Science.gov

Sample records for flow-induced shear stresses

  1. Modeling of flow-induced shear stress applied on 3D cellular scaffolds: Implications for vascular tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Lesman, Ayelet; Blinder, Yaron; Levenberg, Shulamit

    2010-02-15

    Novel tissue-culture bioreactors employ flow-induced shear stress as a means of mechanical stimulation of cells. We developed a computational fluid dynamics model of the complex three-dimensional (3D) microstructure of a porous scaffold incubated in a direct perfusion bioreactor. Our model was designed to predict high shear-stress values within the physiological range of those naturally sensed by vascular cells (1-10 dyne/cm(2)), and will thereby provide suitable conditions for vascular tissue-engineering experiments. The model also accounts for cellular growth, which was designed as an added cell layer grown on all scaffold walls. Five model variants were designed, with geometric differences corresponding to cell-layer thicknesses of 0, 50, 75, 100, and 125 microm. Four inlet velocities (0.5, 1, 1.5, and 2 cm/s) were applied to each model. Wall shear-stress distribution and overall pressure drop calculations were then used to characterize the relation between flow rate, shear stress, cell-layer thickness, and pressure drop. The simulations showed that cellular growth within 3D scaffolds exposes cells to elevated shear stress, with considerably increasing average values in correlation to cell growth and inflow velocity. Our results provide in-depth analysis of the microdynamic environment of cells cultured within 3D environments, and thus provide advanced control over tissue development in vitro.

  2. Design optimization of scaffold microstructures using wall shear stress criterion towards regulated flow-induced erosion.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yuhang; Schellekens, Michiel; Zhou, Shiwei; Cadman, Joseph; Li, Wei; Appleyard, Richard; Li, Qing

    2011-08-01

    Tissue scaffolds aim to provide a cell-friendly biomechanical environment for facilitating cell growth. Existing studies have shown significant demands for generating a certain level of wall shear stress (WSS) on scaffold microstructural surfaces for promoting cellular response and attachment efficacy. Recently, its role in shear-induced erosion of polymer scaffold has also drawn increasing attention. This paper proposes a bi-directional evolutionary structural optimization (BESO) approach for design of scaffold microstructure in terms of the WSS uniformity criterion, by downgrading highly-stressed solid elements into fluidic elements and/or upgrading lowly-stressed fluidic elements into solid elements. In addition to this, a computational model is presented to simulate shear-induced erosion process. The effective stiffness and permeability of initial and optimized scaffold microstructures are characterized by the finite element based homogenization technique to quantify the variations of mechanical properties of scaffold during erosion. The illustrative examples show that a uniform WSS is achieved within the optimized scaffold microstructures, and their architectural and biomechanical features are maintained for a longer lifetime during shear-induced erosion process. This study provides a mathematical means to the design optimization of cellular biomaterials in terms of the WSS criterion towards controllable shear-induced erosion.

  3. Combined effects of flow-induced shear stress and electromagnetic field on neural differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Mascotte-Cruz, Juan Uriel; Ríos, Amelia; Escalante, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    Differentiation of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) into neural phenotype has been induced by either flow-induced shear stress (FSS) or electromagnetic fields (EMF). However, procedures are still expensive and time consuming. In the present work, induction for 1 h with the combination of both forces showed the presence of the neural precursor nestin as early as 9 h in culture after treatment and this result lasted for the following 6 d. In conclusion, the use of a combination of FSS and EMF for a short-time renders in neurite-like cells, although further investigation is required to analyze cell functionality.

  4. Endothelial cell alignment as a result of anisotropic strain and flow induced shear stress combinations.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Ravi; Le Gac, Séverine; Verdonschot, Nico; van den Berg, Albert; Koopman, Bart; Rouwkema, Jeroen

    2016-07-12

    Endothelial cells (ECs) are continuously exposed in vivo to cyclic strain and shear stress from pulsatile blood flow. When these stimuli are applied in vitro, ECs adopt an appearance resembling their in vivo state, most apparent in their alignment (perpendicular to uniaxial strain and along the flow). Uniaxial strain and flow perpendicular to the strain, used in most in vitro studies, only represent the in vivo conditions in straight parts of vessels. The conditions present over large fractions of the vasculature can be better represented by anisotropic biaxial strains at various orientations to flow. To emulate these biological complexities in vitro, we have developed a medium-throughput device to screen for the effects on cells of variously oriented anisotropic biaxial strains and flow combinations. Upon the application of only strains for 24 h, ECs (HUVECs) aligned perpendicular to the maximum principal strain and the alignment was stronger for a higher maximum:minimum principal strain ratio. A 0.55 Pa shear stress, when applied alone or with strain for 24 h, caused cells to align along the flow. Studying EC response to such combined physiological mechanical stimuli was not possible with existing platforms and to our best knowledge, has not been reported before.

  5. Endothelial cell alignment as a result of anisotropic strain and flow induced shear stress combinations

    PubMed Central

    Sinha, Ravi; Le Gac, Séverine; Verdonschot, Nico; van den Berg, Albert; Koopman, Bart; Rouwkema, Jeroen

    2016-01-01

    Endothelial cells (ECs) are continuously exposed in vivo to cyclic strain and shear stress from pulsatile blood flow. When these stimuli are applied in vitro, ECs adopt an appearance resembling their in vivo state, most apparent in their alignment (perpendicular to uniaxial strain and along the flow). Uniaxial strain and flow perpendicular to the strain, used in most in vitro studies, only represent the in vivo conditions in straight parts of vessels. The conditions present over large fractions of the vasculature can be better represented by anisotropic biaxial strains at various orientations to flow. To emulate these biological complexities in vitro, we have developed a medium-throughput device to screen for the effects on cells of variously oriented anisotropic biaxial strains and flow combinations. Upon the application of only strains for 24 h, ECs (HUVECs) aligned perpendicular to the maximum principal strain and the alignment was stronger for a higher maximum:minimum principal strain ratio. A 0.55 Pa shear stress, when applied alone or with strain for 24 h, caused cells to align along the flow. Studying EC response to such combined physiological mechanical stimuli was not possible with existing platforms and to our best knowledge, has not been reported before. PMID:27404382

  6. High shear flow induces migration of adherent human platelets.

    PubMed

    Kraemer, Bjoern F; Schmidt, Christine; Urban, Benjamin; Bigalke, Boris; Schwanitz, Laura; Koch, Miriam; Seizer, Peter; Schaller, Martin; Gawaz, Meinrad; Lindemann, Stephan

    2011-01-01

    Shear forces are generated in all parts of the vascular system and contribute directly and indirectly to vascular disease progression. Endothelial cells are able to adapt to flow conditions, and are known to polarize and migrate in response to shear forces. Platelets exposed to shear stress are activated and release bioactive molecules from their alpha granules. So far, platelets have been considered to be static cells that do not leave the site of tight adhesion. However, we have recently been able to demonstrate the capacity of platelets to migrate in response to stromal derived factor-1 (SDF-1). In this project, we have demonstrated that platelets accumulate in areas with a high concentration of SDF-1 under flow conditions and respond to high shear stress by cellular polarization, cytoskeletal reorganisation, and flow-directed migration. In this context, we have shown increased Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome protein (WASP) phosphorylation and intracellular redistribution of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) under high-shear stress conditions. The effect of flow-induced platelet migration has not previously been recognized and offers a new role for platelets as mobile cells. Their migratory potential may enable platelets to cover intimal lesions and contribute to vascular repair.

  7. Shear flow induced unfolding of collapsed polymers.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander-Katz, Alfredo; Netz, Roland

    2006-03-01

    In the process of clotting in small vessels, platelets form a plug in an injured zone only in the presence of a protein known as the von Willebrand Factor (vWF). The absence or malfunction of the vWF leads to a bleeding disorder, the so-called von Willebrand disease. It is believed that the protein is collapsed (or globular) when released into the blood flow, and that it undergoes a transition at high shear rates that allows it to bind platelets. Using hydrodynamic simulations of a simple model of the vWF in shear flow, we show that a globular polymer undergoes a globule-stretch transition at a critical shear rate. Below this threshold shear rate the polymer remains collapsed and slightly deformed, while above it the chain displays strong elongations in the direction of the flow. Finally, we discuss the relevance of our results in the case of blood flow, and compare them to the physiological values present in the body.

  8. Flows induced by exponential stretching and shearing plate motions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weidman, Patrick

    2016-11-01

    Boundary-layer solutions for the flow induced by an exponentially stretching surface also sheared in its own plane are given. Prior to this study no similarity solutions have been reported for flows generated by exponentially sheared surfaces concomitant with surface stretching in any form. The method of solution is self-similarity. The results found here are intimately related to those of Magyari and Keller ["Heat and mass transfer in the boundary layers on an exponentially stretching continuous surface," J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys. 32, 577-585 (1999)] who studied the motion and heat transfer induced by an exponentially stretching plate. In addition to two particular cases reported here, a third situation is found where an exponentially stretching surface admits a concomitant arbitrary streamwise shearing motion.

  9. Shear flow-induced detachment kinetics of Dictyostelium discoideum cells from solid substrate.

    PubMed Central

    Décavé, Emmanuel; Garrivier, Daniel; Bréchet, Yves; Fourcade, Bertrand; Bruckert, Franz

    2002-01-01

    Using Dictyostelium discoideum as a model organism of specific and nonspecific adhesion, we studied the kinetics of shear flow-induced cell detachment. For a given cell, detachment occurs for values of the applied hydrodynamic stress above a threshold. Cells are removed from the substrate with an apparent first-order rate constant that strongly depends on the applied stress. The threshold stress depends on cell size and physicochemical properties of the substrate, but is not affected by depolymerization of the actin and tubulin cytoskeleton. In contrast, the kinetics of cell detachment is almost independent of cell size, but is strongly affected by a modification of the substrate and the presence of an intact actin cytoskeleton. These results are interpreted in the framework of a peeling model. The threshold stress and the cell-detachment rate measure the local equilibrium energy and the dissociation rate constant of the adhesion bridges, respectively. PMID:11964228

  10. Flow induced protein nucleation: Insulin oligomerization under shear.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dexter, Andrew; Azadani, Ali; Sorci, Mirco; Belfort, Georges; Hirsa, Amir

    2007-11-01

    A large number of diseases are associated with protein aggregation and misfolding, such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's and human prion diseases such as Creutzveld-Jakob disease. Characteristic of these diseases is the presence of amyloid fibrils and their precursors, oligomers and protofibrils. Considerable evidence exists that a shearing flow strongly influences amyloid formation both in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, the stability of protein-based pharmaceuticals is essential for conventional therapeutic preparations and drug delivery systems. By studying the nucleation and growth of insulin fibrils in a well-defined flow system, we expect to identify the flow conditions that impact protein aggregation kinetics and which lead to protein destabilization. The present flow system consists of an annular region bounded by stationary inner and outer cylinders and is driven by rotation of the floor. Preliminary results indicate that a continuous shearing flow can accelerate the aggregation process. The interfacial shear viscosity was found to drastically increase during aggregation and appears to be a useful parameter to probe protein oligomerization and the effects of flow.

  11. Shear flow induced wave couplings in the solar wind

    SciTech Connect

    Poedts, S.; Rogava, A.D. |; Mahajan, S.M. |

    1998-01-01

    A sheared background flow in a plasma induces coupling between different MHD wave modes, resulting in their mutual transformations with corresponding energy redistributing between the modes. In this way, the energy can be transfered from one wave mode to the other, but energy can also be added to or extracted from the background flow. In the present paper it is investigated whether the wave coupling and energy transfer mechanisms can operate under solar wind conditions. It is shown that this is indeed the case. Hence, the long-period waves observed in the solar wind at r > 0.3 AU might be generated by much faster periodic oscillations in the photosphere of the Sun. Other possible consequences for observable beat phenomena in the wind and the acceleration of the solar wind particles are also discussed.

  12. Fluid shear stress threshold regulates angiogenic sprouting.

    PubMed

    Galie, Peter A; Nguyen, Duc-Huy T; Choi, Colin K; Cohen, Daniel M; Janmey, Paul A; Chen, Christopher S

    2014-06-03

    The density and architecture of capillary beds that form within a tissue depend on many factors, including local metabolic demand and blood flow. Here, using microfluidic control of local fluid mechanics, we show the existence of a previously unappreciated flow-induced shear stress threshold that triggers angiogenic sprouting. Both intraluminal shear stress over the endothelium and transmural flow through the endothelium above 10 dyn/cm(2) triggered endothelial cells to sprout and invade into the underlying matrix, and this threshold is not impacted by the maturation of cell-cell junctions or pressure gradient across the monolayer. Antagonizing VE-cadherin widened cell-cell junctions and reduced the applied shear stress for a given transmural flow rate, but did not affect the shear threshold for sprouting. Furthermore, both transmural and luminal flow induced expression of matrix metalloproteinase 1, and this up-regulation was required for the flow-induced sprouting. Once sprouting was initiated, continuous flow was needed to both sustain sprouting and prevent retraction. To explore the potential ramifications of a shear threshold on the spatial patterning of new sprouts, we used finite-element modeling to predict fluid shear in a variety of geometric settings and then experimentally demonstrated that transmural flow guided preferential sprouting toward paths of draining interstitial fluid flow as might occur to connect capillary beds to venules or lymphatics. In addition, we show that luminal shear increases in local narrowings of vessels to trigger sprouting, perhaps ultimately to normalize shear stress across the vasculature. Together, these studies highlight the role of shear stress in controlling angiogenic sprouting and offer a potential homeostatic mechanism for regulating vascular density.

  13. Flows induced by power-law stretching surface motion modulated by transverse or orthogonal surface shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weidman, Patrick

    2017-02-01

    Boundary-layer solutions to Banks' problem for the flow induced by power-law stretching of a plate are obtained for two generalizations that include arbitrary transverse plate shearing motion. In one extension an arbitrary transverse shearing motion is the product of the power-law stretching. In the other extension the streamwise stretching coordinate is added to an arbitrary transverse shearing and together raised to the power of stretching. In addition we find that Banks' power law stretching may be accompanied by orthogonal power-law shear. In all cases, the original boundary-value problem of Banks [1] is recovered. Results are illustrated with velocity profiles both at the plate and at fixed height in the fluid above the plate.

  14. Liquid Crystals Indicate Directions Of Surface Shear Stresses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reda, Daniel C.

    1996-01-01

    Report consisting of main text of U.S. Patent 5,394,752 presents detailed information on one aspect of method of using changes in colors of liquid-crystal coatings to indicate instantaneous directions of flow-induced shear stresses (skin friction) on aerodynamic surfaces.

  15. A conceptual framework for shear flow-induced erosion of soft cohesive sediment beds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winterwerp, J. C.; van Kesteren, W. G. M.; van Prooijen, B.; Jacobs, W.

    2012-10-01

    This paper proposes a conceptual framework for erosion of cohesive sediment beds. We focus on cohesive beds, distinguishing between floc erosion, surface erosion, and mass erosion. By (our) definition, surface erosion is a drained soil mechanical process, whereas mass erosion occurs under undrained conditions. The eroding shear stress is modeled through a probability density function. This yields a continuous description of floc erosion and surface erosion as a function of mean bed shear stress. Furthermore, we assume a distribution for the bed strength. The mean values of the bed strength are derived from soil mechanical theory, assuming that the surface erosion rate is limited by the swelling rate from the undrained shear strength in the bed to its drained value at its surface. The rate of erosion then relates to the undrained shear strength of the soil, and its consolidation (swelling) coefficient. The critical shear stress for erosion is slightly larger than the true cohesion of the bed, i.e., the drained strength, and follows a power law relation with the plasticity index. The conceptual framework proposed herein has been validated against a limited number of experimental data, and has a series of advantages above other methods of direct measuring erodibility, as it is inexpensive and can be used to attain space-covering information on the sediment bed. Moreover, the use of bulk soil mechanical parameters accounts implicitly for the effects of organic material, though the role of, e.g., macrophytobenthos mats and/or bioturbation is difficult to capture a priori.

  16. A Piezoelectric Shear Stress Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Taeyang; Saini, Aditya; Kim, Jinwook; Gopalarathnam, Ashok; Zhu, Yong; Palmieri, Frank L.; Wohl, Christopher J.; Jiang, Xiaoning

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a piezoelectric sensor with a floating element was developed for shear stress measurement. The piezoelectric sensor was designed to detect the pure shear stress suppressing effects of normal stress generated from the vortex lift-up by applying opposite poling vectors to the: piezoelectric elements. The sensor was first calibrated in the lab by applying shear forces and it showed high sensitivity to shear stress (=91.3 +/- 2.1 pC/Pa) due to the high piezoelectric coefficients of PMN-33%PT (d31=-1330 pC/N). The sensor also showed almost no sensitivity to normal stress (less than 1.2 pC/Pa) because of the electromechanical symmetry of the device. The usable frequency range of the sensor is 0-800 Hz. Keywords: Piezoelectric sensor, shear stress, floating element, electromechanical symmetry

  17. Mechanical stretch and shear flow induced reorganization and recruitment of fibronectin in fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Steward, Robert L.; Cheng, Chao-Min; Ye, Jonathan D.; Bellin, Robert M.; LeDuc, Philip R.

    2011-01-01

    It was our objective to study the role of mechanical stimulation on fibronectin (FN) reorganization and recruitment by exposing fibroblasts to shear fluid flow and equibiaxial stretch. Mechanical stimulation was also combined with a Rho inhibitor to probe their coupled effects on FN. Mechanically stimulated cells revealed a localization of FN around the cell periphery as well as an increase in FN fibril formation. Mechanical stimulation coupled with chemical stimulation also revealed an increase in FN fibrils around the cell periphery. Complimentary to this, fibroblasts exposed to fluid shear stress structurally rearranged pre-coated surface FN, but unstimulated and stretched cells did not. These results show that mechanical stimulation directly affected FN reorganization and recruitment, despite perturbation by chemical stimulation. Our findings will help elucidate the mechanisms of FN biosynthesis and organization by furthering the link of the role of mechanics with FN. PMID:22355663

  18. Yield shear stress and disaggregating shear stress of human blood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Jinmu; Lee, Byoung-Kwon; Shin, Sehyun

    2014-05-01

    This review presents two distinct rheological parameters of blood that have the potential to indicate blood circulation adequacy: yield shear stress (YSS) and disaggregating shear stress (DSS). YSS and DSS reflect the strength of red blood cell (RBC) aggregation in suspension under static and dynamic conditions, respectively. YSS, defined as the critical stress to disperse RBC aggregates under static conditions, was found to be dependent upon hematocrit, fibrinogen, and red cell deformability, but not temperature. DSS, defined as the minimum shear stress to disperse RBC aggregates under dynamic conditions, is dependent upon fibrinogen, red cell deformability, and temperature but not hematocrit. Owing to recent advances in measurement technology, these two parameters can be easily measured, and thus, their clinical significance in blood circulation can be verified.

  19. Hemodynamic shear stress and the endothelium in cardiovascular pathophysiology

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Peter F

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY Endothelium lining the cardiovascular system is highly sensitive to hemodynamic shear stresses that act at the vessel luminal surface in the direction of blood flow. Physiological variations of shear stress regulate acute changes in vascular diameter and when sustained induce slow, adaptive, structural-wall remodeling. Both processes are endothelium-dependent and are systemically and regionally compromised by hyperlipidemia, hypertension, diabetes and inflammatory disorders. Shear stress spans a range of spatiotemporal scales and contributes to regional and focal heterogeneity of endothelial gene expression, which is important in vascular pathology. Regions of flow disturbances near arterial branches, bifurcations and curvatures result in complex spatiotemporal shear stresses and their characteristics can predict atherosclerosis susceptibility. Changes in local artery geometry during atherogenesis further modify shear stress characteristics at the endothelium. Intravascular devices can also influence flow-mediated endothelial responses. Endothelial flow-induced responses include a cell-signaling repertoire, collectively known as mechanotransduction, that ranges from instantaneous ion fluxes and biochemical pathways to gene and protein expression. A spatially decentralized mechanism of endothelial mechanotransduction is dominant, in which deformation at the cell surface induced by shear stress is transmitted as cytoskeletal tension changes to sites that are mechanically coupled to the cytoskeleton. A single shear stress mechanotransducer is unlikely to exist; rather, mechanotransduction occurs at multiple subcellular locations. PMID:19029993

  20. Yield and flow-induced phase transition in colloidal gels under startup shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Lilian; Landrum, Benjamin; Zia, Roseanna

    2016-11-01

    We study the micro-mechanical origins of the transition from solid-like to liquid-like behavior during flow startup of colloidal gels via large-scale dynamic simulation, with a view toward understanding connections to energy storage and phase transition. Such materials often exhibit an overshoot in stress, and prior studies of strong, dilute colloidal gels with a stringy microstructure connect this "yield" event to loss of network connectivity. Owing to the importance of Brownian transport in phase separation processes in colloids, here we study a reversible colloidal gel of hard spheres that interact via a short-range attraction of several kT, for which Brownian motion can lead to rapid quiescent coarsening. In the present study, we interrogate the shear stress for a range of imposed flow strengths, monitoring particle-level structure and dynamics, to determine the microscopic picture of gel yield. Our detailed studies of the microstructural evolution and macroscopic response during startup provide insight into the phase behavior during yield. We present a new model of stress development, phase transition, and structural evolution during transient yield in colloidal gels for which ongoing phase separation informs gel phenomenology.

  1. Graphene Nanosheets and Shear Flow Induced Crystallization in Isotactic Polypropylene Nanocomposites

    SciTech Connect

    Z Xu; C Chen; Y Wang; H Tang; Z Li; B Hsiao

    2011-12-31

    Combined effects of graphene nanosheets (GNSs) and shear flow on the crystallization behavior of isotactic polypropylene (iPP) were investigated by in-situ synchrotron wide-angle X-ray diffraction (WAXD) and small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) techniques. For crystallization under quiescent condition (at 145 C), the half-crystallization time (t{sub 1/2}) of nanocomposites containing 0.05 and 0.1 wt % GNSs was reduced to at least 50% compared to that of neat iPP, indicating the high nucleation ability of GNSs. The crystallization rate of iPP was directly proportional to the GNS content. Under a relatively weak shear flow (at a rate of 20 s{sup -1} for 5 s duration) and a low degree of supercooling, the neat iPP exhibited an isotropic structure due to the relaxation of row nuclei. However, visible antisotropic crystals appeared in sheared iPP/GNSs nanocomposites, indicating that GNSs induced a network structure hindering the mobility of iPP chains and allowing the survival of oriented row nuclei for a long period of time. The presence of GNSs clearly enhanced the effects of shear-induced nucleation as well as orientation of iPP crystals. Two kinds of nucleating origins coexisted in the sheared nanocomposite melt: heterogeneous nucleating sites initiated by GNSs and homogeneous nucleating sites (row nuclei) induced by shear. The difference of t{sub 1/2} of nanocomposites with and without shear was significantly larger than that of neat iPP. The presence of GNSs and shear flow exhibited a synergistic interaction on promoting crystallization kinetics of iPP, although the effect of GNS concentration was not apparent. From WAXD results of isothermal and nonisothermal crystallization of sheared iPP, it was found that the appearance of {beta}-crystals depended on the preservation of row nuclei, where the {alpha}-crystals were predominant in the iPP/GNSs nanocomposites, indicating that GNSs could directly induce {alpha}-crystals of iPP.

  2. Formation of Microbial Streamers by Flow-Induced Shear and Their Hydrodynamic Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, J.; Olsen, K. A.; Nguyen, T.; Tice, M. M.; 2012; 2013, G. C.

    2014-12-01

    Microbial streamers are productive elements of surface-attached microbial communities that paradoxically seem to roughen mats under rapid, high shear flows, potentially exposing the mat to greater risk of erosion. They are common features found in modern hot-spring outflow channels, yet their formation mechanisms and effects on mat erosion are poorly understood. We test a hypothesis that streamers are produced by shear-induced viscoelastic deformation, and that streamers grow to heal detached turbulent boundary layers. Laboratory flume experiments were conducted using Particle Image/Tracking Velocimetry (PIV/PTV) to gain quantitative insights into the behavior of flows around small projections constructed from 3D-printed plastics or hydrated EPS gels, as well as artificial streamers. The combined use of fabricated hard and viscoelastic shapes, tracer particles, sheet lasers and high speed cameras allowed visualization of flows and quantitative measurements. Results show that primary and secondary flows (backflow behind projections) combine to produce deformations that drive the elongation of the top and ultimately initiate streamer formation. With insufficient secondary flows, streamers are not able to rise up from the basal mat. This implies that a combination of sufficient topographic relief and flow strength is required for streamers to form. In addition, flow measurements indicate that the presence of artificial streamers made the surface hydraulically smoother, and in effect reducing bed shear at the base. These results suggest a novel set of feedbacks that could reduce net mat erosion in energetic flows, and could help guide the evaluation of biosignatures in sedimentary rocks deposited in the presence of microbial mats.

  3. Shear stress-induced NO production is dependent on ATP autocrine signaling and capacitative calcium entry

    PubMed Central

    Andrews, Allison M.; Jaron, Dov; Buerk, Donald G.; Barbee, Kenneth A.

    2014-01-01

    Flow-induced production of nitric oxide (NO) by endothelial cells plays a fundamental role in vascular homeostasis. However, the mechanisms by which shear stress activates NO production remain unclear due in part to limitations in measuring NO, especially under flow conditions. Shear stress elicits the release of ATP, but the relative contribution of autocrine stimulation by ATP to flow-induced NO production has not been established. Furthermore, the importance of calcium in shear stress-induced NO production remains controversial, and in particular the role of capacitive calcium entry (CCE) has yet to be determined. We have utilized our unique NO measurement device to investigate the role of ATP autocrine signaling and CCE in shear stress-induced NO production. We found that endogenously released ATP and downstream activation of purinergic receptors and CCE plays a significant role in shear stress-induced NO production. ATP-induced eNOS phophorylation under static conditions is also dependent on CCE. Inhibition of protein kinase C significantly inhibited eNOS phosphorylation and the calcium response. To our knowledge, we are the first to report on the role of CCE in the mechanism of acute shear stress-induced NO response. In addition, our work highlights the importance of ATP autocrine signaling in shear stress-induced NO production. PMID:25386222

  4. Shape Recovery of Elastic Red Blood Cells from Shear Flow Induced Deformation in Three Dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Yan; Gounley, John

    2015-11-01

    Red blood cells undergo substantial shape changes in vivo. Modeled as an elastic capsule, the shape recovery of a three dimensional biconcave capsule from shear flow is studied for different preferred elastic and bending configuration. The fluid-structure interaction is modeled using the multiple-relaxation time lattice Boltzmann (LBM) and immersed boundary (IBM) methods. Based on the studies of the limited shape memory observed in three dimensions, the shape recovery is caused by the preferred elastic configuration, at least when paired with a constant spontaneous curvature. For these capsules, the incompleteness of the shape recovery observed precludes any conjecture about whether a single or multiple phase(s) are necessary to describe the recovery process. Longer simulations and a more stable methodology will be necessary. Y. Peng acknowledges support from Old Dominion University Research Foundation Grant #503921 and National Science Foundation Grant DMS-1319078.

  5. Stress analysis of shear/compression test

    SciTech Connect

    Nishijima, S.; Okada, T.; Ueno, S.

    1997-06-01

    Stress analysis has been made on the glass fiber reinforced plastics (GFRP) subjected to the combined shear and compression stresses by means of finite element method. The two types of experimental set up were analyzed, that is parallel and series method where the specimen were compressed by tilted jigs which enable to apply the combined stresses, to the specimen. Modified Tsai-Hill criterion was employed to judge the failure under the combined stresses that is the shear strength under the compressive stress. The different failure envelopes were obtained between the two set ups. In the parallel system the shear strength once increased with compressive stress then decreased. On the contrary in the series system the shear strength decreased monotonicly with compressive stress. The difference is caused by the different stress distribution due to the different constraint conditions. The basic parameters which control the failure under the combined stresses will be discussed.

  6. 4D shear stress maps of the developing heart using Doppler optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Lindsy M; Jenkins, Michael W; Gu, Shi; Barwick, Lee; Watanabe, Michiko; Rollins, Andrew M

    2012-11-01

    Accurate imaging and measurement of hemodynamic forces is vital for investigating how physical forces acting on the embryonic heart are transduced and influence developmental pathways. Of particular importance is blood flow-induced shear stress, which influences gene expression by endothelial cells and potentially leads to congenital heart defects through abnormal heart looping, septation, and valvulogenesis. However no imaging tool has been available to measure shear stress on the endocardium volumetrically and dynamically. Using 4D structural and Doppler OCT imaging, we are able to accurately measure the blood flow in the heart tube in vivo and to map endocardial shear stress throughout the heart cycle under physiological conditions for the first time. These measurements of the shear stress patterns will enable precise titration of experimental perturbations and accurate correlation of shear with the expression of molecules critical to heart development.

  7. Determining Shear Stress Distribution in a Laminate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bednarcyk, Brett A.; Aboudi, Jacob; Yarrington, Phillip W.

    2010-01-01

    A "simplified shear solution" method approximates the through-thickness shear stress distribution within a composite laminate based on an extension of laminated beam theory. The method does not consider the solution of a particular boundary value problem; rather, it requires only knowledge of the global shear loading, geometry, and material properties of the laminate or panel. It is thus analogous to lamination theory in that ply-level stresses can be efficiently determined from global load resultants at a given location in a structure and used to evaluate the margin of safety on a ply-by-ply basis. The simplified shear solution stress distribution is zero at free surfaces, continuous at ply boundaries, and integrates to the applied shear load. The method has been incorporated within the HyperSizer commercial structural sizing software to improve its predictive capability for designing composite structures. The HyperSizer structural sizing software is used extensively by NASA to design composite structures. In the case of through-thickness shear loading on panels, HyperSizer previously included a basic, industry-standard, method for approximating the resulting shear stress distribution in sandwich panels. However, no such method was employed for solid laminate panels. The purpose of the innovation is to provide an approximation of the through-thickness shear stresses in a solid laminate given the through-thickness shear loads (Qx and Qy) on the panel. The method was needed for implementation within the HyperSizer structural sizing software so that the approximated ply-level shear stresses could be utilized in a failure theory to assess the adequacy of a panel design. The simplified shear solution method was developed based on extending and generalizing bi-material beam theory to plate-like structures. It is assumed that the through-thickness shear stresses arise due to local bending of the laminate induced by the through-thickness shear load, and by imposing

  8. Fluid shear, intercellular stress, and endothelial cell alignment.

    PubMed

    Steward, Robert; Tambe, Dhananjay; Hardin, C Corey; Krishnan, Ramaswamy; Fredberg, Jeffrey J

    2015-04-15

    Endothelial cell alignment along the direction of laminar fluid flow is widely understood to be a defining morphological feature of vascular homeostasis. While the role of associated signaling and structural events have been well studied, associated intercellular stresses under laminar fluid shear have remained ill-defined and the role of these stresses in the alignment process has remained obscure. To fill this gap, we report here the tractions as well as the complete in-plane intercellular stress fields measured within the human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) monolayer subjected to a steady laminar fluid shear of 1 Pa. Tractions, intercellular stresses, as well as their time course, heterogeneity, and anisotropy, were measured using monolayer traction microscopy and monolayer stress microscopy. Prior to application of laminar fluid flow, intercellular stresses were largely tensile but fluctuated dramatically in space and in time (317 ± 122 Pa). Within 12 h of the onset of laminar fluid flow, the intercellular stresses decreased substantially but continued to fluctuate dramatically (142 ± 84 Pa). Moreover, tractions and intercellular stresses aligned strongly and promptly (within 1 h) along the direction of fluid flow, whereas the endothelial cell body aligned less strongly and substantially more slowly (12 h). Taken together, these results reveal that steady laminar fluid flow induces prompt reduction in magnitude and alignment of tractions and intercellular stress tensor components followed by the retarded elongation and alignment of the endothelial cell body. Appreciably smaller intercellular stresses supported by cell-cell junctions logically favor smaller incidence of gap formation and thus improved barrier integrity.

  9. Turbulent shear stresses in compressible boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laderman, A. J.; Demetriades, A.

    1979-01-01

    Hot-wire anemometer measurements of turbulent shear stresses in a Mach 3 compressible boundary layer were performed in order to investigate the effects of heat transfer on turbulence. Measurements were obtained by an x-probe in a flat plate, zero pressure gradient, two dimensional boundary layer in a wind tunnel with wall to freestream temperature ratios of 0.94 and 0.71. The measured shear stress distributions are found to be in good agreement with previous results, supporting the contention that the shear stress distribution is essentially independent of Mach number and heat transfer for Mach numbers from incompressible to hypersonic and wall to freestream temperature ratios of 0.4 to 1.0. It is also found that corrections for frequency response limitations of the electronic equipment are necessary to determine the correct shear stress distribution, particularly at the walls.

  10. Wall shear stress in collapsed tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naili, S.; Ribreau, C.

    1999-01-01

    A small flexural wall rigidity brings unique features to cross-sectional shapes and blood flow within veins, which are characterised by a non-uniform hemodynamical environment acting upon endothelial cells. Velocity fields and related wall shear stress were numerically determined for a large number of conditions, assuming a fully developed, steady, incompressible laminar flow through an uniform smooth pipe with a constant cross-section. It was shown that the flatness greatly influences the resulting distribution of the wall shear stresses along the lumen perimeter. For instance, under a steady longitudinal pressure gradient at about 500 Pascal per meter inside a constant oval-shaped tube, with a lumen perimeter of the order of 5 × 10^{-2} meter, the maximum wall shear stress is found at about 2 Pascal where the local curvature is minimal. On the other hand, the minimal wall shear stress of the order of 1 Pascal is found where the local curvature is maximal. Clear indications have been reported showing that the hemodynamical wall shear stress does alter endothelial cell morphology and orientation. These results are being used for developing an experimental set-up in order to locally map out the characteristic shear stresses looking for endothelial shape modifications whenever a viscous fluid flow is applied.

  11. Boundary Shear Stress Along Vegetated Streambanks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, L. A.; Wynn, T.

    2007-12-01

    Sediment, a leading cause of water quality impairment, damages aquatic ecosystems and interferes with recreational uses and water treatment processes. Streambank retreat can contribute as much as 85% of watershed sediment yield. Vegetation is an important component of stream restoration designs used to control streambank retreat, but vegetation effects on streambank boundary shear stress (SBSS) need to be quantified. The overall goal of this experiment is to predict boundary shear stress along vegetated streambanks. This goal will be met by determining a method for measuring boundary shear stress in the field along hydraulically rough streambanks, evaluating the effects of streambank vegetation on boundary shear stress in the field, and developing predictive methods based on measurable vegetative properties. First, three streambank vegetation types (herbaceous, shrubbery, and woody) will be modeled in a flume study to examine both boundary shear stress measurement theory and instruments for field use. An appropriate method (law of the wall, Reynold's stresses, TKE, or average wall shear stress) and field instrument (ADV, propeller, or Pitot tube) will be selected, resulting in a field technique to measure SBSS. Predictive methods for estimating SBSS, based on common vegetation measurements, will be developed in the flume study and validated with field data. This research is intended to improve our understanding of the role of riparian vegetation in stream morphology by evaluating the effects of vegetation on boundary shear stress, providing insight to the type and density of vegetation required for streambank stability. The results will also aide in quantifying sediment inputs from streambanks, providing quantitative information for stream restoration projects and watershed management planning.

  12. Flow-induced wall mechanics of patient-specific aneurysmal cerebral arteries: Nonlinear isotropic versus anisotropic wall stress.

    PubMed

    Cornejo, Sergio; Guzmán, Amador; Valencia, Alvaro; Rodríguez, Jose; Finol, Ender

    2014-01-01

    Fluid-structure interaction simulations of three patient-specific models of cerebral aneurysms were carried out with the objective of quantifying the effects of non-Newtonian blood flow and the vessel mechanical behavior on the time-dependent fluid shear and normal stresses, and structural stress and stretch. The average wall shear stress at peak systole was found to be approximately one order of magnitude smaller than the shear stresses in the proximal communicating arteries, regardless of the shape or size of the aneurysms. Spatial distributions of oscillatory shear index were consistent with the reciprocal of wall shear stress distributions at peak systole for all aneurysm geometries, demonstrating that oscillatory shear index correlates inversely with wall shear at this time point in the cardiac cycle. An aneurysm wall modeled with an isotropic material resulted in an underestimation of both the maximum principal stress and stretch, compared to the anisotropic material model. For the three aneurysm geometries, anisotropic peak wall stresses were approximately 50% higher than for an isotropic material. Regardless of the constitutive material, the maximum stresses were consistently located at the aneurysm neck; stresses in the dome were 30% of those in the neck.

  13. Shear-flow induced detachment of Saccharomyces cerevisiae from stainless steel: influence of yeast and solid surface properties.

    PubMed

    Guillemot, Gaëlle; Vaca-Medina, Guadalupe; Martin-Yken, Helene; Vernhet, Aude; Schmitz, Philippe; Mercier-Bonin, Muriel

    2006-05-01

    The present study focused on the shear-induced detachment of Saccharomyces cerevisiae in adhesive contact with a 316L stainless steel surface using a shear stress flow chamber, with a view to determining the respective influence of the yeast surface properties and the support characteristics. The effect of cultivation of S. cerevisiae yeast cells on their subsequent detachment from the solid surface was particularly investigated. In order to elucidate the role of stainless steel, non-metallic supports were used as control, covering a broad range of surface properties such as surface free energy and roughness: polypropylene (hydrophobic), polystyrene (mildly hydrophobic, similar to stainless steel) and glass (hydrophilic). All materials were very smooth with respect to the size of yeast. First, experiments were carried out on two types of yeast cells, just rehydrated in saline solution, a biological model widely used in the literature. The influence of the ionic strength (1.5 and 150 mM NaCl) on glass and stainless steel was evaluated. Unlike on glass, no clear evidence was found for electrostatic repulsion with stainless steel since high adhesion was observed whatever the ionic strength. A lack of correlation in adhesion results was also obtained when considering the surface physico-chemical characteristics of type I (hydrophilic) and type II (hydrophobic) rehydrated cells and those of both polymers. It was postulated that unavoidable "sticky" compounds were present on the cell wall, which could not be completely removed during the successive washings of the rehydrated cell suspension before use. This could dramatically alter the yeast surface properties and modify the adhesion strength, thus clearly demonstrating the necessity to work with yeast coming from fresh cultures. Biologically active yeast cells were then used. Once cultured, type I- and type II-yeast cells were shown to exhibit the same hydrophilic properties. Regardless of the material used, for the

  14. MEMS shear stress sensors for cardiovascular diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Soundararajan, Gopikrishnan; Hsiai, Tzung K; DeMaio, Lucas; Chang, Michael; Chang, Stanley

    2004-01-01

    Coronary artery disease is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the industrialized nations. Both biochemical and biomechanical stimuli modulate the pathogenesis of coronary artery diseases. Shear stress acting on the lumen of blood vessels intimately modulates the biological activities of vascular endothelial cells (ECs). We hereby develop microelectro mechanical system (MEMS)-based sensors at the dimension comparable to a single EC to monitor realtime shear stress in fluidic channel. Our goal is to fabricate sensors for ex vivo or in vivo shear stress measurement at Reynolds number commonly encountered in human circulation. The MEMS sensors were designed based on the previously described heat transfer principles. The polysilicon was doped with phosphorous to render the sensing element a high resistivity at 2.5 KOmega. The development of backside wire bonding enabled the application for the vascular geometry. The small dimension (80x2 mum) and the gain amplitude at 71 KHz offered an entry point to measure shear stress with high spatial and temporal resolution.

  15. Integrated Shear Stress/Temperature Micromachined Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheplak, Mark; Cattafesta, Louis N., III; Nishida, Toshikazu

    2002-01-01

    During this project we were able to design and initiate the fabrication of an integrated Micro ElectroMechanical Systems (MEMS)-based shear stress/temperature sensor for flow control applications. A brief summary of the completed activities during this project is presented.

  16. Shear stress regulates HUVEC hydraulic conductivity by occludin phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Pang, Zhengyu; Antonetti, David A; Tarbell, John M

    2005-11-01

    Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) display hydraulic conductivity (L(P)) responses to shear stress that differ markedly from the responses of bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAECs). In HUVECs, 5, 10, and 20 dyn cm(-2) steady shear stress transiently increased L(P) with a return to preshear baseline after a 2-h exposure to shear stress. Pure oscillatory shear stress of 0 +/- 20 dyn cm(-2) (mean+/-amplitude) had no effect on L(P), whereas superposition of oscillatory shear stress on steady shear stress suppressed the effect induced by steady shear stress alone. Shear reversal (amplitude greater than mean) was not necessary for the inhibitory influence of oscillatory shear stress. The transient increase of L(P) by steady shear stress was not affected by incubation with BAPTA-AM (10 microM), suggesting calcium independence of the shear response. Decreasing nitric oxide (NO) concentration with L-NMMA (100 microM), a nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitor, did not inhibit the HUVEC L(P) response to shear stress. At the protein level, 10 dyn cm(-2) shear stress did not affect the total content of occludin, but it did elevate the phosphorylation level transiently. The positive correlation between occludin phosphorylation and hydraulic conductivity parallels observations in BAECs and suggests that occludin phosphorylation may be a general mediator of shear-L(P) responses in diverse endothelial cell types.

  17. Flexible Micropost Arrays for Shear Stress Measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wohl, Christopher J.; Palmieri, Frank L.; Hopkins, John W.; Jackson, Allen M.; Connell, John W.; Lin, Yi; Cisotto, Alexxandra A.

    2015-01-01

    Increased fuel costs, heightened environmental protection requirements, and noise abatement continue to place drag reduction at the forefront of aerospace research priorities. Unfortunately, shortfalls still exist in the fundamental understanding of boundary-layer airflow over aerodynamic surfaces, especially regarding drag arising from skin friction. For example, there is insufficient availability of instrumentation to adequately characterize complex flows with strong pressure gradients, heat transfer, wall mass flux, three-dimensionality, separation, shock waves, and transient phenomena. One example is the acoustic liner efficacy on aircraft engine nacelle walls. Active measurement of shear stress in boundary layer airflow would enable a better understanding of how aircraft structure and flight dynamics affect skin friction. Current shear stress measurement techniques suffer from reliability, complexity, and airflow disruption, thereby compromising resultant shear stress data. The state-of-the-art for shear stress sensing uses indirect or direct measurement techniques. Indirect measurements (e.g., hot-wire, heat flux gages, oil interferometry, laser Doppler anemometry, small scale pressure drag surfaces, i.e., fences) require intricate knowledge of the studied flow, restrictive instrument arrangements, large surface areas, flow disruption, or seeding material; with smaller, higher bandwidth probes under development. Direct measurements involve strain displacement of a sensor element and require no prior knowledge of the flow. Unfortunately, conventional "floating" recessed components for direct measurements are mm to cm in size. Whispering gallery mode devices and Fiber Bragg Gratings are examples of recent additions to this type of sensor with much smaller (?m) sensor components. Direct detection techniques are often single point measurements and difficult to calibrate and implement in wind tunnel experiments. In addition, the wiring, packaging, and installation

  18. APPLYING SHEAR STRESS TO PLURIPOTENT STEM CELLS

    PubMed Central

    Wolfe, Russell P.; Guidry, Julia B.; Messina, Stephanie L.; Ahsan, Tabassum

    2016-01-01

    Summary Thorough understanding of the effects of shear stress on stem cells is critical for the rationale design of large-scale production of cell-based therapies. This is of growing importance as emerging tissue engineering and regenerative medicine applications drive the need for clinically-relevant numbers of both pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) and cells derived from PSCs. Here we describe the use of a custom parallel plate bioreactor system to impose fluid shear stress on a layer of PSCs adhered to protein-coated glass slides. This system can be useful both for basic science studies in mechanotransduction and as a surrogate model for bioreactors used in large-scale production. PMID:25762292

  19. Stent implantation influence wall shear stress evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernad, S. I.; Totorean, A. F.; Bosioc, A. I.; Petre, I.; Bernad, E. S.

    2016-06-01

    Local hemodynamic factors are known affect the natural history of the restenosis critically after coronary stenting of atherosclerosis. Stent-induced flows disturbance magnitude dependent directly on the strut design. The impact of flow alterations around struts vary as the strut geometrical parameters change. Our results provide data regarding the hemodynamic parameters for the blood flow in both stenosed and stented coronary artery under physiological conditions, namely wall shear stress and pressure drop.

  20. Shear Stress Sensing using Elastomer Micropillar Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wohl, Christopher J.; Palmieri, Frank L.; Lin, Yi; Jackson, Allen M.; Cissoto, Alexxandra; Sheplak, Mark; Connell, John W.

    2013-01-01

    The measurement of shear stress developed as a fluid moves around a solid body is difficult to measure. Stresses at the fluid-solid interface are very small and the nature of the fluid flow is easily disturbed by introducing sensor components to the interface. To address these challenges, an array of direct and indirect techniques have been investigated with various advantages and challenges. Hot wire sensors and other indirect sensors all protrude significantly into the fluid flow. Microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) devices, although facilitating very accurate measurements, are not durable, are prone to contamination, and are difficult to implement into existing model geometries. One promising approach is the use of engineered surfaces that interact with fluid flow in a detectable manner. To this end, standard lithographic techniques have been utilized to generate elastomeric micropillar arrays of various lengths and diameters. Micropillars of controlled length and width were generated in polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) elastomer using a soft-lithography technique. The 3D mold for micropillar replication was fabricated using laser ablative micromachining and contact lithography. Micropillar dimensions and mechanical properties were characterized and compared to shear sensing requirements. The results of this characterization as well as shear stress detection techniques will be discussed.

  1. Shear stress-induced mitochondrial biogenesis decreases the release of microparticles from endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ji-Seok; Kim, Boa; Lee, Hojun; Thakkar, Sunny; Babbitt, Dianne M.; Eguchi, Satoru; Brown, Michael D.

    2015-01-01

    The concept of enhancing structural integrity of mitochondria has emerged as a novel therapeutic option for cardiovascular disease. Flow-induced increase in laminar shear stress is a potent physiological stimulant associated with exercise, which exerts atheroprotective effects in the vasculature. However, the effect of laminar shear stress on mitochondrial remodeling within the vascular endothelium and its related functional consequences remain largely unknown. Using in vitro and in vivo complementary studies, here, we report that aerobic exercise alleviates the release of endothelial microparticles in prehypertensive individuals and that these salutary effects are, in part, mediated by shear stress-induced mitochondrial biogenesis. Circulating levels of total (CD31+/CD42a−) and activated (CD62E+) microparticles released by endothelial cells were significantly decreased (∼40% for both) after a 6-mo supervised aerobic exercise training program in individuals with prehypertension. In cultured human endothelial cells, laminar shear stress reduced the release of endothelial microparticles, which was accompanied by an increase in mitochondrial biogenesis through a sirtuin 1 (SIRT1)-dependent mechanism. Resveratrol, a SIRT1 activator, treatment showed similar effects. SIRT1 knockdown using small-interfering RNA completely abolished the protective effect of shear stress. Disruption of mitochondrial integrity by either antimycin A or peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator-1α small-interfering RNA significantly increased the number of total, and activated, released endothelial microparticles, and shear stress restored these back to basal levels. Collectively, these data demonstrate a critical role of endothelial mitochondrial integrity in preserving endothelial homeostasis. Moreover, prolonged laminar shear stress, which is systemically elevated during aerobic exercise in the vessel wall, mitigates endothelial dysfunction by promoting mitochondrial

  2. Bellows flow-induced vibrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tygielski, P. J.; Smyly, H. M.; Gerlach, C. R.

    1983-01-01

    The bellows flow excitation mechanism and results of comprehensive test program are summarized. The analytical model for predicting bellows flow induced stress is refined. The model includes the effects of an upstream elbow, arbitrary geometry, and multiple piles. A refined computer code for predicting flow induced stress is described which allows life prediction if a material S-N diagram is available.

  3. Wrinkling of reinforced plates subjected to shear stresses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seydel, Edgar

    1931-01-01

    An analysis is made here of the problem of long plates with transverse stiffeners subject to shear. A typical example would be a long Wagner beam. The shear stress is calculated at which the web wrinkles and shear stress becomes a maximum. The equation is solved for both a condition of free support and rigidity of support on the edges.

  4. Flow-activated chloride channels in vascular endothelium. Shear stress sensitivity, desensitization dynamics, and physiological implications.

    PubMed

    Gautam, Mamta; Shen, Yue; Thirkill, Twanda L; Douglas, Gordon C; Barakat, Abdul I

    2006-12-01

    Although activation of outward rectifying Cl(-) channels is one of the fastest responses of endothelial cells (ECs) to shear stress, little is known about these channels. In this study, we used whole-cell patch clamp recordings to characterize the flow-activated Cl(-) current in bovine aortic ECs (BAECs). Application of shear stress induced rapid development of a Cl(-) current that was effectively blocked by the Cl(-) channel antagonist 5-nitro-2-(3-phenopropylamino)benzoic acid (100 microM). The current initiated at a shear stress as low as 0.3 dyne/cm(2), attained its peak within minutes of flow onset, and saturated above 3.5 dynes/cm(2) approximately 2.5-3.5-fold increase over pre-flow levels). The Cl(-) current desensitized slowly in response to sustained flow, and step increases in shear stress elicited increased current only if the shear stress levels were below the 3.5 dynes/cm(2) saturation level. Oscillatory flow with a physiological oscillation frequency of 1 Hz, as occurs in disturbed flow zones prone to atherosclerosis, failed to elicit the Cl(-) current, whereas lower oscillation frequencies led to partial recovery of the current. Nonreversing pulsatile flow, generally considered protective of atherosclerosis, was as effective in eliciting the current as steady flow. Measurements using fluids of different viscosities indicated that the Cl(-) current is responsive to shear stress rather than shear rate. Blocking the flow-activated Cl(-) current abolished flow-induced Akt phosphorylation in BAECs, whereas blocking flow-sensitive K(+) currents had no effect, suggesting that flow-activated Cl(-) channels play an important role in regulating EC flow signaling.

  5. Lubricant limiting shear stress effect on EHD film thickness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gecim, B.; Winer, W. O.

    1979-01-01

    A Grubin-like EHD inlet analysis utilizing a non-linear viscous fluid model with a limiting shear stress is reported. The shear rheological equation requirs only a low shear stress viscosity and the limiting shear stress both functions of pressure. Values employed for these properties are taken from measurements on typical lubricants. Reductions of EHD film thickness are found to be up to 40 percent compared with the standard Grubin prediction for typical operating conditions. Slide-roll ratio, limiting shear stress dependence on pressure, and atmospheric pressure value of limiting shear stress are new variables required to determine film thickness with the first two being more important than the last. The EHD film thickness is reduced by increasing slide-roll ratio and/or decreasing the pressure dependence of the limiting shear stress.

  6. Shear stress cleaning for surface departiculation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Musselman, R. P.; Yarbrough, T. W.

    1986-01-01

    A cleaning technique widely used by the nuclear utility industry for removal of radioactive surface contamination has proven effective at removing non-hazardous contaminant particles as small as 0.1 micrometer. The process employs a controlled high velocity liquid spray inside a vapor containment enclosure to remove particles from a surface. The viscous drag force generated by the cleaning fluid applies a shear stress greater than the adhesion force that holds small particles to a substrate. Fluid mechanics and field tests indicate general cleaning parameters.

  7. Shear-stress relaxation and ensemble transformation of shear-stress autocorrelation functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wittmer, J. P.; Xu, H.; Baschnagel, J.

    2015-02-01

    We revisit the relation between the shear-stress relaxation modulus G (t ) , computed at finite shear strain 0 <γ ≪1 , and the shear-stress autocorrelation functions C(t ) | γ and C(t ) | τ computed, respectively, at imposed strain γ and mean stress τ . Focusing on permanent isotropic spring networks it is shown theoretically and computationally that in general G(t ) =C (t ) | τ=C(t ) | γ+Geq for t >0 with Geq being the static equilibrium shear modulus. G (t ) and C(t ) | γ thus must become different for solids and it is impossible to obtain Geq alone from C(t ) | γ as often assumed. We comment briefly on self-assembled transient networks where Geq(f ) must vanish for a finite scission-recombination frequency f . We argue that G(t ) =C (t ) | τ=C(t ) | γ should reveal an intermediate plateau set by the shear modulus Geq(f =0 ) of the quenched network.

  8. Tumor cell cycle arrest induced by shear stress: Roles of integrins and Smad

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Shun-Fu; Chang, Cheng Allen; Lee, Ding-Yu; Lee, Pei-Ling; Yeh, Yu-Ming; Yeh, Chiuan-Ren; Cheng, Cheng-Kung; Chien, Shu; Chiu, Jeng-Jiann

    2008-01-01

    Interstitial flow in and around tumor tissue affects the mechanical microenvironment to modulate tumor cell growth and metastasis. We investigated the roles of flow-induced shear stress in modulating cell cycle distribution in four tumor cell lines and the underlying mechanisms. In all four cell lines, incubation under static conditions for 24 or 48 h led to G0/G1 arrest; in contrast, shear stress (12 dynes/cm2) induced G2/M arrest. The molecular basis of the shear effect was analyzed, and the presentation on molecular mechanism is focused on human MG63 osteosarcoma cells. Shear stress induced increased expressions of cyclin B1 and p21CIP1 and decreased expressions of cyclins A, D1, and E, cyclin-dependent protein kinases (Cdk)-1, -2, -4, and -6, and p27KIP1 as well as a decrease in Cdk1 activity. Using specific antibodies and small interfering RNA, we found that the shear-induced G2/M arrest and corresponding changes in G2/M regulatory protein expression and activity were mediated by αvβ3 and β1 integrins through bone morphogenetic protein receptor type IA-specific Smad1 and Smad5. Shear stress also down-regulated runt-related transcription factor 2 (Runx2) binding activity and osteocalcin and alkaline phosphatase expressions in MG63 cells; these responses were mediated by αvβ3 and β1 integrins through Smad5. Our findings provide insights into the mechanism by which shear stress induces G2/M arrest in tumor cells and inhibits cell differentiation and demonstrate the importance of mechanical microenvironment in modulating molecular signaling, gene expression, cell cycle, and functions in tumor cells. PMID:18310319

  9. Shear stress induced stimulation of mammalian cell metabolism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcintire, L. V.; Frangos, J. A.; Eskin, S. G.

    1988-01-01

    A flow apparatus was developed for the study of the metabolic response of anchorage dependent cells to a wide range of steady and pulsatile shear stresses under well controlled conditions. Human umbilical vein endothelial cell monolayers were subjected to steady shear stresses of up to 24 dynes/sq cm, and the production of prostacyclin was determined. The onset of flow led to a burst in prostacyclin production which decayed to a long term steady state rate (SSR). The SSR of cells exposed to flow was greater than the basal release level, and increased linearly with increasing shear stress. It is demonstrated that shear stresses in certain ranges may not be detrimental to mammalian cell metabolism. In fact, throughout the range of shear stresses studied, metabolite production is maximized by maximizing shear stress.

  10. Colors Of Liquid Crystals Used To Measure Surface Shear Stresses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reda, D. C.; Muratore, J. J., Jr.

    1996-01-01

    Developmental method of mapping shear stresses on aerodynamic surfaces involves observation, at multiple viewing angles, of colors of liquid-crystal surface coats illuminated by white light. Report describing method referenced in "Liquid Crystals Indicate Directions Of Surface Shear Stresses" (ARC-13379). Resulting maps of surface shear stresses contain valuable data on magnitudes and directions of skin friction forces associated with surface flows; data used to refine mathematical models of aerodynamics for research and design purposes.

  11. Wall shear stress estimates in coronary artery constrictions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Back, L. H.; Crawford, D. W.

    1992-01-01

    Wall shear stress estimates from laminar boundary layer theory were found to agree fairly well with the magnitude of shear stress levels along coronary artery constrictions obtained from solutions of the Navier Stokes equations for both steady and pulsatile flow. The relatively simple method can be used for in vivo estimates of wall shear stress in constrictions by using a vessel shape function determined from a coronary angiogram, along with a knowledge of the flow rate.

  12. Role of hemodynamic shear stress in cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Cecchi, Emanuele; Giglioli, Cristina; Valente, Serafina; Lazzeri, Chiara; Gensini, Gian Franco; Abbate, Rosanna; Mannini, Lucia

    2011-02-01

    Atherosclerosis is the main cause of morbidity and mortality in the Western world. Inflammation and blood flow alterations are new markers emerging as possible determinants for the development of atherosclerotic lesions. In particular, blood flow exerts a shear stress on vessel walls that alters cell physiology. Shear stress arises from the friction between two virtual layers of a fluid and is induced by the difference in motion and viscosity between these layers. Regions of the arterial tree with uniform geometry are exposed to a unidirectional and constant flow, which determines a physiologic shear stress, while arches and bifurcations are exposed to an oscillatory and disturbed flow, which determines a low shear stress. Atherosclerotic lesions develop mainly in areas of low shear stress, while those exposed to a physiologic shear stress are protected. The presence of areas of the arterial tree with different wall shear stress may explain, in part, the different localization of atherosclerotic lesions in both coronary and extracoronary arteries. The measurement of this parameter may help in identifying atherosclerotic plaques at higher risk as well as in evaluating the efficacy of different pharmacological interventions. Moreover, an altered shear stress is associated with the occurrence of both aortic and intracranial aneurysms, possibly leading to their growth and rupture. Finally, the evaluation of shear stress may be useful for predicting the risk of developing restenosis after coronary and peripheral angioplasty and for devising a coronary stent with a strut design less thrombogenic and more conducive to endothelization.

  13. Mechanistic theory of margination and flow-induced segregation in confined multicomponent suspensions: Simple shear and Poiseuille flows*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henríquez Rivera, Rafael G.; Zhang, Xiao; Graham, Michael D.

    2016-10-01

    A mechanistic model, derived from kinetic theory, is developed to describe segregation in confined multicomponent suspensions such as blood. It incorporates the two key phenomena arising in these systems at low Reynolds number: hydrodynamic pair collisions and hydrodynamic migration. Two flow profiles are considered: simple shear flow (plane Couette flow) and plane Poiseuille flow. The theory begins by writing the evolution of the number density of each component in the suspension as a master equation with contributions from migration and collisions. By making judicious approximations for the collisions, this system of integrodifferential equations is reduced to a set of drift-diffusion equations. We focus attention on the case of a binary suspension with a deformable primary component that completely dominates the collision dynamics in the system and a trace component that has no effect on the primary. The model captures the phenomena of depletion layer formation and margination observed in confined multicomponent suspensions of deformable particles. The depletion layer thickness of the primary component is predicted to follow a master curve relating it in a specific way to confinement ratio and volume fraction. Results from various sources (experiments, detailed simulations, master equation solutions) with different parameters (flexibility of different components in the suspension, viscosity ratio, confinement, among others) collapse onto the same curve. For sufficiently dilute suspensions the analytical form predicted by the drift-diffusion theory for this curve is in excellent agreement with results from these other sources with only one adjustable parameter. In a binary suspension, several regimes of segregation arise, depending on the value of a "margination parameter" M . Most importantly, in both Couette and Poiseuille flows there is a critical value of M below which a sharp "drainage transition" occurs: one component is completely depleted from the bulk

  14. Adjustable shear stress erosion and transport flume

    DOEpatents

    Roberts, Jesse D.; Jepsen, Richard A.

    2002-01-01

    A method and apparatus for measuring the total erosion rate and downstream transport of suspended and bedload sediments using an adjustable shear stress erosion and transport (ASSET) flume with a variable-depth sediment core sample. Water is forced past a variable-depth sediment core sample in a closed channel, eroding sediments, and introducing suspended and bedload sediments into the flow stream. The core sample is continuously pushed into the flow stream, while keeping the surface level with the bottom of the channel. Eroded bedload sediments are transported downstream and then gravitationally separated from the flow stream into one or more quiescent traps. The captured bedload sediments (particles and aggregates) are weighed and compared to the total mass of sediment eroded, and also to the concentration of sediments suspended in the flow stream.

  15. On stress collapse in adiabatic shear bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, T. W.; Walter, J. W.

    T HE DYNAMICS of adiabatic shear band formation is considered making use of a simplified thermo/visco/plastic flow law. A new numerical solution is used to follow the growth of a perturbation from initiation, through early growth and severe localization, to a slowly varying terminal configuration. Asymptotic analyses predict the early and late stage patterns, but the timing and structure of the abrupt transition to severe localization can only be studied numerically, to date. A characteristic feature of the process is that temperature and plastic strain rate begin to localize immediately, but only slowly, whereas the stress first evolves almost as if there were no perturbation, but then collapses rapidly when severe localization occurs.

  16. Two-axis direct fluid shear stress sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bajikar, Sateesh (Inventor); Scott, Michael A. (Inventor); Adcock, Edward E. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A micro sized multi-axis semiconductor skin friction/wall shear stress induced by fluid flow. The sensor design includes a shear/strain transduction gimble connected to a force collecting plate located at the flow boundary surface. The shear force collecting plate is interconnected by an arm to offset the tortional hinges from the fluid flow. The arm is connected to the shear force collecting plate through dual axis torsional hinges with piezoresistive torsional strain gauges. These gauges are disposed on the tortional hinges and provide a voltage output indicative of applied shear stress acting on the force collection plate proximate the flow boundary surface. Offsetting the torsional hinges creates a force concentration and resolution structure that enables the generation of a large stress on the strain gauge from small shear stress, or small displacement of the collecting plate. The design also isolates the torsional sensors from exposure to the fluid flow.

  17. Endothelial dysfunction following prolonged sitting is mediated by a reduction in shear stress.

    PubMed

    Restaino, Robert M; Walsh, Lauren K; Morishima, Takuma; Vranish, Jennifer R; Martinez-Lemus, Luis A; Fadel, Paul J; Padilla, Jaume

    2016-03-01

    We and others have recently reported that prolonged sitting impairs endothelial function in the leg vasculature; however, the mechanism(s) remain unknown. Herein, we tested the hypothesis that a sustained reduction in flow-induced shear stress is the underlying mechanism by which sitting induces leg endothelial dysfunction. Specifically, we examined whether preventing the reduction in shear stress during sitting would abolish the detrimental effects of sitting on popliteal artery endothelial function. In 10 young healthy men, bilateral measurements of popliteal artery flow-mediated dilation were performed before and after a 3-h sitting period during which one foot was submerged in 42°C water (i.e., heated) to increase blood flow and thus shear stress, whereas the contralateral leg remained dry and served as internal control (i.e., nonheated). During sitting, popliteal artery mean shear rate was reduced in the nonheated leg (pre-sit, 42.9 ± 4.5 s(-1); and 3-h sit, 23.6 ± 3.3 s(-1); P < 0.05) but not in the heated leg (pre-sit, 38.9 ± 3.4 s(-1); and 3-h sit, 63.9 ± 16.9 s(-1); P > 0.05). Popliteal artery flow-mediated dilation was impaired after 3 h of sitting in the nonheated leg (pre-sit, 7.1 ± 1.4% vs. post-sit, 2.8 ± 0.9%; P < 0.05) but not in the heated leg (pre-sit: 7.3 ± 1.5% vs. post-sit, 10.9 ± 1.8%; P > 0.05). Collectively, these data suggest that preventing the reduction of flow-induced shear stress during prolonged sitting with local heating abolishes the impairment in popliteal artery endothelial function. Thus these findings are consistent with the hypothesis that sitting-induced leg endothelial dysfunction is mediated by a reduction in shear stress.

  18. Endothelial dysfunction following prolonged sitting is mediated by a reduction in shear stress

    PubMed Central

    Restaino, Robert M.; Walsh, Lauren K.; Morishima, Takuma; Vranish, Jennifer R.; Martinez-Lemus, Luis A.; Fadel, Paul J.

    2016-01-01

    We and others have recently reported that prolonged sitting impairs endothelial function in the leg vasculature; however, the mechanism(s) remain unknown. Herein, we tested the hypothesis that a sustained reduction in flow-induced shear stress is the underlying mechanism by which sitting induces leg endothelial dysfunction. Specifically, we examined whether preventing the reduction in shear stress during sitting would abolish the detrimental effects of sitting on popliteal artery endothelial function. In 10 young healthy men, bilateral measurements of popliteal artery flow-mediated dilation were performed before and after a 3-h sitting period during which one foot was submerged in 42°C water (i.e., heated) to increase blood flow and thus shear stress, whereas the contralateral leg remained dry and served as internal control (i.e., nonheated). During sitting, popliteal artery mean shear rate was reduced in the nonheated leg (pre-sit, 42.9 ± 4.5 s−1; and 3-h sit, 23.6 ± 3.3 s−1; P < 0.05) but not in the heated leg (pre-sit, 38.9 ± 3.4 s−1; and 3-h sit, 63.9 ± 16.9 s−1; P > 0.05). Popliteal artery flow-mediated dilation was impaired after 3 h of sitting in the nonheated leg (pre-sit, 7.1 ± 1.4% vs. post-sit, 2.8 ± 0.9%; P < 0.05) but not in the heated leg (pre-sit: 7.3 ± 1.5% vs. post-sit, 10.9 ± 1.8%; P > 0.05). Collectively, these data suggest that preventing the reduction of flow-induced shear stress during prolonged sitting with local heating abolishes the impairment in popliteal artery endothelial function. Thus these findings are consistent with the hypothesis that sitting-induced leg endothelial dysfunction is mediated by a reduction in shear stress. PMID:26747508

  19. A model of Barchan dunes including lateral shear stress.

    PubMed

    Schwämmle, V; Herrmann, H J

    2005-01-01

    Barchan dunes are found where sand availability is low and wind direction quite constant. The two dimensional shear stress of the wind field and the sand movement by saltation and avalanches over a barchan dune are simulated. The model with one dimensional shear stress is extended including surface diffusion and lateral shear stress. The resulting final shape is compared to the results of the model with a one dimensional shear stress and confirmed by comparison to measurements. We found agreement and improvements with respect to the model with one dimensional shear stress. Additionally, a characteristic edge at the center of the windward side is discovered which is also observed for big barchans. Diffusion effects reduce this effect for small dunes.

  20. The shear-stress intensity factor for a centrally cracked stiff-flanged shear web

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fichter, W. B.

    1976-01-01

    By use of the principle of superposition the stiff-flanged shear web is modeled mathematically by an infinite elastic strip with fixed longitudinal edges. The shear-stress intensity factor for a central longitudinal crack is calculated for various values of the ratio of strip width to crack length, h/a, in the range 0.1-10. The interaction of the crack with the boundaries is illustrated by boundary shear-stress distributions for three values of h/a. Some implications of the results for the design of damage-tolerant shear webs are discussed briefly.

  1. Intracellular pH changes in human aortic smooth muscle cells in response to fluid shear stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stamatas, G. N.; Patrick, C. W. Jr; McIntire, L. V.

    1997-01-01

    The smooth muscle cell (SMC) layers of human arteries may be exposed to blood flow after endothelium denudation, for example, following balloon angioplasty treatment. These SMCs are also constantly subjected to pressure driven transmural fluid flow. Flow-induced shear stress can alter SMC growth and metabolism. Signal transduction mechanisms involved in these flow effects on SMCs are still poorly understood. In this work, the hypothesis that shear stress alters the intracellular pH (pHi) of SMC is examined. When exposed to venous and arterial levels of shear stress, human aortic smooth muscle cells (hASMC) undergo alkalinization. The alkalinization plateau persisted even after 20 min of cell exposure to flow. Addition of amiloride (10 micromoles) or its 5-(N-ethyl-N-isopropyl) analog (EIPA, 10 micromoles), both Na+/H+ exchanger inhibitors, attenuated intracellular alkalinization, suggesting the involvement of the Na+/H+ exchanger in this response. The same concentrations of these inhibitors did not show an effect on pHi of hASMCs in static culture. 4-Acetamido-4'-isothio-cyanatostilbene-2,2'-disulfonic acid (SITS, 1 mM), a Cl-/HCO3- exchange inhibitor, affected the pHi of hASMCs both in static and flow conditions. Our results suggest that flow may perturb the Na+/H+ exchanger leading to an alkalinization of hASMCs, a different response from the flow-induced acidification seen with endothelial cells at the same levels of shear stress. Understanding the flow-induced signal transduction pathways in the vascular cells is of great importance in the tissue engineering of vascular grafts. In the case of SMCs, the involvement of pHi changes in nitric oxide production and proliferation regulation highlights further the significance of such studies.

  2. Steady and transient fluid shear stress stimulate NO release in osteoblasts through distinct biochemical pathways

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McAllister, T. N.; Frangos, J. A.

    1999-01-01

    Fluid flow has been shown to be a potent stimulus in osteoblasts and osteocytes and may therefore play an important role in load-induced bone remodeling. The objective of this study was to investigate the characteristics of flow-activated pathways. Previously we reported that fluid flow stimulates rapid and continuous release of nitric oxide (NO) in primary rat calvarial osteoblasts. Here we demonstrate that flow-induced NO release is mediated by shear stress and that this response is distinctly biphasic. Transients in shear stress associated with the onset of flow stimulated a burst in NO production (8.2 nmol/mg of protein/h), while steady flow stimulated sustained NO production (2.2 nmol/mg of protein/h). Both G-protein inhibition and calcium chelation abolished the burst phase but had no effect on sustained production. Activation of G-proteins stimulated dose-dependent NO release in static cultures of both calvarial osteoblasts and UMR-106 osteoblast-like cells. Pertussis toxin had no effect on NO release. Calcium ionophore stimulated low levels of NO production within 15 minutes but had no effect on sustained production. Taken together, these data suggest that fluid shear stress stimulates NO release by two distinct pathways: a G-protein and calcium-dependent phase sensitive to flow transients, and a G-protein and calcium-independent pathway stimulated by sustained flow.

  3. Vascular mechanobiology: endothelial cell responses to fluid shear stress.

    PubMed

    Ando, Joji; Yamamoto, Kimiko

    2009-11-01

    Endothelial cells (ECs) lining blood vessel walls respond to shear stress, a fluid mechanical force generated by flowing blood, and the EC responses play an important role in the homeostasis of the circulatory system. Abnormal EC responses to shear stress impair various vascular functions and lead to vascular diseases, including hypertension, thrombosis, and atherosclerosis. Bioengineering approaches in which cultured ECs are subjected to shear stress in fluid-dynamically designed flow-loading devices have been widely used to analyze EC responses at the cellular and molecular levels. Remarkable progress has been made, and the results have shown that ECs alter their morphology, function, and gene expression in response to shear stress. Shear stress affects immature cells, as well as mature ECs, and promotes differentiation of bone-marrow-derived endothelial progenitor cells and embryonic stem cells into ECs. Much research has been done on shear stress sensing and signal transduction, and their molecular mechanisms are gradually coming to be understood. However, much remains uncertain, and many candidates have been proposed for shear stress sensors. More extensive studies of vascular mechanobiology should increase our understanding of the molecular basis of the blood-flow-mediated control of vascular functions.

  4. Measurement of surface shear stress vector distribution using shear-sensitive liquid crystal coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Ji-Song; Scholz, Peter; Gu, Liang-Xian

    2012-10-01

    The global wall shear stress measurement technique using shear-sensitive liquid crystal (SSLC) is extended to wind tunnel measurements. Simple and common everyday equipment is used in the measurement; in particular a tungsten-halogen light bulb provides illumination and a saturation of SSLC coating color change with time is found. Spatial wall shear stress distributions of several typical flows are obtained using this technique, including wall-jet flow, vortex flow generated by a delta wing and junction flow behind a thin cylinder, although the magnitudes are not fully calibrated. The results demonstrate that SSLC technique can be extended to wind tunnel measurements with no complicated facilities used.

