 30 cm media height from the bottom flange. Five phases were observed according to different organic loadings during the experiment period, and the results indicated that COD removal increased linearly when the organic loading was increased.

  18. Physical modelling of rainfall-induced flow failures in loose granular soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Take, W. A.; Beddoe, R. A.

    2015-09-01

    The tragic consequences of the March 2014 Oso landslide in Washington, USA were particularly high due to the mobility of the landslide debris. Confusingly, a landslide occurred at that exact same location a number of years earlier, but simply slumped into the river at the toe of the slope. Why did these two events differ so drastically in their mobility? Considerable questions remain regarding the conditions required to generate flow failures in loose soils. Geotechnical centrifuge testing, in combination with high-speed cameras and advanced image analysis has now provided the landslides research community with a powerful new tool to experimentally investigate the complex mechanics leading to high mobility landslides. This paper highlights recent advances in our understanding of the process of static liquefaction in loose granular soil slopes achieved through observations of highly-instrumented physical models. In particular, the paper summarises experimental results aimed to identify the point of initiation of the chain-reaction required to trigger liquefaction flow failures, to assess the effect of slope inclination on the likelihood of a flowslide being triggered, and to quantify the effect of antecedent groundwater levels on the distal reach of landslide debris with the objective of beginning to explain why neighbouring slopes can exhibit such a wide variation in landslide travel distance upon rainfall-triggering.

  19. A computer program for the simulation of heat and moisture flow in soils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Camillo, P.; Schmugge, T. J.

    1981-01-01

    A computer program that simulates the flow of heat and moisture in soils is described. The space-time dependence of temperature and moisture content is described by a set of diffusion-type partial differential equations. The simulator uses a predictor/corrector to numerically integrate them, giving wetness and temperature profiles as a function of time. The simulator was used to generate solutions to diffusion-type partial differential equations for which analytical solutions are known. These equations include both constant and variable diffusivities, and both flux and constant concentration boundary conditions. In all cases, the simulated and analytic solutions agreed to within the error bounds which were imposed on the integrator. Simulations of heat and moisture flow under actual field conditions were also performed. Ground truth data were used for the boundary conditions and soil transport properties. The qualitative agreement between simulated and measured profiles is an indication that the model equations are reasonably accurate representations of the physical processes involved.

  20. Roots at the percolation threshold - how mucilage affects water flow in soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kroener, Eva; Benard, Pascal; Ahmed, Mutez; Zarebanadkouki, Mohsen; Kaestner, Anders; Vontobel, Peter; Carminati, Andrea

    2015-04-01

    Much of the carbon assimilated by plants during photosynthesis is lost to the soil via rhizodeposition. One component of rhizodeposition is mucilage, a hydrogel that dramatically alters the soil physical properties. Mucilage can hold large volumes of water, but it becomes hydrophobic after drying. Drying/swelling dynamics of mucilage lead to a dynamic relation between water content and water potential, resulting in a non-equilibrium water retention curve of the rhizosphere. Here we present experimental evidence of this non-equilibrium during rewetting. Additionally we propose a model of water flow across the rhizosphere. The model is based on the Richards' equation and accounts for 1) the reduced mobility of water in mucilage filled pores, 2) the increased water holding capacity of the rhizosphere under equilibrium conditions and 3) the non-equilibrium dynamics induced by swelling and shrinking dynamics of mucilage. We expect this non-equilibrium behavior to be more important during rewetting: the dryer the mucilage the longer it takes for the rhizosphere to go to equilibrium. By choosing a relaxation time that depends on water content this idea is included in our model. Our model predicts that under certain rewetting conditions water flows across a dry rhizosphere without rewetting it significantly during the first hours. To justify this concept, we developed a pore network model in which mucilage is randomly distributed through the pore domain. The pores covered with mucilage are assumed to be hydrophobic and are not rewetted upon irrigation. The pore network model predicts that there is a critical mucilage concentration at which the fraction of mucilage covered pores is high enough to prevent the water flow through the rhizosphere. This critical mucilage concentration corresponds to the percolation threshold. Near the percolation threshold water can cross the region, without rewetting it significantly. Using the pore network model we derive an analytic relation

  1. Performance evaluation of a ceramic cross-flow filter on a bench- scale coal gasifier. Second quarterly project report, January 1, 1985--March 31, 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Ciliberti, D.F.; Lippert, T.E.

    1985-12-31

    The Department of Energy is currently supporting a program that will aid in the development of cross flow filtration technology as applied to combined cycle power generation with coal gasification. The stated overall goal is to gain information on both the operational and economic feasibility of the implementation of cross flow filtration in various gasifier options. Westinghouse has prepared a comprehensive program that will lead directly to these program goals in an efficient manner. The proposed program is composed of three major technical tasks. Task 1 is directed at the design and actual test of a cross flow filter at a DOE bench scale gasifier. Task 2 is composed of several smaller theoretical and experimental efforts that are intended to firm up areas where engineering and design principles are lacking or considered inadequate. The third task is intended to integrate the results of the first two tasks in a conceptual design and cost analysis such that proper economic perspective for the filter concept can be gained. A brief summary of the approach taken in the technical tasks is presented in the following discussion. (VC)

  2. Performance evaluation of a ceramic cross-flow filter on a bench-scale coal gasifier. Fifth quarterly report, October 1, 1985--December 31, 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Ciliberti, D.F.; Lippert, T.E.

    1985-12-31

    The Department of Energy is currently sporting a program that will aid in the development of cross flow filtration technology as applied to combined cycle power generation with coal gasification. The stated overall goal is to gain information on both the operational and economic feasibility of the implementation of cross flow filtration in various gasifier options. Westinghouse has prepared a comprehensive program that will lead directly to these program goals in an efficient manner. the proposed program is composed of three major technical task. Task 1 is directed at the design and actual test of a cross flow filter at a DOE bench scale gasifier. Task 2 is composed of several smaller theoretical and experimental efforts that are intended to firm up areas where engineering and design principles are lacking or considered inadequate. The third task is intended to integrate the results of the first two tasks in a conceptual design and cost analysis such that proper economic perspective for the filter concept can be gained. A brief summary of the approach taken in the technical tasks is presented in the following discussion.

  3. Performance evaluation of a ceramic cross-flow filter on a bench-scale coal gasifier. Fourth quarterly report, July 1, 1985--September 30, 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Ciliberti, D.F.; Lippert, T.E.

    1985-12-31

    The Department of Energy is currently supporting a program that will aid in the development of cross flow filtration technology as applied to combined cycle power generation with coal gasification. The stated overall goal is to gain information on both the operational and economic feasibility of the implementation of cross flow filtration in various gasifier options. Westinghouse has prepared a comprehensive program that will lead directly to these program goals in an efficient manner. The proposed program is composed of three major technical tasks. Task 1 is directed at the design and actual test of a cross flow filter at a DOE bench scale gasifier. Task 2 is composed of several smaller theoretical and experimental efforts that are intended to firm up areas where engineering and design principles are lacking or considered inadequate. The third task is intended to integrate the results of the first two tasks in a conceptual design and cost analysis such that proper economic perspective for the filter concept can be gained. A brief summary of the approach taken in the technical tasks is presented in the following discussion.

  4. Characterization of colloidal phosphorus species in drainage waters from a clay soil using asymmetric flow field-flow fractionation.

    PubMed

    Regelink, Inge C; Koopmans, Gerwin F; van der Salm, Caroline; Weng, Liping; van Riemsdijk, Willem H

    2013-01-01

    Phosphorus transport from agricultural land contributes to eutrophication of surface waters. Pipe drain and trench waters from a grassland field on a heavy clay soil in the Netherlands were sampled before and after manure application. Phosphorus speciation was analyzed by physicochemical P fractionation, and the colloidal P fraction in the dissolved fraction (<0.45 μm) was analyzed by asymmetric flow field-flow fractionation (AF4) coupled to high-resolution inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry and ultraviolet diode array detector. When no manure was applied for almost 7 mo, total P (TP) concentrations were low (<21 μmol L), and TP was almost evenly distributed among dissolved reactive P (DRP), dissolved unreactive P (DUP), and particulate P (PP). Total P concentrations increased by a factor of 60 and 4 when rainfall followed shortly after application of cattle slurry or its solid fraction, respectively. Under these conditions, DRP contributed 50% or more to TP. The P speciation within the DUP and PP fractions varied among the different sampling times. Phosphorus associated with dissolved organic matter, probably via cation bridging, comprised a small fraction of DUP at all sampling times. Colloidal P coeluted with clay particles when P application was withheld for almost 7 mo and after application of the solid cattle slurry fraction. At these sampling times, PP correlated well with particulate Fe, Al, and Si, indicating that P is associated with colloidal clay particles. After cattle slurry application, part of DUP was probably present as phospholipids. Physicochemical fractionation combined with AF4 analysis is a promising tool to unravel the speciation of colloidal P in environmental water samples.

