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Sample records for fluconazole plasma concentration

  1. Fluconazole treatment hyperpolarizes the plasma membrane of Candida cells.

    PubMed

    Elicharova, Hana; Sychrova, Hana

    2013-11-01

    Five pathogenic Candida species were compared in terms of their osmotolerance, tolerance to toxic sodium and lithium cations, and resistance to fluconazole. The species not only differed, in general, in their tolerance to high osmotic pressure (C. albicans and C. parapsilosis being the most osmotolerant) but exhibited distinct sensitivities to toxic sodium and lithium cations, with C. parapsilosis and C. tropicalis being very tolerant but C. krusei and C. dubliniensis sensitive to LiCl. The treatment of both fluconazole-susceptible (C. albicans and C. parapsilosis) and fluconazole-resistant (C. dubliniensis, C. krusei and C. tropicalis) growing cells with subinhibitory concentrations of fluconazole resulted in substantially elevated intracellular Na(+) levels. Using a diS-C3(3) assay, for the first time, to monitor the relative membrane potential (ΔΨ) of Candida cells, we show that the fluconazole treatment of growing cells of all five species results in a substantial hyperpolarization of their plasma membranes, which is responsible for an increased non-specific transport of toxic alkali metal cations and other cationic drugs (e.g., hygromycin B). Thus, the combination of relatively low doses of fluconazole and drugs, whose import into the tested Candida strains is driven by the cell membrane potential, might be especially potent in terms of its ability to inhibit the growth of or even kill various Candida species.

  2. Fluconazole

    MedlinePlus

    Fluconazole is used to treat fungal infections, including yeast infections of the vagina, mouth, throat, esophagus (tube ... by fungus. Fluconazole is also used to prevent yeast infections in patients who are likely to become ...

  3. DETERMINATION OF FLUCONAZOLE IN HUMAN PLASMA BY REVERSE PHASE HIGH PERFORMANCE LIQUID CHROMATOGRAPHY.

    PubMed

    Safaei, Zahra; Alipour, Eskandar; Shafaati, Alireza; Zarghp, Afshin

    2015-01-01

    A rapid, simple and reproducible high performance liquid chromatographic method was developed and validated for determination of fluconazole in human plasma. The separation was performed on MZ C8 column (125 x 4 mm, 5 µm) using acetonitrile - potassium dihydrogen phosphate buffer (15 : 85, v/v), pH 3.0, as the mobile phase at a flow rate of 1.5 mL/min. The wavelength was set at 261 nm. The assay enables the measurement of fluconazole for therapeutic drug monitoring with a minimum quantification limit of 20 ng/mL. The method involves simple, protein precipitation procedure and analytical recovery was complete. The calibration curve was linear over the concentration range 0.1-4 µg/mL. The coefficients of variation for inter-day and intra-day assay were found to be less than 10%.

  4. Unbound fraction of fluconazole and linezolid in human plasma as determined by ultrafiltration: Impact of membrane type.

    PubMed

    Kratzer, Alexander; Kees, Frieder; Dorn, Christoph

    2016-12-15

    Ultrafiltration is a rapid and convenient method to determine the free concentrations of drugs in plasma. Several ultrafiltration devices based on Eppendorf cups are commercially available, but are not validated for such use by the manufacturer. Plasma pH, temperature and relative centrifugal force as well as membrane type can influence the results. In the present work, we developed an ultrafiltration method in order to determine the free concentrations of linezolid or fluconazole, both neutral and moderately lipophilic antiinfective drugs for parenteral as well as oral administration, in plasma of patients. Whereas both substances behaved relatively insensitive in human plasma regarding variations in pH (7.0-8.5), temperature (5-37°C) or relative centrifugal force (1000-10.000xg), losses of linezolid were observed with the Nanosep Omega device due to adsorption onto the polyethersulfone membrane (unbound fraction 75% at 100mg/L and 45% at 0.1mg/L, respectively). No losses were observed with Vivacon which is equipped with a membrane of regenerated cellulose. With fluconazole no differences between Nanosep and Vivacon were observed. Applying standard conditions (pH 7.4/37°C/1000xg/20min), the mean unbound fraction of linezolid in pooled plasma from healthy volunteers was 81.5±2.8% using Vivacon, that of fluconazole was 87.9±3.5% using Nanosep or 89.4±3.3% using Vivacon. The unbound fraction of linezolid was 85.4±3.7% in plasma samples from surgical patients and 92.1±6.2% in ICU patients, respectively. The unbound fraction of fluconazole was 93.9±3.3% in plasma samples from ICU patients.

  5. Influence of sustained low-efficiency diafiltration (SLED-f) on interstitial fluid concentrations of fluconazole in a critically ill patient: Use of microdialysis.

    PubMed

    Sinnollareddy, Mahipal G; Roberts, Michael S; Lipman, Jeffrey; Peake, Sandra L; Roberts, Jason A

    2015-07-01

    Acute kidney injury is a common complication in critically ill patients, and hybrid techniques including sustained low-efficiency dialysis/diafiltration (SLED-f) are being increasingly utilised in intensive care units. Most fungal infections occur in the interstitial fluid (ISF) of tissues and successful treatment of a fungal infection relies on the ability of an antifungal agent to achieve adequate concentrations at the site of infection. Tissue distribution of antimicrobials is impaired in critically ill patients owing to a variety of disease-related physiological changes, e.g. sepsis. Fluconazole is a widely used antifungal agent used to treat Candida spp. infections in critically ill patients. The implications for ISF concentrations of enhanced elimination during renal replacement therapy have not yet been reported for fluconazole. The aim of this single-patient case report was to describe the influence of SLED-f on subcutaneous (SC) ISF concentrations of fluconazole and the implications for achieving pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic targets. Serial blood and ISF samples were collected at pre- and post-filter ports within the SLED-f circuit and subcutaneously inserted microdialysis probe, respectively. Fluconazole concentrations were measured using a validated chromatography method. The SC ISF-to-plasma partition coefficient of fluconazole in this patient was 0.91, indicating rapid equilibrium. SC ISF fluconazole concentrations consistently decreased after initiating SLED-f. The majority of the fluconazole was eliminated from the SC ISF as a result of redistribution. Considering the extensive tissue re-distribution of fluconazole and observed elimination from tissue compartments, higher doses may be required to treat deep-seated fungal infections.

  6. Retrospective Study of Cryptococcal Meningitis With Elevated Minimum Inhibitory Concentration to Fluconazole in Immunocompromised Patients.

    PubMed

    Nasri, Hashem; Kabbani, Sarah; Bou Alwan, Melhim; Wang, Yun F; Rebolledo, Paulina A; Kraft, Colleen S; Nguyen, Minh L; Anderson, Albert M; Rouphael, Nadine

    2016-04-01

    Background.  Mortality for cryptococcal meningitis remains significant, in spite of available treatment. Resistance to first-line maintenance therapy, particularly fluconazole, has been reported. Methods.  A retrospective chart review was performed on immunocompromised patients with cryptococcal meningitis, who had susceptibility testing performed between January 2001 and December 2011, at 3 hospitals in Atlanta, Georgia. Results.  A total of 35 immunocompromised patients with cryptococcal meningitis were identified, 13 (37.1%) of whom had an elevated minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) to fluconazole (MIC ≥16 µg/mL). Eighty percent of patients were males with African American predominance, the median age was 37 years, and 80% of the patients were human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) positive. Subsequent recurrence of cryptococcal meningitis was more likely in HIV patients compared with solid organ transplant patients (P = .0366). Overall, there was a statistically significant increase in an elevated MIC to fluconazole in patients who had a history of prior azole use (odds ratio, 10.12; 95% confidence interval, 2.04-50.16). Patients with an elevated MIC to fluconazole and those with a high cerebrospinal fluid cryptococcal antigen load (≥1:512) were more likely to have central nervous system complications (P = .0358 and P = .023, respectively). Although no association was observed between an elevated MIC to fluconazole and mortality, those who received voriconazole or high-dose fluconazole (≥800 mg) for maintenance therapy were more likely to survive (P = .0288). Conclusions.  Additional studies are required to further investigate the morbidity and mortality associated with an elevated MIC to fluconazole in cryptococcal meningitis, to determine when it is appropriate to perform susceptibility testing, and to evaluate its cost effectiveness.

  7. Cyclosporine A decreases the fluconazole minimum inhibitory concentration of Candida albicans clinical isolates but not biofilm formation and cell growth.

    PubMed

    Wibawa, T; Nurrokhman; Baly, I; Daeli, P R; Kartasasmita, G; Wijayanti, N

    2015-03-01

    Among the genus Candida, Candida albicans is the most abundant species in humans. One of the virulent factors of C. albicans is its ability to develop biofilm. Biofilm forming microbes are characterized by decreasing of its susceptibility to antibiotics and antifungal. The fungicidal effect of fluconazole may be enhanced by cyclosporine A in laboratory engineered C. albicans strains. The aim of this work is to analyze the synergistic effect of cyclosporine A with fluconazole in C. albicans clinical isolates and the effect of cycolsporine A alone in the biofilm formation. Six fluconazole resistant and six sensitive C. albicans clinical isolates were analyzed for its minimum inhibitory concentration (MICs), biofilm formation, and cell growths. A semi-quantitative XTT [2,3-bis(2-methoxy-4-nitro-5- sulfo-phenyl)-2H-tetrazolium-5-carboxanilide] reduction assay was conducted to measure the biofilm formation. Cyclosporine A has synergistic effect with fluconazole that was shown by decreasing MICs of both fluconazole resistant and sensitive C. albicans clinical isolates. However, cyclosporine A alone did not influence the biofilm formation and cell growth of both fluconazole resistant and sensitive C. albicans clinical isolates. These results indicated that cyclosporine A might be a promising candidate of adjuvant therapy for fluconazole against both fluconazole resistant and sensitive C. albicans clinical isolates.

  8. Enhanced extracellular production of aspartyl proteinase, a virulence factor, by Candida albicans isolates following growth in subinhibitory concentrations of fluconazole.

    PubMed

    Wu, T; Wright, K; Hurst, S F; Morrison, C J

    2000-05-01

    We examined the production of secreted aspartyl proteinase (Sap), a putative virulence factor of Candida albicans, by a series of 17 isolates representing a single strain obtained from the oral cavity of an AIDS patient before and after the development of clinical and in vitro resistance to fluconazole. Isolates were grown in Sap-inducing yeast carbon base-bovine serum albumin medium containing 0, 0.25, 0.5, or 1 MIC of fluconazole, and cultures were sampled daily for 14 days to determine extracellular Sap activity by enzymatic degradation of bovine serum albumin. Extracellular Sap activity was significantly decreased in a dose-dependent manner for the most fluconazole-susceptible isolate (MIC, 1.0 microg/ml) and significantly increased in a dose-dependent manner for the most fluconazole-resistant isolate (MIC, >64 microg/ml). Enhanced extracellular Sap production could not be attributed to cell death or nonspecific release of Sap, because there was no reduction in the number of CFU and no significant release of enolase, a constitutive enzyme of the glycolytic pathway. Conversely, intracellular Sap concentrations were significantly increased in a dose-dependent manner in the most fluconazole-susceptible isolate and decreased in the most fluconazole-resistant isolate. Enhanced Sap production correlated with the overexpression of a gene encoding a multidrug resistance (MDR1) efflux pump occurring in these isolates. These data indicate that exposure to subinhibitory concentrations of fluconazole can result in enhanced extracellular production of Sap by isolates with the capacity to overexpress MDR1 and imply that patients infected with these isolates and subsequently treated with suboptimal doses of fluconazole may experience enhanced C. albicans virulence in vivo.

  9. Identification of Candida species in patients with oral lesion undergoing chemotherapy along with minimum inhibitory concentration to fluconazole

    PubMed Central

    Maheronnaghsh, Mehrnoush; Tolouei, Sepideh; Dehghan, Parvin; Chadeganipour, Mostafa; Yazdi, Maryam

    2016-01-01

    Background: Various species of Candida, especially Candida albicans was known as the most important etiological agent of fungal infections. Oral candidiasis is the most common fungal infection in patients undergoing chemotherapy. The purpose of this study was to identify Candida species from oral lesions of these patients and antifungal susceptibility of the clinical isolates. Materials and Methods: Among 385 patients with cancer, 55 (14.3%) showed oral lesions. Oral swabs were performed to identify the yeasts using direct smear and CHROMagar medium. Micro dilution method was prepared in different concentrations of fluconazole and minimum inhibitory concentration and minimum fungicidal concentration of each species were compared. Results: Oral candidiasis confirmed in 36 cases by direct examination and culture. C. albicans and non-albicans represented in 26 (72.2%) and 10 (27.8%) of the isolates, respectively. 76.5% of C. albicans and 23.5% non-albicans isolates were resistant to fluconazole. Data were shown that 62% and 30.7% of resistant strains of C. albicans were found in patient with gastrointestinal cancer and lymphoma respectively. Conclusion: Data were shown that C. albicans is the most commonly identified species in oral candidiasis and majority of fluconazole resistant C. albicans were found in patients with gastrointestinal cancer and lymphoma. Therefore, we recommend an alternative drug instead of fluconazole as a first line of treatment for these type of cancers and administration of fluconazole in patients undergoing chemotherapy should be prescribed in accordance with the type of cancer. PMID:27656601

  10. Human subcutaneous tissue distribution of fluconazole: comparison of microdialysis and suction blister techniques

    PubMed Central

    Sasongko, Lucy; Williams, Kenneth M; Day, Richard O; McLachlan, Andrew J

    2003-01-01

    Aims To investigate uptake of fluconazole into the interstitial fluid of human subcutaneous tissue using the microdialysis and suction blister techniques. Methods A sterile microdialysis probe (CMA/60) was inserted subcutaneously into the upper arm of five healthy volunteers following an overnight fast. Blisters were induced on the lower arm using gentle suction prior to ingestion of a single oral dose of fluconazole (200 mg). Microdialysate, blister fluid and blood were sampled over 8 h. Fluconazole concentrations were determined in each sample using a validated HPLC assay. In vivo recovery of fluconazole from the microdialysis probe was determined in each subject by perfusing the probe with fluconazole solution at the end of the 8 h sampling period. Individual in vivo recovery was used to calculate fluconazole concentrations in subcutaneous interstitial fluid. A physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model was used to predict fluconazole concentrations in human subcutaneous interstitial fluid. Results There was a lag-time (approximately 0.5 h) between detection of fluconazole in microdialysate compared with plasma in each subject. The in vivo recovery of fluconazole from the microdialysis probe ranged from 57.0 to 67.2%. The subcutaneous interstitial fluid concentrations obtained by microdialysis were very similar to the unbound concentrations of fluconazole in plasma with maximum concentration of 4.29 ± 1.19 µg ml−1 in subcutaneous interstitial fluid and 3.58 ± 0.14 µg ml−1 in plasma. Subcutaneous interstitial fluid-to-plasma partition coefficient (Kp) of fluconazole was 1.16 ± 0.22 (95% CI 0.96, 1.35). By contrast, fluconazole concentrations in blister fluid were significantly lower (P < 0.05, paired t-test) than unbound plasma concentrations over the first 3 h and maximum concentrations in blister fluid had not been achieved at the end of the sampling period. There was good agreement between fluconazole concentrations derived from microdialysis

  11. Determination of the minimum inhibitory concentration of Cryptococcus neoformans and Cryptococcus gattii against fluconazole by flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Morales, Bernardina Penarrieta; Junior, Ivan Neves; Trilles, Luciana; Bertho, Alvaro Luiz; Oliveira, Raquel De Vasconcellos Carvalhaes De; Nishikawa, Marilia Martins; Elias, Mônica Dos Santos; Wanke, Bodo; Lazéra, Márcia Dos Santos

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies have used flow cytometry (FCM) as an important alternative method to determine the antifungal susceptibility of yeasts compared to the broth microdilution Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) reference procedure. We present a comparative study of the broth microdilution method and flow cytometry to assess the in vitro antifungal susceptibility of Cryptococcus neoformans (n = 16) and C. gattii (n = 24) to fluconazole. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) assays by flow cytometry were defined as the lowest drug concentration that showed ∼50% of the count of acridine orange negative cells compared to that of the growth control. Categorical classification showed all C. neoformans isolates were susceptible to fluconazole. Three isolates of C. gattii were susceptible dose-dependent and the remaining 21 isolates were classified as susceptible. MICs comparison of both methodologies demonstrated 100% categorical agreement of the results obtained for C. neoformans and C. gattii. The MICs obtained with the CLSI-approved method and flow cytometry were compared by the Spearman correlation test and a significant Pv = 0.001. The flow cytometric method has the advantage of analyzing a large and constant number of cells in less time, i.e., 9 h incubation for fluconazole using acridine orange versus 72 h for broth microdilution method. In conclusion, the two methods were comparable and flow cytometry method can expedite and improve the results of in vitro susceptibility tests of C. neoformans and C. gattii against fluconazole and also allows comparative studies in vitro/in vivo more rapidly, which along with clinical data, could assist in selecting the most appropriate treatment choice.

  12. Association of fluconazole area under the concentration-time curve/MIC and dose/MIC ratios with mortality in nonneutropenic patients with candidemia.

    PubMed

    Pai, Manjunath P; Turpin, Robin S; Garey, Kevin W

    2007-01-01

    The present study tested in vitro susceptibility of Candida bloodstream isolates to fluconazole to determine if the ratio of the fluconazole area under the concentration-time curve (AUC) or weight-normalized daily dose (dose(wn)) to MIC correlated with mortality. Fluconazole susceptibility and outcome data were determined for 77 patients with a positive Candida blood culture between 2002 and 2005. The most commonly isolated Candida species were C. albicans (64%), C. glabrata (14%), C. parapsilosis (8%), C. tropicalis (6%), and C. lusitaniae (4%). Only two isolates were classified as fluconazole resistant by the CLSI M27-A2 method. Fluconazole MICs were highest against C. glabrata relative to other Candida species. Overall the crude mortality assessed at hospital discharge was 19.4% (n = 15). Mortality rates by species were as follows: C. albicans, 16.3%; C. glabrata, 36.4%; C. parapsilosis, 0%; C. tropicalis, 0%; C. lusitaniae, 33.3%. A mortality rate of 50% was noted among patients infected with nonsusceptible isolates (MIC > or = 16 microg/ml) compared to 18% for patients infected with susceptible (MIC < or = 8 microg/ml) isolates (P = 0.17). The fluconazole dose(wn)/MIC (24-h) values were significantly higher for the 62 survivors (13.3 +/- 10.5 [mean +/- standard deviation]) compared to the 15 nonsurvivors (7.0 +/- 8.0) (P = 0.03). The fluconazole AUC/MIC (24 h) values also trended higher for survivors (775 +/- 739) compared to nonsurvivors (589 +/- 715) (P = 0.09). These data support the dose-dependent properties of fluconazole. Underdosing fluconazole against less-susceptible Candida isolates has the potential to increase the risk of mortality associated with candidemia.

  13. Association of Fluconazole Area under the Concentration-Time Curve/MIC and Dose/MIC Ratios with Mortality in Nonneutropenic Patients with Candidemia▿

    PubMed Central

    Pai, Manjunath P.; Turpin, Robin S.; Garey, Kevin W.

    2007-01-01

    The present study tested in vitro susceptibility of Candida bloodstream isolates to fluconazole to determine if the ratio of the fluconazole area under the concentration-time curve (AUC) or weight-normalized daily dose (dosewn) to MIC correlated with mortality. Fluconazole susceptibility and outcome data were determined for 77 patients with a positive Candida blood culture between 2002 and 2005. The most commonly isolated Candida species were C. albicans (64%), C. glabrata (14%), C. parapsilosis (8%), C. tropicalis (6%), and C. lusitaniae (4%). Only two isolates were classified as fluconazole resistant by the CLSI M27-A2 method. Fluconazole MICs were highest against C. glabrata relative to other Candida species. Overall the crude mortality assessed at hospital discharge was 19.4% (n = 15). Mortality rates by species were as follows: C. albicans, 16.3%; C. glabrata, 36.4%; C. parapsilosis, 0%; C. tropicalis, 0%; C. lusitaniae, 33.3%. A mortality rate of 50% was noted among patients infected with nonsusceptible isolates (MIC ≥ 16 μg/ml) compared to 18% for patients infected with susceptible (MIC ≤ 8 μg/ml) isolates (P = 0.17). The fluconazole dosewn/MIC (24-h) values were significantly higher for the 62 survivors (13.3 ± 10.5 [mean ± standard deviation]) compared to the 15 nonsurvivors (7.0 ± 8.0) (P = 0.03). The fluconazole AUC/MIC (24 h) values also trended higher for survivors (775 ± 739) compared to nonsurvivors (589 ± 715) (P = 0.09). These data support the dose-dependent properties of fluconazole. Underdosing fluconazole against less-susceptible Candida isolates has the potential to increase the risk of mortality associated with candidemia. PMID:17101684

  14. Correlation between in vitro and in vivo antifungal activities in experimental fluconazole-resistant oropharyngeal and esophageal candidiasis.

    PubMed

    Walsh, T J; Gonzalez, C E; Piscitelli, S; Bacher, J D; Peter, J; Torres, R; Shetti, D; Katsov, V; Kligys, K; Lyman, C A

    2000-06-01

    Oropharyngeal and esophageal candidiasis (OPEC) is a frequent opportunistic mycosis in immunocompromised patients. Azole-resistant OPEC is a refractory form of this infection occurring particularly in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients. The procedures developed by the Antifungal Subcommittee of the National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards (NCCLS) are an important advance in standardization of in vitro antifungal susceptibility methodology. In order to further understand the relationship between NCCLS methodology and antifungal therapeutic response, we studied the potential correlation between in vitro susceptibility to fluconazole and in vivo response in a rabbit model of fluconazole-resistant OPEC. MICs of fluconazole were determined by NCCLS methods. Three fluconazole-susceptible (FS) (MIC, fluconazole-resistant (FR) (MIC, >/=64 microgram/ml) isolates of Candida albicans from prospectively monitored HIV-infected children with OPEC were studied. FR isolates were recovered from children with severe OPEC refractory to fluconazole, and FS isolates were recovered from those with mucosal candidiasis responsive to fluconazole. Fluconazole at 2 mg/kg of body weight/day was administered to infected animals for 7 days. The concentrations of fluconazole in plasma were maintained above the MICs for FS isolates throughout the dosing interval. Fluconazole concentrations in the esophagus were greater than or equal to those in plasma. Rabbits infected with FS isolates and treated with fluconazole had significant reductions in oral mucosal quantitative cultures (P < 0.001) and tissue burden of C. albicans in tongue, soft palate, and esophagus (P < 0.001). In comparison, rabbits infected with FR isolates were unresponsive to fluconazole and had no reduction in oral mucosal quantitative cultures or tissue burden of C. albicans versus untreated controls. We conclude that there is a strong correlation between in vitro

  15. Fluconazole Penetration into the Pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Shrikhande, Shailesh; Friess, Helmut; Issenegger, Claudia; Martignoni, Marcus E.; Yong, Huang; Gloor, Beat; Yeates, Rodney; Kleeff, Jörg; Büchler, Markus W.

    2000-01-01

    Because of antibiotic prophylaxis for necrotizing pancreatitis, the frequency of fungal superinfection in patients with pancreatic necrosis is increasing. In this study we analyzed the penetration of fluconazole into the human pancreas and in experimental acute pancreatitis. In human pancreatic tissues, the mean fluconazole concentration was 8.19 ± 3.38 μg/g (96% of the corresponding concentration in serum). In experimental edematous and necrotizing pancreatitis, 88 and 91% of the serum fluconazole concentration was found in the pancreas. These data show that fluconazole penetration into the pancreas is sufficient to prevent and/or treat fungal contamination in patients with pancreatic necrosis. PMID:10952621

  16. Fluconazole Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... injection is used to treat fungal infections, including yeast infections of the mouth, throat, esophagus (tube leading ... by fungus. Fluconazole is also used to prevent yeast infections in patients who are likely to become ...

  17. Synergistic effect of the flavonoid catechin, quercetin, or epigallocatechin gallate with fluconazole induces apoptosis in Candida tropicalis resistant to fluconazole.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Cecília Rocha; de Andrade Neto, João Batista; de Sousa Campos, Rosana; Figueiredo, Narjara Silvestre; Sampaio, Letícia Serpa; Magalhães, Hemerson Iury Ferreira; Cavalcanti, Bruno Coêlho; Gaspar, Danielle Macêdo; de Andrade, Geanne Matos; Lima, Iri Sandro Pampolha; de Barros Viana, Glauce Socorro; de Moraes, Manoel Odorico; Lobo, Marina Duarte Pinto; Grangeiro, Thalles Barbosa; Nobre Júnior, Hélio Vitoriano

    2014-01-01

    Flavonoids are a class of phenolic compounds commonly found in fruits, vegetables, grains, flowers, tea, and wine. They differ in their chemical structures and characteristics. Such compounds show various biological functions and have antioxidant, antimicrobial, anti-inflammatory, and antiapoptotic properties. The aim of this study was to evaluate the in vitro interactions of flavonoids with fluconazole against Candida tropicalis strains resistant to fluconazole, investigating the mechanism of synergism. Three combinations formed by the flavonoids (+)-catechin hydrated, hydrated quercetin, and (-)-epigallocatechin gallate at a fixed concentration with fluconazole were tested. Flavonoids alone had no antifungal activity within the concentration range tested, but when they were used as a cotreatment with fluconazole, there was significant synergistic activity. From this result, we set out to evaluate the possible mechanisms of cell death involved in this synergism. Isolated flavonoids did not induce morphological changes or changes in membrane integrity in the strains tested, but when they were used as a cotreatment with fluconazole, these changes were quite significant. When evaluating mitochondrial damage and the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) only in the cotreatment, changes were observed. Flavonoids combined with fluconazole were shown to cause a significant increase in the rate of damage and the frequency of DNA damage in the tested strains. The cotreatment also induced an increase in the externalization of phosphatidylserine, an important marker of early apoptosis. It is concluded that flavonoids, when combined with fluconazole, show activity against strains of C. tropicalis resistant to fluconazole, promoting apoptosis by exposure of phosphatidylserine in the plasma membrane and morphological changes, mitochondrial depolarization, intracellular accumulation of ROS, condensation, and DNA fragmentation.

  18. Some pharmacokinetic indices of oral fluconazole administration to koalas (Phascolarctos cinereus) infected with cryptococcosis.

    PubMed

    Govendir, M; Black, L A; Jobbins, S E; Kimble, B; Malik, R; Krockenberger, M B

    2016-08-01

    Three asymptomatic koalas serologically positive for cryptococcosis and two symptomatic koalas were treated with 10 mg/kg fluconazole orally, twice daily for at least 2 weeks. The median plasma Cmax and AUC0-8 h for asymptomatic animals were 0.9 μg/mL and 4.9 μg/mL·h, respectively; and for symptomatic animals 3.2 μg/mL and 17.3 μg/mL·h, respectively. An additional symptomatic koala was treated with fluconazole (10 mg/kg twice daily) and a subcutaneous amphotericin B infusion twice weekly. After 2 weeks the fluconazole Cmax was 3.7 μg/mL and the AUC0-8 h was 25.8 μg/mL*h. An additional three koalas were treated with fluconazole 15 mg/kg twice daily for at least 2 weeks, with the same subcutaneous amphotericin protocol co-administered to two of these koalas (Cmax : 5.0 μg/mL; mean AUC0-8 h : 18.1 μg/mL*h). For all koalas, the fluconazole plasma Cmax failed to reach the MIC90 (16 μg/mL) to inhibit C. gattii. Fluconazole administered orally at either 10 or 15 mg/kg twice daily in conjunction with amphotericin is unlikely to attain therapeutic plasma concentrations. Suggestions to improve treatment of systemic cryptococcosis include testing pathogen susceptibility to fluconazole, monitoring plasma fluconazole concentrations, and administration of 20-25 mg/kg fluconazole orally, twice daily, with an amphotericin subcutaneous infusion twice weekly. © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Veterinary Pharmacology and Therapeutics Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Bioequivalence study of two fluconazole capsule formulations in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Pereira, R; Fidelis, S; Vanunci, M L P; Oliveira, C H; Mendes, G D; Abib, E; Moreno, R A

    2004-01-01

    To compare the bioavailability of a fluconazole 150 mg capsule formulation from Laboratório Teuto Brasileiro Ltd., Brazil (test formulation), and Zoltec 150 mg capsule from Laboratórios Pfizer Ltd., Brazil (reference formulation), in 24 volunteers of both sexes. The study was conducted open with randomized 2-period crossover design and a 2-week washout period. Plasma samples were obtained over a 168-hour interval. Fluconazole concentrations were analyzed by combined reversed-phase liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) with positive ion electrospray ionization using selected ion monitoring method. From the fluconazole plasma concentration vs. time curves the following pharmacokinetic parameters were obtained: AUC(last), AUC(0-inf) and C(max). Geometric mean of fluconazole/Zoltec 150 mg individual percent ratio was 102.6% for AUC(last), 102.2% for AUC(0-inf) and 109.4% for C(max). The 90% confidence intervals were 97.3-108.2%, 97.0-107.8%, and 103.1-116.0%, respectively. Since the 90% CI for both Cmax, AUC(last) and AUC(0-inf) were within the 80-125% interval proposed by the Food and Drug Administration, it was concluded that fluconazole 150 mg capsule was bioequivalent to Zoltec 150 mg, according to both the rate and extent of absorption.

  20. Influence of different susceptibility testing methods and media on determination of the relevant fluconazole minimum inhibitory concentrations for heavy trailing Candida isolates with low-high phenotype.

    PubMed

    Alp, Sehnaz; Sancak, Banu; Hascelik, Gulsen; Arikan, Sevtap

    2010-11-01

    We investigated the incidence of trailing growth with fluconazole in 101 clinical Candida isolates (49 C. albicans and 52 C. tropicalis) and tried to establish the convenient susceptibility testing method and medium for fluconazole minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) determination. MICs were determined by CLSI M27-A2 broth microdilution (BMD) and Etest methods on RPMI-1640 agar supplemented with 2% glucose (RPG) and on Mueller-Hinton agar supplemented with 2% glucose and 0.5 μg ml(-1) methylene blue (GMB). BMD and Etest MICs were read at 24 and 48 h, and susceptibility categories were compared. All isolates were determined as susceptible with BMD, Etest-RPG and Etest-GMB at 24 h. While all isolates were interpreted as susceptible at 48 h on Etest-RPG and Etest-GMB, one C. albicans isolate was interpreted as susceptible-dose dependent (S-DD) and two C. tropicalis isolates were interpreted as resistant with BMD. On Etest-RPG, trailing growth caused widespread microcolonies within the inhibition zone and resulted in confusion in MIC determination. On Etest-GMB, because of the nearly absence of microcolonies within the zone of inhibition, MICs were evaluated more easily. We conclude that, for the determination of fluconazole MICs of trailing Candida isolates, the Etest method has an advantage over BMD and can be used along with this reference method. Moreover, GMB appears more beneficial than RPG for the fluconazole Etest. © 2009 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  1. Fluconazole penetration into the human prostate.

    PubMed Central

    Finley, R W; Cleary, J D; Goolsby, J; Chapman, S W

    1995-01-01

    Fluconazole concentrations in the serum and prostate of human volunteers undergoing transurethral resection for benign prostatic hypertrophy were measured. There was a high correlation (r = 0.783) between serum (mean = 6.6 micrograms/ml) and tissue (mean = 1.9 micrograms/g) fluconazole concentrations, and these data were used to construct a model for local tissue concentrations. PMID:7726532

  2. In Vivo Microdialysis To Determine Subcutaneous Interstitial Fluid Penetration and Pharmacokinetics of Fluconazole in Intensive Care Unit Patients with Sepsis.

    PubMed

    Sinnollareddy, Mahipal G; Roberts, Michael S; Lipman, Jeffrey; Lassig-Smith, Melissa; Starr, Therese; Robertson, Thomas; Peake, Sandra L; Roberts, Jason A

    2016-02-01

    The objective of the study was to describe the subcutaneous interstitial fluid (ISF) pharmacokinetics of fluconazole in critically ill patients with sepsis. This prospective observational study was conducted at two tertiary intensive care units in Australia. Serial fluconazole concentrations were measured over 24 h in plasma and subcutaneous ISF using microdialysis. The concentrations in plasma and microdialysate were measured using a validated high-performance liquid chromatography system with electrospray mass spectrometer detector method. Noncompartmental pharmacokinetic analysis was performed. Twelve critically ill patients with sepsis were enrolled. The mean in vivo fluconazole recovery rates ± standard deviation (SD) for microdialysis were 51.4% ± 16.1% with a mean (±SD) fluconazole ISF penetration ratio of 0.52 ± 0.30 (coefficient of variation, 58%). The median free plasma area under the concentration-time curve from 0 to 24 h (AUC0-24) was significantly higher than the median ISF AUC0-24 (340.4 versus 141.1 mg · h/liter; P = 0.004). There was no statistical difference in median fluconazole ISF penetration between patients receiving and not receiving vasopressors (median, 0.28 versus 0.78; P = 0.106). Both minimum and the maximum concentrations of drug in serum (Cmax and Cmin) showed a significant correlation with the fluconazole plasma exposure (Cmax, R(2) = 0.86, P < 0.0001; Cmin, R(2) = 0.75, P < 0.001). Our data suggest that fluconazole was distributed variably, but incompletely, from plasma into subcutaneous interstitial fluid in this cohort of critically ill patients with sepsis. Given the variability of fluconazole interstitial fluid exposures and lack of clinically identifiable factors by which to recognize patients with reduced distribution/exposure, we suggest higher than standard doses to ensure that drug exposure is adequate at the site of infection.

  3. Population Pharmacokinetics of Fluconazole in Premature Infants with Birth Weights Less than 750 Grams

    PubMed Central

    Momper, Jeremiah D.; Capparelli, Edmund V.; Wade, Kelly C.; Kantak, Anand; Dhanireddy, Ramasubbareddy; Cummings, James J.; Nedrelow, Jonathan H.; Hudak, Mark L.; Mundakel, Gratias T.; Natarajan, Girija; Gao, Jamie; Laughon, Matt; Benjamin, Daniel K.

    2016-01-01

    Fluconazole is an effective agent for prophylaxis of invasive candidiasis in premature infants. The objective of this study was to characterize the population pharmacokinetics (PK) and dosing requirements of fluconazole in infants with birth weights of <750 g. As part of a randomized clinical trial, infants born at <750 g birth weight received intravenous (i.v.) or oral fluconazole at 6 mg/kg of body weight twice weekly. Fluconazole plasma concentrations from samples obtained by either scheduled or scavenged sampling were measured using a liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry assay. Population PK analysis was conducted using NONMEM 7.2. Population PK parameters were allometrically scaled by body weight. Covariates were evaluated by univariable screening followed by multivariable assessment. Fluconazole exposures were simulated in premature infants using the final PK model. A population PK model was developed from 141 infants using 604 plasma samples. Plasma fluconazole PK were best described by a one-compartment model with first-order elimination. Only serum creatinine was an independent predictor for clearance in the final model. The typical population parameter estimate for oral bioavailability in the final model was 99.5%. Scavenged samples did not bias the parameter estimates and were as informative as scheduled samples. Simulations indicated that the study dose maintained fluconazole troughs of >2,000 ng/ml in 80% of simulated infants at week 1 and 59% at week 4 of treatment. Developmental changes in fluconazole clearance are best predicted by serum creatinine in this population. A twice-weekly dose of 6 mg/kg achieves appropriate levels for prevention of invasive candidiasis in extremely premature infants. PMID:27401564

  4. Utilizing online-dual-SPE-LC with HRMS for the simultaneous quantification of amphotericin B, fluconazole, and fluorocytosine in human plasma and cerebrospinal fluid.

    PubMed

    Qu, Lihua; Qian, Jing; Ma, Ping; Yin, Zheng

    2017-04-01

    Amphotericin B (AMB), fluconazole (FZ), and fluorocytosine (FC) are recommended for HIV-associated cryptococcal meningitis (CM) patients as preferred antibiotics. This study presents a fast and automated online-dual-solid phase extraction (SPE)-LC coupled with high resolution mass spectrometer (HRMS) method to simultaneously measure the concentrations of AMB, FZ, and FC in human plasma and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Automated sample clean-up was performed on the human plasma and CSF samples with stop-flow heart-cutting two dimensional (2D) separation using a online-dual-SPE system, allowing retention and accumulation of AMB, FZ, and carbamazepine (CBZ, Internal standard (IS)) by the Oasis(®)HLB cartridge, and retention and accumulation of FC and 5-methylcytosine hydrochloride (MC, IS) by the HyperSep Hypercarb cartridge respectively. Followed by LC elution, quantification by Q-Exactive Hybrid Quadrupole-Orbitrap with targeted-selected ion monitoring (t-SIM) mode was applied to simultaneously determine the concentrations of AMB, FZ and FC. The bioanalysis was achieved in a total running time of 7min. The method was fully validated according to FDA guidelines. The lowest limit of quantification (LLOQ) was 0.04, 0.04, and 0.40μgmL(-1) for AMB, FZ, and FC, respectively. AMB, FZ, and FC levels were linear in the ranges of 0.04-2.00μgmL(-1), 0.04-2.00μgmL(-1) and 0.40-20.00μgmL(-1), respectively. The method showed good performance for human plasma and CSF samples with linearity (R(2)>0.99), intra-day and inter-day precision (relative standard deviation, RSD<4.32% and <4.06%, respectively), recovery (89.93-93.28% and 90.09-93.58%, respectively) and matrix effect (96.35-103.78% and 92.32-101.48%, respectively). The validated method was successfully applied in real samples of Chinese patients. Overall, our results indicate that this fully automated, sensitive, and reliable online-dual-SPE-LC-HRMS method is effective for therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) of AMB, FZ, and

  5. Plasma leptin concentration in donkeys.

    PubMed

    Díez, E; López, I; Pérez, C; Pineda, C; Aguilera-Tejero, E

    2012-01-01

    Donkeys appear to be more predisposed than large breed horses to suffer from hyperlipemia. The reason for that predisposition is unknown but anorexia is a consistent feature of the disease. Leptin, a protein synthesized in fat tissue, is one of the major inhibitors of appetite in mammals. We hypothesized that donkeys could have elevated plasma leptin concentrations compared to horses. Blood samples were obtained from 50 donkeys for measurement of leptin, triglycerides (TGs), glucose, and insulin. Glucose/insulin ratio, modified insulin to glucose ratio, and reciprocal of the square root of insulin were calculated. Based on their body condition score (BCS), donkeys were classified as lean (n = 18), normal (n = 16), or overweight (n = 16). The results were compared with reference values from our laboratory and with a group of horses (n = 25) used as an internal control. Values of both leptin and TGs in donkeys were above the horse reference range and also significantly higher than those of the control horses: leptin (11.2 ± 1.7 versus 5.8 ± 0.5 µg/L, p < 0.05) and TGs (0.93 ± 0.1 versus 0.54 ± 0.1 mmol/L, p < 0.01). Overweight donkeys had leptin (19.3 ± 2.9 µg/L) and TG (1.3 ± 0.2 mmol/L) concentrations that were significantly (p < 0.01) higher than normal (9.4 ± 3.3 µg/L and 0.85 ± 0.1 mmol/L, respectively) and lean (5.5 ± 1.0 µg/L and 0.66 ± 0.1 mmol/L, respectively) donkeys. A significant positive correlation (p < 0.01) was found between BCS and leptin (r = 0.43), TGs (r = 0.46), glucose (r = 0.41), and insulin (r = 0.40). Donkeys have higher plasma leptin concentrations than horses and leptin is correlated with BCS.

  6. The influence of tea tree oil (Melaleuca alternifolia) on fluconazole activity against fluconazole-resistant Candida albicans strains.

    PubMed

    Mertas, Anna; Garbusińska, Aleksandra; Szliszka, Ewelina; Jureczko, Andrzej; Kowalska, Magdalena; Król, Wojciech

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the activity of fluconazole against 32 clinical strains of fluconazole-resistant Candida albicans, and C. albicans ATCC 10231 reference strain, after their exposure to sublethal concentrations of tea tree oil (TTO) or its main bioactive component terpinen-4-ol. For all tested fluconazole-resistant C. albicans strains TTO and terpinen-4-ol minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs) were low, ranging from 0.06% to 0.5%. The 24-hour exposure of fluconazole-resistant C. albicans strains to fluconazole with sublethal dose of TTO enhanced fluconazole activity against these strains. Overall, 62.5% of isolates were classified as susceptible, 25.0% exhibited intermediate susceptibility, and 12.5% were resistant. For all of the tested clinical strains the fluconazole MIC decreased from an average of 244.0 μg/mL to an average of 38.46 μg/mL, and the fluconazole minimal fungicidal concentrations (MFC) decreased from an average of 254.67 μg/mL to an average of 66.62 μg/mL. Terpinen-4-ol was found to be more active than TTO, and strongly enhanced fluconazole activity against fluconazole-resistant C. albicans strains. The results of this study demonstrate that combining natural substances such as TTO and conventional drug such as fluconazole, may help treat difficult yeast infections.

  7. The Influence of Tea Tree Oil (Melaleuca alternifolia) on Fluconazole Activity against Fluconazole-Resistant Candida albicans Strains

    PubMed Central

    Garbusińska, Aleksandra; Kowalska, Magdalena; Król, Wojciech

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the activity of fluconazole against 32 clinical strains of fluconazole-resistant Candida albicans, and C. albicans ATCC 10231 reference strain, after their exposure to sublethal concentrations of tea tree oil (TTO) or its main bioactive component terpinen-4-ol. For all tested fluconazole-resistant C. albicans strains TTO and terpinen-4-ol minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs) were low, ranging from 0.06% to 0.5%. The 24-hour exposure of fluconazole-resistant C. albicans strains to fluconazole with sublethal dose of TTO enhanced fluconazole activity against these strains. Overall, 62.5% of isolates were classified as susceptible, 25.0% exhibited intermediate susceptibility, and 12.5% were resistant. For all of the tested clinical strains the fluconazole MIC decreased from an average of 244.0 μg/mL to an average of 38.46 μg/mL, and the fluconazole minimal fungicidal concentrations (MFC) decreased from an average of 254.67 μg/mL to an average of 66.62 μg/mL. Terpinen-4-ol was found to be more active than TTO, and strongly enhanced fluconazole activity against fluconazole-resistant C. albicans strains. The results of this study demonstrate that combining natural substances such as TTO and conventional drug such as fluconazole, may help treat difficult yeast infections. PMID:25722982

  8. Fluconazole dosing predictions in critically-ill patients receiving prolonged intermittent renal replacement therapy: a Monte Carlo simulation approach.

    PubMed

    Gharibian, Katherine N; Mueller, Bruce A

    2016-07-01

    Fluconazole is a renally-eliminated antifungal commonly used to treat Candida species infections. In critically-ill patients receiving prolonged intermittent renal replacement therapy (PIRRT), limited pharmacokinetic (PK) data are available to guide fluconazole dosing. We used previously-published fluconazole clearance data and PK data of critically-ill patients with acute kidney injury to develop a PK model with the goal of determining a therapeutic dosing regimen for critically-ill patients receiving PIRRT. Monte Carlo simulations were performed to create a virtual cohort of patients receiving different fluconazole dosing regimens. Plasma drug concentration-time profiles were evaluated on the probability of attaining a mean 24-hour area under the drug concentration-time curve to minimum inhibitory concentration ratio (AUC24h : MIC) of 100 during the initial 48 hours of antifungal therapy. At the susceptibility breakpoint of Candida albicans (2 mg/L), 93 - 96% of simulated subjects receiving PIRRT attained the pharmacodynamic target with a fluconazole 800-mg loading dose plus 400 mg twice daily (q12h or pre and post PIRRT) regimen. Monte Carlo simulations of a PK model of PIRRT provided a basis for the development of an informed fluconazole dosing recommendation when PK data was limited. This finding should be validated in the clinical setting.

  9. Plasma fibrinogen concentration in a Chinese population.

    PubMed

    Ko, G T; Yeung, V T; Chan, J C; Chow, C C; Li, J K; So, W Y; Tsang, L W; Cockram, C S

    1997-06-01

    Plasma fibrinogen concentration has been shown to be a predictor of major cardiovascular events. Information on plasma fibrinogen amongst Chinese has been scanty. We examined the relationships between plasma fibrinogen concentration and cardiovascular risk factors in 988 chinese subjects who underwent 75 g oral glucose tolerance test for screening for glucose intolerance. The study involved a selected sample with subjects who had an history of gestational diabetes, delivery of big babies (birth weight > or = 4 kg), equivocal plasma glucose concentrations and subjects who were family members of diabetic patients. This was mainly a non-smoking (96.6%), non-drinking (98%) and non-exercising (99%) population of which 87% (n = 855) were female. Among the 988 subjects (age +/- S.D. 36.8 +/- 10.2, range 16-79 years), plasma fibrinogen concentration ranged from 1.40 to 9.90 g/l with a mean of 3.26 +/- 0.93 g/l. On stratification of the subjects into 4 quartiles based on plasma fibrinogen concentrations, we found that increased plasma fibrinogen was associated with older age, higher body mass index (BMI), systolic and diastolic blood pressure (BP), fasting and 2 h plasma glucose (PG), prevalence of diabetes, glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) and triglyceride (TG) level. After adjustment for age and sex, increased plasma fibrinogen concentration remained associated with higher BMI, systolic BP, 2 h PG and TG level. On multivariate analysis using age, BMI, BP, TG, HbA1c and PG as independent variables, plasma fibrinogen was independently related to plasma TG concentration and HbA1c. With 1 S.D. change in TG concentration and HbA1c, there were 3.7 and 5.2% changes in plasma fibrinogen concentration respectively. These findings emphasize the close relationships between plasma fibrinogen and cardiovascular risk factors, in particular abnormal lipid and glucose metabolism.

  10. Risk Factors for Fluconazole-Resistant Candida glabrata Bloodstream Infections

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ingi; Fishman, Neil O.; Zaoutis, Theoklis E.; Morales, Knashawn H.; Weiner, Mark G.; Synnestvedt, Marie; Nachamkin, Irving; Lautenbach, Ebbing

    2010-01-01

    Background Bloodstream infections (BSIs) caused by Candida glabrata have increased substantially. Candida glabrata is often associated with resistance to fluconazole therapy. However, to our knowledge, risk factors for fluconazole-resistant C glabrata BSIs have not been studied. Methods A case-case-control study was conducted at 3 hospitals from January 1, 2003, to May 31, 2007. The 2 case groups included patients with fluconazole-resistant C glabrata BSIs (minimum inhibitory concentration ≥16 μg/mL) and patients with fluconazole-susceptible C glabrata BSIs (minimum inhibitory concentration ≤8 μg/mL). Hospitalized patients without C glabrata BSIs were randomly selected for inclusion in the control group and were frequency matched to cases on the basis of time at risk. Two case-control studies were performed using this shared control group. The primary risk factor of interest, previous fluconazole use, was evaluated at multivariate analyses, adjusting for demographic data, comorbid conditions, and antimicrobial exposures. Results We included 76 patients with fluconazole-resistant C glabrata BSIs, 68 patients with fluconazole-susceptible C glabrata BSIs, and 512 control patients. Previous fluconazole use (adjusted odds ratio [95% confidence interval], 2.3 [1.3–4.2]) and linezolid use (4.6 [2.2–9.3]) were independent risk factors for fluconazole-resistant C glabrata BSIs; previous cefepime use (2.2 [1.2–3.9]) and metronidazole use (2.0 [1.1–3.5]) were independent risk factors for fluconazole-susceptible C glabrata BSIs. Conclusions Previous fluconazole use is a significant risk factor for health care–associated fluconazole-resistant C glabrata BSIs. Future studies will be needed to evaluate the effect of decreasing fluconazole use on rates of fluconazole-resistant C glabrata BSIs. PMID:19237722

  11. High concentration plasma-reduced plateletapheresis concentrates.

    PubMed

    Perseghin, Paolo

    2011-06-01

    Single-donor hyperconcentrated plateletapheresis (dry-platelets) collection has been introduced in the 90's as a part of the newly developed multi-component collection strategy. This approach allowed to safely collect multiple components from a single apheresis donation, i.e. RBC, FFP and/or plateletpheresis units. Dry-platelets are usually resuspended in additive solution to maintain an adequate pH during the storage period until use. Some concern existed about possible higher degrees of platelet activation in dry-platelets units when compared to standard concentration (1.0-1.6 × 10(6)/μL platelets) units and its possible correlation with lower in vivo efficiency and/or survival of the former units. Several authors investigated this specific issue, and dry-platelets units proved to be equally effective than standard concentration plateletpheresis units in recipients. The use of dry-platelets units may reduce (i) the risk of passive infusion of naturally occurring ABO-related hemolytic antibodies when donor O platelets are given to group A, B, or AB recipient, (ii) the risk of TRALI when multiparous donors undergo plateletpheresis. Furthermore, dry-platelet collection may allow for an increased amount of FFP sent to industry. Finally, hyperconcentrated platelet units may be used for "niche" indications, such as intrauterine platelet transfusion or, in case of autologous dry-platelet collection, for further freezing for long term storage in selected patients within onco-hematological settings.

  12. Comparative effects of the antimycotic drugs ketoconazole, fluconazole, itraconazole and terbinafine on the metabolism of cyclosporin by human liver microsomes.

    PubMed Central

    Back, D J; Tjia, J F

    1991-01-01

    Four antimycotic drugs, the azoles ketoconazole, itraconazole and fluconazole, and the allylamine terbinafine have been studied for their effect on the metabolism of cyclosporin by human liver microsomes (n = 3) in vitro. Ketoconazole caused marked inhibition of cyclosporin hydroxylase (to metabolites M17 and M1) with IC50 and Ki values of 0.24 +/- 0.01 and 0.022 +/- 0.004 microM, respectively. Based on IC50 values, itraconazole was ten times less potent (IC50 value of 2.2 +/- 0.2 microM) and both fluconazole and terbinafine had values above 100 microM. Ki values for itraconazole and fluconazole were 0.7 +/- 0.2 and 40 +/- 5.6 microM, respectively. No kinetic parameters were calculated for terbinafine because of the lack of inhibitory effects. Based on these data, ketoconazole is confirmed as being a potent inhibitor of cyclosporin metabolism and this has clinical relevance. Although inhibition by fluconazole was much less than that by itraconazole at equimolar concentrations, it should be noted that in patients plasma concentrations of fluconazole are much greater than those of itraconazole. Clinical interactions of cyclosporin with both fluconazole and itraconazole have been reported. In contrast to the azoles, terbinafine does not have the same potential for interaction. PMID:1659439

  13. Spice oil cinnamaldehyde exhibits potent anticandidal activity against fluconazole resistant clinical isolates.

    PubMed

    Shreaz, Sheikh; Bhatia, Rimple; Khan, Neelofar; Muralidhar, Sumathi; Basir, Seemi F; Manzoor, Nikhat; Khan, Luqman Ahmad

    2011-10-01

    Fluconazole resistance is becoming an important clinical concern. We studied the in vitro effects of cinnamaldehyde against 18 fluconazole-resistant Candida isolates. MIC(90) of cinnamaldehyde against different Candida isolates ranged 100-500 μg/ml. Growth and sensitivity of the organisms were significantly affected by cinnamaldehyde at different concentrations. The rapid irreversible action of this compound on fungal cells suggested membrane-located targets for its action. Insight studies to mechanism suggested that cinnamaldehyde exerts its antifungal activity by targeting sterol biosynthesis and plasma membrane ATPase activity. Inhibition of H(+) (-)ATPase leads to intracellular acidification and cell death. Toxicity against H9c2 rat cardiac myoblasts was studied to exclude the possibility of further associated cytotoxicity. The observed selectively fungicidal characteristics against fluconazole-resistant Candida isolates signify a promising candidature of this essential oil as an antifungal agent in treatments for candidosis.

  14. Pharmacokinetics of fluconazole in children requiring peritoneal dialysis.

    PubMed

    Wong, S F; Leung, M P; Chan, M Y

    1997-01-01

    After major open heart surgery, a significant number of infants and children are dependent on peritoneal dialysis as a result of renal impairment. They often require broad-spectrum antibiotics for the treatment of ongoing infections or as prophylactic therapy and have an increased risk of fungal infection. Fluconazole is a new thiazole antifungal agent that has been widely used in adults, but its use in children with acute renal impairment requiring peritoneal dialysis has not been documented. The purpose of this investigation was to study the pharmacokinetics of fluconazole in infants and children who developed various degrees of renal impairment, with or without the need for peritoneal dialysis, after major open heart surgery. Between January 1992 and June 1995, 17 children ranging in age from 2 weeks to 3 years (mean, 6 months) who received fluconazole therapy intravenously (3 mg/kg per day for 2 to 3 weeks) after major open heart surgery were enrolled in a prospective study. They were divided into two groups--those who required peritoneal dialysis (PD group; n = 8) and those who did not (non-PD group; n = 9). Blood, urine, and peritoneal dialysate samples were collected for 4 days to determine the pharmacokinetics of the drug, and data were compared between the two groups. The two groups of children had similar demographic characteristics, and their plasma concentrations of fluconazole showed no statistically significant differences. For children dependent on peritoneal dialysis, fluconazole was excreted almost solely through dialysis. Despite a significantly longer terminal elimination half-life for this group of infants, they tended to have a marginally larger volume of distribution of the drug. This, coupled with the continuous hourly exchange of dialysate, provided a large sink volume to effectively remove flu- conazole from the circulation. Thus the plasma clearance and the accumulation ratio were comparable for the two groups of children. Continuous

  15. Plasma concentrations of voriconazole in falcons.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, V; Demiraj, F; Di Somma, A; Bailey, T; Ungemach, F R; Krautwald-Junghanns, M-E

    2007-08-25

    Doses of 12.5 mg voriconazole/kg bodyweight administered every 12 hours by crop gavage to six falcons for 14 days provided peak plasma concentrations of more than 1 microg/ml, but the trough concentrations were lower and sometimes undetectable. Administering the same doses incorporated into meat that was fed to one falcon for seven days and to three falcons for up to 91 days provided similar plasma concentrations.

  16. Plasma lipid concentrations for some Brazilian lizards.

    PubMed

    Gillett, M P; Lima, V L; Costa, J C; Sibrian, A M

    1979-01-01

    1. Plasma concentrations of cholesterol, cholesteryl esters, phospholipids and triglycerides were determined for ten species of Brazilian lizards, Iguana iguana, Tropidurus torquatos and T. semitaeniatus (Iguanidae), Tupinambis teguixin, Ameiva ameiva and Cnemidophorus ocellifer (Teiidae), Mabuya maculata (Scincidae), Hemidactylus mabouia (Gekkonidae), Amphisbaenia vermicularis and Leposternon polystegum (Amphisbaenidae). 2. Considerable inter- and intra-species variations in plasma lipid concentrations were observed. 3. The percentage of total cholesterol esterified and the individual phospholipid composition of plasma were relatively constant for each species. 4. Over 60% of the cholesteryl esters present in plasma from three species each of iguanid and teiid lizards were polyenoic.

  17. Plasma lipid concentrations during episodic occupational stress.

    PubMed

    McCann, B S; Benjamin, G A; Wilkinson, C W; Retzlaff, B M; Russo, J; Knopp, R H

    1999-01-01

    The possibility that stress affects plasma lipid concentrations has been the subject of recent investigation, but the findings are equivocal in nonlaboratory settings. To determine whether psychological stress contributes to variability in plasma lipid concentrations and concomitant changes in health behaviors, the effect of increased work load on plasma lipids and apolipoproteins was examined in 173 lawyers. Plasma cholesterol, triglyceride, and apolipoprotein concentrations were studied during periods of high work load (corresponding to impending tax deadlines) and during periods of usual work load. Self-reports of stress, work load, and time pressure, and cortisol, blood pressure, and heart rate were measured to verify that impending deadlines were associated with increased stress levels. Health behaviors which may affect plasma lipoprotein concentrations, including dietary intake and exercise, were also examined. High work load was accompanied by increases in self-reported work load among lawyers most directly affected by the impending deadlines. Plasma apolipoprotein B and triglycerides increased during periods of high work load (M = 1.9 mg/dL, SD = 10.1 and M = 5.3, SD = 34.4, respectively). No changes in dietary intake and exercise were observed. Psychological stress (high work load) is associated with potentially atherogenic changes in plasma lipid concentrations. While the lipoprotein effect of this short-term work stress is small, the effects of longer-term stress on multiple rise factors including triglycerides and apolipoprotein B could have significance for the development of coronary artery disease.

  18. Plasma catecholamine concentrations associated with cerebral vasospasm.

    PubMed

    Loach, A B; Benedict, C R

    1980-03-01

    Plasma concentrations of adrenaline and noradrenaline were measured sequentially over the immediate post-operative period following clipping of an intracranial aneurysm in 11 patients. Those patients who developed local cerebral vasospasm showed a sustained rise in plasma catecholamines, particularly noradrenaline, whilst those patients who developed generalised cerebral vasospasm showed early peaks of very high concentrations of adrenaline and noradrenaline which preceded radiological evidence of generalized vasospam.

  19. Decreased plasma motilin concentrations in pregnancy.

    PubMed Central

    Christofides, N D; Ghatei, M A; Bloom, S R; Borberg, C; Gillmer, M D

    1982-01-01

    Plasma motilin concentrations were measured in 37 women during the second and third trimester of pregnancy and one week after delivery. The mean plasma motilin concentrations, both fasting and after a glucose load and a mixed meal, were significantly (p less than 0.001) reduced during pregnancy, returning to the normal range one week post partum. Pregnancy appears to have a profound inhibitory effect on plasma motilin, and this may in part be responsible for the gastrointestinal hypomotility associated with pregnancy. PMID:6814598

  20. Arachidonic acid affects biofilm formation and PGE2 level in Candida albicans and non-albicans species in presence of subinhibitory concentration of fluconazole and terbinafine.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Nripendra Nath; Ali, Shakir; Shukla, Praveen K

    2014-01-01

    Candida albicans utilizes arachidonic acid (AA) released during the course of infection (Candidiasis) from phospholipids of infected host cell membranes and synthesizes extracellular prostaglandin(s) which play an important role in hyphae formation and host cell damage. C. albicans biofilms secrete significantly more prostaglandin(s) and evidence suggests that Candida biofilms have dramatically reduced susceptibility to majority of antifungal drugs. AA influences the saturation level of lipids and fluidity of yeast cell membranes. Therefore the aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of AA alone or in combination with antifungal agents on biofilm formation and production of prostaglandin (PGE2) in C. albicans, C. parapsilosis, C. glabrata, C. tropicalis, and C. albicans amphotericin B resistant strain (AmBR). Maximum biofilm formation was found to be in the case of C. albicans compared to C. non-albicans species. However, among the non-albicans species C. tropicalis exhibited highest biofilm formation. Treatment with AA in combination with subinhibitory concentrations of fluconazole and terbinafine separately exhibited significant (p<0.05) reduction in biofilm formation against C. glabrata, C. parapsilosis, C. tropicalis and AmBR as compared to their individual effect. Further, these two antifungal agents in combination with AA caused an increase in production of prostaglandin from fungal cell itself which was significant (p<0.05) in case of all the strains tested. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  1. Plasma Glutamine Concentrations in Liver Failure.

    PubMed

    Helling, Gunnel; Wahlin, Staffan; Smedberg, Marie; Pettersson, Linn; Tjäder, Inga; Norberg, Åke; Rooyackers, Olav; Wernerman, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Higher than normal plasma glutamine concentration at admission to an intensive care unit is associated with an unfavorable outcome. Very high plasma glutamine levels are sometimes seen in both acute and chronic liver failure. We aimed to systematically explore the relation between different types of liver failure and plasma glutamine concentrations. Four different groups of patients were studies; chronic liver failure (n = 40), acute on chronic liver failure (n = 20), acute fulminant liver failure (n = 20), and post-hepatectomy liver failure (n = 20). Child-Pugh and Model for End-stage Liver Disease (MELD) scores were assessed as indices of liver function. All groups except the chronic liver failure group were followed longitudinally during hospitalisation. Outcomes were recorded up to 48 months after study inclusion. All groups had individuals with very high plasma glutamine concentrations. In the total group of patients (n = 100), severity of liver failure correlated significantly with plasma glutamine concentration, but the correlation was not strong. Liver failure, regardless of severity and course of illness, may be associated with a high plasma glutamine concentration. Further studies are needed to understand whether high glutamine levels should be regarded as a biomarker or as a contributor to symptomatology in liver failure.

  2. Plasma Glutamine Concentrations in Liver Failure

    PubMed Central

    Helling, Gunnel; Wahlin, Staffan; Smedberg, Marie; Pettersson, Linn; Tjäder, Inga; Norberg, Åke; Rooyackers, Olav; Wernerman, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Background Higher than normal plasma glutamine concentration at admission to an intensive care unit is associated with an unfavorable outcome. Very high plasma glutamine levels are sometimes seen in both acute and chronic liver failure. We aimed to systematically explore the relation between different types of liver failure and plasma glutamine concentrations. Methods Four different groups of patients were studies; chronic liver failure (n = 40), acute on chronic liver failure (n = 20), acute fulminant liver failure (n = 20), and post-hepatectomy liver failure (n = 20). Child-Pugh and Model for End-stage Liver Disease (MELD) scores were assessed as indices of liver function. All groups except the chronic liver failure group were followed longitudinally during hospitalisation. Outcomes were recorded up to 48 months after study inclusion. Results All groups had individuals with very high plasma glutamine concentrations. In the total group of patients (n = 100), severity of liver failure correlated significantly with plasma glutamine concentration, but the correlation was not strong. Conclusion Liver failure, regardless of severity and course of illness, may be associated with a high plasma glutamine concentration. Further studies are needed to understand whether high glutamine levels should be regarded as a biomarker or as a contributor to symptomatology in liver failure. PMID:26938452

  3. Effects of the moderate CYP3A4 inhibitor, fluconazole, on the pharmacokinetics of fesoterodine in healthy subjects

    PubMed Central

    Malhotra, Bimal; Dickins, Maurice; Alvey, Christine; Jumadilova, Zhanna; Li, Xiaoxi; Duczynski, Gregory; Gandelman, Kuan

    2011-01-01

    AIMS To assess the effects of fluconazole, a moderate CYP3A4 inhibitor, on the pharmacokinetics (PK) and safety/tolerability of fesoterodine. METHODS In this open-label, randomized, two-way crossover study, 28 healthy subjects (18–55 years) received single doses of fesoterodine 8 mg alone or with fluconazole 200 mg. PK endpoints, including the area under the plasma concentration–time curve from 0 to infinity (AUC(0,∞)), maximum plasma concentration (Cmax), time to Cmax (tmax), and half-life (t1/2), were assessed for 5-hydroxymethyl tolterodine (5-HMT), the active moiety of fesoterodine. RESULTS Concomitant administration of fesoterodine with fluconazole increased AUC(0,∞) and Cmax of 5-HMT by approximately 27% and 19%, respectively, with corresponding 90% confidence intervals of (18%, 36%) and (11%, 28%). There was no apparent effect of fluconazole on 5-HMT tmax or t½. Fesoterodine was generally well tolerated regardless of fluconazole co-administration, with no reports of death, serious adverse events (AEs) or severe AEs. Following co-administration of fesoterodine with fluconazole, 13 subjects (48%) experienced a total of 40 AEs; following administration of fesoterodine alone, six subjects (22%) experienced a total of 19 AEs. The majority of AEs were of mild intensity. There were no clinically significant changes in laboratory or physical examination parameters. CONCLUSION Fesoterodine 8 mg single dose was well tolerated when administered alone or with fluconazole. Based on the observed increase in 5-HMT exposures being within the inherent variability of 5-HMT pharmacokinetics, adjustment of fesoterodine dose is not warranted when co-administered with a moderate CYP3A4 inhibitor provided they are not also inhibitors of transporters. PMID:21545485

  4. Fluconazole and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... It is used in the treatment of vaginal yeast infections when topical creams are not effective. It ... the most commonly used dose to treat vaginal yeast infections. I would like to stop taking fluconazole ...

  5. Fluconazole and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... It is used in the treatment of vaginal yeast infections when topical creams are not effective. It ... the most commonly used dose to treat vaginal yeast infections. I would like to stop taking fluconazole ...

  6. Plasma Efavirenz Concentrations Are Associated With Lipid and Glucose Concentrations

    PubMed Central

    Sinxadi, Phumla Zuleika; McIlleron, Helen Margaret; Dave, Joel Alex; Smith, Peter John; Levitt, Naomi Sharlene; Haas, David William; Maartens, Gary

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Efavirenz-based antiretroviral therapy (ART) has been associated with dyslipidemia and dysglycemia, risk factors for cardiovascular disease. However, the pathogenesis is not well understood. We characterized relationships between plasma efavirenz concentrations and lipid and glucose concentrations in HIV-infected South Africans. Participants on efavirenz-based ART were enrolled into a cross-sectional study. The oral glucose tolerance test was performed after an overnight fast, and plasma drawn for mid-dosing interval efavirenz, fasting total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein (LDL) and high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, and triglycerides concentrations. Among 106 participants (77 women), median age was 38 years, median CD4 + T-cell count was 322 cells/μL, median duration on ART was 18 months, and median (interquartile range) efavirenz concentration was 2.23 (1.66 to 4.10) μg/mL. On multivariable analyses (adjusting for age, sex, body mass index, and ART duration) doubling of efavirenz concentrations resulted in mean changes in mmol/L (95%CI) of: total cholesterol (0.40 [0.22 to 0.59]), LDL cholesterol (0.19 [0.04 to 0.30]), HDL cholesterol (0.14 [0.07 to 0.20]), triglycerides (0.17 [0.03 to 0.33]), fasting glucose (0.18 [0.03 to 0.33]), and 2-h glucose concentrations (0.33 [0.08 to 0.60]). Among 57 participants with CYP2B6 genotype data, associations between slow metabolizer genotypes and metabolic profiles were generally consistent with those for measured efavirenz concentrations. Higher plasma efavirenz concentrations are associated with higher plasma lipid and glucose concentrations. This may have implications for long-term cardiovascular complications of efavirenz-based ART, particularly among populations with high prevalence of CYP2B6 slow metabolizer genotypes. PMID:26765416

  7. Pathogen Inactivated Plasma Concentrated: Preparation and Uses

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-09-01

    ultrasound to cold plasma. The ultrasound generates pure ice crystals, which are then removed to leave concentrated plasma. Testing: Porcine parvovirus ...of decontamination, porcine parvovirus (PPV) was selected as a model virus; B19 is the form that infects humans. PPV is an interesting pathogen...that all of the plasma is treated quite uniformly. Porcine Parvovirus Inactivation with Ozone 0.0 1.0 2.0 3.0 4.0 5.0 6.0 7.0 1.0 1.5 2.0 2.5 3.0

  8. Doxepin concentrations in plasma and cerebrospinal fluid.

    PubMed

    Schomburg, Robert; Remane, Daniela; Fassbender, Klaus; Maurer, Hans H; Spiegel, Jörg

    2011-04-01

    Doxepin--like other antidepressant drugs (ADs)--shows a variable antidepressant effect in clinical practice. The cause for this variability is as yet unclear; however, pharmacokinetic factors such as the variable permeability of doxepin into the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), may contribute to the difference in therapeutic efficacy. We measured and correlated the concentration of doxepin and its active metabolite nordoxepin in both the plasma and CSF. Plasma and CSF samples were taken simultaneously from 21 patients who were treated with doxepin due to different clinical indications. The plasma concentration of both doxepin and nordoxepin correlated significantly with the oral dosage of doxepin (doxepin: r = +0.66, p < 0.001; nordoxepin: r = +0.78, p < 0.0001; Spearman's correlation). Furthermore, we found significant correlations between the plasma and CSF concentrations of both doxepin (r = +0.71; p < 0.001; Pearson's correlation) and nordoxepin (r = +0.74; p < 0.001). These highly significant correlations between the plasma and CSF concentrations indicate a constant CSF permeability of doxepin and its active metabolite nordoxepin.

  9. Plasma ascorbic acid concentrations in healthy dogs.

    PubMed

    Wang, S; Berge, G E; Sund, R B

    2001-08-01

    Using a highly sensitive and selective analytical method and careful stability control, plasma concentrations of ascorbic acid were determined in German Shepherd Dogs, Labrador Retrievers and Siberian Huskies, a total 99 animals. Mean concentration was 35.9 micromol l(-1)(range 18.2-50.7), and no significant variation was observed neither between breeds nor between females and males. These and previous reported data on plasma ascorbic acid levels in dogs are discussed in the light of methodological aspects. Copyright 2001 Harcourt Publishers Ltd.

  10. Uptake and intracellular activity of fluconazole in human polymorphonuclear leukocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Pascual, A; García, I; Conejo, C; Perea, E J

    1993-01-01

    The penetration of fluconazole into human polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) and tissue culture epithelial cells (McCoy) was evaluated. At different extracellular concentrations (0.5 to 10 mg/liter), fluconazole reached cell-associated concentrations greater than the extracellular ones in either human PMNs (intracellular concentration to extracellular concentration ratio, > or = 2.2) or McCoy cells (intracellular concentration to extracellular concentration ratio, > or = 1.3). The uptake of fluconazole by PMNs was rapid and reversible but was not energy dependent. The intracellular penetration of fluconazole was not affected by environmental pH or temperature. Ingestion of opsonized zymosan and opsonized Candida albicans did not significantly increase the amount of PMN-associated fluconazole. At therapeutic extracellular concentrations, the intracellular activity of fluconazole against C. albicans in PMNs was significantly lower than that of amphotericin B. It was concluded that fluconazole reaches high intracellular concentrations within PMNs but shows moderate activity against intracellular C. albicans in vitro. PMID:8452347

  11. Plasma carnitine concentrations after chronic alcohol intoxication.

    PubMed

    Kępka, Alina; Waszkiewicz, Napoleon; Zalewska-Szajda, Beata; Chojnowska, Sylwia; Płudowski, Paweł; Konarzewska, Emilia; Szulc, Agata; Ladny, Jerzy Robert; Zwierz, Krzysztof; Szajda, Sławomir Dariusz

    2013-05-31

    Carnitine transports fatty acids from the cytoplasm to the mitochondrial matrix, where the fatty acids are oxidized. Chronic alcohol consumption reduces the concentration of carnitine and interferes with oxidative processes occurring in the cell. The assessment of carnitine concentrations in plasma of chronically intoxicated alcohol dependent persons in a 49-day abstinence period. The study included 31 patients (5 women and 27 men) aged from 26 to 60 years (44.6 ± 8.9) and 32 healthy subjects (15 women and 17 men) aged 22-60 years (39.8 ± 9.4). The patients' alcohol dependence ranged from 2 to 30 years (13.6 ± 7.5). Examined subjects consumed 75-700 g of ethanol/day (226.9 ± 151.5). Plasma concentrations of free and total carnitine were measured three times: at the first (T0), 30th (T30) and 49th (T49) day of hospital detoxification. Free (FC) and total (TC) carnitine were determined by the spectrophotometric method. Plasma acylcarnitine (AC) concentration was calculated from the difference between TC and FC; then the AC/FC ratio was calculated. To determine statistically significant differences for related variables, Student's t-test was used. At T0, alcoholics had significantly lower concentration of FC and TC (p < 0.05) in plasma, as compared to the control group. In comparison to controls, at T30, plasma TC and FC (p < 0.01) as well as AC (p < 0.001) were reduced. The lowest concentration of TC, FC and AC (p < 0.001)was found at T49. The ratio of AC/FC at T0 had a tendency to be higher in alcoholics than in the control group (p = 0.05), whereas at T49 it was significantly lower in alcoholics as compared to the control subjects (p < 0.05). Chronic alcohol intoxication causes a plasma deficiency of carnitine. Forty-nine days of abstinence showed a significant decrease in the concentration of TC, FC and AC. Further research is necessary to clarify whether a low level of plasma carnitine after chronic alcohol intoxication is caused by the uptake of blood

  12. Decreased maternal plasma apelin concentrations in preeclampsia.

    PubMed

    Bortoff, Katherine D; Qiu, Chunfang; Runyon, Scott; Williams, Michelle A; Maitra, Rangan

    2012-01-01

    Preeclampsia is a hypertensive disorder that complicates 3-7% of pregnancies. The development of preeclampsia has not been completely elucidated and current therapies are not broadly efficacious. The apelinergic system appears to be involved in hypertensive disorders and experimental studies indicate a role of this system in preeclampsia. Thus, an epidemiological evaluation of apelin protein concentration in plasma was conducted in case-control study of pregnant women. Data and maternal plasma samples were collected from pregnant women with confirmed preeclampsia (n = 76) or normotensive controls (n = 79). Concentrations of apelin peptides were blindly measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Data were subjected to statistical analyses. Plasma apelin concentrations, measured at delivery, were lower in preeclampsia cases compared with controls (mean ± standard deviation: 0.66 ± 0.29 vs. 0.78 ± 0.31 ng/mL, p = 0.02). After controlling for confounding by maternal age, smoking status, and pre-pregnancy body mass index, odds of preeclampsia were 48% lower for women with high versus low plasma apelin (≥0.73 vs. <0.73 ng/mL) concentrations. Reduced circulating apelin peptides may be associated with preeclampsia. The apelinergic system should be further investigated to elucidate its role in preclampsia and other hypertensive maternal disorders.

  13. Plasma aminotransferase concentrations in preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Victor, S; Dickinson, H; Turner, M A

    2011-03-01

    The aim of this study was to generate reference ranges for aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and alanine aminotransferase (ALT) in preterm infants by describing the observed plasma concentration of these enzymes in babies born between 22 and 36 weeks' gestation. A service evaluation was conducted in babies admitted to two large neonatal intensive care units in the UK. 7006 blood samples from 1860 infants admitted to the two units between 2004 and 2008 were included. Extremely premature infants had high plasma enzyme activities when compared to babies at a later corrected gestational age. This may be due to more severe illness immediately after birth.

  14. Factors influencing lopinavir and atazanavir plasma concentration

    PubMed Central

    Stöhr, Wolfgang; Back, David; Dunn, David; Sabin, Caroline; Winston, Alan; Gilson, Richard; Pillay, Deenan; Hill, Teresa; Ainsworth, Jonathan; Gazzard, Brian; Leen, Clifford; Bansi, Loveleen; Fisher, Martin; Orkin, Chloe; Anderson, Jane; Johnson, Margaret; Easterbrook, Philippa; Gibbons, Sara; Khoo, Saye

    2010-01-01

    Background The protease inhibitors lopinavir and atazanavir are both recommended for treatment of HIV-infected patients. Considerable inter-individual variability in plasma concentration has been observed for both drugs. The aim of this study was to evaluate which demographic factors and concomitant drugs are associated with lopinavir and atazanavir plasma concentration. Methods Data from the Liverpool TDM (therapeutic drug monitoring) Registry were linked with the UK Collaborative HIV Cohort (CHIC) study. For each patient, the first measurement of lopinavir (twice daily) or atazanavir [once daily, ritonavir boosted (/r) or unboosted] plasma concentration was included. Linear regression was used to evaluate the association of dose, gender, age, weight, ethnicity and concomitant antiretroviral drugs or rifabutin with log-transformed drug concentration, adjusted for time since last intake. Results Data from 439 patients on lopinavir (69% 400 mg/r, 31% 533 mg/r; 3% concomitant rifabutin) and 313 on atazanavir (60% 300 mg/r, 32% 400 mg/r, 8% 400 mg) were included. Multivariable models revealed the following predictors for lopinavir concentration: weight (11% decrease per additional 10 kg; P = 0.001); dose (25% increase for 533 mg/r; P = 0.024); and rifabutin (116% increase; P < 0.001). For atazanavir the predictors were dose (compared with 300 mg/r: 40% increase for 400 mg/r, 67% decrease for 400 mg; overall P < 0.001) and efavirenz (32% decrease; P = 0.016) but not tenofovir (P = 0.54). Conclusions This analysis confirms that efavirenz decreases atazanavir concentrations, and there was a negative association of weight and lopinavir concentrations. The strong impact of rifabutin on lopinavir concentration should be studied further. PMID:19897506

  15. Factors influencing lopinavir and atazanavir plasma concentration.

    PubMed

    Stöhr, Wolfgang; Back, David; Dunn, David; Sabin, Caroline; Winston, Alan; Gilson, Richard; Pillay, Deenan; Hill, Teresa; Ainsworth, Jonathan; Gazzard, Brian; Leen, Clifford; Bansi, Loveleen; Fisher, Martin; Orkin, Chloe; Anderson, Jane; Johnson, Margaret; Easterbrook, Philippa; Gibbons, Sara; Khoo, Saye

    2010-01-01

    The protease inhibitors lopinavir and atazanavir are both recommended for treatment of HIV-infected patients. Considerable inter-individual variability in plasma concentration has been observed for both drugs. The aim of this study was to evaluate which demographic factors and concomitant drugs are associated with lopinavir and atazanavir plasma concentration. Data from the Liverpool TDM (therapeutic drug monitoring) Registry were linked with the UK Collaborative HIV Cohort (CHIC) study. For each patient, the first measurement of lopinavir (twice daily) or atazanavir [once daily, ritonavir boosted (/r) or unboosted] plasma concentration was included. Linear regression was used to evaluate the association of dose, gender, age, weight, ethnicity and concomitant antiretroviral drugs or rifabutin with log-transformed drug concentration, adjusted for time since last intake. Data from 439 patients on lopinavir (69% 400 mg/r, 31% 533 mg/r; 3% concomitant rifabutin) and 313 on atazanavir (60% 300 mg/r, 32% 400 mg/r, 8% 400 mg) were included. Multivariable models revealed the following predictors for lopinavir concentration: weight (11% decrease per additional 10 kg; P = 0.001); dose (25% increase for 533 mg/r; P = 0.024); and rifabutin (116% increase; P < 0.001). For atazanavir the predictors were dose (compared with 300 mg/r: 40% increase for 400 mg/r, 67% decrease for 400 mg; overall P < 0.001) and efavirenz (32% decrease; P = 0.016) but not tenofovir (P = 0.54). This analysis confirms that efavirenz decreases atazanavir concentrations, and there was a negative association of weight and lopinavir concentrations. The strong impact of rifabutin on lopinavir concentration should be studied further.

