Science.gov

Sample records for fluid leak analysis

  1. Hazardous fluid leak detector

    DOEpatents

    Gray, Harold E.; McLaurin, Felder M.; Ortiz, Monico; Huth, William A.

    1996-01-01

    A device or system for monitoring for the presence of leaks from a hazardous fluid is disclosed which uses two electrodes immersed in deionized water. A gas is passed through an enclosed space in which a hazardous fluid is contained. Any fumes, vapors, etc. escaping from the containment of the hazardous fluid in the enclosed space are entrained in the gas passing through the enclosed space and transported to a closed vessel containing deionized water and two electrodes partially immersed in the deionized water. The electrodes are connected in series with a power source and a signal, whereby when a sufficient number of ions enter the water from the gas being bubbled through it (indicative of a leak), the water will begin to conduct, thereby allowing current to flow through the water from one electrode to the other electrode to complete the circuit and activate the signal.

  2. Cerebrospinal fluid leaks following septoplasty.

    PubMed

    Venkatesan, Naren N; Mattox, Douglas E; Del Gaudio, John M

    2014-12-01

    We conducted a retrospective review to identify the characteristics of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak in patients who had undergone septoplasty and in selected patients who had experienced a spontaneous CSF leak. CSF leak is a known but infrequently reported complication of septoplasty; to the best of our knowledge, only 4 cases have been previously published in the literature. A review of our institution's database revealed 3 cases of postseptoplasty CSF leak. We reviewed all the available data to look for any commonalities among these 7 cases. In addition, we reviewed 6 cases of spontaneous CSF leak selected from our database for the same purpose. For all patients, we noted the side of the cribriform plate defect, its size and, for the postseptoplasty cases, the interval between the septoplasty and the leak repair. Overall, we found that leaks were much more common on the right side than on the left. The sizes of the leaks in the 2 postseptoplasty groups were comparable (mean: 14.0 × 6.4 mm). The interval between septoplasty and leak repair ranged from 2.5 to 20 years in our cases and from 3 days to 22 weeks in the previously published cases. All 3 of the postseptoplasty patients in our database presented with clear rhinorrhea. Two of the 3 patients had meningitis; 1 of these 2 also had pneumocephalus. Of the 6 cases of spontaneous CSF leaks, 4 occurred on the right and 2 on the left; the average size of the defect was 5.8 mm in the greatest dimension. The finding that cribriform plate defects after septoplasty were typically right-sided likely reflects the prevalence of left-sided surgical approaches. Also, the fact that the defects were larger in the postseptoplasty cases than in the spontaneous cases is likely attributable to the torque effect toward the thin skull base that occurs when the perpendicular plate is twisted during septoplasty.

  3. Incidence of cerebrospinal fluid leak following petrosectomy and analysis of avoidance techniques.

    PubMed

    Walcott, Brian P; Nahed, Brian V; Sarpong, Yaw; Kahle, Kristopher T; Sekhar, Laligam N; Ferreira, Manuel J

    2012-01-01

    A cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak following skull base surgery can lead to meningitis, impaired wound healing, and often requires re-operation and/or CSF diversion. Thirty-two patients underwent a presigmoid, transpetrosal approach to skull base aneurysms and tumors. A vascularized temporalis muscle flap was utilized during the closure of the initial skull base reconstruction in 18 of the 32 patients. A temporary CSF diversion was utilized in 23 of the 32 patients. A permanent shunt was placed in eight patients. One patient developed a postoperative CSF leak from the contralateral ear due to a congenital abnormality in the middle ear. Another patient, who did not have a vascularized temporalis muscle flap reconstruction, developed a postoperative CSF leak in the context of an operation for recurrent tumor and prior radiation treatment. CSF diversion and vascularized temporalis muscle flaps are effective in preventing the development of postoperative CSF leaks following petrosectomy.

  4. Spontaneous cerebrospinal fluid leak at the clivus

    PubMed Central

    Składzien, Jacek; Betlej, Marek; Chrzan, Robert; Mika, Joanna

    2015-01-01

    We present a case report of a 60-year-old woman with a spontaneous cerebrospinal fluid leak at the clivus, obesity and no history of trauma. Follow-up imaging scans confirmed enlargement of the defect within the posterior clival framework to the size of 16 × 9 × 4 mm with a suspected meningocerebral hernia. The surgeons used the “two nostrils – four hands” endoscopic operating technique. The patient reported a history of cerebrospinal fluid leaks lasting for 3 years, with increasingly shorter leak-free periods and an increasing incidence of inflammatory complications. The patient recovered without complications, and she was discharged 14 days after the surgery. Good local outcome and improved patient condition were achieved postoperatively. PMID:26865899

  5. Stochastic Consequence Analysis for Waste Leaks

    SciTech Connect

    HEY, B.E.

    2000-05-31

    This analysis evaluates the radiological consequences of potential Hanford Tank Farm waste transfer leaks. These include ex-tank leaks into structures, underneath the soil, and exposed to the atmosphere. It also includes potential misroutes, tank overflow

  6. Leak locating microphone, method and system for locating fluid leaks in pipes

    DOEpatents

    Kupperman, David S.; Spevak, Lev

    1994-01-01

    A leak detecting microphone inserted directly into fluid within a pipe includes a housing having a first end being inserted within the pipe and a second opposed end extending outside the pipe. A diaphragm is mounted within the first housing end and an acoustic transducer is coupled to the diaphragm for converting acoustical signals to electrical signals. A plurality of apertures are provided in the housing first end, the apertures located both above and below the diaphragm, whereby to equalize fluid pressure on either side of the diaphragm. A leak locating system and method are provided for locating fluid leaks within a pipe. A first microphone is installed within fluid in the pipe at a first selected location and sound is detected at the first location. A second microphone is installed within fluid in the pipe at a second selected location and sound is detected at the second location. A cross-correlation is identified between the detected sound at the first and second locations for identifying a leak location.

  7. Comprehensive quantitative analysis on privacy leak behavior.

    PubMed

    Fan, Lejun; Wang, Yuanzhuo; Jin, Xiaolong; Li, Jingyuan; Cheng, Xueqi; Jin, Shuyuan

    2013-01-01

    Privacy information is prone to be leaked by illegal software providers with various motivations. Privacy leak behavior has thus become an important research issue of cyber security. However, existing approaches can only qualitatively analyze privacy leak behavior of software applications. No quantitative approach, to the best of our knowledge, has been developed in the open literature. To fill this gap, in this paper we propose for the first time four quantitative metrics, namely, possibility, severity, crypticity, and manipulability, for privacy leak behavior analysis based on Privacy Petri Net (PPN). In order to compare the privacy leak behavior among different software, we further propose a comprehensive metric, namely, overall leak degree, based on these four metrics. Finally, we validate the effectiveness of the proposed approach using real-world software applications. The experimental results demonstrate that our approach can quantitatively analyze the privacy leak behaviors of various software types and reveal their characteristics from different aspects.

  8. Comprehensive Quantitative Analysis on Privacy Leak Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Lejun; Wang, Yuanzhuo; Jin, Xiaolong; Li, Jingyuan; Cheng, Xueqi; Jin, Shuyuan

    2013-01-01

    Privacy information is prone to be leaked by illegal software providers with various motivations. Privacy leak behavior has thus become an important research issue of cyber security. However, existing approaches can only qualitatively analyze privacy leak behavior of software applications. No quantitative approach, to the best of our knowledge, has been developed in the open literature. To fill this gap, in this paper we propose for the first time four quantitative metrics, namely, possibility, severity, crypticity, and manipulability, for privacy leak behavior analysis based on Privacy Petri Net (PPN). In order to compare the privacy leak behavior among different software, we further propose a comprehensive metric, namely, overall leak degree, based on these four metrics. Finally, we validate the effectiveness of the proposed approach using real-world software applications. The experimental results demonstrate that our approach can quantitatively analyze the privacy leak behaviors of various software types and reveal their characteristics from different aspects. PMID:24066046

  9. Method and apparatus for continuous fluid leak monitoring and detection in analytical instruments and instrument systems

    DOEpatents

    Weitz, Karl K.; Moore, Ronald J.

    2010-07-13

    A method and device are disclosed that provide for detection of fluid leaks in analytical instruments and instrument systems. The leak detection device includes a collection tube, a fluid absorbing material, and a circuit that electrically couples to an indicator device. When assembled, the leak detection device detects and monitors for fluid leaks, providing a preselected response in conjunction with the indicator device when contacted by a fluid.

  10. Massive Cerebrospinal Fluid Leak of the Temporal Bone

    PubMed Central

    Manno, Alessandra; Pasqualitto, Emanuela; Ciofalo, Andrea; Angeletti, Diletta; Pasquariello, Benedetta

    2016-01-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leakage of the temporal bone region is defined as abnormal communications between the subarachnoidal space and the air-containing spaces of the temporal bone. CSF leak remains one of the most frequent complications after VS surgery. Radiotherapy is considered a predisposing factor for development of temporal bone CSF leak because it may impair dural repair mechanisms, thus causing inadequate dural sealing. The authors describe the case of a 47-year-old man with a massive effusion of CSF which extended from the posterior and lateral skull base to the first cervical vertebrae; this complication appeared after a partial enucleation of a vestibular schwannoma (VS) with subsequent radiation treatment and second operation with total VS resection. PMID:27597915

  11. Massive Cerebrospinal Fluid Leak of the Temporal Bone.

    PubMed

    Iannella, Giannicola; Manno, Alessandra; Pasqualitto, Emanuela; Ciofalo, Andrea; Angeletti, Diletta; Pasquariello, Benedetta; Magliulo, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leakage of the temporal bone region is defined as abnormal communications between the subarachnoidal space and the air-containing spaces of the temporal bone. CSF leak remains one of the most frequent complications after VS surgery. Radiotherapy is considered a predisposing factor for development of temporal bone CSF leak because it may impair dural repair mechanisms, thus causing inadequate dural sealing. The authors describe the case of a 47-year-old man with a massive effusion of CSF which extended from the posterior and lateral skull base to the first cervical vertebrae; this complication appeared after a partial enucleation of a vestibular schwannoma (VS) with subsequent radiation treatment and second operation with total VS resection.

  12. Risk factors for postoperative cerebrospinal fluid leak and meningitis after expanded endoscopic endonasal surgery.

    PubMed

    Ivan, Michael E; Iorgulescu, J Bryan; El-Sayed, Ivan; McDermott, Michael W; Parsa, Andrew T; Pletcher, Steven D; Jahangiri, Arman; Wagner, Jeffrey; Aghi, Manish K

    2015-01-01

    Postoperative cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak is a serious complication of transsphenoidal surgery, which can lead to meningitis and often requires reparative surgery. We sought to identify preoperative risk factors for CSF leaks and meningitis. We reviewed 98 consecutive expanded endoscopic endonasal surgeries performed from 2008-2012 and analyzed preoperative comorbidities, intraoperative techniques, and postoperative care. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed. The most common pathologies addressed included pituitary adenoma, Rathke cyst, chordoma, esthesioneuroblastoma, meningioma, nasopharyngeal carcinoma, and squamous cell carcinoma. There were 11 CSF leaks (11%) and 10 central nervous system (CNS) infections (10%). Univariate and multivariate analysis of preoperative risk factors showed that patients with non-ideal body mass index (BMI) were associated with higher rate of postoperative CSF leak and meningitis (both p<0.01). Also, patients with increasing age were associated with increased CSF leak (p = 0.03) and the length of time a lumbar drain was used postoperatively was associated with infection in a univariate analysis. In addition, three of three endoscopic transsphenoidal surgeries combined with open cranial surgery had a postoperative CSF leak and CNS infection rate which was a considerably higher rate than for transsphenoidal surgeries alone or surgeries staged with open cases (p<0.01 and p=0.04, respectively) In this series of expanded endoscopic transsphenoidal surgeries, preoperative BMI remains the most important preoperative predictor for CSF leak and infection. Other risk factors include age, intraoperative CSF leak, lumbar drain duration, and cranial combined cases. Risks associated with complex surgical resections when combining open and endoscopic approaches could be minimized by staging these procedures.

  13. Leak Mitigation in Mechanically Pumped Fluid Loops for Long Duration Space Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Jennifer R.; Birur, Gajanana; Bame, David; Mastropietro, A. J.; Bhandari, Pradeep; Lee, Darlene; Karlmann, Paul; Liu, Yuanming

    2013-01-01

    Mechanically pumped fluid loops (MPFLs) are increasingly considered for spacecraft thermal control. A concern for long duration space missions is the leak of fluid leading to performance degradation or potential loop failure. An understanding of leak rate through analysis, as well as destructive and non-destructive testing, provides a verifiable means to quantify leak rates. The system can be appropriately designed to maintain safe operating pressures and temperatures throughout the mission. Two MPFLs on the Mars Science Laboratory Spacecraft, launched November 26, 2011, maintain the temperature of sensitive electronics and science instruments within a -40 deg C to 50 deg C range during launch, cruise, and Mars surface operations. With over 100 meters of complex tubing, fittings, joints, flex lines, and pumps, the system must maintain a minimum pressure through all phases of the mission to provide appropriate performance. This paper describes the process of design, qualification, test, verification, and validation of the components and assemblies employed to minimize risks associated with excessive fluid leaks from pumped fluid loop systems.

  14. Leak detection in pipelines using cepstrum analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taghvaei, M.; Beck, S. B. M.; Staszewski, W. J.

    2006-02-01

    The detection and location of leaks in pipeline networks is a major problem and the reduction of these leaks has become a major priority for pipeline authorities around the world. Although the reasons for these leaks are well known, some of the current methods for locating and identifying them are either complicated or imprecise; most of them are time consuming. The work described here shows that cepstrum analysis is a viable approach to leak detection and location in pipeline networks. The method uses pressure waves caused by quickly opening and closing a solenoid valve. Due to their simplicity and robustness, transient analyses provide a plausible route towards leak detection. For this work, the time domain signals of these pressure transients were obtained using a single pressure transducer. These pressure signals were first filtered using discrete wavelets to remove the dc offset, and the low and high frequencies. They were then analysed using a cepstrum method which identified the time delay between the initial wave and its reflections. There were some features in the processed results which can be ascribed to features in the pipeline network such as junctions and pipe ends. When holes were drilled in the pipe, new peaks occurred which identified the presence of a leak in the pipeline network. When tested with holes of different sizes, the amplitude of the processed peak was seen to increase as the cube root of the leak diameter. Using this method, it is possible to identify leaks that are difficult to find by other methods as they are small in comparison with the flow through the pipe.

  15. Endoscopic Transmaxillary Transposition of Temporalis Flap for Recurrent Cerebrospinal Fluid Leak Closure.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Regi; Girishan, Shabari; Chacko, Ari George

    2016-12-01

    Objective To describe the technique of endoscopic transmaxillary temporalis muscle flap transposition for the repair of a persistent postoperative sphenoidal cerebrospinal fluid leak. Design The repair of a recurrent cerebrospinal fluid leak for a patient who had undergone endoscopic transsphenoidal excision of an invasive silent corticotroph Hardy C and Knosp Grade IV pituitary adenoma was undertaken. The patient had completed postoperative radiotherapy for the residual tumor and presented with cerebrospinal fluid leak, 1 year later. The initial two attempts to repair the cerebrospinal fluid leak with free grafts failed. Therefore, an endoscopic transmaxillary transposition of the temporalis muscle flap was attempted to stop the cerebrospinal fluid leak. Results The endoscopic transmaxillary transposition of the vascularized temporalis muscle flap onto the cerebrospinal fluid leak repair site resulted in successful closure of the cerebrospinal fluid leak. Conclusion Endoscopic transmaxillary transposition of the temporalis flap resulted in closure of recurrent cerebrospinal fluid leak in a patient with recurrent pituitary adenoma, who had undergone previous surgery and radiotherapy. This technique has advantages over the endoscopic transpterygoid transposition of the same flap and could be used as a complementary technique in selected patients.

  16. Simulation and evaluation of respirator faceseal leaks using computational fluid dynamics and infrared imaging.

    PubMed

    Lei, Zhipeng; Yang, James; Zhuang, Ziqing; Roberge, Raymond

    2013-05-01

    This paper presents a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation approach for the prediction of leakage between an N95 filtering facepiece respirator (FFR) and a headform and an infrared camera (IRC) method for validating the CFD approach. The CFD method was used to calculate leak location(s) and 'filter-to-faceseal leakage' (FTFL) ratio for 10 headforms and 6 FFRs.The computational geometry and leak gaps were determined from analysis of the contact simulation results between each headform-N95 FFR combination. The volumetric mesh was formed using a mesh generation method developed by the authors. The breathing cycle was described as a time-dependent profile of the air velocity through the nostril. Breathing air passes through both the FFR filter medium and the leak gaps. These leak gaps are the areas failing to achieve a seal around the circumference of the FFR. The CFD approach was validated by comparing facial temperatures and leak sites from IRC measurements with eight human subjects. Most leaks appear at the regions of the nose (40%) and right (26%) and left cheek (26%) sites. The results also showed that, with N95 FFR (no exhalation valves) use, there was an increase in the skin temperature at the region near the lip, which may be related to thermal discomfort. The breathing velocity and the viscous resistance coefficient of the FFR filter medium directly impacted the FTFL ratio, while the freestream flow did not show any impact on the FTFL ratio. The proposed CFD approach is a promising alternative method to study FFR leakage if limitations can be overcome.

  17. Management of Cerebrospinal Fluid Leak following Posterior Cranial Fossa Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Altaf, Imran; Vohra, Anjum Habib; Shams, Shahzad

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Cerebrospinal fluid leakage remains a significant cause of morbidity following posterior fossa surgery, and its treatment remains a difficult problem. The aim of the study was to propose a treatment algorithm for its management. Methods: A retrospective, single-center study was conducted on 147 patients who underwent elective posterior fossa surgery for a variety of diseases. Patients with post operative CSF leakage had either been treated initially with conservative measures including re-suturing of the wound, with CSF lumbar drainage to be employed in case the CSF leakage didn’t stop, or the initial intervention was the institution of CSF lumbar drainage simultaneously with conservative measures. VP (ventriculo-peritoneal) shunt was done in patients with gross hydrocephalus on postoperative CT brain. Results: There were 25 (17%) cases of CSF leakage, including 24 incisional CSF leaks and one case of CSF otorrhea. In eight patients with incisional CSF leakage treated initially with conservative measures including re-suturing of the wound, CSF leakage stopped in only two cases. CSF lumbar drainage instituted later on in six cases with persistent leakage stopped the CSF leakage. In fourteen patients managed initially with re-suturing of the wound and concomitant CSF lumbar drainage, CSF leakage settled in all the cases. Two patients with gross hydrocephalus on post operative CT were managed successfully with VP shunt. Re-suturing of the wound with concomitant CSF lumbar drainage was found to be significantly associated (p=0.003) with the stoppage of CSF leakage, and the settlement of meningitis (p= 0.014). Conclusion: Incisional CSF leaks after posterior fossa surgery should be managed with re-suturing of the wound and concomitant CSF lumbar drainage, instead of an initial trial of conservative therapy alone. PMID:28083041

  18. Sellar Reconstruction and Rates of Delayed Cerebrospinal Fluid Leak after Endoscopic Pituitary Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Sanders-Taylor, Chris; Anaizi, Amjad; Kosty, Jennifer; Zimmer, Lee A.; Theodosopoulos, Phillip V.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Delayed cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leaks are a complication in transsphenoidal surgery, potentially causing morbidity and longer hospital stays. Sella reconstruction can limit this complication, but is it necessary in all patients? Design Retrospective review. Setting Single-surgeon team (2005–2012) addresses this trend toward graded reconstruction. Participants A total of 264 consecutive patients with pituitary adenomas underwent endoscopic transsphenoidal resections. Sellar defects sizable to accommodate a fat graft were reconstructed. Main outcomes Delayed CSF leak and autograft harvesting. Results Overall, 235 (89%) had reconstruction with autograft (abdominal fat, septal bone/cartilage) and biological glue. Delayed CSF leak was 1.9%: 1.7%, and 3.4% for reconstructed and nonreconstructed sellar defects, respectively (p = 0.44). Complications included one reoperation for leak, two developed meningitis, and autograft harvesting resulted in abdominal hematoma in 0.9% and wound infection in 0.4%. Conclusion In our patients, delayed CSF leaks likely resulted from missed intraoperative CSF leaks or postoperative changes. Universal sellar reconstruction can preemptively treat missed leaks and provide a barrier for postoperative changes. When delayed CSF leaks occurred, sellar reconstruction often allowed for conservative treatment (i.e., lumbar drain) without repeat surgery. We found universal reconstruction provides a low risk of delayed CSF leak with minimal complications. PMID:26225317

  19. The Relief of Unilateral Painful Thoracic Radiculopathy without Headache from Remote Spontaneous Spinal Cerebrospinal Fluid Leak

    PubMed Central

    Son, Byung-chul; Ha, Sang-woo; Lee, Si-hoon; Choi, Jin-gyu

    2016-01-01

    Spontaneous intracranial hypotension (SIH) caused by spontaneous spinal cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leaks produces orthostatic headaches. Although upper arm pain or paresthesia is reportedly associated with SIH from spontaneous spinal CSF leak in the presence of orthostatic headache, low thoracic radicular pain due to spontaneous spinal CSF leak unassociated with postural headache is extremely rare. We report a 67-year-old female who presented with chronic, positional radicular right T11 pain. Computed tomography myelography showed a spontaneous lumbar spinal CSF leak at L2-3 and repeated lumbar epidural blood patches significantly alleviated chronic, positional, and lower thoracic radiculopathic pain. The authors speculate that a chronic spontaneous spinal CSF leak not severe enough to cause typical orthostatic headache or epidural CSF collection may cause local symptoms such as irritation of a remote nerve root. There might be considerable variabilities in the clinical features of SIH which can present a diagnostic challenge. PMID:27445613

  20. Comprehensive leak detection survey and benefit/cost analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Scholze, R.J. Jr.; Maloney, S.W.

    1995-06-01

    Fort Carson, Colorado was the site of a comprehensive leak detection investigation of the potable water system with the express purpose of quantifying the benefits to be derived by a military installation from use of leak detection and repair technology. Military bases are often the size of a small city and one Directorate or Department has responsibility for all real estate (buildings, roads, grounds, etc.) unlike a municipal public works department. The investigation used state of the art noise correlation and computer correlation technology to survey the distribution system mains. This was complemented by a building to building survey covering office and commercial buildings along with family and barracks housing where investigators entered buildings and quantified visible leaks in faucets and water closets, etc. Following repairs and a year`s time, a follow-on survey is performed to again examine all aspects of the system. The result was a complete economic evaluation and benefit/cost analysis of the installation. Representative findings include: the majority of distribution system leaks were at hydrants or similar appurtenances; and family housing was found to be the other major concentration of leaks. However, where the first survey found 80 percent of housing units had leaks, findings from the second round on the order of 20 percent. Office buildings were found from the first survey to not merit follow-on attention due to limited numbers of leaks. Water-consciousness was raised for both the responsible directorate and individuals in family housing and leak repair was given a higher priority for repairs. This paper will outline the leak detection methodology used, characterize the types and patterns of leaks found, introduce an economic analysis for the entire leak detection process, and finally, provide lessons learned with practical results and implications.

  1. Endoscopic Repair of Frontal Sinus Cerebrospinal Fluid Leaks after Firearm Injuries: Report of Two Cases

    PubMed Central

    Reyes, Camilo; Solares, C. Arturo

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To describe two cases of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak repair after gunshot wound to the head. Design Retrospective review of two cases. Settings A large regional tertiary care facility. Participants Two patients with gunshot wounds to the skull base. Main Outcome Measures Preoperative and postoperative physical and radiologic findings. Results Patients in this series underwent endoscopic surgery, debridement, and repair of CSF leaks after gunshot wounds to the head. To date, the patients are without CSF leak. Conclusions Endoscopic closure of anterior skull base CSF leaks in patients with gunshot wounds can be safe and effective. Treatment should be decided by the severity of neurologic deterioration throughout the emergency period and the existence or absence of associated intracranial lesions. Timing for surgery should be decided with great care and with a multidisciplinary approach. PMID:26251818

  2. Effect of rock rheology on fluid leak- off during hydraulic fracturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yarushina, V. M.; Bercovici, D.; Oristaglio, M. L.

    2012-04-01

    In this communication, we evaluate the effect of rock rheology on fluid leak­off during hydraulic fracturing of reservoirs. Fluid leak-off in hydraulic fracturing is often nonlinear. The simple linear model developed by Carter (1957) for flow of fracturing fluid into a reservoir has three different regions in the fractured zone: a filter cake on the fracture face, formed by solid additives from the fracturing fluid; a filtrate zone affected by invasion of the fracturing fluid; and a reservoir zone with the original formation fluid. The width of each zone, as well as its permeability and pressure drop, is assumed to remain constant. Physical intuition suggests some straightforward corrections to this classical theory to take into account the pressure dependence of permeability, the compressibility or non-Newtonian rheology of fracturing fluid, and the radial (versus linear) geometry of fluid leak­off from the borehole. All of these refinements, however, still assume that the reservoir rock adjacent to the fracture face is non­deformable. Although the effect of poroelastic stress changes on leak-off is usually thought to be negligible, at the very high fluid pressures used in hydraulic fracturing, where the stresses exceed the rock strength, elastic rheology may not be the best choice. For example, calculations show that perfectly elastic rock formations do not undergo the degree of compaction typically seen in sedimentary basins. Therefore, pseudo-elastic or elastoplastic models are used to fit observed porosity profiles with depth. Starting from balance equations for mass and momentum for fluid and rock, we derive a hydraulic flow equation coupled with a porosity equation describing rock compaction. The result resembles a pressure diffusion equation with the total compressibility being a sum of fluid, rock and pore-space compressibilities. With linear elastic rheology, the bulk formation compressibility is dominated by fluid compressibility. But the possibility

  3. Connective tissue spectrum abnormalities associated with spontaneous cerebrospinal fluid leaks: a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Reinstein, Eyal; Pariani, Mitchel; Bannykh, Serguei; Rimoin, David L; Schievink, Wouter I

    2013-04-01

    We aimed to assess the frequency of connective tissue abnormalities among patients with cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leaks in a prospective study using a large cohort of patients. We enrolled a consecutive group of 50 patients, referred for consultation because of CSF leak. All patients have been carefully examined for the presence of connective tissue abnormalities, and based on findings, patients underwent genetic testing. Ancillary diagnostic studies included echocardiography, eye exam, and histopathological examinations of skin and dura biopsies in selected patients. We identified nine patients with heritable connective tissue disorders, including Marfan syndrome, Ehlers-Danlos syndrome and other unclassified forms. In seven patients, spontaneous CSF leak was the first noted manifestation of the genetic disorder. We conclude that spontaneous CSF leaks are associated with a spectrum of connective tissue abnormalities and may be the first noted clinical presentation of the genetic disorder. We propose that there is a clinical basis for considering spontaneous CSF leak as a clinical manifestation of heritable connective tissue disorders, and we suggest that patients with CSF leaks should be screened for connective tissue and vascular abnormalities.

  4. Dural Defect Repair in Translabyrinthine Acoustic Neuroma Surgery and Its Implications in Cerebrospinal Fluid Leak Occurrence

    PubMed Central

    Netto, Aloysio Augusto Tahan de Campos; Colafêmina, José Fernando; Centeno, Ricardo Silva

    2012-01-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak is a complication that may occur after translabyrinthine (translab) acoustic neuroma (AN) removal. The aim of this study is to verify the incidence of CSF leak using two techniques for dural defect closure in translab AN surgery and present a new technique for dural repair. A retrospective study was held, reviewing charts of 34 patients in a tertiary neurotologic referral center. Out of these 34 patients that underwent translab AN excision in a 1-year period, 18 had their dural defect repaired using only abdominal fat graft and 16 using synthetic dura substitute (SDS) plus abdominal fat tissue. One patient (5.5%) in the first group had CSF leak and 1 (6.2%) in the second group had CSF leak postoperatively. Our data suggest that there are no significant differences in CSF leak rates using both techniques, although studies in a larger series must be undertaken to conclude it. We believe that the development of some points in the new technique for dural repair can achieve better results and reduce the CSF leak incidence in the translabyrinthine acoustic neuroma surgery in the near future. PMID:24083124

  5. Hazardous Gas Leak Analysis in the Space Shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barile, Ronald G.

    1991-01-01

    Helium tests of the main propulsion system in the Space Shuttle and on hydrogen leaks are examined. The hazardous gas detection system (HGDS) in the mobile launch pad uses mass spectrometers (MS) to monitor the shuttle environment for leaks. The mass spectrometers are fed by long tubes to sample gas from the payload bay, mid-body, aft engine compartment, and external tank. The purpose is to improve the HGDS, especially in its potential for locating cryogen leaks. Pre-existing leak data was analyzed for transient information to determine if the leak location could be pinpointed from test data. A rapid response leak detection experiment was designed, built, and tested. Large eddies and vortices were visually seen with Schlieren imaging, and they were detected in the time plots of the various instruments. The response time of the MS was found in the range of 0.05 to 0.1 sec. Pulsed concentration waves were clearly detected at 25 cycles per sec by spectral analysis of MS data. One conclusion is that the backup HGDS sampling frequency should be increased above the present rate of 1 sample per second.

  6. Assessments of fluid friction factors for use in leak rate calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Chivers, T.C.

    1997-04-01

    Leak before Break procedures require estimates of leakage, and these in turn need fluid friction to be assessed. In this paper available data on flow rates through idealized and real crack geometries are reviewed in terms of a single friction factor k It is shown that for {lambda} < 1 flow rates can be bounded using correlations in terms of surface R{sub a} values. For {lambda} > 1 the database is less precise, but {lambda} {approx} 4 is an upper bound, hence in this region flow calculations can be assessed using 1 < {lambda} < 4.

  7. Leak Location in Plates Using Spatial Fourier Transform Based Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, R.; Holland, S.; Strei, M.; Song, J.; Chimenti, D. E.

    2005-04-01

    The location of air leaks in plate-like structures is examined using a spatial Fourier transform based analysis. Noise data is collected over 2-D spatial arrays at sensor locations, from which mean cross-correlations are compiled. Propagation properties, transit times, and energy distribution among modes are extracted through spatial Fourier transformation of these data. A simple algorithm to determine source location using a reduced set of transform data is demonstrated experimentally, based upon extraction of energy propagation direction.

  8. Modified Graded Repair of Cerebrospinal Fluid Leaks in Endoscopic Endonasal Transsphenoidal Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jae-Hyun; Choi, Jai Ho; Kim, Young-Il; Kim, Sung Won

    2015-01-01

    Objective Complete sellar floor reconstruction is critical to avoid postoperative cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leakage during transsphenoidal surgery. Recently, the pedicled nasoseptal flap has undergone many modifications and eventually proved to be valuable and efficient. However, using these nasoseptal flaps in all patients who undergo transsphenoidal surgery, including those who had none or only minor CSF leakage, appears to be overly invasive and time-consuming. Methods Patients undergoing endoscopic endonasal transsphenoidal tumor surgery within a 5 year-period were reviewed. Since 2009, we classified the intraoperative CSF leakage into grades from 0 to 3. Sellar floor reconstruction was tailored to each leak grade. We did not use any tissue grafts such as abdominal fat and did not include any procedures of CSF diversions such as lumbar drainage. Results Among 200 cases in 188 patients (147 pituitary adenoma and 41 other pathologies), intraoperative CSF leakage was observed in 27.4% of 197 cases : 14.7% Grade 1, 4.6% Grade 2a, 3.0% Grade 2b, and 5.1% Grade 3. Postoperative CSF leakage was observed in none of the cases. Septal bone buttress was used for Grade 1 to 3 leakages instead of any other foreign materials. Pedicled nasoseptal flap was used for Grades 2b and 3 leakages. Unused septal bones and nasoseptal flaps were repositioned. Conclusion Modified classification of intraoperative CSF leaks and tailored repair technique in a multilayered fashion using an en-bloc harvested septal bone and vascularized nasoseptal flaps is an effective and reliable method for the prevention of postoperative CSF leaks. PMID:26279811

  9. Pneumocephalus leading to the diagnosis of cerebrospinal fluid leak and esophageal perforation after cervical spine surgery.

    PubMed

    Goodwin, C Rory; Boone, Christine E; Pendleton, James; Elder, Benjamin D; Wei, Zhikui; Hsu, Wesley; Sciubba, Daniel M; Witham, Timothy F

    2016-04-01

    Pneumocephalus is a collection of air within in the intracranial cavity, most commonly seen following traumatic injury or cranial surgeries. Esophageal injury and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak are rare complications that may occur following anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF). We present a novel case of pneumocephalus arising from unrestricted leakage of CSF via coincident esophageal injury and durotomy in a patient who underwent an ACDF after trauma. A 21-year-old man presented to an outside hospital with C5/C6 subluxation, complete spinal cord injury, and quadriplegia from a motor vehicle accident. He underwent an ACDF, during which a CSF leak was observed. He was then transferred to our institution for rehabilitation and tracheostomy placement 1 week after the ACDF surgery. Following the tracheostomy, the patient developed intractable fevers and nonspecific symptoms. A CT scan demonstrated frontal pneumocephalus without mass effect. Air was found in the retropharyngeal space. There were no accumulations of CSF in the neck. Extravasation of contrast around instrumentation at C5/C6 on a cine esophagogram demonstrated an esophageal perforation at that level. Pneumocephalus may form when large volumes of CSF escape from the intracranial space and air is drawn into the space by the negative pressure. In this unusual case, the esophageal perforation promoted the formation of the pneumocephalus. Treatment included closure of both defects, disrupting the suspected communication between the intracranial space and the esophagus.

  10. Sandwich Wound Closure Reduces the Risk of Cerebrospinal Fluid Leaks in Posterior Fossa Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Heymanns, Verena; Oseni, Abidemi W.; Alyeldien, Ameer; Maslehaty, Homajoun; Parvin, Richard; Scholz, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Posterior fossa surgery is demanding and hides a significant number of obstacles starting from the approach to the wound closure. The risk of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leakage in posterior fossa surgery given in the literature is around 8%. The present study aims to introduce a sandwich closure of the dura in posterior fossa surgery, which reduces significantly the number of CSF leaks (3.8%) in the patients treated in our department. Three hundred and ten patients treated in our hospital in the years 2009-2013 for posterior fossa pathologies were retrospectively evaluated. The dura closure method was as following: lyophilized dura put under the dura and sealed with fibrin glue and sutures, dura adapting stitches, TachoSil® (Takeda Pharma A/S, Roskilde, Denmark), Gelfoam® (Pfizer Inc., New York, NY, USA) and polymethylmethacrylate (osteoclastic craniotomy). The incidence of postsurgical complications associated with the dural closure like CSF leakage, infections, bleeding is evaluated. Only 3.8% of patients developed CSF leakage and only 0.5% needed a second surgery for CSF leakage closure. Two percent had a cerebellar bleeding with no need for re-operation and 3% had a wound infection treated with antibiotics. The sandwich wound closure we are applying for posterior fossa surgery in our patients correlates with a significant reduction of CSF leaks compared to the literature. PMID:27478578

  11. Fluid Inclusion Gas Analysis

    DOE Data Explorer

    Dilley, Lorie

    2013-01-01

    Fluid inclusion gas analysis for wells in various geothermal areas. Analyses used in developing fluid inclusion stratigraphy for wells and defining fluids across the geothermal fields. Each sample has mass spectrum counts for 180 chemical species.

  12. Leak rate analysis of the Westinghouse Reactor Coolant Pump

    SciTech Connect

    Boardman, T.; Jeanmougin, N.; Lofaro, R.; Prevost, J.

    1985-07-01

    An independent analysis was performed by ETEC to determine what the seal leakage rates would be for the Westinghouse Reactor Coolant Pump (RCP) during a postulated station blackout resulting from loss of ac electric power. The object of the study was to determine leakage rates for the following conditions: Case 1: All three seals function. Case 2: No. 1 seal fails open while Nos. 2 and 3 seals function. Case 3: All three seals fail open. The ETEC analysis confirmed Westinghouse calculations on RCP seal performance for the conditions investigated. The leak rates predicted by ETEC were slightly lower than those predicted by Westinghouse for each of the three cases as summarized below. Case 1: ETEC predicted 19.6 gpm, Westinghouse predicted 21.1 gpm. Case 2: ETEC predicted 64.7 gpm, Westinghouse predicted 75.6 gpm. Case 3: ETEC predicted 422 gpm, Westinghouse predicted 480 gpm. 3 refs., 22 figs., 6 tabs.

  13. Coupled Model for CO2 Leaks from Geological Storage: Geomechanics, Fluid Flow and Phase Transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gor, G.; Prevost, J.

    2013-12-01

    Deep saline aquifers are considered as a promising option for long-term storage of carbon dioxide. However, risk of CO2 leakage from the aquifers through faults, natural or induced fractures or abandoned wells cannot be disregarded. Therefore, modeling of various leakage scenarios is crucial when selecting a site for CO2 sequestration and choosing proper operational conditions. Carbon dioxide is injected into wells at supercritical conditions (t > 31.04 C, P > 73.82 bar), and these conditions are maintained in the deep aquifers (at 1-2 km depth) due to hydrostatic pressure and geothermal gradient. However, if CO2 and brine start to migrate from the aquifer upward, both pressure and temperature will decrease, and at the depth of 500-750 m, the conditions for CO2 will become subcritical. At subcritical conditions, CO2 starts boiling and the character of the flow changes dramatically due to appearance of the third (vapor) phase and latent heat effects. When modeling CO2 leaks, one needs to couple the multiphase flow in porous media with geomechanics. These capabilities are provided by Dynaflow, a finite element analysis program [1]; Dynaflow has already showed to be efficient for modeling caprock failure causing CO2 leaks [2, 3]. Currently we have extended the capabilities of Dynaflow with the phase transition module, based on two-phase and three-phase isenthalpic flash calculations [4]. We have also developed and implemented an efficient method for solving heat and mass transport with the phase transition using our flash module. Therefore, we have developed a robust tool for modeling CO2 leaks. In the talk we will give a brief overview of our method and illustrate it with the results of simulations for characteristic test cases. References: [1] J.H. Prevost, DYNAFLOW: A Nonlinear Transient Finite Element Analysis Program. Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ. http://www.princeton.edu/~dynaflow/ (last update 2013

  14. Postoperative Low-Flow Cerebrospinal Fluid Leak of Endoscopic Endonasal Transsphenoidal Surgery for Pituitary Adenoma--Wait and See, or Lumbar Drain?

    PubMed

    Zhan, Rucai; Chen, Songyu; Xu, Shujun; Liu, James K; Li, Xingang

    2015-06-01

    To assess the effectiveness of continuous lumbar drainage (LD) for management of postoperative cerebrospinal fluid leaks after endoscopic endonasal transsphenoidal approach for resection of pituitary adenoma. Three hundred eighty-four medical records of patients who were admitted to our institute during a 2.5-year period were retrospectively reviewed, 33 of them experienced low-flow cerebrospinal fluid leak postoperatively. If LD was used, all patients with low-flow cerebrospinal fluid leak were classified into 2 groups, lumbar drained group and conservatively treated group. The age, sex, management of cerebrospinal fluid leaks, and related complications were reviewed. Statistical comparisons between the 2 groups were made using SPSS 19.0 (IBM Corp, Armonk, NY). The differences were considered statistically significant if the P value was less than 0.05.Thirty-three of 384 (8.6%) experienced low-flow postoperative cerebrospinal fluid leaks. Cured rate of cerebrospinal fluid leak was 94.4% (17/18) in continuous lumbar drained group, and 93.3% (14/15) in control group. There were 2 (11.2%) patients who developed meningitis in the LD group and 1 (5.6%) patient in the control group. One patient required endoscopic repair of skull base because of persistent cerebrospinal fluid leak in both groups, with the rates of 5.6% and 6.7%, respectively. There was no significant difference noted in each rate in both groups.Placement of LD may not be necessary for the management of low-flow postoperative cerebrospinal fluid leak after using endoscopic endonasal transsphenoidal approach to pituitary adenoma.

  15. Leak detector uses ultrasonics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heisman, R. M.; Iceland, W. F.; Keir, A. R.

    1978-01-01

    Probe located on outer wall of vacuum-jacketed fluid lines detects leaks on inner wall. Probe picks up and amplifies vibrations that occur when gas rushes through leak and converts them to audible signal or CRT display. System is considerably simpler to use than helium leak detectors and allows rapid checks to be made as part of routine maintenance.

  16. Sealing Nitrogen Tetroxide Leaks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garrard, George G.; Houston, Donald W.; Scott, Frank D.

    1990-01-01

    Use of Furmanite FSC-N-6B sealant in clam-shell sealing device makes it possible to stop leaks of nitrogen tetroxide through defective or improperly-seated plumbing fittings. Devised to stop leaks in vent line of small rocket motor on Space Shuttle. Also used on plumbing containing hydrazine and other hazardous fluids, and repair withstands severe temperature, vibration, and shock. Leaks stopped in place, without draining or replacement of leaking parts.

  17. Permanent underwater leak detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costello, L.; McStay, D.; Moodie, D.; Kane, D.

    2009-07-01

    A new optoelectronic sensor for the real time monitoring of key components such as valves and connectors within the subsea production equipment for leaks of hydraulic fluid is reported. The sensor is capable of detecting low concentrations of such fluids, allowing the early detection of small leaks, and the ability to monitor the evolution of the leak-rate with time, hence providing an important new tool in complying with environmental requirements, enabling early intervention and optimising subsea production

  18. [Diagnosis: synovial fluid analysis].

    PubMed

    Gallo Vallejo, Francisco Javier; Giner Ruiz, Vicente

    2014-01-01

    Synovial fluid analysis in rheumatological diseases allows a more accurate diagnosis in some entities, mainly infectious and microcrystalline arthritis. Examination of synovial fluid in patients with osteoarthritis is useful if a differential diagnosis will be performed with other processes and to distinguish between inflammatory and non-inflammatory forms. Joint aspiration is a diagnostic and sometimes therapeutic procedure that is available to primary care physicians.

  19. U.S. strategic petroleum reserve Big Hill 114 leak analysis 2012.

    SciTech Connect

    Lord, David L.; Roberts, Barry L.; Lord, Anna C. Snider; Sobolik, Steven Ronald; Park, Byoung Yoon; Rudeen, David Keith

    2013-06-01

    This report addresses recent well integrity issues related to cavern 114 at the Big Hill Strategic Petroleum Reserve site. DM Petroleum Operations, M&O contractor for the U.S. Strategic Petroleum Reserve, recognized an apparent leak in Big Hill cavern well 114A in late summer, 2012, and provided written notice to the State of Texas as required by law. DM has since isolated the leak in well A with a temporary plug, and is planning on remediating both 114 A- and B-wells with liners. In this report Sandia provides an analysis of the apparent leak that includes: (i) estimated leak volume, (ii) recommendation for operating pressure to maintain in the cavern between temporary and permanent fixes for the well integrity issues, and (iii) identification of other caverns or wells at Big Hill that should be monitored closely in light of the sequence of failures there in the last several years.

  20. Analysis of Pressurized Water Reactor Primary Coolant Leak Events Caused by Thermal Fatigue

    SciTech Connect

    Atwood, Corwin Lee; Shah, Vikram Naginbhai; Galyean, William Jospeh

    1999-09-01

    We present statistical analyses of pressurized water reactor (PWR) primary coolant leak events caused by thermal fatigue, and discuss their safety significance. Our worldwide data contain 13 leak events (through-wall cracking) in 3509 reactor-years, all in stainless steel piping with diameter less than 25 cm. Several types of data analysis show that the frequency of leak events (events per reactor-year) is increasing with plant age, and the increase is statistically significant. When an exponential trend model is assumed, the leak frequency is estimated to double every 8 years of reactor age, although this result should not be extrapolated to plants much older than 25 years. Difficulties in arresting this increase include lack of quantitative understanding of the phenomena causing thermal fatigue, lack of understanding of crack growth, and difficulty in detecting existing cracks.

  1. Analysis of electric and magnetic fields leaking from induction heaters.

    PubMed

    Andreuccetti, D; Bini, M; Ignesti, A; Olmi, R; Rubino, N; Vanni, R

    1988-01-01

    Results are presented of an investigation on electric and magnetic fields leaking from inductive (magnetic) heaters that are used for thermal processing of high-power electron tubes and lasers in an industrial plant. Measurements of electric and magnetic fields were done using both commercially available and laboratory-developed instrumentation. Isotropic H-field sensors were developed to allow quantitative evaluation of high-intensity magnetic fields. Ten induction heaters with nominal A.C. power ranging from 2.5 kW to 15 kW and operating at frequencies between 300 kHz and 790 kHz were surveyed. Electric field strengths up to 8 kV/m and magnetic field strengths up to 20 A/m were measured.

  2. Delayed cerebrospinal fluid leak after watertight dural closure with a polyethylene glycol hydrogel dural sealant in posterior fossa surgery: case report.

    PubMed

    Jito, Junya; Nitta, Naoki; Nozaki, Kazuhiko

    2014-01-01

    A polyethylene glycol (PEG) hydrogel sealant recently has been approved as an adjunct to sutured dural closure in Japan. We treated consecutive six patients with PEG hydrogel sealant in posterior fossa operation. Three of six cases suffered delayed cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak after watertight dural closure with the PEG hydrogel sealant, although there was no leak case which was treated with fibrin glue, before 2 years until the adoption of the new material. These patients underwent posterior fossa craniotomy and discharged without remarkable CSF leak. The pseudomeningocele under the occipital wound caused the CSF leak occurr from 5th to 7th week postoperatively. All CSF leak cases needed surgical repair. At the repair, the PEG hydrogel was liquefied and almost absorbed. A fistula on the closure line and a dead space after the absorption of the PEG hydrogel was observed. When the absorbable PEG hydrogel sealant plugs in small gaps of sutured dura, its properties to prevent adhesion might suppress healing process of dural closure, so that CSF could leak through the gaps and collect as a pseudomeningocele in the dead space after absorption of the PEG hydrogel. In posterior fossa surgery a PEG hydrogel sealant should be applied when dural edges are closed tightly without any gaps.

  3. Cerebrospinal Fluid Leak in Cochlear Implantation: Enlarged Cochlear versus Enlarged Vestibular Aqueduct (Common Cavity Excluded)

    PubMed Central

    Polizzi, Valeria; Formigoni, Patrizia; Russo, Carmela; Tribi, Lorenzo

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To share our experience of cerebrospinal fluid gusher in cochlear implantation in patients with enlarged cochlear or vestibular aqueduct. Study Design. Case series with comparison and a review of the literature. Methods. A retrospective study was performed. Demographic and radiological results of patients with enlarged cochlear aqueduct or enlarged vestibular aqueduct in 278 consecutive cochlear implant recipients, including children and adults, were evaluated between January 2000 and December 2015. Results. Six patients with enlarged cochlear aqueduct and eight patients with enlarged vestibular aqueduct were identified. Cerebrospinal fluid gusher occurs in five subjects with enlarged cochlear aqueduct and in only one case of enlarged vestibular aqueduct. Conclusion. Based on these findings, enlarged cochlear aqueduct may be the best risk predictor of cerebrospinal fluid gusher at cochleostomy during cochlear implant surgery despite enlarged vestibular aqueduct. PMID:27847516

  4. Single cell rheometry with a microfluidic constriction: Quantitative control of friction and fluid leaks between cell and channel walls

    PubMed Central

    Preira, Pascal; Valignat, Marie-Pierre; Bico, José; Théodoly, Olivier

    2013-01-01

    We report how cell rheology measurements can be performed by monitoring the deformation of a cell in a microfluidic constriction, provided that friction and fluid leaks effects between the cell and the walls of the microchannels are correctly taken into account. Indeed, the mismatch between the rounded shapes of cells and the angular cross-section of standard microfluidic channels hampers efficient obstruction of the channel by an incoming cell. Moreover, friction forces between a cell and channels walls have never been characterized. Both effects impede a quantitative determination of forces experienced by cells in a constriction. Our study is based on a new microfluidic device composed of two successive constrictions, combined with optical interference microscopy measurements to characterize the contact zone between the cell and the walls of the channel. A cell squeezed in a first constriction obstructs most of the channel cross-section, which strongly limits leaks around cells. The rheological properties of the cell are subsequently probed during its entry in a second narrower constriction. The pressure force is determined from the pressure drop across the device, the cell velocity, and the width of the gutters formed between the cell and the corners of the channel. The additional friction force, which has never been analyzed for moving and constrained cells before, is found to involve both hydrodynamic lubrication and surface forces. This friction results in the existence of a threshold for moving the cells and leads to a non-linear behavior at low velocity. The friction force can nevertheless be assessed in the linear regime. Finally, an apparent viscosity of single cells can be estimated from a numerical prediction of the viscous dissipation induced by a small step in the channel. A preliminary application of our method yields an apparent loss modulus on the order of 100 Pa s for leukocytes THP-1 cells, in agreement with the literature data. PMID:24404016

  5. Synovial fluid analysis.

    PubMed

    Brannan, Scott R; Jerrard, David A

    2006-04-01

    AsA prompt and accurate diagnosis of a painful, swollen joint is imperative, primarily in the case of a septic joint, as delayed therapy may result in progression of disease or permanent loss of function. Procurement and analysis of synovial fluid (SF) are paramount in helping the clinician to determine a patient's clinical condition and further course of treatment. Measurement of white blood cell (WBC) counts, crystal analysis by polarized microscopy, and microbiologic studies including Gram stain and culture are the SF parameters that are collectively most important in the ultimate determination by a clinician of the presence or absence of an infectious or inflammatory joint. It is important for the clinician to understand and recognize the limitations of various SF parameters to minimize under-treating patients with potentially serious joint pathology.

  6. Pleural fluid analysis

    MedlinePlus

    ... of fluid that has collected in the pleural space. This is the space between the lining of the outside of the ... the chest. When fluid collects in the pleural space, the condition is called pleural effusion .

  7. Peritoneal fluid analysis

    MedlinePlus

    ... at fluid that has built up in the space in the abdomen around the internal organs. This area is called the peritoneal space. ... sample of fluid is removed from the peritoneal space using a needle and syringe. Your health care ...

  8. Leak detection aid

    DOEpatents

    Steeper, T.J.

    1989-12-26

    A leak detection apparatus and method for detecting leaks across an O-ring sealing a flanged surface to a mating surface is an improvement in a flanged surface comprising a shallow groove following O-ring in communication with an entrance and exit port intersecting the shallow groove for injecting and withdrawing, respectively, a leak detection fluid, such as helium. A small quantity of helium injected into the entrance port will flow to the shallow groove, past the O-ring and to the exit port. 2 figs.

  9. Leak detection aid

    DOEpatents

    Steeper, Timothy J.

    1989-01-01

    A leak detection apparatus and method for detecting leaks across an O-ring sealing a flanged surface to a mating surface is an improvement in a flanged surface comprising a shallow groove following O-ring in communication with an entrance and exit port intersecting the shallow groove for injecting and withdrawing, respectively, a leak detection fluid, such as helium. A small quantity of helium injected into the entrance port will flow to the shallow groove, past the O-ring and to the exit port.

  10. Peritoneal Fluid Analysis

    MedlinePlus

    ... tests for viruses, mycobacteria ( AFB testing in identifying tuberculosis ), and parasites Adenosine deaminase – rarely ordered for detecting tuberculosis in peritoneal fluid ^ Back to top When is ...

  11. Leak detection/verification

    SciTech Connect

    Krhounek, V.; Zdarek, J.; Pecinka, L.

    1997-04-01

    Loss of coolant accident (LOCA) experiments performed as part of a Leak Before Break (LBB) analysis are very briefly summarized. The aim of these experiments was to postulate the leak rates of the coolant. Through-wall cracks were introduced into pipes by fatigue cycling and hydraulically loaded in a test device. Measurements included coolant pressure and temperature, quantity of leaked coolant, displacement of a specimen, and acoustic emission. Small cracks were plugged with particles in the coolant during testing. It is believed that plugging will have no effect in cracks with leak rates above 35 liters per minute. The leak rate safety margin of 10 is sufficient for cracks in which the leak rate is more than 5 liters per minute.

  12. [Evidence-based clinical practice guidelines for the treatment of dural tears and the consequent cerebrospinal fluid leak during spine surgery].

    PubMed

    2017-02-01

    Dural tears (DT) and the consequent cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) leak are not rare in spine surgeries. CSF leak can be troublesome, leading to pseudomeningocele, cutaneous CSF fistula, and meningitis. Revision surgery is unavoidable in some cases. The reported incidences of DT and CSF leak are different according to the various pathologies. Ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament, revision spine surgery and multi-segment laminectomy have higher risks for DT. Various techniques have been described to manage this complication, such as bed rest, repair with dural substitutes, fibrin glue, gelatin sponge, lumbar drain, muscle flap, etc.Through objective evaluation of the evidence and transparency in the process of making recommendations, it is Chinese Association of Orthopaedic Surgeons' goal to develop evidence-based clinical practice guidelines for the treatment of incidental DT and the consequent CSF leak during spine surgery. The current clinical guidelines focus on 9 clinical questions and the strength of recommendations were made based on the quality of the literature. The work group considers that this guideline recommendations aim to assist in delivering optimum, efficacious treatment and functional recovery from this complication.

  13. Photoacoustic spectrometry for trace gas analysis and leak detection using different cell geometries.

    PubMed

    Gondal, M A; Dastageer, A; Shwehdi, M H

    2004-01-09

    A photoacoustic (PA) spectrometer with high selectivity and sensitivity has been developed for trace gas analysis and for the detection of gas leak at part per trillion by volume (pptV) level. This PA system comprises of a resonant photoacoustic cell, a pulsed line tunable CO(2) laser as an excitation source and a sensitive electret microphone as a photoacoustic detector with an option to trigger the safety alarm system for early warning of gas leaks. In this work, three resonant PA cells with various geometries have been developed at our laboratory for the detection of photoacoustic signal using pulsed laser system and their comparative performance have been studied. As a special application of this PA system, the detection of sulfur hexa fluoride (SF(6)) gas using these three cells has been carried out for optimizing the sensitivity. Besides this, our PA system can very well be applied for pollution monitoring and detection of hazardous gases in a noisy environment.

  14. Towards an analysis of leak-before-break assessments in the ductile tearing regime

    SciTech Connect

    Parfitt, V.R.

    1991-12-31

    This paper presents the elastic-plastic fracture analysis of a typical semi-elliptical axial surface flaw growing to a thru-thickness flaw and assessing the leak-before break situation in a pressure vessel subject to pressure. The paper first discusses the semi-elliptical flaw J-integral solution and the thru-thickness flaw solution as modified herein. Then a review is presented of the three ductile tearing stability fracture analysis methods based on the fully plastic J-integral solution; (1) the crack driving force diagram, (2) the tearing modulus diagram, and (3) the failure assessment diagram. These methods are then used to determine the factors of safety to initiation of ductile tearing as the crack grows. Factors of safety based on either pressure alone or crack size alone are illustrated. An illustration is given of a leak-before-break solution discussing the semi-elliptical flaw growing to a thru-thickness flaw in the vessel. The paper concludes with a discussion of additional effort needed to better characterize leak-before-break solutions in the ductile tearing regime.

  15. Pericardial Fluid Analysis

    MedlinePlus

    ... this test may be used to help detect tuberculosis (TB) . Less commonly ordered tests for infectious diseases, ... fluid in a person with symptoms that suggest tuberculosis means it is likely that person has a ...

  16. Preservation of the Myofascial Cuff During Posterior Fossa Surgery to Reduce the Rate of Pseudomeningocele Formation and Cerebrospinal Fluid Leak: A Technical Note

    PubMed Central

    Felbaum, Daniel R; Anaizi, Amjad; Mason, Robert B; Jean, Walter C; Voyadzis, Jean M

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Suboccipital craniotomy is a workhorse neurosurgical operation for approaching the posterior fossa but carries a high risk of pseudomeningocele and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak. We describe our experience with a simple T-shaped fascial opening that preserves the occipital myofascial cuff as compared to traditional methods to reduce this risk. Methods: A single institution, retrospective review of prospectively collected database was performed of patients that underwent a suboccipital craniectomy or craniotomy. Patient data was reviewed for craniotomy or craniectomy, dural graft, and/or sealant use as well as CSF complications. A pseudomeningocele was defined as a subcutaneous collection of cerebrospinal fluid palpable clinically and confirmed on imaging. A CSF leak was defined as a CSF-cutaneous fistula manifested by CSF leaking through the wound. All patients underwent regular postoperative visits of two weeks, one month, and three months. Results: Our retrospective review identified 33 patients matching the inclusion criteria. Overall, our cohort had a 21% (7/33) rate of clinical and radiographic pseudomeningocele formation with 9% (3/33) requiring surgical revision or a separate procedure. The rate of clinical and radiographic pseudomeningocele formation in the myofascial cuff preservation technique was less than standard techniques (12% and 31%, respectively). Revision or further surgical procedures were also reduced in the myofascial cuff preservation technique vs. the standard technique (6% vs 13%). Conclusions: Preservation of the myofascial cuff during posterior fossa surgery is a simple and adoptable technique that reduces the rate of pseudomeningocele formation and CSF leak as compared with standard techniques.   PMID:28133584

  17. Milestone Report #2: Direct Evaporator Leak and Flammability Analysis Modifications and Optimization of the Organic Rankine Cycle to Improve the Recovery of Waste Heat

    SciTech Connect

    Donna Post Guillen

    2013-09-01

    The direct evaporator is a simplified heat exchange system for an Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC) that generates electricity from a gas turbine exhaust stream. Typically, the heat of the exhaust stream is transferred indirectly to the ORC by means of an intermediate thermal oil loop. In this project, the goal is to design a direct evaporator where the working fluid is evaporated in the exhaust gas heat exchanger. By eliminating one of the heat exchangers and the intermediate oil loop, the overall ORC system cost can be reduced by approximately 15%. However, placing a heat exchanger operating with a flammable hydrocarbon working fluid directly in the hot exhaust gas stream presents potential safety risks. The purpose of the analyses presented in this report is to assess the flammability of the selected working fluid in the hot exhaust gas stream stemming from a potential leak in the evaporator. Ignition delay time for cyclopentane at temperatures and pressure corresponding to direct evaporator operation was obtained for several equivalence ratios. Results of a computational fluid dynamic analysis of a pinhole leak scenario are given.

  18. Analysis of potential for jet-impingement erosion from leaking steam generator tubes during severe accidents.

    SciTech Connect

    Majumdar, S.; Diercks, D. R.; Shack, W. J.; Energy Technology

    2002-05-01

    This report summarizes analytical evaluation of crack-opening areas and leak rates of superheated steam through flaws in steam generator tubes and erosion of neighboring tubes due to jet impingement of superheated steam with entrained particles from core debris created during severe accidents. An analytical model for calculating crack-opening area as a function of time and temperature was validated with tests on tubes with machined flaws. A three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics code was used to calculate the jet velocity impinging on neighboring tubes as a function of tube spacing and crack-opening area. Erosion tests were conducted in a high-temperature, high-velocity erosion rig at the University of Cincinnati, using micrometer-sized nickel particles mixed in with high-temperature gas from a burner. The erosion results, together with analytical models, were used to estimate the erosive effects of superheated steam with entrained aerosols from the core during severe accidents.

  19. A probabilistic method for leak-before-break analysis of CANDU reactor pressure tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Puls, M.P.; Wilkins, B.J.S.; Rigby, G.L.

    1997-04-01

    A probabilistic code for the prediction of the cumulative probability of pressure tube ruptures in CANDU type reactors is described. Ruptures are assumed to result from the axial growth by delayed hydride cracking. The BLOOM code models the major phenomena that affect crack length and critical crack length during the reactor sequence of events following the first indications of leakage. BLOOM can be used to develop unit-specific estimates of the actual probability of pressure rupture in operating CANDU reactors and supplement the existing leak before break analysis.