  5. Remotely serviced filter and housing

    DOEpatents

    Ross, Maurice J.; Zaladonis, Larry A.

    1988-09-27

    A filter system for a hot cell comprises a housing adapted for input of air or other gas to be filtered, flow of the air through a filter element, and exit of filtered air. The housing is tapered at the top to make it easy to insert a filter cartridge using an overhead crane. The filter cartridge holds the filter element while the air or other gas is passed through the filter element. Captive bolts in trunnion nuts are readily operated by electromechanical manipulators operating power wrenches to secure and release the filter cartridge. The filter cartridge is adapted to make it easy to change a filter element by using a master-slave manipulator at a shielded window station.

  6. Sap flow characteristics of neotropical mangroves in flooded and drained soils.

    PubMed

    Krauss, Ken W; Young, P Joy; Chambers, Jim L; Doyle, Thomas W; Twilley, Robert R

    2007-05-01

    Effects of flooding on water transport in mangroves have previously been investigated in a few studies, most of which were conducted on seedlings in controlled settings. In this study, we used heat-dissipation sap probes to determine if sap flow (J(s)) attenuates with radial depth into the xylem of mature trees of three south Florida mangrove species growing in Rookery Bay. This was accomplished by inserting sap probes at multiple depths and monitoring diurnal flow. For most species and diameter size class combinations tested, J(s) decreased dramatically beyond a radial depth of 2 or 4 cm, with little sap flow beyond a depth of 6 cm. Mean J(s) was reduced on average by 20% in Avicennia germinans (L.) Stearn, Laguncularia racemosa (L.) Gaertn. f. and Rhizophora mangle L. trees when soils were flooded. Species differences were highly significant, with L. racemosa having the greatest midday J(s) of about 26 g H(2)O m(-2) s(-1) at a radial depth of 2 cm compared with a mean for the other two species of about 15 g H(2)O m(-2) s(-1). Sap flow at a depth of 2 cm in mangroves was commensurate with rates reported for other forested wetland tree species. We conclude that: (1) early spring flooding of basin mangrove forests causes reductions in sap flow in mature mangrove trees; (2) the sharp attenuations in J(s) along the radial profile have implications for understanding whole-tree water use strategies by mangrove forests; and (3) regardless of flood state, individual mangrove tree water use follows leaf-level mechanisms in being conservative. PMID:17267368

  7. Sap flow characteristics of neotropical mangroves in flooded and drained soils

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Krauss, Ken W.; Young, P. Joy; Chambers, Jim L.; Doyle, Thomas W.; Twilley, Robert R.

    2007-01-01

    Effects of flooding on water transport in mangroves have previously been investigated in a few studies, most of which were conducted on seedlings in controlled settings. In this study, we used heat-dissipation sap probes to determine if sap flow (Js) attenuates with radial depth into the xylem of mature trees of three south Florida mangrove species growing in Rookery Bay. This was accomplished by inserting sap probes at multiple depths and monitoring diurnal flow. For most species and diameter size class combinations tested, Js decreased dramatically beyond a radial depth of 2 or 4 cm, with little sap flow beyond a depth of 6 cm. Mean Js was reduced on average by 20% in Avicennia germinans (L.) Stearn, Laguncularia racemosa (L.) Gaertn. f. and Rhizophora mangle L. trees when soils were flooded. Species differences were highly significant, with L. racemosahaving the greatest midday Js of about 26g H2O H2O m−2s−1 at a radial depth of 2 cm compared with a mean for the other two species of about 15 g H2O m−2s−1. Sap flow at a depth of 2 cm in mangroves was commensurate with rates reported for other forested wetland tree species. We conclude that: (1) early spring flooding of basin mangrove forests causes reductions in sap flow in mature mangrove trees; (2) the sharp attenuations in Js along the radial profile have implications for understanding whole-tree water use strategies by mangrove forests; and (3) regardless of flood state, individual mangrove tree water use follows leaf-level mechanisms in being conservative.

  8. Hydrogeochemistry of the Overland Flow in Soil at Agroecosystems in Eastern Amazon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, C. F. G. D.; Figueiredo, R. O.; Oliveira, F. D. A.

    2014-12-01

    In the watershed of the Timboteua and Buiuna streams, northeast of Pará state, Amazon, it was characterized the overland flow dissolved material by some hydrogeochemical variables: electrical conductivity (EC), pH, chloride (Cl-), nitrate (NO3-), phosphate (PO43-), and sulfate (SO42-). In two small holder properties three overland flow experimental plots (1m2) were placed in each of the six evaluated ecosystems under similar biophysical conditions, totaling 18 plots. There was also installed three rainwater collectors and two rain gauges in a nearby area. In the rainy season were collected 234 samples of rainwater and overland flow. The evaluation of the measured variables promote the hydrogeochemical characterization of the overland flow at soil under chop-and-mulch and slash-and-burn practices in the different ecosystems found in the familiar agriculture of this watershed, in which it was identified some distinct hydrogeochemical characteristics of the overland flow. The lowest losses of NO3- (variation range = 0.07 to 2.57 μM) was found in agroecosystem - chop-and-mulch, this nutrient obtained higher values in agroecosystem - slash-and-burn (RQ). In agroecosystem (RQ) initially, there was a high value of PO43- (8.87 μM); EC (121 μS cm-1) and a subsequent sharp decline. Secondary successional forest (CP) of 20 years presented in overland flow pH 4.8 and EC 25 μS cm-1 (average 6 months), low loss of NO3- (0.2 μM) and PO43- (0.05 μM), and large range of variation of SO42- (0.7 to 21.5 μM). While Cl- and SO42- overland flow concentrations were affect by the rainfall variation, the increase of NO3- and PO43-concentrations were more related to the ecosystem management, with the first element responding to the presence of nitrogen-fixing species and the second responding to the burning practices. In summary: This study was efficient to characterize the hydrogeochemical of the overland flow and its relation to the altered ecosystems by Amazonian family farming.

  9. Experimental observations and modeling of ponding and overland flow in flat, permeable soil fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Appels, Willemijn; Bogaart, Patrick; van der Zee, Sjoerd

    2015-04-01

    In flat well-drained agricultural terrain, overland flow is a relatively rare phenomenon, yet still a potentially important driver of sediment and nutrient transport. Under these conditions, periods of intense rainfall, shallow groundwater dynamics and local combinations of meso- and microtopography control whether water in ponds will become connected to streams and ditches. Combining overland flow measurements at agricultural fields with a new modeling approach, we explored: (i) what rainfall conditions relate to overland flow and (ii) how does flow route connectivity develop for various types of runoff generation and meso/microtopography? For this purpose, we assessed overland flow at two field sites in flat, lowland catchments in the sandy part of the Netherlands and developed a dynamic model (FAST-runoff) to simulate redistribution of water over a heterogeneous surface with infiltration and soil water storage. Experimentally, it appeared that most overland flow occurred as saturation excess runoff during long wet periods, though infiltration excess runoff generation may have played a role during snowmelt periods that generated small amounts of runoff. For both fields, the contributing area during the saturation excess events was large and flow paths long, irrespective of the profoundly different microtopographies. We explored this behaviour with our FAST-Runoff model and found that under saturation excess conditions, mesotopographic features, such as natural depressions or those caused by tillage, gain importance at the expense of the spatial organization of microtopography. The surface topographies of our experimental fields were equal in terms of standard topographic analytical measures such as Curvature, Convergence Index, and Topographic Wetness Index. However, the fields could be distinguished when analysed with a quantitative indicator of flow for hydrological connectivity. Also, the fields had different dynamics related to the runoff generating mechanism

