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Sample records for fluid bilayer membranes

  1. Efficient tunable generic model for self-assembling fluid bilayer membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deserno, Markus

    2005-03-01

    We present a new model for the simulation of generic lipid bilayers in the mesoscopic regime (between a few nanometers and many tens of nanometers), which is very robust, versatile, and extremely efficient, since it avoids the need for an embedding solvent. Based entirely on simple pair potentials, it features a wide region of unassisted self assembly into fluid bilayers without the need for careful parameter tuning. The resulting membranes display the correct continuum elastic behavior with bending constants in the experimentally relevant range. It can be readily used to study events like bilayer fusion, bilayer melting, lipid mixtures, rafts, and protein-bilayer interactions.

  2. Incorporation of surface tension into molecular dynamics simulation of an interface: a fluid phase lipid bilayer membrane.

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, S W; Clark, M; Balaji, V; Subramaniam, S; Scott, H L; Jakobsson, E

    1995-01-01

    In this paper we report on the molecular dynamics simulation of a fluid phase hydrated dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine bilayer. The initial configuration of the lipid was the x-ray crystal structure. A distinctive feature of this simulation is that, upon heating the system, the fluid phase emerged from parameters, initial conditions, and boundary conditions determined independently of the collective properties of the fluid phase. The initial conditions did not include chain disorder characteristic of the fluid phase. The partial charges on the lipids were determined by ab initio self-consistent field calculations and required no adjustment to produce a fluid phase. The boundary conditions were constant pressure and temperature. Thus the membrane was not explicitly required to assume an area/phospholipid molecule thought to be characteristic of the fluid phase, as is the case in constant volume simulations. Normal to the membrane plane, the pressure was 1 atmosphere, corresponding to the normal laboratory situation. Parallel to the membrane plane a negative pressure of -100 atmospheres was applied, derived from the measured surface tension of a monolayer at an air-water interface. The measured features of the computed membrane are generally in close agreement with experiment. Our results confirm the concept that, for appropriately matched temperature and surface pressure, a monolayer is a close approximation to one-half of a bilayer. Our results suggest that the surface area per phospholipid molecule for fluid phosphatidylcholine bilayer membranes is smaller than has generally been assumed in computational studies at constant volume. Our results confirm that the basis of the measured dipole potential is primarily water orientations and also suggest the presence of potential barriers for the movement of positive charges across the water-headgroup interfacial region of the phospholipid. Images FIGURE 2 PMID:8534794

  3. Effect of intra-membrane C60 fullerenes on the modulus of elasticity and the mechanical resistance of gel and fluid lipid bilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jihan; Liang, Dehai; Contera, Sonia

    2015-10-01

    Penetration and partition of C60 to the lipid bilayer core are both relevant to C60 toxicity, and useful to realise C60 biomedical potential. A key aspect is the effect of C60 on bilayer mechanical properties. Here, we present an experimental study on the mechanical effect of the incorporation of C60 into the hydrophobic core of fluid and gel phase zwitterionic phosphatidylcholine (PC) lipid bilayers. We demonstrate its incorporation inside the hydrophobic lipid core and the effect on the packing of the lipids and the vesicle size using a combination of infrared (IR) spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy (AFM) and laser light scattering. Using AFM we measured the Young's modulus of elasticity (E) of 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC), 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DMPC) and 1,2-distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DSPC) in the absence (presence) of intra-membranous C60 at 24.5 °C. E of fluid phase supported bilayers is not altered by C60, but E increases with incorporation of C60 in gel phase bilayers. The increase is higher for longer hydrocarbon chains: 1.6 times for DPPC and 2 times for DSPC. However the mechanical resistance of gel phase bilayers of curved bilayered structures decreases with the incorporation of C60. Our combined results indicate that C60 causes a decrease in gel phase lipid mobility, i.e. an increase in membrane viscosity.

  4. Solvent-free model for self-assembling fluid bilayer membranes: Stabilization of the fluid phase based on broad attractive tail potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooke, Ira R.; Deserno, Markus

    2005-12-01

    We present a simple and highly adaptable method for simulating coarse-grained lipid membranes without explicit solvent. Lipids are represented by one head bead and two tail beads, with the interaction between tails being of key importance in stabilizing the fluid phase. Two such tail-tail potentials were tested, with the important feature in both cases being a variable range of attraction. We examined phase diagrams of this range versus temperature for both functional forms of the tail-tail attraction and found that a certain threshold attractive width was required to stabilize the fluid phase. Within the fluid-phase region we find that material properties such as area per lipid, orientational order, diffusion constant, interleaflet flip-flop rate, and bilayer stiffness all depend strongly and monotonically on the attractive width. For three particular values of the potential width we investigate the transition between gel and fluid phases via heating or cooling and find that this transition is discontinuous with considerable hysteresis. We also investigated the stretching of a bilayer to eventually form a pore and found excellent agreement with recent analytic theory.

  5. Equilibrium Configurations of Lipid Bilayer Membranes and Carbon Nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivaïlo, M. Mladenov; Peter, A. Djondjorov; Mariana, Ts. Hadzhilazova; Vassil, M. Vassilev

    2013-02-01

    The present article concerns the continuum modelling of the mechanical behaviour and equilibrium shapes of two types of nano-scale objects: fluid lipid bilayer membranes and carbon nanostructures. A unified continuum model is used to handle four different case studies. Two of them consist in representing in analytic form cylindrical and axisymmetric equilibrium configurations of single-wall carbon nanotubes and fluid lipid bilayer membranes subjected to uniform hydrostatic pressure. The third one is concerned with determination of possible shapes of junctions between a single-wall carbon nanotube and a fiat graphene sheet or another single-wall carbon nanotube. The last one deals with the mechanical behaviour of closed fluid lipid bilayer membranes (vesicles) adhering onto a fiat homogeneous rigid substrate subjected to micro-injection and uniform hydrostatic pressure.

  6. Photon correlation spectroscopy of bilayer lipid membranes.

    PubMed

    Crilly, J F; Earnshaw, J C

    1983-02-01

    Light scattering by thermal fluctuations on simple monoglyceride bilayer membranes has been used to investigate the viscoelastic properties of these structures. Spectroscopic analysis of these fluctuations (capillary waves) permits the nonperturbative measurement of the interfacial tension and a shear interfacial viscosity acting normal to the membrane plane. The methods were established by studies of solvent and nonsolvent bilayers of glycerol monooleate (GMO). Changes in the tension of GMO/n-decane membranes induced by altering the composition of the parent solution were detected and quantified. In a test of the reliability of the technique controlled variations of the viscosity of the aqueous bathing solution were accurately monitored. The technique was applied to solvent-free bilayers formed from dispersions of GMO in squalane. The lower tensions observed attested to the comparative absence of solvent in such bilayers. In contrast to the solvent case, the solvent-free membranes exhibited a significant transverse shear viscosity, indicative of the enhanced intermolecular interactions within the bilayer.

  7. Interaction of n-octyl β,D-glucopyranoside with giant magnetic-fluid-loaded phosphatidylcholine vesicles: direct visualization of membrane curvature fluctuations as a function of surfactant partitioning between water and lipid bilayer.

    PubMed

    Ménager, Christine; Guemghar, Dihya; Cabuil, Valérie; Lesieur, Sylviane

    2010-10-01

    The present study deals with the morphological modifications of giant dioleoyl phosphatidylcholine vesicles (DOPC GUVs) induced by the nonionic surfactant n-octyl β,D-glucopyranoside at sublytic levels, i.e., in the first steps of the vesicle-to-micelle transition process, when surfactant inserts into the vesicle bilayer without disruption. Experimental conditions were perfected to exactly control the surfactant bilayer composition of the vesicles, in line with former work focused on the mechanical properties of the membrane of magnetic-fluid-loaded DOPC GUVs submitted to a magnetic field. The purpose here was to systematically examine, in the absence of any external mechanical constraint, the dynamics of giant vesicle shape and membrane deformations as a function of surfactant partitioning between the aqueous phase and the lipid membrane, beforehand established by turbidity measurements from small unilamellar vesicles. PMID:20825201

  8. Design of Asymmetric Peptide Bilayer Membranes.

    PubMed

    Li, Sha; Mehta, Anil K; Sidorov, Anton N; Orlando, Thomas M; Jiang, Zhigang; Anthony, Neil R; Lynn, David G

    2016-03-16

    Energetic insights emerging from the structural characterization of peptide cross-β assemblies have enabled the design and construction of robust asymmetric bilayer peptide membranes. Two peptides differing only in their N-terminal residue, phosphotyrosine vs lysine, coassemble as stacks of antiparallel β-sheets with precisely patterned charged lattices stabilizing the bilayer leaflet interface. Either homogeneous or mixed leaflet composition is possible, and both create nanotubes with dense negative external and positive internal solvent exposed surfaces. Cross-seeding peptide solutions with a preassembled peptide nanotube seed leads to domains of different leaflet architecture within single nanotubes. Architectural control over these cross-β assemblies, both across the bilayer membrane and along the nanotube length, provides access to highly ordered asymmetric membranes for the further construction of functional mesoscale assemblies.

  9. Integral Membrane Proteins and Bilayer Proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Whitelegge, Julian P.

    2013-01-01

    Integral membrane proteins reside within the bilayer membranes that surround cells and organelles, playing critical roles in movement of molecules across them and the transduction of energy and signals. While their extreme amphipathicity presents technical challenges, biological mass spectrometry has been applied to all aspects of membrane protein chemistry and biology, including analysis of primary, secondary, tertiary and quaternary structure, as well as the dynamics that accompany functional cycles and catalysis. PMID:23301778

  10. Bilayer membrane interactions with nanofabricated scaffolds

    SciTech Connect

    Collier, C. Patrick

    2015-07-29

    Membrane function is facilitated by lateral organization within the lipid bilayer, including phase-separation of lipids into more ordered domains (lipid rafts) and anchoring of the membrane to a cytoskeleton. These features have proven difficult to reproduce in model membrane systems such as black lipid membranes, unilamellar vesicles and supported bilayers. However, advances in micro/nanofabrication have resulted in more realistic synthetic models of membrane-cytoskeleton interactions that can help uncover the design rules responsible for biological membrane formation and organization. This review will focus on describing micro-/nanostructured scaffolds that can emulate the connections of a cellular membrane to an underlying “cytoskeleton”. This includes molecular-based scaffolds anchored to a solid substrate through surface chemistry, solid-state supports modified by material deposition, lithography and etching, the creation of micro/nanoporous arrays, integration with microfluidics, and droplet-based bilayers at interfaces. Lastly, model systems such as these are increasing our understanding of structure and organization in cell membranes, and how they result in the emergence of functionality at the nanoscale.

  11. Bilayer membrane interactions with nanofabricated scaffolds

    DOE PAGES

    Collier, C. Patrick

    2015-07-29

    Membrane function is facilitated by lateral organization within the lipid bilayer, including phase-separation of lipids into more ordered domains (lipid rafts) and anchoring of the membrane to a cytoskeleton. These features have proven difficult to reproduce in model membrane systems such as black lipid membranes, unilamellar vesicles and supported bilayers. However, advances in micro/nanofabrication have resulted in more realistic synthetic models of membrane-cytoskeleton interactions that can help uncover the design rules responsible for biological membrane formation and organization. This review will focus on describing micro-/nanostructured scaffolds that can emulate the connections of a cellular membrane to an underlying “cytoskeleton”. Thismore » includes molecular-based scaffolds anchored to a solid substrate through surface chemistry, solid-state supports modified by material deposition, lithography and etching, the creation of micro/nanoporous arrays, integration with microfluidics, and droplet-based bilayers at interfaces. Lastly, model systems such as these are increasing our understanding of structure and organization in cell membranes, and how they result in the emergence of functionality at the nanoscale.« less

  12. Engineering Lipid Bilayer Membranes for Protein Studies

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Muhammad Shuja; Dosoky, Noura Sayed; Williams, John Dalton

    2013-01-01

    Lipid membranes regulate the flow of nutrients and communication signaling between cells and protect the sub-cellular structures. Recent attempts to fabricate artificial systems using nanostructures that mimic the physiological properties of natural lipid bilayer membranes (LBM) fused with transmembrane proteins have helped demonstrate the importance of temperature, pH, ionic strength, adsorption behavior, conformational reorientation and surface density in cellular membranes which all affect the incorporation of proteins on solid surfaces. Much of this work is performed on artificial templates made of polymer sponges or porous materials based on alumina, mica, and porous silicon (PSi) surfaces. For example, porous silicon materials have high biocompatibility, biodegradability, and photoluminescence, which allow them to be used both as a support structure for lipid bilayers or a template to measure the electrochemical functionality of living cells grown over the surface as in vivo. The variety of these media, coupled with the complex physiological conditions present in living systems, warrant a summary and prospectus detailing which artificial systems provide the most promise for different biological conditions. This study summarizes the use of electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) data on artificial biological membranes that are closely matched with previously published biological systems using both black lipid membrane and patch clamp techniques. PMID:24185908

  13. Membrane fusion promoters and inhibitors have contrasting effects on lipid bilayer structure and undulations.

    PubMed

    McIntosh, T J; Kulkarni, K G; Simon, S A

    1999-04-01

    It has been established that the fusion of both biological membranes and phospholipid bilayers can be modulated by altering their lipid composition (Chernomordik et al., 1995 .J. Membr. Biol. 146:3). In particular, when added exogenously between apposing membranes, monomyristoylphosphatidylcholine (MMPC) inhibits membrane fusion, whereas glycerol monoleate (GMO), oleic acid (OA), and arachidonic acid (AA) promote fusion. This present study uses x-ray diffraction to investigate the effects of MMPC, GMO, OA, and AA on the bending and stability of lipid bilayers when bilayers are forced together with applied osmotic pressure. The addition of 10 and 30 mol% MMPC to egg phosphatidylcholine (EPC) bilayers maintains the bilayer structure, even when the interbilayer fluid spacing is reduced to approximately 3 A, and increases the repulsive pressure between bilayers so that the fluid spacing in excess water increases by 5 and 15 A, respectively. Thus MMPC increases the undulation pressure, implying that the addition of MMPC promotes out-of-plane bending and decreases the adhesion energy between bilayers. In contrast, the addition of GMO has minor effects on the undulation pressure; 10 and 50 mol% GMO increase the fluid spacing of EPC in excess water by 0 and 2 A, respectively. However, x-ray diffraction indicates that, at small interbilayer separations, GMO, OA, or AA converts the bilayer to a structure containing hexagonally packed scattering units approximately 50 A in diameter. Thus GMO, OA, or AA destabilizes bilayer structure as apposing bilayers are brought into contact, which could contribute to their role in promoting membrane fusion.

  14. Bilayer-thickness-mediated interactions between integral membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Kahraman, Osman; Koch, Peter D; Klug, William S; Haselwandter, Christoph A

    2016-04-01

    Hydrophobic thickness mismatch between integral membrane proteins and the surrounding lipid bilayer can produce lipid bilayer thickness deformations. Experiment and theory have shown that protein-induced lipid bilayer thickness deformations can yield energetically favorable bilayer-mediated interactions between integral membrane proteins, and large-scale organization of integral membrane proteins into protein clusters in cell membranes. Within the continuum elasticity theory of membranes, the energy cost of protein-induced bilayer thickness deformations can be captured by considering compression and expansion of the bilayer hydrophobic core, membrane tension, and bilayer bending, resulting in biharmonic equilibrium equations describing the shape of lipid bilayers for a given set of bilayer-protein boundary conditions. Here we develop a combined analytic and numerical methodology for the solution of the equilibrium elastic equations associated with protein-induced lipid bilayer deformations. Our methodology allows accurate prediction of thickness-mediated protein interactions for arbitrary protein symmetries at arbitrary protein separations and relative orientations. We provide exact analytic solutions for cylindrical integral membrane proteins with constant and varying hydrophobic thickness, and develop perturbative analytic solutions for noncylindrical protein shapes. We complement these analytic solutions, and assess their accuracy, by developing both finite element and finite difference numerical solution schemes. We provide error estimates of our numerical solution schemes and systematically assess their convergence properties. Taken together, the work presented here puts into place an analytic and numerical framework which allows calculation of bilayer-mediated elastic interactions between integral membrane proteins for the complicated protein shapes suggested by structural biology and at the small protein separations most relevant for the crowded membrane

  15. Phase transitions in planar bilayer membranes.

    PubMed

    White, S H

    1975-02-01

    Temperature-dependent structural changes in planar bilayer membranes formed from glycerol monooleate (GMO) dispersed in various n-alkane solvents (C12-C17) have been studied using precise measurements of specific geometric capacitance (Cg). Cg generally increases as temperature (T) decreases. A change in the slope of Cg(T) occurs between 15 and 18 degrees C for all solvent systems examined. Measurements of the interfacial tension (gamma) of the bulk GMO-alkane dispersions against 0.1 M NaCl show that gamma generally decreases with decreasing temperature. The data can be fitted with two straight lines of different slope which intersect on the average at 17 degrees C. Pagano et al. (1973, Science (Wash. D.C.). 181:557) have shown using calorimetry that GMO has a phase transition at about 15 degrees C. Thus, the changes in Cg and gamma with temperature are likely to result from a GMO phase transition. A second structural change is observed to occur between 5 and 10 degrees C which has not been detected calorimetrically. Calculations of Cg based on various estimates of the hydrocarbon dielectric coefficient (epsilon-b) and/or hydrocarbon thickness (delta-b) leads to models for the structure of the bilayer above and below the phase transition temperature.

  16. Topologically-Mediated Membrane Dynamics in Supported Lipid Bilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilmore, Sean Fitzpatrick

    2011-12-01

    This thesis is primarily design driven. It describes the development and application of dynamically tunable class of solid-fluid interfaces, which serves as a test-bed configuration for fundamental studies of soft condensed matter in reduced dimension. My specific focus is in developing these interfaces to recapitulate topology-mediated phenomenon in biological lipid membranes. The phenomena that the interfacial topology manifest in diffusional characteristics in model membranes are probed using wide-area epifluorescence microscopy and a semi-quantitative analysis of dynamic recovery following photobleaching. Furthermore, real-time remodeling of the membrane-substrate interface topology is shown to provide fundamental information regarding curvature-dependent molecular sorting and resorting. Specifically our experiments using putative raft composition mixtures confirm the conformation-dependent alignment of liquid-ordered domains and moreover reveal domain-domain interactions for the first time in model bilayers. Ongoing work aimed at delineating these inter-domain interactions in terms of membrane elastic properties is being performed. Future work that includes peptide-driven membrane deformation and sorting, as well large-scale, curvature-driven in vivo sorting of lipids is proposed and discussed.

  17. Dynamics and instabilities of lipid bilayer membrane shapes.

    PubMed

    Shi, Zheng; Baumgart, Tobias

    2014-06-01

    Biological membranes undergo constant shape remodeling involving the formation of highly curved structures. The lipid bilayer represents the fundamental architecture of the cellular membrane with its shapes determined by the Helfrich curvature bending energy. However, the dynamics of bilayer shape transitions, especially their modulation by membrane proteins, and the resulting shape instabilities, are still not well understood. Here, we review in a unifying manner several theories that describe the fluctuations (i.e. undulations) of bilayer shapes as well as their local coupling with lipid or protein density variation. The coupling between local membrane curvature and lipid density gives rise to a 'slipping mode' in addition to the conventional 'bending mode' for damping the membrane fluctuation. This leads to a number of interesting experimental phenomena regarding bilayer shape dynamics. More importantly, curvature-inducing proteins can couple with membrane shape and eventually render the membrane unstable. A criterion for membrane shape instability is derived from a linear stability analysis. The instability criterion reemphasizes the importance of membrane tension in regulating the stability and dynamics of membrane geometry. Recent progresses in understanding the role of membrane tension in regulating dynamical cellular processes are also reviewed. Protein density is emphasized as a key factor in regulating membrane shape transitions: a threshold density of curvature coupling proteins is required for inducing membrane morphology transitions. PMID:24529968

  18. Dynamics and instabilities of lipid bilayer membrane shapes

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Zheng; Baumgart, Tobias

    2014-01-01

    Biological membranes undergo constant shape remodeling involving the formation of highly curved structures. The lipid bilayer represents the fundamental architecture of the cellular membrane with its shapes determined by the Helfrich curvature bending energy. However, the dynamics of bilayer shape transitions, especially their modulation by membrane proteins, and the resulting shape instabilities, are still not well understood. Here, we review in a unifying manner several theories that describe the fluctuations (i.e. undulations) of bilayer shapes as well as their local coupling with lipid or protein density variation. The coupling between local membrane curvature and lipid density gives rise to a ‘slipping mode’ in addition to the conventional ‘bending mode’ for damping the membrane fluctuation. This leads to a number of interesting experimental phenomena regarding bilayer shape dynamics. More importantly, curvature-inducing proteins can couple with membrane shape and eventually render the membrane unstable. A criterion for membrane shape instability is derived from a linear stability analysis. The instability criterion reemphasizes the importance of membrane tension in regulating the stability and dynamics of membrane geometry. Recent progresses in understanding the role of membrane tension in regulating dynamical cellular processes are also reviewed. Protein density is emphasized as a key factor in regulating membrane shape transitions: a threshold density of curvature coupling proteins is required for inducing membrane morphology transitions. PMID:24529968

  19. Fusion and fission of fluid amphiphilic bilayers.

    PubMed

    Gotter, Martin; Strey, Reinhard; Olsson, Ulf; Wennerström, Håkan

    2005-01-01

    The system water-oil (n-decane)-nonionic surfactant (C12E5) forms bilayer phases in a large concentration region, but, for a given oil-to-surfactant ratio, only in a narrow temperature range. In addition to the anisotropic lamellar phase (Lalpha) there is also, at slightly higher temperature, a sponge or L3-phase where the bilayers build up an isotropic structure extending macroscopically in three dimensions. In this phase the bilayer mid-surface has a mean curvature close to zero and a negative Euler characteristic. In this paper we study how the bilayers in the lamellar and the sponge phase respond dynamically to sudden temperature changes. The monolayer spontaneous curvature depends sensitively on temperature and a change of temperature thus provides a driving force for a change in bilayer topology. The equilibration therefore involves kinetic steps of fusion/fission of bilayers. Such dynamic processes have previously been monitored by temperature jump experiments using light scattering in the sponge phase. These experiments revealed an extraordinarily strong dependence of the relaxation time on the bilayer volume fraction phi. At phi < 0.1 the relaxation times are so slow that experiments using deuterium nuclear magnetic resonance (2H-NMR) appear feasible. We here report on the first experiments concerned with the dynamics of the macroscopic phase transition sponge-lamellae by 2H-NMR. We find that the sponge-to-lamellae transition occurs through a nucleation process followed by domain growth involving bilayer fission at domain boundaries. In contrast, the lamellae-to-sponge transformation apparently occurs through a succession of uncorrelated bilayer fusion events. PMID:15715316

  20. Mechanism of unassisted ion transport across membrane bilayers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, M. A.; Pohorille, A.

    1996-01-01

    To establish how charged species move from water to the nonpolar membrane interior and to determine the energetic and structural effects accompanying this process, we performed molecular dynamics simulations of the transport of Na+ and Cl- across a lipid bilayer located between two water lamellae. The total length of molecular dynamics trajectories generated for each ion was 10 ns. Our simulations demonstrate that permeation of ions into the membrane is accompanied by the formation of deep, asymmetric thinning defects in the bilayer, whereby polar lipid head groups and water penetrate the nonpolar membrane interior. Once the ion crosses the midplane of the bilayer the deformation "switches sides"; the initial defect slowly relaxes, and a defect forms in the outgoing side of the bilayer. As a result, the ion remains well solvated during the process; the total number of oxygen atoms from water and lipid head groups in the first solvation shell remains constant. A similar membrane deformation is formed when the ion is instantaneously inserted into the interior of the bilayer. The formation of defects considerably lowers the free energy barrier to transfer of the ion across the bilayer and, consequently, increases the permeabilities of the membrane to ions, compared to the rigid, planar structure, by approximately 14 orders of magnitude. Our results have implications for drug delivery using liposomes and peptide insertion into membranes.

  1. Mechanism of unassisted ion transport across membrane bilayers.

    PubMed

    Wilson, M A; Pohorille, A

    1996-07-17

    To establish how charged species move from water to the nonpolar membrane interior and to determine the energetic and structural effects accompanying this process, we performed molecular dynamics simulations of the transport of Na+ and Cl- across a lipid bilayer located between two water lamellae. The total length of molecular dynamics trajectories generated for each ion was 10 ns. Our simulations demonstrate that permeation of ions into the membrane is accompanied by the formation of deep, asymmetric thinning defects in the bilayer, whereby polar lipid head groups and water penetrate the nonpolar membrane interior. Once the ion crosses the midplane of the bilayer the deformation "switches sides"; the initial defect slowly relaxes, and a defect forms in the outgoing side of the bilayer. As a result, the ion remains well solvated during the process; the total number of oxygen atoms from water and lipid head groups in the first solvation shell remains constant. A similar membrane deformation is formed when the ion is instantaneously inserted into the interior of the bilayer. The formation of defects considerably lowers the free energy barrier to transfer of the ion across the bilayer and, consequently, increases the permeabilities of the membrane to ions, compared to the rigid, planar structure, by approximately 14 orders of magnitude. Our results have implications for drug delivery using liposomes and peptide insertion into membranes.

  2. Theory of periodic structures in lipid bilayer membranes

    PubMed Central

    Falkovitz, Meira S.; Seul, Michael; Frisch, Harry L.; McConnell, Harden M.

    1982-01-01

    An approximate, new model for the structure of the periodic, undulated Pβ′, phase of phosphatidylcholine bilayers is proposed. The properties of this phase are deduced by minimizing a Landau-de Gennes expression for the bilayer free energy when this free energy contains a term favoring a spontaneous curvature of the membrane. The theoretical calculation leads to a model for the Pβ′ phase of phosphatidylcholine bilayers having a number of novel physical properties, including periodic variations in membrane “fluidity.” PMID:16593202

  3. [Calcium-induced changes in bilayer membranes from oxidized cholesterol].

    PubMed

    Hianik, T; Miklovichova, J; Foltinova, O; Bajchi, A

    1985-01-01

    Elastic properties of oxidized cholesterol bilayers in n-octane and membrane solvent free were studied by measuring Young modulus E perpendicular in the direction perpendicular to the membrane plane as a function of concentration of calcium ions. Interaction between calcium ions and solvent free bilayers resulted in a significant increases of Young modulus E perpendicular in the concentration range 20-40 mmol/l Ca2+. It is suggested that the hardening of the membrane is caused by some structural changes in the hydrophobic region of the membrane.

  4. Tethered and Polymer Supported Bilayer Lipid Membranes: Structure and Function

    PubMed Central

    Andersson, Jakob; Köper, Ingo

    2016-01-01

    Solid supported bilayer lipid membranes are model systems to mimic natural cell membranes in order to understand structural and functional properties of such systems. The use of a model system allows for the use of a wide variety of analytical tools including atomic force microscopy, impedance spectroscopy, neutron reflectometry, and surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy. Among the large number of different types of model membranes polymer-supported and tethered lipid bilayers have been shown to be versatile and useful systems. Both systems consist of a lipid bilayer, which is de-coupled from an underlying support by a spacer cushion. Both systems will be reviewed, with an emphasis on the effect that the spacer moiety has on the bilayer properties. PMID:27249006

  5. Tethered and Polymer Supported Bilayer Lipid Membranes: Structure and Function.

    PubMed

    Andersson, Jakob; Köper, Ingo

    2016-01-01

    Solid supported bilayer lipid membranes are model systems to mimic natural cell membranes in order to understand structural and functional properties of such systems. The use of a model system allows for the use of a wide variety of analytical tools including atomic force microscopy, impedance spectroscopy, neutron reflectometry, and surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy. Among the large number of different types of model membranes polymer-supported and tethered lipid bilayers have been shown to be versatile and useful systems. Both systems consist of a lipid bilayer, which is de-coupled from an underlying support by a spacer cushion. Both systems will be reviewed, with an emphasis on the effect that the spacer moiety has on the bilayer properties. PMID:27249006

  6. Viscoelastic changes measured in partially suspended single bilayer membranes.

    PubMed

    Hasan, Imad Younus; Mechler, Adam

    2015-07-21

    For studies involving biomimetic phospholipid membrane systems, such as membrane-protein interactions, it is crucial that the supported membrane is biomimetic in its physical properties as well as in its composition. Two often overlooked aspects of biomimicry are the need for unrestrained lipid mobility, reflected in the viscoelastic properties of the membrane, and sufficient space between the membrane and the support for the insertion of transmembrane proteins. Here we show for a series of DMPC-based membranes that a partially suspended single bilayer membrane can be formed on functionalized gold surface without tethering. These membranes exhibit sufficient freedom of motion to represent the viscoelastic properties of a free lamellar bilayer membrane as demonstrated by determining the phase transition temperatures of these single bilayer membranes from the viscosity change upon chain melting using the dissipation signal of a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM-D). Atomic force microscopy imaging confirmed confluent, smooth membrane coverage of the QCM-D sensor that completely obscured the roughness of the sputtered gold surface. High-force AFM imaging was able to push membrane patches into the valleys of the gold morphology, confirming the inherently suspended nature of the MPA supported membrane. We show that the correlation between frequency and dissipation changes in the QCM-D sensograms is a sensitive indicator of the morphology of the membrane. PMID:26073288

  7. Galactocerebroside-phospholipid interactions in bilayer membranes.

    PubMed

    Ruocco, M J; Shipley, G G; Oldfield, E

    1983-07-01

    Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and x-ray diffraction have been used to study the interaction of hydrated N-palmitoylgalactosylsphingosine (NPGS) and dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC). For mixtures containing less than 23 mol% NPGS, complete miscibility of NPGS into hydrated DPPC bilayers is observed in both the bilayer gel and liquid-crystal phases. X-ray diffraction data demonstrate insignificant differences in the DPPC-bilayer gel-phase parameters on incorporation of up to 23 mol% NPGS. At greater than 23 mol% NPGS, additional high-temperature transitions occur, indicating phase separation of cerebroside. For these cerebroside concentrations, at 20 degrees C, x-ray diffraction shows two lamellar phases, hydrated DPPC-NPGS gel bilayers (d = 64 A) containing 23 mol% NPGS, and NPGS "crystal" bilayers (d = 55 A). On heating to temperatures greater than 45 degrees C, the mixed DPPC-NPGS bilayer phase undergoes chain melting, and on further increasing the temperature progressively more NPGS is incorporated into the liquid-crystal DPPC-NPGS bilayer phase. At temperatures greater than 82 degrees C (the transition temperature of hydrated NPGS), complete lipid miscibility is observed at all DPPC/NPGS molar ratios.

  8. Anthrax toxin-induced rupture of artificial lipid bilayer membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nablo, Brian J.; Panchal, Rekha G.; Bavari, Sina; Nguyen, Tam L.; Gussio, Rick; Ribot, Wil; Friedlander, Art; Chabot, Donald; Reiner, Joseph E.; Robertson, Joseph W. F.; Balijepalli, Arvind; Halverson, Kelly M.; Kasianowicz, John J.

    2013-08-01

    We demonstrate experimentally that anthrax toxin complexes rupture artificial lipid bilayer membranes when isolated from the blood of infected animals. When the solution pH is temporally acidified to mimic that process in endosomes, recombinant anthrax toxin forms an irreversibly bound complex, which also destabilizes membranes. The results suggest an alternative mechanism for the translocation of anthrax toxin into the cytoplasm.

  9. Cyclic and Linear Monoterpenes in Phospholipid Membranes: Phase Behavior, Bilayer Structure, and Molecular Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Pham, Quoc Dat; Topgaard, Daniel; Sparr, Emma

    2015-10-13

    Monoterpenes are abundant in essential oils extracted from plants. These relatively small and hydrophobic molecules have shown important biological functions, including antimicrobial activity and membrane penetration enhancement. The interaction between the monoterpenes and lipid bilayers is considered important to the understanding of the biological functions of monoterpenes. In this study, we investigated the effect of cyclic and linear monoterpenes on the structure and dynamics of lipids in model membranes. We have studied the ternary system 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine-monoterpene-water as a model with a focus on dehydrated conditions. By combining complementary techniques, including differential scanning calorimetry, solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance, and small- and wide-angle X-ray scattering, bilayer structure, phase transitions, and lipid molecular dynamics were investigated at different water contents. Monoterpenes cause pronounced melting point depression and phase segregation in lipid bilayers, and the extent of these effects depends on the hydration conditions. The addition of a small amount of thymol to the fluid bilayer (volume fraction of 0.03 in the bilayer) leads to an increased order in the acyl chain close to the bilayer interface. The findings are discussed in relation to biological systems and lipid formulations. PMID:26375869

  10. Modeling Nanoparticle Wrapping or Translocation in Bilayer Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Curtis, Emily M.; Bahrami, Amir H.; Weikl, Thomas R.; Hall, Carol K.

    2015-01-01

    The spontaneous wrapping of nanoparticles by membranes is of increasing interest as nanoparticles become more prevalent in consumer products and hence more likely to enter the human body. We introduce a simulations-based tool that can be used to visualize the molecular level interaction between nanoparticles and bilayer membranes. By combining LIME, an intermediate resolution, implicit solvent model for phospholipids, with discontinuous molecular dynamics (DMD), we are able to simulate the wrapping or embedding of nanoparticles by 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC) bilayer membranes. Simulations of hydrophilic nanoparticles with diameters from 10Å to 250Å show that hydrophilic nanoparticles with diameters greater than 20Å become wrapped while the nanoparticle with a diameter of 10Å does not . Instead this smaller particle became embedded in the bilayer surface where it could interact with the hydrophilic head groups of the lipid molecules. We also investigate the interaction between a DPPC bilayer and hydrophobic nanoparticles with diameters 10Å to 40Å. These nanoparticles do not undergo the wrapping process; instead they directly penetrate the membrane and embed themselves within the inner hydrophobic core of the bilayers. PMID:26260123

  11. Modeling nanoparticle wrapping or translocation in bilayer membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curtis, Emily M.; Bahrami, Amir H.; Weikl, Thomas R.; Hall, Carol K.

    2015-08-01

    The spontaneous wrapping of nanoparticles by membranes is of increasing interest as nanoparticles become more prevalent in consumer products and hence more likely to enter the human body. We introduce a simulations-based tool that can be used to visualize the molecular level interaction between nanoparticles and bilayer membranes. By combining LIME, an intermediate resolution, implicit solvent model for phospholipids, with discontinuous molecular dynamics (DMD), we are able to simulate the wrapping or embedding of nanoparticles by 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC) bilayer membranes. Simulations of hydrophilic nanoparticles with diameters from 10 Å to 250 Å show that hydrophilic nanoparticles with diameters greater than 20 Å become wrapped while the nanoparticle with a diameter of 10 Å does not. Instead this smaller particle became embedded in the bilayer surface where it can interact with the hydrophilic head groups of the lipid molecules. We also investigate the interaction between a DPPC bilayer and hydrophobic nanoparticles with diameters 10 Å to 40 Å. These nanoparticles do not undergo the wrapping process; instead they directly penetrate the membrane and embed themselves within the inner hydrophobic core of the bilayers.

  12. Modeling nanoparticle wrapping or translocation in bilayer membranes.

    PubMed

    Curtis, Emily M; Bahrami, Amir H; Weikl, Thomas R; Hall, Carol K

    2015-09-14

    The spontaneous wrapping of nanoparticles by membranes is of increasing interest as nanoparticles become more prevalent in consumer products and hence more likely to enter the human body. We introduce a simulations-based tool that can be used to visualize the molecular level interaction between nanoparticles and bilayer membranes. By combining LIME, an intermediate resolution, implicit solvent model for phospholipids, with discontinuous molecular dynamics (DMD), we are able to simulate the wrapping or embedding of nanoparticles by 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC) bilayer membranes. Simulations of hydrophilic nanoparticles with diameters from 10 Å to 250 Å show that hydrophilic nanoparticles with diameters greater than 20 Å become wrapped while the nanoparticle with a diameter of 10 Å does not. Instead this smaller particle became embedded in the bilayer surface where it can interact with the hydrophilic head groups of the lipid molecules. We also investigate the interaction between a DPPC bilayer and hydrophobic nanoparticles with diameters 10 Å to 40 Å. These nanoparticles do not undergo the wrapping process; instead they directly penetrate the membrane and embed themselves within the inner hydrophobic core of the bilayers.

  13. Homogeneous immunoassay based on dihexadecyl-dimethylammonium bilayer membranes.

    PubMed

    Ihara, H; Imamura, T; Kunitake, T; Hirayama, C

    1988-06-30

    We describe a rapid, highly sensitive, simple immunoassay based on cationic bilayer membranes prepared from dihexadecyl-dimethylammonium bromide. This detergent was dispersed in water to give a slightly turbid solution which contained lamellar (not vesicular) bilayer membranes with a gel to liquid crystal phase transition (Tc, 28 degrees C). An anionic hapten (N,N'-bis(2,4-dinitrophenyl)-L-lysine) combined electrostatically with this cationic membrane to induce aggregation of membranes, making the solution turbid. This aggregation was suppressed by antibodies to the hapten. The aggregation rate was rapid at a temperature above Tc, and the amount of antibodies was quantified by measuring absorbance or light scattering of the aqueous solution with a detection limit of 0.1 ng/ml of the antibodies. Anionic and zwitterionic bilayer membranes from di(tetradecyl)phosphate and phosphocholine derivatives, respectively, were less sensitive as detectors of the hapten-antibody reaction. Ionic interactions between cationic bilayer membranes and anionic haptens are important for successful assay performance.

  14. Structure of sphingomyelin bilayers and complexes with cholesterol forming membrane rafts.

    PubMed

    Quinn, Peter J

    2013-07-30

    Sphingomyelin and cholesterol are of interest to biologists because they interact to form condensed structures said to be responsible for a variety of functions that membranes perform. Synchrotron X-ray diffraction methods have been used to investigate the structure of bilayers of D-erythro palmitoyl-sphingomyelin and complexes formed by palmitoyl- and egg-sphingomyelin with cholesterol in aqueous multibilayer dispersions. D-erythro palmitoyl sphingomyelin bilayers exist in two conformers that are distinguished by their lamellar repeat spacing, bilayer thickness, and polar group hydration. The distinction is attributed to hydrogen bonding to water or to intermolecular hydrogen bonds that are disrupted by the formation of ripple structure. The coexisting bilayer structures of pure palmitoyl sphingomyelin are observed in the presence of cholesterol-rich bilayers that are characterized by different bilayer parameters. The presence of cholesterol preferentially affects the conformer of D-erythro sphingomyelin with thicker, more hydrated bilayers. Coexisting bilayers of sphingomyelin and complexes with cholesterol are in register and remain coupled at temperatures at least up to 50 °C. Cholesterol forms a complex of 1.8 mols of sphingomyelin per cholesterol at 37 °C that coexists with bilayers of pure sphingomyelin up to 50 °C. Redistribution of the two lipids takes place on cooling below the fluid- to gel-phase transition temperature, resulting in the withdrawal of sphingomyelin into gel phase and the formation of coexisting bilayers of equimolar proportions of the two lipids. Cholesterol-rich bilayers fit a stripe model at temperatures less than 37 °C characterized by alternating rows of sphingomyelin and cholesterol molecules. A quasicrystalline array models the arrangement at higher temperatures in which each cholesterol molecule is surrounded by seven hydrocarbon chains, each of which is in contact with two cholesterol molecules. The thickness of bilayer

  15. Structure and dynamics of water and lipid molecules in charged anionic DMPG lipid bilayer membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rønnest, A. K.; Peters, G. H.; Hansen, F. Y.; Taub, H.; Miskowiec, A.

    2016-04-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations have been used to investigate the influence of the valency of counter-ions on the structure of freestanding bilayer membranes of the anionic 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoglycerol (DMPG) lipid at 310 K and 1 atm. At this temperature, the membrane is in the fluid phase with a monovalent counter-ion and in the gel phase with a divalent counter-ion. The diffusion constant of water as a function of its depth in the membrane has been determined from mean-square-displacement calculations. Also, calculated incoherent quasielastic neutron scattering functions have been compared to experimental results and used to determine an average diffusion constant for all water molecules in the system. On extrapolating the diffusion constants inferred experimentally to a temperature of 310 K, reasonable agreement with the simulations is obtained. However, the experiments do not have the sensitivity to confirm the diffusion of a small component of water bound to the lipids as found in the simulations. In addition, the orientation of the dipole moment of the water molecules has been determined as a function of their depth in the membrane. Previous indirect estimates of the electrostatic potential within phospholipid membranes imply an enormous electric field of 108-109 V m-1, which is likely to have great significance in controlling the conformation of translocating membrane proteins and in the transfer of ions and molecules across the membrane. We have calculated the membrane potential for DMPG bilayers and found ˜1 V (˜2 ṡ 108 V m-1) when in the fluid phase with a monovalent counter-ion and ˜1.4 V (˜2.8 ṡ 108 V m-1) when in the gel phase with a divalent counter-ion. The number of water molecules for a fully hydrated DMPG membrane has been estimated to be 9.7 molecules per lipid in the gel phase and 17.5 molecules in the fluid phase, considerably smaller than inferred experimentally for 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphorylcholine (DMPC

  16. Elastic deformation and failure of lipid bilayer membranes containing cholesterol.

    PubMed Central

    Needham, D; Nunn, R S

    1990-01-01

    Giant bilayer vesicles were reconstituted from several lipids and lipid/cholesterol (CHOL) mixtures: stearolyloleoylphosphatidylcholine (SOPC), bovine sphingomyelin (BSM), diarachidonylphosphatidylcholine (DAPC), SOPC/CHOL, BSM/CHOL, DAPC/CHOL, and extracted red blood cell (RBC) lipids with native cholesterol. Single-walled vesicles were manipulated by micropipette suction and several membrane material properties were determined. The properties measured were the elastic area compressibility modulus K, the critical areal strain alpha c, and the tensile strength tau lys, from which the failure energy or membrane toughness Tf was calculated. The elastic area expansion moduli for these lipid and lipid/cholesterol bilayers ranged from 57 dyn/cm for DAPC to 1,734 dyn/cm for BSM/CHOL. The SOPC/CHOL series and RBC lipids had intermediate values. The results indicated that the presence of cholesterol is the single most influential factor in increasing bilayer cohesion, but only for lipids where both chains are saturated, or mono- or diunsaturated. Multiple unsaturation in both lipid chains inhibits the condensing effect of cholesterol in bilayers. The SOPC/CHOL system was studied in more detail. The area expansion modulus showed a nonlinear increase with increasing cholesterol concentration up to a constant plateau, indicating a saturation limit for cholesterol in the bilayer phase of approximately 55 mol% CHOL. The membrane compressibility was modeled by a property-averaging composite theory involving two bilayer components, namely, uncomplexed lipid and a lipid/cholesterol complex of stoichiometry 1/1.22. The area expansion modulus of this molecular composite membrane was evaluated by a combination of the expansion moduli of each component scaled by their area fractions in the bilayer. Bilayer toughness, which is the energy stored in the bilayer at failure, showed a maximum value at approximately 40 mol% CHOL. This breakdown energy was found to be only a fraction of the

  17. Supported lipid bilayer membranes for water purification by reverse osmosis.

    PubMed

    Kaufman, Yair; Berman, Amir; Freger, Viatcheslav

    2010-05-18

    Some biological plasma membranes pass water with a permeability and selectivity largely exceeding those of commercial membranes for water desalination using specialized trans-membrane proteins aquaporins. However, highly selective transport of water through aquaporins is usually driven by an osmotic rather mechanical pressure, which is not as attractive from the engineering point of view. The feasibility of adopting biomimetic membranes for water purification driven by a mechanical pressure, i.e., filtration is explored in this paper. Toward this goal, it is proposed to use a commercial nanofiltration (NF) membrane as a support for biomimetic lipid bilayer membranes to render them robust enough to withstand the required pressures. It is shown in this paper for the first time that by properly tuning molecular interactions supported phospholipid bilayers (SPB) can be prepared on a commercial NF membrane. The presence of SPB on the surface was verified and quantified by several spectroscopic and microscopic techniques, which showed morphology close to the desired one with very few defects. As an ultimate test it is shown that hydraulic permeability of the SPB supported on the NF membrane (NTR-7450) approaches the values deduced from the typical osmotic permeabilities of intact continuous bilayers. This permeability was unaffected by the trans-membrane flow of water and by repeatedly releasing and reapplying a 10 bar pressure. Along with a parallel demonstration that aquaporins could be incorporated in a similar bilayer on mica, this demonstrates the feasibility of the proposed approach. The prepared SPB structure may be used as a platform for preparing biomimetic filtration membranes with superior performance based on aquaporins. The concept of SPBs on permeable substrates of the present type may also be useful in the future for studying transport of various molecules through trans-membrane proteins. PMID:20099798

  18. Supported lipid bilayer membranes for water purification by reverse osmosis.

    PubMed

    Kaufman, Yair; Berman, Amir; Freger, Viatcheslav

    2010-05-18

    Some biological plasma membranes pass water with a permeability and selectivity largely exceeding those of commercial membranes for water desalination using specialized trans-membrane proteins aquaporins. However, highly selective transport of water through aquaporins is usually driven by an osmotic rather mechanical pressure, which is not as attractive from the engineering point of view. The feasibility of adopting biomimetic membranes for water purification driven by a mechanical pressure, i.e., filtration is explored in this paper. Toward this goal, it is proposed to use a commercial nanofiltration (NF) membrane as a support for biomimetic lipid bilayer membranes to render them robust enough to withstand the required pressures. It is shown in this paper for the first time that by properly tuning molecular interactions supported phospholipid bilayers (SPB) can be prepared on a commercial NF membrane. The presence of SPB on the surface was verified and quantified by several spectroscopic and microscopic techniques, which showed morphology close to the desired one with very few defects. As an ultimate test it is shown that hydraulic permeability of the SPB supported on the NF membrane (NTR-7450) approaches the values deduced from the typical osmotic permeabilities of intact continuous bilayers. This permeability was unaffected by the trans-membrane flow of water and by repeatedly releasing and reapplying a 10 bar pressure. Along with a parallel demonstration that aquaporins could be incorporated in a similar bilayer on mica, this demonstrates the feasibility of the proposed approach. The prepared SPB structure may be used as a platform for preparing biomimetic filtration membranes with superior performance based on aquaporins. The concept of SPBs on permeable substrates of the present type may also be useful in the future for studying transport of various molecules through trans-membrane proteins.

  19. Interaction of 3β-amino-5-cholestene with phospholipids in binary and ternary bilayer membranes

    PubMed Central

    Lönnfors, Max; Engberg, Oskar; Peterson, Blake R.; Slotte, J. Peter

    2011-01-01

    3β-Amino-5-cholestene (aminocholesterol) is a synthetic sterol whose properties in bilayer membranes have been examined. In fluid palmitoyl sphingomyelin (PSM) bilayers, aminocholesterol and cholesterol were equally effective in increasing acyl chain order, based on changes in diphenylhexatriene (DPH) anisotropy. In fluid 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC) bilayers, aminocholesterol ordered acyl chains, but slightly less efficiently than cholesterol. Aminocholesterol eliminated the PSM and DPPC gel-to-liquid crystalline phase transition enthalpy linearly with concentration, and the enthalpy approached zero at 30 mol% sterol. Whereas cholesterol was able to increase the thermostability of ordered PSM domains in a fluid bilayer, aminocholesterol under equal conditions failed to do this, suggesting that its interaction with PSM was not as favorable as cholesterol’s. In ternary mixed bilayers, containing 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC), PSM or DPPC, and cholesterol at proportions to contain a liquid-ordered phase (60:40 by mol of POPC and PSM or DPPC, and 30 mol% cholesterol), the average life-time of trans parinaric acid (tPA) was close to 20 ns. When cholesterol was replaced with aminocholesterol in such mixed bilayers, the average life-time of tPA was only marginally shorter (about 18 ns). This observation, together with acyl chain ordering data, clearly shows that aminocholesterol was able to form a liquid-ordered phase with saturated PSM or DPPC. We conclude that aminocholesterol should be a good sterol replacement in model membrane systems for which a partial positive charge is deemed beneficial. PMID:22128897

  20. Effect of cholesterol on the lateral nanoscale dynamics of fluid membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, Clare L; Barrett, M; Heiss, Arno; Salditt, Tim; Katsaras, John; Shi, An-Chang; Rheinstadter, Maikel C

    2012-01-01

    Inelastic neutron scattering was used to study the effect of 5 and 40 mol% cholesterol on the lateral nanoscale dynamics of phospholipid membranes. By measuring the excitation spectrum at several lateral q || values (up to q || = 3 1), complete dispersion curves were determined of gel, fluid and liquid-ordered phase bilayers. The inclusion of cholesterol had a distinct effect on the collective dynamics of the bilayer s hydrocarbon chains; specifically, we observed a pronounced stiffening of the membranes on the nanometer length scale in both gel and fluid bilayers, even though they were experiencing a higher degree of molecular disorder. Also, for the first time we determined the nanoscale dynamics in the high-cholesterol liquid-ordered phase of bilayers containing cholesterol. Namely, this phase appears to be softer than fluid bilayers, but better ordered than bilayers in the gel phase.

  1. Spontaneous curvature of bilayer membranes from molecular simulations: Asymmetric lipid densities and asymmetric adsorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    RóŻycki, Bartosz; Lipowsky, Reinhard

    2015-02-01

    Biomimetic and biological membranes consist of molecular bilayers with two leaflets which are typically exposed to different aqueous environments and may differ in their molecular density or composition. Because of these asymmetries, the membranes prefer to curve in a certain manner as quantitatively described by their spontaneous curvature. Here, we study such asymmetric membranes via coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations. We consider two mechanisms for the generation of spontaneous curvature: (i) different lipid densities within the two leaflets and (ii) leaflets exposed to different concentrations of adsorbing particles. We focus on membranes that experience no mechanical tension and describe two methods to compute the spontaneous curvature. The first method is based on the detailed structure of the bilayer's stress profile which can hardly be measured experimentally. The other method starts from the intuitive view that the bilayer represents a thin fluid film bounded by two interfaces and reduces the complexity of the stress profile to a few membrane parameters that can be measured experimentally. For the case of asymmetric adsorption, we introduce a simulation protocol based on two bilayers separated by two aqueous compartments with different adsorbate concentrations. The adsorption of small particles with a size below 1 nm is shown to generate large spontaneous curvatures up to about 1/(24 nm). Our computational approach is quite general: it can be applied to any molecular model of bilayer membranes and can be extended to other mechanisms for the generation of spontaneous curvatures as provided, e.g., by asymmetric lipid composition or depletion layers of solute molecules.

  2. Penetration of Cell Membranes and Synthetic Lipid Bilayers by Nanoprobes

    PubMed Central

    Angle, Matthew R.; Wang, Andrew; Thomas, Aman; Schaefer, Andreas T.; Melosh, Nicholas A.

    2014-01-01

    Nanoscale devices have been proposed as tools for measuring and controlling intracellular activity by providing electrical and/or chemical access to the cytosol. Unfortunately, nanostructures with diameters of 50–500 nm do not readily penetrate the cell membrane, and rationally optimizing nanoprobes for cell penetration requires real-time characterization methods that are capable of following the process of membrane penetration with nanometer resolution. Although extensive work has examined the rupture of supported synthetic lipid bilayers, little is known about the applicability of these model systems to living cell membranes with complex lipid compositions, cytoskeletal attachment, and membrane proteins. Here, we describe atomic force microscopy (AFM) membrane penetration experiments in two parallel systems: live HEK293 cells and stacks of synthetic lipid bilayers. By using the same probes in both systems, we were able to clearly identify membrane penetration in synthetic bilayers and compare these events with putative membrane penetration events in cells. We examined membrane penetration forces for three tip geometries and 18 chemical modifications of the probe surface, and in all cases the median forces required to penetrate cellular and synthetic lipid bilayers with nanoprobes were greater than 1 nN. The penetration force was sensitive to the probe's sharpness, but not its surface chemistry, and the force did not depend on cell surface or cytoskeletal properties, with cells and lipid stacks yielding similar forces. This systematic assessment of penetration under various mechanical and chemical conditions provides insights into nanoprobe-cell interactions and informs the design of future intracellular nanoprobes. PMID:25418094

  3. The interaction of bee melittin with lipid bilayer membranes.

    PubMed

    Dawson, C R; Drake, A F; Helliwell, J; Hider, R C

    1978-06-16

    The influence of melittin and the related 8-26 peptide on the stability and electrical properties of bilayer lipid membranes is reported. Melittin, unlike the 8-26 peptide, has a dramatic influence on lipid membranes, causing rupture at dilute concentrations. The circular dichroism of melittin demonstrated that under physiological conditions, in water, melittin is in extended conformation, which is enhanced in aqueous ethanol. However in 'membrane-like' conditions it is essentially alpha-helical. Secondary structure predictions were used to locate possible alpha-helical nucleation centres and a model of melittin was built according to these predictions. It is postulated that melittin causes a wedge effect in membranes.

  4. Pore spanning lipid bilayers on silanised nanoporous alumina membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Md Jani, Abdul M.; Zhou, Jinwen; Nussio, Matthew R.; Losic, Dusan; Shapter, Joe G.; Voelcker, Nicolas H.

    2008-12-01

    The preparation of bilayer lipid membranes (BLMs) on solid surfaces is important for many studies probing various important biological phenomena including the cell barrier properties, ion-channels, biosensing, drug discovery and protein/ligand interactions. In this work we present new membrane platforms based on suspended BLMs on nanoporous anodic aluminium oxide (AAO) membranes. AAO membranes were prepared by electrochemical anodisation of aluminium foil in 0.3 M oxalic acid using a custom-built etching cell and applying voltage of 40 V, at 1oC. AAO membranes with controlled diameter of pores from 30 - 40 nm (top of membrane) and 60 -70 nm (bottom of membrane) were fabricated. Pore dimensions have been confirmed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). AAO membranes were chemically functionalised with 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES). Confirmation of the APTES attachment to the AAO membrane was achieved by means of infrared spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and contact angle measurements. The Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectra of functionalised membranes show several peaks from 2800 to 3000 cm-1 which were assigned to symmetric and antisymmetric CH2 bands. XPS data of the membrane showed a distinct increase in C1s (285 eV), N1s (402 eV) and Si2p (102 eV) peaks after silanisation. The water contact angle of the functionalised membrane was 80o as compared to 20o for the untreated membrane. The formation of BLMs comprising dioleoyl-phosphatidylserine (DOPS) on APTESmodified AAO membranes was carried using the vesicle spreading technique. AFM imaging and force spectroscopy was used to characterise the structural and nanomechanical properties of the suspended membrane. This technique also confirmed the stability of bilayers on the nanoporous alumina support for several days. Fabricated suspended BLMs on nanoporous AAO hold promise for the construction of biomimetic membrane architectures with embedded

  5. Interphases of chain molecules: Monolayers and lipid bilayer membranes

    PubMed Central

    Dill, Ken A.; Flory, Paul J.

    1980-01-01

    Using the lattice model for a liquid, we treat the packing of short-chain molecules in interphases such as bilayer membranes. The constant density in the interphase imposes intermolecular constraints on the configurations of the flexible chains. The statistical theory here presented predicts a diffuse distribution of chain ends near the bilayer midplane; no adjustable parameters are required. Inasmuch as some of the chains terminate relatively near the polar interface, the number of chains reaching deeper planar layers is diminished. Consequently, configurational freedom increases with depth. This is the source of the well-known disorder gradient. PMID:16592834

  6. Lipid Bilayer Membrane Perturbation by Embedded Nanopores: A Simulation Study.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Fandiño, Rebeca; Piñeiro, Ángel; Trick, Jemma L; Sansom, Mark S P

    2016-03-22

    A macromolecular nanopore inserted into a membrane may perturb the dynamic organization of the surrounding lipid bilayer. To better understand the nature of such perturbations, we have undertaken a systematic molecular dynamics simulation study of lipid bilayer structure and dynamics around three different classes of nanopore: a carbon nanotube, three related cyclic peptide nanotubes differing in the nature of their external surfaces, and a model of a β-barrel nanopore protein. Periodic spatial distributions of several lipid properties as a function of distance from the nanopore were observed. This was especially clear for the carbon nanotube system, for which the density of lipids, the bilayer thickness, the projection of lipid head-to-tail vectors onto the membrane plane, and lipid lateral diffusion coefficients exhibited undulatory behavior as a function of the distance from the surface of the channel. Overall, the differences in lipid behavior as a function of the nanopore structure reveal local adaptation of the bilayer structure and dynamics to different embedded nanopore structures. Both the local structure and dynamic behavior of lipids around membrane-embedded nanopores are sensitive to the geometry and nature of the outer surface of the macromolecule/molecular assembly forming the pore.

  7. Covalent attachment of functionalized lipid bilayers to planar waveguides for measuring protein binding to biomimetic membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Heyse, S.; Vogel, H.; Sänger, M.; Sigrist, H.

    1995-01-01

    A new method is presented for measuring sensitively the interactions between ligands and their membrane-bound receptors in situ using integrated optics, thus avoiding the need for additional labels. Phospholipid bilayers were attached covalently to waveguides by a novel protocol, which can in principle be used with any glass-like surface. In a first step, phospholipids carrying head-group thiols were covalently immobilized onto SiO2-TiO2 waveguide surfaces. This was accomplished by acylation of aminated waveguides with the heterobifunctional crosslinker N-succinimidyl-3-maleimidopropionate, followed by the formation of thioethers between the surface-grafted maleimides and the synthetic thiolipids. The surface-attached thiolipids served as hydrophobic templates and anchors for the deposition of a complete lipid bilayer either by fusion of lipid vesicles or by lipid self-assembly from mixed lipid/detergent micelles. The step-by-step lipid bilayer formation on the waveguide surface was monitored in situ by an integrated optics technique, allowing the simultaneous determination of optical thickness and one of the two refractive indices of the adsorbed organic layers. Surface coverages of 50-60% were calculated for thiolipid layers. Subsequent deposition of POPC resulted in an overall lipid layer thickness of 45-50 A, which corresponds to the thickness of a fluid bilayer membrane. Specific recognition reactions occurring at cell membrane surfaces were modeled by the incorporation of lipid-anchored receptor molecules into the supported bilayer membranes. (1) The outer POPC layer was doped with biotinylated phosphatidylethanolamine. Subsequent specific binding of streptavidin was optically monitored. (2) A lipopeptide was incorporated in the outer POPC monolayer. Membrane binding of monoclonal antibodies, which were directed against the peptide moiety of the lipopeptide, was optically detected. The specific antibody binding correlated well with the lipopepitde

  8. Bilayer thickness mismatch controls domain size in biomimetic membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heberle, Frederick A.; Petruzielo, Robin S.; Pan, Jianjun; Drazba, Paul; Kučerka, Norbert; Standaert, Robert F.; Feigenson, Gerald W.; Katsara, John

    2013-03-01

    In order to promote functionality, cells may alter the spatial organization of membrane lipids and proteins, including separation of liquid phases into distinct domains. In model membranes, domain size and morphology depend strongly on composition and temperature, but the physicochemical mechanisms controlling them are poorly understood. Theoretical work suggests a role for interfacial energy at domain boundaries, which may be driven in part by thickness mismatch between a domain and its surrounding bilayer. However, no direct evidence linking thickness mismatch to domain size in free-standing bilayers has been reported. We describe the use of Small Angle Neutron Scattering (SANS) to detect domains in simplified lipid-only models that mimic the composition of plasma membrane. We find that domain size is controlled by the degree of acyl chain unsaturation of low-melting temperature lipids, and that this size transition is correlated to changes in the thickness mismatch between coexisting liquid phases.

  9. Protein-lipid interactions in bilayer membranes: a lattice model.

    PubMed

    Pink, D A; Chapman, D

    1979-04-01

    A lattice model has been developed to study the effects of intrinsic membrane proteins upon the thermodynamic properties of a lipid bilayer membrane. We assume that only nearest-neighbor van der Waals and steric interactions are important and that the polar group interactions can be represented by effective pressure-area terms. Phase diagrams, the temperature T(0), which locates the gel-fluid melting, the transition enthalpy, and correlations were calculated by mean field and cluster approximations. Average lipid chain areas and chain areas when the lipid is in a given protein environment were obtained. Proteins that have a "smooth" homogeneous surface ("cholesterol-like") and those that have inhomogeneous surfaces or that bind lipids specifically were considered. We find that T(0) can vary depending upon the interactions and that another peak can appear upon the shoulder of the main peak which reflects the melting of a eutectic mixture. The transition enthalpy decreases generally, as was found before, but when a second peak appears departures from this behavior reflect aspects of the eutectic mixture. We find that proteins have significant nonzero probabilities for being adjacent to one another so that no unbroken "annulus" of lipid necessarily exists around a protein. If T(0) does not increase much, or decreases, with increasing c, then lipids adjacent to a protein cannot all be all-trans on the time scale (10(-7) sec) of our system. Around a protein the lipid correlation depth is about one lipid layer, and this increases with c. Possible consequences of ignoring changes in polar group interactions due to clustering of proteins are discussed.

  10. Intermonolayer Friction and Surface Shear Viscosity of Lipid Bilayer Membranes

    PubMed Central

    den Otter, W. K.; Shkulipa, S. A.

    2007-01-01

    The flow behavior of lipid bilayer membranes is characterized by a surface viscosity for in-plane shear deformations, and an intermonolayer friction coefficient for slip between the two leaflets of the bilayer. Both properties have been studied for a variety of coarse-grained double-tailed model lipids, using equilibrium and nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations. For lipids with two identical tails, the surface shear viscosity rises rapidly with tail length, while the intermonolayer friction coefficient is less sensitive to the tail length. Interdigitation of lipid tails across the bilayer midsurface, as observed for lipids with two distinct tails, strongly enhances the intermonolayer friction coefficient, but hardly affects the surface shear viscosity. The simulation results are compared against the available experimental data. PMID:17468168

  11. The mechanoelectrical response of droplet interface bilayer membranes.

    PubMed

    Freeman, E C; Najem, J S; Sukharev, S; Philen, M K; Leo, D J

    2016-03-28

    Mechanotransduction and interfacial properties in unsupported liquid biomimetic membranes are explored using the droplet-interface bilayer technique. The fluidic monolayer-membrane system afforded by this technique allows for dynamic control over the membrane dimensions and curvature, which under periodic deformations generates capacitive currents (akin to a Kelvin probe), and permits a detailed electrostatic characterization of the boundary layers as well as observation of flexoelectric effects. Both high and low displacement frequency regimes are examined, and the results show that the mechanoelectric signals generated by the membranes may be linked to the membrane electrostatic structure. In addition, we show that periodic membrane bending in a high-frequency regime generates tension sufficient to activate reconstituted mechanosensitive channels. PMID:26905644

  12. Shape control of lipid bilayer membranes by confined actin bundles.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Feng-Ching; Koenderink, Gijsje Hendrika

    2015-12-01

    In living cells, lipid membranes and biopolymers determine each other's conformation in a delicate force balance. Cellular polymers such as actin filaments are strongly confined by the plasma membrane in cell protrusions such as lamellipodia and filopodia. Conversely, protrusion formation is facilitated by actin-driven membrane deformation and these protrusions are maintained by dense actin networks or bundles of actin filaments. Here we investigate the mechanical interplay between actin bundles and lipid bilayer membranes by reconstituting a minimal model system based on cell-sized liposomes with encapsulated actin filaments bundled by fascin. To address the competition between the deformability of the membrane and the enclosed actin bundles, we tune the bundle stiffness (through the fascin-to-actin molar ratio) and the membrane rigidity (through protein decoration). Using confocal microscopy and quantitative image analysis, we show that actin bundles deform the liposomes into a rich set of morphologies. For liposomes having a small membrane bending rigidity, the actin bundles tend to generate finger-like membrane protrusions that resemble cellular filopodia. Stiffer bundles formed at high crosslink density stay straight in the liposome body, whereas softer bundles formed at low crosslink density are bent and kinked. When the membrane has a large bending rigidity, membrane protrusions are suppressed. In this case, membrane enclosure forces the actin bundles to organize into cortical rings, to minimize the energy cost associated with filament bending. Our results highlight the importance of taking into account mechanical interactions between the actin cytoskeleton and the membrane to understand cell shape control.

  13. Supported bilayers with excess membrane reservoir: a template for reconstituting membrane budding and fission.

    PubMed

    Pucadyil, Thomas J; Schmid, Sandra L

    2010-07-21

    A complete mechanistic understanding of membrane-localized processes in vesicular transport, such as membrane budding and fission, requires their reconstitution with biochemically-defined components from a biochemically-defined substrate. Supported bilayers formed by vesicle fusion represent an attractive substrate for this purpose. However, conventional supported bilayers lack a sufficient membrane reservoir to recreate membrane budding and fission events. We describe the formation of supported bilayers with excess membrane reservoir (SUPER) templates from the fusion of liposomes containing negatively charged lipids on silica beads under high-ionic-strength conditions. Using a fluorescence microscopy-based assay to monitor early and late stages of supported bilayer formation, we show that an increase in ionic strength leads to an increase in the rates of liposome adsorption and subsequent fusion during formation of supported bilayers. The two rates, however, increase disproportionally, leading to accumulation of excess reservoir with an increase in ionic strength. SUPER templates allow the seamless application of microscopy-based assays to analyze membrane-localized processes together with sedimentation-based assays to isolate vesicular and nonvesicular products released from the membrane. The results presented here emphasize the general utility of these templates for analyzing vesicular and nonvesicular transport processes.

  14. Electrochemical characterization of bilayer lipid membrane-semiconductor junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Xiao Kang; Baral, S.; Fendler, J.H. )

    1990-03-08

    Three different systems of glyceryl monooleate (GMO), bilayer lipid membrane (BLM) supported semiconductor particles have been prepared and characterized. A single composition of particulate semiconductor deposited only on one side of the BLM constituted system A, two different compositions of particulate semiconductors sequentially deposited on the same side of the BLM represented system B, and two different compositions of particulate semiconductors deposited on the opposite sides of the BLM made up system C.

  15. Modeling the Elastic Properties of Lipid Bilayer Membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barry, Edward; Gibaud, Thomas; Zakhary, Mark; Dogic, Zvonimir

    2011-03-01

    Model membranes such as lipid bilayers have been indispensable tools for our understanding of the elastic properties of biological membranes. In this talk, I will introduce a colloidal model for membranes and demonstrate that the physical properties of these colloidal membranes are identical to lipid bilayers. The model system is unique in that the constituent molecules are homogenous and non-amphiphilic, yet their self-assembly into membranes and other hierarchical assemblages, such as a lamellar type phases and chiral ribbons, proceeds spontaneously in solution. Owing to the large size of the constituent molecules, individual molecules can be directly visualized and simultaneous observations at the continuum and molecular lengthscales are used to characterize the behavior of model membranes with unprecedented detail. Moreover, once assembled in solution, molecular interactions can be controlled in situ. In particular, the strength of chiral interactions can be varied, leading to fascinating transitions in behavior that resembles the formation of starfish vesicles. These observations point towards the important role of line tension, and have potential implications for phase separated lipid mixtures or lipid rafts.

  16. Membrane Protein Mobility and Orientation Preserved in Supported Bilayers Created Directly from Cell Plasma Membrane Blebs.

    PubMed

    Richards, Mark J; Hsia, Chih-Yun; Singh, Rohit R; Haider, Huma; Kumpf, Julia; Kawate, Toshimitsu; Daniel, Susan

    2016-03-29

    Membrane protein interactions with lipids are crucial for their native biological behavior, yet traditional characterization methods are often carried out on purified protein in the absence of lipids. We present a simple method to transfer membrane proteins expressed in mammalian cells to an assay-friendly, cushioned, supported lipid bilayer platform using cell blebs as an intermediate. Cell blebs, expressing either GPI-linked yellow fluorescent proteins or neon-green fused transmembrane P2X2 receptors, were induced to rupture on glass surfaces using PEGylated lipid vesicles, which resulted in planar supported membranes with over 50% mobility for multipass transmembrane proteins and over 90% for GPI-linked proteins. Fluorescent proteins were tracked, and their diffusion in supported bilayers characterized, using single molecule tracking and moment scaling spectrum (MSS) analysis. Diffusion was characterized for individual proteins as either free or confined, revealing details of the local lipid membrane heterogeneity surrounding the protein. A particularly useful result of our bilayer formation process is the protein orientation in the supported planar bilayer. For both the GPI-linked and transmembrane proteins used here, an enzymatic assay revealed that protein orientation in the planar bilayer results in the extracellular domains facing toward the bulk, and that the dominant mode of bleb rupture is via the "parachute" mechanism. Mobility, orientation, and preservation of the native lipid environment of the proteins using cell blebs offers advantages over proteoliposome reconstitution or disrupted cell membrane preparations, which necessarily result in significant scrambling of protein orientation and typically immobilized membrane proteins in SLBs. The bleb-based bilayer platform presented here is an important step toward integrating membrane proteomic studies on chip, especially for future studies aimed at understanding fundamental effects of lipid interactions

  17. Membrane Protein Mobility and Orientation Preserved in Supported Bilayers Created Directly from Cell Plasma Membrane Blebs.

    PubMed

    Richards, Mark J; Hsia, Chih-Yun; Singh, Rohit R; Haider, Huma; Kumpf, Julia; Kawate, Toshimitsu; Daniel, Susan

    2016-03-29

    Membrane protein interactions with lipids are crucial for their native biological behavior, yet traditional characterization methods are often carried out on purified protein in the absence of lipids. We present a simple method to transfer membrane proteins expressed in mammalian cells to an assay-friendly, cushioned, supported lipid bilayer platform using cell blebs as an intermediate. Cell blebs, expressing either GPI-linked yellow fluorescent proteins or neon-green fused transmembrane P2X2 receptors, were induced to rupture on glass surfaces using PEGylated lipid vesicles, which resulted in planar supported membranes with over 50% mobility for multipass transmembrane proteins and over 90% for GPI-linked proteins. Fluorescent proteins were tracked, and their diffusion in supported bilayers characterized, using single molecule tracking and moment scaling spectrum (MSS) analysis. Diffusion was characterized for individual proteins as either free or confined, revealing details of the local lipid membrane heterogeneity surrounding the protein. A particularly useful result of our bilayer formation process is the protein orientation in the supported planar bilayer. For both the GPI-linked and transmembrane proteins used here, an enzymatic assay revealed that protein orientation in the planar bilayer results in the extracellular domains facing toward the bulk, and that the dominant mode of bleb rupture is via the "parachute" mechanism. Mobility, orientation, and preservation of the native lipid environment of the proteins using cell blebs offers advantages over proteoliposome reconstitution or disrupted cell membrane preparations, which necessarily result in significant scrambling of protein orientation and typically immobilized membrane proteins in SLBs. The bleb-based bilayer platform presented here is an important step toward integrating membrane proteomic studies on chip, especially for future studies aimed at understanding fundamental effects of lipid interactions

  18. Ethanol effects on binary and ternary supported lipid bilayers with gel/fluid domains and lipid rafts.

    PubMed

    Marquês, Joaquim T; Viana, Ana S; De Almeida, Rodrigo F M

    2011-01-01

    Ethanol-lipid bilayer interactions have been a recurrent theme in membrane biophysics, due to their contribution to the understanding of membrane structure and dynamics. The main purpose of this study was to assess the interplay between membrane lateral heterogeneity and ethanol effects. This was achieved by in situ atomic force microscopy, following the changes induced by sequential ethanol additions on supported lipid bilayers formed in the absence of alcohol. Binary phospholipid mixtures with a single gel phase, dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC)/cholesterol, gel/fluid phase coexistence DPPC/dioleoylphosphatidylcholine (DOPC), and ternary lipid mixtures containing cholesterol, mimicking lipid rafts (DOPC/DPPC/cholesterol and DOPC/sphingomyelin/cholesterol), i.e., with liquid ordered/liquid disordered (ld/lo) phase separation, were investigated. For all compositions studied, and in two different solid supports, mica and silicon, domain formation or rearrangement accompanied by lipid bilayer thinning and expansion was observed. In the case of gel/fluid coexistence, low ethanol concentrations lead to a marked thinning of the fluid but not of the gel domains. In the case of ld/lo all the bilayer thins simultaneously by a similar extent. In both cases, only the more disordered phase expanded significantly, indicating that ethanol increases the proportion of disordered domains. Water/bilayer interfacial tension variation and freezing point depression, inducing acyl chain disordering (including opening and looping), tilting, and interdigitation, are probably the main cause for the observed changes. The results presented herein demonstrate that ethanol influences the bilayer properties according to membrane lateral organization. PMID:20955684

  19. Tethered bilayer lipid membranes (tBLMs): interest and applications for biological membrane investigations.

    PubMed

    Rebaud, Samuel; Maniti, Ofelia; Girard-Egrot, Agnès P

    2014-12-01

    Biological membranes play a central role in the biology of the cell. They are not only the hydrophobic barrier allowing separation between two water soluble compartments but also a supra-molecular entity that has vital structural functions. Notably, they are involved in many exchange processes between the outside and inside cellular spaces. Accounting for the complexity of cell membranes, reliable models are needed to acquire current knowledge of the molecular processes occurring in membranes. To simplify the investigation of lipid/protein interactions, the use of biomimetic membranes is an approach that allows manipulation of the lipid composition of specific domains and/or the protein composition, and the evaluation of the reciprocal effects. Since the middle of the 80's, lipid bilayer membranes have been constantly developed as models of biological membranes with the ultimate goal to reincorporate membrane proteins for their functional investigation. In this review, after a brief description of the planar lipid bilayers as biomimetic membrane models, we will focus on the construction of the tethered Bilayer Lipid Membranes, the most promising model for efficient membrane protein reconstitution and investigation of molecular processes occurring in cell membranes.

  20. Nanometric Gap Structure with a Fluid Lipid Bilayer for the Selective Transport and Detection of Biological Molecules.

    PubMed

    Ando, Koji; Tanabe, Masashi; Morigaki, Kenichi

    2016-08-01

    The biological membrane is a natural biosensing platform that can detect specific molecules with extremely high sensitivity. We developed a biosensing methodology by combining a model biological membrane and a nanometer-sized gap structure on a glass substrate. The model membrane comprised lithographically patterned polymeric and fluid lipid bilayers. The polymeric bilayer was bonded to a poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) sheet by using an adhesion layer with a defined thickness (lipid vesicles). Extruded lipid vesicles having a biotin moiety on the surface were used as the adhesion layer in conjunction with the biotin-streptavidin linkage. A gap structure was formed between the fluid bilayer and PDMS (nanogap junction). The thickness of the gap structure was several tens of nanometers, as determined by the thickness of the adhesion layer. The nanogap junction acted as a sensitive biosensing platform. From a mixture of proteins (cholera toxin and albumin), the target protein (cholera toxin) was selectively transported into the gap by the specific binding to a glycolipid (GM1) in the fluid bilayer and lateral diffusion. The target protein molecules were then detected with an elevated signal-to-noise ratio due to the reduced background noise in the nanometric gap. The combination of selective transport and reduced background noise drastically enhanced the sensitivity toward the target protein. The nanogap junction should have broad biomedical applications by realizing highly selective and sensitive biosensing in samples having diverse coexisting molecules. PMID:27427950

  1. Melittin-induced cholesterol reorganization in lipid bilayer membranes

    DOE PAGES

    Qian, Shuo; Heller, William T.