  20. Spontaneous spinal cerebrospinal fluid leak as a cause of coma after craniotomy for clipping of an unruptured intracranial aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Schievink, Wouter I; Palestrant, David; Maya, M Marcel; Rappard, George

    2009-03-01

    Spontaneous spinal CSF leaks are best known as a cause of orthostatic headache, but may also be the cause of coma. The authors encountered a unique case of a spontaneous spinal CSF leak causing coma 2 days after craniotomy for clipping of an unruptured aneurysm. This 44-year-old woman with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease underwent an uneventful craniotomy for an incidental anterior choroidal artery aneurysm. No intraoperative spinal CSF drainage was used. Two days after surgery the patient became comatose with a left oculomotor nerve palsy. Computed tomography scanning revealed a right extraceberal hematoma and loss of gray-white matter differentiation. The hematoma was evacuated and a diagnosis of hemodialysis disequilibrium syndrome was made. Continuous hemodialysis and hyperosmolar therapy were instituted without any improvement. The CT scans were then reinterpreted as showing sagging of the brain, and the patient was placed in the Trendelenburg position which resulted in prompt improvement in her level of consciousness. A CT myelogram demonstrated an upper thoracic CSF leak that eventually required surgical correction. The patient made a complete neurological recovery. Neurological deterioration after craniotomy may be caused by brain sagging caused by a spontaneous spinal CSF leak, similar to intracranial hypotension due to intraoperative lumbar CSF drainage.

  1. Mitigated Transfer Line Leaks that Result in Surface Pools and Spray Leaks into Pits

    SciTech Connect

    HEY, B.E.

    1999-12-07

    This analysis provides radiological and toxicological consequence calculations for postulated mitigated leaks during transfers of six waste compositions. Leaks in Cleanout Boxes equipped with supplemental covers and leaks in pits are analyzed.

  2. Ammonia Leak Locator Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dodge, Franklin T.; Wuest, Martin P.; Deffenbaugh, Danny M.

    1995-01-01

    The thermal control system of International Space Station Alpha will use liquid ammonia as the heat exchange fluid. It is expected that small leaks (of the order perhaps of one pound of ammonia per day) may develop in the lines transporting the ammonia to the various facilities as well as in the heat exchange equipment. Such leaks must be detected and located before the supply of ammonia becomes critically low. For that reason, NASA-JSC has a program underway to evaluate instruments that can detect and locate ultra-small concentrations of ammonia in a high vacuum environment. To be useful, the instrument must be portable and small enough that an astronaut can easily handle it during extravehicular activity. An additional complication in the design of the instrument is that the environment immediately surrounding ISSA will contain small concentrations of many other gases from venting of onboard experiments as well as from other kinds of leaks. These other vapors include water, cabin air, CO2, CO, argon, N2, and ethylene glycol. Altogether, this local environment might have a pressure of the order of 10(exp -7) to 10(exp -6) torr. Southwest Research Institute (SwRI) was contracted by NASA-JSC to provide support to NASA-JSC and its prime contractors in evaluating ammonia-location instruments and to make a preliminary trade study of the advantages and limitations of potential instruments. The present effort builds upon an earlier SwRI study to evaluate ammonia leak detection instruments [Jolly and Deffenbaugh]. The objectives of the present effort include: (1) Estimate the characteristics of representative ammonia leaks; (2) Evaluate the baseline instrument in the light of the estimated ammonia leak characteristics; (3) Propose alternative instrument concepts; and (4) Conduct a trade study of the proposed alternative concepts and recommend promising instruments. The baseline leak-location instrument selected by NASA-JSC was an ion gauge.

  3. Space Station Freedom seal leakage rate analysis and testing summary: Air leaks in ambient versus vacuum exit conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodriguez, P. I.; Markovitch, R.

    1992-01-01

    This report is intended to reveal the apparent relationship of air seal leakage rates between 2 atmospheres (atm) to 1 atm and 1 atm to vacuum conditions. Gas dynamics analysis is provided as well as data summarizing the MSFC test report, 'Space Station Freedom (S.S. Freedom) Seal Flaw Study With Delta Pressure Leak Rate Comparison Test Report'.

  4. An approximate solution for a penny-shaped hydraulic fracture that accounts for fracture toughness, fluid viscosity and leak-off

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    This paper develops a closed-form approximate solution for a penny-shaped hydraulic fracture whose behaviour is determined by an interplay of three competing physical processes that are associated with fluid viscosity, fracture toughness and fluid leak-off. The primary assumption that permits one to construct the solution is that the fracture behaviour is mainly determined by the three-process multiscale tip asymptotics and the global fluid volume balance. First, the developed approximation is compared with the existing solutions for all limiting regimes of propagation. Then, a solution map, which indicates applicability regions of the limiting solutions, is constructed. It is also shown that the constructed approximation accurately captures the scaling that is associated with the transition from any one limiting solution to another. The developed approximation is tested against a reference numerical solution, showing that accuracy of the fracture width and radius predictions lie within a fraction of a per cent for a wide range of parameters. As a result, the constructed approximation provides a rapid solution for a penny-shaped hydraulic fracture, which can be used for quick fracture design calculations or as a reference solution to evaluate accuracy of various hydraulic fracture simulators. PMID:28083110

  5. An approximate solution for a penny-shaped hydraulic fracture that accounts for fracture toughness, fluid viscosity and leak-off

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dontsov, E. V.

    2016-12-01

    This paper develops a closed-form approximate solution for a penny-shaped hydraulic fracture whose behaviour is determined by an interplay of three competing physical processes that are associated with fluid viscosity, fracture toughness and fluid leak-off. The primary assumption that permits one to construct the solution is that the fracture behaviour is mainly determined by the three-process multiscale tip asymptotics and the global fluid volume balance. First, the developed approximation is compared with the existing solutions for all limiting regimes of propagation. Then, a solution map, which indicates applicability regions of the limiting solutions, is constructed. It is also shown that the constructed approximation accurately captures the scaling that is associated with the transition from any one limiting solution to another. The developed approximation is tested against a reference numerical solution, showing that accuracy of the fracture width and radius predictions lie within a fraction of a per cent for a wide range of parameters. As a result, the constructed approximation provides a rapid solution for a penny-shaped hydraulic fracture, which can be used for quick fracture design calculations or as a reference solution to evaluate accuracy of various hydraulic fracture simulators.

  6. Aerospace Payloads Leak Test Methodology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lvovsky, Oleg; Grayson, Cynthia M.

    2010-01-01

    Pressurized and sealed aerospace payloads can leak on orbit. When dealing with toxic or hazardous materials, requirements for fluid and gas leakage rates have to be properly established, and most importantly, reliably verified using the best Nondestructive Test (NDT) method available. Such verification can be implemented through application of various leak test methods that will be the subject of this paper, with a purpose to show what approach to payload leakage rate requirement verification is taken by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). The scope of this paper will be mostly a detailed description of 14 leak test methods recommended.

  7. Analysis of Pressure Data As CO2/Brine Leak Diagnostic in Shallow Aquifers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trainor Guitton, W.; Mansoor, K.; Sun, Y.; Carroll, S.

    2014-12-01

    Pressure is a promising signal for detecting CO2leakage from deep, geologic storage reservoirs to shallow groundwater sources. Pressure signals should faster than other physical indications (i.e. electrical or geochemical changes) thus allowing for a timely leak diagnosis and mitigation. We explore the effectiveness of pressure as a detection tool. A simulation-based approach is used to diagnose a CO2/brine leak using pressure data from monitoring wells and to assess the influence of 3 principal uncertainties: distances between the source leak and the monitoring well, heterogeneity of the aquifer flow properties, and CO2 and brine leakage rates. Specifically, five parameters are sampled: the correlation lengths of the vertical and horizontal permeability for the aquifer (2), the sand proportion for each model (1), and the CO2 and brine leakage flux magnitude (2). Areal model dimensions and grid cell dimensions allow for sampling distances of 25 m to 990 m from the leaking well to the monitoring well. We generate 500 simulations by sampling each parameter within an appropriate range predefined by site-specific values. Pressure transducers in monitoring wells will only be accurate at measuring changes on the order of 0.1 to 0.3 PSI. These pressure thresholds are used to establish which simulations are classified as leaks at the leaking location and which locations away from the leak would constitute a signal. We observe 3 conclusions from the results: vertical flow barriers (heterogeneity) creates complicated pressure signals by forcing convoluted flow paths false positives (Pr( No Leak | Signal)) do not occur with our sample simulations false negatives (Pr( Leak | No signal)) dominate after 200 days even when considering only potential monitoring wells within 100m of the leaking well. We use these posteriors to calculate the value of information (VOI) from above zone pressure data. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by

  8. Crack instability analysis methods for leak-before-break program in piping systems

    SciTech Connect

    Mattar Neto, M.; Nobrega, P.G.B. da

    1995-11-01

    The instability evaluation of cracks in piping systems is a step that is considered when a high-energy line is investigated in a leak-before-break (LBB) program. Different approaches have been used to assess stability of cracks: (a) local flow stress (LFS); (b) limit load (LL); (c) elastic-plastic fracture mechanics (EPFM) as J-integral versus tearing modulus (J-T) analysis. The first two methods are used for high ductile materials, when it is assumed that remaining ligament of the cracked pipe section becomes fully plastic prior to crack extension. EPFM is considered for low ductile piping when the material reaches unstable ductile tearing prior to plastic collapse in the net section. In this paper the LFS, LL and EPFM J-T methodologies were applied to calculate failure loads in circumferential through-wall cracked pipes with different materials, geometries and loads. It presents a comparison among the results obtained from the above three formulations and also compares them with experimental data available in the literature.

  9. SEALING SIMULATED LEAKS

    SciTech Connect

    Michael A. Romano

    2004-09-01

    This report details the testing equipment, procedures and results performed under Task 7.2 Sealing Simulated Leaks. In terms of our ability to seal leaks identified in the technical topical report, Analysis of Current Field Data, we were 100% successful. In regards to maintaining seal integrity after pigging operations we achieved varying degrees of success. Internal Corrosion defects proved to be the most resistant to the effects of pigging while External Corrosion proved to be the least resistant. Overall, with limitations, pressure activated sealant technology would be a viable option under the right circumstances.

  10. Genome-wide SNP analysis of the Systemic Capillary Leak Syndrome (Clarkson disease)

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Zhihui; Nagarajan, Vijayaraj; Sturdevant, Daniel E; Iwaki, Shoko; Chan, Eunice; Wisch, Laura; Young, Michael; Nelson, Celeste M; Porcella, Stephen F; Druey, Kirk M

    2013-01-01

    The Systemic Capillary Leak Syndrome (SCLS) is an extremely rare, orphan disease that resembles, and is frequently erroneously diagnosed as, systemic anaphylaxis. The disorder is characterized by repeated, transient, and seemingly unprovoked episodes of hypotensive shock and peripheral edema due to transient endothelial hyperpermeability. SCLS is often accompanied by a monoclonal gammopathy of unknown significance (MGUS). Using Affymetrix Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP) microarrays, we performed the first genome-wide SNP analysis of SCLS in a cohort of 12 disease subjects and 18 controls. Exome capture sequencing was performed on genomic DNA from nine of these patients as validation for the SNP-chip discoveries and de novo data generation. We identified candidate susceptibility loci for SCLS, which included a region flanking CAV3 (3p25.3) as well as SNP clusters in PON1 (7q21.3), PSORS1C1 (6p21.3), and CHCHD3 (7q33). Among the most highly ranked discoveries were gene-associated SNPs in the uncharacterized LOC100130480 gene (rs6417039, rs2004296). Top case-associated SNPs were observed in BTRC (rs12355803, 3rs4436485), ARHGEF18 (rs11668246), CDH13 (rs4782779), and EDG2 (rs12552348), which encode proteins with known or suspected roles in B cell function and/or vascular integrity. 61 SNPs that were significantly associated with SCLS by microarray analysis were also detected and validated by exome deep sequencing. Functional annotation of highly ranked SNPs revealed enrichment of cell projections, cell junctions and adhesion, and molecules containing pleckstrin homology, Ras/Rho regulatory, and immunoglobulin Ig-like C2/fibronectin type III domains, all of which involve mechanistic functions that correlate with the SCLS phenotype. These results highlight SNPs with potential relevance to SCLS. PMID:24808988

  11. Geomechanical analysis to predict the oil leak at the wellbores in Big Hill Strategic Petroleum Reserve

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Byoung Yoon

    2014-02-01

    Oil leaks were found in wellbores of Caverns 105 and 109 at the Big Hill Strategic Petroleum Reserve site. According to the field observations, two instances of casing damage occurred at the depth of the interbed between the caprock bottom and salt top. A three dimensional finite element model, which contains wellbore element blocks and allows each cavern to be configured individually, is constructed to investigate the wellbore damage mechanism. The model also contains element blocks to represent interface between each lithology and a shear zone to examine the interbed behavior in a realistic manner. The causes of the damaged casing segments are a result of vertical and horizontal movements of the interbed between the caprock and salt dome. The salt top subsides because the volume of caverns below the salt top decrease with time due to salt creep closure, while the caprock subsides at a slower rate because the caprock is thick and stiffer. This discrepancy yields a deformation of the well. The deformed wellbore may fail at some time. An oil leak occurs when the wellbore fails. A possible oil leak date of each well is determined using the equivalent plastic strain failure criterion. A well grading system for a remediation plan is developed based on the predicted leak dates of each wellbore.

  12. CSF leak

    MedlinePlus

    ... PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2012:chap 138. Rosenberg GA. Brain edema and disorders of cerebrospinal fluid circulation. In: Daroff RB, Jankovic J, Mazziotta JC, Pomeroy SL, eds. Bradley's Neurology in Clinical Practice . 7th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; ... Cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) collection Review Date 5/30/ ...

  13. Hemostasis and other benefits of fibrin sealants/glues in spine surgery beyond cerebrospinal fluid leak repairs

    PubMed Central

    Epstein, Nancy E.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Fibrin sealants (FS)/glues (FG) are primarily utilized in spinal surgery to either strengthen repairs of elective (e.g., intradural tumors/pathology) or traumatic cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) fistulas. Here, additional roles/benefits of FS/FG in spine surgery are explored; these include increased hemostasis, reduction of scar, reduction of the risk of infection if impregnated with antibiotics, and its application to restrict diffusion and limit some of the major complications attributed to the controversial “off-label” use of bone morphogeneitc protein (rhBMP-2/INFUSE). Methods: We reviewed multiple studies, focusing not just on the utility of FS/FG in the treatment of CSF fistulas, but on its other applications. Results: FS/FG have been primarily used to supplement elective/traumatic dural closure in spinal surgery. However, FS/FG also contribute to; hemostasis, reducing intraoperative/postoperative bleeding/transfusion requirements, length of stay (LOS)/costs, reduced postoperative scar/radiculitis, and infection when impregnated with antibiotics. Nevertheless, one should seriously question whether FS/FG should be applied to prevent diffusion and limit major complications attributed to the “off-label” use of BMP/INFUSE (e.g., limit/prevent heterotopic ossification, dysphagia/respiratory decompensation, and new neurological deficits). Conclusions: FS/FG successfully supplement watertight dural closure following elective (e.g., intradural tumor) or traumatic CSF fistulas occurring during spinal surgery. Additional benefits include: intraoperative hemostasis with reduced postoperative drainage, reduced transfusion requirements, reduced LOS, cost, scar, and prophylaxis against infection (e.g., impregnated with antibiotics). However, one should seriously question whether FS/FG should be used to contain the diffusion of BMP/INFUSE and limit its complications when utilized “off-label”. PMID:25289150

  14. Sensitivity analysis of sluicing-leak parameters for the 241-AX tank farm

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, J.D., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-12-12

    The scope of this work was to analyze the sensitivity of contaminant fluxes from the vadose zone to the water table, to several parameters. Some of these parameters are controllable. The results were evaluated with respect to their sensitivity to the following types of parameters: hydrostratigraphy and hydraulic properties; volume, duration, and source area of leakage; simultaneous leakage from multiple tanks; pre-existing leaks; barriers to infiltration of meteoric water; and contaminant concentrations and geochemistry.

  15. Fluid Dynamic Analysis of Volcanic Tremor,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-10-01

    stations near Mount Etna and concluded abrupt flow input, an abrupt outflow, or some other that the origin was source related, perturbation of an...the pressure head in meters, of the fluid transient theory to the analysis of tremor Q = the volumetric flow rate (m3/s), at Mount Etna . Analysis of...analytical potential of the fluid dynamic theory, we consider a single-phase fluid, a melt of Mount Hood andesite at 1250C, in which significant pressure

  16. Derivation of effectiveness-NTU method for heat exchangers with heat leak

    SciTech Connect

    William M. Soyars

    2001-11-01

    A powerful and useful method for heat exchanger analysis is the effectiveness-NTU method. The equations for this technique presented in textbooks, however, are limited to the case where all of the heat transfer occurs between the two fluid streams. In an application of interest to us, cryogenic heat exchangers, we wish to consider a heat leak term. Thus, we have derived equations for the {var_epsilon}-NTU method with heat leak involved. The cases to be studied include evaporators, condensers, and counter-flow, with heat leak both in and out.

  17. Leak detection by acoustic emission monitoring. Phase 1: Feasibility study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lichtenstein, Bernard; Winder, A. A.

    1994-05-01

    This investigation was conducted to determine the feasibility of detecting leaks from underground storage tanks or pipelines using acoustic emissions. An extensive technical literature review established that distinguishable acoustic emission signals will be generated when a storage tank is subjected to deformation stresses. A parametric analysis was performed which indicated that leak rates less than 0.1 gallons per hour can be detected for leak sizes less than 1/32 inch with 99% probability if the transient signals were sensed with an array of accelerometers (cemented to the tank or via acoustic waveguides), each having a sensitivity greater than 250 mv/g over a frequency range of 0.1 to 4000 Hz, and processed in a multi-channel Fourier spectrum analyzer with automatic threshold detection. An acoustic transient or energy release processor could conceivably detect the onset of the leak at the moment of fracture of the tank wall. The primary limitations to realizing reliable and robust acoustic emission monitoring of underground fluid leaks are the various masking noise sources prevalent at Air Force bases, which are attributed to aircraft, motor traffic, pump station operation, and ground tremors.

  18. Pressure Rise Analysis When Hydrogen Leak from a Cracked Pipe in the Cryogenic Hydrogen System in J-PARC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tatsumoto, H.; Aso, T.; Hasegawa, S.; Ushijima, I.; Kato, T.; Ohtsu, K.; Ikeda, Y.

    2006-04-01

    As one of the main experimental facilities in the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC), an intense spallation neutron source (JSNS) driven by a 1 MW proton beam is being constructed. Cryogenic hydrogen at supercritical pressure is selected as a moderator. The total nuclear heating at the moderators is estimated to be a 3.7 kW. A hydrogen system to cool the moderators has been designed. The most severe off-normal event for the cryogenic hydrogen system is considered to be a hydrogen leak when a pipe cracks. In such a case, the hydrogen must be discharged to atmosphere quickly and safely. An analytical code that simulates the pressure change during a hydrogen leak was developed. A pressure rise analysis for various sized cracks was performed, and the required sizes for relief devices were determined. A safety valve size is φ42.7 mm and a rupture disc for vacuum layer should have a diameter of 37.1 mm, respectively.

  19. Transient thermal analysis of fluid systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chandler, G. D.; Trust, R. D.

    1977-01-01

    Computer program performs transient thermal analysis of any 2-node to 200-node-thermal network, which transports heat by fluid flow convection. Program can be modified to add conduction along tubes and radiation.

  20. Transcriptomic analysis of degraded forensic body fluids.

    PubMed

    Lin, Meng-Han; Jones, Daniel F; Fleming, Rachel

    2015-07-01

    Massively parallel sequencing (MPS) has facilitated a significant increase in transcriptomic studies in all biological disciplines. However, the analysis of degraded RNA remains a genuine challenge in practice. In forensic science the biological samples encountered are often extensively degraded and of low abundance. RNA from these compromised samples is used for body fluid identification through the detection of body fluid-specific transcripts. Here we demonstrate the sequencing of four forensically relevant body fluids: oral mucosa/saliva (buccal), circulatory blood, menstrual blood and vaginal fluid. RNA was extracted from fresh, two and six week aged samples. Despite the extensive degradation of most body fluids, significant high quality sequencing output (>80% sequence above Q30) was generated. An average of over 80% of reads from all but one sample aligned successfully to the reference human genome. Furthermore, FPKMs (fragments per kilobase of exon per million fragments mapped) generated indicate the accurate detection of known body fluid markers in respective body fluids. Assessment of global gene expression levels over degradation time enabled the characterisation of differential RNA degradation in different body fluids. This study demonstrates the practical application of MPS technology for the accurate analysis of degraded RNA from minimal samples.

  1. Apparatus and method for fluid analysis

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, Bary W.; Peters, Timothy J.; Shepard, Chester L.; Reeves, James H.

    2004-11-02

    The present invention is an apparatus and method for analyzing a fluid used in a machine or in an industrial process line. The apparatus has at least one meter placed proximate the machine or process line and in contact with the machine or process fluid for measuring at least one parameter related to the fluid. The at least one parameter is a standard laboratory analysis parameter. The at least one meter includes but is not limited to viscometer, element meter, optical meter, particulate meter, and combinations thereof.

  2. Apparatus And Method For Fluid Analysis

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, Bary W.; Peters, Timothy J.; Shepard, Chester L.; Reeves, James H.

    2003-05-13

    The present invention is an apparatus and method for analyzing a fluid used in a machine or in an industrial process line. The apparatus has at least one meter placed proximate the machine or process line and in contact with the machine or process fluid for measuring at least one parameter related to the fluid. The at least one parameter is a standard laboratory analysis parameter. The at least one meter includes but is not limited to viscometer, element meter, optical meter, particulate meter, and combinations thereof.

  3. Analysis of Skylab fluid mechanics science demonstrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tegart, J. R.; Butz, J. R.

    1975-01-01

    The results of the data reduction and analysis of the Skylab fluid mechanics demonstrations are presented. All the fluid mechanics data available from the Skylab missions were identified and surveyed. The significant fluid mechanics phenomena were identified and reduced to measurable quantities wherever possible. Data correlations were performed using existing theories. Among the phenomena analyzed were: static low-g interface shapes, oscillation frequency and damping of a liquid drop, coalescence, rotating drop, liquid films and low-g ice melting. A survey of the possible applications of the results was made and future experiments are recommended.

  4. Chlorofluorocarbon leak detection technology

    SciTech Connect

    Munday, E.B.

    1990-12-01

    There are about 590 large coolant systems located at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS) and the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) leaking nearly 800,000 lb of R-114 refrigerant annually (1989 estimate). A program is now under way to reduce the leakage to 325,000 lb/year -- an average loss of 551 lb/year (0.063 lb/h) per coolant system, some of which are as large as 800 ft. This report investigates leak detection technologies that can be used to locate leaks in the coolant systems. Included are descriptions, minimum leak detection rate levels, advantages, disadvantages, and vendor information on the following technologies: bubbling solutions; colorimetric leak testing; dyes; halogen leak detectors (coronea discharge detectors; halide torch detectors, and heated anode detectors); laser imaging; mass spectroscopy; organic vapor analyzers; odorants; pressure decay methods; solid-state electrolytic-cell gas sensors; thermal conductivity leak detectors; and ultrasonic leak detectors.

  5. Spectral luminescence analysis of amniotic fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slobozhanina, Ekaterina I.; Kozlova, Nataly M.; Kasko, Leonid P.; Mamontova, Marina V.; Chernitsky, Eugene A.

    1997-12-01

    It is shown that the amniotic fluid has intensive ultra-violet luminescence caused by proteins. Along with it amniotic fluid radiated in the field of 380 - 650 nm with maxima at 430 - 450 nm and 520 - 560 nm. The first peak of luminescence ((lambda) exc equals 350 nm; (lambda) em equals 430 - 440 nm) is caused (most probably) by the presence in amniotic fluid of some hormones, NADH2 and NADPH2. A more long-wave component ((lambda) exc equals 460 nm; (lambda) em equals 520 - 560 nm) is most likely connected with the presence in amniotic fluid pigments (bilirubin connected with protein and other). It is shown that intensity and maximum of ultra-violet luminescence spectra of amniotic fluid in normality and at pathology are identical. However both emission spectra and excitation spectra of long-wave ((lambda) greater than 450 nm) luminescence of amniotic fluid from pregnant women with such prenatal abnormal developments of a fetus as anencephaly and spina bifida are too long-wave region in comparison with the norm. Results of research testify that spectral luminescent analysis of amniotic fluid can be used for screening of malformations of the neural tube. It is very difficult for a practical obstetrician to reveal pregnant women with a high risk of congenital malformations of the fetus. Apart from ultrasonic examination, cytogenetic examination of amniotic fluid and defumination of concentrations of alpha-fetoprotein and acetylcholin-esterases in the amniotic fluid and blood plasma are the most widely used diagnostic approaches. However, biochemical and cytogenetic diagnostic methods are time-consuming. In the present work spectral luminescence properties of the amniotic fluid are investigated to determine spectral parameters that can be used to reveal pregnant women with a high risk of congenital malformations of their offsprings.

  6. Temperature and Atomic Oxygen Effects on Helium Leak Rates of a Candidate Main Interface Seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Penney, Nicholas; Wasowski, Janice L.; Daniels, Christopher C.

    2011-01-01

    Helium leak tests were completed to characterize the leak rate of a 54 in. diameter composite space docking seal design in support of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration s (NASA's) Low Impact Docking System (LIDS). The evaluated seal design was a candidate for the main interface seal on the LIDS, which would be compressed between two vehicles, while docked, to prevent the escape of breathable air from the vehicles and into the vacuum of space. Leak tests completed at nominal temperatures of -30, 20, and 50 C on untreated and atomic oxygen (AO) exposed test samples were examined to determine the influence of both test temperature and AO exposure on the performance of the composite seal assembly. Results obtained for untreated seal samples showed leak rates which increased with increased test temperature. This general trend was not observed in tests of the AO exposed specimens. Initial examination of collected test data suggested that AO exposure resulted in higher helium leak rates, however, further analysis showed that the differences observed in the 20 and 50 C tests between the untreated and AO exposed samples were within the experimental error of the test method. Lack of discernable trends in the test data prevented concrete conclusions about the effects of test temperature and AO exposure on helium leak rates of the candidate seal design from being drawn. To facilitate a comparison of the current test data with results from previous leak tests using air as the test fluid, helium leak rates were converted to air leak rates using standard conversion factors for viscous and molecular flow. Flow rates calculated using the viscous flow conversion factor were significantly higher than the experimental air leakage values, whereas values calculated using the molecular flow conversion factor were significantly lower than the experimentally obtained air leak rates. The difference in these sets of converted flow rates and their deviation from the

  7. Measuring Small Leak Holes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koch, D. E.; Stephenson, J. G.

    1983-01-01

    Hole sizes deduced from pressure measurements. Measuring apparatus consists of pitot tube attached to water-filled manometer. Compartment tested is pressurized with air. Pitot probe placed at known distance from leak. Dynamic pressure of jet measured at that point and static pressure measured in compartment. Useful in situations in which small leaks are tolerable but large leaks are not.

  8. Leak detection capability in CANDU reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Azer, N.; Barber, D.H.; Boucher, P.J.

    1997-04-01

    This paper addresses the moisture leak detection capability of Ontario Hydro CANDU reactors which has been demonstrated by performing tests on the reactor. The tests confirmed the response of the annulus gas system (AGS) to the presence of moisture injected to simulate a pressure tube leak and also confirmed the dew point response assumed in leak before break assessments. The tests were performed on Bruce A Unit 4 by injecting known and controlled rates of heavy water vapor. To avoid condensation during test conditions, the amount of moisture which could be injected was small (2-3.5 g/hr). The test response demonstrated that the AGS is capable of detecting and annunciating small leaks. Thus confidence is provided that it would alarm for a growing pressure tube leak where the leak rate is expected to increase to kg/hr rapidly. The measured dew point response was close to that predicted by analysis.

  9. Surgical nuances for nasoseptal flap reconstruction of cranial base defects with high-flow cerebrospinal fluid leaks after endoscopic skull base surgery.

    PubMed

    Liu, James K; Schmidt, Richard F; Choudhry, Osamah J; Shukla, Pratik A; Eloy, Jean Anderson

    2012-06-01

    Extended endoscopic endonasal approaches have allowed for a minimally invasive solution for removal of a variety of ventral skull base lesions, including intradural tumors. Depending on the location of the pathological entity, various types of surgical corridors are used, such as transcribriform, transplanum transtuberculum, transsellar, transclival, and transodontoid approaches. Often, a large skull base dural defect with a high-flow CSF leak is created after endoscopic skull base surgery. Successful reconstruction of the cranial base defect is paramount to separate the intracranial contents from the paranasal sinus contents and to prevent postoperative CSF leakage. The vascularized pedicled nasoseptal flap (PNSF) has become the workhorse for cranial base reconstruction after endoscopic skull base surgery, dramatically reducing the rate of postoperative CSF leakage since its implementation. In this report, the authors review the surgical technique and describe the operative nuances and lessons learned for successful multilayered PNSF reconstruction of cranial base defects with high-flow CSF leaks created after endoscopic skull base surgery. The authors specifically highlight important surgical pearls that are critical for successful PNSF reconstruction, including target-specific flap design and harvesting, pedicle preservation, preparation of bony defect and graft site to optimize flap adherence, multilayered closure technique, maximization of the reach of the flap, final flap positioning, and proper bolstering and buttressing of the PNSF to prevent flap dehiscence. Using this technique in 93 patients, the authors' overall postoperative CSF leak rate was 3.2%. An illustrative intraoperative video demonstrating the reconstruction technique is also presented.

  10. 40 CFR 86.328-79 - Leak checks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... checks. (a) Vacuum side leak check. (1) Any location within the analysis system where a vacuum leak could affect the test results must be checked. (2) The maximum allowable leakage rate on the vacuum side is...

  11. 40 CFR 86.328-79 - Leak checks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... checks. (a) Vacuum side leak check. (1) Any location within the analysis system where a vacuum leak could affect the test results must be checked. (2) The maximum allowable leakage rate on the vacuum side is...

  12. Proteomic analysis of human osteoarthritis synovial fluid

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Osteoarthritis is a chronic musculoskeletal disorder characterized mainly by progressive degradation of the hyaline cartilage. Patients with osteoarthritis often postpone seeking medical help, which results in the diagnosis being made at an advanced stage of cartilage destruction. Sustained efforts are needed to identify specific markers that might help in early diagnosis, monitoring disease progression and in improving therapeutic outcomes. We employed a multipronged proteomic approach, which included multiple fractionation strategies followed by high resolution mass spectrometry analysis to explore the proteome of synovial fluid obtained from osteoarthritis patients. In addition to the total proteome, we also enriched glycoproteins from synovial fluid using lectin affinity chromatography. Results We identified 677 proteins from synovial fluid of patients with osteoarthritis of which 545 proteins have not been previously reported. These novel proteins included ADAM-like decysin 1 (ADAMDEC1), alanyl (membrane) aminopeptidase (ANPEP), CD84, fibulin 1 (FBLN1), matrix remodelling associated 5 (MXRA5), secreted phosphoprotein 2 (SPP2) and spondin 2 (SPON2). We identified 300 proteins using lectin affinity chromatography, including the glycoproteins afamin (AFM), attractin (ATRN), fibrillin 1 (FBN1), transferrin (TF), tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 1 (TIMP1) and vasorin (VSN). Gene ontology analysis confirmed that a majority of the identified proteins were extracellular and are mostly involved in cell communication and signaling. We also confirmed the expression of ANPEP, dickkopf WNT signaling pathway inhibitor 3 (DKK3) and osteoglycin (OGN) by multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) analysis of osteoarthritis synovial fluid samples. Conclusions We present an in-depth analysis of the synovial fluid proteome from patients with osteoarthritis. We believe that the catalog of proteins generated in this study will further enhance our knowledge regarding the

  13. Analysis of Underground Storage Tanks System Materials to Increased Leak Potential Associated with E15 Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Kass, Michael D; Theiss, Timothy J; Janke, Christopher James; Pawel, Steven J

    2012-07-01

    include model year 2001 light-duty vehicles, but specifically prohibited use in motorcycles and off-road vehicles and equipment. UST stakeholders generally consider fueling infrastructure materials designed for use with E0 to be adequate for use with E10, and there are no known instances of major leaks or failures directly attributable to ethanol use. It is conceivable that many compatibility issues, including accelerated corrosion, do arise and are corrected onsite and, therefore do not lead to a release. However, there is some concern that higher ethanol concentrations, such as E15 or E20, may be incompatible with current materials used in standard gasoline fueling hardware. In the summer of 2008, DOE recognized the need to assess the impact of intermediate blends of ethanol on the fueling infrastructure, specifically located at the fueling station. This includes the dispenser and hanging hardware, the underground storage tank, and associated piping. The DOE program has been co-led and funded by the Office of the Biomass Program and Vehicle Technologies Program with technical expertise from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). The infrastructure material compatibility work has been supported through strong collaborations and testing at Underwriters Laboratories (UL). ORNL performed a compatibility study investigating the compatibility of fuel infrastructure materials to gasoline containing intermediate levels of ethanol. These results can be found in the ORNL report entitled Intermediate Ethanol Blends Infrastructure Materials Compatibility Study: Elastomers, Metals and Sealants (hereafter referred to as the ORNL intermediate blends material compatibility study). These materials included elastomers, plastics, metals and sealants typically found in fuel dispenser infrastructure. The test fuels evaluated in the ORNL study were SAE standard test fuel formulations used to assess material-fuel compatibility within a

  14. Detecting Methane Leaks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grant, W. B.; Hinkley, E. D.

    1984-01-01

    Remote sensor uses laser radiation backscattered from natural targets. He/Ne Laser System for remote scanning of Methane leaks employs topographic target to scatter light to receiver near laser transmitter. Apparatus powered by 1.5kW generator transported to field sites and pointed at suspected methane leaks. Used for remote detection of natural-gas leaks and locating methane emissions in landfill sites.

  15. Analysis of Waste Leak and Toxic Chemical Release Accidents from Waste Feed Delivery (WFD) Diluent System

    SciTech Connect

    WILLIAMS, J.C.

    2000-09-15

    Radiological and toxicological consequences are calculated for 4 postulated accidents involving the Waste Feed Delivery (WFD) diluent addition systems. Consequences for the onsite and offsite receptor are calculated. This analysis contains technical information used to determine the accident consequences for the River Protection Project (RPP) Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR).

  16. Leak detection by acoustic emission monitoring. Phase 1. Feasibility study. Final report, August 1987-March 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Lichtenstein, B.; Winder, A.A.

    1994-05-26

    This investigation was conducted to determine the feasibility of detecting leaks from underground storage tanks or pipelines using acoustic emissions. An extensive technical literature review established that distinguishable acoustic emission signals will be generated when a storage tank is subjected to deformation stresses. A parametric analysis was performed which indicated that leak rates less than 0.1 gallons per hour can be detected for leak sizes less than 1/32 inch with 99% probability if the transient signals were sensed with an array of accelerometers (cemented to the tank or via acoustic waveguides), each having a sensitivity greater than 250 mv/g over a frequency range of 0.1 to 4000 Hz, and processed in a multi-channel Fourier spectrum analyzer with automatic threshold detection. An acoustic transient or energy release processor could conceivably detect the onset of the leak at the moment of fracture of the tank wall. The primary limitations to realizing reliable and robust acoustic emission monitoring of underground fluid leaks are the various masking noise sources prevalent at Air Force bases, which are attributed to aircraft, motor traffic, pump station operation, and ground tremors. Acoustic, Leak detection, Underground tank, Pipeline.

  17. Apparatus for detecting leaks

    DOEpatents

    Booth, Eugene T.

    1976-02-24

    A method and apparatus for determining the position of and estimating the size of leaks in an evacuating apparatus comprising the use of a testing gas such as helium or hydrogen flowing around said apparatus whereby the testing gas will be drawn in at the site of any leaks.

  18. Experiences with leak rate calculations methods for LBB application

    SciTech Connect

    Grebner, H.; Kastner, W.; Hoefler, A.; Maussner, G.

    1997-04-01

    In this paper, three leak rate computer programs for the application of leak before break analysis are described and compared. The programs are compared to each other and to results of an HDR Reactor experiment and two real crack cases. The programs analyzed are PIPELEAK, FLORA, and PICEP. Generally, the different leak rate models are in agreement. To obtain reasonable agreement between measured and calculated leak rates, it was necessary to also use data from detailed crack investigations.

  19. Automated fluid analysis apparatus and techniques

    DOEpatents

    Szecsody, James E.

    2004-03-16

    An automated device that couples a pair of differently sized sample loops with a syringe pump and a source of degassed water. A fluid sample is mounted at an inlet port and delivered to the sample loops. A selected sample from the sample loops is diluted in the syringe pump with the degassed water and fed to a flow through detector for analysis. The sample inlet is also directly connected to the syringe pump to selectively perform analysis without dilution. The device is airtight and used to detect oxygen-sensitive species, such as dithionite in groundwater following a remedial injection to treat soil contamination.

  20. Ninth Thermal and Fluids Analysis Workshop Proceedings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakowski, Barbara (Compiler)

    1999-01-01

    The Ninth Thermal and Fluids Analysis Workshop (TFAWS 98) was held at the Ohio Aerospace Institute in Cleveland, Ohio from August 31 to September 4, 1998. The theme for the hands-on training workshop and conference was "Integrating Computational Fluid Dynamics and Heat Transfer into the Design Process." Highlights of the workshop (in addition to the papers published herein) included an address by the NASA Chief Engineer, Dr. Daniel Mulville; a CFD short course by Dr. John D. Anderson of the University of Maryland; and a short course by Dr. Robert Cochran of Sandia National Laboratories. In addition, lectures and hands-on training were offered in the use of several cutting-edge engineering design and analysis-oriented CFD and Heat Transfer tools. The workshop resulted in international participation of over 125 persons representing aerospace and automotive industries, academia, software providers, government agencies, and private corporations. The papers published herein address issues and solutions related to the integration of computational fluid dynamics and heat transfer into the engineering design process. Although the primary focus is aerospace, the topics and ideas presented are applicable to many other areas where these and other disciplines are interdependent.

  1. Twelfth Thermal and Fluids Analysis Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Majumdar, Alok (Compiler)

    2002-01-01

    The Twelfth Thermal and Fluids Analysis Workshop (TFAWS 01) was held at the Bevill Center, The University of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville, Alabama, September 10-14, 2001. The theme for the hands-on training workshop and conference was "Engineering Excellence and Advances in the New Millenium." Forty-five technical papers were presented in four sessions: (1) Thermal Spacecraft/Payloads, (2) Thermal Propulsion/Vehicles, (3) Interdisciplinary Papers, and (4) Fluids Papers. Thirty-nine papers were published in these proceedings. The remaining six papers were not available in electronic format at the time of publication. In addition to the technical papers, there were (a) nine hands-on classes on thermal and flow analyses software, (b) thirteen short courses and product overview lectures, (c) five keynote lectures and, (d) panel discussions consisting of eight presentations. The workshop resulted in participation of 195 persons representing NASA Centers, Government agencies, aerospace industries, academia, software providers, and private corporations.

  2. The Tenth Thermal and Fluids Analysis Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Majumdar, Alok (Compiler); McConnaughey, Paul (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The Tenth Thermal arid Fluids Analysis Workshop (TFAWS 99) was held at the Bevill Center, University of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville, Alabama, September 13-17, 1999. The theme for the hands-on training workshop and conference was "Tools and Techniques Contributing to Engineering Excellence". Forty-seven technical papers were presented in four sessions. The sessions were: (1) Thermal Spacecraft/Payloads, (2) Thermal Propulsion/Vehicles, (3) Interdisciplinary Paper, and (4) Fluids Paper. Forty papers were published in these proceedings. The remaining seven papers were not available in electronic format at the time of publication. In addition to the technical papers, there were (a) nine hands-on classes on thermal and flow analyses software, (b) twelve short courses, (c) thirteen product overview lectures, and (d) three keynote lectures. The workshop resulted in participation of 171 persons representing NASA Centers, Government agencies, aerospace industries, academia, software providers, and private corporations.

  3. Manufacturing in space: Fluid dynamics numerical analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, S. J.; Nicholson, L. A.; Spradley, L. W.

    1981-01-01

    Natural convection in a spherical container with cooling at the center was numerically simulated using the Lockheed-developed General Interpolants Method (GIM) numerical fluid dynamic computer program. The numerical analysis was simplified by assuming axisymmetric flow in the spherical container, with the symmetry axis being a sphere diagonal parallel to the gravity vector. This axisymmetric spherical geometry was intended as an idealization of the proposed Lal/Kroes growing experiments to be performed on board Spacelab. Results were obtained for a range of Rayleigh numbers from 25 to 10,000. For a temperature difference of 10 C from the cooling sting at the center to the container surface, and a gravitional loading of 0.000001 g a computed maximum fluid velocity of about 2.4 x 0.00001 cm/sec was reached after about 250 sec. The computed velocities were found to be approximately proportional to the Rayleigh number over the range of Rayleigh numbers investigated.

  4. Endoscopic skull base reconstruction: a review and clinical case series of 152 vascularized flaps used for surgical skull base defects in the setting of intraoperative cerebrospinal fluid leak.

    PubMed

    Thorp, Brian D; Sreenath, Satyan B; Ebert, Charles S; Zanation, Adam M

    2014-01-01

    Endoscopic skull base surgery continues to rapidly evolve, requiring comparable advances in reconstructive techniques. While smaller skull base defects with low intraoperative CSF flow have been successfully managed with a variety of avascular and/or noncellular techniques, larger defects with high CSF flow require more robust repairs often in the form of vascularized flaps, which confer excellent success rates in this setting. Despite these successful outcomes, a paucity of data describing specific patient and operative characteristics and their effects on repair exist. Therefore, a retrospective, consecutive chart review was performed on patients who underwent endoscopic skull base reconstruction with a vascularized flap in the setting of intraoperative CSF leaks. In this series, 151 patients with a mean age of 51 years underwent 152 vascularized flap skull base reconstructions for an array of benign and malignant pathologies. These vascularized flaps included 144 nasoseptal flaps, 6 endoscopic-assisted pericranial flaps, 1 facial artery buccinator flap, and 1 inferior turbinate flap that were used throughout all regions of the skull base. Perioperative (< 3 months) and postoperative (> 3 months) flap complications were assessed and revealed 3 perioperative flap defects (2.0%) defined as a visualized defect within the substrate of the flap and a total of 5 perioperative CSF leaks (3.3%). No patient experienced flap death/complete flap loss in the cohort. Assessed postoperative flap complications included 1 case (0.7%) of mucocele formation, 8 cases (5.3%) of prolonged skull base crusting, and 2 cases (1.3%) of donor-site complication, specifically septal perforation secondary to nasoseptal flap harvest. Among the 152 cases identified, 37 patients received radiation therapy while 114 patients did not undergo radiation therapy as part of the treatment profile. No significant association was found between perioperative complication rates and radiation therapy (p = 0

  5. The Sixth Annual Thermal and Fluids Analysis Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    The Sixth Annual Thermal and Fluids Analysis Workshop consisted of classes, vendor demonstrations, and paper sessions. The classes and vendor demonstrations provided participants with the information on widely used tools for thermal and fluids analysis. The paper sessions provided a forum for the exchange of information and ideas among thermal and fluids analysis. Paper topics included advances an uses of established thermal and fluids computer codes (such as SINDA and TRASYS) as well as unique modeling techniques and applications.

  6. Leak checking in ISABELLE

    SciTech Connect

    Briggs, J.; Halama, H.J.

    1981-01-01

    The Intersecting Storage Accelerator (ISABELLE) contains two completely independent vacuum systems. One known as Beam Vacuum operates at 1 x 10/sup -11/ Torr and maintains a very clean environment for the circulating proton beam. The other system known as Insulating Vacuum maintains superconducting magnet vessels at a pressure below 1 x 10/sup -6/ Torr. In this system all gasses except helium are cryocondensed on the cold surfaces of superconducting magnets and cryogenic circuits. Turbomolecular pumps pump the inadvertent small helium leaks. The helium background both in the MagCOOL area and in the ISABELLE tunnel limits the sensitivity of conventional leak detectors. Leak detection in ISABELLE is one of the most important functions, since there are thousands of bellows and welds operating at 4 K and at 15 atmosphere pressure and that many welds can only be leak checked at room temperature. Leak rates are known to increase by 4 orders of magnitude when cooled from 300 K to 4 K. Thus the required 10/sup -10/ Torr liters s/sup -1/ sensitivity is essential for proper operation and methods and equipment which permit the location of such leaks in large systems have been developed and tested on the First Cell and the refrigerators. They produced a completely leak free system, i.e. the helium background did not change when all pumps were closed for 24 hours. These methods and the equipment are discussed in detail.

  7. Automated leak test systems

    SciTech Connect

    Cordaro, J.V.; Thompson, W.D.; Reeves, G.

    1997-09-15

    An automated leak test system for tritium shipping containers has been developed at Westinghouse Savannah River Co. (WSRC). The leak detection system employs a computer controlled helium detector which allows an operator to enter key information when prompted. The software for controlling the tests and the equipment apparatus were both designed and manufactured at the Savannah River Technology Center within WSRC. Recertification Test: Every twelve months, the pressure vessel portion of the shipping container itself must undergo a rigorous recertification leak test. After an empty pressure vessel (shipping container) is assembled, it is placed into one of six stainless steel belljars for helium leak testing. The belljars are fashioned in row much the same as assembly line arrangement. Post-load Test: A post-load leak test is performed upon reservoirs that have been filled with tritium and placed inside the shipping containers mentioned above. These leak tests are performed by a rate-of-rise method where the area around the shipping container seals is evacuated, valved off from the vacuum pump, and then the vacuum pressure is monitored over a two-minute period. The Post Load Leak Test is a quality verification test to ensure that the shipping container has been correctly assembled. 2 figs.

  8. HL-20 computational fluid dynamics analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weilmuenster, K. James; Greene, Francis A.

    1993-09-01

    The essential elements of a computational fluid dynamics analysis of the HL-20/personnel launch system aerothermal environment at hypersonic speeds including surface definition, grid generation, solution techniques, and visual representation of results are presented. Examples of solution technique validation through comparison with data from ground-based facilities are presented, along with results from computations at flight conditions. Computations at flight points indicate that real-gas effects have little or no effect on vehicle aerodynamics and, at these conditions, results from approximate techniques for determining surface heating are comparable with those obtained from Navier-Stokes solutions.

  9. HL-20 computational fluid dynamics analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weilmuenster, K. J.; Greene, Francis A.

    1993-01-01

    The essential elements of a computational fluid dynamics analysis of the HL-20/personnel launch system aerothermal environment at hypersonic speeds including surface definition, grid generation, solution techniques, and visual representation of results are presented. Examples of solution technique validation through comparison with data from ground-based facilities are presented, along with results from computations at flight conditions. Computations at flight points indicate that real-gas effects have little or no effect on vehicle aerodynamics and, at these conditions, results from approximate techniques for determining surface heating are comparable with those obtained from Navier-Stokes solutions.

  10. 40 CFR 61.135 - Standard: Equipment leaks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Emissions from Coke By-Product Recovery Plants § 61.135 Standard: Equipment leaks. (a) Each owner or... system that purges the barrier fluid into a process stream with zero benzene emissions to the...

  11. 40 CFR 61.135 - Standard: Equipment leaks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Emissions from Coke By-Product Recovery Plants § 61.135 Standard: Equipment leaks. (a) Each owner or... system that purges the barrier fluid into a process stream with zero benzene emissions to the...

  12. 40 CFR 61.135 - Standard: Equipment leaks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Emissions from Coke By-Product Recovery Plants § 61.135 Standard: Equipment leaks. (a) Each owner or... system that purges the barrier fluid into a process stream with zero benzene emissions to the...

  13. 40 CFR 61.135 - Standard: Equipment leaks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Emissions from Coke By-Product Recovery Plants § 61.135 Standard: Equipment leaks. (a) Each owner or... system that purges the barrier fluid into a process stream with zero benzene emissions to the...

  14. 40 CFR 61.135 - Standard: Equipment leaks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Emissions from Coke By-Product Recovery Plants § 61.135 Standard: Equipment leaks. (a) Each owner or... system that purges the barrier fluid into a process stream with zero benzene emissions to the...

  15. DETECTION OF INTERSTATE LIQUIDS PIPELINE LEAKS: FEASIBILITY EVALUATION.

    SciTech Connect

    DIETZ,R.N.

    1998-10-20

    The approximately 200,000-mile fuel pipeline system in the U.S. operates at flow rates up to 2.5 x 10{sup 6}gallons per hour (GPH). Most commercial technologies only provide on-line leak detection at about 0.3% of flow rate, i.e., about 7,500 GPH or larger. Detection of leaks at about 1 GPH or so is desirable both from a regulatory and leak-prevention standpoint. Brookhaven's commercially-accepted perfluorocarbon tracer (PFT) technology for underground leak detection of utility industry dielectric fluids at leak rates less than 0.1 GPH, with new enhancements, will be able to cost-effectively detect fuel pipeline system leaks to about 1 GPH--3 orders-of-magnitude better than any on-line system. The magnitude of detected leaks would be calculable as well. Proposed mobile surveys (such as those used periodically in the gas pipeline industry) at about 110 to 120 miles per day would allow such small leaks to be detected at 10-ppb tagging levels (less than $1,500 of PFT for a 48-hour tag at the maximum transport rate) under worst-case meteorological dispersion conditions. Smaller leaks could be detected by proportionately larger tagging concentrations. Leaks would be pinpointed by subsequent conventional barholing and vapor analyses. There are no health nor safety issues associated with the use of the proposed technological approach nor any consequential environmental impacts associated with the proposed magnitudes of PFT tagging.

  16. Detection of interstate liquids pipeline leaks: Feasibility evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Dietz, R.N.; Senum, G.I.

    1998-10-20

    The approximately 200,000-mile fuel pipeline system in the US operates at flow rates up to 2.5 {times} 10{sup 6} gallons per hour (GPH). Most commercial technologies only provide on-line leak detection at about 0.3% of flow rate, i.e., about 7,500 GPH or larger. Detection of leaks at about 1 GPH or so is desirable both from a regulatory and leak-prevention standpoint. Brookhaven`s commercially-accepted perfluorocarbon tracer (PFT) technology for underground leak detection of utility industry dielectric fluids at leak rates less than 0.1 GPH, with new enhancements, will be able to cost-effectively detect fuel pipeline system leaks to about 1 GPH--3 orders-of-magnitude better than any on-line system. The magnitude of detected leaks would be calculable as well. Proposed mobile surveys (such as those used periodically in the gas pipeline industry) at about 110 to 120 miles per day would allow such small leaks to be detected at 10-ppb tagging levels (less than $1,500 of PFT for a 48-hour tag at the maximum transport rate) under worst-case meteorological dispersion conditions. Smaller leaks could be detected by proportionately larger tagging concentrations. Leaks would be pinpointed by subsequent conventional barholing and vapor analyses. There are no health nor safety issues associated with the use of the proposed technological approach nor any consequential environmental impacts associated with the proposed magnitudes of PFT tagging.

  17. Use of IHTS pipe leak jacketing for LSPB

    SciTech Connect

    1983-08-15

    In an effort to reduce costs of the Large Scale Prototype Breeder (LSPB), Westinghouse and Burns and Roe examined the use of leak jacketing the Intermediate Heat Transport System (IHTS) piping in the Steam Generation Building (SGB) to reduce the amount of sodium leaked to the SGB atmosphere. The design basis leak for the LSPB, IHTS, is an Moderate Energy Fluid System (MEFS) leak. Previous calculations performed for the Mainstream Design SGB showed that high pressures, temperature and hydrogen concentrations would be produced as a result of the sodium leak. The high pressures would mean that the SGB would have to be vented to avoid overpressurization. Venting the SGB results in the dispersion of large quantities of sodium aerosols which can be ingested into reactor or spent fuel decay heat removal heat exchangers, the control room HVAC or the emergency gas turbines. This would require expensive design changes or relocating plant safety related equipment. By leak jacketing the IHTS piping, the effects of the sodium leak in the SGB can be greatly reduced. As a result of this study, it is recommended that leak jacketing of the large diameter IHTS piping in the SGB be used in the design of LSPB. The leak jacketing concept was the most cost effective means of mitigating the consequences of an MEFS leak in the SGB. This report shows the basis and results of the anaylsis, mitigation features and costs, and conclusions.

  18. Gaseous leak detector

    DOEpatents

    Juravic, Jr., Frank E.

    1988-01-01

    In a short path length mass-spectrometer type of helium leak detector wherein the helium trace gas is ionized, accelerated and deflected onto a particle counter, an arrangement is provided for converting the detector to neon leak detection. The magnetic field of the deflection system is lowered so as to bring the non linear fringe area of the magnetic field across the ion path, thereby increasing the amount of deflection of the heavier neon ions.

  19. Improved gaseous leak detector

    DOEpatents

    Juravic, F.E. Jr.

    1983-10-06

    In a short path length mass-spectrometer type of helium leak detector wherein the helium trace gas is ionized, accelerated and deflected onto a particle counter, an arrangement is provided for converting the detector to neon leak detection. The magnetic field of the deflection system is lowered so as to bring the nonlinear fringe area of the magnetic field across the ion path, thereby increasing the amount of deflection of the heavier neon ions.

  20. Analysis of large-leak test SWAT-3 Run-6 data by use of sodium-water-reaction analysis code SWAAM-I

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, Y.W.; Lin, H.C.

    1982-02-01

    The Sodium Water Advanced Analysis Method computer code (SWAAM-I) is used to analyze the large-leak test data SWAT-3 Run-6. The SWAT-3 is the mockup of the secondary system of the Japanese breeder-reactor demonstration plant Monju. The steam-generator design for the Monju reactor was a helical-coil-tube type with a cover-gas space, and the SWAT-3 Run-6 Test vessel simulates this design of the steam generator. The objectives of this work are: (1) to examine the adequacy of the SWAAM-I code for the helical-coil-tube steam-generator system, (2) to understand and confirm the understanding of phenomena that have major design implications, and (3) to define needs for additional development of SWAAM-I code capabilities.

  1. Technique for detecting liquid metal leaks

    DOEpatents

    Bauerle, James E.

    1979-01-01

    In a system employing flowing liquid metal as a heat transfer medium in contact with tubular members containing a working fluid, i.e., steam, liquid metal leaks through the wall of the tubular member are detected by dislodging the liquid metal compounds forming in the tubular member at the leak locations and subsequently transporting the dislodged compound in the form of an aerosol to a detector responsive to the liquid metal compound. In the application to a sodium cooled tubular member, the detector would consist of a sodium responsive device, such as a sodium ion detector.

  2. Hydraulic Fracturing Fluid Analysis for Regulatory Parameters - A Progress Report

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This presentation is a progress report on the analysis of Hydraulic Fracturing Fluids for regulatory compounds outlined in the various US EPA methodologies. Fracturing fluids vary significantly in consistency and viscosity prior to fracturing. Due to the nature of the fluids the analytical challenges will have to be addressed. This presentation also outlines the sampling issues associated with the collection of dissolved gas samples.

  3. Overview af MSFC's Applied Fluid Dynamics Analysis Group Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia, Roberto; Griffin, Lisa; Williams, Robert

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents viewgraphs on NASA Marshall Space Flight Center's Applied Fluid Dynamics Analysis Group Activities. The topics include: 1) Status of programs at MSFC; 2) Fluid Mechanics at MSFC; 3) Relevant Fluid Dynamics Activities at MSFC; and 4) Shuttle Return to Flight.

  4. Single-Shell Tanks Leak Integrity Elements/ SX Farm Leak Causes and Locations - 12127

    SciTech Connect

    Girardot, Crystal; Harlow, Don; Venetz, Theodore; Washenfelder, Dennis; Johnson, Jeremy

    2012-07-01

    leak detection. In-tank parameters can include temperature of the supernatant and sludge, types of waste, and chemical determination by either transfer or sample analysis. Ex-tank information can be assembled from many sources including design media, construction conditions, technical specifications, and other sources. Five conditions may have contributed to SX Farm tank liner failure including: tank design, thermal shock, chemistry-corrosion, liner behavior (bulging), and construction temperature. Tank design did not apparently change from tank to tank for the SX Farm tanks; however, there could be many unknown variables present in the quality of materials and quality of construction. Several significant SX Farm tank design changes occurred from previous successful tank farm designs. Tank construction occurred in winter under cold conditions which could have affected the ductile to brittle transition temperature of the tanks. The SX Farm tanks received high temperature boiling waste from REDOX which challenged the tank design with rapid heat up and high temperatures. All eight of the leaking SX Farm tanks had relatively high rate of temperature rise. Supernatant removal with subsequent nitrate leaching was conducted in all but three of the eight leaking tanks prior to leaks being detected. It is possible that no one characteristic of the SX Farm tanks could in isolation from the others have resulted in failure. However, the application of so many stressors - heat up rate, high temperature, loss of corrosion protection, and tank design working jointly or serially resulted in their failure. Thermal shock coupled with the tank design, construction conditions, and nitrate leaching seem to be the overriding factors that can lead to tank liner failure. The distinction between leaking and sound SX Farm tanks seems to center on the waste types, thermal conditions, and nitrate leaching. (authors)

  5. SINGLE-SHELL TANKS LEAK INTEGRITY ELEMENTS/SX FARM LEAK CAUSES AND LOCATIONS - 12127

    SciTech Connect

    VENETZ TJ; WASHENFELDER D; JOHNSON J; GIRARDOT C

    2012-01-25

    leak detection. In-tank parameters can include temperature of the supernatant and sludge, types of waste, and chemical determination by either transfer or sample analysis. Ex-tank information can be assembled from many sources including design media, construction conditions, technical specifications, and other sources. Five conditions may have contributed to SX Farm tank liner failure including: tank design, thermal shock, chemistry-corrosion, liner behavior (bulging), and construction temperature. Tank design did not apparently change from tank to tank for the SX Farm tanks; however, there could be many unknown variables present in the quality of materials and quality of construction. Several significant SX Farm tank design changes occurred from previous successful tank farm designs. Tank construction occurred in winter under cold conditions which could have affected the ductile to brittle transition temperature of the tanks. The SX Farm tanks received high temperature boiling waste from REDOX which challenged the tank design with rapid heat up and high temperatures. All eight of the leaking SX Farm tanks had relatively high rate of temperature rise. Supernatant removal with subsequent nitrate leaching was conducted in all but three of the eight leaking tanks prior to leaks being detected. It is possible that no one characteristic of the SX Farm tanks could in isolation from the others have resulted in failure. However, the application of so many stressors - heat up rate, high temperature, loss of corrosion protection, and tank design - working jointly or serially resulted in their failure. Thermal shock coupled with the tank design, construction conditions, and nitrate leaching seem to be the overriding factors that can lead to tank liner failure. The distinction between leaking and sound SX Farm tanks seems to center on the waste types, thermal conditions, and nitrate leaching.

  6. Cerebrospinal fluid cutaneous fistula following obstetric epidural analgaesia. Case report.

    PubMed

    Fedriani de Matos, J J; Quintero Salvago, A V; Gómez Cortés, M D

    2017-03-28

    Cutaneous fistula of cerebrospinal fluid is a rare complication of neuroaxial blockade. We report the case of a parturient in whom an epidural catheter was placed for labour analgesia and 12h after the catheter was removed, presented an abundant asymptomatic fluid leak from the puncture site, compatible in the cyto-chemical analysis with cerebrospinal fluid. She was treated with acetazolamide, compression of skin orifice of the fluid leakage, antibiotic prophylaxis, hydration and rest, and progressed satisfactorily without requiring blood patch.

  7. Glycol leak detection system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabe, Paul; Browne, Keith; Brink, Janus; Coetzee, Christiaan J.

    2016-07-01

    MonoEthylene glycol coolant is used extensively on the Southern African Large Telescope to cool components inside the telescope chamber. To prevent coolant leaks from causing serious damage to electronics and optics, a Glycol Leak Detection System was designed to automatically shut off valves in affected areas. After two years of research and development the use of leaf wetness sensors proved to work best and is currently operational. These sensors are placed at various critical points within the instrument payload that would trigger the leak detector controller, which closes the valves, and alerts the building management system. In this paper we describe the research of an initial concept and the final accepted implementation and the test results thereof.

