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Sample records for flt3 ligand targeted

  1. Dual inhibition of AKT/FLT3-ITD by A674563 overcomes FLT3 ligand-induced drug resistance in FLT3-ITD positive AML

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wenchao; Yu, Kailin; Liu, Xiaochuan; Zou, Fengming; Zhao, Zheng; Wu, Jiaxin; Liu, Juan; Liu, Feiyang; Wang, Li; Stone, Richard M.; Galinksy, Ilene A.; Griffin, James D.; Zhang, Shanchun; Weisberg, Ellen L.; Liu, Jing; Liu, Qingsong

    2016-01-01

    The FLT3-ITD mutation is one of the most prevalent oncogenic mutations in AML. Several FLT3 kinase inhibitors have shown impressive activity in clinical evaluation, however clinical responses are usually transient and clinical effects are rapidly lost due to drug resistance. One of the resistance mechanisms in the AML refractory patients involves FLT3-ligand induced reactivation of AKT and/or ERK signaling via FLT3 wt kinase. Via a screen of numerous AKT kinase inhibitors, we identified the well-established orally available AKT inhibitor, A674563, as a dual suppressor of AKT and FLT3-ITD. A674563 suppressed FLT3-ITD positive AML both in vitro and in vivo. More importantly, compared to other FLT3 inhibitors, A674563 is able to overcome FLT3 ligand-induced drug resistance through simultaneous inhibition of FLT3-ITD- and AKT-mediated signaling. Our findings suggest that A674563 might be a potential drug candidate for overcoming FLT3 ligand-mediated drug resistance in FLT3-ITD positive AML. PMID:27074558

  2. Computer aided drug discovery of highly ligand efficient, low molecular weight imidazopyridine analogs as FLT3 inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Frett, Brendan; McConnell, Nick; Smith, Catherine C.; Wang, Yuanxiang; Shah, Neil P.; Li, Hong-yu

    2015-01-01

    The FLT3 kinase represents an attractive target to effectively treat AML. Unfortunately, no FLT3 targeted therapeutic is currently approved. In line with our continued interests in treating kinase related disease for anti-FLT3 mutant activity, we utilized pioneering synthetic methodology in combination with computer aided drug discovery and identified low molecular weight, highly ligand efficient, FLT3 kinase inhibitors. Compounds were analyzed for biochemical inhibition, their ability to selectively inhibit cell proliferation, for FLT3 mutant activity, and preliminary aqueous solubility. Validated hits were discovered that can serve as starting platforms for lead candidates. PMID:25765758

  3. HIV gag protein is efficiently cross-presented when targeted with an antibody towards the DEC-205 receptor in Flt3 ligand-mobilized murine dendritic cells

    PubMed Central

    Bozzacco, Leonia; Trumpfheller, Christine; Huang, Yaoxing; Longhi, Maria Paula; Shimeliovich, Irina; Schauer, Joseph D.; Park, Chae Gyu; Steinman, Ralph M.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Dendritic cells present exogenous proteins to MHC class I restricted CD8+ T cells. This function does not require endogenous antigen synthesis within DC, providing the potential to elicit CD8+ T cell responses to immune complexes, inactivated microbes, dying cells and proteins like ovalbumin. In mice, the CD8+ or DEC-205+ DC are specialized for cross-presentation, and this subset can be increased 10 fold in numbers following Flt3L treatment in vivo. Therefore we studied cross-presentation by abundant Flt3L DC using HIV gag protein. When enriched by positive selection with anti-CD11c beads, cells from Flt3L mice are not only more abundant but are more highly enriched in CD11c high DC, particularly the DEC-205+ subset. DC cross-present HIV gag to primed CD8+ T cells, but when the antigen is delivered within an antibody to DEC-205 receptor, cross-presentation becomes 100 fold more efficient than non-targeted antigen. This finding requires gag to be engineered into anti-DEC antibody, not just mixed with antibody. Flt3L DC are a valuable tool to study cross-presentation, since their use overcomes the obstacle posed by the low number of cross-presenting DC in the steady state. These findings support future experiments to use Flt3L to enhance presentation of DC-targeted vaccines. PMID:19830741

  4. Flt3 Ligand Regulates the Development of Innate Lymphoid Cells in Fetal and Adult Mice.

    PubMed

    Baerenwaldt, Anne; von Burg, Nicole; Kreuzaler, Matthias; Sitte, Selina; Horvath, Edit; Peter, Annick; Voehringer, David; Rolink, Antonius G; Finke, Daniela

    2016-03-15

    Flt3 ligand (Flt3L) promotes survival of lymphoid progenitors in the bone marrow and differentiation of dendritic cells (DCs), but its role in regulating innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) during fetal and adult life is not understood. By using Flt3L knockout and transgenic mice, we demonstrate that Flt3L controls ILC numbers by regulating the pool of α4β7(-) and α4β7(+) lymphoid tissue inducer cell progenitors in the fetal liver and common lymphoid progenitors in the bone marrow. Deletion of flt3l severely reduced the number of fetal liver progenitors and lymphoid tissue inducer cells in the neonatal intestine, resulting in impaired development of Peyer's patches. In the adult intestine, NK cells and group 2 and 3 ILCs were severely reduced. This effect occurred independently of DCs as ILC numbers were normal in mice in which DCs were constitutively deleted. Finally, we could show that administration of Flt3L increased the number of NKp46(-) group 3 ILCs in wild-type and even in Il7(-/-) mice, which generally have reduced numbers of ILCs. Taken together, Flt3L significantly contributes to ILC and Peyer's patches development by targeting lymphoid progenitor cells during fetal and adult life.

  5. FLT3 inhibition: a moving and evolving target in acute myeloid leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Leung, A Y H; Man, C-H; Kwong, Y-L

    2013-02-01

    Internal tandem duplication (ITD) of the fms-like tyrosine kinase 3 (FLT3) gene is a gain-of-function mutation common in acute myeloid leukaemia (AML). It is associated with inferior prognosis and response to chemotherapy. Single base mutations at the FLT3 tyrosine kinase domain (TKD) also leads to a gain of function, although its prognostic significance is less well defined because of its rarity. The clinical benefits of FLT3 inhibition are generally limited to AML with FLT3-ITD. However, responses are transient and leukaemia progression invariably occurs. There is compelling evidence that leukaemia clones carrying both ITD and TKD mutations appear when resistance to FLT3 inhibitors occurs. Interestingly, the emergence of double ITD and TKD mutants can be recapitulated in vitro when FLT3-ITD+ leukaemia cell lines are treated with mutagens and FLT3 inhibitors. Furthermore, murine xenotransplantation models also suggest that, in some cases, the FTL3-ITD and TKD double mutants actually exist in minute amounts before treatment with FLT3 inhibitors, expand under the selection pressure of FLT3 inhibition and become the predominant resistant clone(s) during the drug-refractory phase. On the basis of this model of clonal evolution, a multipronged strategy using more potent FLT3 inhibitors, and a combinatorial approach targeting both FLT3-dependent and FLT3-independent pathways, will be needed to improve outcome.

  6. Barley as a green factory for the production of functional Flt3 ligand.

    PubMed

    Erlendsson, Lýdur S; Muench, Marcus O; Hellman, Ulf; Hrafnkelsdóttir, Soffía M; Jonsson, Anders; Balmer, Yves; Mäntylä, Einar; Orvar, Björn L

    2010-02-01

    Biologically active recombinant human Flt3 ligand was expressed and isolated from transgenic barley seeds. Its expression is controlled by a tissue specific promoter that confines accumulation of the recombinant protein to the endosperm tissue of the seed. The recombinant Flt3 ligand variant expressed in the seeds contains an HQ-tag for affinity purification on immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography (IMAC) resin. The tagged protein was purified from seed extracts to near homogeneity using sequential chromatography on IMAC affinity resin and cation exchange resin. We also show that the recombinant Flt3 ligand protein undergoes posttranslational modifications: it is a glycoprotein containing alpha-1,3-fucose and alpha-1,2-xylose. The HQ-tagged Flt3 ligand variant exhibits comparable biological activity to commercial Flt3 ligand. This is the first report showing expression and accumulation of recombinant human growth factor in barley seeds with a yield of active protein similar to a bacterial expression system. The present results demonstrate that plant molecular farming is a viable approach for the bioproduction of human-derived growth factors. PMID:19844912

  7. Barley as a green factory for the production of functional Flt3 ligand.

    PubMed

    Erlendsson, Lýdur S; Muench, Marcus O; Hellman, Ulf; Hrafnkelsdóttir, Soffía M; Jonsson, Anders; Balmer, Yves; Mäntylä, Einar; Orvar, Björn L

    2010-02-01

    Biologically active recombinant human Flt3 ligand was expressed and isolated from transgenic barley seeds. Its expression is controlled by a tissue specific promoter that confines accumulation of the recombinant protein to the endosperm tissue of the seed. The recombinant Flt3 ligand variant expressed in the seeds contains an HQ-tag for affinity purification on immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography (IMAC) resin. The tagged protein was purified from seed extracts to near homogeneity using sequential chromatography on IMAC affinity resin and cation exchange resin. We also show that the recombinant Flt3 ligand protein undergoes posttranslational modifications: it is a glycoprotein containing alpha-1,3-fucose and alpha-1,2-xylose. The HQ-tagged Flt3 ligand variant exhibits comparable biological activity to commercial Flt3 ligand. This is the first report showing expression and accumulation of recombinant human growth factor in barley seeds with a yield of active protein similar to a bacterial expression system. The present results demonstrate that plant molecular farming is a viable approach for the bioproduction of human-derived growth factors.

  8. FLT3 Ligand as a Molecular Adjuvant for Naked RNA Vaccines.

    PubMed

    Kreiter, Sebastian; Diken, Mustafa; Selmi, Abderraouf; Petschenka, Jutta; Türeci, Özlem; Sahin, Ugur

    2016-01-01

    Intranodal immunization with antigen-encoding naked mRNA has proven to be an efficacious and safe approach to induce antitumor immunity. Thanks to its unique characteristics, mRNA can act not only as a source for antigen but also as an adjuvant for activation of the immune system. The search for additional adjuvants that can be combined with mRNA to further improve the potency of the immunization revealed Fms-like tyrosine kinase 3 (FLT3ligand as a potent candidate. Systemic administration of the dendritic cell-activating FLT3 ligand prior to or along with mRNA immunization-enhanced priming and expansion of antigen-specific CD8(+) T cells in lymphoid organs, T-cell homing into melanoma tumors, and therapeutic activity of the intranodally administered mRNA. Both compounds demonstrate a successful combination in terms of boosting the immune response. This chapter describes methods for intranodal immunization with naked mRNA by co-administration of FLT3 ligand, which leads to strong synergistic effects. PMID:27236799

  9. Flt3 is a target of coumestrol in protecting against UVB-induced skin photoaging.

    PubMed

    Park, Gaeun; Baek, Sohee; Kim, Jong-Eun; Lim, Tae-gyu; Lee, Charles C; Yang, Hee; Kang, Young-Gyu; Park, Jun Seong; Augustin, Martin; Mrosek, Michael; Lee, Chang Yong; Dong, Zigang; Huber, Robert; Lee, Ki Won

    2015-12-01

    While skin aging is a naturally occurring process by senescence, exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation accelerates wrinkle formation and sagging of skin. UV induces skin aging by degrading collagen via activating matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). In this study, we show that coumestrol, a metabolite of the soybean isoflavone daidzein, has a preventive effect on skin photoaging in three-dimensional human skin equivalent model. Coumestrol inhibited UVB-induced MMP-1 expression and activity. Whole human kinase profiling assay identified FLT3 kinase as a novel target protein of coumestrol in UVB-induced signaling pathway in skin. Coumestrol suppresses FLT3 kinase activity, and subsequently, Ras/MEK/ERK and Akt/p70 ribosomal S6 kinase pathway. This suppresses AP-1 activity and in turn, diminishes MMP-1 gene transcription. Using X-ray crystallography, the binding of coumestrol to FLT3 was defined and implied ATP-competitive inhibition. Residues Lys644 and Phe830 showed local changes to accommodate coumestrol in the ATP-binding pocket. 4-APIA, a pharmacological inhibitor of FLT3, inhibited MMP-1 expression and induced signal transduction changes similar to coumestrol. Taken together, coumestrol inhibits UVB-induced MMP-1 expression by suppressing FLT3 kinase activity. These findings suggest that coumestrol is a novel dietary compound with potential application in preventing and improving UVB-associated skin aging.

  10. Targeted Therapy of FLT3 in Treatment of AML—Current Status and Future Directions

    PubMed Central

    Engen, Caroline Benedicte Nitter; Wergeland, Line; Skavland, Jørn; Gjertsen, Bjørn Tore

    2014-01-01

    Internal tandem duplications (ITDs) of the gene encoding the Fms-Like Tyrosine kinase-3 (FLT3) receptor are present in approximately 25% of patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). The mutation is associated with poor prognosis, and the aberrant protein product has been hypothesized as an attractive therapeutic target. Various tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) have been developed targeting FLT3, but in spite of initial optimism the first generation TKIs tested in clinical studies generally induce only partial and transient hematological responses. The limited treatment efficacy generally observed may be explained by numerous factors; extensively pretreated and high risk cohorts, suboptimal pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic properties of the compounds, acquired TKI resistance, or the possible fact that inhibition of mutated FLT3 alone is not sufficient to avoid disease progression. The second-generation agent quizartinb is showing promising outcomes and seems better tolerated and with less toxic effects than traditional chemotherapeutic agents. Therefore, new generations of TKIs might be feasible for use in combination therapy or in a salvage setting in selected patients. Here, we sum up experiences so far, and we discuss the future outlook of targeting dysregulated FLT3 signaling in the treatment of AML. PMID:26237612

  11. Functional expression, purification, and characterization of human Flt3 ligand in the Pichia pastoris system.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan-Li; Chen, Song-Sen; Yang, Ke-Gong; Su, Lin; Deng, Yan-Chun; Liu, Chang-Zheng

    2005-08-01

    Flt3 ligand (FL) is a potent hematopoietic cytokine that affects the growth and differentiation of hematopoietic progenitor and stem cells both in vivo and in vitro. Pichia pastoris transformants secreting high-level rhFL were obtained using 'yeastern blotting' method and the expression level in liquid was about 30 mg/L. rhFL was purified to about 95% purity with overnight dialysis, filtration and an anion-exchange step. Further purification steps employing Sephacryl S-200 and reverse-phase HPLC raised the purity to over 99%. The purified rhFL possessed correct N-terminal amino acid sequence and positive Western blotting bands. SDS-PAGE and mass spectrometry analysis showed molecular weight of rhFL was about 21 and 34 kDa, suggesting that rhFL was glycosylated. The result of capillary electrophoresis showed that its pI is 3.12-4.72. Endo H deglycosylation analysis indicated that there was O-glycosylation besides N-glycosylation in rhFL secreted from P. pastoris. Bioactivity assay showed that the purified rhFL had dose-dependent expansion activity on bone marrow nucleated cells. PMID:15914030

  12. Systemic Dendritic Cell Mobilization Associated with Administration of FLT3 Ligand to SIV- and SHIV-Infected Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Reeves, R. Keith; Wei, Qing; Stallworth, Jackie

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Reports indicate that myeloid and plasmacytoid dendritic cells (mDCs and pDCs), which are key effector cells in host innate immune responses, can be infected with HIV-1 and are reduced in number and function during the chronic phase of HIV disease. Furthermore, it was recently demonstrated that a sustained loss of mDCs and pDCs occurs in SIV-infected macaques. Since loss of functional DC populations might impair innate immune responses to opportunistic microorganisms and neoplastic cells, we explored whether inoculation of naive and SIV- or SHIV-infected pigtailed macaques with the hematopoietic cytokine FLT3-ligand (FLT3-L) would expand the number of mDCs and pDCs in vivo. After the macaques received supraphysiologic doses of FLT3-L, mDCs, pDCs, and monocytes increased up to 45-fold in blood, lymph nodes, and bone marrow (BM), with DC expansion in the BM preceding mobilization in blood and lymphoid tissues. FLT3-L also increased serum levels of IL-12, at least transiently, and elicited higher surface expression of HLA-DR and the activation markers CD25 and CD69 on NK and T cells. During and after treatment of infected animals, APCs increased in number and were activated; however, CD4+ T cell numbers, virion RNA, and anti-SIV/SHIV antibody titers remained relatively stable, suggesting that FLT3-L might be a safe modality to expand DC populations and provide therapeutic benefit during chronic lentivirus infections. PMID:20001520

  13. Expression of GADS enhances FLT3-induced mitogenic signaling

    PubMed Central

    Chougule, Rohit A.; Cordero, Eugenia; Moharram, Sausan A.; Pietras, Kristian; Rönnstrand, Lars; Kazi, Julhash U.

    2016-01-01

    GADS is a member of a family of SH2 and SH3 domain-containing adaptors that functions in tyrosine kinase-mediated signaling cascades. Its expression is largely restricted to hematopoietic tissues and cell lines. Therefore, GADS is mainly involved in leukocyte-specific protein tyrosine kinase signaling. GADS is known to interact with tyrosine-phosphorylated SHC, BCR-ABL and KIT. The SH2 domain of GADS has a similar binding specificity to that of GRB2 but its SH3 domain displays a different binding specificity, and thus it is involved in other downstream signaling pathways than GRB2. In the present study, we examined the role of GADS in FLT3 signaling. FLT3 is a type III receptor tyrosine kinase, which is mutated in more than 30% of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and the most common mutations is the internal tandem duplication (ITD) mutations. We observed that expression of GADS enhanced oncogenic FLT3-ITD-induced cell proliferation and colony formation in vitro. In a mouse xenograft model, GADS accelerated FLT3-ITD-dependent tumor formation. Furthermore, expression of GADS induced a transcriptional program leading to upregulation of MYC and mTORC1 target genes. GADS localizes to the cell membrane and strongly binds to ligand-stimulated wild-type FLT3 or is constitutively associated with the oncogenic mutant FLT3-ITD. We mapped the binding sites in FLT3 to pY955 and pY969 which overlaps with the GRB2 binding sites. Expression of GADS enhanced FLT3-mediated phosphorylation of AKT, ERK1/2, p38 and STAT5. Taken together, our data suggests that GADS is an important downstream component of FLT3 signaling and expression of GADS potentiates FLT3-mediated mitogenic signaling. PMID:26895103

  14. Discovery and Rational Design of Pteridin-7(8H)-one-Based Inhibitors Targeting FMS-like Tyrosine Kinase 3 (FLT3) and Its Mutants.

    PubMed

    Sun, Deheng; Yang, Yu; Lyu, Jiankun; Zhou, Wei; Song, Wenlin; Zhao, Zhenjiang; Chen, Zhuo; Xu, Yufang; Li, Honglin

    2016-07-14

    FLT3 has been validated as a therapeutic target for the treatment of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). In this paper, we describe for the first time, pteridin-7(8H)-one as a scaffold for potent FLT3 inhibitors derived from structural optimizations on irreversible EGFR inhibitors. The representative inhibitor (31) demonstrates single-digit nanomolar inhibition against FLT3 and subnanomolar KD for drug-resistance FLT3 mutants. In profiling of the in vitro tumor cell lines, it shows good selectivity against AML cells harboring FLT3-ITD mutations over other leukemia and solid tumor cell lines. The mechanism of action study illustrates that pteridin-7(8H)-one derivatives suppress the phosphorylation of FLT3 and its downstream pathways, thereby inducing G0/G1 cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in AML cells. In in vivo studies, 31 significantly suppresses the tumor growth in MV4-11 xenograft model. Overall, we provide a structurally distinct chemical scaffold with which to develop FLT3 mutants-selective inhibitors for AML treatment.

  15. Both soluble and membrane-bound forms of Flt3 ligand enhance tumor immunity following "suicide" gene therapy in a murine colon carcinoma model.

    PubMed

    Alsheikhly, Abdul-Razzak; Zweiri, Jehad; Walmesley, Alice J; Watson, Alastair J M; Christmas, Stephen E

    2004-11-01

    In prodrug-activated ("suicide") gene therapy, tumor cells are transfected with the gene for an enzyme that converts an inactive prodrug, such as ganciclovir (GCV), to a toxic compound. Transfected cells are killed on administration of GCV, as also are untransfected "bystander" cells. The ability of the dendritic cell stimulatory cytokine Flt3 ligand (Flt3-L) to modulate prodrug-activated gene therapy has been investigated. Transfectants of the murine colon carcinoma MC26 were generated expressing soluble (FLS) and membrane-bound forms of Flt3-L. They were inoculated together with wild-type MC26 cells and cells expressing herpes simplex virus-1 (HSV1) thymidine kinase into BALB/c mice, which were then administered GCV. Expression of Flt3-L or FLS prevented regrowth of tumor in most mice, which was comparable to the effect of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), while tumors recurred in all mice receiving "suicide" gene therapy alone. Recurring tumor cells were resistant to direct killing by GCV but sensitive to "bystander" killing in vitro. Mice without tumor recurrence were rechallenged with unmodified MC26 cells. Of those mice given transfectants expressing GM-CSF, Flt3-L, or FLS, approximately 50% were immune to rechallenge. These mice also showed cytotoxic and proliferative responses to MC26 cells. These experiments show that both soluble and membrane-bound forms of Flt3-L were able to induce a protective immune response to colon carcinoma cells in a fashion similar to GM-CSF.

  16. [Renaturation with simultaneous purification of the recombinant human Flt3 ligand from inclusion bodies by high performance hydrophobic interaction chromatography].

    PubMed

    Jia, Jia; Wang, Lili; Gao, Dong; Geng, Xindu

    2010-06-01

    Flt3 ligand (FL) is a class of cytokines with the functions of promoting early hematopoiesis. It has important clinical value in promoting growth and development of hematopoietic cells and hematopoietic mobilization. In order to obtain large quantities of recombinant human FL (rhFL) by genetic engineering methods for clinic and research, in this work, rhFL was expressed in E. coli as inclusion bodies. The inclusion bodies were recovered, cleaned and solubilized in 8 mol/L urea, the solubilized rhFL was renatured by high performance hydrophobic interaction chromatography (HPHIC) with simultaneous purification, the retention feature and renaturation regularity were studied. The results showed that when the denatured protein concentration was 8.51 g/L, and the end group of stationary phase was PEG800, under the conditions of mobile phase of pH 7.0 and with the addition of 4 mol/L urea, 1.8 mmol/L glutathione (GSH) and 0.3 mmol/L oxidative glutathione (GSSG), a mass recovery of 36.9% and a purity of 94.5% were obtained after refolding with simultaneous purification. The obtained rhFL was successfully renatured with simultaneous purification in only one step of HPHIC, and it provided a foundation for the manufacturing of high quality rhFL.

  17. FLT3 ligand administration after hematopoietic cell transplantation increases circulating dendritic cell precursors that can be activated by CpG oligodeoxynucleotides to enhance T-cell and natural killer cell function.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei; Chan, Anissa S H; Dawson, Amanda J; Liang, Xueqing; Blazar, Bruce R; Miller, Jeffrey S

    2005-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are key effectors in innate immunity and play critical roles in triggering adaptive immune responses. FLT3 ligand (FLT3-L) is essential for DC development from hematopoietic progenitors. In a phase I clinical trial, we demonstrated that immunotherapy with subcutaneous injection of FLT3-L is safe and well tolerated in cancer patients recovering from autologous hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). FLT3-L administration significantly increased the frequency and absolute number of blood DC precursors without affecting other mature cell lineages during the 6-week course of FLT3-L therapy. After 14 days of FLT3-L administration, the number of blood CD11c + DCs, plasmacytoid DCs (PDCs), and CD14 + monocytes increased by 5.3-, 2.9-, 3.8-fold, respectively, and was maintained at increased levels throughout FLT3-L therapy. FLT3-L-increased blood DCs in HCT patients were immature and had modest enhancing effects on in vitro T-cell proliferation to antigens and natural killer (NK) cell function. The addition of type B CpG oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs) to peripheral blood mononuclear cells obtained from HCT patients receiving FLT3-L therapy induced rapid maturation of both CD11c + DCs and PDCs and enhanced T-cell proliferative responses. In addition, CpG ODN induced potent activation of NK cells from FLT3-L-treated patients with increased surface CD69 expression and augmented cytotoxicity. CpG ODN-induced activation of NK cells was primarily via an indirect mechanism through PDCs. These findings suggest that FLT3-L mobilization of DC precursors followed by a specific DC stimulus such as CpG ODN may provide a novel strategy to manipulate antitumor immunity in patients after HCT. PMID:15625541

  18. Adjuvanting a DNA vaccine with a TLR9 ligand plus Flt3 ligand results in enhanced cellular immunity against the simian immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed

    Kwissa, Marcin; Amara, Rama R; Robinson, Harriet L; Moss, Bernard; Alkan, Sefik; Jabbar, Abdul; Villinger, Francois; Pulendran, Bali

    2007-10-29

    DNA vaccines offer promising strategies for immunization against infections. However, their clinical use requires improvements in immunogenicity. We explored the efficacy of Toll-like receptor (TLR) ligands (TLR-Ls) on augmenting the immunogenicity of a DNA prime-modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA) boost vaccine against SIV. Rhesus macaques were injected with Fms-like tyrosine kinase 3 (Flt3)-ligand (FL) to expand dendritic cells (DCs) and were primed with a DNA vaccine encoding immunodeficiency virus antigens mixed with ligands for TLR9 or TLR7/8. Subsequently, the animals were boosted with DNA and twice with recombinant MVA expressing the same antigens. TLR9-L (CpG DNA) mediated activation of DCs in vivo and enhanced the magnitude of antigen-specific CD8(+) interferon (IFN) gamma(+) T cells and polyfunctional CD8(+) T cells producing IFN-gamma, tumor necrosis factor alpha, and interleukin 2. Although this trial was designed primarily as an immunogenicity study, we challenged the animals with pathogenic SIVmac(251) and observed a reduction in peak viremia and cumulative viral loads in the TLR9-L plus FL-adjuvanted group relative to the unvaccinated group; however, the study design precluded comparisons between the adjuvanted groups and the group vaccinated with DNA/MVA alone. Viral loads were inversely correlated with the magnitude and quality of the immune response. Thus, the immunogenicity of DNA vaccines can be augmented with TLR9-L plus FL. PMID:17954572

  19. NOTCH2 and FLT3 gene mis-splicings are common events in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML): new potential targets in AML

    PubMed Central

    Bar-Natan, Michal; Haibe-Kains, Benjamin; Pilarski, Patrick M.; Bach, Christian; Pevzner, Samuel; Calimeri, Teresa; Avet-Loiseau, Herve; Lode, Laurence; Verselis, Sigitas; Fox, Edward A.; Galinsky, Ilene; Mathews, Steven; Dagogo-Jack, Ibiayi; Wadleigh, Martha; Steensma, David P.; Motyckova, Gabriela; Deangelo, Daniel J.; Quackenbush, John; Tenen, Daniel G.; Stone, Richard M.; Griffin, James D.

    2014-01-01

    Our previous studies revealed an increase in alternative splicing of multiple RNAs in cells from patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) compared with CD34+ bone marrow cells from normal donors. Aberrantly spliced genes included a number of oncogenes, tumor suppressor genes, and genes involved in regulation of apoptosis, cell cycle, and cell differentiation. Among the most commonly mis-spliced genes (>70% of AML patients) were 2, NOTCH2 and FLT3, that encode myeloid cell surface proteins. The splice variants of NOTCH2 and FLT3 resulted from complete or partial exon skipping and utilization of cryptic splice sites. Longitudinal analyses suggested that NOTCH2 and FLT3 aberrant splicing correlated with disease status. Correlation analyses between splice variants of these genes and clinical features of patients showed an association between NOTCH2-Va splice variant and overall survival of patients. Our results suggest that NOTCH2 and FLT3 mis-splicing is a common characteristic of AML and has the potential to generate transcripts encoding proteins with altered function. Thus, splice variants of these genes might provide disease markers and targets for novel therapeutics. PMID:24574459

  20. Role of Misfolded N-CoR Mediated Transcriptional Deregulation of Flt3 in Acute Monocytic Leukemia (AML)-M5 Subtype

    PubMed Central

    Nin, Dawn Sijin; Kok, Wai Kay; Li, Feng; Takahashi, Shinichiro; Chng, Wee Joo; Khan, Matiullah

    2012-01-01

    The nuclear receptor co-repressor (N-CoR) is a key component of the generic multi-protein complex involved in transcriptional control. Flt3, a key regulator of hematopoietic cell growth, is frequently deregulated in AML (acute myeloid leukemia). Here, we report that loss of N-CoR-mediated transcriptional control of Flt3 due to misfolding, contributes to malignant growth in AML of the M5 subtype (AML-M5). An analysis of hematopoietic genes in AML cells led to the identification of Flt3 as a transcriptional target of N-CoR. Flt3 level was inversely related to N-CoR status in various leukemia cells. N-CoR was associated with the Flt3 promoter in-vivo, and a reporter driven by the Flt3 promoter was effectively repressed by N-CoR. Blocking N-CoR loss with Genistein; an inhibitor of N-CoR misfolding, significantly down-regulated Flt3 levels regardless of the Flt3 receptor mutational status and promoted the differentiation of AML-M5 cells. While stimulation of the Flt3 receptor with the Flt3 ligand triggered N-CoR loss, Flt3 antibody mediated blockade of Flt3 ligand-receptor binding led to N-CoR stabilization. Genetic ablation of N-CoR potentiated Flt3 ligand induced proliferation of BA/F3 cells. These findings suggest that N-CoR-induced repression of Flt3 might be crucial for limiting the contribution of the Flt3 signaling pathway on the growth potential of leukemic cells and its deregulation due to N-CoR loss in AML-M5, could contribute to malignant growth by conferring a proliferative advantage to the leukemic blasts. Therapeutic restoration of N-CoR function could thus be a useful approach in restricting the contribution of the Flt3 signaling pathway in AML-M5 pathogenesis. PMID:22514634

  1. A novel Flt3-deficient HIS mouse model with selective enhancement of human DC development.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Mention, Jean-Jacques; Court, Nathalie; Masse-Ranson, Guillemette; Toubert, Antoine; Spits, Hergen; Legrand, Nicolas; Corcuff, Erwan; Strick-Marchand, Helene; Di Santo, James P

    2016-05-01

    Humanized mice harboring human immune systems (HIS) represent a platform to study immune responses against pathogens and to screen vaccine candidates and novel immunotherapeutics. Innate and adaptive immune responses are suboptimal in HIS mice, possibly due to poor reconstitution of human antigen-presenting cells, including dendritic cells (DCs). DC homeostasis is regulated by cytokine availability, and Flt3-ligand (Flt3L) is one factor that conditions this process. Mouse myelopoiesis is essentially normal in most current HIS models. As such, developing mouse myeloid cells may limit human DC reconstitution by reducing available Flt3L and by cellular competition for specific "niches." To address these issues, we created a novel HIS model that compromises host myeloid cell development via deficiency in the receptor tyrosine kinase Flk2/Flt3. In Balb/c Rag2(-/-) Il2rg(-/-) Flt3(-/-) (BRGF) recipients, human conventional DCs and plasmacytoid DCs develop from hCD34(+) precursors and can be specifically boosted with exogenous Flt3L. Human DCs that develop in this context normally respond to TLR stimulation, and improved human DC homeostasis is associated with increased numbers of human NK and T cells. This new HIS-DC model should provide a means to dissect human DC differentiation and represents a novel platform to screen immune adjuvants and DC targeting therapies. PMID:26865269

  2. MUC1-C oncoprotein promotes FLT3 receptor activation in acute myeloid leukemia cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Suiyang; Yin, Li; Stroopinsky, Dina; Rajabi, Hasan; Puissant, Alexandre; Stegmaier, Kimberly; Avigan, David; Kharbanda, Surender; Kufe, Donald

    2014-01-01

    Blasts from approximately one-third of patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) harbor activating mutations in the FMS-like tyrosine kinase 3 (FLT3) receptor tyrosine kinase that confer a poor prognosis. The Mucin 1-C-terminal subunit (MUC1-C) oncoprotein is aberrantly expressed in AML blasts and stem cells; however, there is no known interaction between MUC1-C and FLT3. The present studies demonstrate that MUC1-C associates with wild-type and mutant FLT3 in AML cells. Targeting MUC1-C with the cell-penetrating peptide inhibitor GO-203 disrupts MUC1-C/FLT3 complexes and downregulates FLT3 activation. GO-203 treatment of AML cells was also associated with inhibition of the FLT3 downstream effectors AKT, extracellular signal-regulated kinase, and STAT5. The results further show that AML cells with FLT3-activating mutations and resistant to the FLT3 inhibitor midostaurin/PKC412 are sensitive to GO-203–induced growth arrest and death. Moreover, GO-203 increases sensitivity of mutant FLT3 AML cells to FLT3 inhibitor treatment. These results indicate that MUC1-C contributes to FLT3 activation in AML cells and that targeting MUC1-C inhibits the FLT3 signaling pathway. Our findings support the development of MUC1-C inhibitors alone and in combination with agents that target FLT3 for the treatment of wild-type and mutant FLT3 AML. PMID:24282218

  3. CDC25A governs proliferation and differentiation of FLT3-ITD acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Bertoli, Sarah; Boutzen, Helena; David, Laure; Larrue, Clément; Vergez, François; Fernandez-Vidal, Anne; Yuan, Lingli; Hospital, Marie-Anne; Tamburini, Jérôme; Demur, Cécile; Delabesse, Eric; Saland, Estelle; Sarry, Jean-Emmanuel; Galcera, Marie-Odile; Mas, Véronique Mansat-De; Didier, Christine; Dozier, Christine; Récher, Christian; Manenti, Stéphane

    2015-01-01

    We investigated cell cycle regulation in acute myeloid leukemia cells expressing the FLT3-ITD mutated tyrosine kinase receptor, an underexplored field in this disease. Upon FLT3 inhibition, CDC25A mRNA and protein were rapidly down-regulated, while levels of other cell cycle proteins remained unchanged. This regulation was dependent on STAT5, arguing for FLT3-ITD-dependent transcriptional regulation of CDC25A. CDC25 inhibitors triggered proliferation arrest and cell death of FLT3-ITD as well as FLT3-ITD/TKD AC-220 resistant cells, but not of FLT3-wt cells. Consistently, RNA interference-mediated knock-down of CDC25A reduced the proliferation of FLT3-ITD cell lines. Finally, the clonogenic capacity of primary FLT3-ITD AML cells was reduced by the CDC25 inhibitor IRC-083864, while FLT3-wt AML and normal CD34+ myeloid cells were unaffected. In good agreement, in a cohort of 100 samples from AML patients with intermediate-risk cytogenetics, high levels of CDC25A mRNA were predictive of higher clonogenic potential in FLT3-ITD+ samples, not in FLT3-wt ones. Importantly, pharmacological inhibition as well as RNA interference-mediated knock-down of CDC25A also induced monocytic differentiation of FLT3-ITD positive cells, as judged by cell surface markers expression, morphological modifications, and C/EBPα phosphorylation. CDC25 inhibition also re-induced monocytic differentiation in primary AML blasts carrying the FLT3-ITD mutation, but not in blasts expressing wild type FLT3. Altogether, these data identify CDC25A as an early cell cycle transducer of FLT3-ITD oncogenic signaling, and as a promising target to inhibit proliferation and re-induce differentiation of FLT3-ITD AML cells. PMID:26515730

  4. All-trans retinoic acid synergizes with FLT3 inhibition to eliminate FLT3/ITD+ leukemia stem cells in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Ma, Hayley S; Greenblatt, Sarah M; Shirley, Courtney M; Duffield, Amy S; Bruner, J Kyle; Li, Li; Nguyen, Bao; Jung, Eric; Aplan, Peter D; Ghiaur, Gabriel; Jones, Richard J; Small, Donald

    2016-06-01

    FMS-like tyrosine kinase 3 (FLT3)-mutant acute myeloid leukemia (AML) portends a poor prognosis, and ineffective targeting of the leukemic stem cell (LSC) population remains one of several obstacles in treating this disease. All-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) has been used in several clinical trials for the treatment of nonpromyelocytic AML with limited clinical activity observed. FLT3 tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) used as monotherapy also achieve limited clinical responses and are thus far unable to affect cure rates in AML patients. We explored the efficacy of combining ATRA and FLT3 TKIs to eliminate FLT3/internal tandem duplication (ITD)(+) LSCs. Our studies reveal highly synergistic drug activity, preferentially inducing apoptosis in FLT3/ITD(+) cell lines and patient samples. Colony-forming unit assays further demonstrate decreased clonogenicity of FLT3/ITD(+) cells upon treatment with ATRA and TKI. Most importantly, the drug combination depletes FLT3/ITD(+) LSCs in a genetic mouse model of AML, and prolongs survival of leukemic mice. Furthermore, engraftment of primary FLT3/ITD(+) patient samples is reduced in mice following treatment with FLT3 TKI and ATRA in combination, with evidence of cellular differentiation occurring in vivo. Mechanistically, we provide evidence that the synergism of ATRA and FLT3 TKIs is at least in part due to the observation that FLT3 TKI treatment upregulates the antiapoptotic protein Bcl6, limiting the drug's apoptotic effect. However, cotreatment with ATRA reduces Bcl6 expression to baseline levels through suppression of interleukin-6 receptor signaling. These studies provide evidence of the potential of this drug combination to eliminate FLT3/ITD(+) LSCs and reduce the rate of relapse in AML patients with FLT3 mutations. PMID:27103744

  5. SYK Is a Critical Regulator of FLT3 In Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Puissant, Alexandre; Fenouille, Nina; Alexe, Gabriela; Pikman, Yana; Bassil, Christopher F.; Mehta, Swapnil; Du, Jinyan; Kazi, Julhash U.; Luciano, Frédéric; Rönnstrand, Lars; Kung, Andrew L.; Aster, Jon C.; Galinsky, Ilene; Stone, Richard M.; DeAngelo, Daniel J.; Hemann, Michael T.; Stegmaier, Kimberly

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Cooperative dependencies between mutant oncoproteins and wild-type proteins are critical in cancer pathogenesis and therapy resistance. Although spleen tyrosine kinase (SYK) has been implicated in hematologic malignancies, it is rarely mutated. We used kinase activity profiling to identify collaborators of SYK in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and determined that FMS-like tyrosine kinase 3 (FLT3) is transactivated by SYK via direct binding. Highly activated SYK is predominantly found in FLT3-ITD positive AML and cooperates with FLT3-ITD to activate MYC transcriptional programs. FLT3-ITD AML cells are more vulnerable to SYK suppression than FLT3 wild-type counterparts. In a FLT3-ITD in vivo model, SYK is indispensable for myeloproliferative disease (MPD) development, and SYK overexpression promotes overt transformation to AML and resistance to FLT3-ITD-targeted therapy. SIGNIFICANCE Although imatinib therapy has been paradigm shifting for treating patients with BCR-ABL-rearranged chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML), the application of targeted kinase inhibitors to treating AML has been a more complex undertaking. In this study, we identified an oncogenic partnership between the most commonly mutated kinase in AML, FLT3, and the cytoplasmic kinase SYK. SYK transactivates FLT3 by a direct physical interaction, is critical for the development of FLT3-ITD-induced myeloid neoplasia, and is more highly activated in primary human FLT3-ITD-positive AML. These studies also raise the possibility of SYK activation as a mechanism of resistance to FLT3 inhibitors, suggest FLT3 mutant AML as a subtype for SYK inhibitor testing, and nominate the clinical testing of SYK and FLT3 inhibitor combinations. PMID:24525236

  6. The MERTK/FLT3 inhibitor MRX-2843 overcomes resistance-conferring FLT3 mutations in acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Minson, Katherine A.; Smith, Catherine C.; DeRyckere, Deborah; Libbrecht, Clara; Lee-Sherick, Alisa B.; Huey, Madeline G.; Lasater, Elisabeth A.; Kirkpatrick, Gregory D.; Stashko, Michael A.; Zhang, Weihe; Jordan, Craig T.; Kireev, Dmitri; Wang, Xiaodong; Frye, Stephen V.; Earp, H. Shelton; Shah, Neil P.; Graham, Douglas K.

    2016-01-01

    FMS-like tyrosine kinase 3–targeted (FLT3-targeted) therapies have shown initial promise for the treatment of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) expressing FLT3-activating mutations; however, resistance emerges rapidly. Furthermore, limited options exist for the treatment of FLT3-independent AML, demonstrating the need for novel therapies that reduce toxicity and improve survival. MERTK receptor tyrosine kinase is overexpressed in 80% to 90% of AMLs and contributes to leukemogenesis. Here, we describe MRX-2843, a type 1 small-molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitor that abrogates activation of both MERTK and FLT3 and their downstream effectors. MRX-2843 treatment induces apoptosis and inhibits colony formation in AML cell lines and primary patient samples expressing MERTK and/or FLT3-ITD, with a wide therapeutic window compared with that of normal human cord blood cells. In murine orthotopic xenograft models, once-daily oral therapy prolonged survival 2- to 3-fold over that of vehicle-treated controls. Additionally, MRX-2843 retained activity against quizartinib-resistant FLT3-ITD–mutant proteins with clinically relevant alterations at the D835 or F691 loci and prolonged survival in xenograft models of quizartinib-resistant AML. Together, these observations validate MRX-2843 as a translational agent and support its clinical development for the treatment of AML. PMID:27158668

  7. Breakdown of the FLT3-ITD/STAT5 axis and synergistic apoptosis induction by the histone deacetylase inhibitor panobinostat and FLT3-specific inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Pietschmann, Kristin; Bolck, Hella Anna; Buchwald, Marc; Spielberg, Steffi; Polzer, Harald; Spiekermann, Karsten; Bug, Gesine; Heinzel, Thorsten; Böhmer, Frank-Dietmar; Krämer, Oliver H

    2012-11-01

    Activating mutations of the class III receptor tyrosine kinase FLT3 are the most frequent molecular aberration in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Mutant FLT3 accelerates proliferation, suppresses apoptosis, and correlates with poor prognosis. Therefore, it is a promising therapeutic target. Here, we show that RNA interference against FLT3 with an internal tandem duplication (FLT3-ITD) potentiates the efficacy of the histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACi) panobinostat (LBH589) against AML cells expressing FLT3-ITD. Similar to RNA interference, tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI; AC220/cpd.102/PKC412) in combination with LBH589 exhibit superior activity against AML cells. Median dose-effect analyses of drug-induced apoptosis rates of AML cells (MV4-11 and MOLM-13) revealed combination index (CI) values indicating strong synergism. AC220, the most potent and FLT3-specific TKI, shows highest synergism with LBH589 in the low nanomolar range. A 4-hour exposure to LBH589 + AC220 already generates more than 50% apoptosis after 24 hours. Different cell lines lacking FLT3-ITD as well as normal peripheral blood mononuclear cells are not significantly affected by LBH589 + TKI, showing the specificity of this treatment regimen. Immunoblot analyses show that LBH589 + TKI induce apoptosis via degradation of FLT3-ITD and its prosurvival target STAT5. Previously, we showed the LBH589-induced proteasomal degradation of FLT3-ITD. Here, we show that activated caspase-3 also contributes to the degradation of FLT3-ITD and that STAT5 is a direct target of this protease. Our data strongly emphasize HDACi/TKI drug combinations as promising modality for the treatment of FLT3-ITD-positive AMLs. PMID:22942377

  8. Palbociclib treatment of FLT3-ITD+ AML cells uncovers a kinase-dependent transcriptional regulation of FLT3 and PIM1 by CDK6.

    PubMed

    Uras, Iris Z; Walter, Gina J; Scheicher, Ruth; Bellutti, Florian; Prchal-Murphy, Michaela; Tigan, Anca S; Valent, Peter; Heidel, Florian H; Kubicek, Stefan; Scholl, Claudia; Fröhling, Stefan; Sexl, Veronika

    2016-06-01

    Up to 30% of patients with acute myeloid leukemia have constitutively activating internal tandem duplications (ITDs) of the FLT3 receptor tyrosine kinase. Such mutations are associated with a poor prognosis and a high propensity to relapse after remission. FLT3 inhibitors are being developed as targeted therapy for FLT3-ITD(+) acute myeloid leukemia; however, their use is complicated by rapid development of resistance, which illustrates the need for additional therapeutic targets. We show that the US Food and Drug Administration-approved CDK4/6 kinase inhibitor palbociclib induces apoptosis of FLT3-ITD leukemic cells. The effect is specific for FLT3-mutant cells and is ascribed to the transcriptional activity of CDK6: CDK6 but not its functional homolog CDK4 is found at the promoters of the FLT3 and PIM1 genes, another important leukemogenic driver. There CDK6 regulates transcription in a kinase-dependent manner. Of potential clinical relevance, combined treatment with palbociclib and FLT3 inhibitors results in synergistic cytotoxicity. Simultaneously targeting two critical signaling nodes in leukemogenesis could represent a therapeutic breakthrough, leading to complete remission and overcoming resistance to FLT3 inhibitors. PMID:27099147

  9. Palbociclib treatment of FLT3-ITD+ AML cells uncovers a kinase-dependent transcriptional regulation of FLT3 and PIM1 by CDK6

    PubMed Central

    Uras, Iris Z.; Walter, Gina J.; Scheicher, Ruth; Bellutti, Florian; Prchal-Murphy, Michaela; Tigan, Anca S.; Valent, Peter; Heidel, Florian H.; Kubicek, Stefan; Scholl, Claudia; Fröhling, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Up to 30% of patients with acute myeloid leukemia have constitutively activating internal tandem duplications (ITDs) of the FLT3 receptor tyrosine kinase. Such mutations are associated with a poor prognosis and a high propensity to relapse after remission. FLT3 inhibitors are being developed as targeted therapy for FLT3-ITD+ acute myeloid leukemia; however, their use is complicated by rapid development of resistance, which illustrates the need for additional therapeutic targets. We show that the US Food and Drug Administration–approved CDK4/6 kinase inhibitor palbociclib induces apoptosis of FLT3-ITD leukemic cells. The effect is specific for FLT3-mutant cells and is ascribed to the transcriptional activity of CDK6: CDK6 but not its functional homolog CDK4 is found at the promoters of the FLT3 and PIM1 genes, another important leukemogenic driver. There CDK6 regulates transcription in a kinase-dependent manner. Of potential clinical relevance, combined treatment with palbociclib and FLT3 inhibitors results in synergistic cytotoxicity. Simultaneously targeting two critical signaling nodes in leukemogenesis could represent a therapeutic breakthrough, leading to complete remission and overcoming resistance to FLT3 inhibitors. PMID:27099147

  10. FLT3-ITD drives Ara-C resistance in leukemic cells via the induction of RUNX3.

    PubMed

    Damdinsuren, Anar; Matsushita, Hiromichi; Ito, Masatoshi; Tanaka, Masayuki; Jin, Guilan; Tsukamoto, Hideo; Asai, Satomi; Ando, Kiyoshi; Miyachi, Hayato

    2015-12-01

    Internal tandem duplication (ITD) mutations of the FLT3 gene (FLT3-ITD) are well known to correlate with a poor prognosis in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). We previously reported that FLT3-ITD confers resistance to cytosine arabinoside (Ara-C), a key cytotoxic agent in AML treatments. In order to elucidate the detailed molecular mechanisms underlying the Ara-C resistance induced by FLT3-ITD, we performed a microarray gene expression analysis of the human leukemic cell line K562 transduced with FLT3-ITD (K562/FLT3-ITD) and identified RUNX3 as a downstream target of FLT3-ITD. The transcriptional induction of the RUNX3 expression by FLT3-ITD was noted on a Luciferase assay. The knockdown of the RUNX3 expression in the K562/FLT3-ITD cells increased the sensitivity to Ara-C, and the exogenous expression of RUNX3 per se resulted in the enhancement of Ara-C resistance in the K562 cells. A relationship between the FLT3-ITD-induced RUNX3 expression and Ara-C resistance was also observed in AML cells with an endogenous FLT3-ITD expression. Collectively, these findings demonstrate that RUNX3 is a prerequisite for Ara-C resistance via FLT3-ITD signaling. PMID:26475207

  11. G-749, a novel FLT3 kinase inhibitor, can overcome drug resistance for the treatment of acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hee Kyu; Kim, Hong Woo; Lee, In Yong; Lee, Jungmi; Lee, Jaekyoo; Jung, Dong Sik; Lee, Sang Yeop; Park, Sung Ho; Hwang, Haejun; Choi, Jang-Sik; Kim, Jung-Ho; Kim, Se Won; Kim, Jung Keun; Cools, Jan; Koh, Jong Sung

    2014-01-01

    Aberrant activations of Fms-like tyrosine receptor kinase (FLT) 3 are implicated in the pathogenesis of 20% to 30% of patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). G-749 is a novel FLT3 inhibitor that showed potent and sustained inhibition of the FLT3 wild type and mutants including FLT3-ITD, FLT3-D835Y, FLT3-ITD/N676D, and FLT3-ITD/F691L in cellular assays. G-749 retained its inhibitory potency in various drug-resistance milieus such as patient plasma, FLT3 ligand surge, and stromal protection. Furthermore, it displayed potent antileukemic activity in bone marrow blasts from AML patients regardless of FLT3 mutation status, including those with little or only minor responses to AC220 or PKC412. Oral administration of G-749 yielded complete tumor regression and increased life span in animal models. Thus, G-749 appears to be a promising next-generation drug candidate for the treatment of relapsed and refractory AML patients with various FLT3-ITD/FLT3-TKD mutants and further shows the ability to overcome drug resistance. PMID:24532805

  12. Enzyme-free and sensitive electrochemical determination of the FLT3 gene based on a dual signal amplified strategy: Controlled nanomaterial multilayers and a target-catalyzed hairpin assembly.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yingying; Ren, Qunxiang; Liu, Bo; Qin, Yan; Zhao, Shuang

    2016-04-15

    An isothermal, enzyme-free and sensitive electrochemical DNA sensor was developed for the detection of the FLT3 gene in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). First, aminated multi-walled carbon nanotubes (AMWNTs) and gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) were alternately self-assembled on a gold electrode using a layer-by-layer strategy. Then, the hairpin DNA probe 1 (H1), with a thiol group at the 3' end and a ferrocenyl moiety (Fc) at the 5' end, was immobilized on the AMWNTs/AuNPs multilayer films through Au-S bonding. When the target DNA (TD) appeared, it hybridized with and opened the hairpin structure of H1, and Fc was forced away from the electrode surface, leading to a significant decrease in the current peak of square wave voltammetry. Subsequently, the hairpin DNA probe 2 (H2) bound to H1, freeing the TD to trigger another reaction cycle. The combination of this target-catalyzed hairpin assembly and the LBL assembly of nanomaterials achieved a detection limit of 0.1 pM with a wide linear range of 0.1-1000 pM. The sensor discriminated between mismatched DNA and the target DNA with high selectivity. This dual signal amplification strategy is relatively simple and inexpensive because it does not need any enzymes or sophisticated equipment and successfully assayed the FLT3 gene from real samples. PMID:26584077

  13. Enzyme-free and sensitive electrochemical determination of the FLT3 gene based on a dual signal amplified strategy: Controlled nanomaterial multilayers and a target-catalyzed hairpin assembly.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yingying; Ren, Qunxiang; Liu, Bo; Qin, Yan; Zhao, Shuang

    2016-04-15

    An isothermal, enzyme-free and sensitive electrochemical DNA sensor was developed for the detection of the FLT3 gene in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). First, aminated multi-walled carbon nanotubes (AMWNTs) and gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) were alternately self-assembled on a gold electrode using a layer-by-layer strategy. Then, the hairpin DNA probe 1 (H1), with a thiol group at the 3' end and a ferrocenyl moiety (Fc) at the 5' end, was immobilized on the AMWNTs/AuNPs multilayer films through Au-S bonding. When the target DNA (TD) appeared, it hybridized with and opened the hairpin structure of H1, and Fc was forced away from the electrode surface, leading to a significant decrease in the current peak of square wave voltammetry. Subsequently, the hairpin DNA probe 2 (H2) bound to H1, freeing the TD to trigger another reaction cycle. The combination of this target-catalyzed hairpin assembly and the LBL assembly of nanomaterials achieved a detection limit of 0.1 pM with a wide linear range of 0.1-1000 pM. The sensor discriminated between mismatched DNA and the target DNA with high selectivity. This dual signal amplification strategy is relatively simple and inexpensive because it does not need any enzymes or sophisticated equipment and successfully assayed the FLT3 gene from real samples.

  14. FYN expression potentiates FLT3-ITD induced STAT5 signaling in acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Chougule, Rohit A.; Kazi, Julhash U.; Rönnstrand, Lars

    2016-01-01

    FYN is a non-receptor tyrosine kinase belonging to the SRC family of kinases, which are frequently over-expressed in human cancers, and play key roles in cancer biology. SRC has long been recognized as an important oncogene, but little attention has been given to its other family members. In this report, we have studied the role of FYN in FLT3 signaling in respect to acute myeloid leukemia (AML). We observed that FYN displays a strong association with wild-type FLT3 as well as oncogenic FLT3-ITD and is dependent on the kinase activity of FLT3 and the SH2 domain of FYN. We identified multiple FYN binding sites in FLT3, which partially overlapped with SRC binding sites. To understand the role of FYN in FLT3 signaling, we generated FYN overexpressing cells. We observed that expression of FYN resulted in slightly enhanced phosphorylation of AKT, ERK1/2 and p38 in response to ligand stimulation. Furthermore, FYN expression led to a slight increase in FLT3-ITD-dependent cell proliferation, but potent enhancement of STAT5 phosphorylation as well as colony formation. We also observed that FYN expression is deregulated in AML patient samples and that higher expression of FYN, in combination with FLT3-ITD mutation, resulted in enrichment of the STAT5 signaling pathway and correlated with poor prognosis in AML. Taken together our data suggest that FYN cooperates with oncogenic FLT3-ITD in cellular transformation by selective activation of the STAT5 pathway. Therefore, inhibition of FYN, in combination with FLT3 inhibition, will most likely be beneficial for this group of AML patients. PMID:26848862

  15. Serum FLT-3 ligand in a busulphan-induced model of chronic bone marrow hypoplasia in the female CD-1 mouse.

    PubMed

    Molyneux, Gemma; Gibson, Frances M; Whayman, Matthew; Turton, John A

    2008-04-01

    The concentration of the cytokine fms-like tyrosine kinase-3 ligand (FL) is elevated in the plasma of patients treated with chemotherapy or radiotherapy for malignant conditions. In addition, plasma FL is increased in patients with bone marrow failure resulting from stem-cell defects (e.g. aplastic anaemia). Our goal in the present study was to measure the concentration of serum FL in mice treated with the chemotherapeutic agent busulphan (BU) to induce bone marrow depression and relate changes in FL to effects on haemopoiesis. Female CD-1 mice were treated with BU (9.0 mg/kg) or vehicle by intraperitoneal injection on 10 occasions over 21 days. Animals were autopsied on days 1, 23, 72, 119 and 177 postdosing. A full blood count was performed, and serum prepared for FL analysis. Femoral marrow cell suspensions were prepared to assess the total femoral nucleated cell count (FNCC) and the number of committed haemopoietic progenitor cells (CFU-C). On days 1 and 23 postdosing, significant decreases were evident in many peripheral blood parameters; the FNCC and CFU-C were also reduced in BU-treated mice, in conjunction with increases in serum FL levels. On days 72, 119 and 177 postdosing, several peripheral blood and bone marrow parameters remained reduced and the concentration of serum FL continued to be significantly increased. Linear regression analysis demonstrated significant correlations between the concentration of serum FL in BU-treated mice and peripheral blood and bone marrow parameters; this suggests the possible use of serum FL as a potential biomarker for drug-induced bone marrow injury.

  16. Dendritic Cell-Specific Delivery of Flt3L by Coronavirus Vectors Secures Induction of Therapeutic Antitumor Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Nussbacher, Monika; Allgäuer, Eva; Cervantes-Barragan, Luisa; Züst, Roland; Ludewig, Burkhard

    2013-01-01

    Efficacy of antitumor vaccination depends to a large extent on antigen targeting to dendritic cells (DCs). Here, we assessed antitumor immunity induced by attenuated coronavirus vectors which exclusively target DCs in vivo and express either lymphocyte- or DC-activating cytokines in combination with a GFP-tagged model antigen. Tracking of in vivo transduced DCs revealed that vectors encoding for Fms-like tyrosine kinase 3 ligand (Flt3L) exhibited a higher capacity to induce DC maturation compared to vectors delivering IL-2 or IL-15. Moreover, Flt3L vectors more efficiently induced tumor-specific CD8+ T cells, expanded the epitope repertoire, and provided both prophylactic and therapeutic tumor immunity. In contrast, IL-2- or IL-15-encoding vectors showed a substantially lower efficacy in CD8+ T cell priming and failed to protect the host once tumors had been established. Thus, specific in vivo targeting of DCs with coronavirus vectors in conjunction with appropriate conditioning of the microenvironment through Flt3L represents an efficient strategy for the generation of therapeutic antitumor immunity. PMID:24312302

  17. FLT3-ITDs instruct a myeloid differentiation and transformation bias in lymphomyeloid multipotent progenitors.

    PubMed

    Mead, Adam J; Kharazi, Shabnam; Atkinson, Deborah; Macaulay, Iain; Pecquet, Christian; Loughran, Stephen; Lutteropp, Michael; Woll, Petter; Chowdhury, Onima; Luc, Sidinh; Buza-Vidas, Natalija; Ferry, Helen; Clark, Sally-Ann; Goardon, Nicolas; Vyas, Paresh; Constantinescu, Stefan N; Sitnicka, Ewa; Nerlov, Claus; Jacobsen, Sten Eirik W

    2013-06-27

    Whether signals mediated via growth factor receptors (GFRs) might influence lineage fate in multipotent progenitors (MPPs) is unclear. We explored this issue in a mouse knockin model of gain-of-function Flt3-ITD mutation because FLT3-ITDs are paradoxically restricted to acute myeloid leukemia even though Flt3 primarily promotes lymphoid development during normal hematopoiesis. When expressed in MPPs, Flt3-ITD collaborated with Runx1 mutation to induce high-penetrance aggressive leukemias that were exclusively of the myeloid phenotype. Flt3-ITDs preferentially expanded MPPs with reduced lymphoid and increased myeloid transcriptional priming while compromising early B and T lymphopoiesis. Flt3-ITD-induced myeloid lineage bias involved upregulation of the transcription factor Pu.1, which is a direct target gene of Stat3, an aberrantly activated target of Flt3-ITDs, further establishing how lineage bias can be inflicted on MPPs through aberrant GFR signaling. Collectively, these findings provide new insights into how oncogenic mutations might subvert the normal process of lineage commitment and dictate the phenotype of resulting malignancies.

  18. Knock-in of a FLT3/ITD mutation cooperates with a NUP98-HOXD13 fusion to generate acute myeloid leukemia in a mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Greenblatt, Sarah; Li, Li; Slape, Christopher; Nguyen, Bao; Novak, Rachel; Duffield, Amy; Huso, David; Desiderio, Stephen; Borowitz, Michael J.; Aplan, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Constitutive activation of FLT3 by internal tandem duplication (ITD) is one of the most common molecular alterations in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). FLT3/ITD mutations have also been observed in myelodysplastic syndrome patients both before and during progression to AML. Previous work has shown that insertion of an FLT3/ITD mutation into the murine Flt3 gene induces a myeloproliferative neoplasm, but not progression to acute leukemia, suggesting that additional cooperating events are required. We therefore combined the FLT3/ITD mutation with a model of myelodysplastic syndrome involving transgenic expression of the Nup98-HoxD13 (NHD13) fusion gene. Mice expressing both the FLT3/ITD and NHD13 transgene developed AML with 100% penetrance and short latency. These leukemias were driven by mutant FLT3 expression and were susceptible to treatment with FLT3 tyrosine kinase inhibitors. We also observed a spontaneous loss of the wild-type Flt3 allele in these AMLs, further modeling the loss of the heterozygosity phenomenon that is seen in human AML with FLT3-activating mutations. Because resistance to FLT3 inhibitors remains an important clinical issue, this model may help identify new molecular targets in collaborative signaling pathways. PMID:22323452

  19. Treatment-influenced associations of PML-RARα mutations, FLT3 mutations, and additional chromosome abnormalities in relapsed acute promyelocytic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Moser, Barry K.; Racevskis, Janis; Poiré, Xavier; Bloomfield, Clara D.; Carroll, Andrew J.; Ketterling, Rhett P.; Roulston, Diane; Schachter-Tokarz, Esther; Zhou, Da-cheng; Chen, I-Ming L.; Harvey, Richard; Koval, Greg; Sher, Dorie A.; Feusner, James H.; Tallman, Martin S.; Larson, Richard A.; Powell, Bayard L.; Appelbaum, Frederick R.; Paietta, Elisabeth; Willman, Cheryl L.; Stock, Wendy

    2012-01-01

    Mutations in the all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA)–targeted ligand binding domain of PML-RARα (PRα/LBD+) have been implicated in the passive selection of ATRA-resistant acute promyelocytic leukemia clones leading to disease relapse. Among 45 relapse patients from the ATRA/chemotherapy arm of intergroup protocol C9710, 18 patients harbored PRα/LBD+ (40%), 7 of whom (39%) relapsed Off-ATRA selection pressure, suggesting a possible active role of PRα/LBD+. Of 41 relapse patients coanalyzed, 15 (37%) had FMS-related tyrosine kinase 3 internal tandem duplication mutations (FLT3-ITD+), which were differentially associated with PRα/LBD+ depending on ATRA treatment status at relapse: positively, On-ATRA; negatively, Off-ATRA. Thirteen of 21 patients (62%) had additional chromosome abnormalities (ACAs); all coanalyzed PRα/LBD mutant patients who relapsed off-ATRA (n = 5) had associated ACA. After relapse Off-ATRA, ACA and FLT3-ITD+ were negatively associated and were oppositely associated with presenting white blood count and PML-RARα type: ACA, low, L-isoform; FLT3-ITD+, high, S-isoform. These exploratory results suggest that differing PRα/LBD+ activities may interact with FLT3-ITD+ or ACA, that FLT3-ITD+ and ACA are associated with different intrinsic disease progression pathways manifest at relapse Off-ATRA, and that these different pathways may be short-circuited by ATRA-selectable defects at relapse On-ATRA. ACA and certain PRα/LBD+ were also associated with reduced postrelapse survival. PMID:22734072

  20. Profiling of somatic mutations in acute myeloid leukemia with FLT3-ITD at diagnosis and relapse.

    PubMed

    Garg, Manoj; Nagata, Yasunobu; Kanojia, Deepika; Mayakonda, Anand; Yoshida, Kenichi; Haridas Keloth, Sreya; Zang, Zhi Jiang; Okuno, Yusuke; Shiraishi, Yuichi; Chiba, Kenichi; Tanaka, Hiroko; Miyano, Satoru; Ding, Ling-Wen; Alpermann, Tamara; Sun, Qiao-Yang; Lin, De-Chen; Chien, Wenwen; Madan, Vikas; Liu, Li-Zhen; Tan, Kar-Tong; Sampath, Abhishek; Venkatesan, Subhashree; Inokuchi, Koiti; Wakita, Satoshi; Yamaguchi, Hiroki; Chng, Wee Joo; Kham, Shirley-Kow Yin; Yeoh, Allen Eng-Juh; Sanada, Masashi; Schiller, Joanna; Kreuzer, Karl-Anton; Kornblau, Steven M; Kantarjian, Hagop M; Haferlach, Torsten; Lill, Michael; Kuo, Ming-Chung; Shih, Lee-Yung; Blau, Igor-Wolfgang; Blau, Olga; Yang, Henry; Ogawa, Seishi; Koeffler, H Phillip

    2015-11-26

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) with an FLT3 internal tandem duplication (FLT3-ITD) mutation is an aggressive hematologic malignancy with a grave prognosis. To identify the mutational spectrum associated with relapse, whole-exome sequencing was performed on 13 matched diagnosis, relapse, and remission trios followed by targeted sequencing of 299 genes in 67 FLT3-ITD patients. The FLT3-ITD genome has an average of 13 mutations per sample, similar to other AML subtypes, which is a low mutation rate compared with that in solid tumors. Recurrent mutations occur in genes related to DNA methylation, chromatin, histone methylation, myeloid transcription factors, signaling, adhesion, cohesin complex, and the spliceosome. Their pattern of mutual exclusivity and cooperation among mutated genes suggests that these genes have a strong biological relationship. In addition, we identified mutations in previously unappreciated genes such as MLL3, NSD1, FAT1, FAT4, and IDH3B. Mutations in 9 genes were observed in the relapse-specific phase. DNMT3A mutations are the most stable mutations, and this DNMT3A-transformed clone can be present even in morphologic complete remissions. Of note, all AML matched trio samples shared at least 1 genomic alteration at diagnosis and relapse, suggesting common ancestral clones. Two types of clonal evolution occur at relapse: either the founder clone recurs or a subclone of the founder clone escapes from induction chemotherapy and expands at relapse by acquiring new mutations. Relapse-specific mutations displayed an increase in transversions. Functional assays demonstrated that both MLL3 and FAT1 exert tumor-suppressor activity in the FLT3-ITD subtype. An inhibitor of XPO1 synergized with standard AML induction chemotherapy to inhibit FLT3-ITD growth. This study clearly shows that FLT3-ITD AML requires additional driver genetic alterations in addition to FLT3-ITD alone.

  1. Profiling of somatic mutations in acute myeloid leukemia with FLT3-ITD at diagnosis and relapse.

    PubMed

    Garg, Manoj; Nagata, Yasunobu; Kanojia, Deepika; Mayakonda, Anand; Yoshida, Kenichi; Haridas Keloth, Sreya; Zang, Zhi Jiang; Okuno, Yusuke; Shiraishi, Yuichi; Chiba, Kenichi; Tanaka, Hiroko; Miyano, Satoru; Ding, Ling-Wen; Alpermann, Tamara; Sun, Qiao-Yang; Lin, De-Chen; Chien, Wenwen; Madan, Vikas; Liu, Li-Zhen; Tan, Kar-Tong; Sampath, Abhishek; Venkatesan, Subhashree; Inokuchi, Koiti; Wakita, Satoshi; Yamaguchi, Hiroki; Chng, Wee Joo; Kham, Shirley-Kow Yin; Yeoh, Allen Eng-Juh; Sanada, Masashi; Schiller, Joanna; Kreuzer, Karl-Anton; Kornblau, Steven M; Kantarjian, Hagop M; Haferlach, Torsten; Lill, Michael; Kuo, Ming-Chung; Shih, Lee-Yung; Blau, Igor-Wolfgang; Blau, Olga; Yang, Henry; Ogawa, Seishi; Koeffler, H Phillip

    2015-11-26

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) with an FLT3 internal tandem duplication (FLT3-ITD) mutation is an aggressive hematologic malignancy with a grave prognosis. To identify the mutational spectrum associated with relapse, whole-exome sequencing was performed on 13 matched diagnosis, relapse, and remission trios followed by targeted sequencing of 299 genes in 67 FLT3-ITD patients. The FLT3-ITD genome has an average of 13 mutations per sample, similar to other AML subtypes, which is a low mutation rate compared with that in solid tumors. Recurrent mutations occur in genes related to DNA methylation, chromatin, histone methylation, myeloid transcription factors, signaling, adhesion, cohesin complex, and the spliceosome. Their pattern of mutual exclusivity and cooperation among mutated genes suggests that these genes have a strong biological relationship. In addition, we identified mutations in previously unappreciated genes such as MLL3, NSD1, FAT1, FAT4, and IDH3B. Mutations in 9 genes were observed in the relapse-specific phase. DNMT3A mutations are the most stable mutations, and this DNMT3A-transformed clone can be present even in morphologic complete remissions. Of note, all AML matched trio samples shared at least 1 genomic alteration at diagnosis and relapse, suggesting common ancestral clones. Two types of clonal evolution occur at relapse: either the founder clone recurs or a subclone of the founder clone escapes from induction chemotherapy and expands at relapse by acquiring new mutations. Relapse-specific mutations displayed an increase in transversions. Functional assays demonstrated that both MLL3 and FAT1 exert tumor-suppressor activity in the FLT3-ITD subtype. An inhibitor of XPO1 synergized with standard AML induction chemotherapy to inhibit FLT3-ITD growth. This study clearly shows that FLT3-ITD AML requires additional driver genetic alterations in addition to FLT3-ITD alone. PMID:26438511

  2. Efficacy of a Mer and Flt3 tyrosine kinase small molecule inhibitor, UNC1666, in acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Lee-Sherick, Alisa B.; Zhang, Weihe; Menachof, Kelly K.; Hill, Amanda A.; Rinella, Sean; Kirkpatrick, Gregory; Page, Lauren S.; Stashko, Michael A.; Jordan, Craig T.; Wei, Qi; Liu, Jing; Zhang, Dehui; DeRyckere, Deborah; Wang, Xiaodong; Frye, Stephen; Earp, H. Shelton; Graham, Douglas K.

    2015-01-01

    Mer and Flt3 receptor tyrosine kinases have been implicated as therapeutic targets in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). In this manuscript we describe UNC1666, a novel ATP-competitive small molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitor, which potently diminishes Mer and Flt3 phosphorylation in AML. Treatment with UNC1666 mediated biochemical and functional effects in AML cell lines expressing Mer or Flt3 internal tandem duplication (ITD), including decreased phosphorylation of Mer, Flt3 and downstream effectors Stat, Akt and Erk, induction of apoptosis in up to 98% of cells, and reduction of colony formation by greater than 90%, compared to treatment with vehicle. These effects were dose-dependent, with inhibition of downstream signaling and functional effects correlating with the degree of Mer or Flt3 kinase inhibition. Treatment of primary AML patient samples expressing Mer and/or Flt3-ITD with UNC1666 also inhibited Mer and Flt3 intracellular signaling, induced apoptosis, and inhibited colony formation. In summary, UNC1666 is a novel potent small molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitor that decreases oncogenic signaling and myeloblast survival, thereby validating dual Mer/Flt3 inhibition as an attractive treatment strategy for AML. PMID:25762638

  3. Pharmacological targeting of miR-155 via the NEDD8-activating enzyme inhibitor MLN4924 (Pevonedistat) in FLT3-ITD acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Khalife, J; Radomska, H S; Santhanam, R; Huang, X; Neviani, P; Saultz, J; Wang, H; Wu, Y-Z; Alachkar, H; Anghelina, M; Dorrance, A; Curfman, J; Bloomfield, C D; Medeiros, B C; Perrotti, D; Lee, L J; Lee, R J; Caligiuri, M A; Pichiorri, F; Croce, C M; Garzon, R; Guzman, M L; Mendler, J H; Marcucci, G

    2015-10-01

    High levels of microRNA-155 (miR-155) are associated with poor outcome in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). In AML, miR-155 is regulated by NF-κB, the activity of which is, in part, controlled by the NEDD8-dependent ubiquitin ligases. We demonstrate that MLN4924, an inhibitor of NEDD8-activating enzyme presently being evaluated in clinical trials, decreases binding of NF-κB to the miR-155 promoter and downregulates miR-155 in AML cells. This results in the upregulation of the miR-155 targets SHIP1, an inhibitor of the PI3K/Akt pathway, and PU.1, a transcription factor important for myeloid differentiation, leading to monocytic differentiation and apoptosis. Consistent with these results, overexpression of miR-155 diminishes MLN4924-induced antileukemic effects. In vivo, MLN4924 reduces miR-155 expression and prolongs the survival of mice engrafted with leukemic cells. Our study demonstrates the potential of miR-155 as a novel therapeutic target in AML via pharmacologic interference with NF-κB-dependent regulatory mechanisms. We show the targeting of this oncogenic microRNA with MLN4924, a compound presently being evaluated in clinical trials in AML. As high miR-155 levels have been consistently associated with aggressive clinical phenotypes, our work opens new avenues for microRNA-targeting therapeutic approaches to leukemia and cancer patients. PMID:25971362

  4. Src-Like adaptor protein (SLAP) binds to the receptor tyrosine kinase Flt3 and modulates receptor stability and downstream signaling.

    PubMed

    Kazi, Julhash U; Rönnstrand, Lars

    2012-01-01

    Fms-like tyrosine kinase 3 (Flt3) is an important growth factor receptor in hematopoiesis. Gain-of-function mutations of the receptor contribute to the transformation of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Src-like adaptor protein (SLAP) is an interaction partner of the E3 ubiquitin ligase Cbl that can regulate receptor tyrosine kinases-mediated signal transduction. In this study, we analyzed the role of SLAP in signal transduction downstream of the type III receptor tyrosine kinase Flt3. The results show that upon ligand stimulation SLAP stably associates with Flt3 through multiple phosphotyrosine residues in Flt3. SLAP constitutively interacts with oncogenic Flt3-ITD and co-localizes with Flt3 near the cell membrane. This association initiates Cbl-dependent receptor ubiquitination and degradation. Depletion of SLAP expression by shRNA in Flt3-transfected Ba/F3 cells resulted in a weaker activation of FL-induced PI3K-Akt and MAPK signaling. Meta-analysis of microarray data from patient samples suggests that SLAP mRNA is differentially expressed in different cancers and its expression was significantly increased in patients carrying the Flt3-ITD mutation. Thus, our data suggest a novel role of SLAP in different cancers and in modulation of receptor tyrosine kinase signaling apart from its conventional role in regulation of receptor stability.

  5. Evolution of a FLT3-TKD mutated subclone at meningeal relapse in acute promyelocytic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Bochtler, Tilmann; Fröhling, Stefan; Weichert, Wilko; Endris, Volker; Thiede, Christian; Hutter, Barbara; Hundemer, Michael; Ho, Anthony D.; Krämer, Alwin

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report the case of an acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) patient who—although negative for FLT3 mutations at diagnosis—developed isolated FLT3 tyrosine kinase II domain (FLT3-TKD)-positive meningeal relapse, which, in retrospect, could be traced back to a minute bone marrow subclone present at first diagnosis. Initially, the 48-yr-old female diagnosed with high-risk APL had achieved complete molecular remission after standard treatment with all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) and chemotherapy according to the AIDA (ATRA plus idarubicin) protocol. Thirteen months after the start of ATRA maintenance, the patient suffered clinically overt meningeal relapse along with minute molecular traces of PML/RARA (promyelocytic leukemia/retinoic acid receptor alpha) in the bone marrow. Following treatment with arsenic trioxide and ATRA in combination with intrathecal cytarabine and methotrexate, the patient achieved a complete molecular remission in both cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and bone marrow, which currently lasts for 2 yr after completion of therapy. Whole-exome sequencing and subsequent ultradeep targeted resequencing revealed a heterozygous FLT3-TKD mutation in CSF leukemic cells (p.D835Y, c.2503G>T, 1000/1961 reads [51%]), which was undetectable in the concurrent bone marrow sample. Interestingly, the FLT3-TKD mutated meningeal clone originated from a small bone marrow subclone present in a variant allele frequency of 0.4% (6/1553 reads) at initial diagnosis. This case highlights the concept of clonal evolution with a subclone harboring an additional mutation being selected as the “fittest” and leading to meningeal relapse. It also further supports earlier suggestions that FLT3 mutations may play a role for migration and clonal expansion in the CSF sanctuary site. PMID:27626069

  6. Evolution of a FLT3-TKD mutated subclone at meningeal relapse in acute promyelocytic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Bochtler, Tilmann; Fröhling, Stefan; Weichert, Wilko; Endris, Volker; Thiede, Christian; Hutter, Barbara; Hundemer, Michael; Ho, Anthony D.; Krämer, Alwin

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report the case of an acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) patient who—although negative for FLT3 mutations at diagnosis—developed isolated FLT3 tyrosine kinase II domain (FLT3-TKD)-positive meningeal relapse, which, in retrospect, could be traced back to a minute bone marrow subclone present at first diagnosis. Initially, the 48-yr-old female diagnosed with high-risk APL had achieved complete molecular remission after standard treatment with all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) and chemotherapy according to the AIDA (ATRA plus idarubicin) protocol. Thirteen months after the start of ATRA maintenance, the patient suffered clinically overt meningeal relapse along with minute molecular traces of PML/RARA (promyelocytic leukemia/retinoic acid receptor alpha) in the bone marrow. Following treatment with arsenic trioxide and ATRA in combination with intrathecal cytarabine and methotrexate, the patient achieved a complete molecular remission in both cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and bone marrow, which currently lasts for 2 yr after completion of therapy. Whole-exome sequencing and subsequent ultradeep targeted resequencing revealed a heterozygous FLT3-TKD mutation in CSF leukemic cells (p.D835Y, c.2503G>T, 1000/1961 reads [51%]), which was undetectable in the concurrent bone marrow sample. Interestingly, the FLT3-TKD mutated meningeal clone originated from a small bone marrow subclone present in a variant allele frequency of 0.4% (6/1553 reads) at initial diagnosis. This case highlights the concept of clonal evolution with a subclone harboring an additional mutation being selected as the “fittest” and leading to meningeal relapse. It also further supports earlier suggestions that FLT3 mutations may play a role for migration and clonal expansion in the CSF sanctuary site.

  7. Evolution of a FLT3-TKD mutated subclone at meningeal relapse in acute promyelocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Bochtler, Tilmann; Fröhling, Stefan; Weichert, Wilko; Endris, Volker; Thiede, Christian; Hutter, Barbara; Hundemer, Michael; Ho, Anthony D; Krämer, Alwin

    2016-09-01

    Here, we report the case of an acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) patient who-although negative for FLT3 mutations at diagnosis-developed isolated FLT3 tyrosine kinase II domain (FLT3-TKD)-positive meningeal relapse, which, in retrospect, could be traced back to a minute bone marrow subclone present at first diagnosis. Initially, the 48-yr-old female diagnosed with high-risk APL had achieved complete molecular remission after standard treatment with all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) and chemotherapy according to the AIDA (ATRA plus idarubicin) protocol. Thirteen months after the start of ATRA maintenance, the patient suffered clinically overt meningeal relapse along with minute molecular traces of PML/RARA (promyelocytic leukemia/retinoic acid receptor alpha) in the bone marrow. Following treatment with arsenic trioxide and ATRA in combination with intrathecal cytarabine and methotrexate, the patient achieved a complete molecular remission in both cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and bone marrow, which currently lasts for 2 yr after completion of therapy. Whole-exome sequencing and subsequent ultradeep targeted resequencing revealed a heterozygous FLT3-TKD mutation in CSF leukemic cells (p.D835Y, c.2503G>T, 1000/1961 reads [51%]), which was undetectable in the concurrent bone marrow sample. Interestingly, the FLT3-TKD mutated meningeal clone originated from a small bone marrow subclone present in a variant allele frequency of 0.4% (6/1553 reads) at initial diagnosis. This case highlights the concept of clonal evolution with a subclone harboring an additional mutation being selected as the "fittest" and leading to meningeal relapse. It also further supports earlier suggestions that FLT3 mutations may play a role for migration and clonal expansion in the CSF sanctuary site. PMID:27626069

  8. TALENs-mediated gene disruption of FLT3 in leukemia cells: Using genome-editing approach for exploring the molecular basis of gene abnormality

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jue; Li, Tongjuan; Zhou, Mi; Hu, Zheng; Zhou, Xiaoxi; Zhou, Shiqiu; Wang, Na; Huang, Liang; Zhao, Lei; Cao, Yang; Xiao, Min; Ma, Ding; Zhou, Pengfei; Shang, Zhen; Zhou, Jianfeng

    2015-01-01

    Novel analytic tools are needed to elucidate the molecular basis of leukemia-relevant gene mutations in the post-genome era. We generated isogenic leukemia cell clones in which the FLT3 gene was disrupted in a single allele using TALENs. Isogenic clones with mono-allelic disrupted FLT3 were compared to an isogenic wild-type control clone and parental leukemia cells for transcriptional expression, downstream FLT3 signaling and proliferation capacity. The global gene expression profiles of mutant K562 clones and corresponding wild-type controls were compared using RNA-seq. The transcriptional levels and the ligand-dependent autophosphorylation of FLT3 were decreased in the mutant clones. TALENs-mediated FLT3 haplo-insufficiency impaired cell proliferation and colony formation in vitro. These inhibitory effects were maintained in vivo, improving the survival of NOD/SCID mice transplanted with mutant K562 clones. Cluster analysis revealed that the gene expression pattern of isogenic clones was determined by the FLT3 mutant status rather than the deviation among individual isogenic clones. Differentially expressed genes between the mutant and wild-type clones revealed an activation of nonsense-mediated decay pathway in mutant K562 clones as well as an inhibited FLT3 signaling. Our data support that this genome-editing approach is a robust and generally applicable platform to explore the molecular bases of gene mutations. PMID:26669855

  9. Hoxa9 Regulates Flt3 in Lymphohematopoietic Progenitors

    PubMed Central

    Gwin, Kimberly; Frank, Elena; Bossou, Ayoko; Medina, Kay L.

    2014-01-01

    Early B cell factor (EBF) is a transcription factor essential for specification and commitment to the B cell fate. In this study, we show downregulation of a developmentally regulated cluster of hoxa genes, notably hoxa9, coincides with induction of EBF at the Pro-B cell stage of B cell differentiation. Analysis of the hematopoietic progenitor compartment in Hoxa9−/− mice revealed significantly reduced frequencies and expression levels of Flt3, a cytokine receptor important for lymphoid priming and the generation of B cell precursors (BCPs). We show that Hoxa9 directly regulates the flt3 gene. Chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis revealed binding of Hoxa9 to the flt3 promoter in a lymphoid progenitor cell line. Knockdown of Hoxa9 significantly reduced Flt3 transcription and expression. Conversely, forced expression of Hoxa9 increased Flt3 transcription and expression in a Pro-B cell line that expressed low levels of Flt3. Hoxa9 inversely correlated with ebf1 in ex vivo-isolated bone marrow progenitors and BCPs, suggesting that EBF might function to silence a Hoxa9 transcriptional program. Restoration of EBF function in an EBF−/− cell line induced B lineage gene expression but did not directly suppress hoxa9 transcription, revealing alternate mechanisms of Hoxa9 regulation in BCPs. These data provide new insight into Hoxa9 function and regulation during lymphoid and B cell development. Furthermore, they suggest that failure to upregulate Flt3 provides a molecular basis for the lymphoid/early B cell deficiencies in Hoxa9−/− mice. PMID:20971928

  10. Flt3L-dependence helps define an uncharacterized subset of murine cutaneous dendritic cells

    PubMed Central

    Mollah, Shamim; Dobrin, Joseph; Feder, Rachel; Tse, Sze-Wah; Matos, Ines; Cheong, Cheolho; Steinman, Ralph M.; Anandasabapathy, Niroshana

    2014-01-01

    Skin-derived dendritic cells (DC) are potent antigen presenting cells with critical roles in both adaptive immunity and tolerance to self. Skin DC carry antigens and constitutively migrate to the skin draining lymph nodes (LN). In mice, Langerin-CD11b− dermal DC are a low-frequency, heterogeneous, migratory DC subset that traffic to LN (Langerin-CD11b-migDC). Here, we build on the observation that Langerin-CD11b− migDC are Fms-like tyrosine kinase 3 ligand (Flt3L) dependent and strongly Flt3L responsive, which may relate them to classical DCs. Examination of DC capture of FITC from painted skin, DC isolation from skin explant culture, and from the skin of CCR7 knockout mice which accumulate migDC, demonstrate these cells are cutaneous residents. Langerin-CD11b-Flt3L responsive DC are largely CD24(+) and CX3CR1low and can be depleted from Zbtb46-DTR mice, suggesting classical DC lineage. Langerin-CD11bmigDC present antigen with equal efficiency to other DC subsets ex vivo including classical CD8α cDC and Langerin+CD103+ dermal DC. Finally, transcriptome analysis suggests a close relationship to other skin DC, and a lineage relationship to other classical DC. This work demonstrates that Langerin- CD11b− dermal DC, a previously overlooked cell subset, may be an important player in the cutaneous immune environment. PMID:24288007

  11. Adaptation of the plasma inhibitory activity assay to detect Aurora, ABL and FLT3 kinase inhibition by AT9283 in pediatric leukemia.

    PubMed

    Podesta, Jennifer E; Sugar, Richard; Squires, Matt; Linardopoulos, Spiros; Pearson, Andrew D J; Moore, Andrew S

    2011-09-01

    Non-invasive assessment of biomarker modulation is important for evaluating targeted therapeutics, particularly in pediatrics. The plasma inhibitory activity (PIA) assay is used clinically to assess FLT3 inhibition ex vivo and guide dosing. AT9283 is a novel Aurora kinase inhibitor with secondary activity against FLT3 and ABL. We adapted the PIA assay to simultaneously detect inhibition of Aurora and FLT3 in AML, and Aurora and ABL in CML by AT9283. Furthermore, we optimized the assay for children, where limited blood volumes are available for pharmacodynamic studies. Simultaneously detecting multiple kinase inhibition may identify important mechanisms of action for novel anti-leukemic drugs.

  12. High frequency of rare structural chromosome abnormalities at relapse of cytogenetically normal acute myeloid leukemia with FLT3 internal tandem duplication.

    PubMed

    Gourdin, Theodore S; Zou, Ying; Ning, Yi; Emadi, Ashkan; Duong, Vu H; Tidwell, Michael L; Chen, Ching; Rassool, Feyruz V; Baer, Maria R

    2014-01-01

    FLT3 internal tandem duplication (ITD) mutations are present in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in 30% of patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML), most commonly in those with a normal karyotype, and are associated with short relapse-free survival. Both in vitro and in vivo studies of FLT3-ITD cell lines have demonstrated reactive oxygen species-mediated DNA double-strand breaks and associated error-prone DNA repair as a mechanism of genomic instability, and we hypothesized that genomic instability might be manifested by cytogenetic changes at relapse of FLT3-ITD AML. We retrospectively reviewed charts of patients with cytogenetically normal (CN) FLT3-ITD AML treated at the University of Maryland Greenebaum Cancer Center, with attention to metaphase analysis results at relapse. Cytogenetic data were available from first and, when applicable, subsequent relapses for 15 patients diagnosed with CN FLT3-ITD AML. Among 12 patients with documented FLT3-ITD at first and, when applicable, subsequent relapse, 10 had cytogenetic changes, including nine with rare structural abnormalities. The high frequency of rare structural chromosome abnormalities at relapse in our case series supports a role of genomic instability in the genesis of relapse, and suggests that reactive oxygen species-generating and DNA repair pathways might be therapeutic targets in FLT3-ITD AML. PMID:25441683

  13. TTT-3002 is a novel FLT3 tyrosine kinase inhibitor with activity against FLT3-associated leukemias in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Ma, Hayley; Nguyen, Bao; Li, Li; Greenblatt, Sarah; Williams, Allen; Zhao, Ming; Levis, Mark; Rudek, Michelle; Duffield, Amy; Small, Donald

    2014-03-01

    More than 35% of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients harbor a constitutively activating mutation in FMS-like tyrosine kinase-3 (FLT3). The most common type, internal tandem duplication (ITD), confers poor prognosis. We report for the first time on TTT-3002, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) that is one of the most potent FLT3 inhibitors discovered to date. Studies using human FLT3/ITD mutant leukemia cell lines revealed the half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) for inhibiting FLT3 autophosphorylation is from 100 to 250 pM. The proliferation IC50 for TTT-3002 in these same cells was from 490 to 920 pM. TTT-3002 also showed potent activity when tested against the most frequently occurring FLT3-activating point mutation, FLT3/D835Y, against which many current TKIs are ineffective. These findings were validated in vivo by using mouse models of FLT3-associated AML. Survival and tumor burden of mice in several FLT3/ITD transplantation models is significantly improved by administration of TTT-3002 via oral dosing. Finally, we demonstrated that TTT-3002 is cytotoxic to leukemic blasts isolated from FLT3/ITD-expressing AML patients, while displaying minimal toxicity to normal hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells from healthy blood and bone marrow donors. Therefore, TTT-3002 has demonstrated preclinical potential as a promising new FLT3 TKI in the treatment of FLT3-mutant AML.

  14. FES kinases are required for oncogenic FLT3 signaling.

    PubMed

    Voisset, E; Lopez, S; Chaix, A; Georges, C; Hanssens, K; Prébet, T; Dubreuil, P; De Sepulveda, P

    2010-04-01

    The closely related non-receptor tyrosine kinases FEline Sarcoma (FES) and FEs Related (FER) are activated by cell surface receptors in hematopoietic cells. Despite the early description of oncogenic viral forms of fes, v-fes, and v-fps, the implication of FES and FER in human pathology is not known. We have recently shown that FES but not FER is necessary for oncogenic KIT receptor signaling. Here, we report that both FES and FER kinases are activated in primary acute myeloid leukemia (AML) blasts and in AML cell lines. FES and FER activation is dependent on FLT3 in cell lines harboring constitutively active FLT3 mutants. Moreover, both FES and FER proteins are critical for FLT3-internal tandem duplication (ITD) signaling and for cell proliferation in relevant AML cell lines. FER is required for cell cycle transitions, whereas FES seems necessary for cell survival. We concluded that FES and FER kinases mediate essential non-redundant functions downstream of FLT3-ITD.

  15. Rat bone marrow-derived dendritic cells generated with GM-CSF/IL-4 or FLT3L exhibit distinct phenotypical and functional characteristics.

    PubMed

    N'diaye, Marie; Warnecke, Andreas; Flytzani, Sevasti; Abdelmagid, Nada; Ruhrmann, Sabrina; Olsson, Tomas; Jagodic, Maja; Harris, Robert A; Guerreiro-Cacais, Andre Ortlieb

    2016-03-01

    Dendritic cells are professional APCs that play a central role in the initiation of immune responses. The limited ex vivo availability of dendritic cells inspires the widespread use of bone marrow-derived dendritic cells as an alternative in research. However, the functional characteristics of bone marrow-derived dendritic cells are incompletely understood. Therefore, we compared functional and phenotypic characteristics of rat bone marrow-derived dendritic cells generated with GM-CSF/IL-4 or FLT3 ligand bone marrow-derived dendritic cells. A comparison of surface markers revealed that FLT3 ligand-bone marrow-derived dendritic cells expressed signal regulatory protein α, CD103, and CD4 and baseline levels of MHC class II, CD40, and CD86, which were highly up-regulated upon stimulation. Conversely, GM-CSF/IL-4-bone marrow-derived dendritic cells constitutively expressed signal regulatory protein α, CD11c, and CD11b but only mildly up-regulated MHC class II, CD40, or CD86 following stimulation. Expression of dendritic cell-associated core transcripts was restricted to FLT3 ligand-bone marrow-derived dendritic cells . GM-CSF/IL-4-bone marrow-derived dendritic cells were superior at phagocytosis but were outperformed by FLT3 ligand-bone marrow-derived dendritic cells at antigen presentation and T cell stimulation in vitro. Stimulated GM-CSF/IL-4-bone marrow-derived dendritic cells secreted more TNF, CCL5, CCL20, and NO, whereas FLT3 ligand-bone marrow-derived dendritic cells secreted more IL-6 and IL-12. Finally, whereas GM-CSF/IL-4-bone marrow-derived dendritic cell culture supernatants added to resting T cell cultures promoted forkhead box p3(+) regulatory T cell populations, FLT3 ligand-bone marrow-derived dendritic cell culture supernatants drove Th17 differentiation. We conclude that rat GM-CSF/IL-4-bone marrow-derived dendritic cells and FLT3 ligand-bone marrow-derived dendritic cells are functionally distinct. Our data support the current rationale that FLT3

  16. Functions of flt3 in zebrafish hematopoiesis and its relevance to human acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    He, Bai-Liang; Shi, Xiangguo; Man, Cheuk Him; Ma, Alvin C. H.; Ekker, Stephen C.; Chow, Howard C. H.; So, Chi Wai Eric; Choi, William W. L.; Zhang, Wenqing; Zhang, Yiyue

    2014-01-01

    FMS-like tyrosine kinase 3 (FLT3) is expressed in human hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) but its role during embryogenesis is unclear. In acute myeloid leukemia (AML), internal tandem duplication (ITD) of FLT3 at the juxtamembrane (JMD) and tyrosine kinase (TKD) domains (FLT3-ITD+) occurs in 30% of patients and is associated with inferior clinical prognosis. TKD mutations (FLT3-TKD+) occur in 5% of cases. We made use of zebrafish to examine the role of flt3 in developmental hematopoiesis and model human FLT3-ITD+ and FLT3-TKD+ AML. Zebrafish flt3 JMD and TKD were remarkably similar to their mammalian orthologs. Morpholino knockdown significantly reduced the expression of l-plastin (pan-leukocyte), csf1r, and mpeg1 (macrophage) as well as that of c-myb (definitive HSPCs), lck, and rag1 (T-lymphocyte). Expressing human FLT3-ITD in zebrafish embryos resulted in expansion and clustering of myeloid cells (pu.1+, mpo+, and cebpα+) which were ameliorated by AC220 and associated with stat5, erk1/2, and akt phosphorylation. Human FLT3-TKD (D835Y) induced significant, albeit modest, myeloid expansion resistant to AC220. This study provides novel insight into the role of flt3 during hematopoiesis and establishes a zebrafish model of FLT3-ITD+ and FLT3-TKD+ AML that may facilitate high-throughput screening of novel and personalized agents. PMID:24591202

  17. The Important Role of FLT3-L in Ex Vivo Expansion of Hematopoietic Stem Cells following Co-Culture with Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Oubari, Farhad; Amirizade, Naser; Mohammadpour, Hemn; Nakhlestani, Mozhdeh; Zarif, Mahin Nikougoftar

    2015-01-01

    Objective Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) transplantation using umbilical cord blood (UCB) has improved during the last decade. Because of cell limitations, several studies focused on the ex vivo expansion of HSCs. Numerous investigations were performed to introduce the best cytokine cocktails for HSC expansion The majority used the Fms-related tyrosine kinase 3 ligand (FLT3-L) as a critical component. According to FLT3-L biology, in this study we have investigated the hypothesis that FLT3-L only effectively induces HSCs expansion in the presence of a mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) feeder. Materials and Methods In this experimental study, HSCs and MSCs were isolated from UCB and placenta, respectively. HSCs were cultured in different culture conditions in the presence and absence of MSC feeder and cytokines. After ten days of culture, total nucleated cell count (TNC), cluster of differentiation 34+(CD34+) cell count, colony forming unit assay (CFU), long-term culture initiating cell (LTC-IC), homeobox protein B4 (HoxB4) mRNA and surface CD49d expression were evaluated. The fold increase for some culture conditions was compared by the t test. Results HSCs expanded in the presence of cytokines and MSCs feeder. The rate of expansion in the co-culture condition was two-fold more than culture with cytokines (P<0.05). FLT3-L could expand HSCs in the co-culture condition at a level of 20-fold equal to the presence of stem cell factor (SCF), thrombopoietin (TPO) and FLT3-L without feeder cells. The number of extracted colonies from LTC-IC and CD49d expression compared with a cytokine cocktail condition meaningfully increased (P<0.05). Conclusion FLT3-L co-culture with MSCs can induce high yield expansion of HSCs and be a substitute for the universal cocktail of SCF, TPO and FLT3-L in feeder-free culture. PMID:26199899

  18. An overview on the role of FLT3-tyrosine kinase receptor in acute myeloid leukemia: biology and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Grafone, Tiziana; Palmisano, Michela; Nicci, Chiara; Storti, Sergio

    2012-01-01

    Hematopoiesis, the process by which the hematopoietic stem cells and progenitors differentiate into blood cells of various lineages, involves complex interactions of transcription factors that modulate the expression of downstream genes and mediate proliferation and differentiation signals. Despite the many controls that regulate hematopoiesis, mutations in the regulatory genes capable of promoting leukemogenesis may occur. The FLT3 gene encodes a tyrosine kinase receptor that plays a key role in controlling survival, proliferation and differentiation of hematopoietic cells. Mutations in this gene are critical in causing a deregulation of the delicate balance between cell proliferation and differentiation. In this review, we provide an update on the structure, synthesis and activation of the FLT3 receptor and the subsequent activation of multiple downstream signaling pathways. We also review activating FLT3 mutations that are frequently identified in acute myeloid leukemia, cause activation of more complex downstream signaling pathways and promote leukemogenesis. Finally, FLT3 has emerged as an important target for molecular therapy. We, therefore, report on some recent therapies directed against it. PMID:25992210

  19. Utilizing target-ligand interaction information in fingerprint searching for ligands of related targets.

    PubMed

    Tan, Lu; Bajorath, Jürgen

    2009-07-01

    Protein-ligand interaction information is captured by determination of interacting fragments (IF) of ligands available in complex X-ray structures. From IF, fingerprints (IF-FP) are calculated for similarity searching. Previously, we have shown that IF-FP often produce higher search performance than general structural fragment- or key-type fingerprints. In this study, we introduce the transfer of target-ligand interaction information from one target to a related one for which no structural information is available. Thus, IFs from a crystallographic target B-ligand complex are incorporated into structural key fingerprints of known ligands for target A. Similarity searching using these IF transfer fingerprints (IF-TFP) is shown to further increase the search performance of conventional ligand fingerprints. Thus, interaction information can be transferred between related targets in order to support ligand-based fingerprint search calculations for targets for which no structural information is currently available.

  20. Marmosets as a preclinical model for testing “off-label” use of doxycycline to turn on Flt3L expression from high-capacity adenovirus vectors

    PubMed Central

    VanderVeen, Nathan; Paran, Christopher; Appelhans, Ashley; Krasinkiewicz, Johnny; Lemons, Rosemary; Appelman, Henry; Doherty, Robert; Palmer, Donna; Ng, Philip; Lowenstein, Pedro R; Castro, Maria G

    2014-01-01

    We developed a combined conditional cytotoxic, i.e., herpes simplex type 1-thymidine kinase (TK), plus immune-stimulatory, i.e., fms-like tyrosine kinase ligand-3–mediated gene therapy for glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). Therapeutic transgenes were encoded within high-capacity adenoviral vectors (HC-Ad); TK was expressed constitutively, while Flt3L was under the control of the TetOn regulatable promoter. We previously assessed efficacy and safety in intracranial GBM rodent models. But, since this approach involves expression of a cytokine within the brain, we chose the nonhuman primate, i.e., Callithrix jaccus (marmoset) as it has been established that its immune response shares similarities with man. We characterized the safety, cell-type specific expression, and doxycycline (DOX)-inducibility of HC-Ad-TetOn-Flt3L delivered within the striatum. We used allometrically scaled DOX doses delivered orally, twice daily for one month, mimicking the route and duration of DOX administration planned for the GBM trial. Flt3L was effectively expressed within astrocytes, microglia, oligodendrocytes, and neurons. No evidence of brain or systemic toxicities due to the treatment was encountered. Our data indicate that DOX doses equivalent to those used in humans to treat infections can be safely used “off-label” to turn “on” therapeutic gene expression from HC-Ad-TetOn-Flt3L; providing evidence for the safety of this approach in the clinic. PMID:25068145

  1. Efficacy and safety of CDX-301, recombinant human Flt3L, at expanding dendritic cells and hematopoietic stem cells in healthy human volunteers.

    PubMed

    Anandasabapathy, N; Breton, G; Hurley, A; Caskey, M; Trumpfheller, C; Sarma, P; Pring, J; Pack, M; Buckley, N; Matei, I; Lyden, D; Green, J; Hawthorne, T; Marsh, H C; Yellin, M; Davis, T; Keler, T; Schlesinger, S J

    2015-07-01

    Fms-like tyrosine kinase-3 ligand (Flt3L) uniquely binds the Flt3 (CD135) receptor expressed on hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), early progenitor cells, immature thymocytes and steady-state dendritic cells (DCs) and induces their proliferation, differentiation, development and mobilization in the bone marrow, peripheral blood and lymphoid organs. CDX-301 has an identical amino-acid sequence and comparable biological activity to the previously tested rhuFlt3L, which ceased clinical development over a decade ago. This Phase 1 trial assessed the safety, pharmacokinetic, pharmacodynamic and immunologic profile of CDX-301, explored alternate dosing regimens and examined the impact of rhuFlt3L on key immune cell subsets. Thirty healthy volunteers received CDX-301 (1-75 μg/kg/day) over 5-10 days. One event of Grade 3 community-acquired pneumonia occurred. There were no other infections, dose-limiting toxicities or serious adverse events. CDX-301 resulted in effective peripheral expansion of monocytes, hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells and key subsets of myeloid DCs and plasmacytoid DCs, with no clear effect on regulatory T cells. These data from healthy volunteers support the potential for CDX-301, as monotherapy or in combination with other agents, in various indications including allogeneic HSC transplantation and immunotherapy, but the effects of CDX-301 will need to be investigated in each of these patient populations. PMID:25915810

  2. Crystal structure of the FLT3 kinase domain bound to the inhibitor quizartinib (AC220)

    SciTech Connect

    Zorn, Julie A.; Wang, Qi; Fujimura, Eric; Barros, Tiago; Kuriyan, John; Boggon, Titus J.

    2015-04-02

    More than 30% of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients possess activating mutations in the receptor tyrosine kinase FMS-like tyrosine kinase 3 or FLT3. A small-molecule inhibitor of FLT3 (known as quizartinib or AC220) that is currently in clinical trials appears promising for the treatment of AML. Here, we report the co-crystal structure of the kinase domain of FLT3 in complex with quizartinib. FLT3 with quizartinib bound adopts an “Abl-like” inactive conformation with the activation loop stabilized in the “DFG-out” orientation and folded back onto the kinase domain. This conformation is similar to that observed for the uncomplexed intracellular domain of FLT3 as well as for related receptor tyrosine kinases, except for a localized induced fit in the activation loop. The co-crystal structure reveals the interactions between quizartinib and the active site of FLT3 that are key for achieving its high potency against both wild-type FLT3 as well as a FLT3 variant observed in many AML patients. This co-complex further provides a structural rationale for quizartinib-resistance mutations.

  3. Crystal structure of the FLT3 kinase domain bound to the inhibitor quizartinib (AC220)

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Zorn, Julie A.; Wang, Qi; Fujimura, Eric; Barros, Tiago; Kuriyan, John; Boggon, Titus J.

    2015-04-02

    More than 30% of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients possess activating mutations in the receptor tyrosine kinase FMS-like tyrosine kinase 3 or FLT3. A small-molecule inhibitor of FLT3 (known as quizartinib or AC220) that is currently in clinical trials appears promising for the treatment of AML. Here, we report the co-crystal structure of the kinase domain of FLT3 in complex with quizartinib. FLT3 with quizartinib bound adopts an “Abl-like” inactive conformation with the activation loop stabilized in the “DFG-out” orientation and folded back onto the kinase domain. This conformation is similar to that observed for the uncomplexed intracellular domain ofmore » FLT3 as well as for related receptor tyrosine kinases, except for a localized induced fit in the activation loop. The co-crystal structure reveals the interactions between quizartinib and the active site of FLT3 that are key for achieving its high potency against both wild-type FLT3 as well as a FLT3 variant observed in many AML patients. This co-complex further provides a structural rationale for quizartinib-resistance mutations.« less

  4. Crystal Structure of the FLT3 Kinase Domain Bound to the Inhibitor Quizartinib (AC220)

    PubMed Central

    Zorn, Julie A.; Wang, Qi; Fujimura, Eric; Barros, Tiago; Kuriyan, John

    2015-01-01

    More than 30% of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients possess activating mutations in the receptor tyrosine kinase FMS-like tyrosine kinase 3 or FLT3. A small-molecule inhibitor of FLT3 (known as quizartinib or AC220) that is currently in clinical trials appears promising for the treatment of AML. Here, we report the co-crystal structure of the kinase domain of FLT3 in complex with quizartinib. FLT3 with quizartinib bound adopts an “Abl-like” inactive conformation with the activation loop stabilized in the “DFG-out” orientation and folded back onto the kinase domain. This conformation is similar to that observed for the uncomplexed intracellular domain of FLT3 as well as for related receptor tyrosine kinases, except for a localized induced fit in the activation loop. The co-crystal structure reveals the interactions between quizartinib and the active site of FLT3 that are key for achieving its high potency against both wild-type FLT3 as well as a FLT3 variant observed in many AML patients. This co-complex further provides a structural rationale for quizartinib-resistance mutations. PMID:25837374

  5. NADPH oxidase-generated hydrogen peroxide induces DNA damage in mutant FLT3-expressing leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Stanicka, Joanna; Russell, Eileen G; Woolley, John F; Cotter, Thomas G

    2015-04-10

    Internal tandem duplication of the FMS-like tyrosine kinase (FLT3-ITD) receptor is present in 20% of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients and it has been associated with an aggressive AML phenotype. FLT3-ITD expressing cell lines have been shown to generate increased levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and DNA double strand breaks (DSBs). However, the molecular basis of how FLT3-ITD-driven ROS leads to the aggressive form of AML is not clearly understood. Our group has previously reported that inhibition of FLT3-ITD signaling results in post-translational down-regulation of p22(phox), a small membrane-bound subunit of the NADPH oxidase (NOX) complex. Here we demonstrated that 32D cells, a myeloblast-like cell line transfected with FLT3-ITD, have a higher protein level of p22(phox) and p22(phox)-interacting NOX isoforms than 32D cells transfected with the wild type FLT3 receptor (FLT3-WT). The inhibition of NOX proteins, p22(phox), and NOX protein knockdowns caused a reduction in ROS, as measured with a hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-specific dye, peroxy orange 1 (PO1), and nuclear H2O2, as measured with nuclear peroxy emerald 1 (NucPE1). These reductions in the level of H2O2 following the NOX knockdowns were accompanied by a decrease in the number of DNA DSBs. We showed that 32D cells that express FLT3-ITD have a higher level of both oxidized DNA and DNA DSBs than their wild type counterparts. We also observed that NOX4 and p22(phox) localize to the nuclear membrane in MV4-11 cells expressing FLT3-ITD. Taken together these data indicate that NOX and p22(phox) mediate the ROS production from FLT3-ITD that signal to the nucleus causing genomic instability. PMID:25697362

  6. Midostaurin and Decitabine in Treating Older Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Myeloid Leukemia and FLT3 Mutation

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-10

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia With FLT3/ITD Mutation; Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Gene Mutations; FLT3 Tyrosine Kinase Domain Point Mutation; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  7. Copy-neutral loss of heterozygosity is prevalent and a late event in the pathogenesis of FLT3/ITD AML.

    PubMed

    Stirewalt, D L; Pogosova-Agadjanyan, E L; Tsuchiya, K; Joaquin, J; Meshinchi, S

    2014-01-01

    Patients with high FLT3 internal tandem duplication allelic ratios (FLT3/ITD-ARs) have a poor prognosis. Single-nucleotide polymorphism/comparative genomic hybridization, single-cell PCR and colony-forming assays were used to evaluate genotypic evolution of high FLT3/ITD-ARs in 85 acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients. Microarrays were used to examine molecular pathways disrupted in leukemic blasts with high FLT3/ITD-ARs. Copy-neutral loss of heterozygosity (CN-LOH) was identified at the FLT3 locus in diagnostic samples with high FLT3/ITD-ARs (N=11), but not in samples with low FLT3/ITD-ARs (N=24), FLT3-activating loop mutations (N=11) or wild-type FLT3 (N=39). Single-cell assays showed that homozygous FLT3/ITD genotype was present in subsets of leukemic blasts at diagnosis but became the dominant clone at relapse. Less differentiated CD34(+)/CD33(-) progenitor colonies were heterozygous for FLT3/ITD, whereas more differentiated CD34(+)/CD33(+) progenitor colonies were homozygous for FLT3/ITD. Expression profiling revealed that samples harboring high FLT3/ITD-ARs aberrantly expressed genes within the recombination/DNA repair pathway. Thus, the development of CN-LOH at the FLT3 locus, which results in high FLT3/ITD-ARs, likely represents a late genomic event that occurs after the acquisition of the FLT3/ITD. Although the etiology underlying the development of CN-LOH remains to be clarified, the disruption in recombination/DNA repair pathway, which is present before the development of LOH, may have a role. PMID:24786392

  8. IMC-EB10, an anti-FLT3 monoclonal antibody, prolongs survival and reduces nonobese diabetic/severe combined immunodeficient engraftment of some acute lymphoblastic leukemia cell lines and primary leukemic samples.

    PubMed

    Piloto, Obdulio; Nguyen, Bao; Huso, David; Kim, Kyu-Tae; Li, Yiwen; Witte, Larry; Hicklin, Daniel J; Brown, Patrick; Small, Donald

    2006-05-01

    The class III receptor tyrosine kinase FLT3 is expressed on the blasts of >90% of patients with B-lineage acute lymphoblastic leukemias (ALL). In addition, it is expressed at extremely high levels in ALL patients with mixed lineage leukemia rearrangements or hyperdiploidy and is sometimes mutated in these same patients. In this report, we investigate the effects of treating ALL cell lines and primary samples with human anti-FLT3 monoclonal antibodies (mAb) capable of preventing binding of FLT3 ligand. In vitro studies, examining the ability of two anti-FLT3 mAbs (IMC-EB10 and IMC-NC7) to affect FLT3 activation and downstream signaling in ALL cell lines and primary blasts, yielded variable results. FLT3 phosphorylation was consistently inhibited by IMC-NC7 treatment, but in some cell lines, IMC-EB10 actually stimulated FLT3 activation, possibly as a result of antibody-mediated receptor dimerization. Through antibody-dependent, cell-mediated cytotoxicity, such an antibody could still prove efficacious against leukemia cells in vivo. In fact, IMC-EB10 treatment significantly prolonged survival and/or reduced engraftment of several ALL cell lines and primary ALL samples in nonobese diabetic/severe combined immunodeficient (NOD/SCID) mice. This occurred even when IMC-EB10 treatment resulted in FLT3 activation in vitro. Moreover, fluorescence-activated cell sorting and PCR analysis of IMC-EB10-treated NOD/SCID mice surviving 150 days post-leukemic cell injection revealed that FLT3 immunotherapy reduced leukemic engraftment below the level of detection in these assays (<0.001%). Furthermore, in vivo IMC-EB10 treatment did not select for resistant cells, because cells surviving IMC-EB10 treatment remain sensitive to IMC-EB10 cytotoxicity upon retransplantation. In vivo studies involving either partial depletion or activation of natural killer (NK) cells show that most of the cytotoxic effect of IMC-EB10 is mediated through NK cells. Therefore, such an antibody, either

  9. Potentiation of antileukemic therapies by the dual PI3K/PDK-1 inhibitor, BAG956: effects on BCR-ABL– and mutant FLT3-expressing cells

    PubMed Central

    Weisberg, Ellen; Banerji, Lolita; Wright, Renee D.; Barrett, Rosemary; Ray, Arghya; Moreno, Daisy; Catley, Laurence; Jiang, Jingrui; Hall-Meyers, Elizabeth; Sauveur-Michel, Maira; Stone, Richard; Galinsky, Ilene; Fox, Edward; Kung, Andrew L.

    2008-01-01

    Mediators of PI3K/AKT signaling have been implicated in chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Studies have shown that inhibitors of PI3K/AKT signaling, such as wortmannin and LY294002, are able to inhibit CML and AML cell proliferation and synergize with targeted tyrosine kinase inhi-bitors. We investigated the ability of BAG956, a dual PI3K/PDK-1 inhibitor, to be used in combination with inhibitors of BCR-ABL and mutant FLT3, as well as with the mTOR inhibitor, rapamycin, and the rapamycin derivative, RAD001. BAG956 was shown to block AKT phosphorylation induced by BCR-ABL–, and induce apoptosis of BCR-ABL–expressing cell lines and patient bone marrow cells at concentrations that also inhibit PI3K signaling. Enhancement of the inhibitory effects of the tyrosine kinase inhibitors, imatinib and nilotinib, by BAG956 was demonstrated against BCR-ABL expressing cells both in vitro and in vivo. We have also shown that BAG956 is effective against mutant FLT3-expressing cell lines and AML patient bone marrow cells. Enhancement of the inhibitory effects of the tyrosine kinase inhibitor, PKC412, by BAG956 was demonstrated against mutant FLT3-expressing cells. Finally, BAG956 and rapamycin/RAD001 were shown to combine in a nonantagonistic fashion against BCR-ABL– and mutant FLT3-expressing cells both in vitro and in vivo. PMID:18184863

  10. Nanoparticle ligand presentation for targeting solid tumors.

    PubMed

    Duskey, Jason T; Rice, Kevin G

    2014-10-01

    Among the many scientific advances to come from the study of nanoscience, the development of ligand-targeted nanoparticles to eliminate solid tumors is predicted to have a major impact on human health. There are many reports describing novel designs and testing of targeted nanoparticles to treat cancer. While the principles of the technology are well demonstrated in controlled lab experiments, there are still many hurdles to overcome for the science to mature into truly efficacious targeted nanoparticles that join the arsenal of agents currently used to treat cancer in humans. One of these hurdles is overcoming unwanted biodistribution to the liver while maximizing delivery to the tumor. This almost certainly requires advances in both nanoparticle stealth technology and targeting. Currently, it continues to be a challenge to control the loading of ligands onto polyethylene glycol (PEG) to achieve maximal targeting. Nanoparticle cellular uptake and subcellular targeting of genes and siRNA also remain a challenge. This review examines the types of ligands that have been most often used to target nanoparticles to solid tumors. As the science matures over the coming decade, careful control over ligand presentation on nanoparticles of precise size, shape, and charge will likely play a major role in achieving success.

  11. Nanoparticle ligand presentation for targeting solid tumors.

    PubMed

    Duskey, Jason T; Rice, Kevin G

    2014-10-01

    Among the many scientific advances to come from the study of nanoscience, the development of ligand-targeted nanoparticles to eliminate solid tumors is predicted to have a major impact on human health. There are many reports describing novel designs and testing of targeted nanoparticles to treat cancer. While the principles of the technology are well demonstrated in controlled lab experiments, there are still many hurdles to overcome for the science to mature into truly efficacious targeted nanoparticles that join the arsenal of agents currently used to treat cancer in humans. One of these hurdles is overcoming unwanted biodistribution to the liver while maximizing delivery to the tumor. This almost certainly requires advances in both nanoparticle stealth technology and targeting. Currently, it continues to be a challenge to control the loading of ligands onto polyethylene glycol (PEG) to achieve maximal targeting. Nanoparticle cellular uptake and subcellular targeting of genes and siRNA also remain a challenge. This review examines the types of ligands that have been most often used to target nanoparticles to solid tumors. As the science matures over the coming decade, careful control over ligand presentation on nanoparticles of precise size, shape, and charge will likely play a major role in achieving success. PMID:24927668

  12. Enhanced efficacy of DNA vaccination against botulinum neurotoxin serotype A by co-administration of plasmids encoding DC-stimulating Flt3L and MIP-3α cytokines.

    PubMed

    Xu, Qing; Zhu, Yu-Feng; Wang, Hai-Chao; Gong, Zheng-Wei; Yu, Yun-Zhou

    2016-09-01

    Targeting antigens encoded by DNA vaccines to the key antigen-presenting cells by chemotactic or growth factors, is an effective strategy for enhancing the potency of DNA vaccinations. Here, we report the effects of chemotactic or growth factors on a DNA vaccine against botulinum neurotoxin serotype A (BoNT/A) in a mouse model. We demonstrated that mice immunized with DNA constructs encoding the Hc domain of BoNT/A (AHc) fused with DC-stimulating Flt3L or MIP-3α cytokines failed to elicit an enhanced or efficacious AHc-specific humoral or protective response in mice. However, the potency of DNA vaccination was significantly modulated and enhanced by co-administration of AHc-expressing DNA with pFlt3L or pMIP-3α, which generated strong immune and protective responses against BoNT/A. Moreover, the enhanced potency was further boosted by co-administration of AHc-expressing DNA with the combination of pFlt3L and pMIP-3α in mice, but not with the Flt3L-MIP-3α fusion molecule, which indicated that co-immunization with both pFlt3L and pMIP-3α could synergistically enhance AHc-specific immune and protective responses against BoNT/A. In summary, our findings indicate that co-administration of plasmids encoding antigen and cytokine rather than administration of plasmids encoding cytokine-antigen fusion is effective to enhance the potency of AHc-expressing DNA vaccine.

  13. Computer-guided design, synthesis, and biological evaluation of quinoxalinebisarylureas as FLT3 inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Göring, Stefan; Bensinger, Dennis; Naumann, Eva C; Schmidt, Boris

    2015-03-01

    Activating mutations of FMS-like tyrosine kinase 3 (FLT3) are present in ∼30 % of patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and are associated with poor prognosis. Point mutations in the tyrosine kinase domain (TKD) are observed as primary mutations or are acquired as secondary mutations in FLT3 with internal tandem duplications (ITDs) after treatment with tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs). Although dozens of potent inhibitors against FLT3 ITD have been reported, activating TKD point mutations, especially at residues F691 and D835, remain the leading cause for therapy resistance, highlighting the consistent need for new potent inhibitors. Herein we report the identification and characterization of novel quinoxaline-based FLT3 inhibitors. We used the pharmacophore features of diverse known inhibitors as a starting point for a new optimization algorithm for type II TKIs, starting from an in silico library pharmacophore search and induced-fit docking in the known FLT3 structure. This led to the design of a set of diverse quinoxalinebisarylureas, which were profiled in an FLT3 kinase activity assay. The most promising compounds were further evaluated in a zebrafish embryo phenotype assay.

  14. Internal Tandem Duplication in FLT3 Attenuates Proliferation and Regulates Resistance to the FLT3 Inhibitor AC220 by Modulating p21Cdkn1a and Pbx1 in Hematopoietic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Abe, Mariko; Pelus, Louis M.; Singh, Pratibha; Hirade, Tomohiro; Onishi, Chie; Purevsuren, Jamiyan; Taketani, Takeshi; Yamaguchi, Seiji; Fukuda, Seiji

    2016-01-01

    Internal tandem duplication (ITD) mutations in the Fms-related tyrosine kinase 3 (FLT3) gene (FLT3-ITD) are associated with poor prognosis in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Due to the development of drug resistance, few FLT3-ITD inhibitors are effective against FLT3-ITD+ AML. In this study, we show that FLT3-ITD activates a novel pathway involving p21Cdkn1a (p21) and pre-B cell leukemia transcription factor 1 (Pbx1) that attenuates FLT3-ITD cell proliferation and is involved in the development of drug resistance. FLT3-ITD up-regulated p21 expression in both mouse bone marrow c-kit+-Sca-1+-Lin- (KSL) cells and Ba/F3 cells. The loss of p21 expression enhanced growth factor-independent proliferation and sensitivity to cytarabine as a consequence of concomitantly enriching the S+G2/M phase population and significantly increasing the expression of Pbx1, but not Evi-1, in FLT3-ITD+ cells. This enhanced cell proliferation following the loss of p21 was partially abrogated when Pbx1 expression was silenced in FLT3-ITD+ primary bone marrow colony-forming cells and Ba/F3 cells. When FLT3-ITD was antagonized with AC220, a selective inhibitor of FLT3-ITD, p21 expression was decreased coincident with Pbx1 mRNA up-regulation and a rapid decline in the number of viable FLT3-ITD+ Ba/F3 cells; however, the cells eventually became refractory to AC220. Overexpressing p21 in FLT3-ITD+ Ba/F3 cells delayed the emergence of cells that were refractory to AC220, whereas p21 silencing accelerated their development. These data indicate that FLT3-ITD is capable of inhibiting FLT3-ITD+ cell proliferation through the p21/Pbx1 axis and that treatments that antagonize FLT3-ITD contribute to the subsequent development of cells that are refractory to a FLT3-ITD inhibitor by disrupting p21 expression. PMID:27387666

  15. Quantitative trait mapping reveals a regulatory axis involving peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors, PRDM16, transforming growth factor-β2 and FLT3 in hematopoiesis.

    PubMed

    Avagyan, Serine; Aguilo, Francesca; Kamezaki, Kenjiro; Snoeck, Hans-Willem

    2011-12-01

    Hematopoiesis is the process whereby BM HSCs renew to maintain their number or to differentiate into committed progenitors to generate all blood cells. One approach to gain mechanistic insight into this complex process is the investigation of quantitative genetic variation in hematopoietic function among inbred mouse strains. We previously showed that TGF-β2 is a genetically determined positive regulator of hematopoiesis. In the presence of unknown nonprotein serum factors TGF-β2, but not TGF-β1 or -β3, enhances progenitor proliferation in vitro, an effect that is subject to mouse strain-dependent variation mapping to a locus on chr.4, Tb2r1. TGF-β2-deficient mice show hematopoietic defects, demonstrating the physiologic role of this cytokine. Here, we show that TGF-β2 specifically and predominantly cell autonomously enhances signaling by FLT3 in vitro and in vivo. A coding polymorphism in Prdm16 (PR-domain-containing 16) underlies Tb2r1 and differentially regulates transcriptional activity of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPARγ), identifying lipid PPAR ligands as the serum factors required for regulation of FLT3 signaling by TGF-β2. We furthermore show that PPARγ agonists play a FLT3-dependent role in stress responses of progenitor cells. These observations identify a novel regulatory axis that includes PPARs, Prdm16, and TGF-β2 in hematopoiesis.

  16. Deletion and deletion/insertion mutations in the juxtamembrane domain of the FLT3 gene in adult acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Deeb, Kristin K.; Smonskey, Matthew T.; DeFedericis, HanChun; Deeb, George; Sait, Sheila N.J.; Wetzler, Meir; Wang, Eunice S.; Starostik, Petr

    2014-01-01

    In contrast to FLT3 ITD mutations, in-frame deletions in the FLT3 gene have rarely been described in adult acute leukemia. We report two cases of AML with uncommon in-frame mutations in the juxtamembrane domain of the FLT3 gene: a 3-bp (c.1770_1774delCTACGinsGT; p.F590_V592delinsLF) deletion/insertion and a 12-bp (c.1780_1791delTTCAGAGAATAT; p.F594_Y597del) deletion. We verified by sequencing that the reading frame of the FLT3 gene was preserved and by cDNA analysis that the mRNA of the mutant allele was expressed in both cases. Given the recent development of FLT3 inhibitors, our findings may be of therapeutic value for AML patients harboring similar FLT3 mutations. PMID:25379410

  17. Targeting mitochondrial energy metabolism with TSPO ligands.

    PubMed

    Gut, Philipp

    2015-08-01

    The translocator protein (18 kDa) (TSPO) resides on the outer mitochondrial membrane where it is believed to participate in cholesterol transport and steroid hormone synthesis. Although it is almost ubiquitously expressed, what TSPO does in non-steroidogenic tissues is largely unexplored. Recent studies report changes in glucose homoeostasis and cellular energy production when TSPO function is modulated by selective ligands or by genetic loss-of-function. This review summarizes findings that connect TSPO function with the regulation of mitochondrial energy metabolism. The juxtaposition of TSPO at the cytosolic/mitochondrial interface and the existence of endogenous ligands that are regulated by metabolism suggest that TSPO functions to adapt mitochondrial to cellular metabolism. From a pharmacological perspective the specific up-regulation of TSPO in neuro-inflammatory and injury-induced conditions make TSPO an interesting, druggable target of mitochondrial metabolism.

  18. Ligand-targeted particulate nanomedicines undergoing clinical evaluation: current status.

    PubMed

    van der Meel, Roy; Vehmeijer, Laurens J C; Kok, Robbert J; Storm, Gert; van Gaal, Ethlinn V B

    2013-10-01

    Since the introduction of Doxil® on the market nearly 20years ago, a number of nanomedicines have become part of treatment regimens in the clinic. With the exception of antibody-drug conjugates, these nanomedicines are all devoid of targeting ligands and rely solely on their physicochemical properties and the (patho)physiological processes in the body for their biodistribution and targeting capability. At the same time, many preclinical studies have reported on nanomedicines exposing targeting ligands, or ligand-targeted nanomedicines, yet none of these have been approved at this moment. In the present review, we provide a concise overview of 13 ligand-targeted particulate nanomedicines (ligand-targeted PNMs) that have progressed into clinical trials. The progress of each ligand-targeted PNM is discussed based on available (pre)clinical data. Main conclusions of these analyses are that (a) ligand-targeted PNMs have proven to be safe and efficacious in preclinical models; (b) the vast majority of ligand-targeted PNMs is generated for the treatment of cancer; (c) contribution of targeting ligands to the PNM efficacy is not unambiguously proven; and (d) targeting ligands do not cause localization of the PNM within the target tissue, but rather provide benefits in terms of target cell internalization and target tissue retention once the PNM has arrived at the target site. Increased understanding of the in vivo fate and interactions of the ligand-targeted PNMs with proteins and cells in the human body is mandatory to rationally advance the clinical translation of ligand-targeted PNMs. Future perspectives for ligand-targeted PNM approaches include the delivery of drugs that are unable or inefficient in passing cellular membranes, treatment of drug resistant tumors, targeting of the tumor blood supply, the generation of targeted vaccines and nanomedicines that are able to cross the blood-brain barrier.

  19. Targeting Selectins and Their Ligands in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Natoni, Alessandro; Macauley, Matthew S.; O’Dwyer, Michael E.

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant glycosylation is a hallmark of cancer cells with increased evidence pointing to a role in tumor progression. In particular, aberrant sialylation of glycoproteins and glycolipids has been linked to increased immune cell evasion, drug evasion, drug resistance, tumor invasiveness, and vascular dissemination, leading to metastases. Hypersialylation of cancer cells is largely the result of overexpression of sialyltransferases (STs). Differentially, humans express twenty different STs in a tissue-specific manner, each of which catalyzes the attachment of sialic acids via different glycosidic linkages (α2-3, α2-6, or α2-8) to the underlying glycan chain. One important mechanism whereby overexpression of STs contributes to an enhanced metastatic phenotype is via the generation of selectin ligands. Selectin ligand function requires the expression of sialyl-Lewis X and its structural isomer sialyl-Lewis A, which are synthesized by the combined action of alpha α1-3-fucosyltransferases, α2-3-sialyltransferases, β1-4-galactosyltranferases, and N-acetyl-β-glucosaminyltransferases. The α2-3-sialyltransferases ST3Gal4 and ST3Gal6 are critical to the generation of functional E- and P-selectin ligands and overexpression of these STs have been linked to increased risk of metastatic disease in solid tumors and poor outcome in multiple myeloma. Thus, targeting selectins and their ligands as well as the enzymes involved in their generation, in particular STs, could be beneficial to many cancer patients. Potential strategies include ST inhibition and the use of selectin antagonists, such as glycomimetic drugs and antibodies. Here, we review ongoing efforts to optimize the potency and selectivity of ST inhibitors, including the potential for targeted delivery approaches, as well as evaluate the potential utility of selectin inhibitors, which are now in early clinical development. PMID:27148485

  20. The Flt3 Internal Tandem Duplication Alters Chemotherapy Response In Vitro and In Vivo in a p53-Dependent Manner

    PubMed Central

    Pardee, Timothy S.; Zuber, Johannes; Lowe, Scott W.

    2011-01-01

    Objective The FLT3 internal tandem duplication (Flt3-ITD) confers a worse prognosis for patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML); however, the mechanisms involved are unknown. As AML is treated with cytarabine (Ara-C) and an anthracycline we sought to determine the effects of the Flt3-ITD on response to these agents. Methods A genetically defined mouse model of AML was used to examine the effects of the Flt3-ITD on response to cytarabine and doxorubicin in vitro and in vivo. Results In vitro, the Flt3-ITD conferred resistance to doxorubicin and doxorubicin plus Ara-C, but sensitivity to Ara-C alone. This resistance was reversible by the Flt3-ITD inhibitor sorafenib. The Flt3-ITD did not affect DNA damage levels following treatment but was associated with increased levels of p53. The p53 response was critical to the observed changes as the Flt3-ITD had no effect on chemotherapy response in the setting of p53 null AML. In vivo, the Flt3-ITD accelerated engraftment that was partially reversible by Ara-C but not doxorubicin. Additionally, Ara-C provided a significant reduction in disease burden and a survival advantage that was not increased by the addition of doxorubicin. Doxorubicin alone lead to only minimal disease reduction and no survival benefit. Conclusions These data demonstrate that the Flt3-ITD confers sensitivity to cytarabine, but resistance to doxorubicin in a manner that depends on p53. Thus, patients with Flt3-ITD positive AML may not benefit from treatment with an anthracycline. PMID:21288478

  1. [Applications of microchip electrophoresis and capillary electrophoresis for screening FLT3-ITD gene mutation in acute myeloid leukemia].

    PubMed

    Leng, Xin; Li, Ling-Di; Li, Jin-Lan; Huang, Xiao-Jun; Ruan, Guo-Rui

    2014-02-01

    The purpose of the present study was to compare the reliability of microchip electrophoresis and capillary electrophoresis for screening FLT3-ITD gene mutation in acute myeloid leukemia. The FLT3-ITD mutation in the genomic DNA samples from 214 untreated AML patients were separately detected by PCR-microchip electrophoresis and PCR-capillary electrophoresis, then the DNA direct sequencing analysis was carried out. The results from PCR-microchip electrophoresis showed that there were 151 FLT3-ITD mutation negative, 58 FLT3-ITD mutation positive (58/214, 27.1%) and 5 FLT3-ITD mutation doubtful positive (5/214, 2.3%), while the outcomes from PCR-capillary electrophoresis displayed that there were 147 FLT3-ITD mutation negative and 67 FLT3-ITD mutation positive (67/214, 31.3%) without doubtful positive. In the 67 FLT3-ITD mutation positive samples detected by using PCR-capillary electrophoresis, 4 samples were detected as the negative while 5 samples were measured as the doubtful positive by using PCR-microchip electrophoresis. The followed sequencing analysis demonstrated that the above 9 samples were all FLT3-ITD mutation positive, indicating that PCR-capillary electrophoresis was more accurate and sensitive in screening the FLT3-ITD mutation, although statistic analysis showed that there were no significant differences in the detected results between PCR-microchip electrophoresis and PCR-capillary electrophoresis groups (Pearson Chi-squared Test, P > 0.05). It is concluded that both PCR-microchip electrophoresis and PCR-capillary electrophoresis were convenient and fast for screening FLT3-ITD mutation, but the accuracy of PCR-microchip electrophoresis awaits further improvement.

  2. The FLT3 and PDGFR inhibitor crenolanib is a substrate of the multidrug resistance protein ABCB1 but does not inhibit transport function at pharmacologically relevant concentrations.

    PubMed

    Mathias, Trevor J; Natarajan, Karthika; Shukla, Suneet; Doshi, Kshama A; Singh, Zeba N; Ambudkar, Suresh V; Baer, Maria R

    2015-04-01

    Background Crenolanib (crenolanib besylate, 4-piperidinamine, 1-[2-[5-[(3-methyl-3-oxetanyl)methoxy]-1H-benzimidazol-1-yl]-8-quinolinyl]-, monobenzenesulfonate) is a potent and specific type I inhibitor of fms-like tyrosine kinase 3 (FLT3) that targets the active kinase conformation and is effective against FLT3 with internal tandem duplication (ITD) with point mutations induced by, and conferring resistance to, type II FLT3 inhibitors in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells. Crenolanib is also an inhibitor of platelet-derived growth factor receptor alpha and beta and is in clinical trials in both gastrointestinal stromal tumors and gliomas. Methods We tested crenolanib interactions with the multidrug resistance-associated ATP-binding cassette proteins ABCB1 (P-glycoprotein), ABCG2 (breast cancer resistance protein) and ABCC1 (multidrug resistance-associated protein 1), which are expressed on AML cells and other cancer cells and are important components of the blood-brain barrier. Results We found that crenolanib is a substrate of ABCB1, as evidenced by approximate five-fold resistance of ABCB1-overexpressing cells to crenolanib, reversal of this resistance by the ABCB1-specific inhibitor PSC-833 and stimulation of ABCB1 ATPase activity by crenolanib. In contrast, crenolanib was not a substrate of ABCG2 or ABCC1. Additionally, it did not inhibit substrate transport by ABCB1, ABCG2 or ABCC1, at pharmacologically relevant concentrations. Finally, incubation of the FLT3-ITD AML cell lines MV4-11 and MOLM-14 with crenolanib at a pharmacologically relevant concentration of 500 nM did not induce upregulation of ABCB1 cell surface expression. Conclusions Thus ABCB1 expression confers resistance to crenolanib and likely limits crenolanib penetration of the central nervous system, but crenolanib at therapeutic concentrations should not alter cellular exposure to ABC protein substrate chemotherapy drugs.

  3. FLT3 and NPM-1 mutations in a cohort of acute promyelocytic leukemia patients from India

    PubMed Central

    Swaminathan, Suchitra; Garg, Swati; Madkaikar, Manisha; Gupta, Maya; Jijina, Farah; Ghosh, Kanjaksha

    2014-01-01

    Background: Acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) with t (15;17) is a distinct category of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and is reported to show better response to anthracyclin based chemotherapy. A favorable overall prognosis over other subtypes of AML has been reported for APL patients but still about 15% patients relapse. Methods: This study evaluated the presence of Famus like tyrosine kinase-3 (FLT3) and nucleophosmin-1 (NPM1) gene mutations in a cohort of 40 APL patients. Bone marrow/peripheral blood samples from patients at the time of diagnosis and follow-up were processed for immunophenotyping, cytogenetic markers and isolation of DNA and RNA. Samples were screened for the presence of mutations in FLT3 and NPM1 genes using polymerase chain reaction followed by sequencing. Results: Frequency of FLT3/internal tandem duplication and FLT3/tyrosine kinase domain was found to be 25% and 7% respectively. We observed a high frequency of NPM1 mutation (45%) in the present population of APL patients. PMID:25400345

  4. Chronic FLT3-ITD Signaling in Acute Myeloid Leukemia Is Connected to a Specific Chromatin Signature

    PubMed Central

    Cauchy, Pierre; James, Sally R.; Zacarias-Cabeza, Joaquin; Ptasinska, Anetta; Imperato, Maria Rosaria; Assi, Salam A.; Piper, Jason; Canestraro, Martina; Hoogenkamp, Maarten; Raghavan, Manoj; Loke, Justin; Akiki, Susanna; Clokie, Samuel J.; Richards, Stephen J.; Westhead, David R.; Griffiths, Michael J.; Ott, Sascha; Bonifer, Constanze; Cockerill, Peter N.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is characterized by recurrent mutations that affect the epigenetic regulatory machinery and signaling molecules, leading to a block in hematopoietic differentiation. Constitutive signaling from mutated growth factor receptors is a major driver of leukemic growth, but how aberrant signaling affects the epigenome in AML is less understood. Furthermore, AML cells undergo extensive clonal evolution, and the mutations in signaling genes are often secondary events. To elucidate how chronic growth factor signaling alters the transcriptional network in AML, we performed a system-wide multi-omics study of primary cells from patients suffering from AML with internal tandem duplications in the FLT3 transmembrane domain (FLT3-ITD). This strategy revealed cooperation between the MAP kinase (MAPK) inducible transcription factor AP-1 and RUNX1 as a major driver of a common, FLT3-ITD-specific gene expression and chromatin signature, demonstrating a major impact of MAPK signaling pathways in shaping the epigenome of FLT3-ITD AML. PMID:26212328

  5. Lack of FLT3-TKD835 gene mutation in toxicity of sulfur mustard in Iranian veterans

    PubMed Central

    Ayatollahi, Hossein; Rafiee, Mohammad; Keramati, Mohammad-Reza; Balali-Mood, Mahdi; Asgharzadeh, Ali; Sadeghian, Mohammad Hadi; Sheikhi, Maryam; Amini, Nafiseh; Zarmehri, Azam Moradi

    2015-01-01

    Objective(s): Sulfur mustard (SM) was used by the Iraqi army against the Iranian troops in the Iran-Iraq war from 1983–1988. This chemical gas affects different organs including the skin, lungs and the hematopoietic system. Any exposure to SM increases the risk of chromosomal breaking, hyperdiploidy and hypodiploidy. Studies have shown that the risk for acute myeloblastic and lymphoblastic leukemia increases in veterans exposed to SM. FLT3 mutations including ITD and TKD mutations had been observed in some cases of leukemia. Therefore, we aimed to investigate the frequency of FLT3-TKD835 mutations in the veterans exposed to SM agent. Materials and Methods: We studied 42 patients who were exposed to SM during the war in Khorasan Razavi province, Mashhad, Iran in 2012. As control group, 30 healthy males were selected from first-degree relatives of the patients. For assessment of TKD835 mutation, DNA was extracted and RFLP-PCR was performed. Results: Analysis of RFLP-PCR data showed no FLT-3 TKD mutation in any of the patients. Conclusion: Although contact with SM can increase the risk of malignancy especially hematologic neoplasms, results of the study show that another mechanism of leukemogenesis, other than FLT3-TKD mutation, may be the reason for increased risk of leukemia in SM toxicity. PMID:26523218

  6. Design of ligand-targeted nanoparticles for enhanced cancer targeting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefanick, Jared F.

    Ligand-targeted nanoparticles are increasingly used as drug delivery vehicles for cancer therapy, yet have not consistently produced successful clinical outcomes. Although these inconsistencies may arise from differences in disease models and target receptors, nanoparticle design parameters can significantly influence therapeutic efficacy. By employing a multifaceted synthetic strategy to prepare peptide-targeted nanoparticles with high purity, reproducibility, and precisely controlled stoichiometry of functionalities, this work evaluates the roles of polyethylene glycol (PEG) coating, ethylene glycol (EG) peptide-linker length, peptide hydrophilicity, peptide density, and nanoparticle size on tumor targeting in a systematic manner. These parameters were analyzed in multiple disease models by targeting human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) in breast cancer and very late antigen-4 (VLA-4) in multiple myeloma to demonstrate the widespread applicability of this approach. By increasing the hydrophilicity of the targeting peptide sequence and simultaneously optimizing the EG peptide-linker length, the in vitro cellular uptake of targeted liposomes was significantly enhanced. Specifically, including a short oligolysine chain adjacent to the targeting peptide sequence effectively increased cellular uptake ~80-fold using an EG6 peptide-linker compared to ~10-fold using an EG45 linker. In vivo, targeted liposomes prepared in a traditional manner lacking the oligolysine chain demonstrated similar biodistribution and tumor uptake to non-targeted liposomes. However, by including the oligolysine chain, targeted liposomes using an EG45 linker significantly improved tumor uptake ~8-fold over non-targeted liposomes, while the use of an EG6 linker decreased tumor accumulation and uptake, owing to differences in cellular uptake kinetics, clearance mechanisms, and binding site barrier effects. To further improve tumor targeting and enhance the selectivity of targeted

  7. Tetraspecific ligand for tumor-targeted delivery of nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dongwook; Friedman, Adam D; Liu, Rihe

    2014-07-01

    The polygenetic nature of most cancers emphasizes the necessity of cancer therapies that target multiple essential signaling pathways. However, there is a significant paucity of targeting ligands with multi-specificities for targeted delivery of biomaterials. To address this unmet need, we generated a tetraspecific targeting ligand that recognizes four different cancer biomarkers, including VEGFR2, αvβ3 integrin, EGFR, and HER2 receptors, which have been implicated in numerous malignant tumors. The tetraspecific targeting ligand was constructed by sequentially connecting four targeting ligand subunits via flexible linkers, yielding a fusion protein that can be highly expressed in Escherichia coli and readily purified to near homogeneity. Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR), Bio-Layer Interferometry (BLI) studies and extensive cellular binding analyses indicated that all the targeting ligand subunits in the tetraspecific fusion protein recognized their target receptors proximately to the corresponding monospecific ligands. The resulting tetraspecific targeting ligand was applied for the delivery of nanomaterials such as gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) for targeted hyperthermic killing of various cancer cell lines with biomarkers of interest expressed. We demonstrate that the tetraspecific ligand can be facilely introduced on the surface of AuNPs and efficient target-dependent killing of cancer cells can be achieved only when the AuNPs are conjugated with the tetraspecific ligand. Significantly, the tetraspecific ligand simultaneously interacts with more than one receptors, such as EGFR and HER2 receptors, when they are expressed on the surface of the same cell, as demonstrated by in vitro binding assays and cell binding analyses. Our results demonstrate that the tetraspecific ligand, through multivalency and synergistic binding, can be readily used to generate various 'smart' biomaterials with greatly broadened tumor targeting range for simultaneous targeting of multiple

  8. Tetraspecific Ligand for Tumor-Targeted Delivery of Nanomaterials

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dongwook; Friedman, Adam D.; Liu, Rihe

    2014-01-01

    The polygenetic nature of most cancers emphasizes the necessity of cancer therapies that target multiple essential signaling pathways. However, there is a significant paucity of targeting ligands with multi-specificities for targeted delivery of biomaterials. To address this unmet need, we generated a tetraspecific targeting ligand that recognizes four different cancer biomarkers, including VEGFR2, αvβ3 integrin, EGFR, and HER2 receptors, which have been implicated in numerous malignant tumors. The tetraspecific targeting ligand was constructed by sequentially connecting four targeting ligand subunits via flexible linkers, yielding a fusion protein that can be highly expressed in E. coli and readily purified to near homogeneity. Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR), Bio-Layer Interferometry (BLI) studies and extensive cellular binding analyses indicated that all the targeting ligand subunits in the tetraspecific fusion protein recognized their target receptors proximately to the corresponding monospecific ligands. The resulting tetraspecific targeting ligand was applied for the delivery of nanomaterials such as gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) for targeted hyperthermic killing of various cancer cell lines with biomarkers of interest expressed. We demonstrate that the tetraspecific ligand can be facilely introduced on the surface of AuNPs and efficient target-dependent killing of cancer cells can be achieved only when the AuNPs are conjugated with the tetraspecific ligand. Significantly, the tetraspecific ligand simultaneously interacts with more than one receptors, such as EGFR and HER2 receptors, when they are expressed on the surface of the same cell, as demonstrated by in vitro binding assays and cell binding analyses. Our results demonstrate that the tetraspecific ligand, through multivalency and synergistic binding, can be readily used to generate various ‘smart’ biomaterials with greatly broadened tumor targeting range for simultaneous targeting of multiple

  9. Gelatin-coated Gold Nanoparticles as Carriers of FLT3 Inhibitors for Acute Myeloid Leukemia Treatment.

    PubMed

    Suarasan, Sorina; Simon, Timea; Boca, Sanda; Tomuleasa, Ciprian; Astilean, Simion

    2016-06-01

    This study presents the design of a gold nanoparticle (AuNPs)-drug system with improved efficiency for the treatment of acute myeloid leukemia. The system is based on four different FLT3 inhibitors, namely midostaurin, sorafenib, lestaurtinib, and quizartinib, which were independently loaded onto gelatin-coated gold nanoparticles. Detailed investigation of the physicochemical properties of the formed complexes lead to the selection of quizartinib-loaded AuNPs for the in vitro evaluation of the biological effects of the formed complex against OCI-AML3 acute myeloid leukemia cells. Viability tests by MTT demonstrated that the proposed drug complex has improved efficacy when compared with the drug alone. The obtained results constitute a premise for further in vivo investigation of such drug vehicles based on AuNPs. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study that investigates the delivery of the above-mentioned FLT3 inhibitors via gelatin-coated gold nanoparticles. PMID:26808072

  10. Gelatin-coated Gold Nanoparticles as Carriers of FLT3 Inhibitors for Acute Myeloid Leukemia Treatment.

    PubMed

    Suarasan, Sorina; Simon, Timea; Boca, Sanda; Tomuleasa, Ciprian; Astilean, Simion

    2016-06-01

    This study presents the design of a gold nanoparticle (AuNPs)-drug system with improved efficiency for the treatment of acute myeloid leukemia. The system is based on four different FLT3 inhibitors, namely midostaurin, sorafenib, lestaurtinib, and quizartinib, which were independently loaded onto gelatin-coated gold nanoparticles. Detailed investigation of the physicochemical properties of the formed complexes lead to the selection of quizartinib-loaded AuNPs for the in vitro evaluation of the biological effects of the formed complex against OCI-AML3 acute myeloid leukemia cells. Viability tests by MTT demonstrated that the proposed drug complex has improved efficacy when compared with the drug alone. The obtained results constitute a premise for further in vivo investigation of such drug vehicles based on AuNPs. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study that investigates the delivery of the above-mentioned FLT3 inhibitors via gelatin-coated gold nanoparticles.

  11. Flt3L controls the development of radiosensitive dendritic cells in the meninges and choroid plexus of the steady-state mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Anandasabapathy, Niroshana; Victora, Gabriel D; Meredith, Matthew; Feder, Rachel; Dong, Baojun; Kluger, Courtney; Yao, Kaihui; Dustin, Michael L; Nussenzweig, Michel C; Steinman, Ralph M; Liu, Kang

    2011-08-01

    Antigen-presenting cells in the disease-free brain have been identified primarily by expression of antigens such as CD11b, CD11c, and MHC II, which can be shared by dendritic cells (DCs), microglia, and monocytes. In this study, starting with the criterion of Flt3 (FMS-like receptor tyrosine kinase 3)-dependent development, we characterize the features of authentic DCs within the meninges and choroid plexus in healthy mouse brains. Analyses of morphology, gene expression, and antigen-presenting function established a close relationship between meningeal and choroid plexus DCs (m/chDCs) and spleen DCs. DCs in both sites shared an intrinsic requirement for Flt3 ligand. Microarrays revealed differences in expression of transcripts encoding surface molecules, transcription factors, pattern recognition receptors, and other genes in m/chDCs compared with monocytes and microglia. Migrating pre-DC progenitors from bone marrow gave rise to m/chDCs that had a 5-7-d half-life. In contrast to microglia, DCs actively present self-antigens and stimulate T cells. Therefore, the meninges and choroid plexus of a steady-state brain contain DCs that derive from local precursors and exhibit a differentiation and antigen-presenting program similar to spleen DCs and distinct from microglia.

  12. Clinical impact of FLT3 mutation load in acute promyelocytic leukemia with t(15;17)/PML-RARA

    PubMed Central

    Schnittger, Susanne; Bacher, Ulrike; Haferlach, Claudia; Kern, Wolfgang; Alpermann, Tamara; Haferlach, Torsten

    2011-01-01

    Background Combined treatment with all-trans-retinoic acid and chemotherapy is extremely efficient in patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia with t(15;17)/PML-RARA, but up to 15% of patients relapse. Design and Methods To further clarify the prognostic impact of parameters such as FLT3 mutations, we comprehensively characterized the relation between genetic features and outcome in 147 patients (aged 19.7–86.3 years) with acute promyelocytic leukemia. Results Internal tandem duplications of the FLT3 gene (FLT3-ITD) were detected in 47/147 (32.0%) and tyrosine kinase domain mutations (FLT3-TKD) in 19/147 (12.9%) patients. FLT3-ITD or FLT3-TKD mutation status did not have a significant prognostic impact, whereas FLT3-ITD mutation load, as defined by a mutation/wild-type ratio of less than 0.5 was associated with trends to a better 2-year overall survival rate (86.7% versus 72.7%; P=0.075) and 2-year event-free survival rate (84.5% versus 62.1%, P=0.023) compared to the survival rates of patients with a ratio of 0.5 or more. Besides the t(15;17), an additional chromosomal abnormality was detected in 57 of 147 cases and did not show a significant impact on survival. White blood cell counts of 10×109/L or less versus more than 10×109/L were associated with a better 2-year overall survival rate (88.3% versus 69.4%, respectively; P=0.015), as was male sex (P=0.040). In multivariate analysis, only higher age had a significant adverse impact. Conclusions Prospective trials should further investigate the clinical impact of the FLT3-ITD/wild-type mutation load aiming to evaluate whether this parameter might be included in risk stratification in patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia. PMID:21859732

  13. High affinity ligands from in vitro selection: Complex targets

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Kevin N.; Jensen, Kirk B.; Julin, Carol M.; Weil, Michael; Gold, Larry

    1998-01-01

    Human red blood cell membranes were used as a model system to determine if the systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX) methodology, an in vitro protocol for isolating high-affinity oligonucleotides that bind specifically to virtually any single protein, could be used with a complex mixture of potential targets. Ligands to multiple targets were generated simultaneously during the selection process, and the binding affinities of these ligands for their targets are comparable to those found in similar experiments against pure targets. A secondary selection scheme, deconvolution-SELEX, facilitates rapid isolation of the ligands to targets of special interest within the mixture. SELEX provides high-affinity compounds for multiple targets in a mixture and might allow a means for dissecting complex biological systems. PMID:9501188

  14. The juxtamembrane domain in ETV6/FLT3 is critical for PIM-1 up-regulation and cell proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Vu, Hoang Anh; Xinh, Phan Thi; Kano, Yasuhiko; Tokunaga, Katsushi; Sato, Yuko

    2009-06-05

    We recently reported that the ETV6/FLT3 fusion protein conferred interleukin-3-independent growth on Ba/F3 cells. The present study has been conducted to assess role of the juxtamembrane domain of FLT3 for signal transduction and cell transformation. The wild-type ETV6/FLT3 fusion protein in transfected cells was a constitutively activated tyrosine kinase that led to up-regulation of PIM-1 and activations of STAT5, AKT, and MAPK. Deletion of the juxtamembrane domain abrogated interleukin-3-independent growth of the transfected cells and PIM-1 up-regulation, whereas it retained compatible levels of phosphorylations of STAT5, AKT, and MAPK. Further deletion of N-terminal region of the tyrosine kinase I domain of FLT3 completely abolished these phosphorylations. Our data indicate that the juxtamembrane domain of FLT3 in ETV6/FLT3 fusion protein is critical for cell proliferation and PIM-1 up-regulation that might be independent of a requirement for signaling through STAT5, MAPK, and AKT pathways.

  15. Bioconjugation Methods for Coupling Targeting Ligands with Fluorescent Dyes.

    PubMed

    Ling, Xiaoxi

    2016-01-01

    Targeted molecular imaging probes are essential tools for visualization of specific molecular processes in cells and living systems. Among these, targeted fluorescent probes are widely used due to the high sensitivity and resolution of fluorescence imaging. The conventional strategy for developing targeted fluorescent probes is to couple targeting ligands with fluorescent dyes by covalent bond via bioconjugation. Here, we describe several commonly used bioconjugation methods, from traditional amide and thiol coupling, to metal-catalyzed coupling reaction and catalyst free cycloaddition. PMID:27283413

  16. Medium-sized FLT3 internal tandem duplications confer worse prognosis than short and long duplications in a non-elderly acute myeloid leukemia cohort.

    PubMed

    Koszarska, Magdalena; Meggyesi, Nora; Bors, Andras; Batai, Arpad; Csacsovszki, Otto; Lehoczky, Eniko; Adam, Emma; Kozma, Andras; Lovas, Nora; Sipos, Andrea; Krahling, Tunde; Dolgos, Janos; Remenyi, Peter; Fekete, Sandor; Masszi, Tamas; Tordai, Attila; Andrikovics, Hajnalka

    2014-07-01

    Internal tandem duplications (ITDs) of the fms-like tyrosine kinase 3 (FLT3) gene occur in about 25% of patients with adult acute myeloid leukemia (AML). The aim of our study was to investigate the frequency of FLT3-ITD mutations followed by a detailed analysis of the mutational load and size of ITD insertions in a cohort consisting of 324 patients younger than 60 years old and treated with curative intention. FLT3-ITD alone did not influence overall survival (OS) or disease-free survival (DFS). We observed worse OS and DFS for patients with high mutational load indicative for loss of the FLT3 wild type allele (p = 0.010, p = 0.038, respectively). In multivariate analyses, patients with FLT3-ITD(48-60bp) showed worse OS and DFS compared to other groups (FLT3-ITD(neg), FLT3-ITD (< 48b), FLT3-ITD (> 60bp); p = 0.014, p = 0.019, respectively). Our novel observation suggested that not only high FLT3-ITD load, but also medium-sized ITD insertions (48-60 bp) represented an adverse prognostic subgroup of patients with AML.

  17. Discovery of 3-phenyl-1H-5-pyrazolylamine derivatives containing a urea pharmacophore as potent and efficacious inhibitors of FMS-like tyrosine kinase-3 (FLT3).

    PubMed

    Lin, Wen-Hsing; Hsu, John T-A; Hsieh, Shu-Yi; Chen, Chiung-Tong; Song, Jen-Shin; Yen, Shih-Chieh; Hsu, Tsu; Lu, Cheng-Tai; Chen, Chun-Hwa; Chou, Ling-Hui; Yang, Yung-Ning; Chiu, Ching-Hui; Chen, Ching-Ping; Tseng, Ya-Ju; Yen, Kuei-Jung; Yeh, Ching-Fang; Chao, Yu-Sheng; Yeh, Teng-Kuang; Jiaang, Weir-Torn

    2013-06-01

    Preclinical investigations and early clinical trials suggest that FLT3 inhibitors are a viable therapy for acute myeloid leukemia. However, early clinical data have been underwhelming due to incomplete inhibition of FLT3. We have developed 3-phenyl-1H-5-pyrazolylamine as an efficient template for kinase inhibitors. Structure-activity relationships led to the discovery of sulfonamide, carbamate and urea series of FLT3 inhibitors. Previous studies showed that the sulfonamide 4 and carbamate 5 series were potent and selective FLT3 inhibitors with good in vivo efficacy. Herein, we describe the urea series, which we found to be potent inhibitors of FLT3 and VEGFR2. Some inhibited growth of FLT3-mutated MOLM-13 cells more strongly than the FLT3 inhibitors sorafenib (2) and ABT-869 (3). In preliminary in vivo toxicity studies of the four most active compounds, 10f was found to be the least toxic. A further in vivo efficacy study demonstrated that 10f achieved complete tumor regression in a higher proportion of MOLM-13 xenograft mice than 4 and 5 (70% vs 10% and 40%). These results show that compound 10f possesses improved pharmacologic and selectivity profiles and could be more effective than previously disclosed FLT3 inhibitors in the treatment of acute myeloid leukemia.

  18. The STAT5 Inhibitor Pimozide Displays Efficacy in Models of Acute Myelogenous Leukemia Driven by FLT3 Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Erik A.; Walker, Sarah R.; Xiang, Michael; Weisberg, Ellen; Bar-Natan, Michal; Barrett, Rosemary; Liu, Suiyang; Kharbanda, Surender; Christie, Amanda L.; Nicolais, Maria; Griffin, James D.; Stone, Richard M.; Kung, Andrew L.

    2012-01-01

    Activation of the transcription factor STAT5 is essential for the pathogenesis of acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) containing the FLT3 internal tandem duplication (ITD) mutation. FLT3 ITD is a constitutively active tyrosine kinase that drives the activation of STAT5, leading to the growth and survival of AML cells. Although there has been some success in identifying tyrosine kinase inhibitors that block the function of FLT3 ITD, there remains a continued need for effective treatment of this disease. We have identified the psychotropic drug pimozide as an effective inhibitor of STAT5 function. Pimozide inhibits the tyrosine phosphorylation of STAT5, leading to the death of AML cells through the induction of apoptosis. Pimozide shows a combinatorial effect with the tyrosine kinase inhibitors midostaurin (PKC412) and sunitinib in the inhibition of STAT5 tyrosine phosphorylation and the induction of apoptosis. Significantly, pimozide reduces the tumor burden in a mouse model of FLT3-driven AML. Therefore, identifying STAT5 inhibitors may provide a new avenue for the treatment of AML, and these may be effective alone or in combination with tyrosine kinase inhibitors. PMID:23264850

  19. Next-generation sequencing of FLT3 internal tandem duplications for minimal residual disease monitoring in acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Bibault, Jean-Emmanuel; Figeac, Martin; Hélevaut, Nathalie; Rodriguez, Céline; Quief, Sabine; Sebda, Shéhérazade; Renneville, Aline; Nibourel, Olivier; Rousselot, Philippe; Gruson, Bérengère; Dombret, Hervé; Castaigne, Sylvie; Preudhomme, Claude

    2015-09-01

    Minimal Residual Disease (MRD) detection can be used for early intervention in relapse, risk stratification, and treatment guidance. FLT3 ITD is the most common mutation found in AML patients with normal karyotype. We evaluated the feasibility of NGS with high coverage (up to 2.4.10(6) PE fragments) for MRD monitoring on FLT3 ITD. We sequenced 37 adult patients at diagnosis and various times of their disease (64 samples) and compared the results with FLT3 ITD ratios measured by fragment analysis. We found that NGS could detect variable insertion sites and lengths in a single test for several patients. We also showed mutational shifts between diagnosis and relapse, with the outgrowth of a clone at relapse different from that dominant at diagnosis. Since NGS is scalable, we were able to adapt sensitivity by increasing the number of reads obtained for follow-up samples, compared to diagnosis samples. This technique could be applied to detect biological relapse before its clinical consequences and to better tailor treatments through the use of FLT3 inhibitors. Larger cohorts should be assessed in order to validate this approach.

  20. Comprehensive genomic analysis reveals FLT3 activation and a therapeutic strategy for a patient with relapsed adult B-lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Griffith, Malachi; Griffith, Obi L; Krysiak, Kilannin; Skidmore, Zachary L; Christopher, Matthew J; Klco, Jeffery M; Ramu, Avinash; Lamprecht, Tamara L; Wagner, Alex H; Campbell, Katie M; Lesurf, Robert; Hundal, Jasreet; Zhang, Jin; Spies, Nicholas C; Ainscough, Benjamin J; Larson, David E; Heath, Sharon E; Fronick, Catrina; O'Laughlin, Shelly; Fulton, Robert S; Magrini, Vincent; McGrath, Sean; Smith, Scott M; Miller, Christopher A; Maher, Christopher A; Payton, Jacqueline E; Walker, Jason R; Eldred, James M; Walter, Matthew J; Link, Daniel C; Graubert, Timothy A; Westervelt, Peter; Kulkarni, Shashikant; DiPersio, John F; Mardis, Elaine R; Wilson, Richard K; Ley, Timothy J

    2016-07-01

    The genomic events responsible for the pathogenesis of relapsed adult B-lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL) are not yet clear. We performed integrative analysis of whole-genome, whole-exome, custom capture, whole-transcriptome (RNA-seq), and locus-specific genomic assays across nine time points from a patient with primary de novo B-ALL. Comprehensive genome and transcriptome characterization revealed a dramatic tumor evolution during progression, yielding a tumor with complex clonal architecture at second relapse. We observed and validated point mutations in EP300 and NF1, a highly expressed EP300-ZNF384 gene fusion, a microdeletion in IKZF1, a focal deletion affecting SETD2, and large deletions affecting RB1, PAX5, NF1, and ETV6. Although the genome analysis revealed events of potential biological relevance, no clinically actionable treatment options were evident at the time of the second relapse. However, transcriptome analysis identified aberrant overexpression of the targetable protein kinase encoded by the FLT3 gene. Although the patient had refractory disease after salvage therapy for the second relapse, treatment with the FLT3 inhibitor sunitinib rapidly induced a near complete molecular response, permitting the patient to proceed to a matched-unrelated donor stem cell transplantation. The patient remains in complete remission more than 4 years later. Analysis of this patient's relapse genome revealed an unexpected, actionable therapeutic target that led to a specific therapy associated with a rapid clinical response. For some patients with relapsed or refractory cancers, this approach may indicate a novel therapeutic intervention that could alter outcome.

  1. Comprehensive genomic analysis reveals FLT3 activation and a therapeutic strategy for a patient with relapsed adult B-lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Griffith, Malachi; Griffith, Obi L; Krysiak, Kilannin; Skidmore, Zachary L; Christopher, Matthew J; Klco, Jeffery M; Ramu, Avinash; Lamprecht, Tamara L; Wagner, Alex H; Campbell, Katie M; Lesurf, Robert; Hundal, Jasreet; Zhang, Jin; Spies, Nicholas C; Ainscough, Benjamin J; Larson, David E; Heath, Sharon E; Fronick, Catrina; O'Laughlin, Shelly; Fulton, Robert S; Magrini, Vincent; McGrath, Sean; Smith, Scott M; Miller, Christopher A; Maher, Christopher A; Payton, Jacqueline E; Walker, Jason R; Eldred, James M; Walter, Matthew J; Link, Daniel C; Graubert, Timothy A; Westervelt, Peter; Kulkarni, Shashikant; DiPersio, John F; Mardis, Elaine R; Wilson, Richard K; Ley, Timothy J

    2016-07-01

    The genomic events responsible for the pathogenesis of relapsed adult B-lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL) are not yet clear. We performed integrative analysis of whole-genome, whole-exome, custom capture, whole-transcriptome (RNA-seq), and locus-specific genomic assays across nine time points from a patient with primary de novo B-ALL. Comprehensive genome and transcriptome characterization revealed a dramatic tumor evolution during progression, yielding a tumor with complex clonal architecture at second relapse. We observed and validated point mutations in EP300 and NF1, a highly expressed EP300-ZNF384 gene fusion, a microdeletion in IKZF1, a focal deletion affecting SETD2, and large deletions affecting RB1, PAX5, NF1, and ETV6. Although the genome analysis revealed events of potential biological relevance, no clinically actionable treatment options were evident at the time of the second relapse. However, transcriptome analysis identified aberrant overexpression of the targetable protein kinase encoded by the FLT3 gene. Although the patient had refractory disease after salvage therapy for the second relapse, treatment with the FLT3 inhibitor sunitinib rapidly induced a near complete molecular response, permitting the patient to proceed to a matched-unrelated donor stem cell transplantation. The patient remains in complete remission more than 4 years later. Analysis of this patient's relapse genome revealed an unexpected, actionable therapeutic target that led to a specific therapy associated with a rapid clinical response. For some patients with relapsed or refractory cancers, this approach may indicate a novel therapeutic intervention that could alter outcome. PMID:27181063

  2. Ligand-targeted liposome design: challenges and fundamental considerations.

    PubMed

    Noble, Gavin T; Stefanick, Jared F; Ashley, Jonathan D; Kiziltepe, Tanyel; Bilgicer, Basar

    2014-01-01

    Nanomedicine, particularly liposomal drug delivery, has expanded considerably over the past few decades, and several liposomal drugs are already providing improved clinical outcomes. Liposomes have now progressed beyond simple, inert drug carriers and can be designed to be highly responsive in vivo, with active targeting, increased stealth, and controlled drug-release properties. Ligand-targeted liposomes (LTLs) have the potential to revolutionize the treatment of cancer. However, these highly engineered liposomes generate new problems, such as accelerated clearance from circulation, compromised targeting owing to non-specific serum protein binding, and hindered tumor penetration. This article highlights recent challenges facing LTL strategies and describes the advanced design elements used to circumvent them.