    2015-06-12

    The peptide melittin, a 26 amino acid, cationic peptide from honey bee (Apis mellifera) venom, disrupts lipid bilayer membranes in a concentration-dependent manner. Rather than interacting with a specific receptor, the peptide interacts directly with the lipid matrix of the membrane in a manner dependent on the lipid composition. Here, a small-angle neutron scattering study of the interaction of melittin with lipid bilayers made of mixtures of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) and cholesterol (Chol) is presented. Through the use of deuterium-labeled DMPC, changes in the distribution of the lipid and cholesterol in unilamellar vesicles were observed for peptide concentrations below those thatmore » cause pores to form. In addition to disrupting the in-plane organization of Chol, melittin produces vesicles having inner and outer leaflet compositions that depend on the lipid–Chol molar ratio and on the peptide concentration. The changes seen at high cholesterol and low peptide concentration are similar to those produced by alamethicin (Qian, S. et al., J. Phys. Chem. B 2014, 118, 11200–11208), which points to an underlying physical mechanism driving the redistribution of Chol, but melittin displays an additional effect not seen with alamethicin. Furthermore, a model for how the peptide drives the redistribution of Chol is proposed. The results suggest that redistribution of the lipids in a target cell membrane by membrane active peptides takes places as a prelude to the lysis of the cell.« less

  2. Melittin-induced cholesterol reorganization in lipid bilayer membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Qian, Shuo; Heller, William T.

    2015-06-12

    The peptide melittin, a 26 amino acid, cationic peptide from honey bee (Apis mellifera) venom, disrupts lipid bilayer membranes in a concentration-dependent manner. Rather than interacting with a specific receptor, the peptide interacts directly with the lipid matrix of the membrane in a manner dependent on the lipid composition. Here, a small-angle neutron scattering study of the interaction of melittin with lipid bilayers made of mixtures of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) and cholesterol (Chol) is presented. Through the use of deuterium-labeled DMPC, changes in the distribution of the lipid and cholesterol in unilamellar vesicles were observed for peptide concentrations below those that cause pores to form. In addition to disrupting the in-plane organization of Chol, melittin produces vesicles having inner and outer leaflet compositions that depend on the lipid–Chol molar ratio and on the peptide concentration. The changes seen at high cholesterol and low peptide concentration are similar to those produced by alamethicin (Qian, S. et al., J. Phys. Chem. B 2014, 118, 11200–11208), which points to an underlying physical mechanism driving the redistribution of Chol, but melittin displays an additional effect not seen with alamethicin. Furthermore, a model for how the peptide drives the redistribution of Chol is proposed. The results suggest that redistribution of the lipids in a target cell membrane by membrane active peptides takes places as a prelude to the lysis of the cell.

  3. Solute effects on the colloidal and phase behavior of lipid bilayer membranes: ethanol-dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine mixtures.

    PubMed Central

    Vierl, U; Löbbecke, L; Nagel, N; Cevc, G

    1994-01-01

    By means of the scanning differential calorimetry, x-ray diffractometry, and the dynamic light scattering, we have systematically studied the phase and packing properties of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine vesicles or multibilayers in the presence of ethanol. We have also determined the partial ternary phase diagram of such dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine/water/ethanol mixtures. The directly measured variability of the structural bilayer parameters implies that ethanol binding to the phospholipid bilayers increases the lateral as well as the transverse repulsion between the lipid molecules. This enlarges the hydrocarbon tilt (by up to 23 degrees) and molecular area (by < or = 40%). Ethanol-phospholid association also broadens the interface and, thus, promotes lipid headgroup solvation. This results in excessive swelling (by 130%) of the phosphatidylcholine bilayers in aqueous ethanol solutions. Lateral bilayer expansion, moreover, provokes a successive interdigitation of the hydrocarbon chains in the systems with bulk ethanol concentrations of 0.4-1.2 M. The hydrocarbon packing density as well as the propensity for the formation of lamellar gel phases simultaneously increase. The pretransition temperature of phosphatidylcholine bilayers is more sensitive to the addition of alcohol (initial shift: delta Tp = 22 degrees C/mol) than the subtransition temperature (delta Ts reversible 5 degrees C/mol), whereas the chain-melting phase transition temperature is even less affected (delta Tm = 1.8 degrees C/mol). After an initial decrease of 3 degrees for the bulk ethanol concentrations below 1.2 M, the Tm value increases by 2.5 degrees above this limiting concentration. The gel-phase phosphatidylcholine membranes below Tm are fully interdigitated above this limiting concentration. The chain tilt on the fringe of full chain interdigitation is zero and increases with higher ethanol concentrations. Above Tm, some of the lipid molecules are solubilized by the bound ethanol

  4. Behavior of Bilayer Leaflets in Asymmetric Model Membranes: Atomistic Simulation Studies

    DOE PAGES

    Tian, Jianhui; Nickels, Jonathan; Katsaras, John; Cheng, Xiaolin

    2016-04-27

    Spatial organization within lipid bilayers is an important feature for a range of biological processes. Leaflet compositional asymmetry and lateral lipid organization are just two of the ways in which membrane structure appears to be more complex than initially postulated by the fluid mosaic model. This raises the question of how the phase behavior in one bilayer leaflet may affect the apposing leaflet and how one begins to construct asymmetric model systems to investigate these interleaflet interactions. In this paper, we report on all-atom molecular dynamics simulations (a total of 4.1 μs) of symmetric and asymmetric bilayer systems composed ofmore » liquid-ordered (Lo) or liquid-disordered (Ld) leaflets, based on the nanodomain-forming POPC/DSPC/cholesterol system. We begin by analyzing an asymmetric bilayer with leaflets derived from simulations of symmetric Lo and Ld bilayers. In this system, we observe that the properties of the Lo and Ld leaflets are similar to those of the Lo and Ld leaflets in corresponding symmetric systems. However, it is not obvious that mixing the equilibrium structures of their symmetric counterparts is the most appropriate way to construct asymmetric bilayers nor that these structures will manifest interleaflet couplings that lead to domain registry/antiregistry. We therefore constructed and simulated four additional asymmetric bilayer systems by systematically adding or removing lipids in the Ld leaflet to mimic potential density fluctuations. We find that the number of lipids in the Ld leaflet affects its own properties, as well as those of the apposing Lo leaflet. Collectively, the simulations reveal the presence of weak acyl chain interdigitation across bilayer leaflets, suggesting that interdigitation alone does not contribute significantly to the interleaflet coupling in nonphase-separated bilayers of this chemical composition. Finally, however, the properties of both leaflets appear to be sensitive to changes in in

  5. Hydrofluoric and nitric acid transport through lipid bilayer membranes.

    PubMed

    Gutknecht, J; Walter, A

    1981-06-01

    Hydrofluoric and nitric acid transport through lipid bilayer membranes were studied by a combination of electrical conductance and pH electrode techniques. Transport occurs primarily by nonionic diffusion of molecular HF and HNO3. Membrane permeabilities to HF and HNO3 ranged from 10(-4) to 10(-3) cm . s-1, five to seven orders of magnitude higher than the permeabilities to NO-3, F- and H+. Our results are consistent with the hypothesis that F- transport through biological membranes occurs mainly by nonionic diffusion of HF. Our results also suggest that of the two principal components of 'acid rain', HNO3 may be more toxic than H2SO4.

  6. Enzyme modification of platinum microelectrodes for detection of cholesterol in vesicle lipid bilayer membranes.

    PubMed

    Devadoss, Anando; Palencsár, M Simona; Jiang, Dechen; Honkonen, Michael L; Burgess, James D

    2005-11-15

    Platinum microelectrodes are modified with a lipid bilayer membrane incorporating cholesterol oxidase. Details for electrode surface modification are presented along with characterization studies of electrode response to cholesterol solution and to cholesterol contained in the lipid bilayer membrane of vesicles. Ferrocyanide voltammetric experiments are used to track deposition of a submonolayer of a thiol-functionalized lipid on the platinum electrode surface, vesicle fusion for bilayer formation on the thiolipid-modified surface, and incorporation of cholesterol oxidase in the electrode-supported thiolipid/lipid bilayer membrane. The data are consistent with formation of a lipid bilayer structure on the electrode surface that contains defects. Experiments for detection of cholesterol solubilized in cyclodextrin solution show steady-state current responses that correlate with cholesterol concentration. Direct contact between the electrode and a vesicle lipid bilayer membrane shows a response that correlates with vesicle membrane cholesterol content. PMID:16285691

  7. Chronopotentiometric technique as a method for electrical characterization of bilayer lipid membranes.

    PubMed

    Naumowicz, Monika; Figaszewski, Zbigniew Artur

    2011-03-01

    The basic electrical parameters of bilayer lipid membranes are capacitance and resistance. This article describes the application of chronopotentiometry to the research of lipid bilayers. Membranes were made from egg yolk phosphatidylcholine. The chronopotentiometric characteristic of the membranes depends on the current value. For low current values, no electroporation takes place and the voltage rises exponentially to a constant value. Based on these kinds of chronopotentiometric curves, a method of the membrane capacitance and the membrane resistance calculations are presented.

  8. The impact of cell-penetrating peptides on membrane bilayer structure during binding and insertion.

    PubMed

    Hirst, Daniel J; Lee, Tzong-Hsien; Kulkarni, Ketav; Wilce, Jacqueline A; Aguilar, Marie-Isabel

    2016-08-01

    We have studied the effect of penetratin and a truncated analogue on the bilayer structure using dual polarisation interferometry, to simultaneously measure changes in mass per unit area and birefringence (an optical parameter representing bilayer order) with high sensitivity during the binding and dissociation from the membrane. Specifically, we studied penetratin (RQIKIWFQNRRMKWKK), along with a shortened and biotinylated version known as R8K-biotin (RRMKWKKK(Biotin)-NH2). Overall both peptides bound only weakly to the neutral DMPC and POPC bilayers, while much higher binding was observed for the anionic DMPC/DMPG and POPC/POPG. The binding of penetratin to gel-phase DMPC/DMPG was adequately represented by a two-state model, whereas on the fluid-phase POPC/POPG it exhibited a distinctly different binding pattern, best represented by a three-state kinetic model. However, R8K-biotin did not bind well to DMPC/DMPG and showed a more transitory and superficial binding to POPC/POPG. Comparing the modelling results for both peptides binding to POPC/POPG suggests an important role for a securely bound intermediate prior to penetratin insertion and translocation. Overall these results further elucidate the mechanism of penetratin, and provide another example of the significance of the ability of DPI to measure structural changes and the use of kinetic analysis to investigate the stages of peptide-membrane interactions. PMID:27163492

  9. Automated Lipid Bilayer Membrane Formation Using a Polydimethylsiloxane Thin Film.

    PubMed

    Choi, Sangbaek; Yoon, Sunhee; Ryu, Hyunil; Kim, Sun Min; Jeon, Tae-Joon

    2016-01-01

    An artificial lipid bilayer, or black lipid membrane (BLM), is a powerful tool for studying ion channels and protein interactions, as well as for biosensor applications. However, conventional BLM formation techniques have several drawbacks and they often require specific expertise and laborious processes. In particular, conventional BLMs suffer from low formation success rates and inconsistent membrane formation time. Here, we demonstrate a storable and transportable BLM formation system with controlled thinning-out time and enhanced BLM formation rate by replacing conventionally used films (polytetrafluoroethylene, polyoxymethylene, polystyrene) to polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). In this experiment, a porous-structured polymer such as PDMS thin film is used. In addition, as opposed to conventionally used solvents with low viscosity, the use of squalene permitted a controlled thinning-out time via slow solvent absorption by PDMS, prolonging membrane lifetime. In addition, by using a mixture of squalene and hexadecane, the freezing point of the lipid solution was increased (~16 °C), in addition, membrane precursors were produced that can be indefinitely stored and readily transported. These membrane precursors have reduced BLM formation time of < 1 hr and achieved a BLM formation rate of ~80%. Moreover, ion channel experiments with gramicidin A demonstrated the feasibility of the membrane system. PMID:27501114

  10. Lateral organization, bilayer asymmetry, and inter-leaflet coupling of biological membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Jeremy C.; Cheng, Xiaolin; Nickels, Jonathan D.

    2015-07-29

    Understanding of cell membrane organization has evolved significantly from the classic fluid mosaic model. It is now recognized that biological membranes are highly organized structures, with differences in lipid compositions between inner and outer leaflets and in lateral structures within the bilayer plane, known as lipid rafts. These organizing principles are important for protein localization and function as well as cellular signaling. However, the mechanisms and biophysical basis of lipid raft formation, structure, dynamics and function are not clearly understood. One key question, which we focus on in this review, is how lateral organization and leaflet compositional asymmetry are coupled. Detailed information elucidating this question has been sparse because of the small size and transient nature of rafts and the experimental challenges in constructing asymmetric bilayers. Resolving this mystery will require advances in both experimentation and modeling. We discuss here the preparation of model systems along with experimental and computational approaches that have been applied in efforts to address this key question in membrane biology. Furthermore, we seek to place recent and future advances in experimental and computational techniques in context, providing insight into in-plane and transverse organization of biological membranes.

  11. Lateral organization, bilayer asymmetry, and inter-leaflet coupling of biological membranes

    DOE PAGES

    Smith, Jeremy C.; Cheng, Xiaolin; Nickels, Jonathan D.

    2015-07-29

    Understanding of cell membrane organization has evolved significantly from the classic fluid mosaic model. It is now recognized that biological membranes are highly organized structures, with differences in lipid compositions between inner and outer leaflets and in lateral structures within the bilayer plane, known as lipid rafts. These organizing principles are important for protein localization and function as well as cellular signaling. However, the mechanisms and biophysical basis of lipid raft formation, structure, dynamics and function are not clearly understood. One key question, which we focus on in this review, is how lateral organization and leaflet compositional asymmetry are coupled.more » Detailed information elucidating this question has been sparse because of the small size and transient nature of rafts and the experimental challenges in constructing asymmetric bilayers. Resolving this mystery will require advances in both experimentation and modeling. We discuss here the preparation of model systems along with experimental and computational approaches that have been applied in efforts to address this key question in membrane biology. Furthermore, we seek to place recent and future advances in experimental and computational techniques in context, providing insight into in-plane and transverse organization of biological membranes.« less

  12. Lateral organization, bilayer asymmetry, and inter-leaflet coupling of biological membranes.

    PubMed

    Nickels, Jonathan D; Smith, Jeremy C; Cheng, Xiaolin

    2015-11-01

    Understanding of cell membrane organization has evolved significantly from the classic fluid mosaic model. It is now recognized that biological membranes are highly organized structures, with differences in lipid compositions between inner and outer leaflets and in lateral structures within the bilayer plane, known as lipid rafts. These organizing principles are important for protein localization and function as well as cellular signaling. However, the mechanisms and biophysical basis of lipid raft formation, structure, dynamics and function are not clearly understood. One key question, which we focus on in this review, is how lateral organization and leaflet compositional asymmetry are coupled. Detailed information elucidating this question has been sparse because of the small size and transient nature of rafts and the experimental challenges in constructing asymmetric bilayers. Resolving this mystery will require advances in both experimentation and modeling. We discuss here the preparation of model systems along with experimental and computational approaches that have been applied in efforts to address this key question in membrane biology. We seek to place recent and future advances in experimental and computational techniques in context, providing insight into in-plane and transverse organization of biological membranes.

  13. The assembly and use of tethered bilayer lipid membranes (tBLMs).

    PubMed

    Cranfield, Charles; Carne, Sonia; Martinac, Boris; Cornell, Bruce

    2015-01-01

    Because they are firmly held in place, tethered bilayer lipid membranes (tBLMs) are considerably more robust than supported lipid bilayers such as black lipid membranes (BLMs) (Cornell et al. Nature 387(6633): 580-583, 1997). Here we describe the procedures required to assemble and test tethered lipid bilayers that can incorporate various lipid species, peptides, and ion channel proteins. PMID:25331126

  14. Permeability of small nonelectrolytes through lipid bilayer membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Walter, A.; Gutknecht, J.

    1986-01-01

    Diffusion of small nonelectrolytes through planar lipid bilayer membranes (egg phosphatidylcholine-decane) was examined by correlating the permeability coefficients of 22 solutes with their partition coefficients between water and four organic solvents. High correlations were observed with hexadecane and olive oil (r = 0.95 and 0.93), but not octanol and ether (r = 0.75 and 0.74). Permeabilities of the seven smallest molecules (mol wt less than 50) (water, hydrofluoric acid, hydrochloric acid, ammonia, methylamine, formic acid and formamide) were 2- to 15-fold higher than the values predicted by the permeabilities of the larger molecules (50 less than mol wt less than 300). The extra permeabilities of the seven smallest molecules were not correlated with partition coefficients but were inversely correlated with molecular volumes. The larger solute permeabilities also decreased with increasing molecular volume, but the relationship was neither steep nor significant. The permeability pattern cannot be explained by the molecular volume dependence of partitioning into the bilayer or by the existence of transient aqueous pores. The molecular volume dependence of solute permeability suggests that the membrane barrier behaves more like a polymer than a liquid hydrocarbon. All the data are consistent with the solubility-diffusion model, which can explain both the hydrophobicity dependence and the molecular volume dependence of nonelectrolyte permeability.

  15. Electrostatics of phosphoinositide bilayer membranes. Theoretical and experimental results.

    PubMed Central

    Langner, M; Cafiso, D; Marcelja, S; McLaughlin, S

    1990-01-01

    We made fluorescence, electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), electrophoretic mobility, and ionizing electrode measurements to study the effect of the monovalent lipid phosphatidylinositol (PI) and the trivalent lipid phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2) on the electrostatic potential adjacent to bilayer membranes. When the membranes were formed from mixtures of PI and the zwitterionic lipid phosphatidylcholine (PC), the Gouy-Chapman-Stern (GCS) theory described adequately the dependence of potential on distance (0, 1, 2 nm) from the membrane, mole % negative lipid, and [KCI]. Furthermore, all EPR and fluorescence probes reported identical surface potentials with a PC/PI membrane. With PC/PIP2 membranes, however, the anionic (coion) probes reported less negative potentials than the cationic (counterion) probes; the deviations from the GCS theory were greater for the coions than the counterions. Discreteness-of-charge theories based on the Poisson-Boltzmann equation incorrectly predict that deviations from the GCS theory should be greater for counterions than for coions. We discuss a consistent statistical mechanical theory that takes into account three effects ignored in the GCS theory: the finite size of the ions in the double layer, the electrical interaction between pairs of ions (correlation effects), and the mobile discrete nature of the surface charges. This theory correctly predicts that deviations from GCS theory should be negligible for monovalent lipids, significant for trivalent lipids, and greater for coions than for counterions. PMID:2156577

  16. Millimeter microwave effect on ion transport across lipid bilayer membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Alekseev, S.I.; Ziskin, M.C.

    1995-06-01

    The effects of millimeter microwaves in the frequency range of 54--76 GHz on capacitance and conductance of lipid bilayer membranes (BLM) were studied. Some of the membranes were modified by gramicidin A and amphotericin B or by tetraphenylboron anions (TPhB{sup {minus}}). The millimeter microwaves were pulse-modulated (PW) at repetition rates ranging from 1 to 100 pps, PW at 1,000 pps, or unmodulated continuous waves (CW). The maximum output power at the waveguide outlet was 20 mW. It was found that CW irradiation decreased the unmodified BLM capacitance by 1.2% {+-} 0.5%. At the same time, membrane current induced by TPhB{sup {minus}} transport increased by 5% {+-} 1%. The changes in conductance of ionic channels formed by gramicidin A and amphotericin B were small (0.6% {+-} 0.4%). No resonance-like effects of mm-wave irradiation on membrane capacitance, ionic channel currents, or TPhB{sup {minus}} transport were detected. All changes in membrane capacitance and currents were independent of the modulation employed and were equivalent to heating by approximately 1.1 C.

  17. Carrier-mediated ion transport in lipid bilayer membranes.

    PubMed

    Laprade, R; Grenier, F; Pagé-Dansereau, M; Dansereau, J

    1984-08-01

    The electrical properties predicted by a widely accepted model for carrier-mediated ion transport in lipid bilayers are described. The different steps leading to ion transport and their associated rate constants are reaction at the interface between an ion in the aqueous phase and a carrier in the membrane (kRi), followed by translocation of the ion-carrier complex across the membrane interior (kis) and its dissociation at the other interface (kDi) after which the free carrier crosses back the membrane interior (ks). Results on glyceryl monooleate (GMO) membranes for a family of homologue carriers, the macrotetralide actin antibiotics (nonactin, monactin, dinactin, trinactin, and tetranactin) and a variety of ions (Na+, Cs+, Rb+, K+, NH4+, and Tl+) are presented. Internally consistent data obtained from steady-state electrical measurements (zero-current potential and conductance, current-voltage relationship) allow us to obtain the equilibrium permeability ratios for the different ions and show that for a given carrier kRi is relatively invariant from one ion to the other, except for Tl+ (larger), which implies that the ionic selectivity is controlled by the dissociation of the complex. The values of the individual rate constants obtained from current relaxation experiments are also presented and confirm the findings from steady-state measurements, as well as the isostericity concept for complexes of different ions with the same carrier (kis invariant). These also allow us to determine the aqueous phase membrane and torus membrane partition coefficients. Finally, the observed increase in kis from nonactin to tetranactin and, for all homologues, from GMO-decane to solvent-free GMO membranes, together with the concomitant decrease in kDi, can be explained in terms of modifications of electrostatic energy profiles induced by variations in carrier size and membrane thickness.

  18. Molecular dynamics study of lipid bilayers modeling the plasma membranes of mouse hepatocytes and hepatomas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andoh, Yoshimichi; Aoki, Noriyuki; Okazaki, Susumu

    2016-02-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) calculations of lipid bilayers modeling the plasma membranes of normal mouse hepatocytes and hepatomas in water have been performed under physiological isothermal-isobaric conditions (310.15 K and 1 atm). The changes in the membrane properties induced by hepatic canceration were investigated and were compared with previous MD calculations included in our previous study of the changes in membrane properties induced by murine thymic canceration. The calculated model membranes for normal hepatocytes and hepatomas comprised 23 and 24 kinds of lipids, respectively. These included phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylserine, phosphatidylinositol, sphingomyelin, lysophospholipids, and cholesterol. We referred to previously published experimental values for the mole fraction of the lipids adopted in the present calculations. The calculated structural and dynamic properties of the membranes such as lateral structure, order parameters, lateral self-diffusion constants, and rotational correlation times all showed that hepatic canceration causes plasma membranes to become more ordered laterally and less fluid. Interestingly, this finding contrasts with the less ordered structure and increased fluidity of plasma membranes induced by thymic canceration observed in our previous MD study.

  19. Molecular dynamics study of lipid bilayers modeling the plasma membranes of mouse hepatocytes and hepatomas.

    PubMed

    Andoh, Yoshimichi; Aoki, Noriyuki; Okazaki, Susumu

    2016-02-28

    Molecular dynamics (MD) calculations of lipid bilayers modeling the plasma membranes of normal mouse hepatocytes and hepatomas in water have been performed under physiological isothermal-isobaric conditions (310.15 K and 1 atm). The changes in the membrane properties induced by hepatic canceration were investigated and were compared with previous MD calculations included in our previous study of the changes in membrane properties induced by murine thymic canceration. The calculated model membranes for normal hepatocytes and hepatomas comprised 23 and 24 kinds of lipids, respectively. These included phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylserine, phosphatidylinositol, sphingomyelin, lysophospholipids, and cholesterol. We referred to previously published experimental values for the mole fraction of the lipids adopted in the present calculations. The calculated structural and dynamic properties of the membranes such as lateral structure, order parameters, lateral self-diffusion constants, and rotational correlation times all showed that hepatic canceration causes plasma membranes to become more ordered laterally and less fluid. Interestingly, this finding contrasts with the less ordered structure and increased fluidity of plasma membranes induced by thymic canceration observed in our previous MD study.

  20. Kinetics of Domains Registration in Multicomponent Lipid Bilayer Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Sornbundit, Kan; Modchang, Charin; Triampo, Wannapong; Triampo, Darapond; Nuttavut, Narin; Sunil Kumar, P.B; Laradji, Mohamed

    2014-01-01

    The kinetics of registration of lipid domains in the apposing leaflets of symmetric bilayer membranes is investigated via systematic dissipative particle dynamics simulations. The decay of the distance between the centres of mass of the domains in the apposing leaflets is almost linear during early stages, and then becomes exponential during late times. The time scales of both linear and exponential decays are found to increase with decreasing the strength of interleaflet coupling. The ratio between the time scales of the exponential and linear regimes decreases with increasing the domain size, implying that the decay of the distance between the domains centres of mass is essentially linear for large domains. These numerical results are largely in agreement with the recent theoretical predictions of Han and Haataja [Soft Matter (2013) 9:2120-2124]. We also found that the domains become elongated during the registration process. PMID:25090030

  1. Acyl chain composition and coexisting fluid phases in lipid bilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Yongwen; Bradley, Miranda; Mitchell, Drake

    2011-10-01

    At room temperature phospholipid bilayers enriched in sphingolipids and cholesterol may form a solid phase as well as two coexisting fluid phases. These are the standard fluid phase, or the liquid-disordered phase, ld, and the liquid-ordered phase, lo, which is commonly associated with lipid rafts. Ternary mixtures of palmitoyl-oleoyl-phosphocholine (POPC; 16:0,18:1 PC), sphingomyelin (SPM), and cholesterol (Chol) form coexisting lo, ld and solid phases over a wide range of molar ratios. We are examining the ability of two fluorescent probes to detect these 2 phases: NBD linked to di-16:0 PE which partitions strongly into the lo phase and NBD linked to di-18:1 PE which partitions strongly into the ld phase. We are also examining the effect of the highly polyunsaturated phospholipid stearoyl-docosahexanoyl-phosphocholine (SDPC; 18:0, 22:6 PC) on the ternary phase diagram of POPC/SPM/Chol with particular focus on the functionally important lo/ld coexistence region. We report on the fluorescence lifetime and anisotropy decay dynamics of these two fluorescent probes.

  2. Enhanced sensitivity of a microfabricated resonator using a graphene-polystyrene bilayer membrane

    SciTech Connect

    Yun, Minhyuk; Lee, Eunho; Cho, Kilwon; Jeon, Sangmin

    2014-08-18

    A graphene layer was synthesized using chemical vapor deposition methods and a polystyrene solution was spin-cast onto the graphene film. The graphene-polystyrene bilayer membrane was attached between the two tines of a microfabricated quartz tuning fork (QTF). The modulus of the graphene-polystyrene bilayer was measured to be twice that of a pristine polystyrene membrane. Exposure of the membrane-coated QTF to ethanol vapor decreased the resonance frequency of the microresonator. The bilayer membrane-coated QTF produced a frequency change that was three times the change obtained using a polystyrene membrane-coated QTF, with a lower degree of degradation in the Q factor. The limit of detection of the bilayer membrane-coated QTF to ethanol vapor was determined to be 20 ppm.

  3. Mechanical properties of electrospun bilayer fibrous membranes as potential scaffolds for tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Pu, Juan; Komvopoulos, Kyriakos

    2014-06-01

    Bilayer fibrous membranes of poly(l-lactic acid) (PLLA) were fabricated by electrospinning, using a parallel-disk mandrel configuration that resulted in the sequential deposition of a layer with fibers aligned across the two parallel disks and a layer with randomly oriented fibers, both layers deposited in a single process step. Membrane structure and fiber alignment were characterized by scanning electron microscopy and two-dimensional fast Fourier transform. Because of the intricacies of the generated electric field, bilayer membranes exhibited higher porosity than single-layer membranes consisting of randomly oriented fibers fabricated with a solid-drum collector. However, despite their higher porosity, bilayer membranes demonstrated generally higher elastic modulus, yield strength and toughness than single-layer membranes with random fibers. Bilayer membrane deformation at relatively high strain rates comprised multiple abrupt microfracture events characterized by discontinuous fiber breakage. Bilayer membrane elongation yielded excessive necking of the layer with random fibers and remarkable fiber stretching (on the order of 400%) in the layer with fibers aligned in the stress direction. In addition, fibers in both layers exhibited multiple localized necking, attributed to the nonuniform distribution of crystalline phases in the fibrillar structure. The high membrane porosity, good mechanical properties, and good biocompatibility and biodegradability of PLLA (demonstrated in previous studies) make the present bilayer membranes good scaffold candidates for a wide range of tissue engineering applications.

  4. Pressure effects on the equilibrium configurations of bilayer lipid membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeVita, Raffaella; Stewart, Iain W.; Leo, Donald J.

    2007-10-01

    Planar bilayer lipid membranes (BLMs) are currently employed to construct many bio-inspired material systems and structures. In order to characterize the pressure effects on the equilibrium configurations of these biological membranes, a novel continuum model is proposed. The BLM is assumed to be a two-layer smectic A liquid crystal. The mean orientation of the amphiphilic molecules comprising the membrane is postulated to be perpendicular to the layers and each layer is idealized as a two-dimensional liquid. Moreover, the BLM is modeled as a simply supported plate undergoing small deformations. It is subjected to a pressure load that acts perpendicularly to the layers. The equilibrium equations and boundary conditions are derived from the bulk elastic energy for smectic A liquid crystals as described by de Gennes and Prost (1993 The Physics of Liquid Crystals 2nd edn (Oxford Science Publications)) by using variational methods. The resulting fourth-order linear partial differential equation is solved by employing cylindrical functions and the series solution is proved to be convergent. The solution is numerically computed for values of the model parameters that are reported in the literature. This paper is dedicated to the memory of our colleagues, Professors Kevin P Granata and Liviu Librescv, who lost their lives during the sensless tragedy on 16 April, 2007 at Virginia Tech.

  5. Oligomeric Structure of Colicin Ia Channel in Lipid Bilayer Membranes*

    PubMed Central

    Greig, Sarah L.; Radjainia, Mazdak; Mitra, Alok K.

    2009-01-01

    Colicin Ia is a soluble, harpoon-shaped bacteriocin which translocates across the periplasmic space of sensitive Escherichia coli cell by parasitizing an outer membrane receptor and forms voltage-gated ion channels in the inner membrane. This process leads to cell death, which has been thought to be caused by a single colicin Ia molecule. To directly visualize the three-dimensional structure of the channel, we generated two-dimensional crystals of colicin Ia inserted in lipid-bilayer membranes and determined a ∼17 three-dimensional model by electron crystallography. Supported by velocity sedimentation, chemical cross-linking and single-particle image analysis, the three-dimensional structure is a crown-shaped oligomer enclosing a ∼35 Å-wide extrabilayer vestibule. Our study suggests that lipid insertion instigates a global conformational change in colicin Ia and that more than one molecule participates in the channel architecture with the vestibule, possibly facilitating the known large scale peptide translocation upon channel opening. PMID:19357078

  6. The Interaction of Melittin with Dimyristoyl Phosphatidylcholine-Dimyristoyl Phosphatidylserine Lipid Bilayer Membranes

    DOE PAGES

    Rai, Durgesh K.; Qian, Shuo; Heller, William T.

    2016-08-13

    We report that membrane-active peptides (MAPs), which interact directly with the lipid bilayer of a cell and include toxins and host defense peptides, display lipid composition-dependent activity. Phosphatidylserine (PS) lipids are anionic lipids that are found throughout the cellular membranes of most eukaryotic organisms where they serve as both a functional component and as a precursor to phosphatidylethanolamine lipids. The inner leaflet of the plasma membrane contains more PS than the outer one, and the asymmetry is actively maintained. Here, the impact of the MAP melittin on the structure of lipid bilayer vesicles made of a mixture of phosphatidylcholine andmore » phosphatidylserine was studied. Small-angle neutron scattering of the MAP associated with selectively deuterium-labeled lipid bilayer vesicles revealed how the thickness and lipid composition of phosphatidylserine-containing vesicles change in response to melittin. The peptide thickens the lipid bilayer for concentrations up to P/L = 1/500, but membrane thinning results when P/L = 1/200. The thickness transition is accompanied by a large change in the distribution of DMPS between the leaflets of the bilayer. The change in composition is driven by electrostatic interactions, while the change in bilayer thickness is driven by changes in the interaction of the peptide with the headgroup region of the lipid bilayer. Lastly, the results provide new information about lipid-specific interactions that take place in mixed composition lipid bilayer membranes.« less

  7. Anisotropic solvent model of the lipid bilayer. 2. Energetics of insertion of small molecules, peptides, and proteins in membranes.

    PubMed

    Lomize, Andrei L; Pogozheva, Irina D; Mosberg, Henry I

    2011-04-25

    A new computational approach to calculating binding energies and spatial positions of small molecules, peptides, and proteins in the lipid bilayer has been developed. The method combines an anisotropic solvent representation of the lipid bilayer and universal solvation model, which predicts transfer energies of molecules from water to an arbitrary medium with defined polarity properties. The universal solvation model accounts for hydrophobic, van der Waals, hydrogen-bonding, and electrostatic solute-solvent interactions. The lipid bilayer is represented as a fluid anisotropic environment described by profiles of dielectric constant (ε), solvatochromic dipolarity parameter (π*), and hydrogen bonding acidity and basicity parameters (α and β). The polarity profiles were calculated using published distributions of quasi-molecular segments of lipids determined by neutron and X-ray scattering for DOPC bilayer and spin-labeling data that define concentration of water in the lipid acyl chain region. The model also accounts for the preferential solvation of charges and polar groups by water and includes the effect of the hydrophobic mismatch for transmembrane proteins. The method was tested on calculations of binding energies and preferential positions in membranes for small-molecules, peptides and peripheral membrane proteins that have been experimentally studied. The new theoretical approach was implemented in a new version (2.0) of our PPM program and applied for the large-scale calculations of spatial positions in membranes of more than 1000 peripheral and integral proteins. The results of calculations are deposited in the updated OPM database ( http://opm.phar.umich.edu ).

  8. Insulin-induced changes in mechanical characteristics of lipid bilayers modified by liver plasma membrane fragments.

    PubMed

    Hianik, T; Kavecanský, J; Zórad, S; Macho, L

    1988-04-01

    Insulin interaction with BLM with incorporated fragments of rat liver plasma membranes, containing hormone receptors, was studied by determining Young modulus of elasticity of bilayer lipid membranes in direction perpendicular to the surface, E. The presence of membrane proteins in a concentration of 60 micrograms.ml-1 induced a significant decrease in parameter E (to approx. 50%) as compared with values obtained in non-modified membranes during insulin action (concentration interval 10(-11)-10(-9) mol.l-1). The extent of the effect was dependent on the initial phase state of the membrane, on cholesterol content in BLM as well as on membrane proteins concentration in lipid bilayer.

  9. Interaction of peptidomimetics with bilayer membranes: biophysical characterization and cellular uptake.

    PubMed

    Jing, Xiaona; Kasimova, Marina R; Simonsen, Anders H; Jorgensen, Lene; Malmsten, Martin; Franzyk, Henrik; Foged, Camilla; Nielsen, Hanne M

    2012-03-20

    Enzymatically stable cell-penetrating α-peptide/β-peptoid peptidomimetics constitute promising drug delivery vehicles for the transport of therapeutic biomacromolecules across membrane barriers. The aim of the present study was to elucidate the mechanism of peptidomimetic-lipid bilayer interactions. A series of peptidomimetics consisting of alternating cationic and hydrophobic residues displaying variation in length and N-terminal end group were applied to fluid-phase, anionic lipid bilayers, and their interaction was investigated using isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) and ellipsometry. Titration of lipid vesicles into solutions of peptidomimetics resulted in exothermic adsorption processes, and the interaction of all studied peptidomimetics with anionic lipid membranes was found to be enthalpy-driven. The enthalpy and Gibbs free energy (ΔG) proved more favorable with increasing chain length. However, not all charges contribute equally to the interaction, as evidenced by the charge-normalized ΔG being inversely correlated to the sequence length. Ellipsometry data suggested that the hydrophobic residues also played an important role in the interaction process. Furthermore, ΔG extracted from ellipsometry data showed good agreement with that obtained with ITC. To further elucidate their interaction with biological membranes, quantitative uptake and cellular distribution were studied in proliferating HeLa cells by flow cytometry and confocal microscopy. The cellular uptake of carboxyfluorescein-labeled peptidomimetics showed a similar ranking as that obtained from the adsorbed amount, and binding energy to model membranes demonstrated that the initial interaction with the membrane is of key importance for the cellular uptake.

  10. Formation of "solvent-free" black lipid bilayer membranes from glyceryl monooleate dispersed in squalene.

    PubMed

    White, S H

    1978-09-01

    A simple technique for forming "black" lipid bilayer membranes containing negligible amounts of alkyl solvent is described. The membranes are formed by the method of Mueller et al (Circulation. 1962. 26:1167.) from glyceryl monooleate (GMO) dispersed in squalene. The squalene forms an annulus to satisfy the boundary conditions of the planar bilayer but does not appear to dissolve noticeably in the bilayer itself. The specific geometric capacitance (Cg) of the membranes at 20 degrees C formed by this technique is 0.7771 +/- 0.0048 muF/cm2. Theoretical estimates of Cg for solvent-free bilayers range from 0.75 to 0.81 muF/cm2. Alkane-free GMO bilayers formed from n-octadecane by the solvent freeze-out method of White (Biochim. Biophys. Acta. 1974. 356:8) have values of Cg = 0.7903 +/- 0.0013 muF/cm2 at 20.5 degrees C. The agreement between the various values of Cg strongly suggests that the bilayers are free of squalene. DC potentials applied to the bilayers have no detectable effect on the value of Cg, as expected for solvent-free films. The ability to form bilayers essentially free of the solvent used in the forming solution makes it possible to determine the area per molecule of the surface active lipid in the bilayer. The area per molecule of GMO at 20 degrees C is estimated to be 37.9 +/- 0.2 A2.

  11. Spectroscopic studies of amphotericin B solubilized in nanoscale bilayer membranes.

    PubMed

    Hargreaves, Peter L; Nguyen, Thanh-Son; Ryan, Robert O

    2006-01-01

    Nanodisks (ND) are discrete nanometer scale phospholipid bilayers whose perimeter is circumscribed by amphipathic apolipoproteins. The membranous environment of ND serves as a matrix for solubilizing the polyene antibiotic amphotericin B (AMB). The spectral properties of AMB in ND are dependent upon AMB concentration. Whereas AMB-ND prepared at a concentration of 2.5 mg AMB per 10 mg phospholipid are consistent with AMB self association in the ND membrane environment, AMB-ND prepared at 0.25 or 0.025 mg AMB per 10 mg phospholipid give rise to spectra reminiscent of AMB in organic solvent. Incubation of ND prepared at a phospholipid/AMB ratio of 400:1 (w/w) at 37 degrees C for 1 h induced a shift in absorbance and near UV circular dichroism spectra consistent with antibiotic self-association. The kinetics of this spectral transition were investigated as a function of incubation temperature. While no change in A388 nm occurred in incubations at 20 degrees C, a time-dependent decrease in A388 nm was observed at 25, 30 and 37 degrees C. Inclusion of ergosterol in the ND membrane attenuated temperature-induced AMB spectral changes. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae growth inhibition assays, ND containing self associated AMB were somewhat less effective than ND possessing a greater proportion of monomeric AMB. On the other hand, inclusion of ergosterol or cholesterol in the ND particle did not alter the growth inhibition properties of AMB-ND. The miniature membrane environment of ND provides a novel milieu for solubilization and characterization of lipophilic biomolecules.

  12. Silica nanoparticles for the oriented encapsulation of membrane proteins into artificial bilayer lipid membranes.

    PubMed

    Schadauer, Florian; Geiss, Andreas F; Srajer, Johannes; Siebenhofer, Bernhard; Frank, Pinar; Reiner-Rozman, Ciril; Ludwig, Bernd; Richter, Oliver-M H; Nowak, Christoph; Naumann, Renate L C

    2015-03-01

    An artificial bilayer lipid membrane system is presented, featuring the oriented encapsulation of membrane proteins in a functionally active form. Nickel nitrilo-triacetic acid-functionalized silica nanoparticles, of a diameter of around 25 nm, are used to attach the proteins via a genetically engineered histidine tag in a uniform orientation. Subsequently, the proteins are reconstituted within a phospholipid bilayer, formed around the particles by in situ dialysis to form so-called proteo-lipobeads (PLBs). With a final size of about 50 nm, the PLBs can be employed for UV/vis spectroscopy studies, particularly of multiredox center proteins, because the effects of light scattering are negligible. As a proof of concept, we use cytochrome c oxidase (CcO) from P. denitrificans with the his tag genetically engineered to subunit I. In this orientation, the P side of CcO is directed to the outside and hence electron transfer can be initiated by reduced cytochrome c (cc). UV/vis measurements are used in order to determine the occupancy by CcO molecules encapsulated in the lipid bilayer as well as the kinetics of electron transfer between CcO and cc. The kinetic data are analyzed in terms of the Michaelis-Menten kinetics showing that the turnover rate of CcO is significantly decreased compared to that of solubilized protein, whereas the binding characteristics are improved. The data demonstrate the suitability of PLBs for functional cell-free bioassays of membrane proteins.

  13. Particle-based simulations of bilayer membranes: self-assembly, structural analysis, and shock-wave damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinhauser, Martin O.; Schindler, Tanja

    2016-08-01

    We report on the results of particle-based, coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations of amphiphilic lipid molecules in aqueous environment where the membrane structures at equilibrium are subsequently exposed to strong shock waves, and their damage is analyzed. The lipid molecules self-assemble from unbiased random initial configurations to form stable bilayer membranes, including closed vesicles. During self-assembly of lipid molecules, we observe several stages of clustering, starting with many small clusters of lipids, gradually merging together to finally form one single bilayer membrane. We find that the clustering of lipids sensitively depends on the hydrophobic interaction h_c of the lipid tails in our model and on temperature T of the system. The self-assembled bilayer membranes are quantitatively analyzed at equilibrium with respect to their degree of order and their local structure. We also show that—by analyzing the membrane fluctuations and using a linearized theory— we obtain area compression moduli K_A and bending stiffnesses κ_B for our bilayer membranes which are within the experimental range of in vivo and in vitro measurements of biological membranes. We also discuss the density profile and the pair correlation function of our model membranes at equilibrium which has not been done in previous studies of particle-based membrane models. Furthermore, we present a detailed phase diagram of our lipid model that exhibits a sol-gel transition between quasi-solid and fluid domains, and domains where no self-assembly of lipids occurs. In addition, we present in the phase diagram the conditions for temperature T and hydrophobicity h_c of the lipid tails of our model to form closed vesicles. The stable bilayer membranes obtained at equilibrium are then subjected to strong shock waves in a shock tube setup, and we investigate the damage in the membranes due to their interaction with shock waves. Here, we find a transition from self

  14. Affinity Capturing and Surface Enrichment of a Membrane Protein Embedded in a Continuous Supported Lipid Bilayer

    PubMed Central

    Simonsson Nyström, Lisa; Burazerovic, Sabina; Gunnarsson, Jenny; Snijder, Arjan; Geschwindner, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Investigations of ligand‐binding kinetics to membrane proteins are hampered by their poor stability and low expression levels, which often translates into sensitivity‐related limitations impaired by low signal‐to‐noise ratios. Inspired by affinity capturing of water‐soluble proteins, which utilizes water as the mobile phase, we demonstrate affinity capturing and local enrichment of membrane proteins by using a fluid lipid bilayer as the mobile phase. Specific membrane‐protein capturing and enrichment in a microfluidic channel was accomplished by immobilizing a synthesized trivalent nitrilotriacetic acid (tris‐NTA)–biotin conjugate. A polymer‐supported lipid bilayer containing His6‐tagged β‐secretase (BACE) was subsequently laterally moved over the capture region by using a hydrodynamic flow. Specific enrichment of His6–BACE in the Ni2+–NTA‐modified region of the substrate resulted in a stationary three‐fold increase in surface coverage, and an accompanied increase in ligand‐binding response. PMID:27777836

  15. Fluid transport by active elastic membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Arthur A.; Lauga, Eric

    2011-09-01

    A flexible membrane deforming its shape in time can self-propel in a viscous fluid. Alternatively, if the membrane is anchored, its deformation will lead to fluid transport. Past work in this area focused on situations where the deformation kinematics of the membrane were prescribed. Here we consider models where the deformation of the membrane is not prescribed, but instead the membrane is internally forced. Both the time-varying membrane shape and the resulting fluid motion result then from a balance between prescribed internal active stresses, internal passive resistance, and external viscous stresses. We introduce two specific models for such active internal forcing: one where a distribution of active bending moments is prescribed, and one where active inclusions exert normal stresses on the membrane by pumping fluid through it. In each case, we asymptotically calculate the membrane shape and the fluid transport velocities for small forcing amplitudes, and recover our results using scaling analysis.

  16. Investigation of the effect of bilayer membrane structures and fluctuation amplitudes on SANS/SAXS profile for short membrane wavelength

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Victor; Hawa, Takumi

    2013-09-28

    The effect of bilayer membrane structures and fluctuation amplitudes on small angle neutron scattering (SANS) and small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) profile is investigated based on harmonic motions of the surfactant bilayers with bending as well as thickness fluctuation motions. In this study we consider the case in which the wavelength of the bilayer membrane is shorter than the thickness of the membrane. We find that the thickness of the surfactant bilayer membrane, d{sub m}, affects both q{sub dip} and q{sub peak} of I(q,0) profile, and that the fluctuation amplitude, a, of the membrane changes the peak of I(q,0). A simple formula is derived to estimate the thickness of the bilayer based on the q{sub dip} of the profile obtained from the simulation. The resulting estimates of the thickness of the bilayer with harmonic motion showed accuracy within 1%. Moreover, the bilayer thicknesses estimated from the proposed formula show an excellent agreement with the SANS and SAXS experimental results available in the literatures. We also propose a curve fit model, which describes the relationship between the fluctuation amplitude and the normalized q{sub peak} ratio. The present results show the feasibility of the simple formula to estimate the fluctuation amplitude based on the SANS and SAXS profiles.

  17. Investigation of the effect of bilayer membrane structures and fluctuation amplitudes on SANS/SAXS profile for short membrane wavelength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Victor; Hawa, Takumi

    2013-09-01

    The effect of bilayer membrane structures and fluctuation amplitudes on small angle neutron scattering (SANS) and small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) profile is investigated based on harmonic motions of the surfactant bilayers with bending as well as thickness fluctuation motions. In this study we consider the case in which the wavelength of the bilayer membrane is shorter than the thickness of the membrane. We find that the thickness of the surfactant bilayer membrane, dm, affects both qdip and qpeak of I(q,0) profile, and that the fluctuation amplitude, a, of the membrane changes the peak of I(q,0). A simple formula is derived to estimate the thickness of the bilayer based on the qdip of the profile obtained from the simulation. The resulting estimates of the thickness of the bilayer with harmonic motion showed accuracy within 1%. Moreover, the bilayer thicknesses estimated from the proposed formula show an excellent agreement with the SANS and SAXS experimental results available in the literatures. We also propose a curve fit model, which describes the relationship between the fluctuation amplitude and the normalized qpeak ratio. The present results show the feasibility of the simple formula to estimate the fluctuation amplitude based on the SANS and SAXS profiles.

  18. Effective interactions between fluid membranes.

    PubMed

    Lu, Bing-Sui; Podgornik, Rudolf

    2015-08-01

    A self-consistent theory is proposed for the general problem of interacting undulating fluid membranes subject to the constraint that they do not interpenetrate. We implement the steric constraint via an exact functional integral representation and, through the use of a saddle-point approximation, transform it into a novel effective steric potential. The steric potential is found to consist of two contributions: one generated by zero-mode fluctuations of the membranes and the other by thermal bending fluctuations. For membranes of cross-sectional area S, we find that the bending fluctuation part scales with the intermembrane separation d as d-2 for d≪√S but crosses over to d-4 scaling for d≫√S, whereas the zero-mode part of the steric potential always scales as d-2. For membranes interacting exclusively via the steric potential, we obtain closed-form expressions for the effective interaction potential and for the rms undulation amplitude σ, which becomes small at low temperatures T and/or large bending stiffnesses κ. Moreover, σ scales as d for d≪√S but saturates at √kBTS/κ for d≫√S. In addition, using variational Gaussian theory, we apply our self-consistent treatment to study intermembrane interactions subject to different types of potentials: (i) the Moreira-Netz potential for a pair of strongly charged membranes with an intervening solution of multivalent counterions, (ii) an attractive square well, (iii) the Morse potential, and (iv) a combination of hydration and van der Waals interactions. PMID:26382349

  19. Effective interactions between fluid membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Bing-Sui; Podgornik, Rudolf

    2015-08-01

    A self-consistent theory is proposed for the general problem of interacting undulating fluid membranes subject to the constraint that they do not interpenetrate. We implement the steric constraint via an exact functional integral representation and, through the use of a saddle-point approximation, transform it into a novel effective steric potential. The steric potential is found to consist of two contributions: one generated by zero-mode fluctuations of the membranes and the other by thermal bending fluctuations. For membranes of cross-sectional area S , we find that the bending fluctuation part scales with the intermembrane separation d as d-2 for d ≪√{S } but crosses over to d-4 scaling for d ≫√{S } , whereas the zero-mode part of the steric potential always scales as d-2. For membranes interacting exclusively via the steric potential, we obtain closed-form expressions for the effective interaction potential and for the rms undulation amplitude σ , which becomes small at low temperatures T and/or large bending stiffnesses κ . Moreover, σ scales as d for d ≪√{S } but saturates at √{kBT S /κ } for d ≫√{S } . In addition, using variational Gaussian theory, we apply our self-consistent treatment to study intermembrane interactions subject to different types of potentials: (i) the Moreira-Netz potential for a pair of strongly charged membranes with an intervening solution of multivalent counterions, (ii) an attractive square well, (iii) the Morse potential, and (iv) a combination of hydration and van der Waals interactions.

  20. Method of fabricating lipid bilayer membranes on solid supports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cho, Nam-Joon (Inventor); Frank, Curtis W. (Inventor); Glenn, Jeffrey S. (Inventor); Cheong, Kwang Ho (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    The present invention provides a method of producing a planar lipid bilayer on a solid support. With this method, a solution of lipid vesicles is first deposited on the solid support. Next, the lipid vesicles are destabilized by adding an amphipathic peptide solution to the lipid vesicle solution. This destabilization leads to production of a planar lipid bilayer on the solid support. The present invention also provides a supported planar lipid bilayer, where the planar lipid bilayer is made of naturally occurring lipids and the solid support is made of unmodified gold or titanium oxide. Preferably, the supported planar lipid bilayer is continuous. The planar lipid bilayer may be made of any naturally occurring lipid or mixture of lipids, including, but not limited to phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylserine, phosphatidylinsitol, cardiolipin, cholesterol, and sphingomyelin.

  1. Filament networks attached to membranes: cytoskeletal pressure and local bilayer deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auth, Thorsten; Safran, S. A.; Gov, Nir S.

    2007-11-01

    Several cell types, among them red blood cells, have a cortical, two-dimensional (2D) network of filaments sparsely attached to their lipid bilayer. In many mammalian cells, this 2D polymer network is connected to an underlying 3D, more rigid cytoskeleton. In this paper, we consider the pressure exerted by the thermally fluctuating, cortical network of filaments on the bilayer and predict the bilayer deformations that are induced by this pressure. We treat the filaments as flexible polymers and calculate the pressure that a network of such linear chains exerts on the bilayer; we then minimize the bilayer shape in order to predict the resulting local deformations. We compare our predictions with membrane deformations observed in electron micrographs of red blood cells. The polymer pressure along with the resulting membrane deformation can lead to compartmentalization, regulate in-plane diffusion and may influence protein sorting as well as transmit signals to the polymerization of the underlying 3D cytoskeleton.

  2. Microfabrication of hybrid fluid membrane for microengines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chutani, R.; Formosa, F.; de Labachelerie, M.; Badel, A.; Lanzetta, F.

    2015-12-01

    This paper describes the microfabrication and dynamic characterization of thick membranes providing a technological solution for microengines. The studied membranes are called hybrid fluid-membrane (HFM) and consist of two thin membranes that encapsulate an incompressible fluid. This work details the microelectromechanical system (MEMS) scalable fabrication and characterization of HFMs. The membranes are composite structures based on Silicon spiral springs embedded in a polymer (RTV silicone). The anodic bonding of multiple stacks of Si/glass structures, the fluid filling and the sealing have been demonstrated. Various HFMs were successfully fabricated and their dynamic characterization demonstrates the agreement between experimental and theoretical results.

  3. Ambidextrous binding of cell and membrane bilayers by soluble matrix metalloproteinase-12.

    PubMed

    Koppisetti, Rama K; Fulcher, Yan G; Jurkevich, Alexander; Prior, Stephen H; Xu, Jia; Lenoir, Marc; Overduin, Michael; Van Doren, Steven R

    2014-11-21

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) regulate tissue remodelling, inflammation and disease progression. Some soluble MMPs are inexplicably active near cell surfaces. Here we demonstrate the binding of MMP-12 directly to bilayers and cellular membranes using paramagnetic NMR and fluorescence. Opposing sides of the catalytic domain engage spin-labelled membrane mimics. Loops project from the β-sheet interface to contact the phospholipid bilayer with basic and hydrophobic residues. The distal membrane interface comprises loops on the other side of the catalytic cleft. Both interfaces mediate MMP-12 association with vesicles and cell membranes. MMP-12 binds plasma membranes and is internalized to hydrophobic perinuclear features, the nuclear membrane and inside the nucleus within minutes. While binding of TIMP-2 to MMP-12 hinders membrane interactions beside the active site, TIMP-2-inhibited MMP-12 binds vesicles and cells, suggesting compensatory rotation of its membrane approaches. MMP-12 association with diverse cell membranes may target its activities to modulate innate immune responses and inflammation.

  4. Erythrocyte Membrane Model with Explicit Description of the Lipid Bilayer and the Spectrin Network

    PubMed Central

    Li, He; Lykotrafitis, George

    2014-01-01

    The membrane of the red blood cell (RBC) consists of spectrin tetramers connected at actin junctional complexes, forming a two-dimensional (2D) sixfold triangular network anchored to the lipid bilayer. Better understanding of the erythrocyte mechanics in hereditary blood disorders such as spherocytosis, elliptocytosis, and especially, sickle cell disease requires the development of a detailed membrane model. In this study, we introduce a mesoscale implicit-solvent coarse-grained molecular dynamics (CGMD) model of the erythrocyte membrane that explicitly describes the phospholipid bilayer and the cytoskeleton, by extending a previously developed two-component RBC membrane model. We show that the proposed model represents RBC membrane with the appropriate bending stiffness and shear modulus. The timescale and self-consistency of the model are established by comparing our results with experimentally measured viscosity and thermal fluctuations of the RBC membrane. Furthermore, we measure the pressure exerted by the cytoskeleton on the lipid bilayer. We find that defects at the anchoring points of the cytoskeleton to the lipid bilayer (as in spherocytes) cause a reduction in the pressure compared with an intact membrane, whereas defects in the dimer-dimer association of a spectrin filament (as in elliptocytes) cause an even larger decrease in the pressure. We conjecture that this finding may explain why the experimentally measured diffusion coefficients of band-3 proteins are higher in elliptocytes than in spherocytes, and higher than in normal RBCs. Finally, we study the effects that possible attractive forces between the spectrin filaments and the lipid bilayer have on the pressure applied on the lipid bilayer by the filaments. We discover that the attractive forces cause an increase in the pressure as they diminish the effect of membrane protein defects. As this finding contradicts with experimental results, we conclude that the attractive forces are moderate and do

  5. Erythrocyte membrane model with explicit description of the lipid bilayer and the spectrin network.

    PubMed

    Li, He; Lykotrafitis, George

    2014-08-01

    The membrane of the red blood cell (RBC) consists of spectrin tetramers connected at actin junctional complexes, forming a two-dimensional (2D) sixfold triangular network anchored to the lipid bilayer. Better understanding of the erythrocyte mechanics in hereditary blood disorders such as spherocytosis, elliptocytosis, and especially, sickle cell disease requires the development of a detailed membrane model. In this study, we introduce a mesoscale implicit-solvent coarse-grained molecular dynamics (CGMD) model of the erythrocyte membrane that explicitly describes the phospholipid bilayer and the cytoskeleton, by extending a previously developed two-component RBC membrane model. We show that the proposed model represents RBC membrane with the appropriate bending stiffness and shear modulus. The timescale and self-consistency of the model are established by comparing our results with experimentally measured viscosity and thermal fluctuations of the RBC membrane. Furthermore, we measure the pressure exerted by the cytoskeleton on the lipid bilayer. We find that defects at the anchoring points of the cytoskeleton to the lipid bilayer (as in spherocytes) cause a reduction in the pressure compared with an intact membrane, whereas defects in the dimer-dimer association of a spectrin filament (as in elliptocytes) cause an even larger decrease in the pressure. We conjecture that this finding may explain why the experimentally measured diffusion coefficients of band-3 proteins are higher in elliptocytes than in spherocytes, and higher than in normal RBCs. Finally, we study the effects that possible attractive forces between the spectrin filaments and the lipid bilayer have on the pressure applied on the lipid bilayer by the filaments. We discover that the attractive forces cause an increase in the pressure as they diminish the effect of membrane protein defects. As this finding contradicts with experimental results, we conclude that the attractive forces are moderate and do

  6. Study of supported bilayer lipid membranes for use in chemo-electric energy conversion via active proton transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarles, Stephen A.; Sundaresan, Vishnu B.; Leo, Donald J.

    2007-09-01

    Bilayer lipid membranes (BLMs) have been studied extensively due to functional and structural similarities to cell membranes, fostering research to understand ion-channel protein functions, measure bilayer mechanical properties, and identify self-assembly mechanisms. BLMs have traditionally been formed across single pores in substrates such as PTFE (Teflon). The incorporation of ion-channel proteins into the lipid bilayer enables the selective transfer of ions and fluid through the BLM. Processes of this nature have led to the measurement of ion current flowing across the lipid membrane and have been used to develop sensors that signal the presence of a particular reactant (glucose, urea, penicillin), improve drug recognition in cells, and develop materials capable of creating chemical energy from light. Recent research at Virginia Tech has shown that the incorporation of proton transporters in a supported BLM formed across an array of pores can convert chemical energy available in the adenosine triphosphate (ATP) into electricity. Experimental results from this work show that the system-named Biocell-is capable of developing 2µW/cm2 of membrane area with 15μl of ATPase. Efforts to increase the power output and conversion efficiency of this process while moving toward a packaged device present a unique engineering problem. The bilayer, as host to the active proton transporters, must therefore be formed evenly across a porous substrate, remain stable and yet fluid-like for protein interaction, and exhibit a large seal resistance. This article presents the ongoing work to characterize the Biocell using impedance analysis. Electrical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) is used to study the effect of adding ATPase proteins to POPS:POPE bilayer lipid membranes and correlate structural changes evident in the impedance data to the energy-conversion capability of various partial and whole Biocell assemblies. The specific membrane resistance of a pure BLM drops from 40-120k

  7. Drag Coefficient of a Liquid Domain in a Fluid Membrane Surrounded by Confined Three-Dimensional Fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujitani, Youhei

    2013-08-01

    It is thought that, in a biomembrane, some minor lipid constituents are concentrated in a domain called the lipid raft. Some raftlike domains in a lipid-bilayer membrane can be regarded as two-dimensional droplets. The membrane viscosities inside and outside the domain are generally different. The present author previously studied the drag coefficient of a circular liquid domain in a flat fluid membrane surrounded by three-dimensional fluids, which occupy the semi-infinite spaces on both sides of the membrane. Here we generalize this problem by assuming that the surrounding fluids are confined by container walls parallel to the membrane. Errors in the present author's previous studies are also corrected in this paper.

  8. Semiconductor particles in bilayer lipid membranes. Formation, characterization, and photoelectrochemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, X.K.; Baral, S.B.; Rolandi, R.; Fendler, J.H.

    1988-02-17

    Bilayer lipid membranes (BLMs) have been formed from bovine brain phosphatidylserine (PS), glyceryl monooleate (GMO), and a ploymerizable surfactant, (n-C/sub 15/H/sub 31/CO/sub 2/(CH/sub 2/))/sub 2/N/sup +/(CH/sub 3/)CH/sub 2/C/sub 6/H/sub 4/CH==CH/sub 2/Cl/sup -/(STYRS). These BLMs were then used to provide matrices for the in situ generation of microcrystalline CdS, CuS, Cu/sub 2/S, PbS, ZnS, HgS, and In/sub 2/S/sub 3/. Semiconductors were formed by injecting appropriate metal ion precursors and H/sub 2/S into the bathing solutions on opposite sides of the BLM. Their presence was established by voltage-dependent capacitance measurements, absorption spectroscopy, and optical microscopy. Subsequent to the injection of H/sub 2/S, the first observable change was the appearance of fairly uniform white dots on the black film. These dots rapidly moved around and grew in size, forming islands that then merged with themselves and with a second generation of dots, which ultimately led to a continuous film that continued to grow in thickness. Film formation and growth were monitored by simultaneous optical thickness and capacitance measurements. These data were treated in terms of an equivalent R-C circuit and allowed for the assessment of the semiconductor penetration depth into the BLM. This value for a GMO-BLM-supported In/sub 2/S/sub 3/ film was determined to be 24 A. Bandgap excitation, by nanosecond-pulsed or continuous illumination of the BLM-supported semiconductor film, led to observable photoelectric effects. Visible light (lambda > 350 nm) excitation into STYRS-BLM-supported CdS led to polymerization of the styrene moiety of STYRS. BLM-supported semiconductors remained stable for days.

  9. Spherical nanoparticle supported lipid bilayers for the structural study of membrane geometry-sensitive molecules.

    PubMed

    Fu, Riqiang; Gill, Richard L; Kim, Edward Y; Briley, Nicole E; Tyndall, Erin R; Xu, Jie; Li, Conggang; Ramamurthi, Kumaran S; Flanagan, John M; Tian, Fang

    2015-11-11

    Many essential cellular processes including endocytosis and vesicle trafficking require alteration of membrane geometry. These changes are usually mediated by proteins that can sense and/or induce membrane curvature. Using spherical nanoparticle supported lipid bilayers (SSLBs), we characterize how SpoVM, a bacterial development factor, interacts with differently curved membranes by magic angle spinning solid-state NMR. Our results demonstrate that SSLBs are an effective system for structural and topological studies of membrane geometry-sensitive molecules.

  10. Composite membranes for fluid separations

    DOEpatents

    Blume, Ingo; Peinemann, Klaus-Viktor; Pinnau, Ingo; Wijmans, Johannes G.

    1992-01-01

    A method for designing and making composite membranes having a microporous support membrane coated with a permselective layer. The method involves calculating the minimum thickness of the permselective layer such that the selectivity of the composite membrane is close to the intrinsic selectivity of the perselective layer. The invention also provides high performance membranes with optimized properties.

  11. Composite membranes for fluid separations

    DOEpatents

    Blume, Ingo; Peinemann, Klaus-Viktor; Pinnau, Ingo; Wijmans, Johannes G.

    1990-01-01

    A method for designing and making composite membranes having a microporous support membrane coated with a permselective layer. The method involves calculating the minimum thickness of the permselective layer such that the selectivity of the composite membrane is close to the intrinsic selectivity of the permselective layer. The invention also provides high performance membranes with optimized properties.

  12. Composite membranes for fluid separations

    DOEpatents

    Blume, Ingo; Peinemann, Klaus-Viktor; Pinnau, Ingo; Wijmans, Johannes G.

    1991-01-01

    A method for designing and making composite membranes having a microporous support membrane coated with a permselective layer. The method involves calculating the minimum thickness of the permselective layer such that the selectivity of the composite membrane is close to the intrinsic selectivity of the permselective layer. The invention also provides high performance membranes with optimized properties.

  13. Construction and characterization of soft-supported lipid bilayer membranes for biosensors application.

    PubMed

    Jimenez, Jeffy; Heim, August J; Matthews, W Garrett; Alcantar, Norma

    2006-01-01

    A model cell membrane can be ingeniously used to mimic biological processes with wide applications in the biomedical field. For instance, a model cell membrane can be used as a functionalized element integrated to a sensor for identification of specific proteins or other molecules in a biofluid. A special characteristic of the model membrane described in this work is the fluidic or surface mobility feature given by a thin film of grafted polymer that serves as a cushion layer to support lipid bilayers. Lipid bilayers were deposited on a polyethylene glycol (PEG) thin film over a polished glass substrate using the Langmuir-Blodgett technique. Topographical characterization of the bilayers was accomplished using atomic force microscopy (AFM). Results revealed that the grafted polymeric PEG cushion layer confers mobility to the model membrane. PMID:17947068

  14. High-throughput formation of lipid bilayer membrane arrays with an asymmetric lipid composition.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Rikiya; Soga, Naoki; Yamanaka, Tomoko; Noji, Hiroyuki

    2014-11-17

    We present a micro-device in which more than 10,000 asymmetric lipid bilayer membranes are formed at a time on micro-chamber arrays. The arrayed asymmetric lipid bilayers, where lipid compositions are different between the inner and outer leaflets, are formed with high efficiency of over 97% by injecting several types of liquids into a micro-device that has hydrophilic-in-hydrophobic surfaces. The lipid compositional asymmetry is an intrinsic property of bio-membranes, and therefore, this micro-device extends the versatility of artificial lipid-bilayer systems, which were previously limited to symmetric bilayer formation, and could contribute to the understanding of the role of lipid compositional asymmetry in cell physiology and also to further analytical and pharmacological applications.

  15. High-throughput formation of lipid bilayer membrane arrays with an asymmetric lipid composition

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Rikiya; Soga, Naoki; Yamanaka, Tomoko; Noji, Hiroyuki

    2014-01-01

    We present a micro-device in which more than 10,000 asymmetric lipid bilayer membranes are formed at a time on micro-chamber arrays. The arrayed asymmetric lipid bilayers, where lipid compositions are different between the inner and outer leaflets, are formed with high efficiency of over 97% by injecting several types of liquids into a micro-device that has hydrophilic-in-hydrophobic surfaces. The lipid compositional asymmetry is an intrinsic property of bio-membranes, and therefore, this micro-device extends the versatility of artificial lipid-bilayer systems, which were previously limited to symmetric bilayer formation, and could contribute to the understanding of the role of lipid compositional asymmetry in cell physiology and also to further analytical and pharmacological applications. PMID:25399694

  16. Bipolar membranes with fluid distribution passages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hitchens, G. Duncan (Inventor); Archer, Shivaun (Inventor); Tennakoon, Charles L. (Inventor); Gonzalez-Martin, Anuncia (Inventor); Cisar, Alan J. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    The present invention provides a bipolar membrane and methods for making and using the membrane. The bipolar membrane comprises a cation-selective region, an anion-selective region, an interfacial region between the anion-selective region and the cation-selective region, and means for delivering fluid directly into the interfacial region. The means for delivering fluid includes passages that may comprise a fluid-permeable material, a wicking material, an open passage disposed within the membrane or some combination thereof. The passages may be provided in many shapes, sizes and configurations, but preferably deliver fluid directly to the interfacial region so that the rate of electrodialysis is no longer limited by the diffusion of fluid through the cation- or anion-selective regions to the interfacial region.

  17. Anionic deep cavitands enable the adhesion of unmodified proteins at a membrane bilayer.

    PubMed

    Ghang, Yoo-Jin; Perez, Lizeth; Morgan, Melissa A; Si, Fang; Hamdy, Omar M; Beecher, Consuelo N; Larive, Cynthia K; Julian, Ryan R; Zhong, Wenwan; Cheng, Quan; Hooley, Richard J

    2014-12-28

    An anionic self-folding deep cavitand is capable of immobilizing unmodified proteins and enzymes at a supported lipid bilayer interface, providing a simple, soft bioreactive surface that allows enzymatic function under mild conditions. The adhesion is based on complementary charge interactions, and the hosts are capable of binding enzymes such as trypsin at the bilayer interface: the catalytic activity is retained upon adhesion, allowing selective reactions to be performed at the membrane surface. PMID:25366572

  18. Stable Free-Standing Lipid Bilayer Membranes in Norland Optical Adhesive 81 Microchannels.

    PubMed

    Marin, Victor; Kieffer, Roland; Padmos, Raymond; Aubin-Tam, Marie-Eve

    2016-08-01

    We report a simple, cost-effective, and reproducible method to form free-standing lipid bilayer membranes in microdevices made with Norland Optical Adhesive 81 (NOA81). Surface treatment with either alkylsilane or fluoroalkylsilane enables the self-assembly of stable 1,2-diphytanoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine 1,2-diphytanoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPhPC) and 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DOPC)/1,2-dihexadecanoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC) membranes. Capacitance measurements are used to characterize the lipid bilayer and to follow its formation in real-time. With current recordings, we detect the insertion of single α-hemolysin pores into the bilayer membrane, demonstrating the possibility of using this device for single-channel electrophysiology sensing applications. Optical transparency of the device and vertical position of the lipid bilayer with respect to the microscope focal plane allows easy integration with other single-molecule techniques, such as optical tweezers. Therefore, this method to form long-lived lipid bilayers finds a wide range of applications, from sensing measurements to biophysical studies of lipid bilayers and associated proteins.

  19. Stable Free-Standing Lipid Bilayer Membranes in Norland Optical Adhesive 81 Microchannels.

    PubMed

    Marin, Victor; Kieffer, Roland; Padmos, Raymond; Aubin-Tam, Marie-Eve

    2016-08-01

    We report a simple, cost-effective, and reproducible method to form free-standing lipid bilayer membranes in microdevices made with Norland Optical Adhesive 81 (NOA81). Surface treatment with either alkylsilane or fluoroalkylsilane enables the self-assembly of stable 1,2-diphytanoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine 1,2-diphytanoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPhPC) and 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DOPC)/1,2-dihexadecanoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC) membranes. Capacitance measurements are used to characterize the lipid bilayer and to follow its formation in real-time. With current recordings, we detect the insertion of single α-hemolysin pores into the bilayer membrane, demonstrating the possibility of using this device for single-channel electrophysiology sensing applications. Optical transparency of the device and vertical position of the lipid bilayer with respect to the microscope focal plane allows easy integration with other single-molecule techniques, such as optical tweezers. Therefore, this method to form long-lived lipid bilayers finds a wide range of applications, from sensing measurements to biophysical studies of lipid bilayers and associated proteins. PMID:27351219

  20. Location, Partitioning Behavior, and Interaction of Capsaicin with Lipid Bilayer Membrane: Study Using Its Intrinsic Fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Swain, Jitendriya; Kumar Mishra, Ashok

    2015-09-10

    Capsaicin is an ingredient of a wide variety of red peppers, and it has various pharmacological and biological applications. The present study explores the interaction of capsaicin with dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) lipid bilayer membrane by monitoring various photophysical parameters using its intrinsic fluorescence. In order to have a clearer understanding of the photophysical responses of capsaicin, studies involving (i) its solvation behavior in different solvents, (ii) the partition coefficient of capsaicin in different thermotropic phase states of lipid bilayer membrane, and (iii) its location inside lipid bilayer membrane have been carried out. Capsaicin has a reasonably high partition coefficient for DMPC liposome membrane, in both solid gel (2.8 ± 0.1 × 10(5)) and liquid crystalline (2.6 ± 0.1 × 10(5)) phases. Fluorescence quenching study using cetylpyridinium chloride (CPC) as quencher suggests that the phenolic group of capsaicin molecule is generally present near the headgroup region and hydrophobic tail present inside hydrophobic core region of the lipid bilayer membrane. The intrinsic fluorescence intensity and lifetime of capsaicin sensitively respond to the temperature dependent phase changes of liposome membrane. Above 15 mol %, capsaicin in the aqueous liposome suspension medium lowers the thermotropic phase transition temperature by about 3 °C, and above 30 mol %, the integrity of the membrane is significantly lost.

  1. Continuum electrostatic approach for evaluating positions and interactions of proteins in a bilayer membrane.

    PubMed

    Supunyabut, Chirayut; Fuklang, Sunit; Sompornpisut, Pornthep

    2015-06-01

    Orientations of proteins in the membranes are crucial to their function and stability. Unfortunately the exact positions of these proteins in the lipid bilayer are mostly undetermined. Here, the spatial orientation of membrane proteins within the lipid membrane was evaluated using a Poisson-Boltzmann solvent continuum approach to calculate the electrostatic free energy of the protein solvation at various orientations in an implicit bilayer. The solvation energy was obtained by computing the difference in electrostatic energies of the protein in water and in lipid/water environments, treating each as an implicit solvent model. The optimal position of transmembrane proteins (TMP) in a lipid bilayer is identified by the minimum in the "downhill" pathway of the solvation energy landscape. The energy landscape pattern was considerably conserved in various TMP classes. Evaluation of the position of 1060 membrane proteins from the orientations of proteins in membranes (OPM) database revealed that most of the polytopic and β-barrel proteins were in good agreement with those of the OPM database. The study provides a useful scheme for estimating the membrane solvation energy made by lipid-exposed amino acids in membrane proteins. In addition, our results tested with the bacterial potassium channel model demonstrated the potential usefulness of the approach in assessing the quality of membrane protein models. The present approach should be applicable for constructing transmembrane proteins-lipid configuration suitable for membrane protein simulations and will have utility for the structural modeling of membrane proteins. PMID:25912455

  2. Transport methods for probing the barrier domain of lipid bilayer membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, T X; Chen, X; Anderson, B D

    1992-01-01

    Two experimental techniques have been utilized to explore the barrier properties of lecithin/decane bilayer membranes with the aim of determining the contributions of various domains within the bilayer to the overall barrier. The thickness of lecithin/decane bilayers was systematically varied by modulating the chemical potential of decane in the annulus surrounding the bilayer using different mole fractions of squalene in decane. The dependence of permeability of a model permeant (acetamide) on the thickness of the solvent-filled region of the bilayer was assessed in these bilayers to determine the contribution of this region to the overall barrier. The flux of acetamide was found to vary linearly with bilayer area with Pm = (2.9 +/- 0.3) x 10(-4) cm s-1, after correcting for diffusion through unstirred water layers. The ratio between the overall membrane permeability coefficient and that calculated for diffusion through the hydrocarbon core in membranes having maximum thickness was 0.24, suggesting that the solvent domain contributes only slightly to the overall barrier properties. Consistent with these results, the permeability of acetamide was found to be independent of bilayer thickness. The relative contributions of the bilayer interface and ordered hydrocarbon regions to the transport barrier may be evaluated qualitatively by exploring the effective chemical nature of the barrier microenvironment. This may be probed by comparing functional group contributions to transport with those obtained for partitioning between water and various model bulk solvents ranging in polarity or hydrogen-bonding potential. A novel approach is described for obtaining group contributions to transport using ionizable permeants and pH adjustment. Using this approach, bilayer permeability coefficients of p-toluic acid and p-hydroxymethyl benzoic acid were determined to be 1.1 +/- 0.2 cm s-1 and (1.6 +/- 0.4) x 10(-3) cm s-1, respectively. From these values, the -OH group contribution

  3. A Bilayered Structure Comprised of Functionalized Carbon Nanotubes for Desalination by Membrane Distillation.

    PubMed

    Bhadra, Madhuleena; Roy, Sagar; Mitra, Somenath

    2016-08-01

    The development of a novel carbon nanotube (CNT) immobilized membrane comprised of a double-layer structure is presented for water desalination by membrane distillation. The bilayered structure is comprised of CNTs functionalized with a hydrophobic octadecyl amine group on the feed side and carboxylated CNTs on the permeate side. The latter is more hydrophilic. The hydrophobic CNTs provide higher water vapor permeation, while the hydrophilic CNTs facilitate the condensation of water vapor. Together, these led to superior performance, and flux in a direct contact membrane distillation mode was found to be as high as 121 kg/m(2)h at 80 °C. The bilayered membrane represented an enhancement of 70% over the unmodified membrane and 37% over a membrane which had a monolayered structure where only the feed side was CNT-modified. PMID:27387851

  4. A Bilayered Structure Comprised of Functionalized Carbon Nanotubes for Desalination by Membrane Distillation.

    PubMed

    Bhadra, Madhuleena; Roy, Sagar; Mitra, Somenath

    2016-08-01

    The development of a novel carbon nanotube (CNT) immobilized membrane comprised of a double-layer structure is presented for water desalination by membrane distillation. The bilayered structure is comprised of CNTs functionalized with a hydrophobic octadecyl amine group on the feed side and carboxylated CNTs on the permeate side. The latter is more hydrophilic. The hydrophobic CNTs provide higher water vapor permeation, while the hydrophilic CNTs facilitate the condensation of water vapor. Together, these led to superior performance, and flux in a direct contact membrane distillation mode was found to be as high as 121 kg/m(2)h at 80 °C. The bilayered membrane represented an enhancement of 70% over the unmodified membrane and 37% over a membrane which had a monolayered structure where only the feed side was CNT-modified.

