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Sample records for fluid therapy stroke

  1. Evolution of Volume and Signal Intensity on Fluid-attenuated Inversion Recovery MR Images after Endovascular Stroke Therapy.

    PubMed

    Federau, Christian; Mlynash, Michael; Christensen, Soren; Zaharchuk, Greg; Cha, Brannon; Lansberg, Maarten G; Wintermark, Max; Albers, Gregory W

    2016-07-01

    Purpose To analyze both volume and signal evolution on magnetic resonance (MR) fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) images between the images after endovascular therapy and day 5 (which was the prespecified end point for infarct volume in the Diffusion and Perfusion Imaging Evaluation for Understanding Stroke Evolution [DEFUSE 2] trial) in a subset of patients enrolled in the DEFUSE 2 study. Materials and Methods This study was approved by the local ethics committee at all participating sites. Informed written consent was obtained from all patients. In this post hoc analysis of the DEFUSE 2 study, 35 patients with FLAIR images acquired both after endovascular therapy (median time after symptom onset, 12 hours) and at day 5 were identified. Patients were separated into two groups based on the degree of reperfusion achieved on time to maximum greater than 6-second perfusion imaging (≥90% vs <90%). After coregistration and signal normalization, lesion volumes and signal intensity were assessed by using FLAIR imaging for the initial lesion (ie, visible after endovascular therapy) and the recruited lesion (the additional lesion visible on day 5, but not visible after endovascular therapy). Statistical significance was assessed by using Wilcoxon signed-rank, Mann-Whitney U, and Fisher exact tests. Results All 35 patients had FLAIR lesion growth between the after-revascularization examination and day 5. Median lesion growth was significantly larger in patients with <90% reperfusion (27.85 mL) compared with ≥90% (8.12 mL; P = .003). In the initial lesion, normalized signal did not change between after endovascular therapy (median, 1.60) and day 5 (median, 1.58) in the ≥90% reperfusion group (P = .97), but increased in the <90% reperfusion group (from 1.60 to 1.73; P = .01). In the recruited lesion, median normalized signal increased significantly in both groups between after endovascular therapy and day 5 (after endovascular therapy, from 1.19 to 1.56, P

  2. Efficacy and Safety of Stroke Volume Variation-Guided Fluid Therapy for Reducing Blood Loss and Transfusion Requirements During Radical Cystectomy: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    PubMed

    Kong, Yu-Gyeong; Kim, Ji Yoon; Yu, Jihion; Lim, Jinwook; Hwang, Jai-Hyun; Kim, Young-Kug

    2016-05-01

    Radical cystectomy, which is performed to treat muscle-invasive bladder tumors, is among the most difficult urological surgical procedures and puts patients at risk of intraoperative blood loss and transfusion. Fluid management via stroke volume variation (SVV) is associated with reduced intraoperative blood loss. Therefore, we evaluated the efficacy and safety of SVV-guided fluid therapy for reducing blood loss and transfusion requirements in patients undergoing radical cystectomy.This study included 48 patients who underwent radical cystectomy, and these patients were randomly allocated to the control group and maintained at <10% SVV (n = 24) or allocated to the trial group and maintained at 10% to 20% SVV (n = 24). The primary endpoints were comparisons of the amounts of intraoperative blood loss and transfused red blood cells (RBCs) between the control and trial groups during radical cystectomy. Intraoperative blood loss was evaluated through the estimated blood loss and estimated red cell mass loss. The secondary endpoints were comparisons of the postoperative outcomes between groups.A total of 46 patients were included in the final analysis: 23 patients in the control group and 23 patients in the trial group. The SVV values in the trial group were significantly higher than in the control group. Estimated blood loss, estimated red cell mass loss, and RBC transfusion requirements in the trial group were significantly lower than in the control group (734.3 ± 321.5 mL vs 1096.5 ± 623.9 mL, P = 0.019; 274.1 ± 207.8 mL vs 553.1 ± 298.7 mL, P <0.001; 0.5 ± 0.8 units vs 1.9 ± 2.2 units, P = 0.005). There were no significant differences in postoperative outcomes between the two groups.SVV-guided fluid therapy (SVV maintained at 10%-20%) can reduce blood loss and transfusion requirements in patients undergoing radical cystectomy without resulting in adverse outcomes. These findings provide useful information for

  3. Goal directed fluid therapy.

    PubMed

    Marik, Paul E; Desai, Himanshu

    2012-01-01

    The cornerstone of treating patients with shock remains as it has for decades, intravenous fluids. Surprisingly, dosing intravenous fluid during resuscitation of shock remains largely empirical. Recent data suggests that early aggressive resuscitation of critically ill patients may limit and/or reverse tissue hypoxia, progression to organ failure and improve outcome. However, overzealous fluid resuscitation has been associated with increased complications, increased length of intensive care unit (ICU) and hospital stay and increased mortality. This review focuses on methods to assess fluid responsiveness and the application of these methods for goal directed fluid therapy in critically ill and peri-operative patients.

  4. Acupuncture therapy for stroke patients.

    PubMed

    Li, Xin; Wang, Qiang

    2013-01-01

    Acupuncture is one of the most important parts of Traditional Chinese Medicine, has been used for more than 3000 years as prevention and treatment for various diseases in China as well as in adjacent regions, and is widely accepted in western countries in recent years. More and more clinical trials revealed that acupuncture shows positive effect in stroke, not only as a complementary and alternative medicine for poststroke rehabilitation but also as a preventive strategy which could induce cerebral ischemic tolerance, especially when combined with modern electrotherapy. Acupuncture has some unique characteristics, which include acupoint specificity and parameter-dependent effect. It also involves complicated mechanism to exert the beneficial effect on stroke. Series of clinical trials have shown that acupuncture primarily regulates the release of neurochemicals, hemorheology, cerebral microcirculation, metabolism, neuronal activity, and the function of specific brain region. Animal studies showed that the effects of acupuncture therapy on stroke were possibly via inhibition of postischemic inflammatory reaction, stimulation of neurogenesis and angiogenesis, and influence on neural plasticity. Mechanisms for its preconditioning effect include activity enhancement of antioxidant, regulation of the endocannabinoid system, and inhibition of apoptosis. Although being controversial, acupuncture is a promising preventive and treatment strategy for stroke, but further high-quality clinical trials would be needed to provide more confirmative evidence.

  5. Fluid therapy in shock.

    PubMed

    Mandell, D C; King, L G

    1998-05-01

    The goal of treatment for all types of shock is the improvement of tissue perfusion and oxygenation. The mainstay of therapy for hypovolemic and septic shock is the expansion of the intravascular volume by fluid administration, including crystalloids, colloids, and blood products. Frequent physical examinations and monitoring enable the clinician to determine the adequacy of tissue oxygenation and thus the success of the fluid therapy.

  6. [Antioxidant therapy in ischemic stroke].

    PubMed

    Suslina, Z A; Federova, T N; Maksimova, M Iu; Riasina, T V; Stvolinskiĭ, S L; Khrapova, E V; Boldyrev, A A

    2000-01-01

    The paper presents the results of investigation of emoxipin, an antioxidant synthetic drug, for treatment of patients with ischemic disorders of cerebral circulation. The drug produced a beneficial clinical effect in patients with lacunar and cardioembolic strokes of moderate severity. Therapy with emoxipin increased endogenic antioxidant activity and improved a clinical status of the patients. The protective effect of carnosine was demonstrated in experimental acute hypobaric hypoxia and cerebral ischemia in rats. The results obtained permit to recommend an inclusion of both emoxipin and carnosine in a combined treatment of ischemic disorders of cerebral circulation.

  7. Stroke: advances in medical therapy and acute stroke intervention.

    PubMed

    Barrett, Kevin M; Lal, Brajesh K; Meschia, James F

    2015-10-01

    Evidence-based therapeutic options for stroke continue to emerge based on results from well-designed clinical studies. Ischemic stroke far exceeds hemorrhagic stroke in terms of prevalence and incidence, both in the USA and worldwide. The public health effect of reducing death and disability related to ischemic stroke justifies the resources that have been invested in identifying safe and effective treatments. The emergence of novel oral anticoagulants for ischemic stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation has introduced complexity to clinical decision making for patients with this common cardiac arrhythmia. Some accepted ischemic stroke preventative strategies, such as carotid revascularization for asymptomatic carotid stenosis, require reassessment, given advances in risk factor management, antithrombotic therapy, and surgical techniques. Intra-arterial therapy, particularly with stent retrievers after intravenous tissue plasminogen activator, has recently been demonstrated to improve functional outcomes and will require investment in system-based care models to ensure that effective treatments are received by patients in a timely fashion. The purpose of this review is to describe recent advances in medical and surgical approaches to ischemic stroke prevention and acute treatment. Results from recently published clinical trials will be highlighted along with ongoing clinical trials addressing key questions in ischemic stroke management and prevention where equipoise remains.

  8. Robot-assisted Therapy in Stroke Rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Chang, Won Hyuk; Kim, Yun-Hee

    2013-09-01

    Research into rehabilitation robotics has grown rapidly and the number of therapeutic rehabilitation robots has expanded dramatically during the last two decades. Robotic rehabilitation therapy can deliver high-dosage and high-intensity training, making it useful for patients with motor disorders caused by stroke or spinal cord disease. Robotic devices used for motor rehabilitation include end-effector and exoskeleton types; herein, we review the clinical use of both types. One application of robot-assisted therapy is improvement of gait function in patients with stroke. Both end-effector and the exoskeleton devices have proven to be effective complements to conventional physiotherapy in patients with subacute stroke, but there is no clear evidence that robotic gait training is superior to conventional physiotherapy in patients with chronic stroke or when delivered alone. In another application, upper limb motor function training in patients recovering from stroke, robot-assisted therapy was comparable or superior to conventional therapy in patients with subacute stroke. With end-effector devices, the intensity of therapy was the most important determinant of upper limb motor recovery. However, there is insufficient evidence for the use of exoskeleton devices for upper limb motor function in patients with stroke. For rehabilitation of hand motor function, either end-effector and exoskeleton devices showed similar or additive effects relative to conventional therapy in patients with chronic stroke. The present evidence supports the use of robot-assisted therapy for improving motor function in stroke patients as an additional therapeutic intervention in combination with the conventional rehabilitation therapies. Nevertheless, there will be substantial opportunities for technical development in near future.

  9. Cell-based therapy in ischemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Cell-based therapy for stroke represents a third wave of therapeutics for stroke and one focused on restorative processes with a longer time window of opportunity than neuroprotective therapies. An early time window, within the first week after stroke, is an opportunity for intravenously delivered bone-marrow and perinatally-derived cells that can home to areas of tissue injury and target brain remodeling. Allogeneic cells will likely be the most scalable and commercially viable product. Later time windows, months after stroke, may be opportunities for intracerebral transplantation of neuronally-differentiated cell types. An integrated approach of cell-based therapy with early phase clinical trials and continued pre-clinical work with focus on mechanisms of action is needed. PMID:18671663

  10. Fluid Therapy in Lung Disease.

    PubMed

    Rozanski, Elizabeth; Lynch, Alex

    2017-03-01

    Fluid therapy is the cornerstone of supportive care in veterinary medicine. In dogs and cats with preexisting confirmed or suspected pulmonary disease, concerns may exist that the fluid therapy may impair gas exchange, either through increases in hydrostatic pressures or extravasation. Colloidal therapy is more likely to magnify lung injury compared with isotonic crystalloids. Radiographic evidence of fluid overload is a late-stage finding, whereas point-of-care ultrasound may provide earlier information that can also be assessed periodically at the patient side. Cases should be evaluated individually, but generally a conservative fluid therapy plan is preferred with close monitoring of its tolerance.

  11. [Fluid therapy in acute pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    de-Madaria, Enrique

    2013-12-01

    Severe acute pancreatitis (AP) is associated with an increased need for fluids due to fluid sequestration and, in the most severe cases, with decreased peripheral vascular tone. For several decades, clinical practice guidelines have recommended aggressive fluid therapy to improve the prognosis of AP. This recommendation is based on theoretical models, animal studies, and retrospective studies in humans. Recent studies suggest that aggressive fluid administration in all patients with AP could have a neutral or harmful effect. Fluid therapy based on Ringer's lactate could improve the course of the disease, although further studies are needed to confirm this possibility. Most patients with AP do not require invasive monitoring of hemodynamic parameters to guide fluid therapy administration. Moreover, the ability of these parameters to improve prognosis has not been demonstrated.

  12. Post-stroke depression therapy: where are we now?

    PubMed

    Nabavi, Seyed Fazel; Turner, Alyna; Dean, Olivia; Sureda, Antoni; Mohammad, Seyed

    2014-01-01

    Post-stroke depression is an important psychological consequence of ischemic stroke, and affects around one third of stroke patients at any time post-stroke. It has a negative impact on patient morbidity and mortality, and as such development of effective post-stroke recognition and treatment strategies are very important. There are several therapeutic strategies for post-stroke depression, including both pharmacological and non-pharmacological approaches. In this review, we present evidence regarding the underlying biology of post-stroke depression, commonalities between post-stroke depression and Major Depressive Disorder and explore several treatment approaches, including antidepressant therapy, psychotherapy, surgical therapy, electroconvulsive therapy, acupuncture, music therapy and natural products. Further experimental and clinical studies are required, particularly in emerging fields such as the role of nutraceuticals in the treatment of stroke.

  13. Perioperative Fluid Therapy.

    PubMed

    Fantoni, Denise; Shih, Andre C

    2017-03-01

    Anesthesia can lead to pathophysiologic changes that dramatically alter the fluid balance of the body compartments and the intravascular space. Fluid administration can be monitored and evaluated using static and dynamic indexes. Guidelines for fluid rates during anesthesia begin with 3 mL/kg/h in cats and 5 mL/kg/h in dogs. If at all possible, patients should be stabilized and electrolyte disturbances should be corrected before general anesthesia.

  14. Constraint-Induced Movement Therapy after Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Kwakkel, Gert; Veerbeek, Janne M.; van Wegen, Erwin E.H.; Wolf, Steven L.

    2015-01-01

    Constraint-induced movement therapy (CIMT) was developed to overcome upper limb impairments after stroke and is the most investigated intervention for treating stroke patients in the previous decades. This review describes the current evidence regarding: original CIMT and modified versions of CIMT (mCIMT). Meta-analysis showed strong evidence favoring both types of CIMT in terms of motor function, arm-hand activities and self-reported arm-hand functioning in daily life, immediately after treatment and at long-term follow-up, whereas no evidence was found for constraining alone (Forced Use (FU) therapy). No evidence was found that type of CIMT, intensity of practice or timing did affect outcome. Although the underlying mechanism that drive (m)CIMT is still poorly understood, recent kinematic conducted studies suggests that improvements introduced by original CIMT or mCIMT are mainly based on adaptation by learning to optimize the use of intact end-effectors by selecting patients with some voluntary motor control of wrist and finger extensors post stroke. PMID:25772900

  15. Literature and art therapy in post-stroke psychological disorders.

    PubMed

    Eum, Yeongcheol; Yim, Jongeun

    2015-01-01

    Stroke is one of the leading causes of morbidity and long-term disability worldwide, and post-stroke depression (PSD) is a common and serious psychiatric complication of stroke. PSD makes patients have more severe deficits in activities of daily living, a worse functional outcome, more severe cognitive deficits and increased mortality as compared to stroke patients without depression. Therefore, to reduce or prevent mental problems of stroke patients, psychological treatment should be recommended. Literature and art therapy are highly effective psychological treatment for stroke patients. Literature therapy divided into poetry and story therapy is an assistive tool that treats neurosis as well as emotional or behavioral disorders. Poetry can add impression to the lethargic life of a patient with PSD, thereby acting as a natural treatment. Story therapy can change the gloomy psychological state of patients into a bright and healthy story, and therefore can help stroke patients to overcome their emotional disabilities. Art therapy is one form of psychological therapy that can treat depression and anxiety in stroke patients. Stroke patients can express their internal conflicts, emotions, and psychological status through art works or processes and it would be a healing process of mental problems. Music therapy can relieve the suppressed emotions of patients and add vitality to the body, while giving them the energy to share their feelings with others. In conclusion, literature and art therapy can identify the emotional status of patients and serve as a useful auxiliary tool to help stroke patients in their rehabilitation process.

  16. Brain repair: cell therapy in stroke

    PubMed Central

    Kalladka, Dheeraj; Muir, Keith W

    2014-01-01

    Stroke affects one in every six people worldwide, and is the leading cause of adult disability. Some spontaneous recovery is usual but of limited extent, and the mechanisms of late recovery are not completely understood. Endogenous neurogenesis in humans is thought to contribute to repair, but its extent is unknown. Exogenous cell therapy is promising as a means of augmenting brain repair, with evidence in animal stroke models of cell migration, survival, and differentiation, enhanced endogenous angiogenesis and neurogenesis, immunomodulation, and the secretion of trophic factors by stem cells from a variety of sources, but the potential mechanisms of action are incompletely understood. In the animal models of stroke, both mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and neural stem cells (NSCs) improve functional recovery, and MSCs reduce the infarct volume when administered acutely, but the heterogeneity in the choice of assessment scales, publication bias, and the possible confounding effects of immunosuppressants make the comparison of effects across cell types difficult. The use of adult-derived cells avoids the ethical issues around embryonic cells but may have more restricted differentiation potential. The use of autologous cells avoids rejection risk, but the sources are restricted, and culture expansion may be necessary, delaying treatment. Allogeneic cells offer controlled cell numbers and immediate availability, which may have advantages for acute treatment. Early clinical trials of both NSCs and MSCs are ongoing, and clinical safety data are emerging from limited numbers of selected patients. Ongoing research to identify prognostic imaging markers may help to improve patient selection, and the novel imaging techniques may identify biomarkers of recovery and the mechanism of action for cell therapies. PMID:24627643

  17. Postmenopausal Hormone Therapy and Risk of Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Carcaillon, Laure; Plu-Bureau, Geneviève; Oger, Emmanuel; Singh-Manoux, Archana; Tubert-Bitter, Pascale; Elbaz, Alexis; Scarabin, Pierre-Yves

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose— The benefit/risk analysis of hormone therapy in postmenopausal women is not straightforward and depends on cardiovascular disease. Evidence supports the safety of transdermal estrogens and the importance of progestogens for thrombotic risk. However, the differential association of oral and transdermal estrogens with stroke remains poorly investigated. Furthermore, there are no data regarding the impact of progestogens. Methods— We set up a nested case–control study of ischemic stroke (IS) within all French women aged 51 to 62 years between 2009 and 2011 without personal history of cardiovascular disease or contraindication to hormone therapy. Participants were identified using the French National Health Insurance database, which includes complete drug claims for the past 3 years and French National hospital data. We identified 3144 hospitalized IS cases who were matched for age and zip code to 12 158 controls. Conditional logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI). Results— Compared with nonusers, the adjusted ORs of IS were1.58 (95% CI, 1.01–2.49) in oral estrogen users and 0.83 (0.56–1.24) in transdermal estrogens users (P<0.01). There was no association of IS with use of progesterone (OR, 0.78; 95% CI, 0.49–1.26), pregnanes (OR, 1.00; 95% CI, 0.60–1.67), and nortestosterones (OR, 1.26; 95% CI, 0.62–2.58), whereas norpregnanes increased IS risk (OR, 2.25; 95% CI, 1.05–4.81). Conclusions— Both route of estrogen administration and progestogens were important determinants of IS. Our findings suggest that transdermal estrogens might be the safest option for short-term hormone therapy use. PMID:27256671

  18. Therapeutic outcomes of transplantation of amniotic fluid-derived stem cells in experimental ischemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Tajiri, Naoki; Acosta, Sandra; Portillo-Gonzales, Gabriel S.; Aguirre, Daniela; Reyes, Stephanny; Lozano, Diego; Pabon, Mibel; Dela Peña, Ike; Ji, Xunming; Yasuhara, Takao; Date, Isao; Solomita, Marianna A.; Antonucci, Ivana; Stuppia, Liborio; Kaneko, Yuji; Borlongan, Cesar V.

    2014-01-01

    Accumulating preclinical evidence suggests the use of amnion as a source of stem cells for investigations of basic science concepts related to developmental cell biology, but also for stem cells’ therapeutic applications in treating human disorders. We previously reported isolation of viable rat amniotic fluid-derived stem (AFS) cells. Subsequently, we recently reported the therapeutic benefits of intravenous transplantation of AFS cells in a rodent model of ischemic stroke. Parallel lines of investigations have provided safety and efficacy of stem cell therapy for treating stroke and other neurological disorders. This review article highlights the need for investigations of mechanisms underlying AFS cells’ therapeutic benefits and discusses lab-to-clinic translational gating items in an effort to optimize the clinical application of the cell transplantation for stroke. PMID:25165432

  19. Speech and language therapy for aphasia following subacute stroke

    PubMed Central

    Koyuncu, Engin; Çam, Pınar; Altınok, Nermin; Çallı, Duygu Ekinci; Duman, Tuba Yarbay; Özgirgin, Neşe

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the time window, duration and intensity of optimal speech and language therapy applied to aphasic patients with subacute stroke in our hospital. The study consisted of 33 patients being hospitalized for stroke rehabilitation in our hospital with first stroke but without previous history of speech and language therapy. Sixteen sessions of impairment-based speech and language therapy were applied to the patients, 30–60 minutes per day, 2 days a week, for 8 successive weeks. Aphasia assessment in stroke patients was performed with Gülhane Aphasia Test-2 before and after treatment. Compared with before treatment, fluency of speech, listening comprehension, reading comprehension, oral motor evaluation, automatic speech, repetition and naming were improved after treatment. This suggests that 16 seesions of speech and language therapy, 30–60 minutes per day, 2 days a week, for 8 successive weeks, are effective in the treatment of aphasic patients with subacute stroke. PMID:27904489

  20. Homocysteine-lowering therapy: a role in stroke prevention?

    PubMed

    Spence, J David

    2007-09-01

    On the basis of the results of several recent clinical trials, many researchers have concluded that vitamin therapy designed to lower total homocysteine concentrations is not effective in reducing the risk of cardiovascular events. However, whereas almost all myocardial infarctions are due to plaque rupture, stroke has many more pathophysiological mechanisms, and thrombosis-which is increased by raised total homocysteine concentrations-has an important role in many of these processes. Thus, stroke and myocardial infarction could respond differently to vitamin therapy. A detailed assessment of the results of the recent HOPE-2 trial and a reanalysis of the VISP trial restricted to patients capable of responding to vitamin therapy suggest that higher doses of vitamin B12 and perhaps new approaches to lowering total homocysteine besides routine vitamin therapy with folate, vitamin B6, and vitamin B12 could reduce the risk of stroke. Thus, therapy to lower homocysteine could still help to prevent stroke, if not other vascular outcomes.

  1. A numerical study of the effects of fluid rheology and stroke kinematics on flagellar swimming in complex fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chuanbin; Guy, Robert; Thomases, Becca

    2016-11-01

    It is observed in experiments that as the fluid rheology is changed, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii exhibits changes in both flagellar kinematics and the swimming speed. To understand this phenomenon, we develop a computational model of the swimmer, using flagellar strokes fit from experimental data. We conduct numerical simulations by changing strokes and fluid rheology independently to dissect the effects of these two factors. We discover that stroke patterns extracted from viscoelastic fluids generate much lower stress and have higher efficiency at the cost of lower swimming speed. We also discover that higher fluid elasticity hinders swimming for a fixed stroke pattern.

  2. Non-pharmaceutical therapies for stroke: Mechanisms and clinical implications

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Fan; Qi, Zhifeng; Luo, Yuming; Hinchliffe, Taylor; Ding, Guanghong; Xia, Ying; Ji, Xunming

    2014-01-01

    Stroke is deemed a worldwide leading cause of neurological disability and death, however, there is currently no promising pharmacotherapy for acute ischemic stroke aside from intravenous or intra-arterial thrombolysis. Yet because of the narrow therapeutic time window involved, thrombolytic application is very restricted in clinical settings. Accumulating data suggest that non-pharmaceutical therapies for stroke might provide new opportunities for stroke treatment. Here we review recent research progress in the mechanisms and clinical implications of non-pharmaceutical therapies, mainly including neuroprotective approaches such as hypothermia, ischemic/hypoxic conditioning, acupuncture, medical gases, transcranial laser therapy, etc. In addition, we briefly summarize mechanical endovascular recanalization devices and recovery devices for the treatment of the chronic phase of stroke and discuss the relative merits of these devices. PMID:24407111

  3. Adult Stem Cell Therapy for Stroke: Challenges and Progress

    PubMed Central

    Bang, Oh Young; Kim, Eun Hee; Cha, Jae Min; Moon, Gyeong Joon

    2016-01-01

    Stroke is one of the leading causes of death and physical disability among adults. It has been 15 years since clinical trials of stem cell therapy in patients with stroke have been conducted using adult stem cells like mesenchymal stem cells and bone marrow mononuclear cells. Results of randomized controlled trials showed that adult stem cell therapy was safe but its efficacy was modest, underscoring the need for new stem cell therapy strategies. The primary limitations of current stem cell therapies include (a) the limited source of engraftable stem cells, (b) the presence of optimal time window for stem cell therapies, (c) inherited limitation of stem cells in terms of growth, trophic support, and differentiation potential, and (d) possible transplanted cell-mediated adverse effects, such as tumor formation. Here, we discuss recent advances that overcome these hurdles in adult stem cell therapy for stroke. PMID:27733032

  4. A large stroke magnetic fluid deformable mirror for focus control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min, Ling-kun; Wu, Zhi-zheng; Huang, Ming-shuang; Kong, Xiang-hui

    2016-03-01

    A liquid deformable mirror, which can provide a large stroke deflection more than 100 μm, is proposed for focus control. The deformable mirror utilizes the concept of magnetic fluid deformation shaped with electromagnetic fields to achieve concave or convex surface and to change the optical focus depth of the mirrors. The free surface of the magnetic fluid is coated with a thin layer of metal-liquid-like film (MELLF) prepared from densely packed silver nanoparticles to enhance the reflectance of the deformable mirror. The experimental results on the fabricated prototype magnetic fluid deformable mirror (MFDM) show that the desired concave/convex surface shape can be controlled precisely with a closed-loop adaptive optical system.

  5. Stem Cell Therapy and Administration Routes After Stroke.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Frutos, Berta; Otero-Ortega, Laura; Gutiérrez-Fernández, María; Fuentes, Blanca; Ramos-Cejudo, Jaime; Díez-Tejedor, Exuperio

    2016-10-01

    Cell-based therapy has demonstrated safety and efficacy in experimental animal models of stroke, as well as safety in stroke patients. However, various questions remain regarding the therapeutic window, dosage, route of administration, and the most appropriate cell type and source, as well as mechanisms of action and immune-modulation to optimize treatment based on stem cell therapy. Various delivery routes have been used in experimental stroke models, including intracerebral, intraventricular, subarachnoid, intra-arterial, intraperitoneal, intravenous, and intranasal routes. From a clinical point of view, it is necessary to demonstrate which is the most feasible, safest, and most effective for use with stroke patients. Therefore, further experimental studies concerning the safety, efficacy, and mechanisms of action involved in these therapeutic effects are required to determine their optimal clinical use.

  6. A content analysis of stroke physical therapy intervention using stroke physiotherapy intervention recording tool.

    PubMed

    Cho, Hyuk-Shin; Cha, Hyun-Gyu

    2016-05-01

    [Purpose] Physical therapy for recovery of function in people with stroke is known to be effective, but which type of physical therapy intervention is most effective is uncertain because a concrete and detailed record of interventions is done. This study aimed to record, analyze, and describe the content of physical therapy interventions for recovery of function after stroke using stroke physiotherapy intervention recording tool (SPIRIT). [Subjects and Methods] A convenience sample of 23 physical therapists from a rehabilitation hospital in Chung-nam recorded the interventions for 73 patients with stroke who were treated for 30 minutes in 670 treatment sessions. Treatment session contents were recorded using SPIRIT. Descriptive statistics were used to describe the interventions accurately and to investigate the differences according to time since stroke. [Results] Facilitation techniques were the most frequently used interventions (n=1,342, 35.1%), followed by practice (n=1,056, 27.6%), and exercise (n=748, 19.6%) in the physical therapists' clinical practice. [Conclusion] This pattern shows that physical therapists were focused on functional activity. Organizing or teaching patient activities for independent practice interventions (n=286, 7.5%) were used to encourage patient activity and independence outside the treatment sessions. Interventions according to time since stroke were not significantly different.

  7. A content analysis of stroke physical therapy intervention using stroke physiotherapy intervention recording tool

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Hyuk-shin; Cha, Hyun-gyu

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] Physical therapy for recovery of function in people with stroke is known to be effective, but which type of physical therapy intervention is most effective is uncertain because a concrete and detailed record of interventions is done. This study aimed to record, analyze, and describe the content of physical therapy interventions for recovery of function after stroke using stroke physiotherapy intervention recording tool (SPIRIT). [Subjects and Methods] A convenience sample of 23 physical therapists from a rehabilitation hospital in Chung-nam recorded the interventions for 73 patients with stroke who were treated for 30 minutes in 670 treatment sessions. Treatment session contents were recorded using SPIRIT. Descriptive statistics were used to describe the interventions accurately and to investigate the differences according to time since stroke. [Results] Facilitation techniques were the most frequently used interventions (n=1,342, 35.1%), followed by practice (n=1,056, 27.6%), and exercise (n=748, 19.6%) in the physical therapists’ clinical practice. [Conclusion] This pattern shows that physical therapists were focused on functional activity. Organizing or teaching patient activities for independent practice interventions (n=286, 7.5%) were used to encourage patient activity and independence outside the treatment sessions. Interventions according to time since stroke were not significantly different. PMID:27313368

  8. Stroke

    MedlinePlus

    ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Stroke About Stroke Stroke -- A Serious Event A stroke is serious, just ... lifestyle can help you prevent stroke. What Is Stroke? A stroke is sometimes called a "brain attack." ...

  9. Progress in sensorimotor rehabilitative physical therapy programs for stroke patients

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jia-Ching; Shaw, Fu-Zen

    2014-01-01

    Impaired motor and functional activity following stroke often has negative impacts on the patient, the family and society. The available rehabilitation programs for stroke patients are reviewed. Conventional rehabilitation strategies (Bobath, Brunnstrom, proprioception neuromuscular facilitation, motor relearning and function-based principles) are the mainstream tactics in clinical practices. Numerous advanced strategies for sensory-motor functional enhancement, including electrical stimulation, electromyographic biofeedback, constraint-induced movement therapy, robotics-aided systems, virtual reality, intermittent compression, partial body weight supported treadmill training and thermal stimulation, are being developed and incorporated into conventional rehabilitation programs. The concept of combining valuable rehabilitative procedures into “a training package”, based on the patient’s functional status during different recovery phases after stroke is proposed. Integrated sensorimotor rehabilitation programs with appropriate temporal arrangements might provide great functional benefits for stroke patients. PMID:25133141

  10. Stroke in women - oral contraception, pregnancy, and hormone replacement therapy.

    PubMed

    Rantanen, Kirsi; Tatlisumak, Turgut

    2013-01-01

    Stroke is a devastating disease affecting millions of people worldwide every year. Female stroke victims have higher mortality rates and they do not re-cover as well as men. Women's longevity and different vascular risk factor burden like a larger prevalence of atrial fibrillation play a role. Women also have unique risk factors such as oral contraception, pregnancy, estrogen decrease after the menopause and hormone replacement therapy, which should all be evaluated and taken into consideration in treatment decisions both in the acute phase of stroke and in secondary prevention. In this review, the evidence regarding these hormonal aspects and the risk of stroke in women are evaluated. The relevant guidelines are studied and research gaps identified. Future topics for research are recommended and current treatment possibilities and their risks discussed.

  11. Update on Antithrombotic Therapy for Stroke Prevention in Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Ovbiagele, Bruce

    2010-01-01

    Opinion statement Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common cardiac arrhythmia in the elderly, affecting 1 in 20 adults over the age of 70 years. Stroke is a major yet highly preventable complication of AF, and the strokes related to AF often are disabling and fatal. Warfarin is the treatment of choice in high-risk patients with AF, and its superior efficacy over aspirin for preventing stroke in these patients is widely recognized. However, several eligible patients with AF are not being treated with warfarin or are being treated inadequately, largely because of concerns regarding the attendant strict monitoring, drug interactions, and risk of major bleeding. As such, alternative antithrombotic therapies that can rival or exceed the efficacy of warfarin, yet compare favorably with its administration and side effect profile, are being sought. One such strategy, the use of a combination antiplatelet regimen, for stroke prevention in high-risk patients with nonvalvular AF was investigated recently in two clinical trials. This article reviews the role of combination antiplatelet regimens in stroke prevention for patients with AF. Other therapies discussed include oral anticoagulation, single antiplatelet therapies, oral anticoagulation plus antiplatelet treatment, direct thrombin inhibitors, and factor Xa inhibitors. PMID:20461116

  12. Multimodality Molecular Imaging of Stem Cells Therapy for Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hong; Tian, Mei

    2013-01-01

    Stem cells have been proposed as a promising therapy for treating stroke. While several studies have demonstrated the therapeutic benefits of stem cells, the exact mechanism remains elusive. Molecular imaging provides the possibility of the visual representation of biological processes at the cellular and molecular level. In order to facilitate research efforts to understand the stem cells therapeutic mechanisms, we need to further develop means of monitoring these cells noninvasively, longitudinally and repeatedly. Because of tissue depth and the blood-brain barrier (BBB), in vivo imaging of stem cells therapy for stroke has unique challenges. In this review, we describe existing methods of tracking transplanted stem cells in vivo, including magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), nuclear medicine imaging, and optical imaging (OI). Each of the imaging techniques has advantages and drawbacks. Finally, we describe multimodality imaging strategies as a more comprehensive and potential method to monitor transplanted stem cells for stroke. PMID:24222920

  13. Effects of a benidipine-based combination therapy on the risk of stroke according to stroke subtype: the COPE trial.

    PubMed

    Umemoto, Seiji; Ogihara, Toshio; Rakugi, Hiromi; Matsumoto, Masayasu; Kitagawa, Kazuo; Shimada, Kazuyuki; Higaki, Jitsuo; Ito, Sadayoshi; Suzuki, Hiromichi; Ohashi, Yasuo; Saruta, Takao; Matsuzaki, Masunori

    2013-12-01

    The Combination Therapy of Hypertension to Prevent Cardiovascular Events (COPE) trial compared the dihydropyridine T/L-type calcium channel blocker benidipine-based therapies when combined with an angiotensin receptor blocker (ARB), a β-blocker (BB) or a thiazide diuretic (TD). The results suggested that benidipine combined with a BB appeared to be less beneficial in reducing the risk of stroke compared with the benidipine-TD combination (hazard ratio (HR): 2.31, P=0.0109). We further evaluated the treatment effects on different stroke subtypes among the three benidipine-based regimens. The COPE trial was an investigator-initiated, multicenter study with PROBE design. Patients with atrial fibrillation or flutter were excluded from the study. All stroke events were subclassified with the Trial of Org 10,172 in Acute Stroke Treatment (TOAST) criteria. The total incidence of stroke was 4.7, hemorrhagic stroke was 1.6 and ischemic stroke was 2.5 per 1000 person-years. The incidence of lacunar stroke was 1.1, large-artery stroke was 0.6, cardioembolic stroke was 0.3, unknown ischemic type was 0.6 and transient ischemic attack was 0.6 per 1000 person-years. Although few differences in stroke subtypes were observed among the three treatment groups, multi-adjusted HRs for the incidence rates of all types of stroke, hemorrhagic stroke and ischemic stroke were significantly higher with the benidipine-BB regimen than with the benidipine-TD regimen. The incidence of both hemorrhagic and ischemic stroke in the benidipine-ARB regimen was not different compared with the other two treatment regimens. This prespecified sub-analysis suggested that a blood pressure-lowering therapy with a benidipine-TD regimen might be beneficial for hypertensive patients to prevent both hemorrhagic and ischemic stroke.

  14. [Fluid management: goal-directed therapy].

    PubMed

    Grünewald, Matthias; Broch, Ole; Bein, Berthold

    2012-07-01

    Goal-directed fluid therapy (GDT) is one important step in perioperative therapy as it improves complication rate and mortality by optimisation of oxygen delivery. There is a convincing evidence for GDT when used early, before organ failure occurs, and in high-risk patients. Moderne algorithms use goals derived from advanced haemodynamic monitoring and are based on the concept of fluid responsiveness and optimisation of global perfusion. Future investigations will have to prove the advantage of using the new less or non-invasive haemodynamic monitoring devices or automatic closed-loop fluid administration systems for GDT.

  15. Alpha 1-Antitrypsin Therapy Mitigated Ischemic Stroke Damage in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Moldthan, Huong L.; Hirko, Aaron C.; Thinschmidt, Jeffrey S.; Grant, Maria; Li, Zhimin; Peris, Joanna; Lu, Yuanqing; Elshikha, Ahmed; King, Michael A.; Hughes, Jeffrey A.; Song, Sihong

    2014-01-01

    Currently, the only effective therapy for acute ischemic stroke is the thrombolytic agent recombinant tissue plasminogen activator. α1-Antitrypsin, an endogenous inhibitor of serine proteinases and a primary acute phase protein with potent anti-inflammatory, anti-apoptotic, antimicrobial and cytoprotective activities, could be beneficial in stroke.. The goal of this study was to test whether α1-antitrypsin could improve ischemic stroke outcome in an established rat model. Middle cerebral artery occlusion was induced in male rats via intracranial microinjection of endothelin-1. Five to ten minutes following stroke induction rats received either intracranial or intravenous delivery of human α1-antitrypsin. Cylinder and vibrissae tests were used to evaluate sensorimotor function before and 72 hours after middle cerebral artery occlusion. Infarct volumes were examined via either 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride assay or magnetic resonance imaging 72 hours after middle cerebral artery occlusion. Despite equivalent initial strokes, at 72 hours the infarct volumes of the human α1-antitrypsin treatment groups (local and systemic injection) were statistically significantly reduced by 83% and 63% (p<0.0001 and p < 0.05 respectively) compared with control rats. Human α1-antitrypsin significantly limited sensory motor systems deficits. Human α1-antitrypsin could be a potential novel therapeutic drug for the protection against neurodegeneration following ischemic stroke, but more studies are needed to investigate the protective mechanisms and efficacy in other animal models. PMID:24582784

  16. Permeating the Blood Brain Barrier and Abrogating the Inflammation in Stroke: Implications for Stroke Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Borlongan, C.V.; Glover, Loren E.; Sanberg, P.R.; Hess, David C.

    2012-01-01

    Cell therapy has been shown as a potential treatment for stroke and other neurological disorders. Human umbilical cord blood (HUCB) may be a promising source of stem cells for cell therapy. The most desired outcomes occur when stem cells cross the blood brain barrier (BBB) and eventually reach the injured brain site. We propose, from our previous studies, that mannitol is capable of disrupting the BBB, allowing the transplanted cells to enter the brain from the periphery. However, when the BBB is compromised, the inflammatory response from circulation may also be able to penetrate the brain and thus may actually exacerbate the stroke rather than afford therapeutic effects. We discuss how an NF-kB decoy can inhibit the inflammatory responses in the stroke brain thereby reducing the negative effects associated with BBB disruption. In this review, we propose the combination of mannitol-induced BBB permeation and NF-kB decoy for enhancing the therapeutic benefits of cell therapy in stroke. PMID:22574981

  17. New evidence for therapies in stroke rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Dobkin, Bruce H.; Dorsch, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    Neurologic rehabilitation aims to reduce impairments and disabilities so that persons with serious stroke can return to participation in usual self-care and daily activities as independently as feasible. New strategies to enhance recovery draw from a growing understanding of how types of training, progressive task-related practice of skills, exercise for strengthening and fitness, neurostimulation, and drug and biological manipulations can induce adaptations at multiple levels of the nervous system. Recent clinical trials provide evidence for a range of new interventions to manage walking, reach and grasp, aphasia, visual field loss, and hemi-inattention. PMID:23591673

  18. Middle cerebral artery territory infarct due to Cryptococcus infectionstitle: an uncommon indication for cerebrospinal fluid analysis in stroke patients.

    PubMed

    Cachia, David; Singh, Charanjeet; Tetzlaff, Michael T; Penas-Prado, Marta

    2015-08-01

    Cryptococcal meningitis is the most common manifestation of cryptococcosis and is caused by the encapsulated yeast organism Cryptococcus neoformans. It occurs most commonly in patients with impaired cell-mediated immunity such as in HIV infection; patients with hematological malignancies; patients post solid-organ transplantation; on chronic steroids or immunosuppressants. Clinically, stroke can arise as a complication of cryptococcal meningitis. While cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) examination is usually not indicated for evaluation of stroke patients, demonstration of cryptococcal yeast forms in CSF is valuable in guiding appropriate therapy in arterial stroke caused by Cryptococci. Herein, we describe the CSF and radiologic correlation in a female patient who presented with disseminated cryptococcosis, cryptococcal meninigitis and a middle cerebral artery infarct.

  19. Potential of adult neural stem cells in stroke therapy.

    PubMed

    Andres, Robert H; Choi, Raymond; Steinberg, Gary K; Guzman, Raphael

    2008-11-01

    Despite state-of-the-art therapy, clinical outcome after stroke remains poor, with many patients left permanently disabled and dependent on care. Stem cell therapy has evolved as a promising new therapeutic avenue for the treatment of stroke in experimental studies, and recent clinical trials have proven its feasibility and safety in patients. Replacement of damaged cells and restoration of function can be accomplished by transplantation of different cell types, such as embryonic, fetal or adult stem cells, human fetal tissue and genetically engineered cell lines. Adult neural stem cells offer the advantage of avoiding the ethical problems associated with embryonic or fetal stem cells and can be harvested as autologous grafts from the individual patients. Furthermore, stimulation of endogenous adult stem cell-mediated repair mechanisms in the brain might offer new avenues for stroke therapy without the necessity of transplantation. However, important scientific issues need to be addressed to advance our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying the critical steps in cell-based repair to allow the introduction of these experimental techniques into clinical practice. This review describes up-to-date experimental concepts using adult neural stem cells for the treatment of stroke.

  20. Induction of pluripotent stem cells transplantation therapy for ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Mei; Lv, Lei; Ji, Haifeng; Yang, Xuelian; Zhu, Wei; Cai, Liying; Gu, Xiaju; Chai, Changfeng; Huang, Shu; Sun, Jian; Dong, Qiang

    2011-08-01

    Stroke can cause permanent neurological damage, complications, and even death. However, there is no treatment exists to restore its lost function. Human embryonic stems transplantation therapy was a novel and potential therapeutic approach for stroke. However, as we have seen, the ethical controversy pertains to embryonic stem cell research. Human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) are the latest generation of stem cells that may be a solution to the controversy of using embryonic cells. In our study, we generated iPSCs from adult human fibroblasts by introduction of four defined transcription factors (Oct4, Sox2, Nanog, and Lin-28). And then, we investigated the efficacy of iPSCs transplantation therapy for stroke on the animal models of middle cerebral artery occlusion. Surprisingly, we found that transplanted iPSCs migrated to injured brain areas, and differentiated into neuron-like cells successfully. After 4-16 days iPSCs grafting, sensorimotor function of rats has been improved significantly. In one word, we may prove that iPSCs therapy in stroke to be an effective form of treatment.

  1. Erythropoietin in Stroke Therapy: Friend or Foe

    PubMed Central

    Souvenir, Rhonda; Doycheva, Desislava; Zhang, John H; Tang, Jiping

    2015-01-01

    Recombinant human erythropoietin (rhEPO), over the past decade, was hailed as an auspicious therapeutic strategy for various types of brain injuries. The promising results from experiments conducted in animal models of stroke led to a hurried clinical trial that was swiftly aborted in Phase II. The multiple neuroprotective modalities of rhEPO failed to translate smoothly to human adult ischemic brain injury and provided limited aid to neonates. In light of the antithetical results, several questions were raised as to why and how this clinical trial failed. There was bolstering evidence from the preliminary studies that pointed to a bright future. Therefore, the objective of this review is to address these questions by discussing the signaling pathways of rhEPO that are reported to mediate the neuroprotective effect in various animal models of brain injury. Major biomedical bibliographical databases (MEDLINE, ISI, PubMed, and Cochrane Library) were searched with the use of keywords such as erythropoietin, stroke, neonatal hypoxia ischemia, intracerebral hemorrhage, etc. This article will discuss the confounding factors that influence the efficacy of rhEPO treatment hence challenging its clinical translatability. Lastly, rhEPO may still be a promising therapeutic candidate for neonates in spite of its shortcoming in clinical trial if caution is taken with the dose and duration of its administration. PMID:25620101

  2. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy and preconditioning for ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Sheng-li; Feng, Hua; Xi, Guo-hua

    2016-01-01

    To date, the therapeutic methods for ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke are still limited. The lack of oxygen supply is critical for brain injury following stroke. Hyperbaric oxygen (HBO), an approach through a process in which patients breathe in 100% pure oxygen at over 101 kPa, has been shown to facilitate oxygen delivery and increase oxygen supply. Hence, HBO possesses the potentials to produce beneficial effects on stroke. Actually, accumulated basic and clinical evidences have demonstrated that HBO therapy and preconditioning could induce neuroprotective functions via different mechanisms. Nevertheless, the lack of clinical translational study limits the application of HBO. More translational studies and clinical trials are needed in the future to develop effective HBO protocols. PMID:28217297

  3. Update of the Stroke Therapy Academic Industry Roundtable Preclinical Recommendations

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, Marc; Feuerstein, Giora; Howells, David W.; Hurn, Patricia D.; Kent, Thomas A.; Savitz, Sean I.; Lo, Eng H.

    2010-01-01

    The initial Stroke Therapy Academic Industry Roundtable (STAIR) recommendations published in 1999 were intended to improve the quality of preclinical studies of purported acute stroke therapies. Although recognized as reasonable, they have not been closely followed nor rigorously validated. Substantial advances have occurred regarding the appropriate quality and breadth of preclinical testing for candidate acute stroke therapies for better clinical translation. The updated STAIR preclinical recommendations reinforce the previous suggestions that reproducibly defining dose response and time windows with both histological and functional outcomes in multiple animal species with appropriate physiological monitoring is appropriate. The updated STAIR recommendations include: the fundamentals of good scientific inquiry should be followed by eliminating randomization and assessment bias, a priori defining inclusion/exclusion criteria, performing appropriate power and sample size calculations, and disclosing potential conflicts of interest. After initial evaluations in young, healthy male animals, further studies should be performed in females, aged animals, and animals with comorbid conditions such as hypertension, diabetes, and hypercholesterolemia. Another consideration is the use of clinically relevant biomarkers in animal studies. Although the recommendations cannot be validated until effective therapies based on them emerge from clinical trials, it is hoped that adherence to them might enhance the chances for success. PMID:19246690

  4. Numerical investigation of fluid-particle interactions for embolic stroke

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, Debanjan; Padilla, Jose; Shadden, Shawn C.

    2016-04-01

    Roughly one-third of all strokes are caused by an embolus traveling to a cerebral artery and blocking blood flow in the brain. The objective of this study is to gain a detailed understanding of the dynamics of embolic particles within arteries. Patient computed tomography image is used to construct a three-dimensional model of the carotid bifurcation. An idealized carotid bifurcation model of same vessel diameters was also constructed for comparison. Blood flow velocities and embolic particle trajectories are resolved using a coupled Euler-Lagrange approach. Blood is modeled as a Newtonian fluid, discretized using the finite volume method, with physiologically appropriate inflow and outflow boundary conditions. The embolus trajectory is modeled using Lagrangian particle equations accounting for embolus interaction with blood as well as vessel wall. Both one- and two-way fluid-particle coupling are considered, the latter being implemented using momentum sources augmented to the discretized flow equations. It was observed that for small-to-moderate particle sizes (relative to vessel diameters), the estimated particle distribution ratio—with and without the inclusion of two-way fluid-particle momentum exchange—were found to be similar. The maximum observed differences in distribution ratio with and without the coupling were found to be higher for the idealized bifurcation model. Additionally, the distribution was found to be reasonably matching the volumetric flow distribution for the idealized model, while a notable deviation from volumetric flow was observed in the anatomical model. It was also observed from an analysis of particle path lines that particle interaction with helical flow, characteristic of anatomical vasculature models, could play a prominent role in transport of embolic particle. The results indicate therefore that flow helicity could be an important hemodynamic indicator for analysis of embolus particle transport. Additionally, in the presence

  5. Fluid therapy in small ruminants and camelids.

    PubMed

    Jones, Meredyth; Navarre, Christine

    2014-07-01

    Body water, electrolytes, and acid-base balance are important considerations in the evaluation and treatment of small ruminants and camelids with any disease process, with restoration of these a priority as adjunctive therapy. The goals of fluid therapy should be to maintain cardiac output and tissue perfusion, and to correct acid-base and electrolyte abnormalities. Hypoglycemia, hyperkalemia, and acidosis are the most life-threatening abnormalities, and require most immediate correction.

  6. Occupational Therapy and Physiotherapy in Acute Stroke: Do Rural Patients Receive Less Therapy?

    PubMed Central

    Ashby, Samantha

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To assess whether acute stroke patients in rural hospitals receive less occupational therapy and physiotherapy than those in metropolitan hospitals. Design. Retrospective case-control study of health data in patients ≤10 days after stroke. Setting. Occupational therapy and physiotherapy services in four rural hospitals and one metropolitan hospital. Participants. Acute stroke patients admitted in one health district. Main Outcome Measures. Frequency and duration of face-to-face and indirect therapy sessions. Results. Rural hospitals admitted 363 patients and metropolitan hospital admitted 378 patients. Mean age was 73 years. Those in rural hospitals received more face-to-face (p > 0.0014) and indirect (p = 0.001) occupational therapy when compared to those in the metropolitan hospital. Face-to-face sessions lasted longer (p = 0.001). Patients admitted to the metropolitan hospital received more face-to-face (p > 0.000) and indirect (p > 0.000) physiotherapy when compared to those admitted to rural hospitals. Face-to-face sessions were shorter (p > 0.000). Almost all were seen within 24 hours of referral. Conclusions. Acute stroke patients in Australian rural hospital may receive more occupational therapy and less physiotherapy than those in metropolitan hospitals. The dose of therapy was lower than recommended, and the referral process may unnecessarily delay the time from admission to a patient's first therapy session. PMID:27752389

  7. [Neuroprotective therapy for the treatment of acute ischemic stroke].

    PubMed

    Naritomi, H

    2001-12-01

    Following cerebral ischemia, various biochemical reactions are provoked in a stepwise manner leading neuronal cells to ischemic death. The prevention of these biochemical reactions may exert neuroprotective actions and consequently reduce the magnitude of ischemic cerebral injury. On the basis of such a view, numerous neuroprotective drugs have been developed during the last decade. Quite a few drugs were found effective in reducing the infarct volume in experimental studies, and more than 15 of them were subjected to clinical phase III trials to see a therapeutic effectiveness. However, the results of phase III trials were disappointing in the majority drugs. Only three drugs, nicaravene, ebselen and edaravone, all radical scavengers, were judged effective by small-sized trials with a wide therapeutic window, 48-72 hours after stroke, in Japan. The fact suggests that a one-point prevention of biochemical reactions by single drug is unable to rescue ischemic neuronal cells. Ischemic insult causes damages of vascular wall including the endothelium which play an important role in the development of hemorrhagic changes or cerebral edema. Vascular protection is considered as important as neuroprotection in treatment of clinical stroke. Mild hypothermia has neuroprotective and vascular protective actions and hence may be more effective than neuroprotective drugs for the treatment of stroke. The prevention of fever, which often occurs in severe stroke, may exert the similar effect as hypothermia in neuroprotection. Neuroprotective therapy in the future should proceed toward the simultaneous protections of neurons and vessels using combination of multiple drugs.

  8. Virtual immersion for post-stroke hand rehabilitation therapy.

    PubMed

    Tsoupikova, Daria; Stoykov, Nikolay S; Corrigan, Molly; Thielbar, Kelly; Vick, Randy; Li, Yu; Triandafilou, Kristen; Preuss, Fabian; Kamper, Derek

    2015-02-01

    Stroke is the leading cause of serious, long-term disability in the United States. Impairment of upper extremity function is a common outcome following stroke, often to the detriment of lifestyle and employment opportunities. While the upper extremity is a natural target for therapy, treatment may be hampered by limitations in baseline capability as lack of success may discourage arm and hand use. We developeda virtual reality (VR) system in order to encourage repetitive task practice. This system combined an assistive glove with a novel VR environment. A set of exercises for this system was developed to encourage specific movements. Six stroke survivors with chronic upper extremity hemiparesis volunteered to participate in a pilot study in which they completed 18 one-hour training sessions with the VR system. Performance with the system was recorded across the 18 training sessions. Clinical evaluations of motor control were conducted at three time points: prior to initiation of training, following the end of training, and 1 month later. Subjects displayed significant improvement on performance of the virtual tasks over the course of the training, although for the clinical outcome measures only lateral pinch showed significant improvement. Future expansion to multi-user virtual environments may extend the benefits of this system for stroke survivors with hemiparesis by furthering engagement in the rehabilitation exercises.

  9. Fluid therapy for children: facts, fashions and questions.

    PubMed

    Holliday, Malcolm A; Ray, Patricio E; Friedman, Aaron L

    2007-06-01

    Fluid therapy restores circulation by expanding extracellular fluid. However, a dispute has arisen regarding the nature of intravenous therapy for acutely ill children following the development of acute hyponatraemia from overuse of hypotonic saline. The foundation on which correct maintenance fluid therapy is built is examined and the difference between maintenance fluid therapy and restoration or replenishment fluid therapy for reduction in extracellular fluid volume is delineated. Changing practices and the basic physiology of extracellular fluid are discussed. Some propose changing the definition of "maintenance therapy" and recommend isotonic saline be used as maintenance and restoration therapy in undefined amounts leading to excess intravenous sodium chloride intake. Intravenous fluid therapy for children with volume depletion should first restore extracellular volume with measured infusions of isotonic saline followed by defined, appropriate maintenance therapy to replace physiological losses according to principles established 50 years ago.

  10. Nanotechnology for the detection and therapy of stroke.

    PubMed

    Kyle, Stuart; Saha, Sikha

    2014-11-01

    Over the years, nanotechnology has greatly developed, moving from careful design strategies and synthesis of novel nanostructures to producing them for specific medical and biological applications. The use of nanotechnology in diagnostics, drug delivery, and tissue engineering holds great promise for the treatment of stroke in the future. Nanoparticles are employed to monitor grafted cells upon implantation, or to enhance the imagery of the tissue, which is coupled with a noninvasive imaging modality such as magnetic resonance imaging, computed axial tomography or positron emission tomography scan. Contrast imaging agents used can range from iron oxide, perfluorocarbon, cerium oxide or platinum nanoparticles to quantum dots. The use of nanomaterial scaffolds for neuroregeneration is another area of nanomedicine, which involves the creation of an extracellular matrix mimic that not only serves as a structural support but promotes neuronal growth, inhibits glial differentiation, and controls hemostasis. Promisingly, carbon nanotubes can act as scaffolds for stem cell therapy and functionalizing these scaffolds may enhance their therapeutic potential for treatment of stroke. This Progress Report highlights the recent developments in nanotechnology for the detection and therapy of stroke. Recent advances in the use of nanomaterials as tissue engineering scaffolds for neuroregeneration will also be discussed.

  11. Biomaterial Applications in Cell-Based Therapy in Experimental Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Boisserand, Ligia S. B.; Kodama, Tomonobu; Papassin, Jérémie; Auzely, Rachel; Moisan, Anaïck; Rome, Claire; Detante, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    Stroke is an important health issue corresponding to the second cause of mortality and first cause of severe disability with no effective treatments after the first hours of onset. Regenerative approaches such as cell therapy provide an increase in endogenous brain structural plasticity but they are not enough to promote a complete recovery. Tissue engineering has recently aroused a major interesting development of biomaterials for use into the central nervous system. Many biomaterials have been engineered based on natural compounds, synthetic compounds, or a mix of both with the aim of providing polymers with specific properties. The mechanical properties of biomaterials can be exquisitely regulated forming polymers with different stiffness, modifiable physical state that polymerizes in situ, or small particles encapsulating cells or growth factors. The choice of biomaterial compounds should be adapted for the different applications, structure target, and delay of administration. Biocompatibilities with embedded cells and with the host tissue and biodegradation rate must be considerate. In this paper, we review the different applications of biomaterials combined with cell therapy in ischemic stroke and we explore specific features such as choice of biomaterial compounds and physical and mechanical properties concerning the recent studies in experimental stroke. PMID:27274738

  12. Stem cell transplantation therapy for multifaceted therapeutic benefits after stroke.

    PubMed

    Wei, Ling; Wei, Zheng Z; Jiang, Michael Qize; Mohamad, Osama; Yu, Shan Ping

    2017-03-18

    One of the exciting advances in modern medicine and life science is cell-based neurovascular regeneration of damaged brain tissues and repair of neuronal structures. The progress in stem cell biology and creation of adult induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells has significantly improved basic and pre-clinical research in disease mechanisms and generated enthusiasm for potential applications in the treatment of central nervous system (CNS) diseases including stroke. Endogenous neural stem cells and cultured stem cells are capable of self-renewal and give rise to virtually all types of cells essential for the makeup of neuronal structures. Meanwhile, stem cells and neural progenitor cells are well-known for their potential for trophic support after transplantation into the ischemic brain. Thus, stem cell-based therapies provide an attractive future for protecting and repairing damaged brain tissues after injury and in various disease states. Moreover, basic research on naïve and differentiated stem cells including iPS cells has markedly improved our understanding of cellular and molecular mechanisms of neurological disorders, and provides a platform for the discovery of novel drug targets. The latest advances indicate that combinatorial approaches using cell based therapy with additional treatments such as protective reagents, preconditioning strategies and rehabilitation therapy can significantly improve therapeutic benefits. In this review, we will discuss the characteristics of cell therapy in different ischemic models and the application of stem cells and progenitor cells as regenerative medicine for the treatment of stroke.

  13. Fantasies About Stem Cell Therapy in Chronic Ischemic Stroke Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young Seo; Chung, Dan-il; Choi, Hojin; Baek, Wonki; Kim, Hyun Young; Heo, Sung Hyuk; Chang, Dae-Il; Na, Hae Ri; Kim, Seung Hyun

    2013-01-01

    Stem cell therapy (SCT) has been proposed for the treatment of neurological disorders. Although there is insufficient clinical evidence to support its efficacy, unproven SCTs are being performed worldwide. In this study, we investigated the perspectives and expectations of chronic ischemic stroke patients and physicians about SCTs. A total of 250 chronic ischemic stroke patients were interviewed at 4 hospitals. Structured open and closed questions about SCT for chronic stroke were asked by trained interviewers using the conventional in-person method. In addition, 250 stroke-related physicians were randomly interviewed via an e-mail questionnaire. Of the 250 patients (mean 63 years, 70% male), 121 (46%) responded that they wanted to receive SCT in spite of its unknown side effects. Around 60% of the patients anticipated physical, emotional, and psychological improvement after SCT, and 158 (63%) believed that SCT might prevent strokes. However, physicians had much lower expectations about the effectiveness of SCTs, which was not in line with patient expectations. Multivariate analysis revealed that the male gender [odds ratio (OR): 2.00, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.10–3.64], longer disease duration (OR: 1.01, 95% CI: 1.00–1.02), higher modified Rankin Scale score (OR: 1.30, 95% CI: 1.06–1.60), and familiarity with stem cells (OR: 1.86, 95% CI: 1.10–3.15) were independently associated with wanting SCT. The major source of information about SCT was television (68%), and the most reliable source was physicians (49%). Patients have unfounded expectations that SCT will improve their functioning. Considering our finding that the major source of information on stem cells is media channels, but not the physician, to decrease patients' inappropriate exposure, doctors should make more effort to educate patients using mass media with accurate information. PMID:22784218

  14. Models to Tailor Brain Stimulation Therapies in Stroke.

    PubMed

    Plow, E B; Sankarasubramanian, V; Cunningham, D A; Potter-Baker, K; Varnerin, N; Cohen, L G; Sterr, A; Conforto, A B; Machado, A G

    2016-01-01

    A great challenge facing stroke rehabilitation is the lack of information on how to derive targeted therapies. As such, techniques once considered promising, such as brain stimulation, have demonstrated mixed efficacy across heterogeneous samples in clinical studies. Here, we explain reasons, citing its one-type-suits-all approach as the primary cause of variable efficacy. We present evidence supporting the role of alternate substrates, which can be targeted instead in patients with greater damage and deficit. Building on this groundwork, this review will also discuss different frameworks on how to tailor brain stimulation therapies. To the best of our knowledge, our report is the first instance that enumerates and compares across theoretical models from upper limb recovery and conditions like aphasia and depression. Here, we explain how different models capture heterogeneity across patients and how they can be used to predict which patients would best respond to what treatments to develop targeted, individualized brain stimulation therapies. Our intent is to weigh pros and cons of testing each type of model so brain stimulation is successfully tailored to maximize upper limb recovery in stroke.

  15. A case of vertebrobasilar stroke during oxygen-ozone therapy.

    PubMed

    Corea, Francesco; Amici, Serena; Murgia, Nicola; Tambasco, Nicola

    2004-01-01

    Despite only sporadic observations, the use of medical oxygen-ozone therapy is a largely diffused treatment for lumbar disk herniation that has failed to respond to conservative management. Combined intradiscal and periganglionic injection of medical ozone and periganglionic injection of steroids are presumed to have a cumulative effect enhancing the overall outcome of treatment for pain caused by disk herniation. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of stroke during such medical application. The patient had Anton's syndrome as a result of top of the basilar hypoperfusion.

  16. Pharmacological hypothermia: a potential for future stroke therapy?

    PubMed

    Liu, Kaiyin; Khan, Hajra; Geng, Xiaokun; Zhang, Jun; Ding, Yuchuan

    2016-06-01

    Mild physical hypothermia after stroke has been associated with positive outcomes. Despite the well-studied beneficial effects of hypothermia in the treatment of stroke, lack of precise temperature control, intolerance for the patient, and immunosuppression are some of the reasons which limit its clinical translation. Pharmacologically induced hypothermia has been explored as a possible treatment option following stroke in animal models. Currently, there are eight classes of pharmacological agents/agonists with hypothermic effects affecting a multitude of systems including cannabinoid, opioid, transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1), neurotensin, thyroxine derivatives, dopamine, gas, and adenosine derivatives. Interestingly, drugs in the TRPV1, neurotensin, and thyroxine families have been shown to have effects in thermoregulatory control in decreasing the compensatory hypothermic response during cooling. This review will briefly present drugs in the eight classes by summarizing their proposed mechanisms of action as well as side effects. Reported thermoregulatory effects of the drugs will also be presented. This review offers the opinion that these agents may be useful in combination therapies with physical hypothermia to achieve faster and more stable temperature control in hypothermia.

  17. Stroke-like migraine attack after cranial radiation therapy: the SMART syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lim, Sue Yin; Brooke, Jonathan; Dineen, Robert; O'Donoghue, Michael

    2016-10-01

    We describe a patient who experienced a prolonged episode of headache, drowsiness, seizure, unilateral weakness, delusion and hallucination due to a stroke-like migraine attack after cranial radiation therapy. Stroke-like migraine attack after radiation therapy (SMART) syndrome is a rare complication of therapeutic brain irradiation.

  18. [Fluid therapy in cardiac surgery. An update].

    PubMed

    Boix, E; Vicente, R; Pérez-Artacho, J

    2014-01-01

    The anesthetist has 2 major tools for optimizing haemodynamics in cardiac surgery: Vasoactive drugs and the intravascular volume. It is necessary to identify which patients would benefit from one or the other therapies for a suitable response to treatment. Hemodynamic monitoring with the different existing parameters (pressure, volumetric static, volumetric functional and echocardiography) allows the management of these patients to be optimized. In this article a review is presented on the most recent and relevant publications, and the different tools available to control the management of the fluid therapy in this context, and to suggest a few guidelines for the haemodynamics monitoring of patients submitted to cardiac surgery. A systematic search has been made in PubMed, limiting the results to the publications over the last five years up to February 2012.

  19. Discontinuation of perioperative antiplatelet and anticoagulant therapy in stroke patients.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, Melissa J; Schneck, Michael J; Biller, José

    2006-11-01

    Growing evidence suggests that perioperative withdrawal of ASA for secondary stroke prevention increases thromboembolic risk without the associated benefit of decreased bleeding complications. ASA maintenance is acceptable in many procedures, including invasive ones. Many procedures, in particular ophthalmologic, dermatologic, and dental surgeries, also are safe while continuing oral AC. Warfarin has been continued successfully even in some surgeries that have high bleeding risk. When the risk is too high, temporary bridging therapy with LWMH is safe in many populations. Although the exact thromboembolic risks associated with temporary cessation of AP and AC are unknown and likely low, morbidity and mortality associated with thromboembolism are high. Further studies investigating the risks and benefits of maintaining AP and AC during procedures, particularly invasive ones, are needed. Meanwhile, it is critical that physicians understand the risks and benefits of perioperative AP and AC and the variety of procedures in which these agents can be safely continued.

  20. Tongguan Liqiao acupuncture therapy improves dysphagia after brainstem stroke

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chun-hong; Bian, Jin-ling; Meng, Zhi-hong; Meng, Li-na; Ren, Xue-song; Wang, Zhi-lin; Guo, Xiao-yan; Shi, Xue-min

    2016-01-01

    Tongguan Liqiao acupuncture therapy has been shown to effectively treat dysphagia after stroke-based pseudobulbar paralysis. We presumed that this therapy would be effective for dysphagia after bulbar paralysis in patients with brainstem infarction. Sixty-four patients with dysphagia following brainstem infarction were recruited and divided into a medulla oblongata infarction group (n = 22), a midbrain and pons infarction group (n = 16), and a multiple cerebral infarction group (n = 26) according to their magnetic resonance imaging results. All patients received Tongguan Liqiao acupuncture for 28 days. The main acupoints were Neiguan (PC6), Renzhong (DU26), Sanyinjiao (SP6), Fengchi (GB20), Wangu (GB12), and Yifeng (SJ17). Furthermore, the posterior pharyngeal wall was pricked. Before and after treatment, patient swallowing functions were evaluated with the Kubota Water Test, Fujishima Ichiro Rating Scale, and the Standard Swallowing Assessment. The Barthel Index was also used to evaluate their quality of life. Results showed that after 28 days of treatment, scores on the Kubota Water Test and Standard Swallowing Assessment had decreased, but scores on the Fujishima Ichiro Rating Scale and Barthel Index had increased in each group. The total efficacy rate was 92.2% after treatment, and was most obvious in patients with medulla oblongata infarction (95.9%). These findings suggest that Tongguan Liqiao acupuncture therapy can repair the connection of upper motor neurons to the medulla oblongata motor nucleus, promote the recovery of brainstem infarction, and improve patient's swallowing ability and quality of life. PMID:27073382

  1. A Comparison of Aphasia Therapy Outcomes before and after a Very Early Rehabilitation Programme Following Stroke

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Godecke, Erin; Ciccone, Natalie A.; Granger, Andrew S.; Rai, Tapan; West, Deborah; Cream, Angela; Cartwright, Jade; Hankey, Graeme J.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Very early aphasia rehabilitation studies have shown mixed results. Differences in therapy intensity and therapy type contribute significantly to the equivocal results. Aims: To compare a standardized, prescribed very early aphasia therapy regimen with a historical usual care control group at therapy completion (4-5 weeks post-stroke)…

  2. Constraint-induced movement therapy promotes brain functional reorganization in stroke patients with hemiplegia

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wenqing; Wang, Aihui; Yu, Limin; Han, Xuesong; Jiang, Guiyun; Weng, Changshui; Zhang, Hongwei; Zhou, Zhiqiang

    2012-01-01

    Stroke patients with hemiplegia exhibit flexor spasms in the upper limb and extensor spasms in the lower limb, and their movement patterns vary greatly. Constraint-induced movement therapy is an upper limb rehabilitation technique used in stroke patients with hemiplegia; however, studies of lower extremity rehabilitation are scarce. In this study, stroke patients with lower limb hemiplegia underwent conventional Bobath therapy for 4 weeks as baseline treatment, followed by constraint-induced movement therapy for an additional 4 weeks. The 10-m maximum walking speed and Berg balance scale scores significantly improved following treatment, and lower extremity motor function also improved. The results of functional MRI showed that constraint-induced movement therapy alleviates the reduction in cerebral functional activation in patients, which indicates activation of functional brain regions and a significant increase in cerebral blood perfusion. These results demonstrate that constraint-induced movement therapy promotes brain functional reorganization in stroke patients with lower limb hemiplegia. PMID:25337108

  3. Critical Early Thrombolytic & Endovascular Reperfusion Therapy For Acute Ischemic Stroke Victims: A Call for Adjunct Neuroprotection

    PubMed Central

    Lapchak, Paul A.

    2015-01-01

    Today, there is an enormous amount of excitement in the field of stroke victim care due to the recent success of MR. CLEAN, SWIFT PRIME, ESCAPE, EXTEND-IA, and REVASCAT endovascular trials. Successful intravenous (IV) recombinant tissue plasminogen activation (rt-PA) clinical trials [i.e.: National Institutes of Neurodegenerative Disease and Stroke (NINDS) stroke trial; Third European Cooperative Acute Stroke Study (ECASSIII) and Third International Stroke study (IST-3)] also need to be emphasized. In the recent endovascular and thrombolytic trials, there is statistically significant improvement using both the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) and the modified Rankin Score (mRS) scale, but neither approach promotes complete recovery in patients enrolled within any particular NIHSS or mRS score tier. Absolute improvement (mRS 0–2 at 90 days) with endovascular therapy is 13.5–31%, whereas thrombolytics alone also significantly improve patient functional independence, but to a lesser degree (NINDS rt-PA trial 13%). This article has 3 main goals: (1) first to emphasize the utility and cost-effectiveness of rt-PA to treat stroke; (2) second to review the recent endovascular trials with respect to efficacy, safety and cost-effectiveness as a stroke treatment; and (3) to further consider and evaluate strategies to develop novel neuroprotective drugs. A thesis will be put forth so that future stroke trials and therapy development can optimally promote recovery so that stroke victims can return to “normal” life. PMID:26314402

  4. Acute reperfusion therapy and stroke care in Asia after successful endovascular trials.

    PubMed

    Toyoda, Kazunori; Koga, Masatoshi; Hayakawa, Mikito; Yamagami, Hiroshi

    2015-06-01

    The current status of and prospects for acute stroke care in Asia in the situation where both intravenous thrombolysis and endovascular therapies have been recognized as established strategies for acute stroke are reviewed. Of 15 million people annually having stroke worldwide, ≈9 million are Asians. The burdens of both ischemic and hemorrhagic strokes are severe in Asia. The unique features of stroke in Asia include susceptibility to intracranial atherosclerosis, high prevalence of intracerebral hemorrhage, effects of dietary and lifestyle habits, and several disorders with genetic causes. These features affect acute stroke care, such as the dosage of alteplase for thrombolysis and consideration of bleeding complications during antithrombotic therapy. Acute endovascular thrombectomy, as well as intravenous thrombolysis, is relatively prevalent in East Asia, but most of the other Asian countries need to develop their human resources and fundamental medical infrastructure for stroke care. A limitation of endovascular therapy in East Asia is the high prevalence of intracranial atherosclerosis that can cause recanalization failure and require additional angioplasty or permanent stent insertion although intracranial stenting is not an established strategy. Multinational collaboration on stroke research among Asian countries is infrequent. Asians should collaborate to perform their own thrombolytic and endovascular trials and seek the optimal strategy for stroke care specific to Asia.

  5. Stroke

    MedlinePlus

    ... emergency. Strokes happen when blood flow to your brain stops. Within minutes, brain cells begin to die. There are two kinds ... blocks or plugs a blood vessel in the brain. The other kind, called hemorrhagic stroke, is caused ...