  3. Targeting FMS-related tyrosine kinase receptor 3 with the human immunoglobulin G1 monoclonal antibody IMC-EB10.

    PubMed

    Youssoufian, Hagop; Rowinsky, Eric K; Tonra, James; Li, Yiwen

    2010-02-15

    FMS-related tyrosine kinase receptor 3 (FLT3) is a class III receptor tyrosine kinase that holds considerable promise as a therapeutic target in hematologic malignancies. Current efforts directed toward the development of small-molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitors of FLT3 may be limited by off-target toxicities and the development of drug resistance. Target-specific antibodies could overcome these hurdles and provide additional mechanisms to enhance the antitumor efficacy of FLT3 inhibitors. IMC-EB10 is a novel antibody directed against FLT3. The binding of IMC-EB10 to FLT3 results in antiproliferative effects in vitro and in mouse models engrafted with human leukemia cells that harbor wild-type or constitutively activated FLT3. Future clinical trials will test these notions formally and will identify the most appropriate opportunities for this member of a new generation of antileukemic therapies.

  4. How reliable are ligand-centric methods for Target Fishing?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peon, Antonio; Dang, Cuong; Ballester, Pedro

    2016-04-01

    Computational methods for Target Fishing (TF), also known as Target Prediction or Polypharmacology Prediction, can be used to discover new targets for small-molecule drugs. This may result in repositioning the drug in a new indication or improving our current understanding of its efficacy and side effects. While there is a substantial body of research on TF methods, there is still a need to improve their validation, which is often limited to a small part of the available targets and not easily interpretable by the user. Here we discuss how target-centric TF methods are inherently limited by the number of targets that can possibly predict (this number is by construction much larger in ligand-centric techniques). We also propose a new benchmark to validate TF methods, which is particularly suited to analyse how predictive performance varies with the query molecule. On average over approved drugs, we estimate that only five predicted targets will have to be tested to find two true targets with submicromolar potency (a strong variability in performance is however observed). In addition, we find that an approved drug has currently an average of eight known targets, which reinforces the notion that polypharmacology is a common and strong event. Furthermore, with the assistance of a control group of randomly-selected molecules, we show that the targets of approved drugs are generally harder to predict.

  5. From Toxins Targeting Ligand Gated Ion Channels to Therapeutic Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Nasiripourdori, Adak; Taly, Valérie; Grutter, Thomas; Taly, Antoine

    2011-01-01

    Ligand-gated ion channels (LGIC) play a central role in inter-cellular communication. This key function has two consequences: (i) these receptor channels are major targets for drug discovery because of their potential involvement in numerous human brain diseases; (ii) they are often found to be the target of plant and animal toxins. Together this makes toxin/receptor interactions important to drug discovery projects. Therefore, toxins acting on LGIC are presented and their current/potential therapeutic uses highlighted. PMID:22069709

  6. Evaluation of Polymeric Nanomedicines Targeted to PSMA: Effect of Ligand on Targeting Efficiency.

    PubMed

    Fuchs, Adrian V; Tse, Brian W C; Pearce, Amanda K; Yeh, Mei-Chun; Fletcher, Nicholas L; Huang, Steve S; Heston, Warren D; Whittaker, Andrew K; Russell, Pamela J; Thurecht, Kristofer J

    2015-10-12

    Targeted nanomedicines offer a strategy for greatly enhancing accumulation of a therapeutic within a specific tissue in animals. In this study, we report on the comparative targeting efficiency toward prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) of a number of different ligands that are covalently attached by the same chemistry to a polymeric nanocarrier. The targeting ligands included a small molecule (glutamate urea), a peptide ligand, and a monoclonal antibody (J591). A hyperbranched polymer (HBP) was utilized as the nanocarrier and contained a fluorophore for tracking/analysis, whereas the pendant functional chain-ends provided a handle for ligand conjugation. Targeting efficiency of each ligand was assessed in vitro using flow cytometry and confocal microscopy to compare degree of binding and internalization of the HBPs by human prostate cancer (PCa) cell lines with different PSMA expression status (PC3-PIP (PSMA+) and PC3-FLU (PSMA-). The peptide ligand was further investigated in vivo, in which BALB/c nude mice bearing subcutaneous PC3-PIP and PC3-FLU PCa tumors were injected intravenously with the HBP-peptide conjugate and assessed by fluorescence imaging. Enhanced accumulation in the tumor tissue of PC3-PIP compared to PC3-FLU highlighted the applicability of this system as a future imaging and therapeutic delivery vehicle.

  7. A Flt3 and Ras-dependent Pathway Primes B Cell Development by Inducing A State of IL7-responsiveness

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lin-Xi; Goetz, Christine A.; Katerndahl, Casey D.S.; Sakaguchi, Nobuo; Farrar, Michael A.

    2009-01-01

    Ras plays an important role in B cell development. However, the stage at which Ras governs B cell development remains unclear. Moreover, the upstream receptors and downstream effectors of Ras that govern B cell differentiation remain undefined. Using mice that express a dominant negative form of Ras, we demonstrate that Ras-mediated signaling plays a critical role in the development of common lymphoid progenitors (CLP). This developmental block parallels that found in flt3−/− mice, suggesting that Flt3 is an important upstream activator of Ras in early B cell progenitors. Ras inhibition impaired proliferation of CLP and pre-pro-B cells but not pro-B cells. Rather, Ras promotes STAT5-dependent pro-B cell differentiation by enhancing IL7Rα levels and suppressing socs2 and socs3 expression. Our results suggest a model in which Flt3/Ras-dependent signals play a critical role in B cell development by priming early B cell progenitors for subsequent STAT5-dependent B cell differentiation. PMID:20065110

  8. Programmed death-1 & its ligands: promising targets for cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Shrimali, Rajeev K; Janik, John E; Abu-Eid, Rasha; Mkrtichyan, Mikayel; Khleif, Samir N

    2015-01-01

    Novel strategies for cancer treatment involving blockade of immune inhibitors have shown significant progress toward understanding the molecular mechanism of tumor immune evasion. The preclinical findings and clinical responses associated with programmed death-1 (PD-1) and PD-ligand pathway blockade seem promising, making these targets highly sought for cancer immunotherapy. In fact, the anti-PD-1 antibodies, pembrolizumab and nivolumab, were recently approved by the US FDA for the treatment of unresectable and metastatic melanoma resistant to anticytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen-4 antibody (ipilimumab) and BRAF inhibitor. Here, we discuss strategies of combining PD-1/PD-ligand interaction inhibitors with other immune checkpoint modulators and standard-of-care therapy to break immune tolerance and induce a potent antitumor activity, which is currently a research area of key scientific pursuit.

  9. Ligand-targeted liposome design: challenges and fundamental considerations.

    PubMed

    Noble, Gavin T; Stefanick, Jared F; Ashley, Jonathan D; Kiziltepe, Tanyel; Bilgicer, Basar

    2014-01-01

    Nanomedicine, particularly liposomal drug delivery, has expanded considerably over the past few decades, and several liposomal drugs are already providing improved clinical outcomes. Liposomes have now progressed beyond simple, inert drug carriers and can be designed to be highly responsive in vivo, with active targeting, increased stealth, and controlled drug-release properties. Ligand-targeted liposomes (LTLs) have the potential to revolutionize the treatment of cancer. However, these highly engineered liposomes generate new problems, such as accelerated clearance from circulation, compromised targeting owing to non-specific serum protein binding, and hindered tumor penetration. This article highlights recent challenges facing LTL strategies and describes the advanced design elements used to circumvent them. PMID:24210498

  10. How Reliable Are Ligand-Centric Methods for Target Fishing?

    PubMed Central

    Peón, Antonio; Dang, Cuong C.; Ballester, Pedro J.

    2016-01-01

    Computational methods for Target Fishing (TF), also known as Target Prediction or Polypharmacology Prediction, can be used to discover new targets for small-molecule drugs. This may result in repositioning the drug in a new indication or improving our current understanding of its efficacy and side effects. While there is a substantial body of research on TF methods, there is still a need to improve their validation, which is often limited to a small part of the available targets and not easily interpretable by the user. Here we discuss how target-centric TF methods are inherently limited by the number of targets that can possibly predict (this number is by construction much larger in ligand-centric techniques). We also propose a new benchmark to validate TF methods, which is particularly suited to analyse how predictive performance varies with the query molecule. On average over approved drugs, we estimate that only five predicted targets will have to be tested to find two true targets with submicromolar potency (a strong variability in performance is however observed). In addition, we find that an approved drug has currently an average of eight known targets, which reinforces the notion that polypharmacology is a common and strong event. Furthermore, with the assistance of a control group of randomly-selected molecules, we show that the targets of approved drugs are generally harder to predict. The benchmark and a simple target prediction method to use as a performance baseline are available at http://ballester.marseille.inserm.fr/TF-benchmark.tar.gz. PMID:27148522

  11. Establishment of xenotransplantation model of human CN-AML with FLT3-ITD (mut) /NPM1 (-) in NOD/SCID mice.

    PubMed

    Shang, Zhen; Wang, Jue; Wang, Di; Xiao, Min; Li, Tong-juan; Wang, Na; Huang, Liang; Zhou, Jian-feng

    2013-06-01

    Patients with FLT3-ITD (mut) /NPM1 (-) cytogenetically normal acute myeloid leukemia (CN-AML), as high-risk molecular group in CN-AML, are associated with a worse prognosis than other CN-AML patients. It is beneficial to generate xenotransplantation model of FLT3-ITD (mut) /NPM1 (-) CN-AML to better understand the pathogenesis and therapeutic strategies of such AML subtype. The purpose of present study was to establish the xenotransplantation model in NOD/SCID mice with FLT3-ITD (mut) /NPM1 (-) CN-AML primary cells. The FLT3-ITD (mut) /NPM1 (-) CN-AML primary cells from 3 of 7 cases were successfully transplanted into NOD/SCID mice, and human CD45 positive cells were detected in the peripheral blood, spleen and bone marrow of mice by using flow cytometry. Infiltration of human leukemia cells in various organs of mice was observed by using immunohistochemistry. Gene analysis confirmed sustained FLT3/ITD mutation without NPM1 mutation in mice. By performing serial transplantation, it was found that characteristics of the leukemia cells in secondary and tertiary generation models remained unchanged. Moreover, in vivo cytarabine administration could extend survival of NOD/SCID mice, which was consistent with clinical observation. In conclusion, we successfully established xenotransplantation model of human FLT3-ITD (mut) /NPM1 (-) CN-AML in NOD/SCID mice. The model was able to present primary disease and suitable to evaluate the curative effects of new drugs or therapy strategies.

  12. Enhanced Active Targeting via Cooperative Binding of Ligands on Liposomes to Target Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Sugiyama, Tomoki; Asai, Tomohiro; Nedachi, Yuki Murase; Katanasaka, Yasufumi; Shimizu, Kosuke; Maeda, Noriyuki; Oku, Naoto

    2013-01-01

    To achieve effective active targeting in a drug delivery system, we previously developed dual-targeting (DT) liposomes decorated with both vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-1 (VEGFR-1)-targeted APRPG and CD13-targeted GNGRG peptide ligands for tumor neovessels, and observed the enhanced suppression of tumor growth in Colon26 NL-17 tumor-bearing mice by the treatment with the DT liposomes encapsulating doxorubicin. In this present study, we examined the binding characteristics of DT liposomes having a different couple of ligands, namely, APRPG and integrin αvβ3-targeted GRGDS peptides. These DT liposomes synergistically associated to stimulated human umbilical vein endothelial cells compared with single-targeting (ST) liposomes decorated with APRPG or GRGDS. The results of a surface plasmon resonance assay showed that ST liposomes modified with APRPG or GRGDS peptide selectively bound to immobilized VEGFR-1 or integrin αvβ3, respectively. DT liposomes showed a higher affinity for a mixture of VEGFR-1 and integrin αvβ3 compared with ST liposomes, suggesting the cooperative binding of these 2 kinds of ligand on the liposomal surface. In a biodistribution assay, the DT liposomes accumulated to a significantly greater extent in the tumors of Colon26 NL-17 tumor-bearing mice compared with other liposomes. Moreover, the intratumoral distribution of the liposomes examined by confocal microscopy suggested that the DT liposomes targeted not only angiogenic endothelial cells but also tumor cells due to GRGDS-decoration. These findings suggest that "dual-targeting" augmented the affinity of the liposomes for the target cells and would thus be useful for active-targeting drug delivery for cancer treatment. PMID:23840738

  13. Screening and Optimization of Ligand Conjugates for Lysosomal Targeting

    PubMed Central

    Meerovich, Igor; Koshkaryev, Alexander; Thekkedath, Ritesh; Torchilin, Vladimir P.

    2011-01-01

    The use of lysosome-targeted liposomes may significantly improve the delivery of therapeutic enzymes and chaperones into lysosomes for the treatment of lysosomal storage disorders. The aim of this research was to synthesize new potentially lysosomotropic ligands on a base of Neutral Red and rhodamine B and to study their ability to enhance specific lysosomal delivery of surface-modified liposomes loaded with a model compound, fluorescein isothiocyanate-dextran (FD). The delivery of these liposomes and their content to lysosomes in HeLa cells was investigated by confocal immunofluorescent microscopy, subcellular fractionation and flow cytometry. Confocal microscopy demonstrated that liposomes modified with derivatives of rhodamine B provide good rate of co-localization well the specific lysosomal markers. The comparison of fluorescence of FD in lysosomes isolated by subcellular fractionation also showed that the efficiency of lysosomal delivery of liposomal load by liposomes modified with some of synthesized ligands was significantly higher compared with plain liposomes. These results were additionally confirmed by the flow cytometry of the intact cells treated with liposomes loaded with with 5-dodecanoylaminofluorescein di-β-D-galactopyranoside, a specific substrate for the intralysosomal β-galactosidase, using a number of cell lines, including macrophages with induced phenotype of lysosomal enzyme deficiency; two of the synthesized ligands – rhodamine B DSPE-PEG2k-amide and 6-(3-(DSPE-PEG2k)-thioureido) rhodamine B – demonstrated enhanced lysosomal delivery, in some cases, higher than that for commercially available rhodamine B octadecyl ester, with the best results (the enhancement of the lysosomal delivery up to 75% greater in comparison to plain liposomes) shown for the cells with induced lysosomal enzyme deficiency phenotype. Use of liposomes modified with rhodamine B derivatives may be advantageous for the development of drug delivery systems for the

  14. A liposomal drug platform overrides peptide ligand targeting to a cancer biomarker, irrespective of ligand affinity or density.

    PubMed

    Gray, Bethany Powell; McGuire, Michael J; Brown, Kathlynn C

    2013-01-01

    One method for improving cancer treatment is the use of nanoparticle drugs functionalized with targeting ligands that recognize receptors expressed selectively by tumor cells. In theory such targeting ligands should specifically deliver the nanoparticle drug to the tumor, increasing drug concentration in the tumor and delivering the drug to its site of action within the tumor tissue. However, the leaky vasculature of tumors combined with a poor lymphatic system allows the passive accumulation, and subsequent retention, of nanosized materials in tumors. Furthermore, a large nanoparticle size may impede tumor penetration. As such, the role of active targeting in nanoparticle delivery is controversial, and it is difficult to predict how a targeted nanoparticle drug will behave in vivo. Here we report in vivo studies for αvβ6-specific H2009.1 peptide targeted liposomal doxorubicin, which increased liposomal delivery and toxicity to lung cancer cells in vitro. We systematically varied ligand affinity, ligand density, ligand stability, liposome dosage, and tumor models to assess the role of active targeting of liposomes to αvβ6. In direct contrast to the in vitro results, we demonstrate no difference in in vivo targeting or efficacy for H2009.1 tetrameric peptide liposomal doxorubicin, compared to control peptide and no peptide liposomes. Examining liposome accumulation and distribution within the tumor demonstrates that the liposome, and not the H2009.1 peptide, drives tumor accumulation, and that both targeted H2009.1 and untargeted liposomes remain in perivascular regions, with little tumor penetration. Thus H2009.1 targeted liposomes fail to improve drug efficacy because the liposome drug platform prevents the H2009.1 peptide from both actively targeting the tumor and binding to tumor cells throughout the tumor tissue. Therefore, using a high affinity and high specificity ligand targeting an over-expressed tumor biomarker does not guarantee enhanced efficacy of a

  15. Rule of five in 2015 and beyond: Target and ligand structural limitations, ligand chemistry structure and drug discovery project decisions.

    PubMed

    Lipinski, Christopher A

    2016-06-01

    The rule of five (Ro5), based on physicochemical profiles of phase II drugs, is consistent with structural limitations in protein targets and the drug target ligands. Three of four parameters in Ro5 are fundamental to the structure of both target and drug binding sites. The chemical structure of the drug ligand depends on the ligand chemistry and design philosophy. Two extremes of chemical structure and design philosophy exist; ligands constructed in the medicinal chemistry synthesis laboratory without input from natural selection and natural product (NP) metabolites biosynthesized based on evolutionary selection. Exceptions to Ro5 are found mostly among NPs. Chemistry chameleon-like behavior of some NPs due to intra-molecular hydrogen bonding as exemplified by cyclosporine A is a strong contributor to NP Ro5 outliers. The fragment derived, drug Navitoclax is an example of the extensive expertise, resources, time and key decisions required for the rare discovery of a non-NP Ro5 outlier.

  16. Ligand-binding assays for cyanobacterial neurotoxins targeting cholinergic receptors.

    PubMed

    Aráoz, Rómulo; Vilariño, Natalia; Botana, Luis M; Molgó, Jordi

    2010-07-01

    Toxic cyanobacterial blooms are a threat to public health because of the capacity of some cyanobacterial species to produce potent hepatotoxins and neurotoxins. Cyanobacterial neurotoxins are involved in the rapid death of wild and domestic animals by targeting voltage gated sodium channels and cholinergic synapses, including the neuromuscular junction. Anatoxin-a and its methylene homologue homoanatoxin-a are potent agonists of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. Since the structural determination of anatoxin-a, several mass spectrometry-based methods have been developed for detection of anatoxin-a and, later, homoanatoxin-a. Mass spectrometry-based techniques provide accuracy, precision, selectivity, sensitivity, reproducibility, adequate limit of detection, and structural and quantitative information for analyses of cyanobacterial anatoxins from cultured and environmental cyanobacterial samples. However, these physicochemical techniques will only detect known toxins for which toxin standards are commercially available, and they require highly specialized laboratory personnel and expensive equipment. Receptor-based assays are functional methods that are based on the mechanism of action of a class of toxins and are thus, suitable tools for survey of freshwater reservoirs for cyanobacterial anatoxins. The competition between cyanobacterial anatoxins and a labelled ligand for binding to nicotinic acetylcholine receptors is measured radioactively or non-radioactively providing high-throughput screening formats for routine detection of this class of neurotoxins. The mouse bioassay is the method of choice for marine toxin monitoring, but has to be replaced by fully validated functional methods. In this paper we review the ligand-binding assays developed for detection of cyanobacterial and algal neurotoxins targeting the nicotinic acetylcholine receptors and for high-throughput screening of novel nicotinic agents.

  17. Blockade of prostaglandin E2 signaling through EP1 and EP3 receptors attenuates Flt3L-dependent dendritic cell development from hematopoietic progenitor cells

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Pratibha; Hoggatt, Jonathan; Hu, Peirong; Speth, Jennifer M.; Fukuda, Seiji; Breyer, Richard M.

    2012-01-01

    Dendritic cell (DC) homeostasis, like all mature blood cells, is maintained via hierarchal generation from hematopoietic precursors; however, little is known about the regulatory mechanisms governing DC generation. Here, we show that prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) is required for optimal Flt3 ligand–mediated DC development and regulates expression of the Flt3 receptor on DC-committed progenitor cells. Inhibition of PGE2 biosynthesis reduces Flt3-mediated activation of STAT3 and expression of the antiapoptotic protein survivin, resulting in increased apoptosis of DC-committed progenitor cells. Reduced DC development caused by diminished PGE2 signaling is reversed by overexpression of Flt3 or survivin in DC progenitors and conversely is mimicked by STAT3 inhibition. PGE2 regulation of DC generation is specifically mediated through the EP1 and EP3 G protein PGE2 receptors. These studies define a novel DC progenitor regulatory pathway in which PGE2 signaling through EP1/EP3 receptors regulates Flt3 expression and downstream STAT3 activation and survivin expression, required for optimal DC progenitor survival and DC development in vivo. PMID:22110249

  18. MiR-424 and miR-155 deregulated expression in cytogenetically normal acute myeloid leukaemia: correlation with NPM1 and FLT3 mutation status

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background MicroRNA have a central role in normal haematopoiesis and are deregulated in acute myeloid leukaemia (AML). The purpose of the study was to investigate by qRT-PCR the expression of miRNAs involved in myeloid differentiation (miR-424, miR-155, miR-223, miR-17-5p) in 48 patients with cytogenetically normal AML well characterized for NPM1 and/or FLT3 mutations. Three types of normalization were used for the data validation. Findings We found that miR-424 was down-modulated in AMLs with NPM1mutA regardless of FLT3 status. On the contrary, miR-155 showed up-regulation in patients with FLT3 internal tandem duplications (ITD) with or without NPM1 mutations. No significant associations were found by analyzing miR-223 and miR-17-5p in relation to FLT3 and NPM1 status. Conclusions This study supports the view that major genetic subsets of CN-AML are associated with distinct miRNA signatures and suggests that miR-424 and miR-155 deregulation is involved in the pathogenesis of CN-AML with NPM1 and FLT3-ITD mutations, respectively. PMID:22681934

  19. Metformin synergistically sensitizes FLT3-ITD-positive acute myeloid leukemia to sorafenib by promoting mTOR-mediated apoptosis and autophagy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fangfang; Liu, Zuofeng; Zeng, Jisha; Zhu, Hongyan; Li, Jingjing; Cheng, Xiaomin; Jiang, Tao; Zhang, Li; Zhang, Chuanfen; Chen, Tie; Liu, Ting; Jia, Yongqian

    2015-12-01

    Mutations of Fms-like tyrosine kinase 3-internal tandem duplication (FLT3-ITD), accounting for approximately 30% of patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML), results in poor therapeutic efficacy and short survival. Sorafenib, an oral multikinase inhibitor, can inhibit FLT3 and improve clinical outcome of FLT3 mutated leukemia. Our current studies have shown that, the antidiabetic drug metformin also exerts anti-leukemic effect by activating p-AMPK and synergistically sensitizes FLT3 mutated AML to sorafenib. Both agents suppress cell proliferation in a dose-dependent manner and induce apoptosis via cell cycle arrest, but does not obviously modulate autophagy marker, light chain 3 (LC3). Mechanistically, in the presence of metformin, the anticancer potential of sorafenib, accompanying with increased LC3 levels, is found to be synergistically enhanced with the remarkably reduced protein expression of the mTOR/p70S6K/4EBP1 pathway, while not appreciably altering cell cycle. Overall, these results show metformin in aid of sorafenib may represent a promising and attractive strategy for the treatment of FLT3-ITD mutated AML. PMID:26505133

  20. Mutation Analysis of JAK2V617F, FLT3-ITD, NPM1, and DNMT3A in Chinese Patients with Myeloproliferative Neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Min; He, Na; Tian, Tian; Liu, Lu; Yu, Shuang; Ma, Daoxin

    2014-01-01

    Since the discovery of JAK2V617F tyrosine kinase-activating mutation, several genes have been found mutated in myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs). FLT3-ITD, NPM1, and DNMT3A mutations frequently occurred in AML patients and have been found conferred with myeloproliferative neoplasms in mouse model. Therefore, we sought to search for mutations in JAK2V617F, FLT3-ITD, NPM1, and DNMT3A in 129 cases including 120 classic MPN cases and 9 MDS/MPN cases. JAK2V617F mutation was found in 60% of the 120 classic MPNs. However, none of the patients displayed FLT3-ITD and NPM1 mutations; only 2 patients harbored DNMT3A R882 mutation. Further studies including whole-genome sequence will be conducted to investigate the possible involvement of these genes in MPN. PMID:24895580

  1. Exploration of Interfacial Hydration Networks of Target-Ligand Complexes.

    PubMed

    Jeszenői, Norbert; Bálint, Mónika; Horváth, István; van der Spoel, David; Hetényi, Csaba

    2016-01-25

    Interfacial hydration strongly influences interactions between biomolecules. For example, drug-target complexes are often stabilized by hydration networks formed between hydrophilic residues and water molecules at the interface. Exhaustive exploration of hydration networks is challenging for experimental as well as theoretical methods due to high mobility of participating water molecules. In the present study, we introduced a tool for determination of the complete, void-free hydration structures of molecular interfaces. The tool was applied to 31 complexes including histone proteins, a HIV-1 protease, a G-protein-signaling modulator, and peptide ligands of various lengths. The complexes contained 344 experimentally determined water positions used for validation, and excellent agreement with these was obtained. High-level cooperation between interfacial water molecules was detected by a new approach based on the decomposition of hydration networks into static and dynamic network regions (subnets). Besides providing hydration structures at the atomic level, our results uncovered hitherto hidden networking fundaments of integrity and stability of complex biomolecular interfaces filling an important gap in the toolkit of drug design and structural biochemistry. The presence of continuous, static regions of the interfacial hydration network was found necessary also for stable complexes of histone proteins participating in chromatin assembly and epigenetic regulation.

  2. Potent graft-versus-leukemia effect after reduced-intensity allogeneic SCT for intermediate-risk AML with FLT3-ITD or wild-type NPM1 and CEBPA without FLT3-ITD.

    PubMed

    Labouré, Gaëlle; Dulucq, Stéphanie; Labopin, Myriam; Tabrizi, Reza; Guérin, Estelle; Pigneux, Arnaud; Lafarge, Xavier; Leguay, Thibaut; Bouabdallah, Krimo; Dilhuydy, Marie-Sarah; Duclos, Cédric; Lascaux, Axelle; Marit, Gérald; Mahon, François-Xavier; Boiron, Jean-Michel; Milpied, Noël; Vigouroux, Stéphane

    2012-12-01

    To investigate the role of reduced-intensity allogeneic (RIC-allo) stem cell transplant (SCT) as postremission therapy in adult intermediate-risk patients with acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) with FLT3-ITD or wild-type NPM1 and CEBPA without FLT3-ITD, we conducted a single-center retrospective study between January 2001 and December 2010. Sixty-six patients were included: 37 treated with RIC-alloSCT and 29 with nonallogeneic SCT therapies. Both groups were comparable concerning age, WBC count at diagnosis, gender, karyotype, genotype, and number of courses of chemotherapy to reach complete remission (CR1). Median follow-up after CR1 was 37 months (range, 11-112 months) and 48 months (range, 9-83 months) in the allo and no-allo groups, respectively. In the allo versus no-allo groups, the 3-year cumulative incidence of relapse (CIR) rates were 25% ± 8% versus 61% ± 9%; P = .005. The 3-year nonrelapse mortality (NRM), overall survival (OS), and relapse-free survival (RFS) were 22% ± 7% versus 4% ± 4% (P = .005), 52% ± 9% versus 44% ± 10% (P = .75), and 53% ± 9% versus 35% ± 9% (P = .28), respectively. Multivariate analysis indicated that CIR was reduced by allo (hazard ratio [HR], 0.32; P = .01). A landmark analysis performed at day 185 after CR1 confirmed a lower CIR after allo. RIC-allo reduces the risk of relapse, suggesting a potent graft-versus-leukemia (GVL) effect in these patients at a high risk of relapse.

  3. Regulation of Stat5 by FAK and PAK1 in Oncogenic FLT3- and KIT-Driven Leukemogenesis.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Anindya; Ghosh, Joydeep; Ramdas, Baskar; Mali, Raghuveer Singh; Martin, Holly; Kobayashi, Michihiro; Vemula, Sasidhar; Canela, Victor H; Waskow, Emily R; Visconte, Valeria; Tiu, Ramon V; Smith, Catherine C; Shah, Neil; Bunting, Kevin D; Boswell, H Scott; Liu, Yan; Chan, Rebecca J; Kapur, Reuben

    2014-11-20

    Oncogenic mutations of FLT3 and KIT receptors are associated with poor survival in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs), and currently available drugs are largely ineffective. Although Stat5 has been implicated in regulating several myeloid and lymphoid malignancies, how precisely Stat5 regulates leukemogenesis, including its nuclear translocation to induce gene transcription, is poorly understood. In leukemic cells, we show constitutive activation of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) whose inhibition represses leukemogenesis. Downstream of FAK, activation of Rac1 is regulated by RacGEF Tiam1, whose inhibition prolongs the survival of leukemic mice. Inhibition of the Rac1 effector PAK1 prolongs the survival of leukemic mice in part by inhibiting the nuclear translocation of Stat5. These results reveal a leukemic pathway involving FAK/Tiam1/Rac1/PAK1 and demonstrate an essential role for these signaling molecules in regulating the nuclear translocation of Stat5 in leukemogenesis.

  4. Drug Discovery against Psoriasis: Identification of a New Potent FMS-like Tyrosine Kinase 3 (FLT3) Inhibitor, 1-(4-((1H-Pyrazolo[3,4-d]pyrimidin-4-yl)oxy)-3-fluorophenyl)-3-(5-(tert-butyl)isoxazol-3-yl)urea, That Showed Potent Activity in a Psoriatic Animal Model.

    PubMed

    Li, Guo-Bo; Ma, Shuang; Yang, Ling-Ling; Ji, Sen; Fang, Zhen; Zhang, Guo; Wang, Li-Jiao; Zhong, Jie-Min; Xiong, Yu; Wang, Jiang-Hong; Huang, Shen-Zhen; Li, Lin-Li; Xiang, Rong; Niu, Dawen; Chen, Ying-Chun; Yang, Sheng-Yong

    2016-09-22

    Psoriasis is a chronic T-cell-mediated autoimmune disease, and FMS-like tyrosine kinase 3 (FLT3) has been considered as a potential molecular target for the treatment of psoriasis. In this investigation, structural optimization was performed on a lead compound, 1-(4-(1H-pyrazolo[3,4-d]pyrimidin-4-yloxy)phenyl)-3-(4-chloro-3-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl)urea (1), which showed a moderate inhibitory activity againt FLT3. A series of pyrazolo[3,4-d]pyrimidine derivatives were synthesized, and structure-activity relationship analysis led to the discovery of a number of potent FLT3 inhibitors. One of the most active compounds, 1-(4-(1H-pyrazolo[3,4-d]pyrimidin-4-yloxy)-3-fluorophenyl)-3-(5-tert-butylisoxazol-3-yl)urea (18b), was then chosen for in-depth antipsoriasis studies because this compound displayed the highest potency in a preliminary antipsoriasis test. Compound 18b exhibited significant antipsoriatic effects in the K14-VEGF transgenic mouse model of psoriasis, and no recurrence was found 15 days later after the last administration. Detailed mechanisms of action of compound 18b were also investigated. Collectively, compound 18b could be a potential drug candidate for psoriasis treatment.

  5. Spatiotemporal Targeting of a Dual-Ligand Nanoparticle to Cancer Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Doolittle, Elizabeth; Peiris, Pubudu M.; Doron, Gilad; Goldberg, Amy; Tucci, Samantha; Rao, Swetha; Shah, Shruti; Sylvestre, Meilyn; Govender, Priya; Turan, Oguz; Lee, Zhenghong; Schiemann, William P.; Karathanasis, Efstathios

    2015-01-01

    Various targeting strategies and ligands have been employed to direct nanoparticles to tumors that upregulate specific cell-surface molecules. However, tumors display a dynamic, heterogeneous microenvironment, which undergoes spatiotemporal changes including the expression of targetable cell-surface biomarkers. Here, we investigated a dual-ligand nanoparticle to effectively target two receptors overexpressed in aggressive tumors. By using two different chemical specificities, the dual-ligand strategy considered the spatiotemporal alterations in the expression patterns of the receptors in cancer sites. As a case study, we used two mouse models of metastasis of triple-negative breast cancer using the MDA-MB-231 and 4T1 cells. The dual-ligand system utilized two peptides targeting P-selectin and αvβ3 integrin, which are functionally linked to different stages of the development of metastatic disease at a distal site. Using in vivo multimodal imaging and post mortem histological analyses, this study shows that the dual-ligand nanoparticle effectively targeted metastatic disease that was otherwise missed by single-ligand strategies. The dual-ligand nanoparticle was capable of capturing different metastatic sites within the same animal that overexpressed either receptor or both of them. Furthermore, the highly efficient targeting resulted in 22% of the injected dual-ligand nanoparticles being deposited in early-stage metastases within 2 h after injection. PMID:26203676

  6. Heptameric targeting ligands against EGFR and HER2 with high stability and avidity.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dongwook; Yan, Yitang; Valencia, C Alexander; Liu, Rihe

    2012-01-01

    Multivalency of targeting ligands provides significantly increased binding strength towards their molecular targets. Here, we report the development of a novel heptameric targeting system, with general applications, constructed by fusing a target-binding domain with the heptamerization domain of the Archaeal RNA binding protein Sm1 through a flexible hinge peptide. The previously reported affibody molecules against EGFR and HER2, Z(EGFR) and Z(HER2), were used as target binding moieties. The fusion molecules were highly expressed in E. coli as soluble proteins and efficiently self-assembled into multimeric targeting ligands with the heptamer as the predominant form. We demonstrated that the heptameric molecules were resistant to protease-mediated digestion or heat- and SDS-induced denaturation. Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) analysis showed that both heptameric Z(EGFR) and Z(HER2) ligands have a significantly enhanced binding strength to their target receptors with a nearly 100 to 1000 fold increase relative to the monomeric ligands. Cellular binding assays showed that heptameric ligands maintained their target-binding specificities similar to the monomeric forms towards their respective receptor. The non-toxic property of each heptameric ligand was demonstrated by the cell proliferation assay. In general,, the heptamerization strategy we describe here could be applied to the facile and efficient engineering of other protein domain- or short peptide-based affinity molecules to acquire significantly improved target-binding strengths with potential applications in the targeted delivery of various imaging or therapeutic agents.. PMID:22912791

  7. 3,3'-Diindolylmethane Inhibits Flt3L/GM-CSF-induced-bone Marrow-derived CD103+ Dendritic Cell Differentiation Regulating Phosphorylation of STAT3 and STAT5

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Ah-Jeong; Kim, Soo-Ji; Jeong, So-Yeon

    2015-01-01

    The intestinal immune system maintains oral tolerance to harmless antigens or nutrients. One mechanism of oral tolerance is mediated by regulatory T cell (Treg)s, of which differentiation is regulated by a subset of dendritic cell (DC)s, primarily CD103+ DCs. The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), a ligand-activated transcription factor, plays an important role in regulating immunity. The intestines are exposed to various AhR ligands, including endogenous metabolites and phytochemicals. It was previously reported that AhR activation induced tolerogenic DCs in mice or in cultures of bone marrow-derived DCs. However, given the variety of tolerogenic DCs, which type of tolerogenic DCs is regulated by AhR remains unknown. In this study, we found that AhR ligand 3,3'-diindolylmethane (DIM) inhibited the development of CD103+ DCs from mouse bone marrow cells stimulated with Flt3L and GM-CSF. DIM interfered with phosphorylation of STAT3 and STAT5 inhibiting the expression of genes, including Id2, E2-2, IDO-1, and Aldh1a2, which are associated with DC differentiation and functions. Finally, DIM suppressed the ability of CD103+ DCs to induce Foxp3+ Tregs. PMID:26770182

  8. Improvement in clinical outcome of FLT3 ITD mutated acute myeloid leukemia patients over the last one and a half decade

    PubMed Central

    Badar, Talha; Kantarjian, Hagop M.; Nogueras-Gonzalez, Graciela M.; Borthakur, Gautam; Manero, Guillermo Garcia; Andreeff, Michael; Konopleva, Marina; Kadia, Tapan M.; Daver, Naval; Wierda, William G.; Luthra, Raja; Patel, Keyur; Oran, Betul; Champlin, Richard; Ravandi, Farhad; Cortes, Jorge E.

    2015-01-01

    Background AML with FLT3 ITD mutations are associated with poor outcome. We reviewed outcomes of patients with FLT3 ITD mutated AML to investigate trends over time. Methods We analyzed 224 AML patients (excluding patients with core binding factor and acute promyelocytic leukemia) referred to our institution between 2000 and 2014. Patients were divided into 5 cohorts by era: 2000–02 (Era 1, n=19), 2003–05 (Era 2, n=41), 2006–08 (Era 3, n=53), 2009–11 (Era 4, n=55), and 2012–14 (Era 5, n=56) to analyze differences in outcome. Results The baseline characteristics were not statistically different across Eras. The response rate (CR/CRp) from Era 1–5 was 68%, 49%, 72%, 73%, and 75% respectively. The overall response rate (all Eras) with chemotherapy alone versus chemotherapy plus FLT3 inhibitor was 67% and 72.5%, respectively (p= 0.4). The median time to relapse was 6, 3.6, 7.9, 8.1 months and not reached from Eras 1 through 5, respectively (p= 0.001). The median OS has improved: 9.6, 7.6, 14.4, 15.7 and 17.8 month from Eras 1–5, respectively (p= <0.001). Stem cell transplant as a time dependent variable, showed better OS in the univariate analysis (HR: 0.57, 95% CI: 0.39–0.84, p= 0.004) but did not retained its significance in multivariate analysis (HR: 0.75, 95% CI: 0.50–1.13, p= 0.16). Conclusion Our data suggest improvement in outcome of FLT3 ITD mutated AML patients over the last 15 years. This is probably due to improvement in treatment strategies, including but not limited to integration of FLT3 inhibitors and increased use of SCT. PMID:26299958

  9. Evaluation of Docking Target Functions by the Comprehensive Investigation of Protein-Ligand Energy Minima

    PubMed Central

    Oferkin, Igor V.; Katkova, Ekaterina V.; Sulimov, Alexey V.; Kutov, Danil C.; Sobolev, Sergey I.; Voevodin, Vladimir V.; Sulimov, Vladimir B.

    2015-01-01

    The adequate choice of the docking target function impacts the accuracy of the ligand positioning as well as the accuracy of the protein-ligand binding energy calculation. To evaluate a docking target function we compared positions of its minima with the experimentally known pose of the ligand in the protein active site. We evaluated five docking target functions based on either the MMFF94 force field or the PM7 quantum-chemical method with or without implicit solvent models: PCM, COSMO, and SGB. Each function was tested on the same set of 16 protein-ligand complexes. For exhaustive low-energy minima search the novel MPI parallelized docking program FLM and large supercomputer resources were used. Protein-ligand binding energies calculated using low-energy minima were compared with experimental values. It was demonstrated that the docking target function on the base of the MMFF94 force field in vacuo can be used for discovery of native or near native ligand positions by finding the low-energy local minima spectrum of the target function. The importance of solute-solvent interaction for the correct ligand positioning is demonstrated. It is shown that docking accuracy can be improved by replacement of the MMFF94 force field by the new semiempirical quantum-chemical PM7 method. PMID:26693223

  10. Targeting Protein-Protein Interactions with Trimeric Ligands: High Affinity Inhibitors of the MAGUK Protein Family

    PubMed Central

    Nissen, Klaus B.; Haugaard-Kedström, Linda M.; Wilbek, Theis S.; Nielsen, Line S.; Åberg, Emma; Kristensen, Anders S.; Bach, Anders; Jemth, Per; Strømgaard, Kristian

    2015-01-01

    PDZ domains in general, and those of PSD-95 in particular, are emerging as promising drug targets for diseases such as ischemic stroke. We have previously shown that dimeric ligands that simultaneously target PDZ1 and PDZ2 of PSD-95 are highly potent inhibitors of PSD-95. However, PSD-95 and the related MAGUK proteins contain three consecutive PDZ domains, hence we envisioned that targeting all three PDZ domains simultaneously would lead to more potent and potentially more specific interactions with the MAGUK proteins. Here we describe the design, synthesis and characterization of a series of trimeric ligands targeting all three PDZ domains of PSD-95 and the related MAGUK proteins, PSD-93, SAP-97 and SAP-102. Using our dimeric ligands targeting the PDZ1-2 tandem as starting point, we designed novel trimeric ligands by introducing a PDZ3-binding peptide moiety via a cysteine-derivatized NPEG linker. The trimeric ligands generally displayed increased affinities compared to the dimeric ligands in fluorescence polarization binding experiments and optimized trimeric ligands showed low nanomolar inhibition towards the four MAGUK proteins, thus being the most potent inhibitors described. Kinetic experiments using stopped-flow spectrometry showed that the increase in affinity is caused by a decrease in the dissociation rate of the trimeric ligand as compared to the dimeric ligands, likely reflecting the lower probability of simultaneous dissociation of all three PDZ ligands. Thus, we have provided novel inhibitors of the MAGUK proteins with exceptionally high affinity, which can be used to further elucidate the therapeutic potential of these proteins. PMID:25658767

  11. Targeting protein-protein interactions with trimeric ligands: high affinity inhibitors of the MAGUK protein family.

    PubMed

    Nissen, Klaus B; Haugaard-Kedström, Linda M; Wilbek, Theis S; Nielsen, Line S; Åberg, Emma; Kristensen, Anders S; Bach, Anders; Jemth, Per; Strømgaard, Kristian

    2015-01-01

    PDZ domains in general, and those of PSD-95 in particular, are emerging as promising drug targets for diseases such as ischemic stroke. We have previously shown that dimeric ligands that simultaneously target PDZ1 and PDZ2 of PSD-95 are highly potent inhibitors of PSD-95. However, PSD-95 and the related MAGUK proteins contain three consecutive PDZ domains, hence we envisioned that targeting all three PDZ domains simultaneously would lead to more potent and potentially more specific interactions with the MAGUK proteins. Here we describe the design, synthesis and characterization of a series of trimeric ligands targeting all three PDZ domains of PSD-95 and the related MAGUK proteins, PSD-93, SAP-97 and SAP-102. Using our dimeric ligands targeting the PDZ1-2 tandem as starting point, we designed novel trimeric ligands by introducing a PDZ3-binding peptide moiety via a cysteine-derivatized NPEG linker. The trimeric ligands generally displayed increased affinities compared to the dimeric ligands in fluorescence polarization binding experiments and optimized trimeric ligands showed low nanomolar inhibition towards the four MAGUK proteins, thus being the most potent inhibitors described. Kinetic experiments using stopped-flow spectrometry showed that the increase in affinity is caused by a decrease in the dissociation rate of the trimeric ligand as compared to the dimeric ligands, likely reflecting the lower probability of simultaneous dissociation of all three PDZ ligands. Thus, we have provided novel inhibitors of the MAGUK proteins with exceptionally high affinity, which can be used to further elucidate the therapeutic potential of these proteins.

  12. Development of a successive targeting liposome with multi-ligand for efficient targeting gene delivery

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Kun; Shen, Haijun; Shen, Song; Xie, Men; Mao, Chuanbin; Qiu, Liyan; Jin, Yi

    2012-01-01

    Background A successful gene delivery system needs to breakthrough several barriers to allow efficient transgenic expression. In the present study, successive targeting liposomes (STL) were constructed by integrating various targeting groups into a nanoparticle to address this issue. Methods Polyethylenimine (PEI) 1800-triamcinolone acetonide (TA) with nuclear targeting capability was synthesized by a two-step reaction. Lactobionic acid was connected with cholesterol to obtain a compound of [(2-lactoylamido) ethylamino]formic acid cholesterol ester (CHEDLA) with hepatocyte-targeting capability. The liposome was modified with PEI 1800-TA and CHEDLA to prepare successive targeting liposome (STL). Its physicochemical properties and transfection efficiency were investigated both in vitro and in vivo. Results The diameter of STL was approximately 100 nm with 20 mV of potential. The confocal microscopy observation and potential assay verified that lipid bilayer of STL was decorated with PEI 1800-TA. Cytotoxicity of STL was significantly lower than that of PEI 1800-TA and PEI 25K. The transfection efficiency of 10% CHEDLA STL in HepG2 cells was the higher than of the latter two with serum. Its transfection efficiency was greatly reduced with excessive free galactose, indicating that STL was absorbed via galactose receptor-mediated endocytosis. The in vivo study in mice showed that 10% CHEDLA STL had better transgenic expression in liver than the other carriers. Conclusions STL with multi-ligand was able to overcome the various barriers to target nucleus and special cells and present distinctive transgenic expression. Therefore, it has a great potential for gene therapy as a nonviral carrier. PMID:21574214

  13. Theranostic Nanoparticles Carrying Doxorubicin Attenuate Targeting Ligand Specific Antibody Responses Following Systemic Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Emmy; Qian, Weiping; Cao, Zehong; Wang, Liya; Bozeman, Erica N.; Ward, Christina; Yang, Bin; Selvaraj, Periasamy; Lipowska, Malgorzata; Wang, Y. Andrew; Mao, Hui; Yang, Lily

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the effects of immune responses on targeted delivery of nanoparticles is important for clinical translations of new cancer imaging and therapeutic nanoparticles. In this study, we found that repeated administrations of magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) conjugated with mouse or human derived targeting ligands induced high levels of ligand specific antibody responses in normal and tumor bearing mice while injections of unconjugated mouse ligands were weakly immunogenic and induced a very low level of antibody response in mice. Mice that received intravenous injections of targeted and polyethylene glycol (PEG)-coated IONPs further increased the ligand specific antibody production due to differential uptake of PEG-coated nanoparticles by macrophages and dendritic cells. However, the production of ligand specific antibodies was markedly inhibited following systemic delivery of theranostic nanoparticles carrying a chemotherapy drug, doxorubicin. Targeted imaging and histological analysis revealed that lack of the ligand specific antibodies led to an increase in intratumoral delivery of targeted nanoparticles. Results of this study support the potential of further development of targeted theranostic nanoparticles for the treatment of human cancers. PMID:25553097

  14. Misfolded N-CoR is Linked to the Ectopic Reactivation of CD34/Flt3-Based Stem-Cell Phenotype in Promyelocytic and Monocytic Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Nin, Dawn Sijin; Li, Feng; Visvanathan, Sridevi; Khan, Matiullah

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear receptor co-repressor (N-CoR) is the key component of generic co-repressor complex essential for the transcriptional control of genes involved in cellular hemostasis. We have recently reported that N-CoR actively represses Flt3, a key factor of hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) self-renewal and growth, and that de-repression of Flt3 by the misfolded N-CoR plays an important role in the pathogenesis of promyelocytic and monocytic acute myeloid leukemia (AML). The leukemic cells derived from the promyelocytic and monocytic AML are distinctly characterized by the ectopic reactivation of stem cell phenotypes in relatively committed myeloid compartment. However, the molecular mechanism underlying this phenomenon is not known. Here, we report that N-CoR function is essential for the commitment of primitive hematopoietic cells to the cells of myeloid lineage and that loss of N-CoR function due to misfolding is linked to the ectopic reactivation of generic stem cell phenotypes in promyelocytic and monocytic AML. Analysis of N-CoR and Flt3 transcripts in mouse hematopoietic cells revealed a positive correlation between N-CoR level and the commitment of myeloid cells and an inverse correlation between N-CoR and Flt3 levels in primitive as well as committed myeloid cells. Enforced N-CoR expression in mouse HSCs inhibited their growth and self-renewal potentials and promoted maturation toward cells of myeloid lineage, suggesting a role of N-CoR in the commitment of cells of myeloid lineage. In contrast to AML cells with natively folded N-CoR, primary and secondary promyelocytic and monocytic AML cells harboring the misfolded N-CoR were highly positive for Flt3 and myeloid antigen-based HSC marker CD34. Genetic and therapeutic restoration of N-CoR conformation significantly down-regulated the CD34 levels in monocytic AML cells, suggesting an important role of N-CoR in the suppression of CD34-based HSC phenotypes. These findings collectively suggest that N-CoR is crucial

  15. NALDB: nucleic acid ligand database for small molecules targeting nucleic acid.

    PubMed

    Kumar Mishra, Subodh; Kumar, Amit

    2016-01-01

    Nucleic acid ligand database (NALDB) is a unique database that provides detailed information about the experimental data of small molecules that were reported to target several types of nucleic acid structures. NALDB is the first ligand database that contains ligand information for all type of nucleic acid. NALDB contains more than 3500 ligand entries with detailed pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic information such as target name, target sequence, ligand 2D/3D structure, SMILES, molecular formula, molecular weight, net-formal charge, AlogP, number of rings, number of hydrogen bond donor and acceptor, potential energy along with their Ki, Kd, IC50 values. All these details at single platform would be helpful for the development and betterment of novel ligands targeting nucleic acids that could serve as a potential target in different diseases including cancers and neurological disorders. With maximum 255 conformers for each ligand entry, our database is a multi-conformer database and can facilitate the virtual screening process. NALDB provides powerful web-based search tools that make database searching efficient and simplified using option for text as well as for structure query. NALDB also provides multi-dimensional advanced search tool which can screen the database molecules on the basis of molecular properties of ligand provided by database users. A 3D structure visualization tool has also been included for 3D structure representation of ligands. NALDB offers an inclusive pharmacological information and the structurally flexible set of small molecules with their three-dimensional conformers that can accelerate the virtual screening and other modeling processes and eventually complement the nucleic acid-based drug discovery research. NALDB can be routinely updated and freely available on bsbe.iiti.ac.in/bsbe/naldb/HOME.php. Database URL: http://bsbe.iiti.ac.in/bsbe/naldb/HOME.php.

  16. NALDB: nucleic acid ligand database for small molecules targeting nucleic acid

    PubMed Central

    Kumar Mishra, Subodh; Kumar, Amit

    2016-01-01

    Nucleic acid ligand database (NALDB) is a unique database that provides detailed information about the experimental data of small molecules that were reported to target several types of nucleic acid structures. NALDB is the first ligand database that contains ligand information for all type of nucleic acid. NALDB contains more than 3500 ligand entries with detailed pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic information such as target name, target sequence, ligand 2D/3D structure, SMILES, molecular formula, molecular weight, net-formal charge, AlogP, number of rings, number of hydrogen bond donor and acceptor, potential energy along with their Ki, Kd, IC50 values. All these details at single platform would be helpful for the development and betterment of novel ligands targeting nucleic acids that could serve as a potential target in different diseases including cancers and neurological disorders. With maximum 255 conformers for each ligand entry, our database is a multi-conformer database and can facilitate the virtual screening process. NALDB provides powerful web-based search tools that make database searching efficient and simplified using option for text as well as for structure query. NALDB also provides multi-dimensional advanced search tool which can screen the database molecules on the basis of molecular properties of ligand provided by database users. A 3D structure visualization tool has also been included for 3D structure representation of ligands. NALDB offers an inclusive pharmacological information and the structurally flexible set of small molecules with their three-dimensional conformers that can accelerate the virtual screening and other modeling processes and eventually complement the nucleic acid-based drug discovery research. NALDB can be routinely updated and freely available on bsbe.iiti.ac.in/bsbe/naldb/HOME.php. Database URL: http://bsbe.iiti.ac.in/bsbe/naldb/HOME.php PMID:26896846

  17. PPAR Ligands Function as Suppressors That Target Biological Actions of HMGB1

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Tianhui

    2016-01-01

    High mobility group box 1 (HMGB1), which has become one of the most intriguing molecules in inflammatory disorders and cancers and with which ligand-activated peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are highly associated, is considered as a therapeutic target. Of particular interest is the fact that certain PPAR ligands have demonstrated their potent anti-inflammatory activities and potential anticancer effects. In this review article we summarize recent experimental evidence that PPAR ligands function as suppressors that target biological actions of HMGB1, including intracellular expression, receptor signaling cascades, and extracellular secretion of HMGB1 in cell lines and/or animal models. We also propose the possible mechanisms underlying PPAR involvement in inflammatory disorders and discuss the future therapeutic value of PPAR ligands targeting HMGB1 molecule for cancer prevention and treatment. PMID:27563308

  18. PPAR Ligands Function as Suppressors That Target Biological Actions of HMGB1.

    PubMed

    Ying, Shibo; Xiao, Xiang; Chen, Tianhui; Lou, Jianlin

    2016-01-01

    High mobility group box 1 (HMGB1), which has become one of the most intriguing molecules in inflammatory disorders and cancers and with which ligand-activated peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are highly associated, is considered as a therapeutic target. Of particular interest is the fact that certain PPAR ligands have demonstrated their potent anti-inflammatory activities and potential anticancer effects. In this review article we summarize recent experimental evidence that PPAR ligands function as suppressors that target biological actions of HMGB1, including intracellular expression, receptor signaling cascades, and extracellular secretion of HMGB1 in cell lines and/or animal models. We also propose the possible mechanisms underlying PPAR involvement in inflammatory disorders and discuss the future therapeutic value of PPAR ligands targeting HMGB1 molecule for cancer prevention and treatment. PMID:27563308

  19. Calcium and calcineurin-NFAT signaling regulate granulocyte-monocyte progenitor cell cycle via Flt3-L.

    PubMed

    Fric, Jan; Lim, Clarice X F; Mertes, Alexandra; Lee, Bernett T K; Viganò, Elena; Chen, Jinmiao; Zolezzi, Francesca; Poidinger, Michael; Larbi, Anis; Strobl, Herbert; Zelante, Teresa; Ricciardi-Castagnoli, Paola

    2014-12-01

    Maintenance of myeloid progenitor cells is controlled by complex regulatory mechanisms and is orchestrated by multiple different transcription factors. Here, we report that the activation of the transcription factor nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) by calcium-sensing protein calcineurin inhibits the proliferation of myeloid granulocyte-monocyte progenitors (GMPs). Myeloid progenitor subtypes exhibit variable sensitivity to induced Ca(2+) entry and consequently display differential engagement of the calcineurin-NFAT pathway. This study shows that inhibition of the calcineurin-NFAT pathway enhances the proliferation of GMPs both in vitro and in vivo and demonstrates that calcineurin-NFAT signaling in GMPs is initiated by Flt3-L. Inhibition of the calcineurin-NFAT pathway modified expression of the cell cycle regulation genes Cdk4, Cdk6, and Cdkn1a (p21), thus enabling rapid cell cycle progression specifically in GMPs. NFAT inhibitor drugs are extensively used in the clinic to restrict the pathological activation of lymphoid cells, and our data reveal for the first time that these therapies also exert potent effects on maintenance of the myeloid cell compartment through specific regulation of GMP proliferation.

  20. Calcium and Calcineurin-NFAT Signaling Regulate Granulocyte-Monocyte Progenitor Cell Cycle via Flt3-L

    PubMed Central

    Fric, Jan; Lim, Clarice XF; Mertes, Alexandra; Lee, Bernett TK; Viganò, Elena; Chen, Jinmiao; Zolezzi, Francesca; Poidinger, Michael; Larbi, Anis; Strobl, Herbert; Zelante, Teresa; Ricciardi-Castagnoli, Paola

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Maintenance of myeloid progenitor cells is controlled by complex regulatory mechanisms and is orchestrated by multiple different transcription factors. Here, we report that the activation of the transcription factor nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) by calcium-sensing protein calcineurin inhibits the proliferation of myeloid granulocyte–monocyte progenitors (GMPs). Myeloid progenitor subtypes exhibit variable sensitivity to induced Ca2+ entry and consequently display differential engagement of the calcineurin-NFAT pathway. This study shows that inhibition of the calcineurin-NFAT pathway enhances the proliferation of GMPs both in vitro and in vivo and demonstrates that calcineurin-NFAT signaling in GMPs is initiated by Flt3-L. Inhibition of the calcineurin-NFAT pathway modified expression of the cell cycle regulation genes Cdk4, Cdk6, and Cdkn1a (p21), thus enabling rapid cell cycle progression specifically in GMPs. NFAT inhibitor drugs are extensively used in the clinic to restrict the pathological activation of lymphoid cells, and our data reveal for the first time that these therapies also exert potent effects on maintenance of the myeloid cell compartment through specific regulation of GMP proliferation. Stem Cells 2014;32:3232–3244 PMID:25100642

  1. Multifunctional Transmembrane Protein Ligands for Cell-Specific Targeting of Plasma Membrane-Derived Vesicles.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Chi; Busch, David J; Vershel, Connor P; Stachowiak, Jeanne C

    2016-07-01

    Liposomes and nanoparticles that bind selectively to cell-surface receptors can target specific populations of cells. However, chemical conjugation of ligands to these particles is difficult to control, frequently limiting ligand uniformity and complexity. In contrast, the surfaces of living cells are decorated with highly uniform populations of sophisticated transmembrane proteins. Toward harnessing cellular capabilities, here it is demonstrated that plasma membrane vesicles (PMVs) derived from donor cells can display engineered transmembrane protein ligands that precisely target cells on the basis of receptor expression. These multifunctional targeting proteins incorporate (i) a protein ligand, (ii) an intrinsically disordered protein spacer to make the ligand sterically accessible, and (iii) a fluorescent protein domain that enables quantification of the ligand density on the PMV surface. PMVs that display targeting proteins with affinity for the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) bind at increasing concentrations to breast cancer cells that express increasing levels of EGFR. Further, as an example of the generality of this approach, PMVs expressing a single-domain antibody against green fluorescence protein (eGFP) bind to cells expressing eGFP-tagged receptors with a selectivity of ≈50:1. The results demonstrate the versatility of PMVs as cell targeting systems, suggesting diverse applications from drug delivery to tissue engineering. PMID:27294846

  2. Key Targets for Multi-Target Ligands Designed to Combat Neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Ramsay, Rona R.; Majekova, Magdalena; Medina, Milagros; Valoti, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    HIGHLIGHTS Compounds that interact with multiple targets but minimally with the cytochrome P450 system (CYP) address the many factors leading to neurodegeneration.Acetyl- and Butyryl-cholineEsterases (AChE, BChE) and Monoamine Oxidases A/B (MAO A, MAO B) are targets for Multi-Target Designed Ligands (MTDL).ASS234 is an irreversible inhibitor of MAO A >MAO B and has micromolar potency against the cholinesterases.ASS234 is a poor CYP substrate in human liver, yielding the depropargylated metabolite.SMe1EC2, a stobadine derivative, showed high radical scavenging property, in vitro and in vivo giving protection in head trauma and diabetic damage of endothelium.Control of mitochondrial function and morphology by manipulating fission and fusion is emerging as a target area for therapeutic strategies to decrease the pathological outcome of neurodegenerative diseases. Growing evidence supports the view that neurodegenerative diseases have multiple and common mechanisms in their aetiologies. These multifactorial aspects have changed the broadly common assumption that selective drugs are superior to “dirty drugs” for use in therapy. This drives the research in studies of novel compounds that might have multiple action mechanisms. In neurodegeneration, loss of neuronal signaling is a major cause of the symptoms, so preservation of neurotransmitters by inhibiting the breakdown enzymes is a first approach. Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitors are the drugs preferentially used in AD and that one of these, rivastigmine, is licensed also for PD. Several studies have shown that monoamine oxidase (MAO) B, located mainly in glial cells, increases with age and is elevated in Alzheimer (AD) and Parkinson's Disease's (PD). Deprenyl, a MAO B inhibitor, significantly delays the initiation of levodopa treatment in PD patients. These indications underline that AChE and MAO are considered a necessary part of multi-target designed ligands (MTDL). However, both of these targets are

  3. Key Targets for Multi-Target Ligands Designed to Combat Neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Ramsay, Rona R.; Majekova, Magdalena; Medina, Milagros; Valoti, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    HIGHLIGHTS Compounds that interact with multiple targets but minimally with the cytochrome P450 system (CYP) address the many factors leading to neurodegeneration.Acetyl- and Butyryl-cholineEsterases (AChE, BChE) and Monoamine Oxidases A/B (MAO A, MAO B) are targets for Multi-Target Designed Ligands (MTDL).ASS234 is an irreversible inhibitor of MAO A >MAO B and has micromolar potency against the cholinesterases.ASS234 is a poor CYP substrate in human liver, yielding the depropargylated metabolite.SMe1EC2, a stobadine derivative, showed high radical scavenging property, in vitro and in vivo giving protection in head trauma and diabetic damage of endothelium.Control of mitochondrial function and morphology by manipulating fission and fusion is emerging as a target area for therapeutic strategies to decrease the pathological outcome of neurodegenerative diseases. Growing evidence supports the view that neurodegenerative diseases have multiple and common mechanisms in their aetiologies. These multifactorial aspects have changed the broadly common assumption that selective drugs are superior to “dirty drugs” for use in therapy. This drives the research in studies of novel compounds that might have multiple action mechanisms. In neurodegeneration, loss of neuronal signaling is a major cause of the symptoms, so preservation of neurotransmitters by inhibiting the breakdown enzymes is a first approach. Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitors are the drugs preferentially used in AD and that one of these, rivastigmine, is licensed also for PD. Several studies have shown that monoamine oxidase (MAO) B, located mainly in glial cells, increases with age and is elevated in Alzheimer (AD) and Parkinson's Disease's (PD). Deprenyl, a MAO B inhibitor, significantly delays the initiation of levodopa treatment in PD patients. These indications underline that AChE and MAO are considered a necessary part of multi-target designed ligands (MTDL). However, both of these targets are

  4. Key Targets for Multi-Target Ligands Designed to Combat Neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Ramsay, Rona R; Majekova, Magdalena; Medina, Milagros; Valoti, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    HIGHLIGHTS Compounds that interact with multiple targets but minimally with the cytochrome P450 system (CYP) address the many factors leading to neurodegeneration.Acetyl- and Butyryl-cholineEsterases (AChE, BChE) and Monoamine Oxidases A/B (MAO A, MAO B) are targets for Multi-Target Designed Ligands (MTDL).ASS234 is an irreversible inhibitor of MAO A >MAO B and has micromolar potency against the cholinesterases.ASS234 is a poor CYP substrate in human liver, yielding the depropargylated metabolite.SMe1EC2, a stobadine derivative, showed high radical scavenging property, in vitro and in vivo giving protection in head trauma and diabetic damage of endothelium.Control of mitochondrial function and morphology by manipulating fission and fusion is emerging as a target area for therapeutic strategies to decrease the pathological outcome of neurodegenerative diseases. Growing evidence supports the view that neurodegenerative diseases have multiple and common mechanisms in their aetiologies. These multifactorial aspects have changed the broadly common assumption that selective drugs are superior to "dirty drugs" for use in therapy. This drives the research in studies of novel compounds that might have multiple action mechanisms. In neurodegeneration, loss of neuronal signaling is a major cause of the symptoms, so preservation of neurotransmitters by inhibiting the breakdown enzymes is a first approach. Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitors are the drugs preferentially used in AD and that one of these, rivastigmine, is licensed also for PD. Several studies have shown that monoamine oxidase (MAO) B, located mainly in glial cells, increases with age and is elevated in Alzheimer (AD) and Parkinson's Disease's (PD). Deprenyl, a MAO B inhibitor, significantly delays the initiation of levodopa treatment in PD patients. These indications underline that AChE and MAO are considered a necessary part of multi-target designed ligands (MTDL). However, both of these targets are simply

  5. Rationalization of the performance and target dependence of similarity searching incorporating protein-ligand interaction information.

    PubMed

    Tan, Lu; Batista, José; Bajorath, Jürgen

    2010-06-28

    Interacting fragments (IFs) derived from protein-ligand complex crystal structures have previously been utilized to complement conventional two-dimensional (2D) similarity searching. In many instances, the (indirect) incorporation of three-dimensional (3D) interaction information through the use of IFs has further improved the search performance of fingerprints of unmodified ligands. However, for a number of targets, changes in the relative performance of conventional fingerprints and IF-based representations have also been observed, and reasons for these effects have thus far remained elusive. Herein, we analyze target-ligand systems that display different similarity search phenotypes. We study protein-ligand interactions and the resulting IF information at the molecular level of detail in order to better understand systematic differences in the search performance of unmodified ligands and IFs. The results show that the degree of conservation of IFs isolated from multiple crystallographic ligands is a major determinant of similarity search performance, regardless of whether IFs consist of coherent substructures or disjoint fragments. Conserved IFs focus similarity search calculations on 2D pharmacophore elements, as revealed by 3D interaction analysis. This leads to increased hit rates compared to unmodified reference ligand representations and to the recognition of smaller and less complex, yet structurally diverse hits. On the basis of these findings, one can predict for which targets the inclusion of IF information will likely result in improved 2D similarity search performance.

  6. Similarity metrics for ligands reflecting the similarity of the target proteins.

    PubMed

    Schuffenhauer, Ansgar; Floersheim, Philipp; Acklin, Pierre; Jacoby, Edgar

    2003-01-01

    In this study we evaluate how far the scope of similarity searching can be extended to identify not only ligands binding to the same target as the reference ligand(s) but also ligands of other homologous targets without initially known ligands. This "homology-based similarity searching" requires molecular representations reflecting the ability of a molecule to interact with target proteins. The Similog keys, which are introduced here as a new molecular representation, were designed to fulfill such requirements. They are based only on the molecular constitution and are counts of atom triplets. Each triplet is characterized by the graph distances and the types of its atoms. The atom-typing scheme classifies each atom by its function as H-bond donor or acceptor and by its electronegativity and bulkiness. In this study the Similog keys are investigated in retrospective in silico screening experiments and compared with other conformation independent molecular representations. Studied were molecules of the MDDR database for which the activity data was augmented by standardized target classification information from public protein classification databases. The MDDR molecule set was split randomly into two halves. The first half formed the candidate set. Ligands of four targets (dopamine D2 receptor, opioid delta-receptor, factor Xa serine protease, and progesterone receptor) were taken from the second half to form the respective reference sets. Different similarity calculation methods are used to rank the molecules of the candidate set by their similarity to each of the four reference sets. The accumulated counts of molecules binding to the reference target and groups of targets with decreasing homology to it were examined as a function of the similarity rank for each reference set and similarity method. In summary, similarity searching based on Unity 2D-fingerprints or Similog keys are found to be equally effective in the identification of molecules binding to the same

  7. Sorafenib Induced Hand Foot Skin Rash in FLT3 ITD Mutated Acute Myeloid Leukemia-A Case Report and Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    Senapati, Jayastu; Devasia, Anup J.; Ganapule, Abhijeet; George, Leni; Viswabandya, Auro

    2014-01-01

    Sorafenib is a novel small molecule multiple kinase inhibitor which has been used for metastatic renal cancer, hepatocellular cancer. Sorafenib induced skin rash has been discussed as a side effect in trials in both, FLT3 wild type and mutated acute myeloid leukemia (AML), as monotherapy or as combination with other chemotherapeutic agents. We describe a patient with FLT 3 ITD mutated AML, who was started on adjunctive Sorafenib therapy. Skin reactions manifested as NCI Grade III palmoplantar erythrodysesthesia (PPE), requiring drug discontinuation. Several pathogenic mechanisms have been implicated in Sorafenib induced skin reactions, but none has been conclusively proven. While treatment options are varied for early stage skin reactions, drug discontinuation remains the only possible therapy presently for severe grade skin reaction. PMID:24678393

  8. The effect of ligand density on in vivo tumor targeting of nanographene oxide.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jong Hyun; Sahu, Abhishek; Jang, Cheol; Tae, Giyoong

    2015-07-10

    Recently, the application of nanographene oxide (nGO) as a drug delivery system has significantly increased. But, the rational engineering of nGO surface to improve its in vivo targeting and biodistribution remains mostly unexplored. In this study, we have prepared folic acid conjugated Pluronic for non-covalent functionalization of nanographene oxide (nGO) sheets and active tumor targeting. To modulate the ligand density on the nGO surface, different ratios of folate conjugated Pluronic and unmodified Pluronic were combined and used for coating nGO sheets. The surface density of targeting ligand linearly increased as the relative amount of folate conjugated Pluronic was increased. The association of functionalized nGOs with folate receptor overexpressing human epithelial mouth carcinoma cells (KB cells) was evaluated by flow cytometry. Cellular uptake of nGO by KB cells increased steadily with the increase in ligand density. In contrast, the in vivo experiment in mouse xenograft model did not show the steady increase in tumor targeting by increasing ligand density. Upon intravenous administration into KB tumor-bearing mice, tumor accumulation of nGO did not show a significant targeting effect up to 25% of ligand coating density. However, a strong and similar tumor accumulation of nGO was observed for both 50% and 100% folate coatings. Thus, a significant difference in tumor accumulation of nGO was observed between the low folate density groups and high folate density groups, suggesting the existence of a critical ligand density for tumor targeting. The significant difference of tumor targeting of nGO depending on ligand density also resulted in the dramatic change in photothermal tumor ablation by the irradiation of NIR laser. PMID:25937319

  9. A new lectin in red kidney beans called PvFRIL stimulates proliferation of NIH 3T3 cells expressing the Flt3 receptor.

    PubMed

    Moore, J G; Fuchs, C A; Hata, Y S; Hicklin, D J; Colucci, G; Chrispeels, M J; Feldman, M

    2000-07-26

    A new legume lectin has been identified by its ability to specifically stimulate proliferation of NIH 3T3 fibroblasts expressing the Flt3 tyrosine kinase receptor. The lectin was isolated from conditioned medium harvested from human peripheral blood mononuclear cells activated to secrete cytokines by a crude red kidney bean extract containing phytohemagglutinin (PHA). Untransfected 3T3 cells and 3T3 cells transfected with the related Fms tyrosine kinase receptor do not respond to this lectin, which we called PvFRIL (Phaseolus vulgaris Flt3 receptor-interacting lectin). When tested on cord blood mononuclear cells enriched for Flt3-expressing progenitors, purified PvFRIL fractions maintained a small population of cells that continued to express CD34 after 2 weeks in suspension cultures containing IL3. These cultures did not show the effects of IL3's strong induction of proliferation and differentiation (high cell number and exhausted medium); instead, low cell number at the end of the culture period resulted in persistence of cells in the context of cell death. These observations led to the hypothesis that PvFRIL acts in a dominant manner to preserve progenitor viability and prevent proliferation and differentiation.

  10. A new lectin in red kidney beans called PvFRIL stimulates proliferation of NIH 3T3 cells expressing the Flt3 receptor.

    PubMed

    Moore, J G; Fuchs, C A; Hata, Y S; Hicklin, D J; Colucci, G; Chrispeels, M J; Feldman, M

    2000-07-26

    A new legume lectin has been identified by its ability to specifically stimulate proliferation of NIH 3T3 fibroblasts expressing the Flt3 tyrosine kinase receptor. The lectin was isolated from conditioned medium harvested from human peripheral blood mononuclear cells activated to secrete cytokines by a crude red kidney bean extract containing phytohemagglutinin (PHA). Untransfected 3T3 cells and 3T3 cells transfected with the related Fms tyrosine kinase receptor do not respond to this lectin, which we called PvFRIL (Phaseolus vulgaris Flt3 receptor-interacting lectin). When tested on cord blood mononuclear cells enriched for Flt3-expressing progenitors, purified PvFRIL fractions maintained a small population of cells that continued to express CD34 after 2 weeks in suspension cultures containing IL3. These cultures did not show the effects of IL3's strong induction of proliferation and differentiation (high cell number and exhausted medium); instead, low cell number at the end of the culture period resulted in persistence of cells in the context of cell death. These observations led to the hypothesis that PvFRIL acts in a dominant manner to preserve progenitor viability and prevent proliferation and differentiation. PMID:10913819

  11. Characterizing and Overriding the Structural Mechanism of the Quizartinib-resistant FLT3 “Gatekeeper” F691L Mutation with PLX3397

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Catherine C.; Zhang, Chao; Lin, Kimberly; Lasater, Elisabeth A.; Zhang, Ying; Massi, Evan; Damon, Lauren E.; Pendleton, Matthew; Bashir, Ali; Sebra, Robert; Perl, Alexander; Kasarskis, Andrew; Shellooe, Rafe; Tsang, Garson; Carias, Heidi; Powell, Ben; Burton, Elizabeth A.; Matusow, Bernice; Zhang, Jiazhong; Spevak, Wayne; Ibrahim, Prabha N.; Le, Mai H.; Hsu, Henry H.; Habets, Gaston; West, Brian L.; Bollag, Gideon; Shah, Neil P.

    2015-01-01

    Tyrosine kinase domain mutations are a common cause of acquired clinical resistance to tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) used to treat cancer, including the FLT3 inhibitor quizartinib. Mutation of kinase “gatekeeper” residues, which control access to an allosteric pocket adjacent to the ATP-binding site, have been frequently implicated in TKI resistance. The molecular underpinnings of gatekeeper mutation-mediated resistance are incompletely understood. We report the first co-crystal structure of FLT3 with the TKI quizartinib, which demonstrates that quizartinib binding relies on essential edge-to-face aromatic interactions with the gatekeeper F691 residue, and F830 within the highly conserved DFG motif in the activation loop. This reliance makes quizartinib critically vulnerable to gatekeeper and activation loop substitutions while minimizing the impact of mutations elsewhere. Moreover, we identify PLX3397, a novel FLT3 inhibitor that retains activity against the F691L mutant due to a binding mode that depends less vitally on specific interactions with the gatekeeper position. PMID:25847190

  12. Characteristics of oncolytic vesicular stomatitis virus displaying tumor-targeting ligands.

    PubMed

    Ammayappan, Arun; Peng, Kah-Whye; Russell, Stephen J

    2013-12-01

    We sought proof of principle that tumor-targeting ligands can be displayed on the surface of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) by engineering its glycoprotein. Here, we successfully rescued VSVs displaying tumor vasculature-targeting ligands. By using a rational approach, we investigated various feasible insertion sites on the G protein of VSV (VSV-G) for display of tumor vasculature-targeting ligands, cyclic RGD (cRGD) and echistatin. We found seven sites on VSV-G that tolerated insertion of the 9-residue cRGD peptide, two of which could tolerate insertion of the 49-amino acid echistatin domain. All of the ligand-displaying viruses replicated as well as the parental virus. In vitro studies demonstrated that the VSV-echistatin viruses specifically bound to targeted integrins. Since the low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) was recently identified as a major receptor for VSV, we investigated the entry of ligand-displaying viruses after masking LDLR. The experiment showed that the modified viruses can enter the cell independently of LDLR, whereas entry of unmodified virus is significantly blocked by a specific monoclonal antibody against LDLR. Both parental and ligand-displaying viruses displayed equal oncolytic efficacies in a syngeneic mouse myeloma model. We further demonstrated that single-chain antibody fragments against tumor-specific antigens can be inserted at the N terminus of the G protein and that corresponding replication-competent VSVs can be rescued efficiently. Overall, we demonstrated that functional tumor-targeting ligands can be displayed on replication-competent VSVs without perturbing viral growth and oncolytic efficacy. This study provides a rational foundation for the future development of fully retargeted oncolytic VSVs.

  13. Phage Peptide Libraries As a Source of Targeted Ligands

    PubMed Central

    Nemudraya, A. A.; Richter, V. A.; Kuligina, E. V.

    2016-01-01

    One of the dominant trends in modern pharmacology is the creation of drugs that act directly on the lesion focus and have minimal toxicity on healthy tissues and organs. This problem is particularly acute in relation to oncologic diseases. Short tissue- and organ-specific peptides capable of delivering drugs to the affected organ or tissue are considered promising targeted agents that can be used in the diagnosis and therapy of diseases, including cancer. The review discusses in detail the technology of phage display as a method for obtaining specific targeted peptide agents and offers examples of their use in diagnostic and clinical practice. PMID:27099784

  14. Chromodomain Ligand Optimization via Target-Class Directed Combinatorial Repurposing.

    PubMed

    Barnash, Kimberly D; Lamb, Kelsey N; Stuckey, Jacob I; Norris, Jacqueline L; Cholensky, Stephanie H; Kireev, Dmitri B; Frye, Stephen V; James, Lindsey I

    2016-09-16

    Efforts to develop strategies for small-molecule chemical probe discovery against the readers of the methyl-lysine (Kme) post-translational modification have been met with limited success. Targeted disruption of these protein-protein interactions via peptidomimetic inhibitor optimization is a promising alternative to small-molecule hit discovery; however, recognition of identical peptide motifs by multiple Kme reader proteins presents a unique challenge in the development of selective Kme reader chemical probes. These selectivity challenges are exemplified by the Polycomb repressive complex 1 (PRC1) chemical probe, UNC3866, which demonstrates submicromolar off-target affinity toward the non-PRC1 chromodomains CDYL2 and CDYL. Moreover, since peptidomimetics are challenging subjects for structure-activity relationship (SAR) studies, traditional optimization of UNC3866 would prove costly and time-consuming. Herein, we report a broadly applicable strategy for the affinity-based, target-class screening of chromodomains via the repurposing of UNC3866 in an efficient, combinatorial peptide library. A first-generation library yielded UNC4991, a UNC3866 analogue that exhibits a distinct selectivity profile while maintaining submicromolar affinity toward the CDYL chromodomains. Additionally, in vitro pull-down experiments from HeLa nuclear lysates further demonstrate the selectivity and utility of this compound for future elucidation of CDYL protein function.

  15. Aptamers: Active Targeting Ligands for Cancer Diagnosis and Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xu; Chen, Jiao; Wu, Min; Zhao, Julia Xiaojun

    2015-01-01

    Aptamers, including DNA, RNA and peptide aptamers, are a group of promising recognition units that can specifically bind to target molecules and cells. Due to their excellent specificity and high affinity to targets, aptamers have attracted great attention in various fields in which selective recognition units are required. They have been used in biosensing, drug delivery, disease diagnosis and therapy (especially for cancer treatment). In this review, we summarized recent applications of DNA and RNA aptamers in cancer theranostics. The specific binding ability of aptamers to cancer-related markers and cancer cells ensured their high performance for early diagnosis of cancer. Meanwhile, the efficient targeting ability of aptamers to cancer cells and tissues provided a promising way to deliver imaging agents and drugs for cancer imaging and therapy. Furthermore, with the development of nanoscience and nanotechnology, the conjugation of aptamers with functional nanomaterials paved an exciting way for the fabrication of theranostic agents for different types of cancers, which might be a powerful tool for cancer treatment. PMID:25699094

  16. A new target ligand Ser–Glu for PEPT1-overexpressing cancer imaging

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Tongcheng; Li, Na; Zhang, Lingzhi; Zhang, Yuanxing; Liu, Qin

    2016-01-01

    Nanoparticles functionalized with active target ligands have been widely used for tumor-specific diagnosis and therapy. The target ligands include antibodies, peptides, proteins, small molecules, and nucleic acid aptamers. Here, we utilize dipeptide Ser–Glu (DIP) as a new ligand to functionalize polymer-based fluorescent nanoparticles (NPs) for pancreatic cancer target imaging. We demonstrate that in the first step, Ser–Glu-conjugated NPs (NPs-DIP) efficiently bind to AsPC-1 and in the following NPs-DIP are internalized into AsPC-1 in vitro. The peptide transporter 1 inhibition experiment reveals that the targeting effects mainly depend on the specific binding of DIP to peptide transporter 1, which is remarkably upregulated in pancreatic cancer cells compared with varied normal cells. Furthermore, NPs-DIP specifically accumulate in the site of pancreatic tumor xenograft and are further internalized into the tumor cells in vivo after intravenous administration, indicating that DIP successfully enhanced nanoparticles internalization efficacy into tumor cells in vivo. This work establishes Ser–Glu to be a new tumor-targeting ligand and provides a promising tool for future tumor diagnostic or therapeutic applications. PMID:26811678

  17. A small molecule nanodrug consisting of amphiphilic targeting ligand-chemotherapy drug conjugate for targeted cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Mou, Quanbing; Ma, Yuan; Zhu, Xinyuan; Yan, Deyue

    2016-05-28

    Targeted drug delivery is a broadly applicable approach for cancer therapy. However, the nanocarrier-based targeted delivery system suffers from batch-to-batch variation, quality concerns and carrier-related toxicity issues. Thus, to develop a carrier-free targeted delivery system with nanoscale characteristics is very attractive. Here, a novel targeting small molecule nanodrug self-delivery system consisting of targeting ligand and chemotherapy drug was constructed, which combined the advantages of small molecules and nano-assemblies together and showed excellent targeting ability and long blood circulation time with well-defined structure, high drug loading ratio and on-demand drug release behavior. As a proof-of-concept, lactose (Lac) and doxorubicin (DOX) were chosen as the targeting ligand and chemotherapy drug, respectively. Lac and DOX were conjugated through a pH-responsive hydrazone group. For its intrinsic amphiphilic property, Lac-DOX conjugate could self-assemble into nanoparticles in water. Both in vitro and in vivo assays indicated that Lac-DOX nanoparticles exhibited enhanced anticancer activity and weak side effects. This novel active targeting nanodrug delivery system shows great potential in cancer therapy.

