Science.gov

Sample records for flt3 ligand targeted

  1. Dual inhibition of AKT/FLT3-ITD by A674563 overcomes FLT3 ligand-induced drug resistance in FLT3-ITD positive AML

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wenchao; Yu, Kailin; Liu, Xiaochuan; Zou, Fengming; Zhao, Zheng; Wu, Jiaxin; Liu, Juan; Liu, Feiyang; Wang, Li; Stone, Richard M.; Galinksy, Ilene A.; Griffin, James D.; Zhang, Shanchun; Weisberg, Ellen L.; Liu, Jing; Liu, Qingsong

    2016-01-01

    The FLT3-ITD mutation is one of the most prevalent oncogenic mutations in AML. Several FLT3 kinase inhibitors have shown impressive activity in clinical evaluation, however clinical responses are usually transient and clinical effects are rapidly lost due to drug resistance. One of the resistance mechanisms in the AML refractory patients involves FLT3-ligand induced reactivation of AKT and/or ERK signaling via FLT3 wt kinase. Via a screen of numerous AKT kinase inhibitors, we identified the well-established orally available AKT inhibitor, A674563, as a dual suppressor of AKT and FLT3-ITD. A674563 suppressed FLT3-ITD positive AML both in vitro and in vivo. More importantly, compared to other FLT3 inhibitors, A674563 is able to overcome FLT3 ligand-induced drug resistance through simultaneous inhibition of FLT3-ITD- and AKT-mediated signaling. Our findings suggest that A674563 might be a potential drug candidate for overcoming FLT3 ligand-mediated drug resistance in FLT3-ITD positive AML. PMID:27074558

  2. The nasal dendritic cell-targeting Flt3 ligand as a safe adjuvant elicits effective protection against fatal pneumococcal pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Kataoka, Kosuke; Fujihashi, Kohtaro; Oma, Keita; Fukuyama, Yoshiko; Hollingshead, Susan K; Sekine, Shinichi; Kawabata, Shigetada; Ito, Hiro-O; Briles, David E; Oishi, Kazunori

    2011-07-01

    We have previously shown that a pneumococcal surface protein A (PspA)-based vaccine containing DNA plasmid encoding the Flt3 ligand (FL) gene (pFL) as a nasal adjuvant prevented nasal carriage of Streptococcus pneumoniae. In this study, we further investigated the safety and efficacy of this nasal vaccine for the induction of PspA-specific antibody (Ab) responses against lung infection with S. pneumoniae. C57BL/6 mice were nasally immunized with recombinant PspA/Rx1 (rPspA) plus pFL three times at weekly intervals. When dynamic translocation of pFL was initially examined, nasal pFL was taken up by nasal dendritic cells (DCs) and epithelial cells (nECs) but not in the central nervous systems, including olfactory nerve and epithelium. Of importance, nasal pFL induced FL protein synthesis with minimum levels of inflammatory cytokines in the nasal washes (NWs) and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF). NWs and BALF as well as plasma of mice given nasal rPspA plus pFL contained increased levels of rPspA-specific secretory IgA and IgG Ab responses that were correlated with elevated numbers of CD8(+) and CD11b(+) DCs and interleukin 2 (IL-2)- and IL-4-producing CD4(+) T cells in the nasal mucosa-associated lymphoid tissues (NALT) and cervical lymph nodes (CLNs). The in vivo protection by rPspA-specific Abs was evident in markedly reduced numbers of CFU in the lungs, airway secretions, and blood when mice were nasally challenged with Streptococcus pneumoniae WU2. Our findings show that nasal pFL is a safe and effective mucosal adjuvant for the enhancement of bacterial antigen (Ag) (rPspA)-specific protective immunity through DC-induced Th2-type and IL-2 cytokine responses.

  3. HIV gag protein is efficiently cross-presented when targeted with an antibody towards the DEC-205 receptor in Flt3 ligand-mobilized murine dendritic cells

    PubMed Central

    Bozzacco, Leonia; Trumpfheller, Christine; Huang, Yaoxing; Longhi, Maria Paula; Shimeliovich, Irina; Schauer, Joseph D.; Park, Chae Gyu; Steinman, Ralph M.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Dendritic cells present exogenous proteins to MHC class I restricted CD8+ T cells. This function does not require endogenous antigen synthesis within DC, providing the potential to elicit CD8+ T cell responses to immune complexes, inactivated microbes, dying cells and proteins like ovalbumin. In mice, the CD8+ or DEC-205+ DC are specialized for cross-presentation, and this subset can be increased 10 fold in numbers following Flt3L treatment in vivo. Therefore we studied cross-presentation by abundant Flt3L DC using HIV gag protein. When enriched by positive selection with anti-CD11c beads, cells from Flt3L mice are not only more abundant but are more highly enriched in CD11c high DC, particularly the DEC-205+ subset. DC cross-present HIV gag to primed CD8+ T cells, but when the antigen is delivered within an antibody to DEC-205 receptor, cross-presentation becomes 100 fold more efficient than non-targeted antigen. This finding requires gag to be engineered into anti-DEC antibody, not just mixed with antibody. Flt3L DC are a valuable tool to study cross-presentation, since their use overcomes the obstacle posed by the low number of cross-presenting DC in the steady state. These findings support future experiments to use Flt3L to enhance presentation of DC-targeted vaccines. PMID:19830741

  4. Ectodomain shedding of FLT3 ligand is mediated by TACE 1

    PubMed Central

    Horiuchi, Keisuke; Morioka, Hideo; Takaishi, Hironari; Akiyama, Haruhiko; Blobel, Carl P.; Toyama, Yoshiaki

    2010-01-01

    FLT3 ligand (FLT3L) has diverse roles in the hematopoietic system, which include stimulating proliferation of hematopoietic precursors and development of natural killer cells and dendritic cells. FLT3L is initially synthesized as a membrane-bound protein, which must be cleaved to become a soluble growth factor. However, little is known about the enzyme involved in the proteolytic release of FLT3L. In the current study, we show that shedding of FLT3L is metalloprotease-dependent, and that this proteolytic activity was abolished in fibroblasts lacking TNFα converting enzyme (TACE) and could be rescued by reintroducing wildtype TACE in these cells. Moreover, we found that cells derived from the thymus of conditional TACE-deficient mice produce less FLT3L, and that serum FLT3L levels in these TACE mutant mice are significantly lower, both after LPS treatment and in the absence of such a challenge, further corroborating the relevance of TACE as FLT3L sheddase in vivo. Considering the involvements of FLT3 and FLT3L in hematopoietic malignancies and stem cell mobilization, the identification of the enzyme involved in FLT3L shedding may have important clinical implications. PMID:19494263

  5. FLT3 inhibition: a moving and evolving target in acute myeloid leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Leung, A Y H; Man, C-H; Kwong, Y-L

    2013-02-01

    Internal tandem duplication (ITD) of the fms-like tyrosine kinase 3 (FLT3) gene is a gain-of-function mutation common in acute myeloid leukaemia (AML). It is associated with inferior prognosis and response to chemotherapy. Single base mutations at the FLT3 tyrosine kinase domain (TKD) also leads to a gain of function, although its prognostic significance is less well defined because of its rarity. The clinical benefits of FLT3 inhibition are generally limited to AML with FLT3-ITD. However, responses are transient and leukaemia progression invariably occurs. There is compelling evidence that leukaemia clones carrying both ITD and TKD mutations appear when resistance to FLT3 inhibitors occurs. Interestingly, the emergence of double ITD and TKD mutants can be recapitulated in vitro when FLT3-ITD+ leukaemia cell lines are treated with mutagens and FLT3 inhibitors. Furthermore, murine xenotransplantation models also suggest that, in some cases, the FTL3-ITD and TKD double mutants actually exist in minute amounts before treatment with FLT3 inhibitors, expand under the selection pressure of FLT3 inhibition and become the predominant resistant clone(s) during the drug-refractory phase. On the basis of this model of clonal evolution, a multipronged strategy using more potent FLT3 inhibitors, and a combinatorial approach targeting both FLT3-dependent and FLT3-independent pathways, will be needed to improve outcome.

  6. Barley as a green factory for the production of functional Flt3 ligand.

    PubMed

    Erlendsson, Lýdur S; Muench, Marcus O; Hellman, Ulf; Hrafnkelsdóttir, Soffía M; Jonsson, Anders; Balmer, Yves; Mäntylä, Einar; Orvar, Björn L

    2010-02-01

    Biologically active recombinant human Flt3 ligand was expressed and isolated from transgenic barley seeds. Its expression is controlled by a tissue specific promoter that confines accumulation of the recombinant protein to the endosperm tissue of the seed. The recombinant Flt3 ligand variant expressed in the seeds contains an HQ-tag for affinity purification on immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography (IMAC) resin. The tagged protein was purified from seed extracts to near homogeneity using sequential chromatography on IMAC affinity resin and cation exchange resin. We also show that the recombinant Flt3 ligand protein undergoes posttranslational modifications: it is a glycoprotein containing alpha-1,3-fucose and alpha-1,2-xylose. The HQ-tagged Flt3 ligand variant exhibits comparable biological activity to commercial Flt3 ligand. This is the first report showing expression and accumulation of recombinant human growth factor in barley seeds with a yield of active protein similar to a bacterial expression system. The present results demonstrate that plant molecular farming is a viable approach for the bioproduction of human-derived growth factors.

  7. Using combination therapy to override stromal-mediated chemoresistance in mutant FLT3-positive AML: Synergism between FLT3 inhibitors, dasatinib/multi-targeted inhibitors, and JAK inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Weisberg, Ellen; Liu, Qingsong; Nelson, Erik; Kung, Andrew L.; Christie, Amanda L.; Bronson, Rod; Sattler, Martin; Sanda, Takaomi; Zhao, Zheng; Hur, Wooyoung; Mitsiades, Constantine; Smith, Robert; Daley, John F.; Stone, Richard; Galinsky, Ilene; Griffin, James D.; Gray, Nathanael

    2014-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) progenitors are frequently characterized by activating mutations in the receptor tyrosine kinase FLT3. Protein tyrosine kinases are integral components of signaling cascades that play a role in both FLT3-mediated transformation as well as viability pathways that are advantageous to leukemic cell survival. The bone marrow microenvironment can diminish AML sensitivity to tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs). We hypothesized that inhibition of protein kinases in addition to FLT3 may be effective in overriding drug resistance in AML. We used a cell-based model mimicking stromal protection as part of an unbiased high-throughput chemical screen to identify kinase inhibitors with the potential to override microenvironment-mediated drug resistance in mutant FLT3-positive AML. Several related multi-targeted kinase inhibitors, including dasatinib, with the capability of reversing microenvironment-induced resistance to FLT3 inhibition were identified and validated. We validated synergy in vitro and demonstrated effective combination potential in vivo. In particular Janus kinase (JAK) inhibitors were effective in overriding stromal protection and potentiating FLT3 inhibition in primary AML and cell lines. These results hint at a novel concept of using combination therapy to override drug resistance in mutant FLT3-positive AML in the bone marrow niche and suppress or eradicate residual disease. PMID:22469781

  8. Flt3L is a novel regulator of skeletal myogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Yejing; Waldemer, Rachel J.; Nalluri, Ramakrishna; Nuzzi, Paul D.; Chen, Jie

    2013-01-01

    Summary Various cues initiate multiple signaling pathways to regulate the highly coordinated process of skeletal myogenesis. Myoblast differentiation comprises a series of ordered events starting with cell cycle withdrawal and ending with myocyte fusion, with each step probably controlled by multiple extracellular signals and intracellular signaling pathways. Here we report the identification of Fms-like tyrokine kinase 3 ligand (Flt3L) signaling as a novel regulator of skeletal myogenesis. Flt3L is a multifunctional cytokine in immune cells, but its involvement in skeletal muscle formation has not been reported. We found that Flt3L is expressed in C2C12 myoblasts, with levels increasing throughout differentiation. Knockdown of Flt3L, or its receptor Flt3, suppresses myoblast differentiation, which is rescued by recombinant Flt3L or Flt3, respectively. Differentiation is not rescued, however, by recombinant ligand when the receptor is knocked down, or vice versa, suggesting that Flt3L and Flt3 function together. Flt3L knockdown also inhibits differentiation in mouse primary myoblasts. Both Flt3L and Flt3 are highly expressed in nascent myofibers during muscle regeneration in vivo, and Flt3L siRNA impairs muscle regeneration, validating the physiological significance of Flt3L function in myogenesis. We have identified a cellular mechanism for the myogenic function of Flt3L, as we show that Flt3L promotes cell cycle exit that is necessary for myogenic differentiation. Furthermore, we identify Erk as a relevant target of Flt3L signaling during myogenesis, and demonstrate that Flt3L suppresses Erk signaling through p120RasGAP. In summary, our work reveals an unexpected role for an immunoregulatory cytokine in skeletal myogenesis and a new myogenic pathway. PMID:23704355

  9. Targeting FLT3-ITD signaling mediates ceramide-dependent mitophagy and attenuates drug resistance in AML.

    PubMed

    Dany, Mohammed; Gencer, Salih; Nganga, Rose; Thomas, Raquela J; Oleinik, Natalia; Baron, Kyla D; Szulc, Zdzislaw M; Ruvolo, Peter; Kornblau, Steven; Andreeff, Michael; Ogretmen, Besim

    2016-10-13

    Signaling pathways regulated by mutant Fms-like tyrosine kinase 3 (FLT3)-internal tandem duplication (ITD), which mediate resistance to acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cell death, are poorly understood. Here, we reveal that pro-cell death lipid ceramide generation is suppressed by FLT3-ITD signaling. Molecular or pharmacologic inhibition of FLT3-ITD reactivated ceramide synthesis, selectively inducing mitophagy and AML cell death. Mechanistically, FLT3-ITD targeting induced ceramide accumulation on the outer mitochondrial membrane, which then directly bound autophagy-inducing light chain 3 (LC3), involving its I35 and F52 residues, to recruit autophagosomes for execution of lethal mitophagy. Short hairpin RNA (shRNA)-mediated knockdown of LC3 prevented AML cell death in response to FLT3-ITD inhibition by crenolanib, which was restored by wild-type (WT)-LC3, but not mutants of LC3 with altered ceramide binding (I35A-LC3 or F52A-LC3). Mitochondrial ceramide accumulation and lethal mitophagy induction in response to FLT3-ITD targeting was mediated by dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1) activation via inhibition of protein kinase A-regulated S637 phosphorylation, resulting in mitochondrial fission. Inhibition of Drp1 prevented ceramide-dependent lethal mitophagy, and reconstitution of WT-Drp1 or phospho-null S637A-Drp1 but not its inactive phospho-mimic mutant (S637D-Drp1), restored mitochondrial fission and mitophagy in response to crenolanib in FLT3-ITD(+) AML cells expressing stable shRNA against endogenous Drp1. Moreover, activating FLT3-ITD signaling in crenolanib-resistant AML cells suppressed ceramide-dependent mitophagy and prevented cell death. FLT3-ITD(+) AML drug resistance is attenuated by LCL-461, a mitochondria-targeted ceramide analog drug, in vivo, which also induced lethal mitophagy in human AML blasts with clinically relevant FLT3 mutations. Thus, these data reveal a novel mechanism which regulates AML cell death by ceramide-dependent mitophagy in response

  10. FLT3 Ligand as a Molecular Adjuvant for Naked RNA Vaccines.

    PubMed

    Kreiter, Sebastian; Diken, Mustafa; Selmi, Abderraouf; Petschenka, Jutta; Türeci, Özlem; Sahin, Ugur

    2016-01-01

    Intranodal immunization with antigen-encoding naked mRNA has proven to be an efficacious and safe approach to induce antitumor immunity. Thanks to its unique characteristics, mRNA can act not only as a source for antigen but also as an adjuvant for activation of the immune system. The search for additional adjuvants that can be combined with mRNA to further improve the potency of the immunization revealed Fms-like tyrosine kinase 3 (FLT3ligand as a potent candidate. Systemic administration of the dendritic cell-activating FLT3 ligand prior to or along with mRNA immunization-enhanced priming and expansion of antigen-specific CD8(+) T cells in lymphoid organs, T-cell homing into melanoma tumors, and therapeutic activity of the intranodally administered mRNA. Both compounds demonstrate a successful combination in terms of boosting the immune response. This chapter describes methods for intranodal immunization with naked mRNA by co-administration of FLT3 ligand, which leads to strong synergistic effects.

  11. Flt3 is a target of coumestrol in protecting against UVB-induced skin photoaging.

    PubMed

    Park, Gaeun; Baek, Sohee; Kim, Jong-Eun; Lim, Tae-gyu; Lee, Charles C; Yang, Hee; Kang, Young-Gyu; Park, Jun Seong; Augustin, Martin; Mrosek, Michael; Lee, Chang Yong; Dong, Zigang; Huber, Robert; Lee, Ki Won

    2015-12-01

    While skin aging is a naturally occurring process by senescence, exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation accelerates wrinkle formation and sagging of skin. UV induces skin aging by degrading collagen via activating matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). In this study, we show that coumestrol, a metabolite of the soybean isoflavone daidzein, has a preventive effect on skin photoaging in three-dimensional human skin equivalent model. Coumestrol inhibited UVB-induced MMP-1 expression and activity. Whole human kinase profiling assay identified FLT3 kinase as a novel target protein of coumestrol in UVB-induced signaling pathway in skin. Coumestrol suppresses FLT3 kinase activity, and subsequently, Ras/MEK/ERK and Akt/p70 ribosomal S6 kinase pathway. This suppresses AP-1 activity and in turn, diminishes MMP-1 gene transcription. Using X-ray crystallography, the binding of coumestrol to FLT3 was defined and implied ATP-competitive inhibition. Residues Lys644 and Phe830 showed local changes to accommodate coumestrol in the ATP-binding pocket. 4-APIA, a pharmacological inhibitor of FLT3, inhibited MMP-1 expression and induced signal transduction changes similar to coumestrol. Taken together, coumestrol inhibits UVB-induced MMP-1 expression by suppressing FLT3 kinase activity. These findings suggest that coumestrol is a novel dietary compound with potential application in preventing and improving UVB-associated skin aging.

  12. A type I IFN–Flt3 ligand axis augments plasmacytoid dendritic cell development from common lymphoid progenitors

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yi-Ling; Chen, Ting-Ting; Pai, Li-Mei; Wesoly, Joanna; Bluyssen, Hans A.R.

    2013-01-01

    During infections and inflammation, plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) are the most potent type I interferon (IFN-I)–producing cells. However, the developmental origin of pDCs and the signals dictating pDC generation remain incompletely understood. Here, we report a synergistic role for IFN-I and Flt3 ligand (FL) in pDC development from common lymphoid progenitors (CLPs). Both conventional DCs (cDCs) and pDCs were generated from CLPs in response to FL, whereas pDC generation required higher concentrations of FL and concurrent IFN-I signaling. An absence of IFN-I receptor, impairment of IFN-I signaling, or neutralization of IFN-I significantly impeded pDC development from CLPs. Furthermore, FL induced IFN-I expression in CLPs, which in turn induced Flt3 up-regulation that facilitated survival and proliferation of CLPs, as well as their differentiation into pDCs. Collectively, these results define a critical role for the FL/IFN-I/Flt3 axis in pDC differentiation from CLPs. PMID:24145513

  13. Activation of protein phosphatase 2A in FLT3+ acute myeloid leukemia cells enhances the cytotoxicity of FLT3 tyrosine kinase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Erwin M.; Harrison, Celeste; Kahl, Richard; Flanagan, Hayley; Panicker, Nikita; Mashkani, Baratali; Don, Anthony S.; Morris, Jonathan; Toop, Hamish; Lock, Richard B.; Powell, Jason A.; Thomas, Daniel; Guthridge, Mark A.; Moore, Andrew; Ashman, Leonie K.; Skelding, Kathryn A.; Enjeti, Anoop; Verrills, Nicole M.

    2016-01-01

    Constitutive activation of the receptor tyrosine kinase Fms-like tyrosine kinase 3 (FLT3), via co-expression of its ligand or by genetic mutation, is common in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). In this study we show that FLT3 activation inhibits the activity of the tumor suppressor, protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A). Using BaF3 cells transduced with wildtype or mutant FLT3, we show that FLT3-induced PP2A inhibition sensitizes cells to the pharmacological PP2A activators, FTY720 and AAL(S). FTY720 and AAL(S) induced cell death and inhibited colony formation of FLT3 activated cells. Furthermore, PP2A activators reduced the phosphorylation of ERK and AKT, downstream targets shared by both FLT3 and PP2A, in FLT3/ITD+ BaF3 and MV4-11 cell lines. PP2A activity was lower in primary human bone marrow derived AML blasts compared to normal bone marrow, with blasts from FLT3-ITD patients displaying lower PP2A activity than WT-FLT3 blasts. Reduced PP2A activity was associated with hyperphosphorylation of the PP2A catalytic subunit, and reduced expression of PP2A structural and regulatory subunits. AML patient blasts were also sensitive to cell death induced by FTY720 and AAL(S), but these compounds had minimal effect on normal CD34+ bone marrow derived monocytes. Finally, PP2A activating compounds displayed synergistic effects when used in combination with tyrosine kinase inhibitors in FLT3-ITD+ cells. A combination of Sorafenib and FTY720 was also synergistic in the presence of a protective stromal microenvironment. Thus combining a PP2A activating compound and a FLT3 inhibitor may be a novel therapeutic approach for treating AML. PMID:27329844

  14. Flt3 ligand improves the innate response to respiratory syncytial virus and limits lung disease upon RSV reexposure in neonate mice.

    PubMed

    Remot, Aude; Descamps, Delphyne; Jouneau, Luc; Laubreton, Daphné; Dubuquoy, Catherine; Bouet, Stephan; Lecardonnel, Jérôme; Rebours, Emmanuelle; Petit-Camurdan, Agnès; Riffault, Sabine

    2016-04-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) causes severe bronchiolitis in infants worldwide. The immunological factors responsible for RSV susceptibility in infants are poorly understood. Here, we used the BALB/c mouse model of neonatal RSV infection to study the mechanisms leading to severe disease upon reexposure to the virus when adults. Two major deficiencies in neonatal lung innate responses were found: a poor DCs mobilization, and a weak engagement of the IFNI pathway. The administration of Flt3 ligand (Flt3-L), a growth factor that stimulates the proliferation of hematopoietic cells, to neonates before RSV-infection, resulted in increased lung DC number, and reconditioned the IFNI pathway upon RSV neonatal infection. Besides, neonates treated with Flt3-L were protected against exacerbated airway disease upon adult reexposure to RSV. This was associated with a reorientation of RSV-specific responses toward Th1-mediated immunity. Thus, the poor lung DCs and IFNI responses to RSV in neonates may be partly responsible for the deleterious long-term consequences revealed upon adult reexposure to RSV, which could be prevented by Flt3-L treatment. These results open new perspectives for developing neonatal immuno-modulating strategies to reduce the burden of bronchiolitis.

  15. Flt3 ligand expands CD103+ dendritic cells, FoxP3+ T regulatory cells and attenuates Crohn’s-like murine ileitis

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Colm B.; Aherne, Carol M.; McNamee, Eóin N.; Lebsack, Matthew D. P.; Eltzschig, Holger; Jedlicka, Paul; Rivera-Nieves, Jesús

    2013-01-01

    Background Imprinting an effector or regulatory phenotype on naïve T cells requires education at induction sites by dendritic cells (DC). In the current studies we analyzed the effect of inflammation on the frequency of mononuclear phagocytes (MP) and the effect of altering their frequency by administration of Flt3-L in chronic ileitis. Design Using a TNF-driven model of ileitis (i.e. TNFΔARE) that recapitulates many features of Crohn’s disease (CD), we assessed dynamic changes in the frequency and functional state of MP within the inflamed ileum by flow cytometry, immunofluorescence and real-time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction and by generating CX3CR1 GFP-reporter TNFΔARE mice. Finally, we assessed the effect of Flt3-L supplementation on the severity of ileitis, the frequency of CD103+ DC and of FoxP3+ Tregs in TNFΔARE mice. Results CD11cHi/MHCII+ MP accumulated in inflamed ilea, predominantly mediated by expansion of the CX3CR1+ MP subpopulation. This coincided with a decreased pro-regulatory CD103+ DC. The phenotype of these MP was that of activated cells, as they expressed increased CD80 and CD86 on their surface. Flt3-ligand administration resulted in a preferential expansion of CD103+ DC that attenuated the severity of ileitis in 20-week-old TNFΔARE mice, mediated by increased CD4+/CD25+/FoxP3+ Tregs. Conclusions Our findings support a role for Flt3-L as a potential therapeutic in Crohn’s-like ileitis. PMID:22068168

  16. Prolonged exposure to FLT3 inhibitors leads to resistance via activation of parallel signaling pathways

    PubMed Central

    Piloto, Obdulio; Wright, Melissa; Brown, Patrick; Kim, Kyu-Tae; Levis, Mark; Small, Donald

    2007-01-01

    Continuous treatment of malignancies with tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) may select for resistant clones (ie, imatinib mesylate). To study resistance to TKIs targeting FLT3, a receptor tyrosine kinase that is frequently mutated in acute myelogenous leukemia (AML), we developed resistant human cell lines through prolonged coculture with FLT3 TKIs. FLT3 TKI-resistant cell lines and primary samples still exhibit inhibition of FLT3 phosphorylation on FLT3 TKI treatment. However, FLT3 TKI-resistant cell lines and primary samples often show continued activation of downstream PI3K/Akt and/or Ras/MEK/MAPK signaling pathways as well as continued expression of genes involved in FLT3-mediated cellular transformation. Inhibition of these signaling pathways restores partial sensitivity to FLT3 TKIs. Mutational screening of FLT3 TKI-resistant cell lines revealed activating N-Ras mutations in 2 cell lines that were not present in the parental FLT3 TKI-sensitive cell line. Taken together, these data indicate that FLT3 TKI-resistant cells most frequently become FLT3 independent because of activation of parallel signaling pathways that provide compensatory survival/proliferation signals when FLT3 is inhibited. Anti-FLT3 mAb treatment was still cytotoxic to FLT3 TKI-resistant clones. An approach combining FLT3 TKIs with anti-FLT3 antibodies and/or inhibitors of important pathways downstream of FLT3 may reduce the chances of developing resistance. PMID:17047150

  17. Pim kinases modulate resistance to FLT3 tyrosine kinase inhibitors in FLT3-ITD acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Green, Alexa S.; Maciel, Thiago T.; Hospital, Marie-Anne; Yin, Chae; Mazed, Fetta; Townsend, Elizabeth C.; Pilorge, Sylvain; Lambert, Mireille; Paubelle, Etienne; Jacquel, Arnaud; Zylbersztejn, Florence; Decroocq, Justine; Poulain, Laury; Sujobert, Pierre; Jacque, Nathalie; Adam, Kevin; So, Jason C. C.; Kosmider, Olivier; Auberger, Patrick; Hermine, Olivier; Weinstock, David M.; Lacombe, Catherine; Mayeux, Patrick; Vanasse, Gary J.; Leung, Anskar Y.; Moura, Ivan C.; Bouscary, Didier; Tamburini, Jerome

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Fms-like tyrosine kinase 3 internal tandem duplication (FLT3-ITD) is frequently detected in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients and is associated with a dismal long-term prognosis. FLT3 tyrosine kinase inhibitors provide short-term disease control, but relapse invariably occurs within months. Pim protein kinases are oncogenic FLT3-ITD targets expressed in AML cells. We show that increased Pim kinase expression is found in relapse samples from AML patients treated with FLT3 inhibitors. Ectopic Pim-2 expression induces resistance to FLT3 inhibition in both FLT3-ITD–induced myeloproliferative neoplasm and AML models in mice. Strikingly, we found that Pim kinases govern FLT3-ITD signaling and that their pharmacological or genetic inhibition restores cell sensitivity to FLT3 inhibitors. Finally, dual inhibition of FLT3 and Pim kinases eradicates FLT3-ITD+ cells including primary AML cells. Concomitant Pim and FLT3 inhibition represents a promising new avenue for AML therapy. PMID:26601252

  18. An autologous in situ tumor vaccination approach for hepatocellular carcinoma. 2. Tumor-specific immunity and cure after radio-inducible suicide gene therapy and systemic CD40-ligand and Flt3-ligand gene therapy in an orthotopic tumor model.

    PubMed

    Kawashita, Yujo; Deb, Niloy J; Garg, Madhur K; Kabarriti, Rafi; Fan, Zuoheng; Alfieri, Alan A; Roy-Chowdhury, Jayanta; Guha, Chandan

    2014-08-01

    Diffuse hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a lethal disease that radiation therapy (RT) currently has a limited role in treating because of the potential for developing fatal radiation-induced liver disease. However, recently diffuse HCC, "radio-inducible suicide gene therapy" has been shown to enhance local tumor control and residual microscopic disease within the liver for diffuse HCC, by using a combination of chemoactivation and molecular radiosensitization. We have demonstrated that the addition of recombinant adenovirus-expressing human Flt3 ligand (Adeno-Flt3L) after radio-inducible suicide gene therapy induced a Th1-biased, immune response and enhanced tumor control in an ectopic model of HCC. We hypothesized that sequential administration of recombinant adenovirus-expressing CD40L (Adeno-CD40L) could further potentiate the efficacy of our trimodal therapy with RT + HSV-TK + Adeno-Flt3L. We examined our hypothesis in an orthotopic model of diffuse HCC using BNL1ME A.7R.1 (BNL) cells in Balb/c mice. BNL murine hepatoma cells (5 × 10(4)) transfected with an expression vector of HSV-TK under the control of a radiation-inducible promoter were injected intraportally into BALB/cJ mice. Fourteen days after the HCC injection, mice were treated with a 25 Gy dose of radiation to the whole liver, followed by ganciclovir (GCV) treatment and systemic adenoviral cytokine gene therapy (Flt3L or CD40L or both). Untreated mice died in 27 ± 4 days. Radiation therapy alone had a marginal effect on survival (median = 35 ± 7 days) and the addition of HSV-TK/GCV gene therapy improved the median survival to 47 ± 6 days. However, the addition of Adeno-Flt3L to radiation therapy and HSV-TK/GCV therapy significantly (P = 0.0005) increased survival to a median of 63 ± 20 days with 44% (7/16) of the animals still alive 116 days after tumor implantation. The curative effect of Flt3L was completely abolished when using immunodeficient nude mice or mice depleted for CD4, CD8 and

  19. Revisiting emergency anti-apoptotic cytokinotherapy: erythropoietin synergizes with stem cell factor, FLT-3 ligand, trombopoietin and interleukin-3 to rescue lethally-irradiated mice.

    PubMed

    Drouet, Michel; Grenier, Nancy; Hérodin, Francis

    2012-06-01

    We have re-evaluated the benefit of using erythropoietin (Epo) as a pleiotropic cytokine to counteract hematological and extra-hematological toxicity following lethal irradiation. B6D2F1 mice were exposed to a dose of 9 Gy gamma radiation resulting in 90% mortality at 30 days, and then injected with stem cell factor, FLT-3 ligand, thrombopoietin and interleukin-3 [i.e. SFT3] at two and 24 hours with or without Epo (1,000 IU/kg) at 2 hours and day 8. As controls, two groups of irradiated mice were given only Epo or Phosphate-buffered saline. Epo synergized with SFT3 to rescue lethally-irradiated mice from radiation-induced death (survival: 60%, 95% and 5% respectively for SFT3, SFT3+Epo and controls at 30 days, p<0.05), whereas Epo alone exhibited no protective effect. Hematopoietic parameters did not differ significantly between SFT3 and SFT3+Epo groups during the animal death period. Some beneficial effects on gastro-intestinal toxicity were noticed following administration of Epo, although lung, liver and kidney were not protected. Further studies are necessary to understand fully the mechanisms involved in these effects of Epo in order to optimize treatment with cytokines following high-dose irradiation.

  20. Incorporating FLT3 inhibitors into acute myeloid leukemia treatment regimens

    PubMed Central

    Pratz, Keith; Levis, Mark

    2011-01-01

    FMS-Like-Tyrosine kinase-3 (FLT3) mutations are found in about 30% of cases of acute myeloid leukemia and confer an increased relapse rate and reduced overall survival. Targeting of this tyrosine kinase by direction inhibition is the focus of both preclinical and clinical research in AML. Several molecules in clinical development inhibit FLT3 with varying degrees of specificity. Preclinical models suggest that these compounds enhance the cytotoxicity of conventional chemotherapeutics against FLT3 mutant leukemia cells. The pharmacodynamic interactions between FLT3 inhibitors and chemotherapy appear to be sequence dependent. When the FLT3 inhibitor is used prior to chemotherapy, antagonism is displayed, while if FLT3 inhibition is instituted after to exposure to chemotherapy, synergistic cytotoxicity is seen. The combination of FLT3 inhibitors with chemotherapy is also complicated by potential pharmacokinetic obstacles, such as plasma protein binding and p-glycoprotein interactions. Ongoing and future studies are aimed at incorporating FLT3 inhibitors into conventional induction and consolidation therapy specifically for patients with FLT3 mutant AML. PMID:18452067

  1. FLT3 inhibitors: clinical potential in acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Hospital, Marie-Anne; Green, Alexa S; Maciel, Thiago T; Moura, Ivan C; Leung, Anskar Y; Bouscary, Didier; Tamburini, Jerome

    2017-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is an aggressive hematopoietic malignancy that is cured in as few as 15%–40% of cases. Tremendous improvements in AML prognostication arose from a comprehensive analysis of leukemia cell genomes. Among normal karyotype AML cases, mutations in the FLT3 gene are the ones most commonly detected as having a deleterious prognostic impact. FLT3 is a transmembrane tyrosine kinase receptor, and alterations of the FLT3 gene such as internal tandem duplications (FLT3-ITD) deregulate FLT3 downstream signaling pathways in favor of increased cell proliferation and survival. FLT3 tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI) emerged as a new therapeutic option in FLT3-ITD AML, and clinical trials are ongoing with a variety of TKI either alone, combined with chemotherapy, or even as maintenance after allogenic stem cell transplantation. However, a wide range of molecular resistance mechanisms are activated upon TKI therapy, thus limiting their clinical impact. Massive research efforts are now ongoing to develop more efficient FLT3 TKI and/or new therapies targeting these resistance mechanisms to improve the prognosis of FLT3-ITD AML patients in the future. PMID:28223820

  2. FLT-3 Expression and Function on Microglia in Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    DeBoy, Cynthia A.; Rus, Horea; Tegla, Cosmin; Cudrici, Cornelia; Jones, Melina V.; Pardo, Carlos A.; Small, Donald; Whartenby, Katharine A.; Calabresi, Peter A.

    2010-01-01

    Inflammatory cell infiltration and resident microglial activation within the central nervous system (CNS) are pathological events in multiple sclerosis (MS) and experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). While MS therapies target the peripheral immune system, no treatment is currently known to also modulate microglia. FMS-like tyrosine-3 (FLT-3) is expressed on hematopoietic and dendritic cells. We reported that FLT-3 inhibition ameliorates early actively induced EAE by predominantly modulating dendritic cell function as compared to microglia. We demonstrate in this report that FLT-3 is expressed in perivascular cuffs, brain parenchyma and in non-lesioned gray and white matter within MS brain but not in these regions within control brain. Furthermore, we demonstrate that FLT-3 is expressed on two populations of cells within MS brain; one which expresses the dendritic cell marker CD209, and the other which does not, suggesting that FLT-3 within MS brain is expressed on infiltrating dendritic cells and a non-dendritic cell such as microglia. Additionally, we report that FLT-3 inhibition in murine microglia blocks, in a dose dependent manner, IFN-γ-induced expression of MHC class II and CD86, and LPS-induced secretion of IL-6. These data suggest that FLT-3 is involved in microglial cell’s capacity to respond to environmental cues to function as antigen presenting cells and mediate CNS inflammation. Furthermore these data suggest that FLT-3 may be a therapeutic target on microglia to mitigate CNS inflammation. PMID:20566414

  3. The new and recurrent FLT3 juxtamembrane deletion mutation shows a dominant negative effect on the wild-type FLT3 receptor

    PubMed Central

    Sandhöfer, Nadine; Bauer, Julia; Reiter, Katrin; Dufour, Annika; Rothenberg, Maja; Konstandin, Nikola P.; Zellmeier, Evelyn; Tizazu, Belay; Greif, Philipp A.; Metzeler, Klaus H.; Hiddemann, Wolfgang; Polzer, Harald; Spiekermann, Karsten

    2016-01-01

    In acute myeloid leukemia (AML), the Fms-like tyrosine kinase 3 (FLT3) is one of the most frequently mutated genes. Recently, a new and recurrent juxtamembrane deletion mutation (p.Q569Vfs*2) resulting in a truncated receptor was identified. The mutated receptor is expressed on the cell surface and still binds its ligand but loses the ability to activate ERK signaling. FLT3 p.Q569fs-expressing Ba/F3 cells show no proliferation after ligand stimulation. Furthermore, coexpressed with the FLT3 wild-type (WT) receptor, the truncated receptor suppresses stimulation and activation of the WT receptor. Thus, FLT3 p.Q569Vfs*2, to our knowledge, is the first FLT3 mutation with a dominant negative effect on the WT receptor. PMID:27346558

  4. The MERTK/FLT3 inhibitor MRX-2843 overcomes resistance-conferring FLT3 mutations in acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Minson, Katherine A; Smith, Catherine C; DeRyckere, Deborah; Libbrecht, Clara; Lee-Sherick, Alisa B; Huey, Madeline G; Lasater, Elisabeth A; Kirkpatrick, Gregory D; Stashko, Michael A; Zhang, Weihe; Jordan, Craig T; Kireev, Dmitri; Wang, Xiaodong; Frye, Stephen V; Earp, H Shelton; Shah, Neil P; Graham, Douglas K

    2016-03-01

    FMS-like tyrosine kinase 3-targeted (FLT3-targeted) therapies have shown initial promise for the treatment of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) expressing FLT3-activating mutations; however, resistance emerges rapidly. Furthermore, limited options exist for the treatment of FLT3-independent AML, demonstrating the need for novel therapies that reduce toxicity and improve survival. MERTK receptor tyrosine kinase is overexpressed in 80% to 90% of AMLs and contributes to leukemogenesis. Here, we describe MRX-2843, a type 1 small-molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitor that abrogates activation of both MERTK and FLT3 and their downstream effectors. MRX-2843 treatment induces apoptosis and inhibits colony formation in AML cell lines and primary patient samples expressing MERTK and/or FLT3-ITD, with a wide therapeutic window compared with that of normal human cord blood cells. In murine orthotopic xenograft models, once-daily oral therapy prolonged survival 2- to 3-fold over that of vehicle-treated controls. Additionally, MRX-2843 retained activity against quizartinib-resistant FLT3-ITD-mutant proteins with clinically relevant alterations at the D835 or F691 loci and prolonged survival in xenograft models of quizartinib-resistant AML. Together, these observations validate MRX-2843 as a translational agent and support its clinical development for the treatment of AML.

  5. The MERTK/FLT3 inhibitor MRX-2843 overcomes resistance-conferring FLT3 mutations in acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Minson, Katherine A.; Smith, Catherine C.; Libbrecht, Clara; Lee-Sherick, Alisa B.; Huey, Madeline G.; Lasater, Elisabeth A.; Kirkpatrick, Gregory D.; Stashko, Michael A.; Zhang, Weihe; Jordan, Craig T.; Kireev, Dmitri; Wang, Xiaodong; Frye, Stephen V.; Earp, H. Shelton; Shah, Neil P.; Graham, Douglas K.

    2016-01-01

    FMS-like tyrosine kinase 3–targeted (FLT3-targeted) therapies have shown initial promise for the treatment of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) expressing FLT3-activating mutations; however, resistance emerges rapidly. Furthermore, limited options exist for the treatment of FLT3-independent AML, demonstrating the need for novel therapies that reduce toxicity and improve survival. MERTK receptor tyrosine kinase is overexpressed in 80% to 90% of AMLs and contributes to leukemogenesis. Here, we describe MRX-2843, a type 1 small-molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitor that abrogates activation of both MERTK and FLT3 and their downstream effectors. MRX-2843 treatment induces apoptosis and inhibits colony formation in AML cell lines and primary patient samples expressing MERTK and/or FLT3-ITD, with a wide therapeutic window compared with that of normal human cord blood cells. In murine orthotopic xenograft models, once-daily oral therapy prolonged survival 2- to 3-fold over that of vehicle-treated controls. Additionally, MRX-2843 retained activity against quizartinib-resistant FLT3-ITD–mutant proteins with clinically relevant alterations at the D835 or F691 loci and prolonged survival in xenograft models of quizartinib-resistant AML. Together, these observations validate MRX-2843 as a translational agent and support its clinical development for the treatment of AML. PMID:27158668

  6. Development and Characterization of FLT3-Specific Curcumin-Loaded Polymeric Micelles as a Drug Delivery System for Treating FLT3-Overexpressing Leukemic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Tima, Singkome; Okonogi, Siriporn; Ampasavate, Chadarat; Pickens, Chad; Berkland, Cory; Anuchapreeda, Songyot

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to develop a curcumin (CM) nanoparticle targeted to Feline McDonough Sarcoma (FMS)-like tyrosine kinase 3 (FLT3) protein on the surface of leukemic cells and to evaluate their properties, specificity, cytotoxicity, and inhibitory effect on FLT3 protein level in FLT3 overexpressing leukemic cells, EoL-1 and MV-4-11 cells. FLT3-specific peptides were conjugated onto modified poloxamer 407 (P407) using the copper-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition reaction (CuAAC). The thin film hydration method was performed for FLT3-specific CM-loaded polymeric micelles (FLT3-CM-micelles) preparation. Flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy were used to determine rate of cellular uptake. 3-(4,5-dimethythiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide assay was used to test the cytotoxicity of the micelles on leukemic cells. FLT3-CM-micelles demonstrated a mean particle size less than 50 nm, high entrapment efficiency, and high rate of CM uptake by leukemic cells. The intracellular CM fluorescence is related to FLT3 protein levels on the leukemic cell surfaces. Moreover, FLT3-CM-micelles demonstrated an excellent cytotoxic effect and decreased FLT3 protein expression in the leukemic cells. The FLT3-CM-micelles could enhance both solubility and cytotoxicity of CM on FLT3 overexpressing leukemic cells. These promising nanoparticles may be used for enhancing anti-leukemic activity of CM and developed as a targeted drug delivery system in the future. PMID:27751588

  7. Palbociclib treatment of FLT3-ITD+ AML cells uncovers a kinase-dependent transcriptional regulation of FLT3 and PIM1 by CDK6

    PubMed Central

    Uras, Iris Z.; Walter, Gina J.; Scheicher, Ruth; Bellutti, Florian; Prchal-Murphy, Michaela; Tigan, Anca S.; Valent, Peter; Heidel, Florian H.; Kubicek, Stefan; Scholl, Claudia; Fröhling, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Up to 30% of patients with acute myeloid leukemia have constitutively activating internal tandem duplications (ITDs) of the FLT3 receptor tyrosine kinase. Such mutations are associated with a poor prognosis and a high propensity to relapse after remission. FLT3 inhibitors are being developed as targeted therapy for FLT3-ITD+ acute myeloid leukemia; however, their use is complicated by rapid development of resistance, which illustrates the need for additional therapeutic targets. We show that the US Food and Drug Administration–approved CDK4/6 kinase inhibitor palbociclib induces apoptosis of FLT3-ITD leukemic cells. The effect is specific for FLT3-mutant cells and is ascribed to the transcriptional activity of CDK6: CDK6 but not its functional homolog CDK4 is found at the promoters of the FLT3 and PIM1 genes, another important leukemogenic driver. There CDK6 regulates transcription in a kinase-dependent manner. Of potential clinical relevance, combined treatment with palbociclib and FLT3 inhibitors results in synergistic cytotoxicity. Simultaneously targeting two critical signaling nodes in leukemogenesis could represent a therapeutic breakthrough, leading to complete remission and overcoming resistance to FLT3 inhibitors. PMID:27099147

  8. FLT3-ITD drives Ara-C resistance in leukemic cells via the induction of RUNX3.

    PubMed

    Damdinsuren, Anar; Matsushita, Hiromichi; Ito, Masatoshi; Tanaka, Masayuki; Jin, Guilan; Tsukamoto, Hideo; Asai, Satomi; Ando, Kiyoshi; Miyachi, Hayato

    2015-12-01

    Internal tandem duplication (ITD) mutations of the FLT3 gene (FLT3-ITD) are well known to correlate with a poor prognosis in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). We previously reported that FLT3-ITD confers resistance to cytosine arabinoside (Ara-C), a key cytotoxic agent in AML treatments. In order to elucidate the detailed molecular mechanisms underlying the Ara-C resistance induced by FLT3-ITD, we performed a microarray gene expression analysis of the human leukemic cell line K562 transduced with FLT3-ITD (K562/FLT3-ITD) and identified RUNX3 as a downstream target of FLT3-ITD. The transcriptional induction of the RUNX3 expression by FLT3-ITD was noted on a Luciferase assay. The knockdown of the RUNX3 expression in the K562/FLT3-ITD cells increased the sensitivity to Ara-C, and the exogenous expression of RUNX3 per se resulted in the enhancement of Ara-C resistance in the K562 cells. A relationship between the FLT3-ITD-induced RUNX3 expression and Ara-C resistance was also observed in AML cells with an endogenous FLT3-ITD expression. Collectively, these findings demonstrate that RUNX3 is a prerequisite for Ara-C resistance via FLT3-ITD signaling.

  9. A pharmacodynamic study of the FLT3 inhibitor KW-2449 yields insight into the basis for clinical response.

    PubMed

    Pratz, Keith W; Cortes, Jorge; Roboz, Gail J; Rao, Niranjan; Arowojolu, Omotayo; Stine, Adam; Shiotsu, Yukimasa; Shudo, Aiko; Akinaga, Shiro; Small, Donald; Karp, Judith E; Levis, Mark

    2009-04-23

    Internal tandem duplication mutations of FLT3 (FLT3/ITD mutations) are common in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and confer a poor prognosis. This would suggest that FLT3 is an ideal therapeutic target, but FLT3 targeted therapy has produced only modest benefits in clinical trials. Due to technical obstacles, the assessment of target inhibition in patients treated with FLT3 inhibitors has been limited and generally only qualitative. KW-2449 is a novel multitargeted kinase inhibitor that induces cytotoxicity in Molm14 cells (which harbor an FLT3/ITD mutation). The cytotoxic effect occurs primarily at concentrations sufficient to inhibit FLT3 autophosphorylation to less than 20% of its baseline. We report here correlative data from a phase 1 trial of KW-2449, a trial in which typical transient reductions in the peripheral blast counts were observed. Using quantitative measurement of FLT3 inhibition over time in these patients, we confirmed that FLT3 was inhibited, but only transiently to less than 20% of baseline. Our results suggest that the failure to fully inhibit FLT3 in sustained fashion may be an underlying reason for the minimal success of FLT3 inhibitors to date, and stress the importance of confirming in vivo target inhibition when taking a targeted agent into the clinical setting.

  10. G-749, a novel FLT3 kinase inhibitor, can overcome drug resistance for the treatment of acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hee Kyu; Kim, Hong Woo; Lee, In Yong; Lee, Jungmi; Lee, Jaekyoo; Jung, Dong Sik; Lee, Sang Yeop; Park, Sung Ho; Hwang, Haejun; Choi, Jang-Sik; Kim, Jung-Ho; Kim, Se Won; Kim, Jung Keun; Cools, Jan; Koh, Jong Sung

    2014-01-01

    Aberrant activations of Fms-like tyrosine receptor kinase (FLT) 3 are implicated in the pathogenesis of 20% to 30% of patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). G-749 is a novel FLT3 inhibitor that showed potent and sustained inhibition of the FLT3 wild type and mutants including FLT3-ITD, FLT3-D835Y, FLT3-ITD/N676D, and FLT3-ITD/F691L in cellular assays. G-749 retained its inhibitory potency in various drug-resistance milieus such as patient plasma, FLT3 ligand surge, and stromal protection. Furthermore, it displayed potent antileukemic activity in bone marrow blasts from AML patients regardless of FLT3 mutation status, including those with little or only minor responses to AC220 or PKC412. Oral administration of G-749 yielded complete tumor regression and increased life span in animal models. Thus, G-749 appears to be a promising next-generation drug candidate for the treatment of relapsed and refractory AML patients with various FLT3-ITD/FLT3-TKD mutants and further shows the ability to overcome drug resistance. PMID:24532805

  11. Inhibition of MEK5 by BIX02188 induces apoptosis in cells expressing the oncogenic mutant FLT3-ITD

    SciTech Connect

    Razumovskaya, Elena; Sun, Jianmin; Roennstrand, Lars

    2011-08-26

    Highlights: {yields} In this study we have demonstrated that FLT3 activation leads to activation of ERK5. {yields} We have demonstrated that ERK5 is involved in activation of AKT downstream of FLT3. {yields} (BIX02188) blocks activation of ERK5 and induces apoptosis in FLT3 Ba/F3 cells. {yields} (BIX02188) induce apoptosis in the two leukemic cell lines MV4-11 and MOLM-13. -- Abstract: Fms-like tyrosine kinase-3 (FLT3) is a growth factor receptor normally expressed on hematopoietic progenitor cells. Approximately one third of all patients with AML carry an activating mutation in FLT3 that drives proliferation and survival of the leukemic cells. The most common activating mutation is the so-called internal tandem duplication (ITD), which involves an in-frame duplication of a segment of varying length in the region of the FLT3 gene that encodes the juxtamembrane domain. The pathways downstream of FLT3-ITD are partially known but further knowledge regarding the downstream signal transduction molecules is important in order to develop alternative strategies for pharmacological intervention. In this paper we have studied the role of MEK/ERK5 in FLT3-ITD mediated transformation. We have found that both wild-type FLT3 and FLT3-ITD activate MEK5 leading to the activation of ERK5. By use of the selective inhibitor of MEK5, (BIX02188), we have shown that activation of AKT downstream of FLT3 is partially dependent on ERK5. Furthermore, inhibition of MEK5/ERK5 induces apoptosis of both FLT3-ITD transfected Ba/F3 cells as well as the FLT3-ITD carrying leukemic cell lines MV4-11 and MOLM-13. These results suggest that MEK5/ERK5 is important for FLT3-ITD induced hematopoietic transformation and may thus represent an alternative therapeutic target in the treatment of FLT3-ITD positive leukemia.

  12. FLT3 tyrosine kinase inhibitors in acute myeloid leukemia: clinical implications and limitations

    PubMed Central

    Kayser, Sabine; Levis, Mark J.

    2015-01-01

    Internal tandem duplications of the FMS-like tyrosine kinase 3 (FLT3) gene are one of the most frequent gene mutations in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and are associated with poor clinical outcome. The remission rate is high with intensive chemotherapy, but most patients eventually relapse. During the last decade, FLT3 mutations have emerged as an attractive target for a molecularly specific treatment strategy. Targeting FLT3 receptor tyrosine kinases in AML has shown encouraging results in the treatment of FLT3 mutated AML, but in most patients responses are incomplete and not sustained. Newer, more specific compounds seem to have a higher potency and selectivity against FLT3. During therapy with FLT3 tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) the induction of acquired resistance has emerged as a clinical problem. Therefore, optimization of the targeted therapy and potential treatment options to overcome resistance is currently the focus of clinical research. In this review we discuss the use and limitations of TKIs as a therapeutic strategy for the treatment of FLT3 mutated AML, including mechanisms of resistance to TKIs as well as possible novel strategies to improve FLT3 inhibitor therapy. PMID:23631653

  13. [Analysis of Flt-3 expression and Flt-3/ITD mutation in acute myeloid leukemia cells].

    PubMed

    Wang, Ya-Lun; Wang, Tong; Xu, Feng; Gang, Yan; Wang, Jie

    2006-06-01

    This study was aimed to explore the relationship between Flt-3 expression, Flt-3/ITD mutation in acute leukemia (AL) cell line and pathogenesis of AL, especially AML. The Flt-3 expression and Flt-3/ITD mutation were detected by RT-PCR and sequencing method in 82 leukemia cell lines including 20 AML, 57 ALL and 5 CML cell lines. The results indicated that positive results of Flt-3 expression were obtained in 48 out of 77 AL cell line, the positive rate was 62%; 12 cell lines were positive in 20 AML cell lines, the positive rate was 60%; 33 cell lines was positive in 57 ALL cell lines, the positive rate was 58%; 3 cell lines were positive in 5 CML cell lines, the positive rate was 60%. There was abnormal gene product in 1 AMOL cell line out of 12 AML cell lines with Flt-3 positive expression (positive rate 8.3%). DNA sequencing of abnormal gene product showed two coding duplication sequence with 29 bp long. The positive rate of Flt-3 expression in undifferentiated cell line was prominently higher than that in mature B cell ALL (P < 0.05). It is concluded that the Flt-3 expression is different in various leukemia cells. Flt-3/ITD duplication was found in one AML cell line. The detection of Flt-3 gene and Flt-3/ITD mutation may contribute to the diagnosis of ALL, especially to AML.

  14. EphrinA1-EphA2 interaction-mediated apoptosis and Flt3L-induced immunotherapy inhibits tumor growth in a breast cancer mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Tandon, Manish; Vemula, Sai V.; Sharma, Anurag; Ahi, Yadvinder S.; Mittal, Shalini; Bangari, Dinesh S.; Mittal, Suresh K.

    2014-01-01

    Background The receptor tyrosine kinase EphA2 is overexpressed in several types of cancers and is currently being pursued as a target for breast cancer therapeutics. The EphA2 ligand EphrinA1 induces EphA2 phosphorylation and intracellular internalization and degradation, thus inhibiting tumor progression. The hematopoietic growth factor, FMS-like tyrosine kinase receptor ligand (Flt3L), promotes expansion and mobilization of functional dendritic cells. Methods We tested the EphrinA1-EphA2 interaction in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells focusing on the receptor-ligand-mediated apoptosis of breast cancer cells. In order to determine whether the EphrinA1-EphA2 interaction-associated apoptosis and Flt3L-mediated immunotherapy would have an additive effect in inhibiting tumor growth, we used an immunocompetent mouse model of breast cancer to evaluate intratumoral (i.t.) inoculation strategies with human adenovirus (HAd) vectors expressing either EphrinA1 (HAd-EphrinA1-Fc), Flt3L (HAd-Flt3L) or a combination of EphrinA1-Fc + Flt3L (HAd-EphrinA1-Fc + HAd-Flt3L). Results In vitro analysis demonstrated that an EphrinA1-EphA2 interaction led to apoptosis-related changes in breast cancer cells. In vivo, three i.t. inoculations of HAd-EphrinA1-Fc showed potent inhibition of tumor growth. Furthermore, increased inhibition in tumor growth was observed with the combination of HAd-EphrinA1-Fc and HAd-Flt3L accompanied by the generation of an anti-tumor adaptive immune response. Conclusions The results indicating induction of apoptosis and inhibition of mammary tumor growth show the potential therapeutic benefits of HAd-EphrinA1-Fc. In combination with HAd-Flt3L, this represents a promising strategy to effectively induce mammary tumor regression by HAd vector-based therapy. PMID:22228563

  15. The stromal cell-derived factor-1alpha dependent migration of human cord blood CD34 haematopoietic stem and progenitor cells switches from protein kinase C (PKC)-alpha dependence to PKC-alpha independence upon prolonged culture in the presence of Flt3-ligand and interleukin-6.

    PubMed

    Kasenda, Benjamin; Kassmer, Susannah H; Niggemann, Bernd; Schiermeier, Sven; Hatzmann, Wolfgang; Zänker, Kurt S; Dittmar, Thomas

    2008-09-01

    Addition of the inflammatory cytokine interleukin (IL)-6 to the culture medium of human cord blood haematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) has been shown to lead to an altered stromal cell-derived factor-1alpha-dependent migratory phenotype. This study investigated whether this effect was attributed to a differential engagement of protein kinase C (PKC) isotypes. The migratory activity of both Flt3-ligand and Flt3-ligand/IL-6 cultured cord blood HSPCs was PKC-alpha dependent on day 1, but PKC-alpha independent after 5 d of cultivation. PKC-alpha expression was not down-regulated in cells cultured for 5 d indicating a switch of signalling molecules directing cell migration.

  16. Fetal and neonatal hematopoietic progenitors are functionally and transcriptionally resistant to Flt3-ITD mutations

    PubMed Central

    Porter, Shaina N; Cluster, Andrew S; Yang, Wei; Busken, Kelsey A; Patel, Riddhi M; Ryoo, Jiyeon; Magee, Jeffrey A

    2016-01-01

    The FLT3 Internal Tandem Duplication (FLT3ITD) mutation is common in adult acute myeloid leukemia (AML) but rare in early childhood AML. It is not clear why this difference occurs. Here we show that Flt3ITD and cooperating Flt3ITD/Runx1 mutations cause hematopoietic stem cell depletion and myeloid progenitor expansion during adult but not fetal stages of murine development. In adult progenitors, FLT3ITD simultaneously induces self-renewal and myeloid commitment programs via STAT5-dependent and STAT5-independent mechanisms, respectively. While FLT3ITD can activate STAT5 signal transduction prior to birth, this signaling does not alter gene expression until hematopoietic progenitors transition from fetal to adult transcriptional states. Cooperative interactions between Flt3ITD and Runx1 mutations are also blunted in fetal/neonatal progenitors. Fetal/neonatal progenitors may therefore be protected from leukemic transformation because they are not competent to express FLT3ITD target genes. Changes in the transcriptional states of developing hematopoietic progenitors may generally shape the mutation spectra of human leukemias. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.18882.001 PMID:27879203

  17. FLT3-ITDs Instruct a Myeloid Differentiation and Transformation Bias in Lymphomyeloid Multipotent Progenitors

    PubMed Central

    Mead, Adam J.; Kharazi, Shabnam; Atkinson, Deborah; Macaulay, Iain; Pecquet, Christian; Loughran, Stephen; Lutteropp, Michael; Woll, Petter; Chowdhury, Onima; Luc, Sidinh; Buza-Vidas, Natalija; Ferry, Helen; Clark, Sally-Ann; Goardon, Nicolas; Vyas, Paresh; Constantinescu, Stefan N.; Sitnicka, Ewa; Nerlov, Claus; Jacobsen, Sten Eirik W.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Whether signals mediated via growth factor receptors (GFRs) might influence lineage fate in multipotent progenitors (MPPs) is unclear. We explored this issue in a mouse knockin model of gain-of-function Flt3-ITD mutation because FLT3-ITDs are paradoxically restricted to acute myeloid leukemia even though Flt3 primarily promotes lymphoid development during normal hematopoiesis. When expressed in MPPs, Flt3-ITD collaborated with Runx1 mutation to induce high-penetrance aggressive leukemias that were exclusively of the myeloid phenotype. Flt3-ITDs preferentially expanded MPPs with reduced lymphoid and increased myeloid transcriptional priming while compromising early B and T lymphopoiesis. Flt3-ITD-induced myeloid lineage bias involved upregulation of the transcription factor Pu.1, which is a direct target gene of Stat3, an aberrantly activated target of Flt3-ITDs, further establishing how lineage bias can be inflicted on MPPs through aberrant GFR signaling. Collectively, these findings provide new insights into how oncogenic mutations might subvert the normal process of lineage commitment and dictate the phenotype of resulting malignancies. PMID:23727242

  18. Integration of Hedgehog and mutant FLT3 signaling in myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Yiting; Gondek, Lukasz; Li, Li; Wang, Qiuju; Ma, Haley; Chang, Emily; Huso, David L.; Foerster, Sarah; Marchionni, Luigi; McGovern, Karen; Watkins, D. Neil; Peacock, Craig D.; Levis, Mark; Smith, B. Douglas; Merchant, Akil A.; Small, Donald; Matsui, William

    2015-01-01

    FLT3 internal tandem duplication (ITD) mutations resulting in constitutive kinase activity are common in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and carry a poor prognosis. Several agents targeting FLT3 have been developed, but their limited clinical activity suggests that the inhibition of other factors contributing to the malignant phenotype is required. We examined gene expression data sets as well as primary specimens and found that the expression of GLI2, a major effector of the Hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway, was increased in FLT3-ITD compared to wild type FLT3 AML. To examine the functional role of the Hh pathway, we studied mice in which Flt3-ITD expression results in an indolent myeloproliferative state and found that constitutive Hh signaling accelerated the development of AML by enhancing STAT5 signaling and the proliferation of bone marrow myeloid progenitors. Furthermore, combined FLT3 and Hh pathway inhibition limited leukemic growth in vitro and in vivo, and this approach may serve as a therapeutic strategy for FLT3-ITD AML. PMID:26062848

  19. How I treat FLT3-mutated AML

    PubMed Central

    Pratz, Keith W.

    2017-01-01

    FLT3-mutated acute myeloid leukemia (AML), despite not being recognized as a distinct entity in the World Health Organization (WHO) classification system, is readily recognized as a particular challenge by clinical specialists who treat acute leukemia. This is especially true with regards to the patients harboring the most common type of FLT3 mutation, the internal tandem duplication (FLT3-ITD) mutation. Here we present 4 patient cases from our institution and discuss how our management reflects what we have learned about this subtype of the disease. We also reflect on how we anticipate the management might change in the near future, with the emergence of clinically useful tyrosine kinase inhibitors. PMID:27872057

  20. Oncogenic roles of PRL-3 in FLT3-ITD induced acute myeloid leukaemia

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jung Eun; Yuen, Hiu Fung; Zhou, Jian Biao; Al-aidaroos, Abdul Qader O; Guo, Ke; Valk, Peter J; Zhang, Shu Dong; Chng, Wee Joo; Hong, Cheng William; Mills, Ken; Zeng, Qi

    2013-01-01

    FLT3-ITD mutations are prevalent mutations in acute myeloid leukaemia (AML). PRL-3, a metastasis-associated phosphatase, is a downstream target of FLT3-ITD. This study investigates the regulation and function of PRL-3 in leukaemia cell lines and AML patients associated with FLT3-ITD mutations. PRL-3 expression is upregulated by the FLT3-STAT5 signalling pathway in leukaemia cells, leading an activation of AP-1 transcription factors via ERK and JNK pathways. PRL-3-depleted AML cells showed a significant decrease in cell growth. Clinically, high PRL-3 mRNA expression was associated with FLT3-ITD mutations in four independent AML datasets with 1158 patients. Multivariable Cox-regression analysis on our Cohort 1 with 221 patients identified PRL-3 as a novel prognostic marker independent of other clinical parameters. Kaplan–Meier analysis showed high PRL-3 mRNA expression was significantly associated with poorer survival among 491 patients with normal karyotype. Targeting PRL-3 reversed the oncogenic effects in FLT3-ITD AML models in vitro and in vivo. Herein, we suggest that PRL-3 could serve as a prognostic marker to predict poorer survival and as a promising novel therapeutic target for AML patients. PMID:23929599

  1. Oncogenic roles of PRL-3 in FLT3-ITD induced acute myeloid leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Park, Jung Eun; Yuen, Hiu Fung; Zhou, Jian Biao; Al-Aidaroos, Abdul Qader O; Guo, Ke; Valk, Peter J; Zhang, Shu Dong; Chng, Wee Joo; Hong, Cheng William; Mills, Ken; Zeng, Qi

    2013-09-01

    FLT3-ITD mutations are prevalent mutations in acute myeloid leukaemia (AML). PRL-3, a metastasis-associated phosphatase, is a downstream target of FLT3-ITD. This study investigates the regulation and function of PRL-3 in leukaemia cell lines and AML patients associated with FLT3-ITD mutations. PRL-3 expression is upregulated by the FLT3-STAT5 signalling pathway in leukaemia cells, leading an activation of AP-1 transcription factors via ERK and JNK pathways. PRL-3-depleted AML cells showed a significant decrease in cell growth. Clinically, high PRL-3 mRNA expression was associated with FLT3-ITD mutations in four independent AML datasets with 1158 patients. Multivariable Cox-regression analysis on our Cohort 1 with 221 patients identified PRL-3 as a novel prognostic marker independent of other clinical parameters. Kaplan-Meier analysis showed high PRL-3 mRNA expression was significantly associated with poorer survival among 491 patients with normal karyotype. Targeting PRL-3 reversed the oncogenic effects in FLT3-ITD AML models in vitro and in vivo. Herein, we suggest that PRL-3 could serve as a prognostic marker to predict poorer survival and as a promising novel therapeutic target for AML patients.

  2. Profiling of somatic mutations in acute myeloid leukemia with FLT3-ITD at diagnosis and relapse

    PubMed Central

    Nagata, Yasunobu; Kanojia, Deepika; Mayakonda, Anand; Yoshida, Kenichi; Haridas Keloth, Sreya; Zang, Zhi Jiang; Okuno, Yusuke; Shiraishi, Yuichi; Chiba, Kenichi; Tanaka, Hiroko; Miyano, Satoru; Ding, Ling-Wen; Alpermann, Tamara; Sun, Qiao-Yang; Lin, De-Chen; Chien, Wenwen; Madan, Vikas; Liu, Li-Zhen; Tan, Kar-Tong; Sampath, Abhishek; Venkatesan, Subhashree; Inokuchi, Koiti; Wakita, Satoshi; Yamaguchi, Hiroki; Chng, Wee Joo; Kham, Shirley-Kow Yin; Yeoh, Allen Eng-Juh; Sanada, Masashi; Schiller, Joanna; Kreuzer, Karl-Anton; Kornblau, Steven M.; Kantarjian, Hagop M.; Haferlach, Torsten; Lill, Michael; Kuo, Ming-Chung; Shih, Lee-Yung; Blau, Igor-Wolfgang; Blau, Olga; Yang, Henry; Ogawa, Seishi; Koeffler, H. Phillip

    2015-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) with an FLT3 internal tandem duplication (FLT3-ITD) mutation is an aggressive hematologic malignancy with a grave prognosis. To identify the mutational spectrum associated with relapse, whole-exome sequencing was performed on 13 matched diagnosis, relapse, and remission trios followed by targeted sequencing of 299 genes in 67 FLT3-ITD patients. The FLT3-ITD genome has an average of 13 mutations per sample, similar to other AML subtypes, which is a low mutation rate compared with that in solid tumors. Recurrent mutations occur in genes related to DNA methylation, chromatin, histone methylation, myeloid transcription factors, signaling, adhesion, cohesin complex, and the spliceosome. Their pattern of mutual exclusivity and cooperation among mutated genes suggests that these genes have a strong biological relationship. In addition, we identified mutations in previously unappreciated genes such as MLL3, NSD1, FAT1, FAT4, and IDH3B. Mutations in 9 genes were observed in the relapse-specific phase. DNMT3A mutations are the most stable mutations, and this DNMT3A-transformed clone can be present even in morphologic complete remissions. Of note, all AML matched trio samples shared at least 1 genomic alteration at diagnosis and relapse, suggesting common ancestral clones. Two types of clonal evolution occur at relapse: either the founder clone recurs or a subclone of the founder clone escapes from induction chemotherapy and expands at relapse by acquiring new mutations. Relapse-specific mutations displayed an increase in transversions. Functional assays demonstrated that both MLL3 and FAT1 exert tumor-suppressor activity in the FLT3-ITD subtype. An inhibitor of XPO1 synergized with standard AML induction chemotherapy to inhibit FLT3-ITD growth. This study clearly shows that FLT3-ITD AML requires additional driver genetic alterations in addition to FLT3-ITD alone. PMID:26438511

  3. An essential pathway links FLT3-ITD, HCK and CDK6 in acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Lopez, Sophie; Voisset, Edwige; Tisserand, Julie C.; Mosca, Cyndie; Prebet, Thomas; Santamaria, David; Dubreuil, Patrice; Sepulveda, Paulo De

    2016-01-01

    CDK4/CDK6 and RB proteins drive the progression through the G1 phase of the cell cycle. In acute myeloid leukemia (AML), the activity of the CDK/Cyclin D complex is increased. The mechanism involved is unknown, as are the respective roles played by CDK4 or CDK6 in this process. Here, we report that AML cells carrying FLT3-ITD mutations are dependent on CDK6 for cell proliferation while CDK4 is not essential. We showed that FLT3-ITD signaling is responsible for CDK6 overexpression, through a pathway involving the SRC-family kinase HCK. Accordingly, FLT3-ITD failed to transform primary hematopoietic progenitor cells from Cdk6−/− mice. Our results demonstrate that CDK6 is the primary target of CDK4/CDK6 inhibitors in FLT3-ITD positive AML. Furthermore, we delineate an essential protein kinase pathway -FLT3/HCK/CDK6- in the context of AML with FLT3-ITD mutations. PMID:27323399

  4. FLT3 kinase inhibitor TTT-3002 overcomes both activating and drug resistance mutations in FLT3 in acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Hayley S.; Nguyen, Bao; Duffield, Amy S.; Li, Li; Galanis, Allison; Williams, Allen B.; Brown, Patrick A.; Levis, Mark J.; Leahy, Daniel J.; Small, Donald

    2014-01-01

    There have been a number of clinical trials testing the efficacy of FLT3 tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). patients harboring a constitutively activating mutation in FLT3 However, there has been limited efficacy, most often due to inadequate achievement of FLT3 inhibition through a variety of mechanisms In a previous study, TTT-3002 was identified as a novel FLT3 inhibitor with the most potent activity to date against FLT3 internal tandem duplication (FLT3/ITD) mutations Here the activity of TTT-3002 is demonstrated against a broad spectrum of FLT3 activating point mutations (FLT3/PMs), including the most frequently occurring D835 mutations The compound is also active against a number of point mutations selected for in FLT3/ITD alleles that confer resistance to other TKIs, including the F691L gatekeeper mutation TTT-3002 maintains activity against relapsed AML patient samples that are resistant to sorafenib and AC220 Studies utilizing human plasma samples from healthy donors and AML patients indicate that TTT-3002 is only moderately protein bound compared to several other TKIs currently in clinical trials Tumor burden of mice in a FLT3 TKI-resistant transplant model is significantly improved by oral dosing of TTT-3002 Therefore, TTT-3002 has demonstrated preclinical potential as a promising new FLT3 TKI that may overcome some of the limitations of other TKIs in the treatment of FLT3-mutant AML PMID:25060518

  5. Pharmacological targeting of miR-155 via the NEDD8-activating enzyme inhibitor MLN4924 (Pevonedistat) in FLT3-ITD acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Khalife, J; Radomska, H S; Santhanam, R; Huang, X; Neviani, P; Saultz, J; Wang, H; Wu, Y-Z; Alachkar, H; Anghelina, M; Dorrance, A; Curfman, J; Bloomfield, C D; Medeiros, B C; Perrotti, D; Lee, L J; Lee, R J; Caligiuri, M A; Pichiorri, F; Croce, C M; Garzon, R; Guzman, M L; Mendler, J H; Marcucci, G

    2015-10-01

    High levels of microRNA-155 (miR-155) are associated with poor outcome in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). In AML, miR-155 is regulated by NF-κB, the activity of which is, in part, controlled by the NEDD8-dependent ubiquitin ligases. We demonstrate that MLN4924, an inhibitor of NEDD8-activating enzyme presently being evaluated in clinical trials, decreases binding of NF-κB to the miR-155 promoter and downregulates miR-155 in AML cells. This results in the upregulation of the miR-155 targets SHIP1, an inhibitor of the PI3K/Akt pathway, and PU.1, a transcription factor important for myeloid differentiation, leading to monocytic differentiation and apoptosis. Consistent with these results, overexpression of miR-155 diminishes MLN4924-induced antileukemic effects. In vivo, MLN4924 reduces miR-155 expression and prolongs the survival of mice engrafted with leukemic cells. Our study demonstrates the potential of miR-155 as a novel therapeutic target in AML via pharmacologic interference with NF-κB-dependent regulatory mechanisms. We show the targeting of this oncogenic microRNA with MLN4924, a compound presently being evaluated in clinical trials in AML. As high miR-155 levels have been consistently associated with aggressive clinical phenotypes, our work opens new avenues for microRNA-targeting therapeutic approaches to leukemia and cancer patients.

  6. FLT3LG — EDRN Public Portal

    Cancer.gov

    From NCBI Gene: Dendritic cells (DCs) provide the key link between innate and adaptive immunity by recognizing pathogens and priming pathogen-specific immune responses. FLT3LG controls the development of DCs and is particularly important for plasmacytoid DCs and CD8 (see MIM 186910)-positive classical DCs and their CD103 (ITGAE; MIM 604682)-positive tissue counterparts (summary by Sathaliyawala et al., 2010 [PubMed 20933441]).[supplied by OMIM, Jan 2011

  7. Microenvironmental hypoxia regulates FLT3 expression and biology in AML.

    PubMed

    Sironi, Silvia; Wagner, Michaela; Kuett, Alexander; Drolle, Heidrun; Polzer, Harald; Spiekermann, Karsten; Rieger, Christina; Fiegl, Michael

    2015-11-30

    Fms-like tyrosine kinase 3 (FLT3) is a receptor tyrosine kinase constitutively expressed by acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) blasts. In addition, 25% of AML patients harbour a FLT3-ITD mutation, associated with inferior outcome due to increased relapse rate. Relapse might be propagated by interactions between AML blasts and the bone marrow microenvironment. Besides cellular elements of the microenvironment (e.g. mesenchymal stromal cells), bone marrow hypoxia has emerged as an additional crucial component. Hence, effects of hypoxia on FLT3 expression and biology could provide novel insight into AML biology. Here we show that 25% of AML patients down-regulate FLT3 expression on blasts in response to in vitro hypoxia (1% O2), which was independent of its mutational state. While virtually no AML cell lines regulate FLT3 in response to hypoxia, the down-regulation could be observed in Ba/F3 cells stably transfected with different FLT3 mutants. Hypoxia-mediated down-regulation was specific for FLT3, reversible and proteasome-dependent; with FLT3 half-life being significantly shorter at hypoxia. Also, PI-3K inhibition could partially abrogate down-regulation of FLT3. Hypoxia-mediated down-regulation of FLT3 conferred resistance against cytarabine in vitro. In conclusion, FLT3 expression in AML is dependent on the oxygen partial pressure, but response to hypoxia differs.

  8. The Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase, Shp2, Positively Contributes to FLT3-ITD-Induced Hematopoietic Progenitor Hyperproliferation and Malignant Disease In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Nabinger, Sarah C.; Li, XingJun; Ramdas, Baskar; He, Yantao; Zhang, Xian; Zeng, Lifan; Richine, Briana; Bowling, Joshua D.; Fukuda, Seiji; Goenka, Shreevrat; Liu, Ziyue; Feng, Gen-Sheng; Yu, Menggang; Sandusky, George E.; Boswell, H. Scott; Zhang, Zhong-Yin; Kapur, Reuben; Chan, Rebecca J.