  16. In vitro evaluation of vincristine and fluconazole combination against Candida.

    PubMed

    Khan, Abdul Arif; Khurshid, Mohsin; Tawfik, A F

    2013-09-01

    Infections associated with cancer are a major scourge and cause of substantial morbidity and mortality in cancer patients. The aim of present study was to appraise the in vitro activity of anticancer agent vincristine and antifungal fluconazole alone and in combination against Candida spp. Results were interpreted in terms of fractional inhibitory concentration index (FICI). Antifungal activity of fluconazole showed marked synergism when used in combination with vincristine, with FICI ranging from 0.25-0.5 against different Candida spp. Although, the use of vincristine with fluconazole is always disputed due to its side effects including decreased peristalsis, but the present research can help to perform suitability analysis of fluconazole use in life threatening invasive candidiasis associated with cancer patients. In addition, the synergism in antifungal activity after using with vincristine also warrants further research in the direction of minimizing adverse reaction associated with combined use of fluconazole and vincristine.

  17. The effect of clarithromycin, fluconazole, and rifabutin on dapsone hydroxylamine formation in individuals with human immunodeficiency virus infection (AACTG 283).

    PubMed

    Winter, Helen R; Trapnell, Carol B; Slattery, John T; Jacobson, Mark; Greenspan, Debra L; Hooton, Thomas M; Unadkat, Jashvant D

    2004-12-01

    Dapsone hydroxylamine formation is thought to be the cause of the high rates of adverse reactions to dapsone in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected individuals. Therefore we studied the effect of the commonly coadministered drugs fluconazole, clarithromycin, and rifabutin on hydroxylamine formation in individuals with HIV infection. HIV-infected subjects (CD4 + > or =200 cells/mm 3 ) were enrolled in a 2-part (A or B) open-label drug interaction study. In part A, subjects (n = 12) received dapsone (100-mg tablet once daily) alone for 2 weeks and then, in a randomly assigned order, received dapsone and either fluconazole (200 mg daily), rifabutin (300 mg daily), or fluconazole plus rifabutin, each for a 2-week period. Part B (n = 11) was identical to part A except that clarithromycin (500 mg twice daily) was substituted for rifabutin. On the last study day of each 2-week period, plasma and urine were collected over ascorbic acid for 24 hours. In part A, fluconazole decreased the area under the plasma concentration-time curve, percent of dose excreted in 24-hour urine, and formation clearance of the hydroxylamine by 49%, 53%, and 55% (n = 12, P < .05), respectively. This inhibition of in vivo hydroxylamine formation was quantitatively consistent with that predicted from human liver microsomal experiments. Rifabutin had no effect on hydroxylamine area under the plasma concentration-time curve or percent excreted in 24-hour urine but increased formation clearance of the hydroxylamine by 92% (n = 12, P < .05). Dapsone clearance was increased by rifabutin or rifabutin plus fluconazole (67% and 38%, respectively) (n = 12, P < .05) but was unaffected by fluconazole or clarithromycin. In part B, hydroxylamine production was unaffected by clarithromycin but was affected by fluconazole in a manner identical to that in part A. On the basis of these data and with the assumption that the exposure to the hydroxylamine is a determinant of dapsone toxicity, we predict that

  18. [Monitoring plasma antibiotic concentrations in Spanish hospitals].

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Lerma, Francisco; Grau, Santiago; Marín-Casino, Mónica; Olaechea, Pedro; Sánchez, Miguel; Martín, Estrella; Pujol, Miquel

    2006-01-01

    Monitoring of plasma aminoglycoside and vancomycin concentrations is a measure of good clinical practice in critically ill patients. However, the frequency and application of this practice in Spanish hospitals is unknown. Observational, multicenter study based on a survey designed by the Study Group for Infection in the Critically Ill Patient of the Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica (SEIMC, Spanish Society of Infectious Diseases and Clinical Microbiology). The survey was sent to the 221 general hospitals with a more than 150-bed capacity included in the hospital directory. Questions regarding the antibiotics monitored, hospital services involved, systems used to report the results, and levels of intervention were included. Information was recorded from 56 (25.3%) hospitals with a total of 36,886 beds, among which 933 (2.5%) corresponded to critically ill patients. In 47 (83.9%) hospitals, plasma concentrations of one or two antibiotics were determined: vancomycin in 47 (83.9% of the total), amikacin in 41 (73.2%), and gentamicin in 40 (71.2%). Analyses were performed by the following services: Biochemistry in 34%, Pharmacy in 25.5% and Pharmacology in 8.5%. Only 57.4% of services recommended dose adjustments according to the results obtained, using eight different dose adjustment models. In 16% of the hospitals surveyed, monitoring of antibiotic concentrations was not performed in daily practice. There was considerable variation in all phases of the process, especially with regard to adjustment of plasma antibiotic concentrations. Consensus recommendations established by all the Services implicated are required to standardize monitoring of plasma antibiotic concentrations.

  19. Do plasma melatonin concentrations decline with age?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeitzer, J. M.; Daniels, J. E.; Duffy, J. F.; Klerman, E. B.; Shanahan, T. L.; Dijk, D. J.; Czeisler, C. A.

    1999-01-01

    PURPOSE: Numerous reports that secretion of the putative sleep-promoting hormone melatonin declines with age have led to suggestions that melatonin replacement therapy be used to treat sleep problems in older patients. We sought to reassess whether the endogenous circadian rhythm of plasma melatonin concentration changes with age in healthy drug-free adults. METHODS: We analyzed the amplitude of plasma melatonin profiles during a constant routine in 34 healthy drug-free older subjects (20 women and 14 men, aged 65 to 81 years) and compared them with 98 healthy drug-free young men (aged 18 to 30 years). RESULTS: We could detect no significant difference between a healthy and drug-free group of older men and women as compared to one of young men in the endogenous circadian amplitude of the plasma melatonin rhythm, as described by mean 24-hour average melatonin concentration (70 pmol/liter vs 73 pmol/liter, P = 0.97), or the duration (9.3 hours vs 9.1 hours, P = 0.43), mean (162 pmol/liter vs 161 pmol/liter, P = 0.63), or integrated area (85,800 pmol x min/liter vs 86,700 pmol x min/liter, P = 0.66) of the nocturnal peak of plasma melatonin. CONCLUSION: These results do not support the hypothesis that reduction of plasma melatonin concentration is a general characteristic of healthy aging. Should melatonin replacement therapy or melatonin supplementation prove to be clinically useful, we recommend that an assessment of endogenous melatonin be carried out before such treatment is used in older patients.

  20. Do plasma melatonin concentrations decline with age?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeitzer, J. M.; Daniels, J. E.; Duffy, J. F.; Klerman, E. B.; Shanahan, T. L.; Dijk, D. J.; Czeisler, C. A.

    1999-01-01

    PURPOSE: Numerous reports that secretion of the putative sleep-promoting hormone melatonin declines with age have led to suggestions that melatonin replacement therapy be used to treat sleep problems in older patients. We sought to reassess whether the endogenous circadian rhythm of plasma melatonin concentration changes with age in healthy drug-free adults. METHODS: We analyzed the amplitude of plasma melatonin profiles during a constant routine in 34 healthy drug-free older subjects (20 women and 14 men, aged 65 to 81 years) and compared them with 98 healthy drug-free young men (aged 18 to 30 years). RESULTS: We could detect no significant difference between a healthy and drug-free group of older men and women as compared to one of young men in the endogenous circadian amplitude of the plasma melatonin rhythm, as described by mean 24-hour average melatonin concentration (70 pmol/liter vs 73 pmol/liter, P = 0.97), or the duration (9.3 hours vs 9.1 hours, P = 0.43), mean (162 pmol/liter vs 161 pmol/liter, P = 0.63), or integrated area (85,800 pmol x min/liter vs 86,700 pmol x min/liter, P = 0.66) of the nocturnal peak of plasma melatonin. CONCLUSION: These results do not support the hypothesis that reduction of plasma melatonin concentration is a general characteristic of healthy aging. Should melatonin replacement therapy or melatonin supplementation prove to be clinically useful, we recommend that an assessment of endogenous melatonin be carried out before such treatment is used in older patients.

  1. Design, synthesis, and evaluation of caffeic acid amides as synergists to sensitize fluconazole-resistant Candida albicans to fluconazole.

    PubMed

    Dai, Li; Zang, Chengxu; Tian, Shujuan; Liu, Wei; Tan, Shanlun; Cai, Zhan; Ni, Tingjunhong; An, Maomao; Li, Ran; Gao, Yue; Zhang, Dazhi; Jiang, Yuanying

    2015-01-01

    A series of caffeic acid amides were designed, synthesized, and their synergistic activity with fluconazole against fluconazole-resistant Candida albicans was evaluated in vitro. The title caffeic acid amides 3-30 except 26 exhibited potent activity, and the subsequent SAR study was conducted. Compound 3, 5, 21, and 34c, at a concentration of 1.0 μg/ml, decreased the MIC₈₀ of fluconazole from 128.0 μg/ml to 1.0-0.5 μg/ml against the fluconazole-resistant C. albicans. This result suggests that the caffeic acid amides, as synergists, can sensitize drug-resistant fungi to fluconazole. The SAR study indicated that the dihydroxyl groups and the amido groups linking to phenyl or heterocyclic rings are the important pharmacophores of the caffeic acid amides.

  2. Fluconazole Dosing for the Prevention or Treatment of Invasive Candidiasis in Young Infants

    PubMed Central

    Wade, Kelly C.; Benjamin, Daniel K.; Kaufman, David A.; Ward, Robert M.; Smith, P. Brian; Jayaraman, Bhuvana; Adamson, Peter C.; Gastonguay, Marc R.; Barrett, Jeffrey S.

    2009-01-01

    Background Young infants are susceptible to developmental factors influencing the pharmacokinetics of drugs. Fluconazole is increasingly used to prevent and treat invasive candidiasis in infants. Dosing guidance remains empiric and variable because limited pharmacokinetic data exist. Methods Our population PK model derived from 357 fluconazole plasma concentrations from 55 infants (23–40 week gestation) illustrates expected changes in fluconazole clearance based upon gestational age, postnatal age, weight, and creatinine. We used a Monte Carlo simulation approach based on parametric description of a patient population’s pharmacokinetic response to fluconazole to predict fluconazole exposure (median, 10th and 90th percentile population variability range) after 3, 6 and 12 mg/kg dosing. Results For the treatment of invasive candidiasis, a dose of at least 12 mg/kg/day in the 1st 90 days after birth is needed to achieve an AUC of >400 mg*h/L and an AUC/MIC>50 for Candida species with MIC<8 µg/ml in ≥ 90% of <30 week gestation infants and 80% of 30–40 week gestation infants. The more preterm infants achieve a higher median AUC (682 mg*hr/L) compared with more mature infants (520 mg*hr/L). For early prevention of candidiasis in 23–29 week infants, a dose of 3 or 6 mg/kg twice weekly during the first 42 days of life is equivalent to an AUC of 50 and 100 mg*hr/L, respectively, and maintains fluconazole concentrations ≥ 2 or 4 µg/ml, respectively, for half of the dosing interval. For late prevention, the 6 mg/kg dose every 72 hours provides similar exposure to 3 mg/kg daily dose. Infants with serum creatinine ≥ 1.3 mg/dl have delayed drug clearance and dose adjustment is indicated if creatinine does not improve within 96 hours. Conclusions A therapeutic concentration of fluconazole in premature infants with invasive candidiasis requires dosing substantially greater than commonly recommended in most reference texts. To prevent invasive candidiasis, twice

  3. CSF and plasma vasopressin concentrations in dementia.

    PubMed Central

    Sørensen, P S; Hammer, M; Vorstrup, S; Gjerris, F

    1983-01-01

    In 16 patients with primary degenerative dementia mean CSF vasopressin concentration was lower (0.9 +/- 0.1 pg/ml (mean +/- SEM)) than in 28 control patients (1.3 +/- 0.1 (mean +/- SEM)) (p less than 0.01). In 18 patients with normal pressure hydrocephalus and potentially reversible dementia mean CSF vasopressin concentration (1.2 pg/ml +/- 0.1 (mean +/- SEM)) was not different from that found in controls. Several of the demented patients had inappropriate plasma vasopressin concentrations suggesting a defect in osmoregulation. These findings encourage further clinical trials of vasopressin in patients with primary degenerative dementia, but it is emphasised that the low CSF vasopressin concentration in these patients might be only a nonspecific phenomenon due to the diffuse loss of cells within the central nervous system. PMID:6644315

  4. Multiplex Ultra-Performance Liquid Chromatography-Tandem Mass Spectrometry Method for Simultaneous Quantification in Human Plasma of Fluconazole, Itraconazole, Hydroxyitraconazole, Posaconazole, Voriconazole, Voriconazole-N-Oxide, Anidulafungin, and Caspofungin▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Decosterd, Laurent Arthur; Rochat, Bertrand; Pesse, Benoît; Mercier, Thomas; Tissot, Frédéric; Widmer, Nicolas; Bille, Jacques; Calandra, Thierry; Zanolari, Boris; Marchetti, Oscar

    2010-01-01

    Therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) may contribute to optimizing the efficacy and safety of antifungal therapy because of the large variability in drug pharmacokinetics. Rapid, sensitive, and selective laboratory methods are needed for efficient TDM. Quantification of several antifungals in a single analytical run may best fulfill these requirements. We therefore developed a multiplex ultra-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS) method requiring 100 μl of plasma for simultaneous quantification within 7 min of fluconazole, itraconazole, hydroxyitraconazole, posaconazole, voriconazole, voriconazole-N-oxide, caspofungin, and anidulafungin. Protein precipitation with acetonitrile was used in a single extraction procedure for eight analytes. After reverse-phase chromatographic separation, antifungals were quantified by electrospray ionization-triple-quadrupole mass spectrometry by selected reaction monitoring detection using the positive mode. Deuterated isotopic compounds of azole antifungals were used as internal standards. The method was validated based on FDA recommendations, including assessment of extraction yields, matrix effect variability (<9.2%), and analytical recovery (80.1 to 107%). The method is sensitive (lower limits of azole quantification, 0.01 to 0.1 μg/ml; those of echinocandin quantification, 0.06 to 0.1 μg/ml), accurate (intra- and interassay biases of −9.9 to +5% and −4.0 to +8.8%, respectively), and precise (intra- and interassay coefficients of variation of 1.2 to 11.1% and 1.2 to 8.9%, respectively) over clinical concentration ranges (upper limits of quantification, 5 to 50 μg/ml). Thus, we developed a simple, rapid, and robust multiplex UPLC-MS/MS assay for simultaneous quantification of plasma concentrations of six antifungals and two metabolites. This offers, by optimized and cost-effective lab resource utilization, an efficient tool for daily routine TDM aimed at maximizing the real-time efficacy and

  5. Acute clozapine overdose: plasma concentration and outcome.

    PubMed

    Broich, K; Heinrich, S; Marneros, A

    1998-07-01

    Clozapine is a tricyclic dibenzodiazepine derivative that is classified as an "atypical neuroleptic" drug for treatment of psychotic diseases. A 19-year-old schizophrenic female, treated with 400 mg clozapine per day, was admitted to the emergency department after ingestion of 5000 mg (50 x 100 mg tablets) of clozapine. Clozapine plasma level 2.5 hours after ingestion was 3.8 microg/ml (normal range 0.2-0.7 microg/ml) and very high in gastric lavage. Contrary to reported cases with such high plasma concentrations the patient suffered only from somnolence with intermittent periods of agitation and a mild anticholinergic syndrome with sinus tachycardia and slight hypotension. After detoxication with gastric lavage and short-term administration of pyridostigmine she remained stable, and 24 hours after ingestion she was transferred to the psychiatric unit without further sequelae. To prevent late-onset complications she was carefully monitored for five days. The clozapine plasma level 24 hours after the first measurement was normal. This case and others reported in the literature confirm that signs and symptoms after clozapine intoxication are variable and that high plasma levels are not lethal in every case.

  6. Mutants with heteroresistance to amphotericin B and fluconazole in Candida

    PubMed Central

    Claudino, A.L.R.; Peixoto Junior, R.F.; Melhem, M.S.C.; Szeszs, M.W.; Lyon, J.P.; Chavasco, J.K.; Franco, M.C.

    2009-01-01

    Several studies have reported the occurrence of infections caused by Candida yeasts as well as the increasing prevalence of non albicans species. The aim of the present work is focused on the obtaining of heteroresistance to amphotericin B and fluconazole in Candida species using two distinct methodologies: selection and induction. Resistant samples were obtained by selective pressure using a medium with fluconazole for growth, followed by growth in a medium with amphotericin B. The selective pressure was also created beginning with growth in amphotericin B medium followed by growth in fluconazole medium. Concomitantly, samples were submitted to the induction of resistance through cultivation in increasing concentrations of fluconazole, followed by cultivation in increasing concentrations of amphotericin B. Subsequently, the induction began with amphotericin B followed by fluconazole. Three samples resistant to fluconazole and amphotericin B were obtained, two by induction (C. glabrata and C. tropicalis) and one by selection (C. tropicalis). Both C. tropicalis originated from the same wild sample. After successive transfers for drug free medium, only the sample obtained by selection was able to maintain the resistance phenotype. These results suggest that the phenotype of heteroresitance to fluconazole and amphotericin B can be produced by two methodologies: selection and induction. PMID:24031445

  7. Plasma prolactin concentrations in lead exposed workers.

    PubMed

    Govoni, S; Battaini, F; Fernicola, C; Castelletti, L; Trabucchi, M

    1987-01-01

    Plasma Prolactin (Prl) Zinc protoporphyrin (Zpp) and blood lead concentrations (PbB) were measured in 76 exposed male workers. All of them were employed in small (not more than 30 persons) pewter factories and were randomly selected from those regularly controlled by the National Health Service, Occupational Health Unit of Brescia (USSL 41). Although all plasma Prl values were within the normal range, the mean value of the subgroup having Zpp and PbB higher than 40 micrograms/dl was significantly higher (+47%) than that observed in the group of workers having Zpp and PbB less than 40 micrograms/dl. The data indicate the possibility of a lead-induced Prl secretion dysfunction, probably mediated by a decrease in dopaminergic inhibitory control.

  8. Pharmacokinetics of fluconazole following intravenous and oral administration to koalas (Phascolarctos cinereus).

    PubMed

    Black, L A; Krockenberger, M B; Kimble, B; Govendir, M

    2014-02-01

    Clinically normal koalas (n = 12) received a single dose of 10 mg/kg fluconazole orally (p.o.; n = 6) or intravenously (i.v.; n = 6). Serial plasma samples were collected over 24 h, and fluconazole concentrations were determined using a validated HPLC assay. A noncompartmental pharmacokinetic analysis was performed. Following i.v. administration, median (range) plasma clearance (CL) and steady-state volume of distribution (Vss ) were 0.31 (0.11-0.55) L/h/kg and 0.92 (0.38-1.40) L/kg, respectively. The elimination half-life (t1/2 ) was much shorter than in many species (i.v.: median 2.25, range 0.98-6.51 h; p.o.: 4.69, range 2.47-8.01 h), and oral bioavailability was low and variable (median 0.53, range 0.20-0.97). Absorption rate-limited disposition was evident. Plasma protein binding was 39.5 ± 3.5%. Although fluconazole volume of distribution (Varea ) displayed an allometric relationship with other mammals, CL and t1/2 did not. Allometrically scaled values were approximately sevenfold lower (CL) and sixfold higher (t1/2 ) than observed values, highlighting flaws associated with this technique in physiologically distinct species. On the basis of fAUC/MIC pharmacodynamic targets, fluconazole is predicted to be ineffective against Cryptococcus gattii in the koala as a sole therapeutic agent administered at 10 mg/kg p.o. every 12 h. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Sensitization of Candida albicans biofilms to fluconazole by terpenoids of plant origin.

    PubMed

    Doke, Sonali Kashinath; Raut, Jayant Shankar; Dhawale, Shashikant; Karuppayil, Sankunny Mohan

    2014-01-01

    Infections associated with the biofilms of Candida albicans are a challenge to antifungal treatment. Combinatorial therapy involving plant molecules with antifungal drugs would be an effective complementary approach against drug-resistant Candida biofilms. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of three bioactive terpenoids (carvacrol, eugenol and thymol) in combination with fluconazole against planktonic cells, biofilm development and mature biofilms of C. albicans. Activities of the selected molecules were tested using a microplate-based methodology, while their combinations with fluconazole were performed in a checkerboard format. Biofilms were quantitated by XTT-metabolic assay and confirmed by microscopic observations. Combinations of carvacrol and eugenol with fluconazole were found synergistic against planktonic growth of C. albicans, while that of thymol with fluconazole did not have any interaction. Biofilm development and mature biofilms were highly resistant to fluconazole, but susceptible to three terpenoids. Sensitization of cells by sub-inhibitory concentrations of carvacrol and eugenol resulted in prevention of biofilm formation at low fluconazole concentrations, i.e. 0.032 and 0.002 mg ml(-1), respectively. Addition of thymol could not potentiate activity of fluconazole against biofilm formation by C. albicans. Fractional inhibitory concentration indices (FICI) for carvacrol-fluconazole and eugenol-fluconazole combinations for biofilm formation were 0.311 and 0.25, respectively. The FICI value of 1.003 indicated a status of indifference for the combination of thymol and fluconazole against biofilm formation. Eugenol and thymol combinations with fluconazole did not have useful interaction against mature biofilms of C. albicans, but the presence of 0.5 mg ml(-1) of carvacrol caused inhibition of mature biofilms at a significantly low concentration (i.e. 0.032 mg ml(-1)) of fluconazole. The study indicated that carvacrol and eugenol

  10. Plasma bupivacaine concentrations following psoas compartment block.

    PubMed

    Odoom, J A; Zuurmond, W W; Sih, I L; Bovill, J; Osterlöf, G; Oosting, H V

    1986-02-01

    Fourteen patients undergoing hip replacement surgery under psoas compartment block combined with general anaesthesia were studied. Group 1 (n = 7) received plain and Group 2 (n = 7) received 0.25% bupivacaine with adrenaline. The mean maximum peak concentrations were 1.93 (SEM 0.46) micrograms/ml and 1.04 (SEM 0.19) micrograms/ml at 10 minutes in groups 1 and 2 respectively. Bupivacaine concentrations were higher at all times in the group which received plain than the group receiving solution containing adrenaline. These differences were statistically significant at 10, 15 (p less than 0.05) and 30 minutes (p less than 0.025). The highest recorded plasma bupivacaine concentration was 4.54 micrograms/ml in one patient receiving plain bupivacaine. No patient developed any signs of toxic symptoms. The duration of analgesia was longer (p less than 0.005) in the group receiving bupivacaine with adrenaline. Bupivacaine 0.25% with adrenaline 1:200 000 is safe for psoas compartment block, and is recommended for hip surgery.

  11. Efficacy of the clinical agent VT-1161 against fluconazole-sensitive and -resistant Candida albicans in a murine model of vaginal candidiasis.

    PubMed

    Garvey, E P; Hoekstra, W J; Schotzinger, R J; Sobel, J D; Lilly, E A; Fidel, P L

    2015-09-01

    Vulvovaginal candidiasis (VVC) and recurrent VVC (RVVC) remain major health problems for women. VT-1161, a novel fungal CYP51 inhibitor which has potent antifungal activity against fluconazole-sensitive Candida albicans, retained its in vitro potency (MIC50 of ≤0.015 and MIC90 of 0.12 μg/ml) against 10 clinical isolates from VVC or RVVC patients resistant to fluconazole (MIC50 of 8 and MIC90 of 64 μg/ml). VT-1161 pharmacokinetics in mice displayed a high volume of distribution (1.4 liters/kg), high oral absorption (73%), and a long half-life (>48 h) and showed rapid penetration into vaginal tissue. In a murine model of vaginal candidiasis using fluconazole-sensitive yeast, oral doses as low as 4 mg/kg VT-1161 significantly reduced the fungal burden 1 and 4 days posttreatment (P < 0.0001). Similar VT-1161 efficacy was measured when an isolate highly resistant to fluconazole (MIC of 64 μg/ml) but fully sensitive in vitro to VT-1161 was used. When an isolate partially sensitive to VT-1161 (MIC of 0.12 μg/ml) and moderately resistant to fluconazole (MIC of 8 μg/ml) was used, VT-1161 remained efficacious, whereas fluconazole was efficacious on day 1 but did not sustain efficacy 4 days posttreatment. Both agents were inactive in treating an infection with an isolate that demonstrated weaker potency (MICs of 2 and 64 μg/ml for VT-1161 and fluconazole, respectively). Finally, the plasma concentrations of free VT-1161 were predictive of efficacy when in excess of the in vitro MIC values. These data support the clinical development of VT-1161 as a potentially more efficacious treatment for VVC and RVVC.

  12. Effects of the moderate CYP3A4 inhibitor, fluconazole, on the pharmacokinetics of fesoterodine in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Malhotra, Bimal; Dickins, Maurice; Alvey, Christine; Jumadilova, Zhanna; Li, Xiaoxi; Duczynski, Gregory; Gandelman, Kuan

    2011-08-01

    Available data suggest that fesoterodine dosage should not exceed 4 mg once daily when taken concomitantly with potent CYP3A4 inhibitors, such as ketoconazole. Currently, no information is available on whether dose adjustment is necessary when fesoterodine is administered with a moderate CYP3A4 inhibitor. This study shows that adjustment of fesoterodine dose is not warranted when co-administered with a moderate CYP3A4 inhibitor. To assess the effects of fluconazole, a moderate CYP3A4 inhibitor, on the pharmacokinetics (PK) and safety/tolerability of fesoterodine. In this open-label, randomized, two-way crossover study, 28 healthy subjects (18-55 years) received single doses of fesoterodine 8 mg alone or with fluconazole 200 mg. PK endpoints, including the area under the plasma concentration-time curve from 0 to infinity (AUC(0,∞)), maximum plasma concentration (C(max) ), time to C(max) (t(max) ), and half-life (t(1/2) ), were assessed for 5-hydroxymethyl tolterodine (5-HMT), the active moiety of fesoterodine. Concomitant administration of fesoterodine with fluconazole increased AUC(0,∞) and C(max) of 5-HMT by approximately 27% and 19%, respectively, with corresponding 90% confidence intervals of (18%, 36%) and (11%, 28%). There was no apparent effect of fluconazole on 5-HMT t(max) or t(½) . Fesoterodine was generally well tolerated regardless of fluconazole co-administration, with no reports of death, serious adverse events (AEs) or severe AEs. Following co-administration of fesoterodine with fluconazole, 13 subjects (48%) experienced a total of 40 AEs; following administration of fesoterodine alone, six subjects (22%) experienced a total of 19 AEs. The majority of AEs were of mild intensity. There were no clinically significant changes in laboratory or physical examination parameters. Fesoterodine 8 mg single dose was well tolerated when administered alone or with fluconazole. Based on the observed increase in 5-HMT exposures being within the inherent

  13. Predictors of plasma zinc concentrations in children with acute diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Strand, Tor A; Adhikari, Ramesh K; Chandyo, Ram K; Sharma, Pushpa R; Sommerfelt, Halvor

    2004-03-01

    Plasma and serum zinc concentrations are the most widely used markers of zinc status in individual persons and populations. The objective was to identify factors that influence plasma zinc concentrations during acute childhood diarrhea. This was a cross-sectional study of 1757 cases of acute diarrhea in 6-35-mo-old Nepalese children. The association between plasma zinc concentration and several clinical, anthropometric, socioeconomic, and biochemical variables was estimated in simple and multiple linear regression analyses. We observed a reduction in the mean plasma zinc concentration of 0.59 (95% CI: 0.44, 0.74) micro mol/L per degree ( degrees C) increase in axillary temperature. Having dysentery and an elevated plasma C-reactive protein concentration was also independently associated with lower plasma zinc. Children with clinical features of dehydration had higher plasma zinc concentrations than did those who were not dehydrated. Furthermore, a decrease in plasma albumin of 1 g/L was associated with a decrease in plasma zinc of 0.25 (95% CI: 0.21, 0.29) micro mol/L. The plasma albumin concentration confounded the associations between some clinical variables and plasma zinc, but the association between axillary temperature and dehydration on one hand and plasma zinc on the other was not substantially influenced by the albumin concentration. Moreover, the plasma zinc concentration increased with an increase in observed hemolysis. Dehydration, clinical and biochemical indicators of inflammation and hemolysis, and, when possible, plasma albumin concentrations should be taken into account when the plasma zinc concentration is used to estimate zinc status during episodes of diarrhea in childhood.

  14. Plasma tryptophan concentration in depressive illness and mania.

    PubMed

    Peet, M; Moody, J P; Worrall, E P; Walker, P; Naylor, G J

    1976-03-01

    Total and free plasma trytophan levels were measured in depressive and manic patients before and after recovery. No change was found in total or free plasma trytophan concentration on recovery from depressive illness. Free plasma tryptophan levels were higher in recovered manics than in active manics, and a group of four manic patients tested before and after recovery showed a significant increase in free plasma tryptophan concentration on recovery.

  15. Effect of fluconazole on the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of oral and rectal bromazepam: an application of electroencephalography as the pharmacodynamic method.

    PubMed

    Ohtani, Yasukiyo; Kotegawa, Tsutomu; Tsutsumi, Kimiko; Morimoto, Takuya; Hirose, Yumiko; Nakano, Shigeyuki

    2002-02-01

    Quantitative analysis of electroencephalography (EEG) is used increasingly to evaluate the pharmacodynamics of benzodiazepines. The present study aimed to apply the EEG method as well as more traditional approaches to an interaction study of bromazepam and fluconazole. Twelve healthy male volunteers participated in a randomized, double-blind, four-way crossover study. The subjects received single oral or rectal doses of bromazepam (3 mg) after 4-day pretreatment of oral fluconazole (100 mg daily) or its placebo. Plasma bromazepam concentrations were measured before and 0.5, 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 12, 22, 46, and 70 hours after bromazepam administration. Pharmacodynamic effects of bromazepam were assessed using self-rated drowsiness, continuous number addition test, and EEG. Fluconazole caused no significant changes in pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of oral or rectal bromazepam. Rectal administration significantly increased AUC (1.7-fold, p < 0.0001) and Cmax (1.6-fold, p < 0.0001) of bromazepam. These changes following rectal dose may be due to avoidance of degradation occurring in the gastrointestinal tract. Rectal bromazepam also increased the area under the effect curves assessed by EEG (p < 0.05) and subjective drowsiness (p < 0.05). EEG effects were closely correlated with mean plasma bromazepam concentrations (r = 0.92, p < 0.001 for placebo; r = 0.89, p < 0.0001 for fluconazole). Thus, the EEG method provided pharmacodynamic data that clearly reflected the pharmacokinetics of bromazepam.

  16. Plasma magnesium concentration in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting.

    PubMed

    Kotlinska-Hasiec, Edyta; Makara-Studzinska, Marta; Czajkowski, Marek; Rzecki, Ziemowit; Olszewski, Krzysztof; Stadnik, Adam; Pilat, Jacek; Rybojad, Beata; Dabrowski, Wojciech

    2017-05-11

    [b]Introduction[/b]. Magnesium (Mg) plays a crucial role in cell physiology and its deficiency may cause many disorders which often require intensive treatment. The aim of this study was to analyse some factors affecting preoperative plasma Mg concentration in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). [b]Materials and method[/b]. Adult patients scheduled for elective CABG with cardio-pulmonary bypass (CPB) under general anaesthesia were studied. Plasma Mg concentration was analysed before surgery in accordance with age, domicile, profession, tobacco smoking and preoperative Mg supplementation. Blood samples were obtained from the radial artery just before the administration of anaesthesia. [b]Results. [/b]150 patients were studied. Mean preoperative plasma Mg concentration was 0.93 ± 0.17 mmol/L; mean concentration in patients - 1.02 ± 0.16; preoperative Mg supplementation was significantly higher than in patients without such supplementation. Moreover, intellectual workers supplemented Mg more frequently and had higher plasma Mg concentration than physical workers. Plasma Mg concentration decreases in elderly patients. Patients living in cities, on average, had the highest plasma Mg concentration. Smokers had significantly lower plasma Mg concentration than non-smokers. [b]Conclusions. [/b]1. Preoperative magnesium supplementation increases its plasma concentration. 2. Intellectual workers frequently supplement magnesium. 3. Smoking cigarettes decreases plasma magnesium concentration.

  17. Is empiric therapy with fluconazole appropriate for esophageal candidiasis?

    PubMed

    Sajith, Kattiparambil Gangadharan; Dutta, Amit Kumar; Sahni, Rani Diana; Esakimuthu, Saritha; Chacko, Ashok

    2014-03-01

    We studied the prevalence of fluconazole resistance in esophageal candidiasis. Patients with suspected esophageal candidiasis during gastroscopy underwent culture of white plaques. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) >64 μg/mL of fluconazole for Candida was indicative of resistance. Sensitivity of itraconazole was tested in a subset of resistant strains. Sixty-five patients were included. Mean (SD) age was 50.03 (13.5) years and 67.7 % were males. Predisposing factors for candidiasis were found in 42 (64.6 %) patients. C. albicans was identified in 64 (97.4 %) patients and C. glabrata in one patient. Fluconazole resistance was seen in 38 (59.4 %) patients with C. albicans and also in the one patient with C. glabrata. All the fluconazole resistant isolates of C. albicans had MIC >128 μg/mL suggesting very high resistance. Twelve patients with fluconazole resistance had itraconazole resistance as well. The study shows a high rate of fluconazole resistance in patients with esophageal candidiasis.

  18. Fluconazole Assists Berberine To Kill Fluconazole-Resistant Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Li, De-Dong; Xu, Yi; Zhang, Da-Zhi; Quan, Hua; Mylonakis, Eleftherios; Hu, Dan-Dan; Li, Ming-Bang; Zhao, Lan-Xue; Zhu, Liang-Hua

    2013-01-01

    It was found in our previous study that berberine (BBR) and fluconazole (FLC) used concomitantly exhibited a synergism against FLC-resistant Candida albicans in vitro. The aim of the present study was to clarify how BBR and FLC worked synergistically and the underlying mechanism. Antifungal time-kill curves indicated that the synergistic effect of the two drugs was BBR dose dependent rather than FLC dose dependent. In addition, we found that BBR accumulated in C. albicans cells, especially in the nucleus, and resulted in cell cycle arrest and significant change in the transcription of cell cycle-related genes. Besides BBR, other DNA intercalators, including methylene blue, sanguinarine, and acridine orange, were all found to synergize with FLC against FLC-resistant C. albicans. Detection of intracellular BBR accumulation by fluorescence measurement showed that FLC played a role in increasing intracellular BBR concentration, probably due to its effect in disrupting the fungal cell membrane. Similar to the case with FLC, other antifungal agents acting on the cell membrane were able to synergize with BBR. Interestingly, we found that the efflux of intracellular BBR was FLC independent but strongly glucose dependent and associated with the drug efflux pump Cdr2p. These results suggest that BBR plays a major antifungal role in the synergism of FLC and BBR, while FLC plays a role in increasing the intracellular BBR concentration. PMID:24060867

  19. Fluconazole inhibits hERG K(+) channel by direct block and disruption of protein trafficking.

    PubMed

    Han, Shengna; Zhang, Yu; Chen, Qiu; Duan, Yanyan; Zheng, Tenghao; Hu, Xiangjie; Zhang, Zhao; Zhang, Lirong

    2011-01-10

    Fluconazole, a commonly used azole antifungal drug, can induce QT prolongation, which may lead to Torsades de Pointes and sudden death. To investigate the arrhythmogenic side effects of fluconazole, we studied the effect of fluconazole on human ether-a-go-go-related gene (hERG) K(+) channels (wild type, Y652A and F656C) expressed in human embryonic kidney (HEK293) cells using a whole-cell patch clamp technique, Western blot analysis and confocal microscopy. Fluconazole inhibited wild type hERG currents in a concentration-dependent manner, with a half-maximum block concentration (IC(50)) of 48.2±9.4μM. Fluconazole did not change other channel kinetics (activation and steady-state inactivation) of hERG channel. Mutations in drug- binding sites (Y652A or F656C) of the hERG channel significantly attenuated the hERG current blockade by fluconazole. In addition, fluconazole inhibited the trafficking of hERG protein by Western blot analysis and confocal microscopy, respectively. These findings indicate that fluconazole may cause acquired long QT syndrome (LQTS) via a direct inhibition of hERG current and by disrupting hERG protein trafficking, and the mutations Y652 and F656 may be obligatory determinants in inhibition of hERG current for fluconazole.

  20. Effect of Efflux Transporter Inhibition on the Distribution of Fluconazole in the Rat Brain.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Zheng, Na; Zhang, Jiatang; Huang, Xusheng; Yu, Shengyuan

    2017-03-24

    Multidrug resistance-associated proteins (MRPs) and organic anion transporters (OATs) are expressed on the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier (BCSFB), preventing the entry of or the pumping out of numerous molecules. Fluconazole is widely used to treat fungal meningoencephalitis. The effect of these transporters on the distribution of fluconazole in the brain is unclear. We used microdialysis to compare the distribution of fluconazole in the rat brain with and without co-administration of probenecid, a MRP and OAT inhibitor. Additionally, we also observed the difference in fluconazole distribution between the two barriers. The results showed that probenecid increased the penetration of fluconazole into the BBB but did not alter the penetration of fluconazole into the BCSFB of rats. The penetration of the BBB and BCSFB by fluconazole did not statistically differ according to physiological condition. These results demonstrate that transporters that can be inhibited by probenecid may be involved in fluconazole resistance at the BBB and provide a laboratory basis for predicting brain extracellular fluid (ECF) concentration using the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) concentration of fluconazole.

  1. SEASONAL VARIATION IN PLASMA SEX STEROID CONCENTRATION IN JUVENILE ALLIGATORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Seasonal variation in plasma sex steroid concentrations is common in mature vertebrates, and is occasionally seen in juvenile animals. In this study, we examine the seasonal pattern of sex hormone concentration in juvenile American alligators (Alligator mississippiensis) and make...

  2. SEASONAL VARIATION IN PLASMA SEX STEROID CONCENTRATION IN JUVENILE ALLIGATORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Seasonal variation in plasma sex steroid concentrations is common in mature vertebrates, and is occasionally seen in juvenile animals. In this study, we examine the seasonal pattern of sex hormone concentration in juvenile American alligators (Alligator mississippiensis) and make...

  3. Doxycycline plasma concentrations in macaws fed a medicate corn diet.

    PubMed

    Prus, S E; Clubb, S L; Flammer, K

    1992-01-01

    A trial was conducted to determine the doxycycline plasma concentrations attained by feeding a medicated corn diet to large psittacine birds. Doxycycline is the preferred drug for the treatment of chlamydiosis in psittacine birds. Healthy macaws were fed a 0.1% doxycycline-medicated corn diet for 45 days, and plasma doxycycline concentrations were determined by microbiological assay on treatment days 3, 15, 30, and 45. Plasma doxycycline concentrations exceeded 1 microgram/ml in 87% of the samples assayed. As blood concentrations of 1 microgram/ml are considered therapeutic, a doxycycline-medicated corn diet may be efficacious in the treatment of chlamydiosis in large psittacine birds.

  4. Intracellular accumulation of boceprevir according to plasma concentrations and pharmacogenetics.

    PubMed

    Cusato, Jessica; Allegra, Sarah; De Nicolò, Amedeo; Boglione, Lucio; Fatiguso, Giovanna; Abdi, Adnan Mohamed; Cariti, Giuseppe; Di Perri, Giovanni; D'Avolio, Antonio

    2015-06-01

    Boceprevir (BOC) is a directly-acting antiviral agent for the treatment of hepatitis C virus genotype 1 (HCV-1) infection. It is a mixture of two stereoisomers, the inactive R and the active S isomers. No data have previously been published on BOC intracellular accumulation. In this study, BOC isomer concentrations in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and plasma were determined. The influence of various single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) on plasma and intracellular drug exposure at Week 4 of triple therapy were also evaluated. Plasma and intracellular BOC concentrations were determined at the end of the dosing interval (C(trough)) using a UPLC-MS/MS validated method. Allelic discrimination was performed through real-time PCR. Median plasma concentrations were 65.97 ng/mL for the S isomer and 36.31 ng/mL for the R isomer; the median S/R plasma concentration ratio was 1.66. The median PBMC concentration was 2285.88 ng/mL for the S isomer; the R isomer was undetectable within PBMCs. The median S isomer PBMC/plasma concentration ratio was 28.59. A significant positive correlation was found between plasma and PBMC S isomer concentrations. ABCB1 1236, SLC28A2 124 and IL28B rs12979860 SNPs were associated with the S isomer PBMC/plasma concentration ratio. In regression models, S isomer plasma levels and FokI polymorphism were able to predict S isomer intracellular exposure, whereas SNPs in AKR1, BCRP1 and SLC28A2 predicted the S isomer PBMC/plasma concentration ratio. No similar data regarding BOC pharmacogenetics and pharmacokinetics have been published previously. This study adds a novel and useful overview of the pharmacological properties of this drug.

  5. Fluconazole transport into Candida albicans secretory vesicles by the membrane proteins Cdr1p, Cdr2p, and Mdr1p.

    PubMed

    Basso, Luiz R; Gast, Charles E; Mao, Yuxin; Wong, Brian

    2010-06-01

    A major cause of azole resistance in Candida albicans is overexpression of CDR1, CDR2, and/or MDR1, which encode plasma membrane efflux pumps. To analyze the catalytic properties of these pumps, we used ACT1- and GAL1-regulated expression plasmids to overexpress CDR1, CDR2, or MDR1 in a C. albicans cdr1 cdr2 mdr1-null mutant. When the genes of interest were expressed, the resulting transformants were more resistant to multiple azole antifungals, and accumulated less [(3)H]fluconazole intracellularly, than empty-vector controls. Next, we used a GAL1-regulated dominant negative sec4 allele to cause cytoplasmic accumulation of post-Golgi secretory vesicles (PGVs), and we found that PGVs isolated from CDR1-, CDR2-, or MDR1-overexpressing cells accumulated much more [(3)H]fluconazole than did PGVs from empty-vector controls. The K(m)s (expressed in micromolar concentrations) and V(max)s (expressed in picomoles per milligram of protein per minute), respectively, for [(3)H]fluconazole transport were 0.8 and 0.91 for Cdr1p, 4.3 and 0.52 for Cdr2p, and 3.5 and 0.59 for Mdr1p. [(3)H]fluconazole transport by Cdr1p and Cdr2p required ATP and was unaffected by carbonyl cyanide 3-chlorophenylhydrazone (CCCP), whereas [(3)H]fluconazole transport by Mdr1p did not require ATP and was inhibited by CCCP. [(3)H]fluconazole uptake by all 3 pumps was inhibited by all other azoles tested, with 50% inhibitory concentrations (IC(50)s; expressed as proportions of the [(3)H]fluconazole concentration) of 0.2 to 5.6 for Cdr1p, 0.3 to 3.1 for Cdr2p, and 0.3 to 3.1 for Mdr1p. The methods used in this study may also be useful for studying other plasma membrane transporters in C. albicans and other medically important fungi.

  6. Fluconazole Transport into Candida albicans Secretory Vesicles by the Membrane Proteins Cdr1p, Cdr2p, and Mdr1p ▿

    PubMed Central

    Basso, Luiz R.; Gast, Charles E.; Mao, Yuxin; Wong, Brian

    2010-01-01

    A major cause of azole resistance in Candida albicans is overexpression of CDR1, CDR2, and/or MDR1, which encode plasma membrane efflux pumps. To analyze the catalytic properties of these pumps, we used ACT1- and GAL1-regulated expression plasmids to overexpress CDR1, CDR2, or MDR1 in a C. albicans cdr1 cdr2 mdr1-null mutant. When the genes of interest were expressed, the resulting transformants were more resistant to multiple azole antifungals, and accumulated less [3H]fluconazole intracellularly, than empty-vector controls. Next, we used a GAL1-regulated dominant negative sec4 allele to cause cytoplasmic accumulation of post-Golgi secretory vesicles (PGVs), and we found that PGVs isolated from CDR1-, CDR2-, or MDR1-overexpressing cells accumulated much more [3H]fluconazole than did PGVs from empty-vector controls. The Kms (expressed in micromolar concentrations) and Vmaxs (expressed in picomoles per milligram of protein per minute), respectively, for [3H]fluconazole transport were 0.8 and 0.91 for Cdr1p, 4.3 and 0.52 for Cdr2p, and 3.5 and 0.59 for Mdr1p. [3H]fluconazole transport by Cdr1p and Cdr2p required ATP and was unaffected by carbonyl cyanide 3-chlorophenylhydrazone (CCCP), whereas [3H]fluconazole transport by Mdr1p did not require ATP and was inhibited by CCCP. [3H]fluconazole uptake by all 3 pumps was inhibited by all other azoles tested, with 50% inhibitory concentrations (IC50s; expressed as proportions of the [3H]fluconazole concentration) of 0.2 to 5.6 for Cdr1p, 0.3 to 3.1 for Cdr2p, and 0.3 to 3.1 for Mdr1p. The methods used in this study may also be useful for studying other plasma membrane transporters in C. albicans and other medically important fungi. PMID:20348384

  7. Partition functions and concentrations in plasmas out of thermal equilibrium

    SciTech Connect

    Andre, P.

    1995-06-01

    Taking into account the disequilibrium between the temperatures (electronic, rotational, vibrational, translational) in a nitrogen-plasma out of thermal equilibrium, different partition function and chemical potential calculation method are described and applied. From the variation of the temperature hypotheses, their influence on the plasma concentration is shown.

  8. Synergistic effect of fluconazole and doxycycline against Candida albicans biofilms resulting from calcium fluctuation and downregulation of fluconazole-inducible efflux pump gene overexpression.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yuan; Li, Hui; Liu, Shuyuan; Zhang, Xiang; Sun, Shujuan

    2014-07-01

    Candida albicans biofilms are intrinsically resistant to antimicrobial agents. Previous work demonstrated that the antifungal activity of fluconazole against C. albicans biofilms is notably enhanced by doxycycline. In order to explore the synergistic mechanism of fluconazole and doxycycline, we investigated the changes of efflux pump gene expression, intracellular calcium concentration and cell cycle distribution after drug intervention in this study. The expression levels of CDR1, CDR2 and MDR1 were determined by real-time PCR, and the results showed that fluconazole alone could stimulate the high expression of CDR1, CDR2 and MDR1, and the combination of doxycycline and fluconazole downregulated the gene overexpression induced by fluconazole. Intracellular calcium concentration was determined using Fluo-3/AM by observing the fluorescence with flow cytometry. A calcium fluctuation, which started 4 h and peaked 8 h after the treatment with fluconazole, was observed. The combined drugs also initiated a calcium fluctuation after 4 h treatment and showed a peak at 16 h, and the peak was higher than that stimulated by fluconazole alone. The cell cycle was measured using flow cytometry. Fluconazole alone and the combined drugs both induced a reduction in the percentages of S-phase cells and an elevation in the percentages of cells in the G2/M phase. The results of this research showed that the synergism of fluconazole and doxycycline against C. albicans biofilms is associated with blockade of the efflux pump genes CDR1, CDR2 and MDR1, and stimulation of high intracellular calcium concentration. The findings of this study are of great significance in the search for new antifungal mechanisms.

  9. Prospective determination of plasma imipenem concentrations in critically ill children.

    PubMed

    Giannoni, Eric; Moreillon, Philippe; Cotting, Jacques; Moessinger, Adrien; Bille, Jacques; Décosterd, Laurent; Zanetti, Giorgio; Majcherczyk, Paul; Bugnon, Denis

    2006-07-01

    Plasma imipenem concentrations were measured in 19 critically ill children (median age, 0.8 year; range, 0.02 to 12.9 years). Wide interindividual variations (2 to 4x at peak and >10x at trough concentrations) resulted in unpredictable plasma levels in several children. To avoid subtherapeutic drug levels, we recommend treatment with at least 100 mg/kg of body weight/day of imipenem-cilastatin for critically ill children requiring such therapy.

  10. Prospective Determination of Plasma Imipenem Concentrations in Critically Ill Children

    PubMed Central

    Giannoni, Eric; Moreillon, Philippe; Cotting, Jacques; Moessinger, Adrien; Bille, Jacques; Décosterd, Laurent; Zanetti, Giorgio; Majcherczyk, Paul; Bugnon, Denis

    2006-01-01

    Plasma imipenem concentrations were measured in 19 critically ill children (median age, 0.8 year; range, 0.02 to 12.9 years). Wide interindividual variations (2 to 4× at peak and >10× at trough concentrations) resulted in unpredictable plasma levels in several children. To avoid subtherapeutic drug levels, we recommend treatment with at least 100 mg/kg of body weight/day of imipenem-cilastatin for critically ill children requiring such therapy. PMID:16801447

  11. Clinical and economic outcomes of decreased fluconazole susceptibility in patients with Candida glabrata bloodstream infections

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ingi; Morales, Knashawn H.; Zaoutis, Theoklis E.; Fishman, Neil O.; Nachamkin, Irving; Lautenbach, Ebbing

    2011-01-01

    Background The impact of reduced fluconazole susceptibility on clinical and economic outcomes in patients with Candida glabrata bloodstream infections (BSI) is unknown. Methods A retrospective cohort study was conducted to evaluate 30-day inpatient mortality and postculture hospital charges in patients with C glabrata BSI with decreased fluconazole susceptibility (minimum inhibitory concentration [MIC] ≥ 16 μg/mL) versus fluconazole-susceptible C glabrata BSI (MIC ≤ 8 μg/mL). These analyses were adjusted for demographics, comorbidities, and time at risk. Secondary analyses limited the C glabrata group with decreased fluconazole susceptibility to MIC ≥ 64 μg/mL. Results There were 45 (31%) deaths among 144 enrolled patients: 19 deaths (25%) among 76 patients with C glabrata BSI with decreased fluconazole susceptibility and 26 deaths (38%) among 68 patients with fluconazole-susceptible C glabrata BSI. Decreased fluconazole susceptibility was not independently associated with increased 30-day inpatient mortality (adjusted odds ratio, .60; 95% confidence interval (CI): .26-1.35; P = 0.22) or hospital charges (multiplicative change in hospital charges, .93; 95% CI: .60-1.43; P = 0.73). Older age was associated with increased mortality and increased time at risk was associated with increased hospital charges. Conclusion Crude mortality rates remain high in patients with C glabrata BSI. However, decreased fluconazole susceptibility was not associated with increased mortality or hospital charges. PMID:20542354

  12. Anti-Candida Activity of Fluoxetine Alone and Combined with Fluconazole: a Synergistic Action against Fluconazole-Resistant Strains

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Ana S.; Gaspar, Carlos A.; Palmeira-de-Oliveira, Rita; Martinez-de-Oliveira, José

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to determine the antimicrobial activity of fluoxetine, alone and combined with fluconazole, against 29 Candida strains isolated from patients with vulvovaginal candidiasis. MIC and minimum lethal concentration values ranged from 9.8 to 625 μg/ml for all strains tested. The combination of fluconazole with fluoxetine resulted in synergistic activity against six Candida strains, with fractional inhibitory index (FIX) values between 0.15 and 0.31. An indifferent effect was found for the remaining strains, with FIX values between 0.63 and 1. PMID:24798281

  13. Triclosan Antagonizes Fluconazole Activity against Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Higgins, J.; Pinjon, E.; Oltean, H.N.; White, T.C.; Kelly, S.L.; Martel, C.M.; Sullivan, D.J.; Coleman, D.C.; Moran, G.P.

    2012-01-01

    Triclosan is a broad-spectrum antimicrobial compound commonly used in oral hygiene products. Investigation of its activity against Candida albicans showed that triclosan was fungicidal at concentrations of 16 mg/L. However, at subinhibitory concentrations (0.5-2 mg/L), triclosan antagonized the activity of fluconazole. Although triclosan induced CDR1 expression in C. albicans, antagonism was still observed in cdr1Δ and cdr2Δ strains. Triclosan did not affect fluconazole uptake or alter total membrane sterol content, but did induce the expression of FAS1 and FAS2, indicating that its mode of action may involve inhibition of fatty acid synthesis, as it does in prokaryotes. However, FAS2 mutants did not exhibit increased susceptibility to triclosan, and overexpression of both FAS1 and FAS2 alleles did not alter triclosan susceptibility. Unexpectedly, the antagonistic effect was specific for C. albicans under hypha-inducing conditions and was absent in the non-filamentous efg1Δ strain. This antagonism may be due to the membranotropic activity of triclosan and the unique composition of hyphal membranes. PMID:21972257

  14. Plasma concentration of topically applied betaxolol in elderly glaucoma patients.

    PubMed

    Vainio-Jylhä, E; Vuori, M L; Pyykkö, K; Huupponen, R

    2001-06-01

    Our aim was to study the concentration of betaxolol in plasma after its topical ocular use during the normal 12 hr dosing interval. Twenty microliters of betaxolol 0.5% solution were applied into both eyes of nine glaucoma patients, and the plasma concentrations of the drug were measured 12 hr thereafter using a radioreceptor assay. The same amount of betaxolol was then applied ocularly, and its concentration in plasma was measured at 5, 10, 15, 30 min and 1, 2, 4 and 8 hr thereafter. The mean (SD) concentration of betaxolol in plasma twelve hr after the first dose was 0.4 (0.2) ng/ml. After the second dose, the patients showed a biphasic concentration vs. time curve, the first peak occurring at 8 (4) min, and the second peak at 210 (132) min; the mean (SD) peak concentrations being 1.1 (0.3) and 2.0 (1.1) ng/ml, respectively. The area under the concentration vs. time curve showed a 4-fold variation among our patients. Topically applied betaxolol was rapidly absorbed into systemic circulation, and concentrations were detectable even at 12 hr. The interindividual variation in the systemic absorption of betaxolol was large.

  15. Postprandial changes in plasma urea and creatinine concentrations in dogs.

    PubMed

    Watson, A D; Church, D B; Fairburn, A J

    1981-11-01

    Changes in plasma urea and creatinine concentrations were compared in 6 dogs fed 3 meals (cooked meat, raw meat, and a soft-moist preparation) in a crossover fashion. Each meal produced changes in urea and creatinine values. Although increased urea values were seen after all meals, the effects on creatinine were varied; concentrations increased after feeding cooked meat, but decreased after consumption of raw meat or soft-moist food. Although the creatinine changes were less pronounced, the variable effect of diet complicates the interpretation of plasma creatinine concentration in evaluating renal function.

  16. Plasma renin activities, angiotensin II concentrations, atrial natriuretic peptide concentrations and cardiopulmonary function values in dogs with severe heartworm disease.

    PubMed

    Kitagawa, H; Kitoh, K; Inoue, H; Ohba, Y; Suzuki, F; Sasaki, Y

    2000-04-01

    Relationships among plasma renin activities (PRA), plasma angiotensin II (ATII) concentrations, atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) concentrations and cardiopulmonary function values were examined in dogs with ascitic pulmonary heartworm disease and acute- and chronic-vena caval syndrome (CS). PRA, plasma ATII concentration and plasma ANP concentration tended to be higher or were significantly higher in dogs with ascites, acute- and chronic-CS. PRA correlated significantly with plasma ATII concentration, WBC count, ALP activity, plasma concentrations of urea nitrogen, creatinine, sodium, potassium, and chloride, right ventricular endodiastolic pressure and right atrial pressure. Plasma ATII concentration correlated significantly with WBC count, plasma concentrations of urea nitrogen, sodium, and potassium, right ventricular endodiastolic pressure and right atrial pressure. Plasma ANP concentration did not correlate with PRA or ATII concentration, but correlated significantly only with pulmonary arterial pressure.

  17. Control of exogenous factors affecting plasma homovanillic acid concentration.

    PubMed

    Davidson, M; Giordani, A B; Mohs, R C; Mykytyn, V V; Platt, S; Aryan, Z S; Davis, K L

    1987-04-01

    Measurements of plasma homovanillic acid (pHVA) concentrations appear to be a valid research strategy in psychiatric disorders in which a central dopamine (DA) abnormality has been implicated. This study provides guidance about the control of some of the exogenous factors affecting pHVA concentrations. Fasting for 14 hours eliminates the dietary effects on pHVA in healthy human subjects. Changing position, walking for 30 minutes, or smoking two cigarettes has no effect on pHVA concentrations.

  18. Regular physical activity influences plasma ghrelin concentration in adolescent girls.

    PubMed

    Jürimäe, Jaak; Cicchella, Antonio; Jürimäe, Toivo; Lätt, Evelin; Haljaste, Kaja; Purge, Pritt; Hamra, Jena; von Duvillard, Serge P

    2007-10-01

    We examined the effect of regular physical activity on plasma ghrelin concentration after onset of puberty in girls. In addition, we also examined the association of fasting plasma ghrelin concentration with various plasma biochemical, body composition, and aerobic capacity variables in healthy adolescent girls. Fifty healthy schoolgirls ages 11 to 16 yr were divided either into a physically active (N = 25) or a physically inactive (N = 25) group. The physically active group consisted of swimmers who had trained on an average of 6.2 +/- 2.0 h.wk(-1) for the last 2 yr, whereas the inclusion criterion for the physically inactive group was the participation in physical education classes only. The subjects were matched for age (+/- 1 yr) and body mass index (BMI; +/- 2 kg.m(-2)). Maturation I group (14 matched pairs) included pubertal stages 2 and 3, and maturation II group (11 matched pairs) included pubertal stages 4 and 5. Physically active girls had significantly higher (P < 0.05) mean plasma ghrelin levels than the physically inactive girls (maturation I: 1152.1 +/- 312.9 vs 877.7 +/- 114.8 pg.mL(-1); maturation II: 1084.0 +/- 252.5 vs 793.4 +/- 164.9 pg.mL(-1)). Plasma ghrelin concentration was negatively related to percent body fat, fat mass, peak oxygen consumption per kilogram of body mass, leptin, estradiol, insulin, and insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) (r > -0.298; P < 0.05). Multivariate linear regression analysis to determine the predictors of ghrelin concentration using the variables that were significantly associated with ghrelin concentration demonstrated that plasma IGF-I was the most important predictor of plasma ghrelin concentration (beta = -0.396; P = 0.008). Regular physical activity influences plasma ghrelin concentrations in girls with different pubertal maturation levels. Plasma IGF-I concentration seems to be the main determinant of circulating ghrelin in healthy, normal-weight adolescent girls.

  19. Cocaine, nicotine, caffeine, and metabolite plasma concentrations in neonates.

    PubMed

    Dempsey, D A; Partridge, J C; Jones, R T; Rowbotham, M C

    1998-01-01

    The objective of this study was to measure the umbilical cord plasma levels of cocaine, nicotine, caffeine, and their metabolites. Thirty-six neonates at risk for prenatal cocaine exposure were prospectively enrolled. Umbilical cord plasma was analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy for cocaine, cocaethylene, benzoylecgonine (BZE), nicotine, cotinine, and caffeine. Eighteen neonates were plasma positive for BZE, and 50% of these were also positive for cocaine. Cocaethylene was not found. The maximum plasma cocaine concentration was 88 ng/mL (mean, 39 ng/mL). The maximum plasma BZE concentration was 3880 ng/mL (mean, 844 ng/mL). Among BZE-positive babies, the mean plasma drug levels were as follows: nicotine, 1.8 ng/mL; cotinine, 94 ng/mL; and caffeine, 1205 ng/mL. Among the BZE-negative babies, the mean plasma drug levels were as follows: nicotine, 5.2 ng/mL; cotinine, 97 ng/mL; and caffeine, 1440 ng/mL. These cocaine levels raise the possibility of pharmacological effects of cocaine in the early neonatal period.

  20. Factors influencing post-exercise plasma protein carbonyl concentration.

    PubMed

    Wadley, Alex J; Turner, James E; Aldred, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    Exercise of sufficient intensity and duration can cause acute oxidative stress. Plasma protein carbonyl (PC) moieties are abundant, chemically stable, and easily detectable markers of oxidative stress that are widely used for the interpretation of exercise-induced changes in redox balance. Despite many studies reporting acute increases in plasma PC concentration in response to exercise, some studies, including those from our own laboratory have shown decreases. This review will discuss the differences between studies reporting increases, decreases, and no change in plasma PC concentration following exercise in humans; highlighting participant physiology (i.e. training status) and study design (i.e. intensity, duration, and novelty of the exercise bout) as the main factors driving the direction of the PC response to exercise. The role of the 20S proteasome system is proposed as a possible mechanism mediating the clearance of plasma PC following exercise. Resting and exercise-induced differences in plasma protein composition and balance between tissues are also discussed. We suggest that exercise may stimulate the clearance of plasma PC present at baseline, whereas simultaneously increasing reactive oxygen species production that facilitates the formation of new PC groups. The balance between these two processes likely explains why some studies have reported no change or even decreases in plasma PC level post-exercise when other biomarkers of oxidative stress (e.g. markers of lipid peroxidation) were elevated. Future studies should determine factors that influence the balance between PC clearance and formation following acute exercise.

  1. Novel hydroxamates potentiated in vitro activity of fluconazole against Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Paul-Satyaseela, Maneesh; Hariharan, Periasamy; Bharani, Thirunavukkarasu; Franklyne, Jonathan S.; Selvakumar, Thangapazham; Bharathimohan, Kuppusamy; Kumar, Chenniappan Vinoth; Kachhadia, Virendra; Narayanan, Shridhar; Rajagopal, Sridharan; Balasubramanian, Gopalan

    2017-01-01

    A set of 12 novel hydroxamate compounds (NHCs), structurally designed as inhibitors of histone deacetylase (HDAC) enzyme, were synthesized at our facility. These were adamantane derivatives with N-hydroxyacetamide as pharmacophore, and each of these compounds was tested for potentiating activity on fluconazole. The concentration of fluconazole which completely inhibited (concentration of complete inhibition [CCI]) the growth of Candida albicans ATCC 90028 and C. albicans ATCC 64550 was determined by micro-dilution method in the absence and presence of NHCs. The CCI of fluconazole without the NHC combination was 64 μg/ml and 1024 μg/ml against C. albicans ATCC 90028 and C. albicans ATCC 64550, respectively. The majority of the NHCs potentiated the fluconazole activity markedly as CCI of fluconazole against C. albicans ATCC 90028 reduced to 0.25 μg/ml. Similarly, CCI of fluconazole against C. albicans ATCC 64550 reduced to 4–8 μg/ml in combination with majority of NHCs while the best activity was displayed by the compound 1 with a reduction of CCI to 0.5 μg/ml. The study results revealed the potential usage of hydroxamate derivatives, structurally designed as HDAC inhibitors to enhance the activity of fluconazole against C. albicans. PMID:28250687

  2. Lipaemic plasma induces haemolysis in resuspended red cell concentrate.

    PubMed

    Bashir, S; Wiltshire, M; Cardigan, R; Thomas, S

    2013-04-01

    We investigated whether haemolysis in red cells suspended in plasma was affected by the lipid content and/or methylene blue (MB) treatment of fresh-frozen plasma (FFP). We also investigated whether haemolysis was affected by the conditions under which lipaemic plasma was stored. Study 1: Visibly lipaemic (n = 22) or nonlipaemic FFP (n = 24) units were thawed, pooled and split into identical pairs, one of which was MB treated. These units were used to resuspend red cell concentrates (RCC) and tested for haemolysis immediately and after 24 and 48 h of storage at 2-6°C. Study 2: Fresh plasma was aliquoted into 15-ml tubes and stored in one of four ways as follows: room temperature; 2-6°C; frozen and thawed; or twice frozen and thawed. A sample of RCC was resuspended in each of these plasmas and haemolysis measured after 2 h. Study 3: Plasma was divided into 15-ml tubes and stored as in study 2 followed by storage left standing upright in a refrigerator (2-6°C) for 24 h (with the exception of the room temperature sample). Plasma was separated into top, middle and bottom fractions and used to resuspend RCC that were assessed for haemolysis after 2 h. The levels of haemolysis in RCC were immediately greater when suspended in lipaemic plasma (0·70 ± 0·53% v 0·05 ± 0·06% for nonlipaemic plasma), which increased further on subsequent storage for 48 h (1·22 ± 0·40% v 0·15 ± 0·14% for nonlipaemic plasma). This was irrespective of whether plasma was MB treated. Lipaemic plasma stored frozen and then thawed resulted in the greatest haemolysis. In lipaemic plasma stored at 2-6°C, the chylomicron-rich top fraction caused the highest level of haemolysis. Haemolysis in red cells is increased in those suspended in lipaemic plasma and is dependent upon the storage conditions of that plasma prior to suspension. These data are relevant to the choice of plasma used to suspend red cells for neonatal exchange transfusion. © 2012 The Author(s). Vox Sanguinis © 2012

  3. Effects of age and sex on olanzapine plasma concentrations.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Ulrike; Marksteiner, Josef; Kemmler, Georg; Saria, Alois; Aichhorn, Wolfgang

    2005-12-01

    Age and sex may influence both efficacy and side effects of second-generation antipsychotics. Women and elderly patients tend to have a higher prevalence for several side effects. Higher plasma levels in these groups of patients may be one reason. We studied the hypothesis that steady-state olanzapine plasma concentrations depend on age and sex. Sixty-seven inpatients on stable olanzapine dose were referred to routine therapeutic drug monitoring of olanzapine. Plasma levels were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection. Obtained data were then analyzed by analysis of covariance. Olanzapine plasma levels showed a marked sex difference with significantly higher mean concentrations in female patients (adjusted mean concentrations, 18.5 ng/mL for men and 31.7 ng/mL for women; P = 0.003). On average, the weight-corrected concentration/dose ratios shown by women were 33.5% higher than those shown by men, irrespective of age. Regarding the effect of age, weight-corrected concentration/dose ratios increased by an average of 9.4% per decade of life. All results were adjusted for smoking. Comedication did not significantly influence these results. In conclusion, age and sex are important variables to consider when prescribing olanzapine for women and in the elderly.

  4. Fluconazole-induced Fixed Drug Eruption.

    PubMed

    Gaiser, Cory Allen; Sabatino, Dominick

    2013-03-01

    Triazole antifungals are commonly used in the treatment of oral, esophageal, and vaginal candidiasis. Fluconazole is frequently prescribed as the therapy modality for vaginal fungal infections. On rare occasions, fluconazole has been shown to cause fixed drug eruptions. Lesions of fixed drug eruptions vary in size and number, but have the same general appearance and symptoms. The authors report a case of fluconazole-induced fixed drug eruption in a 24-year-old woman with recurrent vaginal candidiasis. The lesion was initially diagnosed as a spider bite. Topical and oral provocation tests with fluconazole were performed. Topical provocation with petroleum/fluconazole and dimethyl sulfoxide/fluonazole were both negative. Oral provocation was positive, thus confirming the diagnosis of fluconazole-induced fixed drug eruption.

  5. Use of refractometry for determination of psittacine plasma protein concentration.

    PubMed

    Cray, Carolyn; Rodriguez, Marilyn; Arheart, Kristopher L

    2008-12-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated both poor and good correlation of total protein concentrations in various avian species using refractometry and biuret methodologies. The purpose of the current study was to compare these 2 techniques of total protein determination using plasma samples from several psittacine species and to determine the effect of cholesterol and other solutes on refractometry results. Total protein concentration in heparinized plasma samples without visible lipemia was analyzed by refractometry and an automated biuret method on a dry reagent analyzer (Ortho 250). Cholesterol, glucose, and uric acid concentrations were measured using the same analyzer. Results were compared using Deming regression analysis, Bland-Altman bias plots, and Spearman's rank correlation. Correlation coefficients (r) for total protein results by refractometry and biuret methods were 0.49 in African grey parrots (n=28), 0.77 in Amazon parrots (20), 0.57 in cockatiels (20), 0.73 in cockatoos (36), 0.86 in conures (20), and 0.93 in macaws (38) (P< or =.01). Cholesterol concentration, but not glucose or uric acid concentrations, was significantly correlated with total protein concentration obtained by refractometry in Amazon parrots, conures, and macaws (n=25 each, P<.05), and trended towards significance in African grey parrots and cockatoos (P=.06). Refractometry can be used to accurately measure total protein concentration in nonlipemic plasma samples from some psittacine species. Method and species-specific reference intervals should be used in the interpretation of total protein values.

  6. Potent Synergy between Spirocyclic Pyrrolidinoindolinones and Fluconazole against Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Premachandra, Ilandari Dewage Udara Anulal; Scott, Kevin A; Shen, Chengtian; Wang, Fuqiang; Lane, Shelley; Liu, Haoping; Van Vranken, David L

    2015-10-01

    A spiroindolinone, (1S,3R,3aR,6aS)-1-benzyl-6'-chloro-5-(4-fluorophenyl)-7'-methylspiro[1,2,3a,6a-tetrahydropyrrolo[3,4-c]pyrrole-3,3'-1H-indole]-2',4,6-trione, was previously reported to enhance the antifungal effect of fluconazole against Candida albicans. A diastereomer of this compound was synthesized, along with various analogues. Many of the compounds were shown to enhance the antifungal effect of fluconazole against C. albicans, some with exquisite potency. One spirocyclic piperazine derivative, which we have named synazo-1, was found to enhance the effect of fluconazole with an EC50 value of 300 pM against a susceptible strain of C. albicans and going as low as 2 nM against some resistant strains. Synazo-1 exhibits true synergy with fluconazole, with an FIC index below 0.5 in the strains tested. Synazo-1 exhibited low toxicity in mammalian cells relative to the concentrations required for antifungal synergy.

  7. Potent Synergy between Spirocyclic Pyrrolidinoindolinones and Fluconazole against Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Premachandra, Ilandari Dewage Udara Anulal; Scott, Kevin A.; Shen, Chengtian; Wang, Fuqiang; Lane, Shelley; Liu, Haoping

    2015-01-01

    A spiroindolinone (1S,3R,3aR,6aS)-1-benzyl-6′-chloro-5-(4-fluorophenyl)-7′-methylspiro[1,2,3a,6a-tetrahydropyrrolo[3,4-c]pyrrole-3,3′-1H-indole]-2′,4,6-trione was previously reported to enhance the antifungal effect of fluconazole against C. albicans. A diastereomer of that compound was synthesized, along with various analogues. Many of the compounds were shown to enhance the antifungal effect of fluconazole against C. albicans, some with exquisite potency. One spirocyclic piperazine derivative, which we have named synazo-1, enhanced the effect of fluconazole with EC50 of 300 pM against a susceptible strain of C. albicans and as low as 2 nM against some resistant strains. Synazo-1 exhibits true synergy with fluconazole with an FIC index below 0.5 in the strains tested. Synazo-1 exhibited low toxicity in mammalian cells relative to the concentrations required for the antifungal synergy. PMID:26263912

  8. Variations in plasma phytoestrogen concentrations in European adults.

    PubMed

    Peeters, Petra H M; Slimani, Nadia; van der Schouw, Yvonne T; Grace, Philip B; Navarro, Carmen; Tjonneland, Anne; Olsen, Anja; Clavel-Chapelon, Francoise; Touillaud, Marina; Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine; Jenab, Mazda; Kaaks, Rudolf; Linseisen, Jakob; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Dilis, Vardis; Boeing, Heiner; Weikert, Cornelia; Overvad, Kim; Pala, Valeria; Palli, Domenico; Panico, Salvatore; Tumino, Rosario; Vineis, Paolo; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas; van Gils, Carla H; Skeie, Guri; Jakszyn, Paula; Hallmans, Goran; Berglund, Goran; Key, Tim J; Travis, Ruth; Riboli, Elio; Bingham, Sheila A

    2007-05-01

    Dietary phytoestrogens may play a role in chronic disease occurrence. The aim of our study was to assess the variability of plasma concentrations in European populations. We included 15 geographical regions in 9 European countries (Denmark, France, Germany, Greece, Italy, Spain, Sweden, The Netherlands, and UK) and a 16th region, Oxford, UK, where participants were recruited from among vegans and vegetarians. All subjects were participants of the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC). Plasma concentrations of 3 isoflavones (daidzein, genistein, and glycitein), 2 metabolites of daidzein [O-desmethylangolensin (O-DMA) and equol] and 2 mammalian lignans (enterodiol and enterolactone) were measured in 1414 participants. We computed geometric means for each region and used multivariate regression analysis to assess the influence of region, adjusted for gender, age, BMI, alcohol intake, smoking status, and laboratory batch. Many subjects had concentrations below the detection limit [0.1 microg/L (0.4 nmol/L)] for glycitein (80%), O-DMA (73%) and equol (62%). Excluding subjects from Oxford, UK, the highest concentrations of isoflavones were in subjects from the Netherlands and Cambridge, UK [2-6 microg/L (7-24 nmol/L); P < 0.05], whereas concentrations for lignans were highest in Denmark [8 microg/L (27 nmol/L); P < 0.05]. Isoflavones varied 8- to 13-fold, whereas lignans varied 4-fold. In the vegetarian/vegan cohort of Oxford, concentrations of isoflavones were 5-50 times higher than in nonvegetarian regions. Region was the most important determinant of plasma concentrations for all 7 phytoestrogens. Despite the fact that plasma concentrations of phytoestrogens in Europe were low compared with Asian populations, they varied substantially among subjects from the 16 different regions.

  9. Prazosin lowers plasma triglyceride concentration in rats: a preliminary report.

    PubMed

    Reaven, G M; Dall'Aglio, E

    1982-01-01

    Prazosin was administered by intraperitoneal injection (0.3 or 3.0 mg/kg) to normal chow-fed male rats for 14 days. Mean +/- SEM plasma triglyceride levels were lower (p less than 0.001) in the prazosin-treated rats (74 +/- 12 mg/dl and 72 +/- 9 mg/dl) than in saline-injected control rats (115 +/- 11 mg/dl). This effect was associated with commensurate reductions in very low density lipoprotein-triglyceride secretion in prazosin-treated rats. No changes were noted in either plasma total or high density lipoprotein cholesterol concentrations. In addition, prazosin was capable of reducing by approximately 50% the elevation in plasma triglyceride concentration produced by a high glucose diet in control rats. The mechanism of the observed effect of prazosin on very low density lipoprotein metabolism in the rat remains to be defined.

  10. Measurement of plasma homovanillic acid concentrations in schizophrenic patients.

    PubMed

    Kaminski, R; Powchick, P; Warne, P A; Goldstein, M; McQueeney, R T; Davidson, M

    1990-01-01

    1. Several lines of evidence suggest that abnormalities of central dopaminergic transmission may be involved in the expression of some schizophrenic symptoms. However, elucidation of the role of dopamine (DA) in schizophrenia has eluded investigative efforts partially because no accurate and easily repeatable measure of brain DA activity exists. 2. The development of a technique to measure homovanillic acid in plasma has offered the possibility of performing serial measurements of this major DA metabolite. 3. Assuming that plasma homovanillic acid (PHVA) concentrations is an index of brain DA activity, measurement of PHVA can play a role in elucidating the DA abnormality in schizophrenia. 4. Results to date suggest that plasma homovanillic acid concentrations are lower in chronic schizophrenic patients compared to normal controls, and that PHVA values correlate with schizophrenic symptom severity. 5. In addition, PHVA levels were shown to initially rise and subsequently decline during chronic neuroleptic administration in treatment responsive but not in treatment refractory schizophrenic patients.

  11. Plasma Concentrations of Fentanyl Achieved With Transdermal Application in Chickens.

    PubMed

    Delaski, Kristina M; Gehring, Ronette; Heffron, Brendan T; Negrusz, Adam; Gamble, Kathryn C

    2017-03-01

    Providing appropriate analgesia is an important concern in any species. Fentanyl, a μ-receptor specific opioid, use is common in mammalian species but has been incompletely evaluated for this purpose in avian species. Transdermal fentanyl patches were applied to domestic chickens (n = 10) of varying breeds for 72 hours. Repeated blood samples were collected from the birds to assess time-concentration of fentanyl and norfentanyl in plasma, as assayed by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, throughout patch application and for 48 hours after patch removal. Compartmental modeling was used to characterize the elimination profiles. Evaluation as a large bolus, followed by slower elimination rates over the remaining time, best fit the data as a one-compartment open model. Although maximum plasma fentanyl concentrations varied substantially by individual birds, chickens trended into 2 general groups of maximum plasma concentration, clearance, and volume of distribution, which was attributed to absorption variability. For all birds, harmonic mean of elimination half-life was 7.2 ± 3.7 hours and showed less individual variation than the other pharmacokinetic parameters. Because the application of transdermal fentanyl patches in the chickens achieved plasma fentanyl concentrations considered therapeutic in people, this approach could provide an additional analgesic option for avian patients.

  12. Plasma drug concentrations and physiological measures in 'dance party' participants.

    PubMed

    Irvine, Rodney J; Keane, Michael; Felgate, Peter; McCann, Una D; Callaghan, Paul D; White, Jason M

    2006-02-01

    The increasing use of (+/-) 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) in the setting of large dance parties ('raves') and clubs has been the source of some concern, because of potential acute adverse events, and because animal studies suggest that MDMA has the potential to damage brain serotonin (5-HT) neurons. However, it is not yet known whether MDMA, as used in the setting of dance parties, leads to plasma levels of MDMA that are associated with toxicity to 5-HT neurons in animals. The present study sought to address this question. Plasma MDMA concentrations, vital signs, and a variety of blood and urine measures were obtained prior to, and hours after, individuals attended a dance party. After the dance party, subjects were without clinical complaints, had measurable amounts of residual MDMA in plasma, and nearly half of the subjects also tested positive for methamphetamine, another amphetamine analog that has been shown to have 5-HT neurotoxic potential in animals. Plasma concentrations of MDMA did not correlate with self-reported use of 'ecstasy' and, in some subjects, overlapped with those that have been associated with 5-HT neurotoxicity in non-human primates. Additional subjects were likely to have had similar concentrations while at the dance party, when one considers the reported time of drug ingestion and the plasma half-life of MDMA in humans. Hematological and biochemical analyses were generally unremarkable. Moderate increases in blood pressure, heart rate and body temperature were observed in the subjects with the highest MDMA plasma concentrations. These findings are consistent with epidemiological findings that most people who use MDMA at dance parties do not develop serious clinical complications, and suggest that some of these individuals may be at risk for developing MDMA-induced toxicity to brain serotonin neurons.

  13. Environmentally relevant concentrations of nitrate increase plasma testosterone concentrations in female American alligators (Alligator mississippiensis).

    PubMed

    Hamlin, Heather J; Edwards, Thea M; McCoy, Jessica; Cruze, Lori; Guillette, Louis J

    2016-11-01

    Anthropogenic nitrogen is a ubiquitous environmental contaminant that is contributing to the degradation of freshwater, estuarine, and coastal ecosystems worldwide. The effects of environmental nitrate, a principal form of nitrogen, on the health of aquatic life is of increasing concern. We exposed female American alligators to three concentrations of nitrate (0.7, 10 and 100mg/L NO3-N) for a duration of five weeks and five months from hatch. We assessed growth, plasma sex steroid and thyroid hormone concentrations, and transcription levels of key genes involved in steroidogenesis (StAR, 3β-HSD, and P450scc) and hepatic clearance (Cyp1a, Cyp3a). Exposure to 100mg/L NO3-N for both five weeks and five months resulted in significantly increased plasma testosterone (T) concentrations compared with alligators in the reference treatment. No differences in 17β-estradiol, progesterone, or thyroid hormones were observed, nor were there differences in alligator weight or the mRNA abundance of steroidogenic or hepatic genes. Plasma and urinary nitrate concentrations increased with increasing nitrate treatment levels, although relative plasma concentrations of nitrate were significantly lower in five month, versus five week old animals, possibly due to improved kidney function in older animals. These results indicate that environmentally relevant concentrations of nitrate can increase circulating concentrations of T in young female alligators. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Plasma concentrations of transthyretin in older Sardinians including centenarians.

    PubMed

    Pasella, Sara; Pinna, Sara; Deiana, Marta; Baralla, Angela; Dore, Simone; Mannu, Andrea; Canu, Elisabetta; Sotgiu, Giovanni; Zinellu, Angelo; Mangoni, Arduino A; Sotgia, Salvatore; Carru, Ciriaco; Deiana, Luca

    2016-02-01

    Plasma concentrations of transthyretin (TTR), a negative acute-phase protein, can be influenced by many factors including aging. Under physiological circumstances, TTR concentrations are very low in the fetus, increase slowly after birth up to the fifth decade and, then, decrease slowly. Some studies have shown sex-related differences up to about 70 years, when the differences disappear. The aim of this study was to evaluate the change in TTR concentrations in healthy males and females aged more than sixty, including numerous centenarians living in Sardinia, a large Italian island located in the Mediterranean Sea. The study sample consisted of 211 healthy subjects grouped by age and sex (male/female ratio: 1:1). Plasma TTR was assessed using a non-competitive enzyme immunoassay (ELISA Assaypro LLC, prealbumin AssayMAX Human ELISA Kit). In subjects aged between 60 and 99 years, plasma TTR concentrations were higher compared to the reference ranges reported by CRM 470. Moreover, unlike other studies, sex-related differences in TTR concentrations were only observed in nonagenarians and centenarians. We hypothesize that there are TTR-related genetic differences between the Sardinian population and other Caucasian ethnic groups. Further studies and a larger sample are needed to confirm our hypothesis.

  15. Plasma mepivacaine concentrations in patients undergoing third molar surgery.

    PubMed

    Scarparo, H C; Maia, R N; Filho, Ea Dos Santos; Soares, Ecs; Costa, Fwg; Fonteles, Csr; Bezerra, T P; Ribeiro, T R; Romero, N R

    2016-12-01

    Local anaesthetic-related systemic toxicity mainly results from elevated plasma concentrations of these drugs. We hypothesized that intraoral injection of submaximal doses of mepivacaine does not lead to toxic levels of this drug in blood. This study evaluated the plasma levels of mepivacaine in third molars surgeries. Twenty-one patients were randomly assigned into two groups: group I (two unilateral third molars; submaximal dose of mepivacaine 108 mg with epinephrine 54 μg) and group II (four third molars; submaximal dose of mepivacaine 216 mg with epinephrine 108 μg). Blood samples were collected before anaesthesia, and 5, 10, 15, 20, 30, 40, 60, 90 and 120 min after anaesthesia. Individual peak plasma concentrations ranged 0.77-8.31 μg/mL (group I) and from 2.36-7.72 μg/mL (group II). An increase in the average dose of mepivacaine from 1.88 ± 0.12 mg/kg (group I) to 3.35 ± 0.17 mg/kg (group II) increased the mean mepivacaine peak plasma levels from 2.33 ± 0.58 to 4.01 ± 0.69 μg/mL, respectively. Four patients obtained plasma levels of mepivacaine above the threshold for toxicity (5 μg/mL). Toxic levels of mepivacaine are possible, even when a submaximal dose is used. A twofold increase in the dose of mepivacaine caused the mean peak plasma concentration to increase proportionally, indicating that they may be predicted based on the relation of dose per bodyweight. © 2016 Australian Dental Association.

  16. Laser system for measuring small changes in plasma tracer concentrations.

    PubMed

    Klaesner, J W; Pou, N A; Parker, R E; Galloway, R L; Roselli, R J

    1996-01-01

    The authors developed a laser-diode system that can be used for on-line optical concentration measurements in physiologic systems. Previous optical systems applied to whole blood have been hampered by artifacts introduced by red blood cells (RBCs). The system introduced here uses a commercially available filter cartridge to separate RBCs from plasma before plasma concentration measurements are made at a single wavelength. The filtering characteristics of the Cellco filter cartridge (#4007-10, German-town, MD) were adequate for use in the on-line measurement system. The response time of the filter cartridge was less than 40 seconds, and the sieving characteristics of the filter for macromolecules were excellent, with filtrate-to-plasma albumin ratios of 0.98 +/- 0.11 for studies in sheep and 0.94 +/- 0.15 for studies in dogs. The 635-nm laser diode system developed was shown to be more sensitive than the spectrophotometer used in previous studies (Klaesner et al., Annals of Biomedical Engineering, 1994; 22, 660-73). The new system was used to measure the product of filtration coefficient (Kfc) and reflection coefficient for albumin (delta f) in an isolated canine lung preparation. The delta fKfc values [mL/(cmH2O.min.100 g dry lung weight)] measured with the laser diode system (0.33 +/- 0.22) compared favorably with the delta fKfc obtained using a spectrophotometer (0.27 +/- 0.20) and with the Kfc obtained using the blood-corrected gravimetric method (0.32 +/- 0.23). Thus, this new optical system was shown to accurately measure plasma concentration changes in whole blood for physiologic levels of Kfc. The same system can be used with different optical tracers and different source wavelengths to make optical plasma concentration measurements for other physiologic applications.

  17. Gastrin concentrations in plasma of cats with chronic renal failure.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, R E; Marks, S L; Kass, P H; Cowgill, L D

    1998-09-15

    To determine the prevalence of hypergastrinemia in cats with naturally developing chronic renal failure (CRF) and the correlation between gastrin concentration in plasma and severity of CRF. Cohort study. 30 cats with naturally developing CRF and 12 clinically normal control cats. Gastrin concentrations in plasma were determined by double-antibody radioimmunoassay of blood samples obtained from cats after food was withheld 8 hours. Concentrations were compared, using a nonparametric Kruskal-Wallis ANOVA. 18 cats with CRF had high gastrin concentrations (median, 45 pg/ml; range, < 18 to > 1,333 pg/ml), compared with those for control cats (< 18 pg/ml). Prevalence of hypergastrinemia increased with severity of renal insufficiency. Three of 9 cats with mild CRF, 6 of 11 cats with moderate CRF, and 9 of 10 cats with severe CRF had high gastrin concentrations. Gastrin concentrations were significantly different between control cats and cats with CRF, regardless of disease severity. The potential role of high concentrations of gastrin on gastric hyperacidity, uremic gastritis, bleeding from the gastrointestinal tract, and associated clinical signs of hypergastrinemia (e.g., anorexia and vomiting) may justify use of histamine2-receptor antagonists or proton pump inhibitors to suppress gastric acid secretion in cats with CRF that have these clinical signs.

  18. Tocopherol isomers in intravenous lipid emulsions and resultant plasma concentrations.

    PubMed

    Gutcher, G R; Lax, A A; Farrell, P M

    1984-01-01

    Conflicting reports exist regarding the relative tocopherol isomer content of Intralipid ranging from 99% as alpha-tocopherol to as much as 90% as gamma-tocopherol. Our direct assay of Intralipid as well as plasma levels measured in premature infants receiving Intralipid confirm the existence of a low alpha, high gamma-tocopherol content and imply the need for alpha-tocopherol supplementation in patients receiving Intralipid, particularly the relatively tocopherol-deficient premature infant. Furthermore, the observation of abnormal erythrocyte hemolysis test values despite "normal" total tocopherol plasma concentrations may be explained by high plasma levels of non-alpha, biologically less active isomers. The quantitation of tocopherol isomers helps explain this discrepancy and suggests the need for future studies of vitamin E status to employ measurements of tocopherol isomers in reporting results.

  19. Plasma concentrations of sucralose in children and adults.

    PubMed

    Sylvetsky, Allison C; Bauman, Viviana; Blau, Jenny E; Garraffo, H Martin; Walter, Peter J; Rother, Kristina I

    2017-01-01

    Sucralose is partially absorbed after oral ingestion, with the majority excreted in the feces. We aimed to measure plasma sucralose concentrations following ingestion of doses reflecting a range of consumption (from one can of diet soda up to multiple sodas over the course of a day) and to compare concentrations in children and adults. Eleven adults (7 females, 4 males) consumed 355 mL water containing 0 mg sucralose (control) or 68, 170, or 250 mg sucralose (equivalent to 1-4 diet sodas). A second group of adults (n=11, 6 females and 5 males) consumed 355 mL Diet Rite Cola™ (68 mg sucralose and 41 mg acesulfame-potassium (ace-K)) or 68 mg sucralose and 41 mg ace-K in seltzer. Beverages were provided at separate visits in randomized order, prior to an oral glucose tolerance test. Eleven children (7 females and 4 males) consumed 0 or 68 mg sucralose in 240 mL water, in an identical study design. Blood was collected before beverage ingestion and serially for 120 min. Sucralose doses (corrected for weight) resulted in similar plasma concentrations in children and adults. Children reached peak concentrations of 145-400 ng/mL after 68 mg (mean 262.3 ± 24.6 ng/mL). Most adults reached similar peak concentrations (200-400 ng/mL after 250 mg (365.6 ± 69.9 ng/mL)) with the exception of two adults (1520 ng/mL and 1557 ng/mL, respectively). Concentrations were comparable whether sucralose was administered in water, combined with ace-K, or in diet soda. Due to their lower body weight and blood volume, children have markedly higher plasma sucralose concentrations after consumption of a typical diet soda, emphasizing the need to determine the clinical implications of sucralose use in children.

  20. Drug concentrations in post-mortem femoral blood compared with therapeutic concentrations in plasma

    PubMed Central

    Launiainen, Terhi; Ojanperä, Ilkka

    2014-01-01

    Therapeutic drug concentrations measured in plasma are of limited value as reference intervals for interpretation in post-mortem (PM) toxicology. In this study, drug concentration distributions were studied in PM femoral venous blood from 57 903 Finnish autopsy cases representing all causes of death during an 11-year period. Cause-of-death information was obtained from death certificates issued by forensic pathologists. Median, mean, and upper percentile (90th, 95th, 97.5th) concentrations were calculated for 129 drugs. To illustrate how PM median concentrations relate to established therapeutic ranges in plasma, a PM blood/plasma relationship was calculated for each drug. Males represented 75% of the subjects and showed a lower median age (55 yrs) than females (59 yrs). In 43% of these cases, blood alcohol concentration was higher than 0.2‰, and the median was 1.8‰. Sixty-one (47%) of the 129 drugs showed a PM blood/plasma relationship of 1. For 22 drugs (17%), the relationship was <1, and for 46 drugs (35%), the relationship was >1. No marked correlation was found between the PM blood/plasma relationship and the volume of distribution (Vd). For 36 drugs, more than 10% of cases were fatal poisonings attributed to this drug as the main finding. These drug concentration distributions based on a large database provide a helpful reference not only to forensic toxicologists and pathologists but also to clinical pharmacologists in charge of interpreting drug concentrations in PM cases. © 2013 The Authors. Drug Testing and Analysis published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:23881890

  1. Daily concentrations of air pollution and plasma fibrinogen in London.

    PubMed

    Pekkanen, J; Brunner, E J; Anderson, H R; Tiittanen, P; Atkinson, R W

    2000-12-01

    The reason for the association between air pollution and risk of cardiovascular diseases is unknown. The hypothesis was examined that daily concentrations of air pollution are associated with daily concentrations of fibrinogen, a risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Data on concentrations of plasma fibrinogen for 4982 male and 2223 female office workers, collected in a cross sectional survey in London between September 1991 and May 1993, were combined with data on concentrations of air pollution during the day of blood sampling and during the 3 preceding days. After adjustment for weather and other confounding factors, an increase in the 24 hour mean NO(2) during the previous day from the 10th to the 90th percentile (61.7 microg/m(3)) was associated with a 1.5% (95% confidence interval (95% CI) 0.4% to 2.5%) higher fibrinogen concentration. The respective increase for CO (1.6 mg/m(3)) was 1.5% (95% CI 0.5%, 2.5%). These associations tended to be stronger in the warm season (April to September). Significant associations were found for black smoke and particulate matter of diameter 10 microm (PM(10)) only in the warm season. No association with fibrinogen was found for SO(2) or ozone. The short term association between air pollution, possibly from traffic, and risk of cardiovascular events may be at least partly mediated through increased concentrations of plasma fibrinogen, possibly due to an inflammatory reaction caused by air pollution.

  2. Social regulation of plasma estradiol concentration in a female anuran.

    PubMed

    Lynch, Kathleen S; Wilczynski, Walter

    2006-06-01

    The behavior of an individual within a social aggregation profoundly influences behavior and physiology of other animals within the aggregation in such a way that these social interactions can enhance reproductive success, survival and fitness. This phenomenon is particularly important during the breeding season when males and female must synchronize their reproductive efforts. We examined whether exposure to conspecific social cues can elevate sex steroid levels, specifically estradiol and androgens, in female túngara frogs (Physalaemus pustulosus). We compared plasma estradiol and androgen concentrations in wild-caught females before and after exposure to either natural mate choruses or random tones. After exposure to mate choruses for 10 consecutive nights, estradiol concentrations were significantly elevated whereas there was no significant elevation in estradiol concentrations in the group of females exposed to random tones for 10 nights. Plasma androgen concentrations were not significantly changed after exposure to either natural mate choruses or random tones for 10 consecutive nights. Social modulation of estradiol concentrations may be important in maintaining a female's reproductive state while males are chorusing. To our knowledge, this is the first study to demonstrate social regulation of estradiol concentration in female anurans.

  3. A study of plasma bicalutamide concentrations in hemodialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Ito, Fumio; Goya, Nobuyuki; Nakazawa, Hayakazu; Suzuki, Toshiaki; Suzuki, Keiko; Kubo, Kazuo; Kihara, Takeshi

    2012-01-01

    Bicalutamide is an anti-androgen that is used worldwide to treat prostate cancer (CaP). However, there are no data on blood bicalutamide concentrations in hemodialysis (HD) patients with CaP. Therefore, we investigated the plasma levels of bicalutamide during the peridialysis period in this population. The study group included 5 HD patients with CaP who had been treated with bicalutamide (80 mg/day) for at least 3 months. Blood samples were taken during and between HD sessions and the plasma concentrations of the active R enantiomer (R-bicalutamide) were assessed using an HPLC assay. The plasma R-bicalutamide levels on the non-dialysis day were measured in 2 patients (patients 1 and 2) immediately before dosing and 8 and 24 h after dosing. These levels were 18,730, 19,090 and 19,420 ng/ml (patient 1), and 4,522, 4,581, and 5,296 ng/ml (patient 2), respectively. The mean plasma levels of R-bicalutamide in all 5 subjects just before HD, and 2 and 4 h after the start of HD were 8,726, 9,354 and 10,068 ng/ml, respectively. These results show that bicalutamide does not accumulate and is not diluted in the blood circulation of HD patients when given at the normal dosage used in the general population. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  4. Epilepsy and the concentrations of plasma amino acids in humans.

    PubMed

    Huxtable, R J; Laird, H; Lippincott, S E; Walson, P

    1983-01-01

    We have examined the correlation between the presence of epilepsy in humans, and plasma amino acid levels. Subjects were divided into those having pure generalized tonic-clonic seizures (grand mal group), those having generalized tonic-clonic seizures plus other types of epilepsy (mixed group), and those suffering from epilepsies other than grand mal (no grand mal group). Compared to non-epileptic controls, the grand mal group had significantly higher fasting plasma levels of aspartate (100% increase) and glutamate (380% increase) but significant decreases were seen with phenylalanine (?23%), lysine (?27%), and tryptophan (?30%). The no grand mal group showed similar changes except for lysine. The mixed group showed elevations in glutamate, but decreases only in cysteine and methionine. In response to a high protein meal, plasma levels of alanine, cysteine and methionine rose significantly less for the no grand mal group compared to the control group. Increases in aspartate and glutamate concentrations strongly correlated with the prescription of phenytoin. However, the concentrations of these amino acids were not significantly correlated with the actual plasma levels of phenytoin.

  5. Mass spectrometer for measurements of relative ion concentrations in plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suszcynsky, David M.; D'Angelo, Nicola; Merlino, Robert L.

    1988-01-01

    A mass spectrometer which can be used to measure relative ion concentrations in a multiion component plasma has been designed for use in a strong (1-4-kG) uniform magnetic field. The spectrometer features an acceleration region which accelerates thermal ions through a series of three tantalum electrodes at a 30 deg angle to the B field, and a collection region in which ions are selectively collected, depending on the size of their gyroradii, by a cylindrical collector. Relative ion concentrations are determined from measurements of the collector current as a function of accelerating voltage. Results obtained using this instrument in a Q-machine device operated with a two-ion (Cs+/K+) component plasma are presented.

  6. Plasma Polychlorinated Biphenyl Concentrations and Immune Function in Postmenopausal Women☆

    PubMed Central

    Spector, June T.; De Roos, Anneclaire J.; Ulrich, Cornelia M.; Sheppard, Lianne; Sjodin, Andreas; Wener, Mark H.; Wood, Brent; McTiernan, Anne

    2014-01-01

    Background Polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) exposure has been associated with non-Hodgkin lymphoma in several studies, and the immune system is a potential mediator. Objectives We analyzed associations of plasma PCBs with immune function measures. We hypothesized that higher plasma PCB concentrations are associated with lower immune function cross-sectionally, and that increases in PCB concentrations over a one year period are associated with decreases in immune function. Methods Plasma PCB concentrations and immune function [natural killer (NK) cell cytotoxicity and PHA-induced T-lymphocyte proliferation (PHA-TLP)] were measured at baseline and one year in 109 postmenopausal overweight women participating in an exercise intervention study in the Seattle, Washington (USA) area. Mixed models, with adjustment for body mass index and other potential confounders, were used to estimate associations of PCBs with immune function cross-sectionally and longitudinally. Results Associations of PCBs with immune function measures differed across groups of PCBs (e.g., medium- and high-chlorinated and dioxin-like [mono-ortho substituted]) and by the time frame for the comparison (cross-sectional vs. longitudinal). Higher concentrations of medium- and high-chlorinated PCBs were associated with higher PHA-TLP cross-sectionally but not longitudinally. The mean decrease in 0.5 μg/mL PHA-TLP per 50.0 pmol/g-lipid increase in dioxin-like PCBs over one year was 51.6 (95% confidence interval 2.7, 100.5; P=0.039). There was no association between plasma PCBs and NK cytotoxicity. Conclusions These results do not provide strong evidence of impaired cellular immunity from PCB exposure. Larger longitudinal studies with greater variability in PCB exposures are needed to further examine temporal associations of PCBs with immune function. PMID:24721136

  7. Plasma leptin concentrations and esophageal hypomotility in obese patients

    PubMed Central

    Côté-Daigneault, Justin; Poitras, Pierre; Rabasa-Lhoret, Rémi; Bouin, Mickael

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Although esophageal hypomotility is prevalent in obese patients, its cause remains unknown. Leptin, a hormone derived from adipose tissue, may be involved in this phenomenon because it has been shown to decrease gastric and intestinal motility in animals. It has been hypothesized that elevated plasma leptin concentration is a risk factor for esophageal dysmotility in obese patients. OBJECTIVE: To determine whether plasma leptin concentrations are higher in obese patients with esophageal hypomotility than in obese patients with a normal motility profile. METHOD: Fasting plasma leptin concentration (assessed by radioimmuoassay) was measured in all patients who were included in a study protocol investigating esophageal manometry before bariatric surgery. The patients completed standardized surveys regarding epidemiological data, upper gastrointestinal symptoms, medical history and medication(s). Basal levels of leptin, as well as corrected leptin scores adjusted for sex and body mass index, were compared in patients with and without esophageal dysmotility. RESULTS: Nine patients without dysmotility and eight with dysmotility were included. Both groups were comparable with regard to age (42±9 versus 38±9 years), sex (78% versus 75% women) and body mass index (49±10 kg/m2 versus 42±7 kg/m2). There were no significant differences regarding medication(s) and comorbidities between the two groups. When compared with normal predicted values, the corrected leptin scores were 30% higher in patients with dysmotility than in the control group with normal motility (P≤0.05). CONCLUSION: Obese patients with esophageal dysmotility exhibited elevated plasma leptin concentrations, suggesting a role for leptin in promoting esophageal hypomotility. PMID:25706575

  8. HPLC analysis of K-48 concentration in plasma.

    PubMed

    Kalász, H; Hasan, M Y; Sheen, R; Kuca, K; Petroianu, G; Ludányi, K; Gergely, A; Tekes, K

    2006-07-01

    K-48 is a new oxime-type compound to be used as an enzyme reactivator in the treatment of exposure to organophosphorous compounds. Plasma concentration of K-48 can be determined using reversed-phase HPLC. Analysis using octyl silica stationary phase and ultraviolet-absorbance detection is fast and simple. K-48 displays a relatively high dose-normalized area under the curve as compared to pralidoxime, which might be beneficial for an antidote. After i.m. administration of 50 mumol K-48, the time course of the concentration can be approximated by a straight line between 15 and 120 min meaning the elimination follows zero-order kinetics.

  9. Formulation and evaluation of lecithin organogel for topical delivery of fluconazole.

    PubMed

    Jadhav, Kisan R; Kadam, Vilasrao J; Pisal, Sambhaji S

    2009-04-01

    The purpose of the present study was to develop and investigate the suitability of microemulsion based lecithin organogel formulations for topical delivery of fluconazole in order to bypass its gastrointestinal adverse effects. The ternary phase diagrams were developed and various organogel formulations were prepared using pharmaceutically acceptable surfactant (lecithin) and ethyl oleate (EO). Solubility of fluconazole in EO and EO-lecithin reverse micellar system was determined. The transdermal permeability of fluconazole from different concentrations of lecithin organogels containing EO as oil phase was analyzed using Keshary-Chien diffusion cell through excised rat skin. Solubility of fluconazole in EO-lecithin reverse micellar system was almost 3 folds higher than that in EO. Gelation and immobilization of oil require critical solubility-insolubility balance of gelator. The occurrence of gel phase was lecithin concentration dependent and was observed in 10-60% w/v of system. Organogel containing 300 mM of lecithin showed the higher drug release and better relative consistency. Hence, it was selected for antifungal activity. The increase in antifungal activity of fluconazole in lecithin organogel may be because of the surfactant action of the lecithin and EO that may help in the diffusion of drug. The histopathological data showed that EO-lecithin organogels were safe enough for the topical purpose. Hence, the present lecithin based organogel appears beneficial for topical delivery of fluconazole in terms of easy preparation, safety, stability and low cost.

  10. Curcumin enhances the activity of fluconazole against Cryptococcus gattii-induced cryptococcosis infection in mice.

    PubMed

    da Silva, D L; Magalhães, T F F; Dos Santos, J R A; de Paula, T P; Modolo, L V; de Fátima, A; Buzanello Martins, C V; Santos, D A; de Resende-Stoianoff, M A

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the in vitro and in vivo activities of pure curcumin, as well as its combination with fluconazole, against Cryptococcus gattii. The minimal inhibitory concentrations (MIC) of curcumin and its interactions with fluconazole against C. gattii were assessed in vitro using standard methods. This same combination was used to treat C. gattii-induced cryptococcosis in mice. The behavioural and functional assessment of the mice during treatment was also performed. The average MIC for curcumin was 19·8 μg ml(-1) . Its combination with fluconazole resulted in FICΣ (fractional inhibitory concentration index) values between 0·79 and 2·29. Curcumin (alone or combined with fluconazole) significantly reduced pulmonary damage and fungal burden in the brain. No colonies were found in the brain following combination treatment, which was also confirmed by the improved behaviour of mice. The combination therapy with curcumin and fluconazole was the most effective among the treatments tested, as in addition to reducing the fungal burden and damage on lung tissues, it was able to eliminate the fungal burden in the brain, enhancing the survival of mice. This study points to the possibility of using curcumin in combination with fluconazole as a clinical treatment of cryptococcosis. © 2015 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  11. Induction of ROS generation by fluconazole in Candida glabrata: activation of antioxidant enzymes and oxidative DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Mahl, Camila Donato; Behling, Camile Saul; Hackenhaar, Fernanda S; de Carvalho e Silva, Mélany Natuane; Putti, Jordana; Salomon, Tiago B; Alves, Sydney Hartz; Fuentefria, Alexandre; Benfato, Mara S

    2015-07-01

    In this study, we assessed the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) induced by subinhibitory concentration of fluconazole in susceptible and resistant Candida glabrata strains at stationary growth phase and measured their oxidative responses parameters: glutathione peroxidase (GPx), superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione-S-transferase (GST), consumption of hydrogen peroxide, and total glutathione, as well as oxidative damage in lipids, proteins, and DNA. Data showed that fluconazole increased generation of ROS and GPx and SOD enzymatic activity in treated cells; however, these enzymatic activities did not differ between resistant and susceptible strains. Susceptible strains exhibited higher GST activity than resistant, and when susceptible cells were treated with fluconazole, GST activity decreased. Fluconazole treatment cause oxidative damage only in DNA. There are a possible participation of ROS, as organic peroxides and O2(•-), in antifungal mechanism of fluconazole, which results in higher GPx and SOD enzymatic activities and oxidative DNA damage in C. glabrata.

  12. Cross-resistance to fluconazole induced by exposure to the agricultural azole tetraconazole: an environmental resistance school?

    PubMed

    Rocha, Marcos Fábio Gadelha; Alencar, L P; Paiva, M A N; Melo, Luciana Magalhães; Bandeira, Silviane Praciano; Ponte, Y B; Sales, Jamille Alencar; Guedes, G M M; Castelo-Branco, D S C M; Bandeira, T J P G; Cordeiro, R A; Pereira-Neto, W A; Brandine, G S; Moreira, José Luciano Bezerra; Sidrim, José Júlio Costa; Brilhante, Raimunda Sâmia Nogueira

    2016-05-01

    This study aimed to investigate the influence of tetraconazole and malathion, both used in agricultural activities, on resistance to fluconazole, itraconazole and voriconazole in Candida parapsilosis ATCC 22019. The susceptibility to tetraconazole, malathion, fluconazole, itraconazole and voriconazole, through broth microdilution. Then, 12 independent replicates, were separated and exposed to four treatment groups, each one containing three replicates: G1: tetraconazole; G2: malathion; G3: fluconazole (positive control); G4: negative control. Replicates from G1, G2 and G3, were exposed to weekly increasing concentrations of tetraconazole, malathion and fluconazole, respectively, ranging from MIC/2 to 32 × MIC, throughout 7 weeks. The exposure to tetraconazole, but not malathion, decreased susceptibility to clinical azoles, especially fluconazole. The tetraconazole-induced fluconazole resistance is partially mediated by the increased activity of ATP-dependent efflux pumps, considering the increase in antifungal susceptibility after the addition of the efflux pump inhibitor, promethazine, and the increase in rhodamine 6G efflux and CDR gene expression in the G1 replicates. Moreover, MDR expression was only detected in G1 and G3 replicates, suggesting that MDR pumps are also involved in tetraconazole-induced fluconazole resistance. It is noteworthy that tetraconazole and fluconazole-treated replicates behaved similarly, therefore, resistance to azoles of clinical use may be a consequence of using azoles in farming activities.

  13. Plasma polychlorinated biphenyl concentrations and immune function in postmenopausal women

    SciTech Connect

    Spector, June T.; De Roos, Anneclaire J.; Ulrich, Cornelia M.; Sheppard, Lianne; Sjoedin, Andreas; Wener, Mark H.; Wood, Brent; and others

    2014-05-01

    Background: Polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) exposure has been associated with non-Hodgkin lymphoma in several studies, and the immune system is a potential mediator. Objectives: We analyzed associations of plasma PCBs with immune function measures. We hypothesized that higher plasma PCB concentrations are associated with lower immune function cross-sectionally, and that increases in PCB concentrations over a one year period are associated with decreases in immune function. Methods: Plasma PCB concentrations and immune function [natural killer (NK) cell cytotoxicity and PHA-induced T-lymphocyte proliferation (PHA-TLP)] were measured at baseline and one year in 109 postmenopausal overweight women participating in an exercise intervention study in the Seattle, Washington (USA) area. Mixed models, with adjustment for body mass index and other potential confounders, were used to estimate associations of PCBs with immune function cross-sectionally and longitudinally. Results: Associations of PCBs with immune function measures differed across groups of PCBs (e.g., medium- and high-chlorinated and dioxin-like [mono-ortho-substituted]) and by the time frame for the comparison (cross-sectional vs. longitudinal). Higher concentrations of medium- and high-chlorinated PCBs were associated with higher PHA-TLP cross-sectionally but not longitudinally. The mean decrease in 0.5 µg/mL PHA-TLP/50.0 pmol/g-lipid increase in dioxin-like PCBs over one year was 51.6 (95% confidence interval 2.7, 100.5; P=0.039). There was no association between plasma PCBs and NK cytotoxicity. Conclusions: These results do not provide strong evidence of impaired cellular immunity from PCB exposure. Larger longitudinal studies with greater variability in PCB exposures are needed to further examine temporal associations of PCBs with immune function. - Highlights: • Plasma PCBs and immune function were measured in 109 women at baseline and one year. • Immune measures included T lymphocyte proliferation

  14. Plasma concentrations of coffee polyphenols and plasma biomarkers of diabetes risk in healthy Japanese women

    PubMed Central

    Lee, A H; Tan, L 'B; Hiramatsu, N; Ishisaka, A; Alfonso, H; Tanaka, A; Uemura, N; Fujiwara, Y; Takechi, R

    2016-01-01

    Coffee consumption has been reported to reduce the risk of type 2 diabetes in experimental and epidemiological studies. This anti-diabetic effect of coffee may be attributed to its high content in polyphenols especially caffeic acid and chlorogenic acid. However, the association between plasma coffee polyphenols and diabetic risks has never been investigated in the literature. In this study, fasting plasma samples were collected from 57 generally healthy females aged 38–73 (mean 52, s.d. 8) years recruited in Himeji, Japan. The concentrations of plasma coffee polyphenols were determined by liquid chromatography coupled with mass tandem spectrometer. Diabetes biomarkers in the plasma/serum samples were analysed by a commercial diagnostic laboratory. Statistical associations were assessed using Spearman's correlation coefficients. The results showed that plasma chlorogenic acid exhibited negative associations with fasting blood glucose, glycated hemoglobin and C-reactive protein, whereas plasma total coffee polyphenol and plasma caffeic acid were weakly associated with these biomarkers. Our preliminary data support previous findings that coffee polyphenols have anti-diabetic effects but further replications with large samples of both genders are recommended. PMID:27270110

  15. Plasma concentrations of coffee polyphenols and plasma biomarkers of diabetes risk in healthy Japanese women.

    PubMed

    Lee, A H; Tan, L 'b; Hiramatsu, N; Ishisaka, A; Alfonso, H; Tanaka, A; Uemura, N; Fujiwara, Y; Takechi, R

    2016-06-06

    Coffee consumption has been reported to reduce the risk of type 2 diabetes in experimental and epidemiological studies. This anti-diabetic effect of coffee may be attributed to its high content in polyphenols especially caffeic acid and chlorogenic acid. However, the association between plasma coffee polyphenols and diabetic risks has never been investigated in the literature. In this study, fasting plasma samples were collected from 57 generally healthy females aged 38-73 (mean 52, s.d. 8) years recruited in Himeji, Japan. The concentrations of plasma coffee polyphenols were determined by liquid chromatography coupled with mass tandem spectrometer. Diabetes biomarkers in the plasma/serum samples were analysed by a commercial diagnostic laboratory. Statistical associations were assessed using Spearman's correlation coefficients. The results showed that plasma chlorogenic acid exhibited negative associations with fasting blood glucose, glycated hemoglobin and C-reactive protein, whereas plasma total coffee polyphenol and plasma caffeic acid were weakly associated with these biomarkers. Our preliminary data support previous findings that coffee polyphenols have anti-diabetic effects but further replications with large samples of both genders are recommended.

  16. A convenient method to measure blood-plasma concentration ratio using routine plasma collection in in vivo pharmacokinetic studies.

    PubMed

    Berezhkovskiy, Leonid M; Zhang, Xiaolin; Cheong, Jonathan

    2011-12-01

    A practical time-saving method of determination of equilibrium blood-plasma concentration ratio is described. The method is based on the analysis of compound plasma concentrations in regular blood sample and the blood sample diluted with blank plasma. Since only plasma concentrations are analyzed, the method can be conveniently applied in routine pharmacokinetic studies with minimal additional work for obtaining blood-plasma ratio. The method can also be easily used in in vitro experiment. The results obtained by suggested method are in good agreement with that obtained by common in vitro measurements of blood-plasma ratio.

  17. Combination induction plasma tube and current concentrator for introducing a sample into a plasma

    DOEpatents

    Hull, Donald E.; Bieniewski, Thomas M.

    1988-01-01

    An induction plasma tube in combination with a current concentrator. The rent concentrator has a substantially cylindrical body having an open end and a partially closed end which defines an aperture. A first slot extends the longitudinal length of the cylindrical body and a second slot extends radially outward from the aperture. Together the first and second slots form a single L-shaped slot. The current concentrator is disposed within a volume bounded by an induction coil substantially along the axis thereof, and when power is applied to the induction coil a concentrated current is induced within the current concentrator aperture. The concentrator is moveable relative to the coil along the longitudinal axis of the coil to control the amount of current which is concentrated at the aperture.

  18. Factors affecting plasma aluminum concentrations in nonexposed workers

    SciTech Connect

    House, R.A. )

    1992-10-01

    In this study, the distribution and determinants of plasma aluminum concentrations were examined in 71 office employees not occupationally exposed to aluminum. The samples were analyzed by Zeeman graphite furnace atomic absorption spectroscopy and were found to be log normally distributed. After using the International Federation of Clinical Chemistry (IFCC) recommended procedure for removal of likely aberrant values, the 95th percentile value was 198 nmol/L (90% CI:165-238); when those using antacids were also excluded, the 95th percentile value fell to 175 nmol/L (90% CI:147-208). Multiple regression analysis indicated that the factors most predictive of log plasma aluminum were the batch in which the sample was analyzed and the use of antacids containing aluminum. The statistical significance of the batch variable likely indicates the well-recognized problem of contamination in sampling and analyzing aluminum.35 references.

  19. Factors affecting plasma aluminum concentrations in nonexposed workers.

    PubMed

    House, R A

    1992-10-01

    In this study, the distribution and determinants of plasma aluminum concentrations were examined in 71 office employees not occupationally exposed to aluminum. The samples were analyzed by Zeeman graphite furnace atomic absorption spectroscopy and were found to be log normally distributed. After using the International Federation of Clinical Chemistry (IFCC) recommended procedure for removal of likely aberrant values, the 95th percentile value was 198 nmol/L (90% CI:165-238); when those using antacids were also excluded, the 95th percentile value fell to 175 nmol/L (90% CI:147-208). Multiple regression analysis indicated that the factors most predictive of log plasma aluminum were the batch in which the sample was analyzed and the use of antacids containing aluminum. The statistical significance of the batch variable likely indicates the well-recognized problem of contamination in sampling and analyzing aluminum.

  20. Plasma carnitine concentrations in patients undergoing open heart surgery.

    PubMed

    Nemoto, Shintaro; Yasuhara, Kiyomitsu; Nakamura, Katsutoshi; Miyoshi, Yutaka; Sakai, Akira

    2004-02-01

    Carnitine is an essential cofactor for fatty acid (FA) metabolism, the predominant source of ATP in the normal aerobic heart. During myocardial ischemia, FA metabolism is impaired and tissue carnitine levels are depleted. Since the heart cannot synthesize carnitine, plasma carnitine could play an important role in maintaining myocardial carnitine levels during reperfusion. The purpose of this study was to determine the incidence of abnormal plasma carnitine concentrations in open heart surgery. Blood samples were obtained from eleven patients before, immediately after, and two hours after cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). Total and free carnitine levels were significantly reduced immediately after CPB (p<0.01) and remained depressed until two hours after CPB (p<0.01 vs. pre CPB), while acyl carnitine levels were unchanged over the course of this study. These depressed free carnitine levels might affect cardiac metabolism in the heart after open heart surgery. Carnitine supplement might be a useful adjunct in the therapy after open heart surgery.

  1. Divergent electrophysiologic profile of fluconazole and voriconazole in an experimental whole-heart model of proarrhythmia.

    PubMed

    Frommeyer, Gerrit; Fischer, Christina; Lange, Philipp S; Leitz, Patrick; Fehr, Michael; Bogossian, Harilaos; Milberg, Peter; Eckardt, Lars

    2016-04-05

    In several case reports a prolongation of the QT-interval and even proarrhythmic effects of fluconazole and voriconazole were reported. The aim of the present study was to investigate if application of fluconazole or voriconazole has the potential to provoke polymorphic ventricular tachycardia in a sensitive model of proarrhythmia. In female rabbits, fluconazole (10, 30 and 50 µM, n=6) and voriconazole (10, 30 and 50 µM, n=6) were infused after obtaining baseline data. Eight endocardial and epicardial monophasic action potentials and a simultaneously recorded 12-lead ECG showed a significant QT prolongation after application of fluconazole as compared with baseline (10 µM:+12 ms, 30 µM:+22 ms, 50 µM:+37 ms; P<0.05) accompanied by an increase of action potential duration (APD90). Administration of voriconazole also induced QT prolongation (30 µM:+10 ms, 50 µM:+20 ms, P<0.05). Spatial dispersion of repolarization remained stable in voriconazole-treated hearts while fluconazole induced a significant increase (30 µM:+15 ms, 50 µM:+16 ms; P<0.05). Lowering of potassium concentration in bradycardic AV-blocked hearts did not provoke any early afterdepolarizations (EADs) or polymorphic ventricular tachycardia in voriconazole-treated hearts. Application of fluconazole led to the reproducible induction of EADs in 4 of 6 hearts and polymorphic ventricular tachycardia in 3 of 6 hearts (36 episodes). In the present study, voriconazole demonstrated a safe electrophysiologic profile despite significant QT prolongation. In contrast, fluconazole led to a more marked prolongation of myocardial repolarization combined with a more marked increase of dispersion of repolarization. These results imply that application of fluconazole might be torsadogenic and the QT-interval should be closely monitored.

  2. Fluconazole alters the polysaccharide capsule of Cryptococcus gattii and leads to distinct behaviors in murine Cryptococcosis.

    PubMed

    Santos, Julliana Ribeiro Alves; Holanda, Rodrigo Assunção; Frases, Susana; Bravim, Mayara; Araujo, Glauber de S; Santos, Patrícia Campi; Costa, Marliete Carvalho; Ribeiro, Maira Juliana Andrade; Ferreira, Gabriella Freitas; Baltazar, Ludmila Matos; Miranda, Aline Silva; Oliveira, Danilo Bretas; Santos, Carolina Maria Araújo; Fontes, Alide Caroline Lima; Gouveia, Ludmila Ferreira; Resende-Stoianoff, Maria Aparecida; Abrahão, Jonatas Santos; Teixeira, Antônio Lúcio; Paixão, Tatiane Alves; Souza, Danielle G; Santos, Daniel Assis

    2014-01-01

    Cryptococcus gattii is an emergent human pathogen. Fluconazole is commonly used for treatment of cryptococcosis, but the emergence of less susceptible strains to this azole is a global problem and also the data regarding fluconazole-resistant cryptococcosis are scarce. We evaluate the influence of fluconazole on murine cryptococcosis and whether this azole alters the polysaccharide (PS) from cryptococcal cells. L27/01 strain of C. gattii was cultivated in high fluconazole concentrations and developed decreased drug susceptibility. This phenotype was named L27/01F, that was less virulent than L27/01 in mice. The physical, structural and electrophoretic properties of the PS capsule of L27/01F were altered by fluconazole. L27/01F presented lower antiphagocytic properties and reduced survival inside macrophages. The L27/01F did not affect the central nervous system, while the effect in brain caused by L27/01 strain began after only 12 hours. Mice infected with L27/01F presented lower production of the pro-inflammatory cytokines, with increased cellular recruitment in the lungs and severe pulmonary disease. The behavioral alterations were affected by L27/01, but no effects were detected after infection with L27/01F. Our results suggest that stress to fluconazole alters the capsule of C. gattii and influences the clinical manifestations of cryptococcosis.

  3. Fluconazole Alters the Polysaccharide Capsule of Cryptococcus gattii and Leads to Distinct Behaviors in Murine Cryptococcosis

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Julliana Ribeiro Alves; Holanda, Rodrigo Assunção; Frases, Susana; Bravim, Mayara; Araujo, Glauber de S.; Santos, Patrícia Campi; Costa, Marliete Carvalho; Ribeiro, Maira Juliana Andrade; Ferreira, Gabriella Freitas; Baltazar, Ludmila Matos; Miranda, Aline Silva; Oliveira, Danilo Bretas; Santos, Carolina Maria Araújo; Fontes, Alide Caroline Lima; Gouveia, Ludmila Ferreira; Resende-Stoianoff, Maria Aparecida; Abrahão, Jonatas Santos; Teixeira, Antônio Lúcio; Paixão, Tatiane Alves; Souza, Danielle G.; Santos, Daniel Assis

    2014-01-01

    Cryptococcus gattii is an emergent human pathogen. Fluconazole is commonly used for treatment of cryptococcosis, but the emergence of less susceptible strains to this azole is a global problem and also the data regarding fluconazole-resistant cryptococcosis are scarce. We evaluate the influence of fluconazole on murine cryptococcosis and whether this azole alters the polysaccharide (PS) from cryptococcal cells. L27/01 strain of C. gattii was cultivated in high fluconazole concentrations and developed decreased drug susceptibility. This phenotype was named L27/01F, that was less virulent than L27/01 in mice. The physical, structural and electrophoretic properties of the PS capsule of L27/01F were altered by fluconazole. L27/01F presented lower antiphagocytic properties and reduced survival inside macrophages. The L27/01F did not affect the central nervous system, while the effect in brain caused by L27/01 strain began after only 12 hours. Mice infected with L27/01F presented lower production of the pro-inflammatory cytokines, with increased cellular recruitment in the lungs and severe pulmonary disease. The behavioral alterations were affected by L27/01, but no effects were detected after infection with L27/01F. Our results suggest that stress to fluconazole alters the capsule of C. gattii and influences the clinical manifestations of cryptococcosis. PMID:25392951

  4. Plasma oxytocin concentrations following MDMA or intranasal oxytocin in humans.

    PubMed

    Kirkpatrick, Matthew G; Francis, Sunday M; Lee, Royce; de Wit, Harriet; Jacob, Suma

    2014-08-01

    MDMA (±3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine, 'ecstasy') is reportedly used recreationally because it increases feelings of sociability and interpersonal closeness. Prior work suggests that the pro-social effects of MDMA may be mediated by release of oxytocin. A direct examination of plasma levels of oxytocin after acute doses of oxytocin and MDMA, in the same individuals, would provide further evidence for the idea that MDMA produces its pro-social effects by increasing oxytocin. Fourteen healthy MDMA users participated in a 4-session, double-blind study in which they received oral MDMA (0.75 and 1.5mg/kg), intranasal oxytocin (20IU or 40IU), and placebo. Plasma oxytocin concentrations, as well as cardiovascular and subjective effects were assessed before and at several time points after drug administration. MDMA (1.5mg/kg only) increased plasma oxytocin levels to a mean peak of 83.7pg/ml at approximately 90-120min, compared to 18.6pg/ml after placebo. Intranasal oxytocin (40IU, but not 20IU) increased plasma oxytocin levels to 48.0pg/ml, 30-60min after nasal spray administration. MDMA dose-dependently increased heart rate, blood pressure, feelings of euphoria (e.g., 'High' and 'Like Drug'), and feelings of sociability, whereas oxytocin had no cardiovascular or subjective effects. The subjective and cardiovascular responses to MDMA were not related to plasma oxytocin levels, although the N was small for this analysis. Future studies examining the effects of oxytocin antagonists on responses to MDMA will help to determine the mechanism by which MDMA produces pro-social effects.

  5. Plasma oxytocin concentrations following MDMA or intranasal oxytocin in humans

    PubMed Central

    Kirkpatrick, Matthew G.; Francis, Sunday M.; Lee, Royce; de Wit, Harriet; Jacob, Suma

    2014-01-01

    MDMA (±3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine, ‘ecstasy’) is reportedly used recreationally because it increases feelings of sociability and interpersonal closeness. Prior work suggests that the pro-social effects of MDMA may be mediated by release of oxytocin. A direct examination of plasma levels of oxytocin after acute doses of oxytocin and MDMA, in the same individuals, would provide further evidence for the idea that MDMA produces its prosocial effects by increasing oxytocin. Fourteen healthy MDMA users participated in a 4-session, double-blind study in which they received oral MDMA (0.75 and 1.5 mg/kg), intranasal oxytocin (20 IU or 40 IU), and placebo. Plasma oxytocin concentrations, as well as cardiovascular and subjective effects were assessed before and at several time points after drug administration. MDMA (1.5 mg/kg only) increased plasma oxytocin levels to a mean peak of 83.7 pg/ml at approximately 90–120 minutes, compared to 18.6 pg/ml after placebo. Intranasal oxytocin (40 IU, but not 20 IU) increased plasma oxytocin levels to 48.0 pg/ml, 30–60 min after nasal spray administration. MDMA dose-dependently increased heart rate, blood pressure, feelings of euphoria (e.g., ‘High’ and ‘Like Drug’), and feelings of sociability, whereas oxytocin had no cardiovascular or subjective effects. The subjective and cardiovascular responses to MDMA were not related to plasma oxytocin levels, although the N was small for this analysis. Future studies examining the effects of oxytocin antagonists on responses to MDMA will help to determine the mechanism by which MDMA produces pro-social effects. PMID:24882155

  6. Fluconazole-Induced Type 1 Kounis Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Singh Mahal, Hardeep

    2016-01-01

    The administration of fluconazole is commonly used in both inpatient and outpatient settings for the management of candidiasis infection. Although it is associated with a relatively safe side effect profile, some patients experience adverse effects associated with increased morbidity. We describe 1 such patient, a 42-year-old woman with a history of severe eczema who developed fluconazole-induced type 1 Kounis syndrome. Review of literature indicates that this as the first case reported of fluconazole-induced type 1 Kounis syndrome.

  7. Effects of administration of glucocorticoids and feeding status on plasma leptin concentrations in dogs.

    PubMed

    Nishii, Naohito; Takasu, Masaki; Ohba, Yasunori; Maeda, Sadatoshi; Kitoh, Katsuya; Ohtsuka, Yoshihiko; Honjo, Tsutomu; Saito, Masayuki; Kitagawa, Hitoshi

    2006-02-01

    To investigate effects of short- and long- term administration of glucocorticoids, feeding status, and serum concentrations of insulin and cortisol on plasma leptin concentrations in dogs. 20 nonobese dogs. For experiment 1, plasma leptin concentrations and serum concentrations of insulin and cortisol were monitored for 24 hours in 4 dogs administered dexamethasone (0.1 mg/kg, IV) or saline (0.9% NaCl) solution for fed and nonfed conditions. For experiment 2, 11 dogs were administered prednisolone (1 mg/kg, PO, q 24 h for 56 days [7 dogs] and 2 mg/kg, PO, q 24 h for 28 days [4 dogs]) and 5 dogs served as control dogs. Plasma leptin and serum insulin concentrations were monitored weekly. For experiment 1, dexamethasone injection with the fed condition drastically increased plasma leptin concentrations. Furthermore, injection of saline solution with the fed condition increased plasma leptin concentrations. These increases in plasma leptin concentrations correlated with increases in serum insulin concentrations. Dexamethasone injection with the nonfed condition increased plasma leptin concentrations slightly but continuously. Injection of saline solution with the nonfed condition did not alter plasma leptin concentrations. For experiment 2, prednisolone administration at either dosage and duration did not alter plasma leptin concentrations in any dogs. Dexamethasone injection and feeding increased plasma leptin concentrations in dogs. In addition, dexamethasone administration enhanced the effect of feeding on increases in plasma leptin concentrations. Daily oral administration of prednisolone (1 or 2 mg/kg) did not affect plasma leptin concentrations in dogs.

  8. Predominance of Cryptococcus neoformans var. grubii multilocus sequence type 5 and emergence of isolates with non-wild-type minimum inhibitory concentrations to fluconazole: a multi-centre study in China.

    PubMed

    Fan, X; Xiao, M; Chen, S; Kong, F; Dou, H-T; Wang, H; Xiao, Y-L; Kang, M; Sun, Z-Y; Hu, Z-D; Wan, Z; Chen, S-L; Liao, K; Chu, Y-Z; Hu, T-S; Zou, G-L; Hou, X; Zhang, L; Zhao, Y-P; Xu, Y-C; Liu, Z-Y

    2016-10-01

    There are few data on the molecular epidemiology of cryptococcosis in China. Here we investigated the species distribution, molecular types and antifungal susceptibilities of 312 Cryptococcus neoformans species complex isolates from ten hospitals over 5 years. Isolates were identified by internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequencing and by two matrix-assisted laser desorption-ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) systems. Multilocus sequence typing (MLST) was used to verify species/variety and to designate molecular types. Susceptibility to six antifungal drugs was determined by the Sensititre YeastOne™ method. Cryptococcus neoformans was the predominant species (305/312 isolates (97.8%), all were ITS type 1, serotype A), of which 89.2% (272/305) were C. neoformans var. grubii MLST sequence type (ST) 5 and 6.2% (19/305) were ST31. Other C. neoformans var. grubii STs were rare but included six novel STs. Only two strains were C. neoformans var. neoformans (both serotype AD). Cryptococcus gattii was uncommon (n = 7, four ITS types) and comprised five MLST STs including one novel ST. For C. neoformans var. grubii, the proportion of isolates with non-wild-type MICs to fluconazole significantly rose in the fourth study year (from 0% (0/56 isolates) in the first year to 23.9% (17/71) in the fourth year), including five isolates with fluconazole MICs of ≥32 mg/L. The study has provided useful data on the species epidemiology and their genetic diversity and antifungal susceptibility. The proportional increase in isolates with non-wild-type MICs to fluconazole is noted.

  9. Fluconazole Pharmacokinetics in Burn Patients

    PubMed Central

    Boucher, Bradley A.; King, Stephen R.; Wandschneider, Heidi L.; Hickerson, William L.; Hanes, Scott D.; Herring, Vanessa L.; Canada, Todd W.; Hess, Mary M.

    1998-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics of fluconazole in nine adult patients with severe (30 to 95% total body surface area) burns were studied. There was no significant difference in half-life (t1/2), clearance (CL), or volume of distribution (V) over time in five patients on days 3 and 8 of the study (P > 0.05). Combined parameter estimates (means ± standard deviations) for all nine patients for the two study periods were as follows: t1/2, 24.4 ± 5.8 h; CL, 0.36 ± 0.09 ml/min/kg; and V, 0.72 ± 0.12 liters/kg. These estimates of t1/2 and CL in burn patients were approximately 13% shorter and 30% more rapid, respectively, than the most extreme estimates reported for other populations. PMID:9559811

  10. Differentially expressed proteins in fluconazole-susceptible and fluconazole-resistant isolates of Candida glabrata.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yinzhong; Zhang, Lijun; Jia, Xiaofang; Zhang, Yongxin; Lu, Hongzhou

    2015-06-01

    The current study aimed to identify the differences presented in the proteome of fluconazole-susceptible isolates of Candida glabrata compared to those with fluconazole-resistant ones. Two-dimensional differential gel electrophoresis was applied to identify proteins that were differentially expressed in fluconazole-susceptible and fluconazole-resistant isolates of C. glabrata. Eight proteins including aspartyl-tRNA synthetase, translation elongation factor 3, 3-phosphoglycerate kinase, ribosomal protein L5, coproporphyrinogen III oxidase, pyruvate kinase, G-beta like protein, and F1F0-ATPase alpha subunit were found to be more abundantly represented, while four proteins including vitamin B12-(cobalamin)-independent isozyme of methionine synthase, microtubule-associated protein, adenylosuccinate synthetase, and aldose reductase were found to be less abundantly represented in fluconazole-resistant strains versus those with fluconazole-susceptible ones. These differentially expressed proteins were primarily associated with energy metabolism, stress response, and macromolecule synthesis. Proteins associated with energy metabolism, stress response, and macromolecule synthesis may play a role in the development of fluconazole resistance in the clinical isolates of C. glabrata. Multiple different mechanisms are involved in the development of fluconazole resistance in C. glabrata. These findings provide a scientific basis for discovering new genes and mechanisms associated with fluconazole resistance in C. glabrata.

  11. Effects of running the Bostom Marathon on plasma concentrations of large neutral amino acids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conlay, L. A.; Wurtman, R. J.; Lopez G-Coviella, I.; Blusztajn, J. K.; Vacanti, C. A.; Logue, M.; During, M.; Caballero, B.; Maher, T. J.; Evoniuk, G.

    1989-01-01

    Plasma large neutral amino acid concentrations were measured in thirty-seven subjects before and after completing the Boston Marathon. Concentrations of tyrosine, phenylalanine, and methionine increased, as did their 'plasma ratios' (i.e., the ratio of each amino acid's concentration to the summed plasma concentrations of the other large neutral amino acids which compete with it for brain uptake). No changes were noted in the plasma concentrations of tryptophan, leucine, isoleucine, nor valine; however, the 'plasma ratios' of valine, leucine, and isoleucine all decreased. These changes in plasma amino acid patterns may influence neurotransmitter synthesis.

  12. Effects of running the Bostom Marathon on plasma concentrations of large neutral amino acids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conlay, L. A.; Wurtman, R. J.; Lopez G-Coviella, I.; Blusztajn, J. K.; Vacanti, C. A.; Logue, M.; During, M.; Caballero, B.; Maher, T. J.; Evoniuk, G.

    1989-01-01

    Plasma large neutral amino acid concentrations were measured in thirty-seven subjects before and after completing the Boston Marathon. Concentrations of tyrosine, phenylalanine, and methionine increased, as did their 'plasma ratios' (i.e., the ratio of each amino acid's concentration to the summed plasma concentrations of the other large neutral amino acids which compete with it for brain uptake). No changes were noted in the plasma concentrations of tryptophan, leucine, isoleucine, nor valine; however, the 'plasma ratios' of valine, leucine, and isoleucine all decreased. These changes in plasma amino acid patterns may influence neurotransmitter synthesis.

  13. Relationship between Plasma Albumin Concentration and Plasma Volume in 5 Inbred Rat Strains.

    PubMed

    Rose, Rajiv; Klemcke, Harold G

    2015-09-01

    Using the Evans Blue procedure, we previously found strain-related differences in plasma volumes in 5 inbred rat strains. Because albumin binds strongly with Evans blue, this protein is important in the Evans blue method of plasma volume determination. Therefore, we speculated that interstrain differences in plasma albumin concentration (PAC) could distort calculated plasma volumes. To address this concern, we used ELISA techniques to measure PAC in these inbred rat strains. In study A, the blood volume was measured by using Evans blue dye, and albumin was measured at the start of hemorrhage. In study B, blood volume was not measured, and albumin was measured twice, near the start and end of hemorrhage (approximately 14 min apart). Neither study revealed any interstrain differences in PAC, which decreased after hemorrhage in all 5 strains. No correlation was found between PAC and plasma volume, survival time, blood lactate, or blood base excess. Percentage changes in PAC during hemorrhage were greater in salt-sensitive compared with Lewis rats. Moreover, these percentage changes were associated with survival time in Fawn hooded hypertensive rats. Our data show that the plasma volumes we measured previously were not misrepresented due to variations in PAC.

  14. Plasma digoxin concentrations and urinary excretion during a 'simpler' regimen of infant digitalization.

    PubMed Central

    Savage, M O; Hibble, A G; Pickering, D

    1975-01-01

    We have measured the plasma concentrations in sick neonates and infants being administered digoxin by a safer regimen. In the presence of normal renal function the plasma concentrations appear to be satisfactory. PMID:1103751

  15. Approaches to modeling of plasmas containing impurity at arbitrary concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokar, Mikhail Z.

    2016-02-01

    A new approximate method to modeling of two-ion-species plasmas with arbitrary concentration of impurity is developed. It based on the usage of equations for the electron density and the ratio of the ion species densities as new dependent variables. In contrast to motion equations for the ion mass velocities used normally, those for the new variables have a singularity at the Debye sheath only, as in the case of a one species plasma. Computations for the most critical situations of weak and intermediate friction between species due to Coulomb collisions reproduce nearly perfectly the results got by solving the original equations, however within a calculation time reduced by a factor of 102-103. In the case of strong friction, where ions’ velocities are very close each other, the normal procedure does not converge at all, but the new one, being precise in this limit, operates very reliably. Calculations are done for conditions typical in the linear device PSI-2, with deuterium plasmas seeded by neon impurity. For fixed electron and ion temperatures a critical density of impurity atoms is found, at which the electron density grows without limits. Such a catastrophic behavior does not occur if the electron and ion heat balances are taken into account to calculate the temperature profiles self-consistently.

  16. Midazolam plasma concentration after anesthesia premedication in clinical routine - an observational study : Midazolam plasma concentration after anesthesia premedication.

    PubMed

    Steiner, C; Steurer, M P; Mueller, D; Zueger, M; Dullenkopf, A

    2016-10-24

    Midazolam is commonly used as a pre-anesthesia anxiolytic. It`s elimination may not be fast enough for short procedures. In orally premedicated patients we obtained midazolam plasma concentrations at the end of surgical procedures and compared those to concentrations at anesthesia induction. The study was conducted prospectively with consent of the local ethics committee (Ethikkomission Kanton Thurgau, Switzerland) and carried out with written informed consent of each patient. Female patients aged 20 to 60 years undergoing elective procedures with general anesthesia were included, and were divided in two groups according to the planned surgical time: group S (<30 min) and group L (90-120 min), respectively. All patients received 7.5 mg Midazolam po as premedication. Blood samples were drawn at anesthesia induction, and at the end of surgery. Data were compared with t-test (independent samples; significance level p <0.05). Twenty-five patients per group were included. Four patients were excluded from analysis, since midazolam was not detectable in any samples. Time of premedication to the 1st blood sample was not statistically different between groups, neither were Midazolam plasma levels at this time point (p = 0.94). None of the patients from group L (n = 24), but five patients in group S (n = 22) did have a higher plasma level of Midazolam at the end of the case compared to the beginning. The elimination half-life of oral Midazolam can lead to higher plasma levels at the end of a short procedure compared to those at induction of anesthesia. German Clinical Trials Register (Deutsches Register Klinischer Studien), DRKS00005429 ; date of registration 3(rd) January 2014.

  17. Quality assessment of fluconazole capsules and oral suspensions compounded by pharmacies located in the United States.

    PubMed

    Laporte, Carine M; Cruz-Espindola, Crisanta; Thungrat, Kamoltip; Schick, Anthea E; Lewis, Thomas P; Boothe, Dawn M

    2017-04-01

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate pharmaceutical characteristics (strength or concentration, accuracy, and precision), physical properties, and bacterial contamination of fluconazole compounded products. SAMPLE Fluconazole compounded products (30- and 240-mg capsules; 30- and 100-mg/mL oral suspensions) from 4 US veterinary compounding pharmacies. PROCEDURES Fluconazole compounded products were ordered 3 times from each of 4 pharmacies at 7- or 10-day intervals. Generic fluconazole products (50- and 200-mg tablets; 10- and 40-mg/mL oral suspensions) served as references. Compounded products were evaluated at the time of receipt; suspensions also were evaluated 3 months later and at beyond-use dates. Evaluations included assessments of strength (concentration), accuracy, precision, physical properties, and bacterial contamination. Acceptable accuracy was defined as within ± 10% of the labeled strength (concentration) and acceptable precision as within ± 10%. Fluconazole was quantified by use of high-performance liquid chromatography. RESULTS Physical characteristics of compounded products differed among pharmacies. Aerobic bacterial cultures yielded negative results. Capsules (30 and 240 mg) had acceptable accuracy (median, 96.3%; range, 87.3% to 135.2%) and precision (mean ± SD, 7.4 ± 6.0%). Suspensions (30 and 100 mg/mL) had poor accuracy (median, 73.8%; range, 53.9% to 95.2%) and precision (mean ± SD, 15.0 ± 6.9%). Accuracy and precision were significantly better for capsules than for suspensions. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Fluconazole compounded products, particularly suspensions, differed in pharmaceutical and physical qualities. Studies to evaluate the impact of inconsistent quality on bioavailability or clinical efficacy of compounded fluconazole products are indicated, and each study should include data on the quality of the compounded product evaluated.

  18. Plasma Concentrations of Hepcidin in Anemic Zimbabwean Infants

    PubMed Central

    Mupfudze, Tatenda G.; Stoltzfus, Rebecca J.; Rukobo, Sandra; Moulton, Lawrence H.; Humphrey, Jean H.; Prendergast, Andrew J.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Anemia in infancy is a global public health problem. We evaluated the relative contributions of iron deficiency and inflammation to infant anemia. Methods We measured plasma hepcidin, ferritin, soluble transferrin receptor (sTfR), alpha-1-acid glycoprotein and C-reactive protein (CRP) by ELISA on archived plasma from 289 HIV-unexposed anemic or non-anemic Zimbabwean infants at ages 3mo, 6mo and 12mo. Among anemic infants, we determined the proportion with iron-deficiency anemia (IDA) and anemia of inflammation (AI). We undertook regression analyses of plasma hepcidin and anemia status, adjusting for sex, age and birthweight. Results Anemic infants at 3mo were more stunted and had higher CRP (median 0.45 vs 0.21mg/L; P = 0.037) and hepcidin (median 14.7 vs 9.7ng/mL; P = 0.022) than non-anemic infants, but similar levels of ferritin and sTfR; 11% infants had IDA and 15% had AI. Anemic infants at 6mo had higher hepcidin (median 7.9 vs 4.5ng/mL; P = 0.016) and CRP (median 2.33 vs 0.32mg/L; P<0.001), but lower ferritin (median 13.2 vs 25.1μg/L; P<0.001) than non-anemic infants; 56% infants had IDA and 12% had AI. Anemic infants at 12mo had lower ferritin (median 3.2 vs 22.2μg/L; P<0.001) and hepcidin (median 0.9 vs 1.9ng/mL; P = 0.019), but similar CRP levels; 48% infants had IDA and 8% had AI. Comparing anemic with non-anemic infants, plasma hepcidin was 568% higher, 405% higher and 64% lower at 3mo, 6mo and 12mo, respectively, after adjusting for sex and birthweight (all p<0.01). Plasma hepcidin declined significantly with age among anemic but not non-anemic infants. Girls had 61% higher hepcidin than boys, after adjusting for age, anemia and birthweight (p<0.001). Conclusion Anemia is driven partly by inflammation early in infancy, and by iron deficiency later in infancy, with plasma hepcidin concentrations reflecting the relative contribution of each. However, there is need to better characterize the drivers of hepcidin during infancy in developing

  19. Relationship between trough plasma and epithelial lining fluid concentrations of voriconazole in lung transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Heng, Siow-Chin; Snell, Gregory I; Levvey, Bronwyn; Keating, Dominic; Westall, Glen P; Williams, Trevor J; Whitford, Helen; Nation, Roger L; Slavin, Monica A; Morrissey, Orla; Kong, David C M

    2013-09-01

    Trough (predose) voriconazole concentrations in plasma and pulmonary epithelial lining fluid (ELF) of lung transplant recipients receiving oral voriconazole preemptive treatment were determined. The mean (± standard deviation [SD]) ELF/plasma ratio was 12.5 ± 6.3. A strong positive linear relationship was noted between trough plasma and ELF voriconazole concentrations (r(2) = 0.87), suggesting the feasibility of using trough plasma voriconazole concentration as a surrogate to estimate the corresponding concentration in ELF of lung transplant recipients.

  20. Plasma and salivary amoxicillin concentrations and effect against oral microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Baglie, S; Del Ruenis, A P Bortolo; Motta, R H Lopes; Baglie, R C Catelli; Franco, G C Nobre; Franco, L M; Rosalen, P L; Silva, P; Groppo, F C

    2007-10-01

    Plasma and salivary amoxicillin (AMO) concentrations were quantified following a single oral dose (875 mg) of two formulations of AMO (Amoxicillin-EMS Sigma Pharma and Amoxil BD 875 mg). In addition, the effect of amoxicillin against oral microorganisms was accessed. The open, randomized, two-period crossover study was carried out in 20 volunteers. Saliva and blood samples were collected at 0, 0.5, 1, 2, 4, 8 and 12 h after drug administration, and quantified using HPLC-ESI-MS and HPLC, respectively. Streptococci counts, anaerobe counts and total microorganism counts were obtained. No differences were observed between formulations (p > 0.05) in the plasma and salivary AMO concentrations and the pharmacokinetic parameters (C(max), t(max), AUC(0-8), and AUC(0-infinity)) also showed no statistically significant differences between formulations (p > 0.05). Microorganism counts for the two formulations at all sampling times did not differ (p > 0.05) but all microorganism counts at 60 min post-dose showed a significant decrease (p < 0.05). Amoxicillin was effective in reducing oral microorganism levels up to 12 h post-dose.

  1. Improved medium for fluconazole susceptibility testing of Candida albicans.

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez-Tudela, J L; Martinez-Suarez, J V

    1994-01-01

    We have compared fluconazole susceptibilities of 92 clinical isolates of Candida albicans by broth microdilution in two different media: standard RPMI 1640 (RPMI) and the same medium supplemented with 18 g of glucose per liter (RPMI-glucose). Preparation of media, drugs, and inocula, as well as incubation conditions, followed the preliminary recommendations of the National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards (Villanova, Pa.) antifungal agent working group for broth macrodilution tests with antifungal agents, adapted to microdilution. Microtiter plates were agitated for 5 min before spectrophotometric readings were performed with an automatic plate reader set at 405 mm. The MIC endpoint was defined as an inhibitory concentration calculated from the turbidimetric data as a function of the turbidity in the drug-free control wells. The mean absorbances in the drug-free wells in RPMI and RPMI-glucose were, respectively, 0.38 (41.6% transmission) and 0.99 (10.2% transmission) (P < 0.001; Student's t test). Despite the increased growth in RPMI-glucose, 98.9% of the C. albicans strains tested for fluconazole susceptibility yielded similar MICs (+/- 1 dilution) in both media. Moreover, strains with decreased susceptibility to fluconazole displaying similar MICs in both media are easier to detect in RPMI-glucose because of the greater differences between turbidimetric readings in wells with grown or fluconazole-inhibited cultures. This objective turbidimetric method, with an easy-to-read improved medium (RPMI with glucose), together with previous experience of the National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards antifungal agent subcommittee, could overcome some of the present problems associated with lack of reproducibility of azole susceptibility testing. PMID:8141578

  2. Technical pitfalls in measurement of venous plasma NH3 concentration.

    PubMed

    Gerron, G G; Ansley, J D; Isaacs, J W; Kutner, M H; Rudman, D

    1976-05-01

    Measurement of venous plasma NH3 in normal subjects by the ion-exchange method of Forman [Clin. Chem. 10, 497 (1964)] in a hospital clinical laboratory gave a mean value of 640 mug/liter (range, 300-1320 mug/liter; intraassay, intra-individual, and inter-individual coefficients of variation, 8, 47, and 47%, respectively). The following conditions adversely affect the reproducibility of the test: pollution of laboratory atmosphere and glassware by NH3-containing detergents; smoking by patient or analyst; delay, turbulence, or use of heparin lock in venipuncture; delay or warming of plasma above degrees C before mixing it with resin; and delay in colorimetric analysis of resin eluate. When these sources of error were eliminated, the mean value for normals was reduced to 330 mug/liter, the range was narrowed to 220-470 mug/liter, and the above-mentioned CV's were 5, 16, and 17%, respectively. With the precautions cited, furthermore, the intra-assay and intra-individual CV's for fasting NH3 concentration in cirrhotic patients were similarly reduced. An NH3 tolerance test was done by administering a standard dose of NH4Cl to patients and measuring venous plasma NH3 at 0, 15, 30, 60, and 90 min; the NH3 tolerance was quantified from the area under the curve relating concentration to time (mug - min/liter). As measured in the clinical laboratory, NH3 tolerance of cirrhotic patients showed intra-assay and intra-individual CV's of 50 to 90%. When the tolerance tests were repeated in the same subjects with the laboratory precautions listed above, these CV's were reduced to 8-15%.

  3. Seasonal variation in plasma thyroid hormone concentrations in coastal versus inland populations of juvenile American alligators (Alligator mississippiensis): influence of plasma iodide concentrations.

    PubMed

    Boggs, Ashley S P; Hamlin, Heather J; Lowers, Russell H; Guillette, Louis J

    2011-12-01

    Thyroid hormones, essential for normal growth and health, are associated with changes in temperature, photoperiod, and reproduction. Iodide, a necessary element for thyroid hormone production, varies in diet, and is more abundant in estuarine environments, which could alter thyroid hormone variation. However, associations between thyroid hormone concentrations in animals from marine versus freshwater environments, which could become more pertinent with rising sea levels associated with global climate change, are not well studied. To determine the importance of dietary iodide in seasonal variation of plasma thyroid hormone concentrations, we analyzed seasonal variation of plasma thyroxine (T(4)) and triiodothyronine (T(3)) concentrations in juvenile alligators from an estuarine habitat (Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge; MI) and a freshwater habitat (Lake Woodruff National Wildlife Refuge; LW) and compared these results to plasma inorganic iodide (PII) concentrations. Alligators from MI did not display seasonal variation in plasma T(4), but exhibited a seasonal pattern in plasma T(3) concentrations similar to alligators from LW. Plasma thyroid hormone concentrations were consistently higher at MI than at LW. PII concentrations were correlated with plasma T(4) and T(3) concentrations in juvenile alligators from LW but not MI. The data on plasma T(4) and T(3) concentrations suggest altered iodide metabolism in estuarine alligators. Differences in thyroid hormone concentrations between the populations could be due to differences in dietary iodide, which need to be further evaluated. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. EXTENDED STORAGE OF PLATELET-RICH PLASMA PREPARED PLATELET CONCENTRATES IN PLASMA OR PLASMALYTE

    PubMed Central

    Slichter, Sherrill J.; Bolgiano, Doug; Corson, Jill; Jones, Mary Kay; Christoffel, Todd

    2010-01-01

    Background Using bacterial detection or pathogen reduction, extended platelet storage may be licensed if platelet viability is maintained. FDA's post-storage platelet acceptance guidelines are that autologous stored platelet recoveries and survivals should be ≥66% and ≥58%, respectively, of each donor's fresh platelet data. Study Design And Methods Non-leukoreduced platelet concentrates were prepared from whole blood donations. Autologous platelet concentrates from 62 subjects were stored in 100% plasma (n=44) or 20% plasma/80% Plasmalyte (n=18), an acetate based, non-glucose containing crystalloid solution previously used for platelet storage.(1-3) Fresh platelets were obtained on the day the donor's stored platelets were to be transfused. The fresh and stored platelets were alternately radiolabeled with either 51Chromium or 111Indium, and in vitro measurements were performed on the stored platelets. Results FDA's platelet recovery criterion was met for 7 days of plasma storage, but platelet survivals maintained viability for only 6 days. Plasmalyte stored platelets did not meet either acceptance criteria after 6 days of storage. After 7 days of storage, platelet recoveries averaged 43 ± 4% and 30 ± 4% and survivals 4.1 ± 0.4 days and 2.0 ± 0.2 days for plasma and Plasmalyte-stored platelets, respectively (p=0.03 for recoveries and p<0.001 for survivals). Post-storage platelet recoveries correlated with the commonly-used in vitro platelet quality measurements of HSR and Annexin V binding, while survivals correlated with ESC, morphology score, and pH. Conclusion There is a progressive decrease in recoveries and survivals of plasma stored platelets over time. Platelet viability is better maintained in plasma than Plasmalyte. PMID:20456703

  5. Evaluation of plasma inflammatory cytokine concentrations in racing sled dogs.

    PubMed

    von Pfeil, Dirsko J F; Cummings, Bethany P; Loftus, John P; Levine, Corri B; Mann, Sabine; Downey, Robert L; Griffitts, Caroline; Wakshlag, Joseph J

    2015-12-01

    In human athletes significant changes in cytokine concentrations secondary to exercise have been observed. This prospective study evaluated the effect of a multi-day stage sled dog race on plasma concentrations of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), interleukin-2 (IL-2), interleukin-6 (IL-6), interleukin-8 (IL-8), and interleukin-10 (IL-10). Samples from 20 dogs were harvested prior to and on days 2 and 8 of an 8-day race. Exercise resulted in significantly decreased TNF-α and IL-8 as well as increases of MCP-1, IL-6, and IL-10 concentrations (P-value between 0.01 and < 0.0001 for all parameters). The proportion of values for IL-2 that were below the detection limit increased from 40% on day 0 to 75% on day 2 and decreased on day 8 to 40% (P = 0.04). Racing sled dogs show cytokine-concentration changes that are different from those in humans.

  6. Evaluation of plasma inflammatory cytokine concentrations in racing sled dogs

    PubMed Central

    von Pfeil, Dirsko J. F.; Cummings, Bethany P.; Loftus, John P.; Levine, Corri B.; Mann, Sabine; Downey, Robert L.; Griffitts, Caroline; Wakshlag, Joseph J.

    2015-01-01

    In human athletes significant changes in cytokine concentrations secondary to exercise have been observed. This prospective study evaluated the effect of a multi-day stage sled dog race on plasma concentrations of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), interleukin-2 (IL-2), interleukin-6 (IL-6), interleukin-8 (IL-8), and interleukin-10 (IL-10). Samples from 20 dogs were harvested prior to and on days 2 and 8 of an 8-day race. Exercise resulted in significantly decreased TNF-α and IL-8 as well as increases of MCP-1, IL-6, and IL-10 concentrations (P-value between 0.01 and < 0.0001 for all parameters). The proportion of values for IL-2 that were below the detection limit increased from 40% on day 0 to 75% on day 2 and decreased on day 8 to 40% (P = 0.04). Racing sled dogs show cytokine-concentration changes that are different from those in humans. PMID:26663920

  7. Clinical validation of the analysis of fluconazole in oral fluid in hospitalized children.

    PubMed

    van der Elst, Kim C M; van Alst, Manouche; Lub-de Hooge, Marjolijn N; van Hateren, Kai; Kosterink, Jos G W; Alffenaar, Jan-Willem C; Schölvinck, Elisabeth H

    2014-11-01

    Fluconazole is a first-line antifungal agent for the treatment and prophylaxis of invasive candidiasis in pediatric patients. Pediatric patients are at risk of suboptimal drug exposure, due to developmental changes in gastrointestinal and renal function, metabolic capacity, and volume of distribution. Therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) can therefore be useful to prevent underexposure of fluconazole in children and infants. Children, however, often fear needles and can have difficult vascular access. The purpose of this study was to develop and clinically validate a method of analysis to determine fluconazole in oral fluid in pediatric patients. Twenty-one paired serum and oral fluid samples were obtained from 19 patients and were analyzed using a validated liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS-MS) method after cross-validation between serum and oral fluid. The results were within accepted ranges for accuracy and precision, and samples were stable at room temperature for at least 17 days. A Pearson correlation test for the fluconazole concentrations in serum and oral fluid showed a correlation coefficient of 0.960 (P < 0.01). The mean oral fluid-to-serum concentration ratio was 0.99 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.88 to 1.10) with Bland-Altman analysis. In conclusion, an oral fluid method of analysis was successfully developed and clinically validated for fluconazole in pediatric patients and can be a noninvasive, painless alternative to perform TDM of fluconazole when blood sampling is not possible or desirable. When patients receive prolonged courses of antifungal treatment and use fluconazole at home, this method of analysis can extend the possibilities of TDM for patients at home.

  8. Elevated Plasma Homocysteine Concentration in Opium-Addicted Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Masoomi, Mohammad; Azdaki, Nahid; Shahouzehi, Beydolah

    2015-01-01

    Background Although the triggering role of both opium use and elevated plasma homocysteine level for progressing atherosclerosis and, therefore, appearing coronary heart disease has been clearly determined, no study are available with respect to the relation between these to risk profiles. In the present study and for the first time, we hypothesized that the opium addiction can be potentially correlated with elevated homocysteine concentration. Methods 217 persons (103 opium-addicted and 114 non-addicted) were randomly selected from the Kerman Coronary Artery Disease Risk Study (KERCADRS), Iran, as a population-based, epidemiological prospective study. In all participants, an enzyme immunoassay kit was used to measure homocysteine in serum samples. Findings The serum level of homocysteine was significantly higher in the opium-addicted ones compared to non-addicted individuals (11.49 ± 7.45 vs. 8.02 ± 3.87 μmol/l) (P < 0.001). In this regard, 21.3% of the opium users and only 3.2% of the non-users had homocysteine concentration > 15 μmol/l (P < 0.001). On the other hand, individuals addicted to opiates exhibited significantly elevated odds of having homocysteine level higher than 15 [odds ratio (OR) = 8.244, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 3.117-21.806]. Multivariable linear regression model showed that the opium addiction could strongly predict elevated homocysteine level in the study individuals [beta = 3.524, standard error (SE) = 0.852] (P < 0.001). Conclusion Opium consumption can be strongly accompanied with the elevation of plasma homocysteine concentration, and thus opium addiction can exhibit elevated odds of having hyperhomocysteinemia. PMID:26885351

  9. Plasma Cannabinoid Concentrations during Dronabinol Pharmacotherapy for Cannabis Dependence

    PubMed Central

    Milman, Garry; Bergamaschi, Mateus M.; Lee, Dayong; Mendu, Damodara R.; Barnes, Allan J.; Vandrey, Ryan; Huestis, Marilyn A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Recently, high-dose oral synthetic delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) was shown to alleviate cannabis withdrawal symptoms. The present data describe cannabinoid pharmacokinetics in chronic daily cannabis smokers who received high-dose oral THC pharmacotherapy and later, a smoked cannabis challenge. Methods 11 daily cannabis smokers received 0, 30, 60, or 120 mg/day THC for four 5-day medication sessions, each separated by 9-days of ad-libitum cannabis smoking. On the 5th day, participants were challenged with smoking one 5.9% THC cigarette. Plasma collected on the 1st and 5th days was quantified by GC-GC-MS for THC, 11-hydroxy-THC (11-OH-THC), and 11-nor-9-carboxy-THC (THCCOOH). Linear ranges (ng/mL) were 0.5–100 for THC, 1–50 11-OH-THC, and 0.5–200 THCCOOH. Results During placebo dosing, THC, 11-OH-THC and THCCOOH concentrations consistently decreased, while all cannabinoids increased dose-dependently during active dronabinol administration. THC increase over time was not significant after any dose, 11-OH-THC increased significantly during 60 and 120 mg/day doses, and THCCOOH increased significantly only during the 120 mg/day dose. THC and 11-OH-THC, and THCCOOH concentrations peaked within 0.25 h after cannabis smoking, except after 120 mg/day THC when THCCOOH peaked 0.5 h before smoking. Conclusions The significant withdrawal effects noted during placebo dronabinol administration were supported by significant plasma THC and 11-OH-THC concentration decreases. During active dronabinol dosing, significant dose-dependent increases in THC and 11-OH-THC concentrations support withdrawal symptom suppression. THC concentrations after cannabis smoking were only distinguishable from oral THC doses for 1 h, too short a period to feasibly identify cannabis relapse. THCCOOH/THC ratios were higher 14 h after overnight oral dronabinol abstinence, but cannot distinguish oral THC dosing from smoked cannabis intake. PMID:24067260

  10. Plasma IL-8 concentrations are increased in dogs with spirocercosis.

    PubMed

    Dvir, E; Mellanby, R J; Kjelgaard-Hansen, M; Schoeman, J P

    2012-11-23

    The nematode Spirocerca lupi (S. lupi) induces sarcoma in the dog oesophagus in about 25% of cases. The aim of this study was to compare the differences in the cytokine milieu between dogs with neoplastic (n=29) and non-neoplastic disease (n=49) and age- and gender-matched healthy controls (n=25). We measured IL-2, IL-4, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, IL-18, GM-CSF and MCP-1 in a specific canine multiplex immunoassay kit. Cytokine concentrations were compared between the different groups using the Kruskal-Wallis test followed by Dunn's test. Only IL-8 and IL-18 showed significant differences in their plasma concentration among the three groups. Kruskal-Wallis test revealed a significant (p=0.001) difference in IL-8 concentration between the neoplastic group (634pg/ml), the non-neoplastic (429 pg/ml) and the control groups (150 pg/ml). Post-test analysis revealed a significance difference between the two S. lupi groups and the control group (p<0.01). The highest IL-18 concentration was found in the non-neoplastic group (53 pg/ml), followed by the control group (46 pg/ml) and finally the neoplastic group (33 pg/ml). IL-18 concentrations were significantly higher in the non-neoplastic group than in the neoplastic group (p=0.05). The increased IL-8 in the spirocercosis groups is consistent with the neutrophilic infiltrate in spirocercosis lesions and in those of other inflammatory-induced neoplasias such as Barret's oesophagus and Helicobacter gastritis. IL-18 showed negative regulatory effect in several worm infections and it is possible that it plays the same role in spirocercosis, allowing the worm to evade the host response and to induce neoplastic transformation. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Antibiotic aerosolization: tissue and plasma oxytetracycline concentrations in turkey poults.

    PubMed

    Van Alstine, W G; Dyer, D C

    1985-01-01

    Oxytetracycline hydrochloride (OTC) was delivered by aerosol to healthy 3-week-old turkeys. Trachea, lung, and plasma were evaluated for OTC levels at 1, 4, 8, 12, 24, and 48 hours after aerosol exposure. In Expt. 1, 15 poults in a modified Horsfall unit were exposed to 1 g OTC/m3 of air using a DeVilbiss ultrasonic nebulizer. In Expt. 2, 25,000 poults in a commercial confinement unit were exposed to 0.075 g of OTC/m3 of air using a Fogmaster fogger. In each case, initially high tracheal and lung OTC concentrations were obtained. OTC levels in the trachea fell to less than 1 microgram/g between 4 and 8 hours postexposure. Plasma OTC levels remained low throughout both experiments. Oxytetracycline was still detectable in room air 60 min after aerosol exposure and before ventilation was restored. This method of administration may have promise for use in respiratory infections, but additional studies are needed to further define the use of aerosol therapy in poultry production units.

  12. [Concentration of elements in plasma of patients with essential hypertension].

    PubMed

    Goch, Aleksander

    2005-10-01

    Disturbances in macro- and microelements composition may play a significant role in the development of essential hypertension. The aim of the study was to estimate main and trace elements concentration in plasma of hypertensive patients. The study involved 150 subjects, aged 33-60 years, who were allotted into 2 groups: I--50 clinically healthy subjects (controls), II--100 patients with arterial hypertension. Age and sex ratio were similar in the examined groups. Those subjected to the study were not administered any drugs at least 3 months prior to the determination of macro- and microelements. Determinations of trace elements Ca, F, Na, K, Mg, Fe, Zn, Cu, Ni, Mo, Al, Cd, Fb, Mu, Se, Cr, Co, Li, V, B, Ba, were performed with atomic emission spectrometer with plasmic excitation (ICP MS Philips PU). In group II in comparison to group I (controls) higher values of Fe, Pb, Al, Cd, Co, B i Ba were observed, as well as higher Zn/Cu ratio; but lower values of Cu and lower Ca/Pb, Ca/Al, Zn/Fe, Se/Fe, Zn/Al, Zn/Cd, Se/Pb, Se/Al, Se/Cd ratio. Increase of prooxidative and decrease,of antioxidative elements in plasma may significantly contribute to the essential hypertension pathogenesis probably through oxidative stress development.

  13. Impact of Prior Inappropriate Fluconazole Dosing on Isolation of Fluconazole-Nonsusceptible Candida Species in Hospitalized Patients with Candidemia

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Dhara N.; Yau, Raymond; Lasco, Todd M.; Weston, Jaye; Salazar, Miguel; Palmer, Hannah R.

    2012-01-01

    Prior use of fluconazole is a modifiable risk factor for the isolation of fluconazole-nonsusceptible Candida species. Optimization of the use of fluconazole by appropriate dose or duration may be able to minimize the risk of resistance. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of prior fluconazole therapy, including the dose and duration, on fluconazole susceptibility among Candida species isolated from hospitalized patients with candidemia. A retrospective cohort study of hospitalized patients with a first occurrence of nosocomial candidemia, from 2006 to 2009, was carried out. The relationships between the initial dose and duration of prior fluconazole therapy and the isolation of fluconazole-nonsusceptible Candida species were assessed. An initial fluconazole dose greater than 2 mg/kg and less than 6 mg/kg of body weight was considered suboptimal. A total of 177 patients were identified, of whom 133 patients aged 61 ± 16 years (56% male, 51% Caucasian, 51% with an APACHE II score of ≥15) had candidemia more than 2 days after the hospital admission day. Nine of 107 (8%) patients with fluconazole-susceptible Candida species and 9 of 26 (35%) patients with fluconazole-nonsusceptible Candida species had prior fluconazole exposure (risk ratio [RR], 3.03; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 1.57 to 5.86; P, 0.0022). Preexposure with an initial dose of fluconazole greater than 2 mg/kg and less than 6 mg/kg occurred in 3 of 9 (33%) and 8 of 9 (89%) patients with fluconazole-susceptible and fluconazole-nonsusceptible Candida species, respectively (P, 0.0498). We conclude that patients with candidemia due to fluconazole-nonsusceptible Candida species were more likely to have received prior fluconazole therapy. Suboptimal initial dosing of prior fluconazole therapy was associated with candidemia with fluconazole-nonsusceptible Candida species. PMID:22411611

  14. Decrease in pyridoxal-5'-phosphate concentration and increase in pyridoxal concentration in rat plasma by 4'-O-methylpyridoxine administration.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Daisuke; Yoshimura, Teruki; Johno, Atsushi; Ishikawa, Mika; Sasaki, Keiko; Wada, Keiji

    2015-07-01

    Food poisoning from Ginkgo biloba seeds can cause epilepsy because of a decrease in γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) concentrations in the brain. We previously demonstrated that 4'-O-methylpyridoxine (MPN) is responsible for this observed toxicity of G biloba seeds; however, the mechanism for the decrease in GABA and plasma concentration profile of MPN has not been clarified. Our hypothesis is that MPN induces a decrease in vitamin B6 concentrations, resulting in a decrease in GABA concentration. This study aimed to characterize the plasma concentration profile of MPN and intrinsic vitamin B6 concentrations (pyridoxal [PL], PL-5'-phosphate [PLP], and 4-pyridoxic acid) using a rat model. Plasma concentrations of B6 vitamers after intravenous MPN administration (5 mg/kg) were determined using high-performance liquid chromatography with a fluorescence detector. The half-life of MPN (0.91 ± 0.05 hours) was shorter in rats than the previously reported value in humans. We found a significant decrease in the plasma concentration of PLP, an active form of vitamin B6, after MPN administration. We also observed an increase in plasma PL and 4-pyridoxic acid concentrations; the increase in PL concentration may be caused by either metabolism of MPN to PL or by MPN-mediated inhibition of PL kinase. The present study is the first in vivo study showing relatively rapid elimination of MPN in rats and a decrease in plasma PLP concentration caused by MPN. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Effect of fluconazole on viability of Candida albicans over extended periods of time.

    PubMed Central

    Sohnle, P G; Hahn, B L; Erdmann, M D

    1996-01-01

    The treatment of chronic mycoses may expose the infecting organisms to antimicrobial agents for extended periods of time. It is possible that an azole antifungal drug such as fluconazole, with primarily fungistatic activity in standard in vitro susceptibility tests, might be able to damage the fungal cells and reduce their viability over prolonged incubations under nonproliferating conditions. To test this possibility, Candida albicans yeast cells were exposed to various concentrations of fluconazole in RPMI 1640 tissue culture medium for 4 h at 37 degrees C, washed free of the drug, and then incubated at 37 degrees C for a 28-day period; enumeration of the remaining CFU at various times during this period revealed no increased loss of viability for the fluconazole-exposed organisms. However, when fluconazole was added to the organisms maintained in distilled water (with or without pretreatment with the drug), a marked reduction of viability was found. At 14 days of incubation with two strains of C. albicans, negative cultures were found for 7 of 10 and 10 of 11 samples, respectively, containing 1.0 microgram of fluconazole per ml versus 0 of 10 and 1 of 11 control samples (P of < 0.01 and 0.001, respectively). The effect of fluconazole on fungal viability under these conditions became noticeable at approximately 7 days and was greater when the samples were incubated at 37 degrees C rather than 25 degrees C. These findings suggest that fluconazole may have fungicidal effects on fungal cells during prolonged exposures under conditions in which the organisms are prevented from proliferating by lack of nutrients. PMID:8913476

  16. The in vitro and in vivo efficacy of fluconazole in combination with farnesol against Candida albicans isolates using a murine vulvovaginitis model.

    PubMed

    Bozó, Aliz; Domán, Marianna; Majoros, László; Kardos, Gábor; Varga, István; Kovács, Renátó

    2016-11-01

    Farnesol is a quorum-sensing molecule that inhibits biofilm formation in Candida albicans. Previous in vitro data suggest that, in combination with certain antifungals, farnesol may have an adjuvant anti-biofilm agent. However, the in vivo efficacy of farnesol is very questionable. Therefore, the in vitro and in vivo activity of fluconazole combined with farnesol was evaluated against C. albicans biofilms using fractional inhibitory concentration index (FICI) determination, time-kill experiments and a murine vulvovaginitis model. The median biofilm MICs of fluconazole-sensitive C. albicans isolates ranged between 4 -> 512 mg/L and 150-300 μM for fluconazole and farnesol, respectively. These values were 512 -> 512 mg/L and > 300 μM for fluconazole-resistant clinical isolates. Farnesol decreased the median MICs of fluconazole by 2-64-fold for biofilms. Based on FICI, synergistic interaction was observed only in the case of the sessile SC5314 reference strain (FICIs: 0.16-0.27). In time-kill studies, only the 512 mg/L fluconazole and 512 mg/L fluconazole + 75 μM farnesol reduced biofilm mass significantly at each time point in the case of all isolates. The combination reduced the metabolic activity of biofilms for all isolates in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. Our findings revealed that farnesol alone was not protective in a murine vulvovaginitis model. Farnesol was not beneficial in combination with fluconazole for fluconazole-susceptible isolates, but partially increased fluconazole activity against one fluconazole-resistant isolate, but not the other one.

  17. In vitro activity of essential oils extracted from plants used as spices against fluconazole-resistant and fluconazole-susceptible Candida spp.

    PubMed

    Pozzatti, Patrícia; Scheid, Liliane Alves; Spader, Tatiana Borba; Atayde, Margareth Linde; Santurio, Janio Morais; Alves, Sydney Hartz

    2008-11-01

    In the present study, the antifungal activity of selected essential oils obtained from plants used as spices was evaluated against both fluconazole-resistant and fluconazole-susceptible Candida spp. The Candida species studied were Candida albicans, Candida dubliniensis, Candida tropicalis, Candida glabrata, and Candida krusei. For comparison purposes, they were arranged in groups as C. albicans, C. dubliniensis, and Candida non-albicans. The essential oils were obtained from Cinnamomum zeylanicum Breyn, Lippia graveolens HBK, Ocimum basilicum L., Origanum vulgare L., Rosmarinus officinalis L., Salvia officinalis L., Thymus vulgaris L., and Zingiber officinale. The susceptibility tests were based on the M27-A2 methodology. The chemical composition of the essential oils was obtained by gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy and by retention indices. The results showed that cinnamon, Mexican oregano, oregano, thyme, and ginger essential oils have different levels of antifungal activity. Oregano and ginger essential oils were found to be the most and the least efficient, respectively. The main finding was that the susceptibilities of fluconazole-resistant C. albicans, C. dubliniensis, and Candida non-albicans to Mexican oregano, oregano, thyme, and ginger essential oils were higher than those of the fluconazole-susceptible yeasts (P<0.05). In contrast, fluconazole-resistant C. albicans and Candida non-albicans were less susceptible to cinnamon essential oil than their fluconazole-susceptible counterparts (P<0.05). A relationship between the yeasts' susceptibilities and the chemical composition of the essential oils studied was apparent when these 2 parameters were compared. Finally, basil, rosemary, and sage essential oils did not show antifungal activity against Candida isolates at the tested concentrations.

  18. The effect of concurrent aspirin upon plasma concentrations of tenoxicam.

    PubMed Central

    Day, R O; Paull, P D; Lam, S; Swanson, B R; Williams, K M; Wade, D N

    1988-01-01

    1. The effect of chronic, high-dose aspirin therapy upon the disposition of a single dose and multiple doses of tenoxicam was examined in normal volunteers. 2. Aspirin caused a 24% drop in the t1/2 (P less than 0.005), a 49% rise in the volume of distribution (P less than 0.0003) and a 98% increase in the clearance (P less than 0.0001) of tenoxicam after a single dose of the tenoxicam. 3. Steady-state concentrations of tenoxicam decreased significantly from 10.4 +/- 1.5 to 4.5 +/- 1.6 micrograms ml-1 in the presence of chronic, high-dose aspirin treatment. 4. Tenoxicam percentage free measured in plasma from a normal volunteer was 0.56 +/- 0.05% over the tenoxicam concentration range 1-20 micrograms ml-1 and rose to 1.24 +/- 0.07% in the presence of aspirin 150 micrograms ml-1. 5. The effect of aspirin upon the disposition of tenoxicam was consistent with a competitive protein binding interaction. PMID:3190995

  19. [Disseminated histoplasmosis treated by boluses of fluconazole].

    PubMed

    Mandengue Ebenye, C; Takuefou Mfangam, B; Nouédoui, C; Atangana, P J A

    2015-01-01

    We report a case in which an HIV-infected man was cured of disseminated histoplasmosis (Histoplasma capsulatum var duboisii) after treatment by high-dose fluconazole (1,600 mg taken four times daily) for 2 months, combined with active antiretroviral therapy. The choice of fluconazole at this dosage was motivated by its availability as a generic and thus inexpensive medication, the patient's precarious status, and his critical clinical condition. At the end of the second month of treatment, the patient chose to stop the fluconazole, which he could no longer afford, while continuing the antiretroviral treatment, which was free. The clinical and laboratory improvement observed from the first week has continued to progress for more than 8 months after fluconazole treatment stopped. This single case needs - and deserves - to be confirmed in a series of patients. Nonetheless it makes it possible to envision fluconazole as a low-cost and efficacious antifungal agent for the treatment of disseminated histoplasmosis in AIDS patients in sub-Saharan Africa.

  20. Dolutegravir and elvitegravir plasma concentrations following cessation of drug intake.

    PubMed

    Elliot, Emilie; Amara, Alieu; Jackson, Akil; Moyle, Graeme; Else, Laura; Khoo, Saye; Back, David; Owen, Andrew; Boffito, Marta

    2016-04-01

    To evaluate dolutegravir and elvitegravir/cobicistat pharmacokinetics in HIV-negative volunteers up to 10 days after drug cessation. Healthy volunteers received 50 mg of dolutegravir once-daily for 10 days, then underwent a 9 day wash-out period, and then received elvitegravir/cobicistat as part of Stribild(®) (245 mg of tenofovir, 200 mg of emtricitabine, 150 mg of elvitegravir and 150 mg of cobicistat) for 10 days. Serial pharmacokinetic (PK) sampling occurred prior to the final dose of each course and at regular intervals for up to 216 h (10 days) after drug cessation. Concentrations were determined by LC-MS/MS, and PK parameters were illustrated as geometric mean and 90% CI. Seventeen volunteers completed the study. For dolutegravir, plasma terminal elimination t1/2 to the last measurable concentration (within 216 h) was longer than its t1/2 within the dosing interval (0-24 h): 14.3 h (12.9-15.7 h) versus 23.1 h (19.7-26.6 h); conversely, the terminal elimination t1/2 for elvitegravir was lower than its t1/2 within the dosing interval (0-24 h): 10.8 h (9.7-13.0 h) versus 5.2 h (4.7-6.1 h). Dolutegravir concentrations were above the protein-adjusted (PA) IC90 (64 ng/mL) in 100% of subjects after 36 and 48 h and in 94% after 60 and 72 h. All subjects had detectable dolutegravir concentrations at 96 h, a mean of 23.5% above the IC90. Elvitegravir concentrations were above the PA IC95 (45 ng/mL) in 100% of subjects at 24 h, 65% at 36 h but 0% after 48 h. Our data show marked differences in the elimination rates of dolutegravir and elvitegravir following treatment interruption, which is likely to impact the extent to which drug doses can be delayed or missed. They suggest that clinical differences may emerge in patients who have suboptimal adherence. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Comparison between Fluconazole with Oral Protexin Combination and Fluconazole in the Treatment of Vulvovaginal Candidiasis

    PubMed Central

    Nouraei, S.; Amir Ali Akbari, S.; Jorjani, M.; Alavi Majd, H.; Afrakhteh, M.; Ghafoorian, A.; Tafazzoli Harandi, H.

    2012-01-01

    Background. According to the limited studies reporting new treatments for vulvovaginal candidiasis, this study was designed to compare the combination of fluconazole and oral protexin with fluconazole in the treatment of vulvovaginal candidiasis. Methods. A double-blind clinical trial was conducted, involving 90 women who were referred to the gynecology clinic. Vulvovaginal candidiasis was diagnosed with itching, cheesy vaginal discharge, and any one of the following: dysuria, pH < 4.5, dyspareunia, vulvar erythema, or vulvar edema and if branched hyphae and Candida buds were visible after addition of KOH 10% in the culture and the result of cultivation in Sabouraud's dextrose agar medium was positive. Patients were randomly classified into two groups Absence of discharge, itching, and negative culture results 5–7 days after completion of treatment indicated treatment success. Data in this study were analyzed using the SPSS version 17.0 software. Results. The combinations, fluconazole-oral protexin and fluconazole-placebo, were equally effective in reduction of complaints and symptoms, but fluconazole-oral protexin combination elicited a better therapeutic response (χ2 = 0.01, P = 6.7). In addition, fluconazole-oral protexin combination treatment demonstrated better recovery time (t = −2.04, P = 0.04). Conclusion. This study demonstrated that complementary treatment with probiotic Lactobacillus increased the efficacy of fluconazole in treatment of vulvovaginal candidiasis. Further research is recommended. PMID:23119175

  2. Seasonal variation in plasma thyroxine concentrations in juvenile alligators (Alligators mississippiensis) from three Florida Lakes.

    PubMed

    Bermudez, Dieldrich S; Milnes, Matthew R; Bryan, Teresa A; Gunderson, Mark P; Tubbs, Christopher; Woodward, Allan R; Guillette, Louis J

    2005-05-01

    Circulating concentrations of thyroxine (T(4)) vary seasonally in many vertebrates. This study examined the seasonal variation in plasma concentrations of T(4) in juvenile American alligators (Alligator mississippiensis) from three populations in central Florida, USA. One site, Lake Woodruff National Wildlife Refuge, is considered a reference site whereas the other two lakes, Lake Apopka and Orange Lake, are significantly impacted by human activity. Juvenile American alligators ranging from 75-150 cm in total length were hand-captured at night from November 2000-April 2002. Plasma thyroxine concentrations were analyzed using a radioimmunoassay (RIA) previously validated for alligator plasma. Juvenile American alligators display seasonal variation in circulating T(4) concentrations. Plasma T(4) concentrations decrease from August/September to November and then begin a slow rise until April, at which point they plateau. Sex of juveniles influenced plasma concentrations of T(4) in some months but did not appear to alter the pattern in seasonal variation. The pattern we observed in plasma T(4) concentrations is not directly related to an environmental factor such as ambient temperature but is similar to that seen in plasma sex steroid concentrations during the reproductive cycle of adult alligators. Although the pattern and plasma concentration of T(4) exhibits significant variation among the three lakes studied, the pattern in seasonal variation appears similar. Comparing the seasonal pattern in plasma T(4) with plasma concentrations of sex steroids (testosterone and estradiol-17beta) or corticosterone could provide important information on the peripubescent life stage of the American alligator.

  3. Copper deficiency in sheep: an assessment of relationship between concentrations of copper in serum and plasma.

    PubMed

    Laven, Ra; Smith, Sl

    2008-12-01

    To assess the relationship between concentrations of copper in serum and plasma in sheep. Concentrations of Cu were measured in paired serum and heparinised plasma samples collected from 110 sheep in nine flocks. Linear regression was used to evaluate whether flock or gender had a significant effect on the association between concentrations of Cu in serum and plasma. The individual results for concentrations of Cu in serum were then compared with those from plasma, using correlation and limits of agreement plotting. Concentrations of Cu in serum ranged from 7.3 to 22 (mean 14.0) micromol/L, while concentrations in plasma ranged from 9 to 27 (mean 16.3) micromol/L. On average, concentrations of Cu in serum were 2.3 micromol/L lower than in plasma. Over the range of values seen in this study, concentrations of Cu in plasma and serum were significantly correlated (r=0.89), and mean concentrations in serum were 87% of those in plasma. There was no effect of flock or gender on the relationship between concentrations of Cu in serum and plasma. Despite the significant correlation, there was marked variability between individual samples in the proportion of Cu that was lost during clotting, with the 95% limits of agreement for serum Cu ranging from 70 to 104% of the plasma concentration. As in cattle, the individual variability in the loss of Cu during clotting in sheep is too great for concentration of Cu in serum to be used as a substitute for that in plasma. When assessing the blood Cu pool as part of the diagnosis of Cu-responsive disease in sheep, the concentration of Cu in plasma should be measured in preference to that of serum. We suggest that a range of 4.5 to 9 micromol/L in plasma be used to define marginal Cu status in sheep.

  4. Combination of CuO nanoparticles and fluconazole: preparation, characterization, and antifungal activity against Candida albicans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weitz, Iris S.; Maoz, Michal; Panitz, Daniel; Eichler, Sigal; Segal, Ester

    2015-08-01

    Combination therapy becomes an important strategy in the management of invasive fungal infections and emergence of resistant fungi mutants. In this work, we examine the combination of copper oxide (CuO) nanoparticles (NPs) with fluconazole as potential treatment against the pathogenic fungi, Candida albicans. CuO NPs ( 7 nm in size) were synthesized with acetate ligands assembled on their surface, as shown by both thermal gravimetric analysis and FTIR spectroscopy. Unlike the commercial CuO (both bulk and 50 nm particles), that are poorly dispersed in water, the interaction with water allows the fine dispersion of the coated CuO NPs and their excellent colloidal stability. The addition of fluconazole to the aqueous CuO dispersion induced spontaneous self-assembly of the NPs into linear pearl-like chains network, shown by cryogenic transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM). The antifungal activity of the CuO NPs and their combination with fluconazole (fluconazole-CuO NPs) was studied against C. albicans. The best MIC values were obtained at concentrations as low as 0.2 and 0.3 mg/mL, respectively. The results suggest that fluconazole-CuO NPs can provide a potential alternative treatment for C. albicans infections.

  5. Association of plasma concentration of 4β-hydroxycholesterol with CYP3A5 polymorphism and plasma concentration of indoxyl sulfate in stable kidney transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Yosuke; Itoh, Hiroki; Fujioka, Takashi; Sato, Fuminori; Kawasaki, Kanako; Sato, Yukie; Sato, Yuhki; Ohno, Keiko; Mimata, Hiromitsu; Kishino, Satoshi

    2014-01-01

    Several studies have shown that renal failure decreases CYP3A activity and that uremic toxins may play a role via transcriptional or translational modifications of cytochrome P450 (P450) enzymes and direct inhibition of P450-mediated metabolism. In this study, we evaluated the relationship between CYP3A activity (using plasma concentration of 4β-hydroxycholesterol as a biomarker) and clinical characteristics including plasma concentrations of indoxyl sulfate (3-INDS) and indole-3-acetic acid (3-IAA) in stable kidney transplant recipients. Forty-five Japanese kidney transplant recipients who underwent transplantation more than 90 days prior to the study were included. Morning blood samples were collected and plasma concentrations of 4β-hydroxycholesterol, 3-INDS, and 3-IAA were measured. Plasma concentrations of 4β-hydroxycholesterol were 57.1 ± 11.2, 42.1 ± 11.8, and 34.5 ± 7.3 ng/ml in recipients with CYP3A5*1/*1 (n = 5), *1/*3 (n = 15), and *3/*3 (n = 25) genotypes, respectively, with significant differences between three genotypes. A significant correlation was observed between plasma concentrations of 4β-hydroxycholesterol and 3-INDS but not 3-IAA. Multiple regression analysis identified the number of CYP3A5*3 alleles in genotype, plasma concentration of 3-INDS, and body weight as independent variables associated with plasma concentration of 4β-hydroxycholesterol. In conclusion, these results suggest that CYP3A5 polymorphism and plasma concentration of 3-INDS may account for the interindividual variability of CYP3A activity, and that plasma concentration of 3-INDS may partially explain the gap in CYP3A activity that cannot be explained by genetic contribution in patients with renal failure.

  6. Cutaneous fixed drug eruption to fluconazole.

    PubMed

    Walling, Hobart W; Swick, Brian L

    2010-08-01

    Fixed drug eruption (FDE) is an uncommon medication-induced cutaneous reaction. A case of fluconazole-induced FDE is described. A 64-year-old woman presented with eight ovoid hyperpigmented patches on the arms, palm and lower leg that had recurred multiple times at the identical sites at seemingly random intervals over the prior six months. The clinicopathologic diagnosis strongly favored FDE, though the culprit medication remained elusive. Further evaluation and oral rechallenge confirmed the diagnosis of FDE to fluconazole. The patient had not related the eruption to this medication due to the short courses of therapy and prior use without incident. FDE to fluconazole has only been rarely reported in the literature. The presentation and evaluation of FDE is reviewed.

  7. Involvement of phenobarbital and SKF 525A in the hepatotoxicity of antifungal drugs itraconazole and fluconazole in rats.

    PubMed

    Somchit, N; Wong, C W; Zuraini, A; Ahmad Bustamam, A; Hasiah, A H; Khairi, H M; Sulaiman, M R; Israf, D A

    2006-01-01

    Itraconazole and fluconazole are potent wide spectrum antifungal drugs. Both of these drugs induce hepatotoxicity clinically. The mechanism underlying the hepatotoxicity is unknown. The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of phenobarbital (PB), an inducer of cytochrome P450 (CYP), and SKF 525A, an inhibitor of CYP, in the mechanism of hepatotoxicity induced by these two drugs in vivo. Rats were pretreated with PB (75 mg/kg for 4 days) prior to itraconazole or fluconazole dosing (20 and 200 mg/kg for 4 days). In the inhibition study, for 4 consecutive days, rats were pretreated with SKF 525A (50 mg/kg) or saline followed by itraconazole or fluconazole (20 and 200 mg/kg) Dose-dependent increases in plasma alanine aminotransferase (ALT), gamma-glutamyl transferase (gamma-GT), and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activities and in liver weight were detected in rats receiving itraconazole treatment. Interestingly, pretreatment with PB prior to itraconazole reduced the ALT and gamma-GT activities and the liver weight of rats. No changes were observed in rats treated with fluconazole. Pretreatment with SKF 525A induced more severe hepatotoxicity for both itraconazole and fluconazole. CYP 3A activity was inhibited dose-dependently by itraconazole treatment. Itraconazole had no effects on the activity of CYP 1A and 2E. Fluconazole potently inhibited all three isoenzymes of CYP. PB plays a role in hepatoprotection to itraconazole-induced but not fluconazole-induced hepatotoxicity. SKF 525A enhanced the hepatotoxicity of both antifungal drugs in vivo. Therefore, it can be concluded that inhibition of CYP may play a key role in the mechanism of hepatotoxicity induced by itraconazole and fluconazole.

  8. Doping concentration evaluation using plasma propagation models in plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII) system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Dushyant; Prasad, B.; George, P. J.

    2004-01-01

    Plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII) is a high dose-rate implantation process technique in the area of semiconductor device fabrication used to fabricate various device structures like shallow junction, silicon on insulators and in the processing of flat panel display materials, trench doping, etc. The basic mechanism of ions source and their acceleration in PIII technique is different from that of the conventional ion-implantation. In this, the target is immersed in a plasma source and the implantation is done by accelerating the ions with a negative pulse bias voltage, applied to the target. The dynamics of ion transport and the implantation is different from line-of-sight implantation. In this paper, the doping of individual ions (Ar, He and N), in a collisionless PIII system is studied analytically when a negative pulse of 10 kV is applied to the target. The net ion doping concentration in one pulse duration has also been computed during the propagation of plasma sheaths.

  9. Amino acid substitution in Cryptococcus neoformans lanosterol 14-α-demethylase involved in fluconazole resistance in clinical isolates.

    PubMed

    Bosco-Borgeat, María E; Mazza, Mariana; Taverna, Constanza G; Córdoba, Susana; Murisengo, Omar A; Vivot, Walter; Davel, Graciela

    2016-01-01

    The molecular basis of fluconazole resistance in Cryptococcus neoformans has been poorly studied. A common azole resistance mechanism in Candida species is the acquisition of point mutations in the ERG11 gene encoding the enzyme lanosterol 14-α-demethylase, target of the azole class of drugs. In C. neoformans only two mutations were described in this gene. In order to evaluate other mutations that could be implicated in fluconazole resistance in C. neoformans we studied the genomic sequence of the ERG11 gene in 11 clinical isolates with minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) values to fluconazole of ≥16μg/ml. The sequencing revealed the G1855A mutation in 3 isolates, resulting in the enzyme amino acid substitution G484S. These strains were isolated from two fluconazole-treated patients. This mutation would not intervene in the susceptibility to itraconazole and voriconazole.

  10. Antifungal activity of Rubus chingii extract combined with fluconazole against fluconazole-resistant Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Han, Bing; Chen, Jia; Yu, Yi-qun; Cao, Yong-bing; Jiang, Yuan-ying

    2016-02-01

    This study aimed to investigate the antifungal activity of Rubus chingii extract in combination with fluconazole (FLC) against FLC-resistant Candida albicans 100 in vitro. A R. chingii extract and FLC-resistant C. albicans fungus suspension were prepared. The minimum inhibitory concentration and fractional inhibitory concentration index of R. chingii extract combined with FLC against C. albicans were determined, after which growth curves for C. albicans treated with R. chingii extract, FLC alone and a combination of these preparations were constructed. Additionally, the mechanisms of drug combination against C. albicans were explored by flow cytometry, gas chromatographic mass spectrometry and drug efflux pump function detection. R. chingii extract combined with FLC showed significant synergy. Flow cytometry suggested that C. albicans cells mainly arrest in G1 and S phases when they have been treated with the drug combination. The drug combination resulted in a marked decrease in the ergosterol content of the cell membrane. Additionally, efflux of Rhodamine 6G decreased with increasing concentrations of R. chingii extract. R. chingii extract combined with FLC has antifungal activity against FLC-resistant C. albicans. © 2016 The Societies and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  11. Comparison between efficacy of allicin and fluconazole against Candida albicans in vitro and in a systemic candidiasis mouse model.

    PubMed

    Khodavandi, Alireza; Alizadeh, Fahimeh; Harmal, Nabil S; Sidik, Shiran M; Othman, Fauziah; Sekawi, Zamberi; Jahromi, Mohammad Ali Farboodniay; Ng, Kee-Peng; Chong, Pei Pei

    2011-02-01

    The efficacy of allicin compared with fluconazole in alleviating systemic Candida albicans infections was evaluated both in vitro and in vivo through a systemic candidiasis mouse model. Determination of in vitro minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) for different C. albicans isolates revealed that both allicin and fluconazole showed different MICs that ranged from 0.05 to 12.5 μg mL(-1) and 0.25 to 16 μg mL(-1) , respectively. A time-kill study showed a significant effect of allicin (P<0.01) against C. albicans, comparable to that of fluconazole. Scanning electron microscopy observation revealed that, similar to fluconazole, allicin produced structural destruction of C. albicans cell surface at low MIC and lysis or puncture at high MIC concentrations. Treatment of BALB/c mice systemically infected with C. albicans showed that although the allicin treatment (at 5 mg kg(-1) day(-1) ) was slightly less efficacious than fluconazole treatment in terms of the fungal load reduction and host survival time, it was still effective against C. albicans in terms of mean survival time, which increased from 8.4 to 15.8 days. These results demonstrate the efficacy of anticandidal effects of allicin both in vitro and in an animal model of candidiasis and affirm the potential of allicin as an adjuvant therapy to fluconazole.

  12. Susceptibility profile of vaginal isolates of Candida albicans prior to and following fluconazole introduction - impact of two decades.

    PubMed

    Bulik, C C; Sobel, J D; Nailor, M D

    2011-01-01

    Current treatment options for vulvovaginal candidiasis due to Candida albicans include over-the-counter and prescription antifungal agents. Fluconazole has been used extensively with an unknown impact on susceptibility. To investigate antifungal susceptibility trends in clinical vaginal isolates of C. albicans from 1986 to 2008, microdilution susceptibility was performed on randomly selected single isolates. Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) were determined for: fluconazole, clotrimazole, miconazole, ketoconazole, itraconazole, voriconazole, flucytosine and amphotericin B. The MIC(90) for each drug was then calculated for the time periods: 1986-1989, 1992-1996 and 2005-2007. A total of 250 C. albicans vaginal isolates were included. The MIC(90) (mcg ml(-1) ) for fluconazole was 0.25, 0.5 and 0.5 mcg ml(-1) for each grouping, respectively. The corresponding MIC(90) for flucytosine was 1, 2 and 8 mcg ml(-1) , respectively. The MIC(90) for the remaining agents remained unchanged across time periods mentioned. Of note, the percentage of isolates with MIC ≥1 and ≥2 mcg ml(-1) for fluconazole increased from 3% to 9% over the study period. Although the C. albicans MIC(90) to fluconazole in vaginal isolates has not shown a clinically significant increase since 1986, there is an increasing number of isolates with elevated MICs. The implications of this increase are unknown, but given the achievable vaginal concentrations of fluconazole, reduced susceptibility may have clinical relevance.

  13. Intracutaneous Distributions of Fluconazole, Itraconazole, and Griseofulvin in Guinea Pigs and Binding to Human Stratum Corneum

    PubMed Central

    Sobue, Satoshi; Sekiguchi, Kaneo; Nabeshima, Toshitaka

    2004-01-01

    We have compared the distribution of fluconazole (FLC) with that of itraconazole (ITC) and griseofulvin (GRF) in the abdominal skin tissues after a single oral dose was administered to guinea pigs. The FLC concentrations in the stratum corneum reached a peak at 2 h after administration and were similar to those of ITC and higher than those of GRF in spite of the administration of a lower dose. GRF was eliminated from the stratum corneum faster than FLC and ITC. The FLC concentrations were also remarkably higher than those of ITC and GRF in the epidermis-cutis but lower in the subcutaneous fatty tissue. The distribution characteristics of each drug result from differences in their physicochemical properties. Following the administration of multiple doses, the FLC concentrations in the stratum corneum were highest in the abdominal skin tissues; those at 24 h after each administration increased gradually and were maintained at a level more than 10 times higher than that of the plasma concentrations. The FLC concentrations in the planta pedis stratum corneum and in the nail showed good dose proportionality and obvious accumulation and were 60 and 40 times as high as that in plasma on day 14. The extent of binding of FLC to human corneous keratin in vitro was about 10%, which is lower than those of ITC (94 to 97%) and GRF (36 to 38%). FLC, unlike ITC, therefore, is presumed to exist in the stratum corneum at high concentrations in an active nonbinding form. These excellent intracutaneous pharmacokinetic properties of FLC probably account in large part for the in vivo efficacy of FLC. PMID:14693542

  14. Scope and frequency of fluconazole trailing assessed using EUCAST in invasive Candida spp. isolates.

    PubMed

    Marcos-Zambrano, Laura Judith; Escribano, Pilar; Sánchez-Carrillo, Carlos; Bouza, Emilio; Guinea, Jesús

    2016-10-01

    Trailing is a well-known phenomenon that is defined as reduced but persistent visible growth of Candida spp. at fluconazole concentrations above the MIC. Trailing is commonly detected using the CLSI M27-A3 method, although little is known about its frequency when investigated with EUCAST. We assessed the frequency and scope of fluconazole trailing after using EUCAST EDef 7.2. against a large number of Candida spp. isolates from patients with candidemia. We studied 639 fluconazole-susceptible non-krusei Candida spp. isolates from 570 patients admitted to Gregorio Marañón Hospital. Isolates were tested in vitro for fluconazole susceptibility according to the EUCAST EDef 7.2 procedure; trailing was defined as the presence of any residual growth in wells containing fluconazole concentrations above the MIC. According to the mean percentage of trailing observed, isolates were classified as residual trailers (0.1-5%), slight trailers (6%-10%), moderate trailers (11%-15%), and heavy trailers (>15%). The relationship between trailing and genotyping was assessed. The mean overall percentage of trailing was 6.8%, with C. albicans and C. tropicalis showing the highest percentages (9.75% and 9.29%, respectively; P < .001). C. albicans and C. tropicalis had the highest percentage of heavy trailers (>15%). Trailing was not genotype-specific. Fluconazole trailing was observed frequently when EUCAST was used for antifungal susceptibility testing, particularly in isolates of C. albicans and C. tropicalis The cut-off proposed enabled us to classify the isolates according to the degree of trailing and can be used as the basis for future studies to evaluate the clinical impact of this phenomenon. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The International Society for Human and Animal Mycology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Disruption of the transcriptional regulator Cas5 results in enhanced killing of Candida albicans by Fluconazole.

    PubMed

    Vasicek, Erin M; Berkow, Elizabeth L; Bruno, Vincent M; Mitchell, Aaron P; Wiederhold, Nathan P; Barker, Katherine S; Rogers, P David

    2014-11-01

    Azole antifungal agents such as fluconazole exhibit fungistatic activity against Candida albicans. Strategies to enhance azole antifungal activity would be therapeutically appealing. In an effort to identify transcriptional pathways that influence the killing activity of fluconazole, we sought to identify transcription factors (TFs) involved in this process. From a collection of C. albicans strains disrupted for genes encoding TFs (O. R. Homann, J. Dea, S. M. Noble, and A. D. Johnson, PLoS Genet. 5:e1000783, 2009, http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pgen.1000783), four strains exhibited marked reductions in minimum fungicidal concentration (MFCs) in both RPMI and yeast extract-peptone-dextrose (YPD) media. One of these genes, UPC2, was previously characterized with regard to its role in azole susceptibility. Of mutants representing the three remaining TF genes of interest, one (CAS5) was unable to recover from fluconazole exposure at concentrations as low as 2 μg/ml after 72 h in YPD medium. This mutant also showed reduced susceptibility and a clear zone of inhibition by Etest, was unable to grow on solid medium containing 10 μg/ml fluconazole, and exhibited increased susceptibility by time-kill analysis. CAS5 disruption in highly azole-resistant clinical isolates exhibiting multiple resistance mechanisms did not alter susceptibility. However, CAS5 disruption in strains with specific resistance mutations resulted in moderate reductions in MICs and MFCs. Genome-wide transcriptional analysis was performed in the presence of fluconazole and was consistent with the suggested role of CAS5 in cell wall organization while also suggesting a role in iron transport and homeostasis. These findings suggest that Cas5 regulates a transcriptional network that influences the response of C. albicans to fluconazole. Further delineation of this transcriptional network may identify targets for potential cotherapeutic strategies to enhance the activity of the azole class of antifungals.

  16. Atazanavir increases the plasma concentrations of 1200 mg raltegravir dose.

    PubMed

    Krishna, Rajesh; East, Lilly; Larson, Patrick; Valiathan, Chandni; Deschamps, Kathleen; Luk, Julie Ann; Bethel-Brown, Crystal; Manthos, Helen; Brejda, John; Gartner, Michael

    2016-12-01

    Raltegravir is a human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 integrase strand transfer inhibitor currently marketed at a dose of 400 mg twice-daily (b.i.d.). Raltegravir 1200 mg once-daily (q.d.) (investigational q.d. formulation of 2 × 600 mg tablets; q.d. RAL) was found to be generally well tolerated and non-inferior to the marketed 400 mg b.i.d. dose at 48 weeks in a phase 3 trial. Since raltegravir is eliminated mainly by metabolism via a uridine diphosphate glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) 1A1-mediated glucuronidation pathway, co-administration of UGT1A1 inhibitors may increase the plasma levels of q.d. RAL. To assess this potential, the drug interaction of 1200 mg raltegravir using atazanavir, a known UGT1A1 inhibitor, was studied. An open-label, randomized, 2-period, fixed-sequence phase 1 study was performed in adult healthy male and female (non-childbearing potential) subjects ≥ 19 and ≤ 55 years of age, with a body mass index (BMI) ≥ 18.5 and ≤ 32.0 kg/m(2) . Subjects (n = 14) received a single oral dose of 1200 mg raltegravir in period 1. After a washout period of at least 7 days, the subjects received oral doses of 400 mg atazanavir q.d. for 9 consecutive days, with a single oral dose of 1200 mg raltegravir co-administered on day 7 of period 2. Serial blood samples were collected for 72 h following raltegravir dosing and analysed using a validated bioanalytical method to quantify raltegravir plasma concentrations. Co-administration with atazanavir yielded GMRs (90% CIs) for raltegravir AUC0-∞ , Cmax and C24 of 1.67 (1.34, 2.10), 1.16 (1.01, 1.33) and 1.26 (1.08, 1.46), respectively. There was no effect of raltegravir on serum total bilirubin. In contrast, atazanavir increased the mean bilirubin by up to 200%, an effect that was preserved in the atazanavir/raltegravir treatment group. Administration of single q.d. RAL alone and co-administered with multiple oral doses of atazanavir were generally well tolerated in healthy subjects. The results show that

  17. Lutein supplementation increases breast milk and plasma lutein concentrations in lactating women and infant plasma concentrations but does not affect other carotenoids.

    PubMed

    Sherry, Christina L; Oliver, Jeffery S; Renzi, Lisa M; Marriage, Barbara J

    2014-08-01

    Lutein is a carotenoid that varies in breast milk depending on maternal intake. Data are lacking with regard to the effect of dietary lutein supplementation on breast milk lutein concentration during lactation and subsequent plasma lutein concentration in breast-fed infants. This study was conducted to determine the impact of lutein supplementation in the breast milk and plasma of lactating women and in the plasma of breast-fed infants 2-3 mo postpartum. Lutein is the dominant carotenoid in the infant brain and the major carotenoid found in the retina of the eye. Eighty-nine lactating women 4-6 wk postpartum were randomly assigned to be administered either 0 mg/d of lutein (placebo), 6 mg/d of lutein (low-dose), or 12 mg/d of lutein (high-dose). The supplements were consumed for 6 wk while mothers followed their usual diets. Breast milk carotenoids were measured weekly by HPLC, and maternal plasma carotenoid concentrations were measured at the beginning and end of the study. Infant plasma carotenoid concentrations were assessed at the end of the study. No significant differences were found between dietary lutein + zeaxanthin intake and carotenoid concentrations in breast milk and plasma or body mass index at baseline. Total lutein + zeaxanthin concentrations were greater in the low- and high-dose-supplemented groups than in the placebo group in breast milk (140% and 250%, respectively; P < 0.0001), maternal plasma (170% and 250%, respectively; P < 0.0001), and infant plasma (180% and 330%, respectively; P < 0.05). Lutein supplementation did not affect other carotenoids in lactating women or their infants. Lactating women are highly responsive to lutein supplementation, which affects plasma lutein concentrations in the infant. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT01747668.

  18. Lutein Supplementation Increases Breast Milk and Plasma Lutein Concentrations in Lactating Women and Infant Plasma Concentrations but Does Not Affect Other Carotenoids123

    PubMed Central

    Sherry, Christina L.; Oliver, Jeffery S.; Renzi, Lisa M.; Marriage, Barbara J.

    2014-01-01

    Lutein is a carotenoid that varies in breast milk depending on maternal intake. Data are lacking with regard to the effect of dietary lutein supplementation on breast milk lutein concentration during lactation and subsequent plasma lutein concentration in breast-fed infants. This study was conducted to determine the impact of lutein supplementation in the breast milk and plasma of lactating women and in the plasma of breast-fed infants 2–3 mo postpartum. Lutein is the dominant carotenoid in the infant brain and the major carotenoid found in the retina of the eye. Eighty-nine lactating women 4–6 wk postpartum were randomly assigned to be administered either 0 mg/d of lutein (placebo), 6 mg/d of lutein (low-dose), or 12 mg/d of lutein (high-dose). The supplements were consumed for 6 wk while mothers followed their usual diets. Breast milk carotenoids were measured weekly by HPLC, and maternal plasma carotenoid concentrations were measured at the beginning and end of the study. Infant plasma carotenoid concentrations were assessed at the end of the study. No significant differences were found between dietary lutein + zeaxanthin intake and carotenoid concentrations in breast milk and plasma or body mass index at baseline. Total lutein + zeaxanthin concentrations were greater in the low- and high-dose–supplemented groups than in the placebo group in breast milk (140% and 250%, respectively; P < 0.0001), maternal plasma (170% and 250%, respectively; P < 0.0001), and infant plasma (180% and 330%, respectively; P < 0.05). Lutein supplementation did not affect other carotenoids in lactating women or their infants. Lactating women are highly responsive to lutein supplementation, which affects plasma lutein concentrations in the infant. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT01747668. PMID:24899160

  19. Plasma noradrenaline concentration and blood pressure in essential hypertension, phaeochromocytoma and depression.

    PubMed

    Louis, W J; Doyle, A E; Anavekar, S N

    1975-06-01

    1. Mean plasma noradrenaline concentration was elevated in forty-four patients with established essential hypertension. Eighteen of the hypertensive patients had resting plasma noradrenaline concentrations in the normal range. 2. Patients with endogenous depression had higher mean plasma noradrenaline concentrations but significantly lower blood pressure than patients with essential hypertension. 3. Patients with phaeochromocytoma had plasma noradrenaline concentrations twenty-eight times greater than those found in essential hypertension, but blood pressures were less than 20% higher. 4. It is concluded that excess of sympathetic drive only partly explains the level of the blood pressure in essential hypertension.

  20. Fluconazole administration leading to anaphylactic shock in a preterm newborn.

    PubMed

    Koklu, Esad; Kalay, Salih; Koklu, Selmin; Ariguloglu, Erdal Arvi

    2014-01-01

    Preterm infants, born with immature innate immunity, are less likely to develop anaphylaxis. Fluconazole prophylaxis during the first six weeks of life decreases invasive candidiasis in very low birth weight infants. Adverse effects of fluconazole are very rare. In this study, we report a newborn (a male, 26 weeks gestation and 900 g birth weight) who developed anaphylaxis after fluconazole administration. Hypotension and erythematous rash were present. We believe this to be the first anaphylaxis case in newborns caused by fluconazole in literature. Clinicians should be aware of the possibility of this potentially fatal adverse effect occurring with intravenous fluconazole.

  1. Fixed drug eruption related to fluconazole.

    PubMed

    Lai, Olivia; Hsu, Sylvia

    2016-04-18

    Fixed drug eruption (FDE) is a type of cutaneous drug reaction that occurs at the same sites upon re-exposure to specific medications. Herein we discuss the case of a 23-year-old man with a FDE to fluconazole.

  2. Successful Treatment of Brainstem Blastomycosis with Fluconazole

    PubMed Central

    Brick, Katherine E.; Agger, William A.

    2012-01-01

    The lipid formulation of amphotericin B is the initial drug of choice for central nervous system blastomycosis, but it is costly and associated with significant toxicity. This case report details a patient with primary pulmonary blastomycosis with dissemination to the skin, one joint, and the brainstem that was successfully treated solely with high-dose fluconazole. PMID:21817120

  3. Decreased plasma brain-derived neurotrophic factor and vascular endothelial growth factor concentrations during military training.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Go; Tokuno, Shinichi; Nibuya, Masashi; Ishida, Toru; Yamamoto, Tetsuo; Mukai, Yasuo; Mitani, Keiji; Tsumatori, Gentaro; Scott, Daniel; Shimizu, Kunio

    2014-01-01

    Decreased concentrations of plasma brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and serum BDNF have been proposed to be a state marker of depression and a biological indicator of loaded psychosocial stress. Stress evaluations of participants in military mission are critically important and appropriate objective biological parameters that evaluate stress are needed. In military circumstances, there are several problems to adopt plasma BDNF concentration as a stress biomarker. First, in addition to psychosocial stress, military missions inevitably involve physical exercise that increases plasma BDNF concentrations. Second, most participants in the mission do not have adequate quality or quantity of sleep, and sleep deprivation has also been reported to increase plasma BDNF concentration. We evaluated plasma BDNF concentrations in 52 participants on a 9-week military mission. The present study revealed that plasma BDNF concentration significantly decreased despite elevated serum enzymes that escaped from muscle and decreased quantity and quality of sleep, as detected by a wearable watch-type sensor. In addition, we observed a significant decrease in plasma vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) during the mission. VEGF is also neurotrophic and its expression in the brain has been reported to be up-regulated by antidepressive treatments and down-regulated by stress. This is the first report of decreased plasma VEGF concentrations by stress. We conclude that decreased plasma concentrations of neurotrophins can be candidates for mental stress indicators in actual stressful environments that include physical exercise and limited sleep.

  4. Intracellular CD3+ T Lymphocyte Teriflunomide Concentration Is Poorly Correlated with and Has Greater Variability Than Unbound Plasma Teriflunomide Concentration.

    PubMed

    Hopkins, Ashley M; Moghaddami, Mahin; Foster, David J R; Proudman, Susanna M; Upton, Richard N; Wiese, Michael D

    2017-01-01

    Leflunomide's active metabolite teriflunomide inhibits dihydro-oroate dehydrogenase, an enzyme essential to proliferation of T lymphocytes. As teriflunomide must reach the target site to have this effect, this study assessed the distribution of teriflunomide into T lymphocytes, as intracellular concentrations may be a superior response biomarker to plasma concentrations. CD3 MicroBeads (Miltenyi Biotec, Bergisch Gladbach, Germany) were used to extract CD3(+) T cells from the peripheral blood of patients with rheumatoid arthritis who were taking a stable dose of leflunomide. Unbound plasma and intra-CD3(+) T cell teriflunomide concentrations were quantified using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Concentration (log transformed) and partition differences were assessed through paired Student t tests. Sixteen patients provided plasma steady-state teriflunomide samples, and eight provided a sample 6-12 weeks later. At time-point one, the geometric mean teriflunomide concentration (range) in CD3(+) T cells was 18.12 μg/L (6.15-42.26 μg/L) compared with 69.75 μg/L (32.89-263.1 μg/L) unbound in plasma (P < 0.001). The mean partition coefficient (range) for unbound plasma teriflunomide into CD3(+) T cells was 0.295 (0.092-0.632), which was significantly different from unity (P < 0.001). The median (range) change in teriflunomide concentration between the two time points was 14% (-10% to 40%) in unbound plasma and -29% (-69 to 138%) for CD3(+) T cells. Because teriflunomide concentrations in CD3(+) T cells were lower and displayed a higher intraindividual variability than the unbound plasma concentrations, its applicability as a therapeutic drug-monitoring marker may be limited. Copyright © 2016 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  5. Risk Factors for Fluconazole-Resistant Candidemia ▿

    PubMed Central

    Garnacho-Montero, José; Díaz-Martín, Ana; García-Cabrera, Emilio; Ruiz Pérez de Pipaón, Maite; Hernández-Caballero, Clara; Aznar-Martín, Javier; Cisneros, José M.; Ortiz-Leyba, Carlos

    2010-01-01

    Previous studies have sought to determine the risk factors associated with candidemia caused by non-albicans Candida spp. or with potentially fluconazole-resistant Candida spp. (C. glabrata and C. krusei). Non-albicans Candida strains are a heterogeneous group that includes species with different levels of virulence, and only a limited number of C. glabrata isolates are resistant to fluconazole. We set out to identify the risk factors associated with microbiologically proven fluconazole-resistant candidemia. A prospective study including adult patients with candidemia was performed. Data were collected on patient demographics; underlying diseases; exposure to corticosteroids, antibiotics, or fluconazole; and invasive procedures. Risk factors associated either with non-albicans Candida spp. or potentially fluconazole-resistant Candida spp. (C. glabrata or C. krusei) or with Candida spp. with microbiologically confirmed fluconazole resistance were assessed using logistic regressions. We included 226 candidemia episodes. Non-albicans Candida isolates accounted for 53.1% of the fungal isolates, but only 18.2% of the cases were caused by potentially fluconazole-resistant organisms. Thirty isolates exhibited microbiologically confirmed fluconazole resistance. The multivariate analysis revealed that independent predictors associated with fluconazole-resistant Candida spp. were neutropenia (odds ratio [OR] = 4.94; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.50 to 16.20; P = 0.008), chronic renal disease (OR = 4.82; 95% CI = 1.47 to 15.88; P = 0.01), and previous fluconazole exposure (OR = 5.09; 95% CI = 1.66 to 15.6; P = 0.004). Independently significant variables associated with non-albicans Candida bloodstream infection or with potentially fluconazole-resistant Candida spp. did not include previous fluconazole exposure. We concluded that prior fluconazole treatment is an independent risk factor only for candidemia caused by microbiologically confirmed fluconazole resistant species

  6. Urinary strong ion difference is a major determinant of plasma chloride concentration changes in postoperative patients

    PubMed Central

    Masevicius, Fabio Daniel; Vazquez, Alejandro Risso; Enrico, Carolina; Dubin, Arnaldo

    2013-01-01

    Objective To show that alterations in the plasma chloride concentration ([Cl-]plasma) during the postoperative period are largely dependent on the urinary strong ion difference ([SID]urine=[Na+]urine+[K+]urine-[Cl-]urine) and not on differences in fluid therapy. Methods Measurements were performed at intensive care unit admission and 24 hours later in a total of 148 postoperative patients. Patients were assigned into one of three groups according to the change in [Cl-]plasma at the 24 hours time point: increased [Cl-]plasma (n=39), decreased [Cl-]plasma (n=56) or unchanged [Cl-]plasma (n=53). Results On admission, the increased [Cl-]plasma group had a lower [Cl-]plasma (105±5 versus 109±4 and 106±3mmol/L, p<0.05), a higher plasma anion gap concentration ([AG]plasma) and a higher strong ion gap concentration ([SIG]). After 24 hours, the increased [Cl-]plasma group showed a higher [Cl-]plasma (111±4 versus 104±4 and 107±3mmol/L, p<0.05) and lower [AG]plasma and [SIG]. The volume and [SID] of administered fluids were similar between groups except that the [SID]urine was higher (38±37 versus 18±22 and 23±18mmol/L, p<0.05) in the increased [Cl-]plasma group at the 24 hours time point. A multiple linear regression analysis showed that the [Cl-]plasma on admission and [SID]urine were independent predictors of the variation in [Cl-]plasma 24 hours later. Conclusions Changes in [Cl-]plasma during the first postoperative day were largely related to [SID]urine and [Cl-]plasma on admission and not to the characteristics of the infused fluids. Therefore, decreasing [SID]urine could be a major mechanism for preventing the development of saline-induced hyperchloremia. PMID:24213082

  7. A subdose of fluconazole alters the virulence of Cryptococcus gattii during murine cryptococcosis and modulates type I interferon expression.

    PubMed

    Fontes, Alide Caroline Lima; Bretas Oliveira, Danilo; Santos, Juliana Ribeiro Alves; Carneiro, Hellem Cristina Silva; Ribeiro, Noelly de Queiroz; Oliveira, Lorena Vívien Neves de; Barcellos, Vanessa Abreu; Paixão, Tatiane Alves; Abrahão, Jonatas Santos; Resende-Stoianoff, Maria Aparecida; Vainstein, Marilene Henning; Santos, Daniel Assis

    2017-02-01

    Cryptococcosis is an invasive infection caused by yeast-like fungus of the genera Cryptococcus spp. The antifungal therapy for this disease provides some toxicity and the incidence of infections caused by resistant strains increased. Thus, we aimed to assess the consequences of fluconazole subdoses during the treatment of cryptococcosis in the murine inflammatory response and in the virulence factors of Cryptococcus gattii. Mice infected with Cryptococcus gattii were treated with subdoses of fluconazole. We determined the behavior of mice and type 1 interferon expression during the treatment; we also studied the virulence factors and susceptibility to fluconazole for the colonies recovered from the animals. A subdose of fluconazole prolonged the survival of mice, but the morbidity of cryptococcosis was higher in treated animals. These data were linked to the increase in: (i) fluconazole minimum inhibitory concentration, (ii) capsule size and (iii) melanization of C. gattii, which probably led to the increased expression of type I interferons in the brains of mice but not in the lungs. In conclusion, a subdose of fluconazole altered fungal virulence factors and susceptibility to this azole, leading to an altered inflammatory host response and increased morbidity.

  8. Seasonal variation in plasma free normetanephrine concentrations: implications for biochemical diagnosis of pheochromocytoma.

    PubMed

    Pamporaki, Christina; Bursztyn, Michael; Reimann, Manja; Ziemssen, Tjalf; Bornstein, Stefan R; Sweep, Fred C G J; Timmers, Henri; Lenders, Jacques W M; Eisenhofer, Graeme

    2014-03-01

    Higher plasma concentrations of catecholamines in winter than in summer have been established, but whether this impacts the plasma concentrations of metanephrines used for the diagnosis of pheochromocytoma is unknown. In this study, we examined seasonal variations in the plasma concentrations of metanephrines, the impact of this on diagnostic test performance and the influences of forearm warming ('arterialization' of venous blood) on blood flow and measured concentrations. The measurements of the plasma concentrations of metanephrines were recorded from 4052 patients tested for pheochromocytoma at two clinical centers. Among these patients, 107 had tumors. An additional 26 volunteers were enrolled for the measurements of plasma metanephrines and forearm blood flow before and after forearm warming. There was no seasonal variation in the plasma concentrations of metanephrines among patients with pheochromocytoma, whereas among those without tumors, the plasma concentrations of normetanephrine were higher (P<0.0001) in winter than in summer. Lowest concentrations of normetanephrine were measured in July, with those recorded from December to April being more than 21% higher (P<0.0001). These differences resulted in a twofold higher (P=0.0012) prevalence of false-positive elevations of normetanephrine concentrations in winter than in summer, associated with a drop in overall diagnostic specificity from 96% in summer to 92% in winter (P=0.0010). Forearm warming increased blood flow and lowered (P=0.0020) plasma normetanephrine concentrations. The plasma concentrations of normetanephrine are subject to seasonal variation with a resulting higher prevalence of false-positive results in winter than in summer. Lowered plasma concentrations of normetanephrine with forearm warming suggest an effect of temperature. These results have implications for considerations of temperature to minimize false-positive results.

  9. Increase in plasma cortisol concentrations in ewes fed oestrogenic subterranean clover.

    PubMed

    Tang, B Y; Adams, N R; Sawyer, G J

    1979-11-01

    Pen-feeding oestrogenic clover to ewes increased their plasma cortisol concentration by the third day. This was not due to any change in the variation of cortisol concentration with time of day. Ovulation rate was not affected during the experiment as judged by the levels of plasma progesterone and laparoscopy. The plasma cortisol concentration of ewes also rose within three days of their being placed on oestrogenic clover pasture. During the next 21 days, their mean plasma cortisol was increased by 58 per cent. A previous history of clover disease did not affect this response.

  10. Stress-induced changes in corticosteroid metabolism. [plasma and urine concentrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tacker, M. M.

    1975-01-01

    Because plasma and urine corticosteroid concentrations are influenced by several factors in addition to adrenal cortex secretion, the effect of stress on all of these factors was determined in order to interpret the plasma and urine concentrations. Progress on the investigation is reported.

  11. Stress-induced changes in corticosteroid metabolism. [plasma and urine concentrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tacker, M. M.

    1975-01-01

    Because plasma and urine corticosteroid concentrations are influenced by several factors in addition to adrenal cortex secretion, the effect of stress on all of these factors was determined in order to interpret the plasma and urine concentrations. Progress on the investigation is reported.

  12. Plasma nitrendipine concentrations in elderly hypertensive patients after single and multiple dosing.

    PubMed Central

    Crome, P; Baksi, A; MacMahon, D; Pandita-Gunawardena, N D; Edwards, J; Marley, J

    1988-01-01

    Twenty-three elderly hypertensive subjects received nitrendipine 10mg daily by mouth for 8 days. Plasma nitrendipine concentrations were measured after the first and last dose. There was no significant difference in plasma concentrations at any time point between the two days nor in derived pharmacokinetic measurements. Drug accumulation was not observed. PMID:3179170

  13. Venlafaxine and O-desmethylvenlafaxine concentrations in plasma and cerebrospinal fluid.

    PubMed

    Paulzen, Michael; Groppe, Sarah; Tauber, Simone C; Veselinovic, Tanja; Hiemke, Christoph; Gründer, Gerhard

    2015-01-01

    To investigate whether drug concentrations of venlafaxine and its metabolite O-desmethylvenlafaxine in plasma can be considered as a surrogate marker of concentrations in brain/cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). For therapeutic drug monitoring purposes, plasma and CSF concentrations of venlafaxine and O-desmethylvenlafaxine were measured between November 2011 and August 2013 in 16 depressive inpatients (ICD-10 diagnoses) who were treated with daily doses of venlafaxine extended release (dose range, 75-225 mg). Daily doses were correlated with plasma and CSF levels. The correlation between venlafaxine, O-desmethylvenlafaxine, and the active moiety (AM) in plasma and CSF was calculated. Venlafaxine in plasma (P = .005) and CSF (P = .023) correlated significantly with the daily dose, while O-desmethylvenlafaxine and the active moiety (AM = venlafaxine + O-desmethylvenlafaxine) did not. The correlation between venlafaxine, O-desmethylvenlafaxine, and the AM in plasma and CSF was highly significant (P < .001). The calculated CSF/plasma ratio was 0.74 for venlafaxine, 0.88 for O-desmethylvenlafaxine, and 0.84 for the AM. Venlafaxine and O-desmethylvenlafaxine were found to penetrate well into CSF in patients, which indicated good availability of the drug in the brain, although the findings on CSF concentrations do not allow calculation of concentrations at the target structure within the brain. CSF/plasma ratios for venlafaxine and its metabolite were high probably due to low plasma protein binding. The poor correlation of dose to concentrations in body fluids and the highly significant correlation of plasma to CSF concentrations indicate that plasma concentration is a much better marker of drug concentration in brain than the dose. © Copyright 2015 Physicians Postgraduate Press, Inc.

  14. Differential Responses of Plasma Adropin Concentrations To Dietary Glucose or Fructose Consumption In Humans.

    PubMed

    Butler, Andrew A; St-Onge, Marie-Pierre; Siebert, Emily A; Medici, Valentina; Stanhope, Kimber L; Havel, Peter J

    2015-10-05

    Adropin is a peptide hormone encoded by the Energy Homeostasis Associated (ENHO) gene whose physiological role in humans remains incompletely defined. Here we investigated the impact of dietary interventions that affect systemic glucose and lipid metabolism on plasma adropin concentrations in humans. Consumption of glucose or fructose as 25% of daily energy requirements (E) differentially affected plasma adropin concentrations (P < 0.005) irrespective of duration, sex or age. Glucose consumption reduced plasma adropin from 3.55 ± 0.26 to 3.28 ± 0.23 ng/ml (N = 42). Fructose consumption increased plasma adropin from 3.63 ± 0.29 to 3.93 ± 0.34 ng/ml (N = 45). Consumption of high fructose corn syrup (HFCS) as 25% E had no effect (3.43 ± 0.32 versus 3.39 ± 0.24 ng/ml, N = 26). Overall, the effect of glucose, HFCS and fructose on circulating adropin concentrations were similar to those observed on postprandial plasma triglyceride concentrations. Furthermore, increases in plasma adropin levels with fructose intake were most robust in individuals exhibiting hypertriglyceridemia. Individuals with low plasma adropin concentrations also exhibited rapid increases in plasma levels following consumption of breakfasts supplemented with lipids. These are the first results linking plasma adropin levels with dietary sugar intake in humans, with the impact of fructose consumption linked to systemic triglyceride metabolism. In addition, dietary fat intake may also increase circulating adropin concentrations.

  15. Elevated plasma and urinary concentrations of green tea catechins associated with improved plasma lipid profile in healthy Japanese women.

    PubMed

    Takechi, Ryusuke; Alfonso, Helman; Hiramatsu, Naoko; Ishisaka, Akari; Tanaka, Akira; Tan, La'Belle; Lee, Andy H

    2016-03-01

    This study investigated green tea catechins in plasma and urine and chronic disease biomarkers. We hypothesized that plasma and urinary concentration of green tea catechins are associated with cardiovascular disease and diabetes biomarkers. First void urine and fasting plasma samples were collected from 57 generally healthy females aged 38 to 73 years (mean, 52 ± 8 years) recruited in Himeji, Japan. The concentrations of plasma and urinary green tea catechins were determined by liquid chromatography coupled with mass tandem spectrometer. Low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, triglyceride, glucose, insulin, glycated hemoglobin, and C-reactive protein in plasma/serum samples were analyzed by a commercial diagnostic laboratory. Statistical associations were assessed using Spearman correlation coefficients. The results showed weak associations between plasma total catechin and triglyceride (r = -0.30) and LDL cholesterol (r = -0.28), whereas plasma (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate, (-)-epigallocatechin, (-)-epicatechin-3-gallate, and (-)-epicatechin exhibited weak to moderate associations with triglyceride or LDL cholesterol, but little associations with HDL cholesterol, body fat, and body mass index were evident. Urinary total catechin was weakly associated with triglyceride (r = -0.19) and LDL cholesterol (r = -0.15), whereas urinary (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (r = -0.33), (-)-epigallocatechin (r = -0.23), and (-)-epicatechin-3-gallate (r = -0.33) had weak to moderate correlations with triglyceride and similarly with body fat and body mass index. Both plasma (r = -0.24) and urinary (r = -0.24) total catechin, as well as individual catechins, were weakly associated with glycated hemoglobin. Plasma total and individual catechins were weakly to moderately associated with C-reactive protein, but not the case for urinary catechins. In conclusion, we found weak to moderate associations between plasma and urinary green tea

  16. In vitro activity of essential oils extracted from condiments against fluconazole-resistant and -sensitive Candida glabrata.

    PubMed

    Soares, I H; Loreto, É S; Rossato, L; Mario, D N; Venturini, T P; Baldissera, F; Santurio, J M; Alves, S H

    2015-09-01

    In the present study, the antifungal activity of essential oils obtained from Origanum vulgare (oregano), Cinnamomum zeylanicum (cinnamon), Lippia graveolens (Mexican oregano), Thymus vulgaris (thyme), Salvia officinalis (sage), Rosmarinus officinalis (rosemary), Ocimum basilicum (basil) and Zingiber officinale (ginger) were assessed against Candida glabrata isolates. One group contained 30 fluconazole-susceptible C. glabrata isolates, and the second group contained fluconazole-resistant isolates derived from the first group after the in vitro induction of fluconazole-resistance, for a total of 60 tested isolates. The broth microdilution methodology was used. Concentrations of 50μg/mL, 100μg/mL, 200μg/mL, 400μg/mL, 800μg/mL, 1600μg/mL and 3200μg/mL of the essential oils were used, and the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum fungicidal concentration (MFC) were determined. Thyme, sage, rosemary, basil and ginger essential oils showed no antifungal activity at the tested concentrations. Antimicrobial activity less than or equal to 3200μg/mL was observed for oregano, Mexican oregano and cinnamon essential oils. Both the oregano and Mexican oregano essential oils showed high levels of antifungal activity against the fluconazole-susceptible C. glabrata group, whereas the cinnamon essential oil showed the best antifungal activity against the fluconazole-resistant C. glabrata isolates. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. Pharmacokinetics of fluconazole in critically ill patients with acute kidney injury receiving sustained low-efficiency diafiltration.

    PubMed

    Sinnollareddy, Mahipal G; Roberts, Michael S; Lipman, Jeffrey; Robertson, Thomas A; Peake, Sandra L; Roberts, Jason A

    2015-02-01

    Fluconazole is a widely used antifungal agent in critically ill patients. It is predominantly (60-80%) excreted unchanged in urine. Sustained low-efficiency diafiltration (SLED-f) is increasingly being utilised in critically ill patients because of its practical advantages over continuous renal replacement therapy. To date, the effect of SLED-f on fluconazole pharmacokinetics and dosing has not been studied. The objective of this study was to describe the pharmacokinetics of fluconazole in critically ill patients with acute kidney injury receiving SLED-f and to compare this with other forms of renal replacement therapy. Serial blood samples were collected at pre- and post-filter ports within the SLED-f circuit during SLED-f and from an arterial catheter before and after SLED-f from three patients during one session. Fluconazole concentrations were measured using a validated chromatography method. Median clearance (CL) and 24-h area under the concentration-time curve (AUC0-24) were 2.1L/h and 152 mg·h/L, respectively, whilst receiving SLED-f. Moreover, 72% of fluconazole was cleared by a single SLED-f session (6h) compared with previous reports of 33-38% clearance by a 4-h intermittent haemodialysis session. CL and AUC0-24 were comparable with previous observations in a pre-dilution mode of continuous venovenous haemodiafiltration. The observed rebound concentration of fluconazole post SLED-f was <2%. Although a definitive dosing recommendation is not possible due to the small patient number, it is clear that doses >200mg daily are likely to be required to achieve the PK/PD target for common pathogens because of significant fluconazole clearance by SLED-f.

  18. Seminal plasma hormone concentration after oral application of progesterone.

    PubMed

    Feuring, M; Bertsch, T; Tran, B M; Rossol-Haseroth, K; Losel, R; Tillmann, H C; Schultz, A; Weigel, M; Wehling, M

    2002-02-01

    Previous studies have revealed beneficial in vitro effects of progesterone on sperm function. The aim of this pilot study was to prove if orally given micronized progesterone leads to elevations in progesterone and/or 17alpha-hydroxyprogesterone levels in seminal plasma, since higher seminal plasma levels of these hormones could possibly have a beneficial effect on sperm function as seen in in vitro investigations. Multiple application of micronized progesterone given over 4 days (daily dose 400 mg) to 6 healthy subjects resulted in elevated seminal plasma levels of progesterone (10.90 +/- 9.02 nmol/l vs. 1.43 +/- 0.56 nmol/l, p = 0.04) and 17alpha-hydroxyprogesterone (3.09 +/- 1.72 nmol/l vs. 1.62 +/- 1.26 nmol/l, p = 0.04) whereas no significant difference could be found in testosterone levels (34.82 +/- 13.00 vs. 30.91 +/- 8.56 nmol/l, p = 0.43). In contrast, androstendione levels in seminal plasma were reduced (2.68 1.28 nmol/l vs. 3.65 +/- 1.36 nmol/l, p = 0.01). Although micronized progesterone is rapidly metabolized, oral application resulted in pronounced elevations of progesterone and 17alpha-hydroxyprogesterone in seminal plasma. Further studies will show if oral application of micronized progesterone can induce beneficial effects on sperm function such as those seen in in vitro investigations.

  19. Concentrations in plasma clozapine levels in schizophrenic and schizoaffective patients.

    PubMed

    Iglesias García, Celso; Iglesias Alonso, Ana; Bobes, Julio

    2017-08-22

    There is great variability in plasma levels of clozapine. The objective of this study is to know the characteristics of patients treated with clozapine and the relationship between them and the variability of plasma levels. Descriptive, cross-sectional study of all patients currently treated with clozapine in a Psychiatric Service with a diagnosis of schizophrenic psychosis or schizoaffective disorder. The present study assessed physical situation, psychopathology and functionality of the patients and explored the associations and correlations between clinical variables and plasma levels. We studied 39 patients, predominantly men, with negative and depressive symptoms and cardiovascular risk factors (metabolic syndrome and smoking). Significant variability in dose and even greater in clozapine levels were observed. The levels of clozapine at equal doses/kg of body weight were higher in non-smokers, they had positive correlation with BMI and negative correlation with systolic BP, disruptive behaviors and number of cigarettes consumed. Plasma level monitoring clozapine is an important tool to avoid clozapine plasma levels monitoring and minimize undesirable clinical situations (metabolic syndrome, sedation, negative symptoms and functional impairment). It is also important to control the effects of a smoking habit for optimum drug bioavailability. Copyright © 2017 SEP y SEPB. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  20. [Transferrin concentration in seminal plasma in testicular varicocele with various sperm concentrations and various forms of azoospermia].

    PubMed

    Sigg, C; Brüngger, A; Rakosi, T

    1994-01-01

    Seminal plasma transferrin concentrations were measured in semen samples from 424 men attending a fertility unit. There was a clear positive correlation between seminal plasma transferrin concentration and sperm density: transferrin concentrations decrease with decreasing sperm density and are lowest in patients with azoospermia and those who have undergone vasectomy. The differences between the various groups in sperm density are highly significant, but individual data counts also vary widely. Furthermore, it was demonstrated that in polyzoospermia the seminal plasma transferrin concentration is increased, suggesting primary tubular hyperactivity. No correlations with other seminal parameters or hormonal values were found. Seminal plasma transferrin concentrations in normozoospermia and in varicocele testis or in cases with increased numbers of immature germ cells in the ejaculate were not significantly different. This may be interpreted as indicative of intact secretory activity of Sertoli cells in both varicocele and increased desquamation of immature germ cells. The absence of correlation with any of several important spermatological parameters and our inability to differentiate between azoospermia caused by obstruction and by tubular impairment indicate that seminal plasma transferrin is not a useful marker for Sertoli cell function or for seminiferous tubular dysfunction.

  1. Dietary salt influences postprandial plasma sodium concentration and systolic blood pressure.

    PubMed

    Suckling, Rebecca J; He, Feng J; Markandu, Nirmala D; MacGregor, Graham A

    2012-02-01

    The plasma sodium concentration has a direct effect on blood pressure in addition to its effects on extracellular volume regulated through changes in the endothelium. The mechanism for elevated blood pressure seen with habitually increased salt intake is unclear, especially the effect of salt in a single meal on plasma sodium concentration and blood pressure. To resolve this we compared the effect of soup with or without 6 g of salt (an amount similar to that in a single meal) on the plasma sodium concentration and blood pressure in 10 normotensive volunteers using a randomized, crossover design. The plasma sodium concentration was significantly increased by 3.13±0.75 mmol/l with salted compared with unsalted soup. Blood pressure increased in volunteers ingesting soup with added salt, and there was a significant positive correlation between plasma sodium concentration and systolic blood pressure. A 1-mmol/l increase in plasma sodium was associated with a 1.91-mm Hg increase in systolic blood pressure by linear regression. Thus, changes in plasma sodium concentration occur each time a meal containing salt is consumed. A potential mechanism for the changes in blood pressure seen with salt intake may be through its effects on plasma sodium concentration.

  2. Fluconazole in the treatment of Cushing's disease

    PubMed Central

    Christie-David, Darshika; Gunton, Jenny E

    2016-01-01

    Summary Ketoconazole was a first-line agent for suppressing steroidogenesis in Cushing's disease. It now has limited availability. Fluconazole, another azole antifungal, is an alternative, although its in vivo efficacy is unclear. A 61-year-old female presented with weight gain, abdominal striae and worsening depression. HbA1c increased to 76 mmol/mol despite increasing insulin. Investigations confirmed cortisol excess; afternoon serum cortisol was 552 nmol/l with an inappropriate ACTH of 9.3 pmol/l. In total, 24-h urinary free cortisol (UFC):creatinine ratio was 150 nmol/mmol with failure to suppress after 48 h of low-dose dexamethasone. Pituitary MRI revealed a 4-mm microadenoma. Inferior petrosal sinus sampling confirmed Cushing's disease. Transsphenoidal resection was performed and symptoms improved. However, disease recurred 6 months later with elevated 24-h UFC >2200 nmol/day. Metyrapone was commenced at 750 mg tds. Ketoconazole was later added at 400 mg daily, with dose reduction in metyrapone. When ketoconazole became unavailable, fluconazole 200 mg daily was substituted. Urine cortisol:creatinine ratio rose, and the dose was increased to 400 mg daily with normalisation of urine hormone levels. Serum cortisol and urine cortisol:creatinine ratios remain normal on this regimen at 6 months. In conclusion, to our knowledge, this is the first case demonstrating prolonged in vivo efficacy of fluconazole in combination with low-dose metyrapone for the treatment of Cushing's disease. Fluconazole has a more favourable toxicity profile, and we suggest that it is a potential alternative for medical management of Cushing's disease. Learning points Surgery remains first line for the management of Cushing's disease with pharmacotherapy used where surgery is unsuccessful or there is persistence of cortisol excess.Ketoconazole has previously been used to treat cortisol excess through inhibition of CYP450 enzymes 11-β-hydroxylase and 17-

  3. Fluconazole in the treatment of Cushing's disease.

    PubMed

    Burns, Kharis; Christie-David, Darshika; Gunton, Jenny E

    2016-01-01

    Ketoconazole was a first-line agent for suppressing steroidogenesis in Cushing's disease. It now has limited availability. Fluconazole, another azole antifungal, is an alternative, although its in vivo efficacy is unclear. A 61-year-old female presented with weight gain, abdominal striae and worsening depression. HbA1c increased to 76 mmol/mol despite increasing insulin. Investigations confirmed cortisol excess; afternoon serum cortisol was 552 nmol/l with an inappropriate ACTH of 9.3 pmol/l. In total, 24-h urinary free cortisol (UFC):creatinine ratio was 150 nmol/mmol with failure to suppress after 48 h of low-dose dexamethasone. Pituitary MRI revealed a 4-mm microadenoma. Inferior petrosal sinus sampling confirmed Cushing's disease. Transsphenoidal resection was performed and symptoms improved. However, disease recurred 6 months later with elevated 24-h UFC >2200 nmol/day. Metyrapone was commenced at 750 mg tds. Ketoconazole was later added at 400 mg daily, with dose reduction in metyrapone. When ketoconazole became unavailable, fluconazole 200 mg daily was substituted. Urine cortisol:creatinine ratio rose, and the dose was increased to 400 mg daily with normalisation of urine hormone levels. Serum cortisol and urine cortisol:creatinine ratios remain normal on this regimen at 6 months. In conclusion, to our knowledge, this is the first case demonstrating prolonged in vivo efficacy of fluconazole in combination with low-dose metyrapone for the treatment of Cushing's disease. Fluconazole has a more favourable toxicity profile, and we suggest that it is a potential alternative for medical management of Cushing's disease. Surgery remains first line for the management of Cushing's disease with pharmacotherapy used where surgery is unsuccessful or there is persistence of cortisol excess.Ketoconazole has previously been used to treat cortisol excess through inhibition of CYP450 enzymes 11-β-hydroxylase and 17-α-hydroxylase, though its availability

  4. The Celecoxib Derivative AR-12 Has Broad-Spectrum Antifungal Activity In Vitro and Improves the Activity of Fluconazole in a Murine Model of Cryptococcosis

    PubMed Central

    Koselny, Kristy; Green, Julianne; DiDone, Louis; Halterman, Justin P.; Fothergill, Annette W.; Wiederhold, Nathan P.; Patterson, Thomas F.; Cushion, Melanie T.; Rappelye, Chad; Wellington, Melanie

    2016-01-01

    Only one new class of antifungal drugs has been introduced into clinical practice in the last 30 years, and thus the identification of small molecules with novel mechanisms of action is an important goal of current anti-infective research. Here, we describe the characterization of the spectrum of in vitro activity and in vivo activity of AR-12, a celecoxib derivative which has been tested in a phase I clinical trial as an anticancer agent. AR-12 inhibits fungal acetyl coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA) synthetase in vitro and is fungicidal at concentrations similar to those achieved in human plasma. AR-12 has a broad spectrum of activity, including activity against yeasts (e.g., Candida albicans, non-albicans Candida spp., Cryptococcus neoformans), molds (e.g., Fusarium, Mucor), and dimorphic fungi (Blastomyces, Histoplasma, and Coccidioides) with MICs of 2 to 4 μg/ml. AR-12 is also active against azole- and echinocandin-resistant Candida isolates, and subinhibitory AR-12 concentrations increase the susceptibility of fluconazole- and echinocandin-resistant Candida isolates. Finally, AR-12 also increases the activity of fluconazole in a murine model of cryptococcosis. Taken together, these data indicate that AR-12 represents a promising class of small molecules with broad-spectrum antifungal activity. PMID:27645246

  5. The Celecoxib Derivative AR-12 Has Broad-Spectrum Antifungal Activity In Vitro and Improves the Activity of Fluconazole in a Murine Model of Cryptococcosis.

    PubMed

    Koselny, Kristy; Green, Julianne; DiDone, Louis; Halterman, Justin P; Fothergill, Annette W; Wiederhold, Nathan P; Patterson, Thomas F; Cushion, Melanie T; Rappelye, Chad; Wellington, Melanie; Krysan, Damian J

    2016-12-01

    Only one new class of antifungal drugs has been introduced into clinical practice in the last 30 years, and thus the identification of small molecules with novel mechanisms of action is an important goal of current anti-infective research. Here, we describe the characterization of the spectrum of in vitro activity and in vivo activity of AR-12, a celecoxib derivative which has been tested in a phase I clinical trial as an anticancer agent. AR-12 inhibits fungal acetyl coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA) synthetase in vitro and is fungicidal at concentrations similar to those achieved in human plasma. AR-12 has a broad spectrum of activity, including activity against yeasts (e.g., Candida albicans, non-albicans Candida spp., Cryptococcus neoformans), molds (e.g., Fusarium, Mucor), and dimorphic fungi (Blastomyces, Histoplasma, and Coccidioides) with MICs of 2 to 4 μg/ml. AR-12 is also active against azole- and echinocandin-resistant Candida isolates, and subinhibitory AR-12 concentrations increase the susceptibility of fluconazole- and echinocandin-resistant Candida isolates. Finally, AR-12 also increases the activity of fluconazole in a murine model of cryptococcosis. Taken together, these data indicate that AR-12 represents a promising class of small molecules with broad-spectrum antifungal activity.

  6. Comparative changes in plasma protein concentration, hematocrit and plasma volume during exercise, bedrest and + Gz acceleration.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Beaumont, W.; Greenleaf, J. E.

    1972-01-01

    Discussion of experiments which indicate that under conditions of a constant red cell volume the proportional changes in hematocrit and plasma volume during exercise are never equal. On the basis of direct measurements and calculated changes of plasma volume it is concluded that during maximal exercise there is a small loss of protein from the plasma. It is clear that changes in content of blood constituents can only be evaluated correctly after determination of changes in plasma volume.

  7. [The influence of smoking on plasma non-enzymatic antioxidant concentrations in active smokers (preliminary report)].

    PubMed

    Szołtysek-Bołdys, Izabela; Sobczak, Andrzej; Król, Dorota

    2006-01-01

    Tobacco smoke contains many reactive oxygen species (ROS) that cause oxidative stress. Crucial role in defending the organism against ROS play vitamins E and A. The aim of the study was to investigate the influence of tobacco smoke on concentration of main ingredients of these vitamins alpha-tocopherol and gamma-tocopherol, as well as retinol. The study population consisted of 104 healthy males between the age of 34 and 45 years. Survey questionnaire and determination of plasma cotinine concentration were used to divide the group into smokers (62 males) and non-smokers (42 males). The arbitrary threshold value of plasma cotinine concentration was set to 15 ng/ml. High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) was used to estimate the plasma concentration of alpha- and gamma-tocopherol, retinol and cotinine. Within the smoking part of the study population a significantly lower (by 12.5%) concentration of alpha-tocopherol, and non-significantly higher (by 15.7%) concentration of gamma-tocopherol was ascertained, when compared to the plasma concentration of those compounds in the non-smoking group. Practically no difference in concentration of retinol was found between the two studied groups. In order to determine the magnitude of interdependency between the extensiveness of exposure to tobacco smoke and the concentration of analyzed antioxidants, correlations between their plasma concentrations and plasma concentration of cotinine were investigated. A significant, moderate and negative correlation of alpha-tocopherol versus cotinin was determined, in the smoking group as well as in the entire study population (r = -0.291 and r = - 0,317, respectively). Other relationship: gamma-tocopherol versus cotinine and retinol versus cotinine did not show any correlation. The obtained results suggest that tobacco smoke weakens the organism's antioxidant barrier by decreasing the concentration of plasma alpha-tocopherol, while not influencing significantly the plasma

  8. The effect of interval versus continuous exercise on plasma leptin and ghrelin concentration in young trotters.

    PubMed

    Kowalik, S; Kedzierski, W

    2011-01-01

    The effect of interval vs. continuous exercise on plasma leptin and ghrelin concentration in young Standardbred horses was studied. The experiment was conducted on 27 trotters, in the age between 2 and 3 years. They were divided into two groups according to the type of exercise. Blood samples were collected through jugular venipuncture in the following experimental conditions: at rest, immediately after exercise and 30 minutes after the end of the effort. Plasma leptin and ghrelin concentrations were determined using RIA tests. The continuous exercise induced an increase in plasma leptin concentration whereas the interval type of exercise did not influence the level of this hormone (3.47 +/- 0.78 vs. 4.07 +/- 0.94 and 2.31 +/- 0.15 vs. 2.36 +/- 0.21 ng/mL, respectively). The plasma ghrelin concentration measured after the continuous exercise, significantly increased (720 +/- 27.4 vs. 814 +/- 13.8; p < or = 0.05) whereas concentration of this hormone assessed after the interval exercise, significantly dropped (982 +/- 56.5 vs. 842 +/- 35.6 pg/mL; p < or = 0.05). The changes in plasma ghrelin concentration measured after the end of the effort correlated inversely with blood lactic acid concentration. In conclusion, the obtained results showed that medium-intensive type of exercise, such as trot, interval or continuous, slightly affected plasma leptin level but significantly affected plasma ghrelin concentration in young Standardbred trotters.

  9. Plasma adiponectin concentration is associated with skeletal muscle insulin receptor tyrosine phosphorylation, and low plasma concentration precedes a decrease in whole-body insulin sensitivity in humans.

    PubMed

    Stefan, Norbert; Vozarova, Barbora; Funahashi, Tohru; Matsuzawa, Yuji; Weyer, Christian; Lindsay, Robert S; Youngren, Jack F; Havel, Peter J; Pratley, Richard E; Bogardus, Clifton; Tataranni, P Antonio

    2002-06-01

    Adiponectin, the most abundant adipose-specific protein, has been found to be negatively associated with degree of adiposity and positively associated with insulin sensitivity in Pima Indians and other populations. Moreover, adiponectin administration to rodents has been shown to increase insulin-induced tyrosine phosphorylation of the insulin receptor (IR) and also increase whole-body insulin sensitivity. To further characterize the relationship between plasma adiponectin concentration and insulin sensitivity in humans, we examined 1) the cross-sectional association between plasma adiponectin concentration and skeletal muscle IR tyrosine phosphorylation and 2) the prospective effect of plasma adiponectin concentration at baseline on change in insulin sensitivity. Fasting plasma adiponectin concentration, body composition (hydrodensitometry or dual energy X-ray absorptiometry), insulin sensitivity (insulin-stimulated glucose disposal, hyperinsulinemic clamp), and glucose tolerance (75-g oral glucose tolerance test) were measured in 55 Pima Indians (47 men and 8 women, aged 31 +/- 8 years, body fat 29 +/- 8% [mean +/- SD]; 50 with normal glucose tolerance, 3 with impaired glucose tolerance, and 2 with diabetes). Group 1 (19 subjects) underwent skeletal muscle biopsies for the measurement of basal and insulin-stimulated tyrosine phosphorylation of the IR (stimulated by 100 nmol/l insulin). The fold increase after insulin stimulation was calculated as the ratio between maximal and basal phosphorylation. Group 2 (38 subjects) had follow-up measurements of insulin-stimulated glucose disposal. Cross-sectionally, plasma adiponectin concentration was positively associated with insulin-stimulated glucose disposal (r = 0.58, P < 0.0001) and negatively associated with percent body fat (r = -0.62, P < 0.0001) in the whole group. In group 1 plasma adiponectin was negatively associated with the basal (r = -0.65, P = 0.003) and positively associated with the fold increase in IR

  10. Plasma prion protein concentration and progression of Alzheimer disease

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Christian; Becker, Harry; Peter, Christoph; Lange, Katharina; Friede, Tim; Zerr, Inga

    2014-01-01

    Background/Objective: Recently, PrPc has been linked to AD pathogenesis. Second, a relation of PrPc plasma levels with cognitive status and decline of healthy elderly subjects has been reported. Therefore, we hypothesized baseline plasma levels of PrPc to be associated with AD progression in cognitive and functional domains. Materials and Methods: AD patients (n = 84) were included into an observational study at time of diagnosis. Baseline plasma PrPc levels were determined. Decline was assessed annually (mean follow-up time 3 years) with the aid of different standardized tests (MMSE, iADL, bADL, GDS, UPDRSIII). Multiple regression analyses were used to uncover potential associations between decline and PrPc levels. Results: No association of PrPc and decline could be established. Presence of diabetes mellitus was linked to slower deterioration. Intake of neuroleptic drugs or memantine was associated with faster progression. Conclusion: Plasma PrPc at baseline could not be shown to be related to AD progression in this study. An interesting association of diabetes mellitus and decline warrants further investigation. PMID:24549099

  11. Successful Treatment of Fluconazole-Resistant Oropharyngeal Candidiasis by a Combination of Fluconazole and Terbinafine

    PubMed Central

    Ghannoum, Mahmoud A.; Elewski, Boni

    1999-01-01

    Increasing incidence of resistance to conventional antifungal therapy has demanded that novel therapies be introduced. Recent in vitro studies have shown that combinations involving azoles and allylamines may be effective in inhibiting fluconazole-resistant fungi. In this report, we describe the case of a 39-year-old woman who presented with white patches on her buccal mucosa, tongue, and palate with a bright erythematous erosive base. A fungal culture revealed Candida albicans. The patient failed to respond to the initially prescribed fluconazole therapy. Failure of therapy can be attributed to a developed resistance to fluconazole from the patient’s intermittent use of this antifungal agent at varying dosages for the preceding 2 years due to a diagnosis of onychomycosis. In vitro testing of the culture from the patient showed elevated MICs of fluconazole, itraconzole, and terbinafine (MICs were 32, 0.5, and 64 μg/ml, respectively). Our goal was to combine therapies of fluconazole and terbinafine in an attempt to clear the fungal infection. Impressively, this combination resulted in the clearing of the clinical symptoms and the patient has successfully been asymptomatic for more than 12 months posttreatment. PMID:10548586

  12. Difference in virulence between fluconazole-susceptible and fluconazole-resistant Candida albicans in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Schulz, Bettina; Weber, Kai; Schmidt, Axel; Borg-von Zepelin, Margarete; Ruhnke, Markus

    2011-09-01

    Two Candida albicans isolates were collected from a HIV-positive patient with recurrent oropharyngeal candidosis (OPC). One isolate was taken during the first episode of oral candidosis [fluconazole susceptible (FLU-S), minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) = 0.25 mg l(-1) ] and the second after the patient developed refractory OPC and resistance to fluconazole (FLU-R, MIC = 64 mg l(-1)). Both isolates were clonally identical. Different in vitro studies were carried out to assess putative virulence factors of both isolates. Gene expressions of efflux pumps and CSH1 were determined as well as adherence to human epithelial cells, determination of proteinase secretion and biofilm formation activity. Virulence was studied using a disseminated mouse model. All mice challenged with the FLU-S isolate survived the experiment when FLU was given. However, when FLU was absent, the mortality of the FLU-S isolate was higher than that of the FLU-R isolate with no mice surviving the experiment. In vitro studies showed pronounced growth rates of the FLU-S isolate and a more intense biofilm-building activity compared with the FLU-R isolate. The FLU-R isolate highly up-regulated MDR1 and CSH1. This isolate also adhered stronger to the epithelial cell line. The results showed that FLU-S and FLU-R isolates exhibit different virulence factors, which enable the survival of both isolates in adapted environments.

  13. Plasma concentration of parasite DNA as a measure of disease severity in falciparum malaria.

    PubMed

    Imwong, Mallika; Woodrow, Charles J; Hendriksen, Ilse C E; Veenemans, Jacobien; Verhoef, Hans; Faiz, M Abul; Mohanty, Sanjib; Mishra, Saroj; Mtove, George; Gesase, Samwel; Seni, Amir; Chhaganlal, Kajal D; Day, Nicholas P J; Dondorp, Arjen M; White, Nicholas J

    2015-04-01

    In malaria-endemic areas, Plasmodium falciparum parasitemia is common in apparently healthy children and severe malaria is commonly misdiagnosed in patients with incidental parasitemia. We assessed whether the plasma Plasmodium falciparum DNA concentration is a useful datum for distinguishing uncomplicated from severe malaria in African children and Asian adults. P. falciparum DNA concentrations were measured by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in 224 African children (111 with uncomplicated malaria and 113 with severe malaria) and 211 Asian adults (100 with uncomplicated malaria and 111 with severe malaria) presenting with acute falciparum malaria. The diagnostic accuracy of plasma P. falciparum DNA concentrations in identifying severe malaria was 0.834 for children and 0.788 for adults, similar to that of plasma P. falciparum HRP2 levels and substantially superior to that of parasite densities (P < .0001). The diagnostic accuracy of plasma P. falciparum DNA concentrations plus plasma P. falciparum HRP2 concentrations was significantly greater than that of plasma P. falciparum HRP2 concentrations alone (0.904 for children [P = .004] and 0.847 for adults [P = .003]). Quantitative real-time PCR measurement of parasite DNA in plasma is a useful method for diagnosing severe falciparum malaria on fresh or archived plasma samples.

  14. Effect of azole antifungals ketoconazole and fluconazole on the pharmacokinetics of dexloxiglumide.

    PubMed

    Jakate, Abhijeet S; Roy, Partha; Patel, Alpita; Abramowitz, Wattanaporn; Persiani, Stefano; Wangsa, Julie; Kapil, Ram

    2005-11-01

    Dexloxiglumide is a new CCK(1) receptor antagonist under investigation for treatment of functional gastrointestinal disorders and is metabolized by CYP3A4 and CYP2C9. The objectives of these two separate randomized, two-period, two-treatment crossover studies were to investigate the effects of steady-state ketoconazole, a model CYP3A4 inhibitor (Study 1), and steady-state fluconazole, a model CYP2C9 inhibitor (Study 2), on the pharmacokinetics of dexloxiglumide in healthy subjects. Plasma samples were analysed for dexloxiglumide and its primary metabolites: O-demethyl dexloxiglumide (ODM; Study 1 and 2) and dexloxiglumide carboxylic acid (DCA; Study 2). Following ketoconazole coadministration, dexloxiglumide C(max) increased by 32% (90% confidence intervals (CI) 112-154), with unchanged ODM C(max); AUC of dexloxiglumide and ODM increased by 36% (90% CI 124-140 and 128-142, respectively). No changes were observed in dexloxiglumide or ODM t((1/2)). Fluconazole coadministration caused a 77% increase (90% CI 154-204) in dexloxiglumide C(max), no change in ODM C(max) and a 32% decrease (90% CI 62-75) in DCA C(max). Fluconazole coadministration resulted in a 2.5-fold increase (90% CI 235-267) in dexloxiglumide AUC, 40% increase (90% CI 136-156) in ODM AUC and an 18% decrease (90% CI 82-94) in DCA AUC. The t((1/2)) of all three analytes increased by approximately 2-fold with fluconazole coadministration (P-value < 0.05). Ketoconazole caused a minimal increase while fluconazole caused a moderate increase in dexloxiglumide systemic exposure with no change in the adverse event profile of dexloxiglumide.

  15. Is plasma urotensin II concentration an indicator of myocardial damage in patients with acute coronary syndrome?

    PubMed Central

    Babińska, Magdalena; Holecki, Michał; Prochaczek, Fryderyk; Owczarek, Aleksander; Kokocińska, Danuta; Więcek, Andrzej

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Urotensin II (UII) is a vasoactive peptide secreted by endothelial cells. Increased plasma UII concentration was observed in patients with heart failure, liver cirrhosis, diabetic nephropathy and renal insufficiency. In patients with myocardial infarction both increased and decreased plasma UII concentrations were demonstrated. The aim of this study was to analyze whether plasma UII concentration reflects the severity of acute coronary syndrome (ACS). Material and methods One hundred and forty-nine consecutive patients with ACS, without age limit, were enrolled in the study. In all patients plasma concentration of creatinine, creatine kinase isoenzyme MB (CK-MB), troponin C, N-terminal prohormone of brain natriuretic peptide (NT-pro BNP), and UII were assessed, and echocardiography was performed in order to assess the degree of left ventricular hypertrophy, ejection fraction (EF) and mass (LVM). Results In patients with the highest risk (TIMI 5-7) plasma UII concentration was significantly lower than in those with low risk (TIMI 1-2): 2.61±1.47 ng/ml vs. 3.60±2.20 ng/ml. Significantly lower plasma UII concentration was found in patients with increased concentration of troponin C (2.60±1.52 ng/ml vs. 3.41±2.09 ng/ml). There was a significant negative correlation between plasma UII concentration and TIMI score or concentration of troponin C, but not CK-MB. Borderline correlation between plasma UII and ejection fraction (R = 0.157; p=0.063) or NT-proBNP (R = − 0.156; p=0.058) was found. Conclusions Decreased plasma urotensin II concentration in patients with ACS could be associated with more severe injury of myocardium. PMID:22851999

  16. Synergistic effect of doxycycline and fluconazole against Candida albicans biofilms and the impact of calcium channel blockers.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yuan; Zhang, Caiqing; Lu, Chunyan; Liu, Ping; Li, Yan; Li, Hui; Sun, Shujuan

    2013-08-01

    Candida albicans is a clinically important fungus and is capable of forming biofilms, which contributes to the emergence of fluconazole resistance. Here, sessile minimum inhibitory concentrations (SMICs) of fluconazole combined with doxycycline against biofilms of C. albicans were determined, and the results of SMICs were compared with minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of planktonic cells. SMICs and MICs were determined by microdilution checkerboard method, and the interactions between two drugs were interpreted by two models of fractional inhibitory concentration index and the percentage of growth difference (ΔE). For the biofilms formed over 4, 8, and 12 h, synergism was displayed by the combination of doxycycline(1-64 mg L(-1)) and fluconazole, and the fluconazole SMIC reduced from 64-512 mg L(-1) to 1-16 mg L(-1) against all the tested isolates. Calcium homeostasis is an important factor in growth of C. albicans. In this study, the impact of calcium channel blocker on the drug combination was observed by plate streaking and determined by liquid methods quantitatively. Obvious enhancement of antifungal effect appeared by combination of three drugs. These results show us that fluconazole combined with doxycycline could be effective against C. albicans biofilm, and the combined antifungal mechanism is associated with calcium.

  17. Synergistic in vitro activity of sodium houttuyfonate with fluconazole against clinical Candida albicans strains under planktonic growing conditions.

    PubMed

    Shao, Jing; Cui, YanYan; Zhang, MengXiang; Wang, TianMing; Wu, DaQiang; Wang, ChangZhong

    2017-12-01

    Fluconazole resistance is an intractable problem of treating Candida albicans, calling for more antifungal agents to enhance the activity of fluconazole. This work investigates the anti-C. albicans activities of sodium houttuyfonate (SH) and/or fluconazole and the associated mechanism. The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of SH and fluconazole both ranging from 0.5 to 1024 μg/mL were determined by broth microdilution method in 19 C. albicans isolates, and their fractional inhibitory concentration index (FICI) was evaluated by checkerboard assay. After MICSH and/or MICfluconazole treatments, the expressions of IFD6, PHR1, ZAP1, ADH5, BGL2, XOG1 and FKS1 were analyzed by quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) in C. albicans 1601. The MICs of SH alone ranged from 32 to 256 μg/mL and decreased 2-16-fold in combination. SH showed strong synergism with fluconazole with FICI <0.13-0.5. In C. albicans 1601, we observed that (i) the expression of the seven genes increased notably in a range between 3.71- and 12.63-fold (p < 0.05) when SH was used alone, (ii) the combined use of SH and fluconazole slightly inhibited the expression of IFD6 and PHR1 by 1.23- and 1.35-fold (p > 0.05), but promoted evidently the expression of ZAP1, ADH5, XOG1 and FKS1 by 1.98-, 3.56-, 4.10- and 2.86-fold (p < 0.05). The results suggested SH to be a potential synergist to enhance the antifungal activity of fluconazole in C. albicans resistant isolates, and the underlying mechanism may be associated with β-1,3-glucan synthesis and transportation.

  18. Plasma soluble (pro)renin receptor is independent of plasma renin, prorenin, and aldosterone concentrations but is affected by ethnicity.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Geneviève; Blanchard, Anne; Curis, Emmanuel; Bergerot, Damien; Chambon, Yann; Hirose, Takuo; Caumont-Prim, Aurore; Tabard, Sylvie Brailly; Baron, Stéphanie; Frank, Michael; Totsune, Kazuhito; Azizi, Michel

    2014-02-01

    A soluble (pro)renin receptor (sPRR) circulates in plasma and is able to bind renin and prorenin. It is not known whether plasma sPRR concentrations vary with the activity of the renin-angiotensin system. We measured plasma sPRR, renin, prorenin, and aldosterone concentrations in 121 white and 9 black healthy subjects, 40 patients with diabetes mellitus, 41 hypertensive patients with or without renin-angiotensin system blockers, 9 patients with primary aldosteronism, and 10 patients with Gitelman syndrome. Median physiological plasma sPRR concentration was 23.5 ng/mL (interquartile range, 20.9-26.5) under usual uncontrolled sodium diet. sPRR concentration in healthy subjects, unlike renin and prorenin, did not display circadian variation or dependence on age, sex, posture, or hormonal status. sPRR concentrations were ≈25% lower in black than in white subjects, whereas renin concentrations were ≈40% lower. Patients with diabetes mellitus (average renin-high prorenin levels) and with hypertension only (average renin-average prorenin levels) had sPRR concentrations similar to healthy subjects. Renin-angiotensin system blockade was associated with increase of sPRR concentration by ≈12%. sPRR in patients with primary aldosteronism (low renin-low prorenin) and Gitelman syndrome (high renin-high prorenin) were similar and ≈10% higher than in healthy subjects. There was no correlation between sPRR and renin or prorenin. In conclusion, our results show that plasma sPRR concentrations are dependent on ethnicity and independent of renin, prorenin, and aldosterone concentrations in healthy subjects and in patients with contrasted degrees of renin-angiotensin system activity.

  19. Active-site concentrations of chemicals - are they a better predictor of effect than plasma/organ/tissue concentrations?

    PubMed

    Hammarlund-Udenaes, Margareta

    2010-03-01

    Active-site concentrations can be defined as the concentrations of unbound, pharmacologically active substances at the site of action. In contrast, the total concentrations of the drug in plasma/organ/tissue also include the protein- or tissue-bound molecules that are pharmacologically inactive. Plasma and whole tissue concentrations are used as predictors of effects and side effects because of their ease of sampling, while the concentrations of unbound drug in tissue are more difficult to measure. However, with the introduction of microdialysis and subsequently developed techniques, it has become possible to test the free drug hypothesis. The brain is an interesting organ in this regard because of the presence of the blood-brain barrier with its tight junctions and active efflux and influx transporters. We have proposed that research into brain drug delivery be divided into three main areas: the rate of delivery (PS, CL(in)), the extent of delivery (K(p,uu)) and the non-specific affinity of the drug to brain tissue, described by the volume of distribution of unbound drug in the brain (V(u,brain)). In this way, the concentration of unbound drug at the target site can be estimated from the total brain concentration and the plasma concentration after measuring the fraction of unbound drug. Results so far fully support the theory that active site concentrations are the best predictors when active transport is present. However, there is an urgent need to collect more relevant data for predicting active site concentrations in tissues with active transporters in their plasma membranes.

  20. Variable aromatase inhibitor plasma concentrations do not correlate with circulating estrogen concentrations in post-menopausal breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Hertz, Daniel L; Speth, Kelly A; Kidwell, Kelley M; Gersch, Christina L; Desta, Zeruesenay; Storniolo, Anna Maria; Stearns, Vered; Skaar, Todd C; Hayes, Daniel F; Henry, N Lynn; Rae, James M

    2017-06-22

    The aromatase inhibitors (AI) exemestane (EXE), letrozole (LET), and anastrozole suppress estrogen biosynthesis, and are effective treatments for estrogen receptor (ER)-positive breast cancer. Prior work suggests that anastrozole blood concentrations are associated with the magnitude of estrogen suppression. The objective of this study was to determine whether the magnitude of estrogen suppression, as determined by plasma estradiol (E2) concentrations, in EXE or LET treated patients is associated with plasma AI concentrations. Five hundred post-menopausal women with ER-positive breast cancer were enrolled in the prospective Exemestane and Letrozole Pharmacogenetic (ELPh) Study conducted by the COnsortium on BReast cancer phArmacogomics (COBRA) and randomly assigned to either drug. Estrogen concentrations were measured at baseline and after 3 months of AI treatment and drug concentrations were measured after 1 or 3 months. EXE or LET concentrations were compared with 3-month E2 concentration or the change from baseline to 3 months using several complementary statistical procedures. Four-hundred patients with on-treatment E2 and AI concentrations were evaluable (EXE n = 200, LET n = 200). Thirty (7.6%) patients (EXE n = 13, LET n = 17) had 3-month E2 concentrations above the lower limit of quantification (LLOQ) (median: 4.75; range: 1.42-63.8 pg/mL). EXE and LET concentrations were not associated with on-treatment E2 concentrations or changes in E2 concentrations from baseline (all p > 0.05). Steady-state plasma AI concentrations do not explain variability in E2 suppression in post-menopausal women receiving EXE or LET therapy, in contrast with prior evidence in anastrozole treated patients.

  1. Plasma 8-iso-Prostaglandin F2α concentrations and outcomes after acute intracerebral hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Du, Quan; Yu, Wen-Hua; Dong, Xiao-Qiao; Yang, Ding-Bo; Shen, Yong-Feng; Wang, Hao; Jiang, Li; Du, Yuan-Feng; Zhang, Zu-Yong; Zhu, Qiang; Che, Zhi-Hao; Liu, Qun-Jie

    2014-11-01

    Higher plasma 8-iso-Prostaglandin F2α concentrations have been associated with poor outcome of severe traumatic brain injury. We further investigated the relationships between plasma 8-iso-Prostaglandin F2α concentrations and clinical outcomes in patients with acute intracerebral hemorrhage. Plasma 8-iso-Prostaglandin F2α concentrations of 128 consecutive patients and 128 sex- and gender-matched healthy subjects were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. We assessed their relationships with disease severity and clinical outcomes including 1-week mortality, 6-month mortality and unfavorable outcome (modified Rankin Scale score>2). Plasma 8-iso-Prostaglandin F2α concentrations were substantially higher in patients than in healthy controls. Plasma 8-iso-Prostaglandin F2α concentrations were positively associated with National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) scores and hematoma volume using a multivariate linear regression. It emerged as an independent predictor for clinical outcomes of patients using a forward stepwise logistic regression. ROC curves identified the predictive values of plasma 8-iso-Prostaglandin F2α concentrations, and found its predictive value was similar to NIHSS scores and hematoma volumes. However, it just numerically added the predictive values of NIHSS score and hematoma volume. Increased plasma 8-iso-Prostaglandin F2α concentrations are associated with disease severity and clinical outcome after acute intracerebral hemorrhage. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Decreased plasma isoleucine concentrations after upper gastrointestinal haemorrhage in humans.

    PubMed Central

    Dejong, C H; Meijerink, W J; van Berlo, C L; Deutz, N E; Soeters, P B

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A decrease in arterial isoleucine values after intragastric blood administration in pigs has been observed. This contrasted with increased values of most other amino acids, ammonia, and urea. After an isonitrogenous control meal in these pigs all amino acids including isoleucine increased, and urea increased to a lesser extent, suggesting a relation between the arterial isoleucine decrease and uraemia after gastrointestinal haemorrhage. METHODS: To extend these findings to humans, plasma amino acids were determined after gastrointestinal haemorrhage in patients with peptic ulcers (n = 9) or oesophageal varices induced by liver cirrhosis (n = 4) and compared with preoperative patients (n = 106). RESULTS: After gastrointestinal haemorrhage, isoleucine decreased in all patients by more than 60% and normalised within 48 hours. Most other amino acids increased and also normalised within 48 hours. Uraemia occurred in both groups, hyperammonaemia was seen in patients with liver cirrhosis. CONCLUSIONS: These results confirm previous findings in animals and healthy volunteers that plasma isoleucine decreases after simulated upper gastrointestinal haemorrhage. This supports the hypothesis that the absence of isoleucine in blood protein causes decreased plasma isoleucine values after gastrointestinal haemorrhage, and may be a contributory factor to uraemia and hyperammonaemia in patients with normal and impaired liver function, respectively. Intravenous isoleucine administration after gastrointestinal haemorrhage could be beneficial and will be the subject of further research. PMID:8881800

  3. Negative symptoms in nondeficit syndrome respond to neuroleptic treatment with changes in plasma homovanillic acid concentrations.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, E; Kanba, S; Koshikawa, H; Nibuya, M; Yagi, G; Asai, M

    1996-05-01

    Deficit syndrome (DS) in schizophrenia is characterized by serious, chronic, and primary negative symptoms. We investigated differences in response to neuroleptic treatment between 8 DS patients and 6 nondeficit syndrome (NDS) patients who had the selective dopamine-D2 receptor blocker bromperidol added to their neuroleptic regimens. First, 9 mg/d was administered for 4 weeks, followed by 18 mg/d for another 4 weeks. Plasma homovanillic acid (pHVA) and plasma bromperidol concentrations were measured, and psychiatric symptoms were scored. In the NDS patients, both positive and negative symptoms improved. However, only the positive symptom scores changed in the DS patients. On day 4, pHVA concentrations of the NDS patients alone were significantly elevated. Plasma bromperidol concentrations did not differ between the groups. These results suggest that bromperidol exerts different effects on negative symptoms and pHVA concentrations between NDS and DS patients, effects that are unrelated to plasma bromperidol concentrations.

  4. Negative symptoms in nondeficit syndrome respond to neuroleptic treatment with changes in plasma homovanillic acid concentrations.

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, E; Kanba, S; Koshikawa, H; Nibuya, M; Yagi, G; Asai, M

    1996-01-01

    Deficit syndrome (DS) in schizophrenia is characterized by serious, chronic, and primary negative symptoms. We investigated differences in response to neuroleptic treatment between 8 DS patients and 6 nondeficit syndrome (NDS) patients who had the selective dopamine-D2 receptor blocker bromperidol added to their neuroleptic regimens. First, 9 mg/d was administered for 4 weeks, followed by 18 mg/d for another 4 weeks. Plasma homovanillic acid (pHVA) and plasma bromperidol concentrations were measured, and psychiatric symptoms were scored. In the NDS patients, both positive and negative symptoms improved. However, only the positive symptom scores changed in the DS patients. On day 4, pHVA concentrations of the NDS patients alone were significantly elevated. Plasma bromperidol concentrations did not differ between the groups. These results suggest that bromperidol exerts different effects on negative symptoms and pHVA concentrations between NDS and DS patients, effects that are unrelated to plasma bromperidol concentrations. PMID:8935328

  5. Anti-Trichophyton Activity of Protocatechuates and Their Synergism with Fluconazole

    PubMed Central

    Gullo, Fernanda Patrícia; Sardi, Janaina de Cássia Orlandi; Costa-Orlandi, Caroline Barcelos; Sangalli-Leite, Fernanda; Scorzoni, Liliana; Regasini, Luis Octávio; Petrônio, Maicon Segalla; Souza, Patrícia Fernanda; Silva, Dulce Helena Siqueira; Mendes-Giannini, Maria José Soares

    2014-01-01

    Dermatophytosis and superficial mycosis are a major global public health problem that affects 20–25% of the world's population. The increase in fungal resistance to the commercially available antifungal agents, in conjunction with the limited spectrum of action of such drugs, emphasises the need to develop new antifungal agents. Natural products are attractive prototypes for antifungal agents due to their broad spectrum of biological activities. This study aimed to verify the antifungal activity of protocatechuic acid, 3,4-diacetoxybenzoic, and fourteen alkyl protocatechuates (3,4-dihydroxybenzoates) against Trichophyton rubrum and Trichophyton mentagrophytes and to further assess their activities when combined with fluconazole. Susceptibility and synergism assays were conducted as described in M38-A2 (CLSI), with modifications. Three strains of Trichophyton rubrum and three strains of Trichophyton mentagrophytes were used in this work. The pentyl, hexyl, heptyl, octyl, nonyl, and decyl protocatechuates showed great fungicidal effects, with minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) values ranging from 0.97 to 7.8 mg/L. Heptyl showed a synergistic activity (FIC index = 0.49), reducing the MIC of fluconazole by fourfold. All substances tested were safe, especially the hexyl, heptyl, octyl, and nonyl compounds, all of which showed a high selectivity index, particularly in combination with fluconazole. These ester associations with fluconazole may represent a promising source of prototypes in the search for anti-Trichophyton therapeutic agents. PMID:25136374

  6. Plasma lactate concentrations in free-ranging moose (Alces alces) immobilized with etorphine.

    PubMed

    Haga, Henning A; Wenger, Sandra; Hvarnes, Silje; Os, Oystein; Rolandsen, Christer M; Solberg, Erling J

    2009-11-01

    To investigate plasma lactate concentrations of etorphine-immobilized moose in relation to environmental, temporal and physiological parameters. Prospective clinical study. Fourteen female and five male moose (Alces alces), estimated age range 1-7 years. The moose were darted from a helicopter with 7.5 mg etorphine per animal using projectile syringes and a dart gun. Once immobilized, the moose were approached, a venous blood sample was obtained and vital signs including pulse oximetry were recorded. Diprenorphine was administered to reverse the effects of etorphine. Timing of events, ambient temperature and snow depth were recorded. Blood samples were cooled and centrifuged before plasma was harvested and frozen. The plasma was thawed later and lactate analysed. Data were analysed using descriptive statistics and regression analysis. All animals recovered uneventfully and were alive 12 weeks after immobilization. Mean +/- SD plasma lactate was found to be 9.2 +/- 2.1 mmol L(-1). Plasma lactate concentrations were related positively to snow depth and negatively to time from induction of immobilization to blood sampling. The model that best described the variability in plasma lactate concentrations used induction time (time from firing the dart to the moose being immobilized). The second best model included induction time and snow depth. Plasma lactate concentrations in these etorphine-immobilized moose were in the range reported for other immobilized wild ruminants. Decreasing induction time, which may be related to a more profound etorphine effect, and increasing snow depth possibly may increase plasma lactate concentrations in etorphine-immobilized moose.

  7. Tacrolimus-induced elevation in plasma triglyceride concentrations after administration to renal transplant patients is partially due to a decrease in lipoprotein lipase activity and plasma concentrations.

    PubMed

    Tory, Rita; Sachs-Barrable, Kristina; Goshko, Caylee-Britt; Hill, John S; Wasan, Kishor M

    2009-07-15

    Hyperlipidemia is a frequent and persistent complication in solid organ transplant recipients, leading to the high occurrence of cardiovascular disease in this patient population. Lipid abnormalities including increased total cholesterol, triglycerides (TG), and low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol have been reported frequently in transplantation patients and a variety of immunosuppressive therapies seem to be one of the main factors that influence posttransplant lipidemic profiles. For many years, tacrolimus (TAC) has been used as an immunosuppressive drug in transplantation. The aim of our investigation was to determine the effect of TAC administration on the plasma lipid profile and some key regulatory proteins of plasma lipid metabolism including cholesterol ester transfer protein, hepatic lipase and lipoprotein lipase (LPL) within renal transplant patients. Twenty-five renal transplant patients were recruited and received TAC therapy, of which nine of these patients were treated with statin therapy for dyslipidemia. The effects of TAC on plasma total cholesterol, TG, HDL-C, low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol, cholesterol ester transfer protein, hepatic lipase and LPL concentration and activity were determined from patients plasma samples collected before the transplant surgery (baseline), and weekly for four consecutive weeks after surgery and TAC administration. We observed that TAC significantly increases plasma TG concentrations and reduces LPL plasma concentration and activity in renal transplant patients, independent of any lipid lowering drug treatment patients received. Taken together, these findings suggest that the reduction in LPL activity, partly due to the decrease of plasma LPL concentration after TAC administration may be an explanation for hypertriglyceridemia observed in patients administered TAC.

  8. Pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamic correlations of fluconazole in murine model of cryptococcosis.

    PubMed

    Santos, Julliana Ribeiro Alves; César, Isabela Costa; Costa, Marliete Carvalho; Ribeiro, Noelly Queiroz; Holanda, Rodrigo Assunção; Ramos, Lais Hott; Freitas, Gustavo José Cota; Paixão, Tatiane Alves; Pianetti, Gerson Antônio; Santos, Daniel Assis

    2016-09-20

    The emergence of fluconazole-resistant Cryptococcus gattii is a global concern, since this azole is the main antifungal used worldwide to treat patients with cryptococcosis. Although pharmacokinetic (PK) and pharmacodynamic (PD) indices are useful predictive factors for therapeutic outcomes, there is a scarcity of data regarding PK/PD analysis of antifungals in cryptococcosis caused by resistant strains. In this study, PK/PD parameters were determined in a murine model of cryptococcosis caused by resistant C. gattii. We developed and validated a suitable liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry method for PK studies of fluconazole in the serum, lungs, and brain of uninfected mice. Mice were infected with susceptible or resistant C. gattii, and the effects of different doses of fluconazole on the pulmonary and central nervous system fungal burden were determined. The peak levels in the serum, lungs, and brain were achieved within 0.5h. The AUC/MIC index (area under the curve/minimum inhibitory concentration) was associated with the outcome of anti-cryptococcal therapy. Interestingly, the maximum concentration of fluconazole in the brain was lower than the MIC for both strains. In addition, the treatment of mice infected with the resistant strain was ineffective even when high doses of fluconazole were used or when amphotericin B was tested, confirming the cross-resistance between these drugs. Altogether, our novel data provide the correlation of PK/PD parameters with antifungal therapy during cryptococcosis caused by resistant C. gattii. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Clozapine and norclozapine concentrations in serum and plasma samples from schizophrenic patients.

    PubMed

    Hermida, Jesús; Paz, Eduardo; Tutor, J Carlos

    2008-02-01

    At present, the determination of steady-state trough serum/plasma concentrations of clozapine is considered a useful tool for the clinical management of schizophrenic patients treated with this drug. In a previously published study, it was indicated that only plasma should be used to avoid a significant underestimation of clozapine and norclozapine concentrations; however, a formal evaluation of this topic has still not been made, and a consensus on the use of plasma or serum for therapeutic clozapine monitoring may be desirable. Paired samples of serum and plasma (K3EDTA solution contained in Vacutainer tubes) were obtained from 40 schizophrenic patients, and clozapine and norclozapine concentrations were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography. For the parent drug and its metabolite, serum concentrations were higher than in plasma (approximately 7%), although the correction of plasma concentrations in function of hematocrit values reduced this difference to 3%. High correlation coefficients were found between the serum and uncorrected or corrected plasma clozapine concentrations (r = 0.996, P < 0.001), with clinically acceptable differences between the means and standard error of the estimate and consequently with transferability of the results. The clozapine and norclozapine concentrations in five lithium heparin-containing plasma samples (371.9 +/- 226.7 ng/mL and 217.9 +/- 113.1 ng/mL) were analogous to the corresponding hematocrit-corrected EDTA-containing plasma values (374.4 +/- 225.4 ng/mL and 223.5 +/- 115.2 ng/mL), with correlation coefficients of r > or = 0.998 (P < 0.001). Serum or plasma samples may be used for the therapeutic monitoring of clozapine, and no practical advantages have been found with regard to the stability of the drug or imprecision obtained by using either type of biological matrix.

  10. Glycine and ammonia plasma concentrations during sedation with remifentanil in critically ill patients.

    PubMed

    Bonnet, Marie-Pierre; Minville, Vincent; Asehnoune, Karim; Bridoux, Delphine; Poggi-Bach, Joséphine; Duranteau, Jacques; Benhamou, Dan

    2007-07-01

    To investigate glycine and ammonia plasma concentrations during a 72-h remifentanil infusion and the relationship between glycine concentration and remifentanil infusion rate. A prospective open-label observational clinical trial in a trauma and a neurosurgical intensive care unit in a university teaching hospital. Nine consecutive patients requiring sedation and ventilatory support for at least 72 h. One was excluded due to acute cardiac failure. Patients were sedated with remifentanil and propofol. Glycine and ammonia plasma concentrations were measured every 12 h during an intravenous remifentanil infusion performed over 72 h, and 24 h after the end of the infusion. Cumulative remifentanil dose and rate of infusion were recorded for each patient. Clinical and biological signs of glycine toxicity were evaluated. Glycine and ammonia plasma concentrations did not exceed the toxic threshold at any time. Plasma glycine concentration measured at the end of remifentanil infusion was significantly correlated with the mean weighted rate of remifentanil infusion and with the cumulative remifentanil dose. A correlation between plasma glycine concentration and creatinine clearance at the end of remifentanil infusion was also documented. Plasma glycine concentration was correlated with the remifentanil cumulative dose and the infusion rate and did not reach the toxic threshold. As glycine concentration was also correlated with creatinine clearance and because remifentanil was the only source of exogenous glycine, additional data are necessary to ascertain the safety of remifentanil infusion in ICU patients.

  11. PLASMA ADIPONECTIN CONCENTRATIONS IN NON PREGNANT, NORMAL PREGNANCY AND OVERWEIGHT PREGNANT WOMEN

    PubMed Central

    Nien, Jyh Kae; Mazaki-Tovi, Shali; Romero, Roberto; Erez, Offer; Kusanovic, Juan Pedro; Gotsch, Francesca; Pineles, Beth L.; Gomez, Ricardo; Edwin, Samuel; Mazor, Moshe; Espinoza, Jimmy; Yoon, Bo Hyun; Hassan, Sonia S.

    2008-01-01

    Aims Adiponectin is an adipokine that has anti-diabetic, anti-atherogenic, anti-inflammatory and angiogenic properties. This hormone has been implicated in both the physiological adaptation to normal pregnancy and obstetrical complications. The aims of this study were to determine normal maternal plasma concentrations of adiponectin throughout gestation and to explore the relationships between plasma adiponectin concentration, pregnancy, and maternal overweight. Study design A cross-sectional study was designed to include normal pregnant women (normal weight and overweight; 11–42 weeks of gestation), and non-pregnant women. Plasma adiponectin concentration was determined by immunoassay. Non-parametric statistics were used for analysis. Results (1) Adiponectin was detectable in the plasma of all patients; (2) there was no significant difference in the median adiponectin concentrations between pregnant and non-pregnant women; (3) plasma adiponectin concentrations were negatively correlated with gestational age only among normal weight pregnant women; and (4) overweight patients had significantly lower adiponectin concentrations than normal weight women. Conclusion Consistent with the increased insulin resistance and weight gain that occur in pregnancy, adiponectin concentrations were negatively correlated with gestational age. The results of this study and the nomogram herein presented can serve as the basis to explore the relationship between adiponectin and pregnancy complications and facilitate the clinical use of this important adipokine. Condensation Plasma adiponectin concentrations decrease with advancing gestational age only in nonobese women. PMID:17919116

  12. Efficacy of PLD-118, a novel inhibitor of candida isoleucyl-tRNA synthetase, against experimental oropharyngeal and esophageal candidiasis caused by fluconazole-resistant C. albicans.

    PubMed

    Petraitis, Vidmantas; Petraitiene, Ruta; Kelaher, Amy M; Sarafandi, Alia A; Sein, Tin; Mickiene, Diana; Bacher, John; Groll, Andreas H; Walsh, Thomas J

    2004-10-01

    PLD-118, formerly BAY 10-8888, is a synthetic antifungal derivative of the naturally occurring beta-amino acid cispentacin. We studied the activity of PLD-118 in escalating dosages against experimental oropharyngeal and esophageal candidiasis (OPEC) caused by fluconazole (FLC)-resistant Candida albicans in immunocompromised rabbits. Infection was established by fluconazole-resistant (MIC > 64 microg/ml) clinical isolates from patients with refractory esophageal candidiasis. Antifungal therapy was administered for 7 days. Study groups consisted of untreated controls; animals receiving PLD-118 at 4, 10, 25, or 50 mg/kg of body weight/day via intravenous (i.v.) twice daily (BID) injections; animals receiving FLC at 2 mg/kg/day via i.v. BID injections; and animals receiving desoxycholate amphotericin B (DAMB) i.v. at 0.5 mg/kg/day. PLD-118- and DAMB-treated animals showed a significant dosage-dependent clearance of C. albicans from the tongue, oropharynx, and esophagus in comparison to untreated controls (P plasma pharmacokinetics across the investigated dosage range, as was evident from a dose-dependent increase in plasma clearance and a dose-dependent decrease in the area under the plasma concentration-time curve. The biochemical safety profile was similar to that of FLC. In summary, PLD-118 demonstrated dosage-dependent antifungal activity and nonlinear plasma pharmacokinetics in treatment of experimental FLC-resistant oropharyngeal and esophageal candidiasis.

  13. Effects of rice bran oil on plasma lipid concentrations, lipoprotein composition, and glucose dynamics in mares.

    PubMed

    Frank, N; Andrews, F M; Elliott, S B; Lew, J; Boston, R C

    2005-11-01

    Plasma lipid concentrations, lipoprotein composition, and glucose dynamics were measured and compared between mares fed diets containing added water, corn oil (CO), refined rice bran oil (RR), or crude rice bran oil (CR) to test the hypothesis that rice bran oil lowers plasma lipid concentrations, alters lipoprotein composition, and improves insulin sensitivity in mares. Eight healthy adult mares received a basal diet fed at 1.5 times the DE requirement for maintenance and each of the four treatments according to a repeated 4 x 4 Latin square design consisting of four 5-wk feeding periods. Blood samples were collected for lipid analysis after mares were deprived of feed overnight at 0 and 5 wk. Glucose dynamics were assessed at 0 and 4 wk in fed mares by combined intravenous glucose-insulin tolerance tests. Plasma glucose and insulin concentrations were measured, and estimated values of insulin sensitivity (SI), glucose effectiveness, and net insulin response were obtained using the minimal model. Mean BW increased (P = 0.014) by 29 kg (range = 10 to 50 kg) over 5 wk. Mean plasma concentrations of NEFA, triglyceride (TG), and very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL) decreased (P < 0.001) by 55, 30, and 39%, respectively, and plasma high-density lipoprotein and total cholesterol (TC) concentrations increased (P < 0.001) by 15 and 12%, respectively, over 5 wk. Changes in plasma NEFA (r = 0.58; P < 0.001) and TC (r = 0.44; P = 0.013) concentrations were positively correlated with weight gain over 5 wk. Lipid components of VLDL decreased (P < 0.001) in abundance over 5 wk, whereas the relative protein content of VLDL increased by 39% (P < 0.001). Addition of oil to the basal diet instead of water lowered plasma NEFA and TG concentrations further (P = 0.002 and 0.020, respectively) and increased plasma TC concentrations by a greater magnitude (P = 0.072). However, only plasma TG concentrations and VLDL free cholesterol content were affected (P = 0.024 and 0.009, respectively

  14. The QT interval: a predictor of the plasma and myocardial concentrations of amiodarone.

    PubMed Central

    Debbas, N M; du Cailar, C; Bexton, R S; Demaille, J G; Camm, A J; Puech, P

    1984-01-01

    A study was performed to assess whether plasma and myocardial concentrations of amiodarone correlated with changes on the surface electrocardiogram. Nine patients--seven with angina and two with paroxysmal ventricular tachycardia--were treated with oral amiodarone (200-400 mg daily) for at least nine months before undergoing cardiac surgery. QT intervals were measured from lead II of the surface electrocardiograms recorded before amiodarone treatment and immediately before surgery. Patients with prominent U waves after taking amiodarone were excluded from the study. Plasma and myocardial samples were collected at the beginning of the surgical procedure for estimating plasma and myocardial concentrations using the high performance liquid chromatographic technique. Amiodarone caused a significant lengthening of the QTc interval. There was a good correlation between plasma and myocardial concentrations, and both correlated well with the percentage increase in the QTc interval. Although there was a strong correlation between the dosage given (mg/kg/day) and both plasma and myocardial concentrations, the correlation with the percentage increase in the QTc interval was weaker but still highly significant. Despite previous reports to the contrary, the findings indicate that the plasma concentration of amiodarone does correlate well with the myocardial concentration. The degree of lengthening of the QTc interval may be used clinically to estimate the myocardial concentration of amiodarone. PMID:6696809

  15. High plasma uric acid concentration: causes and consequences

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    High plasma uric acid (UA) is a precipitating factor for gout and renal calculi as well as a strong risk factor for Metabolic Syndrome and cardiovascular disease. The main causes for higher plasma UA are either lower excretion, higher synthesis or both. Higher waist circumference and the BMI are associated with higher insulin resistance and leptin production, and both reduce uric acid excretion. The synthesis of fatty acids (tryglicerides) in the liver is associated with the de novo synthesis of purine, accelerating UA production. The role played by diet on hyperuricemia has not yet been fully clarified, but high intake of fructose-rich industrialized food and high alcohol intake (particularly beer) seem to influence uricemia. It is not known whether UA would be a causal factor or an antioxidant protective response. Most authors do not consider the UA as a risk factor, but presenting antioxidant function. UA contributes to > 50% of the antioxidant capacity of the blood. There is still no consensus if UA is a protective or a risk factor, however, it seems that acute elevation is a protective factor, whereas chronic elevation a risk for disease. PMID:22475652

  16. The effect of estrogens on plasma ghrelin concentrations in women.

    PubMed

    Dafopoulos, K; Chalvatzas, N; Kosmas, G; Kallitsaris, A; Pournaras, S; Messinis, I E

    2010-02-01

    Data regarding the possible effects of estrogen on ghrelin secretion in humans are limited and contradictory. To investigate the effect of estradiol (E2) on ghrelin levels in normal pre- and post-menopausal women. A total of 21 women divided into 3 groups, i.e.13 normally cycling women (no.=7, group 1 and no.=6, group 2) and 8 post-menopausal women (group 3). Women of group 1 received increasing doses of E2 through skin patches from cycle days 3 to 5. Women of group 2, underwent total abdominal hysterectomy plus bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy (TAH+BSO) on cycle day 3. Women of group 3 received po increasing doses of E2 valerate for 15 days. Acylated ghrelin and E2 were measured in all blood samples. In group 1, plasma ghrelin levels did not show any significant changes for the week following cycle day 3. In group 2, ghrelin levels were similar before and after TAH+BSO and remained stable during the first 7 post-operative days. In group 3, no significant changes in plasma ghrelin levels were seen during the 15 days of E2 administration. The present study demonstrates for the first time that ghrelin values were not affected either by exogenous short-term estrogen administration to pre- and post-menopausal women or following ovariectomy in pre-menopausal women. It is suggested that ovarian hormones are not involved in the regulation of ghrelin secretion in women.

  17. Plasma IL-5 concentration and subclinical carotid atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Silveira, Angela; McLeod, Olga; Strawbridge, Rona J.; Gertow, Karl; Sennblad, Bengt; Baldassarre, Damiano; Veglia, Fabrizio; Deleskog, Anna; Persson, Jonas; Leander, Karin; Gigante, Bruna; Kauhanen, Jussi; Rauramaa, Rainer; Smit, Andries J.; Mannarino, Elmo; Giral, Philippe; Gustafsson, Sven; Söderberg, Stefan; Öhrvik, John; Humphries, Steve E.; Tremoli, Elena; de Faire, Ulf; Hamsten, Anders

    2015-01-01

    Objective Genetic variants robustly associated with coronary artery disease were reported in the vicinity of the interleukin (IL)-5 locus, and animal studies suggested a protective role for IL-5 in atherosclerosis. Therefore, we set this work to explore IL-5 as a plasma biomarker for early subclinical atherosclerosis, as determined by measures of baseline severity and change over time of carotid intima-media thickness (cIMT). Methods We used biobank and databases of IMPROVE, a large European prospective cohort study of high-risk individuals (n = 3534) free of clinically overt cardiovascular disease at enrollment, in whom composite and segment-specific measures of cIMT were recorded at baseline and after 15 and 30 months. IL-5 was measured with an immunoassay in plasma samples taken at baseline. Results IL-5 levels were lower in women than in men, lower in the South than in North of Europe, and showed positive correlations with most established risk factors. IL-5 showed significant inverse relationships with cIMT change over time in the common carotid segment in women, but no significant relationships to baseline cIMT in either men or women. Conclusions Our results suggest that IL-5 may be part of protective mechanisms operating in early atherosclerosis, at least in women. However, the relationships are weak and whereas IL-5 has been proposed as a potential molecular target to treat allergies, it is difficult to envisage such a scenario in coronary artery disease. PMID:25587992

  18. MEASURING NICOTINE INTAKE AMONG HIGHLY DEPENDENT ADOLESCENT SMOKERS: COMPARABILITY OF SALIVA AND PLASMA COTININE CONCENTRATIONS

    PubMed Central

    Parzynski, Craig S.; Jaszyna-Gasior, Maria; Franken, Frederick H.; Moolchan, Eric T.

    2008-01-01

    Cotinine is the most common biomarker used to assess nicotine exposure and abstinence. It can be measured in various matrices including saliva, plasma, and urine. Previous research with adults has shown high correlations between saliva and plasma cotinine concentrations. However, research has not examined this relationship in adolescents. Additionally, variability in saliva flow and metabolism across gender, ethnicity, and age may impact the relationship between saliva and plasma cotinine concentration. Our aim was to examine the relationship between saliva and plasma cotinine concentration in a group of nicotine-dependent adolescent smokers. Additionally, we examined these correlations across gender, ethnicity and age. The sample consisted of 66 adolescent smokers (age 15.1 ± 1.3, 63.6% girls, 66.7% European American, CPD 18.3 ± 8.5, FTND 7.1 ± 1.3). Saliva and plasma specimens were collected before the treatment phase of a nicotine replacement therapy trial and analyzed. The relationship between saliva and plasma cotinine concentration was analyzed using Pearson’s correlation coefficients. We performed a secondary analysis using multiple regression to compare correlations across race, gender and age. Results indicated a positive correlation between saliva cotinine and plasma cotinine concentration (r = .84, p < .001). Differences in correlations across age were significant (t = 3.03, p < .01). Differences across ethnicity approached significance (t = −1.93, p = .058). Future research should seek to further validate saliva-to-plasma cotinine concentration ratios in adolescents as well as characterize saliva-to-plasma concentration differences and their underlying mechanisms. PMID:18199474

  19. On the relationship between plasma concentrations of drugs and outcome of stroke studies in laboratory animals.

    PubMed

    Curry, S H

    2001-06-01

    In assessing plasma concentrations of drugs in relation to neuroprotective effect, emphasis should be placed on measured or calculated concentrations during the window of opportunity for effect, rather than at the end of the experiment. Unbound (plasma free) concentrations should be especially considered as should brain penetration to the stroked area. Problem-solving exercises should include post hoc assessment of dosing residues and proof of exposure. The shape of the graph of response versus concentration in plasma is very steep, giving the impression of an all-or-none effect. Although higher doses lead to greater effects, attempts to statistically correlate plasma level and infarct size are likely to be unsuccessful. There is strong evidence that the pharmacokinetic properties of drugs are affected by the physiological consequences of ischemia.

  20. Plasma adiponectin concentration is strongly associated with VLDL-TG catabolism in postmenopausal women.

    PubMed

    Lapointe, A; Tchernof, A; Lamarche, B; Piché, M E; Weisnagel, J; Bergeron, J; Lemieux, S

    2011-04-01

    To investigate associations between plasma adiponectin concentration and very-low density lipoprotein-triglyceride (VLDL-TG) secretion and catabolism in postmenopausal women. This cross-sectional study included 30 postmenopausal women. Plasma adiponectin concentration was measured by ELISA. Insulin sensitivity was assessed by a 2-h euglycemic-hyperinsulinemic clamp. Fasting plasma glucose (FPG) and 2-hour plasma glucose (2hPG) were measured during an oral glucose tolerance test. The calculation of VLDL-TG fractional catabolic rate (FCR) and VLDL-TG total secretion rate (TSR) were based on the monoexponential decrease of TG-[²H₅] glycerol values obtained following the administration of a ²H₅-glycerol bolus. Plasma adiponectin concentration was negatively associated with VLDL-TG TSR (r=-0.50; p=0.005) and positively associated with VLDL-TG FCR (r=0.54; p<0.002). This latter association remained significant after further adjustments for insulin sensitivity, visceral adipose tissue, HDL-C, FPG and 2hPG concentrations. In a multivariate model including adiponectin, insulin sensitivity and 2hPG, plasma adiponectin level was the strongest correlate of VLDL-TG FCR. Elevated plasma adiponectin concentration is associated with a favourable VLDL-TG metabolism. Copyright © 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Evaluation of factors important in modeling plasma concentrations of tetracycline hydrochloride administered in water in swine.

    PubMed

    Mason, Sharon E; Almond, Glen W; Riviere, Jim E; Baynes, Ronald E

    2012-10-01

    To model the plasma tetracycline concentrations in swine (Sus scrofa domestica) treated with medication administered in water and determine the factors that contribute to the most accurate predictions of measured plasma drug concentrations. Plasma tetracycline concentrations measured in blood samples from 3 populations of swine. Data from previous studies provided plasma tetracycline concentrations that were measured in blood samples collected from 1 swine population at 0, 4, 8, 12, 24, 32, 48, 56, 72, 80, 96, and 104 hours and from 2 swine populations at 0, 12, 24, 48, and 72 hours hours during administration of tetracycline hydrochloride dissolved in water. A 1-compartment pharmacostatistical model was used to analyze 5 potential covariate schemes and determine factors most important in predicting the plasma concentrations of tetracycline in swine. 2 models most accurately predicted the tetracycline plasma concentrations in the 3 populations of swine. Factors of importance were body weight or age of pig, ambient temperature, concentration of tetracycline in water, and water use per unit of time. The factors found to be of importance, combined with knowledge of the individual pharmacokinetic and chemical properties of medications currently approved for administration in water, may be useful in more prudent administration of approved medications administered to swine. Factors found to be important in pharmacostatistical models may allow prediction of plasma concentrations of tetracycline or other commonly used medications administered in water. The ability to predict in vivo concentrations of medication in a population of food animals can be combined with bacterial minimum inhibitory concentrations to decrease the risk of developing antimicrobial resistance.

  2. Seasonal changes in concentrations of plasma hormones in the male ring dove (Streptopelia risoria).

    PubMed

    Lea, R W; Sharp, P J; Klandorf, H; Harvey, S; Dunn, I C; Vowles, D M

    1986-03-01

    Seasonal changes in concentrations of plasma LH, prolactin, thyroxine (T4), GH and corticosterone were measured in captive male ring doves exposed to natural lighting at latitude 56 degrees N. Plasma LH levels decreased steeply in autumn when the daylength fell below about 12.5 h but increased in November as the birds became short-day refractory. In comparison with plasma LH concentrations in a group of short-day refractory birds exposed to 6 h light/day from the winter solstice, plasma LH levels in birds exposed to natural lighting increased further in spring after the natural daylength reached about 12.5 h. There were no seasonal changes in plasma prolactin concentrations and plasma T4 concentrations were at their highest during December, January and February, the coldest months of the year. The seasonal fall in plasma LH levels in September was associated with a transitory increase in plasma T4, a transitory decrease in plasma corticosterone and a sustained increase in plasma GH. It is suggested that in the ring dove, short-day refractoriness develops rapidly in November to allow the bird to breed when the opportunity arises, during the winter and early spring. The annual breeding cycle is synchronized by a short-day induced regression of the reproductive system in the autumn, the primary function of which may be to enable the birds to meet the energy requirements for the annual moult. The changes in plasma T4, corticosterone and especially of GH at this time of year are probably concerned with the control of moult or the associated changes in energy requirements.

  3. Monitoring imatinib plasma concentrations in chronic myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Martins, Darlize Hübner; Wagner, Sandrine Comparsi; dos Santos, Tamyris Vianna; Lizot, Lilian de Lima Feltraco; Antunes, Marina Venzon; Capra, Marcelo; Linden, Rafael

    2011-01-01

    Imatinib has proved to be effective in the treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia, but plasma levels above 1,000 ng/mL must be achieved to optimize activity. Therapeutic drug monitoring of imatinib is useful for patients that do not present clinical response. There are several analytical methods to measure imatinib in biosamples, which are mainly based on liquid chromatography with mass spectrometric or diode array spectrophotometric detection. The former is preferred due to its lower cost and wider availability. The present manuscript presents a review of the clinical and analytical aspects of the therapeutic drug monitoring of imatinib in the treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia. The review includes references published over the last 10 years. There is evidence that the monitoring of plasmatic levels of imatinib is an useful alternative, especially considering the wide pharmacokinetic variability of this drug. PMID:23049322

  4. Analysis of the relationship between fluconazole consumption and non-C. albicans Candida infections.

    PubMed

    Tyczkowska-Sieron, E; Gaszynski, W; Tyczkowski, J; Glowacka, A

    2014-10-01

    The effect of fluconazole consumption on the incidence of nosocomial non-C. albicans Candida infections remains unclear. In this study we investigated such a relationship in an intensive care unit (Poland) over an 11-year period (2002-2012). Statistics relating to the number of candidiasis cases and the number of defined daily doses of fluconazole showed that only a very weak and not statistically significant linear correlation existed between these two variables (r(2) = 0.36, P = 0.052). However, the assumption of a 1-year delay in the infection response to changes in fluconazole concentrations resulted in a strong and statistically significant linear correlation (r(2) = 0.64, P = 0.0053). To more accurately determine the nature of this relationship, a simple epidemiological model was proposed that provided a better than linear correlation (r(2) = 0.78, P = 0.00077). We successfully used this approach to analyze results from the literature that were interpreted as evidence that fluconazole use is not a risk factor for development of non-C. albicans Candida infections. If a time delay in the infection response was assumed, a strong and statistically significant correlation was obtained. These findings suggest the need for a closer look at fluconazole therapy as a possible risk factor for development of non-C. albicans Candida infections. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The International Society for Human and Animal Mycology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Pasteurized, monoclonal antibody factor VIII concentrate: establishing a new standard for purity and viral safety of plasma-derived concentrates.

    PubMed

    Goldsmith, J C

    2000-03-01

    A factor VIII concentrate (Monoclate-P) manufactured using a combination of pasteurization and immunoaffinity chromatography has been chosen to compare and contrast manufacturing aspects of plasma-derived factor VIII concentrates. Pasteurization is a virucidal method with a long safety record in clinical practice, while immuno-affinity chromatography selectively isolates and purifies the procoagulant protein of factor VIII, and partitions potential viral contaminants and nonessential proteins to the unbound fraction. The complete Monoclate-P production process reduces human immunodeficiency virus by > or = 10.5 log10, Sindbis (a model for hepatitis C virus) by > or = 6.5 log10, and murine encephalomyocarditis virus (a non-enveloped model virus) by 7.1 log10. The viral safety of Monoclate-P has been further demonstrated in clinical studies in patients not previously treated with blood or plasma-derived products. Additionally, the manufacture of Monoclate-P includes careful donor screening and plasma testing for antibodies to syphilis and human immunodeficiency, hepatitis B, and hepatitis C viruses to enhance source plasma safety. Combined with donor selection and plasma testing, multiple viral reduction steps effectively eliminate both lipid-enveloped viruses (e.g. human immunodeficiency, hepatitis B and C) and non-lipid-enveloped viruses (e.g. hepatitis A). In addition, polymerase chain reaction-based nucleic acid detection tests for hepatitis B and C viruses and for human immunodeficiency virus-1 have been introduced as part of an investigational new drug mechanism.

  6. Plasma and gingival crevicular fluid phenytoin concentrations as risk factors for gingival overgrowth.

    PubMed

    Güncü, Güliz N; Caglayan, Feriha; Dinçel, Aysun; Bozkurt, Atilla; Saygi, Serap; Karabulut, Erdem

    2006-12-01

    Gingival enlargement is one of the side effects associated with the administration of phenytoin. The mechanism by which phenytoin induces gingival enlargement is not well understood. This study was conducted to investigate the relationship between plasma and gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) phenytoin concentrations and the degree of gingival overgrowth in patients with similar gingival and plaque indices and also to determine the risk factors for gingival enlargement. Eighteen patients taking phenytoin in regular doses > or =6 months prior to the investigation participated in the study. Gingival enlargement was evaluated with two indices to score vertical and horizontal overgrowth. The gingival index (GI), plaque index (PI), gingival bleeding time index (GBTI), probing depth (PD), and clinical attachment level (CAL) were also evaluated. GCF and plasma phenytoin concentrations were determined by using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). There was no significant difference between responders and non-responders for PD, CAL, PI, GI, and GBTI. Phenytoin was detected in all of the GCF and plasma samples using the HPLC analysis method. The mean concentration of phenytoin in GCF was significantly greater than the concentration of phenytoin in plasma. No significant difference was observed for the concentration of GCF phenytoin between responders and non-responders. However, the concentration of plasma phenytoin was significantly higher in responders than non-responders. This study showed that plasma phenytoin level appeared to be a risk factor for phenytoin-induced gingival overgrowth.

  7. Concentration of platelets and growth factors in platelet-rich plasma from Goettingen minipigs.

    PubMed

    Jungbluth, Pascal; Grassmann, Jan-Peter; Thelen, Simon; Wild, Michael; Sager, Martin; Windolf, Joachim; Hakimi, Mohssen

    2014-01-01

    In minipigs little is known about the concentration of growth factors in plasma, despite their major role in several patho-physiological processes such as healing of fractures. This prompted us to study the concentration of platelets and selected growth factors in plasma and platelet-rich plasma (PRP) preparation of sixteen Goettingen minipigs. Platelet concentrations increased significantly in PRP in comparison to native blood plasma. Generally, significant increase in the concentration of all growth factors tested was observed in the PRP in comparison to the corresponding plasma or serum. Five of the plasma samples examined contained detectable levels of bone morphogenic protein 2 (BMP-2) whereas eleven of the plasma or serum samples contained minimal amounts of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF-bb) respectively. On the other hand variable concentrations of bone morphogenic protein 7 (BMP-7) and transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1) were measured in all plasma samples. In contrast, all PRP samples contained significantly increased amounts of growth factors. The level of BMP-2, BMP-7, TGF-β1, VEGF and PDGF-bb increased by 17.6, 1.5, 7.1, 7.2 and 103.3 fold, in comparison to the corresponding non-enriched preparations. Moreover significant positive correlations were found between platelet count and the concentrations of BMP-2 (r=0.62, p<0.001), TGF-β1 (r=0.85, p<0.001), VEGF (r=0.46, p<0.01) and PDGF-bb (r=0.9, p<0.001). Our results demonstrate that selected growth factors are present in the platelet-rich plasma of minipigs which might thus serve as a source of autologous growth factors.

  8. Differential Responses of Plasma Adropin Concentrations To Dietary Glucose or Fructose Consumption In Humans

    PubMed Central

    Butler, Andrew A.; St-Onge, Marie-Pierre; Siebert, Emily A.; Medici, Valentina; Stanhope, Kimber L.; Havel, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    Adropin is a peptide hormone encoded by the Energy Homeostasis Associated (ENHO) gene whose physiological role in humans remains incompletely defined. Here we investigated the impact of dietary interventions that affect systemic glucose and lipid metabolism on plasma adropin concentrations in humans. Consumption of glucose or fructose as 25% of daily energy requirements (E) differentially affected plasma adropin concentrations (P < 0.005) irrespective of duration, sex or age. Glucose consumption reduced plasma adropin from 3.55 ± 0.26 to 3.28 ± 0.23 ng/ml (N = 42). Fructose consumption increased plasma adropin from 3.63 ± 0.29 to 3.93 ± 0.34 ng/ml (N = 45). Consumption of high fructose corn syrup (HFCS) as 25% E had no effect (3.43 ± 0.32 versus 3.39 ± 0.24 ng/ml, N = 26). Overall, the effect of glucose, HFCS and fructose on circulating adropin concentrations were similar to those observed on postprandial plasma triglyceride concentrations. Furthermore, increases in plasma adropin levels with fructose intake were most robust in individuals exhibiting hypertriglyceridemia. Individuals with low plasma adropin concentrations also exhibited rapid increases in plasma levels following consumption of breakfasts supplemented with lipids. These are the first results linking plasma adropin levels with dietary sugar intake in humans, with the impact of fructose consumption linked to systemic triglyceride metabolism. In addition, dietary fat intake may also increase circulating adropin concentrations. PMID:26435060

  9. Concentration of platelets and growth factors in platelet-rich plasma from Goettingen minipigs

    PubMed Central

    Jungbluth, Pascal; Grassmann, Jan-Peter; Thelen, Simon; Wild, Michael; Sager, Martin; Windolf, Joachim; Hakimi, Mohssen

    2014-01-01

    In minipigs little is known about the concentration of growth factors in plasma, despite their major role in several patho-physiological processes such as healing of fractures. This prompted us to study the concentration of platelets and selected growth factors in plasma and platelet-rich plasma (PRP) preparation of sixteen Goettingen minipigs. Platelet concentrations increased significantly in PRP in comparison to native blood plasma. Generally, significant increase in the concentration of all growth factors tested was observed in the PRP in comparison to the corresponding plasma or serum. Five of the plasma samples examined contained detectable levels of bone morphogenic protein 2 (BMP-2) whereas eleven of the plasma or serum samples contained minimal amounts of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF-bb) respectively. On the other hand variable concentrations of bone morphogenic protein 7 (BMP-7) and transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1) were measured in all plasma samples. In contrast, all PRP samples contained significantly increased amounts of growth factors. The level of BMP-2, BMP-7, TGF-β1, VEGF and PDGF-bb increased by 17.6, 1.5, 7.1, 7.2 and 103.3 fold, in comparison to the corresponding non-enriched preparations. Moreover significant positive correlations were found between platelet count and the concentrations of BMP-2 (r=0.62, p<0.001), TGF-β1 (r=0.85, p<0.001), VEGF (r=0.46, p<0.01) and PDGF-bb (r=0.9, p<0.001). Our results demonstrate that selected growth factors are present in the platelet-rich plasma of minipigs which might thus serve as a source of autologous growth factors. PMID:26504722

  10. Platelet-rich plasma releasate differently stimulates cellular commitment toward the chondrogenic lineage according to concentration

    PubMed Central

    Matsiko, Amos; Tomazette, Marcel RP; Rocha, Wanessa KR; Cordeiro-Spinetti, Eric; Levingstone, Tanya J; Farina, Marcos; O’Brien, Fergal J; El-Cheikh, Marcia C; Balduino, Alex

    2015-01-01

    Platelet-rich plasma has been used to treat articular cartilage defects, with the expectations of anabolic and anti-inflammatory effects. However, its role on cellular chondrogenic or fibrogenic commitment is still a controversy. Herein, the role of platelet-rich plasma releasate, the product obtained following platelet-rich plasma activation, on cellular commitment toward the chondrogenic lineage was evaluated in vitro. Human nasoseptal chondrogenic cells and human bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells were used as cell types already committed to the chondrogenic lineage and undifferentiated cells, respectively, as different concentrations of platelet-rich plasma releasate were tested in comparison to commonly used fetal bovine serum. Low concentration of platelet-rich plasma releasate (2.5%) presented similar effects on cellular growth compared to 10% fetal bovine serum, for both cell types. In a three-dimensional culture system, platelet-rich plasma releasate alone did not induce full nasoseptal chondrogenic cells cartilage-like pellet formation. Nonetheless, platelet-rich plasma releasate played a significant role on cell commitment as high-passage nasoseptal chondrogenic cells only originated cartilage-like pellets when expanded in the presence of platelet-rich plasma releasate rather than fetal bovine serum. Histological analyses and measurements of pellet area demonstrated that even low concentrations of platelet-rich plasma releasate were enough to prevent nasoseptal chondrogenic cells from losing their chondrogenic potential due to in vitro expansion thereby promoting their recommitment. Low concentration of platelet-rich plasma releasate supplemented in chondrogenic medium also increased the chondrogenic potential of mesenchymal stromal cells seeded on collagen-hyaluronic acid scaffolds, as observed by an increase in chondrogenic-related gene expression, sulfated glycosaminoglycan production, and compressive modulus following in vitro culture. On the

  11. Coronary Artery Vitamin D Receptor Expression and Plasma Concentrations of Vitamin D: Their Association with Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Schnatz, Peter F.; Nudy, Matthew; O’Sullivan, David M.; Jiang, Xuezhi; Cline, J. Mark; Kaplan, Jay R.; Clarkson, Thomas B.; Appt, Susan E.

    2012-01-01

    Objective To analyze coronary artery vitamin D receptor (VDR) expression, plasma concentration of vitamin D3 [25OHD3], and their relationship with coronary artery atherosclerosis. Methods Premenopausal cynomolgus monkeys were fed atherogenic diets containing the equivalent of 1,000 IU/day of 25OHD3. Protein was derived from casein-lactalbumin (C/L, n=10), soy protein isolate (soy, n=10), or a combination (n=19). After 32 months consuming the diets, each monkey underwent surgical menopause. After 32 post-menopausal months, coronary atherosclerosis was measured in the left circumflex artery (LCX) and left anterior descending artery (LAD). VDR expression was determined for the LAD and 25OHD3 concentrations were assessed. Results Both the cross-sectional area of atherosclerotic plaques (mm2) and plaque thickness (mm) in the LCX as well as the LAD were analyzed in these monkeys. Those with higher plasma 25OHD3 concentrations and higher VDR were compared to those with higher plasma 25OHD3 concentrations and lower VDR. Significantly smaller plaque sizes were noted with higher plasma 25OHD3 concentrations and higher VDR. For the LCX, there was also a significantly lower plaque size (both plaque thickness and cross sectional area) in those with higher VDR and lower 25OHD3 concentrations versus those with lower quantities of VDR and higher plasma concentrations of 25OHD3, p=0.040 and p=0.009, respectively. Conclusions Cynomolgus monkeys with higher quantities of VDR have significantly less atherosclerosis than those with lower quantities of VDR and higher plasma 25OHD3 concentrations. If these findings translate to human beings, it might explain why some individuals with higher plasma concentrations of 25OHD3 have more coronary artery atherosclerosis. PMID:22617336

  12. Plasma concentration of vitamin C in dogs with a portosystemic shunt.

    PubMed

    Hishiyama, Nobuya; Kayanuma, Hideki; Matsui, Tohru; Yano, Hideo; Suganuma, Tsunenori; Funaba, Masayuki; Fujise, Hiroshi

    2006-10-01

    Most mammals, including dogs, synthesize vitamin C in the liver. We measured the plasma concentration of vitamin C to assess the body vitamin C status in 15 dogs with a portosystemic shunt (PSS). The plasma biochemical parameters indicated liver abnormalities in all the dogs. In contrast, the plasma concentration of vitamin C ranged from 2.21 to 9.03 mg/L in the 15 dogs and was below the reference range (3.2 to 8.9 mg/L) in only 2 dogs. These findings suggest that vitamin C status is not impaired in dogs with PSS.

  13. The effect of plasma antithrombin concentration on thrombin generation and fibrin gel structure.

    PubMed

    Elgue, G; Sanchez, J; Fatah, K; Olsson, P; Blombäck, B

    1994-07-15

    Congenital deficiency of antithrombin (AT) is associated with thrombotic events and AT consumption occurs in some severe disorders and after treatment with heparin. The aim of this study was to investigate whether variations in the level of plasma AT modify thrombin generation and the fibrin formation process after the intrinsic coagulation mechanism is triggered. Normal plasma was depleted of AT by immunoadsorption on CNBr-Sepharose coupled with the anti-AT-IgG fraction of antiserum. The AT-depleted plasma was reconstituted with AT (between 0.3 and 1.5 AT units per ml). Thrombin generation was measured as the development of thrombin-antithrombin complexes (TAT). The lag phase preceding fibrin formation depended on the concentration of AT. The short lag phase was seen in completely AT-depleted plasma and the long in plasma with 1.5 AT units per ml. TAT generation, determined in parallel consecutive samples, showed that the rate at which thrombin was generated was inverse to the AT concentration in plasma. The network structure of hydrated fibrin gels in the clotted plasma was studied by measuring the wavelength dependence of gel turbidity. The mass/length ratio value, -i.e. the thickness of fiber strands and porosity of the gel increased with increasing AT concentrations. It is concluded that plasma AT regulates the rate of prothrombin-thrombin conversion, the clotting time and the consequently network structure of the fibrin gel.

  14. Plasma lactate concentrations in septic peritonitis: A retrospective study of 83 dogs (2007-2012).

    PubMed

    Cortellini, Stefano; Seth, Mayank; Kellett-Gregory, Lindsay M

    2015-01-01

    To determine if absolute plasma lactate concentration or lactate clearance in dogs with septic peritonitis is associated with morbidity or mortality. Retrospective cohort study from 2007 to 2012. University teaching hospital. Eighty-three dogs with septic peritonitis were included. Patients had at least 1 plasma lactate measurement during the course of the hospitalization. Sixty-four percent of the patients survived to discharge, 22% were euthanized, and 14% died during hospitalization. Plasma lactate concentration >2.5 mmol/L on admission (29% of the patients) was associated with mortality (P = 0.001). Median admission plasma lactate concentration (n = 81) was significantly different between nonsurvivors (2.5 mmol/L, range 0.5-8.4) and survivors (1.4 mmol/L, range 0.5-9.7; P = 0.007). Admission plasma lactate concentration >4 mmol/L yielded a sensitivity of 36% and a specificity of 92% for nonsurvival. The inability to normalize plasma lactate concentration within 6 hours of admission (n = 10/24) yielded a sensitivity of 76% and specificity of 100% for nonsurvival. Postoperative hyperlactatemia (plasma lactate concentration >2 mmol/L; n = 18/76) had a sensitivity of 46% and specificity of 88% for nonsurvival. Persistent postoperative hyperlactatemia (n = 11/18) had a sensitivity of 92% and a specificity of 100% for nonsurvival. Lactate clearance less than 21% at 6 hours (n = 20) had a sensitivity of 54% and specificity of 91% for nonsurvival. Lactate clearance less than 42% at 12 hours (n = 18) had a sensitivity of 82% and a specificity of 100% for nonsurvival. Admission plasma lactate concentration and lactate clearance were good prognostic indicators in dogs with septic peritonitis. © Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care Society 2014.

  15. Independent effects of apolipoprotein AV and apolipoprotein CIII on plasma triglyceride concentrations

    SciTech Connect

    Baroukh, Nadine N.; Bauge, Eric; Akiyama, Jennifer; Chang, Jessie; Fruchart, Jean-Charles; Rubin, Edward M.; Fruchart, Jamila; Pennacchio, Len A.

    2003-08-15

    Both the apolipoprotein A5 and C3 genes have repeatedly been shown to play an important role in determining plasma triglyceride concentrations in humans and mice. In mice, transgenic and knockout experiments indicate that plasma triglyceride levels are negatively and positively correlated with APOA5 and APOC3 expression, respectively. In humans, common polymorphisms in both genes have also been associated with plasma triglyceride concentrations. The evolutionary relationship among these two apolipoprotein genes and their close proximity on human chromosome 11q23 have largely precluded the determination of their relative contribution to altered Both the apolipoprotein A5 and C3 genes have repeatedly been shown to play an important role in determining plasma triglyceride concentrations in humans and mice. In mice, transgenic and knockout experiments indicate that plasma triglyceride levels are negatively and positively correlated with APOA5 and APOC3 expression, respectively. In humans, common polymorphisms in both genes have also been associated with plasma triglyceride concentrations. The evolutionary relationship among these two apolipoprotein genes and their close proximity on human chromosome 11q23 have largely precluded the determination of their relative contribution to altered triglycerides. To overcome these confounding factors and address their relationship, we generated independent lines of mice that either over-expressed (''double transgenic'') or completely lacked (''double knockout'') both apolipoprotein genes. We report that both ''double transgenic'' and ''double knockout'' mice display intermedia tetriglyceride concentrations compared to over-expression or deletion of either gene alone. Furthermore, we find that human ApoAV plasma protein levels in the ''double transgenic'' mice are approximately 500-fold lower than human ApoCIII levels, supporting ApoAV is a potent triglyceride modulator despite its low concentration. Together, these data indicate

  16. Circadian Rhythm of Plasma Aldosterone Concentration in Patients with Primary Aldosteronism

    PubMed Central

    Kem, David C.; Weinberger, Myron H.; Gomez-Sanchez, Celso; Kramer, Norman J.; Lerman, Robert; Furuyama, Shunsuke; Nugent, Charles A.

    1973-01-01

    Plasma aldosterone, cortisol, and renin activity were measured in nine recumbent patients with hyperaldosteronism, including seven with adenomas, one with idiopathic hyperplasia, and one with glucocorticoid suppressible hyperplasia. All had peak values of plasma aldosterone concentration from 3 a.m. to noon and lowest values at 6 p.m. or midnight. This rhythm was similar to the circadian pattern of plasma cortisol in the same patients. When these data were normalized to eliminate the wide variation in ranges of plasma aldosterone and cortisol between individuals, there was an excellent correlation (r = + 0.87, P < 0.005) between the two hormones. In contrast, plasma aldosterone concentrations did not correlate with plasma renin activity before or after normalization of data. Short term suppression of ACTH by administration of dexamethasone eliminated the circadian variation of plasma aldosterone in both patients with hyperplasia and in four of five patients with adenomas, while it markedly altered the rhythm in the fifth. Similar doses of dexamethasone were administered to four normal subjects and did not flatten the circadian rhythm of plasma aldosterone. These data suggest that patients with primary aldosteronism have a circadian rhythm of plasma aldosterone mediated by changes in ACTH. PMID:4353776

  17. Thermodynamic analysis of the plasma production of ferroniobium from a loparite concentrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolaev, A. A.; Kirpichev, D. E.; Nikolaev, A. V.; Tsvetkov, Yu. V.

    2013-11-01

    The possibility of pyrometallurgical processing of a loparite concentrate at a temperature of 2000-4000 K and a pressure of 0.1 MPa is thermodynamically studied using the TERRA software package. It is found that the niobium concentration in the concentrate almost doubles during plasma heating as a result of thermal decomposition and the precipitation of rare-earth metals into a gas phase. Crude niobium can be extracted from the thermally decomposed concentrate by carbothermic or aluminothermic reduction. After plasma-arc vacuum refining, crude niobium can be used for making commercial ferroniobium. The calculated energy consumed for the plasma production of ferroniobium from the loparite concentrate by carbothermic or aluminothermic reduction under adiabatic conditions is 46.6 or 79.0 GJ/(t ferroniobium), respectively. The energy consumption can even be increased severalfold, and the implementation of the process remains economically efficient at the existing market price of ferroniobium.

  18. Treatment of exogenous Candida endophthalmitis in rabbits with oral fluconazole.

    PubMed Central

    Park, S S; D'Amico, D J; Paton, B; Baker, A S

    1995-01-01

    We investigated the efficacy of oral fluconazole, alone or in combination with oral flucytosine (5FC), in treating Candida endophthalmitis using a rabbit model. Albino rabbits were infected with an intravitreal inoculation of 1,000 CFU of susceptible Candida albicans and randomized 5 days later to receive treatment with oral fluconazole alone (80 mg/kg of body weight per day), a combination of fluconazole and 5FC (100 mg/kg/12 h), or no treatment. The treatment effect was assessed at 2 and 4 weeks after therapy by funduscopy, quantitative vitreous culture, and histopathology. Intravitreal levels of fluconazole, 2 to 24 h after the first dose, were measured to be > 10 times the MIC of the drug for C. albicans. Among rabbits treated with fluconazole for 2 weeks, 67% had a > 90% reduction in fungal load (P < 0.05) and 33% were sterile. After 4 weeks, all had a > 99% reduction in fungal load (P < 0.05) and 75% were sterile (P = 0.01). This treatment effect was unchanged 4 weeks after discontinuation of fluconazole. Among rabbits treated with fluconazole and 5FC for 2 weeks, 67% died during therapy. Among the surviving rabbits, 75% had a > 90% reduction in fungal load (P < 0.05) and 25% were sterile. We conclude that oral fluconazole may be useful for treatment of Candida endophthalmitis. Addition of 5FC was associated with high toxicity and minimal additional antifungal effect in our rabbit model. PMID:7786003

  19. Age-related increases in plasma phosphatidylcholine hydroperoxide concentrations in control subjects and patients with hyperlipidemia.

    PubMed

    Kinoshita, M; Oikawa, S; Hayasaka, K; Sekikawa, A; Nagashima, T; Toyota, T; Miyazawa, T

    2000-06-01

    The basal lipid peroxide concentration in the plasma of patients with hyperlipidemia may be related to atherosclerosis. Quantitative determination of lipid peroxides in the plasma is an important step in the overall evaluation of the biochemical processes leading to oxidative injury. Unfortunately, the currently available methods for lipid peroxidation lack specificity and sensitivity. Hyperlipidemic patients (44 males and 50 females), ages 12-82 years (mean +/- SE, 53 +/- 2.3 years for males, 58 +/- 2.0 years for females, and 56 +/- 14 years for total cases), and normolipidemic volunteers (controls, 32 males and 15 females), ages 13-90 years (49 +/- 4 years for males, 65 +/- 4 years for females, and 55 +/- 24 years for total cases), were recruited in the present study. Plasma phosphatidylcholine hydroperoxide (PCOOH) was determined by chemiluminescence-HPLC (CL-HPLC). Plasma PCOOH concentrations increased with age in both controls and hyperlipidemic patients. However, the mean plasma PCOOH concentration in patients with hyperlipidemia (331 +/- 19 nmol/L; n = 94) was significantly (P <0.001) higher than in the controls (160 +/- 65 nmol/L; n = 47). Plasma PCOOH concentrations were similar in three hyperlipidemic phenotypes: hypercholesterolemia (IIa), hypertriglyceridemia (IV), and combined hyperlipidemia (IIb). The mean plasma PCOOH in patients with treatment-induced normalized plasma lipids was 202 +/- 17 nmol/L. There was no significant correlation between plasma PCOOH concentration and total cholesterol, triglycerides, or phospholipids in hyperlipidemic patients. For all subjects, there was a significantly positive correlation between plasma PCOOH and each lipid (total cholesterol, P = 0.0002; triglycerides, P = 0.0137; and phospholipids, P <0.0001). Analysis of fatty acids composition of plasma phosphatidylcholine showed significantly low concentrations of n-6 fatty acids moieties (linoleic acid and arachidonic acid) in patients compared with controls. Our

  20. Depression of plasma luteinizing hormone concentration in quail by the anticholinesterase insecticide parathion

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rattner, B.A.; Clarke, R.N.; Ottinger, M.A.

    1986-01-01

    1. To examine the effects of parathion on basal plasma luteinizing hormone (LH) concentration, male Japanese quail (Coturnix japonica) were orally intubated with 0, 5 or 10 mg/kg parathion and sacrificed after 4, 8 and 24 hr.2. At the 5 mg/kg dose, plasma LH levels were reduced at 4 and 8 hr, but returned to control values by 24 hr. Brain acetylcholinesterase activity was substantially reduced by 10 mg/kg parathion (52, 75 and 37% inhibition at 4, 8 and 24 hr, respectively) and plasma LH concentration remained depressed through the 24-hr period.3. These findings suggest that the organophosphorus insecticide parathion may alter plasma LH concentration in a manner which might impair reproductive activity, and provide indirect evidence for a cholinergic component in the regulation of LH secretion in quail.

  1. Depression of plasma luteinizing hormone concentration in quail by the anticholinesterase insecticide parathion

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rattner, B.A.; Clarke, R.N.; Ottinger, M.A.

    1986-01-01

    To examine the effects of parathion on basal plasma luteinizing hormone (LH) concentration, male Japanese quail (Coturnix japonica) were orally intubated with 0, 5 or 10 mg/kg parathion and sacrificed after 4, 8 and 24 hr. At the 5 mg/kg dose, plasma LH levels were reduced at 4 and 8 hr, but returned to control values by 24 hr. Brain acetylcholinesterase activity was substantially reduced by 10 mg/kg parathion (52, 75 and 37% inhibition at 4, 8 and 24 hr, respectively) and plasma LH concentration remained depressed through the 24-hr period. These findings suggest that the organophosphorus insecticide parathion may alter plasma LH concentration in a manner which might impair reproductive activity, and provide indirect evidence for a cholinergic component in the regulation of LH secretion in quail.

  2. Natriuretic peptides in cetaceans: identification, molecular characterization and changes in plasma concentration after landing.

    PubMed

    Naka, Tadaomi; Katsumata, Etsuko; Sasaki, Kazuki; Minamino, Naoto; Yoshioka, Motoi; Takei, Yoshio

    2007-06-01

    Dolphins are aquatic animals free from gravity, and this may have imposed significant changes in their cardiovascular status and its hormonal regulation compared with terrestrial animals. This study molecularly characterized two major cardiovascular hormones, atrial and B-type natriuretic peptides (ANP and BNP) and measured their changes in dolphin plasma concentrations in relation to the cardiovascular status of the animal. We initially identified ANP and BNP in three species of dolphins (Lagenorhynchus obliquidens, Phocoenoides dalli and Tursiops truncatus). ANP precursors are highly conserved in most mammals, but dolphin BNP precursors were more variable. In molecular phylogenetic analyses, dolphin ANP and BNP precursors grouped with those of artiodactyls, particularly to the camel peptides. The chromatographic characterization of tissue and plasma molecular forms using specific radioimmunoassays showed that the predominant ANP and BNP in the atrium are prohormone and mature peptide, respectively, whereas mature ANP and BNP are circulating in the dolphin blood. A mass spectrometric analysis showed that atrial BNP consists of 26 amino acids, rather than the 32-amino-acid form detected in other mammals. Finally, changes in plasma ANP and BNP concentrations were examined in captive bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) after their pool was drained. Plasma ANP and BNP concentrations did not change after landing, unlike terrestrial mammals. Plasma angiotensin II and cortisol concentrations did not change either, showing minor stress after landing. Since landed dolphins show a different cardiovascular status on land than terrestrial mammals, plasma ANP and BNP concentrations seem to reflect the cardiovascular status characteristic of dolphins.

  3. Plasma pyrimethamine concentrations during long-term treatment for cerebral toxoplasmosis in patients with AIDS.

    PubMed Central

    Klinker, H; Langmann, P; Richter, E

    1996-01-01

    Steady-state plasma pyrimethamine levels were measured by gas chromatography. The specimens were taken from 74 adults with advanced human immunodeficiency virus infection receiving pyrimethamine-containing drugs for prophylaxis or curative therapy of reactivated cerebral toxoplasmosis. During an overall treatment period of 1,049 months, 1,012 plasma samples were investigated. Pyrimethamine concentrations could be evaluated in 904 plasma samples. The weekly dosage of pyrimethamine ranged from 25 to 1,400 mg; one patient with severe diarrhea received 2,100 mg/week. Steady-state plasma pyrimethamine concentrations were achieved after 12 to 20 days. Pyrimethamine concentrations evidently increased with the weekly dosage given. Mean concentrations were 253 +/- 151 ng/ml with 50 mg of pyrimethamine per week, 471 +/- 214 ng/ml with 100 mg of pyrimethamine per week, 1,893 +/- 1,182 ng/ml with 350 mg of pyrimethamine per week and 3,369 +/- 1,726 ng/ml with 1,050 mg of pyrimethamine per week. A widespread interpatient range was found for every dosage. With the simultaneous use of enzyme-inducing comedication, the plasma pyrimethamine levels decreased in several patients. Mild chronic liver disease did not influence plasma pyrimethamine concentrations. To avoid ineffective therapy or severe side effects, monitoring of pyrimethamine could be useful in patients receiving enzyme-inducing comedications and in patients with severe diarrhea or poor compliance. PMID:8807051

  4. Plasma concentrations of testosterone and nandrolone in racing and nonracing intact male horses.

    PubMed

    Soma, L R; Uboh, C E; You, Y; Guan, F; McDonnell, S

    2012-04-01

    Pennsylvania (PA) State Racing Commissions regulate the endogenous androgenic steroid, testosterone (TES), in racing intact males (RIM) by quantification of TES in post-race samples. Post-race plasma samples (2209) collected between March 2008 and November 2010 were analyzed for TES, nandrolone (NAN), and other anabolic steroids (ABS). Of the 2209 plasma samples, 2098 had quantifiable TES ≥ 25 pg/mL. Plasma (mean ± SD) concentrations of TES and NAN in RIM were 329.2 ± 266.4 and 96.0 ± 67.8 pg/mL, respectively. Only 64.6% of RIM had quantifiable concentration of NAN, and there was no relationship between TES and NAN. Plasma TES concentrations were significantly (P < 0.0001) higher during the months of April, May, June, July, and August. A significantly higher (P < 0.006) plasma TES was observed in Thoroughbred (TB) (347.6 ± 288.5 pg/mL) vs. that in Standardbred (STB) (315.4 ± 247.7 pg/mL). Plasma concentrations of TES from breeding stallions (BS) were 601.6 ± 356.5 pg/mL. Statistically significant (P < 0.0001) lower plasma concentrations of the two steroids were observed in RIM horses. Based on quantile distribution of TES in the RIM and BS populations, 99.5% were at or below 1546.1 and 1778.0 pg/mL, respectively. Based on this population of RIM, the suggested upper threshold plasma concentration of endogenous TES in horses competing in PA should remain at 2000 pg/mL. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  5. Retinol, carotenoids, and tocopherols in the milk of lactating adolescents and relationships with plasma concentrations.

    PubMed

    de Azeredo, Vilma B; Trugo, Nadia M F

    2008-02-01

    We determined the concentrations of retinol, carotenoids, and tocopherols in breast milk of adolescents and evaluated their associations with plasma levels and with maternal characteristics (period of lactation, body mass index, age of menarche, and years postmenarche). This was a single cross-sectional survey of retinol, carotenoid, and tocopherol composition of milk and plasma of lactating adolescent mothers (n = 72; 30-120 d postpartum) attending public daycare clinics in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Milk and plasma components were analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography. Nutrient concentrations (micromoles per liter, mean +/- SE) in plasma and milk were, respectively, retinol 2.1 +/- 0.5 and 0.62 +/- 0.44, beta-carotene 0.18 +/- 0.19 and 0.016 +/- 0.017, alpha-carotene 0.05 +/- 0.04 and 0.0035 +/- 0.002, lutein plus zeaxanthin 0.15 +/- 0.11 and 0.025 +/- 0.024, lycopene 0.1 +/- 0.11 and 0.016 +/- 0.025, alpha-tocopherol 10.8 +/- 5.3 and 2.7 +/- 1.8, gamma-tocopherol 2.6 +/- 2.3 and 0.37 +/- 0.15. The milk/plasma molar ratios of retinol and tocopherols were two times higher than those of carotenoids. Significant correlations (P < 0.001) between milk and plasma nutrient levels were observed for beta-carotene (r = 0.41), alpha-carotene (r = 0.60), and lutein plus zeaxanthin (r = 0.57), but not for lycopene, retinol, and tocopherols. Nutrient concentrations in plasma and in milk were not associated with the maternal characteristics investigated. Concentrations of the nutrients studied, especially retinol and alpha-tocopherol, in mature milk of lactating adolescents were, in general, lower than in milk of adult lactating women. Milk concentrations were associated with plasma concentrations only for beta-carotene, alpha-carotene, and lutein plus zeaxanthin.

  6. Temporal plasma vitamin concentrations are altered by fat-soluble vitamin administration in suckling pigs.

    PubMed

    Jang, Y D; Ma, J Y; Monegue, J S; Monegue, H J; Stuart, R L; Lindemann, M D

    2015-11-01

    Piglets are born with purportedly low plasma vitamin D levels. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of fat-soluble vitamin administration, primarily vitamin D, by different administration routes on plasma vitamin concentrations in suckling pigs. A total of 45 pigs from 5 litters were allotted at birth to 3 treatments within each litter. Pigs were administered 400 IU of α-tocopherol, 40,000 IU of retinyl palmitate, and 40,000 IU of vitamin D at d 1 of age either orally or by i.m. injection and compared with control pigs with no supplemental vitamin administration. Blood samples were collected at d 0 (initial), 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 9, 14, and 20 after administration. Plasma 25-hydroxycholecalciferol (25OHD), α-tocopherol, retinyl palmitate, and retinol concentrations were analyzed. Except for retinol, the effects of treatment, day, and day × treatment interaction ( < 0.01) were observed on plasma vitamin concentrations. Plasma concentrations of 25OHD and α-tocopherol increased immediately regardless of administration routes to peak at d 2 and 1 after administration, respectively. Plasma retinyl palmitate concentrations increased only with the injection treatment, with the peak at d 1 after administration. Plasma concentrations of 25OHD in both administration treatments and α-tocopherol in the injection treatment were maintained at greater levels than those in the control treatment until d 20 after administration. With regard to the pharmacokinetic parameters for plasma 25OHD concentrations, the injection treatment had greater elimination half-life ( < 0.01), maximum plasma concentrations ( < 0.05), and all area under the curve parameters ( < 0.01) but a lower elimination rate constant ( < 0.01) than the oral treatment. Relative bioavailability of oral administration compared with injection administration was 55.26%. These results indicate that plasma status of 25OHD,α-tocopherol, and retinyl palmitate are differentially changed between types of

  7. Measurement of plasma cell-free DNA concentrations in dogs with sepsis, trauma, and neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Letendre, Jo-Annie; Goggs, Robert

    2017-05-01

    To determine if cell-free DNA (cfDNA) was identifiable in canine plasma, to evaluate 3 techniques for the measurement of plasma cfDNA concentrations in dogs presented to an emergency service, and to compare the plasma cfDNA concentrations of healthy dogs to those with sepsis, trauma, and neoplasia. Retrospective study of banked canine plasma samples collected between May 2014 and December 2014. Dogs presented to the emergency service of a university veterinary teaching hospital. Plasma cfDNA was measured on residual plasma samples obtained from 15 dogs with sepsis, 15 dogs with moderate-severe trauma, 15 dogs diagnosed with a sarcoma. Plasma cfDNA was also measured in 15 healthy dogs. None. Assay linearity, repeatability, and reproducibility were evaluated. Quantification of cfDNA was performed in duplicate on diluted citrated plasma and following DNA purification using 2 fluorescence assays (SYBR-Gold; Quant-iT) and by ultraviolet absorbance spectroscopy. Fluorescence intensities (FIs) were converted to cfDNA concentrations using standard curves. Median FI values and cfDNA concentrations were compared to healthy controls using the Kruskal-Wallis test, with adjustment for multiple comparisons. Alpha was set at 0.05. Both assays had excellent linearity, and acceptable repeatability and reproducibility. Compared to controls, plasma cfDNA concentrations were significantly increased in dogs with sepsis or moderate-severe trauma with both assays (P ≤ 0.003). Dogs with neoplasia had significantly increased cfDNA concentrations with the Quant-iT assay only (P = 0.003). When measurements were performed on purified DNA, only dogs with moderate-severe trauma had significantly increased cfDNA concentrations (P < 0.001; SYBR-Gold assay). cfDNA can be readily identified in canine plasma using 2 fluorescence assays. DNA extraction offers no advantage over direct measurement. Compared to healthy controls, dogs with sepsis or moderate-severe trauma have significantly increased

  8. Plasma cortisol and glucose concentrations in the striped mullet ( Mugil cephalus L.) subjected to intense handling stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Wanshu

    1992-03-01

    The plasma cortisol and glucose concentrations were determined in mature female striped mullet ( Mugil cephalus L.) subjected to short term intense handling stress. The results indicated that plasma cortisol levels reached a peak 20 min after stress and declined gradually afterwards. The highest concentration of plasma glucose was observed 30 min after stress. The present study showed that the rise of plasma glucose was associated with the plasma cortisol levels.

  9. Moringa Oleifera leaf extract increases plasma antioxidant status associated with reduced plasma malondialdehyde concentration without hypoglycemia in fasting healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Ngamukote, Sathaporn; Khannongpho, Teerawat; Siriwatanapaiboon, Marent; Sirikwanpong, Sukrit; Dahlan, Winai; Adisakwattana, Sirichai

    2016-12-29

    To investigate the effect of Moringa Oleifera leaf extract (MOLE) on plasma glucose concentration and antioxidant status in healthy volunteers. A randomized crossover design was used in this study. Healthy volunteers were randomly assigned to receive either 200 mL of warm water (10 cases) or 200 mL of MOLE (500 mg dried extract, 10 cases). Blood samples were drawn at 0, 30, 60, 90, and 120 min for measuring fasting plasma glucose (FPG), ferric reducing ability of plasma (FRAP), Trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity (TEAC) and malondialdehyde (MDA). FPG concentration was not signifificantly different between warm water and MOLE. The consumption of MOLE acutely improved both FRAP and TEAC, with increases after 30 min of 30 μmol/L FeSO4 equivalents and 0.18 μmol/L Trolox equivalents, respectively. The change in MDA level from baseline was signifificantly lowered after the ingestion of MOLE at 30, 60, and 90 min. In addition, FRAP level was negatively correlated with plasma MDA level after an intake of MOLE. MOLE increased plasma antioxidant capacity without hypoglycemia in human. The consumption of MOLE may reduce the risk factors associated with chronic degenerative diseases.

  10. Impact of hemolysis during sample collection: how different is drug concentration in hemolyzed plasma from that of normal plasma?

    PubMed

    Tan, Aimin; Gagné, Sébastien; Lévesque, Isabelle A; Lachance, Sylvain; Boudreau, Nadine; Lévesque, Ann

    2012-07-15

    Hemolysis is a common phenomenon in clinical studies. Despite the growing interest in hemolysis matrix effect, how hemolysis impacts the representability of hemolyzed plasma samples was rarely evaluated. The purpose of this research is to perform such an evaluation by theoretical consideration and experiment. A formula for estimating the impact is proposed, which includes the degree of hemolysis and the drug's red blood cell (RBC): plasma concentration ratio. The impact of hemolysis on the representability of hemolyzed plasma samples is compound-dependant. Given the same degree of hemolysis, the stronger a drug binds to RBCs, the more significant the impact of hemolysis. For a drug with high affinity to RBCs, the results of hemolyzed plasma samples may not be useful even though they are accurate. There is an overall agreement between theoretical predication and experimental results. Among the ten different drug compounds tested, only methazolamide, which binds strongly to RBCs, showed significant change in plasma concentration due to hemolysis. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Effects of feed on plasma leptin and ghrelin concentrations in crib-biting horses.

    PubMed

    Hemmann, Karin E; Koho, Ninna M; Vainio, Outi M; Raekallio, Marja R

    2013-10-01

    The reason why some horses begin an oral stereotypy such as crib-biting is not known. The aim of this study was to measure ghrelin and leptin concentrations in plasma concentrations to determine whether there is a link to crib-biting in horses. Plasma samples (n=3) were collected for plasma leptin and ghrelin assay before and during the morning first feeding in the usual environments of 15 horses with stereotypic crib-biting and 15 matched controls. The crib-biting intensity was scored in three 5-min phases, and a subgroup of verified crib-biters (n=8) was defined as horses that were seen to crib-bite during this study. Plasma leptin concentration (mean and 95% confidence interval [CI]) was lower in horses observed to crib-bite before and after feeding of concentrates (1.2, CI 0.8-1.7 ng/mL and 1.0, CI 0.6-1.7) than in non-crib-biters (2.3, CI 1.6-3.4 and 2.3, CI 1.6-3.4 ng/mL, respectively) and correlated negatively with crib-biting intensity. Crib-biting intensity was significantly higher shortly after feeding than before or 30 min later. Plasma ghrelin concentration was significantly higher before feeding concentrate than before hay feeding or after the concentrate, but did not differ between groups. There was a significant negative correlation between body composition score and plasma ghrelin concentration. These findings suggest that leptin concentrations may be associated with crib-biting behaviour in horses.

  12. A Risk Score for Fluconazole Failure among Patients with Candidemia.

    PubMed

    Ostrosky-Zeichner, Luis; Harrington, Rachel; Azie, Nkechi; Yang, Hongbo; Li, Nanxin; Zhao, Jing; Koo, Valerie; Wu, Eric Q

    2017-05-01

    This study aimed to develop a prediction model to identify patients with candidemia who were at high risk of failing fluconazole treatment. Adult patients in the United States with candidemia who received fluconazole during hospitalization were selected from the Cerner Health Facts Hospital Database (04/2004 to 03/2013). Fluconazole failure was defined as switching/adding another antifungal, positive Candida culture ≥10 days after fluconazole initiation, or death during hospitalization. Patients were randomized into modeling and validation samples. Using the modeling sample, a regression analysis of least absolute shrinkage and selection operator was used to select risk predictors of fluconazole failure (demographics, Candida species, initiation of fluconazole before positive culture and after admission, and comorbidities, procedures, and treatments during the 6 months before admission and fluconazole initiation). The prediction model was evaluated using the validation sample. We found that of 987 identified patients (average age of 61 years, 51% male, 72% Caucasian), 49% failed and 51% did not fail fluconazole treatment. Of those who failed, 70% switched or added another antifungal, 21% had a second positive Candida test, and 42% died during hospitalization. Nine risk factors were included in the prediction model: days to start fluconazole after admission, Candida glabrata or Candida krusei infection, hematological malignancy, venous thromboembolism (VTE), enteral nutrition, use of nonoperative intubation/irrigation, and other antifungal use. All but VTE were associated with a higher risk of failure. The model's c-statistic was 0.65, with a Hosmer-Lemeshow test P value of 0.23. In summary, this prediction model identified patients with a high risk of fluconazole failure, illustrating the potential value and feasibility of personalizing candidemia treatment. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  13. Insulin resistance is not related to plasma homocysteine concentration in healthy premenapausal women.

    PubMed

    Tanrikulu-Kiliç, F; Bekpinar, S; Unlüçerçi, Y; Orhan, Y

    2006-01-01

    This study was performed to test whether plasma homocysteine concentrations are related to insulin resistance in healthy premenopausal women. For this purpose, the relationship between insulin resistance (as assessed by HOMA index) and fasting plasma homocysteine level was determined in 83 healthy volunteers. The results indicated that homocysteine concentrations did not vary as a function of HOMA index (r = -0.147). Plasma homocysteine concentrations also did not vary as a function of other parameters of insulin resistance such as HDL-cholesterol and triglycerides, which they correlated inversely with body mass index (BMI). Furthermore, when individuals were classified according to quartiles of insulin resistance (HOMA index), plasma homocysteine concentrations from the lowest to the highest quartiles were not significantly different. On the other hand, the HOMA index correlated significantly with triglyceride concentrations (r = 0.377, p< 0.001), HDL-cholesterol (r = -0.310, p< 0.01) and BMI (r = 0.468, p< 0.001). These results suggest that plasma homocysteine concentrations are not related to insulin resistance and/or metabolic abnormalities associated with it in premenopausal women.

  14. Amino acid concentrations in plasma and erythrocytes in aregeneratory and haemolytic anaemias.

    PubMed

    Seip, M; Lindemann, R; Gjesdahl, P; Gjessing, L R

    1975-10-01

    The concentrations of unbound amino acids in erythrocytes and in plasma from 7 normal individuals, 11 patients with various types of aregeneratory anaemia, and 4 patients with hereditary haemolytic anaemias were determined on a Technicon Amino Acid Analyzer (Perry et al 1970). Most amino acids were normally found in higher concentrations in plasma than intracellularly. Cystine, methionine and trypotophan were almost exclusively present in plasma. Aspartic acid, however, was mainly found in erythrocytes, and glutathione only in erythrocytes. Glutamic acid and ornithine were more concentrated in the cells, while glycine and asparagine showed approximately the same concentrations in erythrocytes as in plasma. In the patients, plasma amino acids showed little deviations from normal, but in the erythrocytes there were striking changes. Erythrocyte glutamic acid concentrations were moderately to markedly elevated in all patients studied, and glycine concentrations in 13 out of 15 patients. In addition, the following amino acids were increased intracellularly in more than one patient: glutamine (8 patients), serine (7), asparagine (5), threonine (4), taurine (3), alanine (2), valine (2), ornithine (2), lysine (2), citrulline (2). Aspartic acid was decreased in erythrocytes from 4 patients with aregeneratory and 1 with haemolytic anaemia.

  15. The prognostic value of plasma nesfatin-1 concentrations in patients with traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Wu, Gang-Qun; Chou, Xiao-Min; Ji, Wen-Jian; Yang, Xiao-Gang; Lan, Luo-Xin; Sheng, Yan-Jun; Shen, Yang-Fang; Li, Jian-Rong; Huang, Guo-Zhong; Yu, Wen-Hua; Dong, Xiao-Qiao; Du, Quan; Yang, Ding-Bo; Zhang, Zu-Yong; Wang, Hao; Shen, Yong-Feng; Jiang, Li

    2016-07-01

    Nesfatin-1 is related to inflammation. Its increased circulating concentrations are associated with the severity and prognosis of subarachnoid hemorrhage. In-hospital major adverse events (IMAEs), including acute traumatic coagulopathy, progressive hemorrhagic injury and posttraumatic cerebral infarction, are correlated with mortality after traumatic brain injury (TBI). The present study was designed to investigate the changes of plasma nesfatin-1 concentrations and further assess its association with inflammation, trauma severity, in-hospital mortality and IMAEs following TBI. We measured plasma nesfatin-1 concentrations of 100 severe TBI patients and 100 controls. Progressive hemorrhagic injury and posttraumatic cerebral infarction were diagnosed based on a follow-up computerized tomography scan. Acute traumatic coagulopathy was identified according to a coagulation test. Plasma nesfatin-1 concentrations were significantly higher in patients than in controls and associated highly with Glasgow coma scale (GCS) scores and plasma C-reactive protein concentrations. Nesfatin-1 was indicated as an independent predictor for in-hospital mortality and IMAEs. In accordance with area under receiver operating characteristic curve, its predictive value was similar to GCS scores. Increased plasma nesfatin-1 concentrations are associated closely with inflammation, trauma severity and clinical outcomes, indicating that nesfatin-1 might be involved in inflammation and become a good prognostic biomarker following TBI. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Circadian and postprandial variation in plasma citrulline concentration in healthy dogs.

    PubMed

    Dahan, Julien M; Giron, Celine; Concordet, Didier; Dossin, Olivier

    2016-03-01

    To evaluate circadian and postprandial variations in plasma citrulline concentration in healthy dogs. 8 healthy Beagles. Blood samples were collected from dogs after 12 hours of food withholding (0 hours; 8:00 am) and then every 2 hours for 12 hours (until 8:00 pm) and again at 24 hours (8:00 am the next day). The same protocol was repeated, with the only difference being that a meal was given immediately after the 0-hour sample collection point. Plasma citrulline concentration was measured by ion exchange chromatography. No significant difference in plasma citrulline concentration was identified among measurement points when food was withheld. Mean ± SD plasma citrulline concentration at 4 hours (72.2 ± 12.7 μmol/L) and 24 hours (56.1 ± 12.5 μmol/L) after dogs were fed was significantly different from that at 0 hours (64.4 ± 12.7 μmol/L). Plasma citrulline concentration had no circadian variation in unfed dogs but increased significantly in fed dogs 4 hours after a meal. Therefore, food should be withheld from dogs for 8 to 12 hours before blood sample collection for measurement of citrulline concentration.

  17. Plasma concentrations of fluticasone propionate and budesonide following inhalation: effect of induced bronchoconstriction

    PubMed Central

    Mortimer, Kevin J; Tattersfield, Anne E; Tang, Yufei; Wu, Kai; Lewis, Sarah; Hochhaus, Gunther; Harrison, Tim W

    2007-01-01

    What is already known about this subject All inhaled corticosteroids are absorbed into the systemic circulation and hence have the potential to cause adverse systemic effects. Plasma drug concentrations following inhalation of 1000 µg fluticasone are considerably lower in people with airflow obstruction than in healthy volunteers but this is not the case for budesonide. What this study adds This is the first study to determine whether changes in airflow obstruction within an individual affect the systemic absorption of inhaled fluticasone and budesonide; Plasma concentrations of fluticasone and, to a lesser extent, those of budesonide were lower when the drugs were inhaled following induced bronchoconstriction; The lower plasma concentrations of corticosteroids seen when the drugs were inhaled following induced bronchoconstriction is likely to reflect variations that will occur with fluctuations in airway caliber in asthma. Aims To determine whether and to what extent bronchoconstriction affects plasma concentrations of fluticasone and budesonide following inhalation. Methods Twenty people with mild asthma inhaled 1000 µg fluticasone (Accuhaler®) plus 800 µg budesonide (Turbohaler®) on two visits. On one occasion, prior to drug inhalation, FEV1 was decreased by at least 25% using inhaled methacholine. Plasma drug concentrations were measured for each drug over 5 h and area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC(0,5 h)) compared between visits. Results The mean difference in FEV1 prior to drug inhalation on the 2 days was 33%. AUC(0,5 h) values for fluticasone and budesonide were lower by a median of 60% (IQR 36–75) and 29% (IQR 2–44), respectively, when administered following bronchoconstriction; the reduction was greater for fluticasone than for budesonide, P = 0.007. Conclusions The lower plasma concentrations of fluticasone and, to a lesser extent, budesonide seen when the drugs were inhaled following induced bronchoconstriction, is likely to

  18. Plasma steroid concentrations and male phallus size in juvenile alligators from seven Florida lakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Guillette, L.J.; Woodward, A.R.; Crain, D.A.; Pickford, D.B.; Rooney, A.A.; Percival, H.F.

    1999-01-01

    Neonatal and juvenile alligators from contaminated Lake Apopka in central Florida exhibit abnormal plasma sex steroid concentrations as well as morphological abnormalities of the gonad and phallus. This study addresses whether similar abnormalities occur in juvenile alligators inhabiting six other lakes in Florida. For analysis, animals were partitioned into two subsets, animals 40-79 cm total length (1-3 years old) and juveniles 80-130 cm total length (3-7 years old). Plasma testosterone (T) concentrations were lower in small males from lakes Apopka, Griffin, and Jessup than from Lake Woodruff National Wildlife Refuge (NWR). Similar differences were observed in the larger juveniles, with males from lakes Jessup, Apopka, and Okeechobee having lower plasma T concentrations than Lake Woodruff males. Plasma estradiol-17?? (E2) concentrations were significantly elevated in larger juvenile males from Lake Apopka compared to Lake Woodruff NWR. When compared to small juvenile females from Lake Woodruff NWR, females from lakes Griffin, Apopka, Orange, and Okeechobee had elevated plasma E2 concentrations. Phallus size was significantly smaller in males from lakes Griffin and Apopka when compared to males from Lake Woodruff NWR. An association existed between body size and phallus size on all lakes except Lake Apopka and between phallus size and plasma T concentration on all lakes except lakes Apopka and Orange. Multiple regression analysis, with body size and plasma T concentration as independent covariables, explained the majority of the variation in phallus size on all lakes. These data suggest that the differences in sex steroids and phallus size observed in alligators from Lake Apopka are not limited to that lake, nor to one with a history of a major pesticide spill. Further work examining the relationship of sex steroids and phallus size with specific biotic and abiotic factors, such as antiandrogenic or estrogenic contaminants, is needed.

  19. Fruit and vegetable intakes in relation to plasma nutrient concentrations in women in Shanghai, China

    PubMed Central

    Frankenfeld, Cara L.; Lampe, Johanna W.; Shannon, Jackilen; Gao, Dao L.; Li, Wenjin; Ray, Roberta M.; Chen, Chu; King, Irena B.; Thomas, David B.

    2012-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the validity of fruit and vegetable intake, using three classification schemes, as it relates to plasma carotenoid and vitamin C concentrations among Chinese women. Design Intakes were calculated from an interviewer-administered food frequency questionnaire. Fruits and vegetables, botanical groups, and high-nutrient groups were evaluated. These three classification schemes were compared with plasma carotenoid and vitamin C concentrations from blood drawn within one week of questionnaire completion. Setting Shanghai, China Subjects Participants (n=2031) were drawn from women who participated in a case-control study of diet and breast diseases nested within a randomized trial of breast self-examination among textile workers (n=266,064) Results Fruit intake was significantly (p<0.05) and positively associated with plasma concentrations of α-tocopherol, β-cryptoxanthin, lycopene, α-carotene, β-carotene, retinyl palmitate, and vitamin C. Fruit intake was inversely associated with γ-tocopherol and lutein+zeaxanthin concentrations. Vegetable consumption was significantly and positively associated with γ-tocopherol, and β-cryptoxanthin concentrations. Each botanical and high-nutrient group was also significantly associated with particular plasma nutrient concentrations. Fruit and vegetable intake and most plasma nutrient concentrations were significantly associated with season of interview. Conclusions These results suggest that the manner in which fruits and vegetables are grouped provides different plasma nutrient exposure information, which may be an important consideration when testing and generating hypotheses regarding disease risk in relation to diet. Interview season should be considered when evaluating associations of reported intake and plasma nutrients with disease outcomes. PMID:21729475

  20. Zinc and magnesium concentrations in plasma and red blood cells in patients on digitalis medication

    SciTech Connect

    Zumkley, H.; Bertram, H.P.; Vetter, H.; Zidek, W.; Wessels, F.

    1981-06-01

    Determinations of zinc, sodium, potassium and magnesium in plasma and red blood cells (RBC) were performed in 31 controls and 63 patients treated with digitalis. In digitalized patients Na and Zn concentrations in RBC were significantly increased, whereas the intraerythrocyte Mg concentration was only slightly elevated. Plasma concentrations of all investigated electrolytes as well as of Zn remained within the normal range. There was a close relationship between the increase of Na and Zn content in RBC indicating alterations in transmembrane transport mechanisms induced by digitalis therapy.

  1. Plasma corticosterone and thyroxine concentrations during chronic ingestion of crude oil in mallard ducks (Anas platyrhynchos)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rattner, B.A.; Eastin, W.C.

    1981-01-01

    1. Blood samples were collected from mallard ducks after 6, 12, and 18 weeks of dietary exposure to mash containing 0.015%, 0.150%, and 1.500% crude oil.2. Plasma corticosterone concentrations in ducks fed mash containing 0.150% or 1.500% Alaskan Prudhoe Bay crude oil were uniformly depressed when compared to values in untreated control birds.3. Plasma thyroxine concentration was not altered in ducks chronically exposed to crude oil.4. The observed alteration in corticosterone concentration could reduce tolerance to temperature and dietary fluctuations in the environment.

  2. High-Performance Liquid-Chromatographic Analysis of Plasma Iohexol Concentrations.

    PubMed

    Schwertner, Harvey A; Weld, Kyle J

    2015-10-01

    In this study, a high-performance liquid-chromatographic (HPLC) method using photodiode array detection and isocratic conditions was developed for the analysis of plasma iohexol concentrations. Plasma proteins were precipitated with 1:1 volume of plasma and acetonitrile-ethanol-water (60:38.4:1.6, v/v/v). Iohexol concentrations in the supernatant phase were analyzed on a Waters Symmetry C-18 reversed-phase column under isocratic conditions at 245 nm. The extraction recoveries of iohexol from plasma were >95% and the plasma iohexol calibration curves were linear (R(2) ≥ 0.9998) from 10 to 1500 µg/mL. The within-day coefficients of variation (CVs) at plasma iohexol concentrations of 100, 375, 750 and 1500 µg/mL were 5.1, 3.5, 1.3 and 2.5%, respectively; the between-day CVs at 100, 375, 750 and 1500 µg/mL were 8.6, 4.2, 4.0 and 3.7%, respectively. The day-to-day accuracies of the method at plasma iohexol concentrations of 50, 100, 375, 750 and 1500 µg/mL were 89.0, 99.4, 108.4, 103.6 and 101.2%, respectively (n = 5). The lower limit of plasma iohexol quantitation was 10 µg/mL and no interferences >9 µg/mL were found in over 75 pre-dose porcine plasma samples. The applicability of the method was demonstrated by determining the glomerular filtration rates of iohexol in the porcine (Sus scrofa) model.

  3. Correlation of the in vitro antifungal drug susceptibility with the in vivo activity of fluconazole in a murine model of cerebral infection caused by Cryptococcus gattii.

    PubMed

    Mendes, F E S; Oliveira, L V N; Faria, E S; Alvarenga, D G; Pinto, M R; Taborda, C P; Soares, B M; Cisalpino, P S; Santos, D A

    2010-12-01

    Forty Cryptococcus gattii strains were submitted to antifungal susceptibility testing with fluconazole, itraconazole, amphotericin B and terbinafine. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) ranges were 0.5-64.0 for fluconazole, <0.015-0.25 for itraconazole, 0.015-0.5 for amphotericin B and 0.062-2.0 for terbinafine. A bioassay for the quantitation of fluconazole in murine brain tissue was developed. Swiss mice received daily injections of the antifungal, and their brains were withdrawn at different times over the 14-day study period. The drug concentrations varied from 12.98 to 44.60 μg/mL. This assay was used to evaluate the therapy with fluconazole in a model of infection caused by C. gattii. Swiss mice were infected intracranially and treated with fluconazole for 7, 10 or 14 days. The treatment reduced the fungal burden, but an increase in fungal growth was observed on day 14. The MIC for fluconazole against sequential isolates was 16 μg/mL, except for the isolates obtained from animals treated for 14 days (MIC = 64 μg/mL). The quantitation of cytokines revealed a predominance of IFN-γ and IL-12 in the non-treated group and elevation of IL-4 and IL-10 in the treated group. Our data revealed the possibility of acquired resistance during the antifungal drug therapy.

  4. Plasma Retinol Concentration Is Mainly Driven by Transthyretin in Hemodialysis Patients.

    PubMed

    Bataille, Stanislas; Landrier, Jean-François; Astier, Julien; Cado, Sylvie; Sallette, Jérôme; Serveaux, Marianne; Burtey, Stéphane; Cohen, Julien; Tournier, Charlène; Tourniaire, Franck; Darmon, Patrice

    2017-07-06

    Micronutrients deficiencies in hemodialysis patients are due to low dietary intakes and intradialytic losses for hydrophilic micronutrients. Conversely, lipophilic nondialyzable compounds might accumulate because of a lack of elimination through renal metabolism or dialysis. Other compounds have complex metabolism: their concentration is not explained by these phenomenons. The aim of this study was to report plasma concentrations of lipophilic micronutrients in hemodialysis patients and to analyze if these concentrations were predictive of mortality. The design was monocentric observational longitudinal study. A total of 123 hemodialysis patients included in this observational study. Plasma concentration of lipophilic micronutrients retinol and its two co-transporters transthyretin and retinol-binding protein 4, tocopherol, and carotenoids (α-carotene and β-carotene, β-cryptoxanthin, lycopene, lutein, and zeaxanthin), and all factors associated with 1-year mortality. Within the 123 patients of the study, median age (interquartile range) was 77.5 (69.5-84.5) years and 58.5% were male. Median retinol plasma concentration was 4.07 (2.65-5.51) μmol/L, and 91.9% of patient had high plasma retinol concentrations. In monovariate analysis, retinol levels were inversely correlated with mortality (hazard ratio = 0.57 [0.45-0.72]; P < .001). This effect remained significant after adjustment with several parameters. Nevertheless, the correlation between retinol and mortality disappeared as soon as transthyretin was added in the statistical model, suggesting an effect of transthyretin as confusing bias. Median tocopherol plasma concentration was 34.8 (28.3-42.9) μmol/L and 72.4% of patients had high plasma tocopherol concentration. Neither tocopherol plasma levels nor carotenoids concentrations were correlated with death in multivariate analysis. In hemodialysis patients, the correlation between retinol plasma concentration and mortality represents the nutritional

  5. Role of ouabain-like compound in the regulation of plasma aldosterone concentration in rats.

    PubMed

    Yamada, K; Goto, A; Hui, C; Omata, M

    1996-01-01

    A major biologically active Na,K-ATPase inhibitor in the mammalian circulation may be ouabain-like compound(OLC). We developed a population of immunized rats against ouabain to block the actions of circulating OLC. To investigate the roles of OLC in the regulation of aldosterone secretion and/or production, we measured plasma aldosterone concentration after a week of low salt diet. No significant changes in serum Na and K concentrations were observed in immune rats. The plasma aldosterone concentration was significantly decreased by 30% in 17 immune rats as compared with 11 control rats(control: 455 +/- 53, immune: 315 +/- 21 pg/mL, p < 0.05). These data indicate that chronic blockade of the circulating OLC significantly decreases plasma aldosterone concentration during salt depletion and suggest that endogenous OLC may play an important role in the regulation of aldosterone secretion and/or production.

  6. Plasma cortisol concentrations following cortisone infusion in dogs before and after treatment with cortisone acetate.

    PubMed

    Church, D B; Emslie, D R; Watson, A D

    1999-10-01

    To evaluate effects of iatrogenic hyperadrenocorticism on plasma cortisol concentrations produced by an infusion of hydrocortisone in dogs. Plasma cortisol concentrations were measured regularly during a 6 h infusion of hydrocortisone sodium succinate at two dose rates. The infusions were performed before and after treatment for 30 d with oral cortisone acetate at 10 mg/kg/24 h, divided thrice daily. Adrenal activity during the experimental period was assessed by weekly ACTH stimulation tests. Both infusion rates produced lower plasma cortisol concentrations after treatment for 30 d with cortisone. Prior exposure to high concentrations of glucocorticoids may result in accelerated metabolism of glucocorticoids administered subsequently. This may necessitate increased dosages when using glucocorticoids to support inadequate adrenal function.

  7. The effect of feeding canola meal on concentrations of plasma amino acids.

    PubMed

    Martineau, R; Ouellet, D R; Lapierre, H

    2014-03-01

    An initial meta-analysis on isonitrogenous experiments where a protein source was replaced by canola meal (CM) showed that CM feeding increased yields of milk and milk protein and apparent N efficiency. The objective of the current study was to determine if these responses were related to increased changes in plasma AA concentrations. Although only half of the experiments of the initial meta-analysis reported concentrations of plasma AA and could be used in the current meta-analysis, lactational responses to CM feeding were similar to those reported previously. In the current meta-analysis, CM feeding increased plasma concentrations of total AA, total essential AA (EAA) and all individual EAA, but decreased concentrations of blood and milk urea-N. The current meta-analysis suggests that CM feeding increased the absorption of EAA, which would be responsible for the increased milk protein secretion and the increased apparent N efficiency.

  8. Effects of hemorrhagic hypotension on tyrosine concentrations in rat spinal cord and plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conlay, L. A.; Maher, T. J.; Roberts, C. H.; Wurtman, R. J.

    1988-01-01

    Tyrosine is the precursor for catecholamine neurotransmitters. When catecholamine-containing neurons are physiologically active (as sympathoadrenal cells are in hypotension), tyrosine administration increases catecholamine synthesis and release. Since hypotension can alter plasma amino acid composition, the effects of an acute hypotensive insult on tyrosine concentrations in plasma and spinal cord were examined. Rats were cannulated and bled until the systolic blood pressure was 50 mmHg, or were kept normotensive for 1 h. Tyrosine and other large neutral amino acids (LNAA) known to compete with tyrosine for brain uptake were assayed in plasma and spinal cord. The rate at which intra-arterial (H-3)tyrosine disappeared from the plasma was also estimated in hemorrhaged and control rats. In plasma of hemorrhaged animals, both the tyrosine concentration and the tyrosine/LNAA ratio was elevated; moreover, the disappearance of (H-3)tyrosine was slowed. Tyrosine concentrations also increased in spinal cords of hemorrhaged-hypotensive rats when compared to normotensive controls. Changes in plasma amino acid patterns may thus influence spinal cord concentrations of amino acid precursors for neurotransmitters during the stress of hemorrhagic shock.

  9. Release profiles and morphological characterization by atomic force microscopy and photon correlation spectroscopy of 99mTechnetium-fluconazole nanocapsules.

    PubMed

    de Assis, Danielle Nogueira; Mosqueira, Vanessa Carla Furtado; Vilela, José Mário Carneiro; Andrade, Margareth Spangler; Cardoso, Valbert Nascimento

    2008-02-12

    Several classes of antifungal have been employed in candidiasis treatment, but patients with advanced immunodeficiency can present unsatisfactory results after therapy. In these cases, high doses of drugs or the use of multiple agents are sometimes used, and hence increasing the risk of serious side effects. Considering theses difficulties, the encapsulation of antifungal agents in nanoparticulate carriers has been used with the objective of modifying the pharmacokinetic of drugs resulting in more efficient treatments with less side effects. The purpose of this work was the preparation, characterization and the investigation of the release profiles of radiolabeled fluconazole nanocapsules. The size, homogeneity and zeta potential of NC preparations were determined with a Zetasizer 3000HS. The morphology and the structural organization were evaluated by atomic force microscopy (AFM). The release study in vitro of NC was evaluated in physiologic solution with or without 70% mouse plasma. The labeling yield of fluconazole with 99mTc was 94% and the radiolabeled drug was stable within 24h period. The encapsulation percentage of 99mTc-fluconazole in PLA-POLOX NC and PLA-PEG NC was approximately of 30%. The average diameter calculated by photon correlation spectroscopy (PCS) varied from 236 to 356 nm, while the average diameter determined by AFM varied from 238 to 411 nm. The diameter/height relation decreased significantly when 25% glutaraldehyde was used for NC fixation on mica. The zeta potential varied from -55 to -69 nm and surface-modified NC showed lower absolute values than conventional NC. The in vitro release of 99mTc-fluconazole in plasma medium of the conventional and surface-modified NC was greater than in saline. The drug release in plasma medium from conventional NC was faster than for surface-modified NC. The results obtained in this work suggest that the nanocapsules containing fluconazole could be used to identify infectious foci, due to the properties

  10. Motility of liquid stored ram spermatozoa is altered by dilution rate independent of seminal plasma concentration.

    PubMed

    Mata-Campuzano, M; Soleilhavoup, C; Tsikis, G; Martinez-Pastor, F; de Graaf, S P; Druart, X

    2015-11-01

    The fertility after use of liquid stored ram semen following cervical AI rapidly decreases if semen is stored beyond 12h. The dilution of seminal plasma is often cited as a key contributor to the diminished motility and fertility of ram spermatozoa subjected to liquid preservation. Two experiments were conducted to assess the effect of spermatozoa concentration (i.e. dilution rate) and percentage of seminal plasma on the motility and viability of liquid stored ram spermatozoa. In Experiment 1, semen was diluted to one of seven concentrations ranging from 0.2 to 1.4×10(9)spermatozoa/ml with milk and assessed for motility after 3 or 24h of storage at 15°C. In Experiment 2, semen was collected and washed to remove seminal plasma before re-dilution to 0.2-1.4×10(9)spermatozoa/ml with milk containing 0%, 20% or 40% (final v/v ratio) seminal plasma and assessed for viability and motility after 3 or 24h of storage at 15°C. Whereas motility was not affected by spermatozoa concentration after 3h of storage, the proportion of progressive spermatozoa decreased after 24h of storage when spermatozoa concentration was greater than 1.0×10(9)spermatozoa/ml. The duration of preservation and the spermatozoa concentration affected spermatozoa motility but had no impact on spermatozoa viability. This negative effect of greater spermatozoa concentrations on motility was independent of the presence and the concentration of seminal plasma. The seminal plasma at both concentrations (20% and 40%) had a protective effect on spermatozoa motility after 24h of storage. These findings have the potential to improve the efficiency of cervical AI with liquid stored ram semen.

  11. Impact of Whole-Blood Processing Conditions on Plasma and Serum Concentrations of Cytokines.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae-Eun; Kim, Jong-Wan; Han, Bok-Ghee; Shin, So-Youn

    2016-02-01

    Pre-analytical variations in plasma and serum samples can occur because of variability in whole-blood processing procedures. The aim of this study was to determine the impact of delayed separation of whole blood on the plasma and serum concentrations of cytokines. The concentrations of 16 cytokines were measured in plasma and serum samples when the centrifugation of whole blood at room temperature was delayed for 4, 6, 24, or 48 h, and the values were compared with those observed after separation within 2 h of whole-blood collection. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis was also performed for cytokines to determine whether cytokine levels in plasma and serum samples can be used to assess delayed separation of whole blood. Plasma concentrations of interleukin (IL)-1β, granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), and soluble CD40 ligand (sCD40L) and serum concentrations of IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, macrophage inflammatory protein-1α (MIP-1α), and MIP-1β increased significantly (>2-fold) when separation was delayed at room temperature for 24 h. The concentrations of 6 of these cytokines (all except serum IL-1β and IL-6) demonstrated high diagnostic performance (area under the ROC curve >0.8) for delayed separation of whole blood. Furthermore, these cytokine concentrations typically exhibited high sensitivity and specificity at each optimal cutoff point. Conversely, IL-17A was stable in both plasma and serum samples, even when whole-blood centrifugation was delayed at room temperature for 48 h. This study shows that certain cytokines (IL-1β, GM-CSF, sCD40L, IL-8, MIP-1α, and MIP-1β) could be used for assessing the quality of plasma or serum samples.

  12. Changes in plasma leptin concentration during different types of exercises performed by horses.

    PubMed

    Kędzierski, W

    2014-09-01

    Leptin is a tissue-derivative adipokine that regulates appetite, food intake and energy expenditure. It is still not clear how exercise affects plasma leptin concentration in horses. The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of exercise intensity and duration on plasma leptin levels in working horses. A total of 38 horses were prospectively included in the study and grouped according to the type of exercise they performed: dressage (six stallions, group D), jumping (12 stallions, group J), race (12 Thoroughbred horses, six stallions and six mares, group R) and harness (10 light draft stallions, group H). Blood samples were taken both before and after routine exercise (immediately after the exercise, 30 min and 24 h after). Blood lactic acid (LA) and plasma concentration of leptin, cortisol, uric acid, triacylglycerols, glycerol and free fatty acids were determined. Immediately after exercise, group R had the highest level of LA, whereas groups D and J had the lowest levels. A significant increase in plasma leptin concentration was stated only in group H in samples taken immediately after the end of the exercise period and 30 min after the exercise period, as compared with the values obtained at rest. A significant increase in plasma cortisol concentration was found immediately after the end of the exercise period in groups R and H. Leptin exercise-to-rest ratio was significantly correlated with cortisol exercise-to-rest ratio (r=0.64; P<0.001). The increase in plasma leptin concentration in exercised horses was related to the increased plasma cortisol concentration and took place only during long-lasting exercise, which was not intensive.

  13. Effects of a smoking ban on clozapine plasma concentrations in a nonsecure psychiatric unit

    PubMed Central

    Gee, Siobhan H.; Taylor, David M.; Shergill, Sukhwinder S.; Flanagan, Robert; MacCabe, James H.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Tobacco smoke is known to affect plasma levels of some drugs, including the antipsychotic clozapine. The effects of suddenly stopping smoking on patients who take clozapine can be severe, as plasma concentrations are expected to rapidly rise, potentially leading to toxicity. A ban on smoking at South London and the Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust (SLaM) was implemented in 2014, and this was expected to affect the plasma concentrations of clozapine for inpatients at the time. This study aimed to determine whether plasma concentrations of clozapine were affected, and additionally, in line with observations from other authors, whether levels of reported violence would also be affected. Methods: The smoking habits of all patients at SLaM who smoked and were prescribed clozapine were recorded both before and after the ban. The Glasgow Antipsychotic Side Effect Scale for Clozapine (GASS-C) scale was used to evaluate side-effect burden. Clozapine doses and plasma concentrations were also collected. Results: In total, 31 patients were included in this study. The mean clozapine dose before the ban was 502 mg/day, and this did not change significantly after the ban. Similarly, there were no significant changes in clozapine or norclozapine plasma concentrations, or in GASS-C scores. There was no change in the amount of tobacco patients reported smoking before or after the ban. A modest but statistically significant reduction in violent incidences was observed. Conclusions: Our data suggest that a ban on smoking for patients taking clozapine on open wards at inpatient hospital sites had little impact on clozapine plasma concentrations, because patients continued to smoke tobacco if allowed to leave. Smoking bans may result in a reduction in violent incidences. PMID:28255437

  14. Carbohydrate supplementation and alterations in neutrophils, and plasma cortisol and myoglobin concentration after intense exercise.

    PubMed

    Peake, Jonathan; Wilson, Gary; Mackinnon, Laurel; Coombes, Jeff S

    2005-03-01

    The present study examined the effect of carbohydrate supplementation on changes in neutrophil counts, and the plasma concentrations of cortisol and myoglobin after intense exercise. Eight well-trained male runners ran on a treadmill for 1 h at 85% maximal oxygen uptake on two separate occasions. In a double-blind cross-over design, subjects consumed either 750 ml of a 10% carbohydrate (CHO) drink or a placebo drink on each occasion. The order of the trials was counter-balanced. Blood was drawn immediately before and after exercise, and 1 h after exercise. Immediately after exercise, neutrophil counts (CHO, 49%; placebo, 65%; P<0.05), plasma concentrations of glucose (CHO, 43%; P<0.05), lactate (CHO, 130%; placebo, 130%; P<0.01), cortisol (CHO, 100%; placebo, 161%; P<0.01), myoglobin (CHO, 194%; placebo, 342%; P<0.01) all increased significantly. One hour post-exercise, plasma myoglobin concentration (CHO, 331%; placebo, 482%; P<0.01) and neutrophil count (CHO, 151%; placebo, 230% P<0.01) both increased further above baseline. CHO significantly attenuated plasma myoglobin concentration and the neutrophil count after exercise (P<0.01), but did not affect plasma cortisol concentration. The effects of CHO on plasma myoglobin concentration may be due to alterations in cytokine synthesis, insulin responses or myoglobin clearance rates from the bloodstream during exercise. Plasma cortisol responses to CHO during exercise may depend on the intensity of exercise, or the amount of CHO consumed. Lastly, cortisol appears to play a minor role in the mobilisation of neutrophils after intense exercise.

  15. Effect of carnitine supplement to the dam on plasma carnitine concentration in the sucking foal.

    PubMed

    Benamou, A E; Harris, R C

    1993-01-01

    The changes in carnitine in plasma and milk during the first 3 months of lactation were studied in 14 broodmares and their foals. Six of the mares (Group S) were given a supplement of 10 g carnitine split between the morning and evening feeds, starting 2 weeks before birth. At birth the plasma carnitine concentration in Group S mares was about twice that in Group NS mares (no supplement). In both groups the concentration initially declined in the days after birth. Whilst this trend was reversed in Group S mares, the concentration in Group NS mares remained at a reduced level for the remainder of the study. Milk concentrations declined continuously over the monitoring period in both groups. There was no apparent relationship between milk and plasma concentrations. Despite this the milk concentration tended to be higher in Group S than in Group NS mares although differences were not significant. There was an immediate drop in the plasma concentration in foals after birth which was reversed in foals of Group S mares but not in those of Group NS mares. There were no apparent side effects of carnitine supplementation.

  16. A mixed fruit and vegetable concentrate increases plasma antioxidant vitamins and folate and lowers plasma homocysteine in men.

    PubMed

    Samman, Samir; Sivarajah, Gayathri; Man, June C; Ahmad, Ziaul I; Petocz, Peter; Caterson, Ian D

    2003-07-01

    Fruit and vegetable consumption is inversely associated with coronary heart disease (CHD) risk. The aim of the present study was to determine the effect of supplementation with dehydrated juice concentrates from mixed fruit and vegetables on selected plasma vitamins and antioxidant status. We assessed CHD risk by measuring the concentrations of homocysteine, lipids, lipoproteins, glucose and insulin. Men were recruited to participate in a randomized double-blind, crossover trial with 2 periods of 6 wk, separated by a 3-wk wash-out period. Supplementation with the encapsulated mixed extract (Juice Plus) was compared with physically similar placebo capsules. Thirty-two men (13 smokers, 19 nonsmokers) completed the study with a mean compliance of 88%. Compared with placebo, supplementation increased the concentrations of plasma beta-carotene (0.24 +/- 0.15 vs. 1.12 +/- 0.70 micro mol/L; mean +/- SD; P < 0.0001), retinol (1.87 +/- 0.33 vs. 2.00 +/- 0.43 micro mol/L; P < 0.05), alpha-tocopherol (16.8 +/- 7.3 vs. 19.3 +/- 6.8 micro mol/L; P < 0.01), ascorbic acid (72.1 +/- 19.4 vs. 84.1 +/- 13.5 micro mol/L; P < 0.002) and folic acid (24.5 +/- 10.0 vs. 44.9 +/- 16.9 nmol/L; P < 0.0001). Plasma homocysteine was reduced (8.2 +/- 1.5 vs. 7.6 +/- 1.1; P < 0.05) and inversely related (r = -0.40, P < 0.001) with serum folate concentrations. Plasma vitamin C was positively correlated with the resistance of LDL to oxidation (r = 0.26, P < 0.05) and the plasma ferric reducing/antioxidant power (FRAP) tended to be greater after supplementation than after the placebo period (1125.5 +/- 144.1 vs. 1180.3 +/- 158.1 micro mol/L; P < 0.065). Plasma glucose, insulin and lipid concentrations were unaffected. Responses of smokers and nonsmokers did not differ. In the absence of dietary modification, supplementation with a fruit and vegetable concentrate produced responses consistent with a reduction in CHD risk.

  17. Increased plasma proline concentrations are associated with sarcopenia in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Toyoshima, Kenji; Nakamura, Marie; Adachi, Yusuke; Imaizumi, Akira; Hakamada, Tomomi; Abe, Yasuko; Kaneko, Eiji; Takahashi, Soiciro; Shimokado, Kentaro

    2017-01-01

    Metabolome analyses have shown that plasma amino acid profiles reflect various pathological conditions, such as cancer and diabetes mellitus. It remains unclear, however, whether plasma amino acid profiles change in patients with sarcopenia. This study therefore aimed to investigate whether sarcopenia-specific changes occur in plasma amino acid profiles. A total of 153 community-dwelling and seven institutionalized elderly individuals (56 men, 104 women; mean age, 77.7±7.0 years) were recruited for this cross-sectional analysis. We performed a comprehensive geriatric assessment, which included an evaluation of hand grip strength, gait speed, muscle mass and blood chemistry, including the concentration of 18 amino acids. Twenty-eight of the 160 participants met the criteria for sarcopenia established by the Asian Working Group on Sarcopenia in Older People. Univariate analysis revealed associations between the presence of sarcopenia and a higher plasma concentration of proline and glutamine, lower concentrations of histidine and tryptophan. Multivariable analysis revealed that a higher concentration of proline was the only variable independently associated with sarcopenia. The plasma concentration of proline may be useful for understanding the underlying pathophysiology of sarcopenia.

  18. Comparison of digoxin concentration in plastic serum tubes with clot activator and heparinized plasma tubes.

    PubMed

    Dukić, Lora; Simundić, Ana-Maria; Malogorski, Davorin

    2014-01-01

    Sample type recommended by the manufacturer for the digoxin Abbott assay is either serum collected in glass tubes or plasma (sodium heparin, lithium heparin, citrate, EDTA or oxalate as anticoagulant) collected in plastic tubes. In our hospital samples are collected in plastic tubes. Our hypothesis was that the serum sample collected in plastic serum tube can be used interchangeably with plasma sample for measurement of digoxin concentration. Our aim was verification of plastic serum tubes for determination of digoxin concentration. Concentration of digoxin was determined simultaneously in 26 venous blood plasma (plastic Vacuette, LH Lithium heparin) and serum (plastic Vacuette, Z Serum Clot activator; both Greiner Bio-One GmbH, Kremsmünster, Austria) samples, on Abbott AxSYM analyzer using the original Abbott Digoxin III assay (Abbott, Wiesbaden, Germany). Tube comparability was assessed using the Passing Bablok regression and Bland-Altman plot. Serum and plasma digoxin concentrations are comparable. Passing Bablok intercept (0.08 [95% CI = -0.10 to 0.20]) and slope (0.99 [95% CI = 0.92 to 1.11]) showed there is no constant or proportional error. Blood samples drawn in plastic serum tubes and plastic plasma tubes can be interchangeably used for determination of digoxin concentration.

  19. Antibiotic treatment of acute salpingitis. A study of plasma concentrations of two tetracyclines (doxycycline and lymecycline).

    PubMed

    Forslin, L; Danielson, D; Kjellander, J; Falk, V

    1982-01-01

    A group of 782 patients with a diagnosis of acute salpingitis (a few of the patients because of other infection in the pelvis) were treated with the recommended oral dose of doxycycline (200 mg the first day and 100 mg once daily for at least the following 9-12 days) in combination with 1 g benzyl penicillin and 0.6 g procaine penicillin twice daily intramuscularly for 5-7 days. The plasma concentrations of doxycycline were determined on the third day of treatment before the next dose was given. In 26.5% of the patients the concentrations were below 1 microgram/ml plasma, considered as the minimum therapeutic level. The dose of doxycycline was increased to 200 mg a day in these patients and the plasma concentrations increased accordingly. In another group of 80 patients, 40 were treated with the standard doxycycline dose, and the other 40 patients with the standard lymecycline dose (300 mg twice a day). The plasma concentrations, determined before the dose on the third day, were below 1 microgram/ml in 35% of the patients treated with doxycycline, and in 5% of those treated with lymecycline. Since acute salpingitis in most cases is a serious complication to a lower genital tract infection, often a sexually transmitted disease caused by tetracycline-sensitive organisms, the importance of achieving and determining the therapeutic plasma concentrations of tetracyclines is stressed.

  20. Effect of thyroid hormone on concentrations of plasma calcitonin in broiler chicks.

    PubMed

    Klandorf, H; Boyce, C S; Holt, S B; Iqbal, M; Killefer, J; Peterson, R A; Deaver, D R

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of these studies was to determine the effect of thyroidectomy (Tx), and thyroid hormone (T3/T4) treatment on concentrations of plasma CT in chicks. In addition, the turnover of CT in Tx- and T3/T4-treated chicks was estimated using a novel nonradioactive salmon CT preparation. One-week-old broiler chicks (Gallus domesticus) (n = 75) were divided into three groups. Group I was sham-injected daily (i.m. saline), Group II was injected with 50 micrograms/day of T3/T4 while Group III was injected with the goitrogen, methimazole, (150 mg/kg BW per day) for 8 weeks. Chicks (8-9 weeks old) were implanted with catheters in the brachial wing vein and administered ruthenium-labeled salmon CT. Blood samples were collected at 30 s, 1, 2, 4, 8, 20 min, and 3 h after injection. Results showed that concentrations of plasma CT were decreased in T3/T4-injected birds. There was no significant effect of methimazole on circulating concentrations of plasma CT. The half-life of CT was significantly increased (P < 0.05) in both T3/T4-injected (n = 6; 1.34 +/- 0.16 min) and goitrogen-treated birds (n = 2; 5.81 +/- 2.83 min) compared to controls (n = 7; 54 +/- 3 s) The results demonstrate that changes in concentrations of plasma thyroid hormones can significantly affect concentrations of plasma CT.

  1. Fluconazole pharmacokinetics in a morbidly obese, critically ill patient receiving continuous venovenous hemofiltration.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Natasha D; Phillips, Kristy M

    2014-09-01

    Current fluconazole dosing strategies can be described using either standardized doses (800 or 400 mg) or as weight-based dosing recommendations (12 mg/kg loading dose followed by 6 mg/kg maintenance dose). The ideal method of fluconazole dosing is still unclear for certain patient populations, such as those receiving renal replacement therapy or the morbidly obese. We describe a 48-year-old man with a body mass index of 84 kg/m(2) who was receiving continuous venovenous hemofiltration (CVVH) and was treated with fluconazole by using a weight-based dose determined by lean body weight, infused at a rate of 200 mg/hour. Blood samples were collected at hour 0 (i.e., ~24 hrs after the loading dose was administered) and at 3.5, 6.8, and 11.3 hours after the start of the 600-mg maintenance dose, infused over 3 hours. Pharmacokinetic parameters calculated were maximum serum concentration 9.64 mg/L, minimum serum concentration 5.98 mg/L, area under the serum concentration-time curve from 0-24 hours (AUC0-24 ) 184.75 mg/L•hour, elimination rate constant 0.0199 hour(-1) , elimination half-life 34.8 hours, and total body clearance 3.25 L/hour. Our data, when combined with previously published literature, do not support using a linear dose-to-AUC approximation to estimate drug dosing needs in the critically ill patient population receiving CVVH. In addition, our results suggest that morbidly obese patients are able to achieve pharmacodynamic goals defined as an AUC:MIC ratio higher than 25 by using a lean body weight for fluconazole dosing calculations.

  2. Postprandial changes in plasma acylcarnitine concentrations as markers of fatty acid flux in overweight and obesity

    PubMed Central

    Ramos-Roman, Maria A.; Sweetman, Lawrence; Valdez, Maressa J.; Parks, Elizabeth J.

    2011-01-01

    Objective This study determined whether reductions in postprandial plasma FFA flux would lead to reductions in plasma acylcarnitine (AC) concentrations. Materials/Methods Plasma AC were measured by LC-MS/MS in the fasting state and over 6h after a high-fat (50% energy) meal was fed to 16 overweight and obese subjects with a wide range of insulin sensitivities. Body composition was measured by DEXA, insulin sensitivity by FSIVGTT, substrate oxidation by indirect calorimetry, blood metabolite and hormone concentrations biochemically, and fatty acid flux by using stable isotope tracers. Results Lean body mass (LBM) and fasting fat oxidation correlated positively (r > 0.522, P<0.05), while glucose oxidation correlated negatively (r < −0.551, P <0.04) with fasting AC. Postprandially, plasma glucose, insulin, and TG concentrations increased, and FFA concentrations decreased significantly. The responses of plasma AC species depended on chain length and saturation, with C14:0, C16:0, and C18:0 remaining unchanged, and unsaturated species (e.g., C14:1, C14:2) falling significantly (21–46%, P < 0.03). Post-meal nadir AC concentrations were positively associated with LBM, postprandial fatty acid flux and FFA concentrations (r > 0.515, P < 0.05). By contrast, nadir AC correlated negatively with insulin sensitivity and spillover of meal-derived fatty acids (r < −0.528, P < 0.04). Conclusions Conditions that impact fatty acid flux contribute to the control of postprandial plasma AC concentrations. These data underscore the need for a better understanding of postprandial fatty acid oxidation and dietary fat delivery in the setting of adipose insulin resistance to determine how postprandial lipemia contributes to chronic disease risk. PMID:21820684

  3. A Phenomenological Model for Circadian and Sleep Allostatic Modulation of Plasma Cortisol Concentration

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-25

    decreased morning awakening salivary cortisol . Psychoneuroendo- crinology 29: 1184–1191, 2004. 2. Balbo M, Leproult R, Van Cauter E. Impact of sleep and...A phenomenological model for circadian and sleep allostatic modulation of plasma cortisol concentration David Thorsley,1 Rachel Leproult,2,3 Karine...2012 Thorsley D, Leproult R, Spiegel K, Reifman J. A phenomenological model for circadian and sleep allostatic modulation of plasma cortisol

  4. Plasma aldosterone and sweat sodium concentrations after exercise and heat acclimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirby, C. R.; Convertino, V. A.

    1986-01-01

    The relationship between plasma aldosterone levels and sweat sodium excretion after chronic exercise and heat acclimation was investigated, using subjects exercised, at 40 C and 45 percent humidity, for 2 h/day on ten consecutive days at 45 percent of their maximal oxygen uptake. The data indicate that, following heat acclimation, plasma aldosterone concentrations decrease, and that the eccrine gland responsiveness to aldosterone, as represented by sweat sodium reabsorption, may be augmented through exercise and heat acclimation.

  5. Optimized preparation method of platelet-concentrated plasma and noncoagulating platelet-derived factor concentrates: maximization of platelet concentration and removal of fibrinogen.

    PubMed

    Araki, Jun; Jona, Masahiro; Eto, Hitomi; Aoi, Noriyuki; Kato, Harunosuke; Suga, Hirotaka; Doi, Kentaro; Yatomi, Yutaka; Yoshimura, Kotaro

    2012-03-01

    Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) has been clinically used as an easily prepared growth factor cocktail that can promote wound healing, angiogenesis, and tissue remodeling. However, the therapeutic effects of PRP are still controversial, due partly to the lack of optimized and standardized preparation protocols. We used whole blood (WB) samples to optimize the preparation protocols for PRP, white blood cell-containing (W-PRP), platelet-concentrated plasma (PCP), and noncoagulating platelet-derived factor concentrate (PFC). PRP and W-PRP were most efficiently collected by 10 min centrifugation in a 15-mL conical tube at 230-270 g and 70 g, respectively. To prepare PCP, platelets were precipitated by centrifugation of PRP at >2300 g, 90% of supernatant plasma was removed, and the platelets were resuspended. For preparation of noncoagulating PFC, the supernatant was replaced with one-tenth volume of saline, followed by platelet activation with thrombin. Platelet (before activation) and platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-BB (after activation) concentrations in PCP were approximately 20 times greater than those in WB, whereas PFC contained a 20-times greater concentration of platelets before platelet activation and a 50-times greater concentration of PDGF-BB without formation of a fibrin gel after platelet activation than WB. Surprisingly, total PDGF-BB content in the PFC was twice that of activated WB, which suggested that a substantial portion of the PDGF-BB became trapped in the fibrin glue, and replacement of plasma with saline is crucial for maximization of platelet-derived factors. As an anticoagulant, ethylene di-amine tetra-acetic acid disodium inhibited platelet aggregation more efficiently than acid citrate dextrose solution, resulting in higher nonaggregated platelet yield and final PDGF-BB content. These results increase our understanding of how to optimize and standardize preparation of platelet-derived factors at maximum concentrations.

  6. Optimized Preparation Method of Platelet-Concentrated Plasma and Noncoagulating Platelet-Derived Factor Concentrates: Maximization of Platelet Concentration and Removal of Fibrinogen

    PubMed Central

    Araki, Jun; Jona, Masahiro; Eto, Hitomi; Aoi, Noriyuki; Kato, Harunosuke; Suga, Hirotaka; Doi, Kentaro; Yatomi, Yutaka

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) has been clinically used as an easily prepared growth factor cocktail that can promote wound healing, angiogenesis, and tissue remodeling. However, the therapeutic effects of PRP are still controversial, due partly to the lack of optimized and standardized preparation protocols. We used whole blood (WB) samples to optimize the preparation protocols for PRP, white blood cell-containing (W-PRP), platelet-concentrated plasma (PCP), and noncoagulating platelet-derived factor concentrate (PFC). PRP and W-PRP were most efficiently collected by 10 min centrifugation in a 15-mL conical tube at 230–270 g and 70 g, respectively. To prepare PCP, platelets were precipitated by centrifugation of PRP at >2300 g, 90% of supernatant plasma was removed, and the platelets were resuspended. For preparation of noncoagulating PFC, the supernatant was replaced with one-tenth volume of saline, followed by platelet activation with thrombin. Platelet (before activation) and platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-BB (after activation) concentrations in PCP were approximately 20 times greater than those in WB, whereas PFC contained a 20-times greater concentration of platelets before platelet activation and a 50-times greater concentration of PDGF-BB without formation of a fibrin gel after platelet activation than WB. Surprisingly, total PDGF-BB content in the PFC was twice that of activated WB, which suggested that a substantial portion of the PDGF-BB became trapped in the fibrin glue, and replacement of plasma with saline is crucial for maximization of platelet-derived factors. As an anticoagulant, ethylene di-amine tetra-acetic acid disodium inhibited platelet aggregation more efficiently than acid citrate dextrose solution, resulting in higher nonaggregated platelet yield and final PDGF-BB content. These results increase our understanding of how to optimize and standardize preparation of platelet-derived factors at maximum concentrations. PMID

  7. Susceptibility testing of Candida albicans isolated from oropharyngeal mucosa of HIV+ patients to fluconazole, amphotericin B and Caspofungin. killing kinetics of caspofungin and amphotericin B against fluconazole resistant and susceptible isolates

    PubMed Central

    de Aquino Lemos, Janine; Costa, Carolina Rodrigues; de Araújo, Crystiane Rodrigues; Souza, Lúcia Kioko Hasimoto e; Silva, Maria do Rosário Rodrigues

    2009-01-01

    A clear understanding of the pharmacodynamic properties of antifungal agents is important for the adequate treatment of fungal infections like candidiasis. For certain antifungal agents, the determination of Minimal Fungicidal Concentration (MFC) and time kill curve could be clinically more relevant than the determination of the Minimal Inhibitory Concentration (MIC). In this study, MIC and MFC to fluconazole, amphotericin B and caspofungin against C. albicans isolates and the killing patterns obtained with caspofungin and amphotericin B against susceptible and resistant strains to fluconazole were determined. The results of MICs showed that all C. albicans isolates were highly susceptible to amphotericin B, but two isolates were fluconazole resistant. The comparative analysis between MIC and MFC showed that MFC of fluconazole was fourfold higher than MIC in 41.9% of the C. albicans isolates. Same values of MFC and MIC of amphotericin B and caspofungin were found for 71% of the isolates. Correlation between time kill curves and MFC of amphotericin B and caspofungin against all 4 isolates tested was observed. The caspofungin killing effect was more evident at MFC in 6 hours of incubation than at MIC in this time, suggesting dependence of concentration. The similarity of results of time-kill curve and MFC values indicate that determination of MFC is an alternative for the detection of the fungicidal activity of these drugs. PMID:24031337

  8. Assessment of plasma ammonia and glutamine concentrations in urea cycle disorders.

    PubMed

    Serrano, M; Ormazábal, A; Vilaseca, M A; Lambruschini, N; Garcia-Romero, R; Meavilla, S; Perez-Dueñas, B; Pineda, M; Garcia-Cazorla, A; Campistol, J; Artuch, R

    2011-06-01

    To analyze the association between ammonia and glutamine used for metabolic control in inherited urea cycle disorders (UCD) in a large series of patients. Paired plasma amino acid-ammonia data from 26 UCD patients were analyzed (n=921). Increased plasma glutamine values were consistently observed in UCD patients, despite normal plasma ammonia concentrations, especially for mitochondrial UCD. Further therapeutic efforts are probably needed to control increased glutamine values, considering their potentially neurotoxic effect. Copyright © 2011 The Canadian Society of Clinical Chemists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Determining Concentrations and Temperatures in Semiconductor Manufacturing Plasmas via Submillimeter Absorption Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helal, Yaser H.; Neese, Christopher F.; De Lucia, Frank C.; Ewing, Paul R.; Agarwal, Ankur; Craver, Barry; Stout, Phillip J.; Armacost, Michael D.

    2016-06-01

    Plasmas used in the manufacturing processes of semiconductors are similar in pressure and temperature to plasmas used in studying the spectroscopy of astrophysical species. Likewise, the developed technology in submillimeter absorption spectroscopy can be used for the study of industrial plasmas and for monitoring manufacturing processes. An advantage of submillimeter absorption spectroscopy is that it can be used to determine absolute concentrations and temperatures of plasma species without the need for intrusive probes. A continuous wave, 500 - 750 GHz absorption spectrometer was developed for the purpose of being used as a remote sensor of gas and plasma species. An important part of this work was the optical design to match the geometry of existing plasma reactors in the manufacturing industry. A software fitting routine was developed to simultaneously fit for the background and absorption signal, solving for concentration, rotational temperature, and translational temperature. Examples of measurements made on inductively coupled plasmas will be demonstrated. We would like to thank the Texas Analog Center of Excellence/Semiconductor Research Corporation (TxACE/SRC) and Applied Materials for their support of this work.

  10. Effect of dietary fat source on lipoprotein composition and plasma lipid concentrations in pigs.

    PubMed

    Faidley, T D; Luhman, C M; Galloway, S T; Foley, M K; Beitz, D C

    1990-10-01

    Most studies of the effects of dietary fat sources on plasma lipid components have used diets with extreme fat compositions; the current study was designed to more nearly mimic human dietary fat intake. Young growing pigs were fed diets containing either 20 or 40% of energy as soy oil, beef tallow or a 50/50 blend of soy oil and tallow. Different dietary fats did not affect concentrations of cholesterol, triacylglycerol or protein in plasma or major lipoprotein fractions. The concentration of phospholipid was less in plasma and in very low density lipoproteins with soy oil feeding than with tallow feeding. The weight percentage of cholesteryl ester in the low density lipoprotein fraction tended to be greater with 40% than with 20% tallow and tended to be less with 40% than with 20% soy oil. Phospholipid as a weight percentage of low density lipoprotein was least in pigs fed soy oil. Tallow feeding increased the percentage of myristic, palmitic, palmitoleic and oleic acids in plasma, relative to both other groups. Soy oil feeding increased the percentage of linoleic and linolenic acids. These moderate diets were not hypercholesterolemic, but they did alter plasma fatty acid composition and phospholipid concentrations in plasma and very low density lipoprotein.

  11. Plasma Oxytocin Concentration during Pregnancy is associated with Development of Postpartum Depression

    PubMed Central

    Skrundz, Marta; Bolten, Margarete; Nast, Irina; Hellhammer, Dirk H; Meinlschmidt, Gunther

    2011-01-01

    Postpartum depression (PPD) affects up to 19% of all women after parturition. The non-apeptide oxytocin (OXT) is involved in adjustment to pregnancy, maternal behavior, and bonding. Our aim was to examine the possible association between plasma OXT during pregnancy and the development of PPD symptoms. A total of 74 healthy, pregnant women were included in this prospective study. During the third trimester of pregnancy and within 2 weeks after parturition, PPD symptoms were assessed using the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS). Blood samples for plasma OXT assessment were collected in the third trimester. Following the literature, participants with postpartum EPDS scores of 10 or more were regarded as being at risk for PPD development (rPPD group). In a logistic regression analysis, plasma OXT was included as a potential predictor for being at risk for PPD. Results were controlled for prepartal EPDS score, sociodemographic and birth-outcome variables. Plasma OXT concentration in mid-pregnancy significantly predicted PPD symptoms at 2 weeks postpartum. Compared with the no-risk-for-PPD group, the rPPD group was characterized by lower plasma OXT concentrations. To our knowledge, this is the first study to show an association between prepartal plasma OXT concentration and postpartal symptoms of PPD in humans. Assuming a causal relationship, enhancing OXT release during pregnancy could serve as a potential target in prepartum PPD prevention, and help to minimize adverse effects of PPD on the mother–child relationship. PMID:21562482

  12. Pathogen inactivation and removal methods for plasma-derived clotting factor concentrates.

    PubMed

    Klamroth, Robert; Gröner, Albrecht; Simon, Toby L

    2014-05-01

    Pathogen safety is crucial for plasma-derived clotting factor concentrates used in the treatment of bleeding disorders. Plasma, the starting material for these products, is collected by plasmapheresis (source plasma) or derived from whole blood donations (recovered plasma). The primary measures regarding pathogen safety are selection of healthy donors donating in centers with appropriate epidemiologic data for the main blood-transmissible viruses, screening donations for the absence of relevant infectious blood-borne viruses, and release of plasma pools for further processing only if they are nonreactive for serologic markers and nucleic acids for these viruses. Despite this testing, pathogen inactivation and/or removal during the manufacturing process of plasma-derived clotting factor concentrates is required to ensure prevention of transmission of infectious agents. Historically, hepatitis viruses and human immunodeficiency virus have posed the greatest threat to patients receiving plasma-derived therapy for treatment of hemophilia or von Willebrand disease. Over the past 30 years, dedicated virus inactivation and removal steps have been integrated into factor concentrate production processes, essentially eliminating transmission of these viruses. Manufacturing steps used in the purification of factor concentrates have also proved to be successful in reducing potential prion infectivity. In this review, current techniques for inactivation and removal of pathogens from factor concentrates are discussed. Ideally, production processes should involve a combination of complementary steps for pathogen inactivation and/or removal to ensure product safety. Finally, potential batch-to-batch contamination is avoided by stringent cleaning and sanitization methods as part of the manufacturing process.

  13. Correlation of paired toxic plasma and saliva paracetamol concentrations following deliberate self-poisoning with paracetamol.

    PubMed

    Soderstrom, Jessamine H; Fatovich, Daniel M; Mandelt, Christine; Vasikaran, Sam; McCoubrie, David L; Daly, Frank F; Burrows, Sally A

    2012-07-01

    • Paracetamol is commonly used in deliberate self poisoning (DSP) and this requires blood sampling to refine risk assessment. If saliva concentrations agreed with plasma concentrations, then this could support the development of non-invasive testing. Our pilot work supports this hypothesis, but was largely confined to nontoxic concentrations. • We found agreement between the indications for treatment of paracetamol DSP based on plasma and saliva paracetamol concentrations. Saliva may hold promise as a non-invasive method to risk stratify paracetamol poisoning. Paracetamol is commonly used in deliberate self poisoning (DSP) and requires blood sampling to refine risk assessment. We aimed to test the agreement between plasma and saliva paracetamol concentrations in the toxic range in DSP. Contemporaneous paired plasma and saliva paracetamol concentrations were measured. Saliva was collected using a Sarstedt Salivette® device and the concentration was measured using a colorimetric method. Fifty-six patients (44, 78% female) median age 26 years (IQR 20-41) were enrolled. The median reported paracetamol ingestion was 10 g (IQR 6-14). Specimens were collected at a median of 4 h (IQR 4-5.3) post ingestion. The median plasma and saliva paracetamol concentrations were 29 mg l(-1) (IQR 8-110) and 38 mg l(-1) (IQR 10-105) respectively [mean difference 8 mg l(-1) , 95% confidence interval (CI) 2, 14]. Lin's concordance correlation was 0.97 (95% CI 0.96, 0.98). There were 15 patients who were treated with N-acetylcysteine. Their median reported paracetamol ingestion was 14 g (IQR 10-23) and samples were collected at a median of 4 h post ingestion. The median plasma and saliva paracetamol concentrations were 167 mg l(-1) (IQR 110-200) and 170 mg l(-1) (IQR 103-210) respectively (mean difference 15 mg l(-1) , 95% CI -4, 35). Lin's concordance correlation was 0.94 (95% CI 0.88, 0.99). No patient needing treatment would have been missed using saliva concentrations only. The

  14. Dietary predictors and plasma concentrations of perfluorinated alkyl acids in a Singapore population.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yu; Su, Jin; van Dam, Rob M; Prem, Kiesha; Hoong, Joey Y S; Zou, Li; Lu, Yonghai; Ong, Choon Nam

    2017-03-01

    Perfluorinated alkyl acids (PFAAs), a family of man-made organofluorinated compounds, have drawn much attention due to their ubiquitous existence in the environment and their bioaccumulation potential. Here, we examined the plasma concentrations of thirteen PFAAs in a healthy population (N = 270) in Singapore, and investigated the association between major food groups and plasma PFAA concentrations. We detected eight types of PFAAs in more than 75% of all samples (N = 270), and their median concentrations ranged from 0.05 to 8.34 ng mL(-1). Age- and gender-related differences were observed for the three dominant PFAAs, i.e., perfluorooctanesulfonic acid (PFOS), perfluorohexane sulfonate (PFHxS) and perfluorooctanoate acid (PFOA), with concentrations being higher in men and older adults. Multiple linear regression analyses showed that fish, shellfish, red meat and poultry were associated with increased PFAAs concentrations in plasma, whereas grains and soy products showed inverse associations with PFAAs. Further, significant correlations were observed between various long-chain PFAAs and plasma concentrations of omega-3 fatty acids, suggesting seafood was a significant source of these PFAAs, within this population. Future studies on diet exposure to PFAAs are encouraged to focus more on the effects on diet pattern.

  15. Increased plasma concentrations of tumour markers in the absence of neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Trapé, Jaume; Filella, Xavier; Alsina-Donadeu, Montse; Juan-Pereira, Lluïsa; Bosch-Ferrer, Ángels; Rigo-Bonnin, Raül

    2011-10-01

    Tumour markers are a very heterogeneous group of molecules that are generally found in very small concentrations in the plasma and serum of healthy individuals. In the process of neoplastic differentiation the cell can synthesize, release, or induce synthesis of other cells, thus increasing their concentration in plasma and serum. These substances may also increase their plasma concentration in patients without cancer due to processes that increase the release or reduce catabolism, and so give rise to false positives. An understanding of the main physiopathological processes that increase the concentrations of these substances could improve our interpretation of tumour markers and their clinical application. In this study we review the physiopathological processes that may increase the plasma concentrations of tumour markers. We performed a bibliography review in PubMed, searching for causes of false positives for the following tumour markers: α-Fetoprotein, CA 125, CA 15-3, CA 19-9, CA 72-4, carcinoembryonic antigen, CYFRA 21-1, squamous cell carcinoma, prostatic specific antigen, β(2)-microglobulin, choriogonadotropin (β chain), chromogranin A, neuron specific enolase, HER2-neu, progastrin releasing peptide, S-100, and thyroglobulin. The results favour the use of tests which can identify pathological processes that may increase tumour marker concentrations.

  16. Effects of cholestyramine and colestipol on the plasma concentrations of propranolol.

    PubMed Central

    Hibbard, D M; Peters, J R; Hunninghake, D B

    1984-01-01

    The effect of equivalent hypolipidaemic doses of cholestyramine (8 g) or colestipol (10 g) on the plasma concentrations of propranolol and 4'-hydroxypropranolol was studied in 12 normal volunteers following the oral administration of 120 mg of normal release propranolol tablets. When two doses of either cholestyramine or colestipol were administered prior to the propranolol, the peak plasma concentrations and area under the curve for both propranolol and the metabolite 4'-hydroxypropranolol were reduced significantly (P less than 0.05). We conclude that the drug interaction between cholestyramine or colestipol and propranolol leads to significant reductions in plasma concentrations of propranolol and 4'-hydroxypropranolol which may cause a clinically diminished effect for a given dosage. Therefore, patients should be observed when either of these resins are added to or deleted from a therapeutic regimen. PMID:6487473

  17. Plasma Concentrations of Digoxin after Oral Administration in the Fasting and Postprandial State

    PubMed Central

    White, R. J.; Chamberlain, D. A.; Howard, M.; Smith, T. W.

    1971-01-01

    After the oral administration of 0·5 mg of digoxin in tablet form to fasting subjects peak plasma levels were reached in 30 to 60 minutes. Levels then fell to reach a plateau at six to eight hours. When the same dose was given after food the peak plasma concentrations were significantly lower, but the concentrations reached in samples obtained from two to eight hours after the dose did not differ appreciably from corresponding samples obtained in the fasting experiments. In a four-week cross-over study of 21 patients on maintenance therapy, digoxin taken regularly in the fasting state produced plasma concentrations similar to those obtained when the drug was taken after meals. The rapid appearance of digoxin in the blood suggests that the oral route of administration is adequate for most patients who require rapid digitalization, and the timing of maintenance dosage in relation to meals is unimportant. PMID:5100372

  18. Power law relation between particle concentrations and their sizes in the blood plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirichenko, M. N.; Chaikov, L. L.; Zaritskii, A. R.

    2016-08-01

    This work is devoted to the investigation of sizes and concentrations of particles in blood plasma by dynamic light scattering (DLS). Blood plasma contains many different proteins and their aggregates, microparticles and vesicles. Their sizes, concentrations and shapes can give information about donor's health. Our DLS study of blood plasma reveals unexpected dependence: with increasing of the particle sizes r (from 1 nm up to 1 μm), their concentrations decrease as r-4 (almost by 12 orders). We found also that such dependence was repeated for model solution of fibrinogen and thrombin with power coefficient is -3,6. We believe that this relation is a fundamental law of nature that shows interaction of proteins (and other substances) in biological liquids.

  19. Comparison of microdilution and disc diffusion methods in assessing the in vitro activity of fluconazole and Melaleuca alternifolia (tea tree) oil against vaginal Candida isolates.

    PubMed

    Ergin, A; Arikan, S

    2002-10-01

    The in vitro activity of fluconazole and Melaleuca alternifolia (tea tree) oil was evaluated against 99 vaginal Candida strains by the broth microdilution and disc diffusion methods. The microdilution method was performed in accordance with NCCLS-M27A guidelines. An investigational method was used for the disc diffusion test. Fluconazole and tea tree oil minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) obtained at 48 h tended to increase 1- to 2-fold or remain the same compared to 24 h readings for most of the isolates tested. C. krusei and C. norvegensis had significantly higher MICs and smaller inhibition zones for fluconazole compared to other species. Tea tree oil MICs were found to be similar, in general, for all Candida spp. tested. The geometric mean MIC of tea tree oil for all isolates was 2.2% (range, 0.25-4%) at 24 h and 3.0% (range, 1-8%) at 48 h. Tea tree oil mean inhibition zone diameter was 24 mm (range, 14-42 mm) at 24 h and 15.8 mm (range, 10-35 mm) at 48 h. In vitro activity of tea tree oil against fluconazole-resistant Candida strains was of particular interest. The isolates had similar tea tree oil MICs and inhibition zone diameters regardless of their fluconazole susceptibility profile. Tea tree oil MIC ranges (inhibition zone diameter ranges) were 2-4% (12-21 mm) and 2% (35 mm) at 48 h for C. krusei and C. norvegensis, respectively. These results suggest that tea tree oil MICs of the fluconazole-resistant isolates are comparable to those of fluconazole-susceptible isolates. This in vitro finding is promising for potential use of topical tea tree oil formulations in the treatment of candidiasis due to fluconazole-resistant strains.

  20. Differential association of fluconazole dose and dose/MIC ratio with mortality in patients with Candida albicans and non-albicans bloodstream infection.

    PubMed

    Brosh-Nissimov, T; Ben-Ami, R

    2015-11-01

    Targeting fluconazole therapy to achieve predefined pharmacodynamic goals has been suggested as a means of optimizing the treatment of patients with candidaemia. However, data regarding species-specific dosing targets are inconclusive. We retrospectively analysed a cohort of 75 adult patients with Candida bloodstream infection (BSI) who received initial treatment with fluconazole for ≥48 h (36 Candida albicans and 39 non-albicans Candida (NAC)). Fluconazole dose, the dose/MIC ratio and the 24-h area under the concentration-time curve (AUC24)/MIC ratio were determined for each patient, and classification and regression tree analysis was used to determine breakpoints for significant interactions with 30-day survival. Both fluconazole exposure parameters and patient-related and disease-related variables were assessed in univariable and multivariable survival models. The crude 30-day mortality rate was 32% (44% and 21% for C. albicans and NAC, respectively). An average fluconazole dose of >200 mg/day, a dose/MIC ratio of >400 and an AUC24/MIC ratio of >400 were associated with a higher 30-day survival rate and better microbiological response in patients with C. albicans BSI but not in those with NAC BSI. Baseline chronic kidney disease was a risk factor for fluconazole underdosing and mortality. Severity of sepsis (Sequential Organ Failure Assessment score) was the only significant predictor of death in patients with NAC BSI. We conclude that, although pharmacodynamic target-directed fluconazole dosing may help to optimize outcomes for patients with C. albicans BSI, additional studies are needed to define the role of fluconazole in the treatment of NAC BSI. Copyright © 2015 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Demonstration of Therapeutic Equivalence of Fluconazole Generic Products in the Neutropenic Mouse Model of Disseminated Candidiasis.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Javier M; Rodriguez, Carlos A; Zuluaga, Andres F; Agudelo, Maria; Vesga, Omar

    2015-01-01

    Some generics of antibacterials fail therapeutic equivalence despite being pharmaceutical equivalents of their innovators, but data are scarce with antifungals. We used the neutropenic mice model of disseminated candidiasis to challenge the therapeutic equivalence of three generic products of fluconazole compared with the innovator in terms of concentration of the active pharmaceutical ingredient, analytical chemistry (liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry), in vitro susceptibility testing, single-dose serum pharmacokinetics in infected mice, and in vivo pharmacodynamics. Neutropenic, five week-old, murine pathogen free male mice of the strain Udea:ICR(CD-2) were injected in the tail vein with Candida albicans GRP-0144 (MIC = 0.25 mg/L) or Candida albicans CIB-19177 (MIC = 4 mg/L). Subcutaneous therapy with fluconazole (generics or innovator) and sterile saline (untreated controls) started 2 h after infection and ended 24 h later, with doses ranging from no effect to maximal effect (1 to 128 mg/kg per day) divided every 3 or 6 hours. The Hill's model was fitted to the data by nonlinear regression, and results from each group compared by curve fitting analysis. All products were identical in terms of concentration, chromatographic and spectrographic profiles, MICs, mouse pharmacokinetics, and in vivo pharmacodynamic parameters. In conclusion, the generic products studied were pharmaceutically and therapeutically equivalent to the innovator of fluconazole.

  2. Analysis of Fluconazole in Human Urine Sample by High Performance Liquid Chromatography Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hermawan, D.; Ali, N. A. Md; Ibrahim, W. A. Wan; Sanagi, M. M.

    2013-04-01

    A method for determination of fluconazole, antifungal drug in human urine by using reversed-phased high performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) with ultraviolet (UV) detector was developed. Optimization HPLC conditions were carried out by changing the flow rate and composition of mobile phase. The optimum separation conditions at a flow rate 0.85 mL/min with a composition of mobile phase containing methanol:water (70:30, v/v) with UV detection at a wavelength 254 nm was able to analyze fluconazole within 3 min. The excellent linearity was obtained in the range of concentration 1 to 10 μg/mL with r2 = 0.998. The limit of detection (LOD) and limit of quantitation (LOQ) were 0.39 μg/mL and 1.28 μg/mL, respectively. Solid phase extraction (SPE) method using octadecylsilane (C18) as a sorbent was used to clean-up and pre-concentrated of the urine sample prior to HPLC analysis. The average recoveries of fluconazole in spiked urine sample was 72.4% with RSD of 3.21% (n=3).

  3. Antigen Clearance during Treatment of Disseminated Histoplasmosis with Itraconazole versus Fluconazole in Patients with AIDS

    PubMed Central

    Wheat, L. Joseph; Connolly, Patricia; Haddad, Nicholas; Le Monte, Ann; Brizendine, Edward; Hafner, Richard

    2002-01-01

    Antifungal treatment reduces the concentration of Histoplasma antigen in blood and urine, supporting a hypothesis that antigen clearance could be used to compare the activity of new agents for treating histoplasmosis. In separate trials in patients with AIDS, clinical response was similar with itraconazole (85%) and fluconazole (74%). Fungal blood cultures at week 4, however, were negative in a significantly higher proportion of patients treated with itraconazole (92.3%) than in those treated with fluconazole (61.9%) (P = 0.017). Baseline antigen concentrations were similar in the two groups: serum, P = 0.7235; and urine, P = 0.1360. After 4 weeks of treatment, the decline in antigen from baseline in serum was similar in the two treatment groups (P = 0.5237), as it was in urine (P = 0.4679). At week 12, the decline in antigen from baseline in serum also was similar in the two groups (P = 0.4911) and in urine (P = 0.2786). More rapid clearance of fungemia suggests that itraconazole is more effective than fluconazole in treating histoplasmosis. This study demonstrates that clearance of fungemia is a better measure of antifungal effect than clearance of antigen. PMID:11751146

  4. Demonstration of Therapeutic Equivalence of Fluconazole Generic Products in the Neutropenic Mouse Model of Disseminated Candidiasis

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, Javier M.; Rodriguez, Carlos A.; Zuluaga, Andres F.; Agudelo, Maria; Vesga, Omar

    2015-01-01

    Some generics of antibacterials fail therapeutic equivalence despite being pharmaceutical equivalents of their innovators, but data are scarce with antifungals. We used the neutropenic mice model of disseminated candidiasis to challenge the therapeutic equivalence of three generic products of fluconazole compared with the innovator in terms of concentration of the active pharmaceutical ingredient, analytical chemistry (liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry), in vitro susceptibility testing, single-dose serum pharmacokinetics in infected mice, and in vivo pharmacodynamics. Neutropenic, five week-old, murine pathogen free male mice of the strain Udea:ICR(CD-2) were injected in the tail vein with Candida albicans GRP-0144 (MIC = 0.25 mg/L) or Candida albicans CIB-19177 (MIC = 4 mg/L). Subcutaneous therapy with fluconazole (generics or innovator) and sterile saline (untreated controls) started 2 h after infection and ended 24 h later, with doses ranging from no effect to maximal effect (1 to 128 mg/kg per day) divided every 3 or 6 hours. The Hill’s model was fitted to the data by nonlinear regression, and results from each group compared by curve fitting analysis. All products were identical in terms of concentration, chromatographic and spectrographic profiles, MICs, mouse pharmacokinetics, and in vivo pharmacodynamic parameters. In conclusion, the generic products studied were pharmaceutically and therapeutically equivalent to the innovator of fluconazole. PMID:26536105

  5. Plasma concentrations of adrenomedullin and atrial and brain natriuretic peptides in patients with adrenal pheochromocytoma.

    PubMed

    Hu, Wei; Shi, Lei; Zhou, Pang-Hu; Zhang, Xiao-Bin

    2015-11-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate any changes in the plasma concentrations of adrenomedullin (ADM), atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) and brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) in patients with adrenal pheochromocytoma (PC). The plasma concentrations of the three peptides were measured in 45 healthy control individuals and 90 untreated patients with PC, who consisted of 20 normotensive patients, 30 borderline hypertensive patients and 40 hypertensive patients. After 4 weeks of effective antihypertensive therapy for hypertensive PC patients, the concentrations of ADM, ANP and BNP were measured again, and laparoscopic adrenalectomy was then performed for all PC patients with values that were measured 2 weeks later. The plasma concentrations of the three peptides were significantly increased in the borderline hypertensive and hypertensive patients compared with the concentrations in control individuals and normotensive patients. In addition, there were significant differences between the levels of ADM, ANP and BNP in the borderline and hypertensive groups. The plasma ADM concentration was not associated with the blood urea nitrogen levels, serum creatinine levels or glomerular filtration rate, but was correlated with the serum epinephrine, serum norepinephrine and urine vanillylmandelic acid levels. In addition, the ADM concentration was associated with the systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, left ventricular ejection fraction, left ventricular mass index and plasma concentrations of ANP and BNP in the hypertensive patients with PC. After 4 weeks of antihypertensive treatment, the values of the three peptides in the hypertensive patients with PC were not significantly changed. As expected, the values in borderline and hypertensive groups were significantly decreased 2 weeks subsequent to surgery, whereas there were no significant changes in the normotensive group. ADM may participate, along with ANP and BNP, in the mechanisms that counteract further elevation

  6. Antifungal use and therapeutic monitoring of plasma concentrations of itraconazole in heart and lung transplantation patients.

    PubMed

    Brett, Jonathan; Chong, OiFong; Graham, Garry G; Ray, John E; Marriott, Deborah; Williams, Kenneth M; Day, Richard O

    2013-02-01

    The prophylactic use of itraconazole has dramatically reduced the incidence of fungal infections in patients after solid-organ transplantation. To further reduce this incidence, it has been suggested that plasma concentrations of itraconazole be monitored and maintained above a putative minimum target concentration of 500 ng/mL. A retrospective audit was undertaken of patients who had had a heart or lung transplant over a 14-month period (between January 1, 2010 and March 31, 2011). The itraconazole prophylaxis regimen (dose, time of last dose, time of blood collection) and plasma concentrations were recorded together with the use of concomitant antacid medication. Details of breakthrough fungal infections were documented. Eighty-four heart or lung organ transplantations were undertaken in the study period; 57 were treated prophylactically with itraconazole. Plasma concentrations of itraconazole were monitored in 56% (n = 32) of these cases. Considerable interpatient (range, 50-2000 ng/mL) and intrapatient variability in plasma concentrations was observed. The putative target was not achieved consistently in the majority of cases. All patients were taking a proton pump inhibitor. Six of the cohort developed an invasive fungal infection. None of the 3 patients for whom plasma concentrations were monitored was above the target concentration. Further clinical studies, involving monitoring of the active metabolite and attention to the importance of the stereoisomers of itraconazole, may give better insight into the appropriateness of the currently suggested minimum target concentration, whose validity remains uncertain. Formulations with improved absorption characteristics could reduce the variability of absorption with the goal of further reducing the incidence of infrequent, but life-threatening, invasive fungal infections.

  7. Endocannabinoids concentrations in plasma associated with feed efficiency and carcass composition of beef steers.

    PubMed

    Artegoitia, V M; Foote, A P; Lewis, R M; King, D A; Shackelford, S D; Wheeler, T L; Freetly, H C

    2016-12-01

    Endocannabinoids, including anandamide (AEA) and 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG), are a class of endogenous lipid mediators that activate cannabinoids receptors and may be involved in the control of feed intake and energy metabolism. The objective of this study was to quantify AEA and 2-AG in plasma and identify possible associations with production traits and carcass composition in finishing beef steers. Individual DMI and BW gain were measured on 140 Angus-sired steers for 105 d on a finishing ration. Blood samples were collected on d 84 of the experiment, which was 40 d before slaughter. Variables were analyzed using Pearson CORR procedure of SAS. Mean endocannabinoid concentrations in plasma were 4.48 ± 1.82 ng/mL and 0.44 ± 0.24 ng/mL for AEA and 2-AG, respectively. The AEA concentration was positively correlated with G:F ratio ( = 0.20; = 0.02), indicating that more efficient animals had greater AEA plasma concentrations. In addition, AEA concentration tended to be negatively correlated with the 12th rib fat thickness ( = -0.17; = 0.07); but no correlation was found with USDA-calculated yield grade ( = -0.14; = 0.11), or marbling score ( = 0.05; = 0.54). The concentration of 2-AG was positively correlated with AEA ( = 0.21; = 0.01); however, 2-AG concentration was not correlated with parameters of feed efficiency or carcass composition. To our knowledge, this study is the first to report plasma concentration of endocannabinoids in steers. These results provide evidence that plasma concentration of a key endocannabinoid, AEA, was favorably correlated with feed efficiency and fat thickness in finishing steers.

  8. Plasma and skin blister fluid concentrations of trimethoprim following its oral administration.

    PubMed

    Klimowicz, A; Nowak, A; Kadyków, M

    1988-01-01

    Plasma and skin blister fluid concentration-time curves following a single oral dose of trimethoprim have been evaluated. Skin blisters were produced by the cantharides technique, using patches with cantharidin ointment. Trimethoprim concentrations in plasma following multiple doses of 200 mg were also determined. The maximal concentration in plasma after a single oral dose of 400 mg trimethoprim was 3.95 +/- 1.08 mg/l, and it was observed after 2 h, whereas in skin blister fluid the level was 2.21 +/- 0.62 mg/l, and it was delayed for up to 6 h. This means that a certain time is required for drug transfer from the capillaries via the basal membrane into blister fluid. Penetration of the drug into blister fluid, defined as the ratio of the areas under the trimethoprim level time curve in skin blister fluid to that of plasma, was 0.826 +/- 0.096. The steady-state concentration of trimethoprim in plasma during routine treatment with 200-mg doses ranged between 2 and 3.5 mg/l.

  9. Variations in plasma motilin, somatostatin, and pancreatic polypeptide concentrations and the interdigestive myoelectric complex in dog.

    PubMed

    Poitras, P; Lemoyne, M; Tasse, D; Trudel, L; Yamada, T; Taylor, I L

    1985-12-01

    We have looked at the plasma concentrations of motilin, pancreatic polypeptide (PP), and somatostatin (STS) during the various phases of the interdigestive motor complex (IDMC) in dogs. As expected, motilin cyclical increase was always associated with the phase III of the IDMC. Statistical analysis of PP variations revealed a significant rise 10 min before duodenal phase III; however, in individual animals, this relationship was inconsistent. Although a dose-related increase in PP blood levels was induced by administration of synthetic canine motilin (0-200 ng kg-1 iv), fasting plasma levels of PP were not correlated with the concentrations of circulating endogenous motilin. After truncal vagotomy, while motilin release and the intestinal motility pattern remained unaltered, the phase III associated cyclical increases of PP disappeared. Infusion of physiological amounts of PP (1 microgram kg-1 h-1 for 3 h) mimicking the postprandial release failed to reproduce a fed pattern type of intestinal motility and of motilin secretion. No statistical correlation could be established between STS plasma levels and the motor activity of the intestine. STS plasma levels were not correlated with circulating concentrations of motilin and the exogenous administration of physiological doses of synthetic canine motilin failed to modify STS plasma levels. Morphine (200 micrograms kg-1 iv) stimulated only the release of motilin. These data suggest that the role played by circulating concentrations of PP and STS in the control of the IDMC in dog is at most minimal.

  10. Concentrations of danofloxacin 18% solution in plasma, milk and tissues after subcutaneous injection in dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Mestorino, N; Marchetti, M L; Turic, E; Pesoa, J; Errecalde, J

    2009-04-01

    Danofloxacin is a fluoroquinolone developed for use in veterinary medicine. Its concentrations and pharmacokinetic profile in plasma, milk and tissues of lactating dairy cows were determined, and its milk withdrawal time (WT) calculated. Twenty-one dairy cows received a single subcutaneous administration of 18% mesylate danofloxacin salt (6 mgkg(-1)). Plasma and milk samples were obtained at different times until 48 h. Groups of three animals were sacrificed at different post-administration times and tissue samples (mammary gland, uterus, duodenum, jejunum, ileum, colon and mesenteric lymph nodes) obtained. Danofloxacin concentrations were determined by liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection. The milk WT was calculated by the Time to Safe Concentration method (Software WTM 1.4, EMEA). Danofloxacin was rapidly absorbed and its distribution from plasma to all sampled tissues and milk was extensive. Milk and tissues concentrations were several times above those found in plasma. Plasma area under the curve (AUCp) was 9.69 microghmL(-1) and its elimination half life (T(beta)(1/2)) was 12.53 h. AUC values for the various tissues and milk greatly exceeded AUCp. T(beta)(1/2) from milk and tissues ranged between 4.57 and 21.91 h and the milk withdrawal time was 73.48 h. The reported results support the potential use of danofloxacin in the treatment of mastitis and other infections in milk cows with 3 days of withdrawal.

  11. Urine measurement indicates the plasma brain natriuretic peptide concentration during optimization of heart failure treatment.

    PubMed

    Hahn, Robert G; Jaarsma, Tiny; Waldréus, Nana; Linssen, Gerard C M

    2016-01-01

    To assess the correlation between the amino-terminal pro-hormone brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) concentration in blood and urine during a period when actively adjusting the treatment of heart failure (HF). Plasma and urine analyses of NT-proBNP were compared in 51 patients on admission to and discharge from a nurse-led outpatient clinic where HF treatment was optimized. The median time between the two measurements was 42 days. Correlations were analyzed using linear regression, where R(2) is the degree of variability in the plasma NT-proBNP concentration that can be accounted for by the urinary NT-proBNP. There was a statistically significant linear relationship between the urine and plasma concentrations of NT-proBNP on both occasions, but R(2) varied greatly depending on how the data were presented. The correlation between the raw data showed an R(2) of only 30%, and it almost doubled upon logarithm transformation, which shows that the variability (error) was concentration-dependent. Correction of the urinary NT-proBNP for urinary creatinine further increased R(2) for the logarithm-transformed correlation to 68% on admission and 76% on discharge. The highest R(2) (77%) was obtained when the relative changes in urinary NT-proBNP/creatinine between admission and discharge were compared with the corresponding relative changes in the plasma concentration. The sensitivity and specificity of the urine in indicating plasma concentration changes > 10% were 82% and 86%, respectively. Relative changes in plasma NT-proBNP could be reliably estimated from urine samples during a period of optimization of HF treatment.

  12. The establish of the HPLC method to examine the plasma concentration of lamotrigine and oxcarbazepine.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xue-Ping; Zhao, Yao-Dong; Cheng, Zhi; Zhao, Ning Min; Li, Hao

    2015-05-01

    To establish the HPLC method to examine plasma concentration of lamotrigine and oxcarbazepine. This study set chlorzoxazone as the internal standard, chromatographic column was Column C18 (200×4.6mm, 5um) of DIKMA company, the mobile phase was methanol, water and trifluoroacetic acid, with rate of 40: 60: 0.0005, at a flow rate of 1 mllmin(-1), the detected wavelength was 240 nm. The plasma concentrations of lamotrigine was 0.5-50ug•mL(-1), the standard curve was excellent for Y=0.5511C-0.5669, r=0.9940, average recovery was 91.40%; The plasma concentrations of oxcarbazepine was 0.5-50ugmL-1, the standard curve was good for Y=0.4026C-0.5895, r=0.9925, and the average recovery was 89.59%; The three plasma concentrations of lamotrigine were respectively 25μg•mL(-1), 10 μg•mL(-1) and 2μg•mL(-1) and its five parallel sample for injection RSD were respectively 4.01%, 6.15% and 4.64%; The three plasma concentration of oxcarbazepine were 25μg•mL(-1)-1(-1), 10μg•mL(-1)-1(-1) and 2μg•mL(-1)-1(-1), and its five parallel sample for injection RSD were respectively 3.05%, 4.27% and 9.01%. This method was easy to operate, high recovery and high precision, and was applicable to the clinical detection for plasma concentration of lamotrigine and oxcarbazepine.

  13. Relationship between craving and plasma leptin concentrations in patients with cocaine addiction.

    PubMed

    Martinotti, Giovanni; Montemitro, Chiara; Baroni, Gaia; Andreoli, Sara; Alimonti, Flaminia; Di Nicola, Marco; Tonioni, Federico; Leggio, Lorenzo; di Giannantonio, Massimo; Janiri, Luigi

    2017-08-05

    There is robust evidence indicating an overlap between neurobiological circuitry and pathways that regulate addictions and those that regulate appetite and food intake. Rodent work suggests a role of the appetitive peptide leptin in cocaine-seeking behaviours. The goal of this study was to investigate the possible relationship between plasma leptin concentrations and cocaine craving and use in patients seeking treatment for cocaine dependence. Patients (N=43) with a DSM-IV diagnosis of cocaine dependence were studied before starting detoxification (baseline; T0) and then again 14days after (T1; only those patients who abstained from cocaine during the study). Blood samples for plasma leptin concentrations were collected and cocaine craving was assessed using the Brief Cocaine Craving Questionnaire (Brief-CCQ). Food craving was also assessed using a food Visual Analogue Scale (f-VAS). Barratt Impulsiveness Scale (BIS) was used to evaluate impulsivity. Plasma leptin concentrations at T0 significantly correlated with baseline Brief-CCQ scores (r=0.34, p<0.05). Furthermore, plasma leptin concentrations at T1 significantly correlated with the baseline amount of cocaine used (r=0.5, p<0.05). There were no significant correlations between plasma leptin concentrations and f-VAS scores either at T0 or T1 (p's>0.05). The present study suggests a potential relationship between plasma leptin concentrations and cocaine craving and use. Future mechanistic studies are needed to determine whether manipulations of leptin signalling may lead to novel pharmacological approaches to treat cocaine addiction. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Concentrations of thiocyanate and goitrin in human plasma, their precursor concentrations in brassica vegetables, and associated potential risk for hypothyroidism.

    PubMed

    Felker, Peter; Bunch, Ronald; Leung, Angela M

    2016-04-01

    Brassica vegetables are common components of the diet and have beneficial as well as potentially adverse health effects. Following enzymatic breakdown, some glucosinolates in brassica vegetables produce sulforaphane, phenethyl, and indolylic isothiocyanates that possess anticarcinogenic activity. In contrast, progoitrin and indolylic glucosinolates degrade to goitrin and thiocyanate, respectively, and may decrease thyroid hormone production. Radioiodine uptake to the thyroid is inhibited by 194 μmol of goitrin, but not by 77 μmol of goitrin. Collards, Brussels sprouts, and some Russian kale (Brassica napus) contain sufficient goitrin to potentially decrease iodine uptake by the thyroid. However, turnip tops, commercial broccoli, broccoli rabe, and kale belonging to Brassica oleracae contain less than 10 μmol of goitrin per 100-g serving and can be considered of minimal risk. Using sulforaphane plasma levels following glucoraphanin ingestion as a surrogate for thiocyanate plasma concentrations after indole glucosinolate ingestion, the maximum thiocyanate contribution from indole glucosinolate degradation is estimated to be 10 μM, which is significantly lower than background plasma thiocyanate concentrations (40-69 μM). Thiocyanate generated from consumption of indole glucosinolate can be assumed to have minimal adverse risks for thyroid health. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the International Life Sciences Institute. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Concentrations of thiocyanate and goitrin in human plasma, their precursor concentrations in brassica vegetables, and associated potential risk for hypothyroidism

    PubMed Central

    Bunch, Ronald; Leung, Angela M.

    2016-01-01

    Brassica vegetables are common components of the diet and have beneficial as well as potentially adverse health effects. Following enzymatic breakdown, some glucosinolates in brassica vegetables produce sulforaphane, phenethyl, and indolylic isothiocyanates that possess anticarcinogenic activity. In contrast, progoitrin and indolylic glucosinolates degrade to goitrin and thiocyanate, respectively, and may decrease thyroid hormone production. Radioiodine uptake to the thyroid is inhibited by 194 μmol of goitrin, but not by 77 μmol of goitrin. Collards, Brussels sprouts, and some Russian kale (Brassica napus) contain sufficient goitrin to potentially decrease iodine uptake by the thyroid. However, turnip tops, commercial broccoli, broccoli rabe, and kale belonging to Brassica oleracae contain less than 10 μmol of goitrin per 100-g serving and can be considered of minimal risk. Using sulforaphane plasma levels following glucoraphanin ingestion as a surrogate for thiocyanate plasma concentrations after indole glucosinolate ingestion, the maximum thiocyanate contribution from indole glucosinolate degradation is estimated to be 10 μM, which is significantly lower than background plasma thiocyanate concentrations (40–69 μM). Thiocyanate generated from consumption of indole glucosinolate can be assumed to have minimal adverse risks for thyroid health. PMID:26946249

  16. Low unesterified:esterified eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) plasma concentration ratio is associated with bipolar disorder episodes, and omega-3 plasma concentrations are altered by treatment

    PubMed Central

    Saunders, Erika FH; Reider, Aubrey; Singh, Gagan; Gelenberg, Alan J; Rapoport, Stanley I

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Omega (n)-3 and n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) are molecular modulators of neurotransmission and inflammation. We hypothesized that plasma concentrations of n-3 PUFA would be lower and of n-6 PUFA higher in subjects with bipolar disorder (BD) compared to healthy controls (HC), and would correlate with symptom severity in subjects with BD, and that effective treatment would correlate with increased n-3 but lower n-6 PUFA levels. Additionally, we explored clinical correlations and group differences in plasma levels of saturated and monounsaturated fatty acids. Methods This observational, parallel group study compared biomarkers between HC (n = 31), and symptomatic subjects with BD (n = 27) when ill and after symptomatic recovery (follow-up). Plasma concentrations of five PUFA [linoleic acid (LA), arachidonic acid (AA), alpha-linolenic acid (ALA), docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA)], of two saturated fatty acids (palmitic acid and stearic acid) and of two monounsaturated fatty acids (palmitoleic acid, oleic acid) were measured in esterified (E) and unesterified (UE) forms. Calculated ratios included UE:E for the five PUFA, ratios of n-3 PUFA (DHA:ALA, EPA:ALA, EPA:DHA), and the ratio of n-6:n-3 AA:EPA. Comparisons of plasma fatty acid levels and ratios between BD and HC groups were made with Student t-tests, between the BD group at baseline and follow-up using paired t-tests. Comparison of categorical variables was performed using Chi-square tests. Pearson’s r was used for bivariate correlations with clinical variables, including depressive and manic symptoms, current panic attacks, and psychosis. Results UE EPA was lower in BD than HC, with a large effect size (Cohen’s d = 0.86, p < 0.002), however, it was not statistically significant after correction for multiple comparisons. No statistically significant difference was seen in any plasma PUFA concentration between BD and HC after Bonferroni correction for 40

  17. Low unesterified:esterified eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) plasma concentration ratio is associated with bipolar disorder episodes, and omega-3 plasma concentrations are altered by treatment.

    PubMed

    Saunders, Erika Fh; Reider, Aubrey; Singh, Gagan; Gelenberg, Alan J; Rapoport, Stanley I

    2015-11-01

    Omega (n)-3 and n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) are molecular modulators of neurotransmission and inflammation. We hypothesized that plasma concentrations of n-3 PUFAs would be lower and those of n-6 PUFAs higher in subjects with bipolar disorder (BD) compared to healthy controls (HCs), and would correlate with symptom severity in subjects with BD, and that effective treatment would correlate with increased n-3 but lower n-6 PUFA levels. Additionally, we explored clinical correlations and group differences in plasma levels of saturated and monounsaturated fatty acids. This observational, parallel group study compared biomarkers between HCs (n = 31) and symptomatic subjects with BD (n = 27) when ill and after symptomatic recovery (follow-up). Plasma concentrations of five PUFAs [linoleic acid (LA), arachidonic acid (AA), alpha-linolenic acid (ALA), docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA)], two saturated fatty acids (palmitic acid and stearic acid) and two monounsaturated fatty acids (palmitoleic acid and oleic acid) were measured in esterified (E) and unesterified (UE) forms. Calculated ratios included UE:E for the five PUFAs, ratios of n-3 PUFAs (DHA:ALA, EPA:ALA and EPA:DHA), and the ratio of n-6:n-3 AA:EPA. Comparisons of plasma fatty acid levels and ratios between BD and HC groups were made with Student t-tests, and between the BD group at baseline and follow-up using paired t-tests. Comparison of categorical variables was performed using chi-square tests. Pearson's r was used for bivariate correlations with clinical variables, including depressive and manic symptoms, current panic attacks, and psychosis. UE EPA was lower in subjects with BD than in HCs, with a large effect size (Cohen's d = 0.86, p < 0.002); however, it was not statistically significant after correction for multiple comparisons. No statistically significant difference was seen in any plasma PUFA concentration between the BD and HC groups after Bonferroni correction

  18. Ambroxol Hydrochloride Combined with Fluconazole Reverses the Resistance of Candida albicans to Fluconazole.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiuyun; Zhao, Yuanhao; Huang, Xin; Yu, Cuixiang; Yang, Yilei; Sun, Shujuan

    2017-01-01

    In this study, we found that ambroxol hydrochloride (128 μg/mL) exhibits synergistic antifungal effects in combination with fluconazole (2 μg/mL) against resistant planktonic Candida albicans (C. albicans) cells. This combination also exhibited synergistic effects against resistant C. albicans biofilms in different stages (4, 8, and 12 h) according to the microdilution method. In vitro data were further confirmed by the success of this combination in treating Galleria mellonella infected by resistant C. albicans. With respect to the synergistic mechanism, our result revealed that ambroxol hydrochloride has an effect on the drug transporters of resistant C. albicans, increasing the uptake and decreasing the efflux of rhodamine 6G, a fluorescent alternate of fluconazole. This is the first study to investigate the in vitro and in vivo antifungal effects, as well as the possible synergistic mechanism of ambroxol hydrochloride in combination with fluconazole against resistant C. albicans. The results show the potential role for this drug combination as a therapeutic alternative to treat resistant C. albicans and provide insights into the development of antifungal targets and new antifungal agents.

  19. Plasma concentrations of the enantiomers of halofantrine and its main metabolite in malaria patients.

    PubMed

    Gimenez, F; Gillotin, C; Basco, L K; Bouchaud, O; Aubry, A F; Wainer, I W; Le Bras, J; Farinotti, R

    1994-01-01

    The plasma concentrations of the enantiomers of halofantrine and its N-desbutyl metabolite in six patients with malaria were measured after oral administration of 3 x 750 mg doses of micronised, racemic halofantrine hydrochloride given at 6-hour intervals. Significant differences were observed between the plasma concentrations of the enantiomers both of halofantrine and its N-monodesbutyl metabolite. AUC(0)84h values were higher for (+)halofantrine (9917 micrograms.ml-1.h) than for (-)-halofantrine (6127 micrograms.ml-1.h). The clinical significance of these observations is not known. The isomers have equipotent activity in vitro but their relative toxicity has not yet been assessed.

  20. Oral vitamin B12 supplementation reduces plasma total homocysteine concentration in women in India.

    PubMed

    Yajnik, Chittaranjan S; Lubree, Himangi G; Thuse, Nileema V; Ramdas, Lalita V; Deshpande, Swapna S; Deshpande, Vaishali U; Deshpande, Jyoti A; Uradey, Bhagyashree S; Ganpule, Anjali A; Naik, Sadanand S; Joshi, Niranjan P; Farrant, Hannah; Refsum, Helga

    2007-01-01

    People in India have a high prevalence of low vitamin B12 status and high plasma total homocysteine (tHcy) concentrations. In a proof of principle trial, we studied the effect of oral vitamin B12 (500 microg) and/or 100 g cooked green leafy vegetables (GLV) every alternate day in a 2x2 factorial design over a 6-week period. Forty-two non-pregnant vegetarian women (age 20-50 years) were randomly allocated to four study groups. Clinical measurements were made at the beginning and at the end of the study, and blood samples were collected before, and 2 and 6 weeks after commencement of intervention. Forty women completed the trial. Twenty-six women had low vitamin B12 status (<150 pmol/L) and 24 had hyperhomocysteinemia (>15 micromol/L). GLV supplementation did not alter plasma folate or tHcy. Vitamin B12 supplementation increased plasma vitamin B12 concentration (125 to 215 pmol/L, p <0.05) and reduced tHcy concentration (18.0 to 13.0 micromol/L, p <0.05) within first 2 weeks, both of which remained stable for the next 4 weeks. Plasma vitamin B12 and tHcy concentrations did not change in those who did not receive vitamin B12, and there was no change in plasma folate concentration in any of the groups. Blood haemoglobin concentration increased marginally within first two weeks in those women who received vitamin B12 (by 3 g/L, p <0.05) and the number of women with macrocytosis decreased from 2 to zero. There was no change in vibration sensory threshold during the period of the study. High-dose per oral vitamin B12 supplementation significantly reduced plasma tHcy within 2 weeks but did not achieve normal plasma tHcy concentration even after 6 weeks. People in India have a high prevalence of low vitamin B12 status and high plasma total homocysteine (tHcy) concentrations.

  1. Depression and IL-6 blood plasma concentrations in advanced cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, Colleen M; Rosenfeld, Barry; Pessin, Hayley; Breitbart, William

    2008-01-01

    The authors explored the relationship between depression and interleukin-6 (IL-6) blood plasma concentrations among advanced-stage cancer patients. Seventy-three patients with advanced cancer were rated on depression with the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression and gave blood to be assayed for blood plasma concentration of IL-6. Initial results found no correlation between depression and IL-6. Subsequent analyses found that among those whose blood was drawn within 48 hours of interview completion, depression and IL-6 were highly correlated. Future studies focusing on the relationship between immune functioning and depression must be particularly vigilant regarding methodological issues.

  2. Relationship between reproductive success and male plasma vitellogenin concentrations in cunner, Tautogolabrus adspersus.

    PubMed Central

    Mills, Lesley J; Gutjahr-Gobell, Ruth E; Horowitz, Doranne Borsay; Denslow, Nancy D; Chow, Marjorie C; Zaroogian, Gerald E

    2003-01-01

    The gene for vitellogenin, an egg yolk protein precursor, is usually silent in male fish but can be induced by estrogen exposure. For this reason, vitellogenin production in male fish has become a widely used indicator of exposure to exogenous estrogens or estrogen mimics in the aquatic environment. The utility of this indicator to predict impacts on fish reproductive success is unclear because information on the relationship between male plasma vitellogenin and reproductive end points in male and female fish is limited. In the research reported in this article, we investigated whether the presence of male plasma vitellogenin is a reliable indicator of decreased reproductive success in mature fish. Adult and sexually mature male and female cunner (Tautogolabrus adspersus) were exposed to 17ss-estradiol, ethynylestradiol, or estrone, three steroidal estrogens that elicit the vitellogenic response. Data were gathered and pooled on egg production, egg viability, egg fertility, sperm motility, and male plasma vitellogenin concentrations. All males, including two with plasma vitellogenin levels exceeding 300 mg/mL, produced motile sperm. Neither percent fertile eggs nor percent viable eggs produced by reproductively active fish demonstrated a significant correlation with male plasma vitellogenin concentrations. Male gonadosomatic index and average daily egg production by females showed significant, but weak, negative correlation with male plasma vitellogenin concentrations. Results suggest that male plasma vitellogenin expression is not a reliable indicator of male reproductive dysfunction in adult cunner exposed to estrogens for 2-8 weeks during their reproductive season, at least in relation to capacity to produce motile sperm or fertilize eggs. Male plasma vitellogenin expression may serve as an indicator of reduced female reproductive function caused by estrogen exposure. PMID:12515685

  3. Pathogen inactivation treatment of plasma and platelet concentrates and their predicted functionality in massive transfusion protocols.

    PubMed

    Arbaeen, Ahmad F; Schubert, Peter; Serrano, Katherine; Carter, Cedric J; Culibrk, Brankica; Devine, Dana V

    2017-05-01

    Trauma transfusion packages for hemorrhage control consist of red blood cells, plasma, and platelets at a set ratio. Although pathogen reduction improves the transfusion safety of platelet and plasma units, there is an associated reduction in quality. This study aimed to investigate the impact of riboflavin/ultraviolet light-treated plasma or platelets in transfusion trauma packages composed of red blood cell, plasma, and platelet units in a ratio of 1:1:1 in vitro by modeling transfusion scenarios for trauma patients and assessing function by rotational thromboelastometry. Pathogen-reduced or untreated plasma and buffy coat platelet concentrate units produced in plasma were used in different combinations with red blood cells in trauma transfusion packages. After reconstitution of these packages with hemodiluted blood, the hemostatic functionality was analyzed by rotational thromboelastometry. Hemostatic profiles of pathogen-inactivated buffy coat platelet concentrate and plasma indicated decreased activity compared with their respective controls. Reconstitution of hemodiluted blood (hematocrit = 20%) with packages that contained treated or nontreated components resulted in increased alpha and maximum clot firmness and enhanced clot-formation time. Simulating transfusion scenarios based on 30% blood replacement with a transfusion trauma package resulted in a nonsignificant difference in rotational thromboelastometry parameters between packages containing treated and nontreated blood components (p ≥ 0.05). Effects of pathogen inactivation treatment were evident when the trauma package percentage was 50% or greater and contained both pathogen inactivation-treated plasma and buffy coat platelet concentrate. Rotational thromboelastometry investigations suggest that there is relatively little impact of pathogen inactivation treatment on whole blood clot formation unless large amounts of treated components are used. © 2017 AABB.

  4. Fatigue and plasma cytokine concentrations at rest and during exercise in patients with sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Baydur, Ahmet; Alavy, Bahram; Nawathe, Amar; Liu, Shanshan; Louie, Stan; Sharma, Om Prakash

    2011-07-01

    Patients with sarcoidosis exhibit exercise intolerance-related fatigue and increased levels of circulating proinflammatory cytokines at rest. Exercise may result in increased plasma cytokine levels (PCLs) in healthy adults, but such a relationship has not been studied in sarcoidosis patients. To assess relationship of fatigue in sarcoidosis with PCLs at rest and with cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET). We assessed lung function, CPET data, multidimensional fatigue inventory, plasma tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-1β (IL-1β) concentrations before, immediately after, and 4-6 h following CPET in 22 sarcoidosis patients (13 receiving immunomodulatory drugs) and 22 controls. Patients exhibited greater fatigue, reduced cardiorespiratory function, higher Medical Research Council (MRC) scores and higher plasma TNF-α concentrations than controls at all times. Plasma IL-1β levels did not differ between cohorts. Patients exhibited a 28% increase (statistically not significant) in TNF-α level immediately post exercise. Plasma IL-β concentrations did not change among cohorts. Treated patients exhibited higher MRC and physical fatigue scores and lower breathing reserve, but no differences in cardiorespiratory function or PCLs compared to untreated patients. In treated patients, pre-exercise plasma IL-1β correlated with physical fatigue, reduced motivation and total fatigue; TNF-α levels only correlated with general fatigue score. Treated sarcoidosis patients exhibit a relation between physical fatigue, reduced motivation and total fatigue and pre-exercise plasma IL-1β concentrations. Acute exercise does not increase PCLs. Whether the reduced MRC score and physical fatigue in treated patients is related to the therapy or to the underlying inflammatory process is difficult to determine. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  5. Intake of whole grains and vegetables determines the plasma enterolactone concentration of Danish women.

    PubMed

    Johnsen, Nina F; Hausner, Helene; Olsen, Anja; Tetens, Inge; Christensen, Jane; Knudsen, Knud Erik Bach; Overvad, Kim; Tjønneland, Anne

    2004-10-01

    The mammalian lignan enterolactone (ENL), which is produced from dietary plant-lignan precursors by the intestinal microflora, may protect against breast cancer and other hormone-dependent cancers. This cross-sectional study examined which variables related to diet and lifestyle were associated with high plasma concentrations of ENL in Danish postmenopausal women. Plasma ENL was measured by time-resolved fluoroimmunoassay in 857 Danish women aged 50-64 y who participated in a prospective cohort study. Diet was assessed using a semiquantitative FFQ, and background information on lifestyle was collected using a self-administered questionnaire. Multiple analyses of covariance were completed in two steps. The median plasma ENL concentration was 27 nmol/L (range 0-455 nmol/L). In covariance analyses, positive associations were found between consumption of cereals, vegetables, and beverages and plasma ENL concentration. When analyzing subgroups of these food groups, the associations were confined to whole-grain products, cabbage, leafy vegetables, and coffee. For fat and the nondietary variables, negative associations between BMI, smoking, and frequency of bowel movements and plasma ENL concentration were observed. These data show that foods high in ENL precursors are associated with high concentrations of ENL. Furthermore, smoking, frequent bowel movements, and consumption of fat seems to have a negative affect on the ENL concentration. In conclusion, whole grains and vegetables are the most important dietary providers of plant lignans for the concentration of ENL in Danish postmenopausal women, and if ENL is found to protect against cancer or heart disease, the intake of whole grains and vegetables should be increased.

  6. Dietary flaxseed lignan extract lowers plasma cholesterol and glucose concentrations in hypercholesterolaemic subjects.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Wang, Xiaobing; Liu, Yi; Tian, Haimei; Flickinger, Brent; Empie, Mark W; Sun, Sam Z

    2008-06-01

    Lignans, derived from flaxseed, are phyto-oestrogens being increasingly studied for their health benefits. An 8-week, randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled study was conducted in fifty-five hypercholesterolaemic subjects, using treatments of 0 (placebo), 300 or 600 mg/d of dietary secoisolariciresinol diglucoside (SDG) from flaxseed extract to determine the effect on plasma lipids and fasting glucose levels. Significant treatment effects were achieved (P < 0.05 to < 0.001) for the decrease of total cholesterol (TC), LDL-cholesterol (LDL-C) and glucose concentrations, as well as their percentage decrease from baseline. At weeks 6 and 8 in the 600 mg SDG group, the decreases of TC and LDL-C concentrations were in the range from 22.0 to 24.38 % respectively (all P < 0.005 compared with placebo). For the 300 mg SDG group, only significant differences from baseline were observed for decreases of TC and LDL-C. A substantial effect on lowering concentrations of fasting plasma glucose was also noted in the 600 mg SDG group at weeks 6 and 8, especially in the subjects with baseline glucose concentrations > or = 5.83 mmol/l (lowered 25.56 and 24.96 %; P = 0.015 and P = 0.012 compared with placebo, respectively). Plasma concentrations of secoisolariciresinol (SECO), enterodiol (ED) and enterolactone were all significantly raised in the groups supplemented with flaxseed lignan. The observed cholesterol-lowering values were correlated with the concentrations of plasma SECO and ED (r 0.128-0.302; P < 0.05 to < 0.001). In conclusion, dietary flaxseed lignan extract decreased plasma cholesterol and glucose concentrations in a dose-dependent manner.

  7. Green tea ingestion greatly reduces plasma concentrations of nadolol in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Misaka, S; Yatabe, J; Müller, F; Takano, K; Kawabe, K; Glaeser, H; Yatabe, M S; Onoue, S; Werba, J P; Watanabe, H; Yamada, S; Fromm, M F; Kimura, J

    2014-04-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the effects of green tea on the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of the β-blocker nadolol. Ten healthy volunteers received a single oral dose of 30 mg nadolol with green tea or water after repeated consumption of green tea (700 ml/day) or water for 14 days. Catechin concentrations in green tea and plasma were determined. Green tea markedly decreased the maximum plasma concentration (C(max)) and area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC(0-48)) of nadolol by 85.3% and 85.0%, respectively (P < 0.01), without altering renal clearance of nadolol. The effects of nadolol on systolic blood pressure were significantly reduced by green tea. [(3)H]-Nadolol uptake assays in human embryonic kidney 293 cells stably expressing the organic anion-transporting polypeptides OATP1A2 and OATP2B1 revealed that nadolol is a substrate of OATP1A2 (Michaelis constant (K(m)) = 84.3 μmol/l) but not of OATP2B1. Moreover, green tea significantly inhibited OATP1A2-mediated nadolol uptake (half-maximal inhibitory concentration, IC(50) = 1.36%). These results suggest that green tea reduces plasma concentrations of nadolol possibly in part by inhibition of OATP1A2-mediated uptake of nadolol in the intestine.

  8. Perioperative plasma concentrations of stable nitric oxide products are predictive of cognitive dysfunction after laparoscopic cholecystectomy.

    PubMed

    Iohom, G; Szarvas, S; Larney, V; O'Brien, J; Buckley, E; Butler, M; Shorten, G

    2004-10-01

    In this study our objectives were to determine the incidence of postoperative cognitive dysfunction (POCD) after laparoscopic cholecystectomy under sevoflurane anesthesia in patients aged >40 and <85 yr and to examine the associations between plasma concentrations of i) S-100beta protein and ii) stable nitric oxide (NO) products and POCD in this clinical setting. Neuropsychological tests were performed on 42 ASA physical status I-II patients the day before, and 4 days and 6 wk after surgery. Patient spouses (n = 13) were studied as controls. Cognitive dysfunction was defined as deficit in one or more cognitive domain(s). Serial measurements of serum concentrations of S-100beta protein and plasma concentrations of stable NO products (nitrate/nitrite, NOx) were performed perioperatively. Four days after surgery, new cognitive deficit was present in 16 (40%) patients and in 1 (7%) control subject (P = 0.01). Six weeks postoperatively, new cognitive deficit was present in 21 (53%) patients and 3 (23%) control subjects (P = 0.03). Compared with the "no deficit" group, patients who demonstrated a new cognitive deficit 4 days postoperatively had larger plasma NOx at each perioperative time point (P < 0.05 for each time point). Serum S-100beta protein concentrations were similar in the 2 groups. In conclusion, preoperative (and postoperative) plasma concentrations of stable NO products (but not S-100beta) are associated with early POCD. The former represents a potential biochemical predictor of POCD.

  9. Plasma cortisol concentrations and perceived anxiety in response to on-sight rock climbing.

    PubMed

    Draper, N; Dickson, T; Fryer, S; Blackwell, G; Winter, D; Scarrott, C; Ellis, G

    2012-01-01

    Previous research suggested plasma cortisol concentrations in response to rock climbing have a cubic relationship with state anxiety and self-confidence. This research, however, was conducted in a situation where the climbers had previously climbed the route. The purpose of our study was to examine this relationship in response to on-sight climbing. Nineteen (13 male, 6 female) intermediate climbers volunteered to attend anthropometric and baseline testing sessions, prior to an on-sight ascent (lead climb or top-rope) of the test climb (grade 19 Ewbank/6a sport/5.10b YDS). Data recorded included state anxiety, self-confidence and cortisol concentrations prior to completing the climb. Results indicated that there were no significant differences in state anxiety, self-confidence and plasma cortisol concentration regardless of the style of ascent (lead climb or top-rope) in an on-sight sport climbing context. Regression analysis indicated there was a significant linear relationship between plasma cortisol concentrations and self-confidence (r= - 0.52, R2=0.267, p=0.024), cognitive (r=0.5, R2=0.253, p=0.028), and somatic anxieties (r=0.46, R2=0.210, p=0.049). In an on-sight condition the relationships between plasma cortisol concentrations with anxiety (cognitive and somatic) and self-confidence were linear.

  10. The dynamic observation of plasma concentration of antimicrobial agents during balanced ultrafiltration in vitro.

    PubMed

    Fang, Yinghui; Guan, Yulong; Wan, Caihong; Fu, Zhida; Jiang, Juanjuan; Wu, Chunfu; Zhao, Ju; Sun, Peng; Long, Cun

    2014-01-01

    Routine perioperative intravenous antimicrobial agents are administered as surgical prophylaxis. However, whether balanced ultrafiltration during extracorporeal circulation has substantial effect on the concentration of antimicrobial agents remains unclear. The concentrations of antimicrobial agents in plasma and ultrafiltrate samples were measured in this pseudo-extracorporeal circulation model. Extracorporeal circulation consisted of cardiotomy reservoir, membrane oxygenator, and pediatric arterial line filter. A hemoconcentrator was placed between the arterial purge line and oxygenator venous reservoir. Fresh donor human whole blood was added into the circuit and mixed with Ringer's solution to obtain a final hematocrit of 24-28%. Two kinds of antimicrobial agents, cefotiam (320 mg) and cefmetazole (160 mg), were bolus added into the circuit. After 30 min of extracorporeal circulation, zero-balanced ultrafiltration was initiated and arterial line pressure was maintained at approximately 100 mm Hg with a Hoffman clamp. The rate of ultrafiltration (12 mL/min) was controlled by ultrafiltrate outlet pressure. An identical volume of Plasmalyte A was dripped into the circuit to maintain stable hematocrit during 45 min of experiment. Plasma and ultrafiltrate samples were drawn every 5 min, and concentrations of antimicrobial agents (including cefotiam and cefmetazole) were measured with high performance liquid chromatography. Both antimicrobial agents were detected in ultrafiltrate, demonstrating hemoconcentration may remove antimicrobial agents. The concentrations of plasma antimicrobial agents decreased linearly with the increase of ultrafiltrate volume. At end of balanced ultrafiltration, the concentration of plasma cefotiam was 104.96 ± 44.36 mg/L, which is about 44.38% ± 7.42% of the initial concentration (238.95 ± 101.12 mg/L) (P < 0.001); the concentration of plasma cefmetazole decreased linearly to 25.76 ± 14.78

  11. Plasma adiponectin concentrations are associated with dietary glycemic index in Malaysian patients with type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Loh, Beng-In; Sathyasuryan, Daniel Robert; Mohamed, Hamid Jan Jan

    2013-01-01

    Adiponectin, an adipocyte-derived hormone has been implicated in the control of blood glucose and chronic inflammation in type 2 diabetes. However, limited studies have evaluated dietary factors on plasma adiponectin levels, especially among type 2 diabetic patients in Malaysia. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of dietary glycemic index on plasma adiponectin concentrations in patients with type 2 diabetes. A cross-sectional study was conducted in 305 type 2 diabetic patients aged 19-75 years from the Penang General Hospital, Malaysia. Socio-demographic information was collected using a standard questionnaire while dietary details were determined by using a pre-validated semi-quantitative food frequency questionnaire. Anthropometry measurement included weight, height, BMI and waist circumference. Plasma adiponectin concentrations were measured using a commercial ELISA kit. Data were analyzed using multiple linear regression. After multivariate adjustment, dietary glycemic index was inversely associated with plasma adiponectin concentrations (β =-0.272, 95% CI -0.262, - 0.094; p<0.001). It was found that in individuals who consumed 1 unit of foods containing high dietary glycemic index that plasma adiponectin level reduced by 0.3 μg/mL. Thirty two percent (31.9%) of the variation in adiponectin concentrations was explained by age, sex, race, smoking status, BMI, waist circumference, HDL-C, triglycerides, magnesium, fiber and dietary glycemic index according to the multiple linear regression model (R2=0.319). These results support the hypothesis that dietary glycemic index influences plasma adiponectin concentrations in patients with type 2 diabetes. Controlled clinical trials are required to confirm our findings and to elucidate the underlying mechanism.

  12. High plasma concentrations of dolutegravir in patients with ABCG2 genetic variants.

    PubMed

    Tsuchiya, Kiyoto; Hayashida, Tsunefusa; Hamada, Akinobu; Oki, Sakurako; Oka, Shinichi; Gatanaga, Hiroyuki

    2017-08-29

    The ATP-binding cassette transporters B1 (ABCB1) and G2 (ABCG2) are both expressed in the intestine and known as efflux transporters of drugs. Dolutegravir was identified recently as a substrate of both ABCB1 and ABCG2. This study aimed to determine the relations between single-nucleotide polymorphisms of ABCB1 and ABCG2 genes and plasma dolutegravir concentrations. Plasma samples were obtained from 42 HIV-1-infected patients treated with dolutegravir-containing regimens 0.5-4 h after dolutegravir dosing. Plasma dolutegravir concentrations were measured by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Genomic DNA was isolated from peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Genotyping of allelic variants of ABCB1 1236 C>T (rs1128503), 2677 G>T/A (rs2032582), 3435 C>T (rs1045642), 4036 A>G (rs3842), and ABCG2 421 C>A (rs2231142) was performed using the TaqMan drug metabolism assays. None of the genotypes in ABCB1 1236 C>T, 2677 G>T/A, 3435 C>T, and 4036 A>G correlated with plasma dolutegravir concentration. In contrast, the mean peak plasma concentration of dolutegravir was significantly higher in the genotypes of ABCG2 421 AA (5002 ng/ml, n=3) compared with the genotypes of ABCG2 421 CC (2569 ng/ml, n=22) and ABCG2 421 CA (2479 ng/ml, n=17) (P=0.0005). The speculated peak level of plasma dolutegravir concentration was significantly higher in ABCG2 genetic variant holders, probably, at least in part, because of low expression levels of efflux transporters in the intestines associated with these genetic variants.

  13. Differential alterations in plasma colony-stimulating factor concentrations in meningococcaemia.

    PubMed Central

    Waring, P M; Presneill, J; Maher, D W; Layton, J E; Cebon, J; Waring, L J; Metcalf, D

    1995-01-01

    To determine whether circulating levels of any of the colony-stimulating factors (CSF) might contribute to the host response in severe sepsis, plasma concentrations of granulocyte CSF (G-CSF), granulocyte-macrophage CSF (GM-CSF), and macrophage CSF (M-CSF) were measured by immunoassays in 20 subjects with meningococcaemia, a bloodstream infection caused by Neisseria meningitidis, that has proven to be a valuable model to study the responses of other inflammatory mediators during sepsis and septic shock in humans. Plasma G-CSF concentrations were transiently elevated in most subjects during the early phase of meningococcaemia, and were higher in subjects with septic shock (mean +/- s.d. = 165 +/- 142 ng/ml, n = 9) compared with those who remained normotensive (mean +/- s.d. = 7 +/- 2 ng/ml, n = 10) (P < 0.05). Peak plasma G-CSF concentrations > 10 ng/ml were associated with the development of septic shock (P < 0.01), disseminated intravascular coagulation (P < 0.01), fulminant infection (P < 0.05), and a fatal outcome (P < 0.01). Plasma GM-CSF concentrations > 1 ng/ml were briefly present in subjects with life-threatening septic shock (1-15 ng/ml, n = 5), and were strongly associated with fulminant meningococcaemia (P < 0.01). Plasma M-CSF concentrations were marginally elevated in all subjects, but were not associated with complications related to or arising from sepsis-induced organ injury. This study demonstrates that plasma levels of G-CSF, GM-CSF and M-CSF show very different responses during meningococcaemia, changes which presumably reflect the different roles played by these mediators in sepsis and, potentially, in septic shock. PMID:8536364

  14. Plasma concentration of ketorolac after local infiltration analgesia in hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Affas, F; Eksborg, S; Wretenberg, P; Olofsson, C; Stephanson, N; Stiller, C-O

    2014-10-01

    Local infiltration analgesia (LIA) with local anaesthetic (ropivacaine), a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (ketorolac) and epinephrine after lower extremity arthroplasty has gained increasing popularity during the last decade. This method has certain advantages, which include minimal systemic side effects, faster post-operative mobilization, earlier post-operative discharge from hospital and less opioid consumption. However, information regarding plasma concentrations of ketorolac after LIA mixture is insufficient to predict the risk of renal impairment in patients subjected to arthroplasty. To determine the maximal plasma concentration and the exposure of ketorolac during the first 30 h following LIA in hip arthroplasty. Thirteen patients scheduled for primary total hip arthroplasty with LIA (ropivacaine 200 mg, ketorolac 30 mg and epinephrine 0.5 mg in a volume of 106 ml) were included. Plasma concentration of ketorolac was quantified by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. In addition, we assessed the effect of increasing age and decreasing glomerular filtration rate on the maximal plasma concentration and the total exposure to ketorolac during 30 h. The range of the maximal plasma concentration, 0.3-2.2 mg/l, was detected 30 min-4 h after completing the infiltration. Similar plasma levels have been reported after intramuscular injection of the same dose of ketorolac to healthy elderly volunteers. Exposure to ketorolac after LIA may be comparable to an intramuscular injection of the same dose. Decision of dose reduction should be based on clinical assessment of risk factors. © 2014 The Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica Foundation. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. PLASMA THYROXINE (T4) CONCENTRATION IN ZOO-KEPT BLACK-TAILED PRAIRIE DOGS (CYNOMYS LUDOVICIANUS).

    PubMed

    Eshar, David; Nau, Melissa R; Pohlman, Lisa M

    2017-03-01

    This study was conducted to determine plasma thyroxine (T4) concentrations in zoo-kept black-tailed prairie dogs ( Cynomys ludovicianus ). Thirty-one healthy prairie dogs of both sexes were studied as part of their annual clinical health evaluation, performed under general isoflurane anesthesia. Each animal underwent a complete physical examination, complete blood count, plasma biochemistry, and venous blood gas analysis. Heparinized venous blood samples were collected individually and processed for plasma T4 analysis using a veterinary biochemistry analyzer. The median plasma T4 concentration for the prairie dogs in this study was 4.1 μg/dl (minimum = 0.6 μg/dl; maximum = 8.0 μg/dl). The mean ± standard deviation plasma T4 concentration was 4.49 ± 2.39 μg/dl. No significant differences were found for varying ages, sexes, weights, or housing systems. The data presented in this report can promote better physiologic understanding and improve clinical management of this rodent species.

  16. Interactions of orphenadrine and phenobarbitone with chlorpromazine: plasma concentrations and effects in man.

    PubMed Central

    Loga, S; Curry, S; Lader, M

    1975-01-01

    1 Two studies were carried out on acutely psychotic patients receiving chlorpromazine (100 mg) 8-hourly. 2 In the pilot study on five patients, plasma chlorpromazine concentrations fell over the course of 3 weeks of treatment and parallel changes were noted in the plasma half-life of antipyrine, salivation rate and handwriting length. 3 In the main study involving twelve patients treated for 15 weeks, the above findings were confirmed and were interpreted as indicating that chlorpromazine accelerated its own metabolism by inducing liver microsomal oxidising enzymes. No metabolites of chlorpromazine were detected in plasma. 4 The addition of phenobarbitone (50 mg) 8-hourly for 3 weeks, or orphenadrine (100 mg) 8-hourly for 3 weeks, resulted in a lowering of plasma chlorpromazine concentrations together with a further shortening of plasma antipyrine half-life. 5 Physiological effects of the additional treatments suggested that phenobarbitone lessens the effects of chlorpromazine by lowering body concentrations. However, orphenadrine acts more by virtue of its anticholinergic effects. 6 It was concluded that phenobarbitone and orphenadrine should not be prescribed routinely in patients receiving major tranquillisers. The need for the addition of orphenadrine should be assessed in each individual case. PMID:791320

  17. Low plasma selenium concentrations in critically ill children: the interaction effect between inflammation and selenium deficiency

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Low plasma selenium concentrations are frequent in critically ill patients. However, whether this is due to systemic inflammation, a deficient nutritional state or both is still not clear. We aimed to determine the factors associated with low plasma selenium in critically ill children while considering the inflammatory response and nutritional status. Method A prospective study was conducted in 173 children (median age 34 months) with systemic inflammatory response who had plasma selenium concentrations assessed 48 hours after admission and on the 5th day of ICU stay. The normal reference range was 0.58 μmol/L to 1.6 μmol/L. The outcome variable was ‘low plasma selenium’, which was defined as plasma selenium values below the distribution median during this period. The main explanatory variables were age, malnutrition, sepsis, C-reactive protein (CRP), and clinical severity scores. The data were analyzed using a Binomial Generalized Estimating Equations model, which includes the correlation between admission and 5th day responses. Results Malnutrition and CRP were associated with low plasma selenium. The interaction effect between these two variables was significant. When CRP values were less than or equal to 40 mg/L, malnutrition was associated with low plasma selenium levels (odds ratio (OR) = 3.25, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.39 to 7.63, P = 0.007; OR = 2.98, 95% CI 1.26 to 7.06, P = 0.013; OR = 2.49, 95% CI 1.01 to 6.17, P = 0.049, for CRP = 10, 20 and 40 mg/L, respectively). This effect decreased as CRP concentrations increased and there was loose significance when CRP values were >40 mg/L. Similarly, the effect of CRP on low plasma selenium was significant for well-nourished patients (OR = 1.13; 95% CI 1.06 to 1.22, P <0.001) but not for the malnourished (OR = 1.03; 95% CI 0.99 to 1.08, P = 0.16). Conclusions There is a significant interaction between the magnitude of the inflammatory

  18. Intrathyroidal iodide binding rates and plasma methimazole concentrations in hyperthyroid patients on small doses of carbimazole.

    PubMed Central

    Low, L C; McCruden, D C; Alexander, W D; Hilditch, T E; Skellern, G G; Knight, B I

    1981-01-01

    1 The effect of small doses of carbimazole on the binding rate constant of intrathyroidal iodide, plasma methimazole concentrations and circulating thyroid hormone concentrations in five hyperthyroid patients is presented. 2 In all patients there was a marked reduction in iodide binding with carbimazole doses as low as 5 to 10 mg daily. 3 In three patients little further reduction in the observed binding rate occurred with daily doses in excess of 10 mg despite progressive increases in plasma methimazole concentrations. 4 At the end of 4 weeks' treatment with 10 mg carbimazole daily, the reduction in thyroid hormone concentrations and clinical improvement were such as to suggest that this dose may be an effective starting dose in many patients. PMID:7295461

  19. Effect of exchange transfusions with citrated blood on plasma concentrations of vitamin D metabolites in neonates.

    PubMed

    Markestad, T; Aksnes, L; Finne, P H; Aarskog, D

    1984-05-01

    The plasma concentrations of 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25-OHD), 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D (1,25-(OH)2D), and 24,25-dihydroxyvitamin D (24,25-(OH)2D) were determined pre- and postexchange , and in donors' blood in 10 blood exchange transfusions with citrated blood for neonatal hyperbilirubinemia. The postexchange concentrations of 25-OHD and 24,25-(OH)2D were intermediate between the levels before exchange and in donors' blood. Before therapy, the 1,25-(OH)2D concentrations were higher in the infants' than in donors' blood, and the pre-exchange levels were re-established during the procedure. The results suggest that postexchange concentrations of 25-OHD and 24,25-(OH)2D could be explained on the basis of redistribution of the metabolites between plasma and extravascular pools, whereas de novo synthesis was the most likely cause for the restoration of 1,25-(OH)2D levels.

  20. Dose-adjusted plasma concentrations of sublingual buprenorphine are lower during than after pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Bastian, Jaime R; Chen, Huijun; Zhang, Hongfei; Rothenberger, Scott; Tarter, Ralph; English, Dennis; Venkataramanan, Raman; Caritis, Steve N

    2017-01-01

    Buprenorphine is a Food and Drug Administration-approved maintenance therapy for opioid use disorders and is increasingly being used in pregnant women with opioid use disorders as an alternative to methadone. Dosing of buprenorphine in pregnant women is based on the regimen recommended for nonpregnant females and males. Limited data are available defining the pharmacokinetic properties of sublingual buprenorphine administered during pregnancy. This study evaluated the impact of physiological changes associated with pregnancy on the pharmacokinetics of sublingual buprenorphine during and after pregnancy. Pregnant women (n = 13), between 18(0/7) and 37(6/7) weeks' singleton gestation, receiving sublingual buprenorphine twice daily for opioid use disorders were studied. Pharmacokinetic-2 studies were performed between 18 and 25 weeks (n = 7), pharmacokinetic-3 studies were performed between 31 and 37 weeks (n = 11), and pharmacokinetic-P was performed 4-18 weeks postpartum (n = 10). On the day of the study, blood was withdrawn prior to the daily morning dose of buprenorphine and at 0.25, 0.5, 0.75, 1, 1.5, 2, 4, 8, and 12 hours after the dose. Buprenorphine plasma concentrations were analyzed by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometric detection. All pharmacokinetic parameters were observed or estimated using Microsoft Excel. Statistical analyses were performed to identify significant changes in study participants' buprenorphine pharmacokinetic parameter estimates over the duration of the study. Univariate linear and generalized linear mixed models were used to investigate changes in these measures over time, some of which were log transformed for normality. Dose-normalized (plasma concentration per dose) buprenorphine plasma concentrations were significantly lower during pregnancy (pharmacokinetic-2 plus pharmacokinetic-3) than during the postpartum period (pharmacokinetic-P). Specific pharmacokinetic parameters (and level of significance) were as follows

  1. Plasma Concentrations Following Application of Whole versus Cut Transdermal Clonidine Patches To Critically Ill Children

    PubMed Central

    Zuppa, Athena F.; Tejani, Shamim M.; Cullen, Edward J.; Nadkarni, Vinay M.

    2004-01-01

    Clonidine is used for hypertension and narcotic withdrawal prophylaxis in adults and children. This study described plasma absorption of clonidine from whole and cut transdermal clonidine patches. This was a retrospective descriptive study in an 18 bed multidisciplinary pediatric intensive care unit, evaluating 15 critically ill children with a median age of 1.1 years (range 0.3–11 years) treated with transdermal clonidine for narcotic withdrawal prophylaxis, and who had plasma clonidine concentrations measured. An assessment of the relationship between clonidine dose and patch integrity (whole vs. cut) with plasma concentrations was performed, with further analysis by Spearman Correlation Coefficient. Clonidine doses averaged 7.5±4.2 μg/kg/day (range 2.3–20 μg/kg/day) for 9.8±4.3 days (range 4–20 days). There were 9 cut patches and 6 whole patches. The average prescribed dose delivered by cut patches was 6.4±3 μg/kg/day, resulting in a mean plasma concentration of 1±1.1 ng/ mL (range <0.05–3.3 ng/mL). The average prescribed dose delivered by whole patches was 7±1.7 μg/kg/day, resulting in a mean plasma concentration of 0.55±0.3 ng/mL (range 0.13–1.5 ng/mL). The Spearman Correlation Coefficient was calculated to evaluate the correlation between dose and concentration. For whole and cut patches the correlation coefficient was 0.94 (P=0.005) and 0.72 (P=0.002), respectively. Doses ranging from 1.7 to 20 μg/kg/day using whole patches resulted in no plasma concentrations >2 ng/mL. However, a plasma concentration >2 ng/mL was achieved with a dose of 8.8 μg/kg/day delivered by a cut patch. In addition, the 2 samples that resulted in undetectable concentrations were taken from patients who were treated with cut patches. The results from this pilot study suggest that critically ill children absorb clonidine from transdermal patches, but the rate and extent of absorption appears to be more predictable with the use of whole patches compared to patches

  2. Plasma concentrations of vitamin E in six species of bustard (Gruiformes: Otididae).

    PubMed

    Anderson, Susan J; Dawodu, Adekunle; Patel, Mahendra; Bailey, Thomas A; Silvanose, Christudas

    2002-04-01

    Vitamin E (measured as alpha-tocopherol) and cholesterol concentrations were determined in plasma samples collected from 86 clinically healthy captive adult bustards of six species and 23 captive juveniles (6-12 mo old) of two of these species. Adult houbara bustards (Chlamydotis undulata macqueenii) had higher plasma alpha-tocopherol concentrations than juveniles (adult: mean +/- SE, 11.07 +/- 0.41 micrograms/ml, n = 32; juvenile: 6.33 +/- 0.48, n = 12) and higher alpha-tocopherol: cholesterol ratios (adult: 6.09 +/- 0.44, n = 12; juvenile: 2.94 +/- 0.22, n = 11). No age difference was evident for kori bustard (Ardeotis kori) plasma alpha-tocopherol concentrations (adult: 4.43 +/- 0.42, n = 21; juvenile: 4.46 +/- 0.26, n = 11) or alpha-tocopherol: cholesterol ratios (adult: 3.67 +/- 0.44, n = 20; juvenile: 3.71 +/- 0.36, n = 11). Adult houbara bustards had significantly higher (P < 0.01) alpha-tocopherol concentrations compared with adult rufous-crested (Eupodotis ruficrista; 6.64 +/- 0.33, n = 19) and white-bellied (Eupodotis senegalensis; 7.75 +/- 0.81, n = 8) bustards, but similar alpha-tocopherol: cholesterol ratios (rufous-crested: 5.56 +/- 0.32, n = 18; white-bellied: 5.83 +/- 0.43, n = 8). Juvenile houbara bustards had higher plasma alpha-tocopherol concentrations than juvenile kori bustards but similar alpha-tocopherol:cholesterol ratios. Adult houbara bustard plasma alpha-tocopherol levels and alpha-tocopherol:cholesterol ratios did not differ significantly between sexes. The vitamin E status of adult bustards appeared to be influenced by environmental conditions that varied due to species-specific husbandry regimens, but no clear relationship was seen with dietary vitamin E levels. Juvenile bustards did not have higher vitamin E levels than adults, despite being maintained on four-fold dietary vitamin E concentrations and in similar environmental conditions. This paper presents the first published data for plasma vitamin E concentrations in bustards. The

  3. Plasma prostaglandin E2 concentrations after single dose administration of ketorolac tromethamine (Toradol) in dogs.

    PubMed Central

    Pasloske, K; Burger, J; Conlon, P

    1998-01-01

    Ketorolac tromethamine (Toradol) is a relatively new, potent, non-narcotic analgesic with cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibitory activity and has been associated with gastric and renal toxicity in people and dogs. The objectives of this study were to establish whether endogenous PGE2 exists in the plasma of healthy dogs and to determine if, and to what magnitude, ketorolac alters PGE2 plasma concentrations after administration. Enzyme immunoassay measurement of a stable PGE2 derivative, bicyclo PGE2, showed that after i.v. administration of 0.5 mg/kg ketorolac tromethamine, 1 and 24 h plasma samples contained significantly (P < or = 0.01) less PGE2 than did plasma samples collected from dogs before the drug treatment. After p.o. administration, 1 h plasma samples contained significantly (P < or = 0.01) less PGE2 than did pretreatment samples, and the 24 h post-drug administration samples contained significantly (P < or = 0.01) less plasma PGE2 than the 96 h plasma samples. The results of this study suggest that a clinically effective single i.v. or p.o. dose of ketorolac tromethamine to healthy dogs causes a significant but reversible decrease in endogenous PGE2 production which may partially explain the drug's low therapeutic index. PMID:9684056

  4. Elevated nonesterified fatty acid concentrations in severe preeclampsia shift the isoelectric characteristics of plasma albumin.

    PubMed

    Vigne, J L; Murai, J T; Arbogast, B W; Jia, W; Fisher, S J; Taylor, R N

    1997-11-01

    We previously hypothesized that the endothelial cell dysfunction observed in women with preeclampsia might be caused by an imbalance between circulating very low density lipoproteins and a cytoprotective pI 5.6 isoform of albumin, referred to as toxicity preventing albumin (TxPA). An accurate simplified method was developed to quantify TxPA in small volumes of pregnancy plasma by gel electrofocusing. This assay revealed that circulating TxPA concentrations in women with severe preeclampsia were significantly reduced compared to those in normal pregnant women and women with benign transient hypertension of pregnancy. Nonesterified fatty acids (NEFA) and triglycerides were elevated in plasma from women with severe preeclampsia compared to those in plasma from the two control groups. The inverse correlation between TxPA and NEFA values led us to analyze the NEFA bound to plasma albumin. Gas chromatography and mass spectrometry demonstrated no qualitative differences in the specific fatty acids bound to plasma albumin in severe preeclamptic and normal pregnant women. However, the quantity of NEFA bound to albumin was greater in preeclampsia plasma (2.5 mol NEFA/mol albumin) compared to that in normal pregnancy plasma (0.8 mol NEFA/mol albumin), accounting for the acidic pI shift observed in albumin from the former patients. Functional assays demonstrated that human very low density lipoprotein particles were toxic to human umbilical vein endothelial cells in vitro, but this toxicity was prevented by the addition of TxPA albumin to the culture medium.

  5. Kinetic and Related Determinants of Plasma Triglyceride Concentration in Abdominal Obesity: Multicenter Tracer Kinetic Study.

    PubMed

    Borén, Jan; Watts, Gerald F; Adiels, Martin; Söderlund, Sanni; Chan, Dick C; Hakkarainen, Antti; Lundbom, Nina; Matikainen, Niina; Kahri, Juhani; Vergès, Bruno; Barrett, P Hugh R; Taskinen, Marja-Riitta

    2015-10-01

    Patients with obesity and diabetes mellitus have increased risk of cardiovascular disease. A major cause is an atherogenic dyslipidemia related primarily to elevated plasma concentrations of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins. The aim of this study was to clarify determinants of plasma triglyceride concentration. We focused on factors that predict the kinetics of very-low density lipoprotein 1 (VLDL1) triglycerides. A multicenter study using dual stable isotopes (deuterated leucine and glycerol) and multicompartmental modeling was performed to elucidate the kinetics of triglycerides and apoB in VLDL1 in 46 subjects with abdominal obesity and additional cardiometabolic risk factors. Results showed that plasma triglyceride concentrations were dependent on both the secretion rate (r=0.44, P<0.01; r=0.45, P<0.01) and fractional catabolism (r=0.49, P<0.001; r=0.55, P<0.001) of VLDL1-triglycerides and VLDL1-apoB. Liver fat mass was independently and directly associated with secretion rates of VLDL1-triglycerides (r=0.56, P<0.001) and VLDL1-apoB (r=0.53, P<0.001). Plasma apoC-III concentration was independently and inversely associated with the fractional catabolisms of VLDL1-triglycerides (r=0.48, P<0.001) and VLDL1-apoB (r=0.51, P<0.001). Plasma triglyceride concentrations in abdominal obesity are determined by the kinetics of VLDL1 subspecies, catabolism being mainly dependent on apoC-III concentration and secretion on liver fat content. Reduction in liver fat and targeting apoC-III may be an effective approach for correcting triglyceride metabolism atherogenic dyslipidemia in obesity. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  6. Measurement and Comparison of Organic Compound Concentrations in Plasma, Whole Blood, and Dried Blood Spot Samples.

    PubMed

    Batterman, Stuart A; Chernyak, Sergey; Su, Feng-Chiao

    2016-01-01

    The preferred sampling medium for measuring human exposures of persistent organic compounds (POPs) is blood, and relevant sample types include whole blood, plasma, and dried blood spots (DBS). Because information regarding the performance and comparability of measurements across these sample types is limited, it is difficult to compare across studies. This study evaluates the performance of POP measurements in plasma, whole blood and DBS, and presents the distribution coefficients needed to convert concentrations among the three sample types. Blood samples were collected from adult volunteers, along with demographic and smoking information, and analyzed by GC/MS for organochlorine pesticides (OCPs), chlorinated hydrocarbons (CHCs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and brominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs). Regression models were used to evaluate the relationships between the sample types and possible effects of personal covariates. Distribution coefficients also were calculated using physically-based models. Across all compounds, concentrations in plasma were consistently the highest; concentrations in whole blood and DBS samples were comparable. Distribution coefficients for plasma to whole blood concentrations ranged from 1.74 to 2.26 for pesticides/CHCs, averaged 1.69 ± 0.06 for the PCBs, and averaged 1.65 ± 0.03 for the PBDEs. Regression models closely fit most chemicals (R (2) > 0.80), and whole blood and DBS samples generally showed very good agreement. Distribution coefficients estimated using biologically-based models were near one and did not explain the observed distribution. Among the study population, median concentrations of several pesticides/CHCs and PBDEs exceeded levels reported in the 2007-2008 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, while levels of other OCPs and PBDEs were comparable or lower. Race and smoking status appeared to slightly affect plasma/blood concentration ratios for several POPs. The experimentally

  7. Effects of Different Heavy-Resistance Exercise Protocols on Plasma Beta-Endorphin Concentrations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-01-01

    exercise increases in muscular hypertrophy (27). Thus each exer- protocols used previously. Each subject gave informed cise series provides for...ANTE. P. D., AND M. E. HOUSTON. Effects of concentric and DUDLEY. C. M. MARESH, L. MARCHIrELLI, C. CRUTHIRDS, T. eccentric exercise on protein catabolism...DTIC Effects of different heavy-resistance exercise ELECTE protocols on plasma #-endorphin concentrations MAR 3 0 1993 C WILLIAM J. KRAEMER, JOSEPH E

  8. The effect of assembly and transit stressors on plasma fibrinogen concentration of beef calves.

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, W A

    1984-01-01

    Plasma fibrinogen concentration was measured in beef calves at various points within the system presently used to assemble, market and transport calves from one production point to another in order to determine the effect of the stresses encountered. A short haul of 160 km immediately after weaning did not significantly elevate fibrinogen concentration above the pretransit values. Yearling steers transported 400 km and confined in unfamiliar surroundings for 15 h did have an elevated (P less than 0.01) concentration of fibrinogen, but this increase was not significantly different from that of steers which were confined but not transported, thus confinement may be a significant portion of the stress associated with transit. The change in plasma fibrinogen concentration during assembly and transit was dependent upon the farm from which the calves originated. The magnitude of the change in fibrinogen concentration as a result of assembly and transit varied between the years studied. In one year pretransit assembly for ten days resulted in a higher fibrinogen concentration before and after transit than assembly for four days, but no difference was noted between the two groups in the second year. Bovine plasma fibrinogen concentration does increase in response to the stresses associated with assembly and transit. The stress of fasting and housing in unfamiliar surroundings also increase bovine plasma fibrinogen concentration and are present in the assembly and transit system. These two stresses may account for a majority of the stress associated with marketing and transit. The response of beef calves to the marketing and transit system varied between years. PMID:6713254

  9. Analysis of apolipoprotein A5, C3 and plasma triglyceride concentrations in genetically engineered mice

    SciTech Connect

    Baroukh, Nadine; Bauge, Eric; Akiyama, Jennifer; Chang, Jessie; Afzal, Veena; Fruchart, Jean-Charles; Rubin, Edward M.; Fruchart, Jamila; Pennacchio, Len A.

    2004-03-11

    To address the relationship between the apolipoprotein A5 and C3 genes, we generated independent lines of mice that either over-expressed or completely lacked both genes. We report both lines display normal triglyceride concentrations compared to over-expression or deletion of either gene alone. Together, these data support that APOA5 and APOC3 independently influence plasma triglyceride concentrations but in an opposing manner.

  10. Effect of Ethiopian multiflora honey on fluconazole-resistant Candida species isolated from the oral cavity of AIDS patients.

    PubMed

    Mulu, A; Diro, E; Tekleselassie, H; Belyhun, Y; Anagaw, B; Alemayehu, M; Gelaw, A; Biadglegne, F; Desalegn, K; Yifiru, S; Tiruneh, M; Kassu, A; Nishikawa, T; Isogai, E

    2010-11-01

    This study aimed to determine the antifungal effect of Ethiopian multiflora honey against Candida species isolated from the oral cavity of AIDS patients. Oral rinses were obtained from 13 AIDS patients and cultured on CHROMagar plates at 37°C for 48 hours. Candida species were identified by microbiological and molecular techniques. The antifungal effect of the honey sample on Candida was investigated by an agar dilution technique. Susceptibility of the Candida species to fluconazole was tested following a semi-modified microdilution method. Growth of both fluconazole-susceptible and -resistant Candida species was inhibited with a minimum fungicidal concentration (MFC) of 35-40% (v/v) honey. The MFC of different Candida species was not significantly different (P > 0.05). From the total of 25 Candida isolates tested for susceptibility, 11 (44%), eight (32%) and six (24%) of the isolates were sensitive (minimum inhibitory concentrations [MICs] < 8 µg/mL), susceptible (dose-dependent: MICs 16-32 µg/mL) and resistant (MICs > 64 µg/mL) to fluconazole, respectively. Ethiopian multiflora honey has antifungal activity against fluconazole-resistant Candida species isolated from the oral cavity of AIDS patients. This supports the existing folkloric practice of using honey to treat oral lesions. Nevertheless, identification of the bioactive agents in honey, their clinical evaluation and pharmacological standardization are crucial.

  11. Dissociation between plasma concentrations of thyroxine and insulin-like growth factor-I.

    PubMed

    Dauncey, M J; Morovat, A; Rudd, B T; Shakespear, R A

    1990-09-01

    The relation between plasma concentrations of thyroxine (T4) and insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) has been examined in young, growing pigs under controlled conditions of energy intake. Compared with euthyroid controls, plasma levels of IGF-I were significantly elevated (P less than 0.005) both in hypothyroid animals on the same food intake and in hyperthyroid animals on double the food intake. There was however no increase in IGF-I in a hyperthyroid group on the control level of intake. Contrary to previous reports in which energy intake was not controlled, it is concluded that there is no simple correlation between plasma concentrations of T4 and IGF-I.

  12. Changes of concentration of cyclic AMP in rat brain and plasma in the clinical death model.

    PubMed

    Kapuściński, A

    1991-01-01

    In the experimental model of clinical death in rats (Korpachev et al. 1982) cyclic AMP concentrations were evaluated in the brain and plasma at the end of 5-min clinical death, and 5, 15, 30, 60 and 120 min after resuscitation. The cAMP 125I assay system has been used. At the end of clinical death the cAMP level decreased in the brain with normalization 15 min after resuscitation; the second decrease of the cAMP level was observed 30 min post resuscitation with normalization in later periods. In the plasma cAMP concentration did not change at the end of clinical death, followed by a significant increase 5 min after resuscitation. Later the level of plasma cAMP decreased being still above the control value after 2 hours. The possible role of endogenous catecholamines stimulation on adenylate cyclase activity is discussed.

  13. Plasma concentration of calcium, magnesium and phosphorus in chinchilla with and without tooth overgrowth.

    PubMed

    Muszczyński, Zbigniew; Sulik, Małgorzata; Ogoński, Tadeusz; Antoszek, Jolanta

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the study was to identify the causes underlying overgrowth of incisors in chinchillas through an analysis of selected plasma electrolyte concentrations, with particular consideration of minerals involved in the formation of osseous tissue, i.e., Ca, Mg, and P. The analysis involved 40 female standard chinchillas managed in a commercial farm system, aged 2 to 4 years, divided into two groups of 20 individuals each: D--chinchillas with incisor overgrowth and C--controls with normal dentition. Concentrations of Ca, Mg, and P were measured in blood plasma. The analysis was carried out using ICP OES (inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry) by means of the Optima 2000 DV instrument (Perkin Elmer). The resulting data were analysed statistically using one-way ANOVA with Duncan's range test. The results show that abnormal metabolism of dental tissue minerals, especially Ca and P, cannot be excluded as the cause of tooth overgrowth in chinchilla.

  14. Plasma albumin concentrations and intestinal permeability in Bangladeshi children infected with Ascaris lumbricoides.

    PubMed

    Northrop, C A; Lunn, P G; Wainwright, M; Evans, J

    1987-01-01

    Plasma albumin concentration and intestinal permeability have been investigated in Bangladeshi children before and 9-14 d after successful treatment for ascariasis. Children infected with A. lumbricoides had lower plasma albumin concentrations than counterparts not harbouring this worm and values increased with successful treatment. Intestinal permeability tests indicated that the children had impaired gastrointestinal function and some loss of mucosal integrity; these factors had not improved 9-14 d after A. lumbricoides expulsion. The lowered nitrogen nutritional status implied by the reduced plasma albumin values in infected children, and the improvement following treatment, are in keeping with previous reports that A. lumbricoides impairs protein digestion or absorption. This may be the basis of the better growth rates of dewormed children in this area.

  15. Species-dependent effective concentration of DTPA in plasma for chelation of 241Am.

    PubMed

    Sueda, Katsuhiko; Sadgrove, Matthew P; Jay, Michael; Di Pasqua, Anthony J

    2013-08-01

    Diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA) is a chelating agent that is used to facilitate the elimination of radionuclides such as americium from contaminated individuals. Its primary site of action is in the blood, where it competes with various biological ligands, including transferrin and albumin, for the binding of radioactive metals. To evaluate the chelation potential of DTPA under these conditions, the competitive binding of Am between DTPA and plasma proteins was studied in rat, beagle, and human plasma in vitro. Following incubation of DTPA and Am in plasma, the Am-bound ligands were fractionated by ultrafiltration and ion-exchange chromatography, and each fraction was assayed for Am content by gamma scintillation counting. Dose response curves of DTPA for Am binding were established, and these models were used to calculate the 90% maximal effective concentration, or EC90, of DTPA in each plasma system. The EC90 were determined to be 31.4, 15.9, and 10.0 μM in rat, beagle, and human plasma, respectively. These values correspond to plasma concentrations of DTPA that maximize Am chelation while minimizing excess DTPA. Based on the pharmacokinetic profile of DTPA in humans, after a standard 30 μmol kg intravenous bolus injection, the plasma concentration of DTPA remains above EC90 for approximately 5.6 h. Likewise, the effective duration of DTPA in rat and beagle were determined to be 0.67 and 1.7 h, respectively. These results suggest that species differences must be considered when translating DTPA efficacy data from animals to humans and offer further insights into improving the current DTPA treatment regimen.

  16. Species-dependent effective concentration of DTPA in plasma for chelation of 241Am

    PubMed Central

    Sueda, Katsuhiko; Sadgrove, Matthew P.; Jay, Michael; Di Pasqua, Anthony J.

    2013-01-01

    Diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA) is a chelating agent that is used to facilitate the elimination of radionuclides, such as americium, from contaminated individuals. Its primary site of action is in the blood, where it competes with various biological ligands, including transferrin and albumin, for the binding of radioactive metals. To evaluate the chelation potential of DTPA under these conditions, the competitive binding of 241Am between DTPA and plasma proteins was studied in rat, beagle and human plasma in vitro. Following incubation of DTPA and 241Am in plasma, the 241Am-bound ligands were fractionated by ultrafiltration and ion-exchange chromatography, and each fraction was assayed for 241Am content by gamma scintillation counting. Dose-response curves of DTPA for 241Am binding were established, and these models were used to calculate the 90% maximal effective concentration, or EC90, of DTPA in each plasma system. The EC90 were determined to be 31.4, 15.9 and 10.0 μM in rat, beagle and human plasma, respectively. These values correspond to plasma concentrations of DTPA that maximize 241Am chelation while minimizing excess DTPA. Based on the pharmacokinetic profile of DTPA in humans, after a standard 30 μmol kg−1 intravenous bolus injection, the plasma concentration of DTPA remains above EC90 for approximately 5.6 h. Likewise, the effective duration of DTPA in rat and beagle were determined to be 0.67 and 1.7 h, respectively. These results suggest that species differences must be considered when translating DTPA efficacy data from animals to humans and offer further insights into improving the current DTPA treatment regimen. PMID:23799506

  17. Association of plasma clusterin concentration with severity, pathology, and progression in Alzheimer disease

    PubMed Central

    Thambisetty, Madhav; Simmons, Andrew; Velayudhan, Latha; Hye, Abdul; Campbell, James; Zhang, Yi; Wahlund, Lars-Olof; Westman, Eric; Kinsey, Anna; Güentert, Andreas; Proitsi, Petra; Powell, John; Causevic, Mirsada; Killick, Richard; Lunnon, Katie; Lynham, Steven; Broadstock, Martin; Choudhry, Fahd; Howlett, David R.; Williams, Robert J.; Sharp, Sally I.; Mitchelmore, Cathy; Tunnard, Catherine; Leung, Rufina; Foy, Catherine; O'Brien, Darragh; Breen, Gerome; Furney, Simon; Ward, Malcolm; Kloszewska, Iwona; Mecocci, Patrizia; Soininen, Hilkka; Tsolaki, Magda; Vellas, Bruno; Hodges, Angela; Murphy, Declan; Parkins, Sue; Richardson, Jill; Resnick, Susan M.; Ferrucci, Luigi; Wong, Dean F.; Zhou, Yun; Muehlboeck, Sebastian; Evans, Alan; Francis, Paul T.; Spenger, Christian; Lovestone, Simon

    2010-01-01

    Context Blood-based analytes as indicators of pathological processes in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Objective Combined proteomic and neuroimaging approach to identify plasma proteins associated with AD pathology. Design Discovery-phase proteomic experiments to identify plasma proteins associated with correlates of AD pathology including evidence of atrophy using neuroimaging and more rapid clinical progression, followed by replication using quantitative immunoassay. Extension studies in older non-demented humans using 11C-PiB amyloid imaging and transgenic mice with amyloid pathology. Setting Multi-center European study, AddNeuroMed, and the Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging (BLSA) in United States. Participants AD patients, mild cognitive impairment (MCI) subjects and healthy controls with standardized clinical assessments and structural neuroimaging. Plasma samples from non-demented older BLSA participants with brain amyloid imaging by PET. Main outcome measures Association of plasma proteins with brain atrophy, disease severity and rate of clinical progression. Extension studies in man and transgenic mice tested association between plasma proteins and brain amyloid. Results Clusterin/apolipoprotein-J was associated with atrophy of the entorhinal cortex, baseline disease severity and rapid clinical progression in AD. Increased plasma concentration of clusterin was predictive of greater beta amyloid (Aβ) burden in the medial temporal lobe. Subjects with AD had increased clusterin mRNA in blood but there was no effect of SNPs in the gene encoding clusterin (CLU) with gene or protein expression. Finally, APP/PS1 transgenic mice showed increased plasma clusterin, age-dependent increase in brain clusterin and amyloid and clusterin co-localisation in plaques. Conclusions Clusterin/apolipoprotein-J is a known amyloid chaperone associated with Alzheimer's disease severity, pathology and progression. Increased plasma concentration of clusterin is also associated with

  18. Effect of time exposure to high altitude on zinc and copper concentrations in human plasma.

    PubMed

    Rawal, S B; Singh, M V; Tyagi, A K; Roy, J; Dimri, G P; Selvamurthy, W

    1999-12-01

    Research has focused mainly on the relationship of zinc and copper contents and physical stresses like running, cycling, etc. It has also been reported that other forms of stresses change the concentration of these trace elements in humans. However,there are no reports on the effects of high altitude induced hypoxic stress on the plasma levels of these metals. Since hypoxia is one of the important stresses, we considered it appropriate to observe the changes in the levels of zinc and copper concentrations and in certain related zinc and copper enzymes and hormones in the plasma of human volunteers on acute induction to high altitude. From these findings, we intended to ascertain whether supplementation of these trace elements would be required for optimal health under such conditions. On acute induction to hypoxia, contents of these trace elements may change as the requirements of stressed organs and tissue may increase. Hence, further supplementation may be beneficial under hypoxic stress for better adaptability. Volunteers were divided into two groups: with and without zinc and copper salt supplementation. Blood samples were collected at sea level and on induction to acute hypoxia on days 3 and 10. Trace mineral contents and their related enzyme (alkaline phosphatase) and hormone (ceruloplasmin) levels were determined in plasma samples. Plasma zinc contents were significantly reduced upon induction to high altitude in the non-supplemented group, but not in the zinc-supplemented group. Alkaline phosphatase activity increased significantly upon induction to the high altitude stress. The enzyme activity remained elevated up to day 10 of the stress. Plasma copper contents and ceruloplasmin activity did not change upon induction to high altitude. Under hypoxic stress, circulating levels of zinc and alkaline phosphatase in plasma changed appreciably as plasma zinc was transported into the organs and tissues. However, circulating levels of copper and ceruloplasmin in

  19. Safflower oil consumption does not increase plasma conjugated linoleic acid concentrations in humans.

    PubMed

    Herbel, B K; McGuire, M K; McGuire, M A; Shultz, T D

    1998-02-01

    Conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) is a mixture of positional and geometric isomers of linoleic acid (LA) with conjugated double bonds. CLA has anticarcinogenic properties and has been identified in human tissues, dairy products, meats, and certain vegetable oils. A variety of animal products are good sources of CLA, but plant oils contain much less. However, plant oils are a rich source of LA, which may be isomerized to CLA by intestinal microorganisms in humans. To investigate the effect of triacylglycerol-esterified LA consumption on plasma concentrations of esterified CLA in total lipids, a dietary intervention (6 wk) was conducted with six men and six women. During the intervention period a salad dressing containing 21 g safflower oil providing 16 g LA/d was added to the subjects' daily diets. Three-day diet records and fasting blood were obtained initially and during dietary and postdietary intervention periods. Although LA intake increased significantly during the dietary intervention, plasma CLA concentrations were not affected. Plasma total cholesterol and LDL-cholesterol concentrations were significantly lower after addition of safflower oil to the diet. In summary, consumption of triacylglycerol-esterified LA in safflower oil did not increase plasma concentrations of esterified CLA in total lipids.

  20. Coal pyrolysis to acetylene using dc hydrogen plasma torch: effects of system variables on acetylene concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Longwei; Meng, Yuedong; Shen, Jie; Shu, Xingsheng; Fang, Shidong; Xiong, Xinyang

    2009-03-01

    In order to unveil the inner mechanisms that determine acetylene concentration, experimental studies on the effect of several parameters such as plasma torch power, hydrogen flux and coal flux were carried out from coal pyrolysis in a dc plasma torch. Xinjiang long flame coals including volatile constituents at a level of about 42% were used in the experiment. Under the following experimental conditions, namely plasma torch power, hydrogen flow rate and pulverized coal feed speed of 2.12 MW, 32 kg h-1 and 900 kg h-1, respectively, acetylene volume concentration of about 9.4% was achieved. The experimental results indicate that parameters such as plasma torch power and coal flux play important roles in the formation of acetylene. Acetylene concentration increases inconspicuously with hydrogen flux. A chemical thermodynamic equilibrium model using the free energy method is introduced in this paper to numerically simulate each experimental condition. The numerical results are qualitatively consistent with the experimental results. Two parameters, i.e. the gas temperature and the ratio of hydrogen/carbon, are considered to be the dominant and independent factors that determine acetylene concentration.

  1. Inadequate plasma concentrations in some high-dose methadone maintenance patients.

    PubMed

    Tennant, F S

    1987-10-01

    The author studied 18 heroin addicts who had been maintained on 80 mg/day of methadone and who abused drugs or alcohol. His findings suggest that in some cases of aberrant methadone metabolism, the dose can be raised to achieve plasma concentrations adequate to eliminate drug and alcohol abuse.

  2. Plasma concentrations of disodium cromoglycate after various inhalation methods in healthy subjects

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Y; Muraki, K; Fujitaka, M; Sakura, N; Ueda, K

    1999-01-01

    Aims To compare the plasma concentrations of disodium cromoglycate (DSCG) following various inhalation procedures in healthy volunteers. Methods Nine healthy subjects inhaled 2 mg of aerosol, 20 mg of nebuliser solution only, 20 mg of nebuliser solution mixed with isotonic saline, or 20 mg of nebuliser solution mixed with saline and procaterol, a β2-adenoceptor agonist, on separate occasions 2–3 weeks apart. Plasma concentrations of DSCG were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography (h.p.l.c.). Results The peak plasma concentrations of DSCG were 1.5±0.7 (range 0.4–2.4) ng ml−1 in the aerosol group, 8.8±6.2 (range 5.3–19.9) ng ml−1 in the nebuliser solution only group, 17.2±16.3 (range 5.0–38.6) ng ml−1 in the nebuliser solution plus isotonic saline group, and 24.5±11.9 (range 10.2–44.9) ng ml−1 in the nebuliser solution plus saline and procaterol group. Thus subjects who used the nebuliser had markedly higher plasma concentrations of DSCG than subjects who used the aerosol inhaler. Conclusions These findings may have important implications for the evaluation of inhalation treatment with DSCG for bronchial asthma. PMID:10417491

  3. Diurnal variations in the plasma concentrations of mevalonic acid in patients with abetalipoproteinaemia.

    PubMed

    Pappu, A S; Illingworth, D R

    1994-10-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that changes in the rates of cholesterol biosynthesis can be evaluated by the determination of plasma concentrations of sterol intermediates, including mevalonic acid and lathosterol and that, in normal human subjects, a diurnal rhythm exists in which the highest concentrations of sterol intermediates are observed at night. The factors responsible for this diurnal rhythm in cholesterol synthesis are, however, unknown. To test the hypothesis that the nocturnal increase in cholesterol biosynthesis is attributable to a reduced rate of hepatic uptake of chylomicron remnants at night as compared to higher rates of uptake during the daytime in response to alimentary lipaemia, we have examined the diurnal rhythm of mevalonic acid in six normal volunteers and three patients with phenotypic abetalipoproteinaemia. The latter patients do not absorb appreciable amounts of dietary cholesterol and are unable to synthesize chylomicron particles. Plasma concentrations of mevalonic acid exhibited a diurnal rhythm in the normal subjects, and the highest plasma concentrations were observed between 24.00 hours/04.00 hours. A similar rhythm was observed in the plasma of patients with abetalipoproteinaemia. These results suggest that the nocturnal increase in cholesterol biosynthesis which occurs in humans is not attributable to reduced hepatic uptake of chylomicron remnants at night; further studies are needed to better define those factors which influence the periodicity of cholesterol biosynthesis in humans.

  4. Paracetamol interaction with oral contraceptive steroids: increased plasma concentrations of ethinyloestradiol.

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, S M; Back, D J; Stevenson, P J; Grimmer, S F; Orme, M L

    1987-01-01

    The effect of a single dose of paracetamol (1 g) on plasma concentrations of the oral contraceptive steroids ethinyloestradiol (EE2) and levonorgestrel (LNG) has been studied in six healthy female volunteers. The area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC0-24) of EE2 was significantly increased following paracetamol administration by 22% (control 2221 +/- 291; following paracetamol, 2702 +/- 452 pg ml-1 h; mean +/- s.d.; P less than or equal to 0.05). The greatest effect was evident in the time period 0-3 h. There was a significant decrease in the AUC of EE2-sulphate after paracetamol (7736 +/- 3791 pg ml-1 h) compared with control (13161 +/- 4535 pg ml-1 h; P less than or equal to 0.05). Plasma concentrations of LNG were unaltered by concurrent paracetamol administration. We conclude that the administration of a single 1 g dose of paracetamol causes an increase in plasma concentrations of EE2 as a result of a reduction in the sulphation of the steroid. This interaction may be of clinical significance in women on oral contraceptive steroids who regularly take paracetamol. PMID:3111513

  5. Phenylbutyrate reduces plasma leucine concentrations without affecting the flux of leucine

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Phenylbutyrate (PB) has been used as an alternative pathway to excrete nitrogen in urea cycle disorder patients for the last 20 years. PB, after oxidation to phenylacetate, is conjugated with glutamine and excreted in the urine. A reduction in the plasma concentration of branched amino acids (BCAA) ...

  6. [Determination of cyclohexanone concentration in the plasma separator by gas chromatography].

    PubMed

    Huang, Min-Ju; Yan, Lin; He, Yan-Ying; Lin, Wei-Cong

    2009-09-01

    This essay is to determine the cyclohexanone concentration of the plasma separator. The compound was introduced into the GC analytical system by the carrier gas. The determination was performed by the measurement of their peak area and by the external standard method.

  7. The Effect of Central Injection of Ghrelin and Bombesin on Mean Plasma Thyroid Hormones Concentration

    PubMed Central

    Mahmoudi, Fariba; Mohsennezhad, Fatemeh; Khazali, Homayoun; Ehtesham, Haleh

    2011-01-01

    Ghrelin increases food intakes and body weight. Bombesin decreases food intakes and inhibits the stimulatory effect of Ghrelin on food intakes. Thyroid hormones have a crucial role in the regulation of body weight and yet the effect of bombesin on thyroid axis activity is not fully clear. Therefore, the goal of this study was to determine the effect of different doses of Ghrelin or bombesin on mean plasma thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), Triiodothyronine (T3) and Thyroxin (T4) concentration and also, the effect of interaction between Ghrelin and bombesin on thyroid axis activity. Forty-nine rats in seven groups received saline or different doses of Ghrelin (4, 10 or 15 nmol) and bombesin ( 2.5, 5 or 10 nmol) and forty-two rats in six groups received simultaneous injection of Ghrelin (10 or 15 nmol) and different doses of bombesin (2.5, 5 or 10 nmol) via lateral cerebral ventricle. Blood samples were collected via decapitation 20 min after the injection and plasma was assayed for plasma TSH, T3 and T4 concentration by Radioimmunoassay (RIA). Ghrelin significantly decreased the concentration of mean plasma thyroid hormones compared to saline. Bombesin did not significantly increase thyroid hormones concentration compared to saline but bombesin blocked the inhibitory effect of Ghrelin on thyroid axis activity. Bombesin may be the antagonist of Ghrelin action. PMID:24250396

  8. Changes in plasma amino acid concentrations with increasing age in patients with propionic acidemia.

    PubMed

    Scholl-Bürgi, Sabine; Sass, Jörn Oliver; Heinz-Erian, Peter; Amann, Edda; Haberlandt, Edda; Albrecht, Ursula; Ertl, Claudia; Sigl, Sara Baumgartner; Lagler, Florian; Rostasy, Kevin; Karall, Daniela

    2010-05-01

    The objective of the study is to analyze plasma amino acid concentrations in propionic acidemia (PA) for the purpose of elucidating possible correlations between propionyl-CoA carboxylase deficiency and distinct amino acid behavior. Plasma concentrations of 19 amino acids were measured in 240 random samples from 11 patients (6 families) with enzymatically and/or genetically proven propionic acidemia (sampling period, January 2001-December 2007). They were compared with reference values from the literature and correlated with age using the Pearson correlation coefficient test. Decreased plasma concentrations were observed for glutamine, histidine, threonine, valine, isoleucine, leucine, phenylalanine and arginine. Levels of glycine, alanine and aspartate were elevated, while values of serine, asparagine, ornithine and glutamate were normal. For lysine, proline and methionine a clear association was not possible. Significant correlations with age were observed for 13 amino acids (positive correlation: asparagine, glutamine, proline, alanine, histidine, threonine, methionine, arginine; negative correlation: leucine, phenylalanine, ornithine, glutamate and aspartate). This study gives new insight over long-term changes in plasma amino acid concentrations and may provide options for future therapies (e.g., substitution of anaplerotic substances) in PA patients.

  9. Ethanol vapor above skin: determination by a gas sensor instrument and relationship with plasma concentration.

    PubMed

    Giles, H G; Meggiorini, S; Renaud, G E; Thiessen, J J; Vidins, E I; Compton, K V; Saldivia, V; Orrego, H; Israel, Y

    1987-06-01

    Studies with a new instrument show that blood ethanol concentrations in rats and humans can be estimated by measurement of ethanol vapor above the skin. After intravenous bolus administration of ethanol (1 g/kg) to rats a novel device based on the Figaro sensor was placed above the animal's abdomen. Plasma and skin vapor ethanol concentrations, analyzed by gas chromatography and sensor, respectively, declined in parallel (r = 0.96). In healthy human subjects, plasma and skin vapor concentrations, measured on the palm, also declined in parallel after intravenous ethanol infusion (1 hr, 0.5 g/kg), r = 0.99. In 10 alcoholic liver disease outpatients attending clinic in whom plasma ethanol concentrations ranged from 32-304 mg/dl, the correlation of plasma ethanol determined directly by gas chromatography and indirectly by skin vapor analysis was slope = 0.93, intercept = 1.8, r = 0.94. In controlled studies, skin vapor measurements are comparable with breathalyzer determinations; they may be performed in situations where breathalyzer measurements are inconvenient or where continuous monitoring is desirable.

  10. Evaluation of the Lactate Plus monitor for plasma lactate concentration measurement in dogs.

    PubMed

    Nye, Carolyn J; Musulin, Sarah E; Hanel, Rita M; Mariani, Christopher L

    2017-01-01

    To compare the Lactate Plus handheld monitor to a reference blood gas analyzer for determining plasma lactate concentrations in canine whole blood. Prospective observational study. University teaching hospital. Ninety-four dogs hospitalized or admitted through the emergency service provided 125 blood samples. Only dogs that required a venous or arterial blood gas evaluation as a part of their diagnostic assessment or ongoing management were included. None. Canine whole blood samples were assayed for plasma lactate concentration with a reference blood gas analyzer and the Lactate Plus monitor. Correlation and Bland-Altman analyses were used to compare results between the 2 methods. A subset of blood samples was repeatedly analyzed with the Lactate Plus to assess monitor precision. Plasma lactate measurements from the Lactate Plus monitor showed excellent correlation with those from the reference analyzer (ρ = 0.98, P < 0.0001). Bland-Altman analysis revealed a small bias (0.1296). Agreement between the 2 methods was less consistent for lactate concentrations >5 mmol/L. The coefficient of variation ranged from 0-26.2% (median, 3.7%) and was <15% for 50/53 samples. The Lactate Plus provides a fast and affordable method to measure plasma lactate concentration in dogs. Results showed excellent agreement with the reference analyzer and precision of the instrument was acceptable. © Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care Society 2016.

  11. Plasma Progesterone Concentrations in Dairy Cows with Cystic Ovaries and Clinical Responses Following Treatment with Fenprostalene

    PubMed Central

    Leslie, K. E.; Bosu, W. T. K.

    1983-01-01

    Sixty-two dairy cows diagnosed as having cystic ovarian degeneration were used to study the correlation between rectal palpation findings and plasma progesterone concentrations and the response of cysts to treatment using fenprostalene, a luteolytic agent. Rectal palpation accurately determined the presence of luteal cysts as confirmed by plasma progesterone concentrations of 3 ng/mL or more. Treatment with fenprostalene was very effective for luteal cysts: a high percentage of treated cows exhibited estrus within seven days after treatment. The conception rate following artifical insemination during the induced estrus was 87.5% (21/24). Rectal palpation was much less accurate for the diagnosis of follicular cysts. Cows diagnosed as having follicular cysts had wide variations in plasma progesterone concentrations. Response to fenprostalene treatment was poor in cows with nonluteinized cystic follicles associated with low progesterone concentrations. However, cows diagnosed as having follicular cysts, but with progesterone concentrations of 1 ng/mL or more, responded better to fenprostalene treatment than cows with low progesterone concentrations. It was concluded that, if correctly diagnosed, luteal cysts can be successfully treated with fenprostalene, and conception rates following treatment can be expected to be normal. PMID:17422330

  12. Zinc and iron concentration and SOD activity in human semen and seminal plasma.

    PubMed

    Marzec-Wróblewska, Urszula; Kamiński, Piotr; Lakota, Paweł; Szymański, Marek; Wasilow, Karolina; Ludwikowski, Grzegorz; Kuligowska-Prusińska, Magdalena; Odrowąż-Sypniewska, Grażyna; Stuczyński, Tomasz; Michałkiewicz, Jacek

    2011-10-01

    The aim of the present study was to measure zinc (Zn) and iron (Fe) concentration in human semen and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity in seminal plasma and correlate the results with sperm quality. Semen samples were obtained from men (N = 168) undergoing routine infertility evaluation. The study design included two groups based on the ejaculate parameters. Group I (n = 39) consisted of males with normal ejaculate (normozoospermia), and group II (n = 129) consisted of males with pathological spermiogram. Seminal Zn and Fe were measured in 162 samples (group I, n = 38; group II, n = 124) and SOD activity in 149 samples (group I, n = 37; group II, n = 112). Correlations were found between SOD activity and Fe and Zn concentration, and between Fe and Zn concentration. SOD activity was negatively associated with volume of semen and positively associated with rapid progressive motility, nonprogressive motility, and concentration. Negative correlation was stated between Fe concentration and normal morphology. Mean SOD activity in seminal plasma of semen from men of group I was higher than in seminal plasma of semen from men of group II. Fe concentration was higher in teratozoospermic males than in males with normal morphology of spermatozoa in group II. Our results suggest that Fe may influence spermatozoa morphology.

  13. Synergistic Effect of Fluconazole and Calcium Channel Blockers against Resistant Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shuyuan; Yue, Longtao; Gu, Wenrui; Li, Xiuyun; Zhang, Liuping; Sun, Shujuan

    2016-01-01

    Candidiasis has increased significantly recently that threatens patients with low immunity. However, the number of antifungal drugs on the market is limited in comparison to the number of available antibacterial drugs. This fact, coupled with the increased frequency of fungal resistance, makes it necessary to develop new therapeutic strategies. Combination drug therapy is one of the most widely used and effective strategy to alleviate this problem. In this paper, we were aimed to evaluate the combined antifungal effects of four CCBs (calcium channel blockers), amlodipine (AML), nifedipine (NIF), benidipine (BEN) and flunarizine (FNZ) with fluconazole against C. albicans by checkerboard and time-killing method. In addition, we determined gene (CCH1, MID1, CNA1, CNB1, YVC1, CDR1, CDR2 and MDR1) expression by quantitative PCR and investigated the efflux pump activity of resistant candida albicans by rhodamine 6G assay to reveal the potential mechanisms. Finally, we concluded that there was a synergy when fluconazole combined with the four tested CCBs against resistant strains, with fractional inhibitory concentration index (FICI) <0.5, but no interaction against sensitive strains (FICI = 0.56 ~ 2). The mechanism studies revealed that fluconazole plus amlodipine caused down-regulating of CNA1, CNB1 (encoding calcineurin) and YVC1 (encoding calcium channel protein in vacuole membrane).

  14. Cellular characterisation of Candida tropicalis presenting fluconazole-related trailing growth.

    PubMed

    Dornelas-Ribeiro, Marcos; Pinheiro, Eliane Olmo; Guerra, Carolina; Braga-Silva, Lys Adriana; Carvalho, Silvia Maia Faria de; Santos, André Luis Souza dos; Rozental, Sonia; Fracalanzza, Sergio Eduardo Longo

    2012-02-01

    We assessed fluconazole susceptibility in 52 Candida tropicalis clinical strains using seven antifungal susceptibility methods, including broth microdilution (BMD) [standard M27 A3 (with neutral and acid pH), ATB Fungus 3, Vitek 2 system and flow cytometric analysis] and agar-based methods (disk diffusion and E-test). Trailing growth, detection of cell-associated secreted aspartic proteases (Saps) and morphological and ultrastructural traits of these clinical strains were also examined. The ranges of fluconazole 24 h-minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) values were similar among all methods. The essential agreement among the methods used for MIC determinations was excellent and all methods categorised all strains as susceptible, except for one strain that showed a minor error. The presence of the trailing effect was assessed by six methods. Trailing positivity was observed for 86.5-100% of the strains. The exception was the BMD-Ac method where trailing growth was not observed. Morphological and ultrastructural alterations were detected in C. tropicalis trailing cells, including mitochondrial swelling and cell walls with irregular shapes. We tested the production of Saps in 13 C. tropicalis strains expressing trailing growth through flow cytometry. Our results showed that all of the C. tropicalis strains up-regulated surface Sap expression after 24 h or 48 h of exposure to fluconazole, which was not observed in untreated yeast strains. We concluded that C. tropicalis strains expressing trailing growth presented some particular features on both biological and ultrastructural levels.

  15. Tacrolimus Increases the Effectiveness of Itraconazole and Fluconazole against Sporothrix spp.

    PubMed

    Borba-Santos, Luana P; Reis de Sá, Leandro F; Ramos, Juliene A; Rodrigues, Anderson M; de Camargo, Zoilo P; Rozental, Sonia; Ferreira-Pereira, Antonio

    2017-01-01

    Calcineurin inhibitors - such as the clinically used drug tacrolimus - are active against important fungal pathogens, particularly when combined with azoles. However, tacrolimus has not been tested against sporotrichosis, an endemic subcutaneous mycosis with worldwide distribution. Here, we evaluated the activity of tacrolimus and cyclosporine A in vitro - as monotherapy and in combination with itraconazole or fluconazole - against yeasts of Sporothrix brasiliensis and S. schenckii, the main sporotrichosis agents in Brazil. We also analyzed the effect of tacrolimus treatment on intracellular neutral lipid levels, which typically increase after azole treatment. Tacrolimus inhibited the growth of yeasts from S. brasiliensis and S. schenckii reference isolates, with minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) values (required for ≥50% growth inhibition) of 1 and 2 mg/L, respectively. Importantly, the combination of tacrolimus and azoles exhibited high synergy toward reference Sporothrix isolates. Tacrolimus combined with itraconazole significantly increased neutral lipid accumulation in S. brasiliensis, but not in S. schenckii. Clinical isolates of S. brasiliensis and S. schenckii were more sensitive to tacrolimus as monotherapy than feline-borne isolates, however, synergy between tacrolimus and azoles was only observed for feline-borne isolates. Cyclosporine A was effective against S. brasiliensis and S. schenckii as monotherapy (MIC = 1 mg/L), but exhibited no synergy with itraconazole and fluconazole. We conclude that tacrolimus has promising antifungal activity against sporotrichosis agents, and also increases the activity of the current anti-sporotrichosis therapy (itraconazole and fluconazole) in combination assays against S. brasiliensis feline-borne isolates.

  16. [Identification and susceptibility against fluconazole and albaconazole of 100 yeasts' strains isolated from vaginal discharge].

    PubMed

    Arechavala, Alicia I; Bianchi, Mario H; Robles, Ana María; Santiso, Gabriela; Negroni, Ricardo

    2007-12-31

    Vulvovaginal candidiasis is a condition that affects a great number of fertile women. It is considered the second cause of genital infection after vaginosis due to GAM complex. Candida albicans is the most frequent isolated species from vaginal discharge. However, sometimes more than one yeast species could be found in the same clinical sample that are more resistant to antifungal drugs. Nowadays, it is necessary to identify properly up to species level the isolated microorganism and to determine the antifungal susceptibility profile. One hundred strains obtained from vaginal discharge of 94 patients suffering acute vulvovaginal candidiasis were studied. The identification of the isolates showed: C. albicans 86%, Candida glabrata 6%, Candida inconspicua 3%, Candida krusei 2% and Candida intermedia, Candida holmii and Trichosporon asahii one case each. Minimal inhibitory concentrations (MIC) of all the yeasts against fluconazole and albaconazole were performed. C. glabrata, C. krusei and C. inconspicua were the most resistant against fluconazole, on the other hand albicans was susceptible to this drug. All the isolates presented MIC against albaconazole much lower than fluconazole.

  17. Synergistic Effect of Fluconazole and Calcium Channel Blockers against Resistant Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shuyuan; Yue, Longtao; Gu, Wenrui; Li, Xiuyun; Zhang, Liuping; Sun, Shujuan

    2016-01-01

    Candidiasis has increased significantly recently that threatens patients with low immunity. However, the number of antifungal drugs on the market is limited in comparison to the number of available antibacterial drugs. This fact, coupled with the increased frequency of fungal resistance, makes it necessary to develop new therapeutic strategies. Combination drug therapy is one of the most widely used and effective strategy to alleviate this problem. In this paper, we were aimed to evaluate the combined antifungal effects of four CCBs (calcium channel blockers), amlodipine (AML), nifedipine (NIF), benidipine (BEN) and flunarizine (FNZ) with fluconazole against C. albicans by checkerboard and time-killing method. In addition, we determined gene (CCH1, MID1, CNA1, CNB1, YVC1, CDR1, CDR2 and MDR1) expression by quantitative PCR and investigated the efflux pump activity of resistant candida albicans by rhodamine 6G assay to reveal the potential mechanisms. Finally, we concluded that there was a synergy when fluconazole combined with the four tested CCBs against resistant strains, with fractional inhibitory concentration index (FICI) <0.5, but no interaction against sensitive strains (FICI = 0.56 ~ 2). The mechanism studies revealed that fluconazole plus amlodipine caused down-regulating of CNA1, CNB1 (encoding calcineurin) and YVC1 (encoding calcium channel protein in vacuole membrane). PMID:26986478

  18. Quantification of human plasma-busulfan concentration by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Moon, Soo Young; Lim, Min Kyoo; Hong, Susie; Jeon, Yongbum; Han, Minje; Song, Sang Hoon; Lim, Kyoung Soo; Yu, Kyung-Sang; Jang, In-Jin; Lee, Ji Won; Kang, Hyoung Jin; Song, Junghan

    2014-01-01

    Busulfan, an alkylating agent administered prior to hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, has a narrow therapeutic range and wide variability in metabolism. We developed a liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method for rapid and accurate quantification of plasma busulfan. Busulfan was separated and detected using an LC system containing a C18 column equipped with MS/MS. The sample was eluted with a mobile phase gradient for a total run time of 10 min. Plasma busulfan concentration was quantified against a 6-point standard curve in a multiple reaction monitoring mode at mass-to-charge (m/z) 264.1 > 151.1. Precision, recovery, matrix effect, linearity, detection capability, carryover, and stability were evaluated. The range of plasma busulfan concentration was obtained by analyzing samples from 9 children receiving busulfan. The coefficients of variation of within-run and within-laboratory precision were all below 5%. Recoveries were all within the range of 100-105%. Linearity was verified from 0 to 5,000 ng/mL. Limit of detection and limit of quantification were 1.56 and 25 ng/mL, respectively. Carryover rate was within allowable limits. Plasma busulfan concentration was stable for 2 weeks at -20℃ and -80℃, but decreased by 25% when the plasma was stored for 24 hr at room temperature, and by <5% in 24 hr at 4℃. The plasma busulfan concentrations were between 347 ng/mL and 5,076 ng/mL. Our method using LC-MS/MS enables highly accurate, reproducible, and rapid busulfan monitoring with minimal sample preparation. The method may also enable safe and proper dosage.

  19. Bioactivity of Ceftazidime and Fluconazole Included in Polymethyl Methacrylate Bone Cement for Use in Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Moreno, J; Merino, V; Nácher, A; Rodrigo, J L; Bonet Yuste, Blanca B; Merino-Sanjuán, M

    2017-10-01

    The microorganisms that most frequently cause prosthetic joint infection are methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and gram-negative aerobic bacillus. Studies have documented the efficacy of mixing antibiotics with polymethyl methacrylate, but that of antifungal drugs has not received much attention. The objective of this in vitro study was to characterize the elution profile and bioactivity of ceftazidime and fluconazole when incorporated into bone cement in proportions intended for prophylaxis and treatment of bone infections. Antibiotic-loaded bone cement cylinders in a proportion of 1:40 and 4:40 (ratio of grams of antibiotic to grams of cement) were assayed. Drug delivery was investigated in a flow-through dissolution apparatus (SotaxCE7). To assess bioactivity, antibiotic concentrations were simulated in the joint space of 1000 patients. Antibacterial properties were evaluated by counting colony forming units and the inhibition-halo test. The ratio of released ceftazidime and fluconazole was 453% and 648%, respectively, higher when used for treatment proportions than prophylaxis proportions. A bioactivity simulation exercise showed that the efficacy of ceftazidime/fluconazole determined as the amount of drug is released at the active site in the first 3 days after surgery would depend on the sensitivity of the microorganism and would increase substantially after drain removal. The microbiology study showed that biofilm formation by Pseudomonas aeruginosa could be a problem when ceftazidime was used in treatment or prophylaxis proportions. Our in vitro findings suggest that ceftazidime and fluconazole can be added into polymethyl methacrylate for the prevention/treatment of infections associated to joint surgery. Their efficacy depends on the sensitivity of the microorganism causing the infection. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Overestimation of canine albumin concentration with the bromcresol green method in heparinized plasma samples.

    PubMed

    Stokol, Tracy; Tarrant, Jacqueline M.; Scarlett, Janet M.

    2001-01-01

    Albumin concentrations are routinely measured in dogs with bromcresol green (BCG)-binding assays on automated chemistry analyzers. Several variables affect this assay, including the length of reaction time, sample type, and lack of specificity of BCG for albumin. We observed that albumin concentrations measured with BCG appeared higher in heparinized plasma samples in sick dogs. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of anticoagulant and assay procedure on BCG albumin concentrations in clinically ill dogs. We hypothesized that albumin concentrations would be overestimated in heparinized plasma compared with serum because of the combination of heparin and fibrinogen. Furthermore, we hypothesized that the overestimation would be influenced by assay parameters. Blood was collected from 32 clinically ill dogs into tubes containing heparin, citrate, or no anticoagulant. Citrate was chosen to assess the effect of fibrinogen in the absence of heparin. Albumin concentration was measured in all 3 sample types from each dog using 2 different BCG procedures on an automated chemistry analyzer. The BCG procedures (standard and modified) differed in the wavelengths used for absorbance readings (standard, 600/700; modified, 570/505) and the time point at which absorbance was measured (standard, 100 seconds; modified, 40 seconds). In addition, the modified method incorporated a sample blank. Globulin fractions, fibrinogen concentration, and indices of lipemia, hemolysis, and icterus were evaluated for their contribution to the overestimation of albumin concentration in heparinized plasma compared with serum samples. Albumin concentrations were significantly higher (P plasma (mean +/- SE, 3.8 +/- 0.1 g/dL) than in serum (3.6 +/- 0.2 g/dL) or citrated plasma (3.2 +/- 0.1 g/dL). Overestimation was evident only with the standard BCG procedure. Multiple linear regression analysis indicated that fibrinogen was largely responsible for the higher

  1. Treatment of Malassezia species associated seborrheic blepharitis with fluconazole.

    PubMed

    Zisova, Lilia G

    2009-01-01

    The AIM of the present study was to evaluate the therapeutic effect of fluconazole (FungoIon) in patients with seborrheic blepharitis. Four seborrheic blepharitis patients with Malassezia spp. positive cultures on Dixon's agar were treated with fluconazole (Fungolon) (0.200) weekly for 4 weeks. The therapeutic effect of the treatment was positive in all patients--the clinical symptoms withdrew and cultures became mycologically negative. The results indicate that antifungal agents are efficient in the treatment of seborrheic dermatitis.

  2. Low plasma selenium concentration is associated with elevated risk to neoplastic polyps of the colon

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, L.C.; Hixson, L.G.; Sampliner, R.E. ); Combs, G.F. Jr. )

    1991-03-11

    A cross-sectional study was conducted to examine the relationship of selenium (Se) status and polyps incidence in a sequential series of 100 patients undergoing outpatient colonoscopies at the Tucson VA Hospital. Se was measured in plasma samples by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrophotometry with Zeeman background correction using a reduced palladium matrix modified. The activities of the Se-dependent enzyme glutathione peroxidase (SeGSHpx) were measured using H{sub 2}O{sub 2} as substrate in all plasma samples and in colonic mucosal biopsies obtained from some patients. The mean plasma Se concentration of patients without polyps was 134 ng/ml. Mean plasma Se levels of patients with only diminutive or large polyps were 127 ng/ml and 125 ng/ml; while patients with polyps of both sizes had a mean plasma Se level of 121 ng/ml. Patients with no reported history of cancer, neoplastic polyps or prior colonoscopy, showed an inverse association of plasma Se level and risk of benign colonic neoplasms. The age-adjusted odds ratio for neoplastic polyps was 3.8 for patients with plasma Se levels below vs. above the median value. This association was stronger for patients under 68 yrs of age than for older patients. Activities of SeGSHpx in plasma or colonic mucosa were not related to plasma Se level; however, smokers showed greater SeGSHpx activities than non-smokers. This study is the first to detect an association of Se status and risk to neoplastic polyps of the colon.

  3. Weak acid-concentration Atot and dissociation constant Ka of plasma proteins in racehorses.

    PubMed

    Stampfli, H R; Misiaszek, S; Lumsden, J H; Carlson, G P; Heigenhauser, G J

    1999-07-01

    The plasma proteins are a significant contributor to the total weak acid concentration as a net anionic charge. Due to potential species difference, species-specific values must be confirmed for the weak acid anionic concentrations of proteins (Atot) and the effective dissociation constant for plasma weak acids (Ka). We studied the net anion load Atot of equine plasma protein in 10 clinically healthy mature Standardbred horses. A multi-step titration procedure, using a tonometer covering a titration range of PCO2 from 25 to 145 mmHg at 37 degrees C, was applied on the plasma of these 10 horses. Blood gases (pH, PCO2) and electrolytes required to calculate the strong ion difference ([SID] = [(Na(+) + K(+) + Ca(2+) + Mg(2+))-(Cl(-) + Lac(-) + PO4(2-))]) were simultaneously measured over a physiological pH range from 6.90-7.55. A nonlinear regression iteration to determine Atot and Ka was performed using polygonal regression curve fitting applied to the electrical neutrality equation of the physico-chemical system. The average anion-load Atot for plasma protein of 10 Standardbred horses was 14.89 +/- 0.8 mEq/l plasma and Ka was 2.11 +/- 0.50 x 10(-7) Eq/l (pKa = 6.67). The derived conversion factor (iterated Atot concentration/average plasma protein concentration) for calculation of Atot in plasma is 0.21 mEq/g protein (protein-unit: g/l). This value compares closely with the 0.24 mEq/g protein determined by titration of Van Slyke et al. (1928) and 0.22 mEq/g protein recently published by Constable (1997) for horse plasma. The Ka value compares closely with the value experimentally determined by Constable in 1997 (2.22 x 10(7) Eq/l). Linear regression of a set of experimental data from 5 Thoroughbred horses on a treadmill exercise test, showed excellent correlation with the regression lines not different from identity for the calculated and measured variables pH, HCO3 and SID. Knowledge of Atot and Ka for the horse is useful especially in exercise studies and in

  4. Cholesterol concentration in seminal plasma as a predictive tool for quality semen evaluation.

    PubMed

    Beer-Ljubić, B; Aladrović, J; Marenjak, T S; Laskaj, R; Majić-Balić, I; Milinković-Tur, S

    2009-11-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between lipid composition of bovine serum and seminal plasma, seasonality, and semen quality. The experiment was carried out in two groups of Simmental breeding bulls: Group I (ages 2 to 4 yr) and Group II (ages 5 to 10 yr). Blood samples were collected from jugular vein, and bovine semen was sampled with an artificial vagina once per season. Serum concentrations of total cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), triacylglycerols, nonesterified fatty acids (NEFAs), and lipoprotein electrophoretic patterns were determined. Seminal plasma concentrations of total cholesterol, HDL-C, and LDL-C were assayed. Serum concentration of triacylglycerols in young bulls was significantly higher in winter compared with that in autumn, whereas serum NEFA concentration was significantly higher in autumn compared with that in other seasons. Serum concentration of total cholesterol, LDL-C, and LDL lipoproteins in older bulls was significantly higher in winter than in spring. Seminal plasma concentration of total cholesterol in young bulls was significantly higher in spring compared with that in summer, whereas in older bulls it was significantly higher in winter compared with that in autumn samples. Sperm volume of both groups was significantly higher in summer compared with that in autumn and winter. Sperm motility in young bulls was lowest in summer and differed significantly from the values recorded in other seasons. The changes observed in seminal plasma cholesterol concentration were associated with extracellular lipid use and appeared to be applicable as a biochemical marker of sperm quality.

  5. Plasma polychlorinated biphenyl and organochlorine pesticide concentrations in dementia: the Canadian Study of Health and Aging.

    PubMed

    Medehouenou, Thierry Comlan Marc; Ayotte, Pierre; Carmichael, Pierre-Hugues; Kröger, Edeltraut; Verreault, René; Lindsay, Joan; Dewailly, Éric; Tyas, Suzanne L; Bureau, Alexandre; Laurin, Danielle

    2014-08-01

    Even though polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and organochlorine (OC) pesticides are recognized as neurotoxicants, few studies have investigated their associations with dementia. Here, we assess associations of plasma PCB and OC pesticide concentrations with all-cause dementia and Alzheimer's disease (AD). Analyses are based on data from the Canadian Study of Health and Aging, a population-based study of men and women aged 65+ years at baseline. PCB and OC pesticide concentrations were measured in 2023 participants who had complete clinical evaluations and blood samples; 574 had dementia, including 399 cases of AD. Concentrations were log-transformed and used as continuous variables in logistic regression models to assess their individual associations with dementia and AD. After adjustment for blood collection period, total plasma lipids, age, sex, education, apolipoprotein E e4 allele (ApoE4), tobacco and alcohol use, rural/urban residence, and comorbidities, elevated plasma PCB concentrations were not associated with increased prevalence of dementia and AD. Elevated concentrations of some OC pesticides and metabolites such as hexachlorobenzene, cis-nonachlor and 1,1,1-trichloro-2,2-bis(p-chlorophenyl)ethane were significantly associated with a reduced prevalence of dementia. A significant reduced prevalence