  18. Sensitive NMR Approach for Determining the Binding Mode of Tightly Binding Ligand Molecules to Protein Targets.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wan-Na; Nitsche, Christoph; Pilla, Kala Bharath; Graham, Bim; Huber, Thomas; Klein, Christian D; Otting, Gottfried

    2016-04-01

    Structure-guided drug design relies on detailed structural knowledge of protein-ligand complexes, but crystallization of cocomplexes is not always possible. Here we present a sensitive nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) approach to determine the binding mode of tightly binding lead compounds in complex with difficult target proteins. In contrast to established NMR methods, it does not depend on rapid exchange between bound and free ligand or on stable isotope labeling, relying instead on a tert-butyl group as a chemical label. tert-Butyl groups are found in numerous protein ligands and deliver an exceptionally narrow and tall (1)H NMR signal. We show that a tert-butyl group also produces outstandingly intense intra- and intermolecular NOESY cross-peaks. These enable measurements of pseudocontact shifts generated by lanthanide tags attached to the protein, which in turn allows positioning of the ligand on the protein. Once the ligand has been located, assignments of intermolecular NOEs become possible even without prior resonance assignments of protein side chains. The approach is demonstrated with the dengue virus NS2B-NS3 protease in complex with a high-affinity ligand containing a tert-butyl group. PMID:26974502

  19. Identification of ligands that target the HCV-E2 binding site on CD81.

    PubMed

    Olaby, Reem Al; Azzazy, Hassan M; Harris, Rodney; Chromy, Brett; Vielmetter, Jost; Balhorn, Rod

    2013-04-01

    Hepatitis C is a global health problem. While many drug companies have active R&D efforts to develop new drugs for treating Hepatitis C virus (HCV), most target the viral enzymes. The HCV glycoprotein E2 has been shown to play an essential role in hepatocyte invasion by binding to CD81 and other cell surface receptors. This paper describes the use of AutoDock to identify ligand binding sites on the large extracellular loop of the open conformation of CD81 and to perform virtual screening runs to identify sets of small molecule ligands predicted to bind to two of these sites. The best sites selected by AutoLigand were located in regions identified by mutational studies to be the site of E2 binding. Thirty-six ligands predicted by AutoDock to bind to these sites were subsequently tested experimentally to determine if they bound to CD81-LEL. Binding assays conducted using surface Plasmon resonance revealed that 26 out of 36 (72 %) of the ligands bound in vitro to the recombinant CD81-LEL protein. Competition experiments performed using dual polarization interferometry showed that one of the ligands predicted to bind to the large cleft between the C and D helices was also effective in blocking E2 binding to CD81-LEL.

  20. Ligand-Based Peptide Design and Combinatorial Peptide Libraries to Target G Protein-Coupled Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Gruber, Christian W.; Muttenthaler, Markus; Freissmuth, Michael

    2016-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are considered to represent the most promising drug targets; it has been repeatedly said that a large fraction of the currently marketed drugs elicit their actions by binding to GPCRs (with cited numbers varying from 30–50%). Closer scrutiny, however, shows that only a modest fraction of (~60) GPCRs are, in fact, exploited as drug targets, only ~20 of which are peptide-binding receptors. The vast majority of receptors in the humane genome have not yet been explored as sites of action for drugs. Given the drugability of this receptor class, it appears that opportunities for drug discovery abound. In addition, GPCRs provide for binding sites other than the ligand binding sites (referred to as the “orthosteric site”). These additional sites include (i) binding sites for ligands (referred to as “allosteric ligands”) that modulate the affinity and efficacy of orthosteric ligands, (ii) the interaction surface that recruits G proteins and arrestins, (iii) the interaction sites of additional proteins (GIPs, GPCR interacting proteins that regulate G protein signaling or give rise to G protein-independent signals). These sites can also be targeted by peptides. Combinatorial and natural peptide libraries are therefore likely to play a major role in identifying new GPCR ligands at each of these sites. In particular the diverse natural peptide libraries such as the venom peptides from marine cone-snails and plant cyclotides have been established as a rich source of drug leads. High-throughput screening and combinatorial chemistry approaches allow for progressing from these starting points to potential drug candidates. This will be illustrated by focusing on the ligand-based drug design of oxytocin (OT) and vasopressin (AVP) receptor ligands using natural peptide leads as starting points. PMID:20687879

  1. Ligand-target interaction-based weighting of substructures for virtual screening.

    PubMed

    Crisman, Thomas J; Sisay, Mihiret T; Bajorath, Jürgen

    2008-10-01

    A methodology is introduced to assign energy-based scores to two-dimensional (2D) structural features based on three-dimensional (3D) ligand-target interaction information and utilize interaction-annotated features in virtual screening. Database molecules containing such fragments are assigned cumulative scores that serve as a measure of similarity to active reference compounds. The Interaction Annotated Structural Features (IASF) method is applied to mine five high-throughput screening (HTS) data sets and often identifies more hits than conventional fragment-based similarity searching or ligand-protein docking. PMID:18821751

  2. [Enzyme-catalyzed synthesis of ASGPR ligand-targeted modifier in non-aqueous medium].

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yi; Wu, Wei; Zhang, Dong-qing; Mai, Yan-zhen

    2010-09-01

    The asialoglycoprotein receptor (ASGPR) was used to mediate drug carrier for hepatic targeted drug delivery, this article showed the enzyme-catalyzed esterification of galactose and vinyl stearate and a kind of ASGPR ligand-targeted which was used to insert the surface of liposome has been synthesized. The structure of product has been confirmed by TLC, ESI-MS and 1H NMR. The factors of types and quantity of enzyme, organic solvents, molar ratio of substrate, temperature and time of reaction have been studied. Results showed when using acetone as reaction medium, the quantity of Novozym 435 immobilized lipase was 30 mg mL(-1), molar ratio of galactose to vinyl stearate was 1:5, and reacted at 60 degrees C for 12 h, the transformation of vinyl stearate reached more than 70%. This study provides a novel and efficient route to the synthesis of ligand-targeted modifier.

  3. Structure-Based DNA-Targeting Strategies with Small Molecule Ligands for Drug Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Sheng, Jia; Gan, Jianhua; Huang, Zhen

    2014-01-01

    Nucleic acids are the molecular targets of many clinical anticancer drugs. However, compared with proteins, nucleic acids have traditionally attracted much less attention as drug targets in structure-based drug design, partially because limited structural information of nucleic acids complexed with potential drugs is available. Over the past several years, enormous progresses in nucleic acid crystallization, heavy-atom derivatization, phasing, and structural biology have been made. Many complicated nucleic acid structures have been determined, providing new insights into the molecular functions and interactions of nucleic acids, especially DNAs complexed with small molecule ligands. Thus, opportunities have been created to further discover nucleic acid-targeting drugs for disease treatments. This review focuses on the structure studies of DNAs complexed with small molecule ligands for discovering lead compounds, drug candidates, and/or therapeutics. PMID:23633219

  4. A targeting ligand enhances infectivity and cytotoxicity of an oncolytic adenovirus in human pancreatic cancer tissues.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Yuki; Hiraoka, Nobuyoshi; Goto, Naoko; Rin, Yosei; Miura, Kazuki; Narumi, Kenta; Uchida, Hiroaki; Tagawa, Masatoshi; Aoki, Kazunori

    2014-10-28

    The addition of a targeting strategy is necessary to enhance oncolysis and secure safety of a conditionally replicative adenovirus (CRAd). We have constructed an adenovirus library displaying random peptides on the fiber, and have successfully identified a pancreatic cancer-targeting ligand (SYENFSA). Here, the usefulness of cancer-targeted CRAd for pancreatic cancer was examined as a preclinical study. First, we constructed a survivin promoter-regulated CRAd expressing enhanced green fluorescent protein gene (EGFP), which displayed the identified targeting ligand (AdSur-SYE). The AdSur-SYE resulted in higher gene transduction efficiency and oncolytic potency than the untargeted CRAd (AdSur) in several pancreatic cancer cell lines. An intratumoral injection of AdSur-SYE significantly suppressed the growth of subcutaneous tumors, in which AdSur-SYE effectively proliferated and spread. An ectopic infection in adjacent tissues and organs of intratumorally injected AdSur-SYE was decreased compared with AdSur. Then, to examine whether the targeting ligand actually enhanced the infectivity of CRAd in human pancreatic cancer tissues, tumor cells prepared from surgical specimens were infected with viruses. The AdSur-SYE increased gene transduction efficiency 6.4-fold higher than did AdSur in single cells derived from human pancreatic cancer, whereas the infectivity of both vectors was almost the same in the pancreas and other cancers. Immunostaining showed that most EGFP(+) cells were cytokeratin-positive in the sliced tissues, indicating that pancreatic cancer cells but not stromal cells were injected with AdSur-SYE. AdSur-SYE resulted in a stronger oncolysis in the primary pancreatic cancer cells co-cultured with mouse embryonic fibroblasts than AdSur did. CRAd in combination with a tumor-targeting ligand is promising as a next-generation of oncolytic virotherapy for pancreatic cancer.

  5. Targeted Intracellular Delivery of Antisense Oligonucleotides Via Conjugation With Small Molecule Ligands

    PubMed Central

    Nakagawa, Osamu; Ming, Xin; Huang, Leaf; Juliano, Rudolph L.

    2010-01-01

    Selective delivery of antisense or siRNA oligonucleotides to cells and tissues via receptor-mediated endocytosis is becoming an important approach for oligonucleotide-based pharmacology. In most cases receptor targeting has been attained using antibodies or peptide-type ligands. Thus there are few examples of delivering oligonucleotides using the plethora of small-molecule receptor-specific ligands that currently exist. In this report we describe a facile approach to the generation of mono- and multi-valent conjugates of oligonucleotides with small molecule ligands. Using the sigma receptor ligand anisamide as an example, we describe conversion of the ligand to a phosphoramidite and direct incorporation of this moiety into the oligonucleotide by solid phase DNA synthesis. We generated mono- and tri-valent conjugates of anisamide with a splice switching antisense oligonucleotide (SSO) and tested their ability to modify splicing of a reporter gene (luciferase) in tumor cells in culture. The tri-valent anisamide-SSO conjugate displayed enhanced cellular uptake and was markedly more effective than an unconjugated SSO or the mono-valent conjugate in modifying splicing of the reporter. Significant biological effects were attained in the sub-100 nM concentration range. PMID:20550198

  6. Rapid Exercise-Induced Mobilization of Dendritic Cells Is Potentially Mediated by a Flt3L- and MMP-9-Dependent Process in Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Deckx, Nathalie; Wens, Inez; Nuyts, Amber H.; Lee, Wai-Ping; Hens, Niel; Koppen, Gudrun; Goossens, Herman; Van Damme, Pierre; Berneman, Zwi N.; Eijnde, Bert O.; Cools, Nathalie

    2015-01-01

    In healthy individuals, one exercise bout induces a substantial increase in the number of circulating leukocytes, while their function is transiently suppressed. The effect of one exercise bout in multiple sclerosis (MS) is less studied. Since recent evidence suggests a role of dendritic cells (DC) in the pathogenesis of MS, we investigated the effect of one combined endurance/resistance exercise bout on the number and function of DC in MS patients and healthy controls. Our results show a rapid increase in the number of DC in response to physical exercise in both MS patients and controls. Further investigation revealed that in particular DC expressing the migratory molecules CCR5 and CD62L were increased upon acute physical activity. This may be mediated by Flt3L- and MMP-9-dependent mobilization of DC, as demonstrated by increased circulating levels of Flt3L and MMP-9 following one exercise bout. Circulating DC display reduced TLR responsiveness after acute exercise, as evidenced by a less pronounced upregulation of activation markers, HLA-DR and CD86, on plasmacytoid DC and conventional DC, respectively. Our results indicate mobilization of DC, which may be less prone to drive inflammatory processes, following exercise. This may present a negative feedback mechanism for exercise-induced tissue damage and inflammation. PMID:26604429

  7. A General Synthetic Approach for Designing Epitope Targeted Macrocyclic Peptide Ligands.

    PubMed

    Das, Samir; Nag, Arundhati; Liang, JingXin; Bunck, David N; Umeda, Aiko; Farrow, Blake; Coppock, Matthew B; Sarkes, Deborah A; Finch, Amethist S; Agnew, Heather D; Pitram, Suresh; Lai, Bert; Yu, Mary Beth; Museth, A Katrine; Deyle, Kaycie M; Lepe, Bianca; Rodriguez-Rivera, Frances P; McCarthy, Amy; Alvarez-Villalonga, Belen; Chen, Ann; Heath, John; Stratis-Cullum, Dimitra N; Heath, James R

    2015-11-01

    We describe a general synthetic strategy for developing high-affinity peptide binders against specific epitopes of challenging protein biomarkers. The epitope of interest is synthesized as a polypeptide, with a detection biotin tag and a strategically placed azide (or alkyne) presenting amino acid. This synthetic epitope (SynEp) is incubated with a library of complementary alkyne or azide presenting peptides. Library elements that bind the SynEp in the correct orientation undergo the Huisgen cycloaddition, and are covalently linked to the SynEp. Hit peptides are tested against the full-length protein to identify the best binder. We describe development of epitope-targeted linear or macrocycle peptide ligands against 12 different diagnostic or therapeutic analytes. The general epitope targeting capability for these low molecular weight synthetic ligands enables a range of therapeutic and diagnostic applications, similar to those of monoclonal antibodies.

  8. A D-peptide ligand of nicotine acetylcholine receptors for brain-targeted drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Wei, Xiaoli; Zhan, Changyou; Shen, Qing; Fu, Wei; Xie, Cao; Gao, Jie; Peng, Chunmei; Zheng, Ping; Lu, Weiyue

    2015-03-01

    Lysosomes of brain capillary endothelial cells are implicated in nicotine acetylcholine receptor (nAChR)-mediated transcytosis and act as an enzymatic barrier for the transport of peptide ligands to the brain. A D-peptide ligand of nAChRs (termed (D)CDX), which binds to nAChRs with an IC50 value of 84.5 nM, was developed by retro-inverso isomerization. (D)CDX displayed exceptional stability in lysosomal homogenate and serum, and demonstrated significantly higher transcytosis efficiency in an in vitro blood-brain barrier monolayer compared with the parent L-peptide. When modified on liposomal surface, (D)CDX facilitated significant brain-targeted delivery of liposomes. As a result, brain-targeted delivery of (D)CDX modified liposomes enhanced therapeutic efficiency of encapsulated doxorubicin for glioblastoma. This study illustrates the importance of ligand stability in nAChRs-mediated transcytosis, and paves the way for developing stable brain-targeted entities.

  9. NKG2D-dependent cytotoxicity is controlled by ligand distribution in the target cell membrane

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, Emily; Brzostowski, Joseph A.; Long, Eric O.; Gross, Catharina C.

    2013-01-01

    While the importance of membrane microdomains in receptor-mediated activation of lymphocytes has been established, much less is known about the role of receptor ligand distribution on APC and target cells. Detergent-resistant membrane (DRM) domains, into which glycophosphatidylinositol (GPI)-linked proteins partition, are enriched in cholesterol and glycosphingolipids. ULBP1 is a GPI-linked ligand for natural cytotoxicity receptor NKG2D. To investigate how ULBP1 distribution on target cells affects NKG2D-dependent NK cell activation, we fused the extracellular domain of ULBP1 to the transmembrane domain of CD45. Introduction of this transmembrane domain eliminated the association of ULBP1 with the DRM fraction and caused a significant reduction of cytotoxicity and degranulation by NK cells. Clustering and lateral diffusion of ULBP1 was not affected by changes in the membrane anchor. These results show that the partitioning of receptor ligands in discrete membrane domains of target cells is an important determinant of NK cell activation. PMID:21464092

  10. Targeted PRINT Hydrogels: The Role of Nanoparticle Size and Ligand Density on Cell Association, Biodistribution, and Tumor Accumulation.

    PubMed

    Reuter, Kevin G; Perry, Jillian L; Kim, Dongwook; Luft, J Christopher; Liu, Rihe; DeSimone, Joseph M

    2015-10-14

    In this Letter, we varied targeting ligand density of an EGFR binding affibody on the surface of two different hydrogel PRINT nanoparticles (80 nm × 320 and 55 nm × 60 nm) and monitored effects on target-cell association, off-target phagocytic uptake, biodistribution, and tumor accumulation. Interestingly, variations in ligand density only significantly altered in vitro internalization rates for the 80 nm × 320 nm particle. However, in vivo, both particle sizes experienced significant changes in biodistribution and pharmacokinetics as a function of ligand density. Overall, nanoparticle size and passive accumulation were the dominant factors eliciting tumor sequestration. PMID:26389971

  11. Ligand-Target Prediction by Structural Network Biology Using nAnnoLyze

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Jiménez, Francisco; Marti-Renom, Marc A.

    2015-01-01

    Target identification is essential for drug design, drug-drug interaction prediction, dosage adjustment and side effect anticipation. Specifically, the knowledge of structural details is essential for understanding the mode of action of a compound on a target protein. Here, we present nAnnoLyze, a method for target identification that relies on the hypothesis that structurally similar binding sites bind similar ligands. nAnnoLyze integrates structural information into a bipartite network of interactions and similarities to predict structurally detailed compound-protein interactions at proteome scale. The method was benchmarked on a dataset of 6,282 pairs of known interacting ligand-target pairs reaching a 0.96 of area under the Receiver Operating Characteristic curve (AUC) when using the drug names as an input feature for the classifier, and a 0.70 of AUC for “anonymous” compounds or compounds not present in the training set. nAnnoLyze resulted in higher accuracies than its predecessor, AnnoLyze. We applied the method to predict interactions for all the compounds in the DrugBank database with each human protein structure and provide examples of target identification for known drugs against human diseases. The accuracy and applicability of our method to any compound indicate that a comparative docking approach such as nAnnoLyze enables large-scale annotation and analysis of compound–protein interactions and thus may benefit drug development. PMID:25816344

  12. Target Fishing for Chemical Compounds using Target-Ligand Activity data and Ranking based Methods

    PubMed Central

    Wale, Nikil; Karypis, George

    2009-01-01

    In recent years the development of computational techniques that identify all the likely targets for a given chemical compound, also termed as the problem of Target Fishing, has been an active area of research. Identification of likely targets of a chemical compound helps to understand problems such as toxicity, lack of efficacy in humans, and poor physical properties associated with that compound in the early stages of drug discovery. In this paper we present a set of techniques whose goal is to rank or prioritize targets in the context of a given chemical compound such that most targets that this compound may show activity against appear higher in the ranked list. These methods are based on our extensions to the SVM and Ranking Perceptron algorithms for this problem. Our extensive experimental study shows that the methods developed in this work outperform previous approaches by 2% to 60% under different evaluation criterions. PMID:19764745

  13. Highly Stable, Ligand Clustered “Patchy” Micelle Nanocarriers for Systemic Tumor Targeting

    PubMed Central

    Poon, Zhiyong; Lee, Jung Ah; Huang, Shenwen; Prevost, Richard J; Hammond, Paula T

    2010-01-01

    A novel linear-dendritic block copolymer has been synthesized and evaluated for targeted delivery. The use of the dendron as the micellar exterior block in this architecture allows the presentation of a relatively small quantity of ligands in clusters for enhanced targeting, thus maintaining a long circulation time of these “patchy” micelles. The polypeptide linear hydrophobic block drives formation of micelles that carry core-loaded drugs, and their unique design gives them an extremely high level of stability in vivo. We have found that these systems lead to extended time periods of increased accumulation in the tumor (up to 5 days) compared to non-targeted vehicles. We also demonstrate a 4x increase in efficacy of paclitaxel when delivered in the targeted nanoparticle systems, while significantly decreasing in vivo toxicity of the chemotherapy treatment. PMID:20816874

  14. In silico target fishing for rationalized ligand discovery exemplified on constituents of Ruta graveolens.

    PubMed

    Rollinger, Judith M; Schuster, Daniela; Danzl, Birgit; Schwaiger, Stefan; Markt, Patrick; Schmidtke, Michaela; Gertsch, Jürg; Raduner, Stefan; Wolber, Gerhard; Langer, Thierry; Stuppner, Hermann

    2009-02-01

    The identification of targets whose interaction is likely to result in the successful treatment of a disease is of growing interest for natural product scientists. In the current study we performed an exemplary application of a virtual parallel screening approach to identify potential targets for 16 secondary metabolites isolated and identified from the aerial parts of the medicinal plant RUTA GRAVEOLENS L. Low energy conformers of the isolated constituents were simultaneously screened against a set of 2208 pharmacophore models generated in-house for the IN SILICO prediction of putative biological targets, i. e., target fishing. Based on the predicted ligand-target interactions, we focused on three biological targets, namely acetylcholinesterase (AChE), the human rhinovirus (HRV) coat protein and the cannabinoid receptor type-2 (CB (2)). For a critical evaluation of the applied parallel screening approach, virtual hits and non-hits were assayed on the respective targets. For AChE the highest scoring virtual hit, arborinine, showed the best inhibitory IN VITRO activity on AChE (IC (50) 34.7 muM). Determination of the anti-HRV-2 effect revealed 6,7,8-trimethoxycoumarin and arborinine to be the most active antiviral constituents with IC (50) values of 11.98 muM and 3.19 muM, respectively. Of these, arborinine was predicted virtually. Of all the molecules subjected to parallel screening, one virtual CB (2) ligand was obtained, i. e., rutamarin. Interestingly, in experimental studies only this compound showed a selective activity to the CB (2) receptor ( Ki of 7.4 muM) by using a radioligand displacement assay. The applied parallel screening paradigm with constituents of R. GRAVEOLENS on three different proteins has shown promise as an IN SILICO tool for rational target fishing and pharmacological profiling of extracts and single chemical entities in natural product research.

  15. The synergistic effect of folate and RGD dual ligand of nanographene oxide on tumor targeting and photothermal therapy in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Cheol; Lee, Jong Hyun; Sahu, Abhishek; Tae, Giyoong

    2015-11-01

    Effective delivery of nanoparticles to the target site is necessary for successful biomedical applications. Inefficient targeting is a major concern for nanomedicines in cancer therapy. Conjugation of multiple targeting ligands to the nanoparticle surface might further enhance the targeting efficiency by a co-operative effect of individual ligands. In this study, a dual ligand targeting nanographene oxide (nGO) was developed by non-covalent interaction with folate and cRGD functionalized pluronic, which allowed precise control of ligand number on the nGO surface and ensured stability under physiological conditions. The tumor targeting abilities of single and dual ligand decorated nGOs were evaluated in vitro by using KB cells, over-expressing folate and integrin αvβ3 receptors. In vitro cellular uptake analysis by flow cytometry and confocal laser scanning microscopy showed enhanced uptake of dual ligand modified nGO compared to any of the single ligand modified nGOs. The cellular uptake of dual targeted cRGD-FA-nGO was increased by 1.9 and 2.4 folds compared to single targeted cRGD-nGO or FA-nGO, respectively. The in vivo biodistribution experiment in a mouse xenograft model also confirmed the synergistic targeting effect of cRGD and folate dual functionalized nGO. A significantly higher tumor accumulation of cRGD-FA-nGO was observed compared to cRGD-nGO or FA-nGO. The higher tumor accumulation of dual targeted nGO resulted in complete ablation of tumor tissue through an enhanced photothermal effect by NIR laser irradiation. Therefore, co-functionalization of a nanoparticle by cRGD and folate is a potentially useful way to enhance the tumor targeting efficacy.Effective delivery of nanoparticles to the target site is necessary for successful biomedical applications. Inefficient targeting is a major concern for nanomedicines in cancer therapy. Conjugation of multiple targeting ligands to the nanoparticle surface might further enhance the targeting efficiency by a

  16. Prolonged signaling at the parathyroid hormone receptor by peptide ligands targeted to a specific receptor conformation

    PubMed Central

    Okazaki, Makoto; Ferrandon, Sebastien; Vilardaga, Jean-Pierre; Bouxsein, Mary L.; Potts, John T.; Gardella, Thomas J.

    2008-01-01

    The parathyroid hormone receptor (PTHR) is a class B G protein-coupled receptor that plays critical roles in bone and mineral ion metabolism. Ligand binding to the PTHR involves interactions to both the amino-terminal extracellular (N) domain, and transmembrane/extracellular loop, or juxtamembrane (J) regions of the receptor. Recently, we found that PTH(1–34), but not PTH-related protein, PTHrP(1–36), or M-PTH(1–14) (M = Ala/Aib1,Aib3,Gln10,Har11,Ala12,Trp14,Arg19), binds to the PTHR in a largely GTPγS-resistant fashion, suggesting selective binding to a novel, high-affinity conformation (R0), distinct from the GTPγS-sensitive conformation (RG). We examined the effects in vitro and in vivo of introducing the M substitutions, which enhance interaction to the J domain, into PTH analogs extended C-terminally to incorporate residues involved in the N domain interaction. As compared with PTH(1–34), M-PTH(1–28) and M-PTH(1–34) bound to R0 with higher affinity, produced more sustained cAMP responses in cells, formed more stable complexes with the PTHR in FRET and subcellular localization assays, and induced more prolonged calcemic and phosphate responses in mice. Moreover, after 2 weeks of daily injection in mice, M-PTH(1–34) induced larger increases in trabecular bone volume and greater increases in cortical bone turnover, than did PTH(1–34). Thus, the putative R0 PTHR conformation can form highly stable complexes with certain PTH ligand analogs and thereby mediate surprisingly prolonged signaling responses in bone and/or kidney PTH target cells. Controlling, via ligand analog design, the selectivity with which a PTH ligand binds to R0, versus RG, may be a strategy for optimizing signaling duration time, and hence therapeutic efficacy, of PTHR agonist ligands. PMID:18946036

  17. Unique motifs and hydrophobic interactions shape the binding of modified DNA ligands to protein targets

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Douglas R.; Gelinas, Amy D.; Zhang, Chi; Rohloff, John C.; Carter, Jeffrey D.; O’Connell, Daniel; Waugh, Sheela M.; Wolk, Steven K.; Mayfield, Wesley S.; Burgin, Alex B.; Edwards, Thomas E.; Stewart, Lance J.; Gold, Larry; Janjic, Nebojsa; Jarvis, Thale C.

    2012-01-01

    Selection of aptamers from nucleic acid libraries by in vitro evolution represents a powerful method of identifying high-affinity ligands for a broad range of molecular targets. Nevertheless, a sizeable fraction of proteins remain difficult targets due to inherently limited chemical diversity of nucleic acids. We have exploited synthetic nucleotide modifications that confer protein-like diversity on a nucleic acid scaffold, resulting in a new generation of binding reagents called SOMAmers (Slow Off-rate Modified Aptamers). Here we report a unique crystal structure of a SOMAmer bound to its target, platelet-derived growth factor B (PDGF-BB). The SOMAmer folds into a compact structure and exhibits a hydrophobic binding surface that mimics the interface between PDGF-BB and its receptor, contrasting sharply with mainly polar interactions seen in traditional protein-binding aptamers. The modified nucleotides circumvent the intrinsic diversity constraints of natural nucleic acids, thereby greatly expanding the structural vocabulary of nucleic acid ligands and considerably broadening the range of accessible protein targets. PMID:23139410

  18. Synthesis and binding profile of haloperidol-based bivalent ligands targeting dopamine D(2)-like receptors.

    PubMed

    Salama, Ismail; Löber, Stefan; Hübner, Harald; Gmeiner, Peter

    2014-08-15

    Homodimers of dopamine D2-like receptors are suggested to be of particular importance in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia and, thus, serve as promising targets for the discovery of atypical antipsychotics. This study describes the development of a series of novel bivalent molecules with a pharmacophore derived from the dopamine receptor antagonist haloperidol. These dimers were investigated in comparison to their monomeric analogues for their D2long, D2short, D3, and D4 receptor binding and the ability to bridge two neighboring receptor protomers. Radioligand binding studies provided diagnostic insights when Hill slopes close to two for the bivalent ligand 13 incorporating 22 spacer atoms and a comparative analysis with monovalent control ligands indicated a bivalent binding mode with a simultaneous occupancy of two neighboring binding sites. PMID:25047579

  19. Targeting the thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor with small molecule ligands and antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Terry F; Latif, Rauf

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor (TSHR) is the essential molecule for thyroid growth and thyroid hormone production. Since it is also a key autoantigen in Graves’ disease and is involved in thyroid cancer pathophysiology, the targeting of the TSHR offers a logical model for disease control. Areas covered We review the structure and function of the TSHR and the progress in both small molecule ligands and TSHR antibodies for their therapeutic potential. Expert opinion Stabilization of a preferential conformation for the TSHR by allosteric ligands and TSHR antibodies with selective modulation of the signaling pathways is now possible. These tools may be the next generation of therapeutics for controlling the pathophysiological consequences mediated by the effects of the TSHR in the thyroid and other extrathyroidal tissues. PMID:25768836

  20. Clustered Integrin Ligands as a Novel Approach for the Targeting of Non-Viral Vectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, Quinn Kwan Tai

    Gene transfer or gene delivery is described as the process in which foreign DNA is introduced into cells. Over the years, gene delivery has gained the attention of many researchers and has been developed as powerful tools for use in biotechnology and medicine. With the completion of the Human Genome Project, such advances in technology allowed for the identification of diseases ranging from hereditary disorders to acquired ones (cancer) which were thought to be incurable. Gene therapy provides the means necessary to treat or eliminate genetic diseases from its origin, unlike traditional medicine which only treat symptoms. With ongoing clinical trials for gene therapy increasing, the greatest difficulty still lies in developing safe systems which can target cells of interest to provide efficient delivery. Nature, over millions of years of evolution, has provided an example of one of the most efficient delivery systems: viruses. Although the use of viruses for gene delivery has been well studied, the safety issues involving immunogenicity, insertional mutagenesis, high cost, and poor reproducibility has provided problems for their clinical application. From understanding viruses, we gain insight to designing new systems for non-viral gene delivery. One of these techniques utilized by adenoviruses is the clustering of ligands on its surface through the use of a protein called a penton base. Through the use of nanotechnology we can mimic this basic concept in non-viral gene delivery systems. This dissertation research is focused on developing and applying a novel system for displaying the integrin binding ligand (RGD) in a constrained manner to form a clustered integrin ligand binding platform to be used to enhance the targeting and efficiency of non-viral gene delivery vectors. Peptide mixed monolayer protected gold nanoparticles provides a suitable surface for ligand clustering. A relationship between the peptide ratios in the reaction solution used to form these

  1. The non-canonical Wnt pathway negatively regulates dendritic cell differentiation by inhibiting the expansion of Flt3(+) lymphocyte-primed multipotent precursors.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Jing; Zhou, Haibo; Wu, Ning; Wu, Li

    2016-09-01

    The differentiation of dendritic cells (DC) is affected by the aging process. However, the molecular mechanisms responsible for the alteration of DC development in aged mice have not been clarified. Recently, Wnt5a was reported to be an important aging-related molecule in hematopoietic systems. Here, we hypothesized that the increased expression of Wnt5a in aged hematopoietic precursors led to deficient DC differentiation in aged mice. The percentages and cell numbers of plasmacytoid DC (pDC) and CD172a(-)CD8α(+)conventional DC (cDC) were decreased in aged mice compared to young mice. Further analysis indicated that the hematopoietic precursors that gave rise to DC, including Flt3(+) lymphoid-primed multipotent precursors (LMPP), common lymphoid progenitors (CLP) and common DC precursors (CDP), were all decreased in the bone marrow of aged mice. Overexpression of Wnt5a in hematopoietic precursors strongly affected the differentiation of cDC and pDC in vivo. Treatment of hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) with Wnt5a led to a significant decrease in the differentiation of the LMPP, CLP and CDP populations that was similar to the decrease observed in the bone marrow (BM) HSC of aged mice. Molecular studies demonstrated that Wnt5a negatively regulated the expression of an array of genes important for DC differentiation, including Flt3, Gfi-1, Ikaros, Bcl11a, and IL-7R, by activating the Wnt5a-Cdc42 pathway. Finally, we rejuvenated DC differentiation from aged precursors by blocking the non-canonical Wnt pathway. Our study identified the key roles of the non-canonical Wnt pathway in DC differentiation and DC aging.

  2. The non-canonical Wnt pathway negatively regulates dendritic cell differentiation by inhibiting the expansion of Flt3+ lymphocyte-primed multipotent precursors

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Jing; Zhou, Haibo; Wu, Ning; Wu, Li

    2016-01-01

    The differentiation of dendritic cells (DC) is affected by the aging process. However, the molecular mechanisms responsible for the alteration of DC development in aged mice have not been clarified. Recently, Wnt5a was reported to be an important aging-related molecule in hematopoietic systems. Here, we hypothesized that the increased expression of Wnt5a in aged hematopoietic precursors led to deficient DC differentiation in aged mice. The percentages and cell numbers of plasmacytoid DC (pDC) and CD172a−CD8α+conventional DC (cDC) were decreased in aged mice compared to young mice. Further analysis indicated that the hematopoietic precursors that gave rise to DC, including Flt3+ lymphoid-primed multipotent precursors (LMPP), common lymphoid progenitors (CLP) and common DC precursors (CDP), were all decreased in the bone marrow of aged mice. Overexpression of Wnt5a in hematopoietic precursors strongly affected the differentiation of cDC and pDC in vivo. Treatment of hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) with Wnt5a led to a significant decrease in the differentiation of the LMPP, CLP and CDP populations that was similar to the decrease observed in the bone marrow (BM) HSC of aged mice. Molecular studies demonstrated that Wnt5a negatively regulated the expression of an array of genes important for DC differentiation, including Flt3, Gfi-1, Ikaros, Bcl11a, and IL-7R, by activating the Wnt5a-Cdc42 pathway. Finally, we rejuvenated DC differentiation from aged precursors by blocking the non-canonical Wnt pathway. Our study identified the key roles of the non-canonical Wnt pathway in DC differentiation and DC aging. PMID:26051474

  3. Liposomes for targeting hepatocellular carcinoma: use of conjugated arabinogalactan as targeting ligand.

    PubMed

    Shah, Sanket M; Goel, Peeyush N; Jain, Ankitkumar S; Pathak, Pankaj O; Padhye, Sameer G; Govindarajan, Srinath; Ghosh, Sandipto S; Chaudhari, Pradip R; Gude, Rajiv P; Gopal, Vijaya; Nagarsenker, Mangal S

    2014-12-30

    Present study investigates the potential of chemically modified (Shah et al., 2013) palmitoylated arabinogalactan (PAG) in guiding liposomal delivery system and targeting asialoglycoprotein receptors (ASGPR) which are expressed in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). PAG was incorporated in liposomes during preparation and doxorubicin hydrochloride was actively loaded in preformed liposomes with and without PAG. The liposomal systems with or without PAG were evaluated for in vitro release, in vitro cytotoxicity, in vitro cell uptake on ASGPR(+) cells, in vivo pharmacokinetic study, in vivo biodistribution study, and in vivo efficacy study in immunocompromised mice. The particle size for all the liposomal systems was below 200 nm with a negative zeta potential. Doxorubicin loaded PAG liposomes released significantly higher amount of doxorubicin at pH 5.5 as compared to pH 7.4, providing advantage for targeted tumor therapy. Doxorubicin in PAG liposomes showed superior cytotoxicity on ASGPR(+) HepG2 cells as compared to ASGPR(-), MCF7, A549, and HT29 cells. Superior uptake of doxorubicin loaded PAG liposomes as compared to doxorubicin loaded conventional liposomes was evident in confocal microscopy studies. Higher AUC in pharmacokinetic study and higher deposition in liver was observed for PAG liposomes compared to conventional liposomes. Significantly higher tumor suppression was noted in immunocompromised mice for mice treated with PAG liposomes as compared to the conventional liposomes. Targeting ability and superior activity of PAG liposomes is established pre-clinically suggesting potential of targeted delivery system for improved treatment of HCC.

  4. The effect of dual ligand-targeted micelles on the delivery and efficacy of poorly soluble drug for cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Sawant, Rupa R; Jhaveri, Aditi M; Koshkaryev, Alexander; Qureshi, Farooq; Torchilin, Vladimir P

    2013-08-01

    We prepared and evaluated transferrin (Tf) and monoclonal antibody (mAb) 2C5-modified dual ligand-targeted poly(ethylene glycol)-phosphatidylethanolamine micelles loaded with a poorly soluble drug, R547 (a selective adenosine triphosphate-competitive cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor) for enhancement of targeting efficiency and cytotoxicity in vitro and in vivo to A2780 ovarian carcinoma compared to single ligand-targeted micelles. Micellar solubilization significantly improved the solubility of R547 from 1 to 800 μg/mL. The size of modified and non-modified micelles was 13-16 nm. Flow cytometry indicated significantly enhanced cellular association of dual ligand-targeted micelles compared to single ligand-targeted micelles. Confocal microscopy confirmed the Tf receptor-mediated endocytosis of rhodamine-labeled Tf-modified micelles after staining the micelle-treated cells with the endosomal marker Tf-Alexa488. The optimized dual-targeted micelles enhanced cytotoxicity in vitro against A2780 ovarian cancer cells compared to plain and single ligand-targeted micelles. Interestingly, in vivo anti-tumor efficacy was more pronounced for the preparation with a single-targeting ligand (Tf). The specific combination Tf and mAb 2C5 did not yield the expected increase in efficacy as was observed in vitro. This observation suggests that the relationships between targeting ligands in vivo could be more complex than in simplified in vitro systems, and the results of the optimization process should always be verified in vivo. PMID:23594094

  5. Selective recognition and stabilization of new ligands targeting the potassium form of the human telomeric G-quadruplex DNA

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yi-Hwa; Chuang, Show-Mei; Wu, Pei-Ching; Chen, Chun-Liang; Jeyachandran, Sivakamavalli; Lo, Shou-Chen; Huang, Hsu-Shan; Hou, Ming-Hon

    2016-01-01

    The development of a ligand that is capable of distinguishing among the wide variety of G-quadruplex structures and targeting telomeres to treat cancer is particularly challenging. In this study, the ability of two anthraquinone telomerase inhibitors (NSC749235 and NSC764638) to target telomeric G-quadruplex DNA was probed. We found that these ligands specifically target the potassium form of telomeric G-quadruplex DNA over the DNA counterpart. The characteristic interaction with the telomeric G-quadruplex DNA and the anticancer activities of these ligands were also explored. The results of this present work emphasize our understanding of the binding selectivity of anthraquinone derivatives to G-quadruplex DNA and assists in future drug development for G-quadruplex-specific ligands. PMID:27511133

  6. Selective recognition and stabilization of new ligands targeting the potassium form of the human telomeric G-quadruplex DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yi-Hwa; Chuang, Show-Mei; Wu, Pei-Ching; Chen, Chun-Liang; Jeyachandran, Sivakamavalli; Lo, Shou-Chen; Huang, Hsu-Shan; Hou, Ming-Hon

    2016-08-01

    The development of a ligand that is capable of distinguishing among the wide variety of G-quadruplex structures and targeting telomeres to treat cancer is particularly challenging. In this study, the ability of two anthraquinone telomerase inhibitors (NSC749235 and NSC764638) to target telomeric G-quadruplex DNA was probed. We found that these ligands specifically target the potassium form of telomeric G-quadruplex DNA over the DNA counterpart. The characteristic interaction with the telomeric G-quadruplex DNA and the anticancer activities of these ligands were also explored. The results of this present work emphasize our understanding of the binding selectivity of anthraquinone derivatives to G-quadruplex DNA and assists in future drug development for G-quadruplex-specific ligands.

  7. Mycolic acids, a promising mycobacterial ligand for targeting of nanoencapsulated drugs in tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Lemmer, Yolandy; Kalombo, Lonji; Pietersen, Ray-Dean; Jones, Arwyn T; Semete-Makokotlela, Boitumelo; Van Wyngaardt, Sandra; Ramalapa, Bathabile; Stoltz, Anton C; Baker, Bienyameen; Verschoor, Jan A; Swai, Hulda S; de Chastellier, Chantal

    2015-08-10

    The appearance of drug-resistant strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) poses a great challenge to the development of novel treatment programmes to combat tuberculosis. Since innovative nanotechnologies might alleviate the limitations of current therapies, we have designed a new nanoformulation for use as an anti-TB drug delivery system. It consists of incorporating mycobacterial cell wall mycolic acids (MA) as targeting ligands into a drug-encapsulating Poly dl-lactic-co-glycolic acid polymer (PLGA), via a double emulsion solvent evaporation technique. Bone marrow-derived mouse macrophages, either uninfected or infected with different mycobacterial strains (Mycobacterium avium, Mycobacterium bovis BCG or Mtb), were exposed to encapsulated isoniazid-PLGA nanoparticles (NPs) using MA as a targeting ligand. The fate of the NPs was monitored by electron microscopy. Our study showed that i) the inclusion of MA in the nanoformulations resulted in their expression on the outer surface and a significant increase in phagocytic uptake of the NPs; ii) nanoparticle-containing phagosomes were rapidly processed into phagolysosomes, whether MA had been included or not; and iii) nanoparticle-containing phagolysosomes did not fuse with non-matured mycobacterium-containing phagosomes, but fusion events with mycobacterium-containing phagolysosomes were clearly observed.

  8. Next generation sequencing analysis of platinum refractory advanced germ cell tumor sensitive to Sunitinib (Sutent®) a VEGFR2/PDGFRβ/c-kit/ FLT3/RET/CSF1R inhibitor in a phase II trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Germ cell tumors (GCT) are the most common solid tumors in adolescent and young adult males (age 15 and 35 years) and remain one of the most curable of all solid malignancies. However a subset of patients will have tumors that are refractory to standard chemotherapy agents. The management of this refractory population remains challenging and approximately 400 patients continue to die every year of this refractory disease in the United States. Methods Given the preclinical evidence implicating vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) signaling in the biology of germ cell tumors, we hypothesized that the vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR) inhibitor sunitinib (Sutent) may possess important clinical activity in the treatment of this refractory disease. We proposed a Phase II efficacy study of sunitinib in seminomatous and non-seminomatous metastatic GCT’s refractory to first line chemotherapy treatment (ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00912912). Next generation targeted exome sequencing using HiSeq 2000 (Illumina Inc., San Diego, CA, USA) was performed on the tumor sample of the unusual responder. Results Five patients are enrolled into this Phase II study. Among them we report here the clinical course of a patient (Patient # 5) who had an exceptional response to sunitinib. Next generation sequencing to understand this patient’s response to sunitinib revealed RET amplification, EGFR and KRAS amplification as relevant aberrations. Oncoscan MIP array were employed to validate the copy number analysis that confirmed RET gene amplification. Conclusion Sunitinib conferred clinical benefit to this heavily pre-treated patient. Next generation sequencing of this ‘exceptional responder’ identified the first reported case of a RET amplification as a potential basis of sensitivity to sunitinib (VEGFR2/PDGFRβ/c-kit/ FLT3/RET/CSF1R inhibitor) in a patient with refractory germ cell tumor. Further characterization of GCT patients using

  9. Optimization of a Novel Peptide Ligand Targeting Human Carbonic Anhydrase IX

    PubMed Central

    Rana, Shoaib; Nissen, Felix; Marr, Annabell; Markert, Annette; Altmann, Annette; Mier, Walter; Debus, Juergen; Haberkorn, Uwe; Askoxylakis, Vasileios

    2012-01-01

    Background Carbonic anhydrase IX (CA IX) is a hypoxia-regulated transmembrane protein over-expressed in various types of human cancer. Recently, a new peptide with affinity for human carbonic anhydrase IX (CaIX-P1) was identified using the phage display technology. Aim of the present study is to characterize the binding site in the sequence of CaIX-P1, in order to optimize the binding and metabolic properties and use it for targeting purposes. Methodology/Principal Findings Various fragments of CaIX-P1 were synthesized on solid support using Fmoc chemistry. Alanine scanning was performed for identification of the amino acids crucial for target binding. Derivatives with increased binding affinity were radiolabeled and in vitro studies were carried out on the CA IX positive human renal cell carcinoma cell line SKRC 52 and the CA IX negative human pancreatic carcinoma cell line BxPC3. Metabolic stability was investigated in cell culture medium and human serum. Organ distribution and planar scintigraphy studies were performed in Balb/c nu/nu mice carrying subcutaneously transplanted SKRC 52 tumors. The results of our studies clearly identified amino acids that are important for target binding. Among various fragments and derivatives the ligand CaIX-P1-4-10 (NHVPLSPy) was found to possess increased binding potential in SKRC 52 cells, whereas no binding capacity for BxPC3 cells was observed. Binding of radiolabeled CaIX-P1-4-10 on CA IX positive cells could be inhibited by both the unlabeled and the native CaIX-P1 peptide but not by control peptides. Stability experiments indicated the degradation site in the sequence of CaIX-P1-4-10. Biodistribution studies showed a higher in vivo accumulation in the tumor than in most healthy tissues. Conclusions Our data reveal modifications in the sequence of the CA IX affine ligand CaIX-P1 that might be favorable for improvement of target affinity and metabolic stability, which are necessary prior to the use of the ligand in

  10. New insights into the kinetic target-guided synthesis of protein ligands.

    PubMed

    Oueis, Emilia; Sabot, Cyrille; Renard, Pierre-Yves

    2015-08-01

    The kinetic target-guided synthesis (KTGS) strategy is an unconventional discovery approach that takes advantage of the presence of the biological target itself in order to irreversibly assemble the best inhibitors from an array of building blocks. This strategy has grown over the last two decades notably after the introduction of the in situ click chemistry concept by Sharpless and colleagues in the early 2000s based on the use of the Huisgen cycloaddition between terminal alkynes and azides. KTGS is a captivating area of research offering an unprecedented and powerful strategy to probe the macromolecular complexity and dynamics of biological targets. After a brief introduction listing all chemical ligation reactions reported to date in KTGS, this review focuses on the last five years' progress to expand the repertoire of the click or "click-like" tool box targeting proteins, as well as to overcome limitations arising in particular from false negatives, i.e. potent ligands that are not formed, or formed in undetectable trace amounts. Furthermore, we wish to analyze the new twists and novelties described in some of these applications in order to better understand the conditions that govern this strategy and the extent to which it can be developed and generalized for a more efficient process. PMID:26144842

  11. Ligand-functionalized nanoparticles target endothelial cells in retinal capillaries after systemic application.

    PubMed

    Pollinger, Klaus; Hennig, Robert; Ohlmann, Andreas; Fuchshofer, Rudolf; Wenzel, Rebecca; Breunig, Miriam; Tessmar, Joerg; Tamm, Ernst R; Goepferich, Achim

    2013-04-01

    To date, diseases affecting vascular structures in the posterior eye are mostly treated by laser photocoagulation and multiple intraocular injections, procedures that destroy healthy tissue and can cause vision-threatening complications. To overcome these drawbacks, we investigate the feasibility of receptor-mediated nanoparticle targeting to capillary endothelial cells in the retina after i.v. application. Cell-binding studies using microvascular endothelial cells showed receptor-specific binding and cellular uptake of cyclo(RGDfC)-modified quantum dots via the αvβ3 integrin receptor. Conversely, Mueller cells and astrocytes, representing off-target cells located in the retina, revealed only negligible interaction with nanoparticles. In vivo experiments, using nude mice as the model organism, demonstrated a strong binding of the ligand-modified quantum dots in the choriocapillaris and intraretinal capillaries upon i.v. injection and 1-h circulation time. Nontargeted nanoparticles, in contrast, did not accumulate to a significant amount in the target tissue. The presented strategy of targeting integrin receptors in the retina could be of utmost value for future intervention in pathologies of the posterior eye, which are to date only accessible with difficulty.

  12. The Prelude on Novel Receptor and Ligand Targets Involved in the Treatment of Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Jonnalagadda, Venu Gopal; Ram Raju, Allam Venkata Sita; Pittala, Srinivas; Shaik, Afsar; Selkar, Nilakash Annaji

    2014-01-01

    Metabolic disorders are a group of disorders, due to the disruption of the normal metabolic process at a cellular level. Diabetes Mellitus and Tyrosinaemia are the majorly reported metabolic disorders. Among them, Diabetes Mellitus is a one of the leading metabolic syndrome, affecting 5 to 7 % of the population worldwide and mainly characterised by elevated levels of glucose and is associated with two types of physiological event disturbances such as impaired insulin secretion and insulin resistance. Up to now, various treatment strategies are like insulin, alphaglucosidase inhibitors, biguanides, incretins were being followed. Concurrently, various novel therapeutic strategies are required to advance the therapy of Diabetes mellitus. For the last few decades, there has been an extensive research in understanding the metabolic pathways involved in Diabetes Mellitus at the cellular level and having the profound knowledge on cell-growth, cell-cycle, and apoptosis at a molecular level provides new targets for the treatment of Diabetes Mellitus. Receptor signalling has been involved in these mechanisms, to translate the information coming from outside. To understand the various receptors involved in these pathways, we must have a sound knowledge on receptors and ligands involved in it. This review mainly summarises the receptors and ligands which are involved the Diabetes Mellitus. Finally, researchers have to develop the alternative chemical moieties that retain their affinity to receptors and efficacy. Diabetes Mellitus being a metabolic disorder due to the glucose surfeit, demands the need for regular exercise along with dietary changes. PMID:24754003

  13. Targeting a homogeneously glycosylated antibody Fc to bind cancer cells using a synthetic receptor ligand.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Junpeng; Chen, Rui; Pawlicki, Mark A; Tolbert, Thomas J

    2009-09-30

    The targeting of a glycosylated antibody Fc fragment to bind to cancer cells by site-selective incorporation of a synthetic ligand is described. Homogeneously glycosylated immunoglobulin G subclass 1 fragment crystallizable (IgG1 Fc) was produced by expression in a glycosylation-deficient yeast strain and subsequent treatment with mannosidase IA. A N-terminal cysteine was generated on the expressed IgG1 Fc by utilizing proteolytic processing enzymes in the yeast secretory pathway. A cyclic RGD peptide thioester 2 was synthesized and then site-selectively attached to the N-terminus of the IgG1 Fc glycoprotein using native chemical ligation. The resulting chemically modified antibody fragment, RGD-Man(5)-IgG1 Fc (5), retained biological activity similar to that of the free cyclic RGD peptide 1 when assayed for its ability to both promote and inhibit the adhesion of alpha(v)beta(3) integrin receptor-expressing WM-115 melanoma cells. In addition, fluorescent microscopy experiments were conducted using FITC-labeled 5 and confirmed binding of 5 to WM-115 melanoma cells. Site-selectively modified antibody fragments such as the one described here may be used to combine the beneficial properties of synthetic receptor ligands with antibody fragments to develop useful biochemical tools and improved therapeutics. The methods described here can also be used to produce glycoprotein fragments for the chemoenzymatic synthesis of homogeneous glycoproteins.

  14. Structural insights into human 5-lipoxygenase inhibition: combined ligand-based and target-based approach.

    PubMed

    Charlier, Caroline; Hénichart, Jean-Pierre; Durant, François; Wouters, Johan

    2006-01-12

    The human 5-LOX enzyme and its interaction with competitive inhibitors were investigated by means of a combined ligand-based and target-based approach. First, a pharmacophore model was generated for 16 non redox 5-LOX inhibitors with Catalyst (HipHop module). It includes two hydrophobic groups, an aromatic ring, and two hydrogen bond acceptors. The 3D structure of human 5-LOX was then modeled based on the crystal structure of rabbit 15-LOX, and the binding modes of representative ligands were studied by molecular docking. Confrontation of the docking results with the pharmacophore model allowed the weighting of the pharmacophoric features and the integration of structural information. This led to the proposal of an interaction model inside the 5-LOX active site, consisting of four major and two secondary interaction points: on one hand, two hydrophobic groups, an aromatic ring, and a hydrogen bond acceptor, and, on the other hand, an acidic moiety and an additional hydrogen bond acceptor. PMID:16392803

  15. Structural insights into human 5-lipoxygenase inhibition: combined ligand-based and target-based approach.

    PubMed

    Charlier, Caroline; Hénichart, Jean-Pierre; Durant, François; Wouters, Johan

    2006-01-12

    The human 5-LOX enzyme and its interaction with competitive inhibitors were investigated by means of a combined ligand-based and target-based approach. First, a pharmacophore model was generated for 16 non redox 5-LOX inhibitors with Catalyst (HipHop module). It includes two hydrophobic groups, an aromatic ring, and two hydrogen bond acceptors. The 3D structure of human 5-LOX was then modeled based on the crystal structure of rabbit 15-LOX, and the binding modes of representative ligands were studied by molecular docking. Confrontation of the docking results with the pharmacophore model allowed the weighting of the pharmacophoric features and the integration of structural information. This led to the proposal of an interaction model inside the 5-LOX active site, consisting of four major and two secondary interaction points: on one hand, two hydrophobic groups, an aromatic ring, and a hydrogen bond acceptor, and, on the other hand, an acidic moiety and an additional hydrogen bond acceptor.

  16. Synthesis and evaluation of antineurotoxicity properties of an amyloid-β peptide targeting ligand containing a triamino acid.

    PubMed

    Honcharenko, Dmytro; Bose, Partha Pratim; Maity, Jyotirmoy; Kurudenkandy, Firoz Roshan; Juneja, Alok; Flöistrup, Erik; Biverstål, Henrik; Johansson, Jan; Nilsson, Lennart; Fisahn, André; Strömberg, Roger

    2014-09-14

    Peptide-like compounds containing an arginine have been shown to bind and stabilize the central helix of the Alzheimer's disease related amyloid-β peptide (Aβ) in an α-helical conformation, thereby delaying its aggregation into cytotoxic species. Here we study a novel Aβ targeting ligand AEDabDab containing the triamino acid, N(γ)-(2-aminoethyl)-2,4-diaminobutanoic (AEDab) acid. The new AEDab triamino acid carries an extra positive charge in the side chain and is designed to be incorporated into a ligand AEDabDab where the AEDab replaces an arginine moiety in a previously developed ligand Pep1b. This is done in order to increase the Aβ-ligand interaction, and molecular dynamics (MD) simulation of the stability of the Aβ central helix in the presence of the AEDabDab ligand shows further stabilization of the helical conformation of Aβ compared to the previously reported Pep1b as well as compared to the AEOrnDab ligand containing an N(δ)-(2-aminoethyl)-2,5-diaminopentanoic acid unit which has an additional methylene group. To evaluate the effect of the AEDabDab ligand on the Aβ neurotoxicity the AEDab triamino acid building block is synthesized by reductive alkylation of N-protected-glycinal with α-amino-protected diaminobutanoic acid, and the Aβ targeting ligand AEDabDab is prepared by solid-phase synthesis starting with attachment of glutarate to the Wang support. Replacement of the arginine residue by the AEDab triamino acid resulted in an improved capability of the ligand to prevent the Aβ1-42 induced reduction of gamma (γ) oscillations in hippocampal slice preparation.

  17. Nanoparticles for oral delivery: Targeted nanoparticles with peptidic ligands for oral protein delivery

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Yeonhee; Cho, Yong Woo; Park, Kinam

    2012-01-01

    As the field of biotechnology has advanced, oral protein delivery has also made significant progress. Oral delivery is the most common method of drug administration with high levels of patient acceptance. Despite the preference of oral delivery, administration of therapeutic proteins has been extremely difficult. Increasing the bioavailability of oral protein drugs to the therapeutically acceptable level is still a challenging goal. Poor membrane permeability, high molecular weight, and enzymatic degradation of protein drugs have remained unsolved issues. Among diverse strategies, nanotechnology has provided a glimpse of hope in oral delivery of protein drugs. Nanoparticles have advantages, such as small size, high surface area, and modification using functional groups for high capacity or selectivity. Nanoparticles with peptidic ligands are especially worthy of notice because they can be used for specific targeting in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. This article reviews the transport mechanism of the GI tract, barriers to protein absorption, current status and limitations of nanotechnology for oral protein delivery system. PMID:23123292

  18. Multivalent display of quinic acid based ligands for targeting E-selectin expressing cells.

    PubMed

    Shamay, Yosi; Paulin, Denise; Ashkenasy, Gonen; David, Ayelet

    2009-10-01

    The site-specific expression of molecular markers on endothelial cells of blood vessels during inflammatory response and angiogenesis provides an opportunity to target drugs and imaging molecules to the vascular endothelium of diseased tissues. This paper describes an innovative strategy for selective delivery of polymer conjugates to E- and P-selectin expressing cells using a series of quinic acid (Qa) based non-carbohydrate analogues of the natural ligand sialyl Lewis(x) (sLe(x)) as targeting moieties. We demonstrate that such analogues antagonize the adhesion of sLe(x) expressing HL-60 cells to both E- and P-selectin. Significantly, the apparent avidity of polymer conjugates carrying multiple Qa copies has increased by 3 orders of magnitude relative to their monomeric forms. Furthermore, we found that the major mechanism of copolymer entry and delivery into E-selectin expressing cells is endocytosis. These selectin-targetable copolymers provide the foundation to support controlled delivery of anticancer drugs and imaging agents to tumor vasculature for therapeutic and diagnostic applications. PMID:19746918

  19. Multivalent display of quinic acid based ligands for targeting E-selectin expressing cells.

    PubMed

    Shamay, Yosi; Paulin, Denise; Ashkenasy, Gonen; David, Ayelet

    2009-10-01

    The site-specific expression of molecular markers on endothelial cells of blood vessels during inflammatory response and angiogenesis provides an opportunity to target drugs and imaging molecules to the vascular endothelium of diseased tissues. This paper describes an innovative strategy for selective delivery of polymer conjugates to E- and P-selectin expressing cells using a series of quinic acid (Qa) based non-carbohydrate analogues of the natural ligand sialyl Lewis(x) (sLe(x)) as targeting moieties. We demonstrate that such analogues antagonize the adhesion of sLe(x) expressing HL-60 cells to both E- and P-selectin. Significantly, the apparent avidity of polymer conjugates carrying multiple Qa copies has increased by 3 orders of magnitude relative to their monomeric forms. Furthermore, we found that the major mechanism of copolymer entry and delivery into E-selectin expressing cells is endocytosis. These selectin-targetable copolymers provide the foundation to support controlled delivery of anticancer drugs and imaging agents to tumor vasculature for therapeutic and diagnostic applications.

  20. Ligand substitutions between ruthenium–cymene compounds can control protein versus DNA targeting and anticancer activity

    PubMed Central

    Adhireksan, Zenita; Davey, Gabriela E.; Campomanes, Pablo; Groessl, Michael; Clavel, Catherine M.; Yu, Haojie; Nazarov, Alexey A.; Yeo, Charmian Hui Fang; Ang, Wee Han; Dröge, Peter; Rothlisberger, Ursula; Dyson, Paul J.; Davey, Curt A.

    2014-01-01

    Ruthenium compounds have become promising alternatives to platinum drugs by displaying specific activities against different cancers and favourable toxicity and clearance properties. Nonetheless, their molecular targeting and mechanism of action are poorly understood. Here we study two prototypical ruthenium-arene agents—the cytotoxic antiprimary tumour compound [(η6-p-cymene)Ru(ethylene-diamine)Cl]PF6 and the relatively non-cytotoxic antimetastasis compound [(η6-p-cymene)Ru(1,3,5-triaza-7-phosphaadamantane)Cl2]—and discover that the former targets the DNA of chromatin, while the latter preferentially forms adducts on the histone proteins. Using a novel ‘atom-to-cell’ approach, we establish the basis for the surprisingly site-selective adduct formation behaviour and distinct cellular impact of these two chemically similar anticancer agents, which suggests that the cytotoxic effects arise largely from DNA lesions, whereas the protein adducts may be linked to the other therapeutic activities. Our study shows promise for developing new ruthenium drugs, via ligand-based modulation of DNA versus protein binding and thus cytotoxic potential, to target distinguishing epigenetic features of cancer cells. PMID:24637564

  1. A New Peptide Ligand for Targeting Human Carbonic Anhydrase IX, Identified through the Phage Display Technology

    PubMed Central

    Askoxylakis, Vasileios; Garcia-Boy, Regine; Rana, Shoaib; Krämer, Susanne; Hebling, Ulrike; Mier, Walter; Altmann, Annette; Markert, Annette; Debus, Jürgen; Haberkorn, Uwe

    2010-01-01

    Carbonic anhydrase IX (CAIX) is a transmembrane enzyme found to be overexpressed in various tumors and associated with tumor hypoxia. Ligands binding this target may be used to visualize hypoxia, tumor manifestation or treat tumors by endoradiotherapy. Methods Phage display was performed with a 12 amino acid phage display library by panning against a recombinant extracellular domain of human carbonic anhydrase IX. The identified peptide CaIX-P1 was chemically synthesized and tested in vitro on various cell lines and in vivo in Balb/c nu/nu mice carrying subcutaneously transplanted tumors. Binding, kinetic and competition studies were performed on the CAIX positive human renal cell carcinoma cell line SKRC 52, the CAIX negative human renal cell carcinoma cell line CaKi 2, the human colorectal carcinoma cell line HCT 116 and on human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC). Organ distribution studies were carried out in mice, carrying SKRC 52 tumors. RNA expression of CAIX in HCT 116 and HUVEC cells was investigated by quantitative real time PCR. Results In vitro binding experiments of 125I-labeled-CaIX-P1 revealed an increased uptake of the radioligand in the CAIX positive renal cell carcinoma cell line SKRC 52. Binding of the radioligand in the colorectal carcinoma cell line HCT 116 increased with increasing cell density and correlated with the mRNA expression of CAIX. Radioligand uptake was inhibited up to 90% by the unlabeled CaIX-P1 peptide, but not by the negative control peptide octreotide at the same concentration. No binding was demonstrated in CAIX negative CaKi 2 and HUVEC cells. Organ distribution studies revealed a higher accumulation in SKRC 52 tumors than in heart, spleen, liver, muscle, intestinum and brain, but a lower uptake compared to blood and kidney. Conclusions These data indicate that CaIX-P1 is a promising candidate for the development of new ligands targeting human carbonic anhydrase IX. PMID:21209841

  2. Toward a magic or imaginary bullet? Ligands for drug targeting to cancer cells: principles, hopes, and challenges

    PubMed Central

    Toporkiewicz, Monika; Meissner, Justyna; Matusewicz, Lucyna; Czogalla, Aleksander; Sikorski, Aleksander F

    2015-01-01

    There are many problems directly correlated with the systemic administration of drugs and how they reach their target site. Targeting promises to be a hopeful strategy as an improved means of drug delivery, with reduced toxicity and minimal adverse side effects. Targeting exploits the high affinity of cell-surface-targeted ligands, either directly or as carriers for a drug, for specific retention and uptake by the targeted diseased cells. One of the most important parameters which should be taken into consideration in the selection of an appropriate ligand for targeting is the binding affinity (KD). In this review we focus on the importance of binding affinities of monoclonal antibodies, antibody derivatives, peptides, aptamers, DARPins, and small targeting molecules in the process of selection of the most suitable ligand for targeting of nanoparticles. In order to provide a critical comparison between these various options, we have also assessed each technology format across a range of parameters such as molecular size, immunogenicity, costs of production, clinical profiles, and examples of the level of selectivity and toxicity of each. Wherever possible, we have also assessed how incorporating such a targeted approach compares with, or is superior to, original treatments. PMID:25733832

  3. Multi-ligand nanoparticles for targeted drug delivery to the injured vascular wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kona, Soujanya

    Pathological conditions like coronary artery disease, acute myocardial infarction, stroke, and peripheral artery diseases as well as cardiovascular interventions used in the treatment of coronary artery diseases such as angioplasty and stenting damage/injure the blood vessel wall, leading to inflamed or activated endothelial cells that have been implicated in events leading to thrombosis, inflammation, and restenosis. Oral administration of anti-coagulant and anti-inflammatory drugs causes systemic toxicity, bleeding, patient incompliance, and inadequate amounts of drugs at the injured area. Though drug-eluting stents have shown therapeutic benefits, complications such as in-stent restenosis and late thrombosis still remain and are a cause for concern. Rapid growth in the field of nanotechnology and nanoscience in recent years has paved the way for new targeted and controlled drug delivery strategies. In this perspective, the development of biodegradable nanoparticles for targeted intracellular drug delivery to the inflamed endothelial cells may offer an improved avenue for treatment of cardiovascular diseases. The major objective of this research was to develop "novel multi-ligand nanoparticles," as drug carriers that can efficiently target and deliver therapeutic agents to the injured/inflamed vascular cells under dynamic flow conditions. Our approach mimics the natural binding ability of platelets to injured/activated endothelial cells through glycoprotein Ib (GPIb) bound to P-selectin expressed on inflamed endothelial cells and to the subendothelium through GPIb binding to von Willebrand factor (vWF) deposited onto the injured vascular wall. Our design also exploits the natural cell membrane translocation ability of the internalizing cell peptide - trans-activating transcriptor (TAT) to enhance the nanoparticle uptake by the targeted cells. Our hypothesis is that these multi-ligand nanoparticles would show an increased accumulation at the injury site since GPIb

  4. Combining on-chip synthesis of a focused combinatorial library with computational target prediction reveals imidazopyridine GPCR ligands.

    PubMed

    Reutlinger, Michael; Rodrigues, Tiago; Schneider, Petra; Schneider, Gisbert

    2014-01-01

    Using the example of the Ugi three-component reaction we report a fast and efficient microfluidic-assisted entry into the imidazopyridine scaffold, where building block prioritization was coupled to a new computational method for predicting ligand-target associations. We identified an innovative GPCR-modulating combinatorial chemotype featuring ligand-efficient adenosine A1/2B and adrenergic α1A/B receptor antagonists. Our results suggest the tight integration of microfluidics-assisted synthesis with computer-based target prediction as a viable approach to rapidly generate bioactivity-focused combinatorial compound libraries with high success rates.

  5. PSMA Ligand Conjugated PCL-PEG Polymeric Micelles Targeted to Prostate Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Jian; Sui, Bowen; Gou, Jingxin; Liu, Jingshuo; Tang, Xing; Xu, Hui; Zhang, Yu; Jin, Xiangqun

    2014-01-01

    In this content, a small molecular ligand of prostate specific membrane antigen (SMLP) conjugated poly (caprolactone) (PCL)-b-poly (ethylene glycol) (PEG) copolymers with different block lengths were synthesized to construct a satisfactory drug delivery system. Four different docetaxel-loaded polymeric micelles (DTX-PMs) were prepared by dialysis with particle sizes less than 60 nm as characterized by dynamic light scattering (DLS) and transmission electron microscope (TEM). Optimization of the prepared micelles was conducted based on short-term stability and drug-loading content. The results showed that optimized systems were able to remain stable over 7 days. Compared with Taxotere, DTX-PMs with the same ratio of hydrophilic/hydrophobic chain length displayed similar sustained release behaviors. The cytotoxicity of the optimized targeted DTX-PCL12K-PEG5K-SMLP micelles (DTX-PMs2) and non-targeted DTX-PCL12K-mPEG5K micelles (DTX-PMs1) were evaluated by MTT assays using prostate specific membrane antigen (PSMA) positive prostate adenocarcinoma cells (LNCaP). The results showed that the targeted micelles had a much lower IC50 than their non-targeted counterparts (48 h: 0.87±0.27 vs 13.48±1.03 µg/ml; 72 h: 0.02±0.008 vs 1.35±0.54 µg/ml). In vitro cellular uptake of PMs2 showed 5-fold higher fluorescence intensity than that of PMs1 after 4 h incubation. According to these results, the novel nano-sized drug delivery system based on DTX-PCL-PEG-SMLP offers great promise for the treatment of prostatic cancer. PMID:25386942

  6. Double-targeting Using A TrkC-Ligand Conjugated To BODIPY-based PDT Agent

    PubMed Central

    Kamkaew, Anyanee; Burgess, Kevin

    2013-01-01

    A molecule 1 (IY-IY-PDT) was designed to contain a fragment (IY-IY) that targets the TrkC receptor, and a photosensitizer that acts as an agent for photodynamic therapy (PDT). Molecule 1 had sub-micromolar photocytotoxicities to cells that were either engineered to stably express TrkC (NIH3T3-TrkC) or that naturally express high levels of TrkC (SY5Y neuroblastoma lines). Control experiments showed 1 is not cytotoxic in the dark, and has significantly less photocytotoxicity towards cells that do not express TrkC (NIH3T3-WT). Other controls featuring a similar agent 2 (YI-YI-PDT) which is identical and isomeric with 1 except that the targeting region is scrambled (a YI-YI motif, see text) showed 1 is considerably more photocytotoxic than 2 on TrkC+ cells. Imaging live TrkC+ cells after treatment with a fluorescent agent 1 (IY-IY-PDT) proved that 1 permeates into TrkC+ cells and localizes in the lysosomes. This observation indirectly indicates agent 1 enters the cells via the TrkC receptor. Consistent with this, the dose-dependent PDT effects of 1 can be competitively reduced by the natural TrkC ligand, neurotrophin NT3. PMID:24063347

  7. The preimplantation mouse embryo is a target for cannabinoid ligand-receptor signaling.

    PubMed Central

    Paria, B C; Das, S K; Dey, S K

    1995-01-01

    Using a reverse transcription-coupled PCR, we demonstrated that both brain and spleen type cannabinoid receptor (CB1-R and CB2-R, respectively) mRNAs are expressed in the preimplantation mouse embryo. The CB1-R mRNA expression was coincident with the activation of the embryonic genome late in the two-cell stage, whereas the CB2-R mRNA was present from the one-cell through the blastocyst stages. The major psychoactive component of marijuana (-)-delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol [(-)-THC] inhibited forskolin-stimulated cAMP generation in the blastocyst, and this inhibition was prevented by pertussis toxin. However, the inactive cannabinoid cannabidiol (CBD) failed to influence this response. These results suggest that cannabinoid receptors in the embryo are coupled to inhibitory guanine nucleotide binding proteins. Further, the oviduct and uterus exhibited the enzymatic capacity to synthesize the putative endogenous cannabinoid ligand arachidonylethanolamide (anandamide). Synthetic and natural cannabinoid agonists [WIN 55,212-2, CP 55,940, (-)-THC, and anandamide], but not CBD or arachidonic acid, arrested the development of two-cell embryos primarily between the four-cell and eight-cell stages in vitro in a dose-dependent manner. Anandamide also interfered with the development of eight-cell embryos to blastocysts in culture. The autoradiographic studies readily detected binding of [3H]anandamide in embryos at all stages of development. Positive signals were present in one-cell embryos and all blastomeres of two-cell through four-cell embryos. However, most of the binding sites in eight-cell embryos and morulae were present in the outer cells. In the blastocyst, these signals were primarily localized in the mural trophectoderm with low levels of signals in the polar trophectoderm, while little or no signals were noted in inner cell mass cells.These results establish that the preimplantation mouse embryo is a target for cannabinoid ligands. Consequently, many of the

  8. Targeting breast to brain metastatic tumours with death receptor ligand expressing therapeutic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Bagci-Onder, Tugba; Du, Wanlu; Figueiredo, Jose-Luiz; Martinez-Quintanilla, Jordi; Shah, Khalid

    2015-06-01

    Characterizing clinically relevant brain metastasis models and assessing the therapeutic efficacy in such models are fundamental for the development of novel therapies for metastatic brain cancers. In this study, we have developed an in vivo imageable breast-to-brain metastasis mouse model. Using real time in vivo imaging and subsequent composite fluorescence imaging, we show a widespread distribution of micro- and macro-metastasis in different stages of metastatic progression. We also show extravasation of tumour cells and the close association of tumour cells with blood vessels in the brain thus mimicking the multi-foci metastases observed in the clinics. Next, we explored the ability of engineered adult stem cells to track metastatic deposits in this model and show that engineered stem cells either implanted or injected via circulation efficiently home to metastatic tumour deposits in the brain. Based on the recent findings that metastatic tumour cells adopt unique mechanisms of evading apoptosis to successfully colonize in the brain, we reasoned that TNF receptor superfamily member 10A/10B apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) based pro-apoptotic therapies that induce death receptor signalling within the metastatic tumour cells might be a favourable therapeutic approach. We engineered stem cells to express a tumour selective, potent and secretable variant of a TRAIL, S-TRAIL, and show that these cells significantly suppressed metastatic tumour growth and prolonged the survival of mice bearing metastatic breast tumours. Furthermore, the incorporation of pro-drug converting enzyme, herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase, into therapeutic S-TRAIL secreting stem cells allowed their eradication post-tumour treatment. These studies are the first of their kind that provide insight into targeting brain metastasis with stem-cell mediated delivery of pro-apoptotic ligands and have important clinical implications.

  9. Ligand efficiency-based support vector regression models for predicting bioactivities of ligands to drug target proteins.

    PubMed

    Sugaya, Nobuyoshi

    2014-10-27

    The concept of ligand efficiency (LE) indices is widely accepted throughout the drug design community and is frequently used in a retrospective manner in the process of drug development. For example, LE indices are used to investigate LE optimization processes of already-approved drugs and to re-evaluate hit compounds obtained from structure-based virtual screening methods and/or high-throughput experimental assays. However, LE indices could also be applied in a prospective manner to explore drug candidates. Here, we describe the construction of machine learning-based regression models in which LE indices are adopted as an end point and show that LE-based regression models can outperform regression models based on pIC50 values. In addition to pIC50 values traditionally used in machine learning studies based on chemogenomics data, three representative LE indices (ligand lipophilicity efficiency (LLE), binding efficiency index (BEI), and surface efficiency index (SEI)) were adopted, then used to create four types of training data. We constructed regression models by applying a support vector regression (SVR) method to the training data. In cross-validation tests of the SVR models, the LE-based SVR models showed higher correlations between the observed and predicted values than the pIC50-based models. Application tests to new data displayed that, generally, the predictive performance of SVR models follows the order SEI > BEI > LLE > pIC50. Close examination of the distributions of the activity values (pIC50, LLE, BEI, and SEI) in the training and validation data implied that the performance order of the SVR models may be ascribed to the much higher diversity of the LE-based training and validation data. In the application tests, the LE-based SVR models can offer better predictive performance of compound-protein pairs with a wider range of ligand potencies than the pIC50-based models. This finding strongly suggests that LE-based SVR models are better than pIC50-based

  10. Secondary mutations as mediators of resistance to targeted therapy in leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Cortes, Jorge; Ravandi, Farhad; Patel, Keyur P.; Burger, Jan A.; Konopleva, Marina; Kantarjian, Hagop

    2015-01-01

    The advent of small molecule-based targeted therapy has improved the treatment of both acute and chronic leukemias. Resistance to small molecule inhibitors has emerged as a common theme. The most frequent mode of acquired resistance is the acquisition of point mutations in the kinase domain. FLT3 inhibitors have improved response rates in FLT3-mutated acute myeloid leukemia (AML). The occurrence of the ATP-binding site and activation loop mutations confers varying degrees of resistance to the individual FLT3 inhibitors. Second-generation FLT3 inhibitors such as crenolanib may overcome the resistance of these mutations. Furthermore, nonmutational mechanisms of resistance such as prosurvival pathways and bone marrow signaling may be upregulated in FLT3 inhibitor-resistant AML with secondary kinase domain mutations. More recently, point mutations conferring resistance to the Bruton tyrosine kinase inhibitor ibrutinib in chronic lymphocytic leukemia, arsenic trioxide in acute promyelocytic leukemia, and the BH3-mimetic ABT199 in lymphoma have been identified. In chronic myeloid leukemia, the emergence of tyrosine kinase domain mutations has historically been the dominant mechanism of resistance. The early identification of secondary point mutations and their downstream effects along with the development of second- or third-generation inhibitors and rationally designed small molecule combinations are potential strategies to overcome mutation-mediated resistance. PMID:25795921

  11. Multi-Target Directed Donepezil-Like Ligands for Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Unzeta, Mercedes; Esteban, Gerard; Bolea, Irene; Fogel, Wieslawa A; Ramsay, Rona R; Youdim, Moussa B H; Tipton, Keith F; Marco-Contelles, José

    2016-01-01

    HIGHLIGHTS ASS234 is a MTDL compound containing a moiety from Donepezil and the propargyl group from the PF 9601N, a potent and selective MAO B inhibitor. This compound is the most advanced anti-Alzheimer agent for preclinical studies identified in our laboratory.Derived from ASS234 both multipotent donepezil-indolyl (MTDL-1) and donepezil-pyridyl hybrids (MTDL-2) were designed and evaluated as inhibitors of AChE/BuChE and both MAO isoforms. MTDL-2 showed more high affinity toward the four enzymes than MTDL-1.MTDL-3 and MTDL-4, were designed containing the N-benzylpiperidinium moiety from Donepezil, a metal- chelating 8-hydroxyquinoline group and linked to a N-propargyl core and they were pharmacologically evaluated.The presence of the cyano group in MTDL-3, enhanced binding to AChE, BuChE and MAO A. It showed antioxidant behavior and it was able to strongly complex Cu(II), Zn(II) and Fe(III).MTDL-4 showed higher affinity toward AChE, BuChE.MTDL-3 exhibited good brain penetration capacity (ADMET) and less toxicity than Donepezil. Memory deficits in scopolamine-lesioned animals were restored by MTDL-3.MTDL-3 particularly emerged as a ligand showing remarkable potential benefits for its use in AD therapy. Alzheimer's disease (AD), the most common form of adult onset dementia, is an age-related neurodegenerative disorder characterized by progressive memory loss, decline in language skills, and other cognitive impairments. Although its etiology is not completely known, several factors including deficits of acetylcholine, β-amyloid deposits, τ-protein phosphorylation, oxidative stress, and neuroinflammation are considered to play significant roles in the pathophysiology of this disease. For a long time, AD patients have been treated with acetylcholinesterase inhibitors such as donepezil (Aricept®) but with limited therapeutic success. This might be due to the complex multifactorial nature of AD, a fact that has prompted the design of new Multi-Target-Directed Ligands

  12. Multi-Target Directed Donepezil-Like Ligands for Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Unzeta, Mercedes; Esteban, Gerard; Bolea, Irene; Fogel, Wieslawa A.; Ramsay, Rona R.; Youdim, Moussa B. H.; Tipton, Keith F.; Marco-Contelles, José

    2016-01-01

    HIGHLIGHTS ASS234 is a MTDL compound containing a moiety from Donepezil and the propargyl group from the PF 9601N, a potent and selective MAO B inhibitor. This compound is the most advanced anti-Alzheimer agent for preclinical studies identified in our laboratory.Derived from ASS234 both multipotent donepezil-indolyl (MTDL-1) and donepezil-pyridyl hybrids (MTDL-2) were designed and evaluated as inhibitors of AChE/BuChE and both MAO isoforms. MTDL-2 showed more high affinity toward the four enzymes than MTDL-1.MTDL-3 and MTDL-4, were designed containing the N-benzylpiperidinium moiety from Donepezil, a metal- chelating 8-hydroxyquinoline group and linked to a N-propargyl core and they were pharmacologically evaluated.The presence of the cyano group in MTDL-3, enhanced binding to AChE, BuChE and MAO A. It showed antioxidant behavior and it was able to strongly complex Cu(II), Zn(II) and Fe(III).MTDL-4 showed higher affinity toward AChE, BuChE.MTDL-3 exhibited good brain penetration capacity (ADMET) and less toxicity than Donepezil. Memory deficits in scopolamine-lesioned animals were restored by MTDL-3.MTDL-3 particularly emerged as a ligand showing remarkable potential benefits for its use in AD therapy. Alzheimer's disease (AD), the most common form of adult onset dementia, is an age-related neurodegenerative disorder characterized by progressive memory loss, decline in language skills, and other cognitive impairments. Although its etiology is not completely known, several factors including deficits of acetylcholine, β-amyloid deposits, τ-protein phosphorylation, oxidative stress, and neuroinflammation are considered to play significant roles in the pathophysiology of this disease. For a long time, AD patients have been treated with acetylcholinesterase inhibitors such as donepezil (Aricept®) but with limited therapeutic success. This might be due to the complex multifactorial nature of AD, a fact that has prompted the design of new Multi-Target-Directed Ligands

  13. Requirement of p53 targets in chemosensitization of colonic carcinoma to death ligand therapy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shulin; El-Deiry, Wafik S

    2003-12-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) exhibits specific tumoricidal activity and is under development for cancer therapy. Mismatch-repair-deficient colonic tumors evade TRAIL-induced apoptosis through mutational inactivation of Bax, but chemotherapeutics including Camptosar (CPT-11) restore TRAIL sensitivity. However, the signaling pathways in restoring TRAIL sensitivity remain to be elucidated. Here, we imaged p53 transcriptional activity in Bax-/- carcinomas by using bioluminescence, in vivo, and find that p53 is required for sensitization to TRAIL by CPT-11. Small interfering RNAs directed at proapoptotic p53 targets reveal TRAIL receptor KILLER/DR5 contributes significantly to TRAIL sensitization, whereas Bak plays a minor role. Caspase 8 inhibition protects both CPT-11 pretreated wild-type and Bax-/- HCT116 cells from TRAIL-induced apoptosis, whereas caspase 9 inhibition only rescued the wild-type HCT116 cells from death induced by TRAIL. The results suggest a conversion in the apoptotic mechanism in HCT116 colon carcinoma from a type II pathway involving Bax and the mitochondria to a type I pathway involving efficient extrinsic pathway caspase activation. In contrast to Bax-/- cells, Bak-deficient human cancers undergo apoptosis in response to TRAIL or CPT-11, implying that these proteins have nonoverlapping functions. Our studies elucidate a mechanism for restoration of TRAIL sensitivity in MMR-deficient Bax-/- human cancers through p53-dependent activation of KILLER/DR5 and reconstitution of a type I death pathway. Efforts to identify agents that up-regulate DR5 may be useful in cancer therapies restoring TRAIL sensitivity. PMID:14645705

  14. Identification of a novel peptide ligand targeting visceral adipose tissue via transdermal route by in vivo phage display.

    PubMed

    Lee, Nam Kyung; Kim, Hong Shin; Kim, Kyung Hyun; Kim, Eun-Bae; Cho, Chong Su; Kang, Sang Kee; Choi, Yun Jaie

    2011-11-01

    To find novel peptide ligands targeting visceral adipose tissue (visceral fat) via transdermal route, in vivo phage display screening was conducted by dermal administration of a phage-peptide library to rats and a peptide sequence, CGLHPAFQC (designated as TDA1), was identified as a targeting ligand to visceral adipose tissue through the consecutive transdermal biopannings. Adipocyte-specific affinity and transdermal activity of the TDA1 were validated in vitro and targeting ability of the dermally administered TDA1 to visceral adipose tissue was also confirmed in vivo. TDA1 was effectively translocated into systemic circulation after dermal administration and selectively targeted visceral adipose tissue without any preference to other organs tested. Fluorescent microscopic analysis revealed that the TDA1 could be specifically localized in the hair follicles of the skin, as well as in the visceral adipose tissue. Thus, we inferred that dermally administered TDA1 would first access systemic circulation via hair follicles as its transdermal route and then could target visceral fat effectively. The overall results suggest that the TDA1 peptide could be potentially applied as a homing moiety for delivery of anti-obesity therapeutics to visceral fat through the convenient transdermal pathway. PMID:21999821

  15. Identification of a novel peptide ligand targeting visceral adipose tissue via transdermal route by in vivo phage display.

    PubMed

    Lee, Nam Kyung; Kim, Hong Shin; Kim, Kyung Hyun; Kim, Eun-Bae; Cho, Chong Su; Kang, Sang Kee; Choi, Yun Jaie

    2011-11-01

    To find novel peptide ligands targeting visceral adipose tissue (visceral fat) via transdermal route, in vivo phage display screening was conducted by dermal administration of a phage-peptide library to rats and a peptide sequence, CGLHPAFQC (designated as TDA1), was identified as a targeting ligand to visceral adipose tissue through the consecutive transdermal biopannings. Adipocyte-specific affinity and transdermal activity of the TDA1 were validated in vitro and targeting ability of the dermally administered TDA1 to visceral adipose tissue was also confirmed in vivo. TDA1 was effectively translocated into systemic circulation after dermal administration and selectively targeted visceral adipose tissue without any preference to other organs tested. Fluorescent microscopic analysis revealed that the TDA1 could be specifically localized in the hair follicles of the skin, as well as in the visceral adipose tissue. Thus, we inferred that dermally administered TDA1 would first access systemic circulation via hair follicles as its transdermal route and then could target visceral fat effectively. The overall results suggest that the TDA1 peptide could be potentially applied as a homing moiety for delivery of anti-obesity therapeutics to visceral fat through the convenient transdermal pathway.

  16. Design and Characterization of Superpotent Bivalent Ligands Targeting Oxytocin Receptor Dimers via a Channel-Like Structure.

    PubMed

    Busnelli, Marta; Kleinau, Gunnar; Muttenthaler, Markus; Stoev, Stoytcho; Manning, Maurice; Bibic, Lucka; Howell, Lesley A; McCormick, Peter J; Di Lascio, Simona; Braida, Daniela; Sala, Mariaelvina; Rovati, G Enrico; Bellini, Tommaso; Chini, Bice

    2016-08-11

    Dimeric/oligomeric states of G-protein coupled receptors have been difficult to target. We report here bivalent ligands consisting of two identical oxytocin-mimetics that induce a three order magnitude boost in G-protein signaling of oxytocin receptors (OTRs) in vitro and a 100- and 40-fold gain in potency in vivo in the social behavior of mice and zebrafish. Through receptor mutagenesis and interference experiments with synthetic peptides mimicking transmembrane helices (TMH), we show that such superpotent behavior follows from the binding of the bivalent ligands to dimeric receptors based on a TMH1-TMH2 interface. Moreover, in this arrangement, only the analogues with a well-defined spacer length (∼25 Å) precisely fit inside a channel-like passage between the two protomers of the dimer. The newly discovered oxytocin bivalent ligands represent a powerful tool for targeting dimeric OTR in neurodevelopmental and psychiatric disorders and, in general, provide a framework to untangle specific arrangements of G-protein coupled receptor dimers. PMID:27420737

  17. T Cells Engineered With Chimeric Antigen Receptors Targeting NKG2D Ligands Display Lethal Toxicity in Mice.

    PubMed

    VanSeggelen, Heather; Hammill, Joanne A; Dvorkin-Gheva, Anna; Tantalo, Daniela G M; Kwiecien, Jacek M; Denisova, Galina F; Rabinovich, Brian; Wan, Yonghong; Bramson, Jonathan L

    2015-10-01

    Ligands for the NKG2D receptor are overexpressed on tumors, making them interesting immunotherapy targets. To assess the tumoricidal properties of T cells directed to attack NKG2D ligands, we engineered murine T cells with two distinct NKG2D-based chimeric antigen receptors (CARs): (i) a fusion between the NKG2D receptor and the CD3ζ chain and (ii) a conventional second-generation CAR, where the extracellular domain of NKG2D was fused to CD28 and CD3ζ. To enhance the CAR surface expression, we also engineered T cells to coexpress DAP10. In vitro functionality and surface expression levels of all three CARs was greater in BALB/c T cells than C57BL/6 T cells, indicating strain-specific differences. Upon adoptive transfer of NKG2D-CAR-T cells into syngeneic animals, we observed significant clinical toxicity resulting in morbidity and mortality. The severity of these toxicities varied between the CAR configurations and paralleled their in vitro NKG2D surface expression. BALB/c mice were more sensitive to these toxicities than C57BL/6 mice, consistent with the higher in vitro functionality of BALB/c T cells. Treatment with cyclophosphamide prior to adoptive transfer exacerbated the toxicity. We conclude that while NKG2D ligands may be useful targets for immunotherapy, the pursuit of NKG2D-based CAR-T cell therapies should be undertaken with caution. PMID:26122933

  18. The IUPHAR/BPS Guide to PHARMACOLOGY in 2016: towards curated quantitative interactions between 1300 protein targets and 6000 ligands.

    PubMed

    Southan, Christopher; Sharman, Joanna L; Benson, Helen E; Faccenda, Elena; Pawson, Adam J; Alexander, Stephen P H; Buneman, O Peter; Davenport, Anthony P; McGrath, John C; Peters, John A; Spedding, Michael; Catterall, William A; Fabbro, Doriano; Davies, Jamie A

    2016-01-01

    The IUPHAR/BPS Guide to PHARMACOLOGY (GtoPdb, http://www.guidetopharmacology.org) provides expert-curated molecular interactions between successful and potential drugs and their targets in the human genome. Developed by the International Union of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology (IUPHAR) and the British Pharmacological Society (BPS), this resource, and its earlier incarnation as IUPHAR-DB, is described in our 2014 publication. This update incorporates changes over the intervening seven database releases. The unique model of content capture is based on established and new target class subcommittees collaborating with in-house curators. Most information comes from journal articles, but we now also index kinase cross-screening panels. Targets are specified by UniProtKB IDs. Small molecules are defined by PubChem Compound Identifiers (CIDs); ligand capture also includes peptides and clinical antibodies. We have extended the capture of ligands and targets linked via published quantitative binding data (e.g. Ki, IC50 or Kd). The resulting pharmacological relationship network now defines a data-supported druggable genome encompassing 7% of human proteins. The database also provides an expanded substrate for the biennially published compendium, the Concise Guide to PHARMACOLOGY. This article covers content increase, entity analysis, revised curation strategies, new website features and expanded download options. PMID:26464438

  19. The IUPHAR/BPS Guide to PHARMACOLOGY in 2016: towards curated quantitative interactions between 1300 protein targets and 6000 ligands

    PubMed Central

    Southan, Christopher; Sharman, Joanna L.; Benson, Helen E.; Faccenda, Elena; Pawson, Adam J.; Alexander, Stephen P. H.; Buneman, O. Peter; Davenport, Anthony P.; McGrath, John C.; Peters, John A.; Spedding, Michael; Catterall, William A.; Fabbro, Doriano; Davies, Jamie A.

    2016-01-01

    The IUPHAR/BPS Guide to PHARMACOLOGY (GtoPdb, http://www.guidetopharmacology.org) provides expert-curated molecular interactions between successful and potential drugs and their targets in the human genome. Developed by the International Union of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology (IUPHAR) and the British Pharmacological Society (BPS), this resource, and its earlier incarnation as IUPHAR-DB, is described in our 2014 publication. This update incorporates changes over the intervening seven database releases. The unique model of content capture is based on established and new target class subcommittees collaborating with in-house curators. Most information comes from journal articles, but we now also index kinase cross-screening panels. Targets are specified by UniProtKB IDs. Small molecules are defined by PubChem Compound Identifiers (CIDs); ligand capture also includes peptides and clinical antibodies. We have extended the capture of ligands and targets linked via published quantitative binding data (e.g. Ki, IC50 or Kd). The resulting pharmacological relationship network now defines a data-supported druggable genome encompassing 7% of human proteins. The database also provides an expanded substrate for the biennially published compendium, the Concise Guide to PHARMACOLOGY. This article covers content increase, entity analysis, revised curation strategies, new website features and expanded download options. PMID:26464438

  20. The IUPHAR/BPS Guide to PHARMACOLOGY in 2016: towards curated quantitative interactions between 1300 protein targets and 6000 ligands.

    PubMed

    Southan, Christopher; Sharman, Joanna L; Benson, Helen E; Faccenda, Elena; Pawson, Adam J; Alexander, Stephen P H; Buneman, O Peter; Davenport, Anthony P; McGrath, John C; Peters, John A; Spedding, Michael; Catterall, William A; Fabbro, Doriano; Davies, Jamie A

    2016-01-01

    The IUPHAR/BPS Guide to PHARMACOLOGY (GtoPdb, http://www.guidetopharmacology.org) provides expert-curated molecular interactions between successful and potential drugs and their targets in the human genome. Developed by the International Union of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology (IUPHAR) and the British Pharmacological Society (BPS), this resource, and its earlier incarnation as IUPHAR-DB, is described in our 2014 publication. This update incorporates changes over the intervening seven database releases. The unique model of content capture is based on established and new target class subcommittees collaborating with in-house curators. Most information comes from journal articles, but we now also index kinase cross-screening panels. Targets are specified by UniProtKB IDs. Small molecules are defined by PubChem Compound Identifiers (CIDs); ligand capture also includes peptides and clinical antibodies. We have extended the capture of ligands and targets linked via published quantitative binding data (e.g. Ki, IC50 or Kd). The resulting pharmacological relationship network now defines a data-supported druggable genome encompassing 7% of human proteins. The database also provides an expanded substrate for the biennially published compendium, the Concise Guide to PHARMACOLOGY. This article covers content increase, entity analysis, revised curation strategies, new website features and expanded download options.

  1. Development of a novel microbubble-liposome complex conjugated with peptide ligands targeting IL4R on brain tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Park, See-Hyoung; Yoon, Young Ii; Moon, Hyoungwon; Lee, Ga-Hyun; Lee, Byung-Heon; Yoon, Tae-Jong; Lee, Hak Jong

    2016-07-01

    Gas (SF6)-filled microbubbles (MBs) were prepared by emulsion and solvent-evaporation method. The prepared MBs were further conjugated with doxorubicin (Dox)-loaded nano-sized liposome and peptide ligands to interleukin-4 receptor (IL4R) for targeting brain tumor cells. The final MB-liposome (Dox)-IL4R targeting peptide ligand [MB-Lipo (Dox)-IL4RTP] had a spherical structure with the mean size of 1,500 nm. The MB-Lipo (Dox)‑IL4RTP exhibited cellular uptake in U87MG brain tumor cells (a brain tumor cell line expressing strongly IL4R) with frequency ultrasound energy suggesting that MB-Lipo (Dox)‑IL4RTP provided effective targeting ability for brain tumor cells. In addition, WST-1 assay results showed that MB-Lipo (Dox)‑IL4RTP inhibited the proliferation of U87MG cells IL4R‑dependently. This was confirmed by western blotting of γH2AX, phospho (Ser15)-p53, p53 and p21 which are signal transduction proteins involved in DNA damage response and cell cycle arrest. Taken together, these results indicate that MB-Lipo (Dox)-IL4RTP represents a promising ultrasonic contrast agent for tumor-targeting ultrasonic imaging. PMID:27220374

  2. Development of a novel microbubble-liposome complex conjugated with peptide ligands targeting IL4R on brain tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Park, See-Hyoung; Yoon, Young Ii; Moon, Hyoungwon; Lee, Ga-Hyun; Lee, Byung-Heon; Yoon, Tae-Jong; Lee, Hak Jong

    2016-07-01

    Gas (SF6)-filled microbubbles (MBs) were prepared by emulsion and solvent-evaporation method. The prepared MBs were further conjugated with doxorubicin (Dox)-loaded nano-sized liposome and peptide ligands to interleukin-4 receptor (IL4R) for targeting brain tumor cells. The final MB-liposome (Dox)-IL4R targeting peptide ligand [MB-Lipo (Dox)-IL4RTP] had a spherical structure with the mean size of 1,500 nm. The MB-Lipo (Dox)‑IL4RTP exhibited cellular uptake in U87MG brain tumor cells (a brain tumor cell line expressing strongly IL4R) with frequency ultrasound energy suggesting that MB-Lipo (Dox)‑IL4RTP provided effective targeting ability for brain tumor cells. In addition, WST-1 assay results showed that MB-Lipo (Dox)‑IL4RTP inhibited the proliferation of U87MG cells IL4R‑dependently. This was confirmed by western blotting of γH2AX, phospho (Ser15)-p53, p53 and p21 which are signal transduction proteins involved in DNA damage response and cell cycle arrest. Taken together, these results indicate that MB-Lipo (Dox)-IL4RTP represents a promising ultrasonic contrast agent for tumor-targeting ultrasonic imaging.

  3. The promise of recombinant BMP ligands and other approaches targeting BMPR-II in the treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Ormiston, Mark L.; Upton, Paul D.; Li, Wei; Morrell, Nicholas W.

    2015-01-01

    Human genetic discoveries offer a powerful method to implicate pathways of major importance to disease pathobiology and hence provide targets for pharmacological intervention. The genetics of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) strongly implicates loss-of-function of the bone morphogenetic protein type II receptor (BMPR-II) signalling pathway and moreover implicates the endothelial cell as a central cell type involved in disease initiation. We and others have described several approaches to restore BMPR-II function in genetic and non-genetic forms of PAH. Of these, supplementation of endothelial BMP9/10 signalling with exogenous recombinant ligand has been shown to hold considerable promise as a novel large molecule biopharmaceutical therapy. Here, we describe the mechanism of action and discuss potential additional effects of BMP ligand therapy. PMID:26779522

  4. Targeting ligand-operated chaperone sigma-1 receptors in the treatment of neuropsychiatric disorders

    PubMed Central

    Teruo, Hayashi; Shang-Yi, Tsai; Tomohisa, Mori; Michiko, Fujimoto; Tsung-Ping, Su

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Current conventional therapeutic drugs for the treatment of psychiatric or neurodegenerative disorders have certain limitations of use. Psychotherapeutic drugs such as typical and atypical antipsychotics, tricyclic antidepressants, and selective monoamine reuptake inhibitors, aim to normalize the hyper- or hypo-neurotransmission of monoaminergic systems. Despite their great contribution to the outcomes of psychiatric patients, these agents often exert severe side effects and require chronic treatments to promote amelioration of symptoms. Furthermore, drugs available for the treatment of neurodegenerative disorders are severely limited. Areas covered This review discusses recent evidence that has shed light on sigma-1 receptor ligands, which may serve as a new class of antidepressants or neuroprotective agents. Sigma-1 receptors are novel ligand-operated molecular chaperones regulating a variety of signal transduction, ER stress, cellular redox, cellular survival, and synaptogenesis. Selective sigma-1 receptor ligands exert rapid antidepressant-like, anxiolytic, antinociceptive and robust neuroprotective actions in preclinical studies. The review also looks at recent studies which suggest that reactive oxygen species might play a crucial role as signal integrators at the downstream of Sig-1Rs Expert opinion The significant advances in sigma receptor research in the last decade have begun to elucidate the intracellular signal cascades upstream and downstream of sigma-1 receptors. The novel ligand-operated properties of the sigma-1 receptor chaperone may enable a variety of interventions by which stress-related cellular systems are pharmacologically controlled. PMID:21375464

  5. Synergistic Combination of Multistage Magnetic Guidance and Optimized Ligand Density in Targeting a Nanoplatform for Enhanced Cancer Therapy.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Chih-Sheng; Shen, Yi-Shang; Liu, Jun-Jen; Shyu, Woei-Cherng; Chen, San-Yuan

    2016-08-01

    A new therapeutic strategy of combining multistage short-term magnetic guidance with optimized ligand-mediated targeting in a newly developed nanodelivery system is investigated to promote accumulation and modulate intratumoral distribution behavior of the nanocarriers for enhanced tumor therapy. The multifunctional magnetic nanocarriers (MNCs) composed of single-component thiol-functionalized PVA/PMASH copolymer and superparamagnetic nanoparticles are developed for providing tunable dual-targeting ability and simultaneously modulating pH-responsive on/off drug release. Results show that plasma doxorubicin (Dox) concentration of the mice treated with Trastuzumab (Tra)-targeted Dox-MNCs can be rapidly decreased by applying dual-targeting treatment. More importantly, cooperative modulation of magnetic targeting and Tra density on the nanocarrier significantly optimize intratumoral distribution and enhance the utilization rate of nanomedicines within tumor to inhibit tumor growth. The mice treated with 2T-Dox-MNCs + multistage magnetic targeting (MT) (2 h d(-1) ) show 7.63-fold, 3.25-fold, and 2.7-fold reduction in HER2-positive tumor volume compared to Dox-MNCs, 2T-Dox-MNCs, and 2T-Dox-MNCs + single MT (12 h). The synergistic dual-targeting approach represents a major paradigm advance in tumor treatment and nanocarrier design in preclinical application. PMID:27337051

  6. Development of melanoma-targeted polymer micelles by conjugation of a Melanocortin 1 Receptor (MC1R) specific ligand

    PubMed Central

    Barkey, Natalie M.; Tafreshi, Narges K.; Josan, Jatinder S.; De Silva, Channa R.; Sill, Kevin N.; Hruby, Victor J.; Gillies, Robert J.; Morse, David L.; Vagner, Josef

    2012-01-01

    The incidence of malignant melanoma is rising faster than that of any other cancer in the United States. Due to its high expression on the surface of melanomas, MC1R has been investigated as a target for selective imaging and therapeutic agents against melanoma. Eight ligands were screened against cell lines engineered to over-express MC1R, MC4R or MC5R. Of these, compound 1 (4-phenylbutyryl-His-Dphe-Arg-Trp-NH2) exhibited high (0.2 nM) binding affinity for MC1R, and low (high nM) affinities for MC4R and MC5R. Subsequently functionalization of the ligand at the C-terminus with an alkyne for use in Cu-catalyzed click chemistry was shown not to affect the binding affinity. Finally, formation of the targeted-polymer, as well as the targeted micelle formulation, also resulted in constructs with low nM binding affinity. PMID:22011200

  7. Challenges in design and characterization of ligand-targeted drug delivery systems

    PubMed Central

    Muro, Silvia

    2012-01-01

    Targeting of therapeutic agents to molecular markers expressed on the surface of cells requiring clinical intervention holds promise to improve specificity of delivery, enhancing therapeutic effects while decreasing potential damage to healthy tissues. Drug targeting to cellular receptors involved in endocytic transport facilitates intracellular delivery, a requirement for a number of therapeutic goals. However, after several decades of experimental design, there is still considerable controversy on the practical outcome of drug targeting strategies. The plethora of factors contributing to the relative efficacy of targeting makes the success of these approaches hardly predictable. Lack of fully specific targets, along with selection of targets with spatial and temporal expression well aligned to interventional requirements, pose difficulties to this process. Selection of adequate sub-molecular target epitopes determines accessibility for anchoring of drug conjugates and bulkier drug carriers, as well as proper signaling for uptake within the cell. Targeting design must adapt to physiological variables of blood flow, disease status, and tissue architecture by accommodating physicochemical parameters such as carrier composition, functionalization, geometry, and avidity. In many cases, opposite features need to meet a balance, e.g., sustained circulation versus efficient targeting, penetration through tissues versus uptake within cells, internalization within endocytic compartment to avoid efflux pumps versus accessibility to molecular targets within the cytosol, etc. Detailed characterization of these complex physiological factors and design parameters, along with a deep understanding of the mechanisms governing the interaction of targeted drugs and carriers with the biological environment, are necessary steps toward achieving efficient drug targeting systems. PMID:22709588

  8. Selection and identification of ligand peptides targeting a model of castrate-resistant osteogenic prostate cancer and their receptors.

    PubMed

    Mandelin, Jami; Cardó-Vila, Marina; Driessen, Wouter H P; Mathew, Paul; Navone, Nora M; Lin, Sue-Hwa; Logothetis, Christopher J; Rietz, Anna Cecilia; Dobroff, Andrey S; Proneth, Bettina; Sidman, Richard L; Pasqualini, Renata; Arap, Wadih

    2015-03-24

    We performed combinatorial peptide library screening in vivo on a novel human prostate cancer xenograft that is androgen-independent and induces a robust osteoblastic reaction in bonelike matrix and soft tissue. We found two peptides, PKRGFQD and SNTRVAP, which were enriched in the tumors, targeted the cell surface of androgen-independent prostate cancer cells in vitro, and homed to androgen receptor-null prostate cancer in vivo. Purification of tumor homogenates by affinity chromatography on these peptides and subsequent mass spectrometry revealed a receptor for the peptide PKRGFQD, α-2-macroglobulin, and for SNTRVAP, 78-kDa glucose-regulated protein (GRP78). These results indicate that GRP78 and α-2-macroglobulin are highly active in osteoblastic, androgen-independent prostate cancer in vivo. These previously unidentified ligand-receptor systems should be considered for targeted drug development against human metastatic androgen-independent prostate cancer. PMID:25762070

  9. Tumor-targeted gene therapy: strategies for the preparation of ligand-polyethylene glycol-polyethylenimine/DNA complexes.

    PubMed

    Ogris, Manfred; Walker, Greg; Blessing, Thomas; Kircheis, Ralf; Wolschek, Markus; Wagner, Ernst

    2003-08-28

    Surface-shielded DNA delivery systems have been synthesized with virus-like characteristics that target gene expression into distant tumor tissues. Polyethylenimine (PEI)/DNA complexes ('polyplexes') conjugated with the cell-binding ligand transferrin (Tf) or epidermal growth factor (EGF) were used to achieve receptor-mediated endocytosis. The surface charge of the complexes was masked by covalently linking PEI to polyethylene glycol (PEG). Three alternatives for generating these surface-shielded formulations were utilized, attaching ligand and PEG molecules to PEI either before or after DNA complex formation. The stabilized formulations could be ultra-concentrated, stored frozen, and applied systemically after thawing. Intravenous injection of Tf-PEG-coated polyplexes resulted in gene transfer to subcutaneous Neuro2a neuroblastoma tumors of syngeneic A/J mice; EGF-PEG-coated polyplexes were intravenously applied for targeting human hepatocellular carcinoma xenografts in SCID mice. In these models, luciferase marker gene expression levels in tumor tissues were 10- to 100-fold higher than in other organ tissues. Repeated systemic application of Tf-PEG-PEI/DNA complexes encoding tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) into tumor-bearing mice induced tumor necrosis and inhibition of tumor growth in three murine tumor models of different tissue origin (Neuro2a, M-3 or B16 melanoma). PMID:12932649

  10. Design of a Fluorescent Ligand Targeting the S-adenosylmethioine Binding Site of the Histone Methyltransferase MLL1

    PubMed Central

    Luan, Yepeng; Blazer, Levi L.; Hu, Hao; Hajian, Taraneh; Zhang, Jing; Wu, Hong; Houliston, Scott; Arrowsmith, Cheryl H.; Vedadi, Masoud; Zheng, Yujun George

    2015-01-01

    The histone methyltransferase MLL1 has been linked to translocation-associated gene fusion in childhood leukemias and is an attractive drug target. High-throughput biochemical analysis of MLL1 methyltransferase activity requires the production of at least a trimeric complex of MLL1, RbBP5 and WDR5 to elicit robust activity. Production of trimeric and higher order MLL1 complexes in the quantities and reproducibility required for high-throughput screening presents a significant impediment to MLL1 drug discovery efforts. We present here a small molecule fluorescent ligand (FL-NAH, 6) that is able to bind to the S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) binding site of MLL1 in a manner independent of the associated complex members. We have used FL-NAH to develop a fluorescence polarization-based SAM displacement assay in a 384-well format targeting the MLL1 SET domain in the absence of associated complex members. FL-NAH competes with SAM and is displaced from the MLL1 SET domain by other SAM-binding site ligands with Kdisp values similar to the higher-order complexes, but is unaffected by the H3 peptide substrate. This assay enables screening for SAM-competitive MLL1 inhibitors without requiring the use of trimeric or higher order MLL1 complexes, significantly reducing screening time and cost. PMID:26541578

  11. Using consensus-shape clustering to identify promiscuous ligands and protein targets and to choose the right query for shape-based virtual screening.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Nueno, Violeta I; Ritchie, David W

    2011-06-27

    Ligand-based shape matching approaches have become established as important and popular virtual screening (VS) techniques. However, despite their relative success, many authors have discussed how best to choose the initial query compounds and which of their conformations should be used. Furthermore, it is increasingly the case that pharmaceutical companies have multiple ligands for a given target and these may bind in different ways to the same pocket. Conversely, a given ligand can sometimes bind to multiple targets, and this is clearly of great importance when considering drug side-effects. We recently introduced the notion of spherical harmonic-based "consensus shapes" to help deal with these questions. Here, we apply a consensus shape clustering approach to the 40 protein-ligand targets in the DUD data set using PARASURF/PARAFIT. Results from clustering show that in some cases the ligands for a given target are split into two subgroups which could suggest they bind to different subsites of the same target. In other cases, our clustering approach sometimes groups together ligands from different targets, and this suggests that those ligands could bind to the same targets. Hence spherical harmonic-based clustering can rapidly give cross-docking information while avoiding the expense of performing all-against-all docking calculations. We also report on the effect of the query conformation on the performance of shape-based screening of the DUD data set and the potential gain in screening performance by using consensus shapes calculated in different ways. We provide details of our analysis of shape-based screening using both PARASURF/PARAFIT and ROCS, and we compare the results obtained with shape-based and conventional docking approaches using MSSH/SHEF and GOLD. The utility of each type of query is analyzed using commonly reported statistics such as enrichment factors (EF) and receiver-operator-characteristic (ROC) plots as well as other early performance metrics.

  12. The IUPHAR/BPS Guide to PHARMACOLOGY: an expert-driven knowledgebase of drug targets and their ligands.

    PubMed

    Pawson, Adam J; Sharman, Joanna L; Benson, Helen E; Faccenda, Elena; Alexander, Stephen P H; Buneman, O Peter; Davenport, Anthony P; McGrath, John C; Peters, John A; Southan, Christopher; Spedding, Michael; Yu, Wenyuan; Harmar, Anthony J

    2014-01-01

    The International Union of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology/British Pharmacological Society (IUPHAR/BPS) Guide to PHARMACOLOGY (http://www.guidetopharmacology.org) is a new open access resource providing pharmacological, chemical, genetic, functional and pathophysiological data on the targets of approved and experimental drugs. Created under the auspices of the IUPHAR and the BPS, the portal provides concise, peer-reviewed overviews of the key properties of a wide range of established and potential drug targets, with in-depth information for a subset of important targets. The resource is the result of curation and integration of data from the IUPHAR Database (IUPHAR-DB) and the published BPS 'Guide to Receptors and Channels' (GRAC) compendium. The data are derived from a global network of expert contributors, and the information is extensively linked to relevant databases, including ChEMBL, DrugBank, Ensembl, PubChem, UniProt and PubMed. Each of the ∼6000 small molecule and peptide ligands is annotated with manually curated 2D chemical structures or amino acid sequences, nomenclature and database links. Future expansion of the resource will complete the coverage of all the targets of currently approved drugs and future candidate targets, alongside educational resources to guide scientists and students in pharmacological principles and techniques.

  13. The IUPHAR/BPS Guide to PHARMACOLOGY: an expert-driven knowledgebase of drug targets and their ligands.

    PubMed

    Pawson, Adam J; Sharman, Joanna L; Benson, Helen E; Faccenda, Elena; Alexander, Stephen P H; Buneman, O Peter; Davenport, Anthony P; McGrath, John C; Peters, John A; Southan, Christopher; Spedding, Michael; Yu, Wenyuan; Harmar, Anthony J

    2014-01-01

    The International Union of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology/British Pharmacological Society (IUPHAR/BPS) Guide to PHARMACOLOGY (http://www.guidetopharmacology.org) is a new open access resource providing pharmacological, chemical, genetic, functional and pathophysiological data on the targets of approved and experimental drugs. Created under the auspices of the IUPHAR and the BPS, the portal provides concise, peer-reviewed overviews of the key properties of a wide range of established and potential drug targets, with in-depth information for a subset of important targets. The resource is the result of curation and integration of data from the IUPHAR Database (IUPHAR-DB) and the published BPS 'Guide to Receptors and Channels' (GRAC) compendium. The data are derived from a global network of expert contributors, and the information is extensively linked to relevant databases, including ChEMBL, DrugBank, Ensembl, PubChem, UniProt and PubMed. Each of the ∼6000 small molecule and peptide ligands is annotated with manually curated 2D chemical structures or amino acid sequences, nomenclature and database links. Future expansion of the resource will complete the coverage of all the targets of currently approved drugs and future candidate targets, alongside educational resources to guide scientists and students in pharmacological principles and techniques. PMID:24234439

  14. Toward targeting RNA structure: branched peptides as cell-permeable ligands to TAR RNA.

    PubMed

    Bryson, David I; Zhang, Wenyu; McLendon, Patrick M; Reineke, Theresa M; Santos, Webster L

    2012-01-20

    Rational design of RNA ligands continues to be a formidable challenge, but the potential powerful applications in biology and medicine catapults it to the forefront of chemical research. Indeed, small molecule and macromolecular intervention are attractive approaches, but selectivity and cell permeability can be a hurdle. An alternative strategy is to use molecules of intermediate molecular weight that possess large enough surface area to maximize interaction with the RNA structure but are small enough to be cell-permeable. Herein, we report the discovery of nontoxic and cell-permeable branched peptide (BP) ligands that bind to TAR RNA in the low micromolar range from on-bead high-throughput screening of 4,096 compounds. TAR is a short RNA motif in the 5'-UTR of HIV-1 that is responsible for efficient generation of full RNA transcripts. We demonstrate that BPs are selective for the native TAR RNA structure and that "branching" in peptides provides multivalent interaction, which increases binding affinity to RNA. PMID:22003984

  15. Toward targeting RNA structure: branched peptides as cell-permeable ligands to TAR RNA.

    PubMed

    Bryson, David I; Zhang, Wenyu; McLendon, Patrick M; Reineke, Theresa M; Santos, Webster L

    2012-01-20

    Rational design of RNA ligands continues to be a formidable challenge, but the potential powerful applications in biology and medicine catapults it to the forefront of chemical research. Indeed, small molecule and macromolecular intervention are attractive approaches, but selectivity and cell permeability can be a hurdle. An alternative strategy is to use molecules of intermediate molecular weight that possess large enough surface area to maximize interaction with the RNA structure but are small enough to be cell-permeable. Herein, we report the discovery of nontoxic and cell-permeable branched peptide (BP) ligands that bind to TAR RNA in the low micromolar range from on-bead high-throughput screening of 4,096 compounds. TAR is a short RNA motif in the 5'-UTR of HIV-1 that is responsible for efficient generation of full RNA transcripts. We demonstrate that BPs are selective for the native TAR RNA structure and that "branching" in peptides provides multivalent interaction, which increases binding affinity to RNA.

  16. Towards Targeting RNA Structure: Branched Peptides as Cell Permeable Ligands to TAR RNA

    PubMed Central

    Bryson, David I.; Zhang, Wenyu; McLendon, Patrick M.; Reineke, Theresa M.; Santos, Webster L.

    2011-01-01

    Rational design of RNA ligands continues to be a formidable challenge, but the potential powerful applications in biology and medicine catapults it to the forefront of chemical research. Indeed, small molecule and macromolecular intervention are attractive approaches but selectivity and cell permeability can be a hurdle. An alternative strategy is to use molecules of intermediate molecular weight that possess large enough surface area to maximize interaction with the RNA structure but are small enough to be cell permeable. Herein, we report the discovery of non-toxic and cell permeable branched peptide (BP) ligands that bind to TAR RNA in the low micromolar range from on-bead high throughput screening of 4,096 compounds. TAR is a short RNA motif in the 5′-UTR of HIV-1 that is responsible for efficient generation of full RNA transcripts. We demonstrate that BPs are selective for the native TAR RNA structure and that "branching" in peptides provides multivalent interaction, which increases binding affinity to RNA. PMID:22003984

  17. A novel protocol to accelerate dynamic combinatorial chemistry via isolation of ligand-target adducts from dynamic combinatorial libraries: a case study identifying competitive inhibitors of lysozyme.

    PubMed

    Fang, Zheng; He, Wei; Li, Xin; Li, Zhengjiang; Chen, Beining; Ouyang, Pingkai; Guo, Kai

    2013-09-15

    A novel protocol based on size-exclusion chromatography (SEC) and MS was established to accelerate dynamic combinatorial chemistry (DCC) in this study. By isolating ligand-target adducts from the dynamic combinatorial library (DCL), ligands could be identified directly by MS after denaturation. Three new inhibitors for lysozyme were discovered by this SEC-MS protocol in a case study. Km Data for these new inhibitors was also determined.

  18. DOCLASP - Docking ligands to target proteins using spatial and electrostatic congruence extracted from a known holoenzyme and applying simple geometrical transformations

    PubMed Central

    Chakraborty, Sandeep

    2016-01-01

    The ability to accurately and effectively predict the interaction between proteins and small drug-like compounds has long intrigued researchers for pedagogic, humanitarian and economic reasons. Protein docking methods (AutoDock, GOLD, DOCK, FlexX and Glide to name a few) rank a large number of possible conformations of protein-ligand complexes using fast algorithms. Previously, it has been shown that structural congruence leading to the same enzymatic function necessitates the congruence of electrostatic properties (CLASP). The current work presents a methodology for docking a ligand into a target protein, provided that there is at least one known holoenzyme with ligand bound - DOCLASP (Docking using CLASP). The contact points of the ligand in the holoenzyme defines a motif, which is used to query the target enzyme using CLASP. If there are significant matches, the holoenzyme and the target protein are superimposed based on congruent atoms. The same linear and rotational transformations are also applied to the ligand, thus creating a unified coordinate framework having the holoenzyme, the ligand and the target enzyme. In the current work, the dipeptidyl peptidase-IV inhibitor vildagliptin was docked to the PI-PLC structure complexed with myo-inositol using DOCLASP. Also, corroboration of the docking of phenylthiourea to the modelled structure of polyphenol oxidase (JrPPO1) from walnut is provided based on the subsequently solved structure of JrPPO1 (PDBid:5CE9). Analysis of the binding of the antitrypanosomial drug suramin to nine non-homologous proteins in the PDB database shows a diverse set of binding motifs, and multiple binding sites in the phospholipase A2-likeproteins from the Bothrops genus of pitvipers. The conformational changes in the suramin molecule on binding highlights the challenges in docking flexible ligands into an already ’plastic’ binding site. Thus, DOCLASP presents a method for ’soft docking’ ligands to proteins with low

  19. Bidentate ligands on osmium(VI) nitrido complexes control intracellular targeting and cell death pathways.

    PubMed

    Suntharalingam, Kogularamanan; Johnstone, Timothy C; Bruno, Peter M; Lin, Wei; Hemann, Michael T; Lippard, Stephen J

    2013-09-25

    The cellular response evoked by antiproliferating osmium(VI) nitrido compounds of general formula OsN(N^N)Cl3 (N^N = 2,2'-bipyridine 1, 1,10-phenanthroline 2, 3,4,7,8-tetramethyl-1,10-phenanthroline 3, or 4,7-diphenyl-1,10-phenanthroline 4) can be tuned by subtle ligand modifications. Complex 2 induces DNA damage, resulting in activation of the p53 pathway, cell cycle arrest at the G2/M phase, and caspase-dependent apoptotic cell death. In contrast, 4 evokes endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress leading to the upregulation of proteins of the unfolded protein response pathway, increase in ER size, and p53-independent apoptotic cell death. To the best of our knowledge, 4 is the first osmium compound to induce ER stress in cancer cells.

  20. Receptor Crosslinking: A General Method to Trigger Internalization and Lysosomal Targeting of Therapeutic Receptor:Ligand Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Moody, Paul R; Sayers, Edward J; Magnusson, Johannes P; Alexander, Cameron; Borri, Paola; Watson, Peter; Jones, Arwyn T

    2015-01-01

    A major unmet clinical need is a universal method for subcellular targeting of bioactive molecules to lysosomes. Delivery to this organelle enables either degradation of oncogenic receptors that are overexpressed in cancers, or release of prodrugs from antibody–drug conjugates. Here, we describe a general method that uses receptor crosslinking to trigger endocytosis and subsequently redirect trafficking of receptor:cargo complexes from their expected route, to lysosomes. By incubation of plasma membrane receptors with biotinylated cargo and subsequent addition of streptavidin to crosslink receptor:cargo–biotin complexes, we achieved rapid and selective lysosomal targeting of transferrin, an anti-MHC class I antibody, and the clinically approved anti-Her2 antibody trastuzumab. These three protein ligands each target a receptor with a distinct cellular function and intracellular trafficking profile. Importantly, we confirmed that crosslinking of trastuzumab increased lysosomal degradation of its cognate oncogenic receptor Her2 in breast cancer cell lines SKBR3 and BT474. These data suggest that crosslinking could be exploited for a wide range of target receptors, for navigating therapeutics through the endolysosomal pathway, for significant therapeutic benefit. PMID:26412588

  1. The development of peptide ligands that target helix 69 rRNA of bacterial ribosomes.

    PubMed

    Dremann, Danielle N; Chow, Christine S

    2016-09-15

    Antibiotic resistance prevents successful treatment of common bacterial infections, making it clear that new target locations and drugs are required to resolve this ongoing challenge. The bacterial ribosome is a common target for antibacterials due to its essential contribution to cell viability. The focus of this work is a region of the ribosome called helix 69 (H69), which was recently identified as a secondary target site for aminoglycoside antibiotics. H69 has key roles in essential ribosomal processes such as subunit association, ribosome recycling, and tRNA selection. Conserved across phylogeny, bacterial H69 also contains two pseudouridines and one 3-methylpseudouridine. Phage display revealed a heptameric peptide sequence that targeted H69. Using solid-phase synthesis, peptide variants with higher affinity and improved selectivity to modified H69 were generated. Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry was used to determine relative apparent dissociation constants of the RNA-peptide complexes. PMID:27492196

  2. Ligand binding to anti-cancer target CD44 investigated by molecular simulations.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Tin Trung; Tran, Duy Phuoc; Pham Dinh Quoc Huy; Hoang, Zung; Carloni, Paolo; Van Pham, Phuc; Nguyen, Chuong; Li, Mai Suan

    2016-07-01

    CD44 is a cell-surface glycoprotein and receptor for hyaluronan, one of the major components of the tumor extracellular matrix. There is evidence that the interaction between CD44 and hyaluronan promotes breast cancer metastasis. Recently, the molecule F-19848A was shown to inhibit hyaluronan binding to receptor CD44 in a cell-based assay. In this study, we investigated the mechanism and energetics of F-19848A binding to CD44 using molecular simulation. Using the molecular mechanics/Poisson Boltzmann surface area (MM-PBSA) method, we obtained the binding free energy and inhibition constant of the complex. The van der Waals (vdW) interaction and the extended portion of F-19848A play key roles in the binding affinity. We screened natural products from a traditional Chinese medicine database to search for CD44 inhibitors. From combining pharmaceutical requirements with docking and molecular dynamics simulations, we found ten compounds that are potentially better or equal to the F-19848A ligand at binding to CD44 receptor. Therefore, we have identified new candidates of CD44 inhibitors, based on molecular simulation, which may be effective small molecules for the therapy of breast cancer. PMID:27342250

  3. Selective Tumor Targeting of Desacetyl Vinblastine Hydrazide and Tubulysin B via Conjugation to a Cholecystokinin 2 Receptor (CCK2R) Ligand

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    As the delivery of selectively targeted cytotoxic agents via antibodies or small molecule ligands to malignancies has begun to show promise in the clinic, the need to identify and validate additional cellular targets for specific therapeutic delivery is critical. Although a multitude of cancers have been targeted using the folate receptor, PSMA, bombesin receptor, somatostatin receptor, LHRH, and αvβ3, there is a notable lack of specific small molecule ligand/receptor pairs to cellular targets found within cancers of the GI tract. Because of the selective GI tract expression of the cholecystokinin 2 receptor (CCK2R), we undertook the creation of conjugates that would deliver microtubule-disrupting drugs to malignancies through the specific targeting of CCK2R via a high affinity small molecule ligand. The cytotoxic activity of these conjugates were shown to be receptor mediated in vitro and in vivo with xenograft mouse models exhibiting delayed growth or regression of tumors that expressed CCK2R. Overall, this work demonstrates that ligands to CCK2R can be used to create selectively targeted therapeutic conjugates. PMID:26043355

  4. Fms-Like Tyrosine Kinase 3 Ligand Decreases T Helper Type 17 Cells and Suppressors of Cytokine Signaling Proteins in the Lung of House Dust Mite–Sensitized and –Challenged Mice

    PubMed Central

    McGee, Halvor S.; Stallworth, Arthur L.; Agrawal, Tanupriya; Shao, Zhifei; Lorence, Lindsey; Agrawal, Devendra K.

    2010-01-01

    We previously reported that Fms-like tyrosine kinase 3 ligand (Flt3-L) reversed airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) and airway inflammation, and increased the number of regulatory CD11chighCD8αhighCD11blow dendritic cells and CD4+CD25+ICOS+Foxp3+IL-10+ T-regulatory cells in the lung of allergen-sensitized and -challenged mice. In this study, we evaluated the effect of Flt3-L on Th17 cells and expression of suppressors of cytokine signaling (SOCS) proteins in the lungs of house dust mite (HDM)–sensitized and –challenged mice. BALB/c mice were sensitized and challenged with HDM, and AHR to methacholine was established. Mice were treated with Flt3-L (5 μg, intraperitoneal) daily for 10 days. Levels of IL-4, -5, -6, -8, and -13, and transforming growth factor (TGF)–β in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) were examined by ELISA. Flt3-L treatment reversed existing AHR to methacholine and substantially decreased eosinophils, neutrophils, IL-5, -6, -8, and IL-13, and TGF-β levels in the BALF. HDM-sensitized and -challenged mice showed a significant increase in lung CD4+IL-17+IL-23R+CD25− T cells with high expression of retinoic acid–related orphan receptor (ROR)–γt transcripts. However, administration of Flt3-L substantially decreased the number of lung CD4+IL-17+IL-23R+CD25− T cells, with significantly decreased expression of ROR-γt mRNA in these cells. HDM sensitization caused a significant increase in the expression of SOCS-1, -3, and -5 in the lung. Flt3-L treatment abolished the increase in SOCS-1 and SOCS-3 proteins, whereas SOCS-5 expression was significantly reduced. These data suggest that the therapeutic effect of Flt3-L in reversing the hallmarks of allergic asthma in a mouse model is mediated by decreasing IL-6 and TGF-β levels in the BALF, which, in turn, decrease CD4+IL-17+IL-23R+ROR-γt+CD25− T cells and the expression of SOCS-1 and SOCS-3 in the lung of HDM-sensitized and -challenged mice. PMID:19933379

  5. Rapid Discovery of Functional Small Molecule Ligands against Proteomic Targets through Library-Against-Library Screening

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Identifying “druggable” targets and their corresponding therapeutic agents are two fundamental challenges in drug discovery research. The one-bead-one-compound (OBOC) combinatorial library method has been developed to discover peptides or small molecules that bind to a specific target protein or elicit a specific cellular response. The phage display cDNA expression proteome library method has been employed to identify target proteins that interact with specific compounds. Here, we combined these two high-throughput approaches, efficiently interrogated approximately 1013 possible molecular interactions, and identified 91 small molecule compound beads that interacted strongly with the phage library. Of 19 compounds resynthesized, 4 were cytotoxic against cancer cells; one of these compounds was found to interact with EIF5B and inhibit protein translation. As more binding pairs are confirmed and evaluated, the “library-against-library” screening approach and the resulting small molecule–protein domain interaction database may serve as a valuable tool for basic research and drug development. PMID:27053324

  6. ‘Living’ PEGylation on gold nanoparticles to optimize cancer cell uptake by controlling targeting ligand and charge densities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hongwei; Paholak, Hayley; Ito, Masayuki; Sansanaphongpricha, Kanokwan; Qian, Wei; Che, Yong; Sun, Duxin

    2013-09-01

    We report and demonstrate biomedical applications of a new technique—‘living’ PEGylation—that allows control of the density and composition of heterobifunctional PEG (HS-PEG-R; thiol-terminated poly(ethylene glycol)) on gold nanoparticles (AuNPs). We first establish ‘living’ PEGylation by incubating HS-PEG5000-COOH with AuNPs (˜20 nm) at increasing molar ratios from zero to 2000. This causes the hydrodynamic layer thickness to differentially increase up to 26 nm. The controlled, gradual increase in PEG-COOH density is revealed after centrifugation, based on the ability to re-suspend the pellet and increase the AuNP absorption. Using a fluorescamine-based assay we quantify differential HS-PEG5000-NH2 binding to AuNPs, revealing that it is highly efficient until AuNP saturation is reached. Furthermore, the zeta potential incrementally changes from -44.9 to +52.2 mV and becomes constant upon saturation. Using ‘living’ PEGylation we prepare AuNPs with different ratios of HS-PEG-RGD (RGD: Arg-Gly-Asp) and incubate them with U-87 MG (malignant glioblastoma) and non-target cells, demonstrating that targeting ligand density is critical to maximizing the efficiency of targeting of AuNPs to cancer cells. We also sequentially control the HS-PEG-R density to develop multifunctional nanoparticles, conjugating positively charged HS-PEG-NH2 at increasing ratios to AuNPs containing negatively charged HS-PEG-COOH to reduce uptake by macrophage cells. This ability to minimize non-specific binding/uptake by healthy cells could further improve targeted nanoparticle efficacy.

  7. ‘Living’ PEGylation on gold nanoparticles to optimize cancer cell uptake by controlling targeting ligand and charge densities

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hongwei; Paholak, Hayley; Ito, Masayuki; Sansanaphongpricha, Kanokwan; Qian, Wei; Che, Yong; Sun, Duxin

    2013-01-01

    We report and demonstrate biomedical applications of a new technique – ‘living’ PEGylation – that allows control of the density and composition of heterobifunctional PEG (HS-PEG-R) on gold nanoparticles (AuNPs). We first establish ‘living’ PEGylation by incubating HS-PEG5000-COOH with AuNPs (~20 nm) at increasing molar ratios from zero to 2000. This causes the hydrodynamic layer thickness to differentially increase up to 26 nm. The controlled, gradual increase in PEG-COOH density is revealed after centrifugation, based on the ability to re-suspend the pellet and increase the AuNP absorption. Using a fluorescamine-based assay we quantify differential HS-PEG5000-NH2 binding to AuNPs, revealing it is highly efficient until AuNP saturation. Furthermore, the zeta potential incrementally changes from −44.9 to +52.2 mV and becomes constant upon saturation. Using ‘living’ PEGylation we prepare AuNPs with different ratios of HS-PEG-RGD and incubate them with U-87 MG and non-target cells, demonstrating that targeting ligand density is critical to maximizing the targeting efficiency of AuNPs to cancer cells. We also sequentially control the HS-PEG-R density to develop multifunctional nanoparticles, conjugating positively-charged HS-PEG-NH2 at increasing ratios to AuNPs containing negatively-charged HS-PEG-COOH to reduce uptake by macrophage cells. This ability to minimize non-specific binding/uptake by healthy cells could further improve targeted nanoparticle efficacy. PMID:23940104

  8. Prostate targeting ligands based on N-acetylated alpha-linked acidic dipeptidase.

    PubMed

    Tang, Hailun; Brown, Mark; Ye, Yunpeng; Huang, Guofeng; Zhang, Yihua; Wang, Yuesheng; Zhai, Haixiao; Chen, Xiaohui; Shen, Tsung Ying; Tenniswood, Martin

    2003-07-18

    To identify inhibitors of the intrinsic N-acetylated alpha-linked acidic dipeptidase (NAALADase) activity of prostate specific membrane antigen (PSMA) that may be useful for targeting imaging agents or chemotherapeutic drugs to disseminated prostate cancer, analogs of the tetrahedral transition state for hydrolysis of the natural substrate, N-acetylaspartylglutamate (NAAG), were synthesized. These compounds were assayed for their ability to inhibit the membrane-associated enzyme isolated from LNCaP prostate cancer cells. Active inhibitors were further assayed for their cytotoxicity and membrane binding. We have identified nine compounds, including fluorescent and iodine-labeled conjugates, which inhibit NAALADase enzyme activity with IC(50)s at, or below, 120nM. The binding of these compounds to the cell surface of viable LNCaP prostate tumor cells appears to be specific and saturable, and none of the compounds alter the cell cycle kinetics or induce apoptosis in LNCaP cells, suggesting that they are relatively innocuous and are suitable for targeting imaging agents or cytotoxic drugs to disseminated prostate cancer.

  9. Crystal Structures of Free and Ligand-Bound Focal Adhesion Targeting Domain of Pyk2

    SciTech Connect

    Lulo, J.; Yuzawa, S; Schlessinger, J

    2009-01-01

    Focal adhesion targeting (FAT) domains target the non-receptor tyrosine kinases FAK and Pyk2 to cellular focal adhesion areas, where the signaling molecule paxillin is also located. Here, we report the crystal structures of the Pyk2 FAT domain alone or in complex with paxillin LD4 peptides. The overall structure of Pyk2-FAT is an antiparallel four-helix bundle with an up-down, up-down, right-handed topology. In the LD4-bound FAT complex, two paxillin LD4 peptides interact with two opposite sides of Pyk2-FAT, at the surfaces of the a1a4 and a2a3 helices of each FAT molecule. We also demonstrate that, while paxillin is phosphorylated by Pyk2, complex formation between Pyk2 and paxillin does not depend on Pyk2 tyrosine kinase activity. These experiments reveal the structural basis underlying the selectivity of paxillin LD4 binding to the Pyk2 FAT domain and provide insights about the molecular details which influence the different behavior of these two closely-related kinases.

  10. Internal dosimetry through GATE simulations of preclinical radiotherapy using a melanin-targeting ligand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrot, Y.; Degoul, F.; Auzeloux, P.; Bonnet, M.; Cachin, F.; Chezal, J. M.; Donnarieix, D.; Labarre, P.; Moins, N.; Papon, J.; Rbah-Vidal, L.; Vidal, A.; Miot-Noirault, E.; Maigne, L.

    2014-05-01

    The GATE Monte Carlo simulation platform based on the Geant4 toolkit is under constant improvement for dosimetric calculations. In this study, we explore its use for the dosimetry of the preclinical targeted radiotherapy of melanoma using a new specific melanin-targeting radiotracer labeled with iodine 131. Calculated absorbed fractions and S values for spheres and murine models (digital and CT-scan-based mouse phantoms) are compared between GATE and EGSnrc Monte Carlo codes considering monoenergetic electrons and the detailed energy spectrum of iodine 131. The behavior of Geant4 standard and low energy models is also tested. Following the different authors’ guidelines concerning the parameterization of electron physics models, this study demonstrates an agreement of 1.2% and 1.5% with EGSnrc, respectively, for the calculation of S values for small spheres and mouse phantoms. S values calculated with GATE are then used to compute the dose distribution in organs of interest using the activity distribution in mouse phantoms. This study gives the dosimetric data required for the translation of the new treatment to the clinic.

  11. Double-targeting using a TrkC ligand conjugated to dipyrrometheneboron difluoride (BODIPY) based photodynamic therapy (PDT) agent.

    PubMed

    Kamkaew, Anyanee; Burgess, Kevin

    2013-10-10

    A molecule 1 (IY-IY-PDT) was designed to contain a fragment (IY-IY) that targets the TrkC receptor and a photosensitizer that acts as an agent for photodynamic therapy (PDT). Molecule 1 had submicromolar photocytotoxicities to cells that were engineered to stably express TrkC (NIH3T3-TrkC) or that naturally express high levels of TrkC (SY5Y neuroblastoma lines). Control experiments showed that 1 is not cytotoxic in the dark and has significantly less photocytotoxicity toward cells that do not express TrkC (NIH3T3-WT). Other controls featuring a similar agent 2 (YI-YI-PDT), which is identical and isomeric with 1 except that the targeting region is scrambled (a YI-YI motif, see text), showed that 1 is considerably more photocytotoxic than 2 on TrkC(+) cells. Imaging live TrkC(+) cells after treatment with a fluorescent agent 1 (IY-IY-PDT) proved that 1 permeates into TrkC(+) cells and is localized in the lysosomes. This observation indirectly indicates that agent 1 enters the cells via the TrkC receptor. Consistent with this, the dose-dependent PDT effects of 1 can be competitively reduced by the natural TrkC ligand, neurotrophin NT3.

  12. RANK ligand as a potential target for breast cancer prevention in BRCA1-mutation carriers.

    PubMed

    Nolan, Emma; Vaillant, François; Branstetter, Daniel; Pal, Bhupinder; Giner, Göknur; Whitehead, Lachlan; Lok, Sheau W; Mann, Gregory B; Rohrbach, Kathy; Huang, Li-Ya; Soriano, Rosalia; Smyth, Gordon K; Dougall, William C; Visvader, Jane E; Lindeman, Geoffrey J

    2016-08-01

    Individuals who have mutations in the breast-cancer-susceptibility gene BRCA1 (hereafter referred to as BRCA1-mutation carriers) frequently undergo prophylactic mastectomy to minimize their risk of breast cancer. The identification of an effective prevention therapy therefore remains a 'holy grail' for the field. Precancerous BRCA1(mut/+) tissue harbors an aberrant population of luminal progenitor cells, and deregulated progesterone signaling has been implicated in BRCA1-associated oncogenesis. Coupled with the findings that tumor necrosis factor superfamily member 11 (TNFSF11; also known as RANKL) is a key paracrine effector of progesterone signaling and that RANKL and its receptor TNFRSF11A (also known as RANK) contribute to mammary tumorigenesis, we investigated a role for this pathway in the pre-neoplastic phase of BRCA1-mutation carriers. We identified two subsets of luminal progenitors (RANK(+) and RANK(-)) in histologically normal tissue of BRCA1-mutation carriers and showed that RANK(+) cells are highly proliferative, have grossly aberrant DNA repair and bear a molecular signature similar to that of basal-like breast cancer. These data suggest that RANK(+) and not RANK(-) progenitors are a key target population in these women. Inhibition of RANKL signaling by treatment with denosumab in three-dimensional breast organoids derived from pre-neoplastic BRCA1(mut/+) tissue attenuated progesterone-induced proliferation. Notably, proliferation was markedly reduced in breast biopsies from BRCA1-mutation carriers who were treated with denosumab. Furthermore, inhibition of RANKL in a Brca1-deficient mouse model substantially curtailed mammary tumorigenesis. Taken together, these findings identify a targetable pathway in a putative cell-of-origin population in BRCA1-mutation carriers and implicate RANKL blockade as a promising strategy in the prevention of breast cancer. PMID:27322743

  13. Neuropeptides and neuropeptide receptors: drug targets, and peptide and non-peptide ligands: a tribute to Prof. Dieter Seebach.

    PubMed

    Hoyer, Daniel; Bartfai, Tamas

    2012-11-01

    The number of neuropeptides and their corresponding receptors has increased steadily over the last fourty years: initially, peptides were isolated from gut or brain (e.g., Substance P, somatostatin), then by targeted mining in specific regions (e.g., cortistatin, orexin in the brain), or by deorphanization of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs; orexin, ghrelin receptors) and through the completion the Human Genome Project. Neuropeptides (and their receptors) have regionally restricted distributions in the central and peripheral nervous system. The neuropeptide signaling is somewhat more distinct spatially than signaling with classical, low-molecular-weight neurotransmitters that are more widely expressed, and, therefore, one assumes that drugs acting at neuropeptide receptors may have more selective pharmacological actions with possibly fewer side effects than drugs acting on glutamatergic, GABAergic, monoaminergic, or cholinergic systems. Neuropeptide receptors, which may have a few or multiple subtypes and splice variants, belong almost exclusively to the GPCR family also known as seven-transmembrane receptors (7TM), a favorite class of drug targets in the pharmaceutical industry. Most neuropeptides are co-stored and co-released with classic neurotransmitters, albeit often only at higher frequencies of stimulation or at bursting activity, thus restricting the neuropeptide signaling to specific circumstances, another reason to assume that neuropeptide drug mimics may have less side effects. Neuropeptides possess a wide spectrum of functions from neurohormone, neurotransmitter to growth factor, but also as key inflammatory mediators. Neuropeptides become 'active' when the nervous system is challenged, e.g., by stress, injury, drug abuse, or neuropsychiatric disorders with genetic, epigenetic, and/or environmental components. The unsuspected number of true neuropeptides and their cognate receptors provides opportunities to identify novel targets for the treatment of

  14. Neuropeptides and neuropeptide receptors: drug targets, and peptide and non-peptide ligands: a tribute to Prof. Dieter Seebach.

    PubMed

    Hoyer, Daniel; Bartfai, Tamas

    2012-11-01

    The number of neuropeptides and their corresponding receptors has increased steadily over the last fourty years: initially, peptides were isolated from gut or brain (e.g., Substance P, somatostatin), then by targeted mining in specific regions (e.g., cortistatin, orexin in the brain), or by deorphanization of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs; orexin, ghrelin receptors) and through the completion the Human Genome Project. Neuropeptides (and their receptors) have regionally restricted distributions in the central and peripheral nervous system. The neuropeptide signaling is somewhat more distinct spatially than signaling with classical, low-molecular-weight neurotransmitters that are more widely expressed, and, therefore, one assumes that drugs acting at neuropeptide receptors may have more selective pharmacological actions with possibly fewer side effects than drugs acting on glutamatergic, GABAergic, monoaminergic, or cholinergic systems. Neuropeptide receptors, which may have a few or multiple subtypes and splice variants, belong almost exclusively to the GPCR family also known as seven-transmembrane receptors (7TM), a favorite class of drug targets in the pharmaceutical industry. Most neuropeptides are co-stored and co-released with classic neurotransmitters, albeit often only at higher frequencies of stimulation or at bursting activity, thus restricting the neuropeptide signaling to specific circumstances, another reason to assume that neuropeptide drug mimics may have less side effects. Neuropeptides possess a wide spectrum of functions from neurohormone, neurotransmitter to growth factor, but also as key inflammatory mediators. Neuropeptides become 'active' when the nervous system is challenged, e.g., by stress, injury, drug abuse, or neuropsychiatric disorders with genetic, epigenetic, and/or environmental components. The unsuspected number of true neuropeptides and their cognate receptors provides opportunities to identify novel targets for the treatment of

  15. Enhancement of the priming efficacy of DNA vaccines encoding dendritic cell-targeted antigens by synergistic toll-like receptor ligands

    PubMed Central

    Grossmann, Claudius; Tenbusch, Matthias; Nchinda, Godwin; Temchura, Vladimir; Nabi, Ghulam; Stone, Geoffrey W; Kornbluth, Richard S; Überla, Klaus

    2009-01-01

    Background Targeting of protein antigens to dendritic cells (DC) via the DEC205 receptor enhances presentation of antigen-derived peptides on MHC-I and MHC-II molecules and, in the presence of costimulatory signals, antigen-specific immune responses. The immunogenicity and efficacy of DNA vaccination can also be enhanced by fusing the encoded antigen to single chain antibodies directed against DEC205. To further improve this strategy, we evaluated different toll-like receptor ligands (TLR) and CD40 ligands (CD40L) as adjuvants for DNA vaccines encoding a DEC205-single-chain antibody fused to the ovalbumin model antigen or HIV-1 Gag and assessed the priming efficacy of DNA in a DNA prime adenoviral vector boost immunization regimen. Results Mice were primed with the adjuvanted DEC-205 targeted DNA vaccines and boosted with adenoviral vectors encoding the same antigens. CD8+ T cell responses were determined after the adenoviral booster immunization, to determine how well the different DNA immunization regimens prime for the adenoviral boost. In the absence of adjuvants, targeting of DNA-encoded ovalbumin to DCs suppressed CD8+ T-cell responses after the adenoviral booster immunization. CD8+ T-cell responses to the DEC205 targeted DNA vaccines increased only slightly by adding either the TLR-9 ligand CpG, the TLR-3 ligand Poly I:C, or CD40 ligand expression plasmids. However, the combination of both TLR-ligands led to a strong enhancement of CD8+ T-cell responses compared to a non-targeted DNA vaccine. This finding was confirmed using HIV Gag as antigen. Conclusion Although DNA prime adenoviral vector boost immunizations belong to the strongest inducers of cytotoxic T cell responses in different animal models and humans, the CD8+ T cell responses can be further improved by targeting the DNA encoded antigen to DEC205 in the presence of synergistic TLR ligands CpG and Poly I:C. PMID:19650904

  16. LigSearch: a knowledge-based web server to identify likely ligands for a protein target

    SciTech Connect

    Beer, Tjaart A. P. de; Laskowski, Roman A.; Duban, Mark-Eugene; Chan, A. W. Edith; Anderson, Wayne F.; Thornton, Janet M.

    2013-12-01

    LigSearch is a web server for identifying ligands likely to bind to a given protein. Identifying which ligands might bind to a protein before crystallization trials could provide a significant saving in time and resources. LigSearch, a web server aimed at predicting ligands that might bind to and stabilize a given protein, has been developed. Using a protein sequence and/or structure, the system searches against a variety of databases, combining available knowledge, and provides a clustered and ranked output of possible ligands. LigSearch can be accessed at http://www.ebi.ac.uk/thornton-srv/databases/LigSearch.

  17. Toward the Rational Design of Galactosylated Glycoclusters That Target Pseudomonas aeruginosa Lectin A (LecA): Influence of Linker Arms That Lead to Low-Nanomolar Multivalent Ligands.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuai; Dupin, Lucie; Noël, Mathieu; Carroux, Cindy J; Renaud, Louis; Géhin, Thomas; Meyer, Albert; Souteyrand, Eliane; Vasseur, Jean-Jacques; Vergoten, Gérard; Chevolot, Yann; Morvan, François; Vidal, Sébastien

    2016-08-01

    Anti-infectious strategies against pathogen infections can be achieved through antiadhesive strategies by using multivalent ligands of bacterial virulence factors. LecA and LecB are lectins of Pseudomonas aeruginosa implicated in biofilm formation. A series of 27 LecA-targeting glycoclusters have been synthesized. Nine aromatic galactose aglycons were investigated with three different linker arms that connect the central mannopyranoside core. A low-nanomolar (Kd =19 nm, microarray) ligand with a tyrosine-based linker arm could be identified in a structure-activity relationship study. Molecular modeling of the glycoclusters bound to the lectin tetramer was also used to rationalize the binding properties observed.

  18. Therapeutic targeting of naturally presented myeloperoxidase-derived HLA peptide ligands on myeloid leukemia cells by TCR-transgenic T cells.

    PubMed

    Klar, R; Schober, S; Rami, M; Mall, S; Merl, J; Hauck, S M; Ueffing, M; Admon, A; Slotta-Huspenina, J; Schwaiger, M; Stevanović, S; Oostendorp, R A J; Busch, D H; Peschel, C; Krackhardt, A M

    2014-12-01

    T cells have been proven to be therapeutically effective in patients with relapsed leukemias, although target antigens on leukemic cells as well as T-cell receptors (TCRs), potentially recognizing those antigens, are mostly unknown. We have applied an immunopeptidomic approach and isolated human leukocyte antigen (HLA) ligands from primary leukemia cells. We identified a number of ligands derived from different genes that are restrictedly expressed in the hematopoietic system. We exemplarily selected myeloperoxidase (MPO) as a potential target and isolated a high-avidity TCR with specificity for a HLA-B*07:02-(HLA-B7)-restricted epitope of MPO in the single HLA-mismatched setting. T cells transgenic for this TCR demonstrated high peptide and antigen specificity as well as leukemia reactivity in vitro and in vivo. In contrast, no significant on- and off-target toxicity could be observed. In conclusion, we here demonstrate, exemplarily for MPO, that leukemia-derived HLA ligands can be selected for specific effector tool development to redirect T cells to be used for graft manipulation or adoptive T-cell therapies in diverse transplant settings. This approach can be extended to other HLA ligands and HLA molecules in order to provide better treatment options for this life-threatening disease.

  19. Deregulation of PPARβ/δ target genes in tumor-associated macrophages by fatty acid ligands in the ovarian cancer microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Schumann, Tim; Adhikary, Till; Wortmann, Annika; Finkernagel, Florian; Lieber, Sonja; Schnitzer, Evelyn; Legrand, Nathalie; Schober, Yvonne; Nockher, W Andreas; Toth, Philipp M; Diederich, Wibke E; Nist, Andrea; Stiewe, Thorsten; Wagner, Uwe; Reinartz, Silke; Müller-Brüsselbach, Sabine; Müller, Rolf

    2015-05-30

    The nuclear receptor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor β/δ (PPARβ/δ) is a lipid ligand-inducible transcription factor associated with macrophage polarization. However, its function in tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) has not been investigated to date. Here, we report the PPARβ/δ-regulated transcriptome and cistrome for TAMs from ovarian carcinoma patients. Comparison with monocyte-derived macrophages shows that the vast majority of direct PPARβ/δ target genes are upregulated in TAMs and largely refractory to synthetic agonists, but repressible by inverse agonists. Besides genes with metabolic functions, these include cell type-selective genes associated with immune regulation and tumor progression, e.g., LRP5, CD300A, MAP3K8 and ANGPTL4. This deregulation is not due to increased expression of PPARβ/δ or its enhanced recruitment to target genes. Instead, lipidomic analysis of malignancy-associated ascites revealed high concentrations of polyunsaturated fatty acids, in particular linoleic acid, acting as potent PPARβ/δ agonists in macrophages. These fatty acid ligands accumulate in lipid droplets in TAMs, thereby providing a reservoir of PPARβ/δ ligands. These observations suggest that the deregulation of PPARβ/δ target genes by ligands of the tumor microenvironment contributes to the pro-tumorigenic polarization of ovarian carcinoma TAMs. This conclusion is supported by the association of high ANGPTL4 expression with a shorter relapse-free survival in serous ovarian carcinoma.

  20. Applying Molecular Dynamics Simulations to Identify Rarely Sampled Ligand-bound Conformational States of Undecaprenyl Pyrophosphate Synthase, an Antibacterial Target

    SciTech Connect

    Sinko, William; de Oliveira, César; Williams, Sarah; Van Wynsberghe, Adam; Durrant, Jacob D.; Cao, Rong; Oldfield, Eric; McCammon, J. Andrew

    2012-04-30

    Undecaprenyl pyrophosphate synthase is a cis-prenyltransferase enzyme, which is required for cell wall biosynthesis in bacteria. Undecaprenyl pyrophosphate synthase is an attractive target for antimicrobial therapy. We performed long molecular dynamics simulations and docking studies on undecaprenyl pyrophosphate synthase to investigate its dynamic behavior and the influence of protein flexibility on the design of undecaprenyl pyrophosphate synthase inhibitors. We also describe the first X-ray crystallographic structure of Escherichia coli apo-undecaprenyl pyrophosphate synthase. The molecular dynamics simulations indicate that undecaprenyl pyrophosphate synthase is a highly flexible protein, with mobile binding pockets in the active site. By carrying out docking studies with experimentally validated undecaprenyl pyrophosphate synthase inhibitors using high- and low-populated conformational states extracted from the molecular dynamics simulations, we show that structurally dissimilar compounds can bind preferentially to different and rarely sampled conformational states. By performing structural analyses on the newly obtained apo-undecaprenyl pyrophosphate synthase and other crystal structures previously published, we show that the changes observed during the molecular dynamics simulation are very similar to those seen in the crystal structures obtained in the presence or absence of ligands. We believe that this is the first time that a rare 'expanded pocket' state, key to drug design and verified by crystallography, has been extracted from a molecular dynamics simulation.

  1. Smuggling Drugs into the Brain: An Overview of Ligands Targeting Transcytosis for Drug Delivery across the Blood–Brain Barrier

    PubMed Central

    Georgieva, Julia V.; Hoekstra, Dick; Zuhorn, Inge S.

    2014-01-01

    The blood–brain barrier acts as a physical barrier that prevents free entry of blood-derived substances, including those intended for therapeutic applications. The development of molecular Trojan horses is a promising drug targeting technology that allows for non-invasive delivery of therapeutics into the brain. This concept relies on the application of natural or genetically engineered proteins or small peptides, capable of specifically ferrying a drug-payload that is either directly coupled or encapsulated in an appropriate nanocarrier, across the blood–brain barrier via receptor-mediated transcytosis. Specifically, in this process the nanocarrier–drug system (“Trojan horse complex”) is transported transcellularly across the brain endothelium, from the blood to the brain interface, essentially trailed by a native receptor. Naturally, only certain properties would favor a receptor to serve as a transporter for nanocarriers, coated with appropriate ligands. Here we briefly discuss brain microvascular endothelial receptors that have been explored until now, highlighting molecular features that govern the efficiency of nanocarrier-mediated drug delivery into the brain. PMID:25407801

  2. Investigating the Fluorescence Quenching of Doxorubicin in Folic Acid Solutions and its Relation to Ligand-Targeted Nanocarriers.

    PubMed

    Husseini, Ghaleb A; Kanan, Sofian; Al-Sayah, Mohammad

    2016-02-01

    Folic acid (FA) is one of the most utilized moieties in active (ligand) drug delivery. The folate receptor is widely expressed on the surface of several cell lines and tumors; including ovarian, brain, kidney, breast, and lung cancers. During our previous experiments with Doxorubicin (Dox) encapsulated in folate-targeted micelles, we found that flow cytometry underestimated the amount of drug that accu- mulates inside cells. We attributed this effect to the quenching of Dox by FA and herein investigate this phenomenon in an attempt to obtain a correction factor that could be applied to the fluorescence of Dox in the presence of FA. Initially, we examine the effect of pH on the fluorescence spectra of FA, Dox, equimolar solutions of FA and Dox in water, HCI (0.1 M), and NaOH (0.1 M) solutions. We then measure the effect of the gradual increase of FA concentration on the fluorescence intensity of Dox in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) solutions (pH of 7.4). Using the Stern-Volmer equation, we estimate the association constant of FA-Dox to be K(SV) = 1.5 x 10(4) M(-1). Such an association constant indicates that at the concentrations of FA used in targeted drug delivery systems, a significant concentration of Dox exists as FA-Dox complexes with a quenched fluorescence. Therefore, we conclude that when Dox is used in FA-active drug delivery systems, a correction factor is needed to predict the correct fluorescence intensity of agent in vitro and in vivo. PMID:27433596

  3. Receptor-Activator of Nuclear KappaB Ligand Expression as a New Therapeutic Target in Primary Bone Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Yamagishi, Tetsuro; Kawashima, Hiroyuki; Ogose, Akira; Ariizumi, Takashi; Sasaki, Taro; Hatano, Hiroshi; Hotta, Tetsuo; Endo, Naoto

    2016-01-01

    The receptor-activator of nuclear kappaB ligand (RANKL) signaling pathway plays an important role in the regulation of bone growth and mediates the formation and activation of osteoclasts. Osteoclasts are involved in significant bone resorption and destruction. Denosumab is a fully human monoclonal antibody against RANKL that specifically inhibits osteoclast differentiation and bone resorption. It has been approved for use for multiple myeloma and bone metastases, as well as for giant cell tumor of bone. However, there is no previous report quantitatively, comparing RANKL expression in histologically varied bone tumors. Therefore, we analyzed the mRNA level of various bone tumors and investigated the possibility of these tumors as a new therapeutic target for denosumab. We examined RANKL mRNA expression in 135 clinical specimens of primary and metastatic bone tumors using real-time PCR. The relative quantification of mRNA expression levels was performed via normalization with RPMI8226, a human multiple myeloma cell line that is recognized to express RANKL. Of 135 cases, 64 were also evaluated for RANKL expression by using immunohistochemistry. Among all of the tumors investigated, RANKL expression and the RANKL/osteoprotegerin ratio were highest in giant cell tumor of bone. High RANKL mRNA expression was observed in cases of aneurysmal bone cyst, fibrous dysplasia, osteosarcoma, chondrosarcoma, and enchondroma, as compared to cases of multiple myeloma and bone lesions from metastatic carcinoma. RANKL-positive stromal cells were detected in six cases: five cases of GCTB and one case of fibrous dysplasia. The current study findings indicate that some primary bone tumors present new therapeutic targets for denosumab, particularly those tumors expressing RANKL and those involving bone resorption by osteoclasts. PMID:27163152

  4. Receptor-Activator of Nuclear KappaB Ligand Expression as a New Therapeutic Target in Primary Bone Tumors.

    PubMed

    Yamagishi, Tetsuro; Kawashima, Hiroyuki; Ogose, Akira; Ariizumi, Takashi; Sasaki, Taro; Hatano, Hiroshi; Hotta, Tetsuo; Endo, Naoto

    2016-01-01

    The receptor-activator of nuclear kappaB ligand (RANKL) signaling pathway plays an important role in the regulation of bone growth and mediates the formation and activation of osteoclasts. Osteoclasts are involved in significant bone resorption and destruction. Denosumab is a fully human monoclonal antibody against RANKL that specifically inhibits osteoclast differentiation and bone resorption. It has been approved for use for multiple myeloma and bone metastases, as well as for giant cell tumor of bone. However, there is no previous report quantitatively, comparing RANKL expression in histologically varied bone tumors. Therefore, we analyzed the mRNA level of various bone tumors and investigated the possibility of these tumors as a new therapeutic target for denosumab. We examined RANKL mRNA expression in 135 clinical specimens of primary and metastatic bone tumors using real-time PCR. The relative quantification of mRNA expression levels was performed via normalization with RPMI8226, a human multiple myeloma cell line that is recognized to express RANKL. Of 135 cases, 64 were also evaluated for RANKL expression by using immunohistochemistry. Among all of the tumors investigated, RANKL expression and the RANKL/osteoprotegerin ratio were highest in giant cell tumor of bone. High RANKL mRNA expression was observed in cases of aneurysmal bone cyst, fibrous dysplasia, osteosarcoma, chondrosarcoma, and enchondroma, as compared to cases of multiple myeloma and bone lesions from metastatic carcinoma. RANKL-positive stromal cells were detected in six cases: five cases of GCTB and one case of fibrous dysplasia. The current study findings indicate that some primary bone tumors present new therapeutic targets for denosumab, particularly those tumors expressing RANKL and those involving bone resorption by osteoclasts. PMID:27163152

  5. Schistosoma mansoni TGF-β Receptor II: Role in Host Ligand-Induced Regulation of a Schistosome Target Gene

    PubMed Central

    Osman, Ahmed; Niles, Edward G; Verjovski-Almeida, Sergio; LoVerde, Philip T

    2006-01-01

    Members of transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) superfamily play pivotal roles in development in multicellular organisms. We report the functional characterization of the Schistosoma mansoni type II receptor (SmTβRII). Mining of the S. mansoni expressed sequence tag (EST) database identified an EST clone that shows homology to the kinase domain of type II receptors from different species. The amplified EST sequence was used as a probe to isolate a cDNA clone spanning the entire coding region of a type II serine/threonine kinase receptor. The interaction of SmTβRII with SmTβRI was elucidated and shown to be dependent on TGF-β ligand binding. Furthermore, in the presence of human TGF-β1, SmTβRII was able to activate SmTβRI, which in turn activated SmSmad2 and promoted its interaction with SmSmad4, proving the transfer of the signal from the receptor complex to the Smad proteins. Gynaecophoral canal protein (GCP), whose expression in male worms is limited to the gynaecophoric canal, was identified as a potential TGF-β target gene in schistosomes. Knocking down the expression of SmTβRII using short interfering RNA molecules (siRNA) resulted in a concomitant reduction in the expression of GCP. These data provide evidence for the direct involvement of SmTβRII in mediating TGF-β–induced activation of the TGF-β target gene, SmGCP, within schistosome parasites. The results also provide additional evidence for a role for the TGF-β signaling pathway in male-induced female reproductive development. PMID:16789838

  6. Use of Labelled tLyP-1 as a Novel Ligand Targeting the NRP Receptor to Image Glioma

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Hu-bing; Wang, Zhen; Wang, Quan-shi; Han, Yan-jian; Wang, Meng; Zhou, Wen-lan; Li, Hong-sheng

    2015-01-01

    Background Neuropilin (NRP) receptors are overexpressed in glioma tumor tissue, and therefore may be a potential target for imaging markers. We investigated whether labelled tLyP-1, an NRP targeting peptide, could be used as the targeting ligand for developing reagents for imaging glioma tumors. Methods The tLyP-1 peptide (CGNKRTR) was labeled with 5-carboxyfluorescein (FAM) or 18F-fluoride. A control peptide (MAQKTSH) was also labeled with FAM. The in vitro binding between FAM-tLyP-1 and U87MG cells and in vivo biodistribution of FAM-tLyP-1 in a U87MG glioblastoma xenograft model (nude mouse) were determined. The in vivo biodistribution of 18F-tLyP-1 was also determined by microPET/CT. Results In vitro, FAM-tLyP-1 was strongly taken up by U87MG cells at very low concentrations (1μM). In vivo, FAM-tLyP-1 accumulated in glioma (U87MG) tumors, but uptake was minimal in the normal brain tissue 1 h after administration. The distribution of FAM-tLyP-1 in the tumor tissue was consistent with expression of NRP1. The tumor/brain fluorescence intensity ratio in mice treated with FAM-tLyP-1 was significantly higher than the control FAM-labeled peptide 1 h after administration (3.44 ± 0.83 vs. 1.32 ± 0.15; t = 5.547, P = 0.001). Uptake of FAM-tLyP-1 in glioma tumors could be blocked by administering an excess of non-conjugated tLyP-1 peptide. [Lys4] tLyP-1 was labeled with 18F to synthesis a PET (18F-tLyP-1). MicroPET/CT imaging showed the tumor was visualized clearly with a high tumor/brain radiolabel ratio at 60 min (2.69 ± 0.52) and 120 min (3.11±0.25). Conclusion Taken together, our results suggest that tLyP-1 could be developed as a novel fluorescent or radio labelled tracer for imaging glioma. PMID:26398657

  7. Response of SCP-2L domain of human MFE-2 to ligand removal: binding site closure and burial of peroxisomal targeting signal.