    2014-01-01

    Internal tandem duplications in the fms-like tyrosine kinase receptor (FLT3-ITDs) confer a poor prognosis in acute myeloid leukemia. We hypothesized that increased recruitment of the protein tyrosine phosphatase, Shp2, to FLT3-ITDs contributes to FLT3 ligand (FL)-independent hyperproliferation and STAT5 activation. Co-immunoprecipitation demonstrated constitutive association of Shp2 with the FLT3-ITD, N51-FLT3, as well as with STAT5. Knock-down of Shp2 in Baf3/N51-FLT3 cells significantly reduced proliferation while having little effect on WT-FLT3-expressing cells. Consistently, mutation of N51-FLT3 tyrosine 599 to phenylalanine or genetic disruption of Shp2 in N51-FLT3-expressing bone marrow low density mononuclear cells reduced proliferation and STAT5 activation. In transplants, genetic disruption of Shp2 in vivo yielded increased latency to and reduced severity of FLT3-ITD-induced malignancy. Mechanistically, Shp2 co-localizes with nuclear phospho-STAT5, is present at functional interferon-γ activation sites (GAS) within the BCL2L1 promoter, and positively activates the human BCL2L1 promoter, suggesting that Shp2 works with STAT5 to promote pro-leukemogenic gene expression. Further, using a small molecule Shp2 inhibitor, the proliferation of N51-FLT3-expressing bone marrow progenitors and primary AML samples was reduced in a dose-dependent manner. These findings demonstrate that Shp2 positively contributes to FLT3-ITD-induced leukemia and suggest that Shp2 inhibition may provide a novel therapeutic approach to acute myeloid leukemia. PMID:23103841

  9. SKLB-677, an FLT3 and Wnt/β-catenin signaling inhibitor, displays potent activity in models of FLT3-driven AML

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Shuang; Yang, Ling-Ling; Niu, Ting; Cheng, Chuan; Zhong, Lei; Zheng, Ming-Wu; Xiong, Yu; Li, Lin-Li; Xiang, Rong; Chen, Li-Juan; Zhou, Qiao; Wei, Yu-Quan; Yang, Sheng-Yong

    2015-01-01

    FLT3 has been identified as a valid target for the treatment of acute myeloid leukemia (AML), and some FLT3 inhibitors have shown very good efficacy in treating AML in clinical trials. Nevertheless, recent studies indicated that relapse and drug resistance are still difficult to avoid, and leukemia stem cells (LSCs) are considered one of the most important contributors. Here, we report the characterization of SKLB-677, a new FLT3 inhibitor developed by us recently. SKLB-677 exhibits low nanomolar potency in biochemical and cellular assays. It is efficacious in animal models at doses as low as 1mg/kg when administrated orally once daily. In particular, SKLB-677 but not first-generation and second-generation FLT3 inhibitors in clinical trials has the ability to inhibit Wnt/β-catenin signaling; Wnt/β-catenin signaling is required for the development of LSCs, but not necessary for the development of adult hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). This compound indeed showed considerable suppression effects on leukemia stem-like cells in in vitro functional assays, but had no influence on normal HSCs. Collectively, SKLB-677 is an interesting lead compound for the treatment of AML, and deserves further investigations. PMID:26497577

  10. Evolution of a FLT3-TKD mutated subclone at meningeal relapse in acute promyelocytic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Bochtler, Tilmann; Fröhling, Stefan; Weichert, Wilko; Endris, Volker; Thiede, Christian; Hutter, Barbara; Hundemer, Michael; Ho, Anthony D.; Krämer, Alwin

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report the case of an acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) patient who—although negative for FLT3 mutations at diagnosis—developed isolated FLT3 tyrosine kinase II domain (FLT3-TKD)-positive meningeal relapse, which, in retrospect, could be traced back to a minute bone marrow subclone present at first diagnosis. Initially, the 48-yr-old female diagnosed with high-risk APL had achieved complete molecular remission after standard treatment with all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) and chemotherapy according to the AIDA (ATRA plus idarubicin) protocol. Thirteen months after the start of ATRA maintenance, the patient suffered clinically overt meningeal relapse along with minute molecular traces of PML/RARA (promyelocytic leukemia/retinoic acid receptor alpha) in the bone marrow. Following treatment with arsenic trioxide and ATRA in combination with intrathecal cytarabine and methotrexate, the patient achieved a complete molecular remission in both cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and bone marrow, which currently lasts for 2 yr after completion of therapy. Whole-exome sequencing and subsequent ultradeep targeted resequencing revealed a heterozygous FLT3-TKD mutation in CSF leukemic cells (p.D835Y, c.2503G>T, 1000/1961 reads [51%]), which was undetectable in the concurrent bone marrow sample. Interestingly, the FLT3-TKD mutated meningeal clone originated from a small bone marrow subclone present in a variant allele frequency of 0.4% (6/1553 reads) at initial diagnosis. This case highlights the concept of clonal evolution with a subclone harboring an additional mutation being selected as the “fittest” and leading to meningeal relapse. It also further supports earlier suggestions that FLT3 mutations may play a role for migration and clonal expansion in the CSF sanctuary site. PMID:27626069

  11. FLT3 mutational status is an independent risk factor for adverse outcomes after allogeneic transplantation in AML

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yumeng; Braun, Thomas; Chang, Lawrence; Bixby, Dale; Hanauer, David A.; Chughtai, Komal A.; Gatza, Erin; Couriel, Daniel; Goldstein, Steven; Pawarode, Attaphol; Reddy, Pavan; Riwes, Mary; Connelly, James; Harris, Andrew; Kitko, Carrie; Levine, John; Yanik, Greg

    2015-01-01

    Allogeneic HCT has been increasingly used in the setting of FLT3 mutated AML. However, its role in conferring durable relapse-free intervals remains in question. Herein, we sought to investigate FLT3 mutational status on transplant outcomes. We conducted a retrospective cohort study of 262 consecutive AML patients who underwent first-time allogeneic HCT (2008-2014), of whom 171 had undergone FLT3-ITD mutational testing. FLT3 mutated AML was associated with nearly twice the relapse risk (RR) compared with those without FLT3 mutation 3 years post-HCT (63% vs. 37%, P<0.001), and with a shorter median time to relapse (100 vs. 121 days). FLT3 mutational status remained significantly associated with this outcome after controlling for patient, disease, and transplant-related risk factors (P<0.05). Multivariate analysis showed a significant association of FLT3 mutation with increased 3-year RR (HR 3.63, 95% CI: 2.13, 6.19, P<0.001), and inferior disease-free survival (HR 2.05, 95% CI: 1.29, 3.27, P<0.01) and overall survival (HR 1.92, 95% CI: 1.14, 3.24, P<0.05). These data demonstrate high risk of early relapse after allogeneic HCT for FLT3 mutated AML that translates into adverse disease-free and overall survival outcomes. Additional targeted and coordinated interventions are needed to maintain durable remission after allogeneic HCT in this high-risk population. PMID:26191952

  12. Arsenic trioxide and all-trans-retinoic acid selectively exert synergistic cytotoxicity against FLT3-ITD AML cells via co-inhibition of FLT3 signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li-Na; Tang, Yan-Lai; Zhang, Yin-Chuan; Zhang, Zu-Han; Liu, Xiao-Jian; Ke, Zhi-Yong; Li, Yu; Tan, Hui-Zhen; Huang, Li-Bin; Luo, Xue-Qun

    2017-03-09

    FLT3-ITD mutations occur in approximately 30% of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and are associated with a poor outcome. Currently available FLT3 inhibitors have in vitro but limited clinical activity in FLT3-ITD AML. Reports have shown that an arsenic trioxide (ATO)/all-trans-retinoic acid (ATRA) combination improves prognosis in acute promyelocytic leukemia, especially with FLT3-ITD, and ATO or ATRA alone enhances apoptosis in FLT3-ITD AML cells treated with FLT3 inhibitors, providing a rationale to investigate the role of ATO/ATRA in FLT3-ITD AML. Here, we demonstrate that an ATO/ATRA combination selectively exerts synergistic cytotoxicity against FLT3-ITD AML cell lines (MV4;11/MOLM-13). The signaling pathways affected by ATO/ATRA include FLT3/STAT5/MYC, FLT3/STAT5/E2F1, FLT3/ERK/ATF5 and FLT3/AKT/ATF5.ATF5 may function as an oncogene in FLT3-ITD AML. Our findings provide experimental evidence that supports further exploration of ATO/ATRA in FLT3-ITD AML in vivo and warrants a clinical evaluation of regimens comprising an ATO/ATRA combination.

  13. TALENs-mediated gene disruption of FLT3 in leukemia cells: Using genome-editing approach for exploring the molecular basis of gene abnormality.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jue; Li, Tongjuan; Zhou, Mi; Hu, Zheng; Zhou, Xiaoxi; Zhou, Shiqiu; Wang, Na; Huang, Liang; Zhao, Lei; Cao, Yang; Xiao, Min; Ma, Ding; Zhou, Pengfei; Shang, Zhen; Zhou, Jianfeng

    2015-12-16

    Novel analytic tools are needed to elucidate the molecular basis of leukemia-relevant gene mutations in the post-genome era. We generated isogenic leukemia cell clones in which the FLT3 gene was disrupted in a single allele using TALENs. Isogenic clones with mono-allelic disrupted FLT3 were compared to an isogenic wild-type control clone and parental leukemia cells for transcriptional expression, downstream FLT3 signaling and proliferation capacity. The global gene expression profiles of mutant K562 clones and corresponding wild-type controls were compared using RNA-seq. The transcriptional levels and the ligand-dependent autophosphorylation of FLT3 were decreased in the mutant clones. TALENs-mediated FLT3 haplo-insufficiency impaired cell proliferation and colony formation in vitro. These inhibitory effects were maintained in vivo, improving the survival of NOD/SCID mice transplanted with mutant K562 clones. Cluster analysis revealed that the gene expression pattern of isogenic clones was determined by the FLT3 mutant status rather than the deviation among individual isogenic clones. Differentially expressed genes between the mutant and wild-type clones revealed an activation of nonsense-mediated decay pathway in mutant K562 clones as well as an inhibited FLT3 signaling. Our data support that this genome-editing approach is a robust and generally applicable platform to explore the molecular bases of gene mutations.

  14. PML/RARα and FLT3-ITD induce an APL-like disease in a mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Louise M.; Kutok, Jeffrey L.; Williams, Ifor R.; Boulton, Christina L.; Amaral, Sonia M.; Curley, David P.; Ley, Timothy J.; Gilliland, D. Gary

    2002-01-01

    Acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) cells invariably express aberrant fusion proteins involving the retinoic acid receptor α (RARα). The most common fusion partner is promyelocytic leukemia protein (PML), which is fused to RARα in the balanced reciprocal chromosomal translocation, t(15;17)(q22:q11). Expression of PML/RARα from the cathepsin G promoter in transgenic mice causes a nonfatal myeloproliferative syndrome in all mice; about 15% go on to develop APL after a long latent period, suggesting that additional mutations are required for the development of APL. A candidate target gene for a second mutation is FLT3, because it is mutated in approximately 40% of human APL cases. Activating mutations in FLT3, including internal tandem duplication (ITD) in the juxtamembrane domain, transform hematopoietic cell lines to factor independent growth. FLT3-ITDs also induce a myeloproliferative disease in a murine bone marrow transplant model, but are not sufficient to cause AML. Here, we test the hypothesis that PML/RARα can cooperate with FLT3-ITD to induce an APL-like disease in the mouse. Retroviral transduction of FLT3-ITD into bone marrow cells obtained from PML/RARα transgenic mice results in a short latency APL-like disease with complete penetrance. This disease resembles the APL-like disease that occurs with long latency in the PML/RARα transgenics, suggesting that activating mutations in FLT3 can functionally substitute for the additional mutations that occur during mouse APL progression. The leukemia is transplantable to secondary recipients and is ATRA responsive. These observations document cooperation between PML/RARα and FLT3-ITD in development of the murine APL phenotype. PMID:12060771

  15. Adaptation of the plasma inhibitory activity assay to detect Aurora, ABL and FLT3 kinase inhibition by AT9283 in pediatric leukemia.

    PubMed

    Podesta, Jennifer E; Sugar, Richard; Squires, Matt; Linardopoulos, Spiros; Pearson, Andrew D J; Moore, Andrew S

    2011-09-01

    Non-invasive assessment of biomarker modulation is important for evaluating targeted therapeutics, particularly in pediatrics. The plasma inhibitory activity (PIA) assay is used clinically to assess FLT3 inhibition ex vivo and guide dosing. AT9283 is a novel Aurora kinase inhibitor with secondary activity against FLT3 and ABL. We adapted the PIA assay to simultaneously detect inhibition of Aurora and FLT3 in AML, and Aurora and ABL in CML by AT9283. Furthermore, we optimized the assay for children, where limited blood volumes are available for pharmacodynamic studies. Simultaneously detecting multiple kinase inhibition may identify important mechanisms of action for novel anti-leukemic drugs.

  16. The AML1-ETO fusion gene and the FLT3 length mutation collaborate in inducing acute leukemia in mice

    PubMed Central

    Schessl, Christina; Rawat, Vijay P.S.; Cusan, Monica; Deshpande, Aniruddha; Kohl, Tobias M.; Rosten, Patricia M.; Spiekermann, Karsten; Humphries, R. Keith; Schnittger, Susanne; Kern, Wolfgang; Hiddemann, Wolfgang; Quintanilla-Martinez, Leticia; Bohlander, Stefan K.; Feuring-Buske, Michaela; Buske, Christian

    2005-01-01

    The molecular characterization of leukemia has demonstrated that genetic alterations in the leukemic clone frequently fall into 2 classes, those affecting transcription factors (e.g., AML1-ETO) and mutations affecting genes involved in signal transduction (e.g., activating mutations of FLT3 and KIT). This finding has favored a model of leukemogenesis in which the collaboration of these 2 classes of genetic alterations is necessary for the malignant transformation of hematopoietic progenitor cells. The model is supported by experimental data indicating that AML1-ETO and FLT3 length mutation (FLT3-LM), 2 of the most frequent genetic alterations in AML, are both insufficient on their own to cause leukemia in animal models. Here we report that AML1-ETO collaborates with FLT3-LM in inducing acute leukemia in a murine BM transplantation model. Moreover, in a series of 135 patients with AML1-ETO–positive AML, the most frequently identified class of additional mutations affected genes involved in signal transduction pathways including FLT3-LM or mutations of KIT and NRAS. These data support the concept of oncogenic cooperation between AML1-ETO and a class of activating mutations, recurrently found in patients with t(8;21), and provide a rationale for therapies targeting signal transduction pathways in AML1-ETO–positive leukemias. PMID:16025155

  17. Tumor Targeting via Integrin Ligands

    PubMed Central

    Marelli, Udaya Kiran; Rechenmacher, Florian; Sobahi, Tariq Rashad Ali; Mas-Moruno, Carlos; Kessler, Horst

    2013-01-01

    Selective and targeted delivery of drugs to tumors is a major challenge for an effective cancer therapy and also to overcome the side-effects associated with current treatments. Overexpression of various receptors on tumor cells is a characteristic structural and biochemical aspect of tumors and distinguishes them from physiologically normal cells. This abnormal feature is therefore suitable for selectively directing anticancer molecules to tumors by using ligands that can preferentially recognize such receptors. Several subtypes of integrin receptors that are crucial for cell adhesion, cell signaling, cell viability, and motility have been shown to have an upregulated expression on cancer cells. Thus, ligands that recognize specific integrin subtypes represent excellent candidates to be conjugated to drugs or drug carrier systems and be targeted to tumors. In this regard, integrins recognizing the RGD cell adhesive sequence have been extensively targeted for tumor-specific drug delivery. Here we review key recent examples on the presentation of RGD-based integrin ligands by means of distinct drug-delivery systems, and discuss the prospects of such therapies to specifically target tumor cells. PMID:24010121

  18. Rat bone marrow-derived dendritic cells generated with GM-CSF/IL-4 or FLT3L exhibit distinct phenotypical and functional characteristics.

    PubMed

    N'diaye, Marie; Warnecke, Andreas; Flytzani, Sevasti; Abdelmagid, Nada; Ruhrmann, Sabrina; Olsson, Tomas; Jagodic, Maja; Harris, Robert A; Guerreiro-Cacais, Andre Ortlieb

    2016-03-01

    Dendritic cells are professional APCs that play a central role in the initiation of immune responses. The limited ex vivo availability of dendritic cells inspires the widespread use of bone marrow-derived dendritic cells as an alternative in research. However, the functional characteristics of bone marrow-derived dendritic cells are incompletely understood. Therefore, we compared functional and phenotypic characteristics of rat bone marrow-derived dendritic cells generated with GM-CSF/IL-4 or FLT3 ligand bone marrow-derived dendritic cells. A comparison of surface markers revealed that FLT3 ligand-bone marrow-derived dendritic cells expressed signal regulatory protein α, CD103, and CD4 and baseline levels of MHC class II, CD40, and CD86, which were highly up-regulated upon stimulation. Conversely, GM-CSF/IL-4-bone marrow-derived dendritic cells constitutively expressed signal regulatory protein α, CD11c, and CD11b but only mildly up-regulated MHC class II, CD40, or CD86 following stimulation. Expression of dendritic cell-associated core transcripts was restricted to FLT3 ligand-bone marrow-derived dendritic cells . GM-CSF/IL-4-bone marrow-derived dendritic cells were superior at phagocytosis but were outperformed by FLT3 ligand-bone marrow-derived dendritic cells at antigen presentation and T cell stimulation in vitro. Stimulated GM-CSF/IL-4-bone marrow-derived dendritic cells secreted more TNF, CCL5, CCL20, and NO, whereas FLT3 ligand-bone marrow-derived dendritic cells secreted more IL-6 and IL-12. Finally, whereas GM-CSF/IL-4-bone marrow-derived dendritic cell culture supernatants added to resting T cell cultures promoted forkhead box p3(+) regulatory T cell populations, FLT3 ligand-bone marrow-derived dendritic cell culture supernatants drove Th17 differentiation. We conclude that rat GM-CSF/IL-4-bone marrow-derived dendritic cells and FLT3 ligand-bone marrow-derived dendritic cells are functionally distinct. Our data support the current rationale that FLT3

  19. Temporal Changes in FLT3-ITD Regulation of Stem Cell Self-Renewal and Leukemogenesis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-01

    whether FLT3-ITD depletes HSCs, expands restricted progenitors and promotes a myeloproliferative neoplasm during the adult, but not fetal stage of...goals: Aim 1: To test whether FLT3-ITD depletes HSCs, expands restricted progenitors and promotes a myeloproliferative neoplasm during the adult, but...progenitor pool and myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN) were also evident in 14 day old FLT3-ITD mice but not fetal mice (Fig. 1F and not shown). FLT3-ITD

  20. Expression of caveolin-1 and podocalyxin in rat lungs challenged with 2-kDa macrophage-activating lipopeptide and Flt3L.

    PubMed

    Tschernig, T; Pabst, R; Kasper, M; El-Hadi, Mustafa; Singh, B

    2014-04-01

    Caveolin-1 is one of the important regulators of vascular permeability in inflamed lungs. Podocalyxin is a CD34 protein expressed on vascular endothelium and has a role in podocyte development in the kidney. Few data are available on the expression of caveolin-1 and podocalyxin in lungs challenged with Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) agonists such as mycoplasma-derived macrophage activating lipopeptide or with immune modulators such as Fms-like tyrosine kinase receptor-3 ligand (Flt3L), which expands dendritic cell populations in the lung. Because of the significance of pathogen-derived molecules that act through TLR2 and of the role of immune modulators in lung physiology, we examine the immunohistochemical expression of caveolin-1 and podocalyxin in lungs from rats challenged with a 2-kDa macrophage-activating lipopeptide (MALP-2) and Flt3L. Normal rat lungs expressed caveolin-1 in alveolar septa, vascular endothelium and airway epithelium, especially along the lateral borders of epithelial cells but not in alveolar macrophages. MALP-2 and Flt3L decreased and increased, respectively, the expression of caveolin-1. Caveolin-1 expression seemed to increase in microvessels in bronchiole-associated lymphoid tissue (BALT) in Flt3L-challenged lungs but not in normal or MALP-2-treated lungs. Podocalyxin was absent in the epithelium and alveolar macrophages but was present in the vasculature of control, Flt3L- and MALP-2-treated rats. Compared with control and MALP-2-treated rats, Flt3L-treated lungs showed greater expression of podocalyxin in BALT vasculature and at the interface of monocytes and the endothelium. These immunohistochemical data describing the altered expression of caveolin-1 and podocalyxin in lungs treated with MALP-2 or Flt3L encourage further mechanistic studies on the role of podocalyxin and caveolin-1 in lung inflammation.

  1. FLT3 Mutations in Early T-Cell Precursor ALL Characterize a Stem Cell Like Leukemia and Imply the Clinical Use of Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Neumann, Martin; Coskun, Ebru; Fransecky, Lars; Mochmann, Liliana H.; Bartram, Isabelle; Farhadi Sartangi, Nasrin; Heesch, Sandra; Gökbuget, Nicola; Schwartz, Stefan; Brandts, Christian; Schlee, Cornelia; Haas, Rainer; Dührsen, Ulrich; Griesshammer, Martin; Döhner, Hartmut; Ehninger, Gerhard; Burmeister, Thomas; Blau, Olga; Thiel, Eckhard; Hoelzer, Dieter; Hofmann, Wolf-Karsten; Baldus, Claudia D.

    2013-01-01

    Early T-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ETP-ALL) has been identified as high-risk subgroup of acute T-lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) with a high rate of FLT3-mutations in adults. To unravel the underlying pathomechanisms and the clinical course we assessed molecular alterations and clinical characteristics in a large cohort of ETP-ALL (n = 68) in comparison to non-ETP T-ALL adult patients. Interestingly, we found a high rate of FLT3-mutations in ETP-ALL samples (n = 24, 35%). Furthermore, FLT3 mutated ETP-ALL was characterized by a specific immunophenotype (CD2+/CD5-/CD13+/CD33-), a distinct gene expression pattern (aberrant expression of IGFBP7, WT1, GATA3) and mutational status (absence of NOTCH1 mutations and a low frequency, 21%, of clonal TCR rearrangements). The observed low GATA3 expression and high WT1 expression in combination with lack of NOTCH1 mutations and a low rate of TCR rearrangements point to a leukemic transformation at the pluripotent prothymocyte stage in FLT3 mutated ETP-ALL. The clinical outcome in ETP-ALL patients was poor, but encouraging in those patients with allogeneic stem cell transplantation (3-year OS: 74%). To further explore the efficacy of targeted therapies, we demonstrate that T-ALL cell lines transfected with FLT3 expression constructs were particularly sensitive to tyrosine kinase inhibitors. In conclusion, FLT3 mutated ETP-ALL defines a molecular distinct stem cell like leukemic subtype. These data warrant clinical studies with the implementation of FLT3 inhibitors in addition to early allogeneic stem cell transplantation for this high risk subgroup. PMID:23359050

  2. NKG2D ligands as therapeutic targets

    PubMed Central

    Spear, Paul; Wu, Ming-Ru; Sentman, Marie-Louise; Sentman, Charles L.

    2013-01-01

    The Natural Killer Group 2D (NKG2D) receptor plays an important role in protecting the host from infections and cancer. By recognizing ligands induced on infected or tumor cells, NKG2D modulates lymphocyte activation and promotes immunity to eliminate ligand-expressing cells. Because these ligands are not widely expressed on healthy adult tissue, NKG2D ligands may present a useful target for immunotherapeutic approaches in cancer. Novel therapies targeting NKG2D ligands for the treatment of cancer have shown preclinical success and are poised to enter into clinical trials. In this review, the NKG2D receptor and its ligands are discussed in the context of cancer, infection, and autoimmunity. In addition, therapies targeting NKG2D ligands in cancer are also reviewed. PMID:23833565

  3. PRL-3, a metastasis associated tyrosine phosphatase, is involved in FLT3-ITD signaling and implicated in anti-AML therapy.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jianbiao; Bi, Chonglei; Chng, Wee-Joo; Cheong, Lip-Lee; Liu, Shaw-Cheng; Mahara, Sylvia; Tay, Kian-Ghee; Zeng, Qi; Li, Jie; Guo, Ke; Tan, Cheng Peow Bobby; Yu, Hanry; Albert, Daniel H; Chen, Chien-Shing

    2011-05-12

    Combination with other small molecule drugs represents a promising strategy to improve therapeutic efficacy of FLT3 inhibitors in the clinic. We demonstrated that combining ABT-869, a FLT3 inhibitor, with SAHA, a HDAC inhibitor, led to synergistic killing of the AML cells with FLT3 mutations and suppression of colony formation. We identified a core gene signature that is uniquely induced by the combination treatment in 2 different leukemia cell lines. Among these, we showed that downregulation of PTP4A3 (PRL-3) played a role in this synergism. PRL-3 is downstream of FLT3 signaling and ectopic expression of PRL-3 conferred therapeutic resistance through upregulation of STAT (signal transducers and activators of transcription) pathway activity and anti-apoptotic Mcl-1 protein. PRL-3 interacts with HDAC4 and SAHA downregulates PRL-3 via a proteasome dependent pathway. In addition, PRL-3 protein was identified in 47% of AML cases, but was absent in myeloid cells in normal bone marrows. Our results suggest such combination therapies may significantly improve the therapeutic efficacy of FLT3 inhibitors. PRL-3 plays a potential pathological role in AML and it might be a useful therapeutic target in AML, and warrant clinical investigation.

  4. Specific detection of Flt3 point mutations by highly sensitive real-time polymerase chain reaction in acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Scholl, Sebastian; Krause, Claudia; Loncarevic, Ivan F; Müller, Rouven; Kunert, Christa; Wedding, Ulrich; Sayer, Herbert G; Clement, Joachim H; Höffken, Klaus

    2005-06-01

    Among activating class III receptor tyrosine kinase (Flt3) mutations, internal tandem duplications of Flt3 (Flt3-ITD) are detected in about 25% of patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). In contrast, mutations within the tyrosine kinase domain of Flt3 (Flt3-TKD mutations) are less frequent (approximately 7%), and there are only limited data on the frequency of recently demonstrated activating Flt3 point mutation at codon 592 (Flt3-V592A mutation). We evaluated a new approach for rapid screening of Flt3-TKD and Flt3-V592A mutations using the fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) principle in a group of 122 patients. Based on individual Flt3-TKD mutations, we designed patient-specific primers to perform a highly sensitive polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay for rapid detection of minimal residual disease (MRD). We also used a model system with MonoMac-6 cells carrying the Flt3-V592A mutation to establish a mutation-specific real-time PCR approach also for this molecular aberration. We identified 9 cases (8%) of Flt3-TKD mutations (5 cases of mutation D835Y, 3 cases of mutation D835H, and 1 case of mutation Del836), and no cases of Flt3-V592A mutation. Screening for Flt3-TKD mutations with fluorescent probes is equivalent to conventional screening using standard PCR followed by EcoRV restriction. We present a real-time PCR protocol that can be used for MRD analyses based on individual Flt3-TKD mutations. Examples of MRD analyses are presented for all 3 subtypes of Flt3-TKD mutation identified in this study. In summary, we demonstrate new methodological approaches for rapid screening of Flt3 point mutations and for detection of MRD based on patient-specific Flt3-TKD mutations.

  5. Crystal structure of the FLT3 kinase domain bound to the inhibitor quizartinib (AC220)

    SciTech Connect

    Zorn, Julie A.; Wang, Qi; Fujimura, Eric; Barros, Tiago; Kuriyan, John; Boggon, Titus J.

    2015-04-02

    More than 30% of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients possess activating mutations in the receptor tyrosine kinase FMS-like tyrosine kinase 3 or FLT3. A small-molecule inhibitor of FLT3 (known as quizartinib or AC220) that is currently in clinical trials appears promising for the treatment of AML. Here, we report the co-crystal structure of the kinase domain of FLT3 in complex with quizartinib. FLT3 with quizartinib bound adopts an “Abl-like” inactive conformation with the activation loop stabilized in the “DFG-out” orientation and folded back onto the kinase domain. This conformation is similar to that observed for the uncomplexed intracellular domain of FLT3 as well as for related receptor tyrosine kinases, except for a localized induced fit in the activation loop. The co-crystal structure reveals the interactions between quizartinib and the active site of FLT3 that are key for achieving its high potency against both wild-type FLT3 as well as a FLT3 variant observed in many AML patients. This co-complex further provides a structural rationale for quizartinib-resistance mutations.

  6. Crystal structure of the FLT3 kinase domain bound to the inhibitor quizartinib (AC220)

    DOE PAGES

    Zorn, Julie A.; Wang, Qi; Fujimura, Eric; ...

    2015-04-02

    More than 30% of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients possess activating mutations in the receptor tyrosine kinase FMS-like tyrosine kinase 3 or FLT3. A small-molecule inhibitor of FLT3 (known as quizartinib or AC220) that is currently in clinical trials appears promising for the treatment of AML. Here, we report the co-crystal structure of the kinase domain of FLT3 in complex with quizartinib. FLT3 with quizartinib bound adopts an “Abl-like” inactive conformation with the activation loop stabilized in the “DFG-out” orientation and folded back onto the kinase domain. This conformation is similar to that observed for the uncomplexed intracellular domain ofmore » FLT3 as well as for related receptor tyrosine kinases, except for a localized induced fit in the activation loop. The co-crystal structure reveals the interactions between quizartinib and the active site of FLT3 that are key for achieving its high potency against both wild-type FLT3 as well as a FLT3 variant observed in many AML patients. This co-complex further provides a structural rationale for quizartinib-resistance mutations.« less

  7. Spontaneous Remission in an Older Patient with Relapsed FLT3 ITD Mutant AML

    PubMed Central

    Mendler, Jason H.; Evans, Andrew; Deeb, George; Starostik, Petr; Wallace, Paul K.; Wang, Eunice S.

    2016-01-01

    Spontaneous remission (SR) of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a very rare phenomenon. AML characterized by FLT3 internal tandem duplication (FLT3 ITD) is typically associated with an aggressive clinical course with rapid progression, relapse, and short overall survival in the absence of transplantation. We report here the first case of SR of FLT3 ITD mutant AML in the literature. Our patient was an elderly woman with relapsed NPM1 and FLT3 ITD mutant AML whose disease underwent SR for a brief duration without precipitating cause. We review the potential immune mechanisms underlying SR in AML and discuss the implications for novel immunotherapeutic approaches for FLT3 mutant AML. PMID:28127477

  8. UNC2025, a Potent and Orally Bioavailable MER/FLT3 Dual Inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We previously reported a potent small molecule Mer tyrosine kinase inhibitor UNC1062. However, its poor PK properties prevented further assessment in vivo. We report here the sequential modification of UNC1062 to address DMPK properties and yield a new potent and highly orally bioavailable Mer inhibitor, 11, capable of inhibiting Mer phosphorylation in vivo, following oral dosing as demonstrated by pharmaco-dynamic (PD) studies examining phospho-Mer in leukemic blasts from mouse bone marrow. Kinome profiling versus more than 300 kinases in vitro and cellular selectivity assessments demonstrate that 11 has similar subnanomolar activity against Flt3, an additional important target in acute myelogenous leukemia (AML), with pharmacologically useful selectivity versus other kinases examined. PMID:25068800

  9. UNC2025, a potent and orally bioavailable MER/FLT3 dual inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Weihe; DeRyckere, Deborah; Hunter, Debra; Liu, Jing; Stashko, Michael A; Minson, Katherine A; Cummings, Christopher T; Lee, Minjung; Glaros, Trevor G; Newton, Dianne L; Sather, Susan; Zhang, Dehui; Kireev, Dmitri; Janzen, William P; Earp, H Shelton; Graham, Douglas K; Frye, Stephen V; Wang, Xiaodong

    2014-08-28

    We previously reported a potent small molecule Mer tyrosine kinase inhibitor UNC1062. However, its poor PK properties prevented further assessment in vivo. We report here the sequential modification of UNC1062 to address DMPK properties and yield a new potent and highly orally bioavailable Mer inhibitor, 11, capable of inhibiting Mer phosphorylation in vivo, following oral dosing as demonstrated by pharmaco-dynamic (PD) studies examining phospho-Mer in leukemic blasts from mouse bone marrow. Kinome profiling versus more than 300 kinases in vitro and cellular selectivity assessments demonstrate that 11 has similar subnanomolar activity against Flt3, an additional important target in acute myelogenous leukemia (AML), with pharmacologically useful selectivity versus other kinases examined.

  10. Midostaurin and Decitabine in Treating Older Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Myeloid Leukemia and FLT3 Mutation

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-10

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia With FLT3/ITD Mutation; Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Gene Mutations; FLT3 Tyrosine Kinase Domain Point Mutation; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  11. IMC-EB10, an anti-FLT3 monoclonal antibody, prolongs survival and reduces nonobese diabetic/severe combined immunodeficient engraftment of some acute lymphoblastic leukemia cell lines and primary leukemic samples.

    PubMed

    Piloto, Obdulio; Nguyen, Bao; Huso, David; Kim, Kyu-Tae; Li, Yiwen; Witte, Larry; Hicklin, Daniel J; Brown, Patrick; Small, Donald

    2006-05-01

    The class III receptor tyrosine kinase FLT3 is expressed on the blasts of >90% of patients with B-lineage acute lymphoblastic leukemias (ALL). In addition, it is expressed at extremely high levels in ALL patients with mixed lineage leukemia rearrangements or hyperdiploidy and is sometimes mutated in these same patients. In this report, we investigate the effects of treating ALL cell lines and primary samples with human anti-FLT3 monoclonal antibodies (mAb) capable of preventing binding of FLT3 ligand. In vitro studies, examining the ability of two anti-FLT3 mAbs (IMC-EB10 and IMC-NC7) to affect FLT3 activation and downstream signaling in ALL cell lines and primary blasts, yielded variable results. FLT3 phosphorylation was consistently inhibited by IMC-NC7 treatment, but in some cell lines, IMC-EB10 actually stimulated FLT3 activation, possibly as a result of antibody-mediated receptor dimerization. Through antibody-dependent, cell-mediated cytotoxicity, such an antibody could still prove efficacious against leukemia cells in vivo. In fact, IMC-EB10 treatment significantly prolonged survival and/or reduced engraftment of several ALL cell lines and primary ALL samples in nonobese diabetic/severe combined immunodeficient (NOD/SCID) mice. This occurred even when IMC-EB10 treatment resulted in FLT3 activation in vitro. Moreover, fluorescence-activated cell sorting and PCR analysis of IMC-EB10-treated NOD/SCID mice surviving 150 days post-leukemic cell injection revealed that FLT3 immunotherapy reduced leukemic engraftment below the level of detection in these assays (<0.001%). Furthermore, in vivo IMC-EB10 treatment did not select for resistant cells, because cells surviving IMC-EB10 treatment remain sensitive to IMC-EB10 cytotoxicity upon retransplantation. In vivo studies involving either partial depletion or activation of natural killer (NK) cells show that most of the cytotoxic effect of IMC-EB10 is mediated through NK cells. Therefore, such an antibody, either

  12. Improved FLT3/ITD PCR assay predicts outcome following allogeneic transplant for AML

    PubMed Central

    Grunwald, Michael R.; Tseng, Li-Hui; Lin, Ming-Tseh; Pratz, Keith W.; Eshleman, James R.; Levis, Mark J.; Gocke, Christopher D.

    2014-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients harboring internal tandem duplication (ITD) mutations of the FMS-like tyrosine kinase 3 (FLT3) gene carry a poor prognosis. While allogeneic transplantation may improve outcomes, relapse occurs frequently. The FLT3/ITD mutation has been deemed an unsuitable minimal residual disease (MRD) marker because it is unstable and because the standard assay for the mutation is relatively insensitive. The FLT3 mutation is undetectable by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) at pre- or post-transplant time points in many FLT3/ITD AML patients who subsequently relapse following transplant. We report the application of a new technique, tandem duplication PCR (TD-PCR), for detecting MRD in FLT3/ITD AML patients. Between October 2004 and January 2012, 54 FLT3/ITD AML patients in remission underwent transplantation at our institution. Of 37 patients with available Day 60 marrow samples, 28 (76%) were evaluable for MRD detection. In seven (25%) of the 28 patients, the FLT3/ITD mutation was detectable by TD-PCR, but not by standard PCR, on day 60. Six out of the seven patients (86%) with MRD by TD-PCR have relapsed to date compared with only 2 of 21 (10%) patients who were negative for MRD (p = 0.0003). The ability to detect MRD by this sensitive technique may provide an opportunity for early clinical intervention. PMID:25240816

  13. Regulation of the Flt3 Gene in Haematopoietic Stem and Early Progenitor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Volpe, Giacomo; Walton, David Scott; Vegiopoulos, Alexandros; Del Pozzo, Walter; O’Neill, Laura Patricia; Frampton, Jonathan; Dumon, Stéphanie

    2015-01-01

    The MYB transcription factor plays critical roles in normal and malignant haematopoiesis. We previously showed that MYB was a direct activator of FLT3 expression within the context of acute myeloid leukaemia. During normal haematopoiesis, increasing levels of FLT3 expression determine a strict hierarchy within the haematopoietic stem and early progenitor compartment, which associates with lymphoid and myeloid commitment potential. We use the conditional deletion of the Myb gene to investigate the influence of MYB in Flt3 transcriptional regulation within the haematopoietic stem cell (HSC) hierarchy. In accordance with previous report, in vivo deletion of Myb resulted in rapid biased differentiation of HSC with concomitant loss of proliferation capacity. We find that loss of MYB activity also coincided with decreased FLT3 expression. At the chromatin level, the Flt3 promoter is primed in immature HSC, but occupancy of further intronic elements determines expression. Binding to these locations, MYB and C/EBPα need functional cooperation to activate transcription of the locus. This cooperation is cell context dependent and indicates that MYB and C/EBPα activities are inter-dependent in controlling Flt3 expression to influence lineage commitment of multipotential progenitors. PMID:26382271

  14. Structure-based design of oxygen-linked macrocyclic kinase inhibitors: discovery of SB1518 and SB1578, potent inhibitors of Janus kinase 2 (JAK2) and Fms-like tyrosine kinase-3 (FLT3)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poulsen, Anders; William, Anthony; Blanchard, Stéphanie; Lee, Angeline; Nagaraj, Harish; Wang, Haishan; Teo, Eeling; Tan, Evelyn; Goh, Kee Chuan; Dymock, Brian

    2012-04-01

    Macrocycles from our Aurora project were screened in a kinase panel and were found to be active on other kinase targets, mainly JAKs, FLT3 and CDKs. Subsequently these compounds became leads in our JAK2 project. Macrocycles with a basic nitrogen in the linker form a salt bridge with Asp86 in CDK2 and Asp698 in FLT3. This residue is conserved in most CDKs resulting in potent pan CDK inhibition. One of the main project objectives was to achieve JAK2 potency with 100-fold selectivity against CDKs. Macrocycles with an ether linker have potent JAK2 activity with the ether oxygen forming a hydrogen bond to Ser936. A hydrogen bond to the equivalent residues of JAK3 and most CDKs cannot be formed resulting in good selectivity for JAK2 over JAK3 and CDKs. Further optimization of the macrocyclic linker and side chain increased JAK2 and FLT3 activity as well as improving DMPK properties. The selective JAK2/FLT3 inhibitor 11 (Pacritinib, SB1518) has successfully finished phase 2 clinical trials for myelofibrosis and lymphoma. Another selective JAK2/FLT3 inhibitor, 33 (SB1578), has entered phase 1 clinical development for the non-oncology indication rheumatoid arthritis.

  15. Deletion and deletion/insertion mutations in the juxtamembrane domain of the FLT3 gene in adult acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Deeb, Kristin K.; Smonskey, Matthew T.; DeFedericis, HanChun; Deeb, George; Sait, Sheila N.J.; Wetzler, Meir; Wang, Eunice S.; Starostik, Petr

    2014-01-01

    In contrast to FLT3 ITD mutations, in-frame deletions in the FLT3 gene have rarely been described in adult acute leukemia. We report two cases of AML with uncommon in-frame mutations in the juxtamembrane domain of the FLT3 gene: a 3-bp (c.1770_1774delCTACGinsGT; p.F590_V592delinsLF) deletion/insertion and a 12-bp (c.1780_1791delTTCAGAGAATAT; p.F594_Y597del) deletion. We verified by sequencing that the reading frame of the FLT3 gene was preserved and by cDNA analysis that the mRNA of the mutant allele was expressed in both cases. Given the recent development of FLT3 inhibitors, our findings may be of therapeutic value for AML patients harboring similar FLT3 mutations. PMID:25379410

  16. Ligand-targeted particulate nanomedicines undergoing clinical evaluation: current status.

    PubMed

    van der Meel, Roy; Vehmeijer, Laurens J C; Kok, Robbert J; Storm, Gert; van Gaal, Ethlinn V B

    2013-10-01

    Since the introduction of Doxil® on the market nearly 20years ago, a number of nanomedicines have become part of treatment regimens in the clinic. With the exception of antibody-drug conjugates, these nanomedicines are all devoid of targeting ligands and rely solely on their physicochemical properties and the (patho)physiological processes in the body for their biodistribution and targeting capability. At the same time, many preclinical studies have reported on nanomedicines exposing targeting ligands, or ligand-targeted nanomedicines, yet none of these have been approved at this moment. In the present review, we provide a concise overview of 13 ligand-targeted particulate nanomedicines (ligand-targeted PNMs) that have progressed into clinical trials. The progress of each ligand-targeted PNM is discussed based on available (pre)clinical data. Main conclusions of these analyses are that (a) ligand-targeted PNMs have proven to be safe and efficacious in preclinical models; (b) the vast majority of ligand-targeted PNMs is generated for the treatment of cancer; (c) contribution of targeting ligands to the PNM efficacy is not unambiguously proven; and (d) targeting ligands do not cause localization of the PNM within the target tissue, but rather provide benefits in terms of target cell internalization and target tissue retention once the PNM has arrived at the target site. Increased understanding of the in vivo fate and interactions of the ligand-targeted PNMs with proteins and cells in the human body is mandatory to rationally advance the clinical translation of ligand-targeted PNMs. Future perspectives for ligand-targeted PNM approaches include the delivery of drugs that are unable or inefficient in passing cellular membranes, treatment of drug resistant tumors, targeting of the tumor blood supply, the generation of targeted vaccines and nanomedicines that are able to cross the blood-brain barrier.

  17. FLT3-ITD Mutations in Acute Myeloid Leukemia Patients in Northeast Thailand.

    PubMed

    Kumsaen, Piyawan; Fucharoen, Goonnapa; Sirijerachai, Chittima; Chainansamit, Su-On; Wisanuyothin, Nittaya; Kuwatjanakul, Pichayanan; Wiangnon, Surapon

    2016-01-01

    The FLT3-ITD mutation is one of the most frequent genetic abnormalities in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) where it is associated with a poor prognosis. The FLT3-ITD mutation could, therefore, be a potential molecular prognostic marker important for risk-stratified treatment options. We amplified the FLT3 gene at exon 14 and 15 in 52 AML patients (aged between 2 months and 74 years) from 4 referral centers (a university hospital and 3 regional hospitals in Northeast Thailand), using a simple PCR method. FLT3-ITD mutations were found in 10 patients (19.2%), being more common in adults than in children (21.1% vs. 14.3%) and more prevalent in patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia (AML-M3) than AML-non M3 (4 of 10 AML-M3 vs. 6 of 42 AML- non M3 patients). Duplication sequences varied in size-between 27 and 171 nucleotides (median=63.5) and in their location. FLT3-ITD mutations with common duplication sequences accounted for a significant percentage in AML patients in northeastern Thailand. This simple PCR method is feasible for routine laboratory practice and these data could help tailor use of the national protocol for AML.

  18. FLT3 is implicated in cytarabine transport by human equilibrative nucleoside transporter 1 in pediatric acute leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Català, Albert; Pastor-Anglada, Marçal; Caviedes-Cárdenas, Liska; Malatesta, Roberta; Rives, Susana; Vega-García, Nerea

    2016-01-01

    FLT3 abnormalities are negative prognostic markers in acute leukemia. Infant leukemias are a subgroup with frequent MLL (KMT2A) rearrangements, FLT3 overexpression and high sensitivity to cytarabine, but dismal prognosis. Cytarabine is transported into cells by Human Equilibrative Nucleoside Transporter-1 (hENT1, SLC29A1), but the mechanisms that regulate hENT1 in acute leukemia have been scarcely studied. We explored the expression and functional link between FLT3 and main cytarabine transporters in 50 pediatric patients diagnosed with acute lymphoblastic leukemia and MLL rearrangement (ALL-MLL+) and other subtypes of leukemia, and in leukemia cell lines. A significant positive correlation was found between FLT3 and hENT1 expression in patients. Cytarabine uptake into cells was mediated mainly by hENT1, hENT2 and hCNT1. hENT1-mediated uptake of cytarabine was transiently abolished by the FLT3 inhibitor PKC412, and this effect was associated with decreased hENT1 mRNA and protein levels. Noticeably, the cytotoxicity of cytarabine was lower when cells were first exposed to FLT3 inhibitors (PKC412 or AC220), probably due to decreased hENT1 activity, but we observed a higher cytotoxic effect if FLT3 inhibitors were administered after cytarabine. FLT3 regulates hENT1 activity and thereby affects cytarabine cytotoxicity. The sequence of administration of cytarabine and FLT3 inhibitors is important to maintain their efficacy. PMID:27391351

  19. The Flt3 Internal Tandem Duplication Alters Chemotherapy Response In Vitro and In Vivo in a p53-Dependent Manner

    PubMed Central

    Pardee, Timothy S.; Zuber, Johannes; Lowe, Scott W.

    2011-01-01

    Objective The FLT3 internal tandem duplication (Flt3-ITD) confers a worse prognosis for patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML); however, the mechanisms involved are unknown. As AML is treated with cytarabine (Ara-C) and an anthracycline we sought to determine the effects of the Flt3-ITD on response to these agents. Methods A genetically defined mouse model of AML was used to examine the effects of the Flt3-ITD on response to cytarabine and doxorubicin in vitro and in vivo. Results In vitro, the Flt3-ITD conferred resistance to doxorubicin and doxorubicin plus Ara-C, but sensitivity to Ara-C alone. This resistance was reversible by the Flt3-ITD inhibitor sorafenib. The Flt3-ITD did not affect DNA damage levels following treatment but was associated with increased levels of p53. The p53 response was critical to the observed changes as the Flt3-ITD had no effect on chemotherapy response in the setting of p53 null AML. In vivo, the Flt3-ITD accelerated engraftment that was partially reversible by Ara-C but not doxorubicin. Additionally, Ara-C provided a significant reduction in disease burden and a survival advantage that was not increased by the addition of doxorubicin. Doxorubicin alone lead to only minimal disease reduction and no survival benefit. Conclusions These data demonstrate that the Flt3-ITD confers sensitivity to cytarabine, but resistance to doxorubicin in a manner that depends on p53. Thus, patients with Flt3-ITD positive AML may not benefit from treatment with an anthracycline. PMID:21288478

  20. Selective FLT3 inhibitor FI-700 neutralizes Mcl-1 and enhances p53-mediated apoptosis in AML cells with activating mutations of FLT3 through Mcl-1/Noxa axis.

    PubMed

    Kojima, K; Konopleva, M; Tsao, T; Andreeff, M; Ishida, H; Shiotsu, Y; Jin, L; Tabe, Y; Nakakuma, H

    2010-01-01

    Treatment using Fms-like tyrosine kinase-3 (FLT3) inhibitors is a promising approach to overcome the dismal prognosis of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) with activating FLT3 mutations. Current trials are combining FLT3 inhibitors with p53-activating conventional chemotherapy. The mechanisms of cytotoxicity of FLT3 inhibitors are poorly understood. We investigated the interaction of FLT3 and p53 pathways after their simultaneous blockade using the selective FLT3 inhibitor FI-700 and the MDM2 inhibitor Nutlin-3 in AML. We found that FI-700 immediately reduced antiapoptotic Mcl-1 levels and enhanced Nutlin-induced p53-mediated mitochondrial apoptosis in FLT3/internal tandem duplication cells through the Mcl-1/Noxa axis. FI-700 induced proteasome-mediated degradation of Mcl-1, resulting in the reduced ability of Mcl-1 to sequester proapoptotic Bim. Nutlin-3 induced Noxa, which displaced Bim from Mcl-1. The FI-700/Nutlin-3 combination profoundly activated Bax and induced apoptosis. Our findings suggest that FI-700 actively enhances p53 signaling toward mitochondrial apoptosis and that a combination strategy aimed at inhibiting FLT3 and activating p53 signaling could potentially be effective in AML.

  1. Novel anticancer compound [trifluoromethyl-substituted pyrazole N-nucleoside] inhibits FLT3 activity to induce differentiation in acute myeloid leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Saleh, Ayman M; Taha, Mutasem O; Aziz, Mohammad A; Al-Qudah, Mahmoud A; AbuTayeh, Reem F; Rizvi, Syed A

    2016-06-01

    Anticancer properties of chemically synthesized compounds have continuously been optimized for better efficacy and selectivity. Derivatives of heterocyclic compounds are well known to have selective antiproliferative effect against many types of cancer. In this study, we investigated the ability of an indigenously synthesized anticancer molecule, G-11 [1-(2",3",4",6"-Tetra-O-acetyl-β-D-glucopyranosyl)-4-(3'-trifluoromethylphenylhydrazono)-3-trifluoromethyl-1,4-dihydropyrazol-5-one], to cause selective cytotoxicity and induce differentiation in the acute myeloid leukemia HL-60 cells. G-11 was able to exert cytotoxic effect on hematological (Jurkat, U937, K562, HL-60, CCRF-SB) and solid tumor (MCF-7, HepG2, HeLa, Caco-2) cell lines, with IC50 values significantly lower than noncancerous cells (HEK-293, BJ and Vero) and normal peripheral blood mononuclear cells. G-11 induced differentiation of HL-60 cells to granulocytes and monocytes/macrophages by inhibiting the activation of FLT3 (CD135 tyrosine kinase). ITD-FLT3 mutation found in many acute myeloid leukemia patients could also be targeted by G-11 as exhibited by its inhibitory effect on MOLM-13 and MV4-11 cell lines. Molecular docking studies suggest the involvement of Leu616, Asp698, Cys694 and Cys828 residues in binding of G-11 to FLT3. The ability of G-11 to cause selective cytotoxicity and induce differentiation in cancer cells could be clinically relevant for therapeutic gains.

  2. Design of ligand-targeted nanoparticles for enhanced cancer targeting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefanick, Jared F.

    Ligand-targeted nanoparticles are increasingly used as drug delivery vehicles for cancer therapy, yet have not consistently produced successful clinical outcomes. Although these inconsistencies may arise from differences in disease models and target receptors, nanoparticle design parameters can significantly influence therapeutic efficacy. By employing a multifaceted synthetic strategy to prepare peptide-targeted nanoparticles with high purity, reproducibility, and precisely controlled stoichiometry of functionalities, this work evaluates the roles of polyethylene glycol (PEG) coating, ethylene glycol (EG) peptide-linker length, peptide hydrophilicity, peptide density, and nanoparticle size on tumor targeting in a systematic manner. These parameters were analyzed in multiple disease models by targeting human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) in breast cancer and very late antigen-4 (VLA-4) in multiple myeloma to demonstrate the widespread applicability of this approach. By increasing the hydrophilicity of the targeting peptide sequence and simultaneously optimizing the EG peptide-linker length, the in vitro cellular uptake of targeted liposomes was significantly enhanced. Specifically, including a short oligolysine chain adjacent to the targeting peptide sequence effectively increased cellular uptake ~80-fold using an EG6 peptide-linker compared to ~10-fold using an EG45 linker. In vivo, targeted liposomes prepared in a traditional manner lacking the oligolysine chain demonstrated similar biodistribution and tumor uptake to non-targeted liposomes. However, by including the oligolysine chain, targeted liposomes using an EG45 linker significantly improved tumor uptake ~8-fold over non-targeted liposomes, while the use of an EG6 linker decreased tumor accumulation and uptake, owing to differences in cellular uptake kinetics, clearance mechanisms, and binding site barrier effects. To further improve tumor targeting and enhance the selectivity of targeted

  3. Plasma inhibitory activity (PIA): a pharmacodynamic assay reveals insights into the basis for cytotoxic response to FLT3 inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Levis, Mark; Brown, Patrick; Smith, B. Douglas; Stine, Adam; Pham, Rosalyn; Stone, Richard; DeAngelo, Daniel; Galinsky, Ilene; Giles, Frank; Estey, Elihu; Kantarjian, Hagop; Cohen, Pamela; Wang, Yanfeng; Roesel, Johannes; Karp, Judith E.; Small, Donald

    2006-01-01

    We have developed a useful surrogate assay for monitoring the efficacy of FLT3 inhibition in patients treated with oral FLT3 inhibitors. The plasma inhibitory activity (PIA) for FLT3 correlates with clinical activity in patients treated with CEP-701 and PKC412. Using the PIA assay, along with in vitro phosphorylation and cytotoxicity assays in leukemia cells, we compared PKC412 and its metabolite, CGP52421, with CEP-701. While both drugs could effectively inhibit FLT3 in vitro, CEP-701 was more cytotoxic to primary samples at comparable levels of FLT3 inhibition. PKC412 appears to be more selective than CEP-701 and therefore less effective at inducing cytotoxicity in primary acute myeloid leukemia (AML) samples in vitro. However, the PKC412 metabolite CGP52421 is less selective than its parent compound, PKC412, and is more cytotoxic against primary blast samples at comparable levels of FLT3 inhibition. The plasma inhibitory activity assay represents a useful correlative tool in the development of small-molecule inhibitors. Our application of this assay has revealed that the metabolite CGP52421 may contribute a significant portion of the antileukemia activity observed in patients receiving oral PKC412. Additionally, our results suggest that nonselectivity may constitute an important component of the cytotoxic effect of FLT3 inhibitors in FLT3-mutant AML. PMID:16857987

  4. FLT3 and NPM-1 mutations in a cohort of acute promyelocytic leukemia patients from India

    PubMed Central

    Swaminathan, Suchitra; Garg, Swati; Madkaikar, Manisha; Gupta, Maya; Jijina, Farah; Ghosh, Kanjaksha

    2014-01-01

    Background: Acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) with t (15;17) is a distinct category of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and is reported to show better response to anthracyclin based chemotherapy. A favorable overall prognosis over other subtypes of AML has been reported for APL patients but still about 15% patients relapse. Methods: This study evaluated the presence of Famus like tyrosine kinase-3 (FLT3) and nucleophosmin-1 (NPM1) gene mutations in a cohort of 40 APL patients. Bone marrow/peripheral blood samples from patients at the time of diagnosis and follow-up were processed for immunophenotyping, cytogenetic markers and isolation of DNA and RNA. Samples were screened for the presence of mutations in FLT3 and NPM1 genes using polymerase chain reaction followed by sequencing. Results: Frequency of FLT3/internal tandem duplication and FLT3/tyrosine kinase domain was found to be 25% and 7% respectively. We observed a high frequency of NPM1 mutation (45%) in the present population of APL patients. PMID:25400345

  5. Facile identification of dual FLT3-Aurora A inhibitors: a computer-guided drug design approach.

    PubMed

    Chang Hsu, Yung; Ke, Yi-Yu; Shiao, Hui-Yi; Lee, Chieh-Chien; Lin, Wen-Hsing; Chen, Chun-Hwa; Yen, Kuei-Jung; Hsu, John T-A; Chang, Chungming; Hsieh, Hsing-Pang

    2014-05-01

    Computer-guided drug design is a powerful tool for drug discovery. Herein we disclose the use of this approach for the discovery of dual FMS-like receptor tyrosine kinase-3 (FLT3)-Aurora A inhibitors against cancer. An Aurora hit compound was selected as a starting point, from which 288 virtual molecules were screened. Subsequently, some of these were synthesized and evaluated for their capacity to inhibit FLT3 and Aurora kinase A. To further enhance FLT3 inhibition, structure-activity relationship studies of the lead compound were conducted through a simplification strategy and bioisosteric replacement, followed by the use of computer-guided drug design to prioritize molecules bearing a variety of different terminal groups in terms of favorable binding energy. Selected compounds were then synthesized, and their bioactivity was evaluated. Of these, one novel inhibitor was found to exhibit excellent inhibition of FLT3 and Aurora kinase A and exert a dramatic antiproliferative effect on MOLM-13 and MV4-11 cells, with an IC50 value of 7 nM. Accordingly, it is considered a highly promising candidate for further development.

  6. A Novel Tandem Duplication Assay to Detect Minimal Residual Disease in FLT3/ITD AML

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Ming-Tseh; Tseng, Li-Hui; Dudley, Jonathan C.; Riel, Stacey; Tsai, Harrison; Zheng, Gang; Pratz, Keith W.; Levis, Mark J.; Gocke, Christopher D.

    2015-01-01

    Background Internal tandem duplication (ITD) of the FLT3 gene is associated with poor prognosis in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients with a normal karyotype. The current standard PCR assay for FLT3/ITD detection is not sufficiently sensitive to monitor minimal residual disease (MRD). Clone-specific assays may have sufficient sensitivity but are not practical to implement, since each clone-specific primer/probe requires clinical validation. Objective To develop an assay for clinical molecular diagnostics laboratories to monitor MRD in FLT3/ITD AMLs. Methods We designed a simple novel assay, tandem duplication PCR (TD-PCR), and tested its sensitivity, specificity and clinical utility in FLT3/ITD AML patients. Results TD-PCR was capable of detecting a single ITD molecule and was applicable to 75% of ITD mutants tested. TD-PCR detected MRD in bone marrow prior to patient relapse. TD-PCR also identified low level ITD mutants not only in FLT3/ITD AMLs but also in initial diagnostic specimens reportedly negative by the standard assay in patients who progressed with the same ITDs detected by the TD-PCR assay. Conclusion Detection of MRD by TD-PCR may guide patient selection for early clinical intervention. In contrast to clone-specific approaches, TD-PCR assay can be more easily validated for MRD detection in clinical laboratories due to standardized primers and a universal positive control. In addition, our results on multi-clonality and low-level ITDs suggest that further studies are warranted to elucidate their clinical/biological significance. PMID:26446915

  7. ABT-869, a multitargeted receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor: inhibition of FLT3 phosphorylation and signaling in acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Shankar, Deepa B; Li, Junling; Tapang, Paul; Owen McCall, J; Pease, Lori J; Dai, Yujia; Wei, Ru-Qi; Albert, Daniel H; Bouska, Jennifer J; Osterling, Donald J; Guo, Jun; Marcotte, Patrick A; Johnson, Eric F; Soni, Niru; Hartandi, Kresna; Michaelides, Michael R; Davidsen, Steven K; Priceman, Saul J; Chang, Jenny C; Rhodes, Katrin; Shah, Neil; Moore, Theodore B; Sakamoto, Kathleen M; Glaser, Keith B

    2007-04-15

    In 15% to 30% of patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML), aberrant proliferation is a consequence of a juxtamembrane mutation in the FLT3 gene (FMS-like tyrosine kinase 3-internal tandem duplication [FLT3-ITD]), causing constitutive kinase activity. ABT-869 (a multitargeted receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor) inhibited the phosphorylation of FLT3, STAT5, and ERK, as well as Pim-1 expression in MV-4-11 and MOLM-13 cells (IC(50) approximately 1-10 nM) harboring the FLT3-ITD. ABT-869 inhibited the proliferation of these cells (IC(50) = 4 and 6 nM, respectively) through the induction of apoptosis (increased sub-G(0)/G(1) phase, caspase activation, and PARP cleavage), whereas cells harboring wild-type (wt)-FLT3 were less sensitive. In normal human blood spiked with AML cells, ABT-869 inhibited phosphorylation of FLT3 (IC(50) approximately 100 nM), STAT5, and ERK, and decreased Pim-1 expression. In methylcellulose-based colony-forming assays, ABT-869 had no significant effect up to 1000 nM on normal hematopoietic progenitor cells, whereas in AML patient samples harboring both FLT3-ITD and wt-FLT3, ABT-869 inhibited colony formation (IC(50) = 100 and 1000 nM, respectively). ABT-869 dose-dependently inhibited MV-4-11 and MOLM-13 flank tumor growth, prevented tumor formation, regressed established MV-4-11 xenografts, and increased survival by 20 weeks in an MV-4-11 engraftment model. In tumors, ABT-869 inhibited FLT3 phosphorylation, induced apoptosis (transferase-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling [TUNEL]) and decreased proliferation (Ki67). ABT-869 is under clinical development for AML.

  8. Design of targeting ligands in medicinal inorganic chemistry.

    PubMed

    Storr, Tim; Thompson, Katherine H; Orvig, Chris

    2006-06-01

    This tutorial review will highlight recent advances in medicinal inorganic chemistry pertaining to the use of multifunctional ligands for enhanced effect. Ligands that adequately bind metal ions and also include specific targeting features are gaining in popularity due to their ability to enhance the efficacy of less complicated metal-based agents. Moving beyond the traditional view of ligands modifying reactivity, stabilizing specific oxidation states, and contributing to substitution inertness, we will discuss recent work involving metal complexes with multifunctional ligands that target specific tissues, membrane receptors, or endogenous molecules, including enzymes.

  9. Potent Activity of Ponatinib (AP24534) in Models of FLT3-Driven Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Hematologic Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Gozgit, Joseph M.; Wong, Matthew J.; Wardwell, Scott; Tyner, Jeffrey W.; Loriaux, Marc M.; Mohemmad, Qurish K.; Narasimhan, Narayana I.; Shakespeare, William C.; Wang, Frank; Druker, Brian J.; Clackson, Tim; Rivera, Victor M.

    2011-01-01

    Ponatinib (AP24534) is a novel multitargeted kinase inhibitor that potently inhibits native and mutant BCR-ABL at clinically achievable drug levels. Ponatinib also has in vitro inhibitory activity against a discrete set of kinases implicated in the pathogenesis of other hematologic malignancies, including FLT3, KIT, fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 (FGFR1), and platelet derived growth factor receptor α (PDGFRα). Here, using leukemic cell lines containing activated forms of each of these receptors, we show that ponatinib potently inhibits receptor phosphorylation and cellular proliferation with IC50 values comparable to those required for inhibition of BCR-ABL (0.3 to 20 nmol/L). The activity of ponatinib against the FLT3-ITD mutant, found in up to 30% of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients, was particularly notable. In MV4-11 (FLT3-ITD+/+) but not RS4;11 (FLT3-ITD−/−) AML cells, ponatinib inhibited FLT3 signaling and induced apoptosis at concentrations of less than 10 nmol/L. In an MV4-11 mouse xenograft model, once daily oral dosing of ponatinib led to a dose-dependent inhibition of signaling and tumor regression. Ponatinib inhibited viability of primary leukemic blasts from a FLT3-ITD positive AML patient (IC50 4 nmol/L) but not those isolated from 3 patients with AML expressing native FLT3. Overall, these results support the investigation of ponatinib in patients with FLT3-ITD–driven AML and other hematologic malignancies driven by KIT, FGFR1, or PDGFRα. PMID:21482694

  10. Mll partial tandem duplication and Flt3 internal tandem duplication in a double knock-in mouse recapitulates features of counterpart human acute myeloid leukemias

    PubMed Central

    Zorko, Nicholas A.; Bernot, Kelsie M.; Whitman, Susan P.; Siebenaler, Ronald F.; Ahmed, Elshafa H.; Marcucci, Gabriele G.; Yanes, Daniel A.; McConnell, Kathleen K.; Mao, Charlene; Kalu, Chidimma; Zhang, Xiaoli; Jarjoura, David; Dorrance, Adrienne M.; Heerema, Nyla A.; Lee, Benjamin H.; Huang, Gang; Marcucci, Guido

    2012-01-01

    The MLL-partial tandem duplication (PTD) associates with high-risk cytogenetically normal acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Concurrent presence of FLT3-internal tandem duplication (ITD) is observed in 25% of patients with MLL-PTD AML. However, mice expressing either Mll-PTD or Flt3-ITD do not develop AML, suggesting that 2 mutations are necessary for the AML phenotype. Thus, we generated a mouse expressing both Mll-PTD and Flt3-ITD. MllPTD/WT:Flt3ITD/WT mice developed acute leukemia with 100% penetrance, at a median of 49 weeks. As in human MLL-PTD and/or the FLT3-ITD AML, mouse blasts exhibited normal cytogenetics, decreased Mll-WT-to-Mll-PTD ratio, loss of the Flt3-WT allele, and increased total Flt3. Highlighting the adverse impact of FLT3-ITD dosage on patient survival, mice with homozygous Flt3-ITD alleles, MllPTD/WT:Flt3ITD/ITD, demonstrated a nearly 30-week reduction in latency to overt AML. Here we demonstrate, for the first time, that Mll-PTD contributes to leukemogenesis as a gain-of-function mutation and describe a novel murine model closely recapitulating human AML. PMID:22674806

  11. A randomized assessment of adding the kinase inhibitor lestaurtinib to first-line chemotherapy for FLT3-mutated AML.

    PubMed

    Knapper, Steven; Russell, Nigel; Gilkes, Amanda; Hills, Robert K; Gale, Rosemary E; Cavenagh, James D; Jones, Gail; Kjeldsen, Lars; Grunwald, Michael R; Thomas, Ian; Konig, Heiko; Levis, Mark J; Burnett, Alan K

    2017-03-02

    The clinical benefit of adding FMS-like tyrosine kinase-3 (FLT3)-directed small molecule therapy to standard first-line treatment of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) has not yet been established. As part of the UK AML15 and AML17 trials, patients with previously untreated AML and confirmed FLT3-activating mutations, mostly younger than 60 years, were randomly assigned either to receive oral lestaurtinib (CEP701) or not after each of 4 cycles of induction and consolidation chemotherapy. Lestaurtinib was commenced 2 days after completing chemotherapy and administered in cycles of up to 28 days. The trials ran consecutively. Primary endpoints were overall survival in AML15 and relapse-free survival in AML17; outcome data were meta-analyzed. Five hundred patients were randomly assigned between lestaurtinib and control: 74% had FLT3-internal tandem duplication mutations, 23% FLT3-tyrosine kinase domain point mutations, and 2% both types. No significant differences were seen in either 5-year overall survival (lestaurtinib 46% vs control 45%; hazard ratio, 0.90; 95% CI 0.70-1.15; P = .3) or 5-year relapse-free survival (40% vs 36%; hazard ratio, 0.88; 95% CI 0.69-1.12; P = .3). Exploratory subgroup analysis suggested survival benefit with lestaurtinib in patients receiving concomitant azole antifungal prophylaxis and gemtuzumab ozogamicin with the first course of chemotherapy. Correlative studies included analysis of in vivo FLT3 inhibition by plasma inhibitory activity assay and indicated improved overall survival and significantly reduced rates of relapse in lestaurtinib-treated patients who achieved sustained greater than 85% FLT3 inhibition. In conclusion, combining lestaurtinib with intensive chemotherapy proved feasible in younger patients with newly diagnosed FLT3-mutated AML, but yielded no overall clinical benefit. The improved clinical outcomes seen in patients achieving sustained FLT3 inhibition encourage continued evaluation of FLT3-directed therapy alongside

  12. Single-cell mass cytometry reveals intracellular survival/proliferative signaling in FLT3-ITD-mutated AML stem/progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Han, Lina; Qiu, Peng; Zeng, Zhihong; Jorgensen, Jeffrey L; Mak, Duncan H; Burks, Jared K; Schober, Wendy; McQueen, Teresa J; Cortes, Jorge; Tanner, Scott D; Roboz, Gail J; Kantarjian, Hagop M; Kornblau, Steven M; Guzman, Monica L; Andreeff, Michael; Konopleva, Marina

    2015-04-01

    Understanding the unique phenotypes and complex signaling pathways of leukemia stem cells (LSCs) will provide insights and druggable targets that can be used to eradicate acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Current work on AML LSCs is limited by the number of parameters that conventional flow cytometry (FCM) can analyze because of cell autofluorescence and fluorescent dye spectral overlap. Single-cell mass cytometry (CyTOF) substitutes rare earth elements for fluorophores to label antibodies, which allows measurements of up to 120 parameters in single cells without correction for spectral overlap. The aim of this study was the evaluation of intracellular signaling in antigen-defined stem/progenitor cell subsets in primary AML. CyTOF and conventional FCM yielded comparable results on LSC phenotypes defined by CD45, CD34, CD38, CD123, and CD99. Intracellular phosphoprotein responses to ex vivo cell signaling inhibitors and cytokine stimulation were assessed in myeloid leukemia cell lines and one primary AML sample. CyTOF and conventional FCM results were confirmed by western blotting. In the primary AML sample, we investigated the cell responses to ex vivo stimulation with stem cell factor and BEZ235-induced inhibition of PI3K and identified activation patterns in multiple PI3K downstream signaling pathways including p-4EBP1, p-AKT, and p-S6, particularly in CD34(+) subsets. We evaluated multiple signaling pathways in antigen-defined subpopulations in primary AML cells with FLT3-ITD mutations. The data demonstrated the heterogeneity of cell phenotype distribution and distinct patterns of signaling activation across AML samples and between AML and normal samples. The mTOR targets p-4EBP1 and p-S6 were exclusively found in FLT3-ITD stem/progenitor cells, but not in their normal counterparts, suggesting both as novel targets in FLT3 mutated AML. Our data suggest that CyTOF can identify functional signaling pathways in antigen-defined subpopulations in primary AML, which may

  13. The STAT5 Inhibitor Pimozide Displays Efficacy in Models of Acute Myelogenous Leukemia Driven by FLT3 Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Erik A.; Walker, Sarah R.; Xiang, Michael; Weisberg, Ellen; Bar-Natan, Michal; Barrett, Rosemary; Liu, Suiyang; Kharbanda, Surender; Christie, Amanda L.; Nicolais, Maria; Griffin, James D.; Stone, Richard M.; Kung, Andrew L.

    2012-01-01

    Activation of the transcription factor STAT5 is essential for the pathogenesis of acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) containing the FLT3 internal tandem duplication (ITD) mutation. FLT3 ITD is a constitutively active tyrosine kinase that drives the activation of STAT5, leading to the growth and survival of AML cells. Although there has been some success in identifying tyrosine kinase inhibitors that block the function of FLT3 ITD, there remains a continued need for effective treatment of this disease. We have identified the psychotropic drug pimozide as an effective inhibitor of STAT5 function. Pimozide inhibits the tyrosine phosphorylation of STAT5, leading to the death of AML cells through the induction of apoptosis. Pimozide shows a combinatorial effect with the tyrosine kinase inhibitors midostaurin (PKC412) and sunitinib in the inhibition of STAT5 tyrosine phosphorylation and the induction of apoptosis. Significantly, pimozide reduces the tumor burden in a mouse model of FLT3-driven AML. Therefore, identifying STAT5 inhibitors may provide a new avenue for the treatment of AML, and these may be effective alone or in combination with tyrosine kinase inhibitors. PMID:23264850

  14. Phase I Trial of Maintenance Sorafenib after Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation for FLT3-ITD AML

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yi-Bin; Li, Shuli; Lane, Andrew A.; Connolly, Christine; Del Rio, Candice; Valles, Betsy; Curtis, Morgan; Ballen, Karen; Cutler, Corey; Dey, Bimalangshu R.; El-Jawahri, Areej; Fathi, Amir T.; Ho, Vincent T.; Joyce, Amy; McAfee, Steven; Rudek, Michelle; Rajkhowa, Trivikram; Verselis, Sigitas; Antin, Joseph H.; Spitzer, Thomas R.; Levis, Mark; Soiffer, Robert

    2014-01-01

    The FLT3-ITD mutation is associated with a high relapse rate for patients with AML even after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Sorafenib is a tyrosine kinase inhibitor which inhibits the FLT3 tyrosine kinase and has shown encouraging activity in FLT3-ITD AML. We conducted a phase I trial of maintenance sorafenib after HSCT in patients with FLT3-ITD AML (ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01398501). Patients received a variety of conditioning regimens and graft sources. A dose escalation 3+3 cohort design was used to define the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) with an additional 10 patients treated at the MTD. Sorafenib was initiated between days 45 and 120 after HSCT continued for twelve 28-day cycles. Twenty-two patients were enrolled (status at HSCT: CR1=16, CR2=3, refractory=3). The MTD was established at 400 mg BID with one DLT observed (pericardial effusion). Two patients died of transplant-related causes, both unrelated to sorafenib. Two patients stopped sorafenib after relapse and 5 stopped due to attributable toxicities after the DLT period. Median follow-up for surviving patients is 16.7 months after HSCT (range, 8.1–35.0). There was one case of grade II acute GVHD after starting sorafenib and the 12-month cumulative incidence of chronic GVHD was 38% (90% CI, 21%–56%). For all patients, one-year progression-free survival (PFS) is 85% (90% CI, 66%–94%) and one-year overall survival (OS) is 95% (90% CI, 79%–99%) after HSCT. For patients in CR1 / CR2 prior to HSCT (n=19), one-year PFS is 95% (90% CI, 76%–99%) and one-year OS is 100% with only one patient who has relapsed. Sorafenib is safe after HSCT for FLT3-ITD AML and merits further investigation for the prevention of relapse. PMID:25239228

  15. Prognostic value of FLT3 mutations in patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia treated with all-trans retinoic acid and anthracycline monochemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Barragán, Eva; Montesinos, Pau; Camos, Mireia; González, Marcos; Calasanz, Maria J.; Román-Gómez, José; Gómez-Casares, Maria T.; Ayala, Rosa; López, Javier; Fuster, Óscar; Colomer, Dolors; Chillón, Carmen; Larrayoz, María J.; Sánchez-Godoy, Pedro; González-Campos, José; Manso, Félix; Amador, Maria L.; Vellenga, Edo; Lowenberg, Bob; Sanz, Miguel A.

    2011-01-01

    Background Fms-like tyrosine kinase-3 (FLT3) gene mutations are frequent in acute promyelocytic leukemia but their prognostic value is not well established. Design and Methods We evaluated FLT3-internal tandem duplication and FLT3-D835 mutations in patients treated with all-trans retinoic acid and anthracycline-based chemotherapy enrolled in two subsequent trials of the Programa de Estudio y Tratamiento de las Hemopatías Malignas (PETHEMA) and Hemato-Oncologie voor Volwassenen Nederland (HOVON) groups between 1996 and 2005. Results FLT3-internal tandem duplication and FLT3-D835 mutation status was available for 306 (41%) and 213 (29%) patients, respectively. Sixty-eight (22%) and 20 (9%) patients had internal tandem duplication and D835 mutations, respectively. Internal tandem duplication was correlated with higher white blood cell and blast counts, lactate dehydrogenase, relapse-risk score, fever, hemorrhage, coagulopathy, BCR3 isoform, M3 variant subtype, and expression of CD2, CD34, human leukocyte antigen-DR, and CD11b surface antigens. The FLT3-D835 mutation was not significantly associated with any clinical or biological characteristic. Univariate analysis showed higher relapse and lower survival rates in patients with a FLT3-internal tandem duplication, while no impact was observed in relation to FLT3-D835. The prognostic value of the FLT3-internal tandem duplication was not retained in the multivariate analysis. Conclusions FLT3-internal tandem duplication mutations are associated with several hematologic features in acute promyelocytic leukemia, in particular with high white blood cell counts, but we were unable to demonstrate an independent prognostic value in patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia treated with all-trans retinoic acid and anthracycline-based regimens. PMID:21685470

  16. FLT3-ITD and MLL-PTD influence the expression of MDR-1, MRP-1, and BCRP mRNA but not LRP mRNA assessed with RQ-PCR method in adult acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Nasilowska-Adamska, Barbara; Solarska, Iwona; Paluszewska, Monika; Malinowska, Iwona; Jedrzejczak, Wieslaw W; Warzocha, Krzysztof

    2014-04-01

    Fms-like tyrosine kinase 3-internal tandem duplication (FLT3-ITD) and mixed-lineage leukemia gene-partial tandem duplication (MLL-PTD) are aberrations associated with leukemia which indicate unsatisfactory prognosis. Downstream regulatory targets of FLT3-ITD and MLL-PTD are not well defined. We have analyzed the expression of MDR-1, multidrug resistant protein-1 (MRP-1), breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP), and lung resistance protein (LRP) messenger RNA (mRNA) in relation to the mutational status of FLT3-ITD and MLL-PTD in 185 acute myeloid leukemia (AML) adult patients. The real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction method was performed to assess the expression of the MDR-1, MRP-1, BCRP, and LRP mRNA, and the results were presented as coefficients calculated using an intermediate method according to Pfaffl's rule. Significantly higher expressions of MDR-1 mRNA were found in patients who did not harbor FLT3-ITD (0.20 vs. 0.05; p = 0.0001) and MRP-1 mRNA in patients with this mutation (0.96 vs. 0.70; p = 0.002) and of BCRP mRNA in patients with MLL-PTD (0.61 vs. 0.38; p = 0.03). In univariate analysis, the high expression of MDR-1 mRNA (≥0.1317) negatively influenced the outcome of induction therapy (p = 0.05), whereas the high expression of BCRP mRNA (≥1.1487) was associated with a high relapse rate (RR) (p = 0.013). We found that the high expression of MDR-1 (≥0.1317), MRP-1 (≥0.8409), and BCRP mRNA (≥1.1487) significantly influenced disease-free survival (DFS; p = 0.059, 0.032, and 0.009, respectively) and overall survival (0.048, 0.014, and 0.059, respectively). Moreover, a high expression of BCRP mRNA (≥1.1487) proved to be an independent prognostic factor for RR (p = 0.01) and DFS (p = 0.002) in multivariate analysis. The significant correlation between the expression of MDR-1, MRP-1, and BCRP mRNA and FLT3-ITD or MLL-PTD in AML patients requires further investigation.

  17. How reliable are ligand-centric methods for Target Fishing?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peon, Antonio; Dang, Cuong; Ballester, Pedro

    2016-04-01

    Computational methods for Target Fishing (TF), also known as Target Prediction or Polypharmacology Prediction, can be used to discover new targets for small-molecule drugs. This may result in repositioning the drug in a new indication or improving our current understanding of its efficacy and side effects. While there is a substantial body of research on TF methods, there is still a need to improve their validation, which is often limited to a small part of the available targets and not easily interpretable by the user. Here we discuss how target-centric TF methods are inherently limited by the number of targets that can possibly predict (this number is by construction much larger in ligand-centric techniques). We also propose a new benchmark to validate TF methods, which is particularly suited to analyse how predictive performance varies with the query molecule. On average over approved drugs, we estimate that only five predicted targets will have to be tested to find two true targets with submicromolar potency (a strong variability in performance is however observed). In addition, we find that an approved drug has currently an average of eight known targets, which reinforces the notion that polypharmacology is a common and strong event. Furthermore, with the assistance of a control group of randomly-selected molecules, we show that the targets of approved drugs are generally harder to predict.

