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Sample records for fluorescence correlation spectroscopic

  1. Compact fluorescence spectroscopic tool for cancer detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadeau, Valerie; Hamdan, Khaled; Hewett, Jacqueline; Makaryceva, Juljia; Tait, Iain; Cuschieri, Alfred; Padgett, Miles J.

    2002-05-01

    We describe a compact fluorescence spectroscopic tool for in vivo point monitoring of aminolaevulinic acid (ALA)-induced protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) fluorescence and autofluorescence, as a non-invasive method of differentiating normal and cancerous tissue. This instrument incorporates a 405nm diode laser with a shutter to prevent exposure of tissue to harmful light doses and reduce photobleaching, a bifurcated optical fibre to allow illumination of tissue and collection of fluorescence with a single fibre, a compact grating spectrometer for collection of spectra and a PC for system control. We present spectra obtained using this system both during routine gastro-intestinal (GI) endoscopy for cancer detection and during photodynamic therapy (PDT) of anal intraepithelial neoplasia (AIN) for monitoring of treatment progress. These results illustrate the potential of the system to be used for fluorescence monitoring in a variety of clinical applications.

  2. Fluorescence spectroscopic studies of DNA dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Scalettar, B.A.

    1987-04-01

    Random solvent induced motions of DNA are manifest as nanosecond torsional oscillations of the helix backbone, nanosecond through millisecond bending deformations and overall rotational and translational diffusion of the polymer. Fluorescence spectroscopy is used to study this spectrum of DNA motions while ethidium monoazide was covalently bounded. The steady state fluorescence depolarization data indicate that the covalent monoazide/DNA complex exhibits internal motions characterized by an average angular amplitude of 26 degrees confirming reports of fast torsional oscillations in noncovalent ethidium bromide/DNA systems. Data obtained by use of a new polarized photobleaching recovery technique (FPR) reflect both the rotational dynamics of the polymer and the reversible photochemistry of the dye. To isolate the reorientational motion of the DNA, the FPR experiments were ran in two modes that differ only in the polarization of the bleaching light. A quotient function constructed from the data obtained in these two modes monitors only the rotational component of the FPR recovery. In specific applications those bending deformations of long DNA molecules that have characteristic relaxation times on the order of 100 microseconds have been resolved. A fluorescence correlation technique that relates fluctuations in particle number to center-of-mass motion was used to measure translational diffusion on coefficients of the plasmid PBR322 and a short oligomeric DNA. A theory that describes angular correlation in systems exhibiting cyclic, biologically directed reorientation and random Brownian rotation is developed.

  3. Correlative Fluorescence and Electron Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Schirra, Randall T.; Zhang, Peijun

    2014-01-01

    Correlative fluorescence and electron microscopy (CFEM) is a multimodal technique that combines dynamic and localization information from fluorescence methods with ultrastructural data from electron microscopy, to give new information about how cellular components change relative to the spatiotemporal dynamics within their environment. In this review, we will discuss some of the basic techniques and tools of the trade for utilizing this attractive research method, which is becoming a very powerful tool for biology labs. The information obtained from correlative methods has proven to be invaluable in creating consensus between the two types of microscopy, extending the capability of each, and cutting the time and expense associate with using each method separately for comparative analysis. The realization of the advantages of these methods in cell biology have led to rapid improvement in the protocols and have ushered in a new generation of instruments to reach the next level of correlation – integration. PMID:25271959

  4. Exploring spectroscopic and physicochemical properties of new fluorescent ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Marwani, Hadi M

    2013-03-01

    In the current study, spectroscopic and physicochemical properties of newly prepared ionic liquids were investigated. Ionic liquids were synthesized via a simple and straightforward route using a metathesis reaction of either N,N-diethyl-p-phenylenediamine monohydrochloride or N-phenacylpyridinium bromide with bis(trifluoromethane)sulfonimide lithium in water. High yield and purity were obtained for the resultant ionic liquids. Data acquired by use of (1)H NMR and FT-IR measurements were consistent with the chemical structures of newly prepared ionic liquids. Results of thermal gravimetric analysis also implied that these ionic liquids have good thermal stability. In addition, UV-vis and fluorescence spectroscopy measurements provided that new ionic liquids are good absorbent and fluorescent. Time-based fluorescence steady-state measurements showed that ionic liquids have high photostability against photobleaching. For a deeper mechanistic understanding of the analytical potential of newly synthesized ionic liquids, spectroscopic and physicochemical parameters, including singlet absorption, extinction coefficient, fluorescence quantum yield, Stokes shift, oscillator strength and dipole moment, were also investigated.

  5. Spectroscopic detection of fluorescent protein marker gene activity in genetically modified plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liew, O. W.; Chong, Jenny P. C.; Asundi, Anand K.

    2005-04-01

    This work focuses on developing a portable fibre optic fluorescence analyser for rapid identification of genetically modified plants tagged with a fluorescent marker gene. Independent transgenic tobacco plant lines expressing the enhanced green fluorescence protein (EGFP) gene were regenerated following Agrobacterium-mediated gene transfer. Molecular characterisation of these plant lines was carried out at the DNA level by PCR screening to confirm their transgenic status. Conventional transgene expression analysis was then carried out at the RNA level by RT-PCR and at the protein level by Western blotting using anti-GFP rabbit antiserum. The amount of plant-expressed EGFP on a Western blot was quantified against known amounts of purified EGFP by scanning densitometry. The expression level of EGFP in transformed plants was found to range from 0.1 - 0.6% of total extractable protein. A comparison between conventional western analysis of transformants and direct spectroscopic quantification using the fibre optic fluorescence analyser was made. The results showed that spectroscopic measurements of fluorescence emission from strong EGFP expressors correlated positively with Western blot data. However, the fluorescence analyser was also able to identify weakly expressing plant transformants below the detection limit of colorimetric Western blotting.

  6. Accurate fluorescence quantum yield determination by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Kempe, Daryan; Schöne, Antonie; Fitter, Jörg; Gabba, Matteo

    2015-04-01

    Here, we present a comparative method for the accurate determination of fluorescence quantum yields (QYs) by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy. By exploiting the high sensitivity of single-molecule spectroscopy, we obtain the QYs of samples in the microliter range and at (sub)nanomolar concentrations. Additionally, in combination with fluorescence lifetime measurements, our method allows the quantification of both static and collisional quenching constants. Thus, besides being simple and fast, our method opens up the possibility to photophysically characterize labeled biomolecules under application-relevant conditions and with low sample consumption, which is often important in single-molecule studies.

  7. Fluorescence Spectroscopic Properties of Normal and Abnormal Biomedical Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradhan, Asima

    Steady state and time-resolved optical spectroscopy and native fluorescence is used to study the physical and optical properties occurring in diseased and non-diseased biological human tissue, in particular, cancer of the human breast, artery and the dynamics of a photosensitizer useful in photodynamic therapy. The main focus of the research is on the optical properties of cancer and atherosclerotic tissues as compared to their normal counterparts using the different luminescence based spectroscopic techniques such as steady state fluorescence, time-resolved fluorescence, excitation spectroscopy and phosphorescence. The excitation and steady-state spectroscopic fluorescence using visible excitation wavelength displays a difference between normal and malignant tissues. This difference is attributed to absorption of the emission by hemoglobin in normal tissues. This method using 488nm fails to distinguish neoplastic tissue such as benign tissues and tumors from malignant tumors. The time-resolved fluorescence at visible, near -uv and uv excitation wavelengths display non-exponential profiles which are significantly different for malignant tumors as compared to non-malignant tissues only with uv excitation. The differences observed with visible and near-uv excitation wavelengths are not as significant. The non-exponential profiles are interpreted as due to a combination of fluorophores along with the action of non-radiative processes. Low temperature luminescence studies confirm the occurrence of non-radiative decay processes while temporal studies of various relevant biomolecules indicate the probable fluorophores responsible for the observed signal in tissues. Phosphorescence from human tissues have been observed for the first time and lifetimes of a few hundred nanoseconds are measured for malignant and benign tissues. Time-resolved fluorescence studies of normal artery and atherosclerotic plaque have shown that a combination of two excitation wavelengths can

  8. Spectroscopic Analysis of Today's Compact Fluorescent Light Bulbs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pluhar, Edward

    2012-03-01

    In today's consumer market, there are many different light bulbs that claim to produce `natural' light. In my research, I both quantitatively and qualitatively analyzed this claim. First, utilizing a spectroscope, I compared the spectra emitted by different brands and types of compact fluorescent light (CFL) bulbs to the spectra emitted by the Sun. Once the bulbs were quantitatively analyzed, I proceeded to qualitatively analyze them by exposing subjects to the different bulbs. The subjects were asked to rate the quality of color in different pictures illuminated by each type of CFL. From these tests, I was able to determine the ``best'' CFL bulbs, and conclude whether the health risks associated with CFL bulbs outweigh the cost savings, longevity of the bulbs, and/or quality of light benefits.

  9. Synchronous fluorescence spectroscopic study of solvatochromic curcumin dye

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patra, Digambara; Barakat, Christelle

    2011-09-01

    Curcumin, the main yellow bioactive component of turmeric, has recently acquired attention by chemists due its wide range of potential biological applications as an antioxidant, an anti-inflammatory, and an anti-carcinogenic agent. This molecule fluoresces weakly and poorly soluble in water. In this detailed study of curcumin in thirteen different solvents, both the absorption and fluorescence spectra of curcumin was found to be broad, however, a narrower and simple synchronous fluorescence spectrum of curcumin was obtained at Δ λ = 10-20 nm. Lippert-Mataga plot of curcumin in different solvents illustrated two sets of linearity which is consistent with the plot of Stokes' shift vs. the ET30. When Stokes's shift in wavenumber scale was replaced by synchronous fluorescence maximum in nanometer scale, the solvent polarity dependency measured by λSFSmax vs. Lippert-Mataga plot or ET30 values offered similar trends as measured via Stokes' shift for protic and aprotic solvents for curcumin. Better linear correlation of λSFSmax vs. π* scale of solvent polarity was found compared to λabsmax or λemmax or Stokes' shift measurements. In Stokes' shift measurement both absorption/excitation as well as emission (fluorescence) spectra are required to compute the Stokes' shift in wavenumber scale, but measurement could be done in a very fast and simple way by taking a single scan of SFS avoiding calculation and obtain information about polarity of the solvent. Curcumin decay properties in all the solvents could be fitted well to a double-exponential decay function.

  10. UV-fluorescence spectroscopic technique in the diagnosis of breast, ovarian, uterus, and cervix cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Bidyut B.; Glassman, Wenling S.; Alfano, Robert R.; Cleary, Joseph; Prudente, R.; Celmer, Edward J.; Lubicz, Stephanie

    1991-06-01

    Malignant breast tumors can be separated from benign and normal tissues using uv-fluorescence spectroscopic technique. Using the same method one can also distinguish cancerous tissues from noncancerous ones in case of cervix, uterus and ovary.

  11. In Vivo Fluorescence Correlation and Cross-Correlation Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mütze, Jörg; Ohrt, Thomas; Petrášek, Zdeněk; Schwille, Petra

    In this manuscript, we describe the application of Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy (FCS), Fluorescence Cross-Correlation Spectroscopy (FCCS), and scanning FCS (sFCS) to two in vivo systems. In the first part, we describe the application of two-photon standard and scanning FCS in Caenorhabditis elegans embryos. The differentiation of a single fertilized egg into a complex organism in C. elegans is regulated by a number of protein-dependent processes. The oocyte divides asymmetrically into two daughter cells of different developmental fate. Two of the involved proteins, PAR-2 and NMY-2, are studied. The second investigated system is the mechanism of RNA interference in human cells. An EGFP based cell line that allows to study the dynamics and localization of the RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC) with FCS in vivo is created, which has so far been inaccessible with other experimental methods. Furthermore, Fluorescence Cross-Correlation Spectroscopy is employed to highlight the asymmetric incorporation of labeled siRNAs into RISC.

  12. Strengths and Weaknesses of Recently Engineered Red Fluorescent Proteins Evaluated in Live Cells Using Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Siegel, Amanda P.; Baird, Michelle A.; Davidson, Michael W.; Day, Richard N.

    2013-01-01

    The scientific community is still looking for a bright, stable red fluorescent protein (FP) as functional as the current best derivatives of green fluorescent protein (GFP). The red FPs exploit the reduced background of cells imaged in the red region of the visible spectrum, but photophysical short comings have limited their use for some spectroscopic approaches. Introduced nearly a decade ago, mCherry remains the most often used red FP for fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) and other single molecule techniques, despite the advent of many newer red FPs. All red FPs suffer from complex photophysics involving reversible conversions to a dark state (flickering), a property that results in fairly low red FP quantum yields and potential interference with spectroscopic analyses including FCS. The current report describes assays developed to determine the best working conditions for, and to uncover the shortcoming of, four recently engineered red FPs for use in FCS and other diffusion and spectroscopic studies. All five red FPs assayed had potential shortcomings leading to the conclusion that the current best red FP for FCS is still mCherry. The assays developed here aim to enable the rapid evaluation of new red FPs and their smooth adaptation to live cell spectroscopic microscopy and nanoscopy. PMID:24129172

  13. Ultrasensitive hybridization analysis using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Kinjo, M; Rigler, R

    1995-05-25

    The hybridization of fluorescently tagged 18mer deoxyribonucleotides with complementary DNA templates was analysed by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) in a droplet under an epi-illuminated fluorescence microscope at the level of single molecules. The interaction can be monitored by the change in the translational diffusion time of the smaller (18mer) primer when binding to the bigger (7.5 kb) DNA containing the complementary sequence. The hybridization process in the presence of template M13mp18 ssDNA was monitored in a small volume (2 x 10(-16)I) at various temperatures. The Arrhenius plot of the association rate constant shows that the activation energy was 38.8 kcal/mol, but the hybridization process may involve several components. The titration experiment suggested that approximately 2 primers can be associated with one template DNA at 40 degrees C. Results of a simple homology search for the sequences complementary to the primer indicate the existence of additional sites of lower specificity.

  14. Use of laser fluorescence in dental caries diagnosis: a fluorescence x biomolecular vibrational spectroscopic comparative study.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Fabíola Bastos de; Barbosa, Artur Felipe Santos; Zanin, Fátima Antonia Aparecida; Brugnera Júnior, Aldo; Silveira Júnior, Landulfo; Pinheiro, Antonio Luiz Barbosa

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this work was to verify the existence of correlation between Raman spectroscopy readings of phosphate apatite (~960 cm-1), fluoridated apatite (~575 cm-1) and organic matrix (~1450 cm-1) levels and Diagnodent® readings at different stages of dental caries in extracted human teeth. The mean peak value of fluorescence in the carious area was recorded and teeth were divided in enamel caries, dentin caries and sound dental structure. After fluorescence readings, Raman spectroscopy was carried out on the same sites. The results showed significant difference (ANOVA, p<0.05) between the fluorescence readings for enamel (16.4 ± 2.3) and dentin (57.6 ± 23.7) on carious teeth. Raman peaks of enamel and dentin revealed that ~575 and ~960 cm-1 peaks were more intense in enamel caries. There was significant negative correlation (p<0.05) between the ~575 and ~960 cm-1 peaks and dentin caries. It may be concluded that the higher the fluorescence detected by Diagnodent the lower the peaks of phosphate apatite and fluoridated apatite. As the early diagnosis of caries is directly related to the identification of changes in the inorganic tooth components, Raman spectroscopy was more sensitive to variations of these components than Diagnodent.

  15. Tubulin equilibrium unfolding followed by time-resolved fluorescence and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez, Susana A.; Brunet, Juan E.; Jameson, David M.; Lagos, Rosalba; Monasterio, Octavio

    2004-01-01

    The pathway for the in vitro equilibrium unfolding of the tubulin heterodimer by guanidinium chloride (GdmCl) has been studied using several spectroscopic techniques, specifically circular dichroism (CD), two-photon Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy (FCS), and time-resolved fluorescence, including lifetime and dynamic polarization. The results show that tubulin unfolding is characterized by distinct processes that occur in different GdmCl concentration ranges. From 0 to 0.5 M GdmCl, a slight alteration of the tubulin heterodimer occurs, as evidenced by a small, but reproducible increase in the rotational correlation time of the protein and a sharp decrease in the secondary structure monitored by CD. In the range 0.5–1.5 M GdmCl, significant decreases in the steady-state anisotropy and average lifetime of the intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence occur, as well as a decrease in the rotational correlation time, from 48 to 26 nsec. In the same GdmCl range, the number of protein molecules (labeled with Alexa 488), as determined by two-photon FCS measurements, increases by a factor of two, indicating dissociation of the tubulin dimer into monomers. From 1.5 to 4 M GdmCl, these monomers unfold, as evidenced by the continual decrease in the tryptophan steady-state anisotropy, average lifetime, and rotational correlation time, concomitant with secondary structural changes. These results help to elucidate the unfolding pathway of the tubulin heterodimer and demonstrate the value of FCS measurements in studies on oligomeric protein systems. PMID:14691224

  16. Saturation effects in fluorescence correlation spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Lloyd M.; Shen, Guoqing; Ball, David A.

    2005-03-01

    Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) could provide a more useful tool for intracellular studies and biological sample characterization if measurement times could be reduced. While an increase in laser power can enable an autocorrelation function (ACF) with adequate signal-to-noise to be acquired within a shorter measurement time, excitation saturation then leads to distortion of the ACF and systematic errors in the measurement results. An empirical method for achieving reduced systematic errors by employing a fitting function with an additional adjustable parameter has been previously introduced for two-photon FCS. Here we provide a unified physical explanation of excitation saturation effects for the three cases of continuous-wave, pulsed one-photon excitation, and two-photon excitation FCS. When the time between laser pulses is longer than the fluorescence lifetime, the signal rate at which excitation saturation occurs is lower for pulsed excitation than for cw excitation, and due to the disparate timescales of the photophysical processes following excitation, it is lower still for two-photon excitation. We use a single-molecule description of FCS to obtain improved analytical ACF fitting functions for the three cases. The fitting functions more accurately account for saturation effects than those previously employed without the need for an additional empirical parameter. Use of these fitting functions removes systematic errors and enables measurements to be acquired more quickly by use of higher laser powers. Increase of background, triplet photophysics, and the cases of scanning FCS and fluorescence cross-correlation spectroscopy are also discussed. Experimental results acquired with a custom built apparatus are presented.

  17. Correlation of the gallbladder stone and tissue fluorescent images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kokaj, Jahja O.; Marafi, Mustafa A.; Makdisi, Yacob; Bhatia, Kuldip S.

    2001-11-01

    Fluorescent images of gallbladder stones, tissue and bile are obtained using a streak camera. A Match Spatial Filer (MSF) is made using a stone fluorescent image. The MSF is used to perform correlations with fluorescent tissue and bile image. A method for recognition of the stone and rejection of the tissue during the laser lithotripsy is proposed using the correlation outputs.

  18. Dual-modal silica nanoprobes with surface enhanced Raman spectroscopic and fluorescent signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sang-Myung

    2015-07-01

    We present that dual-modal silica nanoprobes based on surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) and fluorescence, demonstrating the several combinations of two spectroscopic signals for the noble combinatorial nanoprobes (F-SERS dot). Their synthetic procedure was introduced and dual-modal spectroscopic analyses were performed as preliminary studies. Hopefully, F-SERS dots will be one of promising and multifunctional nanoprobes for the various in vitro and in vivo biological diagnoses and screenings.

  19. Dynamic disorder in horseradish peroxidase observed with total internal reflection fluorescence correlation spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassler, Kai; Rigler, Per; Blom, Hans; Rigler, Rudolf; Widengren, Jerker; Lasser, Theo

    2007-04-01

    This paper discusses the application of objective-type total internal reflection fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (TIR-FCS) to the study of the kinetics of immobilized horseradish peroxidase on a single molecule level. Objective-type TIR-FCS combines the advantages of FCS with TIRF microscopy in a way that allows for simultaneous ultra-sensitive spectroscopic measurements using a single-point detector and convenient localization of single molecules on a surface by means of parallel imaging.

  20. Fluorescence spectroscopic study on the interaction of resveratrol with lipoxygenase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinto, María del Carmen; Duque, Antonio Luis; Macías, Pedro

    2010-09-01

    The interaction of lipoxygenase with (E)-resveratrol was investigated by fluorescence spectroscopy. The data obtained revealed that the quenching of intrinsic fluorescence of lipoxygenase is produced by the formation of a complex lipoxygenase-(E)-resveratrol. From the value obtained for the binding constant, according to the Stern-Volmer modified equation, was deduced the existence of static quenching mechanism and, as consequence, the existence of a strong interaction between (E)-resveratrol and lipoxygenase. The values obtained for the thermodynamic parameter Δ H (-3.58 kJ mol -1) and Δ S (87.97 J mol -1K -1) suggested the participation of hydrophobic interactions and hydrogen bonds in the stabilization of the complex ligand-protein. From the static quenching we determined that only exist one independent binding site. Based on the Förster energy transfer theory, the distance between the acceptor ((E)-resveratrol) and the donor (Trp residues of lipoxygenase) was calculated to be 3.42 nm. Finally, based on the information obtained from the evaluation of synchronous and three-dimensional fluorescence spectroscopy, we deduced that the interaction of (E)-resveratrol with lipoxygenase produces micro-environmental and conformational alterations of protein in the binding region.

  1. Chromatographic and fluorescence spectroscopic studies of individual 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene--deoxyribonucleoside adducts

    SciTech Connect

    Moschel, R.C.; Pigott, M.A.; Costantino, N.; Dipple, A.

    1983-09-01

    Compared with standard Sephadex LH-20 column chromatography, a newly developed high pressure liquid chromatographic separation of hydrocarbon deoxyribonucleoside adducts derived from the DNA of mouse embryo cell cultures exposed to 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA) provides markedly superior resolution. Once resolved, the fluorescence spectroscopic properties of the three major DMBA--DNA adducts indicate that the fluorescence exhibited by adducts derived from a bay region syn dihydrodiol epoxide of DMBA differs subtly from that exhibited by adducts derived from the isomeric anti dihydrodiol epoxide.

  2. Identification of organic materials in historic oil paintings using correlated extractionless surface-enhanced Raman scattering and fluorescence microscopy.

    PubMed

    Oakley, Lindsay H; Dinehart, Stephen A; Svoboda, Shelley A; Wustholz, Kristin L

    2011-06-01

    A novel spectroscopic approach, correlated surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) and fluorescence microscopy, is used to identify organic materials in two 18th century oil paintings. The vibrational fingerprint of analyte molecules is revealed using SERS, and corresponding fluorescence measurements provide a probe of local environment as well as an inherent capability to verify material identification. Correlated SERS and fluorescence measurements are performed directly on single pigment particles obtained from historic oil paintings with Ag colloids as the enhancing substrate. We demonstrate the first extractionless nonhydrolysis SERS study of oil paint as well as the potential of correlated SERS and fluorescence microscopy studies for the simultaneous identification of organic colorants and binding media in historic oil paintings. PMID:21524143

  3. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy using quantum dots: advances, challenges and opportunities.

    PubMed

    Heuff, Romey F; Swift, Jody L; Cramb, David T

    2007-04-28

    Semiconductor nanocrystals (quantum dots) have been increasingly employed in measuring the dynamic behavior of biomacromolecules using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy. This poses a challenge, because quantum dots display their own dynamic behavior in the form of intermittent photoluminescence, also known as blinking. In this review, the manifestation of blinking in correlation spectroscopy will be explored, preceded by an examination of quantum dot blinking in general.

  4. Tracking-FCS: Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy of individual particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berglund, Andrew J.; Mabuchi, Hideo

    2005-10-01

    We exploit recent advances in single-particle tracking to perform fluorescence correlation spectroscopy on individual fluorescent particles, in contrast to traditional methods that build up statistics over a sequence of many measurements. By rapidly scanning the focus of an excitation laser in a circular pattern, demodulating the measured fluorescence, and feeding these results back to a piezoelectric translation stage, we track the Brownian motion of fluorescent polymer microspheres in aqueous solution in the plane transverse to the laser axis. We discuss the estimation of particle diffusion statistics from closed-loop position measurements, and we present a generalized theory of fluorescence correlation spectroscopy for the case that the motion of a single fluorescent particle is actively tracked by a time-dependent laser intensity. We model the motion of a tracked particle using Ornstein-Uhlenbeck statistics, using a general theory that contains a umber of existing results as specific cases. We find good agreement between our theory and experimental results, and discuss possible future applications of these techniques to passive, single-shot, single-molecule fluorescence measurements with many orders of magnitude in time resolution.

  5. Pin-Hole Array Correlation Imaging: Highly Parallel Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Needleman, Daniel J.; Xu, Yangqing; Mitchison, Timothy J.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract In this work, we describe pin-hole array correlation imaging, a multipoint version of fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, based upon a stationary Nipkow disk and a high-speed electron multiplying charged coupled detector. We characterize the system and test its performance on a variety of samples, including 40 nm colloids, a fluorescent protein complex, a membrane dye, and a fluorescence fusion protein. Our results demonstrate that pin-hole array correlation imaging is capable of simultaneously performing tens or hundreds of fluorescence correlation spectroscopy-style measurements in cells, with sufficient sensitivity and temporal resolution to study the behaviors of membrane-bound and soluble molecules labeled with conventional chemical dyes or fluorescent proteins. PMID:19527665

  6. Near real time, accurate, and sensitive microbiological safety monitoring using an all-fibre spectroscopic fluorescence system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanholsbeeck, F.; Swift, S.; Cheng, M.; Bogomolny, E.

    2013-11-01

    Enumeration of microorganisms is an essential microbiological task for many industrial sectors and research fields. Various tests for detection and counting of microorganisms are used today. However most of the current methods to enumerate bacteria require either long incubation time for limited accuracy, or use complicated protocols along with bulky equipment. We have developed an accurate, all-fibre spectroscopic system to measure fluorescence signal in-situ. In this paper, we examine the potential of this setup for near real time bacteria enumeration in aquatic environment. The concept is based on a well-known phenomenon that the fluorescence quantum yields of some nucleic acid stains significantly increase upon binding with nucleic acids of microorganisms. In addition we have used GFP labeled organisms. The fluorescence signal increase can be correlated to the amount of nucleic acid present in the sample. In addition we have used GFP labeled organisms. Our results show that we are able to detect a wide range of bacteria concentrations without dilution or filtration (1-108 CFU/ml) using different optical probes we designed. This high sensitivity is due to efficient light delivery with an appropriate collection volume and in situ fluorescence detection as well as the use of a sensitive CCD spectrometer. By monitoring the laser power, we can account for laser fluctuations while measuring the fluorescence signal which improves as well the system accuracy. A synchronized laser shutter allows us to achieve a high SNR with minimal integration time, thereby reducing the photobleaching effect. In summary, we conclude that our optical setup may offer a robust method for near real time bacterial detection in aquatic environment.

  7. Infrared and fluorescence spectroscopic studies of a phospholipid bilayer supported by a soft cationic hydrogel scaffold.

    PubMed

    Grossutti, Michael; Seenath, Ryan; Noël, John A; Lipkowski, Jacek

    2016-07-01

    Polarized attenuated total reflection (ATR-IR) spectroscopy and fluorescence microscopy techniques were used to characterize a 1,2-diphytanoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPhPC) membrane supported on porous, cationic hydrogel beads. Fluorescence microscopy images showed that the DPhPC coated the external surface of the hydrogel scaffold. In addition, a fluorescence assay of the emission intensity of the Tb(3+)/dipicolinic acid complex demonstrated that the DPhPC coating acted as a barrier to Tb(3+) efflux from the scaffolded vesicle and successfully sealed the porous hydrogel bead. Fluorescence quenching and ATR-IR spectroscopic measurements revealed that the lipid coating has a bilayer structure. The phytanoyl chains were found to exhibit significant trans-gauche isomerization, characteristic of the fluid liquid phase. However, no lipid lateral mobility was observed by fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) measurements. The phosphocholine headgroup was found to be well hydrated and oriented such that the cationic choline group tucked in behind the anionic phosphate group, consistent with an electrostatic attraction between the cationic scaffold and zwitterionic lipid. The absence of lipid lateral mobility may be due to the strength of this attraction.

  8. Quantum-chemical investigations of spectroscopic properties of a fluorescence probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Titova, T. Yu.; Morozova, Yu. P.; Zharkova, O. M.; Artyukhov, V. Ya.; Korolev, B. V.

    2012-09-01

    The prodan molecule (6-propionyl-2-dimethylamino naphthalene) - fluorescence probe - is investigated by quantum-chemical methods of intermediate neglect of differential overlap (INDO) and molecular electrostatic potential (MEP). The dipole moments of the ground and excited states, the nature and position of energy levels, the centers of specific solvation, the rate constants of photoprocesses, and the fluorescence quantum yield are estimated. To elucidate the role of the dimethylamino group in the formation of bands and spectral characteristics, the molecule only with the propionyl group (pron) is investigated. The long-wavelength absorption bands of prodan and pron molecules are interpreted. The results obtained for the prodan molecule by the INDO method with original spectroscopic parameterization are compared with the literature data obtained by the DFT/CIS, ZINDO/S, and AM1/CISD methods.

  9. Fluorescence quenching of quantum dots by gold nanoparticles: a potential long range spectroscopic ruler.

    PubMed

    Samanta, Anirban; Zhou, Yadong; Zou, Shengli; Yan, Hao; Liu, Yan

    2014-09-10

    The dependence of quantum dot (QD) fluorescence emission on the proximity of 30 nm gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) was studied with controlled interparticle distances ranging from 15 to 70 nm. This was achieved by coassembling DNA-conjugated QDs and AuNPs in a 1:1 ratio at precise positions on a triangular-shaped DNA origami platform. A profound, long-range quenching of the photoluminescence intensity of the QDs was observed. A combination of static and time-resolved fluorescence measurements suggests that the quenching is due to an increase in the nonradiative decay rate of QD emission. Unlike FRET, the energy transfer is inversely proportional to the 2.7th power of the distance between nanoparticles with half quenching at ∼28 nm. This long-range quenching phenomena may be useful for developing extended spectroscopic rulers in the future. PMID:25084363

  10. Time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopic study of crude petroleum oils: influence of chemical composition.

    PubMed

    Ryder, Alan G

    2004-05-01

    The fluorescence of crude petroleum oils is sensitive to changes in chemical composition and many different fluorescence methods have been used to characterize crude oils. The use of fluorescence lifetimes to quantitatively characterize oil composition has practical advantages over steady-state measurements, but there have been comparatively few studies in which the lifetime behavior is correlated with gross chemical compositional data. In this study, the fluorescence lifetimes for a series of 23 crude petroleum oils with American Petroleum Institute (API) gravities of between 10 and 50 were measured at several emission wavelengths (450-785 nm) using a 380 nm light emitting diode (LED) excitation source. It was found that the intensity average fluorescence lifetime (tau) at any emission wave-length does not correlate well with either API gravity or aromatic concentration. However, it was found that tau is strongly negatively correlated with both the polar and sulfur concentrations and positively correlated with the corrected alkane concentration. This indicates that the fluorescence behavior of crude petroleum oils is governed primarily by the concentration of quenching species. All the strong lifetime-concentration correlations are nonlinear and show a high degree of scatter, especially for medium to light oils with API gravities of between 25 and 40. The degree of scatter is greatest for oils where the concentrations (wt %) of the polar fraction is approximately 10 +/- 4%, the asphaltene component is approximately 1 +/- 0.5%, and sulfur is 0.5 +/- 0.4%. This large degree of scatter precludes the use of average fluorescence lifetime data obtained with 380 nm excitation for the accurate prediction of the common chemical compositional parameters of crude petroleum oils. PMID:15165340

  11. A fast, flexible algorithm for calculating correlations in Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Laurence, T; Fore, S; Huser, T

    2005-10-13

    A new algorithm is introduced for computing correlations of photon arrival time data acquired in single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS). The correlation is first rewritten as a counting operation on photon pairs. For each photon, the contribution to the correlation function for each subsequent photon is calculated for arbitrary bin spacings of the correlation time lag. By retaining the bin positions in the photon sequence after each photon, the correlation can be performed efficiently. Example correlations for simulations of FCS experiments are shown, with comparable execution speed to the commonly used multiple-tau correlation technique. Also, wide bin spacings are possible that allow for real-time software calculation of correlations even for high count rates ({approx}350 kHz). The flexibility and broad applicability of the algorithm is demonstrated using results from single molecule photon antibunching experiments.

  12. Quantitative confocal fluorescence microscopy of dynamic processes by multifocal fluorescence correlation spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krmpot, Aleksandar J.; Nikolić, Stanko N.; Vitali, Marco; Papadopoulos, Dimitrios K.; Oasa, Sho; Thyberg, Per; Tisa, Simone; Kinjo, Masataka; Nilsson, Lennart; Gehring, Walter J.; Terenius, Lars; Rigler, Rudolf; Vukojevic, Vladana

    2015-07-01

    Quantitative confocal fluorescence microscopy imaging without scanning is developed for the study of fast dynamical processes. The method relies on the use of massively parallel Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy (mpFCS). Simultaneous excitation of fluorescent molecules across the specimen is achieved by passing a single laser beam through a Diffractive Optical Element (DOE) to generate a quadratic illumination matrix of 32×32 light sources. Fluorescence from 1024 illuminated spots is detected in a confocal arrangement by a matching matrix detector consisting of the same number of single-photon avalanche photodiodes (SPADs). Software was developed for data acquisition and fast autoand cross-correlation analysis by parallel signal processing using a Graphic Processing Unit (GPU). Instrumental performance was assessed using a conventional single-beam FCS instrument as a reference. Versatility of the approach for application in biomedical research was evaluated using ex vivo salivary glands from Drosophila third instar larvae expressing a fluorescently-tagged transcription factor Sex Combs Reduced (Scr) and live PC12 cells stably expressing the fluorescently tagged mu-opioid receptor (MOPeGFP). We show that quantitative mapping of local concentration and mobility of transcription factor molecules across the specimen can be achieved using this approach, which paves the way for future quantitative characterization of dynamical reaction-diffusion landscapes across live cells/tissue with a submillisecond temporal resolution (presently 21 μs/frame) and single-molecule sensitivity.

  13. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy: Diagnostics for sparse molecules

    PubMed Central

    Maiti, Sudipta; Haupts, Ulrich; Webb, Watt W.

    1997-01-01

    The robust glow of molecular fluorescence renders even sparse molecules detectable and susceptible to analysis for concentration, mobility, chemistry, and photophysics. Correlation spectroscopy, a statistical-physics-based tool, gleans quantitative information from the spontaneously fluctuating fluorescence signals obtained from small molecular ensembles. This analytical power is available for studying molecules present at minuscule concentrations in liquid solutions (less than one nanomolar), or even on the surfaces of living cells at less than one macromolecule per square micrometer. Indeed, routines are becoming common to detect, locate, and examine individual molecules under favorable conditions. PMID:9342306

  14. Electrostatic Interactions of Fluorescent Molecules with Dielectric Interfaces Studied by Total Internal Reflection Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Blom, Hans; Hassler, Kai; Chmyrov, Andriy; Widengren, Jerker

    2010-01-01

    Electrostatic interactions between dielectric surfaces and different fluorophores used in ultrasensitive fluorescence microscopy are investigated using objective-based Total Internal Reflection Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy (TIR-FCS). The interfacial dynamics of cationic rhodamine 123 and rhodamine 6G, anionic/dianionic fluorescein, zwitterionic rhodamine 110 and neutral ATTO 488 are monitored at various ionic strengths at physiological pH. As analyzed by means of the amplitude and time-evolution of the autocorrelation function, the fluorescent molecules experience electrostatic attraction or repulsion at the glass surface depending on their charges. Influences of the electrostatic interactions are also monitored through the triplet-state population and triplet relaxation time, including the amount of detected fluorescence or the count-rate-per-molecule parameter. These TIR-FCS results provide an increased understanding of how fluorophores are influenced by the microenvironment of a glass surface, and show a promising approach for characterizing electrostatic interactions at interfaces. PMID:20386645

  15. Spectroscopic OCT by Grating-Based Temporal Correlation Coupled to Optical Spectral Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Froehly, L.; Ouadour, M.; Furfaro, L.; Sandoz, P.; Leproux, P.; Huss, G.; Couderc, V.

    2008-01-01

    Spectroscopic optical coherence tomography (spectroscopic OCT) is an echographic-like optical method for biomedical functional imaging. Current spectroscopic optical coherence tomography (OCT) methods rely on a posteriori numerical calculation. We present an alternative for optically accessing the spectroscopic information in OCT, that is, without postprocessing, by using a grating-based correlation and a wavelength demultiplexing system. Spectrally resolved A-scan is directly recorded on the image sensor. Due to the grating-based system, no correlation scan is necessary. The signal is registered in the wavelength-depth plane on a 2D camera that provides a large number of resolved points. In the frame of this paper, we present the principle of the system as well as demonstration results. Advantages and drawback of this system compared to others are discussed. PMID:18385813

  16. Simultaneous Correlative Scanning Electron and High-NA Fluorescence Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Liv, Nalan; Zonnevylle, A. Christiaan; Narvaez, Angela C.; Effting, Andries P. J.; Voorneveld, Philip W.; Lucas, Miriam S.; Hardwick, James C.; Wepf, Roger A.; Kruit, Pieter; Hoogenboom, Jacob P.

    2013-01-01

    Correlative light and electron microscopy (CLEM) is a unique method for investigating biological structure-function relations. With CLEM protein distributions visualized in fluorescence can be mapped onto the cellular ultrastructure measured with electron microscopy. Widespread application of correlative microscopy is hampered by elaborate experimental procedures related foremost to retrieving regions of interest in both modalities and/or compromises in integrated approaches. We present a novel approach to correlative microscopy, in which a high numerical aperture epi-fluorescence microscope and a scanning electron microscope illuminate the same area of a sample at the same time. This removes the need for retrieval of regions of interest leading to a drastic reduction of inspection times and the possibility for quantitative investigations of large areas and datasets with correlative microscopy. We demonstrate Simultaneous CLEM (SCLEM) analyzing cell-cell connections and membrane protrusions in whole uncoated colon adenocarcinoma cell line cells stained for actin and cortactin with AlexaFluor488. SCLEM imaging of coverglass-mounted tissue sections with both electron-dense and fluorescence staining is also shown. PMID:23409024

  17. Preparation of plasmid DNA in transfection complexes for fluorescence and electron spectroscopic imaging.

    PubMed

    Malecki, M

    1996-01-01

    The aim of this project was to develop procedures necessary to study mechanisms of receptor mediated gene transfer by means of integrated microscopy. Plasmid DNA was incorporated into a transfection complex consisting of poly(L)lysine and transferrin to which the nuclear localization signal was conjugated. This complex was presented to cultured glioma cells. Preparation of the transfected DNA for imaging was pursued by two methods. In the first method tetramethylrhodamine, nanogold, and ferritin were linked through streptavidin to the biotinylated plasmid DNA. Trafficking of the fluorescent derivatives was studied in living cells with fluorescence microscopy. Then, selected cells were rapidly cryo-immobilized. Ultra-structural distribution of the transfected DNA was imaged with energy filtering transmission electron microscopy. In the second method, the unmodified transfected DNA was detected in cryo-immobilized cells by in situ polymerase chain reaction and in situ hybridization. For laser scanning fluorescence microscopy probes were labeled with tetramethylrhodamine. For ultrastructural analysis by electron spectroscopic imaging, probes containing incorporated digoxigenin were labeled with anti-digoxigenin boronated antibodies. Based upon the developed procedures, it has been demonstrated that the presence of the nuclear localization signal in the transfection complex resulted in rapid nuclear import of the transfected DNA. PMID:9601525

  18. Principles and applications of fluorescence lifetime correlation spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beranová, Lenka; Humpolícková, Jana; Hof, Martin

    2009-05-01

    Two fluorescence spectroscopy concepts, fluorescence correlation spectroscopy and time correlated single photon counting (TCSPC) are employed in fluorescence lifetime correlation spectroscopy (FLCS) - a relatively new technique with several experimental benefits. In FLCS experiments, pulsed excitation is used and data are stored in a special time-tagged time-resolved mode. Mathematical treatment of TCSPC decay patterns of distinct fluorophores and their mixture enables to calculate autocorrelation functions of each of the fluorophores and thus their diffusion properties and concentrations can be determined separately. Moreover, crosscorrelation of the two signals can be performed and information on interaction of the species can be obtained. This technique is particularly helpful for distinguishing different states of the same fluorophore in different microenvironments. The first application of that concept represents the simultaneous determination of two-dimensional diffusion in planar lipid layers and three-dimensional vesicle diffusion in bulk above the lipid layers. The lifetime in both investigated systems differed because the lifetime of the dye is considerably quenched in the layer near the light-absorbing surface. This concept was also used in other applications: a) investigation of a conformational change of a labeled protein, b) detection of small amounts of labeled oligonucleotides bound to metal particles or c) elucidation of the compaction mechanism of different sized labeled DNA molecules. Moreover, it was demonstrated that FLCS can help to overcome some FCS experimental drawbacks.

  19. [Fluorescence spectroscopic study of interaction between Fe-protoporphyrin in myoglobin and Cu(II) ions].

    PubMed

    Feng, Yu-ying; Yang, Hui; Gu, Xiao-tian; Jiang, Hui-jun; Lu, Tian-hong

    2003-06-01

    In this paper, the interaction between Cu(II) ions and Fe-protoporphyrin in horse-heart myoglobin (FePP-Mb) was studied. As a result, some of the Fe(II) ions in FePP-Mb were found to be replaced by Cu(II) ions forming CuPP-Mb, by adding Cu(II) ions into the myoglobin solution. The interaction became stronger when adding more Cu(II) ions into the myoglobin solution. By studying the metal ions' interaction with myoglobin proteins as macromolecules and discussing the interaction mechanism, this work provides a theoretical basis for the further study of hazardous metal ions' interaction with the human body and its mechanism. The fluorescence spectroscopic method used in this study has higher sensitivity than the ordinary UV and CD methods.

  20. Solvation and protonation of coumarin 102 in aqueous media: a fluorescence spectroscopic and theoretical study.

    PubMed

    Hessz, Dóra; Hégely, Bence; Kállay, Mihály; Vidóczy, Tamás; Kubinyi, Miklós

    2014-07-17

    The ground- and excited-state protonation of Coumarin 102 (C102), a fluorescent probe applied frequently in heterogeneous systems with an aqueous phase, has been studied in aqueous solutions by spectroscopic experiments and theoretical calculations. For the dissociation constant of the protonated form in the ground state, pKa = 1.61 was obtained from the absorption spectra; for the excited-state dissociation constant, pKa* = 2.19 was obtained from the fluorescence spectra. These values were closely reproduced by theoretical calculations via a thermodynamic cycle (the value of pKa* also by calculations via the Förster cycle) using an implicit–explicit solvation model (polarized continuum model + addition of a solvent molecule). The theoretical calculations indicated that (i) in the ground state, C102 occurs primarily as a hydrogen-bonded water complex, with the oxo group as the binding site, (ii) this hydrogen bond becomes stronger upon excitation, and (iii) in the ground state, the amino nitrogen atom is the protonation site, and in the excited state, the carboxy oxygen atom is the protonation site. A comprehensive analysis of fluorescence decay data yielded the values kpr = 3.27 × 10(10) M(–1) s(–1) for the rate constant of the excited-state protonation and kdpr = 2.78 × 10(8) s(–1) for the rate constant of the reverse process (kpr and kdpr were treated as independent parameters). This, considering the relatively long fluorescence lifetimes of neutral C102 (6.02 ns) and its protonated form (3.06 ns) in aqueous media, means that a quasi-equilibrium state of excited-state proton transfer is reached in strongly acidic solutions.