  6. Cell Therapy for Stroke: Review of Previous Clinical Trials and Introduction of Our New Trials

    PubMed Central

    SHICHINOHE, Hideo; HOUKIN, Kiyohiro

    2016-01-01

    Stroke is still a leading cause of death and disability, and despite intensive research, few treatment options exist. A recent breakthrough in cell therapy is expected to reverse the neurological sequelae of stroke. Although some pioneer studies on the use of cell therapy for the treatment of stroke have been reported, certain problems still remain unsolved. We investigated the use of autologous bone marrow stromal cell (BMSC) transplantation for the treatment of stroke, to develop it as the next-generation cell therapy. In this study, we introduce the preparation of a new clinical trial, the Research on Advanced Intervention using Novel Bone marrow stem cell (RAINBOW) study. The trial will start in 2016, and we hope that it will not only be helpful for treating patients but also for clarifying the therapeutic mechanisms. Moreover, we review stem cell therapeutics as an emerging paradigm in stroke (STEPS) and the guidelines for the development of cell therapy for stroke in the United States as well as introduce the development of new guidelines in Japan. These guidelines are expected to encourage the development of cell therapy for stroke management. PMID:27302193

  7. Advances in hemorrhagic stroke therapy: conventional and novel approaches.

    PubMed

    Lapchak, Paul A; Araujo, Dalia M

    2007-09-01

    Treatments for spontaneous intracerebral, thrombolytic-induced and intraventricular hemorrhages (IVH) are still at the preclinical or early clinical investigational stages. There has been some renewed interest in the use of surgical evacuation surgery or thrombolytics to remove hematomas, but these techniques can be used only for specific types of brain bleeding. The STICH (Surgical Trial in Intracerebral Haemorrhage) clinical trials should provide some insight into the potential for such techniques to counteract hematoma-induced damage and subsequently, morbidity and mortality. More recently, clinical trials (ATACH [Antihypertensive Treatment in Acute Cerebral Hemorrhage] and INTERACT [Intensive Blood Pressure Reduction in Acute Cerebral Hemorrhage Trial]) have begun testing whether or not regulating blood pressure affects the well-being of hemorrhage patients, but the findings thus far have not conclusively demonstrated a positive result. More promising trials, such as the early stage CHANT (Cerebral Hemorrhagic And NXY-059 Treatment) and the late stage FAST (Factor VIIa for Acute Hemorrhagic Stroke Treatment), have addressed whether or not manipulating oxidative stress and components of the blood coagulation cascade can achieve an improved prognosis following spontaneous hemorrhages. However, CHANT was halted prematurely because although it showed that the spin trap agent NXY-059 was safe, it also demonstrated that the drug was ineffective in treating acute ischemic stroke. In addition, the recombinant activated factor VII FAST trial recently concluded with only modestly positive results. Despite a beneficial effect on the primary end point of reducing hemorrhage volume, controlling the coagulation cascade with recombinant factor VIIa did not decrease the mortality rate. Consequently, Novo Nordisk has abandoned further development of the drug for the treatment of intracerebral hemorrhaging. Even though progress in hemorrhage therapy that successfully reduces the

  8. Functional outcome in acute stroke patients with oropharyngeal Dysphagia after swallowing therapy.

    PubMed

    Huang, Kun-Ling; Liu, Ting-Yuan; Huang, Yu-Chi; Leong, Chau-Peng; Lin, Wei-Che; Pong, Ya-Ping

    2014-01-01

    Dysphagia after stroke is associated with mortality and increased pulmonary complications. Swallowing therapies may decrease pulmonary complications and improve patients' quality of life after stroke. This study used clinical swallowing assessments and videofluoroscopy (VFS) to assess the functional recovery of acute stroke patients with dysphagia after different swallowing therapies. We enrolled 29 acute stroke patients with dysphagia and randomly divided them into 3 therapy groups: traditional swallowing (TS), oropharyngeal neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES), and combined NMES/TS. All patients were assessed using the clinical functional oral intake scale (FOIS), 8-point penetration-aspiration scale (PAS), and functional dysphagia scale (FDS) of VFS before and after treatment. There were no differences in the clinical parameters and swallowing results of the FOIS and VFS before swallowing treatment among the 3 groups (P > .05). TS therapy and combined therapy both had significant swallowing improvement after therapy according to the FOIS and 8-point PAS (P < .05). When comparing the results of the VFS among the 3 groups, we found significant improvements in patients eating cookies and thick liquid after combined NMES/TS therapy (P < .05). In acute stroke patients with dysphagia, combined NMES/TS therapy is the most effective swallowing therapy in taking solid diets and thick liquids.

  9. Effect of fluid loading with normal saline and 6% hydroxyethyl starch on stroke volume variability and left ventricular volume

    PubMed Central

    Kanda, Hirotsugu; Hirasaki, Yuji; Iida, Takafumi; Kanao, Megumi; Toyama, Yuki; Kunisawa, Takayuki; Iwasaki, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this clinical trial was to investigate changes in stroke volume variability (SVV) and left ventricular end-diastolic volume (LVEDV) after a fluid bolus of crystalloid or colloid using real-time three-dimensional transesophageal echocardiography (3D-TEE) and the Vigileo-FloTrac™ system. Materials and methods After obtaining Institutional Review Board approval, and informed consent from the research participants, 22 patients undergoing scheduled peripheral vascular bypass surgery were enrolled in the study. The patients were randomly assigned to receive 500 mL of hydroxyethyl starch (HES; HES group, n=11) or normal saline (Saline group, n=11) for fluid replacement therapy. SVV was measured using the Vigileo-FloTrac system. LVEDV, stroke volume, and cardiac output were measured by 3D-TEE. The measurements were performed over 30 minutes before and after the fluid bolus in both groups. Results SVV significantly decreased after fluid bolus in both groups (HES group, 14.7%±2.6% to 6.9%±2.7%, P<0.001; Saline group, 14.3%±3.9% to 8.8%±3.1%, P<0.001). LVEDV significantly increased after fluid loading in the HES group (87.1±24.0 mL to 99.9±27.2 mL, P<0.001), whereas no significant change was detected in the Saline group (88.8±17.3 mL to 91.4±17.6 mL, P>0.05). Stroke volume significantly increased after infusion in the HES group (50.6±12.5 mL to 61.6±19.1 mL, P<0.01) but not in the Saline group (51.6±13.4 mL to 54.1±12.8 mL, P>0.05). Cardiac output measured by 3D-TEE significantly increased in the HES group (3.5±1.1 L/min to 3.9±1.3 L/min, P<0.05), whereas no significant change was seen in the Saline group (3.4±1.1 L/min to 3.3±1.0 L/min, P>0.05). Conclusion Administration of colloid and crystalloid induced similar responses in SVV. A higher plasma-expanding effect of HES compared to normal saline was demonstrated by the significant increase in LVEDV. PMID:26491368

  10. Art Therapy Outcomes in the Rehabilitation Treatment of a Stroke Patient: A Case Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Sun-Hyun; Kim, Min-Young; Lee, Jae-Hyuk; Chun, Sae-il

    2008-01-01

    This case report discusses the potential for art therapy to aid in the recovery of early-chronic stroke patients. The patient was diagnosed with having a subarachnoid hemorrhage from a cerebral aneurysm rupture 1 year prior to hospitalization. Therapies used as part of the patient's treatment included 10 weeks of art therapy conducted twice a…

  11. Primary stroke in a woman with sickle cell anemia responsive to hydroxyurea therapy.

    PubMed

    Ballas, Samir K; Martinez, Ubaldo; Savage, Michael

    2014-01-01

    The most common cause of stroke in children with sickle cell anemia is infarction due to ischemia. In adults, however, stroke is most commonly hemorrhagic in nature. Other causes of stroke in patients with sickle cell disease are very rare. In this short communication, we describe a woman with sickle cell anemia responsive to hydroxyurea (HU) therapy who had primary stroke due to paradoxical embolization caused by a large atrial septal defect. Successful management of the stroke included surgical closure of the defect with trans-esophageal echocardiographic guidance. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first patient with sickle cell anemia and stroke due to congenital heart disease who did not require open heart surgery for successful management.

  12. Oral anticoagulation to reduce risk of stroke in patients with atrial fibrillation: current and future therapies.

    PubMed

    Amin, Alpesh

    2013-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is associated with an increased incidence and severity of strokes. The burden of AF-related stroke is expected to increase in parallel with the aging of the population. Oral anticoagulation with warfarin has been the pharmacologic standard for stroke risk reduction in patients with AF. When used with close attention to dosing and monitoring, warfarin is effective prophylactic therapy against thromboembolic stroke. However, it is underused by physicians, in part because of the known risks of adverse events with warfarin. Consequently, many patients with AF live with an avoidably elevated risk of stroke. New options, ie, oral anticoagulants with novel mechanisms of action, have recently been approved to reduce the risk of stroke in AF, and others are in development. These newer agents may address some of the complexities of warfarin use while providing similar or better efficacy and safety.

  13. Preventive Antibacterial Therapy in Acute Ischemic Stroke: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Klehmet, Juliane; Rogge, Witold; Drenckhahn, Christoph; Göhler, Jos; Bereswill, Stefan; Göbel, Ulf; Wernecke, Klaus Dieter; Wolf, Tilo; Arnold, Guy; Halle, Elke; Volk, Hans-Dieter; Dirnagl, Ulrich; Meisel, Andreas

    2008-01-01

    Background Pneumonia is a major risk factor of death after acute stroke. In a mouse model, preventive antibacterial therapy with moxifloxacin not only prevents the development of post-stroke infections, it also reduces mortality, and improves neurological outcome significantly. In this study we investigate whether this approach is effective in stroke patients. Methods Preventive ANtibacterial THERapy in acute Ischemic Stroke (PANTHERIS) is a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial in 80 patients with severe, non-lacunar, ischemic stroke (NIHSS>11) in the middle cerebral artery (MCA) territory. Patients received either intravenous moxifloxacin (400 mg daily) or placebo for 5 days starting within 36 hours after stroke onset. Primary endpoint was infection within 11 days. Secondary endpoints included neurological outcome, survival, development of stroke-induced immunodepression, and induction of bacterial resistance. Findings On intention-to treat analysis (79 patients), the infection rate at day 11 in the moxifloxacin treated group was 15.4% compared to 32.5% in the placebo treated group (p = 0.114). On per protocol analysis (n = 66), moxifloxacin significantly reduced infection rate from 41.9% to 17.1% (p = 0.032). Stroke associated infections were associated with a lower survival rate. In this study, neurological outcome and survival were not significantly influenced by treatment with moxifloxacin. Frequency of fluoroquinolone resistance in both treatment groups did not differ. On logistic regression analysis, treatment arm as well as the interaction between treatment arm and monocytic HLA-DR expression (a marker for immunodepression) at day 1 after stroke onset was independently and highly predictive for post-stroke infections. Interpretation PANTHERIS suggests that preventive administration of moxifloxacin is superior in reducing infections after severe non-lacunar ischemic stroke compared to placebo. In addition, the results emphasize the

  14. Cerebrospinal Fluid HIV Escape from Antiretroviral Therapy.

    PubMed

    Ferretti, Francesca; Gisslen, Magnus; Cinque, Paola; Price, Richard W

    2015-06-01

    CNS infection is a nearly constant facet of systemic CNS infection and is generally well controlled by suppressive systemic antiretroviral therapy (ART). However, there are instances when HIV can be detected in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) despite suppression of plasma viruses below the clinical limits of measurement. We review three types of CSF viral escape: asymptomatic, neuro-symptomatic, and secondary. The first, asymptomatic CSF escape, is seemingly benign and characterized by lack of discernable neurological deterioration or subsequent CNS disease progression. Neuro-symptomatic CSF escape is an uncommon, but important, entity characterized by new or progressive CNS disease that is critical to recognize clinically because of its management implications. Finally, secondary CSF escape, which may be even more uncommon, is defined by an increase of CSF HIV replication in association with a concomitant non-HIV infection, as a consequence of the local inflammatory response. Understanding these CSF escape settings not only is important for clinical diagnosis and management but also may provide insight into the CNS HIV reservoir.

  15. Endovascular therapy in children with acute ischemic stroke: review and recommendations.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Michael J; Amlie-Lefond, Catherine; Orbach, Darren B

    2012-09-25

    This review provides a summary of the currently available data pertaining to the interventional management of acute ischemic stroke in children. The literature is scarce and is lacking much-needed prospective trials. No study in the literature on the well-established systemic or local thrombolysis trials has included children. Mechanical thrombectomy trials using clot retriever devices have also excluded patients younger than 18 years. The current review is limited to case series of interventional acute ischemic stroke therapy in children and the potential future of endovascular ischemic stroke therapy in this patient population. Recommendations in this review represent the opinion of the authors, based on review of the limited literature covering endovascular acute ischemic stroke therapy in children.

  16. Post-stroke depression: mechanisms, translation and therapy

    PubMed Central

    Loubinoux, Isabelle; Kronenberg, Golo; Endres, Matthias; Schumann-Bard, Pascale; Freret, Thomas; Filipkowski, Robert K; Kaczmarek, Leszek; Popa-Wagner, Aurel

    2012-01-01

    The interaction between depression and stroke is highly complex. Post-stroke depression (PSD) is among the most frequent neuropsychiatric consequences of stroke. Depression also negatively impacts stroke outcome with increased morbidity, mortality and poorer functional recovery. Antidepressants such as the commonly prescribed selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors improve stroke outcome, an effect that may extend far beyond depression, e.g., to motor recovery. The main biological theory of PSD is the amine hypothesis. Conceivably, ischaemic lesions interrupt the projections ascending from midbrain and brainstem, leading to a decreased bioavailability of the biogenic amines – serotonin (5HT), dopamine (DA) and norepinephrine (NE). Acetylcholine would also be involved. So far, preclinical and translational research on PSD is largely lacking. The implementation and characterization of suitable animal models is clearly a major prerequisite for deeper insights into the biological basis of post-stroke mood disturbances. Equally importantly, experimental models may also pave the way for the discovery of novel therapeutic targets. If we cannot prevent stroke, we shall try to limit its long-term consequences. This review therefore presents animal models of PSD and summarizes potential underlying mechanisms including genomic signatures, neurotransmitter and neurotrophin signalling, hippocampal neurogenesis, cellular plasticity in the ischaemic lesion, secondary degenerative changes, activation of the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and neuroinflammation. As stroke is a disease of the elderly, great clinical benefit may especially accrue from deciphering and targeting basic mechanisms underlying PSD in aged animals. PMID:22348642

  17. The effects of combined hyperbaric oxygen therapy on patients with post-stroke depression.

    PubMed

    Yan, Dong; Shan, Jin; Ze, Yu; Xiao-Yan, Zeng; Xiao-Hua, Hu

    2015-05-01

    [Purpose] To observe the effect of combined hyperbaric oxygen therapy on patients with post-stroke depression. [Subjects] Ninety patients with post-stroke depression were randomly divided into 3 groups: fluoxetine treatment group (n = 30), hyperbaric oxygen therapy group (n = 30), and hyperbaric oxygen combined treatment group (n = 30). [Methods] Fluoxetine treatment group received anti-depression drugs (fluoxetine, 20 mg/day), hyperbaric oxygen therapy group received hyperbaric oxygen (once a day, 5 days/week), hyperbaric oxygen combined treatment group received fluoxetine and hyperbaric oxygen treatments as described above. All patients received routine rehabilitation therapy. Hamilton Depression Scale (HAMD), and Scandinavian Stroke Scale (SSS) scores were evaluated before and at the end of 4th week. The total effective rate of depression release between the 3 groups was also compared at the end of study. [Results] The end scores of HAMD and SSS in the 3 groups were significantly lower than those before treatment. The total effective rate of combined hyperbaric oxygen therapy group after treatment was higher than the other two groups. [Conclusions] Combined hyperbaric oxygen therapy plays an important role in the treatment of patients with post-stroke depression. The total effective rate of combined hyperbaric oxygen therapy was higher than other routine anti post-stroke depression treatments.

  18. Post-stroke Mood and Emotional Disturbances: Pharmacological Therapy Based on Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jong S.

    2016-01-01

    Post-stroke mood and emotional disturbances are frequent and diverse in their manifestations. Out of the many post-stroke disturbances, post-stroke depression, post-stroke anxiety, post-stroke emotional incontinence, post-stroke anger proneness, and post-stroke fatigue are frequent and important symptoms. These symptoms are distressing for both the patients and their caregivers, and negatively influence the patient’s quality of life. Unfortunately, these emotional disturbances are not apparent and are therefore often unnoticed by busy clinicians. Their phenomenology, predicting factors, and pathophysiology have been under-studied, and are under-recognized. In addition, well-designed clinical trials regarding these symptoms are rare. Fortunately, these mood and emotional disturbances may be treated or prevented by various methods, including pharmacological therapy. To administer the appropriate therapy, we have to understand the phenomenology and the similarities and differences in the pathophysiological mechanisms associated with these emotional symptoms. This narrative review will describe some of the most common or relevant post-stroke mood and emotional disturbances. The phenomenology, factors or predictors, and relevant lesion locations will be described, and pharmacological treatment of these emotional disturbances will be discussed based on presumable pathophysiological mechanisms. PMID:27733031

  19. The Role of Astrocytes in Mediating Exogenous Cell-Based Restorative Therapy for Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yi; Liu, Zhongwu; Xin, Hongqi; Chopp, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Astrocytes have not been a major therapeutic target for the treatment of stroke, with most research emphasis on the neuron. Given the essential role that astrocytes play in maintaining physiological function of the central nervous system and the very rapid and sensitive reaction astrocytes have in response to cerebral injury or ischemic insult, we propose to replace the neurocentric view for treatment with a more nuanced astrocytic centered approach. In addition, after decades of effort in attempting to develop neuroprotective therapies, which target reduction of the ischemic lesion, there are no effective clinical treatments for stroke, aside from thrombolysis with tissue plasminogen activator, which is used in a small minority of patients. A more promising therapeutic approach, which may affect nearly all stroke patients, may be in promoting endogenous restorative mechanisms, which enhance neurological recovery. A focus of efforts in stimulating recovery post stroke is the use of exogenously administered cells. The present review focuses on the role of the astrocyte in mediating the brain network, brain plasticity, and neurological recovery post stroke. As a model to describe the interaction of a restorative cell-based therapy with astrocytes, which drives recovery from stroke, we specifically highlight the subacute treatment of stroke with multipotent mesenchymal stromal cell therapy. PMID:24272702

  20. Stroke

    MedlinePlus

    ... Is a Stroke? A stroke occurs if the flow of oxygen-rich blood to a portion of the brain ... pressure from the leaked blood damages brain cells. High blood pressure and ... A TIA occurs if blood flow to a portion of the brain is blocked ...

  1. Hemorrhagic Transformation after Tissue Plasminogen Activator Reperfusion Therapy for Ischemic Stroke: Mechanisms, Models, and Biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Li, Mingchang; Chen, Qianxue; Wang, Jian

    2015-12-01

    Intracerebral hemorrhagic transformation (HT) is well recognized as a common cause of hemorrhage in patients with ischemic stroke. HT after acute ischemic stroke contributes to early mortality and adversely affects functional recovery. The risk of HT is especially high when patients receive thrombolytic reperfusion therapy with tissue plasminogen activator, the only available treatment for ischemic stroke. Although many important publications address preclinical models of ischemic stroke, there are no current recommendations regarding the conduct of research aimed at understanding the mechanisms and prediction of HT. In this review, we discuss the underlying mechanisms for HT after ischemic stroke, provide an overview of the models commonly used for the study of HT, and discuss biomarkers that might be used for the early detection of this challenging clinical problem.

  2. Hemorrhagic Transformation After Tissue Plasminogen Activator Reperfusion Therapy for Ischemic Stroke: Mechanisms, Models, and Biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei; Li, Mingchang; Chen, Qianxue; Wang, Jian

    2014-01-01

    Summary Intracerebral hemorrhagic transformation (HT) is well recognized as a common cause of hemorrhage in patients with ischemic stroke. HT after acute ischemic stroke contributes to early mortality and adversely affects functional recovery. The risk of HT is especially high when patients receive thrombolytic reperfusion therapy with tissue plasminogen activator, the only available treatment for ischemic stroke. Although many important publications address preclinical models of ischemic stroke, there are no current recommendations regarding the conduct of research aimed at understanding the mechanisms and prediction of HT. In this review, we discuss the underlying mechanisms for HT after ischemic stroke, provide an overview of the models commonly used for the study of HT, and discuss biomarkers that might be used for early detection of this challenging clinical problem. PMID:25367883

  3. Estrogen therapy increases BDNF expression and improves post-stroke depression in ovariectomy-treated rats

    PubMed Central

    Su, Qiaoer; Cheng, Yifan; Jin, Kunlin; Cheng, Jianhua; Lin, Yuanshao; Lin, Zhenzhen; Wang, Liuqing; Shao, Bei

    2016-01-01

    The present study investigated the effect of exogenous estrogen on post-stroke depression. Rats were exposed to chronic mild stress following middle cerebral artery occlusion. The occurrence of post-stroke depression was evaluated according to the changes in preference for sucrose and performance in a forced swimming test. Estrogen therapy significantly improved these neurological symptoms, indicating that estrogen is effective in treating post-stroke depression. Increased brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) expression was reported in the hippocampus of rats that had been treated with estrogen for two weeks, suggesting that BDNF expression may be an important contributor to the improvement of post-stroke depression that is observed following estrogen therapy. PMID:27602095

  4. Efficacy of telemedicine for thrombolytic therapy in acute ischemic stroke: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Yun-kai; Zhu, Wei-jun; Hou, Hong-li; Sun, Dong-xu; Zhao, Jie

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the benefits of telemedicine in the delivery of thrombolytic therapy for patients with acute ischemic stroke. We performed a meta-analysis using combinations of the following terms: telestroke, telemedicine, tissue plasminogen activator/t-PA, and acute ischemic stroke. The primary outcome was favorable outcome based on the modified Rankin score. Secondary outcomes were incidence of symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage and overall mortality. We found no significant difference in favorable outcome between the telemedicine and control groups, and no significant difference was found between these groups in the rate of symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage or overall mortality. Patients with acute ischemic stroke who were treated with intravenous thrombolysis had similar outcomes regardless of whether telemedicine was used or they were treated in-person at a medical facility. Telemedicine can be used to support hospitals with limited experience in administering thrombolytic therapy for stroke.

  5. Precision Fluid Management in Continuous Renal Replacement Therapy.

    PubMed

    Murugan, Raghavan; Hoste, Eric; Mehta, Ravindra L; Samoni, Sara; Ding, Xiaoqiang; Rosner, Mitchell H; Kellum, John A; Ronco, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    Fluid management during continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) in critically ill patients is a dynamic process that encompasses 3 inter-related goals: maintenance of the patency of the CRRT circuit, maintenance of plasma electrolyte and acid-base homeostasis and regulation of patient fluid balance. In this article, we report the consensus recommendations of the 2016 Acute Disease Quality Initiative XVII conference on 'Precision Fluid Management in CRRT'. We discuss the principles of fluid management, describe various prescription methods to achieve circuit integrity and introduce the concept of integrated fluid balance for tailoring fluid balance to the needs of the individual patient. We suggest that these recommendations could serve to develop the best clinical practice and standards of care for fluid management in patients undergoing CRRT. Finally, we identify and highlight areas of uncertainty in fluid management and set an agenda for future research.

  6. Why emergency XeCT-CBF should become routine in acute ischemic stroke before thrombolytic therapy.

    PubMed

    Meyer, J S; Rauch, G M

    2000-02-01

    Intravenous thrombolytic therapy using recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rtpa) has been approved for the treatment of acute ischemic stroke in the USA, if treatment is initiated within 3-hours (NINDS tpa Stroke Study Group) but not 6 hours (ECASS II) after time of onset. Favorable outcome in the placebo arm was much higher than expected possibly because patients with TIA's are likely to be included as progressive ischemic stroke subjects when a brief 3-6 hours duration of stroke is defined as the therapeutic window. Yonas' group at the University of Pittsburg demonstrated that adding stable xenon inhalation to routine CT scanning performed during emergency screening of acute stroke, predicted which cases became irreversibly infarcted if thrombolytic therapy was not administered within a few hours of stroke onset, since non-contrasted CT scans are usually normal this early. Adding a few minutes for inhalation of 26% xenon is justified in order to measure LCBF values which predict size, severity and volumes of impending cerebral infarctions and rule out TIA's which have relatively normal CT-CBF values. CT-CBF measures provide positive indications for thrombolytic therapy. This is not possible by MRI and SPECT methods which are not sufficiently quantitative to discern LCBF values persistently below ischemic thresholds of 16 mls/100 gm/min, thereby predicting impending infarction.

  7. The complexities of designing therapy for Māori living with stroke-related communication disorders.

    PubMed

    Brewer, Karen M

    2016-05-27

    Stroke-related communication disorders can have a substantial impact on Māori whānau (extended family). Timely and appropriate speech-language therapy is required, but there are many challenges in providing this. In this article we discuss the need for a kaupapa Māori approach to speech-language therapy that is designed by Māori for Māori, and undertaken in a Māori way. We report the results of a literature review that revealed a small but significant body of literature describing Māori experiences of stroke, aphasia and speech-language therapy, and evidence that a Māori-specific therapy programme can improve outcomes for people with stroke. We then consider the social and political context that impacts the design and delivery of such an approach. Informed by the literature, we propose a hierarchy of skill and resource acquisition for speech-language therapists, in which they learn why to be culturally safe, how to be culturally safe, and how to interact before creating resources to build relationships, resources for education and for therapy. The creation of a kaupapa Māori speech-language therapy approach should bring together people with stroke, whānau members and service providers to create therapy that crosses sectors and disciplines and acknowledges the wider social and political context.

  8. [Achievements and enlightenment of modern acupuncture therapy for stroke based on the neuroanatomy].

    PubMed

    Chen, Li-Fang; Fang, Jian-Qiao; Chen, Lu-Ni; Wang, Chao

    2014-04-01

    Up to now, in the treatment of stroke patients by acupuncture therapy, three main representative achievements involving scalp acupuncture intervention, "Xing Nao Kai Qiao" (restoring consciousness and inducing resuscitation) acupuncture technique and nape acupuncture therapy have been got. Regarding their neurobiological mechanisms, the scalp acupuncture therapy is based on the functional localization of the cerebral cortex, "Xing Nao Kai Qiao" acupuncture therapy is closely related to nerve stem stimulation, and the nape acupuncture therapy is based on the nerve innervation of the regional neck-nape area in obtaining therapeutic effects. In fact, effects of these three acupuncture interventions are all closely associated with the modern neuroanatomy. In the treatment of post-stroke spastic paralysis, cognitive disorder and depression with acupuncture therapy, modern neuroanatomical knowledge should be one of the key theoretical basis and new therapeutic techniques should be explored and developed continuously.

  9. Tetramethylpyrazine nitrone, a multifunctional neuroprotective agent for ischemic stroke therapy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zaijun; Zhang, Gaoxiao; Sun, Yewei; Szeto, Samuel S W; Law, Henry C H; Quan, Quan; Li, Guohui; Yu, Pei; Sho, Eiketsu; Siu, Michael K W; Lee, Simon M Y; Chu, Ivan K; Wang, Yuqiang

    2016-11-14

    TBN, a novel tetramethylpyrazine derivative armed with a powerful free radical-scavenging nitrone moiety, has been reported to reduce cerebral infarction in rats through multi-functional mechanisms of action. Here we study the therapeutic effects of TBN on non-human primate model of stroke. Thirty male Cynomolgus macaques were subjected to stroke with 4 hours ischemia and then reperfusion. TBN were injected intravenously at 3 or 6 hours after the onset of ischemia. Cerebral infarction was examined by magnetic resonance imaging at 1 and 4 weeks post ischemia. Neurological severity scores were evaluated during 4 weeks observation. At the end of experiment, protein markers associated with the stroke injury and TBN treatment were screened by quantitative proteomics. We found that TBN readily penetrated the blood brain barrier and reached effective therapeutic concentration after intravenous administration. It significantly reduced brain infarction and modestly preserved the neurological function of stroke-affected arm. TBN suppressed over-expression of neuroinflammatory marker vimentin and decreased the numbers of GFAP-positive cells, while reversed down-regulation of myelination-associated protein 2', 3'-cyclic-nucleotide 3'-phosphodiesterase and increased the numbers of NeuN-positive cells in the ipsilateral peri-infarct area. TBN may serve as a promising new clinical candidate for the treatment of ischemic stroke.

  10. Tetramethylpyrazine nitrone, a multifunctional neuroprotective agent for ischemic stroke therapy

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zaijun; Zhang, Gaoxiao; Sun, Yewei; Szeto, Samuel S. W.; Law, Henry C. H.; Quan, Quan; Li, Guohui; Yu, Pei; Sho, Eiketsu; Siu, Michael K. W.; Lee, Simon M. Y.; Chu, Ivan K.; Wang, Yuqiang

    2016-01-01

    TBN, a novel tetramethylpyrazine derivative armed with a powerful free radical-scavenging nitrone moiety, has been reported to reduce cerebral infarction in rats through multi-functional mechanisms of action. Here we study the therapeutic effects of TBN on non-human primate model of stroke. Thirty male Cynomolgus macaques were subjected to stroke with 4 hours ischemia and then reperfusion. TBN were injected intravenously at 3 or 6 hours after the onset of ischemia. Cerebral infarction was examined by magnetic resonance imaging at 1 and 4 weeks post ischemia. Neurological severity scores were evaluated during 4 weeks observation. At the end of experiment, protein markers associated with the stroke injury and TBN treatment were screened by quantitative proteomics. We found that TBN readily penetrated the blood brain barrier and reached effective therapeutic concentration after intravenous administration. It significantly reduced brain infarction and modestly preserved the neurological function of stroke-affected arm. TBN suppressed over-expression of neuroinflammatory marker vimentin and decreased the numbers of GFAP-positive cells, while reversed down-regulation of myelination-associated protein 2′, 3′-cyclic-nucleotide 3′-phosphodiesterase and increased the numbers of NeuN-positive cells in the ipsilateral peri-infarct area. TBN may serve as a promising new clinical candidate for the treatment of ischemic stroke. PMID:27841332

  11. Antiplatelet therapy for preventing stroke in patients with chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Kim, Suk Jae; Bang, Oh Young

    2013-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD), defined as reduced glomerular filtration rate and/or proteinuria, is a serious worldwide health problem. The incidence and prevalence of CKD are increasing with age, and patients with CKD are a population at very high risk for developing stroke. CKD may increase the risk for incident stroke independent of conventional stroke risk factors. A common pathological process including anemia, homocysteine, nitric oxide, oxidative stress, inflammation, and conditions promoting coagulation may be related to the development of stroke in the course of CKD. CKD can also serve as a marker of brain injury, because the cerebral microvascular system has similar hemodynamic features with the vascular beds of the kidney. CKD has been linked with markers of cerebral small artery disease including white matter lesions, lacunar infarctions, and cerebral microbleeds. CKD has been implicated with neurological deterioration during hospitalization, poor functional outcome, and hemorrhagic transformation in patients with acute stroke. Recurrence of stroke may also be higher in CKD patients compared with those having normal kidney function. However, there have been no specific recommendations for antiplatelet therapy in patients with ischemic stroke plus CKD. As CKD patients have distinct characteristics including high bleeding complications and poor response to antiplatelet agents, selecting and adjusting platelet aggregation inhibitors should be individualized. In addition, it should be noted that aspirin may aggravate renal dysfunction. Phosphodiesterase inhibitors restore endothelial dysfunction and may serve as a target for preventing stroke in CKD patients. Aside from antiplatelet therapy, other treatments including lipid control, blood pressure lowering, and renal transplantation are also important. Further studies are warranted for optimal treatment in stroke prevention in CKD patients.

  12. The effects of extracorporeal shock wave therapy on stroke patients with plantar fasciitis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Tae Gon; Bae, Sea Hyun; Kim, Gye Yeop; Kim, Kyung Yoon

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this research was to analyze the efficacy of extracorporeal shock wave therapy for the treatment of stroke patients with plantar fasciitis. [Subjects and Methods] This study included 10 stroke patients diagnosed with plantar fasciitis who were administered 3 sessions of extracorporeal shock wave therapy per week. After the last session, they performed stretching exercises for their Achilles tendon and plantar fascia for 30 min/day, 5 times a week for 6 months. The following parameters were measured and compared prior to therapy, 6 weeks after therapy, and 6 months after therapy: thickness of the plantar fascia, using an ultrasonic imaging system; degree of spasticity, using a muscle tension measuring instrument; degree of pain, using the visual analogue scale; and gait ability, using the Functional Gait Assessment. [Results] Decreased plantar fascia thickness, spasticity, and pain and increased gait ability were noted after therapy. These changes were significantly greater at 6 months after therapy than at 6 weeks after therapy. [Conclusion] These results indicated that extracorporeal shock wave therapy reduced tension in the plantar fascia, relieving pain and improving gait ability in stroke patients. PMID:25729207

  13. Association Between Ischemic Stroke and Tumor Necrosis Factor Inhibitor Therapy in Patients With Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Low, Audrey S. L.; Lunt, Mark; Mercer, Louise K.; Watson, Kath D.; Dixon, William G.; Symmons, Deborah P. M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) are at an increased risk of ischemic stroke. Tumor necrosis factor inhibitors (TNFi) may influence risk and mortality after ischemic stroke by reducing inflammation. This study was undertaken to examine the association of TNFi with the risk of incident ischemic stroke and with 30‐day and 1‐year mortality after ischemic stroke. Methods Patients with RA starting therapy with TNFi and a biologics‐naive comparator group treated with synthetic disease‐modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs) only were recruited to the British Society for Rheumatology Biologics Register for Rheumatoid Arthritis from 2001 to 2009. Patients were followed up via clinical and patient questionnaires as well as the national death register. Incident strokes were classified as ischemic if brain imaging reports suggested ischemia or if ischemic stroke was reported as the underlying cause of death on a death certificate. Patients with a previous stroke were excluded. Risk of ischemic stroke was compared between patients receiving synthetic DMARDs only and those ever‐exposed to TNFi using a Cox proportional hazards regression model adjusted for potential confounders. Mortality after ischemic stroke was compared between synthetic DMARD–treated patients and TNFi‐treated patients using logistic regression, adjusted for age and sex. Results To April 2010, 127 verified incident ischemic strokes (21 in 3,271 synthetic DMARD–treated patients and 106 in 11,642 TNFi‐treated patients) occurred during 11,973 and 61,226 person‐years of observation, respectively (incidence rate 175 versus 173 per 100,000 person‐years). After adjustment for confounders, there was no association between ever‐exposure to TNFi and ischemic stroke (hazard ratio 0.99 [95% confidence interval (95% CI) 0.54–1.81]). Mortality 30 days or 1 year after ischemic stroke was not associated with concurrent TNFi exposure (odds ratio 0.18 [95% CI 0.03–1.21] and 0.60 [95

  14. A novel stroke therapy of pharmacologically induced hypothermia after focal cerebral ischemia in mice

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Ko-Eun; Hall, Casey L.; Sun, Jin-Mei; Wei, Ling; Mohamad, Osama; Dix, Thomas A.; Yu, Shan P.

    2012-01-01

    Compelling evidence from preclinical and clinical studies has shown that mild to moderate hypothermia is neuroprotective against ischemic stroke. Clinical applications of hypothermia therapy, however, have been hindered by current methods of physical cooling, which is generally inefficient and impractical in clinical situations. In this report, we demonstrate the potential of pharmacologically induced hypothermia (PIH) by the novel neurotensin receptor 1 (NTR1) agonist ABS-201 in a focal ischemic model of adult mice. ABS-201 (1.5–2.5 mg/kg, i.p.) reduces body and brain temperature by 2–5°C in 15–30 min in a dose-dependent manner without causing shivering or altering physiological parameters. Infarct volumes at 24 h after stroke are reduced by ∼30–40% when PIH therapy is initiated either immediately after stroke induction or after 30–60 min delay. ABS-201 treatment increases bcl-2 expression, decreases caspase-3 activation, and TUNEL-positive cells in the peri-infarct region, and suppresses autophagic cell death compared to stroke controls. The PIH therapy using ABS-201 improves recovery of sensorimotor function as tested 21 d after stroke. These results suggest that PIH induced by neurotensin analogs represented by ABS-201 are promising candidates for treatment of ischemic stroke and possibly for other ischemic or traumatic injuries. Choi, K.-E., Hall, C. L., Sun, J.-M., Wei, L., Mohamad, O., Dix, T. A., Yu, S. P. A novel stroke therapy of pharmacologically induced hypothermia after focal cerebral ischemia in mice. PMID:22459147

  15. Incidence, Causative Mechanisms, and Anatomic Localization of Stroke in Pituitary Adenoma Patients Treated With Postoperative Radiation Therapy Versus Surgery Alone

    SciTech Connect

    Sattler, Margriet G.A.; Vroomen, Patrick C.; Sluiter, Wim J.; Schers, Henk J.; Berg, Gerrit van den; Langendijk, Johannes A.; Wolffenbuttel, Bruce H.R.; Bergh, Alphons C.M. van den; Beek, André P. van

    2013-09-01

    Purpose: To assess and compare the incidence of stroke and stroke subtype in pituitary adenoma patients treated with postoperative radiation therapy (RT) and surgery alone. Methods and Materials: A cohort of 462 pituitary adenoma patients treated between 1959 and 2008 at the University Medical Center Groningen in The Netherlands was studied. Radiation therapy was administered in 236 patients. The TOAST (Trial of ORG 10172 in Acute Stroke Treatment) and the Oxfordshire Community Stroke Project classification methods were used to determine causative mechanism and anatomic localization of stroke. Stroke incidences in patients treated with RT were compared with that observed after surgery alone. Risk factors for stroke incidence were studied by log–rank test, without and with stratification for other significant risk factors. In addition, the stroke incidence was compared with the incidence rate in the general Dutch population. Results: Thirteen RT patients were diagnosed with stroke, compared with 12 surgery-alone patients. The relative risk (RR) for stroke in patients treated with postoperative RT was not significantly different compared with surgery-alone patients (univariate RR 0.62, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.28-1.35, P=.23). Stroke risk factors were coronary or peripheral artery disease (univariate and multivariate RR 10.4, 95% CI 4.7-22.8, P<.001) and hypertension (univariate RR 3.9, 95% CI 1.6-9.8, P=.002). There was no difference in TOAST and Oxfordshire classification of stroke. In this pituitary adenoma cohort 25 strokes were observed, compared with 16.91 expected (standard incidence ratio 1.48, 95% CI 1.00-1.96, P=.049). Conclusions: In pituitary adenoma patients, an increased incidence of stroke was observed compared with the general population. However, postoperative RT was not associated with an increased incidence of stroke or differences in causative mechanism or anatomic localization of stroke compared with surgery alone. The primary stroke risk

  16. Reperfusion Therapies for Acute Ischemic Stroke: An Update

    PubMed Central

    Dorado, Laura; Millán, Mònica; Dávalos, Antoni

    2014-01-01

    Acute ischemic stroke is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in developed countries. Intravenous thrombolysis with tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) within 4.5 hours of symptoms onset significantly improves clinical outcomes in patients with acute ischemic stroke. This narrow window for treatment leads to a small proportion of eligible patients to be treated. Intravenous or intra-arterial trials, combined intravenous/intra-arterial trials, and newer devices to mechanically remove the clot from intracranial arteries have been investigated or are currently being explored to increase patient eligibility and to improve arterial recanalization and clinical outcome. New retrievable stent-based devices offer higher revascularization rates with shorter time to recanalization and are now generally preferred to first generation thrombectomy devices such as Merci Retriever or Penumbra System. These devices have been shown to be effective for opening up occluded vessels in the brain but its efficacy for improving outcomes in patients with acute stroke has not yet been demonstrated in a randomized clinical trial. We summarize the results of the major systemic thrombolytic trials and the latest trials employing different endovascular approaches to ischemic stroke. PMID:24646159

  17. Reperfusion therapies for acute ischemic stroke: an update.

    PubMed

    Dorado, Laura; Millán, Mònica; Dávalos, Antoni

    2014-11-01

    Acute ischemic stroke is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in developed countries. Intravenous thrombolysis with tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) within 4.5 hours of symptoms onset significantly improves clinical outcomes in patients with acute ischemic stroke. This narrow window for treatment leads to a small proportion of eligible patients to be treated. Intravenous or intra-arterial trials, combined intravenous/intra-arterial trials, and newer devices to mechanically remove the clot from intracranial arteries have been investigated or are currently being explored to increase patient eligibility and to improve arterial recanalization and clinical outcome. New retrievable stent-based devices offer higher revascularization rates with shorter time to recanalization and are now generally preferred to first generation thrombectomy devices such as Merci Retriever or Penumbra System. These devices have been shown to be effective for opening up occluded vessels in the brain but its efficacy for improving outcomes in patients with acute stroke has not yet been demonstrated in a randomized clinical trial. We summarize the results of the major systemic thrombolytic trials and the latest trials employing different endovascular approaches to ischemic stroke.

  18. Effects of upper limb robot-assisted therapy in the rehabilitation of stroke patients.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Doo Han; Kim, Se Yun

    2015-03-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to examine the effects of upper limb robot-assisted therapy in the rehabilitation of stroke patients. [Subjects and Methods] Fifteen stroke patients with no visual or cognitive problems were enrolled. All subjects received robot-assisted therapy and comprehensive rehabilitation therapy for 30 minutes each. The experimental group received a conventional therapy and an additional half hour per weekday of robot therapy. The patients participated in a total of 20 sessions, each lasting 60 minutes (conventional therapy 30 min, robot-assisted therapy 30 min), which were held 5 days a week for 4 weeks. [Result] The patients showed a significant difference in smoothness and reach error of the point to point test, circle size and independence of the circle in the circle test, and hold deviation of the playback static test between before and after the intervention. On the other hand, no significant difference was observed in the displacement of the round dynamic test. The patients also showed significant improvement in the Fugl-Meyer Assessment and Modified Barthel Index after the intervention. [Conclusion] These kinematic factors can provide good information when analyzing the upper limb function of stroke patients in robot-assisted therapy. Nevertheless, further research on technology-based kinematic information will be necessary.

  19. Heat transfer model of hyporthermic intracarotid infusion of cold saline for stroke therapy.

    PubMed

    Neimark, Matthew A; Konstas, Angelos-Aristeidis; Laine, Andrew F; Pile-Spellman, John

    2006-01-01

    A 3-dimensional hemispheric computational brain model is developed to simulate infusion of cold saline in the carotid arteries in terms of brain cooling for stroke therapy. The model is based on the Pennes bioheat equation, with four tissue layers: white matter, gray matter, skull, and scalp. The stroke lesion is simulated by reducing blood flow to a selected volume of the brain by a factor of one-third, and brain metabolism by 50%. A stroke penumbra was also generated surrounding the core lesion (blood volume reduction 25%, metabolism reduction 20%). The finite difference method was employed to solve the system of partial differential equations. This model demonstrated a reduction in brain temperature, at the stroke lesion, to 32 degrees C in less than 10 minutes.

  20. Neuroprotection & mechanism of ethanol in stroke and traumatic brain injury therapy: new prospects for an ancient drug.

    PubMed

    Asmaro, Karam; Fu, Paul; Ding, Yuchuan

    2013-01-01

    Effective efforts to screen for agents that protect against the devastating effects of stroke have not produced viable results thus far. As a result this article reviews the possible role of ethanol as a neuroprotective agent in stroke and traumatic brain injury (TBI). Previous studies have associated ethanol consumption with a decreased risk of ischemic stroke, suggesting a neuroprotective mechanism. The translation of this clinical knowledge into basic science research with the goal of new therapy for acute stroke patients remains in its initial stages. In a recent study involving rats, we have shown that ethanol administration, in the correct dose after stroke onset, protects against ischemia-induced brain injury. The purpose of this paper is to discuss ethanol's neuroprotective properties in stroke when consumed as a preconditioning agent, in TBI with a positive blood alcohol content, and finally in stroke treatment, with the goal of using post-ischemia ethanol (PIE) therapy to ameliorate brain damage in the future.

  1. Combining Dopaminergic Facilitation with Robot-Assisted Upper Limb Therapy in Stroke Survivors

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Duc A.; Pajaro-Blazquez, Marta; Daneault, Jean-Francois; Gallegos, Jaime G.; Pons, Jose; Fregni, Felipe; Bonato, Paolo; Zafonte, Ross

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Despite aggressive conventional therapy, lasting hemiplegia persists in a large percentage of stroke survivors. The aim of this article is to critically review the rationale behind targeting multiple sites along the motor learning network by combining robotic therapy with pharmacotherapy and virtual reality–based reward learning to alleviate upper extremity impairment in stroke survivors. Methods for personalizing pharmacologic facilitation to each individual’s unique biology are also reviewed. At the molecular level, treatment with levodopa was shown to induce long-term potentiation-like and practice-dependent plasticity. Clinically, trials combining conventional therapy with levodopa in stroke survivors yielded statistically significant but clinically unconvincing outcomes because of limited personalization, standardization, and reproducibility. Robotic therapy can induce neuroplasticity by delivering intensive, reproducible, and functionally meaningful interventions that are objective enough for the rigors of research. Robotic therapy also provides an apt platform for virtual reality, which boosts learning by engaging reward circuits. The future of stroke rehabilitation should target distinct molecular, synaptic, and cortical sites through personalized multimodal treatments to maximize motor recovery. PMID:26829074

  2. Dementia wander garden aids post cerebrovascular stroke restorative therapy: a case study.

    PubMed

    Detweiler, Mark B; Warf, Carlena

    2005-01-01

    An increasing amount of literature suggests the positive effects of nature in healthcare. The extended life expectancy in the US and the consequent need for long-term care indicates a future need for restorative therapy innovations to reduce the expense associated with long-term care. Moving carefully selected stroke patients' sessions to the peaceful setting of a dementia wander garden, with its designed paths and natural stimuli, may be beneficial. Natural settings have been shown to improve attention and reduce stress--both important therapy objectives in many post-stroke rehabilitation programs. In this case study, using the dementia wander garden for restorative therapy of a non-dementia patient was a novel idea for the restorative therapy group, which does not have a horticultural therapy program. The dementia wander garden stage of the post-stroke rehabilitation helped the patient through a period of treatment resistance. The garden provided both an introduction to the patient's goal of outdoor rehabilitation and a less threatening environment than the long-term care facility hallways. In part because the patient was less self-conscious about manifesting his post-stroke neurological deficits, falling, and being viewed as handicapped when in the dementia wander garden setting, he was able to resume his treatment plan and finish his restorative therapy. In many physical and mental rehabilitation plans, finding a treatment modality that will motivate an individual to participate is a principal goal. Use of a dementia wander garden may help some patients achieve this goal in post-stroke restorative therapy.

  3. Gesture Therapy: A Vision-Based System for Arm Rehabilitation after Stroke

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sucar, L. Enrique; Azcárate, Gildardo; Leder, Ron S.; Reinkensmeyer, David; Hernández, Jorge; Sanchez, Israel; Saucedo, Pedro

    Each year millions of people in the world survive a stroke, in the U.S. alone the figure is over 600,000 people per year. Movement impairments after stroke are typically treated with intensive, hands-on physical and occupational therapy for several weeks after the initial injury. However, due to economic pressures, stroke patients are receiving less therapy and going home sooner, so the potential benefit of the therapy is not completely realized. Thus, it is important to develop rehabilitation technology that allows individuals who had suffered a stroke to practice intensive movement training without the expense of an always-present therapist. Current solutions are too expensive, as they require a robotic system for rehabilitation. We have developed a low-cost, computer vision system that allows individuals with stroke to practice arm movement exercises at home or at the clinic, with periodic interactions with a therapist. The system integrates a web based virtual environment for facilitating repetitive movement training, with state-of-the art computer vision algorithms that track the hand of a patient and obtain its 3-D coordinates, using two inexpensive cameras and a conventional personal computer. An initial prototype of the system has been evaluated in a pilot clinical study with promising results.

  4. Review of technology development and clinical trials of transcranial laser therapy for acute ischemic stroke treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catanzaro, Brian E.; Streeter, Jackson; de Taboada, Luis

    2010-02-01

    Stroke is the one of the leading causes of mortality in the United States, claiming 600,000 lives each year. Evidence suggests that near infrared (NIR) illumination has a beneficial effect on a variety of cells when these cells are exposed to adverse conditions. Among these conditions is the hypoxic state produced by acute ischemic stroke (AIS). To demonstrate the impact NIR Transcranial Laser Therapy (TLT) has on AIS in humans, a series of double blind, placebo controlled clinical trials were designed using the NeuroThera(R) System (NTS). The NTS was designed and developed to treat subjects non-invasively using 808 nm NIR illumination. TLT, as it applies to stroke therapy, and the NTS will be described. The results of the two clinical trials: NeuroThera(R) Safety and Efficacy Trial 1 (NEST-1) and NeuroThera(R) Safety and Efficacy Trial 2 (NEST-2) will be reviewed and discussed.

  5. The impact evaluation of physical therapy on the quality of life of cerebrovascular stroke patients.

    PubMed

    Paula Caleffi Segura, Ana; Veloso Fontes, Sissy; Maiumi Fukujima, Marcia; de Andrade Matas, Sandro Luiz

    2006-09-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the impact of physical therapy on the quality of life of patients presenting with a motor deficit caused by ischemic stroke at the median cerebral artery. Physical therapeutic intervention consisted of three sessions per week of conventional kinesiotherapy; 50 min each, for three consecutive months. The sample comprised 18 patients aged between 18 and 72 years old, evaluated according to the Stroke Impact Scale. There was a significant difference for the following domains: strength (P < 0.001), daily life activities (P < 0.001), mobility (P = 0.001), manual function (P = 0.004) and social participation (P=0.001). We were able to conclude that physical therapy, performed for up to three 50-min weekly sessions for 3 consecutive months, resulted in the reduction of motor deficits and functional improvement, consequently promoting favorable effects on the quality of life of patients presenting with motor deficit due to ischemic stroke.

  6. Optimal timing of speech and language therapy for aphasia after stroke: more evidence needed.

    PubMed

    Nouwens, Femke; Visch-Brink, Evy G; Van de Sandt-Koenderman, Mieke M E; Dippel, Diederik W J; Koudstaal, Peter J; de Lau, Lonneke M L

    2015-01-01

    Aphasia due to stroke affects communication and quality of life. Most stroke survivors with aphasia receive speech and language therapy. Although an early start of treatment is advocated in clinical practice, evidence for "The earlier, the better" in aphasia rehabilitation is weak. Hence, clinicians are faced with the dilemma of when to initiate intensive treatment: as early as possible, when most of the spontaneous recovery occurs but when patients are often ill, or later, when the patients' condition is more stabilized. Here we discuss whether aphasia outcome is affected by timing of treatment in relation to stroke onset and whether there is evidence for an optimal window of time during which language therapy should be provided. Findings from various rehabilitation research fields are discussed and combined to provide principles for future research.

  7. Early and intermediate prognosis of intravenous thrombolytic therapy in acute ischemic stroke subtypes according to the causative classification of stroke system

    PubMed Central

    Pashapour, Ali; Atalu, Abolfazl; Farhoudi, Mehdi; Taheraghdam, Ali-Akbar; Sadeghi Hokmabadi, Elyar; Sharifipour, Ehsan; NajafiNeshli, Mehdi

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: Intravenous thrombolytic therapy has established acceptable results in treating ischemic stroke. However, there is little information on treatment outcome especially in different subtypes. The aim of current study was to evaluate early and intermediate prognosis in intravenous thrombolytic therapy for acute ischemic stroke subtypes. Methodology: Forty eligible patients (57.5% male with mean age of 63.18±13.49 years) with definite ischemic stroke who were admitted to emergency department of Imam Reza University Hospital, in the first 180 minutes after occurrence received recombinant tissue plasminogen activator. All investigation findings were recorded and stroke subtypes were determined according to the Causative Classification of Stroke System. Stroke severity forms including modified Rankin Scale (mRS) and National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) scores were recorded for all patients in first, seven and 90 days after stroke and disease outcome was evaluated. Results: The etiology of stroke was large artery atherosclerosis in 20%, cardio-aortic embolism in 45%, small artery occlusion in 17.5% and undetermined causes in 17.5%. NIHSS and mRS scores were significantly improved during time (P < 0.001 in both cases). Three months mortality rate was 25%. Among the etiologies, patients with small artery occlusion and then cardio-aortic embolism had lower NIHSS score at arrival (P = 0.04). Caplan-meier analysis showed that age, sex and symptom to needle time could predict disease outcome. Conclusion: Intravenous thrombolytic therapy is accompanied by good early and intermediate outcome in most patients with ischemic stroke. Small artery occlusion subtype had less disease severity and higher improvement. PMID:24353536

  8. Endovascular therapy for acute ischaemic stroke: the Pragmatic Ischaemic Stroke Thrombectomy Evaluation (PISTE) randomised, controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Muir, Keith W; Ford, Gary A; Messow, Claudia-Martina; Ford, Ian; Murray, Alicia; Clifton, Andrew; Brown, Martin M; Madigan, Jeremy; Lenthall, Rob; Robertson, Fergus; Dixit, Anand; Cloud, Geoffrey C; Wardlaw, Joanna; Freeman, Janet; White, Philip

    2017-01-01

    Objective The Pragmatic Ischaemic Thrombectomy Evaluation (PISTE) trial was a multicentre, randomised, controlled clinical trial comparing intravenous thrombolysis (IVT) alone with IVT and adjunctive intra-arterial mechanical thrombectomy (MT) in patients who had acute ischaemic stroke with large artery occlusive anterior circulation stroke confirmed on CT angiography (CTA). Design Eligible patients had IVT started within 4.5 hours of stroke symptom onset. Those randomised to additional MT underwent thrombectomy using any Conformité Européene (CE)-marked device, with target interval times for IVT start to arterial puncture of <90 min. The primary outcome was the proportion of patients achieving independence defined by a modified Rankin Scale (mRS) score of 0–2 at day 90. Results Ten UK centres enrolled 65 patients between April 2013 and April 2015. Median National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score was 16 (IQR 13–21). Median stroke onset to IVT start was 120 min. In the intention-to-treat analysis, there was no significant difference in disability-free survival at day 90 with MT (absolute difference 11%, adjusted OR 2.12, 95% CI 0.65 to 6.94, p=0.20). Secondary analyses showed significantly greater likelihood of full neurological recovery (mRS 0–1) at day 90 (OR 7.6, 95% CI 1.6 to 37.2, p=0.010). In the per-protocol population (n=58), the primary and most secondary clinical outcomes significantly favoured MT (absolute difference in mRS 0–2 of 22% and adjusted OR 4.9, 95% CI 1.2 to 19.7, p=0.021). Conclusions The trial did not find a significant difference between treatment groups for the primary end point. However, the effect size was consistent with published data and across primary and secondary end points. Proceeding as fast as possible to MT after CTA confirmation of large artery occlusion on a background of intravenous alteplase is safe, improves excellent clinical outcomes and, in the per-protocol population, improves disability

  9. Dysphagia Therapy in Stroke: A Survey of Speech and Language Ttherapists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Archer, S. K.; Wellwood, I.; Smith, C. H.; Newham, D. J.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Dysphagia is common after stroke, leading to adverse outcome. There is a paucity of high-quality evidence for dysphagia therapy, thus making it difficult to determine the best approaches to treatment. Clinical decisions are often based on usual practice, however no formal method of monitoring practice patterns exists. Aims: To…

  10. Antiplatelet therapy for secondary prevention of noncardioembolic ischemic stroke: a critical review.

    PubMed

    O'Donnell, Martin J; Hankey, Graeme J; Eikelboom, John W

    2008-05-01

    For patients with ischemic stroke or transient ischemic attack caused by atherothromboembolism, immediate and long-term aspirin reduces the relative risk of recurrent stroke, MI, and death attributable to vascular causes. Oral anticoagulation is not more effective than aspirin. Long-term clopidogrel reduces the relative risk of stroke, MI, or vascular death by about 9% (0.3% to 16.5%) compared with aspirin. Any long-term benefits of clopidogrel combined with aspirin, compared with aspirin or clopidogrel alone, appear to be offset by increased major bleeding. The combination of aspirin and extended-release dipyridamole reduces the relative odds of stroke, MI, or vascular death by about 18% (odds ratio 0.82, 0.74 to 0.91) compared with aspirin alone without causing more bleeding. Cilostazole reduces the risk of stroke, MI, or vascular death by 39% compared to placebo. A large clinical trial comparing clopidogrel with the combination of aspirin and dipyridamole, in >20 000 patients with recent (<120 days) atherothrombotic ischemic stroke, is expected to report in 2008. Emerging antiplatelet therapies presently being evaluated for secondary prevention of atherothromboembolism include other P(2)Y(12) ADP receptor antagonists (prasugrel, cangrelor, AZD 6140), thromboxane receptor antagonists (eg, S18886 - terutroban), and thrombin receptor (PAR-1) antagonists (eg, SCH530348).

  11. Effects of Art Therapy Using Color on Purpose in Life in Patients with Stroke and Their Caregivers

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Mi Kyoung

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Patients with stroke suffer from physical disabilities, followed by mental instability. Their caregivers also suffer from mental instability. The present study attempted to address the degree and the change of the level of Purpose in Life (PIL) in patients with stroke and caregivers by applying art therapy using colors. Materials and Methods Twenty-eight stroke patients with a good functional recovery or a moderate disability and their 28 caregivers were selected and evaluated. The period of the study between the stroke and color therapy was more than 6 months. Patients and caregivers were divided into the color therapy (28) and control groups (28). A questionnaire, which measures the level of PIL was conducted separately for patients and caregivers prior to the first session of color therapy (2 hours per week, total 16 sessions). The final examination was performed 5 months after the last color therapy session. Results There was significant difference between before and after color therapy when the level of PIL was measured both in patients and caregivers (p<0.01). These were the same between the color therapy group, compared with the control group (p<0.01). As color therapy progressed to the late phase, patients and caregivers applied increasing number of colors and color intensity. Conclusion These results prove that color therapy will improve PIL of the patients with post-stroke disability and caregivers. Furthermore, color therapy would be a useful adjuvant for improving the quality of life of the patients with stroke and their caregivers. PMID:23225793

  12. Goal-directed therapy in intraoperative fluid and hemodynamic management

    PubMed Central

    Gutierrez, Maria Cristina; Moore, Peter G.; Liu, Hong

    2013-01-01

    Intraoperative fluid management is pivotal to the outcome and success of surgery, especially in high-risk procedures. Empirical formula and invasive static monitoring have been traditionally used to guide intraoperative fluid management and assess volume status. With the awareness of the potential complications of invasive procedures and the poor reliability of these methods as indicators of volume status, we present a case scenario of a patient who underwent major abdominal surgery as an example to discuss how the use of minimally invasive dynamic monitoring may guide intraoperative fluid therapy. PMID:24086168

  13. A variables associated with occupational and physical therapy stroke rehabilitation utilization and outcomes.

    PubMed

    Cook, Chad; Stickley, Lois; Ramey, Kevin; Knotts, Valerie J

    2005-01-01

    Many studies have reported the benefits of a comprehensive stroke team including occupational therapy/physical therapy (OT/PT) services; however, factors associated with access to these services are less known. This study used a subsample of the Health and Retirement Study database, a cross-sectional survey of more than 11,126 Americans aged 65 to 106 years within the contiguous United States. The purposes of this study were to determine the associational factors that contribute to attending OT/PT and determine if attending OT/PT leads to a reduced report of stroke-related problems. The findings indicated that fewer than 10% of stroke survivors in a noninstitutionalized, community-based setting were currently accessing OT/PT. Additionally, access to OT/PT services was highly associated with report of having an attending physician, report of stroke-related weakness, higher monthly income, and older age. The increased odds of reported continued problems associated with a past stroke were associated with failure to access OT/PT services, lower monthly income, Hispanic culture, and age. OT/PT services were typically provided to patients who reported a higher level of physical dysfunction. Despite the greater degree of severity, OT/PT intervention led to reports of lower levels of disability and problems over time.

  14. Movement therapy induced neural reorganization and motor recovery in stroke: a review.

    PubMed

    Arya, Kamal Narayan; Pandian, Shanta; Verma, Rajesh; Garg, R K

    2011-10-01

    This paper is a review conducted to provide an overview of accumulated evidence on contemporary rehabilitation methods for stroke survivors. Loss of functional movement is a common consequence of stroke for which a wide range of interventions has been developed. Traditional therapeutic approaches have shown limited results for motor deficits as well as lack evidence for their effectiveness. Stroke rehabilitation is now based on the evidence of neuroplasticity, which is responsible for recovery following stroke. The neuroplastic changes in the structure and function of relevant brain areas are induced primarily by specific rehabilitation methods. The therapeutic method which induces neuroplastic changes, leads to greater motor and functional recovery than traditional methods. Further, the recovery is permanent in nature. During the last decade various novel stroke rehabilitative methods for motor recovery have been developed. This review focuses on the methods that have evidence of associated cortical level reorganization, namely task-specific training, constraint-induced movement therapy, robotic training, mental imaging, and virtual training. All of these methods utilize principles of motor learning. The findings from this review demonstrated convincing evidence both at the neural and functional level in response to such therapies. The main aim of the review was to determine the evidence for these methods and their application into clinical practice.

  15. Intracranial pressure pulse waveform correlates with aqueductal cerebrospinal fluid stroke volume.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Robert; Baldwin, Kevin; Fuller, Jennifer; Vespa, Paul; Hu, Xiao; Bergsneider, Marvin

    2012-11-01

    This study identifies a novel relationship between cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) stroke volume through the cerebral aqueduct and the characteristic peaks of the intracranial pulse (ICP) waveform. ICP waveform analysis has become much more advanced in recent years; however, clinical practice remains restricted to mean ICP, mainly due to the lack of physiological understanding of the ICP waveform. Therefore, the present study set out to shed some light on the physiological meaning of ICP morphological metrics derived by the morphological clustering and analysis of continuous intracranial pulse (MOCAIP) algorithm by investigating their relationships with a well defined physiological variable, i.e., the stroke volume of CSF through the cerebral aqueduct. Seven patients received both overnight ICP monitoring along with a phase-contrast MRI (PC-MRI) of the cerebral aqueduct to quantify aqueductal stroke volume (ASV). Waveform morphological analysis of the ICP signal was performed by the MOCAIP algorithm. Following extraction of morphological metrics from the ICP signal, nine temporal ICP metrics and two amplitude-based metrics were compared with the ASV via Spearman's rank correlation. Of the nine temporal metrics correlated with the ASV, only the width of the P2 region (ICP-Wi2) reached significance. Furthermore, both ICP pulse pressure amplitude and mean ICP did not reach significance. In this study, we showed the width of the second peak (ICP-Wi2) of an ICP pulse wave is positively related to the volume of CSF movement through the cerebral aqueduct. This finding is an initial step in bridging the gap between ICP waveform morphology research and clinical practice.

  16. Fluid Therapy: Double-Edged Sword during Critical Care?

    PubMed Central

    Benes, Jan; Kirov, Mikhail; Kuzkov, Vsevolod; Lainscak, Mitja; Molnar, Zsolt; Voga, Gorazd; Monnet, Xavier

    2015-01-01

    Fluid therapy is still the mainstay of acute care in patients with shock or cardiovascular compromise. However, our understanding of the critically ill pathophysiology has evolved significantly in recent years. The revelation of the glycocalyx layer and subsequent research has redefined the basics of fluids behavior in the circulation. Using less invasive hemodynamic monitoring tools enables us to assess the cardiovascular function in a dynamic perspective. This allows pinpointing even distinct changes induced by treatment, by postural changes, or by interorgan interactions in real time and enables individualized patient management. Regarding fluids as drugs of any other kind led to the need for precise indication, way of administration, and also assessment of side effects. We possess now the evidence that patient centered outcomes may be altered when incorrect time, dose, or type of fluids are administered. In this review, three major features of fluid therapy are discussed: the prediction of fluid responsiveness, potential harms induced by overzealous fluid administration, and finally the problem of protocol-led treatments and their timing. PMID:26798642

  17. Translating G-CSF as an adjunct therapy to stem cell transplantation for stroke

    PubMed Central

    dela Peña, Ike; Borlongan, Cesar V.

    2015-01-01

    Among recently investigated stroke therapies, stem cell treatment holds great promise by virtue of their putative ability to replace lost cells, promote endogenous neurogenesis and produce behavioral and functional improvement through their “bystander effects.” Translating stem cell in the clinic, however, presents a number of technical difficulties. A strategy suggested to enhance therapeutic utility of stem cells is combination therapy, i.e., cotransplantation of stem cells or adjunct treatment with pharmacological agents and substrates, which is assumed to produce more profound therapeutic benefits by circumventing limitations of individual treatments, and facilitating complementary brain repair processes. We previously demonstrated enhanced functional effects of co-treatment with granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) and human umbilical cord blood cell (hUCB) transplantation in animal models of traumatic brain injury (TBI). Here, we suggest that the aforementioned combination therapy may also produce synergistic effects in stroke. Accordingly, G-CSF treatment may reduce expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines and enhance neurogenesis rendering a receptive microenvironment for hUCB engraftment. Adjunct treatment of G-CSF with hUCB may facilitate stemness maintenance and guide neural lineage commitment of hUCB cells. Moreover, regenerative mechanisms afforded by G-CSF-mobilized endogenous stem cells, secretion of growth factors by hUCB grafts and G-CSF-recruited endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) , as well as the potential graft–host integration that may promote synaptic circuitry re-establishment could altogether produce more pronounced functional improvement in stroked rats subjected to a combination G-CSF treatment and hUCB transplantation. Nevertheless, differences in pathology and repair processes underlying TBI and stroke deserve consideration when testing effects of combinatorial G-CSF and hUCB cell transplantation for stroke treatment

  18. Interleukin-6 is increased in plasma and cerebrospinal fluid of community-dwelling domestic dogs with acute ischaemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Gredal, Hanne; Thomsen, Barbara B.; Boza-Serrano, Antonio; Garosi, Laurent; Rusbridge, Clare; Anthony, Daniel; Møller, Arne; Finsen, Bente; Deierborg, Tomas; Lambertsen, Kate L.

    2017-01-01

    Inflammatory cytokines are potential modulators of infarct progression in acute ischaemic stroke, and are therefore possible targets for future treatment strategies. Cytokine studies in animal models of surgically induced stroke may, however, be influenced by the fact that the surgical intervention itself contributes towards the cytokine response. Community-dwelling domestic dogs suffer from spontaneous ischaemic stroke, and therefore, offer the opportunity to study the cytokine response in a noninvasive set-up. The aims of this study were to investigate cytokine concentrations in plasma and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in dogs with acute ischaemic stroke and to search for correlations between infarct volume and cytokine concentrations. Blood and CSF were collected from dogs less than 72 h after a spontaneous ischaemic stroke. Infarct volumes were estimated on MRIs. Interleukin (IL)-2, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10 and tumour necrosis factor in the plasma, CSF and brain homogenates were measured using a canine-specific multiplex immunoassay. IL-6 was significantly increased in plasma (P=0.04) and CSF (P=0.04) in stroke dogs compared with healthy controls. The concentrations of other cytokines, such as tumour necrosis factor and IL-2, were unchanged. Plasma IL-8 levels correlated significantly with infarct volume (Spearman’s r=0.8, P=0.013). The findings showed increased concentrations of IL-6 in the plasma and CSF of dogs with acute ischaemic stroke comparable to humans. We believe that dogs with spontaneous stroke offer a unique, noninvasive means of studying the inflammatory processes that accompany stroke while reducing confounds that are unavoidable in experimental models. PMID:28079628

  19. Interleukin-6 is increased in plasma and cerebrospinal fluid of community-dwelling domestic dogs with acute ischaemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Gredal, Hanne; Thomsen, Barbara B; Boza-Serrano, Antonio; Garosi, Laurent; Rusbridge, Clare; Anthony, Daniel; Møller, Arne; Finsen, Bente; Deierborg, Tomas; Lambertsen, Kate L; Berendt, Mette

    2017-02-08

    Inflammatory cytokines are potential modulators of infarct progression in acute ischaemic stroke, and are therefore possible targets for future treatment strategies. Cytokine studies in animal models of surgically induced stroke may, however, be influenced by the fact that the surgical intervention itself contributes towards the cytokine response. Community-dwelling domestic dogs suffer from spontaneous ischaemic stroke, and therefore, offer the opportunity to study the cytokine response in a noninvasive set-up. The aims of this study were to investigate cytokine concentrations in plasma and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in dogs with acute ischaemic stroke and to search for correlations between infarct volume and cytokine concentrations. Blood and CSF were collected from dogs less than 72 h after a spontaneous ischaemic stroke. Infarct volumes were estimated on MRIs. Interleukin (IL)-2, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10 and tumour necrosis factor in the plasma, CSF and brain homogenates were measured using a canine-specific multiplex immunoassay. IL-6 was significantly increased in plasma (P=0.04) and CSF (P=0.04) in stroke dogs compared with healthy controls. The concentrations of other cytokines, such as tumour necrosis factor and IL-2, were unchanged. Plasma IL-8 levels correlated significantly with infarct volume (Spearman's r=0.8, P=0.013). The findings showed increased concentrations of IL-6 in the plasma and CSF of dogs with acute ischaemic stroke comparable to humans. We believe that dogs with spontaneous stroke offer a unique, noninvasive means of studying the inflammatory processes that accompany stroke while reducing confounds that are unavoidable in experimental models.

  20. [Pathophysiological mechanisms of hemorrhagic stroke and the ways of differential therapy].

    PubMed

    Gusev, E I; Stonik, V A; Martynov, M Iu; Guseva, M R; Shchukin, I A; Diuĭzen, I V; Koplik, E V; Mishchenko, N P; Agafonova, I G; Kolesnikova, T I; Fedoreev, S A

    2007-01-01

    The changes developing in the perifocal area of hematoma and perspectives of antioxidant and chelate therapy were studied on the model of experimental hemorrhagic stroke and in clinical conditions. Microcirculatory, ischemic and inflammation disturbances with a certain time sequence were found in the perifocal areas. These changes, along with hypostasis and oxidative stress, form the pathobiochemical cascade of changes in hemorrhagic stroke and are potential therapeutic targets. Administering of an antioxidant and chelate drug histochrome reduces the intensity of changes in the perifocal area in the experimental conditions. In clinical conditions, it accelerates the dynamics of brain and meningeal symptoms regression and improves the blood rheological properties.

  1. Use of virtual reality to promote hand therapy post-stroke

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsoupikova, Daria; Stoykov, Nikolay; Vick, Randy; Li, Yu; Kamper, Derek; Listenberger, Molly

    2013-03-01

    A novel artistic virtual reality (VR) environment was developed and tested for use as a rehabilitation protocol for post-stroke hand rehabilitation therapy. The system was developed by an interdisciplinary team of engineers, art therapists, occupational therapists, and VR artists to improve patients' motivation and engagement. Specific exercises were developed to explicitly promote the practice of therapeutic tasks requiring hand and arm coordination for upper extremity rehabilitation. Here we describe system design, development, and user testing for efficiency, subject's satisfaction and clinical feasibility. We report results of the completed qualitative, pre-clinical pilot study of the system effectiveness for therapy. Fourteen stroke survivors with chronic hemiparesis participated in a single training session within the environment to gauge user response to the protocol through a custom survey. Results indicate that users found the system comfortable, enjoyable, tiring; instructions clear, and reported a high level of satisfaction with the VR environment and rehabilitation task variety and difficulty. Most patients reported very positive impressions of the VR environment and rated it highly, appreciating its engagement and motivation. We are currently conducting a longitudinal intervention study over 6 weeks in stroke survivors with chronic hemiparesis. Initial results following use of the system on the first subjects demonstrate that the system is operational and can facilitate therapy for post stroke patients with upper extremity impairment.

  2. The Rise of Cell Therapy Trials for Stroke: Review of Published and Registered Studies

    PubMed Central

    Pimentel-Coelho, Pedro Moreno; Barbosa da Fonseca, Lea Mirian; de Freitas, Gabriel Rodriguez; Mendez-Otero, Rosalia

    2013-01-01

    Stroke is the second leading cause of death and the third leading cause of disability worldwide. Approximately 16 million first-ever strokes occur each year, leading to nearly 6 million deaths. Nevertheless, currently, very few therapeutic options are available. Cell therapies have been applied successfully in different hematological diseases, and are currently being investigated for treating ischemic heart disease, with promising results. Recent preclinical studies have indicated that cell therapies may provide structural and functional benefits after stroke. However, the effects of these treatments are not yet fully understood and are the subject of continuing investigation. Meanwhile, different clinical trials for stroke, the majority of them small, nonrandomized, and uncontrolled, have been reported, and their results indicate that cell therapy seems safe and feasible in these conditions. In the last 2 years, the number of published and registered trials has dramatically increased. Here, we review the main findings available in the field, with emphasis on the clinical results. Moreover, we address some of the questions that have been raised to date, to improve future studies. PMID:23509917

  3. Transdermal hormone therapy and the risk of stroke and venous thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Speroff, L

    2010-10-01

    Recent case-control and cohort studies have indicated that the transdermal administration of postmenopausal estrogen therapy is not associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular complications, specifically stroke and venous thrombosis. These studies have prompted the clinical promotion of transdermal treatment as 'safer'. There are reasons, however, to be cautious regarding postmenopausal transdermal hormone therapy, especially in regard to stroke. Previous reports linking postmenopausal estrogen therapy and the risk of stroke have not yielded consistent results, finding it difficult to adjust for all confounding factors, including compliance with treatment. Age of the population studies may be a critical issue. Notably, the risk of stroke with oral estrogen was not increased in the Women's Health Initiative when women with prior cardiovascular disease or those older than 60 years were excluded. There does appear to be a dose-response relationship with stroke, similar to that observed with estrogen-progestin contraceptives, and this may be a problem when studying standard doses of transdermal treatment, in that many women receiving transdermal estrogen display lower estrogen blood levels when compared with oral treatment. Clinicians should administer low doses of estrogen to women with risk factors for stroke, and the transdermal route of administration is indicated for women at high risk for venous thrombosis and for older postmenopausal women, especially for women with stroke risk factors. In a recent study, Renoux and colleagues from McGill University in Montreal performed a nested case-control study deriving the data from a cohort of women in the UK General Practice Research Database (GPRD). Current use of oral and transdermal hormone therapy, based on recorded prescriptions, was compared to no use in 15 710 cases and 59 958 controls. The adjusted rate ratio (RR) for stroke for current use of transdermal estrogens, with or without a progestin, was not

  4. [Neuroimmunocorrection therapy for the prophylaxis of infectious complications in acute stroke patients].