  18. From Toxins Targeting Ligand Gated Ion Channels to Therapeutic Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Nasiripourdori, Adak; Taly, Valérie; Grutter, Thomas; Taly, Antoine

    2011-01-01

    Ligand-gated ion channels (LGIC) play a central role in inter-cellular communication. This key function has two consequences: (i) these receptor channels are major targets for drug discovery because of their potential involvement in numerous human brain diseases; (ii) they are often found to be the target of plant and animal toxins. Together this makes toxin/receptor interactions important to drug discovery projects. Therefore, toxins acting on LGIC are presented and their current/potential therapeutic uses highlighted. PMID:22069709

  19. Detectable FLT3-ITD or RAS mutation at the time of transformation from MDS to AML predicts for very poor outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Badar, Talha; Patel, Keyur P; Thompson, Philip A; DiNardo, Courtney; Takahashi, Koichi; Cabrero, Monica; Borthakur, Gautam; Cortes, Jorge; Konopleva, Marina; Kadia, Tapan; Bohannan, Zach; Pierce, Sherry; Jabbour, Elias J; Ravandi, Farhad; Daver, Naval; Luthra, Raja; Kantarjian, Hagop; Garcia-Manero, Guillermo

    2016-01-01

    Background The molecular events that drive the transformation from myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) to acute myeloid leukemia (AML) have yet to be fully characterized. We hypothesized that detection of these mutations at the time of transformation from MDS to AML may lead to poorer outcomes. Methods We analyzed 102 MDS patients who were admitted to our institution between 2004 and 2013, had wild-type (wt) FLT3-ITD and RAS at diagnosis, progressed to AML, and had serial mutation testing at both the MDS and AML stages. Results We detected FLT3-ITD and/or RAS mutations in twenty-seven (26%) patients at the time of transformation to AML. Twenty-two patients (81%) had RAS mutations and five (19%) had FLT3-ITD mutations. The median survival after leukemia transformation in patients who had detectable RAS and/or FLT3-ITD mutations was 2·4 months compared to 7·5 months in patients who retained wt RAS and FLT3-ITD (hazard ratio [HR]: 3·08, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1·9–5·0, p < 0·0001). In multivariate analysis, FLT3-ITD and RAS mutations had independent prognostic significance for poor outcome. Conclusions We conclude that 26% of patients had detectable FLT3-ITD or RAS mutation at transformation to AML, and these mutations were associated with very poor outcome. PMID:26547258

  20. Expression of protein-tyrosine phosphatases in Acute Myeloid Leukemia cells: FLT3 ITD sustains high levels of DUSP6 expression

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Protein-tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) are important regulators of cellular signaling and changes in PTP activity can contribute to cell transformation. Little is known about the role of PTPs in Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML). The aim of this study was therefore to establish a PTP expression profile in AML cells and to explore the possible role of FLT3 ITD (Fms-like tyrosine kinase 3 with internal tandem duplication), an important oncoprotein in AML for PTP gene expression. PTP mRNA expression was analyzed in AML cells from patients and in cell lines using a RT-qPCR platform for detection of transcripts of 92 PTP genes. PTP mRNA expression was also analyzed based on a public microarray data set for AML patients. Highly expressed PTPs in AML belong to all PTP subfamilies. Very abundantly expressed PTP genes include PTPRC, PTPN2, PTPN6, PTPN22, DUSP1, DUSP6, DUSP10, PTP4A1, PTP4A2, PTEN, and ACP1. PTP expression was further correlated with the presence of FLT3 ITD, focusing on a set of highly expressed dual-specificity phosphatases (DUSPs). Elevated expression of DUSP6 in patients harboring FLT3 ITD was detected in this analysis. The mechanism and functional role of FLT3 ITD-mediated upregulation of DUSP6 was then explored using pharmacological inhibitors of FLT3 ITD signal transduction and si/shRNA technology in human and murine cell lines. High DUSP6 expression was causally associated with the presence of FLT3 ITD and dependent on FLT3 ITD kinase activity and ERK signaling. DUSP6 depletion moderately increased ERK1/2 activity but attenuated FLT3 ITD-dependent cell proliferation of 32D cells. In conclusion, DUSP6 may play a contributing role to FLT3 ITD-mediated cell transformation. PMID:22784513

  1. Programmed death-1 & its ligands: promising targets for cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Shrimali, Rajeev K; Janik, John E; Abu-Eid, Rasha; Mkrtichyan, Mikayel; Khleif, Samir N

    2015-01-01

    Novel strategies for cancer treatment involving blockade of immune inhibitors have shown significant progress toward understanding the molecular mechanism of tumor immune evasion. The preclinical findings and clinical responses associated with programmed death-1 (PD-1) and PD-ligand pathway blockade seem promising, making these targets highly sought for cancer immunotherapy. In fact, the anti-PD-1 antibodies, pembrolizumab and nivolumab, were recently approved by the US FDA for the treatment of unresectable and metastatic melanoma resistant to anticytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen-4 antibody (ipilimumab) and BRAF inhibitor. Here, we discuss strategies of combining PD-1/PD-ligand interaction inhibitors with other immune checkpoint modulators and standard-of-care therapy to break immune tolerance and induce a potent antitumor activity, which is currently a research area of key scientific pursuit.

  2. Cancer therapy using natural ligands that target estrogen receptor beta

    PubMed Central

    Sareddy, Gangadhara R; Vadlamudi, Ratna K.

    2016-01-01

    Estrogen receptor beta (ERβ) is one of the two key receptors (ERα, ERβ) that facilitate biological actions of 17β-estradiol (E2). ERβ is widely expressed in many tissues, and its expression is reduced or lost during progression of many tumors. ERβ facilitates estrogen signaling by both genomic (classical and non-classical) and extra-nuclear signaling. Emerging evidence suggests that ERβ functions as a tissue-specific tumor suppressor with anti-proliferative actions. Recent studies have identified a number of naturally available selective ERβ agonists. Targeting ERβ using its naturally available ligands is an attractive approach for treating and preventing cancers. This review presents the beneficial actions of ERβ signaling and clinical utility of several natural ERβ ligands as potential cancer therapy. PMID:26614454

  3. Silvestrol exhibits significant in vivo and in vitro antileukemic activities and inhibits FLT3 and miR-155 expressions in acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Activating mutations [internal tandem duplication (ITD)] or overexpression of the FMS-like tyrosine kinase receptor-3 (FLT3) gene are associated with poor outcome in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients, underscoring the need for novel therapeutic approaches. The natural product silvestrol has potent antitumor activity in several malignancies, but its therapeutic impact on distinct molecular high-risk AML subsets remains to be fully investigated. We examined here the preclinical activity of silvestrol in FLT3-ITD and FLT3 wild-type (wt) AML. Methods Silvestrol in vitro anti-leukemic activity was examined by colorimetric cell viability assay, colony-forming and flow cytometry assays assessing growth inhibition and apoptosis, respectively. Pharmacological activity of silvestrol on FLT3 mRNA translation, mRNA and protein expression was determined by RNA-immunoprecipitation, qRT-PCR and immunoblot analyses, respectively. Silvestrol in vivo efficacy was investigated using MV4-11 leukemia-engrafted mice. Results Silvestrol shows antileukemia activity at nanomolar concentrations both in FLT3-wt overexpressing (THP-1) and FLT3-ITD (MV4-11) expressing AML cell lines (IC50 = 3.8 and 2.7 nM, respectively) and patients’ primary blasts [IC50 = ~12 nM (FLT3-wt) and ~5 nM (FLT3-ITD)]. Silvestrol increased apoptosis (~4fold, P = 0.0001), and inhibited colony-formation (100%, P < 0.0001) in primary blasts. Silvestrol efficiently inhibited FLT3 translation reducing FLT3 protein expression by 80–90% and decreased miR-155 levels (~60%), a frequently co-regulated onco-miR in FLT3-ITD-positive AML. The median survival of silvestrol-treated vs vehicle-treated mice was 63 vs 29 days post-engraftment, respectively (P < 0.0001). Conclusions Silvestrol exhibits significant in vivo and in vitro antileukemic activities in AML through a novel mechanism resulting in inhibition of FLT3 and miR-155 expression. These encouraging results warrant a rapid

  4. How Reliable Are Ligand-Centric Methods for Target Fishing?

    PubMed Central

    Peón, Antonio; Dang, Cuong C.; Ballester, Pedro J.

    2016-01-01

    Computational methods for Target Fishing (TF), also known as Target Prediction or Polypharmacology Prediction, can be used to discover new targets for small-molecule drugs. This may result in repositioning the drug in a new indication or improving our current understanding of its efficacy and side effects. While there is a substantial body of research on TF methods, there is still a need to improve their validation, which is often limited to a small part of the available targets and not easily interpretable by the user. Here we discuss how target-centric TF methods are inherently limited by the number of targets that can possibly predict (this number is by construction much larger in ligand-centric techniques). We also propose a new benchmark to validate TF methods, which is particularly suited to analyse how predictive performance varies with the query molecule. On average over approved drugs, we estimate that only five predicted targets will have to be tested to find two true targets with submicromolar potency (a strong variability in performance is however observed). In addition, we find that an approved drug has currently an average of eight known targets, which reinforces the notion that polypharmacology is a common and strong event. Furthermore, with the assistance of a control group of randomly-selected molecules, we show that the targets of approved drugs are generally harder to predict. The benchmark and a simple target prediction method to use as a performance baseline are available at http://ballester.marseille.inserm.fr/TF-benchmark.tar.gz. PMID:27148522

  5. Long FLT3 internal tandem duplications and reduced PML-RARα expression at diagnosis characterize a high-risk subgroup of acute promyelocytic leukemia patients

    PubMed Central

    Chillón, María Carmen; Santamaría, Carlos; García-Sanz, Ramón; Balanzategui, Ana; María Eugenia, Sarasquete; Alcoceba, Miguel; Marín, Luis; Caballero, María Dolores; Vidriales, María Belén; Ramos, Fernando; Bernal, Teresa; Díaz-Mediavilla, Joaquín; de Coca, Alfonso García; Peñarrubia, María Jesús; Queizán, José Antonio; Giraldo, Pilar; San Miguel, Jesús F.; González, Marcos

    2010-01-01

    Background Internal tandem duplications of the FLT3 gene (FLT3-ITDs) are frequent in patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL), however its clinical impact remains controversial. Design and Methods We analyzed the prognostic significance of FLT3-ITD mutant level and size, as well as FLT3-D835 point mutations, PML-RARα expression and other predictive factors in 129 APL patients at diagnosis enrolled on the Spanish LPA96 (n=43) or LPA99 (n=86) PETHEMA trials. Results FLT3-ITDs and D835 mutations were detected in 21% and 9% of patients, respectively. Patients with increased ITD mutant/wild-type ratio or longer ITD size displayed shorter 5-year relapse-free survival (RFS) (P=0.048 and P<0.0001, respectively). However, patients with D835 mutations did not show differences in RFS or overall survival (OS). Moreover, patients with initial normalized copy number (NCN) of PML-RARα transcripts less than the 25th percentile had adverse clinical features and shorter 5-year RFS (P<0.0001) and OS (P=0.004) compared to patients with higher NCN. Patients with low NCN showed increased incidence of ITDs (P=0.001), with higher ratios (P<0.0001) and/or longer sizes (P=0.007). Multivariate analysis showed that long FLT3-ITD (P=0.001), low PML-RARα levels (P=0.004) and elevated WBC counts (>10×109/L) (P=0.018) were independent predictors for shorter RFS. We identified a subgroup of patients with high WBC, long FLT3-ITD and low NCN of transcripts that showed an extremely bad prognosis (5-year RFS 23.4%, P<0.0001). Conclusions In conclusion, FLT3-ITD size and PML-RARα transcript levels at diagnosis could contribute to improve the risk stratification in APL. PMID:20133893

  6. Establishment of xenotransplantation model of human CN-AML with FLT3-ITD (mut) /NPM1 (-) in NOD/SCID mice.

    PubMed

    Shang, Zhen; Wang, Jue; Wang, Di; Xiao, Min; Li, Tong-juan; Wang, Na; Huang, Liang; Zhou, Jian-feng

    2013-06-01

    Patients with FLT3-ITD (mut) /NPM1 (-) cytogenetically normal acute myeloid leukemia (CN-AML), as high-risk molecular group in CN-AML, are associated with a worse prognosis than other CN-AML patients. It is beneficial to generate xenotransplantation model of FLT3-ITD (mut) /NPM1 (-) CN-AML to better understand the pathogenesis and therapeutic strategies of such AML subtype. The purpose of present study was to establish the xenotransplantation model in NOD/SCID mice with FLT3-ITD (mut) /NPM1 (-) CN-AML primary cells. The FLT3-ITD (mut) /NPM1 (-) CN-AML primary cells from 3 of 7 cases were successfully transplanted into NOD/SCID mice, and human CD45 positive cells were detected in the peripheral blood, spleen and bone marrow of mice by using flow cytometry. Infiltration of human leukemia cells in various organs of mice was observed by using immunohistochemistry. Gene analysis confirmed sustained FLT3/ITD mutation without NPM1 mutation in mice. By performing serial transplantation, it was found that characteristics of the leukemia cells in secondary and tertiary generation models remained unchanged. Moreover, in vivo cytarabine administration could extend survival of NOD/SCID mice, which was consistent with clinical observation. In conclusion, we successfully established xenotransplantation model of human FLT3-ITD (mut) /NPM1 (-) CN-AML in NOD/SCID mice. The model was able to present primary disease and suitable to evaluate the curative effects of new drugs or therapy strategies.

  7. A stabilized peptide ligand for multifunctional glioma targeted drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Ying, Man; Shen, Qing; Zhan, Changyou; Wei, Xiaoli; Gao, Jie; Xie, Cao; Yao, Bingxin; Lu, Weiyue

    2016-12-10

    Peptide ligands consisting of l-amino acids are subject to proteolysis in vivo. When modified on the surface of nanocarriers, those peptide ligands would readily degrade and the targeting efficacy is significantly attenuated. It has received increasing scrutiny to design stable peptide ligands for targeted drug delivery. Here, we present the design of a stable peptide ligand by the formation of a head-to-tail amide bond as an example. Even though the linear l-peptide A7R (termed (L)A7R) can bind specifically to vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2) and neuropilin-1 (NRP-1) that are overexpressed on glioma cells, neovasculature and glioma vasculogenic mimicry (VM), the tumor-homing capacity of (L)A7R is greatly impaired in vivo due to proteolysis (e.g. in the serum). A cyclic A7R (cA7R) peptide was identified by computer-aided peptide design and synthesized with high yield by combining solid phase peptide synthesis and native chemical ligation. The binding of cA7R to both receptors was theoretically and experimentally assessed. In our simulated model hydrophobic and ionic interactions dominated the binding of (L)A7R to receptors. It is very interesting that cA7R adopting a different structure from (L)A7R retained high binding affinities to receptors without affecting the hydrophobic and ionic interactions. After head-to-tail cyclization by the formation of an amide bond, cA7R exhibited exceptional stability in mouse serum. Either cA7R or (L)A7R was conjugated on the surface of doxorubicin (DOX) loaded liposomes (cA7R-LS/DOX or (L)A7R-LS/DOX). The results of in vitro cellular assays indicated that cA7R-LS/DOX not only displayed stronger anti-proliferative effect against glioma cells, but also demonstrated to be more efficient in destruction of VM and HUVEC tubes in comparison to (L)A7R-LS/DOX and plain liposomes (LS/DOX, without peptide conjugation). cA7R conjugation could achieve significantly higher accumulation of liposomes in glioma than did (L

  8. Ligands located within a cholesterol domain enhance gene delivery to the target tissue

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Long; Betker, Jamie; Yin, Hao; Anchordoquy, Thomas J.

    2012-01-01

    Targeted gene delivery provides enormous potential for clinical treatment of many incurable diseases. Liposomes formulated with targeting ligands have been tested extensively both in vitro and in vivo, and many studies have strived to identify more efficacious ligands. However, the environment of the ligand within the delivery vehicle is generally not considered, and this study assesses the effect of ligand micoenvironment by utilizing a lipoplex possessing a cholesterol domain. Our recent work has shown that the presence of the targeting ligand within the cholesterol domain promotes more productive transfection in cultured cells. In the present study, lipoplexes having the identical lipid composition were formulated with different conjugates of the folate ligand such that the ligand was included in, or excluded from, the cholesterol domain. The effect of locating the ligand within the cholesterol domain was then tested in a xenograft tumor model in mice. Lipoplexes that included the ligand within the cholesterol domain showed significantly higher luciferase expression and plasmid accumulation in tumors as compared to lipoplexes in which the ligand was excluded from the domain. These results demonstrate that the microenvironment of the ligand can affect gene delivery to tumors, and show that ligand-mediated delivery can be enhanced by locating targeting ligands within a cholesterol domain. PMID:22440429

  9. Rule of five in 2015 and beyond: Target and ligand structural limitations, ligand chemistry structure and drug discovery project decisions.

    PubMed

    Lipinski, Christopher A

    2016-06-01

    The rule of five (Ro5), based on physicochemical profiles of phase II drugs, is consistent with structural limitations in protein targets and the drug target ligands. Three of four parameters in Ro5 are fundamental to the structure of both target and drug binding sites. The chemical structure of the drug ligand depends on the ligand chemistry and design philosophy. Two extremes of chemical structure and design philosophy exist; ligands constructed in the medicinal chemistry synthesis laboratory without input from natural selection and natural product (NP) metabolites biosynthesized based on evolutionary selection. Exceptions to Ro5 are found mostly among NPs. Chemistry chameleon-like behavior of some NPs due to intra-molecular hydrogen bonding as exemplified by cyclosporine A is a strong contributor to NP Ro5 outliers. The fragment derived, drug Navitoclax is an example of the extensive expertise, resources, time and key decisions required for the rare discovery of a non-NP Ro5 outlier.

  10. Favorable outcome of patients with acute myeloid leukemia harboring a low-allelic burden FLT3-ITD mutation and concomitant NPM1 mutation: relevance to post-remission therapy.

    PubMed

    Pratcorona, Marta; Brunet, Salut; Nomdedéu, Josep; Ribera, Josep Maria; Tormo, Mar; Duarte, Rafael; Escoda, Lourdes; Guàrdia, Ramon; Queipo de Llano, M Paz; Salamero, Olga; Bargay, Joan; Pedro, Carmen; Martí, Josep Maria; Torrebadell, Montserrat; Díaz-Beyá, Marina; Camós, Mireia; Colomer, Dolors; Hoyos, Montserrat; Sierra, Jorge; Esteve, Jordi

    2013-04-04

    Risk associated to FLT3 internal tandem duplication (FLT3-ITD) in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) may depend on mutational burden and its interaction with other mutations. We analyzed the effect of FLT3-ITD/FLT3 wild-type (FLT3wt) ratio depending on NPM1 mutation (NPM1mut) in 303 patients with intermediate-risk cytogenetics AML treated with intensive chemotherapy. Among NPM1mut patients, FLT3wt and low ratio (<0.5) subgroups showed similar overall survival, relapse risk, and leukemia-free survival, whereas high ratio (≥0.5) patients had a worse outcome. In NPM1wt AML, FLT3-ITD subgroups showed a comparable outcome, with higher risk of relapse and shortened overall survival than FLT3wt patients. Allogeneic stem cell transplantation in CR1 was associated with a reduced relapse risk in all molecular subgroups with the exception of NPM1mut AML with absent or low ratio FLT3-ITD. In conclusion, effect of FLT3 burden is modulated by NPM1 mutation, especially in patients with a low ratio.

  11. Flt3-L gene therapy enhances immunocytokine-mediated antitumor effects and induces long-term memory.

    PubMed

    Neal, Zane C; Sondel, Paul M; Bates, Mary Kay; Gillies, Stephen D; Herweijer, Hans

    2007-11-01

    Therapeutic treatment with hu14.18-IL-2 immunocytokine (IC) or Flt3-L (FL) protein is initially effective at resolving established intradermal NXS2 neuroblastoma tumors in mice. However, many treated animals develop recurrent disease. We previously found that tumors recurring following natural killer (NK) mediated IC treatment show augmented MHC class I expression, while the tumors that recurred following T cell dependent Flt3-L treatment exhibited decreased MHC class I expression. We hypothesized that this divergent MHC modulation on recurrent tumors was due to therapy-specific immunoediting. We further postulated that combining IC and Flt3-L treatments might decrease the likelihood of recurrent disease by preventing MHC modulation as a mechanism for immune escape. We now report that combinatorial treatment of FL plus hu14.18-IL-2 IC provides greater antitumor benefit than treatment with either alone, suppressing development of recurrent disease. We administered FL by gene therapy using a clinically relevant approach: hydrodynamic limb vein (HLV) delivery of DNA for transgene expression by myofibers. Delivery of FL DNA by HLV injection in mice resulted in systemic expression of >10 ng/ml of FL in blood at day 3, and promoted up to a fourfold and tenfold increase in splenic NK and dendritic cells (DCs), respectively. Furthermore, the combination of FL gene therapy plus suboptimal IC treatment induced a greater expansion in the absolute number of splenic NK and DCs than achieved by individual component treatments. Mice that received combined FL gene therapy plus IC exhibited complete and durable resolution of established NXS2 tumors, and demonstrated protection from subsequent rechallenge with NXS2 tumor.

  12. Characterization of children with FLT3-ITD acute myeloid leukemia: a report from the AIEOP AML-2002 study group.

    PubMed

    Manara, E; Basso, G; Zampini, M; Buldini, B; Tregnago, C; Rondelli, R; Masetti, R; Bisio, V; Frison, M; Polato, K; Cazzaniga, G; Menna, G; Fagioli, F; Merli, P; Biondi, A; Pession, A; Locatelli, F; Pigazzi, M

    2017-01-01

    Recurrent molecular markers have been routinely used in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) for risk assessment at diagnosis, whereas their post-induction monitoring still represents a debated issue. We evaluated the prognostic value and biological impact of minimal residual disease (MRD) and of the allelic ratio (AR) of FLT3-internal-tandem duplication (ITD) in childhood AML. We retrospectively screened 494 children with de novo AML for FLT3-ITD mutation, identifying 54 harboring the mutation; 51% of them presented high ITD-AR at diagnosis and had worse event-free survival (EFS, 19.2 versus 63.5% for low ITD-AR, <0.05). Forty-one percent of children with high levels of MRD after the 1st induction course, measured by a patient-specific real-time-PCR, had worse EFS (22.2 versus 59.4% in low-MRD patients, P<0.05). Next, we correlated these parameters with gene expression, showing that patients with high ITD-AR or persistent MRD had characteristic expression profiles with deregulated genes involved in methylation and acetylation. Moreover, patients with high CyclinA1 expression presented an unfavorable EFS (20.3 versus 51.2% in low CyclinA1 group, P<0.01). Our results suggest that ITD-AR levels and molecular MRD should be considered in planning clinical management of FLT3-ITD patients. Different transcriptional activation of epigenetic and oncogenic profiles may explain variability in outcome among these patients, for whom novel therapeutic approaches are desirable.

  13. Targeting Ligand-Dependent and Ligand-Independent Androgen Receptor Signaling in Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    sub 10nM range efficacy. Our primary objective was to establish a series of compounds blocking the AR ligand-dependent and ligand-independent gene ...of AR driven genes to be more comprehensive and more in line with what is currently known about AR-driven signaling in prostate cancer. We have...developed a robust panel of genes for AR signaling that is reflective of the clinical findings in both ligand dependent and ligand-independent androgen

  14. MiR-424 and miR-155 deregulated expression in cytogenetically normal acute myeloid leukaemia: correlation with NPM1 and FLT3 mutation status

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background MicroRNA have a central role in normal haematopoiesis and are deregulated in acute myeloid leukaemia (AML). The purpose of the study was to investigate by qRT-PCR the expression of miRNAs involved in myeloid differentiation (miR-424, miR-155, miR-223, miR-17-5p) in 48 patients with cytogenetically normal AML well characterized for NPM1 and/or FLT3 mutations. Three types of normalization were used for the data validation. Findings We found that miR-424 was down-modulated in AMLs with NPM1mutA regardless of FLT3 status. On the contrary, miR-155 showed up-regulation in patients with FLT3 internal tandem duplications (ITD) with or without NPM1 mutations. No significant associations were found by analyzing miR-223 and miR-17-5p in relation to FLT3 and NPM1 status. Conclusions This study supports the view that major genetic subsets of CN-AML are associated with distinct miRNA signatures and suggests that miR-424 and miR-155 deregulation is involved in the pathogenesis of CN-AML with NPM1 and FLT3-ITD mutations, respectively. PMID:22681934

  15. Optimization of imidazo[4,5-b]pyridine-based kinase inhibitors: identification of a dual FLT3/Aurora kinase inhibitor as an orally bioavailable preclinical development candidate for the treatment of acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Bavetsias, Vassilios; Crumpler, Simon; Sun, Chongbo; Avery, Sian; Atrash, Butrus; Faisal, Amir; Moore, Andrew S; Kosmopoulou, Magda; Brown, Nathan; Sheldrake, Peter W; Bush, Katherine; Henley, Alan; Box, Gary; Valenti, Melanie; de Haven Brandon, Alexis; Raynaud, Florence I; Workman, Paul; Eccles, Suzanne A; Bayliss, Richard; Linardopoulos, Spiros; Blagg, Julian

    2012-10-25

    Optimization of the imidazo[4,5-b]pyridine-based series of Aurora kinase inhibitors led to the identification of 6-chloro-7-(4-(4-chlorobenzyl)piperazin-1-yl)-2-(1,3-dimethyl-1H-pyrazol-4-yl)-3H-imidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (27e), a potent inhibitor of Aurora kinases (Aurora-A K(d) = 7.5 nM, Aurora-B K(d) = 48 nM), FLT3 kinase (K(d) = 6.2 nM), and FLT3 mutants including FLT3-ITD (K(d) = 38 nM) and FLT3(D835Y) (K(d) = 14 nM). FLT3-ITD causes constitutive FLT3 kinase activation and is detected in 20-35% of adults and 15% of children with acute myeloid leukemia (AML), conferring a poor prognosis in both age groups. In an in vivo setting, 27e strongly inhibited the growth of a FLT3-ITD-positive AML human tumor xenograft (MV4-11) following oral administration, with in vivo biomarker modulation and plasma free drug exposures consistent with dual FLT3 and Aurora kinase inhibition. Compound 27e, an orally bioavailable dual FLT3 and Aurora kinase inhibitor, was selected as a preclinical development candidate for the treatment of human malignancies, in particular AML, in adults and children.

  16. Assessing potential peptide targeting ligands by quantification of cellular adhesion of model nanoparticles under flow conditions.

    PubMed

    Broda, Ellen; Mickler, Frauke Martina; Lächelt, Ulrich; Morys, Stephan; Wagner, Ernst; Bräuchle, Christoph

    2015-09-10

    Sophisticated drug delivery systems are coated with targeting ligands to improve the specific adhesion to surface receptors on diseased cells. In our study, we developed a method with which we assessed the potential of peptide ligands to specifically bind to receptor overexpressing target cells. Therefore, a microfluidic setup was used where the cellular adhesion of nanoparticles with ligand and of control nanoparticles was observed in parallel under the same experimental conditions. The effect of the ligand on cellular binding was quantified by counting the number of adhered nanoparticles with ligand and differently labeled control nanoparticles on single cells after incubation under flow conditions. To provide easy-to-synthesize, stable and reproducible nanoparticles which mimic the surface characteristics of drug delivery systems and meet the requirements for quantitative analysis, latex beads based on amine-modified polystyrene were used as model nanoparticles. Two short peptides were tested to serve as targeting ligand on the beads by increasing the specific binding to HuH7 cells. The c-Met binding peptide cMBP2 was used for hepatocyte growth factor receptor (c-Met) targeting and the peptide B6 for transferrin receptor (TfR) targeting. The impact of the targeting peptide on binding was investigated by comparing the beads with ligand to different internal control beads: 1) without ligand and tailored surface charge (electrostatic control) and 2) with scrambled peptide and similar surface charge, but a different amino acid sequence (specificity control). Our results demonstrate that the method is very useful to select suitable targeting ligands for specific nanoparticle binding to receptor overexpressing tumor cells. We show that the cMBP2 ligand specifically enhances nanoparticle adhesion to target cells, whereas the B6 peptide mediates binding to tumor cells mainly by nonspecific interactions. All together, we suggest that cMBP2 is a suitable choice for

  17. Ligands targeting the excitatory amino acid transporters (EAATs).

    PubMed

    Dunlop, John; Butera, John A

    2006-01-01

    This review provides an overview of ligands for the excitatory amino acid transporters (EAATs), a family of high-affinity glutamate transporters localized to the plasma membrane of neurons and astroglial cells. Ligand development from the perspective of identifying novel and more selective tools for elucidating transporter subtype function, and the potential of transporter ligands in a therapeutic setting are discussed. Acute pharmacological modulation of EAAT activity in the form of linear and conformationally restricted glutamate and aspartate analogs is presented, in addition to recent strategies aimed more toward modulating transporter expression levels, the latter of particular significance to the development of transporter based therapeutics.

  18. Flt3L-mobilized dendritic cells bearing H2-Kbm1 apoptotic cells do not induce cross-tolerance to CD8+ T cells across a class I MHC mismatched barrier.

    PubMed

    del Rio, Maria-Luisa; Cote-Sierra, Javier; Rodriguez-Barbosa, Jose-Ignacio

    2011-05-01

    Tolerization of allogeneic CD8(+) T cells is still a pending issue in the field of transplantation research to achieve long-term survival. To test whether dendritic cells (DC) bearing allogeneic major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I mismatched apoptotic cells could induce cross-tolerance to alloreactive CD8(+) T cells, the following experimental strategy was devised. Rag2/γ(c) KO B6 mice were treated with Fms-like tyrosine kinase 3 ligand (Flt3L)-transduced B16 melanoma cells to drive a rapid expansion and mobilization of DC in vivo. Of all DC populations expanded, splenic CD11c(+) CD103(+) CD8α(+) DC were selectively involved in the process of antigen clearance of X-ray irradiated apoptotic thymocytes in vivo. Considering that CD11c(+) CD103(+) CD8α(+) DC selectively take up apoptotic cells and that they are highly specialized in cross-presenting antigen to CD8(+) T cells, we investigated whether B6 mice adoptively transferred with Flt3L-derived DC loaded with donor-derived apoptotic thymocytes could induce tolerance to bm1 skin allografts. Our findings on host anti-donor alloresponse, as revealed by skin allograft survival and cytotoxic T lymphocyte assays, indicated that the administration of syngeneic DC presenting K(bm1) donor-derived allopeptides through the indirect pathway of antigen presentation was not sufficient to induce cross-tolerance to alloreactive CD8(+) T cells responding to bm1 alloantigens in a murine model of skin allograft transplantation across an MHC class I mismatched barrier.

  19. FLT3L and Plerixafor Combination Increases Hematopoietic Stem Cell Mobilization and Leads to Improved Transplantation Outcome

    PubMed Central

    He, Shun; Chu, Jianhong; Vasu, Sumithira; Deng, Youcai; Yuan, Shunzong; Zhang, Jianying; Fan, Zhijin; Hofmeister, Craig C.; He, Xiaoming; Marsh, Henry C.; Devine, Steven M.; Yu, Jianhua

    2014-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) transplantation has curative potential for patients with hematological malignancies. Clinically, HSCs derived from mobilized peripheral blood are used more frequently than bone marrow. However, current standard mobilizing agents yield grafts that may not contain sufficient HSCs. Here, using murine models, we discovered that FLT3L synergized with Plerixafor to mobilize phenotypically defined HSCs, and their combination (FP) was superior to G-CSF alone or in combination with Plerixafor (GP). Additionally, FP mobilized more Treg cells, NK cells, and plasmacytoid dendritic cells compared with G-CSF alone or GP. Both syngeneic and allogeneic grafts mobilized by FP led to long-term survival in transplanted mice. Collectively, FP represents a promising novel and potent mobilization regimen with potential clinical application in both the autologous and allogeneic transplantation settings. PMID:24365795

  20. The value of molecular stratification for CEBPA(DM) and NPM1(MUT) FLT3(WT) genotypes in older patients with acute myeloid leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Dickson, Glenda J; Bustraan, Sophia; Hills, Robert K; Ali, Akbar; Goldstone, Anthony H; Burnett, Alan K; Linch, David C; Gale, Rosemary E

    2016-02-01

    Older adult patients (≥60 years) with acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) are generally considered to be poor-risk and there is limited information available regarding risk stratification based on molecular characterization in this age group, particularly for the double-mutant CEBPA (CEBPA(DM) ) genotype. To investigate whether a molecular favourable-risk genotype can be identified, we investigated CEBPA, NPM1 and FLT3 status and prognostic impact in a cohort of 301 patients aged 60 years or more with intermediate-risk cytogenetics, all treated intensively. Overall survival (OS) at 1 year was highest in the 12 patients (4%) that were CEBPA(DM) compared to the 76 (28%) with a mutant NPM1 and wild-type FLT3 (NPM1(MUT) FLT3(WT) ) genotype or all other patients (75%, 54%, 33% respectively), with median survival 15·2, 13·6 and 6·6 months, although the benefit was short-term (OS at 3 years 17%, 29%, 12% respectively). Combination of the CEBPA(DM) and NPM1(MUT) FLT3(WT) genotype patients defined a molecular group with favourable prognosis (P < 0·0001 in multivariate analysis), with 57% of patients alive at 1 year compared to 33% for all other patients. Knowledge of genotype in older cytogenetically intermediate-risk patients might influence therapy decisions.

  1. 3,3'-Diindolylmethane Inhibits Flt3L/GM-CSF-induced-bone Marrow-derived CD103+ Dendritic Cell Differentiation Regulating Phosphorylation of STAT3 and STAT5

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Ah-Jeong; Kim, Soo-Ji; Jeong, So-Yeon

    2015-01-01

    The intestinal immune system maintains oral tolerance to harmless antigens or nutrients. One mechanism of oral tolerance is mediated by regulatory T cell (Treg)s, of which differentiation is regulated by a subset of dendritic cell (DC)s, primarily CD103+ DCs. The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), a ligand-activated transcription factor, plays an important role in regulating immunity. The intestines are exposed to various AhR ligands, including endogenous metabolites and phytochemicals. It was previously reported that AhR activation induced tolerogenic DCs in mice or in cultures of bone marrow-derived DCs. However, given the variety of tolerogenic DCs, which type of tolerogenic DCs is regulated by AhR remains unknown. In this study, we found that AhR ligand 3,3'-diindolylmethane (DIM) inhibited the development of CD103+ DCs from mouse bone marrow cells stimulated with Flt3L and GM-CSF. DIM interfered with phosphorylation of STAT3 and STAT5 inhibiting the expression of genes, including Id2, E2-2, IDO-1, and Aldh1a2, which are associated with DC differentiation and functions. Finally, DIM suppressed the ability of CD103+ DCs to induce Foxp3+ Tregs. PMID:26770182

  2. Targeting Protein-Protein Interactions with Trimeric Ligands: High Affinity Inhibitors of the MAGUK Protein Family

    PubMed Central

    Nissen, Klaus B.; Haugaard-Kedström, Linda M.; Wilbek, Theis S.; Nielsen, Line S.; Åberg, Emma; Kristensen, Anders S.; Bach, Anders; Jemth, Per; Strømgaard, Kristian

    2015-01-01

    PDZ domains in general, and those of PSD-95 in particular, are emerging as promising drug targets for diseases such as ischemic stroke. We have previously shown that dimeric ligands that simultaneously target PDZ1 and PDZ2 of PSD-95 are highly potent inhibitors of PSD-95. However, PSD-95 and the related MAGUK proteins contain three consecutive PDZ domains, hence we envisioned that targeting all three PDZ domains simultaneously would lead to more potent and potentially more specific interactions with the MAGUK proteins. Here we describe the design, synthesis and characterization of a series of trimeric ligands targeting all three PDZ domains of PSD-95 and the related MAGUK proteins, PSD-93, SAP-97 and SAP-102. Using our dimeric ligands targeting the PDZ1-2 tandem as starting point, we designed novel trimeric ligands by introducing a PDZ3-binding peptide moiety via a cysteine-derivatized NPEG linker. The trimeric ligands generally displayed increased affinities compared to the dimeric ligands in fluorescence polarization binding experiments and optimized trimeric ligands showed low nanomolar inhibition towards the four MAGUK proteins, thus being the most potent inhibitors described. Kinetic experiments using stopped-flow spectrometry showed that the increase in affinity is caused by a decrease in the dissociation rate of the trimeric ligand as compared to the dimeric ligands, likely reflecting the lower probability of simultaneous dissociation of all three PDZ ligands. Thus, we have provided novel inhibitors of the MAGUK proteins with exceptionally high affinity, which can be used to further elucidate the therapeutic potential of these proteins. PMID:25658767

  3. Targeting protein-protein interactions with trimeric ligands: high affinity inhibitors of the MAGUK protein family.

    PubMed

    Nissen, Klaus B; Haugaard-Kedström, Linda M; Wilbek, Theis S; Nielsen, Line S; Åberg, Emma; Kristensen, Anders S; Bach, Anders; Jemth, Per; Strømgaard, Kristian

    2015-01-01

    PDZ domains in general, and those of PSD-95 in particular, are emerging as promising drug targets for diseases such as ischemic stroke. We have previously shown that dimeric ligands that simultaneously target PDZ1 and PDZ2 of PSD-95 are highly potent inhibitors of PSD-95. However, PSD-95 and the related MAGUK proteins contain three consecutive PDZ domains, hence we envisioned that targeting all three PDZ domains simultaneously would lead to more potent and potentially more specific interactions with the MAGUK proteins. Here we describe the design, synthesis and characterization of a series of trimeric ligands targeting all three PDZ domains of PSD-95 and the related MAGUK proteins, PSD-93, SAP-97 and SAP-102. Using our dimeric ligands targeting the PDZ1-2 tandem as starting point, we designed novel trimeric ligands by introducing a PDZ3-binding peptide moiety via a cysteine-derivatized NPEG linker. The trimeric ligands generally displayed increased affinities compared to the dimeric ligands in fluorescence polarization binding experiments and optimized trimeric ligands showed low nanomolar inhibition towards the four MAGUK proteins, thus being the most potent inhibitors described. Kinetic experiments using stopped-flow spectrometry showed that the increase in affinity is caused by a decrease in the dissociation rate of the trimeric ligand as compared to the dimeric ligands, likely reflecting the lower probability of simultaneous dissociation of all three PDZ ligands. Thus, we have provided novel inhibitors of the MAGUK proteins with exceptionally high affinity, which can be used to further elucidate the therapeutic potential of these proteins.

  4. Development of a successive targeting liposome with multi-ligand for efficient targeting gene delivery

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Kun; Shen, Haijun; Shen, Song; Xie, Men; Mao, Chuanbin; Qiu, Liyan; Jin, Yi

    2012-01-01

    Background A successful gene delivery system needs to breakthrough several barriers to allow efficient transgenic expression. In the present study, successive targeting liposomes (STL) were constructed by integrating various targeting groups into a nanoparticle to address this issue. Methods Polyethylenimine (PEI) 1800-triamcinolone acetonide (TA) with nuclear targeting capability was synthesized by a two-step reaction. Lactobionic acid was connected with cholesterol to obtain a compound of [(2-lactoylamido) ethylamino]formic acid cholesterol ester (CHEDLA) with hepatocyte-targeting capability. The liposome was modified with PEI 1800-TA and CHEDLA to prepare successive targeting liposome (STL). Its physicochemical properties and transfection efficiency were investigated both in vitro and in vivo. Results The diameter of STL was approximately 100 nm with 20 mV of potential. The confocal microscopy observation and potential assay verified that lipid bilayer of STL was decorated with PEI 1800-TA. Cytotoxicity of STL was significantly lower than that of PEI 1800-TA and PEI 25K. The transfection efficiency of 10% CHEDLA STL in HepG2 cells was the higher than of the latter two with serum. Its transfection efficiency was greatly reduced with excessive free galactose, indicating that STL was absorbed via galactose receptor-mediated endocytosis. The in vivo study in mice showed that 10% CHEDLA STL had better transgenic expression in liver than the other carriers. Conclusions STL with multi-ligand was able to overcome the various barriers to target nucleus and special cells and present distinctive transgenic expression. Therefore, it has a great potential for gene therapy as a nonviral carrier. PMID:21574214

  5. Theranostic nanoparticles carrying doxorubicin attenuate targeting ligand specific antibody responses following systemic delivery.

    PubMed

    Yang, Emmy; Qian, Weiping; Cao, Zehong; Wang, Liya; Bozeman, Erica N; Ward, Christina; Yang, Bin; Selvaraj, Periasamy; Lipowska, Malgorzata; Wang, Y Andrew; Mao, Hui; Yang, Lily

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the effects of immune responses on targeted delivery of nanoparticles is important for clinical translations of new cancer imaging and therapeutic nanoparticles. In this study, we found that repeated administrations of magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) conjugated with mouse or human derived targeting ligands induced high levels of ligand specific antibody responses in normal and tumor bearing mice while injections of unconjugated mouse ligands were weakly immunogenic and induced a very low level of antibody response in mice. Mice that received intravenous injections of targeted and polyethylene glycol (PEG)-coated IONPs further increased the ligand specific antibody production due to differential uptake of PEG-coated nanoparticles by macrophages and dendritic cells. However, the production of ligand specific antibodies was markedly inhibited following systemic delivery of theranostic nanoparticles carrying a chemotherapy drug, doxorubicin. Targeted imaging and histological analysis revealed that lack of the ligand specific antibodies led to an increase in intratumoral delivery of targeted nanoparticles. Results of this study support the potential of further development of targeted theranostic nanoparticles for the treatment of human cancers.

  6. NALDB: nucleic acid ligand database for small molecules targeting nucleic acid.

    PubMed

    Kumar Mishra, Subodh; Kumar, Amit

    2016-01-01

    Nucleic acid ligand database (NALDB) is a unique database that provides detailed information about the experimental data of small molecules that were reported to target several types of nucleic acid structures. NALDB is the first ligand database that contains ligand information for all type of nucleic acid. NALDB contains more than 3500 ligand entries with detailed pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic information such as target name, target sequence, ligand 2D/3D structure, SMILES, molecular formula, molecular weight, net-formal charge, AlogP, number of rings, number of hydrogen bond donor and acceptor, potential energy along with their Ki, Kd, IC50 values. All these details at single platform would be helpful for the development and betterment of novel ligands targeting nucleic acids that could serve as a potential target in different diseases including cancers and neurological disorders. With maximum 255 conformers for each ligand entry, our database is a multi-conformer database and can facilitate the virtual screening process. NALDB provides powerful web-based search tools that make database searching efficient and simplified using option for text as well as for structure query. NALDB also provides multi-dimensional advanced search tool which can screen the database molecules on the basis of molecular properties of ligand provided by database users. A 3D structure visualization tool has also been included for 3D structure representation of ligands. NALDB offers an inclusive pharmacological information and the structurally flexible set of small molecules with their three-dimensional conformers that can accelerate the virtual screening and other modeling processes and eventually complement the nucleic acid-based drug discovery research. NALDB can be routinely updated and freely available on bsbe.iiti.ac.in/bsbe/naldb/HOME.php. Database URL: http://bsbe.iiti.ac.in/bsbe/naldb/HOME.php.

  7. NALDB: nucleic acid ligand database for small molecules targeting nucleic acid

    PubMed Central

    Kumar Mishra, Subodh; Kumar, Amit

    2016-01-01

    Nucleic acid ligand database (NALDB) is a unique database that provides detailed information about the experimental data of small molecules that were reported to target several types of nucleic acid structures. NALDB is the first ligand database that contains ligand information for all type of nucleic acid. NALDB contains more than 3500 ligand entries with detailed pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic information such as target name, target sequence, ligand 2D/3D structure, SMILES, molecular formula, molecular weight, net-formal charge, AlogP, number of rings, number of hydrogen bond donor and acceptor, potential energy along with their Ki, Kd, IC50 values. All these details at single platform would be helpful for the development and betterment of novel ligands targeting nucleic acids that could serve as a potential target in different diseases including cancers and neurological disorders. With maximum 255 conformers for each ligand entry, our database is a multi-conformer database and can facilitate the virtual screening process. NALDB provides powerful web-based search tools that make database searching efficient and simplified using option for text as well as for structure query. NALDB also provides multi-dimensional advanced search tool which can screen the database molecules on the basis of molecular properties of ligand provided by database users. A 3D structure visualization tool has also been included for 3D structure representation of ligands. NALDB offers an inclusive pharmacological information and the structurally flexible set of small molecules with their three-dimensional conformers that can accelerate the virtual screening and other modeling processes and eventually complement the nucleic acid-based drug discovery research. NALDB can be routinely updated and freely available on bsbe.iiti.ac.in/bsbe/naldb/HOME.php. Database URL: http://bsbe.iiti.ac.in/bsbe/naldb/HOME.php PMID:26896846

  8. PPAR Ligands Function as Suppressors That Target Biological Actions of HMGB1

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Tianhui

    2016-01-01

    High mobility group box 1 (HMGB1), which has become one of the most intriguing molecules in inflammatory disorders and cancers and with which ligand-activated peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are highly associated, is considered as a therapeutic target. Of particular interest is the fact that certain PPAR ligands have demonstrated their potent anti-inflammatory activities and potential anticancer effects. In this review article we summarize recent experimental evidence that PPAR ligands function as suppressors that target biological actions of HMGB1, including intracellular expression, receptor signaling cascades, and extracellular secretion of HMGB1 in cell lines and/or animal models. We also propose the possible mechanisms underlying PPAR involvement in inflammatory disorders and discuss the future therapeutic value of PPAR ligands targeting HMGB1 molecule for cancer prevention and treatment. PMID:27563308

  9. Key Targets for Multi-Target Ligands Designed to Combat Neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Ramsay, Rona R.; Majekova, Magdalena; Medina, Milagros; Valoti, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    HIGHLIGHTS Compounds that interact with multiple targets but minimally with the cytochrome P450 system (CYP) address the many factors leading to neurodegeneration.Acetyl- and Butyryl-cholineEsterases (AChE, BChE) and Monoamine Oxidases A/B (MAO A, MAO B) are targets for Multi-Target Designed Ligands (MTDL).ASS234 is an irreversible inhibitor of MAO A >MAO B and has micromolar potency against the cholinesterases.ASS234 is a poor CYP substrate in human liver, yielding the depropargylated metabolite.SMe1EC2, a stobadine derivative, showed high radical scavenging property, in vitro and in vivo giving protection in head trauma and diabetic damage of endothelium.Control of mitochondrial function and morphology by manipulating fission and fusion is emerging as a target area for therapeutic strategies to decrease the pathological outcome of neurodegenerative diseases. Growing evidence supports the view that neurodegenerative diseases have multiple and common mechanisms in their aetiologies. These multifactorial aspects have changed the broadly common assumption that selective drugs are superior to “dirty drugs” for use in therapy. This drives the research in studies of novel compounds that might have multiple action mechanisms. In neurodegeneration, loss of neuronal signaling is a major cause of the symptoms, so preservation of neurotransmitters by inhibiting the breakdown enzymes is a first approach. Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitors are the drugs preferentially used in AD and that one of these, rivastigmine, is licensed also for PD. Several studies have shown that monoamine oxidase (MAO) B, located mainly in glial cells, increases with age and is elevated in Alzheimer (AD) and Parkinson's Disease's (PD). Deprenyl, a MAO B inhibitor, significantly delays the initiation of levodopa treatment in PD patients. These indications underline that AChE and MAO are considered a necessary part of multi-target designed ligands (MTDL). However, both of these targets are

  10. Evaluation of the novel algorithm of flexible ligand docking with moveable target-protein atoms.

    PubMed

    Sulimov, Alexey V; Zheltkov, Dmitry A; Oferkin, Igor V; Kutov, Danil C; Katkova, Ekaterina V; Tyrtyshnikov, Eugene E; Sulimov, Vladimir B

    2017-01-01

    We present the novel docking algorithm based on the Tensor Train decomposition and the TT-Cross global optimization. The algorithm is applied to the docking problem with flexible ligand and moveable protein atoms. The energy of the protein-ligand complex is calculated in the frame of the MMFF94 force field in vacuum. The grid of precalculated energy potentials of probe ligand atoms in the field of the target protein atoms is not used. The energy of the protein-ligand complex for any given configuration is computed directly with the MMFF94 force field without any fitting parameters. The conformation space of the system coordinates is formed by translations and rotations of the ligand as a whole, by the ligand torsions and also by Cartesian coordinates of the selected target protein atoms. Mobility of protein and ligand atoms is taken into account in the docking process simultaneously and equally. The algorithm is realized in the novel parallel docking SOL-P program and results of its performance for a set of 30 protein-ligand complexes are presented. Dependence of the docking positioning accuracy is investigated as a function of parameters of the docking algorithm and the number of protein moveable atoms. It is shown that mobility of the protein atoms improves docking positioning accuracy. The SOL-P program is able to perform docking of a flexible ligand into the active site of the target protein with several dozens of protein moveable atoms: the native crystallized ligand pose is correctly found as the global energy minimum in the search space with 157 dimensions using 4700 CPU ∗ h at the Lomonosov supercomputer.

  11. Rational and modular design of potent ligands targeting the RNA that causes myotonic dystrophy 2.

    PubMed

    Lee, Melissa M; Pushechnikov, Alexei; Disney, Matthew D

    2009-05-15

    Most ligands targeting RNA are identified through screening a therapeutic target for binding members of a ligand library. A potential alternative way to construct RNA binders is through rational design using information about the RNA motifs ligands prefer to bind. Herein, we describe such an approach to design modularly assembled ligands targeting the RNA that causes myotonic dystrophy type 2 (DM2), a currently untreatable disease. A previous study identified that 6'-N-5-hexynoate kanamycin A (1) prefers to bind 2x2 nucleotide, pyrimidine-rich RNA internal loops. Multiple copies of such loops are found in the RNA hairpin that causes DM2. The 1 ligand was then modularly displayed on a peptoid scaffold with varied number and spacing to target several internal loops simultaneously. Modularly assembled ligands were tested for binding to a series of RNAs and for inhibiting the formation of the toxic DM2 RNA-muscleblind protein (MBNL-1) interaction. The most potent ligand displays three 1 modules, each separated by four spacing submonomers, and inhibits the formation of the RNA-protein complex with an IC(50) of 25 nM. This ligand has higher affinity and is more specific for binding the DM2 RNA than MBNL-1. It binds the DM2 RNA at least 30 times more tightly than related RNAs and 15-fold more tightly than MBNL-1. A related control peptoid displaying 6'-N-5-hexynoate neamine (2) is >100-fold less potent at inhibiting the RNA-protein interaction and binds to DM2 RNA >125-fold more weakly. Uptake studies into a mouse myoblast cell line also show that the most potent ligand is cell permeable.

  12. Identification of ligand-target pairs from combined libraries of small molecules and unpurified protein targets in cell lysates.

    PubMed

    McGregor, Lynn M; Jain, Tara; Liu, David R

    2014-02-26

    We describe the development and validation of interaction determination using unpurified proteins (IDUP), a method that selectively amplifies DNA sequences identifying ligand+target pairs from a mixture of DNA-linked small molecules and unpurified protein targets in cell lysates. By operating in cell lysates, IDUP preserves native post-translational modifications and interactions with endogenous binding partners, thereby enabling the study of difficult-to-purify targets and increasing the potential biological relevance of detected interactions compared with methods that require purified proteins. In IDUP, target proteins are associated with DNA oligonucleotide tags either non-covalently using a DNA-linked antibody or covalently using a SNAP-tag. Ligand-target binding promotes hybridization of a self-priming hairpin that is extended by a DNA polymerase to create a DNA strand that contains sequences identifying both the target and its ligand. These sequences encoding ligand+target pairs are selectively amplified by PCR and revealed by high-throughput DNA sequencing. IDUP can respond to the effect of affinity-modulating adaptor proteins in cell lysates that would be absent in ligand screening or selection methods using a purified protein target. This capability was exemplified by the 100-fold amplification of DNA sequences encoding FRB+rapamycin or FKBP+rapamycin in samples overexpressing both FRB and FKBP (FRB·rapamycin+FKBP, Kd ≈ 100 fM; FKBP·rapamycin+FRB, Kd = 12 nM). In contrast, these sequences were amplified 10-fold less efficiently in samples overexpressing either FRB or FKBP alone (rapamycin+FKBP, Kd ≈ 0.2 nM; rapamcyin+FRB, Kd = 26 μM). Finally, IDUP was used to process a model library of DNA-linked small molecules and a model library of cell lysates expressing SNAP-target fusions combined in a single sample. In this library×library experiment, IDUP resulted in enrichment of sequences corresponding to five known ligand+target pairs ranging in binding

  13. Tandem duplication PCR: an ultra-sensitive assay for the detection of internal tandem duplications of the FLT3 gene

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Ming-Tseh; Tseng, Li-Hui; Beierl, Katie; Hsieh, Antony; Thiess, Michele; Chase, Nadine; Stafford, Amanda; Levis, Mark J.; Eshleman, James R.; Gocke, Christopher D.

    2013-01-01

    Internal tandem duplication (ITD) mutations of the FLT3 gene have been associated with a poor prognosis in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Detection of ITD-positive minor clones at the initial diagnosis and during the minimal residual disease (MRD) stage may be essential. We previously designed a delta-PCR strategy to improve the sensitivity to 0.1% ITD-positive leukemia cells and showed that minor mutants with an allele burden of less than 1% can be clinically significant. In this study, we report on tandem duplication PCR (TD-PCR), a modified inverse PCR assay, and demonstrate a limit of detection of a few molecules of ITD mutants. The TD-PCR was initially designed to confirm ITD mutation of an amplicon which was undetectable by capillary electrophoresis and was incidentally isolated by a molecular fraction collecting tool. Subsequently, TD-PCR detected ITD mutation in 2 of 77 patients previously reported as negative for ITD mutation by a standard PCR assay. TD-PCR can also potentially be applied to monitor MRD with high analytic sensitivity in a portion of ITD-positive AML patients. Further studies using TD-PCR to detect ITD mutants at diagnosis may clarify the clinical significance of those ITD mutants with extremely low allele burden. PMID:23846441

  14. Characterizing and Overriding the Structural Mechanism of the Quizartinib-resistant FLT3 “Gatekeeper” F691L Mutation with PLX3397

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Catherine C.; Zhang, Chao; Lin, Kimberly; Lasater, Elisabeth A.; Zhang, Ying; Massi, Evan; Damon, Lauren E.; Pendleton, Matthew; Bashir, Ali; Sebra, Robert; Perl, Alexander; Kasarskis, Andrew; Shellooe, Rafe; Tsang, Garson; Carias, Heidi; Powell, Ben; Burton, Elizabeth A.; Matusow, Bernice; Zhang, Jiazhong; Spevak, Wayne; Ibrahim, Prabha N.; Le, Mai H.; Hsu, Henry H.; Habets, Gaston; West, Brian L.; Bollag, Gideon; Shah, Neil P.

    2015-01-01

    Tyrosine kinase domain mutations are a common cause of acquired clinical resistance to tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) used to treat cancer, including the FLT3 inhibitor quizartinib. Mutation of kinase “gatekeeper” residues, which control access to an allosteric pocket adjacent to the ATP-binding site, have been frequently implicated in TKI resistance. The molecular underpinnings of gatekeeper mutation-mediated resistance are incompletely understood. We report the first co-crystal structure of FLT3 with the TKI quizartinib, which demonstrates that quizartinib binding relies on essential edge-to-face aromatic interactions with the gatekeeper F691 residue, and F830 within the highly conserved DFG motif in the activation loop. This reliance makes quizartinib critically vulnerable to gatekeeper and activation loop substitutions while minimizing the impact of mutations elsewhere. Moreover, we identify PLX3397, a novel FLT3 inhibitor that retains activity against the F691L mutant due to a binding mode that depends less vitally on specific interactions with the gatekeeper position. PMID:25847190

  15. High rate of hematological responses to sorafenib in FLT3-ITD acute myeloid leukemia relapsed after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    De Freitas, Tiago; Marktel, Sarah; Piemontese, Simona; Carrabba, Matteo G; Tresoldi, Cristina; Messina, Carlo; Lupo Stanghellini, Maria Teresa; Assanelli, Andrea; Corti, Consuelo; Bernardi, Massimo; Peccatori, Jacopo; Vago, Luca; Ciceri, Fabio

    2016-06-01

    Relapse represents the most significant cause of failure of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) for FLT3-ITD-positive acute myeloid leukemia (AML), and available therapies are largely unsatisfactory. In this study, we retrospectively collected data on the off-label use of the tyrosine kinase inhibitor sorafenib, either alone or in association with hypomethylating agents and adoptive immunotherapy, in 13 patients with post-transplantation FLT3-ITD-positive AML relapses. Hematological response was documented in 12 of 13 patients (92%), and five of 13 (38%) achieved complete bone marrow remission. Treatment was overall manageable in the outpatient setting, although all patients experienced significant adverse events, especially severe cytopenias (requiring a donor stem cell boost in five patients) and typical hand-foot syndrome. None of the patients developed graft-vs.-host disease following sorafenib alone, whereas this was frequently observed when this was given in association with donor T-cell infusions. Six patients are alive and in remission at the last follow-up, and four could be bridged to a second allogeneic HSCT, configuring a 65 ± 14% overall survival at 100 d from relapse. Taken together, our data suggest that sorafenib might represent a valid treatment option for patients with FLT3-ITD-positive post-transplantation relapses, manageable also in combination with other therapeutic strategies.

  16. Chromodomain Ligand Optimization via Target-Class Directed Combinatorial Repurposing.

    PubMed

    Barnash, Kimberly D; Lamb, Kelsey N; Stuckey, Jacob I; Norris, Jacqueline L; Cholensky, Stephanie H; Kireev, Dmitri B; Frye, Stephen V; James, Lindsey I

    2016-09-16

    Efforts to develop strategies for small-molecule chemical probe discovery against the readers of the methyl-lysine (Kme) post-translational modification have been met with limited success. Targeted disruption of these protein-protein interactions via peptidomimetic inhibitor optimization is a promising alternative to small-molecule hit discovery; however, recognition of identical peptide motifs by multiple Kme reader proteins presents a unique challenge in the development of selective Kme reader chemical probes. These selectivity challenges are exemplified by the Polycomb repressive complex 1 (PRC1) chemical probe, UNC3866, which demonstrates submicromolar off-target affinity toward the non-PRC1 chromodomains CDYL2 and CDYL. Moreover, since peptidomimetics are challenging subjects for structure-activity relationship (SAR) studies, traditional optimization of UNC3866 would prove costly and time-consuming. Herein, we report a broadly applicable strategy for the affinity-based, target-class screening of chromodomains via the repurposing of UNC3866 in an efficient, combinatorial peptide library. A first-generation library yielded UNC4991, a UNC3866 analogue that exhibits a distinct selectivity profile while maintaining submicromolar affinity toward the CDYL chromodomains. Additionally, in vitro pull-down experiments from HeLa nuclear lysates further demonstrate the selectivity and utility of this compound for future elucidation of CDYL protein function.

  17. Aptamers: Active Targeting Ligands for Cancer Diagnosis and Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xu; Chen, Jiao; Wu, Min; Zhao, Julia Xiaojun

    2015-01-01

    Aptamers, including DNA, RNA and peptide aptamers, are a group of promising recognition units that can specifically bind to target molecules and cells. Due to their excellent specificity and high affinity to targets, aptamers have attracted great attention in various fields in which selective recognition units are required. They have been used in biosensing, drug delivery, disease diagnosis and therapy (especially for cancer treatment). In this review, we summarized recent applications of DNA and RNA aptamers in cancer theranostics. The specific binding ability of aptamers to cancer-related markers and cancer cells ensured their high performance for early diagnosis of cancer. Meanwhile, the efficient targeting ability of aptamers to cancer cells and tissues provided a promising way to deliver imaging agents and drugs for cancer imaging and therapy. Furthermore, with the development of nanoscience and nanotechnology, the conjugation of aptamers with functional nanomaterials paved an exciting way for the fabrication of theranostic agents for different types of cancers, which might be a powerful tool for cancer treatment. PMID:25699094

  18. Aptamers: active targeting ligands for cancer diagnosis and therapy.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xu; Chen, Jiao; Wu, Min; Zhao, Julia Xiaojun

    2015-01-01

    Aptamers, including DNA, RNA and peptide aptamers, are a group of promising recognition units that can specifically bind to target molecules and cells. Due to their excellent specificity and high affinity to targets, aptamers have attracted great attention in various fields in which selective recognition units are required. They have been used in biosensing, drug delivery, disease diagnosis and therapy (especially for cancer treatment). In this review, we summarized recent applications of DNA and RNA aptamers in cancer theranostics. The specific binding ability of aptamers to cancer-related markers and cancer cells ensured their high performance for early diagnosis of cancer. Meanwhile, the efficient targeting ability of aptamers to cancer cells and tissues provided a promising way to deliver imaging agents and drugs for cancer imaging and therapy. Furthermore, with the development of nanoscience and nanotechnology, the conjugation of aptamers with functional nanomaterials paved an exciting way for the fabrication of theranostic agents for different types of cancers, which might be a powerful tool for cancer treatment.

  19. Ligand-based targeted therapy: a novel strategy for hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Li, Min; Zhang, Weiyue; Wang, Birong; Gao, Yang; Song, Zifang; Zheng, Qi Chang

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the most common primary liver cancer with high morbidity and mortality worldwide. Chemotherapy is recommended to patients with intermediate or advanced stage cancer. However, the conventional chemotherapy yields low desired response rates due to multidrug resistance, fast clearance rate, nonspecific delivery, severe side effects, low drug concentration in cancer cells, and so on. Nanoparticle-mediated targeted drug delivery system can surmount the aforementioned obstacles through enhanced permeability and retention effect and active targeting as a novel approach of therapeutics for HCC in recent years. The active targeting is triggered by ligands on the delivery system, which recognize with and internalize into hepatoma cells with high specificity and efficiency. This review focuses on the latest targeted delivery systems for HCC and summarizes the ligands that can enhance the capacity of active targeting, to provide some insight into future research in nanomedicine for HCC. PMID:27920520

  20. Quantitative control of active targeting of nanocarriers to tumor cells through optimization of folate ligand density.

    PubMed

    Tang, Zhaomin; Li, Dan; Sun, Huili; Guo, Xing; Chen, Yuping; Zhou, Shaobing

    2014-09-01

    The active targeting delivery system has been widely studied in cancer therapy by utilizing folate (FA) ligands to generate specific interaction between nanocarriers and folate receptors (FRs) on tumor cell. However, there is little work that has been published to investigate the influence of the definite density of the FA ligands on the active targeting of nanocarriers. In this study, we have combined magnetic-guided iron oxide nanoparticles with FA ligands, adjusted the FA ligand density and then studied the resulting effects on the active targeting ability of this dual-targeting drug delivery system to tumor cells. We have also optimized the FA ligand density of the drug delivery system for their active targeting to FR-overexpressing tumor cells in vitro. Prussian blue staining, semi-thin section of cells observed with transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES) have shown that the optimal FA density is from 2.3 × 10(18) to 2.5 × 10(18) per gram nanoparticles ((g·NPs)(-1)). We have further tried to qualitatively and quantitatively control the active targeting and delivering of drugs to tumors on 4T1-bearing BALB/c mice. As expected, the in vivo experimental results have also demonstrated that the FA density of the magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) could be optimized for a more easily binding to tumor cells via the multivalent linkages and more readily internalization through the FR-mediated endocytosis. Our study can provide a strategy to quantitatively control the active targeting of nanocarriers to tumor cells for cancer therapy.

  1. Targeting programmed cell death ligand 1 in osteosarcoma: an auto-commentary on therapeutic potential.

    PubMed

    Shen, Jacson K; Cote, Gregory M; Choy, Edwin; Hornicek, Francis J; Duan, Zhenfeng

    Programmed cell death ligand 1 (PDL1) expression was recently shown to correlate with tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) in a subset of osteosarcoma patients. Among clinical factors evaluated across human osteosarcoma samples, a pulmonary origin of metastases correlated with high PDL1 expression and prominent TILs. Considering that multiple agents targeting PD-1/PDL1 are under development, targeting this immune checkpoint may be a novel immunotherapeutic route for osteosarcoma in future clinical trials.

  2. Identification of ligands that target the HCV-E2 binding site on CD81

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olaby, Reem Al; Azzazy, Hassan M.; Harris, Rodney; Chromy, Brett; Vielmetter, Jost; Balhorn, Rod

    2013-04-01

    Hepatitis C is a global health problem. While many drug companies have active R&D efforts to develop new drugs for treating Hepatitis C virus (HCV), most target the viral enzymes. The HCV glycoprotein E2 has been shown to play an essential role in hepatocyte invasion by binding to CD81 and other cell surface receptors. This paper describes the use of AutoDock to identify ligand binding sites on the large extracellular loop of the open conformation of CD81 and to perform virtual screening runs to identify sets of small molecule ligands predicted to bind to two of these sites. The best sites selected by AutoLigand were located in regions identified by mutational studies to be the site of E2 binding. Thirty-six ligands predicted by AutoDock to bind to these sites were subsequently tested experimentally to determine if they bound to CD81-LEL. Binding assays conducted using surface Plasmon resonance revealed that 26 out of 36 (72 %) of the ligands bound in vitro to the recombinant CD81-LEL protein. Competition experiments performed using dual polarization interferometry showed that one of the ligands predicted to bind to the large cleft between the C and D helices was also effective in blocking E2 binding to CD81-LEL.

  3. Ligand-Based Peptide Design and Combinatorial Peptide Libraries to Target G Protein-Coupled Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Gruber, Christian W.; Muttenthaler, Markus; Freissmuth, Michael

    2016-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are considered to represent the most promising drug targets; it has been repeatedly said that a large fraction of the currently marketed drugs elicit their actions by binding to GPCRs (with cited numbers varying from 30–50%). Closer scrutiny, however, shows that only a modest fraction of (~60) GPCRs are, in fact, exploited as drug targets, only ~20 of which are peptide-binding receptors. The vast majority of receptors in the humane genome have not yet been explored as sites of action for drugs. Given the drugability of this receptor class, it appears that opportunities for drug discovery abound. In addition, GPCRs provide for binding sites other than the ligand binding sites (referred to as the “orthosteric site”). These additional sites include (i) binding sites for ligands (referred to as “allosteric ligands”) that modulate the affinity and efficacy of orthosteric ligands, (ii) the interaction surface that recruits G proteins and arrestins, (iii) the interaction sites of additional proteins (GIPs, GPCR interacting proteins that regulate G protein signaling or give rise to G protein-independent signals). These sites can also be targeted by peptides. Combinatorial and natural peptide libraries are therefore likely to play a major role in identifying new GPCR ligands at each of these sites. In particular the diverse natural peptide libraries such as the venom peptides from marine cone-snails and plant cyclotides have been established as a rich source of drug leads. High-throughput screening and combinatorial chemistry approaches allow for progressing from these starting points to potential drug candidates. This will be illustrated by focusing on the ligand-based drug design of oxytocin (OT) and vasopressin (AVP) receptor ligands using natural peptide leads as starting points. PMID:20687879

  4. Ligand targeting of EphA2 enhances keratinocyte adhesion and differentiation via desmoglein 1.

    PubMed

    Lin, Samantha; Gordon, Kristin; Kaplan, Nihal; Getsios, Spiro

    2010-11-15

    EphA2 is a receptor tyrosine kinase that is engaged and activated by membrane-linked ephrin-A ligands residing on adjacent cell surfaces. Ligand targeting of EphA2 has been implicated in epithelial growth regulation by inhibiting the extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (Erk1/2)-mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway. Although contact-dependent EphA2 activation was required for dampening Erk1/2-MAPK signaling after a calcium switch in primary human epidermal keratinocytes, the loss of this receptor did not prevent exit from the cell cycle. Incubating keratinocytes with a soluble ephrin-A1-Fc peptide mimetic to target EphA2 further increased receptor activation leading to its down-regulation. Moreover, soluble ligand targeting of EphA2 restricted the lateral expansion of epidermal cell colonies without limiting proliferation in these primary cultures. Rather, ephrin-A1-Fc peptide treatment promoted epidermal cell colony compaction and stratification in a manner that was associated with increased keratinocyte differentiation. The ligand-dependent increase in keratinocyte adhesion and differentiation relied largely upon the up-regulation of desmoglein 1, a desmosomal cadherin that maintains the integrity and differentiated state of suprabasal keratinocytes in the epidermis. These data suggest that keratinocytes expressing EphA2 in the basal layer may respond to ephrin-A1-based cues from their neighbors to facilitate entry into a terminal differentiation pathway.

  5. Structure-based DNA-targeting strategies with small molecule ligands for drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Jia; Gan, Jianhua; Huang, Zhen

    2013-09-01

    Nucleic acids are the molecular targets of many clinical anticancer drugs. However, compared with proteins, nucleic acids have traditionally attracted much less attention as drug targets in structure-based drug design, partially because limited structural information of nucleic acids complexed with potential drugs is available. Over the past several years, enormous progresses in nucleic acid crystallization, heavy-atom derivatization, phasing, and structural biology have been made. Many complicated nucleic acid structures have been determined, providing new insights into the molecular functions and interactions of nucleic acids, especially DNAs complexed with small molecule ligands. Thus, opportunities have been created to further discover nucleic acid-targeting drugs for disease treatments. This review focuses on the structure studies of DNAs complexed with small molecule ligands for discovering lead compounds, drug candidates, and/or therapeutics.

  6. Structure-Based DNA-Targeting Strategies with Small Molecule Ligands for Drug Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Sheng, Jia; Gan, Jianhua; Huang, Zhen

    2014-01-01

    Nucleic acids are the molecular targets of many clinical anticancer drugs. However, compared with proteins, nucleic acids have traditionally attracted much less attention as drug targets in structure-based drug design, partially because limited structural information of nucleic acids complexed with potential drugs is available. Over the past several years, enormous progresses in nucleic acid crystallization, heavy-atom derivatization, phasing, and structural biology have been made. Many complicated nucleic acid structures have been determined, providing new insights into the molecular functions and interactions of nucleic acids, especially DNAs complexed with small molecule ligands. Thus, opportunities have been created to further discover nucleic acid-targeting drugs for disease treatments. This review focuses on the structure studies of DNAs complexed with small molecule ligands for discovering lead compounds, drug candidates, and/or therapeutics. PMID:23633219

  7. Cancer-specific uptake of a liganded protein nanocarrier targeting aggressive CXCR4(+) colorectal cancer models.

    PubMed

    Céspedes, María Virtudes; Unzueta, Ugutz; Álamo, Patricia; Gallardo, Alberto; Sala, Rita; Casanova, Isolda; Pavón, Miguel Angel; Mangues, María Antonia; Trías, Manuel; López-Pousa, Antonio; Villaverde, Antonio; Vázquez, Esther; Mangues, Ramon

    2016-10-01

    Unliganded drug-nanoconjugates accumulate passively in the tumor whereas liganded nanoconjugates promote drug internalization in tumor cells via endocytosis and increase antitumor efficacy. Whether or not tumor cell internalization associates with enhanced tumor uptake is still under debate. We here compared tumor uptake of T22-GFP-H6, a liganded protein carrier targeting the CXCR4 receptor, and the unliganded GFP-H6 carrier in subcutaneous and metastatic colorectal cancer models. T22-GFP-H6 had a higher tumor uptake in primary tumor and metastatic foci than GFP-H6, with no biodistribution or toxicity on normal tissues. T22-GFP-H6 was detected in target CXCR4(+) tumor cell cytosol whereas GFP-H6 was detected in tumor stroma. SDF1-α co-administration switched T22-GFP-H6 internalization from CXCR4(+) tumor epithelial cells to the stroma. Therefore, the incorporation of a targeting ligand promotes selective accumulation of the nanocarrier inside target tumor cells while increasing whole tumor uptake in a CXCR4-dependent manner, validating T22-GFP-H6 as a CXCR4-targeted drug carrier.

  8. Effects of surface displayed targeting ligand GE11 on liposome distribution and extravasation in tumor.

    PubMed

    Tang, Hailing; Chen, Xiaojing; Rui, Mengjie; Sun, Wenqiang; Chen, Jian; Peng, Jinliang; Xu, Yuhong

    2014-10-06

    Targeting ligands displayed on liposome surface had been used to mediate specific interactions and drug delivery to target cells. However, they also affect liposome distribution in vivo, as well as the tissue extravasation processes after IV injection. In this study, we incorporated an EGFR targeting peptide GE11 on liposome surfaces in addition to PEG at different densities and evaluated their targeting properties and antitumor effects. We found that the densities of surface ligand and PEG were critical to target cell binding in vitro as well as pharmacokinetic profiles in vivo. The inclusion of GE11-PEG-DSPE and PEG-DSPE at 2% and 4% mol ratios in the liposome formulation mediated a rapid accumulation of liposomes within 1 h after IV injection in the tumor tissues surrounding neovascular structures. This is in addition to the EPR effect that was most prominently described for surface PEG modified liposomes. Therefore, despite the fact that the distribution of liposomes into interior tumor tissues was still limited by diffusion, GE11 targeted doxorubicin loaded liposomes showed significantly better antitumor activity in tumor bearing mice as a result of the fast active-targeting efficiency. We anticipate these understandings can benefit further optimization of targeted drug delivery systems for improving efficacy in vivo.

  9. Digital One-Disc-One-Compound Method for High-Throughput Discovery of Prostate Cancer-Targeting Ligands

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    countries. Up to now, chemotherapy is still the main treatment modality in prostate cancers10-11, however the efficacy of the therapy is limited...by severe toxic side effects induced by anticancer drugs on healthy tissues. Targeted chemotherapy which can be achieved by attaching a ligand for...peptide library targeted to α6 integrin receptors will be constructed by ODOC method with the aim of discovery of new ligand for targeted chemotherapy

  10. Rapid Exercise-Induced Mobilization of Dendritic Cells Is Potentially Mediated by a Flt3L- and MMP-9-Dependent Process in Multiple Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Deckx, Nathalie; Wens, Inez; Nuyts, Amber H; Lee, Wai-Ping; Hens, Niel; Koppen, Gudrun; Goossens, Herman; Van Damme, Pierre; Berneman, Zwi N; Eijnde, Bert O; Cools, Nathalie

    2015-01-01

    In healthy individuals, one exercise bout induces a substantial increase in the number of circulating leukocytes, while their function is transiently suppressed. The effect of one exercise bout in multiple sclerosis (MS) is less studied. Since recent evidence suggests a role of dendritic cells (DC) in the pathogenesis of MS, we investigated the effect of one combined endurance/resistance exercise bout on the number and function of DC in MS patients and healthy controls. Our results show a rapid increase in the number of DC in response to physical exercise in both MS patients and controls. Further investigation revealed that in particular DC expressing the migratory molecules CCR5 and CD62L were increased upon acute physical activity. This may be mediated by Flt3L- and MMP-9-dependent mobilization of DC, as demonstrated by increased circulating levels of Flt3L and MMP-9 following one exercise bout. Circulating DC display reduced TLR responsiveness after acute exercise, as evidenced by a less pronounced upregulation of activation markers, HLA-DR and CD86, on plasmacytoid DC and conventional DC, respectively. Our results indicate mobilization of DC, which may be less prone to drive inflammatory processes, following exercise. This may present a negative feedback mechanism for exercise-induced tissue damage and inflammation.

  11. Exploration of Bivalent Ligands Targeting Putative Mu Opioid Receptor and Chemokine Receptor CCR5 Dimerization

    PubMed Central

    Arnatt, Christopher K.; Falls, Bethany A.; Yuan, Yunyun; Raborg, Thomas J.; Masvekar, Ruturaj R.; El-Hage, Nazira; Selley, Dana E.; Nicola, Anthony V.; Knapp, Pamela E.; Hauser, Kurt F.; Zhang, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Modern antiretroviral therapies have provided HIV-1 infected patients longer lifespans and better quality of life. However, several neurological complications are now being seen in these patients due to HIV-1 associated injury of neurons by infected microglia and astrocytes. In addition, these effects can be further exacerbated with opiate use and abuse. One possible mechanism for such potentiation effects of opiates is the interaction of the mu opioid receptor (MOR) with the chemokine receptor CCR5 (CCR5), a known HIV-1 co-receptor, to form MOR-CCR5 heterodimer. In an attempt to understand this putative interaction and its relevance to neuroAIDS, we designed and synthesized a series of bivalent ligands targeting the putative CCR5-MOR heterodimer. To understand how these bivalent ligands may interact with the heterodimer, biological studies including calcium mobilization inhibition, binding affinity, HIV-1 invasion, and cell fusion assays were applied. In particular, HIV-1 infection assays using human peripheral blood mononuclear cells, macrophages, and astrocytes revealed a notable synergy in activity for one particular bivalent ligand. Further, a molecular model of the putative CCR5-MOR heterodimer was constructed, docked with the bivalent ligand, and molecular dynamics simulations of the complex was performed in a membrane-water system to help understand the biological observation. PMID:27720326

  12. Cannabinoid CB2 receptor ligand profiling reveals biased signalling and off-target activity

    PubMed Central

    Soethoudt, Marjolein; Grether, Uwe; Fingerle, Jürgen; Grim, Travis W.; Fezza, Filomena; de Petrocellis, Luciano; Ullmer, Christoph; Rothenhäusler, Benno; Perret, Camille; van Gils, Noortje; Finlay, David; MacDonald, Christa; Chicca, Andrea; Gens, Marianela Dalghi; Stuart, Jordyn; de Vries, Henk; Mastrangelo, Nicolina; Xia, Lizi; Alachouzos, Georgios; Baggelaar, Marc P.; Martella, Andrea; Mock, Elliot D.; Deng, Hui; Heitman, Laura H.; Connor, Mark; Di Marzo, Vincenzo; Gertsch, Jürg; Lichtman, Aron H.; Maccarrone, Mauro; Pacher, Pal; Glass, Michelle; van der Stelt, Mario

    2017-01-01

    The cannabinoid CB2 receptor (CB2R) represents a promising therapeutic target for various forms of tissue injury and inflammatory diseases. Although numerous compounds have been developed and widely used to target CB2R, their selectivity, molecular mode of action and pharmacokinetic properties have been poorly characterized. Here we report the most extensive characterization of the molecular pharmacology of the most widely used CB2R ligands to date. In a collaborative effort between multiple academic and industry laboratories, we identify marked differences in the ability of certain agonists to activate distinct signalling pathways and to cause off-target effects. We reach a consensus that HU910, HU308 and JWH133 are the recommended selective CB2R agonists to study the role of CB2R in biological and disease processes. We believe that our unique approach would be highly suitable for the characterization of other therapeutic targets in drug discovery research. PMID:28045021

  13. The synergistic effect of folate and RGD dual ligand of nanographene oxide on tumor targeting and photothermal therapy in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Cheol; Lee, Jong Hyun; Sahu, Abhishek; Tae, Giyoong

    2015-11-01

    Effective delivery of nanoparticles to the target site is necessary for successful biomedical applications. Inefficient targeting is a major concern for nanomedicines in cancer therapy. Conjugation of multiple targeting ligands to the nanoparticle surface might further enhance the targeting efficiency by a co-operative effect of individual ligands. In this study, a dual ligand targeting nanographene oxide (nGO) was developed by non-covalent interaction with folate and cRGD functionalized pluronic, which allowed precise control of ligand number on the nGO surface and ensured stability under physiological conditions. The tumor targeting abilities of single and dual ligand decorated nGOs were evaluated in vitro by using KB cells, over-expressing folate and integrin αvβ3 receptors. In vitro cellular uptake analysis by flow cytometry and confocal laser scanning microscopy showed enhanced uptake of dual ligand modified nGO compared to any of the single ligand modified nGOs. The cellular uptake of dual targeted cRGD-FA-nGO was increased by 1.9 and 2.4 folds compared to single targeted cRGD-nGO or FA-nGO, respectively. The in vivo biodistribution experiment in a mouse xenograft model also confirmed the synergistic targeting effect of cRGD and folate dual functionalized nGO. A significantly higher tumor accumulation of cRGD-FA-nGO was observed compared to cRGD-nGO or FA-nGO. The higher tumor accumulation of dual targeted nGO resulted in complete ablation of tumor tissue through an enhanced photothermal effect by NIR laser irradiation. Therefore, co-functionalization of a nanoparticle by cRGD and folate is a potentially useful way to enhance the tumor targeting efficacy.Effective delivery of nanoparticles to the target site is necessary for successful biomedical applications. Inefficient targeting is a major concern for nanomedicines in cancer therapy. Conjugation of multiple targeting ligands to the nanoparticle surface might further enhance the targeting efficiency by a

  14. Unique motifs and hydrophobic interactions shape the binding of modified DNA ligands to protein targets

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Douglas R.; Gelinas, Amy D.; Zhang, Chi; Rohloff, John C.; Carter, Jeffrey D.; O’Connell, Daniel; Waugh, Sheela M.; Wolk, Steven K.; Mayfield, Wesley S.; Burgin, Alex B.; Edwards, Thomas E.; Stewart, Lance J.; Gold, Larry; Janjic, Nebojsa; Jarvis, Thale C.