  1. A cryogenic fluorescence spectroscopic study of uranyl carbonate, phosphate, and oxyhydroxide minerals

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Zheming; Zachara, John M.; Liu, Chongxuan; Gassman, Paul L.; Felmy, Andrew R.; Clark, Sue B.

    2008-11-03

    In this work we have applied liquid-helium temperature (LHeT) time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLIF) to characterize a series of natural and synthetic minerals of uranium carbonate, phosphate and oxyhydroxides including rutherfordine, zellerite, liebigite, phosphuranylite, meta-autunite, meta-torbernite, uranyl phosphate, sodium-uranyl-phosphate, bequerelite, clarkeite, curite, schoepite and compregnacite, and compared their spectral characteristics among these minerals as well as our previously published data on uranyl silicates. For the carbonate minerals, the fluorescence spectra depend on the stoichiometry of the mineral. For the phosphate minerals the fluorescence spectra closely resemble each other despite the differences in their composition and structure. For all uranium oxyhydroxides, the fluorescence spectra are largely red-shifted as compared with those of the uranium carbonates and phosphates and their vibronic bands are broadened and less resolved. The much enhanced spectra resolution at LHeT allows more accurate calculation of the O=U=O symmetrical stretch frequency, ν1, corresponding to the average spacing of the vibronic peaks of the fluorescence spectra and the spectral origin as reflected by the position of the first vibronic band. It was found that both the average ν1 and λ1 values correlate well with the average basicity of the inorganic anion.

  2. Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy Close to a Fluctuating Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Fradin, Cécile; Abu-Arish, Asmahan; Granek, Rony; Elbaum, Michael

    2003-01-01

    Compartmentalization of the cytoplasm by membranes should have a strong influence on the diffusion of macromolecules inside a cell, and we have studied how this could be reflected in fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) experiments. We derived the autocorrelation function measured by FCS for fluorescent particles diffusing close to a soft membrane, and show it to be the sum of two contributions: short timescale correlations come from the diffusion of the particles (differing from free diffusion because of the presence of an obstacle), whereas long timescale correlations arise from fluctuations of the membrane itself (which create intensity fluctuations by modulating the number of detected particles). In the case of thermal fluctuations this second type of correlation depends on the elasticity of the membrane. To illustrate this calculation, we report the results of FCS experiments carried out close to a vesicle membrane. The measured autocorrelation functions display very distinctly the two expected contributions, and allow both to recover the diffusion coefficient of the fluorophore and to characterize the membrane fluctuations in term of a bending rigidity. Our results show that FCS measurements inside cells can lead to erroneous values of the diffusion coefficient if the influence of membranes is not recognized. PMID:12609903

  3. In vivo spectroscopic photoacoustic tomography imaging of a far red fluorescent protein expressed in the exocrine pancreas of adult zebrafish

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Mengyang; Schmitner, Nicole; Sandrian, Michelle G.; Zabihian, Behrooz; Hermann, Boris; Salvenmoser, Willi; Meyer, Dirk; Drexler, Wolfgang

    2014-03-01

    Fluorescent proteins brought a revolution in life sciences and biological research in that they make a powerful tool for researchers to study not only the structural and morphological information, but also dynamic and functional information in living cells and organisms. While green fluorescent proteins (GFP) have become a common labeling tool, red-shifted or even near infrared fluorescent proteins are becoming the research focus due to the fact that longer excitation wavelengths are more suitable for deep tissue imaging. In this study, E2-Crimson, a far red fluorescent protein whose excitation wavelength is 611 nm, was genetically expressed in the exocrine pancreas of adult zebrafish. Using spectroscopic all optical detection photoacoustic tomography, we mapped the distribution of E2-Crimson in 3D after imaging the transgenic zebrafish in vivo using two different wavelengths. With complementary morphological information provided by imaging the same fish using a spectral domain optical coherence tomography system, the E2-Crimson distribution acquired from spectroscopic photoacoustic tomography was confirmed in 2D by epifluorescence microscopy and in 3D by histology. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first time a far red fluorescent protein is imaged in vivo by spectroscopic photoacoustic tomography. Due to the regeneration feature of zebrafish pancreas, this work preludes the longitudinal studies of animal models of diseases such as pancreatitis by spectroscopic photoacoustic tomography. Since the effective penetration depth of photoacoustic tomography is beyond the transport mean free path length, other E2-Crimson labeled inner organs will also be able to be studied dynamically using spectroscopic photoacoustic tomography.

  4. Planetary Surface Analysis Using Fast Laser Spectroscopic Techniques: Combined Microscopic Raman, LIBS, and Fluorescence Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blacksberg, J.; Rossman, G. R.; Maruyama, Y.; Charbon, E.

    2011-12-01

    In situ exploration of planetary surfaces has to date required multiple techniques that, when used together, yield important information about their formation histories and evolution. We present a time-resolved laser spectroscopic technique that could potentially collect complementary sets of data providing information on mineral structure, composition, and hydration state. Using a picosecond-scale pulsed laser and a fast time-resolved detector we can simultaneously collect spectra from Raman, Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS), and fluorescence emissions that are separated in time due to the unique decay times of each process. The use of a laser with high rep rate (40 KHz) and low pulse energy (1 μJ/pulse) allows us to rapidly collect high signal to noise Raman spectra while minimizing sample damage. Increasing the pulse energy by about an order of magnitude creates a microscopic plasma near the surface and enables the collection of LIBS spectra at an unusually high rep rate and low pulse energy. Simultaneously, broader fluorescence peaks can be detected with lifetimes varying from nanosecond to microsecond. We will present Raman, LIBS, and fluorescence spectra obtained on natural mineral samples such as sulfates, clays, pyroxenes and carbonates that are of interest for Mars mineralogy. We demonstrate this technique using a photocathode-based streak camera detector as well as a newly-developed solid state Single Photon Avalanche Diode (SPAD) sensor array based on Complementary Metal-Oxide Semiconductor (CMOS) technology. We will discuss the impact of system design and detector choice on science return of a potential planetary surface mission, with a specific focus on size, weight, power, and complexity. The research described here was carried out at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under a contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA).

  5. Diffusion, transport, and cell membrane organization investigated by imaging fluorescence cross-correlation spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Sankaran, Jagadish; Manna, Manoj; Guo, Lin; Kraut, Rachel; Wohland, Thorsten

    2009-11-01

    Cell membrane organization is dynamic and is assumed to have different characteristic length scales. These length scales, which are influenced by lipid and protein composition as well as by the cytoskeleton, can range from below the optical resolution limit (as with rafts or microdomains) to far above the resolution limit (as with capping phenomena or the formation of lipid "platforms"). The measurement of these membrane features poses a significant problem because membrane dynamics are on the millisecond timescale and are thus beyond the time resolution of conventional imaging approaches. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS), a widely used spectroscopic technique to measure membrane dynamics, has the required time resolution but lacks imaging capabilities. A promising solution is the recently introduced method known as imaging total internal reflection (ITIR)-FCS, which can probe diffusion phenomena in lipid membranes with good temporal and spatial resolution. In this work, we extend ITIR-FCS to perform ITIR fluorescence cross-correlation spectroscopy (ITIR-FCCS) between pixel areas of arbitrary shape and derive a generalized expression that is applicable to active transport and diffusion. ITIR-FCCS is applied to model systems exhibiting diffusion, active transport, or a combination of the two. To demonstrate its applicability to live cells, we observe the diffusion of a marker, the sphingolipid-binding domain (SBD) derived from the amyloid peptide Abeta, on live neuroblastoma cells. We investigate the organization and dynamics of SBD-bound lipid microdomains under the conditions of cholesterol removal and cytoskeleton disruption. PMID:19883607

  6. Preliminary investigation of intrinsic UV fluorescence spectroscopic changes associated with proteolytic digestion of bovine articular cartilage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, William; Padilla-Martinez, Juan-Pablo; Ortega-Martinez, Antonio; Franco, Walfre

    2016-03-01

    Degradation and destruction of articular cartilage is the etiology of osteoarthritis (OA), an entity second only to cardiovascular disease as a cause of disability in the United States. Joint mechanics and cartilage biochemistry are believed to play a role in OA; an optical tool to detect structural and chemical changes in articular cartilage might offer benefit for its early detection and treatment. The objective of the present study was to identify the spectral changes in intrinsic ultraviolet (UV) fluorescence of cartilage that occur after proteolytic digestion of cartilage. Bovine articular cartilage samples were incubated in varying concentrations of collagenase ranging from 10ug/mL up to 5mg/mL for 18 hours at 37°C, a model of OA. Pre- and post-incubation measurements were taken of the UV excitation-emission spectrum of each cartilage sample. Mechanical tests were performed to determine the pre- and post-digestion force/displacement ratio associated with indentation of each sample. Spectral changes in intrinsic cartilage fluorescence and stiffness of the cartilage were associated with proteolytic digestion. In particular, changes in the relative intensity of fluorescence peaks associated with pentosidine crosslinks (330 nm excitation, 390 nm emission) and tryptophan (290 nm excitation, 340 nm emission) were found to correlate with different degrees of cartilage digestion and cartilage stiffness. In principle, it may be possible to use UV fluorescence spectral data for early detection of damage to articular cartilage, and as a surrogate measure for cartilage stiffness.

  7. Live-cell multiphoton fluorescence correlation spectroscopy with an improved large Stokes shift fluorescent protein

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Yinghua; Meurer, Matthias; Raghavan, Sarada; Rebane, Aleksander; Lindquist, Jake R.; Santos, Sofia; Kats, Ilia; Davidson, Michael W.; Mazitschek, Ralph; Hughes, Thomas E.; Drobizhev, Mikhail; Knop, Michael; Shah, Jagesh V.

    2015-01-01

    We report an improved variant of mKeima, a monomeric long Stokes shift red fluorescent protein, hmKeima8.5. The increased intracellular brightness and large Stokes shift (∼180 nm) make it an excellent partner with teal fluorescent protein (mTFP1) for multiphoton, multicolor applications. Excitation of this pair by a single multiphoton excitation wavelength (MPE, 850 nm) yields well-separable emission peaks (∼120-nm separation). Using this pair, we measure homo- and hetero-oligomerization interactions in living cells via multiphoton excitation fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (MPE-FCS). Using tandem dimer proteins and small-molecule inducible dimerization domains, we demonstrate robust and quantitative detection of intracellular protein–protein interactions. We also use MPE-FCCS to detect drug–protein interactions in the intracellular environment using a Coumarin 343 (C343)-conjugated drug and hmKeima8.5 as a fluorescence pair. The mTFP1/hmKeima8.5 and C343/hmKeima8.5 combinations, together with our calibration constructs, provide a practical and broadly applicable toolbox for the investigation of molecular interactions in the cytoplasm of living cells. PMID:25877871

  8. Remote excitation fluorescence correlation spectroscopy using silver nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Liang; Yuan, Haifeng; Lu, Gang; Hofkens, Johan; Roeffaers, Maarten; Uji-i, Hiroshi

    2014-11-01

    Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS), a powerful tool to resolve local properties, dynamical process of molecules, rotational and translational diffusion motions, relies on the fluctuations of florescence observables in the observation volume. In the case of rare transition events or small dynamical fluctuations, FCS requires few molecules or even single molecules in the observation volume at a time to minimize the background signals. Metal nanoparticle which possess unique localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) have been used to reduce the observation volume down to sub-diffraction limited scale while maintain at high analyst concentration up to tens of micromolar. Nevertheless, the applications of functionalized nanoparticles in living cell are limited due to the continuous diffusion after cell uptake, which makes it difficult to target the region of interests in the cell. In this work, we demonstrate the use of silver nanowires for remote excitation FCS on fluorescent molecules in solution. By using propagation surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) which supported by the silver nanowire to excite the fluorescence, both illumination and observation volume can be reduced simultaneously. In such a way, less perturbation is induced to the target region, and this will broaden the application scope of silver nanowire as tip in single cell endoscopy.

  9. Structured illumination fluorescence correlation spectroscopy for velocimetry in Zebrafish embryos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pozzi, Paolo; Rossetti, Leone; Sironi, Laura; Freddi, Stefano; D'Alfonso, Laura; Caccia, Michele; Bouzin, Margaux; Collini, Maddalena; Chirico, Giuseppe

    2013-02-01

    The vascular system of Zebrafish embryos is studied by means of Fluorescence Correlation and Image Correlation Spectroscopy. The long term project addresses biologically relevant issues concerning vasculogenesis and cardiogenesis and in particular mechanical interaction between blood flow and endothelial cells. To this purpose we use Zebrafish as a model system since the transparency of its embryos facilitates morphological observation of internal organs in-vivo. The correlation analysis provides quantitative characterization of fluxes in blood vessels in vivo. We have pursued and compared two complementary routes. In a first one we developed a two-spots two-photon setup in which the spots are spaced at adjustable micron-size distances (1-40 μm) along a vessel and the endogenous (autofluorescence) or exogenous (dsRed transgenic erythrocytes) signal is captured with an EM-CCD and cross-correlated. In this way we are able to follow the morphology of the Zebrafish embryo, simultaneously measure the heart pulsation, the velocity of red cells and of small plasma proteins. These data are compared to those obtained by image correlations on Zebrafish vessels. The two methods allows to characterize the motion of plasma fluids and erythrocytes in healthy Zebrafish embryos to be compared in the future to pathogenic ones.

  10. Nucleoplasmic viscosity of living cells investigated by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Lifang; Xing, Da; Chen, Tongshen; Pei, Yihui

    2007-11-01

    Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) is a new kind of real-time, high-speed and single-molecule technique. It is used to detect the kinetic characteristics of fluorescent dye such as diffusion coefficient in the aqueous solution. Combined with confocal microscope optics, it has been now widely applied in cell biological research. Through a time correlation analysis of spontaneous intensity fluctuations, this technique with EGFP as a probe is capable of determining viscosity of fluids according to Stokes-Einstein equation. Nucleoplasmic viscosity is an important physical parameter to quantify the rheological characteristics of the nucleoplasm. Investigation on nucleoplasmic viscosity plays an important role in further understanding intranuclear environment. In this paper, FCS is introduced to noninvasively investigate nucleoplasmic viscosity of living cells. The results show that nucleoplasmic viscosity of lung adenocarcinoma (ASTC-a-1) cells is 2.55+/-0.61 cP and nucleoplasmic viscosity is larger than cytoplasmic viscosity at 37 °C (pH 7.4). In addition, significant changes in nucleoplasmic viscosity are detected by FCS when cells are exposed to hyper or hypotonic medium. Our study suggests that FCS can be used to detect the kinetic characteristics of biomolecules in living cells and thus helps to investigate the dynamic changes of the microenvironment in the cell.

  11. Immunoglobulin surface-binding kinetics studied by total internal reflection with fluorescence correlation spectroscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, N L; Axelrod, D

    1983-01-01

    An experimental application of total internal reflection with fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (TIR/FCS) is presented. TIR/FCS is a new technique for measuring the binding and unbinding rates and surface diffusion coefficient of fluorescent-labeled solute molecules in equilibrium at a surface. A laser beam totally internally reflects at the solid-liquid interface, selectively exciting surface-adsorbed molecules. Fluorescence collected by a microscope from a small, well-defined surface area approximately 5 micron2 spontaneously fluctuates as solute molecules randomly bind to, unbind from, and/or diffuse along the surface in chemical equilibrium. The fluorescence is detected by a photomultiplier and autocorrelated on-line by a minicomputer. The shape of the autocorrelation function depends on the bulk and surface diffusion coefficients, the binding rate constants, and the shape of the illuminated and observed region. The normalized amplitude of the autocorrelation function depends on the average number of molecules bound within the observed area. TIR/FCS requires no spectroscopic or thermodynamic change between dissociated and complexed states and no extrinsic perturbation from equilibrium. Using TIR/FCS, we determine that rhodamine-labeled immunoglobulin and insulin each nonspecifically adsorb to serum albumin-coated fused silica with both reversible and irreversible components. The characteristic time of the most rapidly reversible component measured is approximately 5 ms and is limited by the rate of bulk diffusion. Rhodamine-labeled bivalent antibodies to dinitrophenyl (DNP) bind to DNP-coated fused silica virtually irreversibly. Univalent Fab fragments of these same antibodies appear to specifically bind to DNP-coated fused silica, accompanied by a large amount of nonspecific binding. TIR/FCS is shown to be a feasible technique for measuring absorption/desorption kinetic rates at equilibrium. In suitable systems where nonspecific binding is low, TIR

  12. Spectroscopic Evidence of Anthropogenic Compounds Extraction from Polymers by Fluorescent Dissolved Organic Matter in Natural Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miranda, M.; Trojzuck, A.; Voss, D.; Gassmann, S.; Zielinski, O.

    2016-04-01

    FDOM is one of the most important carriers of anthropogenic compounds in natural waters. It can combine with environmental contaminants and polymers to form diverse chemical structures. To this end, here a microfluidic chip was designed for the analysis of these changes in fluorescent dissolved organic matter (FDOM) fingerprints due to thermal treatment and varying time intervals of exposure. Excitation Emission Matrix Spectroscopy (EEMS) approach was utilized to detect and identify the inherent compounds in sampled FDOM. Strong direct correlations were founded, Spearman rank correlation values (ρ = 0.85 at α = 0.1, n = 4) and linear correlation R2 = 0.8359 were noted between thermal treatment pattern 2 and fluorescence intensity of samples. Materials, acrylic based glue and cyclic olefin copolymer (COC) polymer, used to design the microfluidic sensor were determined to possess unique spectral features in the ultraviolet to green spectrum using EEMS. The study therefore provides an insight on methods to identify contaminants in natural waters. This underlines the potential of optical sensors providing measurements at fast intervals, enabling environmental monitoring.

  13. Characterization of fresh and aged natural ingredients used in historical ointments by molecular spectroscopic techniques: IR, Raman and fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Brambilla, L; Riedo, C; Baraldi, C; Nevin, A; Gamberini, M C; D'Andrea, C; Chiantore, O; Goidanich, S; Toniolo, L

    2011-10-01

    Natural organic materials used to prepare pharmaceutical mixtures including ointments and balsams have been characterized by a combined non-destructive spectroscopic analytical approach. Three classes of materials which include vegetable oils (olive, almond and palm tree), gums (Arabic and Tragacanth) and beeswax are considered in this study according to their widespread use reported in ancient recipes. Micro-FTIR, micro-Raman and fluorescence spectroscopies have been applied to fresh and mildly thermally aged samples. Vibrational characterization of these organic compounds is reported together with tabulated frequencies, highlighting all spectral features and changes in spectra which occur following artificial aging. Synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy has been shown to be particularly useful for the assessment of changes in oils after aging; spectral difference between Tragacanth and Arabic gum could be due to variations in origin and processing of raw materials. Analysis of these materials using non-destructive spectroscopic techniques provided important analytical information which could be used to guide further study.

  14. Fluorescent-spectroscopic and imaging methods of investigations for diagnostics of head and neck tumors and control of PDT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edinak, N. E.; Chental, Victor V.; Komov, D.; Vaculovskaya, E.; Tabolinovskaya, T. D.; Abdullin, N. A.; Pustynsky, I.; Chatikhin, V.; Loschenov, Victor B.; Meerovich, Gennady A.; Stratonnikov, A. A.; Linkov, Kirill G.; Agafonov, Vladimir I.; Zuravleva, V.; Lukjanets, E.

    1996-01-01

    Methodics of PDT control and fluorescent-spectroscopic diagnostic of head and neck tumors and mammary gland cancer (nodular) with the use of Kr, He-Ne and semiconductor lasers and photosensitizer (PS) -- Al phtalocyanin (Photosense) are discussed. The results show that applied diagnostic methods permit us not only to identify the topology and malignancy of a tumor but also to correct PDT process directly during irradiation.

  15. Dynamic and unique nucleolar microenvironment revealed by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Park, Hweon; Han, Sung-Sik; Sako, Yasushi; Pack, Chan-Gi

    2015-03-01

    Organization and functions of the nucleolus is maintained by mobilities and interactions of nucleolar factors. Because the nucleolus is a densely packed structure, molecular crowding effects determined by the molecular concentrations and mobilities in the nucleolus should also be important for regulating nucleolar organization and functions. However, such molecular property of nucleolar organization is not fully understood. To understand the biophysical property of nucleolar organization, the diffusional behaviors of inert green fluorescent protein (GFP) oligomers with or without nuclear localization signals (NLSs) were analyzed under various conditions by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy. Our result demonstrates that the mobility of GFPs inside the nucleolus and the nucleoplasm can be represented by single free diffusion under normal conditions, even though the mobility in the nucleolus is considerably slower than that in the chromatin region. Moreover, the free diffusion of GFPs is found to be significantly size- and NLS-dependent only in the nucleolus. Interestingly, the mobility in the nucleolus is highly sensitive to ATP depletion, as well as actinomycin D (ActD) treatment. In contrast, the ultra-structure of the nucleolus was not significantly changed by ATP depletion but was changed by ActD treatment. These results suggest that the nucleolus behaves similarly to an open aqueous-phase medium with an increased molecular crowding effect that depends on both energy and transcription.

  16. Continuous fluorescence microphotolysis and correlation spectroscopy using 4Pi microscopy.

    PubMed

    Arkhipov, Anton; Hüve, Jana; Kahms, Martin; Peters, Reiner; Schulten, Klaus

    2007-12-01

    Continuous fluorescence microphotolysis (CFM) and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) permit measurement of molecular mobility and association reactions in single living cells. CFM and FCS complement each other ideally and can be realized using identical equipment. So far, the spatial resolution of CFM and FCS was restricted by the resolution of the light microscope to the micrometer scale. However, cellular functions generally occur on the nanometer scale. Here, we develop the theoretical and computational framework for CFM and FCS experiments using 4Pi microscopy, which features an axial resolution of approximately 100 nm. The framework, taking the actual 4Pi point spread function of the instrument into account, was validated by measurements on model systems, employing 4Pi conditions or normal confocal conditions together with either single- or two-photon excitation. In all cases experimental data could be well fitted by computed curves for expected diffusion coefficients, even when the signal/noise ratio was small due to the small number of fluorophores involved.

  17. Detecting Nanodomains in Living Cell Membrane by Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Hai-Tao; Marguet, Didier

    2011-05-01

    Cell membranes actively participate in numerous cellular functions. Inasmuch as bioactivities of cell membranes are known to depend crucially on their lateral organization, much effort has been focused on deciphering this organization on different length scales. Within this context, the concept of lipid rafts has been intensively discussed over recent years. In line with its ability to measure diffusion parameters with great precision, fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) measurements have been made in association with innovative experimental strategies to monitor modes of molecular lateral diffusion within the plasma membrane of living cells. These investigations have allowed significant progress in the characterization of the cell membrane lateral organization at the suboptical level and have provided compelling evidence for the in vivo existence of raft nanodomains. We review these FCS-based studies and the characteristic structural features of raft nanodomains. We also discuss the findings in regards to the current view of lipid rafts as a general membrane-organizing principle.

  18. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy evidence for structural heterogeneity in ionic liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, J C; Baker, G. A.; Hillesheim, P. C.; Dai, S.; Shaw, R. W.; Mahurin, S., M.

    2011-01-01

    In this work, we provide new experimental evidence for chain length-dependent self-aggregation in room temperature ionic liquids (RTILs) using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS). In studying a homologous series of N-alkyl-N-methylpyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl) imide, [C{sub n}MPy][Tf{sub 2}N] RTILs of varying alkyl chain length (n = 3, 4, 6, 8, and 10), biphasic rhodamine 6G solute diffusion dynamics were observed; both the fast and slow diffusion coefficients decreased with increasing alkyl chain length, with the relative contribution from slower diffusion increasing for longer-chain [C{sub n}MPy][Tf{sub 2}N]. We propose that the biphasic diffusion dynamics originate from self-aggregation of the nonpolar alkyl chains in the cationic [CnMPy]{sup +}.

  19. Shedding light on azopolymer brush dynamics by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Kollarigowda, R H; De Santo, I; Rianna, C; Fedele, C; Manikas, A C; Cavalli, S; Netti, P A

    2016-09-14

    Understanding the response to illumination at a molecular level as well as characterising polymer brush dynamics are key features that guide the engineering of new light-stimuli responsive materials. Here, we report on the use of a confocal microscopy technique that was exploited to discern how a single molecular event such as the photoinduced isomerisation of azobenzene can affect an entire polymeric material at a macroscopic level leading to photodriven mass-migration. For this reason, a set of polymer brushes, containing azobenzene (Disperse Red 1, DR) on the side chains of poly(methacrylic acid), was synthesised and the influence of DR on the polymer brush dynamics was investigated for the first time by Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy (FCS). Briefly, two dynamics were observed, a short one coming from the isomerisation of DR and a long one related to the brush main chain. Interestingly, photoinduced polymer aggregation in the confocal volume was observed. PMID:27491890

  20. Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy at Micromolar Concentrations without Optical Nanoconfinement

    SciTech Connect

    Laurence, Ted A.; Ly, Sonny; Bourguet, Feliza; Fischer, Nicholas O.; Coleman, Matthew A.

    2014-08-14

    Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) is an important technique for studying biochemical interactions dynamically that may be used in vitro and in cell-based studies. It is generally claimed that FCS may only be used at nM concentrations. We show that this general consensus is incorrect and that the limitation to nM concentrations is not fundamental but due to detector limits as well as laser fluctuations. With a high count rate detector system and applying laser fluctuation corrections, we demonstrate FCS measurements up to 38 μM with the same signal-to-noise as at lower concentrations. Optical nanoconfinement approaches previously used to increase the concentration range of FCS are not necessary, and further increases above 38 μM may be expected using detectors and detector arrays with higher saturation rates and better laser fluctuation corrections. This approach greatly widens the possibilities of dynamic measurements of biochemical interactions using FCS at physiological concentrations.

  1. Electrically induced microflows probed by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Ybert, C; Nadal, F; Salomé, R; Argoul, F; Bourdieu, L

    2005-03-01

    We report on the experimental characterisation of electrically induced flows at the micrometer scale through Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy (FCS) measurements. We stress the potential of FCS as a useful characterisation technique in microfluidics devices for transport properties cartography. The experimental results obtained in a model situation are in agreement with previous calculations (F. Nadal, F. Argoul, P. Kestener, B. Pouligny, C. Ybert, A. Ajdari, Eur. Phys. J. E 9, 387 (2002)) predicting the structure and electric-field dependency of the induced flow. Additionally, the present study evidences a complex behaviour of the probe nanobeads under electric field whose precise understanding might prove relevant for situations where nano-objects interact with an external electric field.

  2. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy reveals strong fluorescence quenching of FITC adducts on PEGylated gold nanoparticles in water and the presence of fluorescent aggregates of desorbed thiolate ligands.

    PubMed

    Loumaigne, Matthieu; Praho, Raïssa; Nutarelli, Daniele; Werts, Martinus H V; Débarre, Anne

    2010-09-28

    Colloidal gold particles functionalised with oligoethylene-glycolated disulfide ligands and fluorescent moieties derived from fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) have been prepared and studied in aqueous suspension using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS). FCS probes the dynamics of the particles at the single object level, and reveals the desorption of fluorescent ligands which subsequently aggregate into larger (slower diffusing) objects. Cross-correlation spectroscopy of the FITC fluorescence and the Rayleigh-Mie scattering (RM-FCCS) of the gold cores shows that the only detectable fluorescent objects are free ligands and aggregates not associated with a gold particle. The fluorescence of bound fluorophores is quenched making their fluorescence too weak to be detected. FCS and RM-FCCS are useful tools for characterising functionalised noble metal particles in solution, under conditions similar to those used in optical bio-imaging. Desorption of thiolates from gold nanoparticles needs to be taken into account when working with these materials at low concentration.

  3. [Intermolecular Interactions between Cytisine and Bovine Serum Albumin A Synchronous Fluorescence Spectroscopic Analysis and Molecular Docking Research].

    PubMed

    Wu, Yu-hang; Han, Zhong-bao; Ma, Jia-ze; He, Yan; Liu, Li-yan; Xin, Shi-gang; Yu, Zhan

    2016-03-01

    Cytisine (Cy) is one of the alkaloids that exist naturally in the plant genera Laburnum of the family Fabaceae. With strong bioactivities, Cy is commercialized for smoking cessation for years. In this work, the study of intermolecular interactions between Cy and bovine serum albumin (BSA) was performed by applying fluorescence spectroscopic methods under simulated physiological conditions. The mechanism of fluorescence quenching of BSA by Cy was also studied. Parameters such as bathing temperature, time and solution pH were investigated to optimize the fluorescence quenching. The binding type, binding ratio and binding constant between BSA and Cy were calculated by using the Stem-Volmer equation. Experimental results indicated that Cy can quench the fluorescent emission of BSA statically by forming a 1 : 1 type non-covalent complex and the binding constant is 5.6 x 10(3) L x mol(-1). Synchronous fluorescence spectral research shows Cy may affect the fluorescence emission of Trp residues of BSA. Furthermore, molecular docking is utilized to model the complex and probe the plausible quenching mechanism. It can be noted that the hydrogen bindings and hydrophobic interactions between Cy and BSA change the micro-environment of Trp213, which leads to the fluorescence quenching of BSA. PMID:27400521

  4. Correlation Between Bulk Material Defects and Spectroscopic Response in Cadmium Zinc Telluride Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, Bradford H.; Stahle, C. M.; Barthelmy, S. D.; Parsons, A. M.; Tueller, J.; VanSant, J. T.; Munoz, B. F.; Snodgrass, S. J.; Mullinix, R. E.

    1999-01-01

    One of the critical challenges for large area cadmium zinc telluride (CdZnTe) detector arrays is obtaining material capable of uniform imaging and spectroscopic response. Two complementary nondestructive techniques for characterizing bulk CdZnTe have been developed to identify material with a uniform response. The first technique, infrared transmission imaging, allows for rapid visualization of bulk defects. The second technique, x-ray spectral mapping, provides a map of the material spectroscopic response when it is configured as a planar detector. The two techniques have been used to develop a correlation between bulk defect type and detector performance. The correlation allows for the use of infrared imaging to rapidly develop wafer mining maps. The mining of material free of detrimental defects has the potential to dramatically increase the yield and quality of large area CdZnTe detector arrays.

  5. Time-resolved spectroscopic fluorescence imaging, transient absorption and vibrational spectroscopy of intact and photo-inhibited photosynthetic tissue.

    PubMed

    Lukins, Philip B; Rehman, Shakil; Stevens, Gregory B; George, Doaa

    2005-01-01

    Fluorescence, absorption and vibrational spectroscopic techniques were used to study spinach at the photosystem II (PS II), chloroplast and cellular levels and to determine the effects and mechanisms of ultraviolet-B (UV-B) photoinhibition of these structures. Two-photon fluorescence spectroscopic imaging of intact chloroplasts shows significant spatial variations in the component fluorescence spectra in the range 640-740 nm, indicating that the type and distribution of chlorophylls vary markedly with position in the chloroplast. The chlorophyll distributions and excitonic behaviour in chloroplasts and whole plant tissue were studied using picosecond time-gated fluorescence imaging, which also showed UV-induced kinetic changes that clearly indicate that UV-B induces both structural and excitonic uncoupling of chlorophylls within the light-harvesting complexes. Transient absorption measurements and low-frequency infrared and Raman spectroscopy show that the predominant sites of UV-B damage in PS II are at the oxygen-evolving centre (OEC) itself, as well as at specific locations near the OEC-binding sites.

  6. Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy and Nonlinear Stochastic Reaction-Diffusion

    SciTech Connect

    Del Razo, Mauricio; Pan, Wenxiao; Qian, Hong; Lin, Guang

    2014-05-30

    The currently existing theory of fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) is based on the linear fluctuation theory originally developed by Einstein, Onsager, Lax, and others as a phenomenological approach to equilibrium fluctuations in bulk solutions. For mesoscopic reaction-diffusion systems with nonlinear chemical reactions among a small number of molecules, a situation often encountered in single-cell biochemistry, it is expected that FCS time correlation functions of a reaction-diffusion system can deviate from the classic results of Elson and Magde [Biopolymers (1974) 13:1-27]. We first discuss this nonlinear effect for reaction systems without diffusion. For nonlinear stochastic reaction-diffusion systems there are no closed solutions; therefore, stochastic Monte-Carlo simulations are carried out. We show that the deviation is small for a simple bimolecular reaction; the most significant deviations occur when the number of molecules is small and of the same order. Extending Delbrück-Gillespie’s theory for stochastic nonlinear reactions with rapidly stirring to reaction-diffusion systems provides a mesoscopic model for chemical and biochemical reactions at nanometric and mesoscopic level such as a single biological cell.

  7. Vectorized data acquisition and fast triple-correlation integrals for Fluorescence Triple Correlation Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ridgeway, William K.; Millar, David P.; Williamson, James R.

    2013-04-01

    Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy (FCS) is widely used to quantify reaction rates and concentrations of molecules in vitro and in vivo. We recently reported Fluorescence Triple Correlation Spectroscopy (F3CS), which correlates three signals together instead of two. F3CS can analyze the stoichiometries of complex mixtures and detect irreversible processes by identifying time-reversal asymmetries. Here we report the computational developments that were required for the realization of F3CS and present the results as the Triple Correlation Toolbox suite of programs. Triple Correlation Toolbox is a complete data analysis pipeline capable of acquiring, correlating and fitting large data sets. Each segment of the pipeline handles error estimates for accurate error-weighted global fitting. Data acquisition was accelerated with a combination of off-the-shelf counter-timer chips and vectorized operations on 128-bit registers. This allows desktop computers with inexpensive data acquisition cards to acquire hours of multiple-channel data with sub-microsecond time resolution. Off-line correlation integrals were implemented as a two delay time multiple-tau scheme that scales efficiently with multiple processors and provides an unprecedented view of linked dynamics. Global fitting routines are provided to fit FCS and F3CS data to models containing up to ten species. Triple Correlation Toolbox is a complete package that enables F3CS to be performed on existing microscopes. Catalogue identifier: AEOP_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEOP_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen’s University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 50189 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 6135283 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: C/Assembly. Computer: Any with GCC and

  8. Spectroscopic and nonlinear optical properties of new chalcone fluorescent probes for bioimaging applications: a theoretical and experimental study.

    PubMed

    Krawczyk, Przemysław; Pietrzak, Marek; Janek, Tomasz; Jędrzejewska, Beata; Cysewski, Piotr

    2016-06-01

    In this study, the newly synthesized non-centrosymmetric, 4-dimethylamino-3'-isothiocyanatochalcone (PKA) compound was presented. This compound belongs to the chalcone group, and its main purpose is to be used in biomedical imaging as a fluorescence dye. For this reason, the linear and nonlinear properties in solvents of different polarity were thoroughly studied. In accordance with the requirements for a fluorochrome, the PKA compound is characterized by strong absorption, large Stokes' shifts, relatively high fluorescence quantum yields and high nonlinear optical response. Moreover, the isothiocyanate reactive probe was conjugated with Concanavalin A. Conventional fluorescence microscopy imaging of Candida albicans cells incubated with the PKA-Concanavalin A, is presented. The results of this study show that the novel conjugate PKA-Concanavalin A could be a promising new probe for cellular labelling in biological and biomedical research. Graphical abstract Spectroscopic behavior of the PKA dye. PMID:27168200

  9. DNA binding and oligomerization of NtrC studied by fluorescence anisotropy and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Sevenich, F W; Langowski, J; Weiss, V; Rippe, K

    1998-01-01

    Fluorescence anisotropy and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy measurements of rhodamine-labeled DNA oligonucleotide duplexes have been used to determine equilibrium binding constants for DNA binding of the prokaryotic transcription activator protein NtrC. Measurements were made with wild-type NtrC from Escherichia coli and the constitutively active mutant NtrCS160Ffrom Salmonella using DNA duplexes with one or two binding sites. The following results were obtained: (i) the dissociation constant K d for binding of one NtrC dimer to a single binding site was the same for the wild-type and mutant proteins within the error of measurement. (ii) The value of K d decreased from 1.4 +/- 0.7 x 10(-11) M at 15 mM K acetate to 5.8 +/- 2.6 x 10(-9) M at 600 mM K acetate. From the salt dependence of the dissociation constant we calculated that two ion pairs form upon binding of one dimeric protein to the DNA. (iii) Binding of two NtrC dimers to the DNA duplex with two binding sites occured with essentially no cooperativity. Titration curves of NtrCS160Fbinding to the same duplex demonstrated that more than two protein dimers of the mutant protein could bind to the DNA. PMID:9490780

  10. Correlation of molecular structure with fluorescence spectra in rare earth chelates. I.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bjorklund, S.; Degnan, J.; Filipescu, N.; Mcavoy, N.

    1968-01-01

    Rare earth chelates fluorescence spectra correlation with molecular structure, analyzing emission spectrum internal Stark splitting of tetramethylammonium tetrakis /dibenzoylmethido/europate microcrystals

  11. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, a tool to investigate supramolecular dynamics: inclusion complexes of pyronines with cyclodextrin.

    PubMed

    Al-Soufi, Wajih; Reija, Belén; Novo, Mercedes; Felekyan, Suren; Kühnemuth, Ralf; Seidel, Claus A M

    2005-06-22

    The control of supramolecular systems requires a thorough understanding of their dynamics on a molecular level. We present fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) as a powerful spectroscopic tool to study supramolecular dynamics with single molecule sensitivity. The formation of a supramolecular complex between beta-cyclodextrin (beta-CD) as host and pyronines Y (PY) and B (PB) as guests is studied by FCS. Global target analysis of full correlation curves with a newly derived theoretical model yields in a single experiment the fluorescence lifetimes and the diffusion coefficients of free and complexed guests and the rate constants describing the complexation dynamics. These data give insight into the recently published surprising fact that the association equilibrium constant of beta-CD with PY is much lower than that with the much bulkier guest PB. FCS shows that the stability of the complexes is dictated by the dissociation and not by the association process. The association rate constants are very similar for both guests and among the highest reported for this type of systems, although much lower than the diffusion-controlled collision rate constant. A two-step model including the formation of an encounter complex allows one to identify the unimolecular inclusion reaction as the rate-limiting step. Simulations indicate that this step may be controlled by geometrical and orientational requirements. These depend on critical molecular dimensions which are only weakly affected by the different alkyl substituents of PY and PB. Diffusion coefficients of PY and PB, of their complexes, and of rhodamine 110 are given and compared to those of similar molecules.

  12. Molecular aggregation characterized by high order autocorrelation in fluorescence correlation spectroscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, A G; Thompson, N L

    1987-01-01

    The use of high order autocorrelation in fluorescence correlation spectroscopy for investigating aggregation in a sample that contains fluorescent molecules is described. Theoretical expressions for the fluorescence fluctuation autocorrelation functions defined by gm,n(tau) = [(delta fm(t + tau)delta fm(t] - (delta Fm(t] (delta Fn(t

  13. The Intermediate Scattering Function in Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerra, Rodrigo; Andrews, Ballard; Sen, Pabitra

    2006-03-01

    We formulate the autocorrelation function for Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy (FCS) GD(τ) in reciprocal space in terms of the of the Intermediate Scattering Function ISF(k,t) and the fourier transform of the Optical Response Function ORF(k). In this way we may extend the use of FCS to processes that have been studied using NMR, DLS, and neutron scattering. This formalism is useful for the complicated propagators involved in confined systems and in the study of diffusion in cells: where diffusion is either restricted or permeation through membrane is important. Calculations in k-space produce approximate expressions for the ORF using cumulant expansions that are accurate for small wavevectors. This provides descriptions for longer timescales better suited for studying time-dependent diffusion ISF(k,t)->exp[-tD(t)k^2] and provides a natural separation of contributions from system dynamics and from optical artifacts and aberrations. We will show an explicit derivation of a semi-analytical fit function for free diffusion based on standard electromagnetic analysis of a confocal optical apparatus. This fit function is then used to analyze a representative data set and has no free fit parameters other than the diffusion constant.

  14. Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy Evidence for Structural Heterogeneity in Ionic Liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Jianchang; Baker, Gary A; Hillesheim, Patrick C; Dai, Sheng; Shaw, Robert W; Mahurin, Shannon Mark

    2011-01-01

    Self-aggregation in room temperature ionic liquids (RTILs) has been a subject of intense interest in recent years. In this work, we provide new experimental evidence for chain length-dependent self-aggregation in RTILs using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS). In studying a homologous series of N-alkyl-N-methylpyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl) imide, [CnMPy][Tf2N] RTILs of varying alkyl chain length (n = 3, 4, 6, 8, and 10), biphasic rhodamine 6G solute diffusion dynamics were observed; both the fast and slow diffusion coefficients decrease with increasing alkyl chain length, with the relative contribution from slower diffusion increasing for longer-chained [CnMPy][Tf2N]. We propose that the biphasic diffusion dynamics originate from self-aggregation of the nonpolar alkyl chains in the cationic [CnMPy]+. The presence of this local liquid structuring provides important insight into the behavior of RTILs relevant to their application in photovoltaics, fuel cells, and batteries.

  15. Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy at Micromolar Concentrations without Optical Nanoconfinement

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Laurence, Ted A.; Ly, Sonny; Bourguet, Feliza; Fischer, Nicholas O.; Coleman, Matthew A.

    2014-08-14

    Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) is an important technique for studying biochemical interactions dynamically that may be used in vitro and in cell-based studies. It is generally claimed that FCS may only be used at nM concentrations. We show that this general consensus is incorrect and that the limitation to nM concentrations is not fundamental but due to detector limits as well as laser fluctuations. With a high count rate detector system and applying laser fluctuation corrections, we demonstrate FCS measurements up to 38 μM with the same signal-to-noise as at lower concentrations. Optical nanoconfinement approaches previously used to increase themore » concentration range of FCS are not necessary, and further increases above 38 μM may be expected using detectors and detector arrays with higher saturation rates and better laser fluctuation corrections. This approach greatly widens the possibilities of dynamic measurements of biochemical interactions using FCS at physiological concentrations.« less

  16. Noninvasive determination of cell nucleoplasmic viscosity by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Lifang; Wang, Xichao; Xing, Da; Chen, Tongsheng; Chen, Wei R.