    PubMed

    Lensink, M F; Haapalainen, A M; Hiltunen, J K; Glumoff, T; Juffer, A H

    2002-10-11

    In the study of the structure and function relationship of human MFE-2, we have investigated the dynamics of human MFE-2SCP-2L (hSCP-2L) and its response to ligand removal. A comparison was made with homologous rabbit SCP-2. Breathing and a closing motion are found, identifiable with an adjustment in size and a closing off of the binding pocket. Crucial residues for structural integrity have been identified. Particularly mobile areas of the protein are loop 1 that is connecting helices A and C in space, and helix D, next to the entrance of the pocket. In hSCP-2L, the binding pocket gets occupied by Phe93, which is making a tight hydrophobic contact with Trp36. In addition, it is found that the C-terminal peroxisomal targeting signal (PTS1) that is solvent exposed in the complexed structure becomes buried when no ligand is present. Moreover, an anti-correlation exists between burial of PTS1 and the size of the binding pocket. The results are in accordance with plant nsLTPs, where a similar accommodation of binding pocket size was found after ligand binding/removal. Furthermore, the calculations support the suggestion of a ligand-assisted targeting mechanism.

  8. Growth of ligand-target interaction data in ChEMBL is associated with increasing and activity measurement-dependent compound promiscuity.

    PubMed

    Hu, Ye; Bajorath, Jürgen

    2012-10-22

    Compounds with high-confidence target annotations and activity measurements in the original and current release of the ChEMBL database have been compared to better understand how the growth of compound activity data might influence the spectrum of ligand-target interactions and the degree of target promiscuity among active compounds. Compared to the original ChEMBL release, a significant increase in the proportion of target promiscuous compounds was observed in the current version. The presence of these compounds led to large-magnitude changes in compound activity-based target and target family relationships and to a reorganization of major target communities. Surprisingly, however, this strong trend toward increasing target promiscuity was largely caused by growth of compounds with exclusive IC(50) measurements. By contrast, compounds with available equilibrium constants, which were also added in large amounts, did not substantially alter compound-based target relationships and notably contribute to increasing target promiscuity. These findings suggest that apparent compound promiscuity is much dependent on experimental conditions under which activities are determined and that care should be taken when evaluating promiscuity and polypharmacology on the basis of assay-dependent activity measurements.

  9. Multivariate PLS Modeling of Apicomplexan FabD-Ligand Interaction Space for Mapping Target-Specific Chemical Space and Pharmacophore Fingerprints

    PubMed Central

    Surolia, Avadhesha

    2015-01-01

    Biomolecular recognition underlying drug-target interactions is determined by both binding affinity and specificity. Whilst, quantification of binding efficacy is possible, determining specificity remains a challenge, as it requires affinity data for multiple targets with the same ligand dataset. Thus, understanding the interaction space by mapping the target space to model its complementary chemical space through computational techniques are desirable. In this study, active site architecture of FabD drug target in two apicomplexan parasites viz. Plasmodium falciparum (PfFabD) and Toxoplasma gondii (TgFabD) is explored, followed by consensus docking calculations and identification of fifteen best hit compounds, most of which are found to be derivatives of natural products. Subsequently, machine learning techniques were applied on molecular descriptors of six FabD homologs and sixty ligands to induce distinct multivariate partial-least square models. The biological space of FabD mapped by the various chemical entities explain their interaction space in general. It also highlights the selective variations in FabD of apicomplexan parasites with that of the host. Furthermore, chemometric models revealed the principal chemical scaffolds in PfFabD and TgFabD as pyrrolidines and imidazoles, respectively, which render target specificity and improve binding affinity in combination with other functional descriptors conducive for the design and optimization of the leads. PMID:26535573

  10. Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor γ is a Sensitive Target for Oil Sands Process-Affected Water: Effects on Adipogenesis and Identification of Ligands.

    PubMed

    Peng, Hui; Sun, Jianxian; Alharbi, Hattan A; Jones, Paul D; Giesy, John P; Wiseman, Steve

    2016-07-19

    Identification of toxic components of complex mixtures is a challenge. Here, oil sands process-affected water (OSPW) was used as a case study to identify those toxic components with a known protein target. Organic chemicals in OSPW exhibited dose-dependent activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) at concentrations less than those currently in the environment (0.025× equivalent of full-strength OSPW), by use of a luciferase reporter gene assay. Activation of PPARγ-mediated adipogenesis by OSPW was confirmed in 3T3L1 preadipocytes, as evidenced by accumulation of lipids and up-regulation of AP2, LPL, and PPARγ gene expression after exposure to polar fractions of OSPW. Unexpectedly, the nonpolar fractions of OSPW inhibited differentiation of preadipocytes via activation of the Wnt signaling pathway. Organic chemicals in OSPW that were ligands of PPARγ were identified by use of a pull-down system combined with untargeted chemical analysis (PUCA), with a recombinant PPARγ protein. Thirty ligands of PPARγ were identified by use of the PUCA assay. High resolution MS(1) and MS(2) spectra were combined to predict the formulas or structures of a subset of ligands, and polyoxygenated or heteroatomic chemicals, especially hydroxylated carboxylic/sulfonic acids, were the major ligands of PPARγ. PMID:27340905

  11. PL-PatchSurfer2: Improved Local Surface Matching-Based Virtual Screening Method That Is Tolerant to Target and Ligand Structure Variation.

    PubMed

    Shin, Woong-Hee; Christoffer, Charles W; Wang, Jibo; Kihara, Daisuke

    2016-09-26

    Virtual screening has become an indispensable procedure in drug discovery. Virtual screening methods can be classified into two categories: ligand-based and structure-based. While the former have advantages, including being quick to compute, in general they are relatively weak at discovering novel active compounds because they use known actives as references. On the other hand, structure-based methods have higher potential to find novel compounds because they directly predict the binding affinity of a ligand in a target binding pocket, albeit with substantially lower speed than ligand-based methods. Here we report a novel structure-based virtual screening method, PL-PatchSurfer2. In PL-PatchSurfer2, protein and ligand surfaces are represented by a set of overlapping local patches, each of which is represented by three-dimensional Zernike descriptors (3DZDs). By means of 3DZDs, the shapes and physicochemical complementarities of local surface regions of a pocket surface and a ligand molecule can be concisely and effectively computed. Compared with the previous version of the program, the performance of PL-PatchSurfer2 is substantially improved by the addition of two more features, atom-based hydrophobicity and hydrogen-bond acceptors and donors. Benchmark studies showed that PL-PatchSurfer2 performed better than or comparable to popular existing methods. Particularly, PL-PatchSurfer2 significantly outperformed existing methods when apo-form or template-based protein models were used for queries. The computational time of PL-PatchSurfer2 is about 20 times shorter than those of conventional structure-based methods. The PL-PatchSurfer2 program is available at http://www.kiharalab.org/plps2/ . PMID:27500657

  12. PL-PatchSurfer2: Improved Local Surface Matching-Based Virtual Screening Method That Is Tolerant to Target and Ligand Structure Variation.

    PubMed

    Shin, Woong-Hee; Christoffer, Charles W; Wang, Jibo; Kihara, Daisuke

    2016-09-26

    Virtual screening has become an indispensable procedure in drug discovery. Virtual screening methods can be classified into two categories: ligand-based and structure-based. While the former have advantages, including being quick to compute, in general they are relatively weak at discovering novel active compounds because they use known actives as references. On the other hand, structure-based methods have higher potential to find novel compounds because they directly predict the binding affinity of a ligand in a target binding pocket, albeit with substantially lower speed than ligand-based methods. Here we report a novel structure-based virtual screening method, PL-PatchSurfer2. In PL-PatchSurfer2, protein and ligand surfaces are represented by a set of overlapping local patches, each of which is represented by three-dimensional Zernike descriptors (3DZDs). By means of 3DZDs, the shapes and physicochemical complementarities of local surface regions of a pocket surface and a ligand molecule can be concisely and effectively computed. Compared with the previous version of the program, the performance of PL-PatchSurfer2 is substantially improved by the addition of two more features, atom-based hydrophobicity and hydrogen-bond acceptors and donors. Benchmark studies showed that PL-PatchSurfer2 performed better than or comparable to popular existing methods. Particularly, PL-PatchSurfer2 significantly outperformed existing methods when apo-form or template-based protein models were used for queries. The computational time of PL-PatchSurfer2 is about 20 times shorter than those of conventional structure-based methods. The PL-PatchSurfer2 program is available at http://www.kiharalab.org/plps2/ .

  13. Mouse tumor vasculature expresses NKG2D ligands and can be targeted by chimeric NKG2D-modified T cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tong; Sentman, Charles L

    2013-03-01

    Tumor angiogenesis plays an important role in the development of solid tumors, and targeting the tumor vasculature has emerged as a strategy to prevent growth and progression of solid tumors. In this study, we show that murine tumor vasculature expresses Rae1, a ligand for a stimulatory NK receptor NKG2D. By genetic modification of T cells with an NKG2D-based chimeric Ag receptor, referred to as chNKG2D in which the NKG2D receptor is fused to the signaling domain of CD3ζ-chain, T cells were capable of targeting tumor vasculature leading to reduced tumor angiogenesis and tumor growth. This occurred even in tumors where the tumor cells themselves did not express NKG2D ligands. H5V, an endothelial cell line, expresses Rae1 and was lysed by chNKG2D-bearing T cells in a perforin-dependent manner. In vitro capillary tube formation was inhibited by chNKG2D T cells through IFN-γ and cell-cell contact mechanisms. The in vivo antiangiogenesis effects mediated by chNKG2D-bearing T cells at the tumor site were dependent on IFN-γ and perforin. These results provide a novel mechanism for NKG2D-based targeting of solid tumors.

  14. An Algorithm to Identify Target-Selective Ligands – A Case Study of 5-HT7/5-HT1A Receptor Selectivity

    PubMed Central

    Kurczab, Rafał; Canale, Vittorio; Zajdel, Paweł; Bojarski, Andrzej J.

    2016-01-01

    A computational procedure to search for selective ligands for structurally related protein targets was developed and verified for serotonergic 5-HT7/5-HT1A receptor ligands. Starting from a set of compounds with annotated activity at both targets (grouped into four classes according to their activity: selective toward each target, not-selective and not-selective but active) and with an additional set of decoys (prepared using DUD methodology), the SVM (Support Vector Machines) models were constructed using a selective subset as positive examples and four remaining classes as negative training examples. Based on these four component models, the consensus classifier was then constructed using a data fusion approach. The combination of two approaches of data representation (molecular fingerprints vs. structural interaction fingerprints), different training set sizes and selection of the best SVM component models for consensus model generation, were evaluated to determine the optimal settings for the developed algorithm. The results showed that consensus models with molecular fingerprints, a larger training set and the selection of component models based on MCC maximization provided the best predictive performance. PMID:27271158

  15. Ultrasound Molecular Imaging of the Breast Cancer Neovasculature using Engineered Fibronectin Scaffold Ligands: A Novel Class of Targeted Contrast Ultrasound Agent

    PubMed Central

    Abou-Elkacem, Lotfi; Wilson, Katheryne E.; Johnson, Sadie M.; Chowdhury, Sayan M.; Bachawal, Sunitha; Hackel, Benjamin J.; Tian, Lu; Willmann, Jürgen K.

    2016-01-01

    Molecularly-targeted microbubbles (MBs) are increasingly being recognized as promising contrast agents for oncological molecular imaging with ultrasound. With the detection and validation of new molecular imaging targets, novel binding ligands are needed that bind to molecular imaging targets with high affinity and specificity. In this study we assessed a novel class of potentially clinically translatable MBs using an engineered 10th type III domain of human-fibronectin (MB-FN3VEGFR2) scaffold-ligand to image VEGFR2 on the neovasculature of cancer. The in vitro binding of MB-FN3VEGFR2 to a soluble VEGFR2 was assessed by flow-cytometry (FACS) and binding to VEGFR2-expressing cells was assessed by flow-chamber cell attachment studies under flow shear stress conditions. In vivo binding of MB-FN3VEGFR2 was tested in a transgenic mouse model (FVB/N Tg(MMTV/PyMT634Mul) of breast cancer and control litter mates with normal mammary glands. In vitro FACS and flow-chamber cell attachment studies showed significantly (P<0.01) higher binding to VEGFR2 using MB-FN3VEGFR2 than control agents. In vivo ultrasound molecular imaging (USMI) studies using MB-FN3VEGFR2 demonstrated specific binding to VEGFR2 and was significantly higher (P<0.01) in breast cancer compared to normal breast tissue. Ex vivo immunofluorescence-analysis showed significantly (P<0.01) increased VEGFR2-expression in breast cancer compared to normal mammary tissue. Our results suggest that MBs coupled to FN3-scaffolds can be designed and used for USMI of breast cancer neoangiogenesis. Due to their small size, stability, solubility, the lack of glycosylation and disulfide bonds, FN3-scaffolds can be recombinantly produced with the advantage of generating small, high affinity ligands in a cost efficient way for USMI. PMID:27570547

  16. Ultrasound Molecular Imaging of the Breast Cancer Neovasculature using Engineered Fibronectin Scaffold Ligands: A Novel Class of Targeted Contrast Ultrasound Agent.

    PubMed

    Abou-Elkacem, Lotfi; Wilson, Katheryne E; Johnson, Sadie M; Chowdhury, Sayan M; Bachawal, Sunitha; Hackel, Benjamin J; Tian, Lu; Willmann, Jürgen K

    2016-01-01

    Molecularly-targeted microbubbles (MBs) are increasingly being recognized as promising contrast agents for oncological molecular imaging with ultrasound. With the detection and validation of new molecular imaging targets, novel binding ligands are needed that bind to molecular imaging targets with high affinity and specificity. In this study we assessed a novel class of potentially clinically translatable MBs using an engineered 10(th) type III domain of human-fibronectin (MB-FN3VEGFR2) scaffold-ligand to image VEGFR2 on the neovasculature of cancer. The in vitro binding of MB-FN3VEGFR2 to a soluble VEGFR2 was assessed by flow-cytometry (FACS) and binding to VEGFR2-expressing cells was assessed by flow-chamber cell attachment studies under flow shear stress conditions. In vivo binding of MB-FN3VEGFR2 was tested in a transgenic mouse model (FVB/N Tg(MMTV/PyMT634Mul) of breast cancer and control litter mates with normal mammary glands. In vitro FACS and flow-chamber cell attachment studies showed significantly (P<0.01) higher binding to VEGFR2 using MB-FN3VEGFR2 than control agents. In vivo ultrasound molecular imaging (USMI) studies using MB-FN3VEGFR2 demonstrated specific binding to VEGFR2 and was significantly higher (P<0.01) in breast cancer compared to normal breast tissue. Ex vivo immunofluorescence-analysis showed significantly (P<0.01) increased VEGFR2-expression in breast cancer compared to normal mammary tissue. Our results suggest that MBs coupled to FN3-scaffolds can be designed and used for USMI of breast cancer neoangiogenesis. Due to their small size, stability, solubility, the lack of glycosylation and disulfide bonds, FN3-scaffolds can be recombinantly produced with the advantage of generating small, high affinity ligands in a cost efficient way for USMI. PMID:27570547

  17. New Computational Approaches for NMR-based Drug Design: A Protocol for Ligand Docking to Flexible Target Sites

    SciTech Connect

    Gracia, Luis; Speidel, Joshua A.; Weinstein, Harel

    2006-08-24

    NMR-based drug design has met with some success in the last decade, as illustrated in numerous instances by Fesik's ''ligand screening by NMR'' approach. Ongoing efforts to generalize this success have led us to the development of a new paradigm in which quantitative computational approaches are being integrated with NMR derived data and biological assays. The key component of this work is the inclusion of the intrinsic dynamic quality of NMR structures in theoretical models and its use in docking. A new computational protocol is introduced here, designed to dock small molecule ligands to flexible proteins derived from NMR structures. The algorithm makes use of a combination of simulated annealing monte carlo simulations (SA/MC) and a mean field potential informed by the NMR data. The new protocol is illustrated in the context of an ongoing project aimed at developing new selective inhibitors for the PCAF bromodomains that interact with HIV Tat.

  18. New Computational Approaches for NMR-based Drug Design: A Protocol for Ligand Docking to Flexible Target Sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gracia, Luis; Speidel, Joshua A.; Weinstein, Harel

    2006-08-01

    NMR-based drug design has met with some success in the last decade, as illustrated in numerous instances by Fesik's "ligand screening by NMR" approach. Ongoing efforts to generalize this success have led us to the development of a new paradigm in which quantitative computational approaches are being integrated with NMR derived data and biological assays. The key component of this work is the inclusion of the intrinsic dynamic quality of NMR structures in theoretical models and its use in docking. A new computational protocol is introduced here, designed to dock small molecule ligands to flexible proteins derived from NMR structures. The algorithm makes use of a combination of simulated annealing monte carlo simulations (SA/MC) and a mean field potential informed by the NMR data. The new protocol is illustrated in the context of an ongoing project aimed at developing new selective inhibitors for the PCAF bromodomains that interact with HIV Tat.

  19. Bio-functionalization of ligand-free upconverting lanthanide doped nanoparticles for bio-imaging and cell targeting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogdan, Nicoleta; Rodríguez, Emma Martín; Sanz-Rodríguez, Francisco; Iglesias de La Cruz, M.A. Carmen; Juarranz, Ángeles; Jaque, Daniel; Solé, José García; Capobianco, John A.

    2012-05-01

    We report on the functionalization of ligand-free NaGdF4:Er3+, Yb3+ upconverting nanoparticles with heparin and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF). These upconverting nanoparticles are used to obtain high-contrast images of HeLa cells. These images reveal that the heparin-bFGF functionalized nanoparticles show specific binding to the cell membrane.We report on the functionalization of ligand-free NaGdF4:Er3+, Yb3+ upconverting nanoparticles with heparin and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF). These upconverting nanoparticles are used to obtain high-contrast images of HeLa cells. These images reveal that the heparin-bFGF functionalized nanoparticles show specific binding to the cell membrane. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Detailed experimental procedures for the sample preparation and characterization. See DOI: 10.1039/c2nr30982c

  20. Telomere targeting with a novel G-quadruplex-interactive ligand BRACO-19 induces T-loop disassembly and telomerase displacement in human glioblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Guangtong; Liu, Xinrui; Li, Yunqian; Xu, Songbai; Ma, Chengyuan; Wu, Xinmin; Cheng, Ye; Yu, Zhiyun; Zhao, Gang; Chen, Yong

    2016-03-22

    Interference with telomerase and telomere maintenance is emerging as an attractive target for anticancer therapies. Ligand-induced stabilization of G-quadruplex formation by the telomeric DNA 3'-overhang inhibits telomerase from catalyzing telomeric DNA synthesis and from capping telomeric ends, making these ligands good candidates for chemotherapeutic purposes. BRACO-19 is one of the most effective and specific ligand for telomeric G4. It is shown here that BRACO-19 suppresses proliferation and reduces telomerase activity in human glioblastoma cells, paralleled by the displacement of telomerase from nuclear to cytoplasm. Meanwhile, BRACO-19 triggers extensive DNA damage response at telomere, which may result from uncapping and disassembly of telomeric T-loop structure, characterized by the formation of anaphase bridge and telomere fusion, as well as the release of telomere-binding protein from telomere. The resulting dysfunctional telomere ultimately provokes p53 and p21-mediated cell cycle arrest, apoptosis and senescence. Notably, normal primary astrocytes do not respond to the treatment of BRACO-19, suggesting the agent's good selectivity for cancer cells. These results reinforce the notion that G-quadruplex binding compounds can act as broad inhibitors of telomere-related processes and have potential as selective antineoplastic drugs for various tumors including malignant gliomas. PMID:26908447

  1. Synthesis, characterization, and in vitro evaluation of new coordination complexes of platinum(II) and rhenium(I) with a ligand targeting the translocator protein (TSPO).

    PubMed

    Margiotta, Nicola; Denora, Nunzio; Piccinonna, Sara; Laquintana, Valentino; Lasorsa, Francesco Massimo; Franco, Massimo; Natile, Giovanni

    2014-11-21

    The 18 kDa translocator protein (TSPO) is overexpressed in many types of cancers and is also abundant in activated microglial cells occurring in inflammatory neurodegenerative diseases. The TSPO-selective ligand 2-(8-(2-(bis-(pyridin-2-yl-methyl)amino)acetamido)-2-(4-chlorophenyl)H-imidazo[1,2-a]pyridin-3-yl)-N,N-dipropylacetamide (CB256), which fulfills the requirements of a bifunctional chelate approach, has been used to synthesize coordination complexes containing either Pt (1) or Re (3), or both metal ions (2). The new metal complexes showed a cellular uptake markedly greater than that of the precursor metallic compounds and were also able to induce apoptosis in C6 glioma cells. The good cytotoxicity of the free ligand CB256 towards C6, A2780, and A2780cisR tumor cell lines was attenuated after coordination of the dipicolylamine moiety to Pt while coordination of the imidazopyridine residue to Re reduces the affinity towards TSPO. The results of the present investigation are essential for the design of new imidazopyridine bifunctional chelate ligands targeted to TSPO.

  2. Nanoconjugation of PSMA-Targeting Ligands Enhances Perinuclear Localization and Improves Efficacy of Delivered Alpha-Particle Emitters against Tumor Endothelial Analogues.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Charles; Bandekar, Amey; Sempkowski, Michelle; Banerjee, Sangeeta Ray; Pomper, Martin G; Bruchertseifer, Frank; Morgenstern, Alfred; Sofou, Stavroula

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to evaluate the effect on killing efficacy of the intracellular trafficking patterns of α-particle emitters by using different radionuclide carriers in the setting of targeted antivascular α-radiotherapy. Nanocarriers (lipid vesicles) targeted to the prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA), which is unique to human neovasculature for a variety of solid tumors, were loaded with the α-particle generator actinium-225 and were compared with a PSMA-targeted radiolabeled antibody. Actinium-225 emits a total of four α-particles per decay, providing highly lethal and localized irradiation of targeted cells with minimal exposure to surrounding healthy tissues. Lipid vesicles were derivatized with two types of PSMA-targeting ligands: a fully human PSMA antibody (mAb) and a urea-based, low-molecular-weight agent. Target selectivity and extent of internalization were evaluated on monolayers of human endothelial cells (HUVEC) induced to express PSMA in static incubation conditions and in a flow field. Both types of radiolabeled PSMA-targeted vesicles exhibit similar killing efficacy, which is greater than the efficacy of the radiolabeled control mAb when compared on the basis of delivered radioactivity per cell. Fluorescence confocal microscopy demonstrates that targeted vesicles localize closer to the nucleus, unlike antibodies which localize near the plasma membrane. In addition, targeted vesicles cause larger numbers of dsDNAs per nucleus of treated cells compared with the radiolabeled mAb. These findings demonstrate that radionuclide carriers, such as PSMA-targeted lipid-nanocarriers, which localize close to the nucleus, increase the probability of α-particle trajectories crossing the nuclei, and, therefore, enhance the killing efficacy of α-particle emitters.

  3. Nanoconjugation of PSMA-Targeting Ligands Enhances Perinuclear Localization and Improves Efficacy of Delivered Alpha-Particle Emitters against Tumor Endothelial Analogues.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Charles; Bandekar, Amey; Sempkowski, Michelle; Banerjee, Sangeeta Ray; Pomper, Martin G; Bruchertseifer, Frank; Morgenstern, Alfred; Sofou, Stavroula

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to evaluate the effect on killing efficacy of the intracellular trafficking patterns of α-particle emitters by using different radionuclide carriers in the setting of targeted antivascular α-radiotherapy. Nanocarriers (lipid vesicles) targeted to the prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA), which is unique to human neovasculature for a variety of solid tumors, were loaded with the α-particle generator actinium-225 and were compared with a PSMA-targeted radiolabeled antibody. Actinium-225 emits a total of four α-particles per decay, providing highly lethal and localized irradiation of targeted cells with minimal exposure to surrounding healthy tissues. Lipid vesicles were derivatized with two types of PSMA-targeting ligands: a fully human PSMA antibody (mAb) and a urea-based, low-molecular-weight agent. Target selectivity and extent of internalization were evaluated on monolayers of human endothelial cells (HUVEC) induced to express PSMA in static incubation conditions and in a flow field. Both types of radiolabeled PSMA-targeted vesicles exhibit similar killing efficacy, which is greater than the efficacy of the radiolabeled control mAb when compared on the basis of delivered radioactivity per cell. Fluorescence confocal microscopy demonstrates that targeted vesicles localize closer to the nucleus, unlike antibodies which localize near the plasma membrane. In addition, targeted vesicles cause larger numbers of dsDNAs per nucleus of treated cells compared with the radiolabeled mAb. These findings demonstrate that radionuclide carriers, such as PSMA-targeted lipid-nanocarriers, which localize close to the nucleus, increase the probability of α-particle trajectories crossing the nuclei, and, therefore, enhance the killing efficacy of α-particle emitters. PMID:26586724

  4. Cell-specific targeting in the mouse inner ear using nanoparticles conjugated with a neurotrophin-derived peptide ligand: potential tool for drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Roy, Soumen; Johnston, Alex H; Newman, Tracey A; Glueckert, Rudolf; Dudas, Jozsef; Bitsche, Mario; Corbacella, Elisa; Rieger, Gunde; Martini, Alessandro; Schrott-Fischer, Anneliese

    2010-05-10

    Cell specific targeting is an emerging field in nanomedicine. Homing of the multifunctional nanoparticles (MFNPs) is achieved by the conjugation of targeting moieties on the nanoparticle surface. The inner ear is an attractive target for new drug delivery strategies as it is hard to access and hearing loss is a significant worldwide problem. In this work we investigated the utility of a Nerve Growth Factor-derived peptide (hNgf_EE) functionalized nanoparticles (NPs) to target cells of the inner ear. These functionalized NPs were introduced to organotypic explant cultures of the mouse inner ear and to PC-12 rat pheochromocytoma cells. The NPs did not show any signs of toxicity. Specific targeting and higher binding affinity to spiral ganglion neurons, Schwann cells and nerve fibers of the explant cultures were achieved through ligand mediated multivalent binding to tyrosine kinase receptors and to p75 neurotrophin receptors. Unspecific uptake of NPs was investigated using NPs conjugated with scrambled hNgf_EE peptide. Our results indicate a selective cochlear cell targeting by MFNPs, which may be a potential tool for cell specific drug and gene delivery to the inner ear.

  5. Pan-HER-An antibody mixture targeting EGFR, HER2 and HER3 abrogates preformed and ligand-induced EGFR homo- and heterodimers.

    PubMed

    Ellebaek, Sofie; Brix, Susanne; Grandal, Michael; Lantto, Johan; Horak, Ivan D; Kragh, Michael; Poulsen, Thomas Tuxen

    2016-11-01

    The human epidermal growth factor receptor (HER)-family is involved in development of many epithelial cancers. Therefore, HER-family members constitute important targets for anti-cancer therapeutics such as monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). A limitation to the success of single HER-targeting mAbs is development of acquired resistance through mechanisms such as alterted receptor dimerization patterns and dependencies. Pan-HER is a mixture of six mAbs simultaneously targeting epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), HER2 and HER3 with two mAbs against each receptor. Pan-HER has previously demonstrated broader efficacy than targeting single or dual receptor combinations also in resistant settings. In light of this broad efficacy, we decided to investigate the effect of Pan-HER compared with single HER-targeting with single and dual mAbs on HER-family cross-talk and dimerization focusing on EGFR. The effect of Pan-HER on cell proliferation and HER-family receptor degradation was superior to treatment with single mAbs targeting either single receptor, and similar to targeting a single receptor with two non-overlapping antibodies. Furthermore, changes in EGFR-dimerization patterns after treatment with Pan-HER were investigated by in situ proximity ligation assay and co-immunoprecipitation, demonstrating that Pan-HER and the EGFR-targeting mAb mixture efficiently down-regulate basal EGFR homo- and heterodimerization in two tested cell lines, whereas single mAbs had limited effects. Pan-HER and the EGFR-targeting mAb mixture also blocked EGF-binding and thereby ligand-induced changes in EGFR-dimerization levels. These results suggest that Pan-HER reduces the cellular capability to switch HER-dependency and dimerization pattern in response to treatment and thus hold promise for future clinical development of Pan-HER in resistant settings.

  6. Integrating structure- and ligand-based virtual screening: comparison of individual, parallel, and fused molecular docking and similarity search calculations on multiple targets.

    PubMed

    Tan, Lu; Geppert, Hanna; Sisay, Mihiret T; Gütschow, Michael; Bajorath, Jürgen

    2008-10-01

    Similarity searching is often used to preselect compounds for docking, thereby decreasing the size of screening databases. However, integrated structure- and ligand-based screening schemes are rare at present. Docking and similarity search calculations using 2D fingerprints were carried out in a comparative manner on nine target enzymes, for which significant numbers of diverse inhibitors could be obtained. In the absence of knowledge-based docking constraints and target-directed parameter optimisation, fingerprint searching displayed a clear preference over docking calculations. Alternative combinations of docking and similarity search results were investigated and found to further increase compound recall of individual methods in a number of instances. When the results of similarity searching and docking were combined, parallel selection of candidate compounds from individual rankings was generally superior to rank fusion. We suggest that complementary results from docking and similarity searching can be captured by integrated compound selection schemes. PMID:18651695

  7. Design and validation of a homogeneous time-resolved fluorescence cell-based assay targeting the ligand-gated ion channel 5-HT3A.

    PubMed

    Blanc, Emilie; Wagner, Patrick; Plaisier, Fabrice; Schmitt, Martine; Durroux, Thierry; Bourguignon, Jean-Jacques; Partiseti, Michel; Dupuis, Elodie; Bihel, Frederic

    2015-09-01

    Ligand-gated ion channels (LGICs) are considered as attractive protein targets in the search for new therapeutic agents. Nowadays, this strategy involves the capability to screen large chemical libraries. We present a new Tag-lite ligand binding assay targeting LGICs on living cells. This technology combines the use of suicide enzyme tags fused to channels of interest with homogeneous time-resolved fluorescence (HTRF) as the detection readout. Using the 5-HT3 receptor as system model, we showed that the pharmacology of the HALO-5HT3 receptor was identical to that of the native receptor. After validation of the assay by using 5-HT3 agonists and antagonists of reference, a pilot screen enabled us to identify azelastine, a well-known histamine H1 antagonist, as a potent 5-HT3 antagonist. This interesting result was confirmed with electrophysiological experiments. The method described here is easy to implement and could be applicable for other LGICs, opening new ways for the screening of chemical libraries. PMID:25998104

  8. Templated Formation of Discrete RNA and DNA:RNA Hybrid G-Quadruplexes and Their Interactions with Targeting Ligands.

    PubMed

    Bonnat, Laureen; Dejeu, Jérôme; Bonnet, Hugues; Génnaro, Béatrice; Jarjayes, Olivier; Thomas, Fabrice; Lavergne, Thomas; Defrancq, Eric

    2016-02-24

    G-rich RNA and DNA oligonucleotides derived from the human telomeric sequence were assembled onto addressable cyclopeptide platforms through oxime ligations and copper-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAc) reactions. The resulting conjugates were able to fold into highly stable RNA and DNA:RNA hybrid G-quadruplex (G4) architectures as demonstrated by UV, circular dichroism (CD), and NMR spectroscopic analysis. Whereas rationally designed parallel RNA and DNA:RNA hybrid G4 topologies could be obtained, we could not force the formation of an antiparallel RNA G4 structure, thus supporting the idea that this topology is strongly disfavored. The binding affinities of four representative G4 ligands toward the discrete RNA and DNA:RNA hybrid G4 topologies were compared to the one obtained with the corresponding DNA G4 structure. Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) binding analysis suggests that the accessibility to G4 recognition elements is different among the three structures and supports the idea that G4 ligands might be shaped to achieve structure selectivity in a biological context.

  9. Ligand-incorporation site in 5-methylcytosine-detection probe modulating the site of osmium complexation with the target DNA.

    PubMed

    Sugizaki, Kaori; Nakamura, Akiko; Yanagisawa, Hiroyuki; Okamoto, Akimitsu

    2012-09-01

    ICON Probes, short DNA strands containing an adenine linked to a bipyridine ligand, formed an interstrand cross-link with 5-methylcytosine located opposite the modified adenine in the presence of an osmium oxidant. The location of a bipyridine-tethered adenine in the probes varied the selectivity of the reactive base. An ICON probe where the modified adenine was located at the probe center showed a 5-methylcytosine-selective osmium complexation, whereas an ICON probe with the modified adenine at the strand end exhibited high reactivity towards thymine as well as 5-methylcytosine. The modulation of reactive bases by the incorporation of a bipyridine-tethered adenine site made facilitates design of ICON probes for the fluorometric detection of 5-methylcytosine.

  10. Targeted Cancer Therapy Systems: An In Silico Study of Radiohalogenated Ligands in the Estrogen Receptor and the Synthesis of a Molecular Toolkit for the Fabrication of Customizable Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnsley, Kelton K.

    Chemotherapy is often limited by off-target toxicity and the development of multi-drug resistance in response to treatment. Strategies which reduce off-target toxicity by passively or actively targeting cancer cells may improve the efficacy of chemotherapy. Herein, two projects relating to targeted therapy are described. In the first project, the binding modes of 1,1-bis(4-hydroxyphenyl)-2-phenylethylenes (THPEs), a class of synthetic estrogens previously developed by our group, in the human estrogen receptor alpha-ligand binding domain were studied using molecular modeling programs YASARA AutoDock and Schrodinger Glide. The results were internally consistent and supported the observation that a bromine or iodine atom at the 2-position of the THPEs contributes positively to their binding in the estrogen receptor. In the second project, a "molecular toolkit" approach to the synthesis of multifunctional nanoparticles was envisioned. Our hypothesis was that the physical and chemical properties of the final product could be defined by controlling the types and relative amounts of prefunctionalized polymer units (PPUs) as well as the emulsification conditions. The design and syntheses of heterobifunctional linkers and other components for a preliminary molecular toolkit are reported, and the literature on select heterobifunctional aliphatic linkers is examined.

  11. Quantitation of rare circulating tumor cells by folate receptor α ligand-targeted PCR in bladder transitional cell carcinoma and its potential diagnostic significance.

    PubMed

    Qi, Fuming; Liu, Yuchen; Zhao, Rongchang; Zou, Xiangjun; Zhang, Lei; Li, Jiaqiang; Wang, Yongqiang; Li, Feiyang; Zou, Xiaowen; Xia, Ye; Wang, Xuliang; Xing, Li; Li, Cailing; Lu, Jingxiao; Tang, Junlong; Zhou, Fangjian; Liu, Chunxiao; Gui, Yaoting; Cai, Zhiming; Sun, Xiaojuan

    2014-07-01

    Numerous attempts for detection of circulating tumor cells (CTC) have been made to develop reliable assays for early diagnosis of cancers. In this study, we validated the application of folate receptor α (FRα) as the tumor marker to detect CTC through tumor-specific ligand PCR (LT-PCR) and assessed its utility for diagnosis of bladder transitional cell carcinoma (TCC). Immunohistochemistry for FRα was performed on ten bladder TCC tissues. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for FRα was performed on both urine and serum specimens from bladder TCC patients (n = 64 and n = 20, respectively) and healthy volunteers (n = 20 and n = 23, respectively). Western blot analysis and qRT-PCR were performed to confirm the expression of FRα in bladder TCC cells. CTC values in 3-mL peripheral blood were measured in 57 bladder TCC patients, 48 healthy volunteers, and 15 subjects with benign urologic pathologies by the folate receptor α ligand-targeted PCR. We found that FRα protein was overexpressed in both bladder TCC cells and tissues. The levels of FRα mRNA were also much higher in bladder cancer cell lines 5637 and SW780 than those of leukocyte. Values of FRα were higher in both serum and urine specimens of bladder TCC patients than those of control. CTC values were also higher in 3-mL peripheral blood of bladder TCC patients than those of control (median 26.5 Cu/3 mL vs 14.0 Cu/3 mL). Area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve for bladder TCC detection was 0.819, 95 % CI (0.738-0.883). At the cutoff value of 15.43 Cu/3 mL, the sensitivity and the specificity for detecting bladder cancer are 82.14 and 61.9 %, respectively. We concluded that quantitation of CTCs through FRα ligand-PCR could be a promising method for noninvasive diagnosis of bladder TCC.

  12. Tyrosine kinome sequencing of pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia: a report from the Children's Oncology Group TARGET Project | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Cancer.gov

    TARGET researchers sequenced the tyrosine kinome and downstream signaling genes in 45 high-risk pediatric ALL cases with activated kinase signaling, including Ph-like ALL, to establish the incidence of tyrosine kinase mutations in this cohort. The study confirmed previously identified somatic mutations in JAK and FLT3, but did not find novel alterations in any additional tyrosine kinases or downstream genes. The mechanism of kinase signaling activation in this high-risk subgroup of pediatric ALL remains largely unknown.

  13. Nanoparticles produced by ring-opening metathesis polymerization using norbornenyl-poly(ethylene oxide) as a ligand-free generic platform for highly selective in vivo tumor targeting.

    PubMed

    Gueugnon, Fabien; Denis, Iza; Pouliquen, Daniel; Collette, Floraine; Delatouche, Régis; Héroguez, Valérie; Grégoire, Marc; Bertrand, Philippe; Blanquart, Christophe

    2013-07-01

    We described a norbornenyl-poly(ethylene oxide) nanoparticles ligand-free generic platform, made fluorescent with straightforward preparation by ring-opening metathesis polymerization (ROMP). Our method allowed to easily obtain a drug delivery system (DDS) with facilitated functionalization by means of azide-alkyne click chemistry and with a high selectivity for the tumor in vivo, while cellular internalization is obtained without cell targeting strategy. We demonstrated that our nanoparticles are internalized by endocytosis and colocalized with acidic intracellular compartments in two models of aggressive tumoral cell lines with low prognostic and limited therapeutic treatments. Our nanoparticles could be of real interest to limit the toxicity and to increase the clinical benefit of drugs suffering rapid clearance and side effects and an alternative for cancers with poorly efficient therapeutic solutions by associating the drug delivery in the tumor tissue with an acid-sensitive release system.

  14. STRUCTURE BASED DESIGN OF PROTEIN LIGANDS: A STUDY OF ANTIBODY-LIKE SCAFFOLDS TARGETED AGAINST THE ANTHRAX TOXIN

    SciTech Connect

    P. SHIFLETT; E. HONG-GELLER; ET AL

    2000-12-01

    We have adopted structure-based approaches to enhance the affinities of two single chain antibodies, scFv1 and scFv4, that bind to two different epitopes on the Protective Antigen (PA), a toxin from Bacillus anthracis. In one approach, we have modified scFv4 and re-engineered a novel antibody-like scaffold in which we have placed V{sub L} on the N terminus and V{sub H} on the C-terminus and joined them by a 10 amino-acid-long linker. This scaffold preserves the native V{sub L}-V{sub H} contact interface and the dispositions of the CDR loops. It binds to PA with 10 fold higher affinity than scFv4. In a second approach, we have created a bispecific ligand by covalently joining scFv1 and scFv4 by a flexible linker that supports simultaneous and synergistic binding of the two scFvs to PA. This bispecific scFv1-linker-scFv4 binds to PA with 10 fold higher affinity than the individual scFvs. The newly re-engineered antibody-like scaffold of scFv4 and scFv1-linker-scFv4 are expected to be potent inhibitors of PA binding to the host cells.

  15. Synthesis of liver-targeting dual-ligand modified GCGA/5-FU nanoparticles and their characteristics in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Mingrong; Gao, Xiaoyan; Wang, Yong; Chen, Houxiang; He, Bing; Li, Yingchun; Han, Jiang; Zhang, Zhiping

    2013-01-01

    Nanoparticle drug delivery systems using polymers hold promise for clinical applications. We synthesized dual-ligand modified chitosan (GCGA) nanoparticles using lactic acid, glycyrrhetinic acid, and chitosan to target the liver in our previous studies. We then synthesized the GCGA/5-FU nanoparticles by conjugating 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) onto the GCGA nanomaterial, which had a mean particle size of 239.9 nm, a polydispersity index of 0.040, a zeta potential of +21.2 mV, and a drug loading of 3.90%. GCGA/5-FU nanoparticles had good slow release properties, and the release process could be divided into five phases: small burst release, gentle release, second burst release, steady release, and slow release. Inhibitory effects of GCGA/5-FU on tumor cells targeted the liver, and were time and dose dependent. GCGA nanoparticles significantly prolonged the efficacy of 5-FU on tumor cells, and alleviated the resistance of tumor cells to 5-FU. GCGA/5-FU nanoparticles were mostly concentrated in the liver, indicating that the GCGA nanoparticles were liver targeting. GCGA/5-FU nanoparticles significantly suppressed tumor growth in orthotopic liver transplantation mouse model, and improved mouse survival.

  16. Immunogenicity of a neutralizing epitope from porcine epidemic diarrhea virus: M cell targeting ligand fusion protein expressed in transgenic rice calli.

    PubMed

    Huy, Nguyen-Xuan; Kim, Sae-Hae; Yang, Moon-Sik; Kim, Tae-Geum

    2012-10-01

    To increase immune responses of plant-based vaccines in intestine mucosal immune systems, a synthetic neutralizing epitope (sCOE) gene of porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV) was fused with M cell-targeting ligand (Co1) and introduced into a plant expression vector under the control of rice amylase 3D promoter. The sCOE-Co1 fusion gene was introduced into rice calli via the particle bombardment-mediated transformation method. The stable integration and transcriptional expression of the sCOE-Co1 fusion gene was confirmed by genomic DNA PCR amplification and Northern blot analysis, respectively. The expression of the COE-Co1 fusion protein was confirmed by immunoblot analysis. The highest expression level of the COE-Co1 fusion protein reached 0.083 % of the total soluble protein according to quantitative densitometry of Western blot analysis. Mice immunized with transgenic rice calli protein extracts induced significant serum IgG and fecal IgA antibody levels against purified bacterial COE. The systemic and mucosal immune responses were confirmed by measuring COE-specific IgG and IgA antibody-secreting cells in the lymphocytes extracted from the spleen and COE-specific IgA antibody-secreting cells in the Peyer's patches from immunized mice. These results indicated that oral immunization of plant-produced COE-Co1 fusion protein could elicit efficient systemic and mucosal immune responses against the COE antigen. Key message Neutralizing epitope from porcine epidemic diarrhea virus-M cell targeting ligand fusion protein was produced in transgenic rice calli and elicited systemic and mucosal immune responses by oral administration in mice. PMID:22736145

  17. Selection and identification of ligand peptides targeting a model of castrate-resistant osteogenic prostate cancer and their receptors

    PubMed Central

    Mandelin, Jami; Cardó-Vila, Marina; Driessen, Wouter H. P.; Mathew, Paul; Navone, Nora M.; Lin, Sue-Hwa; Logothetis, Christopher J.; Rietz, Anna Cecilia; Dobroff, Andrey S.; Proneth, Bettina; Sidman, Richard L.; Pasqualini, Renata; Arap, Wadih

    2015-01-01

    We performed combinatorial peptide library screening in vivo on a novel human prostate cancer xenograft that is androgen-independent and induces a robust osteoblastic reaction in bonelike matrix and soft tissue. We found two peptides, PKRGFQD and SNTRVAP, which were enriched in the tumors, targeted the cell surface of androgen-independent prostate cancer cells in vitro, and homed to androgen receptor-null prostate cancer in vivo. Purification of tumor homogenates by affinity chromatography on these peptides and subsequent mass spectrometry revealed a receptor for the peptide PKRGFQD, α-2-macroglobulin, and for SNTRVAP, 78-kDa glucose-regulated protein (GRP78). These results indicate that GRP78 and α-2-macroglobulin are highly active in osteoblastic, androgen-independent prostate cancer in vivo. These previously unidentified ligand–receptor systems should be considered for targeted drug development against human metastatic androgen-independent prostate cancer. PMID:25762070

  18. Ligand-conjugated mesoporous silica nanorattles based on enzyme targeted prodrug delivery system for effective lung cancer therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Sundarraj, Shenbagamoorthy; Thangam, Ramar; Sujitha, Mohanan V.; Vimala, Karuppaiya; Kannan, Soundarapandian

    2014-03-15

    Epidermal growth factor receptor antibody (EGFRAb) conjugated silica nanorattles (SNs) were synthesized and used to develop receptor mediated endocytosis for targeted drug delivery strategies for cancer therapy. The present study determined that the rate of internalization of silica nanorattles was found to be high in lung cancer cells when compared with the normal lung cells. EGFRAb can specifically bind to EGFR, a receptor that is highly expressed in lung cancer cells, but is expressed at low levels in other normal cells. Furthermore, in vitro studies clearly substantiated that the cPLA{sub 2}α activity, arachidonic acid release and cell proliferation were considerably reduced by pyrrolidine-2 loaded EGFRAb-SN in H460 cells. The cytotoxicity, cell cycle arrest and apoptosis were significantly induced by the treatment of pyrrolidine-2 loaded EGFRAb-SN when compared with free pyrrolidine-2 and pyrrolidine-2 loaded SNs in human non-small cell lung cancer cells. An in vivo toxicity assessment showed that silica nanorattles and EGFRAb-SN-pyrrolidine-2 exhibited low systemic toxicity in healthy Balb/c mice. The EGFRAb-SN-pyrrolidine-2 showed a much better antitumor activity (38%) with enhanced tumor inhibition rate than the pyrrolidine-2 on the non-small cell lung carcinoma subcutaneous model. Thus, the present findings validated the low toxicity and high therapeutic potentials of EGFRAb-SN-pyrrolidine-2, which may provide a convincing evidence of the silica nanorattles as new potential carriers for targeted drug delivery systems. - Highlights: • EGFRAb-SN developed for receptor-mediated Drug delivery system (DDS). • EGFRAb-SN-pyrrolidine-2 targeted DDS for cPLA2α inhibition in NSLC. • Study indicates EGFRAb-SN-pyrrolidine-2 as an efficient in target dug delivery carrier. • Study explains entire efficiency of EGFRAb-SN-pyrrolidine-2 in vitro and in vivo models.

  19. Ligand-directed reduction-sensitive shell-sheddable biodegradable micelles actively deliver doxorubicin into the nuclei of target cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Yinan; Yang, Weijing; Sun, Huanli; Cheng, Ru; Meng, Fenghua; Deng, Chao; Zhong, Zhiyuan

    2013-10-14

    The therapeutic performance of biodegradable micellar drugs is far from optimal due to existing challenges like poor tumor cell uptake and intracellular drug release. Here, we report on ligand-directed reduction-sensitive shell-sheddable biodegradable micelles based on poly(ethylene glycol)-poly(ε-caprolactone) (PEG-PCL) copolymer actively delivering doxorubicin (DOX) into the nuclei of target cancer cells, inducing superb in vitro antitumor effects. The micelles were constructed from PEG-SS-PCL and galactose-PEG-PCL (Gal-PEG-PCL) block copolymers, in which Gal-PEG-PCL was designed with a longer PEG than that in PEG-SS-PCL (6.0 vs 5.0 kDa) to fully expose Gal ligands onto the surface of micelles for effective targeting to hepatocellular carcinoma cells. PEG-SS-PCL combining with 10 or 20 wt % of Gal-PEG-PCL formed uniform micelles with average sizes of 56.1 and 58.2 nm (denoted as PEG-SS-PCL/Gal10 and PEG-SS-PCL/Gal20, respectively). The in vitro release studies showed that about 81.1 and 75.0% DOX was released in 12 h from PEG-SS-PCL/Gal10 and PEG-SS-PCL/Gal20 micelles under a reducing condition containing 10 mM dithiothreitol (DTT). In contrast, minimal DOX release (<12%) was observed for PEG-SS-PCL/Gal10 and PEG-SS-PCL/Gal20 micelles under nonreducing conditions as well as for reduction-insensitive Gal-PEG-PCL and PEG-PCL/Gal20 micelles in the presence of 10 mM DTT. MTT assays in HeLa and HepG2 cells showed that DOX-loaded PEG-SS-PCL/Gal20 micelles exhibited apparent targetability and significantly enhanced antitumor efficacy toward asialoglycoprotein receptor (ASGP-R)-overexpressing HepG2 cells with a particularly low half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) of 1.58 μg DOX equiv/mL, which was comparable to free DOX and approximately six times lower than that for nontargeting PEG-SS-PCL counterparts under otherwise the same conditions. Interestingly, confocal microscopy observations using FITC-labeled PEG-SS-PCL/Gal20 micelles showed that DOX was

  20. Cooperative therapeutic anti-tumor effect of IL-15 agonist ALT-803 and co-targeting soluble NKG2D ligand sMIC

    PubMed Central

    Basher, Fahmin; Jeng, Emily K.; Wong, Hing; Wu, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    Shedding of the human NKG2D ligand MIC (MHC class I-chain-related molecule) from tumor cell surfaces correlates with progression of many epithelial cancers. Shedding-derived soluble MIC (sMIC) enables tumor immune escape through multiple immune suppressive mechanisms, such as disturbing natural killer (NK) cell homeostatic maintenance, impairing NKG2D expression on NK cells and effector T cells, and facilitating the expansion of arginase I+ myeloid suppressor cells. Our recent study has demonstrated that sMIC is an effective cancer therapeutic target. Whether targeting tumor-derived sMIC would enhance current active immunotherapy is not known. Here, we determined the in vivo therapeutic effect of an antibody co-targeting sMIC with the immunostimulatory IL-15 superagonist complex, ALT-803, using genetically engineered transplantable syngeneic sMIC+ tumor models. We demonstrate that combined therapy of a nonblocking antibody neutralizing sMIC and ALT-803 improved the survival of animals bearing sMIC+ tumors in comparison to monotherapy. We further demonstrate that the enhanced therapeutic effect with combined therapy is through concurrent augmentation of NK and CD8 T cell anti-tumor responses. In particular, expression of activation-induced surface molecules and increased functional potential by cytokine secretion are improved greatly by the administration of combined therapy. Depletion of NK cells abolished the cooperative therapeutic effect. Our findings suggest that administration of the sMIC-neutralizing antibody can enhance the anti-tumor effects of ALT-803. With ALT-803 currently in clinical trials to treat progressive solid tumors, the majority of which are sMIC+, our findings provide a rationale for co-targeting sMIC to enhance the therapeutic efficacy of ALT-803 or other IL-15 agonists. PMID:26625316

  1. High Throughput Sequencing Identifies MicroRNAs Mediating α-Synuclein Toxicity by Targeting Neuroactive-Ligand Receptor Interaction Pathway in Early Stage of Drosophila Parkinson's Disease Model

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Yan; Liang, Xijun; Liu, Lin; Zhang, Dongdong; Wan, Chao; Gan, Zhenji; Yuan, Liudi

    2015-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) is a prevalent neurodegenerative disorder with pathological features including death of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra and intraneuronal accumulations of Lewy bodies. As the main component of Lewy bodies, α-synuclein is implicated in PD pathogenesis by aggregation into insoluble filaments. However, the detailed mechanisms underlying α-synuclein induced neurotoxicity in PD are still elusive. MicroRNAs are ~20nt small RNA molecules that fine-tune gene expression at posttranscriptional level. A plethora of miRNAs have been found to be dysregulated in the brain and blood cells of PD patients. Nevertheless, the detailed mechanisms and their in vivo functions in PD still need further investigation. By using Drosophila PD model expressing α-synuclein A30P, we examined brain miRNA expression with high-throughput small RNA sequencing technology. We found that five miRNAs (dme-miR-133-3p, dme-miR-137-3p, dme-miR-13b-3p, dme-miR-932-5p, dme-miR-1008-5p) were upregulated in PD flies. Among them, miR-13b, miR-133, miR-137 are brain enriched and highly conserved from Drosophila to humans. KEGG pathway analysis using DIANA miR-Path demonstrated that neuroactive-ligand receptor interaction pathway was most likely affected by these miRNAs. Interestingly, miR-137 was predicted to regulate most of the identified targets in this pathway, including dopamine receptor (DopR, D2R), γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptor (GABA-B-R1, GABA-B-R3) and N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor (Nmdar2). The validation experiments showed that the expression of miR-137 and its targets was negatively correlated in PD flies. Further experiments using luciferase reporter assay confirmed that miR-137 could act on specific sites in 3’ UTR region of D2R, Nmdar2 and GABA-B-R3, which downregulated significantly in PD flies. Collectively, our findings indicate that α-synuclein could induce the dysregulation of miRNAs, which target neuroactive ligand

  2. Multi-Target-Directed Ligands and other Therapeutic Strategies in the Search of a Real Solution for Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Agis-Torres, Angel; Sölhuber, Monica; Fernandez, Maria; Sanchez-Montero, J.M.

    2014-01-01

    The lack of an adequate therapy for Alzheimer's Disease (AD) contributes greatly to the continuous growing amount of papers and reviews, reflecting the important efforts made by scientists in this field. It is well known that AD is the most common cause of dementia, and up-to-date there is no prevention therapy and no cure for the disease, which contrasts with the enormous efforts put on the task. On the other hand many aspects of AD are currently debated or even unknown. This review offers a view of the current state of knowledge about AD which includes more relevant findings and processes that take part in the disease; it also shows more relevant past, present and future research on therapeutic drugs taking into account the new paradigm “Multi-Target-Directed Ligands” (MTDLs). In our opinion, this paradigm will lead from now on the research toward the discovery of better therapeutic solutions, not only in the case of AD but also in other complex diseases. This review highlights the strategies followed by now, and focuses other emerging targets that should be taken into account for the future development of new MTDLs. Thus, the path followed in this review goes from the pathology and the processes involved in AD to the strategies to consider in on-going and future researches. PMID:24533013

  3. Simultaneous targeting of two ligand-binding sites on VEGFR2 using biparatopic Affibody molecules results in dramatically improved affinity

    PubMed Central

    Fleetwood, Filippa; Klint, Susanne; Hanze, Martin; Gunneriusson, Elin; Frejd, Fredrik Y.; Ståhl, Stefan; Löfblom, John

    2014-01-01

    Angiogenesis plays an important role in cancer and ophthalmic disorders such as age-related macular degeneration and diabetic retinopathy. The vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) family and corresponding receptors are regulators of angiogenesis and have been much investigated as therapeutic targets. The aim of this work was to generate antagonistic VEGFR2-specific affinity proteins having adjustable pharmacokinetic properties allowing for either therapy or molecular imaging. Two antagonistic Affibody molecules that were cross-reactive for human and murine VEGFR2 were selected by phage and bacterial display. Surprisingly, although both binders independently blocked VEGF-A binding, competition assays revealed interaction with non-overlapping epitopes on the receptor. Biparatopic molecules, comprising the two Affibody domains, were hence engineered to potentially increase affinity even further through avidity. Moreover, an albumin-binding domain was included for half-life extension in future in vivo experiments. The best-performing of the biparatopic constructs demonstrated up to 180-fold slower dissociation than the monomers. The new Affibody constructs were also able to specifically target VEGFR2 on human cells, while simultaneously binding to albumin, as well as inhibit VEGF-induced signaling. In summary, we have generated small antagonistic biparatopic Affibody molecules with high affinity for VEGFR2, which have potential for both future therapeutic and diagnostic purposes in angiogenesis-related diseases. PMID:25515662

  4. Dissecting the Binding Mode of Low Affinity Phage Display Peptide Ligands to Protein Targets by Hydrogen/Deuterium Exchange Coupled to Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Phage display (PD) is frequently used to discover peptides capable of binding to biological protein targets. The structural characterization of peptide–protein complexes is often challenging due to their low binding affinities and high structural flexibility. Here, we investigate the use of hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDX-MS) to characterize interactions of low affinity peptides with their cognate protein targets. The HDX-MS workflow was optimized to accurately detect low-affinity peptide–protein interactions by use of ion mobility, electron transfer dissociation, nonbinding control peptides, and statistical analysis of replicate data. We show that HDX-MS can identify regions in the two epigenetic regulator proteins KDM4C and KDM1A that are perturbed through weak interactions with PD-identified peptides. Two peptides cause reduced HDX on opposite sides of the active site of KDM4C, indicating distinct binding modes. In contrast, the perturbation site of another PD-selected peptide inhibiting the function of KDM1A maps to a GST-tag. Our results demonstrate that HDX-MS can validate and map weak peptide–protein interactions and pave the way for understanding and optimizing the binding of peptide scaffolds identified through PD and similar ligand discovery approaches. PMID:25325890

  5. A novel bispecific ligand-directed toxin designed to simultaneously target EGFR on human glioblastoma cells and uPAR on tumor neovasculature

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Alexander K.; Oh, Seunguk; Chen, Hua; Shu, Yanqun; Ohlfest, John R.

    2011-01-01

    A bispecific ligand-directed toxin (BLT), called EGFATFKDEL, consisting of human epidermal growth factor, a fragment of urokinase, and truncated pseudomonas exotoxin (PE38) was assembled in order to target human glioblastoma. Immunogenicity was reduced by mutating seven immunodominant B-cell epitopes on the PE38 molecule to create a new agent, EGFATFKDEL 7mut. In vitro, the drug selectively killed several human glioblastoma cell lines. EGFATFKDEL is our first BLT designed to simultaneously target EGFR on solid tumors and uPAR on the tumor neovasculature. In vitro assays revealed that the agent is effective against glioblastoma cell lines as well as human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC). Additionally, the bispecific drug displayed enhanced binding to overexpressed epidermal growth factor receptor and urokinase receptor when compared to similar monospecific drugs, EGFKDEL and ATFKDEL. In vivo, an aggressive human glioblastoma cell line was genetically marked with a firefly luciferase reporter gene and administered to the flanks of nude mice. Treatment with intratumoral injections of EGFATFKDEL 7mut eradicated small tumors in over half of the treated mice, which survived with tumor free status at least 100 days post tumor inoculation. ATFKDEL, which primarily targets the tumor neovasculature, prevented tumor growth but did not result in tumor-free mice in most cases. Specificity was shown by treating with an irrelevant BLT control which did not protect mice. Finally, immunization experiments in immunocompetent mice revealed significantly reduced anti-toxin production in EGFATFKDEL 7mut treated groups. Thus, EGFATFKDEL 7mut is an effective drug for glioblastoma therapy in this murine model and warrants further study. PMID:20830604

  6. Multiple Ligands Targeting Cholinesterases and β-Amyloid: Synthesis, Biological Evaluation of Heterodimeric Compounds with Benzylamine Pharmacophore.

    PubMed

    Szałaj, Natalia; Bajda, Marek; Dudek, Katarzyna; Brus, Boris; Gobec, Stanislav; Malawska, Barbara

    2015-08-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a fatal and complex neurodegenerative disorder for which effective treatment remains the unmet challenge. Using donepezil as a starting point, we aimed to develop novel potential anti-AD agents with a multidirectional biological profile. We designed the target compounds as dual binding site acetylcholinesterase inhibitors, where the N-benzylamine pharmacophore is responsible for interactions with the catalytic anionic site of the enzyme. The heteroaromatic fragment responsible for interactions with the peripheral anionic site was modified and three different heterocycles were introduced: isoindoline, isoindolin-1-one, and saccharine. Based on the results of the pharmacological evaluation, we identified compound 8b with a saccharine moiety as the most potent and selective human acetylcholinesterase inhibitor (IC50  = 33 nM) and beta amyloid aggregation inhibitor. It acts as a non-competitive acetylcholinesterase inhibitor and is able to cross the blood-brain barrier in vitro. We believe that compound 8b represents an important lead compound for further development as potential anti-AD agent. PMID:26032855

  7. Multiple Ligands Targeting Cholinesterases and β-Amyloid: Synthesis, Biological Evaluation of Heterodimeric Compounds with Benzylamine Pharmacophore.

    PubMed

    Szałaj, Natalia; Bajda, Marek; Dudek, Katarzyna; Brus, Boris; Gobec, Stanislav; Malawska, Barbara

    2015-08-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a fatal and complex neurodegenerative disorder for which effective treatment remains the unmet challenge. Using donepezil as a starting point, we aimed to develop novel potential anti-AD agents with a multidirectional biological profile. We designed the target compounds as dual binding site acetylcholinesterase inhibitors, where the N-benzylamine pharmacophore is responsible for interactions with the catalytic anionic site of the enzyme. The heteroaromatic fragment responsible for interactions with the peripheral anionic site was modified and three different heterocycles were introduced: isoindoline, isoindolin-1-one, and saccharine. Based on the results of the pharmacological evaluation, we identified compound 8b with a saccharine moiety as the most potent and selective human acetylcholinesterase inhibitor (IC50  = 33 nM) and beta amyloid aggregation inhibitor. It acts as a non-competitive acetylcholinesterase inhibitor and is able to cross the blood-brain barrier in vitro. We believe that compound 8b represents an important lead compound for further development as potential anti-AD agent.

  8. Insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor and ligand targeting in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Slomiany, Mark G; Black, Leigh Ann; Kibbey, Megan M; Tingler, Melissa A; Day, Terry A; Rosenzweig, Steven A

    2007-04-18

    IGF-1 receptor (IGF-1R) signaling is associated with increased tumorigenesis of epithelial cancers. In light of recent epidemiological studies correlating high circulating levels of IGF-1 with increased risk of second primary tumors (SPTs) of the head and neck, we examined IGF system and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) expression in human head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) matched pairs and a cross-section of HNSCC cell lines. Employing the latter, we demonstrated that IGF-1 stimulated S-phase transition in a PI 3-K/Akt and Erk-dependent manner in 5 of 8 cell lines, with Erk activation being dependent upon EGFR kinase activity. IGF-1 stimulated thymidine incorporation was inhibited by treatment with IGFBP-3, the IGF-1R tyrosine kinase inhibitor NVP-AEW541, or the EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor AG1478. Combining IGFBP-3 with NVP-AEW541 or AG1478 abrogated IGF-1 responses at 10-fold lower doses than either compound alone. These results demonstrate the potential for co-targeting the IGF system and EGFR in HNSCC.

  9. Targeting MTHFD2 in acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Pikman, Yana; Puissant, Alexandre; Alexe, Gabriela; Furman, Andrew; Chen, Liying M; Frumm, Stacey M; Ross, Linda; Fenouille, Nina; Bassil, Christopher F; Lewis, Caroline A; Ramos, Azucena; Gould, Joshua; Stone, Richard M; DeAngelo, Daniel J; Galinsky, Ilene; Clish, Clary B; Kung, Andrew L; Hemann, Michael T; Vander Heiden, Matthew G; Banerji, Versha; Stegmaier, Kimberly

    2016-06-27

    Drugs targeting metabolism have formed the backbone of therapy for some cancers. We sought to identify new such targets in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). The one-carbon folate pathway, specifically methylenetetrahydrofolate dehydrogenase-cyclohydrolase 2 (MTHFD2), emerged as a top candidate in our analyses. MTHFD2 is the most differentially expressed metabolic enzyme in cancer versus normal cells. Knockdown of MTHFD2 in AML cells decreased growth, induced differentiation, and impaired colony formation in primary AML blasts. In human xenograft and MLL-AF9 mouse leukemia models, MTHFD2 suppression decreased leukemia burden and prolonged survival. Based upon primary patient AML data and functional genomic screening, we determined that FLT3-ITD is a biomarker of response to MTHFD2 suppression. Mechanistically, MYC regulates the expression of MTHFD2, and MTHFD2 knockdown suppresses the TCA cycle. This study supports the therapeutic targeting of MTHFD2 in AML. PMID:27325891

  10. Ligand modeling and design

    SciTech Connect

    Hay, B.P.

    1997-10-01

    The purpose of this work is to develop and implement a molecular design basis for selecting organic ligands that would be used in the cost-effective removal of specific radionuclides from nuclear waste streams. Organic ligands with metal ion specificity are critical components in the development of solvent extraction and ion exchange processes that are highly selective for targeted radionuclides. The traditional approach to the development of such ligands involves lengthy programs of organic synthesis and testing, which in the absence of reliable methods for screening compounds before synthesis, results in wasted research effort. The author`s approach breaks down and simplifies this costly process with the aid of computer-based molecular modeling techniques. Commercial software for organic molecular modeling is being configured to examine the interactions between organic ligands and metal ions, yielding an inexpensive, commercially or readily available computational tool that can be used to predict the structures and energies of ligand-metal complexes. Users will be able to correlate the large body of existing experimental data on structure, solution binding affinity, and metal ion selectivity to develop structural design criteria. These criteria will provide a basis for selecting ligands that can be implemented in separations technologies through collaboration with other DOE national laboratories and private industry. The initial focus will be to select ether-based ligands that can be applied to the recovery and concentration of the alkali and alkaline earth metal ions including cesium, strontium, and radium.

  11. PoSSuM v.2.0: data update and a new function for investigating ligand analogs and target proteins of small-molecule drugs.

    PubMed

    Ito, Jun-ichi; Ikeda, Kazuyoshi; Yamada, Kazunori; Mizuguchi, Kenji; Tomii, Kentaro

    2015-01-01

    PoSSuM (http://possum.cbrc.jp/PoSSuM/) is a database for detecting similar small-molecule binding sites on proteins. Since its initial release in 2011, PoSSuM has grown to provide information related to 49 million pairs of similar binding sites discovered among 5.5 million known and putative binding sites. This enlargement of the database is expected to enhance opportunities for biological and pharmaceutical applications, such as predictions of new functions and drug discovery. In this release, we have provided a new service named PoSSuM drug search (PoSSuMds) at http://possum.cbrc.jp/PoSSuM/drug_search/, in which we selected 194 approved drug compounds retrieved from ChEMBL, and detected their known binding pockets and pockets that are similar to them. Users can access and download all of the search results via a new web interface, which is useful for finding ligand analogs as well as potential target proteins. Furthermore, PoSSuMds enables users to explore the binding pocket universe within PoSSuM. Additionally, we have improved the web interface with new functions, including sortable tables and a viewer for visualizing and downloading superimposed pockets.

  12. PoSSuM v.2.0: data update and a new function for investigating ligand analogs and target proteins of small-molecule drugs

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Jun-ichi; Ikeda, Kazuyoshi; Yamada, Kazunori; Mizuguchi, Kenji; Tomii, Kentaro

    2015-01-01

    PoSSuM (http://possum.cbrc.jp/PoSSuM/) is a database for detecting similar small-molecule binding sites on proteins. Since its initial release in 2011, PoSSuM has grown to provide information related to 49 million pairs of similar binding sites discovered among 5.5 million known and putative binding sites. This enlargement of the database is expected to enhance opportunities for biological and pharmaceutical applications, such as predictions of new functions and drug discovery. In this release, we have provided a new service named PoSSuM drug search (PoSSuMds) at http://possum.cbrc.jp/PoSSuM/drug_search/, in which we selected 194 approved drug compounds retrieved from ChEMBL, and detected their known binding pockets and pockets that are similar to them. Users can access and download all of the search results via a new web interface, which is useful for finding ligand analogs as well as potential target proteins. Furthermore, PoSSuMds enables users to explore the binding pocket universe within PoSSuM. Additionally, we have improved the web interface with new functions, including sortable tables and a viewer for visualizing and downloading superimposed pockets. PMID:25404129

  13. Identification of Candidate Target Cyp Genes for microRNAs Whose Expression Is Altered by PCN and TCPOBOP, Representative Ligands of PXR and CAR.

    PubMed

    Moriya, Nozomu; Kataoka, Hiromi; Nishikawa, Jun-Ichi; Kugawa, Fumihiko

    2016-08-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNAs that are involved in mRNA post-transcriptional regulation. The deregulation of miRNAs affects the expression of drug-metabolizing enzymes, drug transporters, and nuclear receptors, all of which are important in regulating drug metabolism. miRNA expression can be altered by several endogenous or exogenous agents, such as steroid hormones, carcinogens, and therapeutic drugs. However, it is unclear whether hepatic miRNA expression is regulated by nuclear receptors, such as pregnane X receptor (PXR) and constitutive androstane receptor (CAR), which are indispensable for the expression of the CYPs. Here we investigated the effects of the mouse PXR and CAR ligands pregnenolone-16α-carbonitrile (PCN) and 1,4-bis[(3,5-dichloropyridin-2-yl)oxy]benzene (TCPOBOP) on hepatic miRNA expression in mice. We found that the expression of 9 miRNAs was increased (>2-fold) and of 4 miRNAs was decreased (>50%) in response to PCN, while TCPOBOP treatment led to the up-regulation of 8 miRNAs and down-regulation of 6 miRNAs. Using several miRNA target prediction algorithms, we found that the predicted target genes included several lesser known Cyp genes (Cyp1a1, Cyp1b1, Cyp2b10, Cyp2c38, Cyp2u1, Cyp4a12a/b, Cyp4v3, Cyp17a1, Cyp39a1, and Cyp51). We analyzed the expression of these genes in response to PCN and TCPOBOP and found changes in their mRNA levels, some of which were negatively correlated with the expression of their corresponding miRNAs, suggesting that miRNAs may play a role in regulating Cyp enzyme expression. Further studies will be required to fully elucidate the miRNA regulatory mechanisms that contribute to modulating CYP expression.

  14. Synthesis and evaluation of multi-target-directed ligands for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease based on the fusion of donepezil and melatonin.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jin; Wang, Zhi-Min; Li, Xue-Mei; Li, Fan; Wu, Jia-Jia; Kong, Ling-Yi; Wang, Xiao-Bing

    2016-09-15

    A novel series of compounds obtained by fusing the acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitor donepezil and the antioxidant melatonin were designed as multi-target-directed ligands for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease (AD). In vitro assay indicated that most of the target compounds exhibited a significant ability to inhibit acetylcholinesterase (eeAChE and hAChE), butyrylcholinesterase (eqBuChE and hBuChE), and β-amyloid (Aβ) aggregation, and to act as potential antioxidants and biometal chelators. Especially, 4u displayed a good inhibition of AChE (IC50 value of 193nM for eeAChE and 273nM for hAChE), strong inhibition of BuChE (IC50 value of 73nM for eqBuChE and 56nM for hBuChE), moderate inhibition of Aβ aggregation (56.3% at 20μM) and good antioxidant activity (3.28trolox equivalent by ORAC assay). Molecular modeling studies in combination with kinetic analysis revealed that 4u was a mixed-type inhibitor, binding simultaneously to catalytic anionic site (CAS) and the peripheral anionic site (PAS) of AChE. In addition, 4u could chelate metal ions, reduce PC12 cells death induced by oxidative stress and penetrate the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Taken together, these results strongly indicated the hybridization approach is an efficient strategy to identify novel scaffolds with desired bioactivities, and further optimization of 4u may be helpful to develop more potent lead compound for AD treatment. PMID:27460699

  15. Identification of Candidate Target Cyp Genes for microRNAs Whose Expression Is Altered by PCN and TCPOBOP, Representative Ligands of PXR and CAR.

    PubMed

    Moriya, Nozomu; Kataoka, Hiromi; Nishikawa, Jun-Ichi; Kugawa, Fumihiko

    2016-08-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNAs that are involved in mRNA post-transcriptional regulation. The deregulation of miRNAs affects the expression of drug-metabolizing enzymes, drug transporters, and nuclear receptors, all of which are important in regulating drug metabolism. miRNA expression can be altered by several endogenous or exogenous agents, such as steroid hormones, carcinogens, and therapeutic drugs. However, it is unclear whether hepatic miRNA expression is regulated by nuclear receptors, such as pregnane X receptor (PXR) and constitutive androstane receptor (CAR), which are indispensable for the expression of the CYPs. Here we investigated the effects of the mouse PXR and CAR ligands pregnenolone-16α-carbonitrile (PCN) and 1,4-bis[(3,5-dichloropyridin-2-yl)oxy]benzene (TCPOBOP) on hepatic miRNA expression in mice. We found that the expression of 9 miRNAs was increased (>2-fold) and of 4 miRNAs was decreased (>50%) in response to PCN, while TCPOBOP treatment led to the up-regulation of 8 miRNAs and down-regulation of 6 miRNAs. Using several miRNA target prediction algorithms, we found that the predicted target genes included several lesser known Cyp genes (Cyp1a1, Cyp1b1, Cyp2b10, Cyp2c38, Cyp2u1, Cyp4a12a/b, Cyp4v3, Cyp17a1, Cyp39a1, and Cyp51). We analyzed the expression of these genes in response to PCN and TCPOBOP and found changes in their mRNA levels, some of which were negatively correlated with the expression of their corresponding miRNAs, suggesting that miRNAs may play a role in regulating Cyp enzyme expression. Further studies will be required to fully elucidate the miRNA regulatory mechanisms that contribute to modulating CYP expression. PMID:27237601

  16. LigandRNA: computational predictor of RNA-ligand interactions.

    PubMed

    Philips, Anna; Milanowska, Kaja; Lach, Grzegorz; Bujnicki, Janusz M

    2013-12-01

    RNA molecules have recently become attractive as potential drug targets due to the increased awareness of their importance in key biological processes. The increase of the number of experimentally determined RNA 3D structures enabled structure-based searches for small molecules that can specifically bind to defined sites in RNA molecules, thereby blocking or otherwise modulating their function. However, as of yet, computational methods for structure-based docking of small molecule ligands to RNA molecules are not as well established as analogous methods for protein-ligand docking. This motivated us to create LigandRNA, a scoring function for the prediction of RNA-small molecule interactions. Our method employs a grid-based algorithm and a knowledge-based potential derived from ligand-binding sites in the experimentally solved RNA-ligand complexes. As an input, LigandRNA takes an RNA receptor file and a file with ligand poses. As an output, it returns a ranking of the poses according to their score. The predictive power of LigandRNA favorably compares to five other publicly available methods. We found that the combination of LigandRNA and Dock6 into a "meta-predictor" leads to further improvement in the identification of near-native ligand poses. The LigandRNA program is available free of charge as a web server at http://ligandrna.genesilico.pl.

  17. Fragment-Based Design of Ligands Targeting a Novel Site on the Integrase Enzyme of Human Immunodeficiency Virus;#8197;1

    SciTech Connect

    Wielens, Jerome; Headey, Stephen J.; Deadman, John J.; Rhodes, David I.; Parker, Michael W.; Chalmers, David K.; Scanlon, Martin J.

    2011-08-17

    Fragment-based screening has been used to identify a novel ligand binding site on HIV-1 integrase. Crystal structures of fragments bound at this site (shown) have been used to design elaborated second-generation compounds that bind with higher affinity and good ligand efficiency.

  18. Structure-based identification of CaMKIIα-interacting MUPP1 PDZ domains and rational design of peptide ligands to target such interaction in human fertilization.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi-Le; Han, Zhao-Feng; Sun, Ying-Pu

    2016-06-01

    The recognition and association between Ca(2+)/calmodulin-activated protein kinase II-α (CaMKIIα) and multi-PDZ domain protein 1 (MUPP1) plays an important role in sperm acrosome reaction and human fertilization, which is mediated by the binding of CaMKIIα's C-terminal tail to one or more PDZ domains of the scaffolding protein MUPP1. In this study, we attempt to identify the CaMKIIα-interacting MUPP1 PDZ domains and to design peptide ligands that can potently target and then competitively disrupt such interaction. Here, a synthetic biology approach was proposed to systematically characterize the structural basis, energetic property, dynamic behavior and biological implication underlying the intermolecular interactions between the C-terminal peptide of CaMKIIα and all the 13 PDZ domains of MUPP1. These domains can be grouped into four clusters in terms of their sequence, structure and physiochemical profile; different clusters appear to recognize different classes of PDZ-binding motifs. The cluster 3 includes two members, i.e. MUPP1 PDZ 5 and 11 domains, which were suggested to bind class II motif Φ-X-Φ(-COOH) of the C-terminal peptide SGAPSV(-COOH) of CaMKIIα. Subsequently, the two domains were experimentally measured as the moderate- and high-affinity binders of the peptide by using fluorescence titration (dissociation constants K d = 25.2 ± 4.6 and 0.47 ± 0.08 µM for peptide binding to PDZ 5 and 11, respectively), which was in line with theoretical prediction (binding free energies ΔG total = -7.6 and -9.2 kcal/mol for peptide binding to PDZ 5 and 11, respectively). A systematic mutation of SGAPSV(-COOH) residues suggested few favorable amino acids at different residue positions of the peptide, which were then combined to generate a number of potent peptide mutants for PDZ 11 domain. Consequently, two peptides (SIAPNV(-COOH) and SIVMNV(-COOH)) were identified to have considerably improved affinity with K d increase by ~tenfold relative to

  19. Investigating the Effect of Ligand Amount and Injected Therapeutic Activity: A Simulation Study for 177Lu-Labeled PSMA-Targeting Peptides.

    PubMed

    Kletting, Peter; Schuchardt, Christiane; Kulkarni, Harshad R; Shahinfar, Mostafa; Singh, Aviral; Glatting, Gerhard; Baum, Richard P; Beer, Ambros J

    2016-01-01

    In molecular radiotherapy with 177Lu-labeled prostate specific membrane antigen (PSMA) peptides, kidney and/or salivary glands doses limit the activity which can be administered. The aim of this work was to investigate the effect of the ligand amount and injected activity on the tumor-to-normal tissue biologically effective dose (BED) ratio for 177Lu-labeled PSMA peptides. For this retrospective study, a recently developed physiologically based pharmacokinetic model was adapted for PSMA targeting peptides. General physiological parameters were taken from the literature. Individual parameters were fitted to planar gamma camera measurements (177Lu-PSMA I&T) of five patients with metastasizing prostate cancer. Based on the estimated parameters, the pharmacokinetics of tumor, salivary glands, kidneys, total body and red marrow was simulated and time-integrated activity coefficients were calculated for different peptide amounts. Based on these simulations, the absorbed doses and BEDs for normal tissue and tumor were calculated for all activities leading to a maximal tolerable kidney BED of 10 Gy2.5/cycle, a maximal salivary gland absorbed dose of 7.5 Gy/cycle and a maximal red marrow BED of 0.25 Gy15/cycle. The fits yielded coefficients of determination > 0.85, acceptable relative standard errors and low parameter correlations. All estimated parameters were in a physiologically reasonable range. The amounts (for 25-29 nmol) and pertaining activities leading to a maximal tumor dose, considering the defined maximal tolerable doses to organs of risk, were calculated to be 272±253 nmol (452±420 μg) and 7.3±5.1 GBq. Using the actually injected amount (235±155 μg) and the same maximal tolerable doses, the potential improvement for the tumor BED was 1-3 fold. The results suggest that currently given amounts for therapy are in the appropriate order of magnitude for many lesions. However, for lesions with high binding site density or lower perfusion, optimizing the peptide

  20. Investigating the Effect of Ligand Amount and Injected Therapeutic Activity: A Simulation Study for 177Lu-Labeled PSMA-Targeting Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Schuchardt, Christiane; Kulkarni, Harshad R.; Shahinfar, Mostafa; Singh, Aviral; Glatting, Gerhard; Baum, Richard P.; Beer, Ambros J.

    2016-01-01

    In molecular radiotherapy with 177Lu-labeled prostate specific membrane antigen (PSMA) peptides, kidney and/or salivary glands doses limit the activity which can be administered. The aim of this work was to investigate the effect of the ligand amount and injected activity on the tumor-to-normal tissue biologically effective dose (BED) ratio for 177Lu-labeled PSMA peptides. For this retrospective study, a recently developed physiologically based pharmacokinetic model was adapted for PSMA targeting peptides. General physiological parameters were taken from the literature. Individual parameters were fitted to planar gamma camera measurements (177Lu-PSMA I&T) of five patients with metastasizing prostate cancer. Based on the estimated parameters, the pharmacokinetics of tumor, salivary glands, kidneys, total body and red marrow was simulated and time-integrated activity coefficients were calculated for different peptide amounts. Based on these simulations, the absorbed doses and BEDs for normal tissue and tumor were calculated for all activities leading to a maximal tolerable kidney BED of 10 Gy2.5/cycle, a maximal salivary gland absorbed dose of 7.5 Gy/cycle and a maximal red marrow BED of 0.25 Gy15/cycle. The fits yielded coefficients of determination > 0.85, acceptable relative standard errors and low parameter correlations. All estimated parameters were in a physiologically reasonable range. The amounts (for 25−29 nmol) and pertaining activities leading to a maximal tumor dose, considering the defined maximal tolerable doses to organs of risk, were calculated to be 272±253 nmol (452±420 μg) and 7.3±5.1 GBq. Using the actually injected amount (235±155 μg) and the same maximal tolerable doses, the potential improvement for the tumor BED was 1–3 fold. The results suggest that currently given amounts for therapy are in the appropriate order of magnitude for many lesions. However, for lesions with high binding site density or lower perfusion, optimizing the

  1. Comparison of two cross-bridged macrocyclic chelators for the evaluation of 64Cu-labeled-LLP2A, a peptidomimetic ligand targeting VLA-4-positive tumors.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Majiong; Ferdani, Riccardo; Shokeen, Monica; Anderson, Carolyn J

    2013-02-01

    Integrin α(4)β(1) (also called very late antigen-4 or VLA-4) plays an important role in tumor growth, angiogenesis and metastasis, and there has been increasing interest in targeting this receptor for cancer imaging and therapy. In this study, we conjugated a peptidomimetic ligand known to have good binding affinity for α(4)β(1) integrin to a cross-bridged macrocyclic chelator with a methane phosphonic acid pendant arm, CB-TE1A1P. CB-TE1A1P-LLP2A was labeled with (64)Cu under mild conditions in high specific activity, in contrast to conjugates based on the "gold standard" di-acid cross-bridged chelator, CB-TE2A, which require high temperatures for efficient radiolabeling. Saturation binding assays demonstrated that (64)Cu-CB-TE1A1P-LLP2A had comparable binding affinity (1.2 nM vs 1.6 nM) but more binding sites (B(max)=471 fmol/mg) in B16F10 melanoma tumor cells than (64)Cu-CB-TE2A-LLP2A (B(max)=304 fmol/mg, p<0.03). In biodistribution studies, (64)Cu-CB-TE1A1P-LLP2A had less renal retention but higher uptake in tumor (11.4±2.3 %ID/g versus 3.1±0.6 %ID/g, p<0.001) and other receptor-rich tissues compared to(64)Cu-CB-TE2A-LLP2A. At 2h post-injection, (64)Cu-CB-TE1A1P-LLP2A also had significantly higher tumor:blood and tumor:muscle ratios than (64)Cu-CB-TE2A-LLP2A (CB-TE1A1P=19.5±3.0 and 13.0±1.4, respectively, CB-TE2A=4.2±1.4 and 5.5±0.9, respectively, p<0.001). These data demonstrate that (64)Cu-CB-TE1A1P-LLP2A is an excellent PET radiopharmaceutical for the imaging of α(4)β(1) positive tumors and also has potential for imaging other α(4)β(1) positive cells such as those of the pre-metastatic niche. PMID:23265977

  2. Investigating the Effect of Ligand Amount and Injected Therapeutic Activity: A Simulation Study for 177Lu-Labeled PSMA-Targeting Peptides.

    PubMed

    Kletting, Peter; Schuchardt, Christiane; Kulkarni, Harshad R; Shahinfar, Mostafa; Singh, Aviral; Glatting, Gerhard; Baum, Richard P; Beer, Ambros J

    2016-01-01

    In molecular radiotherapy with 177Lu-labeled prostate specific membrane antigen (PSMA) peptides, kidney and/or salivary glands doses limit the activity which can be administered. The aim of this work was to investigate the effect of the ligand amount and injected activity on the tumor-to-normal tissue biologically effective dose (BED) ratio for 177Lu-labeled PSMA peptides. For this retrospective study, a recently developed physiologically based pharmacokinetic model was adapted for PSMA targeting peptides. General physiological parameters were taken from the literature. Individual parameters were fitted to planar gamma camera measurements (177Lu-PSMA I&T) of five patients with metastasizing prostate cancer. Based on the estimated parameters, the pharmacokinetics of tumor, salivary glands, kidneys, total body and red marrow was simulated and time-integrated activity coefficients were calculated for different peptide amounts. Based on these simulations, the absorbed doses and BEDs for normal tissue and tumor were calculated for all activities leading to a maximal tolerable kidney BED of 10 Gy2.5/cycle, a maximal salivary gland absorbed dose of 7.5 Gy/cycle and a maximal red marrow BED of 0.25 Gy15/cycle. The fits yielded coefficients of determination > 0.85, acceptable relative standard errors and low parameter correlations. All estimated parameters were in a physiologically reasonable range. The amounts (for 25-29 nmol) and pertaining activities leading to a maximal tumor dose, considering the defined maximal tolerable doses to organs of risk, were calculated to be 272±253 nmol (452±420 μg) and 7.3±5.1 GBq. Using the actually injected amount (235±155 μg) and the same maximal tolerable doses, the potential improvement for the tumor BED was 1-3 fold. The results suggest that currently given amounts for therapy are in the appropriate order of magnitude for many lesions. However, for lesions with high binding site density or lower perfusion, optimizing the peptide

  3. The maximal affinity of ligands

    PubMed Central

    Kuntz, I. D.; Chen, K.; Sharp, K. A.; Kollman, P. A.

    1999-01-01

    We explore the question of what are the best ligands for macromolecular targets. A survey of experimental data on a large number of the strongest-binding ligands indicates that the free energy of binding increases with the number of nonhydrogen atoms with an initial slope of ≈−1.5 kcal/mol (1 cal = 4.18 J) per atom. For ligands that contain more than 15 nonhydrogen atoms, the free energy of binding increases very little with relative molecular mass. This nonlinearity is largely ascribed to nonthermodynamic factors. An analysis of the dominant interactions suggests that van der Waals interactions and hydrophobic effects provide a reasonable basis for understanding binding affinities across the entire set of ligands. Interesting outliers that bind unusually strongly on a per atom basis include metal ions, covalently attached ligands, and a few well known complexes such as biotin–avidin. PMID:10468550

  4. Ligand placement based on prior structures: the guided ligand-replacement method

    SciTech Connect

    Klei, Herbert E.; Moriarty, Nigel W. Echols, Nathaniel; Terwilliger, Thomas C.; Baldwin, Eric T.; Pokross, Matt; Posy, Shana; Adams, Paul D.

    2014-01-01

    A new module, Guided Ligand Replacement (GLR), has been developed in Phenix to increase the ease and success rate of ligand placement when prior protein-ligand complexes are available. The process of iterative structure-based drug design involves the X-ray crystal structure determination of upwards of 100 ligands with the same general scaffold (i.e. chemotype) complexed with very similar, if not identical, protein targets. In conjunction with insights from computational models and assays, this collection of crystal structures is analyzed to improve potency, to achieve better selectivity and to reduce liabilities such as absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion and toxicology. Current methods for modeling ligands into electron-density maps typically do not utilize information on how similar ligands bound in related structures. Even if the electron density is of sufficient quality and resolution to allow de novo placement, the process can take considerable time as the size, complexity and torsional degrees of freedom of the ligands increase. A new module, Guided Ligand Replacement (GLR), was developed in Phenix to increase the ease and success rate of ligand placement when prior protein–ligand complexes are available. At the heart of GLR is an algorithm based on graph theory that associates atoms in the target ligand with analogous atoms in the reference ligand. Based on this correspondence, a set of coordinates is generated for the target ligand. GLR is especially useful in two situations: (i) modeling a series of large, flexible, complicated or macrocyclic ligands in successive structures and (ii) modeling ligands as part of a refinement pipeline that can automatically select a reference structure. Even in those cases for which no reference structure is available, if there are multiple copies of the bound ligand per asymmetric unit GLR offers an efficient way to complete the model after the first ligand has been placed. In all of these applications, GLR

  5. Rosetta and the Design of Ligand Binding Sites.

    PubMed

    Moretti, Rocco; Bender, Brian J; Allison, Brittany; Meiler, Jens

    2016-01-01

    Proteins that bind small molecules (ligands) can be used as biosensors, signal modulators, and sequestering agents. When naturally occurring proteins for a particular target ligand are not available, artificial proteins can be computationally designed. We present a protocol based on RosettaLigand to redesign an existing protein pocket to bind a target ligand. Starting with a protein structure and the structure of the ligand, Rosetta can optimize both the placement of the ligand in the pocket and the identity and conformation of the surrounding sidechains, yielding proteins that bind the target compound.

  6. Rosetta and the Design of Ligand Binding Sites.

    PubMed

    Moretti, Rocco; Bender, Brian J; Allison, Brittany; Meiler, Jens

    2016-01-01

    Proteins that bind small molecules (ligands) can be used as biosensors, signal modulators, and sequestering agents. When naturally occurring proteins for a particular target ligand are not available, artificial proteins can be computationally designed. We present a protocol based on RosettaLigand to redesign an existing protein pocket to bind a target ligand. Starting with a protein structure and the structure of the ligand, Rosetta can optimize both the placement of the ligand in the pocket and the identity and conformation of the surrounding sidechains, yielding proteins that bind the target compound. PMID:27094285

  7. Rhenium and technetium tricarbonyl complexes of 1,4-Substituted pyridyl-1,2,3-triazole bidentate 'click' ligands conjugated to a targeting RGD peptide.

    PubMed

    Connell, Timothy U; Hayne, David J; Ackermann, Uwe; Tochon-Danguy, Henri J; White, Jonathan M; Donnelly, Paul S

    2014-04-01

    New 1,4-substituted pyridyl-1,2,3-triazole ligands with pendent phenyl isothiocyanate functional groups linked to the heterocycle through a short methylene or longer polyethylene glycol spacers were prepared and conjugated to a peptide containing the arginine-glycine-aspartic acid peptide motif. Rhenium and technetium carbonyl complexes, [M(CO)3 L(x) (py)](+) (where M = Re(I) or (99m) Tc(I) ; L(x)  = 1,4-substituted pyridyl-1,2,3-triazole ligands and py = pyridine) were prepared. One rhenium complex has been characterized by X-ray crystallography, and the luminescent properties of [M(CO)3 L(x) (py)](+) are reported.

  8. Clobenpropit analogs as dual activity ligands for the histamine H3 and H4 receptors: synthesis, pharmacological evaluation, and cross-target QSAR studies.

    PubMed

    Lim, Herman D; Istyastono, Enade P; van de Stolpe, Andrea; Romeo, Giuseppe; Gobbi, Silvia; Schepers, Marjo; Lahaye, Roger; Menge, Wiro M B P; Zuiderveld, Obbe P; Jongejan, Aldo; Smits, Rogier A; Bakker, Remko A; Haaksma, Eric E J; Leurs, Rob; de Esch, Iwan J P

    2009-06-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that clobenpropit (N-(4-chlorobenzyl)-S-[3-(4(5)-imidazolyl)propyl]isothiourea) binds to both the human histamine H(3) receptor (H(3)R) and H(4) receptor (H(4)R). In this paper, we describe the synthesis and pharmacological characterization of a series of clobenpropit analogs, which vary in the functional group adjacent to the isothiourea moiety in order to study structural requirements for H(3)R and H(4)R ligands. The compounds show moderate to high affinity for both the human H(3)R and H(4)R. Furthermore, the changes in the functional group attached to the isothiourea moiety modulate the intrinsic activity of the ligands at the H(4)R, ranging from neutral antagonism to full agonism. QSAR models have been generated in order to explain the H(3)R and H(4)R affinities.

  9. The TLR7/8 ligand resiquimod targets monocyte-derived dendritic cell differentiation via TLR8 and augments functional dendritic cell generation.

    PubMed

    Hackstein, Holger; Knoche, Angela; Nockher, Angelika; Poeling, Jochen; Kubin, Thomas; Jurk, Marion; Vollmer, Jörg; Bein, Gregor

    2011-01-01

    Imidazoquinolone compounds, such as resiquimod are Toll-like receptor (TLR) 7/8 ligands representing novel immune response modifiers undergoing clinical testing. Resiquimod has been reported to modulate conventional human monocyte-derived DC (moDC) differentiation, but the role of TLR7 and TLR8 is unclear. We directly dissected the TLR7- and TLR8-dependency by employing selective TLR7 ligands and resiquimod-coculture experiments with inhibitory oligonucleotides (iODN) suppressing TLR7, TLR7+8 or TLR7+8+9. Selective TLR7 ligands did not affect conventional moDC differentiation as analyzed by CD14/CD1a expression. iODN experiments confirmed that resiquimod's effects during DC differentiation were antagonized only with TLR8 iODNs. Direct comparison of resiquimod DC with TLR7- and control-DC revealed significantly higher T-cell costimulatory molecule and MHC class II expression. Resiquimod DC promoted significantly stronger allogeneic T-cell proliferation and stronger naïve CD4(+) T-cell proliferation. These results indicate the relevance of TLR8 for human monocyte-derived DC differentiation and maturation and may be relevant for clinical trials employing resiquimod. PMID:21889130

  10. Absolute Ligand Discrimination by Dimeric Signaling Receptors.

    PubMed

    Fathi, Sepehr; Nayak, Chitra R; Feld, Jordan J; Zilman, Anton G

    2016-09-01

    Many signaling pathways act through shared components, where different ligand molecules bind the same receptors or activate overlapping sets of response regulators downstream. Nevertheless, different ligands acting through cross-wired pathways often lead to different outcomes in terms of the target cell behavior and function. Although a number of mechanisms have been proposed, it still largely remains unclear how cells can reliably discriminate different molecular ligands under such circumstances. Here we show that signaling via ligand-induced receptor dimerization-a very common motif in cellular signaling-naturally incorporates a mechanism for the discrimination of ligands acting through the same receptor. PMID:27602720

  11. Current Status of Prostate-Specific Membrane Antigen Targeting in Nuclear Medicine: Clinical Translation of Chelator Containing Prostate-Specific Membrane Antigen Ligands Into Diagnostics and Therapy for Prostate Cancer.

    PubMed

    Kratochwil, Clemens; Afshar-Oromieh, Ali; Kopka, Klaus; Haberkorn, Uwe; Giesel, Frederik L

    2016-09-01

    The prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) is expressed by approximately 90% of prostate carcinomas. The expression correlates with unfavorable prognostic factors, such as a high Gleason score, infiltrative growth, metastasis, and hormone-independence. The high specificity, especially in the undifferentiated stage, makes it an excellent target for diagnosis and therapy. Therefore, antibodies and small molecule inhibitors have been developed for imaging and therapy. In 2011 PSMA-11, a ligand that consists of the Glu-urea-motif and the chelator HBED-CC, which can be exclusively radiolabeled with (68)Ga for PET imaging, presented the clinical breakthrough for prostate cancer diagnostics. In two large diagnostic studies (n = 319 and n = 248) PET/CT with PSMA-11 successfully localized the recurrent tumor in approximately 90% of patients with biochemical relapse. Integrating PSMA-PET/CT into the planning phase of radiotherapy, the treatment concept is changed in 30%-50% of the patients. The combination of the Glu-urea-motif with DOTA, which can be labeled with several diagnostic and therapeutic radionuclides, opened new avenues for therapeutic usage of the small-molecule PSMA ligands. In the beginning of 2016, there are four confirmative reports (n = 19, n = 24, n = 30, and n = 56) from four different centers reporting a PSA response in approximately 70% of patients treated with (177)Lu-labeled PSMA ligands. In conclusion, the data available up to now indicate a widespread use of PSMA ligands for diagnostic applications with respect to staging, detection of recurrence, or metastases in patients with rising tumor markers and for therapy in case of failure of guideline-compliant treatment. PMID:27553466

  12. gammac gene transfer in the presence of stem cell factor, FLT-3L, interleukin-7 (IL-7), IL-1, and IL-15 cytokines restores T-cell differentiation from gammac(-) X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency hematopoietic progenitor cells in murine fetal thymic organ cultures.

    PubMed

    Hacein-Bey, S; Basile, G D; Lemerle, J; Fischer, A; Cavazzana-Calvo, M

    1998-12-01

    X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID-Xl) is a rare human inherited disorder in which early T and natural killer (NK) lymphocyte development is blocked. The genetic disorder results from mutations in the common gammac chain that participates in several cytokine receptors including the interleukin-2 (IL-2), IL-4, IL-7, IL-9, and IL-15 receptors. We have shown in a previous report that gammac gene transfer into SCID-Xl bone marrow (BM) cells restores efficient NK cell differentiation. In this study, we have focused on the introduction of the gammac gene into SCID-Xl hematopoietic stem cells with the goal of obtaining differentiation into mature T cells. For this purpose, we used the in vitro hybrid fetal thymic organ culture (FTOC) system in which a combination of cytokines consisting of stem cell factor (SCF), Flt-3L, IL-7, IL-1, and IL-15 is added concomitantly. In this culture system, CD34(+) marrow cells from two SCID-Xl patients were able to mature into double positive CD4(+) CD8(+) cells and to a lesser degree into CD4(+) TCRbeta+ single positive cells after retroviral-mediated gammac gene transfer. In addition, examination of the output cell population at the TCR DJbeta1 locus exhibited multiple rearrangements. These results indicate that restoration of the gammac/JAK/STAT signaling pathway during the early developmental stages of thymocytes can correct the T-cell differentiation block in SCID-Xl hematopoietic progenitor cells and therefore establishes a basis for further clinical gammac gene transfer studies.

  13. High PRDM16 expression identifies a prognostic subgroup of pediatric acute myeloid leukaemia correlated to FLT3-ITD, KMT2A-PTD, and NUP98-NSD1: the results of the Japanese Paediatric Leukaemia/Lymphoma Study Group AML-05 trial.

    PubMed

    Shiba, Norio; Ohki, Kentaro; Kobayashi, Tohru; Hara, Yusuke; Yamato, Genki; Tanoshima, Reo; Ichikawa, Hitoshi; Tomizawa, Daisuke; Park, Myoung-Ja; Shimada, Akira; Sotomatsu, Manabu; Arakawa, Hirokazu; Horibe, Keizo; Adachi, Souichi; Taga, Takashi; Tawa, Akio; Hayashi, Yasuhide

    2016-02-01

    Recent reports described the NUP98-NSD1 fusion as an adverse prognostic marker for acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) and PRDM16 (also known as MEL1) as the representative overexpressed gene in patients harbouring NUP98-NSD1 fusion. PRDM16 gene expression levels were measured via real-time polymerase chain reaction in 369 paediatric patients with de novo AML, of whom 84 (23%) exhibited PRDM16 overexpression (PRDM16/ABL1 ratio ≥0·010). The frequencies of patients with high or low PRDM16 expression differed widely with respect to each genetic alteration, as follows: t(8;21), 4% vs. 96%, P < 0·001; inv(16), 0% vs. 100%, P < 0·001; KMT2A (also termed MLL)- partial tandem duplication, 100% vs. 0%, P < 0·001; NUP98-NSD1, 100% vs. 0%, P < 0·001. The overall survival (OS) and event-free survival (EFS) among PRDM16-overexpressing patients were significantly worse than in patients with low PRDM16 expression (3-year OS: 51% vs. 81%, P < 0·001, 3-year EFS: 32% vs. 64%, P < 0·001) irrespective of other cytogenetic alterations except for NPM1. PRDM16 gene expression was particularly useful for stratifying FLT3-internal tandem duplication-positive AML patients (3-year OS: high = 30% vs. low = 70%, P < 0·001). PRDM16 overexpression was highly recurrent in de novo paediatric AML patients with high/intermediate-risk cytogenetic profiles and was independently associated with an adverse outcome.

  14. Automated design of ligands to polypharmacological profiles

    PubMed Central

    Besnard, Jérémy; Ruda, Gian Filippo; Setola, Vincent; Abecassis, Keren; Rodriguiz, Ramona M.; Huang, Xi-Ping; Norval, Suzanne; Sassano, Maria F.; Shin, Antony I.; Webster, Lauren A.; Simeons, Frederick R.C.; Stojanovski, Laste; Prat, Annik; Seidah, Nabil G.; Constam, Daniel B.; Bickerton, G. Richard; Read, Kevin D.; Wetsel, William C.; Gilbert, Ian H.; Roth, Bryan L.; Hopkins, Andrew L.

    2012-01-01

    The clinical efficacy and safety of a drug is determined by its activity profile across multiple proteins in the proteome. However, designing drugs with a specific multi-target profile is both complex and difficult. Therefore methods to rationally design drugs a priori against profiles of multiple proteins would have immense value in drug discovery. We describe a new approach for the automated design of ligands against profiles of multiple drug targets. The method is demonstrated by the evolution of an approved acetylcholinesterase inhibitor drug into brain penetrable ligands with either specific polypharmacology or exquisite selectivity profiles for G-protein coupled receptors. Overall, 800 ligand-target predictions of prospectively designed ligands were tested experimentally, of which 75% were confirmed correct. We also demonstrate target engagement in vivo. The approach can be a useful source of drug leads where multi-target profiles are required to achieve either selectivity over other drug targets or a desired polypharmacology. PMID:23235874

  15. Telomere uncapping by the G-quadruplex ligand RHPS4 inhibits clonogenic tumour cell growth in vitro and in vivo consistent with a cancer stem cell targeting mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Phatak, P; Cookson, J C; Dai, F; Smith, V; Gartenhaus, R B; Stevens, M F G; Burger, A M

    2007-01-01

    The pentacyclic acridinium methosulfate salt RHPS4 induces the 3′single-stranded guanine-rich telomeric overhang to fold into a G-quadruplex structure. Stabilisation of the latter is incompatible with an attachment of telomerase to the telomere and thus G-quadruplex ligands can effectively inhibit both the catalytic and capping functions of telomerase. In this study, we examined mechanisms underlying telomere uncapping by RHPS4 in uterus carcinoma cells (UXF1138L) with short telomeres and compared the susceptibility of bulk and clonogenic cancer cells to the G-quadruplex ligand. We show that treatment of UXF1138L cells with RHPS4 leads to the displacement of the telomerase catalytic subunit (hTERT) from the nucleus, induction of telomere-initiated DNA-damage signalling and chromosome fusions. We further report that RHPS4 is more potent against cancer cells that grow as colonies in soft agar than cells growing as monolayers. Human cord blood and HEK293T embryonic kidney cell colony forming units, however, were more resistant to RHPS4. RHPS4-treated UXF1138L xenografts had a decreased clonogenicity, showed loss of nuclear hTERT expression and an induction of mitotic abnormalities compared with controls. Although single-agent RHPS4 had limited in vivo efficacy, a combination of RHPS4 with the mitotic spindle poison Taxol caused tumour remissions and further enhancement of telomere dysfunction. PMID:17406367

  16. Prognostic and therapeutic role of targetable lesions in B-lineage acute lymphoblastic leukemia without recurrent fusion genes

    PubMed Central

    Fedullo, Anna Lucia; Peragine, Nadia; Gianfelici, Valentina; Piciocchi, Alfonso; Brugnoletti, Fulvia; Di Giacomo, Filomena; Pauselli, Simona; Holmes, Antony B.; Puzzolo, Maria Cristina; Ceglie, Giulia; Apicella, Valerio; Mancini, Marco; te Kronnie, Geertruy; Testi, Anna Maria; Vitale, Antonella; Vignetti, Marco; Guarini, Anna; Rabadan, Raul; Foà, Robin

    2016-01-01

    To shed light into the molecular bases of B-lineage acute lymphoblastic leukemia lacking known fusion transcripts, i.e. BCR-ABL1, ETV6-RUNX1, E2A-PBX1, and MLL rearrangements (B-NEG ALL) and the differences between children, adolescents/young adults (AYA) and adults, we analyzed 168 B-NEG ALLs by genome-wide technologies. This approach showed that B-NEG cases carry 10.5 mutations and 9.1 copy-number aberrations/sample. The most frequently mutated druggable pathways were those pertaining to RAS/RTK (26.8%) and JAK/STAT (12.5%) signaling. In particular, FLT3 and JAK/STAT mutations were detected mainly in AYA and adults, while KRAS and NRAS mutations were more frequent in children. RAS/RTK mutations negatively affected the outcome of AYA and adults, but not that of children. Furthermore, adult B-NEG ALL carrying JAK/STAT mutations had a shorter survival. In vitro experiments showed that FLT3 inhibitors reduced significantly the proliferation of FLT3-mutated primary B-NEG ALL cells. Likewise, PI3K/mTOR inhibitors reduced the proliferation of primary cells harboring RAS and IL7R mutations. These results refine the genetic landscape of B-NEG ALL and suggest that the different distribution of lesions and their prognostic impact might sustain the diverse outcome between children, adults and partly AYA - whose genomic scenario is similar to adults - and open the way to targeted therapeutic strategies. PMID:26883104

  17. Prognostic and therapeutic role of targetable lesions in B-lineage acute lymphoblastic leukemia without recurrent fusion genes.

    PubMed

    Messina, Monica; Chiaretti, Sabina; Wang, Jiguang; Fedullo, Anna Lucia; Peragine, Nadia; Gianfelici, Valentina; Piciocchi, Alfonso; Brugnoletti, Fulvia; Di Giacomo, Filomena; Pauselli, Simona; Holmes, Antony B; Puzzolo, Maria Cristina; Ceglie, Giulia; Apicella, Valerio; Mancini, Marco; Te Kronnie, Geertruy; Testi, Anna Maria; Vitale, Antonella; Vignetti, Marco; Guarini, Anna; Rabadan, Raul; Foà, Robin

    2016-03-22

    To shed light into the molecular bases of B-lineage acute lymphoblastic leukemia lacking known fusion transcripts, i.e. BCR-ABL1, ETV6-RUNX1, E2A-PBX1, and MLL rearrangements (B-NEG ALL) and the differences between children, adolescents/young adults (AYA) and adults, we analyzed 168 B-NEG ALLs by genome-wide technologies. This approach showed that B-NEG cases carry 10.5 mutations and 9.1 copy-number aberrations/sample. The most frequently mutated druggable pathways were those pertaining to RAS/RTK (26.8%) and JAK/STAT (12.5%) signaling. In particular, FLT3 and JAK/STAT mutations were detected mainly in AYA and adults, while KRAS and NRAS mutations were more frequent in children. RAS/RTK mutations negatively affected the outcome of AYA and adults, but not that of children. Furthermore, adult B-NEG ALL carrying JAK/STAT mutations had a shorter survival. In vitro experiments showed that FLT3 inhibitors reduced significantly the proliferation of FLT3-mutated primary B-NEG ALL cells. Likewise, PI3K/mTOR inhibitors reduced the proliferation of primary cells harboring RAS and IL7R mutations. These results refine the genetic landscape of B-NEG ALL and suggest that the different distribution of lesions and their prognostic impact might sustain the diverse outcome between children, adults and partly AYA - whose genomic scenario is similar to adults - and open the way to targeted therapeutic strategies.

  18. Periodicity in tumor vasculature targeting kinetics of ligand-functionalized nanoparticles studied by dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging and intravital microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Cebulla, Jana; Huuse, Else Marie; Davies, Catharina de L.; Mulder, Willem J. M.; Larsson, Henrik B.W.; Haraldseth, Olav

    2014-01-01

    In the past two decades advances in the development of targeted nanoparticles have facilitated their application as molecular imaging agents and targeted drug delivery vehicles. Nanoparticle-enhanced molecular imaging of the angiogenic tumor vasculature has been of particular interest. Not only because angiogenesis plays an important role in various pathologies, but also since endothelial cell surface receptors are directly accessible for relatively large circulating nanoparticles. Typically, nanoparticle targeting towards these receptors is studied by analyzing the contrast distribution on tumor images acquired before and at set time points after administration. Although several exciting proof-of-concept studies demonstrated qualitative assessment of relative target concentration and distribution, these studies did not provide quantitative information on the nanoparticle targeting kinetics. These kinetics will not only depend on nanoparticle characteristics, but also on receptor binding and recycling. In this study, we monitored the in vivo targeting kinetics of αvβ3-integrin specific nanoparticles with intravital microscopy and dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging, and using compartment modeling we were able to quantify nanoparticle targeting rates. As such, this approach can facilitate optimization of targeted nanoparticle design and it holds promise for providing more quantitative information on in vivo receptor levels. Interestingly, we also observed a periodicity in the accumulation kinetics of αvβ3-integrin targeted nanoparticles and hypothesize that this periodicity is caused by receptor binding, internalization and recycling dynamics. Taken together, this demonstrates that our experimental approach provides new insights in in vivo nanoparticle targeting, which may proof useful for vascular targeting in general. PMID:23982332

  19. Reducing toxicity of 4–1BB costimulation: targeting 4–1BB ligands to the tumor stroma with bi-specific aptamer conjugates

    PubMed Central

    Schrand, B; Berezhnoy, A; Brenneman, R; Williams, A; Levay, A; Gilboa, E

    2015-01-01

    Systemic administration of immune modulatory antibodies to cancer patients is associated with autoimmune pathologies. We have developed a clinically feasible and broadly applicable approach to limit immune stimulation to disseminated tumor lesions using a bi-specific agonistic 4–1BB oligonucleotide aptamer targeted to a broadly expressed stromal product (e.g., VEGF or osteopontin). The stroma-targeted aptamer conjugates engendered potent antitumor immunity against unrelated tumors and exhibited a superior therapeutic index compared to non-targeted agonistic 4–1BB antibody. PMID:25949891

  20. Nanosized bioceramic particles could function as efficient gene delivery vehicles with target specificity for the spleen.

    PubMed

    Tan, K; Cheang, P; Ho, I A W; Lam, P Y P; Hui, K M

    2007-05-01

    We have compared the ability of several nanosized bioceramic particles including negatively charged silica (SiO(2)), neutrally charged hydroxyapatite (HA) and positively charged zirconia (ZrO(2)) nanoparticles as non-viral vectors for efficient in vivo gene delivery. A mixture of highly monodispersed aqueous suspension of HA or SiO(2) nanoparticles, coated with protamine sulfate (PS), complexed efficiently with plasmid DNA and significantly enhanced transgene expression in vitro. In comparison, ZrO(2) nanoparticles gave poor transfection efficiency under similar conditions tested. It was also determined that, under the same conditions, PS-SiO(2)-DNA, but not PS-HA-DNA-nanoplexes, were able to mediate efficient transgene expression in vitro in the presence of 50% serum. Intraperitoneal injections of PS-SiO(2)-luciferase DNA nanoplexes targeted the highest level of transgene expression in the spleen of recipient mice that lasted for more than 48 h. Injection of PS-SiO(2)-pNGVL-hFLex-MUC-1 nanoplexes was able to mediate the production of Flt-3L in the sera of recipient mice. Simultaneously, the production of Flt-3L was accompanied by the stimulation of IL-2 and interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma). Most importantly, the injection of PS-SiO(2)-pNGVL-hFLex-MUC-1 nanoplexes could mount potent anti-tumour specific immune responses that led to the subsequent regression of parental tumor cells containing the muc-1 determinant.

  1. Rescoring ligand docking poses.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Shijun; Zhang, Youping; Xiu, Zhilong

    2010-05-01

    The ranking of ligand docking poses according to certain scoring systems to identify the best fit is the most important step in virtual database screening for drug discovery. By focusing on method development strategy, this review provides possibilities for constructing rescoring approaches based on an overview of recent developments in the field. These developments can be classified into three categories. The first category involves a scaling approach that employs a factor to scale the primary scoring function. These scaling factors are defined with respect to the geometrical match between the location of a ligand and the target binding site, or defined according to a molecular weight distribution consistent with the empirical range of molecular weights of drug-like compounds. The second category involves consensus scoring approaches that use multiple scoring functions to rank the ligand poses retained in a docking procedure, based on the preliminary ranking according to a primary scoring function. The final category involves the addition of selected accuracy-oriented energy terms, such as the solvent effect and quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics treatments. PMID:20443166

  2. Multiple target drug cocktail design for attacking the core network markers of four cancers using ligand-based and structure-based virtual screening methods

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Computer-aided drug design has a long history of being applied to discover new molecules to treat various cancers, but it has always been focused on single targets. The development of systems biology has let scientists reveal more hidden mechanisms of cancers, but attempts to apply systems biology to cancer therapies remain at preliminary stages. Our lab has successfully developed various systems biology models for several cancers. Based on these achievements, we present the first attempt to combine multiple-target therapy with systems biology. Methods In our previous study, we identified 28 significant proteins--i.e., common core network markers--of four types of cancers as house-keeping proteins of these cancers. In this study, we ranked these proteins by summing their carcinogenesis relevance values (CRVs) across the four cancers, and then performed docking and pharmacophore modeling to do virtual screening on the NCI database for anti-cancer drugs. We also performed pathway analysis on these proteins using Panther and MetaCore to reveal more mechanisms of these cancer house-keeping proteins. Results We designed several approaches to discover targets for multiple-target cocktail therapies. In the first one, we identified the top 20 drugs for each of the 28 cancer house-keeping proteins, and analyzed the docking pose to further understand the interaction mechanisms of these drugs. After screening for duplicates, we found that 13 of these drugs could target 11 proteins simultaneously. In the second approach, we chose the top 5 proteins with the highest summed CRVs and used them as the drug targets. We built a pharmacophore and applied it to do virtual screening against the Life-Chemical library for anti-cancer drugs. Based on these results, wet-lab bio-scientists could freely investigate combinations of these drugs for multiple-target therapy for cancers, in contrast to the traditional single target therapy. Conclusions Combination of systems biology

  3. Characterization of gene mutations and copy number changes in acute myeloid leukemia using a rapid target enrichment protocol.

    PubMed

    Bolli, Niccolò; Manes, Nicla; McKerrell, Thomas; Chi, Jianxiang; Park, Naomi; Gundem, Gunes; Quail, Michael A; Sathiaseelan, Vijitha; Herman, Bram; Crawley, Charles; Craig, Jenny I O; Conte, Natalie; Grove, Carolyn; Papaemmanuil, Elli; Campbell, Peter J; Varela, Ignacio; Costeas, Paul; Vassiliou, George S

    2015-02-01

    Prognostic stratification is critical for making therapeutic decisions and maximizing survival of patients with acute myeloid leukemia. Advances in the genomics of acute myeloid leukemia have identified several recurrent gene mutations whose prognostic impact is being deciphered. We used HaloPlex target enrichment and Illumina-based next generation sequencing to study 24 recurrently mutated genes in 42 samples of acute myeloid leukemia with a normal karyotype. Read depth varied between and within genes for the same sample, but was predictable and highly consistent across samples. Consequently, we were able to detect copy number changes, such as an interstitial deletion of BCOR, three MLL partial tandem duplications, and a novel KRAS amplification. With regards to coding mutations, we identified likely oncogenic variants in 41 of 42 samples. NPM1 mutations were the most frequent, followed by FLT3, DNMT3A and TET2. NPM1 and FLT3 indels were reported with good efficiency. We also showed that DNMT3A mutations can persist post-chemotherapy and in 2 cases studied at diagnosis and relapse, we were able to delineate the dynamics of tumor evolution and give insights into order of acquisition of variants. HaloPlex is a quick and reliable target enrichment method that can aid diagnosis and prognostic stratification of acute myeloid leukemia patients. PMID:25381129

  4. Building a Robust Tumor Profiling Program: Synergy between Next-Generation Sequencing and Targeted Single-Gene Testing

    PubMed Central

    Lieberman, David B.; Roth, David B.; Zhao, Jianhua; Watt, Christopher D.; Daber, Robert D.; Morrissette, Jennifer J. D.

    2016-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS) is a powerful platform for identifying cancer mutations. Routine clinical adoption of NGS requires optimized quality control metrics to ensure accurate results. To assess the robustness of our clinical NGS pipeline, we analyzed the results of 304 solid tumor and hematologic malignancy specimens tested simultaneously by NGS and one or more targeted single-gene tests (EGFR, KRAS, BRAF, NPM1, FLT3, and JAK2). For samples that passed our validated tumor percentage and DNA quality and quantity thresholds, there was perfect concordance between NGS and targeted single-gene tests with the exception of two FLT3 internal tandem duplications that fell below the stringent pre-established reporting threshold but were readily detected by manual inspection. In addition, NGS identified clinically significant mutations not covered by single-gene tests. These findings confirm NGS as a reliable platform for routine clinical use when appropriate quality control metrics, such as tumor percentage and DNA quality cutoffs, are in place. Based on our findings, we suggest a simple workflow that should facilitate adoption of clinical oncologic NGS services at other institutions. PMID:27043212

  5. Targeting TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) receptor by natural products as a potential therapeutic approach for cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Xiaoyun; Zhang, Jingwen; Arfuso, Frank; Chinnathambi, Arunachalam; Zayed, ME; Alharbi, Sulaiman Ali; Kumar, Alan Prem

    2015-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) has been shown to selectively induce apoptotic cell death in various tumor cells by engaging its death-inducing receptors (TRAIL-R1 and TRAIL-R2). This property has led to the development of a number of TRAIL–receptor agonists such as the soluble recombinant TRAIL and agonistic antibodies, which have shown promising anticancer activity in preclinical studies. However, besides activating caspase-dependent apoptosis in several cancer cells, TRAIL may also activate nonapoptotic signal transduction pathways such as nuclear factor-kappa B, mitogen-activated protein kinases, AKT, and signal transducers and activators of transcription 3, which may contribute to TRAIL resistance that is being now frequently encountered in various cancers. TRAIL resistance can be overcome by the application of efficient TRAIL-sensitizing pharmacological agents. Natural compounds have shown a great potential in sensitizing cells to TRAIL treatment through suppression of distinct survival pathways. In this review, we have summarized both apoptotic and nonapoptotic pathways activated by TRAIL, as well as recent advances in developing TRAIL–receptor agonists for cancer therapy. We also briefly discuss combination therapies that have shown great potential in overcoming TRAIL resistance in various tumors. PMID:25854879

  6. Targeted expression of the inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate receptor (IP3R) ligand-binding domain releases Ca2+ via endogenous IP3R channels.

    PubMed

    Várnai, Péter; Balla, András; Hunyady, László; Balla, Tamas

    2005-05-31

    Virtually all functions of a cell are influenced by cytoplasmic [Ca(2+)] increases. Inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor (IP(3)R) channels, located in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), release Ca(2+) in response to binding of the second messenger, IP(3).IP(3)Rs thus are part of the information chain interpreting external signals and transforming them into cytoplasmic Ca(2+) transients. IP(3)Rs function as tetramers, each unit comprising an N-terminal ligand-binding domain (LBD) and a C-terminal channel domain linked by a long regulatory region. It is not yet understood how the binding of IP(3) to the LBD regulates the gating properties of the channel. Here, we use the expression of IP(3) binding protein domains tethered to the surface of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to show that the all-helical domain of the IP(3)R LBD is capable of depleting the ER Ca(2+) pools by opening the endogenous IP(3)Rs, even without IP(3) binding. This effect requires the domain to be within 50 A of the ER membrane and is impaired by the presence of the N-terminal inhibitory segment on the LBD. These findings raise the possibility that the helical domain of the LBD functions as an effector module possibly interacting with the channel domain, thereby being part of the gating mechanisms by which the IP(3)-induced conformational change within the LBD regulates Ca(2+) release.

  7. The Recognition of Identical Ligands by Unrelated Proteins.

    PubMed

    Barelier, Sarah; Sterling, Teague; O'Meara, Matthew J; Shoichet, Brian K

    2015-12-18

    The binding of drugs and reagents to off-targets is well-known. Whereas many off-targets are related to the primary target by sequence and fold, many ligands bind to unrelated pairs of proteins, and these are harder to anticipate. If the binding site in the off-target can be related to that of the primary target, this challenge resolves into aligning the two pockets. However, other cases are possible: the ligand might interact with entirely different residues and environments in the off-target, or wholly different ligand atoms may be implicated in the two complexes. To investigate these scenarios at atomic resolution, the structures of 59 ligands in 116 complexes (62 pairs in total), where the protein pairs were unrelated by fold but bound an identical ligand, were examined. In almost half of the pairs, the ligand interacted with unrelated residues in the two proteins (29 pairs), and in 14 of the pairs wholly different ligand moieties were implicated in each complex. Even in those 19 pairs of complexes that presented similar environments to the ligand, ligand superposition rarely resulted in the overlap of related residues. There appears to be no single pattern-matching "code" for identifying binding sites in unrelated proteins that bind identical ligands, though modeling suggests that there might be a limited number of different patterns that suffice to recognize different ligand functional groups.

  8. Programmed Death Ligand 1 (PD-L1)-targeted TRAIL combines PD-L1-mediated checkpoint inhibition with TRAIL-mediated apoptosis induction.

    PubMed

    Hendriks, Djoke; He, Yuan; Koopmans, Iris; Wiersma, Valerie R; van Ginkel, Robert J; Samplonius, Douwe F; Helfrich, Wijnand; Bremer, Edwin

    2016-08-01

    Antibodies that block PD-L1/PD-1 immune checkpoints restore the activity of functionally-impaired antitumor T cells. These antibodies show unprecedented clinical benefit in various advanced cancers, particularly in melanoma. However, only a subset of cancer patients responds to current PD-L1/PD-1-blocking strategies, highlighting the need for further advancements in PD-L1/PD-1-based immunotherapy. Here, we report on a novel approach designed to combine PD-L1 checkpoint inhibition with the tumor-selective induction of apoptosis by TNF-related Apoptosis Inducing Ligand (TRAIL). In brief, a new bi-functional fusion protein, designated anti-PD-L1:TRAIL, was constructed comprising a PD-L1-blocking antibody fragment genetically fused to the extracellular domain of the pro-apoptotic tumoricidal protein TRAIL. Treatment of PD-L1-expressing cancer cells with anti-PD-L1:TRAIL induced PD-L1-directed TRAIL-mediated cancer cell death. Treatment of T cells with anti-PD-L1:TRAIL augmented T cell activation, as evidenced by increased proliferation, secretion of IFNγ and enhanced killing of cancer cell lines and primary patient-derived cancer cells in mixed T cell/cancer cell culture experiments. Of note, elevated levels of IFNγ further upregulated PD-L1 on cancer cells and simultaneously sensitized cancer cells to TRAIL-mediated apoptosis by anti-PD-L1:TRAIL. Additionally, anti-PD-L1:TRAIL converted immunosuppressive PD-L1-expressing myeloid cells into pro-apoptotic effector cells that triggered TRAIL-mediated cancer cell death. In conclusion, combining PD-L1 checkpoint inhibition with TRAIL-mediated induction of apoptosis using anti-PD-L1:TRAIL yields promising multi-fold and mutually reinforcing anticancer activity that may be exploited to enhance the efficacy of therapeutic PD-L1/PD-1 checkpoint inhibition. PMID:27622071

  9. Modelling ligand selectivity of serine proteases using integrative proteochemometric approaches improves model performance and allows the multi-target dependent interpretation of features.

    PubMed

    Ain, Qurrat U; Méndez-Lucio, Oscar; Ciriano, Isidro Cortés; Malliavin, Thérèse; van Westen, Gerard J P; Bender, Andreas

    2014-11-01

    Serine proteases, implicated in important physiological functions, have a high intra-family similarity, which leads to unwanted off-target effects of inhibitors with insufficient selectivity. However, the availability of sequence and structure data has now made it possible to develop approaches to design pharmacological agents that can discriminate successfully between their related binding sites. In this study, we have quantified the relationship between 12,625 distinct protease inhibitors and their bioactivity against 67 targets of the serine protease family (20,213 data points) in an integrative manner, using proteochemometric modelling (PCM). The benchmarking of 21 different target descriptors motivated the usage of specific binding pocket amino acid descriptors, which helped in the identification of active site residues and selective compound chemotypes affecting compound affinity and selectivity. PCM models performed better than alternative approaches (models trained using exclusively compound descriptors on all available data, QSAR) employed for comparison with R(2)/RMSE values of 0.64 ± 0.23/0.66 ± 0.20 vs. 0.35 ± 0.27/1.05 ± 0.27 log units, respectively. Moreover, the interpretation of the PCM model singled out various chemical substructures responsible for bioactivity and selectivity towards particular proteases (thrombin, trypsin and coagulation factor 10) in agreement with the literature. For instance, absence of a tertiary sulphonamide was identified to be responsible for decreased selective activity (by on average 0.27 ± 0.65 pChEMBL units) on FA10. Among the binding pocket residues, the amino acids (arginine, leucine and tyrosine) at positions 35, 39, 60, 93, 140 and 207 were observed as key contributing residues for selective affinity on these three targets.

  10. Tenfibgen Ligand Nanoencapsulation Delivers Bi-Functional Anti-CK2 RNAi Oligomer to Key Sites for Prostate Cancer Targeting Using Human Xenograft Tumors in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Trembley, Janeen H.; Unger, Gretchen M.; Korman, Vicci L.; Abedin, Md. Joynal; Nacusi, Lucas P.; Vogel, Rachel I.; Slaton, Joel W.; Kren, Betsy T.; Ahmed, Khalil

    2014-01-01

    Protected and specific delivery of nucleic acids to malignant cells remains a highly desirable approach for cancer therapy. Here we present data on the physical and chemical characteristics, mechanism of action, and pilot therapeutic efficacy of a tenfibgen (TBG)-shell nanocapsule technology for tumor-directed delivery of single stranded DNA/RNA chimeric oligomers targeting CK2αα' to xenograft tumors in mice. The sub-50 nm size TBG nanocapsule (s50-TBG) is a slightly negatively charged, uniform particle of 15 - 20 nm size which confers protection to the nucleic acid cargo. The DNA/RNA chimeric oligomer (RNAi-CK2) functions to decrease CK2αα' expression levels via both siRNA and antisense mechanisms. Systemic delivery of s50-TBG-RNAi-CK2 specifically targets malignant cells, including tumor cells in bone, and at low doses reduces size and CK2-related signals in orthotopic primary and metastatic xenograft prostate cancer tumors. In conclusion, the s50-TBG nanoencapsulation technology together with the chimeric oligomer targeting CK2αα' offer significant promise for systemic treatment of prostate malignancy. PMID:25333839

  11. Ligand clouds around protein clouds: a scenario of ligand binding with intrinsically disordered proteins.

    PubMed

    Jin, Fan; Yu, Chen; Lai, Luhua; Liu, Zhirong

    2013-01-01

    Intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) were found to be widely associated with human diseases and may serve as potential drug design targets. However, drug design targeting IDPs is still in the very early stages. Progress in drug design is usually achieved using experimental screening; however, the structural disorder of IDPs makes it difficult to characterize their interaction with ligands using experiments alone. To better understand the structure of IDPs and their interactions with small molecule ligands, we performed extensive simulations on the c-Myc₃₇₀₋₄₀₉ peptide and its binding to a reported small molecule inhibitor, ligand 10074-A4. We found that the conformational space of the apo c-Myc₃₇₀₋₄₀₉ peptide was rather dispersed and that the conformations of the peptide were stabilized mainly by charge interactions and hydrogen bonds. Under the binding of the ligand, c-Myc₃₇₀₋₄₀₉ remained disordered. The ligand was found to bind to c-Myc₃₇₀₋₄₀₉ at different sites along the chain and behaved like a 'ligand cloud'. In contrast to ligand binding to more rigid target proteins that usually results in a dominant bound structure, ligand binding to IDPs may better be described as ligand clouds around protein clouds. Nevertheless, the binding of the ligand and a non-ligand to the c-Myc₃₇₀₋₄₀₉ target could be clearly distinguished. The present study provides insights that will help improve rational drug design that targets IDPs.

  12. Tacrine-Trolox Hybrids: A Novel Class of Centrally Active, Nonhepatotoxic Multi-Target-Directed Ligands Exerting Anticholinesterase and Antioxidant Activities with Low In Vivo Toxicity.

    PubMed

    Nepovimova, Eugenie; Korabecny, Jan; Dolezal, Rafael; Babkova, Katerina; Ondrejicek, Ales; Jun, Daniel; Sepsova, Vendula; Horova, Anna; Hrabinova, Martina; Soukup, Ondrej; Bukum, Neslihan; Jost, Petr; Muckova, Lubica; Kassa, Jiri; Malinak, David; Andrs, Martin; Kuca, Kamil

    2015-11-25

    Coupling of two distinct pharmacophores, tacrine and trolox, endowed with different biological properties, afforded 21 hybrid compounds as novel multifunctional candidates against Alzheimer's disease. Several of them showed improved inhibitory properties toward acetylcholinesterase (AChE) in relation to tacrine. These hybrids also scavenged free radicals. Molecular modeling studies in tandem with kinetic analysis exhibited that these hybrids target both catalytic active site as well as peripheral anionic site of AChE. In addition, incorporation of the moiety bearing antioxidant abilities displayed negligible toxicity on human hepatic cells. This striking effect was explained by formation of nontoxic metabolites after 1 h incubation in human liver microsomes system. Finally, tacrine-trolox hybrids exhibited low in vivo toxicity after im administration in rats and potential to penetrate across blood-brain barrier. All of these outstanding in vitro results in combination with promising in vivo outcomes highlighted derivative 7u as the lead structure worthy of further investigation.

  13. Synthesis of Thiazolo[5,4-f]quinazolin-9(8H)-ones as Multi-Target Directed Ligands of Ser/Thr Kinases.

    PubMed

    Hédou, Damien; Godeau, Julien; Loaëc, Nadège; Meijer, Laurent; Fruit, Corinne; Besson, Thierry

    2016-01-01

    A library of thirty novel thiazolo[5,4-f]quinazolin-9(8H)-one derivatives belonging to four series designated as 12, 13, 14 and 15 was efficiently prepared, helped by microwave-assisted technology when required. The efficient multistep synthesis of methyl 6-amino-2-cyano- benzo[d]thiazole-7-carboxylate (1) has been reinvestigated and performed on a multigram scale. The inhibitory potency of the final products against five kinases involved in Alzheimer's disease was evaluated. This study demonstrates that some molecules of the 12 and 13 series described in this paper are particularly promising for the development of new multi-target inhibitors of kinases. PMID:27144552

  14. 2D MI-DRAGON: a new predictor for protein-ligands interactions and theoretic-experimental studies of US FDA drug-target network, oxoisoaporphine inhibitors for MAO-A and human parasite proteins.

    PubMed

    Prado-Prado, Francisco; García-Mera, Xerardo; Escobar, Manuel; Sobarzo-Sánchez, Eduardo; Yañez, Matilde; Riera-Fernandez, Pablo; González-Díaz, Humberto

    2011-12-01

    There are many pairs of possible Drug-Proteins Interactions that may take place or not (DPIs/nDPIs) between drugs with high affinity/non-affinity for different proteins. This fact makes expensive in terms of time and resources, for instance, the determination of all possible ligands-protein interactions for a single drug. In this sense, we can use Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationships (QSAR) models to carry out rational DPIs prediction. Unfortunately, almost all QSAR models predict activity against only one target. To solve this problem we can develop multi-target QSAR (mt-QSAR) models. In this work, we introduce the technique 2D MI-DRAGON a new predictor for DPIs based on two different well-known software. We use the software MARCH-INSIDE (MI) to calculate 3D structural parameters for targets and the software DRAGON was used to calculated 2D molecular descriptors all drugs showing known DPIs present in the Drug Bank (US FDA benchmark dataset). Both classes of parameters were used as input of different Artificial Neural Network (ANN) algorithms to seek an accurate non-linear mt-QSAR predictor. The best ANN model found is a Multi-Layer Perceptron (MLP) with profile MLP 21:21-31-1:1. This MLP classifies correctly 303 out of 339 DPIs (Sensitivity = 89.38%) and 480 out of 510 nDPIs (Specificity = 94.12%), corresponding to training Accuracy = 92.23%. The validation of the model was carried out by means of external predicting series with Sensitivity = 92.18% (625/678 DPIs; Specificity = 90.12% (730/780 nDPIs) and Accuracy = 91.06%. 2D MI-DRAGON offers a good opportunity for fast-track calculation of all possible DPIs of one drug enabling us to re-construct large drug-target or DPIs Complex Networks (CNs). For instance, we reconstructed the CN of the US FDA benchmark dataset with 855 nodes 519 drugs+336 targets). We predicted CN with similar topology (observed and predicted values of average distance are equal to 6.7 vs. 6.6). These CNs can be used to explore

  15. Polypharmacology of dopamine receptor ligands.

    PubMed

    Butini, S; Nikolic, K; Kassel, S; Brückmann, H; Filipic, S; Agbaba, D; Gemma, S; Brogi, S; Brindisi, M; Campiani, G; Stark, H

    2016-07-01

    Most neurological diseases have a multifactorial nature and the number of molecular mechanisms discovered as underpinning these diseases is continuously evolving. The old concept of developing selective agents for a single target does not fit with the medical need of most neurological diseases. The development of designed multiple ligands holds great promises and appears as the next step in drug development for the treatment of these multifactorial diseases. Dopamine and its five receptor subtypes are intimately involved in numerous neurological disorders. Dopamine receptor ligands display a high degree of cross interactions with many other targets including G-protein coupled receptors, transporters, enzymes and ion channels. For brain disorders like Parkinsońs disease, schizophrenia and depression the dopaminergic system, being intertwined with many other signaling systems, plays a key role in pathogenesis and therapy. The concept of designed multiple ligands and polypharmacology, which perfectly meets the therapeutic needs for these brain disorders, is herein discussed as a general ligand-based concept while focusing on dopaminergic agents and receptor subtypes in particular. PMID:27234980

  16. NMR studies of protein-ligand interactions.

    PubMed

    Maurer, Till

    2005-01-01

    Interaction between biological macromolecules or of macromolecules with low-molecular-weight ligands is a central paradigm in the understanding of function in biological systems. It is also the major goal in pharmaceutical research to find and optimize ligands that modulate the function of biological macromolecules. Both technological advances and new methods in the field of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) have led to the development of several tools by which the interaction of proteins or DNA and low molecular weight-ligands can be characterized at an atomic level. Information can be gained quickly and easily with ligand-based techniques. These need only small amounts of nonisotope labeled, and thus readily available target macromolecules. As the focus is on the signals stemming only from the ligand, no further NMR information regarding the target is needed. Techniques based on the observation of isotopically labeled biological macromolecules open the possibility to observe interactions of proteins with low-molecular-weight ligands, DNA or other proteins. With these techniques, the structure of high-molecular-weight complexes can be determined. Here, the resonance signals of the macromolecule must be identified beforehand, which can be time consuming but with the benefit of obtaining more information with respect to the target ligand complex.

  17. A high-throughput small-molecule ligand screen targeted to agonists and antagonists of the G-protein-coupled receptor GPR54.

    PubMed

    Kuohung, Wendy; Burnett, Maria; Mukhtyar, Deepa; Schuman, Eli; Ni, Jake; Crowley, William F; Glicksman, Marcie A; Kaiser, Ursula B

    2010-06-01

    Recent data have shown that the G-protein-coupled receptor GPR54 (also known as KiSS-1 receptor) regulates GnRH release from the hypothalamus. This essential role of GPR54 in controlling the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis makes it an attractive target for therapeutic intervention in reproductive and cancer medicine. Currently, there are no small-molecule modulators of GPR54 function for experimental or clinical use. To identify small-molecule compounds that modify GPR54 signal transduction, the authors have adapted a cell-based functional assay for high-throughput screening (HTS) using a commercially available homogeneous time-resolved fluorescence assay for inositol phosphate accumulation. They generated stable Chinese hamster ovary cell transfectants that express human GPR54 for use in this assay. After optimization in an automated HTS environment, they screened a library of 110,000 small-molecule compounds using 2 protocols, one to identify agonists and one to identify antagonists. Hits obtained in the primary screen were confirmed to be active in secondary in vitro assays. Compounds identified as agonists or antagonists from HTS and secondary screening will be characterized to identify agents with the potential to be developed as novel orally active agents to treat hormone-dependent disorders such as abnormal puberty, infertility, endometriosis, and sex steroid-dependent tumors.

  18. Potent and Selective Modulation of the RhlR Quorum Sensing Receptor by Using Non-native Ligands: An Emerging Target for Virulence Control in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Eibergen, Nora R; Moore, Joseph D; Mattmann, Margrith E; Blackwell, Helen E

    2015-11-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa uses N-acylated L-homoserine lactone signals and a triumvirate of LuxR-type receptor proteins--LasR, RhlR, and QscR--for quorum sensing (QS). Each of these receptors can contribute to QS activation or repression and, thereby, the control of myriad virulence phenotypes in this pathogen. LasR has traditionally been considered to be at the top of the QS receptor hierarchy in P. aeruginosa; however, recent reports suggest that RhlR plays a more prominent role in infection than originally predicted, in some circumstances superseding that of LasR. Herein, we report the characterization of a set of synthetic, small-molecule agonists and antagonists of RhlR. Using E. coli reporter strains, we demonstrated that many of these compounds can selectively activate or inhibit RhlR instead of LasR and QscR. Moreover, several molecules maintain their activities in P. aeruginosa at concentrations analogous to native RhlR signal levels. These compounds represent useful chemical probes to study the role of RhlR in the complex QS circuitry of P. aeruginosa, its direct (and indirect) effects on virulence, and its overall merit as a target for anti-infective therapy. PMID:26460240

  19. Hybridization of an Aβ-specific antibody fragment with aminopyrazole-based β-sheet ligands displays striking enhancement of target affinity.

    PubMed

    Hellmert, Marco; Müller-Schiffmann, Andreas; Peters, Max Sena; Korth, Carsten; Schrader, Thomas

    2015-03-14

    Determining Aβ levels in body fluids remains a powerful tool in the diagnostics of Alzheimer's disease. This report delineates a new supramolecular strategy which increases the affinity of antibodies towards Aβ to make diagnostic procedures more sensitive. A monoclonal antibody IC16 was generated to an N-terminal epitope of Aβ and the variable regions of the heavy and light chains were cloned as a recombinant protein (scFv). A 6 × histidine tag was fused to the C-terminus of IC16-scFv allowing hybridization with a small organic β-sheet binder via Ni-NTA complexation. On the other hand, a multivalent nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA)-equipped trimeric aminopyrazole (AP) derivative was synthesized based on a cyclam platform; and experimental evidence was obtained for efficient Ni(2+)-mediated complex formation with the histidine-tagged antibody species. In a proof of principle experiment the hybrid molecule showed a strong increase in affinity towards Aβ. Thus, the specific binding power of recombinant antibody fragments to their β-sheet rich targets can be conveniently enhanced by non-covalent hybridization with small organic β-sheet binders.

  20. Potent and Selective Modulation of the RhlR Quorum Sensing Receptor by Using Non-native Ligands: An Emerging Target for Virulence Control in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Eibergen, Nora R; Moore, Joseph D; Mattmann, Margrith E; Blackwell, Helen E

    2015-11-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa uses N-acylated L-homoserine lactone signals and a triumvirate of LuxR-type receptor proteins--LasR, RhlR, and QscR--for quorum sensing (QS). Each of these receptors can contribute to QS activation or repression and, thereby, the control of myriad virulence phenotypes in this pathogen. LasR has traditionally been considered to be at the top of the QS receptor hierarchy in P. aeruginosa; however, recent reports suggest that RhlR plays a more prominent role in infection than originally predicted, in some circumstances superseding that of LasR. Herein, we report the characterization of a set of synthetic, small-molecule agonists and antagonists of RhlR. Using E. coli reporter strains, we demonstrated that many of these compounds can selectively activate or inhibit RhlR instead of LasR and QscR. Moreover, several molecules maintain their activities in P. aeruginosa at concentrations analogous to native RhlR signal levels. These compounds represent useful chemical probes to study the role of RhlR in the complex QS circuitry of P. aeruginosa, its direct (and indirect) effects on virulence, and its overall merit as a target for anti-infective therapy.

  1. Notch-ligand expression by NALT dendritic cells regulates mucosal Th1- and Th2-type responses

    SciTech Connect

    Fukuyama, Yoshiko; Tokuhara, Daisuke; Sekine, Shinichi; Kataoka, Kosuke; Markham, Jonathan D.; Irwin, Allyson R.; Moon, Grace H.; Tokuhara, Yuka; Fujihashi, Keiko; Davydova, Julia; Yamamoto, Masato; Gilbert, Rebekah S.; Fujihashi, Kohtaro

    2012-02-03

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nasal Ad-FL effectively up-regulates APC function by CD11c{sup +} DCs in mucosal tissues. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nasal Ad-FL induces Notch ligand (L)-expressing CD11c{sup +} DCs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Notch L-expressing DCs support the induction of Th1- and Th2-type cytokine responses. -- Abstract: Our previous studies showed that an adenovirus (Ad) serotype 5 vector expressing Flt3 ligand (Ad-FL) as nasal adjuvant activates CD11c{sup +} dendritic cells (DCs) for the enhancement of antigen (Ag)-specific IgA antibody (Ab) responses. In this study, we examined the molecular mechanism for activation of CD11c{sup +} DCs and their roles in induction of Ag-specific Th1- and Th2-cell responses. Ad-FL activated CD11c{sup +} DCs expressed increased levels of the Notch ligand (L)-expression and specific mRNA. When CD11c{sup +} DCs from various mucosal and systemic lymphoid tissues of mice given nasal OVA plus Ad-FL were cultured with CD4{sup +} T cells isolated from non-immunized OVA TCR-transgenic (OT II) mice, significantly increased levels of T cell proliferative responses were noted. Furthermore, Ad-FL activated DCs induced IFN-{gamma}, IL-2 and IL-4 producing CD4{sup +} T cells. Of importance, these APC functions by Ad-FL activated DCs were down-regulated by blocking Notch-Notch-L pathway. These results show that Ad-FL induces CD11c{sup +} DCs to the express Notch-ligands and these activated DCs regulate the induction of Ag-specific Th1- and Th2-type cytokine responses.

  2. Bexarotene ligand pharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Hurst, R E

    2000-12-01

    target rates; side effects were primarily limited to local skin reactions [349982]. Ligand has worldwide rights to market bexarotene capsules, and will market the drug in the US, Canada and selected European markets. In Spain, Portugal, Greece and Central and South America, Ferrer Internacional will market and distribute the drug. As of December 1999, Ligand was seeking additional distribution partners for select European and Asian markets [351604]. In January 2000, Alfa Wassermann signed an agreement with Ligand to exclusively market and distribute Targretin gel and capsules in Italy. Alfa paid US $0.75 million on signing with additional amounts up to an aggregate total of US $1.0 million on achievement of certain registration milestones, which are expected to be met in 2000 [351882].

  3. Expression of receptors for glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor family ligands in sacral spinal cord reveals separate targets of pelvic afferent fibers.

    PubMed

    Forrest, Shelley L; Keast, Janet R

    2008-02-20

    Nerve growth factor has been proposed to mediate many structural and chemical changes in bladder sensory neurons after injury or inflammation. We have examined the expression of receptors for the glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) family within sensory terminals located in the sacral spinal cord and in bladder-projecting sacral dorsal root ganglion neurons of adult female Sprague-Dawley rats. Nerve fibers immunolabelled for GFRalpha1 (GDNF receptor), GFRalpha2 (neurturin receptor), or GFRalpha3 (artemin receptor) showed distinct distribution patterns in the spinal cord, suggesting separate populations of sensory fibers with different functions: GFRalpha1-labeled fibers were in outer lamina II and the lateral-collateral pathway and associated with autonomic interneurons and preganglionic neurons; GFRalpha2-labeled fibers were only in inner lamina II; GFRalpha3-labeled fibers were in lamina I, the lateral-collateral pathway, and areas surrounding dorsal groups of preganglionic neurons and associated interneurons. Immunofluorescence studies of retrogradely labelled bladder-projecting neurons in sacral dorsal root ganglia showed that approximately 25% expressed GFRalpha1 or GFRalpha3 immunoreactivity, the preferred receptors for GDNF and artemin, respectively. After cyclophosphamide-induced bladder inflammation, fluorescence intensity of GFRalpha1-positive fibers increased within the dorsal horn, but there was no change in the GFRalpha2- or GFRalpha3-positive fibers. These studies have shown that GDNF and artemin may target bladder sensory neurons and potentially mediate plasticity of sacral visceral afferent neurons following inflammation. Our results have also revealed three distinct subpopulations of sensory fibers within the sacral spinal cord, which have not been identified previously using other markers.

  4. An inhalable β₂-adrenoceptor ligand-directed guanidinylated chitosan carrier for targeted delivery of siRNA to lung.

    PubMed

    Luo, Yongfeng; Zhai, Xinyun; Ma, Chaonan; Sun, Peng; Fu, Zhiping; Liu, Wenguang; Xu, Jun

    2012-08-20

    SiRNA-based strategies appear to be an exciting new approach for the treatment of respiratory diseases. To extrapolate siRNA-mediated interventions from bench to bedside in this area, several aspects have to be jointly considered, including a safe and efficient gene carrier with pulmonary deposition efficiency, as well as in vivo method for siRNA/nanoparticles delivery. Accordingly, in this work, (i) a non-viral DNA vector, guanidinylated chitosan (GCS) that has been developed in our previous study [X.Y. Zhai, P. Sun, Y.F. Luo, C.N. Ma, J. Xu, W.G. Liu, 2011], was tested for siRNA delivery. We demonstrated that GCS was able to completely condense siRNA at weight ratio 40:1, forming nanosize particles of diameter ~100 nm, 15 mV in surface potential. Guanidinylation of chitosan not only decreased the cytotoxicity but also facilitated cellular internalization of siRNA nanoparticles, leading to an enhanced gene-silencing efficiency compared to the pristine chitosan (CS). (ii) We chemically coupled salbutamol, a β(2)-adrenoceptor agonist, to GCS (SGCS), which successfully improved targeting specificity of the green fluorescent protein (GFP)-siRNA carrier to lung cells harbored with β(2)-adrenergic receptor, and remarkably enhanced the efficacy of gene silence in vitro and in the lung of enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP)-transgenic mice in vivo. (iii) It was proved that this chitosan-based polymer was able to provide both the pDNA and siRNA with the protection against destructive shear forces generated by the mesh-based nebulizers. Aerosol treatment improved the nanoparticle size distribution, which should be in favor of enhancing the transfection efficiency. We suggest a potential application of the chitosan-derived nanodelivery vehicle (SGCS) in RNA interference therapy for lung diseases via aerosol inhalation. PMID:22698944

  5. Selective high affinity polydentate ligands and methods of making such

    DOEpatents

    DeNardo, Sally; DeNardo, Gerald; Balhorn, Rodney

    2010-02-16

    This invention provides novel polydentate selective high affinity ligands (SHALs) that can be used in a variety of applications in a manner analogous to the use of antibodies. SHALs typically comprise a multiplicity of ligands that each bind different region son the target molecule. The ligands are joined directly or through a linker thereby forming a polydentate moiety that typically binds the target molecule with high selectivity and avidity.

  6. Searching for the Multi-Target-Directed Ligands against Alzheimer's disease: discovery of quinoxaline-based hybrid compounds with AChE, H₃R and BACE 1 inhibitory activities.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wenhai; Tang, Li; Shi, Ying; Huang, Shufang; Xu, Lei; Sheng, Rong; Wu, Peng; Li, Jia; Zhou, Naiming; Hu, Yongzhou

    2011-12-01

    A novel series of quinoxaline derivatives, as Multi-Target-Directed Ligands (MTDLs) for AD treatment, were designed by lending the core structural elements required for H(3)R antagonists and hybridizing BACE 1 inhibitor 1 with AChE inhibitor BYYT-25. A virtual database consisting of quinoxaline derivatives was first screened on a pharmacophore model of BACE 1 inhibitors, and then filtered by a molecular docking model of AChE. Seventeen quinoxaline derivatives with high score values were picked out, synthesized and evaluated for their biological activities. Compound 11a, the most effective MTDL, showed the potent activity to H(3)R/AChE/BACE 1 (H(3)R antagonism, IC(50)=280.0 ± 98.0 nM; H(3)R inverse agonism, IC(50)=189.3 ± 95.7 nM; AChE, IC(50)=483 ± 5 nM; BACE 1, 46.64±2.55% inhibitory rate at 20 μM) and high selectivity over H(1)R/H(2)R/H(4)R. Furthermore, the protein binding patterns between 11a and AChE/BACE 1 showed that it makes several essential interactions with the enzymes.

  7. INFERENCE OF PERSONALIZED DRUG TARGETS VIA NETWORK PROPAGATION.

    PubMed

    Shnaps, Ortal; Perry, Eyal; Silverbush, Dana; Sharan, Roded

    2016-01-01

    We present a computational strategy to simulate drug treatment in a personalized setting. The method is based on integrating patient mutation and differential expression data with a protein-protein interaction network. We test the impact of in-silico deletions of different proteins on the flow of information in the network and use the results to infer potential drug targets. We apply our method to AML data from TCGA and validate the predicted drug targets using known targets. To benchmark our patient-specific approach, we compare the personalized setting predictions to those of the conventional setting. Our predicted drug targets are highly enriched with known targets from DrugBank and COSMIC (p < 10(-5) outperforming the non-personalized predictions. Finally, we focus on the largest AML patient subgroup (~30%) which is characterized by an FLT3 mutation, and utilize our prediction score to rank patient sensitivity to inhibition of each predicted target, reproducing previous findings of in-vitro experiments.

  8. Targeted sequencing identifies associations between IL7R-JAK mutations and epigenetic modulators in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Vicente, Carmen; Schwab, Claire; Broux, Michaël; Geerdens, Ellen; Degryse, Sandrine; Demeyer, Sofie; Lahortiga, Idoya; Elliott, Alannah; Chilton, Lucy; La Starza, Roberta; Mecucci, Cristina; Vandenberghe, Peter; Goulden, Nicholas; Vora, Ajay; Moorman, Anthony V; Soulier, Jean; Harrison, Christine J; Clappier, Emmanuelle; Cools, Jan

    2015-10-01

    T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia is caused by the accumulation of multiple oncogenic lesions, including chromosomal rearrangements and mutations. To determine the frequency and co-occurrence of mutations in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia, we performed targeted re-sequencing of 115 genes across 155 diagnostic samples (44 adult and 111 childhood cases). NOTCH1 and CDKN2A/B were mutated/deleted in more than half of the cases, while an additional 37 genes were mutated/deleted in 4% to 20% of cases. We found that IL7R-JAK pathway genes were mutated in 27.7% of cases, with JAK3 mutations being the most frequent event in this group. Copy number variations were also detected, including deletions of CREBBP or CTCF and duplication of MYB. FLT3 mutations were rare, but a novel extracellular mutation in FLT3 was detected and confirmed to be transforming. Furthermore, we identified complex patterns of pairwise associations, including a significant association between mutations in IL7R-JAK genes and epigenetic regulators (WT1, PRC2, PHF6). Our analyses showed that IL7R-JAK genetic lesions did not confer adverse prognosis in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia cases enrolled in the UK ALL2003 trial. Overall, these results identify interconnections between the T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia genome and disease biology, and suggest a potential clinical application for JAK inhibitors in a significant proportion of patients with T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

  9. Handling ligands with Coot

    PubMed Central

    Debreczeni, Judit É.; Emsley, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Coot is a molecular-graphics application primarily aimed to assist in model building and validation of biological macromolecules. Recently, tools have been added to work with small molecules. The newly incorporated tools for the manipulation and validation of ligands include interaction with PRODRG, subgraph isomorphism-based tools, representation of ligand chemistry, ligand fitting and analysis, and are described here. PMID:22505262

  10. The Retinoid X Receptors and Their Ligands

    PubMed Central

    Dawson, Marcia I.; Xia, Zebin

    2014-01-01

    This chapter presents an overview of the current status of studies on the structural and molecular biology of the retinoid X receptor subtypes α, β, and γ (RXRs, NR2B1–3), their nuclear and cytoplasmic functions, post-transcriptional processing, and recently reported ligands. Points of interest are the different changes in the ligand-binding pocket induced by variously shaped agonists, the communication of the ligand–bound pocket with the coactivator binding surface and the heterodimerization interface, and recently identified ligands that are natural products, those that function as environmental toxins or drugs that had been originally designed to interact with other targets, as well as those that were deliberately designed as RXR-selective transcriptional agonists, synergists, or antagonists. Of these synthetic ligands, the general trend in design appears to be away from fully aromatic rigid structures to those containing partial elements of the flexible tetraene side chain of 9-cis-retinoic acid. PMID:22020178

  11. Polypharmacology: in silico methods of ligand design and development.

    PubMed

    McKie, Samuel A

    2016-04-01

    How to design a ligand to bind multiple targets, rather than to a single target, is the focus of this review. Rational polypharmacology draws on knowledge that is both broad ranging and hierarchical. Computer-aided multitarget ligand design methods are described according to their nested knowledge level. Ligand-only and then receptor-ligand strategies are first described; followed by the metabolic network viewpoint. Subsequently strategies that view infectious diseases as multigenomic targets are discussed, and finally the disease level interpretation of medicinal therapy is considered. As yet there is no consensus on how best to proceed in designing a multitarget ligand. The current methodologies are bought together in an attempt to give a practical overview of how polypharmacology design might be best initiated. PMID:27105127

  12. Polypharmacology: in silico methods of ligand design and development.

    PubMed

    McKie, Samuel A

    2016-04-01

    How to design a ligand to bind multiple targets, rather than to a single target, is the focus of this review. Rational polypharmacology draws on knowledge that is both broad ranging and hierarchical. Computer-aided multitarget ligand design methods are described according to their nested knowledge level. Ligand-only and then receptor-ligand strategies are first described; followed by the metabolic network viewpoint. Subsequently strategies that view infectious diseases as multigenomic targets are discussed, and finally the disease level interpretation of medicinal therapy is considered. As yet there is no consensus on how best to proceed in designing a multitarget ligand. The current methodologies are bought together in an attempt to give a practical overview of how polypharmacology design might be best initiated.

  13. Identification of ligand templates using local structure alignment for structure-based drug design.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hui Sun; Im, Wonpil

    2012-10-22

    With a rapid increase in the number of high-resolution protein-ligand structures, the known protein-ligand structures can be used to gain insight into ligand-binding modes in a target protein. On the basis of the fact that the structurally similar binding sites share information about their ligands, we have developed a local structure alignment tool, G-LoSA (graph-based local structure alignment). The known protein-ligand binding-site structure library is searched by G-LoSA to detect binding-site structures with similar geometry and physicochemical properties to a query binding-site structure regardless of sequence continuity and protein fold. Then, the ligands in the identified complexes are used as templates (i.e., template ligands) to predict/design a ligand for the target protein. The performance of G-LoSA is validated against 76 benchmark targets from the Astex diverse set. Using the currently available protein-ligand structure library, G-LoSA is able to identify a single template ligand (from a nonhomologous protein complex) that is highly similar to the target ligand in more than half of the benchmark targets. In addition, our benchmark analyses show that an assembly of structural fragments from multiple template ligands with partial similarity to the target ligand can be used to design novel ligand structures specific to the target protein. This study clearly indicates that a template-based ligand modeling has potential for de novo ligand design and can be a complementary approach to the receptor structure based methods.

  14. Advanced flow cytometric analysis of nanoparticle targeting to rare leukemic stem cells in peripheral human blood in a defined model system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, Christy L.; Leary, James F.

    2015-03-01

    Leukemia stem cells are both stem-like and leukemic-like. This complicates their detection as rare circulating tumor cells in the peripheral blood of leukemia patients. Since leukemic stem cells are also resistant to standard chemotherapeutic regimens, new therapeutic strategies need to be designed to kill the leukemic stem cells without killing normal stem cells. In these initial targeting studies we utilized a bioinformatics approach to design an antibodyfluorescent nanoparticle conjugate for targeting to these leukemic stem cells and to minimize targeting to normal stemprogenitor cells. Multicolor flow cytometric analyses were performed on a BD FACS Aria III. Human leukemic stem cell-like cell RS4;11 (with putative immunophenotype CD133+/CD24+/-, CD34+/-, CD38+, CD10-/Flt3+) was spiked into normal hematopoietic stem-progenitor cells obtained from a "buffy coat" prep (with putative immunophenotype CD133- /CD34+/CD38-/CD10-/Flt-3-) to be used as a model human leukemia patient. To analyze the model system, digital data mixtures of the two cell types were first created and assigned classifiers in order to create truth sets. ROC (Receiver Operating Characteristic) and multidimensional cluster analyses were used to evaluate the specificity and sensitivity of the immunophenotyping panel and for automated cell population identification, respectively. Costs of misclassification (false targeting) were also accounted for by this analysis scheme. Ultimately, this analysis scheme will be applied to use of nanoparticle-antibody conjugates at therapeutic doses for targeted killing of leukemia stem cells preferentially to normal stem -progenitor cells.

  15. High-throughput analysis of genome-wide receptor tyrosine kinase expression in human cancers identifies potential novel drug targets.

    PubMed

    Müller-Tidow, Carsten; Schwäble, Joachim; Steffen, Björn; Tidow, Nicola; Brandt, Burkhardt; Becker, Kerstin; Schulze-Bahr, Eric; Halfter, Hartmut; Vogt, Ulf; Metzger, Ralf; Schneider, Paul M; Büchner, Thomas; Brandts, Christian; Berdel, Wolfgang E; Serve, Hubert

    2004-02-15

    Novel high-throughput analyses in molecular biology allow sensitive and rapid identification of disease-related genes and drug targets. We have used quantitative real-time reverse transcription-PCR reactions (n = 23000) to analyze expression of all human receptor tyrosine kinases (n = 56) in malignant tumors (n = 313) of different origins and normal control samples (n = 58). The different tumor types expressed very different numbers of receptor tyrosine kinases: whereas brain tumors and testicular cancer expressed 50 receptor tyrosine kinases, acute myeloid leukemia (AML) samples expressed only 20 different ones. Specimens of similar tumor origin exhibited characteristic receptor tyrosine kinase expression patterns and were grouped together in hierarchical cluster analyses. When we focused on specific tumor entities, receptor tyrosine kinases were identified that were disease and/or stage specific. Leukemic blasts from AML bone marrow samples differed significantly in receptor tyrosine kinase expression compared with normal bone marrow and purified CD34+ cells. Among the differentially expressed receptor tyrosine kinases, we found FLT3, c-kit, CSF1 receptor, EPHB6, leukocyte tyrosine kinase, and ptk7 to be highly overexpressed in AML samples. Whereas expression changes of some of these were associated with altered differentiation patterns (e.g., CSF1 receptor), others, such as FLT3, were genuinely overexpressed in leukemic blasts. These data and the associated database (http://medweb.uni-muenster.de/institute/meda/research/) provide a comprehensive view of receptor tyrosine kinase expression in human cancer. This information can assist in the definition of novel drug targets.

  16. A screening cascade to identify ERβ ligands

    PubMed Central

    Filgueira, Carly S.; Benod, Cindy; Lou, Xiaohua; Gunamalai, Prem S.; Villagomez, Rosa A.; Strom, Anders; Gustafsson, Jan-Åke; Berkenstam, Anders L.; Webb, Paul

    2014-01-01

    The establishment of effective high throughput screening cascades to identify nuclear receptor (NR) ligands that will trigger defined, therapeutically useful sets of NR activities is of considerable importance. Repositioning of existing approved drugs with known side effect profiles can provide advantages because de novo drug design suffers from high developmental failure rates and undesirable side effects which have dramatically increased costs. Ligands that target estrogen receptor β (ERβ) could be useful in a variety of diseases ranging from cancer to neurological to cardiovascular disorders. In this context, it is important to minimize cross-reactivity with ERα, which has been shown to trigger increased rates of several types of cancer. Because of high sequence similarities between the ligand binding domains of ERα and ERβ, preferentially targeting one subtype can prove challenging. Here, we describe a sequential ligand screening approach comprised of complementary in-house assays to identify small molecules that are selective for ERβ. Methods include differential scanning fluorimetry, fluorescence polarization and a GAL4 transactivation assay. We used this strategy to screen several commercially-available chemical libraries, identifying thirty ERβ binders that were examined for their selectivity for ERβ versus ERα, and tested the effects of selected ligands in a prostate cancer cell proliferation assay. We suggest that this approach could be used to rapidly identify candidates for drug repurposing. PMID:25422593

  17. Biased ligands: pathway validation for novel GPCR therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Rominger, David H; Cowan, Conrad L; Gowen-MacDonald, William; Violin, Jonathan D

    2014-06-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), in recent years, have been shown to signal via multiple distinct pathways. Furthermore, biased ligands for some receptors can differentially stimulate or inhibit these pathways versus unbiased endogenous ligands or drugs. Biased ligands can be used to gain a deeper understanding of the molecular targets and cellular responses associated with a GPCR, and may be developed into therapeutics with improved efficacy, safety and/or tolerability. Here we review examples and approaches to pathway validation that establish the relevance and therapeutic potential of distinct pathways that can be selectively activated or blocked by biased ligands.

  18. Biased ligands: pathway validation for novel GPCR therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Rominger, David H; Cowan, Conrad L; Gowen-MacDonald, William; Violin, Jonathan D

    2014-06-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), in recent years, have been shown to signal via multiple distinct pathways. Furthermore, biased ligands for some receptors can differentially stimulate or inhibit these pathways versus unbiased endogenous ligands or drugs. Biased ligands can be used to gain a deeper understanding of the molecular targets and cellular responses associated with a GPCR, and may be developed into therapeutics with improved efficacy, safety and/or tolerability. Here we review examples and approaches to pathway validation that establish the relevance and therapeutic potential of distinct pathways that can be selectively activated or blocked by biased ligands. PMID:24834870

  19. Ligand modeling and design

    SciTech Connect

    Hay, B.

    1996-10-01

    The purpose of this work is to develop and implement a molecular design basis for selecting organic ligands that would be used tin applications for the cost-effective removal of specific radionuclides from nuclear waste streams.

  20. Strong Ligand-Protein Interactions Derived from Diffuse Ligand Interactions with Loose Binding Sites.

    PubMed

    Marsh, Lorraine

    2015-01-01

    Many systems in biology rely on binding of ligands to target proteins in a single high-affinity conformation with a favorable ΔG. Alternatively, interactions of ligands with protein regions that allow diffuse binding, distributed over multiple sites and conformations, can exhibit favorable ΔG because of their higher entropy. Diffuse binding may be biologically important for multidrug transporters and carrier proteins. A fine-grained computational method for numerical integration of total binding ΔG arising from diffuse regional interaction of a ligand in multiple conformations using a Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) approach is presented. This method yields a metric that quantifies the influence on overall ligand affinity of ligand binding to multiple, distinct sites within a protein binding region. This metric is essentially a measure of dispersion in equilibrium ligand binding and depends on both the number of potential sites of interaction and the distribution of their individual predicted affinities. Analysis of test cases indicates that, for some ligand/protein pairs involving transporters and carrier proteins, diffuse binding contributes greatly to total affinity, whereas in other cases the influence is modest. This approach may be useful for studying situations where "nonspecific" interactions contribute to biological function. PMID:26064949

  1. Strong Ligand-Protein Interactions Derived from Diffuse Ligand Interactions with Loose Binding Sites

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Many systems in biology rely on binding of ligands to target proteins in a single high-affinity conformation with a favorable ΔG. Alternatively, interactions of ligands with protein regions that allow diffuse binding, distributed over multiple sites and conformations, can exhibit favorable ΔG because of their higher entropy. Diffuse binding may be biologically important for multidrug transporters and carrier proteins. A fine-grained computational method for numerical integration of total binding ΔG arising from diffuse regional interaction of a ligand in multiple conformations using a Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) approach is presented. This method yields a metric that quantifies the influence on overall ligand affinity of ligand binding to multiple, distinct sites within a protein binding region. This metric is essentially a measure of dispersion in equilibrium ligand binding and depends on both the number of potential sites of interaction and the distribution of their individual predicted affinities. Analysis of test cases indicates that, for some ligand/protein pairs involving transporters and carrier proteins, diffuse binding contributes greatly to total affinity, whereas in other cases the influence is modest. This approach may be useful for studying situations where “nonspecific” interactions contribute to biological function. PMID:26064949

  2. [Supercomputer investigation of the protein-ligand system low-energy minima].

    PubMed

    Oferkin, I V; Sulimov, A V; Katkova, E V; Kutov, D K; Grigoriev, F V; Kondakova, O A; Sulimov, V B

    2015-01-01

    The accuracy of the protein-ligand binding energy calculations and ligand positioning is strongly influenced by the choice of the docking target function. This work demonstrates the evaluation of the five different target functions used in docking: functions based on MMFF94 force field and functions based on PM7 quantum-chemical method accounting or without accounting the implicit solvent model (PCM, COSMO or SGB). For these purposes the ligand positions corresponding to the minima of the target function and the experimentally known ligand positions in the protein active site (crystal ligand positions) were compared. Each function was examined on the same test-set of 16 protein-ligand complexes. The new parallelized docking program FLM based on Monte Carlo search algorithm was developed to perform the comprehensive low-energy minima search and to calculate the protein-ligand binding energy. This study demonstrates that the docking target function based on the MMFF94 force field can be used to detect the crystal or near crystal positions of the ligand by the finding the low-energy local minima spectrum of the target function. The importance of solvent accounting in the docking process for the accurate ligand positioning is also shown. The accuracy of the ligand positioning as well as the correlation between the calculated and experimentally determined protein-ligand binding energies are improved when the MMFF94 force field is substituted by the new PM7 method with implicit solvent accounting.

  3. Coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations of protein-ligand binding.

    PubMed

    Negami, Tatsuki; Shimizu, Kentaro; Terada, Tohru

    2014-09-30

    Coarse-grained molecular dynamics (CGMD) simulations with the MARTINI force field were performed to reproduce the protein-ligand binding processes. We chose two protein-ligand systems, the levansucrase-sugar (glucose or sucrose), and LinB-1,2-dichloroethane systems, as target systems that differ in terms of the size and shape of the ligand-binding pocket and the physicochemical properties of the pocket and the ligand. Spatial distributions of the Coarse-grained (CG) ligand molecules revealed potential ligand-binding sites on the protein surfaces other than the real ligand-binding sites. The ligands bound most strongly to the real ligand-binding sites. The binding and unbinding rate constants obtained from the CGMD simulation of the levansucrase-sucrose system were approximately 10 times greater than the experimental values; this is mainly due to faster diffusion of the CG ligand in the CG water model. We could obtain dissociation constants close to the experimental values for both systems. Analysis of the ligand fluxes demonstrated that the CG ligand molecules entered the ligand-binding pockets through specific pathways. The ligands tended to move through grooves on the protein surface. Thus, the CGMD simulations produced reasonable results for the two different systems overall and are useful for studying the protein-ligand binding processes.

  4. Assisted assignment of ligands corresponding to unknown electron density.

    SciTech Connect

    Binkowski, T. A.; Cuff, M.; Nocek, B.; Chang, C.; Joachimiak, A.; Biosciences Division

    2010-01-03

    A semi-automated computational procedure to assist in the identification of bound ligands from unknown electron density has been developed. The atomic surface surrounding the density blob is compared to a library of three-dimensional ligand binding surfaces extracted from the Protein Data Bank (PDB). Ligands corresponding to surfaces which share physicochemical texture and geometric shape similarities are considered for assignment. The method is benchmarked against a set of well represented ligands from the PDB, in which we show that we can identify the correct ligand based on the corresponding binding surface. Finally, we apply the method during model building and refinement stages from structural genomics targets in which unknown density blobs were discovered. A semi-automated computational method is described which aims to assist crystallographers with assigning the identity of a ligand corresponding to unknown electron density. Using shape and physicochemical similarity assessments between the protein surface surrounding the density and a database of known ligand binding surfaces, a plausible list of candidate ligands are identified for consideration. The method is validated against highly observed ligands from the Protein Data Bank and results are shown from its use in a high-throughput structural genomics pipeline.

  5. Fragment-based ligand discovery.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Marcus; Hubbard, Roderick E

    2009-02-01

    From home building and decor to mass production, modular design is a standard feature of the modern age. The concept also promises to define drug discovery efforts in the near future, as a wide range of methodologies, from NMR to X-ray crystallography, are being adapted to high-throughput platforms. In particular, "fragment-based ligand discovery" describes the laboratory-driven evolution of drugs from libraries of chemical building blocks. "Evolution" is an apt word for the process, as a wide array of methods are used to define how compound fragments can be best fit into the binding sites of medically relevant target biomolecules. A number of compounds that evolved from fragments have entered the clinic, and the approach is increasingly accepted as an additional route to identifying new hit compounds in pharmaceutical discovery and inhibitor design. PMID:19299661

  6. Selective high-affinity polydentate ligands and methods of making such

    SciTech Connect

    DeNardo, Sally; DeNardo, Gerald; Balhorn, Rodney

    2013-09-17

    This invention provides polydentate selective high affinity ligands (SHALs) that can be used in a variety of applications in a manner analogous to the use of antibodies. SHALs typically comprise a multiplicity of ligands that each binds different regions on the target molecule. The ligands are joined directly or through a linker thereby forming a polydentate moiety that typically binds the target molecule with high selectivity and avidity.

  7. G4LDB: a database for discovering and studying G-quadruplex ligands

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qian; Xiang, Jun-Feng; Yang, Qian-Fan; Sun, Hong-Xia; Guan, Ai-Jiao; Tang, Ya-Lin

    2013-01-01

    The G-quadruplex ligands database (G4LDB, http://www.g4ldb.org) provides a unique collection of reported G-quadruplex ligands to streamline ligand/drug discovery targeting G-quadruplexes. G-quadruplexes are guanine-rich nucleic acid sequences in human telomeres and gene promoter regions. There is a growing recognition for their profound roles in a wide spectrum of diseases, such as cancer, diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Ligands that affect the structure and activity of G-quadruplexes can shed light on the search for G-quadruplex-targeting drugs. Therefore, we built the G4LDB to (i) compile a data set covering various physical properties and 3D structure of G-quadruplex ligands; (ii) provide Web-based tools for G-quadruplex ligand design; and (iii) to facilitate the discovery of novel therapeutic and diagnostic agents targeting G-quadruplexes. G4LDB currently contains >800 G-quadruplex ligands with ∼4000 activity records, which, to our knowledge, is the most extensive collection of its kind. It offers a user friendly interface that can meet a variety of data inquiries from researchers. For example, ligands can be searched for by name, molecular properties, structures, ligand activities and so on. Building on the reported data, the database also provides an online ligand design module that can predict ligand binding affinity in real time. PMID:23161677

  8. KLIFS: a knowledge-based structural database to navigate kinase-ligand interaction space.

    PubMed

    van Linden, Oscar P J; Kooistra, Albert J; Leurs, Rob; de Esch, Iwan J P; de Graaf, Chris

    2014-01-23

    Protein kinases regulate the majority of signal transduction pathways in cells and have become important targets for the development of designer drugs. We present a systematic analysis of kinase-ligand interactions in all regions of the catalytic cleft of all 1252 human kinase-ligand cocrystal structures present in the Protein Data Bank (PDB). The kinase-ligand interaction fingerprints and structure database (KLIFS) contains a consistent alignment of 85 kinase ligand binding site residues that enables the identification of family specific interaction features and classification of ligands according to their binding modes. We illustrate how systematic mining of kinase-ligand interaction space gives new insights into how conserved and selective kinase interaction hot spots can accommodate the large diversity of chemical scaffolds in kinase ligands. These analyses lead to an improved understanding of the structural requirements of kinase binding that will be useful in ligand discovery and design studies.

  9. Analysis of macromolecules, ligands and macromolecule-ligand complexes

    DOEpatents

    Von Dreele, Robert B.

    2008-12-23

    A method for determining atomic level structures of macromolecule-ligand complexes through high-resolution powder diffraction analysis and a method for providing suitable microcrystalline powder for diffraction analysis are provided. In one embodiment, powder diffraction data is collected from samples of polycrystalline macromolecule and macromolecule-ligand complex and the refined structure of the macromolecule is used as an approximate model for a combined Rietveld and stereochemical restraint refinement of the macromolecule-ligand complex. A difference Fourier map is calculated and the ligand position and points of interaction between the atoms of the macromolecule and the atoms of the ligand can be deduced and visualized. A suitable polycrystalline sample of macromolecule-ligand complex can be produced by physically agitating a mixture of lyophilized macromolecule, ligand and a solvent.

  10. Chlorophenylpiperazine analogues as high affinity dopamine transporter ligands.

    PubMed

    Motel, William C; Healy, Jason R; Viard, Eddy; Pouw, Buddy; Martin, Kelly E; Matsumoto, Rae R; Coop, Andrew

    2013-12-15

    Selective σ2 ligands continue to be an active target for medications to attenuate the effects of psychostimulants. In the course of our studies to determine the optimal substituents in the σ2-selective phenyl piperazines analogues with reduced activity at other neurotransmitter systems, we discovered that 1-(3-chlorophenyl)-4-phenethylpiperazine actually had preferentially increased affinity for dopamine transporters (DAT), yielding a highly selective DAT ligand. PMID:24211020

  11. Fluorescent and Lanthanide Labeling for Ligand Screens, Assays, and Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Josan, Jatinder S.; De Silva, Channa R.; Yoo, Byunghee; Lynch, Ronald M.; Pagel, Mark D.; Vagner, Josef; Hruby, Victor J.

    2012-01-01

    The use of fluorescent (or luminescent) and metal contrast agents in high-throughput screens, in vitro assays, and molecular imaging procedures has rapidly expanded in recent years. Here we describe the development and utility of high-affinity ligands for cancer theranostics and other in vitro screening studies. In this context, we also illustrate the syntheses and use of heteromultivalent ligands as targeted imaging agents. PMID:21318902

  12. Fluorescent ligands to investigate GPCR binding properties and oligomerization.

    PubMed

    Cottet, Martin; Faklaris, Orestis; Falco, Amadine; Trinquet, Eric; Pin, Jean-Philippe; Mouillac, Bernard; Durroux, Thierry

    2013-02-01

    Fluorescent ligands for GPCRs (G-protein-coupled receptors) have been synthesized for a long time but their use was usually restricted to receptor localization in the cell by fluorescent imaging microscopy. During the last two decades, the emergence of new fluorescence-based strategies and the concomitant development of fluorescent measurement apparatus have dramatically widened the use of fluorescent ligands. Among the various strategies, TR (time-resolved)-FRET (fluorescence resonance energy transfer) approaches exhibit an interesting potential to study GPCR interactions with various partners. We have derived various sets of ligands that target different GPCRs with fluorophores, which are compatible with TR-FRET strategies. Fluorescent ligands labelled either with a fluorescent donor (such as europium or terbium cryptate) or with a fluorescent acceptor (such as fluorescein, dy647 or Alexa Fluor® 647), for example, kept high affinities for their cognate receptors. These ligands turn out to be interesting tools to develop FRET-based binding assays. We also used these fluorescent ligands to analyse GPCR oligomerization by measuring FRET between ligands bound to receptor dimers. In contrast with FRET strategies, on the basis of receptor labelling, the ligand-based approach we developed is fully compatible with the study of wild-type receptors and therefore with receptors expressed in native tissues. Therefore, by using fluorescent analogues of oxytocin, we demonstrated the existence of oxytocin receptor dimers in the mammary gland of lactating rats.

  13. Inhibition of specific binding of okadaic acid to protein phosphatase 2A by microcystin-LR, calyculin-A and tautomycin: method of analysis of interactions of tight-binding ligands with target protein.

    PubMed Central

    Takai, A; Sasaki, K; Nagai, H; Mieskes, G; Isobe, M; Isono, K; Yasumoto, T

    1995-01-01

    Several groups have reported that okadaic acid (OA) and some other tight-binding protein phosphatase inhibitors including microcystin-LR (MCLR), calyculin-A and tautomycin prevent each other from binding to protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A). In this paper, we have introduced an improved procedure for examining to what extent the affinity of an enzyme for a labelled tight-binding ligand is reduced by binding of an unlabelled tight-binding, ligand to the enzyme. Using this procedure, we have analysed the dose-dependent reduction of PP2A binding of [24-3H]OA by addition of OA, MCLR, calyculin-A and tautomycin. The results indicate that the binding of the unlabelled inhibitors to the PP2A molecule causes a dramatic (10(6)-10(8)-fold) increase in the dissociation constant associated with the interaction of [24-3H]OA and PP2A. This suggests that OA and the other inhibitors bind to PP2A in a mutually exclusive manner. The protein phosphatase inhibitors may share the same binding site on the PP2A molecule. We have also measured values of the dissociation constant (Ki) for the interaction of these toxins with protein phosphatase 1 (PP1). For MCLR and calyculin-A, the ratio of the Ki value obtained for PP1 to that for PP2A was in the range 4-9, whereas it was 0.01-0.02 for tautomycin. The value of tautomycin is considerably smaller than that (0.4) calculated from previously reported Ki values. PMID:7702557

  14. Use of protein-engineered fabrics to identify design rules for integrin ligand clustering in biomaterials.

    PubMed

    Benitez, Patrick L; Mascharak, Shamik; Proctor, Amy C; Heilshorn, Sarah C

    2016-01-01

    able to effectively engage with their target ligands. Together, these two insights into the cellular responses to ligand clustering at the cell-matrix interface may serve as design principles when developing future generations of implantable biomaterials.

  15. Carbodiphosphoranes and Related Ligands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petz, Wolfgang; Frenking, Gernot

    The theoretical and experimental research on carbodiphosphoranes C(PR3)2 and related compounds CL2, both as free molecules and as ligands in transition metal complexes, is reviewed. Carbodiphosphoranes are examples of divalent carbon(0) compounds CL2 which have peculiar donor properties that are due to the fact that the central carbon atom has two lone electron pairs. The bonding situation is best described in terms of L→C←L donor acceptor interactions which distinguishes CL2 compounds (carbones) from divalent carbon(II) compounds (carbenes) through the number of lone electron pairs. The structures and stabilities of transition metal complexes with ligands CL2 can be understood and predictions can be made considering the double donor ability of the carbone compounds.

  16. Importance of the pharmacological profile of the bound ligand in enrichment on nuclear receptors: toward the use of experimentally validated decoy ligands.

    PubMed

    Lagarde, Nathalie; Zagury, Jean-François; Montes, Matthieu

    2014-10-27

    The evaluation of virtual ligand screening methods is of major importance to ensure their reliability. Taking into account the agonist/antagonist pharmacological profile should improve the quality of the benchmarking data sets since ligand binding can induce conformational changes in the nuclear receptor structure and such changes may vary according to the agonist/antagonist ligand profile. We indeed found that splitting the agonist and antagonist ligands into two separate data sets for a given nuclear receptor target significantly enhances the quality of the evaluation. The pharmacological profile of the ligand bound in the binding site of the target structure was also found to be an additional critical parameter. We also illustrate that active compound data sets for a given pharmacological activity can be used as a set of experimentally validated decoy ligands for another pharmacological activity to ensure a reliable and challenging evaluation of virtual screening methods.

  17. Ligand exclusion on acetylcholinesterase.

    PubMed

    Berman, H A; Leonard, K

    1990-11-27

    This paper examines covalent reactivity of AchE with respect to cationic and uncharged methylphosphonates and substrates in the absence and presence of cationic ligands selective for the active center and the peripheral anionic site. The organophosphorus inhibitors are enantiomeric alkyl methylphosphonothioates (1-5) containing cycloheptyl and isopropyl phosphono ester groups and S-methyl, S-n-pentyl, and S-[beta-(trimethylammonio)ethyl] leaving groups; these agents differ in their configuration about phosphorus and their steric, hydrophobic, and electrostatic characteristics. The synthetic substrates examined are acetylthiocholine, p-nitrophenyl acetate, and 7-acetoxy-4-methylcoumarin (7AMC). Antagonism of the methylphosphonothioate reaction by cationic ligands is strongly dependent on the nature of both the cation and the methylphosphonate but independent of the configuration about phosphorus. While all cations cause linear mixed inhibition of acetylthiocholine hydrolysis, there are observed a variety of inhibition patterns of 7AMC and p-nitrophenyl acetate hydrolysis that are distinctly nonlinear, as well as patterns in which the reciprocal plots intersect in the upper right quadrant. Strong antagonism of cationic (methylphosphonyl)thiocholines correlates very well with linear inhibition of acetylthiocholine. Ligands that cause only negligible antagonism of the uncharged methylphosphonates display nonlinear inhibition of uncharged substrates. These relationships, since they are most pronounced for peripheral site ligands and are strongly dependent on the charge carried by the reactant, suggest that the peripheral anionic site alters enzyme reactivity through an electrostatic interaction with the net negative active center. Such behavior indicates a potential role for the peripheral anionic site in conserving AchE catalytic efficiency within a narrow range of values. PMID:2271673

  18. EGF receptor ligands: recent advances

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Bhuminder; Carpenter, Graham; Coffey, Robert J.

    2016-01-01

    Seven ligands bind to and activate the mammalian epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor (EGFR/ERBB1/HER1): EGF, transforming growth factor-alpha (TGFA), heparin-binding EGF-like growth factor (HBEGF), betacellulin (BTC), amphiregulin (AREG), epiregulin (EREG), and epigen (EPGN). Of these, EGF, TGFA, HBEGF, and BTC are thought to be high-affinity ligands, whereas AREG, EREG, and EPGN constitute low-affinity ligands. This focused review is meant to highlight recent studies related to actions of the individual EGFR ligands, the interesting biology that has been uncovered, and relevant advances related to ligand interactions with the EGFR.

  19. EGF receptor ligands: recent advances.

    PubMed

    Singh, Bhuminder; Carpenter, Graham; Coffey, Robert J

    2016-01-01

    Seven ligands bind to and activate the mammalian epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor (EGFR/ERBB1/HER1): EGF, transforming growth factor-alpha (TGFA), heparin-binding EGF-like growth factor (HBEGF), betacellulin (BTC), amphiregulin (AREG), epiregulin (EREG), and epigen (EPGN). Of these, EGF, TGFA, HBEGF, and BTC are thought to be high-affinity ligands, whereas AREG, EREG, and EPGN constitute low-affinity ligands. This focused review is meant to highlight recent studies related to actions of the individual EGFR ligands, the interesting biology that has been uncovered, and relevant advances related to ligand interactions with the EGFR. PMID:27635238

  20. EGF receptor ligands: recent advances

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Bhuminder; Carpenter, Graham; Coffey, Robert J.

    2016-01-01

    Seven ligands bind to and activate the mammalian epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor (EGFR/ERBB1/HER1): EGF, transforming growth factor-alpha (TGFA), heparin-binding EGF-like growth factor (HBEGF), betacellulin (BTC), amphiregulin (AREG), epiregulin (EREG), and epigen (EPGN). Of these, EGF, TGFA, HBEGF, and BTC are thought to be high-affinity ligands, whereas AREG, EREG, and EPGN constitute low-affinity ligands. This focused review is meant to highlight recent studies related to actions of the individual EGFR ligands, the interesting biology that has been uncovered, and relevant advances related to ligand interactions with the EGFR. PMID:27635238

  1. Targeted sequencing identifies associations between IL7R-JAK mutations and epigenetic modulators in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Vicente, Carmen; Schwab, Claire; Broux, Michaël; Geerdens, Ellen; Degryse, Sandrine; Demeyer, Sofie; Lahortiga, Idoya; Elliott, Alannah; Chilton, Lucy; La Starza, Roberta; Mecucci, Cristina; Vandenberghe, Peter; Goulden, Nicholas; Vora, Ajay; Moorman, Anthony V.; Soulier, Jean; Harrison, Christine J.; Clappier, Emmanuelle; Cools, Jan

    2015-01-01

    T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia is caused by the accumulation of multiple oncogenic lesions, including chromosomal rearrangements and mutations. To determine the frequency and co-occurrence of mutations in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia, we performed targeted re-sequencing of 115 genes across 155 diagnostic samples (44 adult and 111 childhood cases). NOTCH1 and CDKN2A/B were mutated/deleted in more than half of the cases, while an additional 37 genes were mutated/deleted in 4% to 20% of cases. We found that IL7R-JAK pathway genes were mutated in 27.7% of cases, with JAK3 mutations being the most frequent event in this group. Copy number variations were also detected, including deletions of CREBBP or CTCF and duplication of MYB. FLT3 mutations were rare, but a novel extracellular mutation in FLT3 was detected and confirmed to be transforming. Furthermore, we identified complex patterns of pairwise associations, including a significant association between mutations in IL7R-JAK genes and epigenetic regulators (WT1, PRC2, PHF6). Our analyses showed that IL7R-JAK genetic lesions did not confer adverse prognosis in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia cases enrolled in the UK ALL2003 trial. Overall, these results identify interconnections between the T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia genome and disease biology, and suggest a potential clinical application for JAK inhibitors in a significant proportion of patients with T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia. PMID:26206799

  2. Encoding protein-ligand interaction patterns in fingerprints and graphs.

    PubMed

    Desaphy, Jérémy; Raimbaud, Eric; Ducrot, Pierre; Rognan, Didier

    2013-03-25

    We herewith present a novel and universal method to convert protein-ligand coordinates into a simple fingerprint of 210 integers registering the corresponding molecular interaction pattern. Each interaction (hydrophobic, aromatic, hydrogen bond, ionic bond, metal complexation) is detected on the fly and physically described by a pseudoatom centered either on the interacting ligand atom, the interacting protein atom, or the geometric center of both interacting atoms. Counting all possible triplets of interaction pseudoatoms within six distance ranges, and pruning the full integer vector to keep the most frequent triplets enables the definition of a simple (210 integers) and coordinate frame-invariant interaction pattern descriptor (TIFP) that can be applied to compare any pair of protein-ligand complexes. TIFP fingerprints have been calculated for ca. 10,000 druggable protein-ligand complexes therefore enabling a wide comparison of relationships between interaction pattern similarity and ligand or binding site pairwise similarity. We notably show that interaction pattern similarity strongly depends on binding site similarity. In addition to the TIFP fingerprint which registers intermolecular interactions between a ligand and its target protein, we developed two tools (Ishape, Grim) to align protein-ligand complexes from their interaction patterns. Ishape is based on the overlap of interaction pseudoatoms using a smooth Gaussian function, whereas Grim utilizes a standard clique detection algorithm to match interaction pattern graphs. Both tools are complementary and enable protein-ligand complex alignments capitalizing on both global and local pattern similarities. The new fingerprint and companion alignment tools have been successfully used in three scenarios: (i) interaction-biased alignment of protein-ligand complexes, (ii) postprocessing docking poses according to known interaction patterns for a particular target, and (iii) virtual screening for bioisosteric

  3. GPCR biased ligands as novel heart failure therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Violin, Jonathan D; Soergel, David G; Boerrigter, Guido; Burnett, John C; Lark, Michael W

    2013-10-01

    G protein-coupled receptors have been successfully targeted by numerous therapeutics including drugs that have transformed the management of cardiovascular disease. However, many GPCRs, when activated or blocked by drugs, elicit both beneficial and adverse pharmacology. Recent work has demonstrated that in some cases, the salutary and deleterious signals linked to a specific GPCR can be selectively targeted by "biased ligands" that entrain subsets of a receptor's normal pharmacology. This review briefly summarizes the advances and current state of the biased ligand field, focusing on an example: biased ligands targeting the angiotensin II type 1 receptor. These compounds exhibit unique pharmacology, distinct from classic agonists or antagonists, and one such molecule is now in clinical development for the treatment of acute heart failure.

  4. Regulation of G Protein-Coupled Receptors by Allosteric Ligands

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Topographically distinct, druggable, allosteric sites may be present on all G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). As such, targeting these sites with synthetic small molecules offers an attractive approach to develop receptor-subtype selective chemical leads for the development of novel therapies. A crucial part of drug development is to understand the acute and chronic effects of such allosteric modulators at their corresponding GPCR target. Key regulatory processes including cell-surface delivery, endocytosis, recycling, and down-regulation tightly control the number of receptors at the surface of the cell. As many GPCR therapeutics will be administered chronically, understanding how such ligands modulate these regulatory pathways forms an essential part of the characterization of novel GPCR ligands. This is true for both orthosteric and allosteric ligands. In this Review, we summarize our current understanding of GPCR regulatory processes with a particular focus on the effects and implications of allosteric targeting of GPCRs. PMID:23398684

  5. Discovery of GPCR ligands for probing signal transduction pathways

    PubMed Central

    Brogi, Simone; Tafi, Andrea; Désaubry, Laurent; Nebigil, Canan G.

    2014-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are seven integral transmembrane proteins that are the primary targets of almost 30% of approved drugs and continue to represent a major focus of pharmaceutical research. All of GPCR targeted medicines were discovered by classical medicinal chemistry approaches. After the first GPCR crystal structures were determined, the docking screens using these structures lead to discovery of more novel and potent ligands. There are over 360 pharmaceutically relevant GPCRs in the human genome and to date about only 30 of structures have been determined. For these reasons, computational techniques such as homology modeling and molecular dynamics simulations have proven their usefulness to explore the structure and function of GPCRs. Furthermore, structure-based drug design and in silico screening (High Throughput Docking) are still the most common computational procedures in GPCRs drug discovery. Moreover, ligand-based methods such as three-dimensional quantitative structure–selectivity relationships, are the ideal molecular modeling approaches to rationalize the activity of tested GPCR ligands and identify novel GPCR ligands. In this review, we discuss the most recent advances for the computational approaches to effectively guide selectivity and affinity of ligands. We also describe novel approaches in medicinal chemistry, such as the development of biased agonists, allosteric modulators, and bivalent ligands for class A GPCRs. Furthermore, we highlight some knockout mice models in discovering biased signaling selectivity. PMID:25506327

  6. Identification of Soft Matter Binding Peptide Ligands Using Phage Display.

    PubMed

    Günay, Kemal Arda; Klok, Harm-Anton

    2015-10-21

    Phage display is a powerful tool for the selection of highly affine, short peptide ligands. While originally primarily used for the identification of ligands to proteins, the scope of this technique has significantly expanded over the past two decades. Phage display nowadays is also increasingly applied to identify ligands that selectively bind with high affinity to a broad range of other substrates including natural and biological polymers as well as a variety of low-molecular-weight organic molecules. Such peptides are of interest for various reasons. The ability to selectively and with high affinity bind to the substrate of interest allows the conjugation or immobilization of, e.g., nanoparticles or biomolecules, or generally, facilitates interactions at materials interfaces. On the other hand, presentation of peptide ligands that selectively bind to low-molecular-weight organic materials is of interest for the development of sensor surfaces. The aim of this article is to highlight the opportunities provided by phage display for the identification of peptide ligands that bind to synthetic or natural polymer substrates or to small organic molecules. The article will first provide an overview of the different peptide ligands that have been identified by phage display that bind to these "soft matter" targets. The second part of the article will discuss the different characterization techniques that allow the determination of the affinity of the identified ligands to the respective substrates. PMID:26275106

  7. Biased ligands at G-protein-coupled receptors: promise and progress.

    PubMed

    Violin, Jonathan D; Crombie, Aimee L; Soergel, David G; Lark, Michael W

    2014-07-01

    Drug discovery targeting G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) is no longer limited to seeking agonists or antagonists to stimulate or block cellular responses associated with a particular receptor. GPCRs are now known to support a diversity of pharmacological profiles, a concept broadly referred to as functional selectivity. In particular, the concept of ligand bias, whereby a ligand stabilizes subsets of receptor conformations to engender novel pharmacological profiles, has recently gained increasing prominence. This review discusses how biased ligands may deliver safer, better tolerated, and more efficacious drugs, and highlights several biased ligands that are in clinical development. Biased ligands targeting the angiotensin II type 1 receptor and the μ opioid receptor illustrate the translation of the biased ligand concept from basic biology to clinical drug development.

  8. Biased ligands at G-protein-coupled receptors: promise and progress.

    PubMed

    Violin, Jonathan D; Crombie, Aimee L; Soergel, David G; Lark, Michael W

    2014-07-01

    Drug discovery targeting G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) is no longer limited to seeking agonists or antagonists to stimulate or block cellular responses associated with a particular receptor. GPCRs are now known to support a diversity of pharmacological profiles, a concept broadly referred to as functional selectivity. In particular, the concept of ligand bias, whereby a ligand stabilizes subsets of receptor conformations to engender novel pharmacological profiles, has recently gained increasing prominence. This review discusses how biased ligands may deliver safer, better tolerated, and more efficacious drugs, and highlights several biased ligands that are in clinical development. Biased ligands targeting the angiotensin II type 1 receptor and the μ opioid receptor illustrate the translation of the biased ligand concept from basic biology to clinical drug development. PMID:24878326

  9. Extending Iterative Protein Redesign and Optimization (IPRO) in Protein Library Design for Ligand Specificity

    PubMed Central

    Fazelinia, Hossein; Cirino, Patrick C.; Maranas, Costas D.

    2007-01-01

    In this article we extend the Iterative Protein Redesign and Optimization (IPRO) framework for the design of protein libraries with targeted ligand specificity. Mutations that minimize the binding energy with the desired ligand are identified. At the same time explicit constraints are introduced that maintain the binding energy for all decoy ligands above a threshold necessary for successful binding. The proposed framework is demonstrated by computationally altering the effector binding specificity of the bacterial transcriptional regulatory protein AraC, belonging to the AraC/XylS family of transcriptional regulators for different unnatural ligands. The obtained results demonstrate the importance of systematically suppressing the binding energy for competing ligands. Pinpointing a small set of mutations within the binding pocket greatly improves the difference in binding energies between targeted and decoy ligands, even when they are very similar. PMID:17208966

  10. Polycatenar Ligand Control of the Synthesis and Self-Assembly of Colloidal Nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Diroll, Benjamin T; Jishkariani, Davit; Cargnello, Matteo; Murray, Christopher B; Donnio, Bertrand

    2016-08-24

    Hydrophobic colloidal nanocrystals are typically synthesized and manipulated with commercially available ligands, and surface functionalization is therefore typically limited to a small number of molecules. Here, we report the use of polycatenar ligands derived from polyalkylbenzoates for the direct synthesis of metallic, chalcogenide, pnictide, and oxide nanocrystals. Polycatenar molecules, branched structures bearing diverging chains in which the terminal substitution pattern, functionality, and binding group can be independently modified, offer a modular platform for the development of ligands with targeted properties. Not only are these ligands used for the direct synthesis of monodisperse nanocrystals, but nanocrystals coated with polycatenar ligands self-assemble into softer bcc superlattices that deviate from conventional harder close-packed structures (fcc or hcp) formed by the same nanocrystals coated with commercial ligands. Self-assembly experiments demonstrate that the molecular structure of polycatenar ligands encodes interparticle spacings and attractions, engineering self-assembly, which is tunable from hard sphere to soft sphere behavior. PMID:27472457

  11. Ligand and receptor dynamics contribute to the mechanism of graded PPARγ agonism

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Travis S.; Chalmers, Michael J.; Novick, Scott; Kuruvilla, Dana S.; Chang, Mi Ra; Kamenecka, Theodore M.; Rance, Mark; Johnson, Bruce A.; Burris, Thomas P.; Griffin, Patrick R.; Kojetin, Douglas J.

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY Ligand binding to proteins is not a static process, but rather involves a number of complex dynamic transitions. A flexible ligand can change conformation upon binding its target. The conformation and dynamics of a protein can change to facilitate ligand binding. The conformation of the ligand, however, is generally presumed to have one primary binding mode, shifting the protein conformational ensemble from one state to another. We report solution NMR studies that reveal peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) modulators can sample multiple binding modes manifesting in multiple receptor conformations in slow conformational exchange. Our NMR, hydrogen/deuterium exchange and docking studies reveal that ligand-induced receptor stabilization and binding mode occupancy correlate with the graded agonist response of the ligand. Our results suggest that ligand and receptor dynamics affect the graded transcriptional output of PPARγ modulators. PMID:22244763

  12. Adenosine receptor ligands: differences with acute versus chronic treatment

    PubMed Central

    Jacobson, Kenneth A.; von Lubitz, Dag K. J. E.; Daly, John W.; Fredholm, Bertil B.

    2012-01-01

    Adenosine receptors have been the target of intense research with respect to potential use of selective ligands in a variety of therapeutic areas. Caffeine and theophylline are adenosine receptor antagonists, and over the past three decades a wide range of selective agonists and antagonists for adenosine receptor subtypes have been developed. A complication to the therapeutic use of adenosine receptor ligands is the observation that the effects of acute administration of a particular ligand can be diametrically opposite to the chronic effects of the same ligand. This ‘effect inversion’ is discussed here by Ken Jecobson and colleagues, and has been observed for effects on cognitive processes, seizures and ischaemic damage. PMID:8936347

  13. Pharmacophore-based discovery of ligands for drug transporters

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Cheng; Ekins, Sean; Bahadduri, Praveen; Swaan, Peter W.

    2006-01-01

    The ability to identify ligands for drug transporters is an important step in drug discovery and development. It can both improve accurate profiling of lead pharmacokinetic properties and assist in the discovery of new chemical entities targeting transporters. In silico approaches, especially pharmacophore-based database screening methods have great potential in improving the throughput of current transporter ligand identification assays, leading to a higher hit rate by focusing in vitro testing to the most promising hits. In this review, the potential of different in silico methods in transporter ligand identification studies are compared and summarized with an emphasis on pharmacophore modeling. Various implementations of pharmacophore model generation, database compilation and flexible screening algorithms are also introduced. Recent successful utilization of database searching with pharmacophores to identify novel ligands for the pharmaceutically significant transporters hPepT1, P-gp, BCRP, MRP1 and DAT are reviewed and challenges encountered with current approaches are discussed. PMID:17097188

  14. Murine germinal center B cells require functional Fms-like tyrosine kinase 3 signaling for IgG1 class-switch recombination

    PubMed Central

    Svensson, Mattias N. D.; Andersson, Karin M. E.; Wasén, Caroline; Nurkkala-Karlsson, Merja; Jonsson, Ing-Marie; Brisslert, Mikael; Bemark, Mats; Bokarewa, Maria I.

    2015-01-01

    Switched antibody classes are important for efficient immune responses. Aberrant antibody production to otherwise harmless antigens may result in autoimmunity. The protein kinase fms-like tyrosine kinase 3 receptor (Flt3) has an important role during early B-cell development, but the role of Flt3 in peripheral B cells has not been assessed before. Herein we describe a previously unappreciated role for Flt3 in IgG1 class-switch recombination (CSR) and production. We show that Flt3 is reexpressed on B-cell lymphoma 6+ germinal center B cells in vivo and following LPS activation of peripheral B cells in vitro. Absence of Flt3 signaling in Flt3 ligand-deficient mice results in impaired IgG1 CSR and accumulation of IgM-secreting plasma cells. On activated B cells, Flt3 is coexpressed and functions in synergy with the common-gamma chain receptor family. B cells from Flt3 ligand-deficient mice have impaired IL-4R signaling, with reduced phosphorylation of signal transducer and activator of transcription (Stat) 6, and demonstrate a failure to initiate CSR to IgG1 with low expression of γ1 germ-line transcripts, resulting in impaired IgG1 production. Thus, functional synergy between Flt3 and IL-4R signaling is critical for Stat-mediated regulation of sterile γ1 germ-line transcripts and CSR to IgG1. PMID:26627255

  15. Molecular and Cellular Mechanisms of Myelodysplastic Syndrome: Implications on Targeted Therapy.

    PubMed

    Gill, Harinder; Leung, Anskar Y H; Kwong, Yok-Lam

    2016-01-01

    Myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) is a group of heterogeneous clonal hematopoietic stem cell disorders characterized by cytopenia, ineffective hematopoiesis, and progression to secondary acute myeloid leukemia in high-risk cases. Conventional prognostication relies on clinicopathological parameters supplemented by cytogenetic information. However, recent studies have shown that genetic aberrations also have critical impacts on treatment outcome. Moreover, these genetic alterations may themselves be a target for treatment. The mutation landscape in MDS is shaped by gene aberrations involved in DNA methylation (TET2, DNMT3A, IDH1/2), histone modification (ASXL1, EZH2), the RNA splicing machinery (SF3B1, SRSF2, ZRSR2, U2AF1/2), transcription (RUNX1, TP53, BCOR, PHF6, NCOR, CEBPA, GATA2), tyrosine kinase receptor signaling (JAK2, MPL, FLT3, GNAS, KIT), RAS pathways (KRAS, NRAS, CBL, NF1, PTPN11), DNA repair (ATM, BRCC3, DLRE1C, FANCL), and cohesion complexes (STAG2, CTCF, SMC1A, RAD21). A detailed understanding of the pathogenetic mechanisms leading to transformation is critical for designing single-agent or combinatorial approaches in target therapy of MDS.

  16. Molecular and Cellular Mechanisms of Myelodysplastic Syndrome: Implications on Targeted Therapy.

    PubMed

    Gill, Harinder; Leung, Anskar Y H; Kwong, Yok-Lam

    2016-01-01

    Myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) is a group of heterogeneous clonal hematopoietic stem cell disorders characterized by cytopenia, ineffective hematopoiesis, and progression to secondary acute myeloid leukemia in high-risk cases. Conventional prognostication relies on clinicopathological parameters supplemented by cytogenetic information. However, recent studies have shown that genetic aberrations also have critical impacts on treatment outcome. Moreover, these genetic alterations may themselves be a target for treatment. The mutation landscape in MDS is shaped by gene aberrations involved in DNA methylation (TET2, DNMT3A, IDH1/2), histone modification (ASXL1, EZH2), the RNA splicing machinery (SF3B1, SRSF2, ZRSR2, U2AF1/2), transcription (RUNX1, TP53, BCOR, PHF6, NCOR, CEBPA, GATA2), tyrosine kinase receptor signaling (JAK2, MPL, FLT3, GNAS, KIT), RAS pathways (KRAS, NRAS, CBL, NF1, PTPN11), DNA repair (ATM, BRCC3, DLRE1C, FANCL), and cohesion complexes (STAG2, CTCF, SMC1A, RAD21). A detailed understanding of the pathogenetic mechanisms leading to transformation is critical for designing single-agent or combinatorial approaches in target therapy of MDS. PMID:27023522

  17. Molecular and Cellular Mechanisms of Myelodysplastic Syndrome: Implications on Targeted Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Gill, Harinder; Leung, Anskar Y. H.; Kwong, Yok-Lam

    2016-01-01

    Myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) is a group of heterogeneous clonal hematopoietic stem cell disorders characterized by cytopenia, ineffective hematopoiesis, and progression to secondary acute myeloid leukemia in high-risk cases. Conventional prognostication relies on clinicopathological parameters supplemented by cytogenetic information. However, recent studies have shown that genetic aberrations also have critical impacts on treatment outcome. Moreover, these genetic alterations may themselves be a target for treatment. The mutation landscape in MDS is shaped by gene aberrations involved in DNA methylation (TET2, DNMT3A, IDH1/2), histone modification (ASXL1, EZH2), the RNA splicing machinery (SF3B1, SRSF2, ZRSR2, U2AF1/2), transcription (RUNX1, TP53, BCOR, PHF6, NCOR, CEBPA, GATA2), tyrosine kinase receptor signaling (JAK2, MPL, FLT3, GNAS, KIT), RAS pathways (KRAS, NRAS, CBL, NF1, PTPN11), DNA repair (ATM, BRCC3, DLRE1C, FANCL), and cohesion complexes (STAG2, CTCF, SMC1A, RAD21). A detailed understanding of the pathogenetic mechanisms leading to transformation is critical for designing single-agent or combinatorial approaches in target therapy of MDS. PMID:27023522

  18. BEX1 acts as a tumor suppressor in acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Lindblad, Oscar; Li, Tianfeng; Su, Xianwei; Sun, Jianmin; Kabir, Nuzhat N; Levander, Fredrik; Zhao, Hui; Lu, Gang; Rönnstrand, Lars; Kazi, Julhash U

    2015-08-28

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a heterogeneous disease of the myeloid lineage. About 35% of AML patients carry an oncogenic FLT3 mutant making FLT3 an attractive target for treatment of AML. Major problems in the development of FLT3 inhibitors include lack of specificity, poor response and development of a resistant phenotype upon treatment. Further understanding of FLT3 signaling and discovery of novel regulators will therefore help to determine additional pharmacological targets in FLT3-driven AML. In this report, we identified BEX1 as a novel regulator of oncogenic FLT3-ITD-driven AML. We showed that BEX1 expression was down-regulated in a group of AML patients carrying FLT3-ITD. Loss of BEX1 expression resulted in poor overall survival (hazard ratio, HR = 2.242, p = 0.0011). Overexpression of BEX1 in mouse pro-B and myeloid cells resulted in decreased FLT3-ITD-dependent cell proliferation, colony and tumor formation, and in increased apoptosis in vitro and in vivo. BEX1 localized to the cytosolic compartment of cells and significantly decreased FLT3-ITD-induced AKT phosphorylation without affecting ERK1/2 or STAT5 phosphorylation. Our data suggest that the loss of BEX1 expression in FLT3-ITD driven AML potentiates oncogenic signaling and leads to decreased overall survival of the patients. PMID:26046670

  19. Bifunctional DTPA-type ligand

    SciTech Connect

    Gansow, O.A.; Brechbiel, M.W.

    1990-03-26

    The subject matter of the invention relates to bifunctional cyclohexyl DTPA ligands and methods of using these compounds. Specifically, such ligands are useful for radiolabeling proteins with radioactive metals, and can consequently be utilized with respect to radioimmunoimaging and/or radioimmunotherapy.

  20. Fms-related tyrosine kinase 3 ligand promotes proliferation of placenta amnion and chorion mesenchymal stem cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Li, Fang; Xu, Yunyun; Xu, Xiaoxia; Xu, Biao; Zhao, Juan; Zhang, Xueguang

    2014-07-01

    Placental mesenchymal stem cells (PMSCs) have important biological properties and the potential for application in numerous clinical fields, including hematopoietic stem cell transplantation and myocardial repair. There are two types of MSCs in the placenta, amniotic mesenchymal stem cells (AMSCs) and chorion mesenchymal stem cells (CMSCs). By comparing the biological characteristics of human placental AMSCs with CMSCs, the present study identified that CD90‑ and CD166‑positive cells were located in the amniotic stroma and chorion stroma surrounding the vessels. In addition, the cultured AMSCs and CMSCs expressed high levels of CD73, CD90, CD105, CD29 and CD44; however they did not express CD14, CD34, CD45 and HLA-DR. Furthermore, the amplification of the fms-related tyrosine kinase 3 ligand (FL) in AMSCs and CMSCs was investigated in vitro. The results demonstrated that FL is able to promote the proliferation of AMSCs and CMSCs effectively in vitro, particularly that of CMSCs. In the FL group, the phenotype and the ability of AMSCs and CMSCs to differentiate into mesenchymal lineages did not change. Flt3, the receptor of FL, is expressed in AMSCs and CMSCs. In conclusion, mesenchymal stem cells with low immunogenicity were identified in the placental amniotic membrane and around the chorion axis. Furthermore, FL has a positive effect on the proliferation of AMSCs and CMSCs in vitro; however, does not affect their differentiation potential. It is particularly promising that FL is able to stimulate CMSCs to proliferate in vitro.

  1. Ligand Pose and Orientational Sampling in Molecular Docking

    PubMed Central

    Coleman, Ryan G.; Carchia, Michael; Sterling, Teague; Irwin, John J.; Shoichet, Brian K.

    2013-01-01

    Molecular docking remains an important tool for structure-based screening to find new ligands and chemical probes. As docking ambitions grow to include new scoring function terms, and to address ever more targets, the reliability and extendability of the orientation sampling, and the throughput of the method, become pressing. Here we explore sampling techniques that eliminate stochastic behavior in DOCK3.6, allowing us to optimize the method for regularly variable sampling of orientations. This also enabled a focused effort to optimize the code for efficiency, with a three-fold increase in the speed of the program. This, in turn, facilitated extensive testing of the method on the 102 targets, 22,805 ligands and 1,411,214 decoys of the Directory of Useful Decoys - Enhanced (DUD-E) benchmarking set, at multiple levels of sampling. Encouragingly, we observe that as sampling increases from 50 to 500 to 2000 to 5000 to 20000 molecular orientations in the binding site (and so from about 1×1010 to 4×1010 to 1×1011 to 2×1011 to 5×1011 mean atoms scored per target, since multiple conformations are sampled per orientation), the enrichment of ligands over decoys monotonically increases for most DUD-E targets. Meanwhile, including internal electrostatics in the evaluation ligand conformational energies, and restricting aromatic hydroxyls to low energy rotamers, further improved enrichment values. Several of the strategies used here to improve the efficiency of the code are broadly applicable in the field. PMID:24098414

  2. NXS2 murine neuroblastomas express increased levels of MHC class I antigens upon recurrence following NK-dependent immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Neal, Zane C; Imboden, Michael; Rakhmilevich, Alexander L; Kim, Kyung-Mann; Hank, Jacquelyn A; Surfus, Jean; Dixon, John R; Lode, Holger N; Reisfeld, Ralph A; Gillies, Stephen D; Sondel, Paul M

    2004-01-01

    We evaluated recurrent NXS2 neuroblastoma tumors that developed following NK- or T-cell-mediated immunotherapy in tumor-bearing mice. Recurrent tumors developed following an NK-dependent antitumor response using a suboptimal dose of hu14.18-IL2, a humanized IL-2 immunocytokine targeted to the GD(2)-ganglioside. This treatment initially induced complete resolution of measurable tumor in the majority of mice, followed, however, by delayed tumor recurrence in some mice. These recurrent NXS2 tumors revealed markedly enhanced (> fivefold) MHC class I antigen expression when compared with NXS2 tumors growing in PBS-treated control mice. A similar level of enhanced MHC class I antigen-expression could be induced on NXS2 cells in vitro by culturing with interferon gamma, and was associated with reduced susceptibility to both NK-cell-mediated tumor cell lysis and antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity in vitro. In contrast, Flt3-ligand treatment of NXS2-bearing mice induced a protective T-cell-dependent antitumor memory response. Recurrent NXS2 tumors that developed following Flt3-L therapy revealed a decreased expression of MHC class I antigens. While NXS2 tumors are susceptible to in vivo destruction following either hu14.18-IL2 or Flt3-ligand immunotherapies, these results suggest that some tumor cells may be selected to survive and progress by expressing either higher or lower levels of MHC class I antigen in order to resist either NK- or T-cell-mediated antitumor responses, respectively.

  3. Lyar Is a New Ligand for Retinal Pigment Epithelial Phagocytosis.

    PubMed

    Guo, Feiye; Ding, Ying; Caberoy, Nora B; Alvarado, Gabriela; Liu, Robert; Shen, Chen; Yu, Jisu; Zhou, Yixiong; Salero, Enrique; LeBlanc, Michelle E; Wang, Weiwen; Li, Wei

    2015-10-01

    Phagocytosis is critical to tissue homeostasis, as highlighted by phagocytosis defect of retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells with debris accumulation, photoreceptor degeneration and blindness. Phagocytosis ligands are the key to delineating molecular mechanisms and functional roles of phagocytes, but are traditionally identified in individual cases with technical challenges. We recently developed open reading frame phage display (OPD) for phagocytosis-based functional cloning (PFC) to identify unknown ligands. One of the identified ligands was Ly-1 antibody reactive clone (Lyar) with functions poorly defined. Herein, we characterized Lyar as a new ligand to stimulate RPE phagocytosis. In contrast to its reported nucleolar expression, immunohistochemistry showed that Lyar was highly expressed in photoreceptor outer segments (POSs) of the retina. Cytoplasmic Lyar was released from apoptotic cells, and selectively bound to shed POSs and apoptotic cells, but not healthy cells. POS vesicles engulfed through Lyar-dependent pathway were targeted to phagosomes and colocalized with phagosome marker Rab7. These results suggest that Lyar is a genuine RPE phagocytosis ligand, which in turn supports the validity of OPD/PFC as the only available approach for unbiased identification of phagocytosis ligands with broad applicability to various phagocytes.

  4. KLIFS: a structural kinase-ligand interaction database

    PubMed Central

    Kooistra, Albert J.; Kanev, Georgi K.; van Linden, Oscar P.J.; Leurs, Rob; de Esch, Iwan J.P.; de Graaf, Chris

    2016-01-01

    Protein kinases play a crucial role in cell signaling and are important drug targets in several therapeutic areas. The KLIFS database contains detailed structural kinase-ligand interaction information derived from all (>2900) structures of catalytic domains of human and mouse protein kinases deposited in the Protein Data Bank in order to provide insights into the structural determinants of kinase-ligand binding and selectivity. The kinase structures have been processed in a consistent manner by systematically analyzing the structural features and molecular interaction fingerprints (IFPs) of a predefined set of 85 binding site residues with bound ligands. KLIFS has been completely rebuilt and extended (>65% more structures) since its first release as a data set, including: novel automated annotation methods for (i) the assessment of ligand-targeted subpockets and the analysis of (ii) DFG and (iii) αC-helix conformations; improved and automated protocols for (iv) the generation of sequence/structure alignments, (v) the curation of ligand atom and bond typing for accurate IFP analysis and (vi) weekly database updates. KLIFS is now accessible via a website (http://klifs.vu-compmedchem.nl) that provides a comprehensive visual presentation of different types of chemical, biological and structural chemogenomics data, and allows the user to easily access, compare, search and download the data. PMID:26496949

  5. Separation and purification of bovine serum albumin binders from Fructus polygoni orientalis using off-line two-dimensional complexation high-speed counter-current chromatography target-guided by ligand fishing.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qi; Shi, Shuyun; Liu, Liangliang; Yang, Hua; Su, Wen; Chen, Xiaoqing

    2013-08-23

    In this study, off-line two-dimensional (2D) complexation high speed counter-current chromatography (HSCCC) was developed for the separation of bovine serum albumin (BSA) binders from the ethyl acetate extract of Fructus polygoni orientalis. Target-guided strategy of BSA functionalized iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles coupled with high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry ((BSA-Fe3O4 MNPs)-HPLC-MS/MS) experiment was proposed. In the orthogonal separation system, a Normal-Phase HSCCC with 0.01mol/L copper ion as complexation agent in the aqueous phase was employed for the first dimension and Recycling HSCCC, Reverse-Phase HSCCC with 0.1mol/L copper ion were used for the second dimension in parallel. Including two pairs of cis-trans isomers, seven BSA binders including 3,5,7-Trihydroxychromone (1), taxifolin (2), N-cis-paprazine (3), N-cis-feruloyltyramine (4), N-trans-paprazine (5), N-trans-feruloyltyramine (6) and an unidentified compound (7) were obtained. The purities of these seven compounds were all over 95.0% as determined by HPLC. The complexation HSCCC behaviors of seven compounds were also investigated by studying their relationship with copper ion. Results showed that the combinative method using (BSA-Fe3O4 MNPs)-HPLC and HSCCC is a quick, efficient, and reproductive technique to isolate potentially bioactive compounds from the complex mixture system of natural products. And the usage of off-line 2D-HSCCC and introduction of chelating metal ion into solvent system are effective ways to implement HSCCC separations in complex samples.

  6. Free Energy Calculations of Mutations Involving a Tightly Bound Water Molecule and Ligand Substitutions in a Ligand-Protein Complex.

    PubMed

    García-Sosa, Alfonso T; Mancera, Ricardo L

    2010-09-17

    The accurate calculation of the free energy of interaction of protein-water-ligand systems has an important role in molecular recognition and drug design that is often not fully considered. We report free energy thermodynamic integration calculations used to evaluate the effects of inclusion, neglect, and targeting and removal (i.e., systematic substitution by ligand functional groups) of an important, tightly bound, water molecule in the SH3 domain of Abl tyrosine kinase. The effects of this water molecule on the free energies of interaction of several Abl-SH3 domain-ligand systems reveal that there is an unfavourable free energy change associated with its removal into the bulk solvent. Only three substitutions by an additional functional group (out of methyl, ethyl, hydroxyl, amino, and amide groups) in the phenyl ring of a tyrosine in the peptide ligand resulted in a favourable change in the free energy of binding upon replacement of the ordered water molecule. This computational approach provides a direct route to the systematic and rigorous prediction of the thermodynamic influence of ordered, structural water molecules on ligand modification and optimization in drug design by calculating free energy changes in protein-water-ligand systems. PMID:27463454

  7. Identification of inhibitors against the potential ligandable sites in the active cholera toxin.

    PubMed

    Gangopadhyay, Aditi; Datta, Abhijit

    2015-04-01

    The active cholera toxin responsible for the massive loss of water and ions in cholera patients via its ADP ribosylation activity is a heterodimer of the A1 subunit of the bacterial holotoxin and the human cytosolic ARF6 (ADP Ribosylation Factor 6). The active toxin is a potential target for the design of inhibitors against cholera. In this study we identified the potential ligandable sites of the active cholera toxin which can serve as binding sites for drug-like molecules. By employing an energy-based approach to identify ligand binding sites, and comparison with the results of computational solvent mapping, we identified two potential ligandable sites in the active toxin which can be targeted during structure-based drug design against cholera. Based on the probe affinities of the identified ligandable regions, docking-based virtual screening was employed to identify probable inhibitors against these sites. Several indole-based alkaloids and phosphates showed strong interactions to the important residues of the ligandable region at the A1 active site. On the other hand, 26 top scoring hits were identified against the ligandable region at the A1 ARF6 interface which showed strong hydrogen bonding interactions, including guanidines, phosphates, Leucopterin and Aristolochic acid VIa. This study has important implications in the application of hybrid structure-based and ligand-based methods against the identified ligandable sites using the identified inhibitors as reference ligands, for drug design against the active cholera toxin.

  8. Genetic alterations in endometrial cancer by targeted next-generation sequencing.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ya-Sian; Huang, Hsien-Da; Yeh, Kun-Tu; Chang, Jan-Gowth

    2016-02-01

    Many genetic factors play important roles in the development of endometrial cancer. The aim of this study was to investigate genetic alterations in the Taiwanese population with endometrial cancer. DNA was extracted from 10 cases of fresh-frozen endometrial cancer tissue. The exomes of cancer-related genes were captured using the NimbleGen Comprehensive Cancer Panel (578 cancer-related genes) and sequenced using the Illumina Genomic Sequencing Platform. Our results revealed 120 variants in 99 genes, 21 of which were included in the Oncomine Cancer Research Panel used in the National Cancer Institute Match Trial. The 21 genes comprised 8 tumor suppressor candidates (ATM, MSH2, PIK3R1, PTCH1, PTEN, TET2, TP53, and TSC1) and 13 oncogene candidates (ALK, BCL9, CTNNB1, ERBB2, FGFR2, FLT3, HNF1A, KIT, MTOR, PDGFRA, PPP2R1A, PTPN11, and SF3B1). We identified a high frequency of mutations in PTEN (50%) and genes involved in the endometrial cancer-related molecular pathway, which involves the IL-7 signaling pathway (PIK3R1, n=1; AKT2, n=1; FOXO1, n=1). We report the mutational landscape of endometrial cancer in the Taiwanese population. We believe that this study will shed new light on fundamental aspects for understanding the molecular pathogenesis of endometrial cancer and may aid in the development of new targeted therapies. PMID:26626801

  9. Galaxy7TM: flexible GPCR-ligand docking by structure refinement.

    PubMed

    Lee, Gyu Rie; Seok, Chaok

    2016-07-01

    G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) play important physiological roles related to signal transduction and form a major group of drug targets. Prediction of GPCR-ligand complex structures has therefore important implications to drug discovery. With previously available servers, it was only possible to first predict GPCR structures by homology modeling and then perform ligand docking on the model structures. However, model structures generated without explicit consideration of specific ligands of interest can be inaccurate because GPCR structures can be affected by ligand binding. The Galaxy7TM server, freely accessible at http://galaxy.seoklab.org/7TM, improves an input GPCR structure by simultaneous ligand docking and flexible structure refinement using GALAXY methods. The server shows better performance in both ligand docking and GPCR structure refinement than commonly used programs AutoDock Vina and Rosetta MPrelax, respectively. PMID:27131365

  10. Galaxy7TM: flexible GPCR–ligand docking by structure refinement

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Gyu Rie; Seok, Chaok

    2016-01-01

    G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) play important physiological roles related to signal transduction and form a major group of drug targets. Prediction of GPCR–ligand complex structures has therefore important implications to drug discovery. With previously available servers, it was only possible to first predict GPCR structures by homology modeling and then perform ligand docking on the model structures. However, model structures generated without explicit consideration of specific ligands of interest can be inaccurate because GPCR structures can be affected by ligand binding. The Galaxy7TM server, freely accessible at http://galaxy.seoklab.org/7TM, improves an input GPCR structure by simultaneous ligand docking and flexible structure refinement using GALAXY methods. The server shows better performance in both ligand docking and GPCR structure refinement than commonly used programs AutoDock Vina and Rosetta MPrelax, respectively. PMID:27131365

  11. Discovery of Potent Dual PPARα Agonists/CB1 Ligands

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    This letter describes the synthesis and in vitro and in vivo evaluation of dual ligands targeting the cannabinoid and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPAR). These compounds were obtained from fusing the pharmacophores of fibrates and the diarylpyrazole rimonabant, a cannabinoid receptor antagonist. They are the first examples of dual compounds with nanomolar affinity for both PPARα and cannabinoid receptors. Besides, lead compound 2 proved to be CB1 selective. Unexpectedly, the phenol intermediates tested were equipotent (compound 1 as compared to 2) or even more potent (compound 3 as compared with 4). This discovery opens the way to design new dual ligands. PMID:24936232

  12. Discovery of Potent Dual PPARα Agonists/CB1 Ligands.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Fernández, Ruth; Fresno, Nieves; Macías-González, Manuel; Elguero, José; Decara, Juan; Girón, Rocío; Rodríguez-Álvarez, Ana; Martín, María Isabel; Rodríguez de Fonseca, Fernando; Goya, Pilar

    2011-11-10

    This letter describes the synthesis and in vitro and in vivo evaluation of dual ligands targeting the cannabinoid and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPAR). These compounds were obtained from fusing the pharmacophores of fibrates and the diarylpyrazole rimonabant, a cannabinoid receptor antagonist. They are the first examples of dual compounds with nanomolar affinity for both PPARα and cannabinoid receptors. Besides, lead compound 2 proved to be CB1 selective. Unexpectedly, the phenol intermediates tested were equipotent (compound 1 as compared to 2) or even more potent (compound 3 as compared with 4). This discovery opens the way to design new dual ligands. PMID:24936232

  13. Discovery of Potent Dual PPARα Agonists/CB1 Ligands.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Fernández, Ruth; Fresno, Nieves; Macías-González, Manuel; Elguero, José; Decara, Juan; Girón, Rocío; Rodríguez-Álvarez, Ana; Martín, María Isabel; Rodríguez de Fonseca, Fernando; Goya, Pilar

    2011-11-10

    This letter describes the synthesis and in vitro and in vivo evaluation of dual ligands targeting the cannabinoid and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPAR). These compounds were obtained from fusing the pharmacophores of fibrates and the diarylpyrazole rimonabant, a cannabinoid receptor antagonist. They are the first examples of dual compounds with nanomolar affinity for both PPARα and cannabinoid receptors. Besides, lead compound 2 proved to be CB1 selective. Unexpectedly, the phenol intermediates tested were equipotent (compound 1 as compared to 2) or even more potent (compound 3 as compared with 4). This discovery opens the way to design new dual ligands.

  14. CHEMICAL GENETICS: LIGAND-BASED DISCOVERY OF GENE FUNCTION

    PubMed Central

    Stockwell, Brent R.

    2011-01-01

    Chemical genetics is the study of gene-product function in a cellular or organismal context using exogenous ligands. In this approach, small molecules that bind directly to proteins are used to alter protein function, enabling a kinetic analysis of the in vivo consequences of these changes. Recent advances have strongly enhanced the power of exogenous ligands such that they can resemble genetic mutations in terms of their general applicability and target specificity. The growing sophistication of this approach raises the possibility of its application to any biological process. PMID:11253651

  15. The incorporation of protein flexibility and conformational energy penalties in docking screens to improve ligand discovery

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Marcus; Coleman, Ryan G.; Fraser, James S.; Shoichet, Brian K.

    2014-01-01

    Proteins fluctuate between alternative conformations, which presents a challenge for ligand discovery because such flexibility is difficult to treat computationally owing to problems with conformational sampling and energy weighting. Here, we describe a flexible-docking method that samples and weights protein conformations using experimentally-derived conformations as a guide. The crystallographically refined occupancies of these conformations, which are observable in an apo receptor structure, define energy penalties for docking. In a large prospective library screen, we identified new ligands that target specific receptor conformations of a cavity in Cytochrome c Peroxidase, and we confirm both ligand pose and associated receptor conformation predictions by crystallography. The inclusion of receptor flexibility led to ligands with new chemotypes and physical properties. By exploiting experimental measures of loop and side chain flexibility, this method can be extended to the discovery of new ligands for hundreds of targets in the Protein Data Bank where similar experimental information is available. PMID:24950326

  16. Ligand Identification Scoring Algorithm (LISA)

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Zheng; Merz, Kenneth M.

    2011-01-01

    A central problem in de novo drug design is determining the binding affinity of a ligand with a receptor. A new scoring algorithm is presented that estimates the binding affinity of a protein-ligand complex given a three-dimensional structure. The method, LISA (Ligand Identification Scoring Algorithm), uses an empirical scoring function to describe the binding free energy. Interaction terms have been designed to account for van der Waals (VDW) contacts, hydrogen bonding, desolvation effects and metal chelation to model the dissociation equilibrium constants using a linear model. Atom types have been introduced to differentiate the parameters for VDW, H-bonding interactions and metal chelation between different atom pairs. A training set of 492 protein-ligand complexes was selected for the fitting process. Different test sets have been examined to evaluate its ability to predict experimentally measured binding affinities. By comparing with other well known scoring functions, the results show that LISA has advantages over many existing scoring functions in simulating protein-ligand binding affinity, especially metalloprotein-ligand binding affinity. Artificial Neural Network (ANN) was also used in order to demonstrate that the energy terms in LISA are well designed and do not require extra cross terms. PMID:21561101

  17. Lipid Homeostasis and Ligands for Liver X Receptors: Identification and Characterization.

    PubMed

    Lobaccaro, Jean-Marc A; Beaudoin, Claude; Bayala, Bagora; Baron, Silvère; Trousson, Amalia

    2016-01-01

    Screening of bona fide ligands for nuclear receptors is a real tour de force as the identified molecules are supposed to be able to activate the targeted proteins in cell culture as well as in vivo. Indeed orphan nuclear receptors are putative pharmacologically targets for various diseases. It is thus necessary to have quick and reproductive systems that help in identifying new ligands, agonist or antagonist, before using them in vivo in animal models to check for secondary effects. Here, we describe the transient transfections (homologous and heterologous) used for the screening of ligands for liver X receptor α (LXRα, NR1H3) in HeLa cells. PMID:27246331

  18. A structural chemogenomics analysis of aminergic GPCRs: lessons for histamine receptor ligand design

    PubMed Central

    Kooistra, A J; Kuhne, S; de Esch, I J P; Leurs, R; de Graaf, C

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose Chemogenomics focuses on the discovery of new connections between chemical and biological space leading to the discovery of new protein targets and biologically active molecules. G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) are a particularly interesting protein family for chemogenomics studies because there is an overwhelming amount of ligand binding affinity data available. The increasing number of aminergic GPCR crystal structures now for the first time allows the integration of chemogenomics studies with high-resolution structural analyses of GPCR-ligand complexes. Experimental Approach In this study, we have combined ligand affinity data, receptor mutagenesis studies, and amino acid sequence analyses to high-resolution structural analyses of (hist)aminergic GPCR-ligand interactions. This integrated structural chemogenomics analysis is used to more accurately describe the molecular and structural determinants of ligand affinity and selectivity in different key binding regions of the crystallized aminergic GPCRs, and histamine receptors in particular. Key Results Our investigations highlight interesting correlations and differences between ligand similarity and ligand binding site similarity of different aminergic receptors. Apparent discrepancies can be explained by combining detailed analysis of crystallized or predicted protein-ligand binding modes, receptor mutation studies, and ligand structure-selectivity relationships that identify local differences in essential pharmacophore features in the ligand binding sites of different receptors. Conclusions and Implications We have performed structural chemogenomics studies that identify links between (hist)aminergic receptor ligands and their binding sites and binding modes. This knowledge can be used to identify structure-selectivity relationships that increase our understanding of ligand binding to (hist)aminergic receptors and hence can be used in future GPCR ligand discovery and design. Linked

  19. Advances Towards The Discovery of GPR55 Ligands.

    PubMed

    Morales, Paula; Jagerovic, Nadine

    2016-01-01

    The G-protein-coupled receptor 55 (GPR55) was identified in 1999. It was proposed as a novel member of the endocannabinoid system due to the fact that some endogenous, plant-derived and synthetic cannabinoid ligands act on GPR55. However, the complexity of the cellular downstream signaling pathways related to GPR55 activation delayed the discovery of selective GPR55 ligands. It was only a few years ago that the high throughput screening of libraries of pharmaceutical companies and governmental organizations allowed to identify selective GPR55 agonists and antagonists. Since then, several GPR55 modulator scaffolds have been reported. The relevance of GPR55 has been explored in diverse physiological and pathological processes revealing its role in inflammation, neuropathic pain, bone physiology, diabetes and cancer. Considering GPR55 as a new promising therapeutic target, there is a clear need for new selective and potent GPR55 modulators. This review will address a current structural update of GPR55 ligands.

  20. Nicotinic acetylcholine receptor ligands; a patent review (2006-2011)

    PubMed Central

    Gündisch, Daniela; Eibl, Christoph

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs), pentameric ligand-gated cation channels, are potential targets for the development of therapeutics for a variety of disease states. Areas covered This article is reviewing recent advances in the development of small molecule ligands for diverse nAChR subtypes and is a continuation of an earlier review in this journal. Expert opinion The development of nAChR ligands with preference for α4β2 or α7 subtypes for the treatment of CNS disorders are in the most advanced developmental stage. In addition, there is a fast growing interest to generate so-called PAMs, positive allosteric modulators, to influence the channels’ functionalities. PMID:22098319

  1. Heterobifunctional PEG Ligands for Bioconjugation Reactions on Iron Oxide Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Bloemen, Maarten; Van Stappen, Thomas; Willot, Pieter; Lammertyn, Jeroen; Koeckelberghs, Guy; Geukens, Nick; Gils, Ann; Verbiest, Thierry

    2014-01-01

    Ever since iron oxide nanoparticles have been recognized as promising scaffolds for biomedical applications, their surface functionalization has become even more important. We report the synthesis of a novel polyethylene glycol-based ligand that combines multiple advantageous properties for these applications. The ligand is covalently bound to the surface via a siloxane group, while its polyethylene glycol backbone significantly improves the colloidal stability of the particle in complex environments. End-capping the molecule with a carboxylic acid introduces a variety of coupling chemistry possibilities. In this study an antibody targeting plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 was coupled to the surface and its presence and binding activity was assessed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and surface plasmon resonance experiments. The results indicate that the ligand has high potential towards biomedical applications where colloidal stability and advanced functionality is crucial. PMID:25275378

  2. Small-molecule microarrays as tools in ligand discovery

    PubMed Central

    Vegas, Arturo J.; Fuller, Jason H.; Koehler, Angela N.

    2009-01-01

    Small molecules that bind and modulate specific protein targets are increasingly used as tools to decipher protein function in a cellular context. Identifying specific small-molecule probes for each protein in the proteome will require miniaturized assays that permit screening large collections of compounds against large numbers of proteins in a highly parallel fashion. Simple and general binding assays involving small-molecule microarrays can be used to identify probes for nearly any protein in the proteome. The assay may be used to identify ligands for proteins in the absence of knowledge about structure or function. In this tutorial review, we introduce small-molecule microarrays (SMMs) as tools for ligand discovery; discuss methods for manufacturing SMMs, including both non-covalent and covalent attachment strategies; and provide examples of ligand discovery involving SMMs. PMID:18568164

  3. Activation of Neuropeptide FF Receptors by Kisspeptin Receptor Ligands.

    PubMed

    Oishi, Shinya; Misu, Ryosuke; Tomita, Kenji; Setsuda, Shohei; Masuda, Ryo; Ohno, Hiroaki; Naniwa, Yousuke; Ieda, Nahoko; Inoue, Naoko; Ohkura, Satoshi; Uenoyama, Yoshihisa; Tsukamura, Hiroko; Maeda, Kei-Ichiro; Hirasawa, Akira; Tsujimoto, Gozoh; Fujii, Nobutaka

    2011-01-13

    Kisspeptin is a member of the RFamide neuropeptide family that is implicated in gonadotropin secretion. Because kisspeptin-GPR54 signaling is implicated in the neuroendocrine regulation of reproduction, GPR54 ligands represent promising therapeutic agents against endocrine secretion disorders. In the present study, the selectivity profiles of GPR54 agonist peptides were investigated for several GPCRs, including RFamide receptors. Kisspeptin-10 exhibited potent binding and activation of neuropeptide FF receptors (NPFFR1 and NPFFR2). In contrast, short peptide agonists bound with much lower affinity to NPFFRs while showing relatively high selectivity toward GPR54. The possible localization of secondary kisspeptin targets was also demonstrated by variation in the levels of GnRH release from the median eminence and the type of GPR54 agonists used. Negligible affinity of the reported NPFFR ligands to GPR54 was observed and indicates the unidirectional cross-reactivity between both ligands.

  4. Design of liposomal formulations for cell targeting.

    PubMed

    Nogueira, Eugénia; Gomes, Andreia C; Preto, Ana; Cavaco-Paulo, Artur

    2015-12-01

    Liposomes have gained extensive attention as carriers for a wide range of drugs due to being both nontoxic and biodegradable as they are composed of substances naturally occurring in biological membranes. Active targeting for cells has explored specific modification of the liposome surface by functionalizing it with specific targeting ligands in order to increase accumulation and intracellular uptake into target cells. None of the Food and Drug Administration-licensed liposomes or lipid nanoparticles are coated with ligands or target moieties to delivery for homing drugs to target tissues, cells or subcellular organelles. Targeted therapies (with or without controlled drug release) are an emerging and relevant research area. Despite of the numerous liposomes reviews published in the last decades, this area is in constant development. Updates urgently needed to integrate new advances in targeted liposomes research. This review highlights the evolution of liposomes from passive to active targeting and challenges in the development of targeted liposomes for specific therapies. PMID:26454541

  5. Computational design of nanoparticle drug delivery systems for selective targeting.

    PubMed

    Duncan, Gregg A; Bevan, Michael A

    2015-10-01

    Ligand-functionalized nanoparticles capable of selectively binding to diseased versus healthy cell populations are attractive for improved efficacy of nanoparticle-based drug and gene therapies. However, nanoparticles functionalized with high affinity targeting ligands may lead to undesired off-target binding to healthy cells. In this work, Monte Carlo simulations were used to quantitatively determine net surface interactions, binding valency, and selectivity between targeted nanoparticles and cell surfaces. Dissociation constant, KD, and target membrane protein density, ρR, are explored over a range representative of healthy and cancerous cell surfaces. Our findings show highly selective binding to diseased cell surfaces can be achieved with multiple, weaker affinity targeting ligands that can be further optimized by varying the targeting ligand density, ρL. Using the approach developed in this work, nanomedicines can be optimally designed for exclusively targeting diseased cells and tissues.

  6. Estrogen Receptor Ligands: A Review (2013–2015)

    PubMed Central

    Farzaneh, Shabnam; Zarghi, Afshin

    2016-01-01

    Estrogen receptors (ERs) are a group of compounds named for their importance in both menstrual and estrous reproductive cycles. They are involved in the regulation of various processes ranging from tissue growth maintenance to reproduction. Their action is mediated through ER nuclear receptors. Two subtypes of the estrogen receptor, ERα and ERβ, exist and exhibit distinct cellular and tissue distribution patterns. In humans, both receptor subtypes are expressed in many cells and tissues, and they control key physiological functions in various organ systems. Estrogens attract great attention due to their wide applications in female reproductive functions and treatment of some estrogen-dependent cancers and osteoporosis. This paper provides a general review of ER ligands published in international journals patented between 2013 and 2015. The broad physiological profile of estrogens has attracted the attention of many researchers to develop new estrogen ligands as therapeutic molecules for various clinical purposes. After the discovery of the ERβ receptor, subtype-selective ligands could be used to elicit beneficial estrogen-like activities and reduce adverse side effects, based on the different distributions and relative levels of the two ER subtypes in different estrogen target tissues. Therefore, recent literature has focused on selective estrogen ligands as highly promising agents for the treatment of some types of cancer, as well as for cardiovascular, inflammatory, and neurodegenerative diseases. Estrogen receptors are nuclear transcription factors that are involved in the regulation of many complex physiological functions in humans. Selective estrogen ligands are highly promising targets for treatment of some types of cancer, as well as for cardiovascular, inflammatory and neurodegenerative diseases. Extensive structure-activity relationship studies of ER ligands based on small molecules indicate that many different structural scaffolds may provide high

  7. Designing ligands to bind proteins.

    PubMed

    Whitesides, George M; Krishnamurthy, Vijay M

    2005-11-01

    The ability to design drugs (so-called 'rational drug design') has been one of the long-term objectives of chemistry for 50 years. It is an exceptionally difficult problem, and many of its parts lie outside the expertise of chemistry. The much more limited problem - how to design tight-binding ligands (rational ligand design) - would seem to be one that chemistry could solve, but has also proved remarkably recalcitrant. The question is 'Why is it so difficult?' and the answer is 'We still don't entirely know'. This perspective discusses some of the technical issues - potential functions, protein plasticity, enthalpy/entropy compensation, and others - that contribute, and suggests areas where fundamental understanding of protein-ligand interactions falls short of what is needed. It surveys recent technological developments (in particular, isothermal titration calorimetry) that will, hopefully, make now the time for serious progress in this area. It concludes with the calorimetric examination of the association of a series of systematically varied ligands with a model protein. The counterintuitive thermodynamic results observed serve to illustrate that, even in relatively simple systems, understanding protein-ligand association is challenging.

  8. Biased ligands for better cardiovascular drugs: dissecting G-protein-coupled receptor pharmacology.

    PubMed

    DeWire, Scott M; Violin, Jonathan D

    2011-07-01

    Drug discovery efforts targeting G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCR) have been immensely successful in creating new cardiovascular medicines. Currently marketed GPCR drugs are broadly classified as either agonists that activate receptors or antagonists that prevent receptor activation by endogenous stimuli. However, GPCR couple to a multitude of intracellular signaling pathways beyond classical G-protein signals, and these signals can be independently activated by biased ligands to vastly expand the potential for new drugs at these classic targets. By selectively engaging only a subset of a receptor's potential intracellular partners, biased ligands may deliver more precise therapeutic benefit with fewer side effects than current GPCR-targeted drugs. In this review, we discuss the history of biased ligand research, the current understanding of how biased ligands exert their unique pharmacology, and how research into GPCR signaling has uncovered previously unappreciated capabilities of receptor pharmacology. We focus on several receptors to illustrate the approaches taken and discoveries made, and how these are steadily illuminating the intricacies of GPCR pharmacology. Discoveries of biased ligands targeting the angiotensin II type 1 receptor and of separable pharmacology suggesting the potential value of biased ligands targeting the β-adrenergic receptors and nicotinic acid receptor GPR109a highlight the powerful clinical promise of this new category of potential therapeutics.

  9. Ligand entry into the calyx of β-lactoglobulin.

    PubMed

    Bello, Martiniano; García-Hernández, Enrique

    2014-07-01

    Although the thermodynamic principles that control the binding of drug molecules to their protein targets are well understood, the detailed process of how a ligand reaches a protein binding site has been an intriguing question over decades. The short time interval between the encounter between a ligand and its receptor to the formation of the stable complex has prevented experimental observations. Bovine β-lactoglobulin (βlg) is a lipocalin member that carries fatty acids (FAs) and other lipids in the cellular environment. Βlg accommodates a FA molecule in its highly hydrophobic cavity and exhibits the capability of recognizing a wide variety of hydrophobic ligands. To elucidate the ligand entry process on βlg, we report molecular dynamics simulations of the encounter between palmitate (PA) or laurate (LA) and βlg. Our results show that residues localized in loops at the cavity entrance play an important role in the ligand penetration process. Analysis of the short-term interaction energies show that the forces operating on the systems lead to average conformations very close to the crystallographic holo-forms. Whereas the binding free energy analysis using the molecular mechanics Generalized Born surface area method shows that these conformations were thermodynamically favorable.

  10. Quantifying ligand bias at seven-transmembrane receptors.

    PubMed

    Rajagopal, Sudarshan; Ahn, Seungkirl; Rominger, David H; Gowen-MacDonald, William; Lam, Christopher M; Dewire, Scott M; Violin, Jonathan D; Lefkowitz, Robert J

    2011-09-01

    Seven transmembrane receptors (7TMRs), commonly referred to as G protein-coupled receptors, form a large part of the "druggable" genome. 7TMRs can signal through parallel pathways simultaneously, such as through heterotrimeric G proteins from different families, or, as more recently appreciated, through the multifunctional adapters, β-arrestins. Biased agonists, which signal with different efficacies to a receptor's multiple downstream pathways, are useful tools for deconvoluting this signaling complexity. These compounds may also be of therapeutic use because they have distinct functional and therapeutic profiles from "balanced agonists." Although some methods have been proposed to identify biased ligands, no comparison of these methods applied to the s