  5. Effects of Lipid Composition on Bilayer Membranes Quantified by All-Atom Molecular Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Ding, Wei; Palaiokostas, Michail; Wang, Wen; Orsi, Mario

    2015-12-10

    Biological bilayer membranes typically contain varying amounts of lamellar and nonlamellar lipids. Lamellar lipids, such as dioleoylphosphatidylcholine (DOPC), are defined by their tendency to form the lamellar phase, ubiquitous in biology. Nonlamellar lipids, such as dioleoylphosphatidylethanolamine (DOPE), prefer instead to form nonlamellar phases, which are mostly nonbiological. However, nonlamellar lipids mix with lamellar lipids in biomembrane structures that remain overall lamellar. Importantly, changes in the lamellar vs nonlamellar lipid composition are believed to affect membrane function and modulate membrane proteins. In this work, we employ atomistic molecular dynamics simulations to quantify how a range of bilayer properties are altered by variations in the lamellar vs nonlamellar lipid composition. Specifically, we simulate five DOPC/DOPE bilayers at mixing ratios of 1/0, 3/1, 1/1, 1/3, and 0/1. We examine properties including lipid area and bilayer thickness, as well as the transmembrane profiles of electron density, lateral pressure, electric field, and dipole potential. While the bilayer structure is only marginally altered by lipid composition changes, dramatic effects are observed for the lateral pressure, electric field, and dipole potential profiles. Possible implications for membrane function are discussed.

  6. Application of self-consistent field theory to self-assembled bilayer membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ping-Wen; Shi, An-Chang

    2015-12-01

    Bilayer membranes self-assembled from amphiphilic molecules such as lipids, surfactants, and block copolymers are ubiquitous in biological and physiochemical systems. The shape and structure of bilayer membranes depend crucially on their mechanical properties such as surface tension, bending moduli, and line tension. Understanding how the molecular properties of the amphiphiles determine the structure and mechanics of the self-assembled bilayers requires a molecularly detailed theoretical framework. The self-consistent field theory provides such a theoretical framework, which is capable of accurately predicting the mechanical parameters of self-assembled bilayer membranes. In this mini review we summarize the formulation of the self-consistent field theory, as exemplified by a model system composed of flexible amphiphilic chains dissolved in hydrophilic polymeric solvents, and its application to the study of self-assembled bilayer membranes. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11421101 and 21274005) and the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council (NSERC) of Canada.

  7. Teflon™-coated silicon apertures for supported lipid bilayer membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilk, S. J.; Goryll, M.; Laws, G. M.; Goodnick, S. M.; Thornton, T. J.; Saraniti, M.; Tang, J.; Eisenberg, R. S.

    2004-10-01

    We present a method for microfabricating apertures in a silicon substrate using well-known cleanroom technologies resulting in highly reproducible giga-seal resistance bilayer formations. Using a plasma etcher, 150μm apertures have been etched through a silicon wafer. Teflon™ has been chemically vapor deposited so that the surface resembles bulk Teflon and is hydrophobic. After fabrication, reproducible high resistance bilayers were formed and characteristic measurements of a self-inserted single OmpF porin ion channel protein were made.

  8. Ceramides in phospholipid membranes: effects on bilayer stability and transition to nonlamellar phases.

    PubMed Central

    Veiga, M P; Arrondo, J L; Goñi, F M; Alonso, A

    1999-01-01

    The effects of ceramides of natural origin on the gel-fluid and lamellar-inverted hexagonal phase transitions of phospholipids (mainly dielaidoylphosphatidylethanolamine) have been studied by differential scanning calorimetry, with additional support from infrared and 31P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. In the lamellar phase, ceramides do not mix ideally with phospholipids, giving rise to the coexistence of domains that undergo the gel-fluid transition at different temperatures. The combination of differential scanning calorimetry and infrared spectroscopy, together with the use of deuterated lipids, allows the demonstration of independent melting temperatures for phospholipid and ceramide in the mixtures. In the lamellar-hexagonal phase transitions, ceramides (up to 15 mol %) decrease the transition temperature, without significantly modifying the transition enthalpy, thus facilitating the inverted hexagonal phase formation. 31P-NMR indicates the coexistence, within a certain range of temperatures, of lamellar and hexagonal phases, or hexagonal phase precursors. Ceramides from egg or from bovine brain are very similar in their effects on the lamellar-hexagonal transition. They are also comparable to diacylglycerides in this respect, although ceramides are less potent. These results are relevant in the interpretation of certain forms of interfacial enzyme activation and in the regulation and dynamics of the bilayer structure of cell membranes. PMID:9876146

  9. Magnetically aligned phospholipid bilayers with positive ordering: a new model membrane system.

    PubMed Central

    Prosser, R S; Hwang, J S; Vold, R R

    1998-01-01

    A stable smectic phospholipid bilayer phase aligned with the director parallel to the magnetic field can be generated by the addition of certain trivalent paramagnetic lanthanide ions to a bicellar solution of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) and dihexanoylphosphatidylcholine (DHPC) in water. Suitable lanthanide ions are those with positive anisotropy of their magnetic susceptibility, namely Eu3+, Er3+, Tm3+, and Yb3+. For samples doped with Tm3+, this phase extends over a wide range of Tm3+ concentrations (6-40 mM) and temperatures (35-90 degrees C) and appears to undergo a transition from a fluid nematic discotic to a fluid, but highly ordered, smectic phase at a temperature that depends on the thulium concentration. As a membrane mimetic, these new, positively ordered phospholipid phases have high potential for structural studies using a variety of techniques such as magnetic resonance (EMR and NMR), small-angle x-ray and neutron diffraction, as well as optical and infrared spectroscopy. PMID:9591667

  10. Strong influence of periodic boundary conditions on lateral diffusion in lipid bilayer membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Camley, Brian A.; Lerner, Michael G.; Pastor, Richard W.; Brown, Frank L. H.

    2015-12-28

    The Saffman-Delbrück hydrodynamic model for lipid-bilayer membranes is modified to account for the periodic boundary conditions commonly imposed in molecular simulations. Predicted lateral diffusion coefficients for membrane-embedded solid bodies are sensitive to box shape and converge slowly to the limit of infinite box size, raising serious doubts for the prospects of using detailed simulations to accurately predict membrane-protein diffusivities and related transport properties. Estimates for the relative error associated with periodic boundary artifacts are 50% and higher for fully atomistic models in currently feasible simulation boxes. MARTINI simulations of LacY membrane protein diffusion and LacY dimer diffusion in DPPC membranes and lipid diffusion in pure DPPC bilayers support the underlying hydrodynamic model.

  11. Strong influence of periodic boundary conditions on lateral diffusion in lipid bilayer membranes.

    PubMed

    Camley, Brian A; Lerner, Michael G; Pastor, Richard W; Brown, Frank L H

    2015-12-28

    The Saffman-Delbrück hydrodynamic model for lipid-bilayer membranes is modified to account for the periodic boundary conditions commonly imposed in molecular simulations. Predicted lateral diffusion coefficients for membrane-embedded solid bodies are sensitive to box shape and converge slowly to the limit of infinite box size, raising serious doubts for the prospects of using detailed simulations to accurately predict membrane-protein diffusivities and related transport properties. Estimates for the relative error associated with periodic boundary artifacts are 50% and higher for fully atomistic models in currently feasible simulation boxes. MARTINI simulations of LacY membrane protein diffusion and LacY dimer diffusion in DPPC membranes and lipid diffusion in pure DPPC bilayers support the underlying hydrodynamic model.

  12. Strong influence of periodic boundary conditions on lateral diffusion in lipid bilayer membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camley, Brian A.; Lerner, Michael G.; Pastor, Richard W.; Brown, Frank L. H.

    2015-12-01

    The Saffman-Delbrück hydrodynamic model for lipid-bilayer membranes is modified to account for the periodic boundary conditions commonly imposed in molecular simulations. Predicted lateral diffusion coefficients for membrane-embedded solid bodies are sensitive to box shape and converge slowly to the limit of infinite box size, raising serious doubts for the prospects of using detailed simulations to accurately predict membrane-protein diffusivities and related transport properties. Estimates for the relative error associated with periodic boundary artifacts are 50% and higher for fully atomistic models in currently feasible simulation boxes. MARTINI simulations of LacY membrane protein diffusion and LacY dimer diffusion in DPPC membranes and lipid diffusion in pure DPPC bilayers support the underlying hydrodynamic model.

  13. Lipid Clustering Correlates with Membrane Curvature as Revealed by Molecular Simulations of Complex Lipid Bilayers

    PubMed Central

    Koldsø, Heidi; Shorthouse, David; Hélie, Jean; Sansom, Mark S. P.

    2014-01-01

    Cell membranes are complex multicomponent systems, which are highly heterogeneous in the lipid distribution and composition. To date, most molecular simulations have focussed on relatively simple lipid compositions, helping to inform our understanding of in vitro experimental studies. Here we describe on simulations of complex asymmetric plasma membrane model, which contains seven different lipids species including the glycolipid GM3 in the outer leaflet and the anionic lipid, phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphophate (PIP2), in the inner leaflet. Plasma membrane models consisting of 1500 lipids and resembling the in vivo composition were constructed and simulations were run for 5 µs. In these simulations the most striking feature was the formation of nano-clusters of GM3 within the outer leaflet. In simulations of protein interactions within a plasma membrane model, GM3, PIP2, and cholesterol all formed favorable interactions with the model α-helical protein. A larger scale simulation of a model plasma membrane containing 6000 lipid molecules revealed correlations between curvature of the bilayer surface and clustering of lipid molecules. In particular, the concave (when viewed from the extracellular side) regions of the bilayer surface were locally enriched in GM3. In summary, these simulations explore the nanoscale dynamics of model bilayers which mimic the in vivo lipid composition of mammalian plasma membranes, revealing emergent nanoscale membrane organization which may be coupled both to fluctuations in local membrane geometry and to interactions with proteins. PMID:25340788

  14. Lipid bilayer formation by contacting monolayers in a microfluidic device for membrane protein analysis.

    PubMed

    Funakoshi, Kei; Suzuki, Hiroaki; Takeuchi, Shoji

    2006-12-15

    Artificial planar lipid bilayers are a powerful tool for the functional study of membrane proteins, yet they have not been widely used due to their low stability and reproducibility. This paper describes an accessible method to form a planar lipid bilayer, simply by contacting two monolayers assembled at the interface between water and organic solvent in a microfluidic chip. The membrane of an organic solvent containing phospholipids at the interface was confirmed to be a bilayer by the capacitance measurement and by measuring the ion channel signal from reconstituted antibiotic peptides. We present two different designs for bilayer formation. One equips two circular wells connected, in which the water/solvent/water interface was formed by simply injecting a water droplet into each well. Another equips the cross-shaped microfluidic channel. In the latter design, formation of the interface at the sectional area was controlled by external syringe pumps. Both methods are extremely simple and reproducible, especially in microdevices, and will lead to automation and multiple bilayer formation for the high-throughput screening of membrane transport in physiological and pharmaceutical studies.

  15. Fluid bilayer structure determination by the combined use of x-ray and neutron diffraction. I. Fluid bilayer models and the limits of resolution.

    PubMed Central

    Wiener, M C; White, S H

    1991-01-01

    This is the first in a series of papers concerned with methods for the determination of the structures of fluid phospholipid bilayers in the liquid-crystalline (L alpha) phase. The basic approach is the joint refinement of quasimolecular models (King and White, 1986. Biophys. J. 49:1047-1054) using x-ray and neutron diffraction data. We present here (a) the rationale for quasimolecular models, (b) the nature of the resolution problem for thermally disordered bilayers, and (c) an analysis of the resolution of experiments in which Gaussian functions are used to describe the distribution of submolecular components. We show that multilamellar liquid-crystalline bilayers are best described by the convolution of a perfect lattice function with a thermally disordered bilayer unit cell. Lamellar diffraction measurements on such a system generally yield only 5-10 orders of diffraction data from which transbilayer profiles of the unit cell can be constructed. The canonical resolution of these transbilayer profiles, defined as the Bragg spacing divided by the index of the highest recorded diffraction order, is typically 5-10 A. Using simple model calculations, we show that the canonical resolution is a measure of the widths of the distributions of constituents of the unit cell rather than a measure of the spatial separation of the distributions. The widths provide a measure of the thermal motion of the bilayer constituents which can be described by Gaussian functions. The equilibrium positions of the centers of the distributions can be determined with a precision of 0.1-0.5 A based upon typical experimental errors. Images FIGURE 1 PMID:2015381

  16. Modeling analysis of the lipid bilayer-cytoskeleton coupling in erythrocyte membrane.

    PubMed

    Pajic-Lijakovic, Ivana; Milivojevic, Milan

    2014-10-01

    Studies of thermal fluctuations in discocytes, echinocytes, and spherocytes suggest that the coupling between lipid bilayer and cytoskeleton can affect viscoelastic behavior of single erythrocyte membranes. To test this hypothesis, we developed a 3D constitutive model describing viscoelastic behavior of erythrocyte membranes, at long relaxation times [Formula: see text] and short relaxation times [Formula: see text]. The model was constructed using combination of spring and spring pot rheological elements arranged in parallel. The rearrangement of cytoskeleton induced by changing the bending state of lipid bilayer was described by a modified Eyring model. The model predictions point to an anomalous nature of energy dissipation and an ordered harmonic nature of the coupling mechanism described by a series of fractional derivatives of the order n [Formula: see text] (where [Formula: see text]). As a result, the stress generated within the lipid bilayer is related to the rate of change of the irreversible stress within the cytoskeleton.

  17. Interaction of ethanol with biological membranes: the formation of non-bilayer structures within the membrane interior and their significance.

    PubMed

    Gurtovenko, Andrey A; Anwar, Jamshed

    2009-02-19

    To gain a better understanding of how ethanol affects biological membranes, we have performed a series of atomic-scale molecular dynamics simulations of phospholipid membranes in aqueous solution with ethanol, whose concentration was varied from 2.5 to 30 mol % (lipid-free basis). At concentrations below the threshold value of approximately 12 mol % (30.5 v/v %) ethanol induces expansion of the membrane, accompanied by a drop in the membrane thickness as well as disordering and enhanced interdigitation of lipid acyl chains. These changes become more pronounced with increase in ethanol concentration, but the bilayer structure of the membrane is maintained. Above the threshold concentration the appearance of multiple transient defects in the lipid/water interface eventually gives rise to desorption and assembly of some of the lipids into non-bilayer structures within the membrane interior. These structures, being small and irregular, resemble inverted micelles and have a long-lived character. Furthermore, formation of the non-bilayer structures is accompanied by mixing of lipids that belong to the opposite membrane leaflets, thereby leading to irreversible changes in the membrane structure. Remarkably, this observation of the formation of non-bilayer structures within the membrane interior, being in good agreement with experimental data, is found to be robust with respect to both the simulation conditions (the system size and the presence of salt) and the type of lipids (phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylethanolamine). We discuss the significance of these non-bilayer structures in relation with the well-known ability of ethanol to promote membrane hemifusion as well as with the possible role of the micelle-like structures as a delivery system for polar solutes and ions. The ethanol-induced "damage" to the bilayer structure also suggests that strong alcoholic beverages ( approximately 40 v/v %) might be potentially hazardous to the epithelial tissues of the human

  18. Screening ion-channel ligand interactions with passive pumping in a microfluidic bilayer lipid membrane chip

    PubMed Central

    Saha, Shimul C.; Powl, Andrew M.; Wallace, B. A.; de Planque, Maurits R. R.; Morgan, Hywel

    2015-01-01

    We describe a scalable artificial bilayer lipid membrane platform for rapid electrophysiological screening of ion channels and transporters. A passive pumping method is used to flow microliter volumes of ligand solution across a suspended bilayer within a microfluidic chip. Bilayers are stable at flow rates up to ∼0.5 μl/min. Phospholipid bilayers are formed across a photolithographically defined aperture made in a dry film resist within the microfluidic chip. Bilayers are stable for many days and the low shunt capacitance of the thin film support gives low-noise high-quality single ion channel recording. Dose-dependent transient blocking of α-hemolysin with β-cyclodextrin (β-CD) and polyethylene glycol is demonstrated and dose-dependent blocking studies of the KcsA potassium channel with tetraethylammonium show the potential for determining IC50 values. The assays are fast (30 min for a complete IC50 curve) and simple and require very small amounts of compounds (100 μg in 15 μl). The technology can be scaled so that multiple bilayers can be addressed, providing a screening platform for ion channels, transporters, and nanopores. PMID:25610515

  19. Natural channel protein inserts and functions in a completely artificial, solid-supported bilayer membrane

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaoyan; Fu, Wangyang; Palivan, Cornelia G.; Meier, Wolfgang

    2013-01-01

    Reconstitution of membrane proteins in artificial membrane systems creates a platform for exploring their potential for pharmacological or biotechnological applications. Previously, we demonstrated amphiphilic block copolymers as promising building blocks for artificial membranes with long-term stability and tailorable structural parameters. However, the insertion of membrane proteins has not previously been realized in a large-area, stable, and solid-supported artificial membrane. Here, we show the first, preliminary model of a channel membrane protein that is functionally incorporated in a completely artificial polymer, tethered, solid-supported bilayer membrane (TSSBM). Unprecedented ionic transport characteristics that differ from previous results on protein insertion into planar, free-standing membranes, are identified. Our findings mark a change in understanding protein insertion and ion flow within natural channel proteins when inserted in an artificial TSSBM, thus holding great potential for numerous applications such as drug screening, trace analyzing, and biosensing. PMID:23846807

  20. HgCl2 disrupts the structure of the human erythrocyte membrane and model phospholipid bilayers.

    PubMed

    Suwalsky, M; Ungerer, B; Villena, F; Cuevas, F; Sotomayor, C P

    2000-10-01

    The structural effects of Hg(II) ions on the erythrocyte membrane were studied through the interactions of HgCl2 with human erythrocytes and their isolated resealed membranes. Studies were carried out by scanning electron microscopy and fluorescence spectroscopy, respectively. Hg(II) induced shape changes in erythrocytes, which took the form of echinocytes and stomatocytes. This finding means that Hg(II) locates in both the outer and inner monolayers of the erythrocyte membrane. Fluorescence spectroscopy results indicate strong interactions of Hg(II) ions with phospholipid amino groups, which also affected the packing of the lipid acyl chains at the deep hydrophobic core of the membrane. HgCl2 also interacted with bilayers of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine and dimyristoylphosphatidylethanolamine, representative of phospholipid classes located in the outer and inner monolayers of the erythrocyte membrane, respectively. X-ray diffraction indicated that Hg(II) ions induced molecular disorder to both phospholipid bilayers, while fluorescence spectroscopy of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine large unilamellar vesicles confirmed the interaction of Hg(II) ions with the lipid polar head groups. All these findings point to the important role of the phospholipid bilayers in the interaction of Hg(II) on cell membranes. PMID:11065190

  1. Particle/fluid interface replication as a means of producing topographically patterned surfaces: Substrates for supported lipid bilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subramaniam, Anand; Lecuyer, Sigolene; Ramamurthi, Kumaran; Losick, Richard; Stone, Howard

    2010-03-01

    There is intense interest in the role of geometry in the thermodynamics and dynamics of such systems as lipid bilayers, membrane proteins and block copolymers. Topographically patterned surfaces that impose well-defined gradients of curvature on surface adsorbed layers are a potential model to study these geometrical effects. Here we report a method for producing topographically patterned surfaces by replicating a fluid-fluid interface studded with colloidal particles. With this method we have fabricated geometrically simple surfaces, such as arrays of spherical features on planar surfaces and also surfaces with complex geometries such as replicas of whole bacterial cells, tubular nanoclays, and even multi-walled carbon nanotubes. Furthermore, chemically heterogeneous surfaces composed of silica, polystyrene, epoxy or poly(dimethyl)siloxane (PDMS), and chemically homogeneous surfaces composed of PDMS or epoxy can be made. As an example of the potential applications of these surfaces, we show that lipid bilayers that are supported on all-PDMS topographically patterned substrates undergo curvature-modulated phase separation.

  2. Interaction between bending and tension forces in bilayer membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Secomb, T W

    1988-01-01

    A theoretical analysis is presented of the bending mechanics of a membrane consisting of two tightly-coupled leaflets, each of which shears and bends readily but strongly resists area changes. Structures of this type have been proposed to model biological membranes such as red blood cell membrane. It is shown that when such a membrane is bent, anisotropic components of resultant membrane tension (shear stresses) are induced, even when the tension in each leaflet is isotropic. The induced shear stresses increase as the square of the membrane curvature, and become significant for moderate curvatures (when the radius of curvature is much larger than the distance between the leaflets). This effect has implications for the analysis of shape and deformation of freely suspended and flowing red blood cells. PMID:3224154

  3. Holographic interferometry of ultrasmall-pressure-induced curvature changes of bilayer lipid membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Picard, G.; Schneider-Henriquez, J.E.; Fendler, J.H. )

    1990-01-25

    Two-exposure interferometric holograms have been shown to sensitively report ultrasmall-pressure (10 natm)-induced curvature changes in glyceryl monooleate (GMO) bilayer lipid membranes (BLMs). The number of concentric fringes observed, and hence the lateral distance between the plane of the Teflon and the BLM, increased linearly with increasing transmembrane pressure and led to a value of 1.1 {plus minus} 0.05 dyn/cm for the surface tension of the BLM. BLMs with appreciable Plateau-Gibbs borders have been shown to undergo nonuniform deformation; the bilayer portion is distorted less than the surrounding Plateau-Gibbs border upon the application of a transmembrane pressure gradient.

  4. Ambidextrous Binding of Cell and Membrane Bilayers by Soluble Matrix Metalloproteinase-12

    PubMed Central

    Koppisetti, Rama K.; Fulcher, Yan G.; Jurkevich, Alexander; Prior, Stephen H.; Xu, Jia; Lenoir, Marc; Overduin, Michael; Van Doren, Steven R.

    2014-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) regulate tissue remodeling, inflammation, and disease progression. Some soluble MMPs are inexplicably active near cell surfaces. Here, we demonstrate binding of MMP-12 directly to bilayers and cellular membranes using paramagnetic NMR and fluorescence. Opposing sides of the catalytic domain engage spin-labeled membrane mimics. Loops project from the β-sheet interface to contact the phospholipid bilayer with basic and hydrophobic residues. The distal membrane interface comprises loops on the other side of the catalytic cleft. Both interfaces mediate MMP-12 association with vesicles and cell membranes. MMP-12 binds plasma membranes and is internalized to hydrophobic perinuclear features, the nuclear membrane, and inside the nucleus within minutes. While binding of TIMP-2 to MMP-12 hinders membrane interactions beside the active site, TIMP-2-inhibited MMP-12 binds vesicles and cells, suggesting compensatory rotation of its membrane approaches. MMP-12 association with diverse cell membranes may target its activities to modulate innate immune responses and inflammation. PMID:25412686

  5. Stochastic transport through carbon nanotubes in lipid bilayers and live cell membranes.

    PubMed

    Geng, Jia; Kim, Kyunghoon; Zhang, Jianfei; Escalada, Artur; Tunuguntla, Ramya; Comolli, Luis R; Allen, Frances I; Shnyrova, Anna V; Cho, Kang Rae; Munoz, Dayannara; Wang, Y Morris; Grigoropoulos, Costas P; Ajo-Franklin, Caroline M; Frolov, Vadim A; Noy, Aleksandr

    2014-10-30

    There is much interest in developing synthetic analogues of biological membrane channels with high efficiency and exquisite selectivity for transporting ions and molecules. Bottom-up and top-down methods can produce nanopores of a size comparable to that of endogenous protein channels, but replicating their affinity and transport properties remains challenging. In principle, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) should be an ideal membrane channel platform: they exhibit excellent transport properties and their narrow hydrophobic inner pores mimic structural motifs typical of biological channels. Moreover, simulations predict that CNTs with a length comparable to the thickness of a lipid bilayer membrane can self-insert into the membrane. Functionalized CNTs have indeed been found to penetrate lipid membranes and cell walls, and short tubes have been forced into membranes to create sensors, yet membrane transport applications of short CNTs remain underexplored. Here we show that short CNTs spontaneously insert into lipid bilayers and live cell membranes to form channels that exhibit a unitary conductance of 70-100 picosiemens under physiological conditions. Despite their structural simplicity, these 'CNT porins' transport water, protons, small ions and DNA, stochastically switch between metastable conductance substates, and display characteristic macromolecule-induced ionic current blockades. We also show that local channel and membrane charges can control the conductance and ion selectivity of the CNT porins, thereby establishing these nanopores as a promising biomimetic platform for developing cell interfaces, studying transport in biological channels, and creating stochastic sensors.

  6. Stochastic transport through carbon nanotubes in lipid bilayers and live cell membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, Jia; Kim, Kyunghoon; Zhang, Jianfei; Escalada, Artur; Tunuguntla, Ramya; Comolli, Luis R.; Allen, Frances I.; Shnyrova, Anna V.; Cho, Kang Rae; Munoz, Dayannara; Wang, Y. Morris; Grigoropoulos, Costas P.; Ajo-Franklin, Caroline M.; Frolov, Vadim A.; Noy, Aleksandr

    2014-10-01

    There is much interest in developing synthetic analogues of biological membrane channels with high efficiency and exquisite selectivity for transporting ions and molecules. Bottom-up and top-down methods can produce nanopores of a size comparable to that of endogenous protein channels, but replicating their affinity and transport properties remains challenging. In principle, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) should be an ideal membrane channel platform: they exhibit excellent transport properties and their narrow hydrophobic inner pores mimic structural motifs typical of biological channels. Moreover, simulations predict that CNTs with a length comparable to the thickness of a lipid bilayer membrane can self-insert into the membrane. Functionalized CNTs have indeed been found to penetrate lipid membranes and cell walls, and short tubes have been forced into membranes to create sensors, yet membrane transport applications of short CNTs remain underexplored. Here we show that short CNTs spontaneously insert into lipid bilayers and live cell membranes to form channels that exhibit a unitary conductance of 70-100 picosiemens under physiological conditions. Despite their structural simplicity, these `CNT porins' transport water, protons, small ions and DNA, stochastically switch between metastable conductance substates, and display characteristic macromolecule-induced ionic current blockades. We also show that local channel and membrane charges can control the conductance and ion selectivity of the CNT porins, thereby establishing these nanopores as a promising biomimetic platform for developing cell interfaces, studying transport in biological channels, and creating stochastic sensors.

  7. Control of membrane permeability in air-stable droplet interface bilayers.

    PubMed

    Mruetusatorn, Prachya; Polizos, Georgios; Datskos, Panos G; Taylor, Graham; Sarles, Stephen A; Boreyko, Jonathan B; Hayes, Douglas G; Collier, C Patrick

    2015-04-14

    Air-stable droplet interface bilayers (airDIBs) on oil-infused surfaces are versatile model membranes for synthetic biology applications, including biosensing of airborne species. However, airDIBs are subject to evaporation, which can, over time, destabilize them and reduce their useful lifetime compared to traditional DIBs that are fully submerged in oil. Here, we show that the lifetimes of airDIBs can be extended by as much as an order of magnitude by maintaining the temperature just above the dew point. We find that raising the temperature from near the dew point (which was 7 °C at 38.5% relative humidity and 22 °C air temperature) to 20 °C results in the loss of hydrated water molecules from the polar headgroups of the lipid bilayer membrane due to evaporation, resulting in a phase transition with increased disorder. This dehydration transition primarily affects the bilayer electrical resistance by increasing the permeability through an increasingly disordered polar headgroup region of the bilayer. Temperature and relative humidity are conveniently tunable parameters for controlling the stability and composition of airDIB membranes while still allowing for operation in ambient environments.

  8. Control of membrane permeability in air-stable droplet interface bilayers

    DOE PAGES

    Mruetusatorn, Prachya; Polizos, Georgios; Datskos, Panos G.; Taylor, Graham; Sarles, Stephen A.; Boreyko, Jonathan; Hayes, Douglas G.; Collier, Pat

    2015-03-19

    Air-stable droplet interface bilayers (airDIBs) on oil-infused surfaces are versatile model membranes for synthetic biology applications, including biosensing of airborne species. However, air-DIBs are subject to evaporation, which can, over time, destabilize them and reduce their useful lifetime compared to traditional DIBs that are fully submerged in oil. Here, we show that lifetimes of air-DIBs can be extended by as much as an order of magnitude by maintaining them at a temperature just above the dew point. We find that raising the temperature from near the dew point (7 C at 38.5 % relative humidity) to room temperature results inmore » loss of water molecules of hydration from the polar head groups of the lipid bilayer membrane due to evaporation in an irreversible process that increases the overall entropy of the system. This dehydration transition affects primarily the bilayer resistance, by increasing ion permeability through the increasingly disordered polar head group region of the bilayer. Temperature and/or relative humidity are conveniently tunable parameters for controlling the stability and composition of air-DIBs membranes, while still allowing for operation in ambient environments.« less

  9. Control of membrane permeability in air-stable droplet interface bilayers.

    PubMed

    Mruetusatorn, Prachya; Polizos, Georgios; Datskos, Panos G; Taylor, Graham; Sarles, Stephen A; Boreyko, Jonathan B; Hayes, Douglas G; Collier, C Patrick

    2015-04-14

    Air-stable droplet interface bilayers (airDIBs) on oil-infused surfaces are versatile model membranes for synthetic biology applications, including biosensing of airborne species. However, airDIBs are subject to evaporation, which can, over time, destabilize them and reduce their useful lifetime compared to traditional DIBs that are fully submerged in oil. Here, we show that the lifetimes of airDIBs can be extended by as much as an order of magnitude by maintaining the temperature just above the dew point. We find that raising the temperature from near the dew point (which was 7 °C at 38.5% relative humidity and 22 °C air temperature) to 20 °C results in the loss of hydrated water molecules from the polar headgroups of the lipid bilayer membrane due to evaporation, resulting in a phase transition with increased disorder. This dehydration transition primarily affects the bilayer electrical resistance by increasing the permeability through an increasingly disordered polar headgroup region of the bilayer. Temperature and relative humidity are conveniently tunable parameters for controlling the stability and composition of airDIB membranes while still allowing for operation in ambient environments. PMID:25790280

  10. Lipid domains control myelin basic protein adsorption and membrane interactions between model myelin lipid bilayers.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dong Woog; Banquy, Xavier; Kristiansen, Kai; Kaufman, Yair; Boggs, Joan M; Israelachvili, Jacob N

    2014-02-25

    The surface forces apparatus and atomic force microscope were used to study the effects of lipid composition and concentrations of myelin basic protein (MBP) on the structure of model lipid bilayers, as well as the interaction forces and adhesion between them. The lipid bilayers had a lipid composition characteristic of the cytoplasmic leaflets of myelin from "normal" (healthy) and "disease-like" [experimental allergic encephalomyelitis (EAE)] animals. They showed significant differences in the adsorption mechanism of MBP. MBP adsorbs on normal bilayers to form a compact film (3-4 nm) with strong intermembrane adhesion (∼0.36 mJ/m(2)), in contrast to its formation of thicker (7-8 nm) swelled films with weaker intermembrane adhesion (∼0.13 mJ/m(2)) on EAE bilayers. MBP preferentially adsorbs to liquid-disordered submicron domains within the lipid membranes, attributed to hydrophobic attractions. These results show a direct connection between the lipid composition of membranes and membrane-protein adsorption mechanisms that affects intermembrane spacing and adhesion and has direct implications for demyelinating diseases.

  11. Control of membrane permeability in air-stable droplet interface bilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Mruetusatorn, Prachya; Polizos, Georgios; Datskos, Panos G.; Taylor, Graham; Sarles, Stephen A.; Boreyko, Jonathan; Hayes, Douglas G.; Collier, Pat

    2015-03-19

    Air-stable droplet interface bilayers (airDIBs) on oil-infused surfaces are versatile model membranes for synthetic biology applications, including biosensing of airborne species. However, air-DIBs are subject to evaporation, which can, over time, destabilize them and reduce their useful lifetime compared to traditional DIBs that are fully submerged in oil. Here, we show that lifetimes of air-DIBs can be extended by as much as an order of magnitude by maintaining them at a temperature just above the dew point. We find that raising the temperature from near the dew point (7 C at 38.5 % relative humidity) to room temperature results in loss of water molecules of hydration from the polar head groups of the lipid bilayer membrane due to evaporation in an irreversible process that increases the overall entropy of the system. This dehydration transition affects primarily the bilayer resistance, by increasing ion permeability through the increasingly disordered polar head group region of the bilayer. Temperature and/or relative humidity are conveniently tunable parameters for controlling the stability and composition of air-DIBs membranes, while still allowing for operation in ambient environments.

  12. Arsenite interactions with phospholipid bilayers as molecular models for the human erythrocyte membrane.

    PubMed

    Suwalsky, Mario; Rivera, Cecilia; Villena, Fernando; Sotomayor, Carlos P; Jemiola-Rzeminska, Malgorzata; Strzalka, Kazimierz

    2007-04-01

    There are scanty reports concerning the effects of arsenic compounds on the structure and functions of cell membranes. With the aim to better understand the molecular mechanisms of the interaction of arsenite with cell membranes we have utilized bilayers of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) and dimyristoylphosphatidylethanolamine (DMPE), representative of phospholipid classes located in the outer and inner monolayers of the human erythrocyte membrane, respectively. The capacity of arsenite to perturb the bilayer structures was determined by X-ray diffraction and fluorescence spectroscopy, whilst the modification of their thermotropic behaviour was followed by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The experiments carried out by X-ray diffraction and calorimetry clearly indicated that NaAsO(2) interacted with DMPE and modified its thermotropic behaviour. No such information has been so far reported in the literature. PMID:17175091

  13. Folding of β-barrel membrane proteins in lipid bilayers - Unassisted and assisted folding and insertion.

    PubMed

    Kleinschmidt, Jörg H

    2015-09-01

    In cells, β-barrel membrane proteins are transported in unfolded form to an outer membrane into which they fold and insert. Model systems have been established to investigate the mechanisms of insertion and folding of these versatile proteins into detergent micelles, lipid bilayers and even synthetic amphipathic polymers. In these experiments, insertion into lipid membranes is initiated from unfolded forms that do not display residual β-sheet secondary structure. These studies therefore have allowed the investigation of membrane protein folding and insertion in great detail. Folding of β-barrel membrane proteins into lipid bilayers has been monitored from unfolded forms by dilution of chaotropic denaturants that keep the protein unfolded as well as from unfolded forms present in complexes with molecular chaperones from cells. This review is aimed to provide an overview of the principles and mechanisms observed for the folding of β-barrel transmembrane proteins into lipid bilayers, the importance of lipid-protein interactions and the function of molecular chaperones and folding assistants. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Lipid-protein interactions.

  14. BILAYER LIPID MEMBRANE (BLM) BASED ION SELECTIVE ELECTRODES AT THE MESO, MICRO, AND NANO SCALES

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Bingwen; Rieck, Daniel; Van Wie, Bernard J.; Cheng, Gary J.; Moffett, David F.; Kidwell, David A.

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a novel method for making micron-sized apertures with tapered sidewalls and nano-sized apertures. Their use in bilayer lipid membrane-based ion selective electrode design is demonstrated and compared to mesoscale bilayers and traditional PVC ion selective electrodes. Micron-sized apertures are fabricated in SU-8 photoresist films and vary in diameter from 10 to 40 microns. The tapered edges in SU-8 films are desired to enhance bilayer lipid membrane (BLM) formation and are fabricated by UV-light overexposure. Nanoapertures are made in boron diffused silicon film. The membranes are used as septa to separate two potassium chloride solutions of different concentrations. Lecithin BLMs are assembled on the apertures by ejecting lipid solution. Potassium ionophore, dibenzo-18-crown-6, is incorporated into BLMs by dissolving it in the lipid solution before membrane assembly. Voltage changes with increasing potassium ion concentrations are recorded with an A/D converter. Various ionophore concentrations in BLMs are investigated. At least a 1% concentration is needed for consistent slopes. Electrode response curves are linear over the 10−6 to 0.1 M range with a sub-Nernstian slope of 20 mV per Log concentration change. This system shows high selectivity to potassium ions over potential interfering sodium ions. BLMs on the three different aperture sizes at the meso, micro, and nano-scales all show similar linear ranges and limits of detection (LODs) as PVC ion selective membranes. PMID:19008091

  15. Characterization of cholesterol-sphingomyelin domains and their dynamics in bilayer membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Samsonov, A V; Mihalyov, I; Cohen, F S

    2001-01-01

    Lipids segregate with each other into small domains in biological membranes, which can facilitate the associations of particular proteins. The segregation of cholesterol and sphingomyelin (SPM) into domains known as rafts is thought to be especially important. The formation of rafts was studied by using planar bilayer membranes that contained rhodamine-phosphatidylethanolamine (rho-DOPE) as a fluorescent probe, and wide-field fluorescence microscopy was used to detect phase separation of the probe. A fluorescently labeled GM(1), known to preferentially partition into rafts, verified that rho-DOPE faithfully reported the rafts. SPM-cholesterol domains did not form at high temperatures but spontaneously formed when temperature was lowered to below the melting temperature of the SPM. Saturated acyl chains on SPMs therefore promote the formation of rafts. The domains were circular (resolution > or = 0.5 microm), quickly reassumed their circular shape after they were deformed, and merged with each other to create larger domains, all phenomena consistent with liquid-ordered (l(o)) rather than solid-ordered (s(o)) domains. A saturated phosphatidylcholine (PC), disteoryl-PC, could substitute for SPM to complex with cholesterol into a l(o)-domain. But in the presence of cholesterol, a saturated phosphatidylethanolamine or phosphatidylserine yielded s(o)-domains of irregular shape. Lipids with saturated acyl chains can therefore pack well among each other and with cholesterol to form l(o)-domains, but domain formation is dependent on the polar headgroup of the lipid. An individual raft always extended through both monolayers. Degrading cholesterol in one monolayer with cholesterol oxidase first caused the boundary of the raft to become irregular; then the raft gradually disappeared. The fluid nature of rafts, demonstrated in this study, may be important for permitting dynamic interactions between proteins localized within rafts. PMID:11509362

  16. Advanced Flicker Spectroscopy of Fluid Membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Döbereiner, Hans-Günther; Gompper, Gerhard; Haluska, Christopher; Kroll, Daniel; Petrov, Peter; Riske, Karin

    2003-07-01

    The bending elasticity of a fluid membrane is characterized by its modulus and spontaneous curvature. We present a new method, advanced flicker spectroscopy of giant nonspherical vesicles, which makes it possible to simultaneously measure both parameters for the first time. Our analysis is based on the generation of a large set of reference data from Monte Carlo simulations of randomly triangulated surfaces. As an example of the potential of the procedure, we monitor thermal trajectories of vesicle shapes and discuss the elastic response of zwitterionic membranes to transmembrane pH gradients. Our technique makes it possible to easily characterize membrane curvature as a function of environmental conditions.

  17. Modeling Yeast Organelle Membranes and How Lipid Diversity Influences Bilayer Properties.

    PubMed

    Monje-Galvan, Viviana; Klauda, Jeffery B

    2015-11-17

    Membrane lipids are important for the health and proper function of cell membranes. We have improved computational membrane models for specific organelles in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to study the effect of lipid diversity on membrane structure and dynamics. Previous molecular dynamics simulations were performed by Jo et al. [(2009) Biophys J. 97, 50-58] on yeast membrane models having six lipid types with compositions averaged between the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and the plasma membrane (PM). We incorporated ergosterol, phosphatidic acid, phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylserine, and phosphatidylinositol lipids in our models to better describe the unique composition of the PM, ER, and trans-Golgi network (TGN) bilayers of yeast. Our results describe membrane structure based on order parameters (SCD), electron density profiles (EDPs), and lipid packing. The average surface area per lipid decreased from 63.8 ± 0.4 Å(2) in the ER to 47.1 ± 0.3 Å(2) in the PM, while the compressibility modulus (KA) varied in the opposite direction. The high SCD values for the PM lipids indicated a more ordered bilayer core, while the corresponding lipids in the ER and TGN models had lower parameters by a factor of at least 0.7. The hydrophobic core thickness (2DC) as estimated from EDPs is the thickest for PM, which is in agreement with estimates of hydrophobic regions of transmembrane proteins from the Orientation of Proteins in Membranes database. Our results show the importance of lipid diversity and composition on a bilayer's structural and mechanical properties, which in turn influences interactions with the proteins and membrane-bound molecules.

  18. Immobilized fluid membranes for gas separation

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Wei; Canfield, Nathan L; Zhang, Jian; Li, Xiaohong Shari; Zhang, Jiguang

    2014-03-18

    Provided herein are immobilized liquid membranes for gas separation, methods of preparing such membranes and uses thereof. In one example, the immobilized membrane includes a porous metallic host matrix and an immobilized liquid fluid (such as a silicone oil) that is immobilized within one or more pores included within the porous metallic host matrix. The immobilized liquid membrane is capable of selective permeation of one type of molecule (such as oxygen) over another type of molecule (such as water). In some examples, the selective membrane is incorporated into a device to supply oxygen from ambient air to the device for electrochemical reactions, and at the same time, to block water penetration and electrolyte loss from the device.

  19. Effects of butanol isomers on dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine bilayer membranes.

    PubMed

    Reeves, Megan D; Schawel, Adam K; Wang, Weidong; Dea, Phoebe

    2007-06-01

    Differential scanning calorimetry and (31)P-NMR were used to study the effects of butanol isomers on the thermotropic phase behavior of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) bilayers. The threshold concentration for the onset of interdigitation for each isomer was determined by the disappearance of the pretransition and the onset of a large hysteresis between the heating and cooling scans of the gel-to-liquid main transition. The threshold concentration was found to correlate with increased solubility of the isomers in the aqueous phase, led by tert-butanol. However, as the solution concentration of tert-butanol increased, there was an abrupt shrinking of the hysteresis, initially with well-resolved shoulder peaks indicating mixed phases. The eventual disappearance of the shoulder peaks was correlated with a breakdown of the multilamellar structure identified using (31)P-NMR.

  20. Electromagnetic and thermal analysis for lipid bilayer membranes exposed to RF fields.

    PubMed

    Eibert, T F; Alaydrus, M; Wilczewski, F; Hansen, V W

    1999-08-01

    Experiments with pulsed radio frequency fields have shown influence on the low-frequency behavior of lipid bilayer membranes. In this paper, we present an electromagnetic and thermal analysis of the used exposure device to clarify whether the observed effects have a thermal cause and to determine the fields at the lipid bilayer. In order to model the very thin lipid bilayer (about 5 nm) accurately, the electromagnetic analysis is broken into several steps employing the finite difference time domain technique and a finite element/boundary element hybrid approach. Based on the obtained power loss due to the electromagnetic fields, the temperature change is calculated using the finite element method for the solution of the heat conduction equation. Both, the electromagnetic and the thermal analysis are performed for a variety of material parameters of the exposure device. The electromagnetic analysis shows that the exposure device is capable of producing voltages on the order of 1 mV across the lipid bilayer. The combined electromagnetic and thermal calculations reveal that the temperature oscillations due to the pulsed radio frequency fields are too small to directly influence the low-frequency behavior of the lipid bilayer.

  1. pH regulation of amphotericin B channels activity in the bilayer lipid membrane

    PubMed Central

    Shahmoradi, Tahereh; Sepehry, Hamid; Ashrafpour, Manuchehr

    2016-01-01

    Background: Amphotericin B (AmB) is a polyene antibiotic frequently applied in the treatment of systemic fungal infections in spite of its secondary effects. The pH plays a crucial role in modulating biophysical features of ion channels in the bilayer lipid membranes. Aim: In this study, the role of pH in the regulation of AmB channel was assessed by single channel recording of ion channel incorporated in the artificial membrane. Materials and Methods: Bilayer lipid membrane was formed by phosphatidylcholine in a 350 μm diameter aperture between two chambers, cis and trans contained 200/50 mMKCl solutions, respectively; then AmB was incorporated into the bilayer lipid membrane. Single channel recordings were used to indicate the effects of pH changes on AmB channels activity. The records were analyzed by Clamp fit 10 software. Results: A kinetic analysis of single channel currents indicated a cation ion channel with 500 pS conductance and voltage-dependence of the open probability of the AmB channel (Po). A reduction of cis pH to 6 decreased Po and conductance. This effect was also voltage-dependent, being greater at a more positive above −40. The pH changes in the range of 6-8 had no effect on the reversal potential and ion selectivity. Conclusion: Our data indicated that extracellular acidity can reduce AmB activity. PMID:27003977

  2. Bilayer lipid membranes: An experimental system for biomolecular electronic devices development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ottova-Leitmannova, A.; Ti Tien, H.

    1992-12-01

    The lipid bilayer postulated as the basic structural matrix of biological membranes is widely accepted. At present, the planar bilayer lipid membrane (BLM) together with spherical lipid bilayers (liposomes), upon suitable modification, serves as a most appropriate model for biological membranes. In recent years, advances in microelectronics and interest in ultrathin organic films, including BLMs and Langmuir-Blodgett (L-B) films, have resulted in a unique fusion of ideas toward the development of biosensors and transducers. Furthermore, recent trends in interdisciplinary studies in chemistry, electronics, and biology have led to a new field of research: biomolecular electronics. This exciting new field of scientific-technological endeavor is part of a more general approach toward the development of a new, post-semiconductor electronic technology, namely, molecular electronics with a long-term goal of molecular computers. Recently, it has been demonstrated that BLMs, after suitable modification, can function as electrodes and exhibit nonlinear electronic properties. These and other experimental findings relevant to sensor development and to “biomolecular electronic devices” (BED) will be described in more details in the present review article. Also the potential use of the BLM system together with its modifications in the development of a new class of organic diodes, switches, biosensors, electrochemical photocells, and biofuel cells will be discussed. Additionally, this paper reports also a novel technique for obtaining BLMs (or lipid bilayers) on solid supports. The presence of solid support on one side of the BLM greatly enhances its mechanical stability, while retaining the dynamic properties of the lipid bilayer. Advantages of the new techniques for self-assembling amphiphilic molecules on rigid substrates are discussed in terms of their possible uses. It is evident that the new BLM system (s-BLMs) is potentially useful for technological applications in the

  3. Fluid Phase Lipid Areas and Bilayer Thicknesses of Commonly Used Phosphatidylcholines as a Function of Temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Kucerka, Norbert; Nieh, Mu-Ping; Katsaras, John

    2011-01-01

    The structural parameters of fluid phase bilayers composed of phosphatidylcholines with fully saturated, mixed, and branched fatty acid chains, at several temperatures, have been determined by simultaneously analyzing small-angle neutron and X-ray scattering data. Bilayer parameters, such as area per lipid and overall bilayer thickness have been obtained in conjunction with intrabilayer structural parameters (e.g. hydrocarbon region thickness). The results have allowed us to assess the effect of temperature and hydrocarbon chain composition on bilayer structure. For example, we found that for all lipids there is, not surprisingly, an increase in fatty acid chain trans-gauche isomerization with increasing temperature. Moreover, this increase in trans-gauche isomerization scales with fatty acid chain length in mixed chain lipids. However, in the case of lipids with saturated fatty acid chains, trans-gauche isomerization is increasingly tempered by attractive chain-chain van der Waals interactions with increasing chain length. Finally, our results confirm a strong dependence of lipid chain dynamics as a function of double bond position along fatty acid chains.

  4. A Distributed Amplifier System for Bilayer Lipid Membrane (BLM) Arrays With Noise and Individual Offset Cancellation.

    PubMed

    Crescentini, Marco; Thei, Frederico; Bennati, Marco; Saha, Shimul; de Planque, Maurits R R; Morgan, Hywel; Tartagni, Marco

    2015-06-01

    Lipid bilayer membrane (BLM) arrays are required for high throughput analysis, for example drug screening or advanced DNA sequencing. Complex microfluidic devices are being developed but these are restricted in terms of array size and structure or have integrated electronic sensing with limited noise performance. We present a compact and scalable multichannel electrophysiology platform based on a hybrid approach that combines integrated state-of-the-art microelectronics with low-cost disposable fluidics providing a platform for high-quality parallel single ion channel recording. Specifically, we have developed a new integrated circuit amplifier based on a novel noise cancellation scheme that eliminates flicker noise derived from devices under test and amplifiers. The system is demonstrated through the simultaneous recording of ion channel activity from eight bilayer membranes. The platform is scalable and could be extended to much larger array sizes, limited only by electronic data decimation and communication capabilities.

  5. Photoelectric Effects in Lipid Bilayer Membranes. A Pedagogical Review.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huebner, Jay S.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Provides information appropriate for introductory lectures on photoelectric effects in membranes. Describes the apparatus and supplies required for laboratory exercises. Outlines typical laboratory exercises. Identifies the chromophores known to induce photoelectric effects. Concludes that this topic can provide useful subjects for undergraduate…

  6. Formation and fluidity measurement of supported lipid bilayer on polyvinyl chloride membrane

    SciTech Connect

    Kobayashi, Takuji Kono, Akiteru Sawada, Kazuaki; Futagawa, Masato; Tero, Ryugo

    2014-02-20

    We prepared an artificial lipid bilayer on a plasticized poly(vinyl chloride) (PVC) membrane on a Si3N4 layer deposited on a Si wafer. We optimized the experimental condition for the fabrication of the PVC membrane, and obtained a PVC membrane with a flat and uniform surface on the scale of several hundreds of micrometer suitable for a substrate for supported lipid bilayers (SLBs). The SLB of 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DOPC) was formed on the PVC membrane by the vesicle fusion method. The observation with a conventional epi-fluorescence microscope and a confocal laser scanning microscope gave geometrically uniform images of the SLB on the PVC membrane. The fluidity and the mobile fraction of the SLB was evaluated by the fluorescence recovery after photobleaching method, and compared with that on a thermally oxidized SiO{sub 2}/Si substrate. The SLB on the PVC membrane contained immobile fraction ∼30%, but the diffusion in the mobile fraction was two times faster than that in the SLB on SiO{sub 2}/Si, which had little immobile fraction.

  7. A solvent model for simulations of peptides in bilayers. II. Membrane-spanning alpha-helices.

    PubMed Central

    Efremov, R G; Nolde, D E; Vergoten, G; Arseniev, A S

    1999-01-01

    We describe application of the implicit solvation model (see the first paper of this series), to Monte Carlo simulations of several peptides in bilayer- and water-mimetic environments, and in vacuum. The membrane-bound peptides chosen were transmembrane segments A and B of bacteriorhodopsin, the hydrophobic segment of surfactant lipoprotein, and magainin2. Their conformations in membrane-like media are known from the experiments. Also, molecular dynamics study of surfactant lipoprotein with different explicit solvents has been reported (Kovacs, H., A. E. Mark, J. Johansson, and W. F. van Gunsteren. 1995. J. Mol. Biol. 247:808-822). The principal goal of this work is to compare the results obtained in the framework of our solvation model with available experimental and computational data. The findings could be summarized as follows: 1) structural and energetic properties of studied molecules strongly depend on the solvent; membrane-mimetic media significantly promote formation of alpha-helices capable of traversing the bilayer, whereas a polar environment destabilizes alpha-helical conformation via reduction of solvent-exposed surface area and packing; 2) the structures calculated in a membrane-like environment agree with the experimental ones; 3) noticeable differences in conformation of surfactant lipoprotein assessed via Monte Carlo simulation with implicit solvent (this work) and molecular dynamics in explicit solvent were observed; 4) in vacuo simulations do not correctly reproduce protein-membrane interactions, and hence should be avoided in modeling membrane proteins. PMID:10233063

  8. Elasticity, strength and stability of bilayer lipid membranes and their changes due to phospholipid modification.

    PubMed

    Passechnik, V I; Hianik, T; Karagodin, V P; Kagan, V E

    1984-12-01

    Elasticity measurements of bilayer lipid membranes (BLM) based on registration of the third harmonic of the membrane current during the application of a periodic tension to the membrane was used to study the effects of lipid peroxidation (LPO) and phospholipase A on BLM. LPO resulted in decreased values of the Young modulus for BLM, while some products of LPO and phospholipid hydrolysis (linolenic acid) were able to increase drastically the modulus. The presence of individual products of LPO and phospholipid hydrolysis in BLM produced non-additive effects on the elasticity, strength and stability of BLM. Lysolecithine strongly affected both the strength and stability of BLM. without changing its elasticity modulus. It was found that the lower the rate of structural changes in lecithine BLM, the longer its lifetime. Membranes having a heterogeneous polar composition form more stable BLM as compared to chemically homogeneous membranes.

  9. Fluctuations of coupled fluid and solid membranes with application to red blood cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auth, Thorsten; Safran, S. A.; Gov, Nir S.

    2007-11-01

    The fluctuation spectra and the intermembrane interaction of two membranes at a fixed average distance are investigated. Each membrane can either be a fluid or a solid membrane, and in isolation, its fluctuations are described by a bare or a wave-vector-dependent bending modulus, respectively. The membranes interact via their excluded-volume interaction; the average distance is maintained by an external, homogeneous pressure. For strong coupling, the fluctuations can be described by a single, effective membrane that combines the elastic properties. For weak coupling, the fluctuations of the individual, noninteracting membranes are recovered. The case of a composite membrane consisting of one fluid and one solid membrane can serve as a microscopic model for the plasma membrane and cytoskeleton of the red blood cell. We find that, despite the complex microstructure of bilayers and cytoskeletons in a real cell, the fluctuations with wavelengths λ≳400nm are well described by the fluctuations of a single, polymerized membrane (provided that there are no inhomogeneities of the microstructure). The model is applied to the fluctuation data of discocytes (“normal” red blood cells), a stomatocyte, and an echinocyte. The elastic parameters of the membrane and an effective temperature that quantifies active, metabolically driven fluctuations are extracted from the experiments.

  10. [A study of the inhomogeneity of bilayer lipid membranes by measurements of higher harmonics of transmembrane current].

    PubMed

    Anosov, A A; Barabanenkov, Iu N; Sel'skiĭ, A G

    2006-01-01

    Higher harmonics of alternating current in bilayer lipid membranes caused by sinusoidal voltage applied to the membrane were measured. The bilayer lipid membranes were prepared from diphytanoylphosphatidylcholine in n-decane and n-tetradecane, and measurements were conducted with the aid of an analog-to-digital converter of 16th category. Sinusoidal voltage was formed using a digital-to-analog converter of the 16th category. The dynamic region of measurements was up 90 dB. The results of measurements were used to determine the alpha and beta coefficients of the expansion of membrane capacity C in terms of membrane voltage U C = C0 (1 + alphaU2 + betaU4). We showed in the framework of the electrostriction model that the relation between the alpha and beta coefficients characterizes the inhomogeneity of bilayer lipid membrane with respect to its thickness and Young modulus of elasticity.

  11. Bathroom greywater recycling using polyelectrolyte-complex bilayer membrane: Advanced study of membrane structure and treatment efficiency.

    PubMed

    Oh, K S; Poh, P E; Chong, M N; Chan, E S; Lau, E V; Saint, C P

    2016-09-01

    Polyelectrolyte-complex bilayer membrane (PCBM) was fabricated using biodegradable chitosan and alginate polymers for subsequent application in the treatment of bathroom greywater. In this study, the properties of PCBMs were studied and it was found that the formation of polyelectrolyte network reduced the molecular weight cut-off (MWCO) from 242kDa in chitosan membrane to 2.71kDa in PCBM. The decrease in MWCO of PCBM results in better greywater treatment efficiency, subsequently demonstrated in a greywater filtration study where treated greywater effluent met the household reclaimed water standard of <2 NTU turbidity and <30ppm total suspended solids (TSS). In addition, a further 20% improvement in chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal was achieved as compared to a single layer chitosan membrane. Results from this study show that the biodegradable PCBM is a potential membrane material in producing clean treated greywater for non-potable applications. PMID:27185127

  12. Bathroom greywater recycling using polyelectrolyte-complex bilayer membrane: Advanced study of membrane structure and treatment efficiency.

    PubMed

    Oh, K S; Poh, P E; Chong, M N; Chan, E S; Lau, E V; Saint, C P

    2016-09-01

    Polyelectrolyte-complex bilayer membrane (PCBM) was fabricated using biodegradable chitosan and alginate polymers for subsequent application in the treatment of bathroom greywater. In this study, the properties of PCBMs were studied and it was found that the formation of polyelectrolyte network reduced the molecular weight cut-off (MWCO) from 242kDa in chitosan membrane to 2.71kDa in PCBM. The decrease in MWCO of PCBM results in better greywater treatment efficiency, subsequently demonstrated in a greywater filtration study where treated greywater effluent met the household reclaimed water standard of <2 NTU turbidity and <30ppm total suspended solids (TSS). In addition, a further 20% improvement in chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal was achieved as compared to a single layer chitosan membrane. Results from this study show that the biodegradable PCBM is a potential membrane material in producing clean treated greywater for non-potable applications.

  13. Characterization of hybrid bilayer membranes on silver electrodes as biocompatible SERS substrates to study membrane-protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Millo, Diego; Bonifacio, Alois; Moncelli, Maria Rosa; Sergo, Valter; Gooijer, Cees; van der Zwan, Gert

    2010-11-01

    Hybrid bilayer lipid membranes (HBMs) were built on roughened silver electrodes exhibiting surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) activity. The HBM consisted of a first layer of octadecanethiol (ODT) directly bound to the electrode surface, on which a second layer of 1,2-diphytanoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPhPC) was obtained by self-assembled phospholipid vesicle fusion. The electrochemical properties of the HBM were investigated in situ by cyclic voltammetry (CV), AC voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The results indicate that our HBMs are well-formed, and their insulating properties are comparable to those observed for HBM supported by smooth metal substrates. The interaction between the bilayer and the human enzyme cytochrome P450 2D6 (CYP2D6) was investigated. Surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering (SERRS) measurements in combination with AC and EIS, performed on the same electrode sample, proved that the CYP2D6 is immobilized on the HBM without evident alterations of its active site and without significant perturbations of the bilayer architecture. This study yields novel insights into the properties of HBMs built on roughened surfaces, providing in situ electrochemical characterization of a substrate which is suitable for studying peripheral membrane proteins with SERRS spectroscopy.

  14. Characterization of ion channels from Acetabularia plasma membrane in planar lipid bilayers.

    PubMed

    White, P J; Smahel, M; Thiel, G

    1993-04-01

    Plasma membrane from Acetabularia acetabulum was prepared by aqueous-polymer two-phase partitioning and incorporated into planar 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl phosphatidylethanolamine bilayers by stirring in the presence of a (cis:trans) 325:100 mM KCl gradient. Under these conditions five distinct K(+)-selective channels were observed which had unitary chord-conductances (determined between 30 mV either side of the reversal potential) and frequencies of incorporation (in parentheses) of 1,600 pS (26%), 485 pS (21%), 259 pS (53%), 140 pS (37%) and 27 pS (37%). Two Cl(-)-selective channels were also observed, which had unitary chord-conductances of 8 and 48 pS and were present in 21 and 16% of bilayers, respectively. The voltage dependencies of channel open probability (Po), open-state time constant (tau o) and closed-state time constant (tau c) were determined for the 259, 140 and 27 pS K+ channels. The Po of all three channels increased with increasingly positive membrane potentials. Thus, since these channels were oriented with their extracellular face adjacent to the cis chamber, which was grounded, all would exhibit outward rectification in vivo. Changes in Po were effected by modulation of tau c in all channels, which shortened as membrane potentials became more positive, and also of tau o in the 140 and 27 pS channels, which increased as membrane potentials became more positive. Extracellular (cis) KCl concentration (and/or the KCl gradient across the bilayer) affected the Po of all three K+ channels, shifting the Po/membrane potential relationship in the direction of the change in the potassium reversal potential. In all channels this was achieved largely by changes in tau c.

  15. Fuel cell membrane hydration and fluid metering

    DOEpatents

    Jones, Daniel O.; Walsh, Michael M.

    2003-01-01

    A hydration system includes fuel cell fluid flow plate(s) and injection port(s). Each plate has flow channel(s) with respective inlet(s) for receiving respective portion(s) of a given stream of reactant fluid for a fuel cell. Each injection port injects a portion of liquid water directly into its respective flow channel. This serves to hydrate at least corresponding part(s) of a given membrane of the corresponding fuel cell(s). The hydration system may be augmented by a metering system including flow regulator(s). Each flow regulator meters an injecting at inlet(s) of each plate of respective portions of liquid into respective portion(s) of a given stream of fluid by corresponding injection port(s).

  16. Fuel cell membrane hydration and fluid metering

    DOEpatents

    Jones, Daniel O.; Walsh, Michael M.

    1999-01-01

    A hydration system includes fuel cell fluid flow plate(s) and injection port(s). Each plate has flow channel(s) with respective inlet(s) for receiving respective portion(s) of a given stream of reactant fluid for a fuel cell. Each injection port injects a portion of liquid water directly into its respective flow channel in order to mix its respective portion of liquid water with the corresponding portion of the stream. This serves to hydrate at least corresponding part(s) of a given membrane of the corresponding fuel cell(s). The hydration system may be augmented by a metering system including flow regulator(s). Each flow regulator meters an injecting at inlet(s) of each plate of respective portions of liquid into respective portion(s) of a given stream of fluid by corresponding injection port(s).

  17. Membrane-Protein Interactions in a Generic Coarse-Grained Model for Lipid Bilayers

    PubMed Central

    West, Beate; Brown, Frank L.H.; Schmid, Friederike

    2009-01-01

    Abstract We study membrane-protein interactions and membrane-mediated protein-protein interactions by Monte Carlo simulations of a generic coarse-grained model for lipid bilayers with cylindrical hydrophobic inclusions. The strength of the hydrophobic force and the hydrophobic thickness of the proteins are systematically varied. The results are compared with analytical predictions of two popular analytical theories: The Landau-de Gennes theory and the elastic theory. The elastic theory provides an excellent description of the fluctuation spectra of pure membranes and successfully reproduces the deformation profiles of membranes around single proteins. However, its prediction for the potential of mean force between proteins is not compatible with the simulation data for large distances. The simulations show that the lipid-mediated interactions are governed by five competing factors: direct interactions; lipid-induced depletion interactions; lipid bridging; lipid packing; and a smooth long-range contribution. The mechanisms leading to hydrophobic mismatch interactions are critically analyzed. PMID:18835907

  18. Using supported bilayers to study the spatiotemporal organization of membrane bound proteins

    PubMed Central

    Field, Christine M.; Groen, Aaron C.; Mitchison, Timothy J.

    2015-01-01

    Cell division in prokaryotes and eukaryotes is commonly initiated by the well-controlled binding of proteins to the cytoplasmic side of the cell membrane. However, a precise characterization of the spatiotemporal dynamics of membrane-bound proteins is often difficult to achieve in vivo. Here, we present protocols for the use of supported lipid bilayers to rebuild the cytokinetic machineries of cells with greatly different dimensions: the bacterium Escherichia coli and eggs of the vertebrate Xenopus laevis. Combined with total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy, these experimental setups allow for precise quantitative analyses of membrane-bound proteins. The protocols described to obtain glass-supported membranes from bacterial and vertebrate lipids can be used as starting points for other reconstitution experiments. We believe that similar biochemical assays will be instrumental to study the biochemistry and biophysics underlying a variety of complex cellular tasks, such as signaling, vesicle trafficking and cell motility. PMID:25997350

  19. Comprehensive analysis of compositional interface fluctuations in planar lipid bilayer membranes.

    PubMed

    Han, Tao; Haataja, Mikko

    2011-11-01

    In this paper we present a comprehensive analysis of line tension-driven compositional interface fluctuations in planar lipid bilayer membranes. Our starting point is the advective Cahn-Hilliard equation for the local lipid composition in symmetric membranes, which explicitly incorporates both advective and diffusive lipid transport processes, and which is coupled to the continuum hydrodynamic equations governing the flow behavior of the membrane and surrounding solvent with finite subphase thickness. In order to extract the interface dynamics from the continuum phase-field formalism, we first derive the appropriate sharp-interface limit equations. We then carry out a linear perturbation analysis for the relaxational dynamics of small-amplitude sinusoidal interface fluctuations to yield the general dispersion relation ω(k) as a function of perturbation wave number k. The resulting expression incorporates the effects of diffusive and advective lipid transport processes within the membrane, viscous or viscoelastic membrane properties, coupling between membrane and solvent, and inertial effects within the membrane and solvent. It is shown that previously considered scenarios naturally emerge as limiting cases of the general result. Furthermore, we discuss two additional scenarios amenable to analysis, one in which the inertia of the solvent is relevant, and another one in which the membrane displays significant viscoelastic properties. Finally, we numerically evaluate the general dispersion relation for three representative model membrane systems. PMID:22181440

  20. Critical particle sizes for the engulfment of nanoparticles by membranes and vesicles with bilayer asymmetry.

    PubMed

    Agudo-Canalejo, Jaime; Lipowsky, Reinhard

    2015-01-01

    The adhesion and engulfment of nanoparticles by biomembranes is essential for many processes such as biomedical imaging, drug delivery, nanotoxicity, and viral infection. Many studies have shown that both surface chemistry, which determines the adhesive strength of the membrane-particle interactions, and particle size represent key parameters for these processes. Here, we show that the asymmetry between the two leaflets of a bilayer membrane provides another key parameter for the engulfment of nanoparticles. The asymmetric membrane prefers to curve in a certain manner as quantitatively described by its spontaneous curvature. We derive two general relationships between particle size, adhesive strength, and spontaneous curvature that determine the instabilities of (i) the nonadhering or free state and (ii) the completely engulfed state of the particle. For model membranes such as lipid or polymer bilayers with a uniform composition, the two relationships lead to two critical particle sizes that determine four distinct engulfment regimes, both for the endocytic and for the exocytic engulfment process. For strong adhesion, the critical particle sizes are on the order of 10 nm, while they are on the order of 1000 nm for weak or ultraweak adhesion. Our theoretical results are therefore accessible to both experimental studies and computer simulations of model membranes. In order to address the more complex process of receptor-mediated endocytosis, we take the adhesion-induced segregation of membrane components into account and consider bound and unbound membrane segments that differ in their spontaneous curvatures. To model protein coats as formed during clathrin-dependent endocytosis, we focus on the case in which the bound membrane segments have a large spontaneous curvature compared to the unbound ones. We derive explicit expressions for the engulfment rate and the uptake of nanoparticles, which both depend on the particle size in a nonmonotonic manner, and provide a

  1. Continuity of Monolayer-Bilayer Junctions for Localization of Lipid Raft Microdomains in Model Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, Yong-Sang; Wittenberg, Nathan J.; Suh, Jeng-Hun; Lee, Sang-Wook; Sohn, Youngjoo; Oh, Sang-Hyun; Parikh, Atul N.; Lee, Sin-Doo

    2016-01-01

    We show that the selective localization of cholesterol-rich domains and associated ganglioside receptors prefer to occur in the monolayer across continuous monolayer-bilayer junctions (MBJs) in supported lipid membranes. For the MBJs, glass substrates were patterned with poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) oligomers by thermally-assisted contact printing, leaving behind 3 nm-thick PDMS patterns. The hydrophobicity of the transferred PDMS patterns was precisely tuned by the stamping temperature. Lipid monolayers were formed on the PDMS patterned surface while lipid bilayers were on the bare glass surface. Due to the continuity of the lipid membranes over the MBJs, essentially free diffusion of lipids was allowed between the monolayer on the PDMS surface and the upper leaflet of the bilayer on the glass substrate. The preferential localization of sphingomyelin, ganglioside GM1 and cholesterol in the monolayer region enabled to develop raft microdomains through coarsening of nanorafts. Our methodology provides a simple and effective scheme of non-disruptive manipulation of the chemical landscape associated with lipid phase separations, which leads to more sophisticated applications in biosensors and as cell culture substrates. PMID:27230411

  2. Distribution and dynamics of quinones in the lipid bilayer mimicking the inner membrane of mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Kaurola, Petri; Sharma, Vivek; Vonk, Amanda; Vattulainen, Ilpo; Róg, Tomasz

    2016-09-01

    Quinone and its analogues (Q) constitute an important class of compounds that perform key electron transfer reactions in oxidative- and photo-phosphorylation. In the inner membrane of mitochondria, ubiquinone molecules undergo continuous redox transitions enabling electron transfer between the respiratory complexes. In such a dynamic system undergoing continuous turnover for ATP synthesis, an uninterrupted supply of substrate molecules is absolutely necessary. In the current work, we have performed atomistic molecular dynamics simulations and free energy calculations to assess the structure, dynamics, and localization of quinone and its analogues in a lipid bilayer, whose composition mimics the one in the inner mitochondrial membrane. The results show that there is a strong tendency of both quinone and quinol molecules to localize in the vicinity of the lipids' acyl groups, right under the lipid head group region. Additionally, we observe a second location in the middle of the bilayer where quinone molecules tend to stabilize. Translocation of quinone through a lipid bilayer is very fast and occurs in 10-100ns time scale, whereas the translocation of quinol is at least an order of magnitude slower. We suggest that this has important mechanistic implications given that the localization of Q ensures maximal occupancy of the Q-binding sites or Q-entry points in electron transport chain complexes, thereby maintaining an optimal turnover rate for ATP synthesis. PMID:27342376

  3. Continuity of monolayer-bilayer junctions for localization of lipid raft microdomains in model membranes

    DOE PAGES

    Ryu, Yong -Sang; Wittenberg, Nathan J.; Suh, Jeng -Hun; Lee, Sang -Wook; Sohn, Youngjoo; Oh, Sang -Hyun; Parikh, Atul N.; Lee, Sin -Doo

    2016-05-27

    We show that the selective localization of cholesterol-rich domains and associated ganglioside receptors prefer to occur in the monolayer across continuous monolayer-bilayer junctions (MBJs) in supported lipid membranes. For the MBJs, glass substrates were patterned with poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) oligomers by thermally-assisted contact printing, leaving behind 3 nm-thick PDMS patterns. The hydrophobicity of the transferred PDMS patterns was precisely tuned by the stamping temperature. Lipid monolayers were formed on the PDMS patterned surface while lipid bilayers were on the bare glass surface. Due to the continuity of the lipid membranes over the MBJs, essentially free diffusion of lipids was allowed betweenmore » the monolayer on the PDMS surface and the upper leaflet of the bilayer on the glass substrate. The preferential localization of sphingomyelin, ganglioside GM1 and cholesterol in the monolayer region enabled to develop raft microdomains through coarsening of nanorafts. Furthermore, our methodology provides a simple and effective scheme of non-disruptive manipulation of the chemical landscape associated with lipid phase separations, which leads to more sophisticated applications in biosensors and as cell culture substrates.« less

  4. Continuity of Monolayer-Bilayer Junctions for Localization of Lipid Raft Microdomains in Model Membranes.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Yong-Sang; Wittenberg, Nathan J; Suh, Jeng-Hun; Lee, Sang-Wook; Sohn, Youngjoo; Oh, Sang-Hyun; Parikh, Atul N; Lee, Sin-Doo

    2016-01-01

    We show that the selective localization of cholesterol-rich domains and associated ganglioside receptors prefer to occur in the monolayer across continuous monolayer-bilayer junctions (MBJs) in supported lipid membranes. For the MBJs, glass substrates were patterned with poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) oligomers by thermally-assisted contact printing, leaving behind 3 nm-thick PDMS patterns. The hydrophobicity of the transferred PDMS patterns was precisely tuned by the stamping temperature. Lipid monolayers were formed on the PDMS patterned surface while lipid bilayers were on the bare glass surface. Due to the continuity of the lipid membranes over the MBJs, essentially free diffusion of lipids was allowed between the monolayer on the PDMS surface and the upper leaflet of the bilayer on the glass substrate. The preferential localization of sphingomyelin, ganglioside GM1 and cholesterol in the monolayer region enabled to develop raft microdomains through coarsening of nanorafts. Our methodology provides a simple and effective scheme of non-disruptive manipulation of the chemical landscape associated with lipid phase separations, which leads to more sophisticated applications in biosensors and as cell culture substrates. PMID:27230411

  5. The Bilayer Enhances Rhodopsin Kinetic Stability in Bovine Rod Outer Segment Disk Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Corley, Scott C.; Sprangers, Peter; Albert, Arlene D.

    2011-01-01

    Rhodopsin is a kinetically stable protein constituting >90% of rod outer segment disk membrane protein. To investigate the bilayer contribution to rhodopsin kinetic stability, disk membranes were systematically disrupted by octyl-β-D-glucopyranoside. Rhodopsin kinetic stability was examined under subsolubilizing (rhodopsin in a bilayer environment perturbed by octyl-β-D-glucopyranoside) and under fully solubilizing conditions (rhodopsin in a micelle with cosolubilized phospholipids). As determined by DSC, rhodopsin exhibited a scan-rate-dependent irreversible endothermic transition at all stages of solubilization. The transition temperature (Tm) decreased in the subsolubilizing stage. However, once the rhodopsin was in a micelle environment there was little change of the Tm as the phospholipid/rhodopsin ratio in the mixed micelles decreased during the fully solubilized stage. Rhodopsin thermal denaturation is consistent with the two-state irreversible model at all stages of solubilization. The activation energy of denaturation (Eact) was calculated from the scan rate dependence of the Tm and from the rate of rhodopsin thermal bleaching at all stages of solubilization. The Eact as determined by both techniques decreased in the subsolubilizing stage, but remained constant once fully solubilized. These results indicate the bilayer structure increases the Eact to rhodopsin denaturation. PMID:21689528

  6. Continuity of Monolayer-Bilayer Junctions for Localization of Lipid Raft Microdomains in Model Membranes.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Yong-Sang; Wittenberg, Nathan J; Suh, Jeng-Hun; Lee, Sang-Wook; Sohn, Youngjoo; Oh, Sang-Hyun; Parikh, Atul N; Lee, Sin-Doo

    2016-05-27

    We show that the selective localization of cholesterol-rich domains and associated ganglioside receptors prefer to occur in the monolayer across continuous monolayer-bilayer junctions (MBJs) in supported lipid membranes. For the MBJs, glass substrates were patterned with poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) oligomers by thermally-assisted contact printing, leaving behind 3 nm-thick PDMS patterns. The hydrophobicity of the transferred PDMS patterns was precisely tuned by the stamping temperature. Lipid monolayers were formed on the PDMS patterned surface while lipid bilayers were on the bare glass surface. Due to the continuity of the lipid membranes over the MBJs, essentially free diffusion of lipids was allowed between the monolayer on the PDMS surface and the upper leaflet of the bilayer on the glass substrate. The preferential localization of sphingomyelin, ganglioside GM1 and cholesterol in the monolayer region enabled to develop raft microdomains through coarsening of nanorafts. Our methodology provides a simple and effective scheme of non-disruptive manipulation of the chemical landscape associated with lipid phase separations, which leads to more sophisticated applications in biosensors and as cell culture substrates.