    2009-03-01

    Noninvasive and reliable quantification of rheological characteristics in the nucleus is extremely useful for fundamental research and practical applications in medicine and biology. This study examines the use of fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) to noninvasively determine nucleoplasmic viscosity (ɛnu), an important parameter of nucleoplasmic rheology. Our FCS analyses show that ɛnu of lung adenocarcinoma (ASTC-a-1) and HeLa cells are 1.77+/-0.42 cP and 1.40+/-0.27 cP, respectively, about three to four times larger than the water viscosity at 37 °C. ɛnu was reduced by 31 to 36% upon hypotonic exposure and increased by 28 to 52% from 37 to 24 °C. In addition, we found that ɛnu of HeLa cells reached the lowest value in the S phase and that there was no significant difference of ɛnu between in the G1 and G2 phases. Last, nucleoplasmic viscosity was found to be larger than cytoplasmic viscosity in both HeLa and ASTC-a-1 cells. These results indicate that FCS can be used as a noninvasive tool to investigate the microenvironment of living cells. This is the first report on the measurement of ɛnu in living cells synchronized in the G1, S, and G2 phases.

  17. [Vermicomposting of different organic materials and three-dimensional excitation emission matrix fluorescence spectroscopic characterization of their dissolved organic matter].

    PubMed

    Yang, Wei; Wang, Dong-sheng; Liu, Man-qiang; Hu, Feng; Li, Hui-xin; Huang, Zhong-yang; Chang, Yi-jun; Jiao, Jia-guo

    2015-10-01

    In this experiment, different proportions of the cattle manure, tea-leaf, herb and mushroom residues, were used as food for earthworm (Eisenia fetida) to study the growth of the earth-worm. Then the characteristics and transformation of nutrient content and three-dimensional excitation emission matrix fluorescence (3DEEM) of dissolved organic matter (DOM) during vermistabilization were investigated by means of chemical and spectroscopic methods. The result showed that the mixture of different ratios of cattle manure with herb residue, and cattle manure with tea-leaf were conducive to the growth of earthworm, while the materials compounded with mushroom residue inhibited the growth of earthworm. With the increasing time of verimcomposting, the pH in vermicompost tended to be circumneutral and weakly acidic, and there were increases in electrical conductivity, and the contents of total nitrogen, total phosphorus, available nitrogen, and available phosphorus, while the total potassium and available potassium increased first and then decreased, and the organic matter content decreased. 3DEEM and fluorescence regional integration results indicated that, the fluorescence of protein-like fluorescence peaks declined significantly, while the intensity of humic-like fluorescence peak increased significantly in DOM. Vermicomposting process might change the compositions of DOM with elevated concentrations of humic acid and fulvic acid in the organics. In all, this study suggested the suitability of 3DEEM for monitoring the organics transformation and assessing the maturity in the vermicomposting. PMID:26995929

  18. Fixation-resistant photoactivatable fluorescent proteins for correlative light and electron microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Paez Segala, Maria G.; Sun, Mei G.; Shtengel, Gleb; Viswanathan, Sarada; Baird, Michelle A.; Macklin, John J.; Patel, Ronak; Allen, John R.; Howe, Elizabeth S.; Piszczek, Grzegorz; Hess, Harald F.; Davidson, Michael W.; Wang, Yalin; Looger, Loren L.

    2014-01-01

    Fluorescent proteins facilitate a variety of imaging paradigms in live and fixed samples. However, they cease to function following heavy fixation, hindering advanced applications such as correlative light and electron microscopy. Here we report engineered variants of the photoconvertible Eos fluorescent protein that function normally in heavily fixed (0.5–1% OsO4), plastic resin-embedded samples, enabling correlative super-resolution fluorescence imaging and high-quality electron microscopy. PMID:25581799

  19. Analyses of the Dynamic Properties of Nuclear Lamins by Fluorescence Recovery After Photobleaching (FRAP) and Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy (FCS).

    PubMed

    Takeshi, Shimi; Pack, Chan-Gi; Goldman, Robert D

    2016-01-01

    The major structural components of the nuclear lamina are the A- and B-type nuclear lamin proteins which are also present in the nucleoplasm. Studies of molecular movements of the lamins in both the lamina and nucleoplasm of living cell nuclei have provided insights into their roles in maintaining nuclear architecture. In this chapter, we present protocols for quantitatively measuring the mobilities of lamin proteins by fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) in mammalian cell nuclei. PMID:27147036

  20. [Laser Induced Fluorescence Spectroscopic Analysis of Aromatics from One Ring to Four Rings].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Peng; Liu, Hai-feng; Yue, Zong-yu; Chen, Bei-ling; Yao, Ming-fa

    2015-06-01

    In order to distinguish small aromatics preferably, a Nd : YAG Laser was used to supply an excitation laser, which was adjusted to 0.085 J x cm(-2) at 266 nm. Benzene, toluene, naphthalene, phenanthrene, anthracene, pyrene and chrysene were used as the representative of different rings aromatics. The fluorescence emission spectra were researched for each aromatic hydrocarbon and mixtures by Laser induced fluorescence (LIF). Results showed that the rings number determined the fluorescence emission spectra, and the structure with same rings number did not affect the emission fluorescence spectrum ranges. This was due to the fact that the absorption efficiency difference at 266 nm resulted in that the fluorescence intensities of each aromatic hydrocarbon with same rings number were different and the fluorescence intensities difference were more apparently with aromatic ring number increasing. When the absorption efficiency was similar at 266 nm and the concentrations of each aromatic hydrocarbon were same, the fluorescence intensities were increased with aromatic ring number increasing. With aromatic ring number increasing, the fluorescence spectrum and emission peak wavelength were all red-shifted from ultraviolet to visible and the fluorescence spectrum range was also wider as the absorption efficiency was similar. The fluorescence emission spectra from one to four rings could be discriminated in the following wavelengths, 275 to 320 nm, 320 to 375 nm, 375 to 425 nm, 425 to 556 nm, respectively. It can be used for distinguish the type of the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) as it exists in single type. As PAHs are usually exist in a variety of different rings number at the same time, the results for each aromatic hydrocarbon may not apply to the aromatic hydrocarbon mixtures. For the aromatic hydrocarbon mixtures, results showed that the one- or two-ring PAHs in mixtures could not be detected by fluorescence as three- or four-ring PAHs existed in mixture

  1. Single gold nanoparticles to enhance the detection of single fluorescent molecules at micromolar concentration using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Punj, Deep; Rigneault, Hervé; Wenger, Jérôme

    2014-05-01

    Single nanoparticles made of noble metals are strongly appealing to develop practical applications to detect fluorescent molecules in solution. Here, we detail the use of a single gold nanoparticle of 100 nm diameter to enhance the detection of single Alex Fluor 647 fluorescent molecules at high concentrations of several micromolar. We discuss the implementation of fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, and provide a new method to reliably extract the enhanced fluorescence signal stemming from the nanoparticle near-field from the background generated in the confocal volume. The applicability of our method is checked by reporting the invariance of the single molecule results as function of the molecular concentration, and the experimental data is found in good agreement with numerical simulations.

  2. Macromolecular competition titration method accessing thermodynamics of the unmodified macromolecule-ligand interactions through spectroscopic titrations of fluorescent analogs.

    PubMed

    Bujalowski, Wlodzimierz; Jezewska, Maria J

    2011-01-01

    Analysis of thermodynamically rigorous binding isotherms provides fundamental information about the energetics of the ligand-macromolecule interactions and often an invaluable insight about the structure of the formed complexes. The Macromolecular Competition Titration (MCT) method enables one to quantitatively obtain interaction parameters of protein-nucleic acid interactions, which may not be available by other methods, particularly for the unmodified long polymer lattices and specific nucleic acid substrates, if the binding is not accompanied by adequate spectroscopic signal changes. The method can be applied using different fluorescent nucleic acids or fluorophores, although the etheno-derivatives of nucleic acid are especially suitable as they are relatively easy to prepare, have significant blue fluorescence, their excitation band lies far from the protein absorption spectrum, and the modification eliminates the possibility of base pairing with other nucleic acids. The MCT method is not limited to the specific size of the reference nucleic acid. Particularly, a simple analysis of the competition titration experiments is described in which the fluorescent, short fragment of nucleic acid, spanning the exact site-size of the protein-nucleic acid complex, and binding with only a 1:1 stoichiometry to the protein, is used as a reference macromolecule. Although the MCT method is predominantly discussed as applied to studying protein-nucleic acid interactions, it can generally be applied to any ligand-macromolecule system by monitoring the association reaction using the spectroscopic signal originating from the reference macromolecule in the presence of the competing macromolecule, whose interaction parameters with the ligand are to be determined.

  3. Decomposition of protein tryptophan fluorescence spectra into log-normal components. III. Correlation between fluorescence and microenvironment parameters of individual tryptophan residues.

    PubMed Central

    Reshetnyak, Y K; Koshevnik, Y; Burstein, E A

    2001-01-01

    In our previous paper (Reshetnyak, Ya. K., and E. A. Burstein. 2001. Biophys. J. 81:1710-1734) we confirmed the existence of five statistically discrete classes of emitting tryptophan fluorophores in proteins. The differences in fluorescence properties of tryptophan residues of these five classes reflect differences in interactions of excited states of tryptophan fluorophores with their microenvironment in proteins. Here we present a system of describing physical and structural parameters of microenvironments of tryptophan residues based on analysis of atomic crystal structures of proteins. The application of multidimensional statistical methods of cluster and discriminant analyses for the set of microenvironment parameters of 137 tryptophan residues of 48 proteins with known three-dimensional structures allowed us to 1) demonstrate the discrete nature of ensembles of structural parameters of tryptophan residues in proteins; 2) assign spectral components obtained after decomposition of tryptophan fluorescence spectra to individual tryptophan residues; 3) find a correlation between spectroscopic and physico-structural features of the microenvironment; and 4) reveal differences in structural and physical parameters of the microenvironment of tryptophan residues belonging to various spectral classes. PMID:11509384

  4. Availability of fluorescence spectroscopic in the accompaniment of formation of corneal cross-linking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, M. M.; Kurachi, C.; Bagnato, V. S.; Faria e Sousa, S. J.; Ventura, L.

    2010-02-01

    The corneal cross-linking is a method that associates riboflavin and ultraviolet light to induce a larger mechanical resistance at cornea. This method has been used for the treatment of Keratoconus. Since cross-linking is recent as treatment, there is a need to verify the effectiveness of the method. Therefore, the viability of the fluorescence spectroscopy technique to follow the cross-linking formation at cornea was studied. Corneas were divided in two measuring procedures: M1 (cornea + riboflavin), and M2 (cornea + riboflavina + light irradiation, 365nm). For fluorescence measurements, a spectrofluorimeter was used, where several wavelengths were selected (between 320nm and 370nm) for cornea excitation. Several fluorescence spectra were collected, at 10 min-interval, during 60 min. Spectra allowed one to observe two very well defined bands of fluorescence: the first one at 400nm (collagen), and the second one at 520nm (riboflavin). After spectra analyses, a decrease of collagen fluorescence was observed for both groups. For riboflavin, on the other hand, there was a fluorescence increase for M1, and a decrease for M2. Thus, it is possible to conclude that it this technique is sensitive for the detection of tissue structural changes during cross-linking treatment, encouraging subsequent studies on quantification of cross-linking promotion in tissue.

  5. Fluorescence spectroscopic study of serum albumin-bromadiolone interaction: fluorimetric determination of bromadiolone.

    PubMed

    Deepa, Subbiah; Mishra, Ashok K

    2005-07-01

    Bromadiolone (BRD), a substituted 4-hydroxycoumarin derivative, is known to possess anti-coagulant activity with acute toxicity. In this paper, we report a study on the interaction of bromadiolone with the plasma proteins bovine serum albumin (BSA) and human serum albumin (HSA), using the intrinsic fluorescence emission properties of bromadiolone. Bromadiolone is weakly fluorescent in aqueous buffer medium, with an emission at 397 nm. Binding of bromadiolone with serum albumins (SA) leads to a marked enhancement in the fluorescence emission intensity and steady state fluorescence anisotropy (r(ss)), accompanied by a blueshift of 10 nm. In the serum albumin-bromadiolone complex, selective excitation of tryptophan (Trp) residue results in emission from bromadiolone, thereby indicating a Förster type energy transfer from Trp to BRD. This quenching of Trp fluorescence by BRD was used to estimate the binding constant of the SA-BRD complex. The binding constants for BRD with BSA and HSA were 7.5 x 10(4) and 3.7 x 10(5)L mol(-1), respectively. Based on this, a new method involving SA as fluorescence-enhancing reagent for estimation of BRD in aqueous samples has been suggested. The detection limits of bromadiolone under the optimum conditions were 0.77 and 0.19 microg mL(-1) in presence of BSA and HSA, respectively. PMID:15925260

  6. A 32-channel photon counting module with embedded auto/cross-correlators for real-time parallel fluorescence correlation spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Gong, S.; Labanca, I.; Rech, I.; Ghioni, M.

    2014-10-15

    Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) is a well-established technique to study binding interactions or the diffusion of fluorescently labeled biomolecules in vitro and in vivo. Fast FCS experiments require parallel data acquisition and analysis which can be achieved by exploiting a multi-channel Single Photon Avalanche Diode (SPAD) array and a corresponding multi-input correlator. This paper reports a 32-channel FPGA based correlator able to perform 32 auto/cross-correlations simultaneously over a lag-time ranging from 10 ns up to 150 ms. The correlator is included in a 32 × 1 SPAD array module, providing a compact and flexible instrument for high throughput FCS experiments. However, some inherent features of SPAD arrays, namely afterpulsing and optical crosstalk effects, may introduce distortions in the measurement of auto- and cross-correlation functions. We investigated these limitations to assess their impact on the module and evaluate possible workarounds.

  7. A 32-channel photon counting module with embedded auto/cross-correlators for real-time parallel fluorescence correlation spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Gong, S.; Labanca, I.; Rech, I.; Ghioni, M.

    2014-01-01

    Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) is a well-established technique to study binding interactions or the diffusion of fluorescently labeled biomolecules in vitro and in vivo. Fast FCS experiments require parallel data acquisition and analysis which can be achieved by exploiting a multi-channel Single Photon Avalanche Diode (SPAD) array and a corresponding multi-input correlator. This paper reports a 32-channel FPGA based correlator able to perform 32 auto/cross-correlations simultaneously over a lag-time ranging from 10 ns up to 150 ms. The correlator is included in a 32 × 1 SPAD array module, providing a compact and flexible instrument for high throughput FCS experiments. However, some inherent features of SPAD arrays, namely afterpulsing and optical crosstalk effects, may introduce distortions in the measurement of auto- and cross-correlation functions. We investigated these limitations to assess their impact on the module and evaluate possible workarounds. PMID:25362365

  8. Optical caries diagnostics: comparison of laser spectroscopic PNC method with method of laser integral fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masychev, Victor I.

    2000-11-01

    In this research we present the results of approbation of two methods of optical caries diagnostics: PNC-spectral diagnostics and caries detection by laser integral fluorescence. The research was conducted in a dental clinic. PNC-method analyses parameters of probing laser radiation and PNC-spectrums of stimulated secondary radiations: backscattering and endogenous fluorescence of caries-involved bacterias. He-Ne-laser ((lambda) =632,8 nm, 1-2mW) was used as a source of probing (stimulated) radiation. For registration of signals, received from intact and pathological teeth PDA-detector was applied. PNC-spectrums were processed by special algorithms, and were displayed on PC monitor. The method of laser integral fluorescence was used for comparison. In this case integral power of fluorescence of human teeth was measured. As a source of probing (stimulated) radiation diode lasers ((lambda) =655 nm, 0.1 mW and 630nm, 1mW) and He-Ne laser were applied. For registration of signals Si-photodetector was used. Integral power was shown in a digital indicator. Advantages and disadvantages of these methods are described in this research. It is disclosed that the method of laser integral power of fluorescence has the following characteristics: simplicity of construction and schema-technical decisions. However the method of PNC-spectral diagnostics are characterized by considerably more sensitivity in diagnostics of initial caries and capability to differentiate pathologies of various stages (for example, calculus/initial caries). Estimation of spectral characteristics of PNC-signals allows eliminating a number of drawbacks, which are character for detection by method of laser integral fluorescence (for instance, detection of fluorescent fillings, plagues, calculus, discolorations generally, amalgam, gold fillings as if it were caries.

  9. Comparison of laser spectroscopic PNC method with laser integral fluorescence in optical caries diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masychev, Victor I.

    2001-05-01

    In this research we represent the results of approbation of two methods of optical caries diagnostics: PNC-spectral diagnostics and caries detection by laser integral fluorescence. The research was conducted in a dental clinic. PNC-method analyzes parameters of probing laser radiation and PNC-spectrums of stimulated secondary radiations: backscattering and endogenous fluorescence of caries- involved bacteria. Ia-Ne laser ((lambda) equals632.8 nm, 1-2 mW) was used as a source of probing (stimulated) radiation. For registration of signals, received from intact and pathological teeth PDA-detector was applied. PNC-spectrums were processed by special algorithms, and were displayed on PC monitor. The method of laser integral fluorescence was used for comparison. In this case integral power of fluorescence of human teeth was measured. As a source of probing (stimulated) radiation diode lasers ((lambda) equals655 nm, 0.1 mW and 630 nm, 1 mW) and Ia-Na laser were applied. For registration of signals Si-photodetector was used. Integral power was shown in a digital indicator. Advantages and disadvantages of these methods are described in this research. It is disclosed that the method of laser integral power of fluorescence has the following characteristics: simplicity of construction and schema-technical decisions. However the method of PNC-spectral diagnostics are characterized by considerably more sensitivity in diagnostics of initial caries and capability to differentiate pathologies of various stages (for example, calculus/initial caries). Estimation of spectral characteristics of PNC-signals allows eliminating a number of drawbacks, which are character for detection by method of laser integral fluorescence (for instance, detection of fluorescent fillings, plagues, calculus, discolorations generally, amalgam, gold fillings as if it were caries).

  10. High volume confinement in two-photon fluorescence correlation spectroscopy with radially polarized light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, D.; Shcheslavskiy, V.; Märki, I.; Leutenegger, M.; Lasser, T.

    2009-02-01

    We present the results on two-photon total-internal-reflection fluorescence correlation spectroscopy. The combination of liquid crystal spatial light modulator, providing radial polarization, with ultrafast laser (picosecond Nd:GdVO4 laser) allowed us to take the advantage of nonlinear optical contrast mechanisms to suppress the side-lobe energy specific for radial polarization and reduce the effective excited volume twice compared to one-photon evanescent wave excitation in fluorescence correlation spectroscopy.

  11. High volume confinement in two-photon total-internal-reflection fluorescence correlation spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, D.; Shcheslavskiy, V.; Märki, I.; Leutenegger, M.; Lasser, T.

    2009-02-01

    We report results on two-photon total-internal-reflection fluorescence correlation spectroscopy with radially polarized light. The combination of liquid crystal spatial light modulator, providing radial polarization with ultrafast laser (picosecond Nd:GdVO4 laser), allowed us to take the advantage of nonlinear optical contrast mechanisms to suppress the side-lobe energy specific for radial polarization and reduce the effective excited volume twice compared to one-photon evanescent wave excitation in fluorescence correlation spectroscopy.

  12. Fluorescence spectroscopic analysis of the interaction of papain with ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Fan, Yunchang; Yan, Jinlong; Zhang, Sheli; Li, Junhai; Chen, Dong; Duan, Peigao

    2012-10-01

    The interaction between papain and two typical ionic liquids (ILs), 1-octyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride ([C(8)mim]Cl) and 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride ([C(4)mim]Cl), was investigated by using fluorescence spectroscopy technique at a pH value of 7.4. The results suggested that ILs could quench the intrinsic fluorescence of papain probably via a static quenching mechanism. The binding constants were determined by employing the fluorescence quenching method. They were very small compared with that of volatile organic solvents, indicating that only very weak interaction between ILs and papain existed. The Gibbs free energy change (∆G), enthalpy change (∆H), and entropy change (∆S) during the interaction of papain and ILs were estimated. Negative values of these parameters indicated that the interaction between ILs and papain was a spontaneous process, also implying that hydrogen bonding and van der Waals forces played important roles in the interaction processes. PMID:22798189

  13. Spectroscopic fluorescence measurements of lamb and human heart tissue in vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filippidis, George; Zacharakis, Giannis; Kochiadakis, G. E.; Chrysostomakis, S. I.; Vardas, P. E.; Fotakis, Costas; Papazoglou, Theodore G.

    2003-10-01

    Laser-induced fluorescence spectra were obtained during the exposure of lamb heart (n=20) tissue to Argon-ion radiation (457.9nm). Fluorescence spectra from different heart compartments (the left and right atria and ventricles, the myocardium, the epicardium, and the aorta) were recorded. Simple algebraic algorithms based on the spectral intensity variation were constructed in order to detect spectral features and characterize the different cardiac compartments. Additionally, it was investigated whether each chamber exhibited constant spectral response. After the end of each experiment the lamb hearts were stored in formalin (10%). The samples were irradiated again after forty eight (48) hours in order to investigate the spectral differences that appear due to formalin conservation. Similar fluorescence measurements were taken from a limited number of human heart tissues (n=2) ex vivo.

  14. Correlated cryo-fluorescence and cryo-electron microscopy with high spatial precision and improved sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Schorb, Martin; Briggs, John A G

    2014-08-01

    Performing fluorescence microscopy and electron microscopy on the same sample allows fluorescent signals to be used to identify and locate features of interest for subsequent imaging by electron microscopy. To carry out such correlative microscopy on vitrified samples appropriate for structural cryo-electron microscopy it is necessary to perform fluorescence microscopy at liquid-nitrogen temperatures. Here we describe an adaptation of a cryo-light microscopy stage to permit use of high-numerical aperture objectives. This allows high-sensitivity and high-resolution fluorescence microscopy of vitrified samples. We describe and apply a correlative cryo-fluorescence and cryo-electron microscopy workflow together with a fiducial bead-based image correlation procedure. This procedure allows us to locate fluorescent bacteriophages in cryo-electron microscopy images with an accuracy on the order of 50 nm, based on their fluorescent signal. It will allow the user to precisely and unambiguously identify and locate objects and events for subsequent high-resolution structural study, based on fluorescent signals.

  15. Steady state fluorescence spectroscopic characterization of normal and diabetic urine at selective excitation wavelength 280 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kesavan, Anjana; Pachaiappan, Rekha; Aruna, Prakasa Rao; Ganesan, Singaravelu

    2016-03-01

    Urine is considered diagnostically important for tits native fluorophores and they vary in their distribution, concentration and physiochemical properties, depending upon the metabolic condition of the subject. In this study, we have made an attempt, to characterize the urine of normal subject and diabetic patients under medication by native fluorescence spectroscopy at 280 nm excitation. Further, the fluorescence data were analyzed employing the multivariate statistical method linear discriminant analysis (LDA) using leave one out cross validation method. The results were promising in discriminating diabetic urine from that of normal urine. This study in future may be extended to check the feasibility in ruling out the coexisting disorders such as cancer.

  16. Stochastic Micro-Pattern for Automated Correlative Fluorescence - Scanning Electron Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Begemann, Isabell; Viplav, Abhiyan; Rasch, Christiane; Galic, Milos

    2015-01-01

    Studies of cellular surface features gain from correlative approaches, where live cell information acquired by fluorescence light microscopy is complemented by ultrastructural information from scanning electron micrographs. Current approaches to spatially align fluorescence images with scanning electron micrographs are technically challenging and often cost or time-intensive. Relying exclusively on open-source software and equipment available in a standard lab, we have developed a method for rapid, software-assisted alignment of fluorescence images with the corresponding scanning electron micrographs via a stochastic gold micro-pattern. Here, we provide detailed instructions for micro-pattern production and image processing, troubleshooting for critical intermediate steps, and examples of membrane ultra-structures aligned with the fluorescence signal of proteins enriched at such sites. Together, the presented method for correlative fluorescence – scanning electron microscopy is versatile, robust and easily integrated into existing workflows, permitting image alignment with accuracy comparable to existing approaches with negligible investment of time or capital. PMID:26647824

  17. Spectroscopic features of dual fluorescence/luminescence resonance energy-transfer molecular beacons.

    PubMed

    Tsourkas, Andrew; Behlke, Mark A; Xu, Yangqing; Bao, Gang

    2003-08-01

    Molecular beacons have the potential to become a powerful tool in gene detection and quantification in living cells. Here we report a novel dual molecular beacons approach to reduce false-positive signals in detecting target nucleic acids in homogeneous assays. A pair of molecular beacons, each containing a fluorescence quencher and a reporter fluorophore, one with a donor and a second with an acceptor fluorophore, hybridize to adjacent regions on the same target resulting in fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). The detection of a FRET signal leads to a substantially increased signal-to-background ratio compared with that seen in single molecular beacon assays and enables discrimination between fluorescence due to specific probe/target hybridization and a variety of possible false-positive events. Further, when a lanthanide chelate is used as a donor in a dual-probe assay, extremely high signal-to-background ratios can be achieved owing to the long lifetime and sharp emission peaks of the donor and the time-gated detection of acceptor fluorescence emission. These new approaches allow for the ultrasensitive detection of target molecules in a way that could be readily applied to real-time imaging of gene expression in living cells.

  18. Spectroscopic parameters of the cuticle and ethanol extracts of the fluorescent cave isopod Mesoniscus graniger (Isopoda, Oniscidea)

    PubMed Central

    Giurginca, Andrei; Šustr, Vladimír; Tajovský, Karel; Giurginca, Maria; Matei, Iulia

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The body surface of the terrestrial isopod Mesoniscus graniger (Frivaldsky, 1863) showed blue autofluorescence under UV light (330–385 nm), using epifluorescence microscopy and also in living individuals under a UV lamp with excitation light of 365 nm. Some morphological cuticular structures expressed a more intense autofluorescence than other body parts. For this reason, only the cuticle was analyzed. The parameters of autofluorescence were investigated using spectroscopic methods (molecular spectroscopy in infrared, ultraviolet-visible, fluorescence, and X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy) in samples of two subspecies of Mesoniscus graniger preserved in ethanol. Samples excited by UV light (from 350 to 380 nm) emitted blue light of wavelengths 419, 420, 441, 470 and 505 nm (solid phase) and 420, 435 and 463 (ethanol extract). The results showed that the autofluorescence observed from living individuals may be due to some β-carboline or coumarin derivatives, some crosslinking structures, dityrosine, or due to other compounds showing similar excitation-emission characteristics. PMID:26261444

  19. Optical spectral fingerprints of tissues from patients with different breast cancer histologies using a novel fluorescence spectroscopic device.

    PubMed

    Sordillo, Laura A; Pu, Yang; Sordillo, Peter P; Budansky, Yury; Alfano, R R

    2013-10-01

    The fluorescence of paired human breast malignant and normal tissue samples was investigated using a novel fluorescence spectroscopic (S3-LED) ratiometer unit with no moving parts. This device can measure the emission spectra of key native organic biomolecules such as tryptophan, tyrosine, collagen and elastin within tissues by using LED (light emitting diode) excitation sources coupled to an optical fiber. With this device, the spectral profiles of 11 paired breast cancerous and normal samples from 11 patients with breast carcinoma were obtained. In each of the 11 cases, marked increases in the tryptophan levels were found in the breast carcinoma samples when compared to the normal breast tissues. In the breast cancer samples, there were also consistently higher ratios of the 340 to 440 nm and the 340 to 460 nm intensity peaks after 280 nm excitation, likely representing an increased tryptophan to NADH ratio in the breast cancer samples. This difference was seen in the spectral profiles of the breast cancer patients regardless of whether they were HER2 positive or negative or hormone receptor positive or negative, and was found regardless of menopausal status, histology, stage, or tumor grade.

  20. Spectroscopical study of bacteriopurpurinimide-naphthalimide conjugates for fluorescent diagnostics and photodynamic therapy.

    PubMed

    Panchenko, Pavel A; Sergeeva, Antonina N; Fedorova, Olga A; Fedorov, Yuri V; Reshetnikov, Roman I; Schelkunova, Anastasiya E; Grin, Mikhail A; Mironov, Andrey F; Jonusauskas, Gediminas

    2014-04-01

    Two novel bis(chromophoric) dyads ABPI-NI1 and ABPI-NI2 containing 1,8-naphthalimide and bacteriopurpurinimide units linked by p-phenylene-methylene (ABPI-NI1) and pentamethylene (ABPI-NI2) spacers were prepared to test their ability to be used in the design of effective agents for both photodynamic therapy (PDT) and fluorescent tumor imaging. Photophysical studies revealed that the emission from the naphthalimide chromophore in both conjugates was partially quenched due to resonance energy transfer between the photoactive components. Compound ABPI-NI2 with more sterically flexible oligomethylene group demonstrated higher fluorescence intensity as compared with that for ABPI-NI1. PMID:24727406

  1. Encapsulation of serotonin in β-cyclodextrin nano-cavities: Fluorescence spectroscopic and molecular modeling studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaudhuri, Sudip; Chakraborty, Sandipan; Sengupta, Pradeep K.

    2010-06-01

    Serotonin is a physiologically important biogenic amine, deficiency of which leads to mental disorders such as Alzheimer's disease, schizophrenia, infantile autism, and depression. Both β-cyclodextrin (β-CD) and its chemically substituted synthetic varieties (often possessing enhanced aqueous solubility and improved drug complexing abilities) are finding wide applications as drug delivery vehicles. Here we have studied the encapsulation of serotonin in β-CD and succinyl-2-hydroxypropyl β-cyclodextrin (SHP-β-CD) by exploiting the intrinsic serotonin fluorescence. Enhanced fluorescence emission intensity (which increases by ˜18% and 34% in β-CD and SHPβ-CD respectively) and anisotropy ( r) ( r = 0.075 and 0.1 in β-CD and SHPβ-CD respectively) are observed in presence of the cyclodextrins. From the fluorescence data host-guest interaction with 1:1 stoichiometry is evident, the association constants ( K) being 126.06 M -1 and 461.62 M -1 for β-CD and SHPβ-CD respectively. Additionally, molecular docking and semiempirical calculations have been carried out which provide, for the first time, detailed insights regarding the encapsulation process. In particular, it is evident that the indole ring is inserted within the β-CD cavity with the aliphatic amine side chain protruding towards the primary rim of the β-CD cavity. Docking calculations reveal that hydrogen bonding interactions are involved in the formation of the inclusion complex. Semiempirical calculations indicate that formation of the 1:1 inclusion complex is energetically favorable which is consistent with the fluorescence data.

  2. Spectroscopic evidence of xanthine compounds fluorescence quenching effect on water-soluble porphyrins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makarska-Bialokoz, Magdalena

    2015-02-01

    The formation of π-stacked complexes between water-soluble porphyrins: 4,4‧,4″,4″‧-(21H,23H-porphine-5,10,15,20-tetrayl)tetrakis-(benzoic acid) (H2TCPP), 5,10,15,20-tetrakis(4-sulfonatophenyl)-21H,23H-porphine (H2TPPS4), 5,10,15,20-tetrakis[4-(trimethylammonio)phenyl]-21H,23H-porphine tetra-p-tosylate (H2TTMePP), 5,10,15,20-tetrakis(1-methyl-4-pyridyl)-21H,23H-porphine tetra-p-tosylate (H2TMePyP), the Cu(II) complexes of H2TTMePP and H2TMePyP, as well as chlorophyll a with xanthine, theophylline (1,3-dimethylxanthine) and theobromine (3,7-dimethylxanthine) has been studied analysing their absorption and steady-state fluorescence spectra in aqueous (or acetone in case of chlorophyll a) solution. During titration by the compounds from xanthine group the bathochromic effect in the porphyrin absorption spectra as well as the hypochromicity of the porphyrin Soret maximum can be noticed. The fluorescence quenching effect observed during interactions in the systems examined suggests the process of static quenching. The association and fluorescence quenching constants are of the order of magnitude of 103 - 102 mol-1. The results obtained show that xanthine and its derivatives can quench the fluorescence of the porphyrins according to the number of methyl groups in the molecule of quencher.

  3. High-precision correlative fluorescence and electron cryo microscopy using two independent alignment markers☆

    PubMed Central

    Schellenberger, Pascale; Kaufmann, Rainer; Siebert, C. Alistair; Hagen, Christoph; Wodrich, Harald; Grünewald, Kay

    2014-01-01

    Correlative light and electron microscopy (CLEM) is an emerging technique which combines functional information provided by fluorescence microscopy (FM) with the high-resolution structural information of electron microscopy (EM). So far, correlative cryo microscopy of frozen-hydrated samples has not reached better than micrometre range accuracy. Here, a method is presented that enables the correlation between fluorescently tagged proteins and electron cryo tomography (cryoET) data with nanometre range precision. Specifically, thin areas of vitrified whole cells are examined by correlative fluorescence cryo microscopy (cryoFM) and cryoET. Novel aspects of the presented cryoCLEM workflow not only include the implementation of two independent electron dense fluorescent markers to improve the precision of the alignment, but also the ability of obtaining an estimate of the correlation accuracy for each individual object of interest. The correlative workflow from plunge-freezing to cryoET is detailed step-by-step for the example of locating fluorescence-labelled adenovirus particles trafficking inside a cell. PMID:24262358

  4. Nonlinear Theory of Anomalous Diffusion and Application to Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boon, Jean Pierre; Lutsko, James F.

    2015-12-01

    The nonlinear theory of anomalous diffusion is based on particle interactions giving an explicit microscopic description of diffusive processes leading to sub-, normal, or super-diffusion as a result of competitive effects between attractive and repulsive interactions. We present the explicit analytical solution to the nonlinear diffusion equation which we then use to compute the correlation function which is experimentally measured by correlation spectroscopy. The theoretical results are applicable in particular to the analysis of fluorescence correlation spectroscopy of marked molecules in biological systems. More specifically we consider the cases of fluorescently labeled lipids in the plasma membrane and of fluorescent apoferritin (a spherically shaped oligomer) in a crowded dextran solution and we find that the nonlinear correlation spectra reproduce very well the experimental data indicating sub-diffusive molecular motion.

  5. Two-photon fluorescence correlation spectroscopy with high count rates and low background using dielectric microspheres

    PubMed Central

    Aouani, Heykel; Schön, Peter; Brasselet, Sophie; Rigneault, Hervé; Wenger, Jérôme

    2010-01-01

    Two-photon excitation fluorescence is a powerful technique commonly used for biological imaging. However, the low absorption cross section of this non-linear process is a critical issue for performing biomolecular spectroscopy at the single molecule level. Enhancing the two-photon fluorescence signal would greatly improve the effectiveness of this technique, yet current methods struggle with medium enhancement factors and/or high background noise. Here, we show that the two-photon fluorescence signal from single Alexa Fluor 488 molecules can be enhanced up to 10 times by using a 3 µm diameter latex sphere while adding almost no photoluminescence background. We report a full characterization of the two-photon fluorescence enhancement by a single microsphere using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy. This opens new routes to enhance non-linear optical signals and extend biophotonic applications. PMID:21258531

  6. Correlative Time-Resolved Fluorescence Microscopy To Assess Antibiotic Diffusion-Reaction in Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Daddi Oubekka, S.; Briandet, R.; Fontaine-Aupart, M.-P.

    2012-01-01

    The failure of antibiotics to inactivate in vivo pathogens organized in biofilms has been shown to trigger chronic infections. In addition to mechanisms involving specific genetic or physiological cell properties, antibiotic sorption and/or reaction with biofilm components may lessen the antibiotic bioavailability and consequently decrease their efficiency. To assess locally and accurately the antibiotic diffusion-reaction, we used for the first time a set of advanced fluorescence microscopic tools (fluorescence recovery after photobleaching, fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, and fluorescence lifetime imaging) that offer a spatiotemporal resolution not available with the commonly used time-lapse confocal imaging method. This set of techniques was used to characterize the dynamics of fluorescently labeled vancomycin in biofilms formed by two Staphylococcus aureus human isolates. We demonstrate that, at therapeutic concentrations of vancomycin, the biofilm matrix was not an obstacle to the diffusion-reaction of the antibiotic that can reach all cells through the biostructure. PMID:22450986

  7. Synthesis and spectroscopic study of highly fluorescent β-enaminone based boron complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumbhar, Haribhau S.; Gadilohar, Balu L.; Shankarling, Ganapati S.

    2015-07-01

    The newly synthesized 1, 1, 2-trimethyl-1H benzo[e]indoline based β-enaminone boron complexes exhibited the intense fluorescence (Fmax = 522-547 nm) in solution as well as in solid state (Fmax = 570-586 nm). These complexes exhibited large stoke shift, excellent thermal and photo stability when compared to the boron dipyrromethene (BODIPY) colorants. Optimized geometry and orbital distribution in ground states were computed by employing density functional theory (DFT). The cyclic voltammetry study revealed the better electron transport ability of these molecules than current electroluminescent materials like tris(8-hydroxyquinoli-nato)-aluminium (Alq3) and BODIPY, which can find application in electroluminescent devices.

  8. Correlative fluorescence and electron microscopy of quantum dot labeled proteins on whole cells in liquid.

    PubMed

    Peckys, Diana B; Dukes, Madeline J; de Jonge, Niels

    2014-01-01

    Correlative fluorescence microscopy and scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) of cells fully immersed in liquid is a new methodology with many application areas. Proteins, in live cells immobilized on microchips, are labeled with fluorescent quantum dot (QD) nanoparticles. In this protocol, the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is labeled. The cells are fixed after a selected labeling time, for example, 5 min as needed to form EGFR dimers. The microchip with cells is then imaged with fluorescence microscopy. Thereafter, the microchip with the labeled cells and one with a spacer are assembled in a special microfluidic device and imaged with STEM.

  9. Synthesis and spectroscopic characterization of fluorescent 4-aminoantipyrine analogues: Molecular docking and in vitro cytotoxicity studies.

    PubMed

    Premnath, D; Selvakumar, P Mosae; Ravichandiran, P; Selvan, G Tamil; Indiraleka, M; Vennila, J Jannet

    2016-01-15

    Two substituted aromatic carbonyl compounds (compounds 1 and 2) of 4-aminoantipyrine were synthesized by condensation of fluorine substituted benzoyl chlorides and 4-aminoantipyrine. The structures of synthesized derivatives were established on the basis of UV-Vis, IR, and Mass, (1)H, (13)C NMR and Fluorescence spectroscopy. Both compounds showed significant fluorescence emission and two broad emission bands were observed in the region at 340 nm and 450 nm on excitation at 280 nm. Theoretically to prove that the molecule has anticancer activity against cervical cancer cells, the compounds were analyzed for molecular docking interactions with HPV16-E7 target protein by Glide protocol. Furthermore, 4-aminoantipyrine derivatives were evaluated for their in vitro cytotoxic activity against human cervical cancer cells (SiHa) by MTT assay. Compound 1 showed two fold higher activity (IC50=0.912 μM) over compound 2, and its activity was similar to that of Pazopanib, suggesting that although the two compounds were chemically very similar the difference in substituent on the phenyl moiety caused changes in properties. PMID:26298678

  10. Synthesis and spectroscopic characterization of fluorescent 4-aminoantipyrine analogues: Molecular docking and in vitro cytotoxicity studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Premnath, D.; Mosae Selvakumar, P.; Ravichandiran, P.; Tamil Selvan, G.; Indiraleka, M.; Jannet Vennila, J.

    2016-01-01

    Two substituted aromatic carbonyl compounds (compounds 1 and 2) of 4-aminoantipyrine were synthesized by condensation of fluorine substituted benzoyl chlorides and 4-aminoantipyrine. The structures of synthesized derivatives were established on the basis of UV-Vis, IR, and Mass, 1H, 13C NMR and Fluorescence spectroscopy. Both compounds showed significant fluorescence emission and two broad emission bands were observed in the region at 340 nm and 450 nm on excitation at 280 nm. Theoretically to prove that the molecule has anticancer activity against cervical cancer cells, the compounds were analyzed for molecular docking interactions with HPV16-E7 target protein by Glide protocol. Furthermore, 4-aminoantipyrine derivatives were evaluated for their in vitro cytotoxic activity against human cervical cancer cells (SiHa) by MTT assay. Compound 1 showed two fold higher activity (IC50 = 0.912 μM) over compound 2, and its activity was similar to that of Pazopanib, suggesting that although the two compounds were chemically very similar the difference in substituent on the phenyl moiety caused changes in properties.

  11. Vibrational nano-spectroscopic imaging correlating structure with intermolecular coupling and dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Pollard, Benjamin; Muller, Eric A.; Hinrichs, Karsten; Raschke, Markus B.

    2014-01-01

    Molecular self-assembly, the function of biomembranes and the performance of organic solar cells rely on nanoscale molecular interactions. Understanding and control of such materials have been impeded by difficulties in imaging their properties with the desired nanometre spatial resolution, attomolar sensitivity and intermolecular spectroscopic specificity. Here we implement vibrational scattering-scanning near-field optical microscopy with high spectral precision to investigate the structure–function relationship in nano-phase separated block copolymers. A vibrational resonance is used as a sensitive reporter of the local chemical environment and we image, with few nanometre spatial resolution and 0.2 cm−1 spectral precision, solvatochromic Stark shifts and line broadening correlated with molecular-scale morphologies. We discriminate local variations in electric fields between nano-domains with quantitative agreement with dielectric continuum models. This ability to directly resolve nanoscale morphology and associated intermolecular interactions can form a basis for the systematic control of functionality in multicomponent soft matter systems. PMID:24721995

  12. Fast nosological imaging using canonical correlation analysis of brain data obtained by two-dimensional turbo spectroscopic imaging.

    PubMed

    Laudadio, Teresa; Martínez-Bisbal, M Carmen; Celda, Bernardo; Van Huffel, Sabine

    2008-05-01

    A new fast and accurate tissue typing technique has recently been successfully applied to prostate MR spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) data. This technique is based on canonical correlation analysis (CCA), a statistical method able to simultaneously exploit the spectral and spatial information characterizing the MRSI data. Here, the performance of CCA is further investigated by using brain data obtained by two-dimensional turbo spectroscopic imaging (2DTSI) from patients affected by glioblastoma. The purpose of this study is to investigate the applicability of CCA when typing tissues of heterogeneous tumors. The performance of CCA is also compared with that of ordinary correlation analysis on simulated as well as in vivo data. The results show that CCA outperforms ordinary correlation analysis in terms of robustness and accuracy.

  13. Identification of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in suspended particulate matter by synchronous fluorescence spectroscopic technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Homdutt; Jain, V. K.; Khan, Zahid H.

    2007-09-01

    The synchronous fluorescence (SF) technique has been used in the identification of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from air particulate sample in an urban environment of Delhi, Jawaharlal Nehru University. Suspended particulate matter samples of 24 h duration were collected on glass fiber filter papers. PAHs were extracted from the filter papers using dichloromethane (DCM) + hexane with ultrasonication method. Qualitative measurements of the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were carried out using the SF technique at various wavelength intervals (Δ λ). Due to the difference in chemical structure, each PAH gives specific characteristic spectrum for each Δ λ. Following PAHs were detected in our measurement: benz(a)anthracene (BaA), pyrene (Pyr), chrysene (Chry), fluoranthene (Flan), phenanthrene (Phen), and benz(ghi)perylene (BghiP). This is in agreement with our earlier work for determination of these PAHs using gas chromatography (GC). The seasonal variation of the PAHs was found to be maximum in winter and minimum during the monsoon.

  14. Synthesis and spectroscopic study of highly fluorescent β-enaminone based boron complexes.

    PubMed

    Kumbhar, Haribhau S; Gadilohar, Balu L; Shankarling, Ganapati S

    2015-07-01

    The newly synthesized 1, 1, 2-trimethyl-1H benzo[e]indoline based β-enaminone boron complexes exhibited the intense fluorescence (Fmax=522-547 nm) in solution as well as in solid state (F max=570-586 nm). These complexes exhibited large stoke shift, excellent thermal and photo stability when compared to the boron dipyrromethene (BODIPY) colorants. Optimized geometry and orbital distribution in ground states were computed by employing density functional theory (DFT). The cyclic voltammetry study revealed the better electron transport ability of these molecules than current electroluminescent materials like tris(8-hydroxyquinoli-nato)-aluminium (Alq3) and BODIPY, which can find application in electroluminescent devices. PMID:25813165

  15. Detection of rheumatoid arthritis by evaluation of normalized variances of fluorescence time correlation functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dziekan, Thomas; Weissbach, Carmen; Voigt, Jan; Ebert, Bernd; MacDonald, Rainer; Bahner, Malte L.; Mahler, Marianne; Schirner, Michael; Berliner, Michael; Berliner, Birgitt; Osel, Jens; Osel, Ilka

    2011-07-01

    Fluorescence imaging using the dye indocyanine green as a contrast agent was investigated in a prospective clinical study for the detection of rheumatoid arthritis. Normalized variances of correlated time series of fluorescence intensities describing the bolus kinetics of the contrast agent in certain regions of interest were analyzed to differentiate healthy from inflamed finger joints. These values are determined using a robust, parameter-free algorithm. We found that the normalized variance of correlation functions improves the differentiation between healthy joints of volunteers and joints with rheumatoid arthritis of patients by about 10% compared to, e.g., ratios of areas under the curves of raw data.

  16. Surface modified single molecules free-diffusion evidenced by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Boutin, Céline; Jaffiol, Rodolphe; Plain, Jérôme; Royer, Pascal

    2008-11-01

    We report on the free diffusion of single molecule near an interface studied using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy. In particular, we show that the chemical nature of the substrate may modify the free diffusion of a widely used molecule (rhodamine 6G), thus inducing unexpected effects in fluorescence correlation spectroscopy measurements. Our results show a strong influence, up to a few micrometer from the interface, of the surface polarity. This effect is assessed through the relative weight of the two dimensions diffusion process observed close to the surface. Our results are discussed in terms of competition between surface-solvent, solvent-molecule and molecule-surface specific interactions.

  17. CFHTLenS and RCSLenS: Testing Photometric Redshift Distributions Using Angular Cross-Correlations with Spectroscopic Galaxy Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, A.; Heymans, C.; Blake, C.; Hildebrandt, H.; Duncan, C. A. J.; Erben, T.; Nakajima, R.; Van Waerbeke, L.; Viola, M.

    2016-09-01

    We determine the accuracy of galaxy redshift distributions as estimated from photometric redshift probability distributions p(z). Our method utilises measurements of the angular cross-correlation between photometric galaxies and an overlapping sample of galaxies with spectroscopic redshifts. We describe the redshift leakage from a galaxy photometric redshift bin j into a spectroscopic redshift bin i using the sum of the p(z) for the galaxies residing in bin j. We can then predict the angular cross-correlation between photometric and spectroscopic galaxies due to intrinsic galaxy clustering when i ≠ j as a function of the measured angular cross-correlation when i = j. We also account for enhanced clustering arising from lensing magnification using a halo model. The comparison of this prediction with the measured signal provides a consistency check on the validity of using the summed p(z) to determine galaxy redshift distributions in cosmological analyses, as advocated by the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Lensing Survey (CFHTLenS). We present an analysis of the photometric redshifts measured by CFHTLenS, which overlaps the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS). We also analyse the Red-sequence Cluster Lensing Survey (RCSLenS), which overlaps both BOSS and the WiggleZ Dark Energy Survey. We find that the summed p(z) from both surveys are generally biased with respect to the true underlying distributions. If unaccounted for, this bias would lead to errors in cosmological parameter estimation from CFHTLenS by less than ˜4%. For photometric redshift bins which spatially overlap in 3-D with our spectroscopic sample, we determine redshift bias corrections which can be used in future cosmological analyses that rely on accurate galaxy redshift distributions.

  18. Fluorescent Ag nanoclusters prepared in aqueous poly(acrylic acid-co-maleic acid) solutions: a spectroscopic study of their excited state dynamics, size and local environment.

    PubMed

    Dandapat, Manika; Mandal, Debabrata

    2016-01-28

    Stable, fluorescent Ag nanoclusters were prepared in aqueous solutions of Na(+) salt of the carboxylate-rich polymer poly(acrylic acid-co-maleic acid) under brief spells of UV irradiation. The nanoclusters were nearly spherical, with diameters within 1.90 ± 0.50 nm, but displayed a prominent red edge excitation shift (REES) of fluorescence upon exciting within the visible absorption band, indicating heterogeneity of energy level distributions. Spectroscopic studies revealed that irrespective of whether the nanoclusters are excited in their UV or visible absorption bands, their fluorescence always ensues from the same manifold of emissive states, with a broad range of fluorescence lifetimes from ∼150 fs to 1 ns. PMID:26700465

  19. Correlative in-resin super-resolution and electron microscopy using standard fluorescent proteins

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Errin; Seiradake, Elena; Jones, E. Yvonne; Davis, Ilan; Grünewald, Kay; Kaufmann, Rainer

    2015-01-01

    We introduce a method for correlative in-resin super-resolution fluorescence and electron microscopy (EM) of biological structures in mammalian culture cells. Cryo-fixed resin embedded samples offer superior structural preservation, performing in-resin super-resolution, however, remains a challenge. We identified key aspects of the sample preparation procedure of high pressure freezing, freeze substitution and resin embedding that are critical for preserving fluorescence and photo-switching of standard fluorescent proteins, such as mGFP, mVenus and mRuby2. This enabled us to combine single molecule localization microscopy with transmission electron microscopy imaging of standard fluorescent proteins in cryo-fixed resin embedded cells. We achieved a structural resolution of 40–50 nm (~17 nm average single molecule localization accuracy) in the fluorescence images without the use of chemical fixation or special fluorophores. Using this approach enabled the correlation of fluorescently labeled structures to the ultrastructure in the same cell at the nanometer level and superior structural preservation. PMID:25823571

  20. Fluorescence Spectroscopic Studies on the Complexation of Antidiabetic Drugs with Glycosylated Serum Albumin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seedher, N.; Kanojia, M.

    2013-11-01

    Glycosylation decreases the association constant values and hence the binding affinity of human serum albumin (HSA) for the antidiabetic drugs under study. The percentage of HAS-bound drug at physiological temperature was only about 21-38 % as compared to 46-74 % for non-glycosylated HSA. Thus the percentage of free drug available for an antihyperglycemic effect was about double (62-79 %) compared to the values for non-glycosylated HSA. Much higher free drug concentrations available for pharmacological effect can lead to the risk of hypoglycemia. Hydrophobic interactions were predominantly involved in the binding. In the binding of gliclazide, hydrogen bonding and electrostatic interactions were involved. Site specificity for glycosylated HSA was the same as that for non-glycosylated HSA; gliclazide and repaglinide bind only at site II whereas glimepiride and glipizide bind at both sites I and II. Glycosylation, however, caused conformational changes in albumin, and the binding region within site II was different for glycosylated and non-glycosylated albumin. Stern-Volmer analysis also indicated the conformational changes in albumin as a result of glycosylation and showed that the dynamic quenching mechanism was valid for fluorescence of both glycosylated and non-glycosylated HSA.

  1. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy: Ultrasensitive detection in clear and turbid media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tahari, Abdel Kader

    In this work, I describe the development of a simple, inexpensive, and powerful alternative technique to detect and analyze, without enrichment, extremely low concentrations of cells, bacteria, viruses, and protein aggregates in turbid fluids for clinical and biotechnological applications. The anticipated applications of this technique are many. They range from the determination of the somatic cell count in milk for the dairy industry, to the enumeration and characterization of microorganisms in environmental microbiology and the food industry, and to the fast and ultrasensitive detection of protein aggregates for the diagnosis of Alzheimer's and other neurodegenerative diseases in clinical medicine. A prototype instrument has been built and allowed the detection and quantification of particles down to a few per milliliter in short scanning times. It consists of a small microscope that has a horizontal geometry and a mechanical instrument that holds a cylindrical cuvette (1 cm in diameter) with two motors that provide a rotational and a slower vertical inversion motions. The illumination focus is centered about 200 mum from the wall of the cuvette inside the sample. The total volume that is explored is large (˜1ml/min for bright particles). The data is analyzed with a correlation filter program based on particle passage pattern recognition. I will also describe further work on improving the sensitivity of the technique, expanding it for multiple-species discrimination and enumeration, and testing the prototype device in actual clinical and biotechnological applications. The main clinical application of this project seeks to establish conditions and use this new technique to quantify and size-analyze oligomeric complexes of the Alzheimer's disease beta-peptide in cerebrospinal fluid and other body fluids as a molecular biomarker for persons at risk of Alzheimer's disease dementia. The technology could potentially be extended to the diagnosis and therapeutic

  2. Bright Fraction of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes through Correlated Fluorescence and Topography Measurements.

    PubMed

    Nogaj, Lisa J; Smyder, Julie A; Leach, Kathryn E; Tu, Xiaomin; Zheng, Ming; Krauss, Todd D

    2015-07-16

    Correlated measurements of fluorescence and topography were performed for individual single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) on quartz using epifluorescence confocal microscopy and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Surprisingly, only ~11% of all SWNTs in DNA-wrapped samples were found to be highly emissive on quartz, suggesting that the ensemble fluorescence quantum yield is low because only a small population of SWNTs fluoresces strongly. Qualitatively similar conclusions were obtained from control studies using a sodium cholate surfactant system. To accommodate AFM measurements, excess surfactant was removed from the substrate. Though individual SWNTs on nonrinsed and rinsed surfaces displayed differences in fluorescence intensities and line widths, arising from the influence of the local environment on individual SWNT optical measurements, photoluminescence data from both samples displayed consistent trends.

  3. Precise quantification of cellular uptake of cell-penetrating peptides using fluorescence-activated cell sorting and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Rezgui, Rachid; Blumer, Katy; Yeoh-Tan, Gilbert; Trexler, Adam J; Magzoub, Mazin

    2016-07-01

    Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) have emerged as a potentially powerful tool for drug delivery due to their ability to efficiently transport a whole host of biologically active cargoes into cells. Although concerted efforts have shed some light on the cellular internalization pathways of CPPs, quantification of CPP uptake has proved problematic. Here we describe an experimental approach that combines two powerful biophysical techniques, fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS), to directly, accurately and precisely measure the cellular uptake of fluorescently-labeled molecules. This rapid and technically simple approach is highly versatile and can readily be applied to characterize all major CPP properties that normally require multiple assays, including amount taken up by cells (in moles/cell), uptake efficiency, internalization pathways, intracellular distribution, intracellular degradation and toxicity threshold. The FACS-FCS approach provides a means for quantifying any intracellular biochemical entity, whether expressed in the cell or introduced exogenously and transported across the plasma membrane. PMID:27033412

  4. Plasmonic antennas and zero-mode waveguides to enhance single molecule fluorescence detection and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy toward physiological concentrations.

    PubMed

    Punj, Deep; Ghenuche, Petru; Moparthi, Satish Babu; de Torres, Juan; Grigoriev, Victor; Rigneault, Hervé; Wenger, Jérôme

    2014-01-01

    Single-molecule approaches to biology offer a powerful new vision to elucidate the mechanisms that underpin the functioning of living cells. However, conventional optical single molecule spectroscopy techniques such as Förster fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) or fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) are limited by diffraction to the nanomolar concentration range, far below the physiological micromolar concentration range where most biological reaction occur. To breach the diffraction limit, zero-mode waveguides (ZMW) and plasmonic antennas exploit the surface plasmon resonances to confine and enhance light down to the nanometer scale. The ability of plasmonics to achieve extreme light concentration unlocks an enormous potential to enhance fluorescence detection, FRET, and FCS. Single molecule spectroscopy techniques greatly benefit from ZMW and plasmonic antennas to enter a new dimension of molecular concentration reaching physiological conditions. The application of nano-optics to biological problems with FRET and FCS is an emerging and exciting field, and is promising to reveal new insights on biological functions and dynamics.

  5. BH2 revisited: New, extensive measurements of laser-induced fluorescence transitions and ab initio calculations of near-spectroscopic accuracy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sunahori, Fumie X.; Gharaibeh, Mohammed; Clouthier, Dennis J.; Tarroni, Riccardo

    2015-05-01

    The spectroscopy of gas phase BH2 has not been explored experimentally since the pioneering study of Herzberg and Johns in 1967. In the present work, laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) spectra of the A ˜ 2 B 1 ( Π u ) - X ˜ 2A1 band system of 11BH2, 10BH2, 11BD2, and 10BD2 have been observed for the first time. The free radicals were "synthesized" by an electric discharge through a precursor mixture of 0.5% diborane (B2H6 or B2D6) in high pressure argon at the exit of a pulsed valve. A total of 67 LIF bands have been measured and rotationally analyzed, 62 of them previously unobserved. These include transitions to a wide variety of excited state bending levels, to several stretch-bend combination levels, and to three ground state levels which gain intensity through Renner-Teller coupling to nearby excited state levels. As an aid to vibronic assignment of the spectra, very high level hybrid ab initio potential energy surfaces were built starting from the coupled cluster singles and doubles with perturbative triples (CCSD(T))/aug-cc-pV5Z level of theory for this seven-electron system. In an effort to obtain the highest possible accuracy, the potentials were corrected for core correlation, extrapolation to the complete basis set limit, electron correlation beyond CCSD(T), and diagonal Born-Oppenheimer effects. The spin-rovibronic states of the various isotopologues of BH2 were calculated for energies up to 22 000 cm-1 above the X ˜ (000) level without any empirical adjustment of the potentials or fitting to experimental data. The agreement with the new LIF data is excellent, approaching near-spectroscopic accuracy (a few cm-1) and has allowed us to understand the complicated spin-rovibronic energy level structure even in the region of strong Renner-Teller resonances.

  6. Cellular characterization of adenylate kinase and its isoform: two-photon excitation fluorescence imaging and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Ruan, Qiaoqiao; Chen, Yan; Gratton, Enrico; Glaser, Michael; Mantulin, William W

    2002-01-01

    Adenylate kinase (AK) is a ubiquitous enzyme that regulates the homeostasis of adenine nucleotides in the cell. AK1beta (long form) from murine cells shares the same protein sequence as AK1 (short form) except for the addition of 18 amino acid residues at its N-terminus. It is hypothesized that these residues serve as a signal for protein lipid modification and targeting of the protein to the plasma membrane. To better understand the cellular function of these AK isoforms, we have used several modern fluorescence techniques to characterize these two isoforms of AK enzyme. We fused cytosolic adenylate kinase (AK1) and its isoform (AK1beta) with enhanced green fluorescence protein (EGFP) and expressed the chimera proteins in HeLa cells. Using two-photon excitation scanning fluorescence imaging, we were able to directly visualize the localization of AK1-EGFP and AK1beta-EGFP in live cells. AK1beta-EGFP mainly localized on the plasma membrane, whereas AK1-EGFP distributed throughout the cell except for trace amounts in the nuclear membrane and some vesicles. We performed fluorescence correlation spectroscopy measurements and photon-counting histogram analysis in specific domains of live cells. For AK1-EGFP, we observed only one diffusion component in the cytoplasm. For AK1beta-EGFP, we observed two distinct diffusion components on the plasma membrane. One corresponded to the free diffusing protein, whereas the other represented the membrane-bound AK1beta-EGFP. The diffusion rate of AK1-EGFP was slowed by a factor of 1.8 with respect to that of EGFP, which was 50% more than what we would expect for a free diffusing AK1-EGFP. To rule out the possibility of oligomer formation, we performed photon-counting histogram analysis to direct analyze the brightness difference between AK1-EGFP and EGFP. From our analysis, we concluded that cytoplasmic AK1-EGFP is monomeric. fluorescence correlation spectroscopy proved to be a powerful technique for quantitatively studying the

  7. Correlation functions in resonance fluorescence with spectral resolution: Signal-processing approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shatokhin, Vyacheslav N.; Kilin, Sergei Ya.

    2016-09-01

    In the framework of the signal processing approach to single-atom resonance fluorescence with spectral resolution, we diagrammatically derive an analytical formula for arbitrary-order spectral correlation functions of the scattered fields that pass through Fabry-Perot interferometers. Our general expression is then applied to study correlation signals in the limit of well separated spectral lines of the resonance fluorescence spectrum. In particular, we study the normalized second-order temporal intensity correlation functions in the case of the interferometers tuned to the components of the spectrum and obtain interferential corrections to the approximate results derived in the secular limit. In addition, we explore purely spectral correlations and show that they can fully be understood in terms of the two-photon cascades down the dressed state ladder.

  8. Probing the endocytic pathway in live cells using dual-color fluorescence cross-correlation analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Bacia, Kirsten; Majoul, Irina V; Schwille, Petra

    2002-01-01

    Fluorescence (auto)correlation spectroscopy (FCS) has developed into a widely used method for investigating molecular dynamics and mobility of molecules in vitro and in vivo. Dual-color cross-correlation, an extension of this technique, also assesses the concomitant movement of two spectrally distinguishable fluorescent molecules and has therefore proven superior to autocorrelation analysis to study interactions between different molecular species in solution. Here we explore the benefits of cross-correlation analysis when applied to live cells, by demonstrating its potential in analyzing endocytic processes. Bacterial cholera toxin (CTX) was labeled with Cy2 and Cy5 dyes on different subunits of the same holotoxin. Along the endocytic pathway, positive cross-correlation between the A and B subunits was first preserved, later followed by a loss in cross-correlation upon their separation in the Golgi. Furthermore, endocytosis of a mixture of only Cy2- and only Cy5-labeled holotoxins also gave rise to cross-correlation. Our results suggest that cross-correlation may be used to recognize whether different cargoes use the same endocytic pathway. Additionally, we show that cross-correlation is applicable to two-dimensional membrane diffusion. CTX bound to GM1-containing artificial giant unilamellar vesicles was diffusible, whereas CTX bound to the plasma membrane was immobile on the FCS time-scale, possibly because of raft-association of GM1. PMID:12124298

  9. Echo Planar Correlated Spectroscopic Imaging (EP-COSI): Implementation and Pilot Evaluation in Human Calf in Vivo#

    PubMed Central

    Lipnick, Scott; Verma, Gaurav; Ramadan, Saadallah; Furuyama, Jon; Thomas, M. Albert

    2010-01-01

    Exploiting the speed benefits of echo-planar imaging (EPI), the echo-planar spectroscopic imaging (EPSI) sequence facilitates recording of one spectral and two to three spatial dimensions faster than the conventional MR Spectroscopic Imaging (MRSI). A novel four dimensional (4D) echo-planar correlated spectroscopic imaging (EP-COSI) was implemented on a whole body 3T MRI scanner combining two spectral with two spatial encodings. Similar to EPSI, the EP-COSI sequence used a bipolar spatial read-out train facilitating simultaneous spatial and spectral encoding, and the conventional phase and spectral encodings for the other spatial and indirect spectral dimensions, respectively. Multiple 2D correlated spectroscopy (COSY) spectra were recorded over the spatially resolved volume of interest (VOI) localized by a train of three slice-selective radio-frequency (RF) pulses (90°-180°-90°). After the initial optimization using phantom solutions, the EP-COSI data were recorded in the lower leg of eight healthy volunteers including one endurance trained volunteer. Pilot results showed acceptable spatial and spectral quality achievable using the EP-COSI sequence. There was a detectable separation of cross peaks arising from the skeletal muscle intramyocellular lipids (IMCL) and extramyocellular lipids (EMCL) saturated and unsaturated pools. Residual dipolar interaction between the N-methylene and N-methyl protons of creatine/phosphocreatine (Cr/PCr) was also observed in the tibialis anterior region. PMID:20574964

  10. Tracking quasi-stationary flow of weak fluorescent signals by adaptive multi-frame correlation.

    PubMed

    Ji, L; Danuser, G

    2005-12-01

    We have developed a novel cross-correlation technique to probe quasi-stationary flow of fluorescent signals in live cells at a spatial resolution that is close to single particle tracking. By correlating image blocks between pairs of consecutive frames and integrating their correlation scores over multiple frame pairs, uncertainty in identifying a globally significant maximum in the correlation score function has been greatly reduced as compared with conventional correlation-based tracking using the signal of only two consecutive frames. This approach proves robust and very effective in analysing images with a weak, noise-perturbed signal contrast where texture characteristics cannot be matched between only a pair of frames. It can also be applied to images that lack prominent features that could be utilized for particle tracking or feature-based template matching. Furthermore, owing to the integration of correlation scores over multiple frames, the method can handle signals with substantial frame-to-frame intensity variation where conventional correlation-based tracking fails. We tested the performance of the method by tracking polymer flow in actin and microtubule cytoskeleton structures labelled at various fluorophore densities providing imagery with a broad range of signal modulation and noise. In applications to fluorescent speckle microscopy (FSM), where the fluorophore density is sufficiently low to reveal patterns of discrete fluorescent marks referred to as speckles, we combined the multi-frame correlation approach proposed above with particle tracking. This hybrid approach allowed us to follow single speckles robustly in areas of high speckle density and fast flow, where previously published FSM analysis methods were unsuccessful. Thus, we can now probe cytoskeleton polymer dynamics in living cells at an entirely new level of complexity and with unprecedented detail.

  11. Polarization-dependent fluorescence correlation spectroscopy for studying structural properties of proteins in living cell

    PubMed Central

    Oura, Makoto; Yamamoto, Johtaro; Ishikawa, Hideto; Mikuni, Shintaro; Fukushima, Ryousuke; Kinjo, Masataka

    2016-01-01

    Rotational diffusion measurement is predicted as an important method in cell biology because the rotational properties directly reflect molecular interactions and environment in the cell. To prove this concept, polarization-dependent fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (pol-FCS) measurements of purified fluorescent proteins were conducted in viscous solution. With the comparison between the translational and rotational diffusion coefficients obtained from pol-FCS measurements, the hydrodynamic radius of an enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) was estimated as a control measurement. The orientation of oligomer EGFP in living cells was also estimated by pol-FCS and compared with Monte Carlo simulations. The results of this pol-FCS experiment indicate that this method allows an estimation of the molecular orientation using the characteristics of rotational diffusion. Further, it can be applied to analyze the degree of molecular orientation and multimerization or detection of tiny aggregation of aggregate-prone proteins. PMID:27489044

  12. Site-specific interaction of thrombin and inhibitors observed by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Klingler, J; Friedrich, T

    1997-01-01

    We report on the application of fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) to observe the interaction between thrombin and thrombin inhibitors. Two site-specific fluorescent labels were used to distinguish between inhibitors directed to the active site, the exosite, or both binding sites of thrombin. For several well-known inhibitors of thrombin, the binding sites observed by FCS correspond to previous studies. The interaction of the recently discovered thrombin inhibitor ornithodorin from the tick Ornithodorus moubata with thrombin was investigated. It was found that this inhibitor, like hirudin and rhodniin, binds to both the active site and exosite of thrombin simultaneously. This study shows the feasibility of FCS as a sensitive and selective method for observing protein-ligand interactions. As an additional technique, simultaneous labeling with both fluorescent labels was successfully demonstrated. Images FIGURE 1 PMID:9336216

  13. Multifocal multiphoton excitation and time correlated single photon counting detection for 3-D fluorescence lifetime imaging.

    PubMed

    Kumar, S; Dunsby, C; De Beule, P A A; Owen, D M; Anand, U; Lanigan, P M P; Benninger, R K P; Davis, D M; Neil, M A A; Anand, P; Benham, C; Naylor, A; French, P M W

    2007-10-01

    We report a multifocal multiphoton time-correlated single photon counting (TCSPC) fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) microscope system that uses a 16 channel multi-anode PMT detector. Multiphoton excitation minimizes out-of-focus photobleaching, multifocal excitation reduces non-linear in-plane photobleaching effects and TCSPC electronics provide photon-efficient detection of the fluorescence decay profile. TCSPC detection is less prone to bleaching- and movement-induced artefacts compared to wide-field time-gated or frequency-domain FLIM. This microscope is therefore capable of acquiring 3-D FLIM images at significantly increased speeds compared to single beam multiphoton microscopy and we demonstrate this with live cells expressing a GFP tagged protein. We also apply this system to time-lapse FLIM of NAD(P)H autofluorescence in single live cells and report measurements on the change in the fluorescence decay profile following the application of a known metabolic inhibitor. PMID:19550524

  14. CINCH (confocal incoherent correlation holography) super resolution fluorescence microscopy based upon FINCH (Fresnel incoherent correlation holography)

    PubMed Central

    Siegel, Nisan; Storrie, Brian; Bruce, Marc

    2016-01-01

    FINCH holographic fluorescence microscopy creates high resolution super-resolved images with enhanced depth of focus. The simple addition of a real-time Nipkow disk confocal image scanner in a conjugate plane of this incoherent holographic system is shown to reduce the depth of focus, and the combination of both techniques provides a simple way to enhance the axial resolution of FINCH in a combined method called “CINCH”. An important feature of the combined system allows for the simultaneous real-time image capture of widefield and holographic images or confocal and confocal holographic images for ready comparison of each method on the exact same field of view. Additional GPU based complex deconvolution processing of the images further enhances resolution. PMID:26839443

  15. Measuring surface dynamics of biomolecules by total internal reflection fluorescence with photobleaching recovery or correlation spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Thompson, N L; Burghardt, T P; Axelrod, D

    1981-03-01

    The theoretical basis of a new technique for measuring equilibrium adsorption/desorption kinetics and surface diffusion of fluorescent-labeled solute molecules at solid surfaces has been developed. The technique combines total internal reflection fluorescence (TIR) with either fluorescence photobleaching recovery (FPR) or fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS). A laser beam totally internally reflects at a solid/liquid interface; the shallow evanescent field in the liquid excites the fluorescence of surface adsorbed molecules. In TIR/FPR, adsorbed molecules are bleaching by a flash of the focused laser beam; subsequent fluorescence recovery is monitored as bleached molecules exchange with unbleached ones from the solution or surrounding nonilluminated regions of the surface. In TIR/FCS, spontaneous fluorescence fluctuations due to individual molecules entering and leaving a well-defined portion of the evanescent field are autocorrelated. Under appropriate experimental conditions, the rate constants and surface diffusion coefficient can be readily obtained from the TIR/FPR and TIR/FCS curves. In general, the shape of the theoretical TIR/FPR and TIR/FCS curves depends in a complex manner upon the bulk and surface diffusion coefficients, the size of the iluminated or observed region, and the adsorption/desorption/kinetic rate constants. The theory can be applied both to specific binding between immobilized receptors and soluble ligands, and to nonspecific adsorption processes. A discussion of experimental considerations and the application of this technique to the adsorption of serum proteins on quartz may be found in the accompanying paper (Burghardt and Axelrod. 1981. Biophys. J. 33:455). PMID:7225515

  16. Diffusion and segmental dynamics of rodlike molecules by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkler, Roland G.

    2007-08-01

    The dynamics of weakly bending polymers is analyzed on the basis of a Gaussian semiflexible chain model and the fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) correlation function is determined. Particular attention is paid to the influence of the rotational motion on the decay of the FCS correlation function. An analytical expression for the correlation function is derived, from which the averaged segmental mean square displacement can be determined independent of any specific model for the polymer dynamcis. The theoretical analysis exhibits a strong dependence of the correlation function on the rotational motion for semiflexible polymers with typical lengths and persistence lengths of actin filaments or fd viruses. Hence, FCS allows for a measurement of the rotational motion of such semiflexible polymers. The theoretical results agree well with experimental measurements on actin filaments and confirm the importance of large relaxation times.

  17. Correlative Electron and Fluorescence Microscopy of Magnetotactic Bacteria in Liquid: Toward In Vivo Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Woehl, Taylor J.; Kashyap, Sanjay; Firlar, Emre; Perez-Gonzalez, Teresa; Faivre, Damien; Trubitsyn, Denis; Bazylinski, Dennis A.; Prozorov, Tanya

    2014-10-31

    Magnetotactic bacteria biomineralize ordered chains of uniform, membrane-bound magnetite or greigite nanocrystals that exhibit nearly perfect crystal structures and species-specific morphologies. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is a critical technique for providing information regarding the organization of cellular and magnetite structures in these microorganisms. However, conventional TEM can only be used to image air-dried or vitrified bacteria removed from their natural environment. Here we present a correlative scanning TEM (STEM) and fluorescence microscopy technique for imaging viable cells of Magnetospirillum magneticum strain AMB-1 in liquid using an in situ fluid cell TEM holder. Fluorescently labeled cells were immobilized on microchip window surfaces and visualized in a fluid cell with STEM, followed by correlative fluorescence imaging to verify their membrane integrity. Notably, the post-STEM fluorescence imaging indicated that the bacterial cell wall membrane did not sustain radiation damage during STEM imaging at low electron dose conditions. We investigated the effects of radiation damage and sample preparation on the bacteria viability and found that approximately 50% of the bacterial membranes remained intact after an hour in the fluid cell, decreasing to ~30% after two hours. These results represent a first step toward in vivo studies of magnetite biomineralization in magnetotactic bacteria.

  18. Correlative Electron and Fluorescence Microscopy of Magnetotactic Bacteria in Liquid: Toward In Vivo Imaging

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Woehl, Taylor J.; Kashyap, Sanjay; Firlar, Emre; Perez-Gonzalez, Teresa; Faivre, Damien; Trubitsyn, Denis; Bazylinski, Dennis A.; Prozorov, Tanya

    2014-10-31

    Magnetotactic bacteria biomineralize ordered chains of uniform, membrane-bound magnetite or greigite nanocrystals that exhibit nearly perfect crystal structures and species-specific morphologies. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is a critical technique for providing information regarding the organization of cellular and magnetite structures in these microorganisms. However, conventional TEM can only be used to image air-dried or vitrified bacteria removed from their natural environment. Here we present a correlative scanning TEM (STEM) and fluorescence microscopy technique for imaging viable cells of Magnetospirillum magneticum strain AMB-1 in liquid using an in situ fluid cell TEM holder. Fluorescently labeled cells were immobilized on microchip windowmore » surfaces and visualized in a fluid cell with STEM, followed by correlative fluorescence imaging to verify their membrane integrity. Notably, the post-STEM fluorescence imaging indicated that the bacterial cell wall membrane did not sustain radiation damage during STEM imaging at low electron dose conditions. We investigated the effects of radiation damage and sample preparation on the bacteria viability and found that approximately 50% of the bacterial membranes remained intact after an hour in the fluid cell, decreasing to ~30% after two hours. These results represent a first step toward in vivo studies of magnetite biomineralization in magnetotactic bacteria.« less

  19. Determination of Dynamics of Plant Plasma Membrane Proteins with Fluorescence Recovery and Raster Image Correlation Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Laňková, Martina; Humpolíčková, Jana; Vosolsobě, Stanislav; Cit, Zdeněk; Lacek, Jozef; Čovan, Martin; Čovanová, Milada; Hof, Martin; Petrášek, Jan

    2016-04-01

    A number of fluorescence microscopy techniques are described to study dynamics of fluorescently labeled proteins, lipids, nucleic acids, and whole organelles. However, for studies of plant plasma membrane (PM) proteins, the number of these techniques is still limited because of the high complexity of processes that determine the dynamics of PM proteins and the existence of cell wall. Here, we report on the usage of raster image correlation spectroscopy (RICS) for studies of integral PM proteins in suspension-cultured tobacco cells and show its potential in comparison with the more widely used fluorescence recovery after photobleaching method. For RICS, a set of microscopy images is obtained by single-photon confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). Fluorescence fluctuations are subsequently correlated between individual pixels and the information on protein mobility are extracted using a model that considers processes generating the fluctuations such as diffusion and chemical binding reactions. As we show here using an example of two integral PM transporters of the plant hormone auxin, RICS uncovered their distinct short-distance lateral mobility within the PM that is dependent on cytoskeleton and sterol composition of the PM. RICS, which is routinely accessible on modern CLSM instruments, thus represents a valuable approach for studies of dynamics of PM proteins in plants. PMID:27041337

  20. Correlative Electron and Fluorescence Microscopy of Magnetotactic Bacteria in Liquid: Toward In Vivo Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Woehl, Taylor J.; Kashyap, Sanjay; Firlar, Emre; Perez-Gonzalez, Teresa; Faivre, Damien; Trubitsyn, Denis; Bazylinski, Dennis A.; Prozorov, Tanya

    2014-01-01

    Magnetotactic bacteria biomineralize ordered chains of uniform, membrane-bound magnetite or greigite nanocrystals that exhibit nearly perfect crystal structures and species-specific morphologies. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is a critical technique for providing information regarding the organization of cellular and magnetite structures in these microorganisms. However, conventional TEM can only be used to image air-dried or vitrified bacteria removed from their natural environment. Here we present a correlative scanning TEM (STEM) and fluorescence microscopy technique for imaging viable cells of Magnetospirillum magneticum strain AMB-1 in liquid using an in situ fluid cell TEM holder. Fluorescently labeled cells were immobilized on microchip window surfaces and visualized in a fluid cell with STEM, followed by correlative fluorescence imaging to verify their membrane integrity. Notably, the post-STEM fluorescence imaging indicated that the bacterial cell wall membrane did not sustain radiation damage during STEM imaging at low electron dose conditions. We investigated the effects of radiation damage and sample preparation on the bacteria viability and found that approximately 50% of the bacterial membranes remained intact after an hour in the fluid cell, decreasing to ~30% after two hours. These results represent a first step toward in vivo studies of magnetite biomineralization in magnetotactic bacteria. PMID:25358460

  1. Correlated atomic force microscopy and fluorescence lifetime imaging of live bacterial cells.

    PubMed

    Micic, Miodrag; Hu, Dehong; Suh, Yung Doug; Newton, Greg; Romine, Margaret; Lu, H Peter

    2004-04-15

    We report on imaging living bacterial cells by using a correlated tapping-mode atomic force microscopy (AFM) and confocal fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM). For optimal imaging of Gram-negative Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 cells, we explored different methods of bacterial sample preparation, such as spreading the cells on poly-L-lysine coated surfaces or agarose gel coated surfaces. We have found that the agarose gel containing 99% ammonium acetate buffer can provide sufficient local aqueous environment for single bacterial cells. Furthermore, the cell surface topography can be characterized by tapping-mode in-air AFM imaging for the single bacterial cells that are partially embedded. Using in-air rather than under-water AFM imaging of the living cells significantly enhanced the contrast and signal-to-noise ratio of the AFM images. Near-field AFM-tip-enhanced fluorescence lifetime imaging (AFM-FLIM) holds high promise on obtaining fluorescence images beyond optical diffraction limited spatial resolution. We have previously demonstrated near-field AFM-FLIM imaging of polymer beads beyond diffraction limited spatial resolution. Here, as the first step of applying AFM-FLIM on imaging bacterial living cells, we demonstrated a correlated and consecutive AFM topographic imaging, fluorescence intensity imaging, and FLIM imaging of living bacterial cells to characterize cell polarity.

  2. Correlative Electron and Fluorescence Microscopy of Magnetotactic Bacteria in Liquid: Toward In Vivo Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woehl, Taylor J.; Kashyap, Sanjay; Firlar, Emre; Perez-Gonzalez, Teresa; Faivre, Damien; Trubitsyn, Denis; Bazylinski, Dennis A.; Prozorov, Tanya

    2014-10-01

    Magnetotactic bacteria biomineralize ordered chains of uniform, membrane-bound magnetite or greigite nanocrystals that exhibit nearly perfect crystal structures and species-specific morphologies. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is a critical technique for providing information regarding the organization of cellular and magnetite structures in these microorganisms. However, conventional TEM can only be used to image air-dried or vitrified bacteria removed from their natural environment. Here we present a correlative scanning TEM (STEM) and fluorescence microscopy technique for imaging viable cells of Magnetospirillum magneticum strain AMB-1 in liquid using an in situ fluid cell TEM holder. Fluorescently labeled cells were immobilized on microchip window surfaces and visualized in a fluid cell with STEM, followed by correlative fluorescence imaging to verify their membrane integrity. Notably, the post-STEM fluorescence imaging indicated that the bacterial cell wall membrane did not sustain radiation damage during STEM imaging at low electron dose conditions. We investigated the effects of radiation damage and sample preparation on the bacteria viability and found that approximately 50% of the bacterial membranes remained intact after an hour in the fluid cell, decreasing to ~30% after two hours. These results represent a first step toward in vivo studies of magnetite biomineralization in magnetotactic bacteria.

  3. Spot Variation Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy Allows for Superresolution Chronoscopy of Confinement Times in Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Ruprecht, Verena; Wieser, Stefan; Marguet, Didier; Schütz, Gerhard J.

    2011-01-01

    Resolving the dynamical interplay of proteins and lipids in the live-cell plasma membrane represents a central goal in current cell biology. Superresolution concepts have introduced a means of capturing spatial heterogeneity at a nanoscopic length scale. Similar concepts for detecting dynamical transitions (superresolution chronoscopy) are still lacking. Here, we show that recently introduced spot-variation fluorescence correlation spectroscopy allows for sensing transient confinement times of membrane constituents at dramatically improved resolution. Using standard diffraction-limited optics, spot-variation fluorescence correlation spectroscopy captures signatures of single retardation events far below the transit time of the tracer through the focal spot. We provide an analytical description of special cases of transient binding of a tracer to pointlike traps, or association of a tracer with nanodomains. The influence of trap mobility and the underlying binding kinetics are quantified. Experimental approaches are suggested that allow for gaining quantitative mechanistic insights into the interaction processes of membrane constituents. PMID:21641330

  4. TOTAL INTERNAL REFLECTION WITH FLUORESCENCE CORRELATION SPECTROSCOPY: APPLICATIONS TO SUBSTRATE-SUPPORTED PLANAR MEMBRANES

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Nancy L.; Wang, Xiang; Navaratnarajah, Punya

    2009-01-01

    In this review paper, the conceptual basis and experimental design of total internal reflection with fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (TIR-FCS) is described. The few applications to date of TIR-FCS to supported membranes are discussed, in addition to a variety of applications not directly involving supported membranes. Methods related, but not technically equivalent, to TIR-FCS are also summarized. Future directions for TIR-FCS are outlined. PMID:19269331

  5. Unraveling transcription factor interactions with heterochromatin protein 1 using fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Siegel, Amanda P.; Hays, Nicole M.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract. The epigenetic control of heterochromatin deposition is achieved through a network of protein interactions mediated by the heterochromatin protein 1 (HP1). In earlier studies, we showed that the CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein alpha (C/EBPα), a transcription factor that controls cell differentiation, localizes to heterochromatin, and interacts with HP1α. Here, deletion and mutagenesis are combined with live-cell imaging approaches to characterize these protein interactions. The results demonstrate that the basic region and leucine zipper (BZip) domain of C/EBPα is sufficient for the interaction with HP1α in regions of heterochromatin. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy and cross-correlation (FCS and FCCS) revealed very different diffusion profiles for HP1α and the BZip protein, and co-expression studies indicated that the mobile fractions of these nuclear proteins diffuse independently of one another. The steady-state interactions of these proteins in regions of heterochromatin were monitored using Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET). A point mutation in HP1α, W174A, which disrupts the interactions with proteins containing the common PxVxL motif did not affect the interaction with the BZip protein. In contrast, the HP1α W41A mutation, which prevents binding to methylated histones, exhibited greatly reduced FRET efficiency when compared to the wild type HP1α or HP1αW174A. The functional significance of these interactions is discussed. PMID:23392382

  6. Speckle correlation resolution enhancement of wide-field fluorescence imaging (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yilmaz, Hasan

    2016-03-01

    Structured illumination enables high-resolution fluorescence imaging of nanostructures [1]. We demonstrate a new high-resolution fluorescence imaging method that uses a scattering layer with a high-index substrate as a solid immersion lens [2]. Random scattering of coherent light enables a speckle pattern with a very fine structure that illuminates the fluorescent nanospheres on the back surface of the high-index substrate. The speckle pattern is raster-scanned over the fluorescent nanospheres using a speckle correlation effect known as the optical memory effect. A series of standard-resolution fluorescence images per each speckle pattern displacement are recorded by an electron-multiplying CCD camera using a commercial microscope objective. We have developed a new phase-retrieval algorithm to reconstruct a high-resolution, wide-field image from several standard-resolution wide-field images. We have introduced phase information of Fourier components of standard-resolution images as a new constraint in our algorithm which discards ambiguities therefore ensures convergence to a unique solution. We demonstrate two-dimensional fluorescence images of a collection of nanospheres with a deconvolved Abbe resolution of 116 nm and a field of view of 10 µm × 10 µm. Our method is robust against optical aberrations and stage drifts, therefore excellent for imaging nanostructures under ambient conditions. [1] M. G. L. Gustafsson, J. Microsc. 198, 82-87 (2000). [2] H. Yilmaz, E. G. van Putten, J. Bertolotti, A. Lagendijk, W. L. Vos, and A. P. Mosk, Optica 2, 424-429 (2015).

  7. BH{sub 2} revisited: New, extensive measurements of laser-induced fluorescence transitions and ab initio calculations of near-spectroscopic accuracy

    SciTech Connect

    Sunahori, Fumie X.; Gharaibeh, Mohammed; Clouthier, Dennis J.; Tarroni, Riccardo

    2015-05-07

    The spectroscopy of gas phase BH{sub 2} has not been explored experimentally since the pioneering study of Herzberg and Johns in 1967. In the present work, laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) spectra of the A{sup ~} {sup 2}B{sub 1}(Π{sub u})−X{sup ~2}A{sub 1} band system of {sup 11}BH{sub 2}, {sup 10}BH{sub 2}, {sup 11}BD{sub 2}, and {sup 10}BD{sub 2} have been observed for the first time. The free radicals were “synthesized” by an electric discharge through a precursor mixture of 0.5% diborane (B{sub 2}H{sub 6} or B{sub 2}D{sub 6}) in high pressure argon at the exit of a pulsed valve. A total of 67 LIF bands have been measured and rotationally analyzed, 62 of them previously unobserved. These include transitions to a wide variety of excited state bending levels, to several stretch-bend combination levels, and to three ground state levels which gain intensity through Renner-Teller coupling to nearby excited state levels. As an aid to vibronic assignment of the spectra, very high level hybrid ab initio potential energy surfaces were built starting from the coupled cluster singles and doubles with perturbative triples (CCSD(T))/aug-cc-pV5Z level of theory for this seven-electron system. In an effort to obtain the highest possible accuracy, the potentials were corrected for core correlation, extrapolation to the complete basis set limit, electron correlation beyond CCSD(T), and diagonal Born-Oppenheimer effects. The spin-rovibronic states of the various isotopologues of BH{sub 2} were calculated for energies up to 22 000 cm{sup −1} above the X{sup ~} (000) level without any empirical adjustment of the potentials or fitting to experimental data. The agreement with the new LIF data is excellent, approaching near-spectroscopic accuracy (a few cm{sup −1}) and has allowed us to understand the complicated spin-rovibronic energy level structure even in the region of strong Renner-Teller resonances.

  8. Tumor redox metabolism correlation with the expression level of red fluorescent protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sha, Shuang; Wang, Anle; Lin, Qiaoya; Zhang, Zhihong

    2015-03-01

    The redox metabolism is variable and complicated with the progress of tumor development. Whether the tumor redox state will affect the exogenous gene expression or not, are still not clear now . To investigate the relationship between tumor endogenous redox state and the exogenous gene expression level, a far red fluorescent protein fRFP was used to monitor tumor cells proliferation and as an exogenous protein expression in tumors. NADH (nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide) and Fp (flavin protein) are two important coenzymes in the mitochondria respiratory chain, which can be as a standard representation for redox metabolism state. Three tumor subcutaneous models (melanoma, human pancreatic carcinoma and nasopharyngeal carcinoma) were used to observe their redox state and protein expression by our home-made redox scanner. The results showed that the distribution of fRFP fluorescent protein expression in the inner tumor regions are heterogeneous, and the fluorescent intensity of fRFP and the fluorescent intensity of NADH have high correlation. In addition, we also found the linear coefficient in three tumors are different, the value of coefficient is (R2 = 0.966 and R2 = 0.943) in melanoma, (R2 = 0.701 and R2 = 0.942) in human pancreatic carcinoma, and (R2 = 0.994) in nasopharyngeal carcinoma, respectively. From these results, we consider that the exogenous protein expression of fRFP in tumor had some relationship with the tumor redox state of NADH.

  9. Determination of Dissociation Constants in Living Zebrafish Embryos with Single Wavelength Fluorescence Cross-Correlation Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Xianke; Foo, Yong Hwee; Sudhaharan, Thankiah; Chong, Shang-Wei; Korzh, Vladimir; Ahmed, Sohail; Wohland, Thorsten

    2009-01-01

    Abstract The quantification of biological interactions is very important in life sciences. Here we report for the first time, to our knowledge, the determination of a biomolecular dissociation constant (KD) in living zebrafish embryos at physiological protein expression levels. For that purpose, we extend the application of single wavelength fluorescence cross-correlation spectroscopy into small organisms and measure the interaction of Cdc42, a small Rho-GTPase, and IQGAP1, an actin-binding scaffolding protein. Cdc42 and IQGAP1 were labeled with monomeric red fluorescent protein and enhanced green fluorescent protein, respectively. Both fluorophores were excited at a single wavelength of 514 nm, simplifying the fluorescence spectroscopy measurements and allowing quantification. For the determination of the interaction, we used two Cdc42 mutants, the constitutively active Cdc42G12V which is in a predominantly GTP-bound form and the dominant-negative GDP-bound Cdc42T17N. While Cdc42G12V binds to IQGAP1 with an apparent KD of ∼100 nM, Cdc42T17N has at least a one-order-of-magnitude lower affinity for the same protein. As a comparison, we measure the same protein-protein interactions in Chinese hamster ovary cell cultures but observe significant differences in protein mobility and KD from the zebrafish measurements, supporting the notion that bimolecular interactions depend on the biological system under investigation and are best performed under physiologically relevant conditions. PMID:19619483

  10. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy as tool for high-content-screening in yeast (HCS-FCS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, Christopher; Huff, Joseph; Marshall, Will; Yu, Elden Qingfeng; Unruh, Jay; Slaughter, Brian; Wiegraebe, Winfried

    2011-03-01

    To measure protein interactions, diffusion properties, and local concentrations in single cells, Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy (FCS) is a well-established and widely accepted method. However, measurements can take a long time and are laborious. Therefore investigations are typically limited to tens or a few hundred cells. We developed an automated system to overcome these limitations and make FCS available for High Content Screening (HCS). We acquired data in an auto-correlation screen of more than 4000 of the 6000 proteins of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, tagged with eGFP and expanded the HCS to use cross-correlation between eGFP and mCherry tagged proteins to screen for molecular interactions. We performed all high-content FCS screens (HCS-FCS) in a 96 well plate format. The system is based on an extended Carl Zeiss fluorescence correlation spectrometer ConfoCor 3 attached to a confocal microscope LSM 510. We developed image-processing software to control these hardware components. The confocal microscope obtained overview images and we developed an algorithm to search for and detect single cells. At each cell, we positioned a laser beam at a well-defined point and recorded the fluctuation signal. We used automatic scoring of the signal for quality control. All data was stored and organized in a database based on the open source Open Microscopy Environment (OME) platform. To analyze the data we used the image processing language IDL and the open source statistical software package R.

  11. Characterization of Porous Materials by Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy Super-resolution Optical Fluctuation Imaging.

    PubMed

    Kisley, Lydia; Brunetti, Rachel; Tauzin, Lawrence J; Shuang, Bo; Yi, Xiyu; Kirkeminde, Alec W; Higgins, Daniel A; Weiss, Shimon; Landes, Christy F

    2015-09-22

    Porous materials such as cellular cytosol, hydrogels, and block copolymers have nanoscale features that determine macroscale properties. Characterizing the structure of nanopores is difficult with current techniques due to imaging, sample preparation, and computational challenges. We produce a super-resolution optical image that simultaneously characterizes the nanometer dimensions of and diffusion dynamics within porous structures by correlating stochastic fluctuations from diffusing fluorescent probes in the pores of the sample, dubbed here as "fluorescence correlation spectroscopy super-resolution optical fluctuation imaging" or "fcsSOFI". Simulations demonstrate that structural features and diffusion properties can be accurately obtained at sub-diffraction-limited resolution. We apply our technique to image agarose hydrogels and aqueous lyotropic liquid crystal gels. The heterogeneous pore resolution is improved by up to a factor of 2, and diffusion coefficients are accurately obtained through our method compared to diffraction-limited fluorescence imaging and single-particle tracking. Moreover, fcsSOFI allows for rapid and high-throughput characterization of porous materials. fcsSOFI could be applied to soft porous environments such hydrogels, polymers, and membranes in addition to hard materials such as zeolites and mesoporous silica.

  12. Infrared Spectroscopic Evidences of Strong Electronic Correlations in (Sr1‑xLax)3Ir2O7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Gihyeon; Song, S. J.; Hogan, T.; Wilson, S. D.; Moon, S. J.

    2016-09-01

    We report on infrared spectroscopic studies of the electronic response of the (Sr1‑xLax)3Ir2O7 system. Our experiments revealed hallmarks of strong electronic correlations in the evolution of the electronic response across the filling-controlled insulator-metal transition. We observed a collapse of the Jeff = 1/2 Mott gap accompanying the transfer of the spectral weight from the high-energy region to the gap region with electron doping. The intraband conductivity at the metallic side of the transition was found to consist of coherent Drude-like and incoherent responses. The sum rule and the extended Drude model analyses further indicated a large mass enhancement. Our results demonstrate a critical role of the electronic correlations in the charge dynamics of the (Sr1‑xLax)3Ir2O7 system.

  13. Infrared Spectroscopic Evidences of Strong Electronic Correlations in (Sr1−xLax)3Ir2O7

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Gihyeon; Song, S. J.; Hogan, T.; Wilson, S. D.; Moon, S. J.

    2016-01-01

    We report on infrared spectroscopic studies of the electronic response of the (Sr1−xLax)3Ir2O7 system. Our experiments revealed hallmarks of strong electronic correlations in the evolution of the electronic response across the filling-controlled insulator-metal transition. We observed a collapse of the Jeff = 1/2 Mott gap accompanying the transfer of the spectral weight from the high-energy region to the gap region with electron doping. The intraband conductivity at the metallic side of the transition was found to consist of coherent Drude-like and incoherent responses. The sum rule and the extended Drude model analyses further indicated a large mass enhancement. Our results demonstrate a critical role of the electronic correlations in the charge dynamics of the (Sr1−xLax)3Ir2O7 system. PMID:27599573

  14. Infrared Spectroscopic Evidences of Strong Electronic Correlations in (Sr1-xLax)3Ir2O7.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Gihyeon; Song, S J; Hogan, T; Wilson, S D; Moon, S J

    2016-01-01

    We report on infrared spectroscopic studies of the electronic response of the (Sr1-xLax)3Ir2O7 system. Our experiments revealed hallmarks of strong electronic correlations in the evolution of the electronic response across the filling-controlled insulator-metal transition. We observed a collapse of the Jeff = 1/2 Mott gap accompanying the transfer of the spectral weight from the high-energy region to the gap region with electron doping. The intraband conductivity at the metallic side of the transition was found to consist of coherent Drude-like and incoherent responses. The sum rule and the extended Drude model analyses further indicated a large mass enhancement. Our results demonstrate a critical role of the electronic correlations in the charge dynamics of the (Sr1-xLax)3Ir2O7 system. PMID:27599573

  15. Structure and dynamics of fluorescently labeled complex fluids by fourier imaging correlation spectroscopy

    PubMed

    Grassman; Knowles; Marcus

    2000-12-01

    We present a method of Fourier imaging correlation spectroscopy (FICS) that performs phase-sensitive measurements of modulated optical signals from fluorescently labeled complex fluids. FICS experiments probe the time-dependent trajectory of a spatial Fourier component of the fluid particle density at a specified wave number k, and provide a direct route to the intermediate scattering function. The FICS approach overcomes signal sensitivity problems associated with dynamic light scattering, while offering a means to acquire time-dependent information about spatial distributions of fluorescent particles, superior in efficiency to direct imaging methods. We describe the instrumental setup necessary to perform FICS experiments, and outline the theory that establishes the connection between FICS observables and statistical mechanical quantities describing liquid state dynamics. Test measurements on monolayer suspensions of rhodamine labeled polystyrene spheres are detailed.

  16. Correlating structure and fluorescence dynamics of quantum dot clusters using super-resolution imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryan, Duncan P.; Goodwin, Peter M.; Sheehan, Chris J.; Whitcomb, Kevin J.; Gelfand, Martin P.; Van Orden, Alan

    2016-02-01

    Clusters of quantum dots exhibit fluorescent behavior that differs from that of individual particles. Bulk measurements involving a large number of particles obscure these dynamics. Synthesizing clusters with 5-10 particles enables the study of collective behavior where single-molecule fluorescence techniques can be applied. Super-resolution microscopy of these clusters correlated with SEM imaging reveals the influence of geometry and structure on emission dynamics. Signatures of energy transfer can be seen in the form of enhanced blinking. Motion of the emission center of the cluster is tracked, made possible by the independent blinking events of the individual particles. Discrete steps in the localization are observed as random switching between various on/off configurations moves the location of the emission center.

  17. Homodimerization of glucocorticoid receptor from single cells investigated using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy and microwells.

    PubMed

    Oasa, Sho; Sasaki, Akira; Yamamoto, Johtaro; Mikuni, Shintaro; Kinjo, Masataka

    2015-08-01

    Glucocorticoid receptor α (GR) binds to the promoter regions of target genes as a homodimer and activates its transcriptional process. Though the homodimerization is thought to be the initial and essential process, the dissociation constant for homodimerization of GR remains controversial. To quantify homodimerization of (enhanced green fluorescence protein) EGFP-(glucocorticoid receptor) GR, the particle brightness in lysates from single cell was estimated for the fraction of homodimeric EGFP-GR using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy and microwells. Fitting the data with a bimolecular reaction model, the dissociation constant was determined. Moreover slow-diffusion complex was observed. These results suggest that EGFP-GR forms not only a monomer-dimer equivalent state but also a large-molecular-weight complex. PMID:26183204

  18. What information is contained in the fluorescence correlation spectroscopy curves, and where

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khadem, S. M. J.; Hille, C.; Löhmannsröben, H.-G.; Sokolov, I. M.

    2016-08-01

    We discuss the application of fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) for characterization of anomalous diffusion of tracer particles in crowded environments. While the fact of anomaly may be detected by the standard fitting procedure, the value of the exponent α of anomalous diffusion may be not reproduced correctly for non-Gaussian anomalous diffusion processes. The important information is however contained in the asymptotic behavior of the fluorescence autocorrelation function at long and at short times. Thus, analysis of the short-time behavior gives reliable values of α and of lower moments of the distribution of particles' displacement, which allows us to confirm or reject its Gaussian nature. The method proposed was tested on the FCS data obtained in artificial crowded fluids and in living cells.

  19. What information is contained in the fluorescence correlation spectroscopy curves, and where.

    PubMed

    Khadem, S M J; Hille, C; Löhmannsröben, H-G; Sokolov, I M

    2016-08-01

    We discuss the application of fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) for characterization of anomalous diffusion of tracer particles in crowded environments. While the fact of anomaly may be detected by the standard fitting procedure, the value of the exponent α of anomalous diffusion may be not reproduced correctly for non-Gaussian anomalous diffusion processes. The important information is however contained in the asymptotic behavior of the fluorescence autocorrelation function at long and at short times. Thus, analysis of the short-time behavior gives reliable values of α and of lower moments of the distribution of particles' displacement, which allows us to confirm or reject its Gaussian nature. The method proposed was tested on the FCS data obtained in artificial crowded fluids and in living cells. PMID:27627335

  20. Measurement of the temperature-dependent diffusion properties of nanoparticles by using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Chanbae; Lee, Jaeran; Kang, Manil; Kim, Sok Won

    2014-10-01

    Changes in the diffusion properties of three kinds of fluorescent particles, Alexa Fluor 647, Q-dots (quantum dots), and beads, with temperature were investigated with a home-built fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) system based on a confocal microscope. In all samples, as the temperature was increased, the diffusion times were reduced, indicating an increase in the diffusion coefficient. In particular, of all the particles, Alexa Fluor 647 having the smallest size of ˜1 nm, showed a hydrodynamic radius that increased with increasing temperature of the solvent. However, for the Q-dots and beads with larger sizes, the hydrodynamic radius of the particles was inversely proportional to the temperature. These results show that diffusion coefficient obtained by changing the temperature has an influence on the hydrodynamic radius of the particles.

  1. Quantitative Determination of Spatial Protein-Protein Correlations in Fluorescence Confocal Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yong; Eghbali, Mansoureh; Ou, Jimmy; Lu, Rong; Toro, Ligia; Stefani, Enrico

    2010-01-01

    Abstract To quantify spatial protein-protein proximity (colocalization) in paired microscopic images of two sets of proteins labeled by distinct fluorophores, we showed that the cross-correlation and the autocorrelation functions of image intensity consisted of fast and slowly decaying components. The fast component resulted from clusters of proteins specifically labeled, and the slow component resulted from image heterogeneity and a broadly-distributed background. To better evaluate spatial proximity between the two specifically labeled proteins, we extracted the fast-decaying component by fitting the sharp peak in correlation functions to a Gaussian function, which was then used to obtain protein-protein proximity index and the Pearson's correlation coefficient. We also employed the median-filter method as a universal approach for background reduction to minimize nonspecific fluorescence. We illustrated our method by analyzing computer-simulated images and biological images. PMID:20141764

  2. Towards correlative super-resolution fluorescence and electron cryo-microscopy.

    PubMed

    Wolff, Georg; Hagen, Christoph; Grünewald, Kay; Kaufmann, Rainer

    2016-09-01

    Correlative light and electron microscopy (CLEM) has become a powerful tool in life sciences. Particularly cryo-CLEM, the combination of fluorescence cryo-microscopy (cryo-FM) permitting for non-invasive specific multi-colour labelling, with electron cryo-microscopy (cryo-EM) providing the undisturbed structural context at a resolution down to the Ångstrom range, has enabled a broad range of new biological applications. Imaging rare structures or events in crowded environments, such as inside a cell, requires specific fluorescence-based information for guiding cryo-EM data acquisition and/or to verify the identity of the structure of interest. Furthermore, cryo-CLEM can provide information about the arrangement of specific proteins in the wider structural context of their native nano-environment. However, a major obstacle of cryo-CLEM currently hindering many biological applications is the large resolution gap between cryo-FM (typically in the range of ∼400 nm) and cryo-EM (single nanometre to the Ångstrom range). Very recently, first proof of concept experiments demonstrated the feasibility of super-resolution cryo-FM imaging and the correlation with cryo-EM. This opened the door towards super-resolution cryo-CLEM, and thus towards direct correlation of structural details from both imaging modalities.

  3. Field confinement with aberration correction for solid immersion lens based fluorescence correlation spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Ramachandra; Mitic, Jelena; Serov, Alexandre; Leitgeb, Rainer A.; Lasser, Theo

    2007-03-01

    The solid immersion lens (SIL) as a tool for increasing the field confinement as well as providing optimal performance by aberration compensation in a confocal fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) system is illustrated here. Using Zernike polynomials we show that aberration compensation and the resultant pre-shaping of the incident wavefront enables near diffraction-limited performance. This is explained based on vectorial computations for high apertures in the Debye approximation. The obtained axial resolution parameters are compared with the obtained diffusion times in a SIL-FCS experiment for measurements in solutions done at the single molecule level.

  4. The Effect of the Refractive Index of the Medium in Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cha, Seoncheol; Kim, Sung Hyun; Kim, Doseok

    2010-03-01

    Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) is a useful tool to study diffusional motion in liquids as it measures resident time of a dye molecule in a small excitation volume made by confocal microscopy. Some reports recently predicted that the measurement result of FCS is affected sensitively by the refractive index of liquid medium. To check for this possibility, several liquids having the same viscosity values but different refractive indices were chosen to dissolve dye molecules. The change in the observed diffusion coefficients in solutions having the same viscosity value manifests that care needs to be taken in the common practice of using sucrose to change the viscosity in the FCS experiment.

  5. Recent Developments in Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy for Diffusion Measurements in Planar Lipid Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Macháň, Radek; Hof, Martin

    2010-01-01

    Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) is a single molecule technique used mainly for determination of mobility and local concentration of molecules. This review describes the specific problems of FCS in planar systems and reviews the state of the art experimental approaches such as 2-focus, Z-scan or scanning FCS, which overcome most of the artefacts and limitations of standard FCS. We focus on diffusion measurements of lipids and proteins in planar lipid membranes and review the contributions of FCS to elucidating membrane dynamics and the factors influencing it, such as membrane composition, ionic strength, presence of membrane proteins or frictional coupling with solid support. PMID:20386647

  6. The initial step of DNA hairpin folding: a kinetic analysis using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jiho; Doose, Sören; Neuweiler, Hannes; Sauer, Markus

    2006-01-01

    Conformational fluctuations of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) oligonucleotides were studied in aqueous solution by monitoring contact-induced fluorescence quenching of the oxazine fluorophore MR121 by intrinsic guanosine residues (dG). We applied fluorescence correlation spectroscopy as well as steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy to analyze kinetics of DNA hairpin folding. We first characterized the reporter system by investigating bimolecular quenching interactions between MR121 and guanosine monophosphate in aqueous solution estimating rate constants, efficiency and stability for formation of quenched complexes. We then studied the kinetics of complex formation between MR121 and dG residues site-specifically incorporated in DNA hairpins. To uncover the initial steps of DNA hairpin folding we investigated complex formation in ssDNA carrying one or two complementary base pairs (dC–dG pairs) that could hybridize to form a short stem. Our data show that incorporation of a single dC–dG pair leads to non-exponential decays for opening and closing kinetics and reduces rate constants by one to two orders of magnitude. We found positive activation enthalpies independent of the number of dC–dG pairs. These results imply that the rate limiting step of DNA hairpin folding is not determined by loop dynamics, or by mismatches in the stem, but rather by interactions between stem and loop nucleotides. PMID:16687657

  7. Probing the photoluminescence properties of gold nanoclusters by fluorescence lifetime correlation spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, C. T. Lin, T. N.; Shen, J. L.; Lin, C. A.; Chang, W. H.; Cheng, H. W.; Tang, J.

    2013-12-21

    Gold nanoclusters (Au NCs) have attracted much attention for promising applications in biological imaging owing to their tiny sizes and biocompatibility. So far, most efforts have been focused on the strategies for fabricating high-quality Au NCs and then characterized by conventional ensemble measurement. Here, a fusion single-molecule technique combining fluorescence correlation spectroscopy and time-correlated single-photon counting can be successfully applied to probe the photoluminescence (PL) properties for sparse Au NCs. In this case, the triplet-state dynamics and diffusion process can be observed simultaneously and the relevant time constants can be derived. This work provides a complementary insight into the PL mechanism at the molecular levels for Au NCs in solution.

  8. Intermolecular disulfide bond formation promotes immunoglobulin aggregation: investigation by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Nag, Moupriya; Bera, Kallol; Basak, Soumen

    2015-01-01

    Protein aggregation generally results from association between hydrophobic regions of individual monomers. However, additional mechanisms arising from specific interactions, such as intermolecular disulfide bond formation, may also contribute to the process. The latter is proposed to be the initiating pathway for aggregation of immunoglobulin (IgG), which is essential for triggering its immune response. To test the veracity of this hypothesis, we have employed fluorescence correlation spectroscopy to measure the kinetics of aggregation of IgG in separate experiments either allowing or inhibiting disulfide formation. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy measurements yielded a diffusion time (τ(D)) of ∼200 µsec for Rhodamine-labeled IgG, corresponding to a hydrodynamic radius (R(H)) of 56 Å for the IgG monomer. The aggregation kinetics of the protein was followed by monitoring the time evolution of τ(D) under conditions in which its cysteine residues were either free or blocked. In both cases, the progress curves confirmed that aggregation proceeded via the nucleation-dependent polymerization pathway. However, for aggregation in the presence of free cysteines, the lag times were shorter, and the aggregate sizes bigger, than their respective counterparts for aggregation in the presence of blocked cysteines. This result clearly demonstrates that formation of intermolecular disulfide bonds represents a preferred pathway in the aggregation process of IgG. Fluorescence spectroscopy showed that aggregates formed in experiments where disulfide formation was prevented denatured at lower concentration of guanidine hydrochloride than those obtained in experiments where the disulfides were free to form, indicating that intermolecular disulfide bridging is a valid pathway for IgG aggregation. PMID:25371040

  9. Translational Diffusion of Fluorescent Proteins by Molecular Fourier Imaging Correlation Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Fink, Michael C.; Adair, Kenneth V.; Guenza, Marina G.; Marcus, Andrew H.

    2006-01-01

    The ability to noninvasively observe translational diffusion of proteins and protein complexes is important to many biophysical problems. We report high signal/noise (≥250) measurements of the translational diffusion in viscous solution of the fluorescent protein, DsRed. This is carried out using a new technique: molecular Fourier imaging correlation spectroscopy (M-FICS). M-FICS is an interferometric method that detects a collective Fourier component of the fluctuating density of a small population of fluorescent molecules, and provides information about the distribution of molecular diffusivities. A theoretical analysis is presented that expresses the detected signal fluctuations in terms of the relevant time-correlation functions for molecular translational diffusion. Furthermore, the role played by optical orientational degrees of freedom is established. We report Fickian self-diffusion of the DsRed tetramer at short timescales. The long-time deviation of our data from Fickian behavior is used to determine the variance of the distribution of the protein self-diffusion coefficient. We compare our results to the expected outcomes for 1), a bi-disperse distribution of protein species, and 2), dynamic disorder of the host solvent. PMID:16920833

  10. Correlative imaging of fluorescent proteins in resin-embedded plant material.

    PubMed

    Bell, Karen; Mitchell, Steve; Paultre, Danae; Posch, Markus; Oparka, Karl

    2013-04-01

    Fluorescent proteins (FPs) were developed for live-cell imaging and have revolutionized cell biology. However, not all plant tissues are accessible to live imaging using confocal microscopy, necessitating alternative approaches for protein localization. An example is the phloem, a tissue embedded deep within plant organs and sensitive to damage. To facilitate accurate localization of FPs within recalcitrant tissues, we developed a simple method for retaining FPs after resin embedding. This method is based on low-temperature fixation and dehydration, followed by embedding in London Resin White, and avoids the need for cryosections. We show that a palette of FPs can be localized in plant tissues while retaining good structural cell preservation, and that the polymerized block face can be counterstained with cell wall probes. Using this method we have been able to image green fluorescent protein-labeled plasmodesmata to a depth of more than 40 μm beneath the resin surface. Using correlative light and electron microscopy of the phloem, we were able to locate the same FP-labeled sieve elements in semithin and ultrathin sections. Sections were amenable to antibody labeling, and allowed a combination of confocal and superresolution imaging (three-dimensional-structured illumination microscopy) on the same cells. These correlative imaging methods should find several uses in plant cell biology.

  11. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy to measure the metabolism of high-density lipoprotein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deitrick, Russell; Gibson, Emily; Razzaghi, Hamid

    2009-10-01

    High-density lipoprotein (HDL), referred to as the ``good cholesterol'', carries free cholesterol to the liver to be filtered from the bloodstream and is important to our understanding of atherosclerosis. HDL is metabolized in part by the enzyme Endothelial Lipase (EL). With this project we will use fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) to study the metabolism of HDL by EL comparing wild type with different genetic mutations. FCS is an advanced microscopy technique in which we record fluctuations in the fluorescence of dye-labeled molecules (in this case, HDL labeled with Nile Red) as they freely diffuse through a small focal volume. This data can be analyzed mathematically using the cross-correlation function, from which we can ultimately ascertain much information. In our case, we are interested in the diffusion coefficient which, via the Stokes-Einstein relation for a sphere, we can determine the size of HDL as it undergoes the process of metabolism. Preliminary results seem to indicate that the metabolic process occurs very quickly, that the final size of HDL depends primarily on the concentration of EL, and that the wild and mutant variants of EL have a similar effectiveness. In following experiments, we hope to investigate these relationships further.

  12. Focal volume optics and experimental artifacts in confocal fluorescence correlation spectroscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Hess, Samuel T; Webb, Watt W

    2002-01-01

    Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) can provide a wealth of information about biological and chemical systems on a broad range of time scales (<1 micros to >1 s). Numerical modeling of the FCS observation volume combined with measurements has revealed, however, that the standard assumption of a three-dimensional Gaussian FCS observation volume is not a valid approximation under many common measurement conditions. As a result, the FCS autocorrelation will contain significant, systematic artifacts that are most severe with confocal optics when using a large detector aperture and aperture-limited illumination. These optical artifacts manifest themselves in the fluorescence correlation as an apparent additional exponential component or diffusing species with significant (>30%) amplitude that can imply extraneous kinetics, shift the measured diffusion time by as much as approximately 80%, and cause the axial ratio to diverge. Artifacts can be minimized or virtually eliminated by using a small confocal detector aperture, underfilled objective back-aperture, or two-photon excitation. However, using a detector aperture that is smaller or larger than the optimal value (approximately 4.5 optical units) greatly reduces both the count rate per molecule and the signal-to-noise ratio. Thus, there is a tradeoff between optimizing signal-to-noise and reducing experimental artifacts in one-photon FCS. PMID:12324447

  13. Correlative imaging of fluorescent proteins in resin-embedded plant material.

    PubMed

    Bell, Karen; Mitchell, Steve; Paultre, Danae; Posch, Markus; Oparka, Karl

    2013-04-01

    Fluorescent proteins (FPs) were developed for live-cell imaging and have revolutionized cell biology. However, not all plant tissues are accessible to live imaging using confocal microscopy, necessitating alternative approaches for protein localization. An example is the phloem, a tissue embedded deep within plant organs and sensitive to damage. To facilitate accurate localization of FPs within recalcitrant tissues, we developed a simple method for retaining FPs after resin embedding. This method is based on low-temperature fixation and dehydration, followed by embedding in London Resin White, and avoids the need for cryosections. We show that a palette of FPs can be localized in plant tissues while retaining good structural cell preservation, and that the polymerized block face can be counterstained with cell wall probes. Using this method we have been able to image green fluorescent protein-labeled plasmodesmata to a depth of more than 40 μm beneath the resin surface. Using correlative light and electron microscopy of the phloem, we were able to locate the same FP-labeled sieve elements in semithin and ultrathin sections. Sections were amenable to antibody labeling, and allowed a combination of confocal and superresolution imaging (three-dimensional-structured illumination microscopy) on the same cells. These correlative imaging methods should find several uses in plant cell biology. PMID:23457228

  14. Silver-Gold Nanocomposite Substrates for Metal-Enhanced Fluorescence: Ensemble and Single-Molecule Spectroscopic Studies.

    PubMed

    Choudhury, Sharmistha Dutta; Badugu, Ramachandram; Ray, Krishanu; Lakowicz, Joseph R

    2012-03-01

    In recent years, there has been a growing interest in the studies involving the interactions of fluorophores with plasmonic nanostructures or nanoparticles. These interactions lead to several favorable effects such as increase in the fluorescence intensities, increased photostabilities, and reduced excited-state lifetimes that can be exploited to improve the capabilities of present fluorescence methodologies. In this regard, we report the use of newly developed silver-gold nanocomposite (Ag-Au-NC) structures as substrates for metal-enhanced fluorescence (MEF). The Ag-Au-NC substrates have been prepared by a one-step galvanic replacement reaction from thin silver films coated on glass slides. This approach is simple and suitable for the fabrication of MEF substrates with large area. We have observed about 15-fold enhancement in the fluorescence intensity of ATTO655 from ensemble fluorescence measurements using these substrates. The fluorescence enhancement on the Ag-Au-NC substrates is also accompanied by a reduction in the fluorescence lifetime of ATTO655, which is consistent with the fluorophore-plasmon coupling mechanism. Single-molecule fluorescence measurements have been performed to gain more insight into the metal-fluorophore interactions and to unravel the heterogeneity in the interaction of individual fluorophores with the fabricated substrates. The single-molecule studies are in good agreement with the ensemble measurements and show maximum enhancements of ~50-fold for molecules located in proximity to the "hotspots" on the substrates. In essence, the Ag-Au-NC substrates have a very good potential for various MEF applications.

  15. Silver–Gold Nanocomposite Substrates for Metal-Enhanced Fluorescence: Ensemble and Single-Molecule Spectroscopic Studies

    PubMed Central

    Choudhury, Sharmistha Dutta; Badugu, Ramachandram; Ray, Krishanu; Lakowicz, Joseph R.

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, there has been a growing interest in the studies involving the interactions of fluorophores with plasmonic nanostructures or nanoparticles. These interactions lead to several favorable effects such as increase in the fluorescence intensities, increased photostabilities, and reduced excited-state lifetimes that can be exploited to improve the capabilities of present fluorescence methodologies. In this regard, we report the use of newly developed silver–gold nanocomposite (Ag–Au–NC) structures as substrates for metal-enhanced fluorescence (MEF). The Ag–Au–NC substrates have been prepared by a one-step galvanic replacement reaction from thin silver films coated on glass slides. This approach is simple and suitable for the fabrication of MEF substrates with large area. We have observed about 15-fold enhancement in the fluorescence intensity of ATTO655 from ensemble fluorescence measurements using these substrates. The fluorescence enhancement on the Ag–Au–NC substrates is also accompanied by a reduction in the fluorescence lifetime of ATTO655, which is consistent with the fluorophore–plasmon coupling mechanism. Single-molecule fluorescence measurements have been performed to gain more insight into the metal–fluorophore interactions and to unravel the heterogeneity in the interaction of individual fluorophores with the fabricated substrates. The single-molecule studies are in good agreement with the ensemble measurements and show maximum enhancements of ~50-fold for molecules located in proximity to the “hotspots” on the substrates. In essence, the Ag–Au–NC substrates have a very good potential for various MEF applications. PMID:22707999

  16. A Chromone-Derived Schiff-Base Ligand as Al(3+) "Turn on" Fluorescent Sensor: Synthesis and Spectroscopic Properties.

    PubMed

    Li, Chao-rui; Qin, Jing-can; Wang, Bao-dui; Fan, Long; Yan, Jun; Yang, Zheng-yin

    2016-01-01

    In this study, a novel chromone-derived Schiff-base ligand called 6-Hydroxy-3-formylchromone (2'-furan formyl) hydrazone (HCFH) has been designed and synthesized as a "turn on" fluorescent sensor for Al(3+). This sensor HCFH showed high selectivity and sensitivity towards Al(3+) over other metal ions investigated, and most metal ions had nearly no influences on the fluorescence response of HCFH to Al(3+). Additionally, the significant enhancement by about 171-fold in fluorescence emission intensity at 502 nm was observed in the presence of Al(3+) in ethanol, and it was due to the chelation-enhanced fluorescence (CHEF) effect upon complexation of HCFH with Al(3+) which inhibited the photoinduced electron transfer (PET) phenomenon from the Schiff-base nitrogen atom to chromone group. Moreover, this sensor formed a 1 : 1 complex with Al(3+) and the fluorescence response of HCFH to Al(3+) was nearly completed within 1 min. Thus, this sensor HCFH could be used to detect and recognize Al(3+) for real-time detection.

  17. Spectroscopic Analysis of Red Fluorescent Proteins and Development of a Microfluidic Cell Sorter for the Generation of Improved Variants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lubbeck, Jennifer L.

    The discovery of the green fluorescent protein (GFP) launched the development of a wide variety of fluorescent protein (FP) mutants whose spectral and photophysical diversity revolutionized in vivo imaging. The excitation and emission spectra of red fluorescent proteins (RFPs), in particular, have been ideally tuned to a window optically favorable for in vivo work. However, their quantum yields, photostabilities and fluorescence intermittency properties require improvement if they are to be broadly employed for low-copy or single-molecule measurements. Attempts to engineer improved RFPs often result in optimization of one photophysical property at the expense of others. We developed a microfluidic-based cytometer for screening HeLa cell-based genetic RFP-libraries simultaneously on the basis of fluorescence lifetime (a proxy for quantum yield), photostability, and brightness. Ten 532 nm excitation beams interrogate each cell in flow. The first is electro-optically modulated (30 MHz) to enable lifetime measurement with phase fluorimetry. The remaining beams act as a pulse sequence for isolating the irreversible photobleaching time constant. Optical-force switching is employed to sort cells based on any combination of the photophysical parameters. Screening with this instrument enables identification of regions of the structure that synergistically affect quantum yield and photostability and the sorting capability provides a new tool for accelerating the development of next generation RFPs.

  18. Single-Particle Spectroscopic Study on Fluorescence Enhancement by Plasmon Coupled Gold Nanorod Dimers Assembled on DNA Origami.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Taishi; Gao, Nengyue; Li, Shuang; Lang, Matthew J; Xu, Qing-Hua

    2015-06-01

    Metal-enhanced fluorescence has attracted much attention due to its scientific importance and lots of potential applications. Plasmon coupled metal nanoparticles have been demonstrated to further improve the enhancement effects. Conventional studies of metal-enhanced fluorescence on the bulk systems are complicated by the ensemble average effects over many critical factors with large variations. Here, fluorescence enhancement of ATTO-655 by a plasmon coupled gold nanorod dimer fixed on a DNA origami nanobreadboard was studied on the single-particle level. A series of gold nanorod dimers with linear orientation and different gap distances ranging from 6.1 to 26.0 nm were investigated to explore the plasmon coupling effect on fluorescence enhancement. The results show that the dimer with the smallest gap (6.1 nm) gives the highest enhancement (470-fold), and the enhancement gradually decreases as the gap distance increases and eventually approaches that from a monomer (120-fold). This trend is consistent with the numerical calculation results. This study indicates that plasmon coupling in gold nanorod dimers offers further increased excitation efficiency to achieve large fluorescence enhancement.

  19. Dynamic imaging by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy identifies diverse populations of polyglutamine oligomers formed in vivo.

    PubMed

    Beam, Monica; Silva, M Catarina; Morimoto, Richard I

    2012-07-27

    Protein misfolding and aggregation are exacerbated by aging and diseases of protein conformation including neurodegeneration, metabolic diseases, and cancer. In the cellular environment, aggregates can exist as discrete entities, or heterogeneous complexes of diverse solubility and conformational state. In this study, we have examined the in vivo dynamics of aggregation using imaging methods including fluorescence microscopy, fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP), and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS), to monitor the diverse biophysical states of expanded polyglutamine (polyQ) proteins expressed in Caenorhabditis elegans. We show that monomers, oligomers and aggregates co-exist at different concentrations in young and aged animals expressing different polyQ-lengths. During aging, when aggregation and toxicity are exacerbated, FCS-based burst analysis and purified single molecule FCS detected a populational shift toward an increase in the frequency of brighter and larger oligomeric species. Regardless of age or polyQ-length, oligomers were maintained in a heterogeneous distribution that spans multiple orders of magnitude in brightness. We employed genetic suppressors that prevent polyQ aggregation and observed a reduction in visible immobile species with the persistence of heterogeneous oligomers, yet our analysis did not detect the appearance of any discrete oligomeric states associated with toxicity. These studies reveal that the reversible transition from monomers to immobile aggregates is not represented by discrete oligomeric states, but rather suggests that the process of aggregation involves a more complex pattern of molecular interactions of diverse intermediate species that can appear in vivo and contribute to aggregate formation and toxicity. PMID:22669943

  20. Synthesis, spectroscopic, fluorescence properties and biological evaluation of novel Pd(II) and Cd(II) complexes of NOON tetradentate Schiff bases.

    PubMed

    Ali, Omyma A M

    2014-01-01

    The solid complexes of Pd(II) and Cd(II) with N,N/bis(salicylaldehyde)4,5-dimethyl-1,2-phenylenediamine (H2L(1)), and N,N/bis(salicylaldehyde)4,5-dichloro-1,2-phenylenediamine (H2L(2)) have been synthesized and characterized by several techniques using elemental analysis (CHN), FT-IR, (1)H NMR, UV-Vis spectra and thermal analysis. Elemental analysis data proved 1:1 stoichiometry for the reported complexes while spectroscopic data indicated square planar and octahedral geometries for Pd(II) and Cd(II) complexes, respectively. The prepared ligands, Pd(II) and Cd(II) complexes exhibited intraligand (π-π(∗)) fluorescence and can potentially serve as photoactive materials. Thermal behavior of the complexes was studied and kinetic parameters were determined by Coats-Redfern method. Both the ligands and their complexes have been screened for antimicrobial activities.

  1. Photon Antibunching in Complex Intermolecular Fluorescence Quenching Kinetics.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Arjun; Enderlein, Jörg; Kumbhakar, Manoj

    2016-08-18

    We present a novel fluorescence spectroscopic method, which combines fluorescence antibunching, time-correlated single-photon counting (TCSPC), and steady-state emission spectroscopy, to study chemical reactions at the single molecule level. We exemplify our method on investigating intermolecular fluorescence quenching of Rhodamine110 by aniline. We demonstrate that the combination of measurements of fluorescence antibunching, fluorescence lifetime, and fluorescence steady state intensity, captures the full picture of the complex quenching kinetics, which involves static and dynamics quenching, and which cannot be seen by steady-state or lifetime measurements alone. PMID:27468007

  2. Spectroscopic orbits of two short-period early-type binaries using two-dimensional cross-correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González, J. F.; Lapasset, E.

    2003-06-01

    We apply the two-dimensional cross-correlation technique TODCOR to derive spectroscopic orbits for the two B-type double-lined spectroscopic binaries HD 66066A and HD 315031, previously mentioned as blue straggler candidates of the open clusters NGC 2516 and NGC 6530, respectively. Reliable radial velocities for both components are measured even for orbital phases for which the separation between the spectral lines are about 0.5 times the quadratic sum of the full-width at half-maximum of the lines. Both binaries have circular orbits and the orbital periods are 1.67 and 1.38 days for HD 66066A and HD 315031, respectively. We calculate minimum masses with errors of 3-5% and obtain the projected radii from the line widths. We derive absolute stellar parameters which are consistent with the age and distance of the clusters. Both binary systems are formed by main-sequence stars and it is expected that they will experience mass-transfer between their components before the end of the core H-burning stage. HD 315031 is likely a triple system as suggested by the variation of the center-of-mass velocity. The observations presented here were obtained at the Complejo Astronómico El Leoncito (CASLEO), which is operated under agreement between the Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas de la República Argentina (CONICET) and the National Universities of La Plata, Córdoba and San Juan.

  3. Proton nuclear magnetic resonance and fluorescence spectroscopic studies of segmental mobility in aequorin and a green fluorescent protein from Aequorea forskalea

    SciTech Connect

    Nageswara Rao, B.D.; Kemple, M.D.; Prendergast, F.G.

    1980-10-01

    Aequorin is a protein of low molecular weight (20,000) isolated from the jellyfish Aequorea forskalea which emits blue light upon the binding of Ca/sup 2 +/ ions. This bioluminescence requires neither exogenous oxygen nor any other cofactors. The light emission occurs from an excited state of a chromophore (an imidazolopyrazinone) which is tightly and noncovalently bound to the protein. Apparently the binding of Ca/sup 2 +/ by the protein induces changes in the protein conformation which allow oxygen, already bound or otherwise held by the protein, to react with and therein oxidize the chromophore. The resulting discharged protein remains intact, with the Ca/sup 2 +/ and the chromophore still bound, but is incapable of further luminescence. The fluorescence spectrum of this discharged protein and the bioluminescence spectrum of the original charged aequorin are identical. A green fluorescent protein (GFP) of approx. 30,000 mol wt isolated from the same organism, functions in vivo as an acceptor of energy from aequorin and subsequently emits green light. We are applying proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and fluorescence spectroscopy to examine structural details of, and fluctuations associated with the luminescent reaction of aequorin and the in vivo energy transfer from aequorin to the GFP.

  4. THE USE OF FLUORESCENCE CORRELATION SPECTROSCOPY TO PROBE CHROMATIN IN THE CELL NUCLEUS

    SciTech Connect

    Sorscher, Stanley M.; Bartholemew, James C.; Klein, Melvin P.

    1980-03-01

    All systems in thermodynamic equilibrium are subject to spontaneous fluctuations from equilibrium. For very small systems, the fluctuations can be made apparent, and can be used to study the behavior of the system without introducing any external perturbations. The mean squared amplitude of these fluctuations contains information about the absolute size of the system. The characteristic time of the fluctuation autocorrelation function contains kinetic information. In the experiments reported here, these concepts are applied to the binding equilibrium between ethidium bromide and DNA, a system where the fluorescence properties of the dye greatly enhance the effect of spontaneous fluctuations in the binding equilibrium. Preliminary experiments employ well characterized DNA preparations, including calf thymus DNA, SV40 DNA, and calf thymus nucleohistone particles. Additional measurements are described which have been made in small regions of individual nuclei, isolated from green monkey kidney cells, observing as few as 5000 dye molecules. The data indicate that the strength of dye binding increases in nuclei isolated from cells which have been stimulated to enter the cell growth cycle. The viscosity of nuclear material is inferred to be between one and two orders of magnitude greater than that of water, and decreases as the cells leave the resting state, and enter the cell growth cycle. Washing the nuclei also lowers the viscosity. These experiments demonstrate that fluorescence correlation spectroscopy can provide information at the subnuclear level that is otherwise unavailable.

  5. Analyzing the Homeostasis of Signaling Proteins by a Combination of Western Blot and Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Yi-Da; Sinzinger, Michael D.; Bovee-Geurts, Petra; Krause, Marina; Dinkla, Sip; Joosten, Irma; Koopman, Werner J.; Adjobo-Hermans, Merel J.W.; Brock, Roland

    2011-01-01

    The determination of intracellular protein concentrations is a prerequisite for understanding protein interaction networks in systems biology. Today, protein quantification is based either on mass spectrometry, which requires large cell numbers and sophisticated measurement protocols, or on quantitative Western blotting, which requires the expression and purification of a recombinant protein as a reference. Here, we present a method that uses a transiently expressed fluorescent fusion protein of the protein-of-interest as an easily accessible reference in small volumes of crude cell lysates. The concentration of the fusion protein is determined by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, and this concentration is used to calibrate the intensity of bands on a Western blot. We applied this method to address cellular protein homeostasis by determining the concentrations of the plasma membrane-located transmembrane scaffolding protein LAT and soluble signaling proteins in naïve T cells and transformed T-cell lymphoma (Jurkat) cells (with the latter having nine times the volume of the former). Strikingly, the protein numbers of soluble proteins scaled with the cell volume, whereas that of the transmembrane protein LAT scaled with the membrane surface. This leads to significantly different stoichiometries of signaling proteins in transformed and naïve cells in concentration ranges that may translate directly into differences in complex formation. PMID:22261070

  6. Correlation of Particle Traversals with Clonogenic Survival Using Cell-Fluorescent Ion Track Hybrid Detector.

    PubMed

    Dokic, Ivana; Niklas, Martin; Zimmermann, Ferdinand; Mairani, Andrea; Seidel, Philipp; Krunic, Damir; Jäkel, Oliver; Debus, Jürgen; Greilich, Steffen; Abdollahi, Amir

    2015-01-01

    Development of novel approaches linking the physical characteristics of particles with biological responses are of high relevance for the field of particle therapy. In radiobiology, the clonogenic survival of cells is considered the gold standard assay for the assessment of cellular sensitivity to ionizing radiation. Toward further development of next generation biodosimeters in particle therapy, cell-fluorescent ion track hybrid detector (Cell-FIT-HD) was recently engineered by our group and successfully employed to study physical particle track information in correlation with irradiation-induced DNA damage in cell nuclei. In this work, we investigated the feasibility of Cell-FIT-HD as a tool to study the effects of clinical beams on cellular clonogenic survival. Tumor cells were grown on the fluorescent nuclear track detector as cell culture, mimicking the standard procedures for clonogenic assay. Cell-FIT-HD was used to detect the spatial distribution of particle tracks within colony-initiating cells. The physical data were associated with radiation-induced foci as surrogates for DNA double-strand breaks, the hallmark of radiation-induced cell lethality. Long-term cell fate was monitored to determine the ability of cells to form colonies. We report the first successful detection of particle traversal within colony-initiating cells at subcellular resolution using Cell-FIT-HD.

  7. Guided fluorescence diagnosis of childhood caries: preliminary measures correlate with depth of carious decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timoshchuk, Mari-Alina; Zhang, Liang; Dickinson, Brian A.; Ridge, Jeremy S.; Kim, Amy S.; Baltuck, Camille T.; Nelson, Leonard Y.; Berg, Joel H.; Seibel, Eric J.

    2014-02-01

    The current rise in childhood caries worldwide has increased the demand for portable technologies that can quickly and accurately detect and diagnose early stage carious lesions. These lesions, if identified at an early stage, can be reversed with remineralization treatments, education, and improvements in home care. A multi-modal optical prototype for detecting and diagnosing occlusal caries demineralization in vivo has been developed and pilot tested. The device uses a 405-nm laser as a scanned illumination source to obtain high resolution and high surface contrast reflectance images, which allows the user to quickly image and screen for any signs of demineralized enamel. When a suspicious region is located, the device can be switched to perform dual laser fluorescence spectroscopy using 405-nm and 532-nm laser excitations. These spectra are used to compute an auto-fluorescence (AF) ratio of the suspicious region and the percent difference of AF ratios from a healthy region of the same tooth. The device was tested on 7 children's teeth in vivo with clinically diagnosed carious lesions. Lesion depth was then visually estimated from the video image using the 405-nm scanned light source, and within a month the maximum drill depth was assessed by a clinician. The researcher and clinicians were masked from previous measurements in a blinded study protocol. Preliminary results show that the ratiometric percent difference measurement of the AF spectrum of the tooth correlates with the severity of the demineralization as assessed by the clinician after drilling.

  8. Microfluidity mapping using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy: a new way to investigate plasma membrane microorganization of living cells.

    PubMed

    Winckler, Pascale; Cailler, Aurélie; Deturche, Régis; Jeannesson, Pierre; Morjani, Hamid; Jaffiol, Rodolphe

    2012-11-01

    Diffusion time distribution analysis has been employed to highlight the microfluidity fingerprint of plasma membrane of living cells. Diffusion time measurements were obtained through fluorescence correlation spectroscopy performed at the single cell level, over various eukaryotic cell lines (MCF7, LR73, KB3.1, MESSA and MDCKII). The nonsymmetric profile of the diffusion time distributions established experimentally, is discussed according to Monte Carlo simulations, which reproduce the diffusion of the fluorescent probe in heterogeneous membrane.

  9. Ultraviolet emission and excitation fluorescence spectroscopic characterization of DMBA-treated Swiss Albino mice skin carcinogenesis for measuring tissue transformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aruna, Prakasa R.; Hemamalini, Srinivasan; Ebenezar, Jeyasingh; Ganesan, Singaravelu

    2002-05-01

    The ultraviolet fluorescence emission spectra of skin tissues under different pathological conditions were measured at 280nm excitation. At this excitation wavelength, the normal skin showed a primary peak emission at 352nm and this primary peak emission from neoplastic skin shows a blue shift with respect to normal tissue. This blue shift increases as the stage of abnormality increases and it is maximum (19nm) for well-differentiated squamous cell carcinoma. This alteration is further confirmed from fluorescence excitation spectra of the tissues for 340nm emission. The study concludes that the change in the emission of tryptophan around 340nm may be due to partial unfolding of protein.

  10. Fluorescence detection of single molecules using pulsed near-field optical excitation and time correlated photon counting

    SciTech Connect

    Ambrose, W.P.; Goodwin, P.M.; Martin, J.C.; Keller, R.A.

    1994-03-01

    Pulsed excitation, time correlated single photon counting and time gated detection are used in near-field optical microscopy to enhance fluorescence images and measure the fluorescence lifetimes of single molecules of Rhodamine 6G on silica surfaces. Time gated detection is used to reject prompt scattered background and to improve the image signal to noise ratio. The excited state lifetime of a single Rhodamine 6G molecule is found to depend on the position of the near-field probe. We attribute the lifetime variations to spontaneous emission rate alterations by the fluorescence reflected from and quenching by the aluminum coated probe.

  11. DNA binding activity of Anabaena sensory rhodopsin transducer probed by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung Hyun; Kim, So Young; Jung, Kwang-Hwan; Kim, Doseok

    2015-01-01

    Anabaena sensory rhodopsin transducer (ASRT) is believed to be a major player in the photo-signal transduction cascade, which is triggered by Anabaena sensory rhodopsin. Here, we characterized DNA binding activity of ASRT probed by using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy. We observed clear decrease of diffusion coefficient of DNA upon binding of ASRT. The dissociation constant, K(D), of ASRT to 20 bp-long DNA fragments lied in micro-molar range and varied moderately with DNA sequence. Our results suggest that ASRT may interact with several different regions of DNA with different binding affinity for global regulation of several genes that need to be activated depending on the light illumination.

  12. Correlative super-resolution fluorescence and electron microscopy of the nuclear pore complex with molecular resolution.

    PubMed

    Löschberger, Anna; Franke, Christian; Krohne, Georg; van de Linde, Sebastian; Sauer, Markus

    2014-10-15

    Here, we combine super-resolution fluorescence localization microscopy with scanning electron microscopy to map the position of proteins of nuclear pore complexes in isolated Xenopus laevis oocyte nuclear envelopes with molecular resolution in both imaging modes. We use the periodic molecular structure of the nuclear pore complex to superimpose direct stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy images with a precision of <20 nm on electron micrographs. The correlative images demonstrate quantitative molecular labeling and localization of nuclear pore complex proteins by standard immunocytochemistry with primary and secondary antibodies and reveal that the nuclear pore complex is composed of eight gp210 (also known as NUP210) protein homodimers. In addition, we find subpopulations of nuclear pore complexes with ninefold symmetry, which are found occasionally among the more typical eightfold symmetrical structures.

  13. Correlation of hemodynamic and fluorescence signals under resting state conditions in mice's barrel field cortex.

    PubMed

    Bélanger, Samuel; de Souza, Bruno Oliveira Ferreira; Casanova, Christian; Lesage, Frédéric

    2016-03-11

    Both neurons and astrocytes are known to affect local vascular response in the brain following neuronal activity. In order to differentiate the contributions of each cell type to the hemodynamic response during stimulation and resting state, intrinsic optical signal (IOI) was recorded synchronized with fluorescence imaging of calcium concentration sensitive dye Oregon Green BAPTA-1 AM. By changing the stimulation parameters (frequency and duration), it was possible to individually promote neuronal and glial responses and to compare them to levels of oxy (HbO), deoxy (HbR) and total (HbT) hemoglobin concentrations. Finally, resting state recordings were done to investigate the possible correlation between hemoglobin fluctuation and calcium transients, based on different frequency bands associated either with neuronal or glial activity. PMID:26850574

  14. Study of mechanical properties of DNA in E. coli cells by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kafle, Rudra; Liebeskind, Molly; Meiners, Jens-Christian

    Mechanical quantities like the elasticity of cells are conventionally measured by directly probing them mechanically. Measurements of these quantities for subcellular structures in living cells are almost impossible this way. We use fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) to measure such mechanical quantities in chromosomal DNA in E. coli cells. We present methods to address complexities of live-cell FCS such as photobleaching, and calculate the viscoelastic moduli from the FCS data. We compare the measured viscoelastic moduli of live cells with those that are ATP-depleted to stop all molecular motor action and find substantial differences. Active processes are stopped in ATP-depleted cells and hence the bacterial DNA appears to become stiffer and the surrounding intracellular medium more viscous. We also compare our results with the FCS data obtained from the lambda DNA solution in various concentrations to mimic the cellular environment.

  15. Lightweight Raman spectroscope using time-correlated photon-counting detection.

    PubMed

    Meng, Zhaokai; Petrov, Georgi I; Cheng, Shuna; Jo, Javier A; Lehmann, Kevin K; Yakovlev, Vladislav V; Scully, Marlan O

    2015-10-01

    Raman spectroscopy is an important tool in understanding chemical components of various materials. However, the excessive weight and energy consumption of a conventional CCD-based Raman spectrometer forbids its applications under extreme conditions, including unmanned aircraft vehicles (UAVs) and Mars/Moon rovers. In this article, we present a highly sensitive, shot-noise-limited, and ruggedized Raman signal acquisition using a time-correlated photon-counting system. Compared with conventional Raman spectrometers, over 95% weight, 65% energy consumption, and 70% cost could be removed through this design. This technique allows space- and UAV-based Raman spectrometers to robustly perform hyperspectral Raman acquisitions without excessive energy consumption.

  16. Lightweight Raman spectroscope using time-correlated photon-counting detection.

    PubMed

    Meng, Zhaokai; Petrov, Georgi I; Cheng, Shuna; Jo, Javier A; Lehmann, Kevin K; Yakovlev, Vladislav V; Scully, Marlan O

    2015-10-01

    Raman spectroscopy is an important tool in understanding chemical components of various materials. However, the excessive weight and energy consumption of a conventional CCD-based Raman spectrometer forbids its applications under extreme conditions, including unmanned aircraft vehicles (UAVs) and Mars/Moon rovers. In this article, we present a highly sensitive, shot-noise-limited, and ruggedized Raman signal acquisition using a time-correlated photon-counting system. Compared with conventional Raman spectrometers, over 95% weight, 65% energy consumption, and 70% cost could be removed through this design. This technique allows space- and UAV-based Raman spectrometers to robustly perform hyperspectral Raman acquisitions without excessive energy consumption. PMID:26392538

  17. Lightweight Raman spectroscope using time-correlated photon-counting detection

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Zhaokai; Petrov, Georgi I.; Cheng, Shuna; Jo, Javier A.; Lehmann, Kevin K.; Yakovlev, Vladislav V.; Scully, Marlan O.

    2015-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy is an important tool in understanding chemical components of various materials. However, the excessive weight and energy consumption of a conventional CCD-based Raman spectrometer forbids its applications under extreme conditions, including unmanned aircraft vehicles (UAVs) and Mars/Moon rovers. In this article, we present a highly sensitive, shot-noise–limited, and ruggedized Raman signal acquisition using a time-correlated photon-counting system. Compared with conventional Raman spectrometers, over 95% weight, 65% energy consumption, and 70% cost could be removed through this design. This technique allows space- and UAV-based Raman spectrometers to robustly perform hyperspectral Raman acquisitions without excessive energy consumption. PMID:26392538

  18. Ultrasensitive detection of genetically modified plants by fluorescence cross-correlation spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Junfeng; Xing, Da; Chen, Tongsheng; Liu, Jinfeng

    2006-09-01

    In this study, a novel method for the direct detection of GMP without amplified by the general method of PCR is firstly presented and proved by experiments. In our method, fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, cleaving nucleic acid by restriction endonuclease and two nucleic acid probe hybridization techniques are combined to distinguish the caulifiower mosaic virus (CaMV) 35S promoter and determine whether samples contain genetically modified components. The detection principle is as follows: firstly two restriction endonucleases FOKI and BsrDlare used to cleave the genomic DNA and the 169bp fragments of CaMV 35S promoter are retrieved; secondly, two nucleic acid probes labeled by Rhodamine Green and y5 dyes respectively hybridize with cleaved 169bp fragments of CaMV 35S promoter; thirdly, the hybridization products simultaneously with two dye-labeled probes are detected by fluorescence cross-correlation spectroscopy and GMP is distinguished. As the detection and analysis by FCS can be performed at the level of single molecule, there is no need for any type of amplification. Genetically modified tobaccos are measured by this method. The results indicate this method can detect CaMV 35S promoter of GMP exactly and the sensitivity can be down to 3.47X10 -10M. Because no any type of amplification is involved, this method can avoid the non-specffic amplification and false-positive problems of PCR, Due to its high-sensitivity, simplicity, reliability and little need for sample amounts, this method promises to be a highly effective detection method for GMP.

  19. Correlative VIS-fluorescence and soft X-ray cryo-microscopy/tomography of adherent cells.

    PubMed

    Hagen, Christoph; Guttmann, Peter; Klupp, Barbara; Werner, Stephan; Rehbein, Stefan; Mettenleiter, Thomas C; Schneider, Gerd; Grünewald, Kay

    2012-02-01

    Soft X-ray cryo-microscopy/tomography of vitreous samples is becoming a valuable tool in structural cell biology. Within the 'water-window' wavelength region (2.34-4.37nm), it provides absorption contrast images with high signal to noise ratio and resolution of a few tens of nanometer. Soft X-rays with wavelengths close to the K-absorption edge of oxygen penetrate biological samples with thicknesses in the micrometer range. Here, we report on the application of a recently established extension of the transmission soft X-ray cryo-microscope (HZB TXM) at the beamline U41-XM of the BESSY II electron storage ring by an in-column epi-fluorescence and reflected light cryo-microscope. We demonstrate the new capability for correlative fluorescence and soft X-ray cryo-microscopy/tomography of this instrument along a typical life science experimental approach - the correlation of a fluorophore-tagged protein (pUL34-GFP of pseudorabies virus, PrV, the nuclear membrane-anchored component of the nuclear egress complex of the Herpesviridae which interacts with viral pUL31) in PrV pUL34-GFP/pUL31 coexpressing mammalian cells, with virus-induced vesicular structures in the nucleus, expanding the nucleoplasmic reticulum. Taken together, our results demonstrate new possibilities to study the role of specific proteins in substructures of adherent cells, especially of the nucleus in toto, accessible to electron microscopy in thinned samples only. PMID:22210307

  20. Correlative VIS-fluorescence and soft X-ray cryo-microscopy/tomography of adherent cells

    PubMed Central

    Hagen, Christoph; Guttmann, Peter; Klupp, Barbara; Werner, Stephan; Rehbein, Stefan; Mettenleiter, Thomas C.; Schneider, Gerd; Grünewald, Kay

    2012-01-01

    Soft X-ray cryo-microscopy/tomography of vitreous samples is becoming a valuable tool in structural cell biology. Within the ‘water-window’ wavelength region (2.34–4.37 nm), it provides absorption contrast images with high signal to noise ratio and resolution of a few tens of nanometer. Soft X-rays with wavelengths close to the K-absorption edge of oxygen penetrate biological samples with thicknesses in the micrometer range. Here, we report on the application of a recently established extension of the transmission soft X-ray cryo-microscope (HZB TXM) at the beamline U41-XM of the BESSY II electron storage ring by an in-column epi-fluorescence and reflected light cryo-microscope. We demonstrate the new capability for correlative fluorescence and soft X-ray cryo-microscopy/tomography of this instrument along a typical life science experimental approach – the correlation of a fluorophore-tagged protein (pUL34-GFP of pseudorabies virus, PrV, the nuclear membrane-anchored component of the nuclear egress complex of the Herpesviridae which interacts with viral pUL31) in PrV pUL34-GFP/pUL31 coexpressing mammalian cells, with virus-induced vesicular structures in the nucleus, expanding the nucleoplasmic reticulum. Taken together, our results demonstrate new possibilities to study the role of specific proteins in substructures of adherent cells, especially of the nucleus in toto, accessible to electron microscopy in thinned samples only. PMID:22210307

  1. Fluorescence Spectroscopic Investigation of Tillage, Cropping Management, and Nitrogen Application Effects on Stable and Water-Extractable Organic Matter

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Organic matter (OM) controls many important soil ecosystem processes. Stable (humic and fulvic) and water-extractable OM was obtained from soils in a nine-year tillage, cropping management, and nitrogen application study and characterized for its composition using multi-dimensional fluorescence spec...

  2. X-ray absorption spectroscopic analyses and fluorescence emission characteristics of PbO-Bi203-Ga203 glasses doped with rare-earth ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Yong Gyu; Kim, Kyong-Hon; Chernov, Vladimir A.; Heo, Jong

    1999-12-01

    A representative of heavy metal oxide glasses, i.e., a PbO- Bi2O3-Ga2O3 glass, was investigated to identify the network structure of the glass and the electronic transition properties of rare-earth ions doped. X-ray absorption spectroscopic analyses showed that gallium forms GaO4 tetrahedral units with an average Ga-O bond length of approximately 1.87 A. Lead forms both PbO3 and PbO4 polyhedra, but the fraction of PbO4 decreases with decreasing PbO content. Bismuth in glasses constructs BiO5 and BiO6 polyhedra, which have a similar coordination scheme of the (alpha) -Bi2O3 crystal. Formation of three-coordinated oxygens is necessary to compensate shortage of oxygens to be two-fold coordinated. These glasses exhibit a relatively good thermal stability as well as the lowest phonon energy among oxide glasses, and thereby enhance numerous fluorescence emissions that are quenched in the conventional oxide glasses. Magnitudes of multiphonon relaxation are the lowest among oxide glasses and comparable to those of fluoride glasses. Fluorescence emission characteristics of Pr3+: 1.3 micrometer and Er3+: 2.7 micrometer were discussed in detail. In addition, influence of OH- on the Nd3+: 1.3 micrometer emission was analyzed. Further research efforts on impurity minimization and fiberization may realize a new oxide-based fiber-optic host.

  3. Correlation of photobleaching, oxidation and metal induced fluorescence quenching of DNA-templated silver nanoclusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morishita, Kiyoshi; Maclean, James L.; Liu, Biwu; Jiang, Hui; Liu, Juewen

    2013-03-01

    Few-atom noble metal nanoclusters have attracted a lot of interest due to their potential applications in biosensor development, imaging and catalysis. DNA-templated silver nanoclusters (AgNCs) are of particular interest as different emission colors can be obtained by changing the DNA sequence. A popular analytical application is fluorescence quenching by Hg2+, where d10-d10 metallophilic interaction has often been proposed for associating Hg2+ with nanoclusters. However, it cannot explain the lack of response to other d10 ions such as Zn2+ and Cd2+. In our effort to elucidate the quenching mechanism, we studied a total of eight AgNCs prepared by different hairpin DNA sequences; they showed different sensitivity to Hg2+, and DNA with a larger cytosine loop size produced more sensitive AgNCs. In all the cases, samples strongly quenched by Hg2+ were also more easily photobleached. Light of shorter wavelengths bleached AgNCs more potently, and photobleached samples can be recovered by NaBH4. Strong fluorescence quenching was also observed with high redox potential metal ions such as Ag+, Au3+, Cu2+ and Hg2+, but not with low redox potential ions. Such metal induced quenching cannot be recovered by NaBH4. Electronic absorption and mass spectrometry studies offered further insights into the oxidation reaction. Our results correlate many important experimental observations and will fuel the further growth of this field.Few-atom noble metal nanoclusters have attracted a lot of interest due to their potential applications in biosensor development, imaging and catalysis. DNA-templated silver nanoclusters (AgNCs) are of particular interest as different emission colors can be obtained by changing the DNA sequence. A popular analytical application is fluorescence quenching by Hg2+, where d10-d10 metallophilic interaction has often been proposed for associating Hg2+ with nanoclusters. However, it cannot explain the lack of response to other d10 ions such as Zn2+ and Cd2+. In

  4. Effect of room temperature surface active ionic liquids on aggregated nanostructures of γ-Cyclodextrins: A picosecond fluorescence spectroscopic study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuchlyan, Jagannath; Banerjee, Chiranjib; Ghosh, Surajit; Kundu, Niloy; Banik, Debasis; Sarkar, Nilmoni

    2014-05-01

    In this Letter we report on controllable transition of aggregated γ-Cyclodextrins (γ-CDs) nanostructures by tuning the concentration of a long chain ionic liquid, 1-dodecyl-3-methyl imidazolium chloride (C12mimCl) added to the aqueous solution of γ-CDs. The gradual increase in concentration of C12mimCl first results in the breaking of γ-CDs aggregates by the formation of inclusion complexes with C12mimCl and then self-organizes into a new supramolecular aggregate. This spontaneous transition from one nanostructure to another has been established by spectroscopic and microscopic studies. It is worth to mention that addition of 1-octyl-3-methyl imidazolium chloride (C8mimCl) does not lead to any such transition.

  5. Interplay of electron correlations and localization in disordered β-tantalum films: Evidence from dc transport and spectroscopic ellipsometry study

    SciTech Connect

    Kovaleva, N. N.; Chvostova, D.; Dejneka, A.; Bagdinov, A. V.; Petrova, M. G.; Demikhov, E. I.; Pudonin, F. A.

    2015-02-02

    We report the dc transport (5 K ≲ T ≲ 380 K) and spectroscopic ellipsometry (0.8 eV ≤ hν ≤ 8.5 eV, T ≃ 300 K) study of β-Ta films prepared by rf sputtering deposition as a function of their thickness in the range 2.5 nm ≲ d ≲ 200 nm. The dc transport of the β-Ta films with a thickness d ≳ 25 nm is characterized by negative temperature coefficient of resistivity (TCR) caused by localization effects peculiar of highly disordered metals. Their dielectric function spectra display non-metallic-like behavior due to the presence of the pronounced band at 2 eV. We found that with increasing TCR absolute value, specifying elevated degree disorder, the optical spectral weight (SW) of free charge carriers decreases. The associated SW is recovered in the range of Mott-Hubbard transitions, indicating the mechanism of localization enhancement by electronic correlations in disordered metals.

  6. Imaging fluorescence correlation spectroscopy studies of dye diffusion in self-assembled organic nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hao; Nagasaka, Shinobu; Kameta, Naohiro; Masuda, Mitsutoshi; Ito, Takashi; Higgins, Daniel A

    2016-06-22

    The rate and mechanism of diffusion by anionic sulforhodamine B (SRB) dye molecules within organic nanotubes self-assembled from bolaamphiphile surfactants were investigated by imaging fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (imaging-FCS). The inner and outer surfaces of the nanotubes are terminated with amine and glucose groups, respectively; the former allow for pH-dependent manipulation of nanotube surface charge while the latter enhance their biocompatibility. Wide-field fluorescence video microscopy was used to locate and image dye-doped nanotubes dispersed on a glass surface. Imaging-FCS was then used to spatially resolve the SRB transport dynamics. Mobilization of the dye molecules was achieved by immersion of the nanotubes in buffer solution. Experiments were performed in pH 6.4, 7.4 and 8.4 buffers, at ionic strengths ranging from 1.73 mM to 520 mM. The results show that coulombic interactions between cationic ammonium ions on the inner nanotube surface and the anionic SRB molecules play a critical role in governing mass transport of the dye. The apparent dye diffusion coefficient, D, was found to generally increase with increasing ionic strength and with increasing pH. The D values obtained were found to be invariant along the nanotube length. Mass transport of the SRB molecules within the nanotubes is concluded to occur by a desorption-mediated Fickian diffusion mechanism in which dye motion is slowed by its coulombic interactions with the inner surfaces of the nanotubes. The results of these studies afford information essential to the use of organic nanotubes in controlled drug release applications. PMID:27271313

  7. Anisotropic diffusion of fluorescently labeled ATP in rat cardiomyocytes determined by raster image correlation spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Vendelin, Marko; Birkedal, Rikke

    2008-01-01

    A series of experimental data points to the existence of profound diffusion restrictions of ADP/ATP in rat cardiomyocytes. This assumption is required to explain the measurements of kinetics of respiration, sarcoplasmic reticulum loading with calcium, and kinetics of ATP-sensitive potassium channels. To be able to analyze and estimate the role of intracellular diffusion restrictions on bioenergetics, the intracellular diffusion coefficients of metabolites have to be determined. The aim of this work was to develop a practical method for determining diffusion coefficients in anisotropic medium and to estimate the overall diffusion coefficients of fluorescently labeled ATP in rat cardiomyocytes. For that, we have extended raster image correlation spectroscopy (RICS) protocols to be able to discriminate the anisotropy in the diffusion coefficient tensor. Using this extended protocol, we estimated diffusion coefficients of ATP labeled with the fluorescent conjugate Alexa Fluor 647 (Alexa-ATP). In the analysis, we assumed that the diffusion tensor can be described by two values: diffusion coefficient along the myofibril and that across it. The average diffusion coefficients found for Alexa-ATP were as follows: 83 ± 14 μm2/s in the longitudinal and 52 ± 16 μm2/s in the transverse directions (n = 8, mean ± SD). Those values are ∼2 (longitudinal) and ∼3.5 (transverse) times smaller than the diffusion coefficient value estimated for the surrounding solution. Such uneven reduction of average diffusion coefficient leads to anisotropic diffusion in rat cardiomyocytes. Although the source for such anisotropy is uncertain, we speculate that it may be induced by the ordered pattern of intracellular structures in rat cardiomyocytes. PMID:18815224

  8. Ligand-receptor interactions in live cells by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Pramanik, Aladdin

    2004-04-01

    Receptor binding studies most often require the use of radioactively labeled ligands. In certain cases, the numbers of receptors are few per cell and no specific binding is detected because of a high background. Specific interactions between certain ligands (e.g. peptides, hormones, natural products) and their receptors are, therefore, often overlooked by the conventional binding technique. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) allows detection of the interaction of ligands with receptors in their native environment in live cells in a tiny confocal volume element (0.2 fl) at single-molecule detection sensitivity. This technique permits the identification of receptors which were not possible before to detect by isotope labeling. The beauty of the FCS technique is that there is no need for separating an unbound ligand from a bound one to calculate the receptor bound and free ligand fractions. This review will show FCS as a sensitive and a rapid technique to study ligand-receptor interaction in live cells and will demonstrate that the FCS-analysis of ligand-receptor interactions in live cells fulfils all the criteria of a ligand binding to its receptor i.e. it is able to provide information on the affinity and specificity of a ligand, binding constant, association and dissociation rate constants as well as the number and mobility of receptors carrying a fluorescently labeled ligand. This review is of pharmaceutical significance since it will provide insights on how FCS can be used as a rapid technique for studying ligand-receptor interactions in cell cultures, which is one step forward towards a high throughput drug screening in cell cultures. PMID:15078155

  9. Studies of cytochrome c-551 unfolding using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy and other biophysical techniques.

    PubMed

    Sil, Pallabi; Paul, Simanta Sarani; Silvio, Eva Di; Travaglini-Allocatelli, Carlo; Chattopadhyay, Krishnananda

    2016-09-21

    In this paper, we have studied the equilibrium unfolding transitions of cytochrome c from Pseudomonas aeruginosa (cytc551), a small bacterial protein. Similar to eukaryotic cytochrome c, cytc551 folds sequentially, although significant differences exist in the order of folding units (foldons). There are two regions of cytc551 (N-terminal helix with residue number 3 to 10 and the loop 2 region containing residues 34 to 45), in which no foldon unit could be assigned. In addition, the helix containing the Cys-X-X-Cys-His motif, adjacent to the N-terminal helix (residue number 3 to 10), shows unexplained ultra-fast collapse. To obtain further insights, we have studied cytc551 site-directed mutants using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) and molecular dynamics simulation. We have found out that cytc551 unfolds through the formation of a fluorescently dark intermediate state and the amplitude of the dark component depends on the position of labeling. We have utilized this position dependence to propose a shape change model during the unfolding of cytc551. The present results show that the N-terminal helix remains in a collapsed position even in the completely unfolded state and this helix may act as a rigid support to guide the folding of its adjacent helix. This rigid support may be responsible for the ultra-fast collapse of the adjacent helix region, which occurs during the initial events of folding. The present results also show that the C-terminal end of loop 2 traverses a large distance during unfolding compared to the N-terminal end, which justifies the observed flexibility of the loop 2 region. PMID:27538920

  10. Picosecond wide-field time-correlated single photon counting fluorescence microscopy with a delay line anode detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirvonen, Liisa M.; Becker, Wolfgang; Milnes, James; Conneely, Thomas; Smietana, Stefan; Le Marois, Alix; Jagutzki, Ottmar; Suhling, Klaus

    2016-08-01

    We perform wide-field time-correlated single photon counting-based fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) with a crossed delay line anode image intensifier, where the pulse propagation time yields the photon position. This microchannel plate-based detector was read out with conventional fast timing electronics and mounted on a fluorescence microscope with total internal reflection (TIR) illumination. The picosecond time resolution of this detection system combines low illumination intensity of microwatts with wide-field data collection. This is ideal for fluorescence lifetime imaging of cell membranes using TIR. We show that fluorescence lifetime images of living HeLa cells stained with membrane dye di-4-ANEPPDHQ exhibit a reduced lifetime near the coverslip in TIR compared to epifluorescence FLIM.

  11. A novel fluorescent histamine H1 receptor antagonist demonstrates the advantage of using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy to study the binding of lipophilic ligands

    PubMed Central

    Rose, Rachel H; Briddon, Stephen J; Hill, Stephen J

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Fluorescent ligands facilitate the study of ligand–receptor interactions at the level of single cells and individual receptors. Here, we describe a novel fluorescent histamine H1 receptor antagonist (mepyramine-BODIPY630-650) and use it to monitor the membrane diffusion of the histamine H1 receptor. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH The human histamine H1 receptor fused to yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) was transiently expressed in CHO-K1 cells. The time course of binding of mepyramine-BODIPY630-650 to the H1 receptor was determined by confocal microscopy. Additionally, fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) was used to characterize the diffusion coefficient of the H1 receptor in cell membranes both directly (YFP fluorescence) and in its antagonist-bound state (with mepyramine-BODIPY630-650). KEY RESULTS Mepyramine-BODIPY630-650 was a high-affinity antagonist at the histamine H1 receptor. Specific membrane binding, in addition to significant intracellular uptake of the fluorescent ligand, was detected by confocal microscopy. However, FCS was able to quantify the receptor-specific binding in the membrane, as well as the diffusion coefficient of the antagonist–H1 receptor–YFP complexes, which was significantly slower than when determined directly using YFP. FCS also detected specific binding of mepyramine-BODIPY630-650 to the endogenous H1 receptor in HeLa cells. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS Mepyramine-BODIPY630-650 is a useful tool for localizing the H1 receptor using confocal microscopy. However, its use in conjunction with FCS allows quantification of ligand binding at the membrane, as well as determining receptor diffusion in the absence of significant bleaching effects. Finally, these methods can be successfully extended to endogenously expressed untagged receptors in HeLa cells. PMID:21880035

  12. Cytotoxicity screening of surfactant-based shampoos using a multiwell fluorescence scanner: Correlation with Draize eye scores.

    PubMed

    Merrick, P; Nieminen, A L; Harper, R A; Herman, B; Lemasters, J J

    1992-11-01

    The irritancy potential of seven shampoos was evaluated by a rapid cytotoxicity assay in cultured human keratinocytes and rat hepatocytes. Loss of cell viability was estimated from increases in propidium iodide fluorescence measured using a multiwell fluorescence scanner. The concentration of shampoo causing a 50% loss of cell viability after 15 min of incubation (V(50)) was determined by probit analysis. Log V(50) measured in human keratinocytes showed a strong negative correlation (r = -0.95; P <0.001) with Draize eye scores in rabbits. Log V(50) measured in rat hepatocytes did not show a statistically significant correlation with Draize eye scores. The results indicate that cytotoxicity screening of human keratinocytes using propidium iodide and a multiwell fluorescence scanner is highly predictive of Draize eye scores for surfactant-containing shampoos.

  13. Fluorescence spectroscopic characterization of DOM fractions isolated from a filtered river water after ozonation and catalytic ozonation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tao; Lu, Jinfeng; Ma, Jun; Qiang, Zhimin

    2008-03-01

    Fluorescence spectra were applied to investigate the structural changes of four dominant dissolved natural organic matter (DOM) fractions of a filtered river water before and after ozonation and catalytic ozonation. The ozonation and catalytic ozonation with synthetic goethite (FeOOH) and cerium dioxide (CeO(2)) were carried out under normal conditions, i.e. pH 7, reaction time of 10 min, and ozone/DOC ratio of about 1. The fluorescence spectra were recorded at both excitation-emission matrix (EEM) and synchronous scanning modes. EEM results reveal that ozonation of these DOM fractions causes a significant decrease of the aromaticity of humic-like structures and an increase of electron withdrawing groups, e.g., carboxylic groups. The catalysts can further improve the destruction of the humic-like structures in catalytic ozonation. Synchronous spectra reveal that ozonation of hydrophobic acid and hydrophilic acid (HIA) yields a significant amount of by-products with low aromaticity and low molecular weight. Catalytic ozonation enhances substantially the formation of these by-products from HIA and improves the destruction of highly polycyclic aromatic structures for all examined DOM fractions. PMID:18190948

  14. Co-treatment of fruit and vegetable waste in sludge digesters: Chemical and spectroscopic investigation by fluorescence and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Provenzano, Maria Rosaria; Cavallo, Ornella; Malerba, Anna Daniela; Di Maria, Francesco; Cucina, Mirko; Massaccesi, Luisa; Gigliotti, Giovanni

    2016-04-01

    In a previous work co-digestion of food waste and sewage sludge was performed in a pilot apparatus reproducing operating conditions of an existing full scale digester and processing waste mixed sludge (WMS) and fruit and vegetable waste (FVW) at different organic loading rates. An analysis of the relationship among bio-methane generation, process stability and digestate phytotoxicity was conducted. In this paper we considered humification parameters and spectroscopic analysis. Humification parameters indicated a higher not humified fraction (NH) and a lower degree of humification (DH) of FVW with respect to WMS (NH=19.22 and 5.10%; DH=36.65 and 61.94% for FVW and WMS, respectively) associated with their different chemical compositions and with the stabilization process previously undergone by sludge. FVW additions seemed to be favourable from an agronomical point of view since a lower percentage of organic carbon was lost. Fourier transform infrared spectra suggested consumption of aliphatics associated with rising in bio-methane generation followed by accumulation of aliphatics and carboxylic acids when the biogas production dropped. The trend of peaks ratios can be used as an indicator of the process efficiency. Fluorescence intensity of peak B associated with tryptophan-like substances and peak D associated with humic-like substances observed on tridimensional Excitation Emission Matrix maps increased up to sample corresponding to the highest rate of biogas production. Overall spectroscopic results provided evidence of different chemical pathways of anaerobic digestion associated with increasing amount of FVW which led to different levels of biogas production.

  15. Tracking transcription factor mobility and interaction in Arabidopsis roots with fluorescence correlation spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Natalie M; Hinde, Elizabeth; Winter, Cara M; Fisher, Adam P; Crosti, Giuseppe; Blilou, Ikram; Gratton, Enrico; Benfey, Philip N; Sozzani, Rosangela

    2016-01-01

    To understand complex regulatory processes in multicellular organisms, it is critical to be able to quantitatively analyze protein movement and protein-protein interactions in time and space. During Arabidopsis development, the intercellular movement of SHORTROOT (SHR) and subsequent interaction with its downstream target SCARECROW (SCR) control root patterning and cell fate specification. However, quantitative information about the spatio-temporal dynamics of SHR movement and SHR-SCR interaction is currently unavailable. Here, we quantify parameters including SHR mobility, oligomeric state, and association with SCR using a combination of Fluorescent Correlation Spectroscopy (FCS) techniques. We then incorporate these parameters into a mathematical model of SHR and SCR, which shows that SHR reaches a steady state in minutes, while SCR and the SHR-SCR complex reach a steady-state between 18 and 24 hr. Our model reveals the timing of SHR and SCR dynamics and allows us to understand how protein movement and protein-protein stoichiometry contribute to development. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.14770.001 PMID:27288545

  16. Heat shock-induced interactions among nuclear HSFs detected by fluorescence cross-correlation spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Pack, Chan-Gi; Ahn, Sang-Gun

    2015-07-31

    The cellular response to stress is primarily controlled in cells via transcriptional activation by heat shock factor 1 (HSF1). HSF1 is well-known to form homotrimers for activation upon heat shock and subsequently bind to target DNAs, such as heat-shock elements, by forming stress granules. A previous study demonstrated that nuclear HSF1 and HSF2 molecules in live cells interacted with target DNAs on the stress granules. However, the process underlying the binding interactions of HSF family in cells upon heat shock remains unclear. This study demonstrate for the first time that the interaction kinetics among nuclear HSF1, HSF2, and HSF4 upon heat shock can be detected directly in live cells using dual color fluorescence cross-correlation spectroscopy (FCCS). FCCS analyses indicated that the binding between HSFs was dramatically changed by heat shock. Interestingly, the recovery kinetics of interaction between HSF1 molecules after heat shock could be represented by changes in the relative interaction amplitude and mobility. - Highlights: • The binding interactions among nuclear HSFs were successfully detected. • The binding kinetics between HSF1s during recovery was quantified. • HSF2 and HSF4 strongly formed hetero-complex, even before heat shock. • Nuclear HSF2 and HSF4 bound to HSF1 only after heat shock.

  17. Benzodiazepine binding studies on living cells: application of small ligands for fluorescence correlation spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Hegener, Oliver; Jordan, Randolf; Häberlein, Hanns

    2002-11-01

    We demonstrate the applicability of fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) for receptor binding studies using low molecular weight ligands on the membranes of living nerve cells. The binding of the benzodiazepine Ro 7-1986/602 (N-des-diethyl-fluorazepam), labeled with the fluorophore Alexa 532, to the benzodiazepine receptor was analyzed quantitatively at the membrane of single rat hippocampal neurons. The values obtained for the dissociation constant Kd = (9.9 +/- 1.9) nm and the rate constant for ligand-receptor dissociation kdisS = (1.28 +/- 0.08) x 10(-3) s(-1) show that there is a specific and high affinity interaction between the dye-labeled ligand (Ro-Alexa) and the receptor site. The binding was saturated at approx. 100 nM and displacement of 10 nM Ro-Alexa, with a 1,000-fold excess of midazolam, showed a non-specific binding of 7-10%. Additionally, two populations of the benzodiazepine receptor that differed in their lateral mobility were detected in the membrane of rat neurons. The diffusion coefficients for these two populations [D(bound1) = (1.32 +/- 0.26) microm2/s; D(bound2) = (2.63 +/- 0.63) x 10(-2) microm2/s] are related to binding sites, which shows a mono-exponential decay in a time-dependent dissociation of the ligand-receptor complex.

  18. Dye-labeled benzodiazepines: development of small ligands for receptor binding studies using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Hegener, Oliver; Jordan, Randolf; Häberlein, Hanns

    2004-07-01

    To investigate benzodiazepine receptor binding studies by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS), the four fluorophores fluorescein, tetramethylrhodamine, Oregon Green 488, and Alexa 532 were coupled to the benzodiazepine Ro 07-1986/602 (Ro). Binding assays to polyclonal antibodies to benzodiazepines and at the native benzodiazepine receptor on the membrane of rat hippocampal neurons were established to examine the dye-labeled ligands for their benzodiazepine character and their binding behavior. Both the fluorescein and the Oregon Green488 moiety led to a loss of the benzodiazepine receptor binding of the corresponding Ro derivatives. Antibody recognition and interactions to the receptor were observed for the tetramethylrhodamine derivative (K(D) = 96.0 +/- 9.5 nM) but with a high amount of nonspecific binding at the cell membrane of about 50%. In saturation experiments a K(D) value of 97.2 +/- 8.5 nM was found for the Alexa Fluor 532 derivative-antibody interaction. Investigation of the binding of this ligand to the benzodiazepine receptor in FCS cell measurements led to confirmation of high specific binding behavior with a K(D) value of 9.9 +/- 1.9 nM. A nonspecific binding of <10% was observed after coincubation with 1 microM of midazolam. The different properties of the labeled benzodiazepine derivatives and the requirements of the fluorophore in small dye-labeled ligands in FCS binding studies, at the membrane of living cells, are discussed.

  19. Exploring doxorubicin localization in eluting TiO2 nanotube arrays through fluorescence correlation spectroscopy analysis.

    PubMed

    De Santo, Ilaria; Sanguigno, Luigi; Causa, Filippo; Monetta, Tullio; Netti, Paolo A

    2012-11-01

    Drug elution properties of TiO(2) nanotube arrays have been largely investigated by means of solely macroscopic observations. Controversial elution performances have been reported so far and a clear comprehension of these phenomena is still missing as a consequence of a lack of molecular investigation methods. Here we propose a way to discern drug elution properties of nanotubes through the evaluation of drug localization by Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy (FCS) analysis. We verified this method upon doxorubicin elution from differently loaded TiO(2) nanotubes. Diverse elution profiles were obtained from nanotubes filled by soaking and wet vacuum impregnation methods. Impregnated nanotubes controlled drug diffusion up to thirty days, while soaked samples completed elution in seven days. FCS analysis of doxorubicin motion in loaded nanotubes clarified that more than 90% of drugs dwell preferentially in inter-nanotube spaces in soaked samples due to decorrelation in a 2D fashion, while a 97% fraction of molecules showed 1D mobility ascribable to displacements along the nanotube vertical axis of wet vacuum impregnated nanotubes. The diverse drug localizations inferred from FCS measurements, together with distinct drug-surface interaction strengths resulting from diverse drug filling techniques, could explain the variability in elution kinetics.

  20. Evaluation of electrostatic binding of PAMAM dendrimers and charged phthalocyanines by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Fernandez, Emilio; Paulo, Pedro M R; Costa, Sílvia M B

    2015-02-14

    We have assessed host-guest interactions between PAMAM dendrimers and charged phthalocyanine probes by Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy (FCS). Our results show strong binding in water at low ionic strength with an affinity that decreases from KB ∼ 10(9) to 10(8) M(-1) upon decreasing the phthalocyanine charge of z = -4, -2 and -1. The binding affinity also decreases significantly upon salt addition leading to KB values of ca. 10(5)-10(6) M(-1). The changes of binding affinity probed by varying the phthalocyanine charge, and by changing the ionic strength or pH conditions, allowed us to evaluate the electrostatic contribution (Kel) in dendrimer-phthalocyanine interactions. In particular, this approach afforded values of electrostatic potential for PAMAM dendrimers in water at low ionic strength and at dendrimer concentrations in the nanomolar range. The electrostatic potential of PAMAM generations 4 and 7 are around 50 mV in close agreement with theoretical estimates using the Poisson-Boltzmann cell model. Interestingly, the nonelectrostatic binding is significant and contributes even more than electrostatic binding to dendrimer-phthalocyanine interactions. The nonelectrostatic binding contributes to an affinity of KB above 10(5) M(-1), as measured under conditions of low dendrimer charge and high ionic strength, which makes these dendrimers promising hosts as drug carriers.

  1. A Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy Study of the Cryoprotective Mechanism of Glucose on Hemocyanin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauger, Eric J.

    Cryopreservation is the method of preserving biomaterials by cooling and storing them at very low temperatures. In order to prevent the damaging effects of cooling, cryoprotectants are used to inhibit ice formation. Common cryoprotectants used today include ethylene glycol, propylene glycol, dimethyl sulfoxide, glycerol, and sugars. However, the mechanism responsible for the effectiveness of these cryoprotectants is poorly understood on the molecular level. The water replacement model predicts that water molecules around the surfaces of proteins are replaced with sugar molecules, forming a protective layer against the denaturing ice formation. Under this scheme, one would expect an increase in the hydrodynamic radius with increasing sugar concentration. In order to test this hypothesis, two-photon fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) was used to measure the hydrodynamic radius of hemocyanin (Hc), an oxygen-carrying protein found in arthropods, in glucose solutions up to 20wt%. FCS found that the hydrodynamic radius was invariant with increasing glucose concentration. Dynamic light scattering (DLS) results verified the hydrodynamic radius of hemocyanin in the absence of glucose. Although this invariant trend seems to indicate that the water replacement hypothesis is invalid the expected glucose layer around the Hc is smaller than the error in the hydrodynamic radius measurements for FCS. The expected change in the hydrodynamic radius with an additional layer of glucose is 1nm, however, the FCS standard error is +/-3.61nm. Therefore, the water replacement model cannot be confirmed nor refuted as a possible explanation for the cryoprotective effects of glucose on Hc.

  2. Tracking transcription factor mobility and interaction in Arabidopsis roots with fluorescence correlation spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Clark, Natalie M; Hinde, Elizabeth; Winter, Cara M; Fisher, Adam P; Crosti, Giuseppe; Blilou, Ikram; Gratton, Enrico; Benfey, Philip N; Sozzani, Rosangela

    2016-01-01

    To understand complex regulatory processes in multicellular organisms, it is critical to be able to quantitatively analyze protein movement and protein-protein interactions in time and space. During Arabidopsis development, the intercellular movement of SHORTROOT (SHR) and subsequent interaction with its downstream target SCARECROW (SCR) control root patterning and cell fate specification. However, quantitative information about the spatio-temporal dynamics of SHR movement and SHR-SCR interaction is currently unavailable. Here, we quantify parameters including SHR mobility, oligomeric state, and association with SCR using a combination of Fluorescent Correlation Spectroscopy (FCS) techniques. We then incorporate these parameters into a mathematical model of SHR and SCR, which shows that SHR reaches a steady state in minutes, while SCR and the SHR-SCR complex reach a steady-state between 18 and 24 hr. Our model reveals the timing of SHR and SCR dynamics and allows us to understand how protein movement and protein-protein stoichiometry contribute to development. PMID:27288545

  3. Mapping Liquid-liquid protein phase separation using ultra-fast-scanning fluorescence correlation spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Ming-Tzo; Elbaum-Garfinkle, Shana; Arnold, Craig B.; Priestley, Rodney D.; Brangwynne, Clifford P.

    Intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) are an understudied class of proteins that play important roles in a wide variety of biological processes in cells. We've previously shown that the C. elegans IDP LAF-1 phase separates into P granule-like droplets in vitro. However, the physics of the condensed phase remains poorly understood. Here, we use a novel technique, ultra-fast-scanning fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, to study the nano-scale rheological properties of LAF-1 droplets. Ultra-fast-scanning FCS uses a tunable acoustic gradient index of refraction (TAG) lens with an oil immersion objective to control axial movement of the focal point over a length of several micrometers at frequencies of 70kHz. Using ultra-fast-scanning FCS allows for the accurate determination of molecular concentrations and their diffusion coefficient, when the particle is passing through an excitation volume. Our work reveals an asymmetric LAF-1 phase diagram, and demonstrates that LAF-1 droplets are purely viscous phases which are highly tunable by salt concentration.

  4. Phospholipid Diffusion Coefficients of Cushioned Model Membranes determined via Z-Scan Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Sterling, Sarah M.; Allgeyer, Edward S.; Fick, Jörg; Prudovsky, Igor; Mason, Michael D.; Neivandt, David J.

    2013-01-01

    Model cellular membranes enable the study of biological processes in a controlled environment and reduce the traditional challenges associated with live or fixed cell studies. However, model membrane systems based on the air/water or oil/solution interface do not allow for incorporation of transmembrane proteins, or for the study of protein transport mechanisms. Conversely, a phospholipid bilayer deposited via the Langmuir-Blodgett/Langmuir Schaefer method on a hydrogel layer is potentially an effective mimic of the cross-section of a biological membrane, and facilitates both protein incorporation and transport studies. Prior to application, however, such membranes must be fully characterized, particularly with respect to the phospholipid bilayer phase transition temperature. Here we present a detailed characterization of the phase transition temperature of the inner and outer leaflets of a chitosan supported model membrane system. Specifically, the lateral diffusion coefficient of each individual leaflet has been determined as a function of temperature. Measurements were performed utilizing z-scan fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS), a technique that yields calibration-free diffusion information. Analysis via the method of Wawrezinieck and coworkers, revealed that phospholipid diffusion changes from raft-like to free diffusion as the temperature is increased; an insight into the dynamic behavior of hydrogel supported membranes not previously reported. PMID:23705855

  5. Using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy to study diffusion in the presence of a hierarchy of membrane domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalay, Ziya

    2014-03-01

    Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) is a commonly used experimental technique to study molecular transport, especially in biological systems. FCS is particularly useful in two-dimensional systems such as the cell membrane, where molecules approximately move in a plane over several hundreds of nanometers, and the signal to noise ratio is high. Recent observations showed that proteins and lipids in the plasma membrane (the outermost membrane of a cell) can become temporarily confined in a hierarchy of membrane domains, induced by actin filaments and dynamic clusters formed by lipids and proteins (rafts). There has been considerable interest in measuring the characteristic size and lifetime of these domains via microscopy techniques, including FCS. Even though FCS is widely applicable, interpretation of the results is often indirect, as data has to be fit to model predictions in order to extract transport coefficients. In this talk, I will present our recent theoretical and computational findings on how FCS measurements would reflect diffusion in the simultaneous presence of cytoskeleton induced membrane compartments, and raft-like domains.

  6. Tracking transcription factor mobility and interaction in Arabidopsis roots with fluorescence correlation spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Clark, Natalie M; Hinde, Elizabeth; Winter, Cara M; Fisher, Adam P; Crosti, Giuseppe; Blilou, Ikram; Gratton, Enrico; Benfey, Philip N; Sozzani, Rosangela

    2016-06-11

    To understand complex regulatory processes in multicellular organisms, it is critical to be able to quantitatively analyze protein movement and protein-protein interactions in time and space. During Arabidopsis development, the intercellular movement of SHORTROOT (SHR) and subsequent interaction with its downstream target SCARECROW (SCR) control root patterning and cell fate specification. However, quantitative information about the spatio-temporal dynamics of SHR movement and SHR-SCR interaction is currently unavailable. Here, we quantify parameters including SHR mobility, oligomeric state, and association with SCR using a combination of Fluorescent Correlation Spectroscopy (FCS) techniques. We then incorporate these parameters into a mathematical model of SHR and SCR, which shows that SHR reaches a steady state in minutes, while SCR and the SHR-SCR complex reach a steady-state between 18 and 24 hr. Our model reveals the timing of SHR and SCR dynamics and allows us to understand how protein movement and protein-protein stoichiometry contribute to development.

  7. Photolithography and Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy used to examine the rates of exchange in reverse micelle systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norris, Zach; Mawson, Cara; Johnson, Kyron; Kessler, Sarah; Rebecca, Anne; Wolf, Nathan; Lim, Michael; Nucci, Nathaniel

    Reverse micelles are molecular complexes that encapsulate a nanoscale pool of water in a surfactant shell dissolved in non-polar solvent. These complexes have a wide range of applications, and in all cases, the degree to which reverse micelles (RM) exchange their contents is relevant for their use. Despite its importance, this aspect of RM behavior is poorly understood. Photolithography is employed here to create micro and nano scale fluidic systems in which mixing rates can be precisely measured using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS). Micro-channel patterns are etched using reactive ion etching process into a layer of silicon dioxide on crystalline silicon substrates. Solutions containing mixtures of reverse micelles, proteins, and fluorophores are placed into reservoirs in the patterns, while diffusion and exchange between RMs is monitored using a FCS system built from a modified confocal Raman spectrometer. Using this approach, the diffusion and exchange rates for RM systems are measured as a function of the components of the RM mixture. Funding provided by Rowan University.

  8. Effect of ethanol-water mixture on the structure and dynamics of lysozyme: A fluorescence correlation spectroscopy study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chattoraj, Shyamtanu; Mandal, Amit Kumar; Bhattacharyya, Kankan

    2014-03-01

    Effect of ethanol-water mixture on the hydrodynamic radius (rH) and conformational dynamics of lysozyme has been studied by circular dichroism, emission spectra, and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy. For this purpose, the protein lysozyme is covalently labeled near the active site with a fluorescent probe, alexa 488. The ethanol molecules are sequestered near the hydrophobic tryptophan residues as indicated by the blue shift of the emission maximum of tryptophan. It is observed that both size (rH) and time constant of conformational relaxation (τR) of lysozyme oscillate with increase in ethanol concentration. The rH of the protein fluctuates from 19 Å in the native state, to a minimum of 13 Å, and a maximum of 29 Å. It is proposed that the oscillating behavior arises from competition between mutual interaction among protein, ethanol, and water. The fluorescence intensity fluctuates because of quenching of the fluorescence of the probe (alexa) by the free amino group of certain residues (e.g., tryptophan). Rate of inter-conversion (folding dynamics) between the open (fluorescent) and closed (non-fluorescent) form has been determined and is found to exhibit similar oscillation with variation in ethanol content.

  9. Correlation of NADH fluorescence lifetime and oxidative phosphorylation metabolism in the osteogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Han-Wen; Yu, Jia-Sin; Hsu, Shu-Han; Wei, Yau-Huei; Lee, Oscar K.; Dong, Chen-Yuan; Wang, Hsing-Wen

    2015-01-01

    Reduced nicotinamide dinucleotide (NADH) fluorescence lifetime has been broadly used as a metabolic indicator for stem cell imaging. However, the direct relationship between NADH fluorescence lifetime and metabolic pathway and activity remains to be clarified. In this study, we measured the NADH fluorescence lifetime of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) as well as the metabolic indictors, such as adenosine triphosphate (ATP) level, oxygen consumption, and lactate release, up to 4 weeks under normal osteogenic differentiation and oxidative phosphorylation-attenuated/inhibited differentiation by oligomycin A (OA) treatment. NADH fluorescence lifetime was positively correlated with oxygen consumption and ATP level during energy transformation from glycolysis to oxidative phosphorylation. Under OA treatment, oxidative phosphorylation was attenuated/inhibited (i.e., oxygen consumption remained the same as controls or lower), cells showed attenuated differentiation under glycolysis, and NADH fluorescence lifetime change was not detected. Increased expression of the overall complex proteins was observed in addition to Complex I. We suggested special caution needs to be exercised while interpreting NADH fluorescence lifetime signal in terms of stem cell differentiation.

  10. Correlation and classification of single kernel fluorescence hyperspectral data with aflatoxin concentration in corn kernels inoculated with Aspergillus flavus spores.

    PubMed

    Yao, H; Hruska, Z; Kincaid, R; Brown, R; Cleveland, T; Bhatnagar, D

    2010-05-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the relationship between fluorescence emissions of corn kernels inoculated with Aspergillus flavus and aflatoxin contamination levels within the kernels. Aflatoxin contamination in corn has been a long-standing problem plaguing the grain industry with potentially devastating consequences to corn growers. In this study, aflatoxin-contaminated corn kernels were produced through artificial inoculation of corn ears in the field with toxigenic A. flavus spores. The kernel fluorescence emission data were taken with a fluorescence hyperspectral imaging system when corn kernels were excited with ultraviolet light. Raw fluorescence image data were preprocessed and regions of interest in each image were created for all kernels. The regions of interest were used to extract spectral signatures and statistical information. The aflatoxin contamination level of single corn kernels was then chemically measured using affinity column chromatography. A fluorescence peak shift phenomenon was noted among different groups of kernels with different aflatoxin contamination levels. The fluorescence peak shift was found to move more toward the longer wavelength in the blue region for the highly contaminated kernels and toward the shorter wavelengths for the clean kernels. Highly contaminated kernels were also found to have a lower fluorescence peak magnitude compared with the less contaminated kernels. It was also noted that a general negative correlation exists between measured aflatoxin and the fluorescence image bands in the blue and green regions. The correlation coefficients of determination, r(2), was 0.72 for the multiple linear regression model. The multivariate analysis of variance found that the fluorescence means of four aflatoxin groups, <1, 1-20, 20-100, and >or=100 ng g(-1) (parts per billion), were significantly different from each other at the 0.01 level of alpha. Classification accuracy under a two-class schema ranged from 0.84 to

  11. Correlative Fluorescence Microscopy and Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy of Quantum Dot Labeled Proteins in Whole Cells in Liquid

    PubMed Central

    Dukes, Madeline J.; Peckys, Diana B.; de Jonge, Niels

    2010-01-01

    Correlative fluorescence microscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is a state-of-the-art microscopy methodology to study cellular function, combining the functionality of light microscopy with the high resolution of electron microscopy. However, this technique involves complex sample preparation procedures due to its need for either thin sections or frozen samples for TEM imaging. Here, we introduce a novel correlative approach capable of imaging whole eukaryotic cells in liquid with fluorescence microscopy and with scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM); there is no additional sample preparation necessary for the electron microscopy. Quantum dots (QDs) were bound to epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptors of COS7 fibroblast cells. Fixed whole cells in saline water were imaged with fluorescence microscopy and subsequently with STEM. The STEM images were correlated with fluorescence images of the same cellular regions. QDs of dimensions 7 × 12 nm were visible in a 5 μm thick layer of saline water, consistent with calculations. A spatial resolution of 3 nm was achieved on the QDs. PMID:20550177

  12. Correlative fluorescence microscopy and scanning transmission electron microscopy of quantum-dot-labeled proteins in whole cells in liquid.

    PubMed

    Dukes, Madeline J; Peckys, Diana B; de Jonge, Niels

    2010-07-27

    Correlative fluorescence microscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is a state-of-the-art microscopy methodology to study cellular function, combining the functionality of light microscopy with the high resolution of electron microscopy. However, this technique involves complex sample preparation procedures due to its need for either thin sections or frozen samples for TEM imaging. Here, we introduce a novel correlative approach capable of imaging whole eukaryotic cells in liquid with fluorescence microscopy and with scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM); there is no additional sample preparation necessary for the electron microscopy. Quantum dots (QDs) were bound to epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptors of COS7 fibroblast cells. Fixed whole cells in saline water were imaged with fluorescence microscopy and subsequently with STEM. The STEM images were correlated with fluorescence images of the same cellular regions. QDs of dimensions 7x12 nm were visible in a 5 microm thick layer of saline water, consistent with calculations. A spatial resolution of 3 nm was achieved on the QDs.

  13. Rapid analysis of Forster resonance energy transfer by two-color global fluorescence correlation spectroscopy: trypsin proteinase reaction.

    PubMed

    Eggeling, Christian; Kask, Peet; Winkler, Dirk; Jäger, Stefan

    2005-07-01

    In this study we introduce the combination of two-color global fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (2CG-FCS) and Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) as a very powerful combination for monitoring biochemical reactions on the basis of single molecule events. 2CG-FCS, which is a new variation emerging from the family of fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, globally analyzes the simultaneously recorded auto- and cross-correlation data from two photon detectors monitoring the fluorescence emission of different colors. Overcoming the limitations inherent in mere auto- and cross-correlation analysis, 2CG-FCS is sensitive in resolving and quantifying fluorescent species that differ in their diffusion characteristics and/or their molecular brightness either in one or both detection channels. It is able to account for effects that have often been considered as sources of severe artifacts in two-color and FRET measurements, the most prominent artifacts comprising photobleaching, cross talk, or concentration variations in sample preparation. Because of its very high statistical accuracy, the combination of FRET and 2CG-FCS is suited for high-throughput applications such as drug screening. Employing beam scanning during data acquisition even further enhances this capability and allows measurement times of <2 s. The improved performance in monitoring a FRET sample was verified by following the protease cleavage reaction of a FRET-active peptide. The FRET-inactive subpopulation of uncleaved substrate could be correctly assigned, revealing a substantial portion of inactive or missing acceptor label. The results were compared to those obtained by two-dimensional fluorescence intensity distribution analysis.

  14. The correlation of the maximum intensity of fluorescence with pigment characteristics of leaves of Betula pendula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zavoruev, V. V.; Zavorueva, E. N.

    2015-11-01

    Using fluorimeter Junior PAM (Heinz Walz GmbH, Germany) the fluorescence parameters of leaves of Betula pendula are investigated. A linear dependence of the maximum fluorescence (Fm) of leaves from the ratio of total chlorophylls concentration to concentration of carotenoids is obtained. Such dependence is found for samples collected during the period of vegetation and for simultaneous selection of colored leaves.

  15. Co(II), Ni(II) and Cu(II) complexes with coumarin-8-yl Schiff-bases: Spectroscopic, in vitro antimicrobial, DNA cleavage and fluorescence studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patil, Sangamesh A.; Unki, Shrishila N.; Kulkarni, Ajaykumar D.; Naik, Vinod H.; Badami, Prema S.

    2011-09-01

    A new series of Co(II), Ni(II) and Cu(II) complexes of the type ML·2H 2O of Schiff-bases derived from m-substituted thiosemicarbazides and 8-acetyl-7-hydroxy-4-methylcoumarin have been synthesized and characterized by spectroscopic studies. Schiff-bases exhibit thiol-thione tautomerism wherein sulphur plays an important role in the coordination. The coordination possibility of the Schiff-bases towards metal ions have been proposed in the light of elemental analyses, spectral (IR, UV-vis, FAB-mass, ESR and fluorescence), magnetic and thermal studies. The low molar conductance values in DMF indicate that, the metal complexes are non-electrolytes. The cyclic voltammetric studies suggested that, the Cu(II) and Ni(II) complexes are of single electron transfer quasi-reversible nature. The Schiff-bases and its metal complexes have been evaluated for their in vitro antibacterial ( Escherichia coli, Staphilococcus aureus, Bascillus subtilis and Salmonella typhi) and antifungal activities ( Candida albicans, Cladosporium and Aspergillus niger) by MIC method. The Schiff-base I and its metal complexes exhibited DNA cleavage activity on isolated DNA of A. niger.

  16. Biomolecular interaction study of hydralazine with bovine serum albumin and effect of β-cyclodextrin on binding by fluorescence, 3D, synchronous, CD, and Raman spectroscopic methods.

    PubMed

    Bolattin, Mallavva B; Nandibewoor, Sharanappa T; Chimatadar, Shivamurti A

    2016-07-01

    Spectrofluoremetric technique was employed to study the binding behavior of hydralazine with bovine serum albumin (BSA) at different temperatures. Binding study of bovine serum albumin with hydralazine has been studied by ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy and confirmed by three-dimensional, synchronous, circular dichroism, and Raman spectroscopic methods. Effect of β-cyclodextrin on binding was studied. The experimental results showed a static quenching mechanism in the interaction of hydralazine with bovine serum albumin. The binding constant and the number of binding sites are calculated according to Stern-Volmer equation. The thermodynamic parameters ∆H(o) , ∆G(o) , ∆S(o) at different temperatures were calculated. These indicated that the hydrogen bonding and weak van der Waals forces played an important role in the interaction. Based on the Förster's theory of non-radiation energy transfer, the binding average distance, r, between the donor (BSA) and acceptor (hydralazine) was evaluated and found to be 3.95 nm. Spectral results showed that the binding of hydralazine to BSA induced conformational changes in BSA. The effect of common ions on the binding of hydralazine to BSA was also examined. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Correlative fluorescence and scanning transmission electron microscopy of quantum dot-labeled proteins on whole cells in liquid.

    PubMed

    Peckys, Diana B; Bandmann, Vera; de Jonge, Niels

    2014-01-01

    Correlative fluorescence microscopy combined with scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) of cells fully immersed in liquid is a new methodology with many application areas. Proteins, in live cells immobilized on microchips, are labeled with fluorescent quantum dot nanoparticles. In this protocol, the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is labeled. The cells are fixed after a selected labeling time, for example, 5 min as needed to form EGFR dimers. The microchip with cells is then imaged with fluorescence microscopy. Thereafter, STEM can be accomplished in two ways. The microchip with the labeled cells and one microchip with a spacer are assembled into a special microfluidic device and imaged with dedicated high-voltage STEM. Alternatively, thin edges of cells can be studied with environmental scanning electron microscopy with a STEM detector, by placing a microchip with cells in a cooled wet environment.

  18. Changes in fluorescent dissolved organic matter upon interaction with anionic surfactant as revealed by EEM-PARAFAC and two dimensional correlation spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Maqbool, Tahir; Hur, Jin

    2016-10-01

    Surfactants are present in significant amounts in both domestic and industrial wastewater, which may interact with dissolved organic matter (DOM). The present study investigated the interactions of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) with three different DOM solutions, including bovine serum albumin (BSA), humic acid (HA), and the mixture of the two (BSA-HA), based on two advanced spectroscopic tools: excitation emission matrix (EEM) combined with parallel factor analysis (EEM-PARAFAC) and two dimensional correlation spectroscopy (2D-COS). The responses of two protein-like components to the addition of SDS differed depending the presence and the absence of HA. A decreasing and an increasing trend was observed for tryptophan-like (C1) and tyrosine-like (C2) components, respectively, in the BSA solution, while the BSA-HA mixture exhibited increasing fluorescence trends for both protein-like components. The conflicting results suggest that HA plays a secondary role in the protein-SDS interactions. No interaction between the SDS and humic-like component was found. 2D-COS combined with fluorescence spectra demonstrated that the protein-SDS interaction occurred on the order of C2 > C1 for the BSA solution but C1 > C2 for the BSA-HA mixture. Analyses of Scatchard plots confirmed the sequential order interpreted from 2D-COS, showing consistent trends in the binding constants. However, the presence of HA affected the protein-SDS interactions in different manners for C1 and C2, enhancing and reducing the binding constants, respectively. Circular dichroism spectra confirmed the occurrence of conformational changes in BSA with SDS. EEM-PARAFAC and 2D-COS successfully explained different interactions of surfactant with protein-like components in the presence of HA.

  19. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy diffusion laws in the presence of moving nanodomains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šachl, Radek; Bergstrand, Jan; Widengren, Jerker; Hof, Martin

    2016-03-01

    It has been shown by means of simulations that spot variation fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (sv-FCS) can be used for the identification and, to some extent, also characterization of immobile lipid nanodomains in model as well as cellular plasma membranes. However, in these simulations, the nanodomains were assumed to be stationary, whereas they actually tend to move like the surrounding lipids. In the present study, we investigated how such domain movement influences the diffusion time/spot-size dependence observed in FCS experiments, usually referred to as ‘diffusion law’ analysis. We show that domain movement might mask the effects of the ‘anomalous’ diffusion characteristics of membrane lipids or proteins predicted for stationary domains, making it difficult to identify such moving nanodomains by sv-FCS. More specifically, our simulations indicate that (i) for domains moving up to a factor of 2.25 slower than the surrounding lipids, such impeded diffusion cannot be observed and the diffusion behaviour of the proteins or lipids is indistinguishable from that of freely diffusing molecules, i.e. nanodomains are not detected; (ii) impeded protein/lipid diffusion behaviour can be observed in experiments where the radii of the detection volume are similar in size to the domain radii, the domain diffusion is about 10 times slower than that of the lipids, and the probes show a high affinity to the domains; and (iii) presence of nanodomains can only be reliably detected by diffraction limited sv-FCS when the domains move very slowly (about 200 times slower than the lipid diffusion). As nanodomains are expected to be in the range of tens of nanometres and most probes show low affinities to such domains, sv-FCS is limited to stationary domains and/or STED-FCS. However, even for that latter technique, diffusing domains smaller than 50 nm in radius are hardly detectable by FCS diffusion time/spot-size dependencies.

  20. Direct Observation of T4 Lysozyme Hinge-Bending Motion by Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Yirdaw, Robel B.; Mchaourab, Hassane S.

    2012-01-01

    Bacteriophage T4 Lysozyme (T4L) catalyzes the hydrolysis of the peptidoglycan layer of the bacterial cell wall late in the infection cycle. It has long been postulated that equilibrium dynamics enable substrate access to the active site located at the interface between the N- and C-terminal domains. Crystal structures of WT-T4L and point mutants captured a range of conformations that differ by the hinge-bending angle between the two domains. Evidence of equilibrium between open and closed conformations in solution was gleaned from distance measurements between the two domains but the nature of the equilibrium and the timescale of the underlying motion have not been investigated. Here, we used fluorescence fluctuation spectroscopy to directly detect T4L equilibrium conformational fluctuations in solution. For this purpose, Tetramethylrhodamine probes were introduced at pairs of cysteines in regions of the molecule that undergo relative displacement upon transition from open to closed conformations. Correlation analysis of Tetramethylrhodamine intensity fluctuations reveals hinge-bending motion that changes the relative distance and orientation of the N- and C-terminal domains with ≅15 μs relaxation time. That this motion involves interconversion between open and closed conformations was further confirmed by the dampening of its amplitude upon covalent substrate trapping. In contrast to the prevalent two-state model of T4L equilibrium, molecular brightness and number of particles obtained from cumulant analysis suggest that T4L populates multiple intermediate states, consistent with the wide range of hinge-bending angles trapped in the crystal structure of T4L mutants. PMID:23062345

  1. Direct observation of T4 lysozyme hinge-bending motion by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Yirdaw, Robel B; McHaourab, Hassane S

    2012-10-01

    Bacteriophage T4 Lysozyme (T4L) catalyzes the hydrolysis of the peptidoglycan layer of the bacterial cell wall late in the infection cycle. It has long been postulated that equilibrium dynamics enable substrate access to the active site located at the interface between the N- and C-terminal domains. Crystal structures of WT-T4L and point mutants captured a range of conformations that differ by the hinge-bending angle between the two domains. Evidence of equilibrium between open and closed conformations in solution was gleaned from distance measurements between the two domains but the nature of the equilibrium and the timescale of the underlying motion have not been investigated. Here, we used fluorescence fluctuation spectroscopy to directly detect T4L equilibrium conformational fluctuations in solution. For this purpose, Tetramethylrhodamine probes were introduced at pairs of cysteines in regions of the molecule that undergo relative displacement upon transition from open to closed conformations. Correlation analysis of Tetramethylrhodamine intensity fluctuations reveals hinge-bending motion that changes the relative distance and orientation of the N- and C-terminal domains with ≅ 15 μs relaxation time. That this motion involves interconversion between open and closed conformations was further confirmed by the dampening of its amplitude upon covalent substrate trapping. In contrast to the prevalent two-state model of T4L equilibrium, molecular brightness and number of particles obtained from cumulant analysis suggest that T4L populates multiple intermediate states, consistent with the wide range of hinge-bending angles trapped in the crystal structure of T4L mutants.

  2. A guide to accurate measurement of diffusion using fluorescence correlation techniques with blinking quantum dot nanoparticle labels.

    PubMed

    Bachir, Alexia I; Kolin, David L; Heinze, Katrin G; Hebert, Benedict; Wiseman, Paul W

    2008-06-14

    Fluctuation-based fluorescence correlation techniques are widely used to study dynamics of fluorophore labeled biomolecules in cells. Semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) have been developed as bright and photostable fluorescent probes for various biological applications. However, the fluorescence intermittency of QDs, commonly referred to as "blinking", is believed to complicate quantitative correlation spectroscopy measurements of transport properties, as it is an additional source of fluctuations that contribute on a wide range of time scales. The QD blinking fluctuations obey power-law distributions so there is no single characteristic fluctuation time for this phenomenon. Consequently, it is highly challenging to separate fluorescence blinking fluctuations from those due to transport dynamics. Here, we quantify the bias introduced by QD blinking in transport measurements made using fluctuation methods. Using computer simulated image time series of diffusing point emitters with set "on" and "off" time emission characteristics, we show that blinking results in a systematic overestimation of the diffusion coefficients measured with correlation analysis when a simple diffusion model is used to fit the time correlation decays. The relative error depends on the inherent blinking power-law statistics, the sampling rate relative to the characteristic diffusion time and blinking times, and the total number of images in the time series. This systematic error can be significant; moreover, it can often go unnoticed in common transport model fits of experimental data. We propose an alternative fitting model that incorporates blinking and improves the accuracy of the recovered diffusion coefficients. We also show how to completely eliminate the bias by applying k-space image correlation spectroscopy, which completely separates the diffusion and blinking dynamics, and allows the simultaneous recovery of accurate diffusion coefficients and QD blinking probability distribution

  3. Infrared and Fluorescence Spectroscopic Investigations of the Acyl Surface Modification of Hydrogel Beads for the Deposition of a Phospholipid Coating.

    PubMed

    Grossutti, Michael; Seenath, Ryan; Lipkowski, Jacek

    2015-10-27

    The scaffolded vesicle has been employed as an alternative means of developing natural model membranes and envisioned as a potential nutraceutical transporter. Furthering the research of the scaffolded vesicle system, a nucleophilic substitution reaction was implemented to form an ester linkage between palmitate and terminal hydroxyl groups of dextran in order to hydrophobically modify the hydrogel scaffold. An average tilt angle of 38° of the hydrophobic palmitate modifying layer on the surface of the hydrogel was determined from dichroic ratios obtained from infrared spectra collected in the attenuated total reflection (ATR) configuration. ATR-IR studies of the DMPC-coated acylated hydrogel demonstrated that the hydrocarbon chains of the DMPC coating was similar to those of the DMPC bilayers and that the underlying palmitate layer had a negligible effect on the average tilt angle (26°) of the DMPC coating. The permeability of this acylated hydrogel was investigated with fluorescence spectroscopy and the terbium/dipicolinic acid assay. The hydrophobic modification on the surface of the hydrogel bead allowed for an efficient deposition of a DMPC layer that served as an impermeable barrier to terbium efflux. About 72% of DMPC-coated acylated hydrogel beads showed ideal barrier properties. The remaining 28% were leaking, but the half-life of terbium efflux of the DMPC-coated acylated hydrogel was increasing, and the total amount of leaked terbium was decreasing with the incubation time. The half-life time and the retention were considered a marked improvement relative to past scaffolded vesicle preparations. The process of acylating hydrogel beads for efficient DMPC deposition has been identified as another viable method for controlling the permeability of the scaffolded vesicle.

  4. Infrared and Fluorescence Spectroscopic Investigations of the Acyl Surface Modification of Hydrogel Beads for the Deposition of a Phospholipid Coating.

    PubMed

    Grossutti, Michael; Seenath, Ryan; Lipkowski, Jacek

    2015-10-27

    The scaffolded vesicle has been employed as an alternative means of developing natural model membranes and envisioned as a potential nutraceutical transporter. Furthering the research of the scaffolded vesicle system, a nucleophilic substitution reaction was implemented to form an ester linkage between palmitate and terminal hydroxyl groups of dextran in order to hydrophobically modify the hydrogel scaffold. An average tilt angle of 38° of the hydrophobic palmitate modifying layer on the surface of the hydrogel was determined from dichroic ratios obtained from infrared spectra collected in the attenuated total reflection (ATR) configuration. ATR-IR studies of the DMPC-coated acylated hydrogel demonstrated that the hydrocarbon chains of the DMPC coating was similar to those of the DMPC bilayers and that the underlying palmitate layer had a negligible effect on the average tilt angle (26°) of the DMPC coating. The permeability of this acylated hydrogel was investigated with fluorescence spectroscopy and the terbium/dipicolinic acid assay. The hydrophobic modification on the surface of the hydrogel bead allowed for an efficient deposition of a DMPC layer that served as an impermeable barrier to terbium efflux. About 72% of DMPC-coated acylated hydrogel beads showed ideal barrier properties. The remaining 28% were leaking, but the half-life of terbium efflux of the DMPC-coated acylated hydrogel was increasing, and the total amount of leaked terbium was decreasing with the incubation time. The half-life time and the retention were considered a marked improvement relative to past scaffolded vesicle preparations. The process of acylating hydrogel beads for efficient DMPC deposition has been identified as another viable method for controlling the permeability of the scaffolded vesicle. PMID:26429738

  5. Spectrally resolved time-correlated single photon counting: a novel approach for characterization of endogenous fluorescence in isolated cardiac myocytes.

    PubMed

    Chorvat, D; Chorvatova, A

    2006-12-01

    A new setup for time-resolved fluorescence micro-spectroscopy of cells, based on multi-dimensional time-correlated single photon counting, was designed and tested. Here we demonstrate that the spectrometer allows fast and reproducible measurements of endogenous flavin fluorescence measured directly in living cardiac cells after excitation with visible picosecond laser diodes. Two complementary approaches for the analysis of spectrally- and time-resolved autofluorescence data are presented, comprising the fluorescence decay fitting by exponential series and the time-resolved emission spectroscopy analysis. In isolated cardiac myocytes, we observed three distinct lifetime pools with characteristic lifetime values spanning from picosecond to nanosecond range and the time-dependent red shift of the autofluorescence emission spectra. We compared obtained results to in vitro recordings of free flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) and FAD in lipoamide dehydrogenase (LipDH). The developed setup combines the strength of both spectral and fluorescence lifetime analysis and provides a solid base for the study of complex systems with intrinsic fluorescence, such as identification of the individual flavinoprotein components in living cardiac cells. This approach therefore constitutes an important instrumental advancement towards redox fluorimetry of living cardiomyocytes, with the perspective of its applications in the investigation of oxidative metabolic state under pathophysiological conditions, such as ischemia and/or metabolic disorders. PMID:17033778

  6. Correlation of conformational heterogeneity of the tryptophyl side chain and time-resolved fluorescence intensity decay kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laws, William R.; Ross, J. B. Alexander

    1992-04-01

    The time-resolved fluorescence properties of a tryptophan residue should be useful for probing protein structure, function, and dynamics. To date, however, the non-single exponential fluorescence intensity decay kinetics for numerous peptides and proteins having a single tryptophan residue have not been adequately explained. Many possibilities have been considered and include: (1) contributions from the 1La and 1Lb states of indole; (2) excited-state hydrogen exchange; and (3) environmental heterogeneity from (chi) 1 and (chi) 2 rotamers. In addition, it has been suggested that generally many factors contribute to the decay and a distribution of probabilities may be more appropriate. Two recent results support multiple species due to conformational heterogeneity as the major contributor to complex kinetics. First, a rotationally constrained tryptophan analogue has fluorescence intensity decay kinetics that can be described by the sum of two exponentials with amplitudes comparable to the relative populations of the two rotational isomers. Second, the multiple exponentials observed for tyrosine-containing model compounds and peptides correlate with the (chi) 1 rotamer populations independently determined by 1H NMR. We now report similar correlations between rotamer populations and fluorescence intensity decay kinetics for a tryptophan analogue of oxytocin. It appears for this compound that either (chi) 2 rotations do not appreciably alter the indole environment, (chi) 2 rotations are rapid enough to average the observed dependence, or only one of two possible (chi) 2 populations is associated with each (chi) 1 rotamer.

  7. Correlative cryo-fluorescence and cryo-scanning electron microscopy as a straightforward tool to study host-pathogen interactions.

    PubMed

    Strnad, Martin; Elsterová, Jana; Schrenková, Jana; Vancová, Marie; Rego, Ryan O M; Grubhoffer, Libor; Nebesářová, Jana

    2015-12-10

    Correlative light and electron microscopy is an imaging technique that enables identification and targeting of fluorescently tagged structures with subsequent imaging at near-to-nanometer resolution. We established a novel correlative cryo-fluorescence microscopy and cryo-scanning electron microscopy workflow, which enables imaging of the studied object of interest very close to its natural state, devoid of artifacts caused for instance by slow chemical fixation. This system was tested by investigating the interaction of the zoonotic bacterium Borrelia burgdorferi with two mammalian cell lines of neural origin in order to broaden our knowledge about the cell-association mechanisms that precedes the entry of the bacteria into the cell. This method appears to be an unprecedentedly fast (<3 hours), straightforward, and reliable solution to study the finer details of pathogen-host cell interactions and provides important insights into the complex and dynamic relationship between a pathogen and a host.

  8. Correlative cryo-fluorescence and cryo-scanning electron microscopy as a straightforward tool to study host-pathogen interactions

    PubMed Central

    Strnad, Martin; Elsterová, Jana; Schrenková, Jana; Vancová, Marie; Rego, Ryan O. M.; Grubhoffer, Libor; Nebesářová, Jana

    2015-01-01

    Correlative light and electron microscopy is an imaging technique that enables identification and targeting of fluorescently tagged structures with subsequent imaging at near-to-nanometer resolution. We established a novel correlative cryo-fluorescence microscopy and cryo-scanning electron microscopy workflow, which enables imaging of the studied object of interest very close to its natural state, devoid of artifacts caused for instance by slow chemical fixation. This system was tested by investigating the interaction of the zoonotic bacterium Borrelia burgdorferi with two mammalian cell lines of neural origin in order to broaden our knowledge about the cell-association mechanisms that precedes the entry of the bacteria into the cell. This method appears to be an unprecedentedly fast (<3 hours), straightforward, and reliable solution to study the finer details of pathogen-host cell interactions and provides important insights into the complex and dynamic relationship between a pathogen and a host. PMID:26658551

  9. Structure and Dimensions of Core-Shell Nanoparticles Comparable to the Confocal Volume Studied by Means of Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Gapinski, Jacek; Jarzębski, Maciej; Buitenhuis, Johan; Deptula, Tobiasz; Mazuryk, Jaroslaw; Patkowski, Adam

    2016-03-15

    In some applications the dye distribution within fluorescently labeled nanoparticles and its stability over long periods of time are important issues. In this article we study numerically and experimentally the applicability of fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) to resolve such questions. When the size of fluorescently labeled particles is comparable to or larger than the confocal volume, the effective confocal volume seen in FCS experiments is increasing. Such an effect has already been studied for uniformly labeled spherical particles. In this work we analyze the form of the FCS correlation functions (CFs) for core-labeled and shell-labeled core-shell particles. For shell-labeled particles an additional fast decay was found both in simulations and in experiments on custom-made surface-labeled particles. Universal scaling of FCS correlation times based on the squared ratio of the labeled part radius of gyration to the Gaussian radius of the beam profile was found. Recipes based on the analysis of simulated CFs, proposed for interpretation of experimental results, were successfully applied to the FCS results on suspensions of large core-labeled and surface-labeled particles.

  10. Monitoring human parvovirus B19 virus-like particles and antibody complexes in solution by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Toivola, Jouni; Michel, Patrik O; Gilbert, Leona; Lahtinen, Tomi; Marjomäki, Varpu; Hedman, Klaus; Vuento, Matti; Oker-Blom, Christian

    2004-01-01

    Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) was used in monitoring human parvovirus B19 virus-like particle (VLP) antibody complexes from acute phase and past-immunity serum samples. The Oregon Green 488-labeled VLPs gave an average diffusion coefficient of 1.7 x 10(-7) cm2 s(-1) with an apparent hydrodynamic radius of 14 nm. After incubation of the fluorescent VLPs with an acute phase serum sample, the mobility information obtained from the fluorescence intensity fluctuation by autocorrelation analysis showed an average diffusion coefficient of 1.5 x 10(-8) cm2 s(-1), corresponding to an average radius of 157 nm. In contrast, incubation of the fluorescent VLPs with a past-immunity serum sample gave an average diffusion coefficient of 3.5 x 10(-8) cm2 s(-1) and a radius of 69 nm. A control serum devoid of B19 antibodies caused a change in the diffusion coefficient from 1.7 x 10(-7) to 1.6 x 10(-7) cm2 s(-1), which is much smaller than that observed with acute phase or past-immunity sera. Thus, VLP-antibody complexes with different diffusion coefficients could be identified for the acute phase and past-immunity sera. FCS measurement of VLP-immune complexes could be useful in distinguishing between antibodies present in acute phase or past-immunity sera as well as in titration of the VLPs.

  11. Lipid Diffusion in Supported Lipid Bilayers: A Comparison between Line-Scanning Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy and Single-Particle Tracking

    PubMed Central

    Rose, Markus; Hirmiz, Nehad; Moran-Mirabal, Jose M.; Fradin, Cécile

    2015-01-01

    Diffusion in lipid membranes is an essential component of many cellular process and fluorescence a method of choice to study membrane dynamics. The goal of this work was to directly compare two common fluorescence methods, line-scanning fluorescence correlation spectroscopy and single-particle tracking, to observe the diffusion of a fluorescent lipophilic dye, DiD, in a complex five-component mitochondria-like solid-supported lipid bilayer. We measured diffusion coefficients of DFCS ~ 3 μm2 · s−1 and DSPT ~ 2 μm2 · s−1, respectively. These comparable, yet statistically different values are used to highlight the main message of the paper, namely that the two considered methods give access to distinctly different dynamic ranges: D ≳ 1 μm2 · s−1 for FCS and D ≲ 5 μm2 · s−1 for SPT (with standard imaging conditions). In the context of membrane diffusion, this means that FCS allows studying lipid diffusion in fluid membranes, as well as the diffusion of loosely-bound proteins hovering above the membrane. SPT, on the other hand, is ideal to study the motions of membrane-inserted proteins, especially those presenting different conformations, but only allows studying lipid diffusion in relatively viscous membranes, such as supported lipid bilayers and cell membranes. PMID:26610279

  12. Correlation between Raman and fluorescence microscopy studies of field-aged commercial urethane-backed poly(vinyl chloride)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Remillard, J. T.; Weber, W. H.; Jones, J.; Helms, J.; Poindexter, B. D.

    1998-03-01

    Urethane-foam-backed poly(vinyl chloride) (PVC) composites are widely used in vehicle interiors. Exposure to heat and light causes vinyl to degrade through dehydrochlorination, a process which results in the formation of conjugated polyene sequences. This leads to the cracking and discoloration that commonly occurs with age in commercial PVC. We present the results of Raman and fluorescence microscopy measurements used to quantify the degradation of two commercial field-aged foam/PVC composites containing different heat stabilizer packages. Raman spectroscopy provides chemically-specific evidence of polyene formation, and clearly indicates differences in the durability of the two materials. After extracting the low molecular weight components from the vinyl, we find the variations in fluorescence intensity with weathering time are closely correlated with the variations in polyene concentration measured using Raman microscopy. This suggests fluorescence techniques can be used as a semiquantitative measure of PVC degradation. These measurements are most easily performed using a fluorescence microscope and CCD camera to record images of the samples. Intensities are quickly determined through the use of image processing software.

  13. Effect of Receptor Dimerization on Membrane Lipid Raft Structure Continuously Quantified on Single Cells by Camera Based Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Weixiang; Pralle, Arnd

    2015-01-01

    Membrane bound cell signaling is modulated by the membrane ultra-structure, which itself may be affected by signaling. However, measuring the interaction of membrane proteins with membrane structures in intact cells in real-time poses considerable challenges. In this paper we present a non-destructive fluorescence method that quantifies these interactions in single cells, and is able to monitor the same cell continuously to observe small changes. This approach combines total internal fluorescence microscopy with fluorescence correlation spectroscopy to measure the protein’s diffusion and molecular concentration in different sized areas simultaneously. It correctly differentiates proteins interacting with membrane fences from proteins interacting with cholesterol-stabilized domains, or lipid rafts. This method detects small perturbations of the membrane ultra-structure or of a protein’s tendency to dimerize. Through continuous monitoring of single cells, we demonstrate how dimerization of GPI-anchored proteins increases their association with the structural domains. Using a dual-color approach we study the effect of dimerization of one GPI-anchored protein on another type of GPI-anchored protein expressed in the same cell. Scans over the cell surface reveal a correlation between cholesterol stabilized domains and membrane cytoskeleton. PMID:25811483

  14. Probing the kinetic landscape of Hox transcription factor-DNA binding in live cells by massively parallel Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Papadopoulos, Dimitrios K; Krmpot, Aleksandar J; Nikolić, Stanko N; Krautz, Robert; Terenius, Lars; Tomancak, Pavel; Rigler, Rudolf; Gehring, Walter J; Vukojević, Vladana

    2015-11-01

    Hox genes encode transcription factors that control the formation of body structures, segment-specifically along the anterior-posterior axis of metazoans. Hox transcription factors bind nuclear DNA pervasively and regulate a plethora of target genes, deploying various molecular mechanisms that depend on the developmental and cellular context. To analyze quantitatively the dynamics of their DNA-binding behavior we have used confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM), single-point fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS), fluorescence cross-correlation spectroscopy (FCCS) and bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC). We show that the Hox transcription factor Sex combs reduced (Scr) forms dimers that strongly associate with its specific fork head binding site (fkh250) in live salivary gland cell nuclei. In contrast, dimers of a constitutively inactive, phospho-mimicking variant of Scr show weak, non-specific DNA-binding. Our studies reveal that nuclear dynamics of Scr is complex, exhibiting a changing landscape of interactions that is difficult to characterize by probing one point at a time. Therefore, we also provide mechanistic evidence using massively parallel FCS (mpFCS). We found that Scr dimers are predominantly formed on the DNA and are equally abundant at the chromosomes and an introduced multimeric fkh250 binding-site, indicating different mobilities, presumably reflecting transient binding with different affinities on the DNA. Our proof-of-principle results emphasize the advantages of mpFCS for quantitative characterization of fast dynamic processes in live cells.

  15. Correlation of tryptophan fluorescence intensity decay parameters with sup 1 H NMR-determined rotamer conformations: (tryptophan sup 2 )oxytocin

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, J.B.A.; Schwartz, G.P.; Laws, W.R. ); Wyssbrod, H.R.; Porter, R.A. ); Michaels, C.A. )

    1992-02-18

    While the fluorescence decay kinetics of tyrosine model compounds can be explained in terms of heterogeneity derived from the three ground-state {chi}{sup 1} rotamers, a similar correlation has yet to be directly observed for a tryptophan residue. In addition, the asymmetric indole ring might also lead to heterogeneity from {chi}{sup 2} rotations. In this paper, the time-resolved and steady-state fluorescence properties of (tryptophan{sup 2})oxytocin at pH 3 are presented and compared with {sup 1}H NMR results. According to the unrestricted analyses of individual fluorescence decay curves taken as a function of emission wavelength-independent decay constants, only three exponential terms are required. In addition, the preexponential weighting factors (amplitudes) have the same relative relationship (weights) as the {sup 1}H NMR-determined {chi}{sup 1} rotamer populations of the indole side chain. {sup 15}N was used in heteronuclear coupling experiments to confirm the rotamer assignments. Inclusion of a linked function restricting the decay amplitudes to the {chi}{sup 1} rotamer populations in the individual decay curve analyses and in the global analysis confirms this correlation. According to qualitative nuclear Overhauser data, there are two {chi}{sup 2} populations.

  16. In situ fluorescence spectroscopy correlates ionomer degradation to reactive oxygen species generation in an operating fuel cell.

    PubMed

    Prabhakaran, Venkateshkumar; Arges, Christopher G; Ramani, Vijay

    2013-11-21

    The rate of generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) within the polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) of an operating proton exchange member fuel cell (PEMFC) was monitored using in situ fluorescence spectroscopy. A modified barrier layer was introduced between the PEM and the electrocatalyst layer to eliminate metal-dye interactions and fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) effects during measurements. Standard fuel cell operating parameters (temperature, relative humidity, and electrode potential) were systematically varied to evaluate their influence on the rate of ROS generation during PEMFC operation. Independently, the macroscopic rate of PEM degradation was measured by monitoring the fluoride ion emission rate (FER) in the effluent stream at each operating condition. The ROS generation reaction rate constant (estimated from the in situ fluorescence experiments) correlated perfectly with the measured FER across all conditions, demonstrating unequivocally for the first time that a direct correlation exists between in situ ROS generation and PEM macroscopic degradation. The activation energy for ROS generation within the PEM was estimated to be 12.5 kJ mol(-1).

  17. Correlation Of Balkan Endemic Nephropathy With Fluorescent Organic Compounds In Shallow Groundwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldberg, Marvin C.; Feder, Gerald L.; Radovanovic, Zoran

    1994-04-01

    Balkan endemic nephropathy (BEN) is a disease of intersitial nephropathy leading to end-stage renal failure. The disease occurs in persons living in villages on alluvial valleys of streams tributary to the Danube River in Rumania, Bulgaria and former Yugoslavia. The etiologic agent is not known, but a contaminant in shallow groundwater has become suspect. In this study, samples of drinking water from endemic and non-endemic village water supplies were analyzed by excitation/emission matrix (EEM) fluorescence spectroscopy. Spectra characteristic of groundwater from BEN households show elongated teardrop shapes in the fluorescence excitation/emission matrix. A sharp rise occurs in fluorescence emission between 380 and 400 nanometers (nm) and a trailing emission intensity from 400 to 550 nm. Spectra of groundwater samples from some BEN households have an additional excitation maxima at 300 nm, which further contributes to the emission intensity at 400 nm. Spectra of water samples from non-BEN households located in endemic villages show characteristics of BEN household waters, exhibiting the 250-nm excitation peak, even though the fluorophoric intensity is much less than that in samples from BEN household waters. Samples from non-endemic villages do not show the characteristic EEM spectra described as "teardrop shaped". The non-BEN households have lower concentrations of these fluorophores in the drinking water than the endemic households; hence, one of the factors in contracting the disease may be the concentration of these fluorescent materials in drinking water.

  18. Fluorescence lifetimes and correlated photon statistics from single CdSe/oligo(phenylene vinylene) composite nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Odoi, M Y; Hammer, N I; Early, K T; McCarthy, K D; Tangirala, R; Emrick, T; Barnes, M D

    2007-09-01

    We present measurements of fluorescence intensity trajectories and associated excited-state decay times from individual CdSe/oligo(phenylene vinylene) (CdSe-OPV) quantum dot nanostructures using time-tagged, time-resolved (TTTR) photon counting techniques. We find that fluorescence decay times for the quantum dot emitter in these composite systems are at least an order of magnitude shorter than ZnS-capped CdSe quantum dot systems. We show that both the blinking suppression and associated lifetime/count rate behavior can be described by a modified version of the diffusive reaction coordinate model which couples slow fluctuations in quantum dot electron (1Se, 1Pe) energies to Auger-assisted hole trapping processes, hence modifying both blinking statistics and excited-state decay rates.

  19. Correlation between the In Vitro Functionality of Stored Platelets and the Cytosolic Esterase-Induced Fluorescence Intensity with CMFDA.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jiexi; Yi, Xiaoyang; Liu, Minxia; Zhou, Qian; Ren, Suping; Wang, Yan; Yang, Chao; Zhou, Jianwei; Han, Ying

    2015-01-01

    It has been hypothesized that the cytosolic esterase-induced fluorescence intensity (CEIFI) from carboxy dimethyl fluorescein diacetate (CMFDA) in platelets may related to platelet functions. In the present study, we measured the change of CEIFI in platelets during storage, and examined the correlations of CEIFI with the in vitro functionality of stored platelets, including the ADP-induced aggregation activity, hypotonic shock response, expression of CD62P as well as platelet apoptosis. The CEIFI of fresh platelets, when tested at 10 μM CMFDA, the mean fluorescence intensity index (MFI) was 305.9 ± 49.9 (N = 80). After 1-day storage, it was 203.8 ± 34.4, the CEIFI of the stored platelets started to decline significantly, and reduced to 112.7 ±27.7 after 7-day storage. The change in CEIFI is highly correlated to all four functional parameters measured, with the correlation coefficients being 0.9813, 0.9848, -0.9945 and -0.9847 for the ADP-induced aggregation activity, hypotonic shock response (HSR), expression of CD62P and platelet apoptosis respectively. The above results show that the CEIFI measurement of platelets represents well the viability and functional state of in vitro stored platelets. This may be used as a convenient new method for quality evaluation for stored platelets if this result can be further validated by the following clinical trials.

  20. Correlating hypoxia with insulin secretion using a fluorescent hypoxia detection system.

    PubMed

    Skiles, Matthew L; Fancy, Romone; Topiwala, Pritesh; Sahai, Suchit; Blanchette, James O

    2011-04-01

    A common obstacle to the survival of encapsulated tissue is oxygen insufficiency. This appears particularly true of encapsulated pancreatic β-cells. Our work investigates a fluorescent hypoxia detection system for early recognition of hypoxic stress in encapsulated pancreatic tissue. Murine insulinoma (MIN6) cells were engineered to produce a red fluorescent protein under the control of hypoxia-inducible-factor-1. Aggregates of these cells were encapsulated in poly(ethylene glycol) hydrogels at densities of 200,000, 600,000, and 1 million cells per capsule then incubated in either a 1% or 20% oxygen environment. Cell function was evaluated by daily measurement of glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. Encapsulated cells were also fluorescently imaged periodically over 72 h for expression of the marker signal. Results indicate that oxygen insufficiency severely impacts insulin release from MIN6 cells, and that large aggregates are especially vulnerable to oxygen limitations. Our marker was found to be successfully indicative of hypoxia and could be used as a predictor of subsequent insulin release. Further work will be required to fully characterize signal dynamics and to evaluate in vivo efficacy. The method presented here represents a unique and valuable approach to detecting hypoxic stress in living tissues which may prove useful to a variety of fields of biological research.

  1. Adulteration screening of botanical materials by a sensitive and model-free approach using infrared spectroscopic imaging and two-dimensional correlation infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jian-bo; Zhou, Qun; Sun, Su-qin

    2016-11-01

    Infrared (IR) spectroscopy is often used as a simple, fast, and green method for the adulteration screening of botanical materials for foods and herbs. However, the overlapping of absorption signals of various substances significantly decrease the sensitivity and specificity of IR spectroscopy in the detection of adulterated samples. In this research, a model-free approach is proposed for the sensitive and non-targeted screening of botanical materials adulterated by adding other plant materials. First, the spectra of the entities in the test sample are collected by near-infrared spectroscopic imaging and clustered by unsupervised pattern recognition methods. The sample may be adulterated if there are two or more clusters of the entities. Next, the entities of different clusters are characterized by mid-infrared spectroscopy to interpret the chemical compositions to determine the clustering is caused whether by adulteration or other reasons. Second derivative spectroscopy and two-dimensional correlation spectroscopy are often needed to resolve the overlapped bands mathematically or experimentally to find the characteristic signals to identify the authentic and adulterant entities. The feasibility of this approach was proved by the simulated adulterated sample of saffron. In conclusion, botanical materials adulterated by adding other plant materials can be detected by a simple, fast, sensitive, and green screening approach using IR spectroscopic imaging, two-dimensional correlation spectroscopy, and necessary chemometrics techniques.

  2. Scanning Single-Molecule Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy Enables Kinetics Study of DNA Hairpin Folding with a Time Window from Microseconds to Seconds.

    PubMed

    Bi, Huimin; Yin, Yandong; Pan, Bailong; Li, Geng; Zhao, Xin Sheng

    2016-05-19

    Single-molecule fluorescence measurements have been widely used to explore kinetics and dynamics of biological systems. Among them, single-molecule imaging (SMI) is good at tracking processes slower than tens of milliseconds, whereas fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) is good at probing processes faster than submilliseconds. However, there is still shortage of simple yet effective single-molecule fluorescence method to cover the time-scale between submilliseconds and tens of milliseconds. To effectively bridge this millisecond gap, we developed a single-molecule fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (smFCS) method that works on surface-immobilized single molecules through surface scanning. We validated it by monitoring the classical DNA hairpin folding process. With a wide time window from microseconds to seconds, the experimental data are well fitted to the two-state folding model. All relevant molecular parameters, including the relative fluorescence brightness, equilibrium constant, and reaction rate constants, were uniquely determined.

  3. Monitoring the diffusion behavior of Na,K-ATPase by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) upon fluorescence labelling with eGFP or Dreiklang

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Junghans, Cornelia; Schmitt, Franz-Josef; Vukojević, Vladana; Friedrich, Thomas

    2016-02-01

    Measurement of lateral mobility of membraneembedded proteins in living cells with high spatial and temporal precision is a challenging task of optofluidics. Biological membranes are complex structures, whose physico-chemical properties depend on the local lipid composition, cholesterol content and the presence of integral or peripheral membrane proteins, which may be involved in supramolecular complexes or are linked to cellular matrix proteins or the cytoskeleton. The high proteinto- lipid ratios in biomembranes indicate that membrane proteins are particularly subject to molecular crowding, making it difficult to follow the track of individual molecules carrying a fluorescence label. Novel switchable fluorescence proteins such as Dreiklang [1], are, in principle, promising tools to study the diffusion behavior of individual molecules in situations of molecular crowding due to excellent spectral control of the ON- and OFF-switching process. In this work, we expressed an integral membrane transport protein, the Na,K-ATPase comprising the human α2-subunit carrying an N-terminal eGFP or Dreiklang tag and human β1-subunit, in HEK293T cells and measured autocorrelation curves by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS). Furthermore,we measured diffusion times and diffusion constants of eGFP and Dreiklang by FCS, first, in aqueous solution after purification of the proteins upon expression in E. coli, and, second, upon expression as soluble proteins in the cytoplasm of HEK293T cells. Our data show that the diffusion behavior of the purified eGFP and Dreiklang in solution as well as the properties of the proteins expressed in the cytoplasm are very similar. However, the autocorrelation curves of eGFP- and Dreiklanglabeled Na,K-ATPase measured in the plasma membrane exhibit marked differences, with the Dreiklang-labeled construct showing shorter diffusion times. This may be related to an additional, as yet unrecognized quenching process that occurs on the same time

  4. Monitoring the diffusion behavior of Na,K-ATPase by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) upon fluorescence labelling with eGFP or Dreiklang

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Junghans, Cornelia; Schmitt, Franz-Josef; Vukojević, Vladana; Friedrich, Thomas

    2015-12-01

    Measurement of lateral mobility of membraneembedded proteins in living cells with high spatial and temporal precision is a challenging task of optofluidics. Biological membranes are complex structures, whose physico-chemical properties depend on the local lipid composition, cholesterol content and the presence of integral or peripheral membrane proteins, which may be involved in supramolecular complexes or are linked to cellular matrix proteins or the cytoskeleton. The high proteinto- lipid ratios in biomembranes indicate that membrane proteins are particularly subject to molecular crowding, making it difficult to follow the track of individual molecules carrying a fluorescence label. Novel switchable fluorescence proteins such as Dreiklang [1], are, in principle, promising tools to study the diffusion behavior of individual molecules in situations of molecular crowding due to excellent spectral control of the ON- and OFF-switching process. In this work, we expressed an integral membrane transport protein, the Na,K-ATPase comprising the human α2-subunit carrying an N-terminal eGFP or Dreiklang tag and human β1-subunit, in HEK293T cells and measured autocorrelation curves by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS). Furthermore,we measured diffusion times and diffusion constants of eGFP and Dreiklang by FCS, first, in aqueous solution after purification of the proteins upon expression in E. coli, and, second, upon expression as soluble proteins in the cytoplasm of HEK293T cells. Our data show that the diffusion behavior of the purified eGFP and Dreiklang in solution as well as the properties of the proteins expressed in the cytoplasm are very similar. However, the autocorrelation curves of eGFP- and Dreiklanglabeled Na,K-ATPase measured in the plasma membrane exhibit marked differences, with the Dreiklang-labeled construct showing shorter diffusion times. This may be related to an additional, as yet unrecognized quenching process that occurs on the same time

  5. Cryo X-ray microscope with flat sample geometry for correlative fluorescence and nanoscale tomographic imaging.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Gerd; Guttmann, Peter; Rehbein, Stefan; Werner, Stephan; Follath, Rolf

    2012-02-01

    X-ray imaging offers a new 3-D view into cells. With its ability to penetrate whole hydrated cells it is ideally suited for pairing fluorescence light microscopy and nanoscale X-ray tomography. In this paper, we describe the X-ray optical set-up and the design of the cryo full-field transmission X-ray microscope (TXM) at the electron storage ring BESSY II. Compared to previous TXM set-ups with zone plate condenser monochromator, the new X-ray optical layout employs an undulator source, a spherical grating monochromator and an elliptically shaped glass capillary mirror as condenser. This set-up improves the spectral resolution by an order of magnitude. Furthermore, the partially coherent object illumination improves the contrast transfer of the microscope compared to incoherent conditions. With the new TXM, cells grown on flat support grids can be tilted perpendicular to the optical axis without any geometrical restrictions by the previously required pinhole for the zone plate monochromator close to the sample plane. We also developed an incorporated fluorescence light microscope which permits to record fluorescence, bright field and DIC images of cryogenic cells inside the TXM. For TXM tomography, imaging with multi-keV X-rays is a straightforward approach to increase the depth of focus. Under these conditions phase contrast imaging is necessary. For soft X-rays with shrinking depth of focus towards 10nm spatial resolution, thin optical sections through a thick specimen might be obtained by deconvolution X-ray microscopy. As alternative 3-D X-ray imaging techniques, the confocal cryo-STXM and the dual beam cryo-FIB/STXM with photoelectron detection are proposed. PMID:22273540

  6. Correlation of femtosecond wave packets and fluorescence interference in a conjugated polymer: Towards the measurement of site homogeneous dephasing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milota, F.; Sperling, J.; Szöcs, V.; Tortschanoff, A.; Kauffmann, H. F.

    2004-05-01

    Probing electronic femtosecond (fs) coherence among segmental sites that are congested by static and dynamic site disorder and subject to structural relaxation is a big, experimental challenge in the study of photophysics of poly(p-phenylenevinylene). In this work, fs-wave-packet fluorescence interferometry experiments are presented that measure macroscopic coherent kernels and their phase-relaxation in the low-temperature, bottom-state regime of the density-of-states below the migrational threshold energy where downhill site-to-site transfer is marginal. By using freely propagating and tunable 70 fs excitation/probing pulses and employing narrow-band spectral filtering of wave packets, fluorescence interferograms with strongly damped beatings can be observed. The coherences formally follow the in-phase superpositions of two site-optical free-induction-decays and originate from distinct pairs of coherent doorway-states, different in energy and space, each of them being targeted, by two discrete quantum-arrival-states 1α and 1β, via independent, isoenergetic 0→1 fluorescence transitions. The coherent transients are explained as site-to-site polarization beatings, caused by the interference of two fluorescence correlation signals. The numerical analysis of the damping regime, based upon second-order perturbational solutions, reveals the lower limit value of homogeneous dephasing in the range from T2≃100 fs to T2≃200 fs depending on the site-excitation energy of the bottom-states. The experiments enable to look into the formation of the relaxed state as a special molecular process of electron-phonon coupling and hence open-up a quite new perspective in the puzzle of multichromophore optical dynamics and structural relaxation in conjugated polymers.

  7. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy of CdSe/ZnS quantum dot optical bioimaging probes with ultra-thin biocompatible coatings

    PubMed Central

    Murcia, Michael J.; Shaw, David L.; Long, Eric C.; Naumann, Christoph A.

    2008-01-01

    The current study reports on the colloidal stabilities and emission properties of CdSe/ZnS quantum dot (QD) optical probes capped with a variety of thin, hydrophilic surface coatings as studied using confocal fluorescence correlation spectroscopy. These coatings are based on mercaptoethanol, mercaptopropionic acid (with and without conjugated aminoethoxyethanol), lipopolymers (DSPE-PEG2000), cysteine (Cys), and a variety of Xaa-Cys dipeptides. The study shows that several types of QDs with thin hydrophilic coatings can be designed that combine good colloidal stability and excellent emission properties (brightness). Furthermore, there is a general correlation between colloidal stability and brightness. The experiments reported herein illustrate that QDs with multiple types of thin coatings can be created for optical imaging applications in a biological environment while also maintaining a size below 10 nm. PMID:19572039

  8. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy of CdSe/ZnS quantum dot optical bioimaging probes with ultra-thin biocompatible coatings.

    PubMed

    Murcia, Michael J; Shaw, David L; Long, Eric C; Naumann, Christoph A

    2008-04-01

    The current study reports on the colloidal stabilities and emission properties of CdSe/ZnS quantum dot (QD) optical probes capped with a variety of thin, hydrophilic surface coatings as studied using confocal fluorescence correlation spectroscopy. These coatings are based on mercaptoethanol, mercaptopropionic acid (with and without conjugated aminoethoxyethanol), lipopolymers (DSPE-PEG2000), cysteine (Cys), and a variety of Xaa-Cys dipeptides. The study shows that several types of QDs with thin hydrophilic coatings can be designed that combine good colloidal stability and excellent emission properties (brightness). Furthermore, there is a general correlation between colloidal stability and brightness. The experiments reported herein illustrate that QDs with multiple types of thin coatings can be created for optical imaging applications in a biological environment while also maintaining a size below 10 nm.

  9. Local variations of HER2 dimerization in breast cancer cells discovered by correlative fluorescence and liquid electron microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Peckys, Diana B.; Korf, Ulrike; de Jonge, Niels

    2015-01-01

    The formation of HER2 homodimers plays an important role in breast cancer aggressiveness and progression; however, little is known about its localization. We have studied the intra- and intercellular variation of HER2 at the single-molecule level in intact SKBR3 breast cancer cells. Whole cells were visualized in hydrated state with correlative fluorescence microscopy and environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM). The locations of individual HER2 receptors were detected using an anti-HER2 affibody in combination with a quantum dot (QD), a fluorescent nanoparticle. Fluorescence microscopy revealed considerable differences of HER2 membrane expression between individual cells and between different membrane regions of the same cell (that is, membrane ruffles and flat areas). Subsequent ESEM of the corresponding cellular regions provided images of individually labeled HER2 receptors. The high spatial resolution of 3 nm and the close proximity between the QD and the receptor allowed quantifying the stoichiometry of HER2 complexes, distinguishing between monomers, dimers, and higher-order clusters. Downstream data analysis based on calculating the pair correlation function from receptor positions showed that cellular regions exhibiting membrane ruffles contained a substantial fraction of HER2 in homodimeric state. Larger-order clusters were also present. Membrane areas with homogeneous membrane topography, on the contrary, displayed HER2 in random distribution. Second, HER2 homodimers appeared to be absent from a small subpopulation of cells exhibiting a flat membrane topography, possibly resting cells. Local differences in homodimer presence may point toward functional differences with possible relevance for studying metastasis and drug response. PMID:26601217

  10. Local variations of HER2 dimerization in breast cancer cells discovered by correlative fluorescence and liquid electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Peckys, Diana B; Korf, Ulrike; de Jonge, Niels

    2015-07-01

    The formation of HER2 homodimers plays an important role in breast cancer aggressiveness and progression; however, little is known about its localization. We have studied the intra- and intercellular variation of HER2 at the single-molecule level in intact SKBR3 breast cancer cells. Whole cells were visualized in hydrated state with correlative fluorescence microscopy and environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM). The locations of individual HER2 receptors were detected using an anti-HER2 affibody in combination with a quantum dot (QD), a fluorescent nanoparticle. Fluorescence microscopy revealed considerable differences of HER2 membrane expression between individual cells and between different membrane regions of the same cell (that is, membrane ruffles and flat areas). Subsequent ESEM of the corresponding cellular regions provided images of individually labeled HER2 receptors. The high spatial resolution of 3 nm and the close proximity between the QD and the receptor allowed quantifying the stoichiometry of HER2 complexes, distinguishing between monomers, dimers, and higher-order clusters. Downstream data analysis based on calculating the pair correlation function from receptor positions showed that cellular regions exhibiting membrane ruffles contained a substantial fraction of HER2 in homodimeric state. Larger-order clusters were also present. Membrane areas with homogeneous membrane topography, on the contrary, displayed HER2 in random distribution. Second, HER2 homodimers appeared to be absent from a small subpopulation of cells exhibiting a flat membrane topography, possibly resting cells. Local differences in homodimer presence may point toward functional differences with possible relevance for studying metastasis and drug response.

  11. On mechanism of intermediate-sized circular DNA compaction mediated by spermine: contribution of fluorescence lifetime correlation spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Humpolícková, Jana; Stepánek, Miroslav; Kral, Teresa; Benda, Ales; Procházka, Karel; Hof, Martin

    2008-01-01

    The compaction of DNA plays a role in the nuclei of several types of cells and becomes important in the non-viral gene therapy. Thus, it is in the scope of research interest. It was shown, that spermine-induced compaction of large DNA molecules occurs in a discrete "all-or-non" regime, where the coexistence of free and folded DNA molecules was observed. In the case of intermediate-sized DNA molecules (approximately 10 kbp), so far, it was stated that the mechanism of folding is continuous. Here, we show, that neither a standard benchmark technique-dynamic light scattering, nor a single molecule technique such as fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, can decide what kind of mechanism is undertaken in the compaction process. Besides, we introduce an application of a new approach-fluorescence lifetime correlation spectroscopy. The method takes an advantage of a subtle lifetime change of an intercalating dye PicoGreen during the titration with spermine and based on that, it reveals the discrete mechanism of the process. Furthermore, we show that it allows for observation of the equilibrium state transition dynamics.

  12. [Indocyanine green infrared fluorescence angiography and histopathological correlation in experimental choroidal circulatory disturbance. Report 2].

    PubMed

    Matsunaga, H; Ando, A; Matsubara, T; Fukushima, I; Takahashi, K; Ohkuma, H; Uyama, M

    1997-02-01

    We performed an experimental study on choroidal circulatory disturbance to clarify basic problems about interpretation of retino-choroidal lesions in indocyanine green fluorescence angiography (ICG angiography). We severed the posterior ciliary arteries to produce choroidal circulatory disturbance. Fluorescein angiography and ICG angiography were performed at one week, and one month after occlusion. These findings were compared with histopathological findings. One week after occlusion, the area of choroidal infarct showed occlusion of choriocapillaris and proliferation of the retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells, this area showed hypofluorescence in the early phase ICG angiography. The hypofluorescence area increased in the late phase. One month after occlusion, the lesion showed loss of choriocapillaris at the center and proliferation of fibroblast-like cells at the edge of the lesion. The subretinal strand showed hyperfluorescence in late phase ICG angiography. Proliferated RPE cells masked ICG fluorescence in the late phase. Fibroblast-like cells showed tissue staining. When reading ICG angiography, we have to take into account that the ICG angiogram is greatly modified by condition of the RPE.

  13. Molecular organization in phospholipid monolayer domains by correlative fluorescence microscopy and electron diffraction.

    PubMed

    Hui, S W; Yu, H

    1994-04-01

    Lipid monolayer is a half leaflet model for lipid bilayer, which forms the basis of biological membranes. Within a certain range of surface area per molecular of phospholipid monolayers at the air-water interface, where the compressibility was nearly infinite, two phases with different molecular packings were observable by fluorescence microscopy. Mixed-phase monolayers of L-1,2-dipalmitoyl-N-monomethyl-3-phosphatidylethanolamine [DP(Me)PE] or L-1,2-dipalmitoyl-N-dimethyl-3-phosphatidyl-ethanolamine [DP(Me)2PE] were deposited on marker grids coated with Formvar films. The molecular organization in the dark and bright fluorescent areas on the grids was investigated by low dose, selected area electron diffraction. Sharp reflection arcs, at a spacing of 4.2A and arranged in a hexagon pattern, were detected from dark domains of both lipids. A diffuse reflection ring at a spacing of 4.6A was derived from the bright background areas. Diffraction patterns were obtained from neighboring areas along selected dark domains of both lipids. The orientations of diffraction patterns from areas along smooth and curving boundaries of DP(Me)2PE domains were found to turn with the boundaries. In the branching domains of DP(Me)PE, the orientations of diffraction patterns indicated that the branches were formed by twinning. Electron diffraction thus provides an unique way to sample the local molecular packing order and orientation within individual domains in phospholipid monolayers.

  14. Interaction of fluorescence labeled single-stranded DNA with hexameric DNA-helicase RepA: a photon and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy study.

    PubMed

    Xu, H; Frank, J; Trier, U; Hammer, S; Schröder, W; Behlke, J; Schäfer-Korting, M; Holzwarth, J F; Saenger, W

    2001-06-19

    Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) was used to characterize the interaction of fluorescence labeled single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) with hexameric RepA DNA-helicase (hRepA) encoded by plasmid RSF1010. The apparent dissociation constants, Kd(app), for the equilibrium binding of 12mer, 30mer, and 45mer ssDNA 5'-labeled with BFL to hRepA dimer in the presence of 0.5 mM ATPgammaS at pH 5.8 and 25 degrees C were determined to be 0.58 +/- 0.12, 0.52 +/- 0.07, and 1.66 +/- 0.32 microM, respectively. Binding curves are compatible with one binding site for ssDNA present on hRepA dimer, with no indication of cooperativity. At pH 7.6 in the presence of ATPgammaS and at pH 5.8 in the absence of ATPgammaS, complex formation between ssDNA and hRepA was too weak for measuring complete binding curves by FCS. Under these conditions, the dissociation constant, Kd(app), is in the range between 10 and 250 microM. The kinetics of complex formation at pH 5.8 are faster than the time resolution (approximately 10-20 s) of FCS experiments under pseudo-first-order conditions, with respect to BFL-ssDNA. Photon correlation spectroscopy (PCS) experiments yielded, within the experimental error range, the same values for the apparent hydrodynamic radii, R(h), of hRepA dimer and its complex with ssDNA as determined by FCS (R(h) = 6.6 +/- 1 nm). hRepA starts to aggregate under acidic conditions (

  15. Correlated analysis of chemical variations with spectroscopic features of the K-Na jarosite solid solutions relevant to Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ling, Zongcheng; Cao, Fengke; Ni, Yuheng; Wu, Zhongchen; Zhang, Jiang; Li, Bo

    2016-06-01

    Detailed chemical, structural and spectroscopic properties of jarosite solid solution minerals are key information for their potential discoveries by future remote sensing and in-situ detections on Mars. We successfully synthesized seven homogeneous K-Na jarosite solid solutions under hydrothermal conditions at 140 °C, whose phase identifications and chemical compositions are confirmed by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The chemical ratios of K/(K+Na) in jarosite solid solutions lead to systematic shifts of their characteristic Raman peaks ν1 (SO4)2- (from 1006 to 1011.3 cm-1), ν3 (SO4)2- (from 1100.6 to 1111.2 cm-1), ν2 (SO4)2- (from 434.2 to 444.8 cm-1) with the increase of Na content. While the OH stretching mode decreases with even larger peak position variations (e.g., ∼3410 cm-1 peak shifts from 3410.5 to 3385.7 cm-1) as the K-Na jarosite solid solutions are enriched in Na content. Raman spectroscopic measurements of the seven K-Na jarosite solid solutions enabled us to build a calibration that uses Raman peak positions to estimate K-Na variation in jarosite, which is the key step for their possible applications in the future Raman applications on Mars' missions (e.g., ExoMars and Mars 2020 missions). The band assignments and compositional related variations of their XRD, near-infrared (NIR) and mid-infrared (MIR) spectra also provide informative clues for identifying the jarosite minerals and inferring their composition during martian in-situ and remote sensing measurements.

  16. Multifunction Imaging and Spectroscopic Instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mouroulis, Pantazis

    2004-01-01

    A proposed optoelectronic instrument would perform several different spectroscopic and imaging functions that, heretofore, have been performed by separate instruments. The functions would be reflectance, fluorescence, and Raman spectroscopies; variable-color confocal imaging at two different resolutions; and wide-field color imaging. The instrument was conceived for use in examination of minerals on remote planets. It could also be used on Earth to characterize material specimens. The conceptual design of the instrument emphasizes compactness and economy, to be achieved largely through sharing of components among subsystems that perform different imaging and spectrometric functions. The input optics for the various functions would be mounted in a single optical head. With the exception of a targeting lens, the input optics would all be aimed at the same spot on a specimen, thereby both (1) eliminating the need to reposition the specimen to perform different imaging and/or spectroscopic observations and (2) ensuring that data from such observations can be correlated with respect to known positions on the specimen. The figure schematically depicts the principal components and subsystems of the instrument. The targeting lens would collect light into a multimode optical fiber, which would guide the light through a fiber-selection switch to a reflection/ fluorescence spectrometer. The switch would have four positions, enabling selection of spectrometer input from the targeting lens, from either of one or two multimode optical fibers coming from a reflectance/fluorescence- microspectrometer optical head, or from a dark calibration position (no fiber). The switch would be the only moving part within the instrument.

  17. Correlations between nuclear and fluorescent Imaging of mammary tumors in mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carroll, Robin; Stone, John; Blue, Eric; Bradley, Eric; Qian, Jianguo; Saha, Margaret; Welsh, Robert

    2008-10-01

    Progress with new imaging technologies permits the study of biological processes both in vivo and noninvasively. Two systems, a position-sensitive gamma camera and a cooled-CCD camera have been applied in this work. A C3H strain of mouse carrying the Mouse Mammary Tumor Virus (MMTV) was imaged using 800 nm Q-tracker fluorescent dots conjugated to a peptide targeting integrin αυβ C a mammary marker for angiogenesis. We subsequently imaged with the gamma camera to detect low levels of ^125I distribution, and hence, the activity of a trans-membrane protein called the sodium iodide symporter (NIS) responsible for iodine transport. Preliminary results indicate that the biodistribution of the tagged Q-tracker dots and ^125I co-localize very early in seemingly normal mammary glands of infected MMTV mice, while in larger palpable tumors the Q-dot signals are less apparent in comparison with the^125I signal.

  18. Shedding light on the photostability of two intermolecular charge-transfer complexes between highly fluorescent bis-1,8-naphthalimide dyes and some π-acceptors: A spectroscopic study in solution and solid states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Refat, Moamen S.; Ismail, Lamia A.; Adam, Abdel Majid A.

    2015-01-01

    Given the great importance of the various uses of 1,8-naphthalimides in the trends of biology, medicine and industry, the current study focused on extending the scope of these dyes by introducing some of their charge-transfer (CT) complexes. For this purpose, two highly fluorescent bis-1,8-naphthalimide dyes and their complexes with some π-acceptors have been synthesized and characterized spectroscopically. The π-acceptors include picric acid (PA), chloranilic acid (CLA), tetracyanoquinodimethane (TCNQ) and dichlorodicyanobenzoquinone (DDQ). The molecular structure, spectroscopic and fluorescence properties as well as the binding modes were deduced from IR, UV-vis and 1H NMR spectral studies. The binding ratio of complexation was determined to be 1:1 according to the elemental analyses and photometric titrations. It has been found that the order of acceptance ability for the different acceptors is TCNQ > DDQ > CLA > PA. The photostability of 1,8-naphthalimide dye as a donor and its charge-transfer complex doped in polymethyl methacrylate/PMMA were exposed to UV-Vis radiation and the change in the absorption spectra was achieved at different times during irradiation period.

  19. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, combined with bimolecular fluorescence complementation, reveals the effects of β-arrestin complexes and endocytic targeting on the membrane mobility of neuropeptide Y receptors

    PubMed Central

    Kilpatrick, Laura E.; Briddon, Stephen J.; Holliday, Nicholas D.

    2012-01-01

    Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) and photon counting histogram (PCH) analysis are powerful ways to study mobility and stoichiometry of G protein coupled receptor complexes, within microdomains of single living cells. However, relating these properties to molecular mechanisms can be challenging. We investigated the influence of β-arrestin adaptors and endocytosis mechanisms on plasma membrane diffusion and particle brightness of GFP-tagged neuropeptide Y (NPY) receptors. A novel GFP-based bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) system also identified Y1 receptor-β-arrestin complexes. Diffusion co-efficients (D) for Y1 and Y2-GFP receptors in HEK293 cell plasma membranes were 2.22 and 2.15 × 10− 9 cm2 s− 1 respectively. At a concentration which promoted only Y1 receptor endocytosis, NPY treatment reduced Y1-GFP motility (D 1.48 × 10− 9 cm2 s− 1), but did not alter diffusion characteristics of the Y2-GFP receptor. Agonist induced changes in Y1 receptor motility were inhibited by mutations (6A) which prevented β-arrestin recruitment and internalisation; conversely they became apparent in a Y2 receptor mutant with increased β-arrestin affinity. NPY treatment also increased Y1 receptor-GFP particle brightness, changes which indicated receptor clustering, and which were abolished by the 6A mutation. The importance of β-arrestin recruitment for these effects was illustrated by reduced lateral mobility (D 1.20–1.33 × 10− 9 cm2 s− 1) of Y1 receptor-β-arrestin BiFC complexes. Thus NPY-induced changes in Y receptor motility and brightness reflect early events surrounding arrestin dependent endocytosis at the plasma membrane, results supported by a novel combined BiFC/FCS approach to detect the underlying receptor-β-arrestin signalling complex. PMID:22487268

  20. Effects of humic substances on the bioconcentration of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons: Correlations with spectroscopic and chemical properties of humic substances

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Haitzer, M.; Abbt-Braun, G.; Traunspurger, W.; Steinberg, C.E.W.

    1999-01-01

    The presence of dissolved humic substances (HS, fulvic and humic acids) generally reduces the uptake of hydrophobic organic compounds into aquatic organisms. The extent of this effect depends both on the concentration and on the origin of the HS. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of qualitative differences between HS from different origins. The effects of seven different HS on the bioconcentration of pyrene and benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans were related to the spectroscopic and chemical properties of the HS. The effect of each humic material on the bioconcentration of pyrene or BaP was quantified as a 'biologically determined' partition coefficient K(DOC). We observed significant linear relationships between K(DOC) and the atomic H/C ratio, the specific absorptivity at 254 nm, the content of aromatic carbons (as determined by 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, the copper-complexing capacity, the content of phenolic OH groups, and the molecular weight of the HS. There was no discernible relationship of K(DOC) with the atomic (N + O)/C ratio, an indicator of the polarity of HS. Taken together, our results show that the variability in the effects of HS from different origins could be related to variations in bulk properties of the HS. Parameters describing the aromaticity of the humic materials seemed to be most useful for estimating effects of HS on the bioconcentration of pyrene and BaP.

  1. Effects of humic substances on the bioconcentration of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons: Correlations with spectroscopic and chemical properties of humic substances

    SciTech Connect

    Haitzer, M.; Abbt-Braun, G.; Traunspurger, W.; Steinberg, C.E.W.

    1999-12-01

    The presence of dissolved humic substances (HS, fulvic and humic acids) generally reduces the uptake of hydrophobic organic compounds into aquatic organisms. The extent of this effect depends both on the concentration and on the origin of the HS. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of qualitative differences between HS from different origins. The effects of seven different HS on the bioconcentration of pyrene and benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans were related to the spectroscopic and chemical properties of the HS. The effect of each humic material on the bioconcentration of pyrene or BaP was quantified as a biologically determined partition coefficient K{sub DOC}. The authors observed significant linear relationships between K{sub DOC} and the atomic H/C ratio, the specific absorptivity at 254 nm, the content of aromatic carbons as determined by {sup 13}C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, the copper-complexing capacity, the content of phenolic OH groups, and the molecular weight of the HS. There was no discernible relationship of K{sub DOC} with the atomic (N + O)/C ratio, an indicator of the polarity of HS. Taken together, their results show that the variability in the effects of HS from different origins could be related to variations in bulk properties of the HS. