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Sample records for fluid flow model

  1. VISCOPLASTIC FLUID MODEL FOR DEBRIS FLOW ROUTING.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chen, Cheng-lung

    1986-01-01

    This paper describes how a generalized viscoplastic fluid model, which was developed based on non-Newtonian fluid mechanics, can be successfully applied to routing a debris flow down a channel. The one-dimensional dynamic equations developed for unsteady clear-water flow can be used for debris flow routing if the flow parameters, such as the momentum (or energy) correction factor and the resistance coefficient, can be accurately evaluated. The writer's generalized viscoplastic fluid model can be used to express such flow parameters in terms of the rheological parameters for debris flow in wide channels. A preliminary analysis of the theoretical solutions reveals the importance of the flow behavior index and the so-called modified Froude number for uniformly progressive flow in snout profile modeling.

  2. Modeling Tools Predict Flow in Fluid Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2010-01-01

    "Because rocket engines operate under extreme temperature and pressure, they present a unique challenge to designers who must test and simulate the technology. To this end, CRAFT Tech Inc., of Pipersville, Pennsylvania, won Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contracts from Marshall Space Flight Center to develop software to simulate cryogenic fluid flows and related phenomena. CRAFT Tech enhanced its CRUNCH CFD (computational fluid dynamics) software to simulate phenomena in various liquid propulsion components and systems. Today, both government and industry clients in the aerospace, utilities, and petrochemical industries use the software for analyzing existing systems as well as designing new ones."

  3. Poiseuille flow to measure the viscosity of particle model fluids.

    PubMed

    Backer, J A; Lowe, C P; Hoefsloot, H C J; Iedema, P D

    2005-04-15

    The most important property of a fluid is its viscosity, it determines the flow properties. If one simulates a fluid using a particle model, calculating the viscosity accurately is difficult because it is a collective property. In this article we describe a new method that has a better signal to noise ratio than existing methods. It is based on using periodic boundary conditions to simulate counter-flowing Poiseuille flows without the use of explicit boundaries. The viscosity is then related to the mean flow velocity of the two flows. We apply the method to two quite different systems. First, a simple generic fluid model, dissipative particle dynamics, for which accurate values of the viscosity are needed to characterize the model fluid. Second, the more realistic Lennard-Jones fluid. In both cases the values we calculated are consistent with previous work but, for a given simulation time, they are more accurate than those obtained with other methods.

  4. A two-fluid model for avalanche and debris flows.

    PubMed

    Pitman, E Bruce; Le, Long

    2005-07-15

    Geophysical mass flows--debris flows, avalanches, landslides--can contain O(10(6)-10(10)) m(3) or more of material, often a mixture of soil and rocks with a significant quantity of interstitial fluid. These flows can be tens of meters in depth and hundreds of meters in length. The range of scales and the rheology of this mixture presents significant modelling and computational challenges. This paper describes a depth-averaged 'thin layer' model of geophysical mass flows containing a mixture of solid material and fluid. The model is derived from a 'two-phase' or 'two-fluid' system of equations commonly used in engineering research. Phenomenological modelling and depth averaging combine to yield a tractable set of equations, a hyperbolic system that describes the motion of the two constituent phases. If the fluid inertia is small, a reduced model system that is easier to solve may be derived.

  5. Surface tension driven flow in glass melts and model fluids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcneil, T. J.; Cole, R.; Subramanian, R. S.

    1982-01-01

    Surface tension driven flow has been investigated analytically and experimentally using an apparatus where a free column of molten glass or model fluids was supported at its top and bottom faces by solid surfaces. The glass used in the experiments was sodium diborate, and the model fluids were silicone oils. In both the model fluid and glass melt experiments, conclusive evidence was obtained to prove that the observed flow was driven primarily by surface tension forces. The experimental observations are in qualitative agreement with predictions from the theoretical model.

  6. Pulmonary Fluid Flow Challenges for Experimental and Mathematical Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Levy, Rachel; Hill, David B.; Forest, M. Gregory; Grotberg, James B.

    2014-01-01

    Modeling the flow of fluid in the lungs, even under baseline healthy conditions, presents many challenges. The complex rheology of the fluids, interaction between fluids and structures, and complicated multi-scale geometry all add to the complexity of the problem. We provide a brief overview of approaches used to model three aspects of pulmonary fluid and flow: the surfactant layer in the deep branches of the lung, the mucus layer in the upper airway branches, and closure/reopening of the airway. We discuss models of each aspect, the potential to capture biological and therapeutic information, and open questions worthy of further investigation. We hope to promote multi-disciplinary collaboration by providing insights into mathematical descriptions of fluid-mechanics in the lung and the kinds of predictions these models can make. PMID:25096289

  7. Benchmarking computational fluid dynamics models for lava flow simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dietterich, Hannah; Lev, Einat; Chen, Jiangzhi

    2016-04-01

    Numerical simulations of lava flow emplacement are valuable for assessing lava flow hazards, forecasting active flows, interpreting past eruptions, and understanding the controls on lava flow behavior. Existing lava flow models vary in simplifying assumptions, physics, dimensionality, and the degree to which they have been validated against analytical solutions, experiments, and natural observations. In order to assess existing models and guide the development of new codes, we conduct a benchmarking study of computational fluid dynamics models for lava flow emplacement, including VolcFlow, OpenFOAM, FLOW-3D, and COMSOL. Using the new benchmark scenarios defined in Cordonnier et al. (Geol Soc SP, 2015) as a guide, we model viscous, cooling, and solidifying flows over horizontal and sloping surfaces, topographic obstacles, and digital elevation models of natural topography. We compare model results to analytical theory, analogue and molten basalt experiments, and measurements from natural lava flows. Overall, the models accurately simulate viscous flow with some variability in flow thickness where flows intersect obstacles. OpenFOAM, COMSOL, and FLOW-3D can each reproduce experimental measurements of cooling viscous flows, and FLOW-3D simulations with temperature-dependent rheology match results from molten basalt experiments. We can apply these models to reconstruct past lava flows in Hawai'i and Saudi Arabia using parameters assembled from morphology, textural analysis, and eruption observations as natural test cases. Our study highlights the strengths and weaknesses of each code, including accuracy and computational costs, and provides insights regarding code selection.

  8. A preliminary study to Assess Model Uncertainties in Fluid Flows

    SciTech Connect

    Marc Oliver Delchini; Jean C. Ragusa

    2009-09-01

    The goal of this study is to assess the impact of various flow models for a simplified primary coolant loop of a light water nuclear reactor. The various fluid flow models are based on the Euler equations with an additional friction term, gravity term, momentum source, and energy source. The geometric model is purposefully chosen simple and consists of a one-dimensional (1D) loop system in order to focus the study on the validity of various fluid flow approximations. The 1D loop system is represented by a rectangle; the fluid is heated up along one of the vertical legs and cooled down along the opposite leg. A pressurizer and a pump are included in the horizontal legs. The amount of energy transferred and removed from the system is equal in absolute value along the two vertical legs. The various fluid flow approximations are compressible vs. incompressible, and complete momentum equation vs. Darcy’s approximation. The ultimate goal is to compute the fluid flow models’ uncertainties and, if possible, to generate validity ranges for these models when applied to reactor analysis. We also limit this study to single phase flows with low-Mach numbers. As a result, sound waves carry a very small amount of energy in this particular case. A standard finite volume method is used for the spatial discretization of the system.

  9. A numerical model for dynamic crustal-scale fluid flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sachau, Till; Bons, Paul; Gomez-Rivas, Enrique; Koehn, Daniel

    2015-04-01

    Fluid flow in the crust is often envisaged and modeled as continuous, yet minimal flow, which occurs over large geological times. This is a suitable approximation for flow as long as it is solely controlled by the matrix permeability of rocks, which in turn is controlled by viscous compaction of the pore space. However, strong evidence (hydrothermal veins and ore deposits) exists that a significant part of fluid flow in the crust occurs strongly localized in both space and time, controlled by the opening and sealing of hydrofractures. We developed, tested and applied a novel computer code, which considers this dynamic behavior and couples it with steady, Darcian flow controlled by the matrix permeability. In this dual-porosity model, fractures open depending on the fluid pressure relative to the solid pressure. Fractures form when matrix permeability is insufficient to accommodate fluid flow resulting from compaction, decompression (Staude et al. 2009) or metamorphic dehydration reactions (Weisheit et al. 2013). Open fractures can close when the contained fluid either seeps into the matrix or escapes by fracture propagation: mobile hydrofractures (Bons, 2001). In the model, closing and sealing of fractures is controlled by a time-dependent viscous law, which is based on the effective stress and on either Newtonian or non-Newtonian viscosity. Our simulations indicate that the bulk of crustal fluid flow in the middle to lower upper crust is intermittent, highly self-organized, and occurs as mobile hydrofractures. This is due to the low matrix porosity and permeability, combined with a low matrix viscosity and, hence, fast sealing of fractures. Stable fracture networks, generated by fluid overpressure, are restricted to the uppermost crust. Semi-stable fracture networks can develop in an intermediate zone, if a critical overpressure is reached. Flow rates in mobile hydrofractures exceed those in the matrix porosity and fracture networks by orders of magnitude

  10. Particle hopping vs. fluid-dynamical models for traffic flow

    SciTech Connect

    Nagel, K.

    1995-12-31

    Although particle hopping models have been introduced into traffic science in the 19509, their systematic use has only started recently. Two reasons for this are, that they are advantageous on modem computers, and that recent theoretical developments allow analytical understanding of their properties and therefore more confidence for their use. In principle, particle hopping models fit between microscopic models for driving and fluiddynamical models for traffic flow. In this sense, they also help closing the conceptual gap between these two. This paper shows connections between particle hopping models and traffic flow theory. It shows that the hydrodynamical limits of certain particle hopping models correspond to the Lighthill-Whitham theory for traffic flow, and that only slightly more complex particle hopping models produce already the correct traffic jam dynamics, consistent with recent fluid-dynamical models for traffic flow. By doing so, this paper establishes that, on the macroscopic level, particle hopping models are at least as good as fluid-dynamical models. Yet, particle hopping models have at least two advantages over fluid-dynamical models: they straightforwardly allow microscopic simulations, and they include stochasticity.

  11. Numerical modeling of fluid flow with rafts: An application to lava flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsepelev, Igor; Ismail-Zadeh, Alik; Melnik, Oleg; Korotkii, Alexander

    2016-07-01

    Although volcanic lava flows do not significantly affect the life of people, its hazard is not negligible as hot lava kills vegetation, destroys infrastructure, and may trigger a flood due to melting of snow/ice. The lava flow hazard can be reduced if the flow patterns are known, and the complexity of the flow with debris is analyzed to assist in disaster risk mitigation. In this paper we develop three-dimensional numerical models of a gravitational flow of multi-phase fluid with rafts (mimicking rigid lava-crust fragments) on a horizontal and topographic surfaces to explore the dynamics and the interaction of lava flows. We have obtained various flow patterns and spatial distribution of rafts depending on conditions at the surface of fluid spreading, obstacles on the way of a fluid flow, raft landing scenarios, and the size of rafts. Furthermore, we analyze two numerical models related to specific lava flows: (i) a model of fluid flow with rafts inside an inclined channel, and (ii) a model of fluid flow from a single vent on an artificial topography, when the fluid density, its viscosity, and the effusion rate vary with time. Although the studied models do not account for lava solidification, crust formation, and its rupture, the results of the modeling may be used for understanding of flows with breccias before a significant lava cooling.

  12. Particle-fluid two-phase flow modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Mortensen, G.A.; Trapp, J.A. |

    1992-09-01

    This paper describes a numerical scheme and computer program, DISCON, for the calculation of two-phase flows that does not require the use of flow regime maps. This model is intermediate between-thermal instantaneous and the averaged two-fluid model. It solves the Eulerian continuity, momentum, and energy equations for each liquid control volume, and the Lagrangian mass, momentum, energy, and position equations for each bubble. The bubbles are modeled individually using a large representative number of bubbles thus avoiding the numerical diffusion associated with Eulerian models. DISCON has been used to calculate the bubbling of air through a column of water and the subcooled boiling of water in a flow channel. The results of these calculations are presented.

  13. Particle-fluid two-phase flow modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Mortensen, G.A. ); Trapp, J.A. Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID )

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes a numerical scheme and computer program, DISCON, for the calculation of two-phase flows that does not require the use of flow regime maps. This model is intermediate between-thermal instantaneous and the averaged two-fluid model. It solves the Eulerian continuity, momentum, and energy equations for each liquid control volume, and the Lagrangian mass, momentum, energy, and position equations for each bubble. The bubbles are modeled individually using a large representative number of bubbles thus avoiding the numerical diffusion associated with Eulerian models. DISCON has been used to calculate the bubbling of air through a column of water and the subcooled boiling of water in a flow channel. The results of these calculations are presented.

  14. Modelling couplings between reaction, fluid flow and deformation: Kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malvoisin, Benjamin; Podladchikov, Yury Y.; Connolly, James A. D.

    2016-04-01

    Mineral assemblages out of equilibrium are commonly found in metamorphic rocks testifying of the critical role of kinetics for metamorphic reactions. As experimentally determined reaction rates in fluid-saturated systems generally indicate complete reaction in less than several years, i.e. several orders of magnitude faster than field-based estimates, metamorphic reaction kinetics are generally thought to be controlled by transport rather than by processes at the mineral surface. However, some geological processes like earthquakes or slow-slip events have shorter characteristic timescales, and transport processes can be intimately related to mineral surface processes. Therefore, it is important to take into account the kinetics of mineral surface processes for modelling fluid/rock interactions. Here, a model coupling reaction, fluid flow and deformation was improved by introducing a delay in the achievement of equilibrium. The classical formalism for dissolution/precipitation reactions was used to consider the influence of the distance from equilibrium and of temperature on the reaction rate, and a dependence on porosity was introduced to model evolution of reacting surface area during reaction. The fitting of experimental data for three reactions typically occurring in metamorphic systems (serpentine dehydration, muscovite dehydration and calcite decarbonation) indicates a systematic faster kinetics close from equilibrium on the dehydration side than on the hydration side. This effect is amplified through the porosity term in the reaction rate since porosity is formed during dehydration. Numerical modelling indicates that this difference in reaction rate close from equilibrium plays a key role in microtextures formation. The developed model can be used in a wide variety of geological systems where couplings between reaction, deformation and fluid flow have to be considered.

  15. Two-fluid model for two-phase flow

    SciTech Connect

    Ishii, M.

    1987-01-01

    The two-fluid model formulation is discussed in detail. The emphasis of the paper is on the three-dimensional formulation and the closure issues. The origin of the interfacial and turbulent transfer terms in the averaged formulation is explained and their original mathematical forms are examined. The interfacial transfer of mass, momentum, and energy is proportional to the interfacial area and driving force. This is not a postulate but a result of the careful examination of the mathematical form of the exact interfacial terms. These two effects are considered separately. Since all the interfacial transfer terms involve the interfacial area concentration, the accurate modeling of the local interfacial area concentration is the first step to be taken for a development of a reliable two-fluid model closure relations. The interfacial momentum interaction has been studied in terms of the standard-drag, lift, virtual mass, and Basset forces. Available analytical and semi-empirical correlations and closure relations are reviewed and existing shortcomings are pointed out. The other major area of importance is the modeling of turbulent transfer in two-phase flow. The two-phase flow turbulence problem is coupled with the phase separation problem even in a steady-state fully developed flow. Thus the two-phase turbulence cannot be understood without understanding the interfacial drag and lift forces accurately. There are some indications that the mixing length type model may not be sufficient to describe the three-dimensional turbulent and flow structures. Although it is a very difficult challenge, the two-phase flow turbulence should be investigated both experimentally and analytically with long time-scale research. 87 refs.

  16. A Generalized Fluid System Simulation Program to Model Flow Distribution in Fluid Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Majumdar, Alok; Bailey, John W.; Schallhorn, Paul; Steadman, Todd

    1998-01-01

    This paper describes a general purpose computer program for analyzing steady state and transient flow in a complex network. The program is capable of modeling phase changes, compressibility, mixture thermodynamics and external body forces such as gravity and centrifugal. The program's preprocessor allows the user to interactively develop a fluid network simulation consisting of nodes and branches. Mass, energy and specie conservation equations are solved at the nodes; the momentum conservation equations are solved in the branches. The program contains subroutines for computing "real fluid" thermodynamic and thermophysical properties for 33 fluids. The fluids are: helium, methane, neon, nitrogen, carbon monoxide, oxygen, argon, carbon dioxide, fluorine, hydrogen, parahydrogen, water, kerosene (RP-1), isobutane, butane, deuterium, ethane, ethylene, hydrogen sulfide, krypton, propane, xenon, R-11, R-12, R-22, R-32, R-123, R-124, R-125, R-134A, R-152A, nitrogen trifluoride and ammonia. The program also provides the options of using any incompressible fluid with constant density and viscosity or ideal gas. Seventeen different resistance/source options are provided for modeling momentum sources or sinks in the branches. These options include: pipe flow, flow through a restriction, non-circular duct, pipe flow with entrance and/or exit losses, thin sharp orifice, thick orifice, square edge reduction, square edge expansion, rotating annular duct, rotating radial duct, labyrinth seal, parallel plates, common fittings and valves, pump characteristics, pump power, valve with a given loss coefficient, and a Joule-Thompson device. The system of equations describing the fluid network is solved by a hybrid numerical method that is a combination of the Newton-Raphson and successive substitution methods. This paper also illustrates the application and verification of the code by comparison with Hardy Cross method for steady state flow and analytical solution for unsteady flow.

  17. Advances in modelling of biomimetic fluid flow at different scales

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The biomimetic flow at different scales has been discussed at length. The need of looking into the biological surfaces and morphologies and both geometrical and physical similarities to imitate the technological products and processes has been emphasized. The complex fluid flow and heat transfer problems, the fluid-interface and the physics involved at multiscale and macro-, meso-, micro- and nano-scales have been discussed. The flow and heat transfer simulation is done by various CFD solvers including Navier-Stokes and energy equations, lattice Boltzmann method and molecular dynamics method. Combined continuum-molecular dynamics method is also reviewed. PMID:21711847

  18. Computational fluid dynamics investigation of turbulence models for non-newtonian fluid flow in anaerobic digesters.

    PubMed

    Wu, Binxin

    2010-12-01

    In this paper, 12 turbulence models for single-phase non-newtonian fluid flow in a pipe are evaluated by comparing the frictional pressure drops obtained from computational fluid dynamics (CFD) with those from three friction factor correlations. The turbulence models studied are (1) three high-Reynolds-number k-ε models, (2) six low-Reynolds-number k-ε models, (3) two k-ω models, and (4) the Reynolds stress model. The simulation results indicate that the Chang-Hsieh-Chen version of the low-Reynolds-number k-ε model performs better than the other models in predicting the frictional pressure drops while the standard k-ω model has an acceptable accuracy and a low computing cost. In the model applications, CFD simulation of mixing in a full-scale anaerobic digester with pumped circulation is performed to propose an improvement in the effective mixing standards recommended by the U.S. EPA based on the effect of rheology on the flow fields. Characterization of the velocity gradient is conducted to quantify the growth or breakage of an assumed floc size. Placement of two discharge nozzles in the digester is analyzed to show that spacing two nozzles 180° apart with each one discharging at an angle of 45° off the wall is the most efficient. Moreover, the similarity rules of geometry and mixing energy are checked for scaling up the digester.

  19. Energy flow model for thin plate considering fluid loading with mean flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Ju-Bum; Hong, Suk-Yoon; Song, Jee-Hun

    2012-11-01

    Energy Flow Analysis (EFA) has been developed to predict the vibration energy density of system structures in the high frequency range. This paper develops the energy flow model for the thin plate in contact with mean flow. The pressure generated by mean flow affects energy governing equation and power reflection-transmission coefficients between plates. The fluid pressure is evaluated by using velocity potential and Bernoulli's equation, and energy governing equations are derived by considering the flexural wavenumbers of a plate, which are different along the direction of flexural wave and mean flow. The derived energy governing equation is composed of two kinds of group velocities. To verify the developed energy flow model, various numerical analyses are performed for a simple plate and a coupled plate for several excitation frequencies. The EFA results are compared with the analytical solutions, and correlations between the EFA results and the analytical solutions are verified.

  20. Flow of a blood analogue fluid in a compliant abdominal aortic aneurysm model: experimental modelling.

    PubMed

    Deplano, Valérie; Knapp, Yannick; Bailly, Lucie; Bertrand, Eric

    2014-04-11

    The aim of this work is to develop a unique in vitro set-up in order to analyse the influence of the shear thinning fluid-properties on the flow dynamics within the bulge of an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). From an experimental point of view, the goals are to elaborate an analogue shear thinning fluid mimicking the macroscopic blood behaviour, to characterise its rheology at low shear rates and to propose an experimental device able to manage such an analogue fluid without altering its feature while reproducing physiological flow rate and pressure, through compliant AAA. Once these experimental prerequisites achieved, the results obtained in the present work show that the flow dynamics is highly dependent on the fluid rheology. The main results point out that the propagation of the vortex ring, generated in the AAA bulge, is slower for shear thinning fluids inducing a smaller travelled distance by the vortex ring so that it never impacts the anterior wall in the distal region, in opposition to Newtonian fluids. Moreover, scalar shear rate values are globally lower for shear thinning fluids inducing higher maximum stress values than those for the Newtonian fluids. Consequently, this work highlights that a Newtonian fluid model is finally inadequate to obtain a reliable prediction of the flow dynamics within AAA.

  1. Mathematical modeling of slope flows with entrainment as flows of non-Newtonian fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zayko, Julia; Eglit, Margarita

    2015-04-01

    Non-Newtonian fluids in which the shear stresses are nonlinear functions of the shear strain rates are used to model slope flows such as snow avalanches, mudflows, debris flows. The entrainment of bottom material is included into the model basing on the assumption that in entraining flows the bed friction is equal to the shear stress of the bottom material (Issler et al, 2011). Unsteady motion down long homogeneous slopes with constant inclines is studied numerically for different flow rheologies and different slope angles. Variation of the velocity profile, increase of the flow depth and velocity due to entrainment as well as the value of the entrainment rate is calculated. Asymptotic formulae for the entrainment rate are derived for unsteady flows of different rheological properties. REFERENCES Chowdhury M., Testik F., 2011. Laboratory testing of mathematical models for high-concentration fluid mud turbidity currents. Ocean Engineering 38, 256-270. Eglit, M.E., Demidov, K.S., 2005. Mathematical modeling of snow entrainment in avalanche motion. Cold Reg. Sci. Technol. 43 (1-2), 10-23. Eglit M. E., Yakubenko A. E., 2012, Mathematical Modeling of slope flows entraining bottom material. Eglit M. E., Yakubenko A. E., 2014, Numerical modeling of slope flows entraining bottom material. Cold Reg. Sci. Technol. 108, 139-148. Issler D, M. Pastor Peréz. 2011. Interplay of entrainment and rheology in snow avalanches; a numerical study. Annals of Glaciology, 52(58), pp.143-147 Kern M. A., Tiefenbacher F., McElwaine J., N., 2004. The rheology of snow in large chute flows. Cold Regions Science and Technology, 39, 181 -192. Naaim, M., Faug, T., Naaim-Bouvet, F., 2003. Dry granular flow modelling including erosion and deposition. Surv. Geophys. 24, 569-585. Naaim, M., Naaim-Bouvet, F., Faug, T., Bouchet, A., 2004. Dense snow avalanche modeling: flow, erosion, deposition and obstacle effects. Cold Reg. Sci. Technol. 39, 193-204. Rougier, J & Kern, M 2010, 'Predicting snow

  2. Spatial and Temporal Low-Dimensional Models for Fluid Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kalb, Virginia

    2008-01-01

    A document discusses work that obtains a low-dimensional model that captures both temporal and spatial flow by constructing spatial and temporal four-mode models for two classic flow problems. The models are based on the proper orthogonal decomposition at two reference Reynolds numbers. Model predictions are made at an intermediate Reynolds number and compared with direct numerical simulation results at the new Reynolds number.

  3. TOPAZ: a computer code for modeling heat transfer and fluid flow in arbitrary networks of pipes, flow branches, and vessels

    SciTech Connect

    Winters, W.S.

    1984-01-01

    An overview of the computer code TOPAZ (Transient-One-Dimensional Pipe Flow Analyzer) is presented. TOPAZ models the flow of compressible and incompressible fluids through complex and arbitrary arrangements of pipes, valves, flow branches and vessels. Heat transfer to and from the fluid containment structures (i.e. vessel and pipe walls) can also be modeled. This document includes discussions of the fluid flow equations and containment heat conduction equations. The modeling philosophy, numerical integration technique, code architecture, and methods for generating the computational mesh are also discussed.

  4. Regional Fluid Flow and Basin Modeling in Northern Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kelley, Karen D.

    2007-01-01

    INTRODUCTION The foothills of the Brooks Range contain an enormous accumulation of zinc (Zn) in the form of zinc sulfide and barium (Ba) in the form of barite in Carboniferous shale, chert, and mudstone. Most of the resources and reserves of Zn occur in the Red Dog deposit and others in the Red Dog district; these resources and reserves surpass those of most deposits worldwide in terms of size and grade. In addition to zinc and lead sulfides (which contain silver, Ag) and barite, correlative strata host phosphate deposits. Furthermore, prolific hydrocarbon source rocks of Carboniferous and Triassic to Early Jurassic age generated considerable amounts of petroleum that may have contributed to the world-class petroleum resources of the North Slope. Deposits of Zn-Pb-Ag or barite as large as those in the Brooks Range are very rare on a global basis and, accordingly, multiple coincident favorable factors must be invoked to explain their origins. To improve our understanding of these factors and to contribute to more effective assessments of resources in sedimentary basins of northern Alaska and throughout the world, the Mineral Resources Program and the Energy Resources Program of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) initiated a project that was aimed at understanding the petroleum maturation and mineralization history of parts of the Brooks Range that were previously poorly characterized. The project, titled ?Regional Fluid Flow and Basin Modeling in Northern Alaska,? was undertaken in collaboration with industry, academia, and other government agencies. This Circular contains papers that describe the results of the recently completed project. The studies that are highlighted in these papers have led to a better understanding of the following: *The complex sedimentary facies relationships and depositional settings and the geochemistry of the sedimentary rocks that host the deposits (sections 2 and 3). *The factors responsible for formation of the barite and zinc deposits

  5. E-1 Dynamic Fluid-Flow Model Update: EASY/ROCETS Enhancement and Model Development Support

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Follett, Randolph F.; Taylor, Robert P.

    1998-01-01

    This report documents the research conducted to update computer models for dynamic fluid flow simulation of the E-1 test stand subsystems at te NASA John C. Stennis Space Center.Work also involved significant upgrades to the capabilities of EASY/ROCKETS library through the inclusion of the NIST-12 thermodynamic property database and development of new control system modules.

  6. Predicting multidimensional annular flows with a locally based two-fluid model

    SciTech Connect

    Antal, S.P. Edwards, D.P.; Strayer, T.D.

    1998-06-01

    Annular flows are a well utilized flow regime in many industrial applications, such as, heat exchangers, chemical reactors and industrial process equipment. These flows are characterized by a droplet laden vapor core with a thin, wavy liquid film wetting the walls. The prediction of annular flows has been largely confined to one-dimensional modeling which typically correlates the film thickness, droplet loading, and phase velocities by considering the average flow conditions and global mass and momentum balances to infer the flow topology. In this paper, a methodology to predict annular flows using a locally based two-fluid model of multiphase flow is presented. The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate a modeling approach for annular flows using a multifield, multidimensional two-fluid model and discuss the need for further work in this area.

  7. Mathematical modeling of fluid flow in aluminum ladles for degasification with impeller - injector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramos-Gómez, E.; González-Rivera, C.; Ramírez-Argáez, M. A.

    2012-09-01

    In this work a fundamental Eulerian mathematical model was developed to simulate fluid flow in a water physical model of an aluminum ladle equipped with impeller for degassing treatment. The effect of critical process parameters such as rotor speed, gas flow rate on the fluid flow and vortex formation was analyzed with this model. Commercial CFD code PHOENICS 3.4 was used to solve all conservation equations governing the process for this twophase fluid flow system. The mathematical model was successfully validated against experimentally measured liquid velocity and turbulent profiles in a physical model. From the results it was concluded that the angular speed of the impeller is the most important parameter promoting better stirred baths. Pumping effect of the impeller is increased as impeller rotation speed increases. Gas flow rate is detrimental on bath stirring and diminishes pumping effect of impeller.

  8. 2D Computational Fluid Dynamic Modeling of Human Ventricle System Based on Fluid-Solid Interaction and Pulsatile Flow.

    PubMed

    Masoumi, Nafiseh; Framanzad, F; Zamanian, Behnam; Seddighi, A S; Moosavi, M H; Najarian, S; Bastani, Dariush

    2013-01-01

    Many diseases are related to cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) hydrodynamics. Therefore, understanding the hydrodynamics of CSF flow and intracranial pressure is helpful for obtaining deeper knowledge of pathological processes and providing better treatments. Furthermore, engineering a reliable computational method is promising approach for fabricating in vitro models which is essential for inventing generic medicines. A Fluid-Solid Interaction (FSI)model was constructed to simulate CSF flow. An important problem in modeling the CSF flow is the diastolic back flow. In this article, using both rigid and flexible conditions for ventricular system allowed us to evaluate the effect of surrounding brain tissue. Our model assumed an elastic wall for the ventricles and a pulsatile CSF input as its boundary conditions. A comparison of the results and the experimental data was done. The flexible model gave better results because it could reproduce the diastolic back flow mentioned in clinical research studies. The previous rigid models have ignored the brain parenchyma interaction with CSF and so had not reported the back flow during the diastolic time. In this computational fluid dynamic (CFD) analysis, the CSF pressure and flow velocity in different areas were concordant with the experimental data.

  9. 2D Computational Fluid Dynamic Modeling of Human Ventricle System Based on Fluid-Solid Interaction and Pulsatile Flow

    PubMed Central

    Masoumi, Nafiseh; Framanzad, F.; Zamanian, Behnam; Seddighi, A.S.; Moosavi, M.H.; Najarian, S.; Bastani, Dariush

    2013-01-01

    Many diseases are related to cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) hydrodynamics. Therefore, understanding the hydrodynamics of CSF flow and intracranial pressure is helpful for obtaining deeper knowledge of pathological processes and providing better treatments. Furthermore, engineering a reliable computational method is promising approach for fabricating in vitro models which is essential for inventing generic medicines. A Fluid-Solid Interaction (FSI)model was constructed to simulate CSF flow. An important problem in modeling the CSF flow is the diastolic back flow. In this article, using both rigid and flexible conditions for ventricular system allowed us to evaluate the effect of surrounding brain tissue. Our model assumed an elastic wall for the ventricles and a pulsatile CSF input as its boundary conditions. A comparison of the results and the experimental data was done. The flexible model gave better results because it could reproduce the diastolic back flow mentioned in clinical research studies. The previous rigid models have ignored the brain parenchyma interaction with CSF and so had not reported the back flow during the diastolic time. In this computational fluid dynamic (CFD) analysis, the CSF pressure and flow velocity in different areas were concordant with the experimental data. PMID:25337330

  10. Modelling of fluid-structure interaction with multiphase viscous flows using an immersed-body method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, P.; Xiang, J.; Fang, F.; Pavlidis, D.; Latham, J.-P.; Pain, C. C.

    2016-09-01

    An immersed-body method is developed here to model fluid-structure interaction for multiphase viscous flows. It does this by coupling a finite element multiphase fluid model and a combined finite-discrete element solid model. A coupling term containing the fluid stresses is introduced within a thin shell mesh surrounding the solid surface. The thin shell mesh acts as a numerical delta function in order to help apply the solid-fluid boundary conditions. When used with an advanced interface capturing method, the immersed-body method has the capability to solve problems with fluid-solid interfaces in the presence of multiphase fluid-fluid interfaces. Importantly, the solid-fluid coupling terms are treated implicitly to enable larger time steps to be used. This two-way coupling method has been validated by three numerical test cases: a free falling cylinder in a fluid at rest, elastic membrane and a collapsing column of water moving an initially stationary solid square. A fourth simulation example is of a water-air interface with a floating solid square being moved around by complex hydrodynamic flows including wave breaking. The results show that the immersed-body method is an effective approach for two-way solid-fluid coupling in multiphase viscous flows.

  11. Modeling of heat transfer and fluid flow for decaying swirl flow in a circular pipe

    SciTech Connect

    Bali, T.

    1998-04-01

    The economic benefits of energy and material savings have prompted and received greatest attention in order to increase convective heat transfer rates in the process equipment. In the present study, a propeller type swirl generator was developed, and its effects on heat transfer and fluid flow were investigated numerically and experimentally for air flow in a pipe. In the numerical study, for axisymmetrically, incompressible turbulent swirl flows, the Navier-Stokes equations were solved using the {kappa}-{var_epsilon} turbulent model. So that a computer program in Fortran was constructed using the SIMPLEC Algorithm. In experimental work, axial and tangential velocity distributions behind the swirl generator were measured by using hot-wire anemometry. Experimental and numerical axial and tangential velocity distributions along the pipe were compared, and good agreement was found. Axial velocity profile showed a decrement in the central portion of the pipe and an increased axial velocity was seen in near the wall. Tangential velocity profiles had a maximum value and its location moved in radially with distance. The effects of swirl flow on the heat transfer and pressure drop were also investigated experimentally.

  12. Hydraulic modeling of unsteady debris-flow surges with solid-fluid interactions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Iverson, Richard M.

    1997-01-01

    Interactions of solid and fluid constituents produce the unique style of motion that typifies debris flows. To simulate this motion, a new hydraulic model represents debris flows as deforming masses of granular solids variably liquefied by viscous pore fluid. The momentum equation of the model describes how internal and boundary forces change as coarse-grained surge heads dominated by grain-contact friction grade into muddy debris-flow bodies more strongly influenced by fluid viscosity and pressure. Scaling analysis reveals that pore-pressure variations can cause flow resistance in surge heads to surpass that in debris-flow bodies by orders of magnitude. Numerical solutions of the coupled momentum and continuity equations provide good predictions of unsteady, nonuniform motion of experimental debris flows from initiation through deposition.

  13. Numerical Modeling of Interstitial Fluid Flow Coupled with Blood Flow through a Remodeled Solid Tumor Microvascular Network.

    PubMed

    Soltani, M; Chen, P

    2013-01-01

    Modeling of interstitial fluid flow involves processes such as fluid diffusion, convective transport in extracellular matrix, and extravasation from blood vessels. To date, majority of microvascular flow modeling has been done at different levels and scales mostly on simple tumor shapes with their capillaries. However, with our proposed numerical model, more complex and realistic tumor shapes and capillary networks can be studied. Both blood flow through a capillary network, which is induced by a solid tumor, and fluid flow in tumor's surrounding tissue are formulated. First, governing equations of angiogenesis are implemented to specify the different domains for the network and interstitium. Then, governing equations for flow modeling are introduced for different domains. The conservation laws for mass and momentum (including continuity equation, Darcy's law for tissue, and simplified Navier-Stokes equation for blood flow through capillaries) are used for simulating interstitial and intravascular flows and Starling's law is used for closing this system of equations and coupling the intravascular and extravascular flows. This is the first study of flow modeling in solid tumors to naturalistically couple intravascular and extravascular flow through a network. This network is generated by sprouting angiogenesis and consisting of one parent vessel connected to the network while taking into account the non-continuous behavior of blood, adaptability of capillary diameter to hemodynamics and metabolic stimuli, non-Newtonian blood flow, and phase separation of blood flow in capillary bifurcation. The incorporation of the outlined components beyond the previous models provides a more realistic prediction of interstitial fluid flow pattern in solid tumors and surrounding tissues. Results predict higher interstitial pressure, almost two times, for realistic model compared to the simplified model.

  14. Numerical Modeling of Interstitial Fluid Flow Coupled with Blood Flow through a Remodeled Solid Tumor Microvascular Network

    PubMed Central

    Soltani, M.; Chen, P.

    2013-01-01

    Modeling of interstitial fluid flow involves processes such as fluid diffusion, convective transport in extracellular matrix, and extravasation from blood vessels. To date, majority of microvascular flow modeling has been done at different levels and scales mostly on simple tumor shapes with their capillaries. However, with our proposed numerical model, more complex and realistic tumor shapes and capillary networks can be studied. Both blood flow through a capillary network, which is induced by a solid tumor, and fluid flow in tumor’s surrounding tissue are formulated. First, governing equations of angiogenesis are implemented to specify the different domains for the network and interstitium. Then, governing equations for flow modeling are introduced for different domains. The conservation laws for mass and momentum (including continuity equation, Darcy’s law for tissue, and simplified Navier–Stokes equation for blood flow through capillaries) are used for simulating interstitial and intravascular flows and Starling’s law is used for closing this system of equations and coupling the intravascular and extravascular flows. This is the first study of flow modeling in solid tumors to naturalistically couple intravascular and extravascular flow through a network. This network is generated by sprouting angiogenesis and consisting of one parent vessel connected to the network while taking into account the non-continuous behavior of blood, adaptability of capillary diameter to hemodynamics and metabolic stimuli, non-Newtonian blood flow, and phase separation of blood flow in capillary bifurcation. The incorporation of the outlined components beyond the previous models provides a more realistic prediction of interstitial fluid flow pattern in solid tumors and surrounding tissues. Results predict higher interstitial pressure, almost two times, for realistic model compared to the simplified model. PMID:23840579

  15. Prediction of fluid forces acting on a hand model in unsteady flow conditions.

    PubMed

    Kudo, Shigetada; Yanai, Toshimasa; Wilson, Barry; Takagi, Hideki; Vennell, Ross

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a method to predict fluid forces acting on the human hand in unsteady flow swimming conditions. A mechanical system consisting of a pulley and chain mechanism and load cell was constructed to rotate a hand model in fluid flows. To measure the angular displacement of the hand model a potentiometer was attached to the axis of the rotation. The hand model was then fixed at various angles about the longitudinal axis of the hand model and rotated at different flow velocities in a swimming flume for 258 different trials to approximate a swimmer's stroke in unsteady flow conditions. Pressures were taken from 12 transducers embedded in the hand model at a sampling frequency of 200Hz. The resultant fluid force acting on the hand model was then determined on the basis of the kinetic and kinematic data taken from the mechanical system at the frequency of 200Hz. A stepwise regression analysis was applied to acquire higher order polynomial equations that predict the fluid force acting on the accelerating hand model from the 12 pressure values. The root mean square (RMS) difference between the resultant fluid force measured and that predicted from the single best-fit polynomial equation across all trials was 5N. The method developed in the present study accurately predicted the fluid forces acting on the hand model.

  16. Fluid particle motion and Lagrangian velocities for pulsatile flow through a femoral artery branch model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cho, Y. I.; Crawford, D. W.; Back, L. H.; Back, M. R.

    1987-01-01

    A flow visualization study using selective dye injection and frame by frame analysis of a movie provided qualitative and quantitative data on the motion of marked fluid particles in a 60 degree artery branch model for simulation of physiological femoral artery flow. Physical flow features observed included jetting of the branch flow into the main lumen during the brief reverse flow period, flow separation along the main lumen wall during the near zero flow phase of diastole when the core flow was in the downstream direction, and inference of flow separation conditions along the wall opposite the branch later in systole at higher branch flow ratios. There were many similarities between dye particle motions in pulsatile flow and the comparative steady flow observations.

  17. Development of Efficient Real-Fluid Model in Simulating Liquid Rocket Injector Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheng, Gary; Farmer, Richard

    2003-01-01

    The characteristics of propellant mixing near the injector have a profound effect on the liquid rocket engine performance. However, the flow features near the injector of liquid rocket engines are extremely complicated, for example supercritical-pressure spray, turbulent mixing, and chemical reactions are present. Previously, a homogeneous spray approach with a real-fluid property model was developed to account for the compressibility and evaporation effects such that thermodynamics properties of a mixture at a wide range of pressures and temperatures can be properly calculated, including liquid-phase, gas- phase, two-phase, and dense fluid regions. The developed homogeneous spray model demonstrated a good success in simulating uni- element shear coaxial injector spray combustion flows. However, the real-fluid model suffered a computational deficiency when applied to a pressure-based computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code. The deficiency is caused by the pressure and enthalpy being the independent variables in the solution procedure of a pressure-based code, whereas the real-fluid model utilizes density and temperature as independent variables. The objective of the present research work is to improve the computational efficiency of the real-fluid property model in computing thermal properties. The proposed approach is called an efficient real-fluid model, and the improvement of computational efficiency is achieved by using a combination of a liquid species and a gaseous species to represent a real-fluid species.

  18. Permeability generation and resetting of tracers during metamorphic fluid flow: implications for advection-dispersion models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cartwright, Ian

    Advection-dispersion fluid flow models implicitly assume that the infiltrating fluid flows through an already fluid-saturated medium. However, whether rocks contain a fluid depends on their reaction history, and whether any initial fluid escapes. The behaviour of different rocks may be illustrated using hypothetical marble compositions. Marbles with diverse chemistries (e.g. calcite + dolomite + quartz) are relatively reactive, and will generally produce a fluid during heating. By contrast, marbles with more restricted chemistries (e.g. calcite + quartz or calcite-only) may not. If the rock is not fluid bearing when fluid infiltration commences, mineralogical reactions may produce a reaction-enhanced permeability in calcite + dolomite + quartz or calcite + quartz, but not in calcite-only marbles. The permeability production controls the pattern of mineralogical, isotopic, and geochemical resetting during fluid flow. Tracers retarded behind the mineralogical fronts will probably be reset as predicted by the advection-dispersion models; however, tracers that are expected to be reset ahead of the mineralogical fronts cannot progress beyond the permeability generating reaction. In the case of very unreactive lithologies (e.g. pure calcite marbles, cherts, and quartzites), the first reaction to affect the rocks may be a metasomatic one ahead of which there is little pervasive resetting of any tracer. Centimetre-scale layering may lead to the formation of self-perpetuating fluid channels in rocks that are not fluid saturated due to the juxtaposition of reactants. Such layered rocks may show patterns of mineralogical resetting that are not predicted by advection-dispersion models. Patterns of mineralogical and isotopic resetting in marbles from a number of terrains, for example: Chillagoe, Marulan South, Reynolds Range (Australia); Adirondack Mountains, Old Woman Mountains, Notch Peak (USA); and Stephen Cross Quarry (Canada) vary as predicted by these models.

  19. Unsteady fluid dynamic model for propeller induced flow fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katz, Joseph; Ashby, Dale L.; Yon, Steven

    1991-01-01

    A potential flow based three-dimensional panel method was modified to treat time dependent flow conditions in which the body's geometry may vary with time. The main objective of this effort was the study of a flow field due to a propeller rotating relative to a nonrotating body which is otherwise moving at a constant forward speed. Calculated surface pressure, thrust and torque coefficient data for a four-bladed marine propeller/body compared favorably with previously published experimental results.

  20. Marker-and-cell and Chorin finite difference modeling for fluid flow in a single fracture?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Duoxing

    2009-10-01

    It is important to set up a detailed dynamic model of the fluid flow through fractures for understanding many fluid processes in Earth sciences. Numerical simulation is a popular tool for exploring these processes. The objective of this study is to understand fluid flow in fractures. Contrary to the conventional macro-scale modeling approach, micro-scale simulation is carried out. The Navior-Stokes equation solver was developed by a staggered marker-and-cell and the Chorin pressure iterating finite difference approach. We analyze the effects of the Reynolds number and the frequency of pressure fluctuations on flow mainly through visualization. A significant result is that the effect of pressure fluctuation-induced fluid flow can be observed in a broader frequency range. The peak velocity shifts along the spatial axis depending upon the frequency of the pressure fluctuation. An effective frequency band of the pressure fluctuation was identified which dominates dynamic behavior of the flow. Another major finding is that there exits a critical frequency of the pressure fluctuation which controls approximately the flow dynamic behavior. We conclude that it is only possible to estimate the flow behavior from pressure fluctuation, if effective frequency range is properly accounted for.

  1. An Integrative Model of Excitation Driven Fluid Flow in a 2D Uterine Channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maggio, Charles; Fauci, Lisa; Chrispell, John

    2009-11-01

    We present a model of intra-uterine fluid flow in a sagittal cross-section of the uterus by inducing peristalsis in a 2D channel. This is an integrative multiscale computational model that takes as input fluid viscosity, passive tissue properties of the uterine channel and a prescribed wave of membrane depolarization. This voltage pulse is coupled to a model of calcium dynamics inside a uterine smooth muscle cell, which in turn drives a kinetic model of myosin phosphorylation governing contractile muscle forces. Using the immersed boundary method, these muscle forces are communicated to a fluid domain to simulate the contractions which occur in a human uterus. An analysis of the effects of model parameters on the flow properties and emergent geometry of the peristaltic channel will be presented.

  2. Microwave fluid flow meter

    DOEpatents

    Billeter, Thomas R.; Philipp, Lee D.; Schemmel, Richard R.

    1976-01-01

    A microwave fluid flow meter is described utilizing two spaced microwave sensors positioned along a fluid flow path. Each sensor includes a microwave cavity having a frequency of resonance dependent upon the static pressure of the fluid at the sensor locations. The resonant response of each cavity with respect to a variation in pressure of the monitored fluid is represented by a corresponding electrical output which can be calibrated into a direct pressure reading. The pressure drop between sensor locations is then correlated as a measure of fluid velocity. In the preferred embodiment the individual sensor cavities are strategically positioned outside the path of fluid flow and are designed to resonate in two distinct frequency modes yielding a measure of temperature as well as pressure. The temperature response can then be used in correcting for pressure responses of the microwave cavity encountered due to temperature fluctuations.

  3. Fluid simulation of tokamak ion temperature gradient turbulence with zonal flow closure model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamagishi, Osamu; Sugama, Hideo

    2016-03-01

    Nonlinear fluid simulation of turbulence driven by ion temperature gradient modes in the tokamak fluxtube configuration is performed by combining two different closure models. One model is a gyrofluid model by Beer and Hammett [Phys. Plasmas 3, 4046 (1996)], and the other is a closure model to reproduce the kinetic zonal flow response [Sugama et al., Phys. Plasmas 14, 022502 (2007)]. By including the zonal flow closure, generation of zonal flows, significant reduction in energy transport, reproduction of the gyrokinetic transport level, and nonlinear upshift on the critical value of gradient scale length are observed.

  4. A two-phase solid/fluid model for dense granular flows including dilatancy effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mangeney, Anne; Bouchut, Francois; Fernandez-Nieto, Enrique; Koné, El-Hadj; Narbona-Reina, Gladys

    2016-04-01

    Describing grain/fluid interaction in debris flows models is still an open and challenging issue with key impact on hazard assessment [{Iverson et al.}, 2010]. We present here a two-phase two-thin-layer model for fluidized debris flows that takes into account dilatancy effects. It describes the velocity of both the solid and the fluid phases, the compression/dilatation of the granular media and its interaction with the pore fluid pressure [{Bouchut et al.}, 2016]. The model is derived from a 3D two-phase model proposed by {Jackson} [2000] based on the 4 equations of mass and momentum conservation within the two phases. This system has 5 unknowns: the solid and fluid velocities, the solid and fluid pressures and the solid volume fraction. As a result, an additional equation inside the mixture is necessary to close the system. Surprisingly, this issue is inadequately accounted for in the models that have been developed on the basis of Jackson's work [{Bouchut et al.}, 2015]. In particular, {Pitman and Le} [2005] replaced this closure simply by imposing an extra boundary condition at the surface of the flow. When making a shallow expansion, this condition can be considered as a closure condition. However, the corresponding model cannot account for a dissipative energy balance. We propose here an approach to correctly deal with the thermodynamics of Jackson's model by closing the mixture equations by a weak compressibility relation following {Roux and Radjai} [1998]. This relation implies that the occurrence of dilation or contraction of the granular material in the model depends on whether the solid volume fraction is respectively higher or lower than a critical value. When dilation occurs, the fluid is sucked into the granular material, the pore pressure decreases and the friction force on the granular phase increases. On the contrary, in the case of contraction, the fluid is expelled from the mixture, the pore pressure increases and the friction force diminishes. To

  5. Numerical modeling of thermal behavior of fluid conduit flow with transport delay

    SciTech Connect

    Chow, T.T.; Ip, F.; Dunn, A.; Tse, W.L.

    1996-12-31

    Fluid mass and energy flows in air-conditioning systems vary with the changing output demand. In lengthy or complex ductwork and pipework, the accuracy in simulating the dynamic network behavior is greatly affected by the accuracy in modeling the radial energy losses and the axial transport lag. Transport delay consideration is also vital in the study of heat exchanger dynamics. This paper reviews the development of transport delay models in fluid conduit flow. A new numerical model is recommended in which the thermal behavior of fluid elements can be traced per physical distance traveled in unit time step. Justifications by sensitivity and frequency response analyses were performed. The results of analytical, experimental, as well as intermodel comparisons demonstrate the promising accuracy of the numerical model introduced.

  6. Geophysical fluid flow experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Broome, B. G.; Fichtl, G.; Fowlis, W.

    1979-01-01

    The essential fluid flow processes associated with the solar and Jovian atmospheres will be examined in a laboratory experiment scheduled for performance on Spacelab Missions One and Three. The experimental instrumentation required to generate and to record convective fluid flow is described. Details of the optical system configuration, the lens design, and the optical coatings are described. Measurement of thermal gradient fields by schlieren techniques and measurement of fluid flow velocity fields by photochromic dye tracers is achieved with a common optical system which utilizes photographic film for data recording. Generation of the photochromic dye tracers is described, and data annotation of experimental parameters on the film record is discussed.

  7. Predictions of bubbly flows in vertical pipes using two-fluid models in CFDS-FLOW3D code

    SciTech Connect

    Banas, A.O.; Carver, M.B.; Unrau, D.

    1995-09-01

    This paper reports the results of a preliminary study exploring the performance of two sets of two-fluid closure relationships applied to the simulation of turbulent air-water bubbly upflows through vertical pipes. Predictions obtained with the default CFDS-FLOW3D model for dispersed flows were compared with the predictions of a new model (based on the work of Lee), and with the experimental data of Liu. The new model, implemented in the CFDS-FLOW3D code, included additional source terms in the {open_quotes}standard{close_quotes} {kappa}-{epsilon} transport equations for the liquid phase, as well as modified model coefficients and wall functions. All simulations were carried out in a 2-D axisymmetric format, collapsing the general multifluid framework of CFDS-FLOW3D to the two-fluid (air-water) case. The newly implemented model consistently improved predictions of radial-velocity profiles of both phases, but failed to accurately reproduce the experimental phase-distribution data. This shortcoming was traced to the neglect of anisotropic effects in the modelling of liquid-phase turbulence. In this sense, the present investigation should be considered as the first step toward the ultimate goal of developing a theoretically sound and universal CFD-type two-fluid model for bubbly flows in channels.

  8. Chemical vapor deposition fluid flow simulation modelling tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bullister, Edward T.

    1992-01-01

    Accurate numerical simulation of chemical vapor deposition (CVD) processes requires a general purpose computational fluid dynamics package combined with specialized capabilities for high temperature chemistry. In this report, we describe the implementation of these specialized capabilities in the spectral element code NEKTON. The thermal expansion of the gases involved is shown to be accurately approximated by the low Mach number perturbation expansion of the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations. The radiative heat transfer between multiple interacting radiating surfaces is shown to be tractable using the method of Gebhart. The disparate rates of reaction and diffusion in CVD processes are calculated via a point-implicit time integration scheme. We demonstrate the use above capabilities on prototypical CVD applications.

  9. Application of a single-fluid model for the steam condensing flow prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smołka, K.; Dykas, S.; Majkut, M.; Strozik, M.

    2016-10-01

    One of the results of many years of research conducted in the Institute of Power Engineering and Turbomachinery of the Silesian University of Technology are computational algorithms for modelling steam flows with a non-equilibrium condensation process. In parallel with theoretical and numerical research, works were also started on experimental testing of the steam condensing flow. This paper presents a comparison of calculations of a flow field modelled by means of a single-fluid model using both an in-house CFD code and the commercial Ansys CFX v16.2 software package. The calculation results are compared to inhouse experimental testing.

  10. Fluid Flow of Vitrectomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharif-Kashani, Pooria; Juan, Tingting; Hubschman, Jean-Pierre; Eldredge, Jeff D.; Pirouz Kavehpour, H.

    2011-11-01

    Vitrectomy is a microsurgical technique to remove the vitreous gel from the vitreous cavity. Due to the viscoelastic nature of the vitreous gel, its complex fluidic behavior during vitrectomy affects the outcome of the procedure. Therefore, the knowledge of such behavior is essential for better designing the vitrectomy devices, such as vitreous cutters, and tuning the system settings such as port and shaft diameters, infusion, vacuum, and cutting rate. We studied the viscoelastic properties of porcine vitreous humor using a stressed-control shear rheometer and obtained its relaxation time, retardation time, and shear-zero viscosity. We performed a computational study of the flow in a vitreous cutter using the viscoelastic parameters obtained from the rheology experiments. We found significant differences between the modeled vitreous gel and a Newtonian surrogate fluid in the flow behavior and performance of the vitreous cutter. Our results will help in understanding of the vitreous behavior during vitrectomy and providing guidelines for new vitreous cutter design.

  11. Benchmarking Computational Fluid Dynamics Models for Application to Lava Flow Simulations and Hazard Assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dietterich, H. R.; Lev, E.; Chen, J.; Cashman, K. V.; Honor, C.

    2015-12-01

    Recent eruptions in Hawai'i, Iceland, and Cape Verde highlight the need for improved lava flow models for forecasting and hazard assessment. Existing models used for lava flow simulation range in assumptions, complexity, and the degree to which they have been validated against analytical solutions, experiments, and natural observations. In order to assess the capabilities of existing models and test the development of new codes, we conduct a benchmarking study of computational fluid dynamics models for lava flows, including VolcFlow, OpenFOAM, Flow3D, and COMSOL. Using new benchmark scenarios defined in Cordonnier et al. (2015) as a guide, we model Newtonian, Herschel-Bulkley and cooling flows over inclined planes, obstacles, and digital elevation models with a wide range of source conditions. Results are compared to analytical theory, analogue and molten basalt experiments, and measurements from natural lava flows. Our study highlights the strengths and weakness of each code, including accuracy and computational costs, and provides insights regarding code selection. We apply the best-fit codes to simulate the lava flows in Harrat Rahat, a predominately mafic volcanic field in Saudi Arabia. Input parameters are assembled from rheology and volume measurements of past flows using geochemistry, crystallinity, and present-day lidar and photogrammetric digital elevation models. With these data, we use our verified models to reconstruct historic and prehistoric events, in order to assess the hazards posed by lava flows for Harrat Rahat.

  12. Dynamic coupling between fluid flow and vein growth in fractures: a 3D numerical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarz, J.-O.; Enzmann, F.

    2012-04-01

    Fluid flow is one of the main mass transport mechanisms in the Earth's crust and abundant mineral vein networks are important indicators for fluid flow and fluid rock interaction. These systems are dynamic and part of the so called RTM processes (reaction-transport-mechanics). Understanding of mineral vein systems requires coupling of these processes. Here we present a conceptional model for dynamic vein growth of syntaxial, posttectonic veins generated by advective fluid flow and show first results of a numerical model for this scenario. Vein generation requires three processes to occur: (i) fracture generation by mechanical stress e.g. hydro-fracturing, (ii) flow of a supersaturated fluid on that fracture and (iii) crystallization of phase(s) on or in the fracture. 3D synthetic fractures are generated with the SynFrac code (Ogilvie, et al. 2006). Subsequently solutions of the Navier-Stokes equation for this fracture are computed by a computational fluid dynamics code called GeoDict (Wiegmann 2007). Transport (advective and diffusive) of chemical species to growth sites in the fracture and vein growth are computed by a self-written MATLAB script. The numerical model discretizes the wall rock and fracture geometry by volumetric pixels (voxels). Based on this representation, the model computes the three basic functions for vein generation: (a) nucleation, (b) fluid flow with transport of chemical species and (c) growth. The following conditions were chosen for these three modules. Nucleation is heterogeneous and occurs instantaneously at the wall rock/fracture interface. Advective and diffusive flow of a supersaturated fluid and related transport of chemical species occurs according to the computed fluid flow field by GeoDict. Concentration of chemical species at the inflow is constant, representing external fluid buffering. Changes/decrease in the concentration of chemical species occurs only due to vein growth. Growth of nuclei is limited either by transport of

  13. Pulsatile flow of blood using a modified second-grade fluid model

    SciTech Connect

    Massoudi, Mehrdad; Tran, P.X.

    2008-07-01

    We study the unsteady pulsatile flow of blood in an artery, where the effects of body acceleration are included. The blood is modeled as a modified second-grade fluid where the viscosity and the normal stress coefficients depend on the shear rate. It is assumed that the blood near the wall behaves as a Newtonian fluid, and in the core as a non-Newtonian fluid. This phenomenon is also known as the Fahraeus–Lindqvist effect. The equations are made dimensionless and solved numerically.

  14. Experimental fluid dynamics. Part 1: Brief overview. Part 2: Flow modeling and verification experiments: RFE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marvin, Joseph G.

    1987-01-01

    The role of experiment in Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) is discussed. Flow modeling of complex physics and determination of accuracy limits (confidence) are two ways in which experimentation can be used to develop CFD. The results of this discussion are presented in viewgraph form.

  15. Magnetic field effect on blood flow of Casson fluid in axisymmetric cylindrical tube: A fractional model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Farhad; Sheikh, Nadeem Ahmad; Khan, Ilyas; Saqib, Muhammad

    2017-02-01

    The effects of magnetohydrodynamics on the blood flow when blood is represented as a Casson fluid, along with magnetic particles in a horizontal cylinder is studied. The flow is due to an oscillating pressure gradient. The Laplace and finite Hankel transforms are used to obtain the closed form solutions of the fractional partial differential equations. Effects of various parameters on the flow of both blood and magnetic particles are shown graphically. The analysis shows that, the model with fractional order derivatives bring a remarkable changes as compared to the ordinary model. The study highlights that applied magnetic field reduces the velocities of both the blood and magnetic particles.

  16. Numerical models of caldera deformation: Effects of multiphase and multicomponent hydrothermal fluid flow

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hutnak, M.; Hurwitz, S.; Ingebritsen, S.E.; Hsieh, P.A.

    2009-01-01

    Ground surface displacement (GSD) in large calderas is often interpreted as resulting from magma intrusion at depth. Recent advances in geodetic measurements of GSD, notably interferometric synthetic aperture radar, reveal complex and multifaceted deformation patterns that often require complex source models to explain the observed GSD. Although hydrothermal fluids have been discussed as a possible deformation agent, very few quantitative studies addressing the effects of multiphase flow on crustal mechanics have been attempted. Recent increases in the power and availability of computing resources allow robust quantitative assessment of the complex time-variant thermal interplay between aqueous fluid flow and crustal deformation. We carry out numerical simulations of multiphase (liquid-gas), multicomponent (H 2O-CO2) hydrothermal fluid flow and poroelastic deformation using a range of realistic physical parameters and processes. Hydrothermal fluid injection, circulation, and gas formation can generate complex, temporally and spatially varying patterns of GSD, with deformation rates, magnitudes, and geometries (including subsidence) similar to those observed in several large calderas. The potential for both rapid and gradual deformation resulting from magma-derived fluids suggests that hydrothermal fluid circulation may help explain deformation episodes at calderas that have not culminated in magmatic eruption.

  17. Fluid friction and wall viscosity of the 1D blood flow model.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao-Fei; Nishi, Shohei; Matsukawa, Mami; Ghigo, Arthur; Lagrée, Pierre-Yves; Fullana, Jose-Maria

    2016-02-29

    We study the behavior of the pulse waves of water into a flexible tube for application to blood flow simulations. In pulse waves both fluid friction and wall viscosity are damping factors, and difficult to evaluate separately. In this paper, the coefficients of fluid friction and wall viscosity are estimated by fitting a nonlinear 1D flow model to experimental data. In the experimental setup, a distensible tube is connected to a piston pump at one end and closed at another end. The pressure and wall displacements are measured simultaneously. A good agreement between model predictions and experiments was achieved. For amplitude decrease, the effect of wall viscosity on the pulse wave has been shown as important as that of fluid viscosity.

  18. Numerical Modeling on Two phase Fluid flow in a Coupled Fracture-Skin-Matrix System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valsala Kumari, R.; G, S. K.

    2015-12-01

    Multiphase flow modeling studies below the ground surface is very essential for designing suitable remediation strategies for contaminated aquifers and for the development of petroleum and geothermal reservoirs. Presence of fractured bedrock beneath the ground surface will make multiphase flow process more complex due to its highly heterogeneous nature. A major challenge in modeling flow within a fractured rock is to capture the interaction between the high permeability fracture and the low permeability rock-matrix. In some instances, weathering and mineral depositions will lead to formation of an additional layer named fracture-skin at the fracture-matrix interface. Porosity and permeability of fracture-skin may significantly vary from the adjacent rock matrix and this variation will result in different flow and transport behavior within the fracture-skin. In the present study, an attempt has been made to model simultaneous flow of two immiscible phases (water and LNAPL) in a saturated coupled fracture-skin-matrix system. A fully-implicit finite difference model has been developed to simulate the variation of pressure and saturation of fluid phases along the fracture and within the rock-matrix. Sensitivity studies have been done to analyze the effect of change of various fracture-skin parameters such as porosity, diffusion coefficient and thickness on pressure and saturation distribution of both wetting and non-wetting fluid phases. It can be concluded from the study that the presence of fracture-skin is significantly affecting the fluid flow at the fracture-matrix interface and it can also be seen from the study that the flow behavior of both fluid phases is sensitive to fracture-skin parameters.

  19. A quantitative comparison between the flow factor approach model and the molecular dynamics simulation results for the flow of a confined molecularly thin fluid film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yongbin

    2015-06-01

    Quantitative comparisons were made between the flow factor approach model and the molecular dynamics simulation (MDS) results both of which describe the flow of a molecularly thin fluid film confined between two solid walls. Although these two approaches, respectively, calculate the flow of a confined molecularly thin fluid film by different ways, very good agreements were found between them when the Couette and Poiseuille flows, respectively, calculated from them were compared. It strongly indicates the validity of the flow factor approach model in modeling the flow of a confined molecularly thin fluid film.

  20. Experimental and modeling study of Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluid flow in pore network micromodels.

    PubMed

    Perrin, Christian L; Tardy, Philippe M J; Sorbie, Ken S; Crawshaw, John C

    2006-03-15

    The in situ rheology of polymeric solutions has been studied experimentally in etched silicon micromodels which are idealizations of porous media. The rectangular channels in these etched networks have dimensions typical of pore sizes in sandstone rocks. Pressure drop/flow rate relations have been measured for water and non-Newtonian hydrolyzed-polyacrylamide (HPAM) solutions in both individual straight rectangular capillaries and in networks of such capillaries. Results from these experiments have been analyzed using pore-scale network modeling incorporating the non-Newtonian fluid mechanics of a Carreau fluid. Quantitative agreement is seen between the experiments and the network calculations in the Newtonian and shear-thinning flow regions demonstrating that the 'shift factor,'alpha, can be calculated a priori. Shear-thickening behavior was observed at higher flow rates in the micromodel experiments as a result of elastic effects becoming important and this remains to be incorporated in the network model.

  1. Computer modelling of bone's adaptation: the role of normal strain, shear strain and fluid flow.

    PubMed

    Tiwari, Abhishek Kumar; Prasad, Jitendra

    2017-04-01

    Bone loss is a serious health problem. In vivo studies have found that mechanical stimulation may inhibit bone loss as elevated strain in bone induces osteogenesis, i.e. new bone formation. However, the exact relationship between mechanical environment and osteogenesis is less clear. Normal strain is considered as a prime stimulus of osteogenic activity; however, there are some instances in the literature where osteogenesis is observed in the vicinity of minimal normal strain, specifically near the neutral axis of bending in long bones. It suggests that osteogenesis may also be induced by other or secondary components of mechanical environment such as shear strain or canalicular fluid flow. As it is evident from the literature, shear strain and fluid flow can be potent stimuli of osteogenesis. This study presents a computational model to investigate the roles of these stimuli in bone adaptation. The model assumes that bone formation rate is roughly proportional to the normal, shear and fluid shear strain energy density above their osteogenic thresholds. In vivo osteogenesis due to cyclic cantilever bending of a murine tibia has been simulated. The model predicts results close to experimental findings when normal strain, and shear strain or fluid shear were combined. This study also gives a new perspective on the relation between osteogenic potential of micro-level fluid shear and that of macro-level bending shear. Attempts to establish such relations among the components of mechanical environment and corresponding osteogenesis may ultimately aid in the development of effective approaches to mitigating bone loss.

  2. Fluid flow model of the Cerro Prieto geothermal field based on well log interpretation

    SciTech Connect

    Halfman, S.E.; Lippmann, M.J.; Zelwer, R.; Howard, J.H.

    1982-10-01

    The subsurface geology of the Cerro Prieto geothermal field was analyzed using geophysical and lithologic logs. The distribution of permeable and relatively impermeable units and the location of faults are shown in a geologic model of the system. By incorporating well completion data and downhole temperature profiles into the geologic model, it was possible to determine he direction of geothermal fluid flow and the role of subsurface geologic features that control this movement.

  3. Fluid flow model of the Cerro Prieto Geothermal Field based on well log interpretation

    SciTech Connect

    Halfman, S.E.; Lippmann, M.J.; Zelwe, R.; Howard, J.H.

    1982-08-10

    The subsurface geology of the Cerro Prieto geothermal field was analyzed using geophysical and lithologic logs. The distribution of permeable and relatively impermeable units and the location of faults are shown in a geologic model of the system. By incorporating well completion data and downhole temperature profiles into the geologic model, it was possible to determine the direction of geothermal fluid flow and the role of subsurface geologic features that control this movement.

  4. A Rayleigh-Plesset based transport model for cryogenic fluid cavitating flow computations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, SuGuo; Wang, GuoYu; Hu, ChangLi

    2014-04-01

    The present article focuses on modeling issues to simulate cryogenic fluid cavitating flows. A revised cavitation model, in which the thermal effect is considered, is derivated and established based on Kubota model. Cavitating flow computations are conducted around an axisymmetric ogive and a 2D quarter caliber hydrofoil in liquid nitrogen implementing the revised model and Kubota model coupled with energy equation and dynamically updating the fluid physical properties, respecitively. The results show that the revised cavitation model can better describe the mass transport process in the cavitation process in cryogenic fluids. Compared with Kubota model, the revised model can reflect the observed "frosty" appearance within the cavity. The cavity length becomes shorter and it can capture the temperature and pressure depressions more consistently in the cavitating region, particularly at the rear of the cavity. The evaporation rate decreases, and while the magnitude of the condensation rate becomes larger because of the thermal effect terms in the revised model compared with the results obtained by the Kubota model.