    2012-01-01

    Selection of aptamers from nucleic acid libraries by in vitro evolution represents a powerful method of identifying high-affinity ligands for a broad range of molecular targets. Nevertheless, a sizeable fraction of proteins remain difficult targets due to inherently limited chemical diversity of nucleic acids. We have exploited synthetic nucleotide modifications that confer protein-like diversity on a nucleic acid scaffold, resulting in a new generation of binding reagents called SOMAmers (Slow Off-rate Modified Aptamers). Here we report a unique crystal structure of a SOMAmer bound to its target, platelet-derived growth factor B (PDGF-BB). The SOMAmer folds into a compact structure and exhibits a hydrophobic binding surface that mimics the interface between PDGF-BB and its receptor, contrasting sharply with mainly polar interactions seen in traditional protein-binding aptamers. The modified nucleotides circumvent the intrinsic diversity constraints of natural nucleic acids, thereby greatly expanding the structural vocabulary of nucleic acid ligands and considerably broadening the range of accessible protein targets. PMID:23139410

  15. Outcome of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for cytogenetically normal AML and identification of high-risk subgroup using WT1 expression in association with NPM1 and FLT3-ITD mutations.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Jae-Ho; Kim, Hee-Je; Jeon, Young-Woo; Lee, Sung-Eun; Cho, Byung-Sik; Eom, Ki-Seong; Kim, Yoo-Jin; Lee, Seok; Min, Chang-Ki; Cho, Seok-Goo; Kim, Dong-Wook; Lee, Jong-Wook; Min, Woo-Sung

    2015-06-06

    According to recent guidelines, cytogenetically normal acute myeloid leukemia (CN AML) is divided into four molecular subgroups based on nucleophosmin-1 (NPM1) and FMS-like tyrosine kinase 3-internal tandem duplication (FLT3-ITD) mutations. All subgroups except for isolated NPM1mut are associated with poor prognosis. We retrospectively analyzed 223 patients with CN AML, 156 of whom were treated with standard chemotherapy. For postremission therapy, patients with available donors underwent allogeneic (allo) hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) and the rest were treated with autologous HSCT or chemotherapy alone. We first compared the 4 conventional molecular subgroups, and then created another 4 subgroups based on WT1 expression: isolated NPM1mut, NPM1wt/FLT3-ITD-neg with low WT1 or high WT1, and FLT3-ITD-pos CN AML. We finally evaluated 89 patients who were treated with allo HSCT and achieved complete remission after standard chemotherapy. FLT3-ITD CN AML showed the worst outcome irrespective of NPM1mut, and isolated NPM1mut CN AML showed no significant differences compared with NPM1wt/FLT3-ITD-neg CN AML. In contrast, two newly stratified low-risk subgroups (NPM1wt/FLT3-ITD-neg with low WT1 and isolated NPM1mut CN AML) showed higher remission rates with superior overall survival (OS) compared with the other two high-risk subgroups, which showed a higher relapse rate even after allo HSCT. Further analysis showed that higher pre-HSCT expression of WT1 resulted in a higher relapse rate and poorer OS after allo HSCT. For CN AML, a risk-adapted approach using allo HSCT with novel agents should be evaluated with stratification specified by WT1. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Targeting the thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor with small molecule ligands and antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Terry F; Latif, Rauf

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor (TSHR) is the essential molecule for thyroid growth and thyroid hormone production. Since it is also a key autoantigen in Graves’ disease and is involved in thyroid cancer pathophysiology, the targeting of the TSHR offers a logical model for disease control. Areas covered We review the structure and function of the TSHR and the progress in both small molecule ligands and TSHR antibodies for their therapeutic potential. Expert opinion Stabilization of a preferential conformation for the TSHR by allosteric ligands and TSHR antibodies with selective modulation of the signaling pathways is now possible. These tools may be the next generation of therapeutics for controlling the pathophysiological consequences mediated by the effects of the TSHR in the thyroid and other extrathyroidal tissues. PMID:25768836

  17. Targeted molecular-genetic imaging and ligand-directed therapy in aggressive variant prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Ferrara, Fortunato; Staquicini, Daniela I; Driessen, Wouter H P; D'Angelo, Sara; Dobroff, Andrey S; Barry, Marc; Lomo, Lesley C; Staquicini, Fernanda I; Cardó-Vila, Marina; Soghomonyan, Suren; Alauddin, Mian M; Flores, Leo G; Arap, Marco A; Lauer, Richard C; Mathew, Paul; Efstathiou, Eleni; Aparicio, Ana M; Troncoso, Patricia; Navone, Nora M; Logothetis, Christopher J; Marchiò, Serena; Gelovani, Juri G; Sidman, Richard L; Pasqualini, Renata; Arap, Wadih

    2016-10-24

    Aggressive variant prostate cancers (AVPC) are a clinically defined group of tumors of heterogeneous morphologies, characterized by poor patient survival and for which limited diagnostic and treatment options are currently available. We show that the cell surface 78-kDa glucose-regulated protein (GRP78), a receptor that binds to phage-display-selected ligands, such as the SNTRVAP motif, is a candidate target in AVPC. We report the presence and accessibility of this receptor in clinical specimens from index patients. We also demonstrate that human AVPC cells displaying GRP78 on their surface could be effectively targeted both in vitro and in vivo by SNTRVAP, which also enabled specific delivery of siRNA species to tumor xenografts in mice. Finally, we evaluated ligand-directed strategies based on SNTRVAP-displaying adeno-associated virus/phage (AAVP) particles in mice bearing MDA-PCa-118b, a patient-derived xenograft (PDX) of castration-resistant prostate cancer bone metastasis that we exploited as a model of AVPC. For theranostic (a merging of the terms therapeutic and diagnostic) studies, GRP78-targeting AAVP particles served to deliver the human Herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase type-1 (HSVtk) gene, which has a dual function as a molecular-genetic sensor/reporter and a cell suicide-inducing transgene. We observed specific and simultaneous PET imaging and treatment of tumors in this preclinical model of AVPC. Our findings demonstrate the feasibility of GPR78-targeting, ligand-directed theranostics for translational applications in AVPC.

  18. Targeted molecular-genetic imaging and ligand-directed therapy in aggressive variant prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ferrara, Fortunato; Staquicini, Daniela I.; Driessen, Wouter H. P.; D’Angelo, Sara; Dobroff, Andrey S.; Barry, Marc; Lomo, Lesley C.; Staquicini, Fernanda I.; Cardó-Vila, Marina; Soghomonyan, Suren; Alauddin, Mian M.; Flores, Leo G.; Arap, Marco A.; Lauer, Richard C.; Mathew, Paul; Efstathiou, Eleni; Aparicio, Ana M.; Troncoso, Patricia; Navone, Nora M.; Logothetis, Christopher J.; Marchiò, Serena; Gelovani, Juri G.; Sidman, Richard L.; Pasqualini, Renata; Arap, Wadih

    2016-01-01

    Aggressive variant prostate cancers (AVPC) are a clinically defined group of tumors of heterogeneous morphologies, characterized by poor patient survival and for which limited diagnostic and treatment options are currently available. We show that the cell surface 78-kDa glucose-regulated protein (GRP78), a receptor that binds to phage-display-selected ligands, such as the SNTRVAP motif, is a candidate target in AVPC. We report the presence and accessibility of this receptor in clinical specimens from index patients. We also demonstrate that human AVPC cells displaying GRP78 on their surface could be effectively targeted both in vitro and in vivo by SNTRVAP, which also enabled specific delivery of siRNA species to tumor xenografts in mice. Finally, we evaluated ligand-directed strategies based on SNTRVAP-displaying adeno-associated virus/phage (AAVP) particles in mice bearing MDA-PCa-118b, a patient-derived xenograft (PDX) of castration-resistant prostate cancer bone metastasis that we exploited as a model of AVPC. For theranostic (a merging of the terms therapeutic and diagnostic) studies, GRP78-targeting AAVP particles served to deliver the human Herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase type-1 (HSVtk) gene, which has a dual function as a molecular-genetic sensor/reporter and a cell suicide-inducing transgene. We observed specific and simultaneous PET imaging and treatment of tumors in this preclinical model of AVPC. Our findings demonstrate the feasibility of GPR78-targeting, ligand-directed theranostics for translational applications in AVPC. PMID:27791181

  19. Muscarinic receptors as model targets and antitargets for structure-based ligand discovery.

    PubMed

    Kruse, Andrew C; Weiss, Dahlia R; Rossi, Mario; Hu, Jianxin; Hu, Kelly; Eitel, Katrin; Gmeiner, Peter; Wess, Jürgen; Kobilka, Brian K; Shoichet, Brian K

    2013-10-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) regulate virtually all aspects of human physiology and represent an important class of therapeutic drug targets. Many GPCR-targeted drugs resemble endogenous agonists, often resulting in poor selectivity among receptor subtypes and restricted pharmacologic profiles. The muscarinic acetylcholine receptor family exemplifies these problems; thousands of ligands are known, but few are receptor subtype-selective and nearly all are cationic in nature. Using structure-based docking against the M2 and M3 muscarinic receptors, we screened 3.1 million molecules for ligands with new physical properties, chemotypes, and receptor subtype selectivities. Of 19 docking-prioritized molecules tested against the M2 subtype, 11 had substantial activity and 8 represented new chemotypes. Intriguingly, two were uncharged ligands with low micromolar to high nanomolar Ki values, an observation with few precedents among aminergic GPCRs. To exploit a single amino-acid substitution among the binding pockets between the M2 and M3 receptors, we selected molecules predicted by docking to bind to the M3 and but not the M2 receptor. Of 16 molecules tested, 8 bound to the M3 receptor. Whereas selectivity remained modest for most of these, one was a partial agonist at the M3 receptor without measurable M2 agonism. Consistent with this activity, this compound stimulated insulin release from a mouse β-cell line. These results support the ability of structure-based discovery to identify new ligands with unexplored chemotypes and physical properties, leading to new biologic functions, even in an area as heavily explored as muscarinic pharmacology.

  20. Clustered Integrin Ligands as a Novel Approach for the Targeting of Non-Viral Vectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, Quinn Kwan Tai

    Gene transfer or gene delivery is described as the process in which foreign DNA is introduced into cells. Over the years, gene delivery has gained the attention of many researchers and has been developed as powerful tools for use in biotechnology and medicine. With the completion of the Human Genome Project, such advances in technology allowed for the identification of diseases ranging from hereditary disorders to acquired ones (cancer) which were thought to be incurable. Gene therapy provides the means necessary to treat or eliminate genetic diseases from its origin, unlike traditional medicine which only treat symptoms. With ongoing clinical trials for gene therapy increasing, the greatest difficulty still lies in developing safe systems which can target cells of interest to provide efficient delivery. Nature, over millions of years of evolution, has provided an example of one of the most efficient delivery systems: viruses. Although the use of viruses for gene delivery has been well studied, the safety issues involving immunogenicity, insertional mutagenesis, high cost, and poor reproducibility has provided problems for their clinical application. From understanding viruses, we gain insight to designing new systems for non-viral gene delivery. One of these techniques utilized by adenoviruses is the clustering of ligands on its surface through the use of a protein called a penton base. Through the use of nanotechnology we can mimic this basic concept in non-viral gene delivery systems. This dissertation research is focused on developing and applying a novel system for displaying the integrin binding ligand (RGD) in a constrained manner to form a clustered integrin ligand binding platform to be used to enhance the targeting and efficiency of non-viral gene delivery vectors. Peptide mixed monolayer protected gold nanoparticles provides a suitable surface for ligand clustering. A relationship between the peptide ratios in the reaction solution used to form these

  1. Ligand-decorated click polypeptide derived nanoparticles for targeted drug delivery applications.

    PubMed

    Quadir, Mohiuddin A; Morton, Stephen W; Mensah, Lawrence B; Shopsowitz, Kevin; Dobbelaar, Jeroen; Effenberger, Nicole; Hammond, Paula T

    2017-03-02

    A ligand decorated, synthetic polypeptide block copolymer platform with environment-responsive capabilities was designed. We evaluated the potential of this system to function as a polymersome for targeted-delivery of a systemic chemotherapy to tumors. Our system employed click chemistry to provide a pH-responsive polypeptide block that drives nanoparticle assembly, and a ligand (folic acid) conjugated PEG block that targets folate-receptor over-expressing cancer cells. These nanocarriers were found to encapsulate a high loading of conventional chemotherapeutics (e.g. doxorubicin at physiological pH) and release the active therapeutic at lysosomal pH upon cellular uptake. The presence of folic acid on the nanoparticle surface facilitated their active accumulation in folate-receptor-overexpressing cancer cells (KB), compared to untargeted carriers. Folate-targeted nanoparticles loaded with doxorubicin also showed enhanced tumor accumulation in folate-receptor positive KB xenografts, resulting in the suppression of tumor growth in an in vivo hind flank xenograft mouse model.

  2. Rational Design and Generation of a Bimodal Bifunctional Ligand for Antibody-Targeted Radiation Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Chong, Hyun-Soon; Ma, Xiang; Le, Thien; Kwamena, Baidoo; Milenic, Diane E.; Brady, Erik D.; Song, Hyun A.; Brechbiel, Martin W.

    2008-01-01

    An antibody-targeted radiation therapy (radioimmunotherapy, RIT) employs a bifunctional ligand that can effectively hold a cytotoxic metal with clinically acceptable complexation kinetics and stability while being attached to a tumor-specific antibody. Clinical exploration of the therapeutic potential of RIT has been challenged by the absence of adequate ligand, a critical component for enhancing the efficacy of the cancer therapy. To address this deficiency, the bifunctional ligand C-NETA in a unique structural class possessing both a macrocyclic cavity and a flexible acyclic moiety was designed. The practical, reproducible, and readily scalable synthetic route to C-NETA was developed, and its potential as the chelator of 212Bi, 213Bi, and 177Lu for RIT was evaluated in vitro and in vivo. C-NETA rapidly binds both Lu(III) and Bi(III), and the respective metal complexes remain extremely stable in serum for 14 days. 177Lu—C-NETA and 205/6Bi—C-NETA possess an excellent or acceptable in vivo biodistribution profile. PMID:18062661

  3. Selective recognition and stabilization of new ligands targeting the potassium form of the human telomeric G-quadruplex DNA

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yi-Hwa; Chuang, Show-Mei; Wu, Pei-Ching; Chen, Chun-Liang; Jeyachandran, Sivakamavalli; Lo, Shou-Chen; Huang, Hsu-Shan; Hou, Ming-Hon

    2016-01-01

    The development of a ligand that is capable of distinguishing among the wide variety of G-quadruplex structures and targeting telomeres to treat cancer is particularly challenging. In this study, the ability of two anthraquinone telomerase inhibitors (NSC749235 and NSC764638) to target telomeric G-quadruplex DNA was probed. We found that these ligands specifically target the potassium form of telomeric G-quadruplex DNA over the DNA counterpart. The characteristic interaction with the telomeric G-quadruplex DNA and the anticancer activities of these ligands were also explored. The results of this present work emphasize our understanding of the binding selectivity of anthraquinone derivatives to G-quadruplex DNA and assists in future drug development for G-quadruplex-specific ligands. PMID:27511133

  4. Selective recognition and stabilization of new ligands targeting the potassium form of the human telomeric G-quadruplex DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yi-Hwa; Chuang, Show-Mei; Wu, Pei-Ching; Chen, Chun-Liang; Jeyachandran, Sivakamavalli; Lo, Shou-Chen; Huang, Hsu-Shan; Hou, Ming-Hon

    2016-08-01

    The development of a ligand that is capable of distinguishing among the wide variety of G-quadruplex structures and targeting telomeres to treat cancer is particularly challenging. In this study, the ability of two anthraquinone telomerase inhibitors (NSC749235 and NSC764638) to target telomeric G-quadruplex DNA was probed. We found that these ligands specifically target the potassium form of telomeric G-quadruplex DNA over the DNA counterpart. The characteristic interaction with the telomeric G-quadruplex DNA and the anticancer activities of these ligands were also explored. The results of this present work emphasize our understanding of the binding selectivity of anthraquinone derivatives to G-quadruplex DNA and assists in future drug development for G-quadruplex-specific ligands.

  5. Theranostic Value of Multimers: Lessons Learned from Trimerization of Neurotensin Receptor Ligands and Other Targeting Vectors

    PubMed Central

    Maschauer, Simone; Einsiedel, Jürgen; Reich, Dominik; Hübner, Harald; Gmeiner, Peter; Wester, Hans-Jürgen; Prante, Olaf; Notni, Johannes

    2017-01-01

    Neurotensin receptor 1 (NTS1) is overexpressed on a variety of cancer entities; for example, prostate cancer, ductal pancreatic adenocarcinoma, and breast cancer. Therefore, it represents an interesting target for the diagnosis of these cancers types by positron emission tomography (PET). The metabolically-stabilized neurotensin (NT) derivative peptide Nlys8-Lys9-Pro10-Tyr11-Tle12-Leu13-OH was elongated at the N-terminus with 6-azido norleucine and coupled with the 1,4,7-triazacyclononane-1,4,7-tris[(2-carboxyethyl)methylenephosphinic acid] (TRAP) chelator TRAP(alkyne)3 in order to synthesize a NT trimer with subnanomolar affinity and high stability. The 68Ga-labeled peptide [68Ga]Ga-TRAP(NT4)3 was characterized in vitro using the NTS1-expressing human colorectal adenocarcinoma cell line HT29. It displayed fast and high internalization rates of >90%, but also fast efflux rates of 50% over 15 min. In vivo, [68Ga]Ga-TRAP(NT4)3 showed moderate HT29 tumor uptake values of 1.7 %ID/g at 60 min post-injection (p.i.), but also high uptake and retention in the kidneys and liver. A comparison of data for trimer/monomer pairs of NT ligands and other targeting vectors (peptides and peptoids targeting integrins αvβ3, α5β1, and αvβ6, the PSMA-ligand DUPA (2-[3-(1,3-dicarboxypropyl)-ureido]pentanedioic acid), and nitroimidazoles targeting hypoxia) revealed that multimers always exhibit higher target affinities and tumor uptake, but not necessarily improved tumor-to-tissue ratios. Thus, although in vitro data are not suitable for prediction of in vivo performance, multimers are potentially superior to monomers, particularly for applications where high tumor accumulation is crucial. PMID:28287433

  6. Dual systemic tumor targeting with ligand-directed phage and Grp78 promoter induces tumor regression.

    PubMed

    Kia, Azadeh; Przystal, Justyna M; Nianiaris, Nastasia; Mazarakis, Nicholas D; Mintz, Paul J; Hajitou, Amin

    2012-12-01

    The tumor-specific Grp78 promoter is overexpressed in aggressive tumors. Cancer patients would benefit greatly from application of this promoter in gene therapy and molecular imaging; however, clinical benefit is limited by lack of strategies to target the systemic delivery of Grp78-driven transgenes to tumors. This study aims to assess the systemic efficacy of Grp78-guided expression of therapeutic and imaging transgenes relative to the standard cytomegalovirus (CMV) promoter. Combination of ligand and Grp78 transcriptional targeting into a single vector would facilitate systemic applications of the Grp78 promoter. We generated a dual tumor-targeted phage containing the arginine-glycine-aspartic acid tumor homing ligand and Grp78 promoter. Next, we combined flow cytometry, Western blot analysis, bioluminescence imaging of luciferase, and HSVtk/ganciclovir gene therapy and compared efficacy to conventional phage carrying the CMV promoter in vitro and in vivo in subcutaneous models of rat and human glioblastoma. We show that double-targeted phage provides persistent transgene expression in vitro and in tumors in vivo after systemic administration compared with conventional phage. Next, we showed significant tumor killing in vivo using the HSVtk/ganciclovir gene therapy and found a systemic antitumor effect of Grp78-driven HSVtk against therapy-resistant tumors. Finally, we uncovered a novel mechanism of Grp78 promoter activation whereby HSVtk/ganciclovir therapy upregulates Grp78 and transgene expression via the conserved unfolded protein response signaling cascade. These data validate the potential of Grp78 promoter in systemic cancer gene therapy and report the efficacy of a dual tumor targeting phage that may prove useful for translation into gene therapy and molecular imaging applications.

  7. Tacrine-resveratrol fused hybrids as multi-target-directed ligands against Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Jeřábek, Jakub; Uliassi, Elisa; Guidotti, Laura; Korábečný, Jan; Soukup, Ondřej; Sepsova, Vendula; Hrabinova, Martina; Kuča, Kamil; Bartolini, Manuela; Peña-Altamira, Luis Emiliano; Petralla, Sabrina; Monti, Barbara; Roberti, Marinella; Bolognesi, Maria Laura

    2017-02-15

    Multi-target drug discovery is one of the most followed approaches in the active central nervous system (CNS) therapeutic area, especially in the search for new drugs against Alzheimer's disease (AD). This is because innovative multi-target-directed ligands (MTDLs) could more adequately address the complexity of this pathological condition. In a continuation of our efforts aimed at a new series of anti-AD MTDLs, we combined the structural features of the cholinesterase inhibitor drug tacrine with that of resveratrol, which is known for its purported antioxidant and anti-neuroinflammatory activities. The most interesting hybrid compounds (5, 8, 9 and 12) inhibited human acetylcholinesterase at micromolar concentrations and effectively modulated Aβ self-aggregation in vitro. In addition, 12 showed intriguing anti-inflammatory and immuno-modulatory properties in neuronal and glial AD cell models. Importantly, the MTDL profile is accompanied by high-predicted blood-brain barrier permeability, and low cytotoxicity on primary neurons.

  8. Targeting TGFβ superfamily ligand accessory proteins as novel therapeutics for chronic lung disorders.

    PubMed

    Budd, David C; Holmes, Alan M

    2012-09-01

    Dysregulation of the transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) pathway has been implicated to underlie a number of disease indications including chronic lung disorders such as asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), interstitial pneumonias, and pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). Consequently, the pharmaceutical industry has devoted significant resources in the pursuit of TGFβ pathway inhibitors that target the cognate type I and II receptors and respective ligands. The progress of these approaches has been painfully slow, due in part to dose-limiting safety issues that result from the antagonism of a pathway that is responsible for regulating many fundamental biological processes including immune surveillance and cardiovascular responses. These disappointments have led many in the field to conclude that modulating the TGFβ pathway for chronic indications with a sufficient safety window using conventional approaches may be extremely difficult to achieve. Here we review the rationale and limitations of the use of TGFβ pathway inhibitors in chronic lung disorders and the possibility of targeting TGFβ superfamily ligand accessory proteins to allow rheostatic regulation of signaling to achieve efficacy while maintaining a sufficient therapeutic index.

  9. Optimization of a Novel Peptide Ligand Targeting Human Carbonic Anhydrase IX

    PubMed Central

    Rana, Shoaib; Nissen, Felix; Marr, Annabell; Markert, Annette; Altmann, Annette; Mier, Walter; Debus, Juergen; Haberkorn, Uwe; Askoxylakis, Vasileios

    2012-01-01

    Background Carbonic anhydrase IX (CA IX) is a hypoxia-regulated transmembrane protein over-expressed in various types of human cancer. Recently, a new peptide with affinity for human carbonic anhydrase IX (CaIX-P1) was identified using the phage display technology. Aim of the present study is to characterize the binding site in the sequence of CaIX-P1, in order to optimize the binding and metabolic properties and use it for targeting purposes. Methodology/Principal Findings Various fragments of CaIX-P1 were synthesized on solid support using Fmoc chemistry. Alanine scanning was performed for identification of the amino acids crucial for target binding. Derivatives with increased binding affinity were radiolabeled and in vitro studies were carried out on the CA IX positive human renal cell carcinoma cell line SKRC 52 and the CA IX negative human pancreatic carcinoma cell line BxPC3. Metabolic stability was investigated in cell culture medium and human serum. Organ distribution and planar scintigraphy studies were performed in Balb/c nu/nu mice carrying subcutaneously transplanted SKRC 52 tumors. The results of our studies clearly identified amino acids that are important for target binding. Among various fragments and derivatives the ligand CaIX-P1-4-10 (NHVPLSPy) was found to possess increased binding potential in SKRC 52 cells, whereas no binding capacity for BxPC3 cells was observed. Binding of radiolabeled CaIX-P1-4-10 on CA IX positive cells could be inhibited by both the unlabeled and the native CaIX-P1 peptide but not by control peptides. Stability experiments indicated the degradation site in the sequence of CaIX-P1-4-10. Biodistribution studies showed a higher in vivo accumulation in the tumor than in most healthy tissues. Conclusions Our data reveal modifications in the sequence of the CA IX affine ligand CaIX-P1 that might be favorable for improvement of target affinity and metabolic stability, which are necessary prior to the use of the ligand in

  10. A novel bicistronic high-capacity gutless adenovirus vector that drives constitutive expression of herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase and tet-inducible expression of Flt3L for glioma therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Puntel, Mariana; Muhammad, A K M G; Candolfi, Marianela; Salem, Alireza; Yagiz, Kader; Farrokhi, Catherine; Kroeger, Kurt M; Xiong, Weidong; Curtin, James F; Liu, Chunyan; Bondale, Niyati S; Lerner, Jonathan; Pechnick, Robert N; Palmer, Donna; Ng, Philip; Lowenstein, Pedro R; Castro, Maria G

    2010-06-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is a deadly primary brain tumor. Conditional cytotoxic/immune-stimulatory gene therapy (Ad-TK and Ad-Flt3L) elicits tumor regression and immunological memory in rodent GBM models. Since the majority of patients enrolled in clinical trials would exhibit adenovirus immunity, which could curtail transgene expression and therapeutic efficacy, we used high-capacity adenovirus vectors (HC-Ads) as a gene delivery platform. Herein, we describe for the first time a novel bicistronic HC-Ad driving constitutive expression of herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase (HSV1-TK) and inducible Tet-mediated expression of Flt3L within a single-vector platform. We achieved anti-GBM therapeutic efficacy with no overt toxicities using this bicistronic HC-Ad even in the presence of systemic Ad immunity. The bicistronic HC-Ad-TK/TetOn-Flt3L was delivered into intracranial gliomas in rats. Survival, vector biodistribution, neuropathology, systemic toxicity, and neurobehavioral deficits were assessed for up to 1 year posttreatment. Therapeutic efficacy was also assessed in animals preimmunized against Ads. We demonstrate therapeutic efficacy, with vector genomes being restricted to the brain injection site and an absence of overt toxicities. Importantly, antiadenoviral immunity did not inhibit therapeutic efficacy. These data represent the first report of a bicistronic vector platform driving the expression of two therapeutic transgenes, i.e., constitutive HSV1-TK and inducible Flt3L genes. Further, our data demonstrate no promoter interference and optimum gene delivery and expression from within this single-vector platform. Analysis of the efficacy, safety, and toxicity of this bicistronic HC-Ad vector in an animal model of GBM strongly supports further preclinical testing and downstream process development of HC-Ad-TK/TetOn-Flt3L for a future phase I clinical trial for GBM.

  11. Ligand-functionalized nanoparticles target endothelial cells in retinal capillaries after systemic application

    PubMed Central

    Pollinger, Klaus; Hennig, Robert; Ohlmann, Andreas; Fuchshofer, Rudolf; Wenzel, Rebecca; Breunig, Miriam; Tessmar, Joerg; Tamm, Ernst R.; Goepferich, Achim

    2013-01-01

    To date, diseases affecting vascular structures in the posterior eye are mostly treated by laser photocoagulation and multiple intraocular injections, procedures that destroy healthy tissue and can cause vision-threatening complications. To overcome these drawbacks, we investigate the feasibility of receptor-mediated nanoparticle targeting to capillary endothelial cells in the retina after i.v. application. Cell-binding studies using microvascular endothelial cells showed receptor-specific binding and cellular uptake of cyclo(RGDfC)-modified quantum dots via the αvβ3 integrin receptor. Conversely, Mueller cells and astrocytes, representing off-target cells located in the retina, revealed only negligible interaction with nanoparticles. In vivo experiments, using nude mice as the model organism, demonstrated a strong binding of the ligand-modified quantum dots in the choriocapillaris and intraretinal capillaries upon i.v. injection and 1-h circulation time. Nontargeted nanoparticles, in contrast, did not accumulate to a significant amount in the target tissue. The presented strategy of targeting integrin receptors in the retina could be of utmost value for future intervention in pathologies of the posterior eye, which are to date only accessible with difficulty. PMID:23530216

  12. The role of flexibility in the rational design of modularly assembled ligands targeting the RNAs that cause the myotonic dystrophies.

    PubMed

    Disney, Matthew D; Lee, Melissa M; Pushechnikov, Alexei; Childs-Disney, Jessica L

    2010-02-15

    Modularly assembled ligands were designed to target the RNAs that cause two currently untreatable neuromuscular disorders, myotonic dystrophy types 1 (DM1) and 2 (DM2). DM1 is caused by an expanded repeating sequence of CUG, and DM2 is caused by expanded CCUG repeats. Both are present in noncoding regions and fold into hairpins with either repeating 1x1 nucleotide UU (DM1) or 2x2 nucleotide 5'-CU/3'-UC (DM2) internal loops separated by two GC pairs. The repeats are toxic because they sequester the RNA splicing regulator muscleblind-like 1 protein (MBNL1). Rational design of ligands targeting these RNAs was enabled by a database of RNA motif-ligand partners compiled by using two-dimensional combinatorial screening (2DCS). One 2DCS study found that the 6''-azido-kanamycin A module binds internal loops similar to those found in DM1 and DM2. In order to further enhance affinity and specificity, the ligand was assembled on a peptoid backbone to precisely control valency and the distance between ligand modules. Designed compounds are more potent and specific binders to the toxic RNAs than MBNL1 and inhibit the formation of the RNA-protein complexes with nanomolar IC(50) values. This study shows that three important factors govern potent inhibition: 1) the surface area sequestered by the assembled ligands; 2) the spacing between ligand modules since a longer distance is required to target DM2 RNAs than DM1 RNAs; and 3) flexibility in the modular assembly scaffold used to display the RNA-binding module. These results have impacts on the general design of assembled ligands targeting RNAs present in genomic sequence.

  13. Training based on ligand efficiency improves prediction of bioactivities of ligands and drug target proteins in a machine learning approach.

    PubMed

    Sugaya, Nobuyoshi

    2013-10-28

    Machine learning methods based on ligand-protein interaction data in bioactivity databases are one of the current strategies for efficiently finding novel lead compounds as the first step in the drug discovery process. Although previous machine learning studies have succeeded in predicting novel ligand-protein interactions with high performance, all of the previous studies to date have been heavily dependent on the simple use of raw bioactivity data of ligand potencies measured by IC50, EC50, K(i), and K(d) deposited in databases. ChEMBL provides us with a unique opportunity to investigate whether a machine-learning-based classifier created by reflecting ligand efficiency other than the IC50, EC50, K(i), and Kd values can also offer high predictive performance. Here we report that classifiers created from training data based on ligand efficiency show higher performance than those from data based on IC50 or K(i) values. Utilizing GPCRSARfari and KinaseSARfari databases in ChEMBL, we created IC50- or K(i)-based training data and binding efficiency index (BEI) based training data then constructed classifiers using support vector machines (SVMs). The SVM classifiers from the BEI-based training data showed slightly higher area under curve (AUC), accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity in the cross-validation tests. Application of the classifiers to the validation data demonstrated that the AUCs and specificities of the BEI-based classifiers dramatically increased in comparison with the IC50- or K(i)-based classifiers. The improvement of the predictive power by the BEI-based classifiers can be attributed to (i) the more separated distributions of positives and negatives, (ii) the higher diversity of negatives in the BEI-based training data in a feature space of SVMs, and (iii) a more balanced number of positives and negatives in the BEI-based training data. These results strongly suggest that training data based on ligand efficiency as well as data based on classical IC50

  14. Remission of lymphoblastic leukaemia in an intravascular fluidic environment by pliable drug carrier with a sliding target ligand

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Donghyun; Lee, Yeong Mi; Lee, Jaehyun; Doh, Junsang; Kim, Won Jong

    2017-01-01

    A polyrotaxane-based nanoconstruct with pliable structure carrying a chemotherapeutic drug was developed for targeting circulating lymphoblastic leukaemia cells in a fluidic environment of blood vessels in vivo. By introducing lymphoblast targeting aptamer DNA through cyclodextrin, threaded in poly(ethylene glycol) as polyrotaxane, target aptamer slides along the long polymeric chain and actively search for target ligand, leading to active targeting in dynamic fluidic system which is enhanced by up to 6–fold compared with that of control carriers with non–sliding targeting ligands. Moreover, the drug carrier was made stimuli-responsive by employing i-motif DNA to selective releases of its payload at intracellular acidic condition. These combined features resulted in the effective remission of lymphoblastic leukaemia both in vitro and in dynamic blood vessels in vivo. PMID:28094326

  15. In silico identification of new ligands for GPR17: a promising therapeutic target for neurodegenerative diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eberini, Ivano; Daniele, Simona; Parravicini, Chiara; Sensi, Cristina; Trincavelli, Maria L.; Martini, Claudia; Abbracchio, Maria P.

    2011-08-01

    GPR17, a previously orphan receptor responding to both uracil nucleotides and cysteinyl-leukotrienes, has been proposed as a novel promising target for human neurodegenerative diseases. Here, in order to specifically identify novel potent ligands of GPR17, we first modeled in silico the receptor by using a multiple template approach, in which extracellular loops of the receptor, quite complex to treat, were modeled making reference to the most similar parts of all the class-A GPCRs crystallized so far. A high-throughput virtual screening exploration of GPR17 binding site with more than 130,000 lead-like compounds was then applied, followed by the wet functional and pharmacological validation of the top-scoring chemical structures. This approach revealed successful for the proposed aim, and allowed us to identify five agonists or partial agonists with very diverse chemical structure. None of these compounds could have been expected `a priori' to act on a GPCR, and all of them behaved as much more potent ligands than GPR17 endogenous activators.

  16. The prelude on novel receptor and ligand targets involved in the treatment of diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Jonnalagadda, Venu Gopal; Ram Raju, Allam Venkata Sita; Pittala, Srinivas; Shaik, Afsar; Selkar, Nilakash Annaji

    2014-01-01

    Metabolic disorders are a group of disorders, due to the disruption of the normal metabolic process at a cellular level. Diabetes Mellitus and Tyrosinaemia are the majorly reported metabolic disorders. Among them, Diabetes Mellitus is a one of the leading metabolic syndrome, affecting 5 to 7 % of the population worldwide and mainly characterised by elevated levels of glucose and is associated with two types of physiological event disturbances such as impaired insulin secretion and insulin resistance. Up to now, various treatment strategies are like insulin, alphaglucosidase inhibitors, biguanides, incretins were being followed. Concurrently, various novel therapeutic strategies are required to advance the therapy of Diabetes mellitus. For the last few decades, there has been an extensive research in understanding the metabolic pathways involved in Diabetes Mellitus at the cellular level and having the profound knowledge on cell-growth, cell-cycle, and apoptosis at a molecular level provides new targets for the treatment of Diabetes Mellitus. Receptor signalling has been involved in these mechanisms, to translate the information coming from outside. To understand the various receptors involved in these pathways, we must have a sound knowledge on receptors and ligands involved in it. This review mainly summarises the receptors and ligands which are involved the Diabetes Mellitus. Finally, researchers have to develop the alternative chemical moieties that retain their affinity to receptors and efficacy. Diabetes Mellitus being a metabolic disorder due to the glucose surfeit, demands the need for regular exercise along with dietary changes.

  17. The Prelude on Novel Receptor and Ligand Targets Involved in the Treatment of Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Jonnalagadda, Venu Gopal; Ram Raju, Allam Venkata Sita; Pittala, Srinivas; Shaik, Afsar; Selkar, Nilakash Annaji

    2014-01-01

    Metabolic disorders are a group of disorders, due to the disruption of the normal metabolic process at a cellular level. Diabetes Mellitus and Tyrosinaemia are the majorly reported metabolic disorders. Among them, Diabetes Mellitus is a one of the leading metabolic syndrome, affecting 5 to 7 % of the population worldwide and mainly characterised by elevated levels of glucose and is associated with two types of physiological event disturbances such as impaired insulin secretion and insulin resistance. Up to now, various treatment strategies are like insulin, alphaglucosidase inhibitors, biguanides, incretins were being followed. Concurrently, various novel therapeutic strategies are required to advance the therapy of Diabetes mellitus. For the last few decades, there has been an extensive research in understanding the metabolic pathways involved in Diabetes Mellitus at the cellular level and having the profound knowledge on cell-growth, cell-cycle, and apoptosis at a molecular level provides new targets for the treatment of Diabetes Mellitus. Receptor signalling has been involved in these mechanisms, to translate the information coming from outside. To understand the various receptors involved in these pathways, we must have a sound knowledge on receptors and ligands involved in it. This review mainly summarises the receptors and ligands which are involved the Diabetes Mellitus. Finally, researchers have to develop the alternative chemical moieties that retain their affinity to receptors and efficacy. Diabetes Mellitus being a metabolic disorder due to the glucose surfeit, demands the need for regular exercise along with dietary changes. PMID:24754003

  18. Activation and Molecular Targets of Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor-γ Ligands in Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Nemenoff, Raphael A.; Weiser-Evans, Mary; Winn, Robert A.

    2008-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death, and five-year survival remains poor, raising the urgency for new treatment strategies. Activation of PPARγ represents a potential target for both the treatment and prevention of lung cancer. Numerous studies have examined the effect of thiazolidinediones such as rosiglitazone and pioglitazone on lung cancer cells in vitro and in xenograft models. These studies indicate that activation of PPARγ inhibits cancer cell proliferation as well as invasiveness and metastasis. While activation of PPARγ can occur by direct binding of pharmacological ligands to the molecule, emerging data indicate that PPARγ activation can occur through engagement of other signal transduction pathways, including Wnt signaling and prostaglandin production. Data, both from preclinical models and retrospective clinical studies, indicate that activation of PPARγ may represent an attractive chemopreventive strategy. This article reviews the existing biological and mechanistic experiments focusing on the role of PPARγ in lung cancer, focusing specifically on nonsmall cell lung cancer. PMID:18509496

  19. Manipulating Antigenic Ligand Strength to Selectively Target Myelin-Reactive CD4+ T Cells in EAE

    PubMed Central

    Sabatino, Joseph J.; Rosenthal, Kristen M.

    2010-01-01

    The development of antigen-specific therapies for the selective tolerization of autoreactive T cells remains the Holy Grail for the treatment of T-cell-mediated autoimmune diseases such as multiple sclerosis (MS) and its animal model experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). This quest remains elusive, however, as the numerous antigen-specific strategies targeting myelin-specific T cells over the years have failed to result in clinical success. In this review, we revisit the antigen-based therapies used in the treatment of myelin-specific CD4+ T cells in the context of the functional avidity and the strength of signal of the encephalitogenic CD4+ T cell repertoire. In light of differences in activation thresholds, we propose that autoreactive T cells are not all equal, and therefore tolerance induction strategies must incorporate ligand strength in order to be successful in treating EAE and ultimately the human disease MS. PMID:19904613

  20. Ligand substitutions between ruthenium–cymene compounds can control protein versus DNA targeting and anticancer activity

    PubMed Central

    Adhireksan, Zenita; Davey, Gabriela E.; Campomanes, Pablo; Groessl, Michael; Clavel, Catherine M.; Yu, Haojie; Nazarov, Alexey A.; Yeo, Charmian Hui Fang; Ang, Wee Han; Dröge, Peter; Rothlisberger, Ursula; Dyson, Paul J.; Davey, Curt A.

    2014-01-01

    Ruthenium compounds have become promising alternatives to platinum drugs by displaying specific activities against different cancers and favourable toxicity and clearance properties. Nonetheless, their molecular targeting and mechanism of action are poorly understood. Here we study two prototypical ruthenium-arene agents—the cytotoxic antiprimary tumour compound [(η6-p-cymene)Ru(ethylene-diamine)Cl]PF6 and the relatively non-cytotoxic antimetastasis compound [(η6-p-cymene)Ru(1,3,5-triaza-7-phosphaadamantane)Cl2]—and discover that the former targets the DNA of chromatin, while the latter preferentially forms adducts on the histone proteins. Using a novel ‘atom-to-cell’ approach, we establish the basis for the surprisingly site-selective adduct formation behaviour and distinct cellular impact of these two chemically similar anticancer agents, which suggests that the cytotoxic effects arise largely from DNA lesions, whereas the protein adducts may be linked to the other therapeutic activities. Our study shows promise for developing new ruthenium drugs, via ligand-based modulation of DNA versus protein binding and thus cytotoxic potential, to target distinguishing epigenetic features of cancer cells. PMID:24637564

  1. Multivalent display of quinic acid based ligands for targeting E-selectin expressing cells.

    PubMed

    Shamay, Yosi; Paulin, Denise; Ashkenasy, Gonen; David, Ayelet

    2009-10-08

    The site-specific expression of molecular markers on endothelial cells of blood vessels during inflammatory response and angiogenesis provides an opportunity to target drugs and imaging molecules to the vascular endothelium of diseased tissues. This paper describes an innovative strategy for selective delivery of polymer conjugates to E- and P-selectin expressing cells using a series of quinic acid (Qa) based non-carbohydrate analogues of the natural ligand sialyl Lewis(x) (sLe(x)) as targeting moieties. We demonstrate that such analogues antagonize the adhesion of sLe(x) expressing HL-60 cells to both E- and P-selectin. Significantly, the apparent avidity of polymer conjugates carrying multiple Qa copies has increased by 3 orders of magnitude relative to their monomeric forms. Furthermore, we found that the major mechanism of copolymer entry and delivery into E-selectin expressing cells is endocytosis. These selectin-targetable copolymers provide the foundation to support controlled delivery of anticancer drugs and imaging agents to tumor vasculature for therapeutic and diagnostic applications.

  2. Isozyme-Specific Ligands for O-acetylserine sulfhydrylase, a Novel Antibiotic Target

    PubMed Central

    Cozzini, Pietro; Campanini, Barbara; Salsi, Enea; Felici, Paolo; Raboni, Samanta; Benedetti, Paolo; Cruciani, Gabriele; Kellogg, Glen E.; Cook, Paul F.; Mozzarelli, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    The last step of cysteine biosynthesis in bacteria and plants is catalyzed by O-acetylserine sulfhydrylase. In bacteria, two isozymes, O-acetylserine sulfhydrylase-A and O-acetylserine sulfhydrylase-B, have been identified that share similar binding sites, although the respective specific functions are still debated. O-acetylserine sulfhydrylase plays a key role in the adaptation of bacteria to the host environment, in the defense mechanisms to oxidative stress and in antibiotic resistance. Because mammals synthesize cysteine from methionine and lack O-acetylserine sulfhydrylase, the enzyme is a potential target for antimicrobials. With this aim, we first identified potential inhibitors of the two isozymes via a ligand- and structure-based in silico screening of a subset of the ZINC library using FLAP. The binding affinities of the most promising candidates were measured in vitro on purified O-acetylserine sulfhydrylase-A and O-acetylserine sulfhydrylase-B from Salmonella typhimurium by a direct method that exploits the change in the cofactor fluorescence. Two molecules were identified with dissociation constants of 3.7 and 33 µM for O-acetylserine sulfhydrylase-A and O-acetylserine sulfhydrylase-B, respectively. Because GRID analysis of the two isoenzymes indicates the presence of a few common pharmacophoric features, cross binding titrations were carried out. It was found that the best binder for O-acetylserine sulfhydrylase-B exhibits a dissociation constant of 29 µM for O-acetylserine sulfhydrylase-A, thus displaying a limited selectivity, whereas the best binder for O-acetylserine sulfhydrylase-A exhibits a dissociation constant of 50 µM for O-acetylserine sulfhydrylase-B and is thus 8-fold selective towards the former isozyme. Therefore, isoform-specific and isoform-independent ligands allow to either selectively target the isozyme that predominantly supports bacteria during infection and long-term survival or to completely block bacterial cysteine

  3. A New Peptide Ligand for Targeting Human Carbonic Anhydrase IX, Identified through the Phage Display Technology

    PubMed Central

    Askoxylakis, Vasileios; Garcia-Boy, Regine; Rana, Shoaib; Krämer, Susanne; Hebling, Ulrike; Mier, Walter; Altmann, Annette; Markert, Annette; Debus, Jürgen; Haberkorn, Uwe

    2010-01-01

    Carbonic anhydrase IX (CAIX) is a transmembrane enzyme found to be overexpressed in various tumors and associated with tumor hypoxia. Ligands binding this target may be used to visualize hypoxia, tumor manifestation or treat tumors by endoradiotherapy. Methods Phage display was performed with a 12 amino acid phage display library by panning against a recombinant extracellular domain of human carbonic anhydrase IX. The identified peptide CaIX-P1 was chemically synthesized and tested in vitro on various cell lines and in vivo in Balb/c nu/nu mice carrying subcutaneously transplanted tumors. Binding, kinetic and competition studies were performed on the CAIX positive human renal cell carcinoma cell line SKRC 52, the CAIX negative human renal cell carcinoma cell line CaKi 2, the human colorectal carcinoma cell line HCT 116 and on human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC). Organ distribution studies were carried out in mice, carrying SKRC 52 tumors. RNA expression of CAIX in HCT 116 and HUVEC cells was investigated by quantitative real time PCR. Results In vitro binding experiments of 125I-labeled-CaIX-P1 revealed an increased uptake of the radioligand in the CAIX positive renal cell carcinoma cell line SKRC 52. Binding of the radioligand in the colorectal carcinoma cell line HCT 116 increased with increasing cell density and correlated with the mRNA expression of CAIX. Radioligand uptake was inhibited up to 90% by the unlabeled CaIX-P1 peptide, but not by the negative control peptide octreotide at the same concentration. No binding was demonstrated in CAIX negative CaKi 2 and HUVEC cells. Organ distribution studies revealed a higher accumulation in SKRC 52 tumors than in heart, spleen, liver, muscle, intestinum and brain, but a lower uptake compared to blood and kidney. Conclusions These data indicate that CaIX-P1 is a promising candidate for the development of new ligands targeting human carbonic anhydrase IX. PMID:21209841

  4. Multi-ligand nanoparticles for targeted drug delivery to the injured vascular wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kona, Soujanya

    Pathological conditions like coronary artery disease, acute myocardial infarction, stroke, and peripheral artery diseases as well as cardiovascular interventions used in the treatment of coronary artery diseases such as angioplasty and stenting damage/injure the blood vessel wall, leading to inflamed or activated endothelial cells that have been implicated in events leading to thrombosis, inflammation, and restenosis. Oral administration of anti-coagulant and anti-inflammatory drugs causes systemic toxicity, bleeding, patient incompliance, and inadequate amounts of drugs at the injured area. Though drug-eluting stents have shown therapeutic benefits, complications such as in-stent restenosis and late thrombosis still remain and are a cause for concern. Rapid growth in the field of nanotechnology and nanoscience in recent years has paved the way for new targeted and controlled drug delivery strategies. In this perspective, the development of biodegradable nanoparticles for targeted intracellular drug delivery to the inflamed endothelial cells may offer an improved avenue for treatment of cardiovascular diseases. The major objective of this research was to develop "novel multi-ligand nanoparticles," as drug carriers that can efficiently target and deliver therapeutic agents to the injured/inflamed vascular cells under dynamic flow conditions. Our approach mimics the natural binding ability of platelets to injured/activated endothelial cells through glycoprotein Ib (GPIb) bound to P-selectin expressed on inflamed endothelial cells and to the subendothelium through GPIb binding to von Willebrand factor (vWF) deposited onto the injured vascular wall. Our design also exploits the natural cell membrane translocation ability of the internalizing cell peptide - trans-activating transcriptor (TAT) to enhance the nanoparticle uptake by the targeted cells. Our hypothesis is that these multi-ligand nanoparticles would show an increased accumulation at the injury site since GPIb

  5. Ligand efficiency-based support vector regression models for predicting bioactivities of ligands to drug target proteins.

    PubMed

    Sugaya, Nobuyoshi

    2014-10-27

    The concept of ligand efficiency (LE) indices is widely accepted throughout the drug design community and is frequently used in a retrospective manner in the process of drug development. For example, LE indices are used to investigate LE optimization processes of already-approved drugs and to re-evaluate hit compounds obtained from structure-based virtual screening methods and/or high-throughput experimental assays. However, LE indices could also be applied in a prospective manner to explore drug candidates. Here, we describe the construction of machine learning-based regression models in which LE indices are adopted as an end point and show that LE-based regression models can outperform regression models based on pIC50 values. In addition to pIC50 values traditionally used in machine learning studies based on chemogenomics data, three representative LE indices (ligand lipophilicity efficiency (LLE), binding efficiency index (BEI), and surface efficiency index (SEI)) were adopted, then used to create four types of training data. We constructed regression models by applying a support vector regression (SVR) method to the training data. In cross-validation tests of the SVR models, the LE-based SVR models showed higher correlations between the observed and predicted values than the pIC50-based models. Application tests to new data displayed that, generally, the predictive performance of SVR models follows the order SEI > BEI > LLE > pIC50. Close examination of the distributions of the activity values (pIC50, LLE, BEI, and SEI) in the training and validation data implied that the performance order of the SVR models may be ascribed to the much higher diversity of the LE-based training and validation data. In the application tests, the LE-based SVR models can offer better predictive performance of compound-protein pairs with a wider range of ligand potencies than the pIC50-based models. This finding strongly suggests that LE-based SVR models are better than pIC50-based

  6. Target-specific NMR detection of protein-ligand interactions with antibody-relayed (15)N-group selective STD.

    PubMed

    Hetényi, Anasztázia; Hegedűs, Zsófia; Fajka-Boja, Roberta; Monostori, Éva; Kövér, Katalin E; Martinek, Tamás A

    2016-12-01

    Fragment-based drug design has been successfully applied to challenging targets where the detection of the weak protein-ligand interactions is a key element. (1)H saturation transfer difference (STD) NMR spectroscopy is a powerful technique for this work but it requires pure homogeneous proteins as targets. Monoclonal antibody (mAb)-relayed (15)N-GS STD spectroscopy has been developed to resolve the problem of protein mixtures and impure proteins. A (15)N-labelled target-specific mAb is selectively irradiated and the saturation is relayed through the target to the ligand. Tests on the anti-Gal-1 mAb/Gal-1/lactose system showed that the approach is experimentally feasible in a reasonable time frame. This method allows detection and identification of binding molecules directly from a protein mixture in a multicomponent system.

  7. Exogenous fms-like tyrosine kinase 3 ligand overrides brain immune privilege and facilitates recognition of a neo-antigen without causing autoimmune neuropathology

    PubMed Central

    Larocque, Daniel; Sanderson, Nicholas S. R.; Bergeron, Josée; Curtin, James F.; Girton, Joe; Wibowo, Mia; Bondale, Niyati; Kroeger, Kurt M.; Yang, Jieping; Lacayo, Liliana M.; Reyes, Kevin C.; Farrokhi, Catherine; Pechnick, Robert N.; Castro, Maria G.; Lowenstein, Pedro R.

    2010-01-01

    Soluble antigens diffuse out of the brain and can thus stimulate a systemic immune response, whereas particulate antigens (from infectious agents or tumor cells) remain within brain tissue, thus failing to stimulate a systemic immune response. Immune privilege describes how the immune system responds to particulate antigens localized selectively within the brain parenchyma. We believe this immune privilege is caused by the absence of antigen presenting dendritic cells from the brain. We tested the prediction that expression of fms-like tyrosine kinase ligand 3 (Flt3L) in the brain will recruit dendritic cells and induce a systemic immune response against exogenous influenza hemagglutinin in BALB/c mice. Coexpression of Flt3L with HA in the brain parenchyma induced a robust systemic anti-HA immune response, and a small response against myelin basic protein and proteolipid protein epitopes. Depletion of CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) enhanced both responses. To investigate the autoimmune impact of these immune responses, we characterized the neuropathological and behavioral consequences of intraparenchymal injections of Flt3L and HA in BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice. T cell infiltration in the forebrain was time and strain dependent, and increased in animals treated with Flt3L and depleted of Tregs; however, we failed to detect widespread defects in myelination throughout the forebrain or spinal cord. Results of behavioral tests were all normal. These results demonstrate that Flt3L overcomes the brain's immune privilege, and supports the clinical development of Flt3L as an adjuvant to stimulate clinically effective immune responses against brain neo-antigens, for example, those associated with brain tumors. PMID:20660723

  8. Digital One-Disc-One-Compound Method for High-Throughput Discovery of Prostate Cancer - Targeting Ligands

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    1 AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-13-1-0312 TITLE: Digital One-Disc-One-Compound Method for High-Throughput Discovery of Prostate Cancer-Targeting... Discovery of Prostate Cancer-Targeting Ligands 5b. GRANT NUMBERW81XWH-13-1-0312 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Drs. Tingrui Pan, Kit Lam...SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT Combinatorial library method significantly accelerates molecular discovery and identification in many areas of biology and

  9. Targeting the TAM Receptors in Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Huey, Madeline G.; Minson, Katherine A.; Earp, H. Shelton; DeRyckere, Deborah; Graham, Douglas K.

    2016-01-01

    Targeted inhibition of members of the TAM (TYRO-3, AXL, MERTK) family of receptor tyrosine kinases has recently been investigated as a novel strategy for treatment of hematologic malignancies. The physiologic functions of the TAM receptors in innate immune control, natural killer (NK) cell differentiation, efferocytosis, clearance of apoptotic debris, and hemostasis have previously been described and more recent data implicate TAM kinases as important regulators of erythropoiesis and megakaryopoiesis. The TAM receptors are aberrantly or ectopically expressed in many hematologic malignancies including acute myeloid leukemia, B- and T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia, chronic lymphocytic leukemia, and multiple myeloma. TAM receptors contribute to leukemic phenotypes through activation of pro-survival signaling pathways and interplay with other oncogenic proteins such as FLT3, LYN, and FGFR3. The TAM receptors also contribute to resistance to both cytotoxic chemotherapeutics and targeted agents, making them attractive therapeutic targets. A number of translational strategies for TAM inhibition are in development, including small molecule inhibitors, ligand traps, and monoclonal antibodies. Emerging areas of research include modulation of TAM receptors to enhance anti-tumor immunity, potential roles for TYRO-3 in leukemogenesis, and the function of the bone marrow microenvironment in mediating resistance to TAM inhibition. PMID:27834816

  10. Ligand structural motifs can decouple glucocorticoid receptor transcriptional activation from target promoter occupancy.

    PubMed

    Blind, Raymond D; Pineda-Torra, Inés; Xu, Yong; Xu, H Eric; Garabedian, Michael J

    2012-04-20

    Glucocorticoid (GC) induction of the tyrosine aminotransferase (TAT) gene by the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) is a classic model used to investigate steroid-regulated gene expression. Classic studies analyzing GC-induction of the TAT gene demonstrated that despite having very high affinity for GR, some steroids cannot induce maximal TAT enzyme activity, but the molecular basis for this phenomenon is unknown. Here, we used RT-PCR and chromatin immunoprecipitation to determine TAT mRNA accumulation and GR recruitment to the TAT promoter (TAT-GRE) in rat hepatoma cells induced by seven GR ligands: dexamethasone (DEX), cortisol (CRT), corticosterone (CCS), 11-deoxycorticosterone (DOC), aldosterone (ALD), progesterone (PRG) and 17-hydroxyprogesterone (17P). As expected, DEX, CRT, CCS and ALD all induced both TAT mRNA and GR recruitment to the TAT-GRE, while PRG and 17P did not. However, while DOC could not induce significant TAT mRNA, it did induce robust GR occupancy of the TAT-GRE. DOC also induced recruitment of the histone acetyltransferase p300 to the TAT-GRE as efficiently as DEX. These DOC-induced effects recapitulated at another GR target gene (sulfonyltransferase 1A1), and DOC also failed to promote the multiple changes in gene expression required for glucocorticoid-dependent 3T3-L1 adipocyte differentiation. Structural simulations and protease sensitivity assays suggest that DOC and DEX induce different conformations in GR. Thus, although steroids that bind GR with high affinity can induce GR and p300 occupancy of target promoters, they may not induce a conformation of GR capable of activating transcription.

  11. Efficient identification of murine M2 macrophage peptide targeting ligands by phage display and next-generation sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Gary W.; Livesay, Brynn R.; Kacherovsky, Nataly A.; Cieslewicz, Maryelise; Lutz, Emi; Waalkes, Adam; Jensen, Michael C.; Salipante, Stephen J.; Pun, Suzie H.

    2015-01-01

    Peptide ligands are used to increase the specificity of drug carriers to their target cells and to facilitate intracellular delivery. One method to identify such peptide ligands, phage display, enables high-throughput screening of peptide libraries for ligands binding to therapeutic targets of interest. However, conventional methods for identifying target binders in a library by Sanger sequencing are low-throughput, labor-intensive, and provide a limited perspective (< 0.01%) of the complete sequence space. Moreover, the small sample space can be dominated by non-specific, preferentially amplifying “parasitic sequences” and plastic-binding sequences, which may lead to the identification of false positives or exclude the identification of target-binding sequences. To overcome these challenges, we employed next-generation Illumina sequencing to couple high-throughput screening and high-throughput sequencing, enabling more comprehensive access to the phage display library sequence space. In this work, we define the hallmarks of binding sequences in next-generation sequencing data, and develop a method that identifies several target-binding phage clones for murine, alternatively-activated (M2) macrophages with a high (100%) success rate: sequences and binding motifs were reproducibly present across biological replicates; binding motifs were identified across multiple unique sequences; and an unselected, amplified library accurately filtered out parasitic sequences. In addition, we validate the Multiple Em for Motif Elicitation tool as an efficient and principled means of discovering binding sequences. PMID:26161996

  12. Detection of minor clones with internal tandem duplication mutations of FLT3 gene in acute myeloid leukemia using delta-PCR.

    PubMed

    Beierl, Katie; Tseng, Li-Hui; Beierl, Russell; Haley, Lisa; Gocke, Christopher D; Eshleman, James R; Lin, Ming-Tseh

    2013-03-01

    Internal tandem duplication (ITD) mutations of the FLT3 gene have been associated with inferior prognosis of acute myeloid leukemia. Detection of minor clones or minimal residual clones with ITD mutations is desirable, but is challenging when the mutant signal determined by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and capillary electrophoresis is weak. In this study, we applied delta-PCR, which is a triple-primer strategy, to ensure PCR specificity and improve the sensitivity to 0.1% leukemic cells with ITD mutation. We also applied a reference peak to calculate ITD allelic burdens of <2% threshold of technical limitation for evaluating the relative ratio of 2 signals by capillary electrophoresis. Delta-PCR was able to detect single or multiple ITD mutations with an allelic burden (peak height ratio of mutant allele and wild-type allele) ranging from 0.4% to >100% among all 31 cases with previous documented ITD mutations. In one of the 3 cases with previously reported negative ITD mutation in the initial diagnostic specimen and ITD-positive results in the follow-up specimens, an ITD of 0.04% allele burden was retrospectively detected in the initial diagnosis specimen using delta-PCR. We also demonstrated that minor ITD mutant clones with an allelic burden of <1% present at diagnosis may become a dominant clone at the later refractory status, suggesting that detection of leukemic clones with allelic burdens of <1% may be clinically significant. Delta-PCR can detect ITD mutations with improved sensitivity and specificity and may be useful for the detection of minimal residual leukemia.

  13. Multi-Target Directed Donepezil-Like Ligands for Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Unzeta, Mercedes; Esteban, Gerard; Bolea, Irene; Fogel, Wieslawa A.; Ramsay, Rona R.; Youdim, Moussa B. H.; Tipton, Keith F.; Marco-Contelles, José

    2016-01-01

    HIGHLIGHTS ASS234 is a MTDL compound containing a moiety from Donepezil and the propargyl group from the PF 9601N, a potent and selective MAO B inhibitor. This compound is the most advanced anti-Alzheimer agent for preclinical studies identified in our laboratory.Derived from ASS234 both multipotent donepezil-indolyl (MTDL-1) and donepezil-pyridyl hybrids (MTDL-2) were designed and evaluated as inhibitors of AChE/BuChE and both MAO isoforms. MTDL-2 showed more high affinity toward the four enzymes than MTDL-1.MTDL-3 and MTDL-4, were designed containing the N-benzylpiperidinium moiety from Donepezil, a metal- chelating 8-hydroxyquinoline group and linked to a N-propargyl core and they were pharmacologically evaluated.The presence of the cyano group in MTDL-3, enhanced binding to AChE, BuChE and MAO A. It showed antioxidant behavior and it was able to strongly complex Cu(II), Zn(II) and Fe(III).MTDL-4 showed higher affinity toward AChE, BuChE.MTDL-3 exhibited good brain penetration capacity (ADMET) and less toxicity than Donepezil. Memory deficits in scopolamine-lesioned animals were restored by MTDL-3.MTDL-3 particularly emerged as a ligand showing remarkable potential benefits for its use in AD therapy. Alzheimer's disease (AD), the most common form of adult onset dementia, is an age-related neurodegenerative disorder characterized by progressive memory loss, decline in language skills, and other cognitive impairments. Although its etiology is not completely known, several factors including deficits of acetylcholine, β-amyloid deposits, τ-protein phosphorylation, oxidative stress, and neuroinflammation are considered to play significant roles in the pathophysiology of this disease. For a long time, AD patients have been treated with acetylcholinesterase inhibitors such as donepezil (Aricept®) but with limited therapeutic success. This might be due to the complex multifactorial nature of AD, a fact that has prompted the design of new Multi-Target-Directed Ligands

  14. Identification of a novel peptide ligand targeting visceral adipose tissue via transdermal route by in vivo phage display.

    PubMed

    Lee, Nam Kyung; Kim, Hong Shin; Kim, Kyung Hyun; Kim, Eun-Bae; Cho, Chong Su; Kang, Sang Kee; Choi, Yun Jaie

    2011-11-01

    To find novel peptide ligands targeting visceral adipose tissue (visceral fat) via transdermal route, in vivo phage display screening was conducted by dermal administration of a phage-peptide library to rats and a peptide sequence, CGLHPAFQC (designated as TDA1), was identified as a targeting ligand to visceral adipose tissue through the consecutive transdermal biopannings. Adipocyte-specific affinity and transdermal activity of the TDA1 were validated in vitro and targeting ability of the dermally administered TDA1 to visceral adipose tissue was also confirmed in vivo. TDA1 was effectively translocated into systemic circulation after dermal administration and selectively targeted visceral adipose tissue without any preference to other organs tested. Fluorescent microscopic analysis revealed that the TDA1 could be specifically localized in the hair follicles of the skin, as well as in the visceral adipose tissue. Thus, we inferred that dermally administered TDA1 would first access systemic circulation via hair follicles as its transdermal route and then could target visceral fat effectively. The overall results suggest that the TDA1 peptide could be potentially applied as a homing moiety for delivery of anti-obesity therapeutics to visceral fat through the convenient transdermal pathway.

  15. Tumor targeting with RGD peptide ligands-design of new molecular conjugates for imaging and therapy of cancers.

    PubMed

    Garanger, Elisabeth; Boturyn, Didier; Dumy, Pascal

    2007-09-01

    Development of molecular devices endowed with tumor-targeting functions and carrying cytotoxic components should enable the specific delivery of chemotherapeutics to malignant tissues, thus increasing their local efficacy while limiting their peripheral toxicity. Such molecular vectors can pave the way for the development of new classes of therapeutics, fighting against protagonists of neoplastic development. In line with this concept, peptide ligands containing the Arginine-Glycine-Aspartate (RGD) triad, which display a strong affinity and selectivity to the alpha(V)beta(3) integrin, have been developed to target the tumor-associated cells expressing the alpha (V)beta (3) receptors. Among the validated ligands, the leader compound is the cyclic pentapeptide c[-RGDf(NMe)V-] (Cilengitide) developed by kessler et al. (J. Med. Chem., 1999, 42, 3033-3040). This compound has entered phase II clinical trials as an anti-angiogenic agent. Further studies have been directed to develop molecular conjugates of the parent c[-RGDfK-] with conventional chemotherapeutics or with labels for non-invasive imaging technologies. More recently, multimeric RGD containing compounds have been exploited to improve the targeting potential as well as cell-membrane breaching, through receptor-mediated endocytosis. The latter have been constructed on various scaffolds (polylysines or polyglutamates, liposomes, nanoparticles...). Our group has developed a chemical system combining all these properties where multivalent RGD targeting functions are associated with functional molecules through a cyclopeptide template. The latter represents a relevant non-viral vector for tumor targeting, imaging and therapy. This review describes the considerations for the design of the diverse RGD ligands developed so far and reports an overview of the main applications of these structures in cancer research.

  16. Purinergic P2X receptors: structural models and analysis of ligand-target interaction.

    PubMed

    Dal Ben, Diego; Buccioni, Michela; Lambertucci, Catia; Marucci, Gabriella; Thomas, Ajiroghene; Volpini, Rosaria

    2015-01-07

    The purinergic P2X receptors are ligand-gated cation channels activated by the endogenous ligand ATP. They assemble as homo- or heterotrimers from seven cloned subtypes (P2X1-7) and all trimer subunits present a common topology consisting in intracellular N- and C- termini, two transmembrane domains and a large extracellular domain. These membrane proteins are present in virtually all mammalian tissues and regulate a large variety of responses in physio- and pathological conditions. The development of ligands that selectively activate or block specific P2X receptor subtypes hence represents a promising strategy to obtain novel pharmacological tools for the treatment of pain, cancer, inflammation, and neurological, cardiovascular, and endocrine diseases. The publication of the crystal structures of zebrafish P2X4 receptor in inactive and ATP-bound active forms provided structural data for the analysis of the receptor structure, the interpretation of mutagenesis data, and the depiction of ligand binding and receptor activation mechanism. In addition, the availability of ATP-competitive ligands presenting selectivity for P2X receptor subtypes supports the design of new potent and selective ligands with possibly improved pharmacokinetic profiles, with the final aim to obtain new drugs. This study describes molecular modelling studies performed to develop structural models of the human and rat P2X receptors in inactive and active states. These models allowed to analyse the role of some non-conserved residues at ATP binding site and to study the receptor interaction with some non-specific or subtype selective agonists and antagonists.

  17. The IUPHAR/BPS Guide to PHARMACOLOGY in 2016: towards curated quantitative interactions between 1300 protein targets and 6000 ligands

    PubMed Central

    Southan, Christopher; Sharman, Joanna L.; Benson, Helen E.; Faccenda, Elena; Pawson, Adam J.; Alexander, Stephen P. H.; Buneman, O. Peter; Davenport, Anthony P.; McGrath, John C.; Peters, John A.; Spedding, Michael; Catterall, William A.; Fabbro, Doriano; Davies, Jamie A.

    2016-01-01

    The IUPHAR/BPS Guide to PHARMACOLOGY (GtoPdb, http://www.guidetopharmacology.org) provides expert-curated molecular interactions between successful and potential drugs and their targets in the human genome. Developed by the International Union of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology (IUPHAR) and the British Pharmacological Society (BPS), this resource, and its earlier incarnation as IUPHAR-DB, is described in our 2014 publication. This update incorporates changes over the intervening seven database releases. The unique model of content capture is based on established and new target class subcommittees collaborating with in-house curators. Most information comes from journal articles, but we now also index kinase cross-screening panels. Targets are specified by UniProtKB IDs. Small molecules are defined by PubChem Compound Identifiers (CIDs); ligand capture also includes peptides and clinical antibodies. We have extended the capture of ligands and targets linked via published quantitative binding data (e.g. Ki, IC50 or Kd). The resulting pharmacological relationship network now defines a data-supported druggable genome encompassing 7% of human proteins. The database also provides an expanded substrate for the biennially published compendium, the Concise Guide to PHARMACOLOGY. This article covers content increase, entity analysis, revised curation strategies, new website features and expanded download options. PMID:26464438

  18. The IUPHAR/BPS Guide to PHARMACOLOGY in 2016: towards curated quantitative interactions between 1300 protein targets and 6000 ligands.

    PubMed

    Southan, Christopher; Sharman, Joanna L; Benson, Helen E; Faccenda, Elena; Pawson, Adam J; Alexander, Stephen P H; Buneman, O Peter; Davenport, Anthony P; McGrath, John C; Peters, John A; Spedding, Michael; Catterall, William A; Fabbro, Doriano; Davies, Jamie A

    2016-01-04

    The IUPHAR/BPS Guide to PHARMACOLOGY (GtoPdb, http://www.guidetopharmacology.org) provides expert-curated molecular interactions between successful and potential drugs and their targets in the human genome. Developed by the International Union of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology (IUPHAR) and the British Pharmacological Society (BPS), this resource, and its earlier incarnation as IUPHAR-DB, is described in our 2014 publication. This update incorporates changes over the intervening seven database releases. The unique model of content capture is based on established and new target class subcommittees collaborating with in-house curators. Most information comes from journal articles, but we now also index kinase cross-screening panels. Targets are specified by UniProtKB IDs. Small molecules are defined by PubChem Compound Identifiers (CIDs); ligand capture also includes peptides and clinical antibodies. We have extended the capture of ligands and targets linked via published quantitative binding data (e.g. Ki, IC50 or Kd). The resulting pharmacological relationship network now defines a data-supported druggable genome encompassing 7% of human proteins. The database also provides an expanded substrate for the biennially published compendium, the Concise Guide to PHARMACOLOGY. This article covers content increase, entity analysis, revised curation strategies, new website features and expanded download options.

  19. The promise of recombinant BMP ligands and other approaches targeting BMPR-II in the treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Ormiston, Mark L.; Upton, Paul D.; Li, Wei; Morrell, Nicholas W.

    2015-01-01

    Human genetic discoveries offer a powerful method to implicate pathways of major importance to disease pathobiology and hence provide targets for pharmacological intervention. The genetics of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) strongly implicates loss-of-function of the bone morphogenetic protein type II receptor (BMPR-II) signalling pathway and moreover implicates the endothelial cell as a central cell type involved in disease initiation. We and others have described several approaches to restore BMPR-II function in genetic and non-genetic forms of PAH. Of these, supplementation of endothelial BMP9/10 signalling with exogenous recombinant ligand has been shown to hold considerable promise as a novel large molecule biopharmaceutical therapy. Here, we describe the mechanism of action and discuss potential additional effects of BMP ligand therapy. PMID:26779522

  20. In silico studies on the interaction between bioactive ligands and ALK5, a biological target related to the cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Michell O; Trossini, Gustavo H G; Maltarollo, Vinícius G; Silva, Danielle da C; Honorio, Kathia M

    2016-09-01

    Studies have showed that there are many biological targets related to the cancer treatment, for example, TGF type I receptor (TGF-βRI or ALK5). The ALK5 inhibition is a strategy to treat some types of cancer, such as breast, lung, and pancreas. Here, we performed CoMFA and CoMSIA studies for 70 ligands with ALK5 inhibition. The internal validation for both models (q(2)LOO = 0.887 and 0.822, respectively) showed their robustness, while the external validations showed their predictive power (CoMFA: r(2)test = 0.998; CoMSIA: r(2)test = 0.975). After all validations, CoMFA and CoMSIA maps indicated physicochemical evidences on the main factors involved in the interaction between bioactive ligands and ALK5. Therefore, these results suggest molecular modifications to design new ALK5 inhibitors.

  1. Comparative study of affinity and selectivity of ligands targeting abasic and mismatch sites in DNA using a fluorescence-melting assay.

    PubMed

    Kotera, Naoko; Granzhan, Anton; Teulade-Fichou, Marie-Paule

    2016-01-01

    Recently, several families of small-molecule ligands have been developed to selectively target DNA pairing defects, such as abasic sites and mismatched base pairs, with the aim to interfere with the DNA repair and the template function of the DNA. However, the affinity and selectivity (with respect to well-matched DNA) of these ligands has barely been evaluated in a systematic way. Herein, we report a comparative study of binding affinity and selectivity of a representative panel of 16 ligands targeting abasic sites and a T-T mismatch in DNA, using a fluorescence-monitored melting assay. We demonstrate that bisintercalator-type macrocyclic ligands are characterized by moderate affinity but exceptionally high selectivity with respect to well-matched DNA, whereas other reported ligands show either modest selectivity or rather low affinity in identical conditions.

  2. MHC-I ligand discovery using targeted database searches of mass spectrometry data: Implications for T cell immunotherapies.

    PubMed

    Murphy, John Patrick; Konda, Prathyusha; Kowalewski, Daniel J; Schuster, Heiko; Clements, Derek; Kim, Youra; Cohen, Alejandro Martin; Sharif, Tanveer; Nielsen, Morten; Stevanović, Stefan; Lee, Patrick W; Gujar, Shashi

    2017-02-28

    Class I major histocompatibility complex I (MHC-I)-bound peptide ligands dictate the activation and specificity of CD8+ T-cells, and thus are important for devising T cell immunotherapies. In recent times, advances in mass spectrometry (MS) have enabled the precise identification of these MHC-I peptides wherein MS spectra are compared against a reference proteome. Unfortunately, matching these spectra to reference proteome databases is hindered by inflated search spaces attributed to a lack of enzyme restriction in the searches, limiting the efficiency with which MHC ligands are discovered. Here, we offer a solution to this problem whereby we developed a targeted database search approach, and accompanying tool SpectMHC, that is based on a priori-predicted MHC-I peptides. We first validated the approach using mass spectrometry data from 2 different allotype-specific mouse antibodies for the C57BL/6 mouse background. We then developed allotype-specific HLA databases to search previously published MS datasets of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). Using this targeted search strategy improved peptide identifications for both mouse and human ligandomes by greater than two-fold and is superior to traditional "no enzyme" searches of reference proteomes. Our novel targeted database search promises to uncover otherwise missed novel T cell epitopes of therapeutic potential.

  3. Bivalent Ligands Targeting Chemokine Receptor Dimerization: Molecular Design and Functional Studies

    PubMed Central

    Arnatt, Christopher Kent; Zhang, Yan

    2015-01-01

    Increasing evidence has shown that chemokine receptors may form functional dimers with unique pharmacological profiles. A common practice to characterize such G protein-coupled receptor dimerization processes is to apply bivalent ligands as chemical probes which can interact with both receptors simultaneously. Currently, two chemokine receptor dimers have been studied by applying bivalent compounds: the CXCR4-CXCR4 homodimer and the CCR5-MOR heterodimer. These bivalent compounds have revealed how dimerization influences receptor function and may lead to novel therapeutics. Future design of bivalent ligands for chemokine receptor dimers may be aided with the recently available CXCR4 homodimer, and CCR5 monomer crystal structures by more accurately simulating chemokine receptors and their dimers. PMID:25159160

  4. Bivalent Approach for Homodimeric Estradiol Based Ligand: Synthesis and Evaluation for Targeted Theranosis of ER(+) Breast Carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Chauhan, Kanchan; Arun, Ashutosh; Singh, Saurabh; Manohar, Murli; Chuttani, Krishna; Konwar, Rituraj; Dwivedi, Anila; Soni, Ravi; Singh, Ajai Kumar; Mishra, Anil K; Datta, Anupama

    2016-04-20

    The synthesis of estradiol based bivalent ligand [(EST)2DT] is reported and its potential for targeted imaging and therapy of ER(+) tumors has been evaluated. For the purpose, ethinylestradiol was functionalized with an azidoethylamine moiety via click chemistry. The resultant derivative was reacted in a bivalent mode with DTPA-dianhydride to form the multicoordinate chelating agent, (EST)2DT which displayed capability to bind (99m)Tc. The radiolabeled complex, (99m)Tc-(EST)2DT was obtained in >99% radiochemical purity and 20-48 GBq/μmol of specific activity. RBA assay revealed ∼15% binding with estrogen receptor. Evaluation of ligand on ER(+)-cell line (MCF-7) suggested enhanced and ER-mediated uptake. In vivo assays displayed early tracer accumulation in MCF-7 xenografts with tumor to muscle ratio ∼6 in 2 h and negligible uptakes in nontargeted organs. MTT assay performed on ER(+) and ER(-) cell lines displayed selective inhibition of ER(+) cancer cell growth with IC50 = 14.3 μM which was comparable to tamoxifen. The anticancer activity of the ligand is possibly due to the increase in ERβ and suppression of ERα protein levels in gene transcription. The studies reveal the potential of (EST)2DT as diagnostic imaging agent with the additional benefits in therapy.

  5. STK-1, the human homolog of Flk-2/Flt-3, is selectively expressed in CD34+ human bone marrow cells and is involved in the proliferation of early progenitor/stem cells.

    PubMed Central

    Small, D; Levenstein, M; Kim, E; Carow, C; Amin, S; Rockwell, P; Witte, L; Burrow, C; Ratajczak, M Z; Gewirtz, A M

    1994-01-01

    We cloned the cDNA for stem cell tyrosine kinase 1 (STK-1), the human homolog of murine Flk-2/Flt-3, from a CD34+ hematopoietic stem cell-enriched library and investigated its expression in subsets of normal human bone marrow. The cDNA encodes a protein of 993 aa with 85% identity and 92% similarity to Flk-2/Flt-3. STK-1 is a member of the type III receptor tyrosine kinase family that includes KIT (steel factor receptor), FMS (colony-stimulating factor 1R), and platelet-derived growth factor receptor. STK-1 expression in human blood and marrow is restricted to CD34+ cells, a population greatly enriched for stem/progenitor cells. Anti-STK-1 antiserum recognizes polypeptides of 160 and 130 kDa in several STK-1-expressing cell lines and in 3T3 cells transfected with a STK-1 expression vector. Antisense oligonucleotides directed against STK-1 sequences inhibited hematopoietic colony formation, most strongly in long-term bone marrow cultures. These data suggest that STK-1 may function as a growth factor receptor on hematopoietic stem and/or progenitor cells. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:7507245

  6. Docking to RNA via Root-Mean-Square-Deviation-Driven Energy Minimization with Flexible Ligands and Flexible Targets

    PubMed Central

    Guilbert, Christophe; James, Thomas L.

    2010-01-01

    Structure-based drug design is now well-established for proteins as a key first step in the lengthy process of developing new drugs. In many ways, RNA may be a better target to treat disease than a protein because it is upstream in the translation pathway, so inhibiting a single mRNA molecule could prevent the production of thousands of protein gene products. Virtual screening is often the starting point for structure-based drug design. However, computational docking of a small molecule to RNA seems to be more challenging than that to protein due to the higher intrinsic flexibility and highly charged structure of RNA. Previous attempts at docking to RNA showed the need for a new approach. We present here a novel algorithm using molecular simulation techniques to account for both nucleic acid and ligand flexibility. In this approach, with both the ligand and the receptor permitted some flexibility, they can bind one another via an induced fit, as the flexible ligand probes the surface of the receptor. A possible ligand can explore a low-energy path at the surface of the receptor by carrying out energy minimization with root-mean-square-distance constraints. Our procedure was tested on 57 RNA complexes (33 crystal and 24 NMR structures); this is the largest data set to date to reproduce experimental RNA binding poses. With our procedure, the lowest-energy conformations reproduced the experimental binding poses within an atomic root-mean-square deviation of 2.5 Å for 74% of tested complexes. PMID:18510306

  7. Fms-like tyrosine kinase 3 ligand is required for thymic dendritic cell generation from bone marrow-derived CD117⁺ hematopoietic progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yunyun; Jiang, Dong; Hu, Yizhou; Li, Yiping; Zhang, Xueguang; Wang, Jian; Wang, Yong

    2015-11-01

    Thymic dendritic cells (TDCs) are a type of dendritic cell (DC) in the thymus, which can enhance the proliferation of thymic T lymphocytes, regulate negative selection and induce central tolerance through autoantigen presentation. However, further investigations using TDCs has been restricted due to insufficient numbers. Therefore, an effective expansion method for TDCs in vitro is urgently required to further examine their biological characteristics. In the present study, a novel system was established using fetal thymus organ culture (FTOC) and a hanging drop culture system in the presence of fms‑like tyrosine kinase 3 ligand (Flt3L), termed the Flt3L/FTOC system. TDCs were successfully generated and expanded from CD117+ bone marrow hematopoietic progenitor cells. Conventional DCs (cDCs; CD11c+B220‑ DCs) and plasmacytoid DCs (pDCs; CD11c+B220+ DCs) were found in the TDCs generated using the Flt3L/FTOC system. These cells exhibited the specific morphological features of DCs, which were confirmed using Giemsa staining. Furthermore, the cytokine and surface marker profiles were also analyzed. Higher expression levels of interferon‑α and interleukin‑12 were observed in the pDCs, compared with the cDCs, and higher expression levels of toll‑like receptor (TLR)7 and TLR9 were found in the pDCs than in the cDCs. In addition, the Flt3L/FTOC‑derived TDCs also exhibited the ability to stimulate the allogenic T cell response. In conclusion, a novel in vitro culture system of thymic cDCs and pDCs using Flt3L was established, and this may provide a methodological basis for understanding the properties of TDCs.

  8. Selection and identification of ligand peptides targeting a model of castrate-resistant osteogenic prostate cancer and their receptors.

    PubMed

    Mandelin, Jami; Cardó-Vila, Marina; Driessen, Wouter H P; Mathew, Paul; Navone, Nora M; Lin, Sue-Hwa; Logothetis, Christopher J; Rietz, Anna Cecilia; Dobroff, Andrey S; Proneth, Bettina; Sidman, Richard L; Pasqualini, Renata; Arap, Wadih

    2015-03-24

    We performed combinatorial peptide library screening in vivo on a novel human prostate cancer xenograft that is androgen-independent and induces a robust osteoblastic reaction in bonelike matrix and soft tissue. We found two peptides, PKRGFQD and SNTRVAP, which were enriched in the tumors, targeted the cell surface of androgen-independent prostate cancer cells in vitro, and homed to androgen receptor-null prostate cancer in vivo. Purification of tumor homogenates by affinity chromatography on these peptides and subsequent mass spectrometry revealed a receptor for the peptide PKRGFQD, α-2-macroglobulin, and for SNTRVAP, 78-kDa glucose-regulated protein (GRP78). These results indicate that GRP78 and α-2-macroglobulin are highly active in osteoblastic, androgen-independent prostate cancer in vivo. These previously unidentified ligand-receptor systems should be considered for targeted drug development against human metastatic androgen-independent prostate cancer.

  9. The IUPHAR/BPS Guide to PHARMACOLOGY: an expert-driven knowledgebase of drug targets and their ligands

    PubMed Central

    Pawson, Adam J.; Sharman, Joanna L.; Benson, Helen E.; Faccenda, Elena; Alexander, Stephen P.H.; Buneman, O. Peter; Davenport, Anthony P.; McGrath, John C.; Peters, John A.; Southan, Christopher; Spedding, Michael; Yu, Wenyuan; Harmar, Anthony J.

    2014-01-01

    The International Union of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology/British Pharmacological Society (IUPHAR/BPS) Guide to PHARMACOLOGY (http://www.guidetopharmacology.org) is a new open access resource providing pharmacological, chemical, genetic, functional and pathophysiological data on the targets of approved and experimental drugs. Created under the auspices of the IUPHAR and the BPS, the portal provides concise, peer-reviewed overviews of the key properties of a wide range of established and potential drug targets, with in-depth information for a subset of important targets. The resource is the result of curation and integration of data from the IUPHAR Database (IUPHAR-DB) and the published BPS ‘Guide to Receptors and Channels’ (GRAC) compendium. The data are derived from a global network of expert contributors, and the information is extensively linked to relevant databases, including ChEMBL, DrugBank, Ensembl, PubChem, UniProt and PubMed. Each of the ∼6000 small molecule and peptide ligands is annotated with manually curated 2D chemical structures or amino acid sequences, nomenclature and database links. Future expansion of the resource will complete the coverage of all the targets of currently approved drugs and future candidate targets, alongside educational resources to guide scientists and students in pharmacological principles and techniques. PMID:24234439

  10. Bidentate ligands on osmium(VI) nitrido complexes control intracellular targeting and cell death pathways.

    PubMed

    Suntharalingam, Kogularamanan; Johnstone, Timothy C; Bruno, Peter M; Lin, Wei; Hemann, Michael T; Lippard, Stephen J

    2013-09-25

    The cellular response evoked by antiproliferating osmium(VI) nitrido compounds of general formula OsN(N^N)Cl3 (N^N = 2,2'-bipyridine 1, 1,10-phenanthroline 2, 3,4,7,8-tetramethyl-1,10-phenanthroline 3, or 4,7-diphenyl-1,10-phenanthroline 4) can be tuned by subtle ligand modifications. Complex 2 induces DNA damage, resulting in activation of the p53 pathway, cell cycle arrest at the G2/M phase, and caspase-dependent apoptotic cell death. In contrast, 4 evokes endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress leading to the upregulation of proteins of the unfolded protein response pathway, increase in ER size, and p53-independent apoptotic cell death. To the best of our knowledge, 4 is the first osmium compound to induce ER stress in cancer cells.

  11. Receptor Crosslinking: A General Method to Trigger Internalization and Lysosomal Targeting of Therapeutic Receptor:Ligand Complexes.

    PubMed

    Moody, Paul R; Sayers, Edward J; Magnusson, Johannes P; Alexander, Cameron; Borri, Paola; Watson, Peter; Jones, Arwyn T

    2015-12-01

    A major unmet clinical need is a universal method for subcellular targeting of bioactive molecules to lysosomes. Delivery to this organelle enables either degradation of oncogenic receptors that are overexpressed in cancers, or release of prodrugs from antibody-drug conjugates. Here, we describe a general method that uses receptor crosslinking to trigger endocytosis and subsequently redirect trafficking of receptor:cargo complexes from their expected route, to lysosomes. By incubation of plasma membrane receptors with biotinylated cargo and subsequent addition of streptavidin to crosslink receptor:cargo-biotin complexes, we achieved rapid and selective lysosomal targeting of transferrin, an anti-MHC class I antibody, and the clinically approved anti-Her2 antibody trastuzumab. These three protein ligands each target a receptor with a distinct cellular function and intracellular trafficking profile. Importantly, we confirmed that crosslinking of trastuzumab increased lysosomal degradation of its cognate oncogenic receptor Her2 in breast cancer cell lines SKBR3 and BT474. These data suggest that crosslinking could be exploited for a wide range of target receptors, for navigating therapeutics through the endolysosomal pathway, for significant therapeutic benefit.

  12. Receptor Crosslinking: A General Method to Trigger Internalization and Lysosomal Targeting of Therapeutic Receptor:Ligand Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Moody, Paul R; Sayers, Edward J; Magnusson, Johannes P; Alexander, Cameron; Borri, Paola; Watson, Peter; Jones, Arwyn T

    2015-01-01

    A major unmet clinical need is a universal method for subcellular targeting of bioactive molecules to lysosomes. Delivery to this organelle enables either degradation of oncogenic receptors that are overexpressed in cancers, or release of prodrugs from antibody–drug conjugates. Here, we describe a general method that uses receptor crosslinking to trigger endocytosis and subsequently redirect trafficking of receptor:cargo complexes from their expected route, to lysosomes. By incubation of plasma membrane receptors with biotinylated cargo and subsequent addition of streptavidin to crosslink receptor:cargo–biotin complexes, we achieved rapid and selective lysosomal targeting of transferrin, an anti-MHC class I antibody, and the clinically approved anti-Her2 antibody trastuzumab. These three protein ligands each target a receptor with a distinct cellular function and intracellular trafficking profile. Importantly, we confirmed that crosslinking of trastuzumab increased lysosomal degradation of its cognate oncogenic receptor Her2 in breast cancer cell lines SKBR3 and BT474. These data suggest that crosslinking could be exploited for a wide range of target receptors, for navigating therapeutics through the endolysosomal pathway, for significant therapeutic benefit. PMID:26412588

  13. DOCLASP - Docking ligands to target proteins using spatial and electrostatic congruence extracted from a known holoenzyme and applying simple geometrical transformations

    PubMed Central

    Chakraborty, Sandeep

    2016-01-01

    The ability to accurately and effectively predict the interaction between proteins and small drug-like compounds has long intrigued researchers for pedagogic, humanitarian and economic reasons. Protein docking methods (AutoDock, GOLD, DOCK, FlexX and Glide to name a few) rank a large number of possible conformations of protein-ligand complexes using fast algorithms. Previously, it has been shown that structural congruence leading to the same enzymatic function necessitates the congruence of electrostatic properties (CLASP). The current work presents a methodology for docking a ligand into a target protein, provided that there is at least one known holoenzyme with ligand bound - DOCLASP (Docking using CLASP). The contact points of the ligand in the holoenzyme defines a motif, which is used to query the target enzyme using CLASP. If there are significant matches, the holoenzyme and the target protein are superimposed based on congruent atoms. The same linear and rotational transformations are also applied to the ligand, thus creating a unified coordinate framework having the holoenzyme, the ligand and the target enzyme. In the current work, the dipeptidyl peptidase-IV inhibitor vildagliptin was docked to the PI-PLC structure complexed with myo-inositol using DOCLASP. Also, corroboration of the docking of phenylthiourea to the modelled structure of polyphenol oxidase (JrPPO1) from walnut is provided based on the subsequently solved structure of JrPPO1 (PDBid:5CE9). Analysis of the binding of the antitrypanosomial drug suramin to nine non-homologous proteins in the PDB database shows a diverse set of binding motifs, and multiple binding sites in the phospholipase A2-likeproteins from the Bothrops genus of pitvipers. The conformational changes in the suramin molecule on binding highlights the challenges in docking flexible ligands into an already ’plastic’ binding site. Thus, DOCLASP presents a method for ’soft docking’ ligands to proteins with low

  14. Ligand peptide-grafted PEGylated liposomes using HER2 targeted peptide-lipid derivatives for targeted delivery in breast cancer cells: The effect of serine-glycine repeated peptides as a spacer.

    PubMed

    Suga, Tadaharu; Fuchigami, Yuki; Hagimori, Masayori; Kawakami, Shigeru

    2017-02-22

    Ligand peptide-grafted PEGylated liposomes have been widely studied for targeted drug delivery systems. Because ligand peptides are commonly grafted using PEG as a spacer on the surface of PEGylated liposomes, the interaction between ligand peptides and their corresponding receptors can be interrupted by steric hindrance of the PEG layer. Therefore, we aimed to develop ligand peptide-lipid derivatives to enhance the targeting efficiency of ligand peptide-grafted PEGylated liposomes, and designed a new ligand peptide-lipid derivatives having serine-glycine repeats (SG)n as a spacer based on the peptide length calculated by PyMol (v0.99). We selected KCCYSL (KCC) as the ligand peptide for binding to human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER2). We synthesized new KCC-(SG)n-lipid derivatives (n=3, 5, 7) and evaluated their cellular association in breast cancer cells. KCC-(SG)n/PEGylated liposomes dramatically increased cellular association on HER2-positive breast cancer cells. The results suggest that KCC can be grafted on the surface of KCC-(SG)n/PEGylated liposomes prepared from KCC-(SG)n-lipid derivatives (n=3, 5, 7). In summary, we succeeded in developing KCC-(SG)n-lipid derivatives for the preparation of ligand peptide-grafted PEGylated liposomes.

  15. Effect of single-chain antibody targeting of the ligand-binding domain in the anaplastic lymphoma kinase receptor

    PubMed Central

    Stylianou, DC; Auf der Maur, A; Kodack, DP; Henke, RT; Hohn, S; Toretsky, JA; Riegel, AT; Wellstein, A

    2013-01-01

    The tyrosine kinase receptor anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) and its ligand, the growth factor pleiotrophin (PTN), are highly expressed during the development of the nervous system and have been implicated in the malignant progression of different tumor types. Here, we describe human single-chain variable fragment (scFv) antibodies that target the ligand-binding domain (LBD) in ALK and show the effect in vitro and in vivo. The ALK LBD was used as a bait in a yeast two-hybdrid system to select human scFv from a library with randomized complementarity-determining region 3 domains. Surface plasmon resonance showed high-affinity binding of the selected scFv. The anti-ALK scFv competed for binding of PTN to ALK in intact cells and inhibited PTN-dependent signal transduction through endogenous ALK. Invasion of an intact endothelial cell monolayer by U87MG human glioblastoma cells was inhibited by the anti-ALK scFv. In addition, the growth of established tumor xenografts in mice was reversed after the induction of the conditional expression of the anti-ALK scFv. In archival malignant brain tumors expression levels of ALK and PTN were found elevated and appear correlated with poor patient survival. This suggests a rate-limiting function of the PTN/ALK interaction that may be exploited therapeutically. PMID:19633684

  16. Bivalent ligands that target μ opioid (MOP) and cannabinoid1 (CB1) receptors are potent analgesics devoid of tolerance.

    PubMed

    Le Naour, Morgan; Akgün, Eyup; Yekkirala, Ajay; Lunzer, Mary M; Powers, Mike D; Kalyuzhny, Alexander E; Portoghese, Philip S

    2013-07-11

    Given that μ opioid (MOP) and canabinoid (CB1) receptors are colocalized in various regions of the central nervous system and have been reported to associate as heteromer (MOP-CB1) in cultured cells, the possibility of functional, endogenous MOP-CB1 in nociception and other pharmacologic effects has been raised. As a first step in investigating this possibility, we have synthesized a series of bivalent ligands 1-5 that contain both μ agonist and CB1 antagonist pharmacophores for use as tools to study the functional interaction between MOP and CB1 receptors in vivo. Immunofluorescent studies on HEK293 cells coexpressing both receptors suggested 5 (20-atom spacer) to be the only member of the series that bridges the protomers of the heteromer. Antinociceptive testing in mice revealed 5 to be the most potent member of the series. As neither a mixture of monovalent ligands 9 + 10 nor bivalents 2-5 produced tolerance in mice, MOR-CB1 apparently is not an important target for reducing tolerance.

  17. Targeted delivery system for cancer cells consist of multiple ligands conjugated genetically modified CCMV capsid on doxorubicin GNPs complex

    PubMed Central

    Barwal, Indu; Kumar, Rajiv; Kateriya, Suneel; Dinda, Amit Kumar; Yadav, Subhash Chandra

    2016-01-01

    Targeted nano-delivery vehicles were developed from genetically modified Cowpea chlorotic mottle virus (CCMV) capsid by ligands bioconjugation for efficient drug delivery in cancer cells. RNA binding (N 1-25aa) and β-hexamer forming (N 27-41aa) domain of capsid was selectively deleted by genetic engineering to achieve the efficient in vitro assembly without natural cargo. Two variants of capsids were generated by truncating 41 and 26 amino acid from N terminus (NΔ41 and NΔ26) designated as F1 and F2 respectively. These capsid were optimally self-assembled in 1:2 molar ratio (F1:F2) to form a monodisperse nano-scaffold of size 28 nm along with chemically conjugated modalities for visualization (fluorescent dye), targeting (folic acid, FA) and anticancer drug (doxorubicin). The cavity of the nano-scaffold was packed with doxorubicin conjugated gold nanoparticles (10 nm) to enhance the stability, drug loading and sustained release of drug. The chimeric system was stable at pH range of 4–8. This chimeric nano-scaffold system showed highly specific receptor mediated internalization (targeting) and ~300% more cytotoxicity (with respect to FA− delivery system) to folate receptor positive Michigan Cancer Foundation-7 (MCF7) cell lines. The present system may offer a programmable nano-scaffold based platform for developing chemotherapeutics for cancer. PMID:27872483

  18. Structural basis for small molecule targeting of the programmed death ligand 1 (PD-L1)

    PubMed Central

    Zak, Krzysztof M.; Grudnik, Przemyslaw; Guzik, Katarzyna; Zieba, Bartosz J.; Musielak, Bogdan; Dömling, Alexander; Dubin, Grzegorz; Holak, Tad A.

    2016-01-01

    Targeting the PD-1/PD-L1 immunologic checkpoint with monoclonal antibodies has provided unprecedented results in cancer treatment in the recent years. Development of chemical inhibitors for this pathway lags the antibody development because of insufficient structural information. The first nonpeptidic chemical inhibitors that target the PD-1/PD-L1 interaction have only been recently disclosed by Bristol-Myers Squibb. Here, we show that these small-molecule compounds bind directly to PD-L1 and that they potently block PD-1 binding. Structural studies reveal a dimeric protein complex with a single small molecule which stabilizes the dimer thus occluding the PD-1 interaction surface of PD-L1s. The small-molecule interaction “hot spots” on PD-L1 surfaces suggest approaches for the PD-1/PD-L1 antagonist drug discovery. PMID:27083005

  19. Magnetic Ligand Fishing as a Targeting Tool for HPLC-HRMS-SPE-NMR: α-Glucosidase Inhibitory Ligands and Alkylresorcinol Glycosides from Eugenia catharinae

    PubMed Central

    Wubshet, Sileshi G.; Brighente, Inês M. C.; Moaddel, Ruin; Staerk, Dan

    2016-01-01

    A bioanalytical platform combining magnetic ligand fishing for α-glucosidase inhibition profiling and HPLC-HRMS-SPE-NMR for structural identification of α-glucosidase inhibitory ligands, both directly from crude plant extracts, is presented. Magnetic beads with N-terminus-coupled α-glucosidase were synthesized and characterized for their inherent catalytic activity. Ligand fishing with the immobilized enzyme was optimized using an artificial test mixture consisting of caffeine, ferulic acid, and luteolin before proof-of-concept with the crude extract of Eugenia catharinae. The combination of ligand fishing and HPLC-HRMS-SPE-NMR identified myricetin 3-O-α-l-rhamnopyranoside, myricetin, quercetin, and kaempferol as α-glucosidase inhibitory ligands in E. catharinae. Furthermore, HPLC-HRMS-SPE-NMR analysis led to identification of six new alkylresorcinol glycosides, i.e., 5-(2-oxopentyl)resorcinol 4-O-β-d-glucopyranoside, 5-propylresorcinol 4-O-β-d-glucopyranoside, 5-pentylresorcinol 4-O-[α-d-apiofuranosyl-(1→6)]-β-d-glucopyranoside, 5-pentylresorcinol 4-O-β-d-glucopyranoside, 4-hydroxy-3-O-methyl-5-pentylresorcinol 1-O-β-d-glucopyranoside, and 3-O-methyl-5-pentylresorcinol 1-O-[β-d-glucopyranosyl-(1→6)]-β-d-glucopyranoside. PMID:26496505

  20. Rapid Discovery of Functional Small Molecule Ligands against Proteomic Targets through Library-Against-Library Screening.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chun-Yi; Wang, Don-Hong; Wang, Xiaobing; Dixon, Seth M; Meng, Liping; Ahadi, Sara; Enter, Daniel H; Chen, Chao-Yu; Kato, Jason; Leon, Leonardo J; Ramirez, Laura M; Maeda, Yoshiko; Reis, Carolina F; Ribeiro, Brianna; Weems, Brittany; Kung, Hsing-Jien; Lam, Kit S

    2016-06-13

    Identifying "druggable" targets and their corresponding therapeutic agents are two fundamental challenges in drug discovery research. The one-bead-one-compound (OBOC) combinatorial library method has been developed to discover peptides or small molecules that bind to a specific target protein or elicit a specific cellular response. The phage display cDNA expression proteome library method has been employed to identify target proteins that interact with specific compounds. Here, we combined these two high-throughput approaches, efficiently interrogated approximately 10(13) possible molecular interactions, and identified 91 small molecule compound beads that interacted strongly with the phage library. Of 19 compounds resynthesized, 4 were cytotoxic against cancer cells; one of these compounds was found to interact with EIF5B and inhibit protein translation. As more binding pairs are confirmed and evaluated, the "library-against-library" screening approach and the resulting small molecule-protein domain interaction database may serve as a valuable tool for basic research and drug development.

  1. Rapid Discovery of Functional Small Molecule Ligands against Proteomic Targets through Library-Against-Library Screening

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Identifying “druggable” targets and their corresponding therapeutic agents are two fundamental challenges in drug discovery research. The one-bead-one-compound (OBOC) combinatorial library method has been developed to discover peptides or small molecules that bind to a specific target protein or elicit a specific cellular response. The phage display cDNA expression proteome library method has been employed to identify target proteins that interact with specific compounds. Here, we combined these two high-throughput approaches, efficiently interrogated approximately 1013 possible molecular interactions, and identified 91 small molecule compound beads that interacted strongly with the phage library. Of 19 compounds resynthesized, 4 were cytotoxic against cancer cells; one of these compounds was found to interact with EIF5B and inhibit protein translation. As more binding pairs are confirmed and evaluated, the “library-against-library” screening approach and the resulting small molecule–protein domain interaction database may serve as a valuable tool for basic research and drug development. PMID:27053324

  2. Rational design of ligands targeting triplet repeating transcripts that cause RNA dominant disease: application to myotonic muscular dystrophy type 1 and spinocerebellar ataxia type 3.

    PubMed

    Pushechnikov, Alexei; Lee, Melissa M; Childs-Disney, Jessica L; Sobczak, Krzysztof; French, Jonathan M; Thornton, Charles A; Disney, Matthew D

    2009-07-22

    Herein, we describe the design of high affinity ligands that bind expanded rCUG and rCAG repeat RNAs expressed in myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) and spinocerebellar ataxia type 3. These ligands also inhibit, with nanomolar IC(50) values, the formation of RNA-protein complexes that are implicated in both disorders. The expanded rCUG and rCAG repeats form stable RNA hairpins with regularly repeating internal loops in the stem and have deleterious effects on cell function. The ligands that bind the repeats display a derivative of the bisbenzimidazole Hoechst 33258, which was identified by searching known RNA-ligand interactions for ligands that bind the internal loop displayed in these hairpins. A series of 13 modularly assembled ligands with defined valencies and distances between ligand modules was synthesized to target multiple motifs in these RNAs simultaneously. The most avid binder, a pentamer, binds the rCUG repeat hairpin with a K(d) of 13 nM. When compared to a series of related RNAs, the pentamer binds to rCUG repeats with 4.4- to >200-fold specificity. Furthermore, the affinity of binding to rCUG repeats shows incremental gains with increasing valency, while the background binding to genomic DNA is correspondingly reduced. Then, it was determined whether the modularly assembled ligands inhibit the recognition of RNA repeats by Muscleblind-like 1 (MBNL1) protein, the expanded-rCUG binding protein whose sequestration leads to splicing defects in DM1. Among several compounds with nanomolar IC(50) values, the most potent inhibitor is the pentamer, which also inhibits the formation of rCAG repeat-MBNL1 complexes. Comparison of the binding data for the designed synthetic ligands and MBNL1 to repeating RNAs shows that the synthetic ligand is 23-fold higher affinity and more specific to DM1 RNAs than MBNL1. Further studies show that the designed ligands are cell permeable to mouse myoblasts. Thus, cell permeable ligands that bind repetitive RNAs have been designed

  3. ‘Living’ PEGylation on gold nanoparticles to optimize cancer cell uptake by controlling targeting ligand and charge densities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hongwei; Paholak, Hayley; Ito, Masayuki; Sansanaphongpricha, Kanokwan; Qian, Wei; Che, Yong; Sun, Duxin

    2013-09-01

    We report and demonstrate biomedical applications of a new technique—‘living’ PEGylation—that allows control of the density and composition of heterobifunctional PEG (HS-PEG-R; thiol-terminated poly(ethylene glycol)) on gold nanoparticles (AuNPs). We first establish ‘living’ PEGylation by incubating HS-PEG5000-COOH with AuNPs (˜20 nm) at increasing molar ratios from zero to 2000. This causes the hydrodynamic layer thickness to differentially increase up to 26 nm. The controlled, gradual increase in PEG-COOH density is revealed after centrifugation, based on the ability to re-suspend the pellet and increase the AuNP absorption. Using a fluorescamine-based assay we quantify differential HS-PEG5000-NH2 binding to AuNPs, revealing that it is highly efficient until AuNP saturation is reached. Furthermore, the zeta potential incrementally changes from -44.9 to +52.2 mV and becomes constant upon saturation. Using ‘living’ PEGylation we prepare AuNPs with different ratios of HS-PEG-RGD (RGD: Arg-Gly-Asp) and incubate them with U-87 MG (malignant glioblastoma) and non-target cells, demonstrating that targeting ligand density is critical to maximizing the efficiency of targeting of AuNPs to cancer cells. We also sequentially control the HS-PEG-R density to develop multifunctional nanoparticles, conjugating positively charged HS-PEG-NH2 at increasing ratios to AuNPs containing negatively charged HS-PEG-COOH to reduce uptake by macrophage cells. This ability to minimize non-specific binding/uptake by healthy cells could further improve targeted nanoparticle efficacy.

  4. Dual-targeting organometallic ruthenium(II) anticancer complexes bearing EGFR-inhibiting 4-anilinoquinazoline ligands.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yang; Zheng, Wei; Luo, Qun; Zhao, Yao; Zhang, Erlong; Liu, Suyan; Wang, Fuyi

    2015-08-07

    We have recently demonstrated that complexation with (η(6)-arene)Ru(II) fragments confers 4-anilinoquinazoline pharmacophores a higher potential for inducing cellular apoptosis while preserving the highly inhibitory activity of 4-anilinoquinazolines against EGFR and the reactivity of the ruthenium centre to 9-ethylguanine (Chem. Commun., 2013, 49, 10224-10226). Reported herein are the synthesis, characterisation and evaluation of the biological activity of a new series of ruthenium(ii) complexes of the type [(η(6)-arene)Ru(N,N-L)Cl]PF6 (arene = p-cymene, benzene, 2-phenylethanol or indane, L = 4-anilinoquinazolines). These organometallic ruthenium complexes undergo fast hydrolysis in aqueous solution. Intriguingly, the ligation of (arene)Ru(II) fragments with 4-anilinoquinazolines not only makes the target complexes excellent EGFR inhibitors, but also confers the complexes high affinity to bind to DNA minor grooves while maintaining their reactivity towards DNA bases, characterising them with dual-targeting properties. Molecular modelling studies reveal that the hydrolysis of these complexes is a favourable process which increases the affinity of the target complexes to bind to EGFR and DNA. In vitro biological activity assays show that most of this group of ruthenium complexes are selectively active inhibiting the EGF-stimulated growth of the HeLa cervical cancer cell line, and the most active complex [(η(6)-arene)Ru(N,N-L13)Cl]PF6 (, IC50 = 1.36 μM, = 4-(3'-chloro-4'-fluoroanilino)-6-(2-(2-aminoethyl)aminoethoxy)-7-methoxyquinazoline) is 29-fold more active than its analogue, [(η(6)-arene)Ru(N,N-ethylenediamine)Cl]PF6, and 21-fold more active than gefitinib, a well-known EGFR inhibitor in use clinically. These results highlight the strong promise to develop highly active ruthenium anticancer complexes by ligation of cytotoxic ruthenium pharmacophores with bioactive organic molecules.

  5. Crystal Structures of Free and Ligand-Bound Focal Adhesion Targeting Domain of Pyk2

    SciTech Connect

    Lulo, J.; Yuzawa, S; Schlessinger, J

    2009-01-01

    Focal adhesion targeting (FAT) domains target the non-receptor tyrosine kinases FAK and Pyk2 to cellular focal adhesion areas, where the signaling molecule paxillin is also located. Here, we report the crystal structures of the Pyk2 FAT domain alone or in complex with paxillin LD4 peptides. The overall structure of Pyk2-FAT is an antiparallel four-helix bundle with an up-down, up-down, right-handed topology. In the LD4-bound FAT complex, two paxillin LD4 peptides interact with two opposite sides of Pyk2-FAT, at the surfaces of the a1a4 and a2a3 helices of each FAT molecule. We also demonstrate that, while paxillin is phosphorylated by Pyk2, complex formation between Pyk2 and paxillin does not depend on Pyk2 tyrosine kinase activity. These experiments reveal the structural basis underlying the selectivity of paxillin LD4 binding to the Pyk2 FAT domain and provide insights about the molecular details which influence the different behavior of these two closely-related kinases.

  6. Internal dosimetry through GATE simulations of preclinical radiotherapy using a melanin-targeting ligand.

    PubMed

    Perrot, Y; Degoul, F; Auzeloux, P; Bonnet, M; Cachin, F; Chezal, J M; Donnarieix, D; Labarre, P; Moins, N; Papon, J; Rbah-Vidal, L; Vidal, A; Miot-Noirault, E; Maigne, L

    2014-05-07

    The GATE Monte Carlo simulation platform based on the Geant4 toolkit is under constant improvement for dosimetric calculations. In this study, we explore its use for the dosimetry of the preclinical targeted radiotherapy of melanoma using a new specific melanin-targeting radiotracer labeled with iodine 131. Calculated absorbed fractions and S values for spheres and murine models (digital and CT-scan-based mouse phantoms) are compared between GATE and EGSnrc Monte Carlo codes considering monoenergetic electrons and the detailed energy spectrum of iodine 131. The behavior of Geant4 standard and low energy models is also tested. Following the different authors' guidelines concerning the parameterization of electron physics models, this study demonstrates an agreement of 1.2% and 1.5% with EGSnrc, respectively, for the calculation of S values for small spheres and mouse phantoms. S values calculated with GATE are then used to compute the dose distribution in organs of interest using the activity distribution in mouse phantoms. This study gives the dosimetric data required for the translation of the new treatment to the clinic.

  7. Internal dosimetry through GATE simulations of preclinical radiotherapy using a melanin-targeting ligand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrot, Y.; Degoul, F.; Auzeloux, P.; Bonnet, M.; Cachin, F.; Chezal, J. M.; Donnarieix, D.; Labarre, P.; Moins, N.; Papon, J.; Rbah-Vidal, L.; Vidal, A.; Miot-Noirault, E.; Maigne, L.

    2014-05-01

    The GATE Monte Carlo simulation platform based on the Geant4 toolkit is under constant improvement for dosimetric calculations. In this study, we explore its use for the dosimetry of the preclinical targeted radiotherapy of melanoma using a new specific melanin-targeting radiotracer labeled with iodine 131. Calculated absorbed fractions and S values for spheres and murine models (digital and CT-scan-based mouse phantoms) are compared between GATE and EGSnrc Monte Carlo codes considering monoenergetic electrons and the detailed energy spectrum of iodine 131. The behavior of Geant4 standard and low energy models is also tested. Following the different authors’ guidelines concerning the parameterization of electron physics models, this study demonstrates an agreement of 1.2% and 1.5% with EGSnrc, respectively, for the calculation of S values for small spheres and mouse phantoms. S values calculated with GATE are then used to compute the dose distribution in organs of interest using the activity distribution in mouse phantoms. This study gives the dosimetric data required for the translation of the new treatment to the clinic.

  8. Targeting P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1/P-selectin interactions as a novel therapy for metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Patel, Madhukar S; Miranda-Nieves, David; Chen, Jiaxuan; Haller, Carolyn A; Chaikof, Elliot L

    2016-12-09

    Obesity-induced insulin resistance and metabolic syndrome continue to pose an important public health challenge worldwide as they significantly increase the risk of type 2 diabetes and atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. Advances in the pathophysiologic understanding of this process has identified that chronic inflammation plays a pivotal role. In this regard, given that both animal models and human studies have demonstrated that the interaction of P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 (PSGL-1) with P-selectin is not only critical for normal immune response but also is upregulated in the setting of metabolic syndrome, PSGL-1/P-selectin interactions provide a novel target for preventing and treating resultant disease. Current approaches of interfering with PSGL-1/P-selectin interactions include targeted antibodies, recombinant immunoglobulins that competitively bind P-selectin, and synthetic molecular therapies. Experimental models as well as clinical trials assessing the role of these modalities in a variety of diseases have continued to contribute to the understanding of PSGL-1/P-selectin interactions and have demonstrated the difficulty in creating clinically relevant therapeutics. Most recently, however, computational simulations have further enhanced our understanding of the structural features of PSGL-1 and related glycomimetics, which are responsible for high-affinity selectin interactions. Leveraging these insights for the design of next generation agents has thus led to development of a promising synthetic method for generating PSGL-1 glycosulfopeptide mimetics for the treatment of metabolic syndrome.

  9. GPER-targeted, 99mTc-labeled, nonsteroidal ligands demonstrate selective tumor imaging and in vivo estrogen binding

    PubMed Central

    Nayak, Tapan K.; Ramesh, Chinnasamy; Hathaway, Helen J.; Norenberg, Jeffrey P.; Arterburn, Jeffrey B.; Prossnitz, Eric R.

    2014-01-01

    Our understanding of estrogen (E2) receptor biology has evolved in recent years with the discovery and characterization of a 7-transmembrane-spanning G protein-coupled estrogen receptor (GPER1/GPER/GPR30) and the development of GPER-selective functional chemical probes. GPER is highly expressed in certain breast, endometrial and ovarian cancers, establishing the importance of non-invasive methods to evaluate GPER expression in vivo. Herein, we developed 99mTc-labeled GPER ligands to demonstrate the in vivo status of GPER as an estrogen receptor and for GPER visualization in whole animals. A series of 99mTc(I)-labeled non-steroidal tetrahydro-3H-cyclopenta[c]quinolone derivatives was synthesized utilizing pyridin-2-yl hydrazine and picolylamine chelates. Radioligand receptor binding studies revealed binding affinities in the 10–30 nM range. Cell signaling assays previously demonstrated that derivatives retaining a ketone functionality displayed agonist properties whereas those lacking such a hydrogen bond acceptor were antagonists. In vivo biodistribution and imaging studies performed on mice bearing human endometrial and breast cancer cell xenografts yielded significant tumor uptake (0.4–1.1 %ID/g). Blocking studies revealed specific uptake in multiple organs (adrenals, uterus, mammary tissue) as well as tumor uptake with similar levels of competition by E2 and G-1, a GPER-selective agonist. In conclusion, we synthesized and evaluated a series of first generation 99mTc-labeled GPER-specific radioligands, demonstrating GPER as an estrogen-binding receptor for the first time in vivo using competitive binding principles, and establishing the utility of such ligands as tumor imaging agents. These results warrant further investigation into the role of GPER in estrogen-mediated carcinogenesis and as a target for diagnostic/therapeutic/ image-guided drug delivery. PMID:25030373

  10. Riboswitch-Mediated Aptamer Binding for Imaging and Therapy (RABIT): A Novel Technique to Selectively Target an Intracellular Ligand Specific for Ovarian Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    AD_________________ Award Number: TITLE: Riboswitch-Mediated Aptamer Binding for Imaging and...SUBTITLE Riboswitch-Mediated Aptamer Binding for Imaging and Therapy (RABIT): A Novel TTechnique to Selectively Target an Intracellular Ligand...ABSTRACT We have proposed to use a riboswitch to image or treat ovarian cancer. The riboswitch, attached to an EpCAM aptamer , will be transported

  11. Targeting heat shock proteins on cancer cells: selection, characterization, and cell-penetrating properties of a peptidic GRP78 ligand.

    PubMed

    Kim, Youngsoo; Lillo, Antonietta M; Steiniger, Sebastian C J; Liu, Ying; Ballatore, Carlo; Anichini, Andrea; Mortarini, Roberta; Kaufmann, Gunnar F; Zhou, Bin; Felding-Habermann, Brunhilde; Janda, Kim D

    2006-08-08

    Peptidic ligands can be used for specific cell targeting and the delivery of payloads into the target cell. Here we describe the screening of a pool of cyclic peptide phage display libraries using whole-cell panning against human melanoma cell line Me6652/4. This strategy resulted in the selection of the cyclic 13-mer Pep42, CTVALPGGYVRVC, which showed preferential internalization into melanoma cell line Me6652/4 versus the reference cell line Me6652/56. This translocation is a receptor-mediated process that does not require electrostatic interactions nor does it involve transfer to the lysosomal compartment. The cellular receptor for Pep42 was identified as the surface membrane form of glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78), a member of the heat shock protein family and a marker on malignant cancer cells. The cellular uptake and intracellular trafficking of Pep42-Quantum Dot conjugates was monitored by confocal laser microscopy, and colocalization within the endoplasmic reticulum was observed. The uptake of Pep42 could be blocked by a monoclonal antibody against the identified receptor. Furthermore, Pep42 was shown to target specifically GRP78-expressing cancer cells. The in vitro cytotoxicity of a Pep42-Taxol conjugate was evaluated by flow cytometry wherein the conjugate was shown to induce apoptosis and was more effective in promoting programmed cell death in Me6652/4 cells. In summary, the data presented suggest that cyclic peptide Pep42 might be a powerful tool in the construction of drug conjugates designed to selectively kill malignant cancer cells.

  12. Silencing NKG2D ligand-targeting miRNAs enhances natural killer cell-mediated cytotoxicity in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Shen, Jiaying; Pan, Jie; Du, Chengyong; Si, Wengong; Yao, Minya; Xu, Liang; Zheng, Huilin; Xu, Mingjie; Chen, Danni; Wang, Shu; Fu, Peifen; Fan, Weimin

    2017-04-06

    NKG2D is one of the major activating receptors of natural killer (NK) cells and binds to several ligands (NKG2DLs). NKG2DLs are expressed on malignant cells and sensitize them to early elimination by cytotoxic lymphocytes. We investigated the clinical importance of NKG2DLs and the mechanism of NKG2DL regulation in breast cancer (BC). Among the NKG2DLs MICA/B and ULBP1/2/3, the expression levels of MICA/B in BC tissues were inversely associated with the Tumor Node Metastasis stage. We first found that the high expression of MICB, but not MICA, was an independent prognostic factor for overall survival in patients with BC. Investigation into the mechanism revealed that a group of microRNAs (miRNAs) belonging to the miR-17-92 cluster, especially miR-20a, decreased the expression of ULBP2 and MICA/B. These miRNAs downregulated the expression of MICA/B by targeting the MICA/B 3'-untranslated region and downregulated ULBP2 by inhibiting the MAPK/ERK signaling pathway. Functional analysis showed that the silencing of NKG2DL-targeting miRNAs in BC cells increased NK cell-mediated cytotoxicity in vitro and inhibited immune escape in vivo. In addition, histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACis) increased NKG2DL expression in BC cells by inhibiting members of the miR-17-92 cluster. Thus, targeting miRNAs with antisense inhibitors or HDACis may represent a novel approach for increasing the immunogenicity of BC.

  13. Peroxisome Proliferator Activated Receptor A Ligands as Anticancer Drugs Targeting Mitochondrial Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Grabacka, Maja; Pierzchalska, Malgorzata; Reiss, Krzysztof

    2011-01-01

    Tumor cells show metabolic features distinctive from normal tissues, with characteristically enhanced aerobic glycolysis, glutaminolysis and lipid synthesis. Peroxisome proliferator activated receptor α (PPAR α) is activated by nutrients (fatty acids and their derivatives) and influences these metabolic pathways acting antagonistically to oncogenic Akt and c-Myc. Therefore PPAR α can be regarded as a candidate target molecule in supplementary anticancer pharmacotherapy as well as dietary therapeutic approach. This idea is based on hitting the cancer cell metabolic weak points through PPAR α mediated stimulation of mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation and ketogenesis with simultaneous reduction of glucose and glutamine consumption. PPAR α activity is induced by fasting and its molecular consequences overlap with the effects of calorie restriction and ketogenic diet (CRKD). CRKD induces increase of NAD+/NADH ratio and drop in ATP/AMP ratio. The first one is the main stimulus for enhanced protein deacetylase SIRT1 activity; the second one activates AMP-dependent protein kinase (AMPK). Both SIRT1 and AMPK exert their major metabolic activities such as fatty acid oxidation and block of glycolysis and protein, nucleotide and fatty acid synthesis through the effector protein peroxisome proliferator activated receptor gamma 1 α coactivator (PGC-1α). PGC-1α cooperates with PPAR α and their activities might contribute to potential anticancer effects of CRKD, which were reported for various brain tumors. Therefore, PPAR α activation can engage molecular interplay among SIRT1, AMPK, and PGC-1α that provides a new, low toxicity dietary approach supplementing traditional anticancer regimen. PMID:21133850

  14. Hybrid-based multi-target ligands for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Rampa, Angela; Belluti, Federica; Gobbi, Silvia; Bisi, Alessandra

    2011-11-01

    Progresses in medicinal chemistry over the last few years have focused on the design and synthesis of hybrid compounds, molecules encompassing in a single scaffold two pharmacophores from known entities endowed with well established biological activities. The interest in this topic is related to the increasing emphasis on the identification of the different factors involved in a number of disorders, such as the complex multifactorial Alzheimer's disease (AD), and hybrid- based strategy has become a focal point in this medicinal chemistry field since it could lead to derivatives with an improved biological profile. Using this strategy, acetylcholinesterase inhibitors (AChEIs) have been extensively coupled with properly selected bioactive molecules to obtain homo- and heterodimers endowed with increased potency together with supplementary actions. In the past decade the inhibition of the AChE induced aggregation of the -amyloid peptide into the senile plaques, which is a key event in the neurotoxic cascade of AD, has been considered a relevant approach leading to several dual binding site inhibitors, able to contact both the peripheral anionic site of AChE and the active site. In recent years, pioneering efforts have been performed to obtain novel AChEIs that, beyond the capability to inhibit AChE, were able to hit a number of specific AD targets. In particular, these compounds proved to possess antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, or neuroprotective activities, useful to block or revert the progression of the disease. This review summarizes the progresses that have been made in the design of hybrid molecules for the treatment of AD.

  15. LigSearch: a knowledge-based web server to identify likely ligands for a protein target

    SciTech Connect

    Beer, Tjaart A. P. de; Laskowski, Roman A.; Duban, Mark-Eugene; Chan, A. W. Edith; Anderson, Wayne F.; Thornton, Janet M.

    2013-12-01

    LigSearch is a web server for identifying ligands likely to bind to a given protein. Identifying which ligands might bind to a protein before crystallization trials could provide a significant saving in time and resources. LigSearch, a web server aimed at predicting ligands that might bind to and stabilize a given protein, has been developed. Using a protein sequence and/or structure, the system searches against a variety of databases, combining available knowledge, and provides a clustered and ranked output of possible ligands. LigSearch can be accessed at http://www.ebi.ac.uk/thornton-srv/databases/LigSearch.

  16. Smuggling Drugs into the Brain: An Overview of Ligands Targeting Transcytosis for Drug Delivery across the Blood–Brain Barrier

    PubMed Central

    Georgieva, Julia V.; Hoekstra, Dick; Zuhorn, Inge S.

    2014-01-01

    The blood–brain barrier acts as a physical barrier that prevents free entry of blood-derived substances, including those intended for therapeutic applications. The development of molecular Trojan horses is a promising drug targeting technology that allows for non-invasive delivery of therapeutics into the brain. This concept relies on the application of natural or genetically engineered proteins or small peptides, capable of specifically ferrying a drug-payload that is either directly coupled or encapsulated in an appropriate nanocarrier, across the blood–brain barrier via receptor-mediated transcytosis. Specifically, in this process the nanocarrier–drug system (“Trojan horse complex”) is transported transcellularly across the brain endothelium, from the blood to the brain interface, essentially trailed by a native receptor. Naturally, only certain properties would favor a receptor to serve as a transporter for nanocarriers, coated with appropriate ligands. Here we briefly discuss brain microvascular endothelial receptors that have been explored until now, highlighting molecular features that govern the efficiency of nanocarrier-mediated drug delivery into the brain. PMID:25407801

  17. Optimization of Tet1 ligand density in HPMA-co-oligolysine copolymers for targeted neuronal gene delivery

    PubMed Central

    Chu, David S.H.; Schellinger, Joan G.; Bocek, Michael J.; Johnson, Russell N.; Pun, Suzie H.

    2013-01-01

    Targeted gene delivery vectors can enhance cellular specificity and transfection efficiency. We demonstrated previously that conjugation of Tet1, a peptide that binds to the GT1b ganglioside, to polyethylenimine results in preferential transfection of neural progenitor cells in vivo. In this work, we investigate the effect of Tet1 ligand density on gene delivery to neuron-like, differentiated PC-12 cells. A series of statistical, cationic peptide-based polymers containing various amounts (1—5 mol%) of Tet1 were synthesized via one-pot reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization by copolymerization of Tet1 and oligo-l-lysine macromonomers with N-(2-hydroxypropyl)methacrylamide (HPMA). When complexed with plasmid DNA, the resulting panel of Tet1-functionalized polymers formed particles with similar particle size as particles formed with untargeted HPMA–oligolysine copolymers. The highest cellular uptake in neuron-like differentiated PC-12 cells was observed using polymers with intermediate Tet1 peptide incorporation. Compared to untargeted polymers, polymers with optimal incorporation of Tet1 increased gene delivery to neuron-like PC-12 cells by over an order of magnitude but had no effect compared to control polymers in transfecting NIH/3T3 control cells. PMID:24041424

  18. Applying Molecular Dynamics Simulations to Identify Rarely Sampled Ligand-bound Conformational States of Undecaprenyl Pyrophosphate Synthase, an Antibacterial Target

    SciTech Connect

    Sinko, William; de Oliveira, César; Williams, Sarah; Van Wynsberghe, Adam; Durrant, Jacob D.; Cao, Rong; Oldfield, Eric; McCammon, J. Andrew

    2012-04-30

    Undecaprenyl pyrophosphate synthase is a cis-prenyltransferase enzyme, which is required for cell wall biosynthesis in bacteria. Undecaprenyl pyrophosphate synthase is an attractive target for antimicrobial therapy. We performed long molecular dynamics simulations and docking studies on undecaprenyl pyrophosphate synthase to investigate its dynamic behavior and the influence of protein flexibility on the design of undecaprenyl pyrophosphate synthase inhibitors. We also describe the first X-ray crystallographic structure of Escherichia coli apo-undecaprenyl pyrophosphate synthase. The molecular dynamics simulations indicate that undecaprenyl pyrophosphate synthase is a highly flexible protein, with mobile binding pockets in the active site. By carrying out docking studies with experimentally validated undecaprenyl pyrophosphate synthase inhibitors using high- and low-populated conformational states extracted from the molecular dynamics simulations, we show that structurally dissimilar compounds can bind preferentially to different and rarely sampled conformational states. By performing structural analyses on the newly obtained apo-undecaprenyl pyrophosphate synthase and other crystal structures previously published, we show that the changes observed during the molecular dynamics simulation are very similar to those seen in the crystal structures obtained in the presence or absence of ligands. We believe that this is the first time that a rare 'expanded pocket' state, key to drug design and verified by crystallography, has been extracted from a molecular dynamics simulation.

  19. Targeting essential Eimeria ninakohlyakimovae sporozoite ligands for caprine host endothelial cell invasion with a phage display peptide library.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, A; Pérez, D; Muñoz, M C; Molina, J M; Taubert, A; Jacobs-Lorena, M; Vega-Rodríguez, J; López, A M; Hermosilla, C

    2015-11-01

    Eimeria ninakohlyakimovae is an important coccidian parasite of goats which causes severe diarrhoea in young animals. Specific molecules that mediate E. ninakohlyakimovae host interactions and molecular mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis are still unknown. Although strong circumstantial evidence indicates that E. ninakohlyakimovae sporozoite interactions with caprine endothelial host cells (ECs) are specific, hardly any information is available about the interacting molecules that confer host cell specificity. In this study, we describe a novel method to identify surface proteins of caprine umbilical vein endothelial cells (CUVEC) using a phage display library. After several panning rounds, we identified a number of peptides that specifically bind to the surface of CUVEC. Importantly, caprine endothelial cell peptide 2 (PCEC2) and PCEC5 selectively reduced the infection rate by E. ninakohlyakimovae sporozoites. These preliminary data give new insight for the molecular identification of ligands involved in the interaction between E. ninakohlyakimovae sporozoites and host ECs. Further studies using this phage approach might be useful to identify new potential target molecules for the development of anti-coccidial drugs or even new vaccine strategies.

  20. Receptor-Activator of Nuclear KappaB Ligand Expression as a New Therapeutic Target in Primary Bone Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Yamagishi, Tetsuro; Kawashima, Hiroyuki; Ogose, Akira; Ariizumi, Takashi; Sasaki, Taro; Hatano, Hiroshi; Hotta, Tetsuo; Endo, Naoto

    2016-01-01

    The receptor-activator of nuclear kappaB ligand (RANKL) signaling pathway plays an important role in the regulation of bone growth and mediates the formation and activation of osteoclasts. Osteoclasts are involved in significant bone resorption and destruction. Denosumab is a fully human monoclonal antibody against RANKL that specifically inhibits osteoclast differentiation and bone resorption. It has been approved for use for multiple myeloma and bone metastases, as well as for giant cell tumor of bone. However, there is no previous report quantitatively, comparing RANKL expression in histologically varied bone tumors. Therefore, we analyzed the mRNA level of various bone tumors and investigated the possibility of these tumors as a new therapeutic target for denosumab. We examined RANKL mRNA expression in 135 clinical specimens of primary and metastatic bone tumors using real-time PCR. The relative quantification of mRNA expression levels was performed via normalization with RPMI8226, a human multiple myeloma cell line that is recognized to express RANKL. Of 135 cases, 64 were also evaluated for RANKL expression by using immunohistochemistry. Among all of the tumors investigated, RANKL expression and the RANKL/osteoprotegerin ratio were highest in giant cell tumor of bone. High RANKL mRNA expression was observed in cases of aneurysmal bone cyst, fibrous dysplasia, osteosarcoma, chondrosarcoma, and enchondroma, as compared to cases of multiple myeloma and bone lesions from metastatic carcinoma. RANKL-positive stromal cells were detected in six cases: five cases of GCTB and one case of fibrous dysplasia. The current study findings indicate that some primary bone tumors present new therapeutic targets for denosumab, particularly those tumors expressing RANKL and those involving bone resorption by osteoclasts. PMID:27163152

  1. Programming of donor T cells using allogeneic δ-like ligand 4-positive dendritic cells to reduce GVHD in mice.

    PubMed

    Mochizuki, Kazuhiro; Meng, Lijun; Mochizuki, Izumi; Tong, Qing; He, Shan; Liu, Yongnian; Purushe, Janaki; Fung, Henry; Zaidi, M Raza; Zhang, Yanyun; Reshef, Ran; Blazar, Bruce R; Yagita, Hideo; Mineishi, Shin; Zhang, Yi

    2016-06-23

    Alloreactive T cells play a critical role in eliminating hematopoietic malignant cells but are also the mediators of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), a major complication that subverts the success of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). However, induction of alloreactive T cells does not necessarily lead to GVHD. Here we report the development of a cellular programming approach to render alloreactive T cells incapable of causing severe GVHD in both major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-mismatched and MHC-identical but minor histocompatibility antigen-mismatched mouse models. We established a novel platform that produced δ-like ligand 4-positive dendritic cells (Dll4(hi)DCs) from murine bone marrow using Flt3 ligand and Toll-like receptor agonists. Upon allogeneic Dll4(hi)DC stimulation, CD4(+) naïve T cells underwent effector differentiation and produced high levels of interferon γ (IFN-γ) and interleukin-17 in vitro, depending on Dll4 activation of Notch signaling. Following transfer, allogeneic Dll4(hi)DC-induced T cells were unable to mediate severe GVHD but preserved antileukemic activity, significantly improving the survival of leukemic mice undergoing allogeneic HSCT. This effect of Dll4(hi)DC-induced T cells was associated with their impaired expansion in GVHD target tissues. IFN-γ was important for Dll4(hi)DC programming to reduce GVHD toxicities of alloreactive T cells. Absence of T-cell IFN-γ led to improved survival and expansion of Dll4(hi)DC-induced CD4(+) T cells in transplant recipients and caused lethal GVHD. Our findings demonstrate that Dll4(hi)DC programming can overcome GVHD toxicity of donor T cells and produce leukemia-reactive T cells for effective immunotherapy.

  2. Design of a bioactive small molecule that targets the myotonic dystrophy type 1 RNA via an RNA motif-ligand database and chemical similarity searching.

    PubMed

    Parkesh, Raman; Childs-Disney, Jessica L; Nakamori, Masayuki; Kumar, Amit; Wang, Eric; Wang, Thomas; Hoskins, Jason; Tran, Tuan; Housman, David; Thornton, Charles A; Disney, Matthew D

    2012-03-14

    Myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) is a triplet repeating disorder caused by expanded CTG repeats in the 3'-untranslated region of the dystrophia myotonica protein kinase (DMPK) gene. The transcribed repeats fold into an RNA hairpin with multiple copies of a 5'CUG/3'GUC motif that binds the RNA splicing regulator muscleblind-like 1 protein (MBNL1). Sequestration of MBNL1 by expanded r(CUG) repeats causes splicing defects in a subset of pre-mRNAs including the insulin receptor, the muscle-specific chloride ion channel, sarco(endo)plasmic reticulum Ca(2+) ATPase 1, and cardiac troponin T. Based on these observations, the development of small-molecule ligands that target specifically expanded DM1 repeats could be of use as therapeutics. In the present study, chemical similarity searching was employed to improve the efficacy of pentamidine and Hoechst 33258 ligands that have been shown previously to target the DM1 triplet repeat. A series of in vitro inhibitors of the RNA-protein complex were identified with low micromolar IC(50)'s, which are >20-fold more potent than the query compounds. Importantly, a bis-benzimidazole identified from the Hoechst query improves DM1-associated pre-mRNA splicing defects in cell and mouse models of DM1 (when dosed with 1 mM and 100 mg/kg, respectively). Since Hoechst 33258 was identified as a DM1 binder through analysis of an RNA motif-ligand database, these studies suggest that lead ligands targeting RNA with improved biological activity can be identified by using a synergistic approach that combines analysis of known RNA-ligand interactions with chemical similarity searching.

  3. Riboswitch-Mediated Aptamer Binding for Imaging and Therapy (RABIT): A Novel Technique to Selectively Target an Intracelluar Ligand Specific for Ovarian Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-12-01

    Binding for Imaging and Therapy (RABIT): A Novel Technique to Selectively Target an Intracellular Ligand Specific for Ovarian Cancer hhh 5a. CONTRACT ...confirm their binding to antipyrine we were unable to progress to actually constructing our proposed riboswitch in the time allotted in this contract ...Award Number: W81XWH-12-1-0554 TITLE: Riboswitch-Mediated Aptamer Binding for Imaging and Therapy (RABIT): A Novel Technique to Selectively

  4. Targeting the leukemia microenvironment by CXCR4 inhibition overcomes resistance to kinase inhibitors and chemotherapy in AML

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Zhihong; Xi Shi, Yue; Samudio, Ismael J.; Wang, Rui-Yu; Ling, Xiaoyang; Frolova, Olga; Levis, Mark; Rubin, Joshua B.; Negrin, Robert R.; Estey, Elihu H.; Konoplev, Sergej; Andreeff, Michael

    2009-01-01

    SDF-1α/CXCR4 signaling plays a key role in leukemia/bone marrow microenvironment interactions. We previously reported that bone marrow–derived stromal cells inhibit chemotherapy-induced apoptosis in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Here we demonstrate that the CXCR4 inhibitor AMD3465 antagonized stromal-derived factor 1α (SDF-1α)–induced and stroma-induced chemotaxis and inhibited SDF-1α–induced activation of prosurvival signaling pathways in leukemic cells. Further, CXCR4 inhibition partially abrogated the protective effects of stromal cells on chemotherapy-induced apoptosis in AML cells. Fetal liver tyrosine kinase-3 (FLT3) gene mutations activate CXCR4 signaling, and coculture with stromal cells significantly diminished antileukemia effects of FLT3 inhibitors in cells with mutated FLT3. Notably, CXCR4 inhibition increased the sensitivity of FLT3-mutated leukemic cells to the apoptogenic effects of the FLT3 inhibitor sorafenib. In vivo studies demonstrated that AMD3465, alone or in combination with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor, induced mobilization of AML cells and progenitor cells into circulation and enhanced antileukemic effects of chemotherapy and sorafenib, resulting in markedly reduced leukemia burden and prolonged survival of the animals. These findings indicate that SDF-1α/CXCR4 interactions contribute to the resistance of leukemic cells to signal transduction inhibitor– and chemotherapy-induced apoptosis in systems mimicking the physiologic microenvironment. Disruption of these interactions with CXCR4 inhibitors represents a novel strategy of sensitizing leukemic cells by targeting their protective bone marrow microenvironment. PMID:18955566

  5. Multivariate PLS Modeling of Apicomplexan FabD-Ligand Interaction Space for Mapping Target-Specific Chemical Space and Pharmacophore Fingerprints

    PubMed Central

    Surolia, Avadhesha

    2015-01-01

    Biomolecular recognition underlying drug-target interactions is determined by both binding affinity and specificity. Whilst, quantification of binding efficacy is possible, determining specificity remains a challenge, as it requires affinity data for multiple targets with the same ligand dataset. Thus, understanding the interaction space by mapping the target space to model its complementary chemical space through computational techniques are desirable. In this study, active site architecture of FabD drug target in two apicomplexan parasites viz. Plasmodium falciparum (PfFabD) and Toxoplasma gondii (TgFabD) is explored, followed by consensus docking calculations and identification of fifteen best hit compounds, most of which are found to be derivatives of natural products. Subsequently, machine learning techniques were applied on molecular descriptors of six FabD homologs and sixty ligands to induce distinct multivariate partial-least square models. The biological space of FabD mapped by the various chemical entities explain their interaction space in general. It also highlights the selective variations in FabD of apicomplexan parasites with that of the host. Furthermore, chemometric models revealed the principal chemical scaffolds in PfFabD and TgFabD as pyrrolidines and imidazoles, respectively, which render target specificity and improve binding affinity in combination with other functional descriptors conducive for the design and optimization of the leads. PMID:26535573

  6. Tropomyosin Receptor Kinase C Targeted Delivery of a Peptidomimetic Ligand-Photosensitizer Conjugate Induces Antitumor Immune Responses Following Photodynamic Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kue, Chin Siang; Kamkaew, Anyanee; Voon, Siew Hui; Kiew, Lik Voon; Chung, Lip Yong; Burgess, Kevin; Lee, Hong Boon

    2016-01-01

    Tropomyosin receptor kinase C (TrkC) targeted ligand-photosensitizer construct, IYIY-diiodo-boron-dipyrromethene (IYIY-I2-BODIPY) and its scrambled counterpart YIYI-I2-BODIPY have been prepared. IYIY-I2-BODIPY binds TrkC similar to neurotrophin-3 (NT-3), and NT-3 has been reported to modulate immune responses. Moreover, it could be shown that photodynamic therapy (PDT) elevates antitumor immune responses. This prompted us to investigate the immunological impacts mediated by IYIY-I2-BODIPY in pre- and post-PDT conditions. We demonstrated that IYIY-I2-BODIPY (strong response) and YIYI-I2-BODIPY (weak response) at 10 mg/kg, but not I2-BODIPY control, increased the levels of IL-2, IL-4, IL-6 and IL-17, but decreased the levels of systemic immunoregulatory mediators TGF-β, myeloid-derived suppressor cells and regulatory T-cells. Only IYIY-I2-BODIPY enhanced the IFN-γ+ and IL-17+ T-lymphocytes, and delayed tumor growth (~20% smaller size) in mice when administrated daily for 5 days. All those effects were observed without irradiation; when irradiated (520 nm, 100 J/cm2, 160 mW/cm2) to produce PDT effects (drug-light interval 1 h), IYIY-I2-BODIPY induced stronger responses. Moreover, photoirradiated IYIY-I2-BODIPY treated mice had high levels of effector T-cells compared to controls. Adoptive transfer of immune cells from IYIY-I2-BODIPY-treated survivor mice that were photoirradiated gave significantly delayed tumor growth (~40–50% smaller size) in recipient mice. IYIY-I2-BODIPY alone and in combination with PDT modulates the immune response in such a way that tumor growth is suppressed. Unlike immunosuppressive conventional chemotherapy, IYIY-I2-BODIPY can act as an immune-stimulatory chemotherapeutic agent with potential applications in clinical cancer treatment. PMID:27853305

  7. Novel approaches using alkaline or acid/guanidine treatment to eliminate therapeutic antibody interference in the measurement of total target ligand.

    PubMed

    Salimi-Moosavi, Hossein; Lee, Jean; Desilva, Binodh; Doellgast, George

    2010-04-06

    Measurement of the total target ligand can help to provide pharmacokinetic (PK) and pharmacodynamic (PD) informations. However, the presence of monocloncal antibody therapeutics (ThAs) interferes with ELISA determinations of the total target proteins. The interferences can cause over- or under-estimation of the target protein analysis. The nature of interferences was dependent upon the ThA, target protein, antibody reagents and assay conditions of the ELISA. We have developed novel alkaline and acid/guanidine treatment approaches to dissociate the protein binding and preferentially denature the ThA. The neutralized target proteins can be determined by ELISA. These methods provide reproducible measurements of total target protein without ThA interference. Serum samples, standards and QCs containing target protein and ThA were treated with alkaline buffer (pH>13) containing casein or acid/guanidine buffer (pH<1). Total target proteins for two different ThA systems were successfully measured and interferences were completely eliminated by the treatments. These methods were successfully applied to analysis in pre-clinical serum samples.

  8. Identification of pancreatic tumors in vivo with ligand-targeted, pH responsive mesoporous silica nanoparticles by multispectral optoacoustic tomography.

    PubMed

    Gurka, Marie K; Pender, Dillon; Chuong, Phillip; Fouts, Benjamin L; Sobelov, Alexander; McNally, Molly W; Mezera, Megan; Woo, Shiao Y; McNally, Lacey R

    2016-06-10

    Despite significant efforts to translate nanotechnology for cancer application, lack of identification of biodistribution/accumulation of these nanovehicles in vivo remains a substantial barrier for successful implementation of theranostic nanoparticles in the clinic. The purpose of the study was to develop a tumor-targeted theranostic nanovehicle for pancreatic cancer detectable by multispectral optoacoustic tomography (MSOT). To improve the tumor specificity of our mesoporous silica nanoparticle (MSN), we utilized a dual targeting strategy: 1) an elevated tumor receptor, urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (UPAR), and 2) the acidic tumor microenvironment. The tumor specificity of the MSN particle was improved with the addition of both chitosan, targeting acidic pH, and urokinase plasminogen activator (UPA), targeting UPAR. Drug release assays confirmed pH responsive release of gemcitabine in vitro. The UPAR specific binding of MSN-UPA nanoparticles was confirmed by reduction in fluorescence signal following MSN-UPA nanoparticle treatment in UPAR positive cells blocked with a UPAR-blocking antibody. Based upon Indocyanine Green encapsulation within the nanoparticles, UPA ligand targeted MSNs demonstrated increased intensity compared to untargeted MSNs at both pH7.4 (7×) and 6.5 (20×); however the signal was much more pronounced at a pH of 6.5 using tissue phantoms (p<0.05). In vivo, MSN-UPA particles demonstrated orthotopic pancreatic tumor specific accumulation compared to liver or kidney as identified using multispectral optoacoustic tomography (p<0.05) and confirmed by ex vivo analysis. By tracking in vivo nanoparticle biodistribution with MSOT, it was shown that pH responsive, ligand targeted MSNs preferentially bind to pancreatic tumors for payload delivery.

  9. An Algorithm to Identify Target-Selective Ligands – A Case Study of 5-HT7/5-HT1A Receptor Selectivity

    PubMed Central

    Kurczab, Rafał; Canale, Vittorio; Zajdel, Paweł; Bojarski, Andrzej J.

    2016-01-01

    A computational procedure to search for selective ligands for structurally related protein targets was developed and verified for serotonergic 5-HT7/5-HT1A receptor ligands. Starting from a set of compounds with annotated activity at both targets (grouped into four classes according to their activity: selective toward each target, not-selective and not-selective but active) and with an additional set of decoys (prepared using DUD methodology), the SVM (Support Vector Machines) models were constructed using a selective subset as positive examples and four remaining classes as negative training examples. Based on these four component models, the consensus classifier was then constructed using a data fusion approach. The combination of two approaches of data representation (molecular fingerprints vs. structural interaction fingerprints), different training set sizes and selection of the best SVM component models for consensus model generation, were evaluated to determine the optimal settings for the developed algorithm. The results showed that consensus models with molecular fingerprints, a larger training set and the selection of component models based on MCC maximization provided the best predictive performance. PMID:27271158

  10. Retracted: FLT3: beyond good and evil.

    PubMed

    Lagunas-Rangel, Francisco Alejandro; Cortes-Penagos, Carlos; Viveros-Sandoval, Martha Eva

    2016-07-29

    The above article, published online on 29 July 2016 in Wiley Online Library (wileyonlinelibrary.com), has been retracted by agreement between the Journal Editor in Chief, Journal Production Manager, and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. The retraction has been agreed due to 48% similar significant between this article and an article published in Nature Reviews Cancer journal.

  11. Ultrasound Molecular Imaging of the Breast Cancer Neovasculature using Engineered Fibronectin Scaffold Ligands: A Novel Class of Targeted Contrast Ultrasound Agent

    PubMed Central

    Abou-Elkacem, Lotfi; Wilson, Katheryne E.; Johnson, Sadie M.; Chowdhury, Sayan M.; Bachawal, Sunitha; Hackel, Benjamin J.; Tian, Lu; Willmann, Jürgen K.

    2016-01-01

    Molecularly-targeted microbubbles (MBs) are increasingly being recognized as promising contrast agents for oncological molecular imaging with ultrasound. With the detection and validation of new molecular imaging targets, novel binding ligands are needed that bind to molecular imaging targets with high affinity and specificity. In this study we assessed a novel class of potentially clinically translatable MBs using an engineered 10th type III domain of human-fibronectin (MB-FN3VEGFR2) scaffold-ligand to image VEGFR2 on the neovasculature of cancer. The in vitro binding of MB-FN3VEGFR2 to a soluble VEGFR2 was assessed by flow-cytometry (FACS) and binding to VEGFR2-expressing cells was assessed by flow-chamber cell attachment studies under flow shear stress conditions. In vivo binding of MB-FN3VEGFR2 was tested in a transgenic mouse model (FVB/N Tg(MMTV/PyMT634Mul) of breast cancer and control litter mates with normal mammary glands. In vitro FACS and flow-chamber cell attachment studies showed significantly (P<0.01) higher binding to VEGFR2 using MB-FN3VEGFR2 than control agents. In vivo ultrasound molecular imaging (USMI) studies using MB-FN3VEGFR2 demonstrated specific binding to VEGFR2 and was significantly higher (P<0.01) in breast cancer compared to normal breast tissue. Ex vivo immunofluorescence-analysis showed significantly (P<0.01) increased VEGFR2-expression in breast cancer compared to normal mammary tissue. Our results suggest that MBs coupled to FN3-scaffolds can be designed and used for USMI of breast cancer neoangiogenesis. Due to their small size, stability, solubility, the lack of glycosylation and disulfide bonds, FN3-scaffolds can be recombinantly produced with the advantage of generating small, high affinity ligands in a cost efficient way for USMI. PMID:27570547

  12. Bio-functionalization of ligand-free upconverting lanthanide doped nanoparticles for bio-imaging and cell targeting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogdan, Nicoleta; Rodríguez, Emma Martín; Sanz-Rodríguez, Francisco; Iglesias de La Cruz, M.A. Carmen; Juarranz, Ángeles; Jaque, Daniel; Solé, José García; Capobianco, John A.

    2012-05-01

    We report on the functionalization of ligand-free NaGdF4:Er3+, Yb3+ upconverting nanoparticles with heparin and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF). These upconverting nanoparticles are used to obtain high-contrast images of HeLa cells. These images reveal that the heparin-bFGF functionalized nanoparticles show specific binding to the cell membrane.We report on the functionalization of ligand-free NaGdF4:Er3+, Yb3+ upconverting nanoparticles with heparin and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF). These upconverting nanoparticles are used to obtain high-contrast images of HeLa cells. These images reveal that the heparin-bFGF functionalized nanoparticles show specific binding to the cell membrane. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Detailed experimental procedures for the sample preparation and characterization. See DOI: 10.1039/c2nr30982c

  13. Prostate-specific Membrane Antigen-targeted Ligand Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography and Immunohistochemical Findings in a Patient With Synchronous Metastatic Penile and Prostate Cancer.

    PubMed

    Froehner, Michael; Kuithan, Friederike; Zöphel, Klaus; Heberling, Ulrike; Laniado, Michael; Wirth, Manfred P

    2017-03-01

    A 68-year-old man presented with synchronous metastatic penile and prostate cancer. 68Ga-labeled prostate-specific membrane antigen-targeted ligand positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PSMA-PET/CT) revealed tracer uptake in inguinal, pelvic, and retroperitoneal metastases. Lymph node biopsies and immunohistochemical staining revealed that both cancers involved the lymph nodes and expressed PSMA. In the deposits of penile squamous cell carcinoma, PSMA expression was seen in tumor vessels and may explain the PSMA-PET/CT positivity of inguinal nodes involved in squamous cell carcinoma. The interpretation of imaging in synchronous tumors should take this fact into consideration.

  14. Plasmacytoid dendritic cells in the tumor microenvironment: immune targets for glioma therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Candolfi, Marianela; King, Gwendalyn D; Yagiz, Kader; Curtin, James F; Mineharu, Yohei; Muhammad, A K M Ghulam; Foulad, David; Kroeger, Kurt M; Barnett, Nick; Josien, Regis; Lowenstein, Pedro R; Castro, Maria G

    2012-08-01

    Adenovirus-mediated delivery of the immune-stimulatory cytokine Flt3L and the conditionally cytotoxic thymidine kinase (TK) induces tumor regression and long-term survival in preclinical glioma (glioblastoma multiforme [GBM]) models. Flt3L induces expansion and recruitment of plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) into the brain. Although pDCs can present antigen and produce powerful inflammatory cytokines, that is, interferon α (IFN-α), their role in tumor immunology remains debated. Thus, we studied the role of pDCs and IFN-α in Ad.TK/GCV+ Ad.Flt3L-mediated anti-GBM therapeutic efficacy. Our data indicate that the combined gene therapy induced recruitment of plasmacytoid DCs (pDCs) into the tumor mass; which were capable of in vivo phagocytosis, IFN-α release, and T-cell priming. Thus, we next used either pDCs or an Ad vector encoding IFN-α delivered within the tumor microenvironment. When rats were treated with Ad.TK/GCV in combination with pDCs or Ad-IFN-α, they exhibited 35% and 50% survival, respectively. However, whereas intracranial administration of Ad.TK/GCV + Ad.Flt3L exhibited a high safety profile, Ad-IFN-α led to severe local inflammation, with neurologic and systemic adverse effects. To elucidate whether the efficacy of the immunotherapy was dependent on IFN-α-secreting pDCs, we administered an Ad vector encoding B18R, an IFN-α antagonist, which abrogated the antitumoral effect of Ad.TK/GCV + Ad.Flt3L. Our data suggest that IFN-α release by activated pDCs plays a critical role in the antitumor effect mediated by Ad.TK/GCV + Ad.Flt3L. In summary, taken together, our results demonstrate that pDCs mediate anti-GBM therapeutic efficacy through the production of IFN-α, thus manipulation of pDCs constitutes an attractive new therapeutic target for the treatment of GBM.

  15. Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cells in the Tumor Microenvironment: Immune Targets for Glioma Therapeutics12

    PubMed Central

    Candolfi, Marianela; King, Gwendalyn D; Yagiz, Kader; Curtin, James F; Mineharu, Yohei; Muhammad, AKM Ghulam; Foulad, David; Kroeger, Kurt M; Barnett, Nick; Josien, Regis; Lowenstein, Pedro R; Castro, Maria G

    2012-01-01

    Adenovirus-mediated delivery of the immune-stimulatory cytokine Flt3L and the conditionally cytotoxic thymidine kinase (TK) induces tumor regression and long-term survival in preclinical glioma (glioblastoma multiforme [GBM]) models. Flt3L induces expansion and recruitment of plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) into the brain. Although pDCs can present antigen and produce powerful inflammatory cytokines, that is, interferon α (IFN-α), their role in tumor immunology remains debated. Thus, we studied the role of pDCs and IFN-α in Ad.TK/GCV+ Ad.Flt3L-mediated anti-GBM therapeutic efficacy. Our data indicate that the combined gene therapy induced recruitment of plasmacytoid DCs (pDCs) into the tumor mass; which were capable of in vivo phagocytosis, IFN-α release, and T-cell priming. Thus, we next used either pDCs or an Ad vector encoding IFN-α delivered within the tumor microenvironment. When rats were treated with Ad.TK/GCV in combination with pDCs or Ad-IFN-α, they exhibited 35% and 50% survival, respectively. However, whereas intracranial administration of Ad.TK/GCV + Ad.Flt3L exhibited a high safety profile, Ad-IFN-α led to severe local inflammation, with neurologic and systemic adverse effects. To elucidate whether the efficacy of the immunotherapy was dependent on IFN-α-secreting pDCs, we administered an Ad vector encoding B18R, an IFN-α antagonist, which abrogated the antitumoral effect of Ad.TK/GCV + Ad.Flt3L. Our data suggest that IFN-α release by activated pDCs plays a critical role in the antitumor effect mediated by Ad.TK/GCV + Ad.Flt3L. In summary, taken together, our results demonstrate that pDCs mediate anti-GBM therapeutic efficacy through the production of IFN-α, thus manipulation of pDCs constitutes an attractive new therapeutic target for the treatment of GBM. PMID:22952428

  16. Nanoconjugation of PSMA-Targeting Ligands Enhances Perinuclear Localization and Improves Efficacy of Delivered Alpha-Particle Emitters against Tumor Endothelial Analogues.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Charles; Bandekar, Amey; Sempkowski, Michelle; Banerjee, Sangeeta Ray; Pomper, Martin G; Bruchertseifer, Frank; Morgenstern, Alfred; Sofou, Stavroula

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to evaluate the effect on killing efficacy of the intracellular trafficking patterns of α-particle emitters by using different radionuclide carriers in the setting of targeted antivascular α-radiotherapy. Nanocarriers (lipid vesicles) targeted to the prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA), which is unique to human neovasculature for a variety of solid tumors, were loaded with the α-particle generator actinium-225 and were compared with a PSMA-targeted radiolabeled antibody. Actinium-225 emits a total of four α-particles per decay, providing highly lethal and localized irradiation of targeted cells with minimal exposure to surrounding healthy tissues. Lipid vesicles were derivatized with two types of PSMA-targeting ligands: a fully human PSMA antibody (mAb) and a urea-based, low-molecular-weight agent. Target selectivity and extent of internalization were evaluated on monolayers of human endothelial cells (HUVEC) induced to express PSMA in static incubation conditions and in a flow field. Both types of radiolabeled PSMA-targeted vesicles exhibit similar killing efficacy, which is greater than the efficacy of the radiolabeled control mAb when compared on the basis of delivered radioactivity per cell. Fluorescence confocal microscopy demonstrates that targeted vesicles localize closer to the nucleus, unlike antibodies which localize near the plasma membrane. In addition, targeted vesicles cause larger numbers of dsDNAs per nucleus of treated cells compared with the radiolabeled mAb. These findings demonstrate that radionuclide carriers, such as PSMA-targeted lipid-nanocarriers, which localize close to the nucleus, increase the probability of α-particle trajectories crossing the nuclei, and, therefore, enhance the killing efficacy of α-particle emitters.

  17. Nanoconjugation of PSMA-targeting ligands enhances perinuclear localization and improves efficacy of delivered alpha-particle emitters against tumor endothelial analogues

    PubMed Central

    Sempkowski, Michelle; Banerjee, Sangeeta Ray; Pomper, Martin G.; Bruchertseifer, Frank; Morgenstern, Alfred; Sofou, Stavroula

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to evaluate the effect on killing efficacy of the intracellular trafficking patterns of alpha-particle emitters by using different radionuclide carriers in the setting of targeted antivascular alpha-radiotherapy. Nanocarriers (lipid vesicles) targeted to the prostate-specific-membrane-antigen (PSMA), which is unique to human neovasculature for a variety of solid tumors, were loaded with the alpha-particle generator actinium-225 and were compared to a PSMA-targeted radiolabeled antibody. Actinium-225 emits a total of four alpha-particles per decay, providing highly lethal and localized irradiation of targeted cells with minimal exposure to surrounding healthy tissues. Lipid vesicles were derivatized with two types of PSMA-targeting ligands: a fully human PSMA antibody (mAb), and a urea-based, low-molecular-weight agent. Target selectivity and extent of internalization were evaluated on monolayers of human endothelial cells (HUVEC) induced to express PSMA in static incubation conditions and in a flow field. Both types of radiolabeled PSMA-targeted vesicles exhibit similar killing efficacy, which is greater than the efficacy of the radiolabeled control mAb when compared on the basis of delivered radioactivity per cell. Fluorescence confocal microscopy demonstrates that targeted vesicles localize closer to the nucleus, unlike antibodies which localize near the plasma membrane. In addition, targeted vesicles cause larger numbers of DNA double strand breaks per nucleus of treated cells compared to the radiolabeled mAb. These findings demonstrate that radionuclide carriers, such as PSMA-targeted lipid-nanocarriers, which localize close to the nucleus increase the probability of alpha-particle trajectories crossing the nuclei, and, therefore, enhance the killing efficacy of alpha-particle emitters. PMID:26586724

  18. Structure-Activity Relationships of Membrane-Targeting Cationic Ligand on Silver Nanoparticle Surface in the Antibiotic-Resistant Antibacterial and Antibiofilm Activity Assay.

    PubMed

    Dai, Xiaomei; Chen, Xuelei; Zhao, Jing; Zhao, Yu; Guo, Qianqian; Zhang, Tianqi; Chu, Chunli; Zhang, Xinge; Li, Chaoxing

    2017-04-06

    To explore structure-activity relationship of membrane-targeting cationic ligand on silver nanoparticle surface in the antibiotic-resistant antibacterial and antibiofilm activity, a series of functionalized silver nanocomposites were synthesized. Tuning of the structural configuration, molecular weight and side chain length of cationic ligand on the nanoparticle surface provided silver nanocomposites effectively antibacterial activity against both antibiotic-resistant Gram-negative and -positive bacteria, including bacterial biofilms. These silver nanocomposites did not trigger hemolytic activity. Significantly, the bacteria did not develop resistance to the obtained nanocomposites even after 30 generations. Study of the antibacterial mechanism confirmed that these nanocomposites could irreversibly disrupt the membrane structure of bacteria and effectively inhibited intracellular enzyme activity, ultimately led to bacterial death. The silver nanocomposites (64 μg/mL) could eradicate 80% of established antibiotic-resistant bacterial biofilms. The strong structure-activity relationship in antibacterial and antibiofilm activity suggests that variation in conformational property of functional ligand could be valuable in the discovery of the new nano-antibacterial agent for treating pathogenic bacterial infections.

  19. Telomere targeting with a novel G-quadruplex-interactive ligand BRACO-19 induces T-loop disassembly and telomerase displacement in human glioblastoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Guangtong; Liu, Xinrui; Li, Yunqian; Xu, Songbai; Ma, Chengyuan; Wu, Xinmin; Cheng, Ye; Yu, Zhiyun; Zhao, Gang; Chen, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Interference with telomerase and telomere maintenance is emerging as an attractive target for anticancer therapies. Ligand-induced stabilization of G-quadruplex formation by the telomeric DNA 3′-overhang inhibits telomerase from catalyzing telomeric DNA synthesis and from capping telomeric ends, making these ligands good candidates for chemotherapeutic purposes. BRACO-19 is one of the most effective and specific ligand for telomeric G4. It is shown here that BRACO-19 suppresses proliferation and reduces telomerase activity in human glioblastoma cells, paralleled by the displacement of telomerase from nuclear to cytoplasm. Meanwhile, BRACO-19 triggers extensive DNA damage response at telomere, which may result from uncapping and disassembly of telomeric T-loop structure, characterized by the formation of anaphase bridge and telomere fusion, as well as the release of telomere-binding protein from telomere. The resulting dysfunctional telomere ultimately provokes p53 and p21-mediated cell cycle arrest, apoptosis and senescence. Notably, normal primary astrocytes do not respond to the treatment of BRACO-19, suggesting the agent's good selectivity for cancer cells. These results reinforce the notion that G-quadruplex binding compounds can act as broad inhibitors of telomere-related processes and have potential as selective antineoplastic drugs for various tumors including malignant gliomas. PMID:26908447

  20. Chelation Motifs Affecting Metal-dependent Viral Enzymes: N′-acylhydrazone Ligands as Dual Target Inhibitors of HIV-1 Integrase and Reverse Transcriptase Ribonuclease H Domain

    PubMed Central

    Carcelli, Mauro; Rogolino, Dominga; Gatti, Anna; Pala, Nicolino; Corona, Angela; Caredda, Alessia; Tramontano, Enzo; Pannecouque, Christophe; Naesens, Lieve; Esposito, Francesca

    2017-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection, still represent a serious global health emergency. The chronic toxicity derived from the current anti-retroviral therapy limits the prolonged use of several antiretroviral agents, continuously requiring the discovery of new antiviral agents with innovative strategies of action. In particular, the development of single molecules targeting two proteins (dual inhibitors) is one of the current main goals in drug discovery. In this contest, metal-chelating molecules have been extensively explored as potential inhibitors of viral metal-dependent enzymes, resulting in some important classes of antiviral agents. Inhibition of HIV Integrase (IN) is, in this sense, paradigmatic. HIV-1 IN and Reverse Transcriptase-associated Ribonuclease H (RNase H) active sites show structural homologies, with the presence of two Mg(II) cofactors, hence it seems possible to inhibit both enzymes by means of chelating ligands with analogous structural features. Here we present a series of N′-acylhydrazone ligands with groups able to chelate the Mg(II) hard Lewis acid ions in the active sites of both the enzymes, resulting in dual inhibitors with micromolar and even nanomolar activities. The most interesting identified N′-acylhydrazone analog, compound 18, shows dual RNase H-IN inhibition and it is also able to inhibit viral replication in cell-based antiviral assays in the low micromolar range. Computational modeling studies were also conducted to explore the binding attitudes of some model ligands within the active site of both the enzymes. PMID:28373864

  1. Quinine binding by the cocaine-binding aptamer. Thermodynamic and hydrodynamic analysis of high-affinity binding of an off-target ligand.

    PubMed

    Reinstein, Oren; Yoo, Mina; Han, Chris; Palmo, Tsering; Beckham, Simone A; Wilce, Matthew C J; Johnson, Philip E

    2013-12-03

    The cocaine-binding aptamer is unusual in that it tightly binds molecules other than the ligand it was selected for. Here, we study the interaction of the cocaine-binding aptamer with one of these off-target ligands, quinine. Isothermal titration calorimetry was used to quantify the quinine-binding affinity and thermodynamics of a set of sequence variants of the cocaine-binding aptamer. We find that the affinity of the cocaine-binding aptamer for quinine is 30-40 times stronger than it is for cocaine. Competitive-binding studies demonstrate that both quinine and cocaine bind at the same site on the aptamer. The ligand-induced structural-switching binding mechanism of an aptamer variant that contains three base pairs in stem 1 is retained with quinine as a ligand. The short stem 1 aptamer is unfolded or loosely folded in the free form and becomes folded when bound to quinine. This folding is confirmed by NMR spectroscopy and by the short stem 1 construct having a more negative change in heat capacity of quinine binding than is seen when stem 1 has six base pairs. Small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) studies of the free aptamer and both the quinine- and the cocaine-bound forms show that, for the long stem 1 aptamers, the three forms display similar hydrodynamic properties, and the ab initio shape reconstruction structures are very similar. For the short stem 1 aptamer there is a greater variation among the SAXS-derived ab initio shape reconstruction structures, consistent with the changes expected with its structural-switching binding mechanism.

  2. Ligand-binding mass spectrometry to study biotransformation of fusion protein drugs and guide immunoassay development: strategic approach and application to peptibodies targeting the thrombopoietin receptor.

    PubMed

    Hall, Michael P; Gegg, Colin; Walker, Kenneth; Spahr, Christopher; Ortiz, Robert; Patel, Vimal; Yu, Steven; Zhang, Liana; Lu, Hsieng; DeSilva, Binodh; Lee, Jean W

    2010-12-01

    The knowledge of in vivo biotransformation (e.g., proteolysis) of protein therapeutic candidates reveals structural liabilities that impact stability. This information aids the development and confirmation of ligand-binding assays with the required specificity for bioactive moieties (including intact molecule and metabolites) for appropriate PK profiling. Furthermore, the information can be used for re-engineering of constructs to remove in vivo liabilities in order to design the most stable candidates. We have developed a strategic approach of ligand-binding mass spectrometry (LBMS) to study biotransformation of fusion proteins of peptides fused to human Fc ("peptibodies") using anti-human Fc immunoaffinity capture followed by tiered mass spectrometric interrogation. LBMS offers the combined power of selectivity of ligand capture with the specificity and detailed molecular-level information of mass spectrometry. In this paper, we demonstrate the preclinical application of LBMS to three peptibodies, AMG531 (romiplostim), AMG195(linear), and AMG195(loop), that target the thrombopoietin receptor. The data show that ligand capture offers excellent sample cleanup and concentration of intact peptibodies and metabolites for subsequent query by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry for identification of in vivo proteolytic points. Additional higher-resolution analysis by nanoscale liquid chromatography interfaced with electrospray ionization mass spectrometry is required for identification of heterogeneous metabolites. Five proteolytic points are accurately identified for AMG531 and two for AMG195(linear), while AMG195(loop) is the most stable construct in rats. We recommend the use of LBMS to assess biotransformation and in vivo stability during early preclinical phase development for all novel fusion proteins.

  3. Pan-HER-An antibody mixture targeting EGFR, HER2 and HER3 abrogates preformed and ligand-induced EGFR homo- and heterodimers.

    PubMed

    Ellebaek, Sofie; Brix, Susanne; Grandal, Michael; Lantto, Johan; Horak, Ivan D; Kragh, Michael; Poulsen, Thomas Tuxen

    2016-11-01

    The human epidermal growth factor receptor (HER)-family is involved in development of many epithelial cancers. Therefore, HER-family members constitute important targets for anti-cancer therapeutics such as monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). A limitation to the success of single HER-targeting mAbs is development of acquired resistance through mechanisms such as alterted receptor dimerization patterns and dependencies. Pan-HER is a mixture of six mAbs simultaneously targeting epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), HER2 and HER3 with two mAbs against each receptor. Pan-HER has previously demonstrated broader efficacy than targeting single or dual receptor combinations also in resistant settings. In light of this broad efficacy, we decided to investigate the effect of Pan-HER compared with single HER-targeting with single and dual mAbs on HER-family cross-talk and dimerization focusing on EGFR. The effect of Pan-HER on cell proliferation and HER-family receptor degradation was superior to treatment with single mAbs targeting either single receptor, and similar to targeting a single receptor with two non-overlapping antibodies. Furthermore, changes in EGFR-dimerization patterns after treatment with Pan-HER were investigated by in situ proximity ligation assay and co-immunoprecipitation, demonstrating that Pan-HER and the EGFR-targeting mAb mixture efficiently down-regulate basal EGFR homo- and heterodimerization in two tested cell lines, whereas single mAbs had limited effects. Pan-HER and the EGFR-targeting mAb mixture also blocked EGF-binding and thereby ligand-induced changes in EGFR-dimerization levels. These results suggest that Pan-HER reduces the cellular capability to switch HER-dependency and dimerization pattern in response to treatment and thus hold promise for future clinical development of Pan-HER in resistant settings.

  4. Differential effects of serotonin (5-HT)2 receptor-targeting ligands on locomotor responses to nicotine-repeated treatment.

    PubMed

    Zaniewska, Magdalena; McCreary, Andrew C; Wydra, Karolina; Filip, Małgorzata

    2010-07-01

    We verified the hypothesis that serotonin (5-HT)(2) receptors control the locomotor effects of nicotine (0.4 mg kg(-1)) in rats by using the 5-HT(2A) receptor antagonist M100907, the preferential 5-HT(2A) receptor agonist DOI, the 5-HT(2C) receptor antagonist SB 242084, and the 5-HT(2C) receptor agonists Ro 60-0175 and WAY 163909. Repeated pairings of a test environment with nicotine for 5 days, on Day 10 significantly augmented the locomotor activity following nicotine administration. Of the investigated 5-HT(2) receptor ligands, M100907 (2 mg kg(-1)) or DOI (1 mg kg(-1)) administered during the first 5 days in combination with nicotine attenuated or enhanced, respectively, the development of nicotine sensitization. Given acutely on Day 10, M100907 (2 mg kg(-1)), Ro 60-0175 (1 mg kg(-1)), and WAY 163909 (1.5 mg kg(-1)) decreased the expression of nicotine sensitization. In another set of experiments, where the nicotine challenge test was performed on Day 15 in animals treated repeatedly (Days: 1-5, 10) with nicotine, none of 5-HT(2) receptor ligands administered during the second withdrawal period (Days: 11-14) to nicotine-treated rats altered the sensitizing effect of nicotine given on Day 15. Our data indicate that 5-HT(2A) receptors (but not 5-HT(2C) receptors) play a permissive role in the sensitizing effects of nicotine, while stimulation of 5-HT(2A) receptors enhances the development of nicotine sensitization and activation of 5-HT(2C) receptors is essential for the expression of nicotine sensitization. Repeated treatment with the 5-HT(2) receptor ligands within the second nicotine withdrawal does not inhibit previously established sensitization.

  5. Design and validation of a homogeneous time-resolved fluorescence cell-based assay targeting the ligand-gated ion channel 5-HT3A.

    PubMed

    Blanc, Emilie; Wagner, Patrick; Plaisier, Fabrice; Schmitt, Martine; Durroux, Thierry; Bourguignon, Jean-Jacques; Partiseti, Michel; Dupuis, Elodie; Bihel, Frederic

    2015-09-01

    Ligand-gated ion channels (LGICs) are considered as attractive protein targets in the search for new therapeutic agents. Nowadays, this strategy involves the capability to screen large chemical libraries. We present a new Tag-lite ligand binding assay targeting LGICs on living cells. This technology combines the use of suicide enzyme tags fused to channels of interest with homogeneous time-resolved fluorescence (HTRF) as the detection readout. Using the 5-HT3 receptor as system model, we showed that the pharmacology of the HALO-5HT3 receptor was identical to that of the native receptor. After validation of the assay by using 5-HT3 agonists and antagonists of reference, a pilot screen enabled us to identify azelastine, a well-known histamine H1 antagonist, as a potent 5-HT3 antagonist. This interesting result was confirmed with electrophysiological experiments. The method described here is easy to implement and could be applicable for other LGICs, opening new ways for the screening of chemical libraries.

  6. Templated Formation of Discrete RNA and DNA:RNA Hybrid G-Quadruplexes and Their Interactions with Targeting Ligands.

    PubMed

    Bonnat, Laureen; Dejeu, Jérôme; Bonnet, Hugues; Génnaro, Béatrice; Jarjayes, Olivier; Thomas, Fabrice; Lavergne, Thomas; Defrancq, Eric

    2016-02-24

    G-rich RNA and DNA oligonucleotides derived from the human telomeric sequence were assembled onto addressable cyclopeptide platforms through oxime ligations and copper-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAc) reactions. The resulting conjugates were able to fold into highly stable RNA and DNA:RNA hybrid G-quadruplex (G4) architectures as demonstrated by UV, circular dichroism (CD), and NMR spectroscopic analysis. Whereas rationally designed parallel RNA and DNA:RNA hybrid G4 topologies could be obtained, we could not force the formation of an antiparallel RNA G4 structure, thus supporting the idea that this topology is strongly disfavored. The binding affinities of four representative G4 ligands toward the discrete RNA and DNA:RNA hybrid G4 topologies were compared to the one obtained with the corresponding DNA G4 structure. Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) binding analysis suggests that the accessibility to G4 recognition elements is different among the three structures and supports the idea that G4 ligands might be shaped to achieve structure selectivity in a biological context.

  7. Conditional control of selectin ligand expression and global fucosylation events in mice with a targeted mutation at the FX locus

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Peter L.; Myers, Jay T.; Rogers, Clare E.; Zhou, Lan; Petryniak, Bronia; Becker, Daniel J.; Homeister, Jonathon W.; Lowe, John B.

    2002-01-01

    Glycoprotein fucosylation enables fringe-dependent modulation of signal transduction by Notch transmembrane receptors, contributes to selectin-dependent leukocyte trafficking, and is faulty in leukocyte adhesion deficiency (LAD) type II, also known as congenital disorder of glycosylation (CDG)-IIc, a rare human disorder characterized by psychomotor defects, developmental abnormalities, and leukocyte adhesion defects. We report here that mice with an induced null mutation in the FX locus, which encodes an enzyme in the de novo pathway for GDP–fucose synthesis, exhibit a virtually complete deficiency of cellular fucosylation, and variable frequency of intrauterine demise determined by parental FX genotype. Live-born FX(−/−) mice exhibit postnatal failure to thrive that is suppressed with a fucose-supplemented diet. FX(−/−) adults suffer from an extreme neutrophilia, myeloproliferation, and absence of leukocyte selectin ligand expression reminiscent of LAD-II/CDG-IIc. Contingent restoration of leukocyte and endothelial selectin ligand expression, general cellular fucosylation, and normal postnatal physiology is achieved by modulating dietary fucose to supply a salvage pathway for GDP–fucose synthesis. Conditional control of fucosylation in FX(−/−) mice identifies cellular fucosylation events as essential concomitants to fertility, early growth and development, and leukocyte adhesion. PMID:12186857

  8. Ligand-incorporation site in 5-methylcytosine-detection probe modulating the site of osmium complexation with the target DNA.

    PubMed

    Sugizaki, Kaori; Nakamura, Akiko; Yanagisawa, Hiroyuki; Okamoto, Akimitsu

    2012-09-01

    ICON Probes, short DNA strands containing an adenine linked to a bipyridine ligand, formed an interstrand cross-link with 5-methylcytosine located opposite the modified adenine in the presence of an osmium oxidant. The location of a bipyridine-tethered adenine in the probes varied the selectivity of the reactive base. An ICON probe where the modified adenine was located at the probe center showed a 5-methylcytosine-selective osmium complexation, whereas an ICON probe with the modified adenine at the strand end exhibited high reactivity towards thymine as well as 5-methylcytosine. The modulation of reactive bases by the incorporation of a bipyridine-tethered adenine site made facilitates design of ICON probes for the fluorometric detection of 5-methylcytosine.

  9. Structural insights into monoamine oxidase inhibitory potency and selectivity of 7-substituted coumarins from ligand- and target-based approaches.

    PubMed

    Catto, Marco; Nicolotti, Orazio; Leonetti, Francesco; Carotti, Andrea; Favia, Angelo Danilo; Soto-Otero, Ramón; Méndez-Alvarez, Estefanía; Carotti, Angelo

    2006-08-10

    A new series of 3-, 4-, 7-polysubstituted coumarins have been designed and evaluated for their monoamine oxidase A and monoamine oxidase B (MAO-A and MAO-B) inhibitory potency. Substituents at position 7 consisted of a bridge of different physicochemical nature linking a phenyl ring to the coumarin scaffold. Structure-affinity and structure-selectivity relationships, derived through CoMFA-GOLPE and docking studies, revealed the key physicochemical interactions responsible for the observed MAO-B and MAO-A inhibitory potency and suggested the main structural determinants for high selectivity toward one of the two enzymatic isoforms. The predictive power of our models was proved with the design of a new inhibitor demonstrating an outstanding MAO-B affinity (pIC50 = 8.29) and the highest MAO-B selectivity (DeltapIC50 = 3.39) within the entire series of ligands examined herein.

  10. Pre-clinical validation of a novel alpha-7 nicotinic receptor radiotracer, [(3)H]AZ11637326: target localization, biodistribution and ligand occupancy in the rat brain.

    PubMed

    Maier, Donna L; Hill, Geraldine; Ding, Min; Tuke, David; Einstein, Emily; Gurley, David; Gordon, John C; Bock, Mary J; Smith, Jeff S; Bialecki, Russell; Eisman, Mark; Elmore, Charles S; Werkheiser, Jennifer L

    2011-01-01

    The alpha-7 neuronal nicotinic receptor is a novel pharmacological target for psychiatric and cognitive disorders. Selective radiotracer tools for pre-clinical receptor occupancy can facilitate the interpretation of the biological actions of small molecules at a target receptor. We discovered a high affinity nicotinic alpha-7 subtype-selective ligand, AZ11637326, with physical-chemical and pharmacokinetic properties suitable for an in vivo radioligand tool. [(3)H]AZ11637326 synthesis by tritiodehalogenation of the corresponding tribromide precursor yielded a high specific activity radiotracer with high affinity alpha-7 receptor binding in the rat hippocampus determined by autoradiography (Kd = 0.2 nM). When [(3)H]AZ11637326 was administered to rats by intravenous bolus, rapid uptake was measured in the brain followed by a 3-4 fold greater specific binding in regions containing the alpha-7 receptor (frontal cortex, hippocampus, hypothalamus and midbrain) when compared to non-target regions (striatum and cerebellum). Systemic administration of the high affinity alpha-7 receptor antagonist, methyllycaconitine (MLA), or pretreatment with alpha-7 selective agonists (AR-R17779, PyrQTC, DBCO-4-POM, and DBCO-3-POM) significantly blocked the alpha-7 specific binding of [(3)H]AZ11637326 in the rat brain. The rank order of ligand ED(50) values for in vivo alpha-7 receptor occupancy in rat hippocampus was: DBCO-4-POM > DBCO-3-POM ∼ MLA > PyrQTC > AR-R17779. The occupancy affinity shift was consistent with in vitro binding affinity in autoradiography. Our studies established the optimal conditions for [(3)H]AZ11637326 in vivo specific binding in the rat brain and support the use of [(3)H]AZ11637326 as a pre-clinical tool for assessment of novel alpha-7 compounds in drug discovery.

  11. Quantitation of rare circulating tumor cells by folate receptor α ligand-targeted PCR in bladder transitional cell carcinoma and its potential diagnostic significance.

    PubMed

    Qi, Fuming; Liu, Yuchen; Zhao, Rongchang; Zou, Xiangjun; Zhang, Lei; Li, Jiaqiang; Wang, Yongqiang; Li, Feiyang; Zou, Xiaowen; Xia, Ye; Wang, Xuliang; Xing, Li; Li, Cailing; Lu, Jingxiao; Tang, Junlong; Zhou, Fangjian; Liu, Chunxiao; Gui, Yaoting; Cai, Zhiming; Sun, Xiaojuan

    2014-07-01

    Numerous attempts for detection of circulating tumor cells (CTC) have been made to develop reliable assays for early diagnosis of cancers. In this study, we validated the application of folate receptor α (FRα) as the tumor marker to detect CTC through tumor-specific ligand PCR (LT-PCR) and assessed its utility for diagnosis of bladder transitional cell carcinoma (TCC). Immunohistochemistry for FRα was performed on ten bladder TCC tissues. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for FRα was performed on both urine and serum specimens from bladder TCC patients (n = 64 and n = 20, respectively) and healthy volunteers (n = 20 and n = 23, respectively). Western blot analysis and qRT-PCR were performed to confirm the expression of FRα in bladder TCC cells. CTC values in 3-mL peripheral blood were measured in 57 bladder TCC patients, 48 healthy volunteers, and 15 subjects with benign urologic pathologies by the folate receptor α ligand-targeted PCR. We found that FRα protein was overexpressed in both bladder TCC cells and tissues. The levels of FRα mRNA were also much higher in bladder cancer cell lines 5637 and SW780 than those of leukocyte. Values of FRα were higher in both serum and urine specimens of bladder TCC patients than those of control. CTC values were also higher in 3-mL peripheral blood of bladder TCC patients than those of control (median 26.5 Cu/3 mL vs 14.0 Cu/3 mL). Area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve for bladder TCC detection was 0.819, 95 % CI (0.738-0.883). At the cutoff value of 15.43 Cu/3 mL, the sensitivity and the specificity for detecting bladder cancer are 82.14 and 61.9 %, respectively. We concluded that quantitation of CTCs through FRα ligand-PCR could be a promising method for noninvasive diagnosis of bladder TCC.

  12. Novel multi-target-directed ligands for Alzheimer's disease: Combining cholinesterase inhibitors and 5-HT6 receptor antagonists. Design, synthesis and biological evaluation.

    PubMed

    Więckowska, Anna; Kołaczkowski, Marcin; Bucki, Adam; Godyń, Justyna; Marcinkowska, Monika; Więckowski, Krzysztof; Zaręba, Paula; Siwek, Agata; Kazek, Grzegorz; Głuch-Lutwin, Monika; Mierzejewski, Paweł; Bienkowski, Przemysław; Sienkiewicz-Jarosz, Halina; Knez, Damijan; Wichur, Tomasz; Gobec, Stanislav; Malawska, Barbara

    2016-11-29

    As currently postulated, a complex treatment may be key to an effective therapy for Alzheimer's disease (AD). Recent clinical trials in patients with moderate AD have shown a superior effect of the combination therapy of donepezil (a selective acetylcholinesterase inhibitor) with idalopirdine (a 5-HT6 receptor antagonist) over monotherapy with donepezil. Here, we present the first report on the design, synthesis and biological evaluation of a novel class of multifunctional ligands that combines a 5-HT6 receptor antagonist with a cholinesterase inhibitor. Novel multi-target-directed ligands (MTDLs) were designed by combining pharmacophores directed against the 5-HT6 receptor (1-(phenylsulfonyl)-4-(piperazin-1-yl)-1H-indole) and cholinesterases (tacrine or N-benzylpiperidine analogues). In vitro evaluation led to the identification of tacrine derivative 12 with well-balanced potencies against the 5-HT6 receptor (Kb = 27 nM), acetylcholinesterase and butyrylcholinesterase (IC50hAChE = 12 nM, IC50hBuChE = 29 nM). The compound also showed good in vitro blood-brain-barrier permeability (PAMPA-BBB assay), which was confirmed in vivo (open field study). Central cholinomimetic activity was confirmed in vivo in rats using a scopolamine-induced hyperlocomotion model. A novel class of multifunctional ligands with compound 12 as the best derivative in a series represents an excellent starting point for the further development of an effective treatment for AD.

  13. On and off-target effects of telomere uncapping G-quadruplex selective ligands based on pentacyclic acridinium salts

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Quadruplexes DNA are present in telomeric DNA as well as in several cancer-related gene promoters and hence affect gene expression and subsequent biological processes. The conformations of G4 provide selective recognition sites for small molecules and thus these structures have become important drug-design targets for cancer treatment. The DNA G-quadruplex binding pentacyclic acridinium salt RHPS4 (1) has many pharmacological attributes of an ideal telomere-targeting agent but has undesirable off-target liabilities. Notably a cardiovascular effect was evident in a guinea pig model, manifested by a marked and sustained increase in QTcB interval. In accordance with this, significant interaction with the human recombinant β2 adrenergic receptor, and M1, M2 and M3 muscarinic receptors was observed, together with a high inhibition of the hERG tail current tested in a patch clamp assay. Two related pentacyclic structures, the acetylamines (2) and (3), both show a modest interaction with β2 adrenergic receptor, and do not significatively inhibit the hERG tail current while demonstrating potent telomere on-target properties comparing closely with 1. Of the two isomers, the 2-acetyl-aminopentacycle (2) more closely mimics the overall biological profile of 1 and this information will be used to guide further synthetic efforts to identify novel variants of this chemotype, to maximize on-target and minimize off-target activities. Consequently, the improvement of toxicological profile of these compounds could therefore lead to the obtainment of suitable molecules for clinical development offering new pharmacological strategies in cancer treatment. PMID:24330541

  14. STRUCTURE BASED DESIGN OF PROTEIN LIGANDS: A STUDY OF ANTIBODY-LIKE SCAFFOLDS TARGETED AGAINST THE ANTHRAX TOXIN

    SciTech Connect

    P. SHIFLETT; E. HONG-GELLER; ET AL

    2000-12-01

    We have adopted structure-based approaches to enhance the affinities of two single chain antibodies, scFv1 and scFv4, that bind to two different epitopes on the Protective Antigen (PA), a toxin from Bacillus anthracis. In one approach, we have modified scFv4 and re-engineered a novel antibody-like scaffold in which we have placed V{sub L} on the N terminus and V{sub H} on the C-terminus and joined them by a 10 amino-acid-long linker. This scaffold preserves the native V{sub L}-V{sub H} contact interface and the dispositions of the CDR loops. It binds to PA with 10 fold higher affinity than scFv4. In a second approach, we have created a bispecific ligand by covalently joining scFv1 and scFv4 by a flexible linker that supports simultaneous and synergistic binding of the two scFvs to PA. This bispecific scFv1-linker-scFv4 binds to PA with 10 fold higher affinity than the individual scFvs. The newly re-engineered antibody-like scaffold of scFv4 and scFv1-linker-scFv4 are expected to be potent inhibitors of PA binding to the host cells.

  15. Antibody targeting soluble NKG2D ligand sMIC refuels and invigorates the endogenous immune system to fight cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Human tumor-derived soluble NKG2D sMIC paralyzes the immune system through multiple pathways. Targeting soluble MIC with a nonblocking sMIC-neutralizing anti-MIC antibody effectuated and revamped endogenous innate and adoptive antitumor responses. Therapy induced regression of primary tumors and eliminated metastasis in preclinical models. PMID:27141357

  16. AChE Inhibition-based Multi-target-directed Ligands, a Novel Pharmacological Approach for the Symptomatic and Disease-modifying Therapy of Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yu; Wang, Hao; Chen, Hong-zhuan

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia in elder people, characterised by a progressive decline in memory as a result of an impairment of cholinergic neurotransmission. To date acetylcholinesterase inhibitors (AChEIs) have become the most prescribed drugs for the symptomatic treatment of mild to moderate AD. However, the traditional “one molecule-one target” paradigm is not sufficient and appropriate to yield the desired therapeutic efficacy since multiple factors, such as amyloid-β (Aβ) deposits, neuroinflammation, oxidative stress, and decreased levels of acetylcholine (ACh) have been thought to play significant roles in the AD pathogenesis. New generation of multi-target drugs is earnestly demanded not only for ameliorating symptoms but also for modifying the disease. Herein, we delineated the catalytic and non-catalytic functions of AChE, and summarized the works of our group and others in research and development of novel AChEI-based multi-target-directed ligands (MTDLs), such as dual binding site AChEIs and multi-target AChEIs inhibiting Aβ aggregation, regulating Aβ procession, antagonizing platelet-activating factor (PAF) receptor, scavenging oxygen radical, chelating metal ions, inhibiting monoamine oxidase B (MAO-B), blocking N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptor and others. PMID:26786145

  17. Synthesis of liver-targeting dual-ligand modified GCGA/5-FU nanoparticles and their characteristics in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Mingrong; Gao, Xiaoyan; Wang, Yong; Chen, Houxiang; He, Bing; Li, Yingchun; Han, Jiang; Zhang, Zhiping

    2013-01-01

    Nanoparticle drug delivery systems using polymers hold promise for clinical applications. We synthesized dual-ligand modified chitosan (GCGA) nanoparticles using lactic acid, glycyrrhetinic acid, and chitosan to target the liver in our previous studies. We then synthesized the GCGA/5-FU nanoparticles by conjugating 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) onto the GCGA nanomaterial, which had a mean particle size of 239.9 nm, a polydispersity index of 0.040, a zeta potential of +21.2 mV, and a drug loading of 3.90%. GCGA/5-FU nanoparticles had good slow release properties, and the release process could be divided into five phases: small burst release, gentle release, second burst release, steady release, and slow release. Inhibitory effects of GCGA/5-FU on tumor cells targeted the liver, and were time and dose dependent. GCGA nanoparticles significantly prolonged the efficacy of 5-FU on tumor cells, and alleviated the resistance of tumor cells to 5-FU. GCGA/5-FU nanoparticles were mostly concentrated in the liver, indicating that the GCGA nanoparticles were liver targeting. GCGA/5-FU nanoparticles significantly suppressed tumor growth in orthotopic liver transplantation mouse model, and improved mouse survival. PMID:24232303

  18. Synthesis and characterization of a melanoma-targeted fluorescence imaging probe by conjugation of a melanocortin 1 receptor (MC1R) specific ligand.

    PubMed

    Tafreshi, Narges K; Huang, Xuan; Moberg, Valerie E; Barkey, Natalie M; Sondak, Vernon K; Tian, Haibin; Morse, David L; Vagner, Josef

    2012-12-19

    The incidence of malignant melanoma is rising more rapidly than that of any other cancer in the United States. The melanocortin 1 receptor (MC1R) is overexpressed in most human melanoma metastases, thus making it a promising target for imaging and therapy of melanomas. We have previously reported the development of a peptidomimetic ligand with high specificity and affinity for MC1R. Here, we have conjugated near-infrared fluorescent dyes to the C-terminus of this ligand via lysine-mercaptopropionic acid linkers to generate MC1R specific optical probes (MC1RL-800, 0.4 nM K(i); and MC1RL-Cy5, 0.3 nM K(i)). Internalization of the imaging probe was studied in vitro by fluorescence microscopy using engineered A375/MC1R cells and B16F10 cells with endogenous MC1R expression. The in vivo tumor targeting of MC1RL-800 was evaluated by intravenous injection of probe into nude mice bearing bilateral subcutaneous A375 xenograft tumors with low MC1R expression and engineered A375/MC1R tumors with high receptor expression. Melanotic B16F10 xenografts were also studied. Fluorescence imaging showed that the agent has higher uptake values in tumors with high expression compared to low (p < 0.05), demonstrating the effect of expression levels on image contrast-to-noise. In addition, tumor uptake was significantly blocked by coinjection of excess NDP-α-MSH peptide (p < 0.05). In conclusion, the MC1R-specific imaging probe developed in this study displays excellent potential for the intraoperative detection of regional node involvement and for margin detection during melanoma metastasis resection.

  19. Tyrosine kinome sequencing of pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia: a report from the Children's Oncology Group TARGET Project | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Cancer.gov

    TARGET researchers sequenced the tyrosine kinome and downstream signaling genes in 45 high-risk pediatric ALL cases with activated kinase signaling, including Ph-like ALL, to establish the incidence of tyrosine kinase mutations in this cohort. The study confirmed previously identified somatic mutations in JAK and FLT3, but did not find novel alterations in any additional tyrosine kinases or downstream genes. The mechanism of kinase signaling activation in this high-risk subgroup of pediatric ALL remains largely unknown.

  20. The tumor suppressor TERE1 (UBIAD1) prenyltransferase regulates the elevated cholesterol phenotype in castration resistant prostate cancer by controlling a program of ligand dependent SXR target genes

    PubMed Central

    Fredericks, William J.; Sepulveda, Jorge; Lal, Priti; Tomaszewski, John E.; Lin, Ming-Fong; McGarvey, Terry; Rauscher, Frank J; Malkowicz, S. Bruce

    2013-01-01

    Castrate-Resistant Prostate Cancer (CRPC) is characterized by persistent androgen receptor-driven tumor growth in the apparent absence of systemic androgens. Current evidence suggests that CRPC cells can produce their own androgens from endogenous sterol precursors that act in an intracrine manner to stimulate tumor growth. The mechanisms by which CRPC cells become steroidogenic during tumor progression are not well defined. Herein we describe a novel link between the elevated cholesterol phenotype of CRPC and the TERE1 tumor suppressor protein, a prenyltransferase that synthesizes vitamin K-2, which is a potent endogenous ligand for the SXR nuclear hormone receptor. We show that 50% of primary and metastatic prostate cancer specimens exhibit a loss of TERE1 expression and we establish a correlation between TERE1 expression and cholesterol in the LnCaP-C81 steroidogenic cell model of the CRPC. LnCaP-C81 cells also lack TERE1 protein, and show elevated cholesterol synthetic rates, higher steady state levels of cholesterol, and increased expression of enzymes in the de novo cholesterol biosynthetic pathways than the non-steroidogenic prostate cancer cells. C81 cells also show decreased expression of the SXR nuclear hormone receptor and a panel of directly regulated SXR target genes that govern cholesterol efflux and steroid catabolism. Thus, a combination of increased synthesis, along with decreased efflux and catabolism likely underlies the CRPC phenotype: SXR might coordinately regulate this phenotype. Moreover, TERE1 controls synthesis of vitamin K-2, which is a potent endogenous ligand for SXR activation, strongly suggesting a link between TERE1 levels, K-2 synthesis and SXR target gene regulation. We demonstrate that following ectopic TERE1 expression or induction of endogenous TERE1, the elevated cholesterol levels in C81 cells are reduced. Moreover, reconstitution of TERE1 expression in C81 cells reactivates SXR and switches on a suite of SXR target genes that

  1. Ligand-conjugated mesoporous silica nanorattles based on enzyme targeted prodrug delivery system for effective lung cancer therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Sundarraj, Shenbagamoorthy; Thangam, Ramar; Sujitha, Mohanan V.; Vimala, Karuppaiya; Kannan, Soundarapandian

    2014-03-15

    Epidermal growth factor receptor antibody (EGFRAb) conjugated silica nanorattles (SNs) were synthesized and used to develop receptor mediated endocytosis for targeted drug delivery strategies for cancer therapy. The present study determined that the rate of internalization of silica nanorattles was found to be high in lung cancer cells when compared with the normal lung cells. EGFRAb can specifically bind to EGFR, a receptor that is highly expressed in lung cancer cells, but is expressed at low levels in other normal cells. Furthermore, in vitro studies clearly substantiated that the cPLA{sub 2}α activity, arachidonic acid release and cell proliferation were considerably reduced by pyrrolidine-2 loaded EGFRAb-SN in H460 cells. The cytotoxicity, cell cycle arrest and apoptosis were significantly induced by the treatment of pyrrolidine-2 loaded EGFRAb-SN when compared with free pyrrolidine-2 and pyrrolidine-2 loaded SNs in human non-small cell lung cancer cells. An in vivo toxicity assessment showed that silica nanorattles and EGFRAb-SN-pyrrolidine-2 exhibited low systemic toxicity in healthy Balb/c mice. The EGFRAb-SN-pyrrolidine-2 showed a much better antitumor activity (38%) with enhanced tumor inhibition rate than the pyrrolidine-2 on the non-small cell lung carcinoma subcutaneous model. Thus, the present findings validated the low toxicity and high therapeutic potentials of EGFRAb-SN-pyrrolidine-2, which may provide a convincing evidence of the silica nanorattles as new potential carriers for targeted drug delivery systems. - Highlights: • EGFRAb-SN developed for receptor-mediated Drug delivery system (DDS). • EGFRAb-SN-pyrrolidine-2 targeted DDS for cPLA2α inhibition in NSLC. • Study indicates EGFRAb-SN-pyrrolidine-2 as an efficient in target dug delivery carrier. • Study explains entire efficiency of EGFRAb-SN-pyrrolidine-2 in vitro and in vivo models.

  2. Oligonucleotide Sensor Based on Selective Capture of Upconversion Nanoparticles Triggered by Target-Induced DNA Interstrand Ligand Reaction.

    PubMed

    Mendez-Gonzalez, Diego; Laurenti, Marco; Latorre, Alfonso; Somoza, Alvaro; Vazquez, Ana; Negredo, Ana Isabel; López-Cabarcos, Enrique; Calderón, Oscar G; Melle, Sonia; Rubio-Retama, Jorge

    2017-04-12

    We present a sensor that exploits the phenomenon of upconversion luminescence to detect the presence of specific sequences of small oligonucleotides such as miRNAs among others. The sensor is based on NaYF4:Yb,Er@SiO2 nanoparticles functionalized with ssDNA that contain azide groups on the 3' ends. In the presence of a target sequence, interstrand ligation is possible via the click-reaction between one azide of the upconversion probe and a DBCO-ssDNA-biotin probe present in the solution. As a result of this specific and selective process, biotin is covalently attached to the surface of the upconversion nanoparticles. The presence of biotin on the surface of the nanoparticles allows their selective capture on a streptavidin-coated support, giving a luminescent signal proportional to the amount of target strands present in the test samples. With the aim of studying the analytical properties of the sensor, total RNA samples were extracted from healthy mosquitoes and were spiked-in with a specific target sequence at different concentrations. The result of these experiments revealed that the sensor was able to detect 10(-17) moles per well (100 fM) of the target sequence in mixtures containing 100 ng of total RNA per well. A similar limit of detection was found for spiked human serum samples, demonstrating the suitability of the sensor for detecting specific sequences of small oligonucleotides under real conditions. In contrast, in the presence of noncomplementary sequences or sequences having mismatches, the luminescent signal was negligible or conspicuously reduced.

  3. pH-responsive Virus-like Nanoparticles with Enhanced Tumour-targeting Ligands for Cancer Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Biabanikhankahdani, Roya; Alitheen, Noorjahan Banu Mohamed; Ho, Kok Lian; Tan, Wen Siang

    2016-01-01

    Multifunctional nanocarriers harbouring specific targeting moieties and with pH-responsive properties offer great potential for targeted cancer therapy. Several synthetic drug carriers have been studied extensively as drug delivery systems but not much information is available on the application of virus-like nanoparticles (VLNPs) as multifunctional nanocarriers. Here, we describe the development of pH-responsive VLNPs, based on truncated hepatitis B virus core antigen (tHBcAg), displaying folic acid (FA) for controlled drug delivery. FA was conjugated to a pentadecapeptide containing nanoglue bound on tHBcAg nanoparticles to increase the specificity and efficacy of the drug delivery system. The tHBcAg nanoparticles loaded with doxorubicin (DOX) and polyacrylic acid (PAA) demonstrated a sustained drug release profile in vitro under tumour tissue conditions in a controlled manner and improved the uptake of DOX in colorectal cancer cells, leading to enhanced antitumour effects. This study demonstrated that DOX-PAA can be packaged into VLNPs without any modification of the DOX molecules, preserving the pharmacological activity of the loaded DOX. The nanoglue can easily be used to display a tumour-targeting molecule on the exterior surface of VLNPs and can bypass the laborious and time-consuming genetic engineering approaches. PMID:27883070

  4. Comprehensive optimization of a single-chain variable domain antibody fragment as a targeting ligand for a cytotoxic nanoparticle.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Kathy; Geddie, Melissa L; Kohli, Neeraj; Kornaga, Tad; Kirpotin, Dmitri B; Jiao, Yang; Rennard, Rachel; Drummond, Daryl C; Nielsen, Ulrik B; Xu, Lihui; Lugovskoy, Alexey A

    2015-01-01

    Antibody-targeted nanoparticles have the potential to significantly increase the therapeutic index of cytotoxic anti-cancer therapies by directing them to tumor cells. Using antibodies or their fragments requires careful engineering because multiple parameters, including affinity, internalization rate and stability, all need to be optimized. Here, we present a case study of the iterative engineering of a single chain variable fragment (scFv) for use as a targeting arm of a liposomal cytotoxic nanoparticle. We describe the effect of the orientation of variable domains, the length and composition of the interdomain protein linker that connects VH and VL, and stabilizing mutations in both the framework and complementarity-determining regions (CDRs) on the molecular properties of the scFv. We show that variable domain orientation can alter cross-reactivity to murine antigen while maintaining affinity to the human antigen. We demonstrate that tyrosine residues in the CDRs make diverse contributions to the binding affinity and biophysical properties, and that replacement of non-essential tyrosines can improve the stability and bioactivity of the scFv. Our studies demonstrate that a comprehensive engineering strategy may be required to identify a scFv with optimal characteristics for nanoparticle targeting.

  5. Multi-Target-Directed Ligands and other Therapeutic Strategies in the Search of a Real Solution for Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Agis-Torres, Angel; Sölhuber, Monica; Fernandez, Maria; Sanchez-Montero, J.M.

    2014-01-01

    The lack of an adequate therapy for Alzheimer's Disease (AD) contributes greatly to the continuous growing amount of papers and reviews, reflecting the important efforts made by scientists in this field. It is well known that AD is the most common cause of dementia, and up-to-date there is no prevention therapy and no cure for the disease, which contrasts with the enormous efforts put on the task. On the other hand many aspects of AD are currently debated or even unknown. This review offers a view of the current state of knowledge about AD which includes more relevant findings and processes that take part in the disease; it also shows more relevant past, present and future research on therapeutic drugs taking into account the new paradigm “Multi-Target-Directed Ligands” (MTDLs). In our opinion, this paradigm will lead from now on the research toward the discovery of better therapeutic solutions, not only in the case of AD but also in other complex diseases. This review highlights the strategies followed by now, and focuses other emerging targets that should be taken into account for the future development of new MTDLs. Thus, the path followed in this review goes from the pathology and the processes involved in AD to the strategies to consider in on-going and future researches. PMID:24533013

  6. A transferrin variant as the targeting ligand for polymeric nanoparticles incorporated in 3-D PLGA porous scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Lopes, André M; Chen, Kevin Y; Kamei, Daniel T

    2017-04-01

    We have developed doxorubicin (DOX)-loaded poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) nanoparticles (DP) conjugated with polyethylene glycol (PEG) and transferrin (Tf) to form Tf-PEG-DPs (TPDPs), and incorporated these TPDPs into three-dimensional (3-D) PLGA porous scaffolds to form a controlled delivery system. To our knowledge, this represents the first use of a Tf variant (oxalate Tf) to improve the targeted delivery of drug-encapsulated nanoparticles (NPs) in PLGA scaffolds to PC3 prostate cancer cells. The PLGA scaffolds with TPDPs incorporated have been shown to release drugs for sustained delivery and provided a continuous release of DOX. The MTS assay was also performed to determine the potency of native and oxalate TPDPs, and a 3.0-fold decrease in IC50 values were observed between the native and oxalate TPDPs. The lower IC50 value for the oxalate version signifies greater potency compared to the native version, since a lower concentration of drug was required to achieve the same therapeutic effect. These results suggest that this technology has potential to become a new implantable polymeric device to improve the controlled and targeted drug delivery of Tf-conjugated NPs for cancer therapy.

  7. A parallel panning scheme used for selection of a GluA4-specific Fab targeting the ligand-binding domain.

    PubMed

    Clausen, Rasmus P; Mohr, Andreas Ø; Riise, Erik; Jensen, Anders A; Gill, Avinash; Madden, Dean R; Kastrup, Jette S; Skottrup, Peter D

    2016-11-01

    A method for development of murine Fab fragments towards extracellular domains of a surface receptor is presented. The GluA4 ionotropic glutamate receptor is used as a model system. Recombinant GluA4 ectodomain comprising both the N-terminal domain (NTD) and the ligand-binding domain (LBD) in one molecule was used for immunization. A Fab-phage library was constructed and a parallel panning approach enabled selection of murine Fab fragments towards either intact ectodomain or the isolated LBD of the GluA4 receptor. One LBD-Fab (FabL9) showed exclusive selectivity for the GluA4 LBD, over a panel of LBDs from GluA2, GluK1, GluK2 and GluD2. Soluble FabL9 was produced in amounts suitable for characterization. Competitive ELISA and rat-brain immunoprecipitation experiments confirmed that the FabL9 epitope is conserved in the LBD and in the intact native receptor. By an alignment of GluA2 and GluA4, the likely binding epitope for FabL9 was predicted. This study demonstrates a simple approach for development of antibody fragments towards specific sub-domains of a large ligand-gated ion channel, and this method could be utilized for all multi-domain surface receptors where antibody domain-selectivity may be desirable. Furthermore, we present for the first time a GluA4 subtype-specific murine Fab fragment targeting the LBD of the receptor.

  8. A combined ligand-based and target-based drug design approach for G-protein coupled receptors: application to salvinorin A, a selective kappa opioid receptor agonist

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Nidhi; Chevé, Gwénaël; Ferguson, David M.; McCurdy, Christopher R.

    2006-08-01

    Combined ligand-based and target-based drug design approaches provide a synergistic advantage over either method individually. Therefore, we set out to develop a powerful virtual screening model to identify novel molecular scaffolds as potential leads for the human KOP (hKOP) receptor employing a combined approach. Utilizing a set of recently reported derivatives of salvinorin A, a structurally unique KOP receptor agonist, a pharmacophore model was developed that consisted of two hydrogen bond acceptor and three hydrophobic features. The model was cross-validated by randomizing the data using the CatScramble technique. Further validation was carried out using a test set that performed well in classifying active and inactive molecules correctly. Simultaneously, a bovine rhodopsin based "agonist-bound" hKOP receptor model was also generated. The model provided more accurate information about the putative binding site of salvinorin A based ligands. Several protein structure-checking programs were used to validate the model. In addition, this model was in agreement with the mutation experiments carried out on KOP receptor. The predictive ability of the model was evaluated by docking a set of known KOP receptor agonists into the active site of this model. The docked scores correlated reasonably well with experimental p K i values. It is hypothesized that the integration of these two independently generated models would enable a swift and reliable identification of new lead compounds that could reduce time and cost of hit finding within the drug discovery and development process, particularly in the case of GPCRs.

  9. Target and resistance-related proteins of recombinant mutant human tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand on myeloma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Jian, Yuan; Chen, Yuling; Geng, Chuanying; Liu, Nian; Yang, Guangzhong; Liu, Jinwei; Li, Xin; Deng, Haiteng; Chen, Wenming

    2016-06-01

    Recombinant mutant human tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (rmhTRAIL) has become a potential therapeutic drug for multiple myeloma (MM). However, the exact targets and resistance mechanisms of rmhTRAIL on MM cells remain to be elucidated. The present study aimed to investigate the target and resistance-related proteins of rmhTRAIL on myeloma cell lines. A TRAIL-sensitive myeloma cell line, RPMI 8226, and a TRAIL-resistance one, U266, were chosen and the differentially expressed proteins between the two cell lines were analyzed prior and subsequent to rmhTRAIL administration by a liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method. The results showed that following TRAIL treatment, 6 apoptosis-related proteins, calpain small subunit 1 (CPNS1), peflin (PEF1), B-cell receptor-associated protein 31 (BAP31), apoptosis-associated speck-like protein containing CARD (ASC), BAG family molecular chaperone regulator 2 (BAG2) and chromobox protein homolog 3 (CBX3), were upregulated in RPMI 8226 cells while no change was identified in the U266 cells. Furthermore, small ubiquitin-related modifier 1 and several other ubiquitin proteasome pathway (UPP)-related proteins expressed higher levels in TRAIL-resistant cells U266 compared to the RPMI-8226 cells prior and subsequent to rmhTRAIL treatment. These results suggested that CPNS1, PEF1, BAP31, ASC, BAG2 and CBX3 were possibly target proteins of rmhTRAIL on RPMI 8226 cells, while UPP may have a vital role in mediating TRAIL-resistance in U266 cells.

  10. Target and resistance-related proteins of recombinant mutant human tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand on myeloma cell lines

    PubMed Central

    JIAN, YUAN; CHEN, YULING; GENG, CHUANYING; LIU, NIAN; YANG, GUANGZHONG; LIU, JINWEI; LI, XIN; DENG, HAITENG; CHEN, WENMING

    2016-01-01

    Recombinant mutant human tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (rmhTRAIL) has become a potential therapeutic drug for multiple myeloma (MM). However, the exact targets and resistance mechanisms of rmhTRAIL on MM cells remain to be elucidated. The present study aimed to investigate the target and resistance-related proteins of rmhTRAIL on myeloma cell lines. A TRAIL-sensitive myeloma cell line, RPMI 8226, and a TRAIL-resistance one, U266, were chosen and the differentially expressed proteins between the two cell lines were analyzed prior and subsequent to rmhTRAIL administration by a liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method. The results showed that following TRAIL treatment, 6 apoptosis-related proteins, calpain small subunit 1 (CPNS1), peflin (PEF1), B-cell receptor-associated protein 31 (BAP31), apoptosis-associated speck-like protein containing CARD (ASC), BAG family molecular chaperone regulator 2 (BAG2) and chromobox protein homolog 3 (CBX3), were upregulated in RPMI 8226 cells while no change was identified in the U266 cells. Furthermore, small ubiquitin-related modifier 1 and several other ubiquitin proteasome pathway (UPP)-related proteins expressed higher levels in TRAIL-resistant cells U266 compared to the RPMI-8226 cells prior and subsequent to rmhTRAIL treatment. These results suggested that CPNS1, PEF1, BAP31, ASC, BAG2 and CBX3 were possibly target proteins of rmhTRAIL on RPMI 8226 cells, while UPP may have a vital role in mediating TRAIL-resistance in U266 cells. PMID:27284413

  11. Controlling the specificity of modularly assembled small molecules for RNA via ligand module spacing: targeting the RNAs that cause myotonic muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Melissa M; Childs-Disney, Jessica L; Pushechnikov, Alexei; French, Jonathan M; Sobczak, Krzysztof; Thornton, Charles A; Disney, Matthew D

    2009-12-02

    tetramer also bind approximately 13- and approximately 63-fold more tightly to DM1 RNAs than does MBNL1. The modularly assembled compounds are cell permeable and nontoxic as determined by flow cytometry. The results establish that for these two systems: (i) a programmable modular assembly approach can provide synthetic ligands for RNA with affinities and specificities that exceed those of natural proteins; and, (ii) the spacing of ligand modules can be used to tune specificity for one RNA target over another.

  12. Ligand modeling and design

    SciTech Connect

    Hay, B.P.

    1997-10-01

    The purpose of this work is to develop and implement a molecular design basis for selecting organic ligands that would be used in the cost-effective removal of specific radionuclides from nuclear waste streams. Organic ligands with metal ion specificity are critical components in the development of solvent extraction and ion exchange processes that are highly selective for targeted radionuclides. The traditional approach to the development of such ligands involves lengthy programs of organic synthesis and testing, which in the absence of reliable methods for screening compounds before synthesis, results in wasted research effort. The author`s approach breaks down and simplifies this costly process with the aid of computer-based molecular modeling techniques. Commercial software for organic molecular modeling is being configured to examine the interactions between organic ligands and metal ions, yielding an inexpensive, commercially or readily available computational tool that can be used to predict the structures and energies of ligand-metal complexes. Users will be able to correlate the large body of existing experimental data on structure, solution binding affinity, and metal ion selectivity to develop structural design criteria. These criteria will provide a basis for selecting ligands that can be implemented in separations technologies through collaboration with other DOE national laboratories and private industry. The initial focus will be to select ether-based ligands that can be applied to the recovery and concentration of the alkali and alkaline earth metal ions including cesium, strontium, and radium.

  13. Targeting MTHFD2 in acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Pikman, Yana; Puissant, Alexandre; Alexe, Gabriela; Furman, Andrew; Chen, Liying M.; Frumm, Stacey M.; Ross, Linda; Fenouille, Nina; Bassil, Christopher F.; Lewis, Caroline A.; Ramos, Azucena; Gould, Joshua; Stone, Richard M.; DeAngelo, Daniel J.; Galinsky, Ilene; Clish, Clary B.; Kung, Andrew L.; Hemann, Michael T.; Vander Heiden, Matthew G.; Banerji, Versha

    2016-01-01

    Drugs targeting metabolism have formed the backbone of therapy for some cancers. We sought to identify new such targets in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). The one-carbon folate pathway, specifically methylenetetrahydrofolate dehydrogenase-cyclohydrolase 2 (MTHFD2), emerged as a top candidate in our analyses. MTHFD2 is the most differentially expressed metabolic enzyme in cancer versus normal cells. Knockdown of MTHFD2 in AML cells decreased growth, induced differentiation, and impaired colony formation in primary AML blasts. In human xenograft and MLL-AF9 mouse leukemia models, MTHFD2 suppression decreased leukemia burden and prolonged survival. Based upon primary patient AML data and functional genomic screening, we determined that FLT3-ITD is a biomarker of response to MTHFD2 suppression. Mechanistically, MYC regulates the expression of MTHFD2, and MTHFD2 knockdown suppresses the TCA cycle. This study supports the therapeutic targeting of MTHFD2 in AML. PMID:27325891

  14. Clinical Significance of Folate Receptor-positive Circulating Tumor Cells Detected by Ligand-targeted Polymerase Chain Reaction in Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lin; Wu, Chuanyong; Qiao, Lihua; Yu, Wenjun; Guo, Qiaomei; Zhao, Mingna; Yang, Guohua; Zhao, Hang; Lou, Jiatao

    2017-01-01

    Background: As the heterogeneity of CTCs is becoming increasingly better understood, it is clear that identifying particular subtypes of CTCs would be more relevant. Methods: We detected folate receptor (FR)-positive circulating tumor cells (FR+-CTCs) by a novel ligand-targeted polymerase chain reaction (LT-PCR) detection technique. Results: In the none-dynamic study, FR+-CTC levels of patients with lung cancer were significantly higher than controls (patients with benign lung diseases and healthy controls). With a threshold of 8.7 CTC units, FR+-CTC showed a sensitivity of 77.7% and specificity of 89.5% in the diagnosis of lung cancer. When compared with established clinical biomarkers including carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), cytokeratin 19 fragment (CYFRA21-1), and neuron-specific enolase (NSE), FR+-CTC showed the highest diagnostic efficiency. Notably, the combination of FR+-CTC, CEA, NSE, and CYFRA21-1 could significantly improve the diagnostic efficacy in differentiating patients with lung cancer from benign lung disease. In our dynamic surveillance study, the CTC levels of 62 non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients decreased significantly after tumor resection. Conclusion: We established a LT-PCR-based FR+-CTC detection platform for patients with lung cancer that exhibits high sensitivity and specificity. This platform would be clinical useful in lung cancer diagnosis and treatment response assessment. PMID:28123603

  15. From the dual function lead AP2238 to AP2469, a multi-target-directed ligand for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Tarozzi, Andrea; Bartolini, Manuela; Piazzi, Lorna; Valgimigli, Luca; Amorati, Riccardo; Bolondi, Cecilia; Djemil, Alice; Mancini, Francesca; Andrisano, Vincenza; Rampa, Angela

    2014-01-01

    The development of drugs with different pharmacological properties appears to be an innovative therapeutic approach for Alzheimer's disease. In this article, we describe a simple structural modification of AP2238, a first dual function lead, in particular the introduction of the catechol moiety performed in order to search for multi-target ligands. The new compound AP2469 retains anti-acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and beta-site amyloid precursor protein cleaving enzyme (BACE)1 activities compared to the reference, and is also able to inhibit Aβ42 self-aggregation, Aβ42 oligomer-binding to cell membrane and subsequently reactive oxygen species formation in both neuronal and microglial cells. The ability of AP2469 to interfere with Aβ42 oligomer-binding to neuron and microglial cell membrane gives this molecule both neuroprotective and anti-inflammatory properties. These findings, together with its strong chain-breaking antioxidant performance, make AP2469 a potential drug able to modify the course of the disease. PMID:25505579

  16. From the dual function lead AP2238 to AP2469, a multi-target-directed ligand for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Tarozzi, Andrea; Bartolini, Manuela; Piazzi, Lorna; Valgimigli, Luca; Amorati, Riccardo; Bolondi, Cecilia; Djemil, Alice; Mancini, Francesca; Andrisano, Vincenza; Rampa, Angela

    2014-04-01

    The development of drugs with different pharmacological properties appears to be an innovative therapeutic approach for Alzheimer's disease. In this article, we describe a simple structural modification of AP2238, a first dual function lead, in particular the introduction of the catechol moiety performed in order to search for multi-target ligands. The new compound AP2469 retains anti-acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and beta-site amyloid precursor protein cleaving enzyme (BACE)1 activities compared to the reference, and is also able to inhibit Aβ 42 self-aggregation, Aβ 42 oligomer-binding to cell membrane and subsequently reactive oxygen species formation in both neuronal and microglial cells. The ability of AP2469 to interfere with Aβ 42 oligomer-binding to neuron and microglial cell membrane gives this molecule both neuroprotective and anti-inflammatory properties. These findings, together with its strong chain-breaking antioxidant performance, make AP2469 a potential drug able to modify the course of the disease.

  17. PoSSuM v.2.0: data update and a new function for investigating ligand analogs and target proteins of small-molecule drugs

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Jun-ichi; Ikeda, Kazuyoshi; Yamada, Kazunori; Mizuguchi, Kenji; Tomii, Kentaro

    2015-01-01

    PoSSuM (http://possum.cbrc.jp/PoSSuM/) is a database for detecting similar small-molecule binding sites on proteins. Since its initial release in 2011, PoSSuM has grown to provide information related to 49 million pairs of similar binding sites discovered among 5.5 million known and putative binding sites. This enlargement of the database is expected to enhance opportunities for biological and pharmaceutical applications, such as predictions of new functions and drug discovery. In this release, we have provided a new service named PoSSuM drug search (PoSSuMds) at http://possum.cbrc.jp/PoSSuM/drug_search/, in which we selected 194 approved drug compounds retrieved from ChEMBL, and detected their known binding pockets and pockets that are similar to them. Users can access and download all of the search results via a new web interface, which is useful for finding ligand analogs as well as potential target proteins. Furthermore, PoSSuMds enables users to explore the binding pocket universe within PoSSuM. Additionally, we have improved the web interface with new functions, including sortable tables and a viewer for visualizing and downloading superimposed pockets. PMID:25404129

  18. Inhibition of MicroRNA-149-5p Induces Apoptosis of Acute Myeloid Leukemia Cell Line THP-1 by Targeting Fas Ligand (FASLG)

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Peijun; Yan, Li

    2016-01-01

    Background This study was aimed to reveal the role of miR-149-5p in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells apoptosis and the possible mechanism involved. Material/Methods The expression of miR-149-5p in leukemia cell lines, as well as the blood and bone marrow (BM) samples from leukemia patients, were monitored by reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). AML cell line THP-1 was transfected with miR-149-5p mimic or inhibitor, and then cell apoptosis was determined using the APO Percentage assay kit. The target of miR-149-5p was predicted by using the microRNA.org database, and verified by RT-PCR, Western blot, and Dual-Luciferase reporter assays. Further, small interfering RNA (siRNA) against the target gene was co-transfected with miR-149-5p inhibitor, and then the cell apoptosis and the expression of apoptosis-related proteins were assessed. Results MiR-149-5p was significantly up-regulated in leukemia cell lines and samples from leukemia patients (P<0.01 or P<0.001), especially in THP-1 cells and samples from AML patients. Cell apoptosis was significantly decreased by miR-149-5p overexpression (P<0.01) and increased by miR-149-5p suppression (P<0.05). Fas Ligand (FASLG) was a direct target of miR-149-5p, and was negatively regulated by miR-149-5p. More importantly, the inductive effects of miR-149-5p suppression on cell apoptosis were abrogated by si-FASLG (P<0.01). Furthermore, the up-regulative effects of miR-149-5p suppression on the phosphorylated form of Fas-associated via death domain (p-FADD), caspase-8, caspase-2, caspase-3, and the cleaved forms of these caspases were abrogated by si-FASLG. Conclusions Inhibition of miR-149-5p can induce apoptosis in THP-1 cells. These inductive effects might be via targeting FASLG and activating FADD and caspases. PMID:28013316

  19. Development of a Novel DNA Aptamer Ligand Targeting to Primary Cultured Tumor Endothelial Cells by a Cell-Based SELEX Method

    PubMed Central

    Ara, Mst. Naznin; Hyodo, Mamoru; Ohga, Noritaka; Hida, Kyoko; Harashima, Hideyoshi

    2012-01-01

    The present study used a spontaneous cell-based SELEX method (Systemic Evolution of Ligands by EXponential Enrichment) to produce DNA aptamers that specifically bind to cell surface proteins or biomarkers produced by primary cultured mouse tumor endothelial cells (mTECs). In solid tumors, new blood vessels are formed through an angiogenesis process, and this plays a critical role in cancer development as well as metastasis. To combat angiogenesis, an appropriate diagnosis and a molecular-level understanding of the different cancer types are now a high priority. The novel DNA aptamer AraHH001, developed in this study, binds specifically to mTECs with high affinity in the nano-molar range, but does not bind to normal skin endothelial cells (skin-ECs). The selected DNA aptamer was also found to bind to cultured human tumor endothelial cells (hTECs), isolated from a clinical patient with a renal carcinoma. The aptamer AraHH001 showed significant anti-angiogenesis activity by inhibiting tube formation by mTECs on matrigel. Interestingly, a confocal laser scanning microscopy examination of in vitro cellular uptake revealed that AraHH001 was assimilated by mTECs, and became co-localized in acidic compartments, as detected by labeling with Lysotracker Red. Therefore, the development of a specific DNA aptamer that binds to mTECs, as reported here for the first time, holds great promise not only as a therapeutic aptamer but also as a targeted molecular probe that appears to play a major role in angiogenesis, and for the development of a targeted new drug delivery system. PMID:23226512

  20. LigandRNA: computational predictor of RNA-ligand interactions.

    PubMed

    Philips, Anna; Milanowska, Kaja; Lach, Grzegorz; Bujnicki, Janusz M

    2013-12-01

    RNA molecules have recently become attractive as potential drug targets due to the increased awareness of their importance in key biological processes. The increase of the number of experimentally determined RNA 3D structures enabled structure-based searches for small molecules that can specifically bind to defined sites in RNA molecules, thereby blocking or otherwise modulating their function. However, as of yet, computational methods for structure-based docking of small molecule ligands to RNA molecules are not as well established as analogous methods for protein-ligand docking. This motivated us to create LigandRNA, a scoring function for the prediction of RNA-small molecule interactions. Our method employs a grid-based algorithm and a knowledge-based potential derived from ligand-binding sites in the experimentally solved RNA-ligand complexes. As an input, LigandRNA takes an RNA receptor file and a file with ligand poses. As an output, it returns a ranking of the poses according to their score. The predictive power of LigandRNA favorably compares to five other publicly available methods. We found that the combination of LigandRNA and Dock6 into a "meta-predictor" leads to further improvement in the identification of near-native ligand poses. The LigandRNA program is available free of charge as a web server at http://ligandrna.genesilico.pl.

  1. Fragment-Based Design of Ligands Targeting a Novel Site on the Integrase Enzyme of Human Immunodeficiency Virus;#8197;1

    SciTech Connect

    Wielens, Jerome; Headey, Stephen J.; Deadman, John J.; Rhodes, David I.; Parker, Michael W.; Chalmers, David K.; Scanlon, Martin J.

    2011-08-17

    Fragment-based screening has been used to identify a novel ligand binding site on HIV-1 integrase. Crystal structures of fragments bound at this site (shown) have been used to design elaborated second-generation compounds that bind with higher affinity and good ligand efficiency.

  2. Structure-based identification of CaMKIIα-interacting MUPP1 PDZ domains and rational design of peptide ligands to target such interaction in human fertilization.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi-Le; Han, Zhao-Feng; Sun, Ying-Pu

    2016-06-01

    The recognition and association between Ca(2+)/calmodulin-activated protein kinase II-α (CaMKIIα) and multi-PDZ domain protein 1 (MUPP1) plays an important role in sperm acrosome reaction and human fertilization, which is mediated by the binding of CaMKIIα's C-terminal tail to one or more PDZ domains of the scaffolding protein MUPP1. In this study, we attempt to identify the CaMKIIα-interacting MUPP1 PDZ domains and to design peptide ligands that can potently target and then competitively disrupt such interaction. Here, a synthetic biology approach was proposed to systematically characterize the structural basis, energetic property, dynamic behavior and biological implication underlying the intermolecular interactions between the C-terminal peptide of CaMKIIα and all the 13 PDZ domains of MUPP1. These domains can be grouped into four clusters in terms of their sequence, structure and physiochemical profile; different clusters appear to recognize different classes of PDZ-binding motifs. The cluster 3 includes two members, i.e. MUPP1 PDZ 5 and 11 domains, which were suggested to bind class II motif Φ-X-Φ(-COOH) of the C-terminal peptide SGAPSV(-COOH) of CaMKIIα. Subsequently, the two domains were experimentally measured as the moderate- and high-affinity binders of the peptide by using fluorescence titration (dissociation constants K d = 25.2 ± 4.6 and 0.47 ± 0.08 µM for peptide binding to PDZ 5 and 11, respectively), which was in line with theoretical prediction (binding free energies ΔG total = -7.6 and -9.2 kcal/mol for peptide binding to PDZ 5 and 11, respectively). A systematic mutation of SGAPSV(-COOH) residues suggested few favorable amino acids at different residue positions of the peptide, which were then combined to generate a number of potent peptide mutants for PDZ 11 domain. Consequently, two peptides (SIAPNV(-COOH) and SIVMNV(-COOH)) were identified to have considerably improved affinity with K d increase by ~tenfold relative to

  3. Synthesis and pharmacological evaluation of dual acting ligands targeting the adenosine A2A and dopamine D2 receptors for the potential treatment of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Jörg, Manuela; May, Lauren T; Mak, Frankie S; Lee, Kiew Ching K; Miller, Neil D; Scammells, Peter J; Capuano, Ben

    2015-01-22

    A relatively new strategy in drug discovery is the development of dual acting ligands. These molecules are potentially able to interact at two orthosteric binding sites of a heterodimer simultaneously, possibly resulting in enhanced subtype selectivity, higher affinity, enhanced or modified physiological response, and reduced reliance on multiple drug administration regimens. In this study, we have successfully synthesized a series of classical heterobivalent ligands as well as a series of more integrated and "drug-like" dual acting molecules, incorporating ropinirole as a dopamine D2 receptor agonist and ZM 241385 as an adenosine A2A receptor antagonist. The best compounds of our series maintained the potency of the original pharmacophores at both receptors (adenosine A2A and dopamine D2). In addition, the integrated dual acting ligands also showed promising results in preliminary blood-brain barrier permeability tests, whereas the classical heterobivalent ligands are potentially more suited as pharmacological tools.

  4. Investigating the Effect of Ligand Amount and Injected Therapeutic Activity: A Simulation Study for 177Lu-Labeled PSMA-Targeting Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Schuchardt, Christiane; Kulkarni, Harshad R.; Shahinfar, Mostafa; Singh, Aviral; Glatting, Gerhard; Baum, Richard P.; Beer, Ambros J.

    2016-01-01

    In molecular radiotherapy with 177Lu-labeled prostate specific membrane antigen (PSMA) peptides, kidney and/or salivary glands doses limit the activity which can be administered. The aim of this work was to investigate the effect of the ligand amount and injected activity on the tumor-to-normal tissue biologically effective dose (BED) ratio for 177Lu-labeled PSMA peptides. For this retrospective study, a recently developed physiologically based pharmacokinetic model was adapted for PSMA targeting peptides. General physiological parameters were taken from the literature. Individual parameters were fitted to planar gamma camera measurements (177Lu-PSMA I&T) of five patients with metastasizing prostate cancer. Based on the estimated parameters, the pharmacokinetics of tumor, salivary glands, kidneys, total body and red marrow was simulated and time-integrated activity coefficients were calculated for different peptide amounts. Based on these simulations, the absorbed doses and BEDs for normal tissue and tumor were calculated for all activities leading to a maximal tolerable kidney BED of 10 Gy2.5/cycle, a maximal salivary gland absorbed dose of 7.5 Gy/cycle and a maximal red marrow BED of 0.25 Gy15/cycle. The fits yielded coefficients of determination > 0.85, acceptable relative standard errors and low parameter correlations. All estimated parameters were in a physiologically reasonable range. The amounts (for 25−29 nmol) and pertaining activities leading to a maximal tumor dose, considering the defined maximal tolerable doses to organs of risk, were calculated to be 272±253 nmol (452±420 μg) and 7.3±5.1 GBq. Using the actually injected amount (235±155 μg) and the same maximal tolerable doses, the potential improvement for the tumor BED was 1–3 fold. The results suggest that currently given amounts for therapy are in the appropriate order of magnitude for many lesions. However, for lesions with high binding site density or lower perfusion, optimizing the

  5. Insights into an original pocket-ligand pair classification: a promising tool for ligand profile prediction.

    PubMed

    Pérot, Stéphanie; Regad, Leslie; Reynès, Christelle; Spérandio, Olivier; Miteva, Maria A; Villoutreix, Bruno O; Camproux, Anne-Claude

    2013-01-01

    Pockets are today at the cornerstones of modern drug discovery projects and at the crossroad of several research fields, from structural biology to mathematical modeling. Being able to predict if a small molecule could bind to one or more protein targets or if a protein could bind to some given ligands is very useful for drug discovery endeavors, anticipation of binding to off- and anti-targets. To date, several studies explore such questions from chemogenomic approach to reverse docking methods. Most of these studies have been performed either from the viewpoint of ligands or targets. However it seems valuable to use information from both ligands and target binding pockets. Hence, we present a multivariate approach relating ligand properties with protein pocket properties from the analysis of known ligand-protein interactions. We explored and optimized the pocket-ligand pair space by combining pocket and ligand descriptors using Principal Component Analysis and developed a classification engine on this paired space, revealing five main clusters of pocket-ligand pairs sharing specific and similar structural or physico-chemical properties. These pocket-ligand pair clusters highlight correspondences between pocket and ligand topological and physico-chemical properties and capture relevant information with respect to protein-ligand interactions. Based on these pocket-ligand correspondences, a protocol of prediction of clusters sharing similarity in terms of recognition characteristics is developed for a given pocket-ligand complex and gives high performances. It is then extended to cluster prediction for a given pocket in order to acquire knowledge about its expected ligand profile or to cluster prediction for a given ligand in order to acquire knowledge about its expected pocket profile. This prediction approach shows promising results and could contribute to predict some ligand properties critical for binding to a given pocket, and conversely, some key pocket

  6. Ligand placement based on prior structures: the guided ligand-replacement method

    SciTech Connect

    Klei, Herbert E.; Moriarty, Nigel W. Echols, Nathaniel; Terwilliger, Thomas C.; Baldwin, Eric T.; Pokross, Matt; Posy, Shana; Adams, Paul D.

    2014-01-01

    A new module, Guided Ligand Replacement (GLR), has been developed in Phenix to increase the ease and success rate of ligand placement when prior protein-ligand complexes are available. The process of iterative structure-based drug design involves the X-ray crystal structure determination of upwards of 100 ligands with the same general scaffold (i.e. chemotype) complexed with very similar, if not identical, protein targets. In conjunction with insights from computational models and assays, this collection of crystal structures is analyzed to improve potency, to achieve better selectivity and to reduce liabilities such as absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion and toxicology. Current methods for modeling ligands into electron-density maps typically do not utilize information on how similar ligands bound in related structures. Even if the electron density is of sufficient quality and resolution to allow de novo placement, the process can take considerable time as the size, complexity and torsional degrees of freedom of the ligands increase. A new module, Guided Ligand Replacement (GLR), was developed in Phenix to increase the ease and success rate of ligand placement when prior protein–ligand complexes are available. At the heart of GLR is an algorithm based on graph theory that associates atoms in the target ligand with analogous atoms in the reference ligand. Based on this correspondence, a set of coordinates is generated for the target ligand. GLR is especially useful in two situations: (i) modeling a series of large, flexible, complicated or macrocyclic ligands in successive structures and (ii) modeling ligands as part of a refinement pipeline that can automatically select a reference structure. Even in those cases for which no reference structure is available, if there are multiple copies of the bound ligand per asymmetric unit GLR offers an efficient way to complete the model after the first ligand has been placed. In all of these applications, GLR

  7. Water-solubilizing Hydrophobic ZnAgInSe/ZnS QDs with Tumor-targeted cRGD-Sulfobetaine-PIMA-Histamine Ligands via a Self-assembly Strategy for Bio-Imaging.

    PubMed

    Deng, Tao; Peng, Yanan; Zhang, Rong; Wang, Jie; Zhang, Jie; Gu, Yue-Qing; Huang, Dechun; Deng, Dawei

    2017-03-15

    Exploring the organic-to-aqueous phase transfer of quantum dots (QDs) is significant for achieving their versatile applications in biomedαical fields. In this thematic issue, surface modification, size control and biocompatibility of QDs and QDs-based nanocomposites are core problems. Herein, the new highly fluorescent tumor-targeted QDs-clusters consisting of ZnAgInSe/ZnS (ZAISe/ZnS) QDs and sulfobetaine-PIMA-histamine (SPH) polymer with the ανβ3 integrin receptor cyclic RGD (c-RGD) were developed via ligand exchange and an accompanying self-assemble process. It was found that the structure of RGD-SPH QDs-clusters was propitious to reduce the capture of reticulo-endothelial system (RES) in virtue of external stealth ligands, and benefit to selectively accumulate at the tumor site after intravenous injection via active tumor targeting cooperated with the enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) effect. In the meantime, those clusters also recognized and enriched to cell surface when co-cultured with the ανβ3 integrin receptor overexpressed malignant cells (U87MG tumors). Based on the results, fabricating mutil-functional nanocomposites integrated with the long-term circulation and dual-targeting effects should be an interesting strategy for imaging cancer in vitro and in vivo.

  8. Rhenium and technetium tricarbonyl complexes of 1,4-Substituted pyridyl-1,2,3-triazole bidentate 'click' ligands conjugated to a targeting RGD peptide.

    PubMed

    Connell, Timothy U; Hayne, David J; Ackermann, Uwe; Tochon-Danguy, Henri J; White, Jonathan M; Donnelly, Paul S

    2014-04-01

    New 1,4-substituted pyridyl-1,2,3-triazole ligands with pendent phenyl isothiocyanate functional groups linked to the heterocycle through a short methylene or longer polyethylene glycol spacers were prepared and conjugated to a peptide containing the arginine-glycine-aspartic acid peptide motif. Rhenium and technetium carbonyl complexes, [M(CO)3 L(x) (py)](+) (where M = Re(I) or (99m) Tc(I) ; L(x)  = 1,4-substituted pyridyl-1,2,3-triazole ligands and py = pyridine) were prepared. One rhenium complex has been characterized by X-ray crystallography, and the luminescent properties of [M(CO)3 L(x) (py)](+) are reported.

  9. Therapeutic Targeting of CC Ligand 21 or CC Chemokine Receptor 7 Abrogates Pulmonary Fibrosis Induced by the Adoptive Transfer of Human Pulmonary Fibroblasts to Immunodeficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Pierce, Elizabeth M.; Carpenter, Kristin; Jakubzick, Claudia; Kunkel, Steven L.; Flaherty, Kevin R.; Martinez, Fernando J.; Hogaboam, Cory M.