  7. Dynamic implicit-solvent coarse-grained models of lipid bilayer membranes: fluctuating hydrodynamics thermostat.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yaohong; Sigurdsson, Jon Karl; Brandt, Erik; Atzberger, Paul J

    2013-08-01

    We introduce a thermostat based on fluctuating hydrodynamics for dynamic simulations of implicit-solvent coarse-grained models of lipid bilayer membranes. We show our fluctuating hydrodynamics approach captures interesting correlations in the dynamics of lipid bilayer membranes that are missing in simulations performed using standard Langevin dynamics. Our momentum conserving thermostat accounts for solvent-mediated momentum transfer by coupling coarse-grained degrees of freedom to stochastic continuum fields that account for both the solvent hydrodynamics and thermal fluctuations. We present both a general framework and specific methods to couple the particle and continuum degrees of freedom in a manner consistent with statistical mechanics and amenable to efficient computational simulation. For self-assembled vesicles, we study the diffusivity of lipids and their spatial correlations. We find the hydrodynamic coupling yields within the bilayer interesting correlations between diffusing lipids that manifest as a vortex-like structure similar to those observed in explicit-solvent simulations. We expect the introduced fluctuating hydrodynamics methods to provide a way to extend implicit-solvent models for use in a wide variety of dynamic studies.

  8. Membrane fusion-competent virus-like proteoliposomes and proteinaceous supported bilayers made directly from cell plasma membranes.

    PubMed

    Costello, Deirdre A; Hsia, Chih-Yun; Millet, Jean K; Porri, Teresa; Daniel, Susan

    2013-05-28

    Virus-like particles are useful materials for studying virus-host interactions in a safe manner. However, the standard production of pseudovirus based on the vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) backbone is an intricate procedure that requires trained laboratory personnel. In this work, a new strategy for creating virus-like proteoliposomes (VLPLs) and virus-like supported bilayers (VLSBs) is presented. This strategy uses a cell blebbing technique to induce the formation of nanoscale vesicles from the plasma membrane of BHK cells expressing the hemagglutinin (HA) fusion protein of influenza X-31. These vesicles and supported bilayers contain HA and are used to carry out single particle membrane fusion events, monitored using total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy. The results of these studies show that the VLPLs and VLSBs contain HA proteins that are fully competent to carry out membrane fusion, including the formation of a fusion pore and the release of fluorophores loaded into vesicles. This new strategy for creating spherical and planar geometry virus-like membranes has many potential applications. VLPLs could be used to study fusion proteins of virulent viruses in a safe manner, or they could be used as therapeutic delivery particles to transport beneficial proteins coexpressed in the cells to a target cell. VLSBs could facilitate high throughput screening of antiviral drugs or pathogen-host cell interactions.

  9. Fluid bilayer structure determination: Joint refinement in composition space using X-ray and neutron diffraction data

    SciTech Connect

    White, S.H.; Wiener, M.C.

    1994-12-31

    Experimentally-determined structural models of fluid lipid bilayers are essential for verifying molecular dynamics simulations of bilayers and for understanding the structural consequences of peptide interactions. The extreme thermal motion of bilayers precludes the possibility of atomic-level structural models. Defining {open_quote}the structure{close_quote} of a bilayer as the time-averaged transbilayer distribution of the water and the principal lipid structural groups such as the carbonyls and double-bonds (quasimolecular fragments), one can represent the bilayer structure as a sum of Gaussian functions referred to collectively as the quasimolecular structure. One method of determining the structure is by neutron diffraction combined with exhaustive specific deuteration. This method is impractical because of the expense of the chemical syntheses and the limited amount of neutron beam time currently available. We have therefore developed the composition space refinement method for combining X-ray and minimal neutron diffraction data to arrive at remarkably detailed and accurate structures of fluid bilayers. The composition space representation of the bilayer describes the probability of occupancy per unit length across the width of the bilayer of each quasimolecular component and permits the joint refinement of X-ray and neutron lamellar diffraction data by means of a single quasimolecular structure that is fitted simultaneously to both data sets. Scaling of each component by the appropriate neutron or X-ray scattering length maps the composition-space profile to the appropriate scattering length space for comparison to experimental data. The difficulty with the method is that fluid bilayer structures are generally only marginally determined by the experimental data. This means that the space of possible solutions must be extensively explored in conjunction with a thorough analysis of errors.

  10. Effects of hydrostatic pressure on lipid bilayer membranes. I. Influence on membrane thickness and activation volumes of lipophilic ion transport.

    PubMed

    Benz, R; Conti, F

    1986-07-01

    Measurements of membrane capacitance, Cm, were performed on lipid bilayers of different lipidic composition (diphytanoyl phosphatidylcholine PPhPC, dioleoyl phosphatidylcholine DOPE, glycerylmonooleate GMO) and containing n-decane as solvent. In the same membranes, the absorption of the lipophilic ions dipicrylamine (DPA-) and tetraphenylborate (TPhB-), and the kinetics of their translocation between the two membrane faces have been studied. The data were obtained from charge pulse relaxation measurements. Upon increasing pressure the specific capacity Cm increased in a fully reversible and reproducible way reflecting a thinning of the membrane that is attributed to extrusion of n-decane from the black membrane area. High pressure decreased the rate constant, ki, for lipophilic ion translocation. After correcting for changes in the height of the energy barrier for translocation due to membrane thinning the pressure dependence of ki yields an apparent activation volume for translocation of approximately 14 cm3/mol both for DPA- and TPhB-. Changes in lipophilic ion absorption following a step of pressure developed with a rather slow time course due to diffusion limitations in solution. The stationary concentration of membrane absorbed lipophilic ions increased with pressure according to an apparent volume of absorption of about -10 cm3/mol. The relevance of the results for the interpretation of the effects of pressure on nerve membrane physiology is discussed.

  11. Immobilization and activity assay of cytochrome P450 on patterned lipid membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Ueda, Yoshihiro; Morigaki, Kenichi . E-mail: morigaki-kenichi@aist.go.jp; Tatsu, Yoshiro; Yumoto, Noboru; Imaishi, Hiromasa . E-mail: himaish@kobe-u.ac.jp

    2007-04-20

    We report on a methodology for immobilizing cytochrome P450 on the surface of micropatterned lipid bilayer membranes and measuring the enzymatic activity. The patterned bilayer comprised a matrix of polymeric lipid bilayers and embedded fluid lipid bilayers. The polymeric lipid bilayer domains act as a barrier to confine fluid lipid bilayers in defined areas and as a framework to stabilize embedded membranes. The fluid bilayer domains, on the other hand, can contain lipid compositions that facilitate the fusion between lipid membranes, and are intended to be used as the binding agent of microsomes containing rat CYP1A1. By optimizing the membrane compositions of the fluid bilayers, we could selectively immobilize microsomal membranes on these domains. The enzymatic activity was significantly higher on lipid bilayer substrates compared with direct adsorption on glass. Furthermore, competitive assay experiment between two fluorogenic substrates demonstrated the feasibility of bioassays based on immobilized P450s.

  12. Fabrication and photoelectric properties of self-assembled bilayer lipid membranes on conducting glass.

    PubMed

    Gao, H; Luo, G A; Feng, J; Ottova, A L; Tien, H T

    2000-12-01

    Supported bilayer lipid membranes (s-BLMs with and without the doping of fullerene C60) self-assembled on indium-tin oxide (ITO) glass were fabricated and characterized by cyclic voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy using a three-electrode system. The photoelectric properties of the ITO supported planar lipid bilayers were studied. Light intensity of irradiation, bias voltage, and concentration of donors have been found to be limiting factors of the transmembrane photocurrent. The facilitation effect of C60 doping in s-BLMs on the photoinduced electron transfer across s-BLM is discussed. This novel self-assembled ITO/s-BLM system may provide a simple and mechanically stable model for the study of the photoelectric and photodynamic properties of biomembranes.

  13. Charge equilibration force fields for molecular dynamics simulations of lipids, bilayers, and integral membrane protein systems.

    PubMed

    Lucas, Timothy R; Bauer, Brad A; Patel, Sandeep

    2012-02-01

    With the continuing advances in computational hardware and novel force fields constructed using quantum mechanics, the outlook for non-additive force fields is promising. Our work in the past several years has demonstrated the utility of polarizable force fields, those based on the charge equilibration formalism, for a broad range of physical and biophysical systems. We have constructed and applied polarizable force fields for lipids and lipid bilayers. In this review of our recent work, we discuss the formalism we have adopted for implementing the charge equilibration (CHEQ) method for lipid molecules. We discuss the methodology, related issues, and briefly discuss results from recent applications of such force fields. Application areas include DPPC-water monolayers, potassium ion permeation free energetics in the gramicidin A bacterial channel, and free energetics of permeation of charged amino acid analogs across the water-bilayer interface. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Membrane protein structure and function.

  14. Voltage-sensitive styryl dyes as singlet oxygen targets on the surface of bilayer lipid membrane.

    PubMed

    Sokolov, V S; Gavrilchik, A N; Kulagina, A O; Meshkov, I N; Pohl, P; Gorbunova, Yu G

    2016-08-01

    Photosensitizers are widely used as photodynamic therapeutic agents killing cancer cells by photooxidation of their components. Development of new effective photosensitive molecules requires profound knowledge of possible targets for reactive oxygen species, especially for its singlet form. Here we studied photooxidation of voltage-sensitive styryl dyes (di-4-ANEPPS, di-8-ANEPPS, RH-421 and RH-237) by singlet oxygen on the surface of bilayer lipid membranes commonly used as cell membrane models. Oxidation was induced by irradiation of a photosensitizer (aluminum phthalocyanine tetrasulfonate) and monitored by the change of dipole potential on the surface of the membrane. We studied the drop of the dipole potential both in the case when the dye molecules were adsorbed on the same side of the lipid bilayer as the photosensitizer (cis-configuration) and in the case when they were adsorbed on the opposite side (trans-configuration). Based on a simple model, we determined the rate of oxidation of the dyes from the kinetics of change of the potential during and after irradiation. This rate is proportional to steady-state concentration of singlet oxygen in the membrane under irradiation. Comparison of the oxidation rates of various dyes reveals that compounds of ANEPPS series are more sensitive to singlet oxygen than RH type dyes, indicating that naphthalene group is primarily responsible for their oxidation. PMID:27236238

  15. Arrayed lipid bilayer chambers allow single-molecule analysis of membrane transporter activity.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Rikiya; Soga, Naoki; Fujita, Daishi; Tabata, Kazuhito V; Yamauchi, Lisa; Hyeon Kim, Soo; Asanuma, Daisuke; Kamiya, Mako; Urano, Yasuteru; Suga, Hiroaki; Noji, Hiroyuki

    2014-07-24

    Nano- to micron-size reaction chamber arrays (femtolitre chamber arrays) have facilitated the development of sensitive and quantitative biological assays, such as single-molecule enzymatic assays, digital PCR and digital ELISA. However, the versatility of femtolitre chamber arrays is limited to reactions that occur in aqueous solutions. Here we report an arrayed lipid bilayer chamber system (ALBiC) that contains sub-million femtolitre chambers, each sealed with a stable 4-μm-diameter lipid bilayer membrane. When reconstituted with a limiting amount of the membrane transporter proteins α-hemolysin or F0F1-ATP synthase, the chambers within the ALBiC exhibit stochastic and quantized transporting activities. This demonstrates that the single-molecule analysis of passive and active membrane transport is achievable with the ALBiC system. This new platform broadens the versatility of femtolitre chamber arrays and paves the way for novel applications aimed at furthering our mechanistic understanding of membrane proteins' function.

  16. Voltage-sensitive styryl dyes as singlet oxygen targets on the surface of bilayer lipid membrane.

    PubMed

    Sokolov, V S; Gavrilchik, A N; Kulagina, A O; Meshkov, I N; Pohl, P; Gorbunova, Yu G

    2016-08-01

    Photosensitizers are widely used as photodynamic therapeutic agents killing cancer cells by photooxidation of their components. Development of new effective photosensitive molecules requires profound knowledge of possible targets for reactive oxygen species, especially for its singlet form. Here we studied photooxidation of voltage-sensitive styryl dyes (di-4-ANEPPS, di-8-ANEPPS, RH-421 and RH-237) by singlet oxygen on the surface of bilayer lipid membranes commonly used as cell membrane models. Oxidation was induced by irradiation of a photosensitizer (aluminum phthalocyanine tetrasulfonate) and monitored by the change of dipole potential on the surface of the membrane. We studied the drop of the dipole potential both in the case when the dye molecules were adsorbed on the same side of the lipid bilayer as the photosensitizer (cis-configuration) and in the case when they were adsorbed on the opposite side (trans-configuration). Based on a simple model, we determined the rate of oxidation of the dyes from the kinetics of change of the potential during and after irradiation. This rate is proportional to steady-state concentration of singlet oxygen in the membrane under irradiation. Comparison of the oxidation rates of various dyes reveals that compounds of ANEPPS series are more sensitive to singlet oxygen than RH type dyes, indicating that naphthalene group is primarily responsible for their oxidation.

  17. Arrayed lipid bilayer chambers allow single-molecule analysis of membrane transporter activity

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Rikiya; Soga, Naoki; Fujita, Daishi; Tabata, Kazuhito V.; Yamauchi, Lisa; Hyeon Kim, Soo; Asanuma, Daisuke; Kamiya, Mako; Urano, Yasuteru; Suga, Hiroaki; Noji, Hiroyuki

    2014-01-01

    Nano- to micron-size reaction chamber arrays (femtolitre chamber arrays) have facilitated the development of sensitive and quantitative biological assays, such as single-molecule enzymatic assays, digital PCR and digital ELISA. However, the versatility of femtolitre chamber arrays is limited to reactions that occur in aqueous solutions. Here we report an arrayed lipid bilayer chamber system (ALBiC) that contains sub-million femtolitre chambers, each sealed with a stable 4-μm-diameter lipid bilayer membrane. When reconstituted with a limiting amount of the membrane transporter proteins α-hemolysin or F0F1-ATP synthase, the chambers within the ALBiC exhibit stochastic and quantized transporting activities. This demonstrates that the single-molecule analysis of passive and active membrane transport is achievable with the ALBiC system. This new platform broadens the versatility of femtolitre chamber arrays and paves the way for novel applications aimed at furthering our mechanistic understanding of membrane proteins’ function. PMID:25058452

  18. PTEN interaction with tethered bilayer lipid membranes containing PI(4,5)P2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moldovan, R.; Shenoy, S.; Shekhar, P.; Kalinowski, A.; Gericke, A.; Heinrich, F.; Loesche, M.

    2009-03-01

    Synthetic lipid membrane models are frequently used for the study of biophysical processes at cell membranes. We use a robust membrane model, the tethered bilayer lipid membrane (tBLM), based on a (C14)2-(PEO)6-thiol anchor, WC14 [1]. Such membranes can be prepared to contain single phospholipids or complex lipid mixtures [2], including functional lipids involved in cell signaling, such as the highly charged phosphatidylinositol phosphates (PIPs). To study the interaction between the tumor suppressor PTEN (phosphatase and tensin homologue deleted on chromosome 10) and model membranes we have incorporated phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate (PI(4,5)P2) in tBLMs and use fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS), neutron reflectometry (NR) and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) for their characterization. NR shows that tBLMs formed with PI(4,5)P2 are complete. FCS of labeled PI(4,5)P2 shows that diffusion occurs at the time scale characteristic of membrane-incorporated lipid. Finally, SPR shows specific binding of PTEN to the model membrane thus confirming the incorporation of PI(4,5)P2 into the tBLM. [1] McGillivray et al, Biointerphases 2, 21-33 (2007) [2] Heinrich et al, Langmuir, submitted

  19. Interactions of Al(acac)3 with cell membranes and model phospholipid bilayers.

    PubMed

    Suwalsky, M; Ungerer, B; Villena, F; Norris, B; Cárdenas, H; Zatta, P

    1999-07-15

    Aluminum is a neurotoxic agent; however, little information has been obtained regarding its molecular cytotoxicity and the effects on the stability of biological membranes. This is mainly due to the ill-defined chemical speciation of the metal compounds. For this reason, the present study used aluminum acetylacetonate, (Al(acac)3), a neutral, chemically well-defined, hydrolytically stable and lipophilic compound. To understand the molecular mechanism of its interaction with cell membranes, Al(acac)3 was incubated with human erythrocytes, isolated toad skin and molecular models of biomembranes. The latter consisted of multilayers of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) and dimyristoyphosphatidylethanolamine (DMPE), representative of phospholipid classes located in the outer and inner monolayers of the human erythrocyte membrane, respectively. The results showed that Al(acac)3 interacted with the erythrocyte membrane modifying its normal discoid morphology to both echinocytic and stomatocytic shapes. This finding indicates that the Al complex was inserted in both the outer and inner layers of the red cell membrane, a conclusion supported by X-ray diffraction analyses of DMPC and DMPE bilayers. Electrophysiological measurements performed on toad skin revealed a significant decrease in the potential difference and short-circuit current responses after application of Al(acac)3, effects interpreted to reflect inhibition of the active transport of ions. Al(acac)3 was active on both surfaces of the skin suggesting that the membrane was permeated by the metal complex. It is concluded that Al(acac)3 both alters the molecular structure of the lipid bilayer, thereby modifying the biophysical properties of the cell membrane, and changes its physiological properties. PMID:10499289

  20. Adsorption of monovalent cations to bilayer membranes containing negative phospholipids.

    PubMed

    Eisenberg, M; Gresalfi, T; Riccio, T; McLaughlin, S

    1979-11-13

    The electrophoretic mobilities of multilamellar phosphatidylserine vesicles were measured in solutions containing monovalent cations, and the xi potentials, the electrostatic potentials at the hydrodynamic plane of shear, were calculated from the Helmholtz--Smoluchowski equation. In the presence of 0.1 M lithium, sodium, ammonium, potassium, rubidium, cesium, tetraethylammonium, and tetramethylammonium chloride, the xi potentials were -60, -62, -72, -73, -77, -80, -82, and -91 mV, respectively. Similar results were obtained with phosphatidylglycerol vesicles; different results were obtained with cardiolipin, phosphatidylinositol, and phosphatidic acid vesicles. The phosphatidylserine results are interpreted in terms of the Stern equation, a combination of the Gouy equation from the theory of the diffuse double layer, the Boltzmann relation, and the Langmuir adsorption isotherm. Evidence is presented that suggests the hydrodynamic plane of shear is 2 A from the surface of the membrane in solutions containing the alkali metal cations. With this assumption, the intrinsic association constants of the above monovalent cations with phosphatidylserine are 0.8, 0.6, 0.17, 0.15, 0.08, 0.05, 0.03, and 0 M-1, respectively. The validity of this approach was tested in two ways. First, the xi potentials of vesicles formed from mixtures of phosphatidylserine and a zwitterionic lipid, phosphatidylcholine, were measured in solutions containing different concentrations of sodium. All the data could be described by the Stern equation if the "relaxation" of the ionic atmosphere, which is predicted by classic electrostatic and hydrodynamic theory to occur at low salt concentrations and high potentials, was circumvented by using only large (diameter greater than 13 micrometers) vesicles for these measurements. Second, the fluorescent probe 2-(p-toluidinyl)naphthalene-6-sulfonate was used to estimate the potential at the surface of phosphatidylserine and phosphatidylglycerol vesicles

  1. A calorimetric and spectroscopic comparison of the effects of cholesterol and its sulfur-containing analogs thiocholesterol and cholesterol sulfate on the thermotropic phase behavior and organization of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine bilayer membranes.

    PubMed

    Benesch, Matthew G K; Lewis, Ruthven N A H; McElhaney, Ronald N

    2016-02-01

    We performed differential scanning calorimetric (DSC) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopic studies of the effects of cholesterol (Chol), thiocholesterol (tChol) and cholesterol sulfate (CholS) on the thermotropic phase behavior and organization of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) bilayer membranes. Our DSC results indicate that Chol and tChol incorporation produce small temperature increases in the main phase transition broad component while CholS markedly decreases it, but Chol decreases cooperativity and enthalpy more strongly than CholS and especially tChol. Hence, Chol and tChol thermally stabilize fluid DPPC bilayer sterol-rich domains while CholS markedly destabilizes them, and CholS and particularly tChol are less miscible in such domains. Our FTIR spectroscopic results indicate that Chol incorporation increases the rotational conformational order of fluid DPPC bilayers to a slightly and somewhat greater degree than tChol and CholS, respectively, consistent with our DSC findings. Also, Chol and CholS produce comparable degrees of H-bonding (hydration) of the DPPC ester carbonyls in fluid bilayers, whereas tChol increases H-bonding. At low temperatures, Chol is fully soluble in gel-state DPPC bilayers, whereas tChol and CholS are not. Thus tChol and CholS incorporation can produce considerably different effects on DPPC bilayers. In particular, the tChol thiol group markedly reduces its lateral miscibility and increases DPPC carbonyl H-bonding without significantly affecting the other characteristic effects of Chol itself, while the CholS sulfate group significantly reduces its ability to thermally stabilize and order fluid DPPC membranes. This latter result suggests that the molecular basis for the purported ability of CholS to "stabilize" various biological membranes should be re-examined.

  2. Effect of Antimicrobial Peptide on Dynamics of Phosphocholine Membrane. Role of Cholesterol and Physical State of Bilayer

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, Veerendra K; Mamontov, Eugene; Anunciado, Divina B; O'Neill, Hugh Michael; Urban, Volker S

    2015-06-24

    Antimicrobial peptides are universal in all forms of life and are well known for their strong interaction with the cell membrane. This makes them a popular target for investigation of peptide-lipid interactions. Here we report the effect of melittin, an important antimicrobial peptide, on the dynamics of membranes based on 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DMPC) lipid in both the solid gel and fluid phases. To probe the phase transition, elastic neutron intensity temperature scans have been carried out on DMPC-based unilamellar vesicles (ULV) with and without melittin. We have found that addition of a small amount (0.2 mol%) melittin eliminates the steep fall in the elastic intensity at 296 K associated with the solid gel to fluid phase transition, which is observed for pure DMPC vesicles. Quasielastic neutron scattering (QENS) experiments have been carried out on DMPC ULV in the solid gel and fluid phases with and without 0.2 mol % melittin. The data analysis invariably shows the presence of lateral and internal motions of the DMPC molecule. We found that melittin does have a profound effect on the dynamics of lipid molecules, especially on the lateral motion, and affects it in a different way, depending on the phase of the bilayers. In the solid gel phase, it acts as a plasticizer, enhancing the lateral motion of DMPC. However, in the fluid phase it acts as a stiffening agent, restricting the lateral motion of the lipid molecules. These observations are consistent with the mean squared displacements extracted from the elastic intensity temperature scans. Cholesterol is a vital component of eukaryotic membrane, which is a natural target for melittin. To investigate the effect of melittin on vesicles supplemented with cholesterol, QENS experiments have also been carried out on DMPC ULV with 20 mol% cholesterol in the presence and absence of 0.2 mol% melittin. Remarkably, the effects of melittin on the membrane dynamics disappear in the presence of 20 mol

  3. Effect of Antimicrobial Peptide on Dynamics of Phosphocholine Membrane. Role of Cholesterol and Physical State of Bilayer

    DOE PAGES

    Sharma, Veerendra K; Mamontov, Eugene; Anunciado, Divina B; O'Neill, Hugh Michael; Urban, Volker S

    2015-06-24

    Antimicrobial peptides are universal in all forms of life and are well known for their strong interaction with the cell membrane. This makes them a popular target for investigation of peptide-lipid interactions. Here we report the effect of melittin, an important antimicrobial peptide, on the dynamics of membranes based on 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DMPC) lipid in both the solid gel and fluid phases. To probe the phase transition, elastic neutron intensity temperature scans have been carried out on DMPC-based unilamellar vesicles (ULV) with and without melittin. We have found that addition of a small amount (0.2 mol%) melittin eliminates the steep fallmore » in the elastic intensity at 296 K associated with the solid gel to fluid phase transition, which is observed for pure DMPC vesicles. Quasielastic neutron scattering (QENS) experiments have been carried out on DMPC ULV in the solid gel and fluid phases with and without 0.2 mol % melittin. The data analysis invariably shows the presence of lateral and internal motions of the DMPC molecule. We found that melittin does have a profound effect on the dynamics of lipid molecules, especially on the lateral motion, and affects it in a different way, depending on the phase of the bilayers. In the solid gel phase, it acts as a plasticizer, enhancing the lateral motion of DMPC. However, in the fluid phase it acts as a stiffening agent, restricting the lateral motion of the lipid molecules. These observations are consistent with the mean squared displacements extracted from the elastic intensity temperature scans. Cholesterol is a vital component of eukaryotic membrane, which is a natural target for melittin. To investigate the effect of melittin on vesicles supplemented with cholesterol, QENS experiments have also been carried out on DMPC ULV with 20 mol% cholesterol in the presence and absence of 0.2 mol% melittin. Remarkably, the effects of melittin on the membrane dynamics disappear in the presence

  4. Structure of the Disulfide Bond Generating Membrane Protein DsbB in the Lipid Bilayer

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Ming; Nesbitt, Anna E.; Sperling, Lindsay J.; Berthold, Deborah A.; Schwieters, Charles D.; Gennis, Robert B.; Rienstra, Chad M.

    2013-01-01

    The integral membrane protein DsbB in Escherichia coli is responsible for oxidizing the periplasmic protein DsbA, which forms disulfide bonds in substrate proteins. We have developed a high-resolution structural model by combining experimental X-ray and solid-state NMR with molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. We embedded the high-resolution DsbB structure, derived from the joint calculation with X-ray reflections and solid-state NMR restraints, into the lipid bilayer and performed MD simulations to provide a mechanistic view of DsbB function in the membrane. Further, we revealed the membrane topology of DsbB by selective proton spin diffusion experiments, which directly probe the correlations of DsbB with water and lipid acyl chains. NMR data also support the model of a flexible periplasmic loop and an interhelical hydrogen bond between Glu26 and Tyr153. PMID:23416557

  5. Flexoelectricity and thermal fluctuations of lipid bilayer membranes: Renormalization of flexoelectric, dielectric, and elastic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, L. P.; Sharma, P.

    2013-03-01

    Thermal fluctuations renormalize the bending elasticity of lipid bilayers. This well-studied effect is a cornerstone in the study of several membrane biophysical phenomena. Analogously, nearly all membranes are endowed with an electromechanical coupling called flexoelectricity that admits membrane polarization due to curvature changes. Flexoelectricity is found to be important in a number of biological functions, including hearing, ion transport, and in some situations where mechanotransduction is necessary. Very little is known about the interplay between thermal fluctuations and flexoelectricity. In this work, we explore how the apparent flexoelectricity is altered due to thermal fluctuations and, further, how the elastic and dielectric properties are renormalized due to flexoelectricity. We find that the apparent bending rigidity is softened by flexoelectricity and discuss the ramifications for interpreting existing experimental work.

  6. Anion carrier formation by calix[4]arene-bis-hydroxymethylphosphonic acid in bilayer membranes.

    PubMed

    Shatursky, Oleg Ya; Kasatkina, Ludmila A; Rodik, Roman V; Cherenok, Sergiy O; Shkrabak, Alexander A; Veklich, Tatiana O; Borisova, Tatiana A; Kosterin, Sergyi O; Kalchenko, Vitaly I

    2014-12-28

    The action of calix[4]arenes C-91, C-97, C-99, C-107 and C-160 on solvent-containing planar bilayer membranes made of cholesterol and egg phosphatidylcholine (egg PC) or synthetic 18-carbon-tail phospholipid DOPC has been investigated in a voltage-clamp mode. Within the range of calix[4]arenes tested, a steady-state voltage-dependent transmembrane current was achieved only after addition of calix[4]-arene C-99 (calix[4]arene-bis-hydroxymethylphosphonic acid) from the side of the membrane the positive potential was applied to. This current exhibited anion selectivity passing more chloride at negative potentials applied from the side of the membrane to which calix[4]arene C-99 was introduced. The kinetics and temperature-dependence determined for calix[4]arene C-99-mediated ionic transport suggest a carrier mode of facilitated diffusion.

  7. Protein-fluctuation-induced water-pore formation in ion channel voltage-sensor translocation across a lipid bilayer membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajapaksha, Suneth P.; Pal, Nibedita; Zheng, Desheng; Lu, H. Peter

    2015-11-01

    We have applied a combined fluorescence microscopy and single-ion-channel electric current recording approach, correlating with molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, to study the mechanism of voltage-sensor domain translocation across a lipid bilayer. We use the colicin Ia ion channel as a model system, and our experimental and simulation results show the following: (1) The open-close activity of an activated colicin Ia is not necessarily sensitive to the amplitude of the applied cross-membrane voltage when the cross-membrane voltage is around the resting potential of excitable membranes; and (2) there is a significant probability that the activation of colicin Ia occurs by forming a transient and fluctuating water pore of ˜15 Å diameter in the lipid bilayer membrane. The location of the water-pore formation is nonrandom and highly specific, right at the insertion site of colicin Ia charged residues in the lipid bilayer membrane, and the formation is intrinsically associated with the polypeptide conformational fluctuations and solvation dynamics. Our results suggest an interesting mechanistic pathway for voltage-sensitive ion channel activation, and specifically for translocation of charged polypeptide chains across the lipid membrane under a transmembrane electric field: the charged polypeptide domain facilitates the formation of hydrophilic water pore in the membrane and diffuses through the hydrophilic pathway across the membrane; i.e., the charged polypeptide chain can cross a lipid membrane without entering into the hydrophobic core of the lipid membrane but entirely through the aqueous and hydrophilic environment to achieve a cross-membrane translocation. This mechanism sheds light on the intensive and fundamental debate on how a hydrophilic and charged peptide domain diffuses across the biologically inaccessible high-energy barrier of the hydrophobic core of a lipid bilayer: The peptide domain does not need to cross the hydrophobic core to move across a

  8. Protein-fluctuation-induced water-pore formation in ion channel voltage-sensor translocation across a lipid bilayer membrane.

    PubMed

    Rajapaksha, Suneth P; Pal, Nibedita; Zheng, Desheng; Lu, H Peter

    2015-01-01

    We have applied a combined fluorescence microscopy and single-ion-channel electric current recording approach, correlating with molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, to study the mechanism of voltage-sensor domain translocation across a lipid bilayer. We use the colicin Ia ion channel as a model system, and our experimental and simulation results show the following: (1) The open-close activity of an activated colicin Ia is not necessarily sensitive to the amplitude of the applied cross-membrane voltage when the cross-membrane voltage is around the resting potential of excitable membranes; and (2) there is a significant probability that the activation of colicin Ia occurs by forming a transient and fluctuating water pore of ∼15 Å diameter in the lipid bilayer membrane. The location of the water-pore formation is nonrandom and highly specific, right at the insertion site of colicin Ia charged residues in the lipid bilayer membrane, and the formation is intrinsically associated with the polypeptide conformational fluctuations and solvation dynamics. Our results suggest an interesting mechanistic pathway for voltage-sensitive ion channel activation, and specifically for translocation of charged polypeptide chains across the lipid membrane under a transmembrane electric field: the charged polypeptide domain facilitates the formation of hydrophilic water pore in the membrane and diffuses through the hydrophilic pathway across the membrane; i.e., the charged polypeptide chain can cross a lipid membrane without entering into the hydrophobic core of the lipid membrane but entirely through the aqueous and hydrophilic environment to achieve a cross-membrane translocation. This mechanism sheds light on the intensive and fundamental debate on how a hydrophilic and charged peptide domain diffuses across the biologically inaccessible high-energy barrier of the hydrophobic core of a lipid bilayer: The peptide domain does not need to cross the hydrophobic core to move across a

  9. Protein-fluctuation-induced water-pore formation in ion channel voltage-sensor translocation across a lipid bilayer membrane.

    PubMed

    Rajapaksha, Suneth P; Pal, Nibedita; Zheng, Desheng; Lu, H Peter

    2015-01-01

    We have applied a combined fluorescence microscopy and single-ion-channel electric current recording approach, correlating with molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, to study the mechanism of voltage-sensor domain translocation across a lipid bilayer. We use the colicin Ia ion channel as a model system, and our experimental and simulation results show the following: (1) The open-close activity of an activated colicin Ia is not necessarily sensitive to the amplitude of the applied cross-membrane voltage when the cross-membrane voltage is around the resting potential of excitable membranes; and (2) there is a significant probability that the activation of colicin Ia occurs by forming a transient and fluctuating water pore of ∼15 Å diameter in the lipid bilayer membrane. The location of the water-pore formation is nonrandom and highly specific, right at the insertion site of colicin Ia charged residues in the lipid bilayer membrane, and the formation is intrinsically associated with the polypeptide conformational fluctuations and solvation dynamics. Our results suggest an interesting mechanistic pathway for voltage-sensitive ion channel activation, and specifically for translocation of charged polypeptide chains across the lipid membrane under a transmembrane electric field: the charged polypeptide domain facilitates the formation of hydrophilic water pore in the membrane and diffuses through the hydrophilic pathway across the membrane; i.e., the charged polypeptide chain can cross a lipid membrane without entering into the hydrophobic core of the lipid membrane but entirely through the aqueous and hydrophilic environment to achieve a cross-membrane translocation. This mechanism sheds light on the intensive and fundamental debate on how a hydrophilic and charged peptide domain diffuses across the biologically inaccessible high-energy barrier of the hydrophobic core of a lipid bilayer: The peptide domain does not need to cross the hydrophobic core to move across a

  10. The anticancer drug chlorambucil interacts with the human erythrocyte membrane and model phospholipid bilayers.

    PubMed

    Suwalsky, M; Hernández, P; Villena, F; Sotomayor, C P

    1999-12-01

    The plasma membrane has gained increasing attention as a possible target of antitumor drugs. It has been reported that they act as growth factor antagonists, growth factor receptor blockers, interfere with mitogenic signal transduction or exert direct cytotoxic effects. Chlorambucil (4-[p-(bis[2-chloroethyl]amino)phenyl]butyric acid) is an alkylating agent widely used in the treatment of chronic lymphocytic leukaemia. Contradictory reports have been published concerning its interaction with cell membranes. Whereas a decrease in the fluidity of Ehrlich ascite tumor cells has been adduced, no evidences were found that chlorambucil changes membrane lipid fluidity and alkylating agents had effects in these systems even at highly toxic concentrations. Our results showed that chlorambucil at a dose equivalent to its therapeutical concentration in the plasma (3.6 microM) caused the human erythrocyte membrane to develop cup-shaped forms (stomatocytes). Accordingly to the bilayer couple hypothesis, this means that the drug is inserted into the inner monolayer of the erythrocyte membrane, a conclusion supported by X-ray diffraction performed on multilayers of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) and dimyristoylphosphatidylethanolamine (DMPE), representative of phospholipid classes located in the outer and inner monolayers of the erythrocyte membrane, respectively. It is concluded that the cytotoxic effect of chlorambucil might be due to alteration of the structure and therefore of the physiological properties of cell membranes such as fluidity, permeability, receptor and channel functions. PMID:10685501

  11. Polyelectrolyte-Mediated Transport of Doxorubicin Through the Bilayer Lipid Membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yaroslavov, Alexander A.; Kitaeva, Marina V.; Melik-Nubarov, Nikolay S.; Menger, Frederic M.

    A model is developed for the effect of ionic polymers on the transport of doxorubicin, an antitumor drug, through a bilayer membrane. Accordingly, a protonated (cationic) form of doxorubicin binds to an anionic polymer, poly(acrylic acid), the resulting complex being several hundred nanometers in size. Nevertheless, large complex species associate with neutral egg lecithin liposomes by means of hydrophobic attraction between the doxorubicin and the liposome bilayer. Then, the doxorubicin enters the liposome interior which has been imparted with an acidic buffer to protonate the doxorubicin. The rate of transmembrane Dox permeation decreases when elevating the polyacid-to-doxorubicin ratio. A cationic polymer, polylysine, being coupled with liposomes containing the negative lipid cardiolipin, accelerates membrane transport of doxorubicin with the maximum rate at a complete neutralization of the membrane charge by an interacting polycation. The effect of a polycation on doxorubicin transport becomes more pronounced as small negative liposomes (60-80 nm in diameter) are changed to larger ones (approx. 600 nm in diameter). An opportunity thus opens up for the manipulation of the kinetics of drug uptake by cells and, ultimately, the control of the pharmaceutical action of drugs.

  12. Swelling of phospholipid membranes by divalent metal ions depends on the location of the ions in the bilayers.

    PubMed

    Alsop, Richard J; Maria Schober, Rafaëla; Rheinstädter, Maikel C

    2016-08-10

    The Hofmeister series illustrates how salts produce a wide range of effects in biological systems, which are not exclusively explained by ion charge. In lipid membranes, charged ions have been shown to bind to lipids and either hydrate or dehydrate lipid head groups, and also to swell the water layer in multi-lamellar systems. Typically, Hofmeister phenomena are explained by the interaction of the ions with water, as well as with biological interfaces, such as proteins or membranes. We studied the effect of the divalent cations Mg(2+), Ca(2+), Fe(2+), and Zn(2+) on oriented, stacked, phospholipid bilayers made of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC). Using high-resolution X-ray diffraction, we observed that the cations lead to a swelling of the water layer between the bilayers, without causing significant changes to the bilayer structure. The cations swelled the bilayers in different amounts, in the order Fe(2+) > Mg(2+) > Ca(2+) > Zn(2+). By decomposing the total bilayer electron density into different molecular groups, Zn(2+) and Ca(2+) were found to interact with the glycerol groups of the lipid molecules and cause minor swelling of the bilayers. Mg(2+) and Fe(2+) were found to position near the phosphate groups and cause a strong increase in the number of hydration water molecules. Our results present a molecular mechanism-of-action for the Hofmeister series in phospholipid membranes. PMID:27453289

  13. Bilayer porous scaffold based on poly-(ɛ-caprolactone) nanofibrous membrane and gelatin sponge for favoring cell proliferation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Zhihua; Zhou, Yang; Chen, Yiwang; Nie, Huarong; Wang, Yang; Li, Fan; Zheng, Yan

    2011-12-01

    Electrospun poly-(ɛ-caprolactone) (PCL) nanofibers has been widely used in the medical prosthesis. However, poor hydrophilicity and the lack of natural recognition sites for covalent cell-recognition signal molecules to promote cell attachment have limited its utility as tissue scaffolds. In this study, Bilayer porous scaffolds based on PCL electrospun membranes and gelatin (GE) sponges were fabricated through soft hydrolysis of PCL electrospun followed by grafting gelatin onto the fiber surface, through crosslinking and freeze drying treatment of additional gelatin coat and grafted gelatin surface. GE sponges were stably anchored on PCL membrane surface with the aid of grafted GE molecules. The morphologies of bilayer porous scaffolds were observed through SEM. The contact angle of the scaffolds was 0°, the mechanical properties of scaffolds were measured by tensile test, Young's moduli of PCL scaffolds before and after hydrolysis are 66-77.3 MPa and 62.3-75.4 MPa, respectively. Thus, the bilayer porous scaffolds showed excellent hydrophilic surface and desirable mechanical strength due to the soft hydrolysis and GE coat. The cell culture results showed that the adipose derived mesenchymal stem cells did more favor to adhere and grow on the bilayer porous scaffolds than on PCL electrospun membranes. The better cell affinity of the final bilayer scaffolds not only attributed to the surface chemistry but also the introduction of bilayer porous structure.

  14. The intermediate scattering function for lipid bilayer membranes: From nanometers to microns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, Max C.; Peng, Yonggang; Zheng, Yujun; Brown, Frank L. H.

    2011-11-01

    A numerical scheme based upon established hydrodynamic and elastic considerations is introduced and used to predict the intermediate scattering function for lipid bilayer membranes. The predictions span multiple wavelength regimes, including those studied by dynamic light scattering (DLS; microns) and neutron spin-echo (NSE) spectroscopy (10-100 nm). The results validate a recent theory specific to the NSE regime and expose slight inaccuracies associated with the theoretical results available in the DLS regime. The assumptions that underlie both our numerical methods and the related theoretical predictions are reviewed in detail to explain when certain results can be applied to experiment and where caution must be exercised.

  15. Photo-osmosis through liquid membrane bilayers generated by [beta]-carotene coupled with bacteriorhodopsin

    SciTech Connect

    Madamwar, D.B.; Jain, N. )

    1992-11-01

    [beta]-carotene, a photosynthetic pigment isolated from the blue green algae Anabeana variabilis has been shown to exhibit the phenomenon of photo-osmosis through liquid membrane bilayers. In the authors search for new pigments that could show this phenomenon, they found [beta]-carotene also. When [beta]-carotene was combined with bacteriorhodopsin extracted from the extreme halophile Halobacterium halobium, the rate of photo-osmotic velocity was much higher than for either of these pigments independently. The rate of light induced volume flux depends on temperature, intensity, and wavelength of incident light and the nature and concentration of electron donors and acceptors. 10 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  16. The intermediate scattering function for lipid bilayer membranes: From nanometers to microns

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, Max C.; Peng Yonggang; Zheng Yujun; Brown, Frank L. H.

    2011-11-21

    A numerical scheme based upon established hydrodynamic and elastic considerations is introduced and used to predict the intermediate scattering function for lipid bilayer membranes. The predictions span multiple wavelength regimes, including those studied by dynamic light scattering (DLS; microns) and neutron spin-echo (NSE) spectroscopy (10-100 nm). The results validate a recent theory specific to the NSE regime and expose slight inaccuracies associated with the theoretical results available in the DLS regime. The assumptions that underlie both our numerical methods and the related theoretical predictions are reviewed in detail to explain when certain results can be applied to experiment and where caution must be exercised.

  17. Bilayer registry in a multicomponent asymmetric membrane: Dependence on lipid composition and chain length

    SciTech Connect

    Polley, Anirban; Mayor, Satyajit; Rao, Madan E-mail: madan@ncbs.res.in

    2014-08-14

    A question of considerable interest to cell membrane biology is whether phase segregated domains across an asymmetric bilayer are strongly correlated with each other and whether phase segregation in one leaflet can induce segregation in the other. We answer both these questions in the affirmative, using an atomistic molecular dynamics simulation to study the equilibrium statistical properties of a 3-component asymmetric lipid bilayer comprising an unsaturated palmitoyl-oleoyl-phosphatidyl-choline, a saturated sphingomyelin, and cholesterol with different composition ratios. Our simulations are done by fixing the composition of the upper leaflet to be at the coexistence of the liquid ordered (l{sub o})-liquid disordered (l{sub d}) phases, while the composition of the lower leaflet is varied from the phase coexistence regime to the mixed l{sub d} phase, across a first-order phase boundary. In the regime of phase coexistence in each leaflet, we find strong transbilayer correlations of the l{sub o} domains across the two leaflets, resulting in bilayer registry. This transbilayer correlation depends sensitively upon the chain length of the participating lipids and possibly other features of lipid chemistry, such as degree of saturation. We find that the l{sub o} domains in the upper leaflet can induce phase segregation in the lower leaflet, when the latter is nominally in the mixed (l{sub d}) phase.

  18. A Study of Lipid Bilayer Membrane Stability Using Precise Measurements of Specific Capacitance

    PubMed Central

    White, Stephen H.

    1970-01-01

    A method is described for measuring the specific capacitance (Cm) of lipid bilayer membranes with an estimated experimental error of only 1%. The gross capacitance was measured with an AC Wheatstone bridge and a photographic technique was used to determine the area of thin membrane. The results of measurements on oxidized cholesterol-decane membranes formed in 1 × 10-2 M KCl show that Cm depends upon temperature, voltage, time, and the age of the bulk membrane solutions. For a freshly thinned membrane (from 5 week old solution), Cm increases exponentially from an initial value of 0.432 ±0.021 (SD) μF/cm2 with a time constant of ∼15 min. A 100 mv potential applied across the membrane for 10-20 min prior to making measurements eliminated this time dependence and produced final-state membranes. Cm of final-state membranes depends upon applied voltage (Va) and obeys the equation Cm = C0 + βVa2 where Va ≃ VDC + VrmsAC. C0 and β depend upon temperature; C0 decreases linearly with temperature while β increases linearly. At 20°C, C0 = 0.559 ±0.01 (SD) μF/cm2 and β = 0.0123 ±0.0036 (SD) (μF/cm2)/(mv2) and at 34°C, C0 = 0.472 ±0.01 and β = 0.0382 ±0.0039. These variations in Cm are interpreted as resulting from thickness changes. The possibility that they result from diffuse layer and/or membrane dielectric phenomena is discussed and found to be unlikely. The results are discussed in terms of membrane stability by constructing hypothetical potential energy vs. thickness curves. ImagesFigure 2 PMID:5489777

  19. Phosphatidylinositol induces fluid phase formation and packing defects in phosphatidylcholine model membranes.

    PubMed

    Peng, Aaron; Pisal, Dipak S; Doty, Amy; Balu-Iyer, Sathy V

    2012-01-01

    Liposomes consisted of phosphatidylinositol (PI) and phosphatidylcholine (PC) have been utilized as delivery vehicle for drugs and proteins. In the present work, we studied the effect of soy PI on physical properties of 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DMPC) liposomes such as phase state of lipid bilayer, lipid packing and phase properties using multiple orthogonal biophysical techniques. The 6-dodecanoyl-2-dimethylamino naphthalene (Laurdan) fluorescence studies showed that presence of PI induces the formation of fluid phases in DMPC. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), temperature dependent fluorescence anisotropy measurements, and generalized polarization values for Laurdan showed that the presence of as low as 10mol% of PI induces substantial broadening and shift to lower temperature of phase transition of DMPC. The fluorescence emission intensity of DPH labeled, PI containing DMPC lipid bilayer decreased possibly due to deeper penetration of water molecules in lipid bilayer. In order to further delineate the effect of PI on the physico chemical properties of DMPC is due to either significant hydrophobic mismatch between the acyl chains of the DMPC and that of soy PI or due to the inositol head group, we systematically replaced soy PI with PC species of similar acyl chain composition (DPPC and 18:2 (Cis) PC) or with diacylglycerol (DAG), respectively. The anisotropy of PC membrane containing soy PI showed largest fluidity change compared to other compositions. The data suggests that addition of PI alters structure and dynamics of DMPC bilayer in that it promotes deeper water penetration in the bilayer, induces fluid phase characteristics and causes lipid packing defects that involve its inositol head group.

  20. Exploiting lipopolysaccharide-induced deformation of lipid bilayers to modify membrane composition and generate two-dimensional geometric membrane array patterns

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Peter G.; Swingle, Kirstie L.; Paxton, Walter F.; Nogan, John J.; Stromberg, Loreen R.; Firestone, Millicent A.; Mukundan, Harshini; Montaño, Gabriel A.

    2015-01-01

    Supported lipid bilayers have proven effective as model membranes for investigating biophysical processes and in development of sensor and array technologies. The ability to modify lipid bilayers after their formation and in situ could greatly advance membrane technologies, but is difficult via current state-of-the-art technologies. Here we demonstrate a novel method that allows the controlled post-formation processing and modification of complex supported lipid bilayer arrangements, under aqueous conditions. We exploit the destabilization effect of lipopolysaccharide, an amphiphilic biomolecule, interacting with lipid bilayers to generate voids that can be backfilled to introduce desired membrane components. We further demonstrate that when used in combination with a single, traditional soft lithography process, it is possible to generate hierarchically-organized membrane domains and microscale 2-D array patterns of domains. Significantly, this technique can be used to repeatedly modify membranes allowing iterative control over membrane composition. This approach expands our toolkit for functional membrane design, with potential applications for enhanced materials templating, biosensing and investigating lipid-membrane processes. PMID:26015293

  1. Exploiting lipopolysaccharide-induced deformation of lipid bilayers to modify membrane composition and generate two-dimensional geometric membrane array patterns

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, Peter G.; Swingle, Kirstie L.; Paxton, Walter F.; Nogan, John J.; Stromberg, Loreen R.; Firestone, Millicent A.; Mukundan, Harshini; Montaño, Gabriel A.

    2015-05-27

    Supported lipid bilayers have proven effective as model membranes for investigating biophysical processes and in development of sensor and array technologies. The ability to modify lipid bilayers after their formation and in situ could greatly advance membrane technologies, but is difficult via current state-of-the-art technologies. Here we demonstrate a novel method that allows the controlled post-formation processing and modification of complex supported lipid bilayer arrangements, under aqueous conditions. We exploit the destabilization effect of lipopolysaccharide, an amphiphilic biomolecule, interacting with lipid bilayers to generate voids that can be backfilled to introduce desired membrane components. We further demonstrate that when used in combination with a single, traditional soft lithography process, it is possible to generate hierarchically-organized membrane domains and microscale 2-D array patterns of domains. Significantly, this technique can be used to repeatedly modify membranes allowing iterative control over membrane composition. This approach expands our toolkit for functional membrane design, with potential applications for enhanced materials templating, biosensing and investigating lipid-membrane processes.

  2. Exploiting lipopolysaccharide-induced deformation of lipid bilayers to modify membrane composition and generate two-dimensional geometric membrane array patterns

    DOE PAGES

    Adams, Peter G.; Swingle, Kirstie L.; Paxton, Walter F.; Nogan, John J.; Stromberg, Loreen R.; Firestone, Millicent A.; Mukundan, Harshini; Montaño, Gabriel A.

    2015-05-27

    Supported lipid bilayers have proven effective as model membranes for investigating biophysical processes and in development of sensor and array technologies. The ability to modify lipid bilayers after their formation and in situ could greatly advance membrane technologies, but is difficult via current state-of-the-art technologies. Here we demonstrate a novel method that allows the controlled post-formation processing and modification of complex supported lipid bilayer arrangements, under aqueous conditions. We exploit the destabilization effect of lipopolysaccharide, an amphiphilic biomolecule, interacting with lipid bilayers to generate voids that can be backfilled to introduce desired membrane components. We further demonstrate that when usedmore » in combination with a single, traditional soft lithography process, it is possible to generate hierarchically-organized membrane domains and microscale 2-D array patterns of domains. Significantly, this technique can be used to repeatedly modify membranes allowing iterative control over membrane composition. This approach expands our toolkit for functional membrane design, with potential applications for enhanced materials templating, biosensing and investigating lipid-membrane processes.« less

  3. Formation of an ordered phase by ceramides and diacylglycerols in a fluid phosphatidylcholine bilayer--Correlation with structure and hydrogen bonding capacity.

    PubMed

    Ekman, Peik; Maula, Terhi; Yamaguchi, Shou; Yamamoto, Tetsuya; Nyholm, Thomas K M; Katsumura, Shigeo; Slotte, J Peter

    2015-10-01

    Ceramides and diacylglycerols are lipids with a large hydrophobic part (acyl chains and long-chain base) whereas their polar function (hydroxyl group) is small. They need colipids with large head groups to coexist in bilayer membranes. In this study, we have determined how saturated and unsaturated ceramides and acyl-chain matched diacylglycerols form ordered domains in 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine bilayers as a function of bilayer concentration. The formation of ordered domains was determined from lifetime analysis of trans-parinaric acid. Ceramides formed ordered domains with equal average tPA lifetime at lower bilayer concentration when compared to acyl-chain matched diacylglycerols. This was true for both saturated (16:0) and mono-unsaturated (18:1) species. This finding suggested that hydrogen bonding among ceramides contributed to their more efficient ordered phase formation, since diacylglycerols do not form similar hydrogen bonding networks. The role of hydrogen bonding in ordered domain formation was further verified by using palmitoyl ceramide analogs with 2N and 3OH methylated long-chain bases. These analogs do not form hydrogen bonds from the 2NH or the 3OH, respectively. While methylation of the 3OH did not affect ordered phase formation compared to native palmitoyl ceramide, 2NH methylation markedly attenuated ceramide ordered phase formation. We conclude that in addition to acyl chain length, saturation, molecular order, and lack of large head group, also hydrogen bonding involving the 2NH is crucial for efficient formation of ceramide-rich domains in fluid phosphatidylcholine bilayers.

  4. Kinetics of pore size during irreversible electrical breakdown of lipid bilayer membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Wilhelm, C; Winterhalter, M; Zimmermann, U; Benz, R

    1993-01-01

    The kinetics of pore formation followed by mechanical rupture of lipid bilayer membranes were investigated in detail by using the charge-pulse method. Membranes of various compositions were charged to a sufficiently high voltage to induce mechanical breakdown. The subsequent decrease of membrane voltage was used to calculate the conductance. During mechanical breakdown, which was probably caused by the widening of one single pore, the membrane conductance was a linear and not exponential function of time after the initial starting process. In a large number of experiments using various lipids and electrolytes, the characteristic opening process of the pore turned out to be independent of the actual membrane potential and electrolyte concentration. Our theoretical analysis of the pore formation suggested that the voltage-induced irreversible breakdown is due to a decrease in edge energy when the pore had formed. After initiation of the pore, the electrical contribution to surface tension is negligible. The time course of the increase of pore size shows that our model of the irreversible breakdown is in good agreement with mechanical properties of membranes reported elsewhere. PMID:8431536

  5. The dependence of the lipid bilayer membrane: buffer partition coefficient of pentobarbitone on pH and lipid composition.

    PubMed Central

    Miller, K W; Yu, S C

    1977-01-01

    1 The membrane/buffer partition coefficient of [14C]-pentobarbitone has been determined as a function of the lipid composition of bilayer membranes. 2 A new technique based on ultrafiltration gave comparable results to conventional techniques but required less time for equilbration. 3 The membrane/buffer coefficient was independent of pentobarbitone concentration in the range studies. 4 The apparent partition coefficient varied with pH and was a linear function of the degree of dissociation of pentobarbition. 5 Both the charged and uncharged forms of pentobarbitone partitioned into the membrane, the latter to a much greater extent than the former. 6 At low pH the highest partition coefficient observed was in egg phosphatidylcholine bilayer membranes. 7 Incorporation of cholesterol or phosphatidic acid into phosphatidylcholine membranes greatly reduced the partition coefficient. 8 High pressures do not greatly change these partition coefficients. PMID:21013

  6. Alginate/chitosan based bi-layer composite membrane as potential sustained-release wound dressing containing ciprofloxacin hydrochloride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Fei; Dong, Yang; Song, Aihua; Yin, Ran; Li, Sanming

    2014-08-01

    The aims of this research were to develop and evaluate a novel ciprofloxacin hydrochloride loaded bi-layer composite membrane based on alginate and chitosan. In vitro antimicrobial activity, drug permeation study, morphology, cytotoxicity, primary skin irritation and in vivo pharmacodynamics were investigated. Results showed that the membranes could inhibit the growth of microorganisms for longer than 7 days. And there was no significant decrease in the metabolic activity of the Hacat fibroblasts cells were treated with the membranes. No edema and erythema were observed after administration of membranes on the rabbit skin after 14 days. Moreover, the results of pharmacodynamics showed that the membranes were more effective in improving the wound healing process. In conclusion, a novel bi-layer composite membrane was developed and results suggested that it could be exploited as sustained-release wound dressings.

  7. Improved 1H amide resonance line narrowing in oriented sample solid-state NMR of membrane proteins in phospholipid bilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, George J.; Park, Sang Ho; Opella, Stanley J.

    2012-07-01

    We demonstrate 1H amide resonance line widths <300 Hz in 1H/15N heteronuclear correlation (HETCOR) spectra of membrane proteins in aligned phospholipid bilayers. This represents a substantial improvement over typically observed line widths of ˜1 kHz. Furthermore, in a proton detected local field (PDLF) version of the experiment that measures heteronuclear dipolar couplings, line widths <130 Hz are observed. This dramatic line narrowing of 1H amide resonances enables many more individual signals to be resolved and assigned from uniformly 15N labeled membrane proteins in phospholipid bilayers under physiological conditions of temperature and pH. Finding that the decrease in line widths occurs only for membrane proteins that undergo fast rotational diffusion around the bilayer normal, but not immobile molecules, such as peptide single crystals, identifies a potential new direction for pulse sequence development that includes overall molecular dynamics in their design.

  8. Membrane Binding of HIV-1 Matrix Protein: Dependence on Bilayer Composition and Protein Lipidation

    PubMed Central

    Barros, Marilia; Nanda, Hirsh

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT By assembling in a protein lattice on the host's plasma membrane, the retroviral Gag polyprotein triggers formation of the viral protein/membrane shell. The MA domain of Gag employs multiple signals—electrostatic, hydrophobic, and lipid-specific—to bring the protein to the plasma membrane, thereby complementing protein-protein interactions, located in full-length Gag, in lattice formation. We report the interaction of myristoylated and unmyristoylated HIV-1 Gag MA domains with bilayers composed of purified lipid components to dissect these complex membrane signals and quantify their contributions to the overall interaction. Surface plasmon resonance on well-defined planar membrane models is used to quantify binding affinities and amounts of protein and yields free binding energy contributions, ΔG, of the various signals. Charge-charge interactions in the absence of the phosphatidylinositide PI(4,5)P2 attract the protein to acidic membrane surfaces, and myristoylation increases the affinity by a factor of 10; thus, our data do not provide evidence for a PI(4,5)P2 trigger of myristate exposure. Lipid-specific interactions with PI(4,5)P2, the major signal lipid in the inner plasma membrane, increase membrane attraction at a level similar to that of protein lipidation. While cholesterol does not directly engage in interactions, it augments protein affinity strongly by facilitating efficient myristate insertion and PI(4,5)P2 binding. We thus observe that the isolated MA protein, in the absence of protein-protein interaction conferred by the full-length Gag, binds the membrane with submicromolar affinities. IMPORTANCE Like other retroviral species, the Gag polyprotein of HIV-1 contains three major domains: the N-terminal, myristoylated MA domain that targets the protein to the plasma membrane of the host; a central capsid-forming domain; and the C-terminal, genome-binding nucleocapsid domain. These domains act in concert to condense Gag into a membrane

  9. Chemotherapy Drugs Thiocolchicoside and Taxol Permeabilize Lipid Bilayer Membranes by Forming Ion Pores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashrafuzzaman, Md; Duszyk, M.; Tuszynski, J. A.

    2011-12-01

    We report ion channel formation by chemotherapy drugs: thiocolchicoside (TCC) and taxol (TXL) which primarily target tubulin but not only. For example, TCC has been shown to interact with GABAA, nuclear envelope and strychnine-sensitive glycine receptors. TXL interferes with the normal breakdown of microtubules inducing mitotic block and apoptosis. It also interacts with mitochondria and found significant chemotherapeutic applications for breast, ovarian and lung cancer. In order to better understand the mechanisms of TCC and TXL actions, we examined their effects on phospholipid bilayer membranes. Our electrophysiological recordings across membranes constructed in NaCl aqueous phases consisting of TCC or TXL under the influence of an applied transmembrane potential (V) indicate that both molecules induce stable ion flowing pores/channels in membranes. Their discrete current versus time plots exhibit triangular shapes which is consistent with a spontaneous time-dependent change of the pore conductance in contrast to rectangular conductance events usually induced by ion channels. These events exhibit conductance (~0.01-0.1 pA/mV) and lifetimes (~5-30 ms) within the ranges observed in e.g., gramicidin A and alamethicin channels. The channel formation probability increases linearly with TCC/TXL concentration and V and is not affected by pH (5.7 - 8.4). A theoretical explanation on the causes of chemotherapy drug induced ion pore formation and the pore stability has also been found using our recently discovered binding energy between lipid bilayer and the bilayer embedded ion channels using gramicidin A channels as tools. This picture of energetics suggests that as the channel forming agents approach to the lipids on bilayer the localized charge properties in the constituents of both channel forming agents (e.g., chemotherapy drugs in this study) and the lipids determine the electrostatic drug-lipid coupling energy through screened Coulomb interactions between the drug

  10. Self-assembly of azobenzene bilayer membranes in binary ionic liquid-water nanostructured media.

    PubMed

    Kang, Tejwant Singh; Ishiba, Keita; Morikawa, Masa-aki; Kimizuka, Nobuo

    2014-03-11

    Anionic azobenzene-containing amphiphile 1 (sodium 4-[4-(N-methyl-N-dodecylamino)phenylazo]benzenesulfonate) forms ordered bilayer membranes in binary ionic liquid (1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium ethyl sulfate, [C2mim][C2OSO3])-water mixtures. The binary [C2mim][C2OSO3]-water mixture is macroscopically homogeneous at any mixing ratio; however, it possesses fluctuating nanodomains of [C2mim][C2OSO3] molecules as observed by dynamic light scattering (DLS). These nanodomains show reversible heat-induced mixing behavior with water. Although the amphiphile 1 is substantially insoluble in pure water, it is dispersible in the [C2mim][C2OSO3]-water mixtures. The concentration of [C2mim][C2OSO3] and temperature exert significant influences on the self-assembling characteristics of 1 in the binary media, as shown by DLS, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), UV-vis spectroscopy, and zeta-potential measurements. Bilayer membranes with rod- or dotlike nanostructures were formed at a lower content of [C2mim][C2OSO3] (2-30 v/v %), in which azobenzene chromophores adopt parallel molecular orientation regardless of temperature. In contrast, when the content of [C2mim][C2OSO3] is increased above 60 v/v %, azobenzene bilayers showed thermally reversible gel-to-liquid crystalline phase transition. The self-assembly of azobenzene amphiphiles is tunable depending on the volume fraction of [C2mim][C2OSO3] and temperature, which are associated with the solvation by nanoclusters in the binary [C2mim][C2OSO3]-water media. These observations clearly indicate that mixtures of water-soluble ionic liquids and water provide unique and valiant environments for ordered molecular self-assembly. PMID:24528277

  11. Self-assembly of azobenzene bilayer membranes in binary ionic liquid-water nanostructured media.

    PubMed

    Kang, Tejwant Singh; Ishiba, Keita; Morikawa, Masa-aki; Kimizuka, Nobuo

    2014-03-11

    Anionic azobenzene-containing amphiphile 1 (sodium 4-[4-(N-methyl-N-dodecylamino)phenylazo]benzenesulfonate) forms ordered bilayer membranes in binary ionic liquid (1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium ethyl sulfate, [C2mim][C2OSO3])-water mixtures. The binary [C2mim][C2OSO3]-water mixture is macroscopically homogeneous at any mixing ratio; however, it possesses fluctuating nanodomains of [C2mim][C2OSO3] molecules as observed by dynamic light scattering (DLS). These nanodomains show reversible heat-induced mixing behavior with water. Although the amphiphile 1 is substantially insoluble in pure water, it is dispersible in the [C2mim][C2OSO3]-water mixtures. The concentration of [C2mim][C2OSO3] and temperature exert significant influences on the self-assembling characteristics of 1 in the binary media, as shown by DLS, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), UV-vis spectroscopy, and zeta-potential measurements. Bilayer membranes with rod- or dotlike nanostructures were formed at a lower content of [C2mim][C2OSO3] (2-30 v/v %), in which azobenzene chromophores adopt parallel molecular orientation regardless of temperature. In contrast, when the content of [C2mim][C2OSO3] is increased above 60 v/v %, azobenzene bilayers showed thermally reversible gel-to-liquid crystalline phase transition. The self-assembly of azobenzene amphiphiles is tunable depending on the volume fraction of [C2mim][C2OSO3] and temperature, which are associated with the solvation by nanoclusters in the binary [C2mim][C2OSO3]-water media. These observations clearly indicate that mixtures of water-soluble ionic liquids and water provide unique and valiant environments for ordered molecular self-assembly.

  12. New insight into probe-location dependent polarity and hydration at lipid/water interfaces: comparison between gel- and fluid-phases of lipid bilayers.

    PubMed

    Singh, Moirangthem Kiran; Shweta, Him; Khan, Mohammad Firoz; Sen, Sobhan

    2016-09-21

    Environment polarity and hydration at lipid/water interfaces play important roles in membrane biology, which are investigated here using a new homologous series of 4-aminophthalimide-based fluorescent molecules (4AP-Cn; n = 2-10, 12) having different lipophilicities (octanol/water partition coefficient - log P). We show that 4AP-Cn molecules probe a peculiar stepwise polarity (E) profile at the lipid/water interface of the gel-phase (Lβ') DPPC (1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine) bilayer at room temperature, which was not anticipated in earlier studies. However, the same molecules probe only a subtle but continuous polarity change at the interface of water and the fluid-phase (Lα) DOPC (1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine) bilayer at room temperature. Fluorescence quenching experiments indicate that solutes with different log P values adsorb at different depths across DPPC/water and DOPC/water interfaces, which correlate with the polarity profiles observed at the interfaces. Molecular dynamics simulations performed on eight probe-lipid systems (four in each of the DPPC and DOPC bilayers - a total run of 2.6 μs) support experimental results, providing further information on the relative position and angle distributions as well as hydration of probes at the interfaces. Simulation results indicate that besides positions, probe orientations also play an important role in defining the local dielectric environment by controlling the probes' exposure to water at the interfaces especially of the gel-phase DPPC bilayer. The results suggest that 4AP-Cn probes are well suited for studying solvation properties at lipid/water interfaces of gel- and fluid-phases simultaneously. PMID:27147404

  13. New insight into probe-location dependent polarity and hydration at lipid/water interfaces: comparison between gel- and fluid-phases of lipid bilayers.

    PubMed

    Singh, Moirangthem Kiran; Shweta, Him; Khan, Mohammad Firoz; Sen, Sobhan

    2016-09-21

    Environment polarity and hydration at lipid/water interfaces play important roles in membrane biology, which are investigated here using a new homologous series of 4-aminophthalimide-based fluorescent molecules (4AP-Cn; n = 2-10, 12) having different lipophilicities (octanol/water partition coefficient - log P). We show that 4AP-Cn molecules probe a peculiar stepwise polarity (E) profile at the lipid/water interface of the gel-phase (Lβ') DPPC (1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine) bilayer at room temperature, which was not anticipated in earlier studies. However, the same molecules probe only a subtle but continuous polarity change at the interface of water and the fluid-phase (Lα) DOPC (1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine) bilayer at room temperature. Fluorescence quenching experiments indicate that solutes with different log P values adsorb at different depths across DPPC/water and DOPC/water interfaces, which correlate with the polarity profiles observed at the interfaces. Molecular dynamics simulations performed on eight probe-lipid systems (four in each of the DPPC and DOPC bilayers - a total run of 2.6 μs) support experimental results, providing further information on the relative position and angle distributions as well as hydration of probes at the interfaces. Simulation results indicate that besides positions, probe orientations also play an important role in defining the local dielectric environment by controlling the probes' exposure to water at the interfaces especially of the gel-phase DPPC bilayer. The results suggest that 4AP-Cn probes are well suited for studying solvation properties at lipid/water interfaces of gel- and fluid-phases simultaneously.

  14. Interactions of Graphene Oxide with Model Cell Membranes: Probing Nanoparticle Attachment and Lipid Bilayer Disruption.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xitong; Chen, Kai Loon

    2015-11-10

    With the rapid growth in the application of graphene oxide (GO) in diverse fields, the toxicity of GO toward bacterial and mammalian cells has recently attracted extensive research attention. While several mechanisms have been proposed for the cytotoxicity of GO, the attachment of GO to cell membranes is expected to be the key initial process that precedes these mechanisms. In this study, we investigate the propensity for GO to attach to and disrupt model cell membranes using supported lipid bilayers (SLBs) and supported vesicular layers (SVLs) that are composed of zwitterionic 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DOPC). The deposition kinetics of GO on SLBs were determined using quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring and were observed to increase with increasing electrolyte (NaCl and CaCl2) concentrations, indicating that GO attachment to SLBs was controlled by electrostatic interactions. The GO deposition kinetics measured at elevated electrolyte concentrations were lower than mass-transfer-limited kinetics, likely due to the presence of hydration forces between GO and SLBs. Upon the attachment of GO to supported vesicles that were encapsulated with a fluorescent dye, dye leakage was detected, thus indicating that the lipid vesicles were disrupted. When the exposure of the SVL to the GO suspension was terminated, the leakage of dye decreased significantly, demonstrating that the pores on the lipid bilayers have a self-healing ability. PMID:26466194

  15. Single Channel Activity from Ion Channels in Engineered Tethered Bilayer Membrane Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keizer, Henk; Fine, Daniel; K"{O}Per, Ingo; Anderson, Peter

    2005-11-01

    The demand for rapid in situ detection of chemical and biological analytes at high sensitivity has increased interest in the development of biosensors like the commercially available compact glucose sensor. Engineered membrane bound ion channels are promising biological receptors since they would allow for the stochastic detection of analytes at high sensitivity, they can be mutated to alter sensitivity, and they produce a well-defined read-out that is inherently suitable for digitization. In order to perform stochastic sensing it is necessary to be able to measure the ion currents associated with single ion channel opening and closing events. Although sensors based on supported bilayers containing various pore forming proteins have been described, none of these systems have recorded single channel activity. Here we describe the measurement of stochastic activity from synthetic single ion channels, based on the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) from Torpedo californica, inserted into individual pixels of a microelectrode array device. The limited size of the gold sense pad surface, 100x100 μm, and the electrical stability of the overlying lipid bilayer membrane make each pixel sensitive enough to measure single ion channel currents in the picoampere range.

  16. Photosensitizer binding to lipid bilayers as a precondition for the photoinactivation of membrane channels.

    PubMed Central

    Rokitskaya, T I; Block, M; Antonenko, Y N; Kotova, E A; Pohl, P

    2000-01-01

    The photodynamic activity of sulfonated aluminum phthalocyanines (AlPcS(n), 1 membrane lipids. Adsorbing to the surface of large unilamellar vesicles (LUVs), aluminum phthalocyanine disulfonate induced the highest changes in their electrophoretic mobility. AlPcS(2) was also most efficient in mediating photoinactivation of gramicidin channels, as revealed by measurements of the electric current across planar lipid bilayers. The increase in the degree of sulfonation of phthalocyanine progressively reduced its affinity for the lipid bilayer as well as its potency of sensitizing gramicidin channel photoinactivation. The portion of photoinactivated gramicidin channels, alpha, increased with rising photosensitizer concentration up to some optimum. The concentration at which alpha was at half-maximum amounted to 80 nM, 30 nM, 200 nM, and 2 microM for AlPcS(1), AlPcS(2), AlPcS(3), and AlPcS(4), respectively. At high concentrations alpha was found to decrease, which was attributed to quenching of reactive oxygen species and self-quenching of the photosensitizer triplet state by its ground state. Fluoride anions were observed to inhibit both AlPcS(n) (2 membrane lipids is a prerequisite for the photodynamic inactivation of gramicidin channels. PMID:10777753

  17. Lipid bilayer membrane affinity rationalizes inhibition of lipid peroxidation by a natural lignan antioxidant.

    PubMed

    Podloucká, Pavlína; Berka, Karel; Fabre, Gabin; Paloncýová, Markéta; Duroux, Jean-Luc; Otyepka, Michal; Trouillas, Patrick

    2013-05-01

    Lipid peroxidation is a degenerative oxidative process that modifies the structure of membranes, influencing their biological functions. Lignans, natural polyphenolic antioxidants widely distributed in plants, can prevent this membrane damage by free-radical scavenging. Here, we rationalize the difference in lipid peroxidation inhibition activity of argenteane, a natural dilignan isolated from wild nutmeg, and 3,3'-dimethoxy-1,1'-biphenyl-2,2'-diol, which represents the central part of argenteane responsible for its antioxidant activity. Although both compounds have the same capacity to scavenge free radicals, argenteane is a more active inhibitor of lipid peroxidation. We show that both compounds penetrate into DOPC and PLPC lipid bilayers and adopt similar positions and orientations, which therefore does not explain the difference in their lipid peroxidation inhibition activity. However, free energy profiles indicate that argenteane has a significantly higher affinity to the lipid bilayer, and thus a higher effective concentration to scavenge radicals formed during lipid peroxidation. This finding explains the higher activity of argenteane to inhibit lipid peroxidation. PMID:23560800

  18. Voltage-controlled insertion of single α-hemolysin and Mycobacterium smegmatis nanopores into lipid bilayer membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renner, Stephan; Bessonov, Andrey; Simmel, Friedrich C.

    2011-02-01

    One of the prerequisites for single molecule nanopore translocation experiments is the availability of a single nanopore embedded into a lipid bilayer membrane. Using two alternative experimental setups, microdroplets, and a classical planar lipid bilayer setup, we here show that at near-neutral pH and high salt concentration the incorporation rates of the pore-forming proteins α-hemolysin and porin A from Mycobacterium smegmatis are exponentially enhanced at elevated voltages. This fact can be utilized to establish an experimental procedure by which a voltage-controlled insertion of single pores into lipid membranes can be achieved.

  19. Lipid bilayer membranes: Missing link in the comprehension of synovial lubrication?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Packard, Ross; Cowley, Leonie; Dubief, Yves

    2010-03-01

    The human body hosts an extremely efficient tribological system in its synovial joints that operate under very low friction and virtually no wear. It has long been assumed that the higher molecular weight molecules present in the synovial fluid (hyaluronic acid, lubricin) are solely responsible for the mechanical properties of joint. Smaller components, unsaturated phospholipids, have a virtually an undefined role, most probably because of the cancellation of their amphiphilic properties ex vivo caused by oxidation. Using experimental observations of multilamellar arrangements in synovial joints, we formulate the assumption that self-assembling structures provide the anisotropy necessary to synovial fluid to resist drainage under normal compression. Our molecular dynamics simulations demonstrate the tremendous mechanical properties of lipid bilayers and also highlight their weakening consistent with modifications resulting from injuries or joint prosthesis.

  20. Creating Biological Membranes on the Micron Scale: Forming Patterned Lipid Bilayers Using a Polymer Lift-Off Technique

    PubMed Central

    Orth, R. N.; Kameoka, J.; Zipfel, W. R.; Ilic, B.; Webb, W. W.; Clark, T. G.; Craighead, H. G.

    2003-01-01

    We present a new method for creating patches of fluid lipid bilayers with conjugated biotin and other compounds down to 1 μm resolution using a photolithographically patterned polymer lift-off technique. The patterns are realized as the polymer is mechanically peeled away in one contiguous piece in solution. The functionality of these surfaces is verified with binding of antibodies and avidin on these uniform micron-scale platforms. The biomaterial patches, measuring 1 μm–76 μm on edge, provide a synthetic biological substrate for biochemical analysis that is ∼100× smaller in width than commercial printing technologies. 100 nm unilamellar lipid vesicles spread to form a supported fluid lipid bilayer on oxidized silicon surface as confirmed by fluorescence photobleaching recovery. Fluorescence photobleaching recovery measurements of DiI (1,1′-dioctadecyl-3,3,3′,3′-tetramethylindocarbocyanine perchlorate (DiIC18(3))) stained bilayer patches yielded an average diffusion coefficient of 7.54 ± 1.25 μm2 s−1, equal to or slightly faster than typically found in DiI stained cells. This diffusion rate is ∼3× faster than previous values for bilayers on glass. This method provides a new means to form functionalized fluid lipid bilayers as micron-scale platforms to immobilize biomaterials, capture antibodies and biotinylated reagents from solution, and form antigenic stimuli for cell stimulation. PMID:14581207

  1. Genomic Analysis Indicates the Presence of an Asymmetric Bilayer Outer Membrane in Planctomycetes and Verrucomicrobia

    PubMed Central

    Speth, Daan R.; van Teeseling, Muriel C. F.; Jetten, Mike S. M.