  5. Multiscale computational model of fluid flow and matrix deformation in decellularized liver.

    PubMed

    Nishii, Kenichiro; Reese, Greg; Moran, Emma C; Sparks, Jessica L

    2016-04-01

    Currently little is known about the biomechanical environment in decellularized tissue. The goal of this research is to quantify the mechanical microenvironment in decellularized liver, for varying organ-scale perfusion conditions, using a combined experimental/computational approach. Needle-guided ultra-miniature pressure sensors were inserted into liver tissue to measure parenchymal fluid pressure ex-situ in portal vein-perfused native (n=5) and decellularized (n=7) ferret liver, for flow rates from 3-12mL/min. Pressures were also recorded at the inlet near the portal vein cannula to estimate total vascular resistance of the specimens. Experimental results were fit to a multiscale computational model to simulate perfusion conditions inside native versus decellularized livers for four experimental flow rates. The multiscale model consists of two parts: an organ-scale electrical analog model of liver hemodynamics and a tissue-scale model that predicts pore fluid pressure, pore fluid velocity, and solid matrix stress and deformation throughout the 3D hepatic lobule. Distinct models were created for native versus decellularized liver. Results show that vascular resistance decreases by 82% as a result of decellularization. The hydraulic conductivity of the decellularized liver lobule, a measure of tissue permeability, was 5.6 times that of native liver. For the four flow rates studied, mean fluid pressures in the decellularized lobule were 0.6-2.4mmHg, mean fluid velocities were 211-767μm/s, and average solid matrix principal strains were 1.7-6.1%. In the future this modeling platform can be used to guide the optimization of perfusion seeding and conditioning strategies for decellularized scaffolds in liver bioengineering.

  6. Nonlinear modeling and testing of magneto-rheological fluids in low shear rate squeezing flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farjoud, Alireza; Ahmadian, Mehdi; Mahmoodi, Nima; Zhang, Xinjie; Craft, Michael

    2011-08-01

    A novel analytical investigation of magneto-rheological (MR) fluids in squeezing flows is performed and the results are validated with experimental test data. The squeeze flow of MR fluids has recently been of great interest to researchers. This is due to the large force capacity of MR fluids in squeeze mode compared to other modes (valve and shear modes), which makes the squeeze mode appropriate for a wide variety of applications such as impact dampers and engine mounts. Tested MR fluids were capable of providing a large range of controllable force along a short stroke in squeeze mode. A mathematical model was developed using perturbation techniques to predict closed-form solutions for velocity field, shear rate distribution, pressure distribution and squeeze force. Therefore, the obtained solutions greatly help with the design process of intelligent devices that use MR fluids in squeeze mode. The mathematical model also reduces the need for complicated and computationally expensive numerical simulations. The analytical results are validated by performing experimental tests on a novel MR device called an 'MR pouch' in an MR squeeze mode rheometer, both designed and built at CVeSS.

  7. Optimization of a new flow design for solid oxide cells using computational fluid dynamics modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duhn, Jakob Dragsbæk; Jensen, Anker Degn; Wedel, Stig; Wix, Christian

    2016-12-01

    Design of a gas distributor to distribute gas flow into parallel channels for Solid Oxide Cells (SOC) is optimized, with respect to flow distribution, using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) modelling. The CFD model is based on a 3d geometric model and the optimized structural parameters include the width of the channels in the gas distributor and the area in front of the parallel channels. The flow of the optimized design is found to have a flow uniformity index value of 0.978. The effects of deviations from the assumptions used in the modelling (isothermal and non-reacting flow) are evaluated and it is found that a temperature gradient along the parallel channels does not affect the flow uniformity, whereas a temperature difference between the channels does. The impact of the flow distribution on the maximum obtainable conversion during operation is also investigated and the obtainable overall conversion is found to be directly proportional to the flow uniformity. Finally the effect of manufacturing errors is investigated. The design is shown to be robust towards deviations from design dimensions of at least ±0.1 mm which is well within obtainable tolerances.

  8. Fluid Transport in Porous Rocks. II. Hydrodynamic Model of Flow and Intervoxel Coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mansfield, P.; Issa, B.

    In a preceding paper [P. Mansfield and B. Issa, J. Magn. Reson. A122, 137-148 (1996)], a stochastic model of fluid flow in porous rocks based upon the experimental observation of water flow through a Bentheimer sandstone core was proposed. The flow maps were measured by NMR-imaging techniques. The stochastic theory led to a Gaussian velocity distribution with a mean value in accord with Darcy's law. Also predicted was a linear relationship between flow variance and mean fluid flow through rock, the Mansfield-Issa equation, originally proposed as an empirical relationship. In the present work a flow coupling mechanism between voxels is proposed. Examination of the flow coupling between isolated voxel pairs leads to a complementary explanation of the Gaussian velocity distribution, and also gives further details of the Mansfield-Issa equation. These details lead to a new expression for the connectivity, < C>, between voxels with an experimental value of < C> = 5.64 × 10 -9for Bentheimer sandstone.

  9. Magnetically stimulated fluid flow patterns

    ScienceCinema

    Martin, Jim; Solis, Kyle

    2016-07-12

    Sandia National Laboratories' Jim Martin and Kyle Solis explain research on the effects of magnetic fields on fluid flows and how they stimulate vigorous flows. Fluid flow is a necessary phenomenon in everything from reactors to cooling engines in cars.

  10. Magnetically stimulated fluid flow patterns

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Jim; Solis, Kyle

    2014-03-06

    Sandia National Laboratories' Jim Martin and Kyle Solis explain research on the effects of magnetic fields on fluid flows and how they stimulate vigorous flows. Fluid flow is a necessary phenomenon in everything from reactors to cooling engines in cars.

  11. Heterogeneities in fractured aquifers: Examples from outcrops and implications for fluid flow modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonellini, Marco; Nella Mollema, Pauline

    2016-04-01

    Surface outcrops provide natural analogs for aquifers and they offer an opportunity to study the geometry of geologic heterogeneities in three dimensions over a range of scales. We show photographs, maps, quantitative field data of rock fractures and sedimentary features in outcrops exposed in a unique collection of many different settings. These include small-scale sedimentary structures, carbonate nodules, faults, and other fractures as documented in outcrops of porous sandstone (Utah, USA and Italy), tight sandstones (Bolivia), dolomite (Northern Italy), and carbonates (Central Italy). We simulate the geometries observed in outcrops with simple conceptual and numerical models of flow to show how important it is to recognize the appropriate attributes for the description and the process responsible for the formation of geologic heterogeneities. For example, knowing the type of structural heterogeneities (fault, joint, compaction band, stylolite, and vein) and their development mechanics helps to predict the distribution and preferential orientation of these features within an aquifer. This knowledge is particularly important for modeling of fluid flow where geophysical or borehole data are lacking. Geologic heterogeneities of sedimentary, structural or diagenetic (chemical) nature influence the fluid flow properties in many aquifers and reservoirs at scales varying over several orders of magnitude and with a spatial variability ranging from mm to tens of meters. Heterogeneities may enhance or degrade porosity and permeability, they impart anisotropy to permeability and dispersion and affect mass transport-related processes in groundwater. Furthermore, aquifer heterogeneities control aquifer continuity and compartmentalization. In fractured aquifers, geologic and diagenetic heterogeneities may affect connectivity, aperture of the flow channels or the distribution of permeability buffers, barriers and seals. Also variations in layer thickness and lithology within a

  12. A consistent model for fluid distribution, viscosity distribution, and flow-thermal structure in subduction zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horiuchi, Shun-suke; Iwamori, Hikaru

    2016-05-01

    Water plays crucial roles in the subduction zone dynamics affecting the thermal-flow structure through the fluid processes. We aim to understand what controls the dynamics and construct a model to solve consistently fluid generation, fluid transport, its reaction with the solid and resultant viscosity, and thermal-flow structure. We highlight the effect of mechanical weakening of rocks associated with hydration. The viscosity of serpentinite (ηserp) in subduction zones critically controls the flow-thermal structure via extent of mechanical coupling between the subducting slab and overlying mantle wedge. When ηserp is greater than 1021 Pa s, the thermal-flow structure reaches a steady state beneath the volcanic zone, and the melting region expands until Cin (initial water content in the subducting oceanic crust) reaches 3 wt %, and it does not expand from 3 wt %. On the other hand, when ηserp is less than 1019 Pa s, the greater water dependence of viscosity (expressed by a larger fv) confines a hot material to a narrower channel intruding into the wedge corner from a deeper part of the back-arc region. Consequently, the overall heat flux becomes less for a larger fv. When ageba (age of back-arc basin as a rifted lithosphere) = 7.5 Ma, the increase in fv weakens but shifts the melting region toward the trench side because of the narrow channel flow intruding into the wedge corner, where as it shuts down melting when ageba=20 Ma. Several model cases (particularly those with ηserp=1020 to 1021 Pa s and a relatively large fv for Cin=2 to 3 wt %) broadly account for the observations in the Northeast Japan arc (i.e., location and width of volcanic chain, extent of serpentinite, surface heat flow, and seismic tomography), although the large variability of surface heat flow and seismic tomographic images does not allow us to constrain the parameter range tightly.

  13. Modelling flow and heat transfer in two-fluid interfacial flows, with applications to drops and jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehdi-Nejad, Vala

    2003-10-01

    A two-dimensional, axi-symmetric model is developed to calculate flow and heat transfer in a two-fluid system. The model uses one set of the governing equations combined with a volume tracking method on a fixed structured mesh to model the simultaneous movement of mass, momentum and energy across cell boundaries. Both first and second-order methods are used to approximate temperature fields with sharp gradients that exist near a fluid-fluid interface. The model is first used to simulate the effect of surrounding air during a droplet impact. Bubble entrapment is observed in both numerical simulation and experimental photographs. The impact of water, n-heptane and molten nickel droplets on a solid surface is simulated. When a droplet approaches another surface, air in the gap between them was forced out. Increased air pressure below the droplet creates a depression in its surface, in which air is trapped. Different behaviors observed for water and n-heptane simulations are attributed to differences in wetting behavior. Next, to demonstrate the capabilities of the model, the interfacial heat transfer from molten tin droplets falling in an oil bath is modelled. The development of vortices behind droplets is simulated and the effect of fluid recirculation and oil thermal conductivity on heat dissipation is studied. The thesis concludes with application of the model to a study of interfacial heat transfer during jet break up. It is demonstrated that the change of fluid properties associated with interfacial heat transfer affects the jet break up and the resulting droplet size. It is also shown that obtaining a desirable droplet size during jet break up not only depends on hydrodynamic conditions such as nozzle diameter, jet initial velocity, and pressure, but also on thermal conditions such as the initial jet temperature and the surrounding fluid thermal properties.

  14. Numerical modeling of heat transfer and fluid flow in laser metal deposition by powder injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Zhiqiang

    Laser metal deposition is an additive manufacturing technique which allows quick fabrication of fully-dense metallic components directly from Computer Aided Design (CAD) solid models. A self-consistent three-dimensional model was developed for the laser metal deposition process by powder injection, which simulates heat transfer, phase changes, and fluid flow in the melt pool. The governing equations for solid, liquid and gas phases in the calculation domain have been formulated using the continuum model. The free surface in the melt pool has been tracked by the Volume of Fluid (VOF) method, while the VOF transport equation was solved using the Piecewise Linear Interface Calculation (PLIC) method. Surface tension was modeled by taking the Continuum Surface Force (CSF) model combined with a force-balance flow algorithm. Laser-powder interaction was modeled to account for the effects of laser power attenuation and powder temperature rise during the laser metal deposition process. The governing equations were discretized in the physical space using the finite volume method. The advection terms were approximated using the MUSCL flux limiter scheme. The fluid flow and energy equations were solved in a coupled manner. The incompressible flow equations were solved using a two-step projection method, which requires a solution of a Poisson equation for the pressure field. The discretized pressure Poisson equation was solved using the ICCG (Incomplete Cholesky Conjugate Gradient) solution technique. The energy equation was solved by an enthalpy-based method. Temperature-dependent thermal-physical material properties were considered in the numerical implementation. The numerical model was validated by comparing simulations with experimental measurements.

  15. Application of two-fluid model in the unsteady flow simulation for a multiphase rotodynamic pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Y Yu, Z.; Zhu, B. S.; Cao, S. L.; Y Wang, G.

    2013-12-01

    Based on the assumption of tiny bubbly flow, the gas-liquid two-phase unsteady flow in a multiphase rotodynamic pump was numerically simulated with two-fluid model. The two-phase transport process and the evolution characteristic of the pump head were analyzed. In the working conditions, the liquid flow rate was constant, and the IGVF (inlet gas volume fraction) was 0.05, 0.15 and 0.25, respectively. The k ω- based SST model was used for turbulence; the drag force and the added mass force were accounted for in the interfacial momentum transfer terms. Because the wrap angle of the blade was large, the hybrid mesh was adopted to guarantee high mesh quality. The simulation results demonstrate that two-fluid model can more reasonably capture the transport process than the homogeneous model; and the drag law should be corrected based on the mixture viscosity in high gas volume fraction conditions. If the liquid flow rate is constant, the increase of IGVF can raise the pressure in the inlet extended region, while the pressure in the outlet extended region will not be affected much, thus the pump head will go down. In addition, due to the fluctuation of gas volume fraction field, the pump head will also fluctuate around a stable value in the transport process.

  16. Modeling studies for multiphase fluid and heat flow processes in nuclear waste isolation

    SciTech Connect

    Pruess, K.

    1988-07-01

    Multiphase fluid and heat flow plays an important role in many problems relating to the disposal of nuclear wastes in geologic media. Examples include boiling and condensation processes near heat-generating wastes, flow of water and formation gas in partially saturated formations, evolution of a free gas phase from waste package corrosion in initially water-saturated environments, and redistribution (dissolution, transport, and precipitation) of rock minerals in non-isothermal flow fields. Such processes may strongly impact upon waste package and repository design considerations and performance. This paper summarizes important physical phenomena occurring in multiphase and nonisothermal flows, as well as techniques for their mathematical modeling and numerical simulation. Illustrative applications are given for a number of specific fluid and heat flow problems, including: thermohydrologic conditions near heat-generating waste packages in the unsaturated zone; repository-wide convection effects in the unsaturated zone; effects of quartz dissolution and precipitation for disposal in the saturated zone; and gas pressurization and flow corrosion of low-level waste packages. 34 refs; 7 figs; 2 tabs.

  17. A two-fluid model for black-hole accretion flows: particle acceleration and disc structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jason P.; Becker, Peter A.

    2017-02-01

    Hot, tenuous advection-dominated accretion flows around black holes are ideal sites for the Fermi acceleration of relativistic particles at standing shock waves in the accretion disc. Previous work has demonstrated that the shock-acceleration process can be efficient enough to power the observed, strong outflows in radio-loud active galaxies such as M87. However, the dynamical effect (back-reaction) on the flow, exerted by the pressure of the relativistic particles, has not been previously considered, and this effect can have a significant influence on the disc structure. We reexamine the problem by developing a new, two-fluid model for the structure of the accretion disc that includes the dynamical effect of the relativistic particle pressure, combined with the pressure of the background (thermal) gas. The new model is analogous to the two-fluid model of cosmic ray acceleration in supernova-driven shock waves. As part of the model, we also develop a new set of shock jump conditions, which are solved along with the hydrodynamic conservation equations to determine the structure of the accretion disc. The solutions include the formation of a mildly relativistic outflow (jet) at the shock radius, driven by the relativistic particles accelerated in the disc. One of our main conclusions is that in the context of the new two-fluid accretion model, global smooth (shock-free) solutions do not exist, and the disc must always contain a standing shock wave, at least in the inviscid case considered here.

  18. A Numerical Hydro-Chemo-Mechanical Model for Fault Activation under Reactive Fluid Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pouya, A.; Tounsi, H.; Rohmer, J.

    2015-12-01

    The migration of CO2-rich fluid in fractured rock masses can cause processes such as mineral dissolution and precipitation, chemically induced weakening, which can affect the long-term mechanical and transport properties of the rock mass as well as the stability of fault systems. Some numerical approaches are already available in the literature for modelling the dissolution/precipitation phenomena in fractures (e.g. Yasuhara & Elsworth 2007) as well as subcritical crack propagation (e.g. Park et al. 2007). Generally, the dissolution is supposed to increase the rock porosity and, in this way, decrease the rock strength. Some experimental data are available for the variation of rock strength and stiffness parameters with the porosity and so as a consequence of dissolution process (Bemer et al. 2004). Also the effect of chemical processes on the mechanical stability has been studied and modelled numerically in the framework of continuum materials and the context, in particular, of weathering in underground galleries (Ghabezloo & Pouya 2006). In the context of fault systems, a complete numerical modelling of the stability evolution with the flow of a reactive fluid has not yet been done. In this paper we present a simplified, but complete, set of equations for a whole system of coupled hydro-chemo-mechanical process of reactive fluid flow inside a fault. These equations have been implemented in Porofis, a FEM numerical code specially conceived for HCM processes in porous fractured media. We show how this numerical method allows to model the coupled HCM processes in the fault and the evolution of the mechanical stability in presence of in situ stresses and reactive fluid flow.

  19. Fluid flow, mineral reactions, and metasomatism

    SciTech Connect

    Ferry, J.M.; Dipple, G.M. )

    1991-03-01

    A general model that relates fluid flow along a temnperature gradient to chemical reaction in rocks can be used to quantitatively interpret petrologic and geochemical data on metasomatism from ancient flow systems in terms of flow direction and time-integrated fluid flux. The model is applied to regional metamorphism, quartz veins, and a metasomatized ductile fault zone.

  20. Computational fluid dynamics model for predicting flow of viscous fluids in a large fermentor with hydrofoil flow impellers and internal cooling coils

    PubMed

    Kelly; Humphrey

    1998-03-01

    Considerable debate has occurred over the use of hydrofoil impellers in large-scale fermentors to improve mixing and mass transfer in highly viscous non-Newtonian systems. Using a computational fluid dynamics software package (Fluent, version 4.30) extensive calculations were performed to study the effect of impeller speed (70-130 rpm), broth rheology (value of power law flow behavior index from 0.2 to 0.6), and distance between the cooling coil bank and the fermentor wall (6-18 in.) on flow near the perimeter of a large (75-m3) fermentor equipped with A315 impellers. A quadratic model utilizing the data was developed in an attempt to correlate the effect of A315 impeller speed, power law flow behavior index, and distance between the cooling coil bank and the fermentor wall on the average axial velocity in the coil bank-wall region. The results suggest that there is a potential for slow or stagnant flow in the coil bank-wall region which could result in poor oxygen and heat transfer for highly viscous fermentations. The results also indicate that there is the potential for slow or stagnant flow in the region between the top impeller and the gas headspace when flow through the coil bank-wall region is slow. Finally, a simple guideline was developed to allow fermentor design engineers to predict the degree of flow behind a bank of helical cooling coils in a large fermentor with hydrofoil flow impellers.

  1. An improved gray lattice Boltzmann model for simulating fluid flow in multi-scale porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jiujiang; Ma, Jingsheng

    2013-06-01

    A lattice Boltzmann (LB) model is proposed for simulating fluid flow in porous media by allowing the aggregates of finer-scale pores and solids to be treated as 'equivalent media'. This model employs a partially bouncing-back scheme to mimic the resistance of each aggregate, represented as a gray node in the model, to the fluid flow. Like several other lattice Boltzmann models that take the same approach, which are collectively referred to as gray lattice Boltzmann (GLB) models in this paper, it introduces an extra model parameter, ns, which represents a volume fraction of fluid particles to be bounced back by the solid phase rather than the volume fraction of the solid phase at each gray node. The proposed model is shown to conserve the mass even for heterogeneous media, while this model and that model of Walsh et al. (2009) [1], referred to the WBS model thereafter, are shown analytically to recover Darcy-Brinkman's equations for homogenous and isotropic porous media where the effective viscosity and the permeability are related to ns and the relaxation parameter of LB model. The key differences between these two models along with others are analyzed while their implications are highlighted. An attempt is made to rectify the misconception about the model parameter ns being the volume fraction of the solid phase. Both models are then numerically verified against the analytical solutions for a set of homogenous porous models and compared each other for another two sets of heterogeneous porous models of practical importance. It is shown that the proposed model allows true no-slip boundary conditions to be incorporated with a significant effect on reducing errors that would otherwise heavily skew flow fields near solid walls. The proposed model is shown to be numerically more stable than the WBS model at solid walls and interfaces between two porous media. The causes to the instability in the latter case are examined. The link between these two GLB models and a

  2. Steady shear rheometry of dissipative particle dynamics models of polymer fluids in reverse Poiseuille flow.

    PubMed

    Fedosov, Dmitry A; Karniadakis, George Em; Caswell, Bruce

    2010-04-14

    Polymer fluids are modeled with dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) as undiluted bead-spring chains and their solutions. The models are assessed by investigating their steady shear-rate properties. Non-Newtonian viscosity and normal stress coefficients, for shear rates from the lower to the upper Newtonian regimes, are calculated from both plane Couette and plane Poiseuille flows. The latter is realized as reverse Poiseuille flow (RPF) generated from two Poiseuille flows driven by uniform body forces in opposite directions along two-halves of a computational domain. Periodic boundary conditions ensure the RPF wall velocity to be zero without density fluctuations. In overlapping shear-rate regimes the RPF properties are confirmed to be in good agreement with those calculated from plane Couette flow with Lees-Edwards periodic boundary conditions (LECs), the standard virtual rheometer for steady shear-rate properties. The concentration and the temperature dependence of the properties of the model fluids are shown to satisfy the principles of concentration and temperature superposition commonly employed in the empirical correlation of real polymer-fluid properties. The thermodynamic validity of the equation of state is found to be a crucial factor for the achievement of time-temperature superposition. With these models, RPF is demonstrated to be an accurate and convenient virtual rheometer for the acquisition of steady shear-rate rheological properties. It complements, confirms, and extends the results obtained with the standard LEC configuration, and it can be used with the output from other particle-based methods, including molecular dynamics, Brownian dynamics, smooth particle hydrodynamics, and the lattice Boltzmann method.

  3. A Two-Phase Solid/Fluid Model for Dense Granular Flows Including Dilatancy Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mangeney, A.; Bouchut, F.; Fernández-Nieto, E. D.; Narbona-Reina, G.; Kone, E. H.

    2014-12-01

    We propose a thin layer depth-averaged two-phase model to describe solid-fluid mixtures such as debris flows. It describes the velocity of the two phases, the compression/dilatation of the granular media and its interaction with the pore fluid pressure, that itself modifies the friction within the granular phase (Iverson et al., 2010). The model is derived from a 3D two-phase model proposed by Jackson (2000) based on the 4 equations of mass and momentum conservation within the two phases. This system has 5 unknowns: the solid and fluid velocities, the solid and fluid pressures and the solid volume fraction. As a result, an additional equation inside the mixture is necessary to close the system. Surprisingly, this issue is inadequately accounted for in the models that have been developed on the basis of Jackson's work (Bouchut et al., 2014). In particular, Pitman and Le replaced this closure simply by imposing an extra boundary condition at the surface of the flow. When making a shallow expansion, this condition can be considered as a closure condition. However, the corresponding model cannot account for a dissipative energy balance. We propose here an approach to correctly deal with the thermodynamics of Jackson's equations. We close the mixture equations by a weak compressibility relation involving a critical density, or equivalently a critical pressure. Moreover, we relax one boundary condition, making it possible for the fluid to escape the granular media when compression of the granular mass occurs. Furthermore, we introduce second order terms in the equations making it possible to describe the evolution of the pore fluid pressure in response to the compression/dilatation of the granular mass without prescribing an extra ad-hoc equation for the pore pressure. We prove that the energy balance associated with this Jackson closure is dissipative, as well as its thin layer associated model. We present several numerical tests for the 1D case that are compared to the

  4. A Two-Phase Solid/Fluid Model for Dense Granular Flows Including Dilatancy Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mangeney, Anne; Bouchut, Francois; Fernandez-Nieto, Enrique; Narbona-Reina, Gladys

    2015-04-01

    We propose a thin layer depth-averaged two-phase model to describe solid-fluid mixtures such as debris flows. It describes the velocity of the two phases, the compression/dilatation of the granular media and its interaction with the pore fluid pressure, that itself modifies the friction within the granular phase (Iverson et al., 2010). The model is derived from a 3D two-phase model proposed by Jackson (2000) based on the 4 equations of mass and momentum conservation within the two phases. This system has 5 unknowns: the solid and fluid velocities, the solid and fluid pressures and the solid volume fraction. As a result, an additional equation inside the mixture is necessary to close the system. Surprisingly, this issue is inadequately accounted for in the models that have been developed on the basis of Jackson's work (Bouchut et al., 2014). In particular, Pitman and Le replaced this closure simply by imposing an extra boundary condition at the surface of the flow. When making a shallow expansion, this condition can be considered as a closure condition. However, the corresponding model cannot account for a dissipative energy balance. We propose here an approach to correctly deal with the thermodynamics of Jackson's equations. We close the mixture equations by a weak compressibility relation involving a critical density, or equivalently a critical pressure. Moreover, we relax one boundary condition, making it possible for the fluid to escape the granular media when compression of the granular mass occurs. Furthermore, we introduce second order terms in the equations making it possible to describe the evolution of the pore fluid pressure in response to the compression/dilatation of the granular mass without prescribing an extra ad-hoc equation for the pore pressure. We prove that the energy balance associated with this Jackson closure is dissipative, as well as its thin layer associated model. We present several numerical tests for the 1D case that are compared to the

  5. Optimization of a Two-Fluid Hydrodynamic Model of Churn-Turbulent Flow

    SciTech Connect

    Donna Post Guillen

    2009-07-01

    A hydrodynamic model of two-phase, churn-turbulent flows is being developed using the computational multiphase fluid dynamics (CMFD) code, NPHASE-CMFD. The numerical solutions obtained by this model are compared with experimental data obtained at the TOPFLOW facility of the Institute of Safety Research at the Forschungszentrum Dresden-Rossendorf. The TOPFLOW data is a high quality experimental database of upward, co-current air-water flows in a vertical pipe suitable for validation of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes. A five-field CMFD model was developed for the continuous liquid phase and four bubble size groups using mechanistic closure models for the ensemble-averaged Navier-Stokes equations. Mechanistic models for the drag and non-drag interfacial forces are implemented to include the governing physics to describe the hydrodynamic forces controlling the gas distribution. The closure models provide the functional form of the interfacial forces, with user defined coefficients to adjust the force magnitude. An optimization strategy was devised for these coefficients using commercial design optimization software. This paper demonstrates an approach to optimizing CMFD model parameters using a design optimization approach. Computed radial void fraction profiles predicted by the NPHASE-CMFD code are compared to experimental data for four bubble size groups.

  6. Integrated geophysical and hydrothermal models of flank degassing and fluid flow at Masaya Volcano, Nicaragua

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sanford, Ward E.; Pearson, S.C.P.; Kiyosugi, K.; Lehto, H.L.; Saballos, J.A.; Connor, C.B.

    2012-01-01

    We investigate geologic controls on circulation in the shallow hydrothermal system of Masaya volcano, Nicaragua, and their relationship to surface diffuse degassing. On a local scale (~250 m), relatively impermeable normal faults dipping at ~60° control the flowpath of water vapor and other gases in the vadose zone. These shallow normal faults are identified by modeling of a NE-SW trending magnetic anomaly of up to 2300 nT that corresponds to a topographic offset. Elevated SP and CO2 to the NW of the faults and an absence of CO2 to the SE suggest that these faults are barriers to flow. TOUGH2 numerical models of fluid circulation show enhanced flow through the footwalls of the faults, and corresponding increased mass flow and temperature at the surface (diffuse degassing zones). On a larger scale, TOUGH2 modeling suggests that groundwater convection may be occurring in a 3-4 km radial fracture zone transecting the entire flank of the volcano. Hot water rising uniformly into the base of the model at 1 x 10-5 kg/m2s results in convection that focuses heat and fluid and can explain the three distinct diffuse degassing zones distributed along the fracture. Our data and models suggest that the unusually active surface degassing zones at Masaya volcano can result purely from uniform heat and fluid flux at depth that is complicated by groundwater convection and permeability variations in the upper few km. Therefore isolating the effects of subsurface geology is vital when trying to interpret diffuse degassing in light of volcanic activity.

  7. Computational Fluid Dynamics modeling of contrast transport in basilar aneurysms following flow-altering surgeries.

    PubMed

    Vali, Alireza; Abla, Adib A; Lawton, Michael T; Saloner, David; Rayz, Vitaliy L

    2017-01-04

    In vivo measurement of blood velocity fields and flow descriptors remains challenging due to image artifacts and limited resolution of current imaging methods; however, in vivo imaging data can be used to inform and validate patient-specific computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models. Image-based CFD can be particularly useful for planning surgical interventions in complicated cases such as fusiform aneurysms of the basilar artery, where it is crucial to alter pathological hemodynamics while preserving flow to the distal vasculature. In this study, patient-specific CFD modeling was conducted for two basilar aneurysm patients considered for surgical treatment. In addition to velocity fields, transport of contrast agent was simulated for the preoperative and postoperative conditions using two approaches. The transport of a virtual contrast passively following the flow streamlines was simulated to predict post-surgical flow regions prone to thrombus deposition. In addition, the transport of a mixture of blood with an iodine-based contrast agent was modeled to compare and verify the CFD results with X-ray angiograms. The CFD-predicted patterns of contrast flow were qualitatively compared to in vivo X-ray angiograms acquired before and after the intervention. The results suggest that the mixture modeling approach, accounting for the flow rates and properties of the contrast injection, is in better agreement with the X-ray angiography data. The virtual contrast modeling assessed the residence time based on flow patterns unaffected by the injection procedure, which makes the virtual contrast modeling approach better suited for prediction of thrombus deposition, which is not limited to the peri-procedural state.

  8. Modelling the damage potential of fluid flows for animal cells undergoing cultivation in bioreactors.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanford Keen, Giles

    1996-11-01

    Mechanical disruption and injury sustained by animal cells undergoing cultivation in bioreactors is an important problem in biotechnology. Damage to cells is thought to be caused primarily by bubbles bursting at the free surface of the culture medium. Here we present computational studies applying a mathematical model for the cell damage rates experienced by cells in laminar flow. Two fluid dynamical systems are considered - namely a converging channel and a single bursting bubble. The flows are calculated using a fourth-order finite difference technique on a stretched grid, and a boundary integral method respectively. It is possible to obtain an estimate for the number of cells in a particular population which are likely to be disrupted by the forces they experience in the flow. This is done by calculating the maximum rate of strain experienced by fluid particles, and combining this with experimental data on the strength and size of cells, obtained by micromanipulation techniques. The resulting information is then used together with the cell damage model to produce a cell damage prediction. The computational results are compared with experimental measurements of cell death, to validate the model for cell damage.

  9. Zebrafish models of idiopathic scoliosis link cerebrospinal fluid flow defects to spine curvature.

    PubMed

    Grimes, D T; Boswell, C W; Morante, N F C; Henkelman, R M; Burdine, R D; Ciruna, B

    2016-06-10

    Idiopathic scoliosis (IS) affects 3% of children worldwide, yet the mechanisms underlying this spinal deformity remain unknown. Here we show that ptk7 mutant zebrafish, a faithful developmental model of IS, exhibit defects in ependymal cell cilia development and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow. Transgenic reintroduction of Ptk7 in motile ciliated lineages prevents scoliosis in ptk7 mutants, and mutation of multiple independent cilia motility genes yields IS phenotypes. We define a finite developmental window for motile cilia in zebrafish spine morphogenesis. Notably, restoration of cilia motility after the onset of scoliosis blocks spinal curve progression. Together, our results indicate a critical role for cilia-driven CSF flow in spine development, implicate irregularities in CSF flow as an underlying biological cause of IS, and suggest that noninvasive therapeutic intervention may prevent severe scoliosis.

  10. Recent advances in computational fluid dynamics relevant to the modelling of pesticide flow on leaf surfaces.

    PubMed

    Glass, C Richard; Walters, Keith F A; Gaskell, Philip H; Lee, Yeaw C; Thompson, Harvey M; Emerson, David R; Gu, Xiao-Jun

    2010-01-01

    Increasing societal and governmental concern about the worldwide use of chemical pesticides is now providing strong drivers towards maximising the efficiency of pesticide utilisation and the development of alternative control techniques. There is growing recognition that the ultimate goal of achieving efficient and sustainable pesticide usage will require greater understanding of the fluid mechanical mechanisms governing the delivery to, and spreading of, pesticide droplets on target surfaces such as leaves. This has led to increasing use of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) as an important component of efficient process design with regard to pesticide delivery to the leaf surface. This perspective highlights recent advances in CFD methods for droplet spreading and film flows, which have the potential to provide accurate, predictive models for pesticide flow on leaf surfaces, and which can take account of each of the key influences of surface topography and chemistry, initial spray deposition conditions, evaporation and multiple droplet spreading interactions. The mathematical framework of these CFD methods is described briefly, and a series of new flow simulation results relevant to pesticide flows over foliage is provided. The potential benefits of employing CFD for practical process design are also discussed briefly.

  11. Low order modelling for feedback control of fluid flows around complex geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dellar, Oliver; Jones, Bryn; Department of Automatic Control; Systems Engineering Collaboration

    2015-11-01

    The majority of goods transportation vehicles' power is consumed in overcoming aerodynamic drag. Reduction in pressure drag via feedback control could have significant economic and environmental effects on CO2 emissions, and reduce fatigue on the body by suppressing vortex shedding. The difficulty in designing such controllers lies in obtaining models suited to modern control design methods, which are necessarily of much lesser complexity than typical Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) models, or models derived from immediate spatial discretisation of the Navier-Stokes equations. This work develops an approach for modelling fluid flows using frequency response data generated for individual computational node sub-systems that result from a CFD type spatial discretisation of the governing equations. Input-to-sensor frequency response data for the overall system are then computed by forming interconnections between adjacent nodes via a Redheffer Star Product operation, from which one typically observes low-order dynamics. With this data, a low-order model can be identified and used for controller design. This method avoids manipulating large matrices and is therefore computationally efficient and numerically well-conditioned. It can be readily applied to complex geometry flows.

  12. Computational Fluid Dynamics Modelling of the Diurnal Variation of Flow in a Street Canyon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwak, Kyung-Hwan; Baik, Jong-Jin; Lee, Sang-Hyun; Ryu, Young-Hee

    2011-10-01

    Urban surface and radiation processes are incorporated into a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model to investigate the diurnal variation of flow in a street canyon with an aspect ratio of 1. The developed CFD model predicts surface and substrate temperatures of the roof, walls, and road. One-day simulations are performed with various ambient wind speeds of 2, 3, 4, 5, and 6 ms-1, with the ambient wind perpendicular to the north-south oriented canyon. During the day, the largest maximum surface temperature for all surfaces is found at the road surface for an ambient wind speed of 3 ms-1 (56.0°C). Two flow regimes are identified by the vortex configuration in the street canyon. Flow regime I is characterized by a primary vortex. Flow regime II is characterized by two counter-rotating vortices, which appears in the presence of strong downwind building-wall heating. Air temperature is relatively low near the downwind building wall in flow regime I and inside the upper vortex in flow regime II. In flow regime II, the upper vortex expands with increasing ambient wind speed, thus enlarging the extent of cool air within the canyon. The canyon wind speed in flow regime II is proportional to the ambient wind speed, but that in flow regime I is not. For weak ambient winds, the dependency of surface sensible heat flux on the ambient wind speed is found to play an essential role in determining the relationship between canyon wind speed and ambient wind speed.

  13. Numerical investigation of dynamics of unsteady sheet/cloud cavitating flow using a compressible fluid model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Guang-Hao; Wang, Guo-Yu; Huang, Biao; Hu, Chang-Li; Wang, Zhi-Ying; Wang, Jian

    2015-02-01

    In this paper, a compressible fluid model is proposed to investigate dynamics of the turbulent cavitating flow over a Clark-Y hydrofoil. The numerical simulation is based on the homogeneous mixture approach coupled with filter-based density correction model (FBDCM) turbulence model and Zwart cavitation model. Considering the compressibility effect, the equation of state of each phase is introduced into the numerical model. The results show that the predicted results agree well with experimental data concerning the time-averaged lift/drag coefficient and shedding frequency. The quasi-periodic evolution of sheet/cloud cavitation and the resulting lift and drag are discussed in detail. Especially, the present compressible-mixture numerical model is capable of simulating the shock waves in the final stage of cavity collapse. It is found that the shock waves may cause the transient significant increase and decrease in lift and drag if the cavity collapses near the foil surface.

  14. An Improved Lattice Boltzmann Model for Non-Newtonian Flows with Applications to Solid-Fluid Interactions in External Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adam, Saad; Premnath, Kannan

    2016-11-01

    Fluid mechanics of non-Newtonian fluids, which arise in numerous settings, are characterized by non-linear constitutive models that pose certain unique challenges for computational methods. Here, we consider the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM), which offers some computational advantages due to its kinetic basis and its simpler stream-and-collide procedure enabling efficient simulations. However, further improvements are necessary to improve its numerical stability and accuracy for computations involving broader parameter ranges. Hence, in this study, we extend the cascaded LBM formulation by modifying its moment equilibria and relaxation parameters to handle a variety of non-Newtonian constitutive equations, including power-law and Bingham fluids, with improved stability. In addition, we include corrections to the moment equilibria to obtain an inertial frame invariant scheme without cubic-velocity defects. After preforming its validation study for various benchmark flows, we study the physics of non-Newtonian flow over pairs of circular and square cylinders in a tandem arrangement, especially the wake structure interactions and their effects on resulting forces in each cylinder, and elucidate the effect of the various characteristic parameters.

  15. Characteristics of Jeffrey fluid model for peristaltic flow of chyme in small intestine with magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akbar, Noreen Sher; Nadeem, S.; Lee, Changhoon

    In the present article we have analyzed the Jeffrey fluid model for the peristaltic flow of chyme in the small intestine. We have formulated the problem using two non-periodic sinusoidal waves of different wavelengths propagating with same speed c along the outer wall of the tube. Governing equations for the problem under consideration have been simplified under the assumptions of long wavelength and low Reynolds number approximation (such assumptions are consistent since Re (Reynolds number) is very small and long wavelength approximation also exists in the small intestine). Exact solutions have been calculated for velocity and pressure rise. Physical behavior of different parameters of Jeffrey fluid has been presented graphically for velocity, pressure rise, pressure gradient and frictional forces. The trapping phenomenon is also discussed at the end of the article.

  16. Fracture propagation and fluid flow in fractured reservoirs: field studies and numerical models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brenner, S. L.

    2005-05-01

    In fractured reservoirs (e.g., for petroleum or geothermal water), fluid flow is largely controlled by the permeability of the fracture network. Together with shear fractures (faults), hydrofractures (extension fractures generated by internal fluid pressure, including mineral veins and joints) contribute considerably to the permeability in fractured reservoirs. The permeability of an individual fracture is proportional to the cube of its aperture. But for fluid flow to occur between two sites in a reservoir, there must be at least one interconnected cluster of fractures that links these sites, that is, the percolation threshold must be reached. Field observations show that in heterogeneous and anisotropic, e.g., layered, rocks many hydrofractures become arrested or offset at layer contacts (become stratabound) and do not form interconnected networks. Here I present results from field studies in layered sedimentary rocks from the Bristol Channel Basin, UK. The Lower Jurassic sections exposed near Kilve, Somerset Coast (Southwest England), and around Nash Point, Glamorgan Coast (South Wales) consist of limestone and shale layers dissected by normal faults (Kilve) or strike-slip faults (Nash Point). Whereas joints occur throughout the study areas, calcite veins occur almost exclusively in the cores and damage zones of the faults. These observations indicate that geothermal water was transported along the then-active faults into the host rocks. Furthermore, there is evidence that the veins were injected as hydrofractures from the fault planes into the limestone layers next to the faults. The most important factors that contribute to hydrofracture arrest or offset are discontinuities, stiffness (Young's modulus) changes between layers, and stress barriers - layers where the local stress field is unfavorable to the propagation of a hydrofracture. Using numerical models I explore the conditions for hydrofracture propagation and conclude that mechanical layering largely

  17. Computational modelling on 2D magnetohydrodynamic flow of Sisko fluid over a time dependent stretching surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmood, T.; Shahzad, A.; Iqbal, Z.; Ahmed, J.; Khan, M.

    A study is presented for the flow and heat transfer of Sisko fluid model over an unsteady stretching sheet in the presence of uniform magnetic field. While taking newly developed similarity transformations, the governing time dependent partial differential equations are reduced to nonlinear ordinary differential equations. Numerical solutions of the reduced nonlinear differential equations are found by employing Shooting method. The influence of physical parameters of interest on the velocity and temperature profiles are highlighted graphically and examined in detail. Moreover, the skin friction coefficient and Nusselt number are tabulated against influential parameters. Skin friction coefficient increases with unsteadiness parameter, magnetic field and suction parameter.

  18. Analysis Of Residence Time Distribution Of Fluid Flow By Axial Dispersion Model

    SciTech Connect

    Sugiharto; Su'ud, Zaki; Kurniadi, Rizal; Waris, Abdul; Abidin, Zainal

    2010-12-23

    Radioactive tracer {sup 82}Br in the form of KBr-82 with activity {+-} 1 mCi has been injected into steel pipeline to qualify the extent dispersion of water flowing inside it. Internal diameter of the pipe is 3 in. The water source was originated from water tank through which the water flow gravitically into the pipeline. Two collimated sodium iodide detectors were used in this experiment each of which was placed on the top of the pipeline at the distance of 8 and 11 m from injection point respectively. Residence time distribution (RTD) curves obtained from injection of tracer are elaborated numerically to find information of the fluid flow properties. The transit time of tracer calculated from the mean residence time (MRT) of each RTD curves is 14.9 s, therefore the flow velocity of the water is 0.2 m/s. The dispersion number, D/uL, for each RTD curve estimated by using axial dispersion model are 0.055 and 0.06 respectively. These calculations are performed after fitting the simulated axial dispersion model on the experiment curves. These results indicated that the extent of dispersion of water flowing in the pipeline is in the category of intermediate.

  19. Multicomponent model of deformation and detachment of a biofilm under fluid flow.

    PubMed

    Tierra, Giordano; Pavissich, Juan P; Nerenberg, Robert; Xu, Zhiliang; Alber, Mark S

    2015-05-06

    A novel biofilm model is described which systemically couples bacteria, extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) and solvent phases in biofilm. This enables the study of contributions of rheology of individual phases to deformation of biofilm in response to fluid flow as well as interactions between different phases. The model, which is based on first and second laws of thermodynamics, is derived using an energetic variational approach and phase-field method. Phase-field coupling is used to model structural changes of a biofilm. A newly developed unconditionally energy-stable numerical splitting scheme is implemented for computing the numerical solution of the model efficiently. Model simulations predict biofilm cohesive failure for the flow velocity between [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] m s(-1) which is consistent with experiments. Simulations predict biofilm deformation resulting in the formation of streamers for EPS exhibiting a viscous-dominated mechanical response and the viscosity of EPS being less than [Formula: see text]. Higher EPS viscosity provides biofilm with greater resistance to deformation and to removal by the flow. Moreover, simulations show that higher EPS elasticity yields the formation of streamers with complex geometries that are more prone to detachment. These model predictions are shown to be in qualitative agreement with experimental observations.

  20. Multicomponent model of deformation and detachment of a biofilm under fluid flow

    PubMed Central

    Tierra, Giordano; Pavissich, Juan P.; Nerenberg, Robert; Xu, Zhiliang; Alber, Mark S.

    2015-01-01

    A novel biofilm model is described which systemically couples bacteria, extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) and solvent phases in biofilm. This enables the study of contributions of rheology of individual phases to deformation of biofilm in response to fluid flow as well as interactions between different phases. The model, which is based on first and second laws of thermodynamics, is derived using an energetic variational approach and phase-field method. Phase-field coupling is used to model structural changes of a biofilm. A newly developed unconditionally energy-stable numerical splitting scheme is implemented for computing the numerical solution of the model efficiently. Model simulations predict biofilm cohesive failure for the flow velocity between and m s−1 which is consistent with experiments. Simulations predict biofilm deformation resulting in the formation of streamers for EPS exhibiting a viscous-dominated mechanical response and the viscosity of EPS being less than . Higher EPS viscosity provides biofilm with greater resistance to deformation and to removal by the flow. Moreover, simulations show that higher EPS elasticity yields the formation of streamers with complex geometries that are more prone to detachment. These model predictions are shown to be in qualitative agreement with experimental observations. PMID:25808342

  1. A fiber matrix model for fluid flow and streaming potentials in the canaliculi of an osteon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeng, Y.; Cowin, S. C.; Weinbaum, S.

    1994-01-01

    A theoretical model is developed to predict the fluid shear stress and streaming potential at the surface of osteocytic processes in the lacunar-canalicular porosity of an osteon when the osteon is subject to mechanical loads that are parallel or perpendicular to its axis. The theory developed in Weinbaum et al. (31) for the flow through a proteoglycan matrix in a canaliculus is employed in a poroelastic model for the osteon. Our formulation is a generalization of that of Petrov et al. (17). Our model predicts that, in order to satisfy the measured frequency dependence of the phase and magnitude of the SGP in macroscopic bone samples, the fiber spacing in the fluid annulus must lie in the narrow range 6-7 nm typical of the spacing of GAG sidechains along a protein monomer. The model predictions for the local SGP profiles in the osteon agree with the experimental observations of Starkebaum et al. (24). The theory predicts that the pore pressure relaxation time, tau d, for a 150-300 microns diameter osteon with the foregoing matrix structure is approximately 0.03-0.13 sec, and that the amplitude of the mean fluid shear stress on the membrane of the osteocytic process at the mean areal radius of the osteon has a maximum at 28 Hz if tau d = 0.06 sec. This maximum, which is independent of the magnitude of the loading, could be important in vivo since the recent experiments of Turner et al. (28) and McLeod et al. (15) have a peak in the strain frequency spectrum between 20 and 30 Hz that also appears to be independent of the type (magnitude) of loading. Numerical predictions for the amplitude of the average fluid shear stress on the osteocytic membrane at the mean areal radius of the osteon show that the fluid shear stress associated with the low amplitude 20-30 Hz spectral strain component is at least as large as the average fluid shear stress associated with the high amplitude 1 Hz stride component, although the latter loading is an order of magnitude larger, and has a

  2. SDEM modelling of deformation associated with a listric fault system and associated fluid flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasmussen, Marie L.; Clausen, Ole R.; Egholm, David L.; Andresen, Katrine J.

    2016-04-01

    Numerical modelling of geological structures using FEM, DEM and SDEM methods as well as analogue modelling are widely used in order to achieve a better understanding of the kinematics and dynamics during deformation. The methods are furthermore the ultimate source for mapping (observing) the true geometry of geological structures as well as subsurface fluid flow phenomena in 3D seismic data developed for hydrocarbon exploration. Here we use 3D seismic data and SDEM modelling to suggest a dynamic-kinematic evolution of the deformation in the hangingwall of a listric fault overlying an active salt roller. We use the results to obtain a better understanding of the fluid flow in a complex deformed hangingwall. The case study is focused at the D-1 fault trend in the western part of the Norwegian Danish Basin, at the northern slope of the Ringkøbing-Fyn High. The D-1 main fault detaches along the northern flank of a Zechstein salt roller which was active during the Cenozoic. The seismic analysis shows a system of secondary normal antithetic and synthetic faults dipping approximately 50-60dg within the hangingwall. Shallow gas is trapped in the hangingwall and the secondary faults often confine the accumulations i.e. indicating that the secondary faults are sealing. The modelling confirms that the geometry of the secondary faults is highly controlled by the rheology of different layers in the hangingwall but also on the intensity of the salt movement. The modelling also suggests the presence of vertical deformation zones; structures which are not directly observed on the seismic data. The vertical deformation zones are related to the differential vertical movement of the strata due to salt migration. A neural network trained chimney probability cube shows high probabilities for the presence of minor vertical gas chimneys below the gas accumulations suggesting that vertical fluid migration in the hangingwall occurred in areas with significant vertical salt movements. The

  3. Modeling Lymph Flow and Fluid Exchange with Blood Vessels in Lymph Nodes

    PubMed Central

    Jafarnejad, Mohammad; Woodruff, Matthew C.; Zawieja, David C.; Carroll, Michael C.; Moore, J.E.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: Lymph nodes (LNs) are positioned strategically throughout the body as critical mediators of lymph filtration and immune response. Lymph carries cytokines, antigens, and cells to the downstream LNs, and their effective delivery to the correct location within the LN directly impacts the quality and quantity of immune response. Despite the importance of this system, the flow patterns in LN have never been quantified, in part because experimental characterization is so difficult. Methods and Results: To achieve a more quantitative knowledge of LN flow, a computational flow model has been developed based on the mouse popliteal LN, allowing for a parameter sensitivity analysis to identify the important system characteristics. This model suggests that about 90% of the lymph takes a peripheral path via the subcapsular and medullary sinuses, while fluid perfusing deeper into the paracortex is sequestered by parenchymal blood vessels. Fluid absorption by these blood vessels under baseline conditions was driven mainly by oncotic pressure differences between lymph and blood, although the magnitude of fluid transfer is highly dependent on blood vessel surface area. We also predict that the hydraulic conductivity of the medulla, a parameter that has never been experimentally measured, should be at least three orders of magnitude larger than that of the paracortex to ensure physiologic pressures across the node. Conclusions: These results suggest that structural changes in the LN microenvironment, as well as changes in inflow/outflow conditions, dramatically alter the distribution of lymph, cytokines, antigens, and cells within the LN, with great potential for modulating immune response. PMID:26683026

  4. Inverse model of fully coupled fluid flow and stress in fractured rock masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y.; Rutqvist, J.

    2008-12-01

    In order to reflect the real behavior of the seepage field and deformation field during the environment change and construction process£¬the basic equations and FEM methods for fully coupled analysis of fluid flow and stress are developed£¬based on the assumptions of small deformation and incompressible water flow in complicated fractured rock masses. Both the equivalent continuum media model and the discrete media model are adopted. And the modified initial flow method is used to deal with the free surface of unconfined seepage. Due to the difficulty in determining the parameters of water flow field, stress field and their coupling relations, an inverse model is presented for the fully coupled problem in which both the data of water head and displacement are taken into consideration. Objective function is defined based on sensitivity analysis of parameters, and the relative values of water head, displacement on parameters are adopted in the establishment of objective function. A hybrid genetic algorithm is proposed as optimization method. The probability of crossover and mutation is determined according to chromosome fitness and a concept of self- adaptive probability is given. In addition, simplex method is also applied to increase the ability of local search, the operation of accelerated cycle is used in order to decrease optimization time.

  5. Nanoscale Pore Imaging and Pore Scale Fluid Flow Modeling in Chalk

    SciTech Connect

    Tomutsa, Liviu; Silin, Dmitriy

    2004-08-19

    For many rocks of high economic interest such as chalk, diatomite, tight gas sands or coal, nanometer scale resolution is needed to resolve the 3D-pore structure, which controls the flow and trapping of fluids in the rocks. Such resolutions cannot be achieved with existing tomographic technologies. A new 3D imaging method, based on serial sectioning and using the Focused Ion Beam (FIB) technology has been developed. FIB allows for the milling of layers as thin as 10 nanometers by using accelerated Ga+ ions to sputter atoms from the sample surface. After each milling step, as a new surface is exposed, a 2D image of this surface is generated. Next, the 2D images are stacked to reconstruct the 3D pore or grain structure. Resolutions as high as 10 nm are achievable using such a technique. A new robust method of pore-scale fluid flow modeling has been developed and applied to sandstone and chalk samples. The method uses direct morphological analysis of the pore space to characterize the petrophysical properties of diverse formations. Not only petrophysical properties (porosity, permeability, relative permeability and capillary pressures) can be computed but also flow processes, such as those encountered in various IOR approaches, can be simulated. Petrophysical properties computed with the new method using the new FIB data will be presented. Present study is a part of the development of an Electronic Core Laboratory at LBNL/UCB.

  6. A mathematical model of fluid and gas flow in nanoporous media.

    PubMed

    Monteiro, Paulo J M; Rycroft, Chris H; Barenblatt, Grigory Isaakovich

    2012-12-11

    The mathematical modeling of the flow in nanoporous rocks (e.g., shales) becomes an important new branch of subterranean fluid mechanics. The classic approach that was successfully used in the construction of the technology to develop oil and gas deposits in the United States, Canada, and the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics becomes insufficient for deposits in shales. In the present article a mathematical model of the flow in nanoporous rocks is proposed. The model assumes the rock consists of two components: (i) a matrix, which is more or less an ordinary porous or fissurized-porous medium, and (ii) specific organic inclusions composed of kerogen. These inclusions may have substantial porosity but, due to the nanoscale of pores, tubes, and channels, have extremely low permeability on the order of a nanodarcy (~109-²¹ m² ) or less. These inclusions contain the majority of fluid: oil and gas. Our model is based on the hypothesis that the permeability of the inclusions substantially depends on the pressure gradient. At the beginning of the development of the deposit, boundary layers are formed at the boundaries of the low-permeable inclusions, where the permeability is strongly increased and intensive flow from inclusions to the matrix occurs. The resulting formulae for the production rate of the deposit are presented in explicit form. The formulae demonstrate that the production rate of deposits decays with time following a power law whose exponent lies between -1/2 and -1. Processing of experimental data obtained from various oil and gas deposits in shales demonstrated an instructive agreement with the prediction of the model.

  7. A mathematical model of fluid and gas flow in nanoporous media

    PubMed Central

    Monteiro, Paulo J. M.; Rycroft, Chris H.; Barenblatt, Grigory Isaakovich

    2012-01-01

    The mathematical modeling of the flow in nanoporous rocks (e.g., shales) becomes an important new branch of subterranean fluid mechanics. The classic approach that was successfully used in the construction of the technology to develop oil and gas deposits in the United States, Canada, and the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics becomes insufficient for deposits in shales. In the present article a mathematical model of the flow in nanoporous rocks is proposed. The model assumes the rock consists of two components: (i) a matrix, which is more or less an ordinary porous or fissurized-porous medium, and (ii) specific organic inclusions composed of kerogen. These inclusions may have substantial porosity but, due to the nanoscale of pores, tubes, and channels, have extremely low permeability on the order of a nanodarcy () or less. These inclusions contain the majority of fluid: oil and gas. Our model is based on the hypothesis that the permeability of the inclusions substantially depends on the pressure gradient. At the beginning of the development of the deposit, boundary layers are formed at the boundaries of the low-permeable inclusions, where the permeability is strongly increased and intensive flow from inclusions to the matrix occurs. The resulting formulae for the production rate of the deposit are presented in explicit form. The formulae demonstrate that the production rate of deposits decays with time following a power law whose exponent lies between and . Processing of experimental data obtained from various oil and gas deposits in shales demonstrated an instructive agreement with the prediction of the model. PMID:23188803

  8. Computer modeling of fluid flow and combustion in the ISV (In Situ Vitrification) confinement hood

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, R.W.; Paik, S.

    1990-09-01

    Safety and suitability objectives for the application of the In Situ Vitrification (ISV) technology at the INEL require that the physical processes involved in ISVV be modeled to determine their operational behavior. The mathematical models that have been determined to address the modeling needs adequately for the ISV analysis package are detailed elsewhere. The present report is concerned with the models required for simulating the reacting flow that occurs in the ISV confinement hood. An experimental code named COYOTE has been secured that appears adequate to model the combustion in the confinement hood. The COYOTE code is a two-dimensional, transient, compressible, Eulerian, gas dynamics code for modeling reactive flows. It recognizes nonuniform Cartesian and cylindrical geometry and is based on the ICE (Implicit Continuous-fluid Eulerian) family of solution methods. It includes models for chemical reactions based on chemical kinetics as well as equilibrium chemistry. The mathematical models contained in COYOTE, their discrete analogs, the solution procedure, code structure and some test problems are presented in the report. 12 refs., 17 figs., 6 tabs.

  9. Matrix-fracture transfer shape factor for modeling flow of a compressible fluid in dual-porosity media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranjbar, Ehsan; Hassanzadeh, Hassan

    2011-05-01

    The matrix-fracture transfer shape factor is one of the important parameters in the modeling of fluid flow in fractured porous media using a dual-porosity concept. Warren and Root [36] introduced the dual-porosity concept and suggested a relation for the shape factor. There is no general relationship for determining the shape factor for a single-phase flow of slightly compressible fluids. Therefore, different studies reported different values for this parameter, as an input into the flow models. Several investigations have been reported on the shape factor for slightly compressible fluids. However, the case of compressible fluids has not been investigated in the past. The focus of this study is, therefore, to find the shape factor for the single-phase flow of compressible fluids (gases) in fractured porous media. In this study, a model for the determination of the shape factor for compressible fluids is presented; and, the solution of nonlinear gas diffusivity equation is used to derive the shape factor. The integral method and the method of moments are used to solve the nonlinear governing equation by considering the pressure dependency of the viscosity and isothermal compressibility of the fluid. The approximate semi-analytical model for the shape factor presented in this study is verified using single-porosity, fine-grid, numerical simulations. The dependency of the shape factor on the gas specific gravity, pressure and temperature are also investigated. The theoretical analysis presented improves our understanding of fluid flow in fractured porous media. In addition, the developed matrix-fracture transfer shape factor can be used as an input for modeling flow of compressible fluids in dual-porosity systems, such as naturally fractured gas reservoirs, coalbed methane reservoirs and fractured tight gas reservoirs.

  10. Parameter estimation from flowing fluid temperature logging data in unsaturated fractured rock using multiphase inverse modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Mukhopadhyay, S.; Tsang, Y.; Finsterle, S.

    2009-01-15

    A simple conceptual model has been recently developed for analyzing pressure and temperature data from flowing fluid temperature logging (FFTL) in unsaturated fractured rock. Using this conceptual model, we developed an analytical solution for FFTL pressure response, and a semianalytical solution for FFTL temperature response. We also proposed a method for estimating fracture permeability from FFTL temperature data. The conceptual model was based on some simplifying assumptions, particularly that a single-phase airflow model was used. In this paper, we develop a more comprehensive numerical model of multiphase flow and heat transfer associated with FFTL. Using this numerical model, we perform a number of forward simulations to determine the parameters that have the strongest influence on the pressure and temperature response from FFTL. We then use the iTOUGH2 optimization code to estimate these most sensitive parameters through inverse modeling and to quantify the uncertainties associated with these estimated parameters. We conclude that FFTL can be utilized to determine permeability, porosity, and thermal conductivity of the fracture rock. Two other parameters, which are not properties of the fractured rock, have strong influence on FFTL response. These are pressure and temperature in the borehole that were at equilibrium with the fractured rock formation at the beginning of FFTL. We illustrate how these parameters can also be estimated from FFTL data.

  11. Enhanced Geothermal Systems Research and Development: Models of Subsurface Chemical Processes Affecting Fluid Flow

    SciTech Connect

    Moller, Nancy; Weare J. H.

    2008-05-29

    Successful exploitation of the vast amount of heat stored beneath the earth’s surface in hydrothermal and fluid-limited, low permeability geothermal resources would greatly expand the Nation’s domestic energy inventory and thereby promote a more secure energy supply, a stronger economy and a cleaner environment. However, a major factor limiting the expanded development of current hydrothermal resources as well as the production of enhanced geothermal systems (EGS) is insufficient knowledge about the chemical processes controlling subsurface fluid flow. With funding from past grants from the DOE geothermal program and other agencies, we successfully developed advanced equation of state (EOS) and simulation technologies that accurately describe the chemistry of geothermal reservoirs and energy production processes via their free energies for wide XTP ranges. Using the specific interaction equations of Pitzer, we showed that our TEQUIL chemical models can correctly simulate behavior (e.g., mineral scaling and saturation ratios, gas break out, brine mixing effects, down hole temperatures and fluid chemical composition, spent brine incompatibilities) within the compositional range (Na-K-Ca-Cl-SO4-CO3-H2O-SiO2-CO2(g)) and temperature range (T < 350°C) associated with many current geothermal energy production sites that produce brines with temperatures below the critical point of water. The goal of research carried out under DOE grant DE-FG36-04GO14300 (10/1/2004-12/31/2007) was to expand the compositional range of our Pitzer-based TEQUIL fluid/rock interaction models to include the important aluminum and silica interactions (T < 350°C). Aluminum is the third most abundant element in the earth’s crust; and, as a constituent of aluminosilicate minerals, it is found in two thirds of the minerals in the earth’s crust. The ability to accurately characterize effects of temperature, fluid mixing and interactions between major rock-forming minerals and hydrothermal and

  12. Computational Modeling of Fluid Flow through a Fracture in Permeable Rock

    SciTech Connect

    Crandall, Dustin; Ahmadi, Goodarz; Smith, Duane H

    2010-01-01

    Laminar, single-phase, finite-volume solutions to the Navier–Stokes equations of fluid flow through a fracture within permeable media have been obtained. The fracture geometry was acquired from computed tomography scans of a fracture in Berea sandstone, capturing the small-scale roughness of these natural fluid conduits. First, the roughness of the two-dimensional fracture profiles was analyzed and shown to be similar to Brownian fractal structures. The permeability and tortuosity of each fracture profile was determined from simulations of fluid flow through these geometries with impermeable fracture walls. A surrounding permeable medium, assumed to obey Darcy’s Law with permeabilities from 0.2 to 2,000 millidarcies, was then included in the analysis. A series of simulations for flows in fractured permeable rocks was performed, and the results were used to develop a relationship between the flow rate and pressure loss for fractures in porous rocks. The resulting frictionfactor, which accounts for the fracture geometric properties, is similar to the cubic law; it has the potential to be of use in discrete fracture reservoir-scale simulations of fluid flow through highly fractured geologic formations with appreciable matrix permeability. The observed fluid flow from the surrounding permeable medium to the fracture was significant when the resistance within the fracture and the medium were of the same order. An increase in the volumetric flow rate within the fracture profile increased by more than 5% was observed for flows within high permeability-fractured porous media.

  13. Modeling Variable-Density Fluid Flow and Solute Transport in Glaciated Sedimentary Basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McIntosh, J. C.; Garven, G.; Hanor, J. S.

    2005-12-01

    Sedimentary basins typically contain saline formation waters (35 to >250 g/L TDS) with relatively long residence times (Kyrs to Myrs). Advance and retreat of km-thick ice sheets, as recently as the Late Pleistocene (<18 ka BP), exposed regional aquifers along the margins of northern latitude basins. Overpressuring of aquifers beneath the wet-based glaciers forced meltwaters to great depths in subsurface flow systems, significantly diluting remnant saline fluids and reorganizing salinity structures. Permafrost zones outboard of the ice sheet margins further enhanced deep circulation of glacial recharge. In basins containing shallow evaporites, meltwaters dissolved large quantities of halite, generating relatively recent (<1 Ma) NaCl brines. Furthermore, glacial recharge promoted generation of economic deposits of microbial methane in shallow organic-rich sediments. To better constrain the impact of glaciation on variable-density fluid flow and solute transport in sedimentary basins, we constructed a transient 2D finite element model of the northern half of the glaciated Michigan Basin. The circular basin is relatively tectonically undeformed and contains ~4 km of Paleozoic strata, primarily composed of carbonates, clastics and bedded evaporites. Thick glacial drift deposits (up to ~300 m) form most of the topographic relief in this low-lying intracratonic region. The salinity of basin fluids sharply increases from <0.5 g/L TDS near the surface to >350 g/L at ~800 m depth. Modern groundwater flow is primarily restricted to shallow glacial drift aquifers, with discharge to the Great Lakes. During Pleistocene glaciation, however groundwater flow patterns were reversed, and meteoric waters were routed into Paleozoic carbonate and siliclastic basinal aquifer systems, depressing the freshwater-saline water mixing zones and dissolving halite. Dilute waters (<100 g/L TDS) migrated ~200 km laterally into the Devonian carbonate aquifers. Carbon-14 ages and δ18O values of

  14. Physiological Flow of Jeffrey Six Constant Fluid Model due to Ciliary Motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaheen, A.; Hussain, S.; Nadeem, S.

    2016-12-01

    The main purpose of this article is to present a mathematical model of ciliary motion in an annulus. In this analysis, the peristaltic motion of non-Newtonian Jeffrey six constant fluid is observed in an annulus with ciliated tips in the presence of heat and mass transfer. The effects of viscous dissipation are also considered. The flow equations of non-Newtonian fluid for the two-dimensional tube in cylindrical coordinates are simplified using the low Reynolds number and long wave-length approximations. The main equations for Jeffrey six constant fluid are considered in cylindrical coordinates system. The resulting nonlinear problem is solved using the regular perturbation technique in terms of a variant of small dimensionless parameter α. The results of the solutions for velocity, temperature and concentration field are presented graphically. Bk is Brinkman number, ST is soret number, and SH is the Schmidth number. Outcome for the longitudinal velocity, pressure rise, pressure gradient and stream lines are represented through graphs. in the history, the viscous-dissipation effect is usually represented by the Brinkman number.

  15. On Cattaneo-Christov heat flux model for Carreau fluid flow over a slendering sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashim; Khan, Masood

    The underlying intentions of this article are to investigate the impact of non-Fourier heat flux model on the stagnation-point flow of non-Newtonian Carreau fluid. In this study, the innovative Cattaneo-Christov constitutive model is introduced to study the characteristics of thermal relaxation time. The flow is impelled by a slendering surface which is of the variable thickness. In the model, the physical mechanism responsible for homogeneous-heterogeneous reactions are further taken into account. Also, the diffusion coefficients of the reactant and auto catalyst are considered to be equal. The governing non-linear partial differential equations consisting of the momentum, energy and concentration equations are reduced to the coupled ordinary differential equations by means of local similarity transformations. The transformed ODEs are tackled numerically by employing an effective shooting algorithm along with the Runge-Kutta Fehlberg scheme. The physical characteristics of the fluid velocity, temperature and concentration profiles are illuminated with the variation of numerous governing factors and are presented graphically. For instance, our result indicates that the temperature and thermal boundary layer thickness are lower in case of Cattaneo-Christov heat flux model when compared to classical Fourier's heat model. Meanwhile, the rate of heat transfer is significantly improved by a high wall thickness parameter and an opposite influence is found due to the thermal relaxation parameter. We further noticed that a higher value of homogeneous and heterogeneous reaction parameter corresponds to a deceleration in the concentration field and it shows an inverse relation for the Schmidt number. A correlation with accessible results for specific cases is found with fabulous consent.

  16. Stochastic modeling of fluid-particle flows in homogeneous cluster-induced turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Innocenti, Alessio; Chibbaro, Sergio; Fox, Rodney; Salvetti, Maria Vittoria

    2016-11-01

    Inertial particles in turbulent flows are characterized by preferential concentration and segregation and, at sufficient mass loading, dense clusters may spontaneously generate due to momentum coupling between the phases. These clusters in turn can generate and sustain turbulence in the fluid phase, which we refer to as cluster-induced turbulence (CIT). In the present work, we tackle the problem of homogeneous gravity driven CIT in the framework of a stochastic model, based on a Lagrangian formalism which includes naturally the Eulerian one. A rigorous formalism has been put forward focusing in particular on the terms responsible of the two-way coupling in the carrier phase, which is the key mechanism in this type of flow. Moreover, the decomposition of the particle-phase velocity into the spatially correlated and uncorrelated components has been used allowing to identify the contributions to the correlated fluctuating energy and to the granular temperature. Tests have been performed taking into account also the effects of collisions between particles. Results are compared against DNS, and they show a good accuracy in predicting first and second order moments of particle velocity and fluid velocity seen by particles.