    2007-01-01

    Idiopathic interstitial pneumonias (IIPs) are a collection of pulmonary fibrotic diseases of unknown etiopathogenesis. CC chemokine receptor 7 (CCR7) is expressed in IIP biopsies and primary fibroblast lines, but its role in pulmonary fibrosis was not previously examined. To study the in vivo role of CCR7 in a novel model of pulmonary fibrosis, 1.0 × 106 primary fibroblasts grown from idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis/usual interstitial pneumonia, nonspecific interstitial pneumonia, or histologically normal biopsies were injected intravenously into C.B-17 severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID)/beige (bg) mice. At days 35 and 63 after idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis/usual interstitial pneumonia fibroblast injection, patchy interstitial fibrosis and increased hydroxyproline were present in the lungs of immunodeficient mice. Adoptively transferred nonspecific interstitial pneumonia fibroblasts caused a more diffuse interstitial fibrosis and increased hydroxyproline levels at both times, but injected normal human fibroblasts did not induce interstitial remodeling changes in C.B-17SCID/bg mice. Systemic therapeutic immunoneutralization of either human CCR7 or CC ligand 21, its ligand, significantly attenuated the pulmonary fibrosis in groups of C.B-17SCID/bg mice that received either type of IIP fibroblasts. Thus, the present study demonstrates that pulmonary fibrosis is initiated by the intravenous introduction of primary human fibroblast lines into immunodeficient mice, and this fibrotic response is dependent on the interaction between CC ligand 21 and CCR7. PMID:17392156

  10. Prospective Preliminary In Vitro Investigation of a Magnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticle Conjugated with Ligand CD80 and VEGF Antibody As a Targeted Drug Delivery System for the Induction of Cell Death in Rodent Osteosarcoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kovach, AnneMarie Kay; Gambino, Jen M.; Nguyen, Vina; Nelson, Zach; Szasz, Taylor; Liao, Jun; Williams, Lakiesha; Bulla, Sandra; Prabhu, Raj

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Target drug deliveries using nanotechnology are a novel consideration in the treatment of cancer. We present herein an in vitro mouse model for the preliminary investigation of the efficacy of an iron oxide nanoparticle complex conjugated to vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) antibody and ligand cluster of differentiation 80 (CD80) for the purpose of eventual translational applications in the treatment of human osteosarcoma (OSA). The 35 nm diameter iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles are functionalized with an n-hydroxysuccinimide biocompatible coating and are conjugated on the surface to proteins VEGF antibody and ligand CD80. Combined, these proteins have the ability to target OSA cells and induce apoptosis. The proposed system was tested on a cancerous rodent osteoblast cell line (ATCCTMNPO CRL-2836) at four different concentrations (0.1, 1.0, 10.0, and 100.0 μg/mL) of ligand CD80 alone, VEGF antibody alone, and a combination thereof (CD80+VEGF). Systems were implemented every 24 h over different sequential treatment timelines: 24, 48, and 72 h, to find the optimal protein concentration required for a reduction in cell proliferation. Results demonstrated that a combination of ligand CD80 and VEGF antibody was consistently most effective at reducing aberrant osteoblastic proliferation for both the 24- and 72-h timelines. At 48 h, however, an increase in cell proliferation was documented for the 0.1 and 1 μg/mL groups. For the 24- and 72-h tests, concentrations of 1.0 μg/mL of CD80+VEGF and 0.1 μg/mL of VEGF antibody were most effective. Concentrations of 10.0 and 100.0 μg/mL of CD80+VEGF reduced cell proliferation, but not as remarkably as the 1.0 μg/mL concentration. In addition, cell proliferation data showed that multiple treatments (72-h test) induced cell death in the osteoblasts better than a single treatment. Future targeted drug delivery system research includes trials in OSA cell lines from greater phylum species

  11. Therapeutics Targeting FGF Signaling Network in Human Diseases.

    PubMed

    Katoh, Masaru

    2016-12-01

    Fibroblast growth factor (FGF) signaling through its receptors, FGFR1, FGFR2, FGFR3, or FGFR4, regulates cell fate, angiogenesis, immunity, and metabolism. Dysregulated FGF signaling causes human diseases, such as breast cancer, chondrodysplasia, gastric cancer, lung cancer, and X-linked hypophosphatemic rickets. Recombinant FGFs are pro-FGF signaling therapeutics for tissue and/or wound repair, whereas FGF analogs and gene therapy are under development for the treatment of cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and osteoarthritis. FGF traps, anti-FGF/FGFR monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), and small-molecule FGFR inhibitors are anti-FGF signaling therapeutics under development for the treatment of cancer, chondrodysplasia, and rickets. Here, I discuss the benefit-risk and cost-effectiveness issues of precision medicine targeting FGFRs, ALK, EGFR, and FLT3. FGFR-targeted therapy should be optimized for cancer treatment, focusing on genomic tests and recurrence.

  12. Automated design of ligands to polypharmacological profiles

    PubMed Central

    Besnard, Jérémy; Ruda, Gian Filippo; Setola, Vincent; Abecassis, Keren; Rodriguiz, Ramona M.; Huang, Xi-Ping; Norval, Suzanne; Sassano, Maria F.; Shin, Antony I.; Webster, Lauren A.; Simeons, Frederick R.C.; Stojanovski, Laste; Prat, Annik; Seidah, Nabil G.; Constam, Daniel B.; Bickerton, G. Richard; Read, Kevin D.; Wetsel, William C.; Gilbert, Ian H.; Roth, Bryan L.; Hopkins, Andrew L.

    2012-01-01

    The clinical efficacy and safety of a drug is determined by its activity profile across multiple proteins in the proteome. However, designing drugs with a specific multi-target profile is both complex and difficult. Therefore methods to rationally design drugs a priori against profiles of multiple proteins would have immense value in drug discovery. We describe a new approach for the automated design of ligands against profiles of multiple drug targets. The method is demonstrated by the evolution of an approved acetylcholinesterase inhibitor drug into brain penetrable ligands with either specific polypharmacology or exquisite selectivity profiles for G-protein coupled receptors. Overall, 800 ligand-target predictions of prospectively designed ligands were tested experimentally, of which 75% were confirmed correct. We also demonstrate target engagement in vivo. The approach can be a useful source of drug leads where multi-target profiles are required to achieve either selectivity over other drug targets or a desired polypharmacology. PMID:23235874

  13. The IMiDs targets IKZF-1/3 and IRF4 as novel negative regulators of NK cell-activating ligands expression in multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Fionda, Cinzia; Abruzzese, Maria Pia; Zingoni, Alessandra; Cecere, Francesca; Vulpis, Elisabetta; Peruzzi, Giovanna; Soriani, Alessandra; Molfetta, Rosa; Paolini, Rossella; Ricciardi, Maria Rosaria; Petrucci, Maria Teresa; Santoni, Angela; Cippitelli, Marco

    2015-09-15

    Immunomodulatory drugs (IMiDs) have potent anti-tumor activities in multiple myeloma (MM) and are able to enhance the cytotoxic function of natural killer (NK) cells, important effectors of the immune response against MM. Here, we show that these drugs can enhance the expression of the NKG2D and DNAM-1 activating receptor ligands MICA and PVR/CD155 in human MM cell lines and primary malignant plasma cells. Depletion of cereblon (CRBN) by shRNA interference strongly impaired upregulation of these ligands and, more interestingly, IMiDs/CRBN-mediated downregulation of the transcription factors Ikaros (IKZF1), Aiolos (IKZF3) and IRF4 was critical for these regulatory mechanisms. Indeed, shRNA knockdown of IKZF1 or IKZF3 expression was both necessary and sufficient for the upregulation of MICA and PVR/CD155 expression, suggesting that these transcription factors can repress these genes; accordingly, the direct interaction and the negative role of IKZF1 and IKZF3 proteins on MICA and PVR/CD155 promoters were demonstrated. Finally, MICA expression was enhanced in IRF4-silenced cells, indicating a specific suppressive role of this transcription factor on MICA gene expression in MM cells.Taken together, these findings describe novel molecular pathways involved in the regulation of MICA and PVR/CD155 gene expression and identify the transcription factors IKZF-1/IKZF-3 and IRF4 as repressors of these genes in MM cells.

  14. The IMiDs targets IKZF-1/3 and IRF4 as novel negative regulators of NK cell-activating ligands expression in multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Fionda, Cinzia; Abruzzese, Maria Pia; Zingoni, Alessandra; Cecere, Francesca; Vulpis, Elisabetta; Peruzzi, Giovanna; Soriani, Alessandra; Molfetta, Rosa; Paolini, Rossella; Ricciardi, Maria Rosaria; Petrucci, Maria Teresa

    2015-01-01

    Immunomodulatory drugs (IMiDs) have potent anti-tumor activities in multiple myeloma (MM) and are able to enhance the cytotoxic function of natural killer (NK) cells, important effectors of the immune response against MM. Here, we show that these drugs can enhance the expression of the NKG2D and DNAM-1 activating receptor ligands MICA and PVR/CD155 in human MM cell lines and primary malignant plasma cells. Depletion of cereblon (CRBN) by shRNA interference strongly impaired upregulation of these ligands and, more interestingly, IMiDs/CRBN-mediated downregulation of the transcription factors Ikaros (IKZF1), Aiolos (IKZF3) and IRF4 was critical for these regulatory mechanisms. Indeed, shRNA knockdown of IKZF1 or IKZF3 expression was both necessary and sufficient for the upregulation of MICA and PVR/CD155 expression, suggesting that these transcription factors can repress these genes; accordingly, the direct interaction and the negative role of IKZF1 and IKZF3 proteins on MICA and PVR/CD155 promoters were demonstrated. Finally, MICA expression was enhanced in IRF4-silenced cells, indicating a specific suppressive role of this transcription factor on MICA gene expression in MM cells. Taken together, these findings describe novel molecular pathways involved in the regulation of MICA and PVR/CD155 gene expression and identify the transcription factors IKZF-1/IKZF-3 and IRF4 as repressors of these genes in MM cells. PMID:26269456

  15. Prognostic and therapeutic role of targetable lesions in B-lineage acute lymphoblastic leukemia without recurrent fusion genes

    PubMed Central

    Fedullo, Anna Lucia; Peragine, Nadia; Gianfelici, Valentina; Piciocchi, Alfonso; Brugnoletti, Fulvia; Di Giacomo, Filomena; Pauselli, Simona; Holmes, Antony B.; Puzzolo, Maria Cristina; Ceglie, Giulia; Apicella, Valerio; Mancini, Marco; te Kronnie, Geertruy; Testi, Anna Maria; Vitale, Antonella; Vignetti, Marco; Guarini, Anna; Rabadan, Raul; Foà, Robin

    2016-01-01

    To shed light into the molecular bases of B-lineage acute lymphoblastic leukemia lacking known fusion transcripts, i.e. BCR-ABL1, ETV6-RUNX1, E2A-PBX1, and MLL rearrangements (B-NEG ALL) and the differences between children, adolescents/young adults (AYA) and adults, we analyzed 168 B-NEG ALLs by genome-wide technologies. This approach showed that B-NEG cases carry 10.5 mutations and 9.1 copy-number aberrations/sample. The most frequently mutated druggable pathways were those pertaining to RAS/RTK (26.8%) and JAK/STAT (12.5%) signaling. In particular, FLT3 and JAK/STAT mutations were detected mainly in AYA and adults, while KRAS and NRAS mutations were more frequent in children. RAS/RTK mutations negatively affected the outcome of AYA and adults, but not that of children. Furthermore, adult B-NEG ALL carrying JAK/STAT mutations had a shorter survival. In vitro experiments showed that FLT3 inhibitors reduced significantly the proliferation of FLT3-mutated primary B-NEG ALL cells. Likewise, PI3K/mTOR inhibitors reduced the proliferation of primary cells harboring RAS and IL7R mutations. These results refine the genetic landscape of B-NEG ALL and suggest that the different distribution of lesions and their prognostic impact might sustain the diverse outcome between children, adults and partly AYA - whose genomic scenario is similar to adults - and open the way to targeted therapeutic strategies. PMID:26883104

  16. Inhibition of acetylcholinesterase, beta-amyloid aggregation, and NMDA receptors in Alzheimer's disease: a promising direction for the multi-target-directed ligands gold rush.

    PubMed

    Rosini, Michela; Simoni, Elena; Bartolini, Manuela; Cavalli, Andrea; Ceccarini, Luisa; Pascu, Nicoleta; McClymont, David W; Tarozzi, Andrea; Bolognesi, Maria L; Minarini, Anna; Tumiatti, Vincenzo; Andrisano, Vincenza; Mellor, Ian R; Melchiorre, Carlo

    2008-08-14

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a multifactorial syndrome with several target proteins contributing to its etiology. To confront AD, an innovative strategy is to design single chemical entities able to simultaneously modulate more than one target. Here, we present compounds that inhibit acetylcholinesterase and NMDA receptor activity. Furthermore, these compounds inhibit AChE-induced Abeta aggregation and display antioxidant properties, emerging as lead candidates for treating AD.

  17. Ligand placement based on prior structures: the guided ligand-replacement method

    PubMed Central

    Klei, Herbert E.; Moriarty, Nigel W.; Echols, Nathaniel; Terwilliger, Thomas C.; Baldwin, Eric T.; Pokross, Matt; Posy, Shana; Adams, Paul D.

    2014-01-01

    The process of iterative structure-based drug design involves the X-ray crystal structure determination of upwards of 100 ligands with the same general scaffold (i.e. chemotype) complexed with very similar, if not identical, protein targets. In conjunction with insights from computational models and assays, this collection of crystal structures is analyzed to improve potency, to achieve better selectivity and to reduce liabilities such as absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion and toxicology. Current methods for modeling ligands into electron-density maps typically do not utilize information on how similar ligands bound in related structures. Even if the electron density is of sufficient quality and resolution to allow de novo placement, the process can take considerable time as the size, complexity and torsional degrees of freedom of the ligands increase. A new module, Guided Ligand Replacement (GLR), was developed in Phenix to increase the ease and success rate of ligand placement when prior protein–ligand complexes are available. At the heart of GLR is an algorithm based on graph theory that associates atoms in the target ligand with analogous atoms in the reference ligand. Based on this correspondence, a set of coordinates is generated for the target ligand. GLR is especially useful in two situations: (i) modeling a series of large, flexible, complicated or macrocyclic ligands in successive structures and (ii) modeling ligands as part of a refinement pipeline that can automatically select a reference structure. Even in those cases for which no reference structure is available, if there are multiple copies of the bound ligand per asymmetric unit GLR offers an efficient way to complete the model after the first ligand has been placed. In all of these applications, GLR leverages prior knowledge from earlier structures to facilitate ligand placement in the current structure. PMID:24419386

  18. Multiple target drug cocktail design for attacking the core network markers of four cancers using ligand-based and structure-based virtual screening methods

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Computer-aided drug design has a long history of being applied to discover new molecules to treat various cancers, but it has always been focused on single targets. The development of systems biology has let scientists reveal more hidden mechanisms of cancers, but attempts to apply systems biology to cancer therapies remain at preliminary stages. Our lab has successfully developed various systems biology models for several cancers. Based on these achievements, we present the first attempt to combine multiple-target therapy with systems biology. Methods In our previous study, we identified 28 significant proteins--i.e., common core network markers--of four types of cancers as house-keeping proteins of these cancers. In this study, we ranked these proteins by summing their carcinogenesis relevance values (CRVs) across the four cancers, and then performed docking and pharmacophore modeling to do virtual screening on the NCI database for anti-cancer drugs. We also performed pathway analysis on these proteins using Panther and MetaCore to reveal more mechanisms of these cancer house-keeping proteins. Results We designed several approaches to discover targets for multiple-target cocktail therapies. In the first one, we identified the top 20 drugs for each of the 28 cancer house-keeping proteins, and analyzed the docking pose to further understand the interaction mechanisms of these drugs. After screening for duplicates, we found that 13 of these drugs could target 11 proteins simultaneously. In the second approach, we chose the top 5 proteins with the highest summed CRVs and used them as the drug targets. We built a pharmacophore and applied it to do virtual screening against the Life-Chemical library for anti-cancer drugs. Based on these results, wet-lab bio-scientists could freely investigate combinations of these drugs for multiple-target therapy for cancers, in contrast to the traditional single target therapy. Conclusions Combination of systems biology

  19. Targeted Gene Disruption Demonstrates That P-Selectin Glycoprotein Ligand 1 (Psgl-1) Is Required for P-Selectin–Mediated but Not E-Selectin–Mediated Neutrophil Rolling and Migration

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jing; Hirata, Takako; Croce, Kevin; Merrill-Skoloff, Glenn; Tchernychev, Boris; Williams, Eric; Flaumenhaft, Robert; Furie, Barbara C.; Furie, Bruce

    1999-01-01

    P-selectin glycoprotein ligand 1 (PSGL-1) is a mucin-like selectin counterreceptor that binds to P-selectin, E-selectin, and L-selectin. To determine its physiological role in cell adhesion as a mediator of leukocyte rolling and migration during inflammation, we prepared mice genetically deficient in PSGL-1 by targeted disruption of the PSGL-1 gene. The homozygous PSGL-1–deficient mouse was viable and fertile. The blood neutrophil count was modestly elevated. There was no evidence of spontaneous development of skin ulcerations or infections. Leukocyte infiltration in the chemical peritonitis model was significantly delayed. Leukocyte rolling in vivo, studied by intravital microscopy in postcapillary venules of the cremaster muscle, was markedly decreased 30 min after trauma in the PSGL-1–deficient mouse. In contrast, leukocyte rolling 2 h after tumor necrosis factor α stimulation was only modestly reduced, but blocking antibodies to E-selectin infused into the PSGL-1–deficient mouse almost completely eliminated leukocyte rolling. These results indicate that PSGL-1 is required for the early inflammatory responses but not for E-selectin–mediated responses. These kinetics are consistent with a model in which PSGL-1 is the predominant neutrophil P-selectin ligand but is not a required counterreceptor for E-selectin under in vivo physiological conditions. PMID:10601352

  20. Farnesoid X receptor ligand CDCA suppresses human prostate cancer cells growth by inhibiting lipid metabolism via targeting sterol response element binding protein 1

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Nian; Zhao, Jun; Wang, Jinguo; Teng, Haolin; Fu, Yaowen; Yuan, Hang

    2016-01-01

    Aim: A wealth of studies have demonstrated that abnormal cellular lipid metabolism plays an important role in prostate cancer (PCa) development. Therefore, manipulating lipid metabolism is a potential PCa therapy strategy. In this study, our goal is to investigate the role of farnesoid X receptor (FXR) in regulating the proliferation and lipid metabolism of human PCa cells following its ligand chenodexycholic acid (CDCA) treatment. Methods: Oil Red O was used to stain lipid contents in PCa cells, and siRNA knockdown was performed to deplete FXR expression. To study the cell proliferation when treated by CDCA or FXR knockdown, cell counting kit 8 (CCK8) was adopted to evaluate tumor cell growth. Western blot was used for protein analysis. Results: Our data suggest that activation of FXR by CDCA reduces lipid accumulation and significantly inhibits cells proliferation in prostate tumor cells. Instead, CDCA treatment doesn’t affect normal prostate epithelial RWPE-1 cells growth in vitro. FXR activation decreases mRNA and protein levels of sterol regulatory element binding protein 1 (SREBP1) and some other key regulators involved in lipid metabolism. Depletion of FXR by siRNA attenuates the inhibitory effects. Conclusion: Our study indicates that activation of FXR inhibits lipid metabolism via SREBP1 pathway and further suppresses prostate tumor growth in vitro. PMID:27904713

  1. A targeted secretome profiling by multiplexed immunoassay revealed that secreted chemokine ligand 2 (MCP-1/CCL2) affects neural differentiation in mesencephalic neural progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Colucci-D'Amato, Luca; Cicatiello, Anna Emilia; Reccia, Mafalda Giovanna; Volpicelli, Floriana; Severino, Valeria; Russo, Rosita; Sandomenico, Annamaria; Doti, Nunzianna; D'Esposito, Vittoria; Formisano, Pietro; Chambery, Angela

    2015-02-01

    Chemokines and cytokines, primarily known for their roles in the immune and inflammatory response, have also been identified as key components of the neurogenic niche where they are involved in the modulation of neural stem cell proliferation and differentiation. However, a complete understanding of the functional role played in neural differentiation and a comprehensive profiling of these secreted molecules are lacking. By exploiting the multiplexing capability of magnetic bead-based immunoassays, we have investigated the changes of the expression levels of a set of chemokines and cytokines released from the pluripotent neural cell line mes-c-myc A1 following its differentiation from a proliferating phenotype (A1P) toward a neural (A1D) phenotype. We found a subset of molecules exclusively released from A1P, whereas others were differentially detected in A1P and A1D conditioned media. Among them, we identified monocyte chemoattractant protein-1/chemokine ligand 2 (MCP-1/CCL2) as a proneurogenic factor able to affect neuronal differentiation of A1 cells as well as of neuroblasts from primary cultures and to induce the elongation and/or formation of neuritic processes. Altogether, data are suggestive of a main role played by the CCL2/CCR2 signaling pathway and in general of the network of secreted cytokines/chemokines in the differentiation of neural progenitor cells toward a neural fate.

  2. Targeted Mass Spectrometry-Based Approach for Protein-Ligand Binding Analyses in Complex Biological Mixtures Using a Phenacyl Bromide Modification Strategy.

    PubMed

    Jin, Lorrain; Wang, Dongyu; Gooden, David M; Ball, Carol H; Fitzgerald, Michael C

    2016-11-15

    The characterization of protein folding stability changes on the proteomic scale is useful for protein-target discovery and for the characterization of biological states. The Stability of Proteins from Rates of Oxidation (SPROX) technique is one of several mass spectrometry-based techniques recently established for the making proteome-wide measurements of protein folding and stability. A critical part of proteome-wide applications of SPROX is the identification and quantitation of methionine-containing peptides. Demonstrated here is a targeted mass spectrometry-based proteomics strategy for the detection and quantitation of methionine-containing peptides in SPROX experiments. The strategy involves the use of phenacyl bromide (PAB) for the targeted detection and quantitation of methionine-containing peptides in SPROX using selective reaction monitoring (SRM) on a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer (QQQ-MS). As proof-of-principle, the known binding interaction of Cyclosporine A with cyclophilin A protein in a yeast cell lysate is successfully detected and quantified using a targeted SRM workflow. Advantages of the described workflow over other SPROX protocols include a 20-fold reduction in the amount of total protein needed for analysis and the ability to work with the endogenous proteins in a given sample (e.g., stabile isotope labeling with amino acids in cell culture is not necessary).

  3. Biological activity of sporolides A and B from Salinispora tropica: in silico target prediction using ligand-based pharmacophore mapping and in vitro activity validation on HIV-1 reverse transcriptase.

    PubMed

    Dineshkumar, Kesavan; Aparna, Vasudevan; Madhuri, Kantilal Z; Hopper, Waheeta

    2014-03-01

    Sporolides A and B are novel polycyclic macrolides from the obligate marine actinomycetes, Salinispora tropica. The unique and novel structure of sporolides makes them interesting candidates for targeting diverse biological activities. Biological target prediction of sporolides was carried out using ligand-based pharmacophore screening against known inhibitors and drugs. Validation of pharmacophore screening was carried out for the identified hits. New biological targets predicted for sporolides using this method were HIV-1 reverse transcriptase, adenosine A3 receptor, endothelin receptor ET-A, oxytocin receptor, voltage-gated L-type calcium channel α-1C subunit/calcium channel α/Δ subunit 1. Drug-likeness properties were predicted for the selected compounds using QikProp module. Sporolides A and B showed maximum docking score with HIV-1 reverse transcriptase. Structural interaction fingerprints analysis indicated similar binding pattern of the sporolides with the HIV-1 reverse transcriptase. Sporolide B exhibited good inhibitory activity against HIV-1 reverse transcriptase in in vitro fluorescent assay.

  4. Characterization of gene mutations and copy number changes in acute myeloid leukemia using a rapid target enrichment protocol

    PubMed Central

    Bolli, Niccolò; Manes, Nicla; McKerrell, Thomas; Chi, Jianxiang; Park, Naomi; Gundem, Gunes; Quail, Michael A.; Sathiaseelan, Vijitha; Herman, Bram; Crawley, Charles; Craig, Jenny I. O.; Conte, Natalie; Grove, Carolyn; Papaemmanuil, Elli; Campbell, Peter J.; Varela, Ignacio; Costeas, Paul; Vassiliou, George S.

    2015-01-01

    Prognostic stratification is critical for making therapeutic decisions and maximizing survival of patients with acute myeloid leukemia. Advances in the genomics of acute myeloid leukemia have identified several recurrent gene mutations whose prognostic impact is being deciphered. We used HaloPlex target enrichment and Illumina-based next generation sequencing to study 24 recurrently mutated genes in 42 samples of acute myeloid leukemia with a normal karyotype. Read depth varied between and within genes for the same sample, but was predictable and highly consistent across samples. Consequently, we were able to detect copy number changes, such as an interstitial deletion of BCOR, three MLL partial tandem duplications, and a novel KRAS amplification. With regards to coding mutations, we identified likely oncogenic variants in 41 of 42 samples. NPM1 mutations were the most frequent, followed by FLT3, DNMT3A and TET2. NPM1 and FLT3 indels were reported with good efficiency. We also showed that DNMT3A mutations can persist post-chemotherapy and in 2 cases studied at diagnosis and relapse, we were able to delineate the dynamics of tumor evolution and give insights into order of acquisition of variants. HaloPlex is a quick and reliable target enrichment method that can aid diagnosis and prognostic stratification of acute myeloid leukemia patients. PMID:25381129

  5. Building a Robust Tumor Profiling Program: Synergy between Next-Generation Sequencing and Targeted Single-Gene Testing

    PubMed Central

    Lieberman, David B.; Roth, David B.; Zhao, Jianhua; Watt, Christopher D.; Daber, Robert D.; Morrissette, Jennifer J. D.

    2016-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS) is a powerful platform for identifying cancer mutations. Routine clinical adoption of NGS requires optimized quality control metrics to ensure accurate results. To assess the robustness of our clinical NGS pipeline, we analyzed the results of 304 solid tumor and hematologic malignancy specimens tested simultaneously by NGS and one or more targeted single-gene tests (EGFR, KRAS, BRAF, NPM1, FLT3, and JAK2). For samples that passed our validated tumor percentage and DNA quality and quantity thresholds, there was perfect concordance between NGS and targeted single-gene tests with the exception of two FLT3 internal tandem duplications that fell below the stringent pre-established reporting threshold but were readily detected by manual inspection. In addition, NGS identified clinically significant mutations not covered by single-gene tests. These findings confirm NGS as a reliable platform for routine clinical use when appropriate quality control metrics, such as tumor percentage and DNA quality cutoffs, are in place. Based on our findings, we suggest a simple workflow that should facilitate adoption of clinical oncologic NGS services at other institutions. PMID:27043212

  6. Building a Robust Tumor Profiling Program: Synergy between Next-Generation Sequencing and Targeted Single-Gene Testing.

    PubMed

    Hiemenz, Matthew C; Kadauke, Stephan; Lieberman, David B; Roth, David B; Zhao, Jianhua; Watt, Christopher D; Daber, Robert D; Morrissette, Jennifer J D

    2016-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS) is a powerful platform for identifying cancer mutations. Routine clinical adoption of NGS requires optimized quality control metrics to ensure accurate results. To assess the robustness of our clinical NGS pipeline, we analyzed the results of 304 solid tumor and hematologic malignancy specimens tested simultaneously by NGS and one or more targeted single-gene tests (EGFR, KRAS, BRAF, NPM1, FLT3, and JAK2). For samples that passed our validated tumor percentage and DNA quality and quantity thresholds, there was perfect concordance between NGS and targeted single-gene tests with the exception of two FLT3 internal tandem duplications that fell below the stringent pre-established reporting threshold but were readily detected by manual inspection. In addition, NGS identified clinically significant mutations not covered by single-gene tests. These findings confirm NGS as a reliable platform for routine clinical use when appropriate quality control metrics, such as tumor percentage and DNA quality cutoffs, are in place. Based on our findings, we suggest a simple workflow that should facilitate adoption of clinical oncologic NGS services at other institutions.

  7. The Recognition of Identical Ligands by Unrelated Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Barelier, Sarah; Sterling, Teague; O'Meara, Matthew J.; Shoichet, Brian K.

    2015-01-01

    The binding of drugs and reagents to off-targets is well-known. Whereas many off-targets are related to the primary target by sequence and fold, many ligands bind to unrelated pairs of proteins, and these are harder to anticipate. If the binding site in the off-target can be related to that of the primary target, this challenge resolves into aligning the two pockets. However, other cases are possible: the ligand might interact with entirely different residues and environments in the off-target, or wholly different ligand atoms may be implicated in the two complexes. To investigate these scenarios at atomic resolution, the structures of 59 ligands in 116 complexes (62 pairs in total), where the protein pairs were unrelated by fold but bound an identical ligand, were examined. In almost half of the pairs, the ligand interacted with unrelated residues in the two proteins (29 pairs), and in 14 of the pairs wholly different ligand moieties were implicated in each complex. Even in those 19 pairs of complexes that presented similar environments to the ligand, ligand superposition rarely resulted in the overlap of related residues. There appears to be no single pattern-matching “code” for identifying binding sites in unrelated proteins that bind identical ligands, though modeling suggests that there might be a limited number of different patterns that suffice to recognize different ligand functional groups. PMID:26421501

  8. Programmed Death Ligand 1 (PD-L1)-targeted TRAIL combines PD-L1-mediated checkpoint inhibition with TRAIL-mediated apoptosis induction

    PubMed Central

    Hendriks, Djoke; He, Yuan; Koopmans, Iris; Wiersma, Valerie R.; van Ginkel, Robert J.; Samplonius, Douwe F.; Helfrich, Wijnand; Bremer, Edwin

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Antibodies that block PD-L1/PD-1 immune checkpoints restore the activity of functionally-impaired antitumor T cells. These antibodies show unprecedented clinical benefit in various advanced cancers, particularly in melanoma. However, only a subset of cancer patients responds to current PD-L1/PD-1-blocking strategies, highlighting the need for further advancements in PD-L1/PD-1-based immunotherapy. Here, we report on a novel approach designed to combine PD-L1 checkpoint inhibition with the tumor-selective induction of apoptosis by TNF-related Apoptosis Inducing Ligand (TRAIL). In brief, a new bi-functional fusion protein, designated anti-PD-L1:TRAIL, was constructed comprising a PD-L1-blocking antibody fragment genetically fused to the extracellular domain of the pro-apoptotic tumoricidal protein TRAIL. Treatment of PD-L1-expressing cancer cells with anti-PD-L1:TRAIL induced PD-L1-directed TRAIL-mediated cancer cell death. Treatment of T cells with anti-PD-L1:TRAIL augmented T cell activation, as evidenced by increased proliferation, secretion of IFNγ and enhanced killing of cancer cell lines and primary patient-derived cancer cells in mixed T cell/cancer cell culture experiments. Of note, elevated levels of IFNγ further upregulated PD-L1 on cancer cells and simultaneously sensitized cancer cells to TRAIL-mediated apoptosis by anti-PD-L1:TRAIL. Additionally, anti-PD-L1:TRAIL converted immunosuppressive PD-L1-expressing myeloid cells into pro-apoptotic effector cells that triggered TRAIL-mediated cancer cell death. In conclusion, combining PD-L1 checkpoint inhibition with TRAIL-mediated induction of apoptosis using anti-PD-L1:TRAIL yields promising multi-fold and mutually reinforcing anticancer activity that may be exploited to enhance the efficacy of therapeutic PD-L1/PD-1 checkpoint inhibition. PMID:27622071

  9. Riboswitch-Mediated Aptamer Binding for Imaging and Therapy (RABIT): A Novel Technique to Selectively Target an Intracellular Ligand Specific for Ovarian Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-12-1-0554 TITLE: Riboswitch-Mediated Aptamer Binding for...TITLE AND SUBTITLE Riboswitch-Mediated Aptamer Binding for Imaging and Therapy (RABIT): A Novel Technique to Selectively Target an Intracellular...for imaging and low toxicity for therapy. We will make a riboswitch consisting of two aptamers and a sensor region that can hybridize with the

  10. Identification of Small Non-Peptidic Ligands that Bind the Scf-beta-TRCP Ubiquitin Ligase to Target to ER for Ubiquitination and Degradation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-08-01

    Genetic loss of function analysis is a powerful method for the study of protein function. However, some cell biological questions are difficult to address...selective loss of critical cellular proteins and subsequent destruction (rather than inhibition) of a targeted protein in an analysis of the resulting...4 for 2.5 h. Western blot analysis of cells treated with complex would be predicted to induce FKBP12 ubiquitination PROTAC-4 also indicated loss of

  11. ProPose: steered virtual screening by simultaneous protein-ligand docking and ligand-ligand alignment.

    PubMed

    Seifert, Markus H J

    2005-01-01

    The 'model-free' screening engine ProPose implements a general method for performing simultaneous protein-ligand docking, ligand-ligand alignment, pharmacophore queries-and combinations thereof-in order to incorporate a priori information into screening protocols. In this manuscript we describe a case study on herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase, an important antiviral drug target, where we evaluate different approaches for handling a specific type of a priori information, i.e., multiple target structures. We demonstrate that a simultaneous alignment on two target structures--in conjunction with logic operations on interactions and docking constraints derived from protein structure--is an effective means of (i) improving the enrichment of chemical substructures that are compatible with the a priori known ligands, (ii) ensuring the steric fit into the target protein, and (iii) handling target flexibility. The combination of ligand- and receptor-based methods steers the virtual screening by ranking molecules according to the similarity of their interaction pattern with known ligands, thereby--to some extent--outweighing the deficiencies of simple scoring functions often used in initial virtual screening.

  12. High-Affinity DNA Aptamer Generation Targeting von Willebrand Factor A1-Domain by Genetic Alphabet Expansion for Systematic Evolution of Ligands by Exponential Enrichment Using Two Types of Libraries Composed of Five Different Bases.

    PubMed

    Matsunaga, Ken-Ichiro; Kimoto, Michiko; Hirao, Ichiro

    2017-01-11

    The novel evolutionary engineering method ExSELEX (genetic alphabet expansion for systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment) provides high-affinity DNA aptamers that specifically bind to target molecules, by introducing an artificial hydrophobic base analogue as a fifth component into DNA aptamers. Here, we present a newer version of ExSELEX, using a library with completely randomized sequences consisting of five components: four natural bases and one unnatural hydrophobic base, 7-(2-thienyl)imidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (Ds). In contrast to the limited number of Ds-containing sequence combinations in our previous library, the increased complexity of the new randomized library could improve the success rates of high-affinity aptamer generation. To this end, we developed a sequencing method for each clone in the enriched library after several rounds of selection. Using the improved library, we generated a Ds-containing DNA aptamer targeting von Willebrand factor A1-domain (vWF) with significantly higher affinity (KD = 75 pM), relative to those generated by the initial version of ExSELEX, as well as that of the known DNA aptamer consisting of only the natural bases. In addition, the Ds-containing DNA aptamer was stabilized by introducing a mini-hairpin DNA resistant to nucleases, without any loss of affinity (KD = 61 pM). This new version is expected to consistently produce high-affinity DNA aptamers.

  13. Ligand clouds around protein clouds: a scenario of ligand binding with intrinsically disordered proteins.

    PubMed

    Jin, Fan; Yu, Chen; Lai, Luhua; Liu, Zhirong

    2013-01-01

    Intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) were found to be widely associated with human diseases and may serve as potential drug design targets. However, drug design targeting IDPs is still in the very early stages. Progress in drug design is usually achieved using experimental screening; however, the structural disorder of IDPs makes it difficult to characterize their interaction with ligands using experiments alone. To better understand the structure of IDPs and their interactions with small molecule ligands, we performed extensive simulations on the c-Myc₃₇₀₋₄₀₉ peptide and its binding to a reported small molecule inhibitor, ligand 10074-A4. We found that the conformational space of the apo c-Myc₃₇₀₋₄₀₉ peptide was rather dispersed and that the conformations of the peptide were stabilized mainly by charge interactions and hydrogen bonds. Under the binding of the ligand, c-Myc₃₇₀₋₄₀₉ remained disordered. The ligand was found to bind to c-Myc₃₇₀₋₄₀₉ at different sites along the chain and behaved like a 'ligand cloud'. In contrast to ligand binding to more rigid target proteins that usually results in a dominant bound structure, ligand binding to IDPs may better be described as ligand clouds around protein clouds. Nevertheless, the binding of the ligand and a non-ligand to the c-Myc₃₇₀₋₄₀₉ target could be clearly distinguished. The present study provides insights that will help improve rational drug design that targets IDPs.

  14. Single peptide ligand-functionalized uniform hollow mesoporous silica nanoparticles achieving dual-targeting drug delivery to tumor cells and angiogenic blood vessel cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yang; Chen, Qing; Xu, Ming; Guan, Guannan; Hu, Wen; Liang, Ying; Zhao, Xiuli; Qiao, Mingxi; Chen, Dawei; Liu, Hao

    2015-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to construct hollow mesoporous silica nanoparticles (HMSN) decorated with tLyp-1 peptide (tHMSN) for dual-targeting drug delivery to tumor cells and angiogenic blood vessel cells. Methods HMSN were synthesized de novo using a novel cationic surfactant-assisted selective etching strategy and were then modified with tLyp-1. Multiple methods, including transmission electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, bicinchoninic acid assay, and nitrogen adsorption and desorption isotherms, were used to characterize the tHMSN. Doxorubicin were chosen as the model cargo, and the uptake of doxorubicin-loaded tHMSN into MDA-MB-231 cells and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), as models of tumor cells and tumor neovascular endothelial cells, respectively, were observed and detected by confocal laser scanning microscopy and flow cytometry. An in vitro pharmacodynamic study and a study of the mechanism via which the nanoparticles were endocytosed were also performed. Results HMSN with a highly uniform size and well oriented mesopores were synthesized. After tHMSN were characterized, enhanced uptake of the cargo carried by tHMSN into MDA-MB-231 cells and HUVECs compared with that of their unmodified counterparts was validated by confocal laser scanning microscopy and flow cytometry at the qualitative and quantitative levels, respectively. Further, the pharmacodynamic study suggested that, compared with their unmodified counterparts, doxorubicin-loaded tHMSN had an enhanced inhibitory effect on MDA-MB-231 cells and HUVECs in vitro. Finally, a preliminary study on the mechanism by which the nanoparticles were endocytosed indicated that the clathrin-mediated endocytosis pathway has a primary role in the transport of tHMSN into the cytoplasm. Conclusion tHMSN might serve as an effective active targeting nanocarrier strategy for anti-mammary cancer drug delivery. PMID:25834425

  15. 2D MI-DRAGON: a new predictor for protein-ligands interactions and theoretic-experimental studies of US FDA drug-target network, oxoisoaporphine inhibitors for MAO-A and human parasite proteins.

    PubMed

    Prado-Prado, Francisco; García-Mera, Xerardo; Escobar, Manuel; Sobarzo-Sánchez, Eduardo; Yañez, Matilde; Riera-Fernandez, Pablo; González-Díaz, Humberto

    2011-12-01

    There are many pairs of possible Drug-Proteins Interactions that may take place or not (DPIs/nDPIs) between drugs with high affinity/non-affinity for different proteins. This fact makes expensive in terms of time and resources, for instance, the determination of all possible ligands-protein interactions for a single drug. In this sense, we can use Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationships (QSAR) models to carry out rational DPIs prediction. Unfortunately, almost all QSAR models predict activity against only one target. To solve this problem we can develop multi-target QSAR (mt-QSAR) models. In this work, we introduce the technique 2D MI-DRAGON a new predictor for DPIs based on two different well-known software. We use the software MARCH-INSIDE (MI) to calculate 3D structural parameters for targets and the software DRAGON was used to calculated 2D molecular descriptors all drugs showing known DPIs present in the Drug Bank (US FDA benchmark dataset). Both classes of parameters were used as input of different Artificial Neural Network (ANN) algorithms to seek an accurate non-linear mt-QSAR predictor. The best ANN model found is a Multi-Layer Perceptron (MLP) with profile MLP 21:21-31-1:1. This MLP classifies correctly 303 out of 339 DPIs (Sensitivity = 89.38%) and 480 out of 510 nDPIs (Specificity = 94.12%), corresponding to training Accuracy = 92.23%. The validation of the model was carried out by means of external predicting series with Sensitivity = 92.18% (625/678 DPIs; Specificity = 90.12% (730/780 nDPIs) and Accuracy = 91.06%. 2D MI-DRAGON offers a good opportunity for fast-track calculation of all possible DPIs of one drug enabling us to re-construct large drug-target or DPIs Complex Networks (CNs). For instance, we reconstructed the CN of the US FDA benchmark dataset with 855 nodes 519 drugs+336 targets). We predicted CN with similar topology (observed and predicted values of average distance are equal to 6.7 vs. 6.6). These CNs can be used to explore

  16. Potent and Selective Modulation of the RhlR Quorum Sensing Receptor by Using Non-native Ligands: An Emerging Target for Virulence Control in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Eibergen, Nora R; Moore, Joseph D; Mattmann, Margrith E; Blackwell, Helen E

    2015-11-02

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa uses N-acylated L-homoserine lactone signals and a triumvirate of LuxR-type receptor proteins--LasR, RhlR, and QscR--for quorum sensing (QS). Each of these receptors can contribute to QS activation or repression and, thereby, the control of myriad virulence phenotypes in this pathogen. LasR has traditionally been considered to be at the top of the QS receptor hierarchy in P. aeruginosa; however, recent reports suggest that RhlR plays a more prominent role in infection than originally predicted, in some circumstances superseding that of LasR. Herein, we report the characterization of a set of synthetic, small-molecule agonists and antagonists of RhlR. Using E. coli reporter strains, we demonstrated that many of these compounds can selectively activate or inhibit RhlR instead of LasR and QscR. Moreover, several molecules maintain their activities in P. aeruginosa at concentrations analogous to native RhlR signal levels. These compounds represent useful chemical probes to study the role of RhlR in the complex QS circuitry of P. aeruginosa, its direct (and indirect) effects on virulence, and its overall merit as a target for anti-infective therapy.

  17. Synthesis and pharmacological evaluation of 8- and 9-substituted benzolactam-v8 derivatives as potent ligands for protein kinase C, a therapeutic target for Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Mach, Ulrich R; Lewin, Nancy E; Blumberg, Peter M; Kozikowski, Alan P

    2006-03-01

    A central element in the pathophysiology of Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the formation of amyloid plaques, which result from abnormal processing of the amyloid precursor protein (APP). The processing of APP is largely provided by three key enzymes, namely the alpha-, beta-, and gamma-secretases. As the latter two contribute to the formation of neurotoxic Abeta fragments while alpha-secretase does not, a decrease in the amyloidogenic products can be brought about either by inhibition of the beta- and gamma-secretases or through the activation of alpha-secretase. It is now known that the activation of protein kinase C (PKC) enhances alpha-secretase activity and therefore represents a possible target for the development of agents urgently needed for the treatment of this devastating neurodegenerative disorder. In the present study, new benzolactam-V8-based PKC activators were synthesized and tested for their binding affinity toward PKCalpha. All compounds tested showed binding values in the nanomolar concentration range. In accordance with previous publications, 9-substitution dramatically increased PKC binding affinity in comparison with the corresponding 8-substituted analogues. In addition to the location of the side chain on the aromatic ring, the binding affinities of these benzolactams were found to depend on the orientation, length, and electronic properties of this appendage. An interesting decrease in binding affinity was found for the 9-thienyl analogue 13, suggesting adverse electronic interactions of the sulfur atom with PKC or parts of the cellular membrane.

  18. Notch-ligand expression by NALT dendritic cells regulates mucosal Th1- and Th2-type responses

    SciTech Connect

    Fukuyama, Yoshiko; Tokuhara, Daisuke; Sekine, Shinichi; Kataoka, Kosuke; Markham, Jonathan D.; Irwin, Allyson R.; Moon, Grace H.; Tokuhara, Yuka; Fujihashi, Keiko; Davydova, Julia; Yamamoto, Masato; Gilbert, Rebekah S.; Fujihashi, Kohtaro

    2012-02-03

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nasal Ad-FL effectively up-regulates APC function by CD11c{sup +} DCs in mucosal tissues. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nasal Ad-FL induces Notch ligand (L)-expressing CD11c{sup +} DCs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Notch L-expressing DCs support the induction of Th1- and Th2-type cytokine responses. -- Abstract: Our previous studies showed that an adenovirus (Ad) serotype 5 vector expressing Flt3 ligand (Ad-FL) as nasal adjuvant activates CD11c{sup +} dendritic cells (DCs) for the enhancement of antigen (Ag)-specific IgA antibody (Ab) responses. In this study, we examined the molecular mechanism for activation of CD11c{sup +} DCs and their roles in induction of Ag-specific Th1- and Th2-cell responses. Ad-FL activated CD11c{sup +} DCs expressed increased levels of the Notch ligand (L)-expression and specific mRNA. When CD11c{sup +} DCs from various mucosal and systemic lymphoid tissues of mice given nasal OVA plus Ad-FL were cultured with CD4{sup +} T cells isolated from non-immunized OVA TCR-transgenic (OT II) mice, significantly increased levels of T cell proliferative responses were noted. Furthermore, Ad-FL activated DCs induced IFN-{gamma}, IL-2 and IL-4 producing CD4{sup +} T cells. Of importance, these APC functions by Ad-FL activated DCs were down-regulated by blocking Notch-Notch-L pathway. These results show that Ad-FL induces CD11c{sup +} DCs to the express Notch-ligands and these activated DCs regulate the induction of Ag-specific Th1- and Th2-type cytokine responses.

  19. Selective high affinity polydentate ligands and methods of making such

    DOEpatents

    DeNardo, Sally; DeNardo, Gerald; Balhorn, Rodney

    2010-02-16

    This invention provides novel polydentate selective high affinity ligands (SHALs) that can be used in a variety of applications in a manner analogous to the use of antibodies. SHALs typically comprise a multiplicity of ligands that each bind different region son the target molecule. The ligands are joined directly or through a linker thereby forming a polydentate moiety that typically binds the target molecule with high selectivity and avidity.

  20. Biomimetic affinity ligands for protein purification.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Isabel T; Taipa, M Angela

    2014-01-01

    The development of sophisticated molecular modeling software and new bioinformatic tools, as well as the emergence of data banks containing detailed information about a huge number of proteins, enabled the de novo intelligent design of synthetic affinity ligands. Such synthetic compounds can be tailored to mimic natural biological recognition motifs or to interact with key surface-exposed residues on target proteins and are designated as "biomimetic ligands." A well-established methodology for generating biomimetic or synthetic affinity ligands integrates rational design with combinatorial solid-phase synthesis and screening, using the triazine scaffold and analogues of amino acids side chains to create molecular diversity.Triazine-based synthetic ligands are nontoxic, low-cost, highly stable compounds that can replace advantageously natural biological ligands in the purification of proteins by affinity-based methodologies.

  1. A juxta-membrane amino acid sequence of P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 is involved in moesin binding and ezrin/radixin/moesin-directed targeting at the trailing edge of migrating lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Serrador, Juan M; Urzainqui, Ana; Alonso-Lebrero, Jose L; Cabrero, J Román; Montoya, Maria C; Vicente-Manzanares, Miguel; Yáñez-Mó, María; Sánchez-Madrid, Francisco

    2002-06-01

    P-selectin glycoprotein ligand 1 (PSGL-1) is an adhesion receptor localized on the tips of microvilli that is involved in the rolling of neutrophils on activated endothelium. We found that PSGL-1 was concentrated at the uropod of chemokine-stimulated lymphoid cells. Dynamic fluorescence videomicroscopy analyses of migrating lymphocytes demonstrated that PSGL-1 and moesin redistributed towards the cellular uropod at the trailing edge of these cells, where activated ezrin/radixin/moesin (ERM) proteins were located. An eighteen amino acid sequence in the juxta-membrane region of the PSGL-1 cytoplasmic tail was found to be critical for uropod targeting and moesin binding. Substitution of S336, S348, and the basic cluster R337K338 by alanines within this region significantly impaired both moesin binding and PSGL-1 polarization. These results underline the role of moesin in the subcellular redistribution of PSGL-1 in lymphoid cells and make evident the importance of specific serine residues within the cytoplasmic tail of PSGL-1 for this process.

  2. Predicting protein-ligand affinity with a random matrix framework.

    PubMed

    Lee, Alpha A; Brenner, Michael P; Colwell, Lucy J

    2016-11-29

    Rapid determination of whether a candidate compound will bind to a particular target receptor remains a stumbling block in drug discovery. We use an approach inspired by random matrix theory to decompose the known ligand set of a target in terms of orthogonal "signals" of salient chemical features, and distinguish these from the much larger set of ligand chemical features that are not relevant for binding to that particular target receptor. After removing the noise caused by finite sampling, we show that the similarity of an unknown ligand to the remaining, cleaned chemical features is a robust predictor of ligand-target affinity, performing as well or better than any algorithm in the published literature. We interpret our algorithm as deriving a model for the binding energy between a target receptor and the set of known ligands, where the underlying binding energy model is related to the classic Ising model in statistical physics.

  3. A chemogenomics view on protein-ligand spaces

    PubMed Central

    Strömbergsson, Helena; Kleywegt, Gerard J

    2009-01-01

    Background Chemogenomics is an emerging inter-disciplinary approach to drug discovery that combines traditional ligand-based approaches with biological information on drug targets and lies at the interface of chemistry, biology and informatics. The ultimate goal in chemogenomics is to understand molecular recognition between all possible ligands and all possible drug targets. Protein and ligand space have previously been studied as separate entities, but chemogenomics studies deal with large datasets that cover parts of the joint protein-ligand space. Since drug discovery has traditionally focused on ligand optimization, the chemical space has been studied extensively. The protein space has been studied to some extent, typically for the purpose of classification of proteins into functional and structural classes. Since chemogenomics deals not only with ligands but also with the macromolecules the ligands interact with, it is of interest to find means to explore, compare and visualize protein-ligand subspaces. Results Two chemogenomics protein-ligand interaction datasets were prepared for this study. The first dataset covers the known structural protein-ligand space, and includes all non-redundant protein-ligand interactions found in the worldwide Protein Data Bank (PDB). The second dataset contains all approved drugs and drug targets stored in the DrugBank database, and represents the approved drug-drug target space. To capture biological and physicochemical features of the chemogenomics datasets, sequence-based descriptors were computed for the proteins, and 0, 1 and 2 dimensional descriptors for the ligands. Principal component analysis (PCA) was used to analyze the multidimensional data and to create global models of protein-ligand space. The nearest neighbour method, computed using the principal components, was used to obtain a measure of overlap between the datasets. Conclusion In this study, we present an approach to visualize protein-ligand spaces from a

  4. Combination Targeted Therapy to Disrupt Aberrant Oncogenic Signaling and Reverse Epigenetic Dysfunction in IDH2- and TET2-Mutant Acute Myeloid Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Shih, Alan H; Meydan, Cem; Shank, Kaitlyn; Garrett-Bakelman, Francine E; Ward, Patrick S; Intlekofer, Andrew; Nazir, Abbas; Stein, Eytan; Knapp, Kristina; Glass, Jacob; Travins, Jeremy; Straley, Kim; Gliser, Camelia; Mason, Chris; Yen, Katharine; Thompson, Craig B; Melnick, Ari; Levine, Ross L

    2017-02-13

    Genomic studies in acute myeloid leukemias (AML) have identified mutations which drive altered DNA methylation, including TET2 and IDH2. Here we show that models of AMLs resulting from TET2 or IDH2 mutations combined with FLT3ITD mutations are sensitive to 5-Azacytidine or to the IDH2 inhibitor AG-221, respectively. 5-Azacytidine and AG-221 treatment induced an attenuation of aberrant DNA methylation and transcriptional output, and resulted in a reduction in leukemic blasts consistent with anti-leukemic activity. These therapeutic benefits were associated with restoration of leukemic cell differentiation, and the normalization of hematopoiesis was derived from mutant cells. By contrast, combining AG-221 or 5-Azacytidine with FLT3 inhibition resulted in a reduction in mutant allele burden, progressive recovery of normal hematopoiesis from non-mutant stem-progenitor cells, and reversal of dysregulated DNA methylation and transcriptional output. Together, our studies suggest combined targeting of signaling and epigenetic pathways can increase therapeutic response in AML.

  5. Targeted sequencing identifies associations between IL7R-JAK mutations and epigenetic modulators in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Vicente, Carmen; Schwab, Claire; Broux, Michaël; Geerdens, Ellen; Degryse, Sandrine; Demeyer, Sofie; Lahortiga, Idoya; Elliott, Alannah; Chilton, Lucy; La Starza, Roberta; Mecucci, Cristina; Vandenberghe, Peter; Goulden, Nicholas; Vora, Ajay; Moorman, Anthony V; Soulier, Jean; Harrison, Christine J; Clappier, Emmanuelle; Cools, Jan

    2015-10-01

    T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia is caused by the accumulation of multiple oncogenic lesions, including chromosomal rearrangements and mutations. To determine the frequency and co-occurrence of mutations in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia, we performed targeted re-sequencing of 115 genes across 155 diagnostic samples (44 adult and 111 childhood cases). NOTCH1 and CDKN2A/B were mutated/deleted in more than half of the cases, while an additional 37 genes were mutated/deleted in 4% to 20% of cases. We found that IL7R-JAK pathway genes were mutated in 27.7% of cases, with JAK3 mutations being the most frequent event in this group. Copy number variations were also detected, including deletions of CREBBP or CTCF and duplication of MYB. FLT3 mutations were rare, but a novel extracellular mutation in FLT3 was detected and confirmed to be transforming. Furthermore, we identified complex patterns of pairwise associations, including a significant association between mutations in IL7R-JAK genes and epigenetic regulators (WT1, PRC2, PHF6). Our analyses showed that IL7R-JAK genetic lesions did not confer adverse prognosis in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia cases enrolled in the UK ALL2003 trial. Overall, these results identify interconnections between the T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia genome and disease biology, and suggest a potential clinical application for JAK inhibitors in a significant proportion of patients with T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

  6. Interrupting autocrine ligand-receptor binding: comparison between receptor blockers and ligand decoys.

    PubMed Central

    Forsten, K E; Lauffenburger, D A

    1992-01-01

    Stimulation of cell behavioral functions by ligand/receptor binding can be accomplished in autocrine fashion, where cells secrete ligand capable of binding to receptors on their own surfaces. This proximal secretion of autocrine ligands near the surface receptors on the secreting cell suggests that control of these systems by inhibitors of receptor/ligand binding may be more difficult than for systems involving exogenous ligands. Hence, it is of interest to predict the conditions under which successful inhibition of cell receptor binding by the autocrine ligand can be expected. Previous theoretical work using a compartmentalized model for autocrine cells has elucidated the conditions under which addition of solution decoys for the autocrine ligand can interrupt cell receptor/ligand binding via competitive binding of the secreted molecules (Forsten, K. E., and D. A. Lauffenburger. 1992. Biophys. J. 61:1-12.) We now apply a similar modeling approach to examine the addition of solution blockers targeted against the cell receptor. Comparison of the two alternative inhibition strategies reveals that a significantly lower concentration of receptor blockers, compared to ligand decoys, will obtain a high degree of inhibition. The more direct interruption scheme characteristic of the receptor blockers may make them a preferred strategy when feasible. PMID:1330038

  7. Capillary electrophoresis-systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment selection of base- and sugar-modified DNA aptamers: target binding dominated by 2'-O,4'-C-methylene-bridged/locked nucleic acid primer.

    PubMed

    Kasahara, Yuuya; Irisawa, Yuuta; Fujita, Hiroto; Yahara, Aiko; Ozaki, Hiroaki; Obika, Satoshi; Kuwahara, Masayasu

    2013-05-21

    Chemically modified DNA aptamers specific to human α-thrombin were obtained from oligodeoxyribonucleotide (ODN) libraries by using a capillary electrophoresis-systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (CE-SELEX) method. These libraries contained 2'-O,4'-C-methylene-bridged/linked bicyclic ribonucleotides (B/L nucleotides) in the primer region and/or C5-modified thymidine bearing N(6)-ethyladenine (t) in the nonprimer region. Modified DNA aptamers showed high binding affinities to the target, with dissociation constants (Kd) values in the range of subnanomolar to several ten nanomolar levels. The introduction of base modification significantly suppressed the frequency of G-quadruplex motifs, which are often seen in thrombin-binding DNA aptamers. The resulting alternatives contained the 10-mer consensus sequence t5Gt2G2, which is frequently found in modified DNA aptamers with subnanomolar protein binding affinities. Furthermore, some base- and sugar-modified DNA aptamers with the 12-mer consensus sequence t2G2tC(A/G)A2G2t displayed binding activities that were dependent on the presence of B/L nucleotides in the primer region. Such aptamers were interestingly not recovered from a natural DNA library or from DNA libraries modified with either B/L nucleotides or t's. This emerging characteristic binding property will enable the creation of a direct selection methodology for DNA-based molecular switches that are triggered by chemical conversion of B/L nucleotides introduced to constant sequence regions in ODN libraries.

  8. Inhibition of insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II)-dependent cell growth by multidentate pentamannosyl 6-phosphate-based ligands targeting the mannose 6-phosphate/IGF-II receptor

    PubMed Central

    Grosely, Rosslyn; MacDonald, Richard G.

    2016-01-01

    The mannose 6-phosphate/insulin-like growth factor II receptor (M6P/IGF2R) binds M6P-capped ligands and IGF-II at different binding sites within the ectodomain and mediates ligand internalization and trafficking to the lysosome. Multivalent M6P-based ligands can cross-bridge the M6P/IGF2R, which increases the rate of receptor internalization, permitting IGF-II binding as a passenger ligand and subsequent trafficking to the lysosome, where the IGF-II is degraded. This unique feature of the receptor may be exploited to design novel therapeutic agents against IGF-II-dependent cancers that will lead to decreased bioavailable IGF-II within the tumor microenvironment. We have designed a panel of M6P-based ligands that bind to the M6P/IGF2R with high affinity in a bivalent manner and cause decreased cell viability. We present evidence that our ligands bind through the M6P-binding sites of the receptor and facilitate internalization and degradation of IGF-II from conditioned medium to mediate this cellular response. To our knowledge, this is the first panel of synthetic bivalent ligands for the M6P/IGF2R that can take advantage of the ligand-receptor interactions of the M6P/IGF2R to provide proof-of-principle evidence for the feasibility of novel chemotherapeutic agents that decrease IGF-II-dependent growth of cancer cells. PMID:27694692

  9. The Retinoid X Receptors and Their Ligands

    PubMed Central

    Dawson, Marcia I.; Xia, Zebin

    2014-01-01

    This chapter presents an overview of the current status of studies on the structural and molecular biology of the retinoid X receptor subtypes α, β, and γ (RXRs, NR2B1–3), their nuclear and cytoplasmic functions, post-transcriptional processing, and recently reported ligands. Points of interest are the different changes in the ligand-binding pocket induced by variously shaped agonists, the communication of the ligand–bound pocket with the coactivator binding surface and the heterodimerization interface, and recently identified ligands that are natural products, those that function as environmental toxins or drugs that had been originally designed to interact with other targets, as well as those that were deliberately designed as RXR-selective transcriptional agonists, synergists, or antagonists. Of these synthetic ligands, the general trend in design appears to be away from fully aromatic rigid structures to those containing partial elements of the flexible tetraene side chain of 9-cis-retinoic acid. PMID:22020178

  10. Modeling of the Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor (AhR) ligand binding domain and its utility in virtual ligand screening to predict new AhR ligands

    PubMed Central

    Bisson, William; Koch, Daniel; O’Donnell, Edmond; Khalil, Sammy M.; Kerkvliet, Nancy; Tanguay, Robert; Abagyan, Ruben; Kolluri, Siva Kumar

    2012-01-01

    The Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor (AhR) is a ligand-activated transcription factor; the AhR Per-AhR/Arnt-Sim (PAS) domain binds ligands. We developed homology models of the AhR PAS domain to characterize previously observed intra- and inter-species differences in ligand binding using Molecular Docking. In silico structure-based virtual ligand screening using our model resulted in the identification of pinocembrin and 5-hydroxy-7-methoxyflavone, which promoted nuclear translocation and transcriptional activation of AhR and AhR-dependent induction of endogenous target genes. PMID:19719119

  11. Nanoparticle multivalency counterbalances the ligand affinity loss upon PEGylation.

    PubMed

    Hennig, Robert; Pollinger, Klaus; Veser, Anika; Breunig, Miriam; Goepferich, Achim

    2014-11-28

    The conjugation of receptor ligands to shielded nanoparticles is a widely used strategy to precisely control nanoparticle-cell interactions. However, it is often overlooked that a ligand's affinity can be severely impaired by its attachment to the polyethylene glycol (PEG) chains that are frequently used to protect colloids from serum protein adsorption. Using the model ligand EXP3174, a small-molecule antagonist for the angiotensin II receptor type 1 (AT1R), we investigated the ligand's affinity before and after its PEGylation and when attached to PEGylated nanoparticles. The PEGylated ligand displayed a 580-fold decreased receptor affinity compared to the native ligand. Due to their multivalency, the nanoparticles regained a low nanomolar receptor affinity, which is in the range of the affinity of the native ligand. Moreover, a four orders of magnitude higher concentration of free ligand was required to displace PEGylated nanoparticles carrying EXP3174 from the receptor. On average, one nanoparticle was decorated with 11.2 ligand molecules, which led to a multivalent enhancement factor of 22.5 compared to the monovalent PEGylated ligand. The targeted nanoparticles specifically bound the AT1R and showed no interaction to receptor negative cells. Our study shows that the attachment of a small-molecule ligand to a PEG chain can severely affect its receptor affinity. Concomitantly, when the ligand is tethered to nanoparticles, the immense avidity greatly increases the ligand-receptor interaction. Based on our results, we highly recommend the affinity testing of receptor ligands before and after PEGylation to identify potent molecules for active nanoparticle targeting.

  12. Identification of Ligand Templates using Local Structure Alignment for Structure-based Drug Design

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hui Sun; Im, Wonpil

    2012-01-01

    With a rapid increase in the number of high-resolution protein-ligand structures, the known protein-ligand structures can be used to gain insight into ligand-binding modes in a target protein. Based on the fact that the structurally similar binding sites share information about their ligands, we have developed a local structure alignment tool, G-LoSA (Graph-based Local Structure Alignment). In G-LoSA, the known protein-ligand binding-site structure library is searched to detect binding-site structures with similar geometry and physicochemical properties to a query binding-site structure regardless of sequence continuity and protein fold. Then, the ligands in the identified complexes are used as templates (i.e., template ligands) to predict/design a ligand for the target protein. The performance of G-LoSA is validated against 76 benchmark targets from the Astex diverse set. Using the currently available protein-ligand structure library, G-LoSA is able to identify a single template ligand (from a non-homologous protein complex) that is highly similar to the target ligand in more than half of the benchmark targets. In addition, our benchmark analyses show that an assembly of structural fragments from multiple template ligands with partial similarity to the target ligand can be used to design novel ligand structures specific to the target protein. This study clearly indicates that a template-based ligand modeling has potential for de novo ligand design and can be a complementary approach to the receptor structure based methods. PMID:22978550

  13. Advanced flow cytometric analysis of nanoparticle targeting to rare leukemic stem cells in peripheral human blood in a defined model system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, Christy L.; Leary, James F.

    2015-03-01

    Leukemia stem cells are both stem-like and leukemic-like. This complicates their detection as rare circulating tumor cells in the peripheral blood of leukemia patients. Since leukemic stem cells are also resistant to standard chemotherapeutic regimens, new therapeutic strategies need to be designed to kill the leukemic stem cells without killing normal stem cells. In these initial targeting studies we utilized a bioinformatics approach to design an antibodyfluorescent nanoparticle conjugate for targeting to these leukemic stem cells and to minimize targeting to normal stemprogenitor cells. Multicolor flow cytometric analyses were performed on a BD FACS Aria III. Human leukemic stem cell-like cell RS4;11 (with putative immunophenotype CD133+/CD24+/-, CD34+/-, CD38+, CD10-/Flt3+) was spiked into normal hematopoietic stem-progenitor cells obtained from a "buffy coat" prep (with putative immunophenotype CD133- /CD34+/CD38-/CD10-/Flt-3-) to be used as a model human leukemia patient. To analyze the model system, digital data mixtures of the two cell types were first created and assigned classifiers in order to create truth sets. ROC (Receiver Operating Characteristic) and multidimensional cluster analyses were used to evaluate the specificity and sensitivity of the immunophenotyping panel and for automated cell population identification, respectively. Costs of misclassification (false targeting) were also accounted for by this analysis scheme. Ultimately, this analysis scheme will be applied to use of nanoparticle-antibody conjugates at therapeutic doses for targeted killing of leukemia stem cells preferentially to normal stem -progenitor cells.

  14. A screening cascade to identify ERβ ligands

    PubMed Central

    Filgueira, Carly S.; Benod, Cindy; Lou, Xiaohua; Gunamalai, Prem S.; Villagomez, Rosa A.; Strom, Anders; Gustafsson, Jan-Åke; Berkenstam, Anders L.; Webb, Paul

    2014-01-01

    The establishment of effective high throughput screening cascades to identify nuclear receptor (NR) ligands that will trigger defined, therapeutically useful sets of NR activities is of considerable importance. Repositioning of existing approved drugs with known side effect profiles can provide advantages because de novo drug design suffers from high developmental failure rates and undesirable side effects which have dramatically increased costs. Ligands that target estrogen receptor β (ERβ) could be useful in a variety of diseases ranging from cancer to neurological to cardiovascular disorders. In this context, it is important to minimize cross-reactivity with ERα, which has been shown to trigger increased rates of several types of cancer. Because of high sequence similarities between the ligand binding domains of ERα and ERβ, preferentially targeting one subtype can prove challenging. Here, we describe a sequential ligand screening approach comprised of complementary in-house assays to identify small molecules that are selective for ERβ. Methods include differential scanning fluorimetry, fluorescence polarization and a GAL4 transactivation assay. We used this strategy to screen several commercially-available chemical libraries, identifying thirty ERβ binders that were examined for their selectivity for ERβ versus ERα, and tested the effects of selected ligands in a prostate cancer cell proliferation assay. We suggest that this approach could be used to rapidly identify candidates for drug repurposing. PMID:25422593

  15. Biased ligands: pathway validation for novel GPCR therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Rominger, David H; Cowan, Conrad L; Gowen-MacDonald, William; Violin, Jonathan D

    2014-06-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), in recent years, have been shown to signal via multiple distinct pathways. Furthermore, biased ligands for some receptors can differentially stimulate or inhibit these pathways versus unbiased endogenous ligands or drugs. Biased ligands can be used to gain a deeper understanding of the molecular targets and cellular responses associated with a GPCR, and may be developed into therapeutics with improved efficacy, safety and/or tolerability. Here we review examples and approaches to pathway validation that establish the relevance and therapeutic potential of distinct pathways that can be selectively activated or blocked by biased ligands.

  16. Ligand modeling and design

    SciTech Connect

    Hay, B.

    1996-10-01

    The purpose of this work is to develop and implement a molecular design basis for selecting organic ligands that would be used tin applications for the cost-effective removal of specific radionuclides from nuclear waste streams.

  17. CLiBE: a database of computed ligand binding energy for ligand-receptor complexes.

    PubMed

    Chen, X; Ji, Z L; Zhi, D G; Chen, Y Z

    2002-11-01

    Consideration of binding competitiveness of a drug candidate against natural ligands and other drugs that bind to the same receptor site may facilitate the rational development of a candidate into a potent drug. A strategy that can be applied to computer-aided drug design is to evaluate ligand-receptor interaction energy or other scoring functions of a designed drug with that of the relevant ligands known to bind to the same binding site. As a tool to facilitate such a strategy, a database of ligand-receptor interaction energy is developed from known ligand-receptor 3D structural entries in the Protein Databank (PDB). The Energy is computed based on a molecular mechanics force field that has been used in the prediction of therapeutic and toxicity targets of drugs. This database also contains information about ligand function and other properties and it can be accessed at http://xin.cz3.nus.edu.sg/group/CLiBE.asp. The computed energy components may facilitate the probing of the mode of action and other profiles of binding. A number of computed energies of some PDB ligand-receptor complexes in this database are studied and compared to experimental binding affinity. A certain degree of correlation between the computed energy and experimental binding affinity is found, which suggests that the computed energy may be useful in facilitating a qualitative analysis of drug binding competitiveness.

  18. LibME-automatic extraction of 3D ligand-binding motifs for mechanistic analysis of protein-ligand recognition.

    PubMed

    He, Wei; Liang, Zhi; Teng, MaiKun; Niu, LiWen

    2016-12-01

    Identifying conserved binding motifs is an efficient way to study protein-ligand recognition. Most 3D binding motifs only contain information from the protein side, and so motifs that combine information from both protein and ligand sides are desired. Here, we propose an algorithm called LibME (Ligand-binding Motif Extractor), which automatically extracts 3D binding motifs composed of the target ligand and surrounding conserved residues. We show that the motifs extracted by LibME for ATP and its analogs are highly similar to well-known motifs reported by previous studies. The superiority of our method to handle flexible ligands was also demonstrated using isocitric acid as an example. Finally, we show that these motifs, together with their visual exhibition, permit better investigating and understanding of protein-ligand recognition process.

  19. [Supercomputer investigation of the protein-ligand system low-energy minima].

    PubMed

    Oferkin, I V; Sulimov, A V; Katkova, E V; Kutov, D K; Grigoriev, F V; Kondakova, O A; Sulimov, V B

    2015-01-01

    The accuracy of the protein-ligand binding energy calculations and ligand positioning is strongly influenced by the choice of the docking target function. This work demonstrates the evaluation of the five different target functions used in docking: functions based on MMFF94 force field and functions based on PM7 quantum-chemical method accounting or without accounting the implicit solvent model (PCM, COSMO or SGB). For these purposes the ligand positions corresponding to the minima of the target function and the experimentally known ligand positions in the protein active site (crystal ligand positions) were compared. Each function was examined on the same test-set of 16 protein-ligand complexes. The new parallelized docking program FLM based on Monte Carlo search algorithm was developed to perform the comprehensive low-energy minima search and to calculate the protein-ligand binding energy. This study demonstrates that the docking target function based on the MMFF94 force field can be used to detect the crystal or near crystal positions of the ligand by the finding the low-energy local minima spectrum of the target function. The importance of solvent accounting in the docking process for the accurate ligand positioning is also shown. The accuracy of the ligand positioning as well as the correlation between the calculated and experimentally determined protein-ligand binding energies are improved when the MMFF94 force field is substituted by the new PM7 method with implicit solvent accounting.

  20. Posttranslational regulation of Fas ligand function

    PubMed Central

    Voss, Matthias; Lettau, Marcus; Paulsen, Maren; Janssen, Ottmar

    2008-01-01

    The TNF superfamily member Fas ligand acts as a prototypic death factor. Due to its ability to induce apoptosis in Fas (APO-1, CD95) expressing cells, Fas ligand participates in essential effector functions of the immune system. It is involved in natural killer cell- and T cell-mediated cytotoxicity, the establishment of immune privilege, and in termination of immune responses by induction of activation-induced cell death. In addition, Fas ligand-positive tumours may evade immune surveillance by killing Fas-positive tumour-infiltrating cells. Given these strong cytotoxic capabilities of Fas ligand, it is obvious that its function has to be strictly regulated to avoid uncontrolled damage. In hematopoietic cells, the death factor is stored in secretory lysosomes and is mobilised to the immunological synapse only upon activation. The selective sorting to and the release from this specific lysosomal compartment requires interactions of the Fas ligand cytosolic moiety, which mediates binding to various adapter proteins involved in trafficking and cytoskeletal reorganisation. In addition, Fas ligand surface expression is further regulated by posttranslational ectodomain shedding and subsequent regulated intramembrane proteolysis, releasing a soluble ectodomain cytokine into the extracellular space and an N-terminal fragment with a potential role in intracellular signalling processes. Moreover, other posttranslational modifications of the cytosolic domain, including phosphorylation and ubiquitylation, have been described to affect various aspects of Fas ligand biology. Since FasL is regarded as a potential target for immunotherapy, the further characterisation of its biological regulation and function will be of great importance for the development and evaluation of future therapeutic strategies. PMID:19114018

  1. CB receptor ligands from plants.

    PubMed

    Woelkart, Karin; Salo-Ahen, Outi M H; Bauer, Rudolf

    2008-01-01

    Advances in understanding the physiology and pharmacology of the endogenous cannabinoid system have potentiated the interest of cannabinoid receptors as potential therapeutic targets. Cannabinoids have been shown to modulate a variety of immune cell functions and have therapeutic implications on central nervous system (CNS) inflammation, chronic inflammatory conditions such as arthritis, and may be therapeutically useful in treating autoimmune conditions such as multiple sclerosis. Many of these drug effects occur through cannabinoid receptor signalling mechanisms and the modulation of cytokines and other gene products. Further, endocannabinoids have been found to have many physiological and patho-physiological functions, including mood alteration and analgesia, control of energy balance, gut motility, motor and co-ordination activities, as well as alleviation of neurological, psychiatric and eating disorders. Plants offer a wide range of chemical diversity and have been a growing domain in the search for effective cannabinoid ligands. Cannabis sativa L. with the known plant cannabinoid, Delta(9-)tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and Echinacea species with the cannabinoid (CB) receptor-binding lipophilic alkamides are the best known herbal cannabimimetics. This review focuses on the state of the art in CB ligands from plants, as well their possible therapeutic and immunomodulatory effects.

  2. DNA-ligand interactions gained and lost: light-induced ligand redistribution in a supramolecular cascade.

    PubMed

    Berdnikova, Daria V; Aliyeu, Tseimur M; Paululat, Thomas; Fedorov, Yuri V; Fedorova, Olga A; Ihmels, Heiko

    2015-03-21

    A supramolecular five-component cascade is presented that enables light-controlled transport of an in situ modified ligand between three host systems based on the different complexation preferences of cyclodextrin, cucurbituril, and double-stranded DNA. The results point out novel approaches for the control of drug-DNA interactions in DNA-targeting therapy.

  3. Ligand binding by PDZ domains.

    PubMed

    Chi, Celestine N; Bach, Anders; Strømgaard, Kristian; Gianni, Stefano; Jemth, Per

    2012-01-01

    The postsynaptic density protein-95/disks large/zonula occludens-1 (PDZ) protein domain family is one of the most common protein-protein interaction modules in mammalian cells, with paralogs present in several hundred human proteins. PDZ domains are found in most cell types, but neuronal proteins, for example, are particularly rich in these domains. The general function of PDZ domains is to bring proteins together within the appropriate cellular compartment, thereby facilitating scaffolding, signaling, and trafficking events. The many functions of PDZ domains under normal physiological as well as pathological conditions have been reviewed recently. In this review, we focus on the molecular details of how PDZ domains bind their protein ligands and their potential as drug targets in this context.

  4. Novel targeted drug therapies for the treatment of childhood acute leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Patrick; Hunger, Stephen P; Smith, Franklin O; Carroll, William L; Reaman, Gregory H

    2009-01-01

    The cure rates for childhood acute leukemia have dramatically improved to approximately 70% overal, with treatments that include intensive cytotoxic chemotherapy and, in some cases, hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. However, many children still die of their disease or of treatment-related toxicities. Even in patients that are cured, there can be significant and, not uncommonly debilitating, acute and late complications of treatment. Improved understanding of the molecular and cellular biology of leukemia and the increasing availability of high-throughput genomic techniques have facilitated the development of molecularly targeted therapies that have the potential to be more effective and less toxic than the standard approaches. In this article, we review the progress to date with agents that are showing promise in the treatment of childhood acute leukemia, including monoclonal antibodies, inhibitors of kinases and other signaling molecules (e.g., BCR–ABL, FLT3, farnesyltransferase, mTOR and γ-secretase), agents that target epigenetic regulation of gene expression (DNA methyltransferase inhibitors and histone deacetylase inhibitors) and proteasome inhibitors. For the specific agents in each of these classes, we summarize the published preclinical data and the clinical trials that have been completed, are in progress or are being planned for children with acute leukemia. Finally, we discuss potential challenges to the success of molecularly targeted therapy, including proper target identification, adequate targeting of leukemia stem cells, developing synergistic and tolerable combinations of agents and designing adequately powered clinical trials to test efficacy in molecularly defined subsets of patients. PMID:20126514

  5. Ligand fitting with CCP4

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Crystal structures of protein–ligand complexes are often used to infer biology and inform structure-based drug discovery. Hence, it is important to build accurate, reliable models of ligands that give confidence in the interpretation of the respective protein–ligand complex. This paper discusses key stages in the ligand-fitting process, including ligand binding-site identification, ligand description and conformer generation, ligand fitting, refinement and subsequent validation. The CCP4 suite contains a number of software tools that facilitate this task: AceDRG for the creation of ligand descriptions and conformers, Lidia and JLigand for two-dimensional and three-dimensional ligand editing and visual analysis, Coot for density interpretation, ligand fitting, analysis and validation, and REFMAC5 for macromolecular refinement. In addition to recent advancements in automatic carbohydrate building in Coot (LO/Carb) and ligand-validation tools (FLEV), the release of the CCP4i2 GUI provides an integrated solution that streamlines the ligand-fitting workflow, seamlessly passing results from one program to the next. The ligand-fitting process is illustrated using instructive practical examples, including problematic cases such as post-translational modifications, highlighting the need for careful analysis and rigorous validation. PMID:28177312

  6. Selective high-affinity polydentate ligands and methods of making such

    DOEpatents

    DeNardo, Sally; DeNardo, Gerald; Balhorn, Rodney

    2013-09-17

    This invention provides polydentate selective high affinity ligands (SHALs) that can be used in a variety of applications in a manner analogous to the use of antibodies. SHALs typically comprise a multiplicity of ligands that each binds different regions on the target molecule. The ligands are joined directly or through a linker thereby forming a polydentate moiety that typically binds the target molecule with high selectivity and avidity.

  7. Discovery of novel integrin ligands from combinatorial libraries using a multiplex "beads on a bead" approach.

    PubMed

    Cho, Choi-Fong; Amadei, Giulio A; Breadner, Daniel; Luyt, Leonard G; Lewis, John D

    2012-11-14

    The development of screening approaches to identify novel affinity ligands has paved the way for a new generation of molecular targeted nanomedicines. Conventional methods typically bias the display of the target protein to ligands during the screening process. We have developed an unbiased multiplex "beads on a bead" strategy to isolate, characterize, and validate high affinity ligands from OBOC libraries. Novel non-RGD peptides that target α(v)β(3) integrin were discovered that do not affect cancer or endothelial cell biology. The peptides identified here represent novel integrin-targeted agents that can be used to develop targeted nanomedicines without the risk of increased tumor invasion and metastasis.

  8. Pim-1: A Molecular Target to Modulate Cellular Resistance to Therapy in Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-10-01

    7 • Identication of quercetagetin as a moderately potent and specific, cell-permeable PIM1 kinase inhibitor • Demonstration...Baird K, Ahn J-Y, Meltzer P, Lilly M, Small D: Pim-1 is upregulated in constitutively activating FLT3 mutants and plays a role in FLT3-mediated cell...survival. Blood 105(4), 1759-1767 (2005). 49. Chen WW, Chan DC, Donald C, Lilly MB, Kraft AS. Pim family kinases enhance tumor growth of

  9. CD22 regulates B lymphocyte function in vivo through both ligand-dependent and ligand-independent mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Poe, Jonathan C; Fujimoto, Yoko; Hasegawa, Minoru; Haas, Karen M; Miller, Ann S; Sanford, Isaac G; Bock, Cheryl B; Fujimoto, Manabu; Tedder, Thomas F

    2004-10-01

    The interaction of CD22 with alpha2,6-linked sialic acid ligands has been widely proposed to regulate B lymphocyte function and migration. Here, we generated gene-targeted mice that express mutant CD22 molecules that do not interact with these ligands. CD22 ligand binding regulated the expression of cell surface CD22, immunoglobulin M and major histocompatibility complex class II on mature B cells, maintenance of the marginal zone B cell population, optimal B cell antigen receptor-induced proliferation, and B cell turnover rates. However, CD22 negative regulation of calcium mobilization after B cell antigen receptor ligation, CD22 phosphorylation, recruitment of SHP-1 to CD22 and B cell migration did not require CD22 ligand engagement. These observations resolve longstanding questions regarding the physiological importance of CD22 ligand binding in the regulation of B cell function in vivo.

  10. The Smart Targeting of Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Friedman, Adam D.; Claypool, Sarah E.; Liu, Rihe

    2014-01-01

    One major challenge in nanomedicine is how to selectively deliver nanoparticles to diseased tissues. Nanoparticle delivery system requires targeting for specific delivery to pathogenic sites when enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) is not suitable or inefficient. Functionalizing nanoparticles is a widely-used technique that allows for conjugation with targeting ligands, which possess inherent ability to direct selective binding to cell types or states and, therefore, confer “smartness” to nanoparticles. This review illustrates methods of ligand-nanoparticle functionalization, provides a cross-section of various ligand classes, including small molecules, peptides, antibodies, engineered proteins, or nucleic acid aptamers, and discusses some unconventional approaches currently under investigation. PMID:23470005

  11. Analysis of macromolecules, ligands and macromolecule-ligand complexes

    DOEpatents

    Von Dreele, Robert B.

    2008-12-23

    A method for determining atomic level structures of macromolecule-ligand complexes through high-resolution powder diffraction analysis and a method for providing suitable microcrystalline powder for diffraction analysis are provided. In one embodiment, powder diffraction data is collected from samples of polycrystalline macromolecule and macromolecule-ligand complex and the refined structure of the macromolecule is used as an approximate model for a combined Rietveld and stereochemical restraint refinement of the macromolecule-ligand complex. A difference Fourier map is calculated and the ligand position and points of interaction between the atoms of the macromolecule and the atoms of the ligand can be deduced and visualized. A suitable polycrystalline sample of macromolecule-ligand complex can be produced by physically agitating a mixture of lyophilized macromolecule, ligand and a solvent.

  12. Inhibition of specific binding of okadaic acid to protein phosphatase 2A by microcystin-LR, calyculin-A and tautomycin: method of analysis of interactions of tight-binding ligands with target protein.

    PubMed Central

    Takai, A; Sasaki, K; Nagai, H; Mieskes, G; Isobe, M; Isono, K; Yasumoto, T

    1995-01-01

    Several groups have reported that okadaic acid (OA) and some other tight-binding protein phosphatase inhibitors including microcystin-LR (MCLR), calyculin-A and tautomycin prevent each other from binding to protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A). In this paper, we have introduced an improved procedure for examining to what extent the affinity of an enzyme for a labelled tight-binding ligand is reduced by binding of an unlabelled tight-binding, ligand to the enzyme. Using this procedure, we have analysed the dose-dependent reduction of PP2A binding of [24-3H]OA by addition of OA, MCLR, calyculin-A and tautomycin. The results indicate that the binding of the unlabelled inhibitors to the PP2A molecule causes a dramatic (10(6)-10(8)-fold) increase in the dissociation constant associated with the interaction of [24-3H]OA and PP2A. This suggests that OA and the other inhibitors bind to PP2A in a mutually exclusive manner. The protein phosphatase inhibitors may share the same binding site on the PP2A molecule. We have also measured values of the dissociation constant (Ki) for the interaction of these toxins with protein phosphatase 1 (PP1). For MCLR and calyculin-A, the ratio of the Ki value obtained for PP1 to that for PP2A was in the range 4-9, whereas it was 0.01-0.02 for tautomycin. The value of tautomycin is considerably smaller than that (0.4) calculated from previously reported Ki values. PMID:7702557

  13. Fluorescent and Lanthanide Labeling for Ligand Screens, Assays, and Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Josan, Jatinder S.; De Silva, Channa R.; Yoo, Byunghee; Lynch, Ronald M.; Pagel, Mark D.; Vagner, Josef; Hruby, Victor J.

    2012-01-01

    The use of fluorescent (or luminescent) and metal contrast agents in high-throughput screens, in vitro assays, and molecular imaging procedures has rapidly expanded in recent years. Here we describe the development and utility of high-affinity ligands for cancer theranostics and other in vitro screening studies. In this context, we also illustrate the syntheses and use of heteromultivalent ligands as targeted imaging agents. PMID:21318902

  14. Regulation of ligands for the activating receptor NKG2D

    PubMed Central

    Mistry, Anita R; O'Callaghan, Chris A

    2007-01-01

    The outcome of an encounter between a cytotoxic cell and a potential target cell depends on the balance of signals from inhibitory and activating receptors. Natural Killer group 2D (NKG2D) has recently emerged as a major activating receptor on T lymphocytes and natural killer cells. In both humans and mice, multiple different genes encode ligands for NKG2D, and these ligands are non-classical major histocompatibility complex class I molecules. The NKG2D–ligand interaction triggers an activating signal in the cell expressing NKG2D and this promotes cytotoxic lysis of the cell expressing the ligand. Most normal tissues do not express ligands for NKG2D, but ligand expression has been documented in tumour and virus-infected cells, leading to lysis of these cells. Tight regulation of ligand expression is important. If there is inappropriate expression in normal tissues, this will favour autoimmune processes, whilst failure to up-regulate the ligands in pathological conditions would favour cancer development or dissemination of intracellular infection. PMID:17614877

  15. Proteome-wide covalent ligand discovery in native biological systems

    PubMed Central

    Backus, Keriann M.; Correia, Bruno E.; Lum, Kenneth M.; Forli, Stefano; Horning, Benjamin D.; González-Páez, Gonzalo E.; Chatterjee, Sandip; Lanning, Bryan R.; Teijaro, John R.; Olson, Arthur J.; Wolan, Dennis W.; Cravatt, Benjamin F.

    2016-01-01

    Small molecules are powerful tools for investigating protein function and can serve as leads for new therapeutics. Most human proteins, however, lack small-molecule ligands, and entire protein classes are considered “undruggable” 1,2. Fragment-based ligand discovery (FBLD) can identify small-molecule probes for proteins that have proven difficult to target using high-throughput screening of complex compound libraries 1,3. Although reversibly binding ligands are commonly pursued, covalent fragments provide an alternative route to small-molecule probes 4–10, including those that can access regions of proteins that are difficult to access through binding affinity alone 5,10,11. In this manuscript, we report a quantitative analysis of cysteine-reactive small-molecule fragments screened against thousands of proteins. Covalent ligands were identified for >700 cysteines found in both druggable proteins and proteins deficient in chemical probes, including transcription factors, adaptor/scaffolding proteins, and uncharacterized proteins. Among the atypical ligand-protein interactions discovered were compounds that react preferentially with pro- (inactive) caspases. We used these ligands to distinguish extrinsic apoptosis pathways in human cell lines versus primary human T-cells, showing that the former is largely mediated by caspase-8 while the latter depends on both caspase-8 and −10. Fragment-based covalent ligand discovery provides a greatly expanded portrait of the ligandable proteome and furnishes compounds that can illuminate protein functions in native biological systems. PMID:27309814

  16. Gene therapy-mediated reprogramming tumor infiltrating T cells using IL-2 and inhibiting NF-κB signaling improves the efficacy of immunotherapy in a brain cancer model.

    PubMed

    Mineharu, Yohei; Muhammad, A K M Ghulam; Yagiz, Kader; Candolfi, Marianela; Kroeger, Kurt M; Xiong, Weidong; Puntel, Mariana; Liu, Chunyan; Levy, Eva; Lugo, Claudia; Kocharian, Adrina; Allison, James P; Curran, Michael A; Lowenstein, Pedro R; Castro, Maria G

    2012-10-01

    Immune-mediated gene therapy using adenovirus expressing Flt3 ligand and thymidine kinase followed by ganciclovir administration (Flt3/TK) effectively elicits tumor regression in preclinical glioma models. Herein, we assessed new strategies to optimize Flt3L/TK therapeutic efficacy in a refractory RG2 orthotopic glioblastoma model. Specifically, we aimed to optimize the therapeutic efficacy of Flt3L/TK treatment in the RG2 model by overexpressing the following genes within the brain tumor microenvironment: 1) a TK mutant with enhanced cytotoxicity (SR39 mutant TK), 2) Flt3L-IgG fusion protein that has a longer half-life, 3) CD40L to stimulate DC maturation, 4) T helper cell type 1 polarizing dendritic cell cytokines interleukin-12 or C-X-C motif ligand 10 chemokine (CXCL)-10, 5) C-C motif ligand 2 chemokine (CCL2) or C-C motif ligand 3 chemokine (CCL3) to enhance dendritic cell recruitment into the tumor microenvironment, 6) T helper cell type 1 cytokines interferon-γ or interleukin-2 to enhance effector T-cell functions, and 7) IκBα or p65RHD (nuclear factor kappa-B [NF-κB] inhibitors) to suppress the function of Foxp3+ Tregs and enhanced effector T-cell functions. Anti-tumor immunity and tumor specific effector T-cell functions were assessed by cytotoxic T lymphocyte assay and intracellular IFN-γ staining. Our data showed that overexpression of interferon-γ or interleukin-2, or inhibition of the nuclear factor kappa-B within the tumor microenvironment, enhanced cytotoxic T lymphocyte-mediated immune responses and successfully extended the median survival of rats bearing intracranial RG2 when combined with Flt3L/TK. These findings indicate that enhancement of T-cell functions constitutes a critical therapeutic target to overcome immune evasion and enhance therapeutic efficacy for brain cancer. In addition, our study provides novel targets to be used in combination with immune-therapeutic strategies for glioblastoma, which are currently being tested in the

  17. EGF receptor ligands: recent advances

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Bhuminder; Carpenter, Graham; Coffey, Robert J.

    2016-01-01

    Seven ligands bind to and activate the mammalian epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor (EGFR/ERBB1/HER1): EGF, transforming growth factor-alpha (TGFA), heparin-binding EGF-like growth factor (HBEGF), betacellulin (BTC), amphiregulin (AREG), epiregulin (EREG), and epigen (EPGN). Of these, EGF, TGFA, HBEGF, and BTC are thought to be high-affinity ligands, whereas AREG, EREG, and EPGN constitute low-affinity ligands. This focused review is meant to highlight recent studies related to actions of the individual EGFR ligands, the interesting biology that has been uncovered, and relevant advances related to ligand interactions with the EGFR. PMID:27635238

  18. Importance of the pharmacological profile of the bound ligand in enrichment on nuclear receptors: toward the use of experimentally validated decoy ligands.

    PubMed

    Lagarde, Nathalie; Zagury, Jean-François; Montes, Matthieu

    2014-10-27

    The evaluation of virtual ligand screening methods is of major importance to ensure their reliability. Taking into account the agonist/antagonist pharmacological profile should improve the quality of the benchmarking data sets since ligand binding can induce conformational changes in the nuclear receptor structure and such changes may vary according to the agonist/antagonist ligand profile. We indeed found that splitting the agonist and antagonist ligands into two separate data sets for a given nuclear receptor target significantly enhances the quality of the evaluation. The pharmacological profile of the ligand bound in the binding site of the target structure was also found to be an additional critical parameter. We also illustrate that active compound data sets for a given pharmacological activity can be used as a set of experimentally validated decoy ligands for another pharmacological activity to ensure a reliable and challenging evaluation of virtual screening methods.

  19. Enhanced Ligand Sampling for Relative Protein–Ligand Binding Free Energy Calculations

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Free energy calculations are used to study how strongly potential drug molecules interact with their target receptors. The accuracy of these calculations depends on the accuracy of the molecular dynamics (MD) force field as well as proper sampling of the major conformations of each molecule. However, proper sampling of ligand conformations can be difficult when there are large barriers separating the major ligand conformations. An example of this is for ligands with an asymmetrically substituted phenyl ring, where the presence of protein loops hinders the proper sampling of the different ring conformations. These ring conformations become more difficult to sample when the size of the functional groups attached to the ring increases. The Adaptive Integration Method (AIM) has been developed, which adaptively changes the alchemical coupling parameter λ during the MD simulation so that conformations sampled at one λ can aid sampling at the other λ values. The Accelerated Adaptive Integration Method (AcclAIM) builds on AIM by lowering potential barriers for specific degrees of freedom at intermediate λ values. However, these methods may not work when there are very large barriers separating the major ligand conformations. In this work, we describe a modification to AIM that improves sampling of the different ring conformations, even when there is a very large barrier between them. This method combines AIM with conformational Monte Carlo sampling, giving improved convergence of ring populations and the resulting free energy. This method, called AIM/MC, is applied to study the relative binding free energy for a pair of ligands that bind to thrombin and a different pair of ligands that bind to aspartyl protease β-APP cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1). These protein–ligand binding free energy calculations illustrate the improvements in conformational sampling and the convergence of the free energy compared to both AIM and AcclAIM. PMID:25906170

  20. Identification of Ligand-Receptor Interactions: Ligand Molecular Arrays, SPR and NMR Methodologies.

    PubMed

    Day, Christopher J; Hartley-Tassell, Lauren E; Korolik, Victoria

    2017-01-01

    Despite many years of research into bacterial chemotaxis, the only well characterized system to date is that of E. coli. Even for E. coli, the direct ligand binding had been fully characterized only for aspartate and serene receptors Tar and Tsr. In 30 years since, no other direct receptor-ligand interaction had been described for bacteria, until the characterization of the C. jejuni aspartate and multiligand receptors (Hartley-Tassell et al. Mol Microbiol 75:710-730, 2010). While signal transduction components of many sensory pathways have now been characterized, ligand-receptor interactions remain elusive due to paucity of high-throughput screening methods. Here, we describe the use of microarray screening we developed to identify ligands, surface plasmon resonance, and saturation transfer difference nuclear magnetic resonance (STD-NMR) we used to verify the hits and to determine the affinity constants of the interactions, allowing for more targeted verification of ligands with traditional chemotaxis and in vivo assays described in Chapter 13 .

  1. Encoding protein-ligand interaction patterns in fingerprints and graphs.

    PubMed

    Desaphy, Jérémy; Raimbaud, Eric; Ducrot, Pierre; Rognan, Didier

    2013-03-25

    We herewith present a novel and universal method to convert protein-ligand coordinates into a simple fingerprint of 210 integers registering the corresponding molecular interaction pattern. Each interaction (hydrophobic, aromatic, hydrogen bond, ionic bond, metal complexation) is detected on the fly and physically described by a pseudoatom centered either on the interacting ligand atom, the interacting protein atom, or the geometric center of both interacting atoms. Counting all possible triplets of interaction pseudoatoms within six distance ranges, and pruning the full integer vector to keep the most frequent triplets enables the definition of a simple (210 integers) and coordinate frame-invariant interaction pattern descriptor (TIFP) that can be applied to compare any pair of protein-ligand complexes. TIFP fingerprints have been calculated for ca. 10,000 druggable protein-ligand complexes therefore enabling a wide comparison of relationships between interaction pattern similarity and ligand or binding site pairwise similarity. We notably show that interaction pattern similarity strongly depends on binding site similarity. In addition to the TIFP fingerprint which registers intermolecular interactions between a ligand and its target protein, we developed two tools (Ishape, Grim) to align protein-ligand complexes from their interaction patterns. Ishape is based on the overlap of interaction pseudoatoms using a smooth Gaussian function, whereas Grim utilizes a standard clique detection algorithm to match interaction pattern graphs. Both tools are complementary and enable protein-ligand complex alignments capitalizing on both global and local pattern similarities. The new fingerprint and companion alignment tools have been successfully used in three scenarios: (i) interaction-biased alignment of protein-ligand complexes, (ii) postprocessing docking poses according to known interaction patterns for a particular target, and (iii) virtual screening for bioisosteric

  2. GPCR biased ligands as novel heart failure therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Violin, Jonathan D; Soergel, David G; Boerrigter, Guido; Burnett, John C; Lark, Michael W

    2013-10-01

    G protein-coupled receptors have been successfully targeted by numerous therapeutics including drugs that have transformed the management of cardiovascular disease. However, many GPCRs, when activated or blocked by drugs, elicit both beneficial and adverse pharmacology. Recent work has demonstrated that in some cases, the salutary and deleterious signals linked to a specific GPCR can be selectively targeted by "biased ligands" that entrain subsets of a receptor's normal pharmacology. This review briefly summarizes the advances and current state of the biased ligand field, focusing on an example: biased ligands targeting the angiotensin II type 1 receptor. These compounds exhibit unique pharmacology, distinct from classic agonists or antagonists, and one such molecule is now in clinical development for the treatment of acute heart failure.

  3. Discovery of GPCR ligands for probing signal transduction pathways

    PubMed Central

    Brogi, Simone; Tafi, Andrea; Désaubry, Laurent; Nebigil, Canan G.

    2014-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are seven integral transmembrane proteins that are the primary targets of almost 30% of approved drugs and continue to represent a major focus of pharmaceutical research. All of GPCR targeted medicines were discovered by classical medicinal chemistry approaches. After the first GPCR crystal structures were determined, the docking screens using these structures lead to discovery of more novel and potent ligands. There are over 360 pharmaceutically relevant GPCRs in the human genome and to date about only 30 of structures have been determined. For these reasons, computational techniques such as homology modeling and molecular dynamics simulations have proven their usefulness to explore the structure and function of GPCRs. Furthermore, structure-based drug design and in silico screening (High Throughput Docking) are still the most common computational procedures in GPCRs drug discovery. Moreover, ligand-based methods such as three-dimensional quantitative structure–selectivity relationships, are the ideal molecular modeling approaches to rationalize the activity of tested GPCR ligands and identify novel GPCR ligands. In this review, we discuss the most recent advances for the computational approaches to effectively guide selectivity and affinity of ligands. We also describe novel approaches in medicinal chemistry, such as the development of biased agonists, allosteric modulators, and bivalent ligands for class A GPCRs. Furthermore, we highlight some knockout mice models in discovering biased signaling selectivity. PMID:25506327

  4. Mass spectrometric analysis of protein–ligand interactions

    PubMed Central

    Ishii, Kentaro; Noda, Masanori; Uchiyama, Susumu

    2016-01-01

    The interactions of small molecules with proteins (protein–ligand interactions) mediate various biological phenomena including signal transduction and protein transcription and translation. Synthetic compounds such as drugs can also bind to target proteins, leading to the inhibition of protein–ligand interactions. These interactions typically accompany association–dissociation equilibrium according to the free energy difference between free and bound states; therefore, the quantitative biophysical analysis of the interactions, which uncovers the stoichiometry and dissociation constant, is important for understanding biological reactions as well as for rational drug development. Mass spectrometry (MS) has been used to determine the precise molecular masses of molecules. Recent advancements in MS enable us to determine the molecular masses of protein–ligand complexes without disrupting the non-covalent interactions through the gentle desolvation of the complexes by increasing the vacuum pressure of a chamber in a mass spectrometer. This method is called MS under non-denaturing conditions or native MS and allows the unambiguous determination of protein–ligand interactions. Under a few assumptions, MS has also been applied to determine the dissociation constants for protein–ligand interactions. The structural information of a protein–ligand interaction, such as the location of the interaction and conformational change in a protein, can also be analyzed using hydrogen/deuterium exchange MS. In this paper, we briefly describe the history, principle, and recent applications of MS for the study of protein–ligand interactions. PMID:27924262

  5. Pharmacophore-based discovery of ligands for drug transporters

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Cheng; Ekins, Sean; Bahadduri, Praveen; Swaan, Peter W.

    2006-01-01

    The ability to identify ligands for drug transporters is an important step in drug discovery and development. It can both improve accurate profiling of lead pharmacokinetic properties and assist in the discovery of new chemical entities targeting transporters. In silico approaches, especially pharmacophore-based database screening methods have great potential in improving the throughput of current transporter ligand identification assays, leading to a higher hit rate by focusing in vitro testing to the most promising hits. In this review, the potential of different in silico methods in transporter ligand identification studies are compared and summarized with an emphasis on pharmacophore modeling. Various implementations of pharmacophore model generation, database compilation and flexible screening algorithms are also introduced. Recent successful utilization of database searching with pharmacophores to identify novel ligands for the pharmaceutically significant transporters hPepT1, P-gp, BCRP, MRP1 and DAT are reviewed and challenges encountered with current approaches are discussed. PMID:17097188

  6. Biased ligands at G-protein-coupled receptors: promise and progress.

    PubMed

    Violin, Jonathan D; Crombie, Aimee L; Soergel, David G; Lark, Michael W

    2014-07-01

    Drug discovery targeting G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) is no longer limited to seeking agonists or antagonists to stimulate or block cellular responses associated with a particular receptor. GPCRs are now known to support a diversity of pharmacological profiles, a concept broadly referred to as functional selectivity. In particular, the concept of ligand bias, whereby a ligand stabilizes subsets of receptor conformations to engender novel pharmacological profiles, has recently gained increasing prominence. This review discusses how biased ligands may deliver safer, better tolerated, and more efficacious drugs, and highlights several biased ligands that are in clinical development. Biased ligands targeting the angiotensin II type 1 receptor and the μ opioid receptor illustrate the translation of the biased ligand concept from basic biology to clinical drug development.

  7. Apoptosis Induction by Targeting Interferon Gamma Receptor 2 (IFNgammaR2) in Prostate Cancer: Ligand (IFNgamma)-Independent Novel Function of IFNgammaR2 as a Bax Inhibitor

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-08-01

    level of IFNγR2 confers apoptosis resistance of prostate cancer. In this project, we will investigate the role of IFNγR2 in drug resistance of prostate...4979 Nothing listed 12 Table of Contents Page Introduction…………………………………………………………….………..….. 5 Body ...enhances Bax activation. (Months 1-24) Task 2: To identify the subtype of prostate cancer that can be effectively treated by IFNγR2-targeting

  8. Apoptosis Induction by Targeting Interferon Gamma Receptor 2 (IFNgammaR2) in Prostate Cancer: Ligand (IFNgamma)-Independent Novel Function of IFNgammaR2 as a Bax Inhibitor

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-08-01

    inhibitor of Bax. Bax is a key mediator of apoptosis. We found that IFNγR2 is overexpressed in prostate cancer, and we hypothesize that abnormally high...We found that IFNγR2 levels are abnormally elevated in prostate cancer cell lines. Short hairpin (sh) RNA- mediated knockdown of IFNγR2 was able to... enhances Bax activation. (Months 1-24) Task 2: To identify the subtype of prostate cancer that can be effectively treated by IFNγR2-targeting

  9. Melatonin: functions and ligands.

    PubMed

    Singh, Mahaveer; Jadhav, Hemant R

    2014-09-01

    Melatonin is a chronobiotic substance that acts as synchronizer by stabilizing bodily rhythms. Its synthesis occurs in various locations throughout the body, including the pineal gland, skin, lymphocytes and gastrointestinal tract (GIT). Its synthesis and secretion is controlled by light and dark conditions, whereby light decreases and darkness increases its production. Thus, melatonin is also known as the 'hormone of darkness'. Melatonin and analogs that bind to the melatonin receptors are important because of their role in the management of depression, insomnia, epilepsy, Alzheimer's disease (AD), diabetes, obesity, alopecia, migraine, cancer, and immune and cardiac disorders. In this review, we discuss the mechanism of action of melatonin in these disorders, which could aid in the design of novel melatonin receptor ligands.

  10. Ligand-based virtual screening under partial shape constraints.

    PubMed

    von Behren, Mathias M; Rarey, Matthias

    2017-04-01

    Ligand-based virtual screening has proven to be a viable technology during the search for new lead structures in drug discovery. Despite the rapidly increasing number of published methods, meaningful shape matching as well as ligand and target flexibility still remain open challenges. In this work, we analyze the influence of knowledge-based sterical constraints on the performance of the recently published ligand-based virtual screening method mRAISE. We introduce the concept of partial shape matching enabling a more differentiated view on chemical structure. The new method is integrated into the LBVS tool mRAISE providing multiple options for such constraints. The applied constraints can either be derived automatically from a protein-ligand complex structure or by manual selection of ligand atoms. In this way, the descriptor directly encodes the fit of a ligand into the binding site. Furthermore, the conservation of close contacts between the binding site surface and the query ligand can be enforced. We validated our new method on the DUD and DUD-E datasets. Although the statistical performance remains on the same level, detailed analysis reveal that for certain and especially very flexible targets a significant improvement can be achieved. This is further highlighted looking at the quality of calculated molecular alignments using the recently introduced mRAISE dataset. The new partial shape constraints improved the overall quality of molecular alignments especially for difficult targets with highly flexible or different sized molecules. The software tool mRAISE is freely available on Linux operating systems for evaluation purposes and academic use (see http://www.zbh.uni-hamburg.de/raise ).

  11. Ligand-based virtual screening under partial shape constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Behren, Mathias M.; Rarey, Matthias

    2017-03-01

    Ligand-based virtual screening has proven to be a viable technology during the search for new lead structures in drug discovery. Despite the rapidly increasing number of published methods, meaningful shape matching as well as ligand and target flexibility still remain open challenges. In this work, we analyze the influence of knowledge-based sterical constraints on the performance of the recently published ligand-based virtual screening method mRAISE. We introduce the concept of partial shape matching enabling a more differentiated view on chemical structure. The new method is integrated into the LBVS tool mRAISE providing multiple options for such constraints. The applied constraints can either be derived automatically from a protein-ligand complex structure or by manual selection of ligand atoms. In this way, the descriptor directly encodes the fit of a ligand into the binding site. Furthermore, the conservation of close contacts between the binding site surface and the query ligand can be enforced. We validated our new method on the DUD and DUD-E datasets. Although the statistical performance remains on the same level, detailed analysis reveal that for certain and especially very flexible targets a significant improvement can be achieved. This is further highlighted looking at the quality of calculated molecular alignments using the recently introduced mRAISE dataset. The new partial shape constraints improved the overall quality of molecular alignments especially for difficult targets with highly flexible or different sized molecules. The software tool mRAISE is freely available on Linux operating systems for evaluation purposes and academic use (see http://www.zbh.uni-hamburg.de/raise).

  12. Molecular and Cellular Mechanisms of Myelodysplastic Syndrome: Implications on Targeted Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Gill, Harinder; Leung, Anskar Y. H.; Kwong, Yok-Lam

    2016-01-01

    Myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) is a group of heterogeneous clonal hematopoietic stem cell disorders characterized by cytopenia, ineffective hematopoiesis, and progression to secondary acute myeloid leukemia in high-risk cases. Conventional prognostication relies on clinicopathological parameters supplemented by cytogenetic information. However, recent studies have shown that genetic aberrations also have critical impacts on treatment outcome. Moreover, these genetic alterations may themselves be a target for treatment. The mutation landscape in MDS is shaped by gene aberrations involved in DNA methylation (TET2, DNMT3A, IDH1/2), histone modification (ASXL1, EZH2), the RNA splicing machinery (SF3B1, SRSF2, ZRSR2, U2AF1/2), transcription (RUNX1, TP53, BCOR, PHF6, NCOR, CEBPA, GATA2), tyrosine kinase receptor signaling (JAK2, MPL, FLT3, GNAS, KIT), RAS pathways (KRAS, NRAS, CBL, NF1, PTPN11), DNA repair (ATM, BRCC3, DLRE1C, FANCL), and cohesion complexes (STAG2, CTCF, SMC1A, RAD21). A detailed understanding of the pathogenetic mechanisms leading to transformation is critical for designing single-agent or combinatorial approaches in target therapy of MDS. PMID:27023522

  13. Bifunctional DTPA-type ligand

    SciTech Connect

    Gansow, O.A.; Brechbiel, M.W.

    1990-03-26

    The subject matter of the invention relates to bifunctional cyclohexyl DTPA ligands and methods of using these compounds. Specifically, such ligands are useful for radiolabeling proteins with radioactive metals, and can consequently be utilized with respect to radioimmunoimaging and/or radioimmunotherapy.

  14. RAGE and its ligands in retinal disease.

    PubMed

    Barile, Gaetano R; Schmidt, Ann M

    2007-12-01

    RAGE, the receptor for advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs), is a multiligand signal transduction receptor of the immunoglobulin superfamily of cell surface molecules that has been implicated in the pathogenesis of diabetic complications, neurodegenerative diseases, inflammatory disorders, and cancer. These diverse biologic disorders reflect the multiplicity of ligands capable of cellular interaction via RAGE that include, in addition to AGEs, amyloid-beta (Abeta) peptide, the S100/calgranulin family of proinflammatory cytokines, and amphoterin, a member of the High Mobility Group Box (HMGB) DNA-binding proteins. In the retina, RAGE expression is present in neural cells, the vasculature, and RPE cells, and it has also been detected in pathologic cellular retinal responses including epiretinal and neovascular membrane formation. Ligands for RAGE, in particular AGEs, have emerged as relevant to the pathogenesis of diabetic retinopathy and age-related macular disease. While the understanding of RAGE and its role in retinal dysfunction with aging, diabetes mellitus, and/or activation of pro-inflammatory pathways is less complete compared to other organ systems, increasing evidence indicates that RAGE can initiate and sustain significant cellular perturbations in the inner and outer retina. For these reasons, antagonism of RAGE interactions with its ligands may be a worthwhile therapeutic target in such seemingly disparate, visually threatening retinal diseases as diabetic retinopathy, age-related macular degeneration, and proliferative vitreoretinopathy.

  15. Murine germinal center B cells require functional Fms-like tyrosine kinase 3 signaling for IgG1 class-switch recombination.

    PubMed

    Svensson, Mattias N D; Andersson, Karin M E; Wasén, Caroline; Erlandsson, Malin C; Nurkkala-Karlsson, Merja; Jonsson, Ing-Marie; Brisslert, Mikael; Bemark, Mats; Bokarewa, Maria I

    2015-12-01

    Switched antibody classes are important for efficient immune responses. Aberrant antibody production to otherwise harmless antigens may result in autoimmunity. The protein kinase fms-like tyrosine kinase 3 receptor (Flt3) has an important role during early B-cell development, but the role of Flt3 in peripheral B cells has not been assessed before. Herein we describe a previously unappreciated role for Flt3 in IgG1 class-switch recombination (CSR) and production. We show that Flt3 is reexpressed on B-cell lymphoma 6(+) germinal center B cells in vivo and following LPS activation of peripheral B cells in vitro. Absence of Flt3 signaling in Flt3 ligand-deficient mice results in impaired IgG1 CSR and accumulation of IgM-secreting plasma cells. On activated B cells, Flt3 is coexpressed and functions in synergy with the common-gamma chain receptor family. B cells from Flt3 ligand-deficient mice have impaired IL-4R signaling, with reduced phosphorylation of signal transducer and activator of transcription (Stat) 6, and demonstrate a failure to initiate CSR to IgG1 with low expression of γ1 germ-line transcripts, resulting in impaired IgG1 production. Thus, functional synergy between Flt3 and IL-4R signaling is critical for Stat-mediated regulation of sterile γ1 germ-line transcripts and CSR to IgG1.

  16. Neuroprotective targets through which 6-acetyl-3-(4-(4-(4-fluorophenyl)piperazin-1-yl)butyl)benzo[d]oxazol-2(3H)-one (SN79), a sigma receptor ligand, mitigates the effects of methamphetamine in vitro.

    PubMed

    Kaushal, Nidhi; Robson, Matthew J; Rosen, Abagail; McCurdy, Christopher R; Matsumoto, Rae R

    2014-02-05

    Exposure to high or repeated doses of methamphetamine can cause hyperthermia and neurotoxicity, which are thought to increase the risk of developing a variety of neurological conditions. Sigma receptor antagonism can prevent methamphetamine-induced hyperthermia and neurotoxicity, but the underlying cellular targets through which the neuroprotection is conveyed remain unknown. Differentiated NG108-15 cells were thus used as a model system to begin elucidating the neuroprotective mechanisms targeted by sigma receptor antagonists to mitigate the effects of methamphetamine. In differentiated NG108-15 cells, methamphetamine caused the generation of reactive oxygen/nitrogen species, an increase in PERK-mediated endoplasmic reticulum stress and the activation of caspase-3, -8 and -9, ultimately resulting in apoptosis at micromolar concentrations, and necrotic cell death at higher concentrations. The sigma receptor antagonist, 6-acetyl-3-(4-(4-(4-fluorophenyl)piperazin-1-yl)butyl)benzo[d]oxazol-2(3H)-one (SN79), attenuated methamphetamine-induced increases in reactive oxygen/nitrogen species, activation of caspase-3, -8 and -9 and accompanying cellular toxicity. In contrast, 1,3-di(2-tolyl)-guanidine (DTG), a sigma receptor agonist, shifted the dose response curve of methamphetamine-induced cell death towards the left. To probe the effect of temperature on neurotoxicity, NG108-15 cells maintained at an elevated temperature (40 °C) exhibited a significant and synergistic increase in cell death in response to methamphetamine, compared to cells maintained at a normal cell culture temperature (37 °C). SN79 attenuated the enhanced cell death observed in the methamphetamine-treated cells at 40 °C. Together, the data demonstrate that SN79 reduces methamphetamine-induced reactive oxygen/nitrogen species generation and caspase activation, thereby conveying neuroprotective effects against methamphetamine under regular and elevated temperature conditions.

  17. A library screening approach identifies naturally occurring RNA sequences for a G-quadruplex binding ligand.

    PubMed

    Mirihana Arachchilage, Gayan; Morris, Mark J; Basu, Soumitra

    2014-02-07

    An RNA G-quadruplex library was synthesised and screened against kanamycin A as the ligand. Naturally occurring G-quadruplex forming sequences that differentially bind to kanamycin A were identified and characterized. This provides a simple and effective strategy for identification of potential intracellular G-quadruplex targets for a ligand.

  18. Ligand Pose and Orientational Sampling in Molecular Docking

    PubMed Central

    Coleman, Ryan G.; Carchia, Michael; Sterling, Teague; Irwin, John J.; Shoichet, Brian K.

    2013-01-01

    Molecular docking remains an important tool for structure-based screening to find new ligands and chemical probes. As docking ambitions grow to include new scoring function terms, and to address ever more targets, the reliability and extendability of the orientation sampling, and the throughput of the method, become pressing. Here we explore sampling techniques that eliminate stochastic behavior in DOCK3.6, allowing us to optimize the method for regularly variable sampling of orientations. This also enabled a focused effort to optimize the code for efficiency, with a three-fold increase in the speed of the program. This, in turn, facilitated extensive testing of the method on the 102 targets, 22,805 ligands and 1,411,214 decoys of the Directory of Useful Decoys - Enhanced (DUD-E) benchmarking set, at multiple levels of sampling. Encouragingly, we observe that as sampling increases from 50 to 500 to 2000 to 5000 to 20000 molecular orientations in the binding site (and so from about 1×1010 to 4×1010 to 1×1011 to 2×1011 to 5×1011 mean atoms scored per target, since multiple conformations are sampled per orientation), the enrichment of ligands over decoys monotonically increases for most DUD-E targets. Meanwhile, including internal electrostatics in the evaluation ligand conformational energies, and restricting aromatic hydroxyls to low energy rotamers, further improved enrichment values. Several of the strategies used here to improve the efficiency of the code are broadly applicable in the field. PMID:24098414

  19. Riboswitch structure in the ligand-free state.

    PubMed

    Liberman, Joseph A; Wedekind, Joseph E

    2012-01-01

    Molecular investigations of riboswitches bound to small-molecule effectors have produced a wealth of information on how these molecules achieve high affinity and specificity for a target ligand. X-ray crystal structures have been determined for the ligand-free state for representatives of the preQ₁-I, S-adenosylmethionine I, lysine, and glycine aptamer classes. These structures in conjunction with complimentary techniques, such as in-line probing, NMR spectroscopy, Förster resonance energy transfer, small-angle scattering, and computational simulations, have demonstrated that riboswitches adopt multiple conformations in the absence of ligand. Despite a number of investigations that support ligand-dependent folding, mounting evidence suggests that free-state riboswitches interact with their effectors in the sub-populations of largely prefolded states as embodied by the principle of conformational selection, which has been documented extensively for protein-mediated ligand interactions. Fundamental riboswitch investigations of the bound and free states have advanced our understanding of RNA folding, ligand recognition, and how these factors culminate in communication between an aptamer and its expression platform. An understanding of these topics is essential to comprehend riboswitch gene regulation at the molecular level, which has already provided a basis to understand the mechanism of action of natural antimicrobials.

  20. Orphan receptor ligand discovery by pickpocketing pharmacological neighbors.

    PubMed

    Ngo, Tony; Ilatovskiy, Andrey V; Stewart, Alastair G; Coleman, James L J; McRobb, Fiona M; Riek, R Peter; Graham, Robert M; Abagyan, Ruben; Kufareva, Irina; Smith, Nicola J

    2017-02-01

    Understanding the pharmacological similarity of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) is paramount for predicting ligand off-target effects, drug repurposing, and ligand discovery for orphan receptors. Phylogenetic relationships do not always correctly capture pharmacological similarity. Previous family-wide attempts to define pharmacological relationships were based on three-dimensional structures and/or known receptor-ligand pairings, both unavailable for orphan GPCRs. Here, we present GPCR-CoINPocket, a novel contact-informed neighboring pocket metric of GPCR binding-site similarity that is informed by patterns of ligand-residue interactions observed in crystallographically characterized GPCRs. GPCR-CoINPocket is applicable to receptors with unknown structure or ligands and accurately captures known pharmacological relationships between GPCRs, even those undetected by phylogeny. When applied to orphan receptor GPR37L1, GPCR-CoINPocket identified its pharmacological neighbors, and transfer of their pharmacology aided in discovery of the first surrogate ligands for this orphan with a 30% success rate. Although primarily designed for GPCRs, the method is easily transferable to other protein families.

  1. Lyar Is a New Ligand for Retinal Pigment Epithelial Phagocytosis.

    PubMed

    Guo, Feiye; Ding, Ying; Caberoy, Nora B; Alvarado, Gabriela; Liu, Robert; Shen, Chen; Yu, Jisu; Zhou, Yixiong; Salero, Enrique; LeBlanc, Michelle E; Wang, Weiwen; Li, Wei

    2015-10-01

    Phagocytosis is critical to tissue homeostasis, as highlighted by phagocytosis defect of retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells with debris accumulation, photoreceptor degeneration and blindness. Phagocytosis ligands are the key to delineating molecular mechanisms and functional roles of phagocytes, but are traditionally identified in individual cases with technical challenges. We recently developed open reading frame phage display (OPD) for phagocytosis-based functional cloning (PFC) to identify unknown ligands. One of the identified ligands was Ly-1 antibody reactive clone (Lyar) with functions poorly defined. Herein, we characterized Lyar as a new ligand to stimulate RPE phagocytosis. In contrast to its reported nucleolar expression, immunohistochemistry showed that Lyar was highly expressed in photoreceptor outer segments (POSs) of the retina. Cytoplasmic Lyar was released from apoptotic cells, and selectively bound to shed POSs and apoptotic cells, but not healthy cells. POS vesicles engulfed through Lyar-dependent pathway were targeted to phagosomes and colocalized with phagosome marker Rab7. These results suggest that Lyar is a genuine RPE phagocytosis ligand, which in turn supports the validity of OPD/PFC as the only available approach for unbiased identification of phagocytosis ligands with broad applicability to various phagocytes.

  2. Ligand binding analysis and screening by chemical denaturation shift.

    PubMed

    Schön, Arne; Brown, Richard K; Hutchins, Burleigh M; Freire, Ernesto

    2013-12-01

    The identification of small molecule ligands is an important first step in drug development, especially drugs that target proteins with no intrinsic activity. Toward this goal, it is important to have access to technologies that are able to measure binding affinities for a large number of potential ligands in a fast and accurate way. Because ligand binding stabilizes the protein structure in a manner dependent on concentration and binding affinity, the magnitude of the protein stabilization effect elicited by binding can be used to identify and characterize ligands. For example, the shift in protein denaturation temperature (Tm shift) has become a popular approach to identify potential ligands. However, Tm shifts cannot be readily transformed into binding affinities, and the ligand rank order obtained at denaturation temperatures (≥60°C) does not necessarily coincide with the rank order at physiological temperature. An alternative approach is the use of chemical denaturation, which can be implemented at any temperature. Chemical denaturation shifts allow accurate determination of binding affinities with a surprisingly wide dynamic range (high micromolar to sub nanomolar) and in situations where binding changes the cooperativity of the unfolding transition. In this article, we develop the basic analytical equations and provide several experimental examples.

  3. FXR and its ligands inhibit the function of platelets

    PubMed Central

    Vaiyapuri, Sakthivel; Ali, Marfoua S.; Sasikumar, Parvathy; Sage, Tanya; Flora, Gagan D; Bye, Alex P; Kriek, Neline; Dorchies, Emilie; Molendi-Coste, Olivier; Dombrowicz, David; Staels, Bart; Bishop-Bailey, David

    2016-01-01

    Objective While initially seemingly paradoxical due to the lack of nucleus, platelets possess a number of transcription factors that regulate their function through DNA-independent mechanisms. These include the Farnesoid X Receptor (FXR), a member of the superfamily of ligand-activated transcription factors that has been identified as a bile acid receptor. In this study, we show that FXR is present in human platelets and FXR ligands, GW4064 and 6-ECDCA, modulate platelet activation nongenomically. Approach and Results FXR ligands inhibited the activation of platelets in response to stimulation of collagen or thrombin receptors, resulting in diminished intracellular calcium mobilization and secretion, fibrinogen binding and aggregation. Exposure to FXR ligands also reduced integrin αIIbβ3 outside-in signaling and thereby reduced the ability of platelets to spread and to stimulate clot retraction. FXR function in platelets was found to be associated with the modulation of cGMP levels in platelets and associated downstream inhibitory signaling. Platelets from FXR-deficient mice were refractory to the actions of FXR agonists on platelet function and cyclic nucleotide signaling, firmly linking the non-genomic actions of these ligands to the FXR receptor. Conclusion This study provides support for the ability of FXR ligands to modulate platelet activation. The athero-protective effects of GW4064, with its novel antiplatelet effects, indicate FXR as a potential target for prevention of athero-thrombotic disease. PMID:27758768

  4. Early development of sigma-receptor ligands.

    PubMed

    Narayanan, Sanju; Bhat, Rohit; Mesangeau, Christophe; Poupaert, Jacques H; McCurdy, Christopher R

    2011-01-01

    Sigma receptors (σ-1 and σ-2) are non-opioid proteins implicated in the pathophysiology of various neurological disorders and cancer. The σ-1 subtype is a chaperon protein widely distributed in the CNS and peripheral tissues. These receptors are involved in the modulation of K(+)- and Ca(2+)-dependent signaling cascades at the endoplasmic reticulum and modulation of neurotransmitter release. σ-1 receptors are emerging targets for the treatment of neurophychiatric diseases (schizophrenia and depression) and cocaine addiction. σ-2 receptors are lipid raft proteins. They are highly expressed on many tumor cells and hence considered potential targets for anticancer drugs. σ receptors bind to a diverse class of pharmacological compounds like cocaine, methamphetamine, benzomorphans like (±)-pentazocine, (±)-SKF-10,047 and endogenous neurosteroids and sphingolipids. In this review we focus on the early development of σ receptor-specific ligands and radiolabeling agents.

  5. KLIFS: a structural kinase-ligand interaction database

    PubMed Central

    Kooistra, Albert J.; Kanev, Georgi K.; van Linden, Oscar P.J.; Leurs, Rob; de Esch, Iwan J.P.; de Graaf, Chris

    2016-01-01

    Protein kinases play a crucial role in cell signaling and are important drug targets in several therapeutic areas. The KLIFS database contains detailed structural kinase-ligand interaction information derived from all (>2900) structures of catalytic domains of human and mouse protein kinases deposited in the Protein Data Bank in order to provide insights into the structural determinants of kinase-ligand binding and selectivity. The kinase structures have been processed in a consistent manner by systematically analyzing the structural features and molecular interaction fingerprints (IFPs) of a predefined set of 85 binding site residues with bound ligands. KLIFS has been completely rebuilt and extended (>65% more structures) since its first release as a data set, including: novel automated annotation methods for (i) the assessment of ligand-targeted subpockets and the analysis of (ii) DFG and (iii) αC-helix conformations; improved and automated protocols for (iv) the generation of sequence/structure alignments, (v) the curation of ligand atom and bond typing for accurate IFP analysis and (vi) weekly database updates. KLIFS is now accessible via a website (http://klifs.vu-compmedchem.nl) that provides a comprehensive visual presentation of different types of chemical, biological and structural chemogenomics data, and allows the user to easily access, compare, search and download the data. PMID:26496949

  6. Improved Estimation of Protein-Ligand Binding Free Energy by Using the Ligand-Entropy and Mobility of Water Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Fukunishi, Yoshifumi; Nakamura, Haruki

    2013-01-01

    We previously developed the direct interaction approximation (DIA) method to estimate the protein-ligand binding free energy (ΔG). The DIA method estimates the ΔG value based on the direct van der Waals and electrostatic interaction energies between the protein and the ligand. In the current study, the effect of the entropy of the ligand was introduced with protein dynamic properties by molecular dynamics simulations, and the interaction between each residue of the protein and the ligand was also weighted considering the hydration of each residue. The molecular dynamics simulation of the apo target protein gave the hydration effect of each residue, under the assumption that the residues, which strongly bind the water molecules, are important in the protein-ligand binding. These two effects improved the reliability of the DIA method. In fact, the parameters used in the DIA became independent of the target protein. The averaged error of ΔG estimation was 1.3 kcal/mol and the correlation coefficient between the experimental ΔG value and the calculated ΔG value was 0.75. PMID:24276169

  7. Identification of inhibitors against the potential ligandable sites in the active cholera toxin.

    PubMed

    Gangopadhyay, Aditi; Datta, Abhijit

    2015-04-01

    The active cholera toxin responsible for the massive loss of water and ions in cholera patients via its ADP ribosylation activity is a heterodimer of the A1 subunit of the bacterial holotoxin and the human cytosolic ARF6 (ADP Ribosylation Factor 6). The active toxin is a potential target for the design of inhibitors against cholera. In this study we identified the potential ligandable sites of the active cholera toxin which can serve as binding sites for drug-like molecules. By employing an energy-based approach to identify ligand binding sites, and comparison with the results of computational solvent mapping, we identified two potential ligandable sites in the active toxin which can be targeted during structure-based drug design against cholera. Based on the probe affinities of the identified ligandable regions, docking-based virtual screening was employed to identify probable inhibitors against these sites. Several indole-based alkaloids and phosphates showed strong interactions to the important residues of the ligandable region at the A1 active site. On the other hand, 26 top scoring hits were identified against the ligandable region at the A1 ARF6 interface which showed strong hydrogen bonding interactions, including guanidines, phosphates, Leucopterin and Aristolochic acid VIa. This study has important implications in the application of hybrid structure-based and ligand-based methods against the identified ligandable sites using the identified inhibitors as reference ligands, for drug design against the active cholera toxin.

  8. Validity of ligand efficiency metrics.

    PubMed

    Murray, Christopher W; Erlanson, Daniel A; Hopkins, Andrew L; Keserü, György M; Leeson, Paul D; Rees, David C; Reynolds, Charles H; Richmond, Nicola J

    2014-06-12

    A recent viewpoint article (Improving the plausibility of success with inefficient metrics. ACS Med. Chem. Lett. 2014, 5, 2-5) argued that the standard definition of ligand efficiency (LE) is mathematically invalid. In this viewpoint, we address this criticism and show categorically that the definition of LE is mathematically valid. LE and other metrics such as lipophilic ligand efficiency (LLE) can be useful during the multiparameter optimization challenge faced by medicinal chemists.

  9. Ligand Identification Scoring Algorithm (LISA)

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Zheng; Merz, Kenneth M.

    2011-01-01

    A central problem in de novo drug design is determining the binding affinity of a ligand with a receptor. A new scoring algorithm is presented that estimates the binding affinity of a protein-ligand complex given a three-dimensional structure. The method, LISA (Ligand Identification Scoring Algorithm), uses an empirical scoring function to describe the binding free energy. Interaction terms have been designed to account for van der Waals (VDW) contacts, hydrogen bonding, desolvation effects and metal chelation to model the dissociation equilibrium constants using a linear model. Atom types have been introduced to differentiate the parameters for VDW, H-bonding interactions and metal chelation between different atom pairs. A training set of 492 protein-ligand complexes was selected for the fitting process. Different test sets have been examined to evaluate its ability to predict experimentally measured binding affinities. By comparing with other well known scoring functions, the results show that LISA has advantages over many existing scoring functions in simulating protein-ligand binding affinity, especially metalloprotein-ligand binding affinity. Artificial Neural Network (ANN) was also used in order to demonstrate that the energy terms in LISA are well designed and do not require extra cross terms. PMID:21561101

  10. Ligand Identification Scoring Algorithm (LISA).

    PubMed

    Zheng, Zheng; Merz, Kenneth M

    2011-06-27

    A central problem in de novo drug design is determining the binding affinity of a ligand with a receptor. A new scoring algorithm is presented that estimates the binding affinity of a protein-ligand complex given a three-dimensional structure. The method, LISA (Ligand Identification Scoring Algorithm), uses an empirical scoring function to describe the binding free energy. Interaction terms have been designed to account for van der Waals (VDW) contacts, hydrogen bonding, desolvation effects, and metal chelation to model the dissociation equilibrium constants using a linear model. Atom types have been introduced to differentiate the parameters for VDW, H-bonding interactions, and metal chelation between different atom pairs. A training set of 492 protein-ligand complexes was selected for the fitting process. Different test sets have been examined to evaluate its ability to predict experimentally measured binding affinities. By comparing with other well-known scoring functions, the results show that LISA has advantages over many existing scoring functions in simulating protein-ligand binding affinity, especially metalloprotein-ligand binding affinity. Artificial Neural Network (ANN) was also used in order to demonstrate that the energy terms in LISA are well designed and do not require extra cross terms.

  11. Discovery of Potent Dual PPARα Agonists/CB1 Ligands.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Fernández, Ruth; Fresno, Nieves; Macías-González, Manuel; Elguero, José; Decara, Juan; Girón, Rocío; Rodríguez-Álvarez, Ana; Martín, María Isabel; Rodríguez de Fonseca, Fernando; Goya, Pilar

    2011-11-10

    This letter describes the synthesis and in vitro and in vivo evaluation of dual ligands targeting the cannabinoid and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPAR). These compounds were obtained from fusing the pharmacophores of fibrates and the diarylpyrazole rimonabant, a cannabinoid receptor antagonist. They are the first examples of dual compounds with nanomolar affinity for both PPARα and cannabinoid receptors. Besides, lead compound 2 proved to be CB1 selective. Unexpectedly, the phenol intermediates tested were equipotent (compound 1 as compared to 2) or even more potent (compound 3 as compared with 4). This discovery opens the way to design new dual ligands.

  12. A novel peptide targeting Clec9a on dendritic cell for cancer immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Zhongyi; Wu, Yahong; Du, Jiangfeng; Li, Guodong; Wang, Shengdian; Cao, Wenpeng; Zhou, Xiuman; Wu, Chunjing; Zhang, Dan; Jing, Xueli; Li, Yifan; Wang, Hongfei; Gao, Yanfeng; Qi, Yuanming

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are professional antigen-presenting cells with antigen recognition molecules on the surface. Clec9a is selectively expressed on mouse CD8a+ DCs and CD103+ DCs subsets, which are functionally similar to human BDCA3+ DCs. It is reported that Clec9a is responsible for the antigen cross-presentation of these DC subsets. In the present study, by using phage display technique, we discovered a novel peptide WH, which can selectively bind to mouse Flt3L induced Clec9a+ DCs or Clec9a over-expressed HEK-293T cells. Furthermore, by using computer-aided docking model and mutation assay, we observed that Asp248 and Trp250 are two key residues for Clec9a to bind with peptide WH. When coupled with OVA257-264 epitope, peptide WH can significantly enhance the ability of Clec9a+ DCs to activate OVA-specific CD8+ T cells, which elicit strong ability to secret IFN-γ, express perforin and granzyme B mRNA. In B16-OVA lung metastasis mouse model, WH-OVA257-264 fusion peptide can also enhance the activation of CD8+ T cells and decrease the lung metastasis loci. All these results suggested that peptide WH could be considered as an antigen delivery carrier targeting Clec9a+ DCs for cancer immunotherapy. PMID:27250027

  13. Incorporation of protein flexibility and conformational energy penalties in docking screens to improve ligand discovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, Marcus; Coleman, Ryan G.; Fraser, James S.; Shoichet, Brian K.

    2014-07-01

    Proteins fluctuate between alternative conformations, which presents a challenge for ligand discovery because such flexibility is difficult to treat computationally owing to problems with conformational sampling and energy weighting. Here we describe a flexible docking method that samples and weights protein conformations using experimentally derived conformations as a guide. The crystallographically refined occupancies of these conformations, which are observable in an apo receptor structure, define energy penalties for docking. In a large prospective library screen, we identified new ligands that target specific receptor conformations of a cavity in cytochrome c peroxidase, and we confirm both ligand pose and associated receptor conformation predictions by crystallography. The inclusion of receptor flexibility led to ligands with new chemotypes and physical properties. By exploiting experimental measures of loop and side-chain flexibility, this method can be extended to the discovery of new ligands for hundreds of targets in the Protein Data Bank for which similar experimental information is available.

  14. Inside job: ligand-receptor pharmacology beneath the plasma membrane

    PubMed Central

    Babcock, Joseph J; Li, Min

    2013-01-01

    Most drugs acting on the cell surface receptors are membrane permeable and thus able to engage their target proteins in different subcellular compartments. However, these drugs' effects on cell surface receptors have historically been studied on the plasma membrane alone. Increasing evidence suggests that small molecules may also modulate their targeted receptors through membrane trafficking or organelle-localized signaling inside the cell. These additional modes of interaction have been reported for functionally diverse ligands of GPCRs, ion channels, and transporters. Such intracellular drug-target engagements affect cell surface expression. Concurrent intracellular and cell surface signaling may also increase the complexity and therapeutic opportunities of small molecule modulation. Here we discuss examples of ligand-receptor interactions that are present in both intra- and extracellular sites, and the potential therapeutic opportunities presented by this phenomenon. PMID:23685953

  15. Quantitation of Membrane-Ligand Interactions Using Backscattering Interferometry

    PubMed Central

    Baksh, Michael M.; Kussrow, Amanda K.; Mileni, Mauro; Finn, M.G.; Bornhop, Darryl J.

    2011-01-01

    Though membrane-associated proteins are ubiquitous within all living organisms and represent the majority of drug targets, a general method for direct, label-free measurement of ligand binding to native membranes has not been reported. Here we show backscattering interferometry (BSI) to be a viable technique for quantifying ligand-receptor binding affinities in a variety of membrane environments. By detecting minute changes in the refractive index of a solution, BSI allows binding interactions of proteins with their ligands to be measured at picomolar concentrations. Equilibrium binding constants in the micromolar to picomolar range were obtained for small- and large-molecule interactions in both synthetic- and cell-derived membranes without the use of labels or supporting substrates. The simple and low-cost hardware, high sensitivity, and label-free nature of BSI should make it readily applicable to the study of many membrane-associated proteins of biochemical and pharmacological interest. PMID:21399645

  16. Photosensitivity of neurons enabled by cell-targeted gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Carvalho-de-Souza, João L; Treger, Jeremy S; Dang, Bobo; Kent, Stephen B H; Pepperberg, David R; Bezanilla, Francisco

    2015-04-08

    Unmodified neurons can be directly stimulated with light to produce action potentials, but such techniques have lacked localization of the delivered light energy. Here we show that gold nanoparticles can be conjugated to high-avidity ligands for a variety of cellular targets. Once bound to a neuron, these particles transduce millisecond pulses of light into heat, which changes membrane capacitance, depolarizing the cell and eliciting action potentials. Compared to non-functionalized nanoparticles, ligand-conjugated nanoparticles highly resist convective washout and enable photothermal stimulation with lower delivered energy and resulting temperature increase. Ligands targeting three different membrane proteins were tested; all showed similar activity and washout resistance. This suggests that many types of ligands can be bound to nanoparticles, preserving ligand and nanoparticle function, and that many different cell phenotypes can be targeted by appropriate choice of ligand. The findings have applications as an alternative to optogenetics and potentially for therapies involving neuronal photostimulation.

  17. Estrogen Receptor Ligands: A Review (2013–2015)

    PubMed Central

    Farzaneh, Shabnam; Zarghi, Afshin

    2016-01-01

    Estrogen receptors (ERs) are a group of compounds named for their importance in both menstrual and estrous reproductive cycles. They are involved in the regulation of various processes ranging from tissue growth maintenance to reproduction. Their action is mediated through ER nuclear receptors. Two subtypes of the estrogen receptor, ERα and ERβ, exist and exhibit distinct cellular and tissue distribution patterns. In humans, both receptor subtypes are expressed in many cells and tissues, and they control key physiological functions in various organ systems. Estrogens attract great attention due to their wide applications in female reproductive functions and treatment of some estrogen-dependent cancers and osteoporosis. This paper provides a general review of ER ligands published in international journals patented between 2013 and 2015. The broad physiological profile of estrogens has attracted the attention of many researchers to develop new estrogen ligands as therapeutic molecules for various clinical purposes. After the discovery of the ERβ receptor, subtype-selective ligands could be used to elicit beneficial estrogen-like activities and reduce adverse side effects, based on the different distributions and relative levels of the two ER subtypes in different estrogen target tissues. Therefore, recent literature has focused on selective estrogen ligands as highly promising agents for the treatment of some types of cancer, as well as for cardiovascular, inflammatory, and neurodegenerative diseases. Estrogen receptors are nuclear transcription factors that are involved in the regulation of many complex physiological functions in humans. Selective estrogen ligands are highly promising targets for treatment of some types of cancer, as well as for cardiovascular, inflammatory and neurodegenerative diseases. Extensive structure-activity relationship studies of ER ligands based on small molecules indicate that many different structural scaffolds may provide high

  18. Biased ligands for better cardiovascular drugs: dissecting G-protein-coupled receptor pharmacology.

    PubMed

    DeWire, Scott M; Violin, Jonathan D

    2011-07-08

    Drug discovery efforts targeting G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCR) have been immensely successful in creating new cardiovascular medicines. Currently marketed GPCR drugs are broadly classified as either agonists that activate receptors or antagonists that prevent receptor activation by endogenous stimuli. However, GPCR couple to a multitude of intracellular signaling pathways beyond classical G-protein signals, and these signals can be independently activated by biased ligands to vastly expand the potential for new drugs at these classic targets. By selectively engaging only a subset of a receptor's potential intracellular partners, biased ligands may deliver more precise therapeutic benefit with fewer side effects than current GPCR-targeted drugs. In this review, we discuss the history of biased ligand research, the current understanding of how biased ligands exert their unique pharmacology, and how research into GPCR signaling has uncovered previously unappreciated capabilities of receptor pharmacology. We focus on several receptors to illustrate the approaches taken and discoveries made, and how these are steadily illuminating the intricacies of GPCR pharmacology. Discoveries of biased ligands targeting the angiotensin II type 1 receptor and of separable pharmacology suggesting the potential value of biased ligands targeting the β-adrenergic receptors and nicotinic acid receptor GPR109a highlight the powerful clinical promise of this new category of potential therapeutics.

  19. Ligand-Receptor Binding Measured by Laser-Scanning Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuck, Paul; Lao, Zhege; Skwish, Stephen; Fraser Glickman, J.; Yang, Ke; Burbaum, Jonathan; Inglese, James

    1999-09-01

    This report describes the integration of laser-scanning fluorometric cytometry and nonseparation ligand-binding techniques to provide new assay methods adaptable to miniaturization and high-throughput screening. Receptor-bound, cyanine dye-labeled ligands, [Cy]ligands, were discriminated from those free in solution by measuring the accumulated fluorescence associated with a receptor-containing particle. To illustrate the various binding formats accommodated by this technique, saturation- and competition-binding analyses were performed with [Cy]ligands and their cognate receptors expressed in CHO cells or as fusion proteins coated on polystyrene microspheres. We have successfully applied this technique to the analysis of G protein-coupled receptors, cytokine receptors, and SH2 domains. Multiparameter readouts from ligands labeled separately with Cy5 and Cy5.5 demonstrate the simultaneous analysis of two target receptors in a single well. In addition, laser-scanning cytometry has been used to assay enzymes such as phosphatases and in the development of single-step fluorescent immunoassays.

  20. A modified fluorescent intercalator displacement assay for RNA ligand discovery

    PubMed Central

    Asare-Okai, Papa Nii; Chow, Christine S.

    2010-01-01

    Fluorescent intercalator displacement (FID) is a convenient and practical tool for identifying new nucleic-acid-binding ligands. The success of FID is based on the fact that it can be fashioned into a versatile screening assay for assessing the relative binding affinities of compounds to nucleic acids. FID is a tagless approach; the target RNAs and the ligands or small molecules under investigation do not have to be modified in order to be examined. In this study, a modified FID assay for screening RNA-binding ligands was established using 3-methyl-2-((1-(3-(trimethylammonio)propyl)-4-quinolinylidene)methyl)benzothiazolium (TO-PRO) as the fluorescent indicator. Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) results provide direct evidence that correlates the reduction in fluorescence intensity observed in the FID assay with displacement of the dye molecule from RNA. The assay was successfully applied to screen a variety of RNA-binding ligands with a set of small hairpin RNAs. Ligands that bind with moderate affinity to the chosen RNA constructs (A-site, TAR, h31, and H69) were identified. PMID:20863807

  1. Continuous microfluidic assortment of interactive ligands (CMAIL)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsiao, Yi-Hsing; Huang, Chao-Yang; Hu, Chih-Yung; Wu, Yen-Yu; Wu, Chung-Hsiun; Hsu, Chia-Hsien; Chen, Chihchen

    2016-08-01

    Finding an interactive ligand-receptor pair is crucial to many applications, including the development of monoclonal antibodies. Biopanning, a commonly used technique for affinity screening, involves a series of washing steps and is lengthy and tedious. Here we present an approach termed continuous microfluidic assortment of interactive ligands, or CMAIL, for the screening and sorting of antigen-binding single-chain variable antibody fragments (scFv) displayed on bacteriophages (phages). Phages carrying native negative charges on their coat proteins were electrophoresed through a hydrogel matrix functionalized with target antigens under two alternating orthogonal electric fields. During the weak horizontal electric field phase, phages were differentially swept laterally depending on their affinity for the antigen, and all phages were electrophoresed down to be collected during the strong vertical electric field phase. Phages of different affinity were spatially separated, allowing the continuous operation. More than 105 CFU (colony forming unit) antigen-interacting phages were isolated with ~100% specificity from a phage library containing 3 × 109 individual members within 40 minutes of sorting using CMAIL. CMAIL is rapid, sensitive, specific, and does not employ washing, elution or magnetic beads. In conclusion, we have developed an efficient and cost-effective method for isolating and sorting affinity reagents involving phage display.

  2. Continuous microfluidic assortment of interactive ligands (CMAIL)

    PubMed Central

    Hsiao, Yi-Hsing; Huang, Chao-Yang; Hu, Chih-Yung; Wu, Yen-Yu; Wu, Chung-Hsiun; Hsu, Chia-Hsien; Chen, Chihchen

    2016-01-01

    Finding an interactive ligand-receptor pair is crucial to many applications, including the development of monoclonal antibodies. Biopanning, a commonly used technique for affinity screening, involves a series of washing steps and is lengthy and tedious. Here we present an approach termed continuous microfluidic assortment of interactive ligands, or CMAIL, for the screening and sorting of antigen-binding single-chain variable antibody fragments (scFv) displayed on bacteriophages (phages). Phages carrying native negative charges on their coat proteins were electrophoresed through a hydrogel matrix functionalized with target antigens under two alternating orthogonal electric fields. During the weak horizontal electric field phase, phages were differentially swept laterally depending on their affinity for the antigen, and all phages were electrophoresed down to be collected during the strong vertical electric field phase. Phages of different affinity were spatially separated, allowing the continuous operation. More than 105 CFU (colony forming unit) antigen-interacting phages were isolated with ~100% specificity from a phage library containing 3 × 109 individual members within 40 minutes of sorting using CMAIL. CMAIL is rapid, sensitive, specific, and does not employ washing, elution or magnetic beads. In conclusion, we have developed an efficient and cost-effective method for isolating and sorting affinity reagents involving phage display. PMID:27578501

  3. Why mercury prefers soft ligands

    SciTech Connect

    Riccardi, Demian M; Guo, Hao-Bo; Gu, Baohua; Parks, Jerry M; Summers, Anne; Miller, S; Liang, Liyuan; Smith, Jeremy C

    2013-01-01

    Mercury (Hg) is a major global pollutant arising from both natural and anthropogenic sources. Defining the factors that determine the relative affinities of different ligands for the mercuric ion, Hg2+, is critical to understanding its speciation, transformation, and bioaccumulation in the environment. Here, we use quantum chemistry to dissect the relative binding free energies for a series of inorganic anion complexes of Hg2+. Comparison of Hg2+ ligand interactions in the gaseous and aqueous phases shows that differences in interactions with a few, local water molecules led to a clear periodic trend within the chalcogenide and halide groups and resulted in the well-known experimentally observed preference of Hg2+ for soft ligands such as thiols. Our approach establishes a basis for understanding Hg speciation in the biosphere.

  4. What are Nuclear Receptor Ligands?

    PubMed Central

    Sladek, Frances M.

    2010-01-01

    Nuclear receptors (NRs) are a family of highly conserved transcription factors that regulate transcription in response to small lipophilic compounds. They play a role in every aspect of development, physiology and disease in humans. They are also ubiquitous in and unique to the animal kingdom suggesting that they may have played an important role in their evolution. In contrast to the classical endocrine receptors that originally defined the family, recent studies suggest that the first NRs might have been sensors of their environment, binding ligands that were external to the host organism. The purpose of this review is to provide a broad perspective on NR ligands and address the issue of exactly what constitutes a NR ligand from historical, biological and evolutionary perspectives. This discussion will lay the foundation for subsequent reviews in this issue as well as pose new questions for future investigation. PMID:20615454

  5. Molecular Recognition and Ligand Association

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baron, Riccardo; McCammon, J. Andrew

    2013-04-01

    We review recent developments in our understanding of molecular recognition and ligand association, focusing on two major viewpoints: (a) studies that highlight new physical insight into the molecular recognition process and the driving forces determining thermodynamic signatures of binding and (b) recent methodological advances in applications to protein-ligand binding. In particular, we highlight the challenges posed by compensating enthalpic and entropic terms, competing solute and solvent contributions, and the relevance of complex configurational ensembles comprising multiple protein, ligand, and solvent intermediate states. As more complete physics is taken into account, computational approaches increase their ability to complement experimental measurements, by providing a microscopic, dynamic view of ensemble-averaged experimental observables. Physics-based approaches are increasingly expanding their power in pharmacology applications.

  6. Targeting Itch with Ligands Selective for κ Opioid Receptors.

    PubMed

    Cowan, Alan; Kehner, George B; Inan, Saadet

    2015-01-01

    Several chemically diverse pruritogens, including bombesin, compound 48/80, norbinaltorphimine, and 5'-GNTI, cause rodents to scratch excessively in a stable, uniform manner and consequently provide convenient animal models of itch against which potential antipruritics may be evaluated, structure-activity relationships established, and the nature of spontaneous, repetitive behavior itself analyzed. Decreasing the number of scratching bouts in these apparently simple models has been the requisite first step in the progress of kappa opioid agonists such as nalbuphine, asimadoline, and CR845 toward clinical testing as antipruritics. Nalfurafine is the prime example of a kappa agonist spanning the developmental divide between scratching mice models and commercialization within 10 years. Patients undergoing hemodialysis and suffering from the itching associated with uremic pruritus, and potentially those inflicted with atopic dermatitis, are the beneficiaries.

  7. Development and evaluation of targeting ligands surface modified paclitaxel nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Sohn, Jeong Sun; Yoon, Doo-Soo; Sohn, Jun Youn; Park, Jeong-Sook; Choi, Jin-Seok

    2017-03-01

    To overcome the toxicity of excipient or blank nanoparticles for drug delivery nano-system, the surface modified paclitaxel nanocrystals (PTX-NC) have been developed. PTX-NCs were prepared by nano-precipitation method. The surface of PTX-NCs were modified by grafting with apo-transferrin (Tf) or hyaluronic acid (HA). The physical properties of PTX-NCs were evaluated by field emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM), zeta-sizer, zeta-potential, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectrometry. In vitro drug release study was performed in phosphate buffered saline (PBS) with or without 0.5% (w/v) Tween 80 for 24h. Cellular uptake was studied at time intervals of 0.5, 1, and 2h in MCF-7 cells, and cell growth inhibition study was performed for 24h using MCF-7 cells (cancer cells), and HaCaT cells (normal cells). Three different types of PTX-NCs with a mean size of 236.0±100.6nm (PTX-NC), 302.0±152.0nm (Tf-PTX-NC) and 339±180.6nm (HA-PTX-NC) were successfully prepared. The drug release profiles showed 29.1%/6.9% (PTX (pure)), 40.7%/23.9% (PTX-NC), 50.5%/25.1% (Tf-PTX-NC) and 46.8/24.8% (HA-PTX-NC) in PBS with/without 0.5% (w/v) Tween 80 for 24h, respectively. As per the results, the drug release of PTX-NCs showed the faster release as compared to that of PTX (pure). Surface modified PTX-NCs exhibited higher values for cell permeability than unmodified PTX-NC in the cellular uptake study. Surface modified PTX-NCs inhibited the cell growth approximately to 60% in MCF-7 cells, however effect of surface modified PTX-NCs on normal cell line was lower than the PTX-NC and PTX (pure). In conclusion, biological macromolecules (Tf or HA) surface modified PTX-NC enhanced the cellular uptake and the cell growth inhibition.

  8. Beta-arrestin-biased ligands at seven-transmembrane receptors.

    PubMed

    Violin, Jonathan D; Lefkowitz, Robert J

    2007-08-01

    Seven-transmembrane receptors (7TMRs), the most common molecular targets of modern drug therapy, are critically regulated by beta-arrestins, which both inhibit classic G-protein signaling and initiate distinct beta-arrestin signaling. The interplay of G-protein and beta-arrestin signals largely determines the cellular consequences of 7TMR-targeted drugs. Until recently, a drug's efficacy for beta-arrestin recruitment was believed to be proportional to its efficacy for G-protein activities. This paradigm restricts 7TMR drug effects to a linear spectrum of responses, ranging from inhibition of all responses to stimulation of all responses. However, it is now clear that 'biased ligands' can selectively activate G-protein or beta-arrestin functions and thus elicit novel biological effects from even well-studied 7TMRs. Here, we discuss the current state of beta-arrestin-biased ligand research and the prospects for beta-arrestin bias as a therapeutic target. Consideration of ligand bias might have profound influences on the way scientists approach 7TMR-targeted drug discovery.

  9. Targeting Ligand-Dependent and Ligand-Independent Androgen Receptor Signaling in Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    Pugh M, Raj GV, Brown GD, D’Santos C, Robinson JL, Silva G, Launchbury R, Perou CM, Stingl J, Caldas C, Tilley WD, Carroll JS. Progesterone receptor... Peng Y, Raj GV, Yee D, Lange CA. Progesterone receptor-B enhances estrogen responsiveness of breast cancer cells via scaffolding PELP1- and estrogen

  10. Targeting Ligand Dependent and Ligand Independent Androgen Receptor Signaling in Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    subunits interact under specific condi- tions, and the consequences of these interactions are fun- damental to drug development. Thus, it can be... drug therapy approaches are summarized in Table 2. Converting Peptides to Peptidomimetics Identifying PPI surfaces Identifying interaction motifs between... drugs that have potent effects in blocking the interaction between Runx1:CBFb found in acute myeloid lymphoma (102). Limitations of Peptidomimetics The

  11. Selective precipitation and purification of monovalent proteins using oligovalent ligands and ammonium sulfate.

    PubMed

    Mirica, Katherine A; Lockett, Matthew R; Snyder, Phillip W; Shapiro, Nathan D; Mack, Eric T; Nam, Sarah; Whitesides, George M

    2012-02-15

    This paper describes a method for the selective precipitation and purification of a monovalent protein (carbonic anhydrase is used as a demonstration) from cellular lysate using ammonium sulfate and oligovalent ligands. The oligovalent ligands induce the formation of protein-ligand aggregates, and at an appropriate concentration of dissolved ammonium sulfate, these complexes precipitate. The purification involves three steps: (i) the removal of high-molecular-weight impurities through the addition of ammonium sulfate to the crude cell lysate; (ii) the introduction of an oligovalent ligand and the selective precipitation of the target protein-ligand aggregates from solution; and (iii) the removal of the oligovalent ligand from the precipitate by dialysis to release the target protein. The increase of mass and volume of the proteins upon aggregate formation reduces their solubility, and results in the selective precipitation of these aggregates. We recovered human carbonic anhydrase, from crude cellular lysate, in 82% yield and 95% purity with a trivalent benzene sulfonamide ligand. This method provides a chromatography-free strategy of purifying monovalent proteins--for which appropriate oligovalent ligands can be synthesized--and combines the selectivity of affinity-based purification with the convenience of salt-induced precipitation.

  12. Computer-aided design of a novel ligand for retinoic acid receptor in cancer chemotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, Carlos H. T. P.; Leopoldino, Andreia M.; Silva, Eloiza H. T.; Espinoza, V. A. A.; Taft, C. A.

    The isotypes of RAR and RXR are retinoic acid and retinoid X acid receptors, respectively, whose ligand-binding domain contains the ligand-dependent activation function, with distinct pharmacological targets for retinoids, involved in the treatment of various cancers and skin diseases. Due to the major challenge which cancer treatment and cure still imposes after many decades to the international scientific community, there is actually considerable interest in new ligands with increased bioactivity. We have focused on the retinoid acid receptor, which is considered an interesting target for drug design. In this work, we carried out density functional geometry optimizations and different docking procedures. We performed screening in a large database (hundreds of thousands of molecules which we optimized at the AM1 level) yielding a set of potential bioactive ligands. A new ligand was selected and optimized at the B3LYP/6-31G* level. A flexible docking program was used to investigate the interactions between the receptor and the new ligand. The result of this work is compared with several crystallographic ligands of RAR. Our theoretically more bioactive new ligand indicates stronger and more hydrogen bonds as well as hydrophobic interactions with the receptor.

  13. Selective Precipitation and Purification of Monovalent Proteins Using Oligovalent Ligands and Ammonium Sulfate

    PubMed Central

    Mirica, Katherine A.; Lockett, Matthew R.; Snyder, Phillip W.; Shapiro, Nathan D.; Mack, Eric T.; Nam, Sarah; Whitesides, George M.

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes a method for the selective precipitation and purification of a monovalent protein (carbonic anhydrase is used as a demonstration) from cellular lysate using ammonium sulfate and oligovalent ligands. The oligovalent ligands induce the formation of protein-ligand aggregates, and at an appropriate concentration of dissolved ammonium sulfate, these complexes precipitate. The purification involves three steps: i) the removal of high-molecular weight impurities through the addition of ammonium sulfate to the crude cell lysate; ii) the introduction of an oligovalent ligand and the selective precipitation of the target protein-ligand aggregates from solution; and iii) the removal of the oligovalent ligand from the precipitate by dialysis to release the target protein. The increase of mass and volume of the proteins upon aggregate formation reduces their solubility, and results in the selective precipitation of these aggregates. We recovered human carbonic anhydrase, from crude cellular lysate, in 82% yield and 95% purity with a trivalent benzene sulfonamide ligand. This method provides a chromatography-free strategy of purifying monovalent proteins—for which appropriate oligovalent ligands can be synthesized—and combines the selectivity of affinity-based purification with the convenience of salt-induced precipitation. PMID:22188202

  14. Ligand-induced Epitope Masking

    PubMed Central

    Mould, A. Paul; Askari, Jan