  10. Calibration of a one-dimensional water flow model for the evaluation of the reclamation success of saline soil substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaygan, Mandana; Baumgartl, Thomas; Arnold, Sven; Reading, Lucy; Fletcher, Andrew

    2015-04-01

    Highly saline-sodic soils restrict plant establishment. Salt affected soils may be reclaimed by leaching salts from a potential root zone. Soil amendments can be used as a reclamation technique to improve the soil pore system and hydraulic functions, which allows the downward transport of water under certain precipitation conditions. The objective of this study was to investigate salt movement within saline-sodic soil at a small scale in soil columns and assess the success of amendment strategies for reclamation of the soil. For the purpose of predicting the effect of typical rainfall scenarios on the reclamation of saline-sodic soils, a one-dimensional numerical water flow model (HYDRUS-1D) was tested and calibrated. The model was calibrated using data from laboratory column experiments. A saline-sodic soil was packed into 30 cm long columns (diameter 7cm) from a depth of 10 to 30 cm and then covered with the same soil, however amended with 40% (wt/wt) fine sand and 20% (wt/wt) wood chips, respectively. A column filled with the saline-sodic soil only to a depth of 30 cm was used as a control. The experiments were carried out by establishing an initial pressure head of -60 cm at the soil surface. Based on climate data from a location in south-west Queensland, rainfall scenarios with 50% and 1% probability of annual exceedance for this location were calculated and applied to the soil columns. The hydrological response in the columns was monitored by measuring the water potential using tensiometers installed in three depths (3, 11 and 25 cm) and knowledge of inflow and outflow of the columns. The simulation captured the observed trends in the results for the investigated columns and measured depths under heavy rainfall events as well as surface substrates exposed to small rainfall events, where the simulated and measured results were in very good agreement, with R2 values generally ranging between 0.92 and 0.98. The simulated results also provided a good description

  11. Colloid Mobilization in a Fractured Soil during Dry-Wet Cycles: Role of Drying Duration and Flow Path Permeability.

    PubMed

    Mohanty, Sanjay K; Saiers, James E; Ryan, Joseph N

    2015-08-01

    In subsurface soils, colloids are mobilized by infiltrating rainwater, but the source of colloids and the process by which colloids are generated between rainfalls are not clear. We examined the effect of drying duration and the spatial variation of soil permeability on the mobilization of in situ colloids in intact soil cores (fractured and heavily weathered saprolite) during dry-wet cycles. Measuring water flux at multiple sampling ports at the core base, we found that water drained through flow paths of different permeability. The duration of antecedent drying cycles affected the amount of mobilized colloids, particularly in high-flux ports that received water from soil regions with a large number of macro- and mesopores. In these ports, the amount of mobilized colloids increased with increased drying duration up to 2.5 days. For drying durations greater than 2.5 days, the amount of mobilized colloids decreased. In contrast, increasing drying duration had a limited effect on colloid mobilization in low-flux ports, which presumably received water from soil regions with fewer macro- and mesopores. On the basis of these results, we attribute this dependence of colloid mobilization upon drying duration to colloid generation from dry pore walls and distribution of colloids in flow paths, which appear to be sensitive to the moisture content of soil after drying and flow path permeability. The results are useful for improving the understanding of colloid mobilization during fluctuating weather conditions.

  12. Colloid Mobilization in a Fractured Soil during Dry-Wet Cycles: Role of Drying Duration and Flow Path Permeability.

    PubMed

    Mohanty, Sanjay K; Saiers, James E; Ryan, Joseph N

    2015-08-01

    In subsurface soils, colloids are mobilized by infiltrating rainwater, but the source of colloids and the process by which colloids are generated between rainfalls are not clear. We examined the effect of drying duration and the spatial variation of soil permeability on the mobilization of in situ colloids in intact soil cores (fractured and heavily weathered saprolite) during dry-wet cycles. Measuring water flux at multiple sampling ports at the core base, we found that water drained through flow paths of different permeability. The duration of antecedent drying cycles affected the amount of mobilized colloids, particularly in high-flux ports that received water from soil regions with a large number of macro- and mesopores. In these ports, the amount of mobilized colloids increased with increased drying duration up to 2.5 days. For drying durations greater than 2.5 days, the amount of mobilized colloids decreased. In contrast, increasing drying duration had a limited effect on colloid mobilization in low-flux ports, which presumably received water from soil regions with fewer macro- and mesopores. On the basis of these results, we attribute this dependence of colloid mobilization upon drying duration to colloid generation from dry pore walls and distribution of colloids in flow paths, which appear to be sensitive to the moisture content of soil after drying and flow path permeability. The results are useful for improving the understanding of colloid mobilization during fluctuating weather conditions. PMID:26134351

  13. Where do roots take up water? Neutron radiography of water flow into the roots of transpiring plants growing in soil.

    PubMed

    Zarebanadkouki, Mohsen; Kim, Yangmin X; Carminati, Andrea

    2013-09-01

    Where and how fast does water flow from soil into roots? The answer to this question requires direct and in situ measurement of local flow of water into roots of transpiring plants growing in soil. We used neutron radiography to trace the transport of deuterated water (D₂O) in lupin (Lupinus albus) roots. Lupins were grown in aluminum containers (30 × 25 × 1 cm) filled with sandy soil. D₂O was injected in different soil regions and its transport in soil and roots was monitored by neutron radiography. The transport of water into roots was then quantified using a convection-diffusion model of D₂O transport into roots. The results showed that water uptake was not uniform along roots. Water uptake was higher in the upper soil layers than in the lower ones. Along an individual root, the radial flux was higher in the proximal segments than in the distal segments. In lupins, most of the water uptake occurred in lateral roots. The function of the taproot was to collect water from laterals and transport it to the shoot. This function is ensured by a low radial conductivity and a high axial conductivity. Lupin root architecture seems well designed to take up water from deep soil layers.

  14. The effect of trees on preferential flow and soil infiltrability in an agroforestry parkland in semiarid Burkina Faso

    PubMed Central

    Bargués Tobella, A; Reese, H; Almaw, A; Bayala, J; Malmer, A; Laudon, H; Ilstedt, U

    2014-01-01

    Water scarcity constrains the livelihoods of millions of people in tropical drylands. Tree planting in these environments is generally discouraged due to the large water consumption by trees, but this view may neglect their potential positive impacts on water availability. The effect of trees on soil hydraulic properties linked to groundwater recharge is poorly understood. In this study, we performed 18 rainfall simulations and tracer experiments in an agroforestry parkland in Burkina Faso to investigate the effect of trees and associated termite mounds on soil infiltrability and preferential flow. The sampling points were distributed in transects each consisting of three positions: (i) under a single tree, (ii) in the middle of an open area, and (iii) under a tree associated with a termite mound. The degree of preferential flow was quantified through parameters based on the dye infiltration patterns, which were analyzed using image analysis of photographs. Our results show that the degree of preferential flow was highest under trees associated with termite mounds, intermediate under single trees, and minimal in the open areas. Tree density also had an influence on the degree of preferential flow, with small open areas having more preferential flow than large ones. Soil infiltrability was higher under single trees than in the open areas or under trees associated with a termite mound. The findings from this study demonstrate that trees have a positive impact on soil hydraulic properties influencing groundwater recharge, and thus such effects must be considered when evaluating the impact of trees on water resources in drylands. Key Points Trees in dryland landscapes increase soil infiltrability and preferential flow Termite mounds in association with trees further enhance preferential flow PMID:25641996

  15. The effect of trees on preferential flow and soil infiltrability in an agroforestry parkland in semiarid Burkina Faso

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bargués Tobella, A.; Reese, H.; Almaw, A.; Bayala, J.; Malmer, A.; Laudon, H.; Ilstedt, U.

    2014-04-01

    Water scarcity constrains the livelihoods of millions of people in tropical drylands. Tree planting in these environments is generally discouraged due to the large water consumption by trees, but this view may neglect their potential positive impacts on water availability. The effect of trees on soil hydraulic properties linked to groundwater recharge is poorly understood. In this study, we performed 18 rainfall simulations and tracer experiments in an agroforestry parkland in Burkina Faso to investigate the effect of trees and associated termite mounds on soil infiltrability and preferential flow. The sampling points were distributed in transects each consisting of three positions: (i) under a single tree, (ii) in the middle of an open area, and (iii) under a tree associated with a termite mound. The degree of preferential flow was quantified through parameters based on the dye infiltration patterns, which were analyzed using image analysis of photographs. Our results show that the degree of preferential flow was highest under trees associated with termite mounds, intermediate under single trees, and minimal in the open areas. Tree density also had an influence on the degree of preferential flow, with small open areas having more preferential flow than large ones. Soil infiltrability was higher under single trees than in the open areas or under trees associated with a termite mound. The findings from this study demonstrate that trees have a positive impact on soil hydraulic properties influencing groundwater recharge, and thus such effects must be considered when evaluating the impact of trees on water resources in drylands.

  16. Analysis of the Impact of Soil Heterogeneity on the Spatial Variation of Unsaturated Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patterson, Matthew; Gimenez, Daniel; Kerry, Ruth; Goovaerts, Pierre

    2016-04-01

    Modelling infiltration into soils with deterministic models requires knowledge of the hydraulic properties of that soil. Informing a model with these properties is complex because of the spatial heterogeneity of hydraulic properties that naturally occurs in all soils . The objective of this work was to analyze the effects that contrasting synthetic heterogeneities have on spatial outflows using a three-dimensional numerical model. An undisturbed soil column of 32 cm diameter and 50 cm height was used in an outflow experiment in the laboratory, where outflow was collected from the bottom of the column in 145 spatially-varied outflow cells and the column was subjected to multiple inflow rates. After the completion of the experiment, 30 sub-cores of 8 cm diameter and 5 cm height were extracted from the column and used to measure hydraulic properties and texture through a combination of pressure plate extractor, automated evaporation method, and a dewpoint potentiometer. The spatial heterogeneity of the soil in the column was represented by a Local Indicator of Spatial Autocorrelation (LISA - Local Moran's I) clustering algorithm, which used both texture and Electrical Resistivity Tomography data to identify significant clusters of points with high (HH) and low (LL) values and values that were not part of a significant cluster (NS). Each cluster was also assigned a numerical index based on LISA. Effective hydraulic properties were assigned to the HH and LL clusters and NS points based on the location of the 30 sub-cores and their average hydraulic properties. Resistivity data were used with omni-directional variograms with ranges of 5 and 15 cm and a nugget of 0.25 to conditionally simulate 50 realizations of 3-D data based on each variogram. The LISA algorithm was then used to detect significant clusters in these data and classify them as HH, LL or NS. Importing the resulting 100 sets of synthetic clusters and their corresponding effective hydraulic properties into

  17. Filter construction and design.

    PubMed

    Jornitz, Maik W

    2006-01-01

    Sterilizing and pre-filters are manufactured in different formats and designs. The criteria for the specific designs are set by the application and the specifications of the filter user. The optimal filter unit or even system requires evaluation, such as flow rate, throughput, unspecific adsorption, steam sterilizability and chemical compatibility. These parameters are commonly tested within a qualification phase, which ensures that an optimal filter design and combination finds its use. If such design investigations are neglected it could be costly in the process scale. PMID:16570863

  18. Novel Backup Filter Device for Candle Filters

    SciTech Connect

    Bishop, B.; Goldsmith, R.; Dunham, G.; Henderson, A.

    2002-09-18

    The currently preferred means of particulate removal from process or combustion gas generated by advanced coal-based power production processes is filtration with candle filters. However, candle filters have not shown the requisite reliability to be commercially viable for hot gas clean up for either integrated gasifier combined cycle (IGCC) or pressurized fluid bed combustion (PFBC) processes. Even a single candle failure can lead to unacceptable ash breakthrough, which can result in (a) damage to highly sensitive and expensive downstream equipment, (b) unacceptably low system on-stream factor, and (c) unplanned outages. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has recognized the need to have fail-safe devices installed within or downstream from candle filters. In addition to CeraMem, DOE has contracted with Siemens-Westinghouse, the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) at the University of North Dakota, and the Southern Research Institute (SRI) to develop novel fail-safe devices. Siemens-Westinghouse is evaluating honeycomb-based filter devices on the clean-side of the candle filter that can operate up to 870 C. The EERC is developing a highly porous ceramic disk with a sticky yet temperature-stable coating that will trap dust in the event of filter failure. SRI is developing the Full-Flow Mechanical Safeguard Device that provides a positive seal for the candle filter. Operation of the SRI device is triggered by the higher-than-normal gas flow from a broken candle. The CeraMem approach is similar to that of Siemens-Westinghouse and involves the development of honeycomb-based filters that operate on the clean-side of a candle filter. The overall objective of this project is to fabricate and test silicon carbide-based honeycomb failsafe filters for protection of downstream equipment in advanced coal conversion processes. The fail-safe filter, installed directly downstream of a candle filter, should have the capability for stopping essentially all particulate

  19. Downscaling Satellite Data for Predicting Catchment-scale Root Zone Soil Moisture with Ground-based Sensors and an Ensemble Kalman Filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, H.; Baldwin, D. C.; Smithwick, E. A. H.

    2015-12-01

    Predicting root zone (0-100 cm) soil moisture (RZSM) content at a catchment-scale is essential for drought and flood predictions, irrigation planning, weather forecasting, and many other applications. Satellites, such as the NASA Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP), can estimate near-surface (0-5 cm) soil moisture content globally at coarse spatial resolutions. We develop a hierarchical Ensemble Kalman Filter (EnKF) data assimilation modeling system to downscale satellite-based near-surface soil moisture and to estimate RZSM content across the Shale Hills Critical Zone Observatory at a 1-m resolution in combination with ground-based soil moisture sensor data. In this example, a simple infiltration model within the EnKF-model has been parameterized for 6 soil-terrain units to forecast daily RZSM content in the catchment from 2009 - 2012 based on AMSRE. LiDAR-derived terrain variables define intra-unit RZSM variability using a novel covariance localization technique. This method also allows the mapping of uncertainty with our RZSM estimates for each time-step. A catchment-wide satellite-to-surface downscaling parameter, which nudges the satellite measurement closer to in situ near-surface data, is also calculated for each time-step. We find significant differences in predicted root zone moisture storage for different terrain units across the experimental time-period. Root mean square error from a cross-validation analysis of RZSM predictions using an independent dataset of catchment-wide in situ Time-Domain Reflectometry (TDR) measurements ranges from 0.060-0.096 cm3 cm-3, and the RZSM predictions are significantly (p < 0.05) correlated with TDR measurements [r = 0.47-0.68]. The predictive skill of this data assimilation system is similar to the Penn State Integrated Hydrologic Modeling (PIHM) system. Uncertainty estimates are significantly (p < 0.05) correlated to cross validation error during wet and dry conditions, but more so in dry summer seasons. Developing an

  20. Numerical Modeling of Water Flow and Salt Transport in Bare Saline Soil Subjected to Transient Evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, X.; Boufadel, M.; Saleh, F. S.

    2014-12-01

    It has been found that evaporation over bare soil plays an important role in subsurface solute transport processes. A numerical study, based on a density-dependent variably saturated groundwater flow model MARUN, was conducted to investigate subsurface flow and salt transport in bare saline aquifers subjected to transient evaporation. The bulk aerodynamic formulation was adopted to simulate transient evaporation rate at ground surface. Subsurface flow pattern, moisture distribution, and salt migration were quantified. Key factors likely affecting this process, including saturated hydraulic conductivity, capillary drive, air humidity, and surrounding water supply, were examined. The results showed that evaporation induced an upward flow pattern, which led to a high saline plume formed beneath the evaporation zone. In absence of surrounding water supply, as the humidity between the ground surface and air tended to equilibrium, evaporation-induced density gradient generated pore water circulations around the plume edge and caused the salt to migrate downwards with "finger" shapes. It was found that capillary properties and atmospheric condition had significant impacts on subsurface moisture distribution and salt migration in response to the evaporation. Larger capillary fringe and/or lower air humidity would allow evaporation to extract more water from the ground. It would induce a larger and denser saline plume formed beneath the evaporation zone. The results also suggested that the presence of the surrounding water supply (represented as a constant water table herein) could provide a steady evaporation rate at the ground surface; meanwhile, in response to the evaporation, a hydraulic gradient was formed from the water supply boundary, which induced an inclined upper saline plume with greater density far from the supply boundary.

  1. Analysis and Experimental Verification of New Power Flow Control for Grid-Connected Inverter with LCL Filter in Microgrid

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Herong; Guan, Yajuan; Wang, Huaibao; Wei, Baoze; Guo, Xiaoqiang

    2014-01-01

    Microgrid is an effective way to integrate the distributed energy resources into the utility networks. One of the most important issues is the power flow control of grid-connected voltage-source inverter in microgrid. In this paper, the small-signal model of the power flow control for the grid-connected inverter is established, from which it can be observed that the conventional power flow control may suffer from the poor damping and slow transient response. While the new power flow control can mitigate these problems without affecting the steady-state power flow regulation. Results of continuous-domain simulations in MATLAB and digital control experiments based on a 32-bit fixed-point TMS320F2812 DSP are in good agreement, which verify the small signal model analysis and effectiveness of the proposed method. PMID:24672304

  2. Analysis and experimental verification of new power flow control for grid-connected inverter with LCL filter in microgrid.

    PubMed

    Gu, Herong; Guan, Yajuan; Wang, Huaibao; Wei, Baoze; Guo, Xiaoqiang

    2014-01-01

    Microgrid is an effective way to integrate the distributed energy resources into the utility networks. One of the most important issues is the power flow control of grid-connected voltage-source inverter in microgrid. In this paper, the small-signal model of the power flow control for the grid-connected inverter is established, from which it can be observed that the conventional power flow control may suffer from the poor damping and slow transient response. While the new power flow control can mitigate these problems without affecting the steady-state power flow regulation. Results of continuous-domain simulations in MATLAB and digital control experiments based on a 32-bit fixed-point TMS320F2812 DSP are in good agreement, which verify the small signal model analysis and effectiveness of the proposed method. PMID:24672304

  3. Remotely serviced filter and housing

    DOEpatents

    Ross, M.J.; Zaladonis, L.A.

    1987-07-22

    A filter system for a hot cell comprises a housing adapted for input of air or other gas to be filtered, flow of the air through a filter element, and exit of filtered air. The housing is tapered at the top to make it easy to insert a filter cartridge holds the filter element while the air or other gas is passed through the filter element. Captive bolts in trunnion nuts are readily operated by electromechanical manipulators operating power wrenches to secure and release the filter cartridge. The filter cartridge is adapted to make it easy to change a filter element by using a master-slave manipulator at a shielded window station. 6 figs.

  4. Importance of Preferential Flow and Soil Management in Vertical Transport of a Biocontrol Strain of Pseudomonas fluorescens in Structured Field Soil

    PubMed Central

    Natsch, A.; Keel, C.; Troxler, J.; Zala, M.; Von Albertini, N.; Defago, G.

    1996-01-01

    The large-scale release of wild-type or genetically modified bacteria into the environment for control of plant diseases or for bioremediation entails the potential risk of groundwater contamination by these microorganisms. For a model study on patterns of vertical transport of bacteria under field conditions, the biocontrol strain Pseudomonas fluorescens CHA0, marked with a spontaneous resistance to rifampin (CHA0-Rif), was applied to a grass-clover ley plot (rotation grassland) and a wheat plot. Immediately after bacterial application, heavy precipitation was simulated by sprinkling, over a period of 8 h, 40 mm of water containing the mobile tracer potassium bromide and the dye Brilliant Blue FCF to identify channels of preferential flow. One day later, a 150-cm-deep soil trench was dug and soil profiles were prepared. Soil samples were extracted at different depths of the profiles and analyzed for the number of CHA0-Rif cells and the concentration of bromide and Brilliant Blue FCF. Dye coverage in the soil profiles was estimated by image analysis. CHA0 was present at 10(sup8) CFU/g in the surface soil, and 10(sup6) to 10(sup7) CFU/g of CHA0 was detected along macropores between 10 and 150 cm deep. Similarly, the concentration of the tracer bromide along the macropores remained at the same level below 20 cm deep. Dye coverage in lower soil layers was higher in the ley than in the wheat plot. In nonstained parts of the profiles, the number of CHA0-Rif cells was substantially smaller and the bromide concentration was below the detection limit in most samples. We conclude that after heavy rainfall, released bacteria are rapidly transported in large numbers through the channels of preferential flow to deeper soil layers. Under these conditions, the transport of CHA0-Rif is similar to that of the conservative tracer bromide and is affected by cultural practice. PMID:16535221

  5. Importance of Preferential Flow and Soil Management in Vertical Transport of a Biocontrol Strain of Pseudomonas fluorescens in Structured Field Soil.

    PubMed

    Natsch, A; Keel, C; Troxler, J; Zala, M; Von Albertini, N; Defago, G

    1996-01-01

    The large-scale release of wild-type or genetically modified bacteria into the environment for control of plant diseases or for bioremediation entails the potential risk of groundwater contamination by these microorganisms. For a model study on patterns of vertical transport of bacteria under field conditions, the biocontrol strain Pseudomonas fluorescens CHA0, marked with a spontaneous resistance to rifampin (CHA0-Rif), was applied to a grass-clover ley plot (rotation grassland) and a wheat plot. Immediately after bacterial application, heavy precipitation was simulated by sprinkling, over a period of 8 h, 40 mm of water containing the mobile tracer potassium bromide and the dye Brilliant Blue FCF to identify channels of preferential flow. One day later, a 150-cm-deep soil trench was dug and soil profiles were prepared. Soil samples were extracted at different depths of the profiles and analyzed for the number of CHA0-Rif cells and the concentration of bromide and Brilliant Blue FCF. Dye coverage in the soil profiles was estimated by image analysis. CHA0 was present at 10(sup8) CFU/g in the surface soil, and 10(sup6) to 10(sup7) CFU/g of CHA0 was detected along macropores between 10 and 150 cm deep. Similarly, the concentration of the tracer bromide along the macropores remained at the same level below 20 cm deep. Dye coverage in lower soil layers was higher in the ley than in the wheat plot. In nonstained parts of the profiles, the number of CHA0-Rif cells was substantially smaller and the bromide concentration was below the detection limit in most samples. We conclude that after heavy rainfall, released bacteria are rapidly transported in large numbers through the channels of preferential flow to deeper soil layers. Under these conditions, the transport of CHA0-Rif is similar to that of the conservative tracer bromide and is affected by cultural practice.

  6. System reliability analysis of granular filter for protection against piping in dams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, A.; Sivakumar Babu, G. L.

    2015-09-01

    Granular filters are provided for the safety of water retaining structure for protection against piping failure. The phenomenon of piping triggers when the base soil to be protected starts migrating in the direction of seepage flow under the influence of seepage force. To protect base soil from migration, the voids in the filter media should be small enough but it should not also be too small to block smooth passage of seeping water. Fulfilling these two contradictory design requirements at the same time is a major concern for the successful performance of granular filter media. Since Terzaghi era, conventionally, particle size distribution (PSD) of granular filters is designed based on particle size distribution characteristics of the base soil to be protected. The design approach provides a range of D15f value in which the PSD of granular filter media should fall and there exist infinite possibilities. Further, safety against the two critical design requirements cannot be ensured. Although used successfully for many decades, the existing filter design guidelines are purely empirical in nature accompanied with experience and good engineering judgment. In the present study, analytical solutions for obtaining the factor of safety with respect to base soil particle migration and soil permeability consideration as proposed by the authors are first discussed. The solution takes into consideration the basic geotechnical properties of base soil and filter media as well as existing hydraulic conditions and provides a comprehensive solution to the granular filter design with ability to assess the stability in terms of factor of safety. Considering the fact that geotechnical properties are variable in nature, probabilistic analysis is further suggested to evaluate the system reliability of the filter media that may help in risk assessment and risk management for decision making.

  7. Fractionation and characterization of natural organic matter from certain rivers and soils by free-flow electrophoresis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leenheer, J.A.; Malcolm, R.L.

    1973-01-01

    Soluble river organic matter and soil fulvic acids from a variety of environments were compared by examining the free-flow electrophoretic fractionation curves of organic carbon, color, and polysaccharides. Significant amounts of virtually colorless organic material were found in both the soil and the river preparations. Polysaccharides comprised 20-75 percent of the colorless material in the soil fulvic acids but only 3.2-7.0 percent of the colorless material in the river preparations. A significant amount of polysaccharides was complexed with organic materials having negative charges. Amounts of polysaccharides were greater in the Fairbanks soil from Alaska than in the soils from North Carolina or Iowa, and they were greater in the Tahquamenon River in Michigan than in the two rivers in Florida; this suggests that polysaccharide degradation is slower in cooler environments. For all of the organic preparations which were fractionated, the intensity of the yellow color increased as the charge on the organic anion increased. Highly colored, negatively charged organic material was found to be present in greater amounts in the subsurface spodic soil horizon of the Lakewood and Fairbanks soils than in the surface mollic horizon of the Macksburg soil. Infrared spectroscopy and elemental analysis of four pooled fractions of the Fairbanks fulvic acid indicated increasing aromatic character with increasing negative charge. An increase in the carboxyl content with negative charge suggests the carboxyl group as the primary source of the negative charge.

  8. Competitive adsorption/desorption of tetracycline, oxytetracycline and chlortetracycline on two acid soils: Stirred flow chamber experiments.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Calviño, David; Bermúdez-Couso, Alipio; Arias-Estévez, Manuel; Nóvoa-Muñoz, Juan Carlos; Fernández-Sanjurjo, Maria J; Álvarez-Rodríguez, Esperanza; Núñez-Delgado, Avelino

    2015-09-01

    The objective of this work was to study the competitive adsorption/desorption of tetracycline (TC), oxytetracycline (OTC) and chlortetracycline (CTC) on two acid soils. We used the stirred flow chamber technique to obtain experimental data on rapid kinetic processes affecting the retention/release of the antibiotics. Both adsorption and desorption were higher on soil 1 (which showed the highest carbon, clay and Al and Fe oxides content) than on soil 2. Moreover, hysteresis affected the adsorption/desorption processes. Experimental data were fitted to a pseudo-first order equation, resulting qamax (adsorption maximum) values that were higher for soil 1 than for soil 2, and indicating that CTC competed with TC more intensely than OTC in soil 1. Regarding soil 2, the values corresponding to the adsorption kinetics constants (ka) and desorption kinetics constants for fast sites (kd1), followed a trend inverse to qamax and qdmax respectively. In conclusion, competition affected adsorption/desorption kinetics for the three antibiotics assayed, and thus retention/release and subsequent transport processes in soil and water environments.

  9. The impact of soil moisture content and particle size variations on heat flow in laboratory simulated wildfires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showman, Sara Jean

    Hydrophobic soils developing as a consequence of wildfires have a large impact on the environment. A greater understanding of when ideal hydrophobic development conditions occur is needed. This thesis aims to identify the impact of varying both soil moisture and soil particle size on the locations for ideal hydrophobic soil development under different intensities of burns. It builds on experiments completed previously to further the understanding of the effect of particle size on heat flow. All experiments done in the previous study used only dry sediment. This study focused on the role of moisture in hydrophobic soil development. A secondary goal of this thesis is to provide an opportunity to further explore convection as a mechanism of soil heating. An indoor wildfire simulator was employed, consisting of an array of propane burners, to determine the impact of varying factors under controlled conditions. The temperature levels and durations selected were based on data obtained from measurements taken during full-scale field based burns. Thermocouples were used to measure temperatures of the flames and temperatures at different depths within the sediment. Determining the impact of soil texture was done by running burns with sand, clay-loam, silt, and clay. The impact of soil moisture was determined by testing each of the sediment types with different levels of moisture. In total, twenty-four burns were completed with peak temperatures of 600°C, 900°C, and 1200°C in order to simulate typical chaparral fires.

  10. The assessment of air and soil as contributors of some trace metals to vegetable plants. I. Use of a filtered air growth cabinet.

    PubMed

    Harrison, R M; Chirgawi, M B

    1989-07-01

    The sources of heavy metals in a number of consumer crops were investigated in the laboratory by growing plants in a dual growth cabinet supplied with both clean and ambient air. Under these conditions, plants were exposed separately to filtered and normal ambient air to assess the influences of soil and atmosphere on the accumulation of Cd, Pb, Zn, Cr and Ni. Radish, carrot, pea, spinach and lettuce plants were successfully grown in the cabinet. Analysis of the metals in the plant tissues showed that the foliar route is potentially of similar importance to the soil-root pathway as a route of transport to the exposed parts of the plants. Whilst the exposed parts showed the highest metal accumulation from the air, the levels of metals in fruits and storage roots resulting from foliar translocation of the airborne component appeared to be low generally. The metal which achieved highest translocation from foliar deposition was Pb. The effect of spraying plants with rain-water was to enhance slightly the total content of all trace metals analysed.

  11. Tracer and hydrometric study of preferential flow in large undisturbed soil cores from the Georgia Piedmont, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McIntosh, Janice; McDonnell, Jeffrey J.; Peters, Norman E.

    1999-01-01

    We studied the temporal patterns of tracer throughput in the outflow of large (30 cm diameter by 38 cm long) undisturbed cores from the Panola Mountain Research Watershed, Georgia. Tracer breakthrough was affected by soil structure and rainfall intensity. Two rainfall intensities (20 and 40 mm hr-1) for separate Cl- and Br- amended solutions were applied to two cores (one extracted from a hillslope soil and one extracted from a residual clay soil on the ridge). For both low and high rainfall intensity experiments, preferential flow occurred in the clay core, but not in the hillslope core. The preferential flow is attributed to well-developed interpedal macrochannels that are commonly found in structured clay soils, characteristic of the ridge site. However, each rainfall intensity exceeded the matrix infiltration capacity at the top of the hillslope core, but did not exceed the matrix infiltration capacity at the middle and bottom of the hillslope core and at all levels in the clay core. Localized zones of saturation created when rainfall intensity exceeds the matrix infiltration capacity may cause water and tracer to overflow from the matrix into macrochannels, where preferential flow occurs to depth in otherwise unsaturated soil. Copyright © 1999 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Tracer and hydrometric study of preferential flow in large undisturbed soil cores from the Georgia Piedmont, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McIntosh, Janice; McDonnell, Jeffrey J.; Peters, Norman E.

    1999-02-01

    We studied the temporal patterns of tracer throughput in the outflow of large (30 cm diameter by 38 cm long) undisturbed cores from the Panola Mountain Research Watershed, Georgia. Tracer breakthrough was affected by soil structure and rainfall intensity. Two rainfall intensities (20 and 40 mm hr-1) for separate Cl- and Br- amended solutions were applied to two cores (one extracted from a hillslope soil and one extracted from a residual clay soil on the ridge). For both low and high rainfall intensity experiments, preferential flow occurred in the clay core, but not in the hillslope core. The preferential flow is attributed to well-developed interpedal macrochannels that are commonly found in structured clay soils, characteristic of the ridge site. However, each rainfall intensity exceeded the matrix infiltration capacity at the top of the hillslope core, but did not exceed the matrix infiltration capacity at the middle and bottom of the hillslope core and at all levels in the clay core. Localized zones of saturation created when rainfall intensity exceeds the matrix infiltration capacity may cause water and tracer to overflow from the matrix into macrochannels, where preferential flow occurs to depth in otherwise unsaturated soil.

  13. Seepage and seepage gradients in an homogeneous, isotropic aquifer with drains as a function of soil properties and flow region geometry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Seepage and seepage gradients are important parameters in soil erosion processes and water quality problems on agricultural land. Traditionally, surface overland flow is viewed as one of the major soil erosive agents on those areas. In recent years, the role of the subsurface flow regime is increasi...

  14. Simulating Diffusive and Preferential Water Flow in Soils with a Coupled Source-Responsive/Richards-Equation Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Healy, R. W.

    2015-12-01

    Water movement through soils is often dominated by preferential flow processes such as fingering and macropore flow. Traditional models of flow in the unsaturated zone are based on the diffusion or Richards equation and assume that diffusive (surface-tension viscous) flow is the only flow process. These models are incapable of accurately simulating preferential flow. Several alternative approaches, including kinematic wave, transfer function, and water-content wave models, have been suggested for simulating water movement through preferential flow paths. The source-responsive model proposed by Nimmo (2010) and Nimmo and Mitchell (2013) is unique among such models in that water transfer from land surface to depth is controlled by the water-application rate at land surface. The source-responsive model has been coupled with a one-dimensional version of the Richards-equation based model of variably saturated flow, VS2DT. The new model, can simulate flow within the preferential (S) domain alone, within the diffuse (D) domain alone, or within both the S and D domains simultaneously. Water exchange between the two domains is treated as a first-order diffusive process, with the exchange coefficient being a function of soil-water content. The new model was used to simulate field and laboratory infiltration experiments described in the literature. Simulations were calibrated against measured soil water contents with the PEST parameter estimation package; values for hydraulic conductivity and 3 van Genuchten and 3 source-responsive parameters were optimized. Although exact matches between measured and simulated water contents were not obtained, the simulation results captured the salient characteristics of the published data sets, including features typical of preferential as well as diffusive flow. Results obtained from simulating flow simultaneously in both the S and D domain provided better matches to measured data than results obtained from simulating flow independently

  15. Using a tank flow model with PEARL to measure the variation in pesticide persistence between anaerobic and aerobic soil conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Real, Joaquin; Seiterle-Winn, Natalie; Frances, Felix

    2013-04-01

    Pesticide leaching is very sensitive to the transformation rate (Boesten and Linden, 1991). The values of the transformation rates of the pesticides differ between aerobic and anaerobic soil conditions. The main objective is to determine if there is a significant variation in pesticide persistence between aerobic and anaerobic soil conditions. An auxiliary hydrological model is used with the PEARL model (Leistra et al, 2001). The auxiliary model determines the degree of saturation of the soil at each time step. The value of the degradation rate for a given pesticide in the PEARL model varies depending on the time periods with saturated or unsaturated soil conditions. The proposed auxiliary model has been conceptualized as a static tank flow model based on the actual evapotranspiration of the crop plants. It is based on the RIBAV model (Garcia-Arias et al. 2012) used for the modeling of riparian vegetation zonation. The tank represents a soil column which also includes the superficial root layer. The lower capacity limit of this tank is the permanent wilting moisture of the soil. The upper capacity limit represents the saturated condition of the soil. The tanks input flows are precipitation and irrigation. In contrast, output flows are the actual evapotranspiration and the discharge of the tank. The most relevant model parameters are the soil retention curves, the crop parameters (specially related to root depths and crop coefficients) and the daily meteorological data (such as precipitation and potential evapotranspiration). The main output of the auxiliary model is the relative soil moisture, which determines if the PEARL model should use the transformation rate value for aerobic or for anaerobic conditions. In order to prove the applicability of the model, it was tested with various pesticides, which cover a wide range of transformation rates. The results show that the auxiliary tank model is able to determine the partition of the pesticides degrading in both

  16. Evaluation of flow injection analysis method with spectrophotometric detection for the determination of atrazine in soil extracts.

    PubMed

    Martins, Elisandra C; Melo, Vander De F; Abate, Gilberto

    2016-09-01

    A method for determining atrazine in soil extracts was evaluated by flow injection analysis with spectrophotometric detection. The method is based on the reaction of atrazine with pyridine in an acid medium followed by the reaction with NaOH and sulfanilic acid. Several analytical conditions were previously studied and optimized. Under the best conditions of analysis, the limits of detection and quantification were 0.15 and 0.45 mg L(-1), respectively, for a linear response between 0.50 and 2.50 mg L(-1), and a sampling throughput of 21 determinations per hour. Using the standard addition method, the maximum relative standard deviation of 17% and recovery values between 80 and 100% were observed for three extracts from soil samples with different composition. The proposed method is simple, low-cost and easy to use, and can be employed for studies involving atrazine in soil samples or for screening of atrazine in soils.

  17. Flow Separation in Undisturbed Soil Using Multiple Anionic Tracers. Part 2. Steady-State Core-Scale Rainfall and Return Flows and Determination of Dispersion Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henderson, D. E.; Reeves, A. D.; Beven, K. J.; Chappell, N. A.

    1996-11-01

    A series of experiments designed to study the separation of flow components from two large undisturbed cores under steady-state rainfall (downward) and return (upward) flows under near-saturated conditions is summarized. The experiments were conducted on soil columns collected from Lancaster University and the Slapton Wood catchment, Devon. The use of the relatively conservative tracers, potassium bromide, o-(trifluoromethyl)benzoic acid and 2,6-difluorobenzoic acid and a combination of application rates made it possible to quantify the different sources of water contributing to the discharge hydrographs. There is significant retention of tracer within the cores, despite the application of several pore volumes of water. The use of steady flow conditions allowed the determination of dispersion coefficients, dispersivity and proportion of mobile water content parameters of the advection-dispersion equation. It was found that there were significant differences between the dispersivities at different flow-rates under upward and downward flux conditions and that in the undisturbed cores studied here the apparent proportions of mobile pore water ranged between 0.33 and 1.0, with an apparently complex relationship to flux rate. Prediction of transport in undisturbed soil remains problematic and tracer experiments will continue to be needed to provide a fundamental understanding of the complex flow processes involved.

  18. Seasonal dynamics of trace elements in tidal salt marsh soils as affected by the flow-sediment regulation regime.

    PubMed

    Bai, Junhong; Xiao, Rong; Zhao, Qingqing; Lu, Qiongqiong; Wang, Junjing; Reddy, K Ramesh

    2014-01-01

    Soil profiles were collected in three salt marshes with different plant species (i.e. Phragmites australis, Tamarix chinensis and Suaeda salsa) in the Yellow River Delta (YRD) of China during three seasons (summer and fall of 2007 and the following spring of 2008) after the flow-sediment regulation regime. Total elemental contents of As, Cd, Cu, Pb and Zn were determined using inductively coupled plasma atomic absorption spectrometry to investigate temporal variations in trace elements in soil profiles of the three salt marshes, assess the enrichment levels and ecological risks of these trace elements in three sampling seasons and identify their influencing factors. Trace elements did not change significantly along soil profiles at each site in each sampling season. The highest value for each sampling site was observed in summer and the lowest one in fall. Soils in both P. australis and S. salsa wetlands tended to have higher trace element levels than those in T. chinensis wetland. Compared to other elements, both Cd and As had higher enrichment factors exceeding moderate enrichment levels. However, the toxic unit (TU) values of these trace elements did not exceed probable effect levels. Correlation analysis showed that these trace elements were closely linked to soil properties such as moisture, sulfur, salinity, soil organic matter, soil texture and pH values. Principal component analysis showed that the sampling season affected by the flow-sediment regulation regime was the dominant factor influencing the distribution patterns of these trace elements in soils, and plant community type was another important factor. The findings of this study could contribute to wetland conservation and management in coastal regions affected by the hydrological engineering. PMID:25216278

  19. Seasonal dynamics of trace elements in tidal salt marsh soils as affected by the flow-sediment regulation regime.

    PubMed

    Bai, Junhong; Xiao, Rong; Zhao, Qingqing; Lu, Qiongqiong; Wang, Junjing; Reddy, K Ramesh

    2014-01-01

    Soil profiles were collected in three salt marshes with different plant species (i.e. Phragmites australis, Tamarix chinensis and Suaeda salsa) in the Yellow River Delta (YRD) of China during three seasons (summer and fall of 2007 and the following spring of 2008) after the flow-sediment regulation regime. Total elemental contents of As, Cd, Cu, Pb and Zn were determined using inductively coupled plasma atomic absorption spectrometry to investigate temporal variations in trace elements in soil profiles of the three salt marshes, assess the enrichment levels and ecological risks of these trace elements in three sampling seasons and identify their influencing factors. Trace elements did not change significantly along soil profiles at each site in each sampling season. The highest value for each sampling site was observed in summer and the lowest one in fall. Soils in both P. australis and S. salsa wetlands tended to have higher trace element levels than those in T. chinensis wetland. Compared to other elements, both Cd and As had higher enrichment factors exceeding moderate enrichment levels. However, the toxic unit (TU) values of these trace elements did not exceed probable effect levels. Correlation analysis showed that these trace elements were closely linked to soil properties such as moisture, sulfur, salinity, soil organic matter, soil texture and pH values. Principal component analysis showed that the sampling season affected by the flow-sediment regulation regime was the dominant factor influencing the distribution patterns of these trace elements in soils, and plant community type was another important factor. The findings of this study could contribute to wetland conservation and management in coastal regions affected by the hydrological engineering.

  20. Seasonal Dynamics of Trace Elements in Tidal Salt Marsh Soils as Affected by the Flow-Sediment Regulation Regime

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Junhong; Xiao, Rong; Zhao, Qingqing; Lu, Qiongqiong; Wang, Junjing; Reddy, K. Ramesh

    2014-01-01

    Soil profiles were collected in three salt marshes with different plant species (i.e. Phragmites australis, Tamarix chinensis and Suaeda salsa) in the Yellow River Delta (YRD) of China during three seasons (summer and fall of 2007 and the following spring of 2008) after the flow-sediment regulation regime. Total elemental contents of As, Cd, Cu, Pb and Zn were determined using inductively coupled plasma atomic absorption spectrometry to investigate temporal variations in trace elements in soil profiles of the three salt marshes, assess the enrichment levels and ecological risks of these trace elements in three sampling seasons and identify their influencing factors. Trace elements did not change significantly along soil profiles at each site in each sampling season. The highest value for each sampling site was observed in summer and the lowest one in fall. Soils in both P. australis and S. salsa wetlands tended to have higher trace element levels than those in T. chinensis wetland. Compared to other elements, both Cd and As had higher enrichment factors exceeding moderate enrichment levels. However, the toxic unit (TU) values of these trace elements did not exceed probable effect levels. Correlation analysis showed that these trace elements were closely linked to soil properties such as moisture, sulfur, salinity, soil organic matter, soil texture and pH values. Principal component analysis showed that the sampling season affected by the flow-sediment regulation regime was the dominant factor influencing the distribution patterns of these trace elements in soils, and plant community type was another important factor. The findings of this study could contribute to wetland conservation and management in coastal regions affected by the hydrological engineering. PMID:25216278

  1. Changes in Soil Chemistry and Agricultural Return Flow in an Integrated Seawater Agriculture System (ISAS) Demonstration in Abu Dhabi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ning, Q.; Matiin, W. A.; Ahmad, F.

    2012-12-01

    Growing halophytes using Integrated Seawater Agriculture Systems (ISAS) offers a sustainable solution for the generation of biomass feedstock for carbon neutral biofuels - halophytes do not enter the foodchain and they do not compete with food-crops for natural resources. A field demonstration of ISAS in the coastal regions of Abu Dhabi, UAE, scheduled to start in 2013, will likely face a number of region-specific challenges not encountered in past demonstrations of ISAS at coastal locations in Mexico and Eritrea. The arid climate, unique soil chemistry (evaporite deposits, especially gypsum), and hypersaline coastal hydrogeology of Abu Dhabi will affect long-term halophyte agricultural productivity when Arabian Gulf seawater is applied to coastal soils as part of ISAS. Therefore, the changes in irrigation return flow quality and soil chemistry must be monitored closely over time to establish transient salt and water balances in order to assess the sustainability of ISAS in the region. As an initial phase of the ISAS demonstration project, numerical modeling of different seawater loadings onto coastal soils was conducted to estimate the chemical characteristics of soil and the irrigation return flow over time. These modeling results will be validated with field monitoring data upon completion of one year of ISAS operation. The results from this study could be used to (i) determine the optimal saline water loading that the soils at the ISAS site can tolerate, (ii) potential for sodicity of the soil with saline water application, (iii) impacts of land application of saline water on underlying coastal groundwater, and (iv) develop strategies to control soil water activities in favor of halophyte agricultural productivity.

  2. Identifying the water source for subsurface flow with deuterium and oxygen-18 isotopes of soil water collected from tension lysimeters and cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Pei; Tang, Xiangyu; Zhao, Peng; Wang, Chao; Tang, Jialiang

    2013-10-01

    The conventional identification of soil water with pre-event water limits deep insights into the involvement of stationary and mobile soil water in subsurface hydrological processes. In three tilled sloping field plots at a hilly area of southwestern China dominated by Entisols, soil water collected with a suction lysimeter was distinguished from the total soil water through an analysis of the stable isotopes deuterium and oxygen-18. Differences in the depth profile of soil water before and after storm events were observed and used to examine how rainwater mixes with soil water and to identify the source contribution of different fractions of soil water in subsurface flow generation. Only water in the 0-10 cm soil layer was significantly affected by evaporation and infiltration. Water in the top 5 cm layer of the soil exhibited the lowest residence time because a storm can replace a substantial proportion of the pre-event water. Soil water at the 10-20 cm depth showed the longest residence time, as indicated by its high proportion of pre-event water. The isotopic signatures demonstrated that piston flow and preferential flow coexisted in this soil. High antecedent soil water content and high rain intensity favor the formation of piston flow. The water collected with the suction lysimeter represented the mobile fraction of the pre-event water in the soil, which effectively participates in the generation of subsurface flow. Newly infiltrated rainwater did not well mix with stationary pre-event water in the soil. The use of recent rainfall to represent mobile soil water may provide a practical solution for overcoming the negative effect of the spatial heterogeneity of the isotopic composition of soil water on hydrograph separation results. Bulk soil water and lysimeter water showed significant differences in isotopic composition under low soil water content or in the top soil layer. Stable isotopes in bulk and lysimeter soil water should be monitored synchronously to

  3. Role of macropore flow in the transport of Escherichia coli cells in undisturbed cores of a brown leached soil.

    PubMed

    Martins, Jean M F; Majdalani, Samer; Vitorge, Elsa; Desaunay, Aurélien; Navel, Aline; Guiné, Véronique; Daïan, Jean François; Vince, Erwann; Denis, Hervé; Gaudet, Jean Paul

    2013-02-01

    The objective of this work was to evaluate the transport of Escherichia coli cells in undisturbed cores of a brown leached soil collected at La Côte St André (France). Two undisturbed soil cores subjected to repeated injections of bacterial cells and/or bromide tracer were used to investigate the effect of soil hydrodynamics and ionic strength on cell mobility. Under the tested experimental conditions, E. coli cells were shown to be transported at the water velocity (retardation factor close to 1) and their retention appeared almost insensitive to water flow and ionic strength variations, both factors being known to control bacterial transport in model saturated porous media. In contrast, E. coli breakthrough curves evolved significantly along with the repetition of the cell injections in each soil core, with a progressive acceleration of their transport. The evolution of E. coli cells BTCs was shown to be due to the evolution of the structure of soil hydraulic pathways caused by the repeated water infiltrations and drainage as may occur in the field. This evolution was demonstrated through mercury intrusion porosimetry (MIP) performed on soil aggregates before and after the repeated infiltrations of bacteria. MIP revealed a progressive and important reduction of the soil aggregate porosity, n, that decreased from approximately 0.5 to 0.3, along with a decrease of the soil percolating step from 27 to 2 μm. From this result a clear compaction of soil aggregates was evidenced that concerned preferentially the pores larger than 2 μm equivalent diameter, i.e. those allowing bacterial cell passage. Since no significant reduction of the global soil volume was observed at the core scale, this aggregate compaction was accompanied by macropore formation that became progressively the preferential hydraulic pathway in the soil cores, leading to transiently bi-modal bacterial BTCs. The evolution of the soil pore structure induced a modification of the main hydrodynamic

  4. Data Assimilation in a Solar Dynamo Model Using Ensemble Kalman Filters: Sensitivity and Robustness in Reconstruction of Meridional Flow Speed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dikpati, Mausumi; Anderson, Jeffrey L.; Mitra, Dhrubaditya

    2016-09-01

    We implement an Ensemble Kalman Filter procedure using the Data Assimilation Research Testbed for assimilating “synthetic” meridional flow-speed data in a Babcock–Leighton-type flux-transport solar dynamo model. By performing several “observing system simulation experiments,” we reconstruct time variation in meridional flow speed and analyze sensitivity and robustness of reconstruction. Using 192 ensemble member