  8. Computational thermo-fluid analysis of a disk brake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takizawa, Kenji; Tezduyar, Tayfun E.; Kuraishi, Takashi; Tabata, Shinichiro; Takagi, Hirokazu

    2016-06-01

    We present computational thermo-fluid analysis of a disk brake, including thermo-fluid analysis of the flow around the brake and heat conduction analysis of the disk. The computational challenges include proper representation of the small-scale thermo-fluid behavior, high-resolution representation of the thermo-fluid boundary layers near the spinning solid surfaces, and bringing the heat transfer coefficient (HTC) calculated in the thermo-fluid analysis of the flow to the heat conduction analysis of the spinning disk. The disk brake model used in the analysis closely represents the actual configuration, and this adds to the computational challenges. The components of the method we have developed for computational analysis of the class of problems with these types of challenges include the Space-Time Variational Multiscale method for coupled incompressible flow and thermal transport, ST Slip Interface method for high-resolution representation of the thermo-fluid boundary layers near spinning solid surfaces, and a set of projection methods for different parts of the disk to bring the HTC calculated in the thermo-fluid analysis. With the HTC coming from the thermo-fluid analysis of the flow around the brake, we do the heat conduction analysis of the disk, from the start of the breaking until the disk spinning stops, demonstrating how the method developed works in computational analysis of this complex and challenging problem.

  9. Overview of MSFC's Applied Fluid Dynamics Analysis Group Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia, Roberto; Griffin, Lisa; Williams, Robert

    2002-01-01

    This viewgraph report presents an overview of activities and accomplishments of NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center's Applied Fluid Dynamics Analysis Group. Expertise in this group focuses on high-fidelity fluids design and analysis with application to space shuttle propulsion and next generation launch technologies. Topics covered include: computational fluid dynamics research and goals, turbomachinery research and activities, nozzle research and activities, combustion devices, engine systems, MDA development and CFD process improvements.

  10. Analysis of fluid/mechanical systems using EASY5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, Robert W., Jr.; Arndt, Scott D.; Hurlbert, Eric A.

    1992-01-01

    This paper illustrates how the use of a general analysis package can simplify modeling and analyzing fluid/mechanical systems. One such package is EASY5, a Boeing Computer Services product. The basic transmission line equations for modeling piped fluid systems are presented, as well as methods of incorporating these equations into the EASY5 environment. The paper describes how this analysis tool has been used to model several fluid subsystems of the Space Shuttle Orbiter.

  11. Detecting well casing leaks in Bangladesh using a salt spiking method.

    PubMed

    Stahl, M O; Ong, J B; Harvey, C F; Johnson, C D; Badruzzaman, A B M; Tarek, M H; van Geen, A; Anderson, J A; Lane, J W

    2014-09-01

    We apply fluid-replacement logging in arsenic-contaminated regions of Bangladesh using a low-cost, down-well fluid conductivity logging tool to detect leaks in the cased section of wells. The fluid-conductivity tool is designed for the developing world: it is lightweight and easily transportable, operable by one person, and can be built for minimal cost. The fluid-replacement test identifies leaking casing by comparison of fluid conductivity logs collected before and after spiking the wellbore with a sodium chloride tracer. Here, we present results of fluid-replacement logging tests from both leaking and non-leaking casing from wells in Araihazar and Munshiganj, Bangladesh, and demonstrate that the low-cost tool produces measurements comparable to those obtained with a standard geophysical logging tool. Finally, we suggest well testing procedures and approaches for preventing casing leaks in Bangladesh and other developing countries.

  12. Detecting well casing leaks in Bangladesh using a salt spiking method

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stahl, M.O.; Ong, J.B.; Harvey, C.F.; Johnson, C.D.; Badruzzaman, A.B.M.; Tarek, M.H.; VanGeen, A.; Anderson, J.A.; Lane, J.W.

    2014-01-01

    We apply fluid-replacement logging in arsenic-contaminated regions of Bangladesh using a low-cost, down-well fluid conductivity logging tool to detect leaks in the cased section of wells. The fluid-conductivity tool is designed for the developing world: it is lightweight and easily transportable, operable by one person, and can be built for minimal cost. The fluid-replacement test identifies leaking casing by comparison of fluid conductivity logs collected before and after spiking the wellbore with a sodium chloride tracer. Here, we present results of fluid-replacement logging tests from both leaking and non-leaking casing from wells in Araihazar and Munshiganj, Bangladesh, and demonstrate that the low-cost tool produces measurements comparable to those obtained with a standard geophysical logging tool. Finally, we suggest well testing procedures and approaches for preventing casing leaks in Bangladesh and other developing countries.

  13. Volumetric relief map for intracranial cerebrospinal fluid distribution analysis.

    PubMed

    Lebret, Alain; Kenmochi, Yukiko; Hodel, Jérôme; Rahmouni, Alain; Decq, Philippe; Petit, Éric

    2015-09-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid imaging plays a significant role in the clinical diagnosis of brain disorders, such as hydrocephalus and Alzheimer's disease. While three-dimensional images of cerebrospinal fluid are very detailed, the complex structures they contain can be time-consuming and laborious to interpret. This paper presents a simple technique that represents the intracranial cerebrospinal fluid distribution as a two-dimensional image in such a way that the total fluid volume is preserved. We call this a volumetric relief map, and show its effectiveness in a characterization and analysis of fluid distributions and networks in hydrocephalus patients and healthy adults.

  14. Sensitive hydrogen leak detector

    DOEpatents

    Myneni, Ganapati Rao

    1999-01-01

    A sensitive hydrogen leak detector system using passivation of a stainless steel vacuum chamber for low hydrogen outgassing, a high compression ratio vacuum system, a getter operating at 77.5 K and a residual gas analyzer as a quantitative hydrogen sensor.

  15. Sensitive hydrogen leak detector

    DOEpatents

    Myneni, G.R.

    1999-08-03

    A sensitive hydrogen leak detector system is described which uses passivation of a stainless steel vacuum chamber for low hydrogen outgassing, a high compression ratio vacuum system, a getter operating at 77.5 K and a residual gas analyzer as a quantitative hydrogen sensor. 1 fig.

  16. Overview of MSFC's Applied Fluid Dynamics Analysis Group Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia, Roberto; Griffin, Lisa; Williams, Robert

    2003-01-01

    TD64, the Applied Fluid Dynamics Analysis Group, is one of several groups with high-fidelity fluids design and analysis expertise in the Space Transportation Directorate at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). TD64 assists personnel working on other programs. The group participates in projects in the following areas: turbomachinery activities, nozzle activities, combustion devices, and the Columbia accident investigation.

  17. Ascitic fluid analysis in malignancy-related ascites.

    PubMed

    Runyon, B A; Hoefs, J C; Morgan, T R

    1988-01-01

    A prospective study identified 45 patients with malignancy-related ascites among 448 ascites patients (10% of the total). Patients were categorized into five subgroups based on the pathophysiology of ascites formation. Each subgroup had a distinctive ascitic fluid analysis. Patients with peritoneal carcinomatosis but without massive liver metastases (53.3% of the patients with malignancy-related ascites) had a uniformly positive ascitic fluid cytology, high ascitic fluid protein concentration and low serum-ascites albumin gradient. Patients with massive liver metastases and no other cause for ascites formation (13.3% of the series) had a negative cytology, low ascitic fluid protein concentration, high serum-ascites albumin gradient and markedly elevated serum alkaline phosphatase. Those with peritoneal carcinomatosis and massive liver metastases (13.3% of the series) had a nearly uniformly positive ascitic fluid cytology, variable protein concentration, high serum-ascites albumin gradient and markedly elevated serum alkaline phosphatase. Chylous ascites (6.7%) was characterized by a milky appearance, negative cytology and an elevated ascitic fluid triglyceride concentration. Patients with hepatocellular carcinoma superimposed on cirrhosis (13.3%) had negative ascitic fluid cytology, low ascitic fluid protein concentration, high serum-ascites albumin gradient and elevated serum and ascitic fluid alpha-fetoprotein concentration. Two-thirds of patients with malignancy-related ascites had peritoneal carcinomatosis; 96.7% of patients with peritoneal carcinomatosis had positive ascitic fluid cytology. Ascitic fluid analysis is helpful in identifying and distinguishing the subgroups of malignancy-related ascites.

  18. The Fourth Annual Thermal and Fluids Analysis Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The Fourth Annual Thermal and Fluids Analysis Workshop was held from August 17-21, 1992, at NASA Lewis Research Center. The workshop consisted of classes, vendor demonstrations, and paper sessions. The classes and vendor demonstrations provided participants with the information on widely used tools for thermal and fluids analysis. The paper sessions provided a forum for the exchange of information and ideas among thermal and fluids analysts. Paper topics included advances and uses of established thermal and fluids computer codes (such as SINDA and TRASYS) as well as unique modeling techniques and applications.

  19. The Fifth Annual Thermal and Fluids Analysis Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    The Fifth Annual Thermal and Fluids Analysis Workshop was held at the Ohio Aerospace Institute, Brook Park, Ohio, cosponsored by NASA Lewis Research Center and the Ohio Aerospace Institute, 16-20 Aug. 1993. The workshop consisted of classes, vendor demonstrations, and paper sessions. The classes and vendor demonstrations provided participants with the information on widely used tools for thermal and fluid analysis. The paper sessions provided a forum for the exchange of information and ideas among thermal and fluids analysts. Paper topics included advances and uses of established thermal and fluids computer codes (such as SINDA and TRASYS) as well as unique modeling techniques and applications.

  20. The Leaking-Toilet Challenge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roman, Harry T.

    2008-01-01

    Leaking toilets can cost homeowners big dollars--often before it is even realized. Homeowners do not necessarily hear it leaking. It just does, and when the water bill comes due, it can be a most unpleasant surprise. This article presents a classroom challenge to try to develop leak-detection ideas that would be inexpensive and easily added to…

  1. The leak location package for assessment of the time-frequency correlation method for leak location

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faerman, V. A.; Cheremnov, A. G.; Avramchuk, V. S.; Shepetovsky, D. V.

    2017-01-01

    The paper describes the simplest implementation of a software and hardware package for acoustic correlation leak location and results of its performance assessment for location of water leaks from a metallic pipe in laboratory conditions. A distinctive feature of this leak locator is the use of the software based on the time-frequency correlation analysis of signals, which was proposed in our previous papers. Comparative analysis results are given for the information content of classical and time-frequency cross-correlation functions as obtained during processing of experimental data. The results obtained justify comparatively higher efficiency of a time-frequency cross correlation method to solve the leak location task. Improved efficiency is determined by bandpass filtration embedded into the time-frequency cross-correlation function calculation.

  2. Leaks, Lumps, and Lines: Stigma and Women's Bodies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chrisler, Joan C.

    2011-01-01

    Women's bodies have often been positioned in art and popular culture as monstrous or defiled and women's bodily products (e.g., menstrual fluid, breast milk) as disgusting. This framing has led to the stigmatization of aspects of women's bodies (e.g., leaking fluids, lumps of fat, and lines in the skin that indicate aging), especially those…

  3. Improved Portable Ultrasonic Leak Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Youngquist, Robert C.; Moerk, John S.; Haskell, William D.; Cox, Robert B.; Polk, Jimmy D.; Strobel, James P.; Luaces, Frank

    1995-01-01

    Improved portable ultrasonic leak detector features three interchangeable ultrasonic-transducer modules, each suited for operation in unique noncontact or contact mode. One module equipped with ultrasound-collecting horn for use in scanning to detect leaks from distance; horn provides directional sensitivity pattern with sensitivity multiplied by factor of about 6 in forward direction. Another module similar, does not include horn; this module used for scanning close to suspected leak, where proximity of leak more than offsets loss of sensitivity occasioned by lack of horn. Third module designed to be pressed against leaking vessel; includes rugged stainless-steel shell. Improved detectors perform significantly better, smaller, more rugged, and greater sensitivity.

  4. Aspects of leak detection

    SciTech Connect

    Chivers, T.C.

    1997-04-01

    A requirement of a Leak before Break safety case is that the leakage from the through wall crack be detected prior to any growth leading to unacceptable failure. This paper sets out to review some recent developments in this field. It does not set out to be a comprehensive guide to all of the methods available. The discussion concentrates on acoustic emission and how the techniques can be qualified and deployed on operational plant.

  5. Method and means of passive detection of leaks in buried pipes

    DOEpatents

    Claytor, T.

    1979-10-30

    A method and means for passive detection of a leak in a buried pipe containing fluid under pressure includes a plurality of acoustic detectors that are placed in contact with the pipe. Noise produced by the leak is detected by the detectors, and the detected signals are correlated to locate the leak. In one embodiment of the invention two detectors are placed at different locations to locate a leak between them. In an alternate embodiment two detectors of different waves are placed at substantially the same location to determine the distance of the leak from the location.

  6. Modeling the Risk of Fire/Explosion Due to Oxidizer/Fuel Leaks in the Ares I Interstage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ring, Robert W.; Stott, James E.; Hales, Christy

    2008-01-01

    A significant flight hazard associated with liquid propellants, such as those used in the upper stage of NASA's new Ares I launch vehicle, is the possibility of leakage of hazardous fluids resulting in a catastrophic fire/explosion. The enclosed and vented interstage of the Ares I contains numerous oxidizer and fuel supply lines as well as ignition sources. The potential for fire/explosion due to leaks during ascent depends on the relative concentrations of hazardous and inert fluids within the interstage along with other variables such as pressure, temperature, leak rates, and fluid outgasing rates. This analysis improves on previous NASA Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) estimates of the probability of deflagration, in which many of the variables pertinent to the problem were not explicitly modeled as a function of time. This paper presents the modeling methodology developed to analyze these risks.

  7. Thermohydrodynamic analysis of cryogenic liquid turbulent flow fluid film bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andres, Luis San

    1993-01-01

    A thermohydrodynamic analysis is presented and a computer code developed for prediction of the static and dynamic force response of hydrostatic journal bearings (HJB's), annular seals or damper bearing seals, and fixed arc pad bearings for cryogenic liquid applications. The study includes the most important flow characteristics found in cryogenic fluid film bearings such as flow turbulence, fluid inertia, liquid compressibility and thermal effects. The analysis and computational model devised allow the determination of the flow field in cryogenic fluid film bearings along with the dynamic force coefficients for rotor-bearing stability analysis.

  8. Generalized Fluid System Simulation Program (GFSSP) Version 6 - General Purpose Thermo-Fluid Network Analysis Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Majumdar, Alok; Leclair, Andre; Moore, Ric; Schallhorn, Paul

    2011-01-01

    GFSSP stands for Generalized Fluid System Simulation Program. It is a general-purpose computer program to compute pressure, temperature and flow distribution in a flow network. GFSSP calculates pressure, temperature, and concentrations at nodes and calculates flow rates through branches. It was primarily developed to analyze Internal Flow Analysis of a Turbopump Transient Flow Analysis of a Propulsion System. GFSSP development started in 1994 with an objective to provide a generalized and easy to use flow analysis tool for thermo-fluid systems.

  9. DETECTION OF HISTORICAL PIPELINE LEAK PLUMES USING NON-INTRUSIVE SURFACE-BASED GEOPHYSICAL TECHNIQUES AT THE HANFORD NUCLEAR SITE WASHINGTON USA

    SciTech Connect

    SKORSKA MB; FINK JB; RUCKER DF; LEVITT MT

    2010-12-02

    Historical records from the Department of Energy Hanford Nuclear Reservation (in eastern WA) indicate that ruptures in buried waste transfer pipelines were common between the 1940s and 1980s, which resulted in unplanned releases (UPRs) of tank: waste at numerous locations. A number of methods are commercially available for the detection of active or recent leaks, however, there are no methods available for the detection of leaks that occurred many years ago. Over the decades, leaks from the Hanford pipelines were detected by visual observation of fluid on the surface, mass balance calculations (where flow volumes were monitored), and incidental encounters with waste during excavation or drilling. Since these detection methods for historic leaks are so limited in resolution and effectiveness, it is likely that a significant number of pipeline leaks have not been detected. Therefore, a technology was needed to detect the specific location of unknown pipeline leaks so that characterization technologies can be used to identify any risks to groundwater caused by waste released into the vadose zone. A proof-of-concept electromagnetic geophysical survey was conducted at an UPR in order to image a historical leak from a waste transfer pipeline. The survey was designed to test an innovative electromagnetic geophysical technique that could be used to rapidly map the extent of historical leaks from pipelines within the Hanford Site complex. This proof-of-concept test included comprehensive testing and analysis of the transient electromagnetic method (TEM) and made use of supporting and confirmatory geophysical methods including ground penetrating radar, magnetics, and electrical resistivity characterization (ERC). The results for this initial proof-of-concept test were successful and greatly exceeded the expectations of the project team by providing excellent discrimination of soils contaminated with leaked waste despite the interference from an electrically conductive pipe.

  10. Methods for analysis of fluoroquinolones in biological fluids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Methods for analysis of 10 selected fluoroquinolone antibiotics in biological fluids are reviewed. Approaches for sample preparation, detection methods, limits of detection and quantitation and recovery information are provided for both single analyte and multi-analyte fluoroquinolone methods....

  11. Body fluid identification by integrated analysis of DNA methylation and body fluid-specific microbial DNA.

    PubMed

    Choi, Ajin; Shin, Kyoung-Jin; Yang, Woo Ick; Lee, Hwan Young

    2014-01-01

    Identification of body fluids found at crime scenes provides important information that can support a link between sample donors and actual criminal acts. Previous studies have reported that DNA methylation analysis at several tissue-specific differentially methylated regions (tDMRs) enables successful identification of semen, and the detection of certain bacterial DNA can allow for identification of saliva and vaginal fluid. In the present study, a method for detecting bacterial DNA was integrated into a previously reported multiplex methylation-sensitive restriction enzyme-polymerase chain reaction. The developed multiplex PCR was modified by the addition of a new semen-specific marker and by including amplicons for the 16S ribosomal RNA gene of saliva- and vaginal fluid-specific bacteria to improve the efficacy to detect a specific type of body fluid. Using the developed multiplex system, semen was distinguishable by unmethylation at the USP49, DACT1, and PFN3 tDMRs and by hypermethylation at L81528, and saliva could be identified by detection of saliva-specific bacteria, Veillonella atypica and/or Streptococcus salivarius. Additionally, vaginal fluid and menstrual blood were differentiated from other body fluids by hypomethylation at the PFN3 tDMR and the presence of vaginal fluid-specific bacteria, Lactobacillus crispatus and/or Lactobacillus gasseri. Because the developed multiplex system uses the same biological source of DNA for individual identification profiling and simultaneously analyses various types of body fluid in one PCR reaction, this method will facilitate more efficient body fluid identification in forensic casework.

  12. An Integrated Solution for Performing Thermo-fluid Conjugate Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kornberg, Oren

    2009-01-01

    A method has been developed which integrates a fluid flow analyzer and a thermal analyzer to produce both steady state and transient results of 1-D, 2-D, and 3-D analysis models. The Generalized Fluid System Simulation Program (GFSSP) is a one dimensional, general purpose fluid analysis code which computes pressures and flow distributions in complex fluid networks. The MSC Systems Improved Numerical Differencing Analyzer (MSC.SINDA) is a one dimensional general purpose thermal analyzer that solves network representations of thermal systems. Both GFSSP and MSC.SINDA have graphical user interfaces which are used to build the respective model and prepare it for analysis. The SINDA/GFSSP Conjugate Integrator (SGCI) is a formbase graphical integration program used to set input parameters for the conjugate analyses and run the models. The contents of this paper describes SGCI and its thermo-fluids conjugate analysis techniques and capabilities by presenting results from some example models including the cryogenic chill down of a copper pipe, a bar between two walls in a fluid stream, and a solid plate creating a phase change in a flowing fluid.

  13. Overview of MSFC's Applied Fluid Dynamics Analysis Group Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia, Roberto; Wang, Tee-See; Griffin, Lisa; Turner, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This document is a presentation graphic which reviews the activities of the Applied Fluid Dynamics Analysis Group at Marshall Space Flight Center (i.e., Code TD64). The work of this group focused on supporting the space transportation programs. The work of the group is in Computational Fluid Dynamic tool development. This development is driven by hardware design needs. The major applications for the design and analysis tools are: turbines, pumps, propulsion-to-airframe integration, and combustion devices.

  14. Analysis of Fluid Flow over a Surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCloud, Peter L. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A method, apparatus, and computer program product for modeling heat radiated by a structure. The flow of a fluid over a surface of a model of the structure is simulated. The surface has a plurality of surface elements. Heat radiated by the plurality of surface elements in response to the fluid flowing over the surface of the model of the structure is identified. An effect of heat radiated by at least a portion of the plurality of surface elements on each other is identified. A model of the heat radiated by the structure is created using the heat radiated by the plurality of surface elements and the effect of the heat radiated by at least a portion of the plurality of surface elements on each other.

  15. Fluid jet polishing: removal process analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faehnle, Oliver W.; van Brug, Hedser H.

    1999-09-01

    This paper reports on a new finishing process, Fluid Jet Polishing (FJP), that resembles the kinetic process employed in ASJ systems in that it is guiding a pre-mixed slurry to the surface, but within FJP low pressures are applied. Since FJP employs a fluid for machining, no tool wear occurs and the tool is cooling and removing debris in process. Using slurry that contained water with grinding abrasives, the FJP finishing process has been demonstrated. On flat glass samples, the surface roughness of a previously ground surface has been reduced from 475 nm rms to 5 nm rms and a prepolished surface has been shaped without increasing its roughness of 1.6 nm rms. Experiments are described showing that the final surface roughness depends on slurry characteristics and that the material removal spot can be adjusted by varying process parameters, e.g. the angle of the incident ray.

  16. Leak test fitting

    DOEpatents

    Pickett, P.T.

    A hollow fitting for use in gas spectrometry leak testing of conduit joints is divided into two generally symmetrical halves along the axis of the conduit. A clip may quickly and easily fasten and unfasten the halves around the conduit joint under test. Each end of the fitting is sealable with a yieldable material, such as a piece of foam rubber. An orifice is provided in a wall of the fitting for the insertion or detection of helium during testing. One half of the fitting also may be employed to test joints mounted against a surface.

  17. Leak test fitting

    DOEpatents

    Pickett, Patrick T.

    1981-01-01

    A hollow fitting for use in gas spectrometry leak testing of conduit joints is divided into two generally symmetrical halves along the axis of the conduit. A clip may quickly and easily fasten and unfasten the halves around the conduit joint under test. Each end of the fitting is sealable with a yieldable material, such as a piece of foam rubber. An orifice is provided in a wall of the fitting for the insertion or detection of helium during testing. One half of the fitting also may be employed to test joints mounted against a surface.

  18. Variable leak gas source

    DOEpatents

    Henderson, Timothy M.; Wuttke, Gilbert H.

    1977-01-01

    A variable leak gas source and a method for obtaining the same which includes filling a quantity of hollow glass micro-spheres with a gas, storing said quantity in a confined chamber having a controllable outlet, heating said chamber above room temperature, and controlling the temperature of said chamber to control the quantity of gas passing out of said controllable outlet. Individual gas filled spheres may be utilized for calibration purposes by breaking a sphere having a known quantity of a known gas to calibrate a gas detection apparatus.

  19. Superfluid helium leak sealant study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vorreiter, J. W.

    1981-01-01

    Twenty-one leak specimens were fabricated in the ends of stainless steel and aluminum tubes. Eighteen of these tubes were coated with a copolymer material to seal the leak. The other three specimens were left uncoated and served as control specimens. All 21 tubes were cold shocked in liquid helium 50 times and then the leak rate was measured while the tubes were submerged in superfluid helium at 1.7 K. During the cold shocks two of the coated specimens were mechanically damaged and eliminated from the test program. Of the remaining 16 coated specimens one suffered a total coating failure and resulting high leak rate. Another three of the coated specimens suffered partial coating failures. The leak rates of the uncoated specimens were also measured and reported. The significance of various leak rates is discussed in view of the infrared astronomical satellite (IRAS) Dewar performance.

  20. Thermohydrodynamic Analysis of Cryogenic Liquid Turbulent Flow Fluid Film Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    SanAndres, Luis

    1996-01-01

    Computational programs developed for the thermal analysis of tilting and flexure-pad hybrid bearings, and the unsteady flow and transient response of a point mass rotor supported on fluid film bearings are described. The motion of a cryogenic liquid on the thin film annular region of a fluid film bearing is described by a set of mass and momentum conservation, and energy transport equations for the turbulent bulk-flow velocities and pressure, and accompanied by thermophysical state equations for evaluation of the fluid material properties. Zeroth-order equations describe the fluid flow field for a journal static equilibrium position, while first-order (linear) equations govern the fluid flow for small amplitude-journal center translational motions. Solution to the zeroth-order flow field equations provides the bearing flow rate, load capacity, drag torque and temperature rise. Solution to the first-order equations determines the rotordynamic force coefficients due to journal radial motions.

  1. SSME propellant path leak detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crawford, Roger; Shohadaee, Ahmad Ali

    1989-01-01

    The complicated high-pressure cycle of the space shuttle main engine (SSME) propellant path provides many opportunities for external propellant path leaks while the engine is running. This mode of engine failure may be detected and analyzed with sufficient speed to save critical engine test hardware from destruction. The leaks indicate hardware failures which will damage or destroy an engine if undetected; therefore, detection of both cryogenic and hot gas leaks is the objective of this investigation. The primary objective of this phase of the investigation is the experimental validation of techniques for detecting and analyzing propellant path external leaks which have a high probability of occurring on the SSME. The selection of candidate detection methods requires a good analytic model for leak plumes which would develop from external leaks and an understanding of radiation transfer through the leak plume. One advanced propellant path leak detection technique is obtained by using state-of-the-art technology infrared (IR) thermal imaging systems combined with computer, digital image processing, and expert systems for the engine protection. The feasibility of IR leak plume detection is evaluated on subscale simulated laboratory plumes to determine sensitivity, signal to noise, and general suitability for the application.

  2. Numerical Simulation of Gas Leaking Diffusion from Storage Tank

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Hongjun; Jing, Jiaqiang

    Over 80 percents of storage tank accidents are caused by gas leaking. Since traditional empirical calculation has great errors, present work aims to study the gas leaking diffusion under different wind conditions by numerical simulation method based on computational fluid dynamics theory. Then gas concentration distribution was obtained to determine the scope of the security zone. The results showed that gas diffused freely along the axis of leaking point without wind, giving rise to large range of hazardous area. However, wind plays the role of migrating and diluting the leaking gas. The larger is the wind speed, the smaller is the damage and the bigger is the security zone. Calculation method and results can provide some reference to establish and implement rescue program for accidents.

  3. Proteome analysis of chick embryonic cerebrospinal fluid.

    PubMed

    Parada, Carolina; Gato, Angel; Aparicio, Mariano; Bueno, David

    2006-01-01

    During early stages of embryo development, the brain cavity is filled with embryonic cerebrospinal fluid (E-CSF), a complex fluid containing different protein fractions that contributes to the regulation of the survival, proliferation and neurogenesis of the neuroectodermal stem cells. Using 2-DE, protein sequencing and database searches, we identified and analyzed the proteome of the E-CSF from chick embryos (Gallus gallus). We identified 26 different gene products, including proteins related to the extracellular matrix, proteins associated with the regulation of osmotic pressure and metal transport, proteins related to cell survival, MAP kinase activators, proteins involved in the transport of retinol and vitamin D, antioxidant and antimicrobial proteins, intracellular proteins and some unknown proteins. Most of these gene products are involved in the regulation of developmental processes during embryogenesis in systems other than E-CSF. Interestingly, 14 of them are also present in adult human CSF proteome, and it has been reported that they are altered in the CSF of patients suffering neurodegenerative diseases and/or neurological disorders. Understanding these molecules and the mechanisms they control during embryonic neurogenesis is a key contribution to the general understanding of CNS development, and may also contribute to greater knowledge of these human diseases.

  4. SPAR improved structure/fluid dynamic analysis capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oden, J. T.; Pearson, M. L.

    1983-01-01

    The capability of analyzing a coupled dynamic system of flowing fluid and elastic structure was added to the SPAR computer code. A method, developed and adopted for use in SPAR utilizes the existing assumed stress hybrid plan element in SPAR. An operational mode was incorporated in SPAR which provides the capability for analyzing the flaw of a two dimensional, incompressible, viscous fluid within rigid boundaries. Equations were developed to provide for the eventual analysis of the interaction of such fluids with an elastic solid.

  5. ISS-CREAM Thermal and Fluid System Design and Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thorpe, Rosemary S.

    2015-01-01

    Thermal and Fluids Analysis Workshop (TFAWS), Silver Spring MD NCTS 21070-15. The ISS-CREAM (Cosmic Ray Energetics And Mass for the International Space Station) payload is being developed by an international team and will provide significant cosmic ray characterization over a long time frame. Cold fluid provided by the ISS Exposed Facility (EF) is the primary means of cooling for 5 science instruments and over 7 electronics boxes. Thermal fluid integrated design and analysis was performed for CREAM using a Thermal Desktop model. This presentation will provide some specific design and modeling examples from the fluid cooling system, complex SCD (Silicon Charge Detector) and calorimeter hardware, and integrated payload and ISS level modeling. Features of Thermal Desktop such as CAD simplification, meshing of complex hardware, External References (Xrefs), and FloCAD modeling will be discussed.

  6. Thermohydrodynamic Analysis of Cryogenic Liquid Turbulent Flow Fluid Film Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    San Andres, Luis

    1996-01-01

    This report describes a thermohydrodynamic analysis and computer programs for the prediction of the static and dynamic force response of fluid film bearings for cryogenic applications. The research performed addressed effectively the most important theoretical and practical issues related to the operation and performance of cryogenic fluid film bearings. Five computer codes have been licensed by the Texas A&M University to NASA centers and contractors and a total of 14 technical papers have been published.

  7. Chemochromic Hydrogen Leak Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberson, Luke; Captain, Janine; Williams, Martha; Smith, Trent; Tate, LaNetra; Raissi, Ali; Mohajeri, Nahid; Muradov, Nazim; Bokerman, Gary

    2009-01-01

    At NASA, hydrogen safety is a key concern for space shuttle processing. Leaks of any level must be quickly recognized and addressed due to hydrogen s lower explosion limit. Chemo - chromic devices have been developed to detect hydrogen gas in several embodiments. Because hydrogen is odorless and colorless and poses an explosion hazard, there is an emerging need for sensors to quickly and accurately detect low levels of leaking hydrogen in fuel cells and other advanced energy- generating systems in which hydrogen is used as fuel. The device incorporates a chemo - chromic pigment into a base polymer. The article can reversibly or irreversibly change color upon exposure to hydrogen. The irreversible pigment changes color from a light beige to a dark gray. The sensitivity of the pigment can be tailored to its application by altering its exposure to gas through the incorporation of one or more additives or polymer matrix. Furthermore, through the incorporation of insulating additives, the chemochromic sensor can operate at cryogenic temperatures as low as 78 K. A chemochromic detector of this type can be manufactured into any feasible polymer part including injection molded plastic parts, fiber-spun textiles, or extruded tapes. The detectors are simple, inexpensive, portable, and do not require an external power source. The chemochromic detectors were installed and removed easily at the KSC launch pad without need for special expertise. These detectors may require an external monitor such as the human eye, camera, or electronic detector; however, they could be left in place, unmonitored, and examined later for color change to determine whether there had been exposure to hydrogen. In one type of envisioned application, chemochromic detectors would be fabricated as outer layers (e.g., casings or coatings) on high-pressure hydrogen storage tanks and other components of hydrogen-handling systems to provide visible indications of hydrogen leaks caused by fatigue failures or

  8. Ultrasonic Leak Detection System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Youngquist, Robert C. (Inventor); Moerk, J. Steven (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    A system for detecting ultrasonic vibrations. such as those generated by a small leak in a pressurized container. vessel. pipe. or the like. comprises an ultrasonic transducer assembly and a processing circuit for converting transducer signals into an audio frequency range signal. The audio frequency range signal can be used to drive a pair of headphones worn by an operator. A diode rectifier based mixing circuit provides a simple, inexpensive way to mix the transducer signal with a square wave signal generated by an oscillator, and thereby generate the audio frequency signal. The sensitivity of the system is greatly increased through proper selection and matching of the system components. and the use of noise rejection filters and elements. In addition, a parabolic collecting horn is preferably employed which is mounted on the transducer assembly housing. The collecting horn increases sensitivity of the system by amplifying the received signals. and provides directionality which facilitates easier location of an ultrasonic vibration source.

  9. Hermetic Seal Leak Detection Apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelley, Anthony R. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    The present invention is a hermetic seal leak detection apparatus, which can be used to test for hermetic seal leaks in instruments and containers. A vacuum tight chamber is created around the unit being tested to minimize gas space outside of the hermetic seal. A vacuum inducing device is then used to increase the gas chamber volume inside the device, so that a slight vacuum is pulled on the unit being tested. The pressure in the unit being tested will stabilize. If the stabilized pressure reads close to a known good seal calibration, there is not a leak in the seal. If the stabilized pressure reads closer to a known bad seal calibration value, there is a leak in the seal. The speed of the plunger can be varied and by evaluating the resulting pressure change rates and final values, the leak rate/size can be accurately calculated.

  10. Fluid and thermal performance analysis of PMSM used for driving

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Shuye; Cui, Guanghui; Li, Zhongyu; Guan, Tianyu

    2016-03-01

    The permanent magnet synchronous motor (PMSM) is widely used in ships under frequency conversion control system. The fluid flow performance and temperature distribution of the PMSM are difficult to clarify due to its complex structure and variable frequency control condition. Therefore, in order to investigate the fluid and thermal characteristics of the PMSM, a 50 kW PMSM was taken as an example in this study, and a 3-D coupling analysis model of fluid and thermal was established. The fluid and temperature fields were calculated by using finite volume method. The cooling medium's properties, such a velocity, streamlines, and temperature, were then analyzed. The correctness of the proposed model, and the rationality of the solution method, were verified by a temperature test of the PMSM. In this study, the changing rheology on the performance of the cooling medium and the working temperature of the PMSM were revealed, which could be helpful for designing the PMSM.

  11. Potentiometric analysis of water soluble cutting fluid-metal combinations

    SciTech Connect

    Kelley, E.E.

    1991-12-01

    The results of corrosion studies conducted by the University of Kansas under Contract G257763 for Allied-Signal Inc., Kansas City Division (KCD), are given. These potentiometric studies evaluate the corrosivity of two water soluble cutting fluids at varying concentrations on samples of 304 stainless steel, 6061-T6 aluminum, and beryllium copper. This testing serves two purposes: (1) to develop effective test procedures adaptable to existing KCD corrosion measurement equipment for corrosion analysis of cutting fluid-metals combinations, and (2) to understand the relative corrosiveness of the varying water soluble cutting fluids on different metals. The tests used were adapted from the American Society of Testing Materials (ASTM). Future testing will identify polarization techniques for establishing corrosion rates which will be used in evaluating both water soluble cutting fluids and other aqueous solutions used at KCD.

  12. Expandable coating cocoon leak detection system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hauser, R. L.; Kochansky, M. C.

    1972-01-01

    Development of system and materials for detecting leaks in cocoon protective coatings are discussed. Method of applying materials for leak determination is presented. Pressurization of system following application of materials will cause formation of bubble if leak exists.

  13. Tuberculosis diagnosed by PCR analysis of synovial fluid.

    PubMed

    Fujimoto, Nobukazu; Gemba, Kenichi; Yao, Atsushi; Ozaki, Shinji; Ono, Katsuichiro; Wada, Sae; Fujii, Yasuhiro; Namba, Yoshifumi; Kishimoto, Takumi

    2010-02-01

    Tuberculosis is a leading cause of mortality due to an infectious agent worldwide. It often affects multiple organs by hematogenous spread of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, but knee-joint involvement is extremely rare, comprising approximately 0.1% of all forms of tuberculosis. We present a case of tuberculous pleuritis with knee-joint involvement. Cytological and biochemical analysis of the pleural fluid and a biopsy specimen of the cervical lymph node indicated tuberculosis, but a definitive diagnosis was not given. A confirmed diagnosis was finally obtained through PCR analysis of the synovial fluid. Tuberculosis should be included in the differential diagnosis in patients with persistent pain and swelling of the knee. PCR analysis of the synovial fluid is a quick and useful method for the diagnosis.

  14. High resolution respirometry analysis of polyethylenimine-mediated mitochondrial energy crisis and cellular stress: Mitochondrial proton leak and inhibition of the electron transport system.

    PubMed

    Hall, Arnaldur; Larsen, Anna K; Parhamifar, Ladan; Meyle, Kathrine D; Wu, Lin-Ping; Moghimi, S Moein

    2013-10-01

    Polyethylenimines (PEIs) are highly efficient non-viral transfectants, but can induce cell death through poorly understood necrotic and apoptotic processes as well as autophagy. Through high resolution respirometry studies in H1299 cells we demonstrate that the 25kDa branched polyethylenimine (25k-PEI-B), in a concentration and time-dependent manner, facilitates mitochondrial proton leak and inhibits the electron transport system. These events were associated with gradual reduction of the mitochondrial membrane potential and mitochondrial ATP synthesis. The intracellular ATP levels further declined as a consequence of PEI-mediated plasma membrane damage and subsequent ATP leakage to the extracellular medium. Studies with freshly isolated mouse liver mitochondria corroborated with bioenergetic findings and demonstrated parallel polycation concentration- and time-dependent changes in state 2 and state 4o oxygen flux as well as lowered ADP phosphorylation (state 3) and mitochondrial ATP synthesis. Polycation-mediated reduction of electron transport system activity was further demonstrated in 'broken mitochondria' (freeze-thawed mitochondrial preparations). Moreover, by using both high-resolution respirometry and spectrophotometry analysis of cytochrome c oxidase activity we were able to identify complex IV (cytochrome c oxidase) as a likely specific site of PEI mediated inhibition within the electron transport system. Unraveling the mechanisms of PEI-mediated mitochondrial energy crisis is central for combinatorial design of safer polymeric non-viral gene delivery systems.

  15. 40 CFR 63.1331 - Equipment leak provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... in pumps and agitator seals in light liquid service shall not be considered to be a leak. For... polymer fluid used to provide lubrication and/or cooling of the pump or agitator shaft exits the pump... by § 63.1335(e)(6). (6) For pumps, valves, connectors, and agitators in heavy liquid...

  16. 40 CFR 63.1331 - Equipment leak provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... in pumps and agitator seals in light liquid service shall not be considered to be a leak. For... polymer fluid used to provide lubrication and/or cooling of the pump or agitator shaft exits the pump... by § 63.1335(e)(6). (6) For pumps, valves, connectors, and agitators in heavy liquid...

  17. 40 CFR 63.1331 - Equipment leak provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... in pumps and agitator seals in light liquid service shall not be considered to be a leak. For... polymer fluid used to provide lubrication and/or cooling of the pump or agitator shaft exits the pump... by § 63.1335(e)(6). (6) For pumps, valves, connectors, and agitators in heavy liquid...

  18. Effect of leak location on measured respirator fit.

    PubMed

    Crutchfield, C D; Park, D L

    1997-06-01

    A significant difference in leak detection as a function of leak location was observed during a study assessing how well current models of quantitative fit-test systems detect leakage. Known sources of leakage (matched hypodermic needles) were introduced at three fixed locations into factory-probed half-mask and full-face respirators mounted on a headform-breathing machine system. The leak locations were the bridge of the nose, the cheek, and the chin. Baseline leakage into each respirator was determined by conducting a fit-test with all fixed leak sources capped. Fit tests were repeated with each individual source uncapped. Study objectives included determining (1) how well each system measured the leakage, and (2) whether leak location had any effect on leak measurement. An ambient aerosol fit-test system (Portacount Plus) and a controlled negative pressure (CNP) fit-test system (FitTester 3000) were used. The ambient aerosol system detected an overall average of 37.2% of the known leakage, with a coefficient of variation of 44.7%. An analysis of variance showed significant differences in aerosol system measurements of leakage as a function of leak location and mask type (p < 0.001). A different pattern of aerosol leak detection as a function of leak location was observed between half-mask and full-face respirators, which appears to be related to differences in in-mask airflow dynamics. The CNP system detected an overall average of 97.9% of the known leakage through the same hypodermic needles, with a coefficient of variation of 4.3%. CNP system results were not affected by leak location (p > 0.43) or mask type (p > 0.32).

  19. A Leak Monitor for Industry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    GenCorp Aerojet Industrial Products, Lewis Research Center, Marshall Space Flight Center, and Case Western Reserve University developed a gas leak detection system, originally for use with the Space Shuttle propulsion system and reusable launch vehicles. The Model HG200 Automated Gas Leak Detection System has miniaturized sensors that can identify extremely low concentrations of hydrogen without requiring oxygen. A microprocessor-based hardware/software system monitors the sensors and displays the source and magnitude of hydrogen leaks in real time. The system detects trace hydrogen around pipes, connectors, flanges and pressure tanks, and has been used by Ford Motor Company in the production of a natural gas-powered car.

  20. Downhole fluid analysis and asphaltene science for petroleum reservoir evaluation.

    PubMed

    Mullins, Oliver C; Pomerantz, Andrew E; Zuo, Julian Y; Dong, Chengli

    2014-01-01

    Petroleum reservoirs are enshrouded in mysteries associated with all manner of geologic and fluid complexities that Mother Nature can inspire. Efficient exploitation of petroleum reservoirs mandates elucidation of these complexities; downhole fluid analysis (DFA) has proven to be indispensable for understanding both fluids and reservoir architecture. Crude oil consists of dissolved gases, liquids, and dissolved solids, known as the asphaltenes. These different fluid components exhibit fluid gradients vertically and laterally, which are best revealed by DFA, with its excellent precision and accuracy. Compositional gradient analysis falls within the purview of thermodynamics. Gas-liquid equilibria can be treated with a cubic equation of state (EoS), such as the Peng-Robinson EoS, a modified van der Waals EoS. In contrast, the first EoS for asphaltene gradients, the Flory-Huggins-Zuo (FHZ) EoS, was developed only recently. The resolution of the asphaltene molecular and nanocolloidal species in crude oil, which is codified in the Yen-Mullins model of asphaltenes, enabled the development of this EoS. The combination of DFA characterization of gradients of reservoir crude oil with the cubic EoS and FHZ EoS analyses brings into view wide-ranging reservoir concerns, such as reservoir connectivity, fault-block migration, heavy oil gradients, tar mat formation, huge disequilibrium fluid gradients, and even stochastic variations of reservoir fluids. New petroleum science and DFA technology are helping to offset the increasing costs and technical difficulties of exploiting ever-more-remote petroleum reservoirs.

  1. Development of perfluorocarbon tracer technology for underground leak location.

    PubMed

    Hassoun, S; McBride, T; Russell, D A

    2000-10-01

    A method has been developed for the atmospheric sampling and analysis of four perfluorocarbon tracer (PFT) compounds simultaneously at the parts per trillion (ppt) level. PFTs were pre-concentrated using adsorbent tube air sampling. Analysis was achieved by thermal desorption (TD) and gas chromatography (GC) with electron capture detection (ECD). Efficient separation of the PFTs from the other sample constituents was achieved by use of a capillary porous layer open tubular (PLOT) GC column without the need to cool the GC oven to sub-ambient temperatures using liquid coolants (M. de Bortoli and E. Pecchio, J. High Resolut. Chromatogr., 1985, 8, 422) or for a catalytic destruction step to remove interferents (T. W. D'Ottavio, R. W. Goodrich and R. N. Dietz, Environ. Sci. Technol., 1986, 20, 100). Results from test field trials with two volatile PFTs that were buried to simulate an underground leaking cable were successful. The PFTs were detected above ground level to pinpoint the leak position. The highest tracer concentrations were detected within 1 m of the simulated leak positions 2 days after tracer burial. The developed technology was applied to an oil leaking high voltage electricity cable. One PFT was added to the cable oil which enabled detection of the oil leak to within 3 m. The reported method has many advantages over currently used leak detection methods and could, in the future, be applied to the detection of underground leaks in a variety of cables and pipes.

  2. Space Shuttle RCS Oxidizer Leak Repair for STS-26

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delventhal, R. A.; Faget, N. M.

    1989-01-01

    Following propellant loading of the Space Shuttle's reaction control system (RCS) for mission STS 26, an oxidizer leak was detected in the left orbital maneuvering system (OMS) pod, where the RCS is located. Subsequent investigation determined that the leak was isolated at a mechanical Dynatube fitting near the RCS nitrogen tetroxide tank. An intense effort was initiated to design, fabricate, and qualify a sealing device to stop the oxidizer leak externally so that the Space Shuttle launch could proceed. It was discovered that sealing devices called clamshells were widely used throughout the petrochemical and power generation industries to stop leaks developed in large diameter pipes which carry steam or other hazardous fluids. These clamshells are available in different diameters and strengths and are placed around the pipe at the location of the leak. A sealing compound is then injected under high pressure into the clamshell to stop the leak. This technology was scaled down and applied to the problem of stopping the leak on the Orbiter, which was on a half-inch diameter line in a nearly inaccessible location. Many obstacles had to be overcome such as determining that the sealing material would be compatible with the nitrogen tetroxide and ensuring that the clamshell would actually fit around the Dynatube fitting without interfering with other lines which were in close proximity. The effort at the NASA Johnson Space Center included materials compatibility testing of several sealants, design of a clamshell to fit in the confined compartment, and manufacture and qualification of the flight hardware. A clamshell was successfully placed around the Dynatube fitting on the Orbiter and the oxidizer leak was terminated. Then it was decided to apply this technology further and design clamshells for other mechanical fittings onboard the Orbiter and develop sealing compounds which will be compatible with fuels such as monomethyl hydrazine (MMH). The potential exists for

  3. Identification of sewage leaks by active remote-sensing methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldshleger, Naftaly; Basson, Uri

    2016-04-01

    The increasing length of sewage pipelines, and concomitant risk of leaks due to urban and industrial growth and development is exposing the surrounding land to contamination risk and environmental harm. It is therefore important to locate such leaks in a timely manner, to minimize the damage. Advances in active remote sensing Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) and Frequency Domain Electromagnetic (FDEM) technologies was used to identify leaking potentially responsible for pollution and to identify minor spills before they cause widespread damage. This study focused on the development of these electromagnetic methods to replace conventional acoustic methods for the identification of leaks along sewage pipes. Electromagnetic methods provide an additional advantage in that they allow mapping of the fluid-transport system in the subsurface. Leak-detection systems using GPR and FDEM are not limited to large amounts of water, but enable detecting leaks of tens of liters per hour, because they can locate increases in environmental moisture content of only a few percentage along the pipes. The importance and uniqueness of this research lies in the development of practical tools to provide a snapshot and monitoring of the spatial changes in soil moisture content up to depths of about 3-4 m, in open and paved areas, at relatively low cost, in real time or close to real time. Spatial measurements performed using GPR and FDEM systems allow monitoring many tens of thousands of measurement points per hectare, thus providing a picture of the spatial situation along pipelines and the surrounding. The main purpose of this study was to develop a method for detecting sewage leaks using the above-proposed geophysical methods, since their contaminants can severely affect public health. We focused on identifying, locating and characterizing such leaks in sewage pipes in residential and industrial areas.

  4. Application of transport phenomena analysis technique to cerebrospinal fluid.

    PubMed

    Lam, C H; Hansen, E A; Hall, W A; Hubel, A

    2013-12-01

    The study of hydrocephalus and the modeling of cerebrospinal fluid flow have proceeded in the past using mathematical analysis that was very capable of prediction phenomenonologically but not well in physiologic parameters. In this paper, the basis of fluid dynamics at the physiologic state is explained using first established equations of transport phenomenon. Then, microscopic and molecular level techniques of modeling are described using porous media theory and chemical kinetic theory and then applied to cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) dynamics. Using techniques of transport analysis allows the field of cerebrospinal fluid dynamics to approach the level of sophistication of urine and blood transport. Concepts such as intracellular and intercellular pathways, compartmentalization, and tortuosity are associated with quantifiable parameters that are relevant to the anatomy and physiology of cerebrospinal fluid transport. The engineering field of transport phenomenon is rich and steeped in architectural, aeronautical, nautical, and more recently biological history. This paper summarizes and reviews the approaches that have been taken in the field of engineering and applies it to CSF flow.

  5. Modeling Leaking Gas Plume Migration

    SciTech Connect

    Silin, Dmitriy; Patzek, Tad; Benson, Sally M.

    2007-08-20

    In this study, we obtain simple estimates of 1-D plume propagation velocity taking into account the density and viscosity contrast between CO{sub 2} and brine. Application of the Buckley-Leverett model to describe buoyancy-driven countercurrent flow of two immiscible phases leads to a transparent theory predicting the evolution of the plume. We obtain that the plume does not migrate upward like a gas bubble in bulk water. Rather, it stretches upward until it reaches a seal or until the fluids become immobile. A simple formula requiring no complex numerical calculations describes the velocity of plume propagation. This solution is a simplification of a more comprehensive theory of countercurrent plume migration that does not lend itself to a simple analytical solution (Silin et al., 2006). The range of applicability of the simplified solution is assessed and provided. This work is motivated by the growing interest in injecting carbon dioxide into deep geological formations as a means of avoiding its atmospheric emissions and consequent global warming. One of the potential problems associated with the geologic method of sequestration is leakage of CO{sub 2} from the underground storage reservoir into sources of drinking water. Ideally, the injected green-house gases will stay in the injection zone for a geologically long time and eventually will dissolve in the formation brine and remain trapped by mineralization. However, naturally present or inadvertently created conduits in the cap rock may result in a gas leak from primary storage. Even in supercritical state, the carbon dioxide viscosity and density are lower than those of the indigenous formation brine. Therefore, buoyancy will tend to drive the CO{sub 2} upward unless it is trapped beneath a low permeability seal. Theoretical and experimental studies of buoyancy-driven supercritical CO{sub 2} flow, including estimation of time scales associated with plume evolution, are critical for developing technology

  6. SPAR improved structure-fluid dynamic analysis capability, phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearson, M. L.

    1984-01-01

    An efficient and general method of analyzing a coupled dynamic system of fluid flow and elastic structures is investigated. The improvement of Structural Performance Analysis and Redesign (SPAR) code is summarized. All error codes are documented and the SPAR processor/subroutine cross reference is included.

  7. Potential applications of computational fluid dynamics to biofluid analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kwak, D.; Chang, J. L. C.; Rogers, S. E.; Rosenfeld, M.; Kwak, D.

    1988-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamics was developed to the stage where it has become an indispensable part of aerospace research and design. In view of advances made in aerospace applications, the computational approach can be used for biofluid mechanics research. Several flow simulation methods developed for aerospace problems are briefly discussed for potential applications to biofluids, especially to blood flow analysis.

  8. 40 CFR 63.502 - Equipment leak and heat exchange system provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... pumps and agitator seals in light liquid service, shall not be considered a leak. For the purposes of... fluid used to provide lubrication and/or cooling of the pump or agitator shaft exits the pump,...

  9. 40 CFR 63.502 - Equipment leak and heat exchange system provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... pumps and agitator seals in light liquid service, shall not be considered a leak. For the purposes of... fluid used to provide lubrication and/or cooling of the pump or agitator shaft exits the pump,...

  10. Leak protection system on a tank for storing or transporting liquefied gas

    SciTech Connect

    Kvamsdal, R.

    1981-01-20

    An improved leak-protection system for spherical cargo tanks carrying LNG eliminates the drainage pumps and the protective insulation on the inner bottom of the ship below the tank, as found in current leak-protection designs. The new design incorporates a catch basin beneath the tank to hold any leaked cargo. The basin is large enough to allow the LNG to gradually evaporate. With this arrangement, the pump system is limited to units for draining water that has leaked in. Designed with two multicelled levels, the catch basin distributes the leaked fluid over the largest possible area, regardless of the trim or list of the moving ship. The aluminum structure of the basin prevents any thermal shock from affecting the hull of the ship below the leaking tank.

  11. Predictors of alveolar air leaks.

    PubMed

    Loran, David B; Woodside, Kenneth J; Cerfolio, Robert J; Zwischenberger, Joseph B

    2002-08-01

    Persistent air leaks are caused by the failure of the postoperative lung to achieve a configuration that is physiologically amenable to healing. The raw pulmonary surface caused by the dissection of the fissure often is separated from the pleura, and the air leak fails to close. Additionally, higher air flow thorough an alveolar-pleural fistula seems to keep the fistula open. Other factors that interfere with wound healing, such as steroid use, diabetes, or malnutrition, can result in persistence of the leak. A thoracic surgeon can minimize the incidence of air leak through meticulous surgical technique and can identify patients in whom the balance of risks (Table 1) and benefits warrant operative intervention based on an understanding of the underlying pathophysiology.

  12. Leak detection with expandable coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    Developed and evaluated is a system for leak detection that can be easily applied over separable connectors and that expands into a bubble or balloon if a leak is present. This objective is accomplished by using thin films of Parafilm tape wrapped over connectors, which are then overcoated with a special formulation. The low yield strength and the high elongation of the envelope permit bubble formation if leakage occurs. This system is appropriate for welds and other hardware besides separable connectors. The practical limit of this system appears to be for leaks exceeding 0.000001 cc/sec. If this envelope is used to trap gases for mass spectrometer inspection, leaks in the range of ten to the minus 8th power cc/sec. may be detectable.

  13. Modeling and locating underground water pipe leak with microseismic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jing; Liu, Jiangping; Liu, Hao; Tian, Zhijian; Cheng, Fei

    2017-01-01

    Traditional pipeline leak locating methods require that geophones have to be placed on the pipe wall. While if the exact location of the pipeline is unknown, the leaks may not be identified accurately. To solve this problem, considering the characteristics of pipeline leak, a continuous random seismic source model is proposed and geological models are established. Based on the two dimensional (2D) viscoacoustic equations and the staggered grid finite-difference (FD) algorithm, the microseismic wave field generated by a leaking pipe is modeled. Cross-correlation analysis and the simulated annealing (SA) algorithm are employed to obtain the time difference and the leak location. Analysis and discussions of the effects of number of recorded traces, survey layout, and offset and trace interval on the accuracy of the estimated location are also conducted. Simulation and data field experiment results indicate that: (1) A continuous random source can realistically represent the leak microseismic wave field in a simulation using 2D viscoacoustic equations and staggered grid FD algorithm. (2) For the leak microseismic wave field, the cross-correlation method is effective for calculating time difference of the direct wave relative to the reference trace. However, outside the refraction blind zone, accuracy of the time difference is reduced by the effects of refracted wave. (3) The SA algorithm based upon time difference, helps to identify the leak location effectively, even in the presence of noise. Estimation of the horizontal distance is more accurate than that of the depth, and the locating errors increase with increasing number of traces and offset. Moreover, in the refraction blind zone, trace interval has almost no impact on the accuracy of the location estimate. And the symmetrical array provides a higher estimate accuracy than the asymmetrical array. (4) The acquisition method of time difference based on the microseismic theory and SA algorithm has a great potential

  14. Leak test adapter for containers

    DOEpatents

    Hallett, Brian H.; Hartley, Michael S.

    1996-01-01

    An adapter is provided for facilitating the charging of containers and leak testing penetration areas. The adapter comprises an adapter body and stem which are secured to the container's penetration areas. The container is then pressurized with a tracer gas. Manipulating the adapter stem installs a penetration plug allowing the adapter to be removed and the penetration to be leak tested with a mass spectrometer. Additionally, a method is provided for using the adapter.

  15. Thermal analysis for the Cryogenic Fluid Management Flight Experiment (CFMFE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smolak, George R.

    1987-01-01

    The purpose was to identify recent thermal analysis efforts and to review that part of the analysis that addresses the prediction of fluid and container temperature gradients during low gravity storage in space. It was concluded that both small and large tanks require hundreds of hours to reach even 60 PSIA. In about 1000 hours, the small tank is close to equilibrium; the large tank requires many thousands of hours to reach equilibrium.

  16. Supercritical fluid chromatography for lipid analysis in foodstuffs.

    PubMed

    Donato, Paola; Inferrera, Veronica; Sciarrone, Danilo; Mondello, Luigi

    2017-01-01

    The task of lipid analysis has always challenged separation scientists, and new techniques in chromatography were often developed for the separation of lipids; however, no single technique or methodology is yet capable of affording a comprehensive screening of all lipid species and classes. This review acquaints the role of supercritical fluid chromatography within the field of lipid analysis, from the early developed capillary separations based on pure CO2 , to the most recent techniques employing packed columns under subcritical conditions, including the niche multidimensional techniques using supercritical fluids in at least one of the separation dimensions. A short history of supercritical fluid chromatography will be introduced first, from its early popularity in the late 1980s, to the sudden fall and oblivion until the last decade, experiencing a regain of interest within the chromatographic community. Afterwards, the subject of lipid nomenclature and classification will be briefly dealt with, before discussing the main applications of supercritical fluid chromatography for food analysis, according to the specific class of lipids.

  17. Low heat leak connector for cryogenic system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stelts, P. D. (Inventor)

    1965-01-01

    Heat leak from the surrounding atmosphere during fluid transfer from a spaced shell-insulated vessel for storing liquified gas having an upper gaseous phase, in minimized by forming a relatively wide, shallow blister on the wall of the vessel at the point of transfer line connection. The shell and the opposed walls of the blister have aligned openings whose common axis passes centrally through the blister and is normal to the surfaces of the vessel and shell. A fluid transfer line conduit passing through the shell opening is in fluid-tight connection with the shell and blister wall. The fluid transfer line confines the fluid in a continuous stream. The blister is filled with a heat insulating material which provides a thermal break between the central wall portions of the blister. A connector at the bottom of the vessel comprises a tube extending between the openings in the blister which projects a short distance within the body of liquefied gas and terminates in a reverse bend to prevent backflow of liquid through the pipe.

  18. Informativeness of NGS Analysis for Vaginal Fluid Identification.

    PubMed

    Giampaoli, Saverio; DeVittori, Elisabetta; Valeriani, Federica; Berti, Andrea; Romano Spica, Vincenzo

    2017-01-01

    The identification of vaginal fluids in forensic examinations plays an important role in crime scene reconstruction. Molecular detection of vaginal bacterial communities can lead to the correct discrimination of body fluids. These kinds of studies can be performed through multiplex real-time PCR using primers for a specific selection of bacteria. The availability of next-generation sequencing (NGS) protocols provided for the extension of the analysis to evaluate the prokaryotes present in specimens. In this study, DNA was extracted from 18 samples (vaginal, oral, fecal, yoghurt) and analyzed by real-time PCR and NGS. The comparison between the two approaches has demonstrated that the information developed through NGS can augment the more conventional real-time PCR detection of a few key bacterial species to provide a more probative result and the correct identification of vaginal fluid from samples that are more forensically challenged.

  19. Metabolic profiling of body fluids and multivariate data analysis.

    PubMed

    Trezzi, Jean-Pierre; Jäger, Christian; Galozzi, Sara; Barkovits, Katalin; Marcus, Katrin; Mollenhauer, Brit; Hiller, Karsten

    2017-01-01

    Metabolome analyses of body fluids are challenging due pre-analytical variations, such as pre-processing delay and temperature, and constant dynamical changes of biochemical processes within the samples. Therefore, proper sample handling starting from the time of collection up to the analysis is crucial to obtain high quality samples and reproducible results. A metabolomics analysis is divided into 4 main steps: 1) Sample collection, 2) Metabolite extraction, 3) Data acquisition and 4) Data analysis. Here, we describe a protocol for gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (GC-MS) based metabolic analysis for biological matrices, especially body fluids. This protocol can be applied on blood serum/plasma, saliva and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples of humans and other vertebrates. It covers sample collection, sample pre-processing, metabolite extraction, GC-MS measurement and guidelines for the subsequent data analysis. Advantages of this protocol include: •Robust and reproducible metabolomics results, taking into account pre-analytical variations that may occur during the sampling process•Small sample volume required•Rapid and cost-effective processing of biological samples•Logistic regression based determination of biomarker signatures for in-depth data analysis.

  20. SSME propellant path leak detection real-time

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crawford, R. A.; Smith, L. M.

    1994-01-01

    Included are four documents that outline the technical aspects of the research performed on NASA Grant NAG8-140: 'A System for Sequential Step Detection with Application to Video Image Processing'; 'Leak Detection from the SSME Using Sequential Image Processing'; 'Digital Image Processor Specifications for Real-Time SSME Leak Detection'; and 'A Color Change Detection System for Video Signals with Applications to Spectral Analysis of Rocket Engine Plumes'.

  1. Intelligent Leak Detection System

    SciTech Connect

    Mohaghegh, Shahab D.

    2014-10-27

    apability of underground carbon dioxide storage to confine and sustain injected CO2 for a very long time is the main concern for geologic CO2 sequestration. If a leakage from a geological CO2 sequestration site occurs, it is crucial to find the approximate amount and the location of the leak in order to implement proper remediation activity. An overwhelming majority of research and development for storage site monitoring has been concentrated on atmospheric, surface or near surface monitoring of the sequestered CO2. This study aims to monitor the integrity of CO2 storage at the reservoir level. This work proposes developing in-situ CO2 Monitoring and Verification technology based on the implementation of Permanent Down-hole Gauges (PDG) or “Smart Wells” along with Artificial Intelligence and Data Mining (AI&DM). The technology attempts to identify the characteristics of the CO2 leakage by de-convolving the pressure signals collected from Permanent Down-hole Gauges (PDG). Citronelle field, a saline aquifer reservoir, located in the U.S. was considered for this study. A reservoir simulation model for CO2 sequestration in the Citronelle field was developed and history matched. The presence of the PDGs were considered in the reservoir model at the injection well and an observation well. High frequency pressure data from sensors were collected based on different synthetic CO2 leakage scenarios in the model. Due to complexity of the pressure signal behaviors, a Machine Learning-based technology was introduced to build an Intelligent Leakage Detection System (ILDS). The ILDS was able to detect leakage characteristics in a short period of time (less than a day) demonstrating the capability of the system in quantifying leakage characteristics subject to complex rate behaviors. The performance of ILDS was examined under different conditions such as multiple well leakages, cap rock leakage, availability of an additional monitoring well, presence of pressure drift and noise

  2. Echocardiographic findings in patients with spontaneous CSF leak.

    PubMed

    Pimienta, Allen L; Rimoin, David L; Pariani, Mitchel; Schievink, Wouter I; Reinstein, Eyal

    2014-10-01

    The presence of cardiovascular abnormalities in patients with spontaneous cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leaks are not well-documented in the literature, as cardiovascular evaluation is not generally pursued if a patient does not exhibit additional clinical features suggesting an inherited connective tissue disorder. We aimed to assess this association, enrolling a consecutive group of 50 patients referred for spinal CSF leak consultation. Through echocardiographic evaluation and detailed medical history, we estimate that up to 20% of patients presenting with a spontaneous CSF leak may have some type of cardiovascular abnormality. Further, the increase in prevalence of aortic dilatation in our cohort was statistically significant in comparison to the estimated population prevalence. This supports a clinical basis for echocardiographic screening of these individuals for cardiovascular manifestations that may have otherwise gone unnoticed or evolved into a more severe manifestation.

  3. New Methods for Sensitivity Analysis in Chaotic, Turbulent Fluid Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blonigan, Patrick; Wang, Qiqi

    2012-11-01

    Computational methods for sensitivity analysis are invaluable tools for fluid mechanics research and engineering design. These methods are used in many applications, including aerodynamic shape optimization and adaptive grid refinement. However, traditional sensitivity analysis methods break down when applied to long-time averaged quantities in chaotic fluid flowfields, such as those obtained using high-fidelity turbulence simulations. Also, a number of dynamical properties of chaotic fluid flows, most notably the ``Butterfly Effect,'' make the formulation of new sensitivity analysis methods difficult. This talk will outline two chaotic sensitivity analysis methods. The first method, the Fokker-Planck adjoint method, forms a probability density function on the strange attractor associated with the system and uses its adjoint to find gradients. The second method, the Least Squares Sensitivity method, finds some ``shadow trajectory'' in phase space for which perturbations do not grow exponentially. This method is formulated as a quadratic programing problem with linear constraints. This talk is concluded with demonstrations of these new methods on some example problems, including the Lorenz attractor and flow around an airfoil at a high angle of attack.

  4. Sodium leak channel, non-selective contributes to the leak current in human myometrial smooth muscle cells from pregnant women

    PubMed Central

    Reinl, Erin L.; Cabeza, Rafael; Gregory, Ismail A.; Cahill, Alison G.; England, Sarah K.

    2015-01-01

    Uterine contractions are tightly regulated by the electrical activity of myometrial smooth muscle cells (MSMCs). These cells require a depolarizing current to initiate Ca2+ influx and induce contraction. Cationic leak channels, which permit a steady flow of cations into a cell, are known to cause membrane depolarization in many tissue types. Previously, a Gd3+-sensitive, Na+-dependent leak current was identified in the rat myometrium, but the presence of such a current in human MSMCs and the specific ion channel conducting this current was unknown. Here, we report the presence of a Na+-dependent leak current in human myometrium and demonstrate that the Na+-leak channel, NALCN, contributes to this current. We performed whole-cell voltage-clamp on fresh and cultured MSMCs from uterine biopsies of term, non-laboring women and isolated the leak currents by using Ca2+ and K+ channel blockers in the bath solution. Ohmic leak currents were identified in freshly isolated and cultured MSMCs with normalized conductances of 14.6 pS/pF and 10.0 pS/pF, respectively. The myometrial leak current was significantly reduced (P < 0.01) by treating cells with 10 μM Gd3+ or by superfusing the cells with a Na+-free extracellular solution. Reverse transcriptase PCR and immunoblot analysis of uterine biopsies from term, non-laboring women revealed NALCN messenger RNA and protein expression in the myometrium. Notably, ∼90% knockdown of NALCN protein expression with lentivirus-delivered shRNA reduced the Gd3+-sensitive leak current density by 42% (P < 0.05). Our results reveal that NALCN, in part, generates the leak current in MSMCs and provide the basis for future research assessing NALCN as a potential molecular target for modulating uterine excitability. PMID:26134120

  5. Sodium leak channel, non-selective contributes to the leak current in human myometrial smooth muscle cells from pregnant women.

    PubMed

    Reinl, Erin L; Cabeza, Rafael; Gregory, Ismail A; Cahill, Alison G; England, Sarah K

    2015-10-01

    Uterine contractions are tightly regulated by the electrical activity of myometrial smooth muscle cells (MSMCs). These cells require a depolarizing current to initiate Ca(2+) influx and induce contraction. Cationic leak channels, which permit a steady flow of cations into a cell, are known to cause membrane depolarization in many tissue types. Previously, a Gd(3+)-sensitive, Na(+)-dependent leak current was identified in the rat myometrium, but the presence of such a current in human MSMCs and the specific ion channel conducting this current was unknown. Here, we report the presence of a Na(+)-dependent leak current in human myometrium and demonstrate that the Na(+)-leak channel, NALCN, contributes to this current. We performed whole-cell voltage-clamp on fresh and cultured MSMCs from uterine biopsies of term, non-laboring women and isolated the leak currents by using Ca(2+) and K(+) channel blockers in the bath solution. Ohmic leak currents were identified in freshly isolated and cultured MSMCs with normalized conductances of 14.6 pS/pF and 10.0 pS/pF, respectively. The myometrial leak current was significantly reduced (P < 0.01) by treating cells with 10 μM Gd(3+) or by superfusing the cells with a Na(+)-free extracellular solution. Reverse transcriptase PCR and immunoblot analysis of uterine biopsies from term, non-laboring women revealed NALCN messenger RNA and protein expression in the myometrium. Notably, ∼90% knockdown of NALCN protein expression with lentivirus-delivered shRNA reduced the Gd(3+)-sensitive leak current density by 42% (P < 0.05). Our results reveal that NALCN, in part, generates the leak current in MSMCs and provide the basis for future research assessing NALCN as a potential molecular target for modulating uterine excitability.

  6. The ISS 2B PVTCS Ammonia Leak: An Operational History

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vareha, Anthony

    2014-01-01

    In 2006, the Photovoltaic Thermal Control System (PVTCS) for the International Space Station's 2B power channel began leaking ammonia at a rate of approximately 1.5lbm/year (out of a starting approximately 53lbm system ammonia mass). Initially, the operations strategy was "feed the leak," a strategy successfully put into action via Extra Vehicular Activity during the STS-134 mission. During this mission the system was topped off with ammonia piped over from a separate thermal control system. This recharge was to have allowed for continued power channel operation into 2014 or 2015, at which point another EVA would have been required. Without these periodic EVAs to refill the 2B coolant system, the channel would eventually leak enough fluid as to risk pump cavitation and system failure, resulting in the loss of the 2B power channel - the most critical of the Space Station's 8 power channels. In mid-2012, the leak rate increased to approximately 5lbm/year. Once discovered, an EVA was planned and executed within a 5 week timeframe to drastically alter the architecture of the PVTCS via connection to a dormant thermal control system not intended to be utilized as anything other than spare components. The purpose of this rerouting of the TCS was to increase system volume and to isolate the photovoltaic radiator, thought to be the likely leak source. This EVA was successfully executed on November 1st, 2012 and left the 2B PVTCS in a configuration where the system was now being adequately cooled via a totally different radiator than what the system was designed to utilize. Unfortunately, data monitoring over the next several months showed that the isolated radiator was not leaking, and the system itself continued to leak steadily until May 9th, 2013. It was on this day that the ISS crew noticed the visible presence of ammonia crystals escaping from the 2B channel's truss segment, signifying a rapid acceleration of the leak from 5lbm/year to 5lbm/day. Within 48 hours of the

  7. Broadband reflectance spectroscopy for establishing a quantitative metric of vascular leak using the Miles assay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMurdy, John; Reichner, Jonathan; Mathews, Zara; Markey, Mary; Intwala, Sunny; Crawford, Gregory

    2009-09-01

    Monitoring the physiological effects of biological mediators on vascular permeability is important for identifying potential targets for antivascular leak therapy. This therapy is relevant to treatments for pulmonary edema and other disorders. Current methods of quantifying vascular leak are in vitro and do not allow repeated measurement of the same animal. Using an in vivo diffuse reflectance optical method allows pharmacokinetic analysis of candidate antileak molecules. Here, vascular leak is assessed in mice and rats by using the Miles assay and introducing irritation both topically using mustard oil and intradermally using vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). The severity of the leak is assessed using broadband diffuse reflectance spectroscopy with a fiber reflectance probe. Postprocessing techniques are applied to extract an artificial quantitative metric of leak from reflectance spectra at vascular leak sites on the skin of the animal. This leak metric is calculated with respect to elapsed time from irritation in both mustard oil and VEGF treatments on mice and VEGF treatments on rats, showing a repeatable increase in leak metric with leak severity. Furthermore, effects of pressure on the leak metric are observed to have minimal effect on the reflectance spectra, while spatial positioning showed spatially nonuniform leak sites.

  8. Hydrogen leak detection in the Space Shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barile, Ronald G

    1992-01-01

    This study focuses on a helium gas jet flowing into room air. Measurements of helium concentration and velocity in the jet-air mixture are reported. The objective is to learn about jet characteristics so that dynamically similar hydrogen leaks may be located in the Space Shuttle. The hazardous gas detection system (HGDS) in the mobile launch pad uses mass spectrometers to monitor the shuttle environment for leaks. The mass spectrometers are fed by long sample tubes which draw gas from the payload bay, mid body, aft engine compartment and external tank. The overall purpose of this study is to improve the HGDS especially in its potential for locating hydrogen leaks. A rapid-response leak detection experiment was designed, built, and tested, following on the work done in this program last summer. The apparatus included a Perkin Elmer MGA-1200 mass spectrometer and air velocity transducer, both monitored by a Macintosh IIFX computer using LabVIEW software. A jet of helium flowing into the lab air simulated a gas leak. Steady helium or hydrogen-nitrogen jets were logged for concentration and velocity, and the power spectral density of each was computed. Last year, large eddies and vortices were visually seen with Schlieren imaging, and they were detected in the time plots of the various instruments. The response time of the MGA-1200 was found in the range of 0.05 to 0.1 sec. Pulsed concentration waves were clearly detected at 25 cycles per sec by spectral analysis of MGA data. No peaks were detected in the power spectrum, so in the present study, 10 Hz bandwidth-averaged power levels were examined at regular frequency intervals. The practical consequences of last year's study are as follows: sampling frequency should be increased above the present rate of 1 sample per second so that transients could be observed and analyzed with frequency response methods. Many more experiments and conditions were observed in this second summer, including the effects of orifice diameter

  9. Packaged integrated opto-fluidic solution for harmful fluid analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allenet, T.; Bucci, D.; Geoffray, F.; Canto, F.; Couston, L.; Jardinier, E.; Broquin, J.-E.

    2016-02-01

    Advances in nuclear fuel reprocessing have led to a surging need for novel chemical analysis tools. In this paper, we present a packaged lab-on-chip approach with co-integration of optical and micro-fluidic functions on a glass substrate as a solution. A chip was built and packaged to obtain light/fluid interaction in order for the entire device to make spectral measurements using the photo spectroscopy absorption principle. The interaction between the analyte solution and light takes place at the boundary between a waveguide and a fluid micro-channel thanks to the evanescent part of the waveguide's guided mode that propagates into the fluid. The waveguide was obtained via ion exchange on a glass wafer. The input and the output of the waveguides were pigtailed with standard single mode optical fibers. The micro-scale fluid channel was elaborated with a lithography procedure and hydrofluoric acid wet etching resulting in a 150+/-8 μm deep channel. The channel was designed with fluidic accesses, in order for the chip to be compatible with commercial fluidic interfaces/chip mounts. This allows for analyte fluid in external capillaries to be pumped into the device through micro-pipes, hence resulting in a fully packaged chip. In order to produce this co-integrated structure, two substrates were bonded. A study of direct glass wafer-to-wafer molecular bonding was carried-out to improve detector sturdiness and durability and put forward a bonding protocol with a bonding surface energy of γ>2.0 J.m-2. Detector viability was shown by obtaining optical mode measurements and detecting traces of 1.2 M neodymium (Nd) solute in 12+/-1 μL of 0.01 M and pH 2 nitric acid (HNO3) solvent by obtaining an absorption peak specific to neodymium at 795 nm.

  10. Application of integrated fluid-thermal-structural analysis methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wieting, Allan R.; Dechaumphai, Pramote; Bey, Kim S.; Thornton, Earl A.; Morgan, Ken

    1988-01-01

    Hypersonic vehicles operate in a hostile aerothermal environment which has a significant impact on their aerothermostructural performance. Significant coupling occurs between the aerodynamic flow field, structural heat transfer, and structural response creating a multidisciplinary interaction. Interfacing state-of-the-art disciplinary analysis methods is not efficient, hence interdisciplinary analysis methods integrated into a single aerothermostructural analyzer are needed. The NASA Langley Research Center is developing such methods in an analyzer called LIFTS (Langley Integrated Fluid-Thermal-Structural) analyzer. The evolution and status of LIFTS is reviewed and illustrated through applications.

  11. Factors affecting the location and shape of face seal leak sites on half-mask respirators.

    PubMed

    Oestenstad, Riedar Kent; Bartolucci, Alfred A

    2010-06-01

    While there have been a number of studies on the effect of leak site and shape on the magnitude of measured leakage through respirator face seals, there have been very few studies to identify the location and size of these leaks. In a previous study we used a method of identifying the location and shape of respirator leaks on a half-mask respirator by the deposition of a fluorescent tracer during a fit test, and testing for their association with facial dimensions. The purpose of this study was to apply that methodology to conduct multiple fit tests to determine if gender, respirator brand, repeated fit tests, and test exercises affected the location and shape of face seal leak sites. Categorical analysis found that none of these factors had a significant effect on the location and shape of leaks. General linear model analysis found some significant effects of the study factors on leaks, but facial dimensions had a greater effect, and there were significant differences between facial dimensions of subjects with a leak and those without. Significant differences in leak site distributions between this and the previous study may have been due to differences in facial dimensions and racial/ethnic composition. Twice as many diffuse leaks as point leaks were observed in both studies, indicating that slit-like leaks would be most appropriate on mannequins used in laboratory respirator leakage studies, and in respirator flow and penetration models. That the study factors had no significant effects in the categorical analysis, significant effects for facial dimensions were found in the linear analysis, and leak site distribution differences between this and our previous study may have been affected by differences in facial dimensions, indicate that, in addition to size, the shape of an individual's face may be an important determinant of leak sites on a half-mask respirator. This would have implications for the design of respirator facepieces and in the selection of

  12. Mapping urban pipeline leaks: methane leaks across Boston.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Nathan G; Ackley, Robert; Crosson, Eric R; Down, Adrian; Hutyra, Lucy R; Brondfield, Max; Karr, Jonathan D; Zhao, Kaiguang; Jackson, Robert B

    2013-02-01

    Natural gas is the largest source of anthropogenic emissions of methane (CH(4)) in the United States. To assess pipeline emissions across a major city, we mapped CH(4) leaks across all 785 road miles in the city of Boston using a cavity-ring-down mobile CH(4) analyzer. We identified 3356 CH(4) leaks with concentrations exceeding up to 15 times the global background level. Separately, we measured δ(13)CH(4) isotopic signatures from a subset of these leaks. The δ(13)CH(4) signatures (mean = -42.8‰ ± 1.3‰ s.e.; n = 32) strongly indicate a fossil fuel source rather than a biogenic source for most of the leaks; natural gas sampled across the city had average δ(13)CH(4) values of -36.8‰ (± 0.7‰ s.e., n = 10), whereas CH(4) collected from landfill sites, wetlands, and sewer systems had δ(13)CH(4) signatures ~20‰ lighter (μ = -57.8‰, ± 1.6‰ s.e., n = 8). Repairing leaky natural gas distribution systems will reduce greenhouse gas emissions, increase consumer health and safety, and save money.

  13. A Multi Fluid Analysis of the Ignition Criterion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guazzotto, Luca; Betti, Riccardo

    2016-10-01

    In magnetic confinement nuclear fusion experiments, performance with respect to ignition is expressed in terms of the Lawson criterion, a zero-dimensional, single-fluid, steady-state power balance expressing the plasma properties needed for ignition through the energy confinement time τE and the plasma temperature and density. Several improvements to the classical criterion are investigated. Ions, electrons and α particles are allowed to have different energy confinement times and energy coupling times are expressed through physics-based relations. The effect of multi-fluid physics is examined in a steady-state analysis and for the time-dependent case, which requires a nonlinear treatment more detailed than the standard `` Ṫ vs . T'' single-fluid one. A one-dimensional analysis is also considered to investigate the importance of density and temperature profiles on the τE needed for ignition. Rather than by solving the 1D transport equations, this is done with a parametric study. This work was performed under DOE Grant DE-FG02-93ER54215.

  14. Model reduction for parametric instability analysis in shells conveying fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kochupillai, Jayaraj; Ganesan, N.; Padmanabhan, Chandramouli

    2003-05-01

    Flexible pipes conveying fluid are often subjected to parametric excitation due to time-periodic flow fluctuations. Such systems are known to exhibit complex instability phenomena such as divergence and coupled-mode flutter. Investigators have typically used weighted residual techniques, to reduce the continuous system model into a discrete model, based on approximation functions with global support, for carrying out stability analysis. While this approach is useful for straight pipes, modelling based on FEM is needed for the study of complicated piping systems, where the approximation functions used are local in support. However, the size of the problem is now significantly larger and for computationally efficient stability analysis, model reduction is necessary. In this paper, model reduction techniques are developed for the analysis of parametric instability in flexible pipes conveying fluids under a mean pressure. It is shown that only those linear transformations which leave the original eigenvalues of the linear time invariant system unchanged are admissible. The numerical technique developed by Friedmann and Hammond (Int. J. Numer. Methods Eng. Efficient 11 (1997) 1117) is used for the stability analysis. One of the key research issues is to establish criteria for deciding the basis vectors essential for an accurate stability analysis. This paper examines this issue in detail and proposes new guidelines for their selection.

  15. Coupling analysis of fluid-structure interaction in fluid-filled elbow pipe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, W. W.; Wu, D. Z.; Wang, L. Q.

    2012-11-01

    Fluid in the ship pipeline, due to power equipment components (such as impellers, plungers, etc.) and valves, will induce turbulence, cavitations, which generate high-frequency vibration excitation lines. The measurements results show that fluid-induced vibration of the pipeline is not only confined to the pipeline, but also have an impact on the hull structure. Pipe vibration due to transient flow is very common in marine pipe system Thus fluid-structure interaction problems in shipping lines is being paid more and more attention. In this paper, the fluid-filled elbow pipe is simulated considering fluid-structure interaction (FSI) by the software ADINA. And the simulation results are validated through comparison with results obtained by other numerical solution. The results show that FSI affects the pipe-filled-water modal frequencies seriously, but have little effects on pipe vibration shapes, and the free vibration frequency of the fluid-filled pipe is lower than that of empty pipe. The pipe vibration amplitude and effective stress caused by fluid increase as the fluid velocity increase. Pipe continues vibrating after fluid velocity is steady, and the vibration is dispersing as time increase. The protection against vibration near the elbow is important because the maximum pipe deformation caused by fluid near the elbow. The maximum effective stress increases from 0 to 1.4MPa due to the fluid velocity increases from 0 to 20m/s in 5 seconds. So it is necessary to consider the FSI for fluid-filled pipe.

  16. Passive vapor monitoring of underground storage tanks for leak detection.

    PubMed

    Weber, D; Schwille, F

    1991-02-01

    Passive vapor monitoring of underground storage tanks (USTs) containing volatile hydrocarbons at locations external to the tank (an external system) is touted as a fast and effective method of leak detection. However, major gaps remain in our knowledge of the physical processes that relate a measured vapor concentration to the leak rate, thus making network design according to a quantitative design criterion nearly impossible, and differentiation between surface spills and a leaking UST requires certain levels of sophistication in the leak detection system and in the analysis that are not usually available. Heavier-than-air vapors from the constituents of stored hydrocarbons could result in a density-driven convective propagation component that complicates the design of leak detection systems, and finally, detection times are highly sensitive to concentration detection threshold levels set by the system. The use of inadequate systems and analyses can lead to either wasted efforts or excessive subsurface contamination. This paper discusses the physical processes involved, explores the above aspects of external passive vapor leak detection design, and suggests some alternatives as they pertain to gasoline service stations.

  17. Variable gas leak rate valve

    DOEpatents

    Eernisse, Errol P.; Peterson, Gary D.

    1976-01-01

    A variable gas leak rate valve which utilizes a poled piezoelectric element to control opening and closing of the valve. The gas flow may be around a cylindrical rod with a tubular piezoelectric member encircling the rod for seating thereagainst to block passage of gas and for reopening thereof upon application of suitable electrical fields.

  18. Ryanodine receptors as leak channels.

    PubMed

    Guerrero-Hernández, Agustín; Ávila, Guillermo; Rueda, Angélica

    2014-09-15

    Ryanodine receptors are Ca(2+) release channels of internal stores. This review focuses on those situations and conditions that transform RyRs from a finely regulated ion channel to an unregulated Ca(2+) leak channel and the pathological consequences of this alteration. In skeletal muscle, mutations in either CaV1.1 channel or RyR1 results in a leaky behavior of the latter. In heart cells, RyR2 functions normally as a Ca(2+) leak channel during diastole within certain limits, the enhancement of this activity leads to arrhythmogenic situations that are tackled with different pharmacological strategies. In smooth muscle, RyRs are involved more in reducing excitability than in stimulating contraction so the leak activity of RyRs in the form of Ca(2+) sparks, locally activates Ca(2+)-dependent potassium channels to reduce excitability. In neurons the enhanced activity of RyRs is associated with the development of different neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer and Huntington diseases. It appears then that the activity of RyRs as leak channels can have both physiological and pathological consequences depending on the cell type and the metabolic condition.

  19. Pipe Leak Detection Technology Development

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U. S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has determined that one of the nation’s biggest infrastructural needs is the replacement or rehabilitation of the water distribution and transmission systems. The institution of more effective pipe leak detection technology will im...

  20. Optical Detection Of Cryogenic Leaks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wyett, Lynn M.

    1988-01-01

    Conceptual system identifies leakage without requiring shutdown for testing. Proposed device detects and indicates leaks of cryogenic liquids automatically. Detector makes it unnecessary to shut equipment down so it can be checked for leakage by soap-bubble or helium-detection methods. Not necessary to mix special gases or other materials with cryogenic liquid flowing through equipment.

  1. LOCATING LEAKS WITH ACOUSTIC TECHNOLOGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Many water distribution systems in this country are almost 100 years old. About 26 percent of piping in these systems is made of unlined cast iron or steel and is in poor condition. Many methods that locate leaks in these pipes are time-consuming, costly, disruptive to operations...

  2. Area Monitoring for Detection of Leaks and/or Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mian, Zahid F. (Inventor); Gamache, Ronald W. (Inventor); Glasser, Nick (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A solution for monitoring an area for the presence of a flame and/or a leak, such as from a pressurized fluid, is provided. An imaging device can be used that acquires image data based on electromagnetic radiation having wavelengths only corresponding to at least one region of the electromagnetic spectrum in which electromagnetic radiation from an ambient light source is less than the electromagnetic radiation emitted by at least one type of flame for which the presence within the area is being monitored. An acoustic device can be used that is configured to acquire acoustic data for the area and enhance acoustic signals in a range of frequencies corresponding to a leak of a pressurized fluid present in the area.

  3. Proteome analysis of digestive fluids in Nepenthes pitchers

    PubMed Central

    Rottloff, Sandy; Miguel, Sissi; Biteau, Flore; Nisse, Estelle; Hammann, Philippe; Kuhn, Lauriane; Chicher, Johana; Bazile, Vincent; Gaume, Laurence; Mignard, Benoit; Hehn, Alain; Bourgaud, Frédéric

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims Carnivorous plants have developed strategies to enable growth in nutrient-poor soils. For the genus Nepenthes, this strategy represents producing pitcher-modified leaves that can trap and digest various prey. These pitchers produce a digestive fluid composed of proteins, including hydrolytic enzymes. The focus of this study was on the identification of these proteins. Methods In order to better characterize and have an overview of these proteins, digestive fluid was sampled from pitchers at different stages of maturity from five species of Nepenthes (N. mirabilis, N. alata, N. sanguinea, N. bicalcarata and N. albomarginata) that vary in their ecological niches and grew under different conditions. Three complementary approaches based on transcriptomic resources, mass spectrometry and in silico analysis were used. Key Results This study permitted the identification of 29 proteins excreted in the pitchers. Twenty of these proteins were never reported in Nepenthes previously and included serine carboxypeptidases, α- and β-galactosidases, lipid transfer proteins and esterases/lipases. These 20 proteins display sequence signals allowing their secretion into the pitcher fluid. Conclusions Nepenthes pitcher plants have evolved an arsenal of enzymes to digest prey caught in their traps. The panel of new proteins identified in this study provides new insights into the digestive process of these carnivorous plants. PMID:26912512

  4. Rapid leak detection with liquid crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heisman, R. M.; Iceland, W. F.; Ruppe, E. P.

    1978-01-01

    Small leaks in vacuum lines are detected by applying liquid-crystal coating, warming suspected area, and observing color change due to differential cooling by leak jet. Technique is used on inside or outside walls of vacuum-jacketed lines.

  5. Fluid Dynamic and Stability Analysis of a Thin Liquid Sheet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McMaster, Matthew S.

    1992-01-01

    Interest in thin sheet flows has recently been renewed due to their potential application in space radiators. Theoretical and experimental studies of the fluid dynamics and stability of thin liquid sheet flows have been carried out in this thesis. A computer program was developed to determine the cross-sectional shape of the edge cylinder given the cross-sectional area of the edge cylinder. A stability analysis was performed on a non-planer liquid sheet. A study was conducted to determine the effects of air resistance on the sheet.

  6. Standard Leak Calibration Facility software system

    SciTech Connect

    McClain, S.K.

    1989-06-01

    A Standard Leak Calibration Facility Software System has been developed and implemented for controlling, and running a standard Leak Calibration Facility. Primary capabilities provided by the software system include computer control of the vacuum system, automatic leak calibration, and data acquisition, manipulation, and storage.

  7. Sensitivities of Soap Solutions in Leak Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stuck, D.; Lam, D. Q.; Daniels, C.

    1985-01-01

    Document describes method for determining minimum leak rate to which soap-solution leak detectors sensitive. Bubbles formed at smaller leak rates than previously assumed. In addition to presenting test results, document discusses effects of joint-flange configurations, properties of soap solutions, and correlation of test results with earlier data.

  8. [Present status and trend of heart fluid mechanics research based on medical image analysis].

    PubMed

    Gan, Jianhong; Yin, Lixue; Xie, Shenghua; Li, Wenhua; Lu, Jing; Luo, Anguo

    2014-06-01

    With introduction of current main methods for heart fluid mechanics researches, we studied the characteristics and weakness for three primary analysis methods based on magnetic resonance imaging, color Doppler ultrasound and grayscale ultrasound image, respectively. It is pointed out that particle image velocity (PIV), speckle tracking and block match have the same nature, and three algorithms all adopt block correlation. The further analysis shows that, with the development of information technology and sensor, the research for cardiac function and fluid mechanics will focus on energy transfer process of heart fluid, characteristics of Chamber wall related to blood fluid and Fluid-structure interaction in the future heart fluid mechanics fields.

  9. Efficient randomized methods for stability analysis of fluids systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawson, Scott; Rowley, Clarence

    2016-11-01

    We show that probabilistic algorithms that have recently been developed for the approximation of large matrices can be utilized to numerically evaluate the properties of linear operators in fluids systems. In particular, we present an algorithm that is well suited for optimal transient growth (i.e., nonmodal stability) analysis. For non-normal systems, such analysis can be important for analyzing local regions of convective instability, and in identifying high-amplitude transients that can trigger nonlinear instabilities. Our proposed algorithms are easy to wrap around pre-existing timesteppers for linearized forward and adjoint equations, are highly parallelizable, and come with known error bounds. Furthermore, they allow for efficient computation of optimal growth modes for numerous time horizons simultaneously. We compare the proposed algorithm to both direct matrix-forming and Krylov subspace approaches on a number of test problems. We will additionally discuss the potential for randomized methods to assist more broadly in the speed-up of algorithms for analyzing both fluids data and operators. Supported by AFOSR Grant FA9550-14-1-0289.

  10. Fiber optic distributed chemical sensor for the real time detection of hydrocarbon fuel leaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendoza, Edgar; Kempen, C.; Esterkin, Yan; Sun, Sunjian

    2015-09-01

    With the increase worldwide demand for hydrocarbon fuels and the vast development of new fuel production and delivery infrastructure installations around the world, there is a growing need for reliable hydrocarbon fuel leak detection technologies to provide safety and reduce environmental risks. Hydrocarbon leaks (gas or liquid) pose an extreme danger and need to be detected very quickly to avoid potential disasters. Gas leaks have the greatest potential for causing damage due to the explosion risk from the dispersion of gas clouds. This paper describes progress towards the development of a fast response, high sensitivity, distributed fiber optic fuel leak detection (HySense™) system based on the use of an optical fiber that uses a hydrocarbon sensitive fluorescent coating to detect the presence of fuel leaks present in close proximity along the length of the sensor fiber. The HySense™ system operates in two modes, leak detection and leak localization, and will trigger an alarm within seconds of exposure contact. The fast and accurate response of the sensor provides reliable fluid leak detection for pipelines, storage tanks, airports, pumps, and valves to detect and minimize any potential catastrophic damage.

  11. An optical sensor for the detection of leaks from subsea pipelines and risers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McStay, D.; Kerlin, J.; Acheson, R.

    2007-07-01

    An optical sensor for the rapid detection of detect leaks of oil, hydraulic fluids or leak detection chemicals from underwater pipelines and risers is reported. The sensor is designed to be deployed on ROVs or AUVs for the rapid survey of underwater pipelines and risers. The system employs ultra-bright LEDs to project a sensing light beam into the water to allow real time detection of ppm concentration plumes of material leaking from pipelines or riser in real time. Typically the system is deployed on an ROV which inspects a pipeline at a height of 2-3m.

  12. Precision blood-leak detector with high long-time stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgiadis, Christos; Kleuver, Wolfram

    1999-11-01

    With this publication a precision blood-leak-detector is presented. The blood-leak-detector is used for recognition of fractures in the dialyzer of a kidney-machine. It has to detect safely a blood flow of ml/min to exclude any risk for the patient. A lot of systems exist for blood-leak-detection. All of them use the same principle. They detect the light absorption in the dialyze fluid. The actual used detectors are inferior to the new developed sensor in resolution and long-time stability. Regular test of the existing systems and high failure rates are responsible for the high maintenance.

  13. Two-fluid analysis of dimensionally similar discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Luce, T.C.; Petty, C.C.

    1994-12-01

    The concept of dimensionless scaling introduces the possibility of determining the required size for a fusion reactor based on data from a single machine. Specifically, all dimensionless quantities other than the normalized gyroradius {rho}* can be simultaneously matched to reactor values in present-day tokamaks. Experiments on DIII-D show that the electrons and ions have distinct {rho}* scalings--for electrons {chi} {proportional_to} {rho}*, while {chi} {proportional_to} {rho}*{sup {minus}1/2} for ions. This observation can unify previous results based on single-fluid analysis, and, in addition, illustrates the danger of using such analysis to extrapolate to a reactor. The {rho}* scaling, coupled with technological limits on the magnetic field strength, determines the minimum size for a reactor. If these {rho}* scalings found on DIII-D hold under reactor-relevant conditions, the confinement will scale unfavorably as {rho}* is reduced to the values expected in a reactor.

  14. Peptidome Analysis of Cerebrospinal Fluid by LC-MALDI MS

    PubMed Central

    Hölttä, Mikko; Zetterberg, Henrik; Mirgorodskaya, Ekaterina; Mattsson, Niklas; Blennow, Kaj; Gobom, Johan

    2012-01-01

    We report on the analysis of endogenous peptides in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) by mass spectrometry. A method was developed for preparation of peptide extracts from CSF. Analysis of the extracts by offline LC-MALDI MS resulted in the detection of 3,000–4,000 peptide-like features. Out of these, 730 peptides were identified by MS/MS. The majority of these peptides have not been previously reported in CSF. The identified peptides were found to originate from 104 proteins, of which several have been reported to be involved in different disorders of the central nervous system. These results support the notion that CSF peptidomics may be viable complement to proteomics in the search of biomarkers of CNS disorders. PMID:22880031

  15. Modern wing flutter analysis by computational fluid dynamics methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cunningham, Herbert J.; Batina, John T.; Bennett, Robert M.

    1988-01-01

    The application and assessment of the recently developed CAP-TSD transonic small-disturbance code for flutter prediction is described. The CAP-TSD code has been developed for aeroelastic analysis of complete aircraft configurations and was previously applied to the calculation of steady and unsteady pressures with favorable results. Generalized aerodynamic forces and flutter characteristics are calculated and compared with linear theory results and with experimental data for a 45 deg sweptback wing. These results are in good agreement with the experimental flutter data which is the first step toward validating CAP-TSD for general transonic aeroelastic applications. The paper presents these results and comparisons along with general remarks regarding modern wing flutter analysis by computational fluid dynamics methods.

  16. Hydrogen Leak Detection Sensor Database

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, Barton D.

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the characteristics of the Hydrogen Sensor database. The database is the result of NASA's continuing interest in and improvement of its ability to detect and assess gas leaks in space applications. The database specifics and a snapshot of an entry in the database are reviewed. Attempts were made to determine the applicability of each of the 65 sensors for ground and/or vehicle use.

  17. A Hydrazine Leak Sensor Based on Chemically Reactive Thermistors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Dennis D.; Mast, Dion J.; Baker, David L.

    1999-01-01

    Leaks in the hydrazine supply system of the Shuttle APU can result in hydrazine ignition and fire in the aft compartment of the Shuttle. Indication of the location of a leak could provide valuable information required for operational decisions. WSTF has developed a small, single use sensor for detection of hydrazine leaks. The sensor is composed of a thermistor bead coated with copper(II) oxide (CuO) dispersed in a clay or alumina binder. The CuO-coated thermistor is one of a pair of closely located thermistors, the other being a reference. On exposure to hydrazine the CuO reacts exothermically with the hydrazine and increases the temperature of the coated-thermistor by several degrees. The temperature rise is sensed by a resistive bridge circuit and an alarm registered by data acquisition software. Responses of this sensor to humidity changes, hydrazine concentration, binder characteristics, distance from a liquid leak, and ambient pressure levels as well as application of this sensor concept to other fluids are presented.

  18. Schlieren optics for leak detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peale, Robert E.; Ruffin, Alranzo B.

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to develop an optical method of leak detection. Various modifications of schlieren optics were explored with initial emphasis on leak detection of the plumbing within the orbital maneuvering system of the space shuttle (OMS pod). The schlieren scheme envisioned for OMS pod leak detection was that of a high contrast pattern on flexible reflecting material imaged onto a negative of the same pattern. We find that the OMS pod geometry constrains the characteristic length scale of the pattern to the order of 0.001 inch. Our experiments suggest that optical modulation transfer efficiency will be very low for such patterns, which will limit the sensitivity of the technique. Optical elements which allow a negative of the scene to be reversibly recorded using light from the scene itself were explored for their potential in adaptive single-ended schlieren systems. Elements studied include photochromic glass, bacteriorhodopsin, and a transmissive liquid crystal display. The dynamics of writing and reading patterns were studied using intensity profiles from recorded images. Schlieren detection of index gradients in air was demonstrated.

  19. Leak Path Development in CO2 Wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torsater, M.; Todorovic, J.; Opedal, N.; Lavrov, A.

    2014-12-01

    Wells have in numerous scientific works been denoted the "weak link" of safe and cost-efficient CO2 Capture and Storage (CCS). Whether they are active or abandoned, all wells are man-made intrusions into the storage reservoir with sealing abilities depending on degradable materials like steel and cement. If dense CO2 is allowed to expand (e.g. due to leakage) it will cool down its surroundings and cause strong thermal and mechanical loading on the wellbore. In addition, CO2 reacts chemically with rock, cement and steel. To ensure long-term underground containment, it is therefore necessary to study how, why, where and when leakage occurs along CO2wells. If cement bonding to rock or casing is poor, leak paths can form already during drilling and completion of the well. In the present work, we have mapped the bonding quality of cement-rock and cement-steel interfaces - and measured their resistance towards CO2 flow. This involved a large experimental matrix including different rocks, steels, cement types and well fluids. The bonding qualities were measured on composite cores using micro computed tomography (µ-CT), and CO2 was flooded through the samples to determine leakage rates. These were further compared to numerical simulations of leakage through the digitalized µ-CT core data, and CO2chemical interactions with the materials were mapped using electron microscopy. We also present a new laboratory set-up for measuring how well integrity is affected by downhole temperature variations - and we showcase some initial results. Our work concludes that leak path development in CO2 wells depends critically on the drilling fluids and presflushes/spacers chosen already during drilling and completion of a well. Fluid films residing on rock and casing surfaces strongly degrade the quality of cement bonding. The operation of the well is also important, as even slight thermal cycling (between 10°C and 95°C on casing) leads to significant de-bonding of the annular cement.

  20. Aerodynamic design optimization using sensitivity analysis and computational fluid dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baysal, Oktay; Eleshaky, Mohamed E.

    1991-01-01

    A new and efficient method is presented for aerodynamic design optimization, which is based on a computational fluid dynamics (CFD)-sensitivity analysis algorithm. The method is applied to design a scramjet-afterbody configuration for an optimized axial thrust. The Euler equations are solved for the inviscid analysis of the flow, which in turn provides the objective function and the constraints. The CFD analysis is then coupled with the optimization procedure that uses a constrained minimization method. The sensitivity coefficients, i.e. gradients of the objective function and the constraints, needed for the optimization are obtained using a quasi-analytical method rather than the traditional brute force method of finite difference approximations. During the one-dimensional search of the optimization procedure, an approximate flow analysis (predicted flow) based on a first-order Taylor series expansion is used to reduce the computational cost. Finally, the sensitivity of the optimum objective function to various design parameters, which are kept constant during the optimization, is computed to predict new optimum solutions. The flow analysis of the demonstrative example are compared with the experimental data. It is shown that the method is more efficient than the traditional methods.

  1. Fluid Structure Interaction Analysis on Sidewall Aneurysm Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Qing

    2016-11-01

    Wall shear stress is considered as an important factor for cerebral aneurysm growth and rupture. The objective of present study is to evaluate wall shear stress in aneurysm sac and neck by a fluid-structure-interaction (FSI) model, which was developed and validated against the particle image velocimetry (PIV) data. In this FSI model, the flow characteristics in a straight tube with different asymmetric aneurysm sizes over a range of Reynolds numbers from 200 to 1600 were investigated. The FSI results agreed well with PIV data. It was found that at steady flow conditions, when Reynolds number above 700, one large recirculating vortex would be formed, occupying the entire aneurysm sac. The center of the vortex is located at region near to the distal neck. A pair of counter rotating vortices would however be formed at Reynolds number below 700. Wall shear stresses reached highest level at the distal neck of the aneurysmal sac. The vortex strength, in general, is stronger at higher Reynolds number. Fluid Structure Interaction Analysis on Sidewall Aneurysm Models.

  2. Application of Control Volume Analysis to Cerebrospinal Fluid Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Timothy; Cohen, Benjamin; Anor, Tomer; Madsen, Joseph

    2011-11-01

    Hydrocephalus is among the most common birth defects and may not be prevented nor cured. Afflicted individuals face serious issues, which at present are too complicated and not well enough understood to treat via systematic therapies. This talk outlines the framework and application of a control volume methodology to clinical Phase Contrast MRI data. Specifically, integral control volume analysis utilizes a fundamental, fluid dynamics methodology to quantify intracranial dynamics within a precise, direct, and physically meaningful framework. A chronically shunted, hydrocephalic patient in need of a revision procedure was used as an in vivo case study. Magnetic resonance velocity measurements within the patient's aqueduct were obtained in four biomedical state and were analyzed using the methods presented in this dissertation. Pressure force estimates were obtained, showing distinct differences in amplitude, phase, and waveform shape for different intracranial states within the same individual. Thoughts on the physiological and diagnostic research and development implications/opportunities will be presented.

  3. Optoelectronic leak detection system for monitoring subsea structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moodie, D.,; Costello, L.; McStay, D.

    2010-04-01

    Leak detection and monitoring on subsea structures is an area of increasing interest for the detection and monitoring of production and control fluids for the oil and gas industry. Current techniques such as capacitive (dielectric) based measurement or passive acoustic systems have limitations and we report here an optoelectronic solution based upon fluorescence spectroscopy to provide a permanent monitoring solution. We report here a new class of optoelectronic subsea sensor for permanent, real time monitoring of hydrocarbon production systems. The system is capable of detecting small leaks of production or hydraulic fluid (ppm levels) over distances of 4-5 meters in a subsea environment. Ideally systems designed for such applications should be capable of working at depths of up to 3000m unattended for periods of 20+ years. The system uses advanced single emitter LED technology to meet the challenges of lifetime, power consumption, spatial coverage and delivery of a cost effective solution. The system is designed for permanent deployment on Christmas tree (XT), subsea processing systems (SPS) and associated equipment to provide enhanced leak detection capability.

  4. Proteomics analysis of bodily fluids in pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Sheng; Brentnall, Teresa A.; Chen, Ru

    2015-01-01

    Proteomics study of pancreatic cancer using bodily fluids emphasizes biomarker discovery and clinical application, presenting unique prospect and challenges. Depending on the physiological nature of the bodily fluid and its proximity to pancreatic cancer, the proteomes of bodily fluids, such as pancreatic juice, pancreatic cyst fluid, blood, bile and urine, can be substantially different in terms of protein constitution and the dynamic range of protein concentration. Thus, a comprehensive discovery and specific detection of cancer-associated proteins within these varied fluids is a complex task, requiring rigorous experiment design and a concerted approach. While major challenges still remain, fluid proteomics studies in pancreatic cancer to date have provided a wealth of information in revealing proteome alterations associated with pancreatic cancer in various bodily fluids. PMID:25780901

  5. [Where is a leak point detected by "the low flow leak test" of anesthetic machines?].

    PubMed

    Omija, K; Tokumine, J; Iha, H; Uehara, M; Nitta, K; Okuda, Y

    1997-10-01

    "The low flow leak test" is recommended for pre-anesthetic inspection of anesthetic machines. We carried out anesthesia compression tests as a standard. Even in that case, often the low flow leak test does not meet the standard. We investigated the point where there is a leak in the anesthetic machine. Observing the leak that fluctuates each time there is detachment or attachment of the canister, the primary cause of the leak is thought to be related to the canister. It is important to carry out an inspection of the canister if the low flow leak test does not meet the standard.

  6. Proceedings of the Eighth Annual Thermal and Fluids Analysis Workshop: Spacecraft Analysis and Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, Todd (Editor); Saiz, John (Editor)

    1997-01-01

    This document contains papers presented at the Eighth Annual Thermal and Fluids Analysis Workshop (TFAWS) on Spacecraft Analysis and Design hosted by the NASA/Johnson Space Center (JSC) on September 8-11, 1997, and held at the University of Houston - Clear Lake (UHCL) in the Bayou Building. The Workshop was sponsored by NASA/JSC. Seminars were hosted and technical papers were provided in fluid and thermal dynamics. Seminars were given in GASP, SINDA, SINAPS Plus, TSS, and PHOENICS. Seventeen papers were presented.

  7. Vacuum leak detector and method

    DOEpatents

    Edwards, Jr., David

    1983-01-01

    Apparatus and method for detecting leakage in a vacuum system involves a moisture trap chamber connected to the vacuum system and to a pressure gauge. Moisture in the trap chamber is captured by freezing or by a moisture adsorbent to reduce the residual water vapor pressure therein to a negligible amount. The pressure gauge is then read to determine whether the vacuum system is leaky. By directing a stream of carbon dioxide or helium at potentially leaky parts of the vacuum system, the apparatus can be used with supplemental means to locate leaks.

  8. Analysis of Drafting Effects in Swimming Using Computational Fluid Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Silva, António José; Rouboa, Abel; Moreira, António; Reis, Victor Machado; Alves, Francisco; Vilas-Boas, João Paulo; Marinho, Daniel Almeida

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of drafting distance on the drag coefficient in swimming. A k-epsilon turbulent model was implemented in the commercial code Fluent® and applied to the fluid flow around two swimmers in a drafting situation. Numerical simulations were conducted for various distances between swimmers (0.5-8.0 m) and swimming velocities (1.6-2.0 m.s-1). Drag coefficient (Cd) was computed for each one of the distances and velocities. We found that the drag coefficient of the leading swimmer decreased as the flow velocity increased. The relative drag coefficient of the back swimmer was lower (about 56% of the leading swimmer) for the smallest inter-swimmer distance (0.5 m). This value increased progressively until the distance between swimmers reached 6.0 m, where the relative drag coefficient of the back swimmer was about 84% of the leading swimmer. The results indicated that the Cd of the back swimmer was equal to that of the leading swimmer at distances ranging from 6.45 to 8. 90 m. We conclude that these distances allow the swimmers to be in the same hydrodynamic conditions during training and competitions. Key pointsThe drag coefficient of the leading swimmer decreased as the flow velocity increased.The relative drag coefficient of the back swimmer was least (about 56% of the leading swimmer) for the smallest inter-swimmer distance (0.5 m).The drag coefficient values of both swimmers in drafting were equal to distances ranging between 6.45 m and 8.90 m, considering the different flow velocities.The numerical simulation techniques could be a good approach to enable the analysis of the fluid forces around objects in water, as it happens in swimming. PMID:24150135

  9. JTMIX - CRYOGENIC MIXED FLUID JOULE-THOMSON ANALYSIS PROGRAM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, J. A.

    1994-01-01

    JTMIX was written to allow the prediction of both ideal and realistic properties of mixed gases in the 65-80K temperature range. It allows mixed gas J-T analysis for any fluid combination of neon, nitrogen, various hydrocarbons, argon, oxygen, carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, and hydrogen sulfide. When used in conjunction with the NIST computer program DDMIX, JTMIX has accurately predicted order-of-magnitude increases in J-T cooling capacities when various hydrocarbons are added to nitrogen, and it predicts nitrogen normal boiling point depressions to as low as 60K when neon is added. JTMIX searches for heat exchanger "pinch points" that can result from insolubility of various components in each other. These points result in numerical solutions that cannot exist. The length of the heat exchanger is searched for such points and, if they exist, the user is warned and the temperatures and heat exchanger effectiveness are corrected to provide a real solution. JTMIX gives very good correlation (within data accuracy) to mixed gas data published by the USSR and data taken by APD for the U.S. Naval Weapons Lab. Data taken at JPL also confirms JTMIX for all cases tested. JTMIX is written in Turbo C for IBM PC compatible computers running MS-DOS. The National Institute of Standards and Technology's (NIST, Gaithersburg, MD, 301-975-2208) computer code DDMIX is required to provide mixed-fluid enthalpy data which is input into JTMIX. The standard distribution medium for this program is a 5.25 inch 360K MS-DOS format diskette. JTMIX was developed in 1991 and is a copyrighted work with all copyright vested in NASA.

  10. 10 CFR 36.59 - Detection of leaking sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... alarm set-point to a higher level if necessary to operate the pool water purification system to clean up... certificate from a transferor that leak test has been done within the 6 months before the transfer. Water from... either by using a radiation monitor on a pool water circulating system or by analysis of a sample of...

  11. 10 CFR 36.59 - Detection of leaking sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... alarm set-point to a higher level if necessary to operate the pool water purification system to clean up... certificate from a transferor that leak test has been done within the 6 months before the transfer. Water from... either by using a radiation monitor on a pool water circulating system or by analysis of a sample of...

  12. 10 CFR 36.59 - Detection of leaking sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... alarm set-point to a higher level if necessary to operate the pool water purification system to clean up... certificate from a transferor that leak test has been done within the 6 months before the transfer. Water from... either by using a radiation monitor on a pool water circulating system or by analysis of a sample of...

  13. 10 CFR 36.59 - Detection of leaking sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... alarm set-point to a higher level if necessary to operate the pool water purification system to clean up... certificate from a transferor that leak test has been done within the 6 months before the transfer. Water from... either by using a radiation monitor on a pool water circulating system or by analysis of a sample of...

  14. 10 CFR 36.59 - Detection of leaking sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... alarm set-point to a higher level if necessary to operate the pool water purification system to clean up... certificate from a transferor that leak test has been done within the 6 months before the transfer. Water from... either by using a radiation monitor on a pool water circulating system or by analysis of a sample of...

  15. Valve leak detection for maintenance and thermal performance

    SciTech Connect

    Dimmick, J.G.; Mills, W.H.

    1988-01-01

    The theory and practical applications of the acoustic valve leak analyzer (AVLA) are discussed in this paper. Test procedures, analysis techniques, limitations, and results are presented, along with several case histories. It also presents information on check valve applications, which are routine for marine steam plants, but only recently of interest to utility engineers.

  16. Long-life leak standard assembly

    DOEpatents

    Basford, James A.; Mathis, John E.; Wright, Harlan C.

    1982-01-01

    The present invention is directed to a portable leak standard assembly which is capable of providing a stream of high-purity reference gas at a virtually constant flow rate over an extensive period of time. The leak assembly comprises a high pressure reservoir coupled to a metal leak valve through a valve-controlled conduit. A reproducible leak valve useful in this assembly is provided by a metal tube crimped with a selected pressure loading for forming an orifice in the tube with this orifice being of a sufficient size to provide the selected flow rate. The leak valve assembly is formed of metal so that it can be "baked-out" in a vacuum furnace to rid the reservoir and attendent components of volatile impurities which reduce the efficiency of the leak standard.

  17. Digital analysis of wind tunnel imagery to measure fluid thickness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Easton, Roger L., Jr.; Enge, James

    1992-01-01

    Documented here are the procedure and results obtained from the application of digital image processing techniques to the problem of measuring the thickness of a deicing fluid on a model airfoil during simulated takeoffs. The fluid contained a fluorescent dye and the images were recorded under flash illumination on photographic film. The films were digitized and analyzed on a personal computer to obtain maps of the fluid thickness.

  18. Functional analysis of insect molting fluid proteins on the protection and regulation of ecdysis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jie; Lu, Anrui; Kong, Lulu; Zhang, Qiaoli; Ling, Erjun

    2014-12-26

    Molting fluid accumulates between the old and new cuticles during periodical ecdysis in Ecdysozoa. Natural defects in insect ecdysis are frequently associated with melanization (an immunity response) occurring primarily in molting fluids, suggesting that molting fluid may impact immunity as well as affect ecdysis. To address this hypothesis, proteomic analysis of molting fluids from Bombyx mori during three different types of ecdysis was performed. Many proteins were newly identified, including immunity-related proteins, in each molting fluid. Molting fluids inhibited the growth of bacteria in vitro. The entomopathogenic fungi Beauveria bassiana, which can escape immune responses in feeding larvae, is quickly recognized by larvae during ecdysis, followed by melanization in molting fluid and old cuticle. Fungal conidia germination was delayed, and no hyphae were detected in the hemocoels of pharate instar insects. Molting fluids protect the delicate pharate instar insects with extremely thin cuticles against microorganisms. To explore the function of molting fluids in ecdysis regulation, based on protein similarity, 32 genes were selected for analysis in ecdysis regulation through RNAi in Tribolium castaneum, a model commonly used to study integument development because RNAi is difficult to achieve in B. mori. We identified 24 molting proteins that affected ecdysis after knockdown, with different physiological functions, including old cuticle protein recycling, molting fluid pressure balance, detoxification, and signal detection and transfer of molting fluids. We report that insects secrete molting fluid for protection and regulation of ecdysis, which indicates a way to develop new pesticides through interrupting insect ecdysis in the future.

  19. Leak detection using structure-borne noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holland, Stephen D. (Inventor); Chimenti, Dale E. (Inventor); Roberts, Ronald A. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A method for detection and location of air leaks in a pressure vessel, such as a spacecraft, includes sensing structure-borne ultrasound waveforms associated with turbulence caused by a leak from a plurality of sensors and cross correlating the waveforms to determine existence and location of the leak. Different configurations of sensors and corresponding methods can be used. An apparatus for performing the methods is also provided.

  20. Comparative Proteomic Analysis of Yak Follicular Fluid during Estrus.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xian; Pei, Jie; Ding, Xuezhi; Chu, Min; Bao, Pengjia; Wu, Xiaoyun; Liang, Chunnian; Yan, Ping

    2016-09-01

    The breeding of yaks is highly seasonal, there are many crucial proteins involved in the reproduction control program, especially in follicular development. In order to isolate differential proteins between mature and immature follicular fluid (FF) of yak, the FF from yak follicles with different sizes were sampled respectively, and two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) of the proteins was carried out. After silver staining, the Image Master 2D platinum software was used for protein analysis and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS) was performed for differential protein identification. The expression level of transferrin and enolase superfamily member 1 (ENOSF1) was determined by Western blotting for verification analysis. The results showed that 2-DE obtained an electrophoresis map of proteins from mature and immature yak FF with high resolution and repeatability. A comparison of protein profiles identified 12 differently expressed proteins, out of which 10 of them were upregulated while 2 were downregulated. Western blotting showed that the expression of transferrin and ENOSF1 was enhanced with follicular development. Both the obtained protein profiles and the differently expressed proteins identified in this study provided experimental data related to follicular development during yak breeding seasons. This study also laid the foundation for understanding the microenvironment during oocyte development.

  1. Bile acids: analysis in biological fluids and tissues

    PubMed Central

    Griffiths, William J.; Sjövall, Jan

    2010-01-01

    The formation of bile acids/bile alcohols is of major importance for the maintenance of cholesterol homeostasis. Besides their functions in lipid absorption, bile acids/bile alcohols are regulatory molecules for a number of metabolic processes. Their effects are structure-dependent, and numerous metabolic conversions result in a complex mixture of biologically active and inactive forms. Advanced methods are required to characterize and quantify individual bile acids in these mixtures. A combination of such analyses with analyses of the proteome will be required for a better understanding of mechanisms of action and nature of endogenous ligands. Mass spectrometry is the basic detection technique for effluents from chromatographic columns. Capillary liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry with electrospray ionization provides the highest sensitivity in metabolome analysis. Classical gas chromatography-mass spectrometry is less sensitive but offers extensive structure-dependent fragmentation increasing the specificity in analyses of isobaric isomers of unconjugated bile acids. Depending on the nature of the bile acid/bile alcohol mixture and the range of concentration of individuals, different sample preparation sequences, from simple extractions to group separations and derivatizations, are applicable. We review the methods currently available for the analysis of bile acids in biological fluids and tissues, with emphasis on the combination of liquid and gas phase chromatography with mass spectrometry. PMID:20008121

  2. Fluid Flow Simulation and Energetic Analysis of Anomalocarididae Locomotion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikel-Stites, Maxwell; Staples, Anne

    2014-11-01

    While an abundance of animal locomotion simulations have been performed modeling the motions of living arthropods and aquatic animals, little quantitative simulation and reconstruction of gait parameters has been done to model the locomotion of extinct animals, many of which bear little physical resemblance to their modern descendants. To that end, this project seeks to analyze potential swimming patterns used by the anomalocaridid family, (specifically Anomalocaris canadensis, a Cambrian Era aquatic predator), and determine the most probable modes of movement. This will serve to either verify or cast into question the current assumed movement patterns and properties of these animals and create a bridge between similar flexible-bodied swimmers and their robotic counterparts. This will be accomplished by particle-based fluid flow simulations of the flow around the fins of the animal, as well as an energy analysis of a variety of sample gaits. The energy analysis will then be compared to the extant information regarding speed/energy use curves in an attempt to determine which modes of swimming were most energy efficient for a given range of speeds. These results will provide a better understanding of how these long-extinct animals moved, possibly allowing an improved understanding of their behavioral patterns, and may also lead to a novel potential platform for bio-inspired underwater autonomous vehicles (UAVs).

  3. Analysis of sponge zones for computational fluid mechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Bodony, Daniel J. . E-mail: bodony@stanford.edu

    2006-03-01

    The use of sponge regions, or sponge zones, which add the forcing term -{sigma}(q - q {sub ref}) to the right-hand-side of the governing equations in computational fluid mechanics as an ad hoc boundary treatment is widespread. They are used to absorb and minimize reflections from computational boundaries and as forcing sponges to introduce prescribed disturbances into a calculation. A less common usage is as a means of extending a calculation from a smaller domain into a larger one, such as in computing the far-field sound generated in a localized region. By analogy to the penalty method of finite elements, the method is placed on a solid foundation, complete with estimates of convergence. The analysis generalizes the work of Israeli and Orszag [M. Israeli, S.A. Orszag, Approximation of radiation boundary conditions, J. Comp. Phys. 41 (1981) 115-135] and confirms their findings when applied as a special case to one-dimensional wave propagation in an absorbing sponge. It is found that the rate of convergence of the actual solution to the target solution, with an appropriate norm, is inversely proportional to the sponge strength. A detailed analysis for acoustic wave propagation in one-dimension verifies the convergence rate given by the general theory. The exponential point-wise convergence derived by Israeli and Orszag in the high-frequency limit is recovered and found to hold over all frequencies. A weakly nonlinear analysis of the method when applied to Burgers' equation shows similar convergence properties. Three numerical examples are given to confirm the analysis: the acoustic extension of a two-dimensional time-harmonic point source, the acoustic extension of a three-dimensional initial-value problem of a sound pulse, and the introduction of unstable eigenmodes from linear stability theory into a two-dimensional shear layer.

  4. High sensitivity leak detection method and apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Myneni, G.R.

    1994-09-06

    An improved leak detection method is provided that utilizes the cyclic adsorption and desorption of accumulated helium on a non-porous metallic surface. The method provides reliable leak detection at superfluid helium temperatures. The zero drift that is associated with residual gas analyzers in common leak detectors is virtually eliminated by utilizing a time integration technique. The sensitivity of the apparatus of this disclosure is capable of detecting leaks as small as 1 [times] 10[sup [minus]18] atm cc sec[sup [minus]1]. 2 figs.

  5. High sensitivity leak detection method and apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Myneni, Ganapatic R.

    1994-01-01

    An improved leak detection method is provided that utilizes the cyclic adsorption and desorption of accumulated helium on a non-porous metallic surface. The method provides reliable leak detection at superfluid helium temperatures. The zero drift that is associated with residual gas analyzers in common leak detectors is virtually eliminated by utilizing a time integration technique. The sensitivity of the apparatus of this disclosure is capable of detecting leaks as small as 1.times.10.sup.-18 atm cc sec.sup.-1.

  6. Safety upgrades plug car leaks

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-08-01

    To lessen the chance of a chemical leak occurring during rail transport, some companies are improving tank car sturdiness and safety by adding such features as top-loading valves, on-board monitoring devices, and thicker, more impact-resistant hulls. Results include a dramatic drop in the number of rail incidents and leak tank cars. Chemicals Division of Olin Corporation (Stamford, Connecticut) has assigned its name to a new fleet of chlorine, caustic soda and toluene diisocyanate (TDI) tank cars. Each car carries the company's Care[trademark]Car registered trademark. The upgrade is part of a company-wide quality improvement process started in 1986. The company requires acoustic emissions (AE) testing on all hazardous materials tank cars. If an area has a defect, it expands and makes a slight sound when subjected to stress. In an AE test, cars are subject to simulated bumps and jolts as in rail shipment. Electronic sensors transfer any stress noises onto a computer screen, where an operator can pinpoint the trouble source.

  7. Thermal analysis of turbulent flow of a supercritical fluid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamane, E.

    1979-01-01

    The influence of the large variation of thermodynamics and transport properties near the pseudocritical temperature on the heat transfer coefficient of supercritical fluid in turbulent flow was studied. The formation of the characteristics peak in the heat transfer coefficient vs. bulk temperature curve is described, and the necessity of the fluid element at pseudocritical temperature located in the buffer layer is discussed.

  8. Argon Spill Trough Bellows - Leak Test

    SciTech Connect

    Jaques, A.; /Fermilab

    1990-04-30

    The four argon spill trough bellows were leak tested with helium during the week of March 12, 1990. Three passed without incident, but the fourth was found to have a leak in the weld at one of the ring/clamps. The hole was approximately 1/32-inch in diameter (a likely result of a welding burn through) and located on an inflexible portion of the bellows, the ring/clamp. Frank Juravic, who conducted the tests, suggested using grey structural epoxy to plug the leak. The epoxy is metallic with some inherent flexibility. The epoxy was applied and the bellows retested in the same manner as before. The repair was a success as the bellows proved to be leaktight. The bellows were then put in their original shipping crates and placed in storage at Lab C. Included in this report is the manufacturer's spec sheets on the bellows, a copy of the Quality Control Report form and a sketch of the test setup with an explanation of the procedure. On the bellows data sheet entitled 'Analysis of Stress in Bellows', the analysis output is obtained through a theoretical bellows program that uses quadratic equations to approximate characteristic curves for such data as axial, lateral and angular movement and spring rates. The program is best suited for bellows with a wall thickness of at least 0.015-inch and an operating pressure significantly above atmospheric. Thus EJS Inc. warned that the output data would not be very accurate in some instances. The data given on the EJS Inc. sketch sheet should be taken as accurate, though, for it was taken from the actual bellows delivered. The 72-inch length includes the 64.64-inch of bellows section, the (3) 1/2-inch ring/clamps and the (2) 1-1/2-inch end bands. The remainder of the discrepancy is accounted for by a 2.75-inch factory elongation of the bellows from the original free length. The 40-inch compression capability includes the 2.75-inch of factory elongation, the program determined 31.9-inch of compression from free length and 5.35-inch of

  9. [The current state of leak in anesthetic machines detected by low flow leak tests].

    PubMed

    Uehara, M; Tokumine, J; Iha, H; Nitta, K; Okuda, Y

    1999-05-01

    To assess the current state of leak in anesthetic machines, we selected 66 units of anesthetic machines for inspection and repair from various medical institutions. Based on a newly designed inspection flow chart a low flow leak test for internal circuits of the anesthetic machines was performed. The conventional low flow leak test was also performed for smooth detection of leak for rational evaluation. Only 39% of the anesthetic machines met the standard of the low flow leak tests, and leak was detected in the remaining 61%. The average residual leak mounted to 0.97 l.min-1, with the maximum of 5.3 l.min-1. Canisters, corrugated tubes, and vaporizers were considered the primary causes of leak. After the inspection and repair, leak in 77.5% of the anesthetic machines either disappeared or decreased and the average residual leak dropped to 0.34 l.min-1. However, 47% of the anesthetic machines still failed to meet the standard of the low flow leak tests. To further improve the situation, more detailed inspection and repair are necessary especially for precise detection of the cause of leak in the internal circuit of anesthetic machines which often remains undetected.

  10. Comparison of an Ultrasonic Phased Array Evaluation with Destructive Analysis of a Documented Leak Path in a Nozzle Removed from Service

    SciTech Connect

    Cinson, Anthony D.; Crawford, Susan L.; MacFarlan, Paul J.; Hanson, Brady D.; Mathews, Royce

    2012-09-24

    Non-destructive and destructive testing methods were employed to evaluate a documented boric acid leakage path through an Alloy 600 control rod drive mechanism (CRDM) penetration from the North Anna Unit 2 reactor pressure vessel head that was removed from service in 2002. A previous ultrasonic in-service-inspection (ISI) conducted by industry prior to the head removal, identified a probable leakage path in Nozzle 63 located in the interference fit between the penetration tube and the vessel head. In this current examination, Nozzle 63 was examined using phased array (PA) ultrasonic testing with a 5.0-MHz, eight-element annular array; immersion data were acquired from the nozzle inner diameter (ID) surface. A variety of focal laws were employed to evaluate the signal responses from the interference fit region. These responses were compared to responses obtained from a mockup specimen that was used to determine detection limits and characterization capabilities for wastage and boric acid presence in the interference fit region. Nozzle 63 was destructively examined after the completion of the ultrasonic nondestructive evaluation (NDE) to visually assess the leak paths. These destructive and nondestructive results compared favorably

  11. Design of airborne wind turbine and computational fluid dynamics analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anbreen, Faiqa

    Wind energy is a promising alternative to the depleting non-renewable sources. The height of the wind turbines becomes a constraint to their efficiency. Airborne wind turbine can reach much higher altitudes and produce higher power due to high wind velocity and energy density. The focus of this thesis is to design a shrouded airborne wind turbine, capable to generate 70 kW to propel a leisure boat with a capacity of 8-10 passengers. The idea of designing an airborne turbine is to take the advantage of higher velocities in the atmosphere. The Solidworks model has been analyzed numerically using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) software StarCCM+. The Unsteady Reynolds Averaged Navier Stokes Simulation (URANS) with K-epsilon turbulence model has been selected, to study the physical properties of the flow, with emphasis on the performance of the turbine and the increase in air velocity at the throat. The analysis has been done using two ambient velocities of 12 m/s and 6 m/s. At 12 m/s inlet velocity, the velocity of air at the turbine has been recorded as 16 m/s. The power generated by the turbine is 61 kW. At inlet velocity of 6 m/s, the velocity of air at turbine increased to 10 m/s. The power generated by turbine is 25 kW.

  12. Immunosensor with fluid control mechanism for salivary cortisol analysis.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Masaki; Matsuda, Yohei; Sasaki, Shohei; Sasaki, Makoto; Kadoma, Yoshihiro; Imai, Yoshikatsu; Niwa, Daisuke; Shetty, Vivek

    2013-03-15

    The purpose of this research is to demonstrate a new design for a cortisol immunosensor for the noninvasive and quantitative analysis of salivary cortisol. We propose a cortisol immunosensor with a fluid control mechanism which has both a vertical flow and a lateral flow. The detected current resulting from a competitive reaction between the sample cortisol and a glucose oxidase (GOD)-labeled cortisol conjugate was found to be inversely related to the concentration of cortisol in the sample solution. A calibration curve using the relative detected current showed a R(2)=0.98 and CV=14% for a range of standard cortisol solutions corresponding to the concentrations of native salivary cortisol (0.1-10 ng/ml). The measurement could be accomplished within 35 min and the cortisol immunosensor could be reused. These results show promise for realizing an on-site and easy-to-use biosensor for cortisol. Used for evaluation of human salivary cortisol levels, the cortisol immunosensor measurement corresponded closely with commercially available ELISA method (R(2)=0.92). Our results indicate the promise of the new cortisol immunosensor for noninvasive, point of care measurement of human salivary cortisol levels.

  13. Storage alters feline bronchoalveolar lavage fluid cytological analysis.

    PubMed

    Nafe, Laura A; DeClue, Amy E; Reinero, Carol R

    2011-02-01

    Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) collection is a valuable respiratory diagnostic procedure in cats. This study evaluated effects of BALF storage on total nucleated cell counts (TNCCs) and differential cell counts (DCC), cell morphology, and cytological diagnosis. Forty-five research cats with neutrophilic, eosinophilic, and mixed inflammation, and healthy controls were enrolled. BALF samples were processed within 1h (baseline) or stored at 4°C (4C24) or room temperature (RT24) for 24h, or 4°C (4C48) or room temperature (RT48) for 48h before processing. Stored BALF at RT48 had decreased TNCC compared to baseline. The RT24 and RT48 samples had greater eosinophil % and the RT24, 4C48, and RT48 samples had decreased neutrophil % compared with baseline. Cellular morphology deteriorated in all stored samples. Storage resulted in a change in cytological diagnosis in up to 57% of stored samples. We conclude that cytological analysis of BALF in cats should be performed promptly for optimal results.

  14. SINDA/SINFLO computer routine, volume 1, revision A. [for fluid flow system analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oren, J. A.; Williams, D. R.

    1975-01-01

    The SINFLO package was developed to modify the SINDA preprocessor to accept and store the input data for fluid flow systems analysis and adding the FLOSOL user subroutine to perform the flow solution. This reduced and simplified the user input required for analysis of flow problems. A temperature calculation method, the flow-hybrid method which was developed in previous VSD thermal simulator routines, was incorporated for calculating fluid temperatures. The calculation method accuracy was improved by using fluid enthalpy rather than specific heat for the convective term of the fluid temperature equation. Subroutines and data input requirements are described along with user subroutines, flow data storage, and usage of the plot program.

  15. Supercritical-fluid extraction and chromatography-mass spectrometry for analysis of mycotoxins

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, R.D.; Udseth, H.R.

    1982-07-01

    The use of direct supercritical-fluid injection-mass spectrometry for the rapid analysis of mycotoxins of the tricothecene group is demonstrated. A solution containing diacetoxyscirpenol or T-2 toxin is injected into a fluid consisting primarily of pentane or carbon dioxide and is rapidly brought to supercritical conditions. Direct injection of the fluid stream into a chemical ionization source allows thermally labile compounds to be analyzed. Under these conditions trichothecene mass spectra showing significant (M + 1)/sup +/ ions and distinctive fragmentation patterns are obtained. Detection limits are in the subnanogram range. Direct analysis from complex substrates using selective supercritical-fluid extraction is proposed. 4 figures.

  16. Leak checker data logging system

    DOEpatents

    Gannon, J.C.; Payne, J.J.

    1996-09-03

    A portable, high speed, computer-based data logging system for field testing systems or components located some distance apart employs a plurality of spaced mass spectrometers and is particularly adapted for monitoring the vacuum integrity of a long string of a superconducting magnets such as used in high energy particle accelerators. The system provides precise tracking of a gas such as helium through the magnet string when the helium is released into the vacuum by monitoring the spaced mass spectrometers allowing for control, display and storage of various parameters involved with leak detection and localization. A system user can observe the flow of helium through the magnet string on a real-time basis hour the exact moment of opening of the helium input valve. Graph reading can be normalized to compensate for magnet sections that deplete vacuum faster than other sections between testing to permit repetitive testing of vacuum integrity in reduced time. 18 figs.

  17. Leak checker data logging system

    DOEpatents

    Gannon, Jeffrey C.; Payne, John J.

    1996-01-01

    A portable, high speed, computer-based data logging system for field testing systems or components located some distance apart employs a plurality of spaced mass spectrometers and is particularly adapted for monitoring the vacuum integrity of a long string of a superconducting magnets such as used in high energy particle accelerators. The system provides precise tracking of a gas such as helium through the magnet string when the helium is released into the vacuum by monitoring the spaced mass spectrometers allowing for control, display and storage of various parameters involved with leak detection and localization. A system user can observe the flow of helium through the magnet string on a real-time basis hour the exact moment of opening of the helium input valve. Graph reading can be normalized to compensate for magnet sections that deplete vacuum faster than other sections between testing to permit repetitive testing of vacuum integrity in reduced time.

  18. Measuring Pinhole Leaks - A Novel Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunn, Carol Anne

    2009-01-01

    Both of the shuttle pads have one of these large liquid hydrogen tanks and the Shuttle program is currently using both pads. However, just recently, there has been increasing concerns over possible air leaks from the outside into the evacuated region. A method to detect leaks involving measuring the change in the boil-off rate of the liquid hydrogen in the tank.

  19. Protecting brazing furnaces from air leaks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armenoff, C. T.; Mckown, R. D.

    1980-01-01

    Inexpensive inert-atmosphere shielding protects vacuum brazing-furnace components that are likely to spring leak. Pipefittings, gages, and valves are encased in transparent plastic shroud inflated with argon. If leak develops, harmless argon will enter vacuum chamber, making it possible to finish ongoing brazing or heat treatment before shutting down for repair.

  20. EPA Needs Leak Detectives in Texas

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    DALLAS - (March 15, 2016) Every year more than one trillion gallons of water are wasted by easy-to-fix household leaks. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is encouraging consumers to Be a leak detective during WaterSense's eighth annua

  1. EPA Needs Leak Detectives in New Mexico

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    DALLAS - (March 15, 2016) Every year more than one trillion gallons of water are wasted by easy-to-fix household leaks. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is encouraging consumers to Be a Leak Detective during WaterSense's eighth annua

  2. Helium Mass Spectrometer Leak Detection: A Method to Quantify Total Measurement Uncertainty

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mather, Janice L.; Taylor, Shawn C.

    2015-01-01

    In applications where leak rates of components or systems are evaluated against a leak rate requirement, the uncertainty of the measured leak rate must be included in the reported result. However, in the helium mass spectrometer leak detection method, the sensitivity, or resolution, of the instrument is often the only component of the total measurement uncertainty noted when reporting results. To address this shortfall, a measurement uncertainty analysis method was developed that includes the leak detector unit's resolution, repeatability, hysteresis, and drift, along with the uncertainty associated with the calibration standard. In a step-wise process, the method identifies the bias and precision components of the calibration standard, the measurement correction factor (K-factor), and the leak detector unit. Together these individual contributions to error are combined and the total measurement uncertainty is determined using the root-sum-square method. It was found that the precision component contributes more to the total uncertainty than the bias component, but the bias component is not insignificant. For helium mass spectrometer leak rate tests where unit sensitivity alone is not enough, a thorough evaluation of the measurement uncertainty such as the one presented herein should be performed and reported along with the leak rate value.

  3. Analysis of dissolved benzene plumes and methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE) plumes in ground water at leaking underground fuel tank (LUFT) sites

    SciTech Connect

    Happel, A.M.; Rice, D.; Beckenbach, E.; Savalin, L.; Temko, H.; Rempel, R.; Dooher, B.

    1996-11-01

    The 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments mandate the addition of oxygenates to gasoline products to abate air pollution. Currently, many areas of the country utilize oxygenated or reformulated fuel containing 15- percent and I I-percent MTBE by volume, respectively. This increased use of MTBE in gasoline products has resulted in accidental point source releases of MTBE containing gasoline products to ground water. Recent studies have shown MTBE to be frequently detected in samples of shallow ground water from urban areas throughout the United States (Squillace et al., 1995). Knowledge of the subsurface fate and transport of MTBE in ground water at leaking underground fuel tank (LUFT) sites and the spatial extent of MTBE plumes is needed to address these releases. The goal of this research is to utilize data from a large number of LUFT sites to gain insights into the fate, transport, and spatial extent of MTBE plumes. Specific goals include defining the spatial configuration of dissolved MTBE plumes, evaluating plume stability or degradation over time, evaluating the impact of point source releases of MTBE to ground water, and attempting to identify the controlling factors influencing the magnitude and extent of the MTBE plumes. We are examining the relationships between dissolved TPH, BTEX, and MTBE plumes at LUFT sites using parallel approaches of best professional judgment and a computer-aided plume model fitting procedure to determine plume parameters. Here we present our initial results comparing dissolved benzene and MTBE plumes lengths, the statistical significance of these results, and configuration of benzene and MTBE plumes at individual LUFT sites.

  4. Leak detection for underground storage tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Durgin, P.B. ); Young, T.M.

    1993-01-01

    This symposium was held in New Orleans, Louisiana on January 29, 1992. The purpose of this conference was to provide a forum for exchange of state-of-the-art information on leak detection for underground storage tanks that leaked fuel. A widespread concern was protection of groundwater supplies from these leaking tanks. In some cases, the papers report on research that was conducted two or three years ago but has never been adequately directed to the underground storage tank leak-detection audience. In other cases, the papers report on the latest leak-detection research. The symposium was divided into four sessions that were entitled: Internal Monitoring; External Monitoring; Regulations and Standards; and Site and Risk Evaluation. Individual papers have been cataloged separately for inclusion in the appropriate data bases.

  5. Application of supercritical fluid carbon dioxide to the extraction and analysis of lipids.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae Won; Fukusaki, Eiichiro; Bamba, Takeshi

    2012-10-01

    Supercritical carbon dioxide (SCCO(2)) is an ecofriendly supercritical fluid that is chemically inert, nontoxic, noninflammable and nonpolluting. As a green material, SCCO(2) has desirable properties such as high density, low viscosity and high diffusivity that make it suitable for use as a solvent in supercritical fluid extraction, an effective and environment-friendly analytical method, and as a mobile phase for supercritical fluid chromatography, which facilitates high-throughput, high-resolution analysis. Furthermore, the low polarity of SCCO(2) is suitable for the extraction and analysis of hydrophobic compounds. The growing concern surrounding environmental pollution has triggered the development of green analysis methods based on the use of SCCO(2) in various laboratories and industries. SCCO(2) is becoming an effective alternative to conventional organic solvents. In this review, the usefulness of SCCO(2) in supercritical fluid extraction and supercritical fluid chromatography for the extraction and analysis of lipids is described.

  6. Proteomic analysis of chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) ovarian fluid.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Sheri L; Villarroel, Marsha; Rosengrave, Patrice; Carne, Alan; Kleffmann, Torsten; Lokman, P Mark; Gemmell, Neil J

    2014-01-01

    The ovarian, or coelomic, fluid that is released with the egg mass of many fishes is increasingly found to play an important role in several biological processes crucial for reproductive success. These include maintenance of oocyte fertility and developmental competence, prolonging of sperm motility, and enhancing sperm swimming speed. Here we examined if and how the proteome of chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) ovarian fluid varied among females and then sought to examine the composition of this fluid. Ovarian fluid in chinook salmon was analyzed using 1D SDS PAGE and LC-MS/MS tryptic digest screened against Mascot and Sequest databases. We found marked differences in the number and concentrations of proteins in salmon ovarian fluid across different females. A total of 174 proteins were identified in ovarian fluid, 47 of which were represented by six or more peptides, belonging to one of six Gene Ontology pathways. The response to chemical stimulus and response to hypoxia pathways were best represented, accounting for 26 of the 174 proteins. The current data set provides a resource that furthers our understanding of those factors that influence successful egg production and fertilisation in salmonids and other species.

  7. Proteomic Analysis of Chinook Salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) Ovarian Fluid

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Sheri L.; Villarroel, Marsha; Rosengrave, Patrice; Carne, Alan; Kleffmann, Torsten; Lokman, P. Mark; Gemmell, Neil J.

    2014-01-01

    The ovarian, or coelomic, fluid that is released with the egg mass of many fishes is increasingly found to play an important role in several biological processes crucial for reproductive success. These include maintenance of oocyte fertility and developmental competence, prolonging of sperm motility, and enhancing sperm swimming speed. Here we examined if and how the proteome of chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) ovarian fluid varied among females and then sought to examine the composition of this fluid. Ovarian fluid in chinook salmon was analyzed using 1D SDS PAGE and LC-MS/MS tryptic digest screened against Mascot and Sequest databases. We found marked differences in the number and concentrations of proteins in salmon ovarian fluid across different females. A total of 174 proteins were identified in ovarian fluid, 47 of which were represented by six or more peptides, belonging to one of six Gene Ontology pathways. The response to chemical stimulus and response to hypoxia pathways were best represented, accounting for 26 of the 174 proteins. The current data set provides a resource that furthers our understanding of those factors that influence successful egg production and fertilisation in salmonids and other species. PMID:25089903

  8. Ultrasonic Detectors Safely Identify Dangerous, Costly Leaks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2013-01-01

    In 1990, NASA grounded its space shuttle fleet. The reason: leaks detected in the hydrogen fuel systems of the Space Shuttles Atlantis and Columbia. Unless the sources of the leaks could be identified and fixed, the shuttles would not be safe to fly. To help locate the existing leaks and check for others, Kennedy Space Center engineers used portable ultrasonic detectors to scan the fuel systems. As a gas or liquid escapes from a leak, the resulting turbulence creates ultrasonic noise, explains Gary Mohr, president of Elmsford, New York-based UE Systems Inc., a long-time leader in ultrasonic detector technologies. "In lay terms, the leak is like a dog whistle, and the detector is like the dog ear." Because the ultrasound emissions from a leak are highly localized, they can be used not only to identify the presence of a leak but also to help pinpoint a leak s location. The NASA engineers employed UE s detectors to examine the shuttle fuel tanks and solid rocket boosters, but encountered difficulty with the devices limited range-certain areas of the shuttle proved difficult or unsafe to scan up close. To remedy the problem, the engineers created a long-range attachment for the detectors, similar to "a zoom lens on a camera," Mohr says. "If you are on the ground, and the leak is 50 feet away, the detector would now give you the same impression as if you were only 25 feet away." The enhancement also had the effect of reducing background noise, allowing for a clearer, more precise detection of a leak s location.

  9. Amniotic Fluid Metabolomic Analysis in Spontaneous Preterm Birth

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Janice; Gunst, Phillip R.; Kacerovsky, Marian; Fortunato, Stephen J.; Saade, George R.; Basraon, Sanmaan

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To identify metabolic changes associated with early spontaneous preterm birth (PTB; <34 weeks) and term births, using high-throughput metabolomics of amniotic fluid (AF) in African American population. Method: In this study, AF samples retrieved from spontaneous PTB (<34 weeks [n = 25]) and normal term birth (n = 25) by transvaginal amniocentesis at the time of labor prior to delivery were subjected to metabolomics analysis. Equal volumes of samples were subjected to a standard solvent extraction method and analyzed using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (MS) and liquid chromatography/MS/MS. Biochemicals were identified through matching of ion features to a library of biochemical standards. After log transformation and imputation of minimum observed values for each compound, t test, correlation tests, and false discovery rate corrections were used to identify differentially regulated metabolites. Data were controlled for clinical/demographic variables and medication during pregnancy. Results: Of 348 metabolites measured in AF samples, 121 metabolites had a gestational age effect and 116 differed significantly between PTB and term births. A majority of significantly altered metabolites could be classified into 3 categories, namely, (1) liver function, (2) fatty acid and coenzyme A (CoA) metabolism, and (3) histidine metabolism. The signature of altered liver function was apparent in many cytochrome P450-related pathways including bile acids, steroids, xanthines, heme, and phase II detoxification of xenobiotics with the largest fold change seen with pantothenol, a CoA synthesis inhibitor that was 8-fold more abundant in PTB. Conclusion: Global metabolic profiling of AF revealed alteration in hepatic metabolites involving xenobiotic detoxification and CoA metabolism in PTB. Maternal and/or fetal hepatic function differences may be developmentally related and its contribution PTB as a cause or effect of PTB is still unclear. PMID:24440995

  10. Interferometer and analysis methods for the in vitro characterization of dynamic fluid layers on contact lenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Primeau, Brian C.; Greivenkamp, John E.

    2012-06-01

    The anterior refracting surface of the eye when wearing a contact lens is the thin fluid layer that forms on the surface of the contact lens. Under normal conditions, this fluid layer is less than 10 μm thick. The fluid layer thickness and topography change over time and are affected by the material properties of the contact lens and may affect vision quality and comfort. An in vitro method of characterizing dynamic fluid layers applied to contact lenses mounted on mechanical substrates has been developed by use of a phase-shifting Twyman-Green interferometer. This interferometer continuously measures light reflected from the surface of the fluid layer, allowing precision analysis of the dynamic fluid layer. Movies showing this fluid layer behavior can be generated. Quantitative analysis beyond typical contact angle or visual inspection methods is provided. Different fluid and contact lens material combinations have been evaluated, and variations in fluid layer properties have been observed. This paper discusses the interferometer design and analysis methods used. Example measurement results of different contact lens are presented.

  11. Blind Leak Detection for Closed Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oelgoetz, Peter; Johnson, Ricky; Todd, Douglas; Russell, Samuel; Walker, James

    2003-01-01

    The current inspection technique for locating interstitial leaking in the Space Shuttle Main Engine nozzles is the application of a liquid leak check solution in the openings where the interstitials space between the tubing and the structural jacket vent out the aft end of the nozzle, while its cooling tubes are pressurized to 25 psig with Helium. When a leak is found, it is classified, and if the leak is severe enough the suspect tube is cut open so that a boroscope can be inserted to find the leak point. Since the boroscope can only cover a finite tube length and since it is impossible to identify which tube (to the right or left of the identified interstitial) is leaking, many extra and undesired repairs have been made to fix just one leak. In certain instances when the interstitials are interlinked by poor braze bonding, many interstitials will show indications of leaking from a single source. What is desired is a technique that can identify the leak source so that a single repair can be performed. Dr, Samuel Russell and James Walker, both with NASA/MSFC have developed a thermographic inspection system that addresses a single repair approach. They have teamed with Boeing/Rocketdyne to repackage the inspection processes to be suitable to address full scale Shuttle development and flight hardware and implement the process at NASA centers. The methods and results presented address the thermographic identification of interstitial leaks in the Space Shuttle Main Engine nozzles. A highly sensitive digital infrared camera (capable of detecting a delta temperature difference of 0.025 C) is used to record the cooling effects associated with a leak source, such as a crack or pinhole, hidden within the nozzle wall by observing the inner hot wall surface as the nozzle is pressurized, These images are enhanced by digitally subtracting a thermal reference image taken before pressurization. The method provides a non-intrusive way of locating the tube that is leaking and the

  12. Research in computational fluid dynamics and analysis of algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gottlieb, David

    1992-01-01

    by Carpenter (from the fluid Mechanics Division) and Gottlieb gave analytic conditions for stability as well as asymptotic stability. This had been incorporated in the code in form of stable boundary conditions. Effects of the cylinder rotations had been studied. The results differ from the known theoretical results. We are in the middle of analyzing the results. A detailed analysis of the effects of the heating of the cylinder on the shedding frequency had been studied using the above schemes. It has been found that the shedding frequency decreases when the wire was heated. Experimental work is being carried out to affirm this result.

  13. Fluid outflows from Venus impact craters - Analysis from Magellan data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Asimow, Paul D.; Wood, John A.

    1992-01-01

    Many impact craters on Venus have unusual outflow features originating in or under the continuous ejecta blankets and continuing downhill into the surrounding terrain. These features clearly resulted from flow of low-viscosity fluids, but the identity of those fluids is not clear. In particular, it should not be assumed a priori that the fluid is an impact melt. A number of candidate processes by which impact events might generate the observed features are considered, and predictions are made concerning the rheological character of flows produce by each mechanism. A sample of outflows was analyzed using Magellan images and a model of unconstrained Bingham plastic flow on inclined planes, leading to estimates of viscosity and yield strength for the flow materials. It is argued that at least two different mechanisms have produced outflows on Venus: an erosive, channel-forming process and a depositional process. The erosive fluid is probably an impact melt, but the depositional fluid may consist of fluidized solid debris, vaporized material, and/or melt.

  14. Spectral analysis of the turbulent mixing of two fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Steinkamp, Michael James

    1995-01-01

    We describe a spectral approach to the investigation of fluid instability, generalized turbulence, and the interpenetration of fluids across an interface. The Technique also applies to a single fluid with large variations in density. Departures of fluctuating velocity components from the local mean are far subsonic, but the mean Mach number can be large. Validity of the description is demonstrated by comparisons with experiments on turbulent mixing due to the late stages of Rayleigh-Taylor instability, when the dynamics become approximately self-similar in response to a constant body force. Generic forms for anisotropic spectral structure are described and used as a basis for deriving spectrally integrated moment equations that can be incorporated into computer codes for scientific and engineering analyses.

  15. Spectral analysis of the turbulent mixing of two fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Steinkamp, M.J.

    1996-02-01

    The authors describe a spectral approach to the investigation of fluid instability, generalized turbulence, and the interpenetration of fluids across an interface. The technique also applies to a single fluid with large variations in density. Departures of fluctuating velocity components from the local mean are far subsonic, but the mean Mach number can be large. Validity of the description is demonstrated by comparisons with experiments on turbulent mixing due to the late stages of Rayleigh-Taylor instability, when the dynamics become approximately self-similar in response to a constant body force. Generic forms for anisotropic spectral structure are described and used as a basis for deriving spectrally integrated moment equations that can be incorporated into computer codes for scientific and engineering analyses.

  16. Disclosure of hydraulic fracturing fluid chemical additives: analysis of regulations.

    PubMed

    Maule, Alexis L; Makey, Colleen M; Benson, Eugene B; Burrows, Isaac J; Scammell, Madeleine K

    2013-01-01

    Hydraulic fracturing is used to extract natural gas from shale formations. The process involves injecting into the ground fracturing fluids that contain thousands of gallons of chemical additives. Companies are not mandated by federal regulations to disclose the identities or quantities of chemicals used during hydraulic fracturing operations on private or public lands. States have begun to regulate hydraulic fracturing fluids by mandating chemical disclosure. These laws have shortcomings including nondisclosure of proprietary or "trade secret" mixtures, insufficient penalties for reporting inaccurate or incomplete information, and timelines that allow for after-the-fact reporting. These limitations leave lawmakers, regulators, public safety officers, and the public uninformed and ill-prepared to anticipate and respond to possible environmental and human health hazards associated with hydraulic fracturing fluids. We explore hydraulic fracturing exemptions from federal regulations, as well as current and future efforts to mandate chemical disclosure at the federal and state level.

  17. Management of Prolonged Pulmonary Air Leaks With Endobronchial Valve Placement

    PubMed Central

    Doelken, Peter; Pupovac, Stevan; Ata, Ashar; Fabian, Tom

    2016-01-01

    Background: Prolonged pulmonary air leaks (PALs) are associated with increased morbidity and extended hospital stay. We sought to investigate the role of bronchoscopic placement of 1-way valves in treating this condition. Methods: We queried a prospectively maintained database of patients with PAL lasting more than 7 days at a tertiary medical center. Main outcome measures included duration of chest tube placement and hospital stay before and after valve deployment. Results: Sixteen patients were eligible to be enrolled from September 2012 through December 2014. One patient refused to give consent, and in 4 patients, the source of air leak could not be identified with bronchoscopic balloon occlusion. Eleven patients (9 men; mean age, 65 ± 15 years) underwent bronchoscopic valve deployment. Eight patients had postoperative PAL and 3 had a secondary spontaneous pneumothorax. The mean duration of air leak before valve deployment was 16 ± 12 days, and the mean number of implanted valves was 1.9 (median, 2). Mean duration of hospital stay before and after valve deployment was 18 and 9 days, respectively (P = .03). Patients who had more than a 50% decrease in air leak on digital monitoring had the thoracostomy tube removed within 3–6 days. There were no procedural complications related to deployment or removal of the valves. Conclusions: Bronchoscopic placement of 1-way valves is a safe procedure that could help manage patients with prolonged PAL. A prospective randomized trial with cost-efficiency analysis is necessary to better define the role of this bronchoscopic intervention and demonstrate its effect on air leak duration. PMID:27647978

  18. Analysis of Direct Samples of Early Solar System Aqueous Fluids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zolensky, Michael E.; Bodnar, R J.; Fedele, L.; Yurimoto,H.; Itoh, S.; Fries, M.; Steele, A.

    2012-01-01

    Over the past three decades we have become increasingly aware of the fundamental importance of water, and aqueous alteration, on primitive solar-system bodies. Some carbonaceous and ordinary chondrites have been altered by interactions with liquid water within the first 10 million years after formation of their parent asteroids. Millimeter to centimeter-sized aggregates of purple halite containing aqueous fluid inclusions were found in the matrix of two freshly-fallen brecciated H chondrite falls, Monahans (1998, hereafter simply "Monahans") (H5) and Zag (H3-6) (Zolensky et al., 1999; Whitby et al., 2000; Bogard et al., 2001) In order to understand origin and evolution of the aqueous fluids inside these inclusions we much measure the actual fluid composition, and also learn the O and H isotopic composition of the water. It has taken a decade for laboratory analytical techniques to catch up to these particular nanomole-sized aqueous samples. We have recently been successful in (1) measuring the isotopic composition of H and O in the water in a few fluid inclusions from the Zag and Monahans halite, (2) mineralogical characterization of the solid mineral phases associated with the aqueous fluids within the halite, and (3) the first minor element analyses of the fluid itself. A Cameca ims-1270 equipped with a cryo-sample-stage of Hokkaido University was specially prepared for the O and H isotopic measurements. The cryo-sample-stage (Techno. I. S. Corp.) was cooled down to c.a. -190 C using liquid nitrogen at which the aqueous fluid in inclusions was frozen. We excavated the salt crystal surfaces to expose the frozen fluids using a 15 keV Cs+ beam and measured negative secondary ions. The secondary ions from deep craters of approximately 10 m in depth emitted stably but the intensities changed gradually during measurement cycles because of shifting states of charge compensation, resulting in rather poor reproducibility of multiple measurements of standard fluid

  19. Vacuum leak detection for double bottom tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Hagen, T.; Rials, R.

    1995-12-31

    Double bottom tanks offer strong leak detection advantages. By incorporating the use of vacuum detection between the two bottoms, the tank bottoms can be verified leak free after construction and during tank use. Utilizing vacuum leak detection requires special considerations. In 1992 a tank construction company built 10 tanks for an oil company in Ponca City, Oklahoma. Each of these tanks were built with a double bottom. This paper provides insight into the planning, construction and testing of this type of double bottom design.

  20. Fate and transport of constituents leaked from Tank 241-A-105

    SciTech Connect

    Caggiano, J.A.

    1991-10-01

    Following a January 28, 1965 sudden steam release in Tank 241-A-105, the carbon steel liner of the tank was noted to have bulged to a maximum height of about 8.5 feet (2.6 meters). Most of this bulging likely resulted from the January 28, 1965 incident. But available data indicate that some bulging during an earlier leak in 1963 when waste was being added to the tank may have contributed. By March 8, 1965, increases in radiation in the 14-05-03 leak detection lateral indicted that fluids had escaped the tank and that the liner was ruptured. Waste was subsequently transferred from Tank 241-A-105 to other tanks, and liquid levels in Tank 241-A-105 were maintained at about 18 inches to control temperature to prevent deterioration of the concrete. Spray cooling water was added weekly to the tank from February 1971 to December 1978 to maintain liquid levels and temperatures, and some of this fluid is assumed to have leaked from the tank. This study examined available data to determine, to the extent possible, the distribution of the leaked constituents in surrounding soils and whether they migrated to groundwater. In this assessment, available data from gross gamma logging of dry wells and leak detection laterals as well as data from analyses of groundwater samples were examined throughout the period of interest. Logs of wells and photographs taken during construction of the 241-A-105 Tank Farm were also examined.

  1. Real-Time Model-Based Leak-Through Detection within Cryogenic Flow Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, M.; Figueroa, F.

    2015-01-01

    The timely detection of leaks within cryogenic fuel replenishment systems is of significant importance to operators on account of the safety and economic impacts associated with material loss and operational inefficiencies. Associated loss in control of pressure also effects the stability and ability to control the phase of cryogenic fluids during replenishment operations. Current research dedicated to providing Prognostics and Health Management (PHM) coverage of such cryogenic replenishment systems has focused on the detection of leaks to atmosphere involving relatively simple model-based diagnostic approaches that, while effective, are unable to isolate the fault to specific piping system components. The authors have extended this research to focus on the detection of leaks through closed valves that are intended to isolate sections of the piping system from the flow and pressurization of cryogenic fluids. The described approach employs model-based detection of leak-through conditions based on correlations of pressure changes across isolation valves and attempts to isolate the faults to specific valves. Implementation of this capability is enabled by knowledge and information embedded in the domain model of the system. The approach has been used effectively to detect such leak-through faults during cryogenic operational testing at the Cryogenic Testbed at NASA's Kennedy Space Center.

  2. Lumbar blood patching for proximal CSF leaks: where does the blood go?

    PubMed Central

    Nesbitt, Cassie; Amukotuwa, Shalini; Chapman, Caron; Batchelor, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Epidural blood patching (EBP) is an important therapeutic approach in managing spontaneous cerebrospinal fluid leaks. The mechanism of action of blood patching is likely to be twofold; fluid replacement having an immediate tamponade effect and the proximal flow of blood products having a ‘plug’ effect. The negative pressure gradient within the epidural space may be important to the rostral flow of injected blood and is possibly increased in intracranial hypotension. PMID:25721827

  3. Lumbar blood patching for proximal CSF leaks: where does the blood go?

    PubMed

    Nesbitt, Cassie; Amukotuwa, Shalini; Chapman, Caron; Batchelor, Peter

    2015-02-26

    Epidural blood patching (EBP) is an important therapeutic approach in managing spontaneous cerebrospinal fluid leaks. The mechanism of action of blood patching is likely to be twofold; fluid replacement having an immediate tamponade effect and the proximal flow of blood products having a 'plug' effect. The negative pressure gradient within the epidural space may be important to the rostral flow of injected blood and is possibly increased in intracranial hypotension.

  4. Environmental policy -- A leaking drum?

    SciTech Connect

    Bishop, J.

    1995-07-01

    Twenty years ago, the US had virtually no overall environmental policy. Since then, one has evolved as a result of accumulated legislation, much of which was crafted in reaction to specific events, typically real or potential disasters. The familiar names of Love Canal, Times Beach, Bhopal and others are the symbolic anchor points of that evolution, which yielded Superfund, the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act, and other environmental statutes. The laws in each case were developed in response to particular environmental and health issues--clean water for drinking and recreation, unpolluted air, safe production of chemicals and chemical-based products. The result was a growing body of environmental legislation that eventually became an accumulate of requirements lacking internal consistency or coherence. Because policymaking followed, rather than guided, legislative actions, the policy itself became inconsistent and sometimes illogical. Like a drum that gradually and indiscriminately is filled with a mixture of mutually reactive chemicals, environmental policy increasingly became a volatile source of concern for those industries in whose midst it had been placed. Lately, there is growing consensus that the drum not only has been overfilled, it also is leaking.

  5. Fluid Production Induced Stress Analysis Surrounding an Elliptic Fracture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandit, Harshad Rajendra

    Hydraulic fracturing is an effective technique used in well stimulation to increase petroleum well production. A combination of multi-stage hydraulic fracturing and horizontal drilling has led to the recent boom in shale gas production which has changed the energy landscape of North America. During the fracking process, highly pressurized mixture of water and proppants (sand and chemicals) is injected into to a crack, which fractures the surrounding rock structure and proppants help in keeping the fracture open. Over a longer period, however, these fractures tend to close due to the difference between the compressive stress exerted by the reservoir on the fracture and the fluid pressure inside the fracture. During production, fluid pressure inside the fracture is reduced further which can accelerate the closure of a fracture. In this thesis, we study the stress distribution around a hydraulic fracture caused by fluid production. It is shown that fluid flow can induce a very high hoop stress near the fracture tip. As the pressure gradient increases stress concentration increases. If a fracture is very thin, the flow induced stress along the fracture decreases, but the stress concentration at the fracture tip increases and become unbounded for an infinitely thin fracture. The result from the present study can be used for studying the fracture closure problem, and ultimately this in turn can lead to the development of better proppants so that prolific well production can be sustained for a long period of time.

  6. Analysis of cannabis in oral fluid specimens by GC-MS with automatic SPE.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hyeyoung; Baeck, Seungkyung; Kim, Eunmi; Lee, Sooyeun; Jang, Moonhee; Lee, Juseon; Choi, Hwakyung; Chung, Heesun

    2009-12-01

    Methamphetamine (MA) is the most commonly abused drug in Korea, followed by cannabis. Traditionally, MA analysis is carried out on both urine and hair samples and cannabis analysis in urine samples only. Despite the fact that oral fluid has become increasingly popular as an alternative specimen in the field of driving under the influence of drugs (DUID) and work place drug testing, its application has not been expanded to drug analysis in Korea. Oral fluid is easy to collect and handle and can provide an indication of recent drug abuse. In this study, we present an analytical method using GC-MS to determine tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and its main metabolite 11-nor-delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol-9-carboxylic acid (THC-COOH) in oral fluid. The validated method was applied to oral fluid samples collected from drug abuse suspects and the results were compared with those in urine. The stability of THC and THC-COOH in oral fluid stored in different containers was also investigated. Oral fluid specimens from 12 drug abuse suspects, submitted by the police, were collected by direct expectoration. The samples were screened with microplate ELISA. For confirmation they were extracted using automated SPE with mixed-mode cation exchange cartridge, derivatized and analyzed by GC-MS using selective ion monitoring (SIM). The concentrations ofTHC and THC-COOH in oral fluid showed a large variation and the results from oral fluid and urine samples from cannabis abusers did not show any correlation. Thus, detailed information about time interval between drug use and sample collection is needed to interpret the oral fluid results properly. In addition, further investigation about the detection time window ofTHC and THC-COOH in oral fluid is required to substitute oral fluid for urine in drug testing.

  7. Influence of wetting effect at the outer surface of the pipe on increase in leak rate - experimental results and discussion

    SciTech Connect

    Isozaki, Toshikuni; Shibata, Katsuyuki

    1997-04-01

    Experimental and computed results applicable to Leak Before Break analysis are presented. The specific area of investigation is the effect of the temperature distribution changes due to wetting of the test pipe near the crack on the increase in the crack opening area and leak rate. Two 12-inch straight pipes subjected to both internal pressure and thermal load, but not to bending load, are modelled. The leak rate was found to be very susceptible to the metal temperature of the piping. In leak rate tests, therefore, it is recommended that temperature distribution be measured precisely for a wide area.

  8. Fuel leak detection apparatus for gas cooled nuclear reactors

    DOEpatents

    Burnette, Richard D.

    1977-01-01

    Apparatus is disclosed for detecting nuclear fuel leaks within nuclear power system reactors, such as high temperature gas cooled reactors. The apparatus includes a probe assembly that is inserted into the high temperature reactor coolant gaseous stream. The probe has an aperture adapted to communicate gaseous fluid between its inside and outside surfaces and also contains an inner tube for sampling gaseous fluid present near the aperture. A high pressure supply of noncontaminated gas is provided to selectively balance the pressure of the stream being sampled to prevent gas from entering the probe through the aperture. The apparatus includes valves that are operable to cause various directional flows and pressures, which valves are located outside of the reactor walls to permit maintenance work and the like to be performed without shutting down the reactor.

  9. Leaking Underground Storage Tank (LUST) Trust Fund

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    In 1986, Congress created the Leaking Underground Storage Tank (LUST) Trust Fund to address releases from federally regulated underground storage tanks (USTs) by amending Subtitle I of the Solid Waste Disposal Act.

  10. Leak Detectives Saving Money, Water in Virginia

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    “Circuit riders” from the Virginia Rural Water Association (VRWA) are traveling to small communities across the Commonwealth using special equipment financed by EPA to locate expensive and wasteful leaks in drinking water distribution systems.

  11. Laboratory analysis of remotely collected oral fluid specimens for opiates by immunoassay.

    PubMed

    Niedbala, R S; Kardos, K; Waga, J; Fritch, D; Yeager, L; Doddamane, S; Schoener, E

    2001-01-01

    The performance characteristics of a method for detecting opiates (morphine, codeine, heroin, and 6-acetylmorphine [6-AM]) in oral fluid specimens were examined and compared with methods for urine specimens. The oral fluid was easily obtained using a simple device that collects between 1 and 1.5 mL of fluid for laboratory analysis. Simultaneously collected specimens from 60 known opiate abusers from a drug-treatment center were first tested using an immunoassay cutoff of 10 ng/mL in oral fluids and 2,000 ng/mL in urine. Using a second aliquot, opiate confirmation in urine was performed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and in oral fluids by GC-MS-MS. The combined immunoassay and GC-MS-MS procedures were completed with less than 250 pL of oral fluid. Opiates identified in oral fluid specimens from heroin users included morphine, codeine, heroin, and 6-AM. The immunoassay was tested for precision, stability, and the effects of potential cross-reactants. The results yielded 93.6% agreement between oral fluid and urine, suggesting that oral fluid may be a reliable matrix for opiate detection.

  12. Use and practice of achiral and chiral supercritical fluid chromatography in pharmaceutical analysis and purification.

    PubMed

    Lemasson, Elise; Bertin, Sophie; West, Caroline

    2016-01-01

    The interest of pharmaceutical companies for complementary high-performance chromatographic tools to assess a product's purity or enhance this purity is on the rise. The high-throughput capability and economic benefits of supercritical fluid chromatography, but also the "green" aspect of CO2 as the principal solvent, render supercritical fluid chromatography very attractive for a wide range of pharmaceutical applications. The recent reintroduction of new robust instruments dedicated to supercritical fluid chromatography and the progress in stationary phase technology have also greatly benefited supercritical fluid chromatography. Additionally, it was shown several times that supercritical fluid chromatography could be orthogonal to reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography and could efficiently compete with it. Supercritical fluid chromatography is an adequate tool for small molecules of pharmaceutical interest: synthetic intermediates, active pharmaceutical ingredients, impurities, or degradation products. In this review, we first discuss about general chromatographic conditions for supercritical fluid chromatography analysis to better suit compounds of pharmaceutical interest. We also discuss about the use of achiral and chiral supercritical fluid chromatography for analytical purposes and the recent applications in these areas. The use of preparative supercritical fluid chromatography by pharmaceutical companies is also covered.

  13. A Computer Program for Consolidation and Dynamic Response Analysis of Fluid-Saturated Media.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-06-01

    Codes Avail and/or Geotechnical Engineering Report No. 14 Dist I Special The Ohio State University Research Foundation 1314 Kinnear Road, Columbus, Ohio...CONSOLIDATION AND DYNAMIC RESPONSE ANALYSIS OF FLUID-SATURATED MEDIA Ranbir S. Sandhu, B. Aboustit, S. J. Hong and M. S. Hiremath Department of Civil Engineering ...RESPONSE ANALYSIS OF FLUID-SATURATED MEDIA By Ranbir S. Sandhu, B. Aboustit, S. J. Hong and M. S. Hiremath Department of Civil Engineering June 1984 Acce

  14. mpileaks - an MPI opject leak debugging library

    SciTech Connect

    Leon, E. A.

    2011-11-14

    The mpileaks tool is to be used by MPI application developers to track and report leaked MPI objects, such as requests, groups, and datatypes. This debugging tool is useful as a quality assurance check for MPI applications, or it can be used to identify leaks fatal to long-running MPI applications. It provides an efficient method to report bugs that are otherwise fifficult to identify.

  15. Chaos analysis of viscoelastic chaotic flows of polymeric fluids in a micro-channel

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, C. P.; Lam, Y. C.; Han, J.

    2015-07-15

    Many fluids, including biological fluids such as mucus and blood, are viscoelastic. Through the introduction of chaotic flows in a micro-channel and the construction of maps of characteristic chaos parameters, differences in viscoelastic properties of these fluids can be measured. This is demonstrated by creating viscoelastic chaotic flows induced in an H-shaped micro-channel through the steady infusion of a polymeric fluid of polyethylene oxide (PEO) and another immiscible fluid (silicone oil). A protocol for chaos analysis was established and demonstrated for the analysis of the chaotic flows generated by two polymeric fluids of different molecular weight but with similar relaxation times. The flows were shown to be chaotic through the computation of their correlation dimension (D{sub 2}) and the largest Lyapunov exponent (λ{sub 1}), with D{sub 2} being fractional and λ{sub 1} being positive. Contour maps of D{sub 2} and λ{sub 1} of the respective fluids in the operating space, which is defined by the combination of polymeric fluids and silicone oil flow rates, were constructed to represent the characteristic of the chaotic flows generated. It was observed that, albeit being similar, the fluids have generally distinct characteristic maps with some similar trends. The differences in the D{sub 2} and λ{sub 1} maps are indicative of the difference in the molecular weight of the polymers in the fluids because the driving force of the viscoelastic chaotic flows is of molecular origin. This approach in constructing the characteristic maps of chaos parameters can be employed as a diagnostic tool for biological fluids and, more generally, chaotic signals.

  16. Chaos analysis of viscoelastic chaotic flows of polymeric fluids in a micro-channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, C. P.; Han, J.; Lam, Y. C.

    2015-07-01

    Many fluids, including biological fluids such as mucus and blood, are viscoelastic. Through the introduction of chaotic flows in a micro-channel and the construction of maps of characteristic chaos parameters, differences in viscoelastic properties of these fluids can be measured. This is demonstrated by creating viscoelastic chaotic flows induced in an H-shaped micro-channel through the steady infusion of a polymeric fluid of polyethylene oxide (PEO) and another immiscible fluid (silicone oil). A protocol for chaos analysis was established and demonstrated for the analysis of the chaotic flows generated by two polymeric fluids of different molecular weight but with similar relaxation times. The flows were shown to be chaotic through the computation of their correlation dimension (D2) and the largest Lyapunov exponent (λ1), with D2 being fractional and λ1 being positive. Contour maps of D2 and λ1 of the respective fluids in the operating space, which is defined by the combination of polymeric fluids and silicone oil flow rates, were constructed to represent the characteristic of the chaotic flows generated. It was observed that, albeit being similar, the fluids have generally distinct characteristic maps with some similar trends. The differences in the D2 and λ1 maps are indicative of the difference in the molecular weight of the polymers in the fluids because the driving force of the viscoelastic chaotic flows is of molecular origin. This approach in constructing the characteristic maps of chaos parameters can be employed as a diagnostic tool for biological fluids and, more generally, chaotic signals.

  17. Forensic Body Fluid Identification by Analysis of Multiple RNA Markers Using NanoString Technology

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jong-Lyul; Park, Seong-Min; Kim, Jeong-Hwan; Lee, Han-Chul; Lee, Seung-Hwan; Woo, Kwang-Man; Kim, Seon-Young

    2013-01-01

    RNA analysis has become a reliable method of body fluid identification for forensic use. Previously, we developed a combination of four multiplex quantitative PCR (qRT-PCR) probes to discriminate four different body fluids (blood, semen, saliva, and vaginal secretion). While those makers successfully identified most body fluid samples, there were some cases of false positive and negative identification. To improve the accuracy of the identification further, we tried to use multiple markers per body fluid and adopted the NanoString nCounter system instead of a multiplex qRT-PCR system. After measuring tens of RNA markers, we evaluated the accuracy of each marker for body fluid identification. For body fluids, such as blood and semen, each body fluid-specific marker was accurate enough for perfect identification. However, for saliva and vaginal secretion, no single marker was perfect. Thus, we designed a logistic regression model with multiple markers for saliva and vaginal secretion and achieved almost perfect identification. In conclusion, the NanoString nCounter is an efficient platform for measuring multiple RNA markers per body fluid and will be useful for forensic RNA analysis. PMID:24465241

  18. Forensic Body Fluid Identification by Analysis of Multiple RNA Markers Using NanoString Technology.

    PubMed

    Park, Jong-Lyul; Park, Seong-Min; Kim, Jeong-Hwan; Lee, Han-Chul; Lee, Seung-Hwan; Woo, Kwang-Man; Kim, Seon-Young

    2013-12-01

    RNA analysis has become a reliable method of body fluid identification for forensic use. Previously, we developed a combination of four multiplex quantitative PCR (qRT-PCR) probes to discriminate four different body fluids (blood, semen, saliva, and vaginal secretion). While those makers successfully identified most body fluid samples, there were some cases of false positive and negative identification. To improve the accuracy of the identification further, we tried to use multiple markers per body fluid and adopted the NanoString nCounter system instead of a multiplex qRT-PCR system. After measuring tens of RNA markers, we evaluated the accuracy of each marker for body fluid identification. For body fluids, such as blood and semen, each body fluid-specific marker was accurate enough for perfect identification. However, for saliva and vaginal secretion, no single marker was perfect. Thus, we designed a logistic regression model with multiple markers for saliva and vaginal secretion and achieved almost perfect identification. In conclusion, the NanoString nCounter is an efficient platform for measuring multiple RNA markers per body fluid and will be useful for forensic RNA analysis.

  19. Automated Hydrogen Gas Leak Detection System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    The Gencorp Aerojet Automated Hydrogen Gas Leak Detection System was developed through the cooperation of industry, academia, and the Government. Although the original purpose of the system was to detect leaks in the main engine of the space shuttle while on the launch pad, it also has significant commercial potential in applications for which there are no existing commercial systems. With high sensitivity, the system can detect hydrogen leaks at low concentrations in inert environments. The sensors are integrated with hardware and software to form a complete system. Several of these systems have already been purchased for use on the Ford Motor Company assembly line for natural gas vehicles. This system to detect trace hydrogen gas leaks from pressurized systems consists of a microprocessor-based control unit that operates a network of sensors. The sensors can be deployed around pipes, connectors, flanges, and tanks of pressurized systems where leaks may occur. The control unit monitors the sensors and provides the operator with a visual representation of the magnitude and locations of the leak as a function of time. The system can be customized to fit the user's needs; for example, it can monitor and display the condition of the flanges and fittings associated with the tank of a natural gas vehicle.

  20. Computational Fluid Dynamics Analysis of Canadian Supercritical Water Reactor (SCWR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Movassat, Mohammad; Bailey, Joanne; Yetisir, Metin

    2015-11-01

    A Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulation was performed on the proposed design for the Canadian SuperCritical Water Reactor (SCWR). The proposed Canadian SCWR is a 1200 MW(e) supercritical light-water cooled nuclear reactor with pressurized fuel channels. The reactor concept uses an inlet plenum that all fuel channels are attached to and an outlet header nested inside the inlet plenum. The coolant enters the inlet plenum at 350 C and exits the outlet header at 625 C. The operating pressure is approximately 26 MPa. The high pressure and high temperature outlet conditions result in a higher electric conversion efficiency as compared to existing light water reactors. In this work, CFD simulations were performed to model fluid flow and heat transfer in the inlet plenum, outlet header, and various parts of the fuel assembly. The ANSYS Fluent solver was used for simulations. Results showed that mass flow rate distribution in fuel channels varies radially and the inner channels achieve higher outlet temperatures. At the outlet header, zones with rotational flow were formed as the fluid from 336 fuel channels merged. Results also suggested that insulation of the outlet header should be considered to reduce the thermal stresses caused by the large temperature gradients.

  1. Analytical study of the performance of a geomembrane leak detection system.

    PubMed

    Lugli, Francesco; Mahler, Claudio Fernando

    2016-05-01

    The electrical detection of leaks in geomembranes is a method that allows identifying leakage of contaminants in lined facilities (e.g. sanitary landfills, pollutant ponds, etc.). The procedure in the field involves placing electrodes above and below the geomembrane, to generate an electrical current, which in turn engenders an electric potential distribution in the protective layer (generally a clayey soil). The electric potential will be greater in areas with higher current density, i.e. near leaks. In this study, we combined models from the literature to carry out a parametric analysis to identify the variables that most influence the amplitude of the electrical signals produced by leaks. The basic hypothesis is that the electrical conduction phenomena in a liner system could be depicted by a direct current circuit. After determining the value of the current at the leak, we calculated the electric potential distribution according to the model of Darilek and Laine. This enabled analysing the sensitivity of the parameters, which can be useful in the design of landfills and facilitate the location of leaks. This study showed that geomembranes with low electrical resistance (owing to low thickness, low resistivity, or extensive area) can hinder the leak detection process. In contrast, low thickness and high resistivity of the protection layer magnify the leak signal.

  2. Intraperitoneal urine leak after prostatectomy confirmed by 99mTc-MAG3 renogram.

    PubMed

    Pogatchnik, Brian; Monti, Serena; Lewis, David H; Heinrich, Demetra A; Mannelli, Lorenzo

    2014-08-01

    A 67-year-old patient presented with abdominal pain and distension 2 days after robotic radical prostatectomy for prostate carcinoma. He became anuric, and his serum creatinine level doubled, making IV contrast contraindicated. Abdominal CT without contrast demonstrated hypodense fluid in the peritoneum. Tc-MAG3 renogram detected extravasation of radiotracer from the bladder. Follow-up retrograde cystogram revealed a posterior anastomotic leak. The patient underwent uneventful surgical repair and made a full recovery. This case demonstrated that Tc-MAG3 can prove leak from the urinary tract, particularly helpful in the setting of poor renal function and contraindication to IV contrast.

  3. Modular, High-Volume Fuel Cell Leak-Test Suite and Process

    SciTech Connect

    Ru Chen; Ian Kaye

    2012-03-12

    Fuel cell stacks are typically hand-assembled and tested. As a result the manufacturing process is labor-intensive and time-consuming. The fluid leakage in fuel cell stacks may reduce fuel cell performance, damage fuel cell stack, or even cause fire and become a safety hazard. Leak check is a critical step in the fuel cell stack manufacturing. The fuel cell industry is in need of fuel cell leak-test processes and equipment that is automatic, robust, and high throughput. The equipment should reduce fuel cell manufacturing cost.

  4. Fluid leakage detector for vacuum applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farkas, Tibor (Inventor); Kim, Brian Byungkyu (Inventor); Nguyen, Bich Ngoc (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    A leak detection system for use with a fluid conducting system in a vacuum environment, such as space, is described. The system preferably includes a mesh-like member substantially disposed about the fluid conducting system, and at least one sensor disposed within the mesh-like member. The sensor is capable of detecting a decrease in temperature of the mesh-like member when a leak condition causes the fluid of the fluid conducting system to freeze when exposed to the vacuum environment. Additionally, a signal processor in preferably in communication with the sensor. The sensor transmits an electrical signal to the signal processor such that the signal processor is capable of indicating the location of the fluid leak in the fluid conducting system.

  5. Proteome analysis of pitcher fluid of the carnivorous plant Nepenthes alata.

    PubMed

    Hatano, Naoya; Hamada, Tatsuro

    2008-02-01

    The genus Nepenthes comprises carnivorous plants that digest insects in pitcher fluid to supplement their nitrogen uptake. In a recent study, two acid proteinases (nepenthesins I and II) were purified from the pitcher fluid. However, no other enzymes involved in prey digestion have been identified, although several enzyme activities have been reported. To identify all the proteins involved, we performed a proteomic analysis of Nepenthes pitcher fluid. The secreted proteins in pitcher fluid were separated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, and several protein bands were detected by silver staining. The proteins were identified by in-gel tryptic digestion, de novo peptide sequencing, and homology searches against public databases. The proteins included homologues of beta-D-xylosidase, beta-1,3-glucanase, chitinase, and thaumatin-like protein, most of which are designated "pathogenesis-related proteins". These proteins presumably inhibit bacterial growth in the pitcher fluid to ensure sufficient nutrients for Nepenthes growth.

  6. A fluid pressure and deformation analysis for geological sequestration of carbon dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Zhijie; Fang, Yilin; Scheibe, Timothy D.; Bonneville, Alain

    2012-06-07

    We present a hydro-mechanical model and deformation analysis for geological sequestration of carbon dioxide. The model considers the poroelastic effects by taking into account the two-way coupling between the geomechanical response and the fluid flow process in greater detail. In order for analytical solutions, the simplified hydro-mechanical model includes the geomechanical part that relies on the theory of linear elasticity, while the fluid flow is based on the Darcy’s law. The model was derived through coupling the two parts using the standard linear poroelasticity theory. Analytical solutions for fluid pressure field were obtained for a typical geological sequestration scenario and the solutions for ground deformation were obtained using the method of Green’s function. Solutions predict the temporal and spatial variation of fluid pressure, the effect of permeability and elastic modulus on the fluid pressure, the ground surface uplift, and the radial deformation during the entire injection period.

  7. Demonstration of rapid and sensitive module leak certification for Space Station Freedom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dietz, R. N.; Goodrich, R. W.

    1991-01-01

    A leak detection and quantification demonstration using perflurocarbon tracer (PFT) technology was successfully performed at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center on January 25, 1991. The real-time Dual Trap Analyzer (DTA) at one-half hour after the start of the first run gave an estimated leak rate of 0.7 mL/min. This has since been refined to be 1.15 (+ or -) 0.09 mL/min. The leak rates in the next three runs were determined to be 9.8 (+ or -) 0.7, -0.4 (+ or -) 0.3, and 76 (+ or -) 6 mL/min, respectively. The theory on leak quantification in the steady-state and time-dependent modes for a single zone test facility was developed and applied to the above determinations. The laboratory PFT analysis system gave a limit-of-detection (LOD) of 0.05 fL for ocPDCH. This is the tracer of choice and is about 100-fold better than that for the DTA. Applied to leak certification, the LOD is about 0.00002 mL/s (0.000075 L/h), a 5 order-of-magnitude improvement over the original leak certification specification. Furthermore, this limit can be attained in a measurement period of 3 to 4 hours instead of days, weeks, or months. A new Leak Certification Facility is also proposed to provide for zonal (three zones) determination of leak rates. The appropriate multizone equations, their solutions, and error analysis have already been derived. A new concept of seal-integrity certification has been demonstrated for a variety of controlled leaks in the range of module leak testing. High structural integrity leaks were shown to have a linear dependence of flow on (Delta)p. The rapid determination of leak rates at different pressures is proposed and is to be determined while subjecting the module to other external force-generating parameters such as vibration, torque, solar intensity, etc.

  8. Demonstration of rapid and sensitive module leak certification for space station freedom

    SciTech Connect

    Dietz, R.N.; Goodrich, R.W. )

    1991-03-01

    A leak detection and quantification demonstration using perflurocarbon tracer (PFT) technology was successfully performed at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center on January 25, 1991. The real-time Dual Trap Analyzer (DTA) at one-half hour after the start of the first run gave an estimated leak rate of 0.7 mL/min. This has since been refined to be 1.15 {plus minus} 0.09 mL/min. The leak rates in the next three runs were determined to be 9.8 {plus minus} 0.7, {minus}0.4 {plus minus} 0.3, and 76 {plus minus} 6 mL/min, respectively. The theory on leak quantification in the steady-state and time-dependent modes for a single zone test facility was developed and applied to the above determinations. The laboratory PFT analysis system gave a limit-of-detection (LOD) of 0.05 fL for ocPDCH. This is the tracer of choice and is about 100-fold better than that for the DTA. Applied to leak certification, the LOD is about 0.00002 mL/s (0.000075 L/h), a 5 order-of-magnitude improvement over the original leak certification specification. Furthermore, this limit can be attained in a measurement period of 3 to 4 hours instead of days, weeks, or months. A new Leak Certification Facility is also proposed to provide for zonal (three zones) determination of leak rates. The appropriate multizone equations, their solutions, and error analysis have already been derived. A new concept of seal-integrity certification has been demonstrated for a variety of controlled leaks in the range of module leak testing. High structural integrity leaks were shown to have a linear dependence of flow on {Delta}p. The rapid determination of leak rates at different pressures is proposed and is to be determined while subjecting the module to other external force-generating parameters such as vibration, torque, solar intensity, etc. 13 refs.

  9. Demonstration of rapid and sensitive module leak certification for space station freedom. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Dietz, R.N.; Goodrich, R.W.

    1991-03-01

    A leak detection and quantification demonstration using perflurocarbon tracer (PFT) technology was successfully performed at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center on January 25, 1991. The real-time Dual Trap Analyzer (DTA) at one-half hour after the start of the first run gave an estimated leak rate of 0.7 mL/min. This has since been refined to be 1.15 {plus_minus} 0.09 mL/min. The leak rates in the next three runs were determined to be 9.8 {plus_minus} 0.7, {minus}0.4 {plus_minus} 0.3, and 76 {plus_minus} 6 mL/min, respectively. The theory on leak quantification in the steady-state and time-dependent modes for a single zone test facility was developed and applied to the above determinations. The laboratory PFT analysis system gave a limit-of-detection (LOD) of 0.05 fL for ocPDCH. This is the tracer of choice and is about 100-fold better than that for the DTA. Applied to leak certification, the LOD is about 0.00002 mL/s (0.000075 L/h), a 5 order-of-magnitude improvement over the original leak certification specification. Furthermore, this limit can be attained in a measurement period of 3 to 4 hours instead of days, weeks, or months. A new Leak Certification Facility is also proposed to provide for zonal (three zones) determination of leak rates. The appropriate multizone equations, their solutions, and error analysis have already been derived. A new concept of seal-integrity certification has been demonstrated for a variety of controlled leaks in the range of module leak testing. High structural integrity leaks were shown to have a linear dependence of flow on {Delta}p. The rapid determination of leak rates at different pressures is proposed and is to be determined while subjecting the module to other external force-generating parameters such as vibration, torque, solar intensity, etc. 13 refs.

  10. Sequential Structural and Fluid Dynamics Analysis of Balloon-Expandable Coronary Stents: A Multivariable Statistical Analysis.

    PubMed

    Martin, David; Boyle, Fergal

    2015-09-01

    Several clinical studies have identified a strong correlation between neointimal hyperplasia following coronary stent deployment and both stent-induced arterial injury and altered vessel hemodynamics. As such, the sequential structural and fluid dynamics analysis of balloon-expandable stent deployment should provide a comprehensive indication of stent performance. Despite this observation, very few numerical studies of balloon-expandable coronary stents have considered both the mechanical and hemodynamic impact of stent deployment. Furthermore, in the few studies that have considered both phenomena, only a small number of stents have been considered. In this study, a sequential structural and fluid dynamics analysis methodology was employed to compare both the mechanical and hemodynamic impact of six balloon-expandable coronary stents. To investigate the relationship between stent design and performance, several common stent design properties were then identified and the dependence between these properties and both the mechanical and hemodynamic variables of interest was evaluated using statistical measures of correlation. Following the completion of the numerical analyses, stent strut thickness was identified as the only common design property that demonstrated a strong dependence with either the mean equivalent stress predicted in the artery wall or the mean relative residence time predicted on the luminal surface of the artery. These results corroborate the findings of the large-scale ISAR-STEREO clinical studies and highlight the crucial role of strut thickness in coronary stent design. The sequential structural and fluid dynamics analysis methodology and the multivariable statistical treatment of the results described in this study should prove useful in the design of future balloon-expandable coronary stents.

  11. Spacecraft Leak Location Using Structure-Borne Noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reusser, R. S.; Chimenti, D. E.; Holland, S. D.; Roberts, R. A.

    2010-02-01

    Guided ultrasonic waves, generated by air escaping through a small hole, have been measured with an 8×8 piezoelectric phased-array detector. Rapid location of air leaks in a spacecraft skin, caused by high-speed collisions with small objects, is essential for astronaut survival. Cross correlation of all 64 elements, one pair at a time, on a diced PZT disc combined with synthetic aperture analysis determines the dominant direction of wave propagation. The leak location is triangulated by combining data from two or more detector. To optimize the frequency band selection for the most robust direction finding, noise-field measurements of a plate with integral stiffeners have been performed using laser Doppler velocimetry. We compare optical and acoustic measurements to analyze the influence of the PZT array detector and its mechanical coupling to the plate.

  12. Image analysis for Validation of Simulations of Fluid Mix Problem

    SciTech Connect

    Kamath, C; Miller, P

    2007-01-10

    As computer simulations gain acceptance for the modeling of complex physical phenomena, there is an increasing need to validate these simulation codes by comparing them to experiments. Currently, this is done qualitatively, using a visual approach. This is obviously very subjective and more quantitative metrics are needed, especially to identify simulations which are closer to experiments than other simulations. In this paper, we show how image processing techniques can be effectively used in such comparisons. Using an example from the problem of mixing of two fluids, we show that we can quantitatively compare experimental and simulation images by extracting higher level features to characterize the objects in the images.

  13. Application of image processing techniques to fluid flow data analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giamati, C. C.

    1981-01-01

    The application of color coding techniques used in processing remote sensing imagery to analyze and display fluid flow data is discussed. A minicomputer based color film recording and color CRT display system is described. High quality, high resolution images of two-dimensional data are produced on the film recorder. Three dimensional data, in large volume, are used to generate color motion pictures in which time is used to represent the third dimension. Several applications and examples are presented. System hardware and software is described.

  14. Malignant Hemispheric Cerebral Infarction Associated with Idiopathic Systemic Capillary Leak Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Miyata, Kei; Mikami, Takeshi; Mikuni, Nobuhiro; Aisaka, Wakiko; Irifune, Hideto; Narimatsu, Eichi

    2013-01-01

    Idiopathic systemic capillary leak syndrome (ISCLS) is a rare condition that is characterized by unexplained episodic capillary hyperpermeability due to a shift of fluid and protein from the intravascular to the interstitial space. This results in diffuse general swelling, fetal hypovolemic shock, hypoalbuminemia, and hemoconcentration. Although ISCLS rarely induces cerebral infarction, we experienced a patient who deteriorated and was comatose as a result of massive cerebral infarction associated with ISCLS. In this case, severe hypotensive shock, general edema, hemiparesis, and aphasia appeared after serious antecedent gastrointestinal symptoms. Progressive life-threatening ischemic cerebral edema required decompressive hemicraniectomy. The patient experienced another episode of severe hypotension and limb edema that resulted in multiple extremity compartment syndrome. Treatment entailed forearm and calf fasciotomies. Cerebral edema in the ischemic brain progresses rapidly in patients suffering from ISCLS. Strict control of fluid volume resuscitation and aggressive diuretic therapy may be needed during the post-leak phase of fluid remobilization. PMID:24163674

  15. Effects of a documented hydrogen fluoride leak

    SciTech Connect

    Feder, W.A.

    1985-01-01

    At about 6 a.m. on June 19, 1984, 1037 liters of pressurized HF liquid escaped from a storage tank through a 2 mm diameter hole. 48 hours after the leak was discovered and sealed, visible injury to vegetation was observed 2 miles downwind of the source in a tear drop pattern. Injury symptoms ranged from a slight browning of leaves and needles to death of twigs and leaves and needles. Poplar, white pine, spruce, oak, red maple and several herbaceous plant species were injured. Ragweed was not injured but sensitive fern was severely injured. Goldenrod was also injured but recovered within 3 weeks after exposure. White pine trees within 1/4 of a mile from the source were killed. Fluoride analysis of tissues from upwind and downwind trees and herbaceous plants revealed fluoride tissue levels ranging from 5 to 34,000 ppm. Examples of distance/concentration are given. Soils revealed fluoride levels of about 1 ppm at all locations.

  16. Analysis of Fluid Flow and Heat Transfer in a Falling Film Using Volume of Fluid Method

    SciTech Connect

    Vishnoi, A.K.; Chandraker, D.K.; Vijayan, P.K.

    2006-07-01

    This paper deals with the applicability of VOF method for interface tracking with heat transfer and validation of the VOF approach using experimental data. A vertical channel flow problem in which the liquid is falling inside a vertical channel along one of the walls from the top is analysed and liquid--air interface is tracked. In the same problem analysis of heat transfer from the wall has been incorporated. This approach has a potential to predict liquid film thickness in a heated tube/subchannel which will lead to the evaluation of critical power (power corresponding to critical heat flux). (authors)

  17. NATRAN2. Fluid Hammer Analysis 1D & 2D Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, Y.W.; Valentin, R.A.

    1992-03-03

    NATRAN2 analyzes short-term pressure-pulse transients in a closed hydraulic system consisting of a two-dimensional axisymmetric domain connected to a one-dimensional piping network. The one-dimensional network may consist of series or parallel piping, pipe junctions, diameter discontinuities, junctions of three to six branches, closed ends, surge tanks, far ends, dummy junctions, acoustic impedance discontinuities, and rupture disks. By default, the working fluid is assumed to be liquid sodium without cavitation; but another working fluid can be specified in terms of its density, sonic speed, and viscosity. The source pressure pulse can arise from one of the following: a pressure-time function specified at some point in the two-dimensional domain, a pressure-time function or a sodium-water reaction specified at some point in the one-dimensional domain. The pressure pulse from a sodium-water reaction is assumed to be generated according to the dynamic model of Zaker and Salmon.

  18. Fluid Structural Analysis of Urine Flow in a Stented Ureter

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-Blanco, J. Carlos; Martínez-Reina, F. Javier; Cruz, Domingo; Pagador, J. Blas; Sánchez-Margallo, Francisco M.; Soria, Federico

    2016-01-01

    Many urologists are currently studying new designs of ureteral stents to improve the quality of their operations and the subsequent recovery of the patient. In order to help during this design process, many computational models have been developed to simulate the behaviour of different biological tissues and provide a realistic computational environment to evaluate the stents. However, due to the high complexity of the involved tissues, they usually introduce simplifications to make these models less computationally demanding. In this study, the interaction between urine flow and a double-J stented ureter with a simplified geometry has been analysed. The Fluid-Structure Interaction (FSI) of urine and the ureteral wall was studied using three models for the solid domain: Mooney-Rivlin, Yeoh, and Ogden. The ureter was assumed to be quasi-incompressible and isotropic. Data obtained in previous studies from ex vivo and in vivo mechanical characterization of different ureters were used to fit the mentioned models. The results show that the interaction between the stented ureter and urine is negligible. Therefore, we can conclude that this type of models does not need to include the FSI and could be solved quite accurately assuming that the ureter is a rigid body and, thus, using the more simple Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) approach. PMID:27127535

  19. EPA Chases Leaks in Arkansas during Seventh Annual Fix a Leak Week

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Central Arkansas Water is offering free leak repairs and rain gauges to low-income or elderly customers throughout Little Rock and North Little Rock. They will also giveaway promotional items such as low-flow showerheads, faucet aerators and toilet leak de

  20. Slip Analysis at Fluid-Solid Interface in MHD Squeezing Flow of Casson Fluid through Porous Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qayyum, Mubashir; Khan, Hamid; Khan, Omar

    An unsteady squeezing flow of Casson fluid having Magneto Hydro Dynamic effect and passing through porous medium channel with slip at the boundaries has been modelled and analyzed. Similarity transformations are applied to the governing partial differential equations of the Casson model to get a highly non-linear fourth order ordinary differential equation. The obtained equation is then solved analytically using the Homotopy Perturbation Method (HPM) for uniform and non-uniform slip at the boundaries. Five cases of boundary conditions, representing slip at upper wall only, uniform slip at both walls, non-uniform slip where slip at upper wall is greater than that of lower wall, non-uniform slip where slip at lower wall is greater than that of upper wall, and slip at lower wall only are considered and thoroughly investigated. Validation is performed by solving the equation numerically using fourth order explicit Runge Kutta method (ERK4). Both analytical and numerical results show good agreement. Lastly, the effects of various fluid parameters on the velocity profile are investigated for each case graphically. Analysis of these plots show that the positive and negative squeeze numbers have opposite effect on the velocity profile throughout all the cases. It is also observed that various fluid parameters like Casson, MHD, and Permeability have similar effects on the velocity profile in the cases when slip is occurring at the upper wall only, and non-uniform slip at both the boundaries with slip at lower wall is greater than upper wall. Furthermore, similar effects have been observed when slip is uniform at both the boundaries, and in case of non-uniform slip with slip at lower wall is less than the upper wall.

  1. Fully-Coupled Fluid/Structure Vibration Analysis Using MSC/NASTRAN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fernholz, Christian M.; Robinson, Jay H.

    1996-01-01

    MSC/NASTRAN's performance in the solution of fully-coupled fluid/structure problems is evaluated. NASTRAN is used to perform normal modes (SOL 103) and forced-response analyses (SOL 108, 111) on cylindrical and cubic fluid/structure models. Bulk data file cards unique to the specification of a fluid element are discussed and analytic partially-coupled solutions are derived for each type of problem. These solutions are used to evaluate NASTRAN's solutions for accuracy. Appendices to this work include NASTRAN data presented in fringe plot form, FORTRAN source code listings written in support of this work, and NASTRAN data file usage requirements for each analysis.

  2. Automated Static Culture System Cell Module Mixing Protocol and Computational Fluid Dynamics Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleis, Stanley J.; Truong, Tuan; Goodwin, Thomas J,

    2004-01-01

    This report is a documentation of a fluid dynamic analysis of the proposed Automated Static Culture System (ASCS) cell module mixing protocol. The report consists of a review of some basic fluid dynamics principles appropriate for the mixing of a patch of high oxygen content media into the surrounding media which is initially depleted of oxygen, followed by a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) study of this process for the proposed protocol over a range of the governing parameters. The time histories of oxygen concentration distributions and mechanical shear levels generated are used to characterize the mixing process for different parameter values.

  3. Operational Philosophy Concerning Manned Spacecraft Cabin Leaks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeSimpelaere, Edward

    2011-01-01

    The last thirty years have seen the Space Shuttle as the prime United States spacecraft for manned spaceflight missions. Many lessons have been learned about spacecraft design and operation throughout these years. Over the next few decades, a large increase of manned spaceflight in the commercial sector is expected. This will result in the exposure of commercial crews and passengers to many of the same risks crews of the Space Shuttle have encountered. One of the more dire situations that can be encountered is the loss of pressure in the habitable volume of the spacecraft during on orbit operations. This is referred to as a cabin leak. This paper seeks to establish a general cabin leak response philosophy with the intent of educating future spacecraft designers and operators. After establishing a relative definition for a cabin leak, the paper covers general descriptions of detection equipment, detection methods, and general operational methods for management of a cabin leak. Subsequently, all these items are addressed from the perspective of the Space Shuttle Program, as this will be of the most value to future spacecraft due to similar operating profiles. Emphasis here is placed upon why and how these methods and philosophies have evolved to meet the Space Shuttle s needs. This includes the core ideas of: considerations of maintaining higher cabin pressures vs. lower cabin pressures, the pros and cons of a system designed to feed the leak with gas from pressurized tanks vs. using pressure suits to protect against lower cabin pressures, timeline and consumables constraints, re-entry considerations with leaks of unknown origin, and the impact the International Space Station (ISS) has had to the standard Space Shuttle cabin leak response philosophy. This last item in itself includes: procedural management differences, hardware considerations, additional capabilities due to the presence of the ISS and its resource, and ISS docking/undocking considerations with a

  4. Analysis of semi-volatile organic compounds using supercritical fluid methodologies

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, B.W.; Chess, E.K.; Yonker, C.R.; Smith, R.D.

    1985-06-01

    This study demonstrates the applicability of supercritical fluid chromatography (SFC) and analytical supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) for the analysis of semi-volatile compounds. Mixtures of nitro-polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons that are not ammenable to gas chromatography were separated using SFC with tentative compound identifications made by SFC-MS. Comparisons of analytical SFE of XAD-2 resin and NBS Urban Dust (SRM 1649) to conventional Soxhlet extraction are also discussed.

  5. Modeling and measurement of the performance of a branched conduit sampling system in a mass spectrometer leak detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, John M.

    1994-01-01

    In the leak testing of a large engineering system, one may distinguish three stages, namely leakage measurement by an overall enclosure, leak location, and leakage measurement by a local enclosure. Sniffer probes attached to helium mass spectrometer leak detectors are normally designed for leak location, a qualitative inspection technique intended to pinpoint where a leak is but not to quantify its rate of discharge. The main conclusion of the present effort is that local leakage measurement by a leak detector with a sniffer probe is feasible provided one has: (1) quantitative data on the performance of the mass separator cell (a device interior to the unit where the stream of fluid in the sample line branches); and (2) a means of stabilizing the mass transfer boundary layer that is created near a local leak site when a sniffer probe is placed in its immediate vicinity. Theoretical models of the mass separator cell are provided and measurements of the machine-specific parameters in the formulas are presented. A theoretical model of a porous probe end for stabilizing the mass transfer boundary is also presented.

  6. Study on effect of liquid level on the heat leak into vertical cryogenic vessels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yang; Wang, Rongshun; Wang, Caili

    2010-06-01

    The diminishing of heat leak into cryogenic vessels can prolong the storage time of cryogenic liquid. With the storage of cryogenic liquid reducing, the heat leak decreases, while the actual storage time increases. Compared with the theoretical analysis, the numerical simulation can more accurately calculate the heat transfer and temperature distribution in the vessel with complex structure. In this paper the steady state heat leak into cryogenic vessels with different liquid level height is analyzed using a finite element model. And liquid nitrogen boil-off method was adopted in experiments to validate the result of numerical simulation. Experimental results indicate favorable agreement with numerical simulation by ANSYS software. The effect of liquid level on heat leak into the cryogenic vessel can be considered in calculation of storage time and structure design.

  7. Vortex element methods for fluid dynamic analysis of engineering systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Reginald Ivan

    The surface-vorticity method of computational fluid mechanics is described, with an emphasis on turbomachinery applications, in an introduction for engineers. Chapters are devoted to surface singularity modeling; lifting bodies, two-dimensional airfoils, and cascades; mixed-flow and radial cascades; bodies of revolution, ducts, and annuli; ducted propellers and fans; three-dimensional and meridional flows in turbomachines; free vorticity shear layers and inverse methods; vortex dynamics in inviscid flows; the simulation of viscous diffusion in discrete vortex modeling; vortex-cloud modeling by the boundary-integral method; vortex-cloud models for lifting bodies and cascades; and grid systems for vortex dynamics and meridional flows. Diagrams, graphs, and the listings for a set of computer programs are provided.

  8. Analysis of nuclear thermal propulsion systems using computational fluid dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stubbs, Robert M.; Kim, Suk C.; Papp, John L.

    1993-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analyses of nuclear rockets with relatively low chamber pressures were carried out to assess the merits of using such low pressures to take advantage of hydrogen dissociation and recombination. The computations, using a Navier-Stokes code with chemical kinetics, describe the flow field in detail, including gas dynamics, thermodynamic and chemical properties, and provide global performance quantities such as specific impulse and thrust. Parametric studies were performed varying chamber temperature, chamber pressure and nozzle size. Chamber temperature was varied between 2700 K and 3600 K, and chamber pressure between 0.1 atm. and 10 atm. Performance advantages associated with lower chamber pressures are shown to occur at the higher chamber temperatures. Viscous losses are greater at lower chamber pressures and can be decreased in larger nozzles where the boundary layer is a smaller fraction of the flow field.

  9. An improved PCA method with application to boiler leak detection.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xi; Marquez, Horacio J; Chen, Tongwen; Riaz, Muhammad

    2005-07-01

    Principal component analysis (PCA) is a popular fault detection technique. It has been widely used in process industries, especially in the chemical industry. In industrial applications, achieving a sensitive system capable of detecting incipient faults, which maintains the false alarm rate to a minimum, is a crucial issue. Although a lot of research has been focused on these issues for PCA-based fault detection and diagnosis methods, sensitivity of the fault detection scheme versus false alarm rate continues to be an important issue. In this paper, an improved PCA method is proposed to address this problem. In this method, a new data preprocessing scheme and a new fault detection scheme designed for Hotelling's T2 as well as the squared prediction error are developed. A dynamic PCA model is also developed for boiler leak detection. This new method is applied to boiler water/steam leak detection with real data from Syncrude Canada's utility plant in Fort McMurray, Canada. Our results demonstrate that the proposed method can effectively reduce false alarm rate, provide effective and correct leak alarms, and give early warning to operators.

  10. Ongoing Analysis of Rocket Based Combined Cycle Engines by the Applied Fluid Dynamics Analysis Group at Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruf, Joseph; Holt, James B.; Canabal, Francisco

    1999-01-01

    This paper presents the status of analyses on three Rocket Based Combined Cycle configurations underway in the Applied Fluid Dynamics Analysis Group (TD64). TD64 is performing computational fluid dynamics analysis on a Penn State RBCC test rig, the proposed Draco axisymmetric RBCC engine and the Trailblazer engine. The intent of the analysis on the Penn State test rig is to benchmark the Finite Difference Navier Stokes code for ejector mode fluid dynamics. The Draco engine analysis is a trade study to determine the ejector mode performance as a function of three engine design variables. The Trailblazer analysis is to evaluate the nozzle performance in scramjet mode. Results to date of each analysis are presented.

  11. Qualitative and Quantitative Proteome Analysis of Oral Fluids in Health and Periodontal Disease by Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Salih, Erdjan

    2017-01-01

    The significance of protein identification and characterization by classical protein chemistry approaches is clearly highlighted by our detailed understanding of the biological systems assembled over a time period of almost a century. The advent of state-of-the-art mass spectrometry (MS) with sensitivity, speed, and global protein analysis capacity without individual protein purification has transformed the classical protein chemistry with premise to accelerate discovery. These combined with the ability of the oral fluids such as whole saliva (WS) and gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) to reflect both systemic and locally derived proteins have generated significant interest to characterize these fluids more extensively by MS technology. This chapter deals with the experimental details of preanalytical steps using multidimensional protein separation combined with MS analysis of WS and GCF to achieve detailed protein composition at qualitative and quantitative levels. These approaches are interfaced with gold standard "stable-isotope" labeling technologies for large-scale quantitative MS analysis which is a prerequisite to determine accurate alterations in protein levels as a function of disease progression. The latter incorporates two stable-isotope chemistries one specific for cysteine containing proteins and the other universal amine-specific reagent in conjunction with oral fluids in health and periodontal disease to perform quantitative MS analysis. In addition, specific preanalytical steps demanded by the oral fluids such as GCF and WS for sample preparations to overcome limitations and uncertainties are elaborated for reliable large-scale quantitative MS analysis.

  12. ICPP water inventory study leak test report

    SciTech Connect

    Richards, B.T.

    1993-12-01

    Data from the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) indicate that there are three areas where perched water bodies (groundwater) are suspect to exist beneath the ICPP. Questions have been raised concerning the recharge sources for the northwest (NW) perched water body which is located below the northwest area of the ICPP. In response to these questions, a Water Inventory Study was initiated to determine the extent and the potential impacts of the ICPP water systems as a recharge source. A key part of the Water Inventory Study was the leak test investigation, performed to leak test the ICPP water piping distribution system, or portions thereof, which could potentially contribute to the recharge of the NW perched water body. This report provides an overview and the results of the leak test investigation and will be incorporated into the overall Water Inventory Study Report.

  13. Remote Leak Detection: Indirect Thermal Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clements, Sandra

    2002-01-01

    Remote sensing technologies are being considered for efficient, low cost gas leak detection. Eleven specific techniques have been identified for further study and evaluation of several of these is underway. The Indirect Thermal Technique is one of the techniques that is being explored. For this technique, an infrared camera is used to detect the temperature change of a pipe or fitting at the site of a gas leak. This temperature change is caused by the change in temperature of the gas expanding from the leak site. During the 10-week NFFP program, the theory behind the technique was further developed, experiments were performed to determine the conditions for which the technique might be viable, and a proof-of-concept system was developed and tested in the laboratory.

  14. Peristaltic Flow of Rabinowitsch Fluid in a Curved Channel: Mathematical Analysis Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Nasir; Sajid, Muhammad; Javid, Khurram; Ahmed, Raheel

    2017-03-01

    Recently, Maraj and Nadeem (E. N. Maraj, S. Nadeem, Z. Naturforsch. A 70, 513 (2015)) discussed the application of Rabinowitsch fluid model for the mathematical analysis of peristaltic flow in a curved channel. The mathematical analysis presented by these authors is scrutinised in detail and certain subtle details are pointed out which affect the final results.

  15. Poroelastic analysis of interstitial fluid flow in a single lamellar trabecula subjected to cyclic loading.

    PubMed

    Kameo, Yoshitaka; Ootao, Yoshihiro; Ishihara, Masayuki

    2016-04-01

    Trabecula, an anatomical unit of the cancellous bone, is a porous material that consists of a lamellar bone matrix and interstitial fluid in a lacuno-canalicular porosity. The flow of interstitial fluid caused by deformation of the bone matrix is believed to initiate a mechanical response in osteocytes for bone remodeling. In order to clarify the effect of the lamellar structure of the bone matrix--i.e., variations in material properties--on the fluid flow stimuli to osteocytes embedded in trabeculae, we investigated the mechanical behavior of an individual trabecula subjected to cyclic loading based on poroelasticity. We focused on variations in the trabecular permeability and developed an analytical solution containing both transient and steady-state responses for interstitial fluid pressure in a single trabecular model represented by a multilayered two-dimensional poroelastic slab. Based on the obtained solution, we calculated the pressure and seepage velocity of the interstitial fluid in lacuno-canalicular porosity, within the single trabecula, under various permeability distributions. Poroelastic analysis showed that a heterogeneous distribution of permeability produces remarkable variations in the fluid pressure and seepage velocity in the cross section of the individual trabecula, and suggests that fluid flow stimuli to osteocytes are mostly governed by the value of permeability in the neighborhood of the trabecular surfaces if there is no difference in the average permeability in a single trabecula.

  16. Endoscopic stenting for laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy leaks

    PubMed Central

    Aydın, Mehmet Timuçin; Alahdab, Yeşim Özen; Aras, Orhan; Karip, Bora; Onur, Ender; İşcan, Yalın; Memişoğlu, Kemal

    2016-01-01

    Objective Laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy is a widely accepted and effective bariatric surgery method. The rate of leakage at the staple-line has been reported to be between 1.5 and 5%. Aside from the use of percutaneous drainage, re-laparoscopy, or abdominal sepsis control by laparotomy, endoscopic esophagogastric stent placement is increasingly preferred as a treatment method. Because laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy is a widely used modality in our hospital, we aimed to evaluate the rate of leaks and the results of stent placements in our patients. Material and Methods Between January 1st 2010 and August 31st 2014, laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy was performed on 236 patients by three surgeons. The demographic information and postoperative discharge summaries were collected and analyzed with the permission of the hospital ethics committee. Information about leak treatment management was also collected. Results Leaks after laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy in four patients were stented in the first postoperative month. Short (12 cm) Hanora® (M.I.Tech, Gyeonggi-do, Korea) self-expandable coated stents were placed in two patients, and long (24 cm) Hanora® self-expandable coated stents were placed in the other two. The stents were removed after one month in two patients, two and a half months later in one, and five months later in another patient. The leaks were demonstrated to be healed in all patients after stent removal. Endoscopic stent revision was performed in one patient due to migration of the stent and in another for stent breakage. Conclusion The success rate of treatment of leaks after laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy by stent placement has been variable in the literature. The success in early stent placement has been shown to be related to physician expertise. According to the results of our patients, we suggest that endoscopic stent placement in the early stage after controlling sepsis is an effective method in the management of leaks. PMID:28149125

  17. Apparatus for Leak Testing Pressurized Hoses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Underwood, Steve D. (Inventor); Garrison, Steve G. (Inventor); Gant, Bobby D. (Inventor); Palmer, John R. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A hose-attaching apparatus for leak-testing a pressurized hose may include a hose-attaching member. A bore may extend through the hose-attaching member. An internal annular cavity may extend coaxially around the bore. At least one of a detector probe hole and a detector probe may be connected to the internal annular cavity. At least a portion of the bore may have a diameter which is at least one of substantially equal to and less than a diameter of a hose to be leak-tested.

  18. Single-Shell Tank Leak Integrity Summary

    SciTech Connect

    Harlow, D. G.; Girardot, C. L.; Venetz, T. J.

    2015-03-26

    This document summarizes and evaluates the information in the Hanford Tri-Party Agreement Interim Milestone M-045-91F Targets completed between 2010 and 2015. 1) Common factors of SST liner failures (M-045-91F-T02), 2) the feasibility of testing for ionic conductivity between the inside and outside of SSTs (M-045-91F-T03, and 3) the causes, locations, and rates of leaks from leaking SSTs (M-045-91F-T04).

  19. Gas chromatographic analysis of volatiles in fluid and gas inclusions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Andrawes, F.; Holzer, G.; Roedder, E.; Gibson, E.K.; Oro, J.

    1984-01-01

    Most geological samples and some synthetic materials contain fluid inclusions. These inclusions preserve for us tiny samples of the liquid and/or the gas phase that was present during formation, although in some cases they may have undergone significant changes from the original material. Studies of the current composition of the inclusions provide data on both the original composition and the change since trapping. These inclusions are seldom larger than 1 millimeter in diameter. The composition varies from a single major compound (e.g., water) in a single phase to a very complex mixture in one or more phases. The concentration of some of the compounds present may be at trace levels. We present here some analyses of inclusions in a variety of geological samples, including diamonds. We used a sample crusher and a gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) system to analyze for organic and inorganic volatiles present as major to trace constituents in inclusions. The crusher is a hardened stainless-steel piston cylinder apparatus with tungsten carbide crusing surfaces, and is operated in a pure helium atmosphere at a controlled temperature. Samples ranging from 1 mg to 1 g were crushed and the released volatiles were analyzed using multi-chromatographic columns and detectors, including the sensitive helium ionization detector. Identification of the GC peaks was carried out by GC-MS. This combination of procedures has been shown to provide geochemically useful information on the process involved in the history of the samples analyzed. ?? 1984.

  20. Computational Fluid Dynamics Analysis of Flexible Duct Junction Box Design

    SciTech Connect

    Beach, R.; Prahl, D.; Lange, R.

    2013-12-01

    IBACOS explored the relationships between pressure and physical configurations of flexible duct junction boxes by using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations to predict individual box parameters and total system pressure, thereby ensuring improved HVAC performance. Current Air Conditioning Contractors of America (ACCA) guidance (Group 11, Appendix 3, ACCA Manual D, Rutkowski 2009) allows for unconstrained variation in the number of takeoffs, box sizes, and takeoff locations. The only variables currently used in selecting an equivalent length (EL) are velocity of air in the duct and friction rate, given the first takeoff is located at least twice its diameter away from the inlet. This condition does not account for other factors impacting pressure loss across these types of fittings. For each simulation, the IBACOS team converted pressure loss within a box to an EL to compare variation in ACCA Manual D guidance to the simulated variation. IBACOS chose cases to represent flows reasonably correlating to flows typically encountered in the field and analyzed differences in total pressure due to increases in number and location of takeoffs, box dimensions, and velocity of air, and whether an entrance fitting is included. The team also calculated additional balancing losses for all cases due to discrepancies between intended outlet flows and natural flow splits created by the fitting. In certain asymmetrical cases, the balancing losses were significantly higher than symmetrical cases where the natural splits were close to the targets. Thus, IBACOS has shown additional design constraints that can ensure better system performance.

  1. SELDI-TOF analysis of glioblastoma cyst fluid is an approach for assessing cellular protein expression

    PubMed Central

    Hoelscher, Martin; Richter, Nina; Melle, Christian; von Eggeling, Ferdinand; Schaenzer, Anne; Nestler, Ulf

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: In about 10% of glioblastoma patients, preoperative MRI discloses the presence of tumor cysts. Whereas the impact of cystic appearance on prognosis has been discussed extensively, only little is known about the tumor cyst fluid. In this study, we tested the feasibility of the surface enhanced laser desorption ionization time of flight (SELDI-TOF) technique to detect cyst fluid proteins. Methods: Cyst fluid was collected from 21 glioblastoma patients for SELDI-TOF analysis and compared to control cerebrospinal fluids from 15 patients with spinal stenosis. Resulting protein peaks with significant differences between groups were further described, using the molecular weight in an internet search of protein databases and publications. Two potential cyst fluid proteins, basigin and ferritin light chain, were selected for immunohistological detection in the histologic slides of the patients, metallothionein (MT) served as negative control. Results: As supposed from the results of the SELDI-TOF analysis, basigin and ferritin were detected immunohistochemically in the cyst wall, whereas MT was more equally distributed between the cyst wall and the surrounding tumor tissue. Median survival time of the patients was 20 months (range 2 to 102 months) and correlated with age, but not with expression of the three proteins. Discussion: The SELDI-TOF approach reveals a number of proteins, potentially present in glioblastoma cyst fluid. Identification of these proteins in tumor cells may help understand the pathogenetic pathways and the prognostic value of cystic changes. PMID:24225180

  2. The analysis of frequency-dependent characteristics for fluid detection: a physical model experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shuang-Quan; Li, Xiang-Yang; Wang, Shang-Xu

    2012-06-01

    According to the Chapman multi-scale rock physical model, the seismic response characteristics vary for different fluid-saturated reservoirs. For class I AVO reservoirs and gas-saturation, the seismic response is a high-frequency bright spot as the amplitude energy shifts. However, it is a low-frequency shadow for the Class III AVO reservoirs saturated with hydrocarbons. In this paper, we verified the high-frequency bright spot results of Chapman for the Class I AVO response using the frequency-dependent analysis of a physical model dataset. The physical model is designed as inter-bedded thin sand and shale based on real field geology parameters. We observed two datasets using fixed offset and 2D geometry with different fluidsaturated conditions. Spectral and time-frequency analyses methods are applied to the seismic datasets to describe the response characteristics for gas-, water-, and oil-saturation. The results of physical model dataset processing and analysis indicate that reflection wave tuning and fluid-related dispersion are the main seismic response characteristic mechanisms. Additionally, the gas saturation model can be distinguished from water and oil saturation for Class I AVO utilizing the frequency-dependent abnormal characteristic. The frequency-dependent characteristic analysis of the physical model dataset verified the different spectral response characteristics corresponding to the different fluid-saturated models. Therefore, by careful analysis of real field seismic data, we can obtain the abnormal spectral characteristics induced by the fluid variation and implement fluid detection using seismic data directly.

  3. Computational Fluid Dynamics-Based Aeroservoelastic Analysis with Hyper-X Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, K. K.; Bach, C.

    2007-01-01

    A finite element computational fluids dynamics-based aeroservoelastic analysis methodology is presented in this paper, in which both structural and fluids discretization are achieved by the finite element method, and their interaction is modeled by the transpiration boundary condition technique. In the fluids discipline either inviscid or viscous flow may be accounted for, usually employing unstructured grids.Adescription of a novel viscous flow solver employing unstructured grids is given in detail. Provisions are made for digital as well as analog controllers. These new aeroservoelastic analysis techniques are next applied for the solution of a number of example problems including the novel Hyper-X launch vehicle. Experimental and actual flight test data are also compared with analysis results that signify to the efficacy and accuracy of the newly developed solution procedures.

  4. Bicompartmental analysis of cerebrospinal fluid circulation. Theory and clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Cabanes, J; Marti, J; Orozco, M; Beltran, A

    1983-08-01

    A new model for cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) circulation is proposed. Specific activity/time curves for CSF kinetics determined after intraventricular injection of a radiotracer were produced by fitting a biexponential function to data points and developing a two-compartmental model. Calculation of kinetic parameters of the model provides quantitative data about CSF dynamics. The study of each compartment separately and of the intercompartmental relationship is possible with this model. Sequential scan images and graphic plots of the variations of radioactivity in both compartments, derived from this model, add supplementary information in the evaluation of patients. Ventriculography was performed in 80 patients, who fell into four groups: those with normal CSF circulation, hydrocephalus, infantile hydrocephalus, and functioning ventricular shunts. Normal and hydrocephalic patients showed significant differences between the two groups in the means of some numerical parameters calculated from the new model. An increase of intraventricular radioactivity at 24 hours (p less than 10(-4)) and of the volume of Compartment 1 (p less than 0.01) with decreased volume of Compartment 2 (p less than 10(-4)) and total flow outside the system (p less than 10(-3)) were found in patients with hydrocephalus. The limiting values for normal patients were also estimated. Communicating and obstructive hydrocephalus could be differentiated by this method; however, no differences in mean values were found relating to the etiology or clinical course of the hydrocephalus. Normal-pressure hydrocephalus and cerebral atrophy produced significantly different mean values for the volume of Compartment 2 (p less than 0.01), flow out of the system (p less than 0.01), and intercompartmental flow (p less than 0.01).

  5. Analysis and optimisation of a mixed fluid cascade (MFC) process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, He; Sun, Heng; Sun, Shoujun; Chen, Cheng

    2017-04-01

    A mixed fluid cascade (MFC) process that comprises three refrigeration cycles has great capacity for large-scale LNG production, which consumes a great amount of energy. Therefore, any performance enhancement of the liquefaction process will significantly reduce the energy consumption. The MFC process is simulated and analysed by use of proprietary software, Aspen HYSYS. The effect of feed gas pressure, LNG storage pressure, water-cooler outlet temperature, different pre-cooling regimes, liquefaction, and sub-cooling refrigerant composition on MFC performance are investigated and presented. The characteristics of its excellent numerical calculation ability and the user-friendly interface of MATLAB™ and powerful thermo-physical property package of Aspen HYSYS are combined. A genetic algorithm is then invoked to optimise the MFC process globally. After optimisation, the unit power consumption can be reduced to 4.655 kW h/kmol, or 4.366 kW h/kmol on condition that the compressor adiabatic efficiency is 80%, or 85%, respectively. Additionally, to improve the process further, with regards its thermodynamic efficiency, configuration optimisation is conducted for the MFC process and several configurations are established. By analysing heat transfer and thermodynamic performances, the configuration entailing a pre-cooling cycle with three pressure levels, liquefaction, and a sub-cooling cycle with one pressure level is identified as the most efficient and thus optimal: its unit power consumption is 4.205 kW h/kmol. Additionally, the mechanism responsible for the weak performance of the suggested liquefaction cycle configuration lies in the unbalanced distribution of cold energy in the liquefaction temperature range.

  6. Viscous flow effects on hydrogen leaks from cracks in the Orbiter Challenger main engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodrich, W. D.

    1984-01-01

    An analytical model was developed to provide additional insight and understanding of the factors that influence the simulation and prediction of leak rates from small cracks in pressurized containers. Specifically, the analysis was aimed at developing an analytical model capable of predicting the hydrogen leak rates from a crack in the combustion chamber coolant discharge manifold on main engine 1 of the Orbiter Challenger that was discovered during flight readiness firings 1 and 2. This model was based on viscous pipe flow analyses and calibrated for the crack geometry by using helium leak-rate data obtained from both low- and high-pressure tests used to simulate the flight readiness firing test conditions. In addition, this model includes the effects of crack width changes caused by different working stresses associated with the different test conditions. Because of the combination of the small crack dimensions and the wide range of pressures used for the test conditions, either laminar or turbulent viscous effects dominated the flows at all test conditions. This model was used to illustrate the sensitivity of the predicted leak rates to considerations of test conditions, viscous flow effects, and geometric features of the crack. In addition, the model was certified by comparing the hydrogen leak-rate prediction for the flight readiness firing test condition to the actual measured leak rate. The prediction was within 9 percent of the measured value.

  7. Standoff gas leak detectors based on tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frish, M. B.; Wainner, R. T.; Green, B. D.; Laderer, M. C.; Allen, M. G.

    2005-11-01

    Trace gas sensing and analysis by Tunable Diode Laser Absorption Spectroscopy (TDLAS) has become a robust and reliable technology accepted for industrial process monitoring and control, quality assurance, environmental sensing, plant safety, and infrastructure security. Sensors incorporating well-packaged wavelength-stabilized near-infrared (1.2 to 2.0 μm) laser sources sense over a dozen toxic or industrially-important gases. A large emerging application for TDLAS is standoff sensing of gas leaks, e.g. from natural gas pipelines. The Remote Methane Leak Detector (RMLD), a handheld standoff TDLAS leak survey tool that we developed, is replacing traditional leak detection tools that must be physically immersed within a leak to detect it. Employing a 10 mW 1.6 micron DFB laser, the RMLD illuminates a non-cooperative topographic surface, up to 30 m distant, and analyzes returned scattered light to deduce the presence of excess methane. The eye-safe, battery-powered, 6-pound handheld RMLD enhances walking pipeline survey rates by more than 30%. When combined with a spinning or rastering mirror, the RMLD serves as a platform for mobile leak mapping systems. Also, to enable high-altitude surveying and provide aerial disaster response, we are extending the standoff range to 3000 m by adding an EDFA to the laser transmitter.

  8. Narrative Review: Clarkson Disease-Systemic Capillary Leak Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Druey, Kirk M.; Greipp, Philip R.

    2010-01-01

    In 1960, Dr. Bayard Clarkson described a patient experiencing sporadic episodes of hypovolemia, hypotension, and edema. Plasma during the acute attack induced a “shock”-like syndrome when given systemically in rats. The unusual and enigmatic “Systemic Capillary Leak Syndrome” (SCLS) named for Dr. Clarkson is of unknown etiology and is characterized by transient, severe, reversible hemoconcentration and hypoalbuminemia due to leakage of fluids and macromolecules (up to 900 kDa) into tissues (1). Fewer than 150 cases of SCLS have been reported since 1960, but the nonspecific presenting symptoms and signs and high mortality rate may have resulted in under-recognition of this disorder. Given the substantial overlap of SCLS with other “shock” syndromes, including sepsis, anaphylaxis, and angioedema, clinicians should consider this diagnosis in patients with unexplained edema, increased hematocrit, and hypotension. PMID:20643990

  9. Idiopathic Systemic Capillary Leak Syndrome: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Yardimci, Bulent; Kazancioglu, Rumeyza

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Idiopathic systemic capillary leak syndrome (ISCLS) is rarely seen, and presents with recurrent episodes of hypotension, shock, hemoconcentration, and hypoproteinemia. The main pathology is the dysfunction of the vascular endothelium, and it is characterized by an increase of capillary permeability that is accompanied by the loss of intravascular fluid and protein. Case Presentation We present a 58-year-old female who presented with peripheral edema, leg pain, and syncope at the emergency department. Interestingly demyemilising neuropathy, which is a rare finding, ensued on day 4. She is still being treated using intravenous immunoglobulin therapy. Conclusions The early signs and symptoms of ISCLS may be subtle; therefore the diagnosis can easily be missed and prompt treatment of the syndrome may be postponed. Thus, the clinician must consider ISCLS in differential diagnosis in cases of hypotension, hemoconcentration, and hypoalbuminemia. PMID:27195144

  10. Cerebrospinal fluid analysis detects cerebral amyloid-β accumulation earlier than positron emission tomography.

    PubMed

    Palmqvist, Sebastian; Mattsson, Niklas; Hansson, Oskar

    2016-04-01

    Cerebral accumulation of amyloid-β is thought to be the starting mechanism in Alzheimer's disease. Amyloid-β can be detected by analysis of cerebrospinal fluid amyloid-β42 or amyloid positron emission tomography, but it is unknown if any of the methods can identify an abnormal amyloid accumulation prior to the other. Our aim was to determine whether cerebrospinal fluid amyloid-β42 change before amyloid PET during preclinical stages of Alzheimer's disease. We included 437 non-demented subjects from the prospective, longitudinal Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) study. All underwent (18)F-florbetapir positron emission tomography and cerebrospinal fluid amyloid-β42 analysis at baseline and at least one additional positron emission tomography after a mean follow-up of 2.1 years (range 1.1-4.4 years). Group classifications were based on normal and abnormal cerebrospinal fluid and positron emission tomography results at baseline. We found that cases with isolated abnormal cerebrospinal fluid amyloid-β and normal positron emission tomography at baseline accumulated amyloid with a mean rate of 1.2%/year, which was similar to the rate in cases with both abnormal cerebrospinal fluid and positron emission tomography (1.2%/year, P = 0.86). The mean accumulation rate of those with isolated abnormal cerebrospinal fluid was more than three times that of those with both normal cerebrospinal fluid and positron emission tomography (0.35%/year, P = 0.018). The group differences were similar when analysing yearly change in standardized uptake value ratio of florbetapir instead of percentage change. Those with both abnormal cerebrospinal fluid and positron emission tomography deteriorated more in memory and hippocampal volume compared with the other groups (P < 0.001), indicating that they were closer to Alzheimer's disease dementia. The results were replicated after adjustments of different factors and when using different cut-offs for amyloid-β abnormality

  11. Structural and vascular analysis of tissue engineering scaffolds, Part 1: Numerical fluid analysis.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Henrique A; Bártolo, Paulo J

    2012-01-01

    Rapid prototyping technologies were recently introduced in the medical field, being particularly viable to produce porous scaffolds for tissue engineering. These scaffolds should be biocompatible, biodegradable, with appropriate porosity, pore structure, and pore distribution on top of presenting both surface and structural compatibility. This chapter presents the state-of-the-art in tissue engineering and scaffold design using numerical fluid analysis for optimal vascular design. The vascularization of scaffolds is an important aspect due to its influence regarding the normal flow of biofluids within the human body. This computational tool also allows to design either a scaffold offering less resistance to the normal flow of biofluids or reducing the possibility for blood coagulation through forcing the flow toward a specific direction.

  12. Analysis of a micro-scale pump which uses controlled acoustic streaming for fluid locomotion

    SciTech Connect

    Dohner, J.L.

    1998-01-01

    In this report the analysis of a micro-scale pump is described. This micro-pump uses active control to produce a distributed body force in a fluid micro-channel. The desired effect of this body force is to drive fluid through the channel. Limitations, assumptions, and design parameters are discussed. The mathematical analysis of pump dynamics is explained in detail. A perturbation analysis is used on the equations of mass, momentum and state to produce equations of motion for first and second order effects. The first order effects are described by linear wave motion in the fluid and are found by using integral equation methods. The second order effects are driven by body forces resulting from first order effects. Thus, by controlling the production of wave motion in the channel, second order excitation can also be controlled. This report is all theory and therefore needs experimental validation. Although many of the assumptions used in this report have been used elsewhere in the literature and have been found to be sufficient, there are many aspects of the problem which have been left unresolved. In particular, flow separation in the fluid channel is a critical problem. If the fluid does not separate, pumping will occur through the channel, however, if internal or external forces are not sufficient to stop separation, this type of pump will not function.

  13. Numerical Analysis of Constrained Dynamical Systems, with Applications to Dynamic Contact of Solids, Nonlinear Elastodynamics and Fluid-Structure Interactions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-12-01

    NUMERICAL ANALYSIS OF CONSTRAINED DYNAMICAL SYSTEMS, WITH APPLICATIONS TO DYNAMIC CONTACT OF SOLIDS, NONLINEAR ELASTODYNAMICS AND FLUID-STRUCTURE...2000 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Numerical Analysis of Constrained Dynamical Systems, with 5b. GRANT NUMBER Applications to Dynamic...This extension allows the analysis of fluid-structure interfaces through the Lagrangian contact logic previously developed. Similarly, we have developed

  14. Computational fluid dynamics analysis of aerosol deposition in pebble beds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mkhosi, Margaret Msongi

    2007-12-01

    The Pebble Bed Modular Reactor is a high temperature gas cooled reactor which uses helium gas as a coolant. The reactor uses spherical graphite pebbles as fuel. The fuel design is inherently resistant to the release of the radioactive material up to high temperatures; therefore, the plant can withstand a broad spectrum of accidents with limited release of radionuclides to the environment. Despite safety features of the concepts, these reactors still contain large inventories of radioactive materials. The transport of most of the radioactive materials in an accident occurs in the form of aerosol particles. In this dissertation, the limits of applicability of existing computational fluid dynamics code FLUENT to the prediction of aerosol transport have been explored. The code was run using the Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes turbulence models to determine the effects of different turbulence models on the prediction of aerosol particle deposition. Analyses were performed for up to three unit cells in the orthorhombic configuration. For low flow conditions representing natural circulation driven flow, the laminar flow model was used and the results were compared with existing experimental data for packed beds. The results compares well with experimental data in the low flow regime. For conditions corresponding to normal operating of the reactor, analyses were performed using the standard k-ɛ turbulence model. From the inertial deposition results, a correlation that can be used to estimate the deposition of aerosol particles within pebble beds given inlet flow conditions has been developed. These results were converted into a dimensionless form as a function of a modified Stokes number. Based on results obtained in the laminar regime and for individual pebbles, the correlation developed for the inertial impaction component of deposition is believed to be credible. The form of the correlation developed also allows these results to be applied to pebble beds of different

  15. COPPER PITTING AND PINHOLE LEAK RESEARCH STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Localized copper corrosion or pitting is a significant problem at many water utilities across the United States. Copper pinhole leak problems resulting from extensive pitting are widely under reported. Given the sensitive nature of the problem, extent of damage possible, costs o...

  16. Microphone Detects Boiler-Tube Leaks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parthasarathy, S. P.

    1985-01-01

    Unit simple, sensitive, rugged, and reliable. Diaphragmless microphone detects leaks from small boiler tubes. Porous plug retains carbon granules in tube while allowing pressure changes to penetrate to granules. Has greater life expectancy than previous controllers and used in variety of hot corrosive atmospheres.

  17. [Ryanodine receptor, calcium leak and arrhythmias].

    PubMed

    Rueda, Angélica; de Alba-Aguayo, David R; Valdivia, Héctor H

    2014-01-01

    The participation of the ionic Ca(2+) release channel/ryanodine receptor in cardiac excitation-contraction coupling is well known since the late '80s, when various seminal papers communicated its purification for the first time and its identity with the "foot" structures located at the terminal cisternae of the sarcoplasmic reticulum. In addition to its main role as the Ca(2+) channel responsible for the transient Ca(2+) increase that activates the contractile machinery of the cardiomyocytes, the ryanodine receptor releases Ca(2+) during the relaxation phase of the cardiac cycle, giving rise to a diastolic Ca(2+) leak. In normal physiological conditions, diastolic Ca(2+) leak regulates the proper level of luminal Ca(2+), but in pathological conditions it participates in the generation of both, acquired and hereditary arrhythmias. Very recently, several groups have focused their efforts into the development of pharmacological tools to control the altered diastolic Ca(2+) leak via ryanodine receptors. In this review, we focus our interest on describing the participation of cardiac ryanodine receptor in the diastolic Ca(2+) leak under physiological or pathological conditions and also on the therapeutic approaches to control its undesired exacerbated activity during diastole.

  18. Fluid dynamic and thermodynamic analysis of a model pertaining to cryogenic fluid management in low gravity environments for a system with dynamically induced settling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rios, J.

    1982-01-01

    The settling behavior of the liquid and gaseous phases of a fluid in a propellant and in a zero-g environment, when such settling is induced through the use of a dynamic device, in this particular case, a helical screw was studied. Particular emphasis was given to: (1) the description of a fluid mechanics model which seems applicable to the system under consideration, (2) a First Law of Thermodynamics analysis of the system, and (3) a discussion of applicable scaling rules.

  19. Methods of analysis for anthocyanins in plants and biological fluids.

    PubMed

    Mazza, G; Cacace, Juan E; Kay, Colin D

    2004-01-01

    Anthocyanins are the largest group of water-soluble pigments in the plant kingdom. They are responsible for most of the red, blue, and purple colors of fruits, vegetables, flowers, and other plant tissues or products. The analysis of anthocyanins is complex as a result of their ability to undergo structural transformations and complexation reactions. In addition, they are difficult to measure independently of other flavonoids, as they have similar structural and reactivity characteristics. Anthocyanins are generally extracted with weakly acidified alcohol-based solvents, followed by concentration (under vacuum), and purification of the pigments. Paper and/or thin-layer chromatography and UV-Vis spectroscopy have traditionally been used for the identification of anthocyanins. Capillary zone electrophoresis, a hybrid of chromatography and electrophoresis, is gaining popularity for the analysis of anthocyanins; however, liquid chromatography (LC) has become the standard method for identification and separation in most laboratories and may be used for both preparative and quantitative analysis. LC with mass spectrometry (MS) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy are possibly the most powerful methods for the structural elucidation of anthocyanins available, to date. At present, the most satisfactory method for mixture analysis is the multistep method of separation, isolation, and quantification by LC with peak identification by MS and high-field NMR.

  20. Wavenumber Prediction of Waves in Buried Pipes for Water Leak Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MUGGLETON, J. M.; BRENNAN, M. J.; PINNINGTON, R. J.

    2002-01-01

    Water leaks are a topic of great concern in Britain and many other countries, because of decreasing water supplies and the deterioration of old pipework. Correlation techniques are widely used in leak detection, but for these to be effective, the propagation wavespeeds and wave attenuation must be known. Relatively predictable for metal pipes, these are largely unknown for the newer plastic pipes, being highly dependent on the pipe wall properties and the surrounding medium. In this paper, pipe equations for n=0 axisymmetric wave motion are derived for a fluid-filled pipe, surrounded by an infinite elastic medium which can support both longitudinal and shear waves. These equations are solved for two wave types,s =1,2, which correspond to a fluid dominated wave and an axial shell wave, and expressions for a complex wavenumber for each wave are given.

  1. Asynchronous in situ connected-components analysis for complex fluid flows

    SciTech Connect

    Mcclure, James; Berrill, Mark A; Prins, Jan F; Miller, Cass

    2016-01-01

    Fluid flow in porous media is at the heart of problems such as groundwater contamination and carbon sequestration, and presents an important challenge for scientific computing. For this class of problem, large three-dimensional simulations are performed to advance scientific inquiry. On massively parallel computing systems, the volume of data generated by such approaches can become a productivity bottleneck if the raw data generated from the simulation is analyzed in a post-processing step. We present a physics-based framework for in situ data reduction that is theoretically grounded in multiscale averaging theory. We show how task parallelism can be exploited to concurrently perform a variety of analysis tasks with data-dependent costs, including the generation of iso-surfaces, morphological analyses, and connected components analysis. A task management framework is constructed to launch asynchronous analysis threads, manage dependencies between different tasks, promote data locality and hide the impact of data transfers. The framework is applied to analyze GPU-based simulations of two-fluid flow in porous media, generating a set of averaged measures that represents the overall system behavior. We demonstrate how the approach can be applied to perform physically-consistent averaging over fluid subregions using connected components analysis. Simulations performed on Oak Ridge National Lab s Titan supercomputer are profiled to demonstrate the performance of the associated multi-threaded in situ analysis for typical production simulation of two-fluid flow.

  2. Modeling leaks from liquid hydrogen storage systems.

    SciTech Connect

    Winters, William Stanley, Jr.

    2009-01-01

    This report documents a series of models for describing intended and unintended discharges from liquid hydrogen storage systems. Typically these systems store hydrogen in the saturated state at approximately five to ten atmospheres. Some of models discussed here are equilibrium-based models that make use of the NIST thermodynamic models to specify the states of multiphase hydrogen and air-hydrogen mixtures. Two types of discharges are considered: slow leaks where hydrogen enters the ambient at atmospheric pressure and fast leaks where the hydrogen flow is usually choked and expands into the ambient through an underexpanded jet. In order to avoid the complexities of supersonic flow, a single Mach disk model is proposed for fast leaks that are choked. The velocity and state of hydrogen downstream of the Mach disk leads to a more tractable subsonic boundary condition. However, the hydrogen temperature exiting all leaks (fast or slow, from saturated liquid or saturated vapor) is approximately 20.4 K. At these temperatures, any entrained air would likely condense or even freeze leading to an air-hydrogen mixture that cannot be characterized by the REFPROP subroutines. For this reason a plug flow entrainment model is proposed to treat a short zone of initial entrainment and heating. The model predicts the quantity of entrained air required to bring the air-hydrogen mixture to a temperature of approximately 65 K at one atmosphere. At this temperature the mixture can be treated as a mixture of ideal gases and is much more amenable to modeling with Gaussian entrainment models and CFD codes. A Gaussian entrainment model is formulated to predict the trajectory and properties of a cold hydrogen jet leaking into ambient air. The model shows that similarity between two jets depends on the densimetric Froude number, density ratio and initial hydrogen concentration.

  3. REFLEAK: NIST Leak/Recharge Simulation Program for Refrigerant Mixtures

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 73 NIST REFLEAK: NIST Leak/Recharge Simulation Program for Refrigerant Mixtures (PC database for purchase)   REFLEAK estimates composition changes of zeotropic mixtures in leak and recharge processes.

  4. 49 CFR 230.64 - Leaks under lagging.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION STEAM LOCOMOTIVE INSPECTION AND MAINTENANCE STANDARDS Boilers and Appurtenances Steam Leaks § 230.64 Leaks under lagging. The steam locomotive owner and/or operator shall take out...

  5. 49 CFR 230.64 - Leaks under lagging.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION STEAM LOCOMOTIVE INSPECTION AND MAINTENANCE STANDARDS Boilers and Appurtenances Steam Leaks § 230.64 Leaks under lagging. The steam locomotive owner and/or operator shall take out...

  6. 49 CFR 230.64 - Leaks under lagging.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION STEAM LOCOMOTIVE INSPECTION AND MAINTENANCE STANDARDS Boilers and Appurtenances Steam Leaks § 230.64 Leaks under lagging. The steam locomotive owner and/or operator shall take out...

  7. 49 CFR 230.64 - Leaks under lagging.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION STEAM LOCOMOTIVE INSPECTION AND MAINTENANCE STANDARDS Boilers and Appurtenances Steam Leaks § 230.64 Leaks under lagging. The steam locomotive owner and/or operator shall take out...

  8. Clinical validation of the analysis of fluconazole in oral fluid in hospitalized children.

    PubMed

    van der Elst, Kim C M; van Alst, Manouche; Lub-de Hooge, Marjolijn N; van Hateren, Kai; Kosterink, Jos G W; Alffenaar, Jan-Willem C; Schölvinck, Elisabeth H

    2014-11-01

    Fluconazole is a first-line antifungal agent for the treatment and prophylaxis of invasive candidiasis in pediatric patients. Pediatric patients are at risk of suboptimal drug exposure, due to developmental changes in gastrointestinal and renal function, metabolic capacity, and volume of distribution. Therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) can therefore be useful to prevent underexposure of fluconazole in children and infants. Children, however, often fear needles and can have difficult vascular access. The purpose of this study was to develop and clinically validate a method of analysis to determine fluconazole in oral fluid in pediatric patients. Twenty-one paired serum and oral fluid samples were obtained from 19 patients and were analyzed using a validated liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS-MS) method after cross-validation between serum and oral fluid. The results were within accepted ranges for accuracy and precision, and samples were stable at room temperature for at least 17 days. A Pearson correlation test for the fluconazole concentrations in serum and oral fluid showed a correlation coefficient of 0.960 (P < 0.01). The mean oral fluid-to-serum concentration ratio was 0.99 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.88 to 1.10) with Bland-Altman analysis. In conclusion, an oral fluid method of analysis was successfully developed and clinically validated for fluconazole in pediatric patients and can be a noninvasive, painless alternative to perform TDM of fluconazole when blood sampling is not possible or desirable. When patients receive prolonged courses of antifungal treatment and use fluconazole at home, this method of analysis can extend the possibilities of TDM for patients at home.

  9. Dissertation Defense Computational Fluid Dynamics Uncertainty Analysis for Payload Fairing Spacecraft Environmental Control Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groves, Curtis Edward

    2014-01-01

    Spacecraft thermal protection systems are at risk of being damaged due to airflow produced from Environmental Control Systems. There are inherent uncertainties and errors associated with using Computational Fluid Dynamics to predict the airflow field around a spacecraft from the Environmental Control System. This paper describes an approach to quantify the uncertainty in using Computational Fluid Dynamics to predict airflow speeds around an encapsulated spacecraft without the use of test data. Quantifying the uncertainty in analytical predictions is imperative to the success of any simulation-based product. The method could provide an alternative to traditional "validation by test only" mentality. This method could be extended to other disciplines and has potential to provide uncertainty for any numerical simulation, thus lowering the cost of performing these verifications while increasing the confidence in those predictions. Spacecraft requirements can include a maximum airflow speed to protect delicate instruments during ground processing. Computational Fluid Dynamics can be used to verify these requirements; however, the model must be validated by test data. This research includes the following three objectives and methods. Objective one is develop, model, and perform a Computational Fluid Dynamics analysis of three (3) generic, non-proprietary, environmental control systems and spacecraft configurations. Several commercially available and open source solvers have the capability to model the turbulent, highly three-dimensional, incompressible flow regime. The proposed method uses FLUENT, STARCCM+, and OPENFOAM. Objective two is to perform an uncertainty analysis of the Computational Fluid Dynamics model using the methodology found in "Comprehensive Approach to Verification and Validation of Computational Fluid Dynamics Simulations". This method requires three separate grids and solutions, which quantify the error bars around Computational Fluid Dynamics

  10. Computational Fluid Dynamics Uncertainty Analysis for Payload Fairing Spacecraft Environmental Control Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groves, Curtis E.

    2013-01-01

    Spacecraft thermal protection systems are at risk of being damaged due to airflow produced from Environmental Control Systems. There are inherent uncertainties and errors associated with using Computational Fluid Dynamics to predict the airflow field around a spacecraft from the Environmental Control System. This proposal describes an approach to validate the uncertainty in using Computational Fluid Dynamics to predict airflow speeds around an encapsulated spacecraft. The research described here is absolutely cutting edge. Quantifying the uncertainty in analytical predictions is imperative to the success of any simulation-based product. The method could provide an alternative to traditional"validation by test only'' mentality. This method could be extended to other disciplines and has potential to provide uncertainty for any numerical simulation, thus lowering the cost of performing these verifications while increasing the confidence in those predictions. Spacecraft requirements can include a maximum airflow speed to protect delicate instruments during ground processing. Computationaf Fluid Dynamics can be used to veritY these requirements; however, the model must be validated by test data. The proposed research project includes the following three objectives and methods. Objective one is develop, model, and perform a Computational Fluid Dynamics analysis of three (3) generic, non-proprietary, environmental control systems and spacecraft configurations. Several commercially available solvers have the capability to model the turbulent, highly three-dimensional, incompressible flow regime. The proposed method uses FLUENT and OPEN FOAM. Objective two is to perform an uncertainty analysis of the Computational Fluid . . . Dynamics model using the methodology found in "Comprehensive Approach to Verification and Validation of Computational Fluid Dynamics Simulations". This method requires three separate grids and solutions, which quantify the error bars around

  11. Dissertation Defense: Computational Fluid Dynamics Uncertainty Analysis for Payload Fairing Spacecraft Environmental Control Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groves, Curtis Edward

    2014-01-01

    Spacecraft thermal protection systems are at risk of being damaged due to airflow produced from Environmental Control Systems. There are inherent uncertainties and errors associated with using Computational Fluid Dynamics to predict the airflow field around a spacecraft from the Environmental Control System. This paper describes an approach to quantify the uncertainty in using Computational Fluid Dynamics to predict airflow speeds around an encapsulated spacecraft without the use of test data. Quantifying the uncertainty in analytical predictions is imperative to the success of any simulation-based product. The method could provide an alternative to traditional validation by test only mentality. This method could be extended to other disciplines and has potential to provide uncertainty for any numerical simulation, thus lowering the cost of performing these verifications while increasing the confidence in those predictions.Spacecraft requirements can include a maximum airflow speed to protect delicate instruments during ground processing. Computational Fluid Dynamics can be used to verify these requirements; however, the model must be validated by test data. This research includes the following three objectives and methods. Objective one is develop, model, and perform a Computational Fluid Dynamics analysis of three (3) generic, non-proprietary, environmental control systems and spacecraft configurations. Several commercially available and open source solvers have the capability to model the turbulent, highly three-dimensional, incompressible flow regime. The proposed method uses FLUENT, STARCCM+, and OPENFOAM. Objective two is to perform an uncertainty analysis of the Computational Fluid Dynamics model using the methodology found in Comprehensive Approach to Verification and Validation of Computational Fluid Dynamics Simulations. This method requires three separate grids and solutions, which quantify the error bars around Computational Fluid Dynamics predictions

  12. Immersogeometric cardiovascular fluid-structure interaction analysis with divergence-conforming B-splines.

    PubMed

    Kamensky, David; Hsu, Ming-Chen; Yu, Yue; Evans, John A; Sacks, Michael S; Hughes, Thomas J R

    2017-02-01

    This paper uses a divergence-conforming B-spline fluid discretization to address the long-standing issue of poor mass conservation in immersed methods for computational fluid-structure interaction (FSI) that represent the influence of the structure as a forcing term in the fluid subproblem. We focus, in particular, on the immersogeometric method developed in our earlier work, analyze its convergence for linear model problems, then apply it to FSI analysis of heart valves, using divergence-conforming B-splines to discretize the fluid subproblem. Poor mass conservation can manifest as effective leakage of fluid through thin solid barriers. This leakage disrupts the qualitative behavior of FSI systems such as heart valves, which exist specifically to block flow. Divergence-conforming discretizations can enforce mass conservation exactly, avoiding this problem. To demonstrate the practical utility of immersogeometric FSI analysis with divergence-conforming B-splines, we use the methods described in this paper to construct and evaluate a computational model of an in vitro experiment that pumps water through an artificial valve.

  13. Concurrent and supercritical fluid chromatographic analysis of Terpene Lactones and ginkolic acids in Ginko biloba

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Supercritical fluid chromatography was used to resolve and determine ginkgolic acids (GAs) and terpene lactones concurrently in ginkgo plant materials and commercial dietary supplements. Analysis of GAs (C13:0, C15:0, C15:1 and C17:1) was carried out by ESI (-) mass detection. The ESI (-) spectra of...

  14. Application of a Real-Fluid Turbomachinery Analysis to Rocket Turbopump Geometries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorney, Daniel J.; Sondak, Douglas L.; Marcu, Bogdan

    2005-01-01

    A three-dimensional flow solver has been developed for turbomachinery components utilizing real fluid properties. The code is applicable to both incompressible and compressible flow fields. In this study, the code has been applied to the analysis of inducer and impeller geometries representative of those used in rocket engine applications. The predicted results show good agreement with the available experimental data.

  15. The Prevention and Management of Air Leaks Following Pulmonary Resection.

    PubMed

    Burt, Bryan M; Shrager, Joseph B

    2015-11-01

    Alveolar air leaks are a common problem in the daily practice of thoracic surgeons. Prolonged air leak following pulmonary resection is associated with increased morbidity, increased length of hospital stay, and increased costs. This article reviews the evidence for the various intraoperative and postoperative options to prevent and manage postoperative air leak.

  16. 1999 Leak Detection and Monitoring and Mitigation Strategy Update

    SciTech Connect

    OHL, P.C.

    1999-09-23

    This document is a complete revision of WHC-SD-WM-ES-378, Rev 1. This update includes recent developments in Leak Detection, Leak Monitoring, and Leak Mitigation technologies, as well as, recent developments in single-shell tank retrieval technologies. In addition, a single-shell tank retrieval release protection strategy is presented.

  17. 10 CFR 39.35 - Leak testing of sealed sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Leak testing of sealed sources. 39.35 Section 39.35 Energy....35 Leak testing of sealed sources. (a) Testing and recordkeeping requirements. Each licensee who uses... Commission for 3 years after the leak test is performed. (b) Method of testing. The wipe of a sealed...

  18. 10 CFR 39.35 - Leak testing of sealed sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Leak testing of sealed sources. 39.35 Section 39.35 Energy....35 Leak testing of sealed sources. (a) Testing and recordkeeping requirements. Each licensee who uses... Commission for 3 years after the leak test is performed. (b) Method of testing. The wipe of a sealed...

  19. Double Shell Tank AY-102 Radioactive Waste Leak Investigation

    SciTech Connect

    Washenfelder, Dennis J.

    2014-04-10

    PowerPoint. The objectives of this presentation are to: Describe Effort to Determine Whether Tank AY-102 Leaked; Review Probable Causes of the Tank AY-102 Leak; and, Discuss Influence of Leak on Hanford’s Double-Shell Tank Integrity Program.

  20. Effect of heat leaks in platinum resistance thermometry.

    PubMed

    Goldratt, E; Yeshurun, Y; Greenfield, A J

    1980-03-01

    The effect of heat leaks in platinum resistance thermometry is analyzed. An experimental method is proposed for estimating the magnitude of this effect. Results are reported for the measurement of the temperature of a hot, solid body under different heat-leak configurations. Design criteria for thermometers are presented which minimize the effect of such heat leaks.

  1. Effect of heat leaks in platinum resistance thermometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldratt, E.; Yeshurun, Y.; Greenfield, A. J.

    1980-03-01

    The effect of heat leaks in platinum resistance thermometry is analyzed. An experimental method is proposed for estimating the magnitude of this effect. Results are reported for the measurement of the temperature of a hot, solid body under different heat-leak configurations. Design criteria for thermometers are presented which minimize the effect of such heat leaks.

  2. 49 CFR 195.134 - CPM leak detection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false CPM leak detection. 195.134 Section 195.134... PIPELINE Design Requirements § 195.134 CPM leak detection. This section applies to each hazardous liquid... computational pipeline monitoring (CPM) leak detection system and each replaced component of an existing...

  3. 49 CFR 195.134 - CPM leak detection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false CPM leak detection. 195.134 Section 195.134... PIPELINE Design Requirements § 195.134 CPM leak detection. This section applies to each hazardous liquid... computational pipeline monitoring (CPM) leak detection system and each replaced component of an existing...

  4. 49 CFR 195.444 - CPM leak detection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false CPM leak detection. 195.444 Section 195.444... PIPELINE Operation and Maintenance § 195.444 CPM leak detection. Each computational pipeline monitoring (CPM) leak detection system installed on a hazardous liquid pipeline transporting liquid in...

  5. 49 CFR 195.444 - CPM leak detection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false CPM leak detection. 195.444 Section 195.444... PIPELINE Operation and Maintenance § 195.444 CPM leak detection. Each computational pipeline monitoring (CPM) leak detection system installed on a hazardous liquid pipeline transporting liquid in...

  6. Leak Detection and Location Technology Assessment for Aerospace Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, William C.; Coffey, Neil C.; Madaras, Eric I.

    2008-01-01

    Micro Meteoroid and Orbital Debris (MMOD) and other impacts can cause leaks in the International Space Station and other aerospace vehicles. The early detection and location of leaks is paramount to astronaut safety. Therefore this document surveys the state of the art in leak detection and location technology for aerospace vehicles.

  7. Kitchen Physics: Lessons in Fluid Pressure and Error Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vieyra, Rebecca Elizabeth; Vieyra, Chrystian; Macchia, Stefano

    2017-02-01

    Although the advent and popularization of the "flipped classroom" tends to center around at-home video lectures, teachers are increasingly turning to at-home labs for enhanced student engagement. This paper describes two simple at-home experiments that can be accomplished in the kitchen. The first experiment analyzes the density of four liquids using a waterproof case and a smartphone barometer in a container, sink, or tub. The second experiment determines the relationship between pressure and temperature of an ideal gas in a constant volume container placed momentarily in a refrigerator freezer. These experiences provide a ripe opportunity both for learning fundamental physics concepts as well as to investigate a variety of error analysis techniques that are frequently overlooked in introductory physics courses.

  8. Aeroservoelastic and Flight Dynamics Analysis Using Computational Fluid Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arena, Andrew S., Jr.

    1999-01-01

    This document in large part is based on the Masters Thesis of Cole Stephens. The document encompasses a variety of technical and practical issues involved when using the STARS codes for Aeroservoelastic analysis of vehicles. The document covers in great detail a number of technical issues and step-by-step details involved in the simulation of a system where aerodynamics, structures and controls are tightly coupled. Comparisons are made to a benchmark experimental program conducted at NASA Langley. One of the significant advantages of the methodology detailed is that as a result of the technique used to accelerate the CFD-based simulation, a systems model is produced which is very useful for developing the control law strategy, and subsequent high-speed simulations.

  9. Optical analysis of suspended particles in the cerebrospinal fluid obtained by puncture from patients diagnosed with the disorders of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) circulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staroń, Waldemar; Herbowski, Leszek; Gurgul, Henryk

    2007-04-01

    The goal of the work was to determine the values of cumulative parameters of the cerebrospinal fluid. Values of the parameters characterise statistical cerebrospinal fluid obtained by puncture from the patients diagnosed due to suspicion of normotensive hydrocephalus. The cerebrospinal fluid taken by puncture for the routine examinations carried out at the patients suspected of normotensive hydrocephalus was analysed. In the paper there are presented results of examinations of several dozens of puncture samples of the cerebrospinal fluid coming from various patients. Each sample was examined under the microscope and photographed in 20 randomly chosen places. On the basis of analysis of the pictures showing the area of 100 x 100μm, the selected cumulative parameters such as count, numerical density, field area and field perimeter were determined for each sample. Then the average value of the parameters was determined as well.

  10. Some Analysis of Major Impact of Geothermal Fluid Components in Power Plant Equipment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buzăianu, A.; Csaki, I.; Moţoiu, P.; Leósson, K.; Serghiuţă, S.; Arnbjornsson, A.; Moţoiu, V.; Popescu, G.; Guðlaugsson, S.; Guðmundsson, D.

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents the results from a some analysis and major impact of geothermal fluid composition on the equipment in use in geothermal power plant. The structural analysis of material deposition improve the direct influenced of chemical composition of stem and waters included CaO, MgO, Al2O3 and SiO2 incorporated in the molten phase and the deposits in the scales formed due to equipment. The steam turbine corrosion damage, particularly of blades, discs and pomps, has long been recognized as a leading causes of reduced availability in the geothermal power plant. The corrosion process depends on temperature, pressure, chemisty and vaporous carryover by diversity of impurity. The experimental analysis procedure involves characterization of the fluid geothermal composition. Detailed information about surfaces morphological modification of the power plant components are obtained by electron microprobe analysis EDX and SEM investigation. References selection are obtaining by X-ray diffractometer patterns of the specimen.

  11. Isogeometric Fluid structure Interaction Analysis with Applications to Arterial Blood Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazilevs, Y.; Calo, V. M.; Zhang, Y.; Hughes, T. J. R.

    2006-09-01

    A NURBS (non-uniform rational B-splines)-based isogeometric fluid structure interaction formulation, coupling incompressible fluids with non-linear elastic solids, and allowing for large structural displacements, is developed. This methodology, encompassing a very general class of applications, is applied to problems of arterial blood flow modeling and simulation. In addition, a set of procedures enabling the construction of analysis-suitable NURBS geometries directly from patient-specific imaging data is outlined. The approach is compared with representative benchmark problems, yielding very good results. Computation of a patient-specific abdominal aorta is also performed, giving qualitative agreement with computations by other researchers using similar models.

  12. Assessment of rheumatoid activity based on clinical features and blood and synovial fluid analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Farr, M; Kendall, M J; Young, D W; Meynell, M J; Hawkins, C F

    1976-01-01

    Joint inflammation in rheumatoid arthritis has been assessed, and the most useful guides to disease activity were determined by analysis of synovial fluid and blood together with the history of joint disability. The patient's own evaluation of the amount of pain suffered was the most useful clinical assessment. Differential cell count and glucose estimations were the most helpful guides in the synovial fluid, while C-reactive protein in the serum most accurately reflected disease activity. The effects of systemic steroids on these indices were studied, and the differences between seronegative and seropositive patients noted. PMID:942273

  13. Micro-analysis of plaque fluid from single-site fasted plaque

    SciTech Connect

    Vogel, G.L.; Carey, C.M.; Chow, L.C.; Tatevossian, A. )

    1990-06-01

    Despite the site-specific nature of caries, nearly all data on the concentration of ions relevant to the level of saturation of plaque fluid with respect to calcium phosphate minerals or enamel are from studies that used pooled samples. A procedure is described for the collection and analysis of inorganic ions relevant to these saturation levels in plaque fluid samples collected from a single surface on a single tooth. Various methods for examining data obtained by this procedure are described, and a mathematical procedure employing potential plots is recommended.

  14. An asymptotic analysis of the laminar-turbulent transition of yield stress fluids in pipes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myers, Tim G.; Mitchell, Sarah L.; Slatter, Paul

    2017-02-01

    The work in this paper concerns the axisymmetric pipe flow of a Herschel-Bulkley fluid, with the aim of determining a relation between the critical velocity (defining the transition between laminar and turbulent flow) and the pipe diameter in terms of the Reynolds number Re 3. The asymptotic behaviour for large and small pipes is examined and simple expressions for the leading order terms are presented. Results are then compared with experimental data. A nonlinear regression analysis shows that for the tested fluids the transition occurs at similar values to the Newtonian case, namely in the range 2100 < Re 3 < 2500.

  15. Research in progress in applied mathematics, numerical analysis, fluid mechanics, and computer science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This report summarizes research conducted at the Institute for Computer Applications in Science and Engineering in applied mathematics, fluid mechanics, and computer science during the period October 1, 1993 through March 31, 1994. The major categories of the current ICASE research program are: (1) applied and numerical mathematics, including numerical analysis and algorithm development; (2) theoretical and computational research in fluid mechanics in selected areas of interest to LaRC, including acoustics and combustion; (3) experimental research in transition and turbulence and aerodynamics involving LaRC facilities and scientists; and (4) computer science.

  16. CO2-Leaking Well - Analytical Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wertz, F.; Audigane, P.; Bouc, O.

    2009-04-01

    The long-term integrity of CO2 storage in geological system relies highly on local trapping mechanisms but also on the absence/control of any kind of outlets. Indeed numerous pathways (faults, wells, rock heterogeneities…) exist that can lead stored gas back to the surface. Thus, such leakage risks must be assessed and quantified if possible. In France, BRGM is inquired for evaluating safety criteria and developing a methodology for qualifying potential geological storage sites. This implies in particular to study the leakage scenario, here through a water-filled well as a worth scenario case. In order to determine the kinds of impacts leaking CO2 can have; knowing the velocity and flow rate of uprising CO2 is a necessity. That is why a better knowledge of CO2 in storage conditions and its behaviour with the environment is required. The following study aims at characterising the CO2 flowing into the well and then rising up in a water column over the vertical dimension. An analytical model was built that describes: - In a first step, the CO2 flow between the reservoir and the inside of the well, depending on quality and thickness of different seals, which determines the flow rate through the well. - In a second step, the CO2 uprising through an open and water filled well, however in steady state, which excludes a priori the characterisation of periodic or chaotic behaviours such as geyser formation. The objective is to give numerous orders of magnitude concerning CO2 thermodynamic properties while rising up: specific enthalpy, density, viscosity, velocity, flow, gas volume fraction and expansion, pressure and temperature gradient. Dissolution is partially taken into account, however without kinetic. The strength of this model is to compute analytically - easily and instantaneously - the 1-dimensional rising velocity of CO2 in a water column as a function of the CO2 density, interfacial tension and initial volume fraction. Characteristic speeds - the ones given by

  17. Least Squares Shadowing Sensitivity Analysis of Chaotic and Turbulent Fluid Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blonigan, Patrick; Wang, Qiqi; Gomez, Steven

    2013-11-01

    Computational methods for sensitivity analysis are invaluable tools for fluid dynamics research and engineering design. These methods are used in many applications, including aerodynamic shape optimization and adaptive grid refinement. However, traditional sensitivity analysis methods break down when applied to long-time averaged quantities in chaotic fluid flow fields, such as those obtained using high-fidelity turbulence simulations. This break down is due to the ``Butterfly Effect'' the high sensitivity of chaotic dynamical systems to the initial condition. A new sensitivity analysis method developed by the authors, Least Squares Shadowing (LSS), can compute useful and accurate gradients for quantities of interest in chaotic and turbulent fluid flows. LSS computes gradients using the ``shadow trajectory,'' a phase space trajectory (or solution) for which perturbations to the flow field do not grow exponentially in time. This talk will outline Least Squares Shadowing and demonstrate it on several chaotic and turbulent fluid flows, including homogeneous isotropic turbulence, Rayleigh-Bénard convection and turbulent channel flow. We would like to acknowledge AFSOR Award F11B-T06-0007 under Dr. Fariba Fahroo, NASA Award NNH11ZEA001N under Dr. Harold Atkins, as well as financial support from ConocoPhillips, the NDSEG fellowship and the ANSYS Fellowship.

  18. Interfacing a General Purpose Fluid Network Flow Program with the SINDA/G Thermal Analysis Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schallhorn, Paul; Popok, Daniel

    1999-01-01

    A general purpose, one dimensional fluid flow code is currently being interfaced with the thermal analysis program Systems Improved Numerical Differencing Analyzer/Gaski (SINDA/G). The flow code, Generalized Fluid System Simulation Program (GFSSP), is capable of analyzing steady state and transient flow in a complex network. The flow code is capable of modeling several physical phenomena including compressibility effects, phase changes, body forces (such as gravity and centrifugal) and mixture thermodynamics for multiple species. The addition of GFSSP to SINDA/G provides a significant improvement in convective heat transfer modeling for SINDA/G. The interface development is conducted in multiple phases. This paper describes the first phase of the interface which allows for steady and quasi-steady (unsteady solid, steady fluid) conjugate heat transfer modeling.

  19. Analysis of fluid extracts obtained from Papaver rhoeas petals contaminated with Papaver bracteatum petals.

    PubMed

    Gambaro, Veniero; Minghetti, Paola; Arnoldi, Sebastiano; Colombo, Maria Laura; Dellʼacqua, Lucia; Casiraghi, Antonella; Guerrini, Katia; Farè, Fiorenza; Roda, Gabriella

    2012-08-01

    In this paper, we report a case of misidentification of medicinal plants involving dried petals of Papaver rhoeas (red poppy) contaminated with Papaver bracteatum (scarlet poppy) petals. Preliminary TLC analysis indicated the presence of thebaine either in the fluid extracts or in the petals. It was therefore necessary to carry out an accurate botanic examination of the plant material, which revealed contamination of the red poppy petals with scarlet poppy petals. Moreover, to confirm the adulteration, we developed and validated an efficient, reversed-phase ion pair HPLC method for determination of the alkaloids specific for the Papaver species. Six petal batches and five commercial fluid extracts were analyzed. Only one petal batch from Iran contained thebaine and its analogue oripavine while the alkaloids typical for the Papaver bracteatum species were identified in all fluid extracts, meaning that they were all prepared with contaminated petals.

  20. PDM performance Test Results and Preliminary Analysis: Incompressible and Compressible Fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Dreesen, D.S.; Gruenhagan, E.; Cohen, J.C.; Moran, D.W.

    1999-02-01

    Three, small diameter, Moineau, positive displacement (drilling) motors (PDMs) were dynamometer tested using water, air-water mist, air-water foam, and aerated water. The motors included (1) a 1.5-inch OD, single-lobe mud motor; (2) a 1.69-inch OD, 5:6 multi-lobe mud motor; and (3) a 1.75-inch OD, 5:6 multi-lobe air motor. This paper describes the test apparatus, procedures, data analysis, and results. Incompressible and compressible fluid performance are compared; linear performance, predicted by a positive displacement motor model, is identified where it occurs. Preliminary results and conclusions are (1) the performance of all three motors is accurately modeled using a two-variable, linear model for incompressible fluid and (2) the model was not successfully adapted to model compressible fluid performance.

  1. Fatty and resin acid analysis in tall oil products via supercritical fluid extraction-supercritical fluid reaction using enzymatic catalysis.

    PubMed

    Taylor, S L; King, J W

    2001-07-01

    Supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) is combined with supercritical fluid reaction (SFR) in an analytical mode to assess tall oil products for their fatty or resin acid content or both. The SFR consists of an inline enzymatically catalyzed reaction in which a lipase transesterifies specific lipids with methanol. The SFE-SFR sequence is conducted employing commercially available extractors using supported lipases in the extraction cell to form methyl esters. In this study, six different commercially available lipases are screened for activity. The SFE-SFR extracts are analyzed by capillary gas chromatography and supercritical fluid chromatography and then compared with tall oil products derivatized by conventional chemical derivatization techniques.

  2. Resources Available for Hazards Analysis of Aerospace Fluids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woods, S. S.; Stewart, W. F.; Baker, D. L.

    2001-01-01

    In recent years, the legislative and executive branches of the federal government have pushed to make government more efficient and responsive to the needs of the marketplace. One of these initiatives, Public Law 104-113, also known as the National Technology Transfer and Advancement Act of 1995 (NTTAA), is designed to accelerate technology transfer to industry and promote government-industry partnership. Summarized, NTTAA states that '... all Federal agencies and departments shall use technical standards that are developed or adopted by voluntary consensus standards bodies, using such technical standards as a means to carry out policy objectives or activities determined by the agencies and departments. Government agencies must now determine if their in-house requirement-setting activities are sufficiently unique that no public interest is served by having them adopted by a voluntary consensus organization (VCO), or if not, to use or develop voluntary consensus standards. The Office of Management and Budget (OMB) is chartered by the law to monitor federal agency progress and report the results to Congress. In response to NTTAA, agency-wide oxygen and hydrogen safety standards sponsored by the NASA Headquarters (HQ) Office of Safety and Mission Assurance (OSMA) were obvious choices for early adoption by VCOs. In 1996, HQ sought assistance from the Johnson Space Center (JSC) White Sands Test Facility (WSTF), the technical lead for development of these safety standards, to evaluate their adoption by VCOs. At that time, WSTF-developed propellant hazards manuals were likewise identified for possible VCO adoption. Subsequently, WSTF was asked to represent NASA for development of an international ISO safety standard for hydrogen use. Concurrent with these WSTF standards activities are related efforts to develop and publish propellant hazards analysis protocols and safety courses for the industrial, propellant use of oxygen, hydrogen, and hypergols. This paper reports on

  3. Thirteenth symposium on energy engineering sciences: Proceedings. Fluid/thermal processes, systems analysis and control

    SciTech Connect

    1995-11-01

    The DOE Office of Basic Energy Sciences, of which Engineering Research is a component program, is responsible for the long-term mission-oriented research in the Department. Consistent with the DOE/BES mission, the Engineering Research Program is charged with the identification, initiation, and management of fundamental research on broad, generic topics addressing energy-related engineering problems. Its stated goals are: (1) to improve and extend the body of knowledge underlying current engineering practice so as to create new options for enhancing energy savings and production, for prolonging useful life of energy-related structures and equipment, and for developing advanced manufacturing technologies and materials processing with emphasis on reducing costs with improved industrial production and performance quality; and (2) to expand the store of fundamental concepts for solving anticipated and unforeseen engineering problems in the energy technologies. The meeting covered the following areas: (1) fluid mechanics 1--fundamental properties; (2) fluid mechanics 2--two phase flow; (3) thermal processes; (4) fluid mechanics 3; (5) process analysis and control; (6) fluid mechanics 4--turbulence; (7) fluid mechanics 5--chaos; (8) materials issues; and (9) plasma processes. Selected papers are indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  4. Longitudinal vibration and stability analysis of carbon nanotubes conveying viscous fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oveissi, Soheil; Toghraie, Davood; Eftekhari, Seyyed Ali

    2016-09-01

    Nowadays, carbon nanotubes (CNT) play an important role in practical applications in fluidic devices. To this end, researchers have studied various aspects of vibration analysis of a behavior of CNT conveying fluid. In this paper, based on nonlocal elasticity theory, single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) is simulated. To investigate and analyze the effect of internal fluid flow on the longitudinal vibration and stability of SWCNT, the equation of motion for longitudinal vibration is obtained by using Navier-Stokes equations. In the governing equation of motion, the interaction of fluid-structure, dynamic and fluid flow velocity along the axial coordinate of the nanotube and the nano-scale effect of the structure are considered. To solve the nonlocal longitudinal vibration equation, the approximate Galerkin method is employed and appropriate simply supported boundary conditions are applied. The results show that the axial vibrations of the nanotubesstrongly depend on the small-size effect. In addition, the fluid flowing in nanotube causes a decrease in the natural frequency of the system. It is obvious that the system natural frequencies reach zero at lower critical flow velocities as the wave number increases. Moreover, the critical flow velocity decreases as the nonlocal parameter increases.

  5. A multiscale 3D finite element analysis of fluid/solute transport in mechanically loaded bone.

    PubMed

    Fan, Lixia; Pei, Shaopeng; Lucas Lu, X; Wang, Liyun

    2016-01-01

    The transport of fluid, nutrients, and signaling molecules in the bone lacunar-canalicular system (LCS) is critical for osteocyte survival and function. We have applied the fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) approach to quantify load-induced fluid and solute transport in the LCS in situ, but the measurements were limited to cortical regions 30-50 μm underneath the periosteum due to the constrains of laser penetration. With this work, we aimed to expand our understanding of load-induced fluid and solute transport in both trabecular and cortical bone using a multiscaled image-based finite element analysis (FEA) approach. An intact murine tibia was first re-constructed from microCT images into a three-dimensional (3D) linear elastic FEA model, and the matrix deformations at various locations were calculated under axial loading. A segment of the above 3D model was then imported to the biphasic poroelasticity analysis platform (FEBio) to predict load-induced fluid pressure fields, and interstitial solute/fluid flows through LCS in both cortical and trabecular regions. Further, secondary flow effects such as the shear stress and/or drag force acting on osteocytes, the presumed mechano-sensors in bone, were derived using the previously developed ultrastructural model of Brinkman flow in the canaliculi. The material properties assumed in the FEA models were validated against previously obtained strain and FRAP transport data measured on the cortical cortex. Our results demonstrated the feasibility of this computational approach in estimating the fluid flux in the LCS and the cellular stimulation forces (shear and drag forces) for osteocytes in any cortical and trabecular bone locations, allowing further studies of how the activation of osteocytes correlates with in vivo functional bone formation. The study provides a promising platform to reveal potential cellular mechanisms underlying the anabolic power of exercises and physical activities in treating

  6. A multiscale 3D finite element analysis of fluid/solute transport in mechanically loaded bone

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Lixia; Pei, Shaopeng; Lucas Lu, X; Wang, Liyun

    2016-01-01

    The transport of fluid, nutrients, and signaling molecules in the bone lacunar–canalicular system (LCS) is critical for osteocyte survival and function. We have applied the fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) approach to quantify load-induced fluid and solute transport in the LCS in situ, but the measurements were limited to cortical regions 30–50 μm underneath the periosteum due to the constrains of laser penetration. With this work, we aimed to expand our understanding of load-induced fluid and solute transport in both trabecular and cortical bone using a multiscaled image-based finite element analysis (FEA) approach. An intact murine tibia was first re-constructed from microCT images into a three-dimensional (3D) linear elastic FEA model, and the matrix deformations at various locations were calculated under axial loading. A segment of the above 3D model was then imported to the biphasic poroelasticity analysis platform (FEBio) to predict load-induced fluid pressure fields, and interstitial solute/fluid flows through LCS in both cortical and trabecular regions. Further, secondary flow effects such as the shear stress and/or drag force acting on osteocytes, the presumed mechano-sensors in bone, were derived using the previously developed ultrastructural model of Brinkman flow in the canaliculi. The material properties assumed in the FEA models were validated against previously obtained strain and FRAP transport data measured on the cortical cortex. Our results demonstrated the feasibility of this computational approach in estimating the fluid flux in the LCS and the cellular stimulation forces (shear and drag forces) for osteocytes in any cortical and trabecular bone locations, allowing further studies of how the activation of osteocytes correlates with in vivo functional bone formation. The study provides a promising platform to reveal potential cellular mechanisms underlying the anabolic power of exercises and physical activities in

  7. Instrumentation system to implement leak test program

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, W.J.; Brown, R.; Rael, D.

    1997-05-01

    HVAC equipment, gloveboxes, and other types of enclosures are required to meet rigid well-defined leak rates when they are to be installed in a nuclear facility. This paper describes two implementations of an instrumentation system that is used to test leak rates on heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) plenums, gloveboxes, and experimental chambers, etc. One of the implementations used a programmable logic controller (PLC). The other used what is probably a simpler system based on FlexNet{reg_sign} modules. The emphasis on both systems was on automatic data collection, automatic report generation, and validation of the test results to ERDA 76-21 and ASME-N510. The data are collected using input modules connected to the PLC in one case. In the other case the data are collected using the FlexNet{reg_sign} modules. In both cases, the data are stored and the reports are generated in a spreadsheet.

  8. Gels, monomer solutions fix pinhole casing leaks

    SciTech Connect

    Creel, P.; Crook, R.

    1997-10-13

    Sodium silicate gel and in situ polymerizing monomer (IPM) solutions have had nearly 100% success in repairing pinhole casing leaks. These methods are an alternative to small-particle cement squeeze jobs and can be used in both producing and injection wells. The particles in small-particle or fine-grind cement average 5 microns in diameter compared to the 50 micron particles in Portland cement. Repairs not only help satisfy regulatory requirements but also reduce possible related casing repair costs such as during drillouts, repeated cement squeezes, and workovers. If casing leaks in injection wells are unsuccessfully squeezed and fail regulatory testing, the operator may be fined and the wells may have to be plugged and abandoned. The paper describes the repair of both injection and production well casings.

  9. Intrabronchial Valve Treatment for Prolonged Air Leak: Can We Justify the Cost?

    PubMed Central

    Podgaetz, Eitan; Zamora, Felix; Gibson, Heidi; Andrade, Rafael S.; Hall, Eric; Dincer, H. Erhan

    2016-01-01

    Background. Prolonged air leak is defined as an ongoing air leak for more than 5 days. Intrabronchial valve (IBV) treatment is approved for the treatment of air leaks. Objective. To analyze our experience with IBV and valuate its cost-effectiveness. Methods. Retrospective analysis of IBV from June 2013 to October 2014. We analyzed direct costs based on hospital and operating room charges. We used average costs in US dollars for the analysis not individual patient data. Results. We treated 13 patients (9 M/4 F), median age of 60 years (38 to 90). Median time from diagnosis to IBV placement was 9.8 days, time from IBV placement to chest tube removal was 3 days, and time from IBV placement to hospital discharge was 4 days. Average room and board costs were $14,605 including all levels of care. IBV cost is $2750 per valve. The average number of valves used was 4. Total cost of procedure, valves, and hospital stay until discharge was $13,900. Conclusion. In our limited experience, the use of IBV to treat prolonged air leaks is safe and appears cost-effective. In pure financial terms, the cost seems justified for any air leak predicted to last greater than 8 days. PMID:27445523

  10. Leak before break evaluation for main steam piping system made of SA106 Gr.C

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Kyoung Mo; Jee, Kye Kwang; Pyo, Chang Ryul; Ra, In Sik

    1997-04-01

    The basis of the leak before break (LBB) concept is to demonstrate that piping will leak significantly before a double ended guillotine break (DEGB) occurs. This is demonstrated by quantifying and evaluating the leak process and prescribing safe shutdown of the plant on the basis of the monitored leak rate. The application of LBB for power plant design has reduced plant cost while improving plant integrity. Several evaluations employing LBB analysis on system piping based on DEGB design have been completed. However, the application of LBB on main steam (MS) piping, which is LBB applicable piping, has not been performed due to several uncertainties associated with occurrence of steam hammer and dynamic strain aging (DSA). The objective of this paper is to demonstrate the applicability of the LBB design concept to main steam lines manufactured with SA106 Gr.C carbon steel. Based on the material properties, including fracture toughness and tensile properties obtained from the comprehensive material tests for base and weld metals, a parametric study was performed as described in this paper. The PICEP code was used to determine leak size crack (LSC) and the FLET code was used to perform the stability assessment of MS piping. The effects of material properties obtained from tests were evaluated to determine the LBB applicability for the MS piping. It can be shown from this parametric study that the MS piping has a high possibility of design using LBB analysis.

  11. Scintigraphy for Pulmonary Capillary Protein Leak

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-09-01

    adrministration (16). The method is noninvasive and has been used clinically to determine the severity and duration of non- cardiogenic pulmonary edema ...If the leak exceeds the 1.iiiphatic capacity, which can increase flow by a factor of 20, pulmcnary interstitial edema occurs. T•hen the interstitial...of shoee is the accepted !::odel for the scudv of pulmonary permehbility - edema (18). It is, therefore, necessary to comnpare our scintigraphic

  12. Scintigraphy for Pulmonary Capillary Protein Leak

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-09-01

    det,,rmine the severity and duration of non- cardiogenic pulmonary edema (17). C. Approach to the Problem The anim-als were anesthetize,, intubated and...pulmonary lymphatics. If the leak exceeds the lymphatic capacity, which can increase flow by a factor of 20, pulmonary interstitial edema occurs. When...therefore, does not appear to cause permeability pulmonary edema in either the sheep or dog. The ARDS seen in patients following sclerotherapy of esophageal

  13. Natural gas pipeline leaks across Washington, DC.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Robert B; Down, Adrian; Phillips, Nathan G; Ackley, Robert C; Cook, Charles W; Plata, Desiree L; Zhao, Kaiguang

    2014-01-01

    Pipeline safety in the United States has increased in recent decades, but incidents involving natural gas pipelines still cause an average of 17 fatalities and $133 M in property damage annually. Natural gas leaks are also the largest anthropogenic source of the greenhouse gas methane (CH4) in the U.S. To reduce pipeline leakage and increase consumer safety, we deployed a Picarro G2301 Cavity Ring-Down Spectrometer in a car, mapping 5893 natural gas leaks (2.5 to 88.6 ppm CH4) across 1500 road miles of Washington, DC. The δ(13)C-isotopic signatures of the methane (-38.2‰ ± 3.9‰ s.d.) and ethane (-36.5 ± 1.1 s.d.) and the CH4:C2H6 ratios (25.5 ± 8.9 s.d.) closely matched the pipeline gas (-39.0‰ and -36.2‰ for methane and ethane; 19.0 for CH4/C2H6). Emissions from four street leaks ranged from 9200 to 38,200 L CH4 day(-1) each, comparable to natural gas used by 1.7 to 7.0 homes, respectively. At 19 tested locations, 12 potentially explosive (Grade 1) methane concentrations of 50,000 to 500,000 ppm were detected in manholes. Financial incentives and targeted programs among companies, public utility commissions, and scientists to reduce leaks and replace old cast-iron pipes will improve consumer safety and air quality, save money, and lower greenhouse gas emissions.

  14. AUTOMATED LEAK DETECTION OF BURIED TANKS USING GEOPHYSICAL METHODS AT THE HANFORD NUCLEAR SITE

    SciTech Connect

    CALENDINE S; SCHOFIELD JS; LEVITT MT; FINK JB; RUCKER DF

    2011-03-30

    At the Hanford Nuclear Site in Washington State, the Department of Energy oversees the containment, treatment, and retrieval of liquid high-level radioactive waste. Much of the waste is stored in single-shelled tanks (SSTs) built between 1943 and 1964. Currently, the waste is being retrieved from the SSTs and transferred into newer double-shelled tanks (DSTs) for temporary storage before final treatment. Monitoring the tanks during the retrieval process is critical to identifying leaks. An electrically-based geophysics monitoring program for leak detection and monitoring (LDM) has been successfully deployed on several SSTs at the Hanford site since 2004. The monitoring program takes advantage of changes in contact resistance that will occur when conductive tank liquid leaks into the soil. During monitoring, electrical current is transmitted on a number of different electrode types (e.g., steel cased wells and surface electrodes) while voltages are measured on all other electrodes, including the tanks. Data acquisition hardware and software allow for continuous real-time monitoring of the received voltages and the leak assessment is conducted through a time-series data analysis. The specific hardware and software combination creates a highly sensitive method of leak detection, complementing existing drywell logging as a means to detect and quantify leaks. Working in an industrial environment such as the Hanford site presents many challenges for electrical monitoring: cathodic protection, grounded electrical infrastructure, lightning strikes, diurnal and seasonal temperature trends, and precipitation, all of which create a complex environment for leak detection. In this discussion we present examples of challenges and solutions to working in the tank farms of the Hanford site.

  15. Probabilistic pipe fracture evaluations for leak-rate-detection applications

    SciTech Connect

    Rahman, S.; Ghadiali, N.; Paul, D.; Wilkowski, G.

    1995-04-01

    Regulatory Guide 1.45, {open_quotes}Reactor Coolant Pressure Boundary Leakage Detection Systems,{close_quotes} was published by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in May 1973, and provides guidance on leak detection methods and system requirements for Light Water Reactors. Additionally, leak detection limits are specified in plant Technical Specifications and are different for Boiling Water Reactors (BWRs) and Pressurized Water Reactors (PWRs). These leak detection limits are also used in leak-before-break evaluations performed in accordance with Draft Standard Review Plan, Section 3.6.3, {open_quotes}Leak Before Break Evaluation Procedures{close_quotes} where a margin of 10 on the leak detection limit is used in determining the crack size considered in subsequent fracture analyses. This study was requested by the NRC to: (1) evaluate the conditional failure probability for BWR and PWR piping for pipes that were leaking at the allowable leak detection limit, and (2) evaluate the margin of 10 to determine if it was unnecessarily large. A probabilistic approach was undertaken to conduct fracture evaluations of circumferentially cracked pipes for leak-rate-detection applications. Sixteen nuclear piping systems in BWR and PWR plants were analyzed to evaluate conditional failure probability and effects of crack-morphology variability on the current margins used in leak rate detection for leak-before-break.

  16. β-human chorionic gonadotropin assay in vaginal washing fluid for the accurate diagnosis of premature rupture of membranes during late pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Temel, Orhan; Çöğendez, Ebru; Selçuk, Selçuk; Asoğlu, Mehmet Reşit; Kaya, Erdal

    2013-01-01

    Objective To determine whether the measurement of beta-human chorionic gonadotropin (β-hCG) levels in vaginal fluid is useful for the diagnosis of premature rupture of membranes (PROM). Material and Methods A total of 92 pregnant women between 24 and 40 weeks gestation participated in this study. The patients with fluid leaking from the vagina were designated Group 1, the patients with no fluid leaking from the vagina were Group 2, and those with a suspicion of fluid leaking from the vagina were classified as Group 3. Irrigating the posterior vaginal fornix with 5 mL sterile saline was used to measure β-hCG levels of the patients. Receiver operator curve (ROC) analysis was used to determine the cut-off value for a positive diagnosis. Results The β-hCG levels of vaginal fluid were measured as 20.5±25.0 mIU/mL, 254.6±346.8 mIU/mL, and 74.3±100.8 mIU/mL in Group 1, Group 2, and Group 3, respectively. Vaginal β-hCG level was higher statistically significantly in Group 2 than Group 1 and 3 (p<0.001). 100 mIU/mL was accepted as a cut-off value by using the receiver operating characteristic curve. According to 100 mIU/mL, sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive and negative predictive values were calculated as 71.2, 100, 100, and 65.1%, respectively. Conclusion The study showed that the measurement of β-hCG level in vaginal washing fluid is an efficient and easy diagnostic test for predicting the amount of fluid leaking from the vagina. However, due to the low negative predictive value of the test, it would not be convenient in daily practice. PMID:24592106

  17. Payload and Components Real-Time Automated Test System (PACRATS), Data Acquisition of Leak Rate and Pressure Data Test Procedure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rinehart, Maegan L.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this activity is to provide the Mechanical Components Test Facility (MCTF) with the capability to obtain electronic leak test and proof pressure data, Payload and Components Real-time Automated Test System (PACRATS) data acquisition software will be utilized to display real-time data. It will record leak rates and pressure/vacuum level(s) simultaneously. This added functionality will provide electronic leak test and pressure data at specified sampling frequencies. Electronically stored data will provide ES61 with increased data security, analysis, and accuracy. The tasks performed in this procedure are to verify PACRATS only, and are not intended to provide verifications for MCTF equipment.

  18. High-resolution temporal analysis of deep subseafloor microbial communities inhabiting basement fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jungbluth, S.; Lin, H. T.; Hsieh, C. C.; Rappe, M. S.

    2014-12-01

    , demonstrating that high-quality borehole fluid samples may range up to ~45,000 cells x ml-1. This analysis helps to constrain subseafloor biomass estimates, reveals its variability in both short and long temporal scales, and provides a glimpse of the variability in microbial community structure that spans from hours to years.

  19. Differential proteomic analysis of bovine conceptus fluid proteins in pregnancies generated by assisted reproductive technologies.

    PubMed

    Riding, George A; Hill, Jonathan R; Jones, Alun; Holland, Michael K; Josh, Peter F; Lehnert, Sigrid A

    2008-07-01

    Proteomic analysis of bovine conceptus fluid proteins during early pregnancy has the potential to expose protein species indicative of both the overall health of the fetal-maternal environment and fetal developmental status. In this study, we examined the differential abundance of bovine conceptus fluid proteins (5-50 kDa fraction) from naturally conceived, in vitro fertilisation (IVF) and somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT)-derived pregnancies at days 45 and 90 of gestation. In day 45 allantoic fluid (AllF) samples, an atypical cluster of low molecular weight ( approximately 14-16 kDa), low pI (between 3.0 and 4.5 pH units) protein species was increased in three of four IVF samples (30-100-fold increase in protein spot volumes compared to normal). These proteins were identified as paralogs of the bovine cathelicidin antimicrobial protein (CAMP) by MALDI-TOF MS peptide mass fingerprint and MALDI-TOF MS/MS peptide sequence analysis. Peptidoglycan recognition protein and serine (or cysteine) proteinase inhibitor clade B1, were also significantly increased in the corresponding IVF samples. In two of four SCNT AllF samples, a 2-10-fold increase in CAMP protein spot volumes were detected. No aberrant abundance levels of individual protein species were observed in amniotic fluid samples, or in day 90 IVF AllF samples. Identification of unique protein species present in the normal bovine AllF proteome at day 45 is also reported.

  20. Compartment Syndrome as a Result of Systemic Capillary Leak Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    D'Egidio, Gianni; Wan, Cynthia; Baxter, Alan; Rosenberg, Hans

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To describe a single case of Systemic Capillary Leak Syndrome (SCLS) with a rare complication of compartment syndrome. Patient. Our patient is a 57-year-old male, referred to our hospital due to polycythemia (hemoglobin (Hgb) of 220 g/L), hypotension, acute renal failure, and bilateral calf pain. Measurements and Main Results. The patient required bilateral forearm, thigh, and calf fasciotomies during his ICU stay and continuous renal replacement therapy was instituted following onset of acute renal failure and oliguria. Ongoing hemodynamic (Norepinephrine and Milrinone infusion) and respiratory (ventilator) support in the ICU was provided until resolution of intravascular fluid extravasation. Conclusions. SCLS is an extremely rare disorder characterized by unexplained episodic capillary hyperpermeability, which causes shift of volume and protein from the intravascular space to the interstitial space. Patients present with significant hypotension, hemoconcentration, hypovolemia, and oliguria. Severe edema results from leakage of fluid and proteins into tissue. The most important part of treatment is maintaining stable hemodynamics, ruling out other causes of shock and diligent monitoring for complications. Awareness of the clinical syndrome with the rare complication of compartment syndrome may help guide investigations and diagnoses of these critically ill patients. PMID:27688917

  1. Functional analysis of articular cartilage deformation, recovery, and fluid flow following dynamic exercise in vivo.

    PubMed

    Eckstein, F; Tieschky, M; Faber, S; Englmeier, K H; Reiser, M

    1999-10-01

    The function of articular cartilage depends on the interaction between the tissue matrix and the interstitial fluid bound to the proteoglycan molecules. Mechanical loading has been shown to be involved in both the metabolic regulation of chondrocytes and in matrix degeneration. The purpose of the present study was therefore to analyze the deformation, recovery, and fluid flow in human articular cartilage after dynamic loading in vivo. The patellae of 7 volunteers were imaged at physical rest and after performing knee bends, with a specifically optimized fat-suppressed FLASH-3D magnetic resonance (MR) sequence. To measure cartilage deformation, the total volume of the patellar cartilage was determined, employing 3D digital image analysis. Patellar cartilage deformation ranged from 2.4 to 8.6% after 50 knee bends, and from 2.4% to 8.5% after 100 knee bends. Repeated sets of dynamic exercise at intervals of 15 min did not cause further deformation. After 100 knee bends, the cartilage required more than 90 min to recover from loading. The rate of fluid flow during relaxation ranged from 1.1 to 3.5 mm(3)/min (0.08 to 0.22 mm(3)/min per square centimeter of the articular surface) and was highly correlated with the individual degree of deformation after knee bends. The data provide the first quantification of articular cartilage recovery and of the rate of fluid flow between the cartilage matrix and surrounding tissue in intact joints in vivo. Measurement in the living opens the possibility of relating interindividual variations of mechanical cartilage properties to the susceptibility of developing joint failure, to assess the load-partitioning between the fluid phase and solid cartilage matrix during load transfer, and to determine the role of mechanically induced fluid flow in the regulation of the metabolic activity of chondrocytes.

  2. A study analysis of cable-body systems totally immersed in a fluid stream

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delaurier, J. D.

    1972-01-01

    A general stability analysis of a cable-body system immersed in a fluid stream is presented. The analytical portion of this analysis treats the system as being essentially a cable problem, with the body dynamics giving the end conditions. The mathematical form of the analysis consists of partial differential wave equations, with the end and auxiliary conditions being determined from the body equations of motion. The equations uncouple to give a lateral problem and a longitudinal problem as in first order airplane dynamics. A series of tests on a tethered wind tunnel model provide a comparison of the theory with experiment.

  3. Leak Rate Quantification Method for Gas Pressure Seals with Controlled Pressure Differential

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daniels, Christopher C.; Braun, Minel J.; Oravec, Heather A.; Mather, Janice L.; Taylor, Shawn C.

    2015-01-01

    An enhancement to the pressure decay leak rate method with mass point analysis solved deficiencies in the standard method. By adding a control system, a constant gas pressure differential across the test article was maintained. As a result, the desired pressure condition was met at the onset of the test, and the mass leak rate and measurement uncertainty were computed in real-time. The data acquisition and control system were programmed to automatically stop when specified criteria were met. Typically, the test was stopped when a specified level of measurement uncertainty was attained. Using silicone O-ring test articles, the new method was compared with the standard method that permitted the downstream pressure to be non-constant atmospheric pressure. The two methods recorded comparable leak rates, but the new method recorded leak rates with significantly lower measurement uncertainty, statistical variance, and test duration. Utilizing this new method in leak rate quantification, projects will reduce cost and schedule, improve test results, and ease interpretation between data sets.

  4. Differential proteomic analysis of synovial fluid from rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis patients

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis are two common musculoskeletal disorders that affect the joints. Despite high prevalence rates, etiological factors involved in these disorders remain largely unknown. Dissecting the molecular aspects of these disorders will significantly contribute to improving their diagnosis and clinical management. In order to identify proteins that are differentially expressed between these two conditions, a quantitative proteomic profiling of synovial fluid obtained from rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis patients was carried out by using iTRAQ labeling followed by high resolution mass spectrometry analysis. Results We have identified 575 proteins out of which 135 proteins were found to be differentially expressed by ≥3-fold in the synovial fluid of rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis patients. Proteins not previously reported to be associated with rheumatoid arthritis including, coronin-1A (CORO1A), fibrinogen like-2 (FGL2), and macrophage capping protein (CAPG) were found to be upregulated in rheumatoid arthritis. Proteins such as CD5 molecule-like protein (CD5L), soluble scavenger receptor cysteine-rich domain-containing protein (SSC5D), and TTK protein kinase (TTK) were found to be upregulated in the synovial fluid of osteoarthritis patients. We confirmed the upregulation of CAPG in rheumatoid arthritis synovial fluid by multiple reaction monitoring assay as well as by Western blot. Pathway analysis of differentially expressed proteins revealed a significant enrichment of genes involved in glycolytic pathway in rheumatoid arthritis. Conclusions We report here the largest identification of proteins from the synovial fluid of rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis patients using a quantitative proteomics approach. The novel proteins identified from our study needs to be explored further for their role in the disease pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis. Sartaj Ahmad and Raja Sekhar Nirujogi

  5. Handling and storage of human body fluids for analysis of extracellular vesicles.

    PubMed

    Yuana, Yuana; Böing, Anita N; Grootemaat, Anita E; van der Pol, Edwin; Hau, Chi M; Cizmar, Petr; Buhr, Egbert; Sturk, Auguste; Nieuwland, Rienk

    2015-01-01

    Because procedures of handling and storage of body fluids affect numbers and composition of extracellular vesicles (EVs), standardization is important to ensure reliable and comparable measurements of EVs in a clinical environment. We aimed to develop standard protocols for handling and storage of human body fluids for EV analysis. Conditions such as centrifugation, single freeze-thaw cycle, effect of time delay between blood collection and plasma preparation and storage were investigated. Plasma is the most commonly studied body fluid in EV research. We mainly focused on EVs originating from platelets and erythrocytes and investigated the behaviour of these 2 types of EVs independently as well as in plasma samples of healthy subjects. EVs in urine and saliva were also studied for comparison. All samples were analysed simultaneously before and after freeze-thawing by resistive pulse sensing, nanoparticle tracking analysis, conventional flow cytometry (FCM) and transmission (scanning) electron microscopy. Our main finding is that the effect of centrifugation markedly depends on the cellular origin of EVs. Whereas erythrocyte EVs remain present as single EVs after centrifugation, platelet EVs form aggregates, which affect their measured concentration in plasma. Single erythrocyte and platelet EVs are present mainly in the range of 100-200 nm, far below the lower limit of what can be measured by conventional FCM. Furthermore, the effects of single freeze-thaw cycle, time delay between blood collection and plasma preparation up to 1 hour and storage up to 1 year are insignificant (p>0.05) on the measured concentration and diameter of EVs from erythrocyte and platelet concentrates and EVs in plasma, urine and saliva. In conclusion, in standard protocols for EV studies, centrifugation to isolate EVs from collected body fluids should be avoided. Freezing and storage of collected body fluids, albeit their insignificant effects, should be performed identically for

  6. Fluid Vessel Quantity Using Non-invasive PZT Technology Flight Volume Measurements Under Zero G Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garofalo, Anthony A

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the project is to perform analysis of data using the Systems Engineering Educational Discovery (SEED) program data from 2011 and 2012 Fluid Vessel Quantity using Non-Invasive PZT Technology flight volume measurements under Zero G conditions (parabolic Plane flight data). Also experimental planning and lab work for future sub-orbital experiments to use the NASA PZT technology for fluid volume measurement. Along with conducting data analysis of flight data, I also did a variety of other tasks. I provided the lab with detailed technical drawings, experimented with 3d printers, made changes to the liquid nitrogen skid schematics, and learned how to weld. I also programmed microcontrollers to interact with various sensors and helped with other things going on around the lab.

  7. Fluid Vessel Quantity using Non-Invasive PZT Technology Flight Volume Measurements Under Zero G Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garofalo, Anthony A.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the project is to perform analysis of data using the Systems Engineering Educational Discovery (SEED) program data from 2011 and 2012 Fluid Vessel Quantity using Non-Invasive PZT Technology flight volume measurements under Zero G conditions (parabolic Plane flight data). Also experimental planning and lab work for future sub-orbital experiments to use the NASA PZT technology for fluid volume measurement. Along with conducting data analysis of flight data, I also did a variety of other tasks. I provided the lab with detailed technical drawings, experimented with 3d printers, made changes to the liquid nitrogen skid schematics, and learned how to weld. I also programmed microcontrollers to interact with various sensors and helped with other things going on around the lab.

  8. Methods for simulation-based analysis of fluid-structure interaction.

    SciTech Connect

    Barone, Matthew Franklin; Payne, Jeffrey L.

    2005-10-01

    Methods for analysis of fluid-structure interaction using high fidelity simulations are critically reviewed. First, a literature review of modern numerical techniques for simulation of aeroelastic phenomena is presented. The review focuses on methods contained within the arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) framework for coupling computational fluid dynamics codes to computational structural mechanics codes. The review treats mesh movement algorithms, the role of the geometric conservation law, time advancement schemes, wetted surface interface strategies, and some representative applications. The complexity and computational expense of coupled Navier-Stokes/structural dynamics simulations points to the need for reduced order modeling to facilitate parametric analysis. The proper orthogonal decomposition (POD)/Galerkin projection approach for building a reduced order model (ROM) is presented, along with ideas for extension of the methodology to allow construction of ROMs based on data generated from ALE simulations.

  9. Cerebrospinal fluid analysis detects cerebral amyloid-β accumulation earlier than positron emission tomography

    PubMed Central

    Mattsson, Niklas

    2016-01-01

    See Rabinovici (doi:10.1093/brain/aww025) for a scientific commentary on this article. Cerebral accumulation of amyloid-β is thought to be the starting mechanism in Alzheimer’s disease. Amyloid-β can be detected by analysis of cerebrospinal fluid amyloid-β42 or amyloid positron emission tomography, but it is unknown if any of the methods can identify an abnormal amyloid accumulation prior to the other. Our aim was to determine whether cerebrospinal fluid amyloid-β42 change before amyloid PET during preclinical stages of Alzheimer’s disease. We included 437 non-demented subjects from the prospective, longitudinal Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) study. All underwent 18F-florbetapir positron emission tomography and cerebrospinal fluid amyloid-β42 analysis at baseline and at least one additional positron emission tomography after a mean follow-up of 2.1 years (range 1.1–4.4 years). Group classifications were based on normal and abnormal cerebrospinal fluid and positron emission tomography results at baseline. We found that cases with isolated abnormal cerebrospinal fluid amyloid-β and normal positron emission tomography at baseline accumulated amyloid with a mean rate of 1.2%/year, which was similar to the rate in cases with both abnormal cerebrospinal fluid and positron emission tomography (1.2%/year, P = 0.86). The mean accumulation rate of those with isolated abnormal cerebrospinal fluid was more than three times that of those with both normal cerebrospinal fluid and positron emission tomography (0.35%/year, P = 0.018). The group differences were similar when analysing yearly change in standardized uptake value ratio of florbetapir instead of percentage change. Those with both abnormal cerebrospinal fluid and positron emission tomography deteriorated more in memory and hippocampal volume compared with the other groups (P < 0.001), indicating that they were closer to Alzheimer’s disease dementia. The results were replicated after

  10. Visualization of a cryogenic jet simulating leak from a liquid hydrogen storage tank

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rose, Tim; Agrawal, Ajay

    2009-11-01

    Hydrogen is considered an alternative fuel in propulsion and power generation due to fuel economy standards and environmental pollution. However, if an accidental leak were to occur in a hydrogen storage tank, the discharged fuel could find an ignition source and produce an explosion. A barrier wall can be used to contain the leak from the storage tank, therefore protecting equipment and people from the explosion. Past studies have investigated the jet/barrier wall interaction, in a laboratory setting, with fuel stored as a gas. Hydrogen fuel stored as a liquid offers higher energy density. In this work, we have studied the leak at cryogenic conditions due to liquid storage parameters. Jet fluid structure is visualized in a laboratory setting using helium as the supersonic jet fluid. High-speed rainbow schlieren deflectometry (RSD) images are used to show instantaneous flow structure of jet (leakage point) and barrier wall interactions. Results show the jet inlet temperature leads to significant differences in the spread angle and the extent of fuel-air mixture region adjacent to the barrier wall.

  11. Nonlinear multiple-discipline analysis of conjugate heat transfer and fluid-structure interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weaver, Michael A.

    Single-discipline analysis approaches often utilize linearized descriptions of coupled system physics from other disciplines. When this level of approximation is inadequate for the purposes of the analysis, nonlinear governing equations for the separate physical disciplines must be introduced, thus producing a multiple-discipline analysis. The multiple-discipline approach can provide a deeper understanding of the underlying system physics, and can reveal deficiencies in systems designed by single-discipline means. An advantageous way to examine a nonlinear multiple-discipline system is the partitioned method, where each discipline subdomain is formulated and discretized separately, allowing separate modular solvers for each set of discretized equations. Avoiding ad hoc approaches, a unified approach is developed here and applied to analysis of conjugate heat transfer in an arc-heater wind tunnel nozzle, and fluid-structure interaction of a segmented solid rocket motor inhibitor. The specific systems examined represent actual hardware designed by single-discipline methods. The nonlinear effects present in the wind tunnel nozzle problem include separated, viscous fluid flow, forced-convection boiling, and flow-dependent heat transfer properties. Nonlinear effects present in the solid rocket motor inhibitor problem include large structural deformation, and separated, viscous fluid flow. Steady-state results obtained for the nozzle problem show distributions for wall temperature, fluid temperatures, and heat flux, as well as coolant flow field and recirculation patterns. These results indicate a design deficiency in the nozzle cooling system. For the inhibitor problem, steady and unsteady fields of stress, strain, and displacement are obtained for the structural components, accompanied by velocity and pressure fields for the surrounding gas flow. The large stress values present in the solid propellant suggest a possible mode for motor failure, and beckon examination of

  12. The composition-explicit distillation curve technique: Relating chemical analysis and physical properties of complex fluids.

    PubMed

    Bruno, Thomas J; Ott, Lisa S; Lovestead, Tara M; Huber, Marcia L

    2010-04-16

    The analysis of complex fluids such as crude oils, fuels, vegetable oils and mixed waste streams poses significant challenges arising primarily from the multiplicity of components, the different properties of the components (polarity, polarizability, etc.) and matrix properties. We have recently introduced an analytical strategy that simplifies many of these analyses, and provides the added potential of linking compositional information with physical property information. This aspect can be used to facilitate equation of state development for the complex fluids. In addition to chemical characterization, the approach provides the ability to calculate thermodynamic properties for such complex heterogeneous streams. The technique is based on the advanced distillation curve (ADC) metrology, which separates a complex fluid by distillation into fractions that are sampled, and for which thermodynamically consistent temperatures are measured at atmospheric pressure. The collected sample fractions can be analyzed by any method that is appropriate. The analytical methods we have applied include gas chromatography (with flame ionization, mass spectrometric and sulfur chemiluminescence detection), thin layer chromatography, FTIR, corrosivity analysis, neutron activation analysis and cold neutron prompt gamma activation analysis. By far, the most widely used analytical technique we have used with the ADC is gas chromatography. This has enabled us to study finished fuels (gasoline, diesel fuels, aviation fuels, rocket propellants), crude oils (including a crude oil made from swine manure) and waste oils streams (used automotive and transformer oils). In this special issue of the Journal of Chromatography, specifically dedicated to extraction technologies, we describe the essential features of the advanced distillation curve metrology as an analytical strategy for complex fluids.

  13. Rapid analysis of polyolefin antioxidants and light stabilisers by supercritical fluid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Kithinji, J P; Bartle, K D; Raynor, M W; Clifford, A A

    1990-02-01

    Nineteen commercial antioxidants and light stabilisers, with a wide range of relative molecular masses and boiling-points, present in polyolefins were analysed by packed column supercritical fluid chromatography on four different phases with CO2 or 10% MeOH-CO2 as the mobile phase and with UV detection. The technique is shown to yield short analysis times and sufficient resolution for a number of additives present in a given polyolefin.

  14. Modeling, Uncertainty Quantification and Sensitivity Analysis of Subsurface Fluid Migration in the Above Zone Monitoring Interval of a Geologic Carbon Storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Namhata, A.; Dilmore, R. M.; Oladyshkin, S.; Zhang, L.; Nakles, D. V.

    2015-12-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) storage into geological formations has significant potential for mitigating anthropogenic CO2 emissions. An increasing emphasis on the commercialization and implementation of this approach to store CO2 has led to the investigation of the physical processes involved and to the development of system-wide mathematical models for the evaluation of potential geologic storage sites and the risk associated with them. The sub-system components under investigation include the storage reservoir, caprock seals, and the above zone monitoring interval, or AZMI, to name a few. Diffusive leakage of CO2 through the caprock seal to overlying formations may occur due to its intrinsic permeability and/or the presence of natural/induced fractures. This results in a potential risk to environmental receptors such as underground sources of drinking water. In some instances, leaking CO2 also has the potential to reach the ground surface and result in atmospheric impacts. In this work, fluid (i.e., CO2 and brine) flow above the caprock, in the region designated as the AZMI, is modeled for a leakage event of a typical geologic storage system with different possible boundary scenarios. An analytical and approximate solution for radial migration of fluids in the AZMI with continuous inflow of fluids from the reservoir through the caprock has been developed. In its present form, the AZMI model predicts the spatial changes in pressure - gas saturations over time in a layer immediately above the caprock. The modeling is performed for a benchmark case and the data-driven approach of arbitrary Polynomial Chaos (aPC) Expansion is used to quantify the uncertainty of the model outputs based on the uncertainty of model input parameters such as porosity, permeability, formation thickness, and residual brine saturation. The recently developed aPC approach performs stochastic model reduction and approximates the models by a polynomial-based response surface. Finally, a global

  15. LEAK: A source term generator for evaluating release rates from leaking vessels

    SciTech Connect

    Clinton, J.H.

    1994-09-01

    An interactive computer code for estimating the rate of release of any one of several materials from a leaking tank or broken pipe leading from a tank is presented. It is generally assumed that the material in the tank is liquid. Materials included in the data base are acetonitrile, ammonia, carbon tetrachloride, chlorine, chlorine trifluoride, fluorine, hydrogen fluoride, nitric acid, nitrogen tetroxide, sodium hydroxide, sulfur hexafluoride, sulfuric acid, and uranium hexafluoride. Materials that exist only as liquid and/or vapor over expected ranges of temperature and pressure can easily be added to the data base file. The Fortran source code for LEAK and the data file are included with this report.

  16. Hydrodynamic analysis of field data acquired during well drilling with aerated fluid.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez, Ruben; Lopez, Antonio; Herrera, Maria

    2006-11-01

    During conventional well drilling the circulating system consists as follow, the drilling fluid is pumped downward into the drilling pipe until the bottom of the open hole then it flows through the drill bit, and at this point formation cuttings are incorporated to the circulating fluid and carried upward to the surface. The mixture returns up to the surface by an annular flow area. However, throughout drilling operations with aerated fluid, the drilling fluid used is composed by gas and an oil-based mud. In consequence, it involves a multiphase flow hydrodynamic analysis. For achieving this, it is necessary a better understood of the flow mechanisms in drilling rig and the operational technique. Therefore, it was carried out a multiphase conservative model that includes three mass equations and a momentum equation. The mathematical model is solved by numerical conservative schemes. The real operational conditions are fed to conservative model and the results are matched up to field measurements in several oil wells. Mainly, flow rates, drilling rate, well and tool geometries are data to estimate the profiles of pressure, mixture density, equivalent circulating density, gas fraction and solid carrying capacity. Even though the problem is very complex, the model describes, properly, the hydrodynamics of drilling techniques applied at oil fields. It is supported by the field data acquired and study cases.

  17. Cytological analysis of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid acquired by bronchoscopy in healthy ferrets: A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Bercier, Marjorie; Langlois, Isabelle; Dunn, Marilyn; Hélie, Pierre; Burns, Patrick; Gara-Boivin, Carolyn

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the normal cytological evaluation of bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid in healthy adult ferrets (N = 12). These ferrets underwent bronchoscopy and BAL using sterile saline [1.5 mL/kg body weight (BW)]. Percentage of fluid recovered, total leukocyte count, differential leukocyte count, and cell count of the epithelial lining fluid (ELF) were determined. The mean percentage of lavage volume recovered from the right lung and left lung were 67.8 ± 14.9% and 69.7 ± 20.0%, respectively. Gender (P = 0.12) and weight (P = 0.17) did not significantly affect the mean percentage of recovered volume. The mean percentage of recovered volume (P = 0.47) and the mean leukocyte count (P = 0.17) from the right and left lung were not significantly different. Macrophages were the main leukocyte component of the lavages, followed by neutrophils, lymphocytes, and eosinophils. The mean proportion of ELF in BAL fluid was 9.3 ± 3.7% v/v. Bronchoscopy is clinically useful for collecting good quality BAL samples for cytological analysis in ferrets. The leucocyte differential was established, which may help veterinarians to make better clinical decisions when treating respiratory disease. Further studies are required with a larger group in order to establish the healthy reference intervals for BAL values in ferrets.

  18. Cytological analysis of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid acquired by bronchoscopy in healthy ferrets: A pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Bercier, Marjorie; Langlois, Isabelle; Dunn, Marilyn; Hélie, Pierre; Burns, Patrick; Gara-Boivin, Carolyn

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the normal cytological evaluation of bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid in healthy adult ferrets (N = 12). These ferrets underwent bronchoscopy and BAL using sterile saline [1.5 mL/kg body weight (BW)]. Percentage of fluid recovered, total leukocyte count, differential leukocyte count, and cell count of the epithelial lining fluid (ELF) were determined. The mean percentage of lavage volume recovered from the right lung and left lung were 67.8 ± 14.9% and 69.7 ± 20.0%, respectively. Gender (P = 0.12) and weight (P = 0.17) did not significantly affect the mean percentage of recovered volume. The mean percentage of recovered volume (P = 0.47) and the mean leukocyte count (P = 0.17) from the right and left lung were not significantly different. Macrophages were the main leukocyte component of the lavages, followed by neutrophils, lymphocytes, and eosinophils. The mean proportion of ELF in BAL fluid was 9.3 ± 3.7% v/v. Bronchoscopy is clinically useful for collecting good quality BAL samples for cytological analysis in ferrets. The leucocyte differential was established, which may help veterinarians to make better clinical decisions when treating respiratory disease. Further studies are required with a larger group in order to establish the healthy reference intervals for BAL values in ferrets. PMID:26733735

  19. Detection, Location, and Classification of Space Shuttle Main Engine Nozzle Leaks by Transient Thermographic Inspection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, Samuel S.; Walker, James L.

    1998-01-01

    Leak checking and evaluation of pressure vessels by observing the slight temperature changes resulting from structural anomalies has been made possible through developments in high resolution infrared cameras and advanced image processing. These developments have made thermal nondestructive analysis a very practical and efficient method to determine material consistency and structural quality as well as monitor processes. The Space Shuttle Main Engine Nozzle has regions which can not be inspected with standard leak check methods. The Thermographic methods being developed to nondestructively test the Nozzle for leaks in inaccessible regions are reported. Also, a flash heating Thermographic investigation of the braze line bonding the cooling tubes to the outer structural jacket of the nozzle is reported.

  20. Computational Modeling and Analysis of the Fluid Dynamics of Competitive Swimming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mittal, Rajat

    2009-11-01

    In order to swim efficiently and/or fast, a swimmer needs to master the subtle cause-and-effect relationship that exists between his/her movements and the surrounding fluid. This is what makes swimming one of the most technical of all sports. For the most part, science has played little if any role in helping swimmers and coaches improve swimming techniques or even to better understand the fluid dynamics of human swimming. Experiments of free swimming humans are extremely difficult to conduct and computational modeling approaches have, in the past, been unable to address this very complex problem. However, the development of a new class of numerical methods, coupled with unique animation and analysis tools is making it possible to analyze swimming strokes in all their complexity. The talk will focus on describing a relatively new numerical method that has been developed to solve flows with highly complex, moving/deforming boundaries. Numerical simulations are used to perform a detailed analysis of the dolphin kick. This stroke has emerged as an important component of competitive swimming in recent years and our analysis has allowed us to extract some useful insights into the fluid dynamics of this stroke. In addition, we also address the continuing debate about the role of lift versus drag in thrust production for human swimming.

  1. Optimum design of Hydrokinetic turbine based on Fluid structure interaction analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolekar, Nitin; Banerjee, Arindam

    2012-11-01

    Hydrokinetic turbines, unlike conventional hydraulic turbines are zero head energy conversion devices, which utilize the kinetic energy of flowing water for power generation. Though the basic operation is similar to wind turbines, due to denser working media, these turbines are subjected to higher loads and stresses. The present work aims at hydrodynamic design and coupled fluid structure interaction (FSI) analysis for a horizontal axis hydrokinetic turbine. Blade element momentum (BEM) theory is utilized to analyze fluid forces and torque developed on turbine blades. The results of BEM are compared with a detailed three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis. The CFD domain is coupled with the structural domain using arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian scheme to find stresses in turbine components. A parametric study will be carried out to understand the effect of various parameters like blade pitch angle, flow velocity and RPM on the stresses developed on blades for different blade materials (aluminum and steel). Based on the one-way FSI analysis, the flow conditions and turbine design parameters will be optimized to achieve maximum possible efficiency. Authors acknowledge financial support through ONR Grant # N000141010923.

  2. Fluid Structure Interaction in a Cold Flow Test and Transient CFD Analysis of Out-of-Round Nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruf, Joseph; Brown, Andrew; McDaniels, David; Wang, Ten-See

    2010-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation describes two nozzle fluid flow interactions. They include: 1) Cold flow nozzle tests with fluid-structure interaction at nozzle separated flow; and 2) CFD analysis for nozzle flow and side loads of nozzle extensions with various out-of-round cases.

  3. Microgravity-Induced Physiological Fluid Redistribution: Computational Analysis to Assess Influence of Physiological Parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, J. G.; Eke, Chika; Werner, C.; Nelson, E. S.; Mulugeta, L.; Feola, A.; Raykin, J.; Samuels, B.; Ethier, C. R.

    2016-01-01

    Space flight impacts human physiology in many ways, the most immediate being the marked cephalad (headward) shift of fluid upon introduction into the microgravity environment. This physiological response to microgravity points to the redistribution of blood and interstitial fluid as a major factor in the loss of venous tone and reduction in heart muscle efficiency which impact astronaut performance. In addition, researchers have hypothesized that a reduction in astronaut visual acuity, part of the Visual Impairment and Intracranial Pressure (VIIP) syndrome, is associated with this redistribution of fluid. VIIP arises within several months of beginning space flight and includes a variety of ophthalmic changes including posterior globe flattening, distension of the optic nerve sheath, and kinking of the optic nerve. We utilize a suite of lumped parameter models to simulate microgravity-induced fluid redistribution in the cardiovascular, central nervous and ocular systems to provide initial and boundary data to a 3D finite element simulation of ocular biomechanics in VIIP. Specifically, the lumped parameter cardiovascular model acts as the primary means of establishing how microgravity, and the associated lack of hydrostatic gradient, impacts fluid redistribution. The cardiovascular model consists of 16 compartments, including three cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) compartments, three cranial blood compartments, and 10 thoracic and lower limb blood compartments. To assess the models capability to address variations in physiological parameters, we completed a formal uncertainty and sensitivity analysis that evaluated the relative importance of 42 input parameters required in the model on relative compartment flows and compartment pressures. Utilizing the model in a pulsatile flow configuration, the sensitivity analysis identified the ten parameters that most influenced each compartment pressure. Generally, each compartment responded appropriately to parameter variations

  4. [Contribution of pleural fluid analysis to the diagnosis of pleural effusion].

    PubMed

    Ferreiro, Lucía; Toubes, María Elena; Valdés, Luis

    2015-08-21

    Analysis of pleural fluid can have, on its own, a high diagnostic value. In addition to thoracocentesis, a diagnostic hypothesis based on medical history, physical examination, blood analysis and imaging tests, the diagnostic effectiveness will significantly increase in order to establish a definite or high probable diagnosis in a substantial number of patients. Differentiating transudates from exudates by the classical Light's criteria helps knowing the pathogenic mechanism resulting in pleural effusion, and it is also useful for differential diagnosis purposes. An increased N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide, both in the fluid and in blood, in a due clinical context, is highly suggestive of heart failure. The presence of an increased inflammatory marker, such as C-reactive protein, together with the presence of over 50% of neutrophils is highly suggestive of parapneumonic pleural effusion. If, in these cases, the pH is<7.20, then the likelihood of complicated pleural effusion is high. There remains to be demonstrated the usefulness of other markers to differentiate complicated from uncomplicated effusions. An adenosine deaminase > 45 U/L and>50% lymphocytes is suggestive of tuberculosis. If a malignant effusion is suspected but the cytological result is negative, increased concentrations of some markers in the pleural fluid can yield high specificity values. Increased levels of mesothelin and fibruline-3 are suggestive of mesothelioma. Immunohistochemical studies can be useful to differentiate reactive mesothelial cells, mesothelioma and metastatic adenocarcinoma. An inadequate use of the information provided by the analysis of pleural fluid would results in a high rate of undiagnosed effusions, which is unacceptable in current clinical practice.

  5. Autonomous Cryogenic Leak Detector for Improving Launch Site Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goswami, Kisholoy

    2013-01-01

    NASA, military, and commercial satellite users need launch services that are highly reliable, less complex, easier to test, and cost effective. This project has developed a tapered optical fiber sensor for detecting hydrogen. The invention involves incorporating chemical indicators on the tapered end of an optical fiber using organically modified silicate nanomaterials. The Hazardous Gas Detection Lab (HGDL) at Kennedy Space Center is involved in the design and development of instrumentation that can detect and qualify various mission-critical chemicals. Historically, hydrogen, helium, nitrogen, oxygen, and argon are the first five gases of HGDL focus. The use of these cryogenic fluids in the area of propulsion offers challenges. Due to their extreme low temperatures, these fluids induce contraction of the materials they contact, a potential cause of leakage. Among them, hydrogen is of particular concern. Small sensors are needed in multiple locations without adding to the structural weight. The most vulnerable parts of the engine are the connection flanges on the transfer lines, which have to support cycles of large thermal amplitude. The thermal protection of the engine provides a closed area, increasing the likelihood of an explosive atmosphere. Thus, even a small leak represents an unacceptable hazardous condition during loading operations, in flight, or after an aborted launch. Tapered fibers were first fabricated from 1/1.3-mm core/cladding (silica/ plastic) optical fibers. Typically a 1-ft (approx. 30- cm) section of the 1-mm fiber is cut from the bundle and marked with a pen into five 2-.-in. (.5.7-cm) sections. A propane torch is applied at every alternate mark to burn the jacket and soften the glass core. While the core is softening, the two ends of the fiber are pulled apart slowly to create fine tapers of .- to .-in. (.6- to 12-mm) long on the 1-mm optical fiber. Following this, the non-tapered ends of the fibers are polished to a 0.3-micron finish

  6. One-Piece Leak-Proof Battery

    DOEpatents

    Verhoog, Roelof

    1999-03-23

    The casing of a leak-proof one-piece battery is made of a material comprising a mixture of at least a matrix based on polypropylene and an alloy of a polyamide and a polypropylene. The ratio of the matrix to the alloy is in the range 0.5 to 6 by weight. The alloy forms elongate arborescent inclusions in the matrix such that, on average, the largest dimension of a segment of the arborescence is at least twenty times the smallest dimension of the segment.

  7. Low heat-leak cryogenic envelope

    DOEpatents

    DeHaan, James R.

    1976-10-19

    A plurality of cryogenic envelope sections are joined together to form a power transmission line. Each of the sections is comprised of inner and outer tubes having multilayer metalized plastic spirally wrapped within a vacuum chamber formed between the inner and outer tubes. A refrigeration tube traverses the vacuum chamber, but exits one section and enters another through thermal standoffs for reducing heat-leak from the outer tube to the refrigeration tube. The refrigeration tube passes through a spirally wrapped shield within each section's vacuum chamber in a manner so that the refrigeration tube is in close thermal contact with the shield, but is nevertheless slideable with respect thereto.

  8. Detection of tumor cells in body cavity fluids by flow cytometric and immunocytochemical analysis.

    PubMed

    Krishan, Awtar; Ganjei-Azar, Parvin; Jorda, Merce; Hamelik, Ronald M; Reis, Isildinha M; Nadji, Mehrdad

    2006-08-01

    Measurement of electronic volume versus DNA content of nuclei can be used to discriminate between normal and malignant cells. Epithelial membrane antigen immunocytochemistry (EMA-ICC), a helpful ancillary test in body cavity fluids, is not universally accurate for detecting malignancy in effusions. The current study was undertaken to determine if multiparametric flow cytometry (based on simultaneous analysis of light scatter, nuclear volume, DNA, and nuclear protein content) in combination with (EMA-ICC) could be used for the detection of malignant cells in peritoneal and pleural fluids. We studied 130 body cavity fluids (68 peritoneal and 62 pleural fluids) by conventional cytology and multiparametric laser flow cytometry. EMA-ICC was performed using EMA antibodies and L-SAB detection system (DakoCytomation, Carpinteria, CA). EMA-ICC had significantly higher sensitivity than conventional cytology (79% versus 59%, P = 0.016) and ploidy (79% versus 38%, P = 0.001). Cytology had significantly higher specificity than ploidy (97% versus 82%, P = 0.012). The differences in specificity between EMA-ICC and ploidy (87% versus 82%, P= 0.607) or EMA-ICC and cytology (87% versus 97%, P = 0.109) were not statistically significant. However, assuming serial testing, sensitivity increased significantly for the combinations of cytology and EMA-ICC (79.4%, P = 0.016) and cytology and ploidy (73.5%, P = 0.004) as compared to cytology alone (58.8%). Also, the combination of cytology and ploidy had a higher sensitivity than ploidy alone (73% versus 38%, P < 0.0001). However, the sensitivity associated with the three tests used in serial (85.3%) was not significantly different from the sensitivities corresponding to the combination of cytology and EMA-ICC (79%) or cytology and ploidy (73%). Multiparametric flow cytometry utilizing high resolution DNA, nuclear volume, protein measurement, and ICC, in combination with cytomorphology, may be a valuable tool for rapid identification of

  9. Relationship between bladder cancer and total fluid intake: a meta-analysis of epidemiological evidence

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Epidemiological findings regarding the association between total fluid intake and bladder cancer risk have yielded varying results. Our objective is to examine the possible associations between total fluid intake and bladder cancer risk. Methods Databases searched include the EMBASE and PUBMED, from inception to February 2014, with no limits on study language. We also reviewed the reference lists of identified studies. Stratified analyses were performed. A random-effect model was used to summarize the estimates of odds ratio (OR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI). Results Overall,17 case-control and four cohort studies were included. The overall OR of bladder cancer for the highest versus the lowest fluid intake was 1.06 (95% CI: 0.88-1.27). In the subgroup analyses, the overall ORs for coffee, green, and black tea intake were 1.17 (95% CI: 1.03-1.33), 0.76 (95% CI: 0.66-0.95), and 0.80 (95% CI: 0.65-0.97), respectively. A significantly decreased risk was observed in Asian people (OR 0.27; 95% CI: 0.10-0.72). Among smokers, a suggestive inverse association was observed between total fluid intake and overall bladder cancer risk (OR 0.80; 95% CI: 0.62-1.02). Conclusions Although this meta-analysis suggested that greater consumption of fluid may have a protective effect on bladder cancer in Asian people, there was no convincing evidence on this association because of the limitations of the individual trials. PMID:25033957

  10. Fluid-driven fracture in poroelastic medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovalyshen, Yevhen

    This research deals with an analysis of the problem of a fluid-driven fracture propagating through a poroelastic medium. Formulation of such model of an hydraulic fracture is at the cross-road of four classical disciplines of engineering mechanics: lubrication theory, filtration theory, fracture mechanics, and poroelasticity, which includes both elasticity and diffusion. The resulting mathematical model consists of a set of non-linear integro-differential history-dependent equations with singular behaviour at the moving fracture front. The main contribution of this research is a detailed study of the large-scale 3D diffusion around the fracture and its associated poroelastic effects on fracture propagation. The study hinges on scaling and asymptotic analyses. To understand the behavior of the solution in the tip region, we study a semi-infinite fracture propagating at a constant velocity. We show that, in contrast to the classical case of the Carter's leak-off model (1D diffusion), the tip region of a finite fracture cannot, in general, be modeled by a semi-infinite fracture when 3D diffusion takes place. Moreover, 3D diffusion does not permit separation of the problem into two regions: the tip and the global fracture. We restrict our study of the fracture propagation to an investigation of two limiting cases: zero viscosity and zero toughness. We show that large-scale 3D diffusion and its associated poroelastic effects can significantly affect the fracture evolution. In particular, we observe a significant increase of the net fracturing fluid pressure compared to the case of 1D diffusion due to the porous medium dilation. Another consequence of 3D diffusion is the possibility of fracture arrest. Indeed, the fracture stops propagating at large time, when the fracturing fluid injection rate is balanced by the leak-off rate at pressure below the critical propagation pressure.

  11. A Hydrogen Leak Detection System for Aerospace and Commercial Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, Gary W.; Makel, D. B.; Jansa, E. D.; Patterson, G.; Cova, P. J.; Liu, C. C.; Wu, Q. H.; Powers, W. T.

    1995-01-01

    Leaks on the space shuttle while on the launch pad have generated interest in hydrogen leak monitoring technology. Microfabricated hydrogen sensors are being fabricated at Case Western Reserve University (CWRU) and tested at NASA Lewis Research Center (LeRC). These sensors have been integrated into hardware and software designed by Aerojet. This complete system allows for multipoint leak monitoring designed to provide leak source and magnitude information in real time. The monitoring system processes data from the hydrogen sensors and presents the operator with a visual indication of the leak location and magnitude. Although the leak monitoring system was designed for hydrogen propulsion systems, the possible applications of this monitoring system are wide ranged. This system is in operation in an automotive application which requires high sensitivity to hydrogen.

  12. A hydrogen leak detection system for aerospace and commercial applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunter, Gary W.; Makel, D. B.; Jansa, E. D.; Patterson, G.; Cova, P. J.; Liu, C. C.; Wu, Q. H.; Powers, W. T.

    1995-10-01

    Leaks on the space shuttle while on the launch pad have generated interest in hydrogen leak monitoring technology. Microfabricated hydrogen sensors are being fabricated at Case Western Reserve University (CWRU) and tested at NASA Lewis Research Center (LeRC). These sensors have been integrated into hardware and software designed by Aerojet. This complete system allows for multipoint leak monitoring designed to provide leak source and magnitude information in real time. The monitoring system processes data from the hydrogen sensors and presents the operator with a visual indication of the leak location and magnitude. Although the leak monitoring system was designed for hydrogen propulsion systems, the possible applications of this monitoring system are wide ranged. This system is in operation in an automotive application which requires high sensitivity to hydrogen.

  13. [Leak test for the internal circuit of anesthesia machines].

    PubMed

    Tokumine, J; Iha, H; Okuda, Y

    1999-05-01

    In spite of detailed periodic inspection performed by specialized engineers, a great number of anesthesia machines fail to meet the standard of low flow leak test because of leak in the internal circuit. To find out the background and the solution to the problem, we sent questionnaire to 11 major manufacturers and/or dealers each responsible for periodic inspection of anesthetic machines. According to the responses to the questionnaire, the manufacturers and/or the dealers had various methods of internal circuit leak test without a unified standard in detail. The mismatch of the test methods with those anesthesia machines equipped with check valve mechanism has also led to poor evaluation of internal circuit leak. Leak test must be standardized for its appropriate application to work effectively for the problem of leak in the internal circuit of anesthesia machines.

  14. Long-life leak standard assembly. [Patent application

    DOEpatents

    Basford, J.A.; Mathis, J.E.; Wright, H.C.

    1980-11-12

    The present invention is directed to a portable leak standard assembly which is capable of providing a stream of high-purity reference gas at a virtually constant flow rate over an extensive period of time. The leak assembly comprises a high pressure reservoir coupled to a metal leak valve through a valve-controlled conduit. A reproducible leak valve useful in this assembly is provided by a metal tube crimped with a selected pressure loading for forming an orifice in the tube with this orifice being of a sufficient size to provide the selected flow rate. The leak valve assembly is formed of metal so that it can be baked-out in a vacuum furnace to rid the reservoir and attendent components of volatile impurities which reduce the efficiency of the leak standard.

  15. Fluid imbalance

    MedlinePlus

    ... up in the body. This is called fluid overload (volume overload). This can lead to edema (excess fluid in ... Water imbalance; Fluid imbalance - dehydration; Fluid buildup; Fluid overload; Volume overload; Loss of fluids; Edema - fluid imbalance; ...

  16. Computational fluid dynamics analysis in microbial fuel cells with different anode configurations.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jiyeon; Kim, Hongsuck; Kim, Byunggoon; Yu, Jaecheul

    2014-01-01

    A key criterion in microbial fuel cell (MFC) design is that the bio-electrochemical reaction between bacteria and the bulk solution should occur evenly on the electrode surface in order to improve electricity generation. However, experimental optimization of MFC design over a wide range of conditions is limited. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) technology makes it possible to evaluate physicochemical phenomena such as fluid flows, mass transfer and chemical reaction, which can assist in system optimization. Twelve MFCs (M1-M12) with different internal structures were subjected to CFD analysis. The dead (DS) and working spaces (WS) of the anode compartment were calculated. The flow patterns of the anodic fluid varied according to the internal structures. The WS where the bio-electrochemical reaction can actually occur varied over the range of 0.14-0.57 m(2). Based on the above results, the power densities were estimated under the assumption that a monolayer biofilm was formed on the electrode. M11, with 18 rectangular-type internal structures, showed the largest WS of 0.57 m(2) and a theoretical maximum power density of 0.54 W/m(2). Although the optimization of the MFC configuration with only CFD analysis remains limited, the present study results are expected to provide fundamental data for MFC optimization.

  17. THERMIT-2: a two-fluid model for light water reactor subchannel transient analysis. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, J.E.; Kao, S.P.; Kazimi, M.S.

    1981-04-01

    The broad effort of developing and assessing the two fluid model computer code THERMIT for light water reactor (LWR) subchannel analysis is described. The developmental effort required a reformulation of the coolant-to-fuel rod coupling so that THERMIT is now capable of traditional coolant-centered subchannel analysis. A model that accounts for mass, momentum and energy transport between mesh cells due to turbulent mixing for two-phase conditions has also been introduced. This model is the first such attempt in a two-fluid context. The liquid-vapor interfacial exchange terms in the two-fluid model have been modified for improved accuracy. A systematic evaluation of the exchange models has been performed. The mass and momentum exchange rates between the vapor and the liquid for pre-CHF conditions were evaluated by comparison to void fraction data in over 30 one-dimensional steady-state experiments reported in the open literature. The liquid-vapor energy exchange rate for post-CHF conditions was assessed using 15 steady-state, one-dimensional wall temperature measurements. The mixing model was tested against G.E. and Ispra BWR and PWR rod-bundle measurements. Comparisons with these measurements have shown the appropriateness of this model.

  18. Analysis of two-dimensional flow of epoxy fluids through woven glass fabric

    SciTech Connect

    Schutz, J.B.; Smith, K.B.

    1997-06-01

    Fabrication of magnet coils for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor will require vacuum pressure impregnation of epoxy resin into the glass fabric of the insulation system. Flow of a fluid through a packed bed of woven glass fabric is extremely complicated, and semiempirical methods must be used to analyze these flows. The previous one-dimensional model has been modified for analysis of two-dimensional isotropic flow of epoxy resins through woven glass fabric. Several two-dimensional flow experiments were performed to validate the analysis, and to determine permeabilities of several fabric weave types. The semiempirical permeability is shown to be a characteristic of the fabric weave, and once determined, may be used to analyze flow of fluids of differing viscosities. Plain weave has a lower permeability than satin weave fabric, possibly due to the increased tortuosity of the preferential flow paths along fiber tows. A flow radius of approximately 2 meters through satin weave fabric is predicted for fluid viscosities of 0.10 Pa s (100 cps) in 20 hours, characteristic of VPI resins.

  19. A hydrodynamic analysis of fluid flow between meshing spur gear teeth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wittbrodt, M. J.; Pechersky, M. J.

    1987-10-01

    A one dimensional analysis of the fluid pumping action resulting from the meshing of spur gears was performed by writing a computer algorithm. Two separate analyses were conducted; one using incompressible and the other using compressible flow theory. The incompressible flow calculations correspond to heavily lubricated gears whereas the compressible flow calculations are representative of lightly lubricated gears. The analysis demonstrated that the velocity of the discharged fluid reached high velocities for both cases. The high meshing rate of the teeth along with the small discharge area is the cause for the high fluid velocities. Certain geometric design variables of the gears were seen to affect the peak velocities for each case. The variables most significantly affecting the peak velocity appear to be the drive ratio and the face width. The high velocities may contribute to the noise generated during meshing of gear teeth due to the jet noise as a result of the high velocity jets impinging on the enclosures surrounding the gears and the formation of shock waves at the exit plane of the teeth.

  20. EPA Chases Leaks in New Mexico during Seventh Annual Fix a Leak Week

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    DALLAS - (March 16, 2015) Dripping faucets and leaky toilets account for a large portion of home water waste. Every year, more than 10,000 gallons of water is wasted in homes due to easy-to-fix leaks. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) i

  1. The regulation and physiology of mitochondrial proton leak.

    PubMed

    Divakaruni, Ajit S; Brand, Martin D

    2011-06-01

    Mitochondria couple respiration to ATP synthesis through an electrochemical proton gradient. Proton leak across the inner membrane allows adjustment of the coupling efficiency. The aim of this review is threefold: 1) introduce the unfamiliar reader to proton leak and its physiological significance, 2) review the role and regulation of uncoupling proteins, and 3) outline the prospects of proton leak as an avenue to treat obesity, diabetes, and age-related disease.

  2. Evaluation of low viscosity variations in fluids using temporal and spatial analysis of the speckle pattern.

    PubMed

    Nader, Christelle Abou; Pellen, Fabrice; Roquefort, Philippe; Aubry, Thierry; Le Jeune, Bernard; Le Brun, Guy; Abboud, Marie

    2016-06-01

    The noninvasive detection of a material's viscoelasticity is of great importance in the medical field. In fact, certain diseases cause changes in tissue structure and biological fluid viscosity; tracking those changes allows for detection of these diseases. Rheological measurements are also imperative in the industrial field, where it is necessary to characterize a material's viscoelasticity for manufacturing purposes. In this Letter, we present a noncontact, noninvasive, and low cost method for determining low viscosity values and variations in fluids. Laser speckle and viscometric measurements are performed on test samples having low scattering coefficients and low viscosities. The speckle spatial analysis proved to be as accurate as the speckle temporal correlation method reported in previous studies. Very low viscosities of the order of 1 mPa.s were retrieved for the first time using speckle images with either a frame rate of 1950 fps or a single acquired image.

  3. Analysis and control of the METC fluid bed gasifier. Quarterly report, April 1995--June 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1995-06-01

    This document summarizes work performed for the period 4/1/95 to 7/31/95 on contract no. DE-FG21-94MC31384 (Work accomplished during the period 10/1/94 to 3/31/94 was summarized in the previous technical progress report included in the appendix of this report). In this work, three components will form the basis for design of a control scheme for the Fluidized Bed Gasifier (FBG) at METC: (1) a control systems analysis based on simple linear models derived from process data, (2) review of the literature on fluid bed gasifier operation and control, and (3) understanding of present FBG operation and real world considerations. Tasks accomplished during the present reporting period include: (1) Completion of a literature survey on Fluid Bed Gasifier control, (2) Observation of the FBG during the week of July 17 to July 21, and (3) Suggested improvements to the control of FBG backpressure and MGCR pressure.

  4. Viscous potential flow analysis of electrified miscible finitely conducting fluid through porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Obied Allah, M. H.

    2013-04-15

    In this work, a viscous potential flow analysis is used to investigate capillary surface waves between two horizontal finite fluid layers. The two layers have finite conductivities and admit mass and heat transfer. A general dispersion relation is derived. The presence of finite conductivities together with the dielectric permeabilities makes the horizontal electric field play a dual role in the stability criterion. The phenomenon of negative viscosity is observed. A new growth rate parameter, depending on the kinematical viscosity of the lower fluid layer, is found and has a stabilizing effect on the unstable modes. The growth rates and neutral stability curve are given and applied to air-water interface. The effects of various parameters are discussed for the Kelvin-Helmholtz and the Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities.

  5. Overview of the Hijiori shallow reservoir circulation tests and reservoir fluid storage analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Takahiro Shiga; Masami Hyodo; Shinji Takasugi; Wright, C.A.; Conant, R.A.

    1996-01-24

    Since 1985, NEDO has advanced a]Hot Dry Rock project in Hijiori, Japan. Circulation tests have been performed in FY1991 (in a shallow reservoir), and in FY1995 (in both shallow and deep reservoirs). In 1991 circulation test, the result was that 78% fluid recovery at an injection rate of 60 tons/hour and production temperatures of 150 °C - 190 °C . However no detailed analysis of flow conditions was given. Therefore, a simplified HDR model has been proposed to understand the Hijion HDR reservoir. We have analyzed the 1991 circulation test using the model. This study is very important for analyzing the circulation test in both of shallow and deep reservoir which was conducted in 1995. This paper summarizes the 1991 circulation test at the Hijiori HDR test site, and estimation of the reservoir fluid storage by using "unrecovered" flow from the new conceptual idea of HDR reservoir model.

  6. MALDI-TOF MS analysis of lipids from cells, tissues and body fluids.

    PubMed

    Fuchs, Beate; Schiller, Jürgen

    2008-01-01

    Many diseases as atherosclerosis and metabolic dysfunctions are known to correlate with changes of the lipid profile of tissues and body fluids. Therefore, the importance of reliable methods of lipid analysis is obvious. Although matrix-assisted laser desorption and ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) was so far primarily used for protein analysis, this method has itself proven to be very useful in lipid analysis, too. This review provides an overview of applications of MALDI-TOF MS in lipid analysis and summarizes the specific advantages and drawbacks of this modern soft-ionization method. The focus will be on the analysis of body fluids and cells as well as the diagnostic potential of the method in the lipid field. It will be shown that MALDI-TOF mass spectra can be recorded in a very short time and provide important information on the lipid as well as the fatty acyl composition of the lipids of an unknown sample. However, it will also be shown that only selected lipid classes (in particular those with quaternary ammonia groups as phosphatidylcholine) are detected if crude mixtures are analyzed as they are more sensitively detectable than other ones. This review ends with a short outlook emphasizing current methodological developments.

  7. MicroRNA analysis of breast ductal fluid in breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Do Canto, Luisa Matos; Marian, Catalin; Willey, Shawna; Sidawy, Mary; Da Cunha, Patricia A; Rone, Janice D; Li, Xin; Gusev, Yuriy; Haddad, Bassem R

    2016-05-01

    Recent studies suggest that microRNAs show promise as excellent biomarkers for breast cancer; however there is still a high degree of variability between studies making the findings difficult to interpret. In addition to blood, ductal lavage (DL) and nipple aspirate fluids represent an excellent opportunity for biomarker detection because they can be obtained in a less invasive manner than biopsies and circumvent the limitations of evaluating blood biomarkers with regards to tissue of origin specificity. In this study, we have investigated for the first time, through a real-time PCR array, the expression of 742 miRNAs in the ductal lavage fluid collected from 22 women with unilateral breast tumors. We identified 17 differentially expressed miRNAs between tumor and paired normal samples from patients with ductal breast carcinoma. Most of these miRNAs have various roles in breast cancer tumorigenesis, invasion and metastasis, therapeutic response, or are associated with several clinical and pathological characteristics of breast tumors. Moreover, some miRNAs were also detected in other biological fluids of breast cancer patients such as serum (miR-23b, -133b, -181a, 338-3p, -625), plasma (miR-200a), and breast milk (miR-181a). A systems biology analysis of these differentially expressed miRNAs points out possible pathways and cellular processes previously described as having an important role in breast cancer such as Wnt, ErbB, MAPK, TGF-β, mTOR, PI3K-Akt, p53 signaling pathways. We also observed a difference in the miRNA expression with respect to the histological type of the tumors. In conclusion, our findings suggest that miRNA analysis of breast ductal fluid is feasible and potentially very useful for the detection of breast cancer.

  8. Lymphangiography in the Diagnosis and Localization of Various Chyle Leaks

    SciTech Connect

    Deso, Steve; Ludwig, Benjamin; Kabutey, Nii-Kabu; Kim, Ducksoo; Guermazi, Ali

    2012-02-15

    Purpose: Chyle leaks are rare entities infrequently encountered by most physicians. However, large centers providing advanced surgical care are inevitably confronted with chyle leaks as a complication of surgery, an extension of disease, or as a primary disorder. Regardless of the etiology, proper diagnosis and localization are paramount in the management of any chyle leak. Materials and Methods: Here we present 16 patients with 17 chyle leaks (5 chyluria, 8 chylothorax, and 4 chylous ascites) who underwent bipedal lymphangiography (LAG) and postprocedure computed tomography (CT) imaging. Results: In each case, the source of the chyle leak was identified and properly localized to guide further treatment. Of the 16 patients who underwent LAG and postprocedure CT imaging, the initial LAG alone provided the diagnosis and localized the chyle leak in 4 patients (25%); the postprocedure CT imaging provided the diagnosis and localized the chyle leak in 6 patients (37.5%); and the two modalities were equal in the diagnosing and localizing the chyle leak in the remaining 6 patients (37.5%)ConclusionThese cases highlight the unparalleled abilities of LAG and the added benefit of post-LAG CT imaging in the diagnosis and fine anatomic localization of chyle leaks. In addition, these cases demonstrate the retained utility of LAG in these investigations despite the development of alternative tests involving CT, magnetic resonance imaging, and nuclear medicine imaging.

  9. Margins in high temperature leak-before-break assessments

    SciTech Connect

    Budden, P.J.; Hooton, D.G.

    1997-04-01

    Developments in the defect assessment procedure R6 to include high-temperature mechanisms in Leak-before-Break arguments are described. In particular, the effect of creep on the time available to detect a leak and on the crack opening area, and hence leak rate, is discussed. The competing influence of these two effects is emphasized by an example. The application to Leak-before-Break of the time-dependent failure assessment diagram approach for high temperature defect assessment is then outlined. The approach is shown to be of use in assessing the erosion of margins by creep.

  10. Method to control the amount of helium during leak testing

    SciTech Connect

    Frank E. Jurvic, Jr.

    2002-03-29

    The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate a method for limiting the amount of helium administered during leak testing and provide a method for keeping the atmospheric helium in a location to a minimum to eliminate backstreaming into the system. This method utilizes the permeability of a balloon. The transporting of helium to the leak check area is also safer by not requiring a cylinder in the leak check location. Utilizing the many shapes of balloons and partially filling of the balloon, any configuration can deliver helium to the leak location. The balloon I filled for the test fell to the floor with the amount of helium I put into the balloon.

  11. Computational fluid dynamics analysis of cold plasma carrier gas injected into a fluid using level set method.

    PubMed

    Shahmohammadi Beni, Mehrdad; Yu, K N

    2015-12-14

    A promising application of plasma medicine is to treat living cells and tissues with cold plasma. In cold plasmas, the fraction of neutrals dominates, so the carrier gas could be considered the main component. In many realistic situations, the treated cells are covered by a fluid. The present paper developed models to determine the temperature of the fluid at the positions of the treated cells. Specifically, the authors developed a three-phase-interaction model which was coupled with heat transfer to examine the injection of the helium carrier gas into water and to investigate both the fluid dynamics and heat transfer output variables, such as temperature, in three phases, i.e., air, helium gas, and water. Our objective was to develop a model to perform complete fluid dynamics and heat transfer computations to determine the temperature at the surface of living cells. Different velocities and plasma temperatures were also investigated using finite element method, and the model was built using the comsol multiphysics software. Using the current model to simulate plasma injection into such systems, the authors were able to investigate the temperature distributions in the domain, as well as the surface and bottom boundary of the medium in which cells were cultured. The temperature variations were computed at small time intervals to analyze the temperature increase in cell targets that could be highly temperature sensisitve. Furthermore, the authors were able to investigate the volume of the plasma plume and its effects on the average temperature of the medium layer/domain. Variables such as temperature and velocity at the cell layer could be computed, and the variations due to different plume sizes could be determined. The current models would be very useful for future design of plasma medicine devices and procedures involving cold plasmas.

  12. Steam-leak cost estimation using thermographically acquired pipe temperature data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madding, Robert P.; MacNamara, Neal A.

    1997-04-01

    Predictive maintenance practitioners readily diagnose steam leaks through drain using infrared thermography, often supplemented with ultrasonic probe verification. Typically, a pipe carries the leaking steam to a flash tank or directly to the condenser. Thus, the energy used to create the steam is what is lost, not the steam itself. However, the cost of steam production is not inexpensive. We have found steam leaks we estimate cost $30 K/year. As a part of the Electric Power Research Institute's (EPRI's) Boiler, Condenser and Steam Cycle Applications Project, the EPRI M&D (Monitoring & Diagnostic) Centers have begun acquiring steam leak data at several electric utilities. Estimates of steam leak costs are key to evaluating cost savings and recommendation of corrective action, but are hampered by lack of knowledge of the steam flow in the line. These lines are usually not instrumented because typically there is no flow. Consequently, we must derive an indirect method of estimating steam flow. This can be done for uninsulated pipes given knowledge of the pipe surface temperature gradient over a known distance. For single phase conditions, the mass flow of steam equals the heat lost from a length of pipe divided by the temperature drop along the length and the heat capacity of the steam. Pipe heat loss is calculated knowing the pipe diameter, pipe surface temperature, ambient air temperature and using American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) tabulated values. The temperatures are derived from thermographic data. Distances can also be derived from thermal imaging radiometer data, depending on the type of system employed. To facilitate calculation of steam leak cost estimates, we have developed a Microsoft ExcelTM spreadsheet macro. The user can interface directly with the spreadsheet, entering appropriate temperatures, distances, pipe diameter, heat rate, cost of power, etc. Or, the analyst can use thermal imaging radiometer

  13. Long-term calorie restriction reduces proton leak and hydrogen peroxide production in liver mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Hagopian, Kevork; Harper, Mary-Ellen; Ram, Jesmon J; Humble, Stephen J; Weindruch, Richard; Ramsey, Jon J

    2005-04-01

    Calorie restriction (CR) without malnutrition increases maximal life span in diverse species. It has been proposed that reduction in energy expenditure and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production could be a mechanism for life span extension with CR. As a step toward testing this theory, mitochondrial proton leak, H2O2 production, and markers of oxidative stress were measured in liver from FBNF1 rats fed control or 40% CR diets for 12 or 18 mo. CR was initiated at 6 mo of age. Proton leak kinetics curves, generated from simultaneous measures of oxygen consumption and membrane potential, indicated a decrease in proton leak after 18 mo of CR, while only a trend toward a proton leak decrease was observed after 12 mo. Significant shifts in phosphorylation and substrate oxidation curves also occurred with CR; however, these changes occurred in concert with the proton leak changes. Metabolic control analysis indicated no difference in the overall pattern of control of the oxidative phosphorylation system between control and CR animals. At 12 mo, no significant differences were observed between groups for H2O2 production or markers of oxidative stress. However, at 18 mo, protein carbonyl content was lower in CR animals, as was H2O2 production when mitochondria were respiring on either succinate alone or pyruvate plus malate in the presence of rotenone. These results indicate that long-term CR lowers mitochondrial proton leak and H2O2 production, and this is consistent with the idea that CR may act by decreasing energy expenditure and ROS production.

  14. Validation of Computational Fluid Dynamic analysis of a rocket engine turbopump impeller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prueger, George H.; Lin, S. J.; Chan, Daniel C.; Eastland, Anthony H.

    1993-06-01

    Incorporation of Computational Fluid Dynamic analysis into the design process of turbomachinery components requires extensive validation of the analysis tools. This validation must include not only investigation of the capabilities of the CFD tool to adequately predict the flow structures present, but also the level of geometric modeling and grid sizes required. Validation of Rocketdyne's Three-Dimensional Elliptic Analysis Code for Turbomachinery, REACT3D, was accomplished by comparison to test data obtained with the Space Shuttle Main Engine High Pressure Fuel Pump impeller. Comparisons were made for averaged quantities which are commonly used in the design process as well as for the detail jet-wake features of the impeller discharge flow. The validation shows that with current computer technology it is feasible to use CFD analysis within the limits of design schedules and budgets.

  15. Supercritical fluid chromatography for GMP analysis in support of pharmaceutical development and manufacturing activities.

    PubMed

    Hicks, Michael B; Regalado, Erik L; Tan, Feng; Gong, Xiaoyi; Welch, Christopher J

    2016-01-05

    Supercritical fluid chromatography (SFC) has long been a preferred method for enantiopurity analysis in support of pharmaceutical discovery and development, but implementation of the technique in regulated GMP laboratories has been somewhat slow, owing to limitations in instrument sensitivity, reproducibility, accuracy and robustness. In recent years, commercialization of next generation analytical SFC instrumentation has addressed previous shortcomings, making the technique better suited for GMP analysis. In this study we investigate the use of modern SFC for enantiopurity analysis of several pharmaceutical intermediates and compare the results with the conventional HPLC approaches historically used for analysis in a GMP setting. The findings clearly illustrate that modern SFC now exhibits improved precision, reproducibility, accuracy and robustness; also providing superior resolution and peak capacity compared to HPLC. Based on these findings, the use of modern chiral SFC is recommended for GMP studies of stereochemistry in pharmaceutical development and manufacturing.

  16. Evaluation of an Interferometric Sensor for In-Space Detection of Gas Leaks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polzin, Kurt A.; Korman, Valentin; Sinko, John; Hendrickson, Adam

    2009-01-01

    Space mission planning often involves long-term storage of volatile liquids or high-pressure gases. These may include cryogenic fuels and oxidizers, high-pressure gases, and life-support-critical consumables. The risk associated with the storage of fluids and gases in space systems has long been an issue and the ability to retain these fluids is often tied to mission success. A leak in the storage or distribution system can cause many different problems, including a simple, but mission endangering, loss of inventory or, in severe cases, unbalanced thrust loads on a flight vehicle. Cryogenic propellants are especially difficult to store, especially over a long duration. The propellant can boil off and be lost through the insulating walls of the tank or simple thermal cycling of the fittings, valves, and propellant feed lines may unseat seals allowing the fluid to escape. Current NASA missions call for long-duration in-space storage of propellants, oxidizers, and life support supplies. Leaks of a scale detectable through a pressure drop in the storage tank are often catastrophic and have long been the focus of ground-based mitigation efforts where redundant systems are often employed. However, there is presently no technology available for detecting and monitoring low-level, but still mission-endangering, gas leaks in space. Standard in-space gas detection methods either have a very limited pressure range over which they operate effectively or are limited to certain gases. Mass spectrometer systems are able to perform the detection tasks, but their size, mass and use of high voltage, which could potentially lead to an arc that ignites a combustible propellent, severely limit their usefulness in a space system. In this paper, we present results from testing of the light-based interferometric gas monitoring and leak detection sensor shown in Fig. 1. The output of the sensor is an interference fringe pattern that is a function of the gas density, and commensurate index

  17. Internal air flow analysis of a bladeless micro aerial vehicle hemisphere body using computational fluid dynamic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Othman, M. N. K.; Zuradzman, M. Razlan; Hazry, D.; Khairunizam, Wan; Shahriman, A. B.; Yaacob, S.; Ahmed, S. Faiz; Hussain, Abadalsalam T.

    2014-12-01

    This paper explain the analysis of internal air flow velocity of a bladeless vertical takeoff and landing (VTOL) Micro Aerial Vehicle (MAV) hemisphere body. In mechanical design, before produce a prototype model, several analyses should be done to ensure the product's effectiveness and efficiency. There are two types of analysis method can be done in mechanical design; mathematical modeling and computational fluid dynamic. In this analysis, I used computational fluid dynamic (CFD) by using SolidWorks Flow Simulation software. The idea came through to overcome the problem of ordinary quadrotor UAV which has larger size due to using four rotors and the propellers are exposed to environment. The bladeless MAV body is designed to protect all electronic parts, which means it can be used in rainy condition. It also has been made to increase the thrust produced by the ducted propeller compare to exposed propeller. From the analysis result, the air flow velocity at the ducted area increased to twice the inlet air. This means that the duct contribute to the increasing of air velocity.

  18. Internal air flow analysis of a bladeless micro aerial vehicle hemisphere body using computational fluid dynamic

    SciTech Connect

    Othman, M. N. K. E-mail: zuradzman@unimap.edu.my E-mail: khairunizam@unimap.edu.my E-mail: s.yaacob@unimap.edu.my E-mail: abadal@unimap.edu.my; Zuradzman, M. Razlan E-mail: zuradzman@unimap.edu.my E-mail: khairunizam@unimap.edu.my E-mail: s.yaacob@unimap.edu.my E-mail: abadal@unimap.edu.my; Hazry, D. E-mail: zuradzman@unimap.edu.my E-mail: khairunizam@unimap.edu.my E-mail: s.yaacob@unimap.edu.my E-mail: abadal@unimap.edu.my; Khairunizam, Wan E-mail: zuradzman@unimap.edu.my E-mail: khairunizam@unimap.edu.my E-mail: s.yaacob@unimap.edu.my E-mail: abadal@unimap.edu.my; Shahriman, A. B. E-mail: zuradzman@unimap.edu.my E-mail: khairunizam@unimap.edu.my E-mail: s.yaacob@unimap.edu.my E-mail: abadal@unimap.edu.my; Yaacob, S. E-mail: zuradzman@unimap.edu.my E-mail: khairunizam@unimap.edu.my E-mail: s.yaacob@unimap.edu.my E-mail: abadal@unimap.edu.my; Ahmed, S. Faiz E-mail: zuradzman@unimap.edu.my E-mail: khairunizam@unimap.edu.my E-mail: s.yaacob@unimap.edu.my E-mail: abadal@unimap.edu.my; and others

    2014-12-04

    This paper explain the analysis of internal air flow velocity of a bladeless vertical takeoff and landing (VTOL) Micro Aerial Vehicle (MAV) hemisphere body. In mechanical design, before produce a prototype model, several analyses should be done to ensure the product's effectiveness and efficiency. There are two types of analysis method can be done in mechanical design; mathematical modeling and computational fluid dynamic. In this analysis, I used computational fluid dynamic (CFD) by using SolidWorks Flow Simulation software. The idea came through to overcome the problem of ordinary quadrotor UAV which has larger size due to using four rotors and the propellers are exposed to environment. The bladeless MAV body is designed to protect all electronic parts, which means it can be used in rainy condition. It also has been made to increase the thrust produced by the ducted propeller compare to exposed propeller. From the analysis result, the air flow velocity at the ducted area increased to twice the inlet air. This means that the duct contribute to the increasing of air velocity.

  19. Analysis of the Laminar Newtonian Fluid Flow Through a Thin Fracture Modelled as a Fluid-Saturated Sparsely Packed Porous Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pažanin, Igor; Siddheshwar, Pradeep G.

    2017-03-01

    In this article we investigate the fluid flow through a thin fracture modelled as a fluid-saturated porous medium. We assume that the fracture has constrictions and that the flow is governed by the prescribed pressure drop between the edges of the fracture. The problem is described by the Darcy-Lapwood-Brinkman model acknowledging the Brinkman extension of the Darcy law as well as the flow inertia. Using asymptotic analysis with respect to the thickness of the fracture, we derive the explicit higher-order approximation for the velocity distribution. We make an error analysis to comment on the order of accuracy of the method used and also to provide rigorous justification for the model.

  20. The role of advection and dispersion in the rock matrix on the transport of leaking CO2-saturated brine along a fractured zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Nawaz; Wörman, Anders; Sanchez-Vila, Xavier; Bottacin-Busolin, Andrea

    2016-12-01

    CO2 that is injected into a geological storage reservoir can leak in dissolved form because of brine displacement from the reservoir, which is caused by large-scale groundwater motion. Simulations of the reactive transport of leaking CO2aq along a conducting fracture in a clay-rich caprock are conducted to analyze the effect of various physical and geochemical processes. Whilst several modeling transport studies along rock fractures have considered diffusion as the only transport process in the surrounding rock matrix (diffusive transport), this study analyzes the combined role of advection and dispersion in the rock matrix in addition to diffusion (advection-dominated transport) on the migration of CO2aq along a leakage pathway and its conversion in geochemical reactions. A sensitivity analysis is performed to quantify the effect of fluid velocity and dispersivity. Variations in the porosity and permeability of the medium are found in response to calcite dissolution and precipitation along the leakage pathway. We observe that advection and dispersion in the rock matrix play a significant role in the overall transport process. For the parameters that were used in this study, advection-dominated transport increased the leakage of CO2aq from the reservoir by nearly 305%, caused faster transport and increased the mass conversion of CO2aq in geochemical reactions along the transport pathway by approximately 12.20% compared to diffusive transport.