  5. Models of flow-induced loading on blood cells in laminar and turbulent flow, with application to cardiovascular device flow.

    PubMed

    Quinlan, Nathan J; Dooley, Patrick N

    2007-08-01

    Viscous shear stress and Reynolds stress are often used to predict hemolysis and thrombosis due to flow-induced stress on blood elements in cardiovascular devices. These macroscopic stresses are distinct from the true stress on an individual cell, which is determined by the local microscale flow field. In this paper the flow-induced stress on blood cells is calculated for laminar and turbulent flow, using simplified models for cells and for turbulent eddies. The model is applied to estimate shear stress on red blood cells in flow through a prosthetic heart valve, using the energy spectral density measured by Liu et al. [J. Biomech. Eng. 122:118-124, 2000]. Results show that in laminar flow, the maximum stress on a cell is approximately equal to the macroscopic viscous shear stress. In turbulent flow through a prosthetic heart valve, the estimated root mean square of flow-induced stress on a cell is at least an order of magnitude less than the Reynolds stress. The results support the hypothesis that smaller turbulent eddies cause higher stress on cells. However, the stress due to an eddy depends on the velocity scale of the eddy as well as its length scale. For the heart valve flow investigated, turbulence contributes to flow-induced stress on cells almost equally across a broad range of the frequency spectrum. The model suggests that Reynolds stress alone is not an adequate predictor of cell damage in turbulent flow, and highlights the importance of the energy spectral density.

  6. Determination of the Shear Stress Distribution in a Laminate from the Applied Shear Resultant--A Simplified Shear Solution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bednarcyk, Brett A.; Aboudi, Jacob; Yarrington, Phillip W.

    2007-01-01

    The simplified shear solution method is presented for approximating the through-thickness shear stress distribution within a composite laminate based on laminated beam theory. The method does not consider the solution of a particular boundary value problem, rather it requires only knowledge of the global shear loading, geometry, and material properties of the laminate or panel. It is thus analogous to lamination theory in that ply level stresses can be efficiently determined from global load resultants (as determined, for instance, by finite element analysis) at a given location in a structure and used to evaluate the margin of safety on a ply by ply basis. The simplified shear solution stress distribution is zero at free surfaces, continuous at ply boundaries, and integrates to the applied shear load. Comparisons to existing theories are made for a variety of laminates, and design examples are provided illustrating the use of the method for determining through-thickness shear stress margins in several types of composite panels and in the context of a finite element structural analysis.

  7. Human endothelial cell responses to cardiovascular inspired pulsatile shear stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, Matthew; Baugh, Lauren; Black, Lauren, III; Kemmerling, Erica

    2016-11-01

    It is well established that hemodynamic shear stress regulates blood vessel structure and the development of vascular pathology. This process can be studied via in vitro models of endothelial cell responses to pulsatile shear stress. In this study, a macro-scale cone and plate viscometer was designed to mimic various shear stress waveforms found in the body and apply these stresses to human endothelial cells. The device was actuated by a PID-controlled DC gear-motor. Cells were exposed to 24 hours of pulsatile shear and then imaged and stained to track their morphology and secretions. These measurements were compared with control groups of cells exposed to constant shear and no shear. The results showed that flow pulsatility influenced levels of secreted proteins such as VE-cadherin and neuroregulin IHC. Cell morphology was also influenced by flow pulsatility; in general cells exposed to pulsatile shear stress developed a higher aspect ratio than cells exposed to no flow but a lower aspect ratio than cells exposed to steady flow.

  8. Shear-stress sensitive lenticular vesicles for targeted drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Holme, Margaret N; Fedotenko, Illya A; Abegg, Daniel; Althaus, Jasmin; Babel, Lucille; Favarger, France; Reiter, Renate; Tanasescu, Radu; Zaffalon, Pierre-Léonard; Ziegler, André; Müller, Bert; Saxer, Till; Zumbuehl, Andreas

    2012-08-01

    Atherosclerosis results in the narrowing of arterial blood vessels and this causes significant changes in the endogenous shear stress between healthy and constricted arteries. Nanocontainers that can release drugs locally with such rheological changes can be very useful. Here, we show that vesicles made from an artificial 1,3-diaminophospholipid are stable under static conditions but release their contents at elevated shear stress. These vesicles have a lenticular morphology, which potentially leads to instabilities along their equator. Using a model cardiovascular system based on polymer tubes and an external pump to represent shear stress in healthy and constricted vessels of the heart, we show that drugs preferentially release from the vesicles in constricted vessels that have high shear stress.

  9. Production of functional proteins: balance of shear stress and gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodwin, Thomas John (Inventor); Hammond, Timothy Grant (Inventor); Kaysen, James Howard (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    The present invention provides a method for production of functional proteins including hormones by renal cells in a three dimensional co-culture process responsive to shear stress using a rotating wall vessel. Natural mixture of renal cells expresses the enzyme 1-a-hydroxylase which can be used to generate the active form of vitamin D: 1,25-diOH vitamin D3. The fibroblast cultures and co-culture of renal cortical cells express the gene for erythropoietin and secrete erythropoietin into the culture supernatant. Other shear stress response genes are also modulated by shear stress, such as toxin receptors megalin and cubulin (gp280). Also provided is a method of treating in-need individual with the functional proteins produced in a three dimensional co-culture process responsive to shear stress using a rotating wall vessel.

  10. Production of functional proteins: balance of shear stress and gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodwin, Thomas John (Inventor); Hammond, Timothy Grant (Inventor); Kaysen, James Howard (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    The present invention provides a method for production of functional proteins including hormones by renal cells in a three dimensional co-culture process responsive to shear stress using a rotating wall vessel. Natural mixture of renal cells expresses the enzyme 1-a-hydroxylase which can be used to generate the active form of vitamin D: 1,25-diOH vitamin D3. The fibroblast cultures and co-culture of renal cortical cells express the gene for erythropoietin and secrete erythropoietin into the culture supernatant. Other shear stress response genes are also modulated by shear stress, such as toxin receptors megalin and cubulin (gp280). Also provided is a method of treating in-need individual with the functional proteins produced in a three dimensional co-culture process responsive to shear stress using a rotating wall vessel.

  11. Production of functional proteins: balance of shear stress and gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodwin, Thomas John (Inventor); Hammond, Timothy Grant (Inventor); Kaysen, James Howard (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A method for the production of functional proteins including hormones by renal cells in a three dimensional culturing process responsive to shear stress uses a rotating wall vessel. Natural mixture of renal cells expresses the enzyme 1-.alpha.-hydroxylase which can be used to generate the active form of vitamin D: 1,25-diOH vitamin D.sub.3. The fibroblast cultures and co-culture of renal cortical cells express the gene for erythropoietin and secrete erythropoietin into the culture supernatant. Other shear stress response genes are also modulated by shear stress, such as toxin receptors megalin and cubulin (gp280). Also provided is a method of treating an in-need individual with the functional proteins produced in a three dimensional co-culture process responsive to shear stress using a rotating wall vessel.

  12. Vorticity alignment and negative normal stresses in sheared attractive emulsions.

    PubMed

    Montesi, Alberto; Peña, Alejandro A; Pasquali, Matteo

    2004-02-06

    Attractive emulsions near the colloidal glass transition are investigated by rheometry and optical microscopy under shear. We find that (i) the apparent viscosity eta drops with increasing shear rate, then remains approximately constant in a range of shear rates, then continues to decay; (ii) the first normal stress difference N1 transitions sharply from nearly zero to negative in the region of constant shear viscosity; and (iii) correspondingly, cylindrical flocs form, align along the vorticity, and undergo a log-rolling movement. An analysis of the interplay between steric constraints, attractive forces, and composition explains this behavior, which seems universal to several other complex systems.

  13. Investigation of platelet margination phenomena at elevated shear stress.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Rui; Kameneva, Marina V; Antaki, James F

    2007-01-01

    Thrombosis is a common complication following the surgical implantation of blood contacting artificial organs. Platelet transport, which is an important process of thrombosis and strongly modulated by flow dynamics, has not been investigated under the shear stress level associated with these devices, which may range from tens to several hundred Pascal.The current research investigated platelet transport within blood under supra-physiological shear stress conditions through a micro flow visualization approach. Images of platelet-sized fluorescent particles in the blood flow were recorded within microchannels (2 cm x 100 microm x 100 microm). The results successfully demonstrated the occurrence of platelet-sized particle margination under shear stresses up to 193 Pa, revealing a platelet near-wall excess up to 8.7 near the wall (within 15 microm) at the highest shear stress. The concentration of red blood cells was found to influence the stream-wise development of platelet margination which was clearly observed in the 20% Ht sample but not the 40% Ht sample. Shear stress had a less dramatic effect on the margination phenomenon than did hematocrit. The results imply that cell-cell collision is an important factor for platelet transport under supra-physiologic shear stress conditions. It is anticipated that these results will contribute to the future design and optimization of artificial organs.

  14. Cell adhesion on zein films under shear stress field.

    PubMed

    Han, Yi-Long; Xu, Qin; Lu, Zhiqian; Wang, Jin-Ye

    2013-11-01

    Vascular implants after implantation need to improve the ability of cells to withstand flow-shear stress. As such, we want to test whether zein films could improve the flow-shear stress resistance of cells by control of their surface morphology. We chose Collagen, poly L-lactic acid (PLLA) and three types of zein as the coating films and evaluated the flow-shear stress resistance of NIH3T3, and EA.hy926 on these respective films. The results showed that the retention of two cell lines on Collagen film was better than PLLA and zein films. The cell retention of EA.hy926 on Zein 3 film with higher roughness was better than Zein 1 film with a flat surface in the first 2h. The cell retention of NIH3T3 on a rougher surface was always better than the smoother one under flow-shear stress condition for 6h. Observation of cell morphologies showed that the aspect ratio changed significantly for NIH3T3 cells upon flow-shear stress condition, as shown by reduced numbers of pseudopodia, increased cell rounding and shrinkage. Zein 3 film with higher roughness improved the flow-shear stress resistance of cells and might be used in vascular implant coatings.

  15. Surface micromachined differential piezoelectric shear-stress sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Randall P.; Kim, Donghwan; Gawalt, David P.; Hall, Neal A.

    2017-01-01

    The ability to measure viscous wall shear stress in high-speed flows is important for verifying simulated results typically obtained from direct numerical simulation in the aerodynamics research community, and robust sensors are required to measure wall shear reliably under such high-speed conditions. This letter summarizes the design, fabrication, and testing of a surface micromachined piezoelectric shear-stress sensor which uses a thin piezoelectric film to generate a voltage proportional to an applied shear stress without additional moving parts. A differential-cell architecture is used to enhance selectivity to shear stress while canceling normal-stress sensitivity. The conceptual design, fabrication details, and experimental measurements of device sensitivity are presented. A finite element model is used to validate the device performance against measurements, and to provide insight into the potential and electric fields underlying the device concept. The potential for understanding device behavior and optimization through modeling is illustrated using finite element analysis results. The minimum detectable shear stress for the sensor is estimated to be 52.9 mPa  √Hz-1 at 1.5 kHz.

  16. Effects of Fluid Shear Stress on Cancer Stem Cell Viability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sunday, Brittney; Triantafillu, Ursula; Domier, Ria; Kim, Yonghyun

    2014-11-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs), which are believed to be the source of tumor formation, are exposed to fluid shear stress as a result of blood flow within the blood vessels. It was theorized that CSCs would be less susceptible to cell death than non-CSCs after both types of cell were exposed to a fluid shear stress, and that higher levels of fluid shear stress would result in lower levels of cell viability for both cell types. To test this hypothesis, U87 glioblastoma cells were cultured adherently (containing smaller populations of CSCs) and spherically (containing larger populations of CSCs). They were exposed to fluid shear stress in a simulated blood flow through a 125-micrometer diameter polyetheretherketone (PEEK) tubing using a syringe pump. After exposure, cell viability data was collected using a BioRad TC20 Automated Cell Counter. Each cell type was tested at three physiological shear stress values: 5, 20, and 60 dynes per centimeter squared. In general, it was found that the CSC-enriched U87 sphere cells had higher cell viability than the CSC-depleted U87 adherent cancer cells. Interestingly, it was also observed that the cell viability was not negatively affected by the higher fluid shear stress values in the tested range. In future follow-up studies, higher shear stresses will be tested. Furthermore, CSCs from different tumor origins (e.g. breast tumor, prostate tumor) will be tested to determine cell-specific shear sensitivity. National Science Foundation Grant #1358991 supported the first author as an REU student.

  17. Trabecular bone remodelling simulation considering osteocytic response to fluid-induced shear stress.

    PubMed

    Adachi, Taiji; Kameo, Yoshitaka; Hojo, Masaki

    2010-06-13

    In bone functional adaptation by remodelling, osteocytes in the lacuno-canalicular system are believed to play important roles in the mechanosensory system. Under dynamic loading, bone matrix deformation generates an interstitial fluid flow in the lacuno-canalicular system; this flow induces shear stress on the osteocytic process membrane that is known to stimulate the osteocytes. In this sense, the osteocytes behave as mechanosensors and deliver mechanical information to neighbouring cells through the intercellular communication network. In this study, bone remodelling is assumed to be regulated by the mechanical signals collected by the osteocytes. From the viewpoint of multi-scale biomechanics, we propose a mathematical model of trabecular bone remodelling that takes into account the osteocytic mechanosensory network system. Based on this model, a computational simulation of trabecular bone remodelling was conducted for a single trabecula under cyclic uniaxial loading, demonstrating functional adaptation to the applied mechanical loading as a load-bearing construct.

  18. Regulation of endothelial connexin40 expression by shear stress.

    PubMed

    Vorderwülbecke, Bernd J; Maroski, Julian; Fiedorowicz, Katarzyna; Da Silva-Azevedo, Luis; Marki, Alex; Pries, Axel R; Zakrzewicz, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    Endothelial connexin (Cx)40 plays an important role in signal propagation along blood vessel walls, modulating vessel diameter and thereby blood flow. Blood flow, in turn, has been shown to alter endothelial Cx40 expression. However, the timing and shear stress dependence of this relationship have remained unclear, as have the signal transduction pathways involved and the functional implications. Therefore, the aim of this study was to quantify the effects of shear stress on endothelial Cx40 expression, to analyze the role of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt signaling involved, and to assess the possible functional consequences for the adaptation of microvascular networks. First-passage human umbilical vein endothelial cells were exposed to defined shear stress conditions and analyzed for Cx40 using real-time RT-PCR and immunoblot analysis. Shear stress caused long-term induction of Cx40 protein expression, with two short-term mRNA peaks at 4 and 16 h, indicating the dynamic nature of the adaptation process. Maximum shear stress-dependent induction was observed at shear levels between 6 and 10 dyn/cm(2). Simulation of this pattern of shear-dependent Cx expression in a vascular adaptation model of a microvascular network led to an improved fit for the simulated results to experimental measurements. Cx40 expression was greatly reduced by inhibiting PI3K or Akt, with PI3K activity being required for basal Cx40 expression and Akt activity taking part in its shear stress-dependent induction.

  19. Development of In-Fiber Reflective Bragg Gratings as Shear Stress Monitors in Aerodynamic Facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parmar, Devendra S.; Sprinkle, Danny R.; Singh, Jag J.

    1998-01-01

    Bragg gratings centered at nominal wavelengths of 1290 nm and 1300 run were inscribed in a 9/125 microns germano-silicate optical fiber, using continuous wave frequency doubled Ar+ laser radiation at 244 nm. Such gratings have been used extensively as temperature and strain monitors in smart structures. They have, however, never been used for measuring aerodynamic shear stresses. As a test of their sensitivity as shear stress monitors, a Bragg fiber attached to a metal plate was subjected to laminar flows in a glass pipe. An easily measurable large flow-induced wavelength shift (Delta Lambda(sub B)) was observed in the Bragg reflected wavelength. Thereafter, the grating was calibrated by making one time, simultaneous measurements of Delta Lambda(sub B) and the coefficient of skin friction (C(sub f)) with a skin friction balance, as a function of flow rates in a subsonic wind tunnel. Onset of fan-induced transition in the tunnel flow provided a unique flow rate for correlating Delta Lambda(sub B) and (C(sub f) values needed for computing effective modulus of rigidity (N(sub eff)) of the fiber attached to the metal plate. This value Of N(sub eff) is expected to remain constant throughout the elastic stress range expected during the Bragg grating aerodynamic tests. It has been used for calculating the value of Cf at various tunnel speeds, on the basis of measured values of Bragg wavelength shifts at those speeds.

  20. Prediction of plantar shear stress distribution by artificial intelligence methods.

    PubMed

    Yavuz, Metin; Ocak, Hasan; Hetherington, Vincent J; Davis, Brian L

    2009-09-01

    Shear forces under the human foot are thought to be responsible for various foot pathologies such as diabetic plantar ulcers and athletic blisters. Frictional shear forces might also play a role in the metatarsalgia observed among hallux valgus (HaV) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients. Due to the absence of commercial devices capable of measuring shear stress distribution, a number of linear models were developed. All of these have met with limited success. This study used nonlinear methods, specifically neural network and fuzzy logic schemes, to predict the distribution of plantar shear forces based on vertical loading parameters. In total, 73 subjects were recruited; 17 had diabetic neuropathy, 14 had HaV, 9 had RA, 11 had frequent foot blisters, and 22 were healthy. A feed-forward neural network (NN) and adaptive neurofuzzy inference system (NFIS) were built. These systems were then applied to a custom-built platform, which collected plantar pressure and shear stress data as subjects walked over the device. The inputs to both models were peak pressure, peak pressure-time integral, and time to peak pressure, and the output was peak resultant shear. Root-mean-square error (RMSE) values were calculated to test the models' accuracy. RMSE/actual shear ratio varied between 0.27 and 0.40 for NN predictions. Similarly, NFIS estimations resulted in a 0.28-0.37 ratio for local peak values in all subject groups. On the other hand, error percentages for global peak shear values were found to be in the range 11.4-44.1. These results indicate that there is no direct relationship between pressure and shear magnitudes. Future research should aim to decrease error levels by introducing shear stress dependent variables into the models.

  1. A model for studying the effect of shear stress on interactions between vascular endothelial cells and smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Jeng-Jiann; Chen, Li-Jing; Chen, Cheng-Nan; Lee, Pei-Ling; Lee, Chih-I

    2004-04-01

    Vascular endothelial cells (ECs) are constantly subjected to blood flow-induced shear stress and the influences of neighboring smooth muscle cells (SMCs). In the present study, a coculture flow system was developed to study the effect of shear stress on EC-SMC interactions. ECs and SMCs were separated by a porous membrane with only the EC side subjected to the flow condition. When ECs were exposed to a shear stress of 12 dynes/cm2 for 24 h, the cocultured SMCs tended to orient perpendicularly to the flow direction. This perpendicular orientation of the cocultured SMCs to flow direction was not observed when ECs were exposed to a shear stress of 2 dynes/cm2. Under the static condition, long and parallel actin bundles were observed in the central regions of the cocultured SMCs, whereas the actin filaments localized mainly at the periphery of the cocultured ECs. After 24 h of flow application, the cocultured ECs displayed very long, well-organized, parallel actin stress fibers aligned with the flow direction in the central regions of the cells. Immunostaining of platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 confirmed the elongation and alignment of the cocultured ECs with the flow direction. Coculture with SMCs under static condition induced EC gene expressions of growth-related oncogene-alpha and monocyte chemotactic protein-1, and shear stress was found to abolish these SMC-induced gene expressions. Our results suggest that shear stress may serve as a down-regulator for the pathophysiologically relevant gene expression in ECs cocultured with SMCs.

  2. Elevated Shear Stress in Arteriovenous Fistulae: Is There Mechanical Homeostasis?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGah, Patrick; Leotta, Daniel; Beach, Kirk; Aliseda, Alberto

    2011-11-01

    Arteriovenous fistulae are created surgically to provide access for dialysis in patients with renal failure. The current hypothesis is that the rapid remodeling occurring after the fistula creation is in part a process to restore the mechanical stresses to some preferred level (i.e. mechanical homeostasis). Given that nearly 50% of fistulae require an intervention after one year, understanding the altered hemodynamic stress is important in improving clinical outcomes. We perform numerical simulations of four patient-specific models of functioning fistulae reconstructed from 3D Doppler ultrasound scans. Our results show that the vessels are subjected to `normal' shear stresses away from the anastomosis; about 1 Pa in the veins and about 2.5 Pa in the arteries. However, simulations show that part of the anastomoses are consistently subjected to very high shear stress (>10Pa) over the cardiac cycle. These elevated values shear stresses are caused by the transitional flows at the anastomoses including flow separation and quasiperiodic vortex shedding. This suggests that the remodeling process lowers shear stress in the fistula but that it is limited as evidenced by the elevated shear at the anastomoses. This constant insult on the arterialized venous wall may explain the process of late fistula failure in which the dialysis access become occluded after years of use. Supported by an R21 Grant from NIDDK (DK081823).

  3. Short exposure time sensitivity of white cells to shear stress.

    PubMed

    Carter, Janell; Hristova, Katia; Harasaki, Hiroaki; Smith, W A

    2003-01-01

    White cells are a critical functional element circulating in blood. This study sheared fresh whole bovine blood in stainless steel and polymeric capillary tubes of various lengths and diameters. Flow rate was constant, resulting in a range of exposure times and shear stresses. White cell count, cell integrity (trypan blue exclusion), and phagocytic index (latex bead ingestion) were assayed. It was found that cell function declined at lower stresses than cell count. White cell count was maintained at higher stress levels at the short exposure times used here compared with the published results at longer times. This study suggests that function, not count, is the critical parameter when studying shear effects on white cells, and that, like red cells, there may be an exposure time effect and that white cell function is impacted at stresses lower than are required for hemolysis.

  4. On the gating of mechanosensitive channels by fluid shear stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Zhangli; Pak, On Shun; Feng, Zhe; Liu, Allen P.; Young, Yuan-Nan

    2016-12-01

    Mechanosensation is an important process in biological fluid-structure interaction. To understand the biophysics underlying mechanosensation, it is essential to quantify the correlation between membrane deformation, membrane tension, external fluid shear stress, and conformation of mechanosensitive (MS) channels. Smoothed dissipative particle dynamics (SDPD) simulations of vesicle/cell in three types of flow configurations are conducted to calculate the tension in lipid membrane due to fluid shear stress from the surrounding viscous flow. In combination with a simple continuum model for an MS channel, SDPD simulation results suggest that shearing adhered vesicles/cells is more effective to induce membrane tension sufficient to stretch MS channels open than a free shear flow or a constrictive channel flow. In addition, we incorporate the bilayer-cytoskeletal interaction in a two-component model to probe the effects of a cytoskeletal network on the gating of MS channels.

  5. Shear Stress Sensing with Elastic Microfence Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cisotto, Alexxandra; Palmieri, Frank L.; Saini, Aditya; Lin, Yi; Thurman, Christopher S; Kim, Jinwook; Kim, Taeyang; Connell, John W.; Zhu, Yong; Gopalarathnam, Ashok; Jiang, Xiaoning; Wohl, Christopher J.

    2015-01-01

    In this work, elastic microfences were generated for the purpose of measuring shear forces acting on a wind tunnel model. The microfences were fabricated in a two part process involving laser ablation patterning to generate a template in a polymer film followed by soft lithography with a two-part silicone. Incorporation of a fluorescent dye was demonstrated as a method to enhance contrast between the sensing elements and the substrate. Sensing elements consisted of multiple microfences prepared at different orientations to enable determination of both shear force and directionality. Microfence arrays were integrated into an optical microscope with sub-micrometer resolution. Initial experiments were conducted on a flat plate wind tunnel model. Both image stabilization algorithms and digital image correlation were utilized to determine the amount of fence deflection as a result of airflow. Initial free jet experiments indicated that the microfences could be readily displaced and this displacement was recorded through the microscope.

  6. Dynamic wall shear stress measurements in a turbulent channel flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amili, Omid; Soria, Julio

    2010-11-01

    To quantify and understand the dynamics of near wall momentum transfer, high spatial resolution, time-resolved measurements of wall shear stress distribution are essential. In this study, a film-based shear stress sensor has been used to measure the time-resolved local wall shear stress distribution in a turbulent channel flow. Measurements have been undertaken in a turbulent channel flow at Reynolds numbers up to 130,000 based on the bulk velocity and channel height. The measured fluctuating wall shear stress distribution provides spatio-temporal information of the characteristics of near wall structures by detecting their footprints. The span-wise extent of the positive two-point correlation of the stream-wise shear stress fluctuations provides the average width in the order of 100 wall units for the near-wall coherent structures. An investigation of the topological features of the velocity gradient and rate of strain tensors enables us to show an intrinsic characteristic of the near wall flow, which follows a two-dimensional flow pattern.

  7. Molecular origins of higher harmonics in large-amplitude oscillatory shear flow: Shear stress response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilbert, P. H.; Giacomin, A. J.

    2016-10-01

    Recent work has focused on deepening our understanding of the molecular origins of the higher harmonics that arise in the shear stress response of polymeric liquids in large-amplitude oscillatory shear flow. For instance, these higher harmonics have been explained by just considering the orientation distribution of rigid dumbbells suspended in a Newtonian solvent. These dumbbells, when in dilute suspension, form the simplest relevant molecular model of polymer viscoelasticity, and this model specifically neglects interactions between the polymer molecules [R. B. Bird et al., "Dilute rigid dumbbell suspensions in large-amplitude oscillatory shear flow: Shear stress response," J. Chem. Phys. 140, 074904 (2014)]. In this paper, we explore these interactions by examining the Curtiss-Bird model, a kinetic molecular theory designed specifically to account for the restricted motions that arise when polymer chains are concentrated, thus interacting and specifically, entangled. We begin our comparison using a heretofore ignored explicit analytical solution [X.-J. Fan and R. B. Bird, "A kinetic theory for polymer melts. VI. Calculation of additional material functions," J. Non-Newtonian Fluid Mech. 15, 341 (1984)]. For concentrated systems, the chain motion transverse to the chain axis is more restricted than along the axis. This anisotropy is described by the link tension coefficient, ɛ, for which several special cases arise: ɛ = 0 corresponds to reptation, ɛ > 1/8 to rod-climbing, 1/5 ≤ ɛ ≤ 3/4 to reasonable predictions for shear-thinning in steady simple shear flow, and ɛ = 1 to the dilute solution without hydrodynamic interaction. In this paper, we examine the shapes of the shear stress versus shear rate loops for the special cases ɛ = (" separators=" 0 , 1 / 8 , 3 / 8 , 1 ) , and we compare these with those of rigid dumbbell and reptation model predictions.

  8. Shear-stress-controlled dynamics of nematic complex fluids.

    PubMed

    Klapp, Sabine H L; Hess, Siegfried

    2010-05-01

    Based on a mesoscopic theory we investigate the nonequilibrium dynamics of a sheared nematic liquid, with the control parameter being the shear stress σ xy (rather than the usual shear rate, γ). To this end we supplement the equations of motion for the orientational order parameters by an equation for γ, which then becomes time dependent. Shearing the system from an isotropic state, the stress-controlled flow properties turn out to be essentially identical to those at fixed γ. Pronounced differences occur when the equilibrium state is nematic. Here, shearing at controlled γ yields several nonequilibrium transitions between different dynamic states, including chaotic regimes. The corresponding stress-controlled system has only one transition from a regular periodic into a stationary (shear-aligned) state. The position of this transition in the σ xy-γ plane turns out to be tunable by the delay time entering our control scheme for σ xy. Moreover, a sudden change in the control method can stabilize the chaotic states appearing at fixed γ.

  9. Effects of dynamic shear and transmural pressure on wall shear stress sensitivity in collecting lymphatic vessels.

    PubMed

    Kornuta, Jeffrey A; Nepiyushchikh, Zhanna; Gasheva, Olga Y; Mukherjee, Anish; Zawieja, David C; Dixon, J Brandon

    2015-11-01

    Given the known mechanosensitivity of the lymphatic vasculature, we sought to investigate the effects of dynamic wall shear stress (WSS) on collecting lymphatic vessels while controlling for transmural pressure. Using a previously developed ex vivo lymphatic perfusion system (ELPS) capable of independently controlling both transaxial pressure gradient and average transmural pressure on an isolated lymphatic vessel, we imposed a multitude of flow conditions on rat thoracic ducts, while controlling for transmural pressure and measuring diameter changes. By gradually increasing the imposed flow through a vessel, we determined the WSS at which the vessel first shows sign of contraction inhibition, defining this point as the shear stress sensitivity of the vessel. The shear stress threshold that triggered a contractile response was significantly greater at a transmural pressure of 5 cmH2O (0.97 dyne/cm(2)) than at 3 cmH2O (0.64 dyne/cm(2)). While contraction frequency was reduced when a steady WSS was applied, this inhibition was reversed when the applied WSS oscillated, even though the mean wall shear stresses between the conditions were not significantly different. When the applied oscillatory WSS was large enough, flow itself synchronized the lymphatic contractions to the exact frequency of the applied waveform. Both transmural pressure and the rate of change of WSS have significant impacts on the contractile response of lymphatic vessels to flow. Specifically, time-varying shear stress can alter the inhibition of phasic contraction frequency and even coordinate contractions, providing evidence that dynamic shear could play an important role in the contractile function of collecting lymphatic vessels.

  10. Effects of dynamic shear and transmural pressure on wall shear stress sensitivity in collecting lymphatic vessels

    PubMed Central

    Kornuta, Jeffrey A.; Nepiyushchikh, Zhanna; Gasheva, Olga Y.; Mukherjee, Anish; Zawieja, David C.

    2015-01-01

    Given the known mechanosensitivity of the lymphatic vasculature, we sought to investigate the effects of dynamic wall shear stress (WSS) on collecting lymphatic vessels while controlling for transmural pressure. Using a previously developed ex vivo lymphatic perfusion system (ELPS) capable of independently controlling both transaxial pressure gradient and average transmural pressure on an isolated lymphatic vessel, we imposed a multitude of flow conditions on rat thoracic ducts, while controlling for transmural pressure and measuring diameter changes. By gradually increasing the imposed flow through a vessel, we determined the WSS at which the vessel first shows sign of contraction inhibition, defining this point as the shear stress sensitivity of the vessel. The shear stress threshold that triggered a contractile response was significantly greater at a transmural pressure of 5 cmH2O (0.97 dyne/cm2) than at 3 cmH2O (0.64 dyne/cm2). While contraction frequency was reduced when a steady WSS was applied, this inhibition was reversed when the applied WSS oscillated, even though the mean wall shear stresses between the conditions were not significantly different. When the applied oscillatory WSS was large enough, flow itself synchronized the lymphatic contractions to the exact frequency of the applied waveform. Both transmural pressure and the rate of change of WSS have significant impacts on the contractile response of lymphatic vessels to flow. Specifically, time-varying shear stress can alter the inhibition of phasic contraction frequency and even coordinate contractions, providing evidence that dynamic shear could play an important role in the contractile function of collecting lymphatic vessels. PMID:26333787

  11. High shear stress induces atherosclerotic vulnerable plaque formation through angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yi; Qiu, Juhui; Luo, Shisui; Xie, Xiang; Zheng, Yiming; Zhang, Kang; Ye, Zhiyi; Liu, Wanqian; Gregersen, Hans; Wang, Guixue

    2016-01-01

    Rupture of atherosclerotic plaques causing thrombosis is the main cause of acute coronary syndrome and ischemic strokes. Inhibition of thrombosis is one of the important tasks developing biomedical materials such as intravascular stents and vascular grafts. Shear stress (SS) influences the formation and development of atherosclerosis. The current review focuses on the vulnerable plaques observed in the high shear stress (HSS) regions, which localizes at the proximal region of the plaque intruding into the lumen. The vascular outward remodelling occurs in the HSS region for vascular compensation and that angiogenesis is a critical factor for HSS which induces atherosclerotic vulnerable plaque formation. These results greatly challenge the established belief that low shear stress is important for expansive remodelling, which provides a new perspective for preventing the transition of stable plaques to high-risk atherosclerotic lesions. PMID:27482467

  12. A Rotary Flow Channel for Shear Stress Sensor Calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zuckerwar, Allan J.; Scott, Michael A.

    2004-01-01

    A proposed shear sensor calibrator consists of a rotating wheel with the sensor mounted tangential to the rim and positioned in close proximity to the rim. The shear stress generated by the flow at the sensor position is simply tau(sub omega) = (mu)r(omega)/h, where mu is the viscosity of the ambient gas, r the wheel radius, omega the angular velocity of the wheel, and h the width of the gap between the wheel rim and the sensor. With numerical values of mu = 31 (mu)Pa s (neon at room temperature), r = 0.5 m, omega = 754 /s (7200 rpm), and h = 50.8 m, a shear stress of tau(sub omega) = 231 Pa can be generated. An analysis based on one-dimensional flow, with the flow velocity having only an angular component as a function of the axial and radial coordinates, yields corrections to the above simple formula for the curvature of the wheel, flatness of the sensor, and finite width of the wheel. It is assumed that the sensor mount contains a trough (sidewalls) to render a velocity release boundary condition at the edges of the rim. The Taylor number under maximum flow conditions is found to be 62.3, sufficiently low to obviate flow instability. The fact that the parameters entering into the evaluation of the shear stress can be measured to high accuracy with well-defined uncertainties makes the proposed calibrator suitable for a physical standard for shear stress calibration.

  13. Nonlinear Reynolds stress model for turbulent shear flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barton, J. Michael; Rubinstein, R.; Kirtley, K. R.

    1991-01-01

    A nonlinear algebraic Reynolds stress model, derived using the renormalization group, is applied to equilibrium homogeneous shear flow and fully developed flow in a square duct. The model, which is quadratically nonlinear in the velocity gradients, successfully captures the large-scale inhomogeneity and anisotropy of the flows studied. The ratios of normal stresses, as well as the actual magnitudes of the stresses are correctly predicted for equilibrium homogeneous shear flow. Reynolds normal stress anisotropy and attendant turbulence driven secondary flow are predicted for a square duct. Profiles of mean velocity and normal stresses are in good agreement with measurements. Very close to walls, agreement with measurements diminishes. The model has the benefit of containing no arbitrary constants; all values are determined directly from the theory. It seems that near wall behavior is influenced by more than the large scale anisotropy accommodated in the current model. More accurate near wall calculations may well require a model for anisotropic dissipation.

  14. Buried wire gage for wall shear stress measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murthy, V. S.; Rose, W. C.

    1978-01-01

    A buried wire gage for measuring wall shear stress in fluid flow was studied and further developed. Several methods of making this relatively new type of gage were examined to arrive at a successful technique that is well-suited for wind-tunnel testing. A series of measurements was made to demonstrate the adequacy of a two-point calibration procedure for these gages. The buried wire gage is also demonstrated to be ideally suited for quantitative measurement of wall shear stress in wind-tunnel testing.

  15. Strain stiffening and stress heterogeneities in sheared collagen networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urbach, Jeffrey

    2014-03-01

    Disordered networks of stiff or semi-flexible filaments display unusual mechanical properties, including dramatic stiffening when sheared, but little is known about the spatial distribution of stresses. This talk will introduce the technique of Boundary Stress Microscopy, which adapts the approach of traction force microscopy to rheological measurements in order to quantify the non-uniform surface stresses in sheared soft materials. Our results on networks of the biopolymer collagen, a major component of the extracellular matrix, show stress variations over length scales much larger than the network mesh size. We find that the heterogeneity increases with strain stiffening, with stresses at high strains exceeding average stresses by an order of magnitude. The strain stiffening behavior over a wide range of mesh sizes can be parameterized by a single characteristic strain and associated stress, which describes both the strain stiffening regime and network yielding. The characteristic stress is approximately proportional to network density, but the peak stress at both the characteristic strain and at yielding are remarkably insensitive to concentration. These results show the power of Boundary Stress Microscopy to reveal the nature of stress propagation in disordered soft materials, which is critical for understanding many important mechanical properties, including the ultimate strength of a material and the nature of appropriate microscopic constitutive equations. Supported by the AFOSR (FA9550-10-1-0473) and the NSF (DMR-0804782).

  16. Aspirin Has Limited Ability to Modulate Shear-Mediated Platelet Activation Associated with Elevated Shear Stress of Ventricular Assist Devices

    PubMed Central

    Valerio, Lorenzo; Tran, Phat L.; Sheriff, Jawaad; Brengle, William; Ghosh, Ram; Chiu, Wei-Che; Redaelli, Alberto; Fiore, Gianfranco B.; Pappalardo, Federico; Bluestein, Danny; Slepian, Marvin J.

    2016-01-01

    Continuous flow ventricular assist devices (cfVADs) while effective in advanced heart failure, remain plagued by thrombosis related to abnormal flows and elevated shear stress. To limit cfVAD thrombosis, patients utilize complex anti-thrombotic regimens built upon a foundation of aspirin (ASA). While much data exists on ASA as a modulator of biochemically-mediated platelet activation, limited data exists as to the efficacy of ASA as a means of limiting shear-mediated platelet activation, particularly under elevated shear stress common within cfVADs. We investigated the ability of ASA (20, 25 and 125 μM) to limit shear-mediated platelet activation under conditions of: 1) constant shear stress (30 dyne/cm2 and 70 dyne/cm2); 2) dynamic shear stress, and 3) initial high shear exposure (70 dyne/cm2) followed by low shear exposure – i.e. a platelet sensitization protocol, utilizing a hemodynamic shearing device providing uniform shear stress in vitro. The efficacy of ASA to limit platelet activation mediated via passage through a clinical cfVAD system (DeBakey Micromed) in vitro was also studied. ASA reduced platelet activation only under conditions of low shear stress (38% reduction compared to control, n = 10, p < 0.004), with minimal protection at higher shear stress and under dynamic conditions (n = 10, p > 0.5) with no limitation of platelet sensitization. ASA had limited ability (25.6% reduction in platelet activation rate) to modulate shear-mediated platelet activation induced via cfVAD passage. These findings, while performed under “deconstructed” non-clinical conditions by utilizing purified platelets alone in vitro, provide a potential contributory mechanistic explanation for the persistent thrombosis rates experienced clinically in cfVAD patients despite ASA therapy. An opportunity exists to develop enhanced pharmacologic strategies to limit shear-mediated platelet activation at elevated shear levels associated with mechanical circulatory support

  17. A Two-Axis Direct Fluid Shear Stress Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adcock, Edward E.; Scott, Michael A.; Bajikar, Sateesh S.

    2010-01-01

    This innovation is a miniature or micro sized semiconductor sensor design that provides two axis direct non-intrusive measurement of skin friction or wall shear stress in fluid flow. The sensor is fabricated by micro-electro-mechanical system (MEMS) technology, enabling small size and low cost reproductions. The sensors have been fabricated by utilizing MEMS fabrication processes to bond a sensing element wafer to a fluid coupling wafer. This layering technique provides for an out of plane dimension that is on the same order of length as the inplane dimensions. The sensor design has the following characteristics: a shear force collecting plate with dimensions that can be tailored to various application specific requirements such as spatial resolution, temporal resolution and shear force range and resolution. This plate is located coplanar to both the sensor body and flow boundary, and is connected to a dual axis gimbal structure by a connecting column or lever arm. The dual axis gimbal structure has torsional hinges with embedded piezoresistive torsional strain gauges which provide a voltage output that is correlated to the applied shear stress (and excitation current) on force collection plate that is located on the flow boundary surface (hence the transduction method). This combination of design elements create a force concentration and resolution structure that enables the generation of a large stress on the strain gauge from the small shear stress on the flow boundary wall. This design as well as the use of back side electrical contacts establishes a non-intrusive method to quantitatively measure the shear force vector on aerodynamic bodies.

  18. Calculation of Near-Bank Velocity and Boundary Shear Stress

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Detailed knowledge of the flow and boundary shear stress fields near the banks of natural channels is essential for making accurate calculations of rates of near-bank sediment transport and geomorphic adjustment. This paper presents a test of a relatively simple, fully predictive, numerical method f...

  19. Incomplete restoration of homeostatic shear stress within arteriovenous fistulae.

    PubMed

    McGah, Patrick M; Leotta, Daniel F; Beach, Kirk W; Eugene Zierler, R; Aliseda, Alberto

    2013-01-01

    Arteriovenous fistulae are surgically created to provide adequate access for dialysis patients suffering from end-stage renal disease. It has long been hypothesized that the rapid blood vessel remodeling occurring after fistula creation is, in part, a process to restore the mechanical stresses to some preferred level, i.e., mechanical homeostasis. We present computational hemodynamic simulations in four patient-specific models of mature arteriovenous fistulae reconstructed from 3D ultrasound scans. Our results suggest that these mature fistulae have remodeled to return to ''normal'' shear stresses away from the anastomoses: about 1.0 Pa in the outflow veins and about 2.5 Pa in the inflow arteries. Large parts of the anastomoses were found to be under very high shear stresses >15 Pa, over most of the cardiac cycle. These results suggest that the remodeling process works toward restoring mechanical homeostasis in the fistulae, but that the process is limited or incomplete, even in mature fistulae, as evidenced by the elevated shear at or near the anastomoses. Based on the long term clinical viability of these dialysis accesses, we hypothesize that the elevated nonhomeostatic shear stresses in some portions of the vessels were not detrimental to fistula patency.

  20. Production of Functional Proteins: Balance of Shear Stress and Gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodwin, Thomas John (Inventor); Hammond, Timothy Grant (Inventor); Haysen, James Howard (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    The present invention provides for a method of culturing cells and inducing the expression of at least one gene in the cell culture. The method provides for contacting the cell with a transcription factor decoy oligonucleotide sequence directed against a nucleotide sequence encoding a shear stress response element.

  1. Signatures of deterministic chaos in dyslipidemic erythrocytes under shear stress.

    PubMed

    Korol, A M; Rasia, R

    2003-03-01

    The erythrocytes deformation under shear stress, the viscoelastic properties and the effects observed on healthy donors and on dyslipidemic patients are investigated from the point of view of nonlinear dynamics. Finally it is suggested that the different results obtained could be useful with regard to pathophysiological disturbances and their treatment.

  2. A fluidized bed technique for estimating soil critical shear stress

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil erosion models, depending on how they are formulated, always have erodibilitiy parameters in the erosion equations. For a process-based model like the Water Erosion Prediction Project (WEPP) model, the erodibility parameters include rill and interrill erodibility and critical shear stress. Thes...

  3. The Need for a Shear Stress Calibration Standard

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, Michael A.

    2004-01-01

    By surveying current research of various micro-electro mechanical systems (MEMS) shear stress sensor development efforts we illustrate the wide variety of methods used to test and characterize these sensors. The different methods of testing these sensors make comparison of results difficult in some cases, and also this comparison is further complicated by the different formats used in reporting the results of these tests. The fact that making these comparisons can be so difficult at times clearly illustrates a need for standardized testing and reporting methodologies. This need indicates that the development of a national or international standard for the calibration of MEMS shear stress sensors should be undertaken. As a first step towards the development of this standard, two types of devices are compared and contrasted. The first type device is a laminar flow channel with two different versions considered: the first built with standard manufacturing techniques and the second with advanced precision manufacturing techniques. The second type of device is a new concept for creating a known shear stress consisting of a rotating wheel with the sensor mounted tangentially to the rim and positioned in close proximity to the rim. The shear stress generated by the flow at the sensor position is simply tau = (mu)r(omega)/h, where mu is the viscosity of the ambient gas, r the wheel radius, omega the angular velocity of the wheel, and h the width of the gap between the wheel rim and the sensor. Additionally, issues related to the development of a standard for shear stress calibration are identified and discussed.

  4. Vascular smooth muscle cell glycocalyx mediates shear stress-induced contractile responses via a Rho kinase (ROCK)-myosin light chain phosphatase (MLCP) pathway.

    PubMed

    Kang, Hongyan; Liu, Jiajia; Sun, Anqiang; Liu, Xiao; Fan, Yubo; Deng, Xiaoyan

    2017-02-13

    The vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) are exposed to interstitial flow induced shear stress that may be sensed by the surface glycocalyx, a surface layer composed primarily of proteoglycans and glycoproteins, to mediate cell contraction during the myogenic response. We, therefore, attempted to elucidate the signal pathway of the glycocalyx mechanotransduction in shear stress regulated SMC contraction. Human umbilical vein SMCs (HUVSMCs) deprived of serum for 3-4 days were exposed to a step increase (0 to 20 dyn/cm(2)) in shear stress in a parallel plate flow chamber, and reduction in the cell area was quantified as contraction. The expressions of Rho kinase (ROCK) and its downstream signal molecules, the myosin-binding subunit of myosin phosphatase (MYPT) and the myosin light chain 2 (MLC2), were evaluated. Results showed that the exposure of HUVSMCs to shear stress for 30 min induced cell contraction significantly, which was accompanied by ROCK1 up-regulation, re-distribution, as well as MYPT1 and MLC activation. However, these shear induced phenomenon could be completely abolished by heparinase III or Y-27632 pre-treatment. These results indicate shear stress induced VSMC contraction was mediated by cell surface glycocalyx via a ROCK-MLC phosphatase (MLCP) pathway, providing evidence of the glycocalyx mechanotransduction in myogenic response.

  5. Vascular smooth muscle cell glycocalyx mediates shear stress-induced contractile responses via a Rho kinase (ROCK)-myosin light chain phosphatase (MLCP) pathway

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Hongyan; Liu, Jiajia; Sun, Anqiang; Liu, Xiao; Fan, Yubo; Deng, Xiaoyan

    2017-01-01

    The vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) are exposed to interstitial flow induced shear stress that may be sensed by the surface glycocalyx, a surface layer composed primarily of proteoglycans and glycoproteins, to mediate cell contraction during the myogenic response. We, therefore, attempted to elucidate the signal pathway of the glycocalyx mechanotransduction in shear stress regulated SMC contraction. Human umbilical vein SMCs (HUVSMCs) deprived of serum for 3–4 days were exposed to a step increase (0 to 20 dyn/cm2) in shear stress in a parallel plate flow chamber, and reduction in the cell area was quantified as contraction. The expressions of Rho kinase (ROCK) and its downstream signal molecules, the myosin-binding subunit of myosin phosphatase (MYPT) and the myosin light chain 2 (MLC2), were evaluated. Results showed that the exposure of HUVSMCs to shear stress for 30 min induced cell contraction significantly, which was accompanied by ROCK1 up-regulation, re-distribution, as well as MYPT1 and MLC activation. However, these shear induced phenomenon could be completely abolished by heparinase III or Y-27632 pre-treatment. These results indicate shear stress induced VSMC contraction was mediated by cell surface glycocalyx via a ROCK-MLC phosphatase (MLCP) pathway, providing evidence of the glycocalyx mechanotransduction in myogenic response. PMID:28191820

  6. Tidal asymmetry and variability of bed shear stress and sediment bed flux at a site in San Francisco Bay, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brennan, Matthew L.; Schoellhamer, David H.; Burau, Jon R.; Monismith, Stephen G.; Winterwerp, J.C.; Kranenburg, C.

    2002-01-01

    The relationship between sediment bed flux and bed shear stress during a pair of field experiments in a partially stratified estuary is examined in this paper. Time series of flow velocity, vertical density profiles, and suspended sediment concentration were measured continuously throughout the water column and intensely within 1 meter of the bed. These time series were analyzed to determine bed shear stress, vertical turbulent sediment flux, and mass of sediment suspended in the water column. Resuspension, as inferred from near-bed measurements of vertical turbulent sediment flux, was flood dominant, in accordance with the flood-dominant bed shear stress. Bathymetry-induced residual flow, gravitational circulation, and ebb tide salinity stratification contributed to the flood dominance. In addition to this flow-induced asymmetry, the erodibility of the sediment appears to increase during the first 2 hours of flood tide. Tidal asymmetry in bed shear stress and erodibility help explain an estuarine turbidity maximum that is present during flood tide but absent during ebb tide. Because horizontal advection was insignificant during most of the observation periods, the change in bed mass can be estimated from changes in the total suspended sediment mass. The square wave shape of the bed mass time series indicates that suspended sediment rapidly deposited in an unconsolidated or concentrated benthic suspension layer at slack tides and instantly resuspended when the shear stress became sufficiently large during a subsequent tide. The variability of bed mass associated with the spring/neap cycle (about 60 mg/cm2) is similar to that associated with the semidiurnal tidal cycle.

  7. Shear stress paradigm for perinatal fractal arterial network remodeling in lambs with pulmonary hypertension and increased pulmonary blood flow.

    PubMed

    Ghorishi, Zahra; Milstein, Jay M; Poulain, Francis R; Moon-Grady, Anita; Tacy, Theresa; Bennett, Stephen H; Fineman, Jeffery R; Eldridge, Marlowe W

    2007-06-01

    Congenital heart disease with increased blood flow commonly leads to the development of increased pulmonary vascular reactivity and pulmonary arterial hypertension by mechanisms that remain unclear. We hypothesized a shear stress paradigm of hemodynamic reactivity and network remodeling via the persistence and/or exacerbation of a fetal diameter bifurcation phenotype [parent diameter d(0) and daughters d(1) >or= d(2) with alpha < 2 in (d(1)/d(0))(alpha) + (d(2)/d(0))(alpha) and area ratio beta < 1 in beta = (d(1)(2)+ d(2)(2))/ d(0)(2)] that mechanically acts as a high resistance magnifier/shear stress amplifier to blood flow. Evidence of a hemodynamic influence on network remodeling was assessed with a lamb model of high-flow-induced secondary pulmonary hypertension in which an aortopulmonary graft was surgically placed in one twin in utero (Shunt twin) but not in the other (Control twin). Eight weeks after birth arterial casts were made of the left pulmonary arterial circulation. Bifurcation diameter measurements down to 0.010 mm in the Shunt and Control twins were then compared with those of an unoperated fetal cast. Network organization, cumulative resistance, and pressure/shear stress distributions were evaluated via a fractal model whose dimension D(0) approximately alpha delineates hemodynamic reactivity. Fetus and Control twin D(0) differed: fetus D(0)=1.72, a high-resistance/shear stress amplifying condition; control twin D(0) = 2.02, an area-preserving transport configuration. The Shunt twin (D(0)=1.72) maintained a fetal design but paradoxically remodeled diameter geometry to decrease cumulative resistance relative to the Control twin. Our results indicate that fetal/neonatal pulmonary hemodynamic reactivity remodels in response to shear stress, but the response to elevated blood flow and pulmonary hypertension involves the persistence and exacerbation of a fetal diameter bifurcation phenotype that facilitates endothelial dysfunction/injury.

  8. Development of a shear stress sensor to analyse the influence of polymers on the turbulent wall shear stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nottebrock, Bernardo; Große, Sebastian; Schröder, Wolfgang

    2011-05-01

    The drag reducing effect of polymers in a channel flow is well known and it is assumed that the polymer filaments interfere with the turbulent structures in the very near-wall flow. To analyse their precise effect, a micro-pillar shear stress sensor (MPS3) measurement system is developed which allows the detection of wall shear stress at high spatial and temporal resolutions. Different manufacturing techniques for the required micro-pillars are discussed and their influence on the flow is investigated evidencing the non-intrusive character of the pillars. Subsequently, a complete calibration is presented to relate the recorded deflection to wall shear stress values and to assure the correct detection over the whole expected frequency spectrum. A feasibility study about the ability to visualize the two-dimensional wall shear stress distribution completes the discussion about the validity of MPS3. In the last step, the drag reduction of a polymer filament grafted on a micro-pillar compared to a plain pillar and the application of MPS3 in an ocean-type polymer solution are investigated. The results confirm the expected behaviour found in the literature.

  9. Arrest stress of uniformly sheared wet granular matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebrahimnazhad Rahbari, S. H.; Brinkmann, M.; Vollmer, J.

    2015-06-01

    We conduct extensive independent numerical experiments considering frictionless disks without internal degrees of freedom (rotation, etc.) in two dimensions. We report here that for a large range of the packing fractions below random-close packing, all components of the stress tensor of wet granular materials remain finite in the limit of zero shear rate. This is direct evidence for a fluid-to-solid arrest transition. The offset value of the shear stress characterizes plastic deformation of the arrested state which corresponds to dynamic yield stress of the system. Based on an analytical line of argument, we propose that the mean number of capillary bridges per particle, ν , follows a nontrivial dependence on the packing fraction, ϕ , and the capillary energy, ɛ . Most noticeably, we show that ν is a generic and universal quantity which does not depend on the driving protocol. Using this universal quantity, we calculate the arrest stress, σa, analytically based on a balance of the energy injection rate due to the external force driving the flow and the dissipation rate accounting for the rupture of capillary bridges. The resulting prediction of σa is a nonlinear function of the packing fraction, ϕ , and the capillary energy, ɛ . This formula provides an excellent, parameter-free prediction of the numerical data. Corrections to the theory for small and large packing fractions are connected to the emergence of shear bands and of contributions to the stress from repulsive particle interactions, respectively.

  10. The Role of Shear Failure on Stress Characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, A. W.; Hauser, M.; Couzens-Schultz, B. A.; Gray, G.

    2014-09-01

    Leak-off pressure and lost circulation data are generally thought to be reflective of minimum stress. We propose an alternative interpretation should be considered where the data may reflect a shear failure along zones of pre-existing weakness rather than opening of tensile fractures against the minimum stress. This mechanism has been discussed in a small number of borehole stability and hydraulic fracture papers, but has not been widely applied to leak-off test or lost circulation interpretation. In this paper, we will revisit and expand the concept introduced recently by Couzens-Schultz and Chan (J Struct Geol, doi: 10.1016/j.jsg.2010.06.013, 2010) based on abnormally low leak-off tests in an active thrust belt to the analysis of lost circulation observations in modern-day deltaic environments. In the Gulf of Mexico, lost circulations historically are interpreted as a representation of the minimum horizontal stress due to initiating or reopening of a fracture in tensile mode. However, shear failure or fault reactivation can occur at pressures well below the minimum far-field stress that is typically considered a safe upper bound for mud pressure if pre-existing planes of weakness such as faults or fracture networks exist. We demonstrated a mud loss event is shown to be inconsistent with the tensile failure mode in a normal stress environment, but in good agreement with expectations for shear failure along pre-existing faults.

  11. Normal stress differences in a sheared gas-solid suspension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, Saikat; Alam, Meheboob

    2016-11-01

    The stress tensor and normal stress differences are analyzed for a homogeneously sheared gas-solid suspension using Enskog-Boltzmann equation. Inelastic particles are suspended in a viscous fluid of viscosity μf and experience a Stokes drag force. Viscous heating due to shear is compensated by (i) the inelastic collisions between particles and (ii) the drag force experienced by the particles due to the interstitial fluid. Rheology of the particle phase is analyzed with anisotropic-Gaussian as the single particle distribution function. The first (N1) and second (N2) normal stress differences are computed as functions of the density (ν), Stokes number (St) and restitution coefficient (e). A comparison with the existing simulation data shows an excellent agreement for both N1 and N2 over the predictions from other Grad-level theories. Finally, in the limit of St -> ∞ (μf -> 0), the related results from the conventional theory of dry granular flows are recovered.

  12. Sensor for Boundary Shear Stress in Fluid Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bao, Xiaoqi; Badescu, Mircea; Sherrit, Stewart; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Lih, Shyh-Shiuh; Chang, Zensheu; Trease, Brian P.; Kerenyi, Kornel; Widholm, Scott E.; Ostlund, Patrick N.

    2012-01-01

    The formation of scour patterns at bridge piers is driven by the forces at the boundary of the water flow. In most experimental scour studies, indirect processes have been applied to estimate the shear stress using measured velocity profiles. The estimations are based on theoretical models and associated assumptions. However, the turbulence flow fields and boundary layer in the pier-scour region are very complex and lead to low-fidelity results. In addition, available turbulence models cannot account accurately for the bed roughness effect. Direct measurement of the boundary shear stress, normal stress, and their fluctuations are attractive alternatives. However, most direct-measurement shear sensors are bulky in size or not compatible to fluid flow. A sensor has been developed that consists of a floating plate with folded beam support and an optical grid on the back, combined with a high-resolution optical position probe. The folded beam support makes the floating plate more flexible in the sensing direction within a small footprint, while maintaining high stiffness in the other directions. The floating plate converts the shear force to displacement, and the optical probe detects the plate s position with nanometer resolution by sensing the pattern of the diffraction field of the grid through a glass window. This configuration makes the sensor compatible with liquid flow applications.

  13. MicroRNA-30 mediates anti-inflammatory effects of shear stress and KLF2 via repression of angiopoietin 2.

    PubMed

    Demolli, Shemsi; Doebele, Carmen; Doddaballapur, Anuradha; Lang, Victoria; Fisslthaler, Beate; Chavakis, Emmanouil; Vinciguerra, Manlio; Sciacca, Sergio; Henschler, Reinhard; Hecker, Markus; Savant, Soniya; Augustin, Hellmut G; Kaluza, David; Dimmeler, Stefanie; Boon, Reinier A

    2015-11-01

    MicroRNAs are endogenously expressed small noncoding RNAs that regulate gene expression. Laminar blood flow induces atheroprotective gene expression in endothelial cells (ECs) in part by upregulating the transcription factor KLF2. Here, we identified KLF2- and flow-responsive miRs that affect gene expression in ECs. Bioinformatic assessment of mRNA expression patterns identified the miR-30-5p seed sequence to be highly enriched in mRNAs that are downregulated by KLF2. Indeed, KLF2 overexpression and shear stress stimulation in vitro and in vivo increased the expression of miR-30-5p family members. Furthermore, we identified angiopoietin 2 (Ang2) as a target of miR-30. MiR-30 overexpression reduces Ang2 levels, whereas miR-30 inhibition by LNA-antimiRs induces Ang2 expression. Consistently, miR-30 reduced basal and TNF-α-induced expression of the inflammatory cell–cell adhesion molecules E-selectin, ICAM1 and VCAM1, which was rescued by stimulation with exogenous Ang2. In summary, KLF2 and shear stress increase the expression of the miR-30-5p family which acts in an anti-inflammatory manner in ECs by impairing the expression of Ang2 and inflammatory cell–cell adhesion molecules. The upregulation of miR-30-5p family members may contribute to the atheroprotective effects of shear stress.

  14. Evaluation of the time dependent surface shear stress in turbulent flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandborn, V. A.

    1979-01-01

    The time dependent surface shear stress has been evaluated using surface heat transfer measurements. For fully developed turbulent pipe and open channel water flows, and incompressible and compressible turbulent boundary layer air flows the measurements indicate the absolute magnitude of the surface shear stress fluctuations will be greater than two times the mean values. The root-mean-square shear stress fluctuations were of the order of 0.2 to 0.4 times the mean surface shear values. Due to these large surface shear stress fluctuations and the nonlinear relation between heat transfer and shear stress, a special technique has been developed to evaluate the measurements. It was found that the non-linear averaging errors for a hot film-surface shear stress gauge in a fully developed pipe flow was of the order of 10 percent at low velocities. A hot wire-surface shear stress gauge was employed for measurements of turbulent boundary layers in air.

  15. Measurement of the temperature-dependent threshold shear-stress of red blood cell aggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Hyun-Jung; Nam, Jeong-Hun; Lee, Yong-Jin; Shin, Sehyun

    2009-09-01

    Red blood cell (RBC) aggregation is becoming an important hemorheological parameter, which typically exhibits temperature dependence. Quite recently, a critical shear-stress was proposed as a new dimensional index to represent the aggregative and disaggregative behaviors of RBCs. The present study investigated the effect of the temperature on the critical shear-stress that is required to keep RBC aggregates dispersed. The critical shear-stress was measured at various temperatures (4, 10, 20, 30, and 37 °C) through the use of a transient microfluidic aggregometry. The critical shear-stress significantly increased as the blood temperature lowered, which accorded with the increase in the low-shear blood viscosity with the lowering of the temperature. Furthermore, the critical shear-stress also showed good agreement with the threshold shear-stress, as measured in a rotational Couette flow. These findings assist in rheologically validating the critical shear-stress, as defined in the microfluidic aggregometry.

  16. Inverse method for estimating shear stress in machining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burns, T. J.; Mates, S. P.; Rhorer, R. L.; Whitenton, E. P.; Basak, D.

    2016-01-01

    An inverse method is presented for estimating shear stress in the work material in the region of chip-tool contact along the rake face of the tool during orthogonal machining. The method is motivated by a model of heat generation in the chip, which is based on a two-zone contact model for friction along the rake face, and an estimate of the steady-state flow of heat into the cutting tool. Given an experimentally determined discrete set of steady-state temperature measurements along the rake face of the tool, it is shown how to estimate the corresponding shear stress distribution on the rake face, even when no friction model is specified.

  17. Mathematical Modeling of Intravascular Blood Coagulation under Wall Shear Stress

    PubMed Central

    Rukhlenko, Oleksii S.; Dudchenko, Olga A.; Zlobina, Ksenia E.; Guria, Georgy Th.

    2015-01-01

    Increased shear stress such as observed at local stenosis may cause drastic changes in the permeability of the vessel wall to procoagulants and thus initiate intravascular blood coagulation. In this paper we suggest a mathematical model to investigate how shear stress-induced permeability influences the thrombogenic potential of atherosclerotic plaques. Numerical analysis of the model reveals the existence of two hydrodynamic thresholds for activation of blood coagulation in the system and unveils typical scenarios of thrombus formation. The dependence of blood coagulation development on the intensity of blood flow, as well as on geometrical parameters of atherosclerotic plaque is described. Relevant parametric diagrams are drawn. The results suggest a previously unrecognized role of relatively small plaques (resulting in less than 50% of the lumen area reduction) in atherothrombosis and have important implications for the existing stenting guidelines. PMID:26222505

  18. Liquid crystals for unsteady surface shear stress visualization

    SciTech Connect

    Reda, D.C.

    1988-01-01

    Oscillating airfoil experiments were conducted to test the frequency response of thermochromic liquid crystal coatings to unsteady surface shear stresses under isothermal-flow conditions. The model was an NACA-0015 airfoil, exposed to an incompressible flow at a freestream Reynolds number (based on chord) of 1.14 x 10/sup 6/. Angle-of-attack forcing functions were sine waves of amplitude +- 10/degree/ about each of three mean angles of attack: 0/degree/, 10/degree/, and 20/degree/. Frequencies of oscillation were 0.2, 0.6 and 1.2 hertz, corresponding to reduced frequencies of 0.0055, 0.0164 and 0.0328. Data acquisition was accomplished by video recording. Observations showed the liquid crystal technique capable of visualizing high surface shear stress zones over the stated dynamic range in a continuous and reversible manner. 11 refs.

  19. [Exercise-induced shear stress: Physiological basis and clinical impact].

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Núñez, Iván; Romero, Fernando; Saavedra, María Javiera

    2016-01-01

    The physiological regulation of vascular function is essential for cardiovascular health and depends on adequate control of molecular mechanisms triggered by endothelial cells in response to mechanical and chemical stimuli induced by blood flow. Endothelial dysfunction is one of the major risk factors for cardiovascular disease, where an imbalance between synthesis of vasodilator and vasoconstrictor molecules is one of its main mechanisms. In this context, the shear stress is one of the most important mechanical stimuli to improve vascular function, due to endothelial mechanotransduction, triggered by stimulation of various endothelial mechanosensors, induce signaling pathways culminating in increased bioavailability of vasodilators molecules such as nitric oxide, that finally trigger the angiogenic mechanisms. These mechanisms allow providing the physiological basis for the effects of exercise on vascular health. In this review it is discussed the molecular mechanisms involved in the vascular response induced by shear stress and its impact in reversing vascular injury associated with the most prevalent cardiovascular disease in our population.

  20. Wall shear stress measurements using a new transducer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vakili, A. D.; Wu, J. M.; Lawing, P. L.

    1986-01-01

    A new instrument has been developed for direct measurement of wall shear stress. This instrument is simple and symmetric in design with small moving mass and no internal friction. Features employed in the design of this instrument eliminate most of the difficulties associated with the traditional floating element balances. Vibration problems associated with the floating element skin friction balances have been found to be minimized by the design features and optional damping provided. The unique design of this instrument eliminates or reduces the errors associated with conventional floating-element devices: such as errors due to gaps, pressure gradient, acceleration, heat transfer and temperature change. The instrument is equipped with various sensing systems and the output signal is a linear function of the wall shear stress. Measurement made in three different tunnels show good agreement with theory and data obtained by the floating element devices.

  1. Limiting shear stress and monotonic properties of liquid water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorshkov, A. I.

    2016-12-01

    Publications in scientific journals in which the authors attempt to experimentally prove that water, the most widespread substance on the Earth, is not a completely classical liquid, have become more frequent recently. This means, first, that water behaves as a solid at very low shear stress, i.e., does not flow, and, second, that the temperature dependences of its different properties are non-monotonic, i.e., possess singularities. We are aware of several such publications [1-5].

  2. Non-volcanic tremor driven by large transient shear stresses

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rubinstein, J.L.; Vidale, J.E.; Gomberg, J.; Bodin, P.; Creager, K.C.; Malone, S.D.

    2007-01-01

    Non-impulsive seismic radiation or 'tremor' has long been observed at volcanoes and more recently around subduction zones. Although the number of observations of non-volcanic tremor is steadily increasing, the causative mechanism remains unclear. Some have attributed non-volcanic tremor to the movement of fluids, while its coincidence with geodetically observed slow-slip events at regular intervals has led others to consider slip on the plate interface as its cause. Low-frequency earthquakes in Japan, which are believed to make up at least part of non-volcanic tremor, have focal mechanisms and locations that are consistent with tremor being generated by shear slip on the subduction interface. In Cascadia, however, tremor locations appear to be more distributed in depth than in Japan, making them harder to reconcile with a plate interface shear-slip model. Here we identify bursts of tremor that radiated from the Cascadia subduction zone near Vancouver Island, Canada, during the strongest shaking from the moment magnitude Mw = 7.8, 2002 Denali, Alaska, earthquake. Tremor occurs when the Love wave displacements are to the southwest (the direction of plate convergence of the overriding plate), implying that the Love waves trigger the tremor. We show that these displacements correspond to shear stresses of approximately 40 kPa on the plate interface, which suggests that the effective stress on the plate interface is very low. These observations indicate that tremor and possibly slow slip can be instantaneously induced by shear stress increases on the subduction interface - effectively a frictional failure response to the driving stress. ??2007 Nature Publishing Group.

  3. Non-volcanic tremor driven by large transient shear stresses.

    PubMed

    Rubinstein, Justin L; Vidale, John E; Gomberg, Joan; Bodin, Paul; Creager, Kenneth C; Malone, Stephen D

    2007-08-02

    Non-impulsive seismic radiation or 'tremor' has long been observed at volcanoes and more recently around subduction zones. Although the number of observations of non-volcanic tremor is steadily increasing, the causative mechanism remains unclear. Some have attributed non-volcanic tremor to the movement of fluids, while its coincidence with geodetically observed slow-slip events at regular intervals has led others to consider slip on the plate interface as its cause. Low-frequency earthquakes in Japan, which are believed to make up at least part of non-volcanic tremor, have focal mechanisms and locations that are consistent with tremor being generated by shear slip on the subduction interface. In Cascadia, however, tremor locations appear to be more distributed in depth than in Japan, making them harder to reconcile with a plate interface shear-slip model. Here we identify bursts of tremor that radiated from the Cascadia subduction zone near Vancouver Island, Canada, during the strongest shaking from the moment magnitude M(w) = 7.8, 2002 Denali, Alaska, earthquake. Tremor occurs when the Love wave displacements are to the southwest (the direction of plate convergence of the overriding plate), implying that the Love waves trigger the tremor. We show that these displacements correspond to shear stresses of approximately 40 kPa on the plate interface, which suggests that the effective stress on the plate interface is very low. These observations indicate that tremor and possibly slow slip can be instantaneously induced by shear stress increases on the subduction interface-effectively a frictional failure response to the driving stress.

  4. Non-canonical Wnt signalling modulates the endothelial shear stress flow sensor in vascular remodelling.

    PubMed

    Franco, Claudio A; Jones, Martin L; Bernabeu, Miguel O; Vion, Anne-Clemence; Barbacena, Pedro; Fan, Jieqing; Mathivet, Thomas; Fonseca, Catarina G; Ragab, Anan; Yamaguchi, Terry P; Coveney, Peter V; Lang, Richard A; Gerhardt, Holger

    2016-02-04

    Endothelial cells respond to molecular and physical forces in development and vascular homeostasis. Deregulation of endothelial responses to flow-induced shear is believed to contribute to many aspects of cardiovascular diseases including atherosclerosis. However, how molecular signals and shear-mediated physical forces integrate to regulate vascular patterning is poorly understood. Here we show that endothelial non-canonical Wnt signalling regulates endothelial sensitivity to shear forces. Loss of Wnt5a/Wnt11 renders endothelial cells more sensitive to shear, resulting in axial polarization and migration against flow at lower shear levels. Integration of flow modelling and polarity analysis in entire vascular networks demonstrates that polarization against flow is achieved differentially in artery, vein, capillaries and the primitive sprouting front. Collectively our data suggest that non-canonical Wnt signalling stabilizes forming vascular networks by reducing endothelial shear sensitivity, thus keeping vessels open under low flow conditions that prevail in the primitive plexus.

  5. Basal shear stress of debris flow in the runout phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Agostino, V.; Bettella, F.; Cesca, M.

    2013-11-01

    A laboratory device is proposed to assess the basal shear stresses generated by debris-flow mixtures during their runout phase. The device consists of an inclinable box with a gate facing a deposition plane. The box is filled with a selected debris-flow mixture, and after sudden opening of the gate, the features of the dam-break deposit can be measured. Based on some simplified assumptions of the energy balance, a methodology is proposed to assess basal shear stresses. The device has been tested using sediment samples from debris-flow deposits generated by two catchments of the Dolomites (Cortina d'Ampezzo, Belluno, Italy) by carrying out runout tests for different sediment concentrations by volume. The results show how the static Coulomb friction law is valid in the runout phase, with friction angles on the order of the angle of repose of the same material in dry conditions. The data elaboration also yields an innovative constitutive equation for shear stresses. This relation merges the Coulomb mixture approach with the concept of a one-phase flow with a certain rheology. This integration offers a useful insight into the weaknesses of the rheological approach if it is not properly scaled up to the ambient pressure of interest.

  6. Molecular Origins of Higher Harmonics in Large-Amplitude Oscillatory Shear Flow: Shear Stress Response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilbert, Peter; Giacomin, A. Jeffrey; Schmalzer, Andrew; Bird, R. B.

    Recent work has focused on understanding the molecular origins of higher harmonics that arise in the shear stress response of polymeric liquids in large-amplitude oscillatory shear flow. These higher harmonics have been explained using only the orientation distribution of a dilute suspension of rigid dumbbells in a Newtonian fluid, which neglects molecular interactions and is the simplest relevant molecular model of polymer viscoelasticity [R.B. Bird et al., J Chem Phys, 140, 074904 (2014)]. We explore these molecular interactions by examining the Curtiss-Bird model, a kinetic molecular theory that accounts for restricted polymer motions arising when chains are concentrated [Fan and Bird, JNNFM, 15, 341 (1984)]. For concentrated systems, the chain motion transverse to the chain axis is more restricted than along the axis. This anisotropy is described by the link tension coefficient, ɛ, for which several special cases arise: ɛ =0 corresponds to reptation, ɛ > 1 1 8 8 to rod-climbing, 1 1 2 2 >= ɛ >= 3 3 4 4 to reasonable shear-thinning predictions in steady simple shear flow, and ɛ =1 to a dilute solution of chains. We examine the shapes of the shear stress versus shear rate loops for the special cases, ɛ = 0 , 1 0 , 1 8 , 3 3 8 8 8 , 3 3 8 8 , 1 , of the Curtiss-Bird model, and we compare these with those

  7. ESTIMATION OF EFFECTIVE SHEAR STRESS WORKING ON FLAT SHEET MEMBRANE USING FLUIDIZED MEDIA IN MBRs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaw, Hlwan Moe; Li, Tairi; Nagaoka, Hiroshi; Mishima, Iori

    This study was aimed at estimating effective shear stress working on flat sheet membrane by the addition of fluidized media in MBRs. In both of laboratory-scale aeration tanks with and without fluidized media, shear stress variations on membrane surface and water phase velocity variations were measured and MBR operation was conducted. For the evaluation of the effective shear stress working on membrane surface to mitigate membrane surface, simulation of trans-membrane pressure increase was conducted. It was shown that the time-averaged absolute value of shear stress was smaller in the reactor with fluidized media than without fluidized media. However, due to strong turbulence in the reactor with fluidized media caused by interaction between water-phase and media and also due to the direct interaction between membrane surface and fluidized media, standard deviation of shear stress on membrane surface was larger in the reactor with fluidized media than without media. Histograms of shear stress variation data were fitted well to normal distribution curves and mean plus three times of standard deviation was defined to be a maximum shear stress value. By applying the defined maximum shear stress to a membrane fouling model, trans-membrane pressure curve in the MBR experiment was simulated well by the fouling model indicting that the maximum shear stress, not time-averaged shear stress, can be regarded as an effective shear stress to prevent membrane fouling in submerged flat-sheet MBRs.

  8. Shear stress blunts tubuloglomerular feedback partially mediated by primary cilia and nitric oxide at the macula densa.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lei; Shen, Chunyu; Liu, Haifeng; Wang, Shaohui; Chen, Xinshan; Roman, Richard J; Juncos, Luis A; Lu, Yan; Wei, Jin; Zhang, Jie; Yip, Kay-Pong; Liu, Ruisheng

    2015-10-01

    The present study tested whether primary cilia on macula densa serve as a flow sensor to enhance nitric oxide synthase 1 (NOS1) activity and inhibit tubuloglomerular feedback (TGF). Isolated perfused macula densa was loaded with calcein red and 4,5-diaminofluorescein diacetate to monitor cell volume and nitric oxide (NO) generation. An increase in tubular flow rate from 0 to 40 nl/min enhanced NO production by 40.0 ± 1.2%. The flow-induced NO generation was blocked by an inhibitor of NOS1 but not by inhibition of the Na/K/2Cl cotransporter or the removal of electrolytes from the perfusate. NO generation increased from 174.8 ± 21 to 276.1 ± 24 units/min in cultured MMDD1 cells when shear stress was increased from 0.5 to 5.0 dynes/cm(2). The shear stress-induced NO generation was abolished in MMDD1 cells in which the cilia were disrupted using a siRNA to ift88. Increasing the NaCl concentration of the tubular perfusate from 10 to 80 mM NaCl in the isolated perfused juxtaglomerular preparation reduced the diameter of the afferent arteriole by 3.8 ± 0.1 μm. This response was significantly blunted to 2.5 ± 0.2 μm when dextran was added to the perfusate to increase the viscosity and shear stress. Inhibition of NOS1 blocked the effect of dextran on TGF response. In vitro, the effects of raising perfusate viscosity with dextran on tubular hydraulic pressure were minimized by reducing the outflow resistance to avoid stretching of tubular cells. These results suggest that shear stress stimulates primary cilia on the macula densa to enhance NO generation and inhibit TGF responsiveness.

  9. Fluid Shear Stress Regulates the Invasive Potential of Glioma Cells via Modulation of Migratory Activity and Matrix Metalloproteinase Expression

    PubMed Central

    Qazi, Henry; Shi, Zhong-Dong; Tarbell, John M.

    2011-01-01

    Background Glioma cells are exposed to elevated interstitial fluid flow during the onset of angiogenesis, at the tumor periphery while invading normal parenchyma, within white matter tracts, and during vascular normalization therapy. Glioma cell lines that have been exposed to fluid flow forces in vivo have much lower invasive potentials than in vitro cell motility assays without flow would indicate. Methodology/Principal Findings A 3D Modified Boyden chamber (Darcy flow through collagen/cell suspension) model was designed to mimic the fluid dynamic microenvironment to study the effects of fluid shear stress on the migratory activity of glioma cells. Novel methods for gel compaction and isolation of chemotactic migration from flow stimulation were utilized for three glioma cell lines: U87, CNS-1, and U251. All physiologic levels of fluid shear stress suppressed the migratory activity of U87 and CNS-1 cell lines. U251 motility remained unaltered within the 3D interstitial flow model. Matrix Metalloproteinase (MMP) inhibition experiments and assays demonstrated that the glioma cells depended on MMP activity to invade, and suppression in motility correlated with downregulation of MMP-1 and MMP-2 levels. This was confirmed by RT-PCR and with the aid of MMP-1 and MMP-2 shRNA constructs. Conclusions/Significance Fluid shear stress in the tumor microenvironment may explain reduced glioma invasion through modulation of cell motility and MMP levels. The flow-induced migration trends were consistent with reported invasive potentials of implanted gliomas. The models developed for this study imply that flow-modulated motility involves mechanotransduction of fluid shear stress affecting MMP activation and expression. These models should be useful for the continued study of interstitial flow effects on processes that affect tumor progression. PMID:21637818

  10. Wall shear stress indicators in abnormal aortic geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prahl Wittberg, Lisa; van Wyk, Stevin; Fuchs, Laszlo; Gutmark, Ephraim; Gutmark-Little, Iris

    2015-11-01

    Cardiovascular disease, such as atherosclerosis, occurs at specific locations in the arterial tree. Characterizing flow and forces at these locations is crucial to understanding the genesis of disease. Measures such as time average wall shear stress, oscillatory shear index, relative residence time and temporal wall shear stress gradients have been shown to identify plaque prone regions. The present paper examines these indices in three aortic geometries obtained from patients whose aortas are deformed due to a genetic pathology and compared to one normal geometry. This patient group is known to be prone to aortic dissection and our study aims to identify early indicators that will enable timely intervention. Data obtained from cardiac magnetic resonance imaging is used to reconstruct the aortic arch. The local unsteady flow characteristics are calculated, fully resolving the flow field throughout the entire cardiac cycle. The Quemada model is applied to account for the non-Newtonian properties of blood, an empirical model valid for different red blood cell loading. The impact of the deformed aortic geometries is analyzed to identify flow patterns that could lead to arterial disease at certain locations.

  11. Measurements of flow-induced birefringence in microfluidics

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Chen-li; Huang, Hung-Yen

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we demonstrate the use of a microscopic circular polariscope to measure the flow-induced birefringence in a microfluidic device that represents the kinematics of fluid motion optically. Unlike the commercial birefringence microscope employed in the previous studies, our approach is able to provide direct measurement of retardance, which quantifies the difference in refractive index of the fluid experienced by the ordinary and extraordinary rays, from one single image frame. This capability facilitates unsteady full-field quantitation of flow-induced birefringence in microfluidics that has never been achieved before. At low flow rates, we find that the value of the retardance is independent of the microfluidic design and proportional to the nominal strain rates. This linearity bridges the measurement of birefringence and the deformation rate in the microflow environment, which yields the stress information of the fluid flow. In addition, the μPIV results confirm that both extensional and shear strain rates contribute to the flow-induced birefringence so that the retardance distribution can be used to represent the field of the principal strain rate in a microfluidic device. The outcome of this study proves that our approach provides a non-invasive method that enables an intuitive full-field representation of stress in the instantaneous flow field in a microfluidic device. PMID:26858809

  12. DPIV prediction of flow induced platelet activation-comparison to numerical predictions.

    PubMed

    Raz, Sagi; Einav, Shmuel; Alemu, Yared; Bluestein, Danny

    2007-04-01

    Flow induced platelet activation (PA) can lead to platelet aggregation, deposition onto the blood vessel wall, and thrombus formation. PA was thoroughly studied under unidirectional flow conditions. However, in regions of complex flow, where the platelet is exposed to varying levels of shear stress for varying durations, the relationship between flow and PA is not well understood. Numerical models were developed for studying flow induced PA resulting from stress histories along Lagrangian trajectories in the flow field. However, experimental validation techniques such as Digital Particle Image Velocimetry (DPIV) were not extended to include such models. In this study, a general experimental tool for PA analysis by means of continuous DPIV was utilized and compared to numerical simulation in a model of coronary stenosis. A scaled up (5:1) 84% eccentric and axisymetric coronary stenosis model was used for analysis of shear stress and exposure time along particle trajectories. Flow induced PA was measured using the PA State (PAS) assay. An algorithm for computing the PA level in pertinent trajectories was developed as a tool for extracting information from DPIV measurements for predicting the flow induced thrombogenic potential. CFD, DPIV and PAS assay results agreed well in predicting the level of PA. In addition, the same trend predicted by the DPIV was measured in vitro using the Platelet Activity State (PAS) assay, namely, that the symmetric stenosis activated the platelets more as compared to the eccentric stenosis.

  13. A method for measurement of turbulent wall shear stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Peter M.; Leehey, Patrick

    A cylinder is placed near the wall in the viscous sublayer of a turbulent boundary layer. It is suspended torsionally about its axis. The axis is parallel to the wall and transverse to the mean flow direction. The torque on the cylinder is proportional to the shear stress of the fluid on the wall below. In principle the torque is insensitive to the blockage effect of the cylinder. The device has been tested in a laminar shear flow created in a cone-and-plate apparatus. It shows a long range of linear response. There is no evidence of hysteresis upon flow reversal. Plans for dynamic testing in a turbulent oil channel flow and the applicability of micro-machining techniques from silicon technololgy to the further miniaturization of this gauge are discussed.

  14. Liposome clusters with shear stress-induced membrane permeability.

    PubMed

    Yoshimoto, Makoto; Tamura, Ryota; Natsume, Tomotaka

    2013-09-01

    Clusters of negatively charged liposomes were prepared by the addition of Ca(2+) and characterized in their structure and membrane permeability under shear stress. The liposomes mainly used were composed of zwitterionic 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC), 20 mol% negatively charged 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoglycerol (POPG) and 30 mol% cholesterol. The liposomes with mean diameter of 193 nm were aggregated into the clusters with a distribution peak at about 1.5 μm in the 50mM Tris buffer solution of pH 8.5 at the lipid and Ca(2+) concentrations of 1.0mM and 40 mM, respectively. More than 90% of liposomes were redispersed at the Ca(2+) concentration of 80 mM. POPG-rich liposomes (POPC/POPG/cholesterol=5:65:30 [lipid]=1.0mM) were irreversibly aggregated at [Ca(2+)]≥ 10 mM, indicating the significant contribution of POPC to the reversible clustering of liposomes. The membranes of liposome clusters were impermeable to 5(6)-carboxyfluorescein (CF) in the static liquid system at 25°C due to the decrease in specific surface area of the liposomal system. In the shear flow, in clear contrast, continuous membrane permeation of CF was observed at the shear rate of 1.5 × 10(3)s(-1), exhibiting comparable membrane permeability to the non-clustered liposomes. The theoretical analysis of modified DLVO potential indicated that liposome membranes were not in contact with each other within the clusters. Therefore, the liposome clusters are structurally flexible under the applied shear stress, providing sufficient lipid membrane-water interfacial area for the permeation of CF. The results obtained would be important to control the formation of liposome clusters and their permeabilization for biochemical and biomedical applications.

  15. Fluid shear stress stimulates phosphorylation-dependent nuclear export of HDAC5 and mediates expression of KLF2 and eNOS.

    PubMed

    Wang, Weiye; Ha, Chang Hoon; Jhun, Bong Sook; Wong, Chelsea; Jain, Mukesh K; Jin, Zheng-Gen

    2010-04-08

    Fluid shear stress generated by steady laminar blood flow protects vessels from atherosclerosis. Krüppel-like factor 2 (KLF2) and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) are fluid shear stress-responsive genes and key mediators in flow anti-inflammatory and antiatherosclerotic actions. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying flow induction of KLF2 and eNOS remain largely unknown. Here, we show a novel role of histone deacetylase 5 (HDAC5) in flow-mediated KLF2 and eNOS expression. We found for the first time that fluid shear stress stimulated HDAC5 phosphorylation and nuclear export in endothelial cells through a calcium/calmodulin-dependent pathway. Consequently, flow induced the dissociation of HDAC5 and myocyte enhancer factor-2 (MEF2) and enhanced MEF2 transcriptional activity, which leads to expression of KLF2 and eNOS. Adenoviral overexpression of a HDAC5 phosphorylation-defective mutant (Ser259/Ser498 were replaced by Ala259/Ala498, HDAC5-S/A), which shows resistance to flow-induced nuclear export, suppressed flow-mediated MEF2 transcriptional activity and expression of KLF2 and eNOS. Importantly, HDAC5-S/A attenuated the flow-inhibitory effect on monocyte adhesion to endothelial cells. Taken together, our results reveal that phosphorylation-dependent derepression of HDAC5 mediates flow-induced KLF2 and eNOS expression as well as flow anti-inflammation, and suggest that HDAC5 could be a potential therapeutic target for the prevention of atherosclerosis.

  16. The release of shear stress in metals under dynamic loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vignjevic, Rade; Bourne, Neil

    2013-06-01

    Metals under shock loading relieve shear stress by slip after. This work focuses on the types of loading where a metal initially responds entirely elastically and plasticity with deformation mechanisms developing over time and determined by the material's state and microstructure. Finite kinetics in shock is mirrored in several commonly observed responses including elastic precursor decay and the measurement of shear stress histories during load. FCC and BCC metals have different kinetics, with those of BCC metals slower. A model, under development, is implemented here to depict the behaviour observed by assigning a finite time to the return of the state point from the quasi equilibrium yield surface to the equilibrium yield surface. This delays the softening of the material and reproduces observed response in the weak shock regime. The model is based on the assumption that formation and self-organisation of dislocation structures at various scales maximises dissipation rate (minimize the free energy) in the material. Initial validation of the model is performed on tantalum by comparing stress histories under shock and shock-less loading with experimental data in order to assess its ability to reproduce experimentally observed features.

  17. Shear stress activation of nuclear receptor PXR in endothelial detoxification.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaohong; Fang, Xi; Zhou, Jing; Chen, Zhen; Zhao, Beilei; Xiao, Lei; Liu, Ao; Li, Yi-Shuan J; Shyy, John Y-J; Guan, Youfei; Chien, Shu; Wang, Nanping

    2013-08-06

    Endothelial cells (ECs) are constantly exposed to xenobiotics and endobiotics or their metabolites, which perturb EC function, as well as to shear stress, which plays a crucial role in vascular homeostasis. Pregnane X receptor (PXR) is a nuclear receptor and a key regulator of the detoxification of xeno- and endobiotics. Here we show that laminar shear stress (LSS), the atheroprotective flow, activates PXR in ECs, whereas oscillatory shear stress, the atheroprone flow, suppresses PXR. LSS activation of PXR in cultured ECs led to the increased expression of a PXR target gene, multidrug resistance 1 (MDR1). An in vivo study using rats showed that the expression of MDR1 was significantly higher in the endothelium from the descending thoracic aorta, where flow is mostly laminar, than from the inner curvature of aortic arch, where flow is disturbed. Functionally, LSS-activated PXR protects ECs from apoptosis triggered by doxorubicin via the induction of MDR1 and other detoxification genes. PXR also suppressed the expression of proinflammatory adhesion molecules and monocyte adhesion in response to TNF-α and lipopolysaccharide. Overexpression of a constitutively active PXR in rat carotid arteries potently attenuated proinflammatory responses. In addition, cDNA microarray revealed a large number of the PXR-activated endothelial genes whose products are responsible for major steps of detoxification, including phase I and II metabolizing enzymes and transporters. These detoxification genes in ECs are induced by LSS in ECs in a PXR-dependent manner. In conclusion, our results indicate that PXR represents a flow-activated detoxification system to protect ECs against damage by xeno- and endobiotics.

  18. Shear stress activation of nuclear receptor PXR in endothelial detoxification

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaohong; Fang, Xi; Zhou, Jing; Chen, Zhen; Zhao, Beilei; Xiao, Lei; Liu, Ao; Li, Yi-Shuan J.; Shyy, John Y.-J.; Guan, Youfei; Chien, Shu; Wang, Nanping

    2013-01-01

    Endothelial cells (ECs) are constantly exposed to xenobiotics and endobiotics or their metabolites, which perturb EC function, as well as to shear stress, which plays a crucial role in vascular homeostasis. Pregnane X receptor (PXR) is a nuclear receptor and a key regulator of the detoxification of xeno- and endobiotics. Here we show that laminar shear stress (LSS), the atheroprotective flow, activates PXR in ECs, whereas oscillatory shear stress, the atheroprone flow, suppresses PXR. LSS activation of PXR in cultured ECs led to the increased expression of a PXR target gene, multidrug resistance 1 (MDR1). An in vivo study using rats showed that the expression of MDR1 was significantly higher in the endothelium from the descending thoracic aorta, where flow is mostly laminar, than from the inner curvature of aortic arch, where flow is disturbed. Functionally, LSS-activated PXR protects ECs from apoptosis triggered by doxorubicin via the induction of MDR1 and other detoxification genes. PXR also suppressed the expression of proinflammatory adhesion molecules and monocyte adhesion in response to TNF-α and lipopolysaccharide. Overexpression of a constitutively active PXR in rat carotid arteries potently attenuated proinflammatory responses. In addition, cDNA microarray revealed a large number of the PXR-activated endothelial genes whose products are responsible for major steps of detoxification, including phase I and II metabolizing enzymes and transporters. These detoxification genes in ECs are induced by LSS in ECs in a PXR-dependent manner. In conclusion, our results indicate that PXR represents a flow-activated detoxification system to protect ECs against damage by xeno- and endobiotics. PMID:23878263

  19. Experimental Stress Analysis of Stiffened Cylinders with Cutouts : Shear Load

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosecrans, Richard; Schlechte , Floyd R

    1954-01-01

    A cylindrical semimonocoque shell of circular cross section was mounted as a cantilever and loaded by a direct shear at the tip. The cylinder was tested with no cutout, with a rectangular cutout on the tension side, and with the cutout centered on the neutral axis on one side of the cylinder. The cutout was successively enlarged through six sizes varying from 30 degrees to 130 degrees in circumference and from 1 and 2 bays in length. Strain measurements were made with resistance-type wire strain gages near the cutout on the stringers, the skin, and the rings for each case, and the stresses obtained are presented in tables. (author)

  20. Interfacial shear stress in stratified flow in a horizontal rectangular duct

    SciTech Connect

    Lorencez, C.; Kawaji, M.; Murao, Y.

    1995-09-01

    Interfacial shear stress has been experimentally examined for both cocurrent and countercurrent stratified wavy flows in a horizontal interfacial shear stress from the measurements were examined and the results have been compared with existing correlations. Some differences were found in the estimated interfacial shear stress from the measurements were examined and the results have been compared with existing correlations. Some differences were found in the estimated interfacial shear stress values at high gas flow rates which could be attributed to the assumptions and procedures involved in each method. The interfacial waves and secondary motions were also found to have significant effects on the accuracy of Reynolds stress and turbulence kinetic energy extrapolation methods.

  1. A review of Reynolds stress models for turbulent shear flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Speziale, Charles G.

    1995-01-01

    A detailed review of recent developments in Reynolds stress modeling for incompressible turbulent shear flows is provided. The mathematical foundations of both two-equation models and full second-order closures are explored in depth. It is shown how these models can be systematically derived for two-dimensional mean turbulent flows that are close to equilibrium. A variety of examples are provided to demonstrate how well properly calibrated versions of these models perform for such flows. However, substantial problems remain for the description of more complex turbulent flows where there are large departures from equilibrium. Recent efforts to extend Reynolds stress models to nonequilibrium turbulent flows are discussed briefly along with the major modeling issues relevant to practical naval hydrodynamics applications.

  2. Mass Transport and Shear Stress in the Carotid Artery Bifurcation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorder, Riley; Aliseda, Alberto

    2010-11-01

    The carotid artery bifurcation (CAB) is one of the leading sites for atherosclerosis, a major cause of death and disability in the developed world. The specific processes by which the complex flow found at the bifurcation and carotid sinus promotes plaque formation and growth are not fully understood. Shear stress, mass transport, and flow residence times are considered key factors. Although the governing equations closely link shear stress and mass transfer, the pulsatile, transitional, and detached flow found at the CAB can lead to differences between regions of WSS and mass transfer statistics. In this study, CAB geometries are reconstructed from patient specific 3D ultrasound medical imaging. Using ANSYS FLUENT, the fluid flow and scalar transport was solved using realistic flow conditions and various mass transfer boundary conditions. The spatial and temporal resolution was validated against the analytical solution of the Graetz-Nusselt problem with constant wall flux to ensure the scalar transport is resolved for a Peclet number up to 100,000. High residence time regions are investigated by determining the number of cardiac cycles required to flush out the carotid sinus. The correlations between regions of low WSS, high OSI, and scalar concentration are computed and interpreted in the context of atherosclerotic plaque origin and progression.

  3. Complete Release of Horizontal Shear Stresses During Geothermal Reservoir Stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoenball, M.; Gaucher, E.; Wellmann, F.; Kohl, T.

    2013-12-01

    Seismicity can be induced in previously seismically inactive regions by man-made changes of the stress field. Notable stress perturbations are created by injection or withdrawal of fluids such as wastewater, fresh water or hydrocarbons. Over the last decades our knowledge of the physical processes of induced seismicity has improved largely. However, the driving force of seismicity, i.e. the actual perturbation of the stress field in the reservoir during fluid injection, remains largely unknown up to now. Measurements of fluid pressure at the well are not enough to extrapolate the pressure change in the reservoir. Here we study the evolution of the stress field during a massive hydraulic stimulation of a 5 km deep well at the enhanced geothermal system at Soultz-sous-Forêts, France. Fresh water was pumped with rates of 30 to 50 ls-1 for 6 days. Locations of 7215 events with maximum magnitude of MW=2.5 were obtained, for 715 events with MW > 1 focal mechanism solutions were derived. At first we present observations of several peculiar phenomena of the seismicity migration, of fluid flow and earthquake mechanisms following the shut-in of the well, which indicate to yet not understood hydro-mechanical coupling mechanisms in connection with shut-in. In order to analyze the changes of the stress field during and after the stimulation we identify the fracture planes from the two nodal planes by a probability-based method where we incorporate structural geological information gained from well logs and uncertainties of the determination of focal mechanism solutions and independent estimates of the stress field. In principle, this approach is able to incorporate further uncertainties, if available. We then conduct stress inversions resolved in time and depth to study spatio-temporal changes of the stress tensor. Our results show an increasingly perturbed stress state with time with a strong reduction of the horizontal shear stresses in areas of highest seismic activity

  4. Viscosity, Shear Waves, and Atomic-Level Stress-Stress Correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levashov, V. A.; Morris, J. R.; Egami, T.

    2011-03-01

    The Green-Kubo equation relates the macroscopic stress-stress correlation function to a liquid’s viscosity. The concept of the atomic-level stresses allows the macroscopic stress-stress correlation function in the equation to be expressed in terms of the space-time correlations among the atomic-level stresses. Molecular dynamics studies show surprisingly long spatial extension of stress-stress correlations and also longitudinal and transverse waves propagating in liquids over ranges which could exceed the system size. The results reveal that the range of propagation of shear waves corresponds to the range of distances relevant for viscosity. Thus our results show that viscosity is a fundamentally nonlocal quantity. We also show that the periodic boundary conditions play a nontrivial role in molecular dynamics simulations, effectively masking the long-range nature of viscosity.

  5. Sitting and endothelial dysfunction: The role of shear stress

    PubMed Central

    Thosar, Saurabh S.; Johnson, Blair D.; Johnston, Jeanne D.; Wallace, Janet P.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Sedentary activity is a modifiable life-style behavior and a key component in the etiology of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ACVD). US adults and children spend more than half their waking time in sedentary pursuits. Sedentary activity has been shown to result in impaired insulin sensitivity, impaired metabolic function and attenuated endothelial function, which are classic markers of ACVD. Sedentary activity is defined as ‘sitting without otherwise being active.’ This behavior promotes reduced muscular activity of the lower extremities which decreases leg blood flow, increases blood pooling in the calf, augments mean arterial pressure, and deforms arterial segments resulting in low mean shear stress (SS). SS activates distinct physiological mechanisms which have been proposed to be protective against ACVD; specifically through a SS-induced endothelium-derived nitric oxide mechanism. Reduced bioavailability of nitric oxide creates a pro-oxidant milieu resulting in increased oxidative stress. There is sufficient evidence which demonstrates that endothelial function is attenuated in the presence of oxidative stress. Sedentary activity results in low SS in the lower extremities which may result in increased oxidative stress and impaired endothelial function. This review furthers the use of sitting as model to study the effects of inactivity, discusses possible physiological mechanisms and suggests future directions. PMID:23197245

  6. Cell-free layer and wall shear stress variation in microvessels.

    PubMed

    Yin, Xuewen; Zhang, Junfeng

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we simulated multiple red blood cells flowing through straight microvessels with the immersed-boundary lattice-Boltzmann model to examine the shear stress variation on the microvessel surface and its relation to the properties of cell-free layer. Significant variation in shear stress has been observed due to the irregular configuration of blood cells flowing near the microvessel wall. A low shear stress is typically found at locations where there is a cell flowing close to the wall, and a large shear stress at locations with a relatively wide gap between cell and wall. This relationship between the shear stress magnitude and the distance between cell and wall has been attributed to the reverse pressure difference developed between the front and rear sides of a cell flowing near the vessel wall. We further studied the effects of several hemodynamic factors on the variation of shear stress, including the cell deformability, the flow rate, and the aggregation among red blood cells. These simulations show that the shear stress variation is less profound in situations with wider cell-free layers, since the reverse pressure difference around the edge cells is less evident, and the influence of this pressure difference on wall shear stress becomes weaker. This study also demonstrates the complexity of the flow field in the gap between cell and wall. More precise experimental techniques are required accurately measure such shear stress variation in microcirculation.

  7. Role of glypican-1 in endothelial NOS activation under various steady shear stress magnitudes.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Ye; Liu, Jingxia

    2016-11-01

    Blood flow patterns in proatherogenic and antiatherogenic regions are rather different. We hypothesize that the laminar flow with steady shear stress increased nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability while disturbed flow with low shear stress reduced it, which is mediating by glypican-1. Thus, we detected the expression of glypican-1 under different shear stress magnitudes, and tested whether the magnitude of shear stress determines the level of endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) via glypican-1 by using phosphatidylinositol phospholipase C (PI-PLC). Results revealed that the expression of glypican-1 depends on the magnitude and duration of shear stress loading. Activation of eNOS in HUVECs is downregulated by 4dyn/cm(2) of shear stress, but is upregulated by 15dyn/cm(2). Removal of glypican-1 significantly suppressed the 15dyn/cm(2) shear stress-induced eNOS activity, and further reduced the 4dyn/cm(2)-inhibited eNOS activity. Therefore, eNOS activation depends on shear stress magnitudes and is mediated by glypican-1. The role of glypican-1 in mediating the eNOS activation under shear stress might involve in protecting the endothelial function against disturbed flow and enhancing the sensitive of the endothelial cell to laminar flow, supporting a potential role of glypican-1 against atherosclerosis.

  8. High Shear Stresses under Exercise Condition Destroy Circulating Tumor Cells in a Microfluidic System

    PubMed Central

    Regmi, Sagar; Fu, Afu; Luo, Kathy Qian

    2017-01-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are the primary targets of cancer treatment as they cause distal metastasis. However, how CTCs response to exercise-induced high shear stress is largely unknown. To study the effects of hemodynamic microenvironment on CTCs, we designed a microfluidic circulatory system that produces exercise relevant shear stresses. We explore the effects of shear stresses on breast cancer cells with different metastatic abilities, cancer cells of ovarian, lung and leukemic origin. Three major findings were obtained. 1) High shear stress of 60 dynes/cm2 achievable during intensive exercise killed more CTCs than low shear stress of 15 dynes/cm2 present in human arteries at the resting state. 2) High shear stress caused necrosis in over 90% of CTCs within the first 4 h of circulation. More importantly, the CTCs that survived the first 4 h-circulation, underwent apoptosis during 16–24 h of post-circulation incubation. 3) Prolonged high shear stress treatment effectively reduced the viability of highly metastatic and drug resistant breast cancer cells. As high shear stress had much less damaging effects on leukemic cells mimicking the white blood cells, we propose that intensive exercise may be a good strategy for generating high shear stress that can destroy CTCs and prevent cancer metastasis. PMID:28054593

  9. A Single Parameter to Characterize Wall Shear Stress Developed from an Underexpanded Axisymmetric Impinging Jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fillingham, Patrick; Murali, Harikrishnan

    2016-11-01

    Wall shear stress is characterized for underexpanded axisymmetric impinging jets for the application of aerodynamic particle resuspension from a surface. Analysis of the flow field and the wall shear stress resulted from normally impinging axisymmetric jets is conducted using Computational Fluid Dynamics. A normally impinging jet is modeled with a constant area nozzle, while varying height to diameter ratio (H/D) and inlet pressures. Schlieren photography is used to visualize the density gradient of the flow field for validation of the CFD. The Dimensionless Jet Parameter (DJP) is developed to describe flow regimes and characterize the shear stress. The DJP is defined as being proportional to the jet pressure ratio divided by the H/D ratio squared. Maximum wall shear stress is examined as a function of DJP with three distinct regimes: (i) subsonic impingement (DJP<1), (ii) transitional (12). Due to the jet energy dissipation in shock structures, which become a dominant dissipation mechanism in the supersonic impingement regime, wall shear stress is limited to a finite value. Additionally, formation of shock structures in the wall flow were observed for DJP>2 resulting in difficulties with dimensionless analysis. In the subsonic impingement and transitional regimes equations as a function of the DJP are obtained for the maximum wall shear stress magnitude, maximum shear stress location, and shear stress decay. Using these relationships wall shear stress can be predicted at all locations along the impingement surface.

  10. Shear Stress-Normal Stress (Pressure) Ratio Decides Forming Callus in Patients with Diabetic Neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Amemiya, Ayumi; Noguchi, Hiroshi; Oe, Makoto; Takehara, Kimie; Ohashi, Yumiko; Suzuki, Ryo; Yamauchi, Toshimasa; Kadowaki, Takashi; Sanada, Hiromi; Mori, Taketoshi

    2016-01-01

    Aim. Callus is a risk factor, leading to severe diabetic foot ulcer; thus, prevention of callus formation is important. However, normal stress (pressure) and shear stress associated with callus have not been clarified. Additionally, as new valuables, a shear stress-normal stress (pressure) ratio (SPR) was examined. The purpose was to clarify the external force associated with callus formation in patients with diabetic neuropathy. Methods. The external force of the 1st, 2nd, and 5th metatarsal head (MTH) as callus predilection regions was measured. The SPR was calculated by dividing shear stress by normal stress (pressure), concretely, peak values (SPR-p) and time integral values (SPR-i). The optimal cut-off point was determined. Results. Callus formation region of the 1st and 2nd MTH had high SPR-i rather than noncallus formation region. The cut-off value of the 1st MTH was 0.60 and the 2nd MTH was 0.50. For the 5th MTH, variables pertaining to the external forces could not be determined to be indicators of callus formation because of low accuracy. Conclusions. The callus formation cut-off values of the 1st and 2nd MTH were clarified. In the future, it will be necessary to confirm the effect of using appropriate footwear and gait training on lowering SPR-i.

  11. Analysis of bonded joints. [shear stress and stress-strain diagrams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srinivas, S.

    1975-01-01

    A refined elastic analysis of bonded joints which accounts for transverse shear deformation and transverse normal stress was developed to obtain the stresses and displacements in the adherends and in the bond. The displacements were expanded in terms of polynomials in the thicknesswise coordinate; the coefficients of these polynomials were functions of the axial coordinate. The stress distribution was obtained in terms of these coefficients by using strain-displacement and stress-strain relations. The governing differential equations were obtained by integrating the equations of equilibrium, and were solved. The boundary conditions (interface or support) were satisfied to complete the analysis. Single-lap, flush, and double-lap joints were analyzed, along with the effects of adhesive properties, plate thicknesses, material properties, and plate taper on maximum peel and shear stresses in the bond. The results obtained by using the thin-beam analysis available in the literature were compared with the results obtained by using the refined analysis. In general, thin-beam analysis yielded reasonably accurate results, but in certain cases the errors were high. Numerical investigations showed that the maximum peel and shear stresses in the bond can be reduced by (1) using a combination of flexible and stiff bonds, (2) using stiffer lap plates, and (3) tapering the plates.

  12. Shear Stress-Normal Stress (Pressure) Ratio Decides Forming Callus in Patients with Diabetic Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Noguchi, Hiroshi; Takehara, Kimie; Ohashi, Yumiko; Suzuki, Ryo; Yamauchi, Toshimasa; Kadowaki, Takashi; Sanada, Hiromi

    2016-01-01

    Aim. Callus is a risk factor, leading to severe diabetic foot ulcer; thus, prevention of callus formation is important. However, normal stress (pressure) and shear stress associated with callus have not been clarified. Additionally, as new valuables, a shear stress-normal stress (pressure) ratio (SPR) was examined. The purpose was to clarify the external force associated with callus formation in patients with diabetic neuropathy. Methods. The external force of the 1st, 2nd, and 5th metatarsal head (MTH) as callus predilection regions was measured. The SPR was calculated by dividing shear stress by normal stress (pressure), concretely, peak values (SPR-p) and time integral values (SPR-i). The optimal cut-off point was determined. Results. Callus formation region of the 1st and 2nd MTH had high SPR-i rather than noncallus formation region. The cut-off value of the 1st MTH was 0.60 and the 2nd MTH was 0.50. For the 5th MTH, variables pertaining to the external forces could not be determined to be indicators of callus formation because of low accuracy. Conclusions. The callus formation cut-off values of the 1st and 2nd MTH were clarified. In the future, it will be necessary to confirm the effect of using appropriate footwear and gait training on lowering SPR-i. PMID:28050567

  13. Rapid flow-induced responses in endothelial cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stamatas, G. N.; McIntire, L. V.

    2001-01-01

    Endothelial cells alter their morphology, growth rate, and metabolism in response to fluid shear stress. To study rapid flow-induced responses in the 3D endothelial cell morphology and calcium distribution, coupled fluorescence microscopy with optical sectioning, digital imaging, and numerical deconvolution techniques have been utilized. Results demonstrate that within the first minutes of flow application nuclear calcium is increasing. In the same time frame whole cell height and nuclear height are reduced by about 1 microm. Whole cell height changes may facilitate reduction of shear stress gradients on the luminal surface, whereas nuclear structural changes may be important for modulating endothelial growth rate and metabolism. To study the role of the cytoskeleton in these responses, endothelial cells have been treated with specific disrupters (acrylamide, cytochalasin D, and colchicine) of each of the cytoskeleton elements (intermediate filaments, microfilaments, and microtubules, respectively). None of these compounds had any effect on the shear-induced calcium response. Cytochalasin D and acrylamide did not affect the shear-induced nuclear morphology changes. Colchicine, however, completely abrogated the response, indicating that microtubules may be implicated in force transmission from the plasma membrane to the nucleus. A pedagogical model based on tensegrity theory principles is presented that is consistent with the results on the 3D endothelial morphology.

  14. Healing and Shear Stress Reduction on Single Fracture of Rock Salt and Limestone under Slide-Hold-Slide Direct Shear Condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kishida, K.; Yano, T.; Yasuhara, H.

    2012-12-01

    In order to clarify the influence of the holding state on the shear strength in the shear process of a single rock fracture, slide-hold-slide (SHS) direct shear-flow coupling tests were carried out on single rock fractures at several confining stresses and under saturated/unsaturated conditions (Kishida, et al., 2011). Consequently, the mortar specimen could be confirmed as the significant shear strength recovery on the SHS process. In this research, the SHS direct shear tests are carried out on the halite (rock salt) and the limestone. In the case of rock salt, a single tensile fracture is artificially created by cutting away. On the other hand, the limestone has a natural rock joint. The experiments are carried out under various normal confining stress conditions and are employed various holding period at the residual state. Figure 1 shows the shear stress - shear displacement of the SHS direct shear experiments on the rock salt. From all cases, the shear stress increases at the initial phase of the experiments, and then, the shear stress reaches at the peak shear strength. After that, the shear stress slightly decreases such as strain softening. Finally, the shear stress reaches to the residual stress state. In every SHS processes, the shear stress is reducing in various hold period. And then, the shear stress is increasing in the process of re-sliding. The shear stress in the process of re-sliding takes over the value at the start time of the holding process. The shear stress reaches at the peak, and then, it reaches the residual stress state. In all cases, as the holding period becomes longer, it is confirmed that the decrement of the shear stress in the holding process is increasing and the increment of the shear stress at the re-sliding process is increasing. Therefore, it is confirmed that the time dependence of shear strength recovery can be observed. In addition, Dieterich's A constant value for the regression lines (Dieterich, 1972, 1994) is plotted

  15. Partial ligation-induced carotid artery occlusion induces leukocyte recruitment and lipid accumulation--a shear stress model of atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Merino, Hilda; Parthasarathy, Sampath; Singla, Dinender K

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that disturbed blood flow-induced shear stress can induce atherosclerosis (ATH) in humans and animals without a high fat diet. Therefore, we hypothesize that partial ligation of the left carotid artery can generate disturbed blood flow and shear stress and would lead to ATH in a predisposed genetic model of Apo E(-/-) mice. The partial left carotid artery model was generated by ligating three out of four branches of the left carotid artery compared with controls which experienced similar surgery conditions but no ligation. Animals were sacrificed 2 weeks post-ligation and examined for plaque formation, infiltration of leukocytes, pro-inflammatory immune response, and blood flow velocity. Our findings suggest a significant (p < 0.05) increase in plaque formation and lipid deposition in the partial ligated animals compared with controls, confirmed with hematoxylin and eosin and oil red O staining. Furthermore, there was a significant (p < 0.05) increase in the number of M1 macrophages and release of pro-inflammatory cytokines, IL-6 and TNFα, as compared with the control. Moreover, partial ligated carotid arteries demonstrated disturbed blood flow as their systolic velocity was significantly reduced. In conclusion, our data suggest that partial ligation of the left carotid artery induces disturbed flow and shear stress in the predisposed genetic model of Apo E(-/-) mice and leads to significantly developed ATH. Similarities to clinical patients who develop ATH independent of a high fat diet show that this could be a potential animal model to examine various parameters in ATH.

  16. Interlaminar shear stress effects on the postbuckling response of graphite-epoxy panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engelstad, S. P.; Knight, N. F., Jr.; Reddy, J. N.

    1990-01-01

    The influence of shear flexibility on overall postbuckling response was assessed, and transverse shear stress distributions in relation to panel failure were examined. Nonlinear postbuckling results are obtained for finite element models based on classical laminated plate theory and first-order shear deformation theory. Good correlation between test and analysis is obtained. The results presented analytically substantiate the experimentally observed failure mode.

  17. Shear stress reduces protease activated receptor-1 expression in human endothelial cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, K. T.; Eskin, S. G.; Patterson, C.; Runge, M. S.; McIntire, L. V.

    2001-01-01

    Shear stress has been shown to regulate several genes involved in the thrombotic and proliferative functions of endothelial cells. Thrombin receptor (protease-activated receptor-1: PAR-1) increases at sites of vascular injury, which suggests an important role for PAR-1 in vascular diseases. However, the effect of shear stress on PAR-1 expression has not been previously studied. This work investigates effects of shear stress on PAR-1 gene expression in both human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and microvascular endothelial cells (HMECs). Cells were exposed to different shear stresses using a parallel plate flow system. Northern blot and flow cytometry analysis showed that shear stress down-regulated PAR-1 messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein levels in both HUVECs and HMECs but with different thresholds. Furthermore, shear-reduced PAR-1 mRNA was due to a decrease of transcription rate, not increased mRNA degradation. Postshear stress release of endothelin-1 in response to thrombin was reduced in HUVECs and HMECs. Moreover, inhibitors of potential signaling pathways applied during shear stress indicated mediation of the shear-decreased PAR-1 expression by protein kinases. In conclusion, shear stress exposure reduces PAR-1 gene expression in HMECs and HUVECs through a mechanism dependent in part on protein kinases, leading to altered endothelial cell functional responses to thrombin.

  18. Duration of exposure to high fluid shear stress is critical in shear-induced platelet activation-aggregation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jian-ning; Bergeron, Angela L; Yu, Qinghua; Sun, Carol; McBride, Latresha; Bray, Paul F; Dong, Jing-fei

    2003-10-01

    Platelet functions are increasingly measured under flow conditions to account for blood hydrodynamic effects. Typically, these studies involve exposing platelets to high shear stress for periods significantly longer than would occur in vivo. In the current study, we demonstrate that the platelet response to high shear depends on the duration of shear exposure. In response to a 100 dyn/cm2 shear stress for periods less than 10-20 sec, platelets in PRP or washed platelets were aggregated, but minimally activated as demonstrated by P-selectin expression and binding of the activation-dependent alphaIIbbeta3 antibody PAC-1 to sheared platelets. Furthermore, platelet aggregation under such short pulses of high shear was subjected to rapid disaggregation. The disaggregated platelets could be re-aggregated by ADP in a pattern similar to unsheared platelets. In comparison, platelets that are exposed to high shear for longer than 20 sec are activated and aggregated irreversibly. In contrast, platelet activation and aggregation were significantly greater in whole blood with significantly less disaggregation. The enhancement is likely via increased collision frequency of platelet-platelet interaction and duration of platelet-platelet association due to high cell density. It may also be attributed to the ADP release from other cells such as red blood cells because increased platelet aggregation in whole blood was partially inhibited by ADP blockage. These studies demonstrate that platelets have a higher threshold for shear stress than previously believed. In a pathologically relevant timeframe, high shear alone is likely to be insufficient in inducing platelet activation and aggregation, but acts synergistically with other stimuli.

  19. Impact of bifurcation dual stenting on endothelial shear stress

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Henry Y.; Koo, Bon-Kwon

    2015-01-01

    Despite advances in percutaneous coronary interventions and the introduction of drug eluding stents, in-stent restenosis and stent thrombosis remain a clinically significant problem for bifurcations. The aim of this study is to determine the effect of dual bifurcation stenting on hemodynamic parameters known to influence restenosis and thrombosis. We hypothesized that double stenting, especially with a longer side branch (SB) stent, likely has a negative effect on wall shear stress (WSS), WSS gradient (WSSG), and oscillatory shear index (OSI). To test this hypothesis, we developed computational models of dual stents at bifurcations and non-Newtonian blood simulations. The models were then interfaced, meshed, and solved in a validated finite-element package. Longer and shorter stents at the SB and provisional stenting were compared. It was found that stents placed in the SB at a bifurcation lowered WSS, but elevated WSSG and OSI. Dual stenting with longer SB stent had the most adverse impact on SB endothelial WSS, WSSG, and OSI, with low WSS region up to 50% more than the case with shorter SB stent. The simulations also demonstrated flow disturbances resulting from SB stent struts protruding into the main flow field near the carina, which may have implications on stent thrombosis. The simulations predict a negative hemodynamic role for SB stenting, which is exaggerated with a longer stent, consistent with clinical trial findings that dual-stenting is comparable or inferior to provisional stenting. PMID:26183473

  20. Flow Instability and Wall Shear Stress Ocillation in Intracranial Aneurysms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baek, Hyoungsu; Jayamaran, Mahesh; Richardson, Peter; Karniadakis, George

    2009-11-01

    We investigate the flow dynamics and oscillatory behavior of wall shear stress (WSS) vectors in intracranial aneurysms using high-order spectral/hp simulations. We analyze four patient- specific internal carotid arteries laden with aneurysms of different characteristics : a wide-necked saccular aneurysm, a hemisphere-shaped aneurysm, a narrower-necked saccular aneurysm, and a case with two adjacent saccular aneurysms. Simulations show that the pulsatile flow in aneurysms may be subject to a hydrodynamic instability during the decelerating systolic phase resulting in a high-frequency oscillation in the range of 30-50 Hz. When the aneurysmal flow becomes unstable, both the magnitude and the directions of WSS vectors fluctuate. In particular, the WSS vectors around the flow impingement region exhibit significant spatial and temporal changes in direction as well as in magnitude.

  1. Wrinkling Phenomena of Thin Flat Plates Subjected to Shear Stresses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bollenrath, F

    1931-01-01

    This report covers a series of tests on thin flat elastic strips restrained at two parallel edges and subjected to shear by conversely directed stresses. Theoretical treatments, particularly those of Lilly, Southwell and Skan, and Timoshenko are briefly outlined. The problem to be solved by these tests was to find out whether, and to what extent the conditions and assumptions upon which the calculations are based are complied with in the tests. Three materials were used: celluloid, duralumin, brass. Owing to the high elastic deformability of celluloid, it was not only possible to observe the beginning but also to ascertain the type of deflection. The test data on celluloid was affirmed by the experiments with duralumin and brass.

  2. Endothelial fluid shear stress sensing in vascular health and disease

    PubMed Central

    Baeyens, Nicolas; Bandyopadhyay, Chirosree; Coon, Brian G.; Yun, Sanguk; Schwartz, Martin A.

    2016-01-01

    Endothelial cells transduce the frictional force from blood flow (fluid shear stress) into biochemical signals that regulate gene expression and cell behavior via specialized mechanisms and pathways. These pathways shape the vascular system during development and during postnatal and adult life to optimize flow to tissues. The same pathways also contribute to atherosclerosis and vascular malformations. This Review covers recent advances in basic mechanisms of flow signaling and the involvement of these mechanisms in vascular physiology, remodeling, and these diseases. We propose that flow sensing pathways that govern normal morphogenesis can contribute to disease under pathological conditions or can be altered to induce disease. Viewing atherosclerosis and vascular malformations as instances of pathological morphogenesis provides a unifying perspective that may aid in developing new therapies. PMID:26928035

  3. Interactions between stainless steel, shear stress, and monocytes.

    PubMed

    Messer, Regina L W; Mickalonis, John; Lewis, Jill B; Omata, Yo; Davis, Cortney M; Brown, Yolanda; Wataha, John C

    2008-10-01

    Angioplasty with stent placement is commonly used to treat coronary atherosclerosis. However, 20-40% of stainless steel stents restenose within 6 months via a prolonged inflammatory response mediated by monocytic infiltration and cytokine secretion. In the current study, we tested a hypothesis that blood flow and monocytes interact to alter stent corrosion. We assessed the effects of THP1 monocytes on the corrosion rate of 316L stainless steel (316LSS) under shear stress (0.5-50 dyn/cm(2)). In addition, THP1 cytokine secretion was determined using cytokine arrays and ELISA analyses. Data were compared using ANOVA and Tukey post hoc analysis (alpha = 0.05). Monocytes significantly lowered 316LSS corrosion rates without limiting current density. However, shear stress alone did not alter the corrosion rate of 316LSS. THP1 cells adhered to the 316LSS surface at all flow rates. Exposure to the 316LSS/corrosion test under high fluid flow rates increased (>twofold) the secretion of 7 of the 42 cytokines tested (angeogenin, GRO, I309, interleukin 8, interleukin 6, interleukin 1beta, and macrophage chemoattractant protein-1). Each of these cytokines play a role in wound healing, macrophage differentiation, and cell proliferation, all hallmarks of in-stent restenosis. Furthermore, only IL8 levels were significantly higher than any of the system controls during the 316LSS/corrosion test conditions. The IL8 levels from the 316LSS/corrosion tests were not significantly different from the +LPS control. Together, these data suggest that monocytic cells maybe activated by exposure to 316LSS stents and could contribute to in-stent restenosis and altered corrosion of the stent.

  4. Understanding the fluid mechanics behind transverse wall shear stress.

    PubMed

    Mohamied, Yumnah; Sherwin, Spencer J; Weinberg, Peter D

    2017-01-04

    The patchy distribution of atherosclerosis within arteries is widely attributed to local variation in haemodynamic wall shear stress (WSS). A recently-introduced metric, the transverse wall shear stress (transWSS), which is the average over the cardiac cycle of WSS components perpendicular to the temporal mean WSS vector, correlates particularly well with the pattern of lesions around aortic branch ostia. Here we use numerical methods to investigate the nature of the arterial flows captured by transWSS and the sensitivity of transWSS to inflow waveform and aortic geometry. TransWSS developed chiefly in the acceleration, peak systolic and deceleration phases of the cardiac cycle; the reverse flow phase was too short, and WSS in diastole was too low, for these periods to have a significant influence. Most of the spatial variation in transWSS arose from variation in the angle by which instantaneous WSS vectors deviated from the mean WSS vector rather than from variation in the magnitude of the vectors. The pattern of transWSS was insensitive to inflow waveform; only unphysiologically high Womersley numbers produced substantial changes. However, transWSS was sensitive to changes in geometry. The curvature of the arch and proximal descending aorta were responsible for the principal features, the non-planar nature of the aorta produced asymmetries in the location and position of streaks of high transWSS, and taper determined the persistence of the streaks down the aorta. These results reflect the importance of the fluctuating strength of Dean vortices in generating transWSS.

  5. Predicting boundary shear stress and sediment transport over bed forms

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McLean, S.R.; Wolfe, S.R.; Nelson, J.M.

    1999-01-01

    To estimate bed-load sediment transport rates in flows over bed forms such as ripples and dunes, spatially averaged velocity profiles are frequently used to predict mean boundary shear stress. However, such averaging obscures the complex, nonlinear interaction of wake decay, boundary-layer development, and topographically induced acceleration downstream of flow separation and often leads to inaccurate estimates of boundary stress, particularly skin friction, which is critically important in predicting bed-load transport rates. This paper presents an alternative methodology for predicting skin friction over 2D bed forms. The approach is based on combining the equations describing the mechanics of the internal boundary layer with semiempirical structure functions to predict the velocity at the crest of a bedform, where the flow is most similar to a uniform boundary layer. Significantly, the methodology is directed toward making specific predictions only at the bed-form crest, and as a result it avoids the difficulty and questionable validity of spatial averaging. The model provides an accurate estimate of the skin friction at the crest where transport rates are highest. Simple geometric constraints can be used to derive the mean transport rates as long as bed load is dominant.To estimate bed-load sediment transport rates in flows over bed forms such as ripples and dunes, spatially averaged velocity profiles are frequently used to predict mean boundary shear stress. However, such averaging obscures the complex, nonlinear interaction of wake decay, boundary-layer development, and topographically induced acceleration downstream of flow separation and often leads to inaccurate estimates of boundary stress, particularly skin friction, which is critically important in predicting bed-load transport rates. This paper presents an alternative methodology for predicting skin friction over 2D bed forms. The approach is based on combining the equations describing the mechanics of

  6. Surface temperatures and glassy state investigations in tribology, part 3. [limiting shear stress rheological model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bair, S.; Winer, W. O.

    1980-01-01

    Research related to the development of the limiting shear stress rheological model is reported. Techniques were developed for subjecting lubricants to isothermal compression in order to obtain relevant determinations of the limiting shear stress and elastic shear modulus. The isothermal compression limiting shear stress was found to predict very well the maximum traction for a given lubricant. Small amounts of side slip and twist incorporated in the model were shown to have great influence on the rising portion of the traction curve at low slide-roll ratio. The shear rheological model was also applied to a Grubin-like elastohydrodynamic inlet analysis for predicting film thicknesses when employing the limiting shear stress model material behavior.

  7. Modeling aeolian sediment transport thresholds on physically rough Martian surfaces: A shear stress partitioning approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillies, John A.; Nickling, William G.; King, James; Lancaster, Nicholas

    2010-09-01

    This paper explores the effect that large roughness elements (0.30 m × 0.26 m × 0.36 m) may have on entrainment of sediment by Martian winds using a shear stress partitioning approach based on a model developed by Raupach et al. (Raupach, M.R., Gillette, D.A., Leys, J.F., 1993. The effect of roughness elements on wind erosion threshold. Journal of Geophysical Research 98(D2), 3023-3029). This model predicts the shear stress partitioning ratio defined as the percent reduction in shear stress on the intervening surface between the roughness elements as compared to the surface in the absence of those elements. This ratio is based on knowledge of the geometric properties of the roughness elements, the characteristic drag coefficients of the elements and the surface, and the assumed effect these elements have on the spatial distribution of the mean and maximum shear stresses. On Mars, unlike on Earth, the shear stress partitioning caused by roughness can be non-linear in that the drag coefficients for the surface as well as for the roughness itself show Reynolds number dependencies for the reported range of Martian wind speeds. The shear stress partitioning model of Raupach et al. is used to evaluate how conditions of the Martian atmosphere will affect the threshold shear stress ratio for Martian surfaces over a range of values of roughness density. Using, as an example, a 125 µm diameter particle with an estimated threshold shear stress on Mars of ≈ 0.06 N m - 2 (shear velocity, u* ≈ 2 m s - 1 on a smooth surface), we evaluate the effect of roughness density on the threshold shear stress ratio for this diameter particle. In general, on Mars higher regional shear stresses are required to initiate particle entrainment for surfaces that have the same physical roughness as defined by the roughness density term ( λ) compared with terrestrial surfaces mainly because of the low Martian atmospheric density.

  8. Shear stress partitioning of overland flow on disturbed and undisturbed rangelands

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Physically-based hillslope erosion models commonly estimate soil detachment and transport capacity based on overland flow shear stress applied to soil aggregates. However, vegetation and rock cover counteract the shear stress of overland flow where they occur. Accordingly, partitioning of total sh...

  9. Wall Shear Stress, Wall Pressure and Near Wall Velocity Field Relationships in a Whirling Annular Seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, Gerald L.; Winslow, Robert B.; Thames, H. Davis, III

    1996-01-01

    The mean and phase averaged pressure and wall shear stress distributions were measured on the stator wall of a 50% eccentric annular seal which was whirling in a circular orbit at the same speed as the shaft rotation. The shear stresses were measured using flush mounted hot-film probes. Four different operating conditions were considered consisting of Reynolds numbers of 12,000 and 24,000 and Taylor numbers of 3,300 and 6,600. At each of the operating conditions the axial distribution (from Z/L = -0.2 to 1.2) of the mean pressure, shear stress magnitude, and shear stress direction on the stator wall were measured. Also measured were the phase averaged pressure and shear stress. These data were combined to calculate the force distributions along the seal length. Integration of the force distributions result in the net forces and moments generated by the pressure and shear stresses. The flow field inside the seal operating at a Reynolds number of 24,000 and a Taylor number of 6,600 has been measured using a 3-D laser Doppler anemometer system. Phase averaged wall pressure and wall shear stress are presented along with phase averaged mean velocity and turbulence kinetic energy distributions located 0.16c from the stator wall where c is the seal clearance. The relationships between the velocity, turbulence, wall pressure and wall shear stress are very complex and do not follow simple bulk flow predictions.

  10. Capillary tone: cyclooxygenase, shear stress, luminal glycocalyx, and hydraulic conductivity (Lp)

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Donna A; Flood, Mary H

    2015-01-01

    Control of capillary hydraulic conductivity (Lp) is the physiological mechanism that underpins systemic hydration. Capillaries form the largest surface of endothelial cells in any species with a cardiovascular system and all capillaries are exposed to the flow-induced force, shear stress (τ). Vasoactive molecules such as prostacyclin (cyclooxygenase product, COX) are released from endothelial cells in response to τ. Little is known about how COX activity impacts capillary Lp. The purpose here was to assess Lp in situ following an acute Δτ stimulus and during COX1/COX2 inhibition. Mesenteric true capillaries (TC) of Rana pipiens (pithed) were cannulated for Lp assessment using the modified Landis technique. Rana were randomized into Control and Test groups. Two capillaries per animal were used (perfusate, 10 mg·mL−1 BSA/frog Ringer's; superfusate, frog Ringer's or indomethacin (10−5 mol·L−1) mixed in frog Ringer's solution). Three distinct responses of Lp to indomethacin (TC2) were demonstrated (TC1 and TC2 medians: Test Subgroup 1, 3.0 vs. 1.8; Test Subgroup 2, 18.2 vs. 2.2; Test Subgroup 3, 4.2 vs. 10.2 × 10−7 cm·sec−1·cm H2O−1). Multiple regression analysis revealed a relationship between capillary Lp and systemic red blood cell concentration or hematocrit, plasma protein concentration, and Δτ (Test Subgroup 1, R2 = 0.59, P < 0.0001; Test Subgroup 2, R2 = 0.96, P = 0.002), but only during COX inhibition. Maintaining red blood cell and plasma protein levels within a normal range may control barrier function in a healthy state. Recovering barrier function may be an unrecognized benefit of transfusions during blood loss or edema formation. PMID:25896981

  11. Capillary tone: cyclooxygenase, shear stress, luminal glycocalyx, and hydraulic conductivity (Lp).

    PubMed

    Williams, Donna A; Flood, Mary H

    2015-04-01

    Control of capillary hydraulic conductivity (Lp) is the physiological mechanism that underpins systemic hydration. Capillaries form the largest surface of endothelial cells in any species with a cardiovascular system and all capillaries are exposed to the flow-induced force, shear stress (τ). Vasoactive molecules such as prostacyclin (cyclooxygenase product, COX) are released from endothelial cells in response to τ. Little is known about how COX activity impacts capillary Lp. The purpose here was to assess Lp in situ following an acute Δτ stimulus and during COX1/COX2 inhibition. Mesenteric true capillaries (TC) of Rana pipiens (pithed) were cannulated for Lp assessment using the modified Landis technique. Rana were randomized into Control and Test groups. Two capillaries per animal were used (perfusate, 10 mg·mL(-1) BSA/frog Ringer's; superfusate, frog Ringer's or indomethacin (10(-5) mol·L(-1)) mixed in frog Ringer's solution). Three distinct responses of Lp to indomethacin (TC2) were demonstrated (TC1 and TC2 medians: Test Subgroup 1, 3.0 vs. 1.8; Test Subgroup 2, 18.2 vs. 2.2; Test Subgroup 3, 4.2 vs. 10.2 × 10(-7) cm·sec(-1)·cm H2O(-1)). Multiple regression analysis revealed a relationship between capillary Lp and systemic red blood cell concentration or hematocrit, plasma protein concentration, and Δτ (Test Subgroup 1, R(2) = 0.59, P < 0.0001; Test Subgroup 2, R(2) = 0.96, P = 0.002), but only during COX inhibition. Maintaining red blood cell and plasma protein levels within a normal range may control barrier function in a healthy state. Recovering barrier function may be an unrecognized benefit of transfusions during blood loss or edema formation.

  12. Fluid shear stress sensitizes cancer cells to receptor-mediated apoptosis via trimeric death receptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, Michael J.; King, Michael R.

    2013-01-01

    Cancer metastasis, the process of cancer cell migration from a primary to distal location, typically leads to a poor patient prognosis. Hematogenous metastasis is initiated by intravasation of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) into the bloodstream, which are then believed to adhere to the luminal surface of the endothelium and extravasate into distal locations. Apoptotic agents such as tumor necrosis factor apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL), whether in soluble ligand form or expressed on the surface of natural killer cells, have shown promise in treating CTCs to reduce the probability of metastasis. The role of hemodynamic shear forces in altering the cancer cell response to apoptotic agents has not been previously investigated. Here, we report that human colon cancer COLO 205 and prostate cancer PC-3 cells exposed to a uniform fluid shear stress in a cone-and-plate viscometer become sensitized to TRAIL-induced apoptosis. Shear-induced sensitization directly correlates with the application of fluid shear stress, and TRAIL-induced apoptosis increases in a fluid shear stress force- and time-dependent manner. In contrast, TRAIL-induced necrosis is not affected by the application fluid shear stress. Interestingly, fluid shear stress does not sensitize cancer cells to apoptosis when treated with doxorubicin, which also induces apoptosis in cancer cells. Caspase inhibition experiments reveal that shear stress-induced sensitization to TRAIL occurs via caspase-dependent apoptosis. These results suggest that physiological fluid shear forces can modulate receptor-mediated apoptosis of cancer cells in the presence of apoptotic agents.

  13. Response of hot element wall shear stress gages in laminar oscillating flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, W. J.; Murphy, J. D.; Giddings, T. A.

    1986-01-01

    An experimental investigation of the time-dependent response of hot element wall shear stress gages in unsteady periodic air flows is reported. The study has focused on wall shear stress in laminar oscillating flows produced on a flat plate by a free stream velocity composed of a mean component and a superposed sinusoidal variation. Two types of hot element gages, platinum film and flush wire, were tested for values of reduced frequency ranging from 0.14 to 2.36. Values of the phase angle of the wall shear stress variation relative to the free stream velocity, as indicated by the hot element gages, are compared with numerical prediction. The comparisons show that the gages indicate a wall shear stress variation that lags the true variation, and that the gages will also not indicate the correct wall shear stress variation in periodic turbulent flows.

  14. Optimization of MR phase-contrast-based flow velocimetry and shear stress measurements.

    PubMed

    Kim, Taeho; Seo, Ji-Hyea; Bang, Seong-Sik; Choi, Hyeon-Woo; Chang, Yongmin; Lee, Jongmin

    2010-02-01

    This study was designed to measure the pixel-by-pixel flow velocity and shear stress from phase-contrast MR images. An optimized method was suggested and the use of the method was confirmed. A self-developed, straight steady flow model system was scanned by MRI with a velocity-encoded phase-contrast sequence. In-house developed software was used for the pixel-by-pixel flow velocity and shear stress measurements and the measurements were compared with physically measured mean velocity and shear stress. A comparison between the use of the in-house velocimetry software and a commercial velocimetry system was also performed. Curved steady flow models were scanned by phase-contrast MRI. Subsequently, velocity and shear stress were measured to confirm the shifted peak flow velocity and shear stress toward the outer side of the lumen. Peak velocity and shear stress were calculated for both the inner and outer half of the lumen and were statistically compared. The mean velocity measured with the use of in-house software had a significant correlation with the physical measurements of mean velocity; in addition, the measurement was more precise compared to the commercial system (R(2) = 0.85 vs. 0.75, respectively). The calculated mean shear stress had a significant correlation with the physical measurements of mean shear stress (R(2) = 0.95). The curved flow model showed a significantly shifted peak velocity and shear stress zones toward the outside of the flow (P < 0.0001). The technique to measure pixel-by-pixel velocity and shear stress of steady flow from velocity-encoded phase-contrast MRI was optimized. This technique had a good correlation with physical measurements and was superior to a commercially available system.

  15. Characteristics of the response of the iliac artery to wall shear stress in the anaesthetized pig.

    PubMed

    Kelly, R F; Snow, H M

    2007-07-15

    The functional significance of shear stress-induced vasodilatation in large conduit arteries is unclear since changes in the diameter have little effect on the resistance to blood flow. However, changes in diameter have a relatively large effect on wall shear stress which suggests that the function of flow-mediated dilatation is to reduce wall shear stress. The mean and pulsatile components of shear stress vary widely throughout the arterial system and areas of low mean and high amplitude of wall shear stress are prone to the development of atheroma. In this study, using an in vivo model with the ability to control flow rate and amplitude of flow independently, we investigated the characteristics of the response of the iliac artery to variations in both the mean and amplitude of wall shear stress. The results of this study confirm that increases in mean wall shear stress are an important stimulus for the release of nitric oxide by the endothelium as indicated by changes in arterial diameter and show for the first time, in vivo, that increases in the amplitude of the pulsatile component of shear stress have a small but significant inhibitory effect on this response. A negative feedback mechanism was identified whereby increases in shear stress brought about by increases in blood flow are reduced by the release of nitric oxide from the endothelium causing dilatation of the artery, thus decreasing the stimulus to cell adhesion and, through a direct action of nitric oxide, inhibiting the process of cell adhesion. The results also provide an explanation for the uneven distribution of atheroma throughout the arterial system, which is related to the ratio of pulsatile to mean shear stress and consequent variability in the production of NO.

  16. Effect of shear stress on asymmetric dimethylarginine release from vascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Osanai, Tomohiro; Saitoh, Masayuki; Sasaki, Satoko; Tomita, Hirofumi; Matsunaga, Toshiro; Okumura, Ken

    2003-11-01

    We demonstrated recently that plasma concentrations of asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA), an endogenous inhibitor of nitric oxide (NO) synthase, are increased by high salt intake concomitantly with a decrease in plasma levels of NO in human hypertension. We investigated the effect of shear stress on ADMA release in 2 types of cells: transformed human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs; cell line ECV-304) and HUVECs. Exposure of ECV-304 cells and HUVECs to shear stress with the use of a cone-plate viscometer enhanced gene expression of protein arginine methyltransferase (PRMT-1), ADMA synthase. In HUVECs, the ratio of PRMT-1 to glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase mRNA was increased by 2-fold by a shear stress of > or =15 dyne/cm2. A dominant-negative mutant of IkappaB kinase alpha and troglitazone at 8 micromol/L, an activator of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma, abolished the shear stress-induced increase in PRMT-1 gene expression in parallel with the blockade of nuclear factor (NF)-kappaB translocation into the nucleus. The activity of dimethylarginine dimethylaminohydrolase, the degradation enzyme of ADMA, was unchanged after shear stress < or =15 dyne/cm2 and was enhanced by 1.48+/-0.06-fold (P<0.05) by shear stress at 25 dyne/cm2. The release of ADMA was increased by 1.64+/-0.10-fold (P<0.05) by shear stress at 15 dyne/cm2 but was not affected by shear stress at 25 dyne/cm2. These results indicate that shear stress enhances gene expression of PRMT-1 and ADMA release via activation of the NF-kappaB pathway. Shear stress at higher magnitudes facilitates the degradation of ADMA, thus returning ADMA release levels to baseline.

  17. Critical combinations of shear and direct axial stress for curved rectangular panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schildcrout, Murry; Stein, Manuel

    1949-01-01

    A solution is presented for the problem of the buckling of curved rectangular panels subjected to combined shear and direct axial stress. Charts giving theoretical critical combinations of shear and direct axial stress are presented for panels having five different length-width ratios. Because the actual critical compressive stress of rectangular panels having substantial curvature is known to be much lower than the theoretical value, a semiempirical method of analysis of curved panels subjected to combined shear and direct axial stress is presented for use in design. (author

  18. Non-canonical Wnt signalling modulates the endothelial shear stress flow sensor in vascular remodelling

    PubMed Central

    Franco, Claudio A; Jones, Martin L; Bernabeu, Miguel O; Vion, Anne-Clemence; Barbacena, Pedro; Fan, Jieqing; Mathivet, Thomas; Fonseca, Catarina G; Ragab, Anan; Yamaguchi, Terry P; Coveney, Peter V; Lang, Richard A; Gerhardt, Holger

    2016-01-01

    Endothelial cells respond to molecular and physical forces in development and vascular homeostasis. Deregulation of endothelial responses to flow-induced shear is believed to contribute to many aspects of cardiovascular diseases including atherosclerosis. However, how molecular signals and shear-mediated physical forces integrate to regulate vascular patterning is poorly understood. Here we show that endothelial non-canonical Wnt signalling regulates endothelial sensitivity to shear forces. Loss of Wnt5a/Wnt11 renders endothelial cells more sensitive to shear, resulting in axial polarization and migration against flow at lower shear levels. Integration of flow modelling and polarity analysis in entire vascular networks demonstrates that polarization against flow is achieved differentially in artery, vein, capillaries and the primitive sprouting front. Collectively our data suggest that non-canonical Wnt signalling stabilizes forming vascular networks by reducing endothelial shear sensitivity, thus keeping vessels open under low flow conditions that prevail in the primitive plexus. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.07727.001 PMID:26845523

  19. Localized α4 Integrin Phosphorylation Directs Shear Stress-Induced Endothelial Cell Alignment

    PubMed Central

    Goldfinger, Lawrence E.; Tzima, Eleni; Stockton, Rebecca; Kiosses, William B.; Kinbara, Kayoko; Tkachenko, Eugene; Gutierrez, Edgar; Groisman, Alex; Nguyen, Phu; Chien, Shu; Ginsberg1, Mark H.

    2009-01-01

    Vascular endothelial cells respond to laminar shear stress by aligning in the direction of flow, a process which may contribute to athero-protection. Here we report that localized α4 integrin phosphorylation is a mechanism for establishing the directionality of shear stress-induced alignment in microvascular endothelial cells. Within 5 minutes of exposure to a physiological level of shear stress, endothelial α4 integrins became phosphorylated on Ser988. In wounded monolayers, phosphorylation was enhanced at the downstream edges of cells relative to the source of flow. The shear-induced α4 integrin phosphorylation was blocked by inhibitors of cAMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA), an enzyme involved in the alignment of endothelial cells under prolonged shear. Moreover, shear-induced localized activation of the small GTPase Rac1, which specifies the directionality of endothelial alignment, was similarly blocked by PKA inhibitors. Furthermore, endothelial cells bearing a non-phosphorylatable α4(S988A) mutation failed to align in response to shear stress, thus establishing α4 as a relevant PKA substrate. We thereby show that shear-induced PKA-dependent α4 integrin phosphorylation at the downstream edge of endothelial cells promotes localized Rac1 activation, which in turn directs cytoskeletal alignment in response to shear stress. PMID:18583710

  20. The production of turbulent stress in a shear flow by irrotational fluctuations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gartshore, I. S.; Durbin, P. A.; Hunt, J. C. R.

    1983-01-01

    Attention is given to the way in which external turbulence affects an initially turbulence-free region in which there is a mean velocity gradient. External turbulence induces irrotational fluctuations in the sheared region which interact with the shear to produce rotational velocity fluctuations and mean Reynolds stresses. Since the actual front between the initial external turbulence and the shear flow is a randomly contorted surface, the turbulence near the front is intermittent, and is presently included in the form of a simple statistical model. In wind tunnel tests, turbulent shear stress was found to grow from zero to significant values in the interaction region. Observed stress magnitude and extent agrees with predictions, and it is concluded that turbulent stresses can be produced by irrotational fluctuations in a region of mean shear.

  1. Contact Pressure and Shear Stress Analysis on Conforming Contact Problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagatani, Haruo; Imou, Akitoshi

    Two methods to solve a conforming contact problem are proposed. First method is general and can be applicable to the contact case between elastic arbitrary shape bodies. For verification FEA is performed on the convex-concave sphere contact, and the result of this method is well corresponding to the FEA result. However, the accuracy deteriorates when the mesh aspect ratio is extremely large. This phenomenon is caused by the usage of numerical integration for the calculation of influence coefficient. The second method is devised to avoid this problem, while this improved method is applicable only to the case when the contact area can be considered to be on a cylinder surface. By using this method, the contact pressure can be obtained without the deterioration even in the case of edge load occurring between ball bearing race shoulder and ball. The results of the contact pressure and the shear stress that is necessary for bearing life estimation are compared with the FEA result, which showed well correspondence.

  2. Surface chemistry modulates osteoblasts sensitivity to low fluid shear stress.

    PubMed

    Xing, Juan; Li, Yan; Lin, Manping; Wang, Jinfeng; Wu, Jinchuan; Ma, Yufei; Wang, Yuanliang; Yang, Li; Luo, Yanfeng

    2014-11-01

    Low fluid shear stress (FSS) is the mechanical environment encountered by osteoblasts in implanted bones or native bones of bed rest patients. High sensitivity of osteoblasts to low FSS is beneficial to osteogenesis. We hypothesize that this sensitivity might be regulated by chemical microenvironment provided by scaffolds. To confirm this hypothesis, self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) were used to provide various surface chemistries including OH, CH3 , and NH2 while parallel-plate fluid flow system produced low FSS (5 dynes/cm(2) ). Alterations in S-phase cell fraction, alkaline phosphatase activity, fibronectin (Fn), and collagen type I (COL I) secretion compared to those without FSS exposure were detected to characterize the sensitivity. Osteoblasts on OH and CH3 SAMs demonstrated obvious sensitivity while on NH2 SAMs negligible sensitivity was observed. Examination of the cell aspect ratio, orientation, and focal adhesions before and after FSS exposure indicates that the full spreading and robust focal adhesions on NH2 SAMs should be responsible for the negligible sensitivity through increasing the cell tolerance to low FSS. Despite the higher sensitivity, the Fn and COL I depositions on both OH and CH3 SAMs after FSS exposure were still less than on NH2 SAMs without FSS exposure. These results suggest that elaborate design of surface chemical compositions is essential for orchestration of surface chemistry with low FSS to realize both high sensitivity and high matrix secretion, facilitating the formation of functional bone tissues in implanted bone.

  3. Characterizations and Correlations of Wall Shear Stress in Aneurysmal Flow

    PubMed Central

    Arzani, Amirhossein; Shadden, Shawn C.

    2016-01-01

    Wall shear stress (WSS) is one of the most studied hemodynamic parameters, used in correlating blood flow to various diseases. The pulsatile nature of blood flow, along with the complex geometries of diseased arteries, produces complicated temporal and spatial WSS patterns. Moreover, WSS is a vector, which further complicates its quantification and interpretation. The goal of this study is to investigate WSS magnitude, angle, and vector changes in space and time in complex blood flow. Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) was chosen as a setting to explore WSS quantification. Patient-specific computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations were performed in six AAAs. New WSS parameters are introduced, and the pointwise correlation among these, and more traditional WSS parameters, was explored. WSS magnitude had positive correlation with spatial/temporal gradients of WSS magnitude. This motivated the definition of relative WSS gradients. WSS vectorial gradients were highly correlated with magnitude gradients. A mix WSS spatial gradient and a mix WSS temporal gradient are proposed to equally account for variations in the WSS angle and magnitude in single measures. The important role that WSS plays in regulating near wall transport, and the high correlation among some of the WSS parameters motivates further attention in revisiting the traditional approaches used in WSS characterizations. PMID:26592536

  4. Design of cellular porous biomaterials for wall shear stress criterion.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yuhang; Zhou, Shiwei; Cadman, Joseph; Li, Qing

    2010-11-01

    The microfluidic environment provided by implanted prostheses has a decisive influence on the viability, proliferation and differentiation of cells. In bone tissue engineering, for instance, experiments have confirmed that a certain level of wall shear stress (WSS) is more advantageous to osteoblastic differentiation. This paper proposes a level-set-based topology optimization method to regulate fluidic WSS distribution for design of cellular biomaterials. The topological boundary of fluid phase is represented by a level-set model embedded in a higher-dimensional scalar function. WSS is determined by the computational fluid dynamics analysis in the scale of cellular base cells. To achieve a uniform WSS distribution at the solid-fluid interface, the difference between local and target WSS is taken as the design criterion, which determines the speed of the boundary evolution in the level-set model. The examples demonstrate the effectiveness of the presented method and exhibit a considerable potential in the design optimization and fabrication of new prosthetic cellular materials for bioengineering applications.

  5. Flow instability and wall shear stress variation in intracranial aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Baek, H.; Jayaraman, M. V.; Richardson, P. D.; Karniadakis, G. E.

    2010-01-01

    We investigate the flow dynamics and oscillatory behaviour of wall shear stress (WSS) vectors in intracranial aneurysms using high resolution numerical simulations. We analyse three representative patient-specific internal carotid arteries laden with aneurysms of different characteristics: (i) a wide-necked saccular aneurysm, (ii) a narrower-necked saccular aneurysm, and (iii) a case with two adjacent saccular aneurysms. Our simulations show that the pulsatile flow in aneurysms can be subject to a hydrodynamic instability during the decelerating systolic phase resulting in a high-frequency oscillation in the range of 20–50 Hz, even when the blood flow rate in the parent vessel is as low as 150 and 250 ml min−1 for cases (iii) and (i), respectively. The flow returns to its original laminar pulsatile state near the end of diastole. When the aneurysmal flow becomes unstable, both the magnitude and the directions of WSS vectors fluctuate at the aforementioned high frequencies. In particular, the WSS vectors around the flow impingement region exhibit significant spatio-temporal changes in direction as well as in magnitude. PMID:20022896

  6. Vascular wall shear stress in zebrafish model of early atherosclerosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Woorak; Seo, Eunseok; Yeom, Eunseop; Lee, Sang Joon

    2016-11-01

    Although atherosclerosis is a multifactorial disease, the role of hemodynamic force has strong influence on the outbreak of the disease. Low and oscillating wall shear stress (WSS) is associated with the incidence of atherosclerosis. Many researchers have investigated relationships between WSS and the occurrence of atherosclerosis using in vitro and in vivo models. However, these models possess technological limitations in mimicking real biophysiological conditions and monitoring the temporal progression of atherosclerosis. In this study, a hypercholesterolaemic zebrafish model was established as a novel model to resolve these technical limitations. WSS in blood vessels of 15 days post-fertilisation zebrafish was measured using a micro PIV technique, and the spatial distribution of lipids inside blood vessels was quantitatively visualized using a confocal microscopy. As a result, lipids are mainly deposited in the regions of low WSS. The oscillating WSS is not induced by blood flows in the zebrafish disease model. The present hypercholesterolaemic zebrafish model would be useful for understanding the effect of WSS on the early stage of atherosclerosis. This work was supported by the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF) under a Grant funded by the Korean government (MSIP) (No. 2008-0061991).

  7. Flow-induced crystallization in isotactic polypropylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamad, Fawzi Ghassan

    Brief intervals of strong flow stretch chains in a semicrystalline polymer melt, which results in an increase in the nuclei number density and a transformation of the crystal structure. This flow-induced crystallization (FIC) phenomenon is explored in this study using highly isotactic polypropylene (iPP) samples. Using one synthesized and five commercial linear isotactic polypropylene samples, we investigate the FIC behavior by imposing shear onto these samples in a rotational rheometer. Equipped with a good temperature control and flexible shear protocol, we apply different temperature and flow conditions. The magnitude of the FIC effect varies with basic processing parameters (shear rate, specific work, crystallization temperature, and shearing temperature) and material properties (totalistic, molecular weight distribution, and particle concentration in the polymer). The scope of this study is to systematically investigate the influences of these parameters on FIC. The FIC effects that are investigated in this dissertation are: crystallization kinetics, persistence time of flow-induced nuclei, and crystal morphology. The crystallization time was measured in the rheometer by monitoring the onset of crystallization after quenching samples sheared above Tm. These samples were subsequently used to study their flow-induced nuclei persistence time and crystal morphology. The lifetime of flow-induced nuclei was determined by measuring the time required to return from FIC back to quiescent crystallization using a differential scanning calorimeter. The crystal morphology was imaged using polarized optical microscopy and atomic force microscopy. We investigated the influence of specific work on the three FIC characteristics, and found three regimes that are separated by the critical work ( Wc) and the saturation work (Wsat) thresholds. Below the critical work threshold, the morphology is composed of mostly spherulite crystals, which keep a constant volume, and a small

  8. Cooperative effects of matrix stiffness and fluid shear stress on endothelial cell behavior.

    PubMed

    Kohn, Julie C; Zhou, Dennis W; Bordeleau, François; Zhou, Allen L; Mason, Brooke N; Mitchell, Michael J; King, Michael R; Reinhart-King, Cynthia A

    2015-02-03

    Arterial hemodynamic shear stress and blood vessel stiffening both significantly influence the arterial endothelial cell (EC) phenotype and atherosclerosis progression, and both have been shown to signal through cell-matrix adhesions. However, the cooperative effects of fluid shear stress and matrix stiffness on ECs remain unknown. To investigate these cooperative effects, we cultured bovine aortic ECs on hydrogels matching the elasticity of the intima of compliant, young, or stiff, aging arteries. The cells were then exposed to laminar fluid shear stress of 12 dyn/cm(2). Cells grown on more compliant matrices displayed increased elongation and tighter EC-cell junctions. Notably, cells cultured on more compliant substrates also showed decreased RhoA activation under laminar shear stress. Additionally, endothelial nitric oxide synthase and extracellular signal-regulated kinase phosphorylation in response to fluid shear stress occurred more rapidly in ECs cultured on more compliant substrates, and nitric oxide production was enhanced. Together, our results demonstrate that a signaling cross talk between stiffness and fluid shear stress exists within the vascular microenvironment, and, importantly, matrices mimicking young and healthy blood vessels can promote and augment the atheroprotective signals induced by fluid shear stress. These data suggest that targeting intimal stiffening and/or the EC response to intima stiffening clinically may improve vascular health.

  9. Effect of shear stress on migration and integrin expression in macaque trophoblast cells.

    PubMed

    Soghomonians, Arlen; Barakat, Abdul I; Thirkill, Twanda L; Blankenship, Thomas N; Douglas, Gordon C

    2002-05-08

    During fetal development, trophoblast cells enter endometrial capillaries, migrate within the uterine vasculature, and eventually reside within spiral arteries of the uterus. This invasive activity is accompanied by upregulation of trophoblast beta1 integrin expression. Fluid mechanical shear stress regulates migration and expression of adhesion molecules in vascular endothelial cells, but nothing is known about the effects of shear stress on trophoblast cells. We tested the hypothesis that shear stress regulates the motility and beta1 integrin expression of trophoblast cells. Early gestation macaque trophoblast cells were cultured in 1 x 1-mm square cross-section capillary tubes within which the flow field was determined using three-dimensional computational fluid dynamic simulations. Trophoblast cells in the capillary tubes were exposed to a steady shear stress of 7.5, 15, or 30 dyn/cm2 for up to 24 h. In the absence of flow, trophoblast cells were highly dynamic with constant nondirectional positional shifts but with no net cell migration. Exposure of the cells to shear stress within 24-72 h of cell plating significantly increased the level of this activity and led to net cell migration in the direction of flow. Shear stress also increased the expression and altered the topography of beta1 integrin. These results suggest that shear stress regulates trophoblast motility and beta1 integrin expression in vitro.

  10. Shear stress variation induced by red blood cell motion in microvessel.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Wenjuan; Zhang, Junfeng

    2010-08-01

    We simulated red blood cells flowing in microvessel to examine the induced wall shear stress variation. A typical peak-valley-peak structure is observed, and it is analyzed in terms of its magnitude, spatial influencing range, and temporal elapsed duration. Effects of red cell deformability, microvessel size, and flow velocity have been investigated. The corresponding variation characters have also been related to cell deformation and flow field. Simulation results show that the variation magnitude is mainly determined by the gap size between cell and vessel wall, while the spatial range of the shear stress variation depends on the cell length as well as the microvessel size. For a certain point on the vessel wall, the shear stress variation lasts a short time at a higher flow velocity, and vice versa. As the cell concentration in the microvessel increases, the shear stress variation structure changes accordingly with the two peaks from two close cells merging together, and eventually only one peak is observed at a hematocrit of 30.72%. However, the effect of hematocrit on the variation magnitude of shear stress is less obvious, and the dynamic nature of shear stress is still significant. This represents the first attempt to study the dynamic shear stress variation on microvessel as red blood cells flow by, and the information obtained in this study could be valuable to relevant research, for example, the mechanotransduction in the endothelia glycocalyx layer.

  11. Numerical and experimental demonstration of shear stress measurement at thick steel plates using acoustoelasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbasi, Zeynab; Ozevin, Didem

    2015-04-01

    The purpose of this article is to numerically quantify the stress state of complex loaded thick steel plates using the fundamental theory of acoustoelasticity, which is the relationship with stress and ultrasonic velocity in the nonlinear regime. The normal and shear stresses of a thick plate can be measured using a phased array placement of ultrasonic sensors and Rayleigh ultrasonic waves. Three measurement angles (i.e., 0 45 and 90 degrees) are selected since three measurements are needed to solve the stress tensor in an isotropic plate. The ultrasonic data is influenced significantly by the frequency of the Rayleigh waves as well as the thickness of the plate being examined; consequently the overall experimental process is influenced by the measurement parameters. In this study, a numerical demonstration is implemented to extract the nonlinearity coefficients using a 3D structural geometry and Murnaghan material model capable of examining the effects of various plate thicknesses and ultrasonic frequencies on the shear stress measurement. The purpose is that as the thickness becomes smaller, the shear stress becomes negligible at the angled measurement. For thicker cross section, shear stress becomes influential if the depth of penetration of Rayleigh wave is greater than the half of the thickness. The correlation between the depth of penetration and shear stress is then obtained. The numerical results are compared with 1 MHz ultrasonic frequency and a 3/8 inch thick steel plate loaded uniaxially while the measurement direction is angled to have the presence of shear stress in the measurement direction.

  12. Endothelial dysfunction and monocyte recruitment in cells exposed to non-uniform shear stress.

    PubMed

    Cicha, Iwona; Goppelt-Struebe, Margarete; Yilmaz, Atilla; Daniel, Werner G; Garlichs, Christoph D

    2008-01-01

    Atherosclerosis results from a combination of local blood flow patterns and systemic risk factors. We investigated whether non-uniform shear stress at bifurcations induces pro-atherogenic endothelial dysfunction and monocyte recruitment. Bifurcating flow-through cell culture slides were used to expose HUVECs to laminar or non-uniform shear stress for 18 h at 10 dyne/cm(2). For the adhesion assay, HUVECs were subsequently perfused with medium containing THP-1 monocytes for 1 h. Protein expression was determined by immunofluorescence. In areas exposed to laminar shear stress, alignment of endothelial cells with the flow was observed, accompanied by upregulation of eNOS and downregulation of connective tissue growth factor (CTGF). In contrast, cells exposed to non-uniform shear stress near the outer walls of bifurcations were characterized by irregular, unaligned shape, induction of endothelin-1 and CTGF, as well as reduced eNOS expression. These atherogenic effects of non-uniform shear stress were prevented when cells were treated with statins (1 mumol/l) during flow. Under non-uniform shear stress, a slight induction of VCAM-1, ICAM-1, and E-/P-selectin was observed. In agreement with this, monocyte recruitment, which was nearly undetectable under laminar shear stress, was moderately induced by non-uniform shear stress (P<0.02). In conclusion, inhibition of antioxidative eNOS and upregulation of atherogenic proteins is the first step in non-uniform shear stress-mediated endothelial dysfunction, which in vivo in the presence of atherogenic risk factors may further enhance monocyte recruitment into the artery wall.

  13. Analysis of the complex stress state during early loading in cylindrical compression-shear specimens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfeiffer, S.; Frint, P.; F-X Wagner, M.

    2017-03-01

    In most engineering applications, materials are subjected to complex load cases rather than the simple uniaxial ones typically used for material characterization. To experimentally study the material behavior under a combination of compression and shear, an inclined compression specimen can be used. This specimen has been applied in various earlier experimental studies, typically to investigate shear localization under quasi-static or impact loading. In this contribution, we analyze the stress state in a compression-shear specimen in detail using an elastic-ideal plastic finite element simulation. The effects of specimen aspect ratio (height/diameter), inclination angle, and friction conditions between specimen and tool plates are investigated using the material parameters of different conventional steels as input. Shear stress distributions in characteristic shear directions on specific planes in the specimen that control the subsequent plastic deformation behavior are evaluated. Our results show that, even in the absence of friction, shear stresses are distributed heterogeneously in the inclined specimen, which differs from the stress distribution in a conventional compression specimen. Moreover, the highest shear and equivalent stresses always occur at the edges of the short diagonal plane of the specimen, independent of the investigated parameters. This study contributes to a more detailed understanding of the elasto-plastic mechanics in compression-shear specimens, and it specifically provides information for the analysis of the onset of early plastic deformation.

  14. Impact of wall shear stress on initial bacterial adhesion in rotating annular reactor.

    PubMed

    Saur, Thibaut; Morin, Emilie; Habouzit, Frédéric; Bernet, Nicolas; Escudié, Renaud

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the bacterial adhesion under different wall shear stresses in turbulent flow and using a diverse bacterial consortium. A better understanding of the mechanisms governing microbial adhesion can be useful in diverse domains such as industrial processes, medical fields or environmental biotechnologies. The impact of wall shear stress-four values ranging from 0.09 to 7.3 Pa on polypropylene (PP) and polyvinyl chloride (PVC)-was carried out in rotating annular reactors to evaluate the adhesion in terms of morphological and microbiological structures. A diverse inoculum consisting of activated sludge was used. Epifluorescence microscopy was used to quantitatively and qualitatively characterize the adhesion. Attached bacterial communities were assessed by molecular fingerprinting profiles (CE-SSCP). It has been demonstrated that wall shear stress had a strong impact on both quantitative and qualitative aspects of the bacterial adhesion. ANOVA tests also demonstrated the significant impact of wall shear stress on all three tested morphological parameters (surface coverage, number of objects and size of objects) (p-values < 2.10-16). High wall shear stresses increased the quantity of attached bacteria but also altered their spatial distribution on the substratum surface. As the shear increased, aggregates or clusters appeared and their size grew when increasing the shears. Concerning the microbiological composition, the adhered bacterial communities changed gradually with the applied shear.

  15. Fiber bundle models for stress release and energy bursts during granular shearing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michlmayr, Gernot; Or, Dani; Cohen, Denis

    2012-12-01

    Fiber bundle models (FBMs) offer a versatile framework for representing transitions from progressive to abrupt failure in disordered material. We report a FBM-based description of mechanical interactions and associated energy bursts during shear deformation of granular materials. For strain-controlled shearing, where elements fail in a sequential order, we present analytical expressions for strain energy release and failure statistics. Results suggest that frequency-magnitude characteristics of fiber failure vary considerably throughout progressive shearing. Predicted failure distributions were in good agreement with experimentally observed shear stress fluctuations and associated bursts of acoustic emissions. Experiments also confirm a delayed release of acoustic emission energy relative to shear stress buildup, as anticipated by the model. Combined with data-rich acoustic emission measurements, the modified FBM offers highly resolved contact-scale insights into granular media dynamics of shearing processes.

  16. Impact of peptide micropatterning on endothelial cell actin remodeling for cell alignment under shear stress.

    PubMed

    Chollet, Céline; Bareille, Reine; Rémy, Murielle; Guignandon, Alain; Bordenave, Laurence; Laroche, Gaetan; Durrieu, Marie-Christine

    2012-12-01

    HSVEC behavior under physiological shear stress in vitro is investigated on PET surfaces micropatterned with both RGDS and WQPPRARI peptides. This technique allows (i) creating geometries on surface to guide cell orientation under shear stress and (ii) controlling surface chemical composition in order to modulate cell behavior. Under shear stress, endothelial cells adhere on patterned PET surfaces and present a more rapid orientation in flow direction in comparison to cells cultured on homogeneous surfaces. Micropatterned surfaces presenting a large surface area ratio of RGDS/WQPPRARI peptides induce fibrillar adhesion, while surfaces presenting an equal RGDS/WQPPRARI peptides surface area ratio preferentially induce focal adhesion.

  17. Red blood cell damage by shear stress for different blood types

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arwatz, Gilad; Bedkowski, Katherine; Smits, Alexander

    2011-11-01

    In surgical practice, blood damage caused by medical devices is often a limiting factor in the duration of an acute procedure or in chronic exposures such as hemodialysis. In order to establish guidelines for designing medical devices, a study was conducted to determine the relationship between shear stress and damage to red blood cells using a concentric Couette device. By measuring the hemolysis level for various shear stresses and exposure times, a non-dimensional relationship between shear stress and blood damage for different blood types was established. Funding provided by Princeton University's Project X.

  18. An Experimental Investigation of the Risk of Triggering Geological Disasters by Injection under Shear Stress.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yixin; Xu, Jiang; Peng, Shoujian

    2016-12-08

    Fluid injection has been applied in many fields, such as hazardous waste deep well injection, forced circulation in geothermal fields, hydraulic fracturing, and CO2 geological storage. However, current research mainly focuses on geological data statistics and the dominating effects of pore pressure. There are only a few laboratory-conditioned studies on the role of drilling boreholes and the effect of injection pressure on the borehole wall. Through experimental phenomenology, this study examines the risk of triggering geological disasters by fluid injection under shear stress. We developed a new direct shear test apparatus, coupled Hydro-Mechanical (HM), to investigate mechanical property variations when an intact rock experienced step drilling borehole, fluid injection, and fluid pressure acting on the borehole and fracture wall. We tested the peak shear stress of sandstone under different experimental conditions, which showed that drilling borehole, water injection, and increased pore pressure led to the decrease in peak shear stress. Furthermore, as pore pressure increased, peak shear stress dispersion increased due to crack propagation irregularity. Because the peak shear stress changed during the fluid injection steps, we suggest that the risk of triggering geological disaster with injection under shear stress, pore, borehole, and fluid pressure should be considered.

  19. An Experimental Investigation of the Risk of Triggering Geological Disasters by Injection under Shear Stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yixin; Xu, Jiang; Peng, Shoujian

    2016-12-01

    Fluid injection has been applied in many fields, such as hazardous waste deep well injection, forced circulation in geothermal fields, hydraulic fracturing, and CO2 geological storage. However, current research mainly focuses on geological data statistics and the dominating effects of pore pressure. There are only a few laboratory-conditioned studies on the role of drilling boreholes and the effect of injection pressure on the borehole wall. Through experimental phenomenology, this study examines the risk of triggering geological disasters by fluid injection under shear stress. We developed a new direct shear test apparatus, coupled Hydro-Mechanical (HM), to investigate mechanical property variations when an intact rock experienced step drilling borehole, fluid injection, and fluid pressure acting on the borehole and fracture wall. We tested the peak shear stress of sandstone under different experimental conditions, which showed that drilling borehole, water injection, and increased pore pressure led to the decrease in peak shear stress. Furthermore, as pore pressure increased, peak shear stress dispersion increased due to crack propagation irregularity. Because the peak shear stress changed during the fluid injection steps, we suggest that the risk of triggering geological disaster with injection under shear stress, pore, borehole, and fluid pressure should be considered.

  20. An Experimental Investigation of the Risk of Triggering Geological Disasters by Injection under Shear Stress

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yixin; Xu, Jiang; Peng, Shoujian

    2016-01-01

    Fluid injection has been applied in many fields, such as hazardous waste deep well injection, forced circulation in geothermal fields, hydraulic fracturing, and CO2 geological storage. However, current research mainly focuses on geological data statistics and the dominating effects of pore pressure. There are only a few laboratory-conditioned studies on the role of drilling boreholes and the effect of injection pressure on the borehole wall. Through experimental phenomenology, this study examines the risk of triggering geological disasters by fluid injection under shear stress. We developed a new direct shear test apparatus, coupled Hydro-Mechanical (HM), to investigate mechanical property variations when an intact rock experienced step drilling borehole, fluid injection, and fluid pressure acting on the borehole and fracture wall. We tested the peak shear stress of sandstone under different experimental conditions, which showed that drilling borehole, water injection, and increased pore pressure led to the decrease in peak shear stress. Furthermore, as pore pressure increased, peak shear stress dispersion increased due to crack propagation irregularity. Because the peak shear stress changed during the fluid injection steps, we suggest that the risk of triggering geological disaster with injection under shear stress, pore, borehole, and fluid pressure should be considered. PMID:27929142

  1. Interlaminar shear stress effects on the postbuckling response of graphite-epoxy panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engelstad, S. P.; Reddy, J. N.; Knight, N. F., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    The objectives of the study are to assess the influence of shear flexibility on overall postbuckling response, and to examine transverse shear stress distributions in relation to panel failure. Nonlinear postbuckling results are obtained for finite element models based on classical laminated plate theory and first-order shear deformation theory. Good correlation between test and analysis is obtained. The results presented in this paper analytically substantiate the experimentally observed failure mode.

  2. Method for measuring surface shear stress magnitude and direction using liquid crystal coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reda, Daniel C. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A method is provided for determining surface shear magnitude and direction at every point on a surface. The surface is covered with a shear stress sensitive liquid crystal coating and illuminated by white light from a normal direction. A video camera is positioned at an oblique angle above the surface to observe the color of the liquid crystal at that angle. The shear magnitude and direction are derived from the color information. A method of calibrating the device is also provided.

  3. Experimental measurement of dynamic fluid shear stress on the ventricular surface of the aortic valve leaflet

    PubMed Central

    Yap, Choon Hwai; Saikrishnan, Neelakantan

    2015-01-01

    Aortic valve (AV) calcification is a highly prevalent disease with serious impact on mortality and morbidity. The exact causes and mechanisms of AV calcification are unclear, although previous studies suggest that mechanical forces play a role. It has been clinically demonstrated that calcification preferentially occurs on the aortic surface of the AV. This is hypothesized to be due to differences in the mechanical environments on the two sides of the valve. It is thus necessary to characterize fluid shear forces acting on both sides of the leaflet to test this hypothesis. The current study is one of two studies characterizing dynamic shear stress on both sides of the AV leaflets. In the current study, shear stresses on the ventricular surface of the AV leaflets were measured experimentally on two prosthetic AV models with transparent leaflets in an in vitro pulsatile flow loop using two-component Laser Doppler Velocimetry (LDV). Experimental measurements were utilized to validate a theoretical model of AV ventricular surface shear stress based on the Womersley profile in a straight tube, with corrections for the opening angle of the valve leaflets. This theoretical model was applied to in vivo data based on MRI-derived volumetric flow rates and valve dimension obtained from the literature. Experimental results showed that ventricular surface shear stress was dominated by the streamwise component. The systolic shear stress waveform resembled a half-sinusoid during systole and peaks at 64–71 dyn/cm2, and reversed in direction at the end of systole for 15–25 ms, and reached a significant negative magnitude of 40–51 dyn/cm2. Shear stresses from the theoretical model applied to in vivo data showed that shear stresses peaked at 77–92 dyn/cm2 and reversed in direction for substantial period of time (108–110 ms) during late systole with peak negative shear stress of 35–38 dyn/cm2. PMID:21465260

  4. Effect of Wall Shear Stress on Corrosion Inhibitor Film Performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canto Maya, Christian M.

    In oil and gas production, internal corrosion of pipelines causes the highest incidence of recurring failures. Ensuring the integrity of ageing pipeline infrastructure is an increasingly important requirement. One of the most widely applied methods to reduce internal corrosion rates is the continuous injection of chemicals in very small quantities, called corrosion inhibitors. These chemical substances form thin films at the pipeline internal surface that reduce the magnitude of the cathodic and/or anodic reactions. However, the efficacy of such corrosion inhibitor films can be reduced by different factors such as multiphase flow, due to enhanced shear stress and mass transfer effects, loss of inhibitor due to adsorption on other interfaces such as solid particles, bubbles and droplets entrained by the bulk phase, and due to chemical interaction with other incompatible substances present in the stream. The first part of the present project investigated the electrochemical behavior of two organic corrosion inhibitors (a TOFA/DETA imidazolinium, and an alkylbenzyl dimethyl ammonium chloride), with and without an inorganic salt (sodium thiosulfate), and the resulting enhancement. The second part of the work explored the performance of corrosion inhibitor under multiphase (gas/liquid, solid/liquid) flow. The effect of gas/liquid multiphase flow was investigated using small and large scale apparatus. The small scale tests were conducted using a glass cell and a submersed jet impingement attachment with three different hydrodynamic patterns (water jet, CO 2 bubbles impact, and water vapor cavitation). The large scale experiments were conducted applying different flow loops (hilly terrain and standing slug systems). Measurements of weight loss, linear polarization resistance (LPR), and adsorption mass (using an electrochemical quartz crystal microbalance, EQCM) were used to quantify the effect of wall shear stress on the performance and integrity of corrosion inhibitor

  5. Visualization and Measurement of Surface Shear Stress Vector Distributions Using Liquid Crystal Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reda, Daniel C.; Wilder, Michael C.

    1998-01-01

    When a shear-sensitive liquid crystal coating is illuminated from the normal direction by white light and observed from an oblique above-plane view angle, its color-change response to shear depends on both shear stress vector magnitude and the direction of the applied shear vector relative to the observer's in-plane line of sight. At any point, the maximum color change is always seen or measured when the local shear vector is aligned with, and directed away from, the observer; the magnitude of the color change at this vector/observer aligned orientation scales directly with shear stress magnitude. Conversely, any point exposed to a shear vector with a component directed toward the observer exhibits a noncolor-change response, always characterized by a rusty red or brown color, independent of both shear magnitude and direction. Based on this knowledge, full-surface shear stress vector visualization and measurement methodologies were formulated and successfully demonstrated. The present paper reviews the observations and measurements that led to the development of these methodologies and applications of both are discussed.

  6. Wall shear stress at the initiation site of cerebral aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Geers, A J; Morales, H G; Larrabide, I; Butakoff, C; Bijlenga, P; Frangi, A F

    2017-02-01

    Hemodynamics are believed to play an important role in the initiation of cerebral aneurysms. In particular, studies have focused on wall shear stress (WSS), which is a key regulator of vascular biology and pathology. In line with the observation that aneurysms predominantly occur at regions of high WSS, such as bifurcation apices or outer walls of vascular bends, correlations have been found between the aneurysm initiation site and high WSS. The aim of our study was to analyze the WSS field at an aneurysm initiation site that was neither a bifurcation apex nor the outer wall of a vascular bend. Ten cases with aneurysms on the A1 segment of the anterior cerebral artery were analyzed and compared with ten controls. Aneurysms were virtually removed from the vascular models of the cases to mimic the pre-aneurysm geometry. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations were created to assess the magnitude, gradient, multidirectionality, and pulsatility of the WSS. To aid the inter-subject comparison of hemodynamic variables, we mapped the branch surfaces onto a two-dimensional parametric space. This approach made it possible to view the whole branch at once for qualitative evaluation. It also allowed us to empirically define a patch for quantitative analysis, which was consistent among subjects and encapsulated the aneurysm initiation sites in our dataset. To test the sensitivity of our results, CFD simulations were repeated with a second independent observer virtually removing the aneurysms and with a 20 % higher flow rate at the inlet. We found that branches harboring aneurysms were characterized by high WSS and high WSS gradients. Among all assessed variables, the aneurysm initiation site most consistently coincided with peaks of temporal variation in the WSS magnitude.

  7. Impact of wall shear stress on initial bacterial adhesion in rotating annular reactor

    PubMed Central

    Saur, Thibaut; Morin, Emilie; Habouzit, Frédéric; Bernet, Nicolas

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the bacterial adhesion under different wall shear stresses in turbulent flow and using a diverse bacterial consortium. A better understanding of the mechanisms governing microbial adhesion can be useful in diverse domains such as industrial processes, medical fields or environmental biotechnologies. The impact of wall shear stress—four values ranging from 0.09 to 7.3 Pa on polypropylene (PP) and polyvinyl chloride (PVC)—was carried out in rotating annular reactors to evaluate the adhesion in terms of morphological and microbiological structures. A diverse inoculum consisting of activated sludge was used. Epifluorescence microscopy was used to quantitatively and qualitatively characterize the adhesion. Attached bacterial communities were assessed by molecular fingerprinting profiles (CE-SSCP). It has been demonstrated that wall shear stress had a strong impact on both quantitative and qualitative aspects of the bacterial adhesion. ANOVA tests also demonstrated the significant impact of wall shear stress on all three tested morphological parameters (surface coverage, number of objects and size of objects) (p-values < 2.10−16). High wall shear stresses increased the quantity of attached bacteria but also altered their spatial distribution on the substratum surface. As the shear increased, aggregates or clusters appeared and their size grew when increasing the shears. Concerning the microbiological composition, the adhered bacterial communities changed gradually with the applied shear. PMID:28207869

  8. Fluid shear stress stimulates prostaglandin and nitric oxide release in bone marrow-derived preosteoclast-like cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McAllister, T. N.; Du, T.; Frangos, J. A.

    2000-01-01

    Bone is a porous tissue that is continuously perfused by interstitial fluid. Fluid flow, driven by both vascular pressure and mechanical loading, may generate significant shear stresses through the canaliculi as well as along the bone lining at the endosteal surface. Both osteoblasts and osteocytes produce signaling factors such as prostaglandins and nitric in response to fluid shear stress (FSS); however, these humoral agents appear to have more profound affects on osteoclast activity at the endosteal surface. We hypothesized that osteoclasts and preosteoclasts may also be mechanosensitive and that osteoclast-mediated autocrine signaling may be important in bone remodeling. In this study, we investigated the effect of FSS on nitric oxide (NO), prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)), and prostacyclin (PGI(2)) release by neonatal rat bone marrow-derived preosteoclast-like cells. These cells were tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) positive, weakly nonspecific esterase (NSE) positive, and capable of fusing into calcitonin-responsive, bone-resorbing, multinucleated cells. Bone marrow-derived preosteoclast-like cells exposed for 6 h to a well-defined FSS of 16 dynes/cm(2) produced NO at a rate of 7.5 nmol/mg protein/h, which was 10-fold that of static controls. This response was completely abolished by 100 microM N(G)-amino-L-arginine (L-NAA). Flow also stimulated PGE(2) production (3.9 microg/mg protein/h) and PGI(2) production (220 pg/mg protein/h). L-NAA attenuated flow-induced PGE(2) production by 30%, suggesting that NO may partially modulate PGE(2) production. This is the first report demonstrating that marrow derived cells are sensitive to FSS and that autocrine signaling in these cells may play an important role in load-induced remodeling and signal transduction in bone. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  9. Torsional bridge setup for the characterization of integrated circuits and microsensors under mechanical shear stress.

    PubMed

    Herrmann, M; Gieschke, P; Ruther, P; Paul, O

    2011-12-01

    We present a torsional bridge setup for the electro-mechanical characterization of devices integrated in the surface of silicon beams under mechanical in-plane shear stress. It is based on the application of a torsional moment to the longitudinal axis of the silicon beams, which results in a homogeneous in-plane shear stress in the beam surface. The safely applicable shear stresses span the range of ±50 MPa. Thanks to a specially designed clamping mechanism, the unintended normal stress typically stays below 2.5% of the applied shear stress. An analytical model is presented to compute the induced shear stress. Numerical computations verify the analytical results and show that the homogeneity of the shear stress is very high on the beam surface in the region of interest. Measurements with piezoresistive microsensors fabricated using a complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor process show an excellent agreement with both the computational results and comparative measurements performed on a four-point bending bridge. The electrical connection to the silicon beam is performed with standard bond wires. This ensures that minimal forces are applied to the beam by the electrical interconnection to the external instrumentation and that devices with arbitrary bond pad layout can be inserted into the setup.

  10. Interaction of wall shear stress magnitude and gradient in the prediction of arterial macromolecular permeability.

    PubMed

    LaMack, Jeffrey A; Himburg, Heather A; Li, Xue-Mei; Friedman, Morton H

    2005-04-01

    Large spatial shear stress gradients have anecdotally been associated with early atherosclerotic lesion susceptibility in vivo and have been proposed as promoters of endothelial cell dysfunction in vitro. Here, experiments are presented in which several measures of the fluid dynamic shear stress, including its gradient, at the walls of in vivo porcine iliac arteries, are correlated against the transendothelial macromolecular permeability of the vessels. The fluid dynamic measurements are based on postmortem vascular casts, and permeability is measured from Evans blue dye (EBD) uptake. Time-averaged wall shear stress (WSS), as well as a new parameter termed maximum gradient stress (MGS) that describes the spatial shear stress gradient due to flow acceleration at a given point, are mapped for each artery and compared on a point-by-point basis to the corresponding EBD patterns. While there was no apparent relation between MGS and EBD uptake, a composite parameter, WSS(-0.11) MGS(0.044), was highly correlated with permeability. Notwithstanding the small exponents, the parameter varied widely within the region of interest. The results suggest that sites exposed to low wall shear stresses are more likely to exhibit elevated permeability, and that this increase is exacerbated in the presence of large spatial shear stress gradients.

  11. Gyrokinetic simulation of momentum transport with residual stress from diamagnetic level velocity shears

    SciTech Connect

    Waltz, R. E.; Staebler, G. M.; Solomon, W. M.

    2011-04-15

    Residual stress refers to the remaining toroidal angular momentum (TAM) flux (divided by major radius) when the shear in the equilibrium fluid toroidal velocity (and the velocity itself) vanishes. Previously [Waltz et al., Phys. Plasmas 14, 122507 (2007); errata 16, 079902 (2009)], we demonstrated with GYRO [Candy and Waltz, J. Comp. Phys. 186, 545 (2003)] gyrokinetic simulations that TAM pinching from (ion pressure gradient supported or diamagnetic level) equilibrium ExB velocity shear could provide some of the residual stress needed to support spontaneous toroidal rotation against normal diffusive loss. Here we show that diamagnetic level shear in the intrinsic drift wave velocities (or ''profile shear'' in the ion and electron density and temperature gradients) provides a comparable residual stress. The individual signed contributions of these small (rho-star level) ExB and profile velocity shear rates to the turbulence level and (rho-star squared) ion energy transport stabilization are additive if the rates are of the same sign. However because of the additive stabilization effect, the contributions to the small (rho-star cubed) residual stress is not always simply additive. If the rates differ in sign, the residual stress from one can buck out that from the other (and in some cases reduce the stabilization.) The residual stress from these diamagnetic velocity shear rates is quantified by the ratio of TAM flow to ion energy (power) flow (M/P) in a global GYRO core simulation of a ''null'' toroidal rotation DIII-D [Mahdavi and Luxon, Fusion Sci. Technol. 48, 2 (2005)] discharge by matching M/P profiles within experimental uncertainty. Comparison of global GYRO (ion and electron energy as well as particle) transport flow balance simulations of TAM transport flow in a high-rotation DIII-D L-mode quantifies and isolates the ExB shear and parallel velocity (Coriolis force) pinching components from the larger ''diffusive'' parallel velocity shear driven component and

  12. A High shear stress segment along the San Andreas Fault: Inferences based on near-field stress direction and stress magnitude observations in the Carrizo Plain Area

    SciTech Connect

    Castillo, D. A.,; Younker, L.W.

    1997-01-30

    Nearly 200 new in-situ determinations of stress directions and stress magnitudes near the Carrizo plain segment of the San Andreas fault indicate a marked change in stress state occurring within 20 km of this principal transform plate boundary. A natural consequence of this stress transition is that if the observed near-field ``fault-oblique`` stress directions are representative of the fault stress state, the Mohr-Coulomb shear stresses resolved on San Andreas sub-parallel planes are substantially greater than previously inferred based on fault-normal compression. Although the directional stress data and near-hydrostatic pore pressures, which exist within 15 km of the fault, support a high shear stress environment near the fault, appealing to elevated pore pressures in the fault zone (Byerlee-Rice Model) merely enhances the likelihood of shear failure. These near-field stress observations raise important questions regarding what previous stress observations have actually been measuring. The ``fault-normal`` stress direction measured out to 70 km from the fault can be interpreted as representing a comparable depth average shear strength of the principal plate boundary. Stress measurements closer to the fault reflect a shallower depth-average representation of the fault zone shear strength. If this is true, only stress observations at fault distances comparable to the seismogenic depth will be representative of the fault zone shear strength. This is consistent with results from dislocation monitoring where there is pronounced shear stress accumulation out to 20 km of the fault as a result of aseismic slip within the lower crust loading the upper locked section. Beyond about 20 km, the shear stress resolved on San Andreas fault-parallel planes becomes negligible. 65 refs., 15 figs.

  13. Quantification of Interfibrillar Shear Stress in Aligned Soft Collagenous Tissues via Notch Tension Testing

    PubMed Central

    Szczesny, Spencer E.; Caplan, Jeffrey L.; Pedersen, Pal; Elliott, Dawn M.

    2015-01-01

    The mechanical function of soft collagenous tissues is largely determined by their hierarchical organization of collagen molecules. While collagen fibrils are believed to be discontinuous and transfer load through shearing of the interfibrillar matrix, interfibrillar shear stresses have never been quantified. Scaling traditional shear testing procedures down to the fibrillar length scale is impractical and would introduce substantial artifacts. Here, through the use of a novel microscopic variation of notch tension testing, we explicitly demonstrate the existence of interfibrillar shear stresses within tendon fascicles and provide the first measurement of their magnitude. Axial stress gradients along the sample length generated by notch tension testing were measured and used to calculate a value of 32 kPa for the interfibrillar shear stress. This estimate is comparable to the interfibrillar shear stress predicted by previous multiscale modeling of tendon fascicles, which supports the hypothesis that fibrils are discontinuous and transmit load through interfibrillar shear. This information regarding the structure-function relationships of tendon and other soft collagenous tissues is necessary to identify potential causes for tissue impairment with degeneration and provide the foundation for developing regenerative repair strategies or engineering biomaterials for tissue replacement. PMID:26469396

  14. Quantification of Interfibrillar Shear Stress in Aligned Soft Collagenous Tissues via Notch Tension Testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szczesny, Spencer E.; Caplan, Jeffrey L.; Pedersen, Pal; Elliott, Dawn M.

    2015-10-01

    The mechanical function of soft collagenous tissues is largely determined by their hierarchical organization of collagen molecules. While collagen fibrils are believed to be discontinuous and transfer load through shearing of the interfibrillar matrix, interfibrillar shear stresses have never been quantified. Scaling traditional shear testing procedures down to the fibrillar length scale is impractical and would introduce substantial artifacts. Here, through the use of a novel microscopic variation of notch tension testing, we explicitly demonstrate the existence of interfibrillar shear stresses within tendon fascicles and provide the first measurement of their magnitude. Axial stress gradients along the sample length generated by notch tension testing were measured and used to calculate a value of 32 kPa for the interfibrillar shear stress. This estimate is comparable to the interfibrillar shear stress predicted by previous multiscale modeling of tendon fascicles, which supports the hypothesis that fibrils are discontinuous and transmit load through interfibrillar shear. This information regarding the structure-function relationships of tendon and other soft collagenous tissues is necessary to identify potential causes for tissue impairment with degeneration and provide the foundation for developing regenerative repair strategies or engineering biomaterials for tissue replacement.

  15. Panoramic diagnostics of shear stresses on the channel wall with a step using the liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zharkova, G. M.; Kovrizhina, V. N.; Petrov, A. P.; Pod'yachev, S. P.

    2016-11-01

    Measurements results on the shear stresses of surface friction by means of thin-film coatings based on cholesteric liquid crystals and specialized software for digital processing of experimental video are presented in the paper. The calibration dependencies of shear stress relative to the hue and azimuth angle as well as shear stress spatial distribution at subsonic turbulent flow ( V ∝ = 84 m/s) around a step, trapezoidal in plane (Reynolds number calculated for step height h, Re h = 2.57•104), with a base angle of 46° were derived for two geometries of experiment. The experiments demonstrated high sensitivity of liquid crystals to rearrangement of the near-wall flow structure and possibility to obtain quantitative data about mean shear stress levels.

  16. Estimation of turbulent shear stress in free jets: application to valvular regurgitation.

    PubMed

    Winoto, S H; Shah, D A; Liu, H

    1996-01-01

    In an attempt to better assess the severity of valvular regurgitation, an in-vitro experiment has been conducted to estimate turbulent shear stress levels within free jets issuing from different orifice shapes and sizes by means of hot-wire anemometry. On the basis of the measured mean velocities and the jet profiles, the distributions of the normalized kinematic turbulent shear stress (uv/Um2) were estimated for different jets by using an equation available for self-preserving circular jet. The results indicate that the equation can estimate the distributions of uv/Um2 independent of the orifice shape and Reynolds number of the jet. For the range of Reynolds numbers considered, the estimation of maximum turbulent shear stress inferred from these distributions suggests that the critical shear stress level of approximately 200 N/m2, corresponding to destruction of blood cells, is exceeded for typical blood flow velocity of 5 m/s at the valvular lesion.

  17. An equilibrium method for prediction of transverse shear stresses in a thick laminated plate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chaudhuri, R. Z.

    1986-01-01

    First two equations of equilibrium are utilized to compute the transverse shear stress variation through thickness of a thick laminated plate after in-plane stresses have been computed using an assumed quadratic displacement triangular element based on transverse inextensibility and layerwise constant shear angle theory (LCST). Centroid of the triangle is the point of exceptional accuracy for transverse shear stresses. Numerical results indicate close agreement with elasticity theory. An interesting comparison between the present theory and that based on assumed stress hybrid finite element approach suggests that the latter does not satisfy the condition of free normal traction at the edge. Comparison with numerical results obtained by using constant shear angle theory suggests that LCST is close to the elasticity solution while the CST is closer to classical (CLT) solution. It is also demonstrated that the reduced integration gives faster convergence when the present theory is applied to a thin plate.

  18. Animal models of surgically manipulated flow velocities to study shear stress-induced atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Winkel, Leah C; Hoogendoorn, Ayla; Xing, Ruoyu; Wentzel, Jolanda J; Van der Heiden, Kim

    2015-07-01

    Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease of the arterial tree that develops at predisposed sites, coinciding with locations that are exposed to low or oscillating shear stress. Manipulating flow velocity, and concomitantly shear stress, has proven adequate to promote endothelial activation and subsequent plaque formation in animals. In this article, we will give an overview of the animal models that have been designed to study the causal relationship between shear stress and atherosclerosis by surgically manipulating blood flow velocity profiles. These surgically manipulated models include arteriovenous fistulas, vascular grafts, arterial ligation, and perivascular devices. We review these models of manipulated blood flow velocity from an engineering and biological perspective, focusing on the shear stress profiles they induce and the vascular pathology that is observed.

  19. The Micro-Pillar Shear-Stress Sensor MPS3 for Turbulent Flow

    PubMed Central

    Große, Sebastian; Schröder, Wolfgang

    2009-01-01

    Wall-shear stress results from the relative motion of a fluid over a body surface as a consequence of the no-slip condition of the fluid in the vicinity of the wall. To determine the two-dimensional wall-shear stress distribution is of utter importance in theoretical and applied turbulence research. In this article, characteristics of the Micro-Pillar Shear-Stress Sensor MPS3, which has been shown to offer the potential to measure the two-directional dynamic wall-shear stress distribution in turbulent flows, will be summarized. After a brief general description of the sensor concept, material characteristics, possible sensor-structure related error sources, various sensitivity and distinct sensor performance aspects will be addressed. Especially, pressure-sensitivity related aspects will be discussed. This discussion will serve as ‘design rules’ for possible new fields of applications of the sensor technology. PMID:22574010

  20. Theory to predict shear stress on cells in turbulent blood flow.

    PubMed

    Morshed, Khandakar Niaz; Bark, David; Forleo, Marcio; Dasi, Lakshmi Prasad

    2014-01-01

    Shear stress on blood cells and platelets transported in a turbulent flow dictates the fate and biological activity of these cells. We present a theoretical link between energy dissipation in turbulent flows to the shear stress that cells experience and show that for the case of physiological turbulent blood flow: (a) the Newtonian assumption is valid, (b) turbulent eddies are universal for the most complex of blood flow problems, and (c) shear stress distribution on turbulent blood flows is possibly universal. Further we resolve a long standing inconsistency in hemolysis between laminar and turbulent flow using the theoretical framework. This work demonstrates that energy dissipation as opposed to bulk shear stress in laminar or turbulent blood flow dictates local mechanical environment of blood cells and platelets universally.

  1. Wall shear stress measurement in blade end-wall corner region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhargava, R.; Raj, R.; Boldman, D. R.

    1987-01-01

    The magnitude and the direction of wall shear stress and surface pressure in the blade end-wall corner region were investigated. The measurements were obtained on a specially designed Preston tube, the tip of which could be concentrically rotated about its axis of rotation at the measurement location. The magnitude of wall shear stress in the vicinity of the corner was observed to increase significantly (170 percent) compared to its far-upstream value; the increase was consistently higher on the blade surface compared to the value on the plate surface of the blade end-wall corner. On both surfaces in the blade end-wall corner, the variation of the wall shear stress direction was found to be more predominant in the vicinity of the blade leading-edge location. The trend of the measured wall shear stress direction showed good agreement with the limiting streamline directions obtained from the flow visualization studies.

  2. Influence of polymer charge on the shear yield stress of silica aggregated with adsorbed cationic polymers.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ying; Yu, Hai; Wanless, Erica J; Jameson, Graeme J; Franks, George V

    2009-08-15

    Flocs were produced by adding three cationic polymers (10% charge density, 3.0x10(5) g/mol molecular weight; 40% charge density, 1.1x10(5) g/mol molecular weight; and 100% charge density, 1.2x10(5) g/mol molecular weight) to 90 nm diameter silica particles. The shear yield stresses of the consolidated sediment beds from settled and centrifuged flocs were determined via the vane technique. The polymer charge density plays an important role in influencing the shear yield stresses of sediment beds. The shear yield stresses of sediment beds from flocs induced by the 10% charged polymer were observed to increase with an increase in polymer dose, initial solid concentration and background electrolyte concentration at all volume fractions. In comparison, polymer dose has a marginal effect on the shear yield stresses of sediment beds from flocs induced by the 40% and 100% charged polymers. The shear yield stresses of sediments from flocs induced by the 40% charged polymer are independent of salt concentration whereas the addition of salt decreases the shear yield stresses of sediments from flocs induced by the 100% charged polymer. When flocculated at the optimum dose for each polymer (12 mg/g silica for the 10% charged polymer at 0.03 M NaCl, 12 mg/g for 40% and 2 mg/g for 100%), shear yield stress increases as polymer charge increases. The effects observed are related to the flocculation mechanism (bridging, patch attraction or charge neutralisation) and the magnitude of the adhesive force. Comparison of shear and compressive yield stresses show that the network is only slightly weaker in shear than in compression. This is different than many other systems (mainly salt and pH coagulation) which have shear yield stress much less than compressive yield stress. The existing models relating the power law exponent of the volume fraction dependence of the shear yield stress to the network fractal structure are not satisfactory to predict all the experimental behaviour.

  3. Effects of different types of fluid shear stress on endothelial cell proliferation and survival.

    PubMed

    Kadohama, Takayuki; Nishimura, Kengo; Hoshino, Yuji; Sasajima, Tadahiro; Sumpio, Bauer E

    2007-07-01

    We attempted to clarify the effect of different types of shear stress on endothelial cell (EC) proliferation and survival. Bovine aortic ECs were subjected to either steady laminar, 1 Hz pulsatile, or 1 Hz to and fro shear at 14 dyne/cm(2). % of BrdU positive EC was 14.3 +/- 1.6% in steady, 21.5 +/- 3.2% in pulsatile, and 11.4 +/- 2.4% in to and fro after 4 h, respectively (P < 0.05). Pulsatile shear compared with static control. Rapamycin reduced BrdU incorporation in all shear regimens (P < 0.001). However, it was still higher in EC exposed to pulsatile shear than the other regimens (P < 0.005). PD98059 completely abolished the increased BrdU incorporation in all shear regimens, including pulsatile shear. Pulsatile shear had significantly elevated ERK1/2 phosphorylation at 5 min compared with steady (P < 0.05) and to and fro shear (P < 0.01) while there was no significant difference in pp70(S6k) phosphorylation between any shear regimen. The ratio of apoptotic cells in serum deprived EC in the presence of steady laminar, pulsatile and to and fro shear for 4 h were 2.7 +/- 0.78%, 2.7 +/- 0.42%, and 2.9 +/- 0.62%, respectively while after the addition of serum for 4 h, it was 4.3 +/- 0.73%. All shear regimens phosphorylated AKT in a time-dependent manner with no significant difference between regimens. Our results demonstrate that different types of shear stress regimens have different effects on EC and may account for the variable response of EC to hemodynamics in the circulation.

  4. Activation and shedding of platelet glycoprotein IIb/IIIa under non-physiological shear stress.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zengsheng; Mondal, Nandan K; Ding, Jun; Koenig, Steven C; Slaughter, Mark S; Griffith, Bartley P; Wu, Zhongjun J

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of non-physiological high shear stress on activation and shedding of platelet GP IIb/IIIa receptors. The healthy donor blood was exposed to three levels of high shear stresses (25, 75, 125 Pa) from the physiological to non-physiological status with three short exposure time (0.05, 0.5, 1.5 s), created by a specific blood shearing system. The activation and shedding of the platelet GPIIb/IIIa were analyzed using flow cytometry and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. In addition, platelet P-selectin expression of sheared blood, which is a marker for activated platelets, was also analyzed. The results from the present study showed that the number of activated platelets, as indicated by the surface GPIIb/IIIa activation and P-selectin expression, increased with increasing the shear stress level and exposure time. However, the mean fluorescence of GPIIb/IIIa on the platelet surface, decreased with increasing the shear stress level and exposure time. The reduction of GPIIb/IIIa on the platelet surface was further proved by the reduction of further activated platelet GPIIb/IIIa surface expression induced by ADP and the increase in GPIIb/IIIa concentration in microparticle-free plasma with increasing the applied shear stress and exposure time. It is clear that non-physiological shear stress induce a paradoxical phenomenon, in which both activation and shedding of the GPIIb/IIIa on the platelet surface occur simultaneously. This study may offer a new perspective to explain the reason of both increased thrombosis and bleeding events in patients implanted with high shear blood-contacting medical devices.

  5. ESTIMATION OF SHEAR STRESS WORKING ON SUBMERGED HOLLOW FIBRE MEMBRANE BY CFD METHOD IN MBRs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaw, Hlwan Moe; Li, Tairi; Nagaoka, Hiroshi

    This study was conducted to evaluate shear stress working on submerged hollow fibre membrane by CFD (Computation Fluid Dynamics) method in MBRs. Shear stress on hollow fibre membrane caused by aeration was measured directly using a two-direction load sensor. The measurement of water-phase flow velocity was done also by using laser doppler velocimeter. It was confirmed that the shear stress was possible to be evaluated from the water-phase flow velocityby the result of comparison of time average shear stress actually measured with one hollow fibre membrane and the one calculated by the water-phase flow velocity. In the estimation of the water-phase flow velocity using the CFD method, time average water-phase flow velocity estimated by consideration of the fluid resistance of the membrane module nearly coincided with the measured values, and it was shown that it was possible to be estimated also within the membrane module. Moreover, the measured shear stress and drag force well coincided with the values calculated from the estimated water-phase flow velocity outside of membrane module and in the center of membrane module, and it was suggested that the shear stress on the hollow fibre membrane could be estimated by the CFD method in MBRs.

  6. Human brain microvascular endothelial cells resist elongation due to shear stress.

    PubMed

    Reinitz, Adam; DeStefano, Jackson; Ye, Mao; Wong, Andrew D; Searson, Peter C

    2015-05-01

    Endothelial cells in straight sections of vessels are known to elongate and align in the direction of flow. This phenotype has been replicated in confluent monolayers of bovine aortic endothelial cells and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) in cell culture under physiological shear stress. Here we report on the morphological response of human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMECs) in confluent monolayers in response to shear stress. Using a microfluidic platform we image confluent monolayers of HBMECs and HUVECs under shear stresses up to 16 dyne cm(-2). From live-cell imaging we quantitatively analyze the cell morphology and cell speed as a function of time. We show that HBMECs do not undergo a classical transition from cobblestone to spindle-like morphology in response to shear stress. We further show that under shear stress, actin fibers are randomly oriented in the cells indicating that there is no cytoskeletal remodeling. These results suggest that HBMECs are programmed to resist elongation and alignment under shear stress, a phenotype that may be associated with the unique properties of the blood-brain barrier.

  7. Transverse shear stresses and their sensitivity coefficients in multilayered composite panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noor, Ahmed K.; Kim, Yong H.; Peters, Jeanne M.

    1994-01-01

    A computational procedure is presented for the accurate determination of transverse shear stresses and their sensitivity coefficients in flat multilayered composite panels subjected to mechanical and thermal loads. The sensitivity coefficients measure the sensitivity of the transverse shear stresses to variations in the different lamination and material parameters of the panel. The panel is discretized by using either a three-field mixed finite element model based on a two-dimensional first- order shear deformation plate theory or a two-field degenerate solid element with each of the displacement components having a linear variation throughout the thickness of the laminate. The evaluation of transverse shear stresses can be conveniently divided into two phases. The first phase consists of using a superconvergent recovery technique for evaluating the in-plane stresses in the different layers. In the second phase, the transverse shear stresses are evaluated by using piecewise integration, in the thickness direction, of the three-dimensional equilibrium equations. The same procedure is used for evaluating the sensitivity coefficients of the transverse shear stresses. The effectiveness of the computational procedure is demonstrated by means of numerical examples of multilayered cross-ply panels subjected to transverse loading, uniform temperature change, and uniform temperature gradient through the thickness of the panel. In each case the standard of the comparison is taken to be the exact solution of the three dimensional thermoelasticity equations of the panel.

  8. Orbital fluid shear stress promotes osteoblast metabolism, proliferation and alkaline phosphates activity in vitro.

    PubMed

    Aisha, M D; Nor-Ashikin, M N K; Sharaniza, A B R; Nawawi, H; Froemming, G R A

    2015-09-10

    Prolonged disuse of the musculoskeletal system is associated with reduced mechanical loading and lack of anabolic stimulus. As a form of mechanical signal, the multidirectional orbital fluid shear stress transmits anabolic signal to bone forming cells in promoting cell differentiation, metabolism and proliferation. Signals are channeled through the cytoskeleton framework, directly modifying gene and protein expression. For that reason, we aimed to study the organization of Normal Human Osteoblast (NHOst) cytoskeleton with regards to orbital fluid shear (OFS) stress. Of special interest were the consequences of cytoskeletal reorganization on NHOst metabolism, proliferation, and osteogenic functional markers. Cells stimulated at 250 RPM in a shaking incubator resulted in the rearrangement of actin and tubulin fibers after 72 h. Orbital shear stress increased NHOst mitochondrial metabolism and proliferation, simultaneously preventing apoptosis. The ratio of RANKL/OPG was reduced, suggesting that orbital shear stress has the potential to inhibit osteoclastogenesis and osteoclast activity. Increase in ALP activity and OCN protein production suggests that stimulation retained osteoblast function. Shear stress possibly generated through actin seemed to hold an anabolic response as osteoblast metabolism and functional markers were enhanced. We hypothesize that by applying orbital shear stress with suitable magnitude and duration as a non-drug anabolic treatment can help improve bone regeneration in prolonged disuse cases.

  9. Application of Entropy Concept for Shear Stress Distribution in Laminar Pipe Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choo, Yeon Moon; Choo, Tai Ho; Jung, Donghwi; Seon, Yun Gwan; Kim, Joong Hoon

    2016-04-01

    In the river fluid mechanics, shear stress is calculated from frictional force caused by viscosity and fluctuating velocity. Traditional shear stress distribution equations have been widely used because of their simplicity. However, they have a critical limitation of requiring energy gradient which is generally difficult to estimate in practice. Especially, measuring velocity/velocity gradient on the boundary layer is difficult in practice. It requires point velocity throughout the entire cross section to calculate velocity gradient. This study proposes shear stress distribution equations for laminar flow based on entropy theory using mean velocity and entropy coefficient. The proposed equations are demonstrated and compared with measured shear stress distribution using Nikuradse's data. Results showed that the coefficient of determination is around 0.99 indicating that the proposed method well describes the true shear stress distribution. Therefore, it was proved that shear stress distribution can be easily and accurately estimated by using the proposed equations. (This research was supported by a gran(13AWMP-B066744-01) from Advanced Water Management Research Program funded by Ministry of Land, Infrastructure and Transport of Korean Government)

  10. Doppler optical coherence tomography imaging of local fluid flow and shear stress within microporous scaffolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Yali; Bagnaninchi, Pierre O.; Yang, Ying; Haj, Alicia El; Hinds, Monica T.; Kirkpatrick, Sean J.; Wang, Ruikang K.

    2009-05-01

    Establishing a relationship between perfusion rate and fluid shear stress in a 3D cell culture environment is an ongoing and challenging task faced by tissue engineers. We explore Doppler optical coherence tomography (DOCT) as a potential imaging tool for in situ monitoring of local fluid flow profiles inside porous chitosan scaffolds. From the measured fluid flow profiles, the fluid shear stresses are evaluated. We examine the localized fluid flow and shear stress within low- and high-porosity chitosan scaffolds, which are subjected to a constant input flow rate of 0.5 ml.min-1. The DOCT results show that the behavior of the fluid flow and shear stress in micropores is strongly dependent on the micropore interconnectivity, porosity, and size of pores within the scaffold. For low-porosity and high-porosity chitosan scaffolds examined, the measured local fluid flow and shear stress varied from micropore to micropore, with a mean shear stress of 0.49+/-0.3 dyn.cm-2 and 0.38+/-0.2 dyn.cm-2, respectively. In addition, we show that the scaffold's porosity and interconnectivity can be quantified by combining analyses of the 3D structural and flow images obtained from DOCT.

  11. Vascular endothelial cell membranes differentiate between stretch and shear stress through transitions in their lipid phases.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Kimiko; Ando, Joji

    2015-10-01

    Vascular endothelial cells (ECs) respond to the hemodynamic forces stretch and shear stress by altering their morphology, functions, and gene expression. However, how they sense and differentiate between these two forces has remained unknown. Here we report that the plasma membrane itself differentiates between stretch and shear stress by undergoing transitions in its lipid phases. Uniaxial stretching and hypotonic swelling increased the lipid order of human pulmonary artery EC plasma membranes, thereby causing a transition from the liquid-disordered phase to the liquid-ordered phase in some areas, along with a decrease in membrane fluidity. In contrast, shear stress decreased the membrane lipid order and increased membrane fluidity. A similar increase in lipid order occurred when the artificial lipid bilayer membranes of giant unilamellar vesicles were stretched by hypotonic swelling, indicating that this is a physical phenomenon. The cholesterol content of EC plasma membranes significantly increased in response to stretch but clearly decreased in response to shear stress. Blocking these changes in the membrane lipid order by depleting membrane cholesterol with methyl-β-cyclodextrin or by adding cholesterol resulted in a marked inhibition of the EC response specific to stretch and shear stress, i.e., phosphorylation of PDGF receptors and phosphorylation of VEGF receptors, respectively. These findings indicate that EC plasma membranes differently respond to stretch and shear stress by changing their lipid order, fluidity, and cholesterol content in opposite directions and that these changes in membrane physical properties are involved in the mechanotransduction that activates membrane receptors specific to each force.

  12. Using two soft computing methods to predict wall and bed shear stress in smooth rectangular channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khozani, Zohreh Sheikh; Bonakdari, Hossein; Zaji, Amir Hossein

    2017-03-01

    Two soft computing methods were extended in order to predict the mean wall and bed shear stress in open channels. The genetic programming (GP) and Genetic Algorithm Artificial Neural Network (GAA) were investigated to determine the accuracy of these models in estimating wall and bed shear stress. The GP and GAA model results were compared in terms of testing dataset in order to find the best model. In modeling both bed and wall shear stress, the GP model performed better with RMSE of 0.0264 and 0.0185, respectively. Then both proposed models were compared with equations for rectangular open channels, trapezoidal channels and ducts. According to the results, the proposed models performed the best in predicting wall and bed shear stress in smooth rectangular channels. The obtained equation for rectangular channels could estimate values closer to experimental data, but the equations for ducts had poor, inaccurate results in predicting wall and bed shear stress. The equation presented for trapezoidal channels did not have acceptable accuracy in predicting wall and bed shear stress either.

  13. Effect of Varying Fluid Shear Stress on Cancer Stem Cell Viability & Protein Expression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domier, Ria; Kim, Yonghyun; Dozier, David; Triantafillu, Ursula

    2013-11-01

    Cancer stem cells cultured in vitro in stirred bioreactors are exposed to shear stress. By observing the effect of shear stress on cancer stem cell viability, laboratory cell growth could be optimized. In addition, metastasized cancer stem cells in vivo are naturally exposed to shear stress, a factor influencing stem cell differentiation, while circulating in the bloodstream. Changes in protein expression after exposure to shear stress could allow for identification and targeting of circulating cancer cells. In this study, blood flow through capillaries was simulated by using a syringe pump to inject suspensions of Kasumi-1 leukemia stem cells into model blood vessels composed of PEEK tubing 125 microns in diameter. The Hagen-Poisseuille equation was used to solve for operating flow rates based on specified amounts of shear stress. After exposure, cell counts and viabilities were observed using an optical microscope and proteins were analyzed using Western blotting. It was observed that at a one minute exposure to stress, cell viability increased as the amount of shear was increased from 10 to 60 dynes per square centimeter. Results from this research are applicable to optimization of large-scale stem cell growth in bioreactors as well as to the design of targeted cancer therapies. Funding from NSF REU grant #1062611 is gratefully acknowledged.

  14. Integration of basal topographic cues and apical shear stress in vascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Joshua T; Wood, Joshua A; Shah, Nihar M; Hughbanks, Marissa L; Russell, Paul; Barakat, Abdul I; Murphy, Christopher J

    2012-06-01

    In vivo, vascular endothelial cells (VECs) are anchored to the underlying stroma through a specialization of the extracellular matrix, the basement membrane (BM) which provides a variety of substratum associated biophysical cues that have been shown to regulate fundamental VEC behaviors. VEC function and homeostasis are also influenced by hemodynamic cues applied to their apical surface. How the combination of these biophysical cues impacts fundamental VEC behavior remains poorly studied. In the present study, we investigated the impact of providing biophysical cues simultaneously to the basal and apical surfaces of human aortic endothelial cells (HAECs). Anisotropically ordered patterned surfaces of alternating ridges and grooves and isotropic holed surfaces of varying pitch (pitch = ridge or hole width + intervening groove or planar regions) were fabricated and seeded with HAECs. The cells were then subjected to a steady shear stress of 20 dyne/cm(2) applied either parallel or perpendicular to the direction of the ridge/groove topography. HAECs subjected to flow parallel to the ridge/groove topography exhibited protagonistic effects of the two stimuli on cellular orientation and elongation. In contrast, flow perpendicular to the substrate topography resulted in largely antagonistic effects. Interestingly, the behavior depended on the shape and size of the topographic features. HAECs exhibited a response that was less influenced by the substratum and primarily driven by flow on isotropically ordered holed surfaces of identical pitch to the anistropically ordered surfaces of alternating ridges and grooves. Simultaneous presentation of biophysical cues to the basal and apical aspects of cells also influenced nuclear orientation and elongation; however, the extent of nuclear realignment was more modest in comparison to cellular realignment regardless of the surface order of topographic features. Flow-induced HAEC migration was also influenced by the ridge

  15. Effect of shear stress on water and LDL transport through cultured endothelial cell monolayers.

    PubMed

    Kang, Hongyan; Cancel, Limary M; Tarbell, John M

    2014-04-01

    Previous animal experiments have shown that the transport of LDL into arterial walls is shear stress dependent. However, little work has probed shear effects on LDL transport in vitro where conditions are well defined and mechanisms are more easily explored. Therefore, we measured shear induced water and LDL fluxes across cultured bovine aortic endothelial (BAEC) monolayers in vitro and developed a three-pore model to describe the transport dynamics. Cell apoptosis was quantified by TdT-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) assay. We also examined the role of nitric oxide (NO) in shear induced water and LDL fluxes by incubating BAEC monolayers with an NO synthase inhibitor, NG-monomethyl-L-arginine (L-NMMA). Our results show that direct exposure of endothelial monolayers to 12 dyn/cm2 shear stress for 3 h elicited a 2.37-fold increase in water flux (Jv), a 3.00-fold increase in LDL permeability (Pe), a 1.32-fold increase in LDL uptake, and a 1.68-fold increase in apoptotic rate. L-NMMA treatment of BAEC monolayers blocked shear induced Jv response, but had no significant effect on shear responses of Pe and cell apoptosis. A long time shear exposure (12 h) of endothelial monolayers reduced Pe and apoptotic rate close to the baseline. These results suggest that an acute change in shear stress from a static baseline state induces increases in water flux that are mediated by an NO dependent mechanism. On the other hand, the permeability of endothelial monolayers to LDL is enhanced by a short term-shear application and reduced nearly to the baseline level by a longer time shear exposure, positively correlated to the leaky junctions forming around apoptotic cells.

  16. Influence of high deformation rate, brain region, transverse compression, and specimen size on rat brain shear stress morphology and magnitude.

    PubMed

    Haslach, Henry W; Gipple, Jenna M; Leahy, Lauren N

    2017-01-26

    An external mechanical insult to the brain, such as a blast, may create internal stress and deformation waves, which have shear and longitudinal components that can induce combined shear and compression of the brain tissue. To isolate the consequences of such interactions for the shear stress and to investigate the role of the extracellular fluid in the mechanical response, translational shear stretch at 10/s, 60/s, and 100/s translational shear rates under either 0% or 33% fixed transverse compression is applied without preconditioning to rat brain specimens. The specimens from the cerebrum, the cerebellum grey matter, and the brainstem white matter are nearly the full length of their respective regions. The translational shear stress response to translational shear deformation is characterized by the effect that each of four factors, high deformation rate, brain region, transverse compression, and specimen size, have on the shear stress magnitude averaged over ten specimens for each combination of factors. Increasing the deformation rate increases the magnitude of the shear stress at a given translational shear stretch, and as tested by ANOVAs so does applying transverse fixed compression of 33% of the thickness. The stress magnitude differs by the region that is the specimen source: cerebrum, cerebellum or brainstem. The magnitude of the shear stress response at a given deformation rate and stretch depends on the specimen length, called a specimen size effect. Surprisingly, under no compression a shorter length specimen requires more shear stress, but under 33% compression a shorter length specimen requires less shear stress, to meet a required shear deformation rate. The shear specimen size effect calls into question the applicability of the classical shear stress definition to hydrated soft biological tissue.

  17. Experimental research of mechanical behavior of porcine brain tissue under rotational shear stress.

    PubMed

    Li, Gang; Zhang, Jianhua; Wang, Kan; Wang, Mingyu; Gao, Changqing; Ma, Chao

    2016-04-01

    The objective of this paper is to investigate mechanical behavior of porcine brain tissue with a series of rotational shear stress control experiments. To this end, several experiments including stress sweep tests, frequency sweep tests and quasi-static creep tests were designed and conducted with a standard rheometer (HAAKE RheoStress6000). The effects of the loading stress rates to mechanical properties of brain tissue were also studied in stress sweep tests. The results of stress sweep tests performed on the same brain showed that brain tissue had an obvious regional inhomogeneity and the mechanical damage occurred at the rotational shear stress of 10-15Pa. The experimental data from three different loading stress rates demonstrated that the mechanical behavior of porcine brain tissue was loading stress rate dependent. With the decrease of loading stress rate, a stiffer mechanical characteristic of brain tissue was observed and the occurrence of mechanical damage can be delayed to a higher stress. From the results of frequency sweep tests we found that brain tissue had almost completely elastic properties at high frequency area. The nonlinear creep response under the rotational shear stress of 1, 3, 5, 7 and 9Pa was shown in results of creep tests. A new nonlinear viscoelastic solid model was proposed for creep tests and matched well with the test data. Considering the regional differences, loading stress rates and test conditions effects, loss tangent tan δ in porcine brain tissue showed a high uniformity of 0.25-0.45.

  18. Analysis of shearing stress in the limited durability of bovine pericardium used as a biomaterial.

    PubMed

    Carrera San Martin, A; García Paez, J M; García Sestafe, J V; Herrero, E J; Navidad, R; Cordón, A; Castillo-Olivares, J L

    1998-02-01

    The objective of the study was to determine the shearing stress exerted by the suture thread under conditions of normal working stress. Thirty-six samples of calf pericardium, similar to that employed in the manufacture of bioprosthetic cardiac valve leaflets, were subjected to tensile testing. Prior to the trial, a continuous suture was sewn in the central zone of each sample, at a 45 degrees angle to the longest axis of the sample, using commercially-available threads (silk, Gore-Tex, Surgilene and nylon). Application of the Mohr circle for combined wear revealed that the shearing stress ranged between 2.68-fold greater (for samples sewn with silk) and 5.48-fold greater (for samples sewn with nylon) than the working tensile stress in the region of the suture. It is concluded that the shearing stress is responsible for the limited durability of sutured samples of calf pericardium prepared to simulate bioprosthetic cardiac valve leaflets.

  19. A new technique for the measurement of surface shear stress vectors using liquid crystal coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reda, Daniel C.; Muratore, J. J., Jr.

    1994-01-01

    Research has recently shown that liquid crystal coating (LCC) color-change response to shear depends on both shear stress magnitude and direction. Additional research was thus conducted to extend the LCC method from a flow-visualization tool to a surface shear stress vector measurement technique. A shear-sensitive LCC was applied to a planar test surface and illuminated by white light from the normal direction. A fiber optic probe was used to capture light scattered by the LCC from a point on the centerline of a turbulent, tangential-jet flow. Both the relative shear stress magnitude and the relative in-plane view angle between the sensor and the centerline shear vector were systematically varied. A spectrophotometer was used to obtain scattered-light spectra which were used to quantify the LCC color (dominant wavelength) as a function of shear stress magnitude and direction. At any fixed shear stress magnitude, the minimum dominant wavelength was measured when the shear vector was aligned with and directed away from the observer; changes in the relative in-plane view angle to either side of this vector/observer aligned position resulted in symmetric Gaussian increases in measured dominant wavelength. Based on these results, a vector measurement methodology, involving multiple oblique-view observations of the test surface, was formulated. Under present test conditions, the measurement resolution of this technique was found to be +/- 1 deg for vector orientations and +/- 5% for vector magnitudes. An approach t o extend the present methodology to full-surface applications is proposed.

  20. Working Principle Simulations of a Dynamic ResonantWall Shear Stress Sensor Concept.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xu; Naughton, Jonathan W; Lindberg, William R

    2008-04-17

    This paper discusses a novel dynamic resonant wall shear stress sensor concept based on an oscillating sensor operating near resonance. The interaction between the oscillating sensor surface and the fluid above it is modelled using the unsteady laminar boundary layer equations. The numerical experiment shows that the effect of the oscillating shear stress is well correlated by the Hummer number, the ratio of the steady shear force caused by the outside flow to the oscillating viscous force created by the sensor motion. The oscillating shear stress predicted by the fluid model is used in a mechanical model of the sensor to predict the sensor's dynamic motion. Static calibration curves for amplitude and frequency influences are predicted. These results agree with experimental results on some extent, and shows some expectation for further development of the dynamic resonant sensor concept.

  1. The production of turbulent stress in a shear flow by irrotational fluctuations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gartshore, I. S.; Durbin, P. A.; Hunt, J. C. R.

    1983-01-01

    This paper examines, both theoretically and experimentally, the effect produced by irrotational fluctuations, associated with a nearby turbulent field, in a region where the turbulence is initially very low but where there is a mean shear. Calculations are based on rapid distortion theory and experiments use linearized hot wire anemometers in an open circuit wind tunnel. Turbulent shear stress is observed to grow from zero to significant values in the interaction region. The magnitude and extent of this observed shear stress agree reasonably well with predictions of the analysis, when intermittency effects are included. It is concluded that turbulent stresses can be produced by irrotational fluctuations in a region of mean shear and that this effect can be estimated using rapid distortion theory if the overall strain ratio is not large.

  2. 4-Dimensional light-sheet microscopy to elucidate shear stress modulation of cardiac trabeculation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Juhyun; Fei, Peng; Packard, René R Sevag; Kang, Hanul; Xu, Hao; Baek, Kyung In; Jen, Nelson; Chen, Junjie; Yen, Hilary; Kuo, C-C Jay; Chi, Neil C; Ho, Chih-Ming; Li, Rongsong; Hsiai, Tzung K

    2016-05-02

    Hemodynamic shear forces are intimately linked with cardiac development, during which trabeculae form a network of branching outgrowths from the myocardium. Mutations that alter Notch signaling also result in trabeculation defects. Here, we assessed whether shear stress modulates trabeculation to influence contractile function. Specifically, we acquired 4D (3D + time) images with light sheets by selective plane illumination microscopy (SPIM) for rapid scanning and deep axial penetration during zebrafish morphogenesis. Reduction of blood viscosity via gata1a morpholino oligonucleotides (MO) reduced shear stress, resulting in downregulation of Notch signaling and attenuation of trabeculation. Arrest of cardiomyocyte contraction either by troponin T type 2a (tnnt2a) MO or in weak atriumm58 (wea) mutants resulted in reduced shear stress and downregulation of Notch signaling and trabeculation. Integrating 4D SPIM imaging with synchronization algorithm demonstrated that coinjection of neuregulin1 mRNA with gata1 MO rescued trabeculation to restore contractile function in association with upregulation of Notch-related genes. Crossbreeding of Tg(flk:mCherry) fish, which allows visualization of the vascular system with the Tg(tp1:gfp) Notch reporter line, revealed that shear stress-mediated Notch activation localizes to the endocardium. Deleting endocardium via the clochesk4 mutants downregulated Notch signaling, resulting in nontrabeculated ventricle. Subjecting endothelial cells to pulsatile flow in the presence of the ADAM10 inhibitor corroborated shear stress-activated Notch signaling to modulate trabeculation.

  3. Effect of cell size and shear stress on bacterium growth rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fadlallah, Hadi; Jarrahi, Mojtaba; Herbert, Éric; Peerhossaini, Hassan; PEF Team

    2015-11-01

    Effect of shear stress on the growth rate of Synechocystis and Chlamydomonas cells is studied. An experimental setup was prepared to monitor the growth rate of the microorganisms versus the shear rate inside a clean room, under atmospheric pressure and 20 °C temperature. Digital magnetic agitators are placed inside a closed chamber provided with airflow, under a continuous uniform light intensity over 4 weeks. In order to study the effect of shear stress on the growth rate, different frequencies of agitation are tested, 2 vessels filled with 150 ml of each specie were placed on different agitating system at the desired frequency. The growth rate is monitored daily by measuring the optical density and then correlate it to the cellular concentration. The PH was adjusted to 7 in order to maintain the photosynthetic activity. Furthermore, to measure the shear stress distribution, the flow velocity field was measured using PIV. Zones of high and low shear stress were identified. Results show that the growth rate is independent of the shear stress magnitude, mostly for Synechocystis, and with lower independency for Chlamydomonas depending on the cell size for each species.

  4. Orbital fluid shear stress promotes osteoblast metabolism, proliferation and alkaline phosphates activity in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Aisha, M.D.; Nor-Ashikin, M.N.K.; Sharaniza, A.B.R.; Nawawi, H.; Froemming, G.R.A.

    2015-09-10

    Prolonged disuse of the musculoskeletal system is associated with reduced mechanical loading and lack of anabolic stimulus. As a form of mechanical signal, the multidirectional orbital fluid shear stress transmits anabolic signal to bone forming cells in promoting cell differentiation, metabolism and proliferation. Signals are channeled through the cytoskeleton framework, directly modifying gene and protein expression. For that reason, we aimed to study the organization of Normal Human Osteoblast (NHOst) cytoskeleton with regards to orbital fluid shear (OFS) stress. Of special interest were the consequences of cytoskeletal reorganization on NHOst metabolism, proliferation, and osteogenic functional markers. Cells stimulated at 250 RPM in a shaking incubator resulted in the rearrangement of actin and tubulin fibers after 72 h. Orbital shear stress increased NHOst mitochondrial metabolism and proliferation, simultaneously preventing apoptosis. The ratio of RANKL/OPG was reduced, suggesting that orbital shear stress has the potential to inhibit osteoclastogenesis and osteoclast activity. Increase in ALP activity and OCN protein production suggests that stimulation retained osteoblast function. Shear stress possibly generated through actin seemed to hold an anabolic response as osteoblast metabolism and functional markers were enhanced. We hypothesize that by applying orbital shear stress with suitable magnitude and duration as a non-drug anabolic treatment can help improve bone regeneration in prolonged disuse cases. - Highlights: • OFS stress transmits anabolic signals to osteoblasts. • Actin and tubulin fibers are rearranged under OFS stress. • OFS stress increases mitochondrial metabolism and proliferation. • Reduced RANKL/OPG ratio in response to OFS inhibits osteoclastogenesis. • OFS stress prevents apoptosis and stimulates ALP and OCN.

  5. PEG-albumin supraplasma expansion is due to increased vessel wall shear stress induced by blood viscosity shear thinning.

    PubMed

    Sriram, Krishna; Tsai, Amy G; Cabrales, Pedro; Meng, Fantao; Acharya, Seetharama A; Tartakovsky, Daniel M; Intaglietta, Marcos

    2012-06-15

    We studied the extreme hemodilution to a hematocrit of 11% induced by three plasma expanders: polyethylene glycol (PEG)-conjugated albumin (PEG-Alb), 6% 70-kDa dextran, and 6% 500-kDa dextran. The experimental component of our study relied on microelectrodes and cardiac output to measure both the rheological properties of plasma-expander blood mixtures and nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability in vessel walls. The modeling component consisted of an analysis of the distribution of wall shear stress (WSS) in the microvessels. Our experiments demonstrated that plasma expansion with PEG-Alb caused a state of supraperfusion with cardiac output 40% above baseline, significantly increased NO vessel wall bioavailability, and lowered peripheral vascular resistance. We attributed this behavior to the shear thinning nature of blood and PEG-Alb mixtures. To substantiate this hypothesis, we developed a mathematical model of non-Newtonian blood flow in a vessel. Our model used the Quemada rheological constitutive relationship to express blood viscosity in terms of both hematocrit and shear rate. The model revealed that the net effect of the hemodilution induced by relatively low-viscosity shear thinning PEG-Alb plasma expanders is to reduce overall blood viscosity and to increase the WSS, thus intensifying endothelial NO production. These changes act synergistically, significantly increasing cardiac output and perfusion due to lowered overall peripheral vascular resistance.

  6. Accurate prediction of wall shear stress in a stented artery: newtonian versus non-newtonian models.

    PubMed

    Mejia, Juan; Mongrain, Rosaire; Bertrand, Olivier F

    2011-07-01

    A significant amount of evidence linking wall shear stress to neointimal hyperplasia has been reported in the literature. As a result, numerical and experimental models have been created to study the influence of stent design on wall shear stress. Traditionally, blood has been assumed to behave as a Newtonian fluid, but recently that assumption has been challenged. The use of a linear model; however, can reduce computational cost, and allow the use of Newtonian fluids (e.g., glycerine and water) instead of a blood analog fluid in an experimental setup. Therefore, it is of interest whether a linear model can be used to accurately predict the wall shear stress caused by a non-Newtonian fluid such as blood within a stented arterial segment. The present work compares the resulting wall shear stress obtained using two linear and one nonlinear model under the same flow waveform. All numerical models are fully three-dimensional, transient, and incorporate a realistic stent geometry. It is shown that traditional linear models (based on blood's lowest viscosity limit, 3.5 Pa s) underestimate the wall shear stress within a stented arterial segment, which can lead to an overestimation of the risk of restenosis. The second linear model, which uses a characteristic viscosity (based on an average strain rate, 4.7 Pa s), results in higher wall shear stress levels, but which are still substantially below those of the nonlinear model. It is therefore shown that nonlinear models result in more accurate predictions of wall shear stress within a stented arterial segment.

  7. The Role of Shear Stress in Arteriovenous Fistula Maturation and Failure: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Browne, Leonard D.; Bashar, Khalid; Griffin, Philip; Kavanagh, Eamon G.; Walsh, Stewart R.; Walsh, Michael T.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Non-maturation and post-maturation venous stenosis are the primary causes of failure within arteriovenous fistulae (AVFs). Although the exact mechanisms triggering failure remain unclear, abnormal hemodynamic profiles are thought to mediate vascular remodelling and can adversely impact on fistula patency. Aim The review aims to clarify the role of shear stress on outward remodelling during maturation and evaluate the evidence supporting theories related to the localisation and development of intimal hyperplasia within AVFs. Methods A systematic review of studies comparing remodelling data with hemodynamic data obtained from computational fluid dynamics of AVFs during and after maturation was conducted. Results Outward remodelling occurred to reduce or normalise the level of shear stress over time in fistulae with a large radius of curvature (curved) whereas shear stress was found to augment over time in fistulae with a small radius of curvature (straight) coinciding with minimal to no increases in lumen area. Although this review highlighted that there is a growing body of evidence suggesting low and oscillating shear stress may stimulate the initiation and development of intimal medial thickening within AVFs. Further lines of evidence are needed to support the disturbed flow theory and outward remodelling findings before surgical configurations and treatment strategies are optimised to conform to them. This review highlighted that variation between the time of analysis, classification of IH, resolution of simulations, data processing techniques and omission of various shear stress metrics prevented forming pooling of data amongst studies. Conclusion Standardised measurements and data processing techniques are needed to comprehensively evaluate the relationship between shear stress and intimal medial thickening. Advances in image acquisition and flow quantifications coupled with the increasing prevalence of longitudinal studies commencing from fistula

  8. Real-time quantification of endothelial response to shear stress and vascular modulators.

    PubMed

    DeStefano, Jackson G; Williams, Ashley; Wnorowski, Alexa; Yimam, Nahom; Searson, Peter C; Wong, Andrew D

    2017-03-27

    Quiescence is commonly used to describe the inactive state of endothelial cells (ECs) in monolayers that have reached homeostasis. Experimentally quiescence is usually described in terms of the relative change in cell activity (e.g. turnover, speed, etc.) in response to a perturbation (e.g. solute, shear stress, etc.). The objective of this study is to provide new insight into EC quiescence by quantitatively defining the morphology and activity of confluent cell monolayers in response to shear stress and vascular modulators. Confluent monolayers of human umbilical vein ECs (HUVECs) were subjected to a range of shear stresses (4-16 dyne cm(-2)) under steady flow. Using phase contrast, time-lapse microscopy and image analysis, we quantified EC morphology, speed, proliferation, and apoptosis rates over time and detected differences in monolayer responses under various media conditions: basal media supplemented with growth factors, interleukin-8, or cyclic AMP. In all conditions, we observed a transition from cobblestone to spindle-like morphology in a dose-dependent manner due to shear stress. Cyclic AMP enhanced the elongation and alignment of HUVECs due to shear stress and reduced steady state cell speed. We observed the lowest proliferation rates below 8 dyne cm(-2) and found that growth factors and cyclic AMP reduced proliferation and apoptosis; interleukin-8 similarly decreased proliferation, but increased apoptosis. We have quantified the response of ECs in confluent monolayers to shear stress and vascular modulators in terms of morphology, speed, proliferation and apoptosis and have established quantifiable metrics of cell activity to define vascular quiescence under shear stress.

  9. Shear Stress Partitioning in Large Patches of Roughness in the Atmospheric Inertial Sublayer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gillies, John A.; Nickling, William G.; King, James

    2007-01-01

    Drag partition measurements were made in the atmospheric inertial sublayer for six roughness configurations made up of solid elements in staggered arrays of different roughness densities. The roughness was in the form of a patch within a large open area and in the shape of an equilateral triangle with 60 m long sides. Measurements were obtained of the total shear stress (tau) acting on the surfaces, the surface shear stress on the ground between the elements (tau(sub S)) and the drag force on the elements for each roughness array. The measurements indicated that tau(sub S) quickly reduced near the leading edge of the roughness compared with tau, and a tau(sub S) minimum occurs at a normalized distance (x/h, where h is element height) of approx. -42 (downwind of the roughness leading edge is negative), then recovers to a relatively stable value. The location of the minimum appears to scale with element height and not roughness density. The force on the elements decreases exponentially with normalized downwind distance and this rate of change scales with the roughness density, with the rate of change increasing as roughness density increases. Average tau(sub S): tau values for the six roughness surfaces scale predictably as a function of roughness density and in accordance with a shear stress partitioning model. The shear stress partitioning model performed very well in predicting the amount of surface shear stress, given knowledge of the stated input parameters for these patches of roughness. As the shear stress partitioning relationship within the roughness appears to come into equilibrium faster for smaller roughness element sizes it would also appear the shear stress partitioning model can be applied with confidence for smaller patches of smaller roughness elements than those used in this experiment.

  10. Forward modeling of ice topography on Mars to infer basal shear stress conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banks, M. E.; Pelletier, J. D.

    2008-01-01

    Understanding the history of ice caps on Mars could reveal important information about Martian geologic and climatic history. To do this, an ice reconstruction model is needed that operates over complex topography and can be constrained with a limited number of free parameters. In this study we developed a threshold-sliding model for ice cap morphology based on the classic model of Nye later incorporated into the models of Reeh and colleagues. We have updated the Nye-Reeh model with a new numerical algorithm. Although the model was originally developed to model perfectly plastic deformation, it is applicable to any ice body that deforms when a threshold basal shear stress is exceeded. The model requires three inputs: a digital elevation model of bed topography, a ``mask'' grid that defines the position of the ice terminus, and a function defining the threshold basal shear stress. To test the robustness of the model, the morphology of the Greenland ice sheet is reconstructed using an empirical equation between threshold basal shear stress and ice surface slope. The model is then used to reconstruct the morphology of ice draping impact craters on the margins of the south polar layered deposits using an inferred constant basal shear stress of ~0.6 bar for the majority of the examples. This inferred basal shear stress value is almost 1/3 of the average basal shear stress calculated for the Greenland ice sheet. What causes this lower basal shear stress value on Mars is unclear but could involve the strain-weakening behavior of ice.

  11. Exploring the Role of Shear Stress and Severe Turbulence in Downstream Fish Passage

    SciTech Connect

    Cada, G.; Carlson, T.; Ferguson, J.; Richmond, M.; Sale, M.

    1999-07-06

    Fish may be exposed to damaging levels of fluid shear stress and turbulence while passing through hydroelectric power plants. The generally assumed locations for such potential damage are the turbine and draft tube passages, although it is possible that fish are also injured during passage over the spillway or through sluiceways and fish bypass outfalls. Unless mitigated, fluid-induced injuries and mortality could frustrate efforts to develop advanced, fish-friendly turbines or to provide safe alternate downstream passages. The effects of shear stress and turbulence on fish are poorly understood, in part because of the difficulties in conceptualizing these phenomena, determining their magnitudes and distribution within hydroelectric systems, and then recreating them in a controlled laboratory environment. We define the fluid phenomena that are relevant to the assessment of effects on fish. The magnitudes of fluid stresses associated with man-altered aquatic environments are often considerably higher than those found in natural environments (e.g., normal river flows). However, levels of shear stresses that occur during flash floods appear to be comparable to those expected within a turbine. Past studies of the effects of shear stress on fish are of limited value, mainly because of their narrow scope and lack of instrumentation to measure velocities on appropriately small scales. A laboratory experiment to study the effects of shear stress and turbulence on fish is described.

  12. Shear wave transducer for stress measurements in boreholes

    DOEpatents

    Mao, Nai-Hsien

    1987-01-01

    A technique and apparatus for estimating in situ stresses by measuring stress-induced velocity anisotropy around a borehole. Two sets each of radially and tangentially polarized transducers are placed inside the hole with displacement directions either parallel or perpendicular to the principal stress directions. With this configuration, relative travel times are measured by both a pulsed phase-locked loop technique and a cross correlation of digitized waveforms. The biaxial velocity data is used to back-calculate the applied stress.

  13. Inhibition of bacterial and leukocyte adhesion under shear stress conditions by material surface chemistry.

    PubMed

    Patel, Jasmine D; Ebert, Michael; Stokes, Ken; Ward, Robert; Anderson, James M

    2003-01-01

    Biomaterial-centered infections, initiated by bacterial adhesion, persist due to a compromised host immune response. Altering implant materials with surface modifying endgroups (SMEs) may enhance their biocompatibility by reducing bacterial and inflammatory cell adhesion. A rotating disc model, which generates shear stress within physiological ranges, was used to characterize adhesion of leukocytes and Staphylococcus epidermidis on polycarbonate-urethanes and polyetherurethanes modified with SMEs (polyethylene oxide, fluorocarbon and dimethylsiloxane) under dynamic flow conditions. Bacterial adhesion in the absence of serum was found to be mediated by shear stress and surface chemistry, with reduced adhesion exhibited on materials modified with polydimethylsiloxane and polyethylene oxide SMEs. In contrast, bacterial adhesion was enhanced on materials modified with fluorocarbon SMEs. In the presence of serum, bacterial adhesion was primarily neither material nor shear dependent. However, bacterial adhesion in serum was significantly reduced to < or = 10% compared to adhesion in serum-free media. Leukocyte adhesion in serum exhibited a shear dependency with increased adhesion occurring in regions exposed to lower shear-stress levels of < or = 7 dyne/cm2. Additionally, polydimethylsiloxane and polyethylene oxide SMEs reduced leukocyte adhesion on polyether-urethanes. In conclusion, these results suggest that surface chemistry and shear stress can mediate bacterial and cellular adhesion. Furthermore, materials modified with polyethylene oxide SMEs are capable of inhibiting bacterial adhesion, consequently minimizing the probability of biomaterial-centered infections.

  14. Suppression of endothelial t-PA expression by prolonged high laminar shear stress

    SciTech Connect

    Ulfhammer, Erik; Carlstroem, Maria; Bergh, Niklas; Larsson, Pia; Karlsson, Lena; Jern, Sverker

    2009-02-06

    Primary hypertension is associated with an impaired capacity for acute release of endothelial tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA), which is an important local protective response to prevent thrombus extension. As hypertensive vascular remodeling potentially results in increased vascular wall shear stress, we investigated the impact of shear on regulation of t-PA. Cultured human endothelial cells were exposed to low ({<=}1.5 dyn/cm{sup 2}) or high (25 dyn/cm{sup 2}) laminar shear stress for up to 48 h in two different experimental models. Using real-time RT-PCR and ELISA, shear stress was observed to time and magnitude-dependently suppress t-PA transcript and protein secretion to approximately 30% of basal levels. Mechanistic experiments revealed reduced nuclear protein binding to the t-PA specific CRE element (EMSA) and an almost completely abrogated shear response with pharmacologic JNK inhibition. We conclude that prolonged high laminar shear stress suppresses endothelial t-PA expression and may therefore contribute to the enhanced risk of arterial thrombosis in hypertensive disease.

  15. Shear stress-induced mechanotransduction protein deregulation and vasculopathy in a mouse model of progeria

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction A mouse model of progeria derived by insertion of the human mutant LMNA gene (mLMNA), producing mutant lamin A, shows loss of smooth muscle cells in the media of the ascending aorta. We hypothesized that high shear stress, in the presence of mutant lamin A, induces this vasculopathy and tried to define the molecular and cellular basis for aortic vasculopathy. Methods Ascending and descending aortas from wild type (WT) and mLMNA+ mice were compared using proteomics, Western blots, PCR and immunostaining. To determine whether high fluidic shear stress, known to occur in the ascending aorta, contributed to the vasculopathy, we exposed descending aortas of mLMNA+ mice, with no apparent vasculopathy, to 75 dynes/cm2 shear stress for 30 minutes using a microfluidic system. Results When the mice were one year of age, expression of several mechanotransduction proteins in the ascending aorta, including vimentin, decreased in mLMNA+ mice but no decrease occurred in the descending aorta. High fluidic shear stress produced a significant reduction in vimentin of mLMNA+ mice but not in similarly treated WT mice. Conclusions The occurrence of mutant lamin A and high shear stress correlate with a reduction in the level of mechanotransduction proteins in smooth muscle cells of the media. Reduction of these proteins may contribute over time to development of vasculopathy in the ascending aorta in progeria syndrome. PMID:24661531

  16. Large scale structures in a turbulent boundary layer and their imprint on wall shear stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pabon, Rommel; Barnard, Casey; Ukeiley, Lawrence; Sheplak, Mark

    2015-11-01

    Experiments were performed on a turbulent boundary layer developing on a flat plate model under zero pressure gradient flow. A MEMS differential capacitive shear stress sensor with a 1 mm × 1 mm floating element was used to capture the fluctuating wall shear stress simultaneously with streamwise velocity measurements from a hot-wire anemometer traversed in the wall normal direction. Near the wall, the peak in the cross correlation corresponds to an organized motion inclined 45° from the wall. In the outer region, the peak diminishes in value, but is still significant at a distance greater than half the boundary layer thickness, and corresponds to a structure inclined 14° from the wall. High coherence between the two signals was found for the low-frequency content, reinforcing the belief that large scale structures have a vital impact on wall shear stress. Thus, estimation of the wall shear stress from the low-frequency velocity signal will be performed, and is expected to be statistically significant in the outer boundary layer. Additionally, conditionally averaged mean velocity profiles will be presented to assess the effects of high and low shear stress. This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship under Grant No. DGE-1315138.

  17. Nature's rheologists: Lymphatic endothelial cells control migration in response to shear stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuller, Gerald; Dunn, Alex; Surya, Vinay

    2015-03-01

    Endothelial cells (ECs) line the inner surface of blood and lymphatic vessels and are sensitive to fluid flow as part of their physiological function. EC organization, migration and vessel development are profoundly influenced by shear stresses, with important implications in cardiovascular disease and tumor metastasis. How ECs sense fluid flow is a central and unanswered question in cardiovascular biology. We developed a high-throughput live-cell flow chamber that models the gradients in wall shear stress experienced by ECs in vivo. Live-cell imaging allows us to probe cellular responses to flow, most notably EC migration, which has a key role in vessel remodeling. We find that most EC subtypes, including ECs from the venous, arterial, and microvascular systems, migrate in the flow direction. In contrast, human lymphatic microvascular ECs (hLMVECs) migrate against flow and up spatial gradients in wall shear stress. Further experiments reveal that hLMVECs are sensitive to the magnitude, direction, and the local spatial gradients in wall shear stress. Lastly, recent efforts have aimed to link this directional migration to spatial gradients in cell-mediated small molecule emission that may be linked to the gradient in wall shear stress.

  18. Shear stress-induced redistribution of the glycocalyx on endothelial cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Bai, Ke; Wang, Wen

    2014-04-01

    The glycocalyx is the inner most layer of the endothelium that is in direct contact with the circulating blood. Shear stress affects its synthesis and reorganization. This study focuses on changes in the spatial distribution of the glycocalyx caused by shear stimulation and its recovery following the removal of the shear stress. Sialic acid components of the glycocalyx on human umbilical vain endothelial cells are observed using confocal microscopy. The percentage area of the cell membrane covered by the glycocalyx, as well as the average fluorescence intensity ratio between the apical and edge areas of the cell is used to assess the spatial distribution of the glycocalyx on the cell membrane. Our results show that following 24 h shear stimulation, the glycocalyx relocates near the edge of endothelial cells (i.e., cell-cell junction regions). Following the removal of the shear stress, the glycocalyx redistributes and gradually appears in the apical region of the cell membrane. This redistribution is faster in the early hours (<4 h) after shear stimulation than that in the later stage (e.g., between 8 and 24 h). We further investigate the recovery of the glycocalyx after its enzyme degradation under either static or shear flow conditions. Our results show that following 24 h recovery under shear flow, the glycocalyx reappears predominantly near the edge of endothelial cells. Static and shear flow conditions result in notable changes in the spatial recovery of the glycocalyx, but the difference is not statistically significant. We hypothesize that newly synthesized glycocalyx is not structurally well developed. Its weak interaction with flow results in less than significant redistribution, contrary to what has been observed for a well-developed glycocalyx layer.

  19. Rheological regional properties of brain tissue studied under cyclic creep/ recovery shear stresses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boudjema, F.; Lounis, M.; Khelidj, B.; Bessai, N.

    2015-04-01

    The rheological properties of brain tissue were studied by repeated creep-recovery shear tests under static conditions for different regions. Corpus callosum CC, Thalamus Th and Corona radiata CR. Non-linear viscoelastic model was also proposed to characterize the transient/steady states of shear creep results. From the creep-recovery data it was obvious that the brain tissues show high regional anisotropy. However. the both samples exhibit fluid viscoelastic properties in the first shear stress cycle of 100 Pa, while this behaviour evolutes to solid viscoelastic with cyclic effect.

  20. Influence of thickness and permeability of endothelial surface layer on transmission of shear stress in capillaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, SongPeng; Zhang, XiangJun; Tian, Yu; Meng, YongGang; Lipowsky, Herbert

    2015-07-01

    The molecular coating on the surface of microvascular endothelium has been identified as a barrier to transvascular exchange of solutes. With a thickness of hundreds of nanometers, this endothelial surface layer (ESL) has been treated as a porous domain within which fluid shear stresses are dissipated and transmitted to the solid matrix to initiate mechanotransduction events. The present study aims to examine the effects of the ESL thickness and permeability on the transmission of shear stress throughout the ESL. Our results indicate that fluid shear stresses rapidly decrease to insignificant levels within a thin transition layer near the outer boundary of the ESL with a thickness on the order of ten nanometers. The thickness of the transition zone between free fluid and the porous layer was found to be proportional to the square root of the Darcy permeability. As the permeability is reduced ten-fold, the interfacial fluid and solid matrix shear stress gradients increase exponentially two-fold. While the interfacial fluid shear stress is positively related to the ESL thickness, the transmitted matrix stress is reduced by about 50% as the ESL thickness is decreased from 500 to 100 nm, which may occur under pathological conditions. Thus, thickness and permeability of the ESL are two main factors that determine flow features and the apportionment of shear stresses between the fluid and solid phases of the ESL. These results may shed light on the mechanisms of force transmission through the ESL and the pathological events caused by alterations in thickness and permeability of the ESL.

  1. Bed shear stress estimation on an open intertidal flat using in situ measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Q.; van Prooijen, B. C.; Wang, Z. B.; Ma, Y. X.; Yang, S. L.

    2016-12-01

    Accurate estimations for the bed shear stress are essential to predict the erosion and deposition processes in estuaries and coasts. This study used high-frequency in situ measurements of water depths and near-bed velocities to estimate bed shear stress on an open intertidal flat in the Yangtze Delta, China. To determine the current-induced bed shear stress (τc) the in situ near-bed velocities were first decomposed from the turbulent velocity into separate wave orbital velocities using two approaches: a moving average (MA) and energy spectrum analysis (ESA). τc was then calculated and evaluated using the log-profile (LP), turbulent kinetic energy (TKE), modified TKE (TKEw), Reynolds stress (RS), and inertial dissipation (ID) methods. Wave-induced bed shear stress (τw) was estimated using classic linear wave theory. The total bed shear stress (τcw) was determined based on the Grant-Madsen wave-current interaction model (WCI). The results demonstrate that when the ratio of significant wave height to water depth (Hs/h) is greater than 0.25, τcw is significantly overestimated because the vertical velocity fluctuations are contaminated by the surface waves generated by high winds. In addition, wind enhances the total bed shear stress as a result of the increases in both τw and τc generated by the greater wave height and reinforcing of vertical turbulence, respectively. From a comparison of these various methods, the TKEw method associated with ESA decomposition was found to be the best approach because: (1) this method generates the highest mean index of agreement; (2) it uses vertical velocities that are less affected by Doppler noise; and (3) it is less sensitive to the near-bed stratification structure and uncertainty in bed location and roughness.

  2. 4-Dimensional light-sheet microscopy to elucidate shear stress modulation of cardiac trabeculation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Juhyun; Fei, Peng; Packard, René R. Sevag; Kang, Hanul; Xu, Hao; Baek, Kyung In; Jen, Nelson; Chen, Junjie; Yen, Hilary; Chi, Neil C.; Ho, Chih-Ming; Hsiai, Tzung K.

    2016-01-01

    Hemodynamic shear forces are intimately linked with cardiac development, during which trabeculae form a network of branching outgrowths from the myocardium. Mutations that alter Notch signaling also result in trabeculation defects. Here, we assessed whether shear stress modulates trabeculation to influence contractile function. Specifically, we acquired 4D (3D + time) images with light sheets by selective plane illumination microscopy (SPIM) for rapid scanning and deep axial penetration during zebrafish morphogenesis. Reduction of blood viscosity via gata1a morpholino oligonucleotides (MO) reduced shear stress, resulting in downregulation of Notch signaling and attenuation of trabeculation. Arrest of cardiomyocyte contraction either by troponin T type 2a (tnnt2a) MO or in weak atriumm58 (wea) mutants resulted in reduced shear stress and downregulation of Notch signaling and trabeculation. Integrating 4D SPIM imaging with synchronization algorithm demonstrated that coinjection of neuregulin1 mRNA with gata1 MO rescued trabeculation to restore contractile function in association with upregulation of Notch-related genes. Crossbreeding of Tg(flk:mCherry) fish, which allows visualization of the vascular system with the Tg(tp1:gfp) Notch reporter line, revealed that shear stress–mediated Notch activation localizes to the endocardium. Deleting endocardium via the clochesk4 mutants downregulated Notch signaling, resulting in nontrabeculated ventricle. Subjecting endothelial cells to pulsatile flow in the presence of the ADAM10 inhibitor corroborated shear stress–activated Notch signaling to modulate trabeculation. PMID:27018592

  3. Effects of fluid shear stress on polyelectrolyte multilayers by neutron scattering studies

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Saurabh; Junghans, Ann; Watkins, Erik; Kapoor, Yash; Toomey, Ryan; Majewski, Jaroslaw

    2015-02-17

    The structure of layer-by-layer (LbL) deposited nanofilm coatings consists of alternating polyethylenimine (PEI) and polystyrenesulfonate (PSS) films deposited on a single crystal quartz substrate. LbL-deposited nanofilms were investigated by neutron reflectomery (NR) in contact with water in the static and fluid shear stress conditions. The fluid shear stress was applied through a laminar flow of the liquid parallel to the quartz/polymer interface in a custom-built solid–liquid interface cell. The scattering length density profiles obtained from NR results of these polyelectrolyte multilayers (PEM), measured under different shear conditions, showed proportional decrease of volume fraction of water hydrating the polymers. For the highest shear rate applied (ca. 6800 s–1) the water volume fraction decreased by approximately 7%. The decrease of the volume fraction of water was homogeneous through the thickness of the film. Since there were not any significant changes in the total polymer thickness, it resulted in negative osmotic pressures in the film. The PEM films were compared with the behavior of thin films of thermoresponsive poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (pNIPAM) deposited via spin-coating. The PEM and pNIPAM differ in their interactions with water molecules, and they showed opposite behaviors under the fluid shear stress. In both cases the polymer hydration was reversible upon the restoration of static conditions. Furthermore, a theoretical explanation is given to explain this difference in the effect of shear on hydration of polymeric thin films.

  4. Lamin A/C deficiency reduces circulating tumor cell resistance to fluid shear stress

    PubMed Central

    Denais, Celine; Chan, Maxine F.; Wang, Zhexiao; Lammerding, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Metastasis contributes to over 90% of cancer-related deaths and is initiated when cancer cells detach from the primary tumor, invade the basement membrane, and enter the circulation as circulating tumor cells (CTCs). While metastasis is viewed as an inefficient process with most CTCs dying within the bloodstream, it is evident that some CTCs are capable of resisting hemodynamic shear forces to form secondary tumors in distant tissues. We hypothesized that nuclear lamins A and C (A/C) act as key structural components within CTCs necessary to resist destruction from elevated shear forces of the bloodstream. Herein, we show that, compared with nonmalignant epithelial cells, tumor cells are resistant to elevated fluid shear forces in vitro that mimic those within the bloodstream, as evidenced by significant decreases in cellular apoptosis and necrosis. Knockdown of lamin A/C significantly reduced tumor cell resistance to fluid shear stress, with significantly increased cell death compared with parental tumor cell and nontargeting controls. Interestingly, lamin A/C knockdown increased shear stress-induced tumor cell apoptosis, but did not significantly affect cellular necrosis. These data demonstrate that lamin A/C is an important structural component that enables tumor cell resistance to fluid shear stress-mediated death in the bloodstream, and may thus facilitate survival and hematogenous metastasis of CTCs. PMID:26447202

  5. Dynamic Shear Stress Regulation of Inflammatory and Thrombotic Pathways in Baboon Endothelial Outgrowth Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hinds, Monica T.; Nerem, Robert M.

    2013-01-01

    Endothelial outgrowth cells (EOCs) have garnered much attention as a potential autologous endothelial source for vascular implants or in tissue engineering applications due to their ease of isolation and proliferative ability; however, how these cells respond to different hemodynamic cues is ill-defined. This study investigates the inflammatory and thrombotic response of baboon EOCs (BaEOCs) to four hemodynamic conditions using the cone and plate shear apparatus: steady, laminar shear stress (SS); pulsatile, nonreversing laminar shear stress (PS); oscillatory, laminar shear stress (OS); and net positive, pulsatile, reversing laminar shear stress (RS). In summary, endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) mRNA was significantly upregulated by SS compared to OS. No differences were found in the mRNA levels of the inflammatory markers intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), E-selectin, and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) between the shear conditions; however, OS significantly increased the number of monocytes bound when compared to SS. Next, SS increased the anti-thrombogenic mRNA levels of CD39, thrombomodulin, and endothelial protein-C receptor (EPCR) compared to OS. SS also significantly increased CD39 and EPCR mRNA levels compared to RS. Finally, no significant differences were detected when comparing pro-thrombotic tissue factor mRNA or its activity levels. These results indicate that shear stress can have beneficial (SS) or adverse (OS, RS) effects on the inflammatory or thrombotic potential of EOCs. Further, these results suggest SS hemodynamic preconditioning may be optimal in increasing the efficacy of a vascular implant or in tissue-engineered applications that have incorporated EOCs. PMID:23406430

  6. [The anticonstrictor effect of endothelial sensitivity to shear stress].

    PubMed

    Mel'kumiants, A M; Balashov, S A; Kartamyshev, S P

    1996-04-01

    Responses of the femoral artery to drops in transmural pressure and to norepinephrine revealed the anticonstrictor effect of the endothelium sensitivity upon a stress action. The effect was less obvious at high flow rate. The data obtained suggests that the endothelium sensitivity to stress inhibits the arterial constrictor responses irrespective of the nature of the constrictor stimuli.

  7. Crack initiation observation and local stress analysis in shear fracture tests of ultra-high strength steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Ninshu; Takada, Kenji; Sugimoto, Nao

    2016-08-01

    To investigate the local strain and stress at the crack initiation position in shear fracture test pieces of ultra-high strength steels, a butterfly shear fracture specimen was employed. The crack initiation position and propagation direction were observed during shear fracture tests by high speed cameras and investigated through analysing the fracture surface by scanning electron microscope. Further, the finite element method was employed and the stress-triaxiality at the crack initiation position was investigated. It can be obtained that the crack initiated at the position where the stress state is close to uniaxial tensile state or plane strain state more than pure shear stress state.

  8. Modeling the curvature and interface shear stress of GaN-sapphire system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jia; Shi, Junjie; Wu, Jiejun; Liu, Huizhao

    2016-03-01

    The curvature and interface shear stress of GaN-sapphire system are studied by establishing the mechanical equations based on two main assumptions: (a) the thickness of GaN film can be compared to the thickness of sapphire substrate, and (b) the thickness of GaN film is non-uniform. Our results show that the curvature of GaN-sapphire system is a variable within the whole circular system. The interface shear stress changes direction around at the middle of radius for the circular system, and the curvature have an important effect on the interface shear stress due to the consideration of non-uniform thickness for GaN film.

  9. An integrated temperature-compensated flexible shear-stress sensor microarray with concentrated leading-wire.

    PubMed

    Tang, Jian; Liu, Wu; Zhang, Weiping; Sun, Yongming; Chen, Honghai

    2016-02-01

    Flexible shear stress sensor is quite important for characterizing curved surface flows. In this work, a novel integrated shear stress sensor microarray is designed with twenty parallel channels, which share the concentrated leading-wire to transmit the ground signal. Electrical pads in rows are easily connected to the circuits with two separate Wheatstone bridges and constant-temperature-difference mode operation is provided for the hot-wires. Temperature crosstalk between adjacent hot-wires is prevented well and the effectiveness of the temperature compensated circuits is verified. Relatively large output response is obtained as the shear stress varies and the sensitivity of the sensors is measured about 0.086 V(2)/Pa(1/3) with nonlinearity lower than 1%, revealing high performance characteristic of the sensors.

  10. The Effects of Hemodynamic Shear Stress on Stemness of Acute Myelogenous Leukemia (AML)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raddatz, Andrew; Triantafillu, Ursula; Kim, Yonghyun (John)

    2015-11-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) have recently been identified as the root cause of tumors generated from cancer cell populations. This is because these CSCs are drug-resistant and have the ability to self-renew and differentiate. Current methods of culturing CSCs require much time and money, so cancer cell culture protocols, which maximize yield of CSCs are needed. It was hypothesized that the quantity of Acute myelogenous leukemia stem cells (LSCs) would increase after applying shear stress to the leukemia cells based on previous studies with breast cancer in bioreactors. The shear stress was applied by pumping the cells through narrow tubing to mimic the in vivo bloodstream environment. In support of the hypothesis, shear stress was found to increase the amount of LSCs in a given leukemia population. This work was supported by NSF REU Site Award 1358991.

  11. Alteration of mean wall shear stress near an oscillating stagnation point.

    PubMed

    Hazel, A L; Pedley, T J

    1998-04-01

    The site opposite an end-to-side anastomosis, resulting from femoral bypass surgery, and the carotid sinus are two regions well known to be prone to fibrous intimal hyperplasia or atherogenesis, respectively. The blood flow at these two sites features a stagnation point, which oscillates in strength and position. Mathematical models are used to determine some of the features of such a flow; in particular, the mean wall shear stress is calculated. The positional oscillations cause a significant change in the distribution and magnitude of the mean wall shear stress from that of the well-studied case of a stagnation point that oscillates only in strength. It is therefore proposed that the recorded effect of time dependence in the flow upon atherogenesis could still be a result of the distribution of the mean and not the time-varying components of the wall shear stress.

  12. Online quantitative phase imaging of vascular endothelial cells under fluid shear stress utilizing digital holographic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odenthal-Schnittler, Maria; Schnittler, Hans Joachim; Kemper, Björn

    2016-03-01

    We have explored the utilization of quantitative phase imaging with digital holographic microscopy (DHM) as a novel tool for quantifying the dynamics of morphologic parameters (morphodynamics) of confluent endothelial cell layers under fluid shear stress conditions. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were exposed to fluid shear stress in a transparent cone/plate flow device (BioTech-Flow-System) and imaged with a modular setup for quantitative DHM phase imaging for up to 48 h. The resulting series of quantitative phase image sequences were analyzed for the average surface roughness of the cell layers and cell alignment. Our results demonstrate that quantitative phase imaging is a powerful and reliable tool to quantify the dynamics of morphological adaptation of endothelial cells to fluid shear stress.

  13. PI16 is a shear stress and inflammation-regulated inhibitor of MMP2

    PubMed Central

    Hazell, Georgina G. J.; Peachey, Alasdair M. G.; Teasdale, Jack E.; Sala-Newby, Graciela B.; Angelini, Gianni D.; Newby, Andrew C.; White, Stephen J.

    2016-01-01

    Raised endothelial shear stress is protective against atherosclerosis but such protection may be lost at sites of inflammation. We found that four splice variants of the peptidase inhibitor 16 (PI16) mRNA are among the most highly shear stress regulated transcripts in human coronary artery endothelial cells (HCAECs), in vitro but that expression is reduced by inflammatory mediators TNFα and IL-1β. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated that PI16 is expressed in human coronary endothelium and in a subset of neointimal cells and medial smooth muscle cells. Adenovirus-mediated PI16 overexpression inhibits HCAEC migration and secreted matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) activity. Moreover, PI16 inhibits MMP2 in part by binding an exposed peptide loop above the active site. Our results imply that, at high endothelial shear stress, PI16 contributes to inhibition of protease activity; protection that can be reversed during inflammation. PMID:27996045

  14. The Effects of Static Coulomb, Normal and Shear Stress Changes on Earthquake Occurrence in Southern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strader, A. E.; Jackson, D. D.

    2011-12-01

    Deng & Sykes (1997) found a strong correlation between receiver earthquake location and positive increase in Coulomb stress (ΔCFF). Assuming a coefficient of friction of 0.6, and resolving stresses onto assumed fault planes with uniform orientation parallel to average Pacific-North American plate motion, they found that only 15% of receiver earthquakes occur in "stress shadows" where the Coulomb stress change should impede faulting. We extended their study by adding two source earthquakes (Hector Mine, 1999 and El Mayor-Cucupah, 2010), and calculating the stress changes at the locations of 134 receiver earthquakes with magnitude 4.4 and greater after 1999. We examined shear stress, normal stress, and Coulomb stress, resolving stresses onto four different hypothetical fault planes: smoothed seismicity-based planes, a weighted average of nearby fault-plane orientations, and the two nodal planes of weighed average moment tensors of nearby earthquakes. We also computed shear, normal, and Coulomb stress histories oriented according to the four choices of fault orientation, and tested the effect of total stress change on receiver earthquake magnitude. Our chi square test results indicate that, with 95% confidence, receiver earthquakes do not tend to avoid stress shadows, and that the choice of plane onto which stress is resolved does not affect the result. On average, 39% of earthquakes occur at the time of maximum stress at the event location, with no significant variation depending on the choice of rupture plane or type of stress change. We found no correlation between earthquake magnitude and total stress change at the events' locations. These results suggest that instantaneous cumulative Coulomb stress, as we and Deng & Sykes modeled it, does not strongly control the locations of future earthquakes. The lack of correlation between Coulomb stress change and magnitude suggests that modeled Coulomb stress change does not control the size of earthquakes once they

  15. Shear stress transmission model for the flagellar rotary motor.

    PubMed

    Mitsui, Toshio; Ohshima, Hiroyuki

    2008-09-01

    Most bacteria that swim are propelled by flagellar filaments, which are driven by a rotary motor powered by proton flux. The mechanism of the flagellar motor is discussed by reforming the model proposed by the present authors in 2005. It is shown that the mean strength of Coulomb field produced by a proton passing the channel is very strong in the Mot assembly so that the Mot assembly can be a shear force generator and induce the flagellar rotation. The model gives clear calculation results in agreement with experimental observations, e g., for the characteristic torque-velocity relationship of the flagellar rotation.

  16. Theory and Practice of Shear/Stress Strain Gage Hygrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shams, Qamar A.; Fenner, Ralph L.

    2006-01-01

    Mechanical hygrometry has progressed during the last several decades from crude hygroscopes to state-of-the art strain-gage sensors. The strain-gage devices vary from different metallic beams to strain-gage sensors using cellulose crystallite elements, held in full shear restraint. This old technique is still in use but several companies are now actively pursuing development of MEMS miniaturized humidity sensors. These new sensors use polyimide thin film for water vapor adsorption and desorption. This paper will provide overview about modern humidity sensors.

  17. Shear-stress fluctuations in self-assembled transient elastic networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wittmer, J. P.; Kriuchevskyi, I.; Cavallo, A.; Xu, H.; Baschnagel, J.

    2016-06-01

    Focusing on shear-stress fluctuations, we investigate numerically a simple generic model for self-assembled transient networks formed by repulsive beads reversibly bridged by ideal springs. With Δ t being the sampling time and t(f ) ˜1 /f the Maxwell relaxation time (set by the spring recombination frequency f ), the dimensionless parameter Δ x =Δ t /t(f ) is systematically scanned from the liquid limit (Δ x ≫1 ) to the solid limit (Δ x ≪1 ) where the network topology is quenched and an ensemble average over m -independent configurations is required. Generalizing previous work on permanent networks, it is shown that the shear-stress relaxation modulus G (t ) may be efficiently determined for all Δ x using the simple-average expression G (t ) =μA-h (t ) with μA=G (0 ) characterizing the canonical-affine shear transformation of the system at t =0 and h (t ) the (rescaled) mean-square displacement of the instantaneous shear stress as a function of time t . This relation is compared to the standard expression G (t ) =c ˜(t ) using the (rescaled) shear-stress autocorrelation function c ˜(t ) . Lower bounds for the m configurations required by both relations are given.

  18. Interface shear stresses during ambulation with a below-knee prosthetic limb

    PubMed Central

    Sanders, Joan E.; Daly, Colin H.; Burgess, Ernest M.

    2015-01-01

    Shear stresses on a residual limb in a prosthetic socket are considered clinically to contribute to tissue breakdown in below-knee amputees. When applied simultaneously with normal stresses, they can cause injury within the skin or can generate an abrasion on the surface. To gain insight into shear stresses and parameters that affect them, interface stresses were recorded on below-knee amputee subjects during walking trials. On the tibial flares, resultant shear ranged from 5.6 kPa to 39.0 kPa, while on the posterior surface it ranged from 5.0 kPa to 40.7 kPa. During stance phase, anterior resultant shears on a socket were directed toward the apex while posterior resultant shears were directed downward approximately perpendicular to the ground. Waveform shapes were usually double-peaked, with the first peak at 25% to 40% into stance phase and the second peak at 65% to 85% into stance. Application of these results to residual limb tissue mechanics and prosthetic design is discussed. PMID:1432723

  19. Pulsatile atheroprone shear stress affects the expression of transient receptor potential channels in human endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Thilo, Florian; Vorderwülbecke, Bernd J; Marki, Alex; Krueger, Katharina; Liu, Ying; Baumunk, Daniel; Zakrzewicz, Andreas; Tepel, Martin

    2012-06-01

    The goal of the study was to assess whether pulsatile atheroprone shear stress modulates the expression of transient receptor potential (TRP) channels, TRPC3, TRPC6, TRPM7, and TRPV1 mRNA, in human umbilical vascular endothelial cells. Exposure of cultured vascular endothelial cells to defined shear stress, producing a constant laminar flow (generating a shear stress of 6 dyne/cm(2)), laminar pulsatile atheroprotective flow (with a mean shear stress of 20 dyne/cm(2)), or laminar atheroprone bidirectional flow (with a mean shear stress of 0 dyne/cm(2)) differentially induced TRPC6 and TRPV1 mRNA as measured by quantitative real-time RT-PCR and normalized to GAPDH expression. Thereby, TRPC6 and TRPV1 mRNA expressions were significantly increased after 24 hours of exposure to an atheroprone flow profile compared with an atheroprotective flow profile. Furthermore, the expression of transcription factors GATA1 and GATA4 was significantly correlated with the expression of TRPC6 mRNA. In contrast, after 24 hours of constant laminar flow, the expression of TRPC6 and TRPV1 mRNA was unchanged, whereas the expression of TRPC3 and TRPM7 was significantly higher in endothelial cells exposed to shear stress in comparison with endothelial cells grown under static conditions. There was a significant association between the expression of TRPC6 and tumor necrosis factor-α mRNA in human vascular tissue. No-flow and atheroprone flow conditions are equally characterized by an increase in the expression of tumor necrosis factor-α; however, inflammation-associated endothelial cell reactions may be further aggravated at atheroprone flow conditions by the increase of TRPV1 and TRPC6, as observed in our study.

  20. Estimation of wall shear stress in bypass grafts with computational fluid dynamics method.

    PubMed

    Goubergrits, L; Affeld, K; Wellnhofer, E; ZurbrüggR; Holmer, T

    2001-03-01

    Coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) operation for coronary artery disease with different types of grafts has a large clinical application world wide. Immediately after this operation patients are usually relieved of their chest pain and have improved cardiac function. However, after a while, these bypass grafts may fail due to for example, neointimal hyperplasia or thrombosis. One of the causes for this bypass graft failure is assumed to be the blood flow with low wall shear stress. The aim of this research is to estimate the wall shear stress in a graft and thus to locate areas were wall shear stress is low. This was done with the help of a blood flow computer model. Post-operative biplane angiograms of the graft were recorded, and from these the three-dimensional geometry of the graft was reconstructed and imported into the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) program FLUENT. The stationary diastolic flow through the grafts was calculated, and the wall shear stress distribution was estimated. This procedure was carried out for one native vessel and two different types of bypass grafts. One bypass graft was a saphenous vein and the other one was a varicose saphenous vein encased in a fine, flexible metal mesh. The mesh was attached to give the graft a defined diameter. The computational results show that each graft has distinct areas of low wall shear stress. The graft with the metal mesh has an area of low wall shear stress (< 1 Pa, stationary flow), which is four times smaller than the respective areas in the other graft and in the native vessel. This is thought to be caused by the smaller and more uniform diameter of the metal mesh-reinforced graft.

  1. Critical shear stress for erosion of cohesive soils subjected to temperatures typical of wildfires

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moody, J.A.; Dungan, Smith J.; Ragan, B.W.

    2005-01-01

    [1] Increased erosion is a well-known response after wildfire. To predict and to model erosion on a landscape scale requires knowledge of the critical shear stress for the initiation of motion of soil particles. As this soil property is temperature-dependent, a quantitative relation between critical shear stress and the temperatures to which the soils have been subjected during a wildfire is required. In this study the critical shear stress was measured in a recirculating flume using samples of forest soil exposed to different temperatures (40??-550??C) for 1 hour. Results were obtained for four replicates of soils derived from three different types of parent material (granitic bedrock, sandstone, and volcanic tuffs). In general, the relation between critical shear stress and temperature can be separated into three different temperature ranges (275??C), which are similar to those for water repellency and temperature. The critical shear stress was most variable (1.0-2.0 N m-2) for temperatures 2.0 N m-2) between 175?? and 275??C, and was essentially constant (0.5-0.8 N m-2) for temperatures >275??C. The changes in critical shear stress with temperature were found to be essentially independent of soil type and suggest that erosion processes in burned watersheds can be modeled more simply than erosion processes in unburned watersheds. Wildfire reduces the spatial variability of soil erodibility associated with unburned watersheds by eliminating the complex effects of vegetation in protecting soils and by reducing the range of cohesion associated with different types of unburned soils. Our results indicate that modeling the erosional response after a wildfire depends primarily on determining the spatial distribution of the maximum soil temperatures that were reached during the wildfire. Copyright 2005 by the American Geophysical Union.

  2. Distribution of shear stress over smooth muscle cells in deformable arterial wall.

    PubMed

    Dabagh, Mahsa; Jalali, Payman; Konttinen, Yrjö T; Sarkomaa, Pertti

    2008-07-01

    A biphasic, anisotropic model of the deformable aortic wall in combination with computational fluid dynamics is used to investigate the variation of shear stress over smooth muscle cells (SMCs) with transmural pressure. The media layer is modeled as a porous medium consisting of SMCs and a homogeneous porous medium of interstitial fluid and elastin, collagen and proteoglycans fibers. Interstitial fluid enters the media through fenestral pores, which are distributed over the internal elastic lamina (IEL). The IEL is considered as an impermeable barrier to fluid flow except at fenestral pores. The thickness and the radius of aortic wall vary with transmural pressure ranging from 10 to 180 mm Hg. It is assumed that SMCs are cylinders with a circular cross section at 0 mm Hg. As the transmural pressure increases, SMCs elongate with simultaneous change of cross sectional shape into ellipse according to the strain field in the media. Results demonstrate that the variation of shear stress within the media layer is significantly dependent on the configuration and cross sectional shape of SMCs. In the staggered array of SMCs, the shear stress over the first SMC nearest to the IEL is about 2.2 times lower than that of the square array. The shear stress even over the second nearest SMC to the IEL is considerably higher (about 15%) in the staggered array. In addition to configuration and cross sectional shape of SMCs, the variation of structural properties of the media layer with pressure and the sensitivity of the local shear stress to the minimum distance between SMCs and the IEL (reducing with transmural pressure) between SMCs and the IEL are studied. At 180 mm Hg, the ratio of the local shear stress of the nearest SMC to that of the second nearest SMC is 4.8 in the square array, whereas it reduces to about 1.8 in the staggered array. The importance of the fluid shear stress is associated with its role in the biomolecular state of smooth muscle cells bearing the shear

  3. On-Chip Evaluation of Shear Stress Effect on Cytotoxicity of Mesoporous Silica Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Donghyuk; Lin, Yu-Shen; Haynes, Christy L.

    2011-01-01

    In this work, nanotoxicity in the bloodstream was modeled and the cytotoxicity of sub-50 nm mesoporous silica nanoparticles to human endothelial cells was investigated under microfluidic flow conditions. Compared to traditional in vitro cytotoxicity assays performed under static conditions, unmodified mesoporous silica nanoparticles show higher and shear stress-dependent toxicity to endothelial cells under flow conditions. Interestingly, even under flow conditions, highly organo-modified mesoporous silica nanoparticles show no significant toxicity to endothelial cells. This paper clearly demonstrates that shear stress is an important factor to be considered in in vitro nanotoxicology assessments and provides a simple device for pursuing this consideration. PMID:22032307

  4. The significance of electrically induced shear stress in drainage of thin aqueous films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ajaev, Vladimir; Ketelaar, Christiaan

    2014-11-01

    We develop a model of drainage of a microscale thin aqueous film separating a gas bubble and a solid wall. In contrast to previous studies, the electrostatic effects are accounted for not only in the normal but also in the shear stress balance at the liquid-gas interface. We show that the action of the tangential component of the electric field leads to potentially strong spatially variable shear stress at the deforming charged interface. This previously overlooked effect turns out to be essential for correctly estimating the long-time drainage rates. Time-dependent fluid interface shapes predicted by our model are in very good agreement with the experimental data.

  5. Significance of electrically induced shear stress in drainage of thin aqueous films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ketelaar, Christiaan; Ajaev, Vladimir S.

    2015-05-01

    We develop a novel model of drainage of microscale thin aqueous film separating a gas bubble and a solid wall. In contrast to previous studies, the electrostatic effects are accounted for not only in the normal but also in the shear stress balance at the liquid-gas interface. We show that the action of the tangential component of the electric field leads to potentially strong spatially variable shear stress at the deforming charged interface. This previously overlooked effect turns out to be essential for correctly estimating the long-time drainage rates. Comparison of time-dependent fluid interface shapes predicted by our model with the experimental data is discussed.

  6. Shear stress-induced Ets-1 modulates protease inhibitor expression in microvascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Milkiewicz, Malgorzata; Uchida, Cassandra; Gee, Eric; Fudalewski, Tomasz; Haas, Tara L

    2008-11-01

    Elevated shear stress within the skeletal muscle microvasculature is implicated in the induction of a longitudinal splitting form of angiogenesis, which is characterized by the lack of basement membrane breakage. We investigated whether the transcriptional regulator, Ets-1, is responsive to changes in hemodynamic forces and if so, whether Ets-1 controls microvascular endothelial cell integrity by inducing the expression of inhibitors of matrix degrading proteases. Rats were treated with prazosin for 2, 4, and 7 days to increase in microvascular shear stress in hindlimb skeletal muscles. In complimentary in vitro experiments, rat microvascular skeletal muscle endothelial cells were exposed to laminar shear stress (15 dyne/cm(2)) for 0.5, 2, and 24 h. TaqMan PCR analysis of laser microdissected capillaries isolated from EDL muscles demonstrated transient (after 2 days) induction of Ets-1 gene expression. In cultured cells, a transient up-regulation of Ets-1 mRNA was observed after 2 h shear stimulation, accompanied by increased phosphorylation of Ets-1 and enhanced Ets-1 DNA binding activity. This response was modulated by ERK1/2 and p38 MAP kinases, but was not dependent on NOS or COX-2 activity. PAI-1, TIMP-1 and TIMP-3 mRNA were elevated significantly in prazosin treated EDL, and in response to shear stimulation in vitro. In cultured endothelial cells, Ets-1 RNA interference abolished the shear-induced increases in Ets-1, PAI-1, TIMP-1, and TIMP-3 mRNA expression. These results suggest that enhanced laminar shear stress may act to preserve the integrity of microvascular walls in part through Ets-1-dependent induction of protease inhibitors.

  7. Surface Shear Stress Around a Single Flexible Live Plant and a Rigid Cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walter, B. A.; Gromke, C.; Leonard, K. C.; Clifton, A.; Lehning, M.

    2010-12-01

    The sheltering effect of vegetation against soil erosion and snow transport has direct implications on land degradation and local water storage as snow in many arid and semi arid regions. Plants influence the erosion, transport and redeposition of soil and snow by the wind through momentum absorption, local stress concentration, trapping particles in motion and reducing the area of sediment exposed to the wind. The shear stress distributions on the ground beneath plant canopies determine the onset and magnitude of differential soil and snow erosion on rough or vegetated surfaces, but this has been studied exclusively with artificial and rigid vegetation elements thus far. Real plants have highly irregular structures that can be extremely flexible and porous. They align with the flow at higher wind speeds, resulting in considerable changes to the drag and flow regimes relative to rigid imitations of comparable size. We present measurements in the SLF atmospheric boundary layer wind tunnel of the surface shear stress distribution around a live grass plant (Lolium Perenne) and a solid cylinder of comparable size. Irwin sensors are used to measure pressure differences close to the surface which can be calibrated with surface shear stress velocities. The basal to frontal area index of the plant and the cylinder as well as the Reynolds number of the two experimental setups have been checked for similarity and show good agreement. Distinctive differences between the shear stress pattern around the plant and the cylinder can be attributed to the influence of the plant’s porosity and flexibility. The sheltered zone behind the plant is narrower in cross-stream and longer in streamwise direction than that of the cylinder. For the plant, the lowest shear stresses in the sheltered zone are 50% lower than the mean surface shear stress (τ = 0.15 N/m2) in the undisturbed flow. The sheltering was higher behind the cylinder with values reduced by 70% relative to background.

  8. Mechanism and kinetics of biofilm growth process influenced by shear stress in sewers.

    PubMed

    Ai, Hainan; Xu, Jingwei; Huang, Wei; He, Qiang; Ni, Bingjie; Wang, Yinliang

    2016-01-01

    Sewer biofilms play an important role in the biotransformation of substances for methane and sulfide emission in sewer networks. The dynamic flows and the particular shear stress in sewers are the key factors determining the growth of the sewer biofilm. In this work, the development of sewer biofilm with varying shear stress is specifically investigated to gain a comprehensive understanding of the sewer biofilm dynamics. Sewer biofilms were cultivated in laboratory-scale gravity sewers under different hydraulic conditions with the corresponding shell stresses are 1.12 Pa, 1.29 Pa and 1.45 Pa, respectively. The evolution of the biofilm thickness were monitored using microelectrodes, and the variation in total solids (TS) and extracellular polymer substance (EPS) levels in the biofilm were also measured. The results showed that the steady-state biofilm thickness were highly related to the corresponding shear stresses with the biofilm thickness of 2.4 ± 0.1 mm, 2.7 ± 0.1 mm and 2.2 ± 0.1 mm at shear stresses of 1.12 Pa, 1.29 Pa and 1.45 Pa, respectively, which the chemical oxygen demand concentration is 400 mg/L approximately. Based on these observations, a kinetic model for describing the development of sewer biofilms was developed and demonstrated to be capable of reproducing all the experimental data.

  9. Flow-induced corrosion behavior of absorbable magnesium-based stents.

    PubMed

    Wang, Juan; Giridharan, Venkataraman; Shanov, Vesselin; Xu, Zhigang; Collins, Boyce; White, Leon; Jang, Yongseok; Sankar, Jagannathan; Huang, Nan; Yun, Yeoheung

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this work was to study corrosion behavior of magnesium (Mg) alloys (MgZnCa plates and AZ31 stents) under varied fluid flow conditions representative of the vascular environment. Experiments revealed that fluid hydrodynamics, fluid flow velocity and shear stress play essential roles in the corrosion behavior of absorbable magnesium-based stent devices. Flow-induced shear stress (FISS) accelerates the overall corrosion (including localized, uniform, pitting and erosion corrosions) due to the increased mass transfer and mechanical force. FISS increased the average uniform corrosion rate, the localized corrosion coverage ratios and depths and the removal rate of corrosion products inside the corrosion pits. For MgZnCa plates, an increase of FISS results in an increased pitting factor but saturates at an FISS of ∼0.15Pa. For AZ31 stents, the volume loss ratio (31%) at 0.056Pa was nearly twice that (17%) at 0Pa before and after corrosion. Flow direction has a significant impact on corrosion behavior as more severe pitting and erosion corrosion was observed on the back ends of the MgZnCa plates, and the corrosion product layer facing the flow direction peeled off from the AZ31 stent struts. This study demonstrates that flow-induced corrosion needs be understood so that Mg-based stents in vascular environments can be effectively designed.

  10. Seasonal Variation in Basal Shear Stress Beneath the Greenland Ice Sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joughin, I.; Alley, R. B.; Behn, M. D.; Das, S. B.; Flowers, G. E.

    2015-12-01

    Over the last decade, it has been well established that in the ablation zone of the Greenland Ice Sheet, surface melt water makes its way to the bed and seasonally modulates ice-flow speed. With a conventional sliding law, the basal shear stress is proportional to the nonlinear product of the sliding speed and the effective pressure (difference between ice overburden and water pressure). Thus, when seasonal surface melting raises subglacial water pressure, it lowers the effective pressure, requiring additional sliding to restore the basal shear stress to maintain an overall force balance. This variation need not be uniform, however, and the basal hydrological system may produce variability at different spatial scales. To examine variability at scales of a few ice thicknesses, we use control-method inverse techniques to determine the basal shear stress using a shallow-shelf, ice-flow model constrained by speckle-tracked velocities measured over 11 and 22-day intervals. We begin by determining a reference basal shear stress estimated for a typical winter velocity field (typically over a 30-by-50 km region). We then determine the corresponding estimates for the region during periods of enhanced summer flow. In general, we find that relative to the winter data, summer basal shear stress tends to increase in areas of steep surface slope (high driving stress) and decrease, despite elevated speeds, in low slope regions, which often correspond to the basins where supraglacial lakes form. Computing the ratio of summer to winter effective pressure indicates little seasonal change in effective pressure for areas of high basal shear stress and a summer decrease in low-slope regions. This pattern is consistent with surface and bed slopes that drive water away from areas of high slopes and stress concentration (e.g., where ice flows over bedrock bumps) toward weak, low-slope regions of the bed. The net result is that, during the summer delivery of water to the bed, basal shear

  11. The microchannel flow model under shear stress and higher frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, K. J.

    2017-04-01

    The microchannel flow model provides a framework for considering the effect of the vascular bed on the time domain and frequency domain response of soft tissues. The derivation originates with a single small fluid-filled vessel in an elastic medium under uniaxial compression. A fractal branching vasculature is also assumed to be present in the tissue under consideration. This note considers two closely related issues. First, the response of the element under compression or shear as a function of the orientation of the fluid-filled vessel is considered. Second, the transition from quasistatic (Poiseuille’s Law) to dynamic (Womersley equations) fluid flow is examined to better predict the evolution of behavior at higher frequencies. These considerations expand the conceptual framework of the microchannel flow model, particularly the range and limits of validity.

  12. The microchannel flow model under shear stress and higher frequencies.

    PubMed

    Parker, Kevin J

    2017-02-24

    The microchannel flow model provides a framework for considering the effect of the vascular bed on the time domain and frequency domain response of soft tissues. The derivation originates with a single small fluid filled vessel in an elastic medium under uniaxial compression. A fractal branching vasculature is also assumed to be present in the tissue under consideration. This short technical note considers two closely related issues. First, the response of the element under compression or shear as a function of the orientation of the fluid-filled vessel is considered. Second, the transition from quasistatic (Poiseuille's Law) to dynamic (Womersley equations) fluid flow is examined to better predict the evolution of behavior at higher frequencies. These considerations expand the conceptual framework of the microchannel flow model, particularly the range and limits of validity.

  13. The shear stress of it all: the cell membrane and mechanochemical transduction.

    PubMed

    White, Charles R; Frangos, John A

    2007-08-29

    As the inner lining of the vessel wall, vascular endothelial cells are poised to act as a signal transduction interface between haemodynamic forces and the underlying vascular smooth-muscle cells. Detailed analyses of fluid mechanics in atherosclerosis-susceptible regions of the vasculature reveal a strong correlation between endothelial cell dysfunction and areas of low mean shear stress and oscillatory flow with flow recirculation. Conversely, steady shear stress stimulates cellular responses that are essential for endothelial cell function and are atheroprotective. The molecular basis of shear-induced mechanochemical signal transduction and the endothelium's ability to discriminate between flow profiles remains largely unclear. Given that fluid shear stress does not involve a traditional receptor/ligand interaction, identification of the molecule(s) responsible for sensing fluid flow and mechanical force discrimination has been difficult. This review will provide an overview of the haemodynamic forces experienced by the vascular endothelium and its role in localizing atherosclerotic lesions within specific regions of the vasculature. Also reviewed are several recent lines of evidence suggesting that both changes in membrane microviscosity linked to heterotrimeric G proteins, and the transmission of tension across the cell membrane to the cell-cell junction where known shear-sensitive proteins are localized, may serve as the primary force-sensing elements of the cell.

  14. Non-Newtonian stress tensor and thermal conductivity tensor in granular plane shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alam, Meheboob; Saha, Saikat

    2014-11-01

    The non-Newtonian stress tensor and the heat flux in the plane shear flow of smooth inelastic disks are analysed from the Grad-level moment equations using the anisotropic Gaussian as a reference. Closed-form expressions for shear viscosity, pressure, first normal stress difference (N1) and the dissipation rate are given as functions of (i) the density or the area fraction (ν), (ii) the restitution coefficient (e), (iii) the dimensionless shear rate (R), (iv) the temperature anisotropy [ η, the difference between the principal eigenvalues of the second moment tensor] and (v) the angle (ϕ) between the principal directions of the shear tensor and the second moment tensor. Particle simulation data for a sheared hard-disk system is compared with theoretical results, with good agreement for p, μ and N1 over a large range of density. In contrast, the predictions from a Navier-Stokes order constitutive model are found to deviate significantly from both the simulation and the moment theory even at moderate values of e. We show that the gradient of the deviatoric part of the kinetic stress drives a heat current and the thermal conductivity is characterized by an anisotropic 2nd rank tensor for which explicit expressions are derived.

  15. The effect of bilayer composition on calcium ion transport facilitated by fluid shear stress.

    PubMed

    Giorgio, T D; Yek, S H

    1995-10-04

    Passive calcium ion permeability across liposome bilayers is increased during exposure to fluid shear forces attainable in the mammalian vasculature. In this study, liposomes prepared from three different lipid mixtures (phosphatidylcholine alone; phosphatidylcholine and cholesterol; a mixture of anionic and cationic phospholipids plus cholesterol) are exposed to uniform shear stress in a rotational viscometer. Liposome permeability to calcium ion is estimated from continuous measurement of free intraliposome calcium ion concentration using a fluorescence technique. Calcium ion permeability in the absence of fluid force and susceptibility to shear-induced permeability modulation are positively correlated with estimated bilayer compressibility. Fluid shear forces are presumed to influence bilayer packing and modulate defect formation in proportion to bilayer compressibility. Bilayer defects produced by fluid forces may increase liposome permeability.

  16. Hemodynamic wall shear stress profiles influence the magnitude and pattern of stenosis in a pig AV fistula.

    PubMed

    Krishnamoorthy, Mahesh K; Banerjee, Rupak K; Wang, Yang; Zhang, Jianhua; Roy, Abhijit Sinha; Khoury, Saeb F; Arend, Lois J; Rudich, Steve; Roy-Chaudhury, Prabir

    2008-12-01

    Venous stenosis is a significant problem in arteriovenous fistulae, likely due to anatomical configuration and wall shear stress profiles. To identify linkages between wall shear stress and the magnitude and pattern of vascular stenosis, we produced curved and straight fistulae in a pig model. A complete wall stress profile was calculated for the curved configuration and correlated with luminal stenosis. Computer modeling techniques were then used to derive a wall shear stress profile for the straight arteriovenous fistula. Differences in the wall shear stress profile of the curved and straight fistula were then related to histological findings. There was a marked inverse correlation between the magnitude of wall shear stress within different regions of the curved arteriovenous fistula and luminal stenosis in these same regions. There were also significantly greater differences in wall shear stress between the outer and inner walls of the straight as compared to curved arteriovenous fistula, which translated into a more eccentric histological pattern of intima-media thickening. Our results suggest a clear linkage between anatomical configuration, wall shear stress profiles, and the pattern of luminal stenosis and intima-media thickening in a pig model of arteriovenous fistula stenosis. These results suggest that fistula failure could be reduced by using computer modeling prior to surgical placement to alter the anatomical and, consequently, the wall shear stress profiles in an arteriovenous fistula.

  17. Estimates of Shear Stress and Measurements of Water Levels in the Lower Fox River near Green Bay, Wisconsin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Westenbroek, Stephen M.

    2006-01-01

    Turbulent shear stress in the boundary layer of a natural river system largely controls the deposition and resuspension of sediment, as well as the longevity and effectiveness of granular-material caps used to cover and isolate contaminated sediments. This report documents measurements and calculations made in order to estimate shear stress and shear velocity on the Lower Fox River, Wisconsin. Velocity profiles were generated using an acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) mounted on a moored vessel. This method of data collection yielded 158 velocity profiles on the Lower Fox River between June 2003 and November 2004. Of these profiles, 109 were classified as valid and were used to estimate the bottom shear stress and velocity using log-profile and turbulent kinetic energy methods. Estimated shear stress ranged from 0.09 to 10.8 dynes per centimeter squared. Estimated coefficients of friction ranged from 0.001 to 0.025. This report describes both the field and data-analysis methods used to estimate shear-stress parameters for the Lower Fox River. Summaries of the estimated values for bottom shear stress, shear velocity, and coefficient of friction are presented. Confidence intervals about the shear-stress estimates are provided.

  18. A stress-controlled shear cell for small-angle light scattering and microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aime, S.; Ramos, L.; Fromental, J. M.; Prévot, G.; Jelinek, R.; Cipelletti, L.

    2016-12-01

    We develop and test a stress-controlled, parallel plates shear cell that can be coupled to an optical microscope or a small angle light scattering setup, for simultaneous investigation of the rheological response and the microscopic structure of soft materials under an imposed shear stress. In order to minimize friction, the cell is based on an air bearing linear stage, the stress is applied through a contactless magnetic actuator, and the strain is measured through optical sensors. We discuss the contributions of inertia and of the small residual friction to the measured signal and demonstrate the performance of our device in both oscillating and step stress experiments on a variety of viscoelastic materials.

  19. Measurement of turbulent wall shear-stress using micro-pillars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gnanamanickam, E. P.; Nottebrock, B.; Große, S.; Sullivan, J. P.; Schröder, W.

    2013-12-01

    In experimental fluid mechanics, measuring spatially and temporally resolved wall shear-stress (WSS) has proved a challenging problem. The micro-pillar shear-stress sensor (MPS3) has been developed with the goal of filling this gap in measurement techniques. The MPS3 comprises an array of flexible micro-pillars flush mounted on the wall of a wall-bounded flow field. The deflection of these micro-pillars in the presence of a shear field is a direct measure of the WSS. This paper presents the MPS3 development work carried out by RWTH Aachen University and Purdue University. The sensor concept, static and dynamic characterization and data reduction issues are discussed. Also presented are demonstrative experiments where the MPS3 was used to measure the WSS in both water and air. The salient features of the measurement technique, sensor development issues, current capabilities and areas for improvement are highlighted.

  20. [Determining wall shear stress in artificial blood pumps of heart assist devices].

    PubMed

    Debaene, P; Aguilera, D; Kertzscher, U; Affeld, K

    2002-01-01

    The walls in blood pumps are made of artificial material and thus are thrombogenic to a lesser or larger degree. Also the flow plays a role: a blood flow with no flow separations and stagnation zones is required to avoid the generation of thrombi. A precondition for solving this problem is the assessment of the wall shear rate. However this parameter is difficult to assess because of the deformability of the walls and the pulsation of the flow. Two methods are proposed to estimate the wall shear stress in bloodpumps. The paint erosion method allows a characterisation of the flow near the wall. The second method is a special development of standard Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV). A vector field of the flow close to the wall results. Both methods should permit the assessment of the wall shear stress in bloodpumps.

  1. Effects of biaxial oscillatory shear stress on endothelial cell proliferation and morphology.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Amlan; Chakraborty, Sutirtha; Jala, Venkatakrishna R; Haribabu, Bodduluri; Sharp, M Keith; Berson, R Eric

    2012-03-01

    Wall shear stress (WSS) on anchored cells affects their responses, including cell proliferation and morphology. In this study, the effects of the directionality of pulsatile WSS on endothelial cell proliferation and morphology were investigated for cells grown in a Petri dish orbiting on a shaker platform. Time and location dependent WSS was determined by computational fluid dynamics (CFD). At low orbital speed (50 rpm), WSS was shown to be uniform (0-1 dyne/cm(2)) across the bottom of the dish, while at higher orbital speed (100 and 150 rpm), WSS remained fairly uniform near the center and fluctuated significantly (0-9 dyne/cm(2)) near the side walls of the dish. Since WSS on the bottom of the dish is two-dimensional, a new directional oscillatory shear index (DOSI) was developed to quantify the directionality of oscillating shear. DOSI approached zero for biaxial oscillatory shear of equal magnitudes near the center and approached one for uniaxial pulsatile shear near the wall, where large tangential WSS dominated a much smaller radial component. Near the center (low DOSI), more, smaller and less elongated cells grew, whereas larger cells with greater elongation were observed in the more uniaxial oscillatory shear (high DOSI) near the periphery of the dish. Further, cells aligned with the direction of the largest component of shear but were randomly oriented in low magnitude biaxial shear. Statistical analyses of the individual and interacting effects of multiple factors (DOSI, shear magnitudes and orbital speeds) showed that DOSI significantly affected all the responses, indicating that directionality is an important determinant of cellular responses.

  2. Cell-matrix adhesion characterization using multiple shear stress zones in single stepwise microchannel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Min-Ji; Doh, Il; Bae, Gab-Yong; Cha, Hyuk-Jin; Cho, Young-Ho

    2014-08-01

    This paper presents a cell chip capable to characterize cell-matrix adhesion by monitoring cell detachment rate. The proposed cell chip can supply multiple levels of shear stress in single stepwise microchannel. As epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), one of hallmarks of cancer metastasis is closely associated to the interaction with extracelluar matrix (ECM), we took advantage of two lung cancer cell models with different adhesion properties to ECM depending their epithelial or mesenchymal properties, including the pair of lung cancer cells with (A549sh) or without E-cadherin expression (A549sh-Ecad), which would be optimal model to examine the alteration of adhesion properties after EMT induction. The cell-matrix adhesion resisting to shear stress appeared to be remarkably differed between lung cancer cells. The detachment rate of epithelial-like H358 and mesenchymal-like H460 cells was 53%-80% and 25%-66% in the shear stress range of 34-60 dyn/cm2, respectively. A549sh-Ecad cells exhibits lower detachment rate (5%-9%) compared to A549sh cells (14%-40%). By direct comparison of adhesion between A549sh and A549sh-Ecad, we demonstrated that A549shE-cad to mimic EMT were more favorable to the ECM attachment under the various levels of shear stress. The present method can be applied to quantitative analysis of tumor cell-ECM adhesion.

  3. Fluid shear stress stimulates MATE2-K expression via Nrf2 pathway activation.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, Yasunori; Kaishima, Misato; Ohnishi, Toshiyuki; Tohyama, Kimio; Chisaki, Ikumi; Nakayama, Yusuke; Ogasawara-Shimizu, Mari; Kawamata, Yuji

    2017-03-04

    Accurate prediction of drug-induced renal toxicity is necessary for development of safer drugs for patients. Cellular assay systems that recapitulate physiologically relevant microenvironments have been proposed for correct estimation of drug responses in the human body. However, establishment of such assay systems for accurate prediction of renal toxicity is challenging because of the lack of readily available in vitro assay systems. In this study, we investigated the cellular response to fluid shear stress, which is a characteristic of the environment in the kidney proximal tubules, using microfluidic devices. The global gene expression profiles of human primary proximal tubule cells under the fluidic conditions revealed upregulation of MATE2-K and activation of Nrf2 signaling in response to fluid shear stress. Network and cell biological analysis additionally showed that expression of MATE2-K is regulated by Nrf2 signaling. These results strongly suggest that fluid shear stress is involved in the expression and maintenance of function of tissue-specific drug transporters in the proximal tubule, where the cells are exposed to continuous shear stress by primary urine. Furthermore, the microfluidic culture of human proximal tubules was demonstrated to be a useful system to analyze the regulatory mechanisms of gene expression in physiologically relevant cell conditions.

  4. Direct Measurement Sensor of the Boundary Shear Stress in Fluid Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Badescu, Mircea; Bao, Xiaoqi; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Chang, Zensheu; Kerenyi, Kornel; Lih, Shyh-Shiuh; Sherrit, Stewart; Trease, Brian P.; Widholm, Scott

    2010-01-01

    The flow fields and boundary erosion that are associated with scour at bridge piers are very complex. Direct measurement of the boundary shear stress and boundary pressure fluctuations in experimental scour research has always been a challenge and high spatial resolution and fidelity have been almost impossible. Most researchers have applied an indirect process to determine shear stress using precise measured velocity profiles. Laser Doppler Anemometry and Particle Image Velocimetry are common techniques used to accurately measure velocity profiles. These methods are based on theoretical assumptions to estimate boundary shear stress. In addition, available turbulence models cannot very well account for the effect of bed roughness which is fundamentally important for any CFD simulation. The authors have taken on the challenge to advance the magnitude level to which direct measurements of the shear stress in water flow can be performed. This paper covered the challenges and the efforts to develop a higher accuracy and small spatial resolution sensor. Also, preliminary sensor designs and test results are presented.

  5. Cloning the Gravity and Shear Stress Related Genes from MG-63 Cells by Subtracting Hybridization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shu; Dai, Zhong-quan; Wang, Bing; Cao, Xin-sheng; Li, Ying-hui; Sun, Xi-qing

    2008-06-01

    Background The purpose of the present study was to clone the gravity and shear stress related genes from osteoblast-like human osteosarcoma MG-63 cells by subtractive hybridization. Method MG-63 cells were divided into two groups (1G group and simulated microgravity group). After cultured for 60 h in two different gravitational environments, two groups of MG-63 cells were treated with 1.5Pa fluid shear stress (FSS) for 60 min, respectively. The total RNA in cells was isolated. The gravity and shear stress related genes were cloned by subtractive hybridization. Result 200 clones were gained. 30 positive clones were selected using PCR method based on the primers of vector and sequenced. The obtained sequences were analyzed by blast. changes of 17 sequences were confirmed by RT-PCR and these genes are related to cell proliferation, cell differentiation, protein synthesis, signal transduction and apoptosis. 5 unknown genes related to gravity and shear stress were found. Conclusion In this part of our study, our result indicates that simulated microgravity may change the activities of MG-63 cells by inducing the functional alterations of specific genes.

  6. Diagnostics of boundary layer transition by shear stress sensitive liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shapoval, E. S.

    2016-10-01

    Previous research indicates that the problem of boundary layer transition visualization on metal models in wind tunnels (WT) which is a fundamental question in experimental aerodynamics is not solved yet. In TsAGI together with Khristianovich Institute of Theoretical and Applied Mechanics (ITAM) a method of shear stress sensitive liquid crystals (LC) which allows flow visualization was proposed. This method allows testing several flow conditions in one wind tunnel run and does not need covering the investigated model with any special heat-insulating coating which spoils the model geometry. This coating is easily applied on the model surface by spray or even by brush. Its' thickness is about 40 micrometers and it does not spoil the surface quality. At first the coating obtains some definite color. Under shear stress the LC coating changes color and this change is proportional to shear stress. The whole process can be visually observed and during the tests it is recorded by camera. The findings of the research showed that it is possible to visualize boundary layer transition, flow separation, shock waves and the flow image on the whole. It is possible to predict that the proposed method of shear stress sensitive liquid crystals is a promise for future research.

  7. In vitro shear stress-induced platelet activation: sensitivity of human and bovine blood.

    PubMed

    Lu, Qijin; Hofferbert, Bryan V; Koo, Grace; Malinauskas, Richard A

    2013-10-01

    As platelet activation plays a critical role in physiological hemostasis and pathological thrombosis, it is important in the overall hemocompatibility evaluation of new medical devices and biomaterials to assess their effects on platelet function. However, there are currently no widely accepted in vitro test methods to perform this assessment. In an effort to develop effective platelet tests for potential use in medical device evaluation, this study compared the sensitivity of platelet responses to shear stress stimulation of human and bovine blood using multiple platelet activation markers. Fresh whole blood samples anticoagulated with heparin or anticoagulant citrate dextrose, solution A (ACDA) were exposed to shear stresses up to 40 Pa for 2 min using a cone-and-plate rheometer model. Platelet activation was characterized by platelet counts, platelet surface P-selectin expression, and serotonin release into blood plasma. The results indicated that exposure to shear stresses above 20 Pa caused significant changes in all three of the platelet markers for human blood and that the changes were usually greater with ACDA anticoagulation than with heparin. In contrast, for bovine blood, the markers did not change with shear stress stimulation except for plasma serotonin in heparin anticoagulated blood. The differences observed between human and bovine platelet responses suggest that the value of using bovine blood for in vitro platelet testing to evaluate devices may be limited.

  8. Influence of shear stress magnitude and direction on atherosclerotic plaque composition

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Vikram V.; Bovens, Sandra M.; Mohri, Zahra; Poulsen, Christian Bo; Gsell, Willy; Tremoleda, Jordi L.; Towhidi, Leila; de Silva, Ranil; Petretto, Enrico; Krams, Rob

    2016-01-01

    The precise flow characteristics that promote different atherosclerotic plaque types remain unclear. We previously developed a blood flow-modifying cuff for ApoE−/− mice that induces the development of advanced plaques with vulnerable and stable features upstream and downstream of the cuff, respectively. Herein, we sought to test the hypothesis that changes in flow magnitude promote formation of the upstream (vulnerable) plaque, whereas altered flow direction is important for development of the downstream (stable) plaque. We instrumented ApoE−/− mice (n = 7) with a cuff around the left carotid artery and imaged them with micro-CT (39.6 µm resolution) eight to nine weeks after cuff placement. Computational fluid dynamics was then performed to compute six metrics that describe different aspects of atherogenic flow in terms of wall shear stress magnitude and/or direction. In a subset of four imaged animals, we performed histology to confirm the presence of advanced plaques and measure plaque length in each segment. Relative to the control artery, the region upstream of the cuff exhibited changes in shear stress magnitude only (p < 0.05), whereas the region downstream of the cuff exhibited changes in shear stress magnitude and direction (p < 0.05). These data suggest that shear stress magnitude contributes to the formation of advanced plaques with a vulnerable phenotype, whereas variations in both magnitude and direction promote the formation of plaques with stable features. PMID:27853578

  9. In Vitro Bone Cell Models: Impact of Fluid Shear Stress on Bone Formation

    PubMed Central

    Wittkowske, Claudia; Reilly, Gwendolen C.; Lacroix, Damien; Perrault, Cecile M.

    2016-01-01

    This review describes the role of bone cells and their surrounding matrix in maintaining bone strength through the process of bone remodeling. Subsequently, this work focusses on how bone formation is guided by mechanical forces and fluid shear stress in particular. It has been demonstrated that mechanical stimulation is an important regulator of bone metabolism. Shear stress generated by interstitial fluid flow in the lacunar-canalicular network influences maintenance and healing of bone tissue. Fluid flow is primarily caused by compressive loading of bone as a result of physical activity. Changes in loading, e.g., due to extended periods of bed rest or microgravity in space are associated with altered bone remodeling and formation in vivo. In vitro, it has been reported that bone cells respond to fluid shear stress by releasing osteogenic signaling factors, such as nitric oxide, and prostaglandins. This work focusses on the application of in vitro models to study the effects of fluid flow on bone cell signaling, collagen deposition, and matrix mineralization. Particular attention is given to in vitro set-ups, which allow long-term cell culture and the application of low fluid shear stress. In addition, this review explores what mechanisms influence the orientation of collagen fibers, which determine the anisotropic properties of bone. A better understanding of these mechanisms could facilitate the design of improved tissue-engineered bone implants or more effective bone disease models. PMID:27896266

  10. Dynamic adhesion of umbilical cord blood endothelial progenitor cells under laminar shear stress.

    PubMed

    Angelos, Mathew G; Brown, Melissa A; Satterwhite, Lisa L; Levering, Vrad W; Shaked, Natan T; Truskey, George A

    2010-12-01

    Late outgrowth endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) represent a promising cell source for rapid reendothelialization of damaged vasculature after expansion ex vivo and injection into the bloodstream. We characterized the dynamic adhesion of umbilical-cord-blood-derived EPCs (CB-EPCs) to surfaces coated with fibronectin. CB-EPC solution density affected the number of adherent cells and larger cells preferentially adhered at lower cell densities. The number of adherent cells varied with shear stress, with the maximum number of adherent cells and the shear stress at maximum adhesion depending upon fluid viscosity. CB-EPCs underwent limited rolling, transiently tethering for short distances before firm arrest. Immediately before arrest, the instantaneous velocity decreased independent of shear stress. A dimensional analysis indicated that adhesion was a function of the net force on the cells, the ratio of cell diffusion to sliding speed, and molecular diffusivity. Adhesion was not limited by the settling rate and was highly specific to α(5)β(1) integrin. Total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy showed that CB-EPCs produced multiple contacts of α(5)β(1) with the surface and the contact area grew during the first 20 min of attachment. These results demonstrate that CB-EPC adhesion from blood can occur under physiological levels of shear stress.

  11. Influence of shear stress magnitude and direction on atherosclerotic plaque composition.

    PubMed

    Pedrigi, Ryan M; Mehta, Vikram V; Bovens, Sandra M; Mohri, Zahra; Poulsen, Christian Bo; Gsell, Willy; Tremoleda, Jordi L; Towhidi, Leila; de Silva, Ranil; Petretto, Enrico; Krams, Rob

    2016-10-01

    The precise flow characteristics that promote different atherosclerotic plaque types remain unclear. We previously developed a blood flow-modifying cuff for ApoE(-/-) mice that induces the development of advanced plaques with vulnerable and stable features upstream and downstream of the cuff, respectively. Herein, we sought to test the hypothesis that changes in flow magnitude promote formation of the upstream (vulnerable) plaque, whereas altered flow direction is important for development of the downstream (stable) plaque. We instrumented ApoE(-/-) mice (n = 7) with a cuff around the left carotid artery and imaged them with micro-CT (39.6 µm resolution) eight to nine weeks after cuff placement. Computational fluid dynamics was then performed to compute six metrics that describe different aspects of atherogenic flow in terms of wall shear stress magnitude and/or direction. In a subset of four imaged animals, we performed histology to confirm the presence of advanced plaques and measure plaque length in each segment. Relative to the control artery, the region upstream of the cuff exhibited changes in shear stress magnitude only (p < 0.05), whereas the region downstream of the cuff exhibited changes in shear stress magnitude and direction (p < 0.05). These data suggest that shear stress magnitude contributes to the formation of advanced plaques with a vulnerable phenotype, whereas variations in both magnitude and direction promote the formation of plaques with stable features.

  12. Assessment of shear stress related parameters in the carotid bifurcation using mouse-specific FSI simulations.

    PubMed

    De Wilde, David; Trachet, Bram; Debusschere, Nic; Iannaccone, Francesco; Swillens, Abigail; Degroote, Joris; Vierendeels, Jan; De Meyer, Guido R Y; Segers, Patrick

    2016-07-26

    The ApoE(-)(/)(-) mouse is a common small animal model to study atherosclerosis, an inflammatory disease of the large and medium sized arteries such as the carotid artery. It is generally accepted that the wall shear stress, induced by the blood flow, plays a key role in the onset of this disease. Wall shear stress, however, is difficult to derive from direct in vivo measurements, particularly in mice. In this study, we integrated in vivo imaging (micro-Computed Tomography-µCT and ultrasound) and fluid-structure interaction (FSI) modeling for the mouse-specific assessment of carotid hemodynamics and wall shear stress. Results were provided for 8 carotid bifurcations of 4 ApoE(-)(/)(-) mice. We demonstrated that accounting for the carotid elasticity leads to more realistic flow waveforms over the complete domain of the model due to volume buffering capacity in systole. The 8 simulated cases showed fairly consistent spatial distribution maps of time-averaged wall shear stress (TAWSS) and relative residence time (RRT). Zones with reduced TAWSS and elevated RRT, potential indicators of atherosclerosis-prone regions, were located mainly at the outer sinus of the external carotid artery. In contrast to human carotid hemodynamics, no flow recirculation could be observed in the carotid bifurcation region.

  13. Microflow-induced shear stress on biomaterial wall by ultrasound-induced encapsulated microbubble oscillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Ji-Wen; Qian, Sheng-You; Sun, Jia-Na; Lü, Yun-Bin; Hu, Ping

    2015-09-01

    A model of an ultrasound-driven encapsulated microbubble (EMB) oscillation near biomaterial wall is presented and used for describing the microflow-induced shear stress on the wall by means of a numerical method. The characteristic of the model lies in the explicit treatment of different types of wall for the EMB responses. The simulation results show that the radius-time change trends obtained by our model are consistent with the existing models and experimental results. In addition, the effect of the elastic wall on the acoustic EMB response is stronger than that of the rigid wall, and the shear stress on the elastic wall is larger than that of the rigid wall. The closer the EMB to the wall, the greater the shear stress on the wall. The substantial shear stress on the wall surface occurs inside a circular zone with a radius about two-thirds of the bubble radius. This paper may be of interest in the study of potential damage mechanisms to the microvessel for drug and gene delivery due to sonoporation. Projects supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11174077 and 11474090), the Natural Science Foundation of Hunan Province, China (Grant No. 13JJ3076), the Science Research Program of Education Department of Hunan Province, China (Grant No. 14A127), and the Doctoral Fund of University of South China (Grant No. 2011XQD46).

  14. Analysis on the effect of geometrical design parameters on maximum shear stresses in an electromagnetic micropump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Halhouli, A. T.

    2010-02-01

    In this work, the concept of recently introduced electromagnetic pump has been presented. This pump has been proposed for pumping biomedical fluids carrying particles sensitive to shear stresses. Its working concept depends on controlling the rotation of two pistons placed in a circular channel in opposing polarity under the influence of a moving electromagnetic field. Analytical and numerical investigations on the effect of pump geometrical parameters on shear stresses at different boundary conditions are performed. The geometrical parameters include: channel aspect ratio (channel width to height) and channel radius ratio (inner to outer radius). Non-dimensional simple analytical shear stress expressions that are valid for a wide range of geometrical design parameters and variety of fluids are derived. CFD simulations have been used to verify the analytical expressions within the range of studied parameters. Obtained results showed that the analytical models predict the wall maximum shear stresses with an error less than 5% for w / h<=1.0 at high radius ratios and with an error less than10% for Ri / Ro >=0.3. These results help the designer in fabricating the micropump to be suitable for biomedical applications, where saving the particles carried in fluids from damage is of high importance.

  15. The effect of roughness elements on wind erosion: The importance of surface shear stress distribution

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Representation of surface roughness effects on aeolian sediment transport is a key source of uncertainty in wind erosion models. Drag partitioning schemes are used to account for roughness by scaling the soil entrainment threshold by the ratio of shear stress on roughness elements to that on the veg...

  16. Development of a MEMS dual-axis differential capacitance floating element shear stress sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Barnard, Casey; Griffin, Benjamin

    2015-09-01

    A single-axis MEMS wall shear stress sensor with differential capacitive transduction method is produced. Using a synchronous modulation and demodulation interface circuit, the system is capable of making real time measurements of both mean and fluctuating wall shear stress. A sensitivity of 3.44 mV/Pa is achieved, with linearity in response demonstrated up to testing limit of 2 Pa. Minimum detectable signals of 340 μPa at 100 Hz and 120 μPa at 1 kHz are indicated, with a resonance of 3.5 kHz. Multiple full scale wind tunnel tests are performed, producing spectral measurements of turbulent boundary layers in wind speeds ranging up to 0.5 Ma (18 Pa of mean wall shear stress). The compact packaging allows for minimally invasive installation, and has proven relatively robust over multiple testing events. Temperature sensitivity, likely due to poor CTE matching of packaged materials, is an ongoing concern being addressed. These successes are being directly leveraged into a development plan for a dual-axis wall shear stress sensor, capable of producing true vector estimates at the wall.

  17. Oscillatory motion based measurement method and sensor for measuring wall shear stress due to fluid flow

    DOEpatents

    Armstrong, William D.; Naughton, Jonathan; Lindberg, William R.

    2008-09-02

    A shear stress sensor for measuring fluid wall shear stress on a test surface is provided. The wall shear stress sensor is comprised of an active sensing surface and a sensor body. An elastic mechanism mounted between the active sensing surface and the sensor body allows movement between the active sensing surface and the sensor body. A driving mechanism forces the shear stress sensor to oscillate. A measuring mechanism measures displacement of the active sensing surface relative to the sensor body. The sensor may be operated under periodic excitation where changes in the nature of the fluid properties or the fluid flow over the sensor measurably changes the amplitude or phase of the motion of the active sensing surface, or changes the force and power required from a control system in order to maintain constant motion. The device may be operated under non-periodic excitation where changes in the nature of the fluid properties or the fluid flow over the sensor change the transient motion of the active sensor surface or change the force and power required from a control system to maintain a specified transient motion of the active sensor surface.

  18. Effect of fluid shear stress on portal vein remodeling in a rat model of portal hypertension.

    PubMed

    Wen, Bin; Liang, Jian; Deng, Xin; Chen, Ran; Peng, Peichun

    2015-01-01

    Aims. To explore the effects and mechanisms of fluid shear stress on portal vein remodeling in a rat model of portal hypertension. Methods. Subcutaneous injections of CCl4 were given to establish a rat model of liver cirrhosis and portal hypertension. Biomechanical technology was adopted to determine the dynamic changes of haemodynamic indices and fluid shear stress. Nitric oxide (NO), synthase (NOS), and endothelin-1 (ET-1) of the portal vein blood were measured. Changes in geometric structure and ultrastructure of the portal vein were observed using optical and electron microscopy. Results. After the CC14 injections, rat haemodynamics were notably altered. From week 4 onwards, PVP, PVF, and PVR gradually and significantly increased (P < 0.05 versus baseline). The fluid shear stress declined from week 4 onwards (P < 0.01 versus control group). NO, NOS, and ET-1 increased after repeated CCI4 injections. Hematoxylin and eosin staining showed thickened portal vein walls, with increased inside and outside diameters. Electron microscopy revealed different degrees of endothelial cell degeneration, destruction of basement membrane integrity, proliferating, and hypertrophic smooth muscle cells. Conclusions. Fluid shear stress not only influenced the biomechanical environment of the portal vein but also participated in vascular remodeling.

  19. Molecular Dynamics Study for Channel Size Dependence of Shear Stress Between Droplet and Wall.

    PubMed

    Fukushima, Akinori; Mima, Toshiki; Kinefuchi, Ikuya; Tokumasu, Takashi

    2015-04-01

    In this study, the channel size dependence of the shear stress between water droplets and solid walls in nm-order channel was analyzed. We considered a several different-sized and highly hydrophobic channel whose macroscopic contact angle was about 150 degrees. We have evaluated the shear stress and the normal pressure by molecular dynamics simulation. Analyzing shear stress and normal pressure based on the macroscopic model, we have discussed the difference between the macroscopic model based on hydrodynamics and the microscopic model. As a result, in the high hydrophobic case, it became clear that the shear stress depends on the channel size due to the large Laplace pressure. Furthermore, in the case that the channel size was less than 50 A, the normal pressure by the molecular simulation didn't agree with the expected value from the Young-Laplace equation. From this study it was clear that molecular simulation is needed when the channel size is less than 40 A.

  20. Shear stress tolerance of Streptococcus mutans aggregates determined by microfluidic funnel device (μFFD).

    PubMed

    Shumi, Wahhida; Kim, So Hyun; Lim, Jeesun; Cho, Kyung-Suk; Han, Hwataik; Park, Sungsu

    2013-05-01

    Dental caries are initiated by the attachment of Streptococcus mutans aggregates to the surface of teeth. Bacterial adhesion to the interproximal space, the space between adjacent teeth, has not been investigated due to the lack of devices that mimic the space. Herein, we describe a method for determining the effect of shear stress and sucrose on the attachment of S. mutans aggregates to the interproximal space using microfluidic funnel device (μFFD). Using μFFD, the shear stress tolerance of sucrose-independent and sucrose-dependent S. mutans aggregates (larger than 50 μm in diameter) trapped in the funnel was tested against various flow rates of saliva solution (5 to 50 μl/min). Sucrose-independent aggregates were completely removed from the funnel walls at a low flow rate (10 μl/min) within 7 min., while sucrose-dependent aggregates were removed from the walls only at higher flow rates (25 and 50 μl/min) within several minutes. These results suggest that sucrose-dependent aggregates are more tolerant of shear stress than sucrose-independent aggregates, and are more likely to remain in the region with the smallest shear stress in the teeth.

  1. Field observations of bed shear stress and sediment resuspension on continental shelves, Alaska and California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Drake, D.E.; Cacchione, D.A.

    1986-01-01

    Bed shear stress was estimated using wave and current measurements obtained with the GEOPROBE bottom-tripod system during resuspension events in Norton Sound, Alaska, and on the northern California shelf. The boundary-layer model of Grant and Madsen (1979, Journal of Geophysical Research, 84, 1797-1808) was used to compute the bed shear stress under combined wave-generated and quasi-steady currents. Resuspension events were identified by sudden, large increases in light scattering at 1.9 m above the sea floor. The shear-stress values were used to compute the Shields parameter (??). The results for Norton Sound are in excellent agreement with the Shields threshold criterion; the data for the California shelf plot somewhat above the Shields threshold curve, though generally within the scatter envelope. Although the surface sediments in each area contain substantial fine-grained fractions (mean diameters were 0.007 cm in Norton Sound and 0.002 cm on the California shelf), the results do not indicate significant cohesion, because the sediment was entrained at bed shear-stress values close to those predicted by the modified Shields curve for cohesionless fine-grained particles. We suspect that frequent wave stirring and observed plowing of the surface sediment by benthonic animals maintain a high water content and contribute to the ease with which these materials are resuspended. ?? 1986.

  2. Flow induced migration in polymer melts – Theory and simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Dorgan, John Robert Rorrer, Nicholas Andrew

    2015-04-28

    Flow induced migration, whereby polymer melts are fractionated by molecular weight across a flow field, represents a significant complication in the processing of polymer melts. Despite its long history, such phenomena remain relatively poorly understood. Here a simple analytical theory is presented which predicts the phenomena based on well-established principles of non-equilibrium thermodynamics. It is unambiguously shown that for purely viscous materials, a gradient in shear rate is needed to drive migration; for purely viscometric flows no migration is expected. Molecular scale simulations of flow migration effects in dense polymer melts are also presented. In shear flow the melts exhibit similar behavior as the quiescent case; a constant shear rate across the gap does not induce chain length based migration. In comparison, parabolic flow causes profound migration for both unentangled and entangled melts. These findings are consistent with the analytical theory. The picture that emerges is consistent with flow induced migration mechanisms predominating over competing chain degradation mechanisms.

  3. Cultivation of shear stress sensitive and tolerant microalgal species in a tubular photobioreactor equipped with a centrifugal pump.

    PubMed

    Michels, Michiel H A; van der Goot, Atze Jan; Vermuë, Marian H; Wijffels, René H

    The tolerance to shear stress of Tetraselmis suecica, Isochrysis galbana, Skeletonema costatum, and Chaetoceros muelleri was determined in shear cylinders. The shear tolerance of the microalgae species strongly depends on the strain. I. galbana, S. costatum, and C. muelleri exposed to shear stress between 1.2 and 5.4 Pa resulted in severe cell damage. T. suecica is not sensitive to stresses up to 80 Pa. The possibility to grow these algae in a tubular photobioreactor (PBR) using a centrifugal pump for recirculation of the algae suspension was studied. The shear stresses imposed on the algae in the circulation tubes and at the pressure side of the pump were 0.57 and 1.82 Pa, respectively. The shear stress tolerant T. suecica was successfully cultivated in the PBR. Growth of I. galbana, S. costatum, and C. muelleri in the tubular PBR was not observed, not even at the lowest pumping speed. For the latter shear sensitive strains, the encountered shear stress levels were in the order of magnitude of the determined maximum shear tolerance of the algae. An equation was used to simulate the effect of possible damage of microalgae caused by passages through local high shear zones in centrifugal pumps on the total algae culture in the PBR. This simulation shows that a culture of shear stress sensitive species is bound to collapse after only limited number of passages, confirming the importance of considering shear stress as a process parameter in future design of closed PBRs for microalgal cultivation.

  4. Quantification of Shear Deformations and Corresponding Stresses in the Biaxially Tested Human Myocardium.

    PubMed

    Sommer, Gerhard; Haspinger, Daniel Ch; Andrä, Michaela; Sacherer, Michael; Viertler, Christian; Regitnig, Peter; Holzapfel, Gerhard A

    2015-10-01

    One goal of cardiac research is to perform numerical simulations to describe/reproduce the mechanoelectrical function of the human myocardium in health and disease. Such simulations are based on a complex combination of mathematical models describing the passive mechanical behavior of the myocardium and its electrophysiology, i.e., the activation of cardiac muscle cells. The problem in developing adequate constitutive models is the shortage of experimental data suitable for detailed parameter estimation in specific functional forms. A combination of shear and biaxial extension tests with different loading protocols on different specimen orientations is necessary to capture adequately the direction-dependent (orthotropic) response of the myocardium. In most experimental animal studies, where planar biaxial extension tests on the myocardium have been conducted, the generated shear stresses were neither considered nor discussed. Hence, in this study a method is presented which allows the quantification of shear deformations and related stresses. It demonstrates an approach for experimenters as to how the generation of these shear stresses can be minimized during mechanical testing. Experimental results on 14 passive human myocardial specimens, obtained from nine human hearts, show the efficiency of this newly developed method. Moreover, the influence of the clamping technique of the specimen, i.e., the load transmission between the testing device and the tissue, on the stress response is determined by testing an isotropic material (Latex). We identified that the force transmission between the testing device and the specimen by means of hooks and cords does not influence the performed experiments. We further showed that in-plane shear stresses definitely exist in biaxially tested human ventricular myocardium, but can be reduced to a minimum by preparing the specimens in an appropriate manner. Moreover, we showed whether shear stresses can be neglected when performing

  5. Some constraints on levels of shear stress in the crust from observations and theory.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McGarr, A.

    1980-01-01

    In situ stress determinations in North America, southern Africa, and Australia indicate that on the average the maximum shear stress increases linearly with depth to at least 5.1 km measured in soft rock, such as shale and sandstone, and to 3.7 km in hard rock, including granite and quartzite. Regression lines fitted to the data yield gradients of 3.8 MPa/km and 6.6 MPa/km for soft and hard rock, respectively. Generally, the maximum shear stress in compressional states of stress for which the least principal stress is oriented near vertically is substantially greater than in extensional stress regimes, with the greatest principal stress in a vertical direction. The equations of equilibrium and compatibility can be used to provide functional constrains on the state of stress. If the stress is assumed to vary only with depth z in a given region, then all nonzero components must have the form A + Bz, where A and B are constants which generally differ for the various components. - Author

  6. A simple model to understand the role of membrane shear elasticity and stress-free shape on the motion of red blood cells in shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viallat, Annie; Abkarian, Manouk; Dupire, Jules

    2015-11-01

    The analytical model presented by Keller and Skalak on the dynamics of red blood cells in shear flow described the cell as a fluid ellipsoid of fixed shape. It was extended to introduce shear elasticity of the cell membrane. We further extend the model when the cell discoid physiological shape is not a stress-free shape. We show that spheroid stress-free shapes enables fitting experimental data with values of shear elasticity typical to that found with micropipettes and optical tweezers. For moderate shear rates (when RBCs keep their discoid shape) this model enables to quantitatively determine an effective cell viscosity, that combines membrane and hemoglobin viscosities and an effective shear modulus of the membrane that combines shear modulus and stress-free shape. This model allows determining RBC mechanical parameters both in the tanktreading regime for cells suspended in a high viscosity medium, and in the tumbling regime for cells suspended in a low viscosity medium. In this regime,a transition is predicted between a rigid-like tumbling motion and a fluid-like tumbling motion above a critical shear rate, which is directly related to the mechanical parameters of the cell. A*MIDEX (n ANR-11-IDEX-0001-02) funded by the ''Investissements d'Avenir'', Region Languedoc-Roussillon, Labex NUMEV (ANR-10-LABX-20), BPI France project DataDiag.

  7. Flow separation and shear stress over angle-of-repose bed forms: A numerical investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lefebvre, Alice; Paarlberg, Andries J.; Winter, Christian

    2014-02-01

    Large asymmetric bed forms commonly develop in rivers. The turbulence associated with flow separation that develops over their steep lee side is responsible for the form shear stress which can represent a substantial part of total shear stress in rivers. This paper uses the Delft3D modeling system to investigate the effects of bed form geometry and forcing conditions on flow separation length and associated turbulence, and bed form shear stress over angle-of-repose (30° lee side angle) bed forms. The model was validated with lab measurements that showed sufficient agreement to be used for a systematic analysis. The influence of flow velocity, bed roughness, relative height (bed form height/water depth), and aspect ratio (bed form height/length) on the variations of the normalized length of the flow separation zone, the extent of the wake region (where the turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) was more than 70% of the maximum TKE), the average TKE within the wake region and the form shear stress were investigated. Form shear stress was found not to scale with the size of the flow separation zone but to be related to the product of the normalized extent of the wake region (extent of the wake region/extent of water body above the bed form) and the average TKE within the wake region. The results add to understanding of the hydrodynamics of bed forms and may be used for the development of better parameterizations of small-scale processes for application in large-scale studies.

  8. Laminar shear stress stimulates vascular smooth muscle cell apoptosis via the Akt pathway.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, Tamara N; Shepherd, Benjamin R; Asada, Hidenori; Teso, Desarom; Muto, Akihito; Fancher, Tiffany; Pimiento, Jose M; Maloney, Stephen P; Dardik, Alan

    2008-08-01

    Vascular smooth muscle cells (SMC) may be directly exposed to blood flow after an endothelial-denuding injury. It is not known whether direct exposure of SMC to shear stress reduces SMC turnover and contributes to the low rate of restenosis after most vascular interventions. This study examines if laminar shear stress inhibits SMC proliferation or stimulates apoptosis. Bovine aortic SMC were exposed to arterial magnitudes of laminar shear stress (11 dynes/cm(2)) for up to 24 h and compared to control SMC (0 dynes/cm(2)). SMC density was assessed by cell counting, DNA synthesis by (3)[H]-thymidine incorporation, and apoptosis by TUNEL staining. Akt, caspase, bax, and bcl-2 phosphorylation were assessed by Western blotting; caspase activity was also measured with an in vitro assay. Analysis of variance was used to compare groups. SMC exposed to laminar shear stress had a 38% decrease in cell number (n = 4, P = 0.03), 54% reduction in (3)[H]-thymidine incorporation (n = 3, P = 0.003), and 15-fold increase in TUNEL staining (n = 4, P < 0.0001). Akt phosphorylation was reduced by 67% (n = 3, P < 0.0001), whereas bax/bcl-2 phosphorylation was increased by 1.8-fold (n = 3, P = 0.01). Caspase-3 activity was increased threefold (n = 5, P = 0.03). Pretreatment of cells with ZVAD-fmk or wortmannin resulted in 42% increased cell retention (n = 3, P < 0.01) and a fourfold increase in apoptosis (n = 3, P < 0.04), respectively. Cells transduced with constitutively-active Akt had twofold decreased apoptosis (n = 3, P < 0.002). SMC exposed to laminar shear stress have decreased proliferation and increased apoptosis, mediated by the Akt pathway. These results suggest that augmentation of SMC apoptosis may be an alternative strategy to inhibit restenosis after vascular injury.

  9. Effects of wall shear stress and its gradient on tumor cell adhesion in curved microvessels.

    PubMed

    Yan, W W; Cai, B; Liu, Y; Fu, B M

    2012-05-01

    Tumor cell adhesion to vessel walls in the microcirculation is one critical step in cancer metastasis. In this paper, the hypothesis that tumor cells prefer to adhere at the microvessels with localized shear stresses and their gradients, such as in the curved microvessels, was examined both experimentally and computationally. Our in vivo experiments were performed on the microvessels (post-capillary venules, 30-50 μm diameter) of rat mesentery. A straight or curved microvessel was cannulated and perfused with tumor cells by a glass micropipette at a velocity of ~1mm/s. At less than 10 min after perfusion, there was a significant difference in cell adhesion to the straight and curved vessel walls. In 60 min, the averaged adhesion rate in the curved vessels (n = 14) was ~1.5-fold of that in the straight vessels (n = 19). In 51 curved segments, 45% of cell adhesion was initiated at the inner side, 25% at outer side, and 30% at both sides of the curved vessels. To investigate the mechanical mechanism by which tumor cells prefer adhering at curved sites, we performed a computational study, in which the fluid dynamics was carried out by the lattice Boltzmann method , and the tumor cell dynamics was governed by the Newton's law of translation and rotation. A modified adhesive dynamics model that included the influence of wall shear stress/gradient on the association/dissociation rates of tumor cell adhesion was proposed, in which the positive wall shear stress/gradient jump would enhance tumor cell adhesion while the negative wall shear stress/gradient jump would weaken tumor cell adhesion. It was found that the wall shear stress/gradient, over a threshold, had significant contribution to tumor cell adhesion by activating or inactivating cell adhesion molecules. Our results elucidated why the tumor cell adhesion prefers to occur at the positive curvature of curved microvessels with very low Reynolds number (in the order of 10(-2)) laminar flow.

  10. Control of circumferential wall stress and luminal shear stress within intact vascular segments perfused ex vivo.

    PubMed

    El-Kurdi, Mohammed S; Vipperman, Jeffrey S; Vorp, David A

    2008-10-01

    Proportional, integral, and derivative (PID) controllers have proven to be robust in controlling many applications, and remain the most widely used control system architecture. The purpose of this work was to use this architecture for designing and tuning two PID controllers. The first was used to control the physiologic arterial circumferential wall stress (CWS) and the second to control the physiologic arterial shear stress (SS) imposed on intact vascular segments that were implanted into an ex vivo vascular perfusion system (EVPS). In order to most accurately control the stresses imposed onto vascular segments perfused ex vivo, analytical models were derived to calculate the CWS and SS. The mid-vein-wall CWS was calculated using the classical Lame solution for thick-walled cylinders in combination with the intraluminal pressure and outer diameter measurements. Similarly, the SS was calculated using the Hagen-Poiseuille equation in combination with the flow rate and outer diameter measurements. Performance of each controller was assessed by calculating the root mean square of the error (RMSE) between the desired and measured process variables. The performance experiments were repeated ten times (N=10) and an average RMSE was reported for each controller. RMSE standard deviations were calculated to demonstrate the reproducibility of the results. Sterile methods were utilized for making blood gas and temperature measurements in order to maintain physiologic levels within the EVPS. Physiologic blood gases (pH, pO(2), and pCO(2)) and temperature within the EVPS were very stable and controlled manually. Blood gas and temperature levels were recorded hourly for several (N=9) 24 h perfusion experiments. RMSE values for CWS control (0.427+/-0.027 KPa) indicated that the system was able to generate a physiologic CWS wave form within 0.5% error of the peak desired CWS over each cardiac cycle. RMSE values for SS control (0.005+/-0.0007 dynescm(2)) indicated that the system

  11. Application of a Reynolds stress turbulence model to the compressible shear layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sarkar, S.; Balakrishnan, L.

    1990-01-01

    Theoretically based turbulence models have had success in predicting many features of incompressible, free shear layers. However, attempts to extend these models to the high-speed, compressible shear layer have been less effective. In the present work, the compressible shear layer was studied with a second-order turbulence closure, which initially used only variable density extensions of incompressible models for the Reynolds stress transport equation and the dissipation rate transport equation. The quasi-incompressible closure was unsuccessful; the predicted effect of the convective Mach number on the shear layer growth rate was significantly smaller than that observed in experiments. Having thus confirmed that compressibility effects have to be explicitly considered, a new model for the compressible dissipation was introduced into the closure. This model is based on a low Mach number, asymptotic analysis of the Navier-Stokes equations, and on direct numerical simulation of compressible, isotropic turbulence. The use of the new model for the compressible dissipation led to good agreement of the computed growth rates with the experimental data. Both the computations and the experiments indicate a dramatic reduction in the growth rate when the convective Mach number is increased. Experimental data on the normalized maximum turbulence intensities and shear stress also show a reduction with increasing Mach number.

  12. Dynamic and shear stress rheological properties of guar galactomannans and its hydrolyzed derivatives.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Majid; Bakalis, Serafim; Gouseti, Ourania; Zahoor, Tahir; Anjum, Faqir Muhammad; Shahid, Muhammad

    2015-01-01

    Guar galactomannan from seed of Cyamopsis tetragonolobus was hydrolyzed using acid (HCl), base [Ba(OH)2] and enzyme (mannanase) method to obtain depolymerized substances with possible functional applications as soluble dietary fiber. Rheological behavior of crude, purified, and depolymerized guar gum solutions was studied at 25 °C, using shear stress and dynamic oscillatory measurements, performed with controlled stress rheometer Bohlin CVO (Malvern Instruments) fitted with cone-and-plate geometry. The various guar gums solutions with different viscosities exhibited shear-thinning behavior at high shear rate and Newtonian behavior at low shear rate. At low shear rate, sigma crude guar gum (SCGG), crude guar gum (CGG), acid hydrolyzed guar gum (AHGG) and enzyme hydrolyzed guar gum (EHGG) exhibited viscosities of 18.59, 1.346, 0.149 and 0.022 Pas, respectively. Oscillatory experiments (G", G') of gums solutions showed typical behavior of weak viscoelastic gel. All investigated guar gums were further used for glucose bio-accessibility using a novel in vitro small intestinal model (SIM). All gums solutions resulted in 20% reduction in simulated glucose absorption, indicating a non-significant functionality difference between various guar gums. So, it can be concluded that hydrolyzed guar gums without disturbing their rheological and physiological behavior would be useful for incorporation in various food products as soluble dietary fiber.

  13. Deep heterogeneity of the stress state in the horizontal shear zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rebetsky, Yu. L.; Mikhailova, A. V.

    2014-11-01

    The formation structures of brittle destruction in a rock layer above an active strike-slip fault in the crystalline basement is studied. The problem is analyzed from the standpoint of loading history, when after the stage of pure gravitational loading, an additional strain state of uniform horizontal shear of both the layer and underlying basement develops, which is further followed by a vertically nonuniform shear caused by the activation of the deep fault. For the studied object, irreversible fracture deformations on macro- and microlevels arise as early as the initial stage of loading under the action of gravitational stresses. These deformations continue evolving on the megascopic level in the course of horizontal shearing that is quasi-uniform both along the depth and laterally. The final formation of the structural ensemble occurs after a long stage of horizontal displacement of the blocks of the crystalline basement—the stage of localized shear. The theoretical analysis of the evolution of the stress state and morphology of the failure structures established the presence of numerous fractures with the normal dip-slip components in the intermediate-depth part of the rock mass, which are formed at the stages of uniform and localized horizontal shearing. The fractures with a strike-slip component mainly arise in the upper and near-axial deep parts of the section.

  14. Basal shear stress under alpine glaciers: Insights from experiments using the iSOSIA and Elmer/ICE models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brædstrup, C. F.; Egholm, D. L.; Ugelvig, S. V.; Pedersen, V. K.

    2015-10-01

    Shear stress at the base of glaciers controls basal sliding and is therefore immensely important for glacial erosion and landscape evolution in arctic and high-altitude areas. However, the inaccessible nature of glacial beds complicates empirical studies of basal shear stress, and little is therefore known of its spatial and temporal distribution. In this study we seek to improve our understanding of basal shear stress using a higher-order numerical ice model (iSOSIA). In order to test the validity of the higher-order model, we first compare the detailed distribution of basal shear stress in iSOSIA and in a three-dimensional full-Stokes model (Elmer/ICE). We find that iSOSIA and Elmer/ICE predict similar first-order stress and velocity patterns, and that differences are restricted to local variations over length-scales on the order of the grid resolution. In addition, we find that subglacial shear stress is relatively uniform and insensitive to suble changes in local topographic relief. Following these initial stress benchmark experiments, we use iSOSIA to investigate changes in basal shear stress as a result of landscape evolution by glacial erosion. The experiments with landscape evolution show that subglacial shear stress decreases as glacial erosion transforms preglacial V-shaped valleys into U-shaped troughs. These findings support the hypothesis that glacial erosion is most efficient in the early stages of glacial landscape development.

  15. Exercise-mediated changes in conduit artery wall thickness in humans: role of shear stress.

    PubMed

    Thijssen, Dick H J; Dawson, Ellen A; van den Munckhof, Inge C L; Tinken, Toni M; den Drijver, Evert; Hopkins, Nicola; Cable, N Timothy; Green, Daniel J

    2011-07-01

    Episodic increases in shear stress have been proposed as a mechanism that induces training-induced adaptation in arterial wall remodeling in humans. To address this hypothesis in humans, we examined bilateral brachial artery wall thickness using high-resolution ultrasound in healthy men across an 8-wk period of bilateral handgrip training. Unilaterally, shear rate was attenuated by cuff inflation around the forearm to 60 mmHg. Grip strength, forearm volume, and girth improved similarly between the limbs. Acute bouts of handgrip exercise increased shear rate (P < 0.005) in the noncuffed limb, whereas cuff inflation successfully decreased exercise-induced increases in shear. Brachial blood pressure responses similarly increased during exercise in both the cuffed and noncuffed limbs. Handgrip training had no effect on baseline brachial artery diameter, blood flow, or shear rate but significantly decreased brachial artery wall thickness after 6 and 8 wk (ANOVA, P < 0.001) and wall-to-lumen ratio after week 8 (ANOVA, P = 0.005). The magnitude of decrease in brachial artery wall thickness and wall-to-lumen ratio after exercise training was similar in the noncuffed and cuffed arms. These results suggest that exercise-induced changes in shear rate are not obligatory for arterial wall remodeling during a period of 8 wk of exercise training in healthy humans.

  16. Mean wall shear stress in the femoral arterial bifurcation is low and independent of age at rest.

    PubMed

    Kornet, L; Hoeks, A P; Lambregts, J; Reneman, R S

    2000-01-01

    In elastic arteries, mean wall shear stress appears to be close to 1. 5 Pa, the value predicted by the theory of minimal energy loss. This finding in elastic arteries does not necessarily represent the situation in muscular arteries. Elastic arteries have to store potential energy, while muscular arteries have mainly a conductive function. Therefore, we determined wall shear stress and its age dependency in the common and superficial femoral arteries, 2-3 cm from the flow divider in 54 presumed healthy volunteers between 21 and 74 years of age, using a non-invasive ultrasound system. Prior to the study, the reliability of this system was determined in terms of intrasubject variation. Mean wall shear stress was significantly lower in the common femoral artery (0.35 +/- 0.18 Pa) than in the superficial femoral artery (0.49 +/- 0.15 Pa). In all age categories, peak systolic wall shear stress and the maximal cyclic change in wall shear stress were not significantly different in the common and the superficial femoral arteries. Peak systolic wall shear stress in the common and the superficial femoral arteries was not significantly different from the value previously determined in the common carotid artery, but mean wall shear stress was lower in the common and superficial femoral arteries than in the common carotid artery by a factor of 2-4. In both the common and the superficial femoral arteries, mean, peak systolic and maximal cyclic change in wall shear stress did not change significantly with age, nor did diameter. We conclude that, as compared to elastic arteries, mean wall shear stress is low in the conductive arteries of a resting leg, due to backflow during the first part of the diastolic phase of the cardiac cycle and the absence of flow during the rest of the diastolic phase. Mean wall shear stress is lower in the common than in the superficial femoral artery due to additional reflections from the deep femoral artery.

  17. The role of von Willebrand factor and fibrinogen in platelet aggregation under varying shear stress.

    PubMed Central

    Ikeda, Y; Handa, M; Kawano, K; Kamata, T; Murata, M; Araki, Y; Anbo, H; Kawai, Y; Watanabe, K; Itagaki, I

    1991-01-01

    Exposure of platelets to shear stress leads to aggregation in the absence of exogenous agonists. We have now found that different adhesive proteins and platelet membrane glycoproteins are involved in aggregation depending on the shear stress conditions and the concentration of divalent cations in the medium. When blood is collected with trisodium citrate as anticoagulant, which causes a decrease in the levels of external ionized calcium ([Ca2+]o), platelet aggregation can be induced under low shear force (12 dyn/cm2) and is mediated by fibrinogen binding to the glycoprotein IIb-IIIa complex. Aggregates formed under these conditions are not stable, and when shear force is increased to 68 dyn/cm2, disaggregation results. By contrast, platelets from blood collected with hirudin as anticoagulant, wherein [Ca2+]o is within normal plasma levels, do not undergo low shear-induced aggregation; however, after exposure to a shear force above 80 dyn/cm2, aggregation is observed but only when von Willebrand factor is present and can interact with both its platelet binding sites, glycoprotein Ib-IX and glycoprotein IIb-IIIa. Fibrinogen is not involved in high shear-induced aggregation which, in fact, occurs normally in patients with severe afibrinogenemia. Thus, von Willebrand factor in the absence of exogenous agonists can mediate platelet aggregation in experimental conditions that may mimic the hemorheological situation of partially occluded arteries. This pathway of platelet aggregation involving only one adhesive ligand and two membrane adhesion receptors may play a relevant role in thrombogenesis. PMID:2010539

  18. Comparison of erythrocyte dynamics in shear flow under different stress-free configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cordasco, Daniel; Yazdani, Alireza; Bagchi, Prosenjit

    2014-04-01

    An open question that has persisted for decades is whether the cytoskeleton of a red blood cell is stress-free or under a stress. This question is important in the context of theoretical modeling of cellular motion under a flowing condition where it is necessary to make an assumption about the stress-free state. Here, we present a 3D numerical study to compare the cell dynamics in a simple shear flow under two different stress-free states, a biconcave discocyte representing the resting shape of the cell, and a nearly spherical oblate shape. We find that whether the stress-free states make a significant difference or not depends on the viscosity of the suspending medium. If the viscosity is close to that of blood plasma, the two stress-free states do not show any significant difference in cell dynamics. However, when the suspending medium viscosity is well above that of the physiological range, as in many in vitro studies, the shear rate separating the tank-treading and tumbling dynamics is observed to be higher for the biconcave stress-free state than the spheroidal state. The former shows a strong shape oscillation with repeated departures from the biconcave shape, while the latter shows a nearly stable biconcave shape. It is found that the cell membrane in the biconcave stress-free state is under a compressive stress and a weaker bending force density, leading to a periodic compression of the cell. The shape oscillation then leads to a higher energy barrier against membrane tank-tread leading to an early transition to tumbling. However, if the cells are released with a large off-shear plane angle, the oscillations can be suppressed due to an azimuthal motion of the membrane along the vorticity direction leading to a redistribution of the membrane points and lowering of the energy barrier, which again results in a nearly similar behavior of the cells under the two different stress-free states. A variety of off-shear plane dynamics is observed, namely, rolling

  19. Effects of fluid shear stress on polyelectrolyte multilayers by neutron scattering studies

    DOE PAGES

    Singh, Saurabh; Junghans, Ann; Watkins, Erik; ...

    2015-02-17

    The structure of layer-by-layer (LbL) deposited nanofilm coatings consists of alternating polyethylenimine (PEI) and polystyrenesulfonate (PSS) films deposited on a single crystal quartz substrate. LbL-deposited nanofilms were investigated by neutron reflectomery (NR) in contact with water in the static and fluid shear stress conditions. The fluid shear stress was applied through a laminar flow of the liquid parallel to the quartz/polymer interface in a custom-built solid–liquid interface cell. The scattering length density profiles obtained from NR results of these polyelectrolyte multilayers (PEM), measured under different shear conditions, showed proportional decrease of volume fraction of water hydrating the polymers. For themore » highest shear rate applied (ca. 6800 s–1) the water volume fraction decreased by approximately 7%. The decrease of the volume fraction of water was homogeneous through the thickness of the film. Since there were not any significant changes in the total polymer thickness, it resulted in negative osmotic pressures in the film. The PEM films were compared with the behavior of thin films of thermoresponsive poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (pNIPAM) deposited via spin-coating. The PEM and pNIPAM differ in their interactions with water molecules, and they showed opposite behaviors under the fluid shear stress. In both cases the polymer hydration was reversible upon the restoration of static conditions. Furthermore, a theoretical explanation is given to explain this difference in the effect of shear on hydration of polymeric thin films.« less

  20. Adaptive response of vascular endothelial cells to an acute increase in shear stress frequency.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ji; Friedman, Morton H

    2013-09-15

    Local shear stress sensed by arterial endothelial cells is occasionally altered by changes in global hemodynamic parameters, e.g., heart rate and blood flow rate, as a result of normal physiological events, such as exercise. In a recently study (41), we demonstrated that during the adaptive response to increased shear magnitude, porcine endothelial cells exhibited an unique phenotype featuring a transient increase in permeability and the upregulation of a set of anti-inflammatory and antioxidative genes. In the present study, we characterize the adaptive response of these cells to an increase in shear frequency, another important hemodynamic parameter with implications in atherogenesis. Endothelial cells were preconditioned by a basal-level sinusoidal shear stress of 15 ± 15 dyn/cm(2) at 1 Hz, and the frequency was then elevated to 2 Hz. Endothelial permeability increased slowly after the frequency step-up, but the increase was relatively small. Using microarrays, we identified 37 genes that are sensitive to the frequency step-up. The acute increase in shear frequency upregulates a set of cell-cycle regulation and angiogenesis-related genes. The overall adaptive response to the increased frequency is distinctly different from that to a magnitude step-up. However, consistent with the previous study, our data support the notion that endothelial function during an adaptive response is different than that of fully adapted endothelial cells. Our studies may also provide insights into the beneficial effects of exercise on vascular health: transient increases in frequency may facilitate endothelial repair, whereas similar increases in shear magnitude may keep excessive inflammation and oxidative stress at bay.

  1. Reynolds stress flow shear and turbulent energy transfer in reversed field pinch configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vianello, Nicola; Spolaore, Monica; Serianni, Gianluigi; Regnoli, Giorgio; Spada, Emanuele; Antoni, Vanni; Bergsåker, Henric; Drake, James R.

    2003-10-01

    The role of Reynolds Stress tensor on flow generation in turbulent fluids and plasmas is still an open question and the comprehension of its behavior may assist the understanding of improved confinement scenario. It is generally believed that shear flow generation may occur by an interaction of the turbulent Reynolds stress with the shear flow. It is also generally believed that this mechanism may influence the generation of zonal flow shears. The evaluation of the complete Reynolds Stress tensor requires contemporary measurements of its electrostatic and magnetic part: this requirement is more restrictive for Reversed Field Pinch configuration where magnetic fluctuations are larger than in tokamak . A new diagnostic system which combines electrostatic and magnetic probes has been installed in the edge region of Extrap-T2R reversed field pinch. With this new probe the Reynolds stress tensor has been deduced and its radial profile has been reconstructed on a shot to shot basis exploring differen plasma conditions. These profiles have been compared with the naturally occurring velocity flow profile, in particular during Pulsed Poloidal Current Drive experiment, where a strong variation of ExB flow radial profile has been registered. The study of the temporal evolution of Reynolds stress reveals the appearance of strong localized bursts: these are considered in relation with global MHD relaxation phenomena, which naturally occur in the core of an RFP plasma sustaining its configuration.

  2. Effects of extracellular fiber architecture on cell membrane shear stress in a 3D fibrous matrix.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, John A; Boschetti, Federica; Swartz, Melody A

    2007-01-01

    Interstitial fluid flow has been shown to affect the organization and behavior of cells in 3D environments in vivo and in vitro, yet the forces driving such responses are not clear. Due to the complex architecture of the extracellular matrix (ECM) and the difficulty of measuring fluid flow near cells embedded in it, the levels of shear stress experienced by cells in this environment are typically estimated using bulk-averaged matrix parameters such as hydraulic permeability. While this is useful for estimating average stresses, it cannot yield insight into how local matrix fiber architecture-which is cell-controlled in the immediate pericellular environment-affects the local stresses imposed on the cell surface. To address this, we used computational fluid dynamics to study flow through an idealized mesh constructed of a cubic lattice of fibers simulating a typical in vitro collagen gel. We found that, in such high porosity matrices, the fibers strongly affect the flow fields near the cell, with peak shear stresses up to five times higher than those predicted by the Brinkman equation. We also found that minor remodeling of the fibers near the cell surface had major effects on the shear stress profile on the cell. These findings demonstrate the importance of fiber architecture to the fluid forces on a cell embedded in a 3D matrix, and also show how small modifications in the local ECM can lead to large changes in the mechanical environment of the cell.

  3. Low coseismic shear stress on the Tohoku-Oki megathrust determined from laboratory experiments.

    PubMed

    Ujiie, Kohtaro; Tanaka, Hanae; Saito, Tsubasa; Tsutsumi, Akito; Mori, James J; Kameda, Jun; Brodsky, Emily E; Chester, Frederick M; Eguchi, Nobuhisa; Toczko, Sean

    2013-12-06

    Large coseismic slip was thought to be unlikely to occur on the shallow portions of plate-boundary thrusts, but the 11 March 2011 Tohoku-Oki earthquake [moment magnitude (Mw) = 9.0] produced huge displacements of ~50 meters near the Japan Trench with a resultant devastating tsunami. To investigate the mechanisms of the very large fault movements, we conducted high-velocity (1.3 meters per second) friction experiments on samples retrieved from the plate-boundary thrust associated with the earthquake. The results show a small stress drop with very low peak and steady-state shear stress. The very low shear stress can be attributed to the abundance of weak clay (smectite) and thermal pressurization effects, which can facilitate fault slip. This behavior provides an explanation for the huge shallow slip that occurred during the earthquake.

  4. Effect of simulated microgravity on osteocytes responding to fluid shear stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiao; Sun, Lian-Wen; Wu, Xin-Tong; Wang, Xiao-Nan; Fan, Yu-Bo

    2013-03-01

    Osteocytes, as most abundant cells and major mechanical sensor in bone, play an important role in the mechanism of microgravity-induced bone loss. The response of osteocytes to fluid flow stress under simulated microgravity was investigated in this study. MLO-Y4, an osteocyte-like cell line, was cultured under simulated microgravity condition for 5 days. Then cells were sheared at 15 dyn/cm2 in flow chamber. After 15 min shear, nitric oxide (NO) was examined by Griess Reagent and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) by ELISA. After 6 h shear, alkaline phosphatase (ALP) was examined by PNPP, osteocalcin (OC) and procollagen type I N propeptide (PINP) by ELISA. Cells were divided into four groups: CON (1 G with no shear), CON-S (1 G with shear), SM (simulated microgravity with no shear) and SM-S (simulated microgravity with shear). The results showed that (1) NO, ALP activity, OC and PINP increased significantly while PGE2 showed no change in SM compared with CON. (2) NO, PGE2, ALP activity and PINP increased significantly while OC decreased significantly in CON-S compared with CON. (3) NO in SM-S had no significant difference compared to SM, PGE2 and OC increased while ALP activity and PINP decreased significantly in SM-S compared with SM. (4) The increasing amplitude of PGE2 and OC, the decreasing amplitude of ALP activity in SM-S to SM was lower than that in CON-S to CON. In addition, some changes of F-actin cytoskeleton were observed by confocal microscopy. All results indicated that the response induced by fluid shear in osteocytes could be inhibited by simulated microgravity, namely the mechanosensibility of osteocytes decreased under simulated microgravity. This may partly contribute to the mechanism of microgravity-induced osteoporosis and will be helpful to find out effective description.

  5. Analysis of shear stress and energy consumption in a tubular airlift membrane system.

    PubMed

    Ratkovich, N; Chan, C C V; Berube, P R; Nopens, I

    2011-01-01

    Application of a two-phase slug flow in side-stream membrane bioreactors (MBRs) has proven to increase the permeate flux and decrease fouling through a better control of the cake layer. Past literature has shown that the hydrodynamics near the membrane surface have an impact on the degree of fouling by imposing high shear stress near the surface of the membrane. Previously, shear stress histograms (SSH) have been introduced to summarize results from an experimental setup developed to investigate the shear stress imposed on the surface of a membrane under different two-phase flow conditions (gas and liquid) by varying the flow of each phase. Bimodal SSHs were observed, with peaks corresponding to the shear induced by the liquid and gas flow respectively. In this contribution, SSHs are modelled using simple empirical relationships. These are used to identify the two-phase flow conditions that optimize fouling control. Furthermore, the total energy consumption of the system was estimated based on the two-phase pressure drop. It was found that low liquid and high gas flow rates (ratio of approx. 4) balanced the peaks and minimized the energy consumption.

  6. Separating Fluid Shear Stress from Acceleration during Vibrations in Vitro: Identification of Mechanical Signals Modulating the Cellular Response

    PubMed Central

    Uzer, Gunes; Manske, Sarah L; Chan, M Ete; Chiang, Fu-Pen; Rubin, Clinton T; Frame, Mary D; Judex, Stefan

    2012-01-01

    The identification of the physical mechanism(s) by which cells can sense vibrations requires the determination of the cellular mechanical environment. Here, we quantified vibration-induced fluid shear stresses in vitro and tested whether this system allows for the separation of two mechanical parameters previously proposed to drive the cellular response to vibration – fluid shear and peak accelerations. When peak accelerations of the oscillatory horizontal motions were set at 1g and 60Hz, peak fluid shear stresses acting on the cell layer reached 0.5Pa. A 3.5-fold increase in fluid viscosity increased peak fluid shear stresses 2.6-fold while doubling fluid volume in the well caused a 2-fold decrease in fluid shear. Fluid shear was positively related to peak acceleration magnitude and inversely related to vibration frequency. These data demonstrated that peak shear stress can be effectively separated from peak acceleration by controlling specific levels of vibration frequency, acceleration, and/or fluid viscosity. As an example for exploiting these relations, we tested the relevance of shear stress in promoting COX-2 expression in osteoblast like cells. Across different vibration frequencies and fluid viscosities, neither the level of generated fluid shear nor the frequency of the signal were able to consistently account for differences in the relative increase in COX-2 expression between groups, emphasizing that the eventual identification of the physical mechanism(s) requires a detailed quantification of the cellular mechanical environment. PMID:23074384

  7. Measuring bed shear stress along vegetated river beds using FST-hemispheres.

    PubMed

    Bockelmann-Evans, B N; Davies, R; Falconer, R A

    2008-09-01

    The measurement of the bed shear stress along vegetated river beds is essential for accurately predicting the water level, velocity and solute and sediment transport fluxes in computational hydroenvironmental models. Details are given herein of an experimental and theoretical study to determine the bed boundary shear stress along vegetated river beds introducing a novel field measuring method, namely the FliessWasserStammtisch (FST)-hemispheres. Although investigations have been conducted previously for sedimentary channels using the FST-hemispheres, this preliminary study is thought to be the first time that such hemispheres have been used to investigate the bed shear stresses in vegetated channels. FST-hemispheres were first developed by Statzner and Müller [1989. Standard hemispheres as indicators of flow characteristics in lotic benthos research. Freshwater Biology 21, 445-459] to act as an integrated indicator of the gross hydrodynamic stresses present near the bed. Test and validation data were found to be at least of the same order of magnitude for the stresses predicted from literature for sedimentary channels, with this study establishing the commencement of a database of calibrated FST-hemisphere laboratory data for vegetated channel beds. In a series of experiments, depths ranging from 0.1 to 0.28 m were considered, equating directly to comparable conditions in small rivers or streams. The results of this study provide a basis for enabling the FST-hemispheres to be used to evaluate the boundary shear stress for a wider range of applications in the future, including vegetated river beds.

  8. Effect of Shear Stress on Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolated from the Cystic Fibrosis Lung

    PubMed Central

    Dingemans, Jozef; Monsieurs, Pieter; Yu, Sung-Huan; Crabbé, Aurélie; Förstner, Konrad U.; Malfroot, Anne

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Chronic colonization of the lungs by Pseudomonas aeruginosa is one of the major causes of morbidity and mortality in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. To gain insights into the characteristic biofilm phenotype of P. aeruginosa in the CF lungs, mimicking the CF lung environment is critical. We previously showed that growth of the non-CF-adapted P. aeruginosa PAO1 strain in a rotating wall vessel, a device that simulates the low fluid shear (LS) conditions present in the CF lung, leads to the formation of in-suspension, self-aggregating biofilms. In the present study, we determined the phenotypic and transcriptomic changes associated with the growth of a highly adapted, transmissible P. aeruginosa CF strain in artificial sputum medium under LS conditions. Robust self-aggregating biofilms were observed only under LS conditions. Growth under LS conditions resulted in the upregulation of genes involved in stress response, alginate biosynthesis, denitrification, glycine betaine biosynthesis, glycerol metabolism, and cell shape maintenance, while genes involved in phenazine biosynthesis, type VI secretion, and multidrug efflux were downregulated. In addition, a number of small RNAs appeared to be involved in the response to shear stress. Finally, quorum sensing was found to be slightly but significantly affected by shear stress, resulting in higher production of autoinducer molecules during growth under high fluid shear (HS) conditions. In summary, our study revealed a way to modulate the behavior of a highly adapted P. aeruginosa CF strain by means of introducing shear stress, driving it from a biofilm lifestyle to a more planktonic lifestyle. PMID:27486191

  9. Cell-Activation by Shear Stresses in Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms (AAA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salsac, Anne-Virginie; Sparks, Steven; Chomaz, Jean-Marc; Lasheras, Juan C.

    2003-11-01

    Increasing experimental evidence indicates that low and oscillatory shear stresses promote proliferative, thrombotic, adhesive and inflammatory-mediated degenerative conditions throughout the wall of the aorta. These degenerative conditions have been shown to be involved in the pathogenesis of AAAs, a permanent, localized dilatation of the abdominal aorta. The purpose of this study is to measure both the magnitude and the duration of the shear stresses acting on both the arterial walls and on the blood cells inside AAAs, and to characterize their changes as the AAA enlarges. We conducted a parametric in-vitro study of the pulsatile blood flow in elastic models of AAAs while systematically varying the blood flow parameters, and the geometry of the aneurysm's bulging. The instantaneous flow characteristic inside the AAA was measured using DPIV at a sampling rate of 15 Hertz. A "cell-activation parameter" defined as the integral of the product of the magnitude of the shear stress and the time during which the stress acts was computed along each of the blood cell pathlines. The Lagrangian tracking of the blood cells shows that a large majority of them are subjected first to very high level of shear-induced "cell-activation" while later on they are entrained in regions of stasis where their residence time can increase up to several cardiac cycles. This cell-activation followed by the entrainment in low shear regions creates the optimal cell-adhesive and inflammatory-mediated degenerative conditions that are postulated to play an important role in the etiology and progressive enlargement of AAAs.

  10. Basal shear stress under alpine glaciers: insights from experiments using the iSOSIA and Elmer/Ice models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brædstrup, C. F.; Egholm, D. L.; Ugelvig, S. V.; Pedersen, V. K.

    2016-02-01

    Shear stress at the base of glaciers exerts a significant control on basal sliding and hence also glacial erosion in arctic and high-altitude areas. However, the inaccessible nature of glacial beds complicates empirical studies of basal shear stress, and little is therefore known of its spatial and temporal distribution. In this study we seek to improve our understanding of basal shear stress using a higher-order numerical ice model (iSOSIA). In order to test the validity of the higher-order model, we first compare the detailed distribution of basal shear stress in iSOSIA and in a three-dimensional full-Stokes model (Elmer/Ice). We find that iSOSIA and Elmer/Ice predict similar first-order stress and velocity patterns, and that differences are restricted to local variations at length scales of the order of the grid resolution. In addition, we find that subglacial shear stress is relatively uniform and insensitive to subtle changes in local topographic relief. Following the initial comparison studies, we use iSOSIA to investigate changes in basal shear stress as a result of landscape evolution by glacial erosion. The experiments with landscape evolution show that subglacial shear stress decreases as glacial erosion transforms preglacial V-shaped valleys into U-shaped troughs. These findings support the hypothesis that glacial erosion is most efficient in the early stages of glacial landscape development.

  11. The effects of low-shear stress on Adherent-invasive Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Allen, Christopher A; Niesel, David W; Torres, Alfredo G

    2008-06-01

    The impact of low-shear stress (LSS) was evaluated on an Adherent-invasive Escherichia coli clinical isolate (AIEC strain O83:H1) from a Crohn's disease patient. High-aspect ratio vessels (HARVs) were used to model LSS conditions to characterize changes in environmental stress resistance and adhesion/invasive properties. Low-shear stress-grown cultures exhibited enhanced thermal and oxidative stress resistance as well as increased adherence to Caco-2 cells, but no changes in invasion were observed. An AIEC rpoS mutant was constructed to examine the impact of this global stress regulator. The absence of RpoS under LSS conditions resulted in increased sensitivity to oxidative stress while adherence levels were elevated in comparison with the wild-type strain. TnphoA mutagenesis and rpoS complementation were carried out on the rpoS mutant to identify those factors involved in the LSS-induced adherence phenotype. Mutagenesis results revealed that one insertion disrupted the tnaB gene (encoding tryptophan permease) and the rpoS tnaB double mutant exhibited decreased adherence under LSS. Complementation of the tnaB gene, or medium supplemented with exogenous indole, restored adhesion of the rpoS tnaB mutant under LSS conditions. Overall, our study demonstrated how mechanical stresses such as LSS altered AIEC phenotypic characteristics and identified novel functions for some RpoS-regulated proteins.

  12. A finite element method for shear stresses calculation in composite blade models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paluch, B.

    1991-09-01

    A finite-element method is developed for accurately calculating shear stresses in helicopter blade models, induced by torsion and shearing forces. The method can also be used to compute the equivalent torsional stiffness of the section, their transverse shear coefficient, and the position of their center of torsion. A grid generator method which is a part of the calculation program is also described and used to discretize the sections quickly and to condition the grid data reliably. The finite-element method was validated on a few sections composed of isotropic materials and was then applied to a blade model sections made of composite materials. Good agreement was obtained between the calculated and experimental data.

  13. Shear stress-driven refreshing capability of plastic deformation in nanolayered metals.

    PubMed

    Yan, J W; Zhu, X F; Yang, B; Zhang, G P

    2013-04-12

    Severely localized deformation within shear bands can occur much more easily in a metal with nanoscale microstructures, such as nanograined and nanolayered materials. Based on atomic-scale observations, here we show that such locally large deformation (the continuous thinning of the layers) within the indentation-induced shear bands of the Cu/Au nanolayers is essentially attributed to the large shear stress component along the interface, which can refresh the capability of the interface to absorb incoming dislocations through unlocking the product of the dislocation-interface reaction. The results have implications for understanding the interface-mediated mechanisms of plastic deformation and for the engineering application of severe plastic deformation processing of metals at nanoscales.

  14. Shear strength measurements during shock loading using laterally mounted stress gauges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Millett, J. C. F.

    2017-01-01

    The shear strength during shock loading of materials is of the utmost importance as it can be used to inform on resistance to ballistic attack. As such a number of techniques have been developed to determine this parameter. One method to do achieve this is the use of stress gauges mounted such that they are sensitive to the longitudinal and lateral components of stress, with shear strength being the difference between the two. A major advantage of this technique is that it places the gauge within the material flow, and as such it is possible to infer materials deformation mechanisms by observing how shear strength changes with time. However, it should also be realised that this technique is invasive as it requires the sample be sectioned such that the stress gauge can be placed in location. This paper will therefore discuss results generated using this technique in a range of materials, and situations where the conditions of stress are known precisely. Results in a range of materials are discussed, placing them in context with other measurement techniques and known materials response.

  15. A Multichannel Dampened Flow System for Studies on Shear Stress-Mediated Mechanotransduction

    PubMed Central

    Voyvodic, Peter L.; Min, Daniel; Baker, Aaron B.

    2012-01-01

    Shear stresses are powerful regulators of cellular function and potent mediators of the development of vascular disease. We have designed and optimized a system allowing the application of flow to cultured cells in a multichannel format. By using a multichannel peristaltic pump, flow can be driven continuously in the system for long-term studies in multiple isolated flow loops. A key component of the system is a dual-chamber pulse dampener that removes the pulsatility of the flow without the need for having an open system or elevated reservoir. We optimized the design parameters of the pulse dampening chambers for the maximum reduction in flow pulsation while minimizing the fluid needed for each isolated flow channel. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were exposed to steady and pulsatile shear stress using the system. We found that cells under steady flow had a marked increased production of eNOS and formation of actin stress fibers in comparison to those under pulsatile flow conditions. Overall, the results confirm the utility of the device as a practical means to apply shear stress to cultured cells in the multichannel format and provide steady, long term flow to microfluidic devices. PMID:22836694

  16. Resolved shear stress intensity coefficient and fatigue crack growth in large crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, QI; Liu, Hao-Wen

    1988-01-01

    Fatigue crack growth in large grain Al alloy was studied. Fatigue crack growth is caused primarily by shear decohesion due to dislocation motion in the crack tip region. The crack paths in the large crystals are very irregular and zigzag. The crack planes are often inclined to the loading axis both in the inplane direction and the thickness direction. The stress intensity factors of such inclined cracks are approximated from the two dimensional finite element calculations. The plastic deformation in a large crystal is highly anisotropic, and dislocation motion in such crystals are driven by the resolved shear stress. The resolved shear stress intensity coefficient in a crack solid, RSSIC, is defined, and the coefficients for the slip systems at a crack tip are evaluated from the calculated stress intensity factors. The orientations of the crack planes are closely related to the slip planes with the high RSSIC values. If a single slip system has a much higher RSSIC than all the others, the crack will follow the slip plane, and the slip plane becomes the crack plane. If two or more slip systems have a high RSSIC, the crack plane is the result of the decohesion processes on these active slip planes.

  17. Analysis of phospholipids, sterols, and fatty acids in Taxus chinensis var. mairei cells in response to shear stress.

    PubMed

    Han, Pei-pei; Zhou, Jian; Yuan, Ying-jin

    2009-08-17

    Plant cell culture has been developed as an alternative method for the production of an anticancer drug, paclitaxel. However, the sensitivity of plant cells to shear stress has been one of the main obstacles to the scale-up of the plant cell culture. To gain a better understanding of the mechanism of plant cells' response to hydrodynamic mechanical stress, lipid profiling of suspension-cultured Taxus chinensis (Chinese yew) var. mairei cells under shear stress was carried out using liquid chromatography-tandem MS and gas chromatography-time-of-flight MS. T. chinensis var. mairei cells cultured in a Couette-type shear reactor responded with an increase of cell membrane permeability compared with control cells, which indicated that the adaptation to shear stress altered membrane lipid composition. The main changes of lipid profiles in the shear-stress-induced cells were the following: (a) the total phospholipid content decreased, especially that of structural phospholipids such as phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylethanolamine and phosphatidylcholine; (b) cells showed increased stigmasterol at the expense of sitosterol and campesterol; (c) the stigmasterol/phospholipid ratio increased; (d) the mono-unsaturated-fatty-acid content increased; (e) the shear-stress-induced cells accumulated very-long-chain saturated fatty acids (C22:0, C23:0, C24:0 and C25:0). These findings suggested alterations in membrane composition and hinted at a possible molecular basis for the mechanotransduction processes induced by shear stress in T. chinensis var. mairei cells.

  18. Chronic high blood flow potentiates shear stress-induced release of NO in arteries of aged rats

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Changdong; Huang, An; Kaley, Gabor; Sun, Dong

    2011-01-01

    Aging impairs shear-stress-dependent dilation of arteries via increased superoxide production, decreased SOD activity, and decreased activation of endothelial nitric oxide (NO) synthase (eNOS). In the present study, we investigated whether chronic increases in shear stress, elicited by increases in blood flow, would improve vascular endothelial function of aged rats. To this end, second-order mesenteric arteries of young (6 mo) and aged (24 mo) male Fischer-344 rats were selectively ligated for 3 wk to elevate blood flow in a first-order artery [high blood flow (HF)]. An in vitro study was then conducted on first-order arteries with HF and normal blood flow (NF) to assess shear stress (1, 10, and 20 dyn/cm2)-induced release of NO into the perfusate. In HF arteries of both age groups, shear stress-induced NO production increased significantly. In 24-mo-old rats, the reduced shear stress-induced NO production in NF arteries was normalized by HF to a level similar to that in NF arteries of 6-mo-old rats. The increased NO production in HF arteries of 24-mo-old rats was associated with increased shear stress-induced dilation, expression of eNOS protein, and shear stress-induced eNOS phosphorylation. Wortmannin, a phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase inhibitor, reduced shear stress-induced eNOS phosphorylation and vasodilation. Superoxide production decreased significantly in HF compared with NF arteries in 24-mo-old rats. The decreased superoxide production was associated with significant increases in CuZn-SOD and extracellular SOD protein expressions and total SOD activity. These results suggest that stimulation with chronic HF restores shear-stress-induced activation of eNOS and antioxidant ability in aged arteries. PMID:17873019

  19. Mechanical loading by fluid shear stress of myotube glycocalyx stimulates growth factor expression and nitric oxide production.

    PubMed

    Juffer, Petra; Bakker, Astrid D; Klein-Nulend, Jenneke; Jaspers, Richard T

    2014-07-01

    Skeletal muscle fibers have the ability to increase their size in response to a mechanical overload. Finite element modeling data suggest that mechanically loaded muscles in vivo may experience not only tensile strain but also shear stress. However, whether shear stress affects biological pathways involved in muscle fiber size adaptation in response to mechanical loading is unknown. Therefore, our aim was twofold: (1) to determine whether shear stress affects growth factor expression and nitric oxide (NO) production by myotubes, and (2) to explore the mechanism by which shear stress may affect myotubes in vitro. C2C12 myotubes were subjected to a laminar pulsating fluid flow (PFF; mean shear stress 0.4, 0.7 or 1.4 Pa, 1 Hz) or subjected to uni-axial cyclic strain (CS; 15 % strain, 1 Hz) for 1 h. NO production during 1-h PFF or CS treatment was quantified using Griess reagent. The glycocalyx was degraded using hyaluronidase, and stretch-activated ion channels (SACs) were blocked using GdCl3. Gene expression was analyzed immediately after 1-h PFF (1.4 Pa, 1 Hz) and at 6 h post-PFF treatment. PFF increased IGF-I Ea, MGF, VEGF, IL-6, and COX-2 mRNA, but decreased myostatin mRNA expression. Shear stress enhanced NO production in a dose-dependent manner, while CS induced no quantifiable increase in NO production. Glycocalyx degradation and blocking of SACs ablated the shear stress-stimulated NO production. In conclusion, shear stress activates signaling pathways involved in muscle fiber size adaptation in myotubes, likely via membrane-bound mechanoreceptors. These results suggest that shear stress exerted on myofiber extracellular matrix plays an important role in mechanotransduction in muscle.

  20. Shear flow-induced optical inhomogeneity of blood assessed in vivo and in vitro by spectral domain optical coherence tomography in the 1.3 μm wavelength range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cimalla, Peter; Walther, Julia; Mittasch, Matthaeus; Koch, Edmund

    2011-11-01

    The optical inhomogeneity of flowing blood, which appears as a waisted double fan-shaped intensity pattern inside vessels in cross-sectional optical coherence tomography (OCT) images, was investigated for the first time. High resolution spectral domain OCT in the 1.3 μm wavelength region is used to assess this inhomogeneous intravascular backscattering of light in an in vivo mouse model and flow phantom measurements. Based on a predicted alignment of the red blood cells toward laminar shear flow, an angular modulation of the corresponding backscattering cross-section inside the vessels is assumed. In combination with the signal attenuation in depth by absorption and scattering, a simple model of the intravascular intensity modulation is derived. The suitability of the model is successfully demonstrated in the in vivo experiments and confirmed by the in vitro measurements. The observed effect appears in flowing blood only and shows a strong dependency on the shear rate. In conclusion, the shear-induced red blood cell alignment in conjunction with the vessel geometry is responsible for the observed intensity distribution. This inherent effect of blood imaging has to be considered in attenuation measurements performed with OCT. Furthermore, the analysis of the intravascular intensity pattern might be useful to evaluate flow characteristics.

  1. Characterizing Wave- and Current-Induced Bottom Shear Stress: U.S. Middle Atlantic Bight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalyander, S.; Butman, B.

    2011-12-01

    The combined action of waves and currents at the seabed creates bottom shear stress, impacting local geology, habitat, and anthropogenic use. In this study, a methodology is developed to characterize the magnitude of benthic disturbance based on spatially and seasonally-resolved statistics (mean, standard deviation, 95th percentile) of wave-current bottom shear stress. The frequency of stress forcing is used to distinguish regions dominated by storms (return interval longer than 33 hours) from those dominated by the tides (periods shorter than 33 hours). In addition, the relative magnitude of the contribution to stress from waves, tides, and storm-driven currents is investigated by comparing wave stress, tidal current stress, and stress from the residual current (currents with tides removed), as well as through cross-correlation of wave and current stress. The methodology is applied to numerical model time-series data for the Middle Atlantic Bight (MAB) off the U.S. East Coast for April 2010 to April 2011; currents are provided from the Integrated Ocean Observing System (IOOS) operational hydrodynamic forecast Experimental System for Predicting Shelf and Slope Optics (ESPreSSO) and waves are provided from a Simulating WAves Nearshore (SWAN) hindcast developed for this project. Spatial resolution of the model is about 5 km and time-series wave and current data are at 1 and 2-hours respectively. Regions of the MAB delineated by stress characteristics include a tidally-dominated shallow region with relative high stress southeast of Massachusetts over Nantucket Shoals; a coastal band extending offshore to about 30 m water depth dominated by waves; a region dominated by waves and wind-driven currents offshore of the Outer Banks of North Carolina; and a low stress region southeast of Long Island, approximately coincident with an area of fine-grained sediments called the "Mud Patch". Comparison of the stress distribution with surface sediment texture data shows that

  2. Effective shear modulus reconstruction obtained with approximate mean normal stress remaining unknown.

    PubMed

    Sumi, Chikayoshi

    2007-11-01

    We previously reported Methods A and B for reconstructing tissue shear modulus and density using mean normal stress as an unknown. The use of Method A enables us to obtain such reconstructions with the mean normal stress remaining unknown by using an iterative method to solve algebraic equations. However, Method A results in a low convergence speed and a low reconstruction accuracy compared with Method B that enables a reconstruction of mean normal stress together. Thus, in this report, we describe a new, rapid and accurate method, Method C, that enables the reconstructions of shear modulus and density in real time with a higher accuracy than Method A. In Method A, no reference mean normal stress is used. In Method C, an arbitrary finite value is used as a quasireference mean normal stress at an arbitrary point (i.e., a quasireference point) or an arbitrary region (i.e., a quasireference region) in the region of interest on the basis of the fact that the gradient operator implemented on the mean normal stress becomes positive-definite. When a quasireference region can be realized, Method C enables such reconstructions with a high accuracy and a high convergence speed similar to Method B. The effectiveness of Method C was verified using simulated phantom deformation data. Method C must be used instead of Method A as a practical method, in combination with Method B.

  3. Characterizing wave- and current- induced bottom shear stress: U.S. middle Atlantic continental shelf

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dalyander, P. Soupy; Butman, Bradford; Sherwood, Christopher R.; Signell, Richard P.; Wilkin, John L.

    2013-01-01

    Waves and currents create bottom shear stress, a force at the seabed that influences sediment texture distribution, micro-topography, habitat, and anthropogenic use. This paper presents a methodology for assessing the magnitude, variability, and driving mechanisms of bottom stress and resultant sediment mobility on regional scales using numerical model output. The analysis was applied to the Middle Atlantic Bight (MAB), off the U.S. East Coast, and identified a tidally-dominated shallow region with relatively high stress southeast of Massachusetts over Nantucket Shoals, where sediment mobility thresholds are exceeded over 50% of the time; a coastal band extending offshore to about 30 m water depth dominated by waves, where mobility occurs more than 20% of the time; and a quiescent low stress region southeast of Long Island, approximately coincident with an area of fine-grained sediments called the “Mud Patch”. The regional high in stress and mobility over Nantucket Shoals supports the hypothesis that fine grain sediment winnowed away in this region maintains the Mud Patch to the southwest. The analysis identified waves as the driving mechanism for stress throughout most of the MAB, excluding Nantucket Shoals and sheltered coastal bays where tides dominate; however, the relative dominance of low-frequency events varied regionally, and increased southward toward Cape Hatteras. The correlation between wave stress and local wind stress was lowest in the central MAB, indicating a relatively high contribution of swell to bottom stress in this area, rather than locally generated waves. Accurate prediction of the wave energy spectrum was critical to produce good estimates of bottom shear stress, which was sensitive to energy in the long period waves.

  4. Evidence that release of adenosine triphosphate from endothelial cells during increased shear stress is vesicular.

    PubMed

    Bodin, P; Burnstock, G

    2001-12-01

    In response to increased shear stress, vascular endothelial cells release adenosine triphosphate (ATP) by an unknown mechanism. We have investigated this mechanism using different approaches. First, we discovered that quinacrine, used to locate intracellular stores of ATP bound to peptides, displayed a granular fluorescence, typical of vesicular storage. Second, we found that two inhibitors of vesicular transport (monensin and N-ethylmaleimide) produced a highly significant reduction in the release of ATP from vascular endothelial cells in response to increased shear stress. Preliminary experiments using inhibitors of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator, the sulfonylurea receptor, and the multidrug resistance protein showed no involvement of these ATP-binding cassette transporter proteins (previously characterized in endothelial cells) in the mechanism of release of ATP. We suggest, therefore, that the release of ATP from vascular endothelial cells, like that of nerve cells, is probably by vesicular exocytosis.

  5. Membrane stress and internal pressure in a red blood cell freely suspended in a shear flow.

    PubMed Central

    Tran-Son-Tay, R; Sutera, S P; Zahalak, G I; Rao, P R

    1987-01-01

    Presented is an algorithm for the approximate calculation of the membrane stress distribution and the internal pressure of a steadily tank-treading red cell. The algorithm is based on an idealized ellipsoidal model of the tank-treading cell (Keller, S.R., and R. Skalak, 1982, J. Fluid Mech., 120:27-47) joined with experimental observations of projected length, width, and tank-treading frequency. The results are inexact because the membrane shape and velocity are assumed a priori, rather than being determined via appropriate material constitutive relations for the membrane; these results are, nevertheless, believed to be approximately correct, and show that internal pressure builds up slowly as cell elongation increases, rising more rapidly as the deformed cell approaches the limiting geometry of a prolate ellipsoid. The maximum shear stress resultant in the membrane was found to be below but approaching the yield point range at the highest shear rate applied. Images FIGURE 1 PMID:3607212

  6. Controlling Shear Stress in 3D Bioprinting is a Key Factor to Balance Printing Resolution and Stem Cell Integrity.

    PubMed

    Blaeser, Andreas; Duarte Campos, Daniela Filipa; Puster, Uta; Richtering, Walter; Stevens, Molly M; Fischer, Horst

    2016-02-04

    A microvalve-based bioprinting system for the manufacturing of high-resolution, multimaterial 3D-structures is reported. Applying a straightforward fluid-dynamics model, the shear stress at the nozzle site can precisely be controlled. Using this system, a broad study on how cell viability and proliferation potential are affected by different levels of shear stress is conducted. Complex, multimaterial 3D structures are printed with high resolution. This work pioneers the investigation of shear stress-induced cell damage in 3D bioprinting and might help to comprehend and improve the outcome of cell-printing studies in the future.

  7. Shear stress influences the pluripotency of murine embryonic stem cells in stirred suspension bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Gareau, Tia; Lara, Giovanna G; Shepherd, Robert D; Krawetz, Roman; Rancourt, Derrick E; Rinker, Kristina D; Kallos, Michael S

    2014-04-01

    Pluripotent embryonic stem cells (ESCs) have been used increasingly in research as primary material for various tissue-engineering applications. Pluripotency, or the ability to give rise to all cells of the body, is an important characteristic of ESCs. Traditional methods use leukaemia inhibitory factor (LIF) to maintain murine embryonic stem cell (mESC) pluripotency in static and bioreactor cultures. When LIF is removed from mESCs in static cultures, pluripotency genes are downregulated and the cultures will spontaneously differentiate. Recently we have shown the maintenance of pluripotency gene expression of mESCs in stirred suspension bioreactors during differentiation experiments in the absence of LIF. This is undesired in a differentiation experiment, where the goal is downregulation of pluripotency gene expression and upregulation of gene expression characteristic to the differentiation. Thus, the objective of this study was to examine how effectively different levels of shear stress [100 rpm (6 dyne/cm(2) ), 60 rpm (3 dyne/cm(2) )] maintained and influenced pluripotency in suspension bioreactors. The pluripotency markers Oct-4, Nanog, Sox-2 and Rex-1 were assessed using gene expression profiles and flow-cytometry analysis and showed that shear stress does maintain and influence the gene expression of certain pluripotency markers. Some significant differences between the two levels of shear stress were seen and the combination of shear stress and LIF was observed to synergistically increase the expression of certain pluripotency markers. Overall, this study provides a better understanding of the environmental conditions within suspension bioreactors and how these conditions affect the pluripotency of mESCs.

  8. Imaging the cellular response to transient shear stress using time-resolved digital holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arita, Yoshihiko; Antkowiak, Maciej; Gunn-Moore, Frank; Dholakia, Kishan

    2014-02-01

    Shear stress has been recognized as one of the biophysical methods by which to permeabilize plasma membranes of cells. In particular, high pressure transient hydrodynamic flows created by laser-induced cavitation have been shown to lead to the uptake of fluorophores and plasmid DNA. While the mechanism and dynamics of cavitation have been extensively studied using a variety of time-resolved imaging techniques, the cellular response to the cavitation bubble and cavitation induced transient hydrodynamic flows has never been shown in detail. We use time-resolved quantitative phase microscopy to study cellular response to laser-induced cavitation bubbles. Laser-induced breakdown of an optically trapped polystyrene nanoparticle (500nm in diameter) irradiated with a single nanosecond laser pulse at 532nm creates transient shear stress to surrounding cells without causing cell lysis. A bi-directional transient displacement of cytoplasm is observed during expansion and collapse of the cavitation bubble. In some cases, cell deformation is only observable at the microsecond time scale without any permanent change in cell shape or optical thickness. On a time scale of seconds, the cellular response to shear stress and cytoplasm deformation typically leads to retraction of the cellular edge most exposed to the flow, rounding of the cell body and, in some cases, loss of cellular dry mass. These results give a new insight into the cellular response to laser-induced shear stress and related plasma membrane permeabilization. This study also demonstrates that laser-induced breakdown of an optically trapped nanoparticle offers localized cavitation (70 μm in diameter), which interacts with a single cell.

  9. A Fiber Optic Sensor Sensitive To Normal Pressure And Shear Stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuomo, Frank W.; Kidwell, Robert S.; Hu, Andong

    1986-11-01

    A fiber optic lever sensing technique that can be used to measure normal pressure as well as shear stresses is discussed. This method uses three unequal fibers combining small size and good sensitivity. Static measurements appear to confirm the theoretical models predicted by geometrical optics and dynamic tests performed at frequencies up to 10 kHz indicate a flat response within this frequency range. These sensors are intended for use in a low speed wind tunnel environment.

  10. Two-Axis Direct Fluid Shear Stress Sensor for Aerodynamic Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bajikar, Sateesh S.; Scott, Michael A.; Adcock, Edward E.

    2011-01-01

    This miniature or micro-sized semiconductor sensor design provides direct, nonintrusive measurement of skin friction or wall shear stress in fluid flow situations in a two-axis configuration. The sensor is fabricated by microelectromechanical system (MEMS) technology, enabling small size and multiple, low-cost reproductions. The sensors may be fabricated by bonding a sensing element wafer to a fluid-coupling element wafer. Using this layered machine structure provides a truly three-dimensional device.

  11. Pulsatile flows and wall-shear stresses in models simulating normal and stenosed aortic arches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Rong Fung; Yang, Ten-Fang; Lan, Y.-K.

    2010-03-01

    Pulsatile aqueous glycerol solution flows in the models simulating normal and stenosed human aortic arches are measured by means of particle image velocimetry. Three transparent models were used: normal, 25% stenosed, and 50% stenosed aortic arches. The Womersley parameter, Dean number, and time-averaged Reynolds number are 17.31, 725, and 1,081, respectively. The Reynolds numbers based on the peak velocities of the normal, 25% stenosed, and 50% stenosed aortic arches are 2,484, 3,456, and 3,931, respectively. The study presents the temporal/spatial evolution processes of the flow pattern, velocity distribution, and wall-shear stress during the systolic and diastolic phases. It is found that the flow pattern evolving in the central plane of normal and stenosed aortic arches exhibits (1) a separation bubble around the inner arch, (2) a recirculation vortex around the outer arch wall upstream of the junction of the brachiocephalic artery, (3) an accelerated main stream around the outer arch wall near the junctions of the left carotid and the left subclavian arteries, and (4) the vortices around the entrances of the three main branches. The study identifies and discusses the reasons for the flow physics’ contribution to the formation of these features. The oscillating wall-shear stress distributions are closely related to the featured flow structures. On the outer wall of normal and slightly stenosed aortas, large wall-shear stresses appear in the regions upstream of the junction of the brachiocephalic artery as well as the corner near the junctions of the left carotid artery and the left subclavian artery. On the inner wall, the largest wall-shear stress appears in the region where the boundary layer separates.

  12. Low-Shear modeled microgravity alters the Salmonella enterica serovar typhimurium stress response in an RpoS-independent manner.

    PubMed

    Wilson, James W; Ott, C Mark; Ramamurthy, Rajee; Porwollik, Steffen; McClelland, Michael; Pierson, Duane L; Nickerson, Cheryl A

    2002-11-01

    We have previously demonstrated that low-shear modeled microgravity (low-shear MMG) serves to enhance the virulence of a bacterial pathogen, Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium. The Salmonella response to low-shear MMG involves a signaling pathway that we have termed the low-shear MMG stimulon, though the identities of the low-shear MMG stimulon genes and regulatory factors are not known. RpoS is the primary sigma factor required for the expression of genes that are induced upon exposure to different environmental-stress signals and is essential for virulence in mice. Since low-shear MMG induces a Salmonella acid stress response and enhances Salmonella virulence, we reasoned that RpoS would be a likely regulator of the Salmonella low-shear MMG response. Our results demonstrate that low-shear MMG provides cross-resistance to several environmental stresses in both wild-type and isogenic rpoS mutant strains. Growth under low-shear MMG decreased the generation time of both strains in minimal medium and increased the ability of both strains to survive in J774 macrophages. Using DNA microarray analysis, we found no evidence of induction of the RpoS regulon by low-shear MMG but did find that other genes were altered in expression under these conditions in both the wild-type and rpoS mutant strains. Our results indicate that, under the conditions of these studies, RpoS is not required for transmission of the signal that induces the low-shear MMG stimulon. Moreover, our studies also indicate that low-shear MMG can be added to a short list of growth conditions that can serve to preadapt an rpoS mutant for resistance to multiple environmental stresses.

  13. Low-Shear modeled microgravity alters the Salmonella enterica serovar typhimurium stress response in an RpoS-independent manner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, James W.; Ott, C. Mark; Ramamurthy, Rajee; Porwollik, Steffen; McClelland, Michael; Pierson, Duane L.; Nickerson, Cheryl A.

    2002-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated that low-shear modeled microgravity (low-shear MMG) serves to enhance the virulence of a bacterial pathogen, Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium. The Salmonella response to low-shear MMG involves a signaling pathway that we have termed the low-shear MMG stimulon, though the identities of the low-shear MMG stimulon genes and regulatory factors are not known. RpoS is the primary sigma factor required for the expression of genes that are induced upon exposure to different environmental-stress signals and is essential for virulence in mice. Since low-shear MMG induces a Salmonella acid stress response and enhances Salmonella virulence, we reasoned that RpoS would be a likely regulator of the Salmonella low-shear MMG response. Our results demonstrate that low-shear MMG provides cross-resistance to several environmental stresses in both wild-type and isogenic rpoS mutant strains. Growth under low-shear MMG decreased the generation time of both strains in minimal medium and increased the ability of both strains to survive in J774 macrophages. Using DNA microarray analysis, we found no evidence of induction of the RpoS regulon by low-shear MMG but did find that other genes were altered in expression under these conditions in both the wild-type and rpoS mutant strains. Our results indicate that, under the conditions of these studies, RpoS is not required for transmission of the signal that induces the low-shear MMG stimulon. Moreover, our studies also indicate that low-shear MMG can be added to a short list of growth conditions that can serve to preadapt an rpoS mutant for resistance to multiple environmental stresses.

  14. Efforts to reduce mortality to hydroelectric turbine-passed fish: locating and quantifying damaging shear stresses.

    PubMed

    Cada, Glenn; Loar, James; Garrison, Laura; Fisher, Richard; Neitzel, Duane

    2006-06-01

    Severe fluid forces are believed to be a source of injury and mortality to fish that pass through hydroelectric turbines. A process is described by which laboratory bioassays, computational fluid dynamics models, and field studies can be integrated to evaluate the significance of fluid shear stresses that occur in a turbine. Areas containing potentially lethal shear stresses were identified near the stay vanes and wicket gates, runner, and in the draft tube of a large Kaplan turbine. However, under typical operating conditions, computational models estimated that these dangerous areas comprise less than 2% of the flow path through the modeled turbine. The predicted volumes of the damaging shear stress zones did not correlate well with observed fish mortality at a field installation of this turbine, which ranged from less than 1% to nearly 12%. Possible reasons for the poor correlation are discussed. Computational modeling is necessary to develop an understanding of the role of particular fish injury mechanisms, to compare their effects with those of other sources of injury, and to minimize the trial and error previously needed to mitigate those effects. The process we describe is being used to modify the design of hydroelectric turbines to improve fish passage survival.

  15. Wall Shear Stress in Oscillating Channel Flow Using Particle Image Velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lance, Blake; Roberts, Jesse; Smith, Barton; Kearney, Sean

    2013-11-01

    Offshore wind and water power are renewable sources with the potential for significant power generation. But each generation mechanism has risks from ocean floor structures that can disrupt natural sediment transport by increasing local shear stress. The Sediment Erosion Actuated by Wave Oscillations and Linear Flow (SEAWOLF) flume was designed and built to replicate wave motion with both oscillatory and unidirectional components to study sediment transport. The rectangular test section provides optical access for Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) measurements. Additionally series of pressure taps allow for differential pressure measurements. Sine-wave oscillations and unidirectional flow in more than a dozen combinations are measured and presented. Phase locked measurements of volume flow rates, velocity fields, and pressure are acquired over several hundred cycles and phase averaged. High spatial resolution PIV is used near the wall for direct shear stress measurements. Since the flow is unsteady, the pressure drop in the test section has both inertial and friction contributions. To isolate the friction term, the pressure resulting from the fluid acceleration is subtracted. The synced PIV and pressure measurements on smooth walls where the viscous sublayer is formed confirm the accuracy of this method. The pressure sensor then measures shear stress on rough walls where the viscous sublayer is disrupted or non-existent and where optical access is difficult.

  16. Live imaging and modeling for shear stress quantification in the embryonic zebrafish heart.

    PubMed

    Boselli, Francesco; Vermot, Julien

    2016-02-01

    Hemodynamic shear stress is sensed by the endocardial cells composing the inner cell layer of the heart, and plays a major role in cardiac morphogenesis. Yet, the underlying hemodynamics and the associated mechanical stimuli experienced by endocardial cells remains poorly understood. Progress in the field has been hampered by the need for high temporal resolution imaging allowing the flow profiles generated in the beating heart to be resolved. To fill this gap, we propose a method to analyze the wall dynamics, the flow field, and the wall shear stress of the developing zebrafish heart. This method combines live confocal imaging and computational fluid dynamics to overcome difficulties related to live imaging of blood flow in the developing heart. To provide an example of the applicability of the method, we discuss the hemodynamic frequency content sensed by endocardial cells at the onset of valve formation, and how the fundamental frequency of the wall shear stress represents a unique mechanical cue to endocardial, heart-valve precursors.

  17. Measurements of gap pressure and wall shear stress of a blood pump model.

    PubMed

    Chua, L P; Akamatsu, T

    2000-04-01

    The centrifugal blood pump with a magnetically suspended impeller has shown its superiority as compared to other artificial hearts. However, there is still insufficient understanding of fluid mechanics related issues in the clearance gap. The design nature of the pump requires sufficient washout in the clearance between the impeller and stationary surfaces. As the gap is only 0.2 mm in width, it is very difficult to conduct measurements with present instrumentation. An enlarged model with 5:1 ratio of the pump has been designed and constructed according to specifications. Dimensionless gap pressure measurements of the model are very close to the prototype. The measurements of wall shear stress of the fluid flow in the clearance gap between the impeller face and inlet casing of a blood pump model were accomplished through hot-wire anemometry and rotating disk apparatus. Regions of relatively high and low shear stresses are identified. These correspond to spots where the likelihood of hemolysis and thrombus formation is high. With the use of dimensional analysis, it is found that the highest wall shear stress is equivalent to 146 Pa which is much lower than the threshold value of 400 Pa for hemolysis reported in the literature.

  18. Mass Transport and Shear Stress as Mediators of Flow Effects on Atherosclerotic Plaque Origin and Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorder, Riley; Aliseda, Alberto

    2009-11-01

    The carotid artery bifurcation (CAB) is one of the leading site for atherosclerosis, a major cause of mortality and morbidity in the developed world. The specific mechanisms by which perturbed flow at the bifurcation and in the carotid bulge promotes plaque formation and growth are not fully understood. Shear stress, mass transport, and flow residence times are considered dominant factors. Shear stress causes restructuring of endothelial cells at the arterial wall which changes the wall's permeability. Long residence times are associated with enhanced mass transport through increased diffusion of lipids and white blood cells into the arterial wall. Although momentum and mass transfer are traditionally coupled by correlations similar to Reynolds Analogy, the complex flow patterns present in this region due to the pulsatile, transitional, detached flow associated with the complex geometry makes the validity of commonly accepted assumptions uncertain. We create solid models of the CAB from MRI or ultrasound medical images, build flow phantoms on clear polyester resin and use an IOR matching, blood mimicking, working fluid. Using PIV and dye injection techniques the shear stress and scalar transport are experimentally investigated. Our goal is to establish a quantitative relationship between momentum and mass transfer under a wide range of physiologically normal and pathological conditions.

  19. Velocity profile and wall shear stress of saccular aneurysms at the anterior communicating artery.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Ryuhei; Ujiie, Hiroshi; Haida, Sayaka; Nakazawa, Nobuhiko; Hori, Tomokatsu

    2008-01-01

    It has recently been shown that the aspect ratio (dome/neck) of an aneurysm correlates well with intraaneurysmal blood flow. Aneurysms with an aspect ratio larger than 1.6 carry a higher risk of rupture. We examined the effect of aspect ratio (AR) on intra-aneurysmal flow using experimental models. Flow visualization with particle imaging velocimetry and measurement of wall shear stress using laser Doppler anemometry were performed on three different aneurysm models: AR 0.5, 1.0, and 2.0. Intraaneurysmal flow consists of inflow, circulation, and outflow. Rapid inflow impinged on the distal neck creating a stagnant point. Rapid flow and maximum wall shear stress were observed in the vicinity of the stagnant point. By changing the Reynold's number, the stagnant point moved. By increasing the AR of the aneurysm, vortices inside the aneurysm sac closed and very slow flow was observed, resulting in very low shear stress markedly at a Reynold's number of 250, compatible with the diastolic phase. In the aneurysm model AR 2.0, both rapid flow at the neck and vortices inside the aneurysm are sufficient to activate platelets, making a thrombus that may anchor on the dome where very slow flow takes place. Hemodynamics in aneurysms larger than AR 2.0 definitely contribute to thrombus formation.

  20. Quantifying Uncertainty in Inferred Viscosity and Basal Shear Stress Over Ice Streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lilien, D.; Joughin, I.; Smith, B. E.

    2015-12-01

    Basal friction and ice viscosity are both essential controls on glacier motion that cannot be measured by remote sensing. In order to initialize models, it is common practice to use inverse methods to determine the basal shear stress over grounded ice and the viscosity of floating ice. It is difficult to quantify the uncertainty in the inferred parameters due to the computational expense of the procedure, the choice of regularization parameter, and the errors in the various measurements used as input, as well as differences in inversion method. Various methods can be used to perform the inversion, and these differing procedures cause discrepancies in the inferred properties of the ice streams. Additionally, the inferred parameters depend on the sophistication of the approximation for ice flow that is used, e.g. full-Stokes or the shallow-shelf approximation. We analyze the impact the choices of modeling procedure and inversion method have on inferred ice properties. To do this we perform a number of inversions for basal shear stress and for ice shelf viscosity over Smith, Pope, and Kohler Glaciers in West Antarctica and assess the sensitivity to modelers' choices. We use both a three dimensional full-Stokes model and a two dimensional shallow-shelf model, with both Robin and adjoint type inversion procedures, to infer basal shear stress and ice viscosity. We compare the results of these different methods and evaluate their implication on uncertainty in the unknown parameters.

  1. In situ measurements of shear stresses of a flushing wave in a circular sewer using ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Staufer, P; Pinnekamp, J

    2008-01-01

    Deposits build up in sewer networks during both spells of dry weather and in connection with storm water events. In order to reduce the negative effects of deposit on the environment, different cleaning technologies and strategies are applied to remove the deposits. Jet cleaning represents the most widely used method to clean sewers. Another alternative cleaning procedure is flushing. On account of new developments in measurement and control panels, the flushing method is becoming more important. Therefore, in the last few years a number of new flushing devices have been constructed for application in basins, main sewers and initial reaches. Today, automatic flushing gates are able to accomplish cleaning procedures under economical and ecological conditions. The properties of flushing waves for cleaning sewers have been determined by several mathematical-numerical studies. These various investigations use altering numerical schemes, are based on different sets of physical equations and take one- or more dimensional aspects into account. Considering that bottom shear stress is the key value to evaluate the beginning of motion of any deposit, one may use this value that has to be determined by measurements. This paper deals with shear stresses caused by flushing waves which have been measured by an ultrasonic device that can determine the velocity in different depths of flow. Thus, it is possible, within certain limits, to calculate bottom shear stresses based on the log-wall law. Further discussion will deal with the requirements of measurements, its uncertainty and aspects in respect to the application of simulation of flushing waves.

  2. Effect of Shear Stress on Permeability of Vascular Endothelial Monolayer Cocultured with Smooth Muscle Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakamoto, Naoya; Ohashi, Toshiro; Sato, Masaaki

    Effect of fluid shear stress on permeability of endothelial monolayer was investigated using an endothelial cell (EC)-smooth muscle cell (SMC) cocultured model (CM). Permeability of ECs to bovine serum albumin was measured after exposure to shear stress of 1.5Pa for 48 hours. Morphology and VE-cadherin expression of ECs in CM was almost same as of ECs cultured alone (monocultured model, MM). Under static condition, EC permeability was 5.1±3.0 × 10-6cm/sec (mean±SD) in MM and 6.5±3.4 × 10-6cm/sec in CM. After exposure to shear stress, EC permeability in CM (2.2±1.9 × 10-6cm/sec, p < 0.05) significantly decreased compared with the static model. However, EC permeability in MM (3.9±3.2 × 10-6cm/sec) did not significantly change compared with static cultured condition. These results suggested that cellular interactions between ECs and SMCs have important influences on EC permeability.

  3. Sensor for Direct Measurement of the Boundary Shear Stress in Fluid Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bao, Xiaoqi; Badescu, Mircea; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Lih, Shyh-Shiuh; Sherrit, Stewart; Chang, Zensheu; Chen, Beck; Widholm, Scott; Ostlund, Patrick

    2011-01-01

    The formation of scour patterns at bridge piers is driven by the forces at the boundary of the water flow. In most experimental scour studies, indirect processes have been applied to estimate the shear and normal stress using measured velocity profiles. The estimations are based on theoretical models and associated assumptions. However, the turbulence flow fields and boundary layer in the pier-scour region are very complex. In addition, available turbulence models cannot account accurately for the bed roughness effect. Direct measurement of the boundary shear and normal stress and their fluctuations are attractive alternatives. However, this approach is a challenging one especially for high spatial resolution and high fidelity measurements. The authors designed and fabricated a prototype miniature shear stress sensor including an EDM machined floating plate and a high-resolution laser optical encoder. Tests were performed both in air as well as operation in water with controlled flow. The sensor sensitivity, stability and signal-to-noise level were measured and evaluated. The detailed test results and a discussion of future work will be presented in this paper.

  4. Assessment of pulsatile wall shear stress in compliant arteries: numerical model, validation and experimental data.

    PubMed

    Salvucci, Fernando P; Perazzo, Carlos A; Barra, Juan G; Armentano, Ricardo L

    2009-01-01

    There is evidence that wall shear stress (WSS) is associated with vascular disease. In particular, it is widely accepted that vascular segments with low or oscillatory values of WSS are more probable to develop vascular disease. It is then necessary to establish a realistic model of the blood flow in blood vessels in order to determine precisely WSS. We proposed a numerical 1D model which takes into account the pulsatile nature of blood flow, the elasticity of the vessel, and its geometry. The model allows the calculation of shear stress. It was validated for stationary situations. Then, we computed the time-dependent WSS distribution from experimental data in the sheep thoracic aorta. Results showed that mean WSS calculated through steady flow and rigid walls models is overestimated. Peak WSS values for pulsatile flow must be considered since they resulted to be at least one order higher than mean values. Oscillations in shear stress in a period showed to be approximately of 40%. These findings show that the proposed model is suitable for estimating time-dependent WSS distributions, and confirm the need of using this kind of model when trying to evaluate realistic WSS in blood vessels.

  5. Reynolds shear stress development in pressure-driven three-dimensional turbulent boundary-layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, S. D.; Eaton, J. K.

    1987-01-01

    The development of the Reynolds stresses has been examined experimentally in an initially two-dimensional boundary layer which is driven to three dimensionality by a spanwise pressure gradient. The pressure field was imposed by an upstream-facing wedge. Two different wedge angles were used in order to vary the level of boundary layer skewing. Bradshaw's Al parameter was found to decrease with the rate of decrease being dependent on the level of skewing between the freestream and the wall flow. It was also concluded that the ratio of the cross-stream to streamwise shear stress components was governed by the rate of freestream turning.

  6. Stress intensity factors in bonded half planes containing inclined cracks and subjected to antiplane shear loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bassani, J. L.; Erdogan, F.

    1978-01-01

    The antiplane shear problem for two bonded dissimilar half planes containing a semi-infinite crack or two arbitrarily located collinear cracks was considered. For the semi-infinite crack the problem was solved for a concentrated wedge load and the stress intensity factor and the angular distribution of stresses were calculated. For finite cracks the problem was reduced to a pair of integral equations. Numerical results were obtained for cracks fully imbedded in a homogeneous medium, one crack tip touching the interface, and a crack crossing the interface for various crack angles.

  7. Stress intensity factors in bonded half planes containing inclined cracks and subjected to antiplane shear loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bassani, J. L.; Erdogan, F.

    1979-01-01

    The antiplane shear problem for two bonded dissimilar half planes containing a semi-infinite crack or two arbitrarily located collinear cracks is considered. For the semi-infinite crack the problem is solved for a concentrated wedge load and the stress intensity factor and the angular distribution of stresses are calculated. For finite cracks the problem is reduced to a pair of integral equations. Numerical results are obtained for cracks fully imbedded in a homogeneous medium, one crack tip touching the interface, and a crack crossing the interface for various crack angles.

  8. The effect of turbulent viscous shear stress on red blood cell hemolysis.

    PubMed

    Yen, Jen-Hong; Chen, Sheng-Fu; Chern, Ming-Kai; Lu, Po-Chien

    2014-06-01

    Non-physiologic turbulent flow occurs in medical cardiovascular devices resulting in hemodynamic stresses that may damage red blood cells (RBC) and cause hemolysis. Hemolysis was previously thought to result from Reynolds shear stress (RSS) in turbulent flows. A more recent hypothesis suggests that turbulent viscous shear stresses (TVSS) at spatial scales similar in size to RBCs are related to their damage. We applied two-dimensional digital particle image velocimetry to measure the flow field of a free-submerged axisymmetric jet that was utilized to hemolyze porcine RBCs in selected locations. Assuming a dynamic equilibrium for the sub-grid scale (SGS) energy flux between the resolved and the sub-grid scales, the SGS energy flux was calculated from the strain rate tensor computed from the resolved velocity fields. The SGS stress was determined by the Smagorinsky model, from which the turbulence dissipation rate and then TVSS were estimated. Our results showed the hemolytic threshold of the Reynolds stresses was up to 517 Pa, and the TVSSs were at least an order of magnitude less than the RSS. The results provide further insight into the relationship between turbulence and RBC damage.

  9. Recent Developments in the Use of Liquid Crystal Coatings for Full-Surface Shear Stress Vector Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reda, D. C.; Wilder, M. C.; Zilliac, G.; Hu, K. C.; Whitney, D. J.; Deardorff, D. G.; Moffat, R. J.; Farina, D. J.; Danek, C.; Martinez, R.; Davis, Sanford S. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    Under normal white-light illumination and oblique observation, liquid crystal coating (LCC) color-change response to shear depends on both shear stress magnitude as well as the direction of the applied shear relative to the observer's line of sight. These color-change responses were quantified by subjecting a LCC to a wall-jet shear flow and measuring scattered-light spectra using a fiber optic probe and spectrophotometer. At any fixed shear stress magnitude, the maximum color change was measured when the shear vector was aligned with and directed away from the observer; changes in the relative in-plane view angle to either side of this vector/observer aligned position resulted in symmetric Gaussian reductions in measured color change. For this vector/observer aligned orientation, color change was found to scale linearly with increasing shear stress magnitude over an eight-fold range. Based on these results, a surface shear stress vector measurement methodology, involving multiple oblique-view observations of the test surface, was formulated. In the present paper, the experimental approach and data analysis procedure required to extend this vector measurement methodology to full-surface applications will be outlined and progress towards demonstrating this areal capability will be reviewed.

  10. Caveolin-1 regulates shear stress-dependent activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, H.; Go, Y. M.; Darji, R.; Choi, J. W.; Lisanti, M. P.; Maland, M. C.; Jo, H.

    2000-01-01

    Fluid shear stress activates a member of the mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase family, extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), by mechanisms dependent on cholesterol in the plasma membrane in bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAEC). Caveolae are microdomains of the plasma membrane that are enriched with cholesterol, caveolin, and signaling molecules. We hypothesized that caveolin-1 regulates shear activation of ERK. Because caveolin-1 is not exposed to the outside, cells were minimally permeabilized by Triton X-100 (0.01%) to deliver a neutralizing, polyclonal caveolin-1 antibody (pCav-1) inside the cells. pCav-1 then bound to caveolin-1 and inhibited shear activation of ERK but not c-Jun NH(2)-terminal kinase. Epitope mapping studies showed that pCav-1 binds to caveolin-1 at two regions (residues 1-21 and 61-101). When the recombinant proteins containing the epitopes fused to glutathione-S-transferase (GST-Cav(1-21) or GST-Cav(61-101)) were preincubated with pCav-1, only GST-Cav(61-101) reversed the inhibitory effect of the antibody on shear activation of ERK. Other antibodies, including m2234, which binds to caveolin-1 residues 1-21, had no effect on shear activation of ERK. Caveolin-1 residues 61-101 contain the scaffolding and oligomerization domains, suggesting that binding of pCav-1 to these regions likely disrupts the clustering of caveolin-1 or its interaction with signaling molecules involved in the shear-sensitive ERK pathway. We suggest that caveolae-like domains play a critical role in the mechanosensing and/or mechanosignal transduction of the ERK pathway.

  11. Turbulence significantly increases pressure and fluid shear stress in an aortic aneurysm model under resting and exercise flow conditions.

    PubMed

    Khanafer, Khalil M; Bull, Joseph L; Upchurch, Gilbert R; Berguer, Ramon

    2007-01-01

    The numerical models of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) in use do not take into account the non-Newtonian behavior of blood and the development of local turbulence. This study examines the influence of pulsatile, turbulent, non-Newtonian flow on fluid shear stresses and pressure changes under rest and exercise conditions. We numerically analyzed pulsatile turbulent flow, using simulated physiological rest and exercise waveforms, in axisymmetric-rigid aortic aneurysm models (AAMs). Discretization of governing equations was achieved using a finite element scheme. Maximum turbulence-induced shear stress was found at the distal end of an AAM. In large AAMs (dilated to undilated diameter ratio = 3.33) at peak systolic flow velocity, fluid shear stress during exercise is 70.4% higher than at rest. Our study provides a numerical, noninvasive method for obtaining detailed data on the forces generated by pulsatile turbulent flow in AAAs that are difficult to study in humans and in physical models. Our data suggest that increased flow turbulence results in increased shear stress in aneurysms. While pressure readings are fairly uniform along the length of an aneurysm, the kinetic energy generated by turbulence impacting on the wall of the distal half of the aneurysm increases fluid and wall shear stress at this site. If the increased fluid shear stress results in further dilation and hence further turbulence, wall stress may be a mechanism for aneurysmal growth and eventual rupture.

  12. Aeolian Shear Stress Ratio Measurements within Mesquite-Dominated Landscapes of the Chihuahuan Desert, New Mexico, USA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, James; Nickling, W. G.; Gilliles, J. A.

    2006-01-01

    A field study was conducted to ascertain the amount of protection that mesquite-dominated communities provide to the surface from wind erosion. The dynamics of the locally accelerated evolution of a mesquite/coppice dune landscape and the undetermined spatial dependence of potential erosion by wind from a shear stress partition model were investigated. Sediment transport and dust emission processes are governed by the amount of protection that can be provided by roughness elements. Although shear stress partition models exist that can describe this, their accuracy has only been tested against a limited dataset because instrumentation has previously been unable to provide the necessary measurements. This study combines the use of meteorological towers and surface shear stress measurements with Irwin sensors to measure the partition of shear stress in situ. The surface shear stress within preferentially aligned vegetation (within coppice dune development) exhibited highly skewed distributions, while a more homogenous surface stress was recorded at a site with less developed coppice dunes. Above the vegetation, the logarithmic velocity profile deduced roughness length (based on 10-min averages) exhibited a distinct correlation with compass direction for the site with vegetation preferentially aligned, while the site with more homogenously distributed vegetation showed very little variation in the roughness length. This distribution in roughness length within an area, defines a distribution of a resolved shear stress partitioning model based on these measurements, ultimately providing potential closure to a previously uncorrelated model parameter.

  13. Fatigue surviving, fracture resistance, shear stress and finite element analysis of glass fiber posts with different diameters.

    PubMed

    Wandscher, Vinícius Felipe; Bergoli, César Dalmolin; de Oliveira, Ariele Freitas; Kaizer, Osvaldo Bazzan; Souto Borges, Alexandre Luiz; Limberguer, Inácio da Fontoura; Valandro, Luiz Felipe

    2015-03-01

    This study evaluated the shear stress presented in glass fiber posts with parallel fiber (0°) and different coronal diameters under fatigue, fracture resistance and FEA. 160 glass-fiber posts (N=160) with eight different coronal diameters were used (DT=double tapered, number of the post=coronal diameter and W=Wider - fiber post with coronal diameter wider than the conventional): DT1.4; DT1.8W; DT1.6; DT2W; DT1.8; DT2.2W; DT2; DT2.2. Eighty posts were submitted to mechanical cycling (3×10(6) cycles; inclination: 45°; load: 50N; frequency: 4Hz; temperature: 37°C) to assess the surviving under intermittent loading and other eighty posts were submitted to fracture resistance testing (resistance [N] and shear-stress [MPa] values were obtained). The eight posts types were 3D modeled (Rhinoceros 4.0) and the shear-stress (MPa) evaluated using FEA (Ansys 13.0). One-way ANOVA showed statistically differences to fracture resistance (DT2.2W and DT2.2 showed higher values) and shear stress values (DT1.4 showed lower values). Only the DT1.4 fiber posts failed after mechanical cycling. FEA showed similar values of shear stress between the groups and these values were similar to those obtained by shear stress testing. The failure analysis showed that 95% of specimens failed by shear. Posts with parallel fiber (0°) may suffer fractures when an oblique shear load is applied on the structure; except the thinner group, greater coronal diameters promoted the same shear stresses.

  14. Pressure and shear stress in trabecular bone marrow during whole bone loading.

    PubMed

    Metzger, Thomas A; Schwaner, Stephen A; LaNeve, Anthony J; Kreipke, Tyler C; Niebur, Glen L

    2015-09-18

    Skeletal adaptation to mechanical loading is controlled by mechanobiological signaling. Osteocytes are highly responsive to applied strains, and are the key mechanosensory cells in bone. However, many cells residing in the marrow also respond to mechanical cues such as hydrostatic pressure and shear stress, and hence could play a role in skeletal adaptation. Trabecular bone encapsulates marrow, forming a poroelastic solid. According to the mechanical theory, deformation of the pores induces motion in the fluid-like marrow, resulting in pressure and velocity gradients. The latter results in shear stress acting between the components of the marrow. To characterize the mechanical environment of trabecular bone marrow in situ, pore pressure within the trabecular compartment of whole porcine femurs was measured with miniature pressure transducers during stress-relaxation and cyclic loading. Pressure gradients ranging from 0.013 to 0.46 kPa/mm were measured during loading. This range was consistent with calculated pressure gradients from continuum scale poroelastic models with the same permeability. Micro-scale computational fluid dynamics models created from computed tomography images were used to calculate the micromechanical stress in the marrow using the measured pressure differentials as boundary conditions. The volume averaged shear stress in the marrow ranged from 1.67 to 24.55 Pa during cyclic loading, which exceeds the mechanostimulatory threshold for mesenchymal lineage cells. Thus, the loading of bone through activities of daily living may be an essential component of bone marrow health and mechanobiology. Additional studies of cell-level interactions during loading in healthy and disease conditions will provide further incite into marrow mechanobiology.

  15. Mis-sizing of stent promotes intimal hyperplasia: impact of endothelial shear and intramural stress.

    PubMed

    Chen, Henry Y; Sinha, Anjan K; Choy, Jenny S; Zheng, Hai; Sturek, Michael; Bigelow, Brian; Bhatt, Deepak L; Kassab, Ghassan S

    2011-12-01

    Stent can cause flow disturbances on the endothelium and compliance mismatch and increased stress on the vessel wall. These effects can cause low wall shear stress (WSS), high wall shear stress gradient (WSSG), oscillatory shear index (OSI), and circumferential wall stress (CWS), which may promote neointimal hyperplasia (IH). The hypothesis is that stent-induced abnormal fluid and solid mechanics contribute to IH. To vary the range of WSS, WSSG, OSI, and CWS, we intentionally mismatched the size of stents to that of the vessel lumen. Stents were implanted in coronary arteries of 10 swine. Intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) was used to size the coronary arteries and stents. After 4 wk of stent implantation, IVUS was performed again to determine the extent of IH. In conjunction, computational models of actual stents, the artery, and non-Newtonian blood were created in a computer simulation to yield the distribution of WSS, WSSG, OSI, and CWS in the stented vessel wall. An inverse relation (R(2) = 0.59, P < 0.005) between WSS and IH was found based on a linear regression analysis. Linear relations between WSSG, OSI, and IH were observed (R(2) = 0.48 and 0.50, respectively, P < 0.005). A linear relation (R(2) = 0.58, P < 0.005) between CWS and IH was also found. More statistically significant linear relations between the ratio of CWS to WSS (CWS/WSS), the products CWS × WSSG and CWS × OSI, and IH were observed (R(2) = 0.67, 0.54, and 0.56, respectively, P < 0.005), suggesting that both fluid and solid mechanics influence the extent of IH. Stents create endothelial flow disturbances and intramural wall stress concentrations, which correlate with the extent of IH formation, and these effects were exaggerated with mismatch of stent/vessel size. These findings reveal the importance of reliable vessel and stent sizing to improve the mechanics on the vessel wall and minimize IH.

  16. Side-implanted piezoresistive shear stress sensor for turbulent boundary layer measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yawei

    In this dissertation, I discuss the device modeling, design optimization, fabrication, packaging and characterization of a micromachined floating element piezoresistive shear stress sensor for the time-resolved, direct measurement of fluctuating wall shear stress in a turbulent flow. This device impacts a broad range of applications from fundamental scientific research to industrial flow control and biomedical applications. The sensor structure integrates side-implanted, diffused resistors into the silicon tethers for piezoresistive detection. Temperature compensation is enabled by integrating a fixed, dummy Wheatstone bridge adjacent to the active shear-stress sensor. A theoretical nonlinear mechanical model is combined with a piezoresistive sensing model to determine the electromechanical sensitivity. Lumped element modeling (LEM) is used to estimate the resonant frequency. Finite element modeling is employed to verify the quasi-static and dynamic models. Two dominant electrical noise sources in the piezoresistive shear stress sensor, 1/f noise and thermal noise, and amplifier noise were considered to determine the noise floor. These models were then leveraged to obtain optimal sensor designs for several sets of specifications. The cost function, minimum detectable shear stress (MDS) formulated in terms of sensitivity and noise floor, is minimized subject to nonlinear constraints of geometry, linearity, bandwidth, power, resistance, and manufacturing limitations. The optimization results indicate a predicted optimal device performance with a MDS of O(0.1 mPa) and a dynamic range greater than 75 dB. A sensitivity analysis indicates that the device performance is most responsive to variations in tether width. The sensors are fabricated using an 8-mask, bulk micromachining process on a silicon wafer. An n-well layer is formed to control the space-charge layer thickness of reverse-biased p/n junction-isolated piezoresistors. The sensor geometry is realized using

  17. Predicting equilibrium states with Reynolds stress closures in channel flow and homogeneous shear flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abid, R.; Speziale, C. G.

    1992-01-01

    Turbulent channel flow and homogeneous shear flow have served as basic building block flows for the testing and calibration of Reynolds stress models. A direct theoretical connection is made between homogeneous shear flow in equilibrium and the log-layer of fully-developed turbulent channel flow. It is shown that if a second-order closure model is calibrated to yield good equilibrium values for homogeneous shear flow it will also yield good results for the log-layer of channel flow provided that the Rotta coefficient is not too far removed from one. Most of the commonly used second-order closure models introduce an ad hoc wall reflection term in order to mask deficient predictions for the log-layer of channel flow that arise either from an inaccurate calibration of homogeneous shear flow or from the use of a Rotta coefficient that is too large. Illustrative model calculations are presented to demonstrate this point which has important implications for turbulence modeling.

  18. Role of fluid shear stress in regulating VWF structure, function and related blood disorders.

    PubMed

    Gogia, Shobhit; Neelamegham, Sriram

    2015-01-01

    Von Willebrand factor (VWF) is the largest glycoprotein in blood. It plays a crucial role in primary hemostasis via its binding interaction with platelet and endothelial cell surface receptors, other blood proteins and extra-cellular matrix components. This protein is found as a series of repeat units that are disulfide bonded to form multimeric structures. Once in blood, the protein multimer distribution is dynamically regulated by fluid shear stress which has two opposing effects: it promotes the aggregation or self-association of multiple VWF units, and it simultaneously reduces multimer size by facilitating the force-dependent cleavage of the protein by various proteases, most notably ADAMTS13 (a disintegrin and metalloprotease with thrombospondin type repeats, motif 1 type 13). In addition to these effects, fluid shear also controls the solution and substrate-immobilized structure of VWF, the nature of contact between blood platelets and substrates, and the biomechanics of the GpIbα-VWF bond. These features together regulate different physiological and pathological processes including normal hemostasis, arterial and venous thrombosis, von Willebrand disease, thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura and acquired von Willebrand syndrome. This article discusses current knowledge of VWF structure-function relationships with emphasis on the effects of hydrodynamic shear, including rapid methods to estimate the nature and magnitude of these forces in selected conditions. It shows that observations made by many investigators using solution and substrate-based shearing devices can be reconciled upon considering the physical size of VWF and the applied mechanical force in these different geometries.

  19. Differential regulation of protease activated receptor-1 and tissue plasminogen activator expression by shear stress in vascular smooth muscle cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papadaki, M.; Ruef, J.; Nguyen, K. T.; Li, F.; Patterson, C.; Eskin, S. G.; McIntire, L. V.; Runge, M. S.

    1998-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that vascular smooth muscle cells are responsive to changes in their local hemodynamic environment. The effects of shear stress on the expression of human protease activated receptor-1 (PAR-1) and tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) mRNA and protein were investigated in human aortic smooth muscle cells (HASMCs). Under conditions of low shear stress (5 dyn/cm2), PAR-1 mRNA expression was increased transiently at 2 hours compared with stationary control values, whereas at high shear stress (25 dyn/cm2), mRNA expression was decreased (to 29% of stationary control; P<0.05) at all examined time points (2 to 24 hours). mRNA half-life studies showed that this response was not due to increased mRNA instability. tPA mRNA expression was decreased (to 10% of stationary control; P<0.05) by low shear stress after 12 hours of exposure and was increased (to 250% of stationary control; P<0.05) after 24 hours at high shear stress. The same trends in PAR-1 mRNA levels were observed in rat smooth muscle cells, indicating that the effects of shear stress on human PAR-1 were not species-specific. Flow cytometry and ELISA techniques using rat smooth muscle cells and HASMCs, respectively, provided evidence that shear stress exerted similar effects on cell surface-associated PAR-1 and tPA protein released into the conditioned media. The decrease in PAR-1 mRNA and protein had functional consequences for HASMCs, such as inhibition of [Ca2+] mobilization in response to thrombin stimulation. These data indicate that human PAR-1 and tPA gene expression are regulated differentially by shear stress, in a pattern consistent with their putative roles in several arterial vascular pathologies.

  20. Role of xanthine oxidoreductase and NAD(P)H oxidase in endothelial superoxide production in response to oscillatory shear stress.

    PubMed

    McNally, J Scott; Davis, Michael E; Giddens, Don P; Saha, Aniket; Hwang, Jinah; Dikalov, Sergey; Jo, Hanjoong; Harrison, David G

    2003-12-01

    Oscillatory shear stress occurs at sites of the circulation that are vulnerable to atherosclerosis. Because oxidative stress contributes to atherosclerosis, we sought to determine whether oscillatory shear stress increases endothelial production of reactive oxygen species and to define the enzymes responsible for this phenomenon. Bovine aortic endothelial cells were exposed to static, laminar (15 dyn/cm2), and oscillatory shear stress (+/-15 dyn/cm2). Oscillatory shear increased superoxide (O2.-) production by more than threefold over static and laminar conditions as detected using electron spin resonance (ESR). This increase in O2*- was inhibited by oxypurinol and culture of endothelial cells with tungsten but not by inhibitors of other enzymatic sources. Oxypurinol also prevented H2O2 production in response to oscillatory shear stress as measured by dichlorofluorescin diacetate and Amplex Red fluorescence. Xanthine-dependent O2*- production was increased in homogenates of endothelial cells exposed to oscillatory shear stress. This was associated with decreased xanthine dehydrogenase (XDH) protein levels and enzymatic activity resulting in an elevated ratio of xanthine oxidase (XO) to XDH. We also studied endothelial cells lacking the p47phox subunit of the NAD(P)H oxidase. These cells exhibited dramatically depressed O2*- production and had minimal XO protein and activity. Transfection of these cells with p47phox restored XO protein levels. Finally, in bovine aortic endothelial cells, prolonged inhibition of the NAD(P)H oxidase with apocynin decreased XO protein levels and prevented endothelial cell stimulation of O2*- production in response to oscillatory shear stress. These data suggest that the NAD(P)H oxidase maintains endothelial cell XO levels and that XO is responsible for increased reactive oxygen species production in response to oscillatory shear stress.

  1. Proposal of a novel evaluation index for the effects of shear stress and exposure time on hepatocyte damage.

    PubMed

    Yasuda, Toshitaka; Obara, Hiromichi; Hsu, Huai-Che; Mizunuma, Hiroshi; Matsuno, Naoto; Enosawa, Shin

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to propose a novel evaluation index for the effects of shear stress level and exposure time on hepatocyte damage. Suspensions of rat hepatocytes (0.5 mL) were subjected to shear stress from 1.2 to 3.1 Pa for 10 min (n = 3) using a rheoscope. We counted living and dead cells in photographs taken at 1-min intervals using a digital camera attached to the microscope. Living and dead cells were distinguished using a Trypan blue exclusion test. Under each level of shear stress, at each 1-min time interval, we measured the viability [living-cell number (t)/countable cell number (t)] and the ratio of living cells [RLC: living-cell number (t)/countable cell number in the initial condition]. The effects of shear stress and exposure time on viability and RLC were assessed by multiple regression analysis. As expected, we observed an increase in the number of dead cells and little change in the number of living cells when shear stress was increased. The coefficient of determination (R (2)) to predict the effectiveness of viability and RLC indicated a low to moderate correlation. Viability correlated with shear stress and exposure time (p < 0.001); however, RLC only correlated with exposure time of shear stress (p < 0.001). In this test condition, viability was strongly related not to living-cell damage but to dead-cell damage. Therefore, we propose RLC as a novel and effective index for investigating the effect of shear stress on living hepatocytes.

  2. Disruption of cytoskeletal structures mediates shear stress-induced endothelin-1 gene expression in cultured porcine aortic endothelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Morita, T; Kurihara, H; Maemura, K; Yoshizumi, M; Yazaki, Y

    1993-01-01

    Hemodynamic shear stress alters the architecture and functions of vascular endothelial cells. We have previously shown that the synthesis of endothelin-1 (ET-1) in endothelial cells is increased by exposure to shear stress. Here we examined whether shear stress-induced alterations in cytoskeletal structures are responsible for increases in ET-1 synthesis in cultured porcine aortic endothelial cells. Exposure of endothelial cells to 5 dyn/cm2 of low shear stress rapidly increased monomeric G-actin contents within 5 min without changing total actin contents. The ratio of G- to total actin, 54 +/- 0.8% in quiescent endothelial cells, increased to 87 +/- 4.2% at 6 h and then decreased. Following the disruption of filamentous (F)-actin into G-actin, ET-1 mRNA levels in endothelial cells also increased within 30 min and reached a peak at 6 h. The F-actin stabilizer, phalloidin, abolished shear stress-induced increases in ET-1 mRNA; however, it failed to inhibit increases in ET-1 mRNA secondary to other stimulants. This indicates that shear stress-induced increases in ET-1 mRNA levels may be mediated by the disruption of actin fibers. Furthermore, increases in ET-1 gene expression can be induced by actin-disrupting agents, cytochalasin B and D. Another cytoskeleton-disrupting agent, colchicine, which inhibits dimerization of tubulin, did not affect the basal level of ET-1 mRNA. However, colchicine completely inhibited shear stress- and cytochalasin B-induced increases in ET-1 mRNA levels. These results suggest that shear stress-induced ET-1 gene expression in endothelial cells is mediated by the disruption of actin cytoskeleton and this induction is dependent on the integrity of microtubules. Images PMID:8408624

  3. Role of xanthine oxidoreductase and NAD(P)H oxidase in endothelial superoxide production in response to oscillatory shear stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McNally, J. Scott; Davis, Michael E.; Giddens, Don P.; Saha, Aniket; Hwang, Jinah; Dikalov, Sergey; Jo, Hanjoong; Harrison, David G.

    2003-01-01

    Oscillatory shear stress occurs at sites of the circulation that are vulnerable to atherosclerosis. Because oxidative stress contributes to atherosclerosis, we sought to determine whether oscillatory shear stress increases endothelial production of reactive oxygen species and to define the enzymes responsible for this phenomenon. Bovine aortic endothelial cells were exposed to static, laminar (15 dyn/cm2), and oscillatory shear stress (+/-15 dyn/cm2). Oscillatory shear increased superoxide (O2.-) production by more than threefold over static and laminar conditions as detected using electron spin resonance (ESR). This increase in O2*- was inhibited by oxypurinol and culture of endothelial cells with tungsten but not by inhibitors of other enzymatic sources. Oxypurinol also prevented H2O2 production in response to oscillatory shear stress as measured by dichlorofluorescin diacetate and Amplex Red fluorescence. Xanthine-dependent O2*- production was increased in homogenates of endothelial cells exposed to oscillatory shear stress. This was associated with decreased xanthine dehydrogenase (XDH) protein levels and enzymatic activity resulting in an elevated ratio of xanthine oxidase (XO) to XDH. We also studied endothelial cells lacking the p47phox subunit of the NAD(P)H oxidase. These cells exhibited dramatically depressed O2*- production and had minimal XO protein and activity. Transfection of these cells with p47phox restored XO protein levels. Finally, in bovine aortic endothelial cells, prolonged inhibition of the NAD(P)H oxidase with apocynin decreased XO protein levels and prevented endothelial cell stimulation of O2*- production in response to oscillatory shear stress. These data suggest that the NAD(P)H oxidase maintains endothelial cell XO levels and that XO is responsible for increased reactive oxygen species production in response to oscillatory shear stress.

  4. Inverting for Shear Stress Rate on the Northern Cascadia Megathrust Using Geodetic Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruhat, L.; Segall, P.; Bradley, A. M.

    2014-12-01

    Past physics-based models of slow slip events (SSE) have shown that, when averaged over many SSE cycles, the shear stress within the SSE zone remains roughly constant. Stress accumulates between SSE, and then is released during slow slip events. However, the predicted long-term deformation rates from such models, assuming the plate boundary is locked to the top of the ETS zone, do not fit well GPS velocities and uplift rates determined from leveling and tide-gauge data. These physics-based models particularly misfit the vertical rates. At the same time, previous kinematic inversions display a gap between the down-dip limit of the locked region and the top of the ETS zone. Our inversions of geodetic data for fault slip rates exhibit a steeper slip-rate profile at the top of the ETS zone, relative to the constant shear stress model, as well as creep up dip of the ETS zone. We explore physics-based models with velocity-strengthening regions of different length up dip the ETS zone, i.e. within the "gap" identified in kinematic inversions. However, this still does not match the observations well. We therefore try a new approach: we invert for shear stress rates on the megathrust that best fit the data. We show that a small decrease in shear stress within the top of the ETS zone, reaching 5 kPa/year at a depth of ~ 30 km, is required to fit the data. Possible explanations for this include a slow decrease in normal stress with time, possibly due to an increase in pore pressure, or a reduction in fault friction. We explore these hypotheses, using 2D quasi-dynamic simulations with rate-and-state friction and isothermal v-cutoff models for generating slow slip events. The potential for creep above the top of the ETS zone has important implications for the mechanical relationship between deep slow slip and dynamic events in the locked region.

  5. Pulsatility Index as a Diagnostic Parameter of Reciprocating Wall Shear Stress Parameters in Physiological Pulsating Waveforms.

    PubMed

    Avrahami, Idit; Kersh, Dikla; Liberzon, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Arterial wall shear stress (WSS) parameters are widely used for prediction of the initiation and development of atherosclerosis and arterial pathologies. Traditional clinical evaluation of arterial condition relies on correlations of WSS parameters with average flow rate (Q) and heart rate (HR) measurements. We show that for pulsating flow waveforms in a straight tube with flow reversals that lead to significant reciprocating WSS, the measurements of HR and Q are not sufficient for prediction of WSS parameters. Therefore, we suggest adding a third quantity-known as the pulsatility index (PI)-which is defined as the peak-to-peak flow rate amplitude normalized by Q. We examine several pulsating flow waveforms with and without flow reversals using a simulation of a Womersley model in a straight rigid tube and validate the simulations through experimental study using particle image velocimetry (PIV). The results indicate that clinically relevant WSS parameters such as the percentage of negative WSS (P[%]), oscillating shear index (OSI) and the ratio of minimum to maximum shear stress rates (min/max), are better predicted when the PI is used in conjunction with HR and Q. Therefore, we propose to use PI as an additional and essential diagnostic quantity for improved predictability of the reciprocating WSS.

  6. Pulsatility Index as a Diagnostic Parameter of Reciprocating Wall Shear Stress Parameters in Physiological Pulsating Waveforms

    PubMed Central

    Avrahami, Idit; Kersh, Dikla

    2016-01-01

    Arterial wall shear stress (WSS) parameters are widely used for prediction of the initiation and development of atherosclerosis and arterial pathologies. Traditional clinical evaluation of arterial condition relies on correlations of WSS parameters with average flow rate (Q) and heart rate (HR) measurements. We show that for pulsating flow waveforms in a straight tube with flow reversals that lead to significant reciprocating WSS, the measurements of HR and Q are not sufficient for prediction of WSS parameters. Therefore, we suggest adding a third quantity—known as the pulsatility index (PI)—which is defined as the peak-to-peak flow rate amplitude normalized by Q. We examine several pulsating flow waveforms with and without flow reversals using a simulation of a Womersley model in a straight rigid tube and validate the simulations through experimental study using particle image velocimetry (PIV). The results indicate that clinically relevant WSS parameters such as the percentage of negative WSS (P[%]), oscillating shear index (OSI) and the ratio of minimum to maximum shear stress rates (min/max), are better predicted when the PI is used in conjunction with HR and Q. Therefore, we propose to use PI as an additional and essential diagnostic quantity for improved predictability of the reciprocating WSS. PMID:27893801

  7. Numerical study of wall shear stress-based descriptors in the human left coronary artery.

    PubMed

    Pinto, S I S; Campos, J B L M

    2016-10-01

    The present work is about the application of wall shear stress descriptors - time averaged wall shear stress (TAWSS), oscillating shear index (OSI) and relative residence time (RRT) - to the study of blood flow in the left coronary artery (LCA). These descriptors aid the prediction of disturbed flow conditions in the vessels and play a significant role in the detection of potential zones of atherosclerosis development. Hemodynamic descriptors data were obtained, numerically, through ANSYS® software, for the LCA of a patient-specific geometry and for a 3D idealized model. Comparing both cases, the results are coherent, in terms of location and magnitude. Low TAWSS, high OSI and high RRT values are observed in the bifurcation - potential zone of atherosclerosis appearance. The dissimilarities observed in the TAWSS values, considering blood as a Newtonian or non-Newtonian fluid, releases the importance of the correct blood rheologic caracterization. Moreover, for a higher Reynolds number, the TAWSS values decrease in the bifurcation and along the LAD branch, increasing the probability of plaques deposition. Furthermore, for a stenotic LCA model, very low TAWSS and high RRT values in front and behind the stenosis are observed, indicating the probable extension, in the flow direction, of the lesion.

  8. Evolution of the wall shear stresses during the progressive enlargement of symmetric abdominal aortic aneurysms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salsac, A.-V.; Sparks, S. R.; Chomaz, J.-M.; Lasheras, J. C.

    2006-08-01

    The changes in the evolution of the spatial and temporal distribution of the wall shear stresses (WSS) and gradients of wall shear stresses (GWSS) at different stages of the enlargement of an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) are important in understanding the aetiology and progression of this vascular disease since they affect the wall structural integrity, primarily via the changes induced on the shape, functions and metabolism of the endothelial cells. Particle image velocimetry (PIV) measurements were performed in in vitro aneurysm models, while changing their geometric parameters systematically. It has been shown that, even at the very early stages of the disease, i.e. increase in the diameter ≤ 50%, the flow separates from the wall and a large vortex ring, usually followed by internal shear layers, is created. These lead to the generation of WSS that drastically differ in mean and fluctuating components from the healthy vessel. Inside the AAA, the mean WSS becomes negative along most of the aneurysmal wall and the magnitude of the WSS can be as low as 26% of the value in a healthy abdominal aorta.

  9. Regulation of shear stress on rolling behaviors of HL-60 cells on P-selectin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ling, YingChen; Fang, Ying; Yang, XiaoFang; Li, QuHuan; Lin, QinYong; Wu, JianHua

    2014-10-01

    Circulating leukocytes in trafficking to the inflammatory sites, will be first tether to, and then roll on the vascular surface. This event is mediated through specific interaction of P-selectin and P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 (PSGL-1), and regulated by hemodynamics. Poor data were reported in understanding P-selectin-mediated rolling. With the flow chamber technique, we herein observed HL-60 cell rolling on P-selectin with or without 3% Ficoll at various wall shear stresses from 0.05 to 0.4 dyn/cm2. The results demonstrated that force rather than transport regulated the rolling, similar to rolling on L- and E-selectin. The rolling was accelerated quickly by an increasing force below the optimal shear threshold of 0.15 dyn/cm2 first and then followed by a slowly decelerating phase starting at the optimum, showing a catch-slip transition and serving as a mechanism for the rolling. The catch-slip transition was completely reflected to the tether lifetime and other rolling parameters, such as the mean and fractional stop time. The narrow catch bond regime stabilized the rolling quickly, through steeply increasing fractional stop time to a plateau of about 0.85. Data presented here suggest that the low shear stress threshold serves as a mechanism for most cell rolling events through P-selectin.

  10. Effects of shear stress pattern and magnitude on mesenchymal transformation and invasion of aortic valve endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Mahler, Gretchen J.; Frendl, Christopher M.; Cao, Qingfeng; Butcher, Jonathan T.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the role of mechanical forces on cell behavior is critical for tissue engineering, regenerative medicine, and disease initiation studies. Current hemodynamic bioreactors are largely limited to 2D substrates or the application of general flow conditions at a tissue level, which eliminates the investigation of some essential physiological and pathological responses. One example is the mesenchymal transformation of endothelial cells in response to shear stress. Endothelial to mesenchymal transformation (EndMT) is a valve morphogenic mechanism associated with aortic valve disease initiation. The aortic valve experiences oscillatory shear on the disease-susceptible fibrosa, and the role of hemodynamics on adult EndMT is unknown. The goal of this work was to develop and characterize a microfluidic bioreactor that applies physiologically relevant laminar or oscillatory shear stresses to endothelial cells and permits the quantitative analysis of 3D cell-extracellular matrix (ECM) interactions. In this study, porcine aortic valve endothelial cells were seeded onto 3D collagen I gels and exposed to different magnitudes of steady or oscillatory shear stress for 48 hours. Cells elongated and aligned perpendicular to laminar, but not oscillatory shear. Low steady shear stress (2 dyne/cm2) and oscillatory shear stress upregulated EndMT- (ACTA2, Snail, TGFB1) and inflammation- (ICAM1, NFKB1) related gene expression, EndMT-related (αSMA) protein expression, and matrix invasion when compared with static controls or cells exposed to high steady shear (10 and 20 dyne/cm2). Our system enables direct testing of the role of shear stress on endothelial cell mesenchymal transformation in a dynamic, 3D environment and shows that hemodynamics regulate EndMT in adult valve endothelial cells. PMID:24898772

  11. Phase-averaged wall shear stress, wall pressure, and near-wall velocity field measurements in a whirling annular seal

    SciTech Connect

    Morrison, G.L.; Winslow, R.B.; Thames, H.D. III

    1996-07-01

    The flow field inside a 50 percent eccentric whirling annular seal operating at a Reynolds number of 24,000 and a Taylor number of 6600 has been measured using a three-dimensional laser-Doppler anemometer system. Flush mount pressure and wall shear stress probes have been used to measure the stresses (normal and shear) along the length of the stator. The rotor was mounted eccentrically on the shaft so that the rotor orbit was circular and rotated at the same speed as the shaft (a whirl ratio of 1.0). This paper presents mean pressure, mean wall shear stress magnitude, and mean wall shear stress direction distributions along the length of the seal. Phase-averaged wall pressure and wall shear stress are presented along with phase-averaged mean velocity and turbulence kinetic energy distributions located 0.16c from the stator wall, where c is the seal clearance. The relationships between the velocity, turbulence, wall pressure, and wall shear stress are very complex and do not follow simple bulk flow predictions.

  12. Spatio-temporal characteristics of large scale motions in a turbulent boundary layer from direct wall shear stress measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pabon, Rommel; Barnard, Casey; Ukeiley, Lawrence; Sheplak, Mark

    2016-11-01

    Particle image velocimetry (PIV) and fluctuating wall shear stress experiments were performed on a flat plate turbulent boundary layer (TBL) under zero pressure gradient conditions. The fluctuating wall shear stress was measured using a microelectromechanical 1mm × 1mm floating element capacitive shear stress sensor (CSSS) developed at the University of Florida. The experiments elucidated the imprint of the organized motions in a TBL on the wall shear stress through its direct measurement. Spatial autocorrelation of the streamwise velocity from the PIV snapshots revealed large scale motions that scale on the order of boundary layer thickness. However, the captured inclination angle was lower than that determined using the classic method by means of wall shear stress and hot-wire anemometry (HWA) temporal cross-correlations and a frozen field hypothesis using a convection velocity. The current study suggests the large size of these motions begins to degrade the applicability of the frozen field hypothesis for the time resolved HWA experiments. The simultaneous PIV and CSSS measurements are also used for spatial reconstruction of the velocity field during conditionally sampled intense wall shear stress events. This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship under Grant No. DGE-1315138.

  13. Cells in 3D matrices under interstitial flow: effects of extracellular matrix alignment on cell shear stress and drag forces.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, John A; Lichter, Seth; Swartz, Melody A

    2010-03-22

    Interstitial flow is an important regulator of various cell behaviors both in vitro and in vivo, yet the forces that fluid flow imposes on cells embedded in a 3D extracellular matrix (ECM), and the effects of matrix architecture on those forces, are not well understood. Here, we demonstrate how fiber alignment can affect the shear and pressure forces on the cell and ECM. Using computational fluid dynamics simulations, we show that while the solutions of the Brinkman equation accurately estimate the average fluid shear stress and the drag forces on a cell within a 3D fibrous medium, the distribution of shear stress on the cellular surface as well as the peak shear stresses remain intimately related to the pericellular fiber architecture and cannot be estimated using bulk-averaged properties. We demonstrate that perpendicular fiber alignment of the ECM yields lower shear stress and pressure forces on the cells and higher stresses on the ECM, leading to decreased permeability, while parallel fiber alignment leads to higher stresses on cells and increased permeability, as compared to a cubic lattice arrangement. The Spielman-Goren permeability relationships for fibrous media agreed well with CFD simulations of flow with explicitly considered fibers. These results suggest that the experimentally observed active remodeling of ECM fibers by fibroblasts under interstitial flow to a perpendicular alignment could serve to decrease the shear and drag forces on the cell.

  14. Effects of shear stress component and loading path on fatigue strength under tension/torsion biaxial cyclic loading

    SciTech Connect

    Morita, Y.; Fujii, T.

    1994-12-31

    The material degradation and its mechanism of a plain woven glass fabric under tension/torsion biaxial cyclic loading were investigated. Thin-walled tubular specimens were used. Different types of loading sequence were applied to the specimens in order to estimate the effect of shear stress component on fatigue degradation of the composite under biaxial cyclic loading. All biaxial loads were proportionally applied to the specimens, but the number of torsion loading cycles and its direction (pulsating or alternate) were changed. Various wave forms were also used to estimate the effect of loading path. Loading path was changed but the final stress state (tensile and shear stresses) was the same. Stress-strain relation and stiffness reduction were observed to evaluate the degree of fatigue damage. The experimental results show that the role of shear stress is important when the material degradation is dominated by the shear stress component although the effect of shear stress component on fatigue strength decreases with an increase of tensile stress component under tension/torsion biaxial loading. Loading sequence also affects more or less on the fatigue life. On the other hand, it is well estimated that the fatigue life is little dependent on loading path in the case of high cycle fatigue.

  15. Development of ionic polymer transducers as flow shear stress sensors: effects of electrode architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffiths, David; Dominic, Justin; Akle, Barbar J.; Vlachos, Pavlos P.; Leo, Donald J.

    2007-04-01

    Ionomeric polymer transducers (IPTs) have recently received a great deal of attention. As actuators, IPT have the ability to generate large bending strain and moderate stress at low applied voltages. Although the actuation capabilities of IPTs have been studied extensively, the sensing performance of these transducers has not received much attention. The work presented herein aims to develop a wall shear stress sensor for aero/hydrodynamic and biomedical applications. Ionic polymers are generally created by an impregnation-reduction process in an ion exchange membrane, typically Nafion, and then coated with a flexible electrode. The traditional impregnation-reduction fabrication technique of IPTs has little control on the electrode thickness. However, the new Direct Assembly Process (DAP) for fabrication of IPTs allows for experimentation with varying conducting materials and direct control of electrode architecture. The thickness of the electrode is controlled by altering the amount of the ionomer/metal mix sprayed on the membrane. Transducers with varied electrode and membrane thicknesses are fabricated. The sensitivity of the transducer is characterized using two basic experiments. First, the electric impedance of the transducer is measured and its capacitive properties are computed. Earlier studies have demonstrated that capacitance has been strongly correlated to actuation performance in IPTs. Subsequently, the sensing capability of the IPTs in bending is measured using a fixed-pined cantilever configuration. Finally the shear stress sensing performance in fluid flow is quantified through a detailed calibration procedure. This is accomplished using two dynamic shear stress calibration apparatuses. In this study we demonstrate a strong correlation between the electrode thickness and the sensing performance of an IPT.

  16. The effect of geometry on the particle stress in suspensions of rigid particles in simple shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daghooghi, Mohsen; Borazjani, Iman

    2014-11-01

    The contribution of particles on the total stress of a suspension is known as particle stress, which consists of three sources: moment of stress on the particle surface, inertial term and Reynolds stress term. The symmetric part of the first term, i.e. stresslet, is considered as the most important term in rheological calculation and contribution of other terms is mainly ignored in low Reynolds regimes. For suspensions of rigid spheres at steady state these terms are negligible comparing to stresslet of the suspension, however this might not be the case for complex particle shapes. Using immersed boundary method, we simulate suspensions of complex shaped particles in simple shear flow to investigate the role of other two terms on the total particle stress and effective viscosity. We validated our results against classical analytical results for the low Reynolds-Stokes problem of suspension of ellipsoidal particles by Jeffery. We studied the effect of volume fraction of suspension and particle shape (aspect ratio) on the rheology of suspensions at Reynolds number range of 0 . 01 < Re < 10 . Our study shows that particle shape has an mportant role on all components of the particle stress, and for Re > 1 the budget of inertial term in the total particle stress is not negligible. This work was supported by the American Chemical Society Doctoral New Investigator grant. The computational resources were partly provided by Center for Computational Research (CCR) at University at Buffalo.

  17. Critical shear stress for mass erosion of organic-rich fine sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehta, Ashish J.; Hwang, Kyu-Nam; Khare, Yogesh P.

    2015-11-01

    In shallow lakes of Florida laden with low-strength organic-rich sediments, wind-induced water movement is believed to actuate bed surface erosion as well as mass erosion. Experiments in hydraulic flumes to measure the critical shear stress for mass erosion tend to be lengthy and require large quantities of sediment. For bottom sediment from Lake Okeechobee at naturally occurring values of the floc volume fraction, a comparison of the viscoplastic yield stress, readily obtained from rheometry, with the mass erosion critical stress from flume tests indicates that it may be permissible to consider the yield stress as a surrogate for the critical stress. This inference appears to be supported by ancillary observations from Lake Apopka and Newnans Lake. Interestingly enough, the variation of yield stress with the floc volume fraction of the organic-rich bed is found to conform to fractal characterization commonly invoked for mineral sediment flocs, consistent with a representative constant value of 2.55 of the fractal dimension. Pending fuller investigations with a wide range of organic-rich sediments, recourse to rheometry in lieu of flume experiments holds promise as a means to simplify testing requirements for estimating the mass erosion critical stress.

  18. Reynolds stress calculations of homogeneous turbulent shear flow with bounded energy states

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Speziale, Charles G.; Abid, R.

    1992-01-01

    Reynolds stress calculations of homogeneous turbulent shear flow are conducted with a second-order closure model modified to account for non-equilibrium vortex stretching in the dissipation rate transport equation, as recently proposed by Bernard and Speziale. As with the earlier reported k-epsilon model calculations incorporating this vortex stretching effect, a production-equals-dissipation equilibrium is obtained with bounded turbulent kinetic energy and dissipation. However, this equilibrium is not achieved until the dimensionless time greater than 60, an elapsed time that is at least twice as large as any of those considered in previous numerical and physical experiments on homogeneous shear flow. Direct quantitative comparisons between the model predictions and the results of experiments are quite favorable. In particular, it is shown that the inclusion of this non-equilibrium vortex stretching effect has the capability of explaining the significant range of production to dissipation ratios observed in experiments.

  19. Reynolds stress calculations of homogeneous turbulent shear flow with bounded energy states

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Speziale, Charles G.; Abid, R.

    1993-01-01

    Reynolds stress calculations of homogeneous turbulent shear flow are conducted with a second-order closure model modified to account for nonequilibrium vortex stretching in the dissipation rate transport equation as recently proposed by Bernard and Speziale (1992). As with the earlier reported K-epsilon model calculations incorporating this vortex stretching effect, a production-equals-dissipation equilibrium is obtained with bounded turbulent kinetic energy and dissipation. However, this equilibrium is now not achieved until the dimensionless time St greater than 60 - an elapsed time that is at least twice as large as any of those considered in previous numerical and physical experiments on homogeneous shear flow. Direct quantitative comparisons between the model predictions and the results of experiments are quite favorable. In particular, it is shown that the inclusion of this nonequilibrium vortex stretching effect has the capability of explaining the significant range of production to dissipation ratios observed in experiments.

  20. Spatially and temporally resolved quantification of endothelial cell modification in response to shear stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambert, Lori; Pipinos, Iraklis; Baxter, Timothy; Leighton, Richard; Wei, Timothy

    2015-11-01

    This talk contains a resport on in vivo measurements made over a confluent layer of bovine endothelial cells in a microchannel. The ultimate goal of the experiments is to understand and model cellular response to fluid stresses and the ensuing transport across the endothelial layer. High resolution μ PTV measurements were made to quantify the cellular response to steady shear rates of 5, 10 and 20 dynes/cm2. Surface topography, shear and pressure distributions were calculated from sets of velocity fields made in planes parallel to the wall. For each experiment, measurements were made in three-hour intervals for eighteen hours. To validate the methodology, the pH of the medium was varied so that the health of the cells would vary. Clear differences in topography and cell orientation were found. Implications for future experiments and research will be discussed.

  1. Interfacial shear stress distribution in model composites. I - A Kevlar 49 fibre in an epoxy matrix

    SciTech Connect

    Jahankhani, H.; Galiotis, C. )

    1991-05-01

    The technique of Laser Raman Spectroscopy has been applied in the study of aramid fibers, such as Kevlar 49, and aramid/epoxy interfaces. A linear relationship has been found between Raman frequencies and strain upon loading a single Kevlar 49 filament in air. Model composites of single Kevlar 49 fibers embedded in epoxy resins have been fabricated and subjected to various degrees of mechanical deformation. The transfer lengths for reinforcement have been measured at various levels of applied tensile load and the dependence of transfer length upon applied matrix strain has been established. Finally, by balancing the tensile and the shear forces acting along the interface, the interfacial shear stress (ISS) distribution along the embedded fiber was obtained. 52 refs.

  2. Shear stress modulates the thickness and architecture of Candida albicans biofilms in a phase-dependent manner

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Pranab K.; Chand, David V.; Chandra, Jyotsna; Anderson, James M.; Ghannoum, Mahmoud A.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Biofilm formation plays an integral role in catheter-associated bloodstream infections caused by Candida albicans. Biofilms formed on catheters placed intravenously are exposed to shear stress caused by blood flow. In this study, we investigated whether shear stress affects the ability of C. albicans to form biofilms. Candida biofilms were formed on catheter discs and exposed to physiological levels of shear stress using a rotating disc system (RDS). Control biofilms were grown under conditions of no flow. Tetrazolium (XTT) assay and dry weight (DW) measurements were used to quantify metabolic activity and biofilm mass respectively. Confocal scanning laser microscopy (CSLM) was used to evaluate architecture and biofilm thickness. After 90 min, cells attached under no-flow exhibited significantly greater XTT activity and DW than those under shear. However, by 24 h, biofilms formed under both conditions had similar XTT activities and DW. Interestingly, thickness of biofilms formed under no-flow was significantly greater after 24 h than of those formed under shear stress, demonstrating that shear exposure results in thinner, but denser biofilms. These studies suggest that biofilm architecture is modulated by shear in a phase-dependent manner. PMID:19076284

  3. Shear-stress intensity factors for elastic sheets with cover plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fichter, W. B.

    1974-01-01

    Shear stress intensity factors are calculated for three problems concerning inextensible cover plates either bonded to or embedded in an elastic sheet which is under uniaxial tension. The stress intensity factors are small when the ratio of sheet thickness to cover plate length is small and, as the ratio increase, rapidly approach their asymptotic values for infinite sheet thickness. In the problem of the embedded cover plate, the stress intensity factor also depends on the Poisson's ratio of the sheet material. The dependence on Poisson's ratio, however, is significant only when the ratio of sheet thickness to cover plate length is small. Some possible implications of the present results for debonding of reinforced sheets under cyclic loading are briefly discussed.

  4. Fatigue crack growth in 2024-T3 aluminum under tensile and transverse shear stresses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Viz, Mark J.; Zehnder, Alan T.

    1994-01-01

    The influence of transverse shear stresses on the fatigue crack growth rate in thin 2024-T3 aluminum alloy sheets is investigated experimentally. The tests are performed on double-edge cracked sheets in cyclic tensile and torsional loading. This loading generates crack tip stress intensity factors in the same ratio as the values computed for a crack lying along a lap joint in a pressurized aircraft fuselage. The relevant fracture mechanics of cracks in thin plates along with the details of the geometrically nonlinear finite element analyses used for the test specimen calibration are developed and discussed. Preliminary fatigue crack growth data correlated using the fully coupled stress intensity factor calibration are presented and compared with fatigue crack growth data from pure delta K(sub I)fatigue tests.

  5. Shear stress enhances microcin B17 production in a rotating wall bioreactor, but ethanol stress does not

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gao, Q.; Fang, A.; Pierson, D. L.; Mishra, S. K.; Demain, A. L.

    2001-01-01

    Stress, including that caused by ethanol, has been shown to induce or promote secondary metabolism in a number of microbial systems. Rotating-wall bioreactors provide a low stress and simulated microgravity environment which, however, supports only poor production of microcin B17 by Escherichia coli ZK650, as compared to production in agitated flasks. We wondered whether the poor production is due to the low level of stress and whether increasing stress in the bioreactors would raise the amount of microcin B17 formed. We found that applying shear stress by addition of a single Teflon bead to a rotating wall bioreactor improved microcin B17 production. By contrast, addition of various concentrations of ethanol to such bioreactors (or to shaken flasks) failed to increase microcin B17 production. Ethanol stress merely decreased production and, at higher concentrations, inhibited growth. Interestingly, cells growing in the bioreactor were much more resistant to the growth-inhibitory and production-inhibitory effects of ethanol than cells growing in shaken flasks.

  6. A control systems approach to quantify wall shear stress normalization by flow-mediated dilation in the brachial artery.

    PubMed

    van Bussel, Frank C G; van Bussel, Bas C T; Hoeks, Arnold P G; Op 't Roodt, Jos; Henry, Ronald M A; Ferreira, Isabel; Vanmolkot, Floris H M; Schalkwijk, Casper G; Stehouwer, Coen D A; Reesink, Koen D

    2015-01-01

    Flow-mediated dilation is aimed at normalization of local wall shear stress under varying blood flow conditions. Blood flow velocity and vessel diameter are continuous and opposing influences that modulate wall shear stress. We derived an index FMDv to quantify wall shear stress normalization performance by flow-mediated dilation in the brachial artery. In 22 fasting presumed healthy men, we first assessed intra- and inter-session reproducibilities of two indices pFMDv and mFMDv, which consider the relative peak and relative mean hyperemic change in flow velocity, respectively. Second, utilizing oral glucose loading, we evaluated the tracking performance of both FMDv indices, in comparison with existing indices [i.e., the relative peak diameter increase (%FMD), the peak to baseline diameter ratio (Dpeak/Dbase), and the relative peak diameter increase normalized to the full area under the curve of blood flow velocity with hyperemia (FMD/shearAUC) or with area integrated to peak hyperemia (FMD/shearAUC_peak)]. Inter-session and intra-session reproducibilities for pFMDv, mFMDv and %FMD were comparable (intra-class correlation coefficients within 0.521-0.677 range). Both pFMDv and mFMDv showed more clearly a reduction after glucose loading (reduction of ~45%, p≤0.001) than the other indices (% given are relative reductions): %FMD (~11%, p≥0.074); Dpeak/Dbase (~11%, p≥0.074); FMD/shearAUC_peak (~20%, p≥0.016) and FMD/shearAUC (~38%, p≤0.038). Further analysis indicated that wall shear stress normalization under normal (fasting) conditions is already far from ideal (FMDv < 1), which (therefore) does not materially change with glucose loading. Our approach might be useful in intervention studies to detect intrinsic changes in shear stress normalization performance in conduit arteries.

  7. Shear stress and flow dynamics of the femoral vein among obese patients who qualify for bariatric surgery.

    PubMed

    Wiewiora, Maciej; Piecuch, Jerzy; Glűck, Marek; Slowinska-Lozynska, Ludmila; Sosada, Krystyn

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of obesity on wall shear stress and its relationship to erythrocyte aggregation. We studied 35 morbidly obese patients who were qualified for bariatric surgery. The control group consisted of 20 non-obese people. Blood rheological measurements were performed using the Laser-assisted Optical Rotational Cell Analyzer (Mechatronics, the Netherlands) and a cone-plate viscometer (Brookfield DV-II). The venous flow dynamics were assessed using a duplex ultrasound. The shear rate was estimated from the measured blood flow velocity and the diameter of the femoral vein. Venous wall shear stress was calculated from the whole blood viscosity and the shear rate. The shear rate (P < 0.005) and the venous wall shear stress (P < 0.05) were significantly lower in obese patients compared with the controls. The aggregation index (P < 0.001), syllectogram amplitude - AMP (P < 0.05) and Tslow (P < 0.001) were significantly higher in the obese patients; the aggregation half-time (P < 0.001) and Tfast (P < 0.001) were decreased compared with the control group. Multivariate regression analyses found waist circumference (β -0.31, P < 0.05), thigh circumference (β 0.33, P < 0.05) and Tslow (β -0.47, P < 0.005) to be variables that independently influenced the shear rate. Nevertheless, the AMP (β 0.34, P < 0.05) and Tslow (β -0.47, P < 0.01) were independent predictors that influenced the wall shear stress. This study indicates that there is a relationship between wall shear stress in the femoral vein and the rheological impairment of the RBC among obese patients, but further studies are necessary to confirm this suggestion.

  8. Effect of mesh distortion on the accuracy of transverse shear stresses and their sensitivity coefficients in multilayered composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noor, Ahmed K.; Kim, Yong H.

    1995-01-01

    A study is made of the effect of mesh distortion on the accuracy of transverse shear stresses and their first-order and second-order sensitivity coefficients in multilayered composite panels subjected to mechanical and thermal loads. The panels are discretized by using a two-field degenerate solid element, with the fundamental unknowns consisting of both displacement and strain components, and the displacement components having a linear variation throughout the thickness of the laminate. A two-step computational procedure is used for evaluating the transverse shear stresses. In the first step, the in-plane stresses in the different layers are calculated at the numerical quadrature points for each element. In the second step, the transverse shear stresses are evaluated by using piecewise integration, in the thickness direction, of the three-dimensional equilibrium equations. The same procedure is used for evaluating the sensitivity coefficients of transverse shear stresses. Numerical results are presented showing no noticeable degradation in the accuracy of the in-plane stresses and their sensitivity coefficients with mesh distortion. However, such degradation is observed for the transverse shear stresses and their sensitivity coefficients. The standard of comparison is taken to be the exact solution of the three-dimensional thermoelasticity equations of the panel.

  9. Experimental analysis of the effect of vegetation on flow and bed shear stress distribution in high-curvature bends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Termini, Donatella

    2016-12-01

    The cross-sectional circulation, which develops in meandering bends, exerts an important role in velocity and the boundary shear stress redistributions. This paper considers the effect of vegetation on cross-sectional flow and bed shear distribution along a high-curvature bend. The analysis is conducted with the aid of data collected in a large-amplitude meandering flume during a reference experiment without vegetation and an experiment with vegetation on the bed. The results show that the presence of vegetation modifies the curvature-induced flow pattern and the directionality of turbulent structures. In fact, in the presence of vegetation, the turbulent structures tend to develop within and between the vegetated elements. The pattern of cross-sectional flow, modified by the presence of vegetation, affects the bed shear stress distribution along the bend so that the core of the highest value of the bed shear stress does not reach the outer bank.

  10. On the expected relationships among apparent stress, static stress drop, effective shear fracture energy, and efficiency

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Beeler, N.M.; Wong, T.-F.; Hickman, S.H.

    2003-01-01

    We consider expected relationships between apparent stress ??a and static stress drop ????s using a standard energy balance and find ??a = ????s (0.5 - ??), where ?? is stress overshoot. A simple implementation of this balance is to assume overshoot is constant; then apparent stress should vary linearly with stress drop, consistent with spectral theories (Brune, 1970) and dynamic crack models (Madariaga, 1976). Normalizing this expression by the static stress drop defines an efficiency ??sw = ??sa/????s as follows from Savage and Wood (1971). We use this measure of efficiency to analyze data from one of a number of observational studies that find apparent stress to increase with seismic moment, namely earthquakes recorded in the Cajon Pass borehole by Abercrombie (1995). Increases in apparent stress with event size could reflect an increase in seismic efficiency; however, ??sw for the Cajon earthquakes shows no such increase and is approximately constant over the entire moment range. Thus, apparent stress and stress drop co-vary, as expected from the energy balance at constant overshoot. The median value of ??sw for the Cajon earthquakes is four times lower than ??sw for laboratory events. Thus, these Cajon-recorded earthquakes have relatively low and approximately constant efficiency. As the energy balance requires ??sw = 0.5 - ??, overshoot can be estimated directly from the Savage-Wood efficiency; overshoot is positive for Cajon Pass earthquakes. Variations in apparent stress with seismic moment for these earthquakes result primarily from systematic variations in static stress drop with seismic moment and do not require a relative decrease in sliding resistance with increasing event size (dynamic weakening). Based on the comparison of field and lab determinations of the Savage-Wood efficiency, we suggest the criterion ??sw > 0.3 as a test for dynamic weakening in excess of that seen in the lab.

  11. Studies on Impingement Effects of Low Density Jets on Surfaces — Determination of Shear Stress and Normal Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sathian, Sarith. P.; Kurian, Job

    2005-05-01

    This paper presents the results of the Laser Reflection Method (LRM) for the determination of shear stress due to impingement of low-density free jets on flat plate. For thin oil film moving under the action of aerodynamic boundary layer the shear stress at the air-oil interface is equal to the shear stress between the surface and air. A direct and dynamic measurement of the oil film slope is measured using a position sensing detector (PSD). The thinning rate of oil film is directly measured which is the major advantage of the LRM over LISF method. From the oil film slope history, direct calculation of the shear stress is done using a three-point formula. For the full range of experiment conditions Knudsen numbers varied till the continuum limit of the transition regime. The shear stress values for low-density flows in the transition regime are thus obtained using LRM and the measured values of shear show fair agreement with those obtained by other methods. Results of the normal pressure measurements on a flat plate in low-density jets by using thermistors as pressure sensors are also presented in the paper. The normal pressure profiles obtained show the characteristic features of Newtonian impact theory for hypersonic flows.

  12. Purinergic Signaling is Required for Fluid Shear Stress-Induced NF-kB Translocation in Osteoblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Genetos, Damian C.; Karin, Norman J.; Geist, Derik J.; Donahue, Henry J.; Duncan, Randall L.

    2011-04-01

    Fluid shear stress regulates gene expression in osteoblasts, in part by activation of the transcription factor NF-kB. We examined whether this process was under control of purinoceptor activation. MC3T3-E1 osteoblasts under static conditions expressed the NF-kB inhibitory protein IkB alpha and exhibited cytosolic localization of NF-kB. Under fluid shear stress, IκBα levels decreased, and concomitant nuclear localization of NF-kB was observed. Cells exposed to fluid shear stress in ATP-depleted medium exhibited no significant reduction in IκBα, and NF-kB remained within the cytosol. Similar results were found using oxidized ATP or Brilliant Blue G, P2X7 receptor antagonists, indicating that the P2X7 receptor is responsible for fluid shear-stress-induced IκBα degradation and nuclear accumulation of NF-kB. Pharmacologic blockage of the P2Y6 receptor also prevented shear-induced IkB alpha degradation. These phenomena involved neither ERK1/2 signaling nor autocrine activation by P2X7-generated lysophosphatidic acid. Our results suggest that fluid shear stress regulates NF-kB activity through the P2Y6 and P2X7 receptor.

  13. Purinergic signaling is required for fluid shear stress-induced NF-{kappa}B translocation in osteoblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Genetos, Damian C.; Karin, Norman J.; Geist, Derik J.; Donahue, Henry J.; Duncan, Randall L.

    2011-04-01

    Fluid shear stress regulates gene expression in osteoblasts, in part by activation of the transcription factor NF-{kappa}B. We examined whether this process was under the control of purinoceptor activation. MC3T3-E1 osteoblasts under static conditions expressed the NF-{kappa}B inhibitory protein I{kappa}B{alpha} and exhibited cytosolic localization of NF-{kappa}B. Under fluid shear stress, I{kappa}B{alpha} levels decreased, and concomitant nuclear localization of NF-{kappa}B was observed. Cells exposed to fluid shear stress in ATP-depleted medium exhibited no significant reduction in I{kappa}B{alpha}, and NF-{kappa}B remained within the cytosol. Similar results were found using oxidized ATP or Brilliant Blue G, P2X{sub 7} receptor antagonists, indicating that the P2X{sub 7} receptor is responsible for fluid shear-stress-induced I{kappa}B{alpha} degradation and nuclear accumulation of NF-{kappa}B. Pharmacologic blockage of the P2Y6 receptor also prevented shear-induced I{kappa}B{alpha} degradation. These phenomena involved neither ERK1/2 signaling nor autocrine activation by P2X{sub 7}-generated lysophosphatidic acid. Our results suggest that fluid shear stress regulates NF-{kappa}B activity through the P2Y{sub 6} and P2X{sub 7} receptor.

  14. A z-axis quartz cross-fork micromachined gyroscope based on shear stress detection.

    PubMed

    Xie, Liqiang; Wu, Xuezhong; Li, Shengyi; Wang, Haoxu; Su, Jianbin; Dong, Peitao

    2010-01-01

    Here we propose a novel quartz micromachined gyroscope. The sensor has a simple cross-fork structure in the x-y plane of quartz crystal. Shear stress rather than normal stress is utilized to sense Coriolis' force generated by the input angular rate signal. Compared to traditional quartz gyroscopes, which have two separate sense electrodes on each sidewall, there is only one electrode on each sidewall of the sense beam. As a result, the fabrication of the electrodes is simplified and the structure can be easily miniaturized. In order to increase sensitivity, a pair of proof masses is attached to the ends of the drive beam, and the sense beam has a tapered design. The structure is etched from a z-cut quartz wafer and the electrodes are realized by direct evaporation using the aperture mask method. The drive mode frequency of the prototype is 13.38 kHz, and the quality factor is approximately 1,000 in air. Therefore, the gyroscope can work properly without a vacuum package. The measurement ability of the shear stress detection design scheme is validated by the Coriolis' force test. The performance of the sensor is characterized on a precision rate table using a specially designed readout circuit. The experimentally obtained scale factor is 1.45 mV/°/s and the nonlinearity is 3.6% in range of ± 200 °/s.

  15. Polyethylene terephthalate membrane grafted with peptidomimetics: endothelial cell compatibility and retention under shear stress.

    PubMed

    Rémy, Murielle; Bareille, Reine; Rerat, Vincent; Bourget, Chantal; Marchand-Brynaert, Jacqueline; Bordenave, Laurence

    2013-01-01

    The present work aimed to treat a polyethylene terephthalate (PET) surface to make the biomaterial more 'attractive' in terms of attachment and shear stress response to endothelial cells with a view to possible applications in vascular grafting. A surface wet-chemistry protocol was applied to graft track-etched PET membranes with RGD peptidomimetics based on the tyrosine template and active at the nano-level vs. isolated human αvβ3 receptor, which was monitored by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, contact angle measurement and atomic force microscopy for characterization. A primary culture of human saphenous vein endothelial cells was used before and after sterilization of the membranes (heat treatment or γ-ray irradiation) to test the benefit of grafting. The optimal surface concentrations of grafted molecules were around 50 pmol/cm². Compared to GRGDS, the peptidomimetics promoted cell attachment with similar or slightly better performances. Endothelialized grafted supports were further exposed to 2 h of shear stress mimicking arterial conditions. Cells were lost on non-grafted PET whereas cells on grafted polymers sterilized by γ-ray irradiation withstood forces with no significant difference in focal contacts. At the mRNA level, cells on functionalized PET were able to respond to shear stress with NFkB upregulation. Thus, grafting of peptidomimetics as ligands of the αvβ3 integrin could be a relevant strategy to improve the adhesion of human endothelial cells and to obtain an efficient endothelialized PET for the surgery of small-diameter vascular prostheses.

  16. Estimates of bottom roughness length and bottom shear stress in South San Francisco Bay, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cheng, R.T.; Ling, C.-H.; Gartner, J.W.; Wang, P.-F.

    1999-01-01

    A field investigation of the hydrodynamics and the resuspension and transport of participate matter in a bottom boundary layer was carried out in South San Francisco Bay (South Bay), California, during March-April 1995. Using broadband acoustic Doppler current profilers, detailed measurements of turbulent mean velocity distribution within 1.5 m above bed have been obtained. A global method of data analysis was used for estimating bottom roughness length zo and bottom shear stress (or friction velocities u*). Field data have been examined by dividing the time series of velocity profiles into 24-hour periods and independently analyzing the velocity profile time series by flooding and ebbing periods. The global method of solution gives consistent properties of bottom roughness length zo and bottom shear stress values (or friction velocities u*) in South Bay. Estimated mean values of zo and u* for flooding and ebbing cycles are different. The differences in mean zo and u* are shown to be caused by tidal current flood-ebb inequality, rather than the flooding or ebbing of tidal currents. The bed shear stress correlates well with a reference velocity; the slope of the correlation defines a drag coefficient. Forty-three days of field data in South Bay show two regimes of zo (and drag coefficient) as a function of a reference velocity. When the mean velocity is >25-30 cm s-1, the ln zo (and thus the drag coefficient) is inversely proportional to the reference velocity. The cause for the reduction of roughness length is hypothesized as sediment erosion due to intensifying tidal currents thereby reducing bed roughness. When the mean velocity is <25-30 cm s-1, the correlation between zo and the reference velocity is less clear. A plausible explanation of scattered values of zo under this condition may be sediment deposition. Measured sediment data were inadequate to support this hypothesis, but the proposed hypothesis warrants further field investigation.

  17. Shear-stress-mediated refolding of proteins from aggregates and inclusion bodies.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Tom Z; Ormonde, Callum F G; Kudlacek, Stephan T; Kunche, Sameeran; Smith, Joshua N; Brown, William A; Pugliese, Kaitlin M; Olsen, Tivoli J; Iftikhar, Mariam; Raston, Colin L; Weiss, Gregory A

    2015-02-09

    Recombinant protein overexpression of large proteins in bacteria often results in insoluble and misfolded proteins directed to inclusion bodies. We report the application of shear stress in micrometer-wide, thin fluid films to refold boiled hen egg white lysozyme, recombinant hen egg white lysozyme, and recombinant caveolin-1. Furthermore, the approach allowed refolding of a much larger protein, cAMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA). The reported methods require only minutes, which is more than 100 times faster than conventional overnight dialysis. This rapid refolding technique could significantly shorten times, lower costs, and reduce waste streams associated with protein expression for a wide range of industrial and research applications.

  18. A Micromachined Geometric Moire Interferometric Floating-Element Shear Stress Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horowitz, S.; Chen, T.; Chandrasekaran, V.; Tedjojuwono, K.; Nishida, T.; Cattafesta, L.; Sheplak, M.

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents the development of a floating-element shear stress sensor that permits the direct measurement of skin friction based on geometric Moir interferometry. The sensor was fabricated using an aligned wafer-bond/thin-back process producing optical gratings on the backside of a floating element and on the top surface of the support wafer. Experimental characterization indicates a static sensitivity of 0.26 microns/Pa, a resonant frequency of 1.7 kHz, and a noise floor of 6.2 mPa/(square root)Hz.

  19. Shear stresses in cemented and bonded optics due to temperature changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoder, P. R.; Vukobratovich, D.

    2015-09-01

    This paper applies analytical means previously published by Chen and Nelson (1979) to estimate the shear stresses developed within the joints between typical cemented optical components and within opto-mechanical subassemblies made of materials with significantly different coefficients of thermal expansion (CTEs) when exposed to extreme ambient temperatures. Two cemented doublet examples, one involving glasses with a large CTE mismatch and another with more equal CTEs, are analyzed. An example involving a prism made of fused silica bonded with epoxy to a titanium base also is considered.

  20. A model for the excitation of osteocytes by mechanical loading-induced bone fluid shear stresses.

    PubMed

    Weinbaum, S; Cowin, S C; Zeng, Y

    1994-03-01

    A new experimentally testable hypothesis is advanced for the mechanosensory transduction mechanism by which communicating osteocytes sense the very small in vivo strains in the calcified matrix components of bone. We propose that the osteocytes, although not responsive to substantial fluid pressures, can be stimulated by relatively small fluid shear stresses acting on the membranes of their osteocytic processes. Biot's porous media theory is used to relate the combined axial and bending loads applied to a whole bone to the flow past the osteocytic processes in their canaliculi. In this theory, the bone pores of interest are the proteoglycan filled fluid annuli that surround the osteocytic processes in the canaliculi. We show that previously predicted fluid pore pressure relaxation times were a hundred-fold too short for the lacunar-canalicular porosity because they neglected the fluid drag associated with proteoglycan matrix on the surface membrane of the osteocyte and its cell processes. The recent theory developed in Tsay and Weinbaum [J. Fluid Mech. 226, 125-148 (1991)] for flow through cross-linked fiber filled channels is used to model the flow through this proteoglycan matrix. The predicted pore relaxation time, 1-2 s, closely corresponds to the times measured by Salzstein and Pollack [J. Biomechanics 20, 271-280 (1987)]. Furthermore, using this model, the magnitude of the predicted fluid induced shear stresses, 8-30 dyn cm-2, is shown to be similar to the fluid shear stresses measured in osteoblasts and other cells in which an intracellular Ca2+ shear stress response had been observed. This model is also used, in conjunction with anatomical data and the pore fluid pressure relaxation time data, to show that the spacing between the fibers is approximately 7 nm. The result is consistent with the notion that the canalicular pore space is filled with glycosaminoglycans that are ordered by albumin according to the model of Michel [J. Physiol. 404, 1-29 (1988

  1. Method of determining shear stress employing a monomer-polymer laminate structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Jag J. (Inventor); Eftekhari, Abe (Inventor); Parmar, Devendra S. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A laminate structure attached to the test surface of an article is presented. The laminate structure is comprised of a liquid crystal polymer substrate. A light absorbing coating is applied to the substrate and is thin enough to permit bonding steric interaction between the liquid crystal polymer substrate and an overlying liquid crystal monomer thin film. Light is directed through and reflected by the liquid crystal monomer thin film and unreflected light is absorbed by the underlying coating. The wavelength of the reflected light is indicative of the shear stress experienced by the test surface.

  2. Experimental Investigation of Entrainment Rate by Debris Flows: from Shear Stress to Granular Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, K. M.; Longjas, A.; Moberly, D.

    2015-12-01

    Debris flows - flows of boulders, gravel, sand, fine particles, and fluids - erode sediment from steep hillsides and deposit them at lower slopes. Current model frameworks for erosion by debris flow vary significantly and include those that consider macroscopic fields such as excess shear stresses, similar to traditional models of bedload transport, to those that consider the "granular" physics, from force chains (related to bed fabric) to granular temperatures (related to random kinetic energy of the flow). We perform experiments to investigate the underlying mechanics associated with entrainment of bed materials by overlying flows in an instrumented laboratory debris flow flume. In particular, we investigate how the erosion rate of a flowing mass impinging on an erodible bed of particles depends on boundary conditions, dynamics of the flow, and the state of the bed. Using high speed imaging to capture average and instantaneous particle dynamics simultaneously with bed stress measurements, we investigate the effectiveness of a variety of model frameworks for capturing the relationships between flow dynamics and erosion rates. We find no correlation between the bed shear stress associated with the mass of the flow and erosion rate. Similarly, we found no correlation between the erosion rate and a Reynolds stress, that is, the stress associated with correlations between downstream and vertical velocity fluctuations. On the other hand, we found that granular temperature is well-correlated with entrainment rate during particular phases of our experimental debris flow. In particular, we found the instantaneous entrainment rate ɛ is linearly dependent on the ratio of the granular temperature Tg to the kinetic energy associated with the average flow velocity u: ɛ ~ (Tg / ρm u2) where ρm is the local instantaneous density of the flow. We present these results and discuss how they vary with the state of the flow, boundary conditions, and particle mixtures.

  3. A new three-dimensional exponential material model of the coronary arterial wall to include shear stress due to torsion.

    PubMed

    Van Epps, J Scott; Vorp, David A

    2008-10-01

    The biomechanical milieu of the coronary arteries is unique in that they experience mechanical deformations of twisting, bending, and stretching due to their tethering to the epicardial surface. Spatial variations in stresses caused by these deformations could account for the heterogeneity of atherosclerotic plaques within the coronary tree. The goal of this work was to utilize previously reported shear moduli to calculate a shear strain parameter for a Fung-type exponential model of the arterial wall and determine if this single constant can account for the observed behavior of arterial segments under torsion. A Fung-type exponential strain-energy function was adapted to include a torsional shear strain term. The material parameter for this term was determined from previously published data describing the relationship between shear modulus and circumferential stress and longitudinal stretch ratio. Values for the shear strain parameter were determined for three geometries representing the mean porcine left anterior descending coronary artery dimensions plus or minus one standard deviation. Finite element simulation of triaxial biomechanical testing was then used to validate the model. The mean value calculated for the shear strain parameter was 0.0759+/-0.0009 (N=3 geometries). In silico triaxial experiments demonstrated that the shear modulus is directly proportional to the applied pressure at a constant longitudinal stretch ratio and to the stretch ratio at a constant pressure. Shear moduli determined from these simulations showed excellent agreement to shear moduli reported in literature. Previously published models describing the torsional shear behavior of porcine coronary arteries require a total of six independent constants. We have reduced that description into a single parameter in a Fung-type exponential strain-energy model. This model will aid in the estimation of wall stress distributions of vascular segments undergoing torsion, as such information

  4. Numerical design and optimization of hydraulic resistance and wall shear stress inside pressure-driven microfluidic networks.

    PubMed

    Damiri, Hazem Salim; Bardaweel, Hamzeh Khalid

    2015-11-07

    Microfluidic networks represent the milestone of microfluidic devices. Recent advancements in microfluidic technologies mandate complex designs where both hydraulic resistance and pressure drop across the microfluidic network are minimized, while wall shear stress is precisely mapped throughout the network. In this work, a combination of theoretical and modeling techniques is used to construct a microfluidic network that operates under minimum hydraulic resistance and minimum pressure drop while constraining wall shear stress throughout the network. The results show that in order to minimize the hydraulic resistance and pressure drop throughout the network while maintaining constant wall shear stress throughout the network, geometric and shape conditions related to the compactness and aspect ratio of the parent and daughter branches must be followed. Also, results suggest that while a "local" minimum hydraulic resistance can be achieved for a geometry with an arbitrary aspect ratio, a "global" minimum hydraulic resistance occurs only when the aspect ratio of that geometry is set to unity. Thus, it is concluded that square and equilateral triangular cross-sectional area microfluidic networks have the least resistance compared to all rectangular and isosceles triangular cross-sectional microfluidic networks, respectively. Precise control over wall shear stress through the bifurcations of the microfluidic network is demonstrated in this work. Three multi-generation microfluidic network designs are considered. In these three designs, wall shear stress in the microfluidic network is successfully kept constant, increased in the daughter-branch direction, or decreased in the daughter-branch direction, respectively. For the multi-generation microfluidic network with constant wall shear stress, the design guidelines presented in this work result in identical profiles of wall shear stresses not only within a single generation but also through all the generations of the

  5. Design and Validation of a Novel Bioreactor to Subject Aortic Valve Leaflets to Side-Specific Shear Stress

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Ling; Rajamannan, Nalini M.; Sucosky, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    Hemodynamic stresses are presumed to play an important role in the development of calcific aortic valve disease (CAVD). The elucidation of the shear stress mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of CAVD has been hampered by the complexity of the native unsteady and side-specific valvular flow environment. To address this gap, this article describes the design and validation of a novel device to expose leaflet samples to time-dependent side-specific shear stress. The device built on a double cone-and-plate geometry was dimensioned based on our previous single-sided shear stress device that minimizes secondary flow effects inherent to this geometry. A fluid–structure interaction (FSI) model was designed to predict the actual shear stress produced on a tissue sample mounted in the new device. Staining was performed on porcine leaflets conditioned in the new bioreactor to assess endothelial integrity and cellular apoptosis. The FSI results demonstrated good agreement between the target (native) and the actual side-specific shear stress produced on a tissue sample. No significant difference in endothelial integrity and cellular apoptosis was detected between samples conditioned for 96 h and fresh controls. This new device will enable the investigation of valvular response to normal and pathologic hemodynamics and the potential mechano-etiology of CAVD. PMID:21455792

  6. Inversion of coeval shear and normal stress of Piton de la Fournaise flank displacement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tridon, Marine; Cayol, Valérie; Froger, Jean-Luc; Augier, Aurélien; Bachèlery, Patrick

    2016-11-01

    The April 2007 eruption of Piton de la Fournaise was the biggest volcano eruptive crisis of the 20th and 21st centuries. Interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) captured a large coeruptive seaward displacement on the volcano's eastern flank, which continued for more than a year at a decreasing rate. Coeruptive uplift and posteruptive subsidence were also observed. While it is generally agreed that flank displacement is induced by fault slip, we suggest that this flank displacement might have been induced by a sheared sill, based on observations of sheared sills at Piton des Neiges. To test this hypothesis, we develop a new method to invert a quadrangular curved source submitted to simultaneous pressure and shear stress changes. This method, based on boundary elements, is applied to data acquired along six Envisat orbits covering a 14 month period subsequent to the April 2007 eruption. Posteruptive displacement is well explained by closure and slip of a large (5 km by 8 km) and shallow (500 m) trapezoidal fracture parallel to the flank and probably coincident with a lithological discontinuity. We investigate whether thermal contraction or degassing of a coeruptive sill can explain the displacement. Such a sill would have to be 10 times thicker than inferred from the coeruptive uplift and solidification time 10 times shorter ( 20 days) than the duration of the posteruptive subsidence (24 to 33 months). Instead, we propose that the posteruptive eastern flank displacement is due to the compaction and ongoing slow slip on a shallow detachment fault.

  7. Flow visualization and wall shear stress of a flapping model hummingbird wing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swanton, Erik W. M.; Vanier, Blake A.; Mohseni, Kamran

    2010-09-01

    The unsteady low Reynolds number aerodynamics of flapping flight was investigated experimentally through flow visualization by suspended particle imagery and wall shear stress measurement from micro-array hot-film anemometry. In conjunction, a mechanism was developed to create a flapping motion with three degrees of freedom and adjustable flapping frequency. The flapping kinematics and wing shape were selected for dynamic similarity to a hummingbird during hovering flight. Flow visualization was used to validate the anemometry observations of leading edge vortex (LEV) characteristics and to investigate the necessity of spanwise flow in LEV stability. The shear sensors determined LEV characteristics throughout the translation section of the stroke period for various wing speeds. It was observed that a minimum frequency between 2 and 3.5 Hz is required for the formation and stabilization of a LEV. The vortex strength peaked around 30% of the flapping cycle (corresponding to just past the translation midpoint), which agrees with results from previous studies conducted by others. The shear sensors also indicated a mild growth in LEV size during translation sections of the wing’s motion. This growth magnitude was nearly constant through a range of operating frequencies.

  8. Platelet deposition in non-parallel flow: influence of shear stress and changes in surface reactivity.

    PubMed

    Weller, Frédéric Frank

    2008-09-01

    This paper deals with flow- and surface-related aspects of primary hemostasis. It investigates the influence of both shear stress and changes in surface reactivity on platelet adhesion. For this purpose, a mathematical model based on the Navier-Stokes equations and on particle conservation is developed. Several vessel geometries of physiological relevance are considered, such as stagnation point flow, sudden expansion and t-junction. Model parameters have been optimized to fit corresponding experimental data. When platelet adhesion was assumed independent of shear, numerically predicted spatial platelet distribution did not match these data at all. However, when adhesion was assumed shear-dependent, better agreement was achieved. Further improvement was obtained when changes in surface reactivity due to platelet adhesion were taken into account. This was done by coupling platelet flux conditions to ordinary differential equations for the evolution of surface-bound platelets. Existence of weak solutions is shown for generalized parabolic systems having such boundary conditions. This, together with proofs for uniqueness and positivity of solutions, guarantees mathematical well posedness of the presented model. Limitations due to the complexity of the hemostatic system are discussed, as well as possible applications in practice. The findings of this paper contribute to understand the roles of flow and surface in primary hemostasis, which is of paramount interest in bioengineering and clinical practice.

  9. Suppression of TAK1 pathway by shear stress counteracts the inflammatory endothelial cell phenotype induced by oxidative stress and TGF-β1

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ee Soo; Boldo, Llorenç Solé; Fernandez, Bernadette O.; Feelisch, Martin; Harmsen, Martin C.

    2017-01-01

    Endothelial dysfunction is characterised by aberrant redox signalling and an inflammatory phenotype. Shear stress antagonises endothelial dysfunction by increasing nitric oxide formation, activating anti-inflammatory pathways and suppressing inflammatory pathways. The TAK1 (MAP3K7) is a key mediator of inflammation and non-canonical TGF-β signalling. While the individual roles of TAK1, ERK5 (MAPK7) and TGF-β pathways in endothelial cell regulation are well characterised, an integrative understanding of the orchestration of these pathways and their crosstalk with the redox system under shear stress is lacking. We hypothesised that shear stress counteracts the inflammatory effects of oxidative stress and TGF-β1 on endothelial cells by restoring redox balance and repressing the TAK1 pathway. Using human umbilical vein endothelial cells, we here show that TGF-β1 aggravates oxidative stress-mediated inflammatory activation and that shear stress activates ERK5 signalling while attenuating TGF-β signalling. ERK5 activation restores redox balance, but fails to repress the inflammatory effect of TGF-β1 which is suppressed upon TAK1 inhibition. In conclusion, shear stress counteracts endothelial dysfunction by suppressing the pro-inflammatory non-canonical TGF-β pathway and by activating the ERK5 pathway which restores redox signalling. We propose that a pharmacological compound that abates TGF-β signalling and enhances ERK5 signalling may be useful to counteract endothelial dysfunction. PMID:28209993

  10. Interaction between a normal shock wave and a turbulent boundary layer at high transonic speeds. Part 2: Wall shear stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liou, M. S.; Adamson, T. C., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    An analysis is presented of the flow in the two inner layers, the Reynolds stress sublayer and the wall layer. Included is the calculation of the shear stress at the wall in the interaction region. The limit processes considered are those used for an inviscid flow.

  11. Investigation of high-speed free shear flows using improved pressure-strain correlated Reynolds stress turbulence model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tiwari, S. N.; Lakshmanan, B.

    1993-01-01

    A high-speed shear layer is studied using compressibility corrected Reynolds stress turbulence model which employs newly developed model for pressure-strain correlation. MacCormack explicit prediction-corrector method is used for solving the governing equations and the turbulence transport equations. The stiffness arising due to source terms in the turbulence equations is handled by a semi-implicit numerical technique. Results obtained using the new model show a sharper reduction in growth rate with increasing convective Mach number. Some improvements were also noted in the prediction of the normalized streamwise stress and Reynolds shear stress. The computed results are in good agreement with the experimental data.

  12. Effects of arterial blood flow on walls of the abdominal aorta: distributions of wall shear stress and oscillatory shear index determined by phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Sughimoto, Koichi; Shimamura, Yoshiaki; Tezuka, Chie; Tsubota, Ken'ichi; Liu, Hao; Okumura, Kenichiro; Masuda, Yoshitada; Haneishi, Hideaki

    2016-07-01

    Although abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) occur mostly inferior to the renal artery, the mechanism of the development of AAA in relation to its specific location is not yet clearly understood. The objective of this study was to evaluate the hypothesis that even healthy volunteers may manifest specific flow characteristics of blood flow and alter wall shear or oscillatory shear stress in the areas where AAAs commonly develop. Eight healthy male volunteers were enrolled in this prospective study, aged from 24 to 27. Phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed with electrocardiographic triggering. Flow-sensitive four-dimensional MR imaging of the abdominal aorta, with three-directional velocity encoding, including simple morphological image acquisition, was performed. Information on specific locations on the aortic wall was applied to the flow encodes to calculate wall shear stress (WSS) and oscillatory shear index (OSI). While time-framed WSS showed the highest peak of 1.14 ± 0.25 Pa in the juxtaposition of the renal artery, the WSS plateaued to 0.61 Pa at the anterior wall of the abdominal aorta. The OSI peaked distal to the renal arteries at the posterior wall of the abdominal aorta of 0.249 ± 0.148, and was constantly elevated in the whole abdominal aorta at more than 0.14. All subjects were found to have elevated OSI in regions where AAAs commonly occur. These findings indicate that areas of constant peaked oscillatory shear stress in the infra-renal aorta may be one of the factors that lead to morphological changes over time, even in healthy individuals.

  13. PIV Measurement of Wall Shear Stress and Flow Structures within an Intracranial Aneurysm Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chow, Ricky; Sparrow, Eph; Campbell, Gary; Divani, Afshin; Sheng, Jian

    2012-11-01

    The formation and rupture of an intracranial aneurysm (IA) is a debilitating and often lethal event. Geometric features of the aneurysm bulb and upstream artery, such as bulb size, bulb shape, and curvature of the artery, are two groups of factors that define the flow and stresses within an IA. Abnormal flow stresses are related to rupture. This presentation discusses the development of a quasi-3D PIV technique and its application in various glass models at Re = 275 and 550 to experimentally assess at a preliminary level the impact of geometry and flow rate. Some conclusions are to be drawn linking geometry of the flow domain to rupture risk. The extracted results also serve as the baseline case and as a precursor to a companion presentation by the authors discussing the impact of flow diverters, a new class of medical devices. The PIV experiments were performed in a fully index-matched flow facility, allowing for unobstructed observations over complex geometry. A reconstruction and analysis method was devised to obtain 3D mean wall stress distributions and flow fields. The quasi 3D measurements were reconstructed from orthogonal planes encompassing the entire glass model, spaced 0.4mm apart. Wall shear stresses were evaluated from the near-wall flow viscous stresses.

  14. Wall shear stress assessment in the common carotid artery of end-stage renal failure patients.

    PubMed

    Samijo, S K; Barkhuysen, R; Willigers, J M; Leunissen, K M L; Ledoux, L A F; Kitslaar, P J E H M; Hoeks, A P G

    2002-01-01

    Under physiological circumstances in the common carotid artery (CCA), mean wall shear stress (WSS), defined as mean wall shear rate (WSR) times local whole blood viscosity (WBV), is maintained at approximately 1.5 Pa. In patients with end-stage renal failure (ESRF) whole blood viscosity is low and it is not unlikely that mean WSS is lower in these patients than in control subjects. Moreover, hemodialysis causes an acute increase in blood viscosity with possible effects on WSS. In this study WSS in the CCA was determined with the Shear Rate Estimating System, an apparatus based on ultrasound, in ESRF patients (n = 13) and in presumed healthy age- and sex-matched control subjects (n = 13). Prior to hemodialysis, mean WSS (0.67 +/- 0.23 Pa) was significantly lower (p < 0.05) in patients with ESRF, due to both a lower WBV (2.80 +/- 0.52 mPa.s) and mean WSR (271 +/- 109 s(-1)), than in the control subjects (mean WSS: 1.24 +/- 0.20 Pa; WBV: 3.20 +/- 0.29 mPa.s; WSR: 387 +/- 51 s(-1)). Hemodialysis induced an increase in WBV (up to 3.71 +/- 1.54 mPa.s, p < 0.01), but mean WSS did not change significantly due to a reciprocal decrease in mean wall shear rate. These findings demonstrate that WSS is lower in hemodialysis patients than in control subjects, and that mean WSS is maintained at this low level despite an acute change in blood viscosity.

  15. Role of fluid shear stress in regulating VWF structure, function and related blood disorders

    PubMed Central

    Gogia, Shobhit; Neelamegham, Sriram

    2015-01-01

    Von Willebrand factor (VWF) is the largest glycoprotein in blood. It plays a crucial role in primary hemostasis via its binding interaction with platelet and endothelial cell surface receptors, other blood proteins and extra-cellular matrix components. This protein is found as a series of repeat units that are disulfide bonded to form multimeric structures. Once in blood, the protein multimer distribution is dynamically regulated by fluid shear stress which has two opposing effects: it promotes the aggregation or self-association of multiple VWF units, and it simultaneously reduces multimer size by facilitating the force-dependent cleavage of the protein by various proteases, most notably ADAMTS13 (a disintegrin and metalloprotease with thrombospondin type repeats, motif 1 type 13). In addition to these effects, fluid shear also controls the solution and substrate-immobilized structure of VWF, the nature of contact between blood platelets and substrates, and the biomechanics of the GpIbα–VWF bond. These features together regulate different physiological and pathological processes including normal hemostasis, arterial and venous thrombosis, von Willebrand disease, thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura and acquired von Willebrand syndrome. This article discusses current knowledge of VWF structure–function relationships with emphasis on the effects of hydrodynamic shear, including rapid methods to estimate the nature and magnitude of these forces in selected conditions. It shows that observations made by many investigators using solution and substrate-based shearing devices can be reconciled upon considering the physical size of VWF and the applied mechanical force in these different geometries. PMID:26600266

  16. Fluid shear stress activates YAP1 to promote cancer cell motility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hyun Jung; Diaz, Miguel F.; Price, Katherine M.; Ozuna, Joyce A.; Zhang, Songlin; Sevick-Muraca, Eva M.; Hagan, John P.; Wenzel, Pamela L.

    2017-01-01

    Mechanical stress is pervasive in egress routes of malignancy, yet the intrinsic effects of force on tumour cells remain poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate that frictional force characteristic of flow in the lymphatics stimulates YAP1 to drive cancer cell migration; whereas intensities of fluid wall shear stress (WSS) typical of venous or arterial flow inhibit taxis. YAP1, but not TAZ, is strictly required for WSS-enhanced cell movement, as blockade of YAP1, TEAD1-4 or the YAP1-TEAD interaction reduces cellular velocity to levels observed without flow. Silencing of TEAD phenocopies loss of YAP1, implicating transcriptional transactivation function in mediating force-enhanced cell migration. WSS dictates expression of a network of YAP1 effectors with executive roles in invasion, chemotaxis and adhesion downstream of the ROCK-LIMK-cofilin signalling axis. Altogether, these data implicate YAP1 as a fluid mechanosensor that functions to regulate genes that promote metastasis.

  17. Fluid shear stress activates YAP1 to promote cancer cell motility

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyun Jung; Diaz, Miguel F.; Price, Katherine M.; Ozuna, Joyce A.; Zhang, Songlin; Sevick-Muraca, Eva M.; Hagan, John P.; Wenzel, Pamela L.

    2017-01-01

    Mechanical stress is pervasive in egress routes of malignancy, yet the intrinsic effects of force on tumour cells remain poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate that frictional force characteristic of flow in the lymphatics stimulates YAP1 to drive cancer cell migration; whereas intensities of fluid wall shear stress (WSS) typical of venous or arterial flow inhibit taxis. YAP1, but not TAZ, is strictly required for WSS-enhanced cell movement, as blockade of YAP1, TEAD1-4 or the YAP1–TEAD interaction reduces cellular velocity to levels observed without flow. Silencing of TEAD phenocopies loss of YAP1, implicating transcriptional transactivation function in mediating force-enhanced cell migration. WSS dictates expression of a network of YAP1 effectors with executive roles in invasion, chemotaxis and adhesion downstream of the ROCK–LIMK–cofilin signalling axis. Altogether, these data implicate YAP1 as a fluid mechanosensor that functions to regulate genes that promote metastasis. PMID:28098159

  18. Surface morphology of platelet adhesion influenced by activators, inhibitors and shear stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, Melanie Groan

    Platelet activation involves multiple events, one of which is the generation and release of nitric oxide (NO), a platelet aggregation inhibitor. Platelets simultaneously send and receive various agents that promote a positive and negative feedback control system during hemostasis. Although the purpose of platelet-derived NO is not fully understood, NO is known to inhibit platelet recruitment. NO's relatively large diffusion coefficient allows it to diffuse more rapidly than platelet agonists. It may thus be able to inhibit recruitment of platelets near the periphery of a growing thrombus before agonists have substantially accumulated in those regions. Results from two studies in our laboratory differed in the extent to which platelet-derived NO decreased platelet adhesion. Frilot studied the effect of L-arginine (L-A) and NG-Methyl-L-arginine acetate salt (L-NMMA) on platelet adhesion to collagen under static conditions in a Petri dish. Eshaq examined the percent coverage on collagen-coated and fibrinogen-coated microchannels under shear conditions with different levels of L-A and Adenosine Diphosphate (ADP). Frilot's results showed no effect of either L-A or L-NMMA on surface coverage, thrombus size or serotonin release, while Eshaq's results showed a decrease in surface coverage with increased levels of L-A. A possible explanation for these contrasting results is that platelet-derived NO may be more important under flow conditions than under static conditions. For this project, the effects of L-A. ADP and L-NMMA on platelet adhesion were studied at varying shear stresses on protein-coated glass slides. The surface exposed to platelet-rich-plasma in combination with each chemical solution was observed under AFM, FE-SEM and fluorescence microscopy. Quantitative and qualitative comparisons of images obtained with these techniques confirmed the presence of platelets on the protein coatings. AFM images of fibrinogen and collagen-coated slides presented characteristic

  19. The Interaction between Fluid Wall Shear Stress and Solid Circumferential Strain Affects Endothelial Gene Expression.

    PubMed

    Amaya, Ronny; Pierides, Alexis; Tarbell, John M

    2015-01-01

    Endothelial cells lining the walls of blood vessels are exposed simultaneously to wall shear stress (WSS) and circumferential stress (CS) that can be characterized by the temporal phase angle between WSS and CS (stress phase angle - SPA). Regions of the circulation with highly asynchronous hemodynamics (SPA close to -180°) such as coronary arteries are associated with the development of pathological conditions such as atherosclerosis and intimal hyperplasia whereas more synchronous regions (SPA closer to 0°) are spared of disease. The present study evaluates endothelial cell gene expression of 42 atherosclerosis-related genes under asynchronous hemodynamics (SPA=-180 °) and synchronous hemodynamics (SPA=0 °). This study used a novel bioreactor to investigate the cellular response of bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAECS) exposed to a combination of pulsatile WSS and CS at SPA=0 or SPA=-180. Using a PCR array of 42 genes, we determined that BAECS exposed to non-reversing sinusoidal WSS (10±10 dyne/cm2) and CS (4 ± 4%) over a 7 hour testing period displayed 17 genes that were up regulated by SPA = -180 °, most of them pro-atherogenic, including NFκB and other NFκB target genes. The up regulation of NFκB p50/p105 and p65 by SPA =-180° was confirmed by Western blots and immunofluorescence staining demonstrating the nuclear translocation of NFκB p50/p105 and p65. These data suggest that asynchronous hemodynamics (SPA=-180 °) can elicit proatherogenic responses in endothelial cells compared to synchronous hemodynamics without shear stress reversal, indicating that SPA may be an important parameter characterizing arterial susceptibility to disease.

  20. Estimation of basal shear stresses from now ice-free LIA glacier forefields in the Swiss Alps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, Mauro; Haeberli, Wilfried; Huss, Matthias; Paul, Frank; Linsbauer, Andreas; Hoelzle, Martin

    2013-04-01

    In most cases, assessing the impacts of climatic changes on glaciers requires knowledge about the ice thickness distribution. Miscellaneous methodological approaches with different degrees of sophistication have been applied to model glacier thickness so far. However, all of them include significant uncertainty. By applying a parameterization scheme for ice thickness determination relying on assumptions about basal shear stress by Haeberli and Hoelzle (1995) to now ice-free glacier forefields in the Swiss Alps, basal shear stress values can be calculated based on a fast and robust experimental approach. In a GIS, the combination of recent (1973) and Little Ice Age (LIA) maximum (around 1850) glacier outlines, central flowlines, a recent Digital Elevation Model (DEM) and a DEM of glacier surface topography for the LIA maximum all