    2012-01-01

    Bacteria of the phylum Planctomycetes are of special interest for the study of compartmental cellular organization. Members of this phylum share a very unusual prokaryotic cell plan, featuring several membrane-bound compartments. Recently, it was shown that this cellular organization might extend to certain members of the phylum Verrucomicrobia. The Planctomycete cell plan has been defined as featuring a proteinaceous cell wall, a cytoplasmic membrane surrounding the paryphoplasm, and an intracytoplasmic membrane defining the riboplasm. So far it was presumed that Planctomycetes did not have an asymmetric bilayer outer membrane as observed in Gram-negative bacteria. However, recent work on outer membrane biogenesis has provided several marker genes in the outer membrane protein (OMP) assembly and the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) insertion complexes. Additionally, advances in computational prediction of OMPs provided new tools to perform more accurate genomic screening for such proteins. Here we searched all 22 Planctomycetes and Verrucomicrobia genomes available in GenBank, plus the recently published genome of “Candidatus Scalindua profunda,” for markers of outer membrane biogenesis and OMPs. We were able to identify the key components of LPS insertion, OMP assembly and at least eight OMPs in all genomes tested. Additionally, we have analyzed the transcriptome and proteome data of the Planctomycetes “Candidatus Kuenenia stuttgartiensis” and “Ca. S. profunda” and could confirm high expression of several predicted OMPs, including the biomarkers of outer membrane biogenesis. These analyses provide a strong indication that an asymmetrical outer membrane may be present in bacteria of both phyla. However, previous experiments have made obvious that the cell envelope of Planctomycetes is clearly divergent from both the Gram-negative and Gram-positive cell types. Thus, the functional implications of the presence of an outer membrane for the Planctomycete cell plan

  2. Oriented Circular Dichroism: A Method to Characterize Membrane-Active Peptides in Oriented Lipid Bilayers.

    PubMed

    Bürck, Jochen; Wadhwani, Parvesh; Fanghänel, Susanne; Ulrich, Anne S

    2016-02-16

    The structures of membrane-bound polypeptides are intimately related to their functions and may change dramatically with the lipid environment. Circular dichroism (CD) is a rapid analytical method that requires relatively low amounts of material and no labeling. Conventional CD is routinely used to monitor the secondary structure of peptides and proteins in solution, for example, in the presence of ligands and other binding partners. In the case of membrane-active peptides and transmembrane proteins, these measurements can be applied to, and remain limited to, samples containing detergent micelles or small sonicated lipid vesicles. Such traditional CD analysis reveals only secondary structures. With the help of an oriented circular dichroism (OCD) setup, however, based on the preparation of macroscopically oriented lipid bilayers, it is possible to address the membrane alignment of a peptide in addition to its conformation. This approach has been mostly used for α-helical peptides so far, but other structural elements are conceivable as well. OCD analysis relies on Moffitt's theory, which predicts that the electronic transition dipole moments of the backbone amide bonds in helical polypeptides are polarized either parallel or perpendicular to the helix axis. The interaction of the electric field vector of the circularly polarized light with these transitions results in an OCD spectrum of a membrane-bound α-helical peptide, which exhibits a characteristic line shape and reflects the angle between the helix axis and the bilayer normal. For parallel alignment of a peptide helix with respect to the membrane surface (S-state), the corresponding "fingerprint" CD band around 208 nm will exhibit maximum negative amplitude. If the helix changes its alignment via an obliquely tilted (T-state) to a fully inserted transmembrane orientation (I-state), the ellipticity at 208 nm decreases and the value approaches zero due to the decreased interactions between the field and the

  3. Tethered bilayer membranes as a complementary tool for functional and structural studies: The pyolysin case.

    PubMed

    Preta, Giulio; Jankunec, Marija; Heinrich, Frank; Griffin, Sholeem; Sheldon, Iain Martin; Valincius, Gintaras

    2016-09-01

    We demonstrate the use of tethered bilayer lipid membranes (tBLMs) as an experimental platform for functional and structural studies of membrane associated proteins by electrochemical techniques. The reconstitution of the cholesterol-dependent cytolysin (CDC) pyolysin (PLO) from Trueperella pyogenes into tBLMs was followed in real-time by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). Changes of the EIS parameters of the tBLMs upon exposure to PLO solutions were consistent with the dielectric barrier damage occurring through the formation of water-filled pores in membranes. Parallel experiments involving a mutant version of PLO, which is able to bind to the membranes but does not form oligomer pores, strengthen the reliability of this methodology, since no change in the electrochemical impedance was observed. Complementary atomic force microscopy (AFM) and neutron reflectometry (NR) measurements revealed structural details of the membrane bound PLO, consistent with the structural transformations of the membrane bound toxins found for other cholesterol dependent cytolysins. In this work, using the tBLMs platform we also observed a protective effect of the dynamin inhibitor Dynasore against pyolysin as well as pneumolysin. An effect of Dynasore in tBLMs, which was earlier observed in experiments with live cells, confirms the biological relevance of the tBLMs models, as well as demonstrates the potential of the electrochemical impedance spectroscopy to quantify membrane damage by the pore forming toxins. In conclusion, tBLMs are a reliable and complementary method to explore the activity of CDCs in eukaryotic cells and to develop strategies to limit the toxic effects of CDCs. PMID:27211243

  4. [Assessment of the viscoelastic properties of biological membranes by measurements on bilayers].

    PubMed

    Pasechnik, V I; Gianik, T

    1978-01-01

    The frequency characteristic of the complex Young modulus along the normal to surface is measured for the bilayer lipid membranes (BLM). For egg lecithin membranes the absolute value of the modulus (formula: see text) rises from 4.10(6) to 10(8) dyn/cm2 (n-decane) and from 10(8) to 10(9) dyn/cm2 (n-hexadecane) with the frequency change from 20 Hz to 15 000 Hz depending on different membrane solvents. (formula: see text) also rises several times if cholesterol is added or lipid hydrocarbon chains are longer or more saturated. If the solvent--n-hexadecane is freezed out in the region of 14 degrees C,(formula: see text) increases up to 10(10) dyn/cm2. The loss angle is measured and real and imaginary parts of (formula: see text) are determined. (formula: see text) posesses the relaxtion times spectrum in the range 10(-5)--10(-3) s. The conclusion is made that biological membranes like BLM have polymer properties, their (formula: see text) values may achieve 10(10) dyn/cm2 and the relaxation times are greater than 10(-3) s.

  5. The self-crosslinked ufasome of conjugated linoleic acid: investigation of morphology, bilayer membrane and stability.

    PubMed

    Fan, Ye; Fang, Yun; Ma, Lin

    2014-11-01

    Unsaturated fatty acid liposomes (Ufasomes) have attracted interests because of the ready availability of unsaturated fatty acids and the simple assembly strategy. However, the colloidal instability of the ufasomes hinders them from applying in the fields of drug delivery and food additives. In the present work, conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) with triple activities of bioactive, assembling and crosslinking was employed as a new molecular building block to construct ufasome and afterwards crosslinked ufasome. First, CLA ufasome was self-assembled from CLA molecules in response to pH variation, and the suitable CLA concentrations and pH ranges were determined by surface tension measurement and acid-base titration. Subsequently, the self-crosslinked CLA ufasome was prepared by intra-ufasomal crosslinking of conjugated double bonds in the CLA molecules. The morphologies of the self-crosslinked CLA ufasomes were imaged using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), from which the size of 20-50 nm and the bilayer thickness of 2.7±0.5 nm were detected. Most importantly, based on the comparison of the bilayer thicknesses of the different fatty acids, the molecular arrangement in the bilayer membrane of the self-crosslinked CLA ufasome is named "side-by-side" model contrary to the ordinary "tail-to-tail" model. The pH stability of the self-crosslinked CLA ufasome was examined in virtue of dynamic light scattering tests. Finally, in vitro release results of 5-fluorouracil from the self-crosslinked CLA ufasome showed that the process was slow and sustainable.

  6. Surface-Enhanced Infrared Spectroscopy and Neutron Reflectivity Studies of Ubiquinone in Hybrid Bilayer Membranes under Potential Control.

    PubMed

    Quirk, Amanda; Lardner, Michael J; Tun, Zin; Burgess, Ian J

    2016-03-01

    Surface-enhanced infrared adsorption spectroscopy (SEIRAS) and neutron reflectometry (NR) were employed to characterize ubiquinone (UQ) containing hybrid bilayer membranes. The biomimetic membrane was prepared by fusing phospholipid vesicles on a hydrophobic octadecanethiol monolayer self-assembled on a thin gold film. Using SEIRAS, the assembly of the membrane is monitored in situ. The presence of ubiquinone is verified by the characteristic carbonyl peaks from the quinone ester. A well-ordered distal lipid leaflet results from fusion of vesicles with and without the addition of ubiquinone. With applied potential, the hybrid bilayer membrane in the absence of UQ behaves in the same way as previously reported solid supported phospholipid membranes. When ubiquinone is incorporated in the membrane, electric field induced changes in the distal leaflet are suppressed. Changes in the infrared vibrations of the ubiquinone due to applied potential indicate the head groups are located in both polar and nonpolar environments. The spectroscopic data reveal that the isoprenoid unit of the ubiquinone is likely lying in the midplane of the lipid bilayer while the head has some freedom to move within the hydrophobic core. The SEIRAS experiments show redox behavior of UQ incorporated in a model lipid membrane that are otherwise inaccessible with traditional electrochemistry techniques. PMID:26867110

  7. Electron transport across glycerol monooleate bilayer lipid membranes facilitated by magnesium etiochlorin.

    PubMed Central

    Feldberg, S W; Armen, G H; Bell, J A; Chang, C K; Wang, C B

    1981-01-01

    The transport of electrons across biological membranes is believed to play an important role in many biophenomena. Although there have been many examples of systems which may be transporting electrons across Mueller-Rudin bilayer lipid membranes (blm), none has been well characterized. The system we describe here comprises a glycerol monooleate blm containing a magnesium etiochlorin (Mg-C) separating two aqueous phases each containing ferricyanide, ferrocyanide, KCl, and a platinum electrode. The E0s for the Mg-C+/Mg-C and ferri-/ferrocyanide couples are 0.22 and 0.24 V vs. SCE. Thus the MG-C+/Mb-C system is easily poised by the ferri-/ferrocyanide system. When the potentials of the ferri-/ferrocyanide couples are different on each side of the blm we show that the open-circuit membrane potential nearly equals the difference between the redox potentials. This is unequivocal evidence that electrons are being transferred across the blm from one aqueous phase to the other. On the basis of these experiments we deduce that electron transport is the major charge transport mechanism. When redox potentials are the same on each side of the blm, the conductance of the membrane can be greater than 10(-3) S/cm2. The conductance is proportional to the second power of the concentration of Mg-C in the membrane-forming mixture. A number of additional experiments are described which attempt to elucidate the mechanism of electron transfer. We believe that our data are consistent with the idea of an electron-hopping mechanism in which the transmembrane electron transport occurs by a series of second-order electron transfers between membrane-bound electron donors (Mg-C) and acceptors (Mg-C+). Alternative explanations are presented. PMID:7213929

  8. Thermodynamic free energy methods to investigate shape transitions in bilayer membranes

    PubMed Central

    Ramakrishnan, N.; Tourdot, Richard W.

    2016-01-01

    The conformational free energy landscape of a system is a fundamental thermodynamic quantity of importance particularly in the study of soft matter and biological systems, in which the entropic contributions play a dominant role. While computational methods to delineate the free energy landscape are routinely used to analyze the relative stability of conformational states, to determine phase boundaries, and to compute ligand-receptor binding energies its use in problems involving the cell membrane is limited. Here, we present an overview of four different free energy methods to study morphological transitions in bilayer membranes, induced either by the action of curvature remodeling proteins or due to the application of external forces. Using a triangulated surface as a model for the cell membrane and using the framework of dynamical triangulation Monte Carlo, we have focused on the methods of Widom insertion, thermodynamic integration, Bennett acceptance scheme, and umbrella sampling and weighted histogram analysis. We have demonstrated how these methods can be employed in a variety of problems involving the cell membrane. Specifically, we have shown that the chemical potential, computed using Widom insertion, and the relative free energies, computed using thermodynamic integration and Bennett acceptance method, are excellent measures to study the transition from curvature sensing to curvature inducing behavior of membrane associated proteins. The umbrella sampling and WHAM analysis has been used to study the thermodynamics of tether formation in cell membranes and the quantitative predictions of the computational model are in excellent agreement with experimental measurements. Furthermore, we also present a method based on WHAM and thermodynamic integration to handle problems related to end-point-catastrophe that are common in most free energy methods.

  9. Micro-patterning of ionic reservoirs within a double bilayer lipid membrane to fabricate a 2D array of ion-channel switch based electrochemical biosensors

    SciTech Connect

    Sansinena, J. M.; Yee, C. K.; Sapuri, A.; Swanson, Basil I.; Redondo, A.; Parikh, A. N.

    2004-01-01

    We present a simple approach for the design of ionic reservoir arrays within a double phospholipid bilayer to ultimately develop a 2D array of ion-channel switch based electrochemical biosensors. As a first step, a primary bilayer lipid membrane is deposited onto an array of electrodes patterned onto a substrate surface. Subsequently, an array of microvoids is created within the bilayer by a wet photolithographic patterning of phospholipid bilayers using a deep UV light source and a quartz/chrome photomask. To ensure registry, the photomask used to pattern bilayers is designed to match up the microvoids within the primary bilayer with the array of electrodes on the substrate surface. The deposition of a secondary bilayer lipid membrane onto the primary bilayer that spans across the patterned microvoids leads to the formation of the array of ionic reservoirs within the double phospholipid bilayer. This is accomplished using giant unilamellar vesicles and by exploiting membrane electrostatics. The use of ion-channels incorporated into the secondary bilayer that covers the individual ionic reservoirs allows the construction of a 2D array of ion-channel switch based electrochemical biosensors that are able to recognize different target-agents simultaneously.

  10. Bilayer Membrane Modulation of Membrane Type 1 Matrix Metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP) Structure and Proteolytic Activity.

    PubMed

    Cerofolini, Linda; Amar, Sabrina; Lauer, Janelle L; Martelli, Tommaso; Fragai, Marco; Luchinat, Claudio; Fields, Gregg B

    2016-01-01

    Cell surface proteolysis is an integral yet poorly understood physiological process. The present study has examined how the pericellular collagenase membrane-type 1 matrix metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP) and membrane-mimicking environments interplay in substrate binding and processing. NMR derived structural models indicate that MT1-MMP transiently associates with bicelles and cells through distinct residues in blades III and IV of its hemopexin-like domain, while binding of collagen-like triple-helices occurs within blades I and II of this domain. Examination of simultaneous membrane interaction and triple-helix binding revealed a possible regulation of proteolysis due to steric effects of the membrane. At bicelle concentrations of 1%, enzymatic activity towards triple-helices was increased 1.5-fold. A single mutation in the putative membrane interaction region of MT1-MMP (Ser466Pro) resulted in lower enzyme activation by bicelles. An initial structural framework has thus been developed to define the role(s) of cell membranes in modulating proteolysis. PMID:27405411

  11. Bilayer Membrane Modulation of Membrane Type 1 Matrix Metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP) Structure and Proteolytic Activity

    PubMed Central

    Cerofolini, Linda; Amar, Sabrina; Lauer, Janelle L.; Martelli, Tommaso; Fragai, Marco; Luchinat, Claudio; Fields, Gregg B.

    2016-01-01

    Cell surface proteolysis is an integral yet poorly understood physiological process. The present study has examined how the pericellular collagenase membrane-type 1 matrix metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP) and membrane-mimicking environments interplay in substrate binding and processing. NMR derived structural models indicate that MT1-MMP transiently associates with bicelles and cells through distinct residues in blades III and IV of its hemopexin-like domain, while binding of collagen-like triple-helices occurs within blades I and II of this domain. Examination of simultaneous membrane interaction and triple-helix binding revealed a possible regulation of proteolysis due to steric effects of the membrane. At bicelle concentrations of 1%, enzymatic activity towards triple-helices was increased 1.5-fold. A single mutation in the putative membrane interaction region of MT1-MMP (Ser466Pro) resulted in lower enzyme activation by bicelles. An initial structural framework has thus been developed to define the role(s) of cell membranes in modulating proteolysis. PMID:27405411

  12. Interaction of multiwalled carbon nanotubes with supported lipid bilayers and vesicles as model biological membranes.

    PubMed

    Yi, Peng; Chen, Kai Loon

    2013-06-01

    The influence of solution chemistry on the kinetics and reversibility of the deposition of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) on model biological membranes was investigated using a quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D). Supported lipid bilayers (SLBs) comprised of zwitterionic 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glyero-3-phosphocholine (DOPC), as well as DOPC vesicles, were used as model cell membranes. Under neutral pH conditions, the deposition kinetics of MWNTs on SLBs increased with increasing electrolyte (NaCl and CaCl2) concentrations. In the presence of NaCl, favorable deposition was not achieved even at a concentration of 1 M, which is attributed to the presence of strong repulsive hydration forces due to the highly hydrophilic headgroups of SLBs. Conversely, favorable deposition was observed at CaCl2 concentrations above 0.5 mM when the charge of SLBs was reversed from negative to positive through the binding of Ca(2+) cations to the exposed phosphate headgroups. Favorable nanotube deposition was also observed at pH 2, at which the DOPC SLBs exhibited positive surface charge, since the isoelectric point of DOPC is ca. 4. When MWNTs on SLBs were rinsed with low ionic strength solutions at pH 7.3, only ca. 20% of deposited nanotubes were released, indicating that nanotube deposition was mostly irreversible. The deposition of MWNTs on DOPC vesicles under favorable deposition conditions did not result in any detectable leakage of solution from the vesicles, indicating that MWNTs did not severely disrupt the DOPC bilayers upon attachment.

  13. A self-consistent chain model for the phase transitions in lipid bilayer membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Kambara, T; Sasaki, N

    1984-01-01

    We presented a mechanical model of a lipid bilayer membrane. The internal conformations of a polar head group and double hydrocarbon chains in a lipid molecule were described on the basis of the isomeric bond-rotation scheme. The thermodynamic properties of the lipid membranes were represented by a density matrix that described the rotational isomeric states of the head groups and chains. The parameters that determined the density matrix were obtained in the presence of the intermolecular interactions, which depend on the conformation of the molecules. The interchain interaction was given by the Kihara potential, which depends on the shape of the chains. The Coulomb interaction between the polar head groups and the lateral pressure were considered. The calculation was made for the three lipid molecules corresponding to DMPC, DPPC, and DSPC. The model agreed well with the following experimental results: the temperature, the latent heat of the gel-to-liquid crystalline phase transition, the temperature dependencies of (a) the intermolecular distance, (b) the number of gauche bonds in a hydrocarbon chain, (c) the order parameter for the bond orientation, (d) the volume of the membrane, (e) the thermal expansion coefficients, and (f) the birefringence. PMID:6487736

  14. Bovine F1Fo ATP synthase monomers bend the lipid bilayer in 2D membrane crystals

    PubMed Central

    Jiko, Chimari; Davies, Karen M; Shinzawa-Itoh, Kyoko; Tani, Kazutoshi; Maeda, Shintaro; Mills, Deryck J; Tsukihara, Tomitake; Fujiyoshi, Yoshinori; Kühlbrandt, Werner; Gerle, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    We have used a combination of electron cryo-tomography, subtomogram averaging, and electron crystallographic image processing to analyse the structure of intact bovine F1Fo ATP synthase in 2D membrane crystals. ATPase assays and mass spectrometry analysis of the 2D crystals confirmed that the enzyme complex was complete and active. The structure of the matrix-exposed region was determined at 24 Å resolution by subtomogram averaging and repositioned into the tomographic volume to reveal the crystal packing. F1Fo ATP synthase complexes are inclined by 16° relative to the crystal plane, resulting in a zigzag topology of the membrane and indicating that monomeric bovine heart F1Fo ATP synthase by itself is sufficient to deform lipid bilayers. This local membrane curvature is likely to be instrumental in the formation of ATP synthase dimers and dimer rows, and thus for the shaping of mitochondrial cristae. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.06119.001 PMID:25815585

  15. Syringotoxin pore formation and inactivation in human red blood cell and model bilayer lipid membranes.

    PubMed

    Szabó, Zsófia; Gróf, Pál; Schagina, Ludmila V; Gurnev, Philip A; Takemoto, Jon Y; Mátyus, Edit; Blaskó, Katalin

    2002-12-23

    The effect of syringotoxin (ST), a member of the cyclic lipodepsipeptides family (CLPs) produced by Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae on the membrane permeability of human red blood cells (RBCs) and model bilayer lipid membranes (BLMs) was studied and compared to that of two recently investigated CLPs, syringomycin E (SRE) and syringopeptin 22A (SP22A) [Biochim. Biophys. Acta 1466 (2000) 79 and Bioelectrochemistry 52 (2000) 161]. The permeability-increasing effect of ST on RBCs was the least among the three CLPs. A time-dependent ST pore inactivation was observed on RBCs at 20 and 37 degrees C but not at 8 degrees C. From the kinetic model worked out parameters as permeability coefficient of RBC membrane for 86Rb(+) and pores mean lifetime were calculated. A shorter pores mean lifetime was calculated at 37 degrees C then at 20 degrees C, which gave us an explanation for the unusual slower rate of tracer efflux measured at 37 degrees C then that at 20 degrees C. The results obtained on BLM showed that the pore inactivation was due to a decrease in the number of pores but not to a change of their dwell time or conductance.

  16. Na+/D-glucose cotransporter based bilayer lipid membrane sensor for D-glucose.

    PubMed

    Sugao, N; Sugawara, M; Minami, H; Uto, M; Umezawa, Y

    1993-02-15

    A new type of amperometric blosensor for glucose was fabricated using a Na+/D-glucose cotransporter as the signal-transducing sensory element that exploits the D-glucose-triggered Na+ ion current through bilayer lipid membranes (BLMs). The planar BLM was formed by the folding method across a small aperture of a thin Teflon film. The Na+/D-glucose cotransporter, isolated and purified from small intestinal brush border membrane of guinea pigs, was embedded into BLMs through proteoliposomes. The number of the protein molecules thus incorporated in the present sensing membrane was estimated to be ca. 10(7). The sensor response was measured as an ionic current through the BLM arising from cotransported Na+ ion flux under a constant applied potential and was only induced by D-glucose above 10(-9) M, but not by the other monosaccharides except for D-galactose. The effect of applied potentials, Na+ and K+ ion concentrations, and the addition of a competitive inhibitor, phlorizin, were scrutinized to characterize the sensor output. The results were briefly discussed in terms of the potential use of the Na+/D-glucose cotransporter as a sensory element for D-glucose.

  17. Biodegradable, Tethered Lipid Bilayer-Microsphere Systems with Membrane-Integrated α-Helical Peptide Anchors.

    PubMed

    Fried, Eric S; Luchan, Joshua; Gilchrist, M Lane

    2016-04-12

    Supported lipid bilayers (SLBs) are ideally suited for the study of biomembrane-biomembrane interactions and for the biomimicry of cell-to-cell communication, allowing for surface ligand displays that contain laterally mobile elements. However, the SLB paradigm does not include three-dimensionality and biocompatibility. As a way to bypass these limitations, we have developed a biodegradable form of microsphere SLBs, also known as proteolipobeads (PLBs), using PLGA microspheres. Microspheres were synthesized using solvent evaporation and size selected with fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS). Biomembranes were covalently tethered upon fusion to microsphere supports via short-chain PEG spacers connecting membrane-integrated α-helical peptides and the microsphere surface, affecting membrane diffusivity and mobility as indicated by confocal FRAP analysis. Membrane heterogeneities, which are attributed to PLGA hydrophobicity and rough surface topography, are curtailed by the addition of PEG tethers. This method allows for the presentation of tethered, laterally mobile biomembranes in three dimensions with functionally embedded attachment peptides for mobile ligand displays.

  18. Effects of interleaflet coupling on the morphologies of multicomponent lipid bilayer membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Funkhouser, Chloe M.; Mayer, Michael; Solis, Francisco J.; Thornton, K.

    2013-01-01

    We investigate dynamical and stationary compositional and surface morphologies in macroscopically phase-separating multicomponent lipid bilayer membranes using a computational model. We employ a phase-field method for the description of the coexisting phases and treat the two leaflets individually while including interleaflet interactions. The compositional evolution of the two leaflets is coupled to the shape evolution of the membrane via a Helfrich free energy with a composition-dependent spontaneous curvature. We investigate the effects of the interleaflet interaction on the dynamics and stationary states of a system favoring nonzero spontaneous curvatures. Morphological phase diagrams are mapped in composition space using three different interleaflet coupling strengths. We find that characteristics sensitive to the coupling strength include the time required to develop regions of fully separated phases, the prevalence of a stripe morphology, and the shifting of phase compositions to accommodate energetically favorable interactions across leaflets. Characteristics found to be robust with respect to coupling strength include (1) the stripe morphology is favored at nearly equal mixtures and (2) phase separation is prevented in systems where a pair of phases that preferentially interact across leaflets together occupy nearly all or none of the membrane.

  19. Biodegradable, Tethered Lipid Bilayer-Microsphere Systems with Membrane-Integrated α-Helical Peptide Anchors.

    PubMed

    Fried, Eric S; Luchan, Joshua; Gilchrist, M Lane

    2016-04-12

    Supported lipid bilayers (SLBs) are ideally suited for the study of biomembrane-biomembrane interactions and for the biomimicry of cell-to-cell communication, allowing for surface ligand displays that contain laterally mobile elements. However, the SLB paradigm does not include three-dimensionality and biocompatibility. As a way to bypass these limitations, we have developed a biodegradable form of microsphere SLBs, also known as proteolipobeads (PLBs), using PLGA microspheres. Microspheres were synthesized using solvent evaporation and size selected with fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS). Biomembranes were covalently tethered upon fusion to microsphere supports via short-chain PEG spacers connecting membrane-integrated α-helical peptides and the microsphere surface, affecting membrane diffusivity and mobility as indicated by confocal FRAP analysis. Membrane heterogeneities, which are attributed to PLGA hydrophobicity and rough surface topography, are curtailed by the addition of PEG tethers. This method allows for the presentation of tethered, laterally mobile biomembranes in three dimensions with functionally embedded attachment peptides for mobile ligand displays. PMID:26972467

  20. Penetration of Oxidized Carbon Nanospheres through Lipid Bilayer Membrane: Comparison to Graphene Oxide and Oxidized Carbon Nanotubes, and Effects of pH and Membrane Composition.

    PubMed

    Seemork, Jiraporn; Sansureerungsikul, Titiporn; Sathornsantikun, Kamonluck; Sinthusake, Tarit; Shigyou, Kazuki; Tree-Udom, Thapakorn; Jiangchareon, Banphot; Chiablaem, Khajeelak; Lirdprapamongkol, Kriengsak; Svasti, Jisnuson; Hamada, Tsutomu; Palaga, Tanapat; Wanichwecharungruang, Supason

    2016-09-14

    Here we show that the ability of oxidized carbon particles to penetrate phospholipid bilayer membrane varies with the particle shapes, chemical functionalities on the particle surface, lipid compositions of the membrane and pH conditions. Among the similar surface charged oxidized carbon particles of spherical (oxidized carbon nanosphere, OCS), tubular (oxidized carbon nanotube, OCT), and sheet (oxidized graphene sheet, OGSh) morphologies, OCS possesses the highest levels of adhesion to lipid bilayer membrane and penetration into the cell-sized liposome. OCS preferably binds better to the disordered lipid bilayer membrane (consisting of 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylcholine) as compared to the ordered membrane (consisting of 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylcholine and cholesterol). The process of OCS-induced leak on the membrane is pH responsive and most pronounced under an acidic condition. Covalently decorating the OCS's surface with poly(ethylene oxide) or (2-aminoethyl)trimethylammonium moieties decreases its ability to interact with the membrane. When used as carriers, OCSs can deliver curcumin into nucleus of A549 human lung cancer and human embryonic kidney cells, in contrast, curcumin molecules delivered by OCTs remain in the cytoplasm. OGShs cannot significantly enter cells and cannot induce noticeable cellular uptake of curcumin. PMID:27404585

  1. Penetration of Oxidized Carbon Nanospheres through Lipid Bilayer Membrane: Comparison to Graphene Oxide and Oxidized Carbon Nanotubes, and Effects of pH and Membrane Composition.

    PubMed

    Seemork, Jiraporn; Sansureerungsikul, Titiporn; Sathornsantikun, Kamonluck; Sinthusake, Tarit; Shigyou, Kazuki; Tree-Udom, Thapakorn; Jiangchareon, Banphot; Chiablaem, Khajeelak; Lirdprapamongkol, Kriengsak; Svasti, Jisnuson; Hamada, Tsutomu; Palaga, Tanapat; Wanichwecharungruang, Supason

    2016-09-14

    Here we show that the ability of oxidized carbon particles to penetrate phospholipid bilayer membrane varies with the particle shapes, chemical functionalities on the particle surface, lipid compositions of the membrane and pH conditions. Among the similar surface charged oxidized carbon particles of spherical (oxidized carbon nanosphere, OCS), tubular (oxidized carbon nanotube, OCT), and sheet (oxidized graphene sheet, OGSh) morphologies, OCS possesses the highest levels of adhesion to lipid bilayer membrane and penetration into the cell-sized liposome. OCS preferably binds better to the disordered lipid bilayer membrane (consisting of 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylcholine) as compared to the ordered membrane (consisting of 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylcholine and cholesterol). The process of OCS-induced leak on the membrane is pH responsive and most pronounced under an acidic condition. Covalently decorating the OCS's surface with poly(ethylene oxide) or (2-aminoethyl)trimethylammonium moieties decreases its ability to interact with the membrane. When used as carriers, OCSs can deliver curcumin into nucleus of A549 human lung cancer and human embryonic kidney cells, in contrast, curcumin molecules delivered by OCTs remain in the cytoplasm. OGShs cannot significantly enter cells and cannot induce noticeable cellular uptake of curcumin.

  2. Organic fluid permeation through fluoropolymer membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Nemser, Stuart M.; Kosaraju, Praveen; Bowser, John

    2015-07-14

    Separation of the components of liquid mixtures is achieved by contacting a liquid mixture with a nonporous membrane having a fluoropolymer selectively permeable layer and imposing a pressure gradient across the membrane from feed side to permeate side. Unusually high transmembrane flux is obtained when the membrane is subjected to one or more process conditions prior to separation. These include (a) leaving some residual amount of membrane casting solvent in the membrane, and (b) contacting the membrane with a component of the mixture to be separated for a duration effective to saturate the membrane with the component.

  3. Probing the Huntingtin 1-17 Membrane Anchor on a Phospholipid Bilayer by Using All-Atom Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Côté, Sébastien; Binette, Vincent; Salnikov, Evgeniy S.; Bechinger, Burkhard; Mousseau, Normand

    2015-01-01

    Mislocalization and aggregation of the huntingtin protein are related to Huntington’s disease. Its first exon—more specifically the first 17 amino acids (Htt17)—is crucial for the physiological and pathological functions of huntingtin. It regulates huntingtin’s activity through posttranslational modifications and serves as an anchor to membrane-containing organelles of the cell. Recently, structure and orientation of the Htt17 membrane anchor were determined using a combined solution and solid-state NMR approach. This prompted us to refine this model by investigating the dynamics and thermodynamics of this membrane anchor on a POPC bilayer using all-atom, explicit solvent molecular dynamics and Hamiltonian replica exchange. Our simulations are combined with various experimental measurements to generate a high-resolution atomistic model for the huntingtin Htt17 membrane anchor on a POPC bilayer. More precisely, we observe that the single α-helix structure is more stable in the phospholipid membrane than the NMR model obtained in the presence of dodecylphosphocholine detergent micelles. The resulting Htt17 monomer has its hydrophobic plane oriented parallel to the bilayer surface. Our results further unveil the key residues interacting with the membrane in terms of hydrogen bonds, salt-bridges, and nonpolar contributions. We also observe that Htt17 equilibrates at a well-defined insertion depth and that it perturbs the physical properties—order parameter, thickness, and area per lipid—of the bilayer in a manner that could favor its dimerization. Overall, our observations reinforce and refine the NMR measurements on the Htt17 membrane anchor segment of huntingtin that is of fundamental importance to its biological functions. PMID:25762330

  4. Drug binding and mobility relating to the thermal fluctuation in fluid lipid membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okamura, Emiko; Yoshii, Noriyuki

    2008-12-01

    Drug binding and mobility in fluid lipid bilayer membranes are quantified in situ by using the multinuclear solution NMR combined with the pulsed-field-gradient technique. One-dimensional and pulsed-field-gradient F19 and H1 NMR signals of an anticancer drug, 5-fluorouracil (5FU) are analyzed at 283-313 K in the presence of large unilamellar vesicles (LUVs) of egg phosphatidylcholine (EPC) as model cell membranes. The simultaneous observation of the membrane-bound and free 5FU signals enables to quantify in what amount of 5FU is bound to the membrane and how fast 5FU is moving within the membrane in relation to the thermal fluctuation of the soft, fluid environment. It is shown that the mobility of membrane-bound 5FU is slowed down by almost two orders of magnitude and similar to the lipid movement in the membrane, the movement closely related to the intramembrane fluidity. The mobility of 5FU and EPC is, however, not similar at 313 K; the 5FU movement is enhanced in the membrane as a result of the loose binding of 5FU in the lipid matrices. The membrane-bound fraction of 5FU is ˜0.1 and almost unaltered over the temperature range examined. It is also independent of the 5FU concentration from 2 to 30 mM with respect to the 40-50 mM LUV. The free energy of the 5FU binding is estimated at -4 to -2 kJ/mol, the magnitude always close to the thermal fluctuation, 2.4-2.6 kJ/mol.

  5. Supported Lipid Bilayer Platform To Test Inhibitors of the Membrane Attack Complex: Insights into Biomacromolecular Assembly and Regulation.

    PubMed

    Yorulmaz, Saziye; Jackman, Joshua A; Hunziker, Walter; Cho, Nam-Joon

    2015-11-01

    Complement activation plays an important role in innate immune defense by triggering formation of the membrane attack complex (MAC), which is a biomacromolecular assembly that exhibits membrane-lytic activity against foreign invaders including various pathogens and biomaterials. Understanding the details of MAC structure and function has been the subject of extensive work involving bulk liposome and erythrocyte assays. However, it is difficult to characterize the mechanism of action of MAC inhibitor drug candidates using the conventional assays. To address this issue, we employ a biomimetic supported lipid bilayer platform to investigate how two MAC inhibitors, vitronectin and clusterin, interfere with MAC assembly in a sequential addition format, as monitored by the quartz crystal microbalance-dissipation (QCM-D) technique. Two experimental strategies based on modular assembly were selected, precincubation of inhibitor and C5b-7 complex before addition to the lipid bilayer or initial addition of inhibitor followed by the C5b-7 complex. The findings indicate that vitronectin inhibits membrane association of C5b-7 via a direct interaction with C5b-7 and via competitive membrane association onto the supported lipid bilayer. On the other hand, clusterin directly interacts with C5b-7 such that C5b-7 is still able to bind to the lipid bilayer, and clusterin affects the subsequent binding of other complement proteins involved in the MAC assembly. Taken together, the findings in this study outline a biomimetic approach based on supported lipid bilayers to explore the interactions between complement proteins and inhibitors, thereby offering insight into MAC assembly and regulation.

  6. Bordetella pertussis major outer membrane porin protein forms small, anion-selective channels in lipid bilayer membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Armstrong, S K; Parr, T R; Parker, C D; Hancock, R E

    1986-01-01

    The major outer membrane protein of molecular weight 40,000 (the 40K protein) of a virulent isolate of Bordetella pertussis was purified to apparent homogeneity. The purified protein formed an oligomer band (of apparent molecular weight 90,000) on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels after solubilization at low temperatures. The porin function of this protein was characterized by the black lipid bilayer method. The 40K protein formed channels smaller than all other constitutive major outer membrane porins studied to date. The average single-channel conductance in 1 M KCl was 0.56 nS. This was less than a third of the conductance previously observed for Escherichia coli porins. Zero-current potential measurements made of the porin to determine its ion selectivity revealed the porin to be more than 100-fold selective for anions over cations. The single-channel conductance was measured as a function of salt concentration. The data could be fitted to a Lineweaver-Burk plot suggesting an anion binding site with a Kd of 1.17 M Cl- and a maximum possible conductance through the channel of 1.28 nS. Images PMID:2420780

  7. An infection-preventing bilayered collagen membrane containing antibiotic-loaded hyaluronan microparticles: physical and biological properties.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jong-Eun; Park, Jong-Chul; Lee, Kwang Hoon; Oh, Sang Ho; Kim, Joong-Gon; Suh, Hwal

    2002-07-01

    An infection-preventing bilayered membrane consisting of a dense and porous collagen membrane has been developed. The membrane was fabricated using a combined freeze-drying/air-drying method. Hyaluronan (HA) microparticles containing silver sulfadiazine (AgSD) were fabricated by gelling an HA solution with calcium chloride and were incorporated into collagen layers to allow the sustained release of AgSD. In vitro biodegradability of the membrane and the release of AgSD from the membrane could be controlled by cross-linking the membrane with ultraviolet (UV) irradiation. In a cytotoxicity test, cellular damage was minimized by the sustained release of AgSD from dressings. The antibacterial capacity of the material against Pseudomonas aeruginosa was investigated using the Bauer-Kirby disk diffusion test, and bacterial growth was found to be inhibited for 4 days. In vivo tests showed that the bilayered membrane was associated with greater tissue regeneration than a polymeric membrane and with no infection-related biological signs.

  8. Diffusion studies on permeable nitroxyl spin probes through bilayer lipid membranes: A low frequency ESR study

    SciTech Connect

    Meenakumari, V.; Benial, A. Milton Franklin; Utsumi, Hideo; Ichikawa, Kazuhiro; Yamada, Ken-ichi; Hyodo, Fuminori; Jawahar, A.

    2015-06-24

    Electron spin resonance (ESR) studies were carried out for permeable 2mM {sup 14}N-labeled deutrated 3 Methoxy carbonyl-2,2,5,5-tetramethyl-pyrrolidine-1-oxyl (MC-PROXYL) in pure water and 1mM, 2mM, 3mM, 4mM concentration of 14N-labeled deutrated MC-PROXYL in 400mM concentration of liposomal solution by using a 300 MHz ESR spectrometer. The ESR parameters such as linewidth, hyperfine coupling constant, g-factor, partition parameter and permeability were reported for these samples. The line broadening was observed for the nitroxyl spin probe in the liposomal solution. The line broadening indicates that the high viscous nature of the liposomal solution. The partition parameter and permeability values indicate the maximum diffusion of nitroxyl spin probes in the bilayer lipid membranes at 2 mM concentration of nitroxyl radical. This study illustrates that ESR can be used to differentiate between the intra and extra- membrane water by loading the liposome vesicles with a lipid-permeable nitroxyl spin probe. From the ESR results, the spin probe concentration was optimized as 2mM in liposomal solution for ESR phantom studies/imaging, invivo and invitro experiments.

  9. Phase separation of cholesterol and the interaction of ethanol with phosphatidylserine-cholesterol bilayer membranes.

    PubMed

    Bach, D; Borochov, N; Wachtel, E

    2002-02-01

    Thermotropic and structural effects of ethanol on phosphatidylserine (PS) membranes containing up to 0.4 mol fraction cholesterol were investigated by differential scanning calorimetry, X-ray diffraction and fluorescence spectroscopy. It was found that in the presence of cholesterol, 10% (v/v) added ethanol depresses the melting temperature of the phospholipid by approximately 2 degrees C, similar to what was observed in the absence of cholesterol. Below the melting temperature the progressive disordering effect of added cholesterol is weakly enhanced by the presence of ethanol. In the liquid crystalline state, the marked decrease in the thickness of the bilayer which ethanol causes in the absence of cholesterol (Chem. Phys. Lipids 92 (1998) 127), is also observed in its presence. We conclude that, in contrast to what has been observed for zwitterionic phospholipids, high concentrations of cholesterol do not diminish the interaction of ethanol with PS membranes. With addition of 10% (v/v) ethanol, crystalline cholesterol diffraction, an indication of phase separation of the sterol, appears at mol fraction cholesterol 0.34, as compared to 0.3 in the absence of ethanol (Chem. Phys. Lipids 92 (1998) 71).

  10. Flow over a membrane-covered, fluid-filled cavity

    PubMed Central

    Mongeau, Luc; Frankel, Steven H.

    2014-01-01

    The flow-induced response of a membrane covering a fluid-filled cavity located in a section of a rigid-walled channel was explored using finite element analysis. The membrane was initially aligned with the channel wall and separated the channel fluid from the cavity fluid. As fluid flowed over the membrane-covered cavity, a streamwise-dependent transmural pressure gradient caused membrane deformation. This model has application to synthetic models of the vocal fold cover layer used in voice production research. In this paper, the model is introduced and responses of the channel flow, the membrane, and the cavity flow are summarized for a range of flow and membrane parameters. It is shown that for high values of cavity fluid viscosity, the intracavity pressure and the beam deflection both reached steady values. For combinations of low cavity viscosity and sufficiently large upstream pressures, large-amplitude membrane vibrations resulted. Asymmetric conditions were introduced by creating cavities on opposing sides of the channel and assigning different stiffness values to the two membranes. The asymmetry resulted in reduction in or cessation of vibration amplitude, depending on the degree of asymmetry, and in significant skewing of the downstream flow field. PMID:24723738

  11. Monitoring of cholesterol oxidation in a lipid bilayer membrane using streptolysin O as a sensing and signal transduction element.

    PubMed

    Shoji, Atsushi; Ikeya, Kana; Aoyagi, Miki; Takatsuji, Ryutaro; Yanagida, Akio; Shibusawa, Yoichi; Sugawara, Masao

    2016-09-01

    Streptolysin O (SLO), which recognizes sterols and forms nanopores in lipid membranes, is proposed as a sensing element for monitoring cholesterol oxidation in a lipid bilayer. The structural requirements of eight sterols for forming nanopores by SLO confirmed that a free 3-OH group in the β-configuration of sterols is required for recognition by SLO in a lipid bilayer. The extent of nanopore formation by SLO in lipid bilayers increased in the order of cholestanolbilayer. The potential of the SLO nanopore-based method for monitoring cholesterol oxidation in a lipid bilayer by other oxidative enzymes is also discussed.

  12. Formation of lipid bilayers inside microfluidic channel array for monitoring membrane-embedded nanopores of phi29 DNA packaging nanomotor.

    PubMed

    Shim, Joon S; Geng, Jia; Ahn, Chong H; Guo, Peixuan

    2012-10-01

    An efficient method to form lipid bilayers inside an array of microfluidic channels has been developed and applied to monitor the membrane-embedded phi29 DNA packaging motor with an electrochemical characterization on a lab-on-a-chip (LOC) platform. A push-pull junction capturing approach was applied to confine a small amount of the lipid solution inside a microchannel. The selective permeability between solvents and water in PDMS was utilized to extract the solvent from the lipid solution, resulting in a self-formation of the lipid bilayer in the microchannel array. Each microchannel was independently connected to a silver/silver chloride (Ag/AgCl) electrode array, leading to a high-throughput monitoring of the nanopore insertion in the formed lipid bilayers. The formation of multiple lipid bilayers inside an array of microchannels and the simultaneous electrical and optical monitoring of multiple bilayer provides an efficient LOC platform for the further development of single phi29 motor pore sensing and high throughput single pore dsDNA sequencing. PMID:22773160

  13. Tethered bilayer lipid membranes studied by simultaneous attenuated total reflectance infrared spectroscopy and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Erbe, Andreas; Bushby, Richard J.; Evans, Stephen D.; Jeuken, Lars J. C.

    2013-01-01

    The formation of tethered lipid bilayer membranes (tBLMs) from unilamelar vesicles of egg yolk phosphatidylcholine (EggPC) on mixed self–assembled monolayers (SAMs) from varying ratios of 6-mercaptohexanol and EO3Cholesteryl on gold has been monitored by simultaneous attenuated total reflectance fourier transform infrared (ATR–FTIR) spectroscopy and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The influence of the lipid orientation (and hence the anisotropy) of lipids on a gold film on the dichroic ratio was studied by simulations of spectra with a matrix method for anisotropic layers. It is shown that for certain tilt angles of the dielectric tensor of the adsorbed anisotropic layer dispersive and negative absorption bands are possible. The experimental data indicates that the structure of the assemblies obtained varies with varying SAM composition. On SAMs with a high content of EO3Cholesteryl, tBLMs with reduced fluidity are formed. For SAMs with high content of 6-mercaptohexanol, the results are consistent with the adsorption of flattened vesicles, while spherical vesicles have been found in a small range of surface compositions. The kinetics of the adsorption process is consistent with the assumption of spherical vesicles as long–living intermediates for surfaces of high 6-mercaptohexanol content. No long–living spherical vesicles have been detected for surfaces with large fraction of EO3Cholesteryl tethers. The observed differences between the surfaces suggest that for the formation of tBLMs (unlike supported BLMs) no critical surface coverage of vesicles is needed prior to lipid bilayer formation. PMID:17388505

  14. Single DNA molecules on freestanding and supported cationic lipid bilayers: diverse conformational dynamics controlled by the local bilayer properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herold, Christoph; Schwille, Petra; Petrov, Eugene P.

    2016-02-01

    We present experimental results on the interaction of DNA macromolecules with cationic lipid membranes with different properties, including freestanding membranes in the fluid and gel state, and supported lipid membranes in the fluid state and under conditions of fluid-gel phase coexistence. We observe diverse conformational dynamics of membrane-bound DNA molecules controlled by the local properties of the lipid bilayer. In case of fluid-state freestanding lipid membranes, the behaviour of DNA on the membrane is controlled by the membrane charge density: whereas DNA bound to weakly charged membranes predominantly behaves as a 2D random coil, an increase in the membrane charge density leads to membrane-driven irreversible DNA collapse and formation of subresolution-sized DNA globules. On the other hand, electrostatic binding of DNA macromolecules to gel-state freestanding membranes leads to completely arrested diffusion and conformational dynamics of membrane-adsorbed DNA. A drastically different picture is observed in case of DNA interaction with supported cationic lipid bilayers: When the supported bilayer is in the fluid state, membrane-bound DNA molecules undergo 2D translational Brownian motion and conformational fluctuations, irrespectively of the charge density of the supported bilayer. At the same time, when the supported cationic membrane shows fluid-gel phase coexistence, membrane-bound DNA molecules are strongly attracted to micrometre-sized gel-phase domains enriched with the cationic lipid, which results in 2D compaction of the membrane-bound macromolecules. This DNA compaction, however, is fully reversible, and disappears as soon as the membrane is heated above the fluid-gel coexistence. We also discuss possible biological implications of our experimental findings.

  15. Lipid bilayers in the gel phase become saturated by triton X-100 at lower surfactant concentrations than those in the fluid phase.

    PubMed

    Ahyayauch, Hasna; Collado, M Isabel; Alonso, Alicia; Goñi, Felix M

    2012-06-01

    It has been repeatedly observed that lipid bilayers in the gel phase are solubilized by lower concentrations of Triton X-100, at least within certain temperature ranges, or other nonionic detergents than bilayers in the fluid phase. In a previous study, we showed that detergent partition coefficients into the lipid bilayer were the same for the gel and the fluid phases. In this contribution, turbidity, calorimetry, and 31P-NMR concur in showing that bilayers in the gel state (at least down to 13-20°C below the gel-fluid transition temperature) become saturated with detergent at lower detergent concentrations than those in the fluid state, irrespective of temperature. The different saturation may explain the observed differences in solubilization. PMID:22713566

  16. Lipid Bilayers in the Gel Phase Become Saturated by Triton X-100 at Lower Surfactant Concentrations Than Those in the Fluid Phase

    PubMed Central

    Ahyayauch, Hasna; Collado, M. Isabel; Alonso, Alicia; Goñi, Felix M.

    2012-01-01

    It has been repeatedly observed that lipid bilayers in the gel phase are solubilized by lower concentrations of Triton X-100, at least within certain temperature ranges, or other nonionic detergents than bilayers in the fluid phase. In a previous study, we showed that detergent partition coefficients into the lipid bilayer were the same for the gel and the fluid phases. In this contribution, turbidity, calorimetry, and 31P-NMR concur in showing that bilayers in the gel state (at least down to 13–20°C below the gel-fluid transition temperature) become saturated with detergent at lower detergent concentrations than those in the fluid state, irrespective of temperature. The different saturation may explain the observed differences in solubilization. PMID:22713566

  17. The temperature-dependent physical state of polar lipids and their miscibility impact the topography and mechanical properties of bilayer models of the milk fat globule membrane.

    PubMed

    Murthy, Appala Venkata Ramana; Guyomarc'h, Fanny; Lopez, Christelle

    2016-09-01

    The polar lipid assembly and biophysical properties of the biological membrane enveloping the milk fat globules (the MFGM) are yet poorly known, especially in connection with the temperature history that milk can experience after its secretion. However, bioactive mechanisms depend on biological structure, which itself highly depend on temperature. The objectives of this study were to investigate polar lipid packing in hydrated bilayers, models of the MFGM, and to follow at intermolecular level temperature-induced changes in the range 60-6°C, using the combination of differential scanning calorimetry, X-ray diffraction, atomic force microscopy (AFM) imaging and force spectroscopy. MFGM polar lipids, especially sphingomyelin, contain long chain saturated fatty acids with high phase transition temperatures. On cooling, the liquid disordered ld to solid ordered so (gel) phase transition of MFGM polar lipids started at about 40°C, leading to phase separation and formation of so phase domains protruding by about 1nm from the ld phase. Indentation measurements using AFM revealed that the resistance of the so phase domains to rupture was significantly higher than that of the ld phase and that it increased for both the domain and fluid phases with decreasing temperature. However, packing and stability of the bilayers were adversely affected by fast cooling to 6°C or by cooling-rewarming cycle. This study showed that MFGM polar lipid bilayers are dynamic systems. Heterogeneity in the structure and mechanical properties of the membrane was induced by temperature-dependent so/ld phase immiscibility of the lipid components. This could have consequences on the MFGM technological and biological functions (e.g. immunity and milk lipid digestion). PMID:27349732

  18. Order Parameters of a Transmembrane Helix in a Fluid Bilayer: Case Study of a WALP Peptide

    PubMed Central

    Holt, Andrea; Rougier, Léa; Réat, Valérie; Jolibois, Franck; Saurel, Olivier; Czaplicki, Jerzy; Killian, J. Antoinette; Milon, Alain

    2010-01-01

    Abstract A new solid-state NMR-based strategy is established for the precise and efficient analysis of orientation and dynamics of transmembrane peptides in fluid bilayers. For this purpose, several dynamically averaged anisotropic constraints, including 13C and 15N chemical shift anisotropies and 13C-15N dipolar couplings, were determined from two different triple-isotope-labeled WALP23 peptides (2H, 13C, and 15N) and combined with previously published quadrupolar splittings of the same peptide. Chemical shift anisotropy tensor orientations were determined with quantum chemistry. The complete set of experimental constraints was analyzed using a generalized, four-parameter dynamic model of the peptide motion, including tilt and rotation angle and two associated order parameters. A tilt angle of 21° was determined for WALP23 in dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine, which is much larger than the tilt angle of 5.5° previously determined from 2H NMR experiments. This approach provided a realistic value for the tilt angle of WALP23 peptide in the presence of hydrophobic mismatch, and can be applied to any transmembrane helical peptide. The influence of the experimental data set on the solution space is discussed, as are potential sources of error. PMID:20441750

  19. Computer Simulations of Small Molecules in Membranes: Insights from Computer Simulations into the Interactions of Small Molecules with Lipid Bilayers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pohorille, Andrew; New, Michael H.; Schweighofer, Karl; Wilson, Michael A.; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Two of Ernest Overton's lasting contributions to biology are the Meyer-Overton relationship between the potency of an anesthetic and its solubility in oil, and the Overton rule which relates the permeability of a membrane to the oil-water partition coefficient of the permeating molecule. A growing body of experimental evidence, however, cannot be reconciled with these theories. In particular, the molecular nature of membranes, unknown to Overton, needs to be included in any description of these phenomena. Computer simulations are ideally suited for providing atomic-level information about the behavior of small molecules in membranes. The authors discuss simulation studies relevant to Overton's ideas. Through simulations it was found that anesthetics tend to concentrate at interfaces and their anesthetic potency correlates better with solubility at the water-membrane interface than with solubility in oil. Simulation studies of membrane permeation revealed the anisotropic nature of the membranes, as evidenced, for example, by the highly nonuniform distribution of free volume in the bilayer. This, in turn, influences the diffusion rates of solutes, which increase with the depth in the membrane. Small solutes tend to move by hopping between voids in the bilayer, and this hopping motion may be responsible for the deviation from the Overton rule of the permeation rates of these molecules.

  20. Modeling of Fluid-Membrane Interaction in Cellular Microinjection Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karzar-Jeddi, Mehdi; Diaz, Jhon; Olgac, Nejat; Fan, Tai-Hsi

    2009-11-01

    Cellular microinjection is a well-accepted method to deliver matters such as sperm, nucleus, or macromolecules into biological cells. To improve the success rate of in vitro fertilization and to establish the ideal operating conditions for a novel computer controlled rotationally oscillating intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) technology, we investigate the fluid-membrane interactions in the ICSI procedure. The procedure consists of anchoring the oocyte (a developing egg) using a holding pipette, penetrating oocyte's zona pellucida (the outer membrane) and the oolemma (the plasma or inner membrane) using an injection micropipette, and finally to deliver sperm into the oocyte for fertilization. To predict the large deformation of the oocyte membranes up to the piercing of the oolemma and the motion of fluids across both membranes, the dynamic fluid-pipette-membrane interactions are formulated by the coupled Stokes' equations and the continuum membrane model based on Helfrich's energy theory. A boundary integral model is developed to simulate the transient membrane deformation and the local membrane stress induced by the longitudinal motion of the injection pipette. The model captures the essential features of the membranes shown on optical images of ICSI experiments, and is capable of suggesting the optimal deformation level of the oolemma to start the rotational oscillations for piercing into the oolemma.

  1. Fluid Mosaic Membranes and the Light Reactions of Photosynthesis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hannay, Jack

    1985-01-01

    Discusses: (1) the fluid mosaic membrane structure and light reactions of photosynthesis as exemplified by the Hill and Bendall "Z-scheme"; (2) the arrangement of light-harvesting pigments, electron transport components, and ATP synthesis on chloroplast membranes; and (3) how these topics are treated in A-level textbooks. (JN)

  2. Determining the pivotal plane of fluid lipid membranes in simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xin; Deserno, Markus

    2015-10-01

    Each leaflet of a curved lipid membrane contains a surface at which the area strain vanishes, the so-called pivotal plane. Its distance z0 from the bilayer's midplane arises in numerous contexts, for instance the connection between monolayer and bilayer moduli, stress-profile moments, or area-difference elasticity theories. Here, we propose two precise methods for determining the location of the pivotal plane in computer simulations, both of which rely on monitoring the lipid imbalance across a curved bilayer. The first method considers the ratio of lipid number between the two leaflets of cylindrical or spherical vesicles; it hence requires lipid flip-flop for equilibration. The second method looks at the leaflet difference across local sections cut out from a buckled membrane; this observable equilibrates even in the absence of flip-flop. We apply our methods to two different coarse-grained lipid models, the generic three-bead solvent-free Cooke model and a ten-bead representation of dimyristoylphosphocholine with the explicit solvent MARTINI model. The Cooke model is amenable to both methods and gives results that agree at the percent level. Using it, we also show that the pivotal plane moves outward as lipid curvature becomes more positive. The MARTINI model can only be analyzed with the buckling method; the obtained value z0 = 0.850(11) nm lies about 0.4 nm inwards of the glycerol backbone and is hence unexpectedly small. We attribute this to limitations of the coarse-grained description, suggesting that the location of the pivotal plane might be a good indicator for how well lipid models capture the microscopic origins of curvature elasticity. Finally, we also show that the pivotal plane position itself moves as the membrane is bent. The leading correction is linear in curvature, dependent on the Poisson ratio, and can matter when analyzing experimental results obtained from highly curved inverse hexagonal phases.

  3. Electro-optics of membrane electroporation in diphenylhexatriene-doped lipid bilayer vesicles.

    PubMed

    Kakorin, S; Stoylov, S P; Neumann, E

    1996-01-16

    The electric (linear) dichroisms observed in the membrane electroporation of salt-filled lipid bilayer vesicles (diameter O = 2 alpha = 0.32 micron; inside [NaCl] = 0.2 M) in isotonic aqueous 0.284 M sucrose-0.2 mM NaCl solution indicate orientation changes of the anisotropic light scattering centers (lipid head groups) and of the optical transition moments of the membrane-inserted probe 1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene (DPH). Both the turbidity dichroism and DPH absorbance dichroism show peculiar features: (1) at external electric fields E > or = Esat the time course of the dichroism shows a maximum value (reversal): Esat = 4.0 (+/- 0.2) MV m-1, T = 293 K (20 degrees C), (2) this reversal value is independent of the field strength for E > or = Esat, (3) the dichroism amplitudes exhibit a maximum value Emax = 3.0 (+/- 0.5) MV m-1, (4) for the pulse duration of 10 microseconds there is one dominant visible normal mode, the relaxation rate increases up to tau-1 approximately 0.6 x 10(6) s-1 at Esat and then decreases for E > Esat. The data can be described in terms of local lipid phase transitions involving clusters Ln of n lipids in the pore edges according to the three-state scheme C<-->HO<-->HI, C being the closed bilayer state, HO the hydrophobic pore state and HI the hydrophilic or inverted pore state with rotated lipid and DPH molecules. At E > or = Esat, further transitions HO<-->HO* and HI<-->HI* are rapidly coupled to the C<-->HO transition, which is rate-limiting. The vesicle geometry conditions a cos theta dependence of the local membrane field effects relative to the E direction and the data reflect cos theta averages. The stationary induced transmembrane voltage delta phi (theta, lambda m) = -1.5 aEf(lambda m) magnitude of cos theta does not exceed the limiting value delta phi sat = -0.53 V, corresponding to the field strength Em,sat = -delta phi sat/d = 100 MV m-1 (10(3) kV cm-1), due to increasing membrane conductivity lambda m. At E = Esat, f(lambda m

  4. Fast Diffusion of Very Long Chain Saturated Fatty Acids across a Bilayer Membrane and Their Rapid Extraction by Cyclodextrins

    PubMed Central

    Pillai, Biju K.; Jasuja, Ravi; Simard, Jeffrey R.; Hamilton, James A.

    2009-01-01

    Abnormalities in the transport of saturated very long chain fatty acids (VLCFA; >C18:0) contribute to their toxic levels in peroxisomal disorders of fatty acid metabolism, such as adrenoleukodystrophy and adrenomyeloneuropathy. We previously showed that VLCFA desorb much slower than normal dietary fatty acids from both albumin and protein-free lipid bilayers. The important step of transbilayer movement (flip-flop) was not measured directly as a consequence of this very slow desorption from donors, and the extremely low aqueous solubility of VLCFA precludes addition of unbound VLCFA to lipid membranes. We have overcome these limitations using methyl-β-cyclodextrin to solubilize VLCFA for rapid delivery to “acceptor” phosphatidylcholine vesicles (small and large unilamellar) and to cells. VLCFA binding was monitored in real time with the fluorescent probe fluorescein-labeled phosphatidylethanolamine in the outer membrane leaflet, and entrapped pyranine was used to detect flip-flop across the membrane. The upper limit of the rate of flip-flop across the membrane was independent of temperature and media viscosity and was similar for model raft and non-raft membranes as well as living cells. We further showed that cyclodextrins can extract VLCFA rapidly (within seconds) from vesicles and cells, which have implications for the mechanism and potential alternative approaches to treat adrenoleukodystrophy. Because VLCFA diffuse through the lipid bilayer, proteins may not be required for their transport across the peroxisomal membrane. PMID:19801636

  5. [Lipid oxidation in bilayer lipid membranes linked with the reaction of oxidation of NAD.H by atmospheric oxygen].

    PubMed

    Shchipumov, Iu A; Sokolov, V S; Iaguzhinskiĭ, L S; Boguslavskiĭ, L I

    1976-01-01

    It is shown that along with NAD.H oxidation with air oxygen peroxide oxidation of lipids forming the membrane takes place in bilayer lipid membranes modified with ubiquinone. During nicotin amide oxidation proton absorption takes place. Peroxide oxidation of lipids results in the liberation of H+ ions, which in its turn brings about the formation of protone-deficient or enriched (against aqueous solution) layers adjacent to the membrane. The potential value on the membrane is shown to depend on nicotine amide and oxygen concentration, on ubiquinone presence and lipid composition of the membrane. It has been also indicated that the transmembrane potential difference is initiated with a sharp change of aqueous solution pH by 0.05--0.4 units. PMID:178383

  6. Sensitivity and directionality of lipid bilayer mechanotransduction studied using a revised, highly durable membrane-based hair cell sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamaddoni, Nima; Freeman, Eric C.; Sarles, Stephen A.

    2015-06-01

    A bioinspired, membrane-based hair cell sensor consists of a planar lipid bilayer formed between two lipid-coated water droplets that connect to an artificial hair. This assembly enables motion of the hair caused by mechanical stimuli to vibrate the bilayer and produce a capacitive current. In this work, the mechanoelectrical transduction mechanism and sensing performance is experimentally characterized for a more-durable, revised hair cell embodiment that includes a cantilevered hair rooted firmly in the surrounding solid substrate. Specifically, this study demonstrates that the revised membrane-based hair cell sensor produces higher time rates of change in capacitance (0.8-6.0 nF s-1) in response to airflow across the hair compared to the original sensor (45-60 pF s-1) that did not feature a cantilevered hair. The 10-fold to 100-fold increase in the time rate change of capacitance corresponds to greater membrane bending and, thus, higher sensing currents. Membranes in the revised sensor exhibit changes in area due to bending on the order of 0.2-2.0%, versus 0.02% for the original sensor. Experiments also reveal that the bilayer displays highest sensitivity to mechanical perturbations normal to the plane of the bilayer, a membrane can transduce hair motion at frequencies below the hair’s characteristic frequency, and bilayers formed between polymerized hydrogel volumes exhibit a higher sensing currents than those formed between liquid aqueous volumes. Finally, measurements of sensitivity (5-35 pA m-1 s-1) and minimum (4.0-0.6 m s-1) and maximum (28-13 m s-1) sensing thresholds to airflow are performed for the first time, and we observe maximum electrical power (˜65 pW) in the membrane occurs for combinations of slower airflow and higher voltage. These results highlight that along with the dimensions of the hair and the compositions of the aqueous volumes, sensing performance can be tuned with applied voltage.

  7. Curvature-undulation coupling as a basis for curvature sensing and generation in bilayer membranes.

    PubMed

    Bradley, Ryan P; Radhakrishnan, Ravi

    2016-08-30

    We present coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations of the epsin N-terminal homology domain interacting with a lipid bilayer and demonstrate a rigorous theoretical formalism and analysis method for computing the induced curvature field in varying concentrations of the protein in the dilute limit. Our theory is based on the description of the height-height undulation spectrum in the presence of a curvature field. We formulated an objective function to compare the acquired undulation spectrum from the simulations to that of the theory. We recover the curvature field parameters by minimizing the objective function even in the limit where the protein-induced membrane curvature is of the same order as the amplitude due to thermal undulations. The coupling between curvature and undulations leads to significant predictions: (i) Under dilute conditions, the proteins can sense a site of spontaneous curvature at distances much larger than their size; (ii) as the density of proteins increases the coupling focuses and stabilizes the curvature field to the site of the proteins; and (iii) the mapping of the protein localization and the induction of a stable curvature is a cooperative process that can be described through a Hill function. PMID:27531962

  8. Curvature–undulation coupling as a basis for curvature sensing and generation in bilayer membranes

    PubMed Central

    Bradley, Ryan P.; Radhakrishnan, Ravi

    2016-01-01

    We present coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations of the epsin N-terminal homology domain interacting with a lipid bilayer and demonstrate a rigorous theoretical formalism and analysis method for computing the induced curvature field in varying concentrations of the protein in the dilute limit. Our theory is based on the description of the height–height undulation spectrum in the presence of a curvature field. We formulated an objective function to compare the acquired undulation spectrum from the simulations to that of the theory. We recover the curvature field parameters by minimizing the objective function even in the limit where the protein-induced membrane curvature is of the same order as the amplitude due to thermal undulations. The coupling between curvature and undulations leads to significant predictions: (i) Under dilute conditions, the proteins can sense a site of spontaneous curvature at distances much larger than their size; (ii) as the density of proteins increases the coupling focuses and stabilizes the curvature field to the site of the proteins; and (iii) the mapping of the protein localization and the induction of a stable curvature is a cooperative process that can be described through a Hill function. PMID:27531962

  9. Reduction in lateral lipid mobility of lipid bilayer membrane by atmospheric pressure plasma irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suda, Yoshiyuki; Tero, Ryugo; Yamashita, Ryuma; Yusa, Kota; Takikawa, Hirofumi

    2016-03-01

    Plasma medicine is an emerging research field in which various applications of electrical discharge, especially in the form of nonequilibrium plasma at atmospheric pressure, are examined, for example, the application of plasma to biological targets for various purposes such as selective killing of tumor cells and blood stanching. We have focused on the behavior of an artificial cell membrane system at the solid-liquid interface. To evaluate the lateral lipid mobility, we measured the diffusion coefficient of the supported lipid bilayer (SLB) composed of dioleoylphosphatidylcholine with fluorescence recovery after photobleaching by confocal laser scanning microscopy. It was found that the diffusion coefficient was decreased by plasma irradiation and that the diffusion coefficient decreasing rate proceeded with increasing plasma power. We investigated the effects of stimulation with an equilibrium chemical, H2O2, on the SLB and confirmed that the diffusion coefficient did not change at least up to a H2O2 concentration of 5 mM. These results indicate that transient active species generated by plasma play critical roles in the reduction in SLB fluidity. The effects of the two generated major oxidized lipid species, hydroxyl- or hydroperoxy-phosphatidylcholine (PC) and acyl-chain-truncated PCs terminated with aldehyde or carboxyl group, on lateral lipid mobility are discussed.

  10. Formation and characterization of microcrystalline semiconductor particles on bilayer lipid membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Baral, S.; Zhao, X.K.; Rolandi, R.; Fendler, J.H.

    1987-05-21

    Microcrystalline cadmium, indium, copper, and zinc sulfides were generated in situ on the surface of bilayer lipid membranes (BLMs) prepared from bovine-brain phosphatidylserine (PS), glyceryl monooleate (GMO), and a synthetic, polymerizable surfactant (n-C/sub 15/H/sub 31/CO/sub 2/(CH/sub 2/)/sub 2/)/sub 2/N/sup +/(CH/sub 3/)CH/sub 2/C/sub 6/H/sub 4/CH double bond CH/sub 2/, Cl/sup -/ (STYRS). Semiconductor-containing BLMs remained stable for days. Semiconductor formation on the BLM surface was monitored by optical microscopy, voltage-dependent capacitance measurements, and absorption and intracavity-laser-absorption spectroscopy. Band gap excitation of GMO- BLM-incorporated CdS resulted in the development of photovoltage. Irradiation of CdS incorporated into BLMs formed from STYRS (using a 350-nm cutoff filter) led to absorption losses due to the styrene moiety in the surfactant. Apparently, CdS sensitized the photopolymerization of STRYS BLMs.

  11. Diffusion and spectroscopy of water and lipids in fully hydrated dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine bilayer membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, J.; Martí, J.; Calero, C.

    2014-03-14

    Microscopic structure and dynamics of water and lipids in a fully hydrated dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine phospholipid lipid bilayer membrane in the liquid-crystalline phase have been analyzed with all-atom molecular dynamics simulations based on the recently parameterized CHARMM36 force field. The diffusive dynamics of the membrane lipids and of its hydration water, their reorientational motions as well as their corresponding spectral densities, related to the absorption of radiation, have been considered for the first time using the present force field. In addition, structural properties such as density and pressure profiles, a deuterium-order parameter, surface tension, and the extent of water penetration in the membrane have been analyzed. Molecular self-diffusion, reorientational motions, and spectral densities of atomic species reveal a variety of time scales playing a role in membrane dynamics. The mechanisms of lipid motion strongly depend on the time scale considered, from fast ballistic translation at the scale of picoseconds (effective diffusion coefficients of the order of 10{sup −5} cm{sup 2}/s) to diffusive flow of a few lipids forming nanodomains at the scale of hundreds of nanoseconds (diffusion coefficients of the order of 10{sup −8} cm{sup 2}/s). In the intermediate regime of sub-diffusion, collisions with nearest neighbors prevent the lipids to achieve full diffusion. Lipid reorientations along selected directions agree well with reported nuclear magnetic resonance data and indicate two different time scales, one about 1 ns and a second one in the range of 2–8 ns. We associated the two time scales of reorientational motions with angular distributions of selected vectors. Calculated spectral densities corresponding to lipid and water reveal an overall good qualitative agreement with Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy experiments. Our simulations indicate a blue-shift of the low frequency spectral bands of hydration water as a result of

  12. Diffusion and spectroscopy of water and lipids in fully hydrated dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine bilayer membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, J.; Calero, C.; Martí, J.

    2014-03-01

    Microscopic structure and dynamics of water and lipids in a fully hydrated dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine phospholipid lipid bilayer membrane in the liquid-crystalline phase have been analyzed with all-atom molecular dynamics simulations based on the recently parameterized CHARMM36 force field. The diffusive dynamics of the membrane lipids and of its hydration water, their reorientational motions as well as their corresponding spectral densities, related to the absorption of radiation, have been considered for the first time using the present force field. In addition, structural properties such as density and pressure profiles, a deuterium-order parameter, surface tension, and the extent of water penetration in the membrane have been analyzed. Molecular self-diffusion, reorientational motions, and spectral densities of atomic species reveal a variety of time scales playing a role in membrane dynamics. The mechanisms of lipid motion strongly depend on the time scale considered, from fast ballistic translation at the scale of picoseconds (effective diffusion coefficients of the order of 10-5 cm2/s) to diffusive flow of a few lipids forming nanodomains at the scale of hundreds of nanoseconds (diffusion coefficients of the order of 10-8 cm2/s). In the intermediate regime of sub-diffusion, collisions with nearest neighbors prevent the lipids to achieve full diffusion. Lipid reorientations along selected directions agree well with reported nuclear magnetic resonance data and indicate two different time scales, one about 1 ns and a second one in the range of 2-8 ns. We associated the two time scales of reorientational motions with angular distributions of selected vectors. Calculated spectral densities corresponding to lipid and water reveal an overall good qualitative agreement with Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy experiments. Our simulations indicate a blue-shift of the low frequency spectral bands of hydration water as a result of its interaction with lipids

  13. Diffusion and spectroscopy of water and lipids in fully hydrated dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine bilayer membranes.

    PubMed

    Yang, J; Calero, C; Martí, J

    2014-03-14

    Microscopic structure and dynamics of water and lipids in a fully hydrated dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine phospholipid lipid bilayer membrane in the liquid-crystalline phase have been analyzed with all-atom molecular dynamics simulations based on the recently parameterized CHARMM36 force field. The diffusive dynamics of the membrane lipids and of its hydration water, their reorientational motions as well as their corresponding spectral densities, related to the absorption of radiation, have been considered for the first time using the present force field. In addition, structural properties such as density and pressure profiles, a deuterium-order parameter, surface tension, and the extent of water penetration in the membrane have been analyzed. Molecular self-diffusion, reorientational motions, and spectral densities of atomic species reveal a variety of time scales playing a role in membrane dynamics. The mechanisms of lipid motion strongly depend on the time scale considered, from fast ballistic translation at the scale of picoseconds (effective diffusion coefficients of the order of 10(-5) cm(2)/s) to diffusive flow of a few lipids forming nanodomains at the scale of hundreds of nanoseconds (diffusion coefficients of the order of 10(-8) cm(2)/s). In the intermediate regime of sub-diffusion, collisions with nearest neighbors prevent the lipids to achieve full diffusion. Lipid reorientations along selected directions agree well with reported nuclear magnetic resonance data and indicate two different time scales, one about 1 ns and a second one in the range of 2-8 ns. We associated the two time scales of reorientational motions with angular distributions of selected vectors. Calculated spectral densities corresponding to lipid and water reveal an overall good qualitative agreement with Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy experiments. Our simulations indicate a blue-shift of the low frequency spectral bands of hydration water as a result of its interaction with

  14. Channels Formed by Botulinum, Tetanus, and Diphtheria Toxins in Planar Lipid Bilayers: Relevance to Translocation of Proteins across Membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoch, David H.; Romero-Mira, Miryam; Ehrlich, Barbara E.; Finkelstein, Alan; Dasgupta, Bibhuti R.; Simpson, Lance L.

    1985-03-01

    The heavy chains of both botulinum neurotoxin type B and tetanus toxin form channels in planar bilayer membranes. These channels have pH-dependent and voltage-dependent properties that are remarkably similar to those previously described for diphtheria toxin. Selectivity experiments with anions and cations show that the channels formed by the heavy chains of all three toxins are large; thus, these channels could serve as ``tunnel proteins'' for translocation of active peptide fragments. These findings support the hypothesis that the active fragments of botulinum neurotoxin and tetanus toxin, like that of diphtheria toxin, are translocated across the membranes of acidic vesicles.

  15. Molecular dynamics simulation of oleic acid/oleate bilayers: an atomistic model for a ufasome membrane.

    PubMed

    Han, Sanghwa

    2013-01-01

    When oleic acid and oleate coexist in comparable amounts they form unilamellar vesicles called ufasomes in aqueous phase. Intrinsic pH sensitivity of ufasomes makes it an attractive vehicle for drug delivery. Physical properties of ufasomes have been studied by using spectroscopic techniques but an atomistic model for a ufasome has not been proposed. In this study molecular dynamics simulation was performed on oleic acid/oleate bilayers with the oleate concentration varying from 40 to 70 mol%. All the bilayers reached an equilibrium and stayed stable during a 40 ns simulation. Area per lipid increased with mol% of oleate probably due to charge repulsion between anionic oleate molecules. Oleate was pulled out toward the aqueous phase so that the carboxyl groups of oleic acid and oleate were separated by 0.392 nm in the bilayer of oleic acid/oleate 1:1. Water concentration at the depth of carboxyl group of oleate was five times as high as that of oleic acid. Number of hydrogen bonds between oleic acid and oleate was small in contrast to a proposal that it is an important factor for the bilayer stability. However there was an extensive array of hydrogen bonds between the lipids and water molecules. Acyl chain order was within a normal range for a lipid bilayer but lateral diffusion was an order of magnitude faster in oleic acid/oleate bilayer than in dioleoylphosphatidylcholine bilayer. Cholesterol increased the bilayer thickness and order parameter and decreased the rate of lateral diffusion.

  16. Studies of molecular diffusion in single-supported bilayer lipid membranes at high hydration by quasielastic neutron scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, M.; Miskowiec, A.; Wang, S.-K.; Taub, H.; Hansen, F. Y.; Jenkins, T.; Tyagi, M.; Neumann, D. A.; Diallo, S. O.; Mamontov, E.; Herwig, K. W.

    2011-03-01

    Bilayer lipid membranes supported on a solid surface are attractive model systems for understanding the structure and dynamics of more complex biological membranes that form the outer boundary of living cells. We have recently obtained quasielastic neutron spectra from single-supported bilayer lipid membranes using the backscattering spectrometer BASIS at the Spallation Neutron Source. Protonated DMPC membranes were deposited onto Si O2 -coated Si(100) substrates and characterized by AFM. Analysis of their neutron spectra shows evidence of a relatively broad Lorentzian component that we associate with bulk-like water above a freezing temperature of ~ 267 K. At lower temperatures, the spectra differ qualitatively from that of bulk supercooled water, a behavior that we attribute to water bound to the membrane. We also find evidence of a narrow Lorentzian component that we tentatively identify with a slower motion (time scale ~ 1 ns) associated with conformational changes of the alkyl tails of the lipid molecules. Supported by NSF Grant No. DMR-0705974.

  17. Photodynamic inactivation of gramicidin channels in bilayer lipid membranes: protective efficacy of singlet oxygen quenchers depends on photosensitizer location.

    PubMed

    Rokitskaya, T I; Firsov, A M; Kotova, E A; Antonenko, Y N

    2015-06-01

    The impact of double bonds in fatty acyl tails of unsaturated lipids on the photodynamic inactivation of ion channels formed by the pentadecapeptide gramicidin A in a planar bilayer lipid membrane was studied. The presence of unsaturated acyl tails protected gramicidin A against photodynamic inactivation, with efficacy depending on the depth of a photosensitizer in the membrane. The protective effect of double bonds was maximal with membrane-embedded chlorin e6-monoethylenediamine monoamide dimethyl ester, and minimal - in the case of water-soluble tri-sulfonated aluminum phthalocyanine (AlPcS3) known to reside at the membrane surface. By contrast, the protective effect of the hydrophilic singlet oxygen scavenger ascorbate was maximal for AlPcS3 and minimal for amide of chlorin e6 dimethyl ester. The depth of photosensitizer position in the lipid bilayer was estimated from the quenching of photosensitizer fluorescence by iodide. Thus, the protective effect of a singlet oxygen scavenger against photodynamic inactivation of the membrane-inserted peptide is enhanced upon location of the photosensitizer and scavenger molecules in close vicinity to each other.

  18. Fundamental Studies of Assembly and Mechanical Properties of Lipid Bilayer Membranes and Unilamellar Vesicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xi

    This dissertation work focuses on: (i) obtaining a phospholipid bilayer membrane (LBM)/conducting electrode system with low defect density and optimized rigidity; (ii) investigating vesicle stability and mechanical properties. LBM is a simplified yet representative cell membrane model. LBMs assembled on conductive surfaces can probe protein-LBM interactions activities electrochemically. Sterically stabilized vesicles could be used as cell models or for drug delivery. The main challenges for LBM assembly on gold are vesicles do not spontaneously rupture to form LBMs on gold and the roughness of the gold substrate has considerable influence on molecular film defect density. In this study, 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC) vesicles were functionalized with 1,2-distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine- N-poly(ethylene glycol)-2000-N-[3-(2-pyridyldithio)propionate] (DSPE-PEG-PDP) to yield stable LBMs on gold without surface modification. A template-stripping method was used to obtain atomically flat and pristine gold surfaces. The critical force to initiate vesicle rupture decreases with increasing DSPE-PEG-PDP concentration, indicating that gold-thiolate bonding between DSPE-PEG-PDP and gold substrates promotes LBM formation. Mechanical properties of LBMs and vesicles were investigated as a function of DSPE-PEG-PDP concentration via Atomic Force Microscopy. The elastic moduli of LBMs were determined with DSPE-PEG-PDP concentration ranging from 0mol% to 24mol% and were found to depend on PEG chain conformation. Incorporating DSPE-PEG-PDP molecules with PEG in mushroom conformation results in a decrease of LBM rigidity, while incorporating PEG in brush conformation leads to LBM stiffening. Contrarily, mechanical properties of functionalized vesicles did not vary significantly by varying DSPE-PEG-PDP concentration. LBM with tunable rigidity by adjusting DSPE-PEG-PDP concentration provides a versatile cell membrane model for studying protein or

  19. Experimental Investigations of Direct and Converse Flexoelectric Effect in Bilayer Lipid Membranes.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todorov, Angelio Todorov

    Flexoelectric coefficients (direct and converse), electric properties (capacitance and resistivity) and mechanical properties (thickness and elastic coefficients) have been determined for bilayer lipid membranes (BLMs) prepared from egg yolk lecithin (EYL), glycerol monoleate (GMO), phosphatidyl choline (PC) and phosphatidyl serine (PS) as a function of frequency, pH and surface charge modifiers. Direct flexoelectric effect manifested itself in the development of microvolt range a.c. potential (U_{f}) upon subjecting one side of a BLM to an oscillating hydrostatic pressure, in the 100-1000 Hz range. Operationally, the flexoelectric coefficient (f) is expressed by the ratio between U_{f} and the change of curvature (c) which accompanied the flexing of the membrane. Membrane curvature was determined by means of either the electric method (capacitance microphone effect) or by the newly developed method of stroboscopic interferometry. Real-time stroboscopic interferometry coupled with simultaneous electric measurements, provided a direct method for the determination of f. Two different frequency regimes of f were recognized. At low frequencies (<300 Hz), associated with free mobility of the surfactant, f-values of 24.1 times 10^{-19} and 0.87 times 10^ {-19} Coulombs were obtained for PC and GMO BLMs. At high frequencies (>300 Hz), associated with blocked mobility of the surfactant, f-values of 16.5 times 10^ {-19} and 0.30 times 10^{-19} Coulombs were obtained for PC and GMO BLMs. The theoretically calculated value for the GMO BLM oscillating at high frequency (0.12 times 10^{-19 } Coulombs) agreed well with that determined experimentally (0.3 times 10 ^{-19} Coulombs). For charged bovine brain PS BLM the observed flexocoefficient was f = 4.0 times 10^{ -18} Coulombs. Converse flexoelectric effect manifested itself in voltage-induced BLM curvature. Observations were carried out on uranyl acetate (UA) stabilized PS BLM under a.c. excitation. Frequency dependence of f

  20. Cell membrane causes the lipid bilayers to behave as variable capacitors: A resonance with self-induction of helical proteins.

    PubMed

    Monajjemi, Majid

    2015-12-01

    Cell membrane has a unique feature of storing biological energies in a physiologically relevant environment. This study illustrates a capacitor model of biological cell membrane including DPPC structures. The electron density profile models, electron localization function (ELF) and local information entropy have been applied to study the interaction of proteins with lipid bilayers in the cell membrane. The quantum and coulomb blockade effects of different thicknesses in the membrane have also been specifically investigated. It has been exhibited the quantum effects can appear in a small region of the free space within the membrane thickness due to the number and type of phospholipid layers. In addition, from the viewpoint of quantum effects by Heisenberg rule, it is shown the quantum tunneling is allowed in some micro positions while it is forbidden in other forms of membrane capacitor systems. Due to the dynamical behavior of the cell membrane, its capacitance is not fixed which results a variable capacitor. In presence of the external fields through protein trance membrane or ions, charges exert forces that can influence the state of the cell membrane. This causes to appear the charge capacitive susceptibility that can resonate with self-induction of helical coils; the resonance of which is the main reason for various biological pulses.

  1. Cell membrane causes the lipid bilayers to behave as variable capacitors: A resonance with self-induction of helical proteins.

    PubMed

    Monajjemi, Majid

    2015-12-01

    Cell membrane has a unique feature of storing biological energies in a physiologically relevant environment. This study illustrates a capacitor model of biological cell membrane including DPPC structures. The electron density profile models, electron localization function (ELF) and local information entropy have been applied to study the interaction of proteins with lipid bilayers in the cell membrane. The quantum and coulomb blockade effects of different thicknesses in the membrane have also been specifically investigated. It has been exhibited the quantum effects can appear in a small region of the free space within the membrane thickness due to the number and type of phospholipid layers. In addition, from the viewpoint of quantum effects by Heisenberg rule, it is shown the quantum tunneling is allowed in some micro positions while it is forbidden in other forms of membrane capacitor systems. Due to the dynamical behavior of the cell membrane, its capacitance is not fixed which results a variable capacitor. In presence of the external fields through protein trance membrane or ions, charges exert forces that can influence the state of the cell membrane. This causes to appear the charge capacitive susceptibility that can resonate with self-induction of helical coils; the resonance of which is the main reason for various biological pulses. PMID:26529673

  2. Localization and interaction of hydroxyflavones with lipid bilayer model membranes: a study using DSC and multinuclear NMR.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Ragini; Joshi, Akshada; Joshi, Urmila J; Srivastava, Sudha; Govil, Girjesh

    2014-06-10

    The localization and interaction of six naturally occurring flavones (FLV, 5HF, 6HF, 7HF, CHY and BLN) in DPPC bilayers were studied using DSC and multi-nuclear NMR. DSC results indicate that FLV and 6HF interact with alkyl chains. The (1)H NMR shows interaction of flavones with the sn-glycero region. Ring current induced chemical shifts indicate that 6HF and BLN acquire parallel orientation in bilayers. 2D NOESY spectra indicate partitioning of the B-ring into the alkyl chain region. The DSC, NMR and binding studies indicate that 5HF and 7HF are located near head group region, while 6HF, CHY and BLN are located in the vicinity of sn-glycero region, and FLV is inserted deepest in the membrane.

  3. Blepharismins, produced by the protozoan, Blepharisma japonicum, form ion-permeable channels in planar lipid bilayer membranes.

    PubMed

    Muto, Y; Matsuoka, T; Kida, A; Okano, Y; Kirino, Y

    2001-11-23

    Blepharismins are polycyclic quinones found in the pigment granules of the ciliated protozoan, Blepharisma. Exposure to purified blepharismins results in lethal damage to several other ciliates. We here report that, at cytotoxic concentrations, blepharismins formed cation-selective channels in planar phospholipid bilayer membranes. The channels formed in a diphytanoylphosphatidylcholine bilayer had a K(+)/Cl(-) permeability ratio of 6.6:1. Single channel recordings revealed the conductance to be quite heterogeneous, ranging from 0.2 to 2.8 nS in solutions containing 0.1 M KCl, possibly reflecting different states of aggregation of blepharismin. Our observations suggest that channel formation is a cytotoxic mechanism of blepharismin's action against predatory protozoa.

  4. Electrostatics of cell membrane recognition: structure and activity of neutral and cationic rigid push-pull rods in isoelectric, anionic, and polarized lipid bilayer membranes.

    PubMed

    Sakai, N; Gerard, D; Matile, S

    2001-03-21

    Design, synthesis, and structural and functional studies of rigid-rod ionophores of different axial electrostatic asymmetry are reported. The employed design strategy emphasized presence of (a) a rigid scaffold to minimize the conformational complexity, (b) a unimolecular ion-conducting pathway to minimize the suprastructural complexity and monitor the function, (c) an extended fluorophore to monitor structure, (d) variable axial rod dipole, and (e) variable terminal charges to create axial asymmetry. Studies in isoelectric, anionic, and polarized bilayer membranes confirmed a general increase in activity of uncharged rigid push-pull rods in polarized bilayers. The similarly increased activity of cationic rigid push-pull rods with an electrostatic asymmetry comparable to that of alpha-helical bee toxin melittin (positive charge near negative axial dipole terminus) is shown by fluorescence-depth quenching experiments to originate from the stabilization of transmembrane rod orientation by the membrane potential. The reduced activity of rigid push-pull rods having an electrostatic asymmetry comparable to that in alpha-helical natural antibiotics (a positive charge near the positive axial dipole terminus) is shown by structural studies to originate from rod "ejection" by membrane potentials comparable to that found in mammalian plasma membranes. This structural evidence for cell membrane recognition by asymmetric rods is unprecedented and of possible practical importance with regard to antibiotic resistance.

  5. GPI-anchored influenza hemagglutinin induces hemifusion to both red blood cell and planar bilayer membranes.

    PubMed

    Melikyan, G B; White, J M; Cohen, F S

    1995-11-01

    Under fusogenic conditions, fluorescent dye redistributed from the outer monolayer leaflet of red blood cells (RBCs) to cells expressing glycophosphatidylinositol-anchored influenza virus hemagglutinin (GPI-HA) without transfer of aqueous dye. This suggests that hemifusion, but not full fusion, occurred (Kemble, G. W., T. Danieli, and J. M. White. 1994. Cell. 76:383-391). We extended the evidence for hemifusion by labeling the inner monolayer leaflets of RBCs with FM4-64 and observing that these inner leaflets did not become continuous with GPI-HA-expressing cells. The region of hemifusion-separated aqueous contents, the hemifusion diaphragm, appeared to be extended and was long-lived. But when RBCs hemifused to GPI-HA-expressing cells were osmotically swollen, some diaphragms were disrupted, and spread of both inner leaflet and aqueous dyes was observed. This was characteristic of full fusion: inner leaflet and aqueous probes spread to cells expressing wild-type HA (wt-HA). By simultaneous video fluorescence microscopy and time-resolved electrical admittance measurements, we rigorously demonstrated that GPI-HA-expressing cells hemifuse to planar bilayer membranes: lipid continuity was established without formation of fusion pores. The hemifusion area became large. In contrast, for cells expressing wt-HA, before lipid dye spread, fusion pores were always observed, establishing that full fusion occurred. We present an elastic coupling model in which the ectodomain of wt-HA induces hemifusion and the transmembrane domain, absent in the GPI-HA-expressing cells, mediates full fusion. PMID:7593189

  6. Ion-channels formed by hypelcins, antibiotic peptides, in planar bilayer lipid membranes.

    PubMed

    Koide, N; Asami, K; Fujita, T

    1997-05-22

    Ion-channel properties of native hypelcins (HP) A-I, A-V and B-V isolated from Hypocrea peltata and a synthetic analog, HP-A-Pheol, were studied in planar bilayer lipid membranes by a single-channel recording technique. The native and synthetic hypelcins formed ion-channels with three conductance levels for 3 mole dm(-3) KCl: < or = 0.09 nS at 225 mV (level 0, only detectable at voltages above 200 mV), approximately 0.6 nS at 150 mV (level 1, most common level) and approximately 3 nS at 150 mV (level 2). The effects of the C-terminal aminoalcohol on the channel properties were examined with HP-A-I, HP-A-V and HP-A-Pheol, whose C-termini are leucinol (Leuol), isoleucinol (Ileol) and phenylalaninol (Pheol), respectively. The substitution of Pheol for Leuol and Ileol prolonged the open channel lifetime. A comparison of HP-A-V (Gln18) and HP-B-V (Glu18) indicated that the carboxyl group at position 18 increased both the open channel lifetime and the magnitude of unitary channel conductance at each conductance level. The pores of level 1 showed poor ion-selectivity for K+ over Cl-. The selectivity order of alkali metal cations was Rb > or = Cs > or = K > Na > Li for level 1 and Cs > Rb > K > Na > Li for level 0. The unitary current-voltage characteristics showed non-linear relationships, which were simulated by a Nernst-Planck approach with a simple barrier model. PMID:9188799

  7. Automatable lipid bilayer formation for ion channel studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poulos, Jason L.; Bang, Hyunwoo; Jeon, Tae-Joon; Schmidt, Jacob J.

    2008-08-01

    Transmembrane proteins and ion channels are important drug targets and have been explored as single molecule sensors. For these proteins to function normally they must be integrated within lipid bilayers; however, the labor and skill required to create artificial lipid bilayers have the limited the possible applications utilizing these proteins. In order to reduce the complexity and cost of lipid bilayer formation and measurement, we have modified a previously published lipid bilayer formation technique using mechanically contacted monolayers so that the process is automatable, requiring minimal operator input. Measurement electronics are integrated with the fluid handling system, greatly reducing the time and operator feedback characteristically required of traditional bilayer experiments. To demonstrate the biological functionality of the resultant bilayers and the system's capabilities as a membrane platform, the ion channel gramicidin A was incorporated and measured with this system.

  8. Bilayer mass transport model for determining swelling and diffusion in coated, ultrathin membranes.

    PubMed

    Nadermann, Nichole K; Chan, Edwin P; Stafford, Christopher M

    2015-02-18

    Water transport and swelling properties of an ultrathin, selective polyamide layer with a hydrophilic polymer coating, i.e., a polymer bilayer, are studied using quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D). Specifically, QCM-D is used to measure the dynamic and equilibrium change in mass in a series of differential sorption experiments to determine the dependence of the apparent diffusion coefficient and equilibrium swelling of the bilayer as a function of the water vapor activity. To determine transport properties specific to the polyamide layer, sorption kinetics of the bilayer was modeled with a bilayer mass transport model. The swelling and water diffusion coefficients are interpreted according to the Painter-Shenoy polymer network swelling model and the solution-diffusion model, respectively.

  9. Study of pH (low) insertion peptides (pHLIPs) interaction with lipid bilayer of membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weerakkody, Dhammika

    The pH-dependent interactions of pHLIPsRTM (pH (Low) Insertion Peptides) with lipid bilayer of membrane provides an opportunity to study and address fundamental questions of protein folding/insertion into membrane and unfolding/exit, as well as develop novel approach to target acidic diseased tissue such as cancer, ischemic myocardium, infection and others. The main goal of the work presented here is to answer the following questions: - What is the molecular mechanism of spontaneous insertion and folding of a peptide in a lipid bilayer of membrane; - What is the molecular mechanism of unfolding and exit of a peptide from a lipid bilayer of membrane; - How polar cargo attached to a peptide's inserting end might affect the process of insertion into a lipid bilayer of membrane; How sequence variation will affect a peptide's interactions with a lipid bilayer of membrane (partitioning into bilayer at neutral and low pH; apparent pK of insertion) with the main goal to identify the best pHLIP variants for imaging and therapy of pathological states such as cancer and others. It has been demonstrated that pHLIP insertion into a membrane is associated with the protonation of Asp/Glu residues, which leads to an increase of hydrophobicity that triggers the folding and insertion of the peptide across a lipid bilayer. The insertion of the pHLIP is unidirectional and it is accompanied by the release of energy. Therefore, the energy of membrane associated-folding can be used to favor the movement of cell-impermeable polar cargo molecules across the hydrophobic membrane bilayer when they are attached to the inserting end of pHLIP. Both pH-targeting behavior and molecular translocation have been demonstrated in cultured cells and in vivo. Thus, there is an opportunity to develop a novel concept in drug delivery, which is based on the use of a monomeric, pH-sensitive peptide molecular transporter, to deliver agents that are significantly more polar than conventional drugs

  10. Membrane Docking Geometry of GRP1 PH Domain Bound to a Target Lipid Bilayer: An EPR Site-Directed Spin-Labeling and Relaxation Study

    PubMed Central

    Landgraf, Kyle E.; Corbin, John A.; Falke, Joseph J.

    2012-01-01

    The second messenger lipid PIP3 (phosphatidylinositol-3,4,5-trisphosphate) is generated by the lipid kinase PI3K (phosphoinositide-3-kinase) in the inner leaflet of the plasma membrane, where it regulates a broad array of cell processes by recruiting multiple signaling proteins containing PIP3-specific pleckstrin homology (PH) domains to the membrane surface. Despite the broad importance of PIP3-specific PH domains, the membrane docking geometry of a PH domain bound to its target PIP3 lipid on a bilayer surface has not yet been experimentally determined. The present study employs EPR site-directed spin labeling and relaxation methods to elucidate the membrane docking geometry of GRP1 PH domain bound to bilayer-embedded PIP3. The model target bilayer contains the neutral background lipid PC and both essential targeting lipids: (i) PIP3 target lipid that provides specificity and affinity, and (ii) PS facilitator lipid that enhances the PIP3 on-rate via an electrostatic search mechanism. The EPR approach measures membrane depth parameters for 18 function-retaining spin labels coupled to the PH domain, and for calibration spin labels coupled to phospholipids. The resulting depth parameters, together with the known high resolution structure of the co-complex between GRP1 PH domain and the PIP3 headgroup, provide sufficient constraints to define an optimized, self-consistent membrane docking geometry. In this optimized geometry the PH domain engulfs the PIP3 headgroup with minimal bilayer penetration, yielding the shallowest membrane position yet described for a lipid binding domain. This binding interaction displaces the PIP3 headgroup from its lowest energy position and orientation in the bilayer, but the headgroup remains within its energetically accessible depth and angular ranges. Finally, the optimized docking geometry explains previous biophysical findings including mutations observed to disrupt membrane binding, and the rapid lateral diffusion observed for PIP3

  11. Interactions of Pleckstrin Homology Domains with Membranes: Adding Back the Bilayer via High-Throughput Molecular Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Eiji; Kalli, Antreas C; Yasuoka, Kenji; Sansom, Mark S P

    2016-08-01

    A molecular simulation pipeline for determining the mode of interaction of pleckstrin homology (PH) domains with phosphatidylinositol phosphate (PIP)-containing lipid bilayers is presented. We evaluate our methodology for the GRP1 PH domain via comparison with structural and biophysical data. Coarse-grained simulations yield a 2D density landscape for PH/membrane interactions alongside residue contact profiles. Predictions of the membrane localization and interactions of 13 PH domains reveal canonical, non-canonical, and dual PIP-binding sites on the proteins. Thus, the PH domains associate with the PIP molecules in the membrane via a highly positively charged loop. Some PH domains exhibit modes of interaction with PIP-containing membranes additional to this canonical binding mode. All 13 PH domains cause a degree of local clustering of PIP molecules upon binding to the membrane. This provides a global picture of PH domain interactions with membranes. The high-throughput approach could be extended to other families of peripheral membrane proteins. PMID:27427480

  12. Formation of lipid bilayer membrane in a poly(dimethylsiloxane) microchip integrated with a stacked polycarbonate membrane support and an on-site nanoinjector

    PubMed Central

    Teng, Wei; Ban, Changill; Hahn, Jong Hoon

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes a new and facile approach for the formation of pore-spanning bilayer lipid membranes (BLMs) within a poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) microfluidic device. Commercially, readily available polycarbonate (PC) membranes are employed for the support of BLMs. PC sheets with 5 μm, 2 μm, and 0.4 μm pore diameters, respectively, are thermally bonded into a multilayer-stack, reducing the pore density of 0.4 μm-pore PC by a factor of 200. The BLMs on this support are considerably stable (a mean lifetime: 17 h). This multilayer-stack PC (MSPC) membrane is integrated into the PDMS chip by an epoxy bonding method developed to secure durable bonding under the use of organic solvents. The microchip has a special channel for guiding a micropipette in the proximity of the MSPC support. With this on-site injection technique, tens to hundreds of nanoliters of solutions can be directly dispensed to the support. Incorporating gramicidin ion channels into BLMs on the MSPC support has confirmed the formation of single BLMs, which is based on the observation from current signals of 20 pS conductance that is typical to single channel opening. Based on the bilayer capacitance (1.4 pF), about 15% of through pores across the MSPC membrane are estimated to be covered with BLMs. PMID:26015832

  13. Formation of cholesterol bilayer domains precedes formation of cholesterol crystals in cholesterol/dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine membranes: EPR and DSC studies.

    PubMed

    Mainali, Laxman; Raguz, Marija; Subczynski, Witold K

    2013-08-01

    Saturation-recovery EPR along with DSC were used to determine the cholesterol content at which pure cholesterol bilayer domains (CBDs) and cholesterol crystals begin to form in dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) membranes. To preserve compositional homogeneity throughout the membrane suspension, lipid multilamellar dispersions were prepared using a rapid solvent exchange method. The cholesterol content increased from 0 to 75 mol %. With spin-labeled cholesterol analogues, it was shown that the CBDs begin to form at ~50 mol % cholesterol. It was confirmed by DSC that the cholesterol solubility threshold for DMPC membranes is detected at ~66 mol % cholesterol. At levels above this cholesterol content, monohydrate cholesterol crystals start to form. The major finding is that the formation of CBDs precedes formation of cholesterol crystals. The region of the phase diagram for cholesterol contents between 50 and 66 mol % is described as a structured one-phase region in which CBDs have to be supported by the surrounding DMPC bilayer saturated with cholesterol. Thus, the phase boundary located at 66 mol % cholesterol separates the structured one-phase region (liquid-ordered phase of DMPC with CBDs) from the two-phase region where the structured liquid-ordered phase of DMPC coexists with cholesterol crystals. It is likely that CBDs are precursors of monohydrate cholesterol crystals.

  14. The pathway of ligand entry from the membrane bilayer to a lipid G protein-coupled receptor

    PubMed Central

    Stanley, Nathaniel; Pardo, Leonardo; Fabritiis, Gianni De

    2016-01-01

    The binding process through the membrane bilayer of lipid-like ligands to a protein target is an important but poorly explored recognition process at the atomic level. In this work we succeeded in resolving the binding of the lipid inhibitor ML056 to the sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor 1 (S1P1R) using unbiased molecular dynamics simulations with an aggregate sampling of over 800 μs. The binding pathway is a multi-stage process consisting of the ligand diffusing in the bilayer leaflet to contact a “membrane vestibule” at the top of TM 7, subsequently moving from this lipid-facing vestibule to the orthosteric binding cavity through a channel formed by TMs 1 and 7 and the N-terminal of the receptor. Unfolding of the N-terminal alpha-helix increases the volume of the channel upon ligand entry, helping to reach the crystallographic pose that also corresponds to the predicted favorable pose. The relaxation timescales of the binding process show that the binding of the ligand to the “membrane vestibule” is the rate-limiting step in the multi microseconds timescale. We comment on the significance and parallels of the binding process in the context of other binding studies. PMID:26940769

  15. Peptide-induced membrane leakage by lysine derivatives of gramicidin A in liposomes, planar bilayers, and erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Sorochkina, Alexandra I; Kovalchuk, Sergei I; Omarova, Elena O; Sobko, Alexander A; Kotova, Elena A; Antonenko, Yuri N

    2013-11-01

    Introducing a charged group near the N-terminus of gramicidin A (gA) is supposed to suppress its ability to form ion channels by restricting its head-to-head dimerization. The present study dealt with the activity of [Lys1]gA, [Lys3]gA, [Glu1]gA, [Glu3]gA, [Lys2]gA, and [Lys5]gA in model membrane systems (planar lipid bilayers and liposomes) and erythrocytes. In contrast to the Glu-substituted peptides, the lysine derivatives of gA caused non-specific liposomal leakage monitored by fluorescence dequenching of lipid vesicles loaded with carboxyfluorescein or other fluorescent dyes. Measurements of electrical current through a planar lipid membrane revealed formation of giant pores by Lys-substituted analogs, which depended on the presence of solvent in the bilayer lipid membrane. The efficacy of unselective pore formation in liposomes depended on the position of the lysine residue in the amino acid sequence, increasing in the row: [Lys2]gA<[Lys5]gA<[Lys1]gA<[Lys3]gA. The similar series of potency was exhibited by the Lys-substituted gA analogs in facilitating erythrocyte hemolysis, whereas the Glu-substituted analogs showed negligible hemolytic activity. Oligomerization of the Lys-substituted peptides is suggested to be involved in the process of nonselective pore formation.

  16. Mesoscale computational studies of membrane bilayer remodeling by curvature-inducing proteins

    PubMed Central

    Ramakrishnan, N.; Sunil Kumar, P. B.; Radhakrishnan, Ravi

    2014-01-01

    Biological membranes constitute boundaries of cells and cell organelles. These membranes are soft fluid interfaces whose thermodynamic states are dictated by bending moduli, induced curvature fields, and thermal fluctuations. Recently, there has been a flood of experimental evidence highlighting active roles for these structures in many cellular processes ranging from trafficking of cargo to cell motility. It is believed that the local membrane curvature, which is continuously altered due to its interactions with myriad proteins and other macromolecules attached to its surface, holds the key to the emergent functionality in these cellular processes. Mechanisms at the atomic scale are dictated by protein-lipid interaction strength, lipid composition, lipid distribution in the vicinity of the protein, shape and amino acid composition of the protein, and its amino acid contents. The specificity of molecular interactions together with the cooperativity of multiple proteins induce and stabilize complex membrane shapes at the mesoscale. These shapes span a wide spectrum ranging from the spherical plasma membrane to the complex cisternae of the Golgi apparatus. Mapping the relation between the protein-induced deformations at the molecular scale and the resulting mesoscale morphologies is key to bridging cellular experiments across the various length scales. In this review, we focus on the theoretical and computational methods used to understand the phenomenology underlying protein-driven membrane remodeling. Interactions at the molecular scale can be computationally probed by all atom and coarse grained molecular dynamics (MD, CGMD), as well as dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) simulations, which we only describe in passing. We choose to focus on several continuum approaches extending the Canham - Helfrich elastic energy model for membranes to include the effect of curvature-inducing proteins and explore the conformational phase space of such systems. In this

  17. Mesoscale computational studies of membrane bilayer remodeling by curvature-inducing proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramakrishnan, N.; Sunil Kumar, P. B.; Radhakrishnan, Ravi

    2014-10-01

    Biological membranes constitute boundaries of cells and cell organelles. These membranes are soft fluid interfaces whose thermodynamic states are dictated by bending moduli, induced curvature fields, and thermal fluctuations. Recently, there has been a flood of experimental evidence highlighting active roles for these structures in many cellular processes ranging from trafficking of cargo to cell motility. It is believed that the local membrane curvature, which is continuously altered due to its interactions with myriad proteins and other macromolecules attached to its surface, holds the key to the emergent functionality in these cellular processes. Mechanisms at the atomic scale are dictated by protein-lipid interaction strength, lipid composition, lipid distribution in the vicinity of the protein, shape and amino acid composition of the protein, and its amino acid contents. The specificity of molecular interactions together with the cooperativity of multiple proteins induce and stabilize complex membrane shapes at the mesoscale. These shapes span a wide spectrum ranging from the spherical plasma membrane to the complex cisternae of the Golgi apparatus. Mapping the relation between the protein-induced deformations at the molecular scale and the resulting mesoscale morphologies is key to bridging cellular experiments across various length scales. In this review, we focus on the theoretical and computational methods used to understand the phenomenology underlying protein-driven membrane remodeling. Interactions at the molecular scale can be computationally probed by all atom and coarse grained molecular dynamics (MD, CGMD), as well as dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) simulations, which we only describe in passing. We choose to focus on several continuum approaches extending the Canham-Helfrich elastic energy model for membranes to include the effect of curvature-inducing proteins and explore the conformational phase space of such systems. In this description, the

  18. Structure and Dynamics of a Fluid Phase Bilayer on a Solid Support as Observed by a Molecular Dynamics Computer Simulation

    PubMed Central

    Roark, Matthew; Feller, Scott E.

    2009-01-01

    Simulations of a 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine lipid bilayer interacting with a solid surface of hydroxylated nanoporous amorphous silica have been carried out over a range of lipid-solid substrate distances. The porous solid surface allowed the water layer to dynamically adjust is thickness, maintaining equal pressures above and below the membrane bilayer. Qualitative estimates of the force between the surfaces leads to an estimated lipid-silicon distance in very good agreement with the results of neutron scattering experiments. Detailed analysis of the simulation at the separation suggested by experiment shows that for this type of solid support the water layer between surfaces is very narrow, consisting only of bound waters hydrating the lipid headgroups and hydrophilic silica surface. The reduced hydration, however, has only minor effects on the headgroup hydration, the orientation of water molecules at the interface, and the membrane dipole potential. While these structural properties were not sensitive to the presence of the solid substrate, the calculated diffusion coefficient for translation of the lipid molecules was altered significantly by the silica surface. PMID:18850686

  19. Ferrocene embedded in an electrode-supported hybrid lipid bilayer membrane: a model system for electrocatalysis in a biomimetic environment.

    PubMed

    Hosseini, Ali; Collman, James P; Devadoss, Anando; Williams, Genevieve Y; Barile, Christopher J; Eberspacher, Todd A

    2010-11-16

    An electrode-supported system in which ferrocene molecules are embedded in a hybrid bilayer membrane (HBM) has been prepared and characterized. The redox properties of the ferrocene molecules were studied by varying the lipid and alkanethiol building blocks of the HBM. The midpoint potential and electron transfer rate of the embedded ferrocene were found to be dependent on the hydrophobic nature of the electrolyte and the distance at which the ferrocene was positioned in the HBM relative to the electrode and the solution. Additionally, the ability of the lipid-embedded ferrocenium ions to oxidize solution phase ascorbic acid was evaluated and found to be dependent on the nature of the counterion.

  20. A DSC and FTIR spectroscopic study of the effects of the epimeric coprostan-3-ols and coprostan-3-one on the thermotropic phase behaviour and organization of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine bilayer membranes: Comparison with their 5-cholesten analogues.

    PubMed

    Benesch, Matthew G K; Lewis, Ruthven N A H; Mannock, David A; McElhaney, Ronald N

    2015-05-01

    We present the results of a comparative differential calorimetric and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic study of the effect of cholesterol and five analogues on the thermotropic phase behaviour and organization of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine bilayer membranes. These sterols/steroids differ in both the nature and stereochemistry of the polar head group at C3 (β-OH, α-OH or CO) and in the presence or absence of a double bond in ring B and in the orientation of rings A and B. The Δ(5) sterols/steroid have a trans rather than a cis ring A/B junction, and the concentration of these compounds required to abolish the DPPC pretransition, inversely related to their relative ability to disorder gel state DPPC bilayers, decreases in the order β-OH > α-OH > CO. However, in the saturated ring junction-inverted (cis) series, these concentrations are much more similar, regardless of polar head group chemical structure. Similarly, the residual enthalpy of the DPPC main phase transition at 50 mol% sterol/steroid, which is inversely related to the miscibility of these compounds in fluid DPPC bilayers, also increases in the order β-OH > α-OH > CO, but this effect is attenuated in the saturated series with an inverted ring A/B orientation. Moreover, replacement of the double bond at C5-C6 with a saturated linkage and inversion of the ring A/B junction reduces both sterol/steroid solubility and the ability to order the hydrocarbon chains of fluid DPPC molecules all cases. Thus, the characteristic effects of sterols/steroids on fluid lipid bilayers are generally optimal when an OH group rather than CO group is present at C3, and when this OH group is in the equatorial (β) orientation, and when the orientation of the ring A/B fusion is trans rather than cis. Overall, these results demonstrate that variations in the saturation and stereochemistry of the steroid ring system influence the effect of variations in the nature and stereochemistry of the polar headgroup at C3

  1. Permeability of fluid-phase phospholipid bilayers: assessment and useful correlations for permeability screening and other applications.

    PubMed

    Nitsche, Johannes M; Kasting, Gerald B

    2013-06-01

    Permeability data (P(lip/w) ) for liquid crystalline phospholipid bilayers composed of egg lecithin and dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) are analyzed in terms of a mathematical model that accounts for free surface area and chain-ordering effects in the bilayer as well as size and lipophilicity of the permeating species. Free surface area and chain ordering are largely determined by temperature and cholesterol content of the membrane, molecular size is represented by molecular weight, and lipophilicity of the barrier region is represented by the 1,9-decadiene/water partition coefficient, following earlier work by Xiang, Anderson, and coworkers. A correlating variable χ = MW(n) σ/(1 -σ) is used to link the results from different membrane systems, where different values of n are tried, and σ denotes a reduced phospholipid density. The group (1 -σ)/σ is a measure of free surface area, but can also be interpreted in terms of free volume. A single exponential function of χ is developed that is able to correlate 39 observations of P(lip/w) for different compounds in egg lecithin at low density, and 22 observations for acetic acid in DMPC at higher densities, spanning nine orders of magnitude to within an rms error for log 10 P(lip/w) of 0.20. The best fit found for n = 0.87 ultimately makes χ much closer to the ratio of molecular to free volumes than surface areas. The results serve as a starting point for estimating passive permeability of cell membranes to nonionized solutes as a function of temperature and cholesterol content of the membrane.

  2. Ion channel behavior of amphotericin B in sterol-free and cholesterol- or ergosterol-containing supported phosphatidylcholine bilayer model membranes investigated by electrochemistry and spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Huang, Weimin; Zhang, Zheling; Han, Xiaojun; Tang, Jilin; Wang, Jianguo; Dong, Shaojun; Wang, Erkang

    2002-12-01

    Amphotericin B (AmB) is a popular drug frequently applied in the treatment of systemic fungal infections. In the presence of ruthenium (II) as the maker ion, the behavior of AmB to form ion channels in sterol-free and cholesterol- or ergosterol-containing supported phosphatidylcholine bilayer model membranes were studied by cyclic votammetry, AC impedance spectroscopy, and UV/visible absorbance spectroscopy. Different concentrations of AmB ranging from a molecularly dispersed to a highly aggregated state of the drug were investigated. In a fixed cholesterol or ergosterol content (5 mol %) in glassy carbon electrode-supported model membranes, our results showed that no matter what form of AmB, monomeric or aggregated, AmB could form ion channels in supported ergosterol-containing phosphatidylcholine bilayer model membranes. However, AmB could not form ion channels in its monomeric form in sterol-free and cholesterol-containing supported model membranes. On the one hand, when AmB is present as an aggregated state, it can form ion channels in cholesterol-containing supported model membranes; on the other hand, only when AmB is present as a relatively highly aggregated state can it form ion channels in sterol-free supported phosphatidylcholine bilayer model membranes. The results showed that the state of AmB played an important role in forming ion channels in sterol-free and cholesterol-containing supported phosphatidylcholine bilayer model membranes.

  3. General model of phospholipid bilayers in fluid phase within the single chain mean field theory.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yachong; Pogodin, Sergey; Baulin, Vladimir A

    2014-05-01

    Coarse-grained model for saturated phospholipids: 1,2-didecanoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DCPC), 1,2-dilauroyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DLPC), 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DMPC), 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC), 1,2-distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DSPC) and unsaturated phospholipids: 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC), 1,2- dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DOPC) is introduced within the single chain mean field theory. A single set of parameters adjusted for DMPC bilayers gives an adequate description of equilibrium and mechanical properties of a range of saturated lipid molecules that differ only in length of their hydrophobic tails and unsaturated (POPC, DOPC) phospholipids which have double bonds in the tails. A double bond is modeled with a fixed angle of 120°, while the rest of the parameters are kept the same as saturated lipids. The thickness of the bilayer and its hydrophobic core, the compressibility, and the equilibrium area per lipid correspond to experimentally measured values for each lipid, changing linearly with the length of the tail. The model for unsaturated phospholipids also fetches main thermodynamical properties of the bilayers. This model is used for an accurate estimation of the free energies of the compressed or stretched bilayers in stacks or multilayers and gives reasonable estimates for free energies. The proposed model may further be used for studies of mixtures of lipids, small molecule inclusions, interactions of bilayers with embedded proteins.

  4. Effect of chirality and length on the penetrability of single-walled carbon nanotubes into lipid bilayer cell membranes.

    PubMed

    Skandani, A Alipour; Zeineldin, R; Al-Haik, M

    2012-05-22

    The ability of carbon nanotubes to enter the cell membrane acting as drug-delivery vehicles has yielded a plethora of experimental investigations, mostly with inconclusive results because of the wide spectra of carbon nanotube structures. Because of the virtual impossibility of synthesizing CNTs with distinct chirality, we report a parametric study on the use of molecular dynamics to provide better insight into the effect of the carbon nanotube chirality and the aspect ratio on the interaction with a lipid bilayer membrane. The simulation results indicated that a single-walled carbon nanotube utilizes different time-evolving mechanisms to facilitate their internalization within the membrane. These mechanisms comprise both penetration and endocytosis. It was observed that carbon nanotubes with higher aspect ratios penetrate the membrane faster whereas shorter nanotubes undergo significant rotation during the final stages of endocytosis. Furthermore, nanotubes with lower chiral indices developed significant adhesion with the membrane. This adhesion is hypothesized to consume some of the carbon nanotube energy, thus resulting in longer times for the nanotube to translocate through the membrane.

  5. A Fluid Membrane-Based Soluble Ligand Display System for Live CellAssays

    SciTech Connect

    Nam, Jwa-Min; Nair, Pradeep N.; Neve, Richard M.; Gray, Joe W.; Groves, Jay T.

    2005-10-14

    Cell communication modulates numerous biological processes including proliferation, apoptosis, motility, invasion and differentiation. Correspondingly, there has been significant interest in the development of surface display strategies for the presentation of signaling molecules to living cells. This effort has primarily focused on naturally surface-bound ligands, such as extracellular matrix components and cell membranes. Soluble ligands (e.g. growth factors and cytokines) play an important role in intercellular communications, and their display in a surface-bound format would be of great utility in the design of array-based live cell assays. Recently, several cell microarray systems that display cDNA, RNAi, or small molecules in a surface array format were proven to be useful in accelerating high-throughput functional genetic studies and screening therapeutic agents. These surface display methods provide a flexible platform for the systematic, combinatorial investigation of genes and small molecules affecting cellular processes and phenotypes of interest. In an analogous sense, it would be an important advance if one could display soluble signaling ligands in a surface assay format that allows for systematic, patterned presentation of soluble ligands to live cells. Such a technique would make it possible to examine cellular phenotypes of interest in a parallel format with soluble signaling ligands as one of the display parameters. Herein we report a ligand-modified fluid supported lipid bilayer (SLB) assay system that can be used to functionally display soluble ligands to cells in situ (Figure 1A). By displaying soluble ligands on a SLB surface, both solution behavior (the ability to become locally enriched by reaction-diffusion processes) and solid behavior (the ability to control the spatial location of the ligands in an open system) could be combined. The method reported herein benefits from the naturally fluid state of the supported membrane, which allows

  6. Tethered bilayer lipid membranes on mixed self-assembled monolayers of a novel anchoring thiol: impact of the anchoring thiol density on bilayer formation.

    PubMed

    Basit, Hajra; Van der Heyden, Angéline; Gondran, Chantal; Nysten, Bernard; Dumy, Pascal; Labbé, Pierre

    2011-12-01

    Tethered bilayer lipid membranes (tBLMs) are designed on mixed self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of a novel synthetic anchoring thiol, 2,3-di-o-palmitoylglycerol-1-tetraethylene glycol mercaptopropanoic acid ester (TEG-DP), and a new short dilution thiol molecule, tetraethylene glycol mercaptopropanoic acid ester (TEG). tBLM formation was accomplished by self-directed fusion of small unilamellar vesicles of 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine. The influence of the dilution of the anchoring thiol molecule in the SAM on the vesicle fusion process and on the properties of the resulting tBLMs is studied. It is observed by quartz crystal microbalance that vesicle fusion is a one-step process for a pure TEG-DP SAM as well as for mixed SAMs containing a high concentration of the anchoring thiol. However, upon dilution of the anchoring thiol to moderate concentrations, this process is decelerated and possibly follows a pathway different from that observed on a pure TEG-DP SAM. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy is used to qualitatively correlate the composition of the SAM to the electrical properties of the tBLM. In this paper we also delineate the necessity of a critical concentration of this anchoring TEG-DP thiol as a requisite for inducing the fusion of vesicles to form a tBLM.

  7. The effect of microwave radiation on the stability and formation of gramicidin-A channels in lipid bilayer membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Sandblom, J.; Theander, S. )

    1991-01-01

    The effects of microwaves on the single-channel kinetics of gramicidin-A channels in lipid bilayer membranes were examined. Attempts were made to separate thermal and athermal effects by accurate measurements of temperature at the site of the membrane and by relating the measured parameters to their previously characterized temperature dependence. It was found that microwave radiation does not affect single-channel conductance or channel life time to a degree that is significantly different from that expected of a purely thermal effect. On the other hand, the rate of channel formation is decreased during exposure, which is opposite to that expected of a purely thermal effect. The mechanism of this effect is discussed in terms of the dimerization process of channel formation.

  8. Optical anisotropy in lipid bilayer membranes: coupled plasmon-waveguide resonance measurements of molecular orientation, polarizability, and shape.

    PubMed

    Salamon, Z; Tollin, G

    2001-03-01

    The birefringence and linear dichroism of anisotropic thin films such as proteolipid membranes are related to molecular properties such as polarizability, shape, and orientation. Coupled plasmon-waveguide resonance (CPWR) spectroscopy is shown in the present work to provide a convenient means of evaluating these parameters in a single lipid bilayer. This is illustrated by using 1-10 mol % of an acyl chain chromophore-labeled phosphatidylcholine (PC) incorporated into a solid-supported PC bilayer deposited onto a hydrated silica surface. CPWR measurements were made of refractive index and extinction coefficient anisotropies with two exciting light wavelengths, one of which is absorbed by the chromophore and one of which is not. These results were used to calculate longitudinal and transverse molecular polarizabilities, the orientational order parameter and average angle between the longitudinal axis of the lipid molecule and the membrane normal, and the molecular shape factors of the lipid molecules. The values thereby obtained are in excellent agreement with parameters determined by other techniques, and provide a powerful tool for analyzing lipid-protein, protein-protein, and protein-ligand interactions in proteolipid films.

  9. Structure of a fluid dioleoylphosphatidylcholine bilayer determined by joint refinement of x-ray and neutron diffraction data. II. Distribution and packing of terminal methyl groups.

    PubMed Central

    Wiener, M C; White, S H

    1992-01-01

    We continue in this paper the presentation of theoretical and experimental methods for the joint refinement of neutron and x-ray lamellar diffraction data for the analysis of fluid (L alpha phase) bilayer structure (Wiener, M. C., and S. H. White. 1991 a, b, c. Biophys. J. 59:162-173 and 174-185; Biochemistry. 30:6997-7008; Wiener, M. C., G. I. King, and S. H. White. Biophys. J. 60: 568-576). We show how to obtain the distribution and packing of the terminal methyls in the interior of a fluid dioleoylphosphatidylcholine bilayer (66% RH) by combining x-ray and neutron scattering-length transbilayer profiles with no a priori assumptions about the functional form of the distribution. We find that the methyls can be represented by a Gaussian function with 1/e-halfwidth of 2.95 +/- 0.28 A situated at the bilayer center. There is substantial mixing of the methyls and methylenes in the bilayer center. The Gaussian representation of the methyl distribution is narrower and has a different shape than predicted by several simulations of fluid bilayers (Gruen, D. W. R., and E. H. B. de Lacey. 1984. Surfactants in Solution, Vol. 1. Plenum Publishing Corp., New York. 279-306; de Loof, H., et al. 1991. Biochemistry. 30:2099-2133) but this may be due to the smaller area/lipid of our experiments and the presence of the double-bonds. Determination of the absolute specific volume of DOPC and an analysis of bulk alkane volumetric data over a range of hydrostatic pressures lead to estimates of methylene and methyl volumes at the bilayer center of 27 +/- 1 A3 and 57.2 +/- 3.6 A3, respectively. This result provides direct confirmation of the common assumption that the molecular packing of methyl and methylene groups in bilayers is the same as in bulk liquid alkanes. Images FIGURE 2 PMID:1547330

  10. Peptide-induced membrane curvature in edge-stabilized open bilayers: A theoretical and molecular dynamics study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pannuzzo, Martina; Raudino, Antonio; Böckmann, Rainer A.

    2014-07-01

    Peptide- or protein-induced curvatures of lipid membranes may be studied in molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. In these, membranes are usually modeled as infinitely extended bilayers by using periodic boundary conditions. However, the enforced periodicity results in an underestimation of the bending power of peptides, unless the patch size is much larger than the induced curvature radii. In this letter, we propose a novel approach to evaluate the bending power of a given distribution and/or density of peptides based on the use of flat open-edged lipid patches. To ensure long-lived metastable structures, the patch rim is stabilized in MD simulations by a local enrichment with short-chain lipids. By combining the theory of continuum elastic media with MD simulations, we prove that open-edged patches evolve from a planar state to a closed vesicle, with a transition rate that strongly depends on the concentration of lipid soluble peptides. For close-to-critical values for the patch size and edge energy, the response to even small changes in peptide concentration adopts a transition-like behavior (buckling instability). The usage of open-edged membrane patches amplifies the bending power of peptides, thereby enabling the analysis of the structural properties of membrane-peptide systems. We applied the presented method to investigate the curvature induced by aggregating β -amyloid peptides, unraveling a strong sensitivity of membrane deformation to the peptide concentration.

  11. Development of an eco-sensor based on bilayer lipid membrane for the continuous monitoring of environmental pollutants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishimori, Yoshio; Kawano, Koichiro; Ishizuka, Masaru; Murahashi, Mizuho; Tamiya, Eiichi

    2004-03-01

    In recent years, we have developed an advanced environmental monitoring system (AEMS) containing the eco-sensor, which means a sensor for the measurement of environmental pollutants, based on lipid membranes for continuous monitoring of ground water in industry areas such as semiconductor factories. The AEMS project is composed of three work packages as follows, 1) Eco -sensor, 2) Prediction of plume propagation using a computer simulation technique, and 3) Environmental protection method. In this paper, we would like to focus on the study of the eco-sensor. We considered that modified lipid membranes serve as good models for cell membranes because they would be ideal hosts for receptor molecules of biological origin or disruptive environmental pollutants. Thus, we selected lipid membrane as a sensing element for environmental pollutants. We have already confirmed that the eco-sensor could detect a 10 ppb level of volatile organic chlorinated compounds (VOCs) such as trichloroethylene in ground water. Here, we tried to apply the eco-sensor to measure other environmental pollutants containing pesticides and endocrine disrupting chemicals. We made a novel automatic bilayer lipid membrane preparation device and a new system for the continuous measurement of environmental pollutants in ground water.

  12. Fluctuation-induced forces in a fluid membrane under tension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zandi, Roya

    2012-02-01

    We develop an exact method to calculate thermal Casimir forces between inclusions of arbitrary shapes and separation, embedded in a fluid membrane whose fluctuations are governed by the combined action of surface tension, bending modulus, and Gaussian rigidity. Each object's shape and mechanical properties enter only through a characteristic matrix, a static analog of the scattering matrix. We calculate the Casimir interaction between two elastic disks embedded in a membrane. In particular, we find that at short separations the interaction is strong and independent of surface tension.

  13. Molecular dynamics study of lipid bilayers modeling the plasma membranes of normal murine thymocytes and leukemic GRSL cells.

    PubMed

    Andoh, Yoshimichi; Okazaki, Susumu; Ueoka, Ryuichi

    2013-04-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) calculations for the plasma membranes of normal murine thymocytes and thymus-derived leukemic GRSL cells in water have been performed under physiological isothermal-isobaric conditions (310.15K and 1 atm) to investigate changes in membrane properties induced by canceration. The model membranes used in our calculations for normal and leukemic thymocytes comprised 23 and 25 kinds of lipids, respectively, including phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylserine, phosphatidylinositol, sphingomyelin, lysophospholipids, and cholesterol. The mole fractions of the lipids adopted here were based on previously published experimental values. Our calculations clearly showed that the membrane area was increased in leukemic cells, and that the isothermal area compressibility of the leukemic plasma membranes was double that of normal cells. The calculated membranes of leukemic cells were thus considerably bulkier and softer in the lateral direction compared with those of normal cells. The tilt angle of the cholesterol and the conformation of the phospholipid fatty acid tails both showed a lower level of order in leukemic cell membranes compared with normal cell membranes. The lateral radial distribution function of the lipids also showed a more disordered structure in leukemic cell membranes than in normal cell membranes. These observations all show that, for the present thymocytes, the lateral structure of the membrane is considerably disordered by canceration. Furthermore, the calculated lateral self-diffusion coefficient of the lipid molecules in leukemic cell membranes was almost double that in normal cell membranes. The calculated rotational and wobbling autocorrelation functions also indicated that the molecular motion of the lipids was enhanced in leukemic cell membranes. Thus, here we have demonstrated that the membranes of thymocyte leukemic cells are more disordered and more fluid than normal cell membranes.

  14. Unusual hydration properties of C16:0 sulfatide bilayer membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Saxena, K; Duclos, R I; Sripada, P K; Shipley, G G

    2000-01-01

    After deacylation of bovine brain sulfatide under mild alkaline conditions and reacylation using palmitoyl chloride (, Chem. Phys. Lipids. 34:41-53), the anionic glycosphingolipid N-palmitoyl galactosulfatide (C16:0-GalSulf) has been synthesized. By differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), anhydrous C16:0-GalSulf exhibits an endothermic transition, T(M) = 93 degrees C (DeltaH = 5. 5 kcal/mol C16:0-GalSulf) on heating. With increasing hydration (50 mM sodium phosphate buffer, pH 7.0; 50 mM NaCl), T(M) decreases, reaching a limiting value of 49 degrees C (DeltaH = 8.2 kcal/mol C16:0-GalSulf) at 20 wt% buffer. X-ray diffraction data have been recorded over the hydration range 0-62% at temperatures below (20 degrees C) and above (60 degrees C) T(M). At 20 degrees C, sharp wide-angle reflections at approximately 1/4.4 A(-1), approximately 1/4.1 A(-1), and approximately 1/3.8 A(-1) indicate the presence of an ordered-chain gel phase, whereas at 60 degrees C a broad reflection at 1/4.5 A(-1) characteristic of a melted-chain phase is observed. Lamellar diffraction patterns consistent with the presence of bilayer phases are observed at both temperatures. At 60 degrees C, in the liquid-crystalline L(alpha) phase, the bilayer periodicity increases with hydration, in both water and 100 mM Na(+) buffer. Interestingly, in the gel phase at 20 degrees C, the bilayer periodicity (d = 64 A) is insensitive to hydration (over the range 30-60 wt%) with either water or buffer. The continuous swelling behavior exhibited by the L(alpha) bilayer phase of C16:0-GalSulf is typical of lipids bearing a net negative charge and confirms that the presence of 100 mM Na(+) is insufficient to shield the charge contributed by the sulfate group. In contrast, the lack of continuous swelling behavior of the bilayer gel phase of C16:0-GalSulf is unusual and resembles that of Na(+) soaps. Thus, presumably, alterations in the surface charge characteristics of the C16:0-GalSulf bilayer occur on hydrocarbon

  15. Fluid lipid membranes: from differential geometry to curvature stresses.

    PubMed

    Deserno, Markus

    2015-01-01

    A fluid lipid membrane transmits stresses and torques that are fully determined by its geometry. They can be described by a stress- and torque-tensor, respectively, which yield the force or torque per length through any curve drawn on the membrane's surface. In the absence of external forces or torques the surface divergence of these tensors vanishes, revealing them as conserved quantities of the underlying Euler-Lagrange equation for the membrane's shape. This review provides a comprehensive introduction into these concepts without assuming the reader's familiarity with differential geometry, which instead will be developed as needed, relying on little more than vector calculus. The Helfrich Hamiltonian is then introduced and discussed in some depth. By expressing the quest for the energy-minimizing shape as a functional variation problem subject to geometric constraints, as proposed by Guven (2004), stress- and torque-tensors naturally emerge, and their connection to the shape equation becomes evident. How to reason with both tensors is then illustrated with a number of simple examples, after which this review concludes with four more sophisticated applications: boundary conditions for adhering membranes, corrections to the classical micropipette aspiration equation, membrane buckling, and membrane mediated interactions.

  16. Dynamic Heterogeneous Dielectric Generalized Born (DHDGB): An implicit membrane model with a dynamically varying bilayer thickness.

    PubMed

    Panahi, Afra; Feig, Michael

    2013-03-12

    An extension to the heterogeneous dielectric generalized Born (HDGB) implicit membrane formalism is presented to allow dynamic membrane deformations in response to membrane-inserted biomolecules during molecular dynamic simulations. The flexible membrane is implemented through additional degrees of freedom that represent the membrane deformation at the contact points of a membrane-inserted solute with the membrane. The extra degrees of freedom determine the dielectric and non-polar solvation free energy profiles that are used to obtain the solvation free energy in the presence of the membrane and are used to calculate membrane deformation free energies according to an elastic membrane model. With the dynamic HDGB (DHDGB) model the membrane is able to deform in response to the insertion of charged molecules thereby avoiding the overestimation of insertion free energies with static membrane models. The DHDGB model also allows the membrane to respond to the insertion of membrane-spanning solutes with hydrophobic mismatch. The model is tested with the membrane insertion of amino acid side chain analogs, arginine-containing helices, the WALP23 peptide, and the gramicidin A channel.

  17. Charge Equilibration Force Fields for Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Lipids, Bilayers, and Integral Membrane Protein Systems

    PubMed Central

    Lucas, Timothy R.; Bauer, Brad A.; Patel, Sandeep

    2014-01-01

    With the continuing advances in computational hardware and novel force fields constructed using quantum mechanics, the outlook for non-additive force fields is promising. Our work in the past several years has demonstrated the utility of polarizable force fields, those based on the charge equilibration formalism, for a broad range of physical and biophysical systems. We have constructed and applied polarizable force fields for lipids and lipid bilayers. In this review of our recent work, we discuss the formalism we have adopted for implementing the charge equilibration (CHEQ) method for lipid molecules. We discuss the methodology, related issues, and briefly discuss results from recent applications of such force fields. Application areas include DPPC-water monolayers, potassium ion permeation free energetics in the gramicidin A bacterial channel, and free energetics of permeation of charged amino acid analogues across the water-bilayer interface. PMID:21967961

  18. All electrochemical fabrication of a bilayer membrane composed of nanotubular photocatalyst and palladium toward high-purity hydrogen production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hattori, Masashi; Noda, Kei

    2015-12-01

    We developed an all-electrochemical technique for fabricating a bilayer structure of a titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanotube array (TNA) and a palladium film (TNA/Pd membrane), which works for photocatalytic high-purity hydrogen production. Electroless plating was used for depositing the Pd film on the TNA surface prepared by anodizing a titanium foil. A 3-μm-thick TNA/Pd membrane without any pinholes in a 1.5-cm-diameter area was fabricated by transferring a 1-μm-thick TNA onto an electroless-plated 2-μm-thick Pd film with a mechanical peel-off process. This ultrathin membrane with sufficient mechanical robustness showed photocatalytic H2 production via methanol reforming under ultraviolet illumination on the TNA side, immediately followed by the purification of the generated H2 gas through the Pd layer. The hydrogen production rate and the apparent quantum yield for high-purity H2 production from methanol/water mixture with the TNA/Pd membrane were also examined. This work suggests that palladium electroless plating is more suitable and practical for preparing a well-organized TNA/Pd heterointerface than palladium sputter deposition.

  19. Formaldehyde assay by capacitance versus voltage and impedance measurements using bi-layer bio-recognition membrane.

    PubMed

    Ben Ali, M; Korpan, Y; Gonchar, M; El'skaya, A; Maaref, M A; Jaffrezic-Renault, N; Martelet, C

    2006-12-15

    A novel formaldehyde sensitive biosensor based on bacterial formaldehyde dehydrogenase (FDH) as a bio-recognition element has been developed. The bio-recognition membrane had bi-layer architecture and consisted of FDH, cross-linked with albumin, and of the cofactor NAD at a high concentration level (first layer). The second layer was a negatively charged Nafion membrane, which prevented a leakage of negatively charged NAD molecules from the bio-membrane. As transducers, gold electrodes SiO(2)/Si/SiO(2)/Ti/Au and electrolyte-insulator-semiconductor Si/SiO(2) (EIS) structures have been used. Changes in capacitance and impedance properties of the bio-recognition membrane have been used for monitoring formaldehyde concentration in a bulk solution. It has been shown that formaldehyde can be detected within a concentration range from 1 microM to 20mM depending on the type of transduction used, with a detection limit of 1 and 100 microM for gold-based and EIS-based transducers, respectively. PMID:16516460

  20. The influence of oscillating electromagnetic fields on membrane structure and function: Synthetic liposome and natural membrane bilayer systems with direct application to the controlled delivery of chemical agents

    SciTech Connect

    Liburdy, R.P.; de Manincor, D.; Fingado, B.

    1989-09-01

    Investigations have been conducted to determine if an imposed electromagnetic field can influence membrane transport, and ion and drug permeability in both synthetic and natural cell membrane systems. Microwave fields enhance accumulation of sodium in the lymphocyte and induce protein shedding at Tc. Microwaves also trigger membrane permeability of liposome systems under specific field exposure conditions. Sensitivity varies in a defined way in bilayers displaying a membrane structural phase transition temperature, Tc; maximal release was observed at or near Tc. Significantly, liposome systems without a membrane phase transition were also found to experience permeability increases but, in contrast, this response was temperature independent. The above results indicate that field-enhanced drug release occurs in liposome vesicles that possess a Tc as well as non-Tc liposomes. Additional studies extend non-Tc liposome responses to the in vivo case in which microwaves trigger Gentamicin release from a liposome depot'' placed subcutaneously in the rat hind leg. In addition, evidence is provided that cell surface sequestered liposomes can be triggered by microwave fields to release drugs directly into target cells. 24 refs., 6 figs.

  1. pH-induced conformational changes of membrane-bound influenza hemagglutinin and its effect on target lipid bilayers.

    PubMed Central

    Gray, C.; Tamm, L. K.

    1998-01-01

    Influenza virus hemagglutinin (HA) has served as a paradigm for both pH-dependent and -independent viral membrane fusion. Although large conformational changes were observed by X-ray crystallography when soluble fragments of HA were subjected to fusion-pH conditions, it is not clear whether the same changes occur in membrane-bound HA, what the spatial relationship is between the conformationally changed HA and the target and viral membranes, and in what way HA perturbs the target membrane at low pH. We have taken a spectroscopic approach using an array of recently developed FTIR techniques to address these questions. Difference attenuated total reflection FTIR spectroscopy was employed to reveal reversible and irreversible components of the pH-induced conformational change of the membrane-bound bromelain fragment of HA, BHA. Additional proteolytic fragments of BHA were produced which permitted a tentative assignment of the observed changes to the HA1 and HA2 subunits, respectively. The membrane-bound HA1 subunit undergoes a reversible conformational change, which most likely involves the loss of a small proportion of beta-sheet at low pH. BHA was found to undergo a partially reversible tilting motion relative to the target membrane upon exposure to pH 5, indicating a previously undescribed hinge near the anchoring point to the target membrane. Time-resolved amide H/D exchange experiments revealed a more dynamic (tertiary) structure of membrane-bound BHA and its HA2, but not its HA1, subunit. Finally BHA and, to a lesser degree, HA1 perturbed the lipid bilayer of the target membrane at the interface, as assessed by spectral changes of the lipid ester carbonyl groups. These results are discussed in the context of a complementary study of HA that was bound to viral membranes through its transmembrane peptide (Gray C, Tamm LK, 1997, Protein Sci 6:1993-2006). A distinctive role for the HA1 subunit in the conformational change of HA becomes apparent from these combined

  2. Glucagon-stimulated adenylate cyclase detects a selective perturbation of the inner half of the liver plasma-membrane bilayer achieved by the local anaesthetic prilocaine.

    PubMed

    Houslay, M D; Dipple, I; Rawal, S; Sauerheber, R D; Esgate, J A; Gordon, L M

    1980-07-15

    Prilocaine can increase the fluidity of rat liver plasma membranes, as indicated by a fatty acid spin-probe. This led to the activation of the membrane-bound fluoride-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity, but not the Lubrol-solubilized activity, suggesting that increased lipid fluidity can activate the enzyme. With increasing prilocaine concentrations above 10 mM, the membrane-bound fluoride-stimulated activity was progressively inhibited, even though bilayer fluidity continued to increase and the activity of the solubilized enzyme remained unaffected. Glucagon-stimulated adenylate cyclase was progressively inhibited by increasing prilocaine concentrations. Prilocaine (10 mM) had no effect on the lipid phase separation occurring at 28 degrees C and attributed to those lipids in the external half of the bilayer, as indicated by Arrhenius plots of both glucagon-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity and the order parameter of a fatty acid spin-probe. However, 10 mM-prilocaine induced a lipid phase separation at around 11 degrees C that was attributed to the lipids of the internal (cytosol-facing) half of the bilayer. It is suggested that prilocaine (10 mM) can selectively perturb the inner half of the bilayer of rat liver plasma membranes owing to its preferential interaction with the acidic phospholipids residing there.

  3. Acetylsalicylic acid (aspirin) and salicylic acid interaction with the human erythrocyte membrane bilayer induce in vitro changes in the morphology of erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Suwalsky, Mario; Belmar, Jessica; Villena, Fernando; Gallardo, María José; Jemiola-Rzeminska, Malgorzata; Strzalka, Kazimierz

    2013-11-01

    Despite the well-documented information, there are insufficient reports concerning the effects of salicylate compounds on the structure and functions of cell membranes, particularly those of human erythrocytes. With the aim to better understand the molecular mechanisms of the interaction of acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) and salicylic acid (SA) with cell membranes, human erythrocyte membranes and molecular models were utilized. These consisted of bilayers of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) and dimyristoylphosphatidylethanolamine (DMPE), representative of phospholipid classes located in the outer and inner monolayers of the human erythrocyte membrane, respectively. The capacity of ASA and SA to perturb the multibilayer structures of DMPC and DMPE was evaluated by X-ray diffraction while DMPC unilamellar vesicles (LUV) were studied by fluorescence spectroscopy. Moreover, we took advantage of the capability of differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) to detect the changes in the thermotropic phase behavior of lipid bilayers resulting from ASA and SA interaction with PC and PE molecules. In an attempt to further elucidate their effects on cell membranes, the present work also examined their influence on the morphology of intact human erythrocytes by means of defocusing and scanning electron microscopy, while isolated unsealed human erythrocyte membranes (IUM) were studied by fluorescence spectroscopy. Results indicated that both salicylates interact with human erythrocytes and their molecular models in a concentration-dependent manner perturbing their bilayer structures. PMID:24055635

  4. Acetylsalicylic acid (aspirin) and salicylic acid interaction with the human erythrocyte membrane bilayer induce in vitro changes in the morphology of erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Suwalsky, Mario; Belmar, Jessica; Villena, Fernando; Gallardo, María José; Jemiola-Rzeminska, Malgorzata; Strzalka, Kazimierz

    2013-11-01

    Despite the well-documented information, there are insufficient reports concerning the effects of salicylate compounds on the structure and functions of cell membranes, particularly those of human erythrocytes. With the aim to better understand the molecular mechanisms of the interaction of acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) and salicylic acid (SA) with cell membranes, human erythrocyte membranes and molecular models were utilized. These consisted of bilayers of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) and dimyristoylphosphatidylethanolamine (DMPE), representative of phospholipid classes located in the outer and inner monolayers of the human erythrocyte membrane, respectively. The capacity of ASA and SA to perturb the multibilayer structures of DMPC and DMPE was evaluated by X-ray diffraction while DMPC unilamellar vesicles (LUV) were studied by fluorescence spectroscopy. Moreover, we took advantage of the capability of differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) to detect the changes in the thermotropic phase behavior of lipid bilayers resulting from ASA and SA interaction with PC and PE molecules. In an attempt to further elucidate their effects on cell membranes, the present work also examined their influence on the morphology of intact human erythrocytes by means of defocusing and scanning electron microscopy, while isolated unsealed human erythrocyte membranes (IUM) were studied by fluorescence spectroscopy. Results indicated that both salicylates interact with human erythrocytes and their molecular models in a concentration-dependent manner perturbing their bilayer structures.

  5. A comparative calorimetric and spectroscopic study of the effects of cholesterol and of the plant sterols β-sitosterol and stigmasterol on the thermotropic phase behavior and organization of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine bilayer membranes.

    PubMed

    Mannock, David A; Benesch, Matthew G K; Lewis, Ruthven N A H; McElhaney, Ronald N

    2015-08-01

    We performed comparative DSC and FTIR spectroscopic measurements of the effects of β-sitosterol (Sito) and stigmasterol (Stig) on the thermotropic phase behavior and organization of DPPC bilayers. Sito and Stig are the major sterols in the biological membranes of higher plants, whereas cholesterol (Chol) is the major sterol in mammalian membranes. Sito differs in structure from Chol in having an ethyl group at C24 of the alkyl side-chain, and Stig in having both the C24 ethyl group and trans-double bond at C22. Our DSC studies indicate that the progressive incorporation of Sito and Stig decrease the temperature and cooperativity of the pretransition of DPPC to a slightly lesser and greater extent than Chol, respectively, but the pretransition persists to 10 mol % sterol concentration in all cases. All three sterols produce essentially identical effects on the thermodynamic parameters of the sharp component of the DPPC main phase transition. However, the ability to increase the temperature and decrease the cooperativity and enthalpy of the broad component decreases in the order Chol>Sito>Stig. Nevertheless, at higher Sito/Stig concentrations, there is no evidence of sterol crystallites. Our FTIR spectroscopic studies demonstrate that Sito and especially Stig incorporation produces a smaller ordering of the hydrocarbon chains of fluid DPPC bilayers than does Chol. In general, the presence of a C24 ethyl group in the alkyl side-chain reduces the characteristic effects of Chol on the thermotropic phase behavior and organization of DPPC bilayer membranes, and a trans-double bond at C22 magnifies this effect.

  6. In Situ Observations of Free-Standing Graphene-like Mono- and Bilayer ZnO Membranes.

    PubMed

    Quang, Huy T; Bachmatiuk, Alicja; Dianat, Arezoo; Ortmann, Frank; Zhao, Jiong; Warner, Jamie H; Eckert, Jürgen; Cunniberti, Gianaurelio; Rümmeli, Mark H

    2015-11-24

    ZnO in its many forms, such as bulk, thin films, nanorods, nanobelts, and quantum dots, attracts significant attention because of its exciting optical, electronic, and magnetic properties. For very thin ZnO films, predictions were made that the bulk wurtzite ZnO structure would transit to a layered graphene-like structure. Graphene-like ZnO layers were later confirmed when supported over a metal substrate. However, the existence of free-standing graphene-like ZnO has, to the best of our knowledge, not been demonstrated. In this work, we show experimental evidence for the in situ formation of free-standing graphene-like ZnO mono- and bilayer ZnO membranes suspended in graphene pores. Local electron energy loss spectroscopy confirms the membranes comprise only Zn and O. Image simulations and supporting analysis confirm that the membranes are graphene-like ZnO. Graphene-like ZnO layers are predicted to have a wide band gap and different and exciting properties as compared to other ZnO structures.

  7. Monitoring the Transmembrane Proton Gradient Generated by Cytochrome bo3 in Tethered Bilayer Lipid Membranes Using SEIRA Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Wiebalck, Swantje; Kozuch, Jacek; Forbrig, Enrico; Tzschucke, C Christoph; Jeuken, Lars J C; Hildebrandt, Peter

    2016-03-10

    Membrane proteins act as biocatalysts or ion/proton pumps to convert and store energy from ubiquitous environmental sources. Interfacing these proteins to electrodes allows utilizing the energy for enzymatic biofuel cells or other auspicious biotechnological applications. To optimize the efficiency of these devices, appropriate membrane models are required that ensure structural and functional integrity of the embedded enzymes and provide structural insight. We present a spectroelectrochemical surface-enhanced infrared absorption (SEIRA) and electrical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) study of the bacterial respiratory ubiquinol/cytochrome bo3 (cyt bo3) couple incorporated into a tethered bilayer lipid membrane (tBLM). Here, we employed a new lipid tether (WK3SH, dihydrocholesteryl (2-(2-(2-ethoxy)ethoxy)ethanethiol), which was synthesized using a three-step procedure with very good yield and allowed measuring IR spectra without significant spectral interference of the tBLM. The functional integrity of the incorporated cyt bo3 was demonstrated by monitoring the enzymatic O2 reduction current and the formation of the transmembrane proton gradient. Based on a SEIRA-spectroscopic redox titration, a shift of the pH-dependent redox potential of the ubiquinones under turnover conditions was correlated with an alkalinization of the submembrane reservoir by +0.8 pH units. This study demonstrates the high potential of tBLMs and the SEIRA spectroscopic approach to study bioenergetic processes.

  8. (13) C-TmDOTA as versatile thermometer compound for solid-state NMR of hydrated lipid bilayer membranes.

    PubMed

    Umegawa, Yuichi; Tanaka, Yuya; Nobuaki, Matsumori; Murata, Michio

    2016-03-01

    Recent advances in solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques, such as magic angle spinning and high-power decoupling, have dramatically increased the sensitivity and resolution of NMR. However, these NMR techniques generate extra heat, causing a temperature difference between the sample in the rotor and the variable temperature gas. This extra heating is a particularly crucial problem for hydrated lipid membrane samples. Thus, to develop an NMR thermometer that is suitable for hydrated lipid samples, thulium-1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetate (TmDOTA) was synthesized and labeled with (13) C (i.e., (13) C-TmDOTA) to increase the NMR sensitivity. The complex was mixed with a hydrated lipid membrane, and the system was subjected to solid-state NMR and differential scanning calorimetric analyses. The physical properties of the lipid bilayer and the quality of the NMR spectra of the membrane were negligibly affected by the presence of (13) C-TmDOTA, and the (13) C chemical shift of the complex exhibited a large-temperature dependence. The results demonstrated that (13) C-TmDOTA could be successfully used as a thermometer to accurately monitor temperature changes induced by (1) H decoupling pulses and/or by magic angle spinning and the temperature distribution of the sample inside the rotor. Thus, (13) C-TmDOTA was shown to be a versatile thermometer for hydrated lipid assemblies. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26460094

  9. Construction of a patterned hydrogel-fibrous mat bilayer structure to mimic choroid and Bruch's membrane layers of retina.

    PubMed

    Komez, Aylin; Baran, Erkan T; Erdem, Uzeyir; Hasirci, Nesrin; Hasirci, Vasif

    2016-09-01

    Deterioration of retina and death of the retinal cells due to age, diabetes, or occlusion can cause retinal degeneration which leads to loss of vision. In this study, it is aimed to design a bilayered matrix to mimic the choroid and the Bruch's membrane of the retinal tissue. As choroid, a microchanneled network resembling a fractal tree design was fabricated by photolithography over photo-cross-linkable methacrylated hyaluronic acid hydrogel. Gelatin or collagen was immobilized into the microchannels to enhance adherence of Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells (HUVEC). At late culture periods (2 weeks), formation of tubular structures due to proliferation of the attached cells was observed. As Bruch's membrane, an electrospun fibroin nanofiber mat was produced to grow retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells on. Cellular interactions between RPE and HUVEC in the microchannels were investigated in a coculture model in a noncontact mode. It was deduced that by combining the RPE layer on the highly permeable Bruch's membrane with the choroid layer populated by HUVECs, a retinal substitute which might have a potential for use in the treatment of retinal diseases is possible. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 104A: 2166-2177, 2016. PMID:27102366

  10. (13) C-TmDOTA as versatile thermometer compound for solid-state NMR of hydrated lipid bilayer membranes.

    PubMed

    Umegawa, Yuichi; Tanaka, Yuya; Nobuaki, Matsumori; Murata, Michio

    2016-03-01

    Recent advances in solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques, such as magic angle spinning and high-power decoupling, have dramatically increased the sensitivity and resolution of NMR. However, these NMR techniques generate extra heat, causing a temperature difference between the sample in the rotor and the variable temperature gas. This extra heating is a particularly crucial problem for hydrated lipid membrane samples. Thus, to develop an NMR thermometer that is suitable for hydrated lipid samples, thulium-1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetate (TmDOTA) was synthesized and labeled with (13) C (i.e., (13) C-TmDOTA) to increase the NMR sensitivity. The complex was mixed with a hydrated lipid membrane, and the system was subjected to solid-state NMR and differential scanning calorimetric analyses. The physical properties of the lipid bilayer and the quality of the NMR spectra of the membrane were negligibly affected by the presence of (13) C-TmDOTA, and the (13) C chemical shift of the complex exhibited a large-temperature dependence. The results demonstrated that (13) C-TmDOTA could be successfully used as a thermometer to accurately monitor temperature changes induced by (1) H decoupling pulses and/or by magic angle spinning and the temperature distribution of the sample inside the rotor. Thus, (13) C-TmDOTA was shown to be a versatile thermometer for hydrated lipid assemblies. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Studies of molecular diffusion in single-supported bilayer lipid membranes at low hydration by quasielastic neutron scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miskowiec, A.; Bai, M.; Lever, M.; Taub, H.; Hansen, F. Y.; Jenkins, T.; Tyagi, M.; Neumann, D. A.; Diallo, S. O.; Mamontov, E.; Herwig, K. W.

    2011-03-01

    We have extended our investigation of the quasielastic neutron scattering from single-supported bilayer lipid membranes to a sample of lower hydration using the backscattering spectrometer BASIS at the SNS of ORNL. To focus on the diffusive motion of the water, tail-deuterated DMPC membranes were deposited onto Si O2 -coated Si(100) substrates and characterized by AFM. Compared to a sample of higher hydration, the dryer sample does not have a step-like freezing transition at ~ 267 K and shows less intensity at higher temperatures of a broad Lorentzian component representing bulk-like water. However, the broad component of the ``wet'' and ``dry'' samples behaves similarly at lower temperatures. The dryer sample also shows evidence of a narrow Lorentzian component that has a different temperature dependence than that attributed to conformational changes of the alkyl tails of the lipid molecules in the wet sample. We tentatively identify this slower diffusive motion (time scale ~ 1 ns) with water more tightly bound to the membrane. Supported by NSF Grant No. DMR-0705974.

  12. Marine sponge cyclic peptide theonellamide A disrupts lipid bilayer integrity without forming distinct membrane pores.

    PubMed

    Espiritu, Rafael Atillo; Cornelio, Kimberly; Kinoshita, Masanao; Matsumori, Nobuaki; Murata, Michio; Nishimura, Shinichi; Kakeya, Hideaki; Yoshida, Minoru; Matsunaga, Shigeki

    2016-06-01

    Theonellamides (TNMs) are antifungal and cytotoxic bicyclic dodecapeptides derived from the marine sponge Theonella sp. These peptides specifically bind to 3β-hydroxysterols, resulting in 1,3-β-D-glucan overproduction and membrane damage in yeasts. The inclusion of cholesterol or ergosterol in phosphatidylcholine membranes significantly enhanced the membrane affinity of theonellamide A (TNM-A) because of its direct interaction with 3β-hydroxyl groups of sterols. To better understand TNM-induced membrane alterations, we investigated the effects of TNM-A on liposome morphology. (31)P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and dynamic light scattering (DLS) measurements revealed that the premixing of TNM-A with lipids induced smaller vesicle formation. When giant unilamellar vesicles were incubated with exogenously added TNM-A, confocal micrographs showed dynamic changes in membrane morphology, which were more frequently observed in cholesterol-containing than sterol-free liposomes. In conjunction with our previous data, these results suggest that the membrane action of TNM-A proceeds in two steps: 1) TNM-A binds to the membrane surface through direct interaction with sterols and 2) accumulated TNM-A modifies the local membrane curvature in a concentration-dependent manner, resulting in dramatic membrane morphological changes and membrane disruption.

  13. Marine sponge cyclic peptide theonellamide A disrupts lipid bilayer integrity without forming distinct membrane pores.

    PubMed

    Espiritu, Rafael Atillo; Cornelio, Kimberly; Kinoshita, Masanao; Matsumori, Nobuaki; Murata, Michio; Nishimura, Shinichi; Kakeya, Hideaki; Yoshida, Minoru; Matsunaga, Shigeki

    2016-06-01

    Theonellamides (TNMs) are antifungal and cytotoxic bicyclic dodecapeptides derived from the marine sponge Theonella sp. These peptides specifically bind to 3β-hydroxysterols, resulting in 1,3-β-D-glucan overproduction and membrane damage in yeasts. The inclusion of cholesterol or ergosterol in phosphatidylcholine membranes significantly enhanced the membrane affinity of theonellamide A (TNM-A) because of its direct interaction with 3β-hydroxyl groups of sterols. To better understand TNM-induced membrane alterations, we investigated the effects of TNM-A on liposome morphology. (31)P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and dynamic light scattering (DLS) measurements revealed that the premixing of TNM-A with lipids induced smaller vesicle formation. When giant unilamellar vesicles were incubated with exogenously added TNM-A, confocal micrographs showed dynamic changes in membrane morphology, which were more frequently observed in cholesterol-containing than sterol-free liposomes. In conjunction with our previous data, these results suggest that the membrane action of TNM-A proceeds in two steps: 1) TNM-A binds to the membrane surface through direct interaction with sterols and 2) accumulated TNM-A modifies the local membrane curvature in a concentration-dependent manner, resulting in dramatic membrane morphological changes and membrane disruption. PMID:27003125

  14. The hydrophobic adsorption of charged molecules to bilayer membranes: a test of the applicability of the stern equation.

    PubMed

    McLaughlin, S; Harary, H

    1976-05-01

    To describe the hydrophobic adsorption of charged molecules to bilayer membranes, one must recognize that the adsorption produces a change in the electrostatic potential at the surface of the membrane. The surface potential produced by the adsorption of the charged molecules can be described most simply by the Gouy equation from the theory of the diffuse double layer. This potential will tend to lower the concentration of the adsorbing ions in the aqueous phase immediately adjacent to the membrane, a phenomenon which can be described by the Boltzmann relation. The number of adsorbed ions is, in turn, a function of the aqueous concentration of these ions at the membrane solution interface and can be described, in the simplest case, by a Langmuir adsorption isotherm. If the ions are regarded as point charges, the combination of the Gouy, Boltzmann, and Langmuir relations may be considered a simplified Stern equation. To test experimentally the applicability of this equation, one should measure both the charge density and surface potential as a function of the concentration of adsorbing molecules in the bulk aqueous phases. Direct, accurate measurements of one of these parameters, the number of moles of 2, 6-toluidinylnaphthalenesulfonate ions bound to vesicles formed from phosphatidylcholine, are available in the literature (Huang, C., and Charlton, J.P. (1972), Biochemistry 11, 735). We estimated the change in the surface potential in two independent ways; by means of conductance measurements with "probe" molecules on planar black lipid membranes and by means of electrophoresis measurements on multilaminar unsonicated vesicles. The two estimates agreed with one another and all of the data could be adequately described by the Stern equation, assuming, at 25 degrees C, a dissociation constant of 2 X 10(-4) M and a maximum number of binding sites of 1/70 A2.

  15. Membrane Elasticity in Giant Vesicles with Fluid Phase Coexistence

    PubMed Central

    Baumgart, T.; Das, S.; Webb, W. W.; Jenkins, J. T.

    2005-01-01

    Biological membranes are known to contain compositional heterogeneities, often termed rafts, with distinguishable composition and function, and these heterogeneities participate in vigorous transport processes. Membrane lipid phase coexistence is expected to modulate these processes through the differing mechanical properties of the bulk domains and line tension at phase boundaries. In this contribution, we compare the predictions from a shape theory derived for vesicles with fluid phase coexistence to the geometry of giant unilamellar vesicles with coexisting liquid-disordered (Ld) and liquid-ordered (Lo) phases. We find a bending modulus for the Lo phase higher than that of the Ld phase and a saddle-splay (Gauss) modulus difference with the Gauss modulus of the Lo phase being more negative than the Ld phase. The Gauss modulus critically influences membrane processes that change topology, such as vesicle fission or fusion, and could therefore be of significant biological relevance in heterogeneous membranes. Our observations of experimental vesicle geometries being modulated by Gaussian curvature moduli differences confirm the prediction by the theory of Juelicher and Lipowsky. PMID:15894634

  16. Following Natures Lead: On the Construction of Membrane-Inserted Toxins in Lipid Bilayer Nanodiscs

    PubMed Central

    Akkaladevi, Narahari; Mukherjee, Srayanta; Katayama, Hiroo; Janowiak, Blythe; Patel, Deepa; Gogol, Edward P.; Pentelute, Bradley L.; Collier, R. John

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial toxin or viral entry into the cell often requires cell surface binding and endocytosis. The endosomal acidification induces a limited unfolding/refolding and membrane insertion reaction of the soluble toxins or viral proteins into their translocation competent or membrane inserted states. At the molecular level, the specific orientation and immobilization of the pre-transitioned toxin on the cell surface is often an important prerequisite prior to cell entry. We propose that structures of some toxin membrane insertion complexes may be observed through procedures where one rationally immobilizes the soluble toxin so that potential unfolding ↔ refolding transitions that occur prior to membrane insertion orientate away from the immobilization surface in the presence of lipid micelle pre-nanodisc structures. As a specific example, the immobilized prepore form of the anthrax toxin pore translocon or protective antigen can be transitioned, inserted into a model lipid membrane (nanodiscs), and released from the immobilized support in its membrane solubilized form. This particular strategy, although unconventional, is a useful procedure for generating pure membrane-inserted toxins in nanodiscs for electron microscopy structural analysis. In addition, generating a similar immobilized platform on label-free biosensor surfaces allows one to observe the kinetics of these acid-induced membrane insertion transitions. These platforms can facilitate the rational design of inhibitors that specifically target the toxin membrane insertion transitions that occur during endosomal acidification. This approach may lead to a new class of direct anti-toxin inhibitors. PMID:25578459

  17. Membrane with internal passages to permit fluid flow and an electrochemical cell containing the same

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cisar, Alan J. (Inventor); Gonzalez-Martin, Anuncia (Inventor); Hitchens, G. Duncan (Inventor); Murphy, Oliver J. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    The invention provides an improved proton exchange membrane for use in electrochemical cells having internal passages parallel to the membrane surface, an apparatus and process for making the membrane, membrane and electrode assemblies fabricated using the membrane, and the application of the membrane and electrode assemblies to a variety of devices, both electrochemical and otherwise. The passages in the membrane extend from one edge of the membrane to another and allow fluid flow through the membrane and give access directly to the membrane for purposes of hydration.

  18. Amphiphilic COSAN and I2-COSAN crossing synthetic lipid membranes: planar bilayers and liposomes.

    PubMed

    Verdiá-Báguena, Carmina; Alcaraz, Antonio; Aguilella, Vicente M; Cioran, Ana M; Tachikawa, Shoji; Nakamura, Hiroyuki; Teixidor, Francesc; Viñas, Clara

    2014-06-28

    The boron-rich cobaltabisdicarbollide (COSAN) and its 8,8'-I2 derivative (I2-COSAN), both of purely inorganic nature, are shown to cross through synthetic lipid membranes. These results reveal unexpected properties at the interface of biological and synthetic membranes.

  19. Viscoelastic deformation of lipid bilayer vesicles.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shao-Hua; Sankhagowit, Shalene; Biswas, Roshni; Wu, Shuyang; Povinelli, Michelle L; Malmstadt, Noah

    2015-10-01

    Lipid bilayers form the boundaries of the cell and its organelles. Many physiological processes, such as cell movement and division, involve bending and folding of the bilayer at high curvatures. Currently, bending of the bilayer is treated as an elastic deformation, such that its stress-strain response is independent of the rate at which bending strain is applied. We present here the first direct measurement of viscoelastic response in a lipid bilayer vesicle. We used a dual-beam optical trap (DBOT) to stretch 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC) giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs). Upon application of a step optical force, the vesicle membrane deforms in two regimes: a fast, instantaneous area increase, followed by a much slower stretching to an eventual plateau deformation. From measurements of dozens of GUVs, the average time constant of the slower stretching response was 0.225 ± 0.033 s (standard deviation, SD). Increasing the fluid viscosity did not affect the observed time constant. We performed a set of experiments to rule out heating by laser absorption as a cause of the transient behavior. Thus, we demonstrate here that the bending deformation of lipid bilayer membranes should be treated as viscoelastic.

  20. Using fluorine nuclear magnetic resonance to probe the interaction of membrane-active peptides with the lipid bilayer.

    PubMed

    Buer, Benjamin C; Chugh, Jeetender; Al-Hashimi, Hashim M; Marsh, E Neil G

    2010-07-13

    A variety of biologically active peptides exert their function through direct interactions with the lipid membrane of the cell. These surface interactions are generally transient and highly dynamic, making them hard to study. Here we have examined the feasibility of using solution phase (19)F nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) to study peptide-membrane interactions. Using the antimicrobial peptide MSI-78 as a model system, we demonstrate that peptide binding to either small unilamellar vesicles (SUVs) or bicelles can readily be detected by simple one-dimensional (19)F NMR experiments with peptides labeled with l-4,4,4-trifluoroethylglycine. The (19)F chemical shift associated with the peptide-membrane complex is sensitive both to the position of the trifluoromethyl reporter group (whether in the hydrophobic face or positively charged face of the amphipathic peptide) and to the curvature of the lipid bilayer (whether the peptide is bound to SUVs or bicelles). (19)F spin echo experiments using the Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill pulse sequence were used to measure the transverse relaxation (T(2)) of the nucleus and thereby examine the local mobility of the MSI-78 analogues bound to bicelles. The fluorine probe positioned in the hydrophobic face of the peptide relaxes at a rate that correlates with the tumbling of the bicelle, suggesting that it is relatively immobile, whereas the probe at the positively charged face relaxes more slowly, indicating this position is much more dynamic. These results are in accord with structural models of MSI-78 bound to lipids and point to the feasibility of using fluorine-labeled peptides to monitor peptide-membrane interactions in living cells.

  1. Molecular Dynamics of a Water-Lipid Bilayer Interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Michael A.; Pohorille, Andrew

    1994-01-01

    We present results of molecular dynamics simulations of a glycerol 1-monooleate bilayer in water. The total length of analyzed trajectories is 5ns. The calculated width of the bilayer agrees well with the experimentally measured value. The interior of the membrane is in a highly disordered fluid state. Atomic density profile, orientational and conformational distribution functions, and order parameters indicate that disorder increases toward the center of the bilayer. Analysis of out-of-plane thermal fluctuations of the bilayer surfaces occurring at the time scale of the present calculations reveals that the distribution of modes agrees with predictions of the capillary wave model. Fluctuations of both bilayer surfaces are uncorrelated, yielding Gaussian distribution of instantaneous widths of the membrane. Fluctuations of the width produce transient thinning defects in the bilayer which occasionally span almost half of the membrane. The leading mechanism of these fluctuations is the orientational and conformational motion of head groups rather than vertical motion of the whole molecules. Water considerably penetrates the head group region of the bilayer but not its hydrocarbon core. The total net excess dipole moment of the interfacial water points toward the aqueous phase, but the water polarization profile is non-monotonic. Both water and head groups significantly contribute to the surface potential across the interface. The calculated sign of the surface potential is in agreement with that from experimental measurements, but the value is markedly overestimated. The structural and electrical properties of the water-bilayer system are discussed in relation to membrane functions, in particular transport of ions and nonelectrolytes across membranes.

  2. Effects of pentanol isomers on the phase behavior of phospholipid bilayer membranes.

    PubMed

    Griffin, Kathryn L; Cheng, Chih-Yin; Smith, Eric A; Dea, Phoebe K

    2010-11-01

    Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) was used to analyze the thermotropic phase behavior of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) bilayers in the presence of pentanol isomers. The concentration of each pentanol isomer needed to induce the interdigitated phase was determined by the appearance of a biphasic effect in the main transition temperatures, the onset of a hysteresis associated with the main transition from the gel-to-liquid crystalline phase, and the disappearance of the pretransition. Lower threshold concentrations were found to correlate with isomers of greater alkyl chain length while branching of the alkyl chain was found to increase biphasic behavior. The addition of a methyl group to butanol systems drastically decreased threshold concentrations. However, as demonstrated in the DPPC/neopentanol system, branching of the alkyl chain away from the -OH group lowers the threshold concentration while maintaining a biphasic effect.

  3. Differential insertion of insulin receptor complexes into Triton X-114 bilayer membranes. Evidence for a differential accessibility of the membrane-exposed receptor domain.

    PubMed

    Flörke, R R; Klein, H W; Reinauer, H

    1993-01-15

    In the present study, the Triton X-114 phase-separation system has been used to characterize molecular properties of the membrane-exposed domain of an integral-membrane hormone receptor. This approach provides novel details of the structure/function relationship of insulin receptors. Upon raising the temperature of a micellar Triton X-114 solution above the cloud-point, a detergent enriched phase pellets and coprecipitates 95% of the purified insulin-free (alpha beta)2 receptors. In contrast, 83% of the hormone bound (alpha beta)2 receptor complexes prefer the detergent-depleted phase, exhibiting prominent properties of non-membraneous proteins. Kinetic studies show that, following insulin binding, the amphiphilicity of the receptor complexes is immediately altered. Only monodisperse (alpha beta)2 complexes were detected when receptor/insulin complexes of the detergent-depleted phase were analyzed by detergent-free sucrose density centrifugation in the presence of 10 nM insulin. These results can be explained in the light of the lipid-bilayer-like organization of the precipitating Triton X-114; hormone-induced intramolecular alterations of (alpha beta)2 receptors appear to fundamentally restrict access to the membrane-exposed receptor domain. Basically, different molecular properties are found for alpha beta receptors. Only 67% of the insulin-free receptors coprecipitate with the Triton-X-114-enriched phase; following insulin binding the coprecipitation is only decreased to 42%. In contrast to (alpha beta)2 receptors, formation of noncovalently aggregated receptor complexes, which are detected by sucrose density centrifugation, could account for the exclusion of alpha beta receptor species from Triton X-114 membranes.

  4. Lipid bilayer preparations of membrane proteins for oriented and magic-angle spinning solid-state NMR samples

    PubMed Central

    Das, Nabanita; Murray, Dylan T; Cross, Timothy A

    2014-01-01

    Solid-state NMR spectroscopy has been used successfully for characterizing the structure and dynamics of membrane proteins as well as their interactions with other proteins in lipid bilayers. such an environment is often necessary for achieving native-like structures. sample preparation is the key to this success. Here we present a detailed description of a robust protocol that results in high-quality membrane protein samples for both magic-angle spinning and oriented-sample solid-state NMR. the procedure is demonstrated using two proteins: CrgA (two transmembrane helices) and rv1861 (three transmembrane helices), both from Mycobacterium tuberculosis. the success of this procedure relies on two points. First, for samples for both types of NMR experiment, the reconstitution of the protein from a detergent environment to an environment in which it is incorporated into liposomes results in ‘complete’ removal of detergent. second, for the oriented samples, proper dehydration followed by rehydration of the proteoliposomes is essential. By using this protocol, proteoliposome samples for magic-angle spinning NMR and uniformly aligned samples (orientational mosaicity of <1°) for oriented-sample NMR can be obtained within 10 d. PMID:24157546

  5. Influence of H2TOEtPyP4 porphyrin on the stability and conductivity of bilayer lipid membranes.

    PubMed

    Torosyan, Anahit; Arakelyan, Valeri

    2015-12-01

    Many water-soluble cationic porphyrins are known to be prospective chemotherapeutics and photosensitizers for cancer treatment and diagnosis. The physicochemical properties of porphyrins, in particular their interactions with membranes, are important determining factors of their biological activity. The influence of cationic meso-tetra-[4-N-(2'-hydroxyethyl) pyridyl] porphyrin (H2TOEtPyP) on the stability and conductivity of bilayer lipid membranes (BLMs) was studied. H2TOEtPyP4 porphyrin was shown to decrease the stability of BLMs made of a mixture of DOPS and DPPE (1:1) in an electric field because of a reduction of line tension of spontaneously formed pore edges in the BLM. The presence of cationic porphyrin was found to reduce BLM surface tension. This effect was enhanced with increasing porphyrin concentration. H2TOEtPyP4 increased the probability of spontaneous pore formation. Further investigating the cyclic current-voltage characteristics of BLMs allowed determining the electrical capacity and conductivity of BLMs in the presence of H2TOEtPyP4 porphyrin. It was shown that in the presence of cationic porphyrin the electrical capacity as well as conductivity of the BLM increases.

  6. Influence of H2TOEtPyP4 porphyrin on the stability and conductivity of bilayer lipid membranes.

    PubMed

    Torosyan, Anahit; Arakelyan, Valeri

    2015-12-01

    Many water-soluble cationic porphyrins are known to be prospective chemotherapeutics and photosensitizers for cancer treatment and diagnosis. The physicochemical properties of porphyrins, in particular their interactions with membranes, are important determining factors of their biological activity. The influence of cationic meso-tetra-[4-N-(2'-hydroxyethyl) pyridyl] porphyrin (H2TOEtPyP) on the stability and conductivity of bilayer lipid membranes (BLMs) was studied. H2TOEtPyP4 porphyrin was shown to decrease the stability of BLMs made of a mixture of DOPS and DPPE (1:1) in an electric field because of a reduction of line tension of spontaneously formed pore edges in the BLM. The presence of cationic porphyrin was found to reduce BLM surface tension. This effect was enhanced with increasing porphyrin concentration. H2TOEtPyP4 increased the probability of spontaneous pore formation. Further investigating the cyclic current-voltage characteristics of BLMs allowed determining the electrical capacity and conductivity of BLMs in the presence of H2TOEtPyP4 porphyrin. It was shown that in the presence of cationic porphyrin the electrical capacity as well as conductivity of the BLM increases. PMID:26307365

  7. Permeation of bacterial cells, permeation of cytoplasmic and artificial membrane vesicles, and channel formation on lipid bilayers by peptide antibiotic AS-48.

    PubMed Central

    Gálvez, A; Maqueda, M; Martínez-Bueno, M; Valdivia, E

    1991-01-01

    Peptide AS-48 induces ion permeation, which is accompanied by the collapse of the cytoplasmic membrane potential, in sensitive bacteria. Active transport by cytoplasmic membrane vesicles is also impaired by AS-48. At low concentrations, this peptide also causes permeability of liposomes to low-molecular-weight compounds without a requirement for a membrane potential. Higher antibiotic concentrations induce severe disorganization, which is visualized under electron microscopy as aggregation and formation of multilamellar structures. Electrical measurements suggest that AS-48 can form channels in lipid bilayers. Images PMID:1702784

  8. Coexistence of a Two-States Organization for a Cell-Penetrating Peptide in Lipid Bilayer

    PubMed Central

    Plénat, Thomas; Boichot, Sylvie; Dosset, Patrice; Milhiet, Pierre-Emmanuel; Le Grimellec, Christian

    2005-01-01

    Primary amphipathic cell-penetrating peptides transport cargoes across cell membranes with high efficiency and low lytic activity. These primary amphipathic peptides were previously shown to form aggregates or supramolecular structures in mixed lipid-peptide monolayers, but their behavior in lipid bilayers remains to be characterized. Using atomic force microscopy, we have examined the interactions of P(α), a primary amphipathic cell-penetrating peptide which remains α-helical whatever the environment, with dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) bilayers. Addition of P(α) at concentrations up to 5 mol % markedly modified the supported bilayers topography. Long and thin filaments lying flat at the membrane surface coexisted with deeply embedded peptides which induced a local thinning of the bilayer. On the other hand, addition of P(α) only exerted very limited effects on the corresponding liposome's bilayer physical state, as estimated from differential scanning calorimetry and diphenylhexatriene fluorescence anisotropy experiments. The use of a gel-fluid phase separated supported bilayers made of a dioleoylphosphatidylcholine/dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine mixture confirmed both the existence of long filaments, which at low peptide concentration were preferentially localized in the fluid phase domains and the membrane disorganizing effects of 5 mol % P(α). The simultaneous two-states organization of P(α), at the membrane surface and deeply embedded in the bilayer, may be involved in the transmembrane carrier function of this primary amphipathic peptide. PMID:16199494

  9. A bilayer composite composed of TiO2-incorporated electrospun chitosan membrane and human extracellular matrix sheet as a wound dressing.

    PubMed

    Woo, Chang Hee; Choi, Young Chan; Choi, Ji Suk; Lee, Hee Young; Cho, Yong Woo

    2015-01-01

    We designed bilayer composites composed of an upper layer of titanium dioxide (TiO2)-incorporated chitosan membrane and a sub-layer of human adipose-derived extracellular matrix (ECM) sheet as a wound dressing for full-thickness wound healing. The dense and fibrous top layer, which aims to protect the wound from bacterial infection, was prepared by electrospinning of chitosan solution followed by immersion in TiO2 solution. The sponge-like sub-layer, which aims to promote new tissue regeneration, was prepared with acellular ECM derived from human adipose tissue. Using a modified drop plate method, there was a 33.9 and 69.6% reduction in viable Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus on the bilayer composite, respectively. In an in vivo experiment using rats, the bilayer composites exhibited good biocompatibility and provided proper physicochemical and compositional cues at the wound site. Changes in wound size and histological examination of full-thickness wounds showed that the bilayer composites induced faster regeneration of granulation tissue and epidermis with less scar formation, than control wounds. Overall results suggest that the TiO2-incorporated chitosan/ECM bilayer composite can be a suitable candidate as a wound dressing, with an excellent inhibition of bacterial penetration and wound healing acceleration effects. PMID:26096447

  10. Structural evolution and membrane interaction of the 40-residue β amyloid peptides: differences in the initial proximity between peptides and the membrane bilayer studied by solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Qiang, Wei; Akinlolu, Rumonat D; Nam, Mimi; Shu, Nicolas

    2014-12-01

    Interactions between the β amyloid (Aβ) peptides and cellular membranes have severe consequences such as neuronal cell disruption and therefore may play important roles in Alzheimer's disease. Understanding the structural basis behind such interactions, however, is hindered by the complexity of the Aβ-membrane systems. In particular, because the Aβ peptides are partially incorporated in the membrane bilayer after enzymatic cleavage, there are multiple possibilities in terms of the initial proximity between the peptides and membranes. Structural studies using in vitro model systems with either externally added or preincorporated Aβ in membrane bilayers resulted in distinct evolution pathways. Previous work has shown that the externally added Aβ formed long and mature filaments, while preincorporated Aβ generated short and curvy fibrils. In this study, we perform detailed characterizations on the structural evolution and membrane interaction for these two pathways, using a combination of solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and other techniques. For the externally added Aβ, we determined the residue-specific structural evolution during the fibrillation process. While the entire fibrillation process for the externally added Aβ was slow, the preincorporated Aβ generated Aβ-lipid complexes rapidly. Specific interactions between the lipids and peptides were observed, suggesting the colocalization of lipids and peptides within the complex. Formation of such a complex induced molecular-level changes in the lipid bilayer, which may serve as a possible mechanism of membrane disruption. PMID:25397729

  11. Is the fluid mosaic (and the accompanying raft hypothesis) a suitable model to describe fundamental features of biological membranes? What may be missing?

    PubMed Central

    Bagatolli, Luis A.; Mouritsen, Ole G.

    2013-01-01

    The structure, dynamics, and stability of lipid bilayers are controlled by thermodynamic forces, leading to overall tensionless membranes with a distinct lateral organization and a conspicuous lateral pressure profile. Bilayers are also subject to built-in curvature-stress instabilities that may be released locally or globally in terms of morphological changes leading to the formation of non-lamellar and curved structures. A key controller of the bilayer’s propensity to form curved structures is the average molecular shape of the different lipid molecules. Via the curvature stress, molecular shape mediates a coupling to membrane-protein function and provides a set of physical mechanisms for formation of lipid domains and laterally differentiated regions in the plane of the membrane. Unfortunately, these relevant physical features of membranes are often ignored in the most popular models for biological membranes. Results from a number of experimental and theoretical studies emphasize the significance of these fundamental physical properties and call for a refinement of the fluid mosaic model (and the accompanying raft hypothesis). PMID:24312108

  12. Catalytic photoinduced electron transport across a lipid bilayer mediated by a membrane-soluble electron relay.

    PubMed

    Limburg, B; Bouwman, E; Bonnet, S

    2015-12-14

    Unidirectional photocatalytic electron transfer from a hydrophilic electron donor encapsulated in the interior of a liposome, to a hydrophilic electron acceptor on the other side of the membrane, has been achieved using the simple membrane-soluble electron relay 1-methoxy-N-methylphenazinium (MMP(+)). The total amount of photoproduct (>140 nmol) exceeds the number of moles of MMP(+) present (125 nmol), thus showing that the transport of electrons is catalytic.

  13. The Structure of Herpesvirus Fusion Glycoprotein B-Bilayer Complex Reveals the Protein-Membrane and Lateral Protein-Protein Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Maurer, Ulrike E.; Zeev-Ben-Mordehai, Tzviya; Pandurangan, Arun Prasad; Cairns, Tina M.; Hannah, Brian P.; Whitbeck, J. Charles; Eisenberg, Roselyn J.; Cohen, Gary H.; Topf, Maya; Huiskonen, Juha T.; Grünewald, Kay

    2013-01-01

    Summary Glycoprotein B (gB) is a key component of the complex herpesvirus fusion machinery. We studied membrane interaction of two gB ectodomain forms and present an electron cryotomography structure of the gB-bilayer complex. The two forms differed in presence or absence of the membrane proximal region (MPR) but showed an overall similar trimeric shape. The presence of the MPR impeded interaction with liposomes. In contrast, the MPR-lacking form interacted efficiently with liposomes. Lateral interaction resulted in coat formation on the membranes. The structure revealed that interaction of gB with membranes was mediated by the fusion loops and limited to the outer membrane leaflet. The observed intrinsic propensity of gB to cluster on membranes indicates an additional role of gB in driving the fusion process forward beyond the transient fusion pore opening and subsequently leading to fusion pore expansion. PMID:23850455

  14. Hydrodynamic effects on spinodal decomposition kinetics in planar lipid bilayer membranes.

    PubMed

    Fan, Jun; Han, Tao; Haataja, Mikko

    2010-12-21

    The formation and dynamics of spatially extended compositional domains in multicomponent lipid membranes lie at the heart of many important biological and biophysical phenomena. While the thermodynamic basis for domain formation has been explored extensively in the past, domain growth in the presence of hydrodynamic interactions both within the (effectively) two-dimensional membrane and in the three-dimensional solvent in which the membrane is immersed has received little attention. In this work, we explore the role of hydrodynamic effects on spinodal decomposition kinetics via continuum simulations of a convective Cahn-Hilliard equation for membrane composition coupled to the Stokes equation. Our approach explicitly includes hydrodynamics both within the planar membrane and in the three-dimensional solvent in the viscously dominated flow regime. Numerical simulations reveal that dynamical scaling breaks down for critical lipid mixtures due to distinct coarsening mechanisms for elongated versus more isotropic compositional lipid domains. The breakdown in scaling should be readily observable in experiments on model membrane systems. PMID:21186889

  15. Fluid Mechanics of the Vascular Basement Membrane in the Brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coloma, Mikhail; Hui, Jonathan; Chiarot, Paul; Huang, Peter; Carare, Roxana; McLeod, Kenneth; Schaffer, David

    2013-11-01

    Beta-amyloid is a normal product of brain metabolic function and is found within the interstitial fluid of the brain. Failure of the clearance of beta-amyloid from the aging brain leads to its accumulation within the walls of arteries and to Alzheimer's disease. The vascular basement membrane (VBM) within the walls of cerebral arteries surrounds the spirally arranged smooth muscle cells and represents an essential pathway for removal of beta-amyloid from the brain. This process fails with the stiffening of arterial walls associated with aging. In this study we hypothesize that the deformation of the VBM associated with arterial pulsations drives the interstitial fluid to drain in the direction opposite of the arterial blood flow. This hypothesis is theoretically investigated by modeling the VBM as a thin, coaxial, fluid-filled porous medium surrounding a periodically deforming cylindrical tube. Flow and boundary conditions required to achieve such a backward clearance are derived through a control volume analysis of mass, momentum, and energy.

  16. Size-selective permeation of water-soluble polymers through the bilayer membrane of cyclodextrin vesicles investigated by PFG-NMR.

    PubMed

    Himmelein, Sabine; Sporenberg, Nora; Schönhoff, Monika; Ravoo, Bart Jan

    2014-04-15

    Cyclodextrin vesicles (CDVs) consist of a bilayer of amphiphilic cyclodextrins (CDs). CDVs exhibit CD cavities at their surface that are able to recognize and bind hydrophobic guest molecules via size-selective inclusion. In this study, the permeability of α- and β-CDVs is investigated by pulsed field gradient-stimulated echo (PFG-STE) nuclear magnetic resonance. Diffusion experiments with water and two types of water-soluble polymers, polyethylene glycol (PEG) and polypropylene glycol (PPG), revealed three main factors that influence the exchange rate and permeability of CDVs. First, the length of the hydrophobic chain of the CD amphiphile plays a crucial role. Reasonably, vesicles consisting of amphiphiles with a longer aliphatic chain are less permeable since both membrane thickness and melting temperature T(m) increase. Second, the exchange rate through the bilayer membrane depends on the molecular weight of the polymer and decreases with increasing weight of the polymer. Most interestingly, a size-selective distinction of permeation due to the embedded CDs in the bilayer membrane was found. The mechanism of permeation is shown to occur through the CD cavity, such that depending on the size of the cavity, permeation of polymers with different cross-sectional diameters takes place. Whereas PPG permeates through the membrane of β-CD vesicles, it does not permeate α-CD vesicles. PMID:24650278

  17. Lipid bilayers covalently anchored to carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Dayani, Yasaman; Malmstadt, Noah

    2012-05-29

    The unique physical and electrical properties of carbon nanotubes make them an exciting material for applications in various fields such as bioelectronics and biosensing. Due to the poor water solubility of carbon nanotubes, functionalization for such applications has been a challenge. Of particular need are functionalization methods for integrating carbon nanotubes with biomolecules and constructing novel hybrid nanostructures for bionanoelectronic applications. We present a novel method for the fabrication of dispersible, biocompatible carbon nanotube-based materials. Multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) are covalently modified with primary amine-bearing phospholipids in a carbodiimide-activated reaction. These modified carbon nanotubes have good dispersibility in nonpolar solvents. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy shows peaks attributable to the formation of amide bonds between lipids and the nanotube surface. Simple sonication of lipid-modified nanotubes with other lipid molecules leads to the formation of a uniform lipid bilayer coating the nanotubes. These bilayer-coated nanotubes are highly dispersible and stable in aqueous solution. Confocal fluorescence microscopy shows labeled lipids on the surface of bilayer-modified nanotubes. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) shows the morphology of dispersed bilayer-coated MWCNTs. Fluorescence quenching of lipid-coated MWCNTs confirms the bilayer configuration of the lipids on the nanotube surface, and fluorescence anisotropy measurements show that the bilayer is fluid above the gel-to-liquid transition temperature. The membrane protein α-hemolysin spontaneously inserts into the MWCNT-supported bilayer, confirming the biomimetic membrane structure. These biomimetic nanostructures are a promising platform for the integration of carbon nanotube-based materials with biomolecules.

  18. Fabrication of charged membranes by the solvent-assisted lipid bilayer (SALB) formation method on SiO2 and Al2O3.

    PubMed

    Tabaei, Seyed R; Vafaei, Setareh; Cho, Nam-Joon

    2015-05-01

    In this study, we employed the solvent-assisted lipid bilayer (SALB) formation method to fabricate charged membranes on solid supports. The SALB formation method exploits a ternary mixture of lipid-alcohol-aqueous buffer to deposit lamellar phase structures on solid supports upon gradual increase of the buffer fraction. Using the quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D) technique, we investigated the formation of negatively and positively charged membranes via the SALB formation method and directly compared with the vesicle fusion method on two different oxide films. Bilayers containing an increasing fraction of negatively charged DOPS lipid molecules were successfully formed on both SiO2 and Al2O3 substrates using the SALB formation method at physiological pH (7.5). In contrast, the vesicle fusion method did not support bilayer formation on Al2O3 and those containing more than 10% DOPS ruptured on SiO2 only under acidic conditions (pH 5). Characterization of the fraction of negatively charge DOPS by in situ annexin 5A binding assay revealed that the fraction of DOPS lipid molecules in the bilayers formed on Al2O3 is significantly higher than that formed on SiO2. This suggests that the SALB self-assembly of charged membranes is predominantly governed by the electrostatic interaction. Furthermore, our findings indicate that when multicomponent lipid mixtures are used, the relative fraction of lipids in the bilayer may differ from the fraction of lipids in the precursor mixture. PMID:25858554

  19. X-ray diffraction study of lipid bilayer membranes interacting with amphiphilic helical peptides: diphytanoyl phosphatidylcholine with alamethicin at low concentrations.

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Y; He, K; Ludtke, S J; Huang, H W

    1995-01-01

    A variety of amphiphilic helical peptides have been shown to exhibit a transition from adsorbing parallel to a membrane surface at low concentrations to inserting perpendicularly into the membrane at high concentrations. Furthermore, this transition has been correlated to the peptides' cytolytic activities. X-ray lamellar diffraction of diphytanoyl phosphatidylcholine-alamethicin mixtures revealed the changes of the bilayer structure with alamethicin concentration. In particular, the bilayer thickness decreases with increasing peptide concentration in proportion to the peptide-lipid molar ratio from as low as 1:150 to 1:47; the latter is near the threshold of the critical concentration for insertion. From the decreases of the bilayer thickness, one can calculate the cross sectional expansions of the lipid chains. For all of the peptide concentrations studied, the area expansion of the chain region for each adsorbed peptide is a constant 280 +/- 20 A2, which is approximately the cross sectional area of an adsorbed alamethicin. This implies that the peptide is adsorbed at the interface of the hydrocarbon region, separating the lipid headgroups laterally. Interestingly, the chain disorder caused by a peptide adsorption tends to spread over a large area, as much as 100 A in diameter. The theoretical basis of the long range nature of bilayer deformation is discussed. PMID:7647240

  20. Solute transport on the sub 100 ms scale across the lipid bilayer membrane of individual proteoliposomes.

    PubMed

    Ohlsson, Gabriel; Tabaei, Seyed R; Beech, Jason; Kvassman, Jan; Johanson, Urban; Kjellbom, Per; Tegenfeldt, Jonas O; Höök, Fredrik

    2012-11-21

    Screening assays designed to probe ligand and drug-candidate regulation of membrane proteins responsible for ion-translocation across the cell membrane are wide spread, while efficient means to screen membrane-protein facilitated transport of uncharged solutes are sparse. We report on a microfluidic-based system to monitor transport of uncharged solutes across the membrane of multiple (>100) individually resolved surface-immobilized liposomes. This was accomplished by rapidly switching (<10 ms) the solution above dye-containing liposomes immobilized on the floor of a microfluidic channel. With liposomes encapsulating the pH-sensitive dye carboxyfluorescein (CF), internal changes in pH induced by transport of a weak acid (acetic acid) could be measured at time scales down to 25 ms. The applicability of the set up to study biological transport reactions was demonstrated by examining the osmotic water permeability of human aquaporin (AQP5) reconstituted in proteoliposomes. In this case, the rate of osmotic-induced volume changes of individual proteoliposomes was time resolved by imaging the self quenching of encapsulated calcein in response to an osmotic gradient. Single-liposome analysis of both pure and AQP5-containing liposomes revealed a relatively large heterogeneity in osmotic permeability. Still, in the case of AQP5-containing liposomes, the single liposome data suggest that the membrane-protein incorporation efficiency depends on liposome size, with higher incorporation efficiency for larger liposomes. The benefit of low sample consumption and automated liquid handling is discussed in terms of pharmaceutical screening applications. PMID:22895529

  1. Method of separating organic contaminants from fluid feedstreams with polyphosphazene membranes

    DOEpatents

    McCaffrey, Robert R.; Cummings, Daniel G.

    1991-01-01

    A method is provided for separating halogenated hydrocarbons from a fluid feedstream. The fluid feedstream is flowed across a first surface of a polyphosphazene semipermeable membrane. At least one halogenated hydrocarbon from the fluid feedstream permeates through the polyphosphazene semipermeable membrane to a second opposed surface of the semipermeable membrane. Then the permeated polar hydrocarbon is removed from the second opposed surface of the polyphosphazene semipermeable membrane. Outstanding and unexpected separation selectivities on the order of 10,000 were obtained for methylene chloride when a methylene chloride in water feedstream was flowed across the polyphosphazene semipermeable membrane in the invented method.

  2. Method of separating organic contaminants from fluid feedstreams with polyphosphazene membranes

    SciTech Connect

    McCaffrey, R.R.; Cummings, D.G.

    1990-12-31

    A method is provided for separating polar hydrocarbons from a fluid feedstream. The fluid feedstream is flowed across a first surface of a polyphosphazene semipermeable membrane. At least one polar hydrocarbon from the fluid feedstream permeates through the polyphosphazene semipermeable membrane to a second opposed surface of the semipermeable membrane. Then the permeated polar hydrocarbon is removed from the second opposed surface of the polyphosphazene semipermeable membrane. Outstanding and unexpected separation selectivities on the order of 10,000 were obtained for methylene chloride when a methylene chloride in water feedstream was flowed across the polyphosphazene semipermeable membrane in the invented method.

  3. Fatty acid composition of membrane bilayers: importance of diet polyunsaturated fat balance.

    PubMed

    Abbott, Sarah K; Else, Paul L; Atkins, Taleitha A; Hulbert, A J

    2012-05-01

    In one of the most extensive analyses to date we show that the balance of diet n-3 and n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) is the most important determinant of membrane composition in the rat under 'normal' conditions. Young adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were fed one of twelve moderate-fat diets (25% of total energy) for 8weeks. Diets differed only in fatty acid (FA) profiles, with saturate (SFA) content ranging 8-88% of total FAs, monounsaturate (MUFA) 6-65%, total PUFA 4-81%, n-6 PUFA 3-70% and n-3 PUFA 1-70%. Diet PUFA included only essential FAs 18:2n-6 and 18:3n-3. Balance between n-3 and n-6 PUFA is defined as the PUFA balance (n-3 PUFA as % of total PUFA) and ranged 1-86% in the diets. FA composition was measured for brain, heart, liver, skeletal muscle, erythrocytes and plasma phospholipids, as well as adipose tissue and plasma triglycerides. The conformer-regulator model was used (slope=1 indicates membrane composition completely conforming to diet). Extensive changes in diet SFA, MUFA and PUFA had minimal effect on membranes (average slopes 0.01, 0.07, 0.07 respectively), but considerable influence on adipose tissue and plasma triglycerides (average slopes 0.27, 0.53, 0.47 respectively). Diet balance between n-3 and n-6 PUFA had a biphasic influence on membrane composition. When n-3 PUFA<10% of total PUFA, membrane composition completely conformed to diet (average slope 0.95), while diet PUFA balance>10% had little influence (average slope 0.19). The modern human diet has an average PUFA balance ~10% and this will likely have significant health implications.

  4. Computational fluid dynamics modeling of proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    SciTech Connect

    UM,SUKKEE; WANG,C.Y.; CHEN,KEN S.

    2000-02-11

    A transient, multi-dimensional model has been developed to simulate proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells. The model accounts simultaneously for electrochemical kinetics, current distribution, hydrodynamics and multi-component transport. A single set of conservation equations valid for flow channels, gas-diffusion electrodes, catalyst layers and the membrane region are developed and numerically solved using a finite-volume-based computational fluid dynamics (CFD) technique. The numerical model is validated against published experimental data with good agreement. Subsequently, the model is applied to explore hydrogen dilution effects in the anode feed. The predicted polarization cubes under hydrogen dilution conditions are found to be in qualitative agreement with recent experiments reported in the literature. The detailed two-dimensional electrochemical and flow/transport simulations further reveal that in the presence of hydrogen dilution in the fuel stream, hydrogen is depleted at the reaction surface resulting in substantial kinetic polarization and hence a lower current density that is limited by hydrogen transport from the fuel stream to the reaction site.

  5. Detection of SEB gene by bilayer lipid membranes nucleic acid biosensor supported by modified patch-clamp pipette electrode.

    PubMed

    Liu, Nan; Gao, Zhixian; Zhou, HuanYing; Yue, Mingxiang

    2007-04-15

    This work reports a kind of novel bilayer lipid membranes (BLMs) nucleic acid biosensor supported by modified patch-clamp pipette electrode was developed to detect staphylococcus enterotoxins B (SEB) gene. BLMs were formed within 15 min and able to be operated at least 24 h. Hydrophobic dodecane tail (C12) modified 18 bp single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) probe was immobilized on BLMs. The electrochemical currents versus the different concentration of ssDNA probe immobilized on BLMs indicated linearly correlation. The BLMs nucleic acid biosensor was fabricated by selecting the ssDNA probe as the signal sensing element with the concentration of 273.65 ng/mL. The electrochemical performance of the biosensor for the detection of SEB was investigated. The result showed that linear relationship was found between the current and ln(concentration) from 20 to 5000 ng/mL and the detection limit was 20 ng/mL. In addition, the biosensor was specific response to SEB gene and showed no significant current alteration in electrolyte which containing no SEB gene. Finally, Atom Force Microscope (AFM) images could be observed and used to evaluate the superficial microstructure of BLMs, ssDNA immobilized on BLMs and BLMs after hybridization. The BLMs nucleic acid biosensor supported by modified patch-clamp pipette electrode will become a highly sensitive, rapid, selective analytical tool for detection of Staphylococcus aureus, which produce SEB. PMID:17092700

  6. The structural role of cholesterol in cell membranes: from condensed bilayers to lipid rafts.

    PubMed

    Krause, Martin R; Regen, Steven L

    2014-12-16

    CONSPECTUS: Defining the two-dimensional structure of cell membranes represents one of the most daunting challenges currently facing chemists, biochemists, and biophysicists. In particular, the time-averaged lateral organization of the lipids and proteins that make up these natural enclosures has yet to be established. As the classic Singer-Nicolson model of cell membranes has evolved over the past 40 years, special attention has focused on the structural role played by cholesterol, a key component that represents ca. 30% of the total lipids that are present. Despite extensive studies with model membranes, two fundamental issues have remained a mystery: (i) the mechanism by which cholesterol condenses low-melting lipids by uncoiling their acyl chains and (ii) the thermodynamics of the interaction between cholesterol and high- and low-melting lipids. The latter bears directly on one of the most popular notions in modern cell biology, that is, the lipid raft hypothesis, whereby cholesterol is thought to combine with high-melting lipids to form "lipid rafts" that float in a "sea" of low-melting lipids. In this Account, we first describe a chemical approach that we have developed in our laboratories that has allowed us to quantify the interactions between exchangeable mimics of cholesterol and low- and high-melting lipids in model membranes. In essence, this "nearest-neighbor recognition" (NNR) method involves the synthesis of dimeric forms of these lipids that contain a disulfide moiety as a linker. By means of thiolate-disulfide interchange reactions, equilibrium mixtures of dimers are then formed. These exchange reactions are initiated either by adding dithiothreitol to a liposomal dispersion to generate a small amount of thiol monomer or by including a small amount of thiol monomer in the liposomes at pH 5.0 and then raising the pH to 7.4. We then show how such NNR measurements have allowed us to distinguish between two very different mechanisms that have been

  7. Formation and Characterization of Supported Lipid Bilayers Composed of Hydrogenated and Deuterated Escherichia coli Lipids

    PubMed Central

    Lind, Tania Kjellerup; Wacklin, Hanna; Schiller, Jürgen; Moulin, Martine; Haertlein, Michael; Pomorski, Thomas Günther; Cárdenas, Marité

    2015-01-01

    Supported lipid bilayers are widely used for sensing and deciphering biomolecular interactions with model cell membranes. In this paper, we present a method to form supported lipid bilayers from total lipid extracts of Escherichia coli by vesicle fusion. We show the validity of this method for different types of extracts including those from deuterated biomass using a combination of complementary surface sensitive techniques; quartz crystal microbalance, neutron reflection and atomic force microscopy. We find that the head group composition of the deuterated and the hydrogenated lipid extracts is similar (approximately 75% phosphatidylethanolamine, 13% phosphatidylglycerol and 12% cardiolipin) and that both samples can be used to reconstitute high-coverage supported lipid bilayers with a total thickness of 41 ± 3 Å, common for fluid membranes. The formation of supported lipid bilayers composed of natural extracts of Escherichia coli allow for following biomolecular interactions, thus advancing the field towards bacterial-specific membrane biomimics. PMID:26658241

  8. Formation and Characterization of Supported Lipid Bilayers Composed of Hydrogenated and Deuterated Escherichia coli Lipids.

    PubMed

    Lind, Tania Kjellerup; Wacklin, Hanna; Schiller, Jürgen; Moulin, Martine; Haertlein, Michael; Pomorski, Thomas Günther; Cárdenas, Marité

    2015-01-01

    Supported lipid bilayers are widely used for sensing and deciphering biomolecular interactions with model cell membranes. In this paper, we present a method to form supported lipid bilayers from total lipid extracts of Escherichia coli by vesicle fusion. We show the validity of this method for different types of extracts including those from deuterated biomass using a combination of complementary surface sensitive techniques; quartz crystal microbalance, neutron reflection and atomic force microscopy. We find that the head group composition of the deuterated and the hydrogenated lipid extracts is similar (approximately 75% phosphatidylethanolamine, 13% phosphatidylglycerol and 12% cardiolipin) and that both samples can be used to reconstitute high-coverage supported lipid bilayers with a total thickness of 41 ± 3 Å, common for fluid membranes. The formation of supported lipid bilayers composed of natural extracts of Escherichia coli allow for following biomolecular interactions, thus advancing the field towards bacterial-specific membrane biomimics. PMID:26658241

  9. Photophysical studies of bioconjugated ruthenium metal-ligand complexes incorporated in phospholipid membrane bilayers.

    PubMed

    Sharmin, Ayesha; Salassa, Luca; Rosenberg, Edward; Ross, J B Alexander; Abbott, Geoffrey; Black, Labe; Terwilliger, Michelle; Brooks, Robert

    2013-10-01

    The luminescent, mono-diimine ruthenium complexes [(H)Ru(CO)(PPh3)2(dcbpy)][PF6] (1) (dcbpy = 4,4'-dicarboxy-2,2'-bipyridyl) and [(H)Ru(CO)(dppene)(5-amino-1,10-phen)][PF6] (2) (dppene = bis(diphenylphosphino)ethylene; phen = phenanthroline) were conjugated with 1,2-dihexadecanoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine (DPPE) and with cholesterol in the case of complex 2. Using standard conjugation techniques, compound 1 gives the bis-lipid derivative [(H)Ru(CO)(PPh3)2(dcbpy-N-DPPE2)][PF6] (3), while 2 provides the monolipid conjugate [(H)Ru(CO)(dppene)(1,10-phen-5-NHC(S)-N-DPPE)][PF6] (4) and the cholesterol derivative [(H)Ru(CO)(dppene)(1,10-phen-5-NHC(O)Ocholesteryl)][PF6] (5). These compounds were characterized by spectroscopic methods, and their photophysical properties were measured in organic solvents. The luminescence of lipid conjugates 3 and 4 is quenched in organic solvents while compound 4 shows a weak, short-lived, blue-shifted emission in aqueous solution. The cholesterol conjugate 5 shows the long-lived, microsecond-time scale emission associated with triplet metal-to-ligand charge-transfer excited states. Incorporation of conjugate 3 in lipid bilayer vesicles restores the luminescence, but with blue shifts (~80 nm) accompanied by nanosecond-time scale lifetimes. In the vesicles conjugate 4 shows a short-lived and blue-shifted emission similar to that observed in solution but with increased intensity. Conjugation of the complex [(H)Ru(CO)(PhP2C2H4C(O)O-N-succinimidyl)2(bpy)][PF6] (6") (bpy = 2,2'-bipyridyl) with DPPE gives the phosphine-conjugated complex [(H)Ru(CO)(PhP2C2H4C(O)-N-DPPE)2(bpy)][PF6] (7). Complex 7 also exhibits a short-lived and blue-shifted emission in solution and in vesicles as observed for complexes 3 and 4. We have also conjugated the complex [Ru(bpy)2(5-amino-1,10-phen)][PF6]2 (8) with both cholesterol (9) and DPPE (10). Neither complex 9 nor the previously reported complex 10 exhibited the blue shifts observed for complexes 3 and 4

  10. Photophysical Studies of Bioconjugated Ruthenium Metal-Ligand Complexes Incorporated in Phospholipid Membrane Bilayers

    PubMed Central

    Sharmin, Ayesha; Salassa, Luca; Rosenberg, Edward; Ross, J. B. Alexander; Abbott, Geoffrey; Black, Labe; Terwilliger, Michelle; Brooks, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Luminescent, mono-diimine, ruthenium complexes, [(H)Ru(CO)(PPh3)2(dcbpy)][PF6] (1, dcbpy = 4,4′-dicarboxy bipyridyl) and [(H)Ru(CO)(dppene)(5-amino-1,10-phen)][PF6] (2, dppene = bis diphenylphosphino-ethylene, phen = 9,10-phenanthroline), have been conjugated with 1,2-dihexadecanoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine (DPPE) and with cholesterol in the case of 2. Compound 1 gives the bis-lipid derivative [(H)Ru(CO)(PPh3)2(dcbpy-N-DPPE2)][PF6] (3), while 2 provides the mono-lipid conjugate [(H)Ru(CO)(dppene)(1,10-phen-5-NHC(S)-N-DPPE)][ PF6] (4), and the cholesterol derivative [(H)Ru(CO)(dppene)(1,10-phen-5-NHC(O)OChol)][PF6] (5, Chol = cholesteryl), using standard conjugation techniques. These compounds were characterized by spectroscopic methods, and their photophysical properties were measured in organic solvents. The luminescence of lipid conjugates 3 and is quenched in organic solvents while compound 4 a weak, short-lived, blue-shifted emission in solution. The cholesterol conjugate shows the long-lived, microsecond-timescale emission associated with triplet metal-to-ligand charge-transfer (3MLCT) excited states. Incorporation of conjugate 3 in lipid bilayer vesicles restores the luminescence, but with blue shifts (~80 nm) accompanied by nanosecond-timescale lifetimes. In the vesicles conjugate 4 shows a similar short-lived and blue-shifted emission to that observed in solution but with increased intensity. Conjugation of the complex [(H)Ru(CO)(PhP2C2H4C(O)O-N-succinimidyl)2(bpy)][PF6] (6”) with DPPE gives the phosphine-conjugated complex [(H)Ru(CO)(PhP2C2H4C(O)-N-DPPE)2(bpy)][PF6] (7). Complex 7 also exhibits a short-lived and blue-shifted emission in solution and in vesicles as observed for 3 and 4. We have also conjugated the complex [Ru(bpy)2(5-amino-1,10-phenanthroline)][PF6]2 (8) with both cholesterol (9) and DPPE (10). Neither 9 nor the previously reported 10 exhibited the blue shifts observed for 3 and 4 when incorporated into LUVs. The anisotropies of

  11. First step in folding of nonconstitutive membrane proteins: spontaneous insertion of a polypeptide into a lipid bilayer and formation of helical structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reshetnyak, Yana; Karabadzhak, Alexander; Weerakkody, Dhammika; Engelman, Donald; Markin, Vladislav; Andreev, Oleg

    2011-03-01

    There are two questions we would like to address: 1) what is the molecular mechanism of a polypeptide insertion into a lipid bilayer and formation of transmembrane helix? 2) Are there any transient changes of a lipid bilayer in process of a polypeptide insertion and folding? As a convenient system we are studying pHLIP (pH (Low) Insertion Peptide) insertion into a membrane and folding, which is modulated by pH. The insertion of pHLIP occurs with rapid (0.1 sec) interfacial helix formation followed by a much slower (100 sec) insertion pathway to form a transmembrane helix. The reverse process of unfolding and peptide exit from the bilayer core proceeds much faster than folding/insertion and through different intermediate states. Our kinetic studies with pHLIP variants indicate that insertion can occur 100 times faster and with less number of intermediate states. To study changes, which might occur with a lipid bilayer in a process of peptide insertion and folding, we employed stopped-flow SAXS. Supported by grant from the NIH RO1133890 to OAA, DME, YRK.

  12. Antioxidant effect of 4-nerolidylcatechol and α-tocopherol in erythrocyte ghost membranes and phospholipid bilayers.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, K S; Silva, A H M; Mendanha, S A; Rezende, K R; Alonso, A

    2013-09-01

    4-Nerolidylcatechol (4-NC) is found in Pothomorphe umbellata root extracts and is reported to have a topical protective effect against UVB radiation-induced skin damage, toxicity in melanoma cell lines, and antimalarial activity. We report a comparative study of the antioxidant activity of 4-NC and α-tocopherol against lipid peroxidation initiated by two free radical-generating systems: 2,2'-azobis(2-aminopropane) hydrochloride (AAPH) and FeSO4/H2O2, in red blood cell ghost membranes and in egg phosphatidylcholine (PC) vesicles. Lipid peroxidation was monitored by membrane fluidity changes assessed by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy of a spin-labeled lipid and by the formation of thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances. When lipoperoxidation was initiated by the hydroxyl radical in erythrocyte ghost membranes, both 4-NC and α-tocopherol acted in a very efficient manner. However, lower activities were observed when lipoperoxidation was initiated by the peroxyl radical; and, in this case, the protective effect of α-tocopherol was lower than that of 4-NC. In egg PC vesicles, malondialdehyde formation indicated that 4-NC was effective against lipoperoxidation initiated by both AAPH and FeSO4/H2O2, whereas α-tocopherol was less efficient in protecting against lipoperoxidation by AAPH, and behaved as a pro-oxidant for FeSO4/H2O2. The DPPH (2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl) free-radical assay indicated that two free radicals were scavenged per 4-NC molecule, and one free radical was scavenged per α-tocopherol molecule. These data provide new insights into the antioxidant capacity of 4-NC, which may have therapeutic applications for formulations designed to protect the skin from sunlight irradiation.

  13. Size Control and Fractionation of Ionic Liquid Filled Polymersomes with Glassy and Rubbery Bilayer Membranes.

    PubMed

    So, Soonyong; Lodge, Timothy P

    2016-05-17

    We demonstrate control over the size of ionic liquid (IL) filled polymeric vesicles (polymersomes) by three distinct methods: mechanical extrusion, cosolvent-based processing in an IL, and fractionation of polymersomes in a biphasic system of IL and water. For the representative ionic liquid (1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl) imide ([EMIM][TFSI])), the size and dispersity of polymersomes formed from 1,2-polybutadiene-b-poly(ethylene oxide) (PB-PEO) and polystyrene-b-poly(ethylene oxide) (PS-PEO) diblock copolymers were shown to be sensitive to assembly conditions. During mechanical extrusion through a polycarbonate membrane, the relatively larger polymersomes were broken up and reorganized into vesicles with mean size comparable to the membrane pore (100 nm radius); the distribution width also decreased significantly after only a few passes. Other routes were studied using the solvent-switch or cosolvent (CS) method, whereby the initial content of the cosolvent and the PEO block length of PS-PEO were systemically changed. The nonvolatility of the ionic liquid directly led to the desired concentration of polymersomes in the ionic liquid using a single step, without the dialysis conventionally used in aqueous systems, and the mean vesicle size depended on the amount of cosolvent employed. Finally, selective phase transfer of PS-PEO polymersomes based on size was used to extract larger polymersomes from the IL to the aqueous phase via interfacial tension controlled phase transfer. The interfacial tension between the PS membrane and the aqueous phase was varied with the concentration of sodium chloride (NaCl) in the aqueous phase; then the larger polymersomes were selectively separated to the aqueous phase due to differences in shielding of the hydrophobic core (PS) coverage by the hydrophilic corona brush (PEO). This novel fractionation is a simple separation process without any special apparatus and can help to prepare monodisperse polymersomes

  14. Size Control and Fractionation of Ionic Liquid Filled Polymersomes with Glassy and Rubbery Bilayer Membranes.

    PubMed

    So, Soonyong; Lodge, Timothy P

    2016-05-17

    We demonstrate control over the size of ionic liquid (IL) filled polymeric vesicles (polymersomes) by three distinct methods: mechanical extrusion, cosolvent-based processing in an IL, and fractionation of polymersomes in a biphasic system of IL and water. For the representative ionic liquid (1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl) imide ([EMIM][TFSI])), the size and dispersity of polymersomes formed from 1,2-polybutadiene-b-poly(ethylene oxide) (PB-PEO) and polystyrene-b-poly(ethylene oxide) (PS-PEO) diblock copolymers were shown to be sensitive to assembly conditions. During mechanical extrusion through a polycarbonate membrane, the relatively larger polymersomes were broken up and reorganized into vesicles with mean size comparable to the membrane pore (100 nm radius); the distribution width also decreased significantly after only a few passes. Other routes were studied using the solvent-switch or cosolvent (CS) method, whereby the initial content of the cosolvent and the PEO block length of PS-PEO were systemically changed. The nonvolatility of the ionic liquid directly led to the desired concentration of polymersomes in the ionic liquid using a single step, without the dialysis conventionally used in aqueous systems, and the mean vesicle size depended on the amount of cosolvent employed. Finally, selective phase transfer of PS-PEO polymersomes based on size was used to extract larger polymersomes from the IL to the aqueous phase via interfacial tension controlled phase transfer. The interfacial tension between the PS membrane and the aqueous phase was varied with the concentration of sodium chloride (NaCl) in the aqueous phase; then the larger polymersomes were selectively separated to the aqueous phase due to differences in shielding of the hydrophobic core (PS) coverage by the hydrophilic corona brush (PEO). This novel fractionation is a simple separation process without any special apparatus and can help to prepare monodisperse polymersomes

  15. Immobilized lipid-bilayer materials

    DOEpatents

    Sasaki, Darryl Y.; Loy, Douglas A.; Yamanaka, Stacey A.

    2000-01-01

    A method for preparing encapsulated lipid-bilayer materials in a silica matrix comprising preparing a silica sol, mixing a lipid-bilayer material in the silica sol and allowing the mixture to gel to form the encapsulated lipid-bilayer material. The mild processing conditions allow quantitative entrapment of pre-formed lipid-bilayer materials without modification to the material's spectral characteristics. The method allows for the immobilization of lipid membranes to surfaces. The encapsulated lipid-bilayer materials perform as sensitive optical sensors for the detection of analytes such as heavy metal ions and can be used as drug delivery systems and as separation devices.

  16. Emerging roles for anionic non-bilayer phospholipids in fortifying the outer membrane permeability barrier.

    PubMed

    Bishop, Russell E

    2014-09-01

    Lately, researchers have been actively investigating Escherichia coli lptD mutants, which exhibit reduced transport of lipopolysaccharide to the cell surface. In this issue of the Journal of Bacteriology, Sutterlin et al. (H. A. Sutterlin, S. Zhang, and T. J. Silhavy, J. Bacteriol. 196:3214-3220, 2014) now reveal an important functional role for phosphatidic acid in fortifying the outer membrane permeability barrier in certain lptD mutant backgrounds. These findings come on the heels of the first reports of two LptD crystal structures, which now provide a structural framework for interpreting lptD genetics.

  17. Emerging Roles for Anionic Non-Bilayer Phospholipids in Fortifying the Outer Membrane Permeability Barrier

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Lately, researchers have been actively investigating Escherichia coli lptD mutants, which exhibit reduced transport of lipopolysaccharide to the cell surface. In this issue of the Journal of Bacteriology, Sutterlin et al. (H. A. Sutterlin, S. Zhang, and T. J. Silhavy, J. Bacteriol. 196:3214–3220, 2014) now reveal an important functional role for phosphatidic acid in fortifying the outer membrane permeability barrier in certain lptD mutant backgrounds. These findings come on the heels of the first reports of two LptD crystal structures, which now provide a structural framework for interpreting lptD genetics. PMID:25022852

  18. Direct Measurement of Cyclic Current-Voltage Responses of Integral Membrane Proteins at a Self-Assembled Lipid-Bilayer-Modified Electrode: Cytochrome f and Cytochrome c Oxidase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salamon, Z.; Hazzard, J. T.; Tollin, G.

    1993-07-01

    Direct cyclic voltage-current responses, produced in the absence of redox mediators, for two detergent-solubilized integral membrane proteins, spinach cytochrome f and beef heart cytochrome c oxidase, have been obtained at an optically transparent indium oxide electrode modified with a self-assembled lipid-bilayer membrane. The results indicate that both proteins interact with the lipid membrane so as to support quasi-reversible electron transfer redox reactions at the semiconductor electrode. The redox potentials that were obtained from analysis of the cyclic "voltammograms," 365 mV for cytochrome f and 250 and 380 mV for cytochrome c oxidase (vs. normal hydrogen electrode), compare quite well with the values reported by using conventional titration methods. The ability to obtain direct electrochemical measurements opens up another approach to the investigation of the properties of integral membrane redox proteins.

  19. Direct measurement of cyclic current-voltage responses of integral membrane proteins at a self-assembled lipid-bilayer-modified electrode: Cytochrome f and cytochrome c oxidase

    SciTech Connect

    Salamon, Z.; Hazzard, J.T.; Tollin, G. )

    1993-07-15

    Direct cyclic voltage-current responses, produced in the absence of redox mediators, for two detergent-solubilized integral membrane proteins, spinach cytochrome f and beef heart cytochrome c oxidase, have been obtained at an optically transparent indium oxide electrode modified with a self-assembled lipid-bilayer membrane. The results indicate that both proteins interact with the lipid membrane so as to support quasi-reversible electron transfer redox reactions at the semiconductor electrode. The redox potentials that were obtained from analysis of the cyclic [open quotes]voltammograms,[close quotes] 365 mV for cytochrome f and 250 and 380 mV for cytochrome c oxidase (vs. normal hydrogen electrode), compare quite well with the values reported by using conventional titration methods. The ability to obtain direct electrochemical measurements opens up another approach to the investigation of the properties of integral membrane redox proteins. 63 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Nanoparticle-lipid bilayer interactions studied with lipid bilayer arrays.

    PubMed

    Lu, Bin; Smith, Tyler; Schmidt, Jacob J

    2015-05-01

    The widespread environmental presence and commercial use of nanoparticles have raised significant health concerns as a result of many in vitro and in vivo assays indicating toxicity of a wide range of nanoparticle species. Many of these assays have identified the ability of nanoparticles to damage cell membranes. These interactions can be studied in detail using artificial lipid bilayers, which can provide insight into the nature of the particle-membrane interaction through variation of membrane and solution properties not possible with cell-based assays. However, the scope of these studies can be limited because of the low throughput characteristic of lipid bilayer platforms. We have recently described an easy to use, parallel lipid bilayer platform which we have used to electrically investigate the activity of 60 nm diameter amine and carboxyl modified polystyrene nanoparticles (NH2-NP and COOH-NP) with over 1000 lipid bilayers while varying lipid composition, bilayer charge, ionic strength, pH, voltage, serum, particle concentration, and particle charge. Our results confirm recent studies finding activity of NH2-NP but not COOH-NP. Detailed analysis shows that NH2-NP formed pores 0.3-2.3 nm in radius, dependent on bilayer and solution composition. These interactions appear to be electrostatic, as they are regulated by NH2-NP surface charge, solution ionic strength, and bilayer charge. The ability to rapidly measure a large number of nanoparticle and membrane parameters indicates strong potential of this bilayer array platform for additional nanoparticle bilayer studies.

  1. Highly efficient integration of the viral portal proteins from different types of phages into planar bilayers for the black lipid membrane analysis.

    PubMed

    Jing, Peng; Paraiso, Hallel; Burris, Benjamin

    2016-02-01

    The planar lipid bilayer technology is a technique that yields incredibly useful structural function information about a single channel protein. It is also currently actively utilized as a powerful platform using biological protein nanopores for the development of single-molecule nanopore sensing technology, as well as ultrafast DNA sequencing technology. The portal protein, GP10, from the bacteriophage Φ29 was the first phage portal protein shown to be successfully inserted into planar bilayer membranes, thereby it may inspire more researchers to apply the techniques to portal proteins from the other bacteriophages. However, the technology is far from perfect since the insertion of the channel proteins into planar bilayer membranes is not only technically difficult but also time-consuming. For the fusion of phage portal proteins, vesicles are typically needed to be reconstituted with the portal proteins to form proteoliposomes. However, most of the phage portal proteins have low solubility, and may self-aggregate during the preparation of the proteoliposomes. Furthermore, the fusion of the formed proteoliposomes is sporadic, unpredictable and varied from person to person. Due to the lack of experimental consistency between labs, the results from different methodologies reported for generating fusible proteoliposomes are highly variable. In this research, we propose a new method for the preparation of the fusible proteoliposomes containing portal proteins from bacteriophages, to circumvent the problems aforementioned. Compared to the conventional methods, this method was able to avoid the protein aggregation issues during the vesicle preparation by eliminating the need for detergents and the subsequent time-consuming step for detergent removal. The proteoliposomes prepared by the method were shown to be more efficiently and rapidly inserted into planar bilayer membranes bathed in different conducting buffer solutions including those with nonelectrolytes such as

  2. Planar asymmetric lipid bilayers of glycosphingolipid or lipopolysaccharide on one side and phospholipids on the other: membrane potential, porin function, and complement activation.

    PubMed Central

    Wiese, A; Reiners, J O; Brandenburg, K; Kawahara, K; Zähringer, U; Seydel, U

    1996-01-01

    We have determined some physicochemical properties of the monosaccharide-type fraction (GSL-1) of glycosphingolipids, the major glycolipid components of the outer leaflet of the Gram-negative species Sphingomonas paucimobilis. These properties included the state of order of the hydrocarbon moiety, the effective molecular area, surface charge density, and intrinsic transmembrane potential profile of reconstituted planar asymmetric GSL-1/phospholipid bilayer membranes. We have, furthermore, investigated the insertion into and the function of porin channels in the reconstituted bilayers and the complement-activating capability of GSL-1 surfaces. All results were compared with respective data for deep rough mutant lipopolysaccharide of Salmonella minnesota R595. We found a remarkable agreement in most functional properties of the two glycolipids. PMID:8770208

  3. Diffusion studies on permeable nitroxyl spin probe through lipid bilayer membrane

    SciTech Connect

    Benial, A. Milton Franklin; Meenakumari, V.; Ichikawa, Kazuhiro; Yamada, Ken-ichi; Utsumi, Hideo; Hyodo, Fuminori; Jawahar, A.

    2014-04-24

    Electron spin resonance (ESR) studies were carried out for 2mM {sup 14}N labeled deutrated permeable 3- methoxycarbonyl-2,2,5,5-tetramethyl-pyrrolidine-1-oxyl (MC-PROXYL) in pure water, 1 mM, 2 mM, 3 mM and 4 mM concentration of MC-PROXYL in 300 mM concentration of liposomal solution by using a L-band ESR spectrometer. The ESR parameters such as linewidth, hyperfine coupling constant, g-factor, partition parameter and permeability were reported. The partition parameter and permeability values indicate the maximum spin distribution in the lipid phase at 2 mM concentration. This study illustrates that ESR can be used to differentiate between the intra and extra-membrane water by loading the liposome vesicles with a lipid-permeable nitroxyl spin probe. From the ESR results, the radical concentration was optimized as 2 mM in liposomal solution for ESR phantom studies and experiments.

  4. Hydration of noncharged lipid bilayer membranes. Theory and experiments with phosphatidylethanolamines.

    PubMed Central

    Cevc, G; Marsh, D

    1985-01-01

    Calorimetric measurements have been made on the thermodynamics of the chain-melting phase transition of saturated diacylphosphatidylethanolamines, with chains containing 12-20 carbons, as a function of water content. The transition temperature, Tt, and the transition enthalpy, and entropy all decrease with an increase in water content; however, the effect on Tt lessens with an increase in chainlength. These results are compared with a theoretical description of lipid hydration in terms of the interlamellar water polarization (i.e., modified water structure) in the interbilayer region. The measured free energy, enthalpy and entropy of the transition and the transition temperature have an approximate hyperbolic tangent dependence on water content, infinity tanh (dw/2 xi), where dw is the interlamellar water-layer thickness and xi approximately equal to 0.25 nm is the water-order correlation length, in agreement with the theory. Auxiliary x-ray diffraction experiments yield results on the repulsive hydration forces between lipid lamellae consistent with the theory, and allow an estimate of the water orienting potential of the interface. The molecular origin of this potential is discussed in electrostatic terms, and the values of its associated molecular parameters are found to yield the right size of hydrational thermodynamic quantities. The theory thus provides an integrated, clear, and simple approach to the hydration properties of lipid membranes. PMID:3978186

  5. RNAi functionalized collagen-chitosan/silicone membrane bilayer dermal equivalent for full-thickness skin regeneration with inhibited scarring.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xing; Ma, Lie; Liang, Jun; Zhang, Bing; Teng, Jianying; Gao, Changyou

    2013-03-01

    Scar inhibition of dermal equivalent is one of the key issues for treatment of full thickness skin defects. To yield a bioactive RNAi functionalized matrix for skin regeneration with inhibited scarring, collagen-chitosan/silicone membrane bilayer dermal equivalent (BDE) was combined with trimetylchitosan (TMC)/siRNA complexes which could induce suppression of transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) pathway. The RNAi-BDE functioned as a reservoir for the incorporated TMC/siRNA complexes, enabling a prolonged siRNA release. The seeded fibroblasts in the RNAi-BDE showed good viability, internalized the TMC/siRNA complexes effectively and suppressed TGF-β1 expression constantly until 14 d. Application of the RNAi-BDE on the full-thickness skin defects of pig backs confirmed the in vivo inhibition of TGF-β1 expression by immunohistochemistry, real-time quantitative PCR and western blotting during 30 d post surgery. The levels of other scar-related factors such as collagen type I, collagen type III and α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) were also down-regulated. In combination with the ultra-thin skin graft transplantation for 73 d, the regenerated skin by RNAi-BDE had an extremely similar structure to that of the normal one. Our study reflects the latest paradigm of tissue engineering by incorporating the emerging biomolecule siRNA. The 3-D scaffolding materials for siRNA delivery may have general implications in generation of bioactive matrix as well. PMID:23261213

  6. Thermal-mechanical fluctuations of fluid membranes in confined geometries: The case of soft confinement

    SciTech Connect

    Podgornik, R.; Parsegian, V.A. )

    1992-02-01

    By definition, membrane or macromolecular assembly is an event of molecular confinement against the configurational entropy of a disordered state. Bilayer membranes under progressive confinement experience a continual damping of undulatory fluctuations, first interpreted as a steric force (Helfrich. Z. Naturforsch. 1978). This paper uses a new, diffusion-equation formalism based on the Feynman-type variational principle to describe how direct interbilayer forces - of hydration, electrostatic double layers, and van der Waals attraction - confine membrane fluctuations. We recover theoretical results to examine measured forces in multilamellar arrays showing that [open quotes]soft[close quotes] collisions, through long-range forces, create a mutual enhancement of both the direct forces and the undulatory steric interactions. Thus, there is yet another way to resolve the old, but false, dilemma to choose between steric and direct forces driving membrane assembly. One may develop a systematic connection between bilayer charge, hydration, and flexibility and the action of configurational entropic forces. The results make clear that one should measure forces between membranes or macromolecules in a way that allows them to express their native mechanical freedom. 15 refs., 3 figs.

  7. Giant multilevel cation channels formed by Alzheimer disease amyloid beta-protein [A beta P-(1-40)] in bilayer membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Arispe, N; Pollard, H B; Rojas, E

    1993-01-01

    We have recently shown that the Alzheimer disease 40-residue amyloid beta-protein [A beta P-(1-40)] can form cation-selective channels when incorporated into planar lipid bilayers by fusion of liposomes containing the peptide. Since A beta P-(1-40) comprises portions of the putative extracellular and membrane-spanning domains of the amyloid precursor protein (APP751), we suggested that the channel-forming property could be the underlying cause of amyloid neurotoxicity. The peptide has been proposed to occur in vivo in both membrane-bound and soluble forms, and we now report that soluble A beta P-(1-40) can also form similar channels in solvent-free lipid bilayers formed at the tip of a patch pipet, as well as in the planar lipid bilayer system. As in the case of liposome-mediated incorporation, the amyloid channel activity in the patch pipet exhibits multiple conductance levels between 40 and 400 pS, cation selectivity, and sensitivity to tromethamine (Tris). Further studies with A beta P channels incorporated into planar lipid bilayers from the liposome complex have also revealed that the channel activity can express spontaneous transitions to a much higher range of conductances between 400 and 4000 pS. Under these conditions, the amyloid channel continues to be cation selective. Amyloid channels were insensitive to nitrendipine at either conductance range. We calculate that if such channels were expressed in cells, the ensuing ion fluxes down their electrochemical potential gradients would be homeostatically dissipative. We therefore interpret these data as providing further support for the concept that cell death in Alzheimer disease may be due to amyloid ion-channel activity. PMID:7504270

  8. Cholesterol Decreases the Size and the Mechanical Resistance to Rupture of Sphingomyelin Rich Domains, in Lipid Bilayers Studied as a Model of the Milk Fat Globule Membrane.

    PubMed

    Murthy, Appala Venkata Ramana; Guyomarc'h, Fanny; Lopez, Christelle

    2016-07-01

    Sphingomyelin-rich microdomains have been observed in the biological membrane surrounding milk fat globules (MFGM). The role played by cholesterol in these domains and in the physical properties and functions of the MFGM remains poorly understood. The objective of this work was therefore to investigate the phase state, topography, and mechanical properties of MFGM polar lipid bilayers as a function of cholesterol concentration, by combining X-ray diffraction, atomic force microscopy imaging, and force spectroscopy. At room temperature, i.e. below the phase transition temperature of the MFGM polar lipids, the bilayers showed the formation of sphingomyelin-rich domains in the solid ordered (so) phase that protruded about 1 nm above the liquid disordered (ld) phase. These so phase domains have a higher mechanical resistance to rupture than the ld phase (30 nN versus 15 nN). Addition of cholesterol in the MFGM polar lipid bilayers (i) induced the formation of liquid ordered (lo) phase for up to 27 mol % in the bilayers, (ii) decreased the height difference between the thicker ordered domains and the surrounding ld phase, (iii) promoted the formation of small sized domains, and (iv) decreased the mechanical resistance to rupture of the sphingomyelin-rich domains down to ∼5 nN. The biological and functional relevance of the lo phase cholesterol/sphingomyelin-rich domains in the membrane surrounding fat globules in milk remains to be elucidated. This study brought new insight about the functional role of cholesterol in milk polar lipid ingredients, which can be used in the preparation of food emulsions, e.g. infant milk formulas. PMID:27300157

  9. Formation of pit-spanning phospholipid bilayers on nanostructured silicon dioxide surfaces for studying biological membrane events.

    PubMed

    Pfeiffer, Indriati; Zäch, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Zwitterionic phospholipid vesicles are known to adsorb and ultimately rupture on flat silicon dioxide (SiO2) surfaces to form supported lipid bilayers. Surface topography, however, alters the kinetics and mechanistic details of vesicles adsorption, which under certain conditions may be exploited to form a suspended bilayer. Here we describe the use of nanostructured SiO2 surfaces prepared by the colloidal lithography technique to scrutinize the formation of suspended 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC) lipid bilayers from a solution of small unilamellar lipid vesicles (SUVs). Atomic force microscopy (AFM) and quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D) were employed to characterize nanostructure fabrication and lipid bilayer assembly on the surface.

  10. Self-organized lipid-porphyrin bilayer membranes in vesicular form: nanostructure, photophysical properties, and dioxygen coordination.

    PubMed

    Komatsu, Teruyuki; Moritake, Miho; Nakagawa, Akito; Tsuchida, Eishun

    2002-12-01

    An amphiphilic tetraphenylporphyrin and its iron complex bearing four phospholipid substituents, in which a trimethylolethane residue connects the two acyl chains (lipid-porphyrins), have been synthesized. The free-base lipid-porphyrin 6a self-organizes in aqueous media to form spherical unilamellar vesicles with a diameter of 100 nm and a uniform thickness of 10 nm, which corresponds to twice the length of the molecule. In the visible absorption spectrum, the porphyrin Soret band was significantly red-shifted (12 nm) relative to that of the monomer in benzene/MeOH solution due to the excitonic interaction of the porphyrin chromophores. The [symbol: see text]-A isotherm of 6a gave an area per molecule of 2.2 nm2, which allowed the estimation of the number of molecules in a single vesicle (2.3 x 10(4)). Double-layered Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) films of 6a on a glass surface exhibited an absorption spectrum identical to that of the 6a vesicles in bulk aqueous solution, and this suggests that they contain similar geometric arrangements of the porphyrin moieties. Exciton calculations on the basis of our structural model reproduced the bathochromic shift of the Soret band well. In the photophysical properties of the 6a vesicles, the characteristics of J-aggregated porphyrins substantially predominate: strong fluorescence and extremely short triplet lifetime. The iron complex 6b with a small molar excess of 1-dodecylimidazole (DIm) also formed spherical unilamellar vesicles (100 nm phi). Scanning force microscopy after evaporation on a graphite surface revealed 6b/DIm vesicles with a vertical height of 19.8 nm, which coincided with the thickness of the double bilayer membranes. The ferrous 6c formed a bis(DIm)-coordinated low-spin FeII complex under an N2 atmosphere. Upon addition of O2 to this solution, a kinetically stable O2 adduct was formed at 37 degrees C with a half-life of 17 h. Distinct gel-phase (liquid-crystal) transitions of the lipid-porphyrin membranes were

  11. A new technique of depositing phospholipid bilayers on quartz surfaces: its use in membrane spin-label studies.

    PubMed

    Kawano, I; Floyd, R A; Sridhar, R

    1981-03-01

    We have developed a new improved technique termed the parallel-beam spattering (PBS) method for depositing phospholipid bilayers on quartz surfaces. This technique involves atomizing the phospholipid mixture with a stream of nitrogen gas and passing this atomized mixture through two orifices separated by a distance to achieve a parallel beam of atomized particles before deposition on the quartz plate. A static electric field can easily be applied to the quartz surface. Also a goniometer of new design has been constructed to allow precise positioning of the deposited phospholipid bilayers with reference to the magnetic field. We have utilized the PBS method to deposit phosphatidylcholine/nitroxyl labeled cholestane mixtures on quartz plates and have found that hydrated bilayers of these mixtures yield ESR spectra with essentially the same characteristics as those obtained using more conventional techniques. The distinct advantage of the new technique for depositing bilayers is that there is no spectral anomaly present which usually is present when the more conventional method of depositing bilayers is used. The spectral anomaly is apparently caused by a portion of the bilayers aligned in directions not directly parallel to the quartz surface. For precision work the spectral anomaly is unacceptable. It is not observed with the new PBS method which has yielded highly reproducible results. PMID:6263962

  12. Modification of ion transport in lipid bilayer membranes in the presence of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid. II. Suppression of tetraphenylborate conductance and changes of interfacial potentials.

    PubMed

    Smejtek, P; Paulis-Illangasekare, M

    1979-06-01

    It has been shown that the blocking of negatively charged tetraphenylborate ion transport in phosphatidylcholine (PC)-cholesterol membranes by the herbicide 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) is dominated by suppression of TPhB- diffusion across the membrane interior, rather than by the decrease of adsorption of TPhB- ions at the membrane surface. The blocking effect can be associated with the decrease of electric potential inside the membrane with respect to that of the aqueous medium, this decreases being proportional to the concentration of 2,4-D in the aqueous solution. It has been estimated that 25 - 30% of the total 2,4-D-induced change of the potential difference is between the plane of absorption of TPhB- and the aqueous solution, and the remaining fraction is between the membrane interior and the absorption plane. The results of this study support the dipolar hypothesis of 2,4-D action in lipid membranes. These conclusions are further supported by measurements changes of electric potential difference across air/water and air/lipid monolayer/water interfaces. It has been found that the electric potential of the nonpolar side of the interface decreases in the presence of neutral molecules of 2,4-D and that this effect becomes more prominent in presence of electrolyte. We have confirmed that PC-cholesterol monolayer cannot be considered as a model for half of the bilayer membrane because of the disagreement between the changes of the interfacial potential difference of PC-cholesterol monolayers and those determined from studied of transport of positive and negative ions across bilayer membranes. In contract, we have found close agreement between the 2,4-D-induced changes of electric potential of the lipid hydrocarbon region in glycerolmonooleate (GMO) membranes and GMO monolayers. We suggest that the action of 2,4-D in lipid membranes is not associated with the changes of orientation of dipoles of lipids constituting the membranes, but rather with a layer

  13. Charge ulse studies of transport phenomena in bilayer membranes. II. Detailed theory of steady-state behavior and application to valinomycin-mediated potassium transport.

    PubMed

    Feldberg, S W; Nakadomari, H

    1977-02-24

    The charge-pulse technique is applied to a study of valinomycin-mediated potassium transport across glycerol monooleate (GMO) bilayers. The theory, based on the Läuger-Stark model, is developed for the steady-state domain. The voltage dependences of the surface complexation reactions are also considered. The analysis of the data yields the folowing values for the rate constants: (see article). With the exception of this last ratio, all the values agree well with previously published data. The implication of the exponential term, 0.045, is that the plane of reaction for the surface complexation actually occurs a small distance within the membrane dielectric. If one presumes that the reaction plane is about half way between the plane of adsorbed complex and the membrane-water interface, one deduces that the complex "feels" only about 80% of the applied voltage across the membrane.

  14. General aspects of peptide selectivity towards lipid bilayers and cell membranes studied by variation of the structural parameters of amphipathic helical model peptides.

    PubMed

    Dathe, Margitta; Meyer, Jana; Beyermann, Michael; Maul, Björn; Hoischen, Christian; Bienert, Michael

    2002-02-01

    Model compounds of modified hydrophobicity (Eta), hydrophobic moment (mu) and angle subtended by charged residues (Phi) were synthesized to define the general roles of structural motifs of cationic helical peptides for membrane activity and selectivity. The peptide sets were based on a highly hydrophobic, non-selective KLA model peptide with high antimicrobial and hemolytic activity. Variation of the investigated parameters was found to be a suitable method for modifying peptide selectivity towards either neutral or highly negatively charged lipid bilayers. Eta and mu influenced selectivity preferentially via modification of activity on 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylcholine (POPC) bilayers, while the size of the polar/hydrophobic angle affected the activity against 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoylphosphatidyl-DL-glycerol (POPG). The influence of the parameters on the activity determining step was modest in both lipid systems and the activity profiles were the result of the parameters' influence on the second less pronounced permeabilization step. Thus, the activity towards POPC vesicles was determined by the high permeabilizing efficiency, however, changes in the structural parameters preferentially influenced the relatively moderate affinity. In contrast, intensive peptide accumulation via electrostatic interactions was sufficient for the destabilization of highly negatively charged POPG lipid membranes, but changes in the activity profile, as revealed by the modification of Phi, seem to be preferentially caused by variation of the low permeabilizing efficiency. The parameters proved very effective also in modifying antimicrobial and hemolytic activity. However, their influence on cell selectivity was limited. A threshold value of hydrophobicity seems to exist which restricted the activity modifying potential of mu and Phi on both lipid bilayers and cell membranes.

  15. Permeation of protons, potassium ions, and small polar molecules through phospholipid bilayers as a function of membrane thickness.

    PubMed Central

    Paula, S; Volkov, A G; Van Hoek, A N; Haines, T H; Deamer, D W

    1996-01-01

    Two mechanisms have been proposed to account for solute permeation of lipid bilayers. Partitioning into the hydrophobic phase of the bilayer, followed by diffusion, is accepted by many for the permeation of water and other small neutral solutes, but transient pores have also been proposed to account for both water and ionic solute permeation. These two mechanisms make distinctively different predictions about the permeability coefficient as a function of bilayer thickness. Whereas the solubility-diffusion mechanism predicts only a modest variation related to bilayer thickness, the pore model predicts an exponential relationship. To test these models, we measured the permeability of phospholipid bilayers to protons, potassium ions, water, urea, and glycerol. Bilayers were prepared as liposomes, and thickness was varied systematically by using unsaturated lipids with chain lengths ranging from 14 to 24 carbon atoms. The permeability coefficient of water and neutral polar solutes displayed a modest dependence on bilayer thickness, with an approximately linear fivefold decrease as the carbon number varied from 14 to 24 atoms. In contrast, the permeability to protons and potassium ions decreased sharply by two orders of magnitude between 14 and 18 carbon atoms, and leveled off, when the chain length was further extended to 24 carbon atoms. The results for water and the neutral permeating solutes are best explained by the solubility-diffusion mechanism. The results for protons and potassium ions in shorter-chain lipids are consistent with the transient pore model, but better fit the theoretical line predicted by the solubility-diffusion model at longer chain lengths. PMID:8770210

  16. Permeation of protons, potassium ions, and small polar molecules through phospholipid bilayers as a function of membrane thickness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paula, S.; Volkov, A. G.; Van Hoek, A. N.; Haines, T. H.; Deamer, D. W.

    1996-01-01

    Two mechanisms have been proposed to account for solute permeation of lipid bilayers. Partitioning into the hydrophobic phase of the bilayer, followed by diffusion, is accepted by many for the permeation of water and other small neutral solutes, but transient pores have also been proposed to account for both water and ionic solute permeation. These two mechanisms make distinctively different predictions about the permeability coefficient as a function of bilayer thickness. Whereas the solubility-diffusion mechanism predicts only a modest variation related to bilayer thickness, the pore model predicts an exponential relationship. To test these models, we measured the permeability of phospholipid bilayers to protons, potassium ions, water, urea, and glycerol. Bilayers were prepared as liposomes, and thickness was varied systematically by using unsaturated lipids with chain lengths ranging from 14 to 24 carbon atoms. The permeability coefficient of water and neutral polar solutes displayed a modest dependence on bilayer thickness, with an approximately linear fivefold decrease as the carbon number varied from 14 to 24 atoms. In contrast, the permeability to protons and potassium ions decreased sharply by two orders of magnitude between 14 and 18 carbon atoms, and leveled off, when the chain length was further extended to 24 carbon atoms. The results for water and the neutral permeating solutes are best explained by the solubility-diffusion mechanism. The results for protons and potassium ions in shorter-chain lipids are consistent with the transient pore model, but better fit the theoretical line predicted by the solubility-diffusion model at longer chain lengths.

  17. Self-formation of bilayer lipid membranes on agarose-coated silicon surfaces studied by simultaneous electrophysiological and surface infrared spectroscopic measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirano-Iwata, Ayumi; Oshima, Azusa; Onodera, Kota; Aoto, Kouji; Taira, Tasuku; Yamaguchi, Ryo-taro; Kimura, Yasuo; Niwano, Michio

    2009-06-01

    Self-formation process of bilayer lipid membranes (BLMs) cushioned on agarose-coated Si surfaces was in situ monitored by simultaneous electrophysiological and infrared absorption spectroscopic (IRAS) measurements using IRAS with the multiple internal reflection geometry. IRAS signals corresponding to self-thinning of lipid solution to form BLMs were demonstrated. It was found that the appearance of IRAS bands due to C=O modes of phosphstidylcholine is related to formation of BLMs with a gigaohm seal. The functionality of the present BLM system was also demonstrated by incorporating gramicidin into the BLMs and recording its channel activities.

  18. Aspirin inhibits formation of cholesterol rafts in fluid lipid membranes.

    PubMed

    Alsop, Richard J; Toppozini, Laura; Marquardt, Drew; Kučerka, Norbert; Harroun, Thad A; Rheinstädter, Maikel C

    2015-03-01

    Aspirin and other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs have a high affinity for phospholipid membranes, altering their structure and biophysical properties. Aspirin has been shown to partition into the lipid head groups, thereby increasing membrane fluidity. Cholesterol is another well known mediator of membrane fluidity, in turn increasing membrane stiffness. As well, cholesterol is believed to distribute unevenly within lipid membranes leading to the formation of lipid rafts or plaques. In many studies, aspirin has increased positive outcomes for patients with high cholesterol. We are interested if these effects may be, at least partially, the result of a non-specific interaction between aspirin and cholesterol in lipid membranes. We have studied the effect of aspirin on the organization of 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylcholine (DPPC) membranes containing cholesterol. Through Langmuir-Blodgett experiments we show that aspirin increases the area per lipid and decreases compressibility at 32.5 mol% cholesterol, leading to a significant increase of fluidity of the membranes. Differential scanning calorimetry provides evidence for the formation of meta-stable structures in the presence of aspirin. The molecular organization of lipids, cholesterol and aspirin was studied using neutron diffraction. While the formation of rafts has been reported in binary DPPC/cholesterol membranes, aspirin was found to locally disrupt membrane organization and lead to the frustration of raft formation. Our results suggest that aspirin is able to directly oppose the formation of cholesterol structures through non-specific interactions with lipid membranes.

  19. Solvent-free simulations of heterogeneous lipid bilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brannigan, Grace H.

    Two molecular implicit solvent models for fluid lipid bilayers are presented. The first represents lipids by rigid, asymmetric, soft spherocylinders. The three parameter potential between pairs of lipids gives rise to micelles, fluid bilayers, and gel-like bilayers. Fluid bilayers have compressibility moduli in agreement with experimental systems but display bending moduli at least three times larger than typical biological membranes without cholesterol. The second three parameter model represents lipids by flexible chains of beads; the hydrophobic effect is mimicked through a soft pair potential localized at the interface between hydrophobic and hydrophilic beads. Fluid bilayers composed of these molecules have both compressibility moduli and elastic moduli in agreement with experimental systems, as well as realistic interfacial tensions and stress profiles. Monte Carlo simulations are used to demonstrate self-assembly for both models. Phase behavior is studied for bilayers composed of the rigid model. Regions of solid, "hexatic", and fluid bilayer behavior are established by identification of phase boundaries. The main melting transition is found to be density driven; the melting temperature scales inversely with lipid length since thermal expansion increases with lipid aspect ratio. A plausible sub-transition is identified for longer molecules. The dependence of membrane elasticity on bilayer thickness is obtained by adjusting the length of the rigid molecules at constant temperature and surface tension. The bending modulus scales with the square of the membrane thickness, as expected, but the proportionality constant is an order of magnitude smaller than expected using continuum elastic theories or measured by experiments. The proportionality constant is found to be non-monotonic for bilayers composed of multiple lipid species; the thinnest membranes are not the most flexible. This is shown to be quantitatively consistent with the random quadratic mixing

  20. Nanoparticle-lipid bilayer interactions studied with lipid bilayer arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Bin; Smith, Tyler; Schmidt, Jacob J.

    2015-04-01

    The widespread environmental presence and commercial use of nanoparticles have raised significant health concerns as a result of many in vitro and in vivo assays indicating toxicity of a wide range of nanoparticle species. Many of these assays have identified the ability of nanoparticles to damage cell membranes. These interactions can be studied in detail using artificial lipid bilayers, which can provide insight into the nature of the particle-membrane interaction through variation of membrane and solution properties not possible with cell-based assays. However, the scope of these studies can be limited because of the low throughput characteristic of lipid bilayer platforms. We have recently described an easy to use, parallel lipid bilayer platform which we have used to electrically investigate the activity of 60 nm diameter amine and carboxyl modified polystyrene nanoparticles (NH2-NP and COOH-NP) with over 1000 lipid bilayers while varying lipid composition, bilayer charge, ionic strength, pH, voltage, serum, particle concentration, and particle charge. Our results confirm recent studies finding activity of NH2-NP but not COOH-NP. Detailed analysis shows that NH2-NP formed pores 0.3-2.3 nm in radius, dependent on bilayer and solution composition. These interactions appear to be electrostatic, as they are regulated by NH2-NP surface charge, solution ionic strength, and bilayer charge. The ability to rapidly measure a large number of nanoparticle and membrane parameters indicates strong potential of this bilayer array platform for additional nanoparticle bilayer studies.The widespread environmental presence and commercial use of nanoparticles have raised significant health concerns as a result of many in vitro and in vivo assays indicating toxicity of a wide range of nanoparticle species. Many of these assays have identified the ability of nanoparticles to damage cell membranes. These interactions can be studied in detail using artificial lipid bilayers, which

  1. Laser flash photolysis as a probe of redox protein-membrane interactions: Effect of binding of spinach plastocyanin and horse cytochrome c to lipid bilayer vesicles on the kinetics of reduction by flavin semiquinone

    SciTech Connect

    Senthilathipan, V.; Tollin, G. )

    1989-02-07

    Spinach plastocyanin binds to both electrically neutral and positively charged lipid bilayer vesicles whereas cytochrome c only binds electrostatically to negatively charged vesicles. Laser flash photolysis using lumiflavin semiquinone as a reductant demonstrates that the reactivity of plastocyanin is increased as much as 6-fold when it is membrane bound whereas the rate constant for cytochrome c reduction is decreased by approximately a factor of 3. Membrane-bound plastocyanin reduction occurs via a two-step mechanism, probably involving prior association of lumiflavin semiquinone with the bilayer. In contrast, cytochrome c reduction in the membrane-bound state follows simple second-order kinetics, implying that the redox site in the bound state is still accessible to lumiflavin semiquinone in solution, although the rate constant is decreased by approximately 3-fold. These results are interpreted as indicating that the bilayer-protein interaction with plastocyanin leads to a steric blockage of the electron-transfer site from the aqueous phase. Little or no hindrance of the redox site occurs with cytochrome c, suggesting a high degree of mobility of this protein on the bilayer surface. Although the increase in plastocyanin reactivity upon binding to the bilayer is quite interesting, its cause remains unclear and requires further study. The results illustrate the utility of laser flash photolysis as a probe of membrane-protein interactions.

  2. Probing Structural Dynamics and Topology of the KCNE1 Membrane Protein in Lipid Bilayers via Site-Directed Spin Labeling and Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Sahu, Indra D; Craig, Andrew F; Dunagan, Megan M; Troxel, Kaylee R; Zhang, Rongfu; Meiberg, Andrew G; Harmon, Corrinne N; McCarrick, Robert M; Kroncke, Brett M; Sanders, Charles R; Lorigan, Gary A

    2015-10-20

    KCNE1 is a single transmembrane protein that modulates the function of voltage-gated potassium channels, including KCNQ1. Hereditary mutations in the genes encoding either protein can result in diseases such as congenital deafness, long QT syndrome, ventricular tachyarrhythmia, syncope, and sudden cardiac death. Despite the biological significance of KCNE1, the structure and dynamic properties of its physiologically relevant native membrane-bound state are not fully understood. In this study, the structural dynamics and topology of KCNE1 in bilayered lipid vesicles was investigated using site-directed spin labeling (SDSL) and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. A 53-residue nitroxide EPR scan of the KCNE1 protein sequence including all 27 residues of the transmembrane domain (45-71) and 26 residues of the N- and C-termini of KCNE1 in lipid bilayered vesicles was analyzed in terms of nitroxide side-chain motion. Continuous wave-EPR spectral line shape analysis indicated the nitroxide spin label side-chains located in the KCNE1 TMD are less mobile when compared to the extracellular region of KCNE1. The EPR data also revealed that the C-terminus of KCNE1 is more mobile when compared to the N-terminus. EPR power saturation experiments were performed on 41 sites including 18 residues previously proposed to reside in the transmembrane domain (TMD) and 23 residues of the N- and C-termini to determine the topology of KCNE1 with respect to the 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC)/1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phospho-(1'-rac-glycerol) (POPG) lipid bilayers. The results indicated that the transmembrane domain is indeed buried within the membrane, spanning the width of the lipid bilayer. Power saturation data also revealed that the extracellular region of KCNE1 is solvent-exposed with some of the portions partially or weakly interacting with the membrane surface. These results are consistent with the previously published solution NMR

  3. Membrane water deaerator investigation. [fluid filter breadboard model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elam, J.; Ruder, J.; Strumpf, H.

    1974-01-01

    The purpose of the membrane water deaerator program was to develop data on a breadboard hollow fiber membrane unit that removes both dissolved and evolved gas from a water transfer system in order to: (1) assure a hard fill of the EVLSS expendable water tank; (2) prevent flow blockage by gas bubbles in circulating systems; and (3) prevent pump cavitation.

  4. Diffusion of ionizable solutes across planar lipid bilayer membranes: boundary-layer pH gradients and the effect of buffers.

    PubMed

    Xiang, T X; Anderson, B D

    1993-11-01

    The diffusion of weak acids or bases across planar lipid bilayer membranes results in aqueous boundary layer pH gradients. If not properly taken into account, such pH gradients will lead to errors in estimated membrane permeability coefficients, Pm. The role of the permeant concentration, the buffer capacity, and the physicochemical properties of both permeant and buffer on the magnitude and impact of such pH gradients have been explored. A theoretical model has been developed to describe the diffusion of both permeant and buffer species. Significant pH gradients develop depending on solution pH and the pKa's, concentrations, and Pm values of both permeant and buffer. The relative error in experimentally determined Pm values was calculated as the ratio, r, between apparent Pm values (obtained from flux measurements using an equation which neglected boundary layer pH gradients) and its true value. Simulated r values ranged from 1 (0% error) to < 0.01 (> 100% error) for weak acids, decreasing with decreasing buffer capacity and increasing solute flux. The buffer capacity required for an r > 0.95 was calculated versus pH for permeants varying in pKa and Pm. Membrane-permeable buffers significantly reduce boundary layer pH gradients through a feedback effect due to buffer cotransport. Apparent Pm values of p-hydroxymethyl benzoic acid across lecithin bilayer membranes at 25 degrees C were obtained as a function of permeant concentration in various buffers [glycolic, 2-(N-morpholino)ethane-sulfonic, and formic acids]. Predictions agreed closely with experimental fluxes. PMID:8290481

  5. Kinetics of the lamellar gel-fluid transition in phosphatidylcholine membranes in the presence of sugars

    SciTech Connect

    Lenné, Thomas; Garvey, Christopher J.; Koster, Karen L.; Bryant, Gary

    2014-09-24

    Phase diagrams are presented for dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) in the presence of sugars (sucrose) over a wide range of relative humidities (RHs). The phase information presented here, determined by small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), is shown to be consistent with previous results achieved by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Both techniques show a significant effect of sucrose concentration on the phase behaviour of this phospholipid bilayer. An experimental investigation into the effect of sugars on the kinetic behaviour of the gel to fluid transition is also presented showing that increasing the sugar content appears to slightly increase the rate at which the transition occurs.

  6. Kinetics of the lamellar gel-fluid transition in phosphatidylcholine membranes in the presence of sugars

    SciTech Connect

    Lenné, Thomas; Garvey, Christopher J; Koster, Karen L; Bryant, Gary

    2010-08-04

    Phase diagrams are presented for dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) in the presence of sugars (sucrose) over a wide range of relative humidities (RHs). The phase information presented here, determined by small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), is shown to be consistent with previous results achieved by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Both techniques show a significant effect of sucrose concentration on the phase behaviour of this phospholipid bilayer. An experimental investigation into the effect of sugars on the kinetic behaviour of the gel to fluid transition is also presented showing that increasing the sugar content appears to slightly increase the rate at which the transition occurs.

  7. Structure of single-supported DMPC lipid bilayer membranes as a function of hydration level studied by neutron reflectivity and Atomic Force Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miskowiec, A.; Schnase, P.; Bai, M.; Taub, H.; Hansen, F. Y.; Dubey, M.; Singh, S.; Majewski, J.

    2012-02-01

    We have recently been investigating the diffusion of water on single-supported DMPC lipid bilayer membranes at different levels of hydration, using high-resolution quasielastic neutron scattering (QNS). To aid in the interpretation of these QNS studies, we have conducted neutron reflectivity (NR) measurements on SPEAR at LANSCE to characterize the structure of similarly prepared samples. Protonated DMPC membranes were deposited onto SiO2-coated Si(100) substrates and characterized by Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) at different levels of hydration. We find reasonable agreement between the membrane thickness determined by NR and AFM at room temperature. We also find consistency between the scattering length density (SLD) profile in the vicinity of the upper leaflet of the supported DMPC membrane and that found in a molecular dynamics simulation of a freestanding membrane at 303 K. However, the fit to the reflectivity curve can be improved by modifying the SLD profile near the leaflet closest to the SiO2 surface.

  8. Transient Potential Gradients and Impedance Measures of Tethered Bilayer Lipid Membranes: Pore-Forming Peptide Insertion and the Effect of Electroporation

    PubMed Central

    Cranfield, Charles G.; Cornell, Bruce A.; Grage, Stephan L.; Duckworth, Paul; Carne, Sonia; Ulrich, Anne S.; Martinac, Boris

    2014-01-01

    In this work, we present experimental data, supported by a quantitative model, on the generation and effect of potential gradients across a tethered bilayer lipid membrane (tBLM) with, to the best of our knowledge, novel architecture. A challenge to generating potential gradients across tBLMs arises from the tethering coordination chemistry requiring an inert metal such as gold, resulting in any externally applied voltage source being capacitively coupled to the tBLM. This in turn causes any potential across the tBLM assembly to decay to zero in milliseconds to seconds, depending on the level of membrane conductance. Transient voltages applied to tBLMs by pulsed or ramped direct-current amperometry can, however, provide current-voltage (I/V) data that may be used to measure the voltage dependency of the membrane conductance. We show that potential gradients >∼150 mV induce membrane defects that permit the insertion of pore-forming peptides. Further, we report here the novel (to our knowledge) use of real-time modeling of conventional low-voltage alternating-current impedance spectroscopy to identify whether the conduction arising from the insertion of a polypeptide is uniform or heterogeneous on scales of nanometers to micrometers across the membrane. The utility of this tBLM architecture and these techniques is demonstrated by characterizing the resulting conduction properties of the antimicrobial peptide PGLa. PMID:24411250

  9. Corrugation of Phase-Separated Lipid Bilayers Supported by Nanoporous Silica Xerogel Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Goksu, E I; Nellis, B A; Lin, W; Satcher Jr., J H; Groves, J T; Risbud, S H; Longo, M L

    2008-10-30

    Lipid bilayers supported by substrates with nanometer-scale surface corrugations holds interest in understanding both nanoparticle-membrane interactions and the challenges of constructing models of cell membranes on surfaces with desirable properties, e.g. porosity. Here, we successfully form a two-phase (gel-fluid) lipid bilayer supported by nanoporous silica xerogel. Surface topology, diffusion, and lipid density in comparison to mica-supported lipid bilayers were characterized by AFM, FRAP, FCS, and quantitative fluorescence microscopy, respectively. We found that the two-phase lipid bilayer follows the xerogel surface contours. The corrugation imparted on the lipid bilayer results in a lipid density that is twice that on a flat mica surface. In direct agreement with the doubling of actual bilayer area in a projected area, we find that the lateral diffusion coefficient (D) of lipids on xerogel ({approx}1.7 {micro}m{sup 2}/s) is predictably lower than on mica ({approx}4.1 {micro}m{sup 2}/s) by both FRAP and FCS techniques. Furthermore, the gel-phase domains on xerogel compared to mica were larger and less numerous. Overall, our results suggest the presence of a relatively defect-free continuous two-phase bilayer that penetrates approximately midway into the first layer of {approx}50 nm xerogel beads.

  10. The Homeodomain Derived Peptide Penetratin Induces Curvature of Fluid Membrane Domains

    PubMed Central

    Lamazière, Antonin; Wolf, Claude; Lambert, Olivier; Chassaing, Gérard; Trugnan, Germain; Ayala-Sanmartin, Jesus

    2008-01-01

    Background Protein membrane transduction domains that are able to cross the plasma membrane are present in several transcription factors, such as the homeodomain proteins and the viral proteins such as Tat of HIV-1. Their discovery resulted in both new concepts on the cell communication during development, and the conception of cell penetrating peptide vectors for internalisation of active molecules into cells. A promising cell penetrating peptide is Penetratin, which crosses the cell membranes by a receptor and metabolic energy-independent mechanism. Recent works have claimed that Penetratin and similar peptides are internalized by endocytosis, but other endocytosis-independent mechanisms have been proposed. Endosomes or plasma membranes crossing mechanisms are not well understood. Previously, we have shown that basic peptides induce membrane invaginations suggesting a new mechanism for uptake, “physical endocytosis”. Methodology/Principal Findings Herein, we investigate the role of membrane lipid phases on Penetratin induced membrane deformations (liquid ordered such as in “raft” microdomains versus disordered fluid “non-raft” domains) in membrane models. Experimental data show that zwitterionic lipid headgroups take part in the interaction with Penetratin suggesting that the external leaflet lipids of cells plasma membrane are competent for peptide interaction in the absence of net negative charges. NMR and X-ray diffraction data show that the membrane perturbations (tubulation and vesiculation) are associated with an increase in membrane negative curvature. These effects on curvature were observed in the liquid disordered but not in the liquid ordered (raft-like) membrane domains. Conclusions/Significance The better understanding of the internalisation mechanisms of protein transduction domains will help both the understanding of the mechanisms of cell communication and the development of potential therapeutic molecular vectors. Here we showed that

  11. Lipid bilayer vesicle generation using microfluidic jetting.

    PubMed

    Coyne, Christopher W; Patel, Karan; Heureaux, Johanna; Stachowiak, Jeanne; Fletcher, Daniel A; Liu, Allen P

    2014-01-01

    Bottom-up synthetic biology presents a novel approach for investigating and reconstituting biochemical systems and, potentially, minimal organisms. This emerging field engages engineers, chemists, biologists, and physicists to design and assemble basic biological components into complex, functioning systems from the bottom up. Such bottom-up systems could lead to the development of artificial cells for fundamental biological inquiries and innovative therapies(1,2). Giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs) can serve as a model platform for synthetic biology due to their cell-like membrane structure and size. Microfluidic jetting, or microjetting, is a technique that allows for the generation of GUVs with controlled size, membrane composition, transmembrane protein incorporation, and encapsulation(3). The basic principle of this method is the use of multiple, high-frequency fluid pulses generated by a piezo-actuated inkjet device to deform a suspended lipid bilayer into a GUV. The process is akin to blowing soap bubbles from a soap film. By varying the composition of the jetted solution, the composition of the encompassing solution, and/or the components included in the bilayer, researchers can apply this technique to create customized vesicles. This paper describes the procedure to generate simple vesicles from a droplet interface bilayer by microjetting. PMID:24637415

  12. Lipid Bilayer Vesicle Generation Using Microfluidic Jetting

    PubMed Central

    Coyne, Christopher W.; Patel, Karan; Heureaux, Johanna; Stachowiak, Jeanne; Fletcher, Daniel A.; Liu, Allen P.

    2014-01-01

    Bottom-up synthetic biology presents a novel approach for investigating and reconstituting biochemical systems and, potentially, minimal organisms. This emerging field engages engineers, chemists, biologists, and physicists to design and assemble basic biological components into complex, functioning systems from the bottom up. Such bottom-up systems could lead to the development of artificial cells for fundamental biological inquiries and innovative therapies1,2. Giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs) can serve as a model platform for synthetic biology due to their cell-like membrane structure and size. Microfluidic jetting, or microjetting, is a technique that allows for the generation of GUVs with controlled size, membrane composition, transmembrane protein incorporation, and encapsulation3. The basic principle of this method is the use of multiple, high-frequency fluid pulses generated by a piezo-actuated inkjet device to deform a suspended lipid bilayer into a GUV. The process is akin to blowing soap bubbles from a soap film. By varying the composition of the jetted solution, the composition of the encompassing solution, and/or the components included in the bilayer, researchers can apply this technique to create customized vesicles. This paper describes the procedure to generate simple vesicles from a droplet interface bilayer by microjetting. PMID:24637415

  13. Lipid bilayer vesicle generation using microfluidic jetting.

    PubMed

    Coyne, Christopher W; Patel, Karan; Heureaux, Johanna; Stachowiak, Jeanne; Fletcher, Daniel A; Liu, Allen P

    2014-02-21

    Bottom-up synthetic biology presents a novel approach for investigating and reconstituting biochemical systems and, potentially, minimal organisms. This emerging field engages engineers, chemists, biologists, and physicists to design and assemble basic biological components into complex, functioning systems from the bottom up. Such bottom-up systems could lead to the development of artificial cells for fundamental biological inquiries and innovative therapies(1,2). Giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs) can serve as a model platform for synthetic biology due to their cell-like membrane structure and size. Microfluidic jetting, or microjetting, is a technique that allows for the generation of GUVs with controlled size, membrane composition, transmembrane protein incorporation, and encapsulation(3). The basic principle of this method is the use of multiple, high-frequency fluid pulses generated by a piezo-actuated inkjet device to deform a suspended lipid bilayer into a GUV. The process is akin to blowing soap bubbles from a soap film. By varying the composition of the jetted solution, the composition of the encompassing solution, and/or the components included in the bilayer, researchers can apply this technique to create customized vesicles. This paper describes the procedure to generate simple vesicles from a droplet interface bilayer by microjetting.

  14. Studies of Phase Transitions and Critical Phenomena: I. Origin of Broken Particle-Hole Symmetry in Critical Fluids. I. Phase Transitions of Interacting Membranes.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldstein, Raymond Ethan

    The longstanding problem of the precise correspondence between critical phenomena in fluids and ferromagnets is resolved in Part I through a synthesis of mean field theory, exact results for lattice models, field-theoretic techniques, and by extensive quantitative comparison with experiment. Emphasis is placed on the origin of broken particle-hole symmetry in fluids as reflected in the form of the critical point scaling fields and in systematic variations in certain nonuniversal critical amplitudes with molecular polarizability. Those trends and the degree to which the scaling axes are linearly mixed versions of the bare "thermal" and "magnetic" fields in particle-hole symmetric systems are shown both for lattice models and real fluids to be intimately related to the presence of many-body interactions of the Axilrod-Teller type. A quantitatively accurate microscopic expression for the field-mixing operator of fluids is derived on the basis of an exact Hubbard-Stratonovich transformation relating the fluid Hamiltonian to that of a Landau-Ginzburg-Wilson model. A phenomenological theory of the phase behavior of multilamellar liquid crystals of hydrated phospholipid bilayers is developed in Part II, and its predictions tested by extensive comparison with experiment. A Ginzburg-Landau free energy functional based on the elastic properties of two coupled monolayers is proposed to describe intrabilayer ordering, and the phenomenon of structural phase transitions driven by membrane interactions is described by incorporating in addition the attractive dispersion interactions and repulsive "hydration" forces acting between membranes. The theory indicates and experiments support a connection between the pseudocriticality of the bilayer transitions and the large susceptibility of the in-plane order to membrane interactions. The pseudocriticality in turn is suggested to arise from the analog of a capillary critical point accessible by finite-size effects. Theoretical phase

  15. Ultrafast molecular dynamics of biofuel extraction for microalgae and bacteria milking: blocking membrane folding pathways to damaged lipid-bilayer conformations with nanomicelles.

    PubMed

    Gillet, Jean-Numa

    2015-01-01

    Cell milking is a 100% renewable green energy for CO2 by extraction of biofuels inside the cytosol of photosynthetic micro-organisms as microalgae and bacteria. The cells are exposed to a hydrophobic solvent forming holes and cracks through their membranes from which the biofuels can leak out. In protein folding, the goal would be to find pathways to the unique functional protein conformer. However, in the lipid-bilayer interaction with the solvent for milking, the objective is to block the pathways for damaged membrane conformations of low free energy with undesired nanostructures, using the solvent properties, as shown with an ab initio structural bioinformatic model. Statistical thermodynamics is used to compute the free energy (including entropy) from the molecular dynamics trajectory of the biomolecular system with many conformational changes. This model can be extended to the general problem of biomolecules folding as for proteins and nucleic acids. Using an adaptation of the Einstein diffusion law, the conformational change dynamics of the lipid bilayer depends on the two diffusion coefficients of the solvent: D1 before the irreversible folding transition time and the much smaller D2 thereafter. In contrast to the n-hexane and n-heptane hydrocarbons of smaller size, the residual D2=4.7 × 10(-7)cm(2)/s of the n-decane solvent, with the highest partition coefficient among the three extractors, is the only to present a D2 value that is significantly below the critical threshold of 10(-6)cm(2)/s. Therefore, the membrane would resist to long hydrocarbons and the exposed cells would remain viable for milking.

  16. Tension induced phase transitions in biomimetic fluid membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shapiro, Marc; Vlahovska, Petia

    2012-11-01

    Membranes in eukaryotic cells are mixtures of hundreds of lipid species. The lipid diversity enables membranes to phase separate and form domains, called rafts, which play a critical role in cell functions such as signaling and trafficking. The phase transitions underlying raft formation have been extensively studied as a function of temperature and composition. However, the third dimension of the phase diagram, i.e., the tension (2D pressure), is still unexplored because membrane tension is difficult to control and quantify. To overcome this challenge, we develop two approaches, capillary micromechanics and electrodeformation, in which the tension is regulated by the area dilation accompanying deformation of a vesicle (a closed membrane). The first technique consists of forcing an initially quasi-spherical vesicle through a tapered glass microcapillary, while the second method utilizes uniform electric fields to deform the vesicle into an ellipsoid. Domains are visualized using a fluorescent dye, which preferentially partitions in one of the phases. The experimental results suggest that the miscibility temperature (at which domains form in an initially homogeneous membrane) increases with applied tension. Domain motions and coarsening are also investigated.

  17. Measurement of membrane binding between recoverin, a calcium-myristoyl switch protein, and lipid bilayers by AFM-based force spectroscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Desmeules, Philippe; Grandbois, Michel; Bondarenko, Vladimir A; Yamazaki, Akio; Salesse, Christian

    2002-01-01

    Myristoyl switch is a feature of several peripheral membrane proteins involved in signal transduction pathways. This unique molecular property is best illustrated by the "Ca(2+)-myristoyl switch" of recoverin, which is a Ca(2+)-binding protein present in retinal rod cells of vertebrates. In this transduction pathway, the Ca(2+)-myristoyl switch acts as a calcium sensor involved in cell recovery from photoactivation. Ca(2+) binding by recoverin induces the extrusion of its myristoyl group to the solvent, which leads to its translocation from cytosol to rod disk membranes. Force spectroscopy, based on atomic force microscope (AFM) technology, was used to determine the extent of membrane binding of recoverin in the absence and presence of calcium, and to quantify this force of binding. An adhesion force of 48 +/- 5 pN was measured between recoverin and supported phospholipid bilayers in the presence of Ca(2+). However, no binding was observed in the absence of Ca(2+). Experiments with nonmyristoylated recoverin confirmed these observations. Our results are consistent with previously measured extraction forces of lipids from membranes. PMID:12023256

  18. Flexible charged macromolecules on mixed fluid lipid membranes: theory and Monte Carlo simulations.

    PubMed

    Tzlil, Shelly; Ben-Shaul, Avinoam

    2005-11-01

    Fluid membranes containing charged lipids enhance binding of oppositely charged proteins by mobilizing these lipids into the interaction zone, overcoming the concomitant entropic losses due to lipid segregation and lower conformational freedom upon macromolecule adsorption. We study this energetic-entropic interplay using Monte Carlo simulations and theory. Our model system consists of a flexible cationic polyelectrolyte, interacting, via Debye-Hückel and short-ranged repulsive potentials, with membranes containing neutral lipids, 1% tetravalent, and 10% (or 1%) monovalent anionic lipids. Adsorption onto a fluid membrane is invariably stronger than to an equally charged frozen or uniform membrane. Although monovalent lipids may suffice for binding rigid macromolecules, polyvalent counter-lipids (e.g., phosphatidylinositol 4,5 bisphosphate), whose entropy loss upon localization is negligible, are crucial for binding flexible macromolecules, which lose conformational entropy upon adsorption. Extending Rosenbluth's Monte Carlo scheme we directly simulate polymer adsorption on fluid membranes. Yet, we argue that similar information could be derived from a biased superposition of quenched membrane simulations. Using a simple cell model we account for surface concentration effects, and show that the average adsorption probabilities on annealed and quenched membranes coincide at vanishing surface concentrations. We discuss the relevance of our model to the electrostatic-switch mechanism of, e.g., the myristoylated alanine-rich C kinase substrate protein.

  19. Ion transport mediated by the valinomycin analogue cyclo(L-Lac-L-Val-D- Pro-D-Val)3 in lipid bilayer membranes

    PubMed Central

    1981-01-01

    Cyclo(L-Lac-L-Val-D-Pro-D-Val)3 (PV-Lac) a structural analogue of the ion-carrier valinomycin, increases the cation permeability of lipid bilayer membranes by forming a 1:1 ion-carrier complex. The selectively sequence for PV-Lac is identical to that of valinomycin; i.e., Rb+ greater than K+ greater than Cs+ greater than or equal to NH+4 greater than Na+ greater than Li+. The steady-state zero-voltage conductance, G(0), is a saturating function of KCl concentration. A similar behavior was found for Rb+, Cs+, and NH+4. However, the ion concentration at which G(0) reaches a plateau strongly depends on membrane composition. The current-voltage curves present saturating characteristics, except at low ion concentrations of Rb+, K+, or Cs+. The ion concentration at which the saturating characteristics appear depends on membrane composition. These and other results presented in this paper agree with a model that assumes complexation between carrier and ion at the membrane-water interface. Current relaxation after voltage-jump studies were also performed for PV-Lac. Both the time constant and the amplitude of the current after a voltage jump strongly depend on ion concentration and membrane composition. These results, together with the stationary conductance data, were used to evaluate the rate constants of the PV-Lac-mediated K+ transport. In glycerolmonooleate they are: association rate constant, 2 x 10(6) M-1 s-1; dissociation rate constant, 4 x 10(5) s-1; translocation rate constant for complex, 5 x 10(4) s-1; and the rate of translocation of the free carrier (ks), 55 s-1. ks is much smaller for PV-Lac than for valinomycin and thus limits the efficiency with which the carrier is able to translocate cations across the membrane. PMID:7241088

  20. Air-stable droplet interface bilayers on oil-infused surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Boreyko, Jonathan B.; Polizos, Georgios; Datskos, Panos G.; Sarles, Stephen A.; Collier, C. Patrick

    2014-01-01

    Droplet interface bilayers are versatile model membranes useful for synthetic biology and biosensing; however, to date they have always been confined to fluid reservoirs. Here, we demonstrate that when two or more water droplets collide on an oil-infused substrate, they exhibit noncoalescence due to the formation of a thin oil film that gets squeezed between the droplets from the bottom up. We show that when phospholipids are included in the water droplets, a stable droplet interface bilayer forms between the noncoalescing water droplets. As with traditional oil-submerged droplet interface bilayers, we were able to characterize ion channel transport by incorporating peptides into each droplet. Our findings reveal that droplet interface bilayers can function in ambient environments, which could potentially enable biosensing of airborne matter. PMID:24821774

  1. Studies of the structure and organization of cationic lipid bilayer membranes: calorimetric, spectroscopic, and x-ray diffraction studies of linear saturated P-O-ethyl phosphatidylcholines.

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, R N; Winter, I; Kriechbaum, M; Lohner, K; McElhaney, R N

    2001-01-01

    Differential scanning calorimetry, x-ray diffraction, and infrared and (31)P-nuclear magnetic resonance ((31)P-NMR) spectroscopy were used to examine the thermotropic phase behavior and organization of cationic model membranes composed of the P-O-ethyl esters of a homologous series of n-saturated 1,2-diacyl phosphatidylcholines (Et-PCs). Differential scanning calorimetry studies indicate that on heating, these lipids exhibit single highly energetic and cooperative endothermic transitions whose temperatures and enthalpies are higher than those of the corresponding phosphatidylcholines (PCs). Upon cooling, these Et-PCs exhibit two exothermic transitions at temperatures slightly below the single endotherm observed upon heating. These cooling exotherms have both been assigned to transitions between the liquid-crystalline and gel phases of these lipids by x-ray diffraction. The x-ray diffraction data also show that unlike the parent PCs, the chain-melting phase transition of these Et-PCs involves a direct transformation of a chain-interdigitated gel phase to the lamellar liquid-crystalline phase for the homologous series of n > or = 14. Our (31)P-NMR spectroscopic studies indicate that the rates of phosphate headgroup reorientation in both gel and liquid-crystalline phases of these lipids are comparable to those of the corresponding PC bilayers. However, the shape of the (31)P-NMR spectra observed in the interdigitated gel phase indicates that phosphate headgroup reorientation is subject to constraints that are not encountered in the non-interdigitated gel phases of parent PCs. The infrared spectroscopic data indicate that the Et-PCs adopt a very compact form of hydrocarbon chain packing in the interdigitated gel phase and that the polar/apolar interfacial regions of these bilayers are less hydrated than those of corresponding PC bilayers in both the gel and liquid-crystalline phases. Our results indicate that esterification of PC phosphate headgroups results in many

  2. Solution Asymmetry and Salt Expand Fluid-Fluid Coexistence Regions of Charged Membranes.

    PubMed

    Kubsch, Bastian; Robinson, Tom; Lipowsky, Reinhard; Dimova, Rumiana

    2016-06-21

    Liquid-liquid phase separation in giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs) leads to the formation of intramembrane domains. To mimic charged biological membranes, we studied phase separation and domain formation in GUVs of ternary lipid mixtures composed of egg sphingomyelin, cholesterol, and the negatively charged lipid dioleoylphosphatidylglycerol. The GUVs were exposed to solutions of sucrose and high-saline buffer. The phase diagram was determined using epifluorescence microscopy for vesicle populations with symmetric and asymmetric solution compositions across the membranes. Trans-membrane solution asymmetry was found to affect the membrane phase state. Furthermore, compared to the case of salt-free conditions, the phase diagram in the presence of high-saline buffer (both symmetrically or asymmetrically present across the membrane) was found to exhibit a significantly extended region of liquid-ordered and liquid-disordered coexistence. These observations were confirmed on single GUVs using microfluidics and confocal microscopy. Moreover, we found that the miscibility temperatures markedly increased for vesicles in the presence of symmetric and asymmetric salt solutions. Our results demonstrate a substantial effect of salt and solution asymmetry on the phase behavior of charged membranes, which has direct implications for protein adsorption onto these membranes and for the repartitioning of proteins within the membrane domains. PMID:27288275

  3. LIPID RAFTS, FLUID/FLUID PHASE SEPARATION, AND THEIR RELEVANCE TO PLASMA MEMBRANE STRUCTURE AND FUNCTION

    PubMed Central

    Sengupta, Prabuddha; Baird, Barbara; Holowka, David

    2007-01-01

    Novel biophysical approaches combined with modeling and new biochemical data have helped to recharge the lipid raft field and have contributed to the generation of a refined model of plasma membrane organization. In this review, we summarize new information in the context of previous literature to provide new insights into the spatial organization and dynamics of lipids and proteins in the plasma membrane of live cells. Recent findings of large-scale separation of liquid-ordered and liquid-disordered phases in plasma membrane vesicles demonstrate this capacity within the complex milieu of plasma membrane proteins and lipids. Roles for membrane heterogeneity and reorganization in immune cell activation are discussed in light of this new information. PMID:17764993

  4. Open channel current noise analysis of S6 peptides from KvAP channel on bilayer lipid membrane shows bimodal power law scaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shrivastava, Rajan; Malik, Chetan; Ghosh, Subhendu

    2016-06-01

    Open channel current noise in synthetic peptide S6 of KvAP channel was investigated in a voltage clamp experiment on bilayer lipid membrane (BLM). It was observed that the power spectral density (PSD) of the component frequencies follows power law with different slopes in different frequency ranges. In order to know the origin of the slopes PSD analysis was done with signal filtering. It was found that the first slope in the noise profile follows 1 / f pattern which exists at lower frequencies and has high amplitude current noise, while the second slope corresponds to 1 /f 2 - 3 pattern which exists at higher frequencies with low amplitude current noise. In addition, white noise was observed at very large frequencies. It was concluded that the plausible reason for the multiple power-law scaling is the existence of different modes of non-equilibrium ion transport through the S6 channel.

  5. Molecular-dynamics simulation of amphiphilic bilayer membranes and wormlike micelles: a multi-scale modelling approach to the design of viscoelastic surfactant solutions.

    PubMed

    Boek, E S; Den Otter, W K; Briels, W J; Iakovlev, D

    2004-08-15

    Bilayer membranes and wormlike micelles have been studied using molecular-dynamics simulations. The structure of the worm is analysed in terms of radial density distribution functions, and mechanical properties such as the elastic modulus are calculated. From an analysis of the fluctuation spectra of the tensionless states, we have calculated bending rigidities. Micelles consisting of coarse-grained (CG) model surfactants are studied in order to map the properties of the atomistic micelle. We optimize the CG model with respect to the structure factor of the atomistic micelle. The mechanical properties thus obtained will be used as input for a mesoscopic model of wormlike micelles where the persistence length is the smallest length-scale.

  6. Membrane lysis by the antibacterial peptides cecropins B1 and B3: A spin-label electron spin resonance study on phospholipid bilayers.

    PubMed Central

    Hung, S C; Wang, W; Chan, S I; Chen, H M

    1999-01-01

    Custom antibacterial peptides, cecropins B1 (CB1) and B3 (CB3), were synthesized. These peptides have particular sequence characteristics, with CB1 having two amphipathic alpha-helical segments and CB3 having two hydrophobic alpha-helical segments. These differences were exploited for a study of their efficacy in breaking up liposomes, which had different combinations of phosphatidic acid (PA) and phosphatidylcholine (PC), and a study of their lipid binding ability. Binding and nonbinding lysis actions of CB1 and CB3 on liposomes were examined further by electron spin resonance (ESR). The spin-labeled lipids 5'SL-PC, 7'SL-PC, 10'SL-PC, 12'SL-PC, and 16'SL-PC were used as probes. The ESR spectra revealed larger outer hyperfine splittings (2A(max)) for CB1 when the interactions of CB1 and CB3 with liposomes were compared. These observations indicate a larger restriction of the motion of the spin-labeled chains in the presence of CB1. Plots of the effective order parameter at the various probe positions (chain flexibility gradient) versus the peptide-lipid ratio further suggested that the lysis action of CB1 is related to its capacity to bind to the lipid bilayers. In contrast, there is no evidence of binding for CB3. To augment these findings, four spin-labeled peptides, C8SL-CB1, C32SL-CB1, C5SL-CB3, and C30SL-CB3, were also examined for their binding to and their state of aggregation within the lipid bilayers. Association isotherms of the peptides were measured for liposomes containing two molar fractions of PA (0.25 and 0.75). The membrane binding of the CB1 peptides exhibited a cooperative behavior, whereas the association isotherm of CB3 revealed binding to the lipid only for beta = 0.75 liposomes. To further identify the location of CB1 in the lipid bilayers, measurements of the collision rate with chromium oxalate in solution were conducted. Results from ESR power saturation measurements suggested that the NH(2)-terminal alpha-helix of CB1 is located on the

  7. Molecular simulation of pressure-driven fluid flow in nanoporous membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takaba, Hiromitsu; Onumata, Yasushi; Nakao, Shin-ichi

    2007-08-01

    An extended nonequilibrium molecular dynamics technique has been developed to investigate the transport properties of pressure-driven fluid flow in thin nanoporous membranes. Our simulation technique allows the simulation of the pressure-driven permeation of liquids through membranes while keeping a constant driving pressure using fluctuating walls. The flow of argon in the liquid state was simulated on applying an external pressure difference of 2.4×106Pa through the slitlike and cylindrical pores. The volume flux and velocity distribution in the membrane pores were examined as a function of pore size, along with the interaction with the pore walls, and these were compared with values estimated using the Hagen-Poiseuille flow. The calculated velocity strongly depends on the strength of the interaction between the fluid and the atoms in the wall when the pore size is approximately <20σ. The calculated volume flux also shows a dependence on the interaction between the fluid and the atoms in the wall. The Hagen-Poiseuille law overestimates or underestimates the flux depending on the interaction. From the analysis of calculated results, a good linear correlation between the density of the fluid in the membrane pores and the deviation of the flux estimated from the Hagen-Poiseuille flow was found. This suggests that the flux deviation in nanopore from the Hagen-Poiseuille flow can be predicted based on the fluid density in the pores.

  8. Polyurethane membrane/knitted mesh-reinforced collagen-chitosan bilayer dermal substitute for the repair of full-thickness skin defects via a two-step procedure.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xingang; Wu, Pan; Hu, Xiuyuan; You, Chuangang; Guo, Rui; Shi, Haifei; Guo, Songxue; Zhou, Hanlei; Yu, Chaoheng; Zhang, Yuanhai; Han, Chunmao

    2016-03-01

    The advent of dermal substitutes provides a revolutionary strategy for the repair and reconstruction of deep skin defects. Dermal substitutes form a regenerative template that provides the porous structure and mechanical support necessary to guide cell migration, deposition of the extracellular matrix (ECM) and angiogenesis. Commercially available dermal substitutes, particularly collagen-based dermal scaffolds, are widely used in clinical practice. However, the poor mechanical properties of collagen-based dermal scaffolds compromise their biological effects, as well as the repair outcomes. Here, we describe a bilayer dermal substitute prepared by integrating a hybrid dermal scaffold with a polyurethane (PU) membrane to obtain a PU membrane/knitted mesh-reinforced collagen-chitosan bilayer dermal substitute (PU-PLGAm/CCS). The morphology of PU-PLGAm/CCS was investigated and, to characterize the effects of PU-PLGAm/CCS on tissue regeneration, dermal substitutes were transplanted to repair full-thickness skin wounds in Sprague-Dawley rats using a two-step surgical procedure. These results were then compared with those obtained using the PELNAC™ Artificial Dermis. In the weeks after the first operation, wound changes were analysed based on macroscopic observations, and tissue specimens were harvested for histology, immunohistochemistry, immunofluorescence real-time quantitative PCR, and Western blotting analysis. Following the second operation (i.e., transplantation of split-thickness skin grafts), the repair outcomes were investigated based on the mechanical strength and ECM expression. PU-PLGAm/CCS significantly inhibited wound contracture, promoted angiogenesis, and facilitated the ordered arrangement of neotissue, such that the repair outcomes were improved in the PU-PLGAm/CCS group compared with the PELNAC™ group. In conclusion, the favourable microstructure and structural stability of dermal substitutes facilitated tissue regeneration. PU-PLGAm/CCS achieved

  9. Autofocus fluid lens device construction and implementation of modified ionic polymer metal composite (IPMC) membrane actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiefer, Rudolf; Kiveste, Harti; Punning, Andres; Kesküla, Arko; Lulla, Tõnis; Aabloo, Alvo

    2014-03-01

    The autofocus fluid lens device, as developed by Philips, is based on water/oil interfaces forming a spherical lens where the meniscus of the liquid can be switched by applying a high voltage to change from a convex to a concave divergent lens. In this work we construct a device to evaluate the performance of membrane actuators based on electro active polymers, in a design applicable for autofocus fluid lens applications. The membrane with a hole in the middle separates the oil phase from the electrolyte phase, forming a meniscus in the middle of the membrane between the oil and electrolyte. If the membrane actuator shows a certain force and displacement, the meniscus between oil and electrolyte changes form between concave and convex, applicable as a fluid lens. Ionic polymer metal composites (IPMCs) are applied in this work to investigate how the performance of the membrane actuator takes place in Milli-Q, certain electrolytes and in combination with an electrochemically deposited conducting polymer. The goal of this work is to investigate the extent of membrane displacement of IPMC actuators operating at a low voltage (+/-0.7 V), and the back relaxation phenomena of IPMC actuators.

  10. Lipid Bilayer Vesicle Dynamics in AC Electric Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McConnell, Lane; Vlahovska, Petia; Miksis, Michael

    2014-11-01

    Vesicles are closed, fluid-filled lipid bilayers which are mechanically similar to biological cells and which undergo shape transitions in the presence of electric fields. Here we model the vesicle membrane as an infinitely thin, capacitive, area-incompressible interface with the surrounding fluids acting as charge-advecting leaky dielectrics. We then implement the boundary integral method to numerically investigate the dynamics of a vesicle in various AC electric field profiles. Our numerical results are then compared with recent small deformation theory and experimental data. We also note our observation of a new theoretical vesicle behavior that has yet to be observed experimentally.

  11. The interaction of N-oleylethanolamine with phospholipid bilayers.

    PubMed

    Epps, D E; Cardin, A D

    1987-10-16

    Long chain acylamides of ethanolamine were previously found to increase in the infarcted canine myocardium. Subsequent in vitro experiments established a number of interesting biological and physiological properties of these compounds including alteration of rabbit skeletal sarcoplasmic reticulum function and inhibition of permeability dependent calcium release from heart mitochondria. These results suggested an interaction between the N-acylethanolamines and biological membranes. In the present work we show that the most potent species in previous studies, N-oleylethanolamine, forms stable complexes with phospholipid vesicles, lowers diphenylhexatriene polarization ratios in dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine and dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine uni- and multilamellar bilayer vesicles, and also produces a concentration dependent decrease in the phase transitions of these lipid structures. In addition studies with parinaric acids also suggested that N-oleylethanolamine partitions preferentially into more fluid areas of the bilayer. The results are discussed in terms of possible effects on biological membranes.

  12. Structural characterization of the voltage sensor domain and voltage-gated K+- channel proteins vectorially-oriented within a single bilayer membrane at the solid/vapor and solid/liquid interfaces via neutron interferometry

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, S.; Dura, J.A.; Freites, J.A.; Tobias, D.J.; Blasie, J. K.

    2012-01-01

    The voltage-sensor domain (VSD) is a modular 4-helix bundle component that confers voltage sensitivity to voltage-gated cation channels in biological membranes. Despite extensive biophysical studies and the recent availability of x-ray crystal structures for a few voltage-gated potassium (Kv-) channels and a voltage-gate sodium (Nav-) channel, a complete understanding of the cooperative mechanism of electromechanical coupling, interconverting the closed-to-open states (i.e. non-conducting to cation conducting) remains undetermined. Moreover, the function of these domains is highly dependent on the physical-chemical properties of the surrounding lipid membrane environment. The basis for this work was provided by a recent structural study of the VSD from a prokaryotic Kv-channel vectorially-oriented within a single phospholipid (POPC; 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine) membrane investigated by x-ray interferometry at the solid/moist He (or solid/vapor) and solid/liquid interfaces thus achieving partial to full hydration, respectively (Gupta et. al. Phys. Rev E. 2011, 84). Here, we utilize neutron interferometry to characterize this system in substantially greater structural detail at the sub-molecular level, due to its inherent advantages arising from solvent contrast variation coupled with the deuteration of selected sub-molecular membrane components, especially important for the membrane at the solid/liquid interface. We demonstrate the unique vectorial orientation of the VSD and the retention of its molecular conformation manifest in the asymmetric profile structure of the protein within the profile structure of this single bilayer membrane system. We definitively characterize the asymmetric phospholipid bilayer solvating the lateral surfaces of the VSD protein within the membrane. The profile structures of both the VSD protein and phospholipid bilayer depend upon the hydration state of the membrane. We also determine the distribution of water and

  13. Quantifying the Diffusion of a Fluid through Membranes by RemoteDetection MRI

    SciTech Connect

    Telkki, Ville-Veikko; Hilty, Christian; Garcia, Sandra; Harel,Elad; Pines, Alexander

    2006-10-24

    We present a method to measure self-diffusion acrossmembranes without the need for concentration or pressure gradients.Hyperpolarized xenon in combination with remote detection of NMR allowsthe measurement of membrane permeation, even in the gas phase. Theresulting images allow quantification of the amount of fluid diffusedthrough the membrane, and represent an alternative, potentially moreprecise way of measuring a membrane diffusion coefficient. The use ofremote detection of NMR allows for non-invasive signal encoding coupledto sensitive detection, making this approach ideal for the study ofdiffusion in intact devices such as fuel cells or separationsystems.

  14. Biomineralization studies on cellulose membrane exposed to biological fluids of Anodonta cygnea.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Anabela; Lopes-Lima, Manuel; Ferreira, Jorge; Araújo, Sandra; Hinzmann, Mariana; Oliveira, José; Rocha, António; Domingues, Bernardo; Bobos, Iulius; Machado, Jorge

    2014-06-01

    The present work proposes to analyse the results obtained under in vitro conditions where cellulose artificial membranes were incubated with biological fluids from the freshwater bivalve Anodonta cygnea. The membranes were mounted between two half 'Ussing chambers' with different composition solutions in order to simulate epithelial surfaces separating organic fluid compartments. The membrane surfaces were submitted to two synthetic calcium and phosphate solutions on opposite sides, at pH 6.0, 7.0 or 9.0 during a period of 6 hours. Additional assays were accomplished mixing these solutions with haemolymph or extrapallial fluid from A. cygnea, only on the calcium side. A selective ion movement, mainly dependent on the membrane pore size and/or cationic affinity, occurred with higher permeability for calcium ions to the opposite phosphate chamber supported by calcium diffusion forces across the cellulose membrane. In general, this promoted a more intense mineral precipitation on the phosphate membrane surface. A strong deposition of calcium phosphate mineral was observed at pH 9.0 as a primary layer with a homogeneous microstructure, being totally absent at pH 6.0. The membrane showed an additional crystal phase at pH 7.0 exhibiting a very particular hexagonal or cuttlebone shape, mainly on the phosphate surface. When organic fluids of A. cygnea were included, these crystal forms presented a high tendency to aggregate under rosaceous shapes, also predominantly in the phosphate side. The cellulose membrane was permeable to small organic molecules that diffused from the calcium towards the phosphate side. In the calcium side, very few similar crystals were observed. The presence of organic matrix from A. cygnea fluids induced a preliminary apatite-brushite crystal polymorphism. So, the present results suggest that cellulose membranes can be used as surrogates of biological epithelia with preferential ionic diffusion from the calcium to the phosphate side where the main

  15. Increased adhesion between neutral lipid bilayers: interbilayer bridges formed by tannic acid.

    PubMed

    Simon, S A; Disalvo, E A; Gawrisch, K; Borovyagin, V; Toone, E; Schiffman, S S; Needham, D; McIntosh, T J

    1994-06-01

    Tannic acid (TA) is a naturally occurring polyphenolic compound that aggregates membranes and neutral phosolipid vesicles and precipitates many proteins. This study analyzes TA binding to lipid membranes and the ensuing aggregation. The optical density of dispersions of phosphatidylcholine (PC) vesicles increased upon the addition of TA and electron micrographs showed that TA caused the vesicles to aggregate and form stacks of tightly packed disks. Solution calorimetry showed that TA bound to PC bilayers with a molar binding enthalpy of -8.3 kcal/mol and zeta potential measurements revealed that TA imparted a small negative charge to PC vesicles. Monolayer studies showed that TA bound to PC with a dissociation constant of 1.5 microM and reduced the dipole potential by up to 250 mV. Both the increase in optical density and decrease in dipole potential produced by TA could be reversed by the addition of polyvinylpyrrolidone, a compound that chelates TA by providing H-bond acceptor groups. NMR, micropipette aspiration, and x-ray diffraction experiments showed that TA incorporated into liquid crystalline PC membranes, increasing the area per lipid molecule and decreasing the bilayer thickness by 2 to 4%. 2H-NMR quadrupole splitting measurements also showed that TA associated with a PC molecule for times much less than 10(-4) s. In gel phase bilayers, TA caused the hydrocarbon chains from apposing monolayers to fully interdigitate. X-ray diffraction measurements of both gel and liquid crystalline dispersions showed that TA, at a critical concentration of about 1 mM, reduced the fluid spacing between adjacent bilayers by 8-10 A. These data place severe constraints on how TA can pack between adjacent bilayers and cause vesicles to adhere. We conclude that TA promotes vesicle aggregation by reducing the fluid spacing between bilayers by the formation of transient interbilayer bridges by inserting its digallic acid residues into the interfacial regions of adjacent bilayers

  16. Hydrodynamic Forces on Macromolecules Protruding from Lipid Bilayers Due to External Liquid Flows.

    PubMed

    Jönsson, Peter; Jönsson, Bengt

    2015-11-24

    It has previously been observed that an externally applied hydrodynamic shear flow above a fluid lipid bilayer can change the local concentration of macromolecules that are associated with the lipid bilayer. The external liquid flow results in a hydrodynamic force on molecules protruding from the lipid bilayer, causing them to move in the direction of the flow. However, there has been no quantitative study about the magnitude of these forces. We here use finite element simulations to investigate how the magnitude of the external hydrodynamic forces varies with the size and shape of the studied macromolecule. The simulations show that the hydrodynamic force is proportional to the effective hydrodynamic area of the studied molecule, Ahydro, multiplied by the mean hydrodynamic shear stress acting on the membrane surface, σhydro. The parameter Ahydro depends on the size and shape of the studied macromolecule above the lipid bilayer and scales with the cross-sectional area of the molecule. We also investigate how hydrodynamic shielding from other surrounding macromolecules decreases Ahydro when the surface coverage of the shielding macromolecules increases. Experiments where the protein streptavidin is anchored to a supported lipid bilayer on the floor of a microfluidic channel were finally performed at three different surface concentrations, Φ = 1%, 6%, and 10%, where the protein is being moved relative to the lipid bilayer by a liquid flow through the channel. From photobleaching measurements of fluorescently labeled streptavidin we found the experimental drift data to be within good accuracy of the simulated results, less than 12% difference, indicating the validity of the results obtained from the simulations. In addition to giving a deeper insight into how a liquid flow can affect membrane-associated molecules in a lipid bilayer, we also see an interesting potential of using hydrodynamic flow experiments together with the obtained results to study the size and

  17. Cholesterol's location in lipid bilayers

    DOE PAGES

    Marquardt, Drew; Kučerka, Norbert; Wassall, Stephen R.; Harroun, Thad A.; Katsaras, John

    2016-04-04

    It is well known that cholesterol modifies the physical properties of lipid bilayers. For example, the much studied liquid-ordered Lo phase contains rapidly diffusing lipids with their acyl chains in the all trans configuration, similar to gel phase bilayers. Moreover, the Lo phase is commonly associated with cholesterol-enriched lipid rafts, which are thought to serve as platforms for signaling proteins in the plasma membrane. Cholesterol's location in lipid bilayers has been studied extensively, and it has been shown – at least in some bilayers – to align differently from its canonical upright orientation, where its hydroxyl group is in themore » vicinity of the lipid–water interface. In this study we review recent works describing cholesterol's location in different model membrane systems with emphasis on results obtained from scattering, spectroscopic and molecular dynamics studies.« less

  18. Development of an implantable synthetic membrane for the treatment of preterm premature rupture of fetal membranes.

    PubMed

    Roman, Sabiniano; Bullock, Anthony J; Anumba, Dilly O; MacNeil, Sheila

    2016-02-01

    Preterm premature rupture of fetal membranes is a very common condition leading to premature labour of a non viable fetus. Significant morbidities may occur when preterm premature rupture of fetal membranes management is attempted to prolong the pregnancy for fetal maturation. Reducing the rate of loss of amniotic fluid and providing a barrier to bacterial entry may allow the pregnancy to continue to term, avoiding complications. Our aim is to develop a synthetic biocompatible membrane to form a distensible barrier for cervical closure which acts to reduce fluid loss and provide a surface for epithelial ingrowth to help repair the damaged membranes. Therefore, a bilayer membrane was developed using an electrospinning technique of combining two FDA-approved polymers, poly-L-lactic acid (PLA) and polyurethane (Z3) polymer. This was compared to a plain electrospun Z3 membrane. The physical and mechanical properties were assessed using scanning electron microscope images and a BOSE tensiometer, respectively, and compared to native fetal membranes. The performance of the membranes in preventing fluid loss was assessed by measuring their ability to support a column of water. Finally the ability of the membranes to support cell ingrowth was assessed by culturing adipose-derived stem cells on the membranes for two weeks and assessing metabolic activity after 7 and 14 days. The physical properties of the bilayer were similar to that of the native fetal membranes and it was resistant to fluid penetration. This bilayer membrane presented mechanical properties close to those for fetal membranes and showed elastic distention, which may be crucial for progress of the pregnancy. The membrane was also able to retain surgical sutures. In addition, it also supported the attachment and growth of adipose-derived stem cells for two weeks. In conclusion, this membrane may prove a useful approach in the treatment of preterm premature rupture of fetal membranes and now merits further

  19. Formation of individual protein channels in lipid bilayers suspended in nanopores.

    PubMed

    Studer, André; Han, Xiaojun; Winkler, Fritz K; Tiefenauer, Louis X

    2009-10-15

    Free-standing lipid bilayers are formed in regularly arranged nanopores of 200, 400 and 800 nm in a 300 nm thin hydrophobic silicon nitride membrane separating two fluid compartments. The extraordinary stability of the lipid bilayers allows us to monitor channel formation of the model peptide melittin and alpha-hemolysin from Staphylococcus aureus using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and chronoamperometry. We observed that melittin channel formation is voltage-dependent and transient, whereas transmembrane heptameric alpha-hemolysin channels in nano-BLMs persist for hours. The onset of alpha-hemolysin-mediated conduction depends on the applied protein concentration and strongly on the diameter of the nanopores. Heptameric channel formation from adsorbed alpha-hemolysin monomers needs more time in bilayers suspended in 200 nm pores compared to bilayers in pores of 400 and 800 nm diameters. Diffusion of sodium ions across alpha-hemolysin channels present in a sufficiently high number in the bilayers was quantitatively and specifically determined using ion selective electrodes. The results demonstrate that relatively small variations of nano-dimensions have a tremendous effect on observable dynamic biomolecular processes. Such nanopore chips are potentially useful as supports for stable lipid bilayers to establish functional assays of membrane proteins needed in basic research and drug discovery.

  20. Pore formation in lipid bilayer membranes made of phosphatidylinositol and oxidized cholesterol followed by means of alternating current.

    PubMed Central

    Gallucci, E; Micelli, S; Monticelli, G

    1996-01-01

    The kinetics of porin incorporation into black lipid membranes (BLM) made of phosphatidylinositol (PI) or oxidized cholesterol (Ox Ch) were studied by means of alternating current; the set-up was able to acquire resistance and capacitance simultaneously by means of a mixed double-frequency approach at 1 Hz and 1 KHz, respectively. Conductance was dependent on the interaction between protein-forming pores and lipids. For PI membranes below a porin concentration of 12.54 ng/ml, there was no membrane conductivity, whereas at 200 ng/ml a steady-state value was reached. Different behavior was displayed by Ox Ch membranes, in which a concentration of 12.54 ng/ml was sufficient to reach a steady state. The incorporation kinetics when porin was added after membrane formation were sigmoidal. When porin was present in the medium before membrane formation, the kinetics were sigmoidal for PI membranes but became exponential for Ox Ch membranes. Furthermore, for BLM made of PI, the conductance-versus-porin concentration relationship is sigmoidal, with a Hill coefficient of 5.6 +/- 0.07, which is functional evidence corroborating the six-channel repeating units seen previously. For BLM made of Ox Ch, this relationship followed a binding isotherm curve with a Hill coefficient of 0.934 +/- 0.129. PMID:8842220

  1. Calorimetric and spectroscopic studies of the thermotropic phase behavior of lipid bilayer model membranes composed of a homologous series of linear saturated phosphatidylserines.

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, R N; McElhaney, R N

    2000-01-01

    The thermotropic phase behavior of lipid bilayer model membranes composed of the even-numbered, N-saturated 1,2-diacyl phosphatidylserines was studied by differential scanning calorimetry and by Fourier-transform infrared and (31)P-nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. At pH 7.0, 0.1 M NaCl and in the absence of divalent cations, aqueous dispersions of these lipids, which have not been incubated at low temperature, exhibit a single calorimetrically detectable phase transition that is fully reversible, highly cooperative, and relatively energetic, and the transition temperatures and enthalpies increase progressively with increases in hydrocarbon chain length. Our spectroscopic observations confirm that this thermal event is a lamellar gel (L(beta))-to-lamellar liquid crystalline (L(alpha)) phase transition. However, after low temperature incubation, the L(beta)/L(alpha) phase transition of dilauroyl phosphatidylserine is replaced by a higher temperature, more enthalpic, and less cooperative phase transition, and an additional lower temperature, less enthalpic, and less cooperative phase transition appears in the longer chain phosphatidylserines. Our spectroscopic results indicate that this change in thermotropic phase behavior when incubated at low temperatures results from the conversion of the L(beta) phase to a highly ordered lamellar crystalline (L(c)) phase. Upon heating, the L(c) phase of dilauroyl phosphatidylserine converts directly to the L(alpha) phase at a temperature slightly higher than that of its original L(beta)/L(alpha) phase transition. Calorimetrically, this process is manifested by a less cooperative but considerably more energetic, higher-temperature phase transition, which replaces the weaker L(beta)/L(alpha) phase transition alluded to above. However, with the longer chain compounds, the L(c) phase first converts to the L(beta) phase at temperatures some 10-25 degrees C below that at which the L(beta) phase converts to the L(alpha) phase

  2. Vascular basement membranes as pathways for the passage of fluid into and out of the brain.

    PubMed

    Morris, Alan W J; Sharp, Matthew MacGregor; Albargothy, Nazira J; Fernandes, Rute; Hawkes, Cheryl A; Verma, Ajay; Weller, Roy O; Carare, Roxana O

    2016-05-01

    In the absence of conventional lymphatics, drainage of interstitial fluid and solutes from the brain parenchyma to cervical lymph nodes is along basement membranes in the walls of cerebral capillaries and tunica media of arteries. Perivascular pathways are also involved in the entry of CSF into the brain by the convective influx/glymphatic system. The objective of this study is to differentiate the cerebral vascular basement membrane pathways by which fluid passes out of the brain from the pathway by which CSF enters the brain. Experiment 1: 0.5 µl of soluble biotinylated or fluorescent Aβ, or 1 µl 15 nm gold nanoparticles was injected into the mouse hippocampus and their distributions determined at 5 min by transmission electron microscopy. Aβ was distributed within the extracellular spaces of the hippocampus and within basement membranes of capillar