  17. A Well-Posed Two Phase Flow Model and its Numerical Solutions for Reactor Thermal-Fluids Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Kadioglu, Samet Y.; Berry, Ray; Martineau, Richard

    2016-08-01

    A 7-equation two-phase flow model and its numerical implementation is presented for reactor thermal-fluids applications. The equation system is well-posed and treats both phases as compressible flows. The numerical discretization of the equation system is based on the finite element formalism. The numerical algorithm is implemented in the next generation RELAP-7 code (Idaho National Laboratory (INL)’s thermal-fluids code) built on top of an other INL’s product, the massively parallel multi-implicit multi-physics object oriented code environment (MOOSE). Some preliminary thermal-fluids computations are presented.

  18. Numerical model of fluid flow and oxygen transport in a radial-flow microchannel containing hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Ledezma, G A; Folch, A; Bhatia, S N; Balis, U J; Yarmush, M L; Toner, M

    1999-02-01

    The incorporation of monolayers of cultured hepatocytes into an extracorporeal perfusion system has become a promising approach for the development of a temporary bioartificial liver (BAL) support system. In this paper we present a numerical investigation of the oxygen tension, shear stress, and pressure drop in a bioreactor for a BAL composed of plasma-perfused chambers containing monolayers of porcine hepatocytes. The chambers consist of microfabricated parallel disks with center-to-edge radial flow. The oxygen uptake rate (OUR), measured in vitro for porcine hepatocytes, was curve-fitted using Michaelis-Menten kinetics for simulation of the oxygen concentration profile. The effect of different parameters that may influence the oxygen transport inside the chambers, such as the plasma flow rate, the chamber height, the initial oxygen tension in the perfused plasma, the OUR, and K(m) was investigated. We found that both the plasma flow rate and the initial oxygen tension may have an important effect upon oxygen transport. Increasing the flow rate and/or the inlet oxygen tension resulted in improved oxygen transport to cells in the radial-flow microchannels, and allowed significantly greater diameter reactor without oxygen limitation to the hepatocytes. In the range investigated in this paper (10 microns < H < 100 microns), and for a constant plasma flow rate, the chamber height, H, had a negligible effect on the oxygen transport to hepatocytes. On the contrary, it strongly affected the mechanical stress on the cells that is also crucial for the successful design of the BAL reactors. A twofold decrease in chamber height from 50 to 25 microns produced approximately a fivefold increase in maximal shear stress at the inlet of the reactor from 2 to 10 dyn/cm2. Further decrease in chamber height resulted in shear stress values that are physiologically unrealistic. Therefore, the channel height needs to be carefully chosen in a BAL design to avoid deleterious hydrodynamic

  19. Interstitial Fluid Flow and Drug Delivery in Vascularized Tumors: A Computational Model

    PubMed Central

    Welter, Michael; Rieger, Heiko

    2013-01-01

    Interstitial fluid is a solution that bathes and surrounds the human cells and provides them with nutrients and a way of waste removal. It is generally believed that elevated tumor interstitial fluid pressure (IFP) is partly responsible for the poor penetration and distribution of therapeutic agents in solid tumors, but the complex interplay of extravasation, permeabilities, vascular heterogeneities and diffusive and convective drug transport remains poorly understood. Here we consider–with the help of a theoretical model–the tumor IFP, interstitial fluid flow (IFF) and its impact upon drug delivery within tumor depending on biophysical determinants such as vessel network morphology, permeabilities and diffusive vs. convective transport. We developed a vascular tumor growth model, including vessel co-option, regression, and angiogenesis, that we extend here by the interstitium (represented by a porous medium obeying Darcy's law) and sources (vessels) and sinks (lymphatics) for IFF. With it we compute the spatial variation of the IFP and IFF and determine its correlation with the vascular network morphology and physiological parameters like vessel wall permeability, tissue conductivity, distribution of lymphatics etc. We find that an increased vascular wall conductivity together with a reduction of lymph function leads to increased tumor IFP, but also that the latter does not necessarily imply a decreased extravasation rate: Generally the IF flow rate is positively correlated with the various conductivities in the system. The IFF field is then used to determine the drug distribution after an injection via a convection diffusion reaction equation for intra- and extracellular concentrations with parameters guided by experimental data for the drug Doxorubicin. We observe that the interplay of convective and diffusive drug transport can lead to quite unexpected effects in the presence of a heterogeneous, compartmentalized vasculature. Finally we discuss various

  20. Dynamic bulk and shear moduli due to grain-scale local fluid flow in fluid-saturated cracked poroelastic rocks: Theoretical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Yongjia; Hu, Hengshan; Rudnicki, John W.

    2016-07-01

    Grain-scale local fluid flow is an important loss mechanism for attenuating waves in cracked fluid-saturated poroelastic rocks. In this study, a dynamic elastic modulus model is developed to quantify local flow effect on wave attenuation and velocity dispersion in porous isotropic rocks. The Eshelby transform technique, inclusion-based effective medium model (the Mori-Tanaka scheme), fluid dynamics and mass conservation principle are combined to analyze pore-fluid pressure relaxation and its influences on overall elastic properties. The derivation gives fully analytic, frequency-dependent effective bulk and shear moduli of a fluid-saturated porous rock. It is shown that the derived bulk and shear moduli rigorously satisfy the Biot-Gassmann relationship of poroelasticity in the low-frequency limit, while they are consistent with isolated-pore effective medium theory in the high-frequency limit. In particular, a simplified model is proposed to quantify the squirt-flow dispersion for frequencies lower than stiff-pore relaxation frequency. The main advantage of the proposed model over previous models is its ability to predict the dispersion due to squirt flow between pores and cracks with distributed aspect ratio instead of flow in a simply conceptual double-porosity structure. Independent input parameters include pore aspect ratio distribution, fluid bulk modulus and viscosity, and bulk and shear moduli of the solid grain. Physical assumptions made in this model include (1) pores are inter-connected and (2) crack thickness is smaller than the viscous skin depth. This study is restricted to linear elastic, well-consolidated granular rocks.

  1. Fluid flow monitoring device

    DOEpatents

    McKay, Mark D.; Sweeney, Chad E.; Spangler, Jr., B. Samuel

    1993-01-01

    A flow meter and temperature measuring device comprising a tube with a body centered therein for restricting flow and a sleeve at the upper end of the tube to carry several channels formed longitudinally in the sleeve to the appropriate axial location where they penetrate the tube to allow pressure measurements and temperature measurements with thermocouples. The high pressure measurement is made using a channel penetrating the tube away from the body and the low pressure measurement is made at a location at the widest part of the body. An end plug seals the end of the device and holes at its upper end allow fluid to pass from the interior of the tube into a plenum. The channels are made by cutting grooves in the sleeve, the grooves widened at the surface of the sleeve and then a strip of sleeve material is welded to the grooves closing the channels. Preferably the sleeve is packed with powdered graphite before cutting the grooves and welding the strips.

  2. Capturing nonlinear dynamics of two-fluid Couette flows with asymptotic models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papageorgiou, Demetrios; Cimpeanu, Radu; Kalogirou, Anna; Keaveny, Eric

    2016-11-01

    The nonlinear stability of two-fluid Couette flows is studied using a novel evolution equation whose dynamics are validated by direct numerical simulations (DNS). The evolution equation incorporates inertial effects at arbitrary Reynolds numbers through a nonlocal term arising from the coupling between the two fluid regions, and is valid when one of the layers is thin. The equation predicts asymmetric solutions and exhibits bistability as seen in experiments. Related low-inertia models have been used in qualitative predictions using ad hoc modifications rather than the direct comparisons carried out here. Comparisons between model solutions and DNS show excellent agreement at Reynolds numbers of O (103) found in experiments. Direct comparisons are also made with the available experimental results of Barthelet et al. (1995) when the thin layer occupies 1 / 5 of the channel height. Pointwise comparisons of the travelling wave shapes are carried out and once again the agreement is very good. EPSRC Grant Numbers EP/K041134 and EP/L020564.

  3. Interpretation and modeling of the averaged equations for a fluid-solid flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shen, Hayley H.; Hwang, Guann-Jiun

    1989-01-01

    A self-consistent derivation of the conservation laws is given for flows of a fluid-solid mixture. A unified analytical framework for obtaining constitutive relations is provided. This analysis uses a control volume/control surface approach that is widely used in fluid mechanics. All terms in the governing equations and the constitutive relations are written in terms of the mass-weighted averages except solid concentration. It is believed that the mass-weighted average is the natural bridge between micromechanics and constitutive relations. The derived momentum equations contain terms that differ from all existing models except that of Prosperetti and Jones (1984). However, their assumptions are not needed here. Special attention is given to the solid phase pressure. The physical basis of the previously assumed form for this pressure (Givler 1987) becomes clear. A number of related phenomena are also discussed. These include the anti-diffusion and anisotropic normal stresses. The energy equations are also different from existing models.

  4. TopoDrive and ParticleFlow--Two Computer Models for Simulation and Visualization of Ground-Water Flow and Transport of Fluid Particles in Two Dimensions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hsieh, Paul A.

    2001-01-01

    This report serves as a user?s guide for two computer models: TopoDrive and ParticleFlow. These two-dimensional models are designed to simulate two ground-water processes: topography-driven flow and advective transport of fluid particles. To simulate topography-driven flow, the user may specify the shape of the water table, which bounds the top of the vertical flow section. To simulate transport of fluid particles, the model domain is a rectangle with overall flow from left to right. In both cases, the flow is under steady state, and the distribution of hydraulic conductivity may be specified by the user. The models compute hydraulic head, ground-water flow paths, and the movement of fluid particles. An interactive visual interface enables the user to easily and quickly explore model behavior, and thereby better understand ground-water flow processes. In this regard, TopoDrive and ParticleFlow are not intended to be comprehensive modeling tools, but are designed for modeling at the exploratory or conceptual level, for visual demonstration, and for educational purposes.

  5. A unified approach to fluid-flow, geomechanical, and seismic modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yarushina, Viktoriya; Minakov, Alexander

    2016-04-01

    The perturbations of pore pressure can generate seismicity. This is supported by observations from human activities that involve fluid injection into rocks at high pressure (hydraulic fracturing, CO2 storage, geothermal energy production) and natural examples such as volcanic earthquakes. Although the seismic signals that emerge during geotechnical operations are small both in amplitude and duration when compared to natural counterparts. A possible explanation for the earthquake source mechanism is based on a number of in situ stress measurements suggesting that the crustal rocks are close to its plastic yield limit. Hence, a rapid increase of the pore pressure decreases the effective normal stress, and, thus, can trigger seismic shear deformation. At the same time, little attention has been paid to the fact that the perturbation of fluid pressure itself represents an acoustic source. Moreover, non-double-couple source mechanisms are frequently reported from the analysis of microseismicity. A consistent formulation of the source mechanism describing microseismic events should include both a shear and isotropic component. Thus, improved understanding of the interaction between fluid flow and seismic deformation is needed. With this study we aim to increase the competence in integrating real-time microseismic monitoring with geomechanical modelling such that there is a feedback loop between monitored deformation and stress field modelling. We propose fully integrated seismic, geomechanical and reservoir modelling. Our mathematical formulation is based on fundamental set of force balance, mass balance, and constitutive poro-elastoplastic equations for two-phase media consisting of deformable solid rock frame and viscous fluid. We consider a simplified 1D modelling setup for consistent acoustic source and wave propagation in poro-elastoplastic media. In this formulation the seismic wave is generated due to local changes of the stress field and pore pressure induced by

  6. Modeling and Analysis of Unsteady Axisymmetric Squeezing Fluid Flow through Porous Medium Channel with Slip Boundary

    PubMed Central

    Qayyum, Mubashir; Khan, Hamid; Rahim, M. Tariq; Ullah, Inayat

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this article is to model and analyze an unsteady axisymmetric flow of non-conducting, Newtonian fluid squeezed between two circular plates passing through porous medium channel with slip boundary condition. A single fourth order nonlinear ordinary differential equation is obtained using similarity transformation. The resulting boundary value problem is solved using Homotopy Perturbation Method (HPM) and fourth order Explicit Runge Kutta Method (RK4). Convergence of HPM solution is verified by obtaining various order approximate solutions along with absolute residuals. Validity of HPM solution is confirmed by comparing analytical and numerical solutions. Furthermore, the effects of various dimensionless parameters on the longitudinal and normal velocity profiles are studied graphically. PMID:25738864

  7. Acoustic concentration of particles in fluid flow

    DOEpatents

    Ward, Michael D.; Kaduchak, Gregory

    2010-11-23

    An apparatus for acoustic concentration of particles in a fluid flow includes a substantially acoustically transparent membrane and a vibration generator that define a fluid flow path therebetween. The fluid flow path is in fluid communication with a fluid source and a fluid outlet and the vibration generator is disposed adjacent the fluid flow path and is capable of producing an acoustic field in the fluid flow path. The acoustic field produces at least one pressure minima in the fluid flow path at a predetermined location within the fluid flow path and forces predetermined particles in the fluid flow path to the at least one pressure minima.

  8. Computational modelling of a non-viscous fluid flow in a multi-walled carbon nanotube modelled as a Timoshenko beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khosravian, N.; Rafii-Tabar, H.

    2008-07-01

    In the design of nanotube-based fluidic devices, a critical issue is the effect of the induced vibrations in the nanotube arising from the fluid flow, since these vibrations can promote structural instabilities, such as buckling transitions. It is known that the induced resonant frequencies depend on the fluid flow velocity in a significant manner. We have studied, for the first time, the flow of a non-viscous fluid in stubby multi-walled carbon nanotubes, using the Timoshenko classical beam theory to model the nanotubes as a continuum structure. We have obtained the variations of the resonant frequencies with the fluid flow velocity under several experimentally interesting boundary conditions and aspect ratios of the nanotube. The main finding from our work is that, compared to an Euler-Bernoulli classical beam model of a nanotube, the Timoshenko beam predicts the loss of stability at lower fluid flow velocities.

  9. A critical evaluation of various turbulence models as applied to internal fluid flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nallasamy, M.

    1985-01-01

    Models employed in the computation of turbulent flows are described and their application to internal flows is evaluated by examining the predictions of various turbulence models in selected flow configurations. The main conclusions are: (1) the k-epsilon model is used in a majority of all the two-dimensional flow calculations reported in the literature; (2) modified forms of the k-epsilon model improve the performance for flows with streamline curvature and heat transfer; (3) for flows with swirl, the k-epsilon model performs rather poorly; the algebraic stress model performs better in this case; and (4) for flows with regions of secondary flow (noncircular duct flows), the algebraic stress model performs fairly well for fully developed flow, for developing flow, the algebraic stress model performance is not good; a Reynolds stress model should be used. False diffusion and inlet boundary conditions are discussed. Countergradient transport and its implications in turbulence modeling is mentioned. Two examples of recirculating flow predictions obtained using PHOENICS code are discussed. The vortex method, large eddy simulation (modeling of subgrid scale Reynolds stresses), and direct simulation, are considered. Some recommendations for improving the model performance are made. The need for detailed experimental data in flows with strong curvature is emphasized.

  10. Well-posedness and convergence of cfd two-fluid model for bubbly flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaidheeswaran, Avinash

    The current research is focused on developing a well-posed multidimensional CFD two-fluid model (TFM) for bubbly flows. Two-phase flows exhibit a wide range of local flow instabilities such as Kelvin-Helmholtz, Rayleigh-Taylor, plume and jet instabilities. They arise due to the density difference and/or the relative velocity between the two phases. A physically correct TFM is essential to model these instabilities. However, this is not the case with the TFMs in numerical codes, which can be shown to have complex eigenvalues due to incompleteness and hence are ill-posed as initial value problems. A common approach to regularize an incomplete TFM is to add artificial physics or numerically by using a coarse grid or first order methods. However, it eliminates the local physical instabilities along with the undesired high frequency oscillations resulting from the ill-posedness. Thus, the TFM loses the capability to predict the inherent local dynamics of the two-phase flow. The alternative approach followed in the current study is to introduce appropriate physical mechanisms that make the TFM well-posed. First a well-posed 1-D TFM for vertical bubbly flows is analyzed with characteristics, and dispersion analysis. When an incomplete TFM is used, it results in high frequency oscillations in the solution. It is demonstrated through the travelling void wave problem that, by adding the missing short wavelength physics to the numerical TFM, this can be removed by making the model well-posed. To extend the limit of well-posedness beyond the well-known TFM of Pauchon and Banerjee [1], the mechanism of collision is considered, and it is shown by characteristics analysis that the TFM then becomes well-posed for all void fractions of practical interest. The aforementioned ideas are then extended to CFD TFM. The travelling void wave problem is again used to demonstrate that by adding appropriate physics, the problem of ill-posedness is resolved. Furthermore, issues pertaining to

  11. Cerebrospinal fluid flow in adults.

    PubMed

    Bradley, William G; Haughton, Victor; Mardal, Kent-Andre

    2016-01-01

    This chapter uses magnetic resonance imaging phase-contrast cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow measurements to predict which clinical normal-pressure hydrocephalus (NPH) patients will respond to shunting as well as which patients with Chiari I are likely to develop symptoms of syringomyelia. Symptomatic NPH patients with CSF flow (measured as the aqueductal CSF stroke volume) which is shown to be hyperdynamic (defined as twice normal) are quite likely to respond to ventriculoperitoneal shunting. The hyperdynamic CSF flow results from normal systolic brain expansion compressing the enlarged ventricles. When atrophy occurs, there is less brain expansion, decreased aqueductal CSF flow, and less likelihood of responding to shunting. It appears that NPH is a "two-hit" disease, starting as benign external hydrocephalus in infancy, followed by deep white-matter ischemia in late adulthood, which causes increased resistance to CSF outflow through the extracellular space of the brain. Using computational flow dynamics (CFD), CSF flow can be modeled at the foramen magnum and in the upper cervical spine. As in the case of NPH, hyperdynamic CSF flow appears to cause the signs and symptoms in Chiari I and can provide an additional indication for surgical decompression. CFD can also predict CSF pressures over the cardiac cycle. It has been hypothesized that elevated pressure pulses may be a significant etiologic factor in some cases of syringomyelia.

  12. THE ROLE OF POROUS MEDIA IN MODELING FLUID FLOW WITHIN HOLLOW FIBER MEMBRANES OF THE TOTAL ARTIFICIAL LUNG.

    PubMed

    Khanafer, Khalil; Cook, Keith; Marafie, Alia

    2012-01-01

    A numerical study was conducted to analyze fluid flow within hollow fiber membranes of the artificial lungs. The hollow fiber bundle was approximated using a porous media model. In addition, the transport equations were solved using the finite-element formulation based on the Galerkin method of weighted residuals. Comparisons with previously published work on the basis of special cases were performed and found to be in excellent agreement. A Newtonian viscous fluid model for the blood was used. Different flow models for porous media, such as the Brinkman-extended Darcy model, Darcy's law model, and the generalized flow model, were considered. Results were obtained in terms of streamlines, velocity vectors, and pressure distribution for various Reynolds numbers and Darcy numbers. The results from this investigation showed that the pressure drop across the artificial lung device increased with an increase in the Reynolds number. In addition, the pressure drop was found to increase significantly for small Darcy numbers.

  13. Analysis of the Laminar Newtonian Fluid Flow Through a Thin Fracture Modelled as a Fluid-Saturated Sparsely Packed Porous Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pažanin, Igor; Siddheshwar, Pradeep G.

    2017-03-01

    In this article we investigate the fluid flow through a thin fracture modelled as a fluid-saturated porous medium. We assume that the fracture has constrictions and that the flow is governed by the prescribed pressure drop between the edges of the fracture. The problem is described by the Darcy-Lapwood-Brinkman model acknowledging the Brinkman extension of the Darcy law as well as the flow inertia. Using asymptotic analysis with respect to the thickness of the fracture, we derive the explicit higher-order approximation for the velocity distribution. We make an error analysis to comment on the order of accuracy of the method used and also to provide rigorous justification for the model.

  14. Geophysical Fluid Flow Cell Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Computer simulation of atmospheric flow corresponds well to imges taken during the second Geophysical Fluid Flow Cell (BFFC) mission. The top shows a view from the pole, while the bottom shows a view from the equator. Red corresponds to hot fluid rising while blue shows cold fluid falling. This simulation was developed by Anil Deane of the University of Maryland, College Park and Paul Fischer of Argorne National Laboratory. Credit: NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

  15. Simulation of weld solidification microstructure and its coupling to the macroscopic heat and fluid flow modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlyk, Vitaliy; Dilthey, Ulrich

    2004-01-01

    The microstructure exerts a strong influence on the mechanical properties and on the integrity of welded joints. Prediction of the formation of the microstructure during welding and of other solidification processes may be an important and supporting factor for technology optimization. Nowadays, increasing computing power allows direct simulations of the dendritic and cell morphology of columnar grains in the molten zone for specific temperature conditions. Modelling is carried out, on the one hand, with the finite difference—cellular automata and, on the other hand, with the phase field method. Determination of the solidification conditions during fusion welding (temperature gradient, local solidification rate, weld pool shape) is carried out with a numerical macroscopic finite element modelling calculation of the weld pool fluid flow and of the temperature distribution, as presented in this paper. As with the use of accurate physical models, the simulations are carried out with a spatial resolution of the microstructure, and many assumptions and restrictions from traditional, analytical or phenomenological models may be eliminated. The possibilities of using numerical algorithms for generation and visualization of microstructure formation during solidification are demonstrated. The spectrum of applications extends from welding and casting to processes with rapid solidification. In particular, computer simulations of the solidification conditions and the formation of a dendritic morphology during the directional solidification in gas-tungsten-arc welding are described. Moreover, the simulation results are compared with the experimental findings.

  16. Modeling of electromagnetic, fluid flow, and heat transfer phenomena in electromagnetic casting of aluminum

    SciTech Connect

    Bhamidipati, J.R.; El-Kaddah, N.

    1995-12-31

    A mathematical model for the analysis and design of electromagnetic continuous casters (EMC) has been developed. The model addresses all aspects of EMC operation, namely, electromagnetic confinement of the molten pool, and melt solidification, all in terms of basic process variables. A methodology is presented for solving the coupled electromagnetic, heat transfer and fluid flow equations without regridding the solution domain during the search for the equilibrium meniscus shape, which is not known a priori. It is based on the solution of these equations in a fixed computational domain using a variable non-orthogonal coordinate transformation. Within this framework, the electromagnetic field was computed using the technique of mutual inductance, while the temperature and velocity fields in the slab were calculated using the control volume technique. The equilibrium shape of the meniscus was determined from the balance between the magnetic, metallostatic, and surface tension pressures. The model was used to simulate EMC casting of aluminum, and the numerical predictions were found to be in excellent agreement with experimental measurements reported in the open literature. The model presented in this paper provides a theoretical framework for the analysis and optimization of EMC casters.

  17. Description of fluid dynamics and coupled transports in models of a laminar flow diffusion chamber.

    PubMed

    Trávníčková, Tereza; Havlica, Jaromír; Ždímal, Vladimír

    2013-08-14

    The aim of this study is to assess how much the results of nucleation experiments in a laminar flow diffusion chamber (LFDC) are influenced by the complexity of the model of the transport properties. The effects of the type of fluid dynamic model (the steady state compressible Navier-Stokes system for an ideal gas/parabolic profile approximation) and the contributions of the coupled terms describing the Dufour effects and thermodiffusion on the predicted magnitude of the nucleation maxima and its location were investigated. This study was performed on the model of the homogeneous nucleation of an n-butanol-He vapor mixture in a LFDC. The isothermal dependencies of the nucleation rate on supersaturation were determined at three nucleation temperatures: 265 K, 270 K, and 280 K. For this purpose, the experimental LFDC data measured by A. P. Hyvärinen et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 124, 224304 (2006)] were reevaluated using transport models at different levels of complexity. Our results indicate that the type of fluid dynamical model affects both the position of the nucleation maxima in the LFDC and the maximum value of the nucleation rate. On the other hand, the Dufour effects and thermodiffusion perceptibly influence only the value of the maximal nucleation rate. Its position changes only marginally. The dependence of the maximum experimental nucleation rate on the saturation ratio and nucleation temperature was acquired for each case. Based on this dependence, we presented a method for the comparison and evaluation of the uncertainties of simpler models' solutions for the results, where we assumed that the model with Navier-Stokes equations and both coupled effects taken into account was the basis. From this comparison, it follows that an inappropriate choice of mathematical models could lead to relative errors of the order of several hundred percent in the maximum experimental nucleation rate. In the conclusion of this study, we also provide some general recommendations

  18. Description of fluid dynamics and coupled transports in models of a laminar flow diffusion chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trávníčková, Tereza; Havlica, Jaromír; Ždímal, Vladimír

    2013-08-01

    The aim of this study is to assess how much the results of nucleation experiments in a laminar flow diffusion chamber (LFDC) are influenced by the complexity of the model of the transport properties. The effects of the type of fluid dynamic model (the steady state compressible Navier-Stokes system for an ideal gas/parabolic profile approximation) and the contributions of the coupled terms describing the Dufour effects and thermodiffusion on the predicted magnitude of the nucleation maxima and its location were investigated. This study was performed on the model of the homogeneous nucleation of an n-butanol-He vapor mixture in a LFDC. The isothermal dependencies of the nucleation rate on supersaturation were determined at three nucleation temperatures: 265 K, 270 K, and 280 K. For this purpose, the experimental LFDC data measured by A. P. Hyvärinen et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 124, 224304 (2006), 10.1063/1.2200341] were reevaluated using transport models at different levels of complexity. Our results indicate that the type of fluid dynamical model affects both the position of the nucleation maxima in the LFDC and the maximum value of the nucleation rate. On the other hand, the Dufour effects and thermodiffusion perceptibly influence only the value of the maximal nucleation rate. Its position changes only marginally. The dependence of the maximum experimental nucleation rate on the saturation ratio and nucleation temperature was acquired for each case. Based on this dependence, we presented a method for the comparison and evaluation of the uncertainties of simpler models' solutions for the results, where we assumed that the model with Navier-Stokes equations and both coupled effects taken into account was the basis. From this comparison, it follows that an inappropriate choice of mathematical models could lead to relative errors of the order of several hundred percent in the maximum experimental nucleation rate. In the conclusion of this study, we also provide some

  19. A simple model of fluid flow and electrolyte balance in the body

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, R. J.; Neal, L.

    1973-01-01

    The model is basically a three-compartment model, the three compartments being the plasma, interstitial fluid and cellular fluid. Sodium, potassium, chloride and urea are the only major solutes considered explicitly. The control of body water and electrolyte distribution is affected via drinking and hormone levels. Basically, the model follows the effect of various oral input water loads on solute and water distribution throughout the body.

  20. Fluid Transport in Porous Rocks. I. EPI Studies and a Stochastic Model of Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mansfield, P.; Issa, B.

    The velocity of water flowing through a Bentheimer sandstone core has been measured by NMR-imaging techniques. The localized pixel values of velocity indicate a random distribution centered around the mean value corresponding to Darcy's law. When the same flow state is repeated, the velocity map changes but the general characteristics of the velocity distribution remain unchanged. The random nature of the irreproducibility of the flow maps has led us to propose a stochastic theory of flow in porous rocks. The theory leads to a Gaussian velocity distribution which approximates well to the data. Also predicted is a linear relationship between flow variance and mean fluid flow through the rock, the Mansfield-Issa equation, originally proposed as an empirical relationship.

  1. Geological Modeling and Fluid Flow Simulation of Acid Gas Storage, Nugget Sandstone, Moxa Arch, Wyoming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, S.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, X.; Du, C.

    2009-12-01

    The Moxa Arch Anticline is a regional-scale northwest-trending uplift in western Wyoming where geological storage of acid gases (CO2, CH4, N2, H2S, He) from ExxonMobile's Shute Creek Gas Plant is under consideration. The Nugget Sandstone, a deep saline aquifer at depths exceeding 17,170 ft, is a candidate formation for acid gas storage. As part of a larger goal of determining site suitability, this study builds three-dimensional local to regional scale geological and fluid flow models for the Nugget Sandstone, its caprock (Twin Creek Limestone), and an underlying aquifer (Ankareh Sandstone), or together, the ``Nugget Suite''. For an area of 3000 square miles, geological and engineering data were assembled, screened for accuracy, and digitized, covering an average formation thickness of ~1700 feet. The data include 900 public-domain well logs (SP, Gamma Ray, Neutron Porosity, Density, Sonic, shallow and deep Resistivity, Lithology, Deviated well logs), 784 feet of core measurements (porosity and permeability), 4 regional geological cross sections, and 3 isopach maps. Data were interpreted and correlated for geological formations and facies, the later categorized using both Neural Network and Gaussian Hierarchical Clustering algorithms. Well log porosities were calibrated with core measurements, those of permeability estimated using formation-specific porosity-permeability transforms. Using conditional geostatistical simulations (first indicator simulation of facies, then sequential Gaussian simulation of facies-specific porosity), data were integrated at the regional-scale to create a geological model from which a local-scale simulation model surrounding the Shute Creek injection site was extracted. Based on this model, full compositional multiphase flow simulations were conducted with which we explore (1) an appropriate grid resolution for accurate acid gas predictions (pressure, saturation, and mass balance); (2) sensitivity of key geological and engineering

  2. Turbulence significantly increases pressure and fluid shear stress in an aortic aneurysm model under resting and exercise flow conditions.

    PubMed

    Khanafer, Khalil M; Bull, Joseph L; Upchurch, Gilbert R; Berguer, Ramon

    2007-01-01

    The numerical models of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) in use do not take into account the non-Newtonian behavior of blood and the development of local turbulence. This study examines the influence of pulsatile, turbulent, non-Newtonian flow on fluid shear stresses and pressure changes under rest and exercise conditions. We numerically analyzed pulsatile turbulent flow, using simulated physiological rest and exercise waveforms, in axisymmetric-rigid aortic aneurysm models (AAMs). Discretization of governing equations was achieved using a finite element scheme. Maximum turbulence-induced shear stress was found at the distal end of an AAM. In large AAMs (dilated to undilated diameter ratio = 3.33) at peak systolic flow velocity, fluid shear stress during exercise is 70.4% higher than at rest. Our study provides a numerical, noninvasive method for obtaining detailed data on the forces generated by pulsatile turbulent flow in AAAs that are difficult to study in humans and in physical models. Our data suggest that increased flow turbulence results in increased shear stress in aneurysms. While pressure readings are fairly uniform along the length of an aneurysm, the kinetic energy generated by turbulence impacting on the wall of the distal half of the aneurysm increases fluid and wall shear stress at this site. If the increased fluid shear stress results in further dilation and hence further turbulence, wall stress may be a mechanism for aneurysmal growth and eventual rupture.

  3. EBSD characterization and modeling of columnar dendritic grains growing in the presence of fluid flow[Electron Backscattered Diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Takatani, H.; Gandin, C.A.; Rappaz, M.

    2000-02-09

    Columnar dendritic grains of steel growth in the presence of fluid flow (e.g., solidified on turning rolls) have been characterized by Electron Backscattered Diffraction (EBSD) technique. It is shown that grains have a random crystallographic orientation at the surfaces of the sheet in contact with the mould. In the middle of the sheet, the grains which have survived the growth selection mechanisms exhibit a (100) texture in which the average dendrite trunk direction is not exactly aligned with the thermal gradient (i.e., the normal to the surfaces of the sheet). It is tilted by about 15{degree} toward the upstream direction. This deviation is examined by simulations of grain structure formation based on a three-dimensional Cellular Automation (CA)-Finite Element (FE) (3D CAFE) model, which has been modified in order to account for fluid flow effects. The modified Ca algorithm includes a growth kinetics of the dendrites which is a function of both the undercooling and fluid flow direction. It is validated by comparing the predicted shape of an individual grain growing under given thermal and fluid flow conditions with an analytical solution. The 3D CAFE predictions of the columnar grains grown in the presence of fluid flow are in good agreement with the experimental EBSB results.

  4. Relaminarization of fluid flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Narasimha, R.; Sreenivasan, K. R.

    1979-01-01

    The mechanisms of the relaminarization of turbulent flows are investigated with a view to establishing any general principles that might govern them. Three basic archetypes of reverting flows are considered: the dissipative type, the absorptive type, and the Richardson type exemplified by a turbulent boundary layer subjected to severe acceleration. A number of other different reverting flows are then considered in the light of the analysis of these archetypes, including radial Poiseuille flow, convex boundary layers, flows reverting by rotation, injection, and suction, as well as heated horizontal and vertical gas flows. Magnetohydrodynamic duct flows are also examined. Applications of flow reversion for turbulence control are discussed.

  5. Update and assessment of geothermal economic models, geothermal fluid flow and heat distribution models, and geothermal data bases

    SciTech Connect

    Kenkeremath, D.

    1985-05-01

    Numerical simulation models and data bases that were developed for DOE as part of a number of geothermal programs have been assessed with respect to their overall stage of development and usefulness. This report combines three separate studies that focus attention upon: (1) economic models related to geothermal energy; (2) physical geothermal system models pertaining to thermal energy and the fluid medium; and (3) geothermal energy data bases. Computerized numerical models pertaining to the economics of extracting and utilizing geothermal energy have been summarized and catalogued with respect to their availability, utility and function. The 19 models that are discussed in detail were developed for use by geothermal operators, public utilities, and lending institutions who require a means to estimate the value of a given resource, total project costs, and the sensitivity of these values to specific variables. A number of the models are capable of economically assessing engineering aspects of geothermal projects. Computerized simulations of heat distribution and fluid flow have been assessed and are presented for ten models. Five of the models are identified as wellbore simulators and five are described as reservoir simulators. Each model is described in terms of its operational characteristics, input, output, and other pertinent attributes. Geothermal energy data bases are reviewed with respect to their current usefulness and availability. Summaries of eight data bases are provided in catalogue format, and an overall comparison of the elements of each data base is included.

  6. Fluid Flow Phenomena during Welding

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Wei

    2011-01-01

    MOLTEN WELD POOLS are dynamic. Liquid in the weld pool in acted on by several strong forces, which can result in high-velocity fluid motion. Fluid flow velocities exceeding 1 m/s (3.3 ft/s) have been observed in gas tungsten arc (GTA) welds under ordinary welding conditions, and higher velocities have been measured in submerged arc welds. Fluid flow is important because it affects weld shape and is related to the formation of a variety of weld defects. Moving liquid transports heat and often dominates heat transport in the weld pool. Because heat transport by mass flow depends on the direction and speed of fluid motion, weld pool shape can differ dramatically from that predicted by conductive heat flow. Temperature gradients are also altered by fluid flow, which can affect weld microstructure. A number of defects in GTA welds have been attributed to fluid flow or changes in fluid flow, including lack of penetration, top bead roughness, humped beads, finger penetration, and undercutting. Instabilities in the liquid film around the keyhole in electron beam and laser welds are responsible for the uneven penetration (spiking) characteristic of these types of welds.

  7. Robust and general method for determining surface fluid flow boundary conditions in articular cartilage contact mechanics modeling.

    PubMed

    Pawaskar, Sainath Shrikant; Fisher, John; Jin, Zhongmin

    2010-03-01

    Contact detection in cartilage contact mechanics is an important feature of any analytical or computational modeling investigation when the biphasic nature of cartilage and the corresponding tribology are taken into account. The fluid flow boundary conditions will change based on whether the surface is in contact or not, which will affect the interstitial fluid pressurization. This in turn will increase or decrease the load sustained by the fluid phase, with a direct effect on friction, wear, and lubrication. In laboratory experiments or clinical hemiarthroplasty, when a rigid indenter or metallic prosthesis is used to apply load to the cartilage, there will not be any fluid flow normal to the surface in the contact region due to the impermeable nature of the indenter/prosthesis. In the natural joint, on the other hand, where two cartilage surfaces interact, flow will depend on the pressure difference across the interface. Furthermore, in both these cases, the fluid would flow freely in non-contacting regions. However, it should be pointed out that the contact area is generally unknown in advance in both cases and can only be determined as part of the solution. In the present finite element study, a general and robust algorithm was proposed to decide nodes in contact on the cartilage surface and, accordingly, impose the fluid flow boundary conditions. The algorithm was first tested for a rigid indenter against cartilage model. The algorithm worked well for two-dimensional four-noded and eight-noded axisymmetric element models as well as three-dimensional models. It was then extended to include two cartilages in contact. The results were in excellent agreement with the previous studies reported in the literature.

  8. Scalable parallel methods for monolithic coupling in fluid-structure interaction with application to blood flow modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Barker, Andrew T. Cai Xiaochuan

    2010-02-01

    We introduce and study numerically a scalable parallel finite element solver for the simulation of blood flow in compliant arteries. The incompressible Navier-Stokes equations are used to model the fluid and coupled to an incompressible linear elastic model for the blood vessel walls. Our method features an unstructured dynamic mesh capable of modeling complicated geometries, an arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian framework that allows for large displacements of the moving fluid domain, monolithic coupling between the fluid and structure equations, and fully implicit time discretization. Simulations based on blood vessel geometries derived from patient-specific clinical data are performed on large supercomputers using scalable Newton-Krylov algorithms preconditioned with an overlapping restricted additive Schwarz method that preconditions the entire fluid-structure system together. The algorithm is shown to be robust and scalable for a variety of physical parameters, scaling to hundreds of processors and millions of unknowns.

  9. Multiphase flow modelling using non orthogonal collocated finite volumes : application to fluid catalytical cracking and large scale geophysical flows.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, R. M.; Nicolas, A. N.

    2003-04-01

    A modeling approach of gas solid flow, taking into account different physical phenomena such as gas turbulence and inter-particle interactions is presented. Moment transport equations are derived for the second order fluctuating velocity tensor which allow to involve practical closures based on single phase turbulence modeling on one hand and kinetic theory of granular media on the other hand. The model is applied to fluid catalytic cracking processes and explosive volcanism. In the industry as well as in the geophysical community, multiphase flows are modeled using a finite volume approach and a multicorrector algorithm in time in order to determine implicitly the pressures, velocities and volume fractions for each phase. Pressures, and velocities are generally determined at mid-half mesh step from each other following the staggered grid approach. This ensures stability and prevents oscillations in pressure. It allows to treat almost all the Reynolds number ranges for all speeds and viscosities. The disadvantages appear when we want to treat more complex geometries or if a generalized curvilinear formulation of the conservation equations is considered. Too many interpolations have to be done and accuracy is then lost. In order to overcome these problems, we use here a similar algorithm in time and a Rhie and Chow interpolation (1983) of the collocated variables and essentially the velocities at the interface. The Rhie and Chow interpolation of the velocities at the finite volume interfaces allows to have no oscillations of the pressure without checkerboard effects and to stabilize all the algorithm. In a first predictor step, fluxes at the interfaces of the finite volumes are then computed using 2nd and 3rd order shock capturing schemes of MUSCL/TVD or Van Leer type, and the orthogonal stress components are treated implicitly while cross viscous/diffusion terms are treated explicitly. Pentadiagonal linear systems are solved in each geometrical direction (the so

  10. Modeling Fluid Flow and Electrical Resistivity in Fractured Geothermal Reservoir Rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Detwiler, R L; Roberts, J J; Ralph, W; Bonner, B P

    2003-01-14

    Phase change of pore fluid (boiling/condensing) in rock cores under conditions representative of geothermal reservoirs results in alterations of the electrical resistivity of the samples. In fractured samples, phase change can result in resistivity changes that are more than an order of magnitude greater than those measured in intact samples. These results suggest that electrical resistivity monitoring may provide a useful tool for monitoring the movement of water and steam within fractured geothermal reservoirs. We measured the electrical resistivity of cores of welded tuff containing fractures of various geometries to investigate the resistivity contrast caused by active boiling and to determine the effects of variable fracture dimensions and surface area on water extraction. We then used the Nonisothermal Unsaturated Flow and Transport model (NUFT) (Nitao, 1998) to simulate the propagation of boiling fronts through the samples. The simulated saturation profiles combined with previously reported measurements of resistivity-saturation curves allow us to estimate the evolution of the sample resistivity as the boiling front propagates into the rock matrix. These simulations provide qualitative agreement with experimental measurements suggesting that our modeling approach may be used to estimate resistivity changes induced by boiling in more complex systems.

  11. Model of fluid flow and internal erosion of a porous fragile medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudrolli, Arshad; Clotet, Xavier

    2016-11-01

    We discuss the internal erosion and transport of particles leading to heterogeneity and channelization of a porous granular bed driven by fluid flow by introducing a model experimental system which enables direct visualization of the evolution of porosity from the single particle up to the system scale. Further, we develop a hybrid hydrodynamic-statistical model to understand the main ingredients needed to simulate our observations. A uniqueness of our study is the close coupling of the experiments and simulations with control parameters used in the simulations derived from the experiments. Understanding this system is of fundamental importance to a number of geophysical processes, and in the extraction of hydrocarbons in the subsurface including the deposition of proppants used in hydraulic fracturing. We provide clear evidence for the importance of curvature of the interface between high and low porosity regions in determining the flux rate needed for erosion and the spatial locations where channels grow. This material is based upon work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences program under DE-SC0010274.

  12. Validation of a 3D computational fluid-structure interaction model simulating flow through an elastic aperture

    PubMed Central

    Quaini, A.; Canic, S.; Glowinski, R.; Igo, S.; Hartley, C.J.; Zoghbi, W.; Little, S.

    2011-01-01

    This work presents a validation of a fluid-structure interaction computational model simulating the flow conditions in an in vitro mock heart chamber modeling mitral valve regurgitation during the ejection phase during which the trans-valvular pressure drop and valve displacement are not as large. The mock heart chamber was developed to study the use of 2D and 3D color Doppler techniques in imaging the clinically relevant complex intra-cardiac flow events associated with mitral regurgitation. Computational models are expected to play an important role in supporting, refining, and reinforcing the emerging 3D echocardiographic applications. We have developed a 3D computational fluid-structure interaction algorithm based on a semi-implicit, monolithic method, combined with an arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian approach to capture the fluid domain motion. The mock regurgitant mitral valve corresponding to an elastic plate with a geometric orifice, was modeled using 3D elasticity, while the blood flow was modeled using the 3D Navier-Stokes equations for an incompressible, viscous fluid. The two are coupled via the kinematic and dynamic conditions describing the two-way coupling. The pressure, the flow rate, and orifice plate displacement were measured and compared with numerical simulation results. In-line flow meter was used to measure the flow, pressure transducers were used to measure the pressure, and a Doppler method developed by one of the authors was used to measure the axial displacement of the orifice plate. The maximum recorded difference between experiment and numerical simulation for the flow rate was 4%, the pressure 3.6%, and for the orifice displacement 15%, showing excellent agreement between the two. PMID:22138194

  13. Reactive fluid flow models and applications to diagenesis, mineral deposits and crustal rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Lasaga, A.C.; Rye, D.M.

    1993-08-01

    Funds are requested for a combined theoretical and field study of coupled fluid flow, heat and mass transport, and chemical reaction in hydrothermal and metamorphic systems. An existing computer code developed by the applicants which numerically treats multi-component, finite-rate reactions combined with advective and dispersive transport in one and two dimensions and which incorporates isotopic exchange and heat and mass transfer will continue to be developed and applied in a variety of geological settings. The code we have developed simultaneously solves for mass transport and reaction, thus offering a significant improvement in computational efficiency over existing ``batch`` reaction path codes. By coupling flow and chemical reaction in a hydrothermal system, we can explicitly investigate the extent to which characteristic flow-reaction paths govern the chemical evolution of the fluids in a hydrothermal system. The concept of a flow-reaction path is particularly important where certain portions of mature hydrothermal systems may exhaust the buffer capacity of the rock as the primary mineralogy is consumed. In these instances 7 fluids traversing distinct regions within the hydrothermal system may experience very different reaction histories, even where the system can be described as nearly isothermal. The study of paleo-hydrothermal systems can yield some important insights into the chemical dynamics of hydrothermal systems in general. As an example of a paleo-hydrothermal system, we have considered the geochemical evolution of ``porphyry-copper`` type mineralization.

  14. Thermal convection in a magnetized conducting fluid with the Cattaneo-Christov heat-flow model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bissell, J. J.

    2016-11-01

    By substituting the Cattaneo-Christov heat-flow model for the more usual parabolic Fourier law, we consider the impact of hyperbolic heat-flow effects on thermal convection in the classic problem of a magnetized conducting fluid layer heated from below. For stationary convection, the system is equivalent to that studied by Chandrasekhar (Hydrodynamic and Hydromagnetic Stability, 1961), and with free boundary conditions we recover the classical critical Rayleigh number Rc(c )(Q ) which exhibits inhibition of convection by the field according to Rc(c )→π2Q as Q →∞ , where Q is the Chandrasekhar number. However, for oscillatory convection we find that the critical Rayleigh number Rc(o )(Q ,P1,P2,C ) is given by a more complicated function of the thermal Prandtl number P1, magnetic Prandtl number P2 and Cattaneo number C. To elucidate features of this dependence, we neglect P2 (in which case overstability would be classically forbidden), and thereby obtain an expression for the Rayleigh number that is far less strongly inhibited by the field, with limiting behaviour Rc(o )→π √{Q }/ C , as Q →∞ . One consequence of this weaker dependence is that onset of instability occurs as overstability provided C exceeds a threshold value CT(Q); indeed, crucially we show that when Q is large, CT∝1 / √{Q }, meaning that oscillatory modes are preferred even when C itself is small. Similar behaviour is demonstrated in the case of fixed boundaries by means of a novel numerical solution.

  15. Fluid flow modeling at the Lusi mud eruption, East java, Indonesia.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collignon, Marine; Schmid, Daniel; Mazzini, Adriano

    2016-04-01

    The 29th of may 2006, gas water and mud breccia started to erupt at several localities along the Watukosek fault system, in the Sidoarjo Regency in East java, Indonesia. The most prominent eruption, named Lusi, is still active and covering a surface of nearly 7 km2, resulting in the displacement of ~ 30 000 people. Although the origin and the chemical composition of the erupted fluids have been documented, the mechanical and physical properties of the mud are poorly constrained, and many aspects still remain not understood. Very little is known about the internal dynamics of the Lusi conduit(s). In this study, conducted in the framework of the Lusi Lab project (ERC grant n°308126) we use both analytical and numerical methods to better understand the flow dynamics within the main conduit and to try to explain the longevity of the edifice. The 2D numerical model considers a vertical conduit with a reservoir at its base and solves the stokes equations, discretized on a finite element mesh. Although, three phases (solid, liquid and gas) are present in nature, we only consider the liquid phase. The solid phase is treated as rigid particles in suspension in the liquid. The gaseous phase (methane and carbon dioxide) is treated in an analytical manner using the equations of state of the H2O-CO2 and H2O-CH4 systems. Here, we discuss the effects of density, viscosity, gas concentration and clasts concentration and size on the dynamics of the flow in the conduit as well as implications of the conduit stability.

  16. Fluid flow modeling of resin transfer molding for composite material wind turbine blade structures.

    SciTech Connect

    Cairns, Douglas S.; Rossel, Scott M.

    2004-06-01

    Resin transfer molding (RTM) is a closed mold process for making composite materials. It has the potential to produce parts more cost effectively than hand lay-up or other methods. However, fluid flow tends to be unpredictable and parts the size of a wind turbine blade are difficult to engineer without some predictive method for resin flow. There were five goals of this study. The first was to determine permeabilities for three fabrics commonly used for RTM over a useful range of fiber volume fractions. Next, relations to estimate permeabilities in mixed fabric lay-ups were evaluated. Flow in blade substructures was analyzed and compared to predictions. Flow in a full-scale blade was predicted and substructure results were used to validate the accuracy of a full-scale blade prediction.

  17. Insertable fluid flow passage bridgepiece and method

    DOEpatents

    Jones, Daniel O.

    2000-01-01

    A fluid flow passage bridgepiece for insertion into an open-face fluid flow channel of a fluid flow plate is provided. The bridgepiece provides a sealed passage from a columnar fluid flow manifold to the flow channel, thereby preventing undesirable leakage into and out of the columnar fluid flow manifold. When deployed in the various fluid flow plates that are used in a Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) fuel cell, bridgepieces of this invention prevent mixing of reactant gases, leakage of coolant or humidification water, and occlusion of the fluid flow channel by gasket material. The invention also provides a fluid flow plate assembly including an insertable bridgepiece, a fluid flow plate adapted for use with an insertable bridgepiece, and a method of manufacturing a fluid flow plate with an insertable fluid flow passage bridgepiece.

  18. Mechanics of coupled granular/fluid flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinningland, J.; Toussaint, R.; Johnsen, O.; Flekkoy, E. G.; Maloy, K. J.

    2006-12-01

    We introduce a hybrid numerical model for coupled flow of solid grains and intersticial fluid, which renders for complex hydrodynamic interactions between mobile grains. This model treats the solid phase as discrete particles, interacting mechanically with the other particles and with the intersticial flowing fluid. The fluid is described by continuum equations rendering for its advection by the local grains, superposed to a pressure diffusion ruled by a Darcy flow with a permeability depending on the local solid fraction. This model is aimed at describing accurately such coupled flow. This model is tested for two model situations, where it is compared to experimental results: 1/ Injection of a localized overpressure in a grain/fluid filled cell lying horizontally, where gravity is unimportant. 2/ Sedimentation of heavy grains falling into an initially grain-free fluid region. The development of pattern-forming instabilities is obtained in these two situations, corresponding to granular/fluid equivalents of the two-fluids Saffman-Taylor and Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities. Numerical and experimental results are shown to be consistent with each other.

  19. On the multidimensional modeling of fluid flow and heat transfer in SCWRS

    SciTech Connect

    Gallaway, T.; Antal, S. P.; Podowski, M. Z.

    2012-07-01

    The Supercritical Water Reactor (SCWR) has been proposed as one of the six Generation IV reactor design concepts under consideration. The key feature of the SCWR is that water at supercritical pressures is used as the reactor coolant. Although at such pressures, fluids do not undergo phase change as they are heated, the fluid properties experience dramatic variations throughout what is known as the pseudo-critical region. Highly nonuniform temperature and fluid property distributions are expected in the reactor core, which will have a significant impact on turbulence and heat transfer in future SCWRs. The goal of the present work has been to understand and predict the effects of these fluid property variations on turbulence and heat transfer throughout the reactor core. Spline-type property models have been formulated for water at supercritical pressures in order to include the dependence of properties on both temperature and pressure into a numerical solver. New models of turbulence and heat transfer for variable-property fluids have been developed and implemented into the NPHASE-CMFD software. The results for these models have been compared to experimental data from the Korea Atomic Energy Research Inst. (KAERI) for various heat transfer regimes. It is found that the Low-Reynolds {kappa}-{epsilon} model performs best at predicting the experimental data. (authors)

  20. Modeling on Fluid Flow and Inclusion Motion in Centrifugal Continuous Casting Strands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qiangqiang; Zhang, Lifeng; Sridhar, Seetharaman

    2016-08-01

    During the centrifugal continuous casting process, unreasonable casting parameters can cause violent level fluctuation, serious gas entrainment, and formation of frozen shell pieces at the meniscus. Thus, in the current study, a three-dimensional multiphase turbulent model was established to study the transport phenomena during centrifugal continuous casting process. The effects of nozzle position, casting and rotational speed on the flow pattern, centrifugal force acting on the molten steel, level fluctuation, gas entrainment, shear stress on mold wall, and motion of inclusions during centrifugal continuous casting process were investigated. Volume of Fluid model was used to simulate the molten steel-air two-phase. The level fluctuation and the gas entrainment during casting were calculated by user-developed subroutines. The trajectory of inclusions in the rotating system was calculated using the Lagrangian approach. The results show that during centrifugal continuous casting, a large amount of gas was entrained into the molten steel, and broken into bubbles of various sizes. The greater the distance to the mold wall, the smaller the centrifugal force. Rotation speed had the most important influence on the centrifugal force distribution at the side region. Angular moving angle of the nozzle with 8° and keeping the rotation speed with 60 revolutions per minute can somehow stabilize the level fluctuation. The increase of angular angle of nozzle from 8 to 18 deg and rotation speed from 40 to 80 revolutions per minute favored to decrease the total volume of entrained bubbles, while the increase of distance of nozzle moving left and casting speed had reverse effects. The trajectories of inclusions in the mold were irregular, and then rotated along the strand length. After penetrating a certain distance, the inclusions gradually moved to the center of billet and gathered there. More work, such as the heat transfer, the solidification, and the inclusions entrapment

  1. Computation of two-fluid, flowing equilibria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinhauer, Loren; Kanki, Takashi; Ishida, Akio

    2006-10-01

    Equilibria of flowing two-fluid plasmas are computed for realistic compact-toroid and spherical-tokamak parameters. In these examples the two-fluid parameter ɛ (ratio of ion inertial length to overall plasma size) is small, ɛ ˜ 0.03 -- 0.2, but hardly negligible. The algorithm is based on the nearby-fluids model [1] which avoids a singularity that otherwise occurs for small ɛ. These representative equilibria exhibit significant flows, both toroidal and poloidal. Further, the flow patterns display notable flow shear. The importance of two-fluid effects is demonstrated by comparing with analogous equilibria (e.g. fixed toroidal and poloidal current) for a static plasma (Grad-Shafranov solution) and a flowing single-fluid plasma. Differences between the two-fluid, single-fluid, and static equilibria are highlighted: in particular with respect to safety factor profile, flow patterns, and electrical potential. These equilibria are computed using an iterative algorithm: it employs a successive-over-relaxation procedure for updating the magnetic flux function and a Newton-Raphson procedure for updating the density. The algorithm is coded in Visual Basic in an Excel platform on a personal computer. The computational time is essentially instantaneous (seconds). [1] L.C. Steinhauer and A. Ishida, Phys. Plasmas 13, 052513 (2006).

  2. Numerical modeling of coupled pressure solution and fluid flow in quartz sandstones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheldon, H. A.; Wheeler, J.; Worden, R.

    2001-12-01

    Pressure solution in quartz sandstones can be envisaged as a 3-stage process, involving dissolution along grain contacts, diffusion of the solute along the grain contact to the pore space, and removal of the solute from the pore fluid by a combination of diffusive and/or advective transport and chemical reactions (e.g. precipitation of dissolved silica on free grain surfaces). A number of authors have developed mathematical models of pressure solution in order to assess the impact of this process on porosity and permeability in sandstones. However, such models have always been based on a simplified subset of the governing equations, in order to reduce the computation time to an acceptable level. For example, some models assume diffusion through the grain contact zone to be the rate-limiting step, with all the dissolved material precipitating locally in the pore space. Other models assume that the rate of removal of solute from the pore fluid, by diffusion and precipitation, is rate-limiting. It is now possible to solve the full coupled system of equations on a PC, without such simplifications. This enables us to investigate the coupling and interactions between pressure solution, chemical reactions in the pore spaces and macroscale advective/diffusive transport in the pore fluid. Preliminary results of such modeling will be presented, highlighting the importance of modeling pressure solution in an open system, where there is a strong coupling between macroscale transport in the pore fluid and the rate of porosity loss due to compaction and cementation.

  3. Application of Stereolithographic Custom Models for Studying the Impact of Biofilms and Mineral Precipitation on Fluid Flow

    PubMed Central

    Stoner, D. L.; Watson, S. M.; Stedtfeld, R. D.; Meakin, P.; Griffel, L. K.; Tyler, T. L.; Pegram, L. M.; Barnes, J. M.; Deason, V. A.

    2005-01-01

    Here we introduce the use of transparent experimental models fabricated by stereolithography for studying the impacts of biomass accumulation, minerals precipitation, and physical configuration of flow paths on liquid flow in fracture apertures. The internal configuration of the models ranged in complexity from simple geometric shapes to those that incorporate replicated surfaces of natural fractures and computationally derived fracture surfaces. High-resolution digital time-lapse imaging was employed to qualitatively observe the migration of colloidal and soluble dyes through the flow models. In this study, a Sphingomonas sp. and Sporosarcina (Bacillus) pasteurii influenced the fluid dynamics by physically altering flow paths. Microbial colonization and calcite deposition enhanced the stagnant regions adjacent to solid boundaries. Microbial growth and calcite precipitation occurred to a greater extent in areas behind the fabricated obstacles and less in high-velocity orifices. PMID:16332867

  4. Finite element modeling of hydrothermal fluid flow in Peace River Arch of Western Canada Sedimentary Basin: implications for dolomitization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Y.; Yang, J.

    2009-05-01

    A finite element computer modeling approach, integrated with existing geological, geochemical and geophysical data, was used to address the diagenetic process of dolomitization in Western Canada Sedimentary Basin (WCSB). A 2-D conceptualized model was developed to simulate hydrothermal flow in particular for the packland play type dolomitization in Peace River Arch of WCSB. Our numerical results indicate that faults serve as important pathways for the ascending hydrothermal fluids driven by buoyancy force due to temporal and spatial changes in temperature. Both steady state and transient computations were conducted to reveal suitable hydraulic conditions under which the modeled temperature within the aquifer system is consistent with observed values in the targeted study area. A series of numerical case studies were carried out to investigate key factors controlling hydrothermal fluid flow, including fault penetration depth, width and permeability, and its connectivity with the host rock units.

  5. Modeling of unsteady flow of viscous fluid in the channel of complex geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marfin, E. A.; Abdrashitov, A. A.

    2016-11-01

    The article concerns an issue of exploring the mechanism of wave influence on the process of filtration. To describe a filtration flow, the porous medium is represented as a capillary, the radius of which varies sinusoidally. In this article we are presenting the results of numerical modeling of pulsating liquid flow in a sinusoidally-shaped channel. Numerical research was conducted with the help of the program complex FlowVision. As a result of series of calculations we received fields of velocities and pressure in the axial section of flowing channel. It was found that it is the flow in narrow isthmuses between the pores that contributes to the pressure difference the most. We revealed the signs of steady-state liquid flow in the channel when imposing fluctuations of pressure in the absence of pressure gradient. The conditions of formation of such flow are revealed.

  6. Internal Flow Thermal/Fluid Modeling of STS-107 Port Wing in Support of the Columbia Accident Investigation Board

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharp, John R.; Kittredge, Ken; Schunk, Richard G.

    2003-01-01

    As part of the aero-thermodynamics team supporting the Columbia Accident Investigation Board (CAB), the Marshall Space Flight Center was asked to perform engineering analyses of internal flows in the port wing. The aero-thermodynamics team was split into internal flow and external flow teams with the support being divided between shorter timeframe engineering methods and more complex computational fluid dynamics. In order to gain a rough order of magnitude type of knowledge of the internal flow in the port wing for various breach locations and sizes (as theorized by the CAB to have caused the Columbia re-entry failure), a bulk venting model was required to input boundary flow rates and pressures to the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analyses. This paper summarizes the modeling that was done by MSFC in Thermal Desktop. A venting model of the entire Orbiter was constructed in FloCAD based on Rockwell International s flight substantiation analyses and the STS-107 reentry trajectory. Chemical equilibrium air thermodynamic properties were generated for SINDA/FLUINT s fluid property routines from a code provided by Langley Research Center. In parallel, a simplified thermal mathematical model of the port wing, including the Thermal Protection System (TPS), was based on more detailed Shuttle re-entry modeling previously done by the Dryden Flight Research Center. Once the venting model was coupled with the thermal model of the wing structure with chemical equilibrium air properties, various breach scenarios were assessed in support of the aero-thermodynamics team. The construction of the coupled model and results are presented herein.

  7. Predictions of hydrothermal alteration within near-ridge oceanic crust from coordinated geochemical and fluid flow models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wetzel, L.R.; Raffensperger, J.P.; Shock, E.L.

    2001-01-01

    Coordinated geochemical and hydrological calculations guide our understanding of the composition, fluid flow patterns, and thermal structure of near-ridge oceanic crust. The case study presented here illustrates geochemical and thermal changes taking place as oceanic crust ages from 0.2 to 1.0 Myr. Using a finite element code, we model fluid flow and heat transport through the upper few hundred meters of an abyssal hill created at an intermediate spreading rate. We use a reaction path model with a customized database to calculate equilibrium fluid compositions and mineral assemblages of basalt and seawater at 500 bars and temperatures ranging from 150 to 400??C. In one scenario, reaction path calculations suggest that volume increases on the order of 10% may occur within portions of the basaltic basement. If this change in volume occurred, it would be sufficient to fill all primary porosity in some locations, effectively sealing off portions of the oceanic crust. Thermal profiles resulting from fluid flow simulations indicate that volume changes along this possible reaction path occur primarily within the first 0.4 Myr of crustal aging. ?? 2001 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Lattice Boltzmann simulation of the flow of binary immiscible fluids with different viscosities using the Shan-Chen microscopic interaction model.

    PubMed

    Chin, Jonathan; Boek, Edo S; Coveney, Peter V

    2002-03-15

    We present a lattice Boltzmann study of the flow of a binary fluid where the fluid components have different viscosities. For this purpose, a microscopic interaction model (due to Shan & Chen) is used. The model is validated for Poiseuille flow of layered immiscible binary fluids and the dispersion of a capillary wave. We then study the unstable displacement of a viscous fluid by a less viscous fluid in a two-dimensional channel. Although a finger-like structure was observed in many simulations, it is not clear if this structure was produced due to viscous fingering or due to other effects.

  9. Rotational fluid flow experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    This project which began in 1986 as part of the Worcester Polytechnic Institute (WPI) Advanced Space Design Program focuses on the design and implementation of an electromechanical system for studying vortex behavior in a microgravity environment. Most of the existing equipment was revised and redesigned by this project team, as necessary. Emphasis was placed on documentation and integration of the electrical and mechanical subsystems. Project results include reconfiguration and thorough testing of all hardware subsystems, implementation of an infrared gas entrainment detector, new signal processing circuitry for the ultrasonic fluid circulation device, improved prototype interface circuits, and software for overall control of experiment operation.

  10. Dynamic simulation of wavy-stratified two-phase flow with the one-dimensional two-fluid model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fullmer, William D.

    The one-dimensional two-fluid model is the basis for the description of the transport of mass, momentum and energy in the thermal-hydraulic codes used for nuclear reactor safety analysis. Unlike other physical transport models, the one-dimensional two-fluid model suffers from the possibility of being ill-posed as an initial-boundary value problem depending on the flow conditions and the relevant physical closure laws. Typically, the ill-posedness is dealt with through either excessive numerical damping or the addition of unphysical closure laws designed for the sole purpose of hyperbolization. Unfortunately both methods eliminate the instability along with the problem of ill-posedness causing the model to undoubtedly lose some of its inherent dynamic capability. In this work, a one-dimensional two-fluid model for horizontal or slightly inclined stratified flow is developed. Higher order physical models that are often neglected, such as surface tension and axial viscous stress, are retained for their short-wavelength stability properties. Characteristic, dispersion and nonlinear analyses are performed to demonstrate that the resulting model is linearly well-posed and nonlinearly well-behaved. While it has been known that higher-order differential terms are able to regularize the short-wavelength problem of ill-posedness without removing the long-wavelength instability, the literature is relatively silent on the consequences of using a model under linearly unstable conditions. Using carefully selected conditions in an idealized infinite domain, it is demonstrated for the first time that the one-dimensional two-fluid model exhibits chaotic behavior in addition to limit cycles and asymptotic stability. The chaotic behavior is a consequence of the long-wavelength linear instability (energy source) the nonlinearity (energy transfer) and the short-wavelength dissipation (energy sink). Since the model is chaotic, solutions exhibit a sensitive dependence on initial

  11. Applications of Jet Ejectors for efficient refrigeration and modelling of Multi Phase Multi Fluid flow in Ejectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konar, D.

    2015-09-01

    The uses of ejector for efficient refrigeration are manifold - it has been used, among other applications, in the VCRS to reduce the compression ratio, in the combined ejector absorption cycle to enhance the refrigeration capacity and in the ejector absorber cycle to obtain lower evaporator pressures, higher absorber pressures and pre-absorption of the refrigerant in the ejector. Hence, modeling of flow which may be two phase two fluid as in ejector absorber cycle or two phase single fluid as in VCRS in an ejector assumes utmost importance. However, much work has not been done in this field. The primary objective of the present work is to discuss about the role of ejectors in various refrigeration systems and to model the two phase two fluid flow in the nozzle and the diffuser of an ejector under suitable assumptions. The equations of conservation of mass, momentum and energy have been solved to find the different flow properties like pressure, temperature and velocity of the two phases as function of the length in the diffuser. Different cases pertaining to different flows have been taken care of by appreciating what type of phenomena can actually occur at the interface of the two phases. Higher pressure rise was obtained for a given diffuser length with higher diffuser angles, smaller droplet diameter, higher inlet velocity of the gaseous phase and higher drag coefficients. Among other results, it was also seen that the two phases reached thermal equilibrium faster with higher diffuser angle, smaller droplet diameter and higher heat transfer coefficient.

  12. A Computer Simulation Model of Fluid Flow Through a Channel with Constriction

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-06-01

    14. SUBJECT TERMS COMSOL , Stenosis, Fluid Dynamics, Hemodynamics 15. NUMBER OF PAGES 67 16. PRICE CODE 17. SECURITY...8. Two dimensional proportional velocity vectors provided from COMSOL multiphysics. Recirculation is clearly visible toward the artery wall, away...Dunec of COMSOL multiphysics for helping to develop our model and to help us get our ideas into model form. Finally, I would like to thank my wife

  13. A novel investigation of a micropolar fluid characterized by nonlinear constitutive diffusion model in boundary layer flow and heat transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sui, Jize; Zhao, Peng; Cheng, Zhengdong; Zheng, Liancun; Zhang, Xinxin

    2017-02-01

    The rheological and heat-conduction constitutive models of micropolar fluids (MFs), which are important non-Newtonian fluids, have been, until now, characterized by simple linear expressions, and as a consequence, the non-Newtonian performance of such fluids could not be effectively captured. Here, we establish the novel nonlinear constitutive models of a micropolar fluid and apply them to boundary layer flow and heat transfer problems. The nonlinear power law function of angular velocity is represented in the new models by employing generalized "n-diffusion theory," which has successfully described the characteristics of non-Newtonian fluids, such as shear-thinning and shear-thickening fluids. These novel models may offer a new approach to the theoretical understanding of shear-thinning behavior and anomalous heat transfer caused by the collective micro-rotation effects in a MF with shear flow according to recent experiments. The nonlinear similarity equations with a power law form are derived and the approximate analytical solutions are obtained by the homotopy analysis method, which is in good agreement with the numerical solutions. The results indicate that non-Newtonian behaviors involving a MF depend substantially on the power exponent n and the modified material parameter K 0 introduced by us. Furthermore, the relations of the engineering interest parameters, including local boundary layer thickness, local skin friction, and Nusselt number are found to be fitted by a quadratic polynomial to n with high precision, which enables the extraction of the rapid predictions from a complex nonlinear boundary-layer transport system.

  14. Adaptive particle-based pore-level modeling of incompressible fluid flow in porous media: a direct and parallel approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ovaysi, S.; Piri, M.

    2009-12-01

    We present a three-dimensional fully dynamic parallel particle-based model for direct pore-level simulation of incompressible viscous fluid flow in disordered porous media. The model was developed from scratch and is capable of simulating flow directly in three-dimensional high-resolution microtomography images of naturally occurring or man-made porous systems. It reads the images as input where the position of the solid walls are given. The entire medium, i.e., solid and fluid, is then discretized using particles. The model is based on Moving Particle Semi-implicit (MPS) technique. We modify this technique in order to improve its stability. The model handles highly irregular fluid-solid boundaries effectively. It takes into account viscous pressure drop in addition to the gravity forces. It conserves mass and can automatically detect any false connectivity with fluid particles in the neighboring pores and throats. It includes a sophisticated algorithm to automatically split and merge particles to maintain hydraulic connectivity of extremely narrow conduits. Furthermore, it uses novel methods to handle particle inconsistencies and open boundaries. To handle the computational load, we present a fully parallel version of the model that runs on distributed memory computer clusters and exhibits excellent scalability. The model is used to simulate unsteady-state flow problems under different conditions starting from straight noncircular capillary tubes with different cross-sectional shapes, i.e., circular/elliptical, square/rectangular and triangular cross-sections. We compare the predicted dimensionless hydraulic conductances with the data available in the literature and observe an excellent agreement. We then test the scalability of our parallel model with two samples of an artificial sandstone, samples A and B, with different volumes and different distributions (non-uniform and uniform) of solid particles among the processors. An excellent linear scalability is

  15. Two-fluid equilibrium with flow: FLOW2

    SciTech Connect

    Guazzotto, L.; Betti, R.

    2015-09-15

    The effects of finite macroscopic velocities on axisymmetric ideal equilibria are examined using the two-fluid (ions and electrons) model. A new equilibrium solver, the code FLOW2, is introduced for the two-fluid model and used to investigate the importance of various flow patterns on the equilibrium of tight aspect ratio (NSTX) and regular tokamak (DIII-D) configurations. Several improvements to the understanding and calculation of two-fluid equilibria are presented, including an analytical and numerical proof of the single-fluid and static limits of the two-fluid model, a discussion of boundary conditions, a user-friendly free-function formulation, and the explicit evaluation of velocity components normal to magnetic surfaces.

  16. A model for fluid flow during saturated boiling on a horizontal cylinder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kheyrandish, K.; Dalton, C.; Lienhard, J. H.

    1987-01-01

    A model has been developed to represent the vapor removal pattern in the vicinity of a cylinder during nucleate flow boiling across a horizontal cylinder. The model is based on a potential flow representation of the liquid and vapor regions and an estimate of the losses that should occur in the flow. Correlation of the losses shows a weak dependence on the Weber number and a slightly stronger dependence on the saturated liquid-to-vapor density ratio. The vapor jet thickness, which is crucial to the prediction of the burnout heat flux, and the shape of the vapor film are predicted. Both are verified by qualitative experimental observations.

  17. Modeling Solar Wind Flow with the Multi-Scale Fluid-Kinetic Simulation Suite

    SciTech Connect

    Pogorelov, N.V.; Borovikov, S. N.; Bedford, M. C.; Heerikhuisen, J.; Kim, T. K.; Kryukov, I. A.; Zank, G. P.

    2013-04-01

    Multi-Scale Fluid-Kinetic Simulation Suite (MS-FLUKSS) is a package of numerical codes capable of performing adaptive mesh refinement simulations of complex plasma flows in the presence of discontinuities and charge exchange between ions and neutral atoms. The flow of the ionized component is described with the ideal MHD equations, while the transport of atoms is governed either by the Boltzmann equation or multiple Euler gas dynamics equations. We have enhanced the code with additional physical treatments for the transport of turbulence and acceleration of pickup ions in the interplanetary space and at the termination shock. In this article, we present the results of our numerical simulation of the solar wind (SW) interaction with the local interstellar medium (LISM) in different time-dependent and stationary formulations. Numerical results are compared with the Ulysses, Voyager, and OMNI observations. Finally, the SW boundary conditions are derived from in-situ spacecraft measurements and remote observations.

  18. Gas-liquid Two Phase Flow Modelling of Incompressible Fluid and Experimental Validation Studies in Vertical Centrifugal Casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, J. X.; Shen, X.; Yin, Y. J.; Guo, Z.; Wang, H.

    2015-06-01

    In this paper, Gas-liquid two phase flow mathematic models of incompressible fluid were proposed to explore the feature of fluid under certain centrifugal force in vertical centrifugal casting (VCC). Modified projection-level-set method was introduced to solve the mathematic models. To validate the simulation results, two methods were used in this study. In the first method, the simulation result of basic VCC flow process was compared with its analytic solution. The relationship between the numerical solution and deterministic analytic solution was presented to verify the correctness of numerical algorithms. In the second method, systematic water simulation experiments were developed. In this initial experiment, special experimental vertical centrifugal device and casting shapes were designed to describe typical mold-filling processes in VCC. High speed camera system and data collection devices were used to capture flow shape during the mold-filling process. Moreover, fluid characteristic at different rotation speed (from 40rpm, 60rpmand 80rpm) was discussed to provide comparative resource for simulation results. As compared with the simulation results, the proposed mathematical models could be proven and the experimental design could help us advance the accuracy of simulation and further studies for VCC.

  19. Physical model of fluid flow characteristics in RH-TOP vacuum refining process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Lu; Bao, Yan-ping; Yue, Feng; Zhang, Li-qiang; Ou, Hong-lin

    2012-06-01

    To understand the characteristic of circulation flow rate in 250-t RH-TOP vacuum refining process, the l:4 water model test was established through the bubble behavior and gas holdup in the up-leg to investigate the effects of different processes and equipment parameters on the RH circulation flow rate. With the increases of lifting gas flow rate, lifting bubble travel, and the internal diameter of the up-leg, and the decrease of nozzle diameter, the work done by bubble floatage and the circulation flow rate increase. The expression of circulation flow rate was derived from the regression analysis of experiment data. Meanwhile, the influences of vacuum chamber pressure and nozzle blockage situation on the circulation flow rate were discussed in detail by the bubble behavior and gas holdup in the up-leg. It is necessary to maintain a certain vacuum chamber liquid level in the molten steel circulation flow. Compared with a nozzle with symmetrical blockage in the up-leg, when a nozzle with non-symmetrical blockage is applied, the lifting gas distribution is non-uniform, causing a great effect on the molten steel circulation flow and making the circulation flow drop largely.

  20. Can a stepwise steady flow computational fluid dynamics model reproduce unsteady particulate matter separation for common unit operations?

    PubMed

    Pathapati, Subbu-Srikanth; Sansalone, John J

    2011-07-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) is emerging as a model for resolving the fate of particulate matter (PM) by unit operations subject to rainfall-runoff loadings. However, compared to steady flow CFD models, there are greater computational requirements for unsteady hydrodynamics and PM loading models. Therefore this study examines if integrating a stepwise steady flow CFD model can reproduce PM separation by common unit operations loaded by unsteady flow and PM loadings, thereby reducing computational effort. Utilizing monitored unit operation data from unsteady events as a metric, this study compares the two CFD modeling approaches for a hydrodynamic separator (HS), a primary clarifier (PC) tank, and a volumetric clarifying filtration system (VCF). Results indicate that while unsteady CFD models reproduce PM separation of each unit operation, stepwise steady CFD models result in significant deviation for HS and PC models as compared to monitored data; overestimating the physical size requirements of each unit required to reproduce monitored PM separation results. In contrast, the stepwise steady flow approach reproduces PM separation by the VCF, a combined gravitational sedimentation and media filtration unit operation that provides attenuation of turbulent energy and flow velocity.

  1. Simulation of Two-Fluid Flows by the Least-Squares Finite Element Method Using a Continuum Surface Tension Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Jie; Yu, Sheng-Tao; Jiang, Bo-nan

    1996-01-01

    In this paper a numerical procedure for simulating two-fluid flows is presented. This procedure is based on the Volume of Fluid (VOF) method proposed by Hirt and Nichols and the continuum surface force (CSF) model developed by Brackbill, et al. In the VOF method fluids of different properties are identified through the use of a continuous field variable (color function). The color function assigns a unique constant (color) to each fluid. The interfaces between different fluids are distinct due to sharp gradients of the color function. The evolution of the interfaces is captured by solving the convective equation of the color function. The CSF model is used as a means to treat surface tension effect at the interfaces. Here a modified version of the CSF model, proposed by Jacqmin, is used to calculate the tension force. In the modified version, the force term is obtained by calculating the divergence of a stress tensor defined by the gradient of the color function. In its analytical form, this stress formulation is equivalent to the original CSF model. Numerically, however, the use of the stress formulation has some advantages over the original CSF model, as it bypasses the difficulty in approximating the curvatures of the interfaces. The least-squares finite element method (LSFEM) is used to discretize the governing equation systems. The LSFEM has proven to be effective in solving incompressible Navier-Stokes equations and pure convection equations, making it an ideal candidate for the present applications. The LSFEM handles all the equations in a unified manner without any additional special treatment such as upwinding or artificial dissipation. Various bench mark tests have been carried out for both two dimensional planar and axisymmetric flows, including a dam breaking, oscillating and stationary bubbles and a conical liquid sheet in a pressure swirl atomizer.

  2. Mathematical modeling of a non-Newtonian fluid flow in the main fracture inside permeable porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilyasov, A. M.; Bulgakova, G. T.

    2016-08-01

    This paper describes a mathematical model of the main fracture isolation in porous media by water-based mature gels. While modeling injection, water infiltration from the gel pack through fracture walls is taking into account, due to which the polymer concentration changes and the residual water resistance factor changes as a consequence. The salutation predicts velocity and pressure fields of the non-Newtonian incompressible fluid filtration for conditions of a non-deformable formation as well as a gel front trajectory in the fracture. The mathematical model of agent injection into the main fracture is based on the fundamental laws of continuum mechanics conservation describing the flow of non-Newtonian and Newtonian fluids separated by an interface plane in a flat channel with permeable walls. The mathematical model is based on a one-dimensional isothermal approximation, with dynamic parameters pressure and velocity, averaged over the fracture section.

  3. On the hyperbolicity of a two-fluid model for debris flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mineo, C.; Torrisi, M.

    2010-05-01

    We consider the system of partial differential equations associated with the mathematical model for debris flows proposed by E.B. Pitman and L. Le (Phil. Trans. R. Soc. A, 363, 1573-1601, 2005) and analyze the problem of the hyperbolicity of the model.

  4. Monitoring Subsurface Fluid Flow Using Perfluorocarbon Tracers: Another Tool Potentially Available for Subsurface Fluid Flow Assessments

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Perfluorocarbon Tracers (PFTs) Complement stable Isotopes and Geochemistry for Verifying, Assessing or Modeling Fluid Flow. Geochemistry, Isotopes and PFT’s complement Geophysics to monitor and verify plume movement, leakage to shallow aquifers or surface

  5. Imaging and modeling of flow in porous media using clinical nuclear emission tomography systems and computational fluid dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Boutchko, Rostyslav; Rayz, Vitaliy L.; Vandehey, Nicholas T.; O’Neil, James P.; Budinger, Thomas F.; Nico, Peter S.; Druhan, Jennifer L.; Saloner, David A.; Gullberg, Grant T.; Moses, William W.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents experimental and modeling aspects of applying nuclear emission tomography to study fluid flow in laboratory packed porous media columns of the type frequently used in geophysics, geochemistry and hydrology research. Positron emission tomography (PET) and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) are used as non-invasive tools to obtain dynamic 3D images of radioactive tracer concentrations. Dynamic sequences obtained using 18F-FDG PET are used to trace flow through a 5 cm diameter × 20 cm tall sand packed column with and without an impermeable obstacle. In addition, a custom-made rotating column setup placed in a clinical two-headed SPECT camera is used to image 99mTc-DTPA tracer propagation in a through-flowing column (10 cm diameter × 30 cm tall) packed with recovered aquifer sediments. A computational fluid dynamics software package FLUENT is used to model the observed flow dynamics. Tracer distributions obtained in the simulations in the smaller column uniformly packed with sand and in the column with an obstacle are remarkably similar to the reconstructed images in the PET experiments. SPECT results demonstrate strongly non-uniform flow patterns for the larger column slurry-packed with sub-surface sediment and slow upward flow. In the numerical simulation of the SPECT study, two symmetric channels with increased permeability are prescribed along the column walls, which result in the emergence of two well-defined preferential flow paths. Methods and results of this work provide new opportunities in hydrologic and biogeochemical research. The primary target application for developed technologies is non-destructive, non-perturbing, quantitative imaging of flow dynamics within laboratory scale porous media systems. PMID:24917693

  6. Imaging and modeling of flow in porous media using clinical nuclear emission tomography systems and computational fluid dynamics.

    PubMed

    Boutchko, Rostyslav; Rayz, Vitaliy L; Vandehey, Nicholas T; O'Neil, James P; Budinger, Thomas F; Nico, Peter S; Druhan, Jennifer L; Saloner, David A; Gullberg, Grant T; Moses, William W

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents experimental and modeling aspects of applying nuclear emission tomography to study fluid flow in laboratory packed porous media columns of the type frequently used in geophysics, geochemistry and hydrology research. Positron emission tomography (PET) and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) are used as non-invasive tools to obtain dynamic 3D images of radioactive tracer concentrations. Dynamic sequences obtained using (18)F-FDG PET are used to trace flow through a 5 cm diameter × 20 cm tall sand packed column with and without an impermeable obstacle. In addition, a custom-made rotating column setup placed in a clinical two-headed SPECT camera is used to image (99m)Tc-DTPA tracer propagation in a through-flowing column (10 cm diameter × 30 cm tall) packed with recovered aquifer sediments. A computational fluid dynamics software package FLUENT is used to model the observed flow dynamics. Tracer distributions obtained in the simulations in the smaller column uniformly packed with sand and in the column with an obstacle are remarkably similar to the reconstructed images in the PET experiments. SPECT results demonstrate strongly non-uniform flow patterns for the larger column slurry-packed with sub-surface sediment and slow upward flow. In the numerical simulation of the SPECT study, two symmetric channels with increased permeability are prescribed along the column walls, which result in the emergence of two well-defined preferential flow paths. Methods and results of this work provide new opportunities in hydrologic and biogeochemical research. The primary target application for developed technologies is non-destructive, non-perturbing, quantitative imaging of flow dynamics within laboratory scale porous media systems.

  7. Flow sensor for biomedical fluids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winkler, H. E.

    1981-01-01

    Electronic sensor accurately measures and controls flow of plasma, whole blood, or drugs in solution. Since sensor does not directly contact fluid, it does not have to be sterilized. It is compatible with disposable bottles, tubes, and hypodermic needles widely used in hospitals. Only modification necessary is in tube, which must contain two small metal inserts, spaced to fit in curved thermistor plates.

  8. Verification of mesoscopic models of viscoelastic fluids with a non-monotonic flow curve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsova, Julia L.; Skul'skiy, Oleg I.

    2016-02-01

    The non-monotonic flow curve of a 1 wt.% polyacrylonitrile solution in dimethyl sulfoxide is described by two mesoscopic models: the modified Vinogradov-Pokrovsky model and the model proposed by Remmelgas, Harrison and Leal. To obtain an adequate description of the experimental curve, we have selected suitable internal parameters for these models. Analytical solutions for the Couette-Poiseuille flow problems are determined in parametric form, which allows us to plot the distribution of stress components and anisotropy tensor as well as the velocity profiles containing closed loops and weak tangential discontinuities. It is shown that both models predict a similar qualitative picture of structure evolution, but exhibit a significant discrepancy in the quantitative description of the magnitude of molecular chain stretching.

  9. Electro-osmotic flow in bicomponent fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazarenko, Andrei; Sega, Marcello

    The electroosmotic flow (EOF) is a widely used technique that uses the action of external electric fields on solvated ions to move fluids around in microfluidics devices. For homogeneous fluids, the characteristics of the flow can be well approximated by simple analytical models, but in multicomponent systems such as oil-in-water droplets one has to rely to numerical simulations. The purpose of this study is to investigate physical properties of the EOF in a bicomponent fluid by solving the coupled equations of motions of explicit ions in interaction with a continuous model of the flow. To do so we couple the hydrodynamics equations as solved by a Shan-Chen Lattice-Boltzmann method to the molecular dynamics of the ions. The presence of explicit ions allows us to go beyond the simple Poisson-Boltzmann approximations, and investigate a variety of EOF regimes. ETN-COLLDENSE (H2020-MCSA-ITN-2014, Grant No. 642774).

  10. Numerical description and experimental validation of a rheology model for non-Newtonian fluid flow in cancellous bone.

    PubMed

    Widmer Soyka, René P; López, Alejandro; Persson, Cecilia; Cristofolini, Luca; Ferguson, Stephen J

    2013-11-01

    Fluids present or used in biology, medicine and (biomedical) engineering are often significantly non-Newtonian. Furthermore, they are chemically complex and can interact with the porous matrix through which they flow. The porous structures themselves display complex morphological inhomogeneities on a wide range of length scales. In vertebroplasty, a shear-thinning fluid, e.g. poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA), is injected into the cavities of vertebral trabecular bone for the stabilization of fractures and metastatic lesions. The main objective of this study was therefore to provide a protocol for numerically investigating the rheological properties of PMMA-based bone cements to predict its spreading behavior while flowing through vertebral trabecular bone. A numerical upscaling scheme based on a dimensionless formulation of the Navier-Stokes equation is proposed in order to relate the pore-scale rheological properties of the PMMA that were experimentally estimated using a plate rheometer, to the continuum-scale. On the pore length scale, a viscosity change on the order of one magnitude was observed whilst the shear-thinning properties caused a viscosity change on the order of only 10% on the continuum length scale and in a flow regime that is relevant for vertebroplasty. An experimental validation, performed on human cadaveric vertebrae (n=9), showed a significant improvement of the cement spreading prediction accuracy with a non-Newtonian formulation. A root mean square cement surface prediction error of 1.53mm (assuming a Newtonian fluid) and 1.37mm (assuming a shear-thinning fluid) was found. Our findings highlight the importance of incorporating the non-Newtonian fluids properties in computational models of porous media at the appropriate length scale.

  11. Nanometer-scale imaging and pore-scale fluid flow modeling inchalk

    SciTech Connect

    Tomutsa, Liviu; Silin, Dmitriy; Radmilovich, Velimir

    2005-08-23

    For many rocks of high economic interest such as chalk,diatomite, tight gas sands or coal, nanometer scale resolution is neededto resolve the 3D-pore structure, which controls the flow and trapping offluids in the rocks. Such resolutions cannot be achieved with existingtomographic technologies. A new 3D imaging method, based on serialsectioning and using the Focused Ion Beam (FIB) technology has beendeveloped. FIB allows for the milling of layers as thin as 10 nanometersby using accelerated Ga+ ions to sputter atoms from the sample surface.After each milling step, as a new surface is exposed, a 2D image of thissurface is generated. Next, the 2D images are stacked to reconstruct the3D pore or grain structure. Resolutions as high as 10 nm are achievableusing this technique. A new image processing method uses directmorphological analysis of the pore space to characterize thepetrophysical properties of diverse formations. In addition to estimationof the petrophysical properties (porosity, permeability, relativepermeability and capillary pressures), the method is used for simulationof fluid displacement processes, such as those encountered in variousimproved oil recovery (IOR) approaches. Computed with the new methodcapillary pressure curves are in good agreement with laboratory data. Themethod has also been applied for visualization of the fluid distributionat various saturations from the new FIB data.

  12. Firedrake-Fluids v0.1: numerical modelling of shallow water flows using an automated solution framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobs, C. T.; Piggott, M. D.

    2015-03-01

    This model description paper introduces a new finite element model for the simulation of non-linear shallow water flows, called Firedrake-Fluids. Unlike traditional models that are written by hand in static, low-level programming languages such as Fortran or C, Firedrake-Fluids uses the Firedrake framework to automatically generate the model's code from a high-level abstract language called Unified Form Language (UFL). By coupling to the PyOP2 parallel unstructured mesh framework, Firedrake can then target the code towards a desired hardware architecture to enable the efficient parallel execution of the model over an arbitrary computational mesh. The description of the model includes the governing equations, the methods employed to discretise and solve the governing equations, and an outline of the automated solution process. The verification and validation of the model, performed using a set of well-defined test cases, is also presented along with a road map for future developments and the solution of more complex fluid dynamical systems.

  13. Modeling Coupled Processes for Multiphase Fluid Flow in Mechanically Deforming Faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKenna, S. A.; Pike, D. Q.

    2011-12-01

    Modeling of coupled hydrological-mechanical processes in fault zones is critical for understanding the long-term behavior of fluids within the shallow crust. Here we utilize a previously developed cellular-automata (CA) model to define the evolution of permeability within a 2-D fault zone under compressive stress. At each time step, the CA model calculates the increase in fluid pressure within the fault at every grid cell. Pressure surpassing a critical threshold (e.g., lithostatic stress) causes a rupture in that cell, and pressure is then redistributed across the neighboring cells. The rupture can cascade through the spatial domain and continue across multiple time steps. Stress continues to increase and the size and location of rupture events are recorded until a percolating backbone of ruptured cells exists across the fault. Previous applications of this model consider uncorrelated random fields for the compressibility of the fault material. The prior focus on uncorrelated property fields is consistent with development of a number of statistical physics models including percolation processes and fracture propagation. However, geologic materials typically express spatial correlation and this can have a significant impact on the results of the pressure and permeability distributions. We model correlation of the fault material compressibility as a multiGaussian random field with a correlation length defined as the full-width at half maximum (FWHM) of the kernel used to create the field. The FWHM is varied from < 0.001 to approximately 0.47 of the domain size. The addition of spatial correlation to the compressibility significantly alters the model results including: 1) Accumulation of larger amounts of strain prior to the first rupture event; 2) Initiation of the percolating backbone at lower amounts of cumulative strain; 3) Changes in the event size distribution to a combined power-law and exponential distribution with a smaller power; and 4) Evolution of the

  14. Viscoelastic flow modeling in the extrusion of a dough-like fluid.

    PubMed

    Dhanasekharan, M; Kokini, J L

    2000-08-01

    This work attempts to investigate the effect of viscoelasticity and three-dimensional geometry in screw channels. The Phan-Thien Tanner (PTT) constitutive equation with simplified model parameters was solved in conjunction with the flow equations. Polyflow, a commercially available finite element code was used to solve the resulting nonlinear partial differential equations. The PTT model predicted one log scale lower pressure buildup compared to the equivalent Newtonian results. However, the velocity profile did not show significant changes for the chosen PTT model parameters. Past Researchers neglected viscoelastic effects and also the three dimensional nature of the flow in extruder channels. The results of this paper provide a starting point for further simulations using more realistic model parameters, which may enable the food engineer to more accurately scale-up and design extrusion processes.

  15. Viscoelastic flow modeling in the extrusion of a dough-like fluid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dhanasekharan, M.; Kokini, J. L.; Janes, H. W. (Principal Investigator)

    2000-01-01

    This work attempts to investigate the effect of viscoelasticity and three-dimensional geometry in screw channels. The Phan-Thien Tanner (PTT) constitutive equation with simplified model parameters was solved in conjunction with the flow equations. Polyflow, a commercially available finite element code was used to solve the resulting nonlinear partial differential equations. The PTT model predicted one log scale lower pressure buildup compared to the equivalent Newtonian results. However, the velocity profile did not show significant changes for the chosen PTT model parameters. Past Researchers neglected viscoelastic effects and also the three dimensional nature of the flow in extruder channels. The results of this paper provide a starting point for further simulations using more realistic model parameters, which may enable the food engineer to more accurately scale-up and design extrusion processes.

  16. Geophysical models of heat and fluid flow in damageable poro-elastic continua

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roubíček, Tomáš

    2017-03-01

    A rather general model for fluid and heat transport in poro-elastic continua undergoing possibly also plastic-like deformation and damage is developed with the goal to cover various specific models of rock rheology used in geophysics of Earth's crust. Nonconvex free energy at small elastic strains, gradient theories (in particular the concept of second-grade nonsimple continua), and Biot poro-elastic model are employed, together with possible large displacement due to large plastic-like strains evolving during long time periods. Also the additive splitting is justified in stratified situations which are of interest in modelling of lithospheric crust faults. Thermodynamically based formulation includes entropy balance (in particular the Clausius-Duhem inequality) and an explicit global energy balance. It is further outlined that the energy balance can be used to ensure, under suitable data qualification, existence of a weak solution and stability and convergence of suitable approximation schemes at least in some particular situations.

  17. Response Of Mineralizing And Non-Mineralizing Bone Cells To Fluid Flow: An In Vitro Model For Mechanotransruction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Makuch, Lauren A.

    2004-01-01

    Humans reach peak bone mass at age 30. After this point, we lose 1 to 2 percent of bone mass each decade. In the microgravity environment of space, astronauts lose bone mass at an accelerated rate of 1 to 2 percent each month. When astronauts travel to Mars, they may be in space for as long as 3 years. During this time, they may lose about half of their bone mass from weight-bearing bones. This loss may be irreversible. The drastic loss in bone that astronauts experience in space makes them much more vulnerable to fractures. In addition, the corresponding removal of calcium from bone results in higher levels of calcium in the blood, which increases the risk of developing kidney stones. Currently, studies are being conducted which investigate factors governing bone adaptation and mechanotransduction. Bone is constantly adapting in response to mechanical stimuli. Increased mechanical loading stimulates bone formation and suppresses bone resorption. Reduction in mechanical loading caused by bedrest, disuse, or microgravity results in decreased bone formation and possibly increased bone resorption. Osteoblasts and osteoclasts are the two main cell types that participate in bone remodeling. Osteoblasts are anabolic (bone-forming) cells and osteoclasts are catabolic (bone-resorbing) cells. In microgravity, the activity of osteoblasts slows down and the activity of osteoclasts may speed up, causing a loss of bone density. Mechanotransduction, the molecular mechanism by which mechanical stimuli are converted to biochemical signals, is not yet understood. Exposure of cells to fluid flow imposes a shear stress on the cells. Several studies have shown that the shear stress that results from fluid flow induces a cellular response similar to that induced by mechanical loading. Thus, fluid flow can be used as an in vitro model to simulate the mechanical stress that bone cells experience in vivo. Previous in vitro studies have shown that fluid flow induces several responses in

  18. Modeling Solar Wind Flow with the Multi-Scale Fluid-Kinetic Simulation Suite

    DOE PAGES

    Pogorelov, N.V.; Borovikov, S. N.; Bedford, M. C.; ...

    2013-04-01

    Multi-Scale Fluid-Kinetic Simulation Suite (MS-FLUKSS) is a package of numerical codes capable of performing adaptive mesh refinement simulations of complex plasma flows in the presence of discontinuities and charge exchange between ions and neutral atoms. The flow of the ionized component is described with the ideal MHD equations, while the transport of atoms is governed either by the Boltzmann equation or multiple Euler gas dynamics equations. We have enhanced the code with additional physical treatments for the transport of turbulence and acceleration of pickup ions in the interplanetary space and at the termination shock. In this article, we present themore » results of our numerical simulation of the solar wind (SW) interaction with the local interstellar medium (LISM) in different time-dependent and stationary formulations. Numerical results are compared with the Ulysses, Voyager, and OMNI observations. Finally, the SW boundary conditions are derived from in-situ spacecraft measurements and remote observations.« less

  19. Enhanced computational performance of the lattice Boltzmann model for simulating micron- and submicron-size particle flows and non-Newtonian fluid flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Başağaoğlu, Hakan; Harwell, John R.; Nguyen, Hoa; Succi, Sauro

    2017-04-01

    Significant improvements in the computational performance of the lattice-Boltzmann (LB) model, coded in FORTRAN90, were achieved through application of enhancement techniques. Applied techniques include optimization of array memory layouts, data structure simplification, random number generation outside the simulation thread(s), code parallelization via OpenMP, and intra- and inter-timestep task pipelining. Effectiveness of these optimization techniques was measured on three benchmark problems: (i) transient flow of multiple particles in a Newtonian fluid in a heterogeneous fractured porous domain, (ii) thermal fluctuation of the fluid at the sub-micron scale and the resultant Brownian motion of a particle, and (iii) non-Newtonian fluid flow in a smooth-walled channel. Application of the aforementioned optimization techniques resulted in an average 21 × performance improvement, which could significantly enhance practical uses of the LB models in diverse applications, focusing on the fate and transport of nano-size or micron-size particles in non-Newtonian fluids.

  20. Cattaneo-Christov Heat Flux Model for MHD Three-Dimensional Flow of Maxwell Fluid over a Stretching Sheet.

    PubMed

    Rubab, Khansa; Mustafa, M

    2016-01-01

    This letter investigates the MHD three-dimensional flow of upper-convected Maxwell (UCM) fluid over a bi-directional stretching surface by considering the Cattaneo-Christov heat flux model. This model has tendency to capture the characteristics of thermal relaxation time. The governing partial differential equations even after employing the boundary layer approximations are non linear. Accurate analytic solutions for velocity and temperature distributions are computed through well-known homotopy analysis method (HAM). It is noticed that velocity decreases and temperature rises when stronger magnetic field strength is accounted. Penetration depth of temperature is a decreasing function of thermal relaxation time. The analysis for classical Fourier heat conduction law can be obtained as a special case of the present work. To our knowledge, the Cattaneo-Christov heat flux model law for three-dimensional viscoelastic flow problem is just introduced here.

  1. Cattaneo-Christov Heat Flux Model for MHD Three-Dimensional Flow of Maxwell Fluid over a Stretching Sheet

    PubMed Central

    Rubab, Khansa; Mustafa, M.

    2016-01-01

    This letter investigates the MHD three-dimensional flow of upper-convected Maxwell (UCM) fluid over a bi-directional stretching surface by considering the Cattaneo-Christov heat flux model. This model has tendency to capture the characteristics of thermal relaxation time. The governing partial differential equations even after employing the boundary layer approximations are non linear. Accurate analytic solutions for velocity and temperature distributions are computed through well-known homotopy analysis method (HAM). It is noticed that velocity decreases and temperature rises when stronger magnetic field strength is accounted. Penetration depth of temperature is a decreasing function of thermal relaxation time. The analysis for classical Fourier heat conduction law can be obtained as a special case of the present work. To our knowledge, the Cattaneo-Christov heat flux model law for three-dimensional viscoelastic flow problem is just introduced here. PMID:27093542

  2. Kinetic and fluid dynamic modeling, numerical approaches of flowing-gas diode-pumped alkali vapor amplifiers.

    PubMed

    Shen, Binglin; Pan, Bailiang; Jiao, Jian; Xia, Chunsheng

    2015-07-27

    Comprehensive analysis of kinetic and fluid dynamic processes in flowing-gas diode-pumped alkali vapor amplifiers is reported. Taking into account effects of the temperature, the amplified spontaneous emission, the saturation power, the excitation of the alkali atoms to high electronic levels and the ionization, a detailed physical model is established to simulate the output performance of flowing-gas diode-pumped alkali vapor amplifiers. Influences of the flow velocity and the pump power on the amplified power are calculated and analyzed. Comparisons between single and double amplifier, longitudinal and transverse flow are made. Results show that end-pumped cascaded amplifier can provide higher output power under the same total pump power and the cell length, while output powers achieved by single- and double-end pumped, double-side pumped amplifiers with longitudinal or transverse flow have a complicated but valuable relation. Thus the model is extremely helpful for designing high-power flowing-gas diode-pumped alkali vapor amplifiers.

  3. Preferential Mode of gas invasion in sediments: Grain-scale mechanistic model of coupled multiphase fluid flow and sediment mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, A. K.; Juanes, R.

    2009-08-01

    We present a discrete element model for simulating, at the grain scale, gas migration in brine-saturated deformable media. We rigorously account for the presence of two fluids in the pore space by incorporating forces on grains due to pore fluid pressures and surface tension between fluids. This model, which couples multiphase fluid flow with sediment mechanics, permits investigation of the upward migration of gas through a brine-filled sediment column. We elucidate the ways in which gas migration may take place: (1) by capillary invasion in a rigid-like medium and (2) by initiation and propagation of a fracture. We find that grain size is the main factor controlling the mode of gas transport in the sediment, and we show that coarse-grain sediments favor capillary invasion, whereas fracturing dominates in fine-grain media. The results have important implications for understanding vent sites and pockmarks in the ocean floor, deep subseabed storage of carbon dioxide, and gas hydrate accumulations in ocean sediments and permafrost regions. Our results predict that in fine sediments, hydrate will likely form in veins following a fracture network pattern, and the hydrate concentration will likely be quite low. In coarse sediments, the buoyant methane gas is likely to invade the pore space more uniformly, in a process akin to invasion percolation, and the overall pore occupancy is likely to be much higher than for a fracture-dominated regime. These implications are consistent with laboratory experiments and field observations of methane hydrates in natural systems.

  4. Fluid flow along faults in carbonate rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romano, Valentina; Battaglia, Maurizio; Bigi, Sabina

    2015-04-01

    The study of fluid flow in fractured rocks plays a key role in reservoir management, including CO2 sequestration and waste isolation. We present a mathematical model of fluid flow in a fault zone, based on field data acquired in Majella Mountain, in the Central Apennines (Italy). The Majella is a thrust related, asymmetric, box shaped anticline. The mountain carbonate outcrops are part of a lower Cretaceous-Miocene succession, covered by a siliciclastic sequence of lower Pliocene age. We study a fault zone located in the Bolognano Formation (Oligo-Miocene age) and exposed in the Roman Valley Quarry near the town of Lettomanoppello, in the northern sector of the Majella Mountain. This is one of the best places in the Apennines to investigate a fault zone and has been the subject of numerous field studies. Faults are mechanical and permeability heterogeneities in the upper crust, so they strongly influence fluid flow. The distribution of the main components (core, damage zone) can lead a fault zone to act as a conduit, a barrier or a combined conduit-barrier system. We integrated existing and our own structural surveys of the area to better identify the major fault features (e.g., kind of fractures, statistical properties, geometry and pertrophysical characteristics). Our analytical model describe the Bolognano Formation using a dual porosity/dual permeability model: global flow occurs through the fracture network only, while rock matrix contain the majority of fluid storage and provide fluid drainage to the fractures. Pressure behavior is analyzed by examining the pressure drawdown curves, the derivative plots and the effects of the characteristic parameters. The analytical model has been calibrated against published data on fluid flow and pressure distribution in the Bolognano Formation.

  5. Theoretical modeling of fluid flow in cellular biological media: an overview.

    PubMed

    Kapellos, George E; Alexiou, Terpsichori S; Payatakes, Alkiviades C

    2010-06-01

    Fluid-structure interactions strongly affect, in multiple ways, the structure and function of cellular biological media, such as tissues, biofilms, and cell-entrapping gels. Mathematical models and computer simulation are important tools in advancing our understanding of these interactions, interpreting experimental observations, and designing novel processes and biomaterials. In this paper, we present a comprehensive survey and highlight promising directions of future research on theoretical modeling of momentum transport in cellular biological media with focus on the formulation of governing equations and the calculation of material properties both theoretically and experimentally. With regard to the governing equations, significant work has been done with single-scale approaches (e.g. mixture theory), whereas traditional upscaling methods (e.g. homogenization, volume averaging) or multiscale equation-free approaches have received limited attention. The underlying concepts, strengths, and limitations of each approach, as well as examples of use in the field of biomaterials are presented. The current status of knowledge regarding the dependence of macroscopic material properties on the volume fractions, geometry, and intrinsic material properties of the constituent phases (cells, extracellular matrix and fluid) is also presented. The observation of conformational changes that occur at finer levels of the structural hierarchy during momentum transport, the correlation of macro-properties with geometrical and topological features of materials with heterogeneous and anisotropic microstructure, as well as the determination of dynamic material properties are among important challenges for future research.

  6. Hydrothermal fluid flow models of Campi Flegrei caldera, Italy constrained by InSAR surface deformation time series observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lundgren, P.; Lanari, R.; Manzo, M.; Sansosti, E.; Tizzani, P.; Hutnak, M.; Hurwitz, S.

    2008-12-01

    Campi Flegrei caldera, Italy, located along the Bay of Naples, has a long history of significant vertical deformation, with the most recent large uplift (>1.5m) occurring in 1983-1984. Each episode of uplift has been followed by a period of subsidence that decreases in rate with time and may be punctuated by brief episodes of lesser uplift. The large amplitude of the major uplifts that occur without volcanic activity, and the subsequent subsidence has been argued as evidence for hydrothermal amplification of any magmatic source. The later subsidence and its temporal decay have been argued as due to diffusion of the pressurized caldera fill material into the less porous surrounding country rock. We present satellite synthetic aperture radar (SAR) interferometry (InSAR) time series analysis of ERS and Envisat data from the European Space Agency, based on exploiting the Small Baseline Subset (SBAS) approach [Berardino et al., 2002]; this allows us to generate maps of relative surface deformation though time, beginning in 1992 through 2007, that are relevant to both ascending and descending satellite orbits. The general temporal behavior is one of subsidence punctuated by several lesser uplift episodes. The spatial pattern of deformation can be modeled through simple inflation/deflation sources in an elastic halfspace. Given the evidence to suggest that fluids may play a significant role in the temporal deformation of Campi Flegrei, rather than a purely magmatic or magma chamber-based interpretation, we model the temporal and spatial evolution of surface deformation as a hydrothermal fluid flow process. We use the TOUGH2-BIOT2 set of numerical codes [Preuss et al., 1999; Hsieh, 1996], which couple multi-phase (liquid-gas) and multi-component (H2O-CO2) fluid flow in a porous or fractured media with plane strain deformation and fluid flow in a linearly elastic porous medium. We explore parameters related to the depth and temporal history of fluid injection, fluid

  7. Ferroelectric Fluid Flow Control Valve

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jalink, Antony, Jr. (Inventor); Hellbaum, Richard F. (Inventor); Rohrbach, Wayne W. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    An active valve is controlled and driven by external electrical actuation of a ferroelectric actuator to provide for improved passage of the fluid during certain time periods and to provide positive closure of the valve during other time periods. The valve provides improved passage in the direction of flow and positive closure in the direction against the flow. The actuator is a dome shaped internally prestressed ferroelectric actuator having a curvature, said dome shaped actuator having a rim and an apex. and a dome height measured from a plane through said rim said apex that varies with an electric voltage applied between an inside and an outside surface of said dome shaped actuator.

  8. Fluid flow electrophoresis in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griffin, R. N.

    1975-01-01

    Four areas relating to free-flow electrophoresis in space were investigated. The first was the degree of improvement over earthbound operations that might be expected. The second area of investigation covered the problems in developing a flowing buffer electrophoresis apparatus. The third area of investigation was the problem of testing on the ground equipment designed for use in space. The fourth area of investigation was the improvement to be expected in space for purification of biologicals. The results of some ground-based experiments are described. Other studies included cooling requirements in space, fluid sealing techniques, and measurement of voltage drop across membranes.

  9. General Transient Fluid Flow Algorithm

    SciTech Connect

    Amsden, A. A.; Ruppel, H. M.; Hirt, C. W.

    1992-03-12

    SALE2D calculates two-dimensional fluid flows at all speeds, from the incompressible limit to highly supersonic. An implicit treatment of the pressure calculation similar to that in the Implicit Continuous-fluid Eulerian (ICE) technique provides this flow speed flexibility. In addition, the computing mesh may move with the fluid in a typical Lagrangian fashion, be held fixed in an Eulerian manner, or move in some arbitrarily specified way to provide a continuous rezoning capability. This latitude results from use of an Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) treatment of the mesh. The partial differential equations solved are the Navier-Stokes equations and the mass and internal energy equations. The fluid pressure is determined from an equation of state and supplemented with an artificial viscous pressure for the computation of shock waves. The computing mesh consists of a two-dimensional network of quadrilateral cells for either cylindrical or Cartesian coordinates, and a variety of user-selectable boundary conditions are provided in the program.

  10. Flow properties of the solar wind obtained from white light data, Ulysses observations and a two-fluid model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Habbal, Shadia Rifai; Esser, Ruth; Guhathakurta, Madhulika; Fisher, Richard

    1995-01-01

    Using the empirical constraints provided by observations in the inner corona and in interplanetary space. we derive the flow properties of the solar wind using a two fluid model. Density and scale height temperatures are derived from White Light coronagraph observations on SPARTAN 201-1 and at Mauna Loa, from 1.16 to 5.5 R, in the two polar coronal holes on 11-12 Apr. 1993. Interplanetary measurements of the flow speed and proton mass flux are taken from the Ulysses south polar passage. By comparing the results of the model computations that fit the empirical constraints in the two coronal hole regions, we show how the effects of the line of sight influence the empirical inferences and subsequently the corresponding numerical results.

  11. Modeling of the Fluid Flow and Heat Transfer an a Pebble Bed Modular Reactor Core With a Computational Fluid Dynamics Code

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, J. Bryce; Yavuzkurt, Savas; Baratta, Anthony J.

    2002-07-01

    The Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (PBMR), a promising Generation IV nuclear reactor design, raises many novel technological issues for which new experience and techniques must be developed. This brief study explores a few of these issues, utilizes a computational fluid dynamics code to model some simple phenomena, and points out deficiencies in current knowledge that should be addressed by future research and experimentation. A highly simplified representation of the PBMR core is analyzed with FLUENT, a commercial computational fluid dynamics code. The applied models examine laminar and turbulent flow in the vicinity of a single spherical fuel pebble near the center of the core, accounting for the effects of the immediately adjacent fuel pebbles. Several important fluid flow and heat transfer parameters are examined, including heat transfer coefficient, Nusselt number, and pressure drop, as well as the temperature, pressure, and velocity profiles near the fuel pebble. The results of these 'unit cell' calculations are also compared to empirical correlations available in the literature. As FLUENT is especially sensitive to geometry during the generation of a computational mesh, the sensitivity of code results to pebble spacing is also examined. The results of this study show that while a PBMR presents a novel and complex geometry, a code such as FLUENT is suitable for calculation of both local and global flow characteristics, and can be a valuable tool for the thermal-hydraulic study of this new reactor design. FLUENT results for pressure drop deviate from the Darcy correlation by several orders of magnitude in all cases. When determining the heat transfer coefficient, FLUENT is again much lower than Robinson's correlation. Results for Nusselt number show better agreement, with FLUENT predicting results that are 10 or 20 times as large as those from the Robinson and Lancashire correlations. These differences may arise because the empirical correlations concern mainly

  12. Dynamics of fluid mixing in separated flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leder, A.

    1991-05-01

    Separated flows at high Re (>103) are highly turbulent. In some situations the turbulence generation and mixing processes associated with flow separation are desirable, e.g., in heat exchangers or in many chemical engineering applications. In others, e.g., stalled airfoils, separation must be avoided as it causes loss in pressure and kinetic energy. To control the phenomenon effectively, physical mechanisms of flow separation and related aspects, such as the growth of flow instabilities in shear layers, the process of vortex formation, and the dynamics of fluid mixing in recirculating flow regions, must be understood. In many cases numerical procedures, e.g., Navier-Stokes calculations including k-ɛ turbulence modeling, fail to predict real physical mechanisms in separated flows.1,2 Separated flows in the lee of bluff bodies have been studied for many years.3,4 However, accurate measurements of the magnitude and direction of velocities and the magnitude of the terms of the Reynolds stress tensor have been restricted by the unsuitability of the hot-wire anemometer in recirculating flows. The development of the pulsed-wire anemometer, flying hot-wire anemometer, and laser-Doppler anemometry (LDA) allows more reliable measurements also in turbulent separated flows.5-8 The aim of this paper is to investigate the dynamics of undisturbed fluid mixing in separated regions of 2-D, incompressible flows with visualization techniques and LDA. Measurements were performed with a vertical flat plate model, mounted in a closed-circuit wind tunnel at low blockage ratio. Because of the noninvasive character, optical techniques like LDA are more suitable to analyze complex fluid motions than pulsed-wire and flying-wire anemometry. The LDA system used to investigate turbulent flow structures consists of a two-channel version operating in backscatter mode and a specifically developed phase detector to extract phase-averaged information from recorded measurement ensembles.9 Endplates

  13. Experimental measurements and visualisation of a viscous fluid flow in Y-branching modelling the common carotid artery bifurcation with MR and Doppler ultrasound velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denisenko, N. S.; Chupakhin, A. P.; Khe, A. K.; Cherevko, A. A.; Yanchenko, A. A.; Tulupov, A. A.; Boiko, A. V.; Krivoshapkin, A. L.; Orlov, K. Yu; Moshkin, M. P.; Akulov, A. E.

    2016-06-01

    In our experiments, we investigate a flow of a viscous fluid in the model of the common carotid artery bifurcation. The studies are carried out using three hardware equipments: two magnetic resonance scanners by Philips and Bruker, and intravascular guidewire ComboWire. The flux is generated by a special pump CompuFlow that is designed to reproduce a flow similar to the one in the blood vessels. A verification of the obtained data is carried out. Conducted research shows the capabilities of the measurement instruments and reflects the character of fluid flow inside the model.

  14. Mathematical Modeling of Fluid Flow in a Water Physical Model of an Aluminum Degassing Ladle Equipped with an Impeller-Injector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez, Eudoxio Ramos; Zenit, Roberto; Rivera, Carlos González; Trápaga, Gerardo; Ramírez-Argáez, Marco A.

    2013-04-01

    In this work, a 3D numerical simulation using a Euler-Euler-based model implemented into a commercial CFD code was used to simulate fluid flow and turbulence structure in a water physical model of an aluminum ladle equipped with an impeller for degassing treatment. The effect of critical process parameters such as rotor speed, gas flow rate, and the point of gas injection (conventional injection through the shaft vs a novel injection through the bottom of the ladle) on the fluid flow and vortex formation was analyzed with this model. The commercial CFD code PHOENICS 3.4 was used to solve all conservation equations governing the process for this two-phase fluid flow system. The mathematical model was reasonably well validated against experimentally measured liquid velocity and vortex sizes in a water physical model built specifically for this investigation. From the results, it was concluded that the angular speed of the impeller is the most important parameter in promoting better stirred baths and creating smaller and better distributed bubbles in the liquid. The pumping effect of the impeller is increased as the impeller rotation speed increases. Gas flow rate is detrimental to bath stirring and diminishes the pumping effect of the impeller. Finally, although the injection point was the least significant variable, it was found that the "novel" injection improves stirring in the ladle.

  15. Magnetohydrodynamic two-phase dusty fluid flow and heat model over deforming isothermal surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turkyilmazoglu, Mustafa

    2017-01-01

    This paper is devoted to the mathematical analysis of a magnetohydrodynamic viscous two-phase dusty fluid flow and heat transfer over permeable stretching or shrinking bodies. The wall boundary is subjected to a linear deformation as well as to a quadratic surface temperature. Such a highly nonlinear phenomenon, for the first time in the literature, is attacked to search for occurrence of exact solutions, whose numerical correspondences are already available for limited wall transpiration velocities. The obtained analytical solutions are found be in perfect line with the numerical computations. Besides this, exact solutions point to the existence of dual solutions for both permeable stretching and shrinking cases, which were not detected from the numerical studies up to date. The existence of such exact solutions and their parameter domain particularly depending on the wall suction or injection are successfully analyzed. The physical outcomes concerning the effects of suspended particles on the momentum and thermal boundary layers well-documented in the open literature can be best understood from the presented exact solutions.

  16. Analytical and Numerical Modeling of Fluid Flow and Heat Transfer through Open-Cell Metal Foam Heat Exchangers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taheri, Mehrdad

    In this thesis analytical and numerical investigations of fluid flow and heat transfer through open cell metal foam heat exchangers are presented. Primarily, different representative unit cell approximations, i.e, tetrakaidecahedron, dodecahedron and cubic are discussed. By applying the thermal resistance analogy, a novel formulation for evaluation of the effective thermal conductivity of metal foams is proposed. The model improves previous models based on cubic or hexagonal cells. By using computer tomography images of a nickel foam sample a realistic 3D geometry is created and the foam's geometrical properties (i.e., porosity and surface area to volume ratio) and effective thermal conductivity are obtained. By using the experimentally found values of permeability, Forchheimer coefficient and solid-fluid interfacial convection coefficient, mathematical models for fluid flow and heat transfer in metal foams are developed. Two different assumptions: local thermal equilibrium (LTE) and local thermal non-equilibrium (LTNE), are used. LTNE yields more accurate results. A three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model of metal foam is made and validated against the experimental data for a square cross sectional nickel foam heat exchanger channel heated from the side walls while cooling air passes through the foam. The simulations are carried out for constant temperature or heat flux and different foam materials with pore densities of 10 and 40 pores per inch. The results show that the bonding of the foam to the walls has a considerable impact on the heat transfer rate. Convective heat transfer coefficients in terms of Nusselt number as functions of Reynolds number are also obtained. The design and CFD modeling of metal foam cross flow heat exchangers are also discussed. The results indicate both effectiveness and number of transfer units (NTU) for the metal foam heat exchangers are higher than those of a hollow channel; however, the effectiveness-NTU curves

  17. Flow of an electrorheological fluid between eccentric rotating cylinders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Průša, Vít; Rajagopal, K. R.

    2012-01-01

    Electrorheological fluids have numerous potential applications in vibration dampers, brakes, valves, clutches, exercise equipment, etc. The flows in such applications are complex three-dimensional flows. Most models that have been developed to describe the flows of electrorheological fluids are one-dimensional models. Here, we discuss the behavior of two fully three-dimensional models for electrorheological fluids. The models are such that they reduce, in the case of simple shear flows with the intensity of the electric field perpendicular to the streamlines, to the same constitutive relation, but they would not be identical in more complicated three-dimensional settings. In order to show the difference between the two models, we study the flow of these fluids between eccentrically placed rotating cylinders kept at different potentials, in the setting that corresponds to technologically relevant problem of flow of electrorheological fluid in journal bearing. Even though the two models have quite a different constitutive structure, due to the assumed forms for the velocity and pressure fields, the models lead to the same velocity field but to different pressure fields. This finding illustrates the need for considering the flows of fluids described by three-dimensional constitutive models in complex geometries, and not restricting ourselves to flows of fluids described by one-dimensional models or simple shear flows of fluids characterized by three-dimensional models.

  18. Analysis of Fluid Flow over a Surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCloud, Peter L. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A method, apparatus, and computer program product for modeling heat radiated by a structure. The flow of a fluid over a surface of a model of the structure is simulated. The surface has a plurality of surface elements. Heat radiated by the plurality of surface elements in response to the fluid flowing over the surface of the model of the structure is identified. An effect of heat radiated by at least a portion of the plurality of surface elements on each other is identified. A model of the heat radiated by the structure is created using the heat radiated by the plurality of surface elements and the effect of the heat radiated by at least a portion of the plurality of surface elements on each other.

  19. Finite scale equations for compressible fluid flow

    SciTech Connect

    Margolin, Len G

    2008-01-01

    Finite-scale equations (FSE) describe the evolution of finite volumes of fluid over time. We discuss the FSE for a one-dimensional compressible fluid, whose every point is governed by the Navier-Stokes equations. The FSE contain new momentum and internal energy transport terms. These are similar to terms added in numerical simulation for high-speed flows (e.g. artificial viscosity) and for turbulent flows (e.g. subgrid scale models). These similarities suggest that the FSE may provide new insight as a basis for computational fluid dynamics. Our analysis of the FS continuity equation leads to a physical interpretation of the new transport terms, and indicates the need to carefully distinguish between volume-averaged and mass-averaged velocities in numerical simulation. We make preliminary connections to the other recent work reformulating Navier-Stokes equations.

  20. Investigation on the Fluid Flow and Mixing Phenomena in a Ruhrstahl-Heraeus (RH) Steel Degasser Using Physical Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lifeng; Li, Fei

    2014-07-01

    In this article, the water model was established to investigate the fluid flow and mixing phenomena during the Ruhrstahl-Heraeus refining process. The mixing time was measured by detecting the conductivity. The velocity, turbulent energy and its dissipation rate were measured using a particle-image velocimetry. There were several findings in the current study. The jet from the downleg penetrated to the bottom of the ladle, collided with the right wall of the ladle, and then went upward and sloped left to enter the upleg, generating a recirculation eddy below the upleg. The turbulent fluctuation velocities at different directions were different so that the k- ɛ turbulent model is invalid to accurately study the fluid flow during ladle refining process. The mixing time was usually three to four times that of the recirculation time, and the mixing was different at different locations. When the mixing time is reported, the location where the mixing time is measured should be clearly mentioned. The mixing time was dependent on the stirring power by t mix ~ ɛ-0.42.

  1. A practical model for fluid flow in discrete-fracture porous media by using the numerical manifold method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Mengsu; Rutqvist, Jonny; Wang, Yuan

    2016-11-01

    In this study, a numerical manifold method (NMM) model is developed to analyze flow in porous media with discrete fractures in a non-conforming mesh. This new model is based on a two-cover-mesh system with a uniform triangular mathematical mesh and boundary/fracture-divided physical covers, where local independent cover functions are defined. The overlapping parts of the physical covers are elements where the global approximation is defined by the weighted average of the physical cover functions. The mesh is generated by a tree-cutting algorithm. A new model that does not introduce additional degrees of freedom (DOF) for fractures was developed for fluid flow in fractures. The fracture surfaces that belong to different physical covers are used to represent fracture flow in the direction of the fractures. In the direction normal to the fractures, the fracture surfaces are regarded as Dirichlet boundaries to exchange fluxes with the rock matrix. Furthermore, fractures that intersect with Dirichlet or Neumann boundaries are considered. Simulation examples are designed to verify the efficiency of the tree-cutting algorithm, the calculation's independency from the mesh orientation, and accuracy when modeling porous media that contain fractures with multiple intersections and different orientations. The simulation results show good agreement with available analytical solutions. Finally, the model is applied to cases that involve nine intersecting fractures and a complex network of 100 fractures, both of which achieve reasonable results. The new model is very practical for modeling flow in fractured porous media, even for a geometrically complex fracture network with large hydraulic conductivity contrasts between fractures and the matrix.

  2. Critical behaviour of a fluid in a random shear flow: renormalization group analysis of a simplified model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonov, N. V.; Ignatieva, A. A.

    2006-11-01

    Critical behaviour of a fluid (binary mixture or liquid crystal), subjected to strongly anisotropic turbulent mixing, is studied by means of the field theoretic renormalization group. As a simplified model, relaxational stochastic dynamics of a non-conserved scalar order parameter, coupled to a random velocity field with prescribed statistics, is considered. The velocity is taken Gaussian, white in time, with a correlation function of the form ~δ(t - t')/|kbottom|d+ξ, where kbottom is the component of the wave vector, perpendicular to the distinguished direction ('direction of the flow')—the d-dimensional generalization of the ensemble introduced by Avellaneda and Majda (1990 Commun. Math. Phys. 131 381) within the context of passive scalar advection. It is shown that, depending on the relation between the exponent ξ and the space dimensionality d, the system exhibits various types of large-scale self-similar behaviour, associated with different infrared attractive fixed points of the renormalization group equations. In addition to well-known asymptotic regimes (model A of equilibrium critical dynamics and a passively advected scalar with no self-interaction), the existence of a new, non-equilibrium and strongly anisotropic type of critical behaviour (universality class) is established, and the corresponding critical dimensions are calculated to the second order of the double expansion in ξ and ɛ = 4 - d (two-loop approximation). The most realistic values of the model parameters (for example, d = 3 and the Kolmogorov exponent ξ = 4/3) belong to this class. The scaling behaviour appears anisotropic in the sense that the critical dimensions related to the directions parallel and perpendicular to the flow are essentially different. The results are in qualitative agreement with the results, obtained in experiments and simulations of fluid systems subjected to various kinds of regular and chaotic anisotropic flows.

  3. Verification and Validation of Numerical Models for Air/Water Flow on Coastal and Navigation Fluid-Structure Interaction Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kees, C. E.; Farthing, M.; Dimakopoulos, A.; DeLataillade, T.

    2015-12-01

    Performance analysis and optimization of coastal and navigation structures is becoming feasible due to recent improvements in numerical methods for multiphase flows and the steady increase in capacity and availability of high performance computing resources. Now that the concept of fully three-dimensional air/water flow modelling for real world engineering analysis is achieving acceptance by the wider engineering community, it is critical to expand careful comparative studies on verification,validation, benchmarking, and uncertainty quantification for the variety of competing numerical methods that are continuing to evolve. Furthermore, uncertainty still remains about the relevance of secondary processes such as surface tension, air compressibility, air entrainment, and solid phase (structure) modelling so that questions about continuum mechanical theory and mathematical analysis of multiphase flow are still required. Two of the most popular and practical numerical approaches for large-scale engineering analysis are the Volume-Of-Fluid (VOF) and Level Set (LS) approaches. In this work we will present a publically available verification and validation test set for air-water-structure interaction problems as well as computational and physical model results including a hybrid VOF-LS method, traditional VOF methods, and Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) results. The test set repository and test problem formats will also be presented in order to facilitate future comparative studies and reproduction of scientific results.

  4. Coupled Model for CO2 Leaks from Geological Storage: Geomechanics, Fluid Flow and Phase Transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gor, G.; Prevost, J.

    2013-12-01

    Deep saline aquifers are considered as a promising option for long-term storage of carbon dioxide. However, risk of CO2 leakage from the aquifers through faults, natural or induced fractures or abandoned wells cannot be disregarded. Therefore, modeling of various leakage scenarios is crucial when selecting a site for CO2 sequestration and choosing proper operational conditions. Carbon dioxide is injected into wells at supercritical conditions (t > 31.04 C, P > 73.82 bar), and these conditions are maintained in the deep aquifers (at 1-2 km depth) due to hydrostatic pressure and geothermal gradient. However, if CO2 and brine start to migrate from the aquifer upward, both pressure and temperature will decrease, and at the depth of 500-750 m, the conditions for CO2 will become subcritical. At subcritical conditions, CO2 starts boiling and the character of the flow changes dramatically due to appearance of the third (vapor) phase and latent heat effects. When modeling CO2 leaks, one needs to couple the multiphase flow in porous media with geomechanics. These capabilities are provided by Dynaflow, a finite element analysis program [1]; Dynaflow has already showed to be efficient for modeling caprock failure causing CO2 leaks [2, 3]. Currently we have extended the capabilities of Dynaflow with the phase transition module, based on two-phase and three-phase isenthalpic flash calculations [4]. We have also developed and implemented an efficient method for solving heat and mass transport with the phase transition using our flash module. Therefore, we have developed a robust tool for modeling CO2 leaks. In the talk we will give a brief overview of our method and illustrate it with the results of simulations for characteristic test cases. References: [1] J.H. Prevost, DYNAFLOW: A Nonlinear Transient Finite Element Analysis Program. Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ. http://www.princeton.edu/~dynaflow/ (last update 2013

  5. Analytical study of Cattaneo-Christov heat flux model for a boundary layer flow of Oldroyd-B fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    F, M. Abbasi; M, Mustafa; S, A. Shehzad; M, S. Alhuthali; T, Hayat

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the Cattaneo-Christov heat flux model for a two-dimensional laminar boundary layer flow of an incompressible Oldroyd-B fluid over a linearly stretching sheet. Mathematical formulation of the boundary layer problems is given. The nonlinear partial differential equations are converted into the ordinary differential equations using similarity transformations. The dimensionless velocity and temperature profiles are obtained through optimal homotopy analysis method (OHAM). The influences of the physical parameters on the velocity and the temperature are pointed out. The results show that the temperature and the thermal boundary layer thickness are smaller in the Cattaneo-Christov heat flux model than those in the Fourier’s law of heat conduction. Project supported by the Deanship of Scientific Research (DSR) King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia (Grant No. 32-130-36-HiCi).

  6. Modeling of Compressible Flow with Friction and Heat Transfer Using the Generalized Fluid System Simulation Program (GFSSP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bandyopadhyay, Alak; Majumdar, Alok

    2007-01-01

    The present paper describes the verification and validation of a quasi one-dimensional pressure based finite volume algorithm, implemented in Generalized Fluid System Simulation Program (GFSSP), for predicting compressible flow with friction, heat transfer and area change. The numerical predictions were compared with two classical solutions of compressible flow, i.e. Fanno and Rayleigh flow. Fanno flow provides an analytical solution of compressible flow in a long slender pipe where incoming subsonic flow can be choked due to friction. On the other hand, Raleigh flow provides analytical solution of frictionless compressible flow with heat transfer where incoming subsonic flow can be choked at the outlet boundary with heat addition to the control volume. Nonuniform grid distribution improves the accuracy of numerical prediction. A benchmark numerical solution of compressible flow in a converging-diverging nozzle with friction and heat transfer has been developed to verify GFSSP's numerical predictions. The numerical predictions compare favorably in all cases.

  7. Steady laminar flow of fractal fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balankin, Alexander S.; Mena, Baltasar; Susarrey, Orlando; Samayoa, Didier

    2017-02-01

    We study laminar flow of a fractal fluid in a cylindrical tube. A flow of the fractal fluid is mapped into a homogeneous flow in a fractional dimensional space with metric induced by the fractal topology. The equations of motion for an incompressible Stokes flow of the Newtonian fractal fluid are derived. It is found that the radial distribution for the velocity in a steady Poiseuille flow of a fractal fluid is governed by the fractal metric of the flow, whereas the pressure distribution along the flow direction depends on the fractal topology of flow, as well as on the fractal metric. The radial distribution of the fractal fluid velocity in a steady Couette flow between two concentric cylinders is also derived.

  8. Large Eddy Simulation of Bubbly Flow and Slag Layer Behavior in Ladle with Discrete Phase Model (DPM)-Volume of Fluid (VOF) Coupled Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Linmin; Liu, Zhongqiu; Cao, Maoxue; Li, Baokuan

    2015-07-01

    In the ladle metallurgy process, the bubble movement and slag layer behavior is very important to the refining process and steel quality. For the bubble-liquid flow, bubble movement plays a significant role in the phase structure and causes the unsteady complex turbulent flow pattern. This is one of the most crucial shortcomings of the current two-fluid models. In the current work, a one-third scale water model is established to investigate the bubble movement and the slag open-eye formation. A new mathematical model using the large eddy simulation (LES) is developed for the bubble-liquid-slag-air four-phase flow in the ladle. The Eulerian volume of fluid (VOF) model is used for tracking the liquid-slag-air free surfaces and the Lagrangian discrete phase model (DPM) is used for describing the bubble movement. The turbulent liquid flow is induced by bubble-liquid interactions and is solved by LES. The procedure of bubble coming out of the liquid and getting into the air is modeled using a user-defined function. The results show that the present LES-DPM-VOF coupled model is good at predicting the unsteady bubble movement, slag eye formation, interface fluctuation, and slag entrainment.

  9. Granular Material Flows with Interstitial Fluid Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunt, Melany L.; Brennen, Christopher E.

    2004-01-01

    The research focused on experimental measurements of the rheological properties of liquid-solid and granular flows. In these flows, the viscous effects of the interstitial fluid, the inertia of the fluid and particles, and the collisional interactions of the particles may all contribute to the flow mechanics. These multiphase flows include industrial problems such as coal slurry pipelines, hydraulic fracturing processes, fluidized beds, mining and milling operation, abrasive water jet machining, and polishing and surface erosion technologies. In addition, there are a wide range of geophysical flows such as debris flows, landslides and sediment transport. In extraterrestrial applications, the study of transport of particulate materials is fundamental to the mining and processing of lunar and Martian soils and the transport of atmospheric dust (National Research Council 2000). The recent images from Mars Global Surveyor spacecraft dramatically depict the complex sand and dust flows on Mars, including dune formation and dust avalanches on the slip-face of dune surfaces. These Aeolian features involve a complex interaction of the prevailing winds and deposition or erosion of the sediment layer; these features make a good test bed for the verification of global circulation models of the Martian atmosphere.

  10. Computational Fluid Dynamics Modeling of the Bonneville Project: Tailrace Spill Patterns for Low Flows and Corner Collector Smolt Egress

    SciTech Connect

    Rakowski, Cynthia L.; Serkowski, John A.; Richmond, Marshall C.; Perkins, William A.

    2010-12-01

    In 2003, an extension of the existing ice and trash sluiceway was added at Bonneville Powerhouse 2 (B2). This extension started at the existing corner collector for the ice and trash sluiceway adjacent to Bonneville Powerhouse 2 and the new sluiceway was extended to the downstream end of Cascade Island. The sluiceway was designed to improve juvenile salmon survival by bypassing turbine passage at B2, and placing these smolt in downstream flowing water minimizing their exposure to fish and avian predators. In this study, a previously developed computational fluid dynamics model was modified and used to characterized tailrace hydraulics and sluiceway egress conditions for low total river flows and low levels of spillway flow. STAR-CD v4.10 was used for seven scenarios of low total river flow and low spill discharges. The simulation results were specifically examined to look at tailrace hydraulics at 5 ft below the tailwater elevation, and streamlines used to compare streamline pathways for streamlines originating in the corner collector outfall and adjacent to the outfall. These streamlines indicated that for all higher spill percentage cases (25% and greater) that streamlines from the corner collector did not approach the shoreline at the downstream end of Bradford Island. For the cases with much larger spill percentages, the streamlines from the corner collector were mid-channel or closer to the Washington shore as they moved downstream. Although at 25% spill at 75 kcfs total river, the total spill volume was sufficient to "cushion" the flow from the corner collector from the Bradford Island shore, areas of recirculation were modeled in the spillway tailrace. However, at the lowest flows and spill percentages, the streamlines from the B2 corner collector pass very close to the Bradford Island shore. In addition, the very flow velocity flows and large areas of recirculation greatly increase potential predator exposure of the spillway passed smolt. If there is

  11. Fluid Flow Experiment for Undergraduate Laboratory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vilimpochapornkul, Viroj; Obot, Nsima T.

    1986-01-01

    The undergraduate fluid mechanics laboratory at Clarkson University consists of three experiments: mixing; drag measurements; and fluid flow and pressure drop measurements. The latter experiment is described, considering equipment needed, procedures used, and typical results obtained. (JN)

  12. Simple interphase drag model for numerical two-fluid modeling of two-phase flow systems. [PWR; BWR

    SciTech Connect

    Chow, H.; Ransom, V.H.

    1984-06-08

    The interphase drag model that has been developed for RELAP5/MOD2 is based on a simple formulation having flow regime maps for both horizontal and vertical flows. The model is based on a conventional semi-empirical formulation that includes the product of drag coefficient, interfacial area, and relative dynamic pressure. The interphase drag model is implemented in the RELAP5/MOD2 light water reactor transient analysis code and has been used to simulate a variety of separate effects experiments to assess the model accuracy. The results from three of these simulations, the General Electric Company small vessel blowdown experiment, Dukler and Smith's counter-current flow experiment, and a Westinghouse Electric Company FLECHT-SEASET forced reflood experiment, are presented and discussed.

  13. Fluids in crustal deformation: Fluid flow, fluid-rock interactions, rheology, melting and resources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacombe, Olivier; Rolland, Yann

    2016-11-01

    Fluids exert a first-order control on the structural, petrological and rheological evolution of the continental crust. Fluids interact with rocks from the earliest stages of sedimentation and diagenesis in basins until these rocks are deformed and/or buried and metamorphosed in orogens, then possibly exhumed. Fluid-rock interactions lead to the evolution of rock physical properties and rock strength. Fractures and faults are preferred pathways for fluids, and in turn physical and chemical interactions between fluid flow and tectonic structures, such as fault zones, strongly influence the mechanical behaviour of the crust at different space and time scales. Fluid (over)pressure is associated with a variety of geological phenomena, such as seismic cycle in various P-T conditions, hydrofracturing (including formation of sub-horizontal, bedding-parallel veins), fault (re)activation or gravitational sliding of rocks, among others. Fluid (over)pressure is a governing factor for the evolution of permeability and porosity of rocks and controls the generation, maturation and migration of economic fluids like hydrocarbons or ore forming hydrothermal fluids, and is therefore a key parameter in reservoir studies and basin modeling. Fluids may also help the crust partially melt, and in turn the resulting melt may dramatically change the rheology of the crust.

  14. Modeling fluid flow and heat transfer at Basin and Range faults: preliminary results for Leach hot springs, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    López, Dina L.; Smith, Leslie; Storey, Michael L.; Nielson, Dennis L.

    1994-01-01

    The hydrothermal systems of the Basin and Range Province are often located at or near major range bounding normal faults. The flow of fluid and energy at these faults is affected by the advective transfer of heat and fluid from an to the adjacent mountain ranges and valleys, This paper addresses the effect of the exchange of fluid and energy between the country rock, the valley fill sediments, and the fault zone, on the fluid and heat flow regimes at the fault plane. For comparative purposes, the conditions simulated are patterned on Leach Hot Springs in southern Grass Valley, Nevada. Our simulations indicated that convection can exist at the fault plane even when the fault is exchanging significant heat and fluid with the surrounding country rock and valley fill sediments. The temperature at the base of the fault decreased with increasing permeability of the country rock. Higher groundwater discharge from the fault and lower temperatures at the base of the fault are favored by high country rock permabilities and fault transmissivities. Preliminary results suggest that basal temperatures and flow rates for Leach Hot Springs can not be simulated with a fault 3 km deep and an average regional heat flow of 150 mW/m2 because the basal temperature and mass discharge rates are too low. A fault permeable to greater depths or a higher regional heat flow may be indicated for these springs.

  15. Approach of Computational Fluid Dynamics of VOF Model in Two Phase flow through Porous Medium under Microgravity Condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasan, Raisul

    2016-07-01

    In this research paper firstly theoretical analysis and design of the porous matrix for filtration and selection of associated liquid (highly viscous and low viscous liquid) is carried out. Hence, porosity of the bed has been found out followed by a detailed CFD analysis of the flow to identify displacement structure (fingering: due to the nonlinear interactions among viscous, capillary and gravitational forces). Moreover, an experiment will be with synthetic porous medium consists of a single layer of glass beads which are then positioned homogeneously or non-homogeneously between two Perspex sheets and then fluid displacement structure/fingering will be photographed. Then the effort will be made to validate results with the experiment based photograph and then the CFD model will be extended to microgravity condition KEYWORDS: CFD, Fingering, microgravity, Non-homogeneously, Capillary .

  16. Characterizing fractured rock for fluid-flow, geomechanical, and paleostress modeling: Methods and preliminary results from Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Barton, C.C.; Larsen, E.; Page, W.R.; Howard, T.M.

    1993-12-31

    Fractures have been characterized for fluid-flow, geomechanical, and paleostress modeling at three localities in the vicinity of drill hole USW G-4 at Yucca Mountain in southwestern Nevada. A method for fracture characterization is introduced that integrates mapping fracture-trace networks and quantifying eight fracture parameters: trace length, orientation, connectivity, aperture, roughness, shear offset, trace-length density, and mineralization. A complex network of fractures was exposed on three 214- to 260-m 2 pavements cleared of debris in the upper lithophysal unit of the Tiva Canyon Member of the Miocene Paint-brush Tuff. The pavements are two-dimensional sections through the three-dimensional network of strata-bound fractures. All fractures with trace lengths greater than 0.2 m were mapped and studied.

  17. A stochastic asymptotic-preserving scheme for a kinetic-fluid model for disperse two-phase flows with uncertainty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Shi; Shu, Ruiwen

    2017-04-01

    In this paper we consider a kinetic-fluid model for disperse two-phase flows with uncertainty. We propose a stochastic asymptotic-preserving (s-AP) scheme in the generalized polynomial chaos stochastic Galerkin (gPC-sG) framework, which allows the efficient computation of the problem in both kinetic and hydrodynamic regimes. The s-AP property is proved by deriving the equilibrium of the gPC version of the Fokker-Planck operator. The coefficient matrices that arise in a Helmholtz equation and a Poisson equation, essential ingredients of the algorithms, are proved to be positive definite under reasonable and mild assumptions. The computation of the gPC version of a translation operator that arises in the inversion of the Fokker-Planck operator is accelerated by a spectrally accurate splitting method. Numerical examples illustrate the s-AP property and the efficiency of the gPC-sG method in various asymptotic regimes.

  18. Inclined fluid-film flow with bottom filtration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kandel, H. N.; Pascal, J. P.

    2013-11-01

    We investigate the interfacial instability of the steady uniform flow of a fluid-film layer down a permeable incline. A theoretical model is obtained by coupling the clear fluid flow equations governing the fluid film with Darcy's law for the filtration of fluid through the porous medium. A linear stability analysis is conducted and the effect of various parameters on the state of neutral stability is investigated. A simplified model is developed by reducing the dimensionality of the problem, which is then employed in order to determine the nonlinear effects on the stability of the equilibrium flow.

  19. Sill intrusion driven fluid flow and vent formation in volcanic basins: Modeling rates of volatile release and paleoclimate effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iyer, Karthik; Schmid, Daniel

    2016-04-01

    Evidence of mass extinction events in conjunction with climate change occur throughout the geological record and may be accompanied by pronounced negative carbon isotope excursions. The processes that trigger such globally destructive changes are still under considerable debate. These include mechanisms such as poisoning from trace metals released during large volcanic eruptions (Vogt, 1972), CO2 released from lava degassing during the formation of Large Igneous Provinces (LIPs) (Courtillot and Renne, 2003) and CH4 release during the destabilization of sub-seafloor methane (Dickens et al., 1995), to name a few. Thermogenic methane derived from contact metamorphism associated with magma emplacement and cooling in sedimentary basins has been recently gaining considerable attention as a potential mechanism that may have triggered global climate events in the past (e.g. Svensen and Jamtveit, 2010). The discovery of hydrothermal vent complexes that are spatially associated with such basins also supports the discharge of greenhouse gases into the atmosphere (e.g. Jamtveit et al., 2004; Planke et al., 2005; Svensen et al., 2006). A previous study that investigated this process using a fluid flow model (Iyer et al., 2013) suggested that although hydrothermal plume formation resulting from sill emplacement may indeed release large quantities of methane at the surface, the rate at which this methane is released into the atmosphere is too slow to trigger, by itself, some of the negative δ13C excursions observed in the fossil record over short time scales observed in the fossil record. Here, we reinvestigate the rates of gas release during sill emplacement in a case study from the Harstad Basin off-shore Norway with a special emphasis on vent formation. The presented study is based on a seismic line that crosses multiple sill structures emplaced around 55 Ma within the Lower Cretaceous sediments. A single well-defined vent complex is interpreted above the termination of the

  20. Using toughreact to model reactive fluid flow and geochemical transport in hydrothermal systems

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Tianfu; Sonnenthal, Eric; Spycher, Nicolas; Pruess, Karsten

    2003-07-31

    The interaction between hydrothermal fluids and the rocks through which they migrate alters the earlier formed primary minerals and leads to the formation of secondary minerals, resulting in changes in the physical and chemical properties of the system. We have developed a comprehensive numerical simulator, TOUGHREACT, which considers nonisothermal multi-component chemical transport in both liquid and gas phases. A variety of subsurface thermo-physical-chemical processes is considered under a wide range of conditions of pressure, temperature, water saturation, and ionic strength. The code can be applied to problems in fundamental analysis of the hydrothermal systems and in the exploration of geothermal reservoirs including chemical evolution, mineral alteration, mineral scaling, changes of porosity and permeability, and mineral recovery from geothermal fluids.

  1. Evaluation of flow velocities after carotid artery stenting through split spectrum Doppler optical coherence tomography and computational fluid dynamics modeling

    PubMed Central

    Vuong, Barry; Genis, Helen; Wong, Ronnie; Ramjist, Joel; Jivraj, Jamil; Farooq, Hamza; Sun, Cuiru; Yang, Victor X.D.

    2014-01-01

    Hemodynamics plays a critical role in the development of atherosclerosis, specifically in regions of curved vasculature such as bifurcations exhibiting irregular blood flow profiles. Carotid atherosclerotic disease can be intervened by stent implantation, but this may result in greater alterations to local blood flow and consequently further complications. This study demonstrates the use of a variant of Doppler optical coherence tomography (DOCT) known as split spectrum DOCT (ssDOCT) to evaluate hemodynamic patterns both before and after stent implantation in the bifurcation junction in the internal carotid artery (ICA). Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models were constructed to simulate blood velocity profiles and compared to the findings achieved through ssDOCT images. Both methods demonstrated noticeable alterations in hemodynamic patterns following stent implantation, with features such as slow velocity regions at the neck of the bifurcation and recirculation zones at the stent struts. Strong correlation between CFD models and ssDOCT images demonstrate the potential of ssDOCT imaging in the optimization of stent implantation in the clinical setting. PMID:25574447

  2. Evaluation of flow velocities after carotid artery stenting through split spectrum Doppler optical coherence tomography and computational fluid dynamics modeling.

    PubMed

    Vuong, Barry; Genis, Helen; Wong, Ronnie; Ramjist, Joel; Jivraj, Jamil; Farooq, Hamza; Sun, Cuiru; Yang, Victor X D

    2014-12-01

    Hemodynamics plays a critical role in the development of atherosclerosis, specifically in regions of curved vasculature such as bifurcations exhibiting irregular blood flow profiles. Carotid atherosclerotic disease can be intervened by stent implantation, but this may result in greater alterations to local blood flow and consequently further complications. This study demonstrates the use of a variant of Doppler optical coherence tomography (DOCT) known as split spectrum DOCT (ssDOCT) to evaluate hemodynamic patterns both before and after stent implantation in the bifurcation junction in the internal carotid artery (ICA). Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models were constructed to simulate blood velocity profiles and compared to the findings achieved through ssDOCT images. Both methods demonstrated noticeable alterations in hemodynamic patterns following stent implantation, with features such as slow velocity regions at the neck of the bifurcation and recirculation zones at the stent struts. Strong correlation between CFD models and ssDOCT images demonstrate the potential of ssDOCT imaging in the optimization of stent implantation in the clinical setting.

  3. A computational model for viscous fluid flow, heat transfer, and melting in in situ vitrification melt pools

    SciTech Connect

    McHugh, P.R.; Ramshaw, J.D.

    1991-11-01

    MAGMA is a FORTRAN computer code designed to viscous flow in in situ vitrification melt pools. It models three-dimensional, incompressible, viscous flow and heat transfer. The momentum equation is coupled to the temperature field through the buoyancy force terms arising from the Boussinesq approximation. All fluid properties, except density, are assumed variable. Density is assumed constant except in the buoyancy force terms in the momentum equation. A simple melting model based on the enthalpy method allows the study of the melt front progression and latent heat effects. An indirect addressing scheme used in the numerical solution of the momentum equation voids unnecessary calculations in cells devoid of liquid. Two-dimensional calculations can be performed using either rectangular or cylindrical coordinates, while three-dimensional calculations use rectangular coordinates. All derivatives are approximated by finite differences. The incompressible Navier-Stokes equations are solved using a new fully implicit iterative technique, while the energy equation is differenced explicitly in time. Spatial derivatives are written in conservative form using a uniform, rectangular, staggered mesh based on the marker and cell placement of variables. Convective terms are differenced using a weighted average of centered and donor cell differencing to ensure numerical stability. Complete descriptions of MAGMA governing equations, numerics, code structure, and code verification are provided. 14 refs.

  4. Incompressible fluid flows in rapidly rotating cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fournier, Alexandre

    The subject of incompressible fluid flows in rapidly rotating cavities, relevant to the dynamics of the Earth's outer core, is addressed here by means of numerical modeling. We recall in the introduction what makes this topic fascinating and challenging, and emphasize the need for new, more flexible numerical approaches in line with the evolution of today's parallel computers. Relying upon recent advances in numerical analysis, we first introduce in chapter 2 a spectral element model of the axisymmetric Navier-Stokes equation, in a rotating reference frame. Comparisons with analytical or published numerical solutions are made for various test problems, which highlight the spectral convergence properties and adaptivity of the approach. In chapter 3, we couple this axisymmetric kernel with a Fourier expansion in longitude in order to describe the dynamics of three-dimensional convection flows. Again, several reference problems are studied. In the specific case of a rotating fluid undergoing thermal convection, this so-called Fourier-spectral element method (FSEM) proves to be as accurate as standard pseudo-spectral techniques. Having this numerical tool anchored on solid grounds, we study in chapter 4 fluid flows driven by thermal convection and precession at the same time. A new topic in the vast field of fluid mechanics, convecto-precessing flows are of particular importance for the Earth's core, and the equations governing their evolution are derived in detail. We solve these using the FSEM; results seem to indicate that to first order, thermal convection and precession ignore each other. We discuss the relevance of these calculations for the Earth's core and outline directions for future related research.

  5. Heat and fluid flow in complex joints during gas metal arc welding—Part I: Numerical model of fillet welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, W.; Kim, C.-H.; DebRoy, T.

    2004-05-01

    Gas metal arc (GMA) fillet welding is one of the most important processes for metal joining because of its high productivity and amiability to automation. This welding process is characterized by the complicated V-shaped joint geometry, a deformable weld pool surface, and the additions of hot metal droplets. In the present work, a three-dimensional numerical heat transfer and fluid flow model was developed to examine the temperature profiles, velocity fields, weld pool shape and size, and the nature of the solidified weld bead geometry during GMA fillet welding. The model solved the equations of conservation of mass, momentum, and energy using a boundary fitted curvilinear coordinate system. Apart from the direct transport of heat from the welding arc, additional heat from the metal droplets was modeled considering a volumetric heat source. The deformation of the weld pool surface was calculated by minimizing the total surface energy. Part I of this article is focused on the details of the numerical model such as coordinate transformation and calculation of volumetric heat source and free surface profile. An application of the model to GMA fillet welding of mild steel is described in an accompanying article (W. Zhang, C.-H. Kim and T. DebRoy, J. Appl Phys. 95, 5220 (2004)).

  6. Fluid flow, methane fluxes, carbonate precipitation and biogeochemical turnover in gas hydrate-bearing sediments at Hydrate Ridge, Cascadia Margin: numerical modeling and mass balances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luff, Roger; Wallmann, Klaus

    2003-09-01

    A numerical model was applied to investigate and to quantify biogeochemical processes and methane turnover in gas hydrate-bearing surface sediments from a cold vent site situated at Hydrate Ridge, an accretionary structure located in the Cascadia Margin subduction zone. Steady state simulations were carried out to obtain a comprehensive overview on the activity in these sediments which are covered with bacterial mats and are affected by strong fluid flow from below. The model results underline the dominance of advective fluid flow that forces a large inflow of methane from below (869 μmol cm -2 a -1) inducing high oxidation rates in the surface layers. Anaerobic methane oxidation is the major process, proceeding at a depth-integrated rate of 870 μmol cm -2 a -1. A significant fraction (14%) of bicarbonate produced by anaerobic methane oxidation is removed from the fluids by precipitation of authigenic aragonite and calcite. The total rate of carbonate precipitation (120 μmol cm -2 a -1) allows for the build-up of a massive carbonate layer with a thickness of 1 m over a period of 20,000 years. Aragonite is the major carbonate mineral formed by anaerobic methane oxidation if the flow velocity of methane-charge fluids is high enough (≥10 cm a -1) to maintain super-saturation with respect to this highly soluble carbonate phase. It precipitates much faster within the studied surface sediments than previously observed in abiotic laboratory experiments, suggesting microbial catalysis. The investigated station is characterized by high carbon and oxygen turnover rates (≈1000 μmol cm -2 a -1) that are well beyond the rates observed at other continental slope sites not affected by fluid venting. This underlines the strong impact of fluid venting on the benthic system, even though the flow velocity of 10 cm a -1 derived by the model is relative low compared to fluid flow rates found at other cold vent sites. Non-steady state simulations using measured fluid flow

  7. Large-Scale Multiphase Flow Modeling of Hydrocarbon Migration and Fluid Sequestration in Faulted Cenozoic Sedimentary Basins, Southern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, B.; Garven, G.; Boles, J. R.

    2011-12-01

    Major fault systems play a first-order role in controlling fluid migration in the Earth's crust, and also in the genesis/preservation of hydrocarbon reservoirs in young sedimentary basins undergoing deformation, and therefore understanding the geohydrology of faults is essential for the successful exploration of energy resources. For actively deforming systems like the Santa Barbara Basin and Los Angeles Basin, we have found it useful to develop computational geohydrologic models to study the various coupled and nonlinear processes affecting multiphase fluid migration, including relative permeability, anisotropy, heterogeneity, capillarity, pore pressure, and phase saturation that affect hydrocarbon mobility within fault systems and to search the possible hydrogeologic conditions that enable the natural sequestration of prolific hydrocarbon reservoirs in these young basins. Subsurface geology, reservoir data (fluid pressure-temperature-chemistry), structural reconstructions, and seismic profiles provide important constraints for model geometry and parameter testing, and provide critical insight on how large-scale faults and aquifer networks influence the distribution and the hydrodynamics of liquid and gas-phase hydrocarbon migration. For example, pore pressure changes at a methane seepage site on the seafloor have been carefully analyzed to estimate large-scale fault permeability, which helps to constrain basin-scale natural gas migration models for the Santa Barbara Basin. We have developed our own 2-D multiphase finite element/finite IMPES numerical model, and successfully modeled hydrocarbon gas/liquid movement for intensely faulted and heterogeneous basin profiles of the Los Angeles Basin. Our simulations suggest that hydrocarbon reservoirs that are today aligned with the Newport-Inglewood Fault Zone were formed by massive hydrocarbon flows from deeply buried source beds in the central synclinal region during post-Miocene time. Fault permeability, capillarity

  8. An investigation of deformation and fluid flow at subduction zones using newly developed instrumentation and finite element modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labonte, Alison Louise

    Detecting seafloor deformation events in the offshore convergent margin environment is of particular importance considering the significant seismic hazard at subduction zones. Efforts to gain insight into the earthquake cycle have been made at the Cascadia and Costa Rica subduction margins through recent expansions of onshore GPS and seismic networks. While these studies have given scientists the ability to quantify and locate slip events in the seismogenic zone, there is little technology available for adequately measuring offshore aseismic slip. This dissertation introduces an improved flow meter for detecting seismic and aseismic deformation in submarine environments. The value of such hydrologic measurements for quantifying the geodetics at offshore margins is verified through a finite element modeling (FEM) study in which the character of deformation in the shallow subduction zone is determined from previously recorded hydrologic events at the Costa Rica Pacific margin. Accurately sensing aseismic events is one key to determining the stress state in subduction zones as these slow-slip events act to load or unload the seismogenic zone during the interseismic period. One method for detecting seismic and aseismic strain events is to monitor the hydrogeologic response to strain events using fluid flow meters. Previous instrumentation, the Chemical Aqueous Transport (CAT) meter which measures flow rates through the sediment-water interface, can detect transient events at very low flowrates, down to 0.0001 m/yr. The CAT meter performs well in low flow rate environments and can capture gradual changes in flow rate, as might be expected during ultra slow slip events. However, it cannot accurately quantify high flow rates through fractures and conduits, nor does it have the temporal resolution and accuracy required for detecting transient flow events associated with rapid deformation. The Optical Tracer Injection System (OTIS) developed for this purpose is an

  9. Fluid flow nozzle energy harvesters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherrit, Stewart; Lee, Hyeong Jae; Walkemeyer, Phillip; Winn, Tyler; Tosi, Luis Phillipe; Colonius, Tim

    2015-04-01

    Power generation schemes that could be used downhole in an oil well to produce about 1 Watt average power with long-life (decades) are actively being developed. A variety of proposed energy harvesting schemes could be used to extract energy from this environment but each of these has their own limitations that limit their practical use. Since vibrating piezoelectric structures are solid state and can be driven below their fatigue limit, harvesters based on these structures are capable of operating for very long lifetimes (decades); thereby, possibly overcoming a principle limitation of existing technology based on rotating turbo-machinery. An initial survey [1] identified that spline nozzle configurations can be used to excite a vibrating piezoelectric structure in such a way as to convert the abundant flow energy into useful amounts of electrical power. This paper presents current flow energy harvesting designs and experimental results of specific spline nozzle/ bimorph design configurations which have generated suitable power per nozzle at or above well production analogous flow rates. Theoretical models for non-dimensional analysis and constitutive electromechanical model are also presented in this paper to optimize the flow harvesting system.

  10. Numerical Modeling of Three-Dimensional Fluid Flow with Phase Change

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Esmaeeli, Asghar; Arpaci, Vedat

    1999-01-01

    We present a numerical method to compute phase change dynamics of three-dimensional deformable bubbles. The full Navier-Stokes and energy equations are solved for both phases by a front tracking/finite difference technique. The fluid boundary is explicitly tracked by discrete points that are connected by triangular elements to form a front that is used to keep the stratification of material properties sharp and to calculate the interfacial source terms. Two simulations are presented to show robustness of the method in handling complex phase boundaries. In the first case, growth of a vapor bubble in zero gravity is studied where large volume increase of the bubble is managed by adaptively increasing the front resolution. In the second case, growth of a bubble under high gravity is studied where indentation at the rear of the bubble results in a region of large curvature which challenges the front tracking in three dimensions.

  11. Connecting Pore Scale Dynamics to Macroscopic Models for Two-Fluid Phase Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McClure, J. E.; Dye, A. L.; Miller, C. T.; Gray, W. G.

    2015-12-01

    Imaging technologies such as computed micro-tomography (CMT) provide high resolution three-dimensional images of real porous medium systems that reveal the true geometric structure of fluid and solid phases. Simulation and analysis tools are essential to extract knowledge from this raw data, and can be applied in tandem to provide information that is otherwise inaccessible. Guidance from multi-scale averaging theory is used to develop a multi-scale analysis framework to determine phase connectivity and extract interfacial areas, curvatures, common line length, contact angle and the velocities of the interface and common curve. The approach is applied to analyze pore-scale dynamics based on a multiphase lattice Boltzmann method. Dense sets of simulations are performed to evaluate the equilibrium relationship between capillary pressure, saturation and interfacial area for several experimentally imaged porous media. The approach is also used study the evolution of macroscopic quantities under dynamic conditions, which is compared to the equilibrium data.

  12. Project Themis Supercritical Cold Flow Facility, Experiment Design and Modeling for the Study of Fluid Mixing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-06-01

    both below and above ambient, were included. The resultant density ratios are presented in Table 2. Water was excluded from initial examination...because of the difficulty in achieving supercritical conditions of the water and freestream gas mixture. Table 2. Density Ratios for Sample Combinations...controlled with a cavitating venturi. The helium and argon mass flows were controlled by sonic venturis. The test chamber pressure was controlled by

  13. A two-phase debris-flow model that includes coupled evolution of volume fractions, granular dilatancy, and pore-fluid pressure

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    George, David L.; Iverson, Richard M.

    2011-01-01

    Pore-fluid pressure plays a crucial role in debris flows because it counteracts normal stresses at grain contacts and thereby reduces intergranular friction. Pore-pressure feedback accompanying debris deformation is particularly important during the onset of debrisflow motion, when it can dramatically influence the balance of forces governing downslope acceleration. We consider further effects of this feedback by formulating a new, depth-averaged mathematical model that simulates coupled evolution of granular dilatancy, solid and fluid volume fractions, pore-fluid pressure, and flow depth and velocity during all stages of debris-flow motion. To illustrate implications of the model, we use a finite-volume method to compute one-dimensional motion of a debris flow descending a rigid, uniformly inclined slope, and we compare model predictions with data obtained in large-scale experiments at the USGS debris-flow flume. Predictions for the first 1 s of motion show that increasing pore pressures (due to debris contraction) cause liquefaction that enhances flow acceleration. As acceleration continues, however, debris dilation causes dissipation of pore pressures, and this dissipation helps stabilize debris-flow motion. Our numerical predictions of this process match experimental data reasonably well, but predictions might be improved by accounting for the effects of grain-size segregation.

  14. Piezoelectric Energy Harvesting in Internal Fluid Flow

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyeong Jae; Sherrit, Stewart; Tosi, Luis Phillipe; Walkemeyer, Phillip; Colonius, Tim

    2015-01-01

    We consider piezoelectric flow energy harvesting in an internal flow environment with the ultimate goal powering systems such as sensors in deep oil well applications. Fluid motion is coupled to structural vibration via a cantilever beam placed in a converging-diverging flow channel. Two designs were considered for the electromechanical coupling: first; the cantilever itself is a piezoelectric bimorph; second; the cantilever is mounted on a pair of flextensional actuators. We experimentally investigated varying the geometry of the flow passage and the flow rate. Experimental results revealed that the power generated from both designs was similar; producing as much as 20 mW at a flow rate of 20 L/min. The bimorph designs were prone to failure at the extremes of flow rates tested. Finite element analysis (FEA) showed fatigue failure was imminent due to stress concentrations near the bimorph’s clamped region; and that robustness could be improved with a stepped-joint mounting design. A similar FEA model showed the flextensional-based harvester had a resonant frequency of around 375 Hz and an electromechanical coupling of 0.23 between the cantilever and flextensional actuators in a vacuum. These values; along with the power levels demonstrated; are significant steps toward building a system design that can eventually deliver power in the Watts range to devices down within a well. PMID:26473879

  15. Value for controlling flow of cryogenic fluid

    DOEpatents

    Knapp, Philip A.

    1996-01-01

    A valve is provided for accurately controlling the flow of cryogenic fluids such as liquid nitrogen. The valve comprises a combination of disc and needle valves affixed to a valve stem in such a manner that the disc and needle are free to rotate about the stem, but are constrained in lateral and vertical movements. This arrangement provides accurate and precise fluid flow control and positive fluid isolation.

  16. Benchmarking a computational fluid dynamics model of separated flow in a thin rectangular channel for use in predictive design analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Stovall, T.K.; Crabtree, A.; Felde, D.

    1995-04-01

    The Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) reactor is being designed to provide a research tool with capabilities beyond those of any existing reactors. One portion of its state-of-the-art design requires high speed fluid flow through narrow channels between the fuel plates in the core. Experience with previous reactors has shown that fuel plate damage can occur when debris becomes lodged at the entrance to these channels. Such debris can disrupt the fluid flow to the plate surfaces and prevent adequate cooling of the fuel. Preliminary ANS designs addressed this issue by providing an unheated entrance length for each fuel plate. In theory, any flow disruption would recover within this unheated length, thus providing adequate heat removal from the downstream heated portions of the fuel plates.

  17. Secondary flow in a curved artery model with Newtonian and non-Newtonian blood-analog fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Najjari, Mohammad Reza; Plesniak, Michael W.

    2016-11-01

    Steady and pulsatile flows of Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluids through a 180°-curved pipe were investigated using particle image velocimetry (PIV). The experiment was inspired by physiological pulsatile flow through large curved arteries, with a carotid artery flow rate imposed. Sodium iodide (NaI) and sodium thiocyanate (NaSCN) were added to the working fluids to match the refractive index (RI) of the test section to eliminate optical distortion. Rheological measurements revealed that adding NaI or NaSCN changes the viscoelastic properties of non-Newtonian solutions and reduces their shear-thinning property. Measured centerline velocity profiles in the upstream straight pipe agreed well with an analytical solution. In the pulsatile case, secondary flow structures, i.e. deformed-Dean, Dean, Wall and Lyne vortices, were observed in various cross sections along the curved pipe. Vortical structures at each cross section were detected using the d2 vortex identification method. Circulation analysis was performed on each vortex separately during the systolic deceleration phase, and showed that vortices split and rejoin. Secondary flow structures in steady flows were found to be morphologically similar to those in pulsatile flows for sufficiently high Dean number. supported by the George Washington University Center for Biomimetics and Bioinspired Engineering.

  18. Flow properties of the solar wind obtained from white light data and a two-fluid model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Habbal, Shadia Rifai; Esser, Ruth; Guhathakurta, Madhulika; Fisher, Richard

    1994-01-01

    The flow properties of the solar wind from 1 R(sub s) to 1 AU were obtained using a two fluid model constrained by density and scale height temperatures derived from white light observations, as well as knowledge of the electron temperature in coronal holes. The observations were obtained with the white light coronographs on SPARTAN 201-1 and at Mauna Loa (Hawaii), in a north polar coronal hole from 1.16 to 5.5 R(sub s) on 11 Apr. 1993. By specifying the density, temperature, Alfven wave velocity amplitude and heating function at the coronal base, it was found that the model parameters fit well the constraints of the empirical density profiles and temperatures. The optimal range of the input parameters was found to yield a higher proton temperature than electron temperature in the inner corona. The results indicate that no preferential heating of the protons at larger distances is needed to produce higher proton than electron temperatures at 1 AU, as observed in the high speed solar wind.

  19. Overview of heat transfer and fluid flow problem areas encountered in stirling engine modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Tew, R.C. Jr.

    1988-02-01

    NASA Lewis Research Center has been managing Stirling engine development programs for over a decade. In addition to contractual programs, this work has included in-house engine testing and development of engine computer models. Attempts to validate Stirling engine computer models with test data have demonstrated that engine thermodynamic losses need better characterization. Various Stirling engine thermodynamic losses and efforts that are underway to characterize these losses are discussed.

  20. Evaluation of a coupled model for numerical simulation of a multiphase flow system in a porous medium and a surface fluid.

    PubMed

    Hibi, Yoshihiko; Tomigashi, Akira

    2015-09-01

    Numerical simulations that couple flow in a surface fluid with that in a porous medium are useful for examining problems of pollution that involve interactions among atmosphere, water, and groundwater, including saltwater intrusion along coasts. Coupled numerical simulations of such problems must consider both vertical flow between the surface fluid and the porous medium and complicated boundary conditions at their interface. In this study, a numerical simulation method coupling Navier-Stokes equations for surface fluid flow and Darcy equations for flow in a porous medium was developed. Then, the basic ability of the coupled model to reproduce (1) the drawdown of a surface fluid observed in square-pillar experiments, using pillars filled with only fluid or with fluid and a porous medium and (2) the migration of saltwater (salt concentration 0.5%) in the porous medium using the pillar filled with fluid and a porous medium was evaluated. Simulations that assumed slippery walls reproduced well the results with drawdowns of 10-30 cm when the pillars were filled with packed sand, gas, and water. Moreover, in the simulation of saltwater infiltration by the method developed in this study, velocity was precisely reproduced because the experimental salt concentration in the porous medium after saltwater infiltration was similar to that obtained in the simulation. Furthermore, conditions across the boundary between the porous medium and the surface fluid were satisfied in these numerical simulations of square-pillar experiments in which vertical flow predominated. Similarly, the velocity obtained by the simulation for a system coupling flow in surface fluid with that in a porous medium when horizontal flow predominated satisfied the conditions across the boundary. Finally, it was confirmed that the present simulation method was able to simulate a practical-scale surface fluid and porous medium system. All of these numerical simulations, however, required a great deal of

  1. Flow and structure of fluids in functionalized nanopores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bordin, José Rafael; Barbosa, Marcia C.

    2017-02-01

    We investigate through non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations the structure and flow of fluids in functionalized nanopores. The nanopores are modeled as cylindrical structures with solvophilic and solvophobic sites. Two fluids are modeled. The first is a standard Lennard Jones fluid. The second one is modeled with an isotropic two-length scale potential, which exhibits in bulk water-like anomalies. Our results indicate distinct dependence of the overall mass flux for each species of fluid with the number of solvophilic sites for different nanotubes' radii. Also, the density and fluid structure are dependent on the nanotube radius and the solvophilic properties of the nanotube. This indicates that the presence of a second length scale in the fluid-fluid interaction will lead to distinct behavior. Also, our results show that chemically functionalized nanotubes with different radii will have distinct nanofluidic features. Our results are explained on the basis of the characteristic scale fluid properties and the effects of nanoconfinement.

  2. Fluid flow through the larynx channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, J. A.; Pereira, J. C.; Thomas, D. W.

    1988-03-01

    The classic two-mass model of the larynx channel is extended by including the false vocal folds and the laryngeal ventricle. Several glottis profiles are postulated to exist which are the result of the forces applied to the mucus membrane due to intraglottal pressure variation. These profiles constrain the air flow which allows the formation of one or two "venae contractae". The location of these influences the pressure in the glottis and layrngeal ventricle and also gives rise to additional viscous losses as well as losses due to flow enlargement. Sampled waveforms are calculated from the model for volume velocity, glottal area, Reynolds number and fluid forces over the vocal folds for various profiles. Results show that the computed waveforms agree with physiological data [1,2] and that it is not necessary to use any empirical constants to match the simulation results. Also, the onset of phonation is shown to be possible either with abduction or adduction of the vocal folds.

  3. Nonlinear gel electrophoresis: an analogy with ideal fluid flow.

    PubMed

    Dennison, C; Phillips, A M; Nevin, J M

    1983-12-01

    The behavior of electrolytes undergoing electrophoresis in various shaped gels was investigated using bromphenol blue as a model electrolyte. The results suggest that during gel electrophoresis, small electrolytes behave in a manner analogous to the flow of ideal, irrotational fluids.

  4. Fluid Mechanics and Rheology of Fluid Fiber Flows: Fundamental Science and Technological Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-01-03

    cooling phenomenon in pressure driven polymer flows , Cao et al. developed a thermal-mechanically consistent theory by postulating density a function...1, iqqfr-T>r. TT. 1998. Fluid mschanics and zfreolcgy of fluid fiH*r flows : fundaTmtal sciaxe and tedrological applications 6. AUTHOR(S) QLtfeqg...research activities are focused on modeling of polymeric liquid crystal (LCP) flows . We first summarizes our comprehensive studies on the shear and

  5. Modeling of Aircraft Deicing Fluid Induced Biochemical Oxygen Demand in Subsurface-Flow Constructed Treatment Wetlands

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-03-01

    meters. The input and output control structures are modeled as sharp crested , rectangular weirs one meter in width. The elevation of the input weir is...manipulated by adjusting the width of both the input and output weirs and the crest height of the output weir . All of these adjustments were found to be...reduction of the weir crest height had an effect on the amount of storm water retained during low precipitation conditions, but not on the crest

  6. Flow visualization in fluid mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freymuth, Peter

    1993-01-01

    The history of flow visualization is reviewed and basic methods are examined. A classification of the field of physical flow visualization is presented. The introduction of major methods is discussed and discoveries made using flow visualization are reviewed. Attention is given to limitations and problem areas in the visual evaluation of velocity and vorticity fields and future applications for flow visualization are suggested.

  7. Visualizing vector field topology in fluid flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helman, James L.; Hesselink, Lambertus

    1991-01-01

    Methods of automating the analysis and display of vector field topology in general and flow topology in particular are discussed. Two-dimensional vector field topology is reviewed as the basis for the examination of topology in three-dimensional separated flows. The use of tangent surfaces and clipping in visualizing vector field topology in fluid flows is addressed.

  8. Fluid flow through packings of rotating obstacles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, Rafael S.; Andrade, José S.; Andrade, Roberto F. S.

    2015-03-01

    We investigate through numerical simulation the nonstationary flow of a Newtonian fluid through a two-dimensional channel filled with an array of circular obstacles of distinct sizes. The disks may rotate around their respective centers, modeling a nonstationary, inhomogeneous porous medium. Obstacle sizes and positions are defined by the geometry of an Apollonian packing (AP). To allow for fluid flow, the radii of the disks are uniformly reduced by a factor 0.6 ≤s ≤0.8 for assemblies corresponding to the four first AP generations. The investigation is targeted to elucidate the main features of the rotating regime as compared to the fixed disk condition. It comprises the evaluation of the region of validity of Darcy's law as well as the study of the nonlinear hydraulic resistance as a function of the channel Reynolds number, the reduction factor s , and the AP generation. Depending on a combination of these factors, the resistance of rotating disks may be larger or smaller than that of the corresponding static case. We also analyze the flow redistribution in the interdisk channels as a result of the rotation pattern and characterize the angular velocity of the disks. Here, the striking feature is the emergence of a stable oscillatory behavior of the angular velocity for almost all disks that are inserted into the assemblies after the second generation.

  9. Episodic fluid flow in the Nankai accretionary complex: Timescale, geochemistry, flow rates, and fluid budget

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Saffer, D.M.; Bekins, B.A.

    1998-01-01

    Down-hole geochemical anomalies encountered in active accretionary systems can be used to constrain the timing, rates, and localization of fluid flow. Here we combine a coupled flow and solute transport model with a kinetic model for smectite dehydration to better understand and quantify fluid flow in the Nankai accretionary complex offshore of Japan. Compaction of sediments and clay dehydration provide fluid sources which drive the model flow system. We explicitly include the consolidation rate of underthrust sediments in our calculations to evaluate the impact that variations in this unknown quantity have on pressure and chloride distribution. Sensitivity analysis of steady state pressure solutions constrains bulk and flow conduit permeabilities. Steady state simulations with 30% smectite in the incoming sedimentary sequence result in minimum chloride concentrations at site 808 of 550 mM, but measured chlorinity is as low as 447 mM. We simulate the transient effects of hydrofracture or a strain event by assuming an instantaneous permeability increase of 3-4 orders of magnitude along a flow conduit (in this case the de??collement), using steady state results as initial conditions. Transient results with an increase in de??collement permeability from 10-16 m2 to 10-13 m2 and 20% smectite reproduce the observed chloride profile at site 808 after 80-160 kyr. Modeled chloride concentrations are highly sensitive to the consolidation rate of underthrust sediments, such that rapid compaction of underthrust material leads to increased freshening. Pressures within the de??collement during transient simulations rise rapidly to a significant fraction of lithostatic and remain high for at least 160 kyr, providing a mechanism for maintaining high permeability. Flow rates at the deformation front for transient simulations are in good agreement with direct measurements, but steady state flow rates are 2-3 orders of magnitude smaller than observed. Fluid budget calculations

  10. Comparison of Fractional Flow Reserve Based on Computational Fluid Dynamics Modeling Using Coronary Angiographic Vessel Morphology Versus Invasively Measured Fractional Flow Reserve.

    PubMed

    Tröbs, Monique; Achenbach, Stephan; Röther, Jens; Redel, Thomas; Scheuering, Michael; Winneberger, David; Klingenbeck, Klaus; Itu, Lucian; Passerini, Tiziano; Kamen, Ali; Sharma, Puneet; Comaniciu, Dorin; Schlundt, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Invasive fractional flow reserve (FFRinvasive), although gold standard to identify hemodynamically relevant coronary stenoses, is time consuming and potentially associated with complications. We developed and evaluated a new approach to determine lesion-specific FFR on the basis of coronary anatomy as visualized by invasive coronary angiography (FFRangio): 100 coronary lesions (50% to 90% diameter stenosis) in 73 patients (48 men, 25 women; mean age 67 ± 9 years) were studied. On the basis of coronary angiograms acquired at rest from 2 views at angulations at least 30° apart, a PC-based computational fluid dynamics modeling software used personalized boundary conditions determined from 3-dimensional reconstructed angiography, heart rate, and blood pressure to derive FFRangio. The results were compared with FFRinvasive. Interobserver variability was determined in a subset of 25 narrowings. Twenty-nine of 100 coronary lesions were hemodynamically significant (FFRinvasive ≤ 0.80). FFRangio identified these with an accuracy of 90%, sensitivity of 79%, specificity of 94%, positive predictive value of 85%, and negative predictive value of 92%. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve was 0.93. Correlation between FFRinvasive (mean: 0.84 ± 0.11) and FFRangio (mean: 0.85 ± 0.12) was r = 0.85. Interobserver variability of FFRangio was low, with a correlation of r = 0.88. In conclusion, estimation of coronary FFR with PC-based computational fluid dynamics modeling on the basis of lesion morphology as determined by invasive angiography is possible with high diagnostic accuracy compared to invasive measurements.

  11. Method and Apparatus for Measuring Fluid Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arndt, G. Dickey (Inventor); Nguyen, Thanh X. (Inventor); Carl, James R. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    Method and apparatus for making measurements on fluids related to their complex permeability are disclosed. A microwave probe is provided for exposure to the fluids. The probe can be non-intrusive or can also be positioned at the location where measurements are to be made. The impedance of the probe is determined. in part. by the complex dielectric constant of the fluids at the probe. A radio frequency signal is transmitted to the probe and the reflected signal is phase and amplitude detected at a rapid rate for the purpose of identifying the fluids. Multiple probes may be selectively positioned to monitor the behavior of the fluids including their flow rate. Fluids may be identified as between two or more different fluids as well as multiple phases of the same fluid based on differences between their complex permittivities.

  12. CFD modeling of fluid flow and solute transport in a µXCT scanned natural fracture: Impact of fracture geometry on solute transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huber, F. M.; Enzmann, F.; Wenka, A.; Dentz, M.; Schaefer, T.

    2010-12-01

    Fluid flow and solute transport through fractures are a key process in both industrial and scientific issues ranging from e.g. geothermal energy production to the disposal of nuclear waste in deep geologic formations. Therefore, a fundamental understanding of the various interdependent processes governing fluid flow and solute transport in fractures over a broad range of length and time scales is of utmost importance. Numerous studies have shown the importance of fracture geometry on flow and solute transport. More recently, significance of so called recirculation zones which are accessible for solutes and colloids through hydrodynamic dispersion and molecular diffusion have been identified [1,2] which can be responsible for pronounced late time solute breakthrough (tailing). Unfortunately, these studies are mostly focused on 2D. Thus, the intention of the prevailing study is to investigate the influence of fracture geometry on solute transport under a broad range of flow conditions (Pe number from 0.1 up to 1000) and as a function of flow direction (that is, reversed flow direction) both in 2D and 3D. We present µXCT measurements with a spatial resolution of 80 µm of a natural single fracture in a diorite drill core from Äspö, Sweden, which serves as direct input for computational mesh generation in order to obtain a realistic 3D model. Besides, a 2D model was produced by projecting the 3D mesh into the x-y-plane to completely exclude the fracture aperture information. Computational fluid dynamic simulations in 2D and 3D have been conducted to study fluid flow and conservative tracer (HTO) transport by means of the finite volume code FLUENT. The natural fracture exhibits a very complex geometry with asperities, rough side walls and a heterogenous aperture distribution. Furthermore, the µXCT data clearly shows that the fracture is not filled with fault gauge material. Simulation results confirm the impact of fracture geometry/roughness on fluid flow causing

  13. Conjugate Compressible Fluid Flow and Heat Transfer in Ducts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cross, M. F.

    2011-01-01

    A computational approach to modeling transient, compressible fluid flow with heat transfer in long, narrow ducts is presented. The primary application of the model is for analyzing fluid flow and heat transfer in solid propellant rocket motor nozzle joints during motor start-up, but the approach is relevant to a wide range of analyses involving rapid pressurization and filling of ducts. Fluid flow is modeled through solution of the spatially one-dimensional, transient Euler equations. Source terms are included in the governing equations to account for the effects of wall friction and heat transfer. The equation solver is fully-implicit, thus providing greater flexibility than an explicit solver. This approach allows for resolution of pressure wave effects on the flow as well as for fast calculation of the steady-state solution when a quasi-steady approach is sufficient. Solution of the one-dimensional Euler equations with source terms significantly reduces computational run times compared to general purpose computational fluid dynamics packages solving the Navier-Stokes equations with resolved boundary layers. In addition, conjugate heat transfer is more readily implemented using the approach described in this paper than with most general purpose computational fluid dynamics packages. The compressible flow code has been integrated with a transient heat transfer solver to analyze heat transfer between the fluid and surrounding structure. Conjugate fluid flow and heat transfer solutions are presented. The author is unaware of any previous work available in the open literature which uses the same approach described in this paper.

  14. Focused fluid flow in passive continental margins.

    PubMed

    Berndt, Christian

    2005-12-15

    Passive continental margins such as the Atlantic seaboard of Europe are important for society as they contain large energy resources, and they sustain ecosystems that are the basis for the commercial fish stock. The margin sediments are very dynamic environments. Fluids are expelled from compacting sediments, bottom water temperature changes cause gas hydrate systems to change their locations and occasionally large magmatic intrusions boil the pore water within the sedimentary basins, which is then expelled to the surface. The fluids that seep through the seabed at the tops of focused fluid flow systems have a crucial role for seabed ecology, and study of such fluid flow systems can also help in predicting the distribution of hydrocarbons in the subsurface and deciphering the climate record. Therefore, the study of focused fluid flow will become one of the most important fields in marine geology in the future.

  15. Thermohydrodynamic analysis of cryogenic liquid turbulent flow fluid film bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andres, Luis San

    1993-01-01

    A thermohydrodynamic analysis is presented and a computer code developed for prediction of the static and dynamic force response of hydrostatic journal bearings (HJB's), annular seals or damper bearing seals, and fixed arc pad bearings for cryogenic liquid applications. The study includes the most important flow characteristics found in cryogenic fluid film bearings such as flow turbulence, fluid inertia, liquid compressibility and thermal effects. The analysis and computational model devised allow the determination of the flow field in cryogenic fluid film bearings along with the dynamic force coefficients for rotor-bearing stability analysis.

  16. Fluid flow dynamics in MAS systems.

    PubMed

    Wilhelm, Dirk; Purea, Armin; Engelke, Frank

    2015-08-01

    The turbine system and the radial bearing of a high performance magic angle spinning (MAS) probe with 1.3mm-rotor diameter has been analyzed for spinning rates up to 67kHz. We focused mainly on the fluid flow properties of the MAS system. Therefore, computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations and fluid measurements of the turbine and the radial bearings have been performed. CFD simulation and measurement results of the 1.3mm-MAS rotor system show relatively low efficiency (about 25%) compared to standard turbo machines outside the realm of MAS. However, in particular, MAS turbines are mainly optimized for speed and stability instead of efficiency. We have compared MAS systems for rotor diameter of 1.3-7mm converted to dimensionless values with classical turbomachinery systems showing that the operation parameters (rotor diameter, inlet mass flow, spinning rate) are in the favorable range. This dimensionless analysis also supports radial turbines for low speed MAS probes and diagonal turbines for high speed MAS probes. Consequently, a change from Pelton type MAS turbines to diagonal turbines might be worth considering for high speed applications. CFD simulations of the radial bearings have been compared with basic theoretical values proposing considerably smaller frictional loss values. The discrepancies might be due to the simple linear flow profile employed for the theoretical model. Frictional losses generated inside the radial bearings result in undesired heat-up of the rotor. The rotor surface temperature distribution computed by CFD simulations show a large temperature gradient over the rotor.

  17. Fluid flow dynamics in MAS systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilhelm, Dirk; Purea, Armin; Engelke, Frank

    2015-08-01

    The turbine system and the radial bearing of a high performance magic angle spinning (MAS) probe with 1.3 mm-rotor diameter has been analyzed for spinning rates up to 67 kHz. We focused mainly on the fluid flow properties of the MAS system. Therefore, computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations and fluid measurements of the turbine and the radial bearings have been performed. CFD simulation and measurement results of the 1.3 mm-MAS rotor system show relatively low efficiency (about 25%) compared to standard turbo machines outside the realm of MAS. However, in particular, MAS turbines are mainly optimized for speed and stability instead of efficiency. We have compared MAS systems for rotor diameter of 1.3-7 mm converted to dimensionless values with classical turbomachinery systems showing that the operation parameters (rotor diameter, inlet mass flow, spinning rate) are in the favorable range. This dimensionless analysis also supports radial turbines for low speed MAS probes and diagonal turbines for high speed MAS probes. Consequently, a change from Pelton type MAS turbines to diagonal turbines might be worth considering for high speed applications. CFD simulations of the radial bearings have been compared with basic theoretical values proposing considerably smaller frictional loss values. The discrepancies might be due to the simple linear flow profile employed for the theoretical model. Frictional losses generated inside the radial bearings result in undesired heat-up of the rotor. The rotor surface temperature distribution computed by CFD simulations show a large temperature gradient over the rotor.

  18. Method and device for measuring fluid flow

    DOEpatents

    Atherton, Richard; Marinkovich, Phillip S.; Spadaro, Peter R.; Stout, J. Wilson

    1976-11-23

    This invention is a fluid flow measuring device for determining the coolant flow at the entrance to a specific nuclear reactor fuel region. The device comprises a plurality of venturis having the upstream inlet and throat pressure of each respectively manifolded together to provide one static pressure signal for each region monitored. The device provides accurate flow measurement with low pressure losses and uniform entrance and discharge flow distribution.

  19. A chaotic-dynamical conceptual model to describe fluid flow and contaminant transport in a fractured vadose zone. 1997 annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Faybishenko, B.

    1997-10-01

    'Understanding subsurface flow and transport processes is critical for effective assessment, decision-making, and remediation activities for contaminated sites. However, for fluid flow and contaminant transport through fractured vadose zones, traditional hydrogeological approaches are often found to be inadequate. In this project, the authors examine flow and transport through a fractured vadose zone as a deterministic chaotic dynamical process, and develop a model of it in these terms. Initially, they examine separately the geometric model of fractured rock and the flow dynamics model needed to describe chaotic behavior. Ultimately they will put the geometry and flow dynamics together to develop a chaotic-dynamical model of flow and transport in a fractured vadose zone. They investigate water flow and contaminant transport on several scales, ranging from small-scale laboratory experiments in fracture replicas and fractured cores, to field experiments conducted in a single exposed fracture at a basalt outcrop, and finally to a ponded infiltration test using a pond of 7 by 8 m. In the field experiments, the authors measure the time-variation of water flux, moisture content, and hydraulic head at various locations, as well as the total inflow rate to the subsurface. Such variations reflect the changes in the geometry and physics of water flow that display chaotic behavior, which the authors try to reconstruct using the data obtained. In the analysis of experimental data, a chaotic model can be used to predict the long-term bounds on fluid flow and transport behavior, known as the attractor of the system, and to examine the limits of short-term predictability within these bounds. This approach is especially well suited to the need for short-term predictions to support remediation decisions and long-term bounding studies.'

  20. Effect of dynamic contact angle in a volume of fluid (VOF) model for a microfluidic capillary flow.

    PubMed

    Ashish Saha, Auro; Mitra, Sushanta K

    2009-11-15

    We perform three-dimensional numerical and experimental study of the dynamic contact angle using volume of fluid (VOF) method applied to microfluidic channels with integrated pillars. Initially, we evaluated different dynamic contact angle models (hydrodynamic, molecular kinetic and empirical) for capillary filling of a two-dimensional microchannel using analytical formulation. Further, the models which require a minimum prescription of adjustable parameters are only used for the study of capillary filling of microchannels with integrated pillars using different working fluids such as DI water, ethanol and isopropyl alcohol. Different microchannel geometry with varying diameter/height/spacing were studied for circular pillars. Effect of square pillars and changing the overall number of pillars on the capillary phenomena were also simulated. Our study demonstrated that the dynamic contact angle models modifies the transient response of the meniscus displacement and also the observed trends are model specific for the various microchannel geometries and working fluids. However, the different models have minimal effect on the meniscus profile. Different inlet boundary conditions were applied to observe the effect of grid resolution selected for numerical study on the capillary filling time. A grid dependent dynamic contact angle model which incorporates effective slip in the model was also used to observe the grid convergence of the numerical results. The grid independence was shown to improve marginally by applying the grid dependent dynamic contact angle model. Further we did numerical experiments of capillary filling considering variable surface wettability on the top and bottom walls of the microchannel with alternate hydrophilic-hydrophobic patterns. The meniscus front pinning was noticed for a high wetting contrast between the patterns. Non uniform streamline patterns indicated mixing of the fluid when using patterned walls. Such a microfluidic device with

  1. Impact and sensitivity of parameters in debris flow models: A Monte Carlo simulation on fluid rheology, geometry and position of release areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robl, Jörg; Hergarten, Stefan

    2015-04-01

    Debris flows are globally abundant threats for settlements and infrastructure in mountainous regions. Crucial influencing factors for hazard zone planning and mitigation strategies are based on numerical models that describe granular flow on general topography by solving a depth-averaged form of the Navier Stokes equations in combination with an appropriate flow resistance law. In case of debris flows, the Voellmy rheology is a widely used constitutive law describing the flow resistance. It combines a velocity independent Coulomb friction term with a term proportional to the square of the velocity as it is commonly used for turbulent flow. Parameters of the Vollemy fluid are determined by back analysis from observed events so that modelled events mimic their historical counterparts. Determined parameters characterizing individual debris flows show a large variability (related to fluid composition and surface roughness). However, there may be several sets of parameters that lead to a similar depositional pattern but cause large differences in flow velocity and momentum along the flow path. Fluid volumes of hazardous debris flows are estimated by analyzing historic events, precipitation time series, hydrographs or empirical relationships that correlate fluid volumes and drainage areas of torrential catchments. Beside uncertainties in the determination of the fluid volume the position and geometry of the initial masses of forthcoming debris flows are in general not well constrained but heavily influence the flow dynamics and the depositional pattern even in the run-out zones. In this study we present a new, freely available numerical description of rapid mass movements based on the GERRIS framework and early results of a Monte Carlo simulation exploring effects of the aforementioned parameters on run-out distance, inundated area and momentum. The novel numerical model describes rapid mass movements on complex topography using the shallow water equations in Cartesian

  2. Engineering fluid flow using sequenced microstructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amini, Hamed; Sollier, Elodie; Masaeli, Mahdokht; Xie, Yu; Ganapathysubramanian, Baskar; Stone, Howard A.; di Carlo, Dino

    2013-05-01

    Controlling the shape of fluid streams is important across scales: from industrial processing to control of biomolecular interactions. Previous approaches to control fluid streams have focused mainly on creating chaotic flows to enhance mixing. Here we develop an approach to apply order using sequences of fluid transformations rather than enhancing chaos. We investigate the inertial flow deformations around a library of single cylindrical pillars within a microfluidic channel and assemble these net fluid transformations to engineer fluid streams. As these transformations provide a deterministic mapping of fluid elements from upstream to downstream of a pillar, we can sequentially arrange pillars to apply the associated nested maps and, therefore, create complex fluid structures without additional numerical simulation. To show the range of capabilities, we present sequences that sculpt the cross-sectional shape of a stream into complex geometries, move and split a fluid stream, perform solution exchange and achieve particle separation. A general strategy to engineer fluid streams into a broad class of defined configurations in which the complexity of the nonlinear equations of fluid motion are abstracted from the user is a first step to programming streams of any desired shape, which would be useful for biological, chemical and materials automation.

  3. Numerical Simulation of Turbulent Fluid Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leonard, A.

    1983-01-01

    Numerical simulation of turbulent flows is discussed. Computational requirements for the direct simulaton of turbulence, simulation of arbitrary homogeneous flows, an expansion technique for wall bounded flows with application to pipe flow, and possibilities of flow representations or modeling techniques that allow the simulation of high Reynolds number flows with a relatively small number of dependent variables are included.

  4. Apparatus for measuring fluid flow

    DOEpatents

    Smith, J.E.; Thomas, D.G.

    Flow measuring apparatus includes a support loop having strain gages mounted thereon and a drag means which is attached to one end of the support loop and which bends the sides of the support loop and induces strains in the strain gages when a flow stream impacts thereon.

  5. Apparatus for measuring fluid flow

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Jack E.; Thomas, David G.

    1984-01-01

    Flow measuring apparatus includes a support loop having strain gages mounted thereon and a drag means which is attached to one end of the support loop and which bends the sides of the support loop and induces strains in the strain gages when a flow stream impacts thereon.

  6. Directed flow fluid rinse trough

    DOEpatents

    Kempka, Steven N.; Walters, Robert N.

    1996-01-01

    Novel rinse troughs accomplish thorough uniform rinsing. The tanks are suitable for one or more essentially planar items having substantially the same shape. The troughs ensure that each surface is rinsed uniformly. The new troughs also require less rinse fluid to accomplish a thorough rinse than prior art troughs.

  7. Directed flow fluid rinse trough

    DOEpatents

    Kempka, S.N.; Walters, R.N.

    1996-07-02

    Novel rinse troughs accomplish thorough uniform rinsing. The tanks are suitable for one or more essentially planar items having substantially the same shape. The troughs ensure that each surface is rinsed uniformly. The new troughs also require less rinse fluid to accomplish a thorough rinse than prior art troughs. 9 figs.

  8. The effect of fluid flow on coiled tubing reach

    SciTech Connect

    Bhalla, K.; Walton, I.C.

    1996-12-31

    A critical parameter to the success of many coiled tubing (CT) operations in highly deviated or horizontal wells is the depth penetration that can be attained before the CT buckles and locks up. Achieving a desired depth is always critical in CT operations and attaining an additional reach of a few hundred feet can be crucial. This paper addresses the effect of fluid flow in the CT and in the CT/wellbore annulus on the state of force and stress in the CT, and thereby predicts its effect on the reach attainable by the CT. The flow of fluid through the CT and annulus between the CT and borehole modifies the pressures and the effective force which governs the mechanical stability of the CT. The net force per unit length due to fluid flow in the coiled tubing and annulus between the coiled tubing casing/well is calculated in terms of the shear stress and its effect on the onset of buckling and lockup is determined. The model is then implemented in a full tubing forces calculation and the effect of flowing fluids and producing fluids on reach is analyzed. The new model is utilized in the design of commercial jobs. The exact analytic model shows that fluid flow inside the CT has zero impact on reach, that downward flow in the annulus has a favourable impact, and upward flow in the annulus reduces the maximum attainable reach. Using the full tubing forces model, a coiled tubing job can be designed taking into account the flow of a fluid with a specified rheology, density and flow rate. Thus the feasibility of attaining a given reach can be more accurately determined. Results are presented in the form of the surface weight for commercial wells and compared to field jobs.

  9. Fluid flow dynamics under location uncertainty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mémin, Etienne

    2014-03-01

    We present a derivation of a stochastic model of Navier Stokes equations that relies on a decomposition of the velocity fields into a differentiable drift component and a time uncorrelated uncertainty random term. This type of decomposition is reminiscent in spirit to the classical Reynolds decomposition. However, the random velocity fluctuations considered here are not differentiable with respect to time, and they must be handled through stochastic calculus. The dynamics associated with the differentiable drift component is derived from a stochastic version of the Reynolds transport theorem. It includes in its general form an uncertainty dependent "subgrid" bulk formula that cannot be immediately related to the usual Boussinesq eddy viscosity assumption constructed from thermal molecular agitation analogy. This formulation, emerging from uncertainties on the fluid parcels location, explains with another viewpoint some subgrid eddy diffusion models currently used in computational fluid dynamics or in geophysical sciences and paves the way for new large-scales flow modelling. We finally describe an applications of our formalism to the derivation of stochastic versions of the Shallow water equations or to the definition of reduced order dynamical systems.

  10. Influence of nanostructural environment and fluid flow on osteoblast-like cell behavior: a model for cell-mechanics studies.

    PubMed

    Prodanov, L; Semeins, C M; van Loon, J J W A; te Riet, J; Jansen, J A; Klein-Nulend, J; Walboomers, X F

    2013-05-01

    Introducing nanoroughness on various biomaterials has been shown to profoundly effect cell-material interactions. Similarly, physical forces act on a diverse array of cells and tissues. Particularly in bone, the tissue experiences compressive or tensile forces resulting in fluid shear stress. The current study aimed to develop an experimental setup for bone cell behavior, combining a nanometrically grooved substrate (200 nm wide, 50 nm deep) mimicking the collagen fibrils of the extracellular matrix, with mechanical stimulation by pulsatile fluid flow (PFF). MC3T3-E1 osteoblast-like cells were assessed for morphology, expression of genes involved in cell attachment and osteoblastogenesis and nitric oxide (NO) release. The results showed that both nanotexture and PFF did affect cellular morphology. Cells aligned on nanotexture substrate in a direction parallel to the groove orientation. PFF at a magnitude of 0.7 Pa was sufficient to induce alignment of cells on a smooth surface in a direction perpendicular to the applied flow. When environmental cues texture and flow were interacting, PFF of 1.4 Pa applied parallel to the nanogrooves initiated significant cellular realignment. PFF increased NO synthesis 15-fold in cells attached to both smooth and nanotextured substrates. Increased collagen and alkaline phosphatase mRNA expression was observed on the nanotextured substrate, but not on the smooth substrate. Furthermore, vinculin and bone sialoprotein were up-regulated after 1 h of PFF stimulation. In conclusion, the data show that interstitial fluid forces and structural cues mimicking extracellular matrix contribute to the final bone cell morphology and behavior, which might have potential application in tissue engineering.

  11. A potential-flow, deformable-body model for fluid structure interactions with compact vorticity: application to animal swimming measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Jifeng; Dabiri, John O.

    2007-11-01

    This paper presents an approach to quantify the unsteady fluid forces, moments and mass transport generated by swimming animals, based on measurements of the surrounding flow field. These goals are accomplished within a framework that is independent of the vorticity field, making it unnecessary to directly resolve boundary layers on the animal, body vortex interactions, or interactions among vortex lines in the wake. Instead, the method identifies Lagrangian coherent structures in the flow, whose dynamics in flows with compact vorticity are shown to be well approximated by potential flow concepts, especially the Kirchhoff and deformation potentials from deformable body theory. Examples of the application of these methods are given for pectoral fin locomotion of the bluegill sunfish and undulatory swimming of jellyfish, and the methods are validated by analysis of a canonical starting vortex ring flow. The transition to a Lagrangian approach toward animal swimming measurements suggests the possibility of implementing recently developed particle tracking (vis-à-vis DPIV) techniques for fully three-dimensional measurements of animal swimming.

  12. Pulsatile magneto-hydrodynamic blood flows through porous blood vessels using a third grade non-Newtonian fluids model.

    PubMed

    Akbarzadeh, Pooria

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, the unsteady pulsatile magneto-hydrodynamic blood flows through porous arteries concerning the influence of externally imposed periodic body acceleration and a periodic pressure gradient are numerically simulated. Blood is taken into account as the third-grade non-Newtonian fluid. Besides the numerical solution, for small Womersley parameter (such as blood flow through arterioles and capillaries), the analytical perturbation method is used to solve the nonlinear governing equations. Consequently, analytical expressions for the velocity profile, wall shear stress, and blood flow rate are obtained. Excellent agreement between the analytical and numerical predictions is evident. Also, the effects of body acceleration, magnetic field, third-grade non-Newtonian parameter, pressure gradient, and porosity on the flow behaviors are examined. Some important conclusions are that, when the Womersley parameter is low, viscous forces tend to dominate the flow, velocity profiles are parabolic in shape, and the center-line velocity oscillates in phase with the driving pressure gradient. In addition, by increasing the pressure gradient, the mean value of the velocity profile increases and the amplitude of the velocity remains constant. Also, when non-Newtonian effect increases, the amplitude of the velocity profile.

  13. Detailed Simulations of Atmospheric Flow and Dispersion in Urban Downtown Areas by Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) Models - An Application of Five CFD Models to Manhattan

    SciTech Connect

    Hanna, S R; Brown, M J; Camelli, F E; Chan, S T; Coirier, W J; Hansen, O R; Huber, A H; Kim, S; Reynolds, R M

    2006-03-06

    Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) model simulations of urban boundary layers have improved so that they are useful in many types of flow and dispersion analyses. The study described here is intended to assist in planning emergency response activities related to releases of chemical or biological agents into the atmosphere in large cities such as New York City. Five CFD models (CFD-Urban, FLACS, FEM3MP, FEFLO-Urban, and Fluent-Urban) have been applied by five independent groups to the same 3-D building data and geographic domain in Manhattan, using approximately the same wind input conditions. Wind flow observations are available from the Madison Square Garden March 2005 (MSG05) field experiment. It is seen from the many side-by-side comparison plots that the CFD models simulations of near-surface wind fields generally agree with each other and with field observations, within typical atmospheric uncertainties of a factor of two. The qualitative results shown here suggest, for example, that transport of a release at street level in a large city could reach a few blocks in the upwind and crosswind directions. There are still key differences seen among the models for certain parts of the domain. Further quantitative examinations of differences among the models and the observations are necessary to understand causal relationships.

  14. Standardization of Thermo-Fluid Modeling in Modelica.Fluid

    SciTech Connect

    Franke, Rudiger; Casella, Francesco; Sielemann, Michael; Proelss, Katrin; Otter, Martin; Wetter, Michael

    2009-09-01

    This article discusses the Modelica.Fluid library that has been included in the Modelica Standard Library 3.1. Modelica.Fluid provides interfaces and basic components for the device-oriented modeling of onedimensional thermo-fluid flow in networks containing vessels, pipes, fluid machines, valves and fittings. A unique feature of Modelica.Fluid is that the component equations and the media models as well as pressure loss and heat transfer correlations are decoupled from each other. All components are implemented such that they can be used for media from the Modelica.Media library. This means that an incompressible or compressible medium, a single or a multiple substance medium with one or more phases might be used with one and the same model as long as the modeling assumptions made hold. Furthermore, trace substances are supported. Modeling assumptions can be configured globally in an outer System object. This covers in particular the initialization, uni- or bi-directional flow, and dynamic or steady-state formulation of mass, energy, and momentum balance. All assumptions can be locally refined for every component. While Modelica.Fluid contains a reasonable set of component models, the goal of the library is not to provide a comprehensive set of models, but rather to provide interfaces and best practices for the treatment of issues such as connector design and implementation of energy, mass and momentum balances. Applications from various domains are presented.

  15. Near critical swirling flow of a viscoelastic fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ly, Nguyen; Rusak, Zvi; Tichy, John; Wang, Shixiao

    2016-11-01

    The interaction between flow inertia and elasticity in high Re, axisymmetric, and near-critical swirling flows of a viscoelastic fluid in a finite-length straight circular pipe is studied. The viscous stresses are described by the Giesekus constitutive model. The application of this model to columnar streamwise vortices is first investigated. Then, a nonlinear small-disturbance analysis is developed from the governing equations of motion. It explores the complicated interactions between flow inertia, swirl, and fluid viscosity and elasticity. An effective Re that links between steady states of swirling flows of a viscoelastic fluid and those of a Newtonian fluid is revealed. The effects of the fluid viscosity, relaxation time, retardation time and mobility parameter on the flow development and on the critical swirl for the appearance of vortex breakdown are explored. Decreasing the ratio of the viscoelastic characteristic times from one increases the critical swirl for breakdown. Increasing the Weissenberg number from zero or increasing the fluid mobility parameter from zero cause a similar effect. Results may explain changes in the appearance of breakdown zones as a function of swirl level that were observed in Stokes et al. (2001) experiments, where Boger fluids were used.

  16. Fluid flow in carbon nanotubes and nanopipes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitby, M.; Quirke, N.

    2007-02-01

    Nanoscale carbon tubes and pipes can be readily fabricated using self-assembly techniques and they have useful electrical, optical and mechanical properties. The transport of liquids along their central pores is now of considerable interest both for testing classical theories of fluid flow at the nanoscale and for potential nanofluidic device applications. In this review we consider evidence for novel fluid flow in carbon nanotubes and pipes that approaches frictionless transport. Methods for controlling such flow and for creating functional device architectures are described and possible applications are discussed.

  17. Destabilization of confined granular packings due to fluid flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monloubou, Martin; Sandnes, Bjørnar

    2016-04-01

    Fluid flow through granular materials can cause fluidization when fluid drag exceeds the frictional stress within the packing. Fluid driven failure of granular packings is observed in both natural and engineered settings, e.g. soil liquefaction and flowback of proppants during hydraulic fracturing operations. We study experimentally the destabilization and flow of an unconsolidated granular packing subjected to a point source fluid withdrawal using a model system consisting of a vertical Hele-Shaw cell containing a water-grain mixture. The fluid is withdrawn from the cell at a constant rate, and the emerging flow patterns are imaged in time-lapse mode. Using Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV), we show that the granular flow gets localized in a narrow channel down the center of the cell, and adopts a Gaussian velocity profile similar to those observed in dry grain flows in silos. We investigate the effects of the experimental parameters (flow rate, grain size, grain shape, fluid viscosity) on the packing destabilization, and identify the physical mechanisms responsible for the observed complex flow behaviour.

  18. Analytical solution of two-fluid electro-osmotic flows of viscoelastic fluids.

    PubMed

    Afonso, A M; Alves, M A; Pinho, F T

    2013-04-01

    This paper presents an analytical model that describes a two-fluid electro-osmotic flow of stratified fluids with Newtonian or viscoelastic rheological behavior. This is the principle of operation of an electro-osmotic two-fluid pump as proposed by Brask et al. [Tech. Proc. Nanotech., 1, 190-193, 2003], in which an electrically non-conducting fluid is transported by the interfacial dragging viscous force of a conducting fluid that is driven by electro-osmosis. The electric potential in the conducting fluid and the analytical steady flow solution of the two-fluid electro-osmotic stratified flow in a planar microchannel are presented by assuming a planar interface between the two immiscible fluids with Newtonian or viscoelastic rheological behavior. The effects of fluid rheology, shear viscosity ratio, holdup and interfacial zeta potential are analyzed to show the viability of this technique, where an enhancement of the flow rate is observed as the shear-thinning effects are increased.

  19. Base Flow Model Validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sinha, Neeraj; Brinckman, Kevin; Jansen, Bernard; Seiner, John

    2011-01-01

    A method was developed of obtaining propulsive base flow data in both hot and cold jet environments, at Mach numbers and altitude of relevance to NASA launcher designs. The base flow data was used to perform computational fluid dynamics (CFD) turbulence model assessments of base flow predictive capabilities in order to provide increased confidence in base thermal and pressure load predictions obtained from computational modeling efforts. Predictive CFD analyses were used in the design of the experiments, available propulsive models were used to reduce program costs and increase success, and a wind tunnel facility was used. The data obtained allowed assessment of CFD/turbulence models in a complex flow environment, working within a building-block procedure to validation, where cold, non-reacting test data was first used for validation, followed by more complex reacting base flow validation.

  20. Drift flux model as approximation of two fluid model for two phase dispersed and slug flow in tube

    SciTech Connect

    Nigmatulin, R.I.

    1995-09-01

    The analysis of one-dimensional schematizing for non-steady two-phase dispersed and slug flow in tube is presented. Quasi-static approximation, when inertia forces because of the accelerations of the phases may be neglected, is considered. Gas-liquid bubbly and slug vertical upward flows are analyzed. Non-trivial theoretical equations for slip velocity for these flows are derived. Juxtaposition of the derived equations for slip velocity with the famous Zuber-Findlay correlation as cross correlation coefficients is criticized. The generalization of non-steady drift flux Wallis theory taking into account influence of wall friction on the bubbly or slug flows for kinematical waves is considered.

  1. An investigation of fluid flow during induction stroke of a water analog model of an IC engine using an innovative optical velocimetry concept: LIPA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stier, Bernd; Falco, R. E.

    1994-01-01

    Optical measurements on an axisymmetrical quartz component engine research model were made to evaluate the flow field encountered during induction. The measurement technique is LIPA (Laser Induced Photochemical Anemometry), a non-intrusive velocimetry concept that provides an investigator of fluid flow with a tool to attain planar information about three-dimensional velocity and vorticity vectors in a single measurement step. The goal of this investigation is to further develop this measurement technique and apply it to study the induction stroke of a water analog model of a four-stroke internal combustion engine. The research conducted in the water analog model is a fundamental scientific inquiry into the flow fields that develop in the induction stroke of an engine at idling engine speeds. As this is the first investigation of its kind using LIPA technique, our goal has been to quantify, in a preliminary manner, the flow field features that develop during the intake stroke. In the process a more comprehensive understanding of the flow field features was developed, and tied to the quantification. The study evaluated the flow field of the intake stroke by estimating fields of velocity and vorticity. On the basis of these data, information about fluid dynamics during induction at engine speeds of 10, 20, and 30 RPM (corresponding to 170, 340, and 510 RPM respectively, when air is the flowing medium) for three different valve lifts was obtained. The overall development of the flow field, its energy content (kinetic, fluctuation) for the different settings of the engine parameters, vorticity information, and cyclic variations have been quantified. These have been discussed in terms of mixing performance.

  2. Unsteady fluid flow in smart material actuated fluid pumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    John, Shaju; Cadou, Christopher

    2005-05-01

    Smart materials' ability to deliver large block forces in a small package while operating at high frequencies makes them extremely attractive for converting electrical to mechanical power. This has led to the development of hybrid actuators consisting of co-located smart material actuated pumps and hydraulic cylinders that are connected by a set of fast-acting valves. The overall success of the hybrid concept hinges on the effectiveness of the coupling between the smart material and the fluid. This, in turn, is strongly dependent on the resistance to fluid flow in the device. This paper presents results from three-dimensional unsteady simulations of fluid flow in the pumping chamber of a prototype hybrid actuator powered by a piezo-electric stack. The results show that the forces associated with moving the fluid into and out of the pumping chamber already exceed 10% of the piezo stack blocked force at relatively low frequencies ~120 Hz and approach 40% of the blocked force at 800 Hz. This reduces the amplitude of the piston motion in such a way that the volume flow rate remains approximately constant above operating frequencies of 500 Hz while the efficiency of the pump decreases rapidly.

  3. Mathematical model of microbicidal flow dynamics and optimization of rheological properties for intra-vaginal drug delivery: Role of tissue mechanics and fluid rheology.

    PubMed

    Anwar, Md Rajib; Camarda, Kyle V; Kieweg, Sarah L

    2015-06-25

    Topically applied microbicide gels can provide a self-administered and effective strategy to prevent sexually transmitted infections (STIs). We have investigated the interplay between vaginal tissue elasticity and the yield-stress of non-Newtonian fluids during microbicide deployment. We have developed a mathematical model of tissue deformation driven spreading of microbicidal gels based on thin film lubrication approximation and demonstrated the effect of tissue elasticity and fluid yield-stress on the spreading dynamics. Our results show that both elasticity of tissue and yield-stress rheology of gel are strong determinants of the coating behavior. An optimization framework has been demonstrated which leverages the flow dynamics of yield-stress fluid during deployment to maximize retention while reaching target coating length for a given tissue elasticity.

  4. Study of turbulent energy dissipation rate of fluid flow in the vicinity of dispersed phase boundary using spatiotemporal tree model.

    PubMed

    Sikiö, Päivi; Jalali, Payman

    2014-12-01

    The hierarchical shell models of turbulence including a spatial dimension, namely, spatiotemporal tree models, reproduce the intermittent behavior of Navier-Stokes equations in both space and time dimensions corresponding to high Reynolds number turbulent flows. This model is used, for the first time in this paper, in a one-dimensional flow zone containing a dispersed-phase particle that can be used in the study of dispersed-phase flows. In this paper, a straightforward method has been used to introduce discrete phase into the spatiotemporal tree model that leads to an increased amount of turbulent energy dissipation rate in the vicinity of the discrete phase. The effects of particle insertion and particle size on the turbulent energy dissipation rate are demonstrated. Moreover, the space-scale behavior of the time-averaged turbulent energy dissipation rate in the presence of dispersed phase is demonstrated by means of continuous wavelet transform.

  5. Fluid inclusion and vitrinite-reflectance geothermometry compared to heat-flow models of maximum paleotemperature next to dikes, western onshore Gippsland Basin, Australia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barker, C.E.; Bone, Y.; Lewan, M.D.

    1999-01-01

    Nine basalt dikes, ranging from 6 cm to 40 m thick, intruding the Upper Jurassic-Lower Cretaceous Strzelecki Group, western onshore Gippsland Basin, were used to study maximum temperatures (Tmax) reached next to dikes. Tmax was estimated from fluid inclusion and vitrinitereflectance geothermometry and compared to temperatures calculated using heat-flow models of contact metamorphism. Thermal history reconstruction suggests that at the time of dike intrusion the host rock was at a temperature of 100-135??C. Fracture-bound fluid inclusions in the host rocks next to thin dikes ( 1.5, using a normalized distance ratio used for comparing measurements between dikes regardless of their thickness. In contrast, the pattern seen next to the thin dikes is a relatively narrow zone of elevated Rv-r. Heat-flow modeling, along with whole rock elemental and isotopic data, suggests that the extended zone of elevated Rv-r is caused by a convection cell with local recharge of the hydrothermal fluids. The narrow zone of elevated Rv-r found next to thin dikes is attributed to the rise of the less dense, heated fluids at the dike contact causing a flow of cooler groundwater towards the dike and thereby limiting its heating effects. The lack of extended heating effects suggests that next to thin dikes an incipient convection system may form in which the heated fluid starts to travel upward along the dike but cooling occurs before a complete convection cell can form. Close to the dike contact at X/D 1.5. ?? 1998 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Flow over a membrane-covered, fluid-filled cavity

    PubMed Central

    Mongeau, Luc; Frankel, Steven H.

    2014-01-01

    The flow-induced response of a membrane covering a fluid-filled cavity located in a section of a rigid-walled channel was explored using finite element analysis. The membrane was initially aligned with the channel wall and separated the channel fluid from the cavity fluid. As fluid flowed over the membrane-covered cavity, a streamwise-dependent transmural pressure gradient caused membrane deformation. This model has application to synthetic models of the vocal fold cover layer used in voice production research. In this paper, the model is introduced and responses of the channel flow, the membrane, and the cavity flow are summarized for a range of flow and membrane parameters. It is shown that for high values of cavity fluid viscosity, the intracavity pressure and the beam deflection both reached steady values. For combinations of low cavity viscosity and sufficiently large upstream pressures, large-amplitude membrane vibrations resulted. Asymmetric conditions were introduced by creating cavities on opposing sides of the channel and assigning different stiffness values to the two membranes. The asymmetry resulted in reduction in or cessation of vibration amplitude, depending on the degree of asymmetry, and in significant skewing of the downstream flow field. PMID:24723738

  7. Computational Fluid Dynamics Modeling of The Dalles Project: Effects of Spill Flow Distribution Between the Washington Shore and the Tailrace Spillwall

    SciTech Connect

    Rakowski, Cynthia L.; Serkowski, John A.; Richmond, Marshall C.

    2010-12-01

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers-Portland District (CENWP) has ongoing work to improve the survival of juvenile salmonids (smolt) migrating past The Dalles Dam. As part of that effort, a spillwall was constructed to improve juvenile egress through the tailrace downstream of the stilling basin. The spillwall was designed to improve smolt survival by decreasing smolt retention time in the spillway tailrace and the exposure to predators on the spillway shelf. The spillwall guides spillway flows, and hence smolt, more quickly into the thalweg. In this study, an existing computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model was modified and used to characterize tailrace hydraulics between the new spillwall and the Washington shore for six different total river flows. The effect of spillway flow distribution was simulated for three spill patterns at the lowest total river flow. The commercial CFD solver, STAR-CD version 4.1, was used to solve the unsteady Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations together with the k-epsilon turbulence model. Free surface motion was simulated using the volume-of-fluid (VOF) technique. The model results were used in two ways. First, results graphics were provided to CENWP and regional fisheries agency representatives for use and comparison to the same flow conditions at a reduced-scale physical model. The CFD results were very similar in flow pattern to that produced by the reduced-scale physical model but these graphics provided a quantitative view of velocity distribution. During the physical model work, an additional spill pattern was tested. Subsequently, that spill pattern was also simulated in the numerical model. The CFD streamlines showed that the hydraulic conditions were likely to be beneficial to fish egress at the higher total river flows (120 kcfs and greater, uniform flow distribution). At the lowest flow case, 90 kcfs, it was necessary to use a non-uniform distribution. Of the three distributions tested, splitting the flow evenly between

  8. MEANS FOR VISUALIZING FLUID FLOW PATTERNS

    DOEpatents

    Lynch, F.E.; Palmer, L.D.; Poppendick, H.F.; Winn, G.M.

    1961-05-16

    An apparatus is given for determining both the absolute and relative velocities of a phosphorescent fluid flowing through a transparent conduit. The apparatus includes a source for exciting a narrow trsnsverse band of the fluid to phosphorescence, detecting means such as a camera located downstream from the exciting source to record the shape of the phosphorescent band as it passes, and a timer to measure the time elapsed between operation of the exciting source and operation of the camera.

  9. Fluid flow through seamounts and implications for global mass fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Robert N.; Fisher, Andrew T.; Chapman, David S.

    2004-08-01

    Seamounts contribute to globally significant hydrothermal fluxes, but the dynamics and impacts of fluid flow through these features are poorly understood. Numerical models of coupled heat and fluid flow illustrate how seamounts induce local convection in the oceanic crust. We consider idealized axisymmetric seamounts and calculate mass and heat fluxes by using a coupled heat- and fluid-flow model. By using P. Wessel's global database of ˜15,000 seamounts identified through satellite gravimetry, we estimate that the mass flux associated with seamounts is ˜1014 kg/yr, a number comparable to estimated regional mass fluxes through mid-ocean ridges and flanks. In addition, the seamount-generated advective heat flux may be locally significant well beyond the 65 Ma average age at which advective lithospheric heat loss on ridge flanks ends. These flows may be important for facilitating geochemical exchange between the crust and ocean and may affect subseafloor microbial ecosystems.

  10. Flow modification in canine intracranial aneurysm model by an asymmetric stent: studies using digital subtraction angiography (DSA) and image-based computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoi, Yiemeng; Ionita, Ciprian N.; Tranquebar, Rekha V.; Hoffmann, Kenneth R.; Woodward, Scott H.; Taulbee, Dale B.; Meng, Hui; Rudin, Stephen

    2006-03-01

    An asymmetric stent with low porosity patch across the intracranial aneurysm neck and high porosity elsewhere is designed to modify the flow to result in thrombogenesis and occlusion of the aneurysm and yet to reduce the possibility of also occluding adjacent perforator vessels. The purposes of this study are to evaluate the flow field induced by an asymmetric stent using both numerical and digital subtraction angiography (DSA) methods and to quantify the flow dynamics of an asymmetric stent in an in vivo aneurysm model. We created a vein-pouch aneurysm model on the canine carotid artery. An asymmetric stent was implanted at the aneurysm, with 25% porosity across the aneurysm neck and 80% porosity elsewhere. The aneurysm geometry, before and after stent implantation, was acquired using cone beam CT and reconstructed for computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis. Both steady-state and pulsatile flow conditions using the measured waveforms from the aneurysm model were studied. To reduce computational costs, we modeled the asymmetric stent effect by specifying a pressure drop over the layer across the aneurysm orifice where the low porosity patch was located. From the CFD results, we found the asymmetric stent reduced the inflow into the aneurysm by 51%, and appeared to create a stasis-like environment which favors thrombus formation. The DSA sequences also showed substantial flow reduction into the aneurysm. Asymmetric stents may be a viable image guided intervention for treating intracranial aneurysms with desired flow modification features.

  11. Computational modelling of the scaffold-free chondrocyte regeneration: a two-way coupling between the cell growth and local fluid flow and nutrient concentration.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Md Shakhawath; Bergstrom, D J; Chen, X B

    2015-11-01

    The in vitro chondrocyte cell culture process in a perfusion bioreactor provides enhanced nutrient supply as well as the flow-induced shear stress that may have a positive influence on the cell growth. Mathematical and computational modelling of such a culture process, by solving the coupled flow, mass transfer and cell growth equations simultaneously, can provide important insight into the biomechanical environment of a bioreactor and the related cell growth process. To do this, a two-way coupling between the local flow field and cell growth is required. Notably, most of the computational and mathematical models to date have not taken into account the influence of the cell growth on the local flow field and nutrient concentration. The present research aimed at developing a mathematical model and performing a numerical simulation using the lattice Boltzmann method to predict the chondrocyte cell growth without a scaffold on a flat plate placed inside a perfusion bioreactor. The model considers the two-way coupling between the cell growth and local flow field, and the simulation has been performed for 174 culture days. To incorporate the cell growth into the model, a control-volume-based surface growth modelling approach has been adopted. The simulation results show the variation of local fluid velocity, shear stress and concentration distribution during the culture period due to the growth of the cell phase and also illustrate that the shear stress can increase the cell volume fraction to a certain extent.

  12. A new approach to fluid flow modeling of directional permeability in a faulted anticline, Little Sand Draw Field, Big Horn Basin, Wyoming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raba'A, Ali Saleh Bin

    2001-09-01

    Little Sand Draw field, Hot Springs County, Wyoming, is a fractured and faulted asymmetric anticlinal oil reservoir. The main producing formation is the Permian Phosphoria Formation. Numerical simulation of this reservoir is important for evaluating reservoir quality and past and future performance. This study presents a new integrated methodology which combines reservoir engineering with geology to improve reservoir characterization, simulation, and planning for reservoir management. The goal of this project is to apply a new geological and engineering approach to simulate directional permeability in a faulted and fractured anticlinal oil reservoir. Tear faults, which have apparent strike slip offset and occur at high angles to the fold axis, have been quantified at Thermopolis anticline, an analogous structure 6 mi (10 km) to the south. The observed tear faults could be significant source of permeability anisotropy, and may provide high permeability conduits across structural folds. Anisotropic directional permeabilities, roughly perpendicular to fold axes, are known from pressure- interference tests in the Phosphoria Formation at Little Sand Draw field. The hypothesis is that tear faults are the cause of the observed directional permeability. To accomplish the objectives, this study constructed 3- dimensional geological and fluid-flow models of the Little Sand Draw field. The spacing of faults in outcrop was used as input for fault compartments in the reservoir simulation model. The hypothesis to be tested in this study is whether reservoir models with or without tear faults provide a good history match. The 3-D geological model was built using EarthVision (Dynamic Graphics) software. The geological model correctly honors the structural geology. Petrophysical properties are distributed in 3-D using five zones in the upper Phosphoria Formation and one zone in the Tensleep Formation. The full-field, 3-D reservoir fluid-flow model was built using the ECLIPSE black

  13. Method and Apparatus for Measuring Fluid Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arndt, G. Dickey (Inventor); Nguyen, Than X. (Inventor); Carl, James R. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    The invention is a method and apparatus for monitoring the presence, concentration, and the movement of fluids. It is based on utilizing electromagnetic measurements of the complex permittivity of the fluids for detecting and monitoring the fluid. More particularly the apparatus uses one or more microwave probes which are placed at the locations where the measurements are to be made. A radio frequency signal is transmitted to the probe and the reflected signal is phase and amplitude detected at a rapid rate for the purpose of identifying the fluids, based on their dielectric constant at the probe. The apparatus can be used for multiple purposes including measures of flow rates, turbulence, dispersion, fluid identification, and changes in flow conditions of multiple fluids or multiple states of a single fluid in a flowline or a holding container. The apparatus includes a probe consisting of two electrical conductors separated by an insulator. A radio frequency signal is communicated to the probe and is reflected back from the portion of the probe exposed to the fluid. The radio frequency signal also provides a reference signal. An oscillator generates a second signal which combined with each of the reference signal and the reflected signal to produce signals of lower frequencies to facilitate filtering and amplifying those signals. The two signals are then mixed in a detector to produce an output signal that is representative of the phase and amplitude change caused by the reflection of the signal at the probe exposed to the fluid. The detector may be a dual phase detector that provides two such output signals that are in phase quadrature. A phase shifter may be provided for selectively changing the phase of the reference signal to improve the sensitivity of at least one of the output signals for more accurate readings and/or for calibration purposes. The two outputs that are in quadrature with respect to each other may be simultaneously monitored to account for

  14. A Grain-Scale Coupled Model of Multiphase Fluid Flow and Sediment Mechanics: Application to Methane Hydrates in Natural Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juanes, R.; Jain, A. K.

    2008-12-01

    We present a discrete element model for the simulation, at the grain scale, of gas migration in brine- saturated deformable media. We account rigorously for the presence of two fluids in the pore space by incorporating grain forces due to pore fluid pressures, and surface tension between fluids. The coupled model permits investigating an essential process that takes place at the base of the hydrate stability zone: the upward migration of methane in its own free gas phase. We elucidate the way in which gas migration may take place: (1) by capillary invasion in a rigid-like medium; and (2) by initiation and propagation of a fracture. We find that the main factor controlling the mode of gas transport in the sediment is the grain size, and show that coarse-grain sediments favor capillary invasion, whereas fracturing dominates in fine-grain media. The results have important implications for understanding hydrates in natural systems. Our results predict that, in fine sediments, hydrate will likely form in veins that follow a fracture-network pattern, and the hydrate concentration in this type of accumulations will likely be quite low. In coarse sediments, the buoyant methane gas is likely to invade the pore space more uniformly, in a process akin to invasion percolation, and the overall pore occupancy is likely to be much higher than for a fracture-dominated regime. These implications are consistent with field observations of methane hydrates in natural systems.

  15. Fluid Flow in An Evaporating Droplet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hu, H.; Larson, R.

    1999-01-01

    Droplet evaporation is a common phenomenon in everyday life. For example, when a droplet of coffee or salt solution is dropped onto a surface and the droplet dries out, a ring of coffee or salt particles is left on the surface. This phenomenon exists not only in everyday life, but also in many practical industrial processes and scientific research and could also be used to assist in DNA sequence analysis, if the flow field in the droplet produced by the evaporation could be understood and predicted in detail. In order to measure the fluid flow in a droplet, small particles can be suspended into the fluid as tracers. From the ratio of gravitational force to Brownian force a(exp 4)(delta rho)(g)/k(sub B)T, we find that particle's tendency to settle is proportional to a(exp 4) (a is particle radius). So, to keep the particles from settling, the droplet size should be chosen to be in a range 0.1 -1.0 microns in experiments. For such small particles, the Brownian force will affect the motion of the particle preventing accurate measurement of the flow field. This problem could be overcome by using larger particles as tracers to measure fluid flow under microgravity since the gravitational acceleration g is then very small. For larger particles, Brownian force would hardly affect the motion of the particles. Therefore, accurate flow field could be determined from experiments in microgravity. In this paper, we will investigate the fluid flow in an evaporating droplet under normal gravity, and compare experiments to theories. Then, we will present our ideas about the experimental measurement of fluid flow in an evaporating droplet under microgravity.

  16. Fluid control in microfluidic devices using a fluid conveyance extension and an absorbent microfluidic flow modulator.

    PubMed

    Yuen, Po Ki

    2013-05-07

    This article presents a simple method for controlling fluid in microfluidic devices without the need for valves or pumps. A fluid conveyance extension is fluidly coupled to the enclosed outlet chamber of a microfluidic device. After a fluid is introduced into the microfluidic device and saturates the fluid conveyance extension, a fluid flow in the microfluidic device is generated by contacting an absorbent microfluidic flow modulator with the fluid conveyance extension to absorb the fluid from the fluid conveyance extension through capillary action. Since the fluid in the microfluidic device is fluidly coupled with the fluid conveyance extension and the fluid conveyance extension is fluidly coupled with the absorbent microfluidic flow modulator, the absorption rate of the absorbent microfluidic flow modulator, which is the rate at which the absorbent microfluidic flow modulator absorbs fluid, matches the fluid flow rate in the microfluidic device. Thus, the fluid flow rate in the microfluidic device is set by the absorption rate of the absorbent microfluidic flow modulator. Sheath flow and fluid switching applications are demonstrated using this simple fluid control method without the need for valves or pumps. Also, the ability to control the fluid flow rate in the microfluidic device is demonstrated using absorbent microfluidic flow modulators with various absorbent characteristics and dimensions.

  17. Messinian Salinity Crisis and basin fluid flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertoni, Claudia; Cartwight, Joe

    2014-05-01

    Syn- and post-depositional movement of fluids through sediments is one of the least understood aspects in the evolution of a basin. The conventional hydrostratigraphic view on marine sedimentary basins assumes that compactional and meteoric groundwater fluid circulation drives fluid movement and defines its timing. However, in the past few years, several examples of instantaneous and catastrophic release of fluids have been observed even through low-permeability sediments. A particularly complex case-study involves the presence of giant salt bodies in the depocentres of marine basins. Evaporites dramatically change the hydrostratigraphy and fluid-dynamics of the basin, and influence the P/T regimes, e.g. through changes in the geothermal gradient and in the compaction of underlying sediments. Our paper reviews the impact of the Messinian Salinity Crisis (MSC) and evaporites on fluid flow in the Mediterranean sub-basins. The analysis of geological and geophysical sub-surface data provides examples from this basin, and the comparison with analogues in other well-known evaporitic provinces. During the MSC, massive sea-level changes occurred in a relatively limited time interval, and affected the balance of fluid dynamics, e.g. with sudden release or unusual trapping of fluids. Fluid expulsion events are here analysed and classified in relation to the long and short-term effects of the MSC. Our main aim is to build a framework for the correct identification of the fluid flow-related events, and their genetic mechanisms. On basin margins, where evaporites are thin or absent, the sea-level changes associated with the MSC force a rapid basinward shift of the mixing zone of meteoric/gravity flow and saline/compactional flow, 100s-km away from its pre-MSC position. This phenomenon changes the geometry of converging flows, creates hydraulic traps for fluids, and triggers specific diagenetic reactions in pre-MSC deep marine sediments. In basin-centre settings, unloading and

  18. Method and apparatus for controlling fluid flow

    DOEpatents

    Miller, J.R.

    1980-06-27

    A method and apparatus for precisely controlling the rate (and hence amount) of fluid flow are given. The controlled flow rate is finely adjustable, can be extremely small (on the order of microliter-atmospheres per second), can be adjusted to zero (flow stopped), and is stable to better than 1% with time. The dead volume of the valve can be made arbitrarily small, in fact essentially zero. The valve employs no wearing mechanical parts (including springs, stems, or seals). The valve is finely adjustable, has a flow rate dynamic range of many decades, can be made compatible with any fluid, and is suitable for incorporation into an open or closed loop servo-control system.

  19. Firedrake-Fluids v0.1: numerical modelling of shallow water flows using a performance-portable automated solution framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobs, C. T.; Piggott, M. D.

    2014-08-01

    This model description paper introduces a new finite element model for the simulation of non-linear shallow water flows, called Firedrake-Fluids. Unlike traditional models that are written by hand in static, low-level programming languages such as Fortran or C, Firedrake-Fluids uses the Firedrake framework to automatically generate the model's code from a high-level abstract language called UFL. By coupling to the PyOP2 parallel unstructured mesh framework, Firedrake can then target the code in a performance-portable manner towards a desired hardware architecture to enable the efficient parallel execution of the model over an arbitrary computational mesh. The description of the model includes the governing equations, the methods employed to discretise and solve the governing equations, and an outline of the automated solution process. The verification and validation of the model, performed using a set of well-defined test cases, is also presented along with a roadmap for future developments and the solution of more complex fluid dynamical systems.

  20. Advanced designs for fluid flow visualization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    Research was carried out on existing and new designs for minimally intrusive measurement of flow fields in the Geophysical Fluid Flow Cell and the proposed Atmospheric General Circulation Experiment. The following topics are discussed: (1) identification and removal of foreign particles, (2) search for higher dielectric photochromic solutions, (3) selection of uv light source, (4) analysis of refractive techniques and (5) examination of fresnel lens applicability.

  1. Fluid migration in the subduction zone: a coupled fluid flow approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hongliang; Huismans, Ritske; Rondenay, Stéphane

    2016-04-01

    Subduction zone are the main entry point of water into earth's mantle and play an important role in the global water cycle. The progressive release of water by metamorphic dehydration induce important physical-chemical process in the subduction zone, such as hydrous melting, hydration and weakening of the mantle wedge, creation of pore fluid pressures that may weaken the subduction interface and induce earthquakes. Most previous studies on the role of fluids in subduction zones assume vertical migration or migration according to the dynamic pressure in the solid matrix without considering the pore fluid pressure effect on the deformation of the solid matrix. Here we investigate this interaction by explicitly modeling two-phase coupled poro-plastic flow during subduction. In this approach, the fluid migrates by compaction and decompaction of the solid matrix and affects the subduction dynamics through pore fluid pressure dependent frictional-plastic yield. Our preliminary results indicate that: 1) the rate of fluid migration depends strongly on the permeability and the bulk viscosity of the solid matrix, 2) fluid transfer occurs preferentially along the slab and then propagates into the mantle wedge by viscous compaction driven fluid flow, 3) fluid transport from the surface to depth is a prerequisite for producing high fluid pore pressures and associated hydration induced weakening of the subduction zone interface.

  2. Phase-Field and Korteweg-Type Models for the Time-Dependent Flow of Compressible Two-Phase Fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freistühler, Heinrich; Kotschote, Matthias

    2017-04-01

    Various versions of the Navier-Stokes-Allen-Cahn (NSAC), the Navier-Stokes-Cahn-Hilliard (NSCH), and the Navier-Stokes-Korteweg (NSK) equations have been used in the literature to model the dynamics of two-phase fluids. One main purpose of this paper consists in (re-)deriving NSAC, NSCH and NSK from first principles, in the spirit of rational mechanics, for fluids of very general constitutive laws. For NSAC, this deduction confirms and extends a proposal of Blesgen. Regarding NSCH, it continues work of Lowengrub and Truskinovsky and provides the apparently first justified formulation in the non-isothermal case. For NSK, it yields a most natural correction to the formulation by Dunn and Serrin. The paper uniformly recovers as examples various classes of fluids, distinguished according to whether none, one, or both of the phases are compressible, and according to the nature of their co-existence. The latter is captured not only by the mixing energy, but also by a `mixing rule'—a constitutive law that characterizes the type of the mixing. A second main purpose of the paper is to communicate the apparently new observation that in the case of two immiscible incompressible phases of different temperature-independent specific volumes, NSAC reduces literally to NSK. This finding may be considered as an independent justification of NSK. An analogous fact is shown for NSCH, which under the same assumption reduces to a new non-local version of NSK.

  3. Fluid Dynamic Modeling to Support the Development of Flow-Based Hepatocyte Culture Systems for Metabolism Studies.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Jenny M; Shim, Yoo-Sik; Hans, Vaibhav; Phillips, Martin B; Macdonald, Jeffrey M; Walker, Glenn; Andersen, Melvin E; Clewell, Harvey J; Yoon, Miyoung

    2016-01-01

    Accurate prediction of metabolism is a significant outstanding challenge in toxicology. The best predictions are based on experimental data from in vitro systems using primary hepatocytes. The predictivity of the primary hepatocyte-based culture systems, however, is still limited due to well-known phenotypic instability and rapid decline of metabolic competence within a few hours. Dynamic flow bioreactors for three-dimensional cell cultures are thought to be better at recapitulating tissue microenvironments and show potential to improve in vivo extrapolations of chemical or drug toxicity based on in vitro test results. These more physiologically relevant culture systems hold potential for extending metabolic competence of primary hepatocyte cultures as well. In this investigation, we used computational fluid dynamics to determine the optimal design of a flow-based hepatocyte culture system for evaluating chemical metabolism in vitro. The main design goals were (1) minimization of shear stress experienced by the cells to maximize viability, (2) rapid establishment of a uniform distribution of test compound in the chamber, and (3) delivery of sufficient oxygen to cells to support aerobic respiration. Two commercially available flow devices - RealBio(®) and QuasiVivo(®) (QV) - and a custom developed fluidized bed bioreactor were simulated, and turbulence, flow characteristics, test compound distribution, oxygen distribution, and cellular oxygen consumption were analyzed. Experimental results from the bioreactors were used to validate the simulation results. Our results indicate that maintaining adequate oxygen supply is the most important factor to the long-term viability of liver bioreactor cultures. Cell density and system flow patterns were the major determinants of local oxygen concentrations. The experimental results closely corresponded to the in silico predictions. Of the three bioreactors examined in this study, we were able to optimize the experimental

  4. Fluid Dynamic Modeling to Support the Development of Flow-Based Hepatocyte Culture Systems for Metabolism Studies

    PubMed Central

    Pedersen, Jenny M.; Shim, Yoo-Sik; Hans, Vaibhav; Phillips, Martin B.; Macdonald, Jeffrey M.; Walker, Glenn; Andersen, Melvin E.; Clewell, Harvey J.; Yoon, Miyoung

    2016-01-01

    Accurate prediction of metabolism is a significant outstanding challenge in toxicology. The best predictions are based on experimental data from in vitro systems using primary hepatocytes. The predictivity of the primary hepatocyte-based culture systems, however, is still limited due to well-known phenotypic instability and rapid decline of metabolic competence within a few hours. Dynamic flow bioreactors for three-dimensional cell cultures are thought to be better at recapitulating tissue microenvironments and show potential to improve in vivo extrapolations of chemical or drug toxicity based on in vitro test results. These more physiologically relevant culture systems hold potential for extending metabolic competence of primary hepatocyte cultures as well. In this investigation, we used computational fluid dynamics to determine the optimal design of a flow-based hepatocyte culture system for evaluating chemical metabolism in vitro. The main design goals were (1) minimization of shear stress experienced by the cells to maximize viability, (2) rapid establishment of a uniform distribution of test compound in the chamber, and (3) delivery of sufficient oxygen to cells to support aerobic respiration. Two commercially available flow devices – RealBio® and QuasiVivo® (QV) – and a custom developed fluidized bed bioreactor were simulated, and turbulence, flow characteristics, test compound distribution, oxygen distribution, and cellular oxygen consumption were analyzed. Experimental results from the bioreactors were used to validate the simulation results. Our results indicate that maintaining adequate oxygen supply is the most important factor to the long-term viability of liver bioreactor cultures. Cell density and system flow patterns were the major determinants of local oxygen concentrations. The experimental results closely corresponded to the in silico predictions. Of the three bioreactors examined in this study, we were able to optimize the experimental

  5. An Iterative CT Reconstruction Algorithm for Fast Fluid Flow Imaging.

    PubMed

    Van Eyndhoven, Geert; Batenburg, K Joost; Kazantsev, Daniil; Van Nieuwenhove, Vincent; Lee, Peter D; Dobson, Katherine J; Sijbers, Jan

    2015-11-01

    The study of fluid flow through solid matter by computed tomography (CT) imaging has many applications, ranging from petroleum and aquifer engineering to biomedical, manufacturing, and environmental research. To avoid motion artifacts, current experiments are often limited to slow fluid flow dynamics. This severely limits the applicability of the technique. In this paper, a new iterative CT reconstruction algorithm for improved a temporal/spatial resolution in the imaging of fluid flow through solid matter is introduced. The proposed algorithm exploits prior knowledge in two ways. First, the time-varying object is assumed to consist of stationary (the solid matter) and dynamic regions (the fluid flow). Second, the attenuation curve of a particular voxel in the dynamic region is modeled by a piecewise constant function over time, which is in accordance with the actual advancing fluid/air boundary. Quantitative and qualitative results on different simulation experiments and a real neutron tomography data set show that, in comparison with the state-of-the-art algorithms, the proposed algorithm allows reconstruction from substantially fewer projections per rotation without image quality loss. Therefore, the temporal resolution can be substantially increased, and thus fluid flow experiments with faster dynamics can be performed.

  6. A Causal, Covariant Theory of Dissipative Fluid Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scofield, Dillon; Huq, Pablo

    2015-04-01

    The use of newtonian viscous dissipation theory in covariant fluid flow theories is known to lead to predictions that are inconsistent with the second law of thermodynamics and to predictions that are acausal. For instance, these problems effectively limit the covariant form of the Navier-Stokes theory (NST) to time-independent flow regimes. Thus the NST, the work horse of fluid dynamical theory, is limited in its ability to model time-dependent turbulent, stellar or thermonuclear flows. We show how such problems are avoided by a new geometrodynamical theory of fluids. This theory is based on a recent result of geometrodynamics showing current conservation implies gauge field creation, called the vortex field lemma and classification of flows by their Pfaff dimension. Experimental confirmation of the theory is reviewed.

  7. The Geophysical Fluid Flow Cell Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hart, J. E.; Ohlsen, D.; Kittleman, S.; Borhani, N.; Leslie, F.; Miller, T.

    1999-01-01

    The Geophysical Fluid Flow Cell (GFFC) experiment performed visualizations of thermal convection in a rotating differentially heated spherical shell of fluid. In these experiments dielectric polarization forces are used to generate a radially directed buoyancy force. This enables the laboratory simulation of a number of geophysically and astrophysically important situations in which sphericity and rotation both impose strong constraints on global scale fluid motions. During USML-2 a large set of experiments with spherically symmetric heating were carried out. These enabled the determination of critical points for the transition to various forms of nonaxisymmetric convection and, for highly turbulent flows, the transition latitudes separating the different modes of motion. This paper presents a first analysis of these experiments as well as data on the general performance of the instrument during the USML-2 flight.

  8. 14 CFR 23.1095 - Carburetor deicing fluid flow rate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Carburetor deicing fluid flow rate. 23.1095... Induction System § 23.1095 Carburetor deicing fluid flow rate. (a) If a carburetor deicing fluid system is used, it must be able to simultaneously supply each engine with a rate of fluid flow, expressed...

  9. Understanding heat and fluid flow in linear GTA welds

    SciTech Connect

    Zacharia, T.; David, S.A.; Vitek, J.M.

    1992-12-31

    A transient heat flow and fluid flow model was used to predict the development of gas tungsten arc (GTA) weld pools in 1.5 mm thick AISI 304 SS. The welding parameters were chosen so as to correspond to an earlier experimental study which produced high-resolution surface temperature maps. The motivation of the present study was to verify the predictive capability of the computational model. Comparison of the numerical predictions and experimental observations indicate good agreement.

  10. Understanding heat and fluid flow in linear GTA welds

    SciTech Connect

    Zacharia, T.; David, S.A.; Vitek, J.M.

    1992-01-01

    A transient heat flow and fluid flow model was used to predict the development of gas tungsten arc (GTA) weld pools in 1.5 mm thick AISI 304 SS. The welding parameters were chosen so as to correspond to an earlier experimental study which produced high-resolution surface temperature maps. The motivation of the present study was to verify the predictive capability of the computational model. Comparison of the numerical predictions and experimental observations indicate good agreement.

  11. Onset of slugging criterion based on characteristics and stability analyses of transient one-dimensional two-phase flow equations of two-fluid model

    SciTech Connect

    Chun, M.H.; Sung, C.K.

    1996-07-01

    A two-step approach has been used to obtain a new criterion for the onset of slug formation: (1) In the first step, a more general expression than the existing models for the onset of slug flow criterion has been derived from the analysis of singular points and neutral stability conditions of the transient one-dimensional two-phase flow equations of two-fluid model. (2) In the second step, introducing simplifications and incorporating a parameter into the general expression obtained in the first step to satisfy a number of physical conditions a priori specified, a new simple criterion for the onset of slug flow has been derived. Comparisons of the present model with existing models and experimental data show that the present model agrees very closely with Taitel and Dukler`s model and experimental data in horizontal pipes. In an inclined pipe ({theta} = 50{degree}), however, the difference between the predictions of the present model and those of existing models is appreciably large and the present model gives the best agreement with Ohnuki et al.`s data.

  12. Fluid flow in nanopores: Accurate boundary conditions for carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokhan, Vladimir P.; Nicholson, David; Quirke, Nicholas

    2002-11-01

    Steady-state Poiseuille flow of a simple fluid in carbon nanopores under a gravitylike force is simulated using a realistic empirical many-body potential model for carbon. Building on our previous study of slit carbon nanopores we show that fluid flow in a nanotube is also characterized by a large slip length. By analyzing temporal profiles of the velocity components of particles colliding with the wall we obtain values of the Maxwell coefficient defining the fraction of molecules thermalized by the wall and, for the first time, propose slip boundary conditions for smooth continuum surfaces such that they are equivalent in adsorption, diffusion, and fluid flow properties to fully dynamic atomistic models.

  13. Enhanced fluid flow through nanoscale carbon pipes.

    PubMed

    Whitby, Max; Cagnon, Laurent; Thanou, Maya; Quirke, Nick

    2008-09-01

    Recent experimental and theoretical studies demonstrate that pressure driven flow of fluids through nanoscale ( d < 10 nm) carbon pores occurs 4 to 5 orders of magnitude faster than predicted by extrapolation from conventional theory. Here, we report experimental results for flow of water, ethanol, and decane through carbon nanopipes with larger inner diameters (43 +/- 3 nm) than previously investigated. We find enhanced transport up to 45 times theoretical predictions. In contrast to previous work, in our systems, decane flows faster than water. These nanopipes were composed of amorphous carbon deposited from ethylene vapor in alumina templates using a single step fabrication process.

  14. Fluid-solid modeling of lymphatic valves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caulk, Alexander; Ballard, Matthew; Nepiyushchikh, Zhanna; Dixon, Brandon; Alexeev, Alexander

    2015-11-01

    The lymphatic system performs important physiological functions such as the return of interstitial fluid to the bloodstream to maintain tissue fluid balance, as well as the transport of immune cells in the body. It utilizes contractile lymphatic vessels, which contain valves that open and close to allow flow in only one direction, to directionally pump lymph against a pressure gradient. We develop a fluid-solid model of geometrically representative lymphatic valves. Our model uses a hybrid lattice-Boltzmann lattice spring method to capture fluid-solid interactions with two-way coupling between a viscous fluid and lymphatic valves in a lymphatic vessel. We use this model to investigate the opening and closing of lymphatic valves, and its effect on lymphatic pumping. This helps to broaden our understanding of the fluid dynamics of the lymphatic system.

  15. A mountain-scale thermal-hydrologic model for simulating fluid flow and heat transfer in unsaturated fractured rock.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yu-Shu; Mukhopadhyay, Sumit; Zhang, Keni; Bodvarsson, G S

    2006-06-30

    A multidimensional, mountain-scale, thermal-hydrologic (TH) numerical model is presented for investigating unsaturated flow behavior in response to decay heat from the proposed radioactive waste repository in the Yucca Mountain unsaturated zone (UZ), The model, consisting of both two-dimensional (2-D) and three-dimensional (3-D) representations of the UZ repository system, is based on the current repository design, drift layout, thermal loading scenario, and estimated current and future climate conditions. This mountain-scale TH model evaluates the coupled TH processes related to mountain-scale UZ flow. It also simulates the impact of radioactive waste heat release on the natural hydrogeological system, including heat-driven processes occurring near and far away from the emplacement tunnels or drifts. The model simulates predict thermally perturbed liquid saturation, gas- and liquid-phase fluxes, and water and rock temperature elevations, as well as the changes in water flux driven by evaporation/condensation processes and drainage between drifts. These simulations provide insights into mountain-scale thermally perturbed flow fields under thermal loading conditions.

  16. Dense brushes of stiff polymers or filaments in fluid flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Römer, F.; Fedosov, D. A.

    2015-03-01

    Dense filamentous brush-like structures are present in many biological interfacial systems (e.g., glycocalyx layer in blood vessels) to control their surface properties. Such structures can regulate the softness of a surface and modify fluid flow. In this letter, we propose a theoretical model which predicts quantitatively flow-induced deformation of a dense brush of stiff polymers or filaments, whose persistence length is larger or comparable to their contour length. The model is validated by detailed mesoscopic simulations and characterizes different contributions to brush deformation including hydrodynamic friction due to flow and steric excluded-volume interactions between grafted filaments. This theoretical model can be used to describe the effect of a stiff-polymer brush on fluid flow and to aid in the quantification of experiments.

  17. Parametric Modeling for Fluid Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pizarro, Yaritzmar Rosario; Martinez, Jonathan

    2013-01-01

    Fluid Systems involves different projects that require parametric modeling, which is a model that maintains consistent relationships between elements as is manipulated. One of these projects is the Neo Liquid Propellant Testbed, which is part of Rocket U. As part of Rocket U (Rocket University), engineers at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida have the opportunity to develop critical flight skills as they design, build and launch high-powered rockets. To build the Neo testbed; hardware from the Space Shuttle Program was repurposed. Modeling for Neo, included: fittings, valves, frames and tubing, between others. These models help in the review process, to make sure regulations are being followed. Another fluid systems project that required modeling is Plant Habitat's TCUI test project. Plant Habitat is a plan to develop a large growth chamber to learn the effects of long-duration microgravity exposure to plants in space. Work for this project included the design and modeling of a duct vent for flow test. Parametric Modeling for these projects was done using Creo Parametric 2.0.

  18. Ultrasonic fluid flow measurement method and apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Kronberg, James W.

    1993-01-01

    An apparatus for measuring the flow of a fluid in a pipe using ultrasonic waves. The apparatus comprises an ultrasonic generator, a lens for focusing the sound energy produced by the generator, and means for directing the focused energy into the side of the pipe through an opening and in a direction close to parallel to the long axis of the pipe. A cone carries the sound energy to the lens from the generator. Depending on the choice of materials, there may be a quarter-wave, acoustic impedance matching section between the generator and the cone to reduce the reflections of energy at the cone boundary. The lens material has an acoustic impedance similar to that of the cone material but a different sonic velocity so that the lens can converge the sound waves in the fluid. A transition section between the lens and the fluid helps to couple the energy to the fluid and assures it is directed as close to parallel to the fluid flow direction as possible.

  19. Ultrasonic fluid flow measurement method and apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Kronberg, J.W.

    1993-10-12

    An apparatus for measuring the flow of a fluid in a pipe using ultrasonic waves. The apparatus comprises an ultrasonic generator, a lens for focusing the sound energy produced by the generator, and means for directing the focused energy into the side of the pipe through an opening and in a direction close to parallel to the long axis of the pipe. A cone carries the sound energy to the lens from the generator. Depending on the choice of materials, there may be a quarter-wave, acoustic impedance matching section between the generator and the cone to reduce the reflections of energy at the cone boundary. The lens material has an acoustic impedance similar to that of the cone material but a different sonic velocity so that the lens can converge the sound waves in the fluid. A transition section between the lens and the fluid helps to couple the energy to the fluid and assures it is directed as close to parallel to the fluid flow direction as possible. 3 figures.

  20. 2D fluid model analysis for the effect of 3D gas flow on a capacitively coupled plasma deposition reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Ho Jun; Lee, Hae June

    2016-06-01

    The wide applicability of capacitively coupled plasma (CCP) deposition has increased the interest in developing comprehensive numerical models, but CCP imposes a tremendous computational cost when conducting a transient analysis in a three-dimensional (3D) model which reflects the real geometry of reactors. In particular, the detailed flow features of reactive gases induced by 3D geometric effects need to be considered for the precise calculation of radical distribution of reactive species. Thus, an alternative inclusive method for the numerical simulation of CCP deposition is proposed to simulate a two-dimensional (2D) CCP model based on the 3D gas flow results by simulating flow, temperature, and species fields in a 3D space at first without calculating the plasma chemistry. A numerical study of a cylindrical showerhead-electrode CCP reactor was conducted for particular cases of SiH4/NH3/N2/He gas mixture to deposit a hydrogenated silicon nitride (SiN x H y ) film. The proposed methodology produces numerical results for a 300 mm wafer deposition reactor which agree very well with the deposition rate profile measured experimentally along the wafer radius.

  1. Slip mechanisms in complex fluid flows.

    PubMed

    Hatzikiriakos, Savvas G

    2015-10-28

    The classical no-slip boundary condition of fluid mechanics is not always a valid assumption for the flow of several classes of complex fluids including polymer melts, their blends, polymer solutions, microgels, glasses, suspensions and pastes. In fact, it appears that slip effect in these systems is the rule and not the exemption. The occurrence of slip complicates the analysis of rheological data, although it provides new opportunities to understand their behavior in restricted environments delineating additional molecular mechanisms i.e. entropic restrictions due to limitations in the number of molecular conformations. This article discusses these complexities and provides future research opportunities.

  2. Molecular dynamics of fluid flows in the Knudsen regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cieplak, Marek

    2000-03-01

    Novel technological applications often involve fluid flows in the Knudsen regime in which the mean free path is comparable to the system size. The boundary conditions at the wall-fluid interface are studied. The wall is modelled by atoms tethered to a lattice that interact by Lennard-Jones forces with the fluid atoms. Monoatomic and polymeric Lennard-Jones fluids are considered and Couette and gravity-driven flows are studied. The scenarios of behavior envisioned by J. C. Maxwell are found not to be valid in general. For instance, there are novel effects related to a non-zero residence time of the fluid molecules in the wall vicinity. In the limiting case of strongly attractive fluid-wall interactions, the velocity distribution of the outcoming atoms is indeed thermal. However, when the attractive tail in the fluid-wall interactions is weak, there are significant deviations from Maxwell's hypothesis. Striking many body effects are found as one interpolates between the dilute gas and the dense fluid regime. The molecular nature of the viscous and thermal slip phenomena are elucidated.

  3. Fluid dynamics of rivulet flow between plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drenckhan, W.; Ritacco, H.; Saint-Jalmes, A.; Saugey, A.; McGuinness, P.; van der Net, A.; Langevin, D.; Weaire, D.

    2007-10-01

    We present computational and experimental investigations into the fluid dynamics of a narrow stream of surfactant solutions, which descends under gravity between two narrowly spaced, vertical glass plates. Such a "rivulet" is bounded by two liquid/solid and two mobile liquid/gas interfaces, posing fluid dynamic problems of direct relevance to local fluid flow in liquid foams and recently reported meandering phenomena. The rivulet presents a system in which the coupling between the bulk flow and the rheological properties of the gas/liquid interface can be systematically investigated. In particular, it carries the promise of providing an alternative measuring technique for interfacial shear viscosities. We present finite element simulations in conjunction with experiments in order to describe the relationship between the rivulet geometry, the flow field, and the interfacial shear viscosities. We also report on the role of the boundary condition between the liquid-carrying channels (surface Plateau borders) and the thin soap film, which spans the two plates at low flow rates.

  4. Viscosity stratified fluids in turbulent channel flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soldati, Alfredo; Ahmadi, Somayeh; Roccon, Alessio; Zonta, Francesco

    2016-11-01

    Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) is used to study the turbulent Poiseuille flow of two immiscible liquid layers inside a rectangular channel. A thin liquid layer (fluid 1) flows on top of a thick liquid layer (fluid 2), such that their thickness ratio is h1 /h2 = 1 / 9 . The two liquid layers have the same density but different viscosities (viscosity-stratified fluids). In particular, we consider three different values of the viscosity ratio λ =ν1 /ν2 : λ = 1 , λ = 0 . 875 and λ = 0 . 75 . Numerical Simulations are based on a Phase Field method to describe the interaction between the two liquid layers. Compared with the case of a single phase flow, the presence of a liquid-liquid interface produces a remarkable turbulence modulation inside the channel, since a significant proportion of the kinetic energy is subtracted from the mean flow and converted into work to deform the interface. This induces a strong turbulence reduction in the proximity of the interface and causes a substantial increase of the volume-flowrate. These effects become more pronounced with decreasing λ.

  5. Depth resolved granular transport driven by shearing fluid flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Benjamin; Kudrolli, Arshad

    2017-02-01

    We investigate granular transport by a fluid flow under steady-state driving conditions, from the bed-load regime to the suspension regime, with an experimental system based on a conical rheometer. The mean granular volume fraction ϕg, the mean granular velocity ug, and the fluid velocity uf are obtained as a function of depth inside the bed using refractive index matching and particle-tracking techniques. A torque sensor is utilized to measure the applied shear stress to complement estimates obtained from measured strain rates high above the bed where ϕg≈0 . The flow is found to be transitional at the onset of transport and the shear stress required to transport grains rises sharply as grains are increasingly entrained by the fluid flow. A significant slip velocity between the fluid and the granular phases is observed at the bed surface before the onset of transport as well as in the bed-load transport regime. We show that ug decays exponentially deep into the bed for ϕg>0.45 with a decay constant which is described by a nonlocal rheology model of granular flow that neglects fluid stress. Further, we show that uf and ug can be described using the applied shear stress and the Krieger-Dougherty model for the effective viscosity in the suspension regime, where 0 <ϕg<0.45 and where ug≈uf .

  6. A locally implicit method for fluid flow problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, K. C.

    1986-01-01

    The fluid flow inside the space shuttle main engine (SSME) traverses through a complex geometrical configuration. The flow is compressible, viscous, and turbulent with pockets of separated regions. Several computer codes are being developed to solve three dimensional Navier-Stokes equations with different turbulence models for analyzing the SSME internal flow. The locally implicit scheme is a computationally efficient scheme which converges rapidly in multi-grid modes for elliptic problems. It has the promise of providing a rapidly converging algorithm for steady-state viscous flow problems.

  7. Thermal radiation effects in squeezing flow of a Jeffery fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayat, T.; Qayyum, A.; Alsaadi, F.; Awais, M.; Dobaie, Abdullah M.

    2013-08-01

    The aim of this work is to analyze the thermal radiation effects in a time-dependent axisymmetric flow of a Jeffery fluid. The flow in a fluid is induced by the unsteady squeezing of two parallel disks. The related partial differential equations for the modeled problem are simplified and transformed into coupled ordinary differential equations by using appropriate transformations. The differential system is solved for the convergent series solution. Effects of the various physical parameters have been analyzed for suction and injection cases.

  8. Fluid flow sensing with ionic polymer-metal composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stalbaum, Tyler; Trabia, Sarah; Shen, Qi; Kim, Kwang J.

    2016-04-01

    Ionic polymer-metal composite (IPMC) actuators and sensors have been developed and modeled over the last two decades for use as soft-robotic deformable actuators and sensors. IPMC devices have been suggested for application as underwater actuators, energy harvesting devices, and medical devices such as in guided catheter insertion. Another interesting application of IPMCs in flow sensing is presented in this study. IPMC interaction with fluid flow is of interest to investigate the use of IPMC actuators as flow control devices and IPMC sensors as flow sensing devices. An organized array of IPMCs acting as interchanging sensors and actuators could potentially be designed for both flow measurement and control, providing an unparalleled tool in maritime operations. The underlying physics for this system include the IPMC ion transport and charge fundamental framework along with fluid dynamics to describe the flow around IPMCs. An experimental setup for an individual rectangular IPMC sensor with an externally controlled fluid flow has been developed to investigate this phenomenon and provide further insight into the design and application of this type of device. The results from this portion of the study include recommendations for IPMC device designs in flow control.

  9. Seismogenic Permeability and Fluid Flow in Crustal Rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talwani, P.

    2005-12-01

    Pore fluids play both a chemical and a mechanical role in the onset of seismicity. The mechanical role is usually associated with time dependent increases in pore pressures. A study of the temporal and spatial pattern of reservoir and fluid injection induced seismicity, and aftershock patterns of large earthquakes suggest that these pore pressure increases occur by diffusion to hypocentral regions through suitably located fractures. The efficiency of this diffusion depends on the hydraulic diffusivity of the fractures, which in turn is related to their intrinsic permeability, k. I have estimated the permeability from the temporal and spatial pattern of these earthquakes. For 82/84 cases this fracture permeability was found to lie between 0.5x10-15 m2 and 50x10-15 m2 (0.5 to 50 mDarcy), a range that I have labeled seismogenic permeability, ks. Theoretical modeling shows that when the fracture permeability, kfluid flow are negligible. When k>ks, there is fluid flow and no seismicity. Thus locations of fluid induced seismicity are associated with elevated fluid pressures and seismogenic permeabilities. Fractures associated with aseismic fluid flow are associated with permeabilities that exceed ks. Support of this concept of ks was obtained from observations from borehole-injection-induced seismicity. Injection experiments at Nojima fault zone, the location of the 1995 M7.2, Kobe earthquake, showed that the permeability of the Nojima fault zone (NFZ) had been enhanced by that earthquake (k approximately equal to 0.1 to 0.5 Darcy), such that k>ks. Injection of fluids in NFZ resulted in fluid flow but no earthquakes. Earthquakes occurred in the adjoining volume where the permeability was approximately ks. At Le Mayet de Montagne experimental site, Soultz, and Hijori hot dry rock sites, seismicity resulted in regions of high pore pressure increases (k approximately equal to ks) but not in regions of fluid flow (k>ks). These results

  10. The origin of massive hydrothermal alterations: what drives fluid flow?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez-Rivas, Enrique; Bons, Paul D.; Martín-Martín, Juan-Diego; Corbella, Mercè; Stafford, Sherry L.; Griera, Albert; Teixell, Antonio; Salas, Ramón; Travé, Anna

    2014-05-01

    Hydrothermal alterations form when fluids warmer than the host rocks flow through them dissolving and precipitating minerals. These fluids typically flow upwards from deeper geologic units using faults as major conduits. In some cases, hydrothermal alterations affect large (km-scale) rock volumes. One example of such process is the massive high-temperature dolostones that crop out at the Benicàssim outcrop analogue (Maestrat Basin, E Spain). In this area, seismic-scale fault-controlled stratabound dolostone bodies extend over several kilometres away from large-scale faults, replacing Lower Cretaceous limestones. The fluid responsible for such alteration is a seawater-derived brine that interacted with underlying Permian-Triassic and Paleozoic basement rocks. The estimated volume of fluid required to produce the Benicàssim dolomitization is huge, with fluid-rock ratios in the order of several tens to a few hundreds, depending on composition and reaction temperature (Gomez-Rivas et al., 2014). An open key question is what brought this warm fluid (80 - 150 ºC) upwards to a depth of less than 1 km, where the dolomitization reaction took place. The driving forces should have been able not only to provide sufficient fluid volumes at shallow depths but also to heat up the whole host rock, including the non-replaced limestones. There are two hyphoteses for driving a warm fluid upwards in the Maestrat Basin: (a) rapid release through faults of overpressured solutions in recurrent pulses and (b) thermal convection. We present a series of heat and fluid flow numerical simulations to constrain the dolomitization conditions under these two end-member cases. The results indicate that in a pulsating model the fluid must flow upwards at velocities higher than cm/s to keep their elevated temperature. Otherwise they cool down quickly, and the host rocks cannot be heated. Such velocities can be reached if the fluid flow velocity equals that of fracture propagation, as in mobile

  11. A hierarchy of two-fluid models with specific numerical methods for the simulation of bubbly flows/acoustic interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drui, Florence; Larat, Adam; Le Chenadec, Vincent; Kokh, Samuel; Massot, Marc

    2014-11-01

    Simulating the injection, evaporation, and combustion of fuel in energy conversion applications represents a major challenge. The formulation of closed sets of equations able to accurately predict these complex systems by relying solely on averaged information has been a longstanding problem. As a consequence, no simple model is currently available that describes the complete injection process, known to range from the separated phase regime in the early stages of atomization to the dispersed regime that occurs further downstream. The benefits of such a unified formulation would be significant, both in terms of computational cost and algorithmic complexity. In order to identify the challenges in formulating one such approach, a one-pressure, one-velocity isothermal two-fluid model for bubble-acoustic wave interaction is studied and incrementally improved by introducing additional variables that characterize the micro-structure of bubbles. The elastic and dissipative structures of the models are investigated in depth, and their performances compared to reference solutions (Drew & Passman, 1999). Numerical strategies are devised which can accurately handle the whole hierarchy and related stiffness, and rely on Suliciu's relaxation method as well as an asymptotic-preserving treatmen

  12. Fault-Related CO2 Degassing, Geothermics, and Fluid Flow in Southern California Basins--Physiochemical Evidence and Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Garven, Grant

    2015-08-11

    Our studies have had an important impact on societal issues. Experimental and field observations show that CO2 degassing, such as might occur from stored CO2 reservoir gas, can result in significant stable isotopic disequilibrium. In the offshore South Ellwood field of the Santa Barbara channel, we show how oil production has reduced natural seep rates in the area, thereby reducing greenhouse gases. Permeability is calculated to be ~20-30 millidarcys for km-scale fault-focused fluid flow, using changes in natural gas seepage rates from well production, and poroelastic changes in formation pore-water pressure. In the Los Angeles (LA) basin, our characterization of formation water chemistry, including stable isotopic studies, allows the distinction between deep and shallow formations waters. Our multiphase computational-based modeling of petroleum migration demonstrates the important role of major faults on geological-scale fluid migration in the LA basin, and show how petroleum was dammed up against the Newport-Inglewood fault zone in a “geologically fast” interval of time (less than 0.5 million years). Furthermore, these fluid studies also will allow evaluation of potential cross-formational mixing of formation fluids. Lastly, our new study of helium isotopes in the LA basin shows a significant leakage of mantle helium along the Newport Inglewood fault zone (NIFZ), at flow rates up to 2 cm/yr. Crustal-scale fault permeability (~60 microdarcys) and advective versus conductive heat transport rates have been estimated using the observed helium isotopic data. The NIFZ is an important deep-seated fault that may crosscut a proposed basin decollement fault in this heavily populated area, and appears to allow seepage of helium from the mantle sources about 30 km beneath Los Angeles. The helium study has been widely cited in recent weeks by the news media, both in radio and on numerous web sites.

  13. Fault-related CO2 degassing, geothermics, and fluid flow in southern California basins---Physiochemical evidence and modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Boles, James R.; Garven, Grant

    2015-08-04

    Our studies have had an important impact on societal issues. Experimental and field observations show that CO2 degassing, such as might occur from stored CO2 reservoir gas, can result in significant stable isotopic disequilibrium. In the offshore South Ellwood field of the Santa Barbara channel, we show how oil production has reduced natural seep rates in the area, thereby reducing greenhouse gases. Permeability is calculated to be ~20-30 millidarcys for km-scale fault-focused fluid flow, using changes in natural gas seepage rates from well production, and poroelastic changes in formation pore-water pressure. In the Los Angeles (LA) basin, our characterization of formation water chemistry, including stable isotopic studies, allows the distinction between deep and shallow formations waters. Our multiphase computational-based modeling of petroleum migration demonstrates the important role of major faults on geological-scale fluid migration in the LA basin, and show how petroleum was dammed up against the Newport-Inglewood fault zone in a “geologically fast” interval of time (less than 0.5 million years). Furthermore, these fluid studies also will allow evaluation of potential cross-formational mixing of formation fluids. Lastly, our new study of helium isotopes in the LA basin shows a significant leakage of mantle helium along the Newport Inglewood fault zone (NIFZ), at flow rates up to 2 cm/yr. Crustal-scale fault permeability (~60 microdarcys) and advective versus conductive heat transport rates have been estimated using the observed helium isotopic data. The NIFZ is an important deep-seated fault that may crosscut a proposed basin decollement fault in this heavily populated area, and appears to allow seepage of helium from the mantle sources about 30 km beneath Los Angeles. The helium study has been widely cited in recent weeks by the news media, both in radio and on numerous web sites.

  14. Fractal characterization of geological fractures in an exposed analog of a petroleum reservoir and its application to fluid flow models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vásquez, A.; Tolson, G.

    2012-12-01

    The quantification of fracture systems is important to understand the phenomenon of fluid flow in naturally fractured petroleum reservoirs. In this work, we present a case of detailed analysis of filled fracture networks (veins) covering four orders of magnitude of scale. For our analysis we selected rocks of the El Doctor platform in the state of Querétaro, Central Mexico, which is an exposed analog of naturally fractured carbonate reservoir rocks common in the near-offshore oil fields in southeast Mexico. The fractal properties of one and two dimensional natural fracture patterns mapped on limestone outcrops, are present and compared to the results obtained in other studies at different scales. The fractal dimension of different fracture properties, such as spacing, thickness, spatial distribution, density, connectivity and length are investigated and measured using different methods. The principal fractal parameters obtained in this study include the cumulative-frequency exponent of spacing and thickness, box-counting dimension, correlation dimension and Lyapunov exponent in 1D analysis; whereas the 2D analysis included the cumulative-length exponent (fragmentation dimension), box-counting dimension, mass dimension (mid and intersection points of fractures), lacunarity and connectivity. In addition, we analyzed the orientation, density and intensity of the fracture arrays. The results of the 1D analysis indicate that the fracture spacing can be characterised using the parameters mentioned before, but the best fractal parameter to characterize the distribution and array of fractures is the Lyapunov exponent, because it's value (1.06-1.42) can differentiate between different types of array. The fractal dimension obtained for cumulative-frequency of the spacing, shows a power law with a negative exponent between -1.08 and -0.70. In the case of box-counting and correlation dimensions, the values of dimension were 0.30-0.68 and 0.40-0.63 respectively. With respect

  15. Dispersion of solids in fracturing flows of yield stress fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hormozi, Sarah; Frigaard, Ian

    2016-11-01

    Solids dispersion is an important part of hydraulic fracturing. Whereas many frac fluids are low-viscous others transport solids through increased viscosity. In this context, one method for influencing both dispersion and solids carrying capacity is to use a yield stress fluid as the frac fluid. We propose a model framework for this scenario and analyse one of the simplifications. A key effect of including a yield stress is to focus high shear rates near the fracture walls. In typical fracturing flows this results in a large variation in shear rates across the fracture. In using shear-thinning viscous frac fluids, flows may vary significantly on the particle scale, from Stokesian behaviour to inertial behaviour across the width of the fracture. Equally, according to the flow rates, Hele-Shaw style models give way at higher Reynolds number to those in which inertia must be considered. We develop a model framework able to include this range of flows and make estimates of the streamwise dispersion in various relevant scenarios. Schlumberger Oilfield Services, NSF and ACS PRF.

  16. Squeeze flow of a Carreau fluid during sphere impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uddin, J.; Marston, J. O.; Thoroddsen, S. T.

    2012-07-01

    We present results from a combined numerical and experimental investigation into the squeeze flow induced when a solid sphere impacts onto a thin, ultra-viscous film of non-Newtonian fluid. We examine both the sphere motion through the liquid as well as the fluid flow field in the region directly beneath the sphere during approach to a solid plate. In the experiments we use silicone oil as the model fluid, which is well-described by the Carreau model. We use high-speed imaging and particle tracking to achieve flow visualisation within the film itself and derive the corresponding velocity fields. We show that the radial velocity either diverges as the gap between the sphere and the wall diminishes (Ztip → 0) or that it reaches a maximum value and then decays rapidly to zero as the sphere comes to rest at a non-zero distance (Ztip = Zmin) away from the wall. The horizontal shear rate is calculated and is responsible for significant viscosity reduction during the approach of the sphere. Our model of this flow, based on lubrication theory, is solved numerically and compared to experimental trials. We show that our model is able to correctly describe the physical features of the flow observed in the experiments.

  17. An Analysis of Polynomial Chaos Approximations for Modeling Single-Fluid-Phase Flow in Porous Medium Systems

    PubMed Central

    Rupert, C.P.; Miller, C.T.

    2008-01-01

    We examine a variety of polynomial-chaos-motivated approximations to a stochastic form of a steady state groundwater flow model. We consider approaches for truncating the infinite dimensional problem and producing decoupled systems. We discuss conditions under which such decoupling is possible and show that to generalize the known decoupling by numerical cubature, it would be necessary to find new multivariate cubature rules. Finally, we use the acceleration of Monte Carlo to compare the quality of polynomial models obtained for all approaches and find that in general the methods considered are more efficient than Monte Carlo for the relatively small domains considered in this work. A curse of dimensionality in the series expansion of the log-normal stochastic random field used to represent hydraulic conductivity provides a significant impediment to efficient approximations for large domains for all methods considered in this work, other than the Monte Carlo method. PMID:18836519

  18. Comprehensive Mathematical Model Of Real Fluids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Peter G.

    1996-01-01

    Mathematical model of thermodynamic properties of water, steam, and liquid and gaseous hydrogen and oxygen developed for use in computational simulations of flows of mass and heat in main engine of space shuttle. Similar models developed for other fluids and applications. Based on HBMS equation of state.

  19. Fluid flow near the surface of earth's outer core

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bloxham, Jeremy; Jackson, Andrew

    1991-01-01

    This review examines the recent attempts at extracting information on the pattern of fluid flow near the surface of the outer core from the geomagnetic secular variation. Maps of the fluid flow at the core surface are important as they may provide some insight into the process of the geodynamo and may place useful constraints on geodynamo models. In contrast to the case of mantle convection, only very small lateral variations in core density are necessary to drive the flow; these density variations are, by several orders of magnitude, too small to be imaged seismically; therefore, the geomagnetic secular variation is utilized to infer the flow. As substantial differences exist between maps developed by different researchers, the possible underlying reasons for these differences are examined with particular attention given to the inherent problems of nonuniqueness.

  20. Physical aspects of computing the flow of a viscous fluid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehta, U. B.

    1984-01-01

    One of the main themes in fluid dynamics at present and in the future is going to be computational fluid dynamics with the primary focus on the determination of drag, flow separation, vortex flows, and unsteady flows. A computation of the flow of a viscous fluid requires an understanding and consideration of the physical aspects of the flow. This is done by identifying the flow regimes and the scales of fluid motion, and the sources of vorticity. Discussions of flow regimes deal with conditions of incompressibility, transitional and turbulent flows, Navier-Stokes and non-Navier-Stokes regimes, shock waves, and strain fields. Discussions of the scales of fluid motion consider transitional and turbulent flows, thin- and slender-shear layers, triple- and four-deck regions, viscous-inviscid interactions, shock waves, strain rates, and temporal scales. In addition, the significance and generation of vorticity are discussed. These physical aspects mainly guide computations of the flow of a viscous fluid.

  1. Shear-thinning of molecular fluids in Couette flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raghavan, Bharath V.; Ostoja-Starzewski, Martin

    2017-02-01

    We use non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations, the Boltzmann equation, and continuum thermomechanics to investigate and characterize the shear-thinning behavior of molecular fluids undergoing Couette flow, interacting via a Lennard-Jones (LJ) potential. In particular, we study the shear-stress under steady-state conditions and its dependency on fluid density and applied shear-strain rate. Motivated by kinetic theory, we propose a rheological equation of state that fits observed system responses exceptionally well and captures the extreme shear-thinning effect. We notice that beyond a particular strain-rate threshold, the fluid exhibits shear-thinning, the degree of which is dependent on the density and temperature of the system. In addition, we obtain a shear-rate dependent model for the viscosity which matches the well established Cross viscosity model. We demonstrate how this model arises naturally from the Boltzmann equation and possesses an inherent scaling parameter that unifies the rheological properties of the LJ fluid. We compare our model with those in the literature. Finally, we formulate a dissipation function modeling the LJ fluid as a quasilinear fluid.

  2. Methods for combining a theoretical and an empirical approach in modelling pressure and flow control valves for CAE-programs for fluid power circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Handroos, Heikki

    An analytical mathematical model for a fluid power valve uses equations based on physical laws. The parameters consist of physical coefficients, dimensions of the internal elements, spring constants, etc. which are not provided by the component manufacturers. The valve has to be dismantled in order to determine their values. The model is only in accordance with a particular type of valve construction and there are a large number of parameters. This is a major common problem in computer aided engineering (CAE) programs for fluid power circuits. Methods for solving this problem by combining a theoretical and an empirical approach are presented. Analytical models for single stage pressure and flow control valves are brought into forms which contain fewer parameters whose values can be determined from measured characteristic curves. The least squares criterion is employed to identify the parameter values describing the steady state of a valve. The steady state characteristic curves that are required data for this identification are quite often provided by the manufacturers. The parameters describing the dynamics of a valve are determined using a simple noncomputational method using dynamic characteristic curves that can be easily measured. The importance of the identification accuracy of the different parameters of the single stage pressure relief valve model is compared using a parameter sensitivity analysis method. A new comparison method called relative mean value criterion is used to compare the influences of variations of the different parameters to a nominal dynamic response.

  3. Curious Fluid Flows: From Complex Fluid Breakup to Helium Wetting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huisman, Fawn Mitsu

    This work encompasses three projects; pinch-off dynamics in non-Newtonian fluids; helium wetting on alkali metals; and the investigation of quartz tuning forks as cryogenic pressure transducers. Chapter 1 discusses the breakup of a non-Newtonian yield stress fluid bridge. We measured the minimum neck radius, hmin, as a function of time and fit it to a power law with exponent n 1. We then compare n1 to exponent n2, obtained from a rotational rheometer using a Herschel-Bulkley model. We confirm n1=n2 for the widest variety of non-Newtonian fluids to date. When these fluids are diluted with a Newtonian fluid n1 does not equal n2. No current models predict that behavior, identifying a new class of fluid breakup. Chapter 2 presents the first chemical potential-temperature phase diagram of helium on lithium, sodium and gold, using a novel pressure measurement system. The growth and superfluid transition of a helium film on these substrates is measured via an oscillator for isotherms (fixed temperature, varying amount of helium gas), and quenches (fixed amount of helium gas, varying temperature). The chemical potential-temperature plot is similar for gold, lithium and sodium despite the large difference in the substrate binding energies. No signs of a 2-D liquid-vapor transition were seen. Chapter 3 discusses the creation of a 32.768 kHz quartz tuning fork in situ pressure transducer. Tuning forks are used to measure pressure at room temperature, but no work addresses their potential as cryogenic pressure transducers. We mapped out the behavior of a tuning fork as a function of pressure at 298, 7.0, 2.5, 1.6, 1.0 and 0.7 K by measuring the quality factor. The fork is sensitive to pressures above 0.1 mTorr, limiting its use as a pressure gauge at 0.6 K and below. The experimental curves were compared to a theoretical Q(P, T) function that was refined using the 298 K data. At cryogenic temperatures the formula breaks down in the viscous region and becomes inaccurate. The

  4. Quantitative evaluation fo cerebrospinal fluid shunt flow

    SciTech Connect

    Chervu, S.; Chervu, L.R.; Vallabhajosyula, B.; Milstein, D.M.; Shapiro, K.M.; Shulman, K.; Blaufox, M.D.

    1984-01-01

    The authors describe a rigorous method for measuring the flow of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in shunt circuits implanted for the relief of obstructive hydrocephalus. Clearance of radioactivity for several calibrated flow rates was determined with a Harvard infusion pump by injecting the Rickham reservoir of a Rickham-Holter valve system with 100 ..mu..Ci of Tc-99m as pertechnetate. The elliptical and the cylindrical Holter valves used as adjunct valves with the Rickham reservoir yielded two different regression lines when the clearances were plotted against flow rats. The experimental regression lines were used to determine the in vivo flow rates from clearances calculated after injecting the Rickham reservoirs of the patients. The unique clearance characteristics of the individual shunt systems available requires that calibration curves be derived for an entire system identical to one implanted in the patient being evaluated, rather than just the injected chamber. Excellent correlation between flow rates and the clinical findings supports the reliability of this method of quantification of CSF shunt flow, and the results are fully accepted by neurosurgeons.

  5. Magnetic fluid flow meter for gases

    SciTech Connect

    Popa, N.C.; Potencz, I.; Vekas, L.

    1994-03-01

    The paper presents the constructive details and functioning principle of an electronic volumetric flow meter for gases, which exploits the properties of magnetic fluids and has no moving mechanical components. It is a bidirectional flow meter, operating both in static and in moving conditions. The flow meter has a sensing unit, which consists of two sensors, one for differential pressure and an other for acceleration or inclination angle and of a tubular measuring element, as well as an electronic measuring system. Details are given on the hydrodynamic-electronic correction mechanism, which eliminates the Influences of inclinations and accelerations on the volumic flow signal, followed by a description of the main features of the electronic system. The experiments performed showed the possibility of metering even very small gas volumes, such as 0.1 cm{sup 3} at a flow rate of 50 cm{sup 3} /min. The metering at higher flow rate values, up to 100 m{sup 3}/h, needed only the insert of the measuring element corresponding to the requested How rate domain.

  6. Erosion of a model geophysical fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luu, Li-Hua; Philippe, Pierre; Chambon, Guillaume

    2014-05-01

    A specificity of natural flows such as debris flows, landslides or snow avalanches is that, mostly, the material forming the static bed has mechanical properties similar to those of the flowing material (mud/mud, snow/snow). To explore the bed erosion phenomenon induced by such geophysical flows, we consider the geomaterial as a continuum by performing experiments in laboratory on a model fluid that can behaves as a solid or as a liquid, depending on the conditions. Indeed, we propose an experimental study where a yield-stress fluid is implemented to model both the eroding flow and the eroded bed. Our approach is to capture the process of erosion in terms of solid-liquid transition. The studied hydrodynamics consists of a pipe-flow disturbed by the presence of an obstacle. We use a polymer micro-gel Carbopol that exhibits a Hershel-Bulkley (HB) rheology. By taking advantage of the fluid transparency, the flow is monitoring by Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) internal visualization technique. Upstream of the obstacle, a solid-liquid-like interface between a flow zone and a dead zone appears in the fluid. In this study, we aim to investigate the dominant physical mechanism underlying the formation of the static domain, by combining the rheological characterization of the yield-stress fluid (using a rheometer), with the observation of the morphological evolution of the system substratum / flow and the local measurement of related hydrodynamic parameters. Our first result shows that the flow above the dead zone behaves as a classical plug flow, whose velocity profile can successfully be described by a Hagen-Poiseuille equation including a HB rheology, but except in a thin zone (compared to the whole flow zone) at the close vicinity of the solid-liquid interface. Thanks to a high PIV measurement resolution, we then properly examine the typical feature lying at the tail of the velocity profile. The numerical derivation of the profile shows that the shear rate in this

  7. Dynamic scaling of unsteady shear-thinning non-Newtonian fluid flows in a large-scale model of a distal anastomosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gray, J. D.; Owen, I.; Escudier, M. P.

    2007-10-01

    Dimensional analysis has been applied to an unsteady pulsatile flow of a shear-thinning power-law non-Newtonian liquid. An experiment was then designed in which both Newtonian and non-Newtonian liquids were used to model blood flow through a large-scale (38.5 mm dia.), simplified, rigid arterial junction (a distal anastomosis of a femorodistal bypass). The flow field within the junction was obtained by Particle Imaging Velocimetry and near-wall velocities were used to calculate the wall shear stresses. Dimensionless wall shear stresses were obtained at different points in the cardiac cycle for two different but dynamically similar non-Newtonian fluids; the good agreement between the measured dimensionless wall shear stresses confirm the validity of the dimensional analysis. However, blood exhibits a constant viscosity at high-shear rates and to obtain complete dynamic similarity between large-scale experiments and life-scale flows, the high-shear viscosity also needs to be included in the analysis. How this might be done is discussed in the paper.

  8. Coupled heat and fluid flow modeling of the Carboniferous Kuna Basin, Alaska: Implications for the genesis of the Red Dog Pb-Zn-Ag-Ba ore district

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Garven, G.; Raffensperger, J.P.; Dumoulin, J.A.; Bradley, D.A.; Young, L.E.; Kelley, K.D.; Leach, D.L.

    2003-01-01

    The Red Dog deposit is a giant 175 Mton (16% Zn, 5% Pb), shale-hosted Pb-Zn-Ag-Ba ore district situated in the Carboniferous Kuna Basin, Western Brooks Range, Alaska. These SEDEX-type ores are thought to have formed in calcareous turbidites and black mudstone at elevated sub-seafloor temperatures (120-150??C) within a hydrogeologic framework of submarine convection that was structurally organized by large normal faults. The theory for modeling brine migration and heat transport in the Kuna Basin is discussed with application to evaluating flow patterns and heat transport in faulted rift basins and the effects of buoyancy-driven free convection on reactive flow and ore genesis. Finite element simulations show that hydrothermal fluid was discharged into the Red Dog subbasin during a period of basin-wide crustal heat flow of 150-160 mW/m2. Basinal brines circulated to depths as great as 1-3 km along multiple normal faults flowed laterally through thick clastic aquifers acquiring metals and heat, and then rapidly ascended a single discharge fault zone at rates ??? 5 m/year to mix with seafloor sulfur and precipitate massive sulfide ores. ?? 2003 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Influence of different retraction techniques on crevicular fluid flow.

    PubMed

    Wöstmann, Bernd; Rehmann, Peter; Balkenhol, Markus

    2008-01-01

    This study aimed to analyze the influence of different retraction techniques (pure cotton cord, cord impregnated with epinephrine, and chemical retraction [Expa-syl]) on the crevicular fluid flow in vivo. A total of 340 prepared teeth were randomly assigned to one of the retraction procedures. Crevicular fluid flow was measured prior to and immediately after the removal of the respective retraction material. Pure cotton cords led to a significant increase in crevicular fluid flow, whereas impregnated cords and Expa-syl significantly reduced crevicular fluid flow (P < .01). The retraction technique has a high impact on the reduction of crevicular fluid flow in patients. Pure cotton retraction cords should be avoided.

  10. Poiseuille flow of a micropolar fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delhommelle, Jerome; Evans, Denis J.

    We use non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations to study the flow of a micropolar fluid and to test an extended Navier-Stokes theory (ENS) for such fluids. The angular streaming velocity (which is of course missing in the classical Navier-Stokes theory) and the translational streaming velocity are found to be in good agreement with the predictions of ENS theory. Besides, owing to molecular rotation, the translational streaming velocity profile is shown to deviate from the classical parabolic profile. Finally, temperature profiles calculated using three different expressions (a kinetic translational, a kinetic rotational and a recently derived configurational expression) are found to be in excellent agreement, demonstrating that the equipartition principle still holds in this non-equilibrium system. No deviation from the classical quartic temperature profile is observed.

  11. Electrical capacitance tomography (ECT) and gamma radiation meter for comparison with and validation and tuning of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling of multiphase flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradeep, Chaminda; Yan, Ru; Vestøl, Sondre; Melaaen, Morten C.; Mylvaganam, Saba

    2014-07-01

    The electrical capacitance tomographic (ECT) approach is increasingly seen as attractive for measurement and control applications in the process industries. Recently, there is increased interest in using the tomographic details from ECT for comparing with and validating and tuning CFD models of multiphase flow. Collaboration with researchers working in the field of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling of multiphase flows gives valuable information for both groups of researchers in the field of ECT and CFD. By studying the ECT tomograms of multiphase flows under carefully monitored inflow conditions of the different media and by obtaining the capacitance values, C(i, j, t) with i = 1…N, j = 1, 2,…N and i ≠ j obtained from ECT modules with N electrodes, it is shown how the interface heights in a pipe with stratified flow of oil and air can be fruitfully compared to the values of those obtained from ECT and gamma radiation meter (GRM) for improving CFD modeling. Monitored inflow conditions in this study are flow rates of air, water and oil into a pipe which can be positioned at varying inclinations to the horizontal, thus emulating the pipelines laid in subsea installations. It is found that ECT-based tomograms show most of the features seen in the GRM-based visualizations with nearly one-to-one correspondence to interface heights obtained from these two methods, albeit some anomalies at the pipe wall. However, there are some interesting features the ECT manages to capture: features which the GRM or the CFD modeling apparently do not show, possibly due to parameters not defined in the inputs to the CFD model or much slower response of the GRM. Results presented in this paper indicate that a combination of ECT and GRM and preferably with other modalities with enhanced data fusion and analysis combined with CFD modeling can help to improve the modeling, measurement and control of multiphase flow in the oil and gas industries and in the process industries

  12. SPXCPL: two-dimensional modeling program of self-potential effects from cross-coupled fluid and heat flow (User's Guide and documentation for Version 1. 0)

    SciTech Connect

    Sill, W.R.; Killpack, T.J.

    1982-03-01

    The program is applicable to the calculation of self-potential effects due to fluid flow (electrokinetic effects) and heat flow (thermoelectric effects). The geological structure is two dimensional but the sources can be either finite line sources or point sources. The accuracy of the calculated potentials depends on the model discretization and the distance from the source(s). For the default mesh, the accuracy is usually a few percent at a distance of about one unit from the source. Surface boundary conditions for the primary problem require careful consideration as the form of the flow near the air-earth interface can have a profound effect on the resultant electric potentials. For temperature problems the appropriate boundary condition is a constant temperature, which is taken as zero. With this boundary condition there is a normal flux of heat at the surface and there will be induced electrical sources here, if the surface medium has a nonzero coupling coefficient. In the models, zero temperature at the surface is produced by giving the air a very large thermal conductivity.

  13. COMPARING SIMULATED AND EXPERIMENTAL HYSTERETIC TWO- PHASE TRANSIENT FLUID FLOW PHENOMENA

    EPA Science Inventory

    A hysteretic model for two-phase permeability (k)-saturation (S)-pressure (P) relations is outlined that accounts for effects of nonwetting fluid entrapment. The model can be employed in unsaturated fluid flow computer codes to predict temporal and spatial fluid distributions. Co...

  14. Fluid Physics of Foam Evolution and Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aref, H.; Thoroddsen, S. T.; Sullivan, J. M.

    2003-01-01

    The grant supported theoretical, numerical and experimental work focused on the elucidation of the fluid physics of foam structure, evolution and flow. The experimental work concentrated on these subject areas: (a) Measurements of the speed of reconnections within a foam; (b) statistics of bubble rearrangements; and (c) three-dimensional reconstruction of the foam structure. On the numerical simulation and theory side our efforts concentrated on the subjects: (a) simulation techniques for 2D and 3D foams; (b) phase transition in a compressible foam; and (c) TCP structures.

  15. Effect of External Pressure and Catheter Gauge on Flow Rate, Kinetic Energy, and Endothelial Injury During Intravenous Fluid Administration in a Rabbit Model.

    PubMed

    Hu, Mei-Hua; Chan, Wei-Hung; Chen, Yao-Chang; Cherng, Chen-Hwan; Lin, Chih-Kung; Tsai, Chien-Sung; Chou, Yu-Ching; Huang, Go-Shine

    2016-01-01

    The effects of intravenous (IV) catheter gauge and pressurization of IV fluid (IVF) bags on fluid flow rate have been studied. However, the pressure needed to achieve a flow rate equivalent to that of a 16 gauge (G) catheter through smaller G catheters and the potential for endothelial damage from the increased kinetic energy produced by higher pressurization are unclear. Constant pressure on an IVF bag was maintained by an automatic adjustable pneumatic pressure regulator of our own design. Fluids running through 16 G, 18 G, 20 G, and 22 G catheters were assessed while using IV bag pressurization to achieve the flow rate equivalent to that of a 16 G catheter. We assessed flow rates, kinetic energy, and flow injury to rabbit inferior vena cava endothelium. By applying sufficient external constant pressure to an IVF bag, all fluids could be run through smaller (G) catheters at the flow rate in a 16 G catheter. However, the kinetic energy increased significantly as the catheter G increased. Damage to the venous endothelium was negligible or minimal/patchy cell loss. We designed a new rapid infusion system, which provides a constant pressure that compresses the fluid volume until it is free from visible residual fluid. When large-bore venous access cannot be obtained, multiple smaller catheters, external pressure, or both should be considered. However, caution should be exercised when fluid pressurized to reach a flow rate equivalent to that in a 16 G catheter is run through a smaller G catheter because of the profound increase in kinetic energy that can lead to venous endothelium injury.

  16. Flow Diode and Method for Controlling Fluid Flow Origin of the Invention

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dyson, Rodger W (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A flow diode configured to permit fluid flow in a first direction while preventing fluid flow in a second direction opposite the first direction is disclosed. The flow diode prevents fluid flow without use of mechanical closures or moving parts. The flow diode utilizes a bypass flowline whereby all fluid flow in the second direction moves into the bypass flowline having a plurality of tortuous portions providing high fluidic resistance. The portions decrease in diameter such that debris in the fluid is trapped. As fluid only travels in one direction through the portions, the debris remains trapped in the portions.

  17. Microscale imaging of cilia-driven fluid flow

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Brendan K.; Choma, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    Cilia-driven fluid flow is important for multiple processes in the body, including respiratory mucus clearance, gamete transport in the oviduct, right-left patterning in the embryonic node, and cerebrospinal fluid circulation. Multiple imaging techniques have been applied towards quantifying ciliary flow. Here we review common velocimetry methods of quantifying fluid flow. We then discuss four important optical modalities, including light microscopy, epifluorescence, confocal microscopy, and optical coherence tomography, that have been used to investigate cilia-driven flow. PMID:25417211

  18. Pattern palette for complex fluid flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandnes, B.

    2012-04-01

    From landslides to oil and gas recovery to the squeeze of a toothpaste tube, flowing complex fluids are everywhere around us in nature and engineering. That is not to say, though, that they are always well understood. The dissipative interactions, through friction and inelastic collisions, often give rise to nonlinear dynamics and complexity manifested in pattern formation on large scales. The images displayed on this poster illustrate the diverse morphologies found in multiphase flows involving wet granular material: Air is injected into a generic mixture of granular material and fluid contained in a 500 µm gap between two parallel glass plates. At low injection rates, friction between the grains - glass beads averaging 100 µm in diameter - dominates the rheology, producing "stick-slip bubbles" and labyrinthine frictional fingering. A transition to various other morphologies, including "corals" and viscous fingers, emerges for increasing injection rate. At sufficiently high granular packing fractions, the material behaves like a deformable, porous solid, and the air rips through in sudden fractures.

  19. Transient fluid flow and heat transfer in petroleum production systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Dongqing

    Heat transfer is an important phenomenon in both wellbore and reservoir. The pertinent temperature distribution can provide a valuable perspective in analyzing and optimizing the oil production. In this work, two kinds of co-production, production fluid through the annulus and tubing, and through two independent tubings, have been modeled using steady state analysis. The fluid temperatures in the production string and annulus have been solved analytically in both cases. Furthermore, we extended the theory of steady state energy transport to remedy asphaltene deposition problem by circulating the cooling fluid in the annulus. Due to the complex nature of two-phase flow in the oil/gas production, more reliable mechanistic modeling approaches have been developed since early 1980's. Rooted in Hasan-Kabir model, we have developed a wellbore/reservoir coupling simulator for the transient non-Darcy two-phase flow in the flow-after-flow well test. The entire historical flow behavior has been modeled using superposition method and validated with field data. Our second simulation is for the investigation of a blowout well, which is a great concern in the oil field. When the pressure in the wellbore is sufficiently high, the fluids will attain sonic velocity at the wellhead. We presented a computational algorithm to estimate the blowout rate in a given wellbore/reservoir system and examined four major parameters, such as formation permeability, Gas-Oil-Ratio (GOR), reservoir pressure and tubing diameter. The transient nature of this approach also illustrates the evolution process of a blowout. We have also developed a transient simulator to determine the location and severity of a blockage in a gas pipeline based on the theory of two-phase flow and pressure transient analysis. The presence of a sizeable blockage will affect the outlet gas pressure response by decreasing the available pipe volume and increasing the friction loss of the fluid flow. The simulator solves for the

  20. Preconditioning methods for ideal and multiphase fluid flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Ashish

    The objective of this study is to develop a preconditioning method for ideal and multiphase multispecies compressible fluid flow solver using homogeneous equilibrium mixture model. The mathematical model for fluid flow going through phase change uses density and temperature in the formulation, where the density represents the multiphase mixture density. The change of phase of the fluid is then explicitly determined using the equation of state of the fluid, which only requires temperature and mixture density. The method developed is based on a finite-volume framework in which the numerical fluxes are computed using Roe's approximate Riemann solver and the modified Harten, Lax and Van-leer scheme (HLLC). All speed Roe and HLLC flux based schemes have been developed either by using preconditioning or by directly modifying dissipation to reduce the effect of acoustic speed in its numerical dissipation when Mach number decreases. Preconditioning proposed by Briley, Taylor and Whitfield, Eriksson and Turkel are studied in this research, where as low dissipation schemes proposed by Rieper and Thornber, Mosedale, Drikakis, Youngs and Williams are also considered. Various preconditioners are evaluated in terms of development, performance, accuracy and limitations in simulations at various Mach numbers. A generalized preconditioner is derived which possesses well conditioned eigensystem for multiphase multispecies flow simulations. Validation and verification of the solution procedure are carried out on several small model problems with comparison to experimental, theoretical, and other numerical results. Preconditioning methods are evaluated using three basic geometries; 1) bump in a channel 2) flow over a NACA0012 airfoil and 3) flow over a cylinder, which are then compared with theoretical and numerical results. Multiphase capabilities of the solver are evaluated in cryogenic and non-cryogenic conditions. For cryogenic conditions the solver is evaluated by predicting

  1. Partitioned fluid-solid coupling for cardiovascular blood flow: left-ventricular fluid mechanics.

    PubMed

    Krittian, Sebastian; Janoske, Uwe; Oertel, Herbert; Böhlke, Thomas

    2010-04-01

    We present a 3D code-coupling approach which has been specialized towards cardiovascular blood flow. For the first time, the prescribed geometry movement of the cardiovascular flow model KaHMo (Karlsruhe Heart Model) has been replaced by a myocardial composite model. Deformation is driven by fluid forces and myocardial response, i.e., both its contractile and constitutive behavior. Whereas the arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian formulation (ALE) of the Navier-Stokes equations is discretized by finite volumes (FVM), the solid mechanical finite elasticity equations are discretized by a finite element (FEM) approach. Taking advantage of specialized numerical solution strategies for non-matching fluid and solid domain meshes, an iterative data-exchange guarantees the interface equilibrium of the underlying governing equations. The focus of this work is on left-ventricular fluid-structure interaction based on patient-specific magnetic resonance imaging datasets. Multi-physical phenomena are described by temporal visualization and characteristic FSI numbers. The results gained show flow patterns that are in good agreement with previous observations. A deeper understanding of cavity deformation, blood flow, and their vital interaction can help to improve surgical treatment and clinical therapy planning.

  2. Gravity-Driven Thin Film Flow of an Ellis Fluid.

    PubMed

    Kheyfets, Vitaly O; Kieweg, Sarah L

    2013-12-01

    The thin film lubrication approximation has been studied extensively for moving contact lines of Newtonian fluids. However, many industrial and biological applications of the thin film equation involve shear-thinning fluids, which often also exhibit a Newtonian plateau at low shear. This study presents new numerical simulations of the three-dimensional (i.e. two-dimensional spreading), constant-volume, gravity-driven, free surface flow of an Ellis fluid. The numerical solution was validated with a new similarity solution, compared to previous experiments, and then used in a parametric study. The parametric study centered around rheological data for an example biological application of thin film flow: topical drug delivery of anti-HIV microbicide formulations, e.g. hydroxyethylcellulose (HEC) polymer solutions. The parametric study evaluated how spreading length and front velocity saturation depend on Ellis parameters. A lower concentration polymer solution with smaller zero shear viscosity (η0), τ1/2, and λ values spread further. However, when comparing any two fluids with any possible combinations of Ellis parameters, the impact of changing one parameter on spreading length depends on the direction and magnitude of changes in the other two parameters. In addition, the isolated effect of the shear-thinning parameter, λ, on the front velocity saturation depended on τ1/2. This study highlighted the relative effects of the individual Ellis parameters, and showed that the shear rates in this flow were in both the shear-thinning and plateau regions of rheological behavior, emphasizing the importance of characterizing the full range of shear-rates in rheological measurements. The validated numerical model and parametric study provides a useful tool for future steps to optimize flow of a fluid with rheological behavior well-described by the Ellis constitutive model, in a range of industrial and biological applications.

  3. Instability of fluid flow over saturated porous medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyubimova, Tatyana; Kolchanova, Ekaterina; Lyubimov, Dmitry

    2013-04-01

    We investigate the stability of a fluid flow over a saturated porous medium. The problem is of importance due to the applications to washing out of contaminants from the bottom layer of vegetation, whose properties are similar to the properties of porous medium. In the case of porous medium with the relatively high permeability and porosity the flow involves a part of the fluid saturating the porous medium, with the tangential fluid velocity drop occurring because of the resistance of the solid matrix. The drop leads to the instability analogous to Kelvin-Helmholtz one accompanied by the formation of travelling waves. In the present paper we consider a two-layer system consisting of a pure fluid layer and a porous layer saturated by the fluid located underneath. The system is bounded by a rigid surface at the bottom and a non-deformable free surface at the top. It is under the gravity and inclined at a slight angle to the horizontal axis. The boundary conditions at the interface between the fluid and porous layers are the continuity of fluid velocities and the balance of normal and tangential stresses taking into account the resistance of the solid matrix with respect to the fluid flow near the interface [1-2]. The problem is solved in the framework of the Brinkman model applying the classical shooting algorithm with orthogonalization. The stability boundaries of the stationary fluid flow over the saturated porous medium with respect to the small oscillatory perturbations are obtained for the various values of the Darcy number and the ratio of the porous layer thickness to the full thickness of the system d. It was shown that at the d > 0.5 with increasing the porous layer thickness (or with decreasing of the fluid layer thickness) the stability threshold rises. This is because of the fact that the instability is primarily caused by perturbations located in the fluid layer. At the d < 0.5 the reduction of the porous layer thickness leads to the stability threshold

  4. Space Coffee Cup: Capillary Flow Driven Fluids in Space

    NASA Video Gallery

    Interested in learning more about how fluids react in Space? In this video, Professor Mark Weislogel, and Dr. Marshall Porterfield will discuss the Space Coffee Cup and Capillary Flow Driven Fluids...

  5. Thermal and Fluid Flow Brazing Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    HOSKING, FLOYD MICHAEL; GIANOULAKIS,STEVEN E.; GIVLER,RICHARD C.; SCHUNK,P. RANDALL

    1999-12-15

    The thermal response of fixtured parts in a batch-type brazing furnace can require numerous, time-consuming development runs before an acceptable furnace schedule or joint design is established. Powerful computational simulation tools are being developed to minimize the required number of verification experiments, improve furnace throughput, and increase product yields. Typical furnace simulations are based on thermal, fluid flow, and structural codes that incorporate the fundamental physics of the brazing process. The use of massively parallel computing to predict furnace and joint-level responses is presented. Measured and computed data are compared. Temperature values are within 1-270 of the expected peak brazing temperature for different loading conditions. Sensitivity studies reveal that the thermal response is more sensitive to the thermal boundary conditions of the heating enclosure than variability y in the materials data. Braze flow simulations predict fillet geometry and free surface joint defects. Dynamic wetting conditions, interfacial reactions, and solidification structure add a high degree of uncertainty to the flow results.

  6. Cerebrospinal fluid flow dynamics in the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Sweetman, Brian; Linninger, Andreas A

    2011-01-01

    Cine-phase-contrast-MRI was used to measure the three-dimensional cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow field inside the central nervous system (CNS) of a healthy subject. Image reconstruction and grid generation tools were then used to develop a three-dimensional fluid-structure interaction model of the CSF flow inside the CNS. The CSF spaces were discretized using the finite-element method and the constitutive equations for fluid and solid motion solved in ADINA-FSI 8.6. Model predictions of CSF velocity magnitude and stroke volume were found to be in excellent agreement with the experimental data. CSF pressure gradients and amplitudes were computed in all regions of the CNS. The computed pressure gradients and amplitudes closely match values obtained clinically. The highest pressure amplitude of 77 Pa was predicted to occur in the lateral ventricles. The pressure gradient between the lateral ventricles and the lumbar region of the spinal canal did not exceed 132 Pa (~1 mmHg) at any time during the cardiac cycle. The pressure wave speed in the spinal canal was predicted and found to agree closely with values previously reported in the literature. Finally, the forward and backward motion of the CSF in the ventricles was visualized, revealing the complex mixing patterns in the CSF spaces. The mathematical model presented in this article is a prerequisite for developing a mechanistic understanding of the relationships among vasculature pulsations, CSF flow, and CSF pressure waves in the CNS.

  7. Fluid Flow Prediction with Development System Interwell Connectivity Influence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolshakov, M.; Deeva, T.; Pustovskikh, A.

    2016-03-01

    In this paper interwell connectivity has been studied. First of all, literature review of existing methods was made which is divided into three groups: Statistically-Based Methods, Material (fluid) Propagation-Based Methods and Potential (pressure) Change Propagation-Based Method. The disadvantages of the first and second groups are as follows: methods do not involve fluid flow through porous media, ignore any changes of well conditions (BHP, skin factor, etc.). The last group considers changes of well conditions and fluid flow through porous media. In this work Capacitance method (CM) has been chosen for research. This method is based on material balance and uses weight coefficients lambdas to assess well influence. In the next step synthetic model was created for examining CM. This model consists of an injection well and a production well. CM gave good results, it means that flow rates which were calculated by analytical method (CM) show matching with flow rate in model. Further new synthetic model was created which includes six production and one injection wells. This model represents seven-spot pattern. To obtain lambdas weight coefficients, the delta function was entered using by minimization algorithm. Also synthetic model which has three injectors and thirteen producer wells was created. This model simulates seven-spot pattern production system. Finally Capacitance method (CM) has been adjusted on real data of oil Field Ω. In this case CM does not give enough satisfying results in terms of field data liquid rate. In conclusion, recommendations to simplify CM calculations were given. Field Ω is assumed to have one injection and one production wells. In this case, satisfying results for production rates and cumulative production were obtained.

  8. Fluid Flow Technology that Measures Up

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    From 1994 to 1996, NASA s Marshall Space Flight Center conducted a Center Director's Discretionary Fund research effort to apply artificial intelligence technologies to the health management of plant equipment and space propulsion systems. Through this effort, NASA established a business relationship with Quality Monitoring and Control (QMC), of Kingwood, Texas, to provide hardware modeling and artificial intelligence tools. Very detailed and accurate Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) analysis and algorithms were jointly created, which identified several missing, critical instrumentation needs for adequately evaluating the engine health status. One of the missing instruments was a liquid oxygen (LOX) flow measurement. This instrument was missing since the original SSME included a LOX turbine flow meter that failed during a ground test, resulting in considerable damage for NASA. New balanced flow meter technology addresses this need with robust, safe, and accurate flow metering hardware.

  9. Time-Dependent Thermally-Driven Interfacial Flows in Multilayered Fluid Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haj-Hariri, Hossein; Borhan, A.

    1996-01-01

    A computational study of thermally-driven convection in multilayered fluid structures will be performed to examine the effect of interactions among deformable fluid-fluid interfaces on the structure of time-dependent flow in these systems. Multilayered fluid structures in two models configurations will be considered: the differentially heated rectangular cavity with a free surface, and the encapsulated cylindrical liquid bridge. An extension of a numerical method developed as part of our recent NASA Fluid Physics grant will be used to account for finite deformations of fluid-fluid interfaces.

  10. On stability and turbulence of fluid flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heisenberg, Werner

    1951-01-01

    This investigation is divided into two parts, the treatment of the stability problem of fluid flows on the one hand, and that of the turbulent motion on the other. The first part summarizes all previous investigations under a unified point of view, that is, sets up as generally as possible the conditions under which a profile possesses unstable or stable characteristics, and indicates the methods for solution of the stability equation for any arbitrary velocity profile and for calculation of the critical Reynolds number for unstable profiles. In the second part, under certain greatly idealizing assumptions, differential equations for the turbulent motions are derived and from them qualitative information about several properties of the turbulent velocity distribution is obtained.

  11. Optimization of micropillar sequences for fluid flow sculpting

    SciTech Connect

    Stoecklein, Daniel; Ganapathysubramanian, Baskar; Wu, Chueh-Yu; Kim, Donghyuk; Di Carlo, Dino

    2016-01-15

    Inertial fluid flow deformation around pillars in a microchannel is a new method for controlling fluid flow. Sequences of pillars have been shown to produce a rich phase space with a wide variety of flow transformations. Previous work has successfully demonstrated manual design of pillar sequences to achieve desired transformations of the flow cross section, with experimental validation. However, such a method is not ideal for seeking out complex sculpted shapes as the search space quickly becomes too large for efficient manual discovery. We explore fast, automated optimization methods to solve this problem. We formulate the inertial flow physics in microchannels with different micropillar configurations as a set of state transition matrix operations. These state transition matrices are constructed from experimentally validated streamtraces for a fixed channel length per pillar. This facilitates modeling the effect of a sequence of micropillars as nested matrix-matrix products, which have very efficient numerical implementations. With this new forward model, arbitrary micropillar sequences can be rapidly simulated with various inlet configurations, allowing optimization routines quick access to a large search space. We integrate this framework with the genetic algorithm and showcase its applicability by designing micropillar sequences for various useful transformations. We computationally discover micropillar sequences for complex transformations that are substantially shorter than manually designed sequences. We also determine sequences for novel transformations that were difficult to manually design. Finally, we experimentally validate these computational designs by fabricating devices and comparing predictions with the results from confocal microscopy.

  12. Improving flow distribution in influent channels using computational fluid dynamics.

    PubMed

    Park, No-Suk; Yoon, Sukmin; Jeong, Woochang; Lee, Seungjae

    2016-10-01

    Although the flow distribution in an influent channel where the inflow is split into each treatment process in a wastewater treatment plant greatly affects the efficiency of the process, and a weir is the typical structure for the flow distribution, to the authors' knowledge, there is a paucity of research on the flow distribution in an open channel with a weir. In this study, the influent channel of a real-scale wastewater treatment plant was used, installing a suppressed rectangular weir that has a horizontal crest to cross the full channel width. The flow distribution in the influent channel was analyzed using a validated computational fluid dynamics model to investigate (1) the comparison of single-phase and two-phase simulation, (2) the improved procedure of the prototype channel, and (3) the effect of the inflow rate on flow distribution. The results show that two-phase simulation is more reliable due to the description of the free-surface fluctuations. It should first be considered for improving flow distribution to prevent a short-circuit flow, and the difference in the kinetic energy with the inflow rate makes flow distribution trends different. The authors believe that this case study is helpful for improving flow distribution in an influent channel.

  13. An integrated, multi-sensing approach to describe the dynamic relations between turbulence, fluid-forces, and reconfiguration of a submerged plant model in steady flows.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henry, Pierre-Yves; Aberle, Jochen; Dijkstra, Jasper; Myrhaug, Dag

    2016-04-01

    Aquatic vegetation plays a vital role in ecohydrological systems regulating many physical, chemical, and biological processes across a wide range of spatial and temporal scales. As a consequence, plant-flow interactions are of particular interest to a wide range of disciplines. While early studies of the interactions between vegetation and flowing water employed simplified and non-flexible structures such as rigid cylinders, recent studies have included flexible plants to identify the main characteristics of the hydrodynamics of vegetated flows. However, the description of plant reconfiguration has often been based on a static approach, i.e. considering the plant's deformation under a static load and neglecting turbulent fluctuations. Correlations between drag fluctuations, plant movements, and upstream turbulence were recently established showing that shear layer turbulence at the surface of the different plant elements (such as blades or stems) can contribute significantly to the dynamic behaviour of the plant. However, the relations between plant movement and force fluctuations might change under varying flow velocities, and although this point is crucial for mixing processes and plant dislodgement by fatigue, these aspects of fluid-structure interactions applied to aquatic vegetation remain largely unexplored. Using an innovative combination of sensing techniques in one set of experiments, this study investigates the relations between turbulence, fluctuating fluid forces and movements of a flexible cylindrical plant surrogate. A silicone-based flexible cylinder was attached at the bottom of a 1m wide flume in fully-developed uniform flow. The lower 22 cm of the plant surrogate were made of plain flexible silicone, while the higher 13cm included a casted rigid sensor, measuring accelerations at the tip of the surrogate. Forces were sampled at high frequencies at the surrogate's base by a 6-degrees-of-freedom force/torque sensor measuring down to the gram

  14. Unsteady flow of a thixotropic or antithixotropic fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Stephen; Pritchard, David; Croudace, Andrew

    2016-11-01

    We describe a general formulation of the governing equations for the unsteady, axisymmetric flow of a thixotropic or antithixotropic fluid in a channel of slowly varying width. These equations are equivalent to the equations of classical lubrication theory for a Newtonian fluid, but incorporate the evolving microstructure of the fluid, described in terms of a scalar structure parameter; they extend and generalise the corresponding results for steady, two-dimensional flow obtained recently by Pritchard, Wilson and McArdle. The magnitudes of temporal and advective thixotropic effects are gauged by naturally defined temporal and advective Deborah numbers. To gain insight into the complicated behaviour of the flow, we explore regimes in which these thixotropic effects first appear at first order in powers of the small aspect ratio. We present illustrative analytical and semi-analytical solutions for particular choices of the constitutive and kinetic laws, including a purely viscous Moore-Mewis-Wagner model and a regularised viscoplastic Hou\\vska model. Partly supported by a United Kingdom EPSRC DTA Studentship and Leverhulme Trust Research Fellowship RF-2013-355.

  15. Theoretical studies of non-Newtonian and Newtonian fluid flow through porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Yu-Shu.

    1990-02-01

    A comprehensive theoretical study has been carried out on the flow behavior of both single and multiple phase non-Newtonian fluids in porous media. This work is divided into three parts: development of numerical and analytical solutions; theoretical studies of transient flow of non-Newtonian fluids in porous media; and applications of well test analysis and displacement efficiency evaluation to field problems. A fully implicit, integral finite difference model has been developed for simulation of non-Newtonian and Newtonian fluid flow through porous media. Several commonly-used rheological models of power-law and Bingham plastic non-Newtonian fluids have been incorporated in the simulator. A Buckley-Leverett type analytical solution for one-dimensional, immiscible displacement involving non-Newtonian fluids in porous media has been developed. An integral method is also presented for the study of transient flow of Bingham fluids in porous media. In addition, two well test analysis methods have been developed for analyzing pressure transient tests of power-law and Bingham fluids, respectively. Applications are included to demonstrate this new technology. The physical mechanisms involved in immiscible displacement with non-Newtonian fluids in porous media have been studied using the Buckley-Leverett type analytical solution. In another study, an idealized fracture model has been used to obtain some insights into the flow of a power-law fluid in a double-porosity medium. Transient flow of a general pseudoplastic fluid has been studied numerically. 125 refs., 91 figs., 12 tabs.

  16. Comparison between traditional laboratory tests, permeability measurements and CT-based fluid flow modelling for cultural heritage applications.

    PubMed

    De Boever, Wesley; Bultreys, Tom; Derluyn, Hannelore; Van Hoorebeke, Luc; Cnudde, Veerle

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we examine the possibility to use on-site permeability measurements for cultural heritage applications as an alternative for traditional laboratory tests such as determination of the capillary absorption coefficient. These on-site measurements, performed with a portable air permeameter, were correlated with the pore network properties of eight sandstones and one granular limestone that are discussed in this paper. The network properties of the 9 materials tested in this study were obtained from micro-computed tomography (μCT) and compared to measurements and calculations of permeability and the capillary absorption rate of the stones under investigation, in order to find the correlation between pore network characteristics and fluid management characteristics of these sandstones. Results show a good correlation between capillary absorption, permeability and network properties, opening the possibility of using on-site permeability measurements as a standard method in cultural heritage applications.

  17. Dynamics of a fluid flow on Mars: Lava or mud?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Lionel; Mouginis-Mark, Peter J.

    2014-05-01

    A distinctive flow deposit southwest of Cerberus Fossae on Mars is analyzed. The flow source is a ∼20 m deep, ∼12 × 1.5 km wide depression within a yardang associated with the Medusae Fossae Formation. The flow traveled for ∼40 km following topographic lows to leave a deposit on average 3-4 km wide. The surface morphology of the deposit suggests that it was produced by the emplacement of a fluid flowing in a laminar fashion and possessing a finite yield strength. We use topographic data from a digital elevation model (DEM) to model the dynamics of the motion and infer that the fluid had a Bingham rheology with a plastic viscosity of ∼1 Pa s and a yield strength of ∼185 Pa. Although the low viscosity is consistent with the properties of komatiite-like lava, the combination of values of viscosity and yield strength, as well as the surface morphology of the flow, suggests that this was a mud flow. Comparison with published experimental data implies a solids content close to 60% by volume and a grain size dominated by silt-size particles. Comparison of the ∼1.5 km3 deposit volume with the ∼0.03 km3 volume of the source depression implies that ∼98% of the flow material was derived from depth in the crust. There are similarities between the deposit studied here, which we infer to be mud, and other flow deposits on Mars currently widely held to be lavas. This suggests that a re-appraisal of many of these deposits is now in order.

  18. Flow dichroism in critical colloidal fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Lenstra, T. A. J.; Dhont, J. K. G.

    2001-06-01

    Due to long-range correlations and slow dynamics of concentration fluctuations in the vicinity of the gas-liquid critical point, shear flow is very effective in distorting the microstructure of near-critical fluids. The anisotropic nature of the shear-field renders the microstructure highly anisotropic, leading to dichroism. Experiments on the dichroic behavior can thus be used to test theoretical predictions on microstructural order under shear flow conditions. We performed both static and dynamic dichroism and turbidity measurements on a colloid-polymer mixture, existing of silica spheres (radius 51 nm) and polydimethylsiloxane polymer (molar weight 204 kg/mol). Sufficiently far away from the critical point, in the mean-field region, the experimental data are in good agreement with theory. Very close to the critical point, beyond mean field, for which no theory exists yet, an unexpected decrease of dichroism on approach of the critical point is observed. Moreover, we do not observe critical slowing down of shear-induced dichroism, right up to the critical point, in contrast to the turbidity.

  19. AFDM: An Advanced Fluid-Dynamics Model

    SciTech Connect

    Wilhelm, D.

    1990-09-01

    This volume describes the Advanced Fluid-Dynamics Model (AFDM) for topologies, flow regimes, and interfacial areas. The objective of these models is to provide values for the interfacial areas between all components existing in a computational cell. The interfacial areas are then used to evaluate the mass, energy, and momentum transfer between the components. A new approach has been undertaken in the development of a model to convect the interfacial areas of the discontinuous velocity fields in the three-velocity-field environment of AFDM. These interfacial areas are called convectible surface areas. The continuous and discontinuous components are chosen using volume fraction and levitation criteria. This establishes so-called topologies for which the convectible surface areas can be determined. These areas are functions of space and time. Solid particulates that are limited to being discontinuous within the bulk fluid are assumed to have a constant size. The convectible surface areas are subdivided to model contacts between two discontinuous components or discontinuous components and the structure. The models have been written for the flow inside of large pools. Therefore, the structure is tracked only as a boundary to the fluid volume without having a direct influence on velocity or volume fraction distribution by means of flow regimes or boundary layer models. 17 refs., 7 tabs., 18 figs.

  20. Fluid flow plate for decreased density of fuel cell assembly

    DOEpatents

    Vitale, Nicholas G.

    1999-01-01

    A fluid flow plate includes first and second outward faces. Each of the outward faces has a flow channel thereon for carrying respective fluid. At least one of the fluids serves as reactant fluid for a fuel cell of a fuel cell assembly. One or more pockets are formed between the first and second outward faces for decreasing density of the fluid flow plate. A given flow channel can include one or more end sections and an intermediate section. An interposed member can be positioned between the outward faces at an interface between an intermediate section, of one of the outward faces, and an end section, of that outward face. The interposed member can serve to isolate the reactant fluid from the opposing outward face. The intermediate section(s) of flow channel(s) on an outward face are preferably formed as a folded expanse.

  1. UZ Flow Models and Submodels

    SciTech Connect

    P. Dixon

    2004-02-11

    The purpose of this Model Report is to document the unsaturated zone (UZ) fluid flow and tracer transport models and submodels as well as the flow fields generated utilizing the UZ Flow and Transport Model of Yucca Mountain (UZ Model), Nevada. This work was planned in ''Technical Work Plan (TWP) for: Performance Assessment Unsaturated Zone'' (BSC 2002 [160819], Section 1.10, Work Package AUZM06). The UZ Model has revised, updated, and enhanced the previous UZ Flow Model REV 00 ICN 01 (BSC 2001 [158726]) by incorporation of the conceptual repository design with new grids, recalibration of property sets, and more comprehensive validation effort. The flow fields describe fracture-fracture, matrix-matrix, and fracture-matrix liquid flow rates and their spatial distributions as well as moisture conditions in the UZ system. These 3-D UZ flow fields are used directly by Performance Assessment (PA). The model and submodels evaluate important hydrogeologic processes in the UZ as well as geochemistry and geothermal conditions. These provide the necessary framework to test conceptual hypotheses of flow and transport at different scales and predict flow and transport behavior under a variety of climatic conditions. In addition, this Model Report supports several PA activities, including abstractions, particle-tracking transport simulations, and the UZ Radionuclide Transport Model.

  2. Cytoskeletal Dynamics and Fluid Flow in Drosophila Oocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Canio, Gabriele; Goldstein, Raymond; Lauga, Eric

    2015-11-01

    The biological world includes a broad range of phenomena in which transport in a fluid plays a central role. Among these is the fundamental issue of cell polarity arising during development, studied historically using the model organism Drosophila melanogaster. The polarity of the oocyte is known to be induced by the translocation of mRNAs by kinesin motor proteins along a dense microtubule cytoskeleton, a process which also induces cytoplasmic streaming. Recent experimental observations have revealed the remarkable fluid-structure interactions that occur as the streaming flows back-react on the microtubules. In this work we use a combination of theory and simulations to address the interplay between the fluid flow and the configuration of cytoskeletal filaments leading to the directed motion inside the oocyte. We show in particular that the mechanical coupling between the fluid motion and the orientation of the microtubules can lead to a transition to coherent motion within the oocyte, as observed. Supported by EPSRC and ERC Advanced Investigator Grant 247333.

  3. Generating Inviscid and Viscous Fluid-Flow Simulations over an Aircraft Surface Using a Fluid-Flow Mesh

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodriguez, David L. (Inventor); Sturdza, Peter (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    Fluid-flow simulation over a computer-generated aircraft surface is generated using inviscid and viscous simulations. A fluid-flow mesh of fluid cells is obtained. At least one inviscid fluid property for the fluid cells is determined using an inviscid fluid simulation that does not simulate fluid viscous effects. A set of intersecting fluid cells that intersects the aircraft surface are identified. One surface mesh polygon of the surface mesh is identified for each intersecting fluid cell. A boundary-layer prediction point for each identified surface mesh polygon is determined. At least one boundary-layer fluid property for each boundary-layer prediction point is determined using the at least one inviscid fluid property of the corresponding intersecting fluid cell and a boundary-layer simulation that simulates fluid viscous effects. At least one updated fluid property for at least one fluid cell is determined using the at least one boundary-layer fluid property and the inviscid fluid simulation.

  4. Characterization of Fluid Flow in Paper-Based Microfluidic Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walji, Noosheen; MacDonald, Brendan

    2014-11-01

    Paper-based microfluidic devices have been presented as a viable low-cost alternative with the versatility to accommodate many applications in disease diagnosis and environmental monitoring. Current microfluidic designs focus on the use of silicone and PDMS structures, and several models have been developed to describe these systems; however, the design process for paper-based devices is hindered by a lack of prediction capability. In this work we simplify the complex underlying physics of the capillary-driven flow mechanism in a porous medium and generate a practical numerical model capable of predicting the flow behaviour. We present our key insights regarding the properties that dictate the behaviour of fluid wicking in paper-based microfluidic devices. We compare the results from our model to experiments and discuss the application of our model to design of paper-based microfluidic devices for arsenic detection in drinking water in Bangladesh.

  5. Thermohydrodynamic Analysis of Cryogenic Liquid Turbulent Flow Fluid Film Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    SanAndres, Luis

    1996-01-01

    Computational programs developed for the thermal analysis of tilting and flexure-pad hybrid bearings, and the unsteady flow and transient response of a point mass rotor supported on fluid film bearings are described. The motion of a cryogenic liquid on the thin film annular region of a fluid film bearing is described by a set of mass and momentum conservation, and energy transport equations for the turbulent bulk-flow velocities and pressure, and accompanied by thermophysical state equations for evaluation of the fluid material properties. Zeroth-order equations describe the fluid flow field for a journal static equilibrium position, while first-order (linear) equations govern the fluid flow for small amplitude-journal center translational motions. Solution to the zeroth-order flow field equations provides the bearing flow rate, load capacity, drag torque and temperature rise. Solution to the first-order equations determines the rotordynamic force coefficients due to journal radial motions.

  6. A Kinetic-fluid Model

    SciTech Connect

    First Author = C.Z. Cheng; Jay R. Johnson

    1998-07-10

    A nonlinear kinetic-fluid model for high-beta plasmas with multiple ion species which can be applied to multiscale phenomena is presented. The model embeds important kinetic effects due to finite ion Larmor radius (FLR), wave-particle resonances, magnetic particle trapping, etc. in the framework of simple fluid descriptions. When further restricting to low frequency phenomena with frequencies less than the ion cyclotron frequency the kinetic-fluid model takes a simpler form in which the fluid equations of multiple ion species collapse into single-fluid density and momentum equations and a low frequency generalized Ohm's law. The kinetic effects are introduced via plasma pressure tensors for ions and electrons which are computed from particle distribution functions that are governed by the Vlasov equation or simplified plasma dynamics equations such as the gyrokinetic equation. The ion FLR effects provide a finite parallel electric field, a perpendicular velocity that modifies the ExB drift, and a gyroviscosity tensor, all of which are neglected in the usual one-fluid MHD description. Eigenmode equations are derived which include magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling effects for low frequency waves (e.g., kinetic/inertial Alfven waves and ballooning-mirror instabilities).

  7. 14 CFR 23.1095 - Carburetor deicing fluid flow rate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Induction System § 23.1095 Carburetor deicing fluid flow rate. (a) If a carburetor deicing fluid system is.... (b) The fluid must be introduced into the air induction system— (1) Close to, and upstream of, the carburetor; and (2) So that it is equally distributed over the entire cross section of the induction...

  8. The fluid mechanics of continuous flow electrophoresis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saville, D. A.

    1990-01-01

    The overall objective is to establish theoretically and confirm experimentally the ultimate capabilities of continuous flow electrophoresis chambers operating in an environment essentially free of particle sedimentation and buoyancy. The efforts are devoted to: (1) studying the effects of particle concentration on sample conductivity and dielectric constant. The dielectric constant and conductivity were identified as playing crucial roles in the behavior of the sample and on the resolving power and throughput of continuous flow devices; and (2) improving the extant mathematical models to predict flow fields and particle trajectories in continuous flow electrophoresis. A dielectric spectrometer was designed and built to measure the complex dielectric constant of a colloidal dispersion as a function of frequency between 500 Hz and 200 kHz. The real part of the signal can be related to the sample's conductivity and the imaginary part to its dielectric constant. Measurements of the dielectric constants of several different dispersions disclosed that the dielectric constants of dilute systems of the sort encountered in particle electrophoresis are much larger than would be expected based on the extant theory. Experiments were carried out to show that, in many cases, this behavior is due to the presence of a filamentary structure of small hairs on the particle surface. A technique for producing electrokinetically ideal synthetic latex particles by heat treating was developed. Given the ubiquitous nature of hairy surfaces with both cells and synthetic particles, it was deemed necessary to develop a theory to explain their behavior. A theory for electrophoretic mobility of hairy particles was developed. Finally, the extant computer programs for predicting the structure of electro-osmotically driven flows were extended to encompass flow channels with variable wall mobilities.

  9. Homogenization of two fluid flow in porous media

    PubMed Central

    Daly, K. R.; Roose, T.

    2015-01-01

    The macroscopic behaviour of air and water in porous media is often approximated using Richards' equation for the fluid saturation and pressure. This equation is parametrized by the hydraulic conductivity and water release curve. In this paper, we use homogenization to derive a general model for saturation and pressure in porous media based on an underlying periodic porous structure. Under an appropriate set of assumptions, i.e. constant gas pressure, this model is shown to reduce to the simpler form of Richards' equation. The starting point for this derivation is the Cahn–Hilliard phase field equation coupled with Stokes equations for fluid flow. This approach allows us, for the first time, to rigorously derive the water release curve and hydraulic conductivities through a series of cell problems. The method captures the hysteresis in the water release curve and ties the macroscopic properties of the porous media with the underlying geometrical and material properties. PMID:27547073

  10. Working fluid flow visualization in gravity heat pipe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemec, Patrik; Malcho, Milan

    2016-03-01

    Heat pipe is device working with phase changes of working fluid inside hermetically closed pipe at specific pressure. The phase changes of working fluid from fluid to vapour and vice versa help heat pipe to transport high heat flux. The article deal about gravity heat pipe construction and processes casing inside during heat pipe operation. Experiment working fluid flow visualization is performed with two glass heat pipes with different inner diameter (13 mm and 22 mm) and filled with water. The working fluid flow visualization explains the phenomena as a working fluid boiling, nucleation of bubbles, and vapour condensation on the wall, vapour and condensate flow interaction, flow down condensate film thickness on the wall occurred during the heat pipe operation.

  11. Flowmeter measures flow rates of high temperature fluids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vary, A.

    1966-01-01

    Flowmeter in which flow rate is determined by measuring the position and thus the displacement of an internal float acted upon by the flowing fluid determines the flow rates of various liquid metals at elevated temperatures. Viscous forces cause the float to move from its mounted position, affording several means for measuring this motion and the flow rate.

  12. Comparing fluid mechanics models with experimental data.

    PubMed

    Spedding, G R

    2003-09-29

    The art of modelling the physical world lies in the appropriate simplification and abstraction of the complete problem. In fluid mechanics, the Navier-Stokes equations provide a model that is valid under most circumstances germane to animal locomotion, but the complexity of solutions provides strong incentive for the development of further, more simplified practical models. When the flow organizes itself so that all shearing motions are collected into localized patches, then various mathematical vortex models have been very successful in predicting and furthering the physical understanding of many flows, particularly in aerodynamics. Experimental models have the significant added convenience that the fluid mechanics can be generated by a real fluid, not a model, provided the appropriate dimensionless groups have similar values. Then, analogous problems can be encountered in making intelligible but independent descriptions of the experimental results. Finally, model predictions and experimental results may be compared if, and only if, numerical estimates of the likely variations in the tested quantities are provided. Examples from recent experimental measurements of wakes behind a fixed wing and behind a bird in free flight are used to illustrate these principles.

  13. Comparing fluid mechanics models with experimental data.

    PubMed Central

    Spedding, G R

    2003-01-01

    The art of modelling the physical world lies in the appropriate simplification and abstraction of the complete problem. In fluid mechanics, the Navier-Stokes equations provide a model that is valid under most circumstances germane to animal locomotion, but the complexity of solutions provides strong incentive for the development of further, more simplified practical models. When the flow organizes itself so that all shearing motions are collected into localized patches, then various mathematical vortex models have been very successful in predicting and furthering the physical understanding of many flows, particularly in aerodynamics. Experimental models have the significant added convenience that the fluid mechanics can be generated by a real fluid, not a model, provided the appropriate dimensionless groups have similar values. Then, analogous problems can be encountered in making intelligible but independent descriptions of the experimental results. Finally, model predictions and experimental results may be compared if, and only if, numerical estimates of the likely variations in the tested quantities are provided. Examples from recent experimental measurements of wakes behind a fixed wing and behind a bird in free flight are used to illustrate these principles. PMID:14561348

  14. Characterization of fluid flow in naturally fractured reservoirs. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, R.D.

    1981-08-01

    This report summarizes the results of a four month study of the characteristics of multiphase flow in naturally fractured porous media. An assessment and evaluation of the literature was carried out and a comprehensive list of references compiled on the subject. Mathematical models presented in the various references cited were evaluated along with the stated assumptions or those inherent in the equations. Particular attention was focused upon identifying unique approaches which would lead to the formulation of a general mathematical model of multiphase/multi-component flow in fractured porous media. A model is presented which may be used to more accurately predict the movement of multi-phase fluids through such type formations. Equations of motion are derived for a multiphase/multicomponent fluid which is flowing through a double porosity, double permeability medium consisting of isotropic primary rock matrix blocks and an anisotropic fracture matrix system. The fractures are assumed to have a general statistical distribution in space and orientation. A general distribution function, called the fracture matrix function is introduced to represent the statistical nature of the fractures.

  15. Advanced numerics for multi-dimensional fluid flow calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanka, S. P.

    1984-01-01

    In recent years, there has been a growing interest in the development and use of mathematical models for the simulation of fluid flow, heat transfer and combustion processes in engineering equipment. The equations representing the multi-dimensional transport of mass, momenta and species are numerically solved by finite-difference or finite-element techniques. However despite the multiude of differencing schemes and solution algorithms, and the advancement of computing power, the calculation of multi-dimensional flows, especially three-dimensional flows, remains a mammoth task. The following discussion is concerned with the author's recent work on the construction of accurate discretization schemes for the partial derivatives, and the efficient solution of the set of nonlinear algebraic equations resulting after discretization. The present work has been jointly supported by the Ramjet Engine Division of the Wright Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio, and the NASA Lewis Research Center.

  16. Advanced numerics for multi-dimensional fluid flow calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Vanka, S.P.

    1984-04-01

    In recent years, there has been a growing interest in the development and use of mathematical models for the simulation of fluid flow, heat transfer and combustion processes in engineering equipment. The equations representing the multi-dimensional transport of mass, momenta and species are numerically solved by finite-difference or finite-element techniques. However despite the multiude of differencing schemes and solution algorithms, and the advancement of computing power, the calculation of multi-dimensional flows, especially three-dimensional flows, remains a mammoth task. The following discussion is concerned with the author's recent work on the construction of accurate discretization schemes for the partial derivatives, and the efficient solution of the set of nonlinear algebraic equations resulting after discretization. The present work has been jointly supported by the Ramjet Engine Division of the Wright Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio, and the NASA Lewis Research Center.

  17. Interstitial fluid flow: simulation of mechanical environment of cells in the interosseous membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Wei; Ding, Guang-Hong

    2011-08-01

    In vitro experiments have shown that subtle fluid flow environment plays a significant role in living biological tissues, while there is no in vivo practical dynamical measurement of the interstitial fluid flow velocity. On the basis of a new finding that capillaries and collagen fibrils in the interosseous membrane form a parallel array, we set up a porous media model simulating the flow field with FLUENT software, studied the shear stress on interstitial cells' surface due to the interstitial fluid flow, and analyzed the effect of flow on protein space distribution around the cells. The numerical simulation results show that the parallel nature of capillaries could lead to directional interstitial fluid flow in the direction of capillaries. Interstitial fluid flow would induce shear stress on the membrane of interstitial cells, up to 30 Pa or so, which reaches or exceeds the threshold values of cells' biological response observed in vitro. Interstitial fluid flow would induce nonuniform spacial distribution of secretion protein of mast cells. Shear tress on cells could be affected by capillary parameters such as the distance between the adjacent capillaries, blood pressure and the permeability coefficient of capillary's wall. The interstitial pressure and the interstitial porosity could also affect the shear stress on cells. In conclusion, numerical simulation provides an effective way for in vivo dynamic interstitial velocity research, helps to set up the vivid subtle interstitial flow environment of cells, and is beneficial to understanding the physiological functions of interstitial fluid flow.

  18. Method and apparatus for chemically altering fluids in continuous flow

    DOEpatents

    Heath, William O.; Virden, Jr., Judson W.; Richardson, R. L.; Bergsman, Theresa M.

    1993-01-01

    The present invention relates to a continuous flow fluid reactor for chemically altering fluids. The reactor operates on standard frequency (50 to 60 Hz) electricity. The fluid reactor contains particles that are energized by the electricity to form a corona throughout the volume of the reactor and subsequently a non-equilibrium plasma that interacts with the fluid. Particles may form a fixed bed or a fluid bed. Electricity may be provided through electrodes or through an inductive coil. Fluids include gases containing exhaust products and organic fuels requiring oxidation.

  19. Method and apparatus for chemically altering fluids in continuous flow

    DOEpatents

    Heath, W.O.; Virden, J.W. Jr.; Richardson, R.L.; Bergsman, T.M.

    1993-10-19

    The present invention relates to a continuous flow fluid reactor for chemically altering fluids. The reactor operates on standard frequency (50 to 60 Hz) electricity. The fluid reactor contains particles that are energized by the electricity to form a corona throughout the volume of the reactor and subsequently a non-equilibrium plasma that interacts with the fluid. Particles may form a fixed bed or a fluid bed. Electricity may be provided through electrodes or through an inductive coil. Fluids include gases containing exhaust products and organic fuels requiring oxidation. 4 figures.

  20. Intermittent Flow In Yield Stress Fluids Slows Down Chaotic Mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boujlel, Jalila; Wendell, Dawn; Gouillart, Emmanuelle; Pigeonneau, Franck; Jop, Pierre; Laboratoire Surface du Verre et Interfaces Team

    2013-11-01

    Many mixing situations involve fluids with non-Newtonian properties: mixing of building materials such as concrete or mortar are based on fluids that have shear- thinning rheological properties. Lack of correct mixing can waste time and money, or lead to products with defects. When fluids are stirred and mixed together at low Reynolds number, the fluid particles should undergo chaotic trajectories to be well mixed by the so-called chaotic advection resulting from the flow. Previous work to characterize chaotic mixing in many different geometries has primarily focused on Newtonian fluids. First studies into non-Newtonian chaotic advection often utilize idealized mixing geometries such as cavity flows or journal bearing flows for numerical studies. Here, we present experimental results of chaotic mixing of yield stress fluids with non-Newtonian fluids using rod-stirring protocol with rotating vessel. We describe the various steps of the mixing and determine their dependence on the fluid rheology and speeds of rotation of the rods and the vessel. We show how the mixing of yield-stress fluids by chaotic advection is reduced compared to the mixing of Newtonian fluids and explain our results, bringing to light the relevant mechanisms: the presence of fluid that only flows intermittently, a phenomenon enhanced by the yield stress, and the importance of the peripheral region. This result is confirmed via numerical simulations.