    PubMed

    Kul'chikov, A E; Makarenko, A N

    2008-01-01

    Neuroimmunocorrection therapy with cerebrolysin has been used for the prophylaxis of clinical pneumonia development in the early stage of acute stroke in a group of 140 patients with heavy clinical course of acute ischemic stroke (AIS). All patients in the test and control groups received the basal anti-AIS therapy and antibacterial drugs (IV-generation cephalosporins) in case of pneumonia development. The efficacy of cerebrolysin administration was evaluated both on the clinical scale (NIH-NINDS, CPIS, SIRS immonograms) and using laboratory indices. It is established that the proposed neuroimmunocorrection therapy with cerebrolysin decreases the frequency of the clinical pneumonia development. A relationship between the pneumonia onset rate and the focus localization in limbico-diencephalic part of the brain is established. The use of cerebrolysin decreases lethality, normalizes the impaired immunity indices, accelerates the restoration of violated neural functions, suppresses pneumonia development, restores the level of albumin, and normalizes the laboratory indices of inflammatory syndrome.

  5. Trophic factors and cell therapy to stimulate brain repair after ischaemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Gutiérrez-Fernández, María; Fuentes, Blanca; Rodríguez-Frutos, Berta; Ramos-Cejudo, Jaime; Vallejo-Cremades, María Teresa; Díez-Tejedor, Exuperio

    2012-01-01

    Brain repair involves a compendium of natural mechanisms that are activated following stroke. From a therapeutic viewpoint, reparative therapies that encourage cerebral plasticity are needed. In the last years, it has been demonstrated that modulatory treatments for brain repair such as trophic factor- and stem cell-based therapies can promote neurogenesis, gliogenesis, oligodendrogenesis, synaptogenesis and angiogenesis, all of which having a beneficial impact on infarct volume, cell death and, finally, and most importantly, on the functional recovery. However, even when promising results have been obtained in a wide range of experimental animal models and conditions these preliminary results have not yet demonstrated their clinical efficacy. Here, we focus on brain repair modulatory treatments for ischaemic stroke, that use trophic factors, drugs with trophic effects and stem cell therapy. Important and still unanswered questions for translational research ranging from experimental animal models to recent and ongoing clinical trials are reviewed here. PMID:22452968

  6. Multimedia-Based Therapy Model for Non-Pharmacological Stroke with Decrease Impaired Muscle Strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hajar Puji Sejati, Rr; Muhimmah, Izzati; Mahtarami, Affan

    2016-01-01

    Stroke patients who experience a decrease in muscle strength need to do exercises so that they can increase their muscle strength. In order to enable the patient does exercise independently the multimedia-based stroke therapy model is needed. These exercises can be done independently, with supervision of the family member at home. So, we develop prototype of the multimedia-based therapy for the family member so that they can assist patients performing exercises without attending therapy session in hospital. This model was built according to the advices from physiotherapist and a medical rehabilitation doctor. This model has been evaluated through focused group discussion by physiotherapists. And they gave positive responses to this proposed model.

  7. The effects of action observation training and mirror therapy on gait and balance in stroke patients

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ho Jeong; Kim, Young Mi; Lee, Dong Kyu

    2017-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of action observation training and mirror therapy to improve on balance and gait function of stroke patients. [Subjects and Methods] The participants were randomly allocated to one of three groups: The action observation training with activity group practiced additional action observation training with activity for three 30-minute session for six weeks (n=12). The mirror therapy with activity group practiced additional mirror therapy with activity for three 30-minute sessions for six weeks (n=11). The only action observation training group practiced additional action observation training for three 30-minute sessions for weeks (n=12). All groups received conventional therapy for five 60-minute sessions over a six-week period. [Results] There were significant improvements in balance and gait function. The action observation training with activity group significantly improved subjects’ static balance. The action observation training with activity group and the mirror therapy with activity group significantly improved subjects’ gait ability. [Conclusion] The activation of mirror neurons combined with a conventional stroke physiotherapy program enhances lower-extremity motor recovery and motor functioning in stroke patients. PMID:28356646

  8. Active music therapy approach for stroke patients in the post-acute rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Raglio, Alfredo; Zaliani, Alberto; Baiardi, Paola; Bossi, Daniela; Sguazzin, Cinzia; Capodaglio, Edda; Imbriani, Chiara; Gontero, Giulia; Imbriani, Marcello

    2017-01-30

    Guidelines in stroke rehabilitation recommend the use of a multidisciplinary approach. Different approaches and techniques with music are used in the stroke rehabilitation to improve motor and cognitive functions but also psychological outcomes. In this randomized controlled pilot trial, relational active music therapy approaches were tested in the post-acute phase of disease. Thirty-eight hospitalized patients with ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke were recruited and allocated in two groups. The experimental group underwent the standard of care (physiotherapy and occupational therapy daily sessions) and relational active music therapy treatments. The control group underwent the standard of care only. Motor functions and psychological aspects were assessed before and after treatments. Music therapy process was also evaluated using a specific rating scale. All groups showed a positive trend in quality of life, functional and disability levels, and gross mobility. The experimental group showed a decrease of anxiety and, in particular, of depression (p = 0.016). In addition, the strength of non-dominant hand (grip) significantly increased in the experimental group (p = 0.041). Music therapy assessment showed a significant improvement over time of non-verbal and sonorous-music relationships. Future studies, including a greater number of patients and follow-up evaluations, are needed to confirm promising results of this study.

  9. Dietary Supplementations as Neuroprotective Therapies: Focus on NT-020 Diet Benefits in a Rat Model of Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Kaneko, Yuji; Cortes, Lourdes; Sanberg, Cyndy; Acosta, Sandra; Bickford, Paula C.; Borlongan, Cesar V.

    2012-01-01

    Stroke remains the number one cause of disability in the adult population. Despite scientific progress in our understanding of stroke pathology, only one treatment (tissue plasminogen activator or tPA) is able to afford benefits but to less than 3% of ischemic stroke patients. The development of experimental dietary supplement therapeutics designed to stimulate endogenous mechanisms that confer neuroprotection is likely to open new avenues for exploring stroke therapies. The present review article evaluates the recent literature supporting the benefits of dietary supplementation for the therapy of ischemic stroke. This article focuses on discussing the medical benefits of NT-020 as an adjunct agent for stroke therapy. Based on our preliminary data, a pre-stroke treatment with dietary supplementation promotes neuroprotection by decreasing inflammation and enhancing neurogenesis. However, we recognize that a pre-stroke treatment holds weak clinical relevance. Thus, the main goal of this article is to provide information about recent data that support the assumption of natural compounds as neuroprotective and to evaluate the therapeutic effects of a dietary supplement called NT-020 as in a stroke model. We focus on a systematic assessment of practical treatment parameters so that NT-020 and other dietary supplementations can be developed as an adjunct agent for the prevention or treatment of chronic diseases. We offer rationale for determining the optimal dosage, therapeutic window, and mechanism of action of NT-020 as a dietary supplement to produce neuroprotection when administered immediately after stroke onset. We highlight our long-standing principle in championing both translational and basic science approaches in an effort to fully reveal the therapeutic potential of NT-020 as dietary supplementation in the treatment of stroke. We envision dietary supplementation as an adjunct therapy for stroke at acute, subacute, and even chronic periods. PMID:22837703

  10. Gesture therapy: a vision-based system for upper extremity stroke rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Sucar, L; Luis, Roger; Leder, Ron; Hernandez, Jorge; Sanchez, Israel

    2010-01-01

    Stroke is the main cause of motor and cognitive disabilities requiring therapy in the world. Therefor it is important to develop rehabilitation technology that allows individuals who had suffered a stroke to practice intensive movement training without the expense of an always-present therapist. We have developed a low-cost vision-based system that allows stroke survivors to practice arm movement exercises at home or at the clinic, with periodic interactions with a therapist. The system integrates a virtual environment for facilitating repetitive movement training, with computer vision algorithms that track the hand of a patient, using an inexpensive camera and a personal computer. This system, called Gesture Therapy, includes a gripper with a pressure sensor to include hand and finger rehabilitation; and it tracks the head of the patient to detect and avoid trunk compensation. It has been evaluated in a controlled clinical trial at the National Institute for Neurology and Neurosurgery in Mexico City, comparing it with conventional occupational therapy. In this paper we describe the latest version of the Gesture Therapy System and summarize the results of the clinical trail.

  11. Cell based therapies for ischemic stroke: From basic science to bedside

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xinfeng; Ye, Ruidong; Yan, Tao; Yu, Shan Ping; Wei, Ling; Xu, Gelin; Fan, Xinying; Jiang, Yongjun; Stetler, R. Anne; Liu, George; Chen, Jieli

    2014-01-01

    Cell therapy is emerging as a viable therapy to restore neurological function after stroke. Many types of stem/progenitor cells from different sources have been explored for their feasibility and efficacy for the treatment of stroke. Transplanted cells not only have the potential to replace the lost circuitry, but also produce growth and trophic factors, or stimulate the release of such factors from host brain cells, thereby enhancing endogenous brain repair processes. Although stem/progenitor cells have shown a promising role in ischemic stroke in experimental studies as well as initial clinical pilot studies, cellular therapy is still at an early stage in humans. Many critical issues need to be addressed including the therapeutic time window, cell type selection, delivery route, and in vivo monitoring of their migration pattern. This review attempts to provide a comprehensive synopsis of preclinical evidence and clinical experience of various donor cell types, their restorative mechanisms, delivery routes, imaging strategies, future prospects and challenges for translating cell therapies as a neurorestorative regimen in clinical applications. PMID:24333397

  12. [Medical treatment of acute hemorrhagic stroke--observation of 44 cases with FCMCK therapy].

    PubMed

    Wang, J

    1990-02-01

    Based on the analysis of heritable autoregulatory functions and adaptive developments which occur long course of in response to inner and outer environment, FCMCK therapy was first designed to mobilize the autoregulatory system and resist the stress of acute hemorrhagic cerebral stroke. In this paper, 44 cases of acute hemorrhagic cerebral stroke were treated with FCMCK therapy, with another 44 cases treated with mannitol as control. The result showed that the mortality rate of the treated group was 4.5% (2/44), significantly lower than that of the control (47.7%, 21/44, P less than 0.01). FCMCK therapy in acute hemorrhagic cerebral stroke has the following advantages: 1) effectiveness in maintenance of adequate blood pressure; 2) effectiveness in reduction of cardiac arrhythmias and other complications; 3) i.v. drip of Ca and repeated use of digitalis shows atoxic effect; and 4) respiratory failure improves without stopping i.v. drip of Mg. The mechanism of FCMCK therapy is briefly discussed by the authors.

  13. Sonification of Arm Movements in Stroke Rehabilitation – A Novel Approach in Neurologic Music Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Scholz, Daniel S.; Rohde, Sönke; Nikmaram, Nikou; Brückner, Hans-Peter; Großbach, Michael; Rollnik, Jens D.; Altenmüller, Eckart O.

    2016-01-01

    Gross motor impairments are common after stroke, but efficient and motivating therapies for these impairments are scarce. We present an innovative musical sonification therapy, especially designed to retrain patients’ gross motor functions. Sonification should motivate patients and provide additional sensory input informing about relative limb position. Twenty-five stroke patients were included in a clinical pre–post study and took part in the sonification training. The patients’ upper extremity functions, their psychological states, and their arm movement smoothness were assessed pre and post training. Patients were randomly assigned to either of two groups. Both groups received an average of 10 days (M = 9.88; SD = 2.03; 30 min/day) of musical sonification therapy [music group (MG)] or a sham sonification movement training [control group (CG)], respectively. The only difference between the two protocols was that in the CG no sound was played back during training. In the beginning, patients explored the acoustic effects of their arm movements in space. At the end of the training, the patients played simple melodies by coordinated arm movements. The 15 patients in the MG showed significantly reduced joint pain (F = 19.96, p < 0.001) in the Fugl–Meyer assessment after training. They also reported a trend to have improved hand function in the stroke impact scale as compared to the CG. Movement smoothness at day 1, day 5, and the last day of the intervention was compared in MG patients and found to be significantly better after the therapy. Taken together, musical sonification may be a promising therapy for motor impairments after stroke, but further research is required since estimated effect sizes point to moderate treatment outcomes. PMID:27445970

  14. Drip, Ship, and On-Demand Endovascular Therapy for Acute Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Park, Man-Seok; Yoon, Woong; Kim, Joon-Tae; Choi, Kang-Ho; Kang, Seung-Ho; Kim, B. Chae; Lee, Seung-Han; Choi, Seong-Min; Kim, Myeong-Kyu; Lee, Ji-Sung; Lee, Eun-Bin; Cho, Ki-Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Background The “drip and ship” approach can facilitate an early initiation of intravenous thrombolysis (IVT) for acute ischemic stroke (AIS) at community hospitals. New endovascular treatment modalities, such as stent retrieval, have further improved the rate of safe and successful recanalization. We assessed the clinical outcomes of on-demand endovascular therapy in patients with AIS who were transported to a comprehensive stroke center under the “drip and ship” paradigm. Methods This retrospective study evaluated prospectively registered patients with acute large vessel occlusions in the anterior circulation who underwent endovascular recanalization after IVT at our regional comprehensive stroke center between January 2011 and April 2014. Clinical outcomes and neuroradiological findings were compared between patients who received IVT at the center (direct visit, DV) and at a community hospital (drip and ship, DS). Results Baseline characteristics such as age, initial National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) score, and risk factors for stroke were similar, and most patients underwent endovascular therapy with a Solitaire stent (81.9% vs. 89.3% for DV and DS, respectively, P = 0.55). The average initial NIHSS score was 12.15±4.1 (12.06 vs. 12.39 for DV and DS, respectively, P = 0.719). The proportions of long-term favorable outcomes (modified Rankin Scale score ≤2 at 90 days) and successful recanalization (Thrombolysis in Cerebral Ischemia score ≥2b) were not significantly different (P = 0.828 and 0.158, respectively). The mortality rates and occurrences of symptomatic intracerebral hemorrhage were not significantly different (P = 0.999 and 0.267, respectively). Conclusions The “drip and ship” approach with subsequent endovascular therapy is a feasible treatment concept for patients with acute large vessel occlusion in the anterior circulation that could help improve clinical outcomes in patients with AIS. PMID:26938774

  15. The Dark Side of the Force – Constraints and Complications of Cell Therapies for Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Boltze, Johannes; Arnold, Antje; Walczak, Piotr; Jolkkonen, Jukka; Cui, Lili; Wagner, Daniel-Christoph

    2015-01-01

    Cell therapies are increasingly recognized as a promising option to augment the limited therapeutic arsenal available to fight ischemic stroke. During the last two decades, cumulating preclinical evidence has indicated a substantial efficacy for most cell treatment paradigms and first clinical trials are currently underway to assess safety and feasibility in patients. However, the strong and still unmet demand for novel stroke treatment options and exciting findings reported from experimental studies may have drawn our attention away from potential side effects related to cell therapies and the ways by which they are commonly applied. This review summarizes common and less frequent adverse events that have been discovered in preclinical and clinical investigations assessing cell therapies for stroke. Such adverse events range from immunological and neoplastic complications over seizures to cell clotting and cell-induced embolism. It also describes potential complications of clinically applicable administration procedures, detrimental interactions between therapeutic cells, and the pathophysiological environment that they are placed into, as well as problems related to cell manufacturing. Virtually each therapeutic intervention comes at a certain risk for complications. Side effects do therefore not generally compromise the value of cell treatments for stroke, but underestimating such complications might severely limit therapeutic safety and efficacy of cell treatment protocols currently under development. On the other hand, a better understanding will provide opportunities to further improve existing therapeutic strategies and might help to define those circumstances, under which an optimal effect can be realized. Hence, the review eventually discusses strategies and recommendations allowing us to prevent or at least balance potential complications in order to ensure the maximum therapeutic benefit at minimum risk for stroke patients. PMID:26257702

  16. Impact of Stroke Therapy Academic Industry Roundtable (STAIR) Guidelines on Peri-Anesthesia Care for Rat Models of Stroke: A Meta-Analysis Comparing the Years 2005 and 2015

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Aurelie; Detilleux, Johann; Flecknell, Paul

    2017-01-01

    Numerous studies using rats in stroke models have failed to translate into successful clinical trials in humans. The Stroke Therapy Academic Industry Roundtable (STAIR) has produced guidelines on the rodent stroke model for preclinical trials in order to promote the successful translation of animal to human studies. These guidelines also underline the importance of anaesthetic and monitoring techniques. The aim of this literature review is to document whether anaesthesia protocols (i.e., choice of agents, mode of ventilation, physiological support and monitoring) have been amended since the publication of the STAIR guidelines in 2009. A number of articles describing the use of a stroke model in adult rats from the years 2005 and 2015 were randomly selected from the PubMed database and analysed for the following parameters: country where the study was performed, strain of rats used, technique of stroke induction, anaesthetic agent for induction and maintenance, mode of intubation and ventilation, monitoring techniques, control of body temperature, vascular accesses, and administration of intravenous fluids and analgesics. For each parameter (stroke, induction, maintenance, monitoring), exact chi-square tests were used to determine whether or not proportions were significantly different across year and p values were corrected for multiple comparisons. An exact p-test was used for each parameter to compare the frequency distribution of each value followed by a Bonferroni test. The level of significant set at < 0.05. Results show that there were very few differences in the anaesthetic and monitoring techniques used between 2005 and 2015. In 2015, significantly more studies were performed in China and significantly fewer studies used isoflurane and nitrous oxide. The most striking finding is that the vast majority of all the studies from both 2005 and 2015 did not report the use of ventilation; measurement of blood gases, end-tidal carbon dioxide concentration, or blood

  17. Unusual case of recurrent SMART (stroke-like migraine attacks after radiation therapy) syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ramanathan, Ramnath Santosh; Sreedher, Gayathri; Malhotra, Konark; Guduru, Zain; Agarwal, Deeksha; Flaherty, Mary; Leichliter, Timothy; Rana, Sandeep

    2016-01-01

    Stroke-like migraine attacks after radiation therapy (SMART) syndrome is a rare delayed complication of cerebral radiation therapy. A 53-year-old female initially presented with headache, confusion and left homonymous hemianopia. Her medical history was notable for cerebellar hemangioblastoma, which was treated with radiation in 1987. Her initial brain MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) revealed cortical enhancement in the right temporo-parieto-occipital region. She improved spontaneously in 2 weeks and follow-up scan at 4 weeks revealed no residual enhancement or encephalomalacia. She presented 6 weeks later with aphasia. Her MRI brain revealed similar contrast-enhancing cortical lesion but on the left side. Repeat CSF studies was again negative other than elevated protein. She was treated conservatively and recovered completely within a week. Before diagnosing SMART syndrome, it is important to rule out tumor recurrence, encephalitis, posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) and stroke. Typically the condition is self-limiting, and gradually resolves.

  18. Pacemaker lead malpositioning led to subsequent ischemic strokes despite antiplatelet and anticoagulation therapy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Pacemaker lead malpositioning may lead to severe clinical adverse events. Rarely, cases of inadvertent placement of a lead into the left ventricle are reported in the literature. We herein report a case of pacemaker lead malpositioning into the left ventricle via a persistent foramen ovale in a male caucasian patient. After this procedural adverse event, the patient suffered from two ischemic strokes despite antiplatelet and anticoagulation therapy. PMID:24650169

  19. A comparison between reported therapy staffing levels and the department of health therapy staffing guidelines for stroke rehabilitation: a national survey

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background This study compared reported staffing levels for stroke care within UK in-patient stroke units to stroke strategy staffing guidelines published by the UK Department of Health and the Royal College of Physicians. The purpose was to explore the extent to which stroke teams are meeting recommended staffing levels. Method The data analyzed in this report consisted of the detailed therapist staffing levels reported in the demographic section of our national survey to determine upper limb treatment in stroke units (the ATRAS survey). A contact list of stroke practitioners was therefore compiled primarily in collaboration with the 28 National Stroke Improvement Networks. Geographic representation of the network areas was obtained by applying the straight-forward systematic sampling method and the Nth name selection technique to each Network list. In total 192 surveys were emailed to stroke care providers around England. This included multiple contacts within stroke teams (e.g. a stroke consultant and a stroke co-coordinator) to increase awareness of the survey. Results A total of 53 surveys were returned from stroke teams and represented 20 of the 28 network areas providing 71% national coverage. To compare reported staffing levels to suggested DoH guidelines, analysis was conducted on 19 of the 37 inpatient hospital care units that had no missing data for staff numbers, unit bed numbers, number of stroke patients treated per annum, average unit length-of-stay, and average unit occupancy rates. Only 42% of units analyzed reached the DoH guideline for physiotherapy and fewer than 16% of the units reached the guideline for speech & language therapy. By contrast, 84% of units surveyed reached the staffing guideline for occupational therapy. However, a post-hoc analysis highlights this as an irregularity in the DoH guidelines, revealing that all therapies are challenged to provide the recommended therapy time. Conclusions Most in-patient stroke units are operating

  20. The Fluid Mechanics of Cancer and Its Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koumoutsakos, Petros; Pivkin, Igor; Milde, Florian

    2013-01-01

    Fluid mechanics is involved in the growth, progression, metastasis, and therapy of cancer. Blood vessels transport oxygen and nutrients to cancerous tissues, provide a route for metastasizing cancer cells to distant organs, and deliver drugs to tumors. The irregular and leaky tumor vasculature is responsible for increased interstitial pressure in the tumor microenvironment, whereas multiscale flow-structure interaction processes control tumor growth, metastasis, and nanoparticle-mediated drug delivery. We outline these flow-mediated processes, along with related experimental and computational methods for the diagnosis, predictive modeling, and therapy of cancer.

  1. Intravenous Fluid Therapy in Traumatic Brain Injury and Decompressive Craniectomy

    PubMed Central

    Alvis-Miranda, Hernando Raphael; Castellar-Leones, Sandra Milena; Moscote-Salazar, Luis Rafael

    2014-01-01

    The patient with head trauma is a challenge for the emergency physician and for the neurosurgeon. Currently traumatic brain injury constitutes a public health problem. Knowledge of the various supportive therapeutic strategies in the pre-hospital and pre-operative stages is essential for optimal care. The immediate rapid infusion of large volumes of crystalloids to restore blood volume and blood pressure is now the standard treatment of patients with combined traumatic brain injury (TBI) and hemorrhagic shock (HS). The fluid in patients with brain trauma and especially in patients with brain injur y is a critical issue. In this context we present a review of the literature about the history, physiology of current fluid preparations, and a discussion regarding the use of fluid therapy in traumatic brain injury and decompressive craniectomy. PMID:27162857

  2. Effect of mirror therapy on upper extremity motor function in stroke patients: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Gurbuz, Nigar; Afsar, Sevgi Ikbali; Ayaş, Sehri; Cosar, Sacide Nur Saracgil

    2016-09-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of mirror therapy combined with a conventional rehabilitation program on upper extremity motor and functional recovery in stroke patients. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty-one hemiplegic patients were included. The patients were randomly assigned to a mirror (n=16) or conventional group (n=15). The patients in both groups underwent conventional therapy for 4 weeks (60-120 minutes/day, 5 days/week). The mirror group received mirror therapy, consisting of periodic flexion and extension movements of the wrist and fingers on the non-paralyzed side. The patients in the conventional group performed the same exercises against the non-reflecting face of the mirror. The patients were evaluated at the beginning and end of the treatment by a blinded assessor using the Brunnstrom stage, Fugl-Meyer Assessment (FMA) upper extremity score, and the Functional Independence Measure (FIM) self-care score. [Results] There was an improvement in Brunnstrom stage and the FIM self-care score in both groups, but the post-treatment FMA score was significantly higher in the mirror therapy group than in the conventional treatment group. [Conclusion] Mirror therapy in addition to a conventional rehabilitation program was found to provide additional benefit in motor recovery of the upper extremity in stroke patients.

  3. Effect of mirror therapy on upper extremity motor function in stroke patients: a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Gurbuz, Nigar; Afsar, Sevgi Ikbali; Ayaş, Sehri; Cosar, Sacide Nur Saracgil

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of mirror therapy combined with a conventional rehabilitation program on upper extremity motor and functional recovery in stroke patients. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty-one hemiplegic patients were included. The patients were randomly assigned to a mirror (n=16) or conventional group (n=15). The patients in both groups underwent conventional therapy for 4 weeks (60–120 minutes/day, 5 days/week). The mirror group received mirror therapy, consisting of periodic flexion and extension movements of the wrist and fingers on the non-paralyzed side. The patients in the conventional group performed the same exercises against the non-reflecting face of the mirror. The patients were evaluated at the beginning and end of the treatment by a blinded assessor using the Brunnstrom stage, Fugl-Meyer Assessment (FMA) upper extremity score, and the Functional Independence Measure (FIM) self-care score. [Results] There was an improvement in Brunnstrom stage and the FIM self-care score in both groups, but the post-treatment FMA score was significantly higher in the mirror therapy group than in the conventional treatment group. [Conclusion] Mirror therapy in addition to a conventional rehabilitation program was found to provide additional benefit in motor recovery of the upper extremity in stroke patients. PMID:27799679

  4. Grasps Recognition and Evaluation of Stroke Patients for Supporting Rehabilitation Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Sale, Patrizio; Nijenhuis, Sharon; Prange, Gerdienke; Amirabdollahian, Farshid

    2014-01-01

    Stroke survivors often suffer impairments on their wrist and hand. Robot-mediated rehabilitation techniques have been proposed as a way to enhance conventional therapy, based on intensive repeated movements. Amongst the set of activities of daily living, grasping is one of the most recurrent. Our aim is to incorporate the detection of grasps in the machine-mediated rehabilitation framework so that they can be incorporated into interactive therapeutic games. In this study, we developed and tested a method based on support vector machines for recognizing various grasp postures wearing a passive exoskeleton for hand and wrist rehabilitation after stroke. The experiment was conducted with ten healthy subjects and eight stroke patients performing the grasping gestures. The method was tested in terms of accuracy and robustness with respect to intersubjects' variability and differences between different grasps. Our results show reliable recognition while also indicating that the recognition accuracy can be used to assess the patients' ability to consistently repeat the gestures. Additionally, a grasp quality measure was proposed to measure the capabilities of the stroke patients to perform grasp postures in a similar way than healthy people. These two measures can be potentially used as complementary measures to other upper limb motion tests. PMID:25258709

  5. [Hemodilution therapy with neuron metabolism specific therapy in ischemic stroke--encouraging results of a comparative study].

    PubMed

    Koppi, S; Barolin, G S

    1996-01-01

    Treating ischemic stroke we could compare a (control-)group of 318 patients under up to date hemodilution therapy to a group of 100 patients receiving exactly the same treating scheme but including an add-on administering of Cerebrolysin. It proved a statistically validated better outcome within the Cerebrolysin add-on treated group evaluated by the Barolin-Neuro-Rehabilitation Scale. 1) More effect on social and occupational parameters than on motor functions, but also including some of those. 2) Cerebrolysin accelerates recovery and therewith offers better starting points for rehabilitation. As stroke is one of the main social-medical neuro-rehabilitation and gerontological problems of our days these results should be recognized in a general therapeutical use.

  6. Bone marrow mononuclear cell therapy in ischaemic stroke: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Kumar, A; Prasad, M; Jali, V P; Pandit, A K; Misra, S; Kumar, P; Chakravarty, K; Kathuria, P; Gulati, A

    2017-05-01

    Bone marrow mononuclear cell (BM-MNC) therapy has emerged as a potential therapy for the treatment of stroke. We performed a systematic review of published studies using BM-MNC therapy in patients with ischaemic stroke (IS). Literature was searched using MEDLINE, PubMed, EMBASE, Trip Database, Cochrane library and clinicaltrial.gov to identify studies on BM-MNC therapy in IS till June, 2016. Data were extracted independently by two reviewers. STATA version 13 was used for carrying out meta-analysis. We included non-randomized open-label, single-arm and non-randomized comparative studies or randomized controlled trials (RCTs) if BM-MNCs were used to treat patients with IS in any phase after the index stroke. One randomized trial, two non-randomized comparative trials and four single-arm open-label trials (total seven studies) involving 227 subjects (137 patients and 90 controls) were included in the systematic review and meta-analysis. The pooled proportion for favourable clinical outcome (modified Rankin Scale score ≤2) in six studies involving 122 subjects was 29% (95% CI 0.16-0.43) who were exposed to BM-MNCs and pooled proportion for favourable clinical outcome of 69 subjects (taken from two trials) who did not receive BM-MNCs was 20% (95% CI 0.12-0.32). The pooled difference in the safety outcomes was not significant between both the groups. Our systematic review suggests that BM-MNC therapy is safe up to 1 year post-intervention and is feasible; however, its efficacy in the case of IS patients is debatable. Well-designed randomized controlled trials are required to provide more information on the efficacy of BM-MNC transplantation in patients with IS.

  7. Fluid therapy for septic shock resuscitation: which fluid should be used?

    PubMed Central

    Corrêa, Thiago Domingos; Rocha, Leonardo Lima; Pessoa, Camila Menezes Souza; Silva, Eliézer; de Assuncao, Murillo Santucci Cesar

    2015-01-01

    Early resuscitation of septic shock patients reduces the sepsis-related morbidity and mortality. The main goals of septic shock resuscitation include volemic expansion, maintenance of adequate tissue perfusion and oxygen delivery, guided by central venous pressure, mean arterial pressure, mixed or central venous oxygen saturation and arterial lactate levels. An aggressive fluid resuscitation, possibly in association with vasopressors, inotropes and red blood cell concentrate transfusion may be necessary to achieve those hemodynamic goals. Nonetheless, even though fluid administration is one of the most common interventions offered to critically ill patients, the most appropriate type of fluid to be used remains controversial. According to recently published clinical trials, crystalloid solutions seem to be the most appropriate type of fluids for initial resuscitation of septic shock patients. Balanced crystalloids have theoretical advantages over the classic solutions, but there is not enough evidence to indicate it as first-line treatment. Additionally, when large amounts of fluids are necessary to restore the hemodynamic stability, albumin solutions may be a safe and effective alternative. Hydroxyethyl starches solutions must be avoided in septic patients due to the increased risk of acute renal failure, increased need for renal replacement therapy and increased mortality. Our objective was to present a narrative review of the literature regarding the major types of fluids and their main drawbacks in the initial resuscitation of the septic shock patients. PMID:26313437

  8. Virtual Reality Reflection Therapy Improves Balance and Gait in Patients with Chronic Stroke: Randomized Controlled Trials.

    PubMed

    In, Taesung; Lee, Kyeongjin; Song, Changho

    2016-10-28

    BACKGROUND Virtual reality reflection therapy (VRRT) is a technically enhanced version of the mirror therapy concept. The aim of this study was to investigate whether VRRT could improve the postural balance and gait ability of patients with chronic stroke. MATERIAL AND METHODS Twenty-five patients with chronic stroke were randomly allocated into the VRRT group (n=13) and the control group (n=12). The participants in both groups performed a conventional rehabilitation program for 30 minutes. The VRRT group also performed a VRRT program for 30 minutes, five times a week for 4 weeks. The control group performed conventional rehabilitation program and a placebo VRRT program. Outcome measures included Berg Balance Scale (BBS), the Functional Reaching Test (FRT), and the Timed Up and Go (TUG) test (for dynamic balance ability), postural sway (for static balance ability), and 10 meter walking velocity (10 mWV) for gait ability. RESULTS There were statistically significant improvements in the VRRT group compared with the control group for BBS, FRT, TUG, postural sway (mediolateral sway distance with eyes open and eyes closed, anteroposterior and total sway distance with eyes open but not with eyes closed), and 10 mWV (p<0.05). CONCLUSIONS Applying VRRT (even as a home treatment) along with a conventional rehabilitation program for patients with chronic stroke might be even more beneficial than conventional rehabilitation program alone in improving affected lower limb function. Future studies should investigate the effectiveness of VRRT with optimal patient selection, and duration and intensity of training.

  9. Virtual Reality Reflection Therapy Improves Balance and Gait in Patients with Chronic Stroke: Randomized Controlled Trials

    PubMed Central

    In, Taesung; Lee, Kyeongjin; Song, Changho

    2016-01-01

    Background Virtual reality reflection therapy (VRRT) is a technically enhanced version of the mirror therapy concept. The aim of this study was to investigate whether VRRT could improve the postural balance and gait ability of patients with chronic stroke. Material/Methods Twenty-five patients with chronic stroke were randomly allocated into the VRRT group (n=13) and the control group (n=12). The participants in both groups performed a conventional rehabilitation program for 30 minutes. The VRRT group also performed a VRRT program for 30 minutes, five times a week for 4 weeks. The control group performed conventional rehabilitation program and a placebo VRRT program. Outcome measures included Berg Balance Scale (BBS), the Functional Reaching Test (FRT), and the Timed Up and Go (TUG) test (for dynamic balance ability), postural sway (for static balance ability), and 10 meter walking velocity (10 mWV) for gait ability. Results There were statistically significant improvements in the VRRT group compared with the control group for BBS, FRT, TUG, postural sway (mediolateral sway distance with eyes open and eyes closed, anteroposterior and total sway distance with eyes open but not with eyes closed), and 10 mWV (p<0.05). Conclusions Applying VRRT (even as a home treatment) along with a conventional rehabilitation program for patients with chronic stroke might be even more beneficial than conventional rehabilitation program alone in improving affected lower limb function. Future studies should investigate the effectiveness of VRRT with optimal patient selection, and duration and intensity of training. PMID:27791207

  10. Exploring Erythropoietin and G-CSF Combination Therapy in Chronic Stroke Patients

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Yoon-Kyum; Cho, Sung-Rae

    2016-01-01

    Erythropoietin (EPO) and granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) are known to have neuroprotective actions. Based on previous reports showing the synergistic effects of EPO+G-CSF combination therapy in experimental models, we investigated the safety of EPO+G-CSF combination therapy in patients with chronic stroke. In a pilot study, 3 patients were treated with EPO and G-CSF for 5 consecutive days, with follow-up on day 30. In an exploratory double-blind study, 6 patients were allocated to treatment with either EPO+G-CSF or placebo. Treatment was applied once a day for 5 days per month over 3 months. Participants were followed up for 6 months. To substantiate safety, vital signs, adverse events, and hematological values were measured on days 0, 5, and 30 in each cycle and on day 180. Functional outcomes were determined on day 0 and 180. In the laboratory measurements, EPO+G-CSF combination therapy significantly elevated erythropoietin, CD34+ hematopoietic stem cells, white blood cells, and neutrophils on day 5 of each cycle. There were no observations of serious adverse events. In the functional outcomes, the grip power of the dominant hand was increased in the EPO+G-CSF treatment group. In conclusion, this exploratory study suggests a novel strategy of EPO+G-CSF combination therapy for stroke patients. PMID:27043535

  11. Prevention of post-stroke generalized anxiety disorder, using escitalopram or problem-solving therapy.

    PubMed

    Mikami, Katsunaka; Jorge, Ricardo E; Moser, David J; Arndt, Stephan; Jang, Mijin; Solodkin, Ana; Small, Steven L; Fonzetti, Pasquale; Hegel, Mark T; Robinson, Robert G

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the efficacy of antidepressant treatment for preventing the onset of generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) among patients with recent stroke. Of 799 patients assessed, 176 were randomized, and 149 patients without evidence of GAD at the initial visit were included in this double-blind treatment with escitalopram (N=47) or placebo (N=49) or non-blinded problem-solving therapy (PST; 12 total sessions; N=53). Participants given placebo over 12 months were 4.95 times more likely to develop GAD than patients given escitalopram and 4.00 times more likely to develop GAD than patients given PST. Although these results should be considered preliminary, the authors found that both escitalopram and PST were effective in preventing new onset of post-stroke GAD.

  12. The effects of very early mirror therapy on functional improvement of the upper extremity in acute stroke patients.

    PubMed

    Yeldan, Ipek; Huseyınsınoglu, Burcu Ersoz; Akıncı, Buket; Tarakcı, Ela; Baybas, Sevim; Ozdıncler, Arzu Razak

    2015-11-01

    [Purpose] The aim of the study was to evaluate the effects of a very early mirror therapy program on functional improvement of the upper extremity in acute stroke patients. [Subjects] Eight stroke patients who were treated in an acute neurology unit were included in the study. [Methods] The patients were assigned alternatively to either the mirror therapy group receiving mirror therapy and neurodevelopmental treatment or the neurodevelopmental treatment only group. The primary outcome measures were the upper extremity motor subscale of the Fugl-Meyer Assessment, Motricity Index upper extremity score, and the Stroke Upper Limb Capacity Scale. Somatosensory assessment with the Ayres Southern California Sensory Integration Test, and the Barthel Index were used as secondary outcome measures. [Results] No statistically significant improvements were found for any measures in either group after the treatment. In terms of minimally clinically important differences, there were improvements in Fugl-Meyer Assessment and Barthel Index in both mirror therapy and neurodevelopmental treatment groups. [Conclusion] The results of this pilot study revealed that very early mirror therapy has no additional effect on functional improvement of upper extremity function in acute stroke patients. Multicenter trials are needed to determine the results of early application of mirror therapy in stroke rehabilitation.

  13. The effects of very early mirror therapy on functional improvement of the upper extremity in acute stroke patients

    PubMed Central

    Yeldan, Ipek; Huseyınsınoglu, Burcu Ersoz; Akıncı, Buket; Tarakcı, Ela; Baybas, Sevim; Ozdıncler, Arzu Razak

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of the study was to evaluate the effects of a very early mirror therapy program on functional improvement of the upper extremity in acute stroke patients. [Subjects] Eight stroke patients who were treated in an acute neurology unit were included in the study. [Methods] The patients were assigned alternatively to either the mirror therapy group receiving mirror therapy and neurodevelopmental treatment or the neurodevelopmental treatment only group. The primary outcome measures were the upper extremity motor subscale of the Fugl-Meyer Assessment, Motricity Index upper extremity score, and the Stroke Upper Limb Capacity Scale. Somatosensory assessment with the Ayres Southern California Sensory Integration Test, and the Barthel Index were used as secondary outcome measures. [Results] No statistically significant improvements were found for any measures in either group after the treatment. In terms of minimally clinically important differences, there were improvements in Fugl-Meyer Assessment and Barthel Index in both mirror therapy and neurodevelopmental treatment groups. [Conclusion] The results of this pilot study revealed that very early mirror therapy has no additional effect on functional improvement of upper extremity function in acute stroke patients. Multicenter trials are needed to determine the results of early application of mirror therapy in stroke rehabilitation. PMID:26696729

  14. Music-supported motor training after stroke reveals no superiority of synchronization in group therapy

    PubMed Central

    Van Vugt, Floris T.; Ritter, Juliane; Rollnik, Jens D.; Altenmüller, Eckart

    2014-01-01

    Background: Music-supported therapy has been shown to be an effective tool for rehabilitation of motor deficits after stroke. A unique feature of music performance is that it is inherently social: music can be played together in synchrony. Aim: The present study explored the potential of synchronized music playing during therapy, asking whether synchronized playing could improve fine motor rehabilitation and mood. Method: Twenty-eight patients in neurological early rehabilitation after stroke with no substantial previous musical training were included. Patients learned to play simple finger exercises and familiar children's songs on the piano for 10 sessions of half an hour. Patients first received three individual therapy sessions and then continued in pairs. The patient pairs were divided into two groups. Patients in one group played synchronously (together group) whereas the patients in the other group played one after the other (in-turn group). To assess fine motor skill recovery the patients performed standard clinical tests such as the nine-hole-pegboard test (9HPT) and index finger-tapping speed and regularity, and metronome-paced finger tapping. Patients' mood was established using the Profile of Mood States (POMS). Results: Both groups showed improvements in fine motor control. In metronome-paced finger tapping, patients in both groups improved significantly. Mood tests revealed reductions in depression and fatigue in both groups. During therapy, patients in the in-turn group rated their partner as more sympathetic than the together-group in a visual-analog scale. Conclusions: Our results suggest that music-supported stroke rehabilitation can improve fine motor control and mood not only individually but also in patient pairs. Patients who were playing in turn rather than simultaneously tended to reveal greater improvement in fine motor skill. We speculate that patients in the former group may benefit from the opportunity to learn from observation. PMID

  15. [Effect of antioxidant therapy on neurotrophins and processes of rehabilitation after stroke].

    PubMed

    Karakulova, Yu V; Selyanina, N V; Zhelnin, A V; Filimonova, T A; Tsepilov, S V

    The aim of the research was to study the effect of the inclusion in the scheme cytoflavin patient care during the recovery period of ischemic stroke in the neuropsychological changes in the status and content of neurotrophins in serum. For this purpose we surveyed 52 patients who underwent a first ischemic stroke (29 women and 23 men) aged 52-74 years. Patients were divided into 2 groups: primary (25 patients) received in addition to basic therapy cytoflavin: intravenously at 20 ml per 400 ml of 5% glucose solution, 1 time a day for 10 days, then into 2 tablets 2 times a day for half an hour before food for a month, and the comparison group (27 patients) who received standard treatment. The control group consisted of 12 healthy people. In addition to standard clinical and laboratory tests were carried out a comprehensive neuropsychological study and evaluation of the data on the scale NIHSS, Bartell, Beck, Spielberger-Hanin, test «frontal dysfunction of the battery» and the Mini-Mental State Examination. Furthermore, determination carried neurotrophic factors: nerve growth factor (NGF) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor brain (BDNF). The study was conducted in the dynamics: before treatment and 2 months after treatment. Patients in the recovery period of the first ischemic stroke revealed moderate manifestations of neuropsychological disorders status and reduction of neurotrophic factors. Inclusion in cytoflavin scheme increased the efficiency of the treatment, which was manifested in a more pronounced when compared with the results of basic therapy, positive dynamics of neurological symptoms and improved cognitive function, accompanied by an increase in BDNF levels. The data on the efficacy and safety allow us to recommend its inclusion in the scheme of treatment of patients in the recovery period after the first carotid ischemic stroke.

  16. Renal Dysfunction and Thrombolytic Therapy in Patients With Acute Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Zilong; Yang, Chunsong; Liu, Ming; Wu, Bo

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Renal dysfunction is a prevalent comorbidity in acute ischemic stroke patients requiring thrombolytic therapy. However, the effect of renal dysfunction on the clinical outcome of this population remains controversial. This study aimed to evaluate the safety and effectiveness of thrombolytic therapy in acute stroke patients with renal dysfunction using a meta-analysis. We systematically searched PubMed and EMBASE for studies that evaluated the relationship between renal dysfunction and intravenous tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) in patients with acute ischemic stroke. Poor outcome (modified Rankin Scale ≥2), mortality, and symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage (ICH) and any ICH were analyzed. Fourteen studies were included (N = 53,553 patients). The mean age ranged from 66 to 75 years. The proportion of male participants was 49% to 74%. The proportion of renal dysfunction varied from 21.9% to 83% according to different definitions. Based on 9 studies with a total of 7796 patients, the meta-analysis did not identify a significant difference in the odds of poor outcome (odds ratio [OR] = 1.06; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.96–1.16; I2 = 44.5) between patients with renal dysfunction and those without renal dysfunction. Patients with renal dysfunction were more likely to die after intravenous thrombolysis (OR = 1.13; 95% CI: 1.05–1.21; I2 = 70.3). No association was observed between symptomatic ICH (OR = 1.02; 95% CI: 0.94–1.10; I2 = 0) and any ICH (OR = 1.07; 95% CI: 0.96–1.18; I2 = 25.8). Renal dysfunction does not increase the risk of poor outcome and ICH after stroke thrombolysis. Renal dysfunction should not be a contraindication for administration of intravenous thrombolysis to eligible patients. PMID:25526464

  17. Effects of a health promotion program on medication adherence to antiplatelet therapy among ischemic stroke patients in Hainan Province, China.

    PubMed

    Su, Qingjie; Li, Chaoyun; Long, Faqing; Chen, Bin; Wan, Zhongqin; Wu, Yingman; Dai, Mingming; Wang, Desheng; Zhang, Yuhui; Wang, Bufei

    2016-01-01

    Survivors of ischemic stroke are still at a significant risk for recurrence. Antiplatelet agents are the treatment of first choice for long-term secondary prevention of vascular events. This study aims to assess a health promotion program on medication adherence to antiplatelet therapy among ischemic stroke patients in Hainan province, China. In five hospitals from the intervention group, four highly experienced physicians trained 62 neurologists, who in turn trained 613 stroke patients to improve their awareness and adherence to antiplatelet therapy. Physicians and patients of the control group received usual stroke management programs. After one-year follow-up, the proportion of patients who took the antiplatelet therapy increased significantly in the intervention group, reaching 73.2%, with a pre-post difference between two arms of 22.9% ( P < 0.01). There was also a significant net increase in the proportion of patients with awareness of antiplatelet therapy (24.4%, P < 0.01). Multivariate analysis illustrated health promotion program, higher education, annual household income, insurance, and medical status affected antiplatelet drug use in stroke patients. In conclusion, the health promotion program, based on a train-the-trainer approach, showed positive effects on awareness of and adherence to antiplatelet therapy, which has the potential to be scaled up to other resource-limited areas.

  18. Antithrombotic therapy in acute ischaemic stroke: an overview of the completed randomised trials.

    PubMed Central

    Sandercock, P A; van den Belt, A G; Lindley, R I; Slattery, J

    1993-01-01

    A formal statistical overview of all truly randomised trials was undertaken to determine whether antithrombotic therapy is effective and safe in the early treatment of patients with acute stroke. There were 15 completed randomised controlled trials of the value of early antithrombotic treatment in patients with acute stroke. The regimes tested in acute presumed or confirmed ischaemic stroke were: heparin, 10 trials with 1047 patients: oral anticoagulants, one trial with 51 patients: antiplatelet therapy, three trials with 103 patients. Heparin was tested in one trial with 46 patients with acute haemorrhagic stroke. Outcome measures were deep venous thrombosis (confirmed by I125 scanning or venography), pulmonary embolism, death from all causes, haemorrhagic transformation of cerebral infarction, level of disability in survivors. In patients with acute ischaemic stroke, allocation to heparin was associated with a highly significant 81% (SD 8, 2p < 0.00001) reduction in deep venous thrombosis detected by I125 fibrinogen scanning or venogram. Only three trials systematically identified pulmonary emboli, which occurred in 6/106 (5.7%) allocated control vs 3/132 (2.3%) allocated heparin, a non-significant 58% reduction (SD 45.7, 2p > 0.1). There were relatively few deaths in the trials in patients with presumed ischaemic stroke: 94/485 (19.4%) among patients allocated to the control group vs 79/497 (15.9%) among patients who were allocated heparin. The observed 18% (SD 16) reduction in the odds of death was not statistically significant. The least biased estimated of the effect of treatment on haemorrhagic transformation of the cerebral infarct (HTI) comes from trials where all patients were scanned at the end of treatment, irrespective of clinical deterioration; using this analysis, haemorrhagic transformation occurred in 7/102 (6.9%) control vs 8/106 (7.5%) treated, a non-significant 12% increase (SD 56, 2p > 0.1). These data cannot exclude the possibility that

  19. Monitoring functional arm movement for home-based therapy after stroke.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, R; Reinkensmeyer, D; Shah, P; Liu, J; Rao, S; Smith, R; Cramer, S; Rahman, T; Bobrow, J

    2004-01-01

    The goal of this project is to develop a means for individuals with stroke to practice arm movement therapy at home with remote monitoring. We previously developed a Web-based system for repetitive movement training (Java Therapy). This paper describes a new input device for the system that measures and assists in naturalistic arm movement, as well as software enhancements. The new input device is an instrumented, adult-sized version of Wilmington robotic exoskeleton (WREX), which is a five degrees-of-freedom orthosis that counterbalances the weight of the arm using elastic bands. To test the ability of the new device (Training-WREX or "T-WREX") to measure and assist in functional arm movements, we measured five chronic stroke subjects' movement ability while wearing the orthosis without gravity balance compared to wearing the orthosis with gravity balance. T-WREX's gravity balance function improved a clinical measure of arm movement (Fugl-Meyer Score), range of motion of reaching movements, and accuracy of drawing movements. Coupled with an enhanced version of Java Therapy, T-WREX will thus provide a means to assist functional arm movement training at home, either over the Web in real-time, or stand-alone with periodic communication with a remote site.

  20. Does Antiplatelet Therapy during Bridging Thrombolysis Increase Rates of Intracerebral Hemorrhage in Stroke Patients?

    PubMed Central

    Mordasini, Pasquale; Slezak, Agnieszka; Liesirova, Kai; Meisterernst, Julia; Schroth, Gerhard; Arnold, Marcel; Jung, Simon; Mattle, Heinrich P.; Gralla, Jan; Fischer, Urs

    2017-01-01

    Background Symptomatic intracerebral hemorrhage (sICH) after bridging thrombolysis for acute ischemic stroke is a devastating complication. We aimed to assess whether the additional administration of aspirin during endovascular intervention increases bleeding rates. Methods We retrospectively compared bleeding complications and outcome in stroke patients who received bridging thrombolysis with (tPA+ASA) and without (tPA-ASA) aspirin during endovascular intervention between November 2008 and March 2014. Furthermore, we analyzed bleeding complications and outcome in antiplatelet naïve patients with those with prior or acute antiplatelet therapy. Results Baseline characteristics, previous medication, and dosage of rtPA did not differ between 50 tPA+ASA (39 aspirin naïve, 11 preloaded) and 181 tPA-ASA patients (p>0.05). tPA+ASA patients had more often internal carotid artery (ICA) occlusion (p<0.001), large artery disease (p<0.001) and received more often acute stenting of the ICA (p<0.001). 10/180 (5.6%) tPA-ASA patients and 3/49 (6.1%) tPA+ASA patients suffered a sICH (p = 1.0). Rates of asymptomatic intracerebral hemorrhage, systemic bleeding complications and outcome did not differ between both groups (p>0.1). There were no differences in bleeding complications and mortality among 112 bridging patients with antiplatelet therapy (62 preloaded, 39 acute administration, 11 both) and 117 antiplatelet naïve patients. In a logistic regression analysis, aspirin administration during endovascular procedure was not a predictor of sICH. Conclusion Antiplatelet therapy before or during bridging thrombolysis in patients with acute ischemic stroke did not increase the risk of bleeding complications and had no impact on outcome. This finding has to be confirmed in larger studies. PMID:28095449

  1. The efficacy of balance training with video game-based therapy in subacute stroke patients: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Morone, Giovanni; Tramontano, Marco; Iosa, Marco; Shofany, Jacob; Iemma, Antonella; Musicco, Massimo; Paolucci, Stefano; Caltagirone, Carlo

    2014-01-01

    The video game-based therapy emerged as a potential valid tool in improving balance in several neurological conditions with controversial results, whereas little information is available regarding the use of this therapy in subacute stroke patients. The aim of this study was to investigate the efficacy of balance training using video game-based intervention on functional balance and disability in individuals with hemiparesis due to stroke in subacute phase. Fifty adult stroke patients participated to the study: 25 subjects were randomly assigned to balance training with Wii Fit, and the other 25 subjects were assigned to usual balance therapy. Both groups were also treated with conventional physical therapy (40 min 2 times/day). The main outcome was functional balance (Berg Balance Scale-BBS), and secondary outcomes were disability (Barthel Index-BI), walking ability (Functional Ambulation Category), and walking speed (10-meters walking test). Wii Fit training was more effective than usual balance therapy in improving balance (BBS: 53 versus 48, P = 0.004) and independency in activity of daily living (BI: 98 versus 93, P = 0.021). A balance training performed with a Wii Fit as an add on to the conventional therapy was found to be more effective than conventional therapy alone in improving balance and reducing disability in patients with subacute stroke.

  2. Robotic therapy for chronic stroke: general recovery of impairment or improved task-specific skill?

    PubMed Central

    Goldsmith, Jeff; Harran, Michelle; Kane, Leslie; Berard, Jessica; Huang, Sylvia; Ryan, Sophia L.; Mazzoni, Pietro; Krakauer, John W.; Huang, Vincent S.

    2015-01-01

    There is a great need to develop new approaches for rehabilitation of the upper limb after stroke. Robotic therapy is a promising form of neurorehabilitation that can be delivered in higher doses than conventional therapy. Here we sought to determine whether the reported effects of robotic therapy, which have been based on clinical measures of impairment and function, are accompanied by improved motor control. Patients with chronic hemiparesis were trained for 3 wk, 3 days a week, with titrated assistive robotic therapy in two and three dimensions. Motor control improvements (i.e., skill) in both arms were assessed with a separate untrained visually guided reaching task. We devised a novel PCA-based analysis of arm trajectories that is sensitive to changes in the quality of entire movement trajectories without needing to prespecify particular kinematic features. Robotic therapy led to skill improvements in the contralesional arm. These changes were not accompanied by changes in clinical measures of impairment or function. There are two possible interpretations of these results. One is that robotic therapy only leads to small task-specific improvements in motor control via normal skill-learning mechanisms. The other is that kinematic assays are more sensitive than clinical measures to a small general improvement in motor control. PMID:26180120

  3. Robotic therapy for chronic stroke: general recovery of impairment or improved task-specific skill?

    PubMed

    Kitago, Tomoko; Goldsmith, Jeff; Harran, Michelle; Kane, Leslie; Berard, Jessica; Huang, Sylvia; Ryan, Sophia L; Mazzoni, Pietro; Krakauer, John W; Huang, Vincent S

    2015-09-01

    There is a great need to develop new approaches for rehabilitation of the upper limb after stroke. Robotic therapy is a promising form of neurorehabilitation that can be delivered in higher doses than conventional therapy. Here we sought to determine whether the reported effects of robotic therapy, which have been based on clinical measures of impairment and function, are accompanied by improved motor control. Patients with chronic hemiparesis were trained for 3 wk, 3 days a week, with titrated assistive robotic therapy in two and three dimensions. Motor control improvements (i.e., skill) in both arms were assessed with a separate untrained visually guided reaching task. We devised a novel PCA-based analysis of arm trajectories that is sensitive to changes in the quality of entire movement trajectories without needing to prespecify particular kinematic features. Robotic therapy led to skill improvements in the contralesional arm. These changes were not accompanied by changes in clinical measures of impairment or function. There are two possible interpretations of these results. One is that robotic therapy only leads to small task-specific improvements in motor control via normal skill-learning mechanisms. The other is that kinematic assays are more sensitive than clinical measures to a small general improvement in motor control.

  4. Low-level light emitting diode (LED) therapy suppresses inflammasome-mediated brain damage in experimental ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hae In; Lee, Sae-Won; Kim, Nam Gyun; Park, Kyoung-Jun; Choi, Byung Tae; Shin, Yong-Il; Shin, Hwa Kyoung

    2017-02-06

    Use of photostimulation including low-level light emitting diode (LED) therapy has broadened greatly in recent years because it is compact, portable, and easy to use. Here, the effects of photostimulation by LED (610 nm) therapy on ischemic brain damage was investigated in mice in which treatment started after a stroke in a clinically relevant setting. The mice underwent LED therapy (20 min) twice a day for 3 days, commencing at 4 hours post-ischemia. LED therapy group generated a significantly smaller infarct size and improvements in neurological function based on neurologic test score. LED therapy profoundly reduced neuroinflammatory responses including neutrophil infiltration and microglia activation in the ischemic cortex. LED therapy also decreased cell death and attenuated the NLRP3 inflammasome, in accordance with down-regulation of pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-1β and IL-18 in the ischemic brain. Moreover, the mice with post-ischemic LED therapy showed suppressed TLR-2 levels, MAPK signaling and NF-kB activation. These findings suggest that by suppressing the inflammasome, LED therapy can attenuate neuroinflammatory responses and tissue damage following ischemic stroke. Therapeutic interventions targeting the inflammasome via photostimulation with LED may be a novel approach to ameliorate brain injury following ischemic stroke. Effect of post-ischemic low-level light emitting diode therapy (LED-T) on infarct reduction was mediated by inflammasome suppression.

  5. [The effectiveness of physical therapy methods (Bobath and motor relearning program) in rehabilitation of stroke patients].

    PubMed

    Krutulyte, Grazina; Kimtys, Algimantas; Krisciūnas, Aleksandras

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine whether two different physiotherapy regimes caused any differences in outcome in the rehabilitation after stroke. We examined 240 patients with stroke. Examination was carried out at the Rehabilitation Center of Kaunas Second Clinical Hospital. Patients were divided into 2 groups: Bobath method was applied to the first (I) group (n=147), motor relearning program (MRP) method was applied to the second (II) group (n=93). In every group of patients we established samples according to sex, age, hospitalization to rehab unit as occurrence of CVA degree of disorder (hemiplegia, hemiparesis). The mobility of patients was evaluated according to European Federation for Research in Rehabilitation (EFRR) scale. Activities of daily living were evaluated by Barthel index. Analyzed groups were evaluated before physical therapy. When preliminary analysis was carried out it proved no statically reliable differences between analyzed groups (reliability 95%). The same statistical analysis was carried out after physical therapy. The results of differences between patient groups were compared using chi(2) method. Bobath method was applied working with the first group of patients. The aim of the method is to improve quality of the affected body side's movements in order to keep both sides working as harmoniously as possible. While applying this method at work, physical therapist guides patient's body on key-points, stimulating normal postural reactions, and training normal movement pattern. MRP method was used while working with the second group patients. This method is based on movement science, biomechanics and training of functional movement. Program is based on idea that movement pattern shouldn't be trained; it must be relearned. CONCLUSION. This study indicates that physiotherapy with task-oriented strategies represented by MRP, is preferable to physiotherapy with facilitation/inhibition strategies, such the Bobath programme, in the

  6. Multiparametric Magnetic Resonance Imaging for Prediction of Parenchymal Hemorrhage in Acute Ischemic Stroke After Reperfusion Therapy

    PubMed Central

    R. Knitter, James; Jahan, Reza; Gornbein, Jeffery; Ajani, Zahra; Feng, Lei; Meyer, Brett C.; Schwamm, Lee H.; Yoo, Albert J.; Marshall, Randolph S.; Meyers, Philip M.; Yavagal, Dileep R.; Wintermark, Max; Liebeskind, David S.; Guzy, Judy; Starkman, Sidney; Saver, Jeffrey L.; Kidwell, Chelsea S.

    2017-01-01

    Background and Purpose— Patients with acute ischemic stroke are at increased risk of developing parenchymal hemorrhage (PH), particularly in the setting of reperfusion therapies. We have developed a predictive model to examine the risk of PH using combined magnetic resonance perfusion and diffusion parameters, including cerebral blood volume (CBV), apparent diffusion coefficient, and microvascular permeability (K2). Methods— Voxel-based values of CBV, K2, and apparent diffusion coefficient from the ischemic core were obtained using pretreatment magnetic resonance imaging data from patients enrolled in the MR RESCUE clinical trial (Mechanical Retrieval and Recanalization of Stroke Clots Using Embolectomy). The associations between PH and extreme values of imaging parameters were assessed in univariate and multivariate analyses. Receiver-operating characteristic curve analysis was performed to determine the optimal parameter(s) and threshold for predicting PH. Results— In 83 patients included in this analysis, 20 developed PH. Univariate analysis showed significantly lower 10th percentile CBV and 10th percentile apparent diffusion coefficient values and significantly higher 90th percentile K2 values within the infarction core of patients with PH. Using classification tree analysis, the 10th percentile CBV at threshold of 0.47 and 90th percentile K2 at threshold of 0.28 resulted in overall predictive accuracy of 88.7%, sensitivity of 90.0%, and specificity of 87.3%, which was superior to any individual or combination of other classifiers. Conclusions— Our results suggest that combined 10th percentile CBV and 90th percentile K2 is an independent predictor of PH in patients with acute ischemic stroke with diagnostic accuracy superior to individual classifiers alone. This approach may allow risk stratification for patients undergoing reperfusion therapies. Clinical Trial Registration— URL: https://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT00389467. PMID

  7. SMART syndrome (stroke-like migraine attacks after radiation therapy) in adult and pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, Amy E; Gillan, Eileen; DiMario, Francis Joseph

    2014-03-01

    SMART syndrome (stroke-like migraine attacks after radiation therapy) is a rare condition that involves complex migraines with focal neurologic findings in patients following cranial irradiation for central nervous system malignancies. Little is known about the mechanisms behind the disorder, making successful treatment challenging. We report 2 new cases of SMART syndrome in pediatric patients as well as review all documented cases of the syndrome. Each of our 2 pediatric patients suffered multiple episodes. Attacks were characterized by severe headache, visual disturbance, aphasia, and weakness. Recovery occurred over several days to weeks. The data from all documented reports of SMART syndrome indicate a greater prevalence for male gender. An age-dependent pattern of onset was also observed, with a greater variability of syndrome onset in patients who received cranial irradiation at a younger age. SMART appears to be a reversible, recurrent long-term complication of radiation therapy with possible age- and gender-related influences.

  8. Recent Progress in Endothelial Progenitor Cell Culture Systems: Potential for Stroke Therapy

    PubMed Central

    TAKIZAWA, Shunya; NAGATA, Eiichiro; NAKAYAMA, Taira; MASUDA, Haruchika; ASAHARA, Takayuki

    2016-01-01

    Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) participate in endothelial repair and angiogenesis due to their abilities to differentiate into endothelial cells and to secrete protective cytokines and growth factors. Consequently, there is considerable interest in cell therapy with EPCs isolated from peripheral blood to treat various ischemic injuries. Quality and quantity-controlled culture systems to obtain mononuclear cells enriched in EPCs with well-defined angiogenic and anti-inflammatory phenotypes have recently been developed, and increasing evidence from animal models and clinical trials supports the idea that transplantation of EPCs contributes to the regenerative process in ischemic organs and is effective for the therapy of ischemic cerebral injury. Here, we briefly describe the general characteristics of EPCs, and we review recent developments in culture systems and applications of EPCs and EPC-enriched cell populations to treat ischemic stroke. PMID:27041632

  9. Effectiveness of an occupational therapy home programme in Spain for people affected by stroke.

    PubMed

    Ávila, Adriana; Durán, Montserrat; Peralbo, Manuel; Torres, Gabriel; Saavedra, Miguel; Viana, Inés M

    2015-03-01

    The main aim of this paper is to assess the effects of an occupational therapy home programme in Spain on 23 people who had had stroke (mean age 61.17 years). The programme was made up of a set of activities and techniques of physical, cognitive, social and functional nature aimed at preventing, maintaining and/or rehabilitating the abilities affected of people who had had stroke. A multiple-baseline intrasubject design and replication with a treatment withdrawal period to check whether the effects of the programme remained was applied. The results show a significant statistical improvement, concerning not only the participants' cognitive skills through Loewenstein Occupational Therapy Cognitive Assessment Battery - Second Edition but also their functional independence as assessed by the Barthel Index. Despite the low number of participants, being one of the limitations of our study, the results support the need to carry out research about the effectiveness of rehabilitation treatments in the home with the goal to plan how public healthcare systems should tackle them and how to improve those already being used.

  10. MRI Biomarkers for Hand-Motor Outcome Prediction and Therapy Monitoring following Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Horn, U.; Grothe, M.

    2016-01-01

    Several biomarkers have been identified which enable a considerable prediction of hand-motor outcome after cerebral damage already in the subacute stage after stroke. We here review the value of MRI biomarkers in the evaluation of corticospinal integrity and functional recruitment of motor resources. Many of the functional imaging parameters are not feasible early after stroke or for patients with high impairment and low compliance. Whereas functional connectivity parameters have demonstrated varying results on their predictive value for hand-motor outcome, corticospinal integrity evaluation using structural imaging showed robust and high predictive power for patients with different levels of impairment. Although this is indicative of an overall higher value of structural imaging for prediction, we suggest that this variation be explained by structure and function relationships. To gain more insight into the recovering brain, not only one biomarker is needed. We rather argue for a combination of different measures in an algorithm to classify fine-graded subgroups of patients. Approaches to determining biomarkers have to take into account the established markers to provide further information on certain subgroups. Assessing the best therapy approaches for individual patients will become more feasible as these subgroups become specified in more detail. This procedure will help to considerably save resources and optimize neurorehabilitative therapy. PMID:27747108

  11. The effects of mirror therapy with tasks on upper extremity function and self-care in stroke patients

    PubMed Central

    Park, Youngju; Chang, Moonyoung; Kim, Kyeong-Mi; An, Duk-Hyun

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of mirror therapy with tasks on upper extremity unction and self-care in stroke patients. [Subjects] Thirty participants were randomly assigned to either an experimental group (n=15) or a control group (n=15). [Methods] Subjects in the experimental group received mirror therapy with tasks, and those in the control group received a sham therapy; both therapies were administered, five times per week for six weeks. The main outcome measures were the Manual Function Test for the paralyzed upper limb and the Functional Independence Measure for self-care performance. [Results] The experimental group had more significant gains in change scores compared with the control group after the intervention. [Conclusion] We consider mirror therapy with tasks to be an effective form of intervention for upper extremity function and self-care in stroke patients. PMID:26157249

  12. Predicting value of cerebrospinal fluid proinflammatory factors in acute phase of ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Beridze, M; Shakarishvili, R

    2006-03-01

    Study purposed to establish the correlation between proinflammatory cytokines' initial CSF levels and neurological outcome on 7th day of acute ischemic stroke. 58 patients with acute ischemic stroke have been investigated. Neurological impairment assessed in 48 hours and on 7th day of stroke applying the international scales NIHSS and GCS. Patients divided into two groups: with severe stroke (GCS>9, NIHSS>15) and stroke with moderate severity (GCS=14,15; NIHSS=10-15). On 7th day increase of NIHSS score and decrease of GCS score at least 1 point was considered as deterioration and decrease of NIHSS score and increase of GCS score at least 1 point was considered as amelioration. CSF levels of proinflamatory cytokines determined using the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Control consisted with 15 patients, which were taken CSF in relation with vertebral discopathies. Means calculated by t-paired test. Pearson correlation and multivariate logistic regression were used. In 48 hours of stroke onset the CSF levels of interleukine-1beta (IL-1beta), interleukine-6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) were elevated compared to control. Statistical differences were not found between groups regarding the initial CSF levels of IL-1beta and TNF-alpha (p<0,5), while the significant statistical differences were found in regard with IL-6 CSF levels (p<0,05) between groups and against control. Significant positive correlation was found between initial CSF IL-6 levels and ischemic lesion size and neurological outcome at 1 week as well (r=+0,48 p<0,05 and r=+0,54 p<0,01 respectively). Thus, the IL-6 CSF levels in acute stage of ischemic stroke might be considered as the relatively stable prognostic indicator of clinical course of the disease.

  13. Effects of mirror therapy combined with motor tasks on upper extremity function and activities daily living of stroke patients

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyunghoon; Lee, Sukmin; Kim, Donghoon; Lee, Kyoungbo; Kim, Youlim

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of mirror therapy combined with exercise tasks on the function of the upper limbs and activities of daily living. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-five stroke patients who were receiving physical therapy at K Hospital in Gyeonggi-do, South Korea, were classified into a mirror therapy group (n=12) and a conventional therapy group (n=13). The therapies were applied for 30 minutes per day, five times per week, for a total of four weeks. Upper limb function was measured with the Action Research Arm test, the Fugl-Meyer Assessment, and the Box and Block test, and activities of daily living were measured with the Functional Independence Measure. A paired test was performed to compare the intragroup differences between before training and after four weeks of therapy, and an independent t-test was performed to compare the differences between the two groups before and after four weeks of therapy. [Results] In the intragroup comparison, both groups showed significant differences between measurements taken before and after four weeks of therapy. In the intergroup comparison, the mirror therapy group showed significant improvements compared with the conventional therapy group, both in upper limb function and activities of daily living. [Conclusion] The findings of this study demonstrated that mirror therapy is more effective than conventional therapy for the training of stroke patients to improve their upper limb function and activities of daily living. PMID:27065534

  14. Effect of gait training with constrained-induced movement therapy (CIMT) on the balance of stroke patients.

    PubMed

    Kim, Nan-Hyang; Cha, Yong-Jun

    2015-03-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of the present study was to examine the effect of intensive gait training using a constrained induced movement therapy (CIMT) technique applied to the non-paretic upper extremity on the balance ability of stroke patients. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty stroke patients were randomly assigned to an experimental group or a control group. The experimental group received gait training with CIMT for 30 minutes per session, three sessions per week for four weeks, and the control group received gait training alone. [Results] The experimental group showed improvements in dynamic balance and the degree of improvement in this group was greater than that observed in the control group. Furthermore, the experimental group showed improvements in movement distances to the paretic side. On the other hand, the control group showed no significant improvements in balance indices after the intervention. [Conclusion] Gait training of stroke patients using CIMT techniques should be regarded as a treatment that can improve the balance of stroke patients.

  15. Machine-based, self-guided home therapy for individuals with severe arm impairment after stroke: a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Zondervan, DK; Augsburger, R; Bodenhoefer, B; Friedman, N; Reinkensmeyer, DJ; Cramer, SC

    2015-01-01

    Background Few therapeutic options exist for the millions of persons living with severe arm impairment after stroke to increase their dose of arm rehabilitation. This study compared self-guided, high-repetition home therapy with a mechanical device (the Resonating Arm Exerciser - RAE) to conventional therapy in patients with chronic stroke, and explored RAE use for patients with subacute stroke. Methods Sixteen participants with severe upper extremity impairment (mean Fugl-Meyer (FM) score = 21.4 ± 8.8 out of 66) > 6 months post stroke were randomized to three-weeks of exercise with RAE or conventional exercises. Primary outcome measure was FM score one month post-therapy. Secondary outcome measures included MAL, Visual Analog Pain scale, and Ashworth spasticity scale. After a one-month break, individuals in the conventional group also received a three-week course of RAE therapy. Results The change in FM score was significant in both the RAE and conventional groups after training (2.6 ± 1.4 and 3.4 ± 2.4, p = 0.008 and 0.016, respectively). These improvements were not significant at one-month. Exercise with RAE led to significantly greater improvements in distal FM score than conventional therapy at the one-month follow-up (p = 0.02). In a separate cohort of patients with subacute stroke, RAE was found feasible for exercise. Discussion In subjects with severe arm impairment after chronic stroke, home-based training with RAE was feasible and significantly reduced impairment without increasing pain or spasticity. Gains with RAE were comparable to those found with conventional training, and also included distal arm improvement. PMID:25273359

  16. Effects of Robot-assisted therapy on upper limb recovery after stroke: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Kwakkel, Gert; Kollen, Boudewijn J.; Krebs, Hermano I.

    2009-01-01

    Background and Purpose To present a systematic review of studies that investigates the effects of robot-assisted therapy on motor and functional recovery in patients with stroke. Summary of Review A database of articles published up to October 2006 was compiled using the following MEDLINE key words: cerebral vascular accident, cerebral vascular disorders, stroke, paresis, hemiplegia, upper extremity, arm and robot. References listed in relevant publications were also screened. Studies that satisfied the following selection criteria were included: (1) patients were diagnosed with cerebral vascular accident; (2) effects of robot-assisted therapy for the upper limb were investigated; (3) the outcome was measured in terms of motor and/or functional recovery of the upper paretic limb; (4) The study was a randomised clinical trial (RCT). For each outcome measure, the estimated effect size (ES) and the summary effect size (SES) expressed in standard deviation units (SDU) were calculated for motor recovery and functional ability (ADL) using fixed and random effect models. Ten studies, involving 218 patients, were included in the synthesis. Their methodological quality ranged from 4 to 8 on a (maximum) 10 point scale. Meta-analysis showed a non-significant heterogeneous SES in terms of upper limb motor recovery. Sensitivity analysis of studies involving only shoulder-elbow robotics subsequently demonstrated a significant homogeneous SES for motor recovery of the upper paretic limb. No significant SES was observed for functional ability (ADL). Conclusion As a result of marked heterogeneity in studies between distal and proximal arm robotics, no overall significant effect in favour of robot-assisted therapy was found in the present meta-analysis. However, subsequent sensitivity analysis showed a significant improvement in upper limb motor function after stroke for upper arm robotics. No significant improvement was found in ADL function. However, the administered ADL scales in

  17. Evaluating the Primary Prevention of Ischemic Stroke of Oral Antithrombotic Therapy in Head and Neck Cancer Patients with Radiation Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Chin-Wei

    2016-01-01

    Although previous studies demonstrated the risk of ischemic stroke (IS) in patients with head and neck cancer (HNC), the impact of oral antithrombotic therapy (OAT) on this risk has not yet been assessed. We aimed to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of OAT in patients with HNC treated with RT. This retrospective cohort study was performed using the National Health Insurance Research Database of Taiwan. A total of 37,638 patients diagnosed with HNC included in the study were classified as users and nonusers of OAT. Primary outcome was IS or transient ischemic attack (TIA), and secondary outcomes were death and major bleeding. The Cox proportional hazards model was used to calculate hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). There was no significant difference in the risk of IS or TIA between patients on continuous OAT and nonusers (adjusted HR, 0.812; 95% CI, 0.199–3.309). The risk of major bleeding was not significantly different between the groups. From a national population database, we did not find an association between OAT and decreasing risk of ischemic stroke/TIA or increasing hazard of major bleeding. PMID:27990433

  18. Interactive Bio-feedback Therapy Using Hybrid Assistive Limbs for Motor Recovery after Stroke: Current Practice and Future Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    MORISHITA, Takashi; INOUE, Tooru

    2016-01-01

    Interactive bio-feedback (iBF) was initially developed for the rehabilitation of motor function in patients with neurological disorders, and subsequently yielded the development of the hybrid assistive limb (HAL). Here, we provide a review of the theory underlying HAL treatment as well as our clinical experience and recommendations for future clinical studies using HAL in acute stroke patients. We performed a PubMed-based literature search, a retrospective data review of our acute stroke case series, and included a sample case report of our findings. Given past animal studies and functional imaging results, iBF therapy using the HAL in the acute phase of stroke seems an appropriate approach for preventing learned non-use and interhemispheric excitation imbalances. iBF therapy may furthermore promote appropriate neuronal network reorganization. Based on experiences in our stroke center, HAL rehabilitation is a safe and effective treatment modality for recovering motor impairments after acute stroke, and allows the design of tailored rehabilitation programs for individual patients. iBF therapy through the HAL system seems to be an effective and promising approach to stroke rehabilitation; however, the superiority of this treatment to conventional rehabilitation remains unclear. Further clinical studies are warranted. Additionally, the formation of a patient registry will permit a meta-analysis of HAL cases and address the problems associated with a controlled trial (e.g., the heterogeneity of an acute stroke cohort). The development of robotic engineering will improve the efficacy of HAL rehabilitation and has the potential to standardize patient rehabilitation practice. PMID:27616320

  19. An exploration of EEG features during recovery following stroke – implications for BCI-mediated neurorehabilitation therapy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Brain-Computer Interfaces (BCI) can potentially be used to aid in the recovery of lost motor control in a limb following stroke. BCIs are typically used by subjects with no damage to the brain therefore relatively little is known about the technical requirements for the design of a rehabilitative BCI for stroke. Methods 32-channel electroencephalogram (EEG) was recorded during a finger-tapping task from 10 healthy subjects for one session and 5 stroke patients for two sessions approximately 6 months apart. An off-line BCI design based on Filter Bank Common Spatial Patterns (FBCSP) was implemented to test and compare the efficacy and accuracy of training a rehabilitative BCI with both stroke-affected and healthy data. Results Stroke-affected EEG datasets have lower 10-fold cross validation results than healthy EEG datasets. When training a BCI with healthy EEG, average classification accuracy of stroke-affected EEG is lower than the average for healthy EEG. Classification accuracy of the late session stroke EEG is improved by training the BCI on the corresponding early stroke EEG dataset. Conclusions This exploratory study illustrates that stroke and the accompanying neuroplastic changes associated with the recovery process can cause significant inter-subject changes in the EEG features suitable for mapping as part of a neurofeedback therapy, even when individuals have scored largely similar with conventional behavioural measures. It appears such measures can mask this individual variability in cortical reorganization. Consequently we believe motor retraining BCI should initially be tailored to individual patients. PMID:24468185

  20. Cortical activation during robotic therapy for a severely affected arm in a chronic stroke patient: a case report.

    PubMed

    Saeki, Satoru; Matsushima, Yasuyuki; Hachisuka, Kenji

    2008-06-01

    The use of robotic-aided therapy in a patient with residual damage from a previous stroke was an attempt to improve function in a moderate to severe hemiparetic arm. Cortical activities associated with motor recovery are not well documented and require investigation. A chronic stroke patient with a severely affected arm underwent a robotic-training program for 12 weeks. The robotic-aided therapy improved motor control and spasticity in the proximal upper-limb. An increased oxygenated hemoglobin level was observed at the motor-related area in the affected hemisphere. A 12-week robotic-aided training program used in a chronic stroke patient demonstrated elements of motor recovery, and was also associated with direct activation of the affected hemisphere.

  1. Physical Therapy for an Adult with Chronic Stroke after Botulinum Toxin Injection for Spasticity: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Phadke, Chetan P.; Ismail, Farooq; Boulias, Chris

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose: In this case report, we describe the type and duration of a physical therapy and botulinum toxin type A (BoNTA) intervention directed at lower limb spasticity and the gait and balance improvement in a patient post-stroke. Treatment of focal spasticity with BoNTA intramuscular injections combined with physical therapy is recommended by rehabilitation experts. However, the optimal type and duration of physical therapy intervention to optimize any functional gains that follow chemodenervation induced by BoNTA has not been established. Method: One individual with chronic stroke who received BoNTA injections for upper and lower extremity spasticity was included. Physical therapy intervention consisted of 45- to 60-min sessions twice weekly for 12 weeks, based on the Bobath–neurodevelopmental therapy approach, and an activity-based home program. Results: After BoNTA injections and physical therapy, the patient made clinically significant improvements in balance and gait speed and became more independent with his ambulation. Conclusions: This case report demonstrates that physical therapy after BoNTA injections can result in significant functional improvements for individuals with spasticity after chronic stroke that may not be possible with BoNTA injections alone. PMID:25931655

  2. Intravenous Grafts Of Amniotic Fluid-Derived Stem Cells Induce Endogenous Cell Proliferation and Attenuate Behavioral Deficits in Ischemic Stroke Rats

    PubMed Central

    Tajiri, Naoki; Acosta, Sandra; Glover, Loren E.; Bickford, Paula C.; Jacotte Simancas, Alejandra; Yasuhara, Takao; Date, Isao; Solomita, Marianna A.; Antonucci, Ivana; Stuppia, Liborio; Kaneko, Yuji; Borlongan, Cesar V.

    2012-01-01

    We recently reported isolation of viable rat amniotic fluid-derived stem (AFS) cells [1]. Here, we tested the therapeutic benefits of AFS cells in a rodent model of ischemic stroke. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats received a 60-minute middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAo). Thirty-five days later, animals exhibiting significant motor deficits received intravenous transplants of rat AFS cells or vehicle. At days 60–63 post-MCAo, significant recovery of motor and cognitive function was seen in stroke animals transplanted with AFS cells compared to vehicle-infused stroke animals. Infarct volume, as revealed by hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining, was significantly reduced, coupled with significant increments in the cell proliferation marker, Ki67, and the neuronal marker, MAP2, in the dentate gyrus (DG) [2] and the subventricular zone (SVZ) of AFS cell-transplanted stroke animals compared to vehicle-infused stroke animals. A significantly higher number of double-labeled Ki67/MAP2-positive cells and a similar trend towards increased Ki67/MAP2 double-labeling were observed in the DG and SVZ of AFS cell-transplanted stroke animals, respectively, compared to vehicle-infused stroke animals. This study reports the therapeutic potential of AFS cell transplantation in stroke animals, possibly via enhancement of endogenous repair mechanisms. PMID:22912905

  3. Effects of Extracorporeal Shockwave Therapy in Chronic Stroke Patients With Knee Osteoarthritis: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effects of extracorporeal shockwave therapy (ESWT) on pain, function, and ultrasonographic features of chronic stroke patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA). Methods A total of 18 chronic stroke patients (33 knee joints) with unilateral or bilateral knee OA (Kellgren-Lawrence grade ≥1) were enrolled in this study. The patients were randomly allocated to an experimental group receiving ESWT (n=9) or a control group receiving sham ESWT (n=9). For the ESWT group, patients received 1,000 pulses weekly for 3 weeks, totaling to an energy dose of 0.05 mJ/mm2 on the proximal medial tibia of the affected knee. The assessments were performed before the treatment, immediately after the first treatment, and 1 week after the last treatment using the following: the visual analog scale (VAS) for pain; patient perception of the clinical severity of OA; the Korean version of Modified Barthel Index (ambulation and chair/bed transfer); the Functional Independence Measure scale (FIM; bed/chair/wheelchair transfer, toilet transfer, walking, and stairs); and ultrasonographic features (articular cartilage thickness, Doppler activity, and joint effusion height). Results The experimental group showed a significant improvement in VAS score (4.50±1.87 to 2.71±1.38) and patient perception of the clinical severity of OA (1.87±0.83 to 2.75±0.46). The bed/chair/wheelchair transfer components of the FIM score also improved significantly (4.12±1.55 to 4.62±1.30). In terms of the ultrasonographic features, increased Doppler activity was observed in the medial knee in the experimental group immediately following ESWT. Conclusion It is suggested that ESWT may reduce pain and improve function in chronic stroke patients with OA, and may increase vascular activity at the target site. PMID:27847716

  4. Acute Stroke Care and Thrombolytic Therapy Use in a Tertiary Care Center in Lebanon

    PubMed Central

    Tamim, Hani

    2014-01-01

    Background. Thrombolytic therapy (rt-PA) is approved for ischemic stroke presenting within 4.5 hours of symptoms onset. The rate of utilization of rt-PA is not well described in developing countries. Objectives. Our study examined patient characteristics and outcomes in addition to barriers to rt-PA utilization in a tertiary care center in Beirut, Lebanon. Methods. A retrospective chart review of all adult patients admitted to the emergency department during a one-year period (June 1st, 2009, to June 1st, 2010) with a final discharge diagnosis of ischemic stroke was completed. Descriptive analysis was done followed by a comparison of two groups (IV rt-PA and no IV rt-PA). Results. During the study period, 87 patients met the inclusion criteria and thus were included in the study. The mean age was found to be 71.9 years (SD = 11.8). Most patients arrived by private transport (85.1%). Weakness and loss of speech were the most common presenting signs (56.3%). Thirty-three patients (37.9%) presented within 4.5 hours of symptom onset. Nine patients (10.3%, 95% CI (5.5–18.5)) received rt-PA. The two groups (rt-PA versus non rt-PA) had similar outcomes (mortality, symptomatic intracerebral hemorrhage, modified Rankin scale scores, and residual deficit at hospital discharge). Conclusion. In our setting, rt-PA utilization was higher than expected. Delayed presentation was the main barrier to rt-PA administration. Public education regarding stroke is needed to decrease time from symptoms onset to ED presentation and potentially improve outcomes further. PMID:25140255

  5. Postmenopausal Hormone Therapy and the Risks of Coronary Heart Disease, Breast Cancer, and Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Prentice, Ross L.

    2014-01-01

    The principal findings are briefly reviewed from the Women's Health Initiative (WHI) trials of the most commonly used postmenopausal hormone regimens in the US, conjugated equine estrogens and these same estrogens plus medroxyprogesterone acetate. A more detailed review is presented for three major clinical outcomes: coronary heart disease, the primary trial outcome for which a major benefit was hypothesized; invasive breast cancer, the primary safety outcome for which some adverse effect was expected; and stroke which surfaced as an important adverse effect with both regimens, and one that is influential in decisions concerning the continued use of postmenopausal estrogens alone. The review for these outcomes includes an update on interactions of treatment effects with study subject characteristics and exposures and with pre-randomization biomarker levels. It also includes a focus on timing issues that are important to the understanding of treatment effects. Specifically, with combined estrogen plus progestin coronary heart disease risk was elevated early with the elevation dissipating after a few years of treatment, whereas breast cancer elevations increased during the treatment period, and climbed to about a 3-fold increase following 5 years of adherence. Importantly, breast cancer risk elevations appear to be higher among women who initiate treatment at the menopause, or soon thereafter, compared to women having a longer gap time. Stroke effects, on the other hand didn't seem to vary appreciably with these timing issues. The adverse effect was evidently localized to ischemic strokes, for which there was an approximate 50% increase with either regimen. The rather limited knowledge concerning the biomarkers and biological pathways that mediate the hormone therapy effects on these diseases is also briefly reviewed. PMID:25321418

  6. Economic Aspects of a Therapy and Support Service for People with Long-Term Stroke and Aphasia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van der Gaag, Anna; Brooks, Richard

    2008-01-01

    Background: This paper considers some economic aspects of a therapy and support service for people with stroke and aphasia. This material was part of a broader evaluation of the service, which is reported elsewhere (van der Gaag et al. 2005, van der Gaag and Mowles 2005). Aims: The purpose of this part of the study was to investigate the…

  7. Therapeutic synergism in the treatment of post-stroke arm paresis utilizing botulinum toxin, robotic therapy, and constraint-induced movement therapy.

    PubMed

    Takebayashi, Takashi; Amano, Satoru; Hanada, Keisuke; Umeji, Atsushi; Takahashi, Kayoko; Koyama, Tetsuo; Domen, Kazuhisa

    2014-11-01

    Botulinum toxin type A (BtxA) injection, constraint-induced movement therapy (CIMT), and robotic therapy (RT) each represent promising approaches to enhance arm motor recovery after stroke. To provide more effective treatment for a 50-year-old man with severe left spastic hemiparesis, we attempted to facilitate CIMT with adaptive approaches to extend the wrist and fingers using RT for 10 consecutive weeks after BtxA injection. This combined treatment resulted in substantial improvements in arm function and the amount of arm use in activities of daily living, and may be effective for stroke patients with severe arm paresis. However, we were unable to sufficiently prove the efficacy of combined treatment based only on a single case. To fully elucidate the efficacy of the combined approach for patients with severe hemiparesis after stroke, future studies of a larger number of patients are needed.

  8. Potential determinants of efficacy of mirror therapy in stroke patients – A pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Brunetti, Maddalena; Morkisch, Nadine; Fritzsch, Claire; Mehnert, Jan; Steinbrink, Jens; Niedeggen, Michael; Dohle, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: Mirror therapy (MT) was found to improve motor function after stroke. However, there is high variability between patients regarding motor recovery. Objectives: The following pilot study was designed to identify potential factors determining this variability between patients with severe upper limb paresis, receiving MT. Methods: Eleven sub-acute stroke patients with severe upper limb paresis participated, receiving in-patient rehabilitation. After a set of pre-assessments (including measurement of brain activity at the primary motor cortex and precuneus during the mirror illusion, using near-infrared spectroscopy as described previously), four weeks of MT were applied, followed by a set of post-assessments. Discriminant group analysis for MT responders and non-responders was performed. Results: Six out of eleven patients were defined as responders and five as non-responders on the basis of their functional motor improvement. The initial motor function and the activity shift in both precunei (mirror index) were found to discriminate significantly between responders and non-responders. Conclusions: In line with earlier results, initial motor function was confirmed as crucial determinant of motor recovery. Additionally, activity response to the mirror illusion in both precunei was found to be a candidate for determination of the efficacy of MT. PMID:26409402

  9. Balance evaluation techniques and physical therapy in post-stroke patients: A literature review.

    PubMed

    Lendraitienė, Eglė; Tamošauskaitė, Agnė; Petruševičienė, Daiva; Savickas, Raimondas

    A stroke (cerebrovascular accident - CVA) is a significant social-economic issue. Approximately 15-30% of all patients develop life-long disability, 20% require over 3 months of specialized care in healthcare institutions, and the majority of the patients never recover the ability to maintain a proper vertical position. Such CVA sequelae as balance disturbances not only negatively affect patients' daily physical activity, but also result in social isolation. A number of standardized clinical scales, tests, and instrumental examination techniques have been proposed for evaluating not only post-CVA balance function, but also any changes in this function following various interventions. Even though scientific literature lists numerous methods and instruments for the improvement of balance after a CVA, not all of them are equally effective, and there have been rather controversial evaluations of some techniques. Nevertheless, the application of the majority of the techniques as complementary or alternative measures to traditional physical therapy (PT) frequently yields better results.

  10. Developing movement therapy application with Microsoft Kinect control for supporting stroke rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Mintal, Flavian A; Szucs, Veronika; Sik-Lanyi, Cecília

    2015-01-01

    The topic of this article and work was to create an application for movement therapy, which can help the rehabilitation of stroke patients. The application makes it possible to make unique exercises for different patients, adapting to the special personal needs. The developed real time gesture analyzing algorithm works in the background of the application, which has not yet spread on the field of medical devices. I deal with one part of this wide field in my dissertation, with the rehabilitation gesture analyzing. The data received from the Kinect sensor is processed by a location based gesture analyzing algorithm, and the results show that the software is suitable for the improvement of the rehabilitation process. It was a key aspect to create a simple interface. I achieved this with the use of the C# language and WPF technology.

  11. [The peculiarities of the application of transcranial magnetic therapy and electrical stimulation for the treatment of the patients presenting with various types of stroke].

    PubMed

    Melnikova, E A

    2015-01-01

    In this article, the results of the authors' research, including analysis of the clinical and instrumental data concerning 203 patients with, stroke are presented. It is shown that the clinical effectiveness of the transcranial methods incorporated in the combined rehabilitation programs depends on the type of stroke and localization of the lesions. Specifically, the patients presenting with ischemic stroke of hemispheric localization experienced a neurophysiologically confirmed significant clinical improvement that became apparent after the consistent application of transcranial magnetic therapy and micropolarization. In the patients with ischemic stroke of stem localization, the positive influence on psychomotor recovery was achieved with the application of transcranial magnetic therapy, but transcranial micropolarization did not have an appreciable effect on the recovery of such patients. The patients presenting with hemorrhagic stroke did not experience any significant improvement of psychomotor parameters from transcranial magnetic therapy and transcranial micropolarization. The likely mechanism underlying the recovery of psychomotor processes under effect of transcranial magnetic therapy in the patients with ischemic stroke is the normalization of the frequency of interaction between brain structures. In addition, in the patients with ischemic stroke of hemispheric localization and in the patients with hemorrhagic stroke electrical myostimulation has a marked impact on the psychomotor recovery only in case of functional treatment. In the patients suffering from ischemic stroke of stem localization non-functional electromyostimulation significantly improves motor functions and cognitive motor control.

  12. National Training Course. Emergency Medical Technician. Paramedic. Instructor's Lesson Plans. Module III. Shock and Fluid Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (DOT), Washington, DC.

    This instructor's lesson plan guide on shock and fluid therapy is one of fifteen modules designed for use in the training of emergency medical technicians (paramedics). Six units of study are presented: (1) body fluids, electrolytes and their effect on the body, and the general principles of fluid and acid base balances; (2) characteristics of…

  13. Procedural Predictors of Outcome in Patients Undergoing Endovascular Therapy for Acute Ischemic Stroke

    SciTech Connect

    Rai, Ansaar T. Jhadhav, Yahodeep; Domico, Jennifer; Hobbs, Gerald R.

    2012-12-15

    Purpose: To identify factors impacting outcome in patients undergoing interventions for acute ischemic stroke (AIS). Materials and Methods: This was a retrospective analysis of patients undergoing endovascular therapy for AIS secondary during a 30 month period. Outcome was based on modified Rankin score at 3- to 6-month follow-up. Recanalization was defined as Thrombolysis in myocardial infarction score 2 to 3. Collaterals were graded based on pial circulation from the anterior cerebral artery either from an ipsilateral injection in cases of middle cerebral artery (MCA) occlusion or contralateral injection for internal carotid artery terminus (ICA) occlusion as follows: no collaterals (grade 0), some collaterals with retrograde opacification of the distal MCA territory (grade 1), and good collaterals with filling of the proximal MCA (M2) branches or retrograde opacification up to the occlusion site (grade 2). Occlusion site was divided into group 1 (ICA), group 2 (MCA with or without contiguous M2 involvement), and group 3 (isolated M2 or M3 branch occlusion). Results: A total of 89 patients were studied. Median age and National Institutes of health stroke scale (NIHSS) score was 71 and 15 years, respectively. Favorable outcome was seen in 49.4% of patients and mortality in 25.8% of patients. Younger age (P = 0.006), lower baseline NIHSS score (P = 0.001), successful recanalization (P < 0.0001), collateral support (P = 0.0008), distal occlusion (P = 0.001), and shorter procedure duration (P = 0.01) were associated with a favorable outcome. Factors affecting successful recanalization included younger age (P = 0.01), lower baseline NIHSS score (P = 0.05), collateral support (P = 0.01), and shorter procedure duration (P = 0.03). An ICA terminus occlusion (P < 0.0001), lack of collaterals (P = 0.0003), and unsuccessful recanalization (P = 0.005) were significantly associated with mortality. Conclusion: Angiographic findings and preprocedure variables can help

  14. Delayed combination therapy of local brain hypothermia and decompressive craniectomy on acute stroke outcome in rat

    PubMed Central

    Allahtavakoli, Mohammad; Kahnouei, Mohammadamin Hosseini; Rezazadeh, Hossein; Roohbakhsh, Ali; Mahmoodi, Mohammad Hossein; Moghadam-Ahmadi, Amir; Zarisfi, Mohammadreza

    2014-01-01

    Objective(s): Hypothermia and decompressive craniectomy (DC) have been shown to be neuroprotective. This study was designed to evaluate neuroprotective effects of delayed singular or combination of DC and local hypothermia on stroke. Materials and Methods: Cerebral ischemia was induced in 48 Wistar rats assigned to 4 groups: control, decompressive craniectomy (DC), local hypothermia (LH), combination of hypothermia and craniectomy (HC). Infarct size and BBB disruption were measured 48 hr after ischemia insult. Neurological deficits were assessed at 24 and 48 hr after stroke by using sticky tape test, hanging-wire test and Bederson’s scoring system. BBB disruption was measured by Evans blue dye leakage. Results: Although infarct size was significantly reduced in LH, DC and HC groups (P<0.001), combination therapy was more neuroprotective compared to craniectomy alone (P<0.01). BBB disruption was significantly reduced in DC (P< 0.05) and LH and HC (P< 0.01).While sticky tape test (P<0.05 at 24 hr; P<0.001 at 48 hr) and hanging-wire test (P<0.05) showed better behavioral performance only in HC, Bederson test showed improved behavioral functions of both LH (P<0.05 at 24 hr and P<0.01 at 48 hr) and HC animals (P<0.01). Neurological deficits were also decreased in LH (P<0.05) or HC (P<0.05 at 24 hr; P<0.01 at 48 hr) groups compared to the DC group at the same time. Conclusion: Based on our data, although both delayed local hypothermia and craniectomy are protective after stoke, combination therapy of them is more neuroprotective than given alone. PMID:25429337

  15. Hyperintense vessels on acute stroke Fluid-attenuated Inversion Recovery imaging: Associations with clinical and other MRI findings

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Bastian; Ebinger, Martin; Kufner, Anna; Köhrmann, Martin; Wu, Ona; Kang, Dong-Wha; Liebeskind, David; Tourdias, Thomas; Singer, Oliver C.; Christensen, Soren; Warach, Steve; Luby, Marie; Fiebach, Jochen B.; Fiehler, Jens; Gerloff, Christian; Thomalla, Götz

    2012-01-01

    Background and Purpose Hyperintense vessels (HV) have been observed in Fluid-Attenuated Inversion Recovery (FLAIR) imaging of patients with acute ischemic stroke and been linked to slow flow in collateral arterial circulation. Given the potential importance of HV, we used a large, multicentre dataset of stroke patients to clarify which clinical and imaging factors play a role in HV. Methods We analyzed data of 516 patients from the previously published PRE-FLAIR study. Patients were studied by MRI within 12 hours of symptom onset. HV were defined as hyperintensities in FLAIR corresponding to the typical course of a blood vessel that was not considered the proximal, occluded main artery ipsilateral to the diffusion restriction. Presence of HV was rated by two observers and related to clinical and imaging findings. Results Presence of HV was identified in 240 of all 516 patients (47%). Patients with HV showed larger initial ischemic lesion volumes (median 12.3 vs. 4.9 ml; p<0.001) and a more severe clinical impairment (median NIHSS 10.5 vs. 6; p<0.001). In 198 patients with MR-angiography, HV were found in 80% of patients with vessel occlusion and in 17% without vessel occlusion. In a multivariable logistic regression model, vessel occlusion was associated with HV (OR 21.7%; 95% CI 9.6–49.9, p < 0.001). HV detected vessel occlusion with a specificity of 0.86 (95% CI 0.80–0.90) and sensitivity of 0.76 (95% CI 0.69–0.83). Conclusions HV are a common finding associated with proximal arterial occlusions and more severe strokes. HV predict arterial occlusion with high diagnostic accuracy. PMID:22933582

  16. Doses to Carotid Arteries After Modern Radiation Therapy for Hodgkin Lymphoma: Is Stroke Still a Late Effect of Treatment?

    SciTech Connect

    Maraldo, Maja V.; Brodin, Patrick; Aznar, Marianne C.; Vogelius, Ivan R.; Munck af Rosenschöld, Per; Petersen, Peter M.; Specht, Lena

    2013-10-01

    Purpose: Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) survivors are at an increased risk of stroke because of carotid artery irradiation. However, for early-stage HL involved node radiation therapy (INRT) reduces the volume of normal tissue exposed to high doses. Here, we evaluate 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT), volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT), and proton therapy (PT) delivered as INRT along with the extensive mantle field (MF) by comparing doses to the carotid arteries and corresponding risk estimates. Methods and Materials: We included a cohort of 46 supradiaphragmatic stage I-II classical HL patients. All patients were initially treated with chemotherapy and INRT delivered as 3D-CRT (30 Gy). For each patient, we simulated MF (36 Gy) and INRT plans using VMAT and PT (30 Gy). Linear dose-response curves for the 20-, 25-, and 30-year risk of stroke were derived from published HL data. Risks of stroke with each technique were calculated for all patients. Statistical analyses were performed with repeated measures analysis of variance. Results: The mean doses to the right and left common carotid artery were significantly lower with modern treatment compared with MF, with substantial patient variability. The estimated excess risk of stroke after 20, 25, and 30 years was 0.6%, 0.86%, and 1.3% for 3D-CRT; 0.67%, 0.96%, and 1.47% for VMAT; 0.61%, 0.96%, and 1.33% for PT; and 1.3%, 1.72%, and 2.61% for MF. Conclusions: INRT reduces the dose delivered to the carotid arteries and corresponding estimated risk of stroke for HL survivors. Even for the subset of patients with lymphoma close to the carotid arteries, the estimated risk is low.

  17. The effect of mirror therapy on upper-extremity function and activities of daily living in stroke patients

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jin-Young; Chang, Moonyoung; Kim, Kyeong-Mi; Kim, Hee-Jung

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of mirror therapy on upper-extremity function and activities of daily living in chronic stroke patients. [Subjects and Methods] Fifteen subjects were each assigned to a mirror therapy group and a sham therapy group. The Fugl-Meyer Motor Function Assessment and the Box and Block Test were performed to compare paretic upper-extremity function and hand coordination abilities. The functional independence measurement was conducted to compare abilities to perform activities of daily living. [Results] Paretic upper-extremity function and hand coordination abilities were significantly different between the mirror therapy and sham therapy groups. Intervention in the mirror therapy group was more effective than in the sham therapy group for improving the ability to perform activities of daily living. Self-care showed statistically significant differences between the two groups. [Conclusion] Mirror therapy is effective in improving paretic upper-extremity function and activities of daily living in chronic stroke patients. PMID:26180297

  18. Perturbation of Brain Oscillations after Ischemic Stroke: A Potential Biomarker for Post-Stroke Function and Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Rabiller, Gratianne; He, Ji-Wei; Nishijima, Yasuo; Wong, Aaron; Liu, Jialing

    2015-01-01

    Brain waves resonate from the generators of electrical current and propagate across brain regions with oscillation frequencies ranging from 0.05 to 500 Hz. The commonly observed oscillatory waves recorded by an electroencephalogram (EEG) in normal adult humans can be grouped into five main categories according to the frequency and amplitude, namely δ (1–4 Hz, 20–200 μV), θ (4–8 Hz, 10 μV), α (8–12 Hz, 20–200 μV), β (12–30 Hz, 5–10 μV), and γ (30–80 Hz, low amplitude). Emerging evidence from experimental and human studies suggests that groups of function and behavior seem to be specifically associated with the presence of each oscillation band, although the complex relationship between oscillation frequency and function, as well as the interaction between brain oscillations, are far from clear. Changes of brain oscillation patterns have long been implicated in the diseases of the central nervous system including ischemic stroke, in which the reduction of cerebral blood flow as well as the progression of tissue damage have direct spatiotemporal effects on the power of several oscillatory bands and their interactions. This review summarizes the current knowledge in behavior and function associated with each brain oscillation, and also in the specific changes in brain electrical activities that correspond to the molecular events and functional alterations observed after experimental and human stroke. We provide the basis of the generations of brain oscillations and potential cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying stroke-induced perturbation. We will also discuss the implications of using brain oscillation patterns as biomarkers for the prediction of stroke outcome and therapeutic efficacy. PMID:26516838

  19. Phase I and Phase II Therapies for Acute Ischemic Stroke: An Update on Currently Studied Drugs in Clinical Research

    PubMed Central

    Reis, Cesar; Akyol, Onat; Ho, Wing Mann; Araujo, Camila; Huang, Lei; Applegate II, Richard

    2017-01-01

    Acute ischemic stroke is a devastating cause of death and disability, consequences of which depend on the time from ischemia onset to treatment, the affected brain region, and its size. The main targets of ischemic stroke therapy aim to restore tissue perfusion in the ischemic penumbra in order to decrease the total infarct area by maintaining blood flow. Advances in research of pathological process and pathways during acute ischemia have resulted in improvement of new treatment strategies apart from restoring perfusion. Additionally, limiting the injury severity by manipulating the molecular mechanisms during ischemia has become a promising approach, especially in animal research. The purpose of this article is to review completed and ongoing phases I and II trials for the treatment of acute ischemic stroke, reviewing studies on antithrombotic, thrombolytic, neuroprotective, and antineuroinflammatory drugs that may translate into more effective treatments. PMID:28286764

  20. Pediatric CI therapy for stroke-induced hemiparesis in young children.

    PubMed

    Taub, Edward; Griffin, Angi; Nick, Jennifer; Gammons, Kristin; Uswatte, Gitendra; Law, Charles R

    2007-01-01

    In this laboratory we have developed a set of techniques that randomized controlled studies and a multisite randomized controlled trial have shown can substantially reduce the motor deficit of adult patients with mild to severe chronic strokes. Equivalent results have been obtained with adult patients after traumatic brain injury and brain resection. The basic technique, termed Constraint-Induced Movement therapy or CI therapy was derived directly from basic research with monkeys with mature motor systems and with monkeys given surgical intervention either on their day of birth or prenatally by intrauterine surgical procedures. We report here the results of two randomized controlled trials of CI therapy with young children with asymmetric upper extremity motor deficits of varied etiologies from 8 months to 8 years of age in one study and with children with hemiparesis consequent to prenatal, perinatal, or early antenatal stroke from 2 to 6 years old in a second study. The procedures used with children are very similar to those used with adults and diverge simply to make the basic techniques age-appropriate. All forms of CI therapy for the upper extremity to date involve 3 main elements: (1) intensive training of the more affected extremity, (2) prolonged restraint of the less affected extremity, (3) a 'transfer package' of techniques to induce transfer of therapeutic gains achieved in the laboratory to the life situation. The results in children with cerebral palsy are considerably better than those obtained in adults. Marked changes were observed in the quality of movement in the laboratory scored by masked observers from videotape; actual amount of use of the more affected arm in the life situation; active range of motion; and emergence of new classes of behaviour never performed before, such as in individual cases, fine thumb-forefinger grasp, supination, and use of the more affected extremity in crawling with palmar placement and rhythmic alteration. In the

  1. Constraint therapy versus intensive training: implications for motor control and brain plasticity after stroke.

    PubMed

    Medée, Béatrice; Bellaiche, Soline; Revol, Patrice; Jacquin-Courtois, Sophie; Arsenault, Lisette; Guichard-Mayel, Audrey; Delporte, Ludovic; Rode, Gilles; Rossetti, Yves; Boisson, Dominique; Luauté, Jacques

    2010-12-01

    Many studies have demonstrated that constraint induced movement therapy (CIMT) improves upper limb motor impairment following stroke. This rehabilitation method combines constraint of the less-affected upperlimb with intensive training of the paretic limb. The aim of the present study was to evaluate, in a single case study, the respective effects of each of these two therapeutic interventions. The patient selected was a 32-year-old right-handed woman. Three and a half years prior to inclusion, she suffered a left capsular infarct responsible for a right hemiparesis. Several assessments were carried out before and after constraint therapy and then after intensive training. Each assessment included measures of hand function as well as a three-dimensional (3D) analysis of prehension. Results showed a significant improvement of motor performance after the constraint period and an additional amelioration after the intensive training period. Kinematic analysis showed that the transport phase of movement (movement time and velocity peaks) was improved after the constraint period, whereas the grasping phase (maximum grip aperture) was modified after intensive training. These data could reflect a specific effect of treatment on each phase of the prehension task, or a more general proximal-to-distal gradient of recovery. Although firm conclusions are not warranted on the basis of this single case study, we confirm the utility of 3D motion analysis to evaluate objectively the effectiveness of a therapeutic intervention. We also discuss the implications of our findings for understanding processes of motor control reorganisation.

  2. Original Research: Sickle cell anemia and pediatric strokes: Computational fluid dynamics analysis in the middle cerebral artery.

    PubMed

    Rivera, Christian P; Veneziani, Alessandro; Ware, Russell E; Platt, Manu O

    2016-04-01

    Children with sickle cell anemia (SCA) have a high incidence of strokes, and transcranial Doppler (TCD) identifies at-risk patients by measuring blood velocities in large intracerebral arteries; time-averaged mean velocities greater than 200 cm/s confer high stroke risk and warrant therapeutic intervention with blood transfusions. Our objective was to use computational fluid dynamics to alter fluid and artery wall properties, to simulate scenarios causative of significantly elevated arterial blood velocities. Two-dimensional simulations were created and increasing percent stenoses were created in silico, with their locations varied among middle cerebral artery (MCA), internal carotid artery (ICA), and anterior cerebral artery (ACA). Stenoses placed in the MCA, ICA, or ACA generated local increases in velocity, but not sufficient to reach magnitudes > 200 cm/s, even up to 75% stenosis. Three-dimensional reconstructions of the MCA, ICA, and ACA from children with SCA were generated from magnetic resonance angiograms. Using finite element method, blood flow was simulated with realistic velocity waveforms to the ICA inlet. Three-dimensional reconstructions revealed an uneven, internal arterial wall surface in children with SCA and higher mean velocities in the MCA up to 145 cm/s compared to non-SCA reconstructions. There were also greater areas of flow recirculation and larger regions of low wall shear stress. Taken together, these bumps on the internal wall of the cerebral arteries could create local flow disturbances that, in aggregate, could elevate blood velocities in SCA. Identifying cellular causes of these microstructures as adhered blood cells or luminal narrowing due to endothelial hyperplasia induced by disturbed flow would provide new targets to treat children with SCA. The preliminary qualitative results provided here point out the critical role of 3D reconstruction of patient-specific vascular geometries and provide qualitative insight to complex

  3. Laser therapy of painful shoulder and shoulder-hand syndrome in treatment of patients after the stroke.

    PubMed

    Karabegović, Azra; Kapidzić-Duraković, Suada; Ljuca, Farid

    2009-02-01

    The common complication after stroke is pain and dysfunction of shoulder of paralyzed arm, as well as the swelling of the hand. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of LASER therapy and to correlate with electrotherapy (TENS, stabile galvanization) in subjects after stroke. We analyzed 70 subjects after stroke with pain in shoulder and oedema of paralyzed hand. The examinees were divided in two groups of 35, and they were treated in the Clinic for Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation in Tuzla during 2006 and 2007. Experimental group (EG) had a treatment with LASER, while the control group (CG) was treated with electrotherapy. Both groups had kinesis therapy and ice massage. All patients were examined on the admission and discharge by using the VAS, DASH, Barthel index and FIM. The pain intensity in shoulder was significantly reduced in EG (p<0,0001), swelling is lowered in EG (p=0,01). Barthel index in both groups was significant higher (p<0,01). DASH was significantly improved after LASER therapy in EG (p<0,01). EG had higher level of independency (p<0,01). LASER therapy used on EG shows significantly better results in reducing pain, swelling, disability and improvement of independency.

  4. Constraint-Induced Aphasia Therapy for Treatment of Chronic Post-Stroke Aphasia: A Randomized, Blinded, Controlled Pilot Trial

    PubMed Central

    Szaflarski, Jerzy P.; Ball, Angel L.; Vannest, Jennifer; Dietz, Aimee R.; Allendorfer, Jane B.; Martin, Amber N.; Hart, Kimberly; Lindsell, Christopher J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Few studies have documented the possibility of treatment-induced improvements in language functions 12 months or longer after stroke. The purpose of the current study was to provide a preliminary estimate of efficacy of constraint-induced aphasia therapy (CIAT) when compared to no-intervention in patients with chronic (>1 year) post-stroke aphasia in order to provide the data needed to design an appropriately powered trial. Material/Methods This was a randomized, controlled, single-blinded, pilot trial. We identified 32 patients with chronic post-stroke aphasia. Of these, 27 were offered participation, and 24 were randomized (CONSORT diagram): 14 to CIAT and to 10 to no-intervention. CIAT groups received up to 4 hours/day of intervention for 10 consecutive business days (40 hours of therapy). Outcomes were assessed within 1 week of intervention and at 1 and 12 weeks after intervention and included several linguistic measures and a measure of overall subjective communication abilities (mini-Communicative Abilities Log (mini-CAL)). To maintain blinding, clinicians treating patients (CIAT group) did not communicate with other team members and the testing team members were blinded to treatment group assignment. Results Overall, the results of this pilot trial support the results of previous observational studies that CIAT may lead to improvements in linguistic abilities. At 12 weeks, the treatment group reported better subjective communication abilities (mini-CAL) than the no-intervention group (p=0.019). Other measures trended towards better performance in the CIAT group. Conclusions In this randomized, controlled, and blinded pilot study, intensive language therapy (CIAT) led to an improvement in subjective language abilities. The effects demonstrated allow the design of a definitive trial of CIAT in patients with a variety of post-stroke aphasia types. In addition, our experiences have identified important considerations for designing subsequent trial

  5. Plasticity in the sensorimotor cortex induced by Music-supported therapy in stroke patients: a TMS study.

    PubMed

    Grau-Sánchez, Jennifer; Amengual, Julià L; Rojo, Nuria; Veciana de Las Heras, Misericordia; Montero, Jordi; Rubio, Francisco; Altenmüller, Eckart; Münte, Thomas F; Rodríguez-Fornells, Antoni

    2013-01-01

    Playing a musical instrument demands the engagement of different neural systems. Recent studies about the musician's brain and musical training highlight that this activity requires the close interaction between motor and somatosensory systems. Moreover, neuroplastic changes have been reported in motor-related areas after short and long-term musical training. Because of its capacity to promote neuroplastic changes, music has been used in the context of stroke neurorehabilitation. The majority of patients suffering from a stroke have motor impairments, preventing them to live independently. Thus, there is an increasing demand for effective restorative interventions for neurological deficits. Music-supported Therapy (MST) has been recently developed to restore motor deficits. We report data of a selected sample of stroke patients who have been enrolled in a MST program (1 month intense music learning). Prior to and after the therapy, patients were evaluated with different behavioral motor tests. Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) was applied to evaluate changes in the sensorimotor representations underlying the motor gains observed. Several parameters of excitability of the motor cortex were assessed as well as the cortical somatotopic representation of a muscle in the affected hand. Our results revealed that participants obtained significant motor improvements in the paretic hand and those changes were accompanied by changes in the excitability of the motor cortex. Thus, MST leads to neuroplastic changes in the motor cortex of stroke patients which may explain its efficacy.

  6. Dysphagia in Stroke: A New Solution

    PubMed Central

    Langdon, Claire; Blacker, David

    2010-01-01

    Dysphagia is extremely common following stroke, affecting 13%–94% of acute stroke sufferers. It is associated with respiratory complications, increased risk of aspiration pneumonia, nutritional compromise and dehydration, and detracts from quality of life. While many stroke survivors experience a rapid return to normal swallowing function, this does not always happen. Current dysphagia treatment in Australia focuses upon prevention of aspiration via diet and fluid modifications, compensatory manoeuvres and positional changes, and exercises to rehabilitate paretic muscles. This article discusses a newer adjunctive treatment modality, neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES), and reviews the available literature on its efficacy as a therapy for dysphagia with particular emphasis on its use as a treatment for dysphagia in stroke. There is a good theoretical basis to support the use of NMES as an adjunctive therapy in dysphagia and there would appear to be a great need for further well-designed studies to accurately determine the safety and efficacy of this technique. PMID:20721336

  7. Correction of hypovolemia with crystalloid fluids: Individualizing infusion therapy.

    PubMed

    Liamis, George; Filippatos, Theodosios D; Elisaf, Moses S

    2015-05-01

    Many situations in clinical practice involving patients with hypovolemia or acutely ill patients usually require the administration of intravenous fluids. Current evidence shows that the use of crystalloids should be considered, since most colloids and human albumin are usually associated with increased adverse effects and high cost, respectively. Among crystalloids, the use of normal saline is implicated with the development of hyperchloremic metabolic acidosis and renal vasoconstriction. These observations have led many authors to propose balanced solutions, mainly Lactated Ringer's, as the infusate of choice. However, although the restoration of volume status is the primary target in hypovolemic state, the correction of any associated acid-base or electrolyte disorders that frequently coexist is also of vital importance. This review presents specific situations that are common in daily clinical practice and require targeted infusate therapy in patients with reduced volume status. Furthermore, the review presents an algorithm aiming to help clinicians to make the best choice between normal or hypotonic saline and lactated Ringer's infusates. Lactated Ringer's infusate should not be given in patients with severe metabolic alkalosis, lactic acidosis with decreased lactate clearance, or severe hyperkalemia, and in patients with traumatic brain injury or at risk of increased intracranial pressure. The optimal choice of infusate should be guided by the cause of hypovolemia, the cardiovascular state of the patient, the renal function, as well as the serum osmolality and the coexisting acid-base and electrolyte disorders. Clinicians should be aware of any coexisting disorders in patients with hypovolemia and guide their choice of infusate treatment based on the overall picture of their patients.

  8. Virtual Reality Therapy for Adults Post-Stroke: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis Exploring Virtual Environments and Commercial Games in Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Lohse, Keith R.; Hilderman, Courtney G. E.; Cheung, Katharine L.; Tatla, Sandy; Van der Loos, H. F. Machiel

    2014-01-01

    Background The objective of this analysis was to systematically review the evidence for virtual reality (VR) therapy in an adult post-stroke population in both custom built virtual environments (VE) and commercially available gaming systems (CG). Methods MEDLINE, CINAHL, EMBASE, ERIC, PSYCInfo, DARE, PEDro, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, and Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews were systematically searched from the earliest available date until April 4, 2013. Controlled trials that compared VR to conventional therapy were included. Population criteria included adults (>18) post-stroke, excluding children, cerebral palsy, and other neurological disorders. Included studies were reported in English. Quality of studies was assessed with the Physiotherapy Evidence Database Scale (PEDro). Results Twenty-six studies met the inclusion criteria. For body function outcomes, there was a significant benefit of VR therapy compared to conventional therapy controls, G = 0.48, 95% CI = [0.27, 0.70], and no significant difference between VE and CG interventions (P = 0.38). For activity outcomes, there was a significant benefit of VR therapy, G = 0.58, 95% CI = [0.32, 0.85], and no significant difference between VE and CG interventions (P = 0.66). For participation outcomes, the overall effect size was G = 0.56, 95% CI = [0.02, 1.10]. All participation outcomes came from VE studies. Discussion VR rehabilitation moderately improves outcomes compared to conventional therapy in adults post-stroke. Current CG interventions have been too few and too small to assess potential benefits of CG. Future research in this area should aim to clearly define conventional therapy, report on participation measures, consider motivational components of therapy, and investigate commercially available systems in larger RCTs. Trial Registration Prospero CRD42013004338 PMID:24681826

  9. Design and validation of low-cost assistive glove for hand assessment and therapy during activity of daily living-focused robotic stroke therapy.

    PubMed

    Nathan, Dominic E; Johnson, Michelle J; McGuire, John R

    2009-01-01

    Hand and arm impairment is common after stroke. Robotic stroke therapy will be more effective if hand and upper-arm training is integrated to help users practice reaching and grasping tasks. This article presents the design, development, and validation of a low-cost, functional electrical stimulation grasp-assistive glove for use with task-oriented robotic stroke therapy. Our glove measures grasp aperture while a user completes simple-to-complex real-life activities, and when combined with an integrated functional electrical stimulator, it assists in hand opening and closing. A key function is a new grasp-aperture prediction model, which uses the position of the end-effectors of two planar robots to define the distance between the thumb and index finger. We validated the accuracy and repeatability of the glove and its capability to assist in grasping. Results from five nondisabled subjects indicated that the glove is accurate and repeatable for both static hand-open and -closed tasks when compared with goniometric measures and for dynamic reach-to-grasp tasks when compared with motion analysis measures. Results from five subjects with stroke showed that with the glove, they could open their hands but without it could not. We present a glove that is a low-cost solution for in vivo grasp measurement and assistance.

  10. Constraint-Induced Therapy Combined with Conventional Neurorehabilitation Techniques in Chronic Stroke Patients with Plegic Hands: A Case Series

    PubMed Central

    Taub, Edward; Uswatte, Gitendra; Bowman, Mary H.; Mark, Victor W.; Delgado, Adriana; Bryson, Camille; Morris, David; Bishop-McKay, Staci

    2012-01-01

    Objective To determine in this pilot study whether the combination of CI therapy and conventional rehabilitation techniques can produce meaningful motor improvement in chronic stroke patients with initially fisted hands. In the past, limited success has been achieved using CI therapy alone for stroke patients with plegic hands. Design Case series Setting University hospital outpatient laboratory Participants Consecutive sample of 6 patients > 1 yr post-stroke with plegic hands Interventions Treatment consisted of an initial period of 3 weeks (Phase A) when adaptive equipment in the home, orthotics and splints were employed to improve ability to engage in activities of daily living. This was continued in Phase B, when CI therapy along with selected neurodevelopmental treatment techniques were added. Main Outcome Measures Motor Activity Log (MAL), accelerometry, Fugl-Meyer Motor Assessment (F-M) Results Patients exhibited a large improvement in spontaneous real-world use of the more-affected arm (mean lower-functioning MAL change = 1.3±0.4 points, P <0.001, d′ = 3.0), and a similar pattern of increase in an objective measure of real-world more-affected arm movement (mean change in ratio of more- to less-affected arm accelerometer recordings = 0.12±0.1 points, P = 0.016 d′ = 1.2). A large improvement in motor status was also recorded (mean F-M change = 5.3±3.3 points, P = 0.005, d′ = 1.6). Conclusions The findings of this pilot study suggest that stroke patients with plegic hands can benefit from CI therapy combined with some conventional rehabilitation techniques, even long after brain injury. More research is warranted. PMID:22922823

  11. Advantages of isovolemic hemodilution-red cell exchange therapy to prevent recurrent stroke in sickle cell anemia patients.

    PubMed

    Sarode, Ravi; Matevosyan, Karén; Rogers, Zora R; Burner, James D; Rutherford, Cynthia

    2011-01-01

    Chronic simple hypertransfusion (every 3 to 4 weeks) effectively prevents secondary stroke in children with sickle cell anemia but leads to iron overload despite chelation therapy. Conventional red blood cell exchange (C-RBCx) has advantages over simple transfusion: no net iron gain and less frequent hospital visits. However, C-RBCx requires more red blood cell units, an apheresis instrument and skilled personnel; it is also more expensive. We developed a modified procedure where isovolemic hemodilution precedes RBCx (IHD-RBCx) to decrease RBC units required and to increase the interval between procedures. Twenty patients underwent IHD-RBCx over a period of 7 years. IHD-RBCx required 11% fewer RBC units and increased inter-procedure interval from 37 to 53 days compared to C-RBCx. The median number of annual procedures decreased from 9.8 to 7.0 per patient, resulting in estimated savings of more than $4.5 million over 10 years for 20 patients while providing improved care. Five patients have discontinued chelation therapy; three while on C-RBCx and two while on IHD-RBCx. No adverse events occurred related to the isovolemic hemodilution phase and no patients had recurrent stroke. IHD-RBCx is a safe, efficient, and cost effective therapy for secondary prevention of stroke in patients with sickle cell anemia.

  12. Cerebral Hyperperfusion in a Child with Stroke-Like Migraine Attacks after Radiation Therapy Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ardicli, Didem; Gocmen, Rahsan; Oguz, Kader K; Varan, Ali; Yalnizoglu, Dilek

    2016-08-01

    Stroke-like migraine attacks after radiation therapy (SMART) syndrome is a rare complication of cranial radiotherapy characterized by migraine-like headache and transient neurological deficits with typical gyriform enhancement on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Potential underlying mechanisms are endothelial damage or dysfunction, vascular instability, vasospasm and, neuronal dysfunction.We report an 11-year-old girl with a primary diagnosis of medulloblastoma presented with acute-onset severe headache and left-sided weakness, 20 months after completing cranial radiotherapy. MRI demonstrated unilateral cortical swelling and concomitant leptomeningeal, gyral contrast enhancement, and MR perfusion imaging showed increased cortical perfusion in the right temporo-parieto-occipital region. Her symptoms resolved spontaneously over several days.SMART syndrome appears to be a reversible, long-term complication of cranial radiotherapy. So far, a limited number of pediatric patients with SMART syndrome have been reported. Prompt recognition of clinical signs and radiological imaging of SMART syndrome may help prevent unnecessary interventions and initiate appropriate diagnostic workup and management.

  13. Combinational therapy of ischemic brain stroke by delivery of heme oxygenase-1 gene and dexamethasone.

    PubMed

    Hyun, Hyesun; Lee, Jiyoung; Hwang, Do Won; Kim, Soonhag; Hyun, Dong Keun; Choi, Joon Sig; Lee, Ja-kyeong; Lee, Minhyung

    2011-01-01

    Combinational therapies using genes and drugs are promising therapeutic strategies for various diseases. In this research, a co-delivery carrier of dexamethasone and plasmid DNA (pDNA) was developed by conjugation of dexamethasone to polyethylenimine (2 kDa, PEI2k) for combinational therapy of ischemic brain. Dynamic light scattering, atomic force microscopy and flow cytometry studies showed that the pDNA/dexamethasone-conjugated PEI2k (PEI2k-Dexa) complex was 150 nm in size and was taken up by cells more easily than PEI2k-Dexa only. The tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) level was decreased more efficiently by pDNA/PEI2k-Dexa complex than dexamethasone only in hypoxia activated Raw 264.7 macrophage cells, suggesting that pDNA/PEI2k-Dexa complex increased the delivery efficiency and therapeutic effect of dexamethasone. In in vitro transfection assay, PEI2k-Dexa had higher transfection efficiency than PEI2k and lipofectamine. However, the simple mixture of PEI2k and dexamethasone did not show this effect, suggesting that the conjugation of dexamethasone to polyethylenimine increased DNA delivery efficiency of PEI2k. To evaluate the effects of combinational therapy in vivo, pDNA/PEI2k-Dexa complex was applied to a transient focal ischemia animal model. At 24 h after the injection, mean infarction volume and the TNF-α level were reduced more efficiently in the pDNA/PEI2k-Dexa injection group, compared with the control, pDNA/PEI2k, or dexamethasone injection group. The infarction volume and inflammatory cytokines were further decreased by delivery of pSV-HO-1 using PEI2k-Dexa. Magnetic resonance imaging and microPET studies confirmed the therapeutic effect of pSV-HO-1/PEI2k-Dexa complex at 10 days after the injection. Therefore, pSV-HO-1/PEI2k-Dexa complexes may be useful in combinational therapy for ischemic diseases such as stroke.

  14. A Simulation for Teaching the Basic and Clinical Science of Fluid Therapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rawson, Richard E.; Dispensa, Marilyn E.; Goldstein, Richard E.; Nicholson, Kimberley W.; Vidal, Noni Korf

    2009-01-01

    The course "Management of Fluid and Electrolyte Disorders" is an applied physiology course taught using lectures and paper-based cases. The course approaches fluid therapy from both basic science and clinical perspectives. While paper cases provide a basis for application of basic science concepts, they lack key components of genuine clinical…

  15. Cilium height difference between strokes is more effective in driving fluid transport in mucociliary clearance: A numerical study.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ling; Jiang, Yi

    2015-10-01

    Mucociliary clearance is the first line of defense in our airway. The purpose of this study is to identify and study key factors in the cilia motion that influence the transport ability of the mucociliary system. Using a rod-propel-fluid model, we examine the effects of cilia density, beating frequency, metachronal wavelength, and the extending height of the beating cilia. We first verify that asymmetry in the cilia motion is key to developing transport in the mucus flow. Next, two types of asymmetries between the effective and recovery strokes of the cilia motion are considered, the cilium beating velocity difference and the cilium height difference. We show that the cilium height difference is more efficient in driving the transport, and the more bend the cilium during the recovery stroke is, the more effective the transport would be. It is found that the transport capacity of the mucociliary system increases with cilia density and cilia beating frequency, but saturates above by a threshold value in both density and frequency. The metachronal wave that results from the phase lag among cilia does not contribute much to the mucus transport, which is consistent with the experimental observation of Sleigh (1989). We also test the effect of mucus viscosity, whose value is found to be inversely proportional to the transport ability. While multiple parts have to interplay and coordinate to allow for most effective mucociliary clearance, our findings from a simple model move us closer to understanding the effects of the cilia motion on the efficiency of this clearance system.

  16. Acute Endovascular Reperfusion Therapy in Ischemic Stroke: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials

    PubMed Central

    Osanai, Toshiya; Pasupuleti, Vinay; Deshpande, Abhishek; Thota, Priyaleela; Roman, Yuani; Hernandez, Adrian V.; Uchino, Ken

    2015-01-01

    Background Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of endovascular therapy for acute ischemic stroke have had inconsistent results. We evaluated the efficacy and safety of endovascular therapy in published RCTs. Methods We performed a systematic review of RCTs of endovascular therapy with thrombolytic or mechanical reperfusion compared with interventions without endovascular therapy. Primary outcome was the frequency of good functional outcome (modified Rankin scale (mRS) of 0-2 at 90 days) and secondary outcomes were mortality at 90 days and symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage (sICH). Random-effects meta-analysis was performed and the Cochrane risk of bias assessment was used to evaluate quality of evidence. Results Ten studies involving 1,612 subjects were included. Endovascular therapy was not significantly associated with good functional outcome (Relative Risk [RR] =1.17; 95% CI, 0.97 to 1.42; p=0.10 and Absolute Risk Difference [ARD] =7%; 95%CI -0.1% to 14%; p=0.05); heterogeneity was moderate among studies (I2=30%). Mortality was unchanged with endovascular therapy (RR=0.92; 95 % CI, 0.75 to 1.13; p=0.45) and there was no difference in sICH (RR=1.20; 95 % CI, 0.79 to 1.82; p=0.39). The quality of evidence was low for all outcomes and the recommendation is weak for the use of endovascular therapy as per GRADE methodology. Conclusions Intra-arterial therapy did not show significant increase in good outcomes and no changes in either mortality or sICH in patients with acute ischemic stroke. We need further RCTs with better design and quality to evaluate the true efficacy of endovascular therapy. PMID:25915905

  17. Stroke volume changes induced by a recruitment maneuver predict fluid responsiveness in patients with protective ventilation in the operating theater

    PubMed Central

    De Broca, Bruno; Garnier, Jeremie; Fischer, Marc-Olivier; Archange, Thomas; Marc, Julien; Abou-Arab, Osama; Dupont, Hervé; Lorne, Emmanuel; Guinot, Pierre-grégoire

    2016-01-01

    Abstract During abdominal surgery, the use of protective ventilation with a low tidal volume, positive expiratory pressure (PEEP) and recruitment maneuvers (RMs) may limit the applicability of dynamic preload indices. The objective of the present study was to establish whether or not the variation in stroke volume (SV) during an RM could predict fluid responsiveness. We prospectively included patients receiving protective ventilation (tidal volume: 6 mL kg−1, PEEP: 5–7 cmH2O; RMs). Hemodynamic variables, such as heart rate, arterial pressure, SV, cardiac output (CO), respiratory variation in SV (ΔrespSV) and pulse pressure (ΔrespPP), and the variation in SV (ΔrecSV) as well as pulse pressure (ΔrecPP) during an RM were measured at baseline, at the end of the RM, and after fluid expansion. Responders were defined as patients with an SV increase of at least 15% after infusion of 500 mL of crystalloid solution. Thirty-seven (62%) of the 60 included patients were responders. Responders and nonresponders differed significantly in terms of the median ΔrecSV (26% [19–37] vs 10% [4–12], respectively; P < 0.0001). A ΔrecSV value more than 16% predicted fluid responsiveness with an area under the receiver-operating characteristic curve (AU) of 0.95 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.91–0.99; P < 0.0001) and a narrow gray zone between 15% and 17%. The area under the curve values for ΔrecPP and ΔrespSV were, respectively, 0.81 (95%CI: 0.7–0.91; P = 0.0001) and 0.80 (95%CI: 0.70–0.94; P < 0.0001). ΔrespPP did not predict fluid responsiveness. During abdominal surgery with protective ventilation, a ΔrecSV value more than 16% accurately predicted fluid responsiveness and had a narrow gray zone (between 15% and 17%). ΔrecPP and ΔrespSV (but not ΔrespPP) were also predictive. PMID:27428237

  18. Use of a Diagnostic Score to Prioritize Computed Tomographic (CT) Imaging for Patients Suspected of Ischemic Stroke Who May Benefit from Thrombolytic Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Bots, Michiel L.; Selvarajah, Sharmini; Kappelle, L. Jaap; Abdul Aziz, Zariah; Sidek, Norsima Nazifah; Vaartjes, Ilonca

    2016-01-01

    Background A shortage of computed tomographic (CT) machines in low and middle income countries often results in delayed CT imaging for patients suspected of a stroke. Yet, time constraint is one of the most important aspects for patients with an ischemic stroke to benefit from thrombolytic therapy. We set out to assess whether application of the Siriraj Stroke Score is able to assist physicians in prioritizing patients with a high probability of having an ischemic stroke for urgent CT imaging. Methods From the Malaysian National Neurology Registry, we selected patients aged 18 years and over with clinical features suggesting of a stroke, who arrived in the hospital 4.5 hours or less from ictus. The prioritization of receiving CT imaging was left to the discretion of the treating physician. We applied the Siriraj Stroke Score to all patients, refitted the score and defined a cut-off value to best distinguish an ischemic stroke from a hemorrhagic stroke. Results Of the 2176 patients included, 73% had an ischemic stroke. Only 33% of the ischemic stroke patients had CT imaging within 4.5 hours. The median door-to-scan time for these patients was 4 hours (IQR: 1;16). With the recalibrated score, it would have been possible to prioritize 95% (95% CI: 94%–96%) of patients with an ischemic stroke for urgent CT imaging. Conclusions In settings where CT imaging capacity is limited, we propose the use of the Siriraj Stroke Score to prioritize patients with a probable ischemic stroke for urgent CT imaging. PMID:27768752

  19. Effects of virtual reality training with modified constraint-induced movement therapy on upper extremity function in acute stage stroke: a preliminary study

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Eun-Kyu; Lee, Sang-Heon

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of virtual reality training combined with modified constraint-induced movement therapy on upper extremity motor function recovery in acute stage stroke patients. [Subjects and Methods] Four acute stage stroke patients participated in the study. A multiple baseline single subject experimental design was utilized. Modified constraint-induced movement therapy was used according to the EXplaining PLastICITy after stroke protocol during baseline sessions. Virtual reality training with modified constraint-induced movement therapy was applied during treatment sessions. The Manual Function Test and the Box and Block Test were used to measure upper extremity function before every session. [Results] The subjects’ upper extremity function improved during the intervention period. [Conclusion] Virtual reality training combined with modified constraint-induced movement is effective for upper extremity function recovery in acute stroke patients. PMID:27942143

  20. Effects of virtual reality training with modified constraint-induced movement therapy on upper extremity function in acute stage stroke: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Ji, Eun-Kyu; Lee, Sang-Heon

    2016-11-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of virtual reality training combined with modified constraint-induced movement therapy on upper extremity motor function recovery in acute stage stroke patients. [Subjects and Methods] Four acute stage stroke patients participated in the study. A multiple baseline single subject experimental design was utilized. Modified constraint-induced movement therapy was used according to the EXplaining PLastICITy after stroke protocol during baseline sessions. Virtual reality training with modified constraint-induced movement therapy was applied during treatment sessions. The Manual Function Test and the Box and Block Test were used to measure upper extremity function before every session. [Results] The subjects' upper extremity function improved during the intervention period. [Conclusion] Virtual reality training combined with modified constraint-induced movement is effective for upper extremity function recovery in acute stroke patients.

  1. Detecting nonvalvular atrial fibrillation and anticoagulant therapy in cardioembolic ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Min, Jiangyong; Farooq, Muhammad Umar

    2016-08-01

    Nonvalvular Atrial fibrillation (NVAF) is the most common cardiac arrhythmia associated with an increase in risk of stroke and systemic thromboembolism. Strokes related to AF are associated with higher mortality, greater disability, longer hospital stays, and lower chance of being discharged home. The present review will focus on the current status of detecting NVAF and stroke prevention when there is AF. The CHA2DS2-VASc risk stratification scheme is discussed for the identification of patients who are at risk for thromboembolic stroke related to NVAF. Patient with a CHA2DS2-VASc score of 2 or greater are candidates for warfarin or a novel oral anticoagulant, irrespective of whether the strategy is for rate or rhythm control. Finally, guidelines and landmark clinical trials in NVAF patients with primary or secondary stroke prevention are discussed.

  2. Adherence to Guidelines for Antithrombotic Therapy in Patients with Atrial Fibrillation According to CHADS2 Score before and after Stroke: A Multicenter Observational Study from Korea

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Wook-Joo; Park, Jong-Moo; Kang, Kyusik; Cho, Yong-Jin; Hong, Keun-Sik; Lee, Soo Joo; Ko, Youngchai; Lee, Kyung Bok; Park, Tai Hwan; Lee, Jun; Cha, Jae-Kwan; Kim, Dae-Hyun; Yu, Kyung-Ho; Lee, Byung-Chul; Oh, Mi-Sun; Lee, Juneyoung; Lee, JiSung; Jang, Myung Suk; Han, Moon-Ku

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose A substantial proportion of patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) are not treated optimally; however, the inappropriateness of drug therapy has never been evaluated before or after a stroke event. We investigated the adherence to guidelines for therapy in AF patients hospitalized with acute ischemic stroke (AIS) before stroke onset and at discharge, with the aim of identifying the factors associated with inappropriate therapy. Methods AIS patients with AF hospitalized within 7 days of onset were identified from a prospective nine-center stroke registry database. Two cohorts were defined: patients diagnosed with AF prior to the stroke event (admission cohort) and patients diagnosed with AF at discharge from hospital (discharge cohort). Any of the following conditions were regarded as nonadherence to guidelines in this study: use of anticoagulant or nonuse of antithrombotics with CHADS2 score=0, nonuse of antithrombotics with CHADS2 score=1, or nonuse of anticoagulant with CHADS2 score ≥2. Results Overall, 406 patients were enrolled in the admission cohort and 518 in the discharge cohort. The rates of nonadherence before a stroke event and at discharge were 77.8% and 33.3%, respectively. These rates varied widely for both cohorts, with interhospital differences being statistically significant. Multivariable analysis revealed that old age, stroke history, and congestive heart failure were associated with nonadherence before stroke. At discharge, males, coronary heart disease, inappropriate antithrombotic use before stroke, and functional disability at discharge were associated with nonadherence. Conclusions This study shows that antithrombotic use in AIS patients with AF might be not optimal before and after stroke in Korea. PMID:26541495

  3. Effect of Integrated Cognitive Therapy on Hippocampal Functional Connectivity Patterns in Stroke Patients with Cognitive Dysfunction: A Resting-State fMRI Study

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Shanli; Jiang, Cai; Ye, Haicheng; Tao, Jing; Huang, Jia; Gao, Yanling; Lin, Zhicheng; Chen, Lidian

    2014-01-01

    Objective. This study aimed to identify abnormal hippocampal functional connectivity (FC) following ischemic stroke using resting-state fMRI. We also explored whether abnormal hippocampal FC could be modulated by integrated cognitive therapy and tested whether these alterations were associated with cognitive performance. Methods. 18 right-handed cognitively impaired ischemic stroke patients and 18 healty control (HC) subjects were included in this study. Stroke subjects were scanned at baseline and after integrated cognitive therapy, while HCs were only scanned at baseline, to identify regions that show significant correlations with the seed region. Behavioral and cognitive assessments were obtained before each scan. Results. During the resting state, we found abnormal hippocampal FC associated with temporal regions, insular cortex, cerebellum, and prefrontal cortex in stroke patients compared to HCs. After integrated cognitive therapy, however, the stroke group showed increased hippocampal FC mainly located in the prefrontal gyrus and the default mode network (DMN). Altered hippocampal FC was associated with cognitive improvement. Conclusion. Resting-state fMRI may provide novel insight into the study of functional networks in the brain after stroke. Furthermore, altered hippocampal FC may be a compensatory mechanism for cognitive recovery after ischemic stroke. PMID:25548595

  4. Mirror therapy combined with biofeedback functional electrical stimulation for motor recovery of upper extremities after stroke: a pilot randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jung Hee; Lee, Byoung-Hee

    2015-06-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of mirror therapy in combination with biofeedback functional electrical stimulation (BF-FES) on motor recovery of the upper extremities after stroke. Twenty-nine patients who suffered a stroke > 6 months prior participated in this study and were randomly allocated to three groups. The BF-FES + mirror therapy and FES + mirror therapy groups practiced training for 5 × 30 min sessions over a 4-week period. The control group received a conventional physical therapy program. The following clinical tools were used to assess motor recovery of the upper extremities: electrical muscle tester, electrogoniometer, dual-inclinometer, electrodynamometer, the Box and Block Test (BBT) and Jabsen Taylor Hand Function Test (JHFT), the Functional Independence Measure, the Modified Ashworth Scale, and the Stroke Specific Quality of Life (SSQOL) assessment. The BF-FES + mirror therapy group showed significant improvement in wrist extension as revealed by the Manual Muscle Test and Range of Motion (p < 0.05). The BF-FES + mirror therapy group showed significant improvement in the BBT, JTHT, and SSQOL compared with the FES + mirror therapy group and control group (p < 0.05). We found that BF-FES + mirror therapy induced motor recovery and improved quality of life. These results suggest that mirror therapy, in combination with BF-FES, is feasible and effective for motor recovery of the upper extremities after stroke.

  5. Brain hemorrhage after endovascular reperfusion therapy of ischemic stroke: a threshold-finding whole-brain perfusion CT study.

    PubMed

    Renú, Arturo; Laredo, Carlos; Tudela, Raúl; Urra, Xabier; Lopez-Rueda, Antonio; Llull, Laura; Oleaga, Laura; Amaro, Sergio; Chamorro, Ángel

    2017-01-01

    Endovascular reperfusion therapy is increasingly used for acute ischemic stroke treatment. The occurrence of parenchymal hemorrhage is clinically relevant and increases with reperfusion therapies. Herein we aimed to examine the optimal perfusion CT-derived parameters and the impact of the duration of brain ischemia for the prediction of parenchymal hemorrhage after endovascular therapy. A cohort of 146 consecutive patients with anterior circulation occlusions and treated with endovascular reperfusion therapy was analyzed. Recanalization was assessed at the end of reperfusion treatment, and the rate of parenchymal hemorrhage at follow-up neuroimaging. In regression analyses, cerebral blood volume and cerebral blood flow performed better than Delay Time maps for the prediction of parenchymal hemorrhage. The most informative thresholds (receiver operating curves) for relative cerebral blood volume and relative cerebral blood flow were values lower than 2.5% of normal brain. In binary regression analyses, the volume of regions with reduced relative cerebral blood volume and/or relative cerebral blood flow was significantly associated with an increased risk of parenchymal hemorrhage, as well as delayed vessel recanalization. These results highlight the relevance of the severity and duration of ischemia as drivers of blood-brain barrier disruption in acute ischemic stroke and support the role of perfusion CT for the prediction of parenchymal hemorrhage.

  6. Efficiency of physical therapy on postural imbalance after stroke: study protocol for a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Hugues, A; Di Marco, J; Janiaud, P; Xue, Y; Pires, J; Khademi, H; Cucherat, M; Bonan, I; Gueyffier, F; Rode, G

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Stroke frequently results in balance disorders, leading to lower levels of activity and a diminution in autonomy. Current physical therapies (PT) aiming to reduce postural imbalance have shown a large variety of effects with low levels of evidence. The objectives are to determine the efficiency of PT in recovering from postural imbalance in patients after a stroke and to assess which PT is more effective. Methods and analysis We will search several databases from inception to October 2015. Only randomised controlled trials assessing PT to recover from poststroke postural imbalance in adults will be considered. Outcome measures will be the Berg Balance Scale (BBS), the Postural Assessment Scale for Stroke (PASS), the ‘weight-bearing asymmetry’ (WBA), the ‘centre of pressure’ (COP) and the ‘limit of stability’ (LOS). WBA, COP and LOS are measured by a (sitting or standing) static evaluation on force plate or another device. Two independent reviewers will screen titles, abstracts and full-text articles, evaluate the risk of bias and will perform data extraction. In addition to the outcomes, measures of independence will be analysed. This study will aim at determining the effects of PT on the function (WBA, COP, LOS), the activity (BBS, PASS) and the independence of patients. Subgroup analyses will be planned according to the location of brain lesion (hemispheric, brainstem or cerebellum), the time since stroke (early, late, chronic), the PT (type, main aim (direct effect or generalisation), overall duration), the type of approaches (top-down or bottom-up) and the methodological quality of studies. Ethics and dissemination No ethical statement will be required. The results will be published in a peer-reviewed journal. This meta-analysis aims at managing the rehabilitation after postural imbalance by PT after a stroke. Trial registration number Prospero CRD42016037966;Pre-results. PMID:28137928

  7. Effects of upper limb robot-assisted therapy on motor recovery of subacute stroke patients: a kinematic approach.

    PubMed

    Mazzoleni, Stefano; Carrozza, Maria Chiara; Sale, Patrizio; Franceschini, Marco; Posteraro, Federico; Tiboni, Micol

    2013-06-01

    The goal of this study is to evaluate the effects of upper limb robot-assisted treatment in a group of 25 subacute post-stroke patients using clinical outcome measures and kinematic parameters. Fugl-Meyer (FM) Assessment scale and Motricity Index (MI) were used for clinical assessment, and a set of kinematic parameters was computed. A significant decrease in motor impairment after the robot-assisted treatment (FM p<0.05 and MI p<0.05) was found. Significant improvements of upper limb motor performance was found after 2 weeks (p<0.001); subsequently, no further significant improvements were observed. Our results confirm that robotic treatment is effective to reduce upper limb motor impairment in subacute stroke patients. Kinematic parameters can provide important information on mechanisms underlying motor recovery and the frequent assessment of their values can contribute to identify an appropriate number of robotic therapy sessions as to reach soon substantial improvements.

  8. Robot-aided therapy on the upper limb of subacute and chronic stroke patients: a biomechanical approach.

    PubMed

    Mazzoleni, S; Filippi, M; Carrozza, M C; Posteraro, F; Puzzolante, L; Falchi, E

    2011-01-01

    The goal of this study is to propose a methodology for evaluating recovery mechanisms in subacute and chronic post-stroke patients after a robot-aided upper-limb therapy, using a set of biomechanical parameters. Fifty-six post-stroke subjects, thirteen subacute and forty-three chronic patients participated in the study. A 2 dof robotic system, implementing an "assist-as-needed" control strategy, was used. Biomechanical parameters related (i) to the speed measured at the robot's end-effector and (ii) to the movement's smoothness were computed. Outcome clinical measures show a decrease in motor impairment after the treatment both in chronic and subacute patients. All the biomechanical parameters show an improvement between admission and discharge. Our results show that the robot-aided training can contribute to reduce the motor impairment in both subacute and chronic patients and identify neurophysiological mechanisms underlying the different stages of motor recovery.

  9. High signal in cerebrospinal fluid mimicking subarachnoid haemorrhage on FLAIR following acute stroke and intravenous contrast medium.

    PubMed

    Dechambre, S D; Duprez, T; Grandin, C B; Lecouvet, F E; Peeters, A; Cosnard, G

    2000-08-01

    We describe five cases of high signal in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) on fast-FLAIR images 24-48 h after onset of stroke. All the patients had undergone perfusion-weighted MRI within 6 h of the onset of the symptoms. The CSF was far brighter than the cortical gyri. The high signal was diffusely around both cerebral hemispheres in two cases and around one hemisphere in two others; it was focal, around the acute ischaemic lesion, in one. CT was normal in all cases. The CSF high signal was transient, decreasing in extent and intensity with time and resolving completely within 3-6 days. It was not associated with worsening of the clinical state or poor outcome. Our explanation of this phenomena is hypothetical: we speculate that it could be due to disruption of the blood-brain barrier resulting in leakage of protein, gadolinium chelates, or both in to the subarachnoid space. It should not be confused with subarachnoid haemorrhage.

  10. Influence of previous physical activity on the outcome of patients treated by thrombolytic therapy for stroke.

    PubMed

    Decourcelle, Amélie; Moulin, Solène; Sibon, Igor; Murao, Kei; Ronzière, Thomas; Godefroy, Olivier; Poli, Mathilde; Cordonnier, Charlotte; Sagnier, Sharmila; Lassalle, Veronica; Okada, Yasushi; Mas, Jean-Louis; Bordet, Régis; Leys, Didier

    2015-11-01

    Physical activity prevents stroke and is associated with less severe strokes. The neuroprotective effect in patients treated with intravenous (i.v.) recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rt-PA), remains uncertain. We aimed at evaluating the relationship between previous physical activity and outcomes in stroke patients treated with i.v. rt-PA. OPHELIE-SPORT was a prospective observational multicenter study conducted in French and Japanese stroke patients treated with i.v. rt-PA. We evaluated the presence, weekly duration (<2, 2-5, >5 h) and intensity (light, moderate, heavy) of previous leisure-time physical activity according to standardized criteria. The primary end-point was an excellent outcome [modified Rankin Scale (mRS) 0-1 or similar to the pre-stroke mRS] after 3 months. Secondary end-points were good outcome (mRS 0-2 or similar to the pre-stroke mRS), and death. Of 519 patients, 74 (14.3 %) had regular physical activity before stroke. They were 14 years younger (p < 0.001), treated 25 min earlier (p = 0.004) and more likely to be men, free of pre-stroke handicap (mRS = 0), atrial fibrillation, arterial hypertension, and diabetes mellitus. National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale scores, at baseline (p = 0.183) and 24 h later (p = 0.203), did not differ between patients with and without physical activity. After adjustment on confounders, there was no association between previous leisure-time physical activity and outcome. Outcomes 3 months after treatment of cerebral ischaemia with i.v. rt-PA are not influenced by previous physical activity.

  11. Susceptibility weighted imaging of stroke brain in response to normobaric oxygen (NBO) therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Iris Y.; Igarashi, Takahiro; Guo, Yingkun; Sun, Phillip Z.

    2015-03-01

    The neuroprotective effect of oxygen leads to recent interest in normobaric oxygen (NBO) therapy after acute ischemic stroke. However, the mechanism remains unclear and inconsistent outcomes were reported in human studies. Because NBO aims to improve brain tissue oxygenation by enhancing oxygen delivery to ischemic tissue, monitoring the oxygenation level changes in response to NBO becomes necessary to elucidate the mechanism and to assess the efficacy. Susceptibility weighted imaging (SWI) which provides a new MRI contrast by combining the magnitude and phase images is fit for purpose. SWI is sensitive to deoxyhemoglobin level changes and thus can be used to evaluate the cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen. In this study, SWI was used for in vivo monitoring of oxygenation changes in a rat model of permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) before, during and after 30 min of NBO treatment. Regions of interest in ischemic core, penumbra and contralateral normal area were generated based on diffusionweighted imaging and perfusion imaging. Significant differences in SWI indicating different oxygenation levels were generally found: contralateral normal > penumbra > ischemic core. Ischemic core showed insignificant increase in oxygenation during NBO and returned to pre-treatment level after termination of NBO. Meanwhile, the oxygenation levels slightly increased in contralateral normal and penumbra regions during NBO and significantly decreased to a level lower than pre-treatment after termination of NBO, indicating secondary metabolic disruption upon the termination of transient metabolic support from oxygen. Further investigation of NBO effect combined with reperfusion is necessary while SWI can be used to detect hemorrhagic transformation after reperfusion.

  12. The potential of transcranial magnetotherapy in color and rhythm therapy in the rehabilitation of ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Sholomov, I I; Cherevashchenko, L A; Suprunov, O V; Raigorodskii, Yu M

    2010-10-01

    A total of 116 patients with ischemic stroke were studied during the early recovery period. The patients were divided into four groups - three experimental groups and one control group. Of these, 87 patients in the first three groups received transcranial magneto- and/or color and rhythm therapy (TcMT, CRT) along with traditional treatment, while the 29 patients of the control group received basal treatment only. TcMT was performed using a bitemporal method, with a running field regime with a modulation frequency of 1-10 Hz. CRT consisted of an alternating scheme of stimulation of the left and right eyes with green and/or blue light with a period of 2-4 sec and an on time of 1 sec. Each of the three experimental groups (group 1 received TcMT, group 2 received CRT, and group 3 received TcMT + CRT) received two courses of treatment separated by 1.5 months. After treatment, all experimental groups, particularly group 3, showed more marked improvements than the control group. Regression of neurological symptomatology on the Lindmark scale in group 3 was 9.5% greater than that in controls; improvements in impairments to activity and self-care ability on the Barthel scale were greater by 8.8%; memory and intellectual changes were also seen on the MMSE and the Luriya and Schulte tests. Rheography and electroencephalography demonstrated significant improvements in hemodynamics and alpha-rhythm differentiation and a 14.6% reduction in the proportion of patients with dysrhythmia in group 3 compared with the control group. The best result on all measures were obtained in patients given the combination of TcMT and CRT; TcMT had the greater influence on hemodynamics, while CRT had the greater effect on psychoemotional status. Both treatments were well tolerated and produced no side effects.

  13. Intracranial pressure elevation after ischemic stroke in rats: cerebral edema is not the only cause, and short-duration mild hypothermia is a highly effective preventive therapy

    PubMed Central

    Murtha, Lucy A; McLeod, Damian D; Pepperall, Debbie; McCann, Sarah K; Beard, Daniel J; Tomkins, Amelia J; Holmes, William M; McCabe, Christopher; Macrae, I Mhairi; Spratt, Neil J

    2015-01-01

    In both the human and animal literature, it has largely been assumed that edema is the primary cause of intracranial pressure (ICP) elevation after stroke and that more edema equates to higher ICP. We recently demonstrated a dramatic ICP elevation 24 hours after small ischemic strokes in rats, with minimal edema. This ICP elevation was completely prevented by short-duration moderate hypothermia soon after stroke. Here, our aims were to determine the importance of edema in ICP elevation after stroke and whether mild hypothermia could prevent the ICP rise. Experimental stroke was performed in rats. ICP was monitored and short-duration mild (35 °C) or moderate (32.5 °C) hypothermia, or normothermia (37 °C) was induced after stroke onset. Edema was measured in three studies, using wet–dry weight calculations, T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging, or histology. ICP increased 24 hours after stroke onset in all normothermic animals. Short-duration mild or moderate hypothermia prevented this rise. No correlation was seen between ΔICP and edema or infarct volumes. Calculated rates of edema growth were orders of magnitude less than normal cerebrospinal fluid production rates. These data challenge current concepts and suggest that factors other than cerebral edema are the primary cause of the ICP elevation 24 hours after stroke onset. PMID:25515213

  14. A Clinical Approach to Antioxidant Therapy: Hypertonic Fluid Resuscitation Trial

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-06-01

    5 2. Experimental Section...limited forward surgical care and delayed evacuation.[9] 1.1.1 Current Fluid Resuscitation Standard of Care By virtue of clinical experience , low cost...bleeding, thereby potentially increasing mortality. Indeed, evidence from experimental animal studies suggests that small-volume hypotensive

  15. An investigation of fluid flow during induction stroke of a water analog model of an IC engine using an innovative optical velocimetry concept: LIPA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stier, Bernd; Falco, R. E.

    1994-01-01

    Optical measurements on an axisymmetrical quartz component engine research model were made to evaluate the flow field encountered during induction. The measurement technique is LIPA (Laser Induced Photochemical Anemometry), a non-intrusive velocimetry concept that provides an investigator of fluid flow with a tool to attain planar information about three-dimensional velocity and vorticity vectors in a single measurement step. The goal of this investigation is to further develop this measurement technique and apply it to study the induction stroke of a water analog model of a four-stroke internal combustion engine. The research conducted in the water analog model is a fundamental scientific inquiry into the flow fields that develop in the induction stroke of an engine at idling engine speeds. As this is the first investigation of its kind using LIPA technique, our goal has been to quantify, in a preliminary manner, the flow field features that develop during the intake stroke. In the process a more comprehensive understanding of the flow field features was developed, and tied to the quantification. The study evaluated the flow field of the intake stroke by estimating fields of velocity and vorticity. On the basis of these data, information about fluid dynamics during induction at engine speeds of 10, 20, and 30 RPM (corresponding to 170, 340, and 510 RPM respectively, when air is the flowing medium) for three different valve lifts was obtained. The overall development of the flow field, its energy content (kinetic, fluctuation) for the different settings of the engine parameters, vorticity information, and cyclic variations have been quantified. These have been discussed in terms of mixing performance.

  16. Drip-and-Ship Thrombolytic Therapy Supported by the Telestroke System for Acute Ischemic Stroke Patients Living in Medically Under-served Areas

    PubMed Central

    KAGEJI, Teruyoshi; OBATA, Fumiaki; OKA, Hirofumi; KANEMATSU, Yasuhisa; TABATA, Ryo; TANI, Kenji; BANDO, Hiroyasu; NAGAHIRO, Shinji

    2016-01-01

    There are a few stroke specialists in medically under-served areas in Japan. Consequently, in remote area patients may not receive thrombolysis with intravenous recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (iv rt-PA), the standard treatment for acute ischemic stroke. Using a mobile telestroke support system (TSS) that accesses the internet via a smart phone, we implemented iv rt-PA infusion therapy under a drip-and-ship protocol to treat the stroke patients in medically under-served areas. The physicians at the Tokushima Prefectural Kaifu Hospital (TPKH), located in rural Japan, can relay CT or MRI scans and other patient data via their smart phone to off-site stroke specialists. In the course of 34 months, we used the TSS in 321 emergencies. A total of 9 of 188 (4.8%) with acute ischemic stroke, received iv rt-PA infusion therapy using a mobile TSS; in 5 among these (55.6%), we obtained partial or complete recanalization of occluded arteries. None suffered post-treatment hemorrhage and their average NIH stroke score fell from 14.6 at the time of admission to 6.8 at 24 h post-infusion. The drip-and-ship protocol contributed to the safe and effective treatment of the stroke patients living in medically under-served rural areas. PMID:27333939

  17. Analysis of affected and non-affected sides of stroke hemiparalysis patients and correlations between rehabilitation therapy assessments using the bioelectrical impedance analysis method

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, ChanUk; Suh, SeongKyo; Kim, YoungGyu

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the use of bioelectrical impedance analysis as an appropriate rehabilitation therapy evaluation tool for stroke hemiplegic patients. [Subjects and Methods] A group of 20 stroke patients diagnosed with stroke hemiplegia who underwent stroke rehabilitation from October to November 2015 participated in this study. Using bioelectrical impedance analysis, stroke hemiparalysis patients were examined, and the affected and non-affected sides were compared. This correlation between impedance measurement values and rehabilitation therapy as an assessment tool was determined. [Results] According to the whole-body bioimpedance measurements, prediction markers, reactances, and phase angles, there were significant differences between the non-affected and affected sides, and bioimpedance had a positive correlation with hand grip power, manual dexterity of hand function, and ability to perform activities of daily living. [Conclusion] There were significant differences between the impedance values of the affected and non-affected sides of hemiplegic stroke patients. These results suggest that bioelectrical impedance analysis can be used as an assessment during the rehabilitation of stroke patients. PMID:28174440

  18. Effects of goal-directed fluid therapy with different lactated Ringer's: hydroxyethyl starch ratios in hemorrhagic shock dogs.

    PubMed

    Tao, J P; Huang, Q Q; Huang, H Q; Yang, J J; Shi, M; Zhou, Y; Wan, L J; Zhou, C; Ou, Y J; Tong, Y Y; Yang, D G; Si, Y Y

    2015-06-18

    The effects of goal-directed fluid therapy, with lactated Ringer's (LR) and 6% hydroxyethyl starch (HES) solution, on hemorrhagic shock dogs are unknown. We aimed to determine the optimal LR: HES ratio for the resuscitation of hemorrhagic shock dogs. Hemorrhagic shock was induced in 40 ventilated dogs by drawing an estimated 60% blood volume. The animals were randomly divided into five groups (N = 8) according to the LR: HES ratio of the resuscitation fluid (3:1, 2:1, 1:1, 1:2, and 1:3), and were then resuscitated for 24 h to reach the stroke volume variation (SVV) and hemoglobin (Hb) goals by fluid infusion and autologous blood perfusion. The extravascular lung water index (EVLWI), pH, partial pressure of oxygen (PaO2), base excess (BE), sodium, chloride, Hb and creatinine clearance (Clearcrea) were checked after 24 h (R24). The EVLWI of the 3:1 group at R24 were higher than that of the 1:3 group and the baseline value (P < 0.05), whereas the PaO2 was lower (P < 0.05). In contrast to the 3:1 group at R24 and baseline, plasma chloride and sodium in the 1:3 and 1:2 groups increased; however, pH, BE, and Clearcrea decreased (P < 0.05). No significant differences were found in the 1:1 and 2:1 groups at R24 compared with baseline (P > 0.05). Resuscitation with LR and HES at 2:1 and 1:1 ratios are superior in maintaining the acid-base, electrolyte, and lung water balances as well as renal function in hemorrhagic shock dogs than at ratios of 3:l, 1:2, and1:3.

  19. Interstitial fluid drainage is impaired in ischemic stroke and Alzheimer's disease mouse models.

    PubMed

    Arbel-Ornath, Michal; Hudry, Eloise; Eikermann-Haerter, Katharina; Hou, Steven; Gregory, Julia L; Zhao, Lingzhi; Betensky, Rebecca A; Frosch, Matthew P; Greenberg, Steven M; Bacskai, Brian J

    2013-09-01

    The interstitial fluid (ISF) drainage pathway has been hypothesized to underlie the clearance of solutes and metabolites from the brain. Previous work has implicated the perivascular spaces along arteries as the likely route for ISF clearance; however, it has never been demonstrated directly. The accumulation of amyloid β (Aβ) peptides in brain parenchyma is one of the pathological hallmarks of Alzheimer disease (AD), and it is likely related to an imbalance between production and clearance of the peptide. Aβ drainage along perivascular spaces has been postulated to be one of the mechanisms that mediate the peptide clearance from the brain. We therefore devised a novel method to visualize solute clearance in real time in the living mouse brain using laser guided bolus dye injections and multiphoton imaging. This methodology allows high spatial and temporal resolution and revealed the kinetics of ISF clearance. We found that the ISF drains along perivascular spaces of arteries and capillaries but not veins, and its clearance exhibits a bi-exponential profile. ISF drainage requires a functional vasculature, as solute clearance decreased when perfusion was impaired. In addition, reduced solute clearance was observed in transgenic mice with significant vascular amyloid deposition; we suggest the existence of a feed-forward mechanism, by which amyloid deposition promotes further amyloid deposition. This important finding provides a mechanistic link between cerebrovascular disease and Alzheimer disease and suggests that facilitation of Aβ clearance along the perivascular pathway should be considered as a new target for therapeutic approaches to Alzheimer disease and cerebral amyloid angiopathy.

  20. Physical therapy applications of MR fluids and intelligent control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Shufang; Lu, Ke-Qian; Sun, J. Q.; Rudolph, Katherine

    2005-05-01

    Resistance exercise has been widely reported to have positive rehabilitation effects for patients with neuromuscular and orthopaedic conditions. This paper presents an optimal design of magneto-rheological fluid dampers for variable resistance exercise devices. Adaptive controls for regulating the resistive force or torque of the device as well as the joint motion are presented. The device provides both isometric and isokinetic strength training for various human joints.

  1. Risk factors for intracranial hemorrhage and nonhemorrhagic stroke after fibrinolytic therapy (from the GUSTO-i trial).

    PubMed

    Kandzari, David E; Granger, Christopher B; Simoons, Maarten L; White, Harvey D; Simes, John; Mahaffey, Kenneth W; Gore, Joel; Weaver, W Douglas; Longstreth, William T; Stebbins, Amanda; Lee, Kerry L; Califf, Robert M; Topol, Eric J

    2004-02-15

    Of 592 patients in the Global Utilization of Streptokinase and tPA for Occluded Arteries-I trial who had a stroke during initial hospitalization, the risk for intracranial hemorrhage was significantly greater in those with recent facial or head trauma (odds ratio 13.0, 95% confidence interval 3.4 to 85.5); dementia was additionally associated with an increased risk for intracranial hemorrhage (odds ratio 3.4, 95% confidence interval 1.2 to 10.2). Because facial or head trauma may greatly influence treatment decisions, this risk factor should be incorporated into models designed to estimate the risks and benefits of fibrinolytic therapy.

  2. Advances in Astrocyte-targeted Approaches for Stroke Therapy: An Emerging Role for Mitochondria and microRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Stary, Creed M.; Giffard, Rona G.

    2014-01-01

    Astrocytes are critical regulators of neuronal function and an effective target for stroke therapy in animal models. Identifying individual targets with the potential for simultaneous activation of multiple downstream pathways that regulate astrocyte homeostasis may be a necessary element for successful clinical translation. Mitochondria and microRNAs each represent individual targets with multi-modal therapeutic potential. Mitochondria regulate metabolism and apoptosis, while microRNAs have the capacity to bind and inhibit numerous mRNAs. By combining strategies targeted at maintaining astrocyte function during and following cerebral ischemia, a synergistic therapeutic effect may be achieved. PMID:24993363

  3. Perioperative nutritional support and fluid therapy in patients with liver diseases.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yongliang; Yang, Zhiying; Tan, Haidong

    2014-06-01

    The prevalence of liver dysfunction and malnutrition is common among patients with obstructive jaundice or cirrhosis, the poor nutrition status in patients with indications for hepatic resection increases the risk of postoperative complications and/or mortality. Hepatic surgery significantly affects body's metabolism and environment. Therefore, it is very important for patients with liver diseases undergoing hepatic surgery to receive essential nutritional support and fluid therapy during perioperative period. There are several principles in nutritional support and fluid therapy that surgeons need to pay attention to, for example, time, nutritional approach, fluid volume, choice of fat emulsions and amino acids. Some issues, such as albumin and plasma application, choice of crystalloid and colloid, liver protective therapy, also need further attention.

  4. Pediatric Stroke

    MedlinePlus

    ... News About Neurology Image Library Search The Internet Stroke Center Patients & Families About Stroke Stroke Diagnosis Stroke ... communicate with your child’s doctor. Symptoms of a Stroke Stroke is an injury to part of the ...

  5. Isolation and purification of self-renewable human neural stem cells for cell therapy in experimental model of ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Azevedo-Pereira, Ricardo L; Daadi, Marcel M

    2013-01-01

    Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) are pluripotent with a strong self-renewable ability making them a virtually unlimited source of neural cells for structural repair in neurological disorders. Currently, hESCs are one of the most promising cell sources amenable for commercialization of off-shelf cell therapy products. However, along with this strong proliferative capacity of hESCs comes the tumorigenic potential of these cells after transplantation. Thus, the isolation and purification of a homogeneous, population of neural stem cells (hNSCs) are of paramount importance to avoid tumor formation in the host brain. This chapter describes the isolation, neuralization, and long-term perpetuation of hNSCs derived from hESCs through use of specific mitogenic growth factors and the preparation of hNSCs for transplantation in an experimental model of stroke. Additionally, we describe methods to analyze the stroke and size of grafts using magnetic resonance imaging and Osirix software, and neuroanatomical tracing procedures to study axonal remodeling after stroke and cell transplantation.

  6. Transfusional iron overload in children with sickle cell anemia on chronic transfusion therapy for secondary stroke prevention.

    PubMed

    Kwiatkowski, Janet L; Cohen, Alan R; Garro, Julian; Alvarez, Ofelia; Nagasubramanian, Ramamorrthy; Sarnaik, Sharada; Thompson, Alexis; Woods, Gerald M; Schultz, William; Mortier, Nicole; Lane, Peter; Mueller, Brigitta; Yovetich, Nancy; Ware, Russell E

    2012-02-01

    Chronic transfusion reduces the risk of recurrent stroke in children with sickle cell anemia (SCA) but leads to iron loading. Management of transfusional iron overload in SCA has been reported as suboptimal [1], but studies characterizing monitoring and treatment practices for iron overload in children with SCA, particularly in recent years with the expansion of chelator options, are lacking. We investigated the degree of iron loading and treatment practices of 161 children with SCA receiving transfusions for a history of stroke who participated in the Stroke with Transfusions Changing to Hydroxyurea (SWiTCH) trial. Data obtained during screening, including past and entry liver iron concentration (LIC) measurements, ferritin values, and chelation were analyzed. The mean age at enrollment was 12.9 ± 4 years and the mean duration of transfusion was 7 ± 3.8 years. Baseline LIC (median 12.94 mg/g dw) and serum ferritin (median 3,164 ng/mL) were elevated. Chelation therapy was initiated after a mean of 2.6 years of transfusions. At study entry, 137 were receiving chelation, most of whom (90%) were receiving deferasirox. This study underscores the need for better monitoring of iron burden with timely treatment adjustments in chronically transfused children with SCA.

  7. Endovascular Stroke Therapy Results Improve over Time: The ‘Learning Curve’ at a New Comprehensive Stoke Center

    PubMed Central

    Benardete, Ethan A.; Nair, Anil K.

    2014-01-01

    Background The requirements for a comprehensive stroke center (CSC) include the capability to perform endovascular stroke therapy (EST). EST is a complex process requiring early identification of appropriate patients and effective delivery of intervention. In order to provide prompt intervention for stroke, CSCs have been established away from large academic centers in community-based hospitals. We hypothesized that quantifiable improvements would occur during the first 2 years of a community-based CSC as the processes and personnel evolved. We report the results over time of EST at a new community-based CSC. Methods We have retrospectively analyzed demographic data and outcome metrics of EST from the initiation phase of a new community-based CSC. Data was divided into year 1 and year 2. Statistical analysis (Student's t test and Fisher's exact test) was performed to compare the patient population and outcomes across the two time periods. Outcome variables included the thrombolysis in cerebral infarction (TICI) score, a change in the NIH stroke scale score and the modified Rankin Scale (mRS) score. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used to statistically analyze the relationship between population variables and outcome. Computed tomography (CT) angiography and CT perfusion analysis were used to select patients for EST. Approximately half of the patients undergoing EST were excluded from receiving intravenous recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (IV rt-PA) by standard criteria, while the other half showed no sign of improvement following 1 h of IV rt-PA treatment. Mechanical thrombolysis with a stentriever was performed in the majority of cases with or without intra-arterial medication. The majority of treated occlusions were in the middle cerebral artery. Results A total of 18 patients underwent EST during year 1 and year 2. A statistically significant increase in good outcomes (mRS score ≤2 at discharge) was seen from year 1 to year 2 (p = 0.05). There were

  8. Effect of whole-body vibration exercise in a sitting position prior to therapy on muscle tone and upper extremity function in stroke patients

    PubMed Central

    Boo, Jung-A; Moon, Sang-Hyun; Lee, Sun-Min; Choi, Jung-Hyun; Park, Si-Eun

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of whole-body vibration exercise in a sitting position prior to therapy in stroke patients. [Subjects and Methods] Fourteen chronic stroke patients were included in this study. Prior to occupational therapy, whole-body exercise was performed for 10 minutes, 5 times per week, for a total of 8 weeks. Muscle tone and upper extremity function were measured. The Modified Ashworth Scale (MAS) was used to measure muscle tone, and the Manual Function Test (MFT) and Fugl-Meyer Assessment scale (FugM) were used to measure upper extremity function. [Results] MAS score was significantly decreased, and MFT and FugM were significantly increased. [Conclusion] These results indicate that whole-body vibration exercise in a sitting position prior to therapy had a positive effect on muscle tone, and upper extremity function in stroke patients. PMID:27065354

  9. Machine Learning for Outcome Prediction of Acute Ischemic Stroke Post Intra-Arterial Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Asadi, Hamed; Dowling, Richard; Yan, Bernard; Mitchell, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Stroke is a major cause of death and disability. Accurately predicting stroke outcome from a set of predictive variables may identify high-risk patients and guide treatment approaches, leading to decreased morbidity. Logistic regression models allow for the identification and validation of predictive variables. However, advanced machine learning algorithms offer an alternative, in particular, for large-scale multi-institutional data, with the advantage of easily incorporating newly available data to improve prediction performance. Our aim was to design and compare different machine learning methods, capable of predicting the outcome of endovascular intervention in acute anterior circulation ischaemic stroke. Method We conducted a retrospective study of a prospectively collected database of acute ischaemic stroke treated by endovascular intervention. Using SPSS®, MATLAB®, and Rapidminer®, classical statistics as well as artificial neural network and support vector algorithms were applied to design a supervised machine capable of classifying these predictors into potential good and poor outcomes. These algorithms were trained, validated and tested using randomly divided data. Results We included 107 consecutive acute anterior circulation ischaemic stroke patients treated by endovascular technique. Sixty-six were male and the mean age of 65.3. All the available demographic, procedural and clinical factors were included into the models. The final confusion matrix of the neural network, demonstrated an overall congruency of ∼80% between the target and output classes, with favourable receiving operative characteristics. However, after optimisation, the support vector machine had a relatively better performance, with a root mean squared error of 2.064 (SD: ±0.408). Discussion We showed promising accuracy of outcome prediction, using supervised machine learning algorithms, with potential for incorporation of larger multicenter datasets, likely further

  10. Therapy with the Combination of Amlodipine and Irbesartan Has Persistent Preventative Effects on Stroke Onset Associated with BDNF Preservation on Cerebral Vessels in Hypertensive Rats.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Yu; Nakagawa, Takashi; Uekawa, Ken; Ma, Mingjie; Lin, Bowen; Kusaka, Hiroaki; Katayama, Tetsuji; Sueta, Daisuke; Toyama, Kensuke; Koibuchi, Nobutaka; Kim-Mitsuyama, Shokei

    2016-02-01

    Although calcium channel blockers, angiotensin II receptor blockers, and combination therapy are effective for hypertensive patients, the significant differences among them against stroke onset are undetermined. In this study, we investigated the significant beneficial effects of the combination therapy using amlodipine and irbesartan against stroke onset in hypertensive rats. The animals were fed an 8% sodium diet and assigned to (1) vehicle, (2) amlodipine (2 mg/kg/day), (3) irbesartan (20 mg/kg/day), and (4) amlodipine + irbesartan groups. The drugs were given orally until 35 days, and incidences of stroke-related signs and mortality and blood pressure (BP) were monitored. Cerebral blood flow (CBF), brain water content, weight of the brain and left ventricle, and histological evaluations were conducted for the treated groups at 42 days after the start of the high-salt diet. Amlodipine and the combination therapy significantly reduced BP compared with the vehicle. Although the rates of stroke-related signs and mortality were high in the vehicle group, the rats in the treatment groups were mostly healthy until 35 days. After all drugs were discontinued, stroke onset was frequently seen in the monotherapy groups until 42 days, but no signs were observed in the combination therapy group. Although there were no significant differences in CBF or brain edema, the combination therapy reduced blood-brain barrier disruption, white matter injury, and reactive astrocytes compared with irbesartan, and the combination also inhibited left ventricular hypertrophy and preserved brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) expression on cerebral vessels compared to the monotherapies. These data suggest that the combination therapy had a persistent preventive effect on stroke onset in hypertensive rats, and the effects might be associated with BDNF preservation on cerebral vessels.

  11. Effects of one session radial extracorporeal shockwave therapy on post-stroke plantarflexor spasticity: a single-blind clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Radinmehr, Hojjat; Nakhostin Ansari, Noureddin; Naghdi, Soofia; Olyaei, Gholamreza; Tabatabaei, Azadeh

    2017-03-01

    Purpose To examine the effects of radial extracorporeal shockwave therapy (rESWT) on plantarflexor spasticity after stroke. Method Twelve patients with stroke were randomly included for this prospective, single-blind clinical trial. Patients received one rESWT session (0.340 mJ/mm(2), 2000 shots) on plantarflexor muscle. The Modified Modified Ashworth Scale (MMAS), H-reflex tests, ankle range of motion (ROM), passive plantarflexor torque (PPFT) and timed up and go test (TUG) were measured at baseline (T0), immediately after treatment (T1) and one hour after the end of the treatment (T2). Results Patients had improved the MMAS scores for both the gastrocnemius and the soleus muscles, active and passive ROM, PPFT and TUG over time after rESWT. For the PPFT, it was greater at high velocity than at low velocity, and there was a significant three-way interaction between time, knee position (extended/flexed) and velocity (low/high). The H-reflex latency had decreased at T1, but there was no significant effect on Hmax/Mmax ratio. Conclusions The rESWT improved plantarflexor spasticity, and the effects sustained for one hour, whereas it was not effective in improving spinal excitability. Implications for Rehabilitation One session radial extracorporeal shock wave therapy (rESWT) is safe and effective in improving post stroke plantarflexor spasticity, ankle active and passive range of motion, passive torque, and walking capability. The spasticity scores improved for both the gastrocnemius and the soleus muscles and persisted one hour after rESWT. The magnitude of resistive plantarflexor passive torque in the knee extended position and high velocity was larger over time suggesting greater gastrocnemius spasticity than soleus. The rESWT had no significant effects on alpha motorneuron excitability.

  12. Neurorestoration after stroke

    PubMed Central

    Azad, Tej D.; Veeravagu, Anand; Steinberg, Gary K.

    2016-01-01

    Recent advancements in stem cell biology and neuromodulation have ushered in a battery of new neurorestorative therapies for ischemic stroke. While the understanding of stroke pathophysiology has matured, the ability to restore patients’ quality of life remains inadequate. New therapeutic approaches, including cell transplantation and neurostimulation, focus on reestablishing the circuits disrupted by ischemia through multidimensional mechanisms to improve neuroplasticity and remodeling. The authors provide a broad overview of stroke pathophysiology and existing therapies to highlight the scientifc and clinical implications of neurorestorative therapies for stroke. PMID:27132523

  13. Changes in Upper-Extremity Functional Capacity and Daily Performance During Outpatient Occupational Therapy for People With Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Doman, Caitlin A.; Waddell, Kimberly J.; Bailey, Ryan R.; Moore, Jennifer L.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE. This study explored how upper-extremity (UE) functional capacity and daily performance change during the course of outpatient rehabilitation in people with stroke. METHOD. Fifteen participants receiving outpatient occupational therapy services for UE paresis poststroke were enrolled. UE motor capacity was measured with the Action Research Arm Test (ARAT), and UE performance was measured using bilateral, wrist-worn accelerometers. Measurements were taken at or near the start of therapy, at every 10th visit or every 30 days throughout the duration of services, and at discharge. RESULTS. Three patterns were observed: (1) increase in ARAT scores and more normalized accelerometry profiles, (2) increase in ARAT scores but no change in accelerometry profiles, and (3) no change in ARAT scores or in accelerometry profiles. CONCLUSION. UE performance in daily life was highly variable, with inconsistencies between change in UE capacity and change in UE performance. UE capacity and performance are important constructs to assess separately during rehabilitation. PMID:27089298

  14. Brain Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy Findings in the Stroke-like Migraine Attacks after Radiation Therapy (SMART) Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Cibeira, Emilio; Calleja-Castaño, Patricia; Gonzalez de la Aleja, Jesus; Sierra-Hidalgo, Fernando; Ruiz Morales, Juan; Salvador-Alvarez, Elena; Ramos-Gonzalez, Ana

    2015-01-01

    A 41-year-old male presented with an acute onset of headache, confusion, seizures, and unilateral focal neurological deficit 25 years after receiving whole-brain radiation therapy to treat a cerebellar medulloblastoma. Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) demonstrated a thick unilateral parieto-occipital cortical contrast enhancement. A diagnosis of "Stroke-like Migraine Attacks after Radiation Therapy" (SMART) syndrome was made. Here, we describe the brain MR spectroscopy findings of SMART, showing a decrease in N-acetyl-aspartate and increased levels of creatine and choline, corresponding with neuronal destruction or transient neuronal impairment with mild nonspecific gliosis. The absence of a lactate peak suggests that mitochondrial dysfunction, vasospasm or ischemic mechanisms were not involved.

  15. Hybrid Assistive Neuromuscular Dynamic Stimulation Therapy: A New Strategy for Improving Upper Extremity Function in Patients with Hemiparesis following Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Honaga, Kaoru; Tochikura, Michi; Abe, Kaoru

    2017-01-01

    Hybrid Assistive Neuromuscular Dynamic Stimulation (HANDS) therapy is one of the neurorehabilitation therapeutic approaches that facilitates the use of the paretic upper extremity (UE) in daily life by combining closed-loop electromyography- (EMG-) controlled neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) with a wrist-hand splint. This closed-loop EMG-controlled NMES can change its stimulation intensity in direct proportion to the changes in voluntary generated EMG amplitudes recorded with surface electrodes placed on the target muscle. The stimulation was applied to the paretic finger extensors. Patients wore a wrist-hand splint and carried a portable stimulator in an arm holder for 8 hours during the daytime. The system was active for 8 hours, and patients were instructed to use their paretic hand as much as possible. HANDS therapy was conducted for 3 weeks. The patients were also instructed to practice bimanual activities in their daily lives. Paretic upper extremity motor function improved after 3 weeks of HANDS therapy. Functional improvement of upper extremity motor function and spasticity with HANDS therapy is based on the disinhibition of the affected hemisphere and modulation of reciprocal inhibition. HANDS therapy may offer a promising option for the management of the paretic UE in patients with stroke. PMID:28191352

  16. Development of an accurate fluid management system for a pediatric continuous renal replacement therapy device

    PubMed Central

    SANTHANAKRISHNAN, ARVIND; NESTLE, TRENT T.; MOORE, BRIAN L.; YOGANATHAN, AJIT P.; PADEN, MATTHEW L.

    2013-01-01

    Acute kidney injury is common in critically ill children and renal replacement therapies provide a life saving therapy to a subset of these children. However, there is no Food and Drug Administration approved device to provide pediatric continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT). Consequently, clinicians adapt approved adult CRRT devices for use in children due to lack of safer alternatives. Complications occur using adult CRRT devices in children due to inaccurate fluid balance (FB) between the volumes of ultrafiltrate (UF) removed and replacement fluid (RF) delivered. We demonstrate the design and validation of a pediatric fluid management system for obtaining accurate instantaneous and cumulative FB. Fluid transport was achieved via multiple novel pulsatile diaphragm pumps. The conservation of volume principle leveraging the physical property of fluid incompressibility along with mechanical coupling via a crankshaft was used for FB. Accuracy testing was conducted in vitro for 8-hour long continuous operation of the coupled UF and RF pumps. The mean cumulative FB error was <1% across filtration flows from 300 mL/hour to 3000 mL/hour. This approach of FB control in a pediatric specific CRRT device would represent a significant accuracy improvement over currently used clinical implementations. PMID:23644618

  17. Therapeutic administration of atomoxetine combined with rTMS and occupational therapy for upper limb hemiparesis after stroke: a case series study of three patients.

    PubMed

    Kinoshita, Shoji; Kakuda, Wataru; Yamada, Naoki; Momosaki, Ryo; Okuma, Ryo; Watanabe, Shu; Abo, Masahiro

    2016-03-01

    Atomoxetine, a selective noradrenaline reuptake inhibitor, has been reported to enhance brain plasticity, but has not yet been used in stroke patients. We reported the feasibility and clinical benefits on motor functional recovery of the combination of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) and intensive occupational therapy (OT) in stroke patients. This pilot study was designed to evaluate the additive effects of oral atomoxetine to rTMS/OT in post-stroke hemiparetic patients. The study included three post-stroke patients with upper limb hemiparesis. Treatment with 40 mg/day atomoxetine commenced 2 weeks before admission. After confirming tolerance, the dose was increased to 120 mg/day. Low-frequency rTMS/OT was provided daily for 15 days during continued atomoxetine therapy. Motor function of the affected upper limb was evaluated with the Fugl-Meyer Assessment and Wolf Motor Function test. All patients completed the protocol and showed motor improvement up to 4 weeks after the treatment. No atomoxetine-related side effects were noted. Our protocol of triple therapy of atomoxetine, low-frequency rTMS, and OT is safe and feasible intervention for upper limb hemiparesis after stroke.

  18. Fate of graft cells: what should be clarified for development of mesenchymal stem cell therapy for ischemic stroke?

    PubMed

    Ikegame, Yuka; Yamashita, Kentaro; Nakashima, Shigeru; Nomura, Yuichi; Yonezawa, Shingo; Asano, Yoshitaka; Shinoda, Jun; Hara, Hideaki; Iwama, Toru

    2014-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are believed to be promising for cell administration therapy after ischemic stroke. Because of their advantageous characteristics, such as ability of differentiation into neurovascular lineages, avoidance of immunological problems, and abundance of graft cells in mesodermal tissues, studies regarding MSC therapy have increased recently. However, several controversies are yet to be resolved before a worldwide consensus regarding a standard protocol is obtained. In particular, the neuroprotective effects, the rate of cell migration to the lesion, and differentiation direction differ depending on preclinical observations. Analyses of these differences and application of recent developments in stem cell biology or engineering in imaging modality may contribute to identification of criteria for optimal stem cell therapy in which reliable protocols, which control cell quality and include safe administration procedures, are defined for each recovery phase after cerebral ischemia. In this mini review, we examine controversies regarding the fate of grafts and the prospects for advanced therapy that could be obtained through recent developments in stem cell research as direct conversion to neural cells.

  19. Effect of mirror therapy with tDCS on functional recovery of the upper extremity of stroke patients

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Hyuk-Shin; Cha, Hyun-gyu

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to determine the effect of mirror therapy (MT) with transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) on the recovery of the upper extremity function of chronic stroke patients. [Subjects] Twenty-seven patients at least 6 months after stroke onset were divided randomly into an experimental group (14 patients) and a control group (13 patients). [Methods] All subjects received tDCS for 20 min followed by a 5 min rest. Then the experimental group received MT while the control group conducted the same exercises as the experimental group using a mirror that did not show the non-paretic upper extremity. The groups performed the same exercises for 20 min. All subjects received this intervention for 45-min three times a week for 6 weeks. [Results] After the intervention, the experimental group showed significant improvements in the box and block test (BBT), grip strength, and the Fugl-Meyer assessment (FMA), and a significant decrease in the Jebsen-Taylor test. The control group showed a significant increase in grip strength after the intervention, and a significant decrease in the Jebsen-Taylor test. Comparison of the result after the intervention revealed that the experimental group showed more significant increases in the BBT and grip strength than the control group. [Conclusion] These results show that MT with tDCS has a positive effect on the functional recovery of the upper extremity of stroke patients, through activating motor regions in the brain, and thus plays an important role in recovery of neuroplasticity. PMID:25995552

  20. An Update on Translating Stem Cell Therapy for Stroke from Bench to Bedside

    PubMed Central

    Dailey, Travis; Metcalf, Christopher; Mosley, Yusef I.; Sullivan, Robert; Shinozuka, Kazutaka; Tajiri, Naoki; Pabon, Mibel; Acosta, Sandra; Kaneko, Yuji; van Loveren, Harry; Borlongan, Cesar V.

    2013-01-01

    With a constellation of stem cell sources available, researchers hope to utilize their potential for cellular repair as a therapeutic target for disease. However, many lab-to-clinic translational considerations must be given in determining their efficacy, variables such as the host response, effects on native tissue, and potential for generating tumors. This review will discuss the current knowledge of stem cell research in neurological disease, mainly stroke, with a focus on the benefits, limitations, and clinical potential. PMID:25177494

  1. An occupational therapy intervention for residents with stroke related disabilities in UK care homes (OTCH): cluster randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Sackley, Catherine M; Walker, Marion F; Burton, Christopher R; Watkins, Caroline L; Mant, Jonathan; Roalfe, Andrea K; Wheatley, Keith; Sheehan, Bart; Sharp, Leslie; Stant, Katie E; Fletcher-Smith, Joanna; Steel, Kerry; Wilde, Kate; Irvine, Lisa

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the clinical efficacy of an established programme of occupational therapy in maintaining functional activity and reducing further health risks from inactivity in care home residents living with stroke sequelae. Design Pragmatic, parallel group, cluster randomised controlled trial. Setting 228 care homes (>10 beds each), both with and without the provision of nursing care, local to 11 trial administrative centres across the United Kingdom. Participants 1042 care home residents with a history of stroke or transient ischaemic attack, including those with language and cognitive impairments, not receiving end of life care. 114 homes (n=568 residents, 64% from homes providing nursing care) were allocated to the intervention arm and 114 homes (n=474 residents, 65% from homes providing nursing care) to standard care (control arm). Participating care homes were randomised between May 2010 and March 2012. Intervention Targeted three month programme of occupational therapy, delivered by qualified occupational therapists and assistants, involving patient centred goal setting, education of care home staff, and adaptations to the environment. Main outcome measures Primary outcome at the participant level: scores on the Barthel index of activities of daily living at three months post-randomisation. Secondary outcome measures at the participant level: Barthel index scores at six and 12 months post-randomisation, and scores on the Rivermead mobility index, geriatric depression scale-15, and EuroQol EQ-5D-3L questionnaire, at all time points. Results 64% of the participants were women and 93% were white, with a mean age of 82.9 years. Baseline characteristics were similar between groups for all measures, personal characteristics, and diagnostic tests. Overall, 2538 occupational therapy visits were made to 498 participants in the intervention arm (mean 5.1 visits per participant). No adverse events attributable to the intervention were recorded. 162 (11%) died

  2. Quantitative measurements of relative fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) signal intensities in acute stroke for the prediction of time from symptom onset

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Bastian; Brinkmann, Mathias; Forkert, Nils D; Treszl, Andras; Ebinger, Martin; Köhrmann, Martin; Wu, Ona; Kang, Dong-Wha; Liebeskind, David S; Tourdias, Thomas; Singer, Oliver C; Christensen, Soren; Luby, Marie; Warach, Steven; Fiehler, Jens; Fiebach, Jochen B; Gerloff, Christian; Thomalla, Götz

    2013-01-01

    In acute stroke magnetic resonance imaging, a ‘mismatch' between visibility of an ischemic lesion on diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) and missing corresponding parenchymal hyperintensities on fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) data sets was shown to identify patients with time from symptom onset ≤4.5 hours with high specificity. However, moderate sensitivity and suboptimal interpreter agreement are limitations of a visual rating of FLAIR lesion visibility. We tested refined image analysis methods in patients included in the previously published PREFLAIR study using refined visual analysis and quantitative measurements of relative FLAIR signal intensity (rSI) from a three-dimensional, segmented stroke lesion volume. A total of 399 patients were included. The rSI of FLAIR lesions showed a moderate correlation with time from symptom onset (r=0.382, P<0.001). A FLAIR rSI threshold of <1.0721 predicted symptom onset ≤4.5 hours with slightly increased specificity (0.85 versus 0.78) but also slightly decreased sensitivity (0.47 versus 0.58) as compared with visual analysis. Refined visual analysis differentiating between ‘subtle' and ‘obvious' FLAIR hyperintensities and classification and regression tree algorithms combining information from visual and quantitative analysis also did not improve diagnostic accuracy. Our results raise doubts whether the prediction of stroke onset time by visual image judgment can be improved by quantitative rSI measurements. PMID:23047272

  3. Beneficial effect of etidronate therapy in chronically hospitalized, disabled patients with stroke.

    PubMed

    Sato, Yoshihiro; Iwamoto, Jun; Honda, Yoshiaki

    2010-05-01

    Incidence of hip fractures is high in chronically hospitalized, disabled, elderly patients after stroke. Duration of hospitalization was more than 1 year because of insufficiency of nursing homes. Our study showed that immobilization-induced hypercalcemia and 25-hydroxyvitamin D deficiency contribute to reduced bone mineral density (BMD). This study was designed to address the possibility that treatment with etidronate may reduce the bone resorption and lower the incidence of fractures in elderly patients who are chronically hospitalized and disabled as a result of hemiparesis after stroke. Patients with stroke were randomly assigned to daily treatment with 400 mg of etidronate (n = 40) or a placebo (n = 40), and followed up for 2 years. At baseline, both groups had low BMD with high levels of serum ionized calcium and urinary deoxypyridinoline. In the etidronate group, serum calcium and urinary deoxypyridinoline levels decreased significantly during the study period, whereas the levels in the placebo group were increased. BMD on the hemiplegic side increased by 1.4% in the etidronate group and decreased by 2.2% in the placebo group (P < .001). Two patients sustained hip fractures in the placebo group, and no hip fracture occurred in the etidronate group. Treatment with etidronate increases BMD in chronically hospitalized patients poststroke, and may prevent hip fracture.

  4. Report on Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy: An Overlooked Therapeutic Option in Stroke Recovery and a Potential Source of Health Sector Revenue and Health Tourism.

    PubMed

    Lowe, S; Le Mercier du Quesnay, D R; Gayle, P M; Henry-Pinnock, F; Wedderburn-Buddo, T

    2015-06-30

    This is a special case report on Jamaica's first use of hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT) in stroke recovery, presented at the 56th Annual Conference of the Association of Surgeons in Jamaica, Kingston, Jamaica; the literature and story behind the trial - covering case history, diagnosis and discussion of outcome, technical issues, costing, insurance and possibilities for income earning and health tourism.

  5. Evidence-Based Systematic Review: Effects of Intensity of Treatment and Constraint-Induced Language Therapy for Individuals with Stroke-Induced Aphasia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cherney, Leora R.; Patterson, Janet P.; Raymer, Anastasia; Frymark, Tobi; Schooling, Tracy

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: This systematic review summarizes evidence for intensity of treatment and constraint-induced language therapy (CILT) on measures of language impairment and communication activity/participation in individuals with stroke-induced aphasia. Method: A systematic search of the aphasia literature using 15 electronic databases (e.g., PubMed,…

  6. Combination of Magnetic Resonance Angiography and Computational Fluid Dynamics May Predict the Risk of Stroke in Patients with Asymptomatic Carotid Plaques

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Qian; Liu, Hongbin; Li, Yanping; Wang, Xiaoxi; Jia, Jinju; Li, Yuying

    2017-01-01

    Background Atherosclerosis plaques in the carotid arteries frequently have been found in patients with stroke. However, the pathogenesis of carotid plaque from asymptomatic to cerebrovascular events is a complex process which is still not completely understood. We aimed to investigate the prognosis of asymptomatic carotid atherosclerotic plaques by use of magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) combined with computational fluid dynamics (CFD). Material/Methods We prospectively studied a cohort of 228 participants (mean age 59.21±8.48) with asymptomatic carotid atherosclerotic plaques; mean follow-up duration was 1147.56±224.84 days. Plaque morphology parameters were obtained by MRA analysis. Lumen area (LA) and total vessel area (TVA) were measured, and wall area (WA=TVA−LA) and normalized wall area index (NWI=WA/TVA) were calculated. CFD analysis was performed to evaluate hemodynamic characteristics, including wall pressure (WP) and wall shear stress (WSS). Independent risk factors for stroke were obtained by Cox regression analysis. The area under the curve (AUC) of receiver operator characteristic (ROC) and Z-statistic test were used to evaluate risk factors. Results Logistics regression analysis showed NWI (OR: 3.472, 95% CI: 2.943–4.096, P=0.11) and WSS (OR: 6.974, 95% CI: 1.070–45.453, P=0.42) were independent risk factors of stroke for patients with asymptomatic carotid plaques. The area under the ROC curve values for WSS, NWI, and WSS+NWI were 0.772, 0.798, and 0.903, respectively. Conclusions The combination of plaque morphology characteristics NWI and hemodynamic parameter WSS may predict the risk of stroke in patients with asymptomatic carotid plaques. PMID:28126983

  7. EEG-Triggered Functional Electrical Stimulation Therapy for Restoring Upper Limb Function in Chronic Stroke with Severe Hemiplegia

    PubMed Central

    Marquis, Aaron; Popovic, Milos R.

    2016-01-01

    We report the therapeutic effects of integrating brain-computer interfacing technology and functional electrical stimulation therapy to restore upper limb reaching movements in a 64-year-old man with severe left hemiplegia following a hemorrhagic stroke he sustained six years prior to this study. He completed 40 90-minute sessions of functional electrical stimulation therapy using a custom-made neuroprosthesis that facilitated 5 different reaching movements. During each session, the participant attempted to reach with his paralyzed arm repeatedly. Stimulation for each of the movement phases (e.g., extending and retrieving the arm) was triggered when the power in the 18 Hz–28 Hz range (beta frequency range) of the participant's EEG activity, recorded with a single electrode, decreased below a predefined threshold. The function of the participant's arm showed a clinically significant improvement in the Fugl-Meyer Assessment Upper Extremity (FMA-UE) subscore (6 points) as well as moderate improvement in Functional Independence Measure Self-Care subscore (7 points). The changes in arm's function suggest that the combination of BCI technology and functional electrical stimulation therapy may restore voluntary motor function in individuals with chronic hemiplegia which results in severe upper limb deficit (FMA-UE ≤ 15), a population that does not benefit from current best-practice rehabilitation interventions. PMID:27882256

  8. Investigation of the effects of mirror therapy on the upper extremity functions of stroke patients using the manual function test.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hwanhee; Shim, Jemyung

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of mirror therapy on the upper extremity functions of stroke patients. [Subjects] The subjects of this study were 14 hemiplegia patients (8 males, 6 females; 9 infarction, 5 hemorrhage; 8 right hemiplegia, 6 left hemiplegia) who voluntarily consented to participate in the study. [Methods] The Korean version of the manual function test (MFT) was used in this study. The test was performed in the following order: arm movement (4 items), grasp and pinch (2 items), and manipulation (2 items). The experiment was conducted with the subjects sitting in a chair. The mirror was vertically placed in the sagittal plane on the desk. The paretic hand was placed behind the mirror, and the non-paretic hand was placed in front of the mirror so that it was reflected in the mirror. In this position, the subjects completed activities repetitively according to the mirror therapy program over the course of four weeks. [Results] There were significant increases in the grasp-and-pinch score and manipulation score. [Conclusion] In conclusion, the grasp-and-pinch and manipulation functions were improved through mirror therapy.

  9. [The role of clinical-electrophysiological indices in therapy for late-stage residual stroke by dynamic correction of proprioception].

    PubMed

    Veĭn, A M; Shvarkov, S B; Khaspekova, N B; Vendrova, M I; Davydov, O S; Bobrovskaia, A N

    2001-01-01

    The new method dynamic proprioceptive correction using a medical loading costume was included into complex therapy in patients with late-stage residual stroke. Application of the costume promoted normalization of complex locomotor acts of walking by correcting proprioceptive pulsation resulted from the system of elastic draughts. Thus, a new motor stereotype was forced upon the patients. Clinical observation, computer analysis of the motor potential, spectrum of heart rhythm variabilities before and after therapy, and psychological testing were performed in 120 patients with motor disorders (pareses, paralyses) resulted from acute cerebral circulatory disorders. A steady-state clinical effect (p < 0.05) was found in 71.9% of the patients after 15 sessions of therapy. The patients became to walk independently, a possibility to self-attendance appeared, their speech became better. Lateralization of a damage and preservation of both the most significant homeostatic vasomotor mechanisms and the cerebral mechanisms of preparation of a movement with the minimal manifestations of emotional-affective disorders were shown to have impact on the patients' rehabilitation and on the early clinical features of pyramidal defect.

  10. Improvement in Stroke-induced Motor Dysfunction by Music-supported Therapy: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yingshi; Cai, Jiayi; Zhang, Yaqiong; Ren, Tianshu; Zhao, Mingyi; Zhao, Qingchun

    2016-01-01

    To conduct a meta-analysis of clinical trials that examined the effect of music-supported therapy on stroke-induced motor dysfunction, comprehensive literature searches of PubMed, Embase and the Cochrane Library from their inception to April 2016 were performed. A total of 10 studies (13 analyses, 358 subjects) were included; all had acceptable quality according to PEDro scale score. The baseline differences between the two groups were confirmed to be comparable. Compared with the control group, the standardized mean difference of 9-Hole Peg Test was 0.28 (−0.01, 0.57), 0.64 (0.31, 0.97) in Box and Block Test, 0.47 (0.08, 0.87) in Arm Paresis Score and 0.35 (−0.04, 0.75) in Action Research Arm Test for upper-limb motor function, 0.11 (−0.24, 0.46) in Berg Balance Scale score, 0.09 (−0.36, 0.54) in Fugl-Meyer Assessment score, 0.30 (−0.15, 0.74) in Wolf Motor Function Test, 0.30 (−0.15, 0.74) in Wolf Motor Function time, 0.65 (0.14, 1.16) in Stride length and 0.62 (0.01, 1.24) in Gait Velocity for total motor function, and 1.75 (0.94, 2.56) in Frontal Assessment Battery score for executive function. There was evidence of a positive effect of music-supported therapy, supporting its use for the treatment of stroke-induced motor dysfunction. This study was registered at PRESPERO (CRD42016037106). PMID:27917945

  11. Final Results of Cilostazol-Aspirin Therapy against Recurrent Stroke with Intracranial Artery Stenosis (CATHARSIS)

    PubMed Central

    Uchiyama, Shinichiro; Sakai, Nobuyuki; Toi, Sono; Ezura, Masayuki; Okada, Yasushi; Takagi, Makoto; Nagai, Yoji; Matsubara, Yoshihiro; Minematsu, Kazuo; Suzuki, Norihiro; Tanahashi, Norio; Taki, Waro; Nagata, Izumi; Matsumoto, Masayasu

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To compare the effect of cilostazol plus aspirin versus aspirin alone on the progression of intracranial arterial stenosis (IAS), and to compare ischemic and hemorrhagic events in patients with symptomatic IAS, an investigator-driven, nationwide multicenter cooperative randomized controlled trial (CATHARSIS; ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier 00333164) was conducted. Methods 165 noncardioembolic ischemic stroke patients with >50% stenosis in the responsible intracranial artery after 2 weeks to 6 months from the onset were randomly allocated to receive either cilostazol 200 mg/day plus aspirin 100 mg/day (n = 83, CA group) or aspirin 100 mg/day alone (n = 82, A group). The primary endpoint was the progression of IAS on magnetic resonance angiography at 2 years after randomization. Secondary endpoints were any vascular events, any cause of death, serious adverse events, new silent brain infarcts, and worsening of the modified Rankin Scale score. Results Progression of IAS was observed in 9.6% of the CA group patients and in 5.6% of the A group patients, with no significant intergroup difference (p = 0.53). The incidence of the secondary endpoints tended to be lower in the CA group compared with the A group, although the differences were not significant. By using exploratory logistic regression analysis adjusted for patient background characteristics, it was shown that the risk for certain combinations of secondary endpoints was lower in the CA group than in the A group [all vascular events and silent brain infarcts: odds ratio (OR) = 0.37, p = 0.04; stroke and silent brain infarcts: OR = 0.34, p = 0.04; all vascular events, worsening of modified Rankin Scale scores and silent brain infracts: OR = 0.41, p = 0.03]. Major hemorrhage was observed in 4 patients of the CA group and in 3 of the A group. Conclusion Progression of IAS during the 2-year observation period appears to be less frequent than previously reported in stroke patients on antiplatelet agents after

  12. Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell therapy in ischemic stroke: mechanisms of action and treatment optimization strategies

    PubMed Central

    Li, Guihong; Yu, Fengbo; Lei, Ting; Gao, Haijun; Li, Peiwen; Sun, Yuxue; Huang, Haiyan; Mu, Qingchun

    2016-01-01

    Animal and clinical studies have confirmed the therapeutic effect of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells on cerebral ischemia, but their mechanisms of action remain poorly understood. Here, we summarize the transplantation approaches, directional migration, differentiation, replacement, neural circuit reconstruction, angiogenesis, neurotrophic factor secretion, apoptosis, immunomodulation, multiple mechanisms of action, and optimization strategies for bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells in the treatment of ischemic stroke. We also explore the safety of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation and conclude that bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation is an important direction for future treatment of cerebral ischemia. Determining the optimal timing and dose for the transplantation are important directions for future research. PMID:27482235

  13. Decision-Assist and Closed-Loop Control of Fluid Therapy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-03-30

    lc. Test other novel monitors - Aesculon and Masimo Objective 2: Evaluate the effectiveness of D-A and CLR of fluid therapy during mild hemorrhage in... Masimo Rainbow SpHb•) to determine its accuracy, precision and change during hemorrhage and resuscitation. Objectives: (1) Determine the accuracy and...oximeter (Co-ox), was compared to non- invasive Masimo Rainbow SET SpHb•. Graphs show regression analysis and Bland-Altman plot for hemoglobin (co-ox

  14. Enteral fluid therapy in 108 horses with large colon impactions and dorsal displacements.

    PubMed

    Monreal, L; Navarro, M; Armengou, L; José-Cunilleras, E; Cesarini, C; Segura, D

    2010-02-27

    To assess the effect of enteral fluid therapy (EFT) in horses with colic, 78 adult horses with colon impactions and 30 with left dorsal colon displacements received an isotonic electrolyte solution via a nasogastric tube at a rate of 8 to 10 l every two hours until resolution of clinical signs. Clinical progression was monitored closely, and plasma biochemistry was evaluated before, during and after treatment. Volume of fluids, time to resolution, and outcome were also recorded. EFT was well tolerated by 102 of 108 horses and was an effective method to resolve 99 per cent of colon impactions and 83 per cent of displacements. For both groups, the mean (sd) time to resolution was 20.2 (5.2) hours and the volume of fluid administered was 118.6 (34.5) l. No relevant abnormalities were observed in most plasma biochemistry parameters during treatment, except for a mild haemodilution effect in 63 per cent of horses.

  15. Early detection of hand movements from electroencephalograms for stroke therapy applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muralidharan, A.; Chae, J.; Taylor, D. M.

    2011-08-01

    Movement-assist devices such as neuromuscular stimulation systems can be used to generate movements in people with chronic hand paralysis due to stroke. If detectable, motor planning activity in the cortex could be used in real time to trigger a movement-assist device and restore a person's ability to perform many of the activities of daily living. Additionally, re-coupling motor planning in the cortex with assisted movement generation in the periphery may provide an even greater benefit—strengthening relevant synaptic connections over time to promote natural motor recovery. This study examined the potential for using electroencephalograms (EEGs) as a means of rapidly detecting the intent to open the hand during movement planning in individuals with moderate chronic hand paralysis following a subcortical ischemic stroke. On average, attempts to open the hand could be detected from EEGs approximately 100-500 ms prior to the first signs of movement onset. This earlier detection would minimize device activation delays and allow for tighter coupling between initial formation of the motor plan in the cortex and augmentation of that plan in the periphery by a movement-assist device. This tight temporal coupling may be important or even essential for strengthening synaptic connections and enhancing natural motor recovery.

  16. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation for stroke rehabilitation-potential therapy or misplaced hope?

    PubMed

    Bates, Kristyn Alissa; Rodger, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    Repeated sessions of transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) are capable of changing and modulating neural activity beyond the period of stimulation. Because many neurological disorders are thought to involve abnormal or dysfunctional neuronal activity, it is hypothesised that the therapeutic action of rTMS may occur through modulating and reversing abnormal activity and facilitating neuroplasticity.Numerous clinical studies have investigated the safety and efficacy of rTMS treatment for a wide variety of conditions including depression, anxiety disorders including obsessive compulsive disorder, Parkinson's disease, stroke, tinnitus, affective disorders, schizophrenia and chronic pain. Despite some promising results, rTMS is not currently widely used to assist in recovery from neurotrama. In this review, we argue that the therapeutic promise of rTMS is limited because the mechanisms of action of rTMS are not completely understood and therefore it is difficult to determine which treatment protocols are appropriate for specific neurological conditions. We use the application of rTMS in motor functional recovery from cerebral ischemic stroke to illustrate the difficulties in interpreting and assessing the therapeutic potential of rTMS for neurotrauma in terms of the presumed mechanisms of action of rTMS. Future directions for research will also be discussed.

  17. Early detection of hand movements from electroencephalograms for stroke therapy applications.

    PubMed

    Muralidharan, A; Chae, J; Taylor, D M

    2011-08-01

    Movement-assist devices such as neuromuscular stimulation systems can be used to generate movements in people with chronic hand paralysis due to stroke. If detectable, motor planning activity in the cortex could be used in real time to trigger a movement-assist device and restore a person's ability to perform many of the activities of daily living. Additionally, re-coupling motor planning in the cortex with assisted movement generation in the periphery may provide an even greater benefit-strengthening relevant synaptic connections over time to promote natural motor recovery. This study examined the potential for using electroencephalograms (EEGs) as a means of rapidly detecting the intent to open the hand during movement planning in individuals with moderate chronic hand paralysis following a subcortical ischemic stroke. On average, attempts to open the hand could be detected from EEGs approximately 100-500 ms prior to the first signs of movement onset. This earlier detection would minimize device activation delays and allow for tighter coupling between initial formation of the motor plan in the cortex and augmentation of that plan in the periphery by a movement-assist device. This tight temporal coupling may be important or even essential for strengthening synaptic connections and enhancing natural motor recovery.

  18. Potent and Selective Inhibitors of Human Reticulocyte 12/15-Lipoxygenase as Anti-Stroke Therapies

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    A key challenge facing drug discovery today is variability of the drug target between species, such as with 12/15-lipoxygenase (12/15-LOX), which contributes to ischemic brain injury, but its human and rodent isozymes have different inhibitor specificities. In the current work, we have utilized a quantitative high-throughput (qHTS) screen to identify compound 1 (ML351), a novel chemotype for 12/15-LOX inhibition that has nanomolar potency (IC50 = 200 nM) against human 12/15-LOX and is protective against oxidative glutamate toxicity in mouse neuronal HT22 cells. In addition, it exhibited greater than 250-fold selectivity versus related LOX isozymes, was a mixed inhibitor, and did not reduce the active-site ferric ion. Lastly, 1 significantly reduced infarct size following permanent focal ischemia in a mouse model of ischemic stroke. As such, this represents the first report of a selective inhibitor of human 12/15-LOX with demonstrated in vivo activity in proof-of-concept mouse models of stroke. PMID:24684213

  19. Multiple Coaxial Catheter System for Reliable Access in Interventional Stroke Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Kulcsar, Zsolt Yilmaz, Hasan; Bonvin, Christophe; Lovblad, Karl O.; Ruefenacht, Daniel A.

    2010-12-15

    In some patients with acute cerebral vessel occlusion, navigating mechanical thrombectomy systems is difficult due to tortuous anatomy of the aortic arch, carotid arteries, or vertebral arteries. Our purpose was to describe a multiple coaxial catheter system used for mechanical revascularization that helps navigation and manipulations in tortuous vessels. A triple or quadruple coaxial catheter system was built in 28 consecutive cases presenting with acute ischemic stroke. All cases were treated by mechanical thrombectomy with the Penumbra System. In cases of unsuccessful thrombo-aspiration, additional thrombolysis or angioplasty with stent placement was used for improving recanalization. The catheter system consisted of an outermost 8-Fr and an intermediate 6-Fr guiding catheter, containing the inner Penumbra reperfusion catheters. The largest, 4.1-Fr, reperfusion catheter was navigated over a Prowler Select Plus microcatheter. The catheter system provided access to reach the cerebral lesions and provided stability for the mechanically demanding manipulations of thromboaspiration and stent navigation in all cases. Apart from their mechanical role, the specific parts of the system could also provide access to different types of interventions, like carotid stenting through the 8-Fr guiding catheter and intracranial stenting and thrombolysis through the Prowler Select Plus microcatheter. In this series, there were no complications related to the catheter system. In conclusion, building up a triple or quadruple coaxial system proved to be safe and efficient in our experience for the mechanical thrombectomy treatment of acute ischemic stroke.

  20. Motor rehabilitation after traumatic brain injury and stroke - Advances in assessment and therapy.

    PubMed

    Platz, T; Hesse, S; Mauritz, K H

    1999-01-01

    A long-term goal in motor rehabilitation is that treatment is not selected on the basis of 'schools of thought', but rather, based on knowledge about efficacy and effectiveness of specific interventions for specific situations (e.g. functional syndromes). Motor dysfunction after stroke or TBI can be caused by many different functional syndromes such as paresis, ataxia, deafferentaion, visuo-perceptual deficits, or apraxia. Examples are provided showing that theory-based analysis of motor behavior makes it possible to describe 'syndrome-specific motor deficits'. Its potential implications for motor rehabilitation are that our understanding of altered motor behavior as well as specific therapeutic approaches might be promoted. A methodological prerequisite for clinical trials in rehabilitation is knowledge about test properties of assessment tools in follow-up situations such as test-retest reliability and responsiveness to change. Test-retest reliability assesses whether a test can produce stable measures with test repetition, while sensitivity to change reflects whether a test detects changes that occur over time. Exemplifying these considerations, a reliability and validity study of a kinematic arm movement analysis is summarized. In terms of new therapeutic developments, two examples of clinical therapeutic studies are provided assessing the efficacy of specific inter-ventions for specific situations in arm and gait rehabilitation: the Arm Ability Training for high functioning hemiparetic stroke and TBI patients, and the treadmill training for non-ambulatory hemiparetic patients. In addition, a new technical development, a machine-controlled gait trainer ist introduced.

  1. Detoxification combining fasting with fluid therapy for refractory cases of severe atopic dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyu Seok; Nam, Hae Jeong

    2013-01-01

    To introduce and determine the clinical benefits of a detoxification program that combines fasting with fluid therapy for refractory cases of severe atopic dermatitis (AD), we performed a retrospective chart review of inpatients with AD from March 2010 to February 2012 at the Department of Ophthalmology, Otorhinolaryngology and Dermatology of Korean Medicine in the Kyung Hee Medical Center. Patients were treated with the detoxification program, which combined fasting with fluid therapy, and herbal medicine, herbal wet wrap dressings, or acupuncture treatment when clinically necessary. The primary outcome was the SCORAD total index. The secondary outcome was the pruritus visual analogue scale (VAS) score in SCORAD as evaluated by a trained dermatology specialist. Among the 130 inpatients that have done detoxification, 7 patients met the inclusion criteria. The mean total SCORAD scores significantly decreased from 64.67 ± 11.72 to 26.26 ± 11.01 (P = 0.018) after the detoxification program. There was also a significant decrease in VAS score for pruritus from 8.00 ± 1.16 to 2.57 ± 0.98 (P = 0.016) between admission and discharge. We suggest that fasting with fluid therapy as a complementary and alternative treatment method may provide some benefits for patients with refractory cases of severe atopic dermatitis.

  2. Secondary stroke prevention.

    PubMed

    Hankey, Graeme J

    2014-02-01

    Survivors of stroke and transient ischaemic attacks are at risk of a recurrent stroke, which is often more severe and disabling than the index event. Optimum secondary prevention of recurrent stroke needs rapid diagnosis and treatment and prompt identification of the underlying cardiovascular cause. Effective treatments include organised acute assessment and intervention with antithrombotic therapy, carotid revascularisation, and control of causal risk factors, as appropriate. However, effective treatments are not implemented optimally in clinical practice. Recurrent strokes continue to account for 25-30% of all strokes and represent unsuccessful secondary prevention. Immediate and sustained implementation of effective and appropriate secondary prevention strategies in patients with first-ever stroke or transient ischaemic attack has the potential to reduce the burden of stroke by up to a quarter.

  3. Multimodal Approaches for Regenerative Stroke Therapies: Combination of Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor with Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells is Not Superior to G-CSF Alone.

    PubMed

    Balseanu, Adrian Tudor; Buga, Ana-Maria; Catalin, Bogdan; Wagner, Daniel-Christoph; Boltze, Johannes; Zagrean, Ana-Maria; Reymann, Klaus; Schaebitz, Wolf; Popa-Wagner, Aurel

    2014-01-01

    Attractive therapeutic strategies to enhance post-stroke recovery of aged brains include methods of cellular therapy that can enhance the endogenous restorative mechanisms of the injured brain. Since stroke afflicts mostly the elderly, it is highly desirable to test the efficacy of cell therapy in the microenvironment of aged brains that is generally refractory to regeneration. In particular, stem cells from the bone marrow allow an autologous transplantation approach that can be translated in the near future to the clinical practice. Such a bone marrow-derived therapy includes the grafting of stem cells as well as the delayed induction of endogenous stem cell mobilization and homing by the stem cell mobilizer granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF). We tested the hypothesis that grafting of bone marrow-derived pre-differentiated mesenchymal cells (BM-MSCs) in G-CSF-treated animals improves the long-term functional outcome in aged rodents. To this end, G-CSF alone (50 μg/kg) or in combination with a single dose (10(6) cells) of rat BM MSCs was administered intravenously to Sprague-Dawley rats at 6 h after transient occlusion (90 min) of the middle cerebral artery. Infarct volume was measured by magnetic resonance imaging at 3 and 48 days post-stroke and additionally by immunhistochemistry at day 56. Functional recovery was tested during the entire post-stroke survival period of 56 days. Daily treatment for post-stroke aged rats with G-CSF led to a robust and consistent improvement of neurological function after 28 days. The combination therapy also led to robust angiogenesis in the formerly infarct core and beyond in the "islet of regeneration." However, G-CSF + BM MSCs may not impact at all on the spatial reference-memory task or infarct volume and therefore did not further improve the post-stroke recovery. We suggest that in a real clinical practice involving older post-stroke patients, successful regenerative therapies would have to be

  4. Comparing Two Computational Mechanisms for Explaining Functional Recovery in Robot-Therapy of Stroke Survivors.

    PubMed

    Piovesan, Davide; Casadio, Maura; Mussa-Ivaldi, Ferdinando A; Morasso, Pietro

    2012-06-01

    In this paper we discuss two possible strategies of movement control that can be used by stroke survivors during rehabilitation robotics training. To perform a reaching task in a minimally assistive force field, subjects either can move following the trajectory provided by the assistive force or they can use an internal representation of a minimum jerk trajectory from their starting position to the target. We used the stiffness and damping values directly estimated from the experimental data to simulate the trajectories that result by taking into account both hypotheses. The comparison of the simulated results with the data collected on four hemiparetic subjects supports the hypothesis that the central nervous system (CNS) is still able to correctly plan the movement, although a normal execution is impaired.

  5. Risk of Stroke in Patients with Stable Coronary Artery Disease Undergoing Percutaneous Coronary Intervention versus Optimal Medical Therapy: Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials

    PubMed Central

    Taglieri, Nevio; Bacchi Reggiani, Maria Letizia; Ghetti, Gabriele; Saia, Francesco; Dall’Ara, Gianni; Gallo, Pamela; Moretti, Carolina; Palmerini, Tullio; Marrozzini, Cinzia; Marzocchi, Antonio; Rapezzi, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    Background Stroke is a rare but serious adverse event associated with percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). However, the relative risk of stroke between stable patients undergoing a direct PCI strategy and those undergoing an initial optimal medical therapy (OMT) strategy has not been established yet. This study sought to investigate if, in patients with stable coronary artery disease (SCAD), an initial strategy PCI is associated with a higher risk of stroke than a strategy based on OMT alone. Methods We performed a meta-analysis of 6 contemporary randomized control trials in which 5673 patients with SCAD were randomized to initial PCI or OMT. Only trials with stent utilization more than 50% were included. Study endpoint was the rate of stroke during follow up. Results Mean age of patients ranged from 60 to 65 years and stent utilization ranged from 72% to 100%. Rate of stroke was 2.0% at a weighted mean follow up of 55.3 months. On pooled analysis, the risk of stroke was similar between patients undergoing a PCI plus OMT and those receiving only OMT (2.2% vs. 1.8%, OR on fixed effect = 1.24 95%CI: 0.85–1.79). There was no heterogeneity among the studies (I2 = 0.0%, P = 0.15). On sensitivity analysis after removing each individual study the pooled effect estimate remains unchanged. Conclusions In patients with SCAD an initial strategy based on a direct PCI is not associated with an increased risk of stroke during long-term follow up compared to an initial strategy based on OMT alone. PMID:27391212

  6. Electroencephalographic markers of robot-aided therapy in stroke patients for the evaluation of upper limb rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Sale, Patrizio; Infarinato, Francesco; Del Percio, Claudio; Lizio, Roberta; Babiloni, Claudio; Foti, Calogero; Franceschini, Marco

    2015-12-01

    Stroke is the leading cause of permanent disability in developed countries; its effects may include sensory, motor, and cognitive impairment as well as a reduced ability to perform self-care and participate in social and community activities. A number of studies have shown that the use of robotic systems in upper limb motor rehabilitation programs provides safe and intensive treatment to patients with motor impairments because of a neurological injury. Furthermore, robot-aided therapy was shown to be well accepted and tolerated by all patients; however, it is not known whether a specific robot-aided rehabilitation can induce beneficial cortical plasticity in stroke patients. Here, we present a procedure to study neural underpinning of robot-aided upper limb rehabilitation in stroke patients. Neurophysiological recordings use the following: (a) 10-20 system electroencephalographic (EEG) electrode montage; (b) bipolar vertical and horizontal electrooculographies; and (c) bipolar electromyography from the operating upper limb. Behavior monitoring includes the following: (a) clinical data and (b) kinematic and dynamic of the operant upper limb movements. Experimental conditions include the following: (a) resting state eyes closed and eyes open, and (b) robotic rehabilitation task (maximum 80 s each block to reach 4-min EEG data; interblock pause of 1 min). The data collection is performed before and after a program of 30 daily rehabilitation sessions. EEG markers include the following: (a) EEG power density in the eyes-closed condition; (b) reactivity of EEG power density to eyes opening; and (c) reactivity of EEG power density to robotic rehabilitation task. The above procedure was tested on a subacute patient (29 poststroke days) and on a chronic patient (21 poststroke months). After the rehabilitation program, we observed (a) improved clinical condition; (b) improved performance during the robotic task; (c) reduced delta rhythms (1-4 Hz) and increased alpha

  7. Early computed tomography-based scores to predict decompressive hemicraniectomy after endovascular therapy in acute ischemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Behme, Daniel; Schnieder, Marlena; Tsogkas, Ioannis; Schregel, Katharina; Bähr, Mathias; Knauth, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Background Identification of patients requiring decompressive hemicraniectomy (DH) after endovascular therapy (EVT) is crucial as clinical signs are not reliable and early DH has been shown to improve clinical outcome. The aim of our study was to identify imaging-based scores to predict the risk for space occupying ischemic stroke and DH. Methods Prospectively derived data from patients with acute large artery occlusion within the anterior circulation and EVT was analyzed in this monocentric study. Predictive value of non-contrast cranial computed tomography (ncCT) and cerebral blood volume (CBV) Alberta Stroke Program Early CT score (ASPECTS) were investigated for DH using logistic regression models and Receiver Operating Characteristic Curve analysis. Results From 218 patients with EVT, DH was performed in 20 patients (9.2%). Baseline- (7 vs. 9; p = 0.009) and follow-up ncCT ASPECTS (1 vs. 7, p<0.001) as well as baseline CBV ASPECTS (5 vs. 7, p<0.001) were significantly lower in patients with DH. ncCT (baseline: OR 0.71, p = 0.018; follow-up: OR 0.32, p = <0.001) and CBV ASPECTS (OR 0.63, p = 0.008) predicted DH. Cut-off ncCT-ASPECTS on baseline was 7-, ncCT-ASPECTS on follow-up was 4- and CBV ASPECTS on baseline was 5 points. Conclusions ASPECTS could be useful to early identify patients requiring DH after EVT for acute large vessel occlusion. PMID:28282456

  8. Ischemic Stroke

    MedlinePlus

    A stroke is a medical emergency. There are two types - ischemic and hemorrhagic. Ischemic stroke is the most common type. It is usually ... are at risk for having a more serious stroke. Symptoms of stroke are Sudden numbness or weakness ...

  9. Risk of First and Recurrent Stroke in Childhood Cancer Survivors Treated With Cranial and Cervical Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, Sabine; Sear, Katherine; Hills, Nancy K.; Chettout, Nassim; Afghani, Shervin; Gastelum, Erica; Haas-Kogan, Daphne; Fullerton, Heather J.

    2013-07-15

    Purpose: To assess, in a retrospective cohort study, rates and predictors of first and recurrent stroke in patients treated with cranial irradiation (CRT) and/or cervical irradiation at ≤18 years of age. Methods and Materials: We performed chart abstraction (n=383) and phone interviews (n=104) to measure first and recurrent stroke in 383 patients who received CRT and/or cervical radiation at a single institution between 1980 and 2009. Stroke was defined as a physician diagnosis and symptoms consistent with stroke. Incidence of first stroke was number of first strokes per person-years of observation after radiation. We used survival analysis techniques to determine cumulative incidence of first and recurrent stroke. Results: Among 325 subjects with sufficient follow-up data, we identified 19 first strokes (13 ischemic, 4 hemorrhagic, 2 unknown subtype) occurring at a median age of 24 years (interquartile range 17-33 years) in patients treated with CRT. Imaging was reviewed when available (n=13), and the stroke was confirmed in 12. Overall rate of first stroke was 625 (95% confidence interval [CI] 378-977) per 100,000 person-years. The cumulative incidence of first stroke was 2% (95% CI 0.01%-5.3%) at 5 years and 4% (95% CI 2.0%-8.4%) at 10 years after irradiation. With each 100-cGy increase in the radiation dose, the stroke hazard increased by 5% (hazard ratio 1.05; 95% CI 1.01-1.09; P=.02). We identified 6 recurrent strokes; 5 had available imaging that confirmed the stroke. Median time to recurrence was 15 months (interquartile range 6 months-3.2 years) after first stroke. The cumulative incidence of recurrent stroke was 38% (95% CI 17%-69%) at 5 years and 59% (95% CI 27%-92%) at 10 years after first stroke. Conclusion: Cranial irradiation puts childhood cancer survivors at high risk of both first and recurrent stroke. Stroke prevention strategies for these survivors are needed.

  10. Sequential Amniotic Fluid Thyroid Hormone Changes Correlate with Goiter Shrinkage following in utero Thyroxine Therapy.

    PubMed

    Munoz, Jessian L; Kessler, Alan A; Felig, Philip; Curtis, Jenifer; Evans, Mark I

    2016-01-01

    Several isolated reports of fetal goiter treatment have shown limited generalizability of approaches and provide no real guidance for optimal timing, dosages, and treatment strategies. Graves' disease accounts for >60% of these cases. Maternal treatments of hyperthyroidism include antithyroid medications such as methimazole and more commonly propylthiouracil (PTU). Here, our management of a patient with a fetal thyroid goiter from maternal exposure to PTU diagnosed at 23.6 weeks' gestation and the management of other cases allow us propose a general strategy for treatment. Intrauterine therapy with 200 and then 400 μg of levothyroxine (3 weeks apart) showed an 85% reduction in fetal thyroid goiter volume. We collected amniotic fluid samples at the time of treatments and assayed thyroid hormones and associated antibodies which closely reflected the changes in thyroid goiter mass volume. Our observations suggest a weekly or biweekly therapeutic intervention schedule. Utilizing both goiter size as well as a novel approach in using amniotic fluid hormone levels to monitor therapy efficacy might improve the quality of treatments. Only with a standardized approach and collection of amniotic fluid thyroid panels do we have the opportunity to develop the database required to determine the number and timing of treatments needed.

  11. Stroke: Hope through Research

    MedlinePlus

    ... United States: estimated at about $43 billion / year direct costs for medical care and therapy: estimated at ... days after a stroke: $35,000* percentage of direct cost of care for the first 90 days*: ...

  12. Computed Tomography-Based Thrombus Imaging for the Prediction of Recanalization after Reperfusion Therapy in Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Heo, Ji Hoe; Kim, Kyeonsub; Yoo, Joonsang; Kim, Young Dae; Nam, Hyo Suk; Kim, Eung Yeop

    2017-01-01

    The prediction of successful recanalization following thrombolytic or endovascular treatment may be helpful to determine the strategy of recanalization treatment in acute stroke. Thrombus can be detected using noncontrast computed tomography (CT) as a hyperdense artery sign or blooming artifact on a T2*-weighted gradient-recalled image. The detection of thrombus using CT depends on slice thickness. Thrombus burden can be determined in terms of the length, volume, and clot burden score. The thrombus size can be quantitatively measured on thin-section CT or CT angiography/magnetic resonance angiography. The determination of thrombus size may be predictive of successful recanalization/non-recanalization after intravenous thrombolysis and endovascular treatment. However, cut-offs of thrombus size for predicting recanalization/non-recanalization are different among studies, due to different methods of measurements. Thus, a standardized method to measure the thrombus is necessary for thrombus imaging to be useful and reliable in clinical practice. Software-based measurements may provide a reliable and accurate assessment. The measurement should be easy and rapid to be more widely used in practice, which could be achieved by improvement of the user interface. In addition to prediction of recanalization, sequential measurements of thrombus volume before and after the treatment may also be useful to determine the efficacy of new thrombolytic drugs. This manuscript reviews the diagnosis of thrombus, prediction of recanalization using thrombus imaging, and practical considerations for the measurement of thrombus burden and density on CT. PMID:28178411

  13. High-dose insulin therapy for neurogenic-stunned myocardium after stroke

    PubMed Central

    Devos, Justine; Peeters, André; Wittebole, Xavier; Hantson, Philippe

    2012-01-01

    A 44-year-old woman with a history of complicated type 2 diabetes mellitus presented with a diagnosis of right-hemispheric ischaemic stroke. She developed acute respiratory distress with radiological evidence of pulmonary oedema. The ECG showed poorly significant ST-segment changes, with a minimal increase of cardiac biomarkers. Echocardiography showed a severely depressed left ventricular function, with also low values of cardiac output at invasive monitoring. The possibility of neurogenic-stunned myocardium was discussed and a metabolic resuscitation with high-dose insulin was proposed. An intravenous bolus of 80 units of insulin (0.72 IU/kg) was followed by a continuous infusion at the rate of 160 IU/h (1.45 IU/kg/h). The treatment led to a rapid and sustained improvement of the haemodynamic condition and was well tolerated. In comparison with dobutamine, insulin had significant inotropic effects without tachycardia. The patient unfortunately died on day 35, from respiratory complications after poor neurological recovery. PMID:23175002

  14. Stem cells from fetal membranes and amniotic fluid: markers for cell isolation and therapy.

    PubMed

    Pozzobon, Michela; Piccoli, Martina; De Coppi, Paolo

    2014-06-01

    Stem cell therapy is in constant need of new cell sources to conceive regenerative medicine approaches for diseases that are still without therapy. Scientists drew the attention toward amniotic membrane and amniotic fluid stem cells, since these sources possess many advantages: first of all as cells can be extracted from discarded foetal material it is inexpensive, secondly abundant stem cells can be obtained and finally, these stem cell sources are free from ethical considerations. Many studies have demonstrated the differentiation potential in vitro and in vivo toward mesenchymal and non-mesenchymal cell types; in addition the immune-modulatory properties make these cells a good candidate for allo- and xenotransplantation. This review offers an overview on markers characterisation and on the latest findings in pre-clinical or clinical setting of the stem cell populations isolated from these sources.

  15. Bilateral brain reorganization with memantine and constraint-induced aphasia therapy in chronic post-stroke aphasia: An ERP study.

    PubMed

    Barbancho, Miguel A; Berthier, Marcelo L; Navas-Sánchez, Patricia; Dávila, Guadalupe; Green-Heredia, Cristina; García-Alberca, José M; Ruiz-Cruces, Rafael; López-González, Manuel V; Dawid-Milner, Marc S; Pulvermüller, Friedemann; Lara, J Pablo

    2015-01-01

    Changes in ERP (P100 and N400) and root mean square (RMS) were obtained during a silent reading task in 28 patients with chronic post-stroke aphasia in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of both memantine and constraint-induced aphasia therapy (CIAT). Participants received memantine/placebo alone (weeks 0-16), followed by drug treatment combined with CIAT (weeks 16-18), and then memantine/placebo alone (weeks 18-20). ERP/RMS values (week 16) decreased more in the memantine group than in the placebo group. During CIAT application (weeks 16-18), improvements in aphasia severity and ERP/RMS values were amplified by memantine and changes remained stable thereafter (weeks 18-20). Changes in ERP/RMS occurred in left and right hemispheres and correlated with gains in language performance. No changes in ERP/RMS were found in a healthy group in two separated evaluations. Our results show that aphasia recovery induced by both memantine alone and in combination with CIAT is indexed by bilateral cortical potentials.

  16. Failure of intravenous fluid therapies to decrease serum sodium levels in elderly hospitalized patients.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Sharila; DeVita, Maria V; Panagopoulos, Georgia; Michelis, Michael F

    2002-01-01

    Elderly patients may have a tendency to develop hyponatremia due to sensitivity to stimuli that release ADH as well as an impaired ability to excrete a water load. We evaluated changes in serum sodium in elderly hospitalized patients who received various forms of intravenous fluid therapies. All patients were required to have a baseline serum sodium of 136-145 meq/L. Fourteen patients were enrolled in the study. The mean age was 82.9 +/- 6.8 years (mean +/- SEM). Thirty-six % were nursing home residents. Seventy-nine % were females. Seventy-two % received half normal saline and the remainder received normal saline as intravenous fluid therapy. The patients received a mean of 1098 +/- 145 mL of intravenous fluid per day, in addition to oral fluids. Mean follow up period was 5.9 days (3-10 days). Mean baseline serum sodium was 140.2 +/- 0.7 meq/L andmean follow up serum sodium was 141.4 +/- 0.9 meq/L. The m ean baseline BUN was 25 +/- 3.6 mg/dL and mean follow u BUN was 19.6 +/- 3.4 mg/dL. The mean baseline serum creatinine was 0.9 +/- 0.1 mg/dL and mean follow up creatinine was 0.9 +/- 0.1 mg/dL. The postintravenous fluid therapy serum sodium in the group receiving half normal saline was 141.7 +/- 0.7 meq/L and 140.8 +/- 3 meq/L in the normal saline group. No significant difference was observed between the pre and post fluid therapy for any of these paramenters (p > 0.05). Mean baseline plasma renin activity was 1.6 +/- 0.7 ng/ml/hour and fifty-seven % had PRA of less than 1 ng/ml/hour. Mean plasma aldosterone was 8.5 +/- 1.8 ng/mL and forty-two % were less than 5.5 ng/mL. Plasma ADH and ANP was 5.7 +/- 3.4 pg/mL and 83.6 +/- 26.9 pg/mL, respectively. Mean serum and urine osmolalities were 290 +/- 3.1 mOsm/kg and 471 +/- 57.7 mOsm/kg, respectively. No patient developed hyponatremia and 7 of the 14 patients experienced an increase in serum sodium during the follow up period. We conclude that many elderly patients hospitalized for acute medical illnesses either

  17. [State-of-the-art Treatment of Acute Stroke].

    PubMed

    Weber, R; Nordmeyer, H

    2015-11-01

    This article gives an overview about diagnostic imaging and treatment options of acute patients with ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke with emphasis on evidence from relevant studies published in the last 2 years. A computed tomography of the brain with CT-angiography should be the minimal standard imaging modality in acute ischemic stroke patients. Diffusion-weighted/imaging-fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR)-mismatch magnetic resonance imaging can be useful in patients with wake-up stroke to select patients for recanalisation therapies. Systemic thrombolysis with rt-PA within 4.5 hours after symptom onset and mechanical thrombectomy with stent retrievers within 6 hours and proven occlusion of a large vessel in the anterior brain circulation are both evidence-based treatments. In contrast, there are no major therapeutic advances in patients with hemorrhagic stroke. The systolic blood pressure should be lowered < 140  mm Hg in these patients within one hour. Both acute ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke and patients with a transient ischemic attack should be monitored and treated on a stroke unit due to an improved outcome. A prophylactic antibiotic treatment and very early mobilization during the first 24 hours is not recommended in acute stroke patients.

  18. Thrombotic and hemorrhagic strokes complicating early therapy for childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Priest, J R; Ramsay, N K; Latchaw, R E; Lockman, L A; Hasegawa, D K; Coates, T D; Coccia, P F; Edson, J R; Nesbit, M E; Krivit, W

    1980-10-01

    Sudden cerebrovascular insults occurred during or immediately following remission induction therapy in 4 children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. In 3, cerebral infarction was due to thrombosis. In the fourth, an intracerebral hematoma developed representing either frank hemorrhaging or a hemorrhagic infarction. None of the patients had central nervous system leukemia or extreme leukocytosis at the time of diagnosis. Symptoms were obtundation, hemiparesis, seizures, and headache. The induction chemotherapy included L-asparaginase which causes deficiencies of antithrombin, plasminogen, fibrinogen, and factors IX and XI. These hemostatic abnormalities may explain the thromboses and bleeding observed in these children.

  19. [Intraoperative fluid therapy in infants with congestive heart failure due to intracranial pial arteriovenous fistula].

    PubMed

    Arroyo-Fernández, F J; Calderón-Seoane, E; Rodríguez-Peña, F; Torres-Morera, L M

    2016-05-01

    Pial arteriovenous fistula is a rare intracranial congenital malformation (0.1-1: 100,000). It has a high blood flow between one or more pial arteries and drains into the venous circulation. It is usually diagnosed during the childhood by triggering an intracranial hypertension and/or congestive heart failure due to left-right systemic shunt. It is a rare malformation with a complex pathophysiology. The perioperative anaesthetic management is not well established. We present a 6-month-old infant diagnosed with pial arteriovenous fistula with hypertension and congestive heart failure due to left-right shunt. He required a craniotomy and clipping of vascular malformation. Anaesthetic considerations in patients with this condition are a great challenge. It must be performed by multidisciplinary teams with experience in paediatrics. The maintenance of blood volume during the intraoperative course is very important. Excessive fluid therapy can precipitate a congestive heart failure or intracranial hypertension, and a lower fluid therapy may cause a tissue hypoxia due to the bleeding.

  20. Burden of stroke in Estonia.

    PubMed

    Kõrv, Janika; Vibo, Riina

    2013-07-01

    Estonia is the smallest of the three Baltic countries. The decline in incidence of first-ever stroke during the 1990s has left Tartu, Estonia with a relatively low stroke incidence. However, the incidence rates for younger age groups, and the 28-day case fatality rate are higher compared with several other studies. Developments in the national health care system in recent years have been positive: the decline of mortality rate of stroke in Estonia is greater than the European Union average. However, the mortality of cardiovascular diseases is higher compared with several European countries. The prevalence of most stroke risk factors is comparable with European Union countries, while atrial fibrillation is somewhat more frequent (30%) among the patients having suffered from ischemic stroke. The management of stroke in Estonia has been in accordance with European and national stroke guidelines. Stroke units are organized in regional and central hospitals in bigger cities. A well-developed and free ambulance service, and a high priority of stroke code, enable a quick transportation of patients to the nearest hospital providing thrombolytic therapy. The number of thrombolyzed stroke cases has increased since 2003. The Estonian Stroke Initiative was founded in 2008 to improve stroke care, promote regional networks, and increase stroke knowledge among the general population and medical professionals. Since then, several activities regarding stroke awareness have been organized.

  1. Closed-loop control of fluid therapy for treatment of hypovolemia.

    PubMed

    Kramer, George C; Kinsky, Michael P; Prough, Donald S; Salinas, Jose; Sondeen, Jill L; Hazel-Scerbo, Michelle L; Mitchell, Charles E

    2008-04-01

    Closed-loop algorithms and resuscitation systems are being developed to control IV infusion rate during early resuscitation of hypovolemia. Although several different physiologic variables have been suggested as an endpoint to guide fluid therapy, blood pressure remains the most used variable for the initial assessment of hemorrhagic shock and the treatment response to volume loading. Closed-loop algorithms use a controller function to alter infusion rate inversely to blood pressure. Studies in hemorrhaged conscious sheep suggest that: (1) a small reduction in target blood pressure can result in a significant reduction in volume requirement; (2) nonlinear algorithms may reduce the risk of increased internal bleeding during resuscitation; (3) algorithm control functions based on proportional-integral, fuzzy logic, or nonlinear decision tables were found to restore and maintain blood pressure equally well. Proportional-integral and fuzzy logic algorithms reduced mean fluid volume requirements compared with the nonlinear decision table; and (4) several algorithms have been constructed to the specific mechanism of injury and the volume expansion properties of different fluids. Closed-loop systems are undergoing translation from animal to patient studies. Future smart resuscitation systems will benefit from new noninvasive technologies for monitoring blood pressure and the development of computer controlled high flow intravenous pumps.

  2. Stroke: New Developments and Their Application in Clinical Practice.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Peter J; Kavanagh, Eoin; Murphy, Sean

    2016-08-01

    Significant advances have been made in recent years in primary stroke prevention, improved stroke outcomes in high-income populations, emergency stroke therapy, and stroke prevention. In this article, we review recent trends in stroke epidemiology, improvements in delivery of intravenous thrombolysis (via stroke system-wide approaches, application of 'Lean Principles' to improve workflow processes, and re-evaluation of exclusion criteria), recent stroke thrombectomy trials, and new developments in stroke prevention, with emphasis on risk prediction in transient ischemic attack, choice and timing of anticoagulation therapy for secondary stroke prevention, and emerging concepts in risk stratification for management of symptomatic carotid stenosis.

  3. An adolescent with intact motor skills and intelligence after infant hemorrhagic stroke without rehabilitation therapy: a case report.

    PubMed

    Lee, Shenghuo; Yan, Tiebin; Lu, Xiao

    2012-01-01

    Devastating intracerebral hemorrhagic stroke is rarely encountered in children, but it has a high mortality rate. The case of a 15-year-old boy who survived a major stroke at 40 days old is described. He showed no significant motor or intelligence impairment in adolescence until he was hospitalized for transient left had tremors and slight left hand weakness caused by a cyst. The patient's almost complete motor recovery highlights the power of neural plasticity in young patients. The pediatric stroke was huge, but this did not affect his adolescent movement or intelligence, demonstrating the great neuroplastic potential of the developing human brain. These observations may help increase our knowledge about stroke in children and improve the treatment of pediatric stroke patients.

  4. Effect of long-term vigabatrin therapy on selected neurotransmitter concentrations in cerebrospinal fluid.

    PubMed

    Ben-Menachem, E; Persson, L I; Mumford, J; Haegele, K D; Huebert, N

    1991-01-01

    Ten patients, suffering from drug-resistant complex partial seizures were treated for a period of up to 3 years with vigabatrin (Sabril). Vigabatrin is a novel antiepileptic agent, whose action is based on the inhibition of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) aminotransferase, the enzyme responsible for the catabolism of the neurotransmitter GABA. Samples of lumbar cerebrospinal fluid were obtained from the patients prior to commencing vigabatrin therapy, and thereafter at 6 months, 1 year, 2 years, and up to 3 years following the initiation of vigabatrin treatment. The influence of vigabatrin on the cerebrospinal fluid concentrations of free and total GABA, homocarnosine, homovanillic acid, 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid, and 3-methoxy-4-hydroxyphenylethylene glycol, as well as of the drug itself, was assessed. All patients demonstrated a clinical response to vigabatrin, and the drug was well tolerated over the entire observation period. Mean (+/- SD) reduction of seizure frequency was 65% +/- 23% (range, 26% to 100%) when comparing the end of the treatment period to the previgabatrin baseline. The cerebrospinal fluid concentrations of both free and total GABA and of the dipeptide homocarnosine showed approximately 2- to 5-fold increases over baseline values, with free GABA and homocarnosine being the more sensitive variables. Cerebrospinal fluid concentrations of homovanillic acid, 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid, and 3-methoxy-4-hydroxyphenylethylene glycol were not altered in a significant manner over the observation period. These findings support the concept that the effects of vigabatrin are restricted to an effect on GABA catabolism and do not extend to the neurotransmitters dopamine and norepinephrine. Clinical efficacy and elevation of GABA and homocarnosine concentration were sustained over the period of observation.

  5. World Stroke Organization global stroke services guidelines and action plan.

    PubMed

    Lindsay, Patrice; Furie, Karen L; Davis, Stephen M; Donnan, Geoffrey A; Norrving, Bo

    2014-10-01

    Every two seconds, someone across the globe suffers a symptomatic stroke. 'Silent' cerebrovascular disease insidiously contributes to worldwide disability by causing cognitive impairment in the elderly. The risk of cerebrovascular disease is disproportionately higher in low to middle income countries where there may be barriers to stroke care. The last two decades have seen a major transformation in the stroke field with the emergence of evidence-based approaches to stroke prevention, acute stroke management, and stroke recovery. The current challenge lies in implementing these interventions, particularly in regions with high incidences of stroke and limited healthcare resources. The Global Stroke Services Action Plan was conceived as a tool to identifying key elements in stroke care across a continuum of health models. At the minimal level of resource availability, stroke care delivery is based at a local clinic staffed predominantly by non-physicians. In this environment, laboratory tests and diagnostic studies are scarce, and much of the emphasis is placed on bedside clinical skills, teaching, and prevention. The essential services level offers access to a CT scan, physicians, and the potential for acute thrombolytic therapy, however stroke expertise may still be difficult to access. At the advanced stroke services level, multidisciplinary stroke expertise, multimodal imaging, and comprehensive therapies are available. A national plan for stroke care should incorporate local and regional strengths and build upon them. This clinical practice guideline is a synopsis of the core recommendations and quality indicators adapted from ten high quality multinational stroke guidelines. It can be used to establish the current level of stroke services, target goals for expanding stroke resources, and ensuring that all stages of stroke care are being adequately addressed, even at the advanced stroke services level. This document is a start, but there is more to be done

  6. Discovering knowledge on pediatric fluid therapy and dysnatremias from quantitative data found in electronic medical records.

    PubMed

    Pham, Steve L; Bickel, Jonathan P; Moritz, Michael L; Levin, James E

    2010-11-13

    It is accepted that intravenous fluid (IVF) therapy can result in hospital-acquired dysnatremias in pediatric patients, with associated morbidity and mortality. There is interest in improving IVF therapy to prevent dysnatremias, but the optimal approach is controversial. In this study, we develop Natremia Deviation and Intravenous Renderer (NaDIR), a tool that preprocesses large volumes of electronic medical record data obtained from an academic pediatric hospital in order to analyze (1) IVF therapy, (2) the epidemiology of dysnatremias, and (3) the impact of IVFs on changes in serum sodium (ΔS(Na)). We then applied NaDIR to 3,256 inpatient records over a 3 month period, which revealed (1) a 19.9% incidence of dysnatremias, (2) a significant increase in lengths of stay associated with dysnatremias, and (3) a novel linear relationship between ΔS(Na) and IVF tonicity. This demonstrates that EMR data that can be readily analyzed to discover epidemiologic and predictive knowledge.

  7. Constraint-Induced Movement Therapy Combined with Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation over Premotor Cortex Improves Motor Function in Severe Stroke: A Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Batista, Larissa M.; Nogueira, Lídia L. R. F.; de Oliveira, Eliane A.; de Carvalho, Antonio G. C.; Lima, Soriano S.; Santana, Jordânia R. M.; de Lima, Emerson C. C.; Fernández-Calvo, Bernardino

    2017-01-01

    Objective. We compared the effects of transcranial direct current stimulation at different cortical sites (premotor and motor primary cortex) combined with constraint-induced movement therapy for treatment of stroke patients. Design. Sixty patients were randomly distributed into 3 groups: Group A, anodal stimulation on premotor cortex and constraint-induced movement therapy; Group B, anodal stimulation on primary motor cortex and constraint-induced movement therapy; Group C, sham stimulation and constraint-induced movement therapy. Evaluations involved analysis of functional independence, motor recovery, spasticity, gross motor function, and muscle strength. Results. A significant improvement in primary outcome (functional independence) after treatment in the premotor group followed by primary motor group and sham group was observed. The same pattern of improvement was highlighted among all secondary outcome measures regarding the superior performance of the premotor group over primary motor and sham groups. Conclusions. Premotor cortex can contribute to motor function in patients with severe functional disabilities in early stages of stroke. This study was registered in ClinicalTrials.gov database (NCT 02628561). PMID:28250992

  8. Therapy-Induced Neuroplasticity of Language in Chronic Post Stroke Aphasia: A Mismatch Negativity Study of (A)Grammatical and Meaningful/less Mini-Constructions

    PubMed Central

    Lucchese, Guglielmo; Pulvermüller, Friedemann; Stahl, Benjamin; Dreyer, Felix R.; Mohr, Bettina

    2017-01-01

    Clinical language performance and neurophysiological correlates of language processing were measured before and after intensive language therapy in patients with chronic (time post stroke >1 year) post stroke aphasia (PSA). As event-related potential (ERP) measure, the mismatch negativity (MMN) was recorded in a distracted oddball paradigm to short spoken sentences. Critical ‘deviant’ sentence stimuli where either well-formed and meaningful, or syntactically, or lexico-semantically incorrect. After 4 weeks of speech-language therapy (SLT) delivered with high intensity (10.5 h per week), clinical language assessment with the Aachen Aphasia Test battery demonstrated significant linguistic improvements, which were accompanied by enhanced MMN responses. More specifically, MMN amplitudes to grammatically correct and meaningful mini-constructions and to ‘jabberwocky’ sentences containing a pseudoword significantly increased after therapy. However, no therapy-related changes in MMN responses to syntactically incorrect strings including agreement violations were observed. While MMN increases to well-formed meaningful strings can be explained both at the word and construction levels, the neuroplastic change seen for ‘jabberwocky’ sentences suggests an explanation in terms of constructions. The results confirm previous reports that intensive SLT leads to improvements of linguistic skills in chronic aphasia patients and now demonstrate that this clinical improvement is associated with enhanced automatic brain indexes of construction processing, although no comparable change is present for ungrammatical strings. Furthermore, the data confirm that the language-induced MMN is a useful tool to map functional language recovery in PSA. PMID:28111545

  9. The effects of game-based virtual reality movement therapy plus mental practice on upper extremity function in chronic stroke patients with hemiparesis: a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jin-Hyuck; Park, Ji-Hyuk

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of game-based virtual reality movement therapy plus mental practice on upper extremity function in chronic stroke patients with hemiparesis. [Subjects] The subjects were chronic stroke patients with hemiparesis. [Methods] Thirty subjects were randomly assigned to either the control group or experimental group. All subjects received 20 sessions (5 days in a week) of virtual reality movement therapy using the Nintendo Wii. In addition to Wii-based virtual reality movement therapy, experimental group subjects performed mental practice consisting of 5 minutes of relaxation, Wii games imagination, and normalization phases before the beginning of Wii games. To compare the two groups, the upper extremity subtest of the Fugl-Meyer Assessment, Box and Block Test, and quality of movement subscale of the Motor Activity Log were performed. [Results] Both groups showed statistically significant improvement in the Fugl-Meyer Assessment, Box and Block Test, and quality of the movement subscale of Motor Activity Log after the interventions. Also, there were significant differences in the Fugl-Meyer Assessment, Box and Block Test, and quality of movement subscale of the Motor Activity Log between the two groups. [Conclusion] Game-based virtual reality movement therapy alone may be helpful to improve functional recovery of the upper extremity, but the addition of MP produces a lager improvement. PMID:27134363

  10. Constraint-Induced Movement Therapy Combined with Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation over Premotor Cortex Improves Motor Function in Severe Stroke: A Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Suellen M; Batista, Larissa M; Nogueira, Lídia L R F; de Oliveira, Eliane A; de Carvalho, Antonio G C; Lima, Soriano S; Santana, Jordânia R M; de Lima, Emerson C C; Fernández-Calvo, Bernardino

    2017-01-01

    Objective. We compared the effects of transcranial direct current stimulation at different cortical sites (premotor and motor primary cortex) combined with constraint-induced movement therapy for treatment of stroke patients. Design. Sixty patients were randomly distributed into 3 groups: Group A, anodal stimulation on premotor cortex and constraint-induced movement therapy; Group B, anodal stimulation on primary motor cortex and constraint-induced movement therapy; Group C, sham stimulation and constraint-induced movement therapy. Evaluations involved analysis of functional independence, motor recovery, spasticity, gross motor function, and muscle strength. Results. A significant improvement in primary outcome (functional independence) after treatment in the premotor group followed by primary motor group and sham group was observed. The same pattern of improvement was highlighted among all secondary outcome measures regarding the superior performance of the premotor group over primary motor and sham groups. Conclusions. Premotor cortex can contribute to motor function in patients with severe functional disabilities in early stages of stroke. This study was registered in ClinicalTrials.gov database (NCT 02628561).

  11. The effects of game-based virtual reality movement therapy plus mental practice on upper extremity function in chronic stroke patients with hemiparesis: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Park, Jin-Hyuck; Park, Ji-Hyuk

    2016-03-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of game-based virtual reality movement therapy plus mental practice on upper extremity function in chronic stroke patients with hemiparesis. [Subjects] The subjects were chronic stroke patients with hemiparesis. [Methods] Thirty subjects were randomly assigned to either the control group or experimental group. All subjects received 20 sessions (5 days in a week) of virtual reality movement therapy using the Nintendo Wii. In addition to Wii-based virtual reality movement therapy, experimental group subjects performed mental practice consisting of 5 minutes of relaxation, Wii games imagination, and normalization phases before the beginning of Wii games. To compare the two groups, the upper extremity subtest of the Fugl-Meyer Assessment, Box and Block Test, and quality of movement subscale of the Motor Activity Log were performed. [Results] Both groups showed statistically significant improvement in the Fugl-Meyer Assessment, Box and Block Test, and quality of the movement subscale of Motor Activity Log after the interventions. Also, there were significant differences in the Fugl-Meyer Assessment, Box and Block Test, and quality of movement subscale of the Motor Activity Log between the two groups. [Conclusion] Game-based virtual reality movement therapy alone may be helpful to improve functional recovery of the upper extremity, but the addition of MP produces a lager improvement.

  12. Ischemic Stroke

    MedlinePlus

    ... Spread the Word Advocate Share Spread the Word Contact Us Contact Us 1-800-STROKES (787-6537) 9707 E. ... Stroke En Espanol Stroke Facts Come Back Strong Contact Us 1-800-787-6537 9707 E. Easter ...

  13. Stroke Rehabilitation

    MedlinePlus

    A stroke can cause lasting brain damage. People who survive a stroke need to relearn skills they lost because of ... them relearn those skills. The effects of a stroke depend on which area of the brain was ...

  14. Hemorrhagic Stroke

    MedlinePlus

    A stroke is a medical emergency. There are two types - ischemic and hemorrhagic. Hemorrhagic stroke is the less common type. It happens when ... an artery wall that breaks open. Symptoms of stroke are Sudden numbness or weakness of the face, ...

  15. Tailoring brain stimulation to the nature of rehabilitative therapies in stroke- a conceptual framework based on their unique mechanisms of recovery

    PubMed Central

    Cunningham, David A.; Potter-Baker, Kelsey A.; Knutson, Jayme S.; Sankarasubramanian, Vishwanath; Machado, Andre G.; Plow, Ela B.

    2015-01-01

    Over the past decade there has been growing interest in combining non-invasive brain stimulation (NIBS) with unilateral therapies involving the paretic upper-limb in order to accelerate rehabilitative outcomes in stroke. However, despite showing early promise, several recent clinical trials of non-invasive brain stimulation have failed to augment rehabilitative outcomes of the paretic upper-limb. Instead, the benefits of NIBS+therapy are modest, and vary considerably from patient-to-patient, failing especially in patients with greater upper-limb impairments. Given these inconsistent results, the present review attempts to address why pairing NIBS with unilateral approaches is weakly generalizable to patients in all ranges of impairments; specifically, do the mechanisms of unilateral therapies fail across the severely impaired? Further, this review addresses whether alternate therapies, such as bilateral therapies involving both upper-limbs, are better suited for the more impaired patients, where they may be more feasible and offer neurophysiologic advantages not offered with unilateral therapies. By comparing the potential neurophysiological mechanisms underlying unilateral and bilateral therapies, this review concludes by providing insight as to how to create NIBS paradigms that are tailored to distinctly augment the effects of therapies across patients with varying degrees of impairment. PMID:26522911

  16. Task-Specific Motor Rehabilitation Therapy After Stroke Improves Performance in a Different Motor Task: Translational Evidence.

    PubMed

    El Amki, M; Baumgartner, P; Bracko, O; Luft, A R; Wegener, S

    2017-01-14

    While the stroke survivor with a motor deficit strives for recovery of all aspects of daily life movements, neurorehabilitation training is often task specific and does not generalize to movements other than the ones trained. In rodent models of post-stroke recovery, this problem is poorly investigated as the training task is often the same as the one that measures motor function. The present study investigated whether motor training by pellet reaching translates into enhancement of different motor functions in rats after stroke. Adult rats were subjected to 60-min middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO). Five days after stroke, animals received either training consisting of 7 days of pellet reaching with the affected forelimb (n = 18) or no training (n = 18). Sensorimotor deficits were assessed using the sticky tape test and a composite neuroscore. Infarct volumes were measured by T2-weighted MRI on day 28. Both groups of rats showed similar lesion volume and forelimb impairment after stroke. Trained animals improved in the sticky tape test after day 7 post-stroke reaching peak performance on day 14. More reaching attempts during rehabilitation were associated with a better performance in the sticky tape removal time. Task-oriented motor training generalizes to other motor functions after experimental stroke. Training intensity correlates with recovery.

  17. Functional Improvement After 4-Week Rehabilitation Therapy and Effects of Attention Deficit in Brain Tumor Patients: Comparison With Subacute Stroke Patients

    PubMed Central

    Han, Eun Young; Kim, Bo Ryun; Kim, Ha Jeong

    2015-01-01

    Objective To confirm functional improvement in brain tumor patients after 4-week conventional rehabilitation therapy, to compare the cognitive impairment of brain tumor patients with subacute stroke patients using computerized neuropsychological testing, and to determine the effects on functional outcomes of daily activity. Methods From April 2008 to December 2012, 55 patients (29 brain tumor patients and 26 subacute stroke patients) were enrolled. All patients were assessed with a computerized neuropsychological test at baseline. Motricity Index, Korean version of Mini Mental Status Examination, and Korean version of Modified Barthel Index scores were assessed at the beginning and end of 4-week rehabilitation. Conventional rehabilitation therapy was applied to both groups for 4 weeks. Results Functional outcomes of all patients in both groups significantly improved after 4-week rehabilitation therapy. In brain tumor patients, the initial Motricity Index, cognitive dysfunction, and visual continuous performance test correction numbers were strong predictors of initial daily activity function (R2=0.778, p<0.01). The final Motricity Index and word-black test were strong predictors of final daily activity function (R2=0.630, p<0.01). In patients with subacute stroke, the initial Motricity index was an independent predictor of initial daily activity function (R2=0.245, p=0.007). The initial daily activity function and color of color word test were strong predictors of final daily activity function (R2=0.745, p<0.01). Conclusion Conventional rehabilitation therapy induced functional improvement in brain tumor patients. Objective evaluation of cognitive function and comprehensive rehabilitation including focused cognitive training should be performed in brain tumor patients for improving their daily activity function. PMID:26361592

  18. Measuring MERCI: exploring data mining techniques for examining the neurologic outcomes of stroke patients undergoing endo-vascular therapy at Erlanger Southeast Stroke Center.

    PubMed

    McNabb, Matthew; Cao, Yu; Devlin, Thomas; Baxter, Blaise; Thornton, Albert

    2012-01-01

    Mechanical Embolus Removal in Cerebral Ischemia (MERCI) has been supported by medical trials as an improved method of treating ischemic stroke past the safe window of time for administering clot-busting drugs, and was released for medical use in 2004. The importance of analyzing real-world data collected from MERCI clinical trials is key to providing insights on the effectiveness of MERCI. Most of the existing data analysis on MERCI results has thus far employed conventional statistical analysis techniques. To the best of our knowledge, advanced data analytics and data mining techniques have not yet been systematically applied. To address the issue in this thesis, we conduct a comprehensive study on employing state of the art machine learning algorithms to generate prediction criteria for the outcome of MERCI patients. Specifically, we investigate the issue of how to choose the most significant attributes of a data set with limited instance examples. We propose a few search algorithms to identify the significant attributes, followed by a thorough performance analysis for each algorithm. Finally, we apply our proposed approach to the real-world, de-identified patient data provided by Erlanger Southeast Regional Stroke Center, Chattanooga, TN. Our experimental results have demonstrated that our proposed approach performs well.

  19. Connector Mechanism Has Smaller Stroke

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milam, M. Bruce

    1992-01-01

    System for connecting electrical and/or fluid lines includes mechanism reducing length of stroke necessary to make or break connections. Feature enables connection and disconnection in confined space, and compensates for misalignment between connectors. Connector in active member moves upward at twice the speed of downward stroke of passive member. Stroke amplified within connector system. Applications include connections between modular electronic units, coupled vehicles, and hydraulic systems.

  20. Multimodal CT in stroke imaging: new concepts.

    PubMed

    Ledezma, Carlos J; Wintermark, Max

    2009-01-01

    A multimodal CT protocol provides a comprehensive noninvasive survey of acute stroke patients with accurate demonstration of the site of arterial occlusion and its hemodynamic tissue status. It combines widespread availability with the ability to provide functional characterization of cerebral ischemia, and could potentially allow more accurate selection of candidates for acute stroke reperfusion therapy. This article discusses the individual components of multimodal CT and addresses the potential role of a combined multimodal CT stroke protocol in acute stroke therapy.

  1. Influence of Daily Fluid Balance prior to Continuous Renal Replacement Therapy on Outcomes in Critically Ill Patients.

    PubMed

    Han, Min Jee; Park, Ki Hyun; Shin, Jung-Ho; Kim, Su Hyun

    2016-08-01

    Positive fluid balance is a risk factor for mortality in critically ill patients, especially those requiring continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT). However, the association between daily fluid balance and various organ impairments remains unclear. This study investigated the impacts of daily fluid balance prior to CRRT on organ dysfunction, as well as mortality in critically ill patients. We identified daily fluid balance between intensive care unit (ICU) admission and CRRT initiation. According to daily fluid balance, the time to CRRT initiation and the rate of organ failure based on the sequential organ failure assessment (SOFA) score were assessed. We recruited 100 patients who experienced CRRT for acute kidney injury. CRRT was initiated within 2 [0, 4] days. The time to CRRT initiation was shortened in proportion to daily fluid balance, even after the adjustment for the renal SOFA score at ICU admission (HR 1.14, P = 0.007). Based on the SOFA score, positive daily fluid balance was associated with respiratory, cardiovascular, nervous, and coagulation failure, independent of each initial SOFA score at ICU admission (HR 1.36, 1.26, 1.24 and 2.26, all P < 0.05). Ultimately, we found that positive fluid balance was related with an increase in the rate of 28-day mortality (HR 1.14, P = 0.012). Positive daily fluid balance may accelerate the requirement for CRRT, moreover, it can be associated with an increased risk of multiple organ failure in critically ill patients.

  2. Influence of Daily Fluid Balance prior to Continuous Renal Replacement Therapy on Outcomes in Critically Ill Patients

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Positive fluid balance is a risk factor for mortality in critically ill patients, especially those requiring continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT). However, the association between daily fluid balance and various organ impairments remains unclear. This study investigated the impacts of daily fluid balance prior to CRRT on organ dysfunction, as well as mortality in critically ill patients. We identified daily fluid balance between intensive care unit (ICU) admission and CRRT initiation. According to daily fluid balance, the time to CRRT initiation and the rate of organ failure based on the sequential organ failure assessment (SOFA) score were assessed. We recruited 100 patients who experienced CRRT for acute kidney injury. CRRT was initiated within 2 [0, 4] days. The time to CRRT initiation was shortened in proportion to daily fluid balance, even after the adjustment for the renal SOFA score at ICU admission (HR 1.14, P = 0.007). Based on the SOFA score, positive daily fluid balance was associated with respiratory, cardiovascular, nervous, and coagulation failure, independent of each initial SOFA score at ICU admission (HR 1.36, 1.26, 1.24 and 2.26, all P < 0.05). Ultimately, we found that positive fluid balance was related with an increase in the rate of 28-day mortality (HR 1.14, P = 0.012). Positive daily fluid balance may accelerate the requirement for CRRT, moreover, it can be associated with an increased risk of multiple organ failure in critically ill patients. PMID:27478348

  3. Aptamer conjugated paclitaxel and magnetic fluid loaded fluorescently tagged PLGA nanoparticles for targeted cancer therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aravind, Athulya; Nair, Remya; Raveendran, Sreejith; Veeranarayanan, Srivani; Nagaoka, Yutaka; Fukuda, Takahiro; Hasumura, Takahashi; Morimoto, Hisao; Yoshida, Yasuhiko; Maekawa, Toru; Sakthi Kumar, D.

    2013-10-01

    Controlled and targeted drug delivery is an essential criterion in cancer therapy to reduce the side effects caused by non-specific drug release and toxicity. Targeted chemotherapy, sustained drug release and optical imaging have been achieved using a multifunctional nanocarrier constructed from poly (D, L-lactide-co-glycolide) nanoparticles (PLGA NPs), an anticancer drug paclitaxel (PTX), a fluorescent dye Nile red (NR), magnetic fluid (MF) and aptamers (Apt, AS1411, anti-nucleolin aptamer). The magnetic fluid and paclitaxel loaded fluorescently labeled PLGA NPs (MF-PTX-NR-PLGA NPs) were synthesized by a single-emulsion technique/solvent evaporation method using a chemical cross linker bis (sulfosuccinimidyl) suberate (BS3) to enable binding of aptamer on to the surface of the nanoparticles. Targeting aptamers were then introduced to the particles through the reaction with the cross linker to target the nucleolin receptors over expressed on the cancer cell surface. Specific binding and uptake of the aptamer conjugated magnetic fluid loaded fluorescently tagged PLGA NPs (Apt-MF-NR-PLGA NPs) to the target cancer cells induced by aptamers was observed using confocal microscopy. Cytotoxicity assay conducted in two cell lines (L929 and MCF-7) confirmed that targeted MCF-7 cancer cells were killed while control cells were unharmed. In addition, aptamer mediated delivery resulting in enhanced binding and uptake to the target cancer cells exhibited increased therapeutic effect of the drug. Moreover, these aptamer conjugated magnetic polymer vehicles apart from actively transporting drugs into specifically targeted tumor regions can also be used to induce hyperthermia or for facilitating magnetic guiding of particles to the tumor regions.

  4. Effects of tissue plasminogen activator and annexin A2 combination therapy on long-term neurological outcomes of rat focal embolic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaoshu; Fan, Xiang; Yu, Zhanyang; Liao, Zhengbu; Zhao, Jianhua; Mandeville, Emiri; Guo, Shuzhen; Lo, Eng H.; Wang, Xiaoying

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose Tissue type plasminogen activator (tPA) in combination with recombinant annexin A2 (rA2) is known to reduce acute brain damage after focal ischemia. Here, we ask whether tPA plus rA2 combination therapy can lead to sustained long term neurological improvements as well. Methods We compared the effects of intravenous high-dose tPA alone (10mg/kg) versus a combination of low-dose tPA (5mg/kg) plus 10 mg/kg rA2 in a model of focal embolic cerebral ischemia in rats. All rats were treated at 3 hours after embolization. Brain tissue and neurological outcomes were assessed at 1 month. Surrogate biomarkers for endogenous neurovascular remodeling in peri-infarct area were analyzed by immunohistochemistry. Results Compared to high-dose tPA alone, low-dose tPA plus rA2 significantly decreased infarction and improved neurological function at 1 month post-stroke. In peri-infarct areas, tPA-plus-rA2 combination therapy also significantly augmented microvessel density, VEGF and synaptophysin expression. Conclusions Compared to conventional high-dose tPA alone, combination low-dose tPA plus rA2 therapy may provide a safe and effective way to improve long term neurological outcomes after stroke. PMID:24368559

  5. Efficacy of Modified Constraint Induced Movement Therapy in the Treatment of Hemiparetic Upper Limb in Stroke Patients: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Rajendra; Borah, Diganta; Kothari, S Y

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Paretic upper limb in stroke patients has a significant impact on the quality of life. Modified Constraint Induced Movement Therapy (mCIMT) is one of the treatment options used for the improvement of the function of the paretic limb. Aim To investigate the efficacy of four week duration mCIMT in the management of upper extremity weakness in hemiparetic patients due to stroke. Materials and Methods Prospective single blind, parallel randomized controlled trial in which 30 patients received conventional rehabilitation programme (control group) and 30 patients participated in a mCIMT programme in addition to the conventional rehabilitation programme (study group). The mCIMT included three hours therapy sessions emphasizing the affected arm use in general functional tasks, three times a week for four weeks. Their normal arm was also constrained for five hours per day over five days per week. All the patients were assessed at baseline, one month and three months after completion of therapy using Fugl-Meyer Assessment (FMA) score for upper extremity and Motor Activity Log (MAL) scale comprising of Amount of Use (AOU) score and Quality of Use (QOU) score. Results All the 3 scores improved significantly in both the groups at each follow-up. Post-hoc analysis revealed that compared to conventional rehabilitation group, mCIMT group showed significantly better scores at 1 month {FMA1 (p-value <0.0001, es0.2870), AOU1 (p-value 0.0007, es0.1830), QOU1 (p-value 0.0015, es0.1640)} and 3 months {FMA3 (p-value <.0001, es0.4240), AOU3 (p-value 0.0003, es 0.2030), QOU3 (p-value 0.0008, es 0.1790)}. Conclusion Four weeks duration for mCIMT is effective in improving the motor function in paretic upper limb of stroke patients. PMID:28050492

  6. Intravenous thrombolysis or endovascular therapy for acute ischemic stroke associated with cervical internal carotid artery occlusion: the ICARO-3 study.

    PubMed

    Paciaroni, Maurizio; Inzitari, Domenico; Agnelli, Giancarlo; Caso, Valeria; Balucani, Clotilde; Grotta, James C; Sarraj, Amrou; Sung-Il, Sohn; Chamorro, Angel; Urra, Xabier; Leys, Didier; Henon, Hilde; Cordonnier, Charlotte; Dequatre, Nelly; Aguettaz, Pierre; Alberti, Andrea; Venti, Michele; Acciarresi, Monica; D'Amore, Cataldo; Zini, Andrea; Vallone, Stefano; Dell'Acqua, Maria Luisa; Menetti, Federico; Nencini, Patrizia; Mangiafico, Salvatore; Barlinn, Kristian; Kepplinger, Jessica; Bodechtel, Ulf; Gerber, Johannes; Bovi, Paolo; Cappellari, Manuel; Linfante, Italo; Dabus, Guilherme; Marcheselli, Simona; Pezzini, Alessandro; Padovani, Alessandro; Alexandrov, Andrei V; Shahripour, Reza Bavarsad; Sessa, Maria; Giacalone, Giacomo; Silvestrelli, Giorgio; Lanari, Alessia; Ciccone, Alfonso; De Vito, Alessandro; Azzini, Cristiano; Saletti, Andrea; Fainardi, Enrico; Orlandi, Giovanni; Chiti, Alberto; Gialdini, Gino; Silvestrini, Mauro; Ferrarese, Carlo; Beretta, Simone; Tassi, Rossana; Martini, Giuseppe; Tsivgoulis, Georgios; Vasdekis, Spyros N; Consoli, Domenico; Baldi, Antonio; D'Anna, Sebastiano; Luda, Emilio; Varbella, Ferdinando; Galletti, Giampiero; Invernizzi, Paolo; Donati, Edoardo; De Lodovici, Maria Luisa; Bono, Giorgio; Corea, Francesco; Sette, Massimo Del; Monaco, Serena; Riva, Maurizio; Tassinari, Tiziana; Scoditti, Umberto; Toni, Danilo

    2015-02-01

    The aim of the ICARO-3 study was to evaluate whether intra-arterial treatment, compared to intravenous thrombolysis, increases the rate of favourable functional outcome at 3 months in acute ischemic stroke and extracranial ICA occlusion. ICARO-3 was a non-randomized therapeutic trial that performed a non-blind assessment of outcomes using retrospective data collected prospectively from 37 centres in 7 countries. Patients treated with endovascular treatment within 6 h from stroke onset (cases) were matched with patients treated with intravenous thrombolysis within 4.5 h from symptom onset (controls). Patients receiving either intravenous or endovascular therapy were included among the cases. The efficacy outcome was disability at 90 days assessed by the modified Rankin Scale (mRS), dichotomized as favourable (score of 0-2) or unfavourable (score of 3-6). Safety outcomes were death and any intracranial bleeding. Included in the analysis were 324 cases and 324 controls: 105 cases (32.4 %) had a favourable outcome as compared with 89 controls (27.4 %) [adjusted odds ratio (OR) 1.25, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 0.88-1.79, p = 0.1]. In the adjusted analysis, treatment with intra-arterial procedures was significantly associated with a reduction of mortality (OR 0.61, 95 % CI 0.40-0.93, p = 0.022). The rates of patients with severe disability or death (mRS 5-6) were similar in cases and controls (30.5 versus 32.4 %, p = 0.67). For the ordinal analysis, adjusted for age, sex, NIHSS, presence of diabetes mellitus and atrial fibrillation, the common odds ratio was 1.15 (95 % IC 0.86-1.54), p = 0.33. There were more cases of intracranial bleeding (37.0 versus 17.3 %, p = 0.0001) in the intra-arterial procedure group than in the intravenous group. After the exclusion of the 135 cases treated with the combination of I.V. thrombolysis and I.A. procedures, 67/189 of those treated with I.A. procedures (35.3 %) had a favourable outcome, compared to 89/324 of

  7. Prehospital stroke care

    PubMed Central

    Saver, Jeffrey L.; Starkman, Sidney; Lees, Kennedy R.; Endres, Matthias

    2013-01-01

    Brain cells die rapidly after stroke and any effective treatment must start as early as possible. In clinical routine, the tight time–outcome relationship continues to be the major limitation of therapeutic approaches: thrombolysis rates remain low across many countries, with most patients being treated at the late end of the therapeutic window. In addition, there is no neuroprotective therapy available, but some maintain that this concept may be valid if administered very early after stroke. Recent innovations have opened new perspectives for stroke diagnosis and treatment before the patient arrives at the hospital. These include stroke recognition by dispatchers and paramedics, mobile telemedicine for remote clinical examination and imaging, and integration of CT scanners and point-of-care laboratories in ambulances. Several clinical trials are now being performed in the prehospital setting testing prehospital delivery of neuroprotective, antihypertensive, and thrombolytic therapy. We hypothesize that these new approaches in prehospital stroke care will not only shorten time to treatment and improve outcome but will also facilitate hyperacute stroke research by increasing the number of study participants within an ultra-early time window. The potentials, pitfalls, and promises of advanced prehospital stroke care and research are discussed in this review. PMID:23897876

  8. Dosimetric model for antibody targeted radionuclide therapy of tumor cells in cerebrospinal fluid

    SciTech Connect

    Millar, W.T.; Barrett, A. )

    1990-02-01

    Although encouraging results have been obtained using systemic radioimmunotherapy in the treatment of cancer, it is likely that regional applications may prove more effective. One such strategy is the treatment of central nervous system leukemia in children by intrathecal instillation of targeting or nontargeting beta particle emitting radionuclide carriers. The beta particle dosimetry of the spine is assessed, assuming that the spinal cord and the cerebrospinal fluid compartment can be adequately represented by a cylindrical annulus. The radionuclides investigated were {sup 90}Y, {sup 131}I, {sup 67}Cu, and {sup 199}Au. It is shown that the radiation dose to the cord can be significantly reduced using short range beta particle emitters and that there is little advantage in using targeting carriers with these radionuclides. {sup 199}Au and {sup 67}Cu also have the advantage of having a suitable gamma emission for imaging, permitting pretherapy imaging and dosimetric calculations to be undertaken prior to therapy. If these methods prove successful, it may be possible to replace the external beam component used in the treatment of central nervous system leukemia in children by intrathecal radionuclide therapy, thus reducing or avoiding side effects such as growth and intellectual impairment.

  9. A Comparative Analysis of 2D and 3D Tasks for Virtual Reality Therapies Based on Robotic-Assisted Neurorehabilitation for Post-stroke Patients

    PubMed Central

    Lledó, Luis D.; Díez, Jorge A.; Bertomeu-Motos, Arturo; Ezquerro, Santiago; Badesa, Francisco J.; Sabater-Navarro, José M.; García-Aracil, Nicolás

    2016-01-01

    Post-stroke neurorehabilitation based on virtual therapies are performed completing repetitive exercises shown in visual electronic devices, whose content represents imaginary or daily life tasks. Currently, there are two ways of visualization of these task. 3D virtual environments are used to get a three dimensional space that represents the real world with a high level of detail, whose realism is determinated by the resolucion and fidelity of the objects of the task. Furthermore, 2D virtual environments are used to represent the tasks with a low degree of realism using techniques of bidimensional graphics. However, the type of visualization can influence the quality of perception of the task, affecting the patient's sensorimotor performance. The purpose of this paper was to evaluate if there were differences in patterns of kinematic movements when post-stroke patients performed a reach task viewing a virtual therapeutic game with two different type of visualization of virtual environment: 2D and 3D. Nine post-stroke patients have participated in the study receiving a virtual therapy assisted by PUPArm rehabilitation robot. Horizontal movements of the upper limb were performed to complete the aim of the tasks, which consist in reaching peripheral or perspective targets depending on the virtual environment shown. Various parameter types such as the maximum speed, reaction time, path length, or initial movement are analyzed from the data acquired objectively by the robotic device to evaluate the influence of the task visualization. At the end of the study, a usability survey was provided to each patient to analysis his/her satisfaction level. For all patients, the movement trajectories were enhanced when they completed the therapy. This fact suggests that patient's motor recovery was increased. Despite of the similarity in majority of the kinematic parameters, differences in reaction time and path length were higher using the 3D task. Regarding the success rates

  10. A Comparative Analysis of 2D and 3D Tasks for Virtual Reality Therapies Based on Robotic-Assisted Neurorehabilitation for Post-stroke Patients.

    PubMed

    Lledó, Luis D; Díez, Jorge A; Bertomeu-Motos, Arturo; Ezquerro, Santiago; Badesa, Francisco J; Sabater-Navarro, José M; García-Aracil, Nicolás

    2016-01-01

    Post-stroke neurorehabilitation based on virtual therapies are performed completing repetitive exercises shown in visual electronic devices, whose content represents imaginary or daily life tasks. Currently, there are two ways of visualization of these task. 3D virtual environments are used to get a three dimensional space that represents the real world with a high level of detail, whose realism is determinated by the resolucion and fidelity of the objects of the task. Furthermore, 2D virtual environments are used to represent the tasks with a low degree of realism using techniques of bidimensional graphics. However, the type of visualization can influence the quality of perception of the task, affecting the patient's sensorimotor performance. The purpose of this paper was to evaluate if there were differences in patterns of kinematic movements when post-stroke patients performed a reach task viewing a virtual therapeutic game with two different type of visualization of virtual environment: 2D and 3D. Nine post-stroke patients have participated in the study receiving a virtual therapy assisted by PUPArm rehabilitation robot. Horizontal movements of the upper limb were performed to complete the aim of the tasks, which consist in reaching peripheral or perspective targets depending on the virtual environment shown. Various parameter types such as the maximum speed, reaction time, path length, or initial movement are analyzed from the data acquired objectively by the robotic device to evaluate the influence of the task visualization. At the end of the study, a usability survey was provided to each patient to analysis his/her satisfaction level. For all patients, the movement trajectories were enhanced when they completed the therapy. This fact suggests that patient's motor recovery was increased. Despite of the similarity in majority of the kinematic parameters, differences in reaction time and path length were higher using the 3D task. Regarding the success rates

  11. Rationale and design of Short-Term EXenatide therapy in Acute ischaemic Stroke (STEXAS): a randomised, open-label, parallel-group study

    PubMed Central

    McGrath, Rachel T; Hocking, Samantha L; Priglinger, Miriam; Day, Susan; Herkes, Geoffrey K; Krause, Martin; Fulcher, Gregory R

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Both hyperglycaemia and hypoglycaemia in acute ischaemic stroke (AIS) are associated with increased infarct size and worse functional outcomes. Thus, therapies that can maintain normoglycaemia during stroke are clinically important. Glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) analogues, including exenatide, are routinely used in the treatment of hyperglycaemia in type 2 diabetes, but data on the usefulness of this class of agents in the management of elevated glucose levels in AIS are limited. Owing to their glucose-dependent mechanism of action, GLP-1 analogues are associated with a low risk of hypoglycaemia, which may give them an advantage over intensive insulin therapy in the acute management of hyperglycaemia in this setting. Methods and analysis The Short-Term EXenatide therapy in Acute ischaemic Stroke study is a randomised, open-label, parallel-group pilot study designed to investigate the efficacy of exenatide at lowering blood glucose levels in patients with hyperglycaemia with AIS. A total of 30 patients presenting with AIS and blood glucose levels >10 mmol/L will be randomised to receive the standard therapy (intravenous insulin) or intravenous exenatide for up to 72 h. Outcomes including blood glucose levels within the target range (5–10 mmol/L), the incidence of hypoglycaemia and the feasibility of administering intravenous exenatide in this patient population will be assessed. A follow-up visit at 3 months will facilitate evaluation of neurological outcomes post-stroke. Ethics and dissemination This study has been approved by the local Institutional Review Board (Northern Sydney Local Health District Human Research Ethics Committee). The study results will be communicated via presentations at scientific conferences and through publication in peer-reviewed journals. Conclusions As GLP-1 analogues require elevated glucose levels to exert their insulin potentiating activity, the use of exenatide in the management of hyperglycaemia in AIS may

  12. The Danish Stroke Registry

    PubMed Central

    Johnsen, Søren Paaske; Ingeman, Annette; Hundborg, Heidi Holmager; Schaarup, Susanne Zielke; Gyllenborg, Jesper

    2016-01-01

    Aim of database The aim of the Danish Stroke Registry is to monitor and improve the quality of care among all patients with acute stroke and transient ischemic attack (TIA) treated at Danish hospitals. Study population All patients with acute stroke (from 2003) or TIA (from 2013) treated at Danish hospitals. Reporting is mandatory by law for all hospital departments treating these patients. The registry included >130,000 events by the end of 2014, including 10,822 strokes and 4,227 TIAs registered in 2014. Main variables The registry holds prospectively collected data on key processes of care, mainly covering the early phase after stroke, including data on time of delivery of the processes and the eligibility of the individual patients for each process. The data are used for assessing 18 process indicators reflecting recommendations in the national clinical guidelines for patients with acute stroke and TIA. Patient outcomes are currently monitored using 30-day mortality, unplanned readmission, and for patients receiving revascularization therapy, also functional level at 3 months poststroke. Descriptive data Sociodemographic, clinical, and lifestyle factors with potential prognostic impact are registered. Conclusion The Danish Stroke Registry is a well-established clinical registry which plays a key role for monitoring and improving stroke and TIA care in Denmark. In addition, the registry is increasingly used for research. PMID:27843349

  13. Ipsilesional High Frequency Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation Add-On Therapy Improved Diffusion Parameters of Stroke Patients with Motor Dysfunction: A Preliminary DTI Study

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Zhiwei; Jin, Yu; Peng, Haitao; Xing, Guoqiang; Liao, Xiang; Wang, Yunfeng; Chen, Huaping; He, Bin; McClure, Morgan A.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of high frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (HF-rTMS) on stroke patients with motor dysfunction and to investigate the underlying neural mechanism. Methods. Fifteen stroke patients were assigned to the rTMS treatment (RT) group and conventional treatment (CT) group. Patients in the RT received 10 Hz rTMS stimulation on the ipsilesional primary motor cortex for 10 days plus conventional treatment of CT, which consisted of acupuncture and antiplatelet aggregation medication. Difference in fractional anisotropy (FA) between pretreatment and posttreatment and between two groups was determined. Correlations between FA values and neurological assessments were also calculated. Results. Both groups significantly improved the neurological function after treatment. rTMS-treated patients showed better improvement in Fugl-Meyer Assessment (FMA) score and increased FA value in motor-related white matter and gray matter cortices compared with CT-treated patients and pretreatment status. Besides, the increased FA value in the ipsilesional posterior limb of the internal capsule in RT group was significantly correlated with the improved FMA score. Significance. HF-rTMS could be a supplement therapy to CT in improving motor recovery in patients with stroke. And this benefit effect may be achieved through modulating the ipsilesional corticospinal tracts and motor-related gray matter cortices. PMID:27840742

  14. [Determination of the critical time point for efficacy of L-arginine infusion therapy in a case of MELAS with frequent stroke-like episodes].

    PubMed

    Sudo, Akira; Sano, Hitomi; Kawamura, Nobuaki

    2014-01-01

    MELAS (mitochondrial myopathy, encephalopathy, lactic acidosis, and stroke-like episodes) is the most representative subtype of mitochondrial diseases. Administration of L-arginine (L-Arg) or a precursor of nitric oxide (NO) has been proposed as a promising medication for MELAS because one of the pathophysiological mechanisms is supposedly a decreased capacity for NO-dependent vasodilation. We experienced a girl with MELAS and frequent stroke-like episodes who was treated with L-Arg infusion. We evaluated the efficacy of L-Arg infusion therapy based on whether her headache and nausea were disappeared and neurological symptoms were improved within 24 hours of L-Arg administration. L-Arg infusions were effective in all four episodes when the treatment was started within 4 hours of the onset of stroke-like episodes. On the other hand, the infusion was effective in only one out of five episodes when the medication was delayed by more than 4 hours after the onset. Furthermore, the early administration of L-Arg resulted in better outcomes regarding new lesions determined by brain MRI. Our data suggest that L-Arg infusion may be most effective when it is started within 4 hours of the onset of neurological symptoms in the acute phase of MELAS. The study of a large number of episodes in many patients will be needed to determine the critical time point of L-Arg administration after the onset of the acute phase of MELAS.

  15. Effects of mesenchymal stem cell therapy, in association with pharmacologically active microcarriers releasing VEGF, in an ischaemic stroke model in the rat.

    PubMed

    Quittet, Marie-Sophie; Touzani, Omar; Sindji, Laurence; Cayon, Jérôme; Fillesoye, Fabien; Toutain, Jérôme; Divoux, Didier; Marteau, Léna; Lecocq, Myriam; Roussel, Simon; Montero-Menei, Claudia N; Bernaudin, Myriam

    2015-03-01

    Few effective therapeutic interventions are available to limit brain damage and functional deficits after ischaemic stroke. Within this context, mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) therapy carries minimal risks while remaining efficacious through the secretion of trophic, protective, neurogenic and angiogenic factors. The limited survival rate of MSCs restricts their beneficial effects. The usefulness of a three-dimensional support, such as a pharmacologically active microcarrier (PAM), on the survival of MSCs during hypoxia has been shown in vitro, especially when the PAMs were loaded with vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). In the present study, the effect of MSCs attached to laminin-PAMs (LM-PAMs), releasing VEGF or not, was evaluated in vivo in a model of transient stroke. The parameters assessed were infarct volume, functional recovery and endogenous cellular reactions. LM-PAMs induced the expression of neuronal markers by MSCs both in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, the prolonged release of VEGF increased angiogenesis around the site of implantation of the LM-PAMs and facilitated the migration of immature neurons towards the ischaemic tissue. Nonetheless, MSCs/LM-PAMs-VEGF failed to improve sensorimotor functions. The use of LM-PAMs to convey MSCs and to deliver growth factors could be an effective strategy to repair the brain damage caused by a stroke.

  16. Comparison of the effects of mirror therapy and electromyography-triggered neuromuscular stimulation on hand functions in stroke patients: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Amasyali, Saliha Y; Yaliman, Ayşe

    2016-12-01

    To determine the effectiveness of mirror therapy and electromyography (EMG)-triggered neuromuscular stimulation on improvement of functions of the upper extremity in patients with subacute stroke in comparison with conventional therapy as well as to evaluate the advantage of each treatment over another, we conducted a prospective, randomized, and controlled trial involving 24 patients with ischemic stroke. The mean age and mean time since stroke of the patients were 58.79±11.49 years and 5.25±2.25 months. Patients were assigned randomly to a mirror therapy group (MT group, n=9), which consisted of therapy with a mirror box 5 days/week, 30 min/day, for 3 weeks, an electrostimulation group (ES group, n=7), which consisted of therapy with EMG-triggered stimulation (EMG-stim) of similar duration and frequency of treatment as the MT group, and a control group (n=8). All the groups received conventional physiotherapy for the same period as the MT group. Patients in the MT group practiced their therapy at home after supervised sessions. The Fugl-Meyer scores of the upper extremity, grip force, wrist extension, and Box and Block Test were evaluated at baseline, after treatment, and at 3 months after the treatment. All of these measures were evaluated by a blinded researcher. We found that there was no significant improvement in wrist extension range and grip force in control group. The MT and EMG-stim were effective in increasing the Fugl-Meyer motor scale for upper extremity (MT group: P<0.01), increasing wrist extension range, grip force, and hand dexterity determined by the Box and Block Test (MT group and ES group P<0.05). Furthermore, hand skills were increased significantly in the MT group compared with the ES group at the follow-up assessment (P<0.05). This pilot study suggested that MT was more efficient in improving motor performance than physiotherapy alone. Also, MT may be more useful in improving the hand skills compared with EMG-stim. We assume that this

  17. Effects of a Single Session of High Intensity Interval Treadmill Training on Corticomotor Excitability following Stroke: Implications for Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Stinear, James W.; Kanekar, Neeta

    2016-01-01

    Objective. High intensity interval treadmill training (HIITT) has been gaining popularity for gait rehabilitation after stroke. In this study, we examined the changes in excitability of the lower limb motor cortical representation (M1) in chronic stroke survivors following a single session of HIITT. We also determined whether exercise-induced changes in excitability could be modulated by transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) enhanced with a paretic ankle skill acquisition task. Methods. Eleven individuals with chronic stroke participated in two 40-minute treadmill-training sessions: HIITT alone and HITT preceded by anodal tDCS enhanced with a skill acquisition task (e-tDCS+HIITT). Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) was used to assess corticomotor excitability of paretic and nonparetic tibialis anterior (TA) muscles. Results. HIIT alone reduced paretic TA M1 excitability in 7 of 11 participants by ≥ 10%. e-tDCS+HIITT increased paretic TA M1 excitability and decreased nonparetic TA M1 excitability. Conclusions. HIITT suppresses corticomotor excitability in some people with chronic stroke. When HIITT is preceded by tDCS in combination with a skill acquisition task, the asymmetry of between-hemisphere corticomotor excitability is reduced. Significance. This study provides preliminary data indicating that the cardiovascular benefits of HIITT may be achieved without suppressing motor excitability in some stroke survivors. PMID:27738524

  18. Effects of a Single Session of High Intensity Interval Treadmill Training on Corticomotor Excitability following Stroke: Implications for Therapy.

    PubMed

    Madhavan, Sangeetha; Stinear, James W; Kanekar, Neeta

    2016-01-01

    Objective. High intensity interval treadmill training (HIITT) has been gaining popularity for gait rehabilitation after stroke. In this study, we examined the changes in excitability of the lower limb motor cortical representation (M1) in chronic stroke survivors following a single session of HIITT. We also determined whether exercise-induced changes in excitability could be modulated by transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) enhanced with a paretic ankle skill acquisition task. Methods. Eleven individuals with chronic stroke participated in two 40-minute treadmill-training sessions: HIITT alone and HITT preceded by anodal tDCS enhanced with a skill acquisition task (e-tDCS+HIITT). Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) was used to assess corticomotor excitability of paretic and nonparetic tibialis anterior (TA) muscles. Results. HIIT alone reduced paretic TA M1 excitability in 7 of 11 participants by ≥ 10%. e-tDCS+HIITT increased paretic TA M1 excitability and decreased nonparetic TA M1 excitability. Conclusions. HIITT suppresses corticomotor excitability in some people with chronic stroke. When HIITT is preceded by tDCS in combination with a skill acquisition task, the asymmetry of between-hemisphere corticomotor excitability is reduced. Significance. This study provides preliminary data indicating that the cardiovascular benefits of HIITT may be achieved without suppressing motor excitability in some stroke survivors.

  19. Impact of Testosterone Replacement Therapy on Myocardial Infarction, Stroke, and Death in Men With Low Testosterone Concentrations in an Integrated Health Care System.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Jeffrey L; May, Heidi T; Lappé, Donald L; Bair, Tami; Le, Viet; Carlquist, John F; Muhlestein, Joseph B

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effect of testosterone replacement therapy (TRT) on cardiovascular outcomes. Men (January 1, 1996, to December 31, 2011) with a low initial total testosterone concentration, a subsequent testosterone level, and >3 years of follow-up were studied. Levels were correlated with testosterone supplement use. The primary outcome was major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE), defined as a composite of death, nonfatal myocardial infarction, and stroke at 3 years. Multivariate adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) comparing groups of persistent low (<212 ng/dl, n = 801), normal (212 to 742 ng/dl, n = 2,241), and high (>742 ng/dl, n = 1,694) achieved testosterone were calculated by Cox hazard regression. A total of 4,736 men were studied. Three-year rates of MACE and death were 6.6% and 4.3%, respectively. Subjects supplemented to normal testosterone had reduced 3-year MACE (HR 0.74; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.56 to 0.98, p = 0.04) compared to persistently low testosterone, driven primarily by death (HR 0.65, 95% CI 0.47 to 0.90). HRs for MI and stroke were 0.73 (95% CI 0.40 to 1.34), p = 0.32, and 1.11 (95% CI 0.54 to 2.28), p = 0.78, respectively. MACE was noninferior but not superior for high achieved testosterone with no benefit on MI and a trend to greater stroke risk. In conclusion, in a large general health care population, TRT to normal levels was associated with reduced MACE and death over 3 years but a stroke signal with high achieved levels suggests a conservative approach to TRT.

  20. Home-based neurologic music therapy for upper limb rehabilitation with stroke patients at community rehabilitation stage—a feasibility study protocol

    PubMed Central

    Street, Alexander J.; Magee, Wendy L.; Odell-Miller, Helen; Bateman, Andrew; Fachner, Jorg C.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Impairment of upper limb function following stroke is more common than lower limb impairment and is also more resistant to treatment. Several lab-based studies with stroke patients have produced statistically significant gains in upper limb function when using musical instrument playing and techniques where rhythm acts as an external time-keeper for the priming and timing of upper limb movements. Methods: For this feasibility study a small sample size of 14 participants (3–60 months post stroke) has been determined through clinical discussion between the researcher and study host in order to test for management, feasibility and effects, before planning a larger trial determined through power analysis. A cross-over design with five repeated measures will be used, whereby participants will be randomized into either a treatment (n = 7) or wait list control (n = 7) group. Intervention will take place twice weekly over 6 weeks. The ARAT and 9HPT will be used to measure for quantitative gains in arm function and finger dexterity, pre/post treatment interviews will serve to investigate treatment compliance and tolerance. A lab based EEG case comparison study will be undertaken to explore audio-motor coupling, brain connectivity and neural reorganization with this intervention, as evidenced in similar studies. Discussion: Before evaluating the effectiveness of a home-based intervention in a larger scale study, it is important to assess whether implementation of the trial methodology is feasible. This study investigates the feasibility, efficacy and patient experience of a music therapy treatment protocol comprising a chart of 12 different instrumental exercises and variations, which aims at promoting measurable changes in upper limb function in hemiparetic stroke patients. The study proposes to examine several new aspects including home-based treatment and dosage, and will provide data on recruitment, adherence and variability of outcomes. PMID:26441586

  1. Can Short-Term Constraint-Induced Movement Therapy Combined With Visual Biofeedback Training Improve Hemiplegic Upper Limb Function of Subacute Stroke Patients?

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Objective To Investigate the synergic effects of short-term constraint-induced movement therapy (CIMT) and visual biofeedback training (VBT) in subacute stroke patients. Methods Thirty-two subacute stroke patients were enrolled and randomly assigned to one of three groups: short-term CIMT with VBT, VBT only, and control groups. We applied CIMT for an hour daily during VBT instead of the ordinary restraint time, referred to as 'short-term' CIMT. Short-term CIMT with VBT group received simultaneous VBT with CIMT, whereas the VBT the only group received VBT without CIMT for an hour a day for 2 weeks. The control group received conventional occupational therapy (OT) alone. Patients underwent the Purdue Pegboard Test, the JAMAR grip strength test, the Wolf Motor Function Test, the Fugl-Meyer Assessment (upper extremity), Motricity index and the Korean version of Modified Barthel Index test to evaluate motor functions of the hemiplegic upper limb at baseline, post-treatment, and 2 weeks after treatment. Results No significant differences were observed between short-term CIMT with VBT and VBT only groups. Both groups showed significantly higher scores compared to the control group in the WMFT and FMA tests. However, the short-term CIMT with VBT group showed significant improvement (p<0.05) compared with the control group in both grasp and pad pinch at post-treatment and 2 weeks after treatment while the VBT only group did not. Conclusion Short-term CIMT with VBT group did not show significant improvement of hemiplegic upper limb function of subacute stroke patients, compared to VBT only group. Larger sample sizes and different restraint times would be needed to clarify the effect. PMID:28119829

  2. To compare the effectiveness of constraint induced movement therapy versus motor relearning programme to improve motor function of hemiplegic upper extremity after stroke

    PubMed Central

    Batool, Sana; Soomro, Nabila; Amjad, Fareeha; Fauz, Rabia

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To compare the effectiveness of constraint induced movement therapy versus motor relearning programme to improve motor function of hemiplegic upper extremity after stroke. Method: A sample of 42 patients was recruited from the Physiotherapy Department of IPM&R and Neurology OPD of Civil Hospital Karachi through non probability purposive sampling technique. Twenty one patients were placed to each experimental and control groups. Experimental group was treated with Constraint Induced Movement Therapy (CIMT) and control group was treated with motor relearning programme (MRP) for three consecutive weeks. Pre and post treatment measurements were determined by upper arm section of Motor Assessment Scale (MAS) and Self Care item of Functional Independence Measure (FIM) Scale. Results: Intra group analysis showed statistically significant results (p-value<0.05) in all items of MAS in both groups. However, advanced hand activities item of MAS in MRP group showed insignificant result (p-value=0.059). Self-care items of FIM Scale also showed significant result (p-value< 0.05) in both groups except dressing upper body item (p-value=0.059) in CIMT group and grooming and dressing upper body items (p-value=0.059 & 0.063) in MRP group showed insignificant p-values. Conclusion: CIMT group showed more significant improvement in motor function and self-care performance of hemiplegic upper extremity as compared to MRP group in patients with sub-acute stroke assessed by the MAS and FIM scales. Thus CIMT is proved to be more statistically significant and clinically effective intervention in comparison to motor relearning programme among the patients aged between 35-60 years. Further studies are needed to evaluate CIMT effects in acute and chronic post stroke population. PMID:26649007

  3. Upper-limb robot-assisted therapy in rehabilitation of acute stroke patients: focused review and results of new randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Masiero, Stefano; Armani, Mario; Rosati, Giulio

    2011-01-01

    The successful motor rehabilitation of stroke patients requires early intensive and task-specific therapy. A recent Cochrane Review, although based on a limited number of randomized controlled trials (RCTs), showed that early robotic training of the upper limb (i.e., during acute or subacute phase) can enhance motor learning and improve functional abilities more than chronic-phase training. In this article, a new subacute-phase RCT with the Neuro-Rehabilitation-roBot (NeReBot) is presented. While in our first study we used the NeReBot in addition to conventional therapy, in this new trial we used the same device in substitution of standard proximal upper-limb rehabilitation. With this protocol, robot patients achieved similar reductions in motor impairment and enhancements in paretic upper-limb function to those gained by patients in a control group. By analyzing these results and those of previous studies, we hypothesize a new robotic protocol for acute and subacute stroke patients based on both treatment modalities (in addition and in substitution).

  4. Feasibility and Efficiency of Human Bone Marrow Stromal Cell Culture with Allogeneic Platelet Lysate-Supplementation for Cell Therapy against Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Chengbo; Wang, Zifeng; Hamauchi, Shuji; Abumiya, Takeo; Kazumata, Ken; Ito, Tsuneo; Kudo, Kohsuke; Takamoto, Shigeru; Houkin, Kiyohiro

    2016-01-01

    Currently, there is increasing interest in human bone marrow stromal cells (hBMSCs) as regeneration therapy against cerebral stroke. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the feasibility and validity of hBMSC cultures with allogeneic platelet lysates (PLs). Platelet concentrates (PC) were harvested from healthy volunteers and made into single donor-derived PL (sPL). The PL mixtures (mPL) were made from three different sPL. Some growth factors and platelet cell surface antigens were detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The hBMSCs cultured with 10% PL were analyzed for their proliferative potential, surface markers, and karyotypes. The cells were incubated with superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) agents and injected into a pig brain. MRI and histological analysis were performed. Consequently, nine lots of sPL and three mPL were prepared. ELISA analysis showed that PL contained adequate growth factors and a particle of platelet surface antigens. Cell proliferation capacity of PLs was equivalent to or higher than that of fetal calf serum (FCS). No contradiction in cell surface markers and no chromosomal aberrations were found. The MRI detected the distribution of SPIO-labeled hBMSCs in the pig brain. In summary, the hBMSCs cultured with allogeneic PL are suitable for cell therapy against stroke. PMID:27840648

  5. Learning, Not Adaptation, Characterizes Stroke Motor Recovery: Evidence From Kinematic Changes Induced by Robot-Assisted Therapy in Trained and Untrained Task in the Same Workspace

    PubMed Central

    Dipietro, L.; Krebs, H. I.; Volpe, B. T.; Stein, J.; Bever, C.; Mernoff, S. T.; Fasoli, S. E.; Hogan, N.

    2015-01-01

    Both the American Heart Association and the VA/DoD endorse upper-extremity robot-mediated rehabilitation therapy for stroke care. However, we do not know yet how to optimize therapy for a particular patient’s needs. Here, we explore whether we must train patients for each functional task that they must perform during their activities of daily living or alternatively capacitate patients to perform a class of tasks and have therapists assist them later in translating the observed gains into activities of daily living. The former implies that motor adaptation is a better model for motor recovery. The latter implies that motor learning (which allows for generalization) is a better model for motor recovery. We quantified trained and untrained movements performed by 158 recovering stroke patients via 13 metrics, including movement smoothness and submovements. Improvements were observed both in trained and untrained movements suggesting that generalization occurred. Our findings suggest that, as motor recovery progresses, an internal representation of the task is rebuilt by the brain in a process that better resembles motor learning than motor adaptation. Our findings highlight possible improvements for therapeutic algorithms design, suggesting sparse-activity-set training should suffice over exhaustive sets of task specific training. PMID:22186963

  6. Retraining and assessing hand movement after stroke using the MusicGlove: comparison with conventional hand therapy and isometric grip training

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background It is thought that therapy should be functional, be highly repetitive, and promote afferent input to best stimulate hand motor recovery after stroke, yet patients struggle to access such therapy. We developed the MusicGlove, an instrumented glove that requires the user to practice gripping-like movements and thumb-finger opposition to play a highly engaging, music-based, video game. The purpose of this study was to 1) compare the effect of training with MusicGlove to conventional hand therapy 2) determine if MusicGlove training was more effective than a matched form of isometric hand movement training; and 3) determine if MusicGlove game scores predict clinical outcomes. Methods 12 chronic stroke survivors with moderate hemiparesis were randomly assigned to receive MusicGlove, isometric, and conventional hand therapy in a within-subjects design. Each subject participated in six one-hour treatment sessions three times per week for two weeks, for each training type, for a total of 18 treatment sessions. A blinded rater assessed hand impairment before and after each training type and at one-month follow-up including the Box and Blocks (B & B) test as the primary outcome measure. Subjects also completed the Intrinsic Motivation Inventory (IMI). Results Subjects improved hand function related to grasping small objects more after MusicGlove compared to conventional training, as measured by the B & B score (improvement of 3.21±3.82 vs. -0.29±2.27 blocks; P=0.010) and the 9 Hole Peg test (improvement of 2.14±2.98 vs. -0.85±1.29 pegs/minute; P=0.005). There was no significant difference between training types in the broader assessment batteries of hand function. Subjects benefited less from isometric therapy than MusicGlove training, but the difference was not significant (P>0.09). Subjects sustained improvements in hand function at a one month follow-up, and found the MusicGlove more motivating than the other two therapies, as measured by the IMI. Music

  7. Acute ischemic stroke update.

    PubMed

    Baldwin, Kathleen; Orr, Sean; Briand, Mary; Piazza, Carolyn; Veydt, Annita; McCoy, Stacey

    2010-05-01

    thrombolectomy are being developed, and neuroprotective therapies such as the use of magnesium, statins, and induced hypothermia are being explored. As treatment interventions become more clearly defined in special subgroups of patients, outcomes in patients with acute ischemic stroke will likely continue to improve.

  8. Cerebrospinal fluid asparagine depletion during pegylated asparaginase therapy in children with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Henriksen, Louise T; Nersting, Jacob; Raja, Raheel A; Frandsen, Thomas L; Rosthøj, Steen; Schrøder, Henrik; Albertsen, Birgitte K

    2014-07-01

    L-asparaginase is an important drug in the treatment of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL). Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) asparagine depletion is considered a marker of asparaginase effect in the central nervous system (CNS) and may play a role in CNS-directed anti-leukaemia therapy. The objective of this study was to describe CSF asparagine depletion during 30 weeks of pegylated asparaginase therapy, 1000 iu/m(2) i.m. every second week, and to correlate CSF asparagine concentration with serum L-asparaginase enzyme activity. Danish children (1-17 years) with ALL, treated according to the Nordic Society of Paediatric Haematology and Oncology ALL2008 protocol, standard and intermediate risk, were included. CSF samples were obtained throughout L-asparaginase treatment at every scheduled lumbar puncture. A total of 128 samples from 31 patients were available for analysis. Median CSF asparagine concentration decreased from a pre-treatment level of 5·3 μmol/l to median levels ≤1·5 μmol/l. However, only 4/31 patients (five samples) had CSF asparagine concentrations below the limit of detection (0·1 μmol/l). In 11 patients, 24 paired same day serum and CSF samples were obtained. A decrease in CSF asparagine corresponded to serum enzyme activities above 50 iu/l. Higher serum enzyme activities were not followed by more extensive depletion. In conclusion, pegylated asparaginase 1000 iu/m(2) i.m. every second week effectively reduced CSF asparagine levels.

  9. Stroke rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Bindawas, Saad M.; Vennu, Vishal S.

    2016-01-01

    Stroke is a major cause of death and other complications worldwide. In Saudi Arabia, stroke has become an emerging health issue leading to disability and death. However, stroke care including rehabilitation services, in Saudi Arabia lags behind developed countries. Stroke rehabilitation is an essential recovery option after stroke and should start as early as possible to avoid potential complications. The growing evidence on stroke rehabilitation effectiveness in different health care settings and outcome measures used widely are reviewed in this call to action paper. PMID:27744457

  10. Respiratory induced dynamic variations of stroke volume and its surrogates as predictors of fluid responsiveness: applicability in the early stages of specific critical states.

    PubMed

    Benes, Jan; Zatloukal, Jan; Kletecka, Jakub; Simanova, Alena; Haidingerova, Lenka; Pradl, Richard

    2014-06-01

    Respiratory induced dynamic variations of stroke volume and its surrogates are very sensitive and specific predictors of fluid responsiveness, but their use as targets for volume management can be limited. In a recent study, limiting factors were present in 53 % of surgical patients with inserted arterial line. In the intensive care unit (ICU) population the frequency is presumably higher, but the real prevalence is unknown. Our goal was to study the feasibility of dynamic variations guided initial volume resuscitation in specific critical states. We have performed a 5 year retrospective evaluation of patients admitted with diagnosis sepsis, polytrauma, after high risk surgery or cardiac arrest. Occurrence of major (sedation, mandatory ventilation and tidal volume, open chest and arrhythmias) and minor limiting factors (PEEP level, use of vasopressors and presence of arterial catheter) was screened within the first 24 h after admission. In the study period 1296 patients were hospitalized in our ICU with severe sepsis (n = 242), polytrauma (n = 561), after high risk surgery (n = 351) or cardiac arrest (n = 141). From these patients 549 (42.4 %) fulfilled all major criteria for applicability of dynamic variations. In our evaluation only limited number of patients admitted for polytrauma (51 %), sepsis (37 %), after cardiac arrest (39 %) or surgical procedure (33 %) fulfil all the major criteria for use of dynamic variations at the ICU admission. The prevalence was similar in patients with shock. Occurrence of minor factors can pose further bias in evaluation of these patients. General use of dynamic variations guided protocols for initial resuscitations seems not universally applicable.

  11. Choice of fluid therapy in patients of craniopharyngioma in the perioperative period: A hospital-based preliminary study

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, K. K.; Dutta, Pinaki; Singh, Apinderpreet; Gupta, Prakamya; Srinivasan, Anand; Bhagat, Hemant; Mathuriya, S. N.; Shah, Viral N.; Bhansali, Anil

    2014-01-01

    Background: Electrolyte imbalance and acute diabetes insipidus (DI) are the most common complications in patients undergoing craniopharyngioma surgery. Improper management of water and electrolyte imbalance is common cause of morbidity and mortality. Data is sparse and controversial regarding the choice of fluid therapy in this population during perioperative period. Methods: In this retrospective-prospective study involving 73 patients (58 retrospective), the type of fluid therapy was correlated with occurrence of hypernatremia, hyponatremia, DI, morbidity, and mortality. In the retrospective study, 48 patients received normal saline and 10 received mixed fluids as per the prevailing practice. In the prospective group, five patients each received normal saline, half normal saline, and 5% dextrose randomly. Results: The sodium values were significantly higher in first 48 h in the group that received normal saline compared with other groups (P < 0.001). The use of normal saline was associated with higher incidence of hypernatremia, DI, and mortality (P = 0.05), while the group that received 5% dextrose was associated with hyponatremia, hypoglycemia, and seizures. There was no perioperative hypotension with use of any of the fluids. Conclusion: Our results indicate half normal saline was fluid of choice with diminished incidence of water and electrolyte abnormalities without increase in mortality during postoperative period. PMID:25101200

  12. Effects of low-level laser therapy (LLLT 808 nm) on lower limb spastic muscle activity in chronic stroke patients.

    PubMed

    das Neves, Marcele Florêncio; Dos Reis, Mariana César Ribeiro; de Andrade, Eliana Aparecida Fonseca; Lima, Fernanda Pupio Silva; Nicolau, Renata Amadei; Arisawa, Emília Ângela Loschiavo; Andrade, Adriano Oliveira; Lima, Mário Oliveira

    2016-09-01

    A cerebrovascular accident (CVA) may affect basic motor functions, including spasticity that may be present in the upper extremity and/or the lower extremity, post-stroke. Spasticity causes pain, muscle force reduction, and decreases the time to onset of muscle fatigue. Several therapeutic resources have been employed to treat CVA to promote functional recovery. The clinical use of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) for rehabilitation of muscular disorders has provided better muscle responses. Thus, the aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of the application of LLLT in spastic muscles in patients with spasticity post-CVA. A double-blind clinical trial was conducted with 15 volunteer stroke patients who presented with post-stroke spasticity. Both males and females were treated; the average age was 51.5 ± 11.8 years old; the participants entered the study ranging from 11 to 48 months post-stroke onset. The patients participated in three consecutive phases (control, placebo, and real LLLT), in which all tests of isometric endurance of their hemiparetic lower limb were performed. LLLT (diode laser, 100 mW 808 nm, beam spot area 0.0314 cm(2), 127.39 J/cm(2)/point, 40 s) was applied before isometric endurance. After the real LLLT intervention, we observed significant reduction in the visual analogue scale for pain intensity (p = 0.0038), increased time to onset of muscle fatigue (p = 0.0063), and increased torque peak (p = 0.0076), but no significant change in the root mean square (RMS) value (electric signal in the motor unit during contraction, as obtained with surface electromyography). Our results suggest that the application of LLLT may contribute to increased recruitment of muscle fibers and, hence, to increase the onset time of the spastic muscle fatigue, reducing pain intensity in stroke patients with spasticity, as has been observed in healthy subjects and athletes.

  13. Role of Cerebrospinal Fluid Biomarkers in Clinical Trials for Alzheimer's Disease Modifying Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Ryoo, Na-Young; Shin, Dong Wun; Trojanowski, John Q

    2014-01-01

    Until now, a disease-modifying therapy (DMT) that has an ability to slow or arrest Alzheimer's disease (AD) progression has not been developed, and all clinical trials involving AD patients enrolled by clinical assessment alone also have not been successful. Given the growing consensus that the DMT is likely to require treatment initiation well before full-blown dementia emerges, the early detection of AD will provide opportunities to successfully identify new drugs that slow the course of AD pathology. Recent advances in early detection of AD and prediction of progression of the disease using various biomarkers, including cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) Aβ1-42, total tau and p-tau181 levels, and imagining biomarkers, are now being actively integrated into the designs of AD clinical trials. In terms of therapeutic mechanisms, monitoring these markers may be helpful for go/no-go decision making as well as surrogate markers for disease severity or progression. Furthermore, CSF biomarkers can be used as a tool to enrich patients for clinical trials with prospect of increasing statistical power and reducing costs in drug development. However, the standardization of technical aspects of analysis of these biomarkers is an essential prerequisite to the clinical uses. To accomplish this, global efforts are underway to standardize CSF biomarker measurements and a quality control program supported by the Alzheimer's Association. The current review summarizes therapeutic targets of developing drugs in AD pathophysiology, and provides the most recent advances in the PMID:25598657

  14. Chloramphenicol with fluid and electrolyte therapy cures terminally ill green tree frogs (Litoria caerulea) with chytridiomycosis.

    PubMed

    Young, Sam; Speare, Rick; Berger, Lee; Skerratt, Lee F

    2012-06-01

    Terminal changes in frogs infected with the amphibian fungal pathogen Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd) include epidermal degeneration leading to inhibited epidermal electrolyte transport, systemic electrolyte disturbances, and asystolic cardiac arrest. There are few reports of successful treatment of chytridiomycosis and none that include curing amphibians with severe disease. Three terminally ill green tree frogs (Litoria caerulea) with heavy Bd infections were cured using a combination of continuous shallow immersion in 20 mg/L chloramphenicol solution for 14 days, parenteral isotonic electrolyte fluid therapy for 6 days, and increased ambient temperature to 28 degrees C for 14 days. All terminally ill frogs recovered rapidly to normal activity levels and appetite within 5 days of commencing treatment. In contrast, five untreated terminally ill L. caerulea with heavy Bd infections died within 24-48 hr of becoming moribund. Subclinical infections in 15 experimentally infected L. caerulea were cured within 28 days by continuous shallow immersion in 20 mg/L chloramphenicol solution without adverse effects. This is the first known report of a clinical treatment protocol for curing terminally ill Bd-infected frogs.

  15. Stroke: current concepts.

    PubMed

    Albertson, Megan; Sharma, Jitendra

    2014-11-01

    Cerebrovascular accidents (CVAs) are the leading cause of disability and the fourth leading cause of death in the U.S. The WHO defines stroke as "rapidly developing clinical signs of focal disturbance of cerebral function lasting more than 24 hours with no apparent cause other than of vascular origin." Strokes are subdivided into two major classifications: ischemic (80-87 percent) andhemorrhagic (13-20 percent). Ischemic strokes occur from thrombi, emboli, or global hypoperfusion. Hemorrhagic strokes are either parenchymal (10 percent of all strokes) or subarachnoid (3 percent of all strokes). There are a variety of recognized risk factors for stroke which include: age, race, family history, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, atherosclerosis, cardiac arrhythmias, prosthetic valves, hyperlipidemia, cigarette smoking, and others (drugs or hormones). The initial assessment of a patient suspected of stroke should be done quickly enough to ensure maximal reperfusion of brain tissue. The steps to achieve this goal are: 1) exclude an intracranial hemorrhage, 2) assess for contraindications to thrombolytics, 3) characterize the infarct. The workup for a patient should first include a history (especially the time when neurologic symptoms began), a physical exam (including the NIHSS), and imaging studies (to rule out hemorrhagic components). In addition, several lab studies can also be obtained including: PT/INR, glucose, complete blood count, metabolic panel, creatine kinase, ECG, echocardiogram, lipid panel, carotid Doppler, MRA or CTA. Acute management of a stroke is primarily focused on stabilizing the patient and allowing as much reperfusion as possible for at-risk brain tissue. Stroke management in the acute setting includes: use of thrombolytics if indicated, and re-assessment to monitor progression. Several trials have been completed in pursuit of safety and effectiveness of intra-arterial stroke therapy for patients outside the recommended thrombolytic time window

  16. Non-Vitamin K Antagonist Oral Anticoagulants and Antiplatelet Therapy for Stroke Prevention in Patients With Atrial Fibrillation: A Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Shashi; Danik, Stephan B; Altman, Robert K; Barrett, Conor D; Lip, Gregory Y H; Chatterjee, Saurav; Roubin, Gary S; Natale, Andrea; Danik, Jacqueline S

    2016-01-01

    Non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants (NOACs) are frequently used to prevent stroke in patients with atrial fibrillation. These patients are often also on aspirin or other antiplatelet agents. It is possible that treatment with both NOACs and aspirin or other antiplatelet drug may be effective in decreasing stroke, but data are sparse regarding the efficacy and safety of using both agents for stroke prevention. To address these issues, data were pooled from the 4 recent randomized, controlled trials of NOACs: apixaban, rivaroxaban, dabigatran, and edoxaban, which included 42,411 patients; 14,148 (33.4%) were also on aspirin or other antiplatelet drug. The number of thromboembolic events among participants on NOAC and aspirin/antiplatelet was compared with the number of events in patients on NOAC alone. Bleeding rates were also compared between those on NOAC + aspirin/antiplatelet and on NOAC alone. These results were compared with thromboembolic and bleeding events in the warfarin + aspirin/antiplatelet versus warfarin alone. No greater risk for thromboembolism was seen in patients on NOACs compared with patients on both NOACs and aspirin/antiplatelet drug. In this nonrandomized comparison, there was initially a signal toward higher thromboembolic rates among NOAC users also on aspirin/antiplatelet drugs (relative risk, 1.16; 95% confidence intervals, 1.05, 1.29) when compared with NOAC alone. This likely reflected the higher CHADS2 scores of those on aspirin/antiplatelet drugs. When the analysis was limited to studies that included aspirin rather than other antiplatelet drugs, no difference was seen for thromboembolic rates comparing dual therapy to NOAC alone (relative risk, 1.02; 95% confidence intervals, 0.90, 1.15). Higher rates of bleeding were seen with aspirin/antiplatelet drug in conjunction with NOAC. In this meta-analysis and nonrandomized comparison of aspirin/antiplatelet users and nonusers also on anticoagulation, there was no additional

  17. Fluid overload and survival in critically ill patients with acute kidney injury receiving continuous renal replacement therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Il Young; Kim, Joo Hui; Lee, Dong Won; Lee, Soo Bong; Rhee, Harin; Seong, Eun Young; Kwak, Ihm Soo

    2017-01-01

    Background Fluid overload is known to be associated with increased mortality in patients with acute kidney injury (AKI) who are critically ill. In this study, we intended to uncover whether the adverse effect of fluid overload on survival could be applied to all of the patients with AKI who received continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT). Methods We analyzed 341 patients with AKI who received CRRT in our intensive care units. The presence of fluid overload was defined as a minimum 10% increase in body weight from the baseline. Demographics, comorbid diseases, clinical data, severity of illness [the sequential organ failure assessment (SOFA) score, number of vasopressors, diagnosis of sepsis, use of ventilator] upon ICU admission, fluid overload status, and time elapsed from AKI diagnosis until CRRT initiation were reviewed from the medical charts. Results Patients with total fluid overload from 3 days before CRRT initiation to ICU discharge had a significantly lower survival rate after ICU admission, as compared to patients with no fluid overload (P < 0.001). Among patients with sepsis (P < 0.001) or with high SOFA scores (P < 0.001), there was a significant difference in survival of the patients with and without fluid overload. In patients without sepsis or with low SOFA score, there was no significant difference in survival of patients irrespective of fluid overload. Conclusion Our study demonstrates that the adverse effect of fluid overload on survival is more evident in patients with sepsis or with more severe illness, and that it might not apply to patients without sepsis or with less severe illness. PMID:28196107

  18. Know Stroke

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home Current Issue Past Issues Special Section Know Stroke Past Issues / Summer 2007 Table of Contents For ... D. Director, National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke Photo courtesy of NIH/NINDS Welcome to this ...

  19. Promoting recovery from ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Antje; Minnerup, Jens

    2016-01-01

    Over recent decades, experimental and clinical stroke studies have identified a number of neurorestorative treatments that stimulate neural plasticity and promote functional recovery. In contrast to the acute stroke treatments thrombolysis and endovascular thrombectomy, neurorestorative treatments are still effective when initiated days after stroke onset, which makes them applicable to virtually all stroke patients. In this article, selected physical, pharmacological and cell-based neurorestorative therapies are discussed, with special emphasis on interventions that have already been transferred from the laboratory to the clinical setting. We explain molecular and structural processes that promote neural plasticity, discuss potential limitations of neurorestorative treatments, and offer a speculative viewpoint on how neurorestorative treatments will evolve.

  20. Ischemic Strokes (Clots)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Quiz 5 Things to Know About Stroke Ischemic Strokes (Clots) Updated:Nov 9,2016 Ischemic stroke accounts ... strokes. Read more about silent strokes . TIA and Stroke: Medical Emergencies When someone has shown symptoms of ...

  1. Recovering after stroke

    MedlinePlus

    Stroke rehabilitation; Cerebrovascular accident - rehabilitation; Recovery from stroke; Stroke - recovery; CVA - recovery ... WHERE TO LIVE AFTER A STROKE Most people will need stroke ... after they leave the hospital. Stroke rehab will help you ...

  2. Effects of Intravenous Fluid Therapy on Clinical and Biochemical Parameters of Trauma Patients

    PubMed Central

    Paydar, Shahram; Bazrafkan, Hamid; Golestani, Nasim; Roozbeh, Jamshid; Akrami, Abbas; Moradi, Ali Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: The administration of crystalloid fluids is considered as the first line treatment in management of trauma patients. Infusion of intravenous fluids leads to various changes in hemodynamic, metabolic and coagulation profiles of these patients. The present study attempted to survey some of these changes in patients with mild severity trauma following normal saline infusion. Methods: This study comprised 84 trauma patients with injury of mild severity in Shahid Rajaei Hospital, Shiraz, Iran, during 2010-2011. The coagulation and metabolic values of each patient were measured before and one and six hours after infusion of one liter normal saline. Then, the values of mentioned parameters on one and six hours after infusion were compared with baseline measures using repeated measures analysis of variance. Results: Eighty four patients included in the present study (76% male). Hemoglobin (Hb) (df: 2; F=32.7; p<0.001), hematocrit (Hct) (df: 2; F=30.7; p<0.001), white blood cells (WBC) (df: 2; F=10.6; p<0.001), and platelet count (df: 2; F=4.5; p=0.01) showed the decreasing pattern following infusion of one liter of normal saline. Coagulation markers were not affected during the time of study (p>0.05). The values of blood urea nitrogen (BUN) showed statistically significant decreasing pattern (df: 2; F=5.6; p=0.007). Pressure of carbon dioxide (PCO2) (df: 2; F=6.4; p=0.002), bicarbonate (HCO3) (df: 2; F=7.0; p=0.001), and base excess (BE) (df: 2; F=3.3; p=0.04) values showed a significant deteriorating changes following hydration therapy. Conclusion: It seems that, the infusion of one liter normal saline during one hour will cause a statistically significant decrease in Hb, Hct, WBC, platelet, BUN, BE, HCO3, and PCO2 in trauma patients with mild severity of injury and stable condition. The changes in, coagulation profiles, pH, PvO2, and electrolytes were not statistically remarkable. PMID:26495354

  3. An update clinical application of amniotic fluid-derived stem cells (AFSCs) in cancer cell therapy and tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Gholizadeh-Ghaleh Aziz, Shiva; Fathi, Ezzatollah; Rahmati-Yamchi, Mohammad; Akbarzadeh, Abolfazl; Fardyazar, Zahra; Pashaiasl, Maryam

    2017-06-01

    Recent studies have elucidated that cell-based therapies are promising for cancer treatments. The human amniotic fluid stem (AFS) cells are advantageous cells for such therapeutic schemes that can be innately changed to express therapeutic proteins. HAFSCs display a natural tropism to cancer cells in vivo. They can be useful in cancer cells targeting. Moreover, they are easily available from surplus diagnostic samples during pregnancy and less ethical and legal concern are associated with the collection and application than other putative cells are subjected. This review will designate representatives of amniotic fluid and stem cell derived from amniotic fluid. For this propose, we collect state of human AFS cells data applicable in cancer therapy by dividing this approach into two main classes (nonengineered and engineered based approaches). Our study shows the advantage of AFS cells over other putative cells types in terms differentiation ability to a wide range of cells by potential and effective use in preclinical studies for a variety of diseases. This study has shown the elasticity of human AFS cells and their favorable potential as a multipotent cell source for regenerative stem cell therapy and capable of giving rise to multiple lineages including such as osteoblasts and adipocyte.

  4. Similar Effects of Two Modified Constraint-Induced Therapy Protocols on Motor Impairment, Motor Function and Quality of Life in Patients with Chronic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Souza, Wilma Costa; Conforto, Adriana B.; Orsini, Marco; Stern, Annette; André, Charles

    2015-01-01

    Modified constraint-induced movement therapy (CIMT) protocols show motor function and real-world arm use improvement. Meanwhile it usually requires constant supervision by physiotherapists and is therefore more expensive than customary care. This study compared the preliminary efficacy of two modified CIMT protocols. A two-group randomized controlled trial with pre and post treatment measures and six months follow-up was conducted. Nineteen patients with chronic stroke received 10 treatment sessions distributed three to four times a week over 22 days. CIMT3h_direct group received 3 hours of CIMT supervised by a therapist (n=10) while CIMT1.5h_direct group had 1.5 hours of supervised CIMT+1.5 hours home exercises supervised by a caregiver (n=9). Outcome measures were the Fugl-Meyer Assessment, the Motor Activity Log, and the Stroke Specific Quality of Life Scale. The modified CIMT protocols were feasible and well tolerated. Improvements in motor function, real-world arm use and quality of life did not differ significantly between treated groups receiving either 3 or 1.5 hours mCIMT supervised by a therapist. PMID:26294941

  5. In utero therapy for congenital disorders using amniotic fluid stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Ramachandra, Durrgah L.; Shaw, Steven S. W.; Shangaris, Panicos; Loukogeorgakis, Stavros; Guillot, Pascale V.; Coppi, Paolo De; David, Anna L.

    2014-01-01

    Congenital diseases are responsible for over a third of all pediatric hospital admissions. Advances in prenatal screening and molecular diagnosis have allowed the detection of many life-threatening genetic diseases early in gestation. In utero transplantation (IUT) with stem cells could cure affected fetuses but so far in humans, successful IUT using allogeneic hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), has been limited to fetuses with severe immunologic defects and more recently IUT with allogeneic mesenchymal stem cell transplantation, has improved phenotype in osteogenesis imperfecta. The options of preemptive treatment of congenital diseases in utero by stem cell or gene therapy changes the perspective of congenital diseases since it may avoid the need for postnatal treatment and reduce future costs. Amniotic fluid stem (AFS) cells have been isolated and characterized in human, mice, rodents, rabbit, and sheep and are a potential source of cells for therapeutic applications in disorders for treatment prenatally or postnatally. Gene transfer to the cells with long-term transgenic protein expression is feasible. Recently, pre-clinical autologous transplantation of transduced cells has been achieved in fetal sheep using minimally invasive ultrasound guided injection techniques. Clinically relevant levels of transgenic protein were expressed in the blood of transplanted lambs for at least 6 months. The cells have also demonstrated the potential of repair in a range of pre-clinical disease models such as neurological disorders, tracheal repair, bladder injury, and diaphragmatic hernia repair in neonates or adults. These results have been encouraging, and bring personalized tissue engineering for prenatal treatment of genetic disorders closer to the clinic. PMID:25566071

  6. Biochemical, histological and functional correction of mucopolysaccharidosis type IIIB by intra-cerebrospinal fluid gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Ribera, Albert; Haurigot, Virginia; Garcia, Miguel; Marcó, Sara; Motas, Sandra; Villacampa, Pilar; Maggioni, Luca; León, Xavier; Molas, Maria; Sánchez, Víctor; Muñoz, Sergio; Leborgne, Christian; Moll, Xavier; Pumarola, Martí; Mingozzi, Federico; Ruberte, Jesús; Añor, Sònia; Bosch, Fatima

    2015-04-01

    Gene therapy is an attractive tool for the treatment of monogenic disorders, in particular for lysosomal storage diseases (LSD) caused by deficiencies in secretable lysosomal enzymes in which neither full restoration of normal enzymatic activity nor transduction of all affected cells are necessary. However, some LSD such as Mucopolysaccharidosis Type IIIB (MPSIIIB) are challenging because the disease's main target organ is the brain and enzymes do not efficiently cross the blood-brain barrier even if present at very high concentration in circulation. To overcome these limitations, we delivered AAV9 vectors encoding for α-N-acetylglucosaminidase (NAGLU) to the Cerebrospinal Fluid (CSF) of MPSIIIB mice with the disease already detectable at biochemical, histological and functional level. Restoration of enzymatic activity in Central Nervous System (CNS) resulted in normalization of glycosaminoglycan content and lysosomal physiology, resolved neuroinflammation and restored the pattern of gene expression in brain similar to that of healthy animals. Additionally, transduction of the liver due to passage of vectors to the circulation led to whole-body disease correction. Treated animals also showed reversal of behavioural deficits and extended lifespan. Importantly, when the levels of enzymatic activity were monitored in the CSF of dogs following administration of canine NAGLU-coding vectors to animals that were either naïve or had pre-existing immunity against AAV9, similar levels of activity were achieved, suggesting that CNS efficacy would not be compromised in patients seropositive for AAV9. Our studies provide a strong rationale for the clinical development of this novel therapeutic approach as the treatment for MPSIIIB.

  7. Associations of MDR1, TBXA2R, PLA2G7, and PEAR1 genetic polymorphisms with the platelet activity in Chinese ischemic stroke patients receiving aspirin therapy

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Ling-ling; Zhao, Yuan-qi; Zhou, Zi-yi; Jin, Jing; Zhao, Min; Chen, Xin-meng; Chen, Ling-yan; Cai, Ye-feng; Li, Jia-li; Huang, Min

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Aspirin resistance has an incidence of 5%–65% in patients with ischemic stroke, who receive the standard dose of aspirin, but the platelet function is inadequately inhibited, thereby leading to thrombotic events. Numerous evidence shows that thromboxane A2 receptor (TXA2 receptor, encoded by TBXA2R), lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 (Lp-PLA2, encoded by PLA2G7) and platelet endothelial aggregation receptor-1 (PEAR1, encoded by PEAR1) are crucial in regulating platelet activation, and P-glycoprotein (P-gp, encoded by MDR1) influences the absorption of aspirin in the intestine. In this study we examined the correlation between MDR1, TBXA2R, PLA2G7, PEAR1 genetic polymorphisms and platelet activity in Chinese ischemic stroke patients receiving aspirin therapy. Methods: A total of 283 ischemic stroke patients receiving 100 mg aspirin for 7 d were genotyped for polymorphisms in MDR1 C3435T, TBXA2R (rs1131882), PLA2G7 (rs1051931, rs7756935), and PEAR1 (rs12566888, rs12041331). The platelet aggregation response was measured using an automatic platelet aggregation analyzer and a commercially available TXB2 ELISA kit. Results: Thirty-three patients (11.66%) were insensitive to aspirin treatment. MDR1 3435TT genotype carriers, whose arachidonic acid (AA) or adenosine diphosphate (ADP)-induced platelet aggregation was lower than that of CC+CT genotype carriers, were less likely to suffer from aspirin resistance (odds ratio=0.421, 95% CI: 0.233–0.759). The TBXA2R rs1131882 CC genotype, which was found more frequently in the aspirin-insensitive group (81.8% vs 62.4%) than in the sensitive group, was identified as a risk factor for aspirin resistance (odds ratio=2.712, 95% CI: 1.080–6.810) with a higher level of AA-induced platelet aggregation. Due to the combined effects of PLA2G7 rs1051931 and rs7756935, carriers of the AA-CC haplotype had a higher level of ADP-induced platelet aggregation, and were at considerably higher risk of aspirin resistance than

  8. The ‘pit-crew’ model for improving door-to-needle times in endovascular stroke therapy: a Six-Sigma project

    PubMed Central

    Rai, Ansaar T; Smith, Matthew S; Boo, SoHyun; Tarabishy, Abdul R; Hobbs, Gerald R; Carpenter, Jeffrey S

    2016-01-01

    Background Delays in delivering endovascular stroke therapy adversely affect outcomes. Time-sensitive treatments such as stroke interventions benefit from methodically developed protocols. Clearly defined roles in these protocols allow for parallel processing of tasks, resulting in consistent delivery of care. Objective To present the outcomes of a quality-improvement (QI) process directed at reducing stroke treatment times in a tertiary level academic medical center. Methods A Six-Sigma-based QI process was developed over a 3-month period. After an initial analysis, procedures were implemented and fine-tuned to identify and address rate-limiting steps in the endovascular care pathway. Prospectively recorded treatment times were then compared in two groups of patients who were treated ‘before’ (n=64) or ‘after’ (n=30) the QI process. Three time intervals were measured: emergency room (ER) to arrival for CT scan (ER–CT), CT scan to interventional laboratory arrival (CT–Lab), and interventional laboratory arrival to groin puncture (Lab–puncture). Results The ER–CT time was 40 (±29) min in the ‘before’ and 26 (±15) min in the ‘after’ group (p=0.008). The CT–Lab time was 87 (±47) min in the ‘before’ and 51 (±33) min in the ‘after’ group (p=0.0002). The Lab–puncture time was 24 (±11) min in the ‘before’ and 15 (±4) min in the ‘after’ group (p<0.0001). The overall ER–arrival to groin-puncture time was reduced from 2 h, 31 min (±51) min in the ‘before’ to 1 h, 33 min (±37) min in the ‘after’ group, (p<0.0001). The improved times were seen for both working hours and off-hours interventions. Conclusions A protocol-driven process can significantly improve efficiency of care in time-sensitive stroke interventions. PMID:26863106

  9. Retraction: 'Beneficial Effect of Intermittent Cyclical Etidronate Therapy in Hemiplegic Patients Following an Acute Stroke' by Y. Sato, T. Asoh, M. Kaji and K. Oizumi.

    PubMed

    2016-10-01

    The above article, published online on 1 December 2000 in Wiley Online Library (wileyonlinelibrary.com), and in Volume 15, Issue 12, pages 2487-2494, has been retracted by agreement between the authors, the Journal Editor in Chief, Juliet Compston, and Wiley Periodicals, Inc. The retraction has been agreed due to concerns about the underlying data to which the authors have given no satisfactory response. Dr Sato acknowledges that his co-authors are named as such for honorary reasons and are not responsible for the content of the manuscript. Reference Sato, Y., Asoh, T., Kaji, M. and Oizumi, K. (2000) Beneficial Effect of Intermittent Cyclical Etidronate Therapy in Hemiplegic Patients Following an Acute Stroke. J Bone Miner Res, 15:2487-2494. doi: 10.1359/jbmr.2000.15.12.2487.

  10. Platelet lysate and granulocyte-colony stimulating factor serve safe and accelerated expansion of human bone marrow stromal cells for stroke therapy.

    PubMed

    Yamauchi, Tomohiro; Saito, Hisayasu; Ito, Masaki; Shichinohe, Hideo; Houkin, Kiyohiro; Kuroda, Satoshi

    2014-12-01

    Autologous human bone marrow stromal cells (hBMSCs) should be expanded in the animal serum-free condition within clinically relevant periods in order to secure safe and effective cell therapy for ischemic stroke. This study was aimed to assess whether the hBMSCs enhance their proliferation capacity and provide beneficial effect in the infarct brain when cultured with platelet lysate (PL) and granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF). The hBMSCs were cultured in the fetal calf serum (FCS)-, PL-, or PL/G-CSF-containing medium. Cell growth kinetics was analyzed. The hBMSCs-PL, hBMSC-PL/G-CSF, or vehicle was stereotactically transplanted into the ipsilateral striatum of the rats subjected to permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion 7 days after the insult. Motor function was assessed for 8 weeks, and the fate of transplanted hBMSCs was examined using immunohistochemistry. As the results, the hBMSCs-PL/G-CSF showed more enhanced proliferation than the hBMSCs-FCS and hBMSCs-PL. Transplantation of hBMSCs expanded with the PL- or PL/G-CSF-containing medium equally promoted functional recovery compared with the vehicle group. Histological analysis revealed that there were no significant differences in their migration, survival, and neural differentiation in the infarct brain between the hBMSCs-PL and hBMSCs-PL/G-CSF. These findings strongly suggest that the combination of PL and G-CSF may accelerate hBMSC expansion and serve safe cell therapy for patients with ischemic stroke at clinically relevant timing.

  11. Comparing uni-modal and multi-modal therapies for improving writing in acquired dysgraphia after stroke.

    PubMed

    Thiel, Lindsey; Sage, Karen; Conroy, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Writing therapy studies have been predominantly uni-modal in nature; i.e., their central therapy task has typically been either writing to dictation or copying and recalling words. There has not yet been a study that has compared the effects of a uni-modal to a multi-modal writing therapy in terms of improvements to spelling accuracy. A multiple-case study with eight participants aimed to compare the effects of a uni-modal and a multi-modal therapy on the spelling accuracy of treated and untreated target words at immediate and follow-up assessment points. A cross-over design was used and within each therapy a matched set of words was targeted. These words and a matched control set were assessed before as well as immediately after each therapy and six weeks following therapy. The two approaches did not differ in their effects on spelling accuracy of treated or untreated items or degree of maintenance. All participants made significant improvements on treated and control items; however, not all improvements were maintained at follow-up. The findings suggested that multi-modal therapy did not have an advantage over uni-modal therapy for the participants in this study. Performance differences were instead driven by participant variables.

  12. Effects of mild hypothermia therapy on the levels of glutathione in rabbit blood and cerebrospinal fluid after cardiopulmonary resuscitation

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Hui; Chen, Yueliang

    2015-01-01

    Objective(s): The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of mild hypothermia therapy on oxidative stress injury of rabbit brain tissue after cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Materials and Methods: Rabbit models of cardiac arrest were established. After the restoration of spontaneous circulation, 50 rabbits were randomly divided into normothermia and hypothermia groups. The following five time points were selected: before CPR, immediately after CPR, 2 hr after CPR (hypothermia group reached the target temperature), 14 hr after CPR (hypothermia group before rewarming), and 24 hr after CPR (hypothermia group recovered to normal temperature). Glutathione (GSH) concentrations in both the blood and cerebrospinal fluid of the normothermia and hypothermia groups were measured. Results: At 2, 14, and 24 hr after CPR, the GSH concentrations in both the blood and cerebrospinal fluid were significantly higher in the hypothermia group than in the nomorthermia group. Conclusion: Mild hypothermia therapy may increase GSH concentrations in rabbit blood and cerebrospinal fluid after CPR as well as promote the recovery of cerebral function. PMID:25810895

  13. Advances in prevention and therapy of neonatal dairy calf diarrhoea: a systematical review with emphasis on colostrum management and fluid therapy.

    PubMed

    Meganck, Vanessa; Hoflack, Geert; Opsomer, Geert

    2014-11-25

    Neonatal calf diarrhoea remains the most common cause of morbidity and mortality in preweaned dairy calves worldwide. This complex disease can be triggered by both infectious and non-infectious causes. The four most important enteropathogens leading to neonatal dairy calf diarrhoea are Escherichia coli, rota- and coronavirus, and Cryptosporidium parvum. Besides treating diarrhoeic neonatal dairy calves, the veterinarian is the most obvious person to advise the dairy farmer on prevention and treatment of this disease. This review deals with prevention and treatment of neonatal dairy calf diarrhoea focusing on the importance of a good colostrum management and a correct fluid therapy.

  14. Prevention and management of stroke in women.

    PubMed

    Howe, Matthew D; McCullough, Louise D

    2015-04-01

    Stroke is the leading cause of acquired disability and the third leading cause of death in women worldwide. Sex differences in risk factors, treatment response and quality of life after stroke complicate stroke management in women. Women have an increased lifetime incidence of stroke compared to men, largely due to a sharp increase in stroke risk in older postmenopausal women. Women also have an increased lifetime prevalence of stroke risk factors, including hypertension and atrial fibrillation in postmenopausal women, as well as abdominal obesity and metabolic syndrome in middle-aged women. Controversy continues over the risks of oral contraceptives, hormone therapy and surgical intervention for carotid stenosis in women. Pregnancy and the postpartum period represent a time of increased risk, presenting challenges to stroke management. Recognition of these issues is critical to improving acute care and functional recovery after stroke in women.

  15. In-flight demonstration of the Space Station Freedom Health Maintenance Facility fluid therapy system (E300/E05)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lloyd, Charles W.

    1993-01-01

    The Space Station Freedom (SSF) Health Maintenance Facility (HMF) will provide medical care for crew members for up to 10 days. An integral part of the required medical care consists of providing intravenous infusion of fluids, electrolyte solutions, and nutrients to sustain an ill or injured crew member. In terrestrial health care facilities, intravenous solutions are normally stored in large quantities. However, due to the station's weight and volume constraints, an adequate supply of the required solutions cannot be carried onboard SSF. By formulating medical fluids onboard from concentrates and station water as needed, the Fluid Therapy System (FTS) eliminates weight and volume concerns regarding intravenous fluids. The first full-system demonstration of FTS is continuous microgravity will be conducted in Spacelab-Japan (SL-J). The FTS evaluation consists of two functional objectives and an in-flight demonstration of intravenous administration of fluids. The first is to make and store sterile water and IV solutions onboard the spacecraft. If intravenous fluids are to be produced in SSF, successful sterilization of water and reconstituting of IV solutions must be achieved. The second objective is to repeat the verification of the FTS infusion pump, which had been performed in Spacelab Life Sciences - 1 (SLS-1). during SLS-1, the FTS IV pump was operated in continuous microgravity for the first time. The pump functioned successfully, and valuable knowledge on its performance in continuous microgravity was obtained. Finally, the technique of starting an IF in microgravity will be demonstrated. The IV technique requires modifications in microgravity, such as use of restraints for equipment and crew members involved.

  16. Stroke Rehabilitation

    MedlinePlus

    ... how to subscribe to the Stroke Connection Magazine. Community Resources Home health services, available from the Visiting Nurses Association, public health departments, hospital home care departments ...

  17. Atherosclerosis and Stroke

    MedlinePlus

    ... After Stroke Inspirational Stories Stroke Heroes Among Us Atherosclerosis and Stroke Updated:Oct 24,2016 Excerpted and ... cause difficulty walking and eventually gangrene. Stroke and atherosclerosis There are two types of ischemic stroke caused ...

  18. Functional Improvement after Photothrombotic Stroke in Rats Is Associated with Different Patterns of Dendritic Plasticity after G-CSF Treatment and G-CSF Treatment Combined with Concomitant or Sequential Constraint-Induced Movement Therapy.

    PubMed

    Frauenknecht, Katrin; Diederich, Kai; Leukel, Petra; Bauer, Henrike; Schäbitz, Wolf-Rüdiger; Sommer, Clemens J; Minnerup, Jens

    2016-01-01

    We have previously shown that granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) treatment alone, or in combination with constraint movement therapy (CIMT) either sequentially or concomitantly, results in significantly improved sensorimotor recovery after photothrombotic stroke in rats in comparison to untreated control animals. CIMT alone did not result in any significant differences compared to the control group (Diederich et al., Stroke, 2012;43:185-192). Using a subset of rat brains from this former experiment the present study was designed to evaluate whether dendritic plasticity would parallel improved functional outcomes. Five treatment groups were analyzed (n = 6 each) (i) ischemic control (saline); (ii) CIMT (CIMT between post-stroke days 2 and 11); (iii) G-CSF (10 μg/kg G-CSF daily between post-stroke days 2 and 11); (iv) combined concurrent group (CIMT plus G-CSF) and (v) combined sequential group (CIMT between post-stroke days 2 and 11; 10 μg/kg G-CSF daily between post-stroke days 12 and 21, respectively). After impregnation of rat brains with a modified Golgi-Cox protocol layer V pyramidal neurons in the peri-infarct cortex as well as the corresponding contralateral cortex were analyzed. Surprisingly, animals with a similar degree of behavioral recovery exhibited quite different patterns of dendritic plasticity in both peri-lesional and contralesional areas. The cause for these patterns is not easily to explain but puts the simple assumption that increased dendritic complexity after stroke necessarily results in increased functional outcome into perspective.

  19. Effects of exercise therapy on knee joint function and synovial fluid cytokine levels in patients with knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shao-Lan; Liu, Hong-Qi; Xu, Xiao-Zu; Zhi, Juan; Geng, Jiao-Jiao; Chen, Jin

    2013-01-01

    The aims of this study were to observe the effect of exercise therapy on the function of the knee joint and the levels of cytokines and cytokine-related genes, specifically tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) and matrix metalloproteinase-3 (MMP-3), in the synovial joints of patients with knee osteoarthritis (KOA) and to explore its mechanism of action. A total of 100 KOA patients were divided into a treatment group (n=50) and a control group (n=50) according to the order of admission. The patients in the treatment group were treated with diclofenac sodium combined with exercise therapy and the patients in the control group were treated with diclofenac sodium only. The function of the knee joint and the therapeutic efficacy was evaluated and the TNF-α, hs-CRP and MMP-3 levels in the synovial fluid were measured following 4 weeks of treatment. The results revealed that the knee joint index score and the TNF-α, hs-CRP and MMP-3 levels in the synovial fluid decreased significantly in the KOA patients of the two groups following treatment (P<0.05). Compared with the control group, the knee joint index score and the TNF-α, hs-CRP and MMP-3 levels in the synovial joints were lower and the therapeutic efficacy was increased in the patients of the treatment group (P<0.05). In brief, exercise therapy may decrease cytokine and cytokine-related gene levels in the synovial fluid and inhibit inflammatory factor-mediated cartilage degradation in KOA patients, thus, effectively improving the clinical symptoms of KOA.

  20. Evaluation of Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy in the Treatment of Spinal Cord Injury Using the Rabbit Spinal Stroke Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-11-30

    Oxygen Therapy, Springer- Verlag, 1988 2. Peirce , E.C., Jacobson C.H., "Cerebral Edema" in Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy, Eds: Davis, J.C., Hunt, T.K., pp. 287...al. (eds.) Fifth International Hyperbaric Congress (Proceedings), Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, B.C., Canada, pp. 350 - 361, 1974 14.Marsala, M...consistant with the theory that ischemia- reperfusion is accompanied by oxygen free-radical production in the CNS and that the vasculature is a target for free

  1. Recanalization and Reperfusion Therapies of Acute Ischemic Stroke: What have We Learned, What are the Major Research Questions, and Where are We Headed?

    PubMed Central

    Gomis, Meritxell; Dávalos, Antoni

    2014-01-01

    Two placebo-controlled trials have shown that early administration of intravenous recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rt-PA) after ischemic stroke improves outcomes up to 4.5 h after symptoms onset; however, six other trials contradict these results. We also know from analysis of the pooled data that benefits from treatment decrease as time from stroke onset to start of treatment increases. In addition to time, another important factor is patient selection through multimodal imaging, combining data from artery status, and salvageable tissue measures. Nonetheless, at the present time randomized controlled trials (RCTs) cannot demonstrate any beneficial outcomes for neuroimaging mismatch selection after 4.5 h from symptoms onset. By focusing on cases of large arterial occlusion, we know that recanalization is crucial, so endovascular treatment is an approach of interest. The use of intra-arterial thrombolysis was tested in two small RCTs that demonstrated clear benefits in terms of higher recanalization and also in clinical outcomes. But a new paradigm of stroke treatment may have begun with mechanical thrombectomy. In this field, Merci devices have been overtaken by fully deployed closed-cell self-expanding stents (stent-retrievers or “stent-trievers”). However, despite the high rate of recanalization achieved with stent-retrievers compared with other recanalization treatments, the use of these devices cannot clearly demonstrate better outcomes. Thus, futile recanalization occurs when successful recanalization fails to improve functional outcome. Recently, three RCTs, namely synthesis, IMS-III, and MR-rescue, have not been demonstrated any clear benefit for endovascular treatment. Most likely, these trials were not adequately designed to prove the superiority of endovascular treatment because they did not use optimal target populations, vascular status was not evaluated in all patients, relatively high rates of patients did not have enough mismatch

  2. Effects of low-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation combined with intensive speech therapy on cerebral blood flow in post-stroke aphasia.

    PubMed

    Hara, Takatoshi; Abo, Masahiro; Kobayashi, Kentaro; Watanabe, Motoi; Kakuda, Wataru; Senoo, Atushi

    2015-10-01

    We provided an intervention to chronic post-stroke aphasic patients using low-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (LF-rTMS) guided by a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) evaluation of language laterality, combined with intensive speech therapy (ST). We performed a single photon emission-computed tomography (SPECT) scan pre- and post-intervention and investigated the relationship between cerebral blood flow (CBF) and language function. Fifty right-handed chronic post-stroke aphasic patients were enrolled in the study. During their 11-day hospital admission, the patients received a 40-min session of 1-Hz LF-rTMS on the left or right hemisphere, according to language localization identified by the fMRI evaluation, and intensive ST daily for 10 days, except for Sunday. A SPECT scan and language evaluation by the Standard Language Test of Aphasia (SLTA) were performed at the time of admission and at 3 months following discharge. We calculated laterality indices (LIs) of regional CBF (rCBF) in 13 language-related Brodmann area (BA) regions of interest. In patients who received LF-rTMS to the intact right hemisphere (RH-LF-rTMS), the improvement in the total SLTA score was significantly correlated with the pre- and post-intervention change of LI (ΔLI) in BA44. In patients who received LF-rTMS to the lesional left hemisphere (LH-LF-rTMS), this association was not observed. Analyses of the SLTA subscales and rCBF ΔLI demonstrated that in the RH-LF-rTMS group, the SLTA Speaking subscale scores were significantly correlated with ΔLIs in BA11, 20, and 21, and the SLTA Writing subscale scores were significantly correlated with ΔLIs in BA6 and 39. Conversely, in the LH-LF-rTMS group, the SLTA Speaking subscale scores were correlated with ΔLI in BA10, and the SLTA Reading subscale scores were significantly correlated with ΔLIs in BA13, 20, 22, and 44. Our results suggest the possibility that fMRI-guided LF-rTMS combined with intensive ST may

  3. Constraint-Induced Movement Therapy for Severe Upper-Extremity Impairment after Stroke in an Outpatient Rehabilitation Setting: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Shears, Jennifer; Hutchings, Lisa; Osmond, Michelle

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: Laboratory studies confirm that constraint-induced movement therapy (CIMT) improves upper-extremity (UE) function after stroke. Due to strict patient criteria and the intensive resources required, CIMT has been slow to become part of rehabilitation practice. Our purpose was to determine the feasibility and effectiveness of an adapted experimental protocol within an outpatient clinical setting for a patient with moderate to severe UE impairment who did not meet traditional CIMT criteria. Patient Description: AJ, a 16-year-old male, experienced a left middle cerebral artery ischemic stroke due to carotid artery dissection one year before beginning CIMT. He demonstrated some proximal movement but no wrist or finger extension. He had received intensive rehabilitation for 12 months prior to beginning CIMT. Intervention: Two occupational therapists and two physiotherapists collaborated to provide CIMT task training for 6 hours daily for 2 weeks. A knitted mitten extending to the elbow restrained the less-involved UE during 90% of waking hours. Tasks were tailored to AJ's interests, with the goal of integrating his affected UE into his behavioural repertoire. Measures and Outcomes: After 2 weeks of CIMT, AJ improved in all measures (grip and lateral pinch strength, Action Research Arm Test [ARAT], and Box and Block Test) except the Chedoke McMaster Impairment Inventory. Greatest gains were seen at 6 months in the ARAT and Box and Block Test, which coincided with patient and family reports of AJ's using his arm in everyday functional tasks. Implications: Shared workload, emphasis on relevant functional tasks, and complete family participation likely influenced the success of CIMT. Our findings suggest that the strict CIMT criteria used in previous studies may exclude patients who might benefit from the treatment. Controlled trials should be undertaken to examine the effects of CIMT in patients with moderate to severe UE impairment. PMID:20145779

  4. Influences of hand dominance on the maintenance of benefits after home-based modified constraint-induced movement therapy in individuals with stroke.

    PubMed

    Lima, Renata C M; Nascimento, Lucas R; Michaelsen, Stella M; Polese, Janaine C; Pereira, Natália D; Teixeira-Salmela, Luci F

    2014-08-29

    Objective: To investigate the influence of hand dominance on the maintenance of gains after home-based modified constraint-induced movement therapy (mCIMT). Method: Aprevious randomized controlled trial was conducted to examine the addition of trunk restraint to the mCIMT. Twenty-two chronic stroke survivors with mild to moderate motor impairments received individual home-based mCIMT with or without trunk restraints, five times per week, three hours daily over two weeks. In this study, the participants were separated into dominant group, which had their paretic upper limb as dominant before the stroke (n=8), and non-dominant group (n=14) for analyses. The ability to perform unimanual tasks was measured by the Wolf Motor Function Test (WMFT) and the Motor Activity Log (MAL), whereas the capacity to perform bimanual tasks was measured using the Bilateral Activity Assessment Scale (BAAS). Results: Analysis revealed significant positive effects on the MAL amount of use and quality of the movement scales, as well as on the BAAS scores after intervention, with no differences between groups. Both groups maintained the bimanual improvements during follow-ups (BAAS-seconds 0.1, 95% CI -10.0 to 10.0), however only the dominant group maintained the unilateral improvements (MAL-amount of use: 1.5, 95% CI 0.7 to 2.3; MAL-quality: 1.3, 95% CI 0.5 to 2.1). Conclusions: Upper limb dominance did not interfere with the acquisition of upper limb skills after mCIMT. However, the participants whose paretic upper limb was dominant demonstrated better abilities to maintain the unilateral gains. The bilateral improvements were maintained, regardless of upper limb dominance.

  5. Influences of hand dominance on the maintenance of benefits after home-based modified constraint-induced movement therapy in individuals with stroke

    PubMed Central

    Lima, Renata C. M.; Nascimento, Lucas R.; Michaelsen, Stella M.; Polese, Janaine C.; Pereira, Natália D.; Teixeira-Salmela, Luci F.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the influence of hand dominance on the maintenance of gains after home-based modified constraint-induced movement therapy (mCIMT). Method: Aprevious randomized controlled trial was conducted to examine the addition of trunk restraint to the mCIMT. Twenty-two chronic stroke survivors with mild to moderate motor impairments received individual home-based mCIMT with or without trunk restraints, five times per week, three hours daily over two weeks. In this study, the participants were separated into dominant group, which had their paretic upper limb as dominant before the stroke (n=8), and non-dominant group (n=14) for analyses. The ability to perform unimanual tasks was measured by the Wolf Motor Function Test (WMFT) and the Motor Activity Log (MAL), whereas the capacity to perform bimanual tasks was measured using the Bilateral Activity Assessment Scale (BAAS). Results: Analysis revealed significant positive effects on the MAL amount of use and quality of the movement scales, as well as on the BAAS scores after intervention, with no differences between groups. Both groups maintained the bimanual improvements during follow-ups (BAAS-seconds 0.1, 95% CI -10.0 to 10.0), however only the dominant group maintained the unilateral improvements (MAL-amount of use: 1.5, 95% CI 0.7 to 2.3; MAL-quality: 1.3, 95% CI 0.5 to 2.1). Conclusions: Upper limb dominance did not interfere with the acquisition of upper limb skills after mCIMT. However, the participants whose paretic upper limb was dominant demonstrated better abilities to maintain the unilateral gains. The bilateral improvements were maintained, regardless of upper limb dominance. PMID:25372006

  6. The addition of functional task-oriented mental practice to conventional physical therapy improves motor skills in daily functions after stroke*

    PubMed Central

    Santos-Couto-Paz, Clarissa C.; Teixeira-Salmela, Luci F.; Tierra-Criollo, Carlos J.

    2013-01-01

    Background Mental practice (MP) is a cognitive strategy which may improve the acquisition of motor skills and functional performance of athletes and individuals with neurological injuries. Objective To determine whether an individualized, specific functional task-oriented MP, when added to conventional physical therapy (PT), promoted better learning of motor skills in daily functions in individuals with chronic stroke (13±6.5 months post-stroke). Method Nine individuals with stable mild and moderate upper limb impairments participated, by employing an A1-B-A2 single-case design. Phases A1 and A2 included one month of conventional PT, and phase B the addition of MP training to PT. The motor activity log (MAL-Brazil) was used to assess the amount of use (AOU) and quality of movement (QOM) of the paretic upper limb; the revised motor imagery questionnaire (MIQ-RS) to assess the abilities in kinesthetic and visual motor imagery; the Minnesota manual dexterity test to assess manual dexterity; and gait speed to assess mobility. Results After phase A1, no significant changes were observed for any of the outcome measures. However, after phase B, significant improvements were observed for the MAL, AOU and QOM scores (p<0.0001), and MIQ-RS kinesthetic and visual scores (p=0.003; p=0.007, respectively). The significant gains in manual dexterity (p=0.002) and gait speed (p=0.019) were maintained after phase A2. Conclusions Specific functional task-oriented MP, when added to conventional PT, led to improvements in motor imagery abilities combined with increases in the AOU and QOM in daily functions, manual dexterity, and gait speed. PMID:24271094

  7. Biotherapies in stroke.

    PubMed

    Detante, O; Jaillard, A; Moisan, A; Barbieux, M; Favre, I M; Garambois, K; Hommel, M; Remy, C

    2014-12-01

    Stroke is the second leading cause of death worldwide and the most common cause of severe disability. Neuroprotection and repair mechanisms supporting endogenous brain plasticity are often insufficient to allow complete recovery. While numerous neuroprotective drugs trials have failed to demonstrate benefits for patients, they have provided interesting translational research lessons related to neurorestorative therapy mechanisms in stroke. Stroke damage is not limited to neurons but involve all brain cell type including the extracellular matrix in a "glio-neurovascular niche". Targeting a range of host brain cells, biotherapies such as growth factors and therapeutic cells, currently hold great promise as a regenerative medical strategy for stroke. These techniques can promote both neuroprotection and delayed neural repair through neuro-synaptogenesis, angiogenesis, oligodendrogliogenesis, axonal sprouting and immunomodulatory effects. Their complex mechanisms of action are interdependent and vary according to the particular growth factor or grafted cell type. For example, while "peripheral" stem or stromal cells can provide paracrine trophic support, neural stem/progenitor cells (NSC) or mature neurons can act as more direct neural replacements. With a wide therapeutic time window after stroke, biotherapies could be used to treat many patients. However, guidelines for selecting the optimal time window, and the best delivery routes and doses are still debated and the answers may depend on the chosen product and its expected mechanism including early neuroprotection, delayed neural repair, trophic systemic transient effects or graft survival and integration. Currently, the great variety of growth factors, cell sources and cell therapy products form a therapeutic arsenal that is available for stroke treatment. Their effective clinical use will require prior careful considerations regarding safety (e.g. tumorgenicity, immunogenicity), potential efficacy, cell

  8. Intravenous Fluid Therapy Course for the Licensed Practical Nurse. Instructor Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Missouri Univ., Columbia. Instructional Materials Lab.

    This curriculum guide provides materials for a 10-unit intravenous (IV) therapy course for licensed practical nurses. Units contain from one to nine lessons. The first unit provides an introduction and orientation to the course. Subsequent units concern documentation, anatomy and physiology as applied to IV therapy, fundamental aspects of fluid…

  9. Clinical Neuroprotective Drugs for Treatment and Prevention of Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Kikuchi, Kiyoshi; Uchikado, Hisaaki; Morioka, Motohiro; Murai, Yoshinaka; Tanaka, Eiichiro

    2012-01-01

    Stroke is an enormous public health problem with an imperative need for more effective therapies. In therapies for ischemic stroke, tissue plasminogen activators, antiplatelet agents and anticoagulants are used mainly for their antithrombotic effects. However, free radical scavengers, minocycline and growth factors have shown neuroprotective effects in the treatment of stroke, while antihypertensive drugs, lipid-lowering drugs and hypoglycemic drugs have shown beneficial effects for the prevention of stroke. In the present review, we evaluate the treatment and prevention of stroke in light of clinical studies and discuss new anti-stroke effects other than the main effects of drugs, focusing on optimal pharmacotherapy. PMID:22837724

  10. Fetal stroke.

    PubMed

    Ozduman, Koray; Pober, Barbara R; Barnes, Patrick; Copel, Joshua A; Ogle, Eileen A; Duncan, Charles C; Ment, Laura R

    2004-03-01

    Fetal stroke, or that which occurs between 14 weeks of gestation and the onset of labor resulting in delivery, has been associated with postnatal epilepsy, mental retardation, and cerebral palsy. The entity is caused by antenatal ischemic, thrombotic, or hemorrhagic injury. We present seven new cases of fetal stroke diagnosed in utero and review the 47 cases reported in the literature. Although risk factors could not be assigned to 50% of the fetuses with stroke, the most common maternal conditions associated with fetal stroke were alloimmune thrombocytopenia and trauma. Magnetic resonance imaging was optimal for identifying fetal stroke, and prenatal imaging revealed hemorrhagic lesions in over 90% of studies; porencephalies were identified in just 13%. Seventy-eight percent of cases with reported outcome resulted in either death or adverse neurodevelopmental outcome at ages 3 months to 6 years. Fetal stroke appears to have different risk factors, clinical characteristics, and outcomes than other perinatal or childhood stroke syndromes. A better understanding of those risk factors predisposing a fetus to cerebral infarction may provide a basis for future therapeutic intervention trials. Ozduman K, Pober BR, Barnes P, Copel JA, Ogle EA, Duncan CC, Ment LR. Fetal stroke.

  11. Fluid therapy in uncontrolled hemorrhage--what experimental models have taught us.

    PubMed

    Hahn, R G

    2013-01-01

    Intravenous fluid is life-saving in hypovolemic shock, but fluid sometimes aggravates the bleeding. During the past 25 years, animal models have helped our understanding of the mechanisms involved in this unexpected effect. A key issue is that vasoconstriction is insufficient to arrest the bleeding when damage is made to a major blood vessel. 'Uncontrolled hemorrhage' is rather stopped by a blood clot formed at the outside surface of the vessel, and the immature clot is sensitive to mechanical and chemical interactions. The mortality increases if rebleeding occurs. In the aortic tear model in swine, hemorrhage volume and the mortality increase from effective restoration of the arterial pressure. The mortality vs. amount of fluid curve is U-shaped with higher mortality at either end. Without any fluid at all, irreversible shock causes death provided the hemorrhage is sufficiently large. Crystalloid fluid administered in a 3 : 1 proportion to the amount of lost blood initiates serious rebleeding. Hypertonic saline 7.5% in 6% dextran 70 (HSD) also provokes rebleeding resulting in higher mortality in the recommended dosage of 4 ml/kg. Uncontrolled hemorrhage models in rats, except for the 'cut-tail' model, confirm the results from swine. To avoid rebleeding, fluid programs should not aim to fully restore the arterial pressure, blood flow rates, or blood volume. For a hemorrhage of 1000 ml, computer simulations show that deliberate hypovolemia (-300 ml) would be achieved by infusing 600-750 ml crystalloid fluid over 20-30 min or 100 ml of HSD over 10-20 min in an adult male.

  12. Controversies in Cardioembolic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Wessler, Benjamin S.; Kent, David M

    2015-01-01

    Opinion statement Cardioembolic (CE) stroke mechanisms account for a significant number of ischemic strokes however the true burden is likely underestimated. It is critically important to identify patients with CE strokes since these individuals have high recurrence rates and represent a subgroup of patients who may benefit from targeted therapy in the form of anticoagulation or device based treatments. Current guidelines offer recommendations for diagnosis and treatment of these patients however important questions remain. Appropriate cardiac testing in the setting of CE must be individualized and the optimal duration of electrocardiographic monitoring to rule out atrial fibrillation (AF) is unclear. So too, risk stratification tools for AF remain understudied and there is controversy about which anticoagulant agents are most appropriate. Lastly, important potential CE sources of stroke such as PFO have garnered significant attention recently and debate regarding how to treat these patients remains. In this review we discuss some of the important controversies in diagnosing and treating patients with possible CE stroke, pointing to areas where future research might be particularly valuable. PMID:25398426

  13. Ischemic Stroke.

    PubMed

    Capriotti, Teri; Murphy, Teresa

    2016-05-01

    Each year, more than 795,000 people in the United States suffer a stroke and by 2030, it is estimated that 4% of the U.S. population will have had a stroke. Home healthcare clinicians will be increasingly called upon to assist stroke survivors and their caregivers adjust to disability and assist the survivor during their reintegration into the community. Therapeutic modalities are changing with advanced technology. Great strides are being made in the treatment of acute stroke; particularly endovascular interventions. More patients are surviving the acute stroke event and therefore will need to learn how to live with various degrees of disability. It is important for home healthcare clinicians to understand the process from acute event to medical stabilization, and from rehabilitation to long-term adaptation.

  14. Collaborative overview of randomised trials of antiplatelet therapy--I: Prevention of death, myocardial infarction, and stroke by prolonged antiplatelet therapy in various categories of patients. Antiplatelet Trialists' Collaboration.

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To determine the effects of "prolonged" antiplatelet therapy (that is, given for one month or more) on "vascular events" (non-fatal myocardial infarctions, non-fatal strokes, or vascular deaths) in various categories of patients. DESIGN--Overviews of 145 randomised trials of "prolonged" antiplatelet therapy versus control and 29 randomised comparisons between such antiplatelet regimens. SETTING--Randomised trials that could have been available by March 1990. SUBJECTS--Trials of antiplatelet therapy versus control included about 70,000 "high risk" patients (that is, with some vascular disease or other condition implying an increased risk of occlusive vascular disease) and 30,000 "low risk" subjects from the general population. Direct comparisons of different antiplatelet regimens involved about 10,000 high risk patients. RESULTS--In each of four main high risk categories of patients antiplatelet therapy was definitely protective. The percentages of patients suffering a vascular event among those allocated antiplatelet therapy versus appropriately adjusted control percentages (and mean scheduled treatment durations and net absolute benefits) were: (a) among about 20,000 patients with acute myocardial infarction, 10% antiplatelet therapy v 14% control (one month benefit about 40 vascular events avoided per 1000 patients treated (2P < 0.00001)); (b) among about 20,000 patients with a past history of myocardial infarction, 13% antiplatelet therapy v 17% control (two year benefit about 40/1000 (2P < 0.00001)); (c) among about 10,000 patients with a past history of stroke or transient ischaemic attack, 18% antiplatelet therapy v 22% control (three year benefit about 40/1000 (2P < 0.00001)); (d) among about 20,000 patients with some other relevant medical history (unstable angina, stable angina, vascular surgery, angioplasty, atrial fibrillation, valvular disease, peripheral vascular disease, etc), 9% v 14% in 4000 patients with unstable angina (six month

  15. The Effect of Photodynamic Therapy and Diode Laser as Adjunctive Periodontal Therapy on the Inflammatory Mediators Levels in Gingival Crevicular Fluid and Clinical Periodontal Status

    PubMed Central

    Teymouri, Faraz; Farhad, Shirin Zahra; Golestaneh, Hedayatollah

    2016-01-01

    Statement of the Problem The presence of bacterial biofilms is the major cause of gingivitis and periodontitis, their mechanical removal is not often enough. Therefore, laser therapy and photodynamic therapy can be effective as adjunctive treatment. Purpose This study aimed to evaluate the impact of these treatments on the level of gingival crevicular fluid (GCF), inflammatory mediators, and periodontal clinical status. Materials and Method In this clinical trial, three quadrants were studied in 12 patients with chronic periodontitis aged 30-60 years. The clinical parameters were recorded and GCF samples were taken. After the first phase of periodontal treatment, one of the three quadrants was determined as the control group, one was treated by diode laser, and one underwent photodynamic therapy. The clinical parameters were recorded 2 and 6 weeks later. The data were statistically analyzed by using Friedman, ANOVA, and LSD post-test. Results Significant reduction was observed over time in the level of Interleukin-1β (IL-1β), Interleukin-17 (IL-17), clinical attachment loss, and pocket depth in the three treatment groups (p< 0.000). The three treatment methods significantly reduced the IL-1β and IL-17 at the baseline, up to 2 weeks, and 2-6 weeks (p< 0.05). Diode laser and photodynamic therapy significantly decreased the average bleeding on probing over time (p< 0.000 and p< 0.002, respectively). Conclusion Laser and photodynamic therapy reduced the inflammatory mediators (IL-1β and IL-17) and improved the clinical symptoms. PMID:27602399

  16. Fluid sampling pump

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, P.V.; Nimberger, M.; Ward, R.L.

    1991-12-24

    This patent describes a fluid sampling pump for withdrawing pressurized sample fluid from a flow line and for pumping a preselected quantity of sample fluid with each pump driving stroke from the pump to a sample vessel, the sampling pump including a pump body defining a pump bore therein having a central axis, a piston slideably moveable within the pump bore and having a fluid inlet end and an opposing operator end, a fluid sample inlet port open to sample fluid in the flow line, a fluid sample outlet port for transmitting fluid from the pump bore to the sample vessel, and a line pressure port in fluid pressure sample fluid in the flow line, an inlet valve for selectively controlling sample fluid flow from the flow line through the fluid sample inlet port, an operator unit for periodically reciprocating the piston within the pump bore, and a controller for regulating the stroke of the piston within the pump bore, and thereby the quantity of fluid pumped with each pump driving stroke. It comprises a balanced check valve seat; a balanced check valve seal; a compression member; and a central plunger.

  17. Multimodal physical therapy management of a 48-year-old female with post-stroke complex regional pain syndrome.

    PubMed

    Anandkumar, Sudarshan; Manivasagam, Murugavel

    2014-01-01

    This case report describes a 48-year-old female who presented with complaints of right shoulder pain, hyperesthesias and swelling of the hand along with added symptoms of pain centralization following a cerebrovascular accident. On clinical evaluation, the patient satisfied the Budapest diagnostic criteria for Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS) type-1. Physical therapy management (1st three sessions) was initially focused on pain neurophysiology education with an aim to reduce kinesiophobia and reconceptualise her pain perception. The patient had an immediate significant improvement in her pain and functional status. Following this, pain modulation in the form of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation, kinesio tape application, "pain exposure" physical therapy and exercise therapy was carried out for a period of 7 weeks. The patient had complete resolution of her symptoms which was maintained at a six-month follow-up.

  18. Stroke rehabilitation: an international perspective.

    PubMed

    Teasell, Robert; Meyer, Matthew J; McClure, Andrew; Pan, Cheng; Murie-Fernandez, Manuel; Foley, Norine; Salter, Katherine

    2009-01-01

    There is a revolution underway in stroke rehabilitation. International comparative studies coupled with an impressive evidence base have provided a platform from which an ideal system for stroke rehabilitation can be envisioned. Using the concepts of structure and process of care, different systems of stroke rehabilitation can be compared and evaluated against best evidence. Two structures of care are examined: specialized interdisciplinary stroke rehabilitation units and outpatient programs. Although specialized interdisciplinary stroke rehabilitation units remain the "gold standard" of care, access to them is often limited. Outpatient programs are essential to stroke rehabilitation systems of care; however, while some countries are investing in outpatient programs, others are scaling back. Even though structures of care have been shown to affect processes of care, it is the processes of care that have proven to be more influential in altering patient outcomes. Four key processes of care are examined: time to admission, intensity of therapy, task-specific therapy, and discharge planning. Within international stroke rehabilitation systems, differences in these processes have resulted in significant differences in outcomes. This allows for "real-world" comparisons of how differing processes affect patient outcomes. Those systems whose structures and processes of care best reflect current best evidence appear to achieve better outcomes.

  19. Stroke Rehabilitation using Virtual Environments

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Michael J.; Knutson, Jayme; Chae, John

    2015-01-01

    Synopsis This review covers the rationale, mechanisms, and availability of commercially available virtual environment-based interventions for stroke rehabilitation. It describes interventions for motor, speech, cognitive, and sensory dysfunction. Also discussed are the important features and mechanisms that allow virtual environments to facilitate motor relearning. A common challenge facing the field is inability to translate success in small trials to efficacy in larger populations. The heterogeneity of stroke pathophysiology has been blamed and experts advocate for the study of multimodal approaches. Therefore, this article also introduces a framework to help define new therapy combinations that may be necessary to address stroke heterogeneity. PMID:26522910

  20. How a Stroke Is Diagnosed

    MedlinePlus

    ... News About Neurology Image Library Search The Internet Stroke Center Patients & Families About Stroke Stroke Diagnosis Stroke ... Diagnosis » How a Stroke is Diagnosed How a Stroke is Diagnosed How a Stroke is Diagnosed Lab ...

  1. Vascular remodeling after ischemic stroke: mechanisms and therapeutic potentials

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jialing; Wang, Yongting; Akamatsu, Yosuke; Lee, Chih Cheng; Stetler, R Anne; Lawton, Michael T.; Yang, Guo-Yuan

    2014-01-01

    The brain vasculature has been increasingly recognized as a key player that directs brain development, regulates homeostasis, and contributes to pathological processes. Following ischemic stroke, the reduction of blood flow elicits a cascade of changes and leads to vascular remodeling. However, the temporal profile of vascular changes after stroke is not well understood. Growing evidence suggests that the early phase of cerebral blood volume (CBV) increase is likely due to the improvement in collateral flow, also known as arteriogenesis, whereas the late phase of CBV increase is attributed to the surge of angiogenesis. Arteriogenesis is triggered by shear fluid stress followed by activation of endothelium and inflammatory processes, while angiogenesis induces a number of pro-angiogenic factors and circulating endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs). The status of collaterals in acute stroke has been shown to have several prognostic implications, while the causal relationship between angiogenesis and improved functional recovery has yet to be established in patients. A number of interventions aimed at enhancing cerebral blood flow including increasing collateral recruitment are under clinical investigation. Transplantation of EPCs to improve angiogenesis is also underway. Knowledge in the underlying physiological mechanisms for improved arteriogenesis and angiogenesis shall lead to more effective therapies for ischemic stroke. PMID:24291532

  2. Stroke management

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Stroke is the third most common cause of death in most developed countries. It is a worldwide problem; about 4.5 million people die from stroke each year. Stroke can occur at any age, but half of all strokes occur in people aged over 70 years. About 80% of all acute strokes are ischaemic, usually resulting from thrombotic or embolic occlusion of a cerebral artery. The remainder are caused either by intracerebral or subarachnoid haemorrhage. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of specialised care in people with acute stroke? What are the effects of medical treatment in people with acute ischaemic stroke? What are the effects of decompressive hemicraniectomy in acute ischaemic stroke? What are the effects of surgical evacuation for intracerebral haematomas? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to August 2010 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically, please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 41 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: acute reduction in blood pressure, aspirin, evacuation (early surgical evacuation, or conservative treatment), decompressive hemicraniectomy, neuroprotective agents (calcium channel blockers, citicoline, gamma-aminobutyric acid agonists, glycine antagonists, lubeluzole, magnesium, N-methyl-D-aspartate antagonists), specialised stroke care, systemic anticoagulation (heparinoids, specific thrombin inhibitors

  3. What to do With Wake-Up Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Barrett, Kevin M.

    2015-01-01

    Wake-up stroke, defined as the situation where a patient awakens with stroke symptoms that were not present prior to falling asleep, represents roughly 1 in 5 acute ischemic strokes and remains a therapeutic dilemma. Patients with wake-up stroke were excluded from most ischemic stroke treatment trials and are often not eligible for acute reperfusion therapy in clinical practice, leading to poor outcomes. Studies of neuroimaging with standard noncontrast computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and multimodal perfusion-based CT and MRI suggest wake-up stroke may occur shortly before awakening and may assist in selecting patients for acute reperfusion therapies. Pilot studies of wake-up stroke treatment based on these neuroimaging features are promising but have limited generalizability. Ongoing randomized treatment trials using neuroimaging-based patient selection may identify a subset of patients with wake-up stroke that can safely benefit from acute reperfusion therapies. PMID:26288674

  4. Fifty years of stroke researches in India

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Tapas Kumar; Das, Shyamal Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Currently, the stroke incidence in India is much higher than Western industrialized countries. Large vessel intracranial atherosclerosis is the commonest cause of ischemic stroke in India. The common risk factors, that is, hypertension, diabetes, smoking, and dyslipidemia are quite prevalent and inadequately controlled; mainly because of poor public awareness and inadequate infrastructure. Only a small number of ischemic stroke cases are able to have the benefit of thrombolytic therapy. Benefits from stem cell therapy in established stroke cases are under evaluation. Presently, prevention of stroke is the best option considering the Indian scenario through control and/or avoiding risk factors of stroke. Interventional studies are an important need for this scenario. PMID:27011621

  5. Danger signals in stroke.

    PubMed

    Gelderblom, Mathias; Sobey, Christopher G; Kleinschnitz, Christoph; Magnus, Tim

    2015-11-01

    Danger molecules are the first signals released from dying tissue after stroke. These danger signals bind to receptors on immune cells that will result in their activation and the release of inflammatory and neurotoxic mediators, resulting in amplification of the immune response and subsequent enlargement of the damaged brain volume. The release of danger signals is a central event that leads to a multitude of signals and cascades in the affected and neighbouring tissue, therefore providing a potential target for therapy.

  6. Enhancing activities of daily living of chronic stroke patients in primary health care by modified constraint-induced movement therapy (HOMECIMT): study protocol for a cluster randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Stroke leads to constant rehabilitation needs even at the chronic stage. However, although many stroke patients receive physical or occupational therapy in primary health care, treatment prescriptions do not generally specify therapeutic goals; in particular, participation is not established as an explicit therapeutic goal in the ambulatory setting. The primary aim of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of a therapy regimen for chronic stroke patients (modified ‘constraint-induced movement therapy (CIMT) at home’) with impaired hand or arm function with regard to the prerequisites of participation in everyday activities: a sufficient arm and hand function. ‘CIMT at home’ will be compared with conventional physical and occupational therapy (‘therapy as usual’). Methods/design The study is a parallel cluster randomized controlled trial with therapy practices as clusters (n = 48). After written consent from the patients (n = 144), the therapists will be randomly assigned to treat either the intervention or the control group. Blinded external assessors will evaluate the patients using standardized outcome measures before and after the intervention, and six months later. The two coprimary endpoint assessments of arm and hand function as prerequisites for participation (defined as equal involvement in activities of daily living) are the motor activity log (quality of arm and hand use) and the Wolf motor function test (arm and hand function). These assessments are made four weeks post-treatment and relativized to baseline performance. Changes in primary outcomes will be analyzed with mixed models, which consider the hierarchical structure of the data and will be adjusted to the baseline measurements and sex. The primary analysis will be the comparison of the two randomized groups, with respect to the adjusted averages for each of the two coprimary endpoints. To keep an overall significance level of 5%, the two endpoints will be tested at the

  7. Restricted Crystalloid Fluid Therapy during Orthotopic Liver Transplant Surgery and its Effect on Respiratory and Renal Insufficiency in the Early Post-operative Period: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Sahmeddini, M. A.; Janatmakan, F.; Khosravi, M. B.; Ghaffaripour, S.; Eghbal, M. H.; Nickeghbalian, S.; Malek-Hosseini, S. A.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Respiratory and renal insufficiencies are common dysfunctions during post-liver transplantation period that increase post-operative mortality and morbidity rates. Intra-operative fluid therapy is an important factor associated with pulmonary and renal insufficiency. Objective: To evaluate the relation between intra-operative fluid therapy and early renal and respiratory insufficiency after liver transplantation. Methods: In this randomized clinical study, 67 adult patients with end-stage liver disease who underwent orthotopic deceased donor liver transplantation were randomly allocated into two groups. The restricted fluid group, which received a controlled fluid administration of normal saline, 5 mL/kg/hr during anesthesia, and non-restricted fluid group received a controlled infusion of normal saline 10 mL/kg/hr during anesthesia. Early post-operative respiratory and renal insufficiency in both groups were assessed. The patients were monitored during the three stages of liver transplantation for their hemodynamic indices. The trial is registered with the Iranian Randomized Clinical Trial Registry, number IRCT2013101811662N4. Results: The baseline demographic and clinical characteristics were similar in both studied groups. The prevalence of respiratory insufficiency in the non-restricted fluid group (15%) significantly (p=0.01) higher than that in the restricted fluid group (0%). The post-operative mean±SD serum creatinine was 1.0±0.1 mg/dL in the non-restricted fluid group and 1.1±0.2 in the restricted fluid group (p=0.43). No patients in the studied groups required post-operative continuous renal replacement therapy. Conclusions: Restricted crystalloid fluid administration during orthotropic liver transplantation though decreased post-operative chance of pulmonary insufficiency, did not increase renal dysfunction. PMID:25184031

  8. Does a combined intervention program of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation and intensive occupational therapy affect cognitive function in patients with post-stroke upper limb hemiparesis?

    PubMed Central

    Hara, Takatoshi; Abo, Masahiro; Kakita, Kiyohito; Masuda, Takeshi; Yamazaki, Ryunosuke

    2016-01-01

    Low-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (LF-rTMS) to the contralesional hemisphere and intensive occupational therapy (iOT) have been shown to contribute to a significant improvement in upper limb hemiparesis in patients with chronic stroke. However, the effect of the combined intervention program of LF-rTMS and iOT on cognitive function is unknown. We retrospectively investigated whether the combined treatment influence patient's Trail-Making Test part B (TMT-B) performance, which is a group of easy and inexpensive neuropsychological tests that evaluate several cognitive functions. Twenty-five patients received 11 sessions of LF-rTMS to the contralesional hemisphere and 2 sessions of iOT per day over 15 successive days. Patients with right- and left-sided hemiparesis demonstrated significant improvements in upper limb motor function following the combined intervention program. Only patients with right-sided hemiparesis exhibited improved TMT-B performance following the combined intervention program, and there was a significant negative correlation between Fugl-Meyer Assessment scale total score change and TMT-B performance. The results indicate the possibility that LF-rTMS to the contralesional hemisphere combined with iOT improves the upper limb motor function and cognitive function of patients with right-sided hemiparesis. However, further studies are necessary to elucidate the mechanism of improved cognitive function. PMID:28197189

  9. Does a combined intervention program of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation and intensive occupational therapy affect cognitive function in patients with post-stroke upper limb hemiparesis?

    PubMed

    Hara, Takatoshi; Abo, Masahiro; Kakita, Kiyohito; Masuda, Takeshi; Yamazaki, Ryunosuke

    2016-12-01

    Low-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (LF-rTMS) to the contralesional hemisphere and intensive occupational therapy (iOT) have been shown to contribute to a significant improvement in upper limb hemiparesis in patients with chronic stroke. However, the effect of the combined intervention program of LF-rTMS and iOT on cognitive function is unknown. We retrospectively investigated whether the combined treatment influence patient's Trail-Making Test part B (TMT-B) performance, which is a group of easy and inexpensive neuropsychological tests that evaluate several cognitive functions. Twenty-five patients received 11 sessions of LF-rTMS to the contralesional hemisphere and 2 sessions of iOT per day over 15 successive days. Patients with right- and left-sided hemiparesis demonstrated significant improvements in upper limb motor function following the combined intervention program. Only patients with right-sided hemiparesis exhibited improved TMT-B performance following the combined intervention program, and there was a significant negative correlation between Fugl-Meyer Assessment scale total score change and TMT-B performance. The results indicate the possibility that LF-rTMS to the contralesional hemisphere combined with iOT improves the upper limb motor function and cognitive function of patients with right-sided hemiparesis. However, further studies are necessary to elucidate the mechanism of improved cognitive function.

  10. SBOTE study: extracorporeal shock wave therapy versus electrical stimulation after botulinum toxin type a injection for post-stroke spasticity-a prospective randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Santamato, Andrea; Notarnicola, Angela; Panza, Francesco; Ranieri, Maurizio; Micello, Maria Francesca; Manganotti, Paolo; Moretti, Biagio; Fortunato, Francesca; Filoni, Serena; Fiore, Pietro

    2013-02-01

    Research is on-going to identify new methods of biostimulation to increase the effect of botulinum toxin type A (BTX-A) in the treatment of spasticity. The Spasticity treated by Botulinum Toxin and ESWT (SBOTE) study is a prospective, randomized controlled trial assessing the effectiveness of extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT) given immediately after BTX-A injections compared with electrical stimulation (ES) given immediately after BTX-A therapy for the management of focal upper limb spasticity in stroke patients. ES was given for 30 min twice a day for 5 days starting at 5 Hz; ESWT was given once a day for 5 days. At study follow-up, patients treated with BTX-A injections and ESWT showed a statistically greater significance and continuous decrease of spasticity measure (modified Ashworth scale [MAS]: 1.37, 1.75 and 1.58 at 15, 30 and 90 days post-treatment, respectively), of spasms (spasm frequency scale [SFS]: 0.8 and 0.25 at 30 and 90 days post-treatment, respectively) and of pain (visual analogue scale [VAS]: 1.94 and 1.87 at 30 and 90 days, respectively) compared with patients treated with BTX-A injections and ES (MAS: 2.37, 2.18 and 2.18, respectively) (p < 0.05) (SFS: 1.5 and 1.06, respectively) (p < 0.05) (VAS: 2.44 and 2.69 respectively) (p < 0.05). ESWT enhances the effect of BTX-A to a greater extent than ES, probably by modulating rheology of the muscle and neurotransmission at the neuromuscular junction.

  11. Preventing stroke

    MedlinePlus

    ... risk of stroke. Diseases such as cancer, chronic kidney disease , and some autoimmune diseases . Weak areas in an artery wall or abnormal arteries and veins . Pregnancy, both during and in the weeks right after ...

  12. Immune Response Augmentation in Metastasized Breast Cancer by Localized Therapy Utilizing Biocompatible Magnetic Fluids. Addendum

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-08-01

    Magneto-rheological Fluid (MRF) iron nano-particles were synthesized using the reverse micelle technique and coated with poly(NIPAAm). The size...distribution of the nano iron particles was characterized using dynamic light scattering (DLS). The particle size was 730nm, and the Tg of the coating was...characterized using DSC. The 80 wt.% MRF based on phosphate buffered saline (PBS) and iron particles was characterized using the shear rheometer in the

  13. Immune Response Augmentation in Metastasized Breast Cancer by Localized Therapy Utilizing Biocompatible Magnetic Fluids

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-08-01

    particles are surface coated using atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) with various polymers, such as poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (poly(NIPAAm...and poly(acrylamide) (poly(AAm)). The surface grafted polymer has been characterized using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and properties of...resulting fluid has been measured using a rheometer. A mathematical model is developed to explore the behavior of iron particles injected into

  14. The effects of a rhythm and music-based therapy program and therapeutic riding in late recovery phase following stroke: a study protocol for a three-armed randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Stroke represents one of the most costly and long-term disabling conditions in adulthood worldwide and there is a need to determine the effectiveness of rehabilitation programs in the late phase after stroke. Limited scientific support exists for training incorporating rhythm and music as well as therapeutic riding and well-designed trials to determine the effectiveness of these treatment modalities are warranted. Methods/Design A single blinded three-armed randomized controlled trial is described with the aim to evaluate whether it is possible to improve the overall health status and functioning of individuals in the late phase of stroke (1-5 years after stroke) through a rhythm and music-based therapy program or therapeutic riding. About 120 individuals will be consecutively and randomly allocated to one of three groups: (T1) rhythm and music-based therapy program; (T2) therapeutic riding; or (T3) control group receiving the T1 training program a year later. Evaluation is conducted prior to and after the 12-week long intervention as well as three and six months later. The evaluation comprises a comprehensive functional and cognitive assessment (both qualitative and quantitative), and questionnaires. Based on the International classification of functioning, disability, and health (ICF), the outcome measures are classified into six comprehensive domains, with participation as the primary outcome measure assessed by the Stroke Impact Scale (SIS, version 2.0.). The secondary outcome measures are grouped within the following domains: body function, activity, environmental factors and personal factors. Life satisfaction and health related quality of life constitute an additional domain. Current status A total of 84 participants were randomised and have completed the intervention. Recruitment proceeds and follow-up is on-going, trial results are expected in early 2014. Discussion This study will ascertain whether any of the two intervention programs can

  15. Stroke bricks - spatial brain regions to assess ischemic stroke localization.

    PubMed

    Ciszek, Bogdan; Jóźwiak, Rafał; Sobieszczuk, Ewa; Przelaskowski, Artur; Skadorwa, Tymon

    2017-03-29

    Computer-aided analysis of non-contrast CT (NCCT) images for rapid diagnosis of ischemic stroke is based on the augmented visualization of evolving ischemic lesions. Computerized support of NCCT often leads to overinterpretation of ischemic areas, thus it is of great interest to provide neurologically verified regions in order to improve accuracy of subsequent radiological assessment. We propose Stroke Bricks (StBr) as an arbitrary spatial division of brain tissue into the regions associated with specific clinical symptoms of ischemic stroke. Neurological stroke deficit is formally translated into respective areas of possible ischemic lesions. StBr were designed according to formalized mapping of neurological symptoms and were attributed to the uniquely defined areas of impaired blood supply. StBr concept may be useful for an integrated radiological CT-based assessment of suspected stroke cases or can be included into computer-aided tools to optimize the evaluation of stroke site and its extent. These data in turn are appropriable for further diagnosis, predicting the therapeutic outcome as well as for patients' qualification for an appropriate form of reperfusion therapy. The usefulness of Stroke Bricks was illustrated in the case studies.

  16. Recovery After Stroke: Recurrent Stroke

    MedlinePlus

    ... blood pressure  Find out if you have atrial fibrillation (an irregular heartbeat which allows blood to pool ... your stroke risk. One form  known as atrial fibrillation or AF  causes blood to form clots that ...

  17. DRESS and Ischemic Stroke.

    PubMed

    Cahyanur, Rahmat; Oktavia, Dina; Koesno, Sukamto

    2012-07-01

    DRESS (drug rash eosinophilia and systemic symptoms) is a life threatening condition characterized by skin rash, fever, leucocytosis with eosinophilia or atypical lymphocytosis, lymphadenopathy, and internal organ involvement. This case report would like to describe an interesting case of DRESS coincidence with ischemic stroke. A 38 year old woman had been admitted with skin rash and fever since four days before. Four weeks before admission she received antibiotic and multivitamin for one week. The patient looked ill, with body temperature 38.0°C. Marked physical findings were cervical lymphadenopathy and hepatomegaly. Dermatological examination finding was generalized exanthema. Laboratory evaluation showed leucocytosis, eosinophilia, and increased level of ALT and AST. During hospitalization the patient also suffered from ischemic stroke. Treatments administered in this patient were oxygen, adequate intravenous fluid, parenteral nutrition, methyl prednisolone, cethirizin bid, ranitidin bid, and antibiotic. The antibiotic treatment in this case was performed with graded challenge or test dosing.

  18. Recent trends in robot-assisted therapy environments to improve real-life functional performance after stroke

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Michelle J

    2006-01-01

    Upper and lower limb robotic tools for neuro-rehabilitation are effective in reducing motor impairment but they are limited in their ability to improve real world function. There is a need to improve functional outcomes after robot-assisted therapy. Improvements in the effectiveness of these environments may be achieved by incorporating into their design and control strategies important elements key to inducing motor learning and cerebral plasticity such as mass-practice, feedback, task-engagement, and complex problem solving. This special issue presents nine articles. Novel strategies covered in this issue encourage more natural movements through the use of virtual reality and real objects and faster motor learning through the use of error feedback to guide acquisition of natural movements that are salient to real activities. In addition, several articles describe novel systems and techniques that use of custom and commercial games combined with new low-cost robot systems and a humanoid robot to embody the " supervisory presence" of the therapy as possible solutions to exercise compliance in under-supervised environments such as the home. PMID:17176474

  19. Stroke (For Kids)

    MedlinePlus

    ... de los dientes Video: Getting an X-ray Stroke KidsHealth > For Kids > Stroke Print A A A ... get help quickly. continue What Happens During a Stroke? A stroke usually happens suddenly, and a person ...

  20. Antiplatelet resistance in stroke

    PubMed Central

    Topçuoglu, Mehmet Akif; Arsava, Ethem Murat; Ay, Hakan

    2011-01-01

    Although the exact prevalence of antiplatelet resistance in ischemic stroke is not known, estimates about the two most widely used antiplatelet agents – aspirin and clopidogrel – suggest that the resistance rate is high, irrespective of the definition used and parameters measured. Inadequate antiplatelet responsiveness correlates with an increased risk of recurrent ischemic vascular events in patients with stroke and acute coronary syndrome. It is not currently known whether tailoring antiplatelet therapy based on platelet function test results translates into a more effective strategy to prevent secondary vascular events after stroke. Large-scale clinical trials using a universally accepted definition and standardized measurement techniques for antiplatelet resistance are needed to demonstrate whether a ‘platelet-function test-guided antiplatelet treatment’ strategy translates into improved stroke care. This article gives an overview of the clinical importance of laboratory antiplatelet resistance, describes the challenges for platelet-function test-guided antiplatelet treatment and discusses practical issues about the management of patients with aspirin and/or clopidogrel resistance. PMID:21306212

  1. Hip Hop Stroke: Study Protocol for a Randomized Controlled Trial to Address Stroke Literacy

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Olajide; Leighton-Herrmann, Ellyn; DeSorbo, Alexandra; Hecht, Mindy; Hedmann, Monique; Huq, Saima; Gerin, William; Chinchilli, Vernon; Ogedegbe, Gbenga; Noble, James

    2015-01-01

    Objective Stroke is the fifth leading cause of death and the leading cause of serious long-term adult disability in the US. Acute stroke treatments with intravenous thrombolysis and endovascular therapy are proven to reduce disability, however a critical limitation on their effectiveness is the narrow time window for administration, which is 4.5 hours and 6 hours respectively from the onset of symptoms. Our overarching goal is to reduce pre-hospital delays to acute stroke treatments in economically disadvantaged minority communities where the greatest delays exist, using Hip Hop Stroke. Methods Hip Hop Stroke (HHS) is a school-based, child-mediated, culturally-tailored stroke communication multimedia intervention developed using validated models of behavior change and designed to improve stroke literacy (knowledge of stroke symptoms, the urgent need to call 911, and prevention measures) of 4th, 5th and 6th grade students and their parents residing in poor urban communities. Children in the intervention arm will receive the HHS intervention, while those in the attentional control arm will receive standardized nutrition education based on the USDA's MyPyramid program. Children will be trained and motivated to share stroke information with their parents or other adult caregiver. Both children and parents will complete a stroke knowledge assessment at baseline, immediately following the program, and at 3-months post-program. The primary outcome is the effect of the child mediation on parental stroke literacy. Conclusion Stroke literate children, a captive audience in school systems, may represent a viable channel for spreading stroke information into households of poor urban communities where mass media stroke campaigns have shown the lowest penetration. These children may also call 911 when witnessing a stroke in their homes or communities. The HHS program may highlight the potential role of children in the chain of stroke recovery as a strategy for reducing

  2. Definition and Implications of the Preventable Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, Mark; Moores, Lisa; Alsharif, Mohamad N.; Paganini-Hill, Annlia

    2016-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Although patients with acute stroke are routinely evaluated for potential treatment (ie, treatability of the stroke), preventability of the presenting stroke is generally not seriously considered. OBJECTIVE To systematically analyze stroke preventability. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS We evaluated medical records of 274 consecutive patients discharged with a diagnosis of ischemic stroke between December 2, 2010, and June 11, 2012, at the University of California Irvine Medical Center. Mean (SE) patient age was 67.2 (0.8) years. Data analysis was conducted from July 3, 2014, to August 4, 2015. EXPOSURES Medical records were systematically examined for demographic information, stroke risk factors, stroke severity, and acute stroke treatment. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES We defined stroke preventability as the degree to which the patient’s presenting stroke was preventable. Using variables easily determined at onset of stroke, we developed a 10-point scale (0, not preventable; 10, most preventable) to classify the degree of stroke preventability. Our focus was effectiveness of treatment of hypertension (0–2 points), hyperlipidemia (0–2 points), and atrial fibrillation (0–4 points), as well as use of antithrombotic treatment for known prior cerebrovascular and cardiovascular disease (0–2 points). RESULTS Total risk scores ranged from 0 to 8 (mean [SE], 2.2 [0.1]), with 207 patients (75.5%) exhibiting some degree of preventability (score of 1 or higher). Seventy-one patients (25.9%) had scores of 4 or higher, indicating that the stroke was highly preventable. Severity of stroke as determined by the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score was not related to preventability of stroke. However, 21 of 71 patients (29.6%) whose stroke was highly preventable were treated with intravenous or intra-arterial acute stroke therapy while these treatments were provided for only 13 of 67 patients (19.4%) with scores of 0 (no preventability) and 19 of

  3. Intrathecal enzyme replacement therapy: Successful treatment of brain disease via the cerebrospinal fluid

    PubMed Central

    Dickson, Patricia; McEntee, Michael; Vogler, Carole; Le, Steven; Levy, Beth; Peinovich, Maryn; Hanson, Stephen; Passage, Merry; Kakkis, Emil

    2010-01-01

    Treatment of brain disease with recombinant proteins is difficult due to the blood-brain barrier. As an alternative to direct injections into the brain, we studied whether application of high concentrations of therapeutic enzymes via intrathecal (IT) injections could successfully drive uptake across the ependyma to treat brain disease. We studied IT enzyme replacement therapy with recombinant human iduronidase (rhIDU) in canine mucopolysaccharidosis I (MPS I, Hurler syndrome), a lysosomal storage disorder with brain and meningeal involvement. Monthly or quarterly IT treatment regimens with rhIDU achieved supranormal iduronidase enzyme levels in the brain, spinal cord, and spinal meninges. All regimens normalized total brain glycosaminoglycan (GAG) storage and reduced spinal meningeal GAG storage by 58–70%. The improvement in GAG storage levels persisted three months after the final IT dose. The successful use of enzyme therapy via the CSF represents a potentially useful approach for lysosomal storage disorders. PMID:17321776

  4. A Pediatric Diabetic Ketoacidosis Management Protocol Incorporating a Two-Bag Intravenous Fluid System Decreases Duration of Intravenous Insulin Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Marsh, Kourtney; Norman, Susan; Brock, Michael Alan; Peng, Monica; Shenk, Jennifer; Chen, Jerome Gene

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in children with type 1 diabetes. We implemented a standardized DKA management protocol by using a 2-bag intravenous (IV) fluid system. The purpose of the study was to examine if the protocol improved clinical outcomes and process efficiency. METHODS: This was a retrospective study of patients who did and did not undergo the protocol. Patients were included if they were 18 years of age or younger, were diagnosed with DKA, admitted to an intensive care unit or stepdown unit, and received continuous IV insulin. RESULTS: Of 119 encounters evaluated, 46 (38.7%) received treatment with the protocol and 73 (61.3%) did not. The median time to normalization of ketoacidosis was 9 hours (IQR 5–12) and 9 hours (IQR 6.5–13) for protocol and non-protocol groups, respectively (p = 0.14). The median duration of IV insulin therapy was 16.9 hours (IQR 13.7–21.5) vs. 21 hours (IQR 15.3–26) for protocol and non-protocol groups (p = 0.03). The median number of adjustments to insulin drip rate was 0 (IQR 0–1) and 2 (IQR 0–3) for protocol and non-protocol groups (p = 0.0001). There was no difference in the incidence of hypokalemia, hypoglycemia, or cerebral edema. CONCLUSIONS: The protocol did not change time to normalization of ketoacidosis but did decrease the duration of insulin therapy, number of adjustments to insulin drip rate, and number of wasted IV fluid bags without increasing the incidence of adverse events. PMID:28018153

  5. A Pediatric Diabetic Ketoacidosis Management Protocol Incorporating a Two-Bag Intravenous Fluid System Decreases Duration of Intravenous Insulin Therapy.

    PubMed

    Veverka, Megan; Marsh, Kourtney; Norman, Susan; Brock, Michael Alan; Peng, Monica; Shenk, Jennifer; Chen, Jerome Gene

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in children with type 1 diabetes. We implemented a standardized DKA management protocol by using a 2-bag intravenous (IV) fluid system. The purpose of the study was to examine if the protocol improved clinical outcomes and process efficiency. METHODS: This was a retrospective study of patients who did and did not undergo the protocol. Patients were included if they were 18 years of age or younger, were diagnosed with DKA, admitted to an intensive care unit or stepdown unit, and received continuous IV insulin. RESULTS: Of 119 encounters evaluated, 46 (38.7%) received treatment with the protocol and 73 (61.3%) did not. The median time to normalization of ketoacidosis was 9 hours (IQR 5-12) and 9 hours (IQR 6.5-13) for protocol and non-protocol groups, respectively (p = 0.14). The median duration of IV insulin therapy was 16.9 hours (IQR 13.7-21.5) vs. 21 hours (IQR 15.3-26) for protocol and non-protocol groups (p = 0.03). The median number of adjustments to insulin drip rate was 0 (IQR 0-1) and 2 (IQR 0-3) for protocol and non-protocol groups (p = 0.0001). There was no difference in the incidence of hypokalemia, hypoglycemia, or cerebral edema. CONCLUSIONS: The protocol did not change time to normalization of ketoacidosis but did decrease the duration of insulin therapy, number of adjustments to insulin drip rate, and number of wasted IV fluid bags without increasing the incidence of adverse events.

  6. Use of the robot assisted gait therapy in rehabilitation of patients with stroke and spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Sale, P; Franceschini, M; Waldner, A; Hesse, S

    2012-03-01

    Difficulty in walking is a major feature of neurological disease, and loss of mobility is the activity of daily living on which patients place the greatest value. The impact on patients is enormous, with negative ramifications on their participation in social, vocational, and recreational activities. In current clinical practice the gait restoration with robotic device is an integral part of rehabilitation program. Robot therapy involves the use of a robot exoskeleton device or end-effector device to help the patient retrain motor coordination by performing well-focused and carefully directed repetitive practice. The exoskeleton, as an assistive device, is also an external structural mechanism with joints and links corresponding to those of the human body. These robots use joint trajectories of the entire gait cycle and offer a uniform (more or less) stiff control along this trajectory. In this field the new powered exoskeleton ReWalk (Argo Medical Technologies Ltd) was developed to have an alternative mobility solution to the wheelchair and rehabilitation treatment for individuals with severe walking impairments, enabling them to stand, walk, ascend/descent stairs and more. The end-effector-based robot is a device with footplates placed on a double crank and rocker gear system. Alternatives to powered exoskeletons are devices that use movable footplates to which the patient's feet are attached. All devices include some form of body weight support. Prominent goals in the field include: developing implementable technologies that can be easily used by patients, therapists, and clinicians; enhancing the efficacy of clinician's therapies and increasing the ease of activities in the daily lives of patients.

  7. Hippocampal stroke.

    PubMed

    Szabo, Kristina

    2014-01-01

    The first to link disturbance of memory and lesions of the medial temporal lobe was the Russian neurologist von Bechterew, who in 1989 presented the brain of a 60-year-old man who had suffered from severe amnesia. Autopsy showed bilateral damage of the medial temporal lobe. Several following postmortem case studies confirmed the association between permanent amnesia and bitemporal stroke. Reports of transient memory deficits in unilateral stroke in combination with other neurological and neuropsychological deficits followed. With the advent of brain imaging, persistent or transient amnesia as the sole or primary manifestation of acute - mostly left-sided - hippocampal stroke was described. With the use of modern MRI techniques the identification of typical ischemic stroke lesion patterns affecting the hippocampus has become possible. Although overt cognitive deficits in unilateral hippocampal stroke seem to be rare, a careful neuropsychological examination might be necessary to detect resulting neuropsychological deficits including disturbances of verbal and nonverbal episodic long-term memory and spatial orientation.

  8. Recognition and Management of Threatened Stroke

    PubMed Central

    McCormick, C. W.

    1983-01-01

    Completed stroke may often be prevented by early recognition and appropriate management of the stroke-threatened patient. About 80% of strokes are ischemic, the remainder hemorrhagic. Roughly half of ischemic strokes are heralded by transient ischemic attacks (TIA). The clinical picture of TIA depends upon which part of the brain is involved. The investigation of such patients is outlined, together with current approaches to medical and surgical therapy. Intracerebral hemorrhage rarely provides any advanced warning, but occasionally subarachnoid hemorrhage may be preceded by a warning leak, the clinical picture of which is described. PMID:21286581

  9. Haptic/graphic rehabilitation: integrating a robot into a virtual environment library and applying it to stroke therapy.

    PubMed

    Sharp, Ian; Patton, James; Listenberger, Molly; Case, Emily

    2011-08-08

    Recent research that tests interactive devices for prolonged therapy practice has revealed new prospects for robotics combined with graphical and other forms of biofeedback. Previous human-robot interactive systems have required different software commands to be implemented for each robot leading to unnecessary developmental overhead time each time a new system becomes available. For example, when a haptic/graphic virtual reality environment has been coded for one specific robot to provide haptic feedback, that specific robot would not be able to be traded for another robot without recoding the program. However, recent efforts in the open source community have proposed a wrapper class approach that can elicit nearly identical responses regardless of the robot used. The result can lead researchers across the globe to perform similar experiments using shared code. Therefore modular "switching out"of one robot for another would not affect development time. In this paper, we outline the successful creation and implementation of a wrapper class for one robot into the open-source H3DAPI, which integrates the software commands most commonly used by all robots.

  10. Robot therapy of the upper limb in stroke patients: preliminary experiences for the principle-based use of this technology.

    PubMed

    Casadio, Maura; Giannoni, Psiche; Masia, Lorenzo; Morasso, Pietro; Sandini, Giulio; Sanguineti, Vittorio; Squeri, Valentina; Vergaro, Elena

    2009-01-01

    Robotic systems for neuromotor rehabilitation have been a part of clinical practice for more than a decade but the efficacy of this new technology is still debated. One reason for this, in our opinion, is that there is still no consensus on the most important features of these systems, or on the underlying theoretical basis, essential for the rational design of treatment protocols. The aim of this paper, born of our long experience in the study of the neural control of movement and the use of robots for characterizing motor control mechanisms, is to make a small contribution to clarifying this issue. What is needed in the future is a "research pipeline" encompassing experimentally validated models of neural control of movement, models of motor learning, models of functional recovery, and finally principle-based robot therapy control strategies. We believe this is a necessary prerequisite for carrying out well formulated comparisons of different control strategies as well as mixed strategies of robot/human treatment, in the framework of randomised, controlled clinical trials.

  11. Continuing versus Stopping Prestroke Antihypertensive Therapy in Acute Intracerebral Hemorrhage: A Subgroup Analysis of the Efficacy of Nitric Oxide in Stroke Trial

    PubMed Central

    Krishnan, Kailash; Scutt, Polly; Woodhouse, Lisa; Adami, Alessandro; Becker, Jennifer L.; Cala, Lesley A.; Casado, Ana M.; Chen, Christopher; Dineen, Robert A.; Gommans, John; Koumellis, Panos; Christensen, Hanna; Collins, Ronan; Czlonkowska, Anna; Lees, Kennedy R.; Ntaios, George; Ozturk, Serefnur; Phillips, Stephen J.; Sprigg, Nikola; Szatmari, Szabolcs; Wardlaw, Joanna M.; Bath, Philip M.

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose More than 50% of patients with acute intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) are taking antihypertensive drugs before ictus. Although antihypertensive therapy should be given long term for secondary prevention, whether to continue or stop such treatment during the acute phase of ICH remains unclear, a question that was addressed in the Efficacy of Nitric Oxide in Stroke (ENOS) trial. Methods ENOS was an international multicenter, prospective, randomized, blinded endpoint trial. Among 629 patients with ICH and systolic blood pressure between 140 and 220 mmHg, 246 patients who were taking antihypertensive drugs were assigned to continue (n = 119) or to stop (n = 127) taking drugs temporarily for 7 days. The primary outcome was the modified Rankin Score at 90 days. Secondary outcomes included death, length of stay in hospital, discharge destination, activities of daily living, mood, cognition, and quality of life. Results Blood pressure level (baseline 171/92 mmHg) fell in both groups but was significantly lower at 7 days in those patients assigned to continue antihypertensive drugs (difference 9.4/3.5 mmHg, P < .01). At 90 days, the primary outcome did not differ between the groups; the adjusted common odds ratio (OR) for worse outcome with continue versus stop drugs was .92 (95% confidence interval, .45-1.89; P = .83). There was no difference between the treatment groups for any secondary outcome measure, or rates of death or serious adverse events. Conclusions Among patients with acute ICH, immediate continuation of antihypertensive drugs during the first week did not reduce death or major disability in comparison to stopping treatment temporarily. PMID:26853137

  12. Effect of Radial Shock Wave Therapy on Spasticity of the Upper Limb in Patients With Chronic Stroke: A Prospective, Randomized, Single Blind, Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Li, Tsung-Ying; Chang, Chih-Ya; Chou, Yu-Ching; Chen, Liang-Cheng; Chu, Heng-Yi; Chiang, Shang-Lin; Chang, Shin-Tsu; Wu, Yung-Tsan

    2016-05-01

    Recently, studies have reported that extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT) is a safe, noninvasive, alternative treatment for spasticity. However, the effect of ESWT on spasticity cannot be determined, because most studies to date have enrolled small patient numbers and have lacked placebo-controlled groups and/or long-term follow-up. In addition, whether varying the number of ESWT sessions would affect the duration of the therapeutic effect has not been investigated in a single study. Hence, we performed a prospective, randomized, single blind, placebo-controlled study to investigate the long-term effect of radial ESWT (rESWT) in patients with poststroke spasticity and surveyed the outcome of functional activity.Sixty patients were randomized into 3 groups. Group A patients received 1 session of rESWT per week for 3 consecutive weeks; group B patients received a single session of rESWT; group C patients received one session of sham rESWT per week for 3 consecutive weeks. The primary outcome was Modified Ashworth Scale of hand and wrist, whereas the secondary outcomes were Fugl-Meyer Assessment of hand function and wrist control. Evaluations were performed before the first rESWT treatment and immediately 1, 4, 8, 12, and 16 weeks after the last session of rESWT.Compared to the control group, the significant reduction in spasticity of hand and wrist lasted at least 16 and 8 weeks in group A and B, respectively. Three sessions of rESWT had a longer-lasting effect than one session. Furthermore, the reduction in spasticity after 3 sessions of rESWT may be beneficial for hand function and wrist control and the effect was maintained for 16 and 12 weeks, respectively.rESWT may be valuable in decreasing spasticity of the hand and wrist with accompanying enhancement of wrist control and hand function in chronic stroke patients.

  13. A comparative study of the effects of trunk exercise program in aquatic and land-based therapy on gait in hemiplegic stroke patients.

    PubMed

    Park, Byoung-Sun; Noh, Ji-Woong; Kim, Mee-Young; Lee, Lim-Kyu; Yang, Seung-Min; Lee, Won-Deok; Shin, Yong-Sub; Kim, Ju-Hyun; Lee, Jeong-Uk; Kwak, Taek-Yong; Lee, Tae-Hyun; Park, Jaehong; Kim, Junghwan

    2016-06-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of aquatic and land-based trunk exercise program on gait in stroke patients. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects were 28 hemiplegic stroke patients (20 males, 8 females). The subjects performed a trunk exercise program for a total of four weeks. [Results] Walking speed and cycle, stance phase and stride length of the affected side, and the symmetry index of the stance phase significantly improved after the aquatic and land-based trunk exercise program. [Conclusion] These results suggest that the aquatic and land-based trunk exercise program may help improve gait performance ability after stroke.

  14. A comparative study of the effects of trunk exercise program in aquatic and land-based therapy on gait in hemiplegic stroke patients

    PubMed Central

    Park, Byoung-Sun; Noh, Ji-Woong; Kim, Mee-Young; Lee, Lim-Kyu; Yang, Seung-Min; Lee, Won-Deok; Shin, Yong-Sub; Kim, Ju-Hyun; Lee, Jeong-Uk; Kwak, Taek-Yong; Lee, Tae-Hyun; Park, Jaehong; Kim, Junghwan

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of aquatic and land-based trunk exercise program on gait in stroke patients. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects were 28 hemiplegic stroke patients (20 males, 8 females). The subjects performed a trunk exercise program for a total of four weeks. [Results] Walking speed and cycle, stance phase and stride length of the affected side, and the symmetry index of the stance phase significantly improved after the aquatic and land-based trunk exercise program. [Conclusion] These results suggest that the aquatic and land-based trunk exercise program may help improve gait performance ability after stroke. PMID:27390444

  15. Sex differences in ischaemic stroke: potential cellular mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Chauhan, Anjali; Moser, Hope; McCullough, Louise D

    2017-04-01

    Stroke remains a leading cause of mortality and disability worldwide. More women than men have strokes each year, in part because women live longer. Women have poorer functional outcomes, are more likely to need nursing home care and have higher rates of recurrent stroke compared with men. Despite continued advancements in primary prevention, innovative acute therapies and ongoing developments in neurorehabilitation, stroke incidence and mortality continue to increase due to the aging of the U.S.

  16. Translational MR Neuroimaging of Stroke and Recovery.

    PubMed

    Mandeville, Emiri T; Ayata, Cenk; Zheng, Yi; Mandeville, Joseph B

    2017-02-01

    Multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become a critical clinical tool for diagnosing focal ischemic stroke severity, staging treatment, and predicting outcome. Imaging during the acute phase focuses on tissue viability in the stroke vicinity, while imaging during recovery requires the evaluation of distributed structural and functional connectivity. Preclinical MRI of experimental stroke models provides validation of non-invasive biomarkers in terms of cellular and molecular mechanisms, while also providing a translational platform for evaluation of prospective therapies. This brief review of translational stroke imaging discusses the acute to chronic imaging transition, the principles underlying common MRI methods employed in stroke research, and the experimental results obtained by clinical and preclinical imaging to determine tissue viability, vascular remodeling, structural connectivity of major white matter tracts, and functional connectivity using task-based and resting-state fMRI during the stroke recovery process.

  17. Upper Extremity Proprioception in Healthy Aging and Stroke Populations, and the Effects of Therapist- and Robot-Based Rehabilitation Therapies on Proprioceptive Function

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Charmayne Mary Lee; Tommasino, Paolo; Budhota, Aamani; Campolo, Domenico

    2015-01-01

    The world’s population is aging, with the number of people ages 65 or older expected to surpass 1.5 billion people, or 16% of the global total. As people age, there are notable declines in proprioception due to changes in the central and peripheral nervous systems. Moreover, the risk of stroke increases with age, with approximately two-thirds of stroke-related hospitalizations occurring in people over the age of 65. In this literature review, we first summarize behavioral studies investigating proprioceptive deficits in normally aging older adults and stroke patients, and discuss the differences in proprioceptive function between these populations. We then provide a state of the art review the literature regarding therapist- and robot-based rehabilitation of the upper extremity proprioceptive dysfunction in stroke populations and discuss avenues of future research. PMID:25784872

  18. The effect of tetracycline fiber therapy on beta-glucuronidase and interleukin-1 beta in crevicular fluid.

    PubMed

    Lamster, I B; Pullman, J R; Celenti, R S; Grbic, J T

    1996-09-01

    Treatment with the tetracycline HCL-containing (Actisite infinity) fiber has been shown to improve clinical measures of periodontitis, as well as reduce the number of sites infected with putative periodontal pathogens. In this study, we examined the effect of the tetracycline fiber on biochemical mediators of the host's inflammatory response in gingival crevicular fluid (GCF). The total amount of the lysosomal enzyme beta-glucuronidase (beta G), considered a marker of primary granule release from polymorphonuclear leukocytes and interleukin-1 beta, a cytokine with important proinflammatory effects, were examined in GCF. Patients with localized recurrent periodontitis were followed over a 16 week period. Treated teeth (Tx), teeth adjacent to treated teeth (ADJ) and control teeth (Cx) were studied. Following fiber therapy, the Tx teeth displayed statistically significant reductions in mean probing depth, depth of the deepest site and bleeding on probing over the 16 weeks of the trial. Significant reduction in the depth of the deepest site was also seen for the ADJ teeth over 16 weeks. Total beta G in GCF was reduced for the Tx teeth comparing baseline to 16 weeks, but no significant changes were observed for the ADJ or Cx teeth. Prior to treatment, total beta G for the Tx teeth was 211 +/- 49 U (mean +/- standard error), versus 146 +/- 174 U for the ADJ teeth and 121 +/- 33 U for the Cx teeth. 16 weeks treatment, the mean values for these 3 categories of teeth were comparable (Tx = 95 +/- 20 U, ADJ = 93 +/- 42 U and Cx = 103 +/- 29 U). For the Tx teeth, the maximum reduction in total beta G following therapy occurred at 6 weeks (65%). Total IL-1 beta was significantly reduced for the Tx teeth at 3 and 6 weeks, but rebounded at 16 weeks. In contrast to what was seen for beta G, the maximum reduction in total IL-1 beta for the Tx teeth was observed at 3 weeks (68%). These data suggest that host mediators associated with increased risk for active disease are reduced

  19. Effect of perioperative crystalloid or colloid fluid therapy on hemorrhage, coagulation competence, and outcome

    PubMed Central

    Rasmussen, Kirsten C.; Secher, Niels H.; Pedersen, Tom

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: A meta-analysis concerning perioperative coagulation competence, hemorrhage, and outcome was conducted including the use of hydroxyethyl starches (HESs), dextran, or albumin versus administration of a crystalloid as control to assess the efficacy and safety of colloids and crystalloids for fluid administration during major elective surgery. Surgery was restricted to cardiovascular and noncardiovascular surgery, and HESs were stratified to HES 130/0.4 and HES 200/0.5. Methods: We searched Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, MEDLINE, ISI Web of Science, EMBASE, conference proceedings, reference lists, and databases of ongoing trials. Results: Thirty one primary clinical randomized controlled trials included 2287 patients undergoing major surgery from January 2000 to August 2015. The perioperative changes in coagulation competence were measured by thromboelastography (TEG) maximum amplitude (MA) in 9 studies administering crystalloids versus HES and in 4 studies administering albumin versus HES. All studies but 1 disclosed increased reduction in TEG-MA following HES administration (P = 0.0001 and 0.0002). The total loss of blood was reported in 17 studies in which crystalloids were compared to HES and 12 studies reported increased blood loss after administration of HES (P < 0.003). When administering albumin versus HES, 6 studies reported reduced hemorrhage associated with albumin administration (P = 0.005). Reoperation was not significantly reduced by the use of crystalloids, but may be more frequent after HESs compared to albumin (P < 0.03). In this analysis, more patients admitted to administration of HESs were exposed to decrease coagulation competence, compared to perioperative crystalloids and albumin administration. Conclusion: This stratified meta-analysis showed that increased blood loss was found in noncardiovascular surgery among patients receiving HES compared with crystalloids, followed by a marked

  20. Role of prediabetes in stroke

    PubMed Central

    Mijajlović, Milija D; Aleksić, Vuk M; Šternić, Nadežda M; Mirković, Mihailo M; Bornstein, Natan M

    2017-01-01

    Stroke is one of the leading causes of death and probably the greatest cause of adult disability worldwide. Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a state of accelerated aging of blood vessels. Patients with diabetes have increased risk of stroke. Hyperglycemia represents a risk factor for poor outcome following stroke, and probably is just a marker of poor outcome rather than a cause. Lowering of blood glucose levels has not been shown to improve prognosis. Also, prevention of stroke risk among patients with DM is not improved with therapy for reduction of glucose levels. On the other hand, prediabetes, a metabolic state between normal glucose metabolism and diabetes, is a risk factor for the development of DM type 2 and subsequently for stroke. Several methods are known to identify prediabetes patients, including fasting plasma glucose levels, 2-hour post load glucose levels, and glycosylated hemoglobin levels. In this text, we tried to summarize known data about diagnosis, epidemiology, risk factors, pathophysiology, and prevention of prediabetes in relation to DM and stroke. PMID:28203079

  1. Stroke biomarkers: Can they help us to guide stroke thrombolysis?

    PubMed

    Montaner, Joan

    2006-11-01

    The use of blood biomarkers is getting increasingly popular in the field of cerebrovascular diseases, since biomarkers might aid physicians in several steps of stroke evaluation. We will discuss whether stroke diagnosis might be possible using some specific brain biomarkers and if this approach will permit rapid referral of stroke patients to hospitals with acute treatments such as tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA) available. Although thrombolytic therapy in acute stroke is effective since it accelerates clot lyses and earlier restoration of blood flow, up to 40-50% of treated patients do not recanalize or do it too late, and between 6 and 15% suffer hemorrhagic transformations with high death rates. In the context of the neurovascular unit, t-PA may degrade extracellular matrix integrity and increase risks of neurovascular cell death, blood-brain barrier leakage, edema and hemorrhage. In humans, biomarkers such as matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) or fibronectin, which might be used to select patients at higher risk of hemorrhagic transformation, and high plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) interfering with tPA-induced recanalization, thus predicting clot-lyses resistance and poor outcome, have been recently identified. Moreover, high levels of MMP-9 and MMP-13 are involved in DWI lesion growth in spite of thrombolytic therapy suggesting its ultra-early role in brain injury. Other biomarkers such as C-reactive protein may accurately predict stroke mortality following reperfusion therapies. Finally, we will also show that genetic background of stroke patients may condition plasma levels of some of these biomarkers and influence therapeutic response in t-PA-treated patients.

  2. Temporal analysis of blood-brain barrier disruption and cerebrospinal fluid matrix metalloproteinases in rhesus monkeys subjected to transient ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yingqian; Fan, Feng; Zeng, Guojun; Zhou, Linlin; Zhang, Yinbing; Zhang, Jie; Jiao, He; Zhang, Ting; Su, Dan; Yang, Cheng; Wang, Xin; Xiao, Kai; Li, Hongxia; Zhong, Zhihui

    2016-01-01

    Blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption plays an important role in pathophysiological progress of ischemic stroke. However, our knowledge of the dynamic change of BBB permeability and its mechanism remains limited. In the current study, we used a non-human primate (NHP) MCAO model and a serial CSF sampling method that allowed us to determine the dynamic change of BBB permeability by calculating the CSF/serum albumin ratio (AR). We showed that AR increased rapidly and significantly after ischemia, and the fold increase of AR is highly correlated with the infarction size during the subacute phase. Moreover, we determined the temporal change of MMP-1, MMP-2, MMP-3, MMP-9, MMP-10, MMP-13, TIMP-1, and TIMP-2 in CSF and serum. Each MMP and TIMP showed different change patterns when comparing their values in CSF and serum. Based on the longitudinal dataset, we showed that the fold increase of MMP-9 in serum and CSF are both correlated to infarction size. Among the measured MMPs and TIMPs, only MMP-2, MMP-13, and TIMP-2 in CSF correlated with AR to some extent. Our data suggest there is no single MMP or TIMP fully responsible for BBB breakdown, which is regulated by a much more complicated signal network and further investigations of the mechanisms are needed.

  3. Acute Stroke Care at Rural Hospitals in Idaho: Challenges in Expediting Stroke Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gebhardt, James G.; Norris, Thomas E.

    2006-01-01

    Context: Thrombolytics are currently the most effective treatment for stroke. However, the National Institute for Neurological Disorders and Stroke criteria for initiation of thrombolytic therapy, most notably the 3-hour time limit from symptom onset, have proven challenging for many rural hospitals to achieve. Purpose: To provide a snapshot of…

  4. Emerging Treatments for Motor Rehabilitation After Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Krishnan, Chandramouli; Khot, Sandeep P.

    2015-01-01

    Although numerous treatments are available to improve cerebral perfusion after acute stroke and prevent recurrent stroke, few rehabilitation treatments have been conclusively shown to improve neurologic recovery. The majority of stroke survivors with motor impairment do not recover to their functional baseline, and there remains a need for novel neurorehabilitation treatments to minimize long-term disability, maximize quality of life, and optimize psychosocial outcomes. In recent years, several novel therapies have emerged to restore motor function after stroke, and additional investigational treatments have also shown promise. Here, we familiarize the neurohospitalist with emerging treatments for poststroke motor rehabilitation. The rehabilitation treatments covered in this review will include selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor medications, constraint-induced movement therapy, noninvasive brain stimulation, mirror therapy, and motor imagery or mental practice. PMID:25829989

  5. Gingival crevicular fluid periostin levels in chronic periodontitis patients following nonsurgical periodontal treatment with low-level laser therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kumaresan, Dhanangchaayan; Balasundaram, Aruna; Naik, Vanaja Krishna; Appukuttan, Deva Priya

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Periostin is a matricellular protein highly expressed in periosteum, periodontal ligament and is essential for tissue integrity and maturation. It plays a role in collagen fibrillogenesis and is downregulated in periodontal disease. Biostimulation utilizing low-level laser therapy (LLLT) influences periodontal ligament fibroblast proliferation. This study was conducted with the objective of estimating periostin levels in chronic periodontitis (CP) patients following LLLT as an adjunct to root surface debridement (RSD). Materials and Methods: Thirty periodontally healthy participants (Group I) and sixty CP participants were recruited. Based on the therapeutic intervention, CP patients were allocated to either RSD (Group II) or to RSD with LLLT (Group III) group. Clinical parameters and gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) periostin levels were assessed at the baseline and at the 3rd month. Results: Periostin levels were significantly lower in CP patients when compared to healthy individuals at the baseline (P < 0.01). Following nonsurgical periodontal treatment (NSPT), periostin levels significantly increased in both Group II and III, when compared to baseline values (P < 0.001). Comparison of mean periostin levels between both the treatment groups showed a significant increase in LLLT group than RSD at the 3rd month (P < 0.05). Conclusion: Within the limitations of the present study, LLLT application was found to have additional benefits over RSD with respect to clinical periodontal parameters and GCF periostin levels. Moreover, periostin may be used as a possible biomarker to evaluate the outcome following NSPT. PMID:28042273

  6. The potential of mesenchymal stem cells derived from amniotic membrane and amniotic fluid for neuronal regenerative therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eun Young; Lee, Kyung-Bon; Kim, Min Kyu

    2014-01-01

    The mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), which are derived from the mesoderm, are considered as a readily available source for tissue engineering. They have multipotent differentiation capacity and can be differentiated into various cell types. Many studies have demonstrated that the MSCs identified from amniotic membrane (AM-MSCs) and amniotic fluid (AF-MSCs) are shows advantages for many reasons, including the possibility of noninvasive isolation, multipotency, self-renewal, low immunogenicity, anti-inflammatory and nontumorigenicity properties, and minimal ethical problem. The AF-MSCs and AM-MSCs may be appropriate sources of mesenchymal stem cells for regenerative medicine, as an alternative to embryonic stem cells (ESCs). Recently, regenerative treatments such as tissue engineering and cell transplantation have shown potential in clinical applications for degenerative diseases. Therefore, amnion and MSCs derived from amnion can be applied to cell therapy in neuro-degeneration diseases. In this review, we will describe the potential of AM-MSCs and AF-MSCs, with particular focus on cures for neuronal degenerative diseases. [BMB Reports 2014; 47(3): 135-140] PMID:24499672

  7. Chronic metabolic acidosis may be the cause of cachexia: body fluid pH correction may be an effective therapy.

    PubMed

    Drochioiu, Gabi

    2008-01-01

    Cachexia is a pathological state characterized by weight loss and protein mobilization during various diseases. Nutritional supplementation or appetite stimulants are unable to restore the loss of lean body mass. Agents interfering with TNF-alpha have not been very successful to date. Only eicosapentaenoic acid was able to interfere with the action of proteolysis-inducing factors. An acceleration of proteolysis and branched-chain amino acid oxidation was correlated with chronic metabolic acidosis. Therefore, we suggest here that the main cause of cachexia is the increased acidity of the body fluids, which results in a higher and non-specific proteolysis of muscle proteins. Moderate hypoxia might be close related to lactic acid production within the whole body, not only in the cancer cells. Anorexia seems to be a consequence, but a cause of cachexia: the cachectic patients are in fact well fed, unfortunately they use fatty acids from their fat and glucose via muscle proteins, amino acids, alanine, and lactic acid. Our hypothesis is consistent with the most findings reported in literature and opens new ways for cachexia prevention and therapy, such as pH correction or higher oxygenation.

  8. Risk stratification and stroke prevention therapy care gaps in Canadian atrial fibrillation patients (from the Co-ordinated National Network to Engage Physicians in the Care and Treatment of Patients With Atrial Fibrillation chart audit).

    PubMed

    Patel, Ashish D; Tan, Mary K; Angaran, Paul; Bell, Alan D; Berall, Murray; Bucci, Claudia; Demchuk, Andrew M; Essebag, Vidal; Goldin, Lianne; Green, Martin S; Gregoire, Jean C; Gross, Peter L; Heilbron, Brett; Lin, Peter J; Ramanathan, Krishnan; Skanes, Allan; Wheeler, Bruce H; Goodman, Shaun G

    2015-03-01

    The objectives of this national chart audit (January to June 2013) of 6,346 patients with atrial fibrillation (AF; ≥18 years without a significant heart valve disorder) from 647 primary care physicians were to (1) describe the frequency of stroke and bleed risk assessments in patients with nonvalvular AF by primary care physicians, including the accuracy of these assessments relative to established predictive indexes; (2) outline contemporary methods of anticoagulation used; and (3) report the time in the therapeutic range among patients prescribed warfarin. An annual stroke risk assessment was not undertaken in 15% and estimated without a formal risk tool in 33%; agreement with CHADS2 score estimation was seen in 87% of patients. Major bleeding risk assessment was not undertaken in 25% and estimated without a formal risk tool in 47%; agreement with HAS-BLED score estimation was observed in 64% with physician overestimation in 26% of patients. Antithrombotic therapy included warfarin (58%), dabigatran (22%), rivaroxaban (14%), and apixaban (<1%). Among warfarin-treated patients, the median international normalized ratio was 2.4 and time in therapeutic range (TTR) was 73%; however, the TTR was <50% in 845 (25%), 50% to 69% in 674 (20%), and ≥70% in 1,827 (55%) patients. In conclusion, we describe a contemporary real-world elderly population with AF at important risk for stroke. There is apparent overestimation of bleeding risk in many patients. Warfarin was the dominant stroke prevention treatment; however, the suggested TTR target was achieved in only 55% of these patients.

  9. National data on stroke outcomes in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Kongbunkiat, Kannikar; Kasemsap, Narongrit; Thepsuthammarat, Kaewjai; Tiamkao, Somsak; Sawanyawisuth, Kittisak

    2015-03-01

    Stroke is a major public health problem worldwide. There are limited data on national stroke prevalence and outcomes after the beginning of the thrombolytic therapy era in Thailand. This study aimed to investigate the prevalence and factors associated with mortality in stroke patients in Thailand using the national reimbursement databases. Clinical data retrieved included individuals under the universal coverage, social security, and civil servant benefit systems between 1 October 2009 and 30 September 2010. The stroke diagnosis code was based on the International Classification of Diseases 10th revision system including G45 (transient cerebral ischemic attacks and related syndromes), I61 (intracerebral hemorrhage), and I63 (cerebral infarction). The prevalence and stroke outcomes were calculated from these coded data. Factors associated with death were evaluated by multivariable logistic regression analysis. We found that the most frequent stroke subtype was cerebral infarction with a prevalence of 122 patients per 100,000 of population, an average length of hospital stay of 6.8 days, an average hospital charge of 20,740 baht (∼$USD 691), a mortality rate of 7%, and thrombolytic prescriptions of 1%. The significant factors associated with stroke mortality were septicemia, pulmonary embolism, pneumonia, myocardial infarction, status epilepticus, and heart failure. In conclusion, the prevalence and outcomes of stroke in Thailand were comparable with other countries. The era of thrombolytic therapy has just begun in Thailand.

  10. Fluid Shifts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stenger, M. B.; Hargens, A.; Dulchavsky, S.; Ebert, D.; Lee, S.; Laurie, S.; Garcia, K.; Sargsyan, A.; Martin, D.; Lui, J.; Macias, B.; Arbeille, P.; Danielson, R.; Chang, D.; Gunga, H.; Johnston, S.; Westby, C.; Ribeiro, L.; Ploutz-Snyder, R.; Smith, S.

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Mechanisms responsible for the ocular structural and functional changes that characterize the visual impairment and intracranial pressure (ICP) syndrome (VIIP) are unclear, but hypothesized to be secondary to the cephalad fluid shift experienced in spaceflight. This study will relate the fluid distribution and compartmentalization associated with long-duration spaceflight with VIIP symptoms. We also seek to determine whether the magnitude of fluid shifts during spaceflight, as well as the VIIP-related effects of those shifts, can be predicted preflight with acute hemodynamic manipulations, and also if lower body negative pressure (LBNP) can reverse the VIIP effects. METHODS: Physiologic variables will be examined pre-, in- and post-flight in 10 International Space Station crewmembers including: fluid compartmentalization (D2O and NaBr dilution); interstitial tissue thickness (ultrasound); vascular dimensions and dynamics (ultrasound and MRI (including cerebrospinal fluid pulsatility)); ocular measures (optical coherence tomography, intraocular pressure, ultrasound); and ICP measures (tympanic membrane displacement, otoacoustic emissions). Pre- and post-flight measures will be assessed while upright, supine and during 15 deg head-down tilt (HDT). In-flight measures will occur early and late during 6 or 12 month missions. LBNP will be evaluated as a countermeasure during HDT and during spaceflight. RESULTS: The first two crewmembers are in the preflight testing phase. Preliminary results characterize the acute fluid shifts experienced from upright, to supine and HDT postures (increased stroke volume, jugular dimensions and measures of ICP) which are reversed with 25 millimeters Hg LBNP. DISCUSSION: Initial results indicate that acute cephalad fluid shifts may be related to VIIP symptoms, but also may be reversible by LBNP. The effect of a chronic fluid shift has yet to be evaluated. Learning Objectives: Current spaceflight VIIP research is described

  11. The "Know Stroke" Campaign

    MedlinePlus

    ... Current Issue Past Issues Special Section The "Know Stroke" Campaign Past Issues / Summer 2007 Table of Contents ... campaign for the U.S. Hispanic community. 1 Know Stroke A stroke occurs when the blood supply to ...

  12. Healthy Living after Stroke

    MedlinePlus

    ... Stories Stroke Heroes Among Us Healthy Living After Stroke Nutrition Good nutrition is one way to reduce ... look to maintain health and wellness. Subscribe to Stroke Connection Get quarterly digital issues plus our monthly ...

  13. Ultrasound and NICOM in the assessment of fluid responsiveness in patients with mild sepsis in the emergency department: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Oord, Martha; Olgers, Tycho J; Doff-Holman, Mirjam; Harms, Mark P M; Ligtenberg, Jack J M; ter Maaten, Jan C

    2017-01-01

    Objective We investigated whether combining the caval index, assessment of the global contractility of the heart and measurement of stroke volume with Noninvasive Cardiac Output Monitoring (NICOM) can aid in fluid management in the emergency department (ED) in patients with sepsis. Setting A prospective observational single-centre pilot study in a tertiary care centre. Primary and secondary outcomes Ultrasound was used to assess the caval index, heart contractility and presence of B-lines in the lungs. Cardiac output and stroke volume were monitored with NICOM. Primary outcome was increase in stroke volume after a fluid bolus of 500 mL, while secondary outcome included signs of fluid overload. Results We included 37 patients with sepsis who received fluid resuscitation of at least 500 mL saline. The population was divided into patients with a high (>36.5%, n=24) and a low caval index (<36.5%, n=13). We observed a significant increase (p=0.022) in stroke volume after 1000 mL fluid in the high caval index group in contrast to the low caval index group but not after 500 mL of fluid. We did not find a significant association between global contractility of the left ventricle and the response on fluid therapy (p=0.086). No patient showed signs of fluid overload. Conclusions Our small pilot study suggests that at least 1000 mL saline is needed to induce a significant response in stroke volume in patients with sepsis and a high caval index. This amount seems to be safe, not leading to the development of fluid overload. Therefore, combining ultrasound and NICOM is feasible and may be valuable tools in the treatment of patients with sepsis in the ED. A larger trial is needed to confirm these results. PMID:28132006

  14. Fluid Shifts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stenger, M.; Hargens, A.; Dulchavsky, S.; Ebert, D.; Lee, S.; Lauriie, S.; Garcia, K.; Sargsyan, A.; Martin, D.; Ribeiro, L.; Lui, J.; Macias, B.; Arbeille, P.; Danielson, R.; Chang, D.; Johnston, S.; Ploutz-Snyder, R.; Smith, S.

    2016-01-01

    ultrasound); (3) vascular dimensions by ultrasound (jugular veins, cerebral and carotid arteries, vertebral arteries and veins, portal vein); (4) vascular dynamics by MRI (head/neck blood flow, cerebrospinal fluid pulsatility); (5) ocular measures (optical coherence tomography, intraocular pressure, 2-dimensional ultrasound including optic nerve sheath diameter, globe flattening, and retina-choroid thickness, Doppler ultrasound of ophthalmic and retinal arteries, and veins); (6) cardiac variables by ultrasound (inferior vena cava, tricuspid flow and tissue Doppler, pulmonic valve, stroke volume, right heart dimensions and function, four-chamber views); and (7) ICP measures (tympanic membrane displacement, distortion-product otoacoustic emissions, and ICP calculated by MRI). On the ground, acute head-down tilt will induce cephalad fluid shifts, whereas LBNP will oppose these shifts. Controlled Mueller maneuvers will manipulate cardiovascular variables. Through interventions applied before, during, and after flight, we intend to fully evaluate the relationship between fluid shifts and the VIIP syndrome.

  15. Wake-Up Stroke and Stroke of Unknown Onset: A Critical Review

    PubMed Central

    Wouters, Anke; Lemmens, Robin; Dupont, Patrick; Thijs, Vincent

    2014-01-01

    Patients, who wake up with an ischemic stroke, account for a large number of the total stroke population, due to circadian morning predominance of stroke. Currently, this subset of patients is excluded from revascularization-therapy since no exact time of onset is known. A large group of these patients might be eligible for therapy. In this review, we assessed the current literature about the hypothesis that wake-up-strokes occur just prior on awakening and if this subgroup differs in characteristics compared to the overall stroke population. We looked at the safety and efficacy of thrombolysis and interventional techniques in the group of patients with unknown stroke-onset. We performed a meta-analysis of the diagnostic accuracy of the diffusion-FLAIR mismatch in identifying stroke within 3 and 4.5 h. The different imaging-selection criteria that can be used to treat these patients are discussed. Additional research on imaging findings associated with recent stroke and penumbral imaging will eventually lead to a shift from a rigid time-frame based therapy to a tissue-based individualized treatment approach. PMID:25161646