  1. MHD Flow of the Micropolar Fluid between Eccentrically Rotating Disks

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Neetu

    2014-01-01

    This analytical investigation examines the magnetohydrodynamic flow problem of an incompressible micropolar fluid between the two eccentrically placed disks. Employing suitable transformations, the flow governing partial differential equations is reduced to ordinary differential equations. An exact solution representing the different flow characteristic of micropolar fluid has been derived by solving the ordinary differential equations. Analysis of the flow characteristics of the micropolar fluid has been done graphically by varying the Reynolds number and the Hartmann number. This analysis has been carried out for the weak and strong interactions. PMID:27355040

  2. Pore fluid pressure and shear behavior in debris flows of different compositions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaitna, Roland; Palucis, Marisa; Yohannes, Bereket; Hill, Kimberly; Dietrich, William

    2016-04-01

    Debris flows are mixtures of sediment and water that can have a wide range of different grain size distributions and water contents. The composition of the material is expected to have a strong effect on the development of pore fluid pressures in excess to hydrostatic, which in turn might affect the internal deformation behavior. We present a set of large scale experiments with debris flow mixtures of different compositions in a 4-m diameter rotating drum. Longitudinal profiles of basal fluid pressure and normal stress were measured and a probe to determine fluid pressure at different depths within the flow was developed and tested. Additionally we determined vertical profiles of mean particle velocities in the flow interior by measuring small variations of conductivity of the passing material and calculating the time lag between signals from two independent measurements at a small, known distance apart. Mean values of basal pore fluid pressure range from hydrostatic pressure for gravel-water flows to nearly complete liquefaction for muddy mixtures having a wide grain size distribution. The data indicate that the presence of fines dampens fluctuations of normalized fluid pressure and normal stress and concentrates shear at the base. The mobility of grain-fluid flows is strongly enhanced by a combination of fines in suspension as part of the interstitial fluid and a wide grain size distribution. Excess fluid pressure may arise from fluid displacement by converging grains at the front of the flow and the slow settling of grains through a highly viscous non-Newtonian fluid. Our findings support the need for pore pressure evolution and diffusion equations in debris flow models as they depend on particle size distributions. This study contributes to the understanding of the production of excess fluid pressure in grain fluid mixtures and may guide the development of constitutive models that describe natural events.

  3. Distribution of flowing fluids in a confined porous medium under microgravity conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Boyun; Holder, Donald W.; Carter, Layne

    2004-08-01

    Predicting distribution of flowing fluids in confined porous media under microgravity conditions is vitally important for optimal design of packed bubble column reactors in space stations. Existing correlations have been found inaccurate when applied to microgravity conditions. On the basis of Darcy's law for two-phase flow, a simple mathematical model has been developed in this study. Sensitivity analyses with the model indicate that for a given combination of wetting and nonwetting fluid flow rates, fluid holdups are controlled by relative permeabilities. The effect of gravity on fluid holdup is influenced by the absolute permeability of the porous medium. Fluid distribution is affected by the temperature-dependent fluid properties and wall effect.

  4. Viscous flow through slowly expanding or contracting porous walls with low seepage Reynolds number: a model for transport of biological fluids through vessels.

    PubMed

    Dinarvand, Saeed

    2011-10-01

    In this article, the problem of laminar, isothermal, incompressible and viscous flow in a rectangular domain bounded by two moving porous walls, which enable the fluid to enter or exit during successive expansions or contractions, is investigated. The governing non-linear equations and their associated boundary conditions are transformed into a highly non-linear ordinary differential equation. The series solution of the problem is obtained by utilising the homotopy perturbation method. Graphical results are presented to investigate the influence of the non-dimensional wall dilation rate and seepage Reynolds number (Re) on the velocity, normal pressure distribution and wall shear stress. Since the transport of biological fluids through contracting or expanding vessels is characterised by low seepage Res, the current study focuses on the viscous flow driven by small wall contractions and expansions of two weakly permeable walls.

  5. Computational fluid dynamic modelling of cavitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deshpande, Manish; Feng, Jinzhang; Merkle, Charles L.

    1993-01-01

    Models in sheet cavitation in cryogenic fluids are developed for use in Euler and Navier-Stokes codes. The models are based upon earlier potential-flow models but enable the cavity inception point, length, and shape to be determined as part of the computation. In the present paper, numerical solutions are compared with experimental measurements for both pressure distribution and cavity length. Comparisons between models are also presented. The CFD model provides a relatively simple modification to an existing code to enable cavitation performance predictions to be included. The analysis also has the added ability of incorporating thermodynamic effects of cryogenic fluids into the analysis. Extensions of the current two-dimensional steady state analysis to three-dimensions and/or time-dependent flows are, in principle, straightforward although geometrical issues become more complicated. Linearized models, however offer promise of providing effective cavitation modeling in three-dimensions. This analysis presents good potential for improved understanding of many phenomena associated with cavity flows.

  6. Friction-Induced Fluid Heating in Nanoscale Helium Flows

    SciTech Connect

    Li Zhigang

    2010-05-21

    We investigate the mechanism of friction-induced fluid heating in nanoconfinements. Molecular dynamics simulations are used to study the temperature variations of liquid helium in nanoscale Poiseuille flows. It is found that the fluid heating is dominated by different sources of friction as the external driving force is changed. For small external force, the fluid heating is mainly caused by the internal viscous friction in the fluid. When the external force is large and causes fluid slip at the surfaces of channel walls, the friction at the fluid-solid interface dominates over the internal friction in the fluid and is the major contribution to fluid heating. An asymmetric temperature gradient in the fluid is developed in the case of nonidentical walls and the general temperature gradient may change sign as the dominant heating factor changes from internal to interfacial friction with increasing external force.

  7. Numerical modeling of fluid migration in subduction zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walter, M. J.; Quinteros, J.; Sobolev, S. V.

    2015-12-01

    It is well known that fluids play a crucial role in subduction evolution. For example, mechanical weakening along tectonic interfaces, due to high fluid pressure, may enable oceanic subduction. Hence, the fluid content seems to be a critical parameter for subduction initiation. Studies have also shown a correlation between the location of slab dehydration and intermediate seismic activity. Furthermore, expelled fluids from the subduction slab affect the melting temperature, consequently, contributing to partial melting in the wedge above the down-going plate and extensive volcanism. In summary, fluids have a great impact on tectonic processes and therefore should be incorporated into geodynamic numerical models. Here we use existing approaches to couple and solve fluid flow equations in the SLIM-3D thermo-mechanical code. SLIM-3D is a three-dimensional thermo-mechanical code capable of simulating lithospheric deformation with elasto-visco-plastic rheology. It has been successfully applied to model geodynamic processes at different tectonic settings, including subduction zones. However, although SLIM-3D already includes many features, fluid migration has not been incorporated into the model yet. To this end, we coupled solid and fluid flow assuming that fluids flow through a porous and deformable solid. Thereby, we introduce a two-phase flow into the model, in which the Stokes flow is coupled with the Darcy law for fluid flow. Ultimately, the evolution of porosity is governed by a compaction pressure and the advection of the porous solid. We show the details of our implementation of the fluid flow into the existing thermo-mechanical finite element code and present first results of benchmarks and experiments. We are especially interested in the coupling of subduction processes and the evolution of the magmatic arc. Thereby, we focus on the key factors controlling magma emplacement and its influence on subduction processes.

  8. Thermodynamics and flow-frames for dissipative relativistic fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Ván, P.; Biró, T. S.

    2014-01-14

    A general thermodynamic treatment of dissipative relativistic fluids is introduced, where the temperature four vector is not parallel to the velocity field of the fluid. Generic stability and kinetic equilibrium points out a particular thermodynamics, where the temperature vector is parallel to the enthalpy flow vector and the choice of the flow fixes the constitutive functions for viscous stress and heat. The linear stability of the homogeneous equilibrium is proved in a mixed particle-energy flow-frame.

  9. HYDROGEN ELECTROLYZER FLOW DISTRIBUTOR MODEL

    SciTech Connect

    Shadday, M

    2006-09-28

    The hybrid sulfur process (HyS) hydrogen electrolyzer consists of a proton exchange membrane (PEM) sandwiched between two porous graphite layers. An aqueous solution of sulfuric acid with dissolved SO{sub 2} gas flows parallel to the PEM through the porous graphite layer on the anode side of the electrolyzer. A flow distributor, consisting of a number of parallel channels acting as headers, promotes uniform flow of the anolyte fluid through the porous graphite layer. A numerical model of the hydraulic behavior of the flow distributor is herein described. This model was developed to be a tool to aid the design of flow distributors. The primary design objective is to minimize spatial variations in the flow through the porous graphite layer. The hydraulic data from electrolyzer tests consists of overall flowrate and pressure drop. Internal pressure and flow distributions are not measured, but these details are provided by the model. The model has been benchmarked against data from tests of the current electrolyzer. The model reasonably predicts the viscosity effect of changing the fluid from water to an aqueous solution of 30 % sulfuric acid. The permeability of the graphite layer was the independent variable used to fit the model to the test data, and the required permeability for a good fit is within the range literature values for carbon paper. The model predicts that reducing the number of parallel channels by 50 % will substantially improve the uniformity of the flow in the porous graphite layer, while maintaining an acceptable pressure drop across the electrolyzer. When the size of the electrolyzer is doubled from 2.75 inches square to 5.5 inches square, the same number of channels as in the current design will be adequate, but it is advisable to increase the channel cross-sectional flow area. This is due to the increased length of the channels.

  10. Fundamental Processes of Atomization in Fluid-Fluid Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallagher, Christopher; Leighton, David T.; Chang, Hsueh-Chia; McCready, Mark J.

    1996-01-01

    This paper discusses our proposed experimental and theoretical study of atomization in gas-liquid and liquid-liquid flows. While atomization is a very important process in these flows, the fundamental mechanism is not understood and there is no predictive theory. Previous photographic studies in (turbulent) gas-liquid flows have shown that liquid is atomized when it is removed by the gas flow from the crest of large solitary or roll waves. Our preliminary studies in liquid-liquid laminar flows exhibit the same mechanism. The two-liquid system is easier to study than gas-liquid systems because the time scales are much slower, the length scales much larger, and there is no turbulence. The proposed work is intended to obtain information about the mechanism of formation, rate of occurrence and the evolving shape of solitary waves; and quantitative aspects of the detailed events of the liquid removal process that can be used to verify a general predictive theory.

  11. Fluid dynamic mechanisms and interactions within separated flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutton, J. C.; Addy, A. L.

    1990-02-01

    The significant results of a joint research effort investigating the fundamental fluid dynamic mechanisms and interactions within high-speed separated flows are presented in detail. The results have obtained through analytical and numerical approaches, but with primary emphasis on experimental investigations of missile and projectile base flow-related configurations. The objectives of the research program focus on understanding the component mechanisms and interactions which establish and maintain high-speed separated flow regions. The analytical and numerical efforts have centered on unsteady plume-wall interactions in rocket launch tubes and on predictions of the effects of base bleed on transonic and supersonic base flowfields. The experimental efforts have considered the development and use of a state-of-the-art two component laser Doppler velocimeter (LDV) system for experiments with planar, two-dimensional, small-scale models in supersonic flows. The LDV experiments have yielded high quality, well documented mean and turbulence velocity data for a variety of high-speed separated flows including initial shear layer development, recompression/reattachment processes for two supersonic shear layers, oblique shock wave/turbulent boundary layer interactions in a compression corner, and two-stream, supersonic, near-wake flow behind a finite-thickness base.

  12. Microscopic and continuum descriptions of Janus motor fluid flow fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reigh, Shang Yik; Huang, Mu-Jie; Schofield, Jeremy; Kapral, Raymond

    2016-11-01

    Active media, whose constituents are able to move autonomously, display novel features that differ from those of equilibrium systems. In addition to naturally occurring active systems such as populations of swimming bacteria, active systems of synthetic self-propelled nanomotors have been developed. These synthetic systems are interesting because of their potential applications in a variety of fields. Janus particles, synthetic motors of spherical geometry with one hemisphere that catalyses the conversion of fuel to product and one non-catalytic hemisphere, can propel themselves in solution by self-diffusiophoresis. In this mechanism, the concentration gradient generated by the asymmetric catalytic activity leads to a force on the motor that induces fluid flows in the surrounding medium. These fluid flows are studied in detail through microscopic simulations of Janus motor motion and continuum theory. It is shown that continuum theory is able to capture many, but not all, features of the dynamics of the Janus motor and the velocity fields of the fluid. This article is part of the themed issue 'Multiscale modelling at the physics-chemistry-biology interface'.

  13. Pattern formation in granular and granular-fluid flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duong, Nhat-Hang P.

    Particles and suspensions of particles in fluids are regularly used in many engineering disciplines such as catalysis and reaction engineering, environmental engineering, pharmaceutical engineering, etc. A few issues that are commonly encountered include ensuring homogeneity in pharmaceutical suspensions, predicting particle transport in atmospheric and effluent streams, and manufacturing uniform composite materials. Yet the fundamental study of particle motions in granular media or in highly concentrated granular suspensions has received little attention. Relevant issues of research interest include development of adaptive models that permit wide ranges of particle concentrations, improvement of analyses that allow physical interpretation of particle motions in any medium, of scales ranging from particle size to system size, and accurate validation of theoretical with experimental data. Given the above shortcomings, this dissertation will focus on investigating basic transport behavior of particles in fluids and developing predictive models for granular media and granular suspensions. Emphasis will be given to combining experiments with computations through examples of pattern forming phenomena in a granular medium and a dense granular-fluid system. The background motivation and the objectives of this dissertation are stated in the opening chapter 1. The next three chapters address these objectives in detail. First, chapter 2 presents experimental evidence, descriptions, and characteristics of novel patterns in a dense granular suspension. This is followed by chapter 3 in which a mean-field continuum model is derived to further elucidate the reported patterning phenomena. Chapter 4 uncovers several novel granular patterns experimentally and is concluded with a coarse-grained phenomenological model for granular surface flows. Lastly, chapter 5 closes the dissertation with conclusions and possible future directions. This work provides additional understanding and

  14. Visualization periodic flows in a continuously stratified fluid.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bardakov, R.; Vasiliev, A.

    2012-04-01

    To visualize the flow pattern of viscous continuously stratified fluid both experimental and computational methods were developed. Computational procedures were based on exact solutions of set of the fundamental equations. Solutions of the problems of flows producing by periodically oscillating disk (linear and torsion oscillations) were visualized with a high resolutions to distinguish small-scale the singular components on the background of strong internal waves. Numerical algorithm of visualization allows to represent both the scalar and vector fields, such as velocity, density, pressure, vorticity, stream function. The size of the source, buoyancy and oscillation frequency, kinematic viscosity of the medium effects were traced in 2D an 3D posing problems. Precision schlieren instrument was used to visualize the flow pattern produced by linear and torsion oscillations of strip and disk in a continuously stratified fluid. Uniform stratification was created by the continuous displacement method. The buoyancy period ranged from 7.5 to 14 s. In the experiments disks with diameters from 9 to 30 cm and a thickness of 1 mm to 10 mm were used. Different schlieren methods that are conventional vertical slit - Foucault knife, vertical slit - filament (Maksoutov's method) and horizontal slit - horizontal grating (natural "rainbow" schlieren method) help to produce supplementing flow patterns. Both internal wave beams and fine flow components were visualized in vicinity and far from the source. Intensity of high gradient envelopes increased proportionally the amplitude of the source. In domains of envelopes convergence isolated small scale vortices and extended mushroom like jets were formed. Experiments have shown that in the case of torsion oscillations pattern of currents is more complicated than in case of forced linear oscillations. Comparison with known theoretical model shows that nonlinear interactions between the regular and singular flow components must be taken

  15. Effect of laminar and turbulent fluid flow on mass transfer in some electrochemical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Qian

    2000-10-01

    The influence of fluid flow on electrode-shape change that results from electrodeposition in the presence of a model leveling agent is simulated and discussed. The treatment is more rigorous than past studies in that flow and concentration fields are recalculated as the electrode shape changes. It is shown that uncertainties due to approximate treatments of fluid flow may be as significant as existing discrepancies between experiment and theory. The mass transfer characteristics of a turbulent slot jet impinging normally on a target wall are examined using numerical simulations. Fluid flow is modeled using the k-turbulence model of Wilcox [1]. The computations are validated against existing experimental fluid flow, heat transfer and mass transfer data. The range of Reynolds numbers examined is from 450 to 20,000 with Prandtl or Schmidt numbers from 1 to 2,400. The distance of the target plate from the slot jet varies between 2 to 8 times the slot jet width. The study reveals computational aspects that are unique to the solution of flow and mass transfer problems with the combination of high Schmidt numbers and turbulent flows. A low order "coherent structure" near-wall flow model first proposed by Chapman and Kuhn [2] is used to obtain the near-wall fluid flow field. This flow field is then used to compute high Schmidt number mass transfer for a turbulent boundary layer flow. It is shown that useful insight can be obtained into high Schmidt number mass transfer for a turbulent fluid flow using this model. The boundary conditions for this near-wall field for more complicated flow or geometries may be obtained either from experimental turbulent velocity and frequency data or from a k-o type of turbulence model.

  16. FLUID FLOW, SOLUTE MIXING AND PRECIPITATION IN POROUS MEDIA

    SciTech Connect

    Redden, George D; Y. Fang; T.D. Scheibe; A.M. Tartakovsky; Fox, Don T; Fujita, Yoshiko; White, Timothy A

    2006-09-01

    Reactions that lead to the formation of mineral precipitates, colloids or growth of biofilms in porous media often depend on the molecular-level diffusive mixing. For example, for the formation of mineral phases, exceeding the saturation index for a mineral is a minimum requirement for precipitation to proceed. Solute mixing frequently occurs at the interface between two solutions each containing one or more soluble reactants, particularly in engineered systems where contaminant degradation or modification or fluid flow are objectives. Although many of the fundamental component processes involved in the deposition or solubilization of solid phases are reasonably well understood, including precipitation equilibrium and kinetics, fluid flow and solute transport, the deposition of chemical precipitates, biofilms and colloidal particles are all coupled to flow, and the science of such coupled processes is not well developed. How such precipitates (and conversely, dissolution of solids) are distributed in the subsurface along flow paths with chemical gradients is a complex and challenging problem. This is especially true in systems that undergo rapid change where equilibrium conditions cannot be assumed, particularly in subsurface systems where reactants are introduced rapidly, compared to most natural flow conditions, and where mixing fronts are generated. Although the concept of dispersion in porous media is frequently used to approximate mixing at macroscopic scales, dispersion does not necessarily describe pore-level or molecular level mixing that must occur for chemical and biological reactions to be possible. An example of coupling between flow, mixing and mineral precipitation, with practical applications to controlling fluid flow or contaminant remediation in subsurface environments is shown in the mixing zone between parallel flowing solutions. Two- and three-dimensional experiments in packed-sand media were conducted where solutions containing calcium and

  17. Direct modeling for computational fluid dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Kun

    2015-06-01

    All fluid dynamic equations are valid under their modeling scales, such as the particle mean free path and mean collision time scale of the Boltzmann equation and the hydrodynamic scale of the Navier-Stokes (NS) equations. The current computational fluid dynamics (CFD) focuses on the numerical solution of partial differential equations (PDEs), and its aim is to get the accurate solution of these governing equations. Under such a CFD practice, it is hard to develop a unified scheme that covers flow physics from kinetic to hydrodynamic scales continuously because there is no such governing equation which could make a smooth transition from the Boltzmann to the NS modeling. The study of fluid dynamics needs to go beyond the traditional numerical partial differential equations. The emerging engineering applications, such as air-vehicle design for near-space flight and flow and heat transfer in micro-devices, do require further expansion of the concept of gas dynamics to a larger domain of physical reality, rather than the traditional distinguishable governing equations. At the current stage, the non-equilibrium flow physics has not yet been well explored or clearly understood due to the lack of appropriate tools. Unfortunately, under the current numerical PDE approach, it is hard to develop such a meaningful tool due to the absence of valid PDEs. In order to construct multiscale and multiphysics simulation methods similar to the modeling process of constructing the Boltzmann or the NS governing equations, the development of a numerical algorithm should be based on the first principle of physical modeling. In this paper, instead of following the traditional numerical PDE path, we introduce direct modeling as a principle for CFD algorithm development. Since all computations are conducted in a discretized space with limited cell resolution, the flow physics to be modeled has to be done in the mesh size and time step scales. Here, the CFD is more or less a direct

  18. Coating Of Model Rheological Fluids In Microchannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koelling, Kurt; Boehm, Michael

    2008-07-01

    Researchers have strived to understand and quantify the dynamics within the myriad micro/nano-devices proposed and developed within the last decade. Concepts such as fluid flow, mass transfer, molecule manipulation, and reaction kinetics must be understood in order to intelligently design and operate these devices. In addition to general engineering principles, intelligent design should also focus on material properties (e.g. density, viscosity, conductivity). One key property, viscosity, will play a large part of any fluidic device, including biomedical devices, because the fluids used will, most likely, be non-Newtonian and therefore highly dependent upon the shear rate. Be it a biomedical or macromolecule separation device, or simply the processing of polymeric material, select model polymers and simple flow schemes can be used to investigate the dynamics within micro-devices. Here, we present results for the processing of Newtonian and non-Newtonian polymeric fluids in micro-channels during two-phase penetrating flow. The system investigated is a circular capillary 100 microns in diameter, which is pre-filled with a polymeric liquid. The polymeric liquid is either of Newtonian viscosity, or the same liquid with dispersed high molecular weight polystyrene, which exhibits viscoelastic behavior. A second, immiscible phase, silicone oil of low Newtonian viscosity, is pumped into the system and subsequently cores the polymeric liquid. The dynamics of bubble flow (e.g. bubble velocity and bubble shape) as well as the influence of rheology on coating will be investigated. By studying these model systems, we will learn how complex fluids behave on progressively smaller size scales.

  19. Tracing fluid flow in geothermal reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Rose, P.E.; Adams, M.C.

    1997-12-31

    A family of fluorescent compounds, the polycyclic aromatic sulfonates, were evaluated for application in intermediate- and high-temperature geothermal reservoirs. Whereas the naphthalene sulfonates were found to be very thermally stable and reasonably detectable, the amino-substituted naphthalene sulfonates were found to be somewhat less thermally stable, but much more detectable. A tracer test was conducted at the Dixie Valley, Nevada, geothermal reservoir using one of the substituted naphthalene sulfonates, amino G, and fluorescein. Four of 9 production wells showed tracer breakthrough during the first 200 days of the test. Reconstructed tracer return curves are presented that correct for the thermal decay of tracer assuming an average reservoir temperature of 227{degrees}C. In order to examine the feasibility of using numerical simulation to model tracer flow, we developed simple, two-dimensional models of the geothermal reservoir using the numerical simulation programs TETRAD and TOUGH2. By fitting model outputs to measured return curves, we show that numerical reservoir simulations can be calibrated with the tracer data. Both models predict the same order of elution, approximate tracer concentrations, and return curve shapes. Using these results, we propose a method for using numerical models to design a tracer test.

  20. Applying uncertainty quantification to multiphase flow computational fluid dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Gel, A; Garg, R; Tong, C; Shahnam, M; Guenther, C

    2013-07-01

    Multiphase computational fluid dynamics plays a major role in design and optimization of fossil fuel based reactors. There is a growing interest in accounting for the influence of uncertainties associated with physical systems to increase the reliability of computational simulation based engineering analysis. The U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) has recently undertaken an initiative to characterize uncertainties associated with computer simulation of reacting multiphase flows encountered in energy producing systems such as a coal gasifier. The current work presents the preliminary results in applying non-intrusive parametric uncertainty quantification and propagation techniques with NETL's open-source multiphase computational fluid dynamics software MFIX. For this purpose an open-source uncertainty quantification toolkit, PSUADE developed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has been interfaced with MFIX software. In this study, the sources of uncertainty associated with numerical approximation and model form have been neglected, and only the model input parametric uncertainty with forward propagation has been investigated by constructing a surrogate model based on data-fitted response surface for a multiphase flow demonstration problem. Monte Carlo simulation was employed for forward propagation of the aleatory type input uncertainties. Several insights gained based on the outcome of these simulations are presented such as how inadequate characterization of uncertainties can affect the reliability of the prediction results. Also a global sensitivity study using Sobol' indices was performed to better understand the contribution of input parameters to the variability observed in response variable.

  1. Microfluidic-SANS: flow processing of complex fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez, Carlos G.; Watanabe, Takaichi; Martel, Anne; Porcar, Lionel; Cabral, João T.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding and engineering the flow-response of complex and non-Newtonian fluids at a molecular level is a key challenge for their practical utilisation. Here we demonstrate the coupling of microfluidics with small angle neutron scattering (SANS). Microdevices with high neutron transmission (up to 98%), low scattering background (), broad solvent compatibility and high pressure tolerance (~3-15 bar) are rapidly prototyped via frontal photo polymerisation. Scattering from single microchannels of widths down to 60 μm, with beam footprint of 500 μm diameter, was successfully obtained in the scattering vector range 0.01-0.3 Å-1, corresponding to real space dimensions of . We demonstrate our approach by investigating the molecular re-orientation and alignment underpinning the flow response of two model complex fluids, namely cetyl trimethylammonium chloride/pentanol/D2O and sodium lauryl sulfate/octanol/brine lamellar systems. Finally, we assess the applicability and outlook of microfluidic-SANS for high-throughput and flow processing studies, with emphasis of soft matter.

  2. Microfluidic-SANS: flow processing of complex fluids

    PubMed Central

    Lopez, Carlos G.; Watanabe, Takaichi; Martel, Anne; Porcar, Lionel; Cabral, João T.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding and engineering the flow-response of complex and non-Newtonian fluids at a molecular level is a key challenge for their practical utilisation. Here we demonstrate the coupling of microfluidics with small angle neutron scattering (SANS). Microdevices with high neutron transmission (up to 98%), low scattering background (), broad solvent compatibility and high pressure tolerance (≈3–15 bar) are rapidly prototyped via frontal photo polymerisation. Scattering from single microchannels of widths down to 60 μm, with beam footprint of 500 μm diameter, was successfully obtained in the scattering vector range 0.01–0.3 Å−1, corresponding to real space dimensions of . We demonstrate our approach by investigating the molecular re-orientation and alignment underpinning the flow response of two model complex fluids, namely cetyl trimethylammonium chloride/pentanol/D2O and sodium lauryl sulfate/octanol/brine lamellar systems. Finally, we assess the applicability and outlook of microfluidic-SANS for high-throughput and flow processing studies, with emphasis of soft matter. PMID:25578326

  3. A chaotic-dynamical conceptual model to describe fluid flow and contaminant transport in a fractured vadose zone. 1997 progress report and presentations at the annual meeting, Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, December 3--4, 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Faybishenko, B.; Doughty, C.; Geller, J.

    1998-07-01

    Understanding subsurface flow and transport processes is critical for effective assessment, decision-making, and remediation activities for contaminated sites. However, for fluid flow and contaminant transport through fractured vadose zones, traditional hydrogeological approaches are often found to be inadequate. In this project, the authors examine flow and transport through a fractured vadose zone as a deterministic chaotic dynamical process, and develop a model of it in these terms. Initially, the authors examine separately the geometric model of fractured rock and the flow dynamics model needed to describe chaotic behavior. Ultimately they will put the geometry and flow dynamics together to develop a chaotic-dynamical model of flow and transport in a fractured vadose zone. They investigate water flow and contaminant transport on several scales, ranging from small-scale laboratory experiments in fracture replicas and fractured cores, to field experiments conducted in a single exposed fracture at a basalt outcrop, and finally to a ponded infiltration test using a pond of 7 by 8 m. In the field experiments, they measure the time-variation of water flux, moisture content, and hydraulic head at various locations, as well as the total inflow rate to the subsurface. Such variations reflect the changes in the geometry and physics of water flow that display chaotic behavior, which they try to reconstruct using the data obtained. In the analysis of experimental data, a chaotic model can be used to predict the long-term bounds on fluid flow and transport behavior, known as the attractor of the system, and to examine the limits of short-term predictability within these bounds. This approach is especially well suited to the need for short-term predictions to support remediation decisions and long-term bounding studies. View-graphs from ten presentations made at the annual meeting held December 3--4, 1997 are included in an appendix to this report.

  4. Fluid mechanics of the stagnation point flow chamber and its platelet deposition.

    PubMed

    Affeld, K; Reininger, A J; Gadischke, J; Grunert, K; Schmidt, S; Thiele, F

    1995-07-01

    The interaction of flow and thrombus generation often is a crucial question for the engineer working in the field of artificial organs. However, this interaction is only incompletely known, and quantitative data under well-defined experimental conditions are especially rare. These can be attained with the stagnation point flow chamber. This flow model applies platelet-rich plasma (PRP) as fluid. Its flow conditions are assessed with the help of computational fluid mechanics. In addition, the concept of the boundary layer is introduced, which permits assessment of the platelet flow along the wall. The results of the experiment indicate that platelets are deposited at a defined shear rate.

  5. Magnetic fluid driven flow in a capillary channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruno, Nickolaus M.; Ciocanel, Constantin

    2010-04-01

    This paper presents simulated and experimental results on the flow induced in a closed channel by a magnetic fluid (i.e. magnetorheological (MR) fluid and a ferrofluid) plunger. The results are used to assess the feasibility of using such fluids for development of milli-micro-scale pumps. The magnetic fluid plunger acts as a piston that is moved along the channel by an array of drive coils (or by a permanent magnet) to displace an immiscible fluid. The excited drive coils produce a traveling magnetic field wave inside the channel which in turn produces magnetic dipoles in the magnetic fluid. The dipoles react with the traveling wave leading to a Kelvin force that drags the magnetic fluid plunger through the channel. The flow rates achievable in this approach are a function of channel geometry, magnetic fluid properties, plug size, frequency of the current passing through the drive coils, and the location of the drive coils along the channel. Representative results of the analysis of the effect of these parameters on the flow rates are presented here. While the simulations indicate that both, MR and ferrofluids may be used for fluid actuation in the selected geometry, the experiments validated only the MR fluid option.

  6. Choked flow of fluid nitrogen with emphasis on the thermodynamic critical region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendricks, R. C.; Simoneau, R. J.; Ehlers, R. C.

    1972-01-01

    Experimental measurements of critical flow rate and pressure ratio for nitrogen flowing through a nozzle are presented. Data for selected stagnation isotherms from 87.5 to 234 K with pressures to 9.3 MN/m2 are compared to an equilibrium model with real fluid properties and also a nonequilibrium model. Critical flow pressure ratio along an isotherm tends to peak while the flow rate indicates an inflection. The point is closely associated with the transposed critical temperature and represents a change in the fluid structure.

  7. Unbalanced-flow, fluid-mixing plug with metering capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    England, John Dwight (Inventor); Kelley, Anthony R. (Inventor); Van Buskirk, Paul D. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A fluid mixer plug has holes formed therethrough such that a remaining portion is closed to fluid flow. The plug's inlet face defines a central circuit region and a ring-shaped region with the ring-shaped region including at least some of the plug's remaining portion so-closed to fluid flow. This remaining portion or closed region at each radius R of the ring shaped region satisfies a radius independent, flow-based relationship. Entry openings are defined in the plug's inlet face in correspondence with the holes. The entry openings define an open flow area at each radius of the ring-shaped region. The open flow area at each such radius satisfies the inverse of the flow-based relationship defining the closed regions of the plug.

  8. Apparatus for irradiating a continuously flowing stream of fluid

    DOEpatents

    Speir, Leslie G.; Adams, Edwin L.

    1984-01-01

    An apparatus for irradiating a continuously flowing stream of fluid is diosed. The apparatus consists of a housing having a spherical cavity and a spherical moderator containing a radiation source positioned within the spherical cavity. The spherical moderator is of lesser diameter than the spherical cavity so as to define a spherical annular volume around the moderator. The housing includes fluid intake and output conduits which open onto the spherical cavity at diametrically opposite positions. Fluid flows through the cavity around the spherical moderator and is uniformly irradiated due to the 4.pi. radiation geometry. The irradiation source, for example a .sup.252 CF neutron source, is removable from the spherical moderator through a radial bore which extends outwardly to an opening on the outside of the housing. The radiation source may be routinely removed without interrupting the flow of fluid or breaching the containment of the fluid.

  9. Feedback regulated induction heater for a flowing fluid

    DOEpatents

    Migliori, A.; Swift, G.W.

    1984-06-13

    A regulated induction heater for heating a stream of flowing fluid to a predetermined desired temperature. The heater includes a radiofrequency induction coil which surrounds a glass tube through which the fluid flows. A heating element consisting of a bundle of approximately 200 stainless steel capillary tubes located within the glass tube couples the output of the induction coil to the fluid. The temperature of the fluid downstream from the heating element is sensed with a platinum resistance thermometer, the output of which is applied to an adjustable porportional and integral feedback control circuit which regulates the power applied to the induction coil. The heater regulates the fluid temperature to within 0.005/sup 0/C at a flow rate of 50 cm/sup 3//sec with a response time of less than 0.1 second, and can accommodate changes in heat load up to 1500 watts.

  10. Feedback regulated induction heater for a flowing fluid

    DOEpatents

    Migliori, Albert; Swift, Gregory W.

    1985-01-01

    A regulated induction heater for heating a stream of flowing fluid to a predetermined desired temperature. The heater includes a radiofrequency induction coil which surrounds a glass tube through which the fluid flows. A heating element consisting of a bundle of approximately 200 stainless steel capillary tubes located within the glass tube couples the output of the induction coil to the fluid. The temperature of the fluid downstream from the heating element is sensed with a platinum resistance thermometer, the output of which is applied to an adjustable proportional and integral feedback control circuit which regulates the power applied to the induction coil. The heater regulates the fluid temperature to within 0.005.degree. C. at a flow rate of 50 cm.sup.3 /second with a response time of less than 0.1 second, and can accommodate changes in heat load up to 1500 watts.

  11. Fluid flow structure around the mixer in a reactor with mechanical mixing

    SciTech Connect

    Lecheva, A.; Zheleva, I.

    2015-10-28

    Fluid flow structure around the mixer in a cylindrical reactor with mechanical mixing is studied and numerical results are presented in this article. The model area is complex because of the presence of convex corners of the mixer in the fluid flow. Proper boundary conditions for the vorticity calculated on the base of the stream function values near solid boundaries of the examined area are presented. The boundary value problem of motion of swirling incompressible viscous fluid in a vertical tank reactor with a mixer is solved numerically. The calculations are made by a computer code, written in MATLAB. The complex structure of the flow around the mixing disk is described and commented.

  12. Fluid mechanics experiments in oscillatory flow. Volume 1: Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seume, J.; Friedman, G.; Simon, T. W.

    1992-01-01

    Results of a fluid mechanics measurement program in oscillating flow within a circular duct are presented. The program began with a survey of transition behavior over a range of oscillation frequency and magnitude and continued with a detailed study at a single operating point. Such measurements were made in support of Stirling engine development. Values of three dimensionless parameters, Re(sub max), Re(sub w), and A(sub R), embody the velocity amplitude, frequency of oscillation and mean fluid displacement of the cycle, respectively. Measurements were first made over a range of these parameters which included operating points of all Stirling engines. Next, a case was studied with values of these parameters that are representative of the heat exchanger tubes in the heater section of NASA's Stirling cycle Space Power Research Engine (SPRE). Measurements were taken of the axial and radial components of ensemble-averaged velocity and rms-velocity fluctuation and the dominant Reynolds shear stress, at various radial positions for each of four axial stations. In each run, transition from laminar to turbulent flow, and its reverse, were identified and sufficient data was gathered to propose the transition mechanism. Models of laminar and turbulent boundary layers were used to process the data into wall coordinates and to evaluate skin friction coefficients. Such data aids in validating computational models and is useful in comparing oscillatory flow characteristics to those of fully-developed steady flow. Data were taken with a contoured entry to each end of the test section and with flush square inlets so that the effects of test section inlet geometry on transition and turbulence are documented. Volume 1 contains the text of the report including figures and supporting appendices. Volume 2 contains data reduction program listings and tabulated data (including its graphical presentation).

  13. Fluid mechanics experiments in oscillatory flow. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Seume, J.; Friedman, G.; Simon, T.W.

    1992-03-01

    Results of a fluid mechanics measurement program is oscillating flow within a circular duct are present. The program began with a survey of transition behavior over a range of oscillation frequency and magnitude and continued with a detailed study at a single operating point. Such measurements were made in support of Stirling engine development. Values of three dimensionless parameters, Re{sub max}, Re{sub W}, and A{sub R}, embody the velocity amplitude, frequency of oscillation and mean fluid displacement of the cycle, respectively. Measurements were first made over a range of these parameters which included operating points of all Stirling engines. Next, a case was studied with values of these parameters that are representative of the heat exchanger tubes in the heater section of NASA`s Stirling cycle Space Power Research Engine (SPRE). Measurements were taken of the axial and radical components of ensemble-averaged velocity and rms-velocity fluctuation and the dominant Reynolds shear stress, at various radial positions for each of four axial stations. In each run, transition from laminar to turbulent flow, and in reverse, were identified and sufficient data was gathered to propose the transition mechanism. Models of laminar and turbulent boundary layers were used to process the data into wall coordinates and to evaluate skin friction coefficients. Such data aids in validating computational models and is useful in comparing oscillatory flow characteristics to those of fully-developed steady flow. Data were taken with a contoured entry to each end of the test section and with flush square inlets so that the effects of test section inlet geometry on transition and turbulence are documented. The following is presented in two-volumes. Volume I contains the text of the report including figures and supporting appendices. Volume II contains data reduction program listings and tabulated data (including its graphical presentation).

  14. Some connections between fluid mechanics and the solving of industrial and environmental fluid-flow problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunt, J. C. R.

    1981-05-01

    The ways in which advances in fluid mechanics have led to improvements in engineering design are discussed, with attention to the stimulation of fluid mechanics research by industrial and environmental problems. The development of many practical uses of fluid flow without the benefit of scientific study is also emphasized. Among the topics discussed are vortices and coherent structures in turbulent flows, lubrication, jet and multiphase flows, the control and exploitation of waves, the effect of unsteady forces on structures, and dispersion phenomena. Among the practical achievements covered are the use of bluff shields to control separated flow over truck bodies and reduce aerodynamic drag, ink-jet printing, hovercraft stability, fluidized-bed combustion, the fluid/solid instabilities caused by air flow around a computer memory floppy disc, and various wind turbines.

  15. Sensor for Boundary Shear Stress in Fluid Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bao, Xiaoqi; Badescu, Mircea; Sherrit, Stewart; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Lih, Shyh-Shiuh; Chang, Zensheu; Trease, Brian P.; Kerenyi, Kornel; Widholm, Scott E.; Ostlund, Patrick N.

    2012-01-01

    The formation of scour patterns at bridge piers is driven by the forces at the boundary of the water flow. In most experimental scour studies, indirect processes have been applied to estimate the shear stress using measured velocity profiles. The estimations are based on theoretical models and associated assumptions. However, the turbulence flow fields and boundary layer in the pier-scour region are very complex and lead to low-fidelity results. In addition, available turbulence models cannot account accurately for the bed roughness effect. Direct measurement of the boundary shear stress, normal stress, and their fluctuations are attractive alternatives. However, most direct-measurement shear sensors are bulky in size or not compatible to fluid flow. A sensor has been developed that consists of a floating plate with folded beam support and an optical grid on the back, combined with a high-resolution optical position probe. The folded beam support makes the floating plate more flexible in the sensing direction within a small footprint, while maintaining high stiffness in the other directions. The floating plate converts the shear force to displacement, and the optical probe detects the plate s position with nanometer resolution by sensing the pattern of the diffraction field of the grid through a glass window. This configuration makes the sensor compatible with liquid flow applications.

  16. Collapsible sheath fluid reservoirs for flow cytometers

    DOEpatents

    Mark, Graham A.

    2000-01-01

    The present invention is a container in the form of a single housing for holding fluid, including a first collapsible reservoir having a first valve. The first reservoir initially contains a volume of fluid. The container also includes a second reservoir, initially empty (or substantially empty), expandable to a second volume. The second reservoir has a second valve. As the volume of said first reservoir decreases, the volume of the second reservoir proportionally increases.

  17. Modeling the Migration of Fluids in Subduction Zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, C. R.; Spiegelman, M.; Van Keken, P. E.; Vrijmoed, J. C.; Hacker, B. R.

    2011-12-01

    Fluids play a major role in the formation of arc volcanism and the generation of continental crust. Progressive dehydration reactions in the downgoing slab release fluids to the hot overlying mantle wedge, causing flux melting and the migration of melts to the volcanic front. While the qualitative concept is well established, the quantitative details of fluid release and especially that of fluid migration and generation of hydrous melting in the wedge is still poorly understood. Here we present new models of the fluid migration through the mantle wedge for subduction zones. We use an existing set of high resolution metamorphic models (van Keken et al, 2010) to predict the regions of water release from the sediments, upper and lower crust, and upper most mantle. We use this water flux as input for the fluid migration calculation based on new finite element models built on advanced computational libraries (FEniCS/PETSc) for efficient and flexible solution of coupled multi-physics problems. The first generation of one-way coupled models solves for the evolution of porosity and fluid-pressure/flux throughout the slab and wedge given solid flow, viscosity and thermal fields from separate solutions to the incompressible Stokes and energy equations in the mantle wedge. These solutions are verified by comparing to previous benchmark studies (van Keken et al, 2008) and global suites of thermal subduction models (Syracuse et al, 2010). Fluid flow depends on both permeability and the rheology of the slab-wedge system as interaction with rheological variability can induce additional pressure gradients that affect the fluid flow pathways. These non-linearities have been shown to explain laboratory-scale observations of melt band orientation in labratory experiments and numerical simulations of melt localization in shear bands (Katz et al 2006). Our second generation of models dispense with the pre-calculation of incompressible mantle flow and fully couple the now compressible

  18. Fluid flow and dissipation in intersecting counter-flow pipes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pekkan, Kerem

    2005-11-01

    Intersecting pipe junctions are common in industrial and biomedical flows. For the later application, standard surgical connections of vessel lumens results a ``+'' shaped topology through a side-to-side or end-to-side anastomosis. Our earlier experimental/computational studies have compared different geometries quantifying the hydrodynamic power loss through the junction where dominant coherent structures are identified. In this study we have calculated the contribution of these structures to the total energy dissipation and its spatial distribution in the connection. A large set of idealized models are studied in which the basic geometric configuration is parametrically varied (from side-to-side to end-to-side anastomosis) which quantified the strength of the secondary flows and coherent structures as a function of the geometric configuration. Steady-state, 3D, incompressible computations are performed using the commercial CFD code FIDAP with unstructured tetrahedral grids. Selected cases are compared with the in-house code results (in Cartesian and structured grids). Grid verification and experimental validation with flow-vis and PIV are presented. Identifying the dissipation hot-spots will enable a targeted inverse design of the junction by reducing the degree of optimization with a focused parameter space.

  19. Large-eddy simulation of supercritical fluid flow and combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huo, Hongfa

    The present study focuses on the modeling and simulation of injection, mixing, and combustion of real fluids at supercritical conditions. The objectives of the study are: (1) to establish a unified theoretical framework that can be used to study the turbulent combustion of real fluids; (2) to implement the theoretical framework and conduct numerical studies with the aim of improving the understanding of the flow and combustion dynamics at conditions representative of contemporary liquid-propellant rocket engine operation; (3) to identify the key design parameters and the flow variables which dictate the dynamics characteristics of swirl- and shear- coaxial injectors. The theoretical and numerical framework is validated by simulating the Sandia Flame D. The calculated axial and radial profiles of velocity, temperature, and mass fractions of major species are in reasonably good agreement with the experimental measurements. The conditionally averaged mass fraction profiles agree very well with the experimental results at different axial locations. The validated model is first employed to examine the flow dynamics of liquid oxygen in a pressure swirl injector at supercritical conditions. Emphasis is placed on analyzing the effects of external excitations on the dynamic response of the injector. The high-frequency fluctuations do not significantly affect the flow field as they are dissipated shortly after being introduced into the flow. However, the lower-frequency fluctuations are amplified by the flow. As a result, the film thickness and the spreading angle at the nozzle exit fluctuate strongly for low-frequency external excitations. The combustion of gaseous oxygen/gaseous hydrogen in a high-pressure combustion chamber for a shear coaxial injector is simulated to assess the accuracy and the credibility of the computer program when applied to a sub-scale model of a combustor. The predicted heat flux profile is compared with the experimental and numerical studies. The

  20. Fluid Structural Analysis of Urine Flow in a Stented Ureter

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-Blanco, J. Carlos; Martínez-Reina, F. Javier; Cruz, Domingo; Pagador, J. Blas; Sánchez-Margallo, Francisco M.; Soria, Federico

    2016-01-01

    Many urologists are currently studying new designs of ureteral stents to improve the quality of their operations and the subsequent recovery of the patient. In order to help during this design process, many computational models have been developed to simulate the behaviour of different biological tissues and provide a realistic computational environment to evaluate the stents. However, due to the high complexity of the involved tissues, they usually introduce simplifications to make these models less computationally demanding. In this study, the interaction between urine flow and a double-J stented ureter with a simplified geometry has been analysed. The Fluid-Structure Interaction (FSI) of urine and the ureteral wall was studied using three models for the solid domain: Mooney-Rivlin, Yeoh, and Ogden. The ureter was assumed to be quasi-incompressible and isotropic. Data obtained in previous studies from ex vivo and in vivo mechanical characterization of different ureters were used to fit the mentioned models. The results show that the interaction between the stented ureter and urine is negligible. Therefore, we can conclude that this type of models does not need to include the FSI and could be solved quite accurately assuming that the ureter is a rigid body and, thus, using the more simple Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) approach. PMID:27127535

  1. Syntectonic fluid flow and fluid compartmentalization in a compressive basin: Example of the Jaca basin (Southwest Pyrenees, Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacroix, Brice; Travé, Anna; Buatier, Martine; Labaume, Pierre

    2013-04-01

    calcite veins evidence a relatively closed paleohydrological system, whereas the second calcite vein generation, which is probably associated to the late tectonic activity of the basin, indicates the contribution of both meteoric and marine waters. Based on these results, a schematic fluid-flow model is presented. This model allows to visualize three main fluid flow compartments along a N-S transect.

  2. Fluid flow effects in evaporation from liquid-vapor meniscus

    SciTech Connect

    Khrustalev, D.; Faghri, A.

    1996-12-31

    A mathematical model of the evaporating liquid-vapor meniscus in a capillary slot has been developed. The model includes two-dimensional steady-state momentum conservation and energy equations for both the vapor and liquid phases, and incorporates the existing simplified one-dimensional model of the evaporating microfilm. The numerical results, obtained for water, demonstrate the importance of accounting for the fluid flow in calculating the effective evaporative heat transfer coefficient and the superheat of the vapor over the liquid-vapor meniscus due to the heat transfer from the heated wall. With higher heat fluxes, a recirculation zone appears in the vapor near the heated wall due to the extensive evaporation in the thin-film region of the liquid-vapor meniscus.

  3. Thermal analysis of turbulent flow of a supercritical fluid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamane, E.

    1979-01-01

    The influence of the large variation of thermodynamics and transport properties near the pseudocritical temperature on the heat transfer coefficient of supercritical fluid in turbulent flow was studied. The formation of the characteristics peak in the heat transfer coefficient vs. bulk temperature curve is described, and the necessity of the fluid element at pseudocritical temperature located in the buffer layer is discussed.

  4. A potential-flow, deformable-body model for fluid-structure interactions with compact vorticity: application to animal swimming measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Jifeng; Dabiri, John O.

    This paper presents an approach to quantify the unsteady fluid forces, moments and mass transport generated by swimming animals, based on measurements of the surrounding flow field. These goals are accomplished within a framework that is independent of the vorticity field, making it unnecessary to directly resolve boundary layers on the animal, body-vortex interactions, or interactions among vortex lines in the wake. Instead, the method identifies Lagrangian coherent structures in the flow, whose dynamics in flows with compact vorticity are shown to be well approximated by potential flow concepts, especially the Kirchhoff and deformation potentials from deformable body theory. Examples of the application of these methods are given for pectoral fin locomotion of the bluegill sunfish and undulatory swimming of jellyfish, and the methods are validated by analysis of a canonical starting vortex ring flow. The transition to a Lagrangian approach toward animal swimming measurements suggests the possibility of implementing recently developed particle tracking (vis-à-vis DPIV) techniques for fully three-dimensional measurements of animal swimming.

  5. Control of Low Reynolds Number Flows with Fluid Structure Interactions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-02-02

    2010, pp. 539- 544. [55] Yilmaz, T.O., and Rockwell, D., "Flow Structure on Finite-Span Wings Due to Pitch - up Motion," Journal of Fluid...flows with large separated regions are also typical for flapping - wing MAVs. Leading-edge vortices are known to enhance lift in unsteady aerodynamics...effective for delta wings [6]; 2) instability of the separation bubble [7]; and 3) wake instability [8,9]. Flow control research on separated flows

  6. Modelling the flow of a second order fluid through and over a porous medium using the volume averages. I. The generalized Brinkman's equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minale, Mario

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, the generalized Brinkman's equation for a viscoelastic fluid is derived using the volume averages. Darcy's generalised equation is consequently obtained neglecting the first and the second Brinkman's correction with respect to the drag term. The latter differs from the Newtonian drag because of an additional term quadratic in the velocity and inversely proportional to a "viscoelastic" permeability defined in the paper. The viscoelastic permeability tensor can be calculated by solving a boundary value problem, but it must be in fact experimentally measured. To isolate the elastic contribution, the constitutive equation of the second order fluid of Coleman and Noll is chosen because, in simple shear at steady state, second order fluids show a constant viscosity and first and second normal stress differences quadratic in the shear rate. The model predictions are compared with data of the literature obtained in a Darcy's experiment and the agreement is good.

  7. Flow Velocities After Carotid Artery Stenting: Impact of Stent Design. A Fluid Dynamics Study in a Carotid Artery Model with Laser Doppler Anemometry

    SciTech Connect

    Greil, Oliver Kleinschmidt, Thomas; Weiss, Wolfgang; Wolf, Oliver; Heider, Peter; Schaffner, Silvio; Gianotti, Marc; Schmid, Thomas; Liepsch, Dieter; Berger, Hermann

    2005-01-15

    Purpose. To study the influence of a newly developed membrane stent design on flow patterns in a physiologic carotid artery model. Methods. Three different stents were positioned in silicone models of the carotid artery: a stainless steel stent (Wall-stent), a nitinol stent (SelfX), and a nitinol stent with a semipermeable membrane (MembraX). To increase the contact area of the membrane with the vessel wall, another MembranX model was modified at the outflow tract. The membrane consists of a biocompatible silicone-polyurethane copolymer (Elast-Eon) with a pore size of 100 {mu}m. All stents were deployed across the bifurcation and the external carotid artery origin. Flow velocity measurements were performed with laser Doppler anemometry (LDA), using pulsatile flow conditions (Re = 220; flow 0.39 l/min; flow rate ratio ICA:ECA = 70:30) in hemodynamically relevant cross-sections. The hemodynamic changes were analyzed by comparing velocity fluctuations of corresponding flow profiles. Results. The flow rate ratio ICA:ECA shifted significantly from 70/30 to 73.9/26.1 in the MembraX and remained nearly unchanged in the SelfX and Wallstent. There were no changes in the flow patterns at the inflow proximal to the stents. In the stent no relevant changes were found in the SelfX. In the Wallstent the separation zone shifted from the orifice of the ICA to the distal end of the stent. Four millimeters distal to the SelfX and the Wallstent the flow profile returned to normal. In the MembraX an increase in the central slipstreams was found with creation of a flow separation distal to the stent. With a modification of the membrane this flow separation vanished. In the ECA flow disturbances were seen at the inner wall distal to the stent struts in the SelfX and the Wallstent. With the MembraX a calming of flow could be observed in the ECA with a slight loss of flow volume. Conclusions. Stent placement across the carotid artery bifurcation induces alterations of the physiologic flow

  8. Viscoelastic fluid-structure interaction between a non-Newtonian fluid flow and flexible cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dey, Anita; Modarres-Sadeghi, Yahya; Rothstein, Jonathan

    2016-11-01

    It is well known that when a flexible or flexibly-mounted structure is placed perpendicular to the flow of a Newtonian fluid, it can oscillate due to the shedding of separated vortices at high Reynolds numbers. If the same flexible object is placed in non-Newtonian flows, however, the structure's response is still unknown. Unlike Newtonian fluids, the flow of viscoelastic fluids can become unstable at infinitesimal Reynolds numbers due to a purely elastic flow instability. In this talk, we will present a series of experiments investigating the response of a flexible cylinder placed in the cross flow of a viscoelastic fluid. The elastic flow instabilities occurring at high Weissenberg numbers can exert fluctuating forces on the flexible cylinder thus leading to nonlinear periodic oscillations of the flexible structure. These oscillations are found to be coupled to the time-dependent state of viscoelastic stresses in the wake of the flexible cylinder. The static and dynamic responses of the flexible cylinder will be presented over a range of flow velocities, along with measurements of velocity profiles and flow-induced birefringence, in order to quantify the time variation of the flow field and the state of stress in the fluid.

  9. FLIP (fluid-implicit-particle): A low-dissipation, particle-in-cell method for fluid flow

    SciTech Connect

    Brackbill, J.U.; Kothe, D.B.; Ruppel, H.M.

    1987-01-01

    Since convective transport is the largest source of computational diffusion, FLIP (fluid-implicit-particle) eliminates convection, and uses instead a Lagrangian formulation. In FLIP, as in PIC, particles represent the fluid: a grid is used only to calculate interactions among particles. FLIP is an adaptation to fluid flows of the implicit moment method for plasma simulation. The particles carry coordinates, momentum, mass and energy; everything necessary to describe the fluid. Using the particle data, Lagrangian moment equations solved on a grid advance the particle variables from time step to time step. An adaptive grid and implicit time differencing extend the method to singular and low-speed flows. Aspects of FLIP's properties are illustrated by calculations of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability, an unstable, subsonic stream, and a supersonic jet. The results demonstrate FLIP's applicability to the many problems where low dissipation is crucial to correct modeling. 21 refs.

  10. Flow regimes for fluid injection into a confined porous medium

    DOE PAGES

    Zheng, Zhong; Guo, Bo; Christov, Ivan C.; ...

    2015-02-24

    We report theoretical and numerical studies of the flow behaviour when a fluid is injected into a confined porous medium saturated with another fluid of different density and viscosity. For a two-dimensional configuration with point source injection, a nonlinear convection–diffusion equation is derived to describe the time evolution of the fluid–fluid interface. In the early time period, the fluid motion is mainly driven by the buoyancy force and the governing equation is reduced to a nonlinear diffusion equation with a well-known self-similar solution. In the late time period, the fluid flow is mainly driven by the injection, and the governingmore » equation is approximated by a nonlinear hyperbolic equation that determines the global spreading rate; a shock solution is obtained when the injected fluid is more viscous than the displaced fluid, whereas a rarefaction wave solution is found when the injected fluid is less viscous. In the late time period, we also obtain analytical solutions including the diffusive term associated with the buoyancy effects (for an injected fluid with a viscosity higher than or equal to that of the displaced fluid), which provide the structure of the moving front. Numerical simulations of the convection–diffusion equation are performed; the various analytical solutions are verified as appropriate asymptotic limits, and the transition processes between the individual limits are demonstrated.« less

  11. Flow regimes for fluid injection into a confined porous medium

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Zhong; Guo, Bo; Christov, Ivan C.; Celia, Michael A.; Stone, Howard A.

    2015-02-24

    We report theoretical and numerical studies of the flow behaviour when a fluid is injected into a confined porous medium saturated with another fluid of different density and viscosity. For a two-dimensional configuration with point source injection, a nonlinear convection–diffusion equation is derived to describe the time evolution of the fluid–fluid interface. In the early time period, the fluid motion is mainly driven by the buoyancy force and the governing equation is reduced to a nonlinear diffusion equation with a well-known self-similar solution. In the late time period, the fluid flow is mainly driven by the injection, and the governing equation is approximated by a nonlinear hyperbolic equation that determines the global spreading rate; a shock solution is obtained when the injected fluid is more viscous than the displaced fluid, whereas a rarefaction wave solution is found when the injected fluid is less viscous. In the late time period, we also obtain analytical solutions including the diffusive term associated with the buoyancy effects (for an injected fluid with a viscosity higher than or equal to that of the displaced fluid), which provide the structure of the moving front. Numerical simulations of the convection–diffusion equation are performed; the various analytical solutions are verified as appropriate asymptotic limits, and the transition processes between the individual limits are demonstrated.

  12. Deployable Emergency Shutoff Device Blocks High-Velocity Fluid Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nabors, Sammy A.

    2015-01-01

    NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center has developed a device and method for blocking the flow of fluid from an open pipe. Motivated by the sea-bed oil-drilling catastrophe in the Gulf of Mexico in 2010, NASA innovators designed the device to plug, control, and meter the flow of gases and liquids. Anchored with friction fittings, spikes, or explosively activated fasteners, the device is well-suited for harsh environments and high fluid velocities and pressures. With the addition of instrumentation, it can also be used as a variable area flow metering valve that can be set based upon flow conditions. With robotic additions, this patent-pending innovation can be configured to crawl into a pipe then anchor and activate itself to block or control fluid flow.

  13. Bone tissue engineering: the role of interstitial fluid flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hillsley, M. V.; Frangos, J. A.

    1994-01-01

    It is well established that vascularization is required for effective bone healing. This implies that blood flow and interstitial fluid (ISF) flow are required for healing and maintenance of bone. The fact that changes in bone blood flow and ISF flow are associated with changes in bone remodeling and formation support this theory. ISF flow in bone results from transcortical pressure gradients produced by vascular and hydrostatic pressure, and mechanical loading. Conditions observed to alter flow rates include increases in venous pressure in hypertension, fluid shifts occurring in bedrest and microgravity, increases in vascularization during the injury-healing response, and mechanical compression and bending of bone during exercise. These conditions also induce changes in bone remodeling. Previously, we hypothesized that interstitial fluid flow in bone, and in particular fluid shear stress, serves to mediate signal transduction in mechanical loading- and injury-induced remodeling. In addition, we proposed that a lack or decrease of ISF flow results in the bone loss observed in disuse and microgravity. The purpose of this article is to review ISF flow in bone and its role in osteogenesis.

  14. Stochastic effects on single phase fluid flow in porous media.

    PubMed

    Mansfield, P; Bencsik, M

    2001-01-01

    The flow encoded PEPI technique has been used to measure the fluid velocity distribution and fluid flow of water passing through a phantom comprising randomly distributed 10 mm glass beads. The object of these experiments is to determine the degree of causality between one steady-state flow condition and another. That is to say, knowing the mean fluid velocity and velocity distribution, can one predict what happens at a higher mean fluid velocity? In a second related experiment flow is established at a given mean fluid velocity. The velocity distribution is measured. The flow is then turned off and later re-established. In both kinds of experiment we conclude that the errors in predicting the flow velocity distribution and the errors in re-establishing a given velocity distribution lie well outside the intrinsic thermal noise associated with velocity measurement. It follows, therefore, that the causal approach to prediction of flow velocity distributions in porous media using the Navier-Stokes approach is invalid.

  15. Capacitance Probe for Fluid Flow and Volume Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arndt, G. Dickey (Inventor); Nguyen, Thanh X. (Inventor); Carl, James R. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    Method and apparatus for making measurements on fluids are disclosed, including the use of a capacitive probe for measuring the flow volume of a material within a flow stream. The capacitance probe has at least two elongate electrodes and, in a specific embodiment of the invention, has three parallel elongate electrodes with the center electrode being an extension of the center conductor of a co-axial cable. A conductance probe is also provided to provide more accurate flow volume data in response to conductivity of the material within the flow stream. A preferred embodiment of the present invention provides for a gas flow stream through a micro-gravity environment that allows for monitoring a flow volume of a fluid sample, such as a urine sample, that is entrained within the gas flow stream.

  16. Capacitance probe for fluid flow and volume measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arndt, G. Dickey (Inventor); Nguyen, Thanh X. (Inventor); Carl, James R. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    Method and apparatus for making measurements on fluids are disclosed, including the use of a capacitive probe for measuring the flow volume of a material within a flow stream. The capacitance probe has at least two elongate electrodes and, in a specific embodiment of the invention, has three parallel elongate electrodes with the center electrode being an extension of the center conductor of a co-axial cable. A conductance probe is also provided to provide more accurate flow volume data in response to conductivity of the material within the flow stream. A preferred embodiment of the present invention provides for a gas flow stream through a microgravity environment that allows for monitoring a flow volume of a fluid sample, such as a urine sample, that is entrained within the gas flow stream.

  17. Axisymmetric flows from fluid injection into a confined porous medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Bo; Zheng, Zhong; Celia, Michael A.; Stone, Howard A.

    2016-02-01

    We study the axisymmetric flows generated from fluid injection into a horizontal confined porous medium that is originally saturated with another fluid of different density and viscosity. Neglecting the effects of surface tension and fluid mixing, we use the lubrication approximation to obtain a nonlinear advection-diffusion equation that describes the time evolution of the sharp fluid-fluid interface. The flow behaviors are controlled by two dimensionless groups: M, the viscosity ratio of displaced fluid relative to injected fluid, and Γ, which measures the relative importance of buoyancy and fluid injection. For this axisymmetric geometry, the similarity solution involving R2/T (where R is the dimensionless radial coordinate and T is the dimensionless time) is an exact solution to the nonlinear governing equation for all times. Four analytical expressions are identified as asymptotic approximations (two of which are new solutions): (i) injection-driven flow with the injected fluid being more viscous than the displaced fluid (Γ ≪ 1 and M < 1) where we identify a self-similar solution that indicates a parabolic interface shape; (ii) injection-driven flow with injected and displaced fluids of equal viscosity (Γ ≪ 1 and M = 1), where we find a self-similar solution that predicts a distinct parabolic interface shape; (iii) injection-driven flow with a less viscous injected fluid (Γ ≪ 1 and M > 1) for which there is a rarefaction wave solution, assuming that the Saffman-Taylor instability does not occur at the reservoir scale; and (iv) buoyancy-driven flow (Γ ≫ 1) for which there is a well-known self-similar solution corresponding to gravity currents in an unconfined porous medium [S. Lyle et al. "Axisymmetric gravity currents in a porous medium," J. Fluid Mech. 543, 293-302 (2005)]. The various axisymmetric flows are summarized in a Γ-M regime diagram with five distinct dynamic behaviors including the four asymptotic regimes and an intermediate regime

  18. Meshless lattice Boltzmann method for the simulation of fluid flows.

    PubMed

    Musavi, S Hossein; Ashrafizaadeh, Mahmud

    2015-02-01

    A meshless lattice Boltzmann numerical method is proposed. The collision and streaming operators of the lattice Boltzmann equation are separated, as in the usual lattice Boltzmann models. While the purely local collision equation remains the same, we rewrite the streaming equation as a pure advection equation and discretize the resulting partial differential equation using the Lax-Wendroff scheme in time and the meshless local Petrov-Galerkin scheme based on augmented radial basis functions in space. The meshless feature of the proposed method makes it a more powerful lattice Boltzmann solver, especially for cases in which using meshes introduces significant numerical errors into the solution, or when improving the mesh quality is a complex and time-consuming process. Three well-known benchmark fluid flow problems, namely the plane Couette flow, the circular Couette flow, and the impulsively started cylinder flow, are simulated for the validation of the proposed method. Excellent agreement with analytical solutions or with previous experimental and numerical results in the literature is observed in all the simulations. Although the computational resources required for the meshless method per node are higher compared to that of the standard lattice Boltzmann method, it is shown that for cases in which the total number of nodes is significantly reduced, the present method actually outperforms the standard lattice Boltzmann method.

  19. Biomagnetic fluid flow in an aneurysm using ferrohydrodynamics principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tzirtzilakis, E. E.

    2015-06-01

    In this study, the fundamental problem of biomagnetic fluid flow in an aneurysmal geometry under the influence of a steady localized magnetic field is numerically investigated. The mathematical model used to formulate the problem is consistent with the principles of ferrohydrodynamics. Blood is considered to be an electrically non-conducting, homogeneous, non-isothermal Newtonian magnetic fluid. For the numerical solution of the problem, which is described by a coupled, non-linear system of Partial Differential Equations (PDEs), with appropriate boundary conditions, the stream function-vorticity formulation is adopted. The solution is obtained by applying an efficient pseudotransient numerical methodology using finite differences. This methodology is based on the application of a semi-implicit numerical technique, transformations, stretching of the grid, and construction of the boundary conditions for the vorticity. The results regarding the velocity and temperature field, skin friction, and rate of heat transfer indicate that the presence of a magnetic field considerably influences the flow field, particularly in the region of the aneurysm.

  20. Magnetic particle capture for biomagnetic fluid flow in stenosed aortic bifurcation considering particle-fluid coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bose, Sayan; Banerjee, Moloy

    2015-07-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles drug carriers continue to attract considerable interest for drug targeting in the treatment of cancer and other pathological conditions. Guiding magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles with the help of an external magnetic field to its target is the basic principle behind the Magnetic Drug Targeting (MDT). It is essential to couple the ferrohydrodynamic (FHD) and magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) principles when magnetic fields are applied to blood as a biomagnetic fluid. The present study is devoted to study on MDT technique by particle tracking in the presence of a non uniform magnetic field in a stenosed aortic bifurcation. The present numerical model of biomagnetic fluid dynamics (BFD) takes into accounts both magnetization and electrical conductivity of blood. The blood flow in the bifurcation is considered to be incompressible and Newtonian. An Eulerian-Lagrangian technique is adopted to resolve the hemodynamic flow and the motion of the magnetic particles in the flow using ANSYS FLUENT two way particle-fluid coupling. An implantable infinitely long cylindrical current carrying conductor is used to create the requisite magnetic field. Targeted transport of the magnetic particles in a partly occluded vessel differs distinctly from the same in a regular unblocked vessel. Results concerning the velocity and temperature field indicate that the presence of the magnetic field influences the flow field considerably and the disturbances increase as the magnetic field strength increases. The insert position is also varied to observe the variation in flow as well as temperature field. Parametric investigation is conducted and the influence of the particle size (dp), flow Reynolds number (Re) and external magnetic field strength (B0) on the "capture efficiency" (CE) is reported. The difference in CE is also studied for different particle loading condition. According to the results, the magnetic field increased the particle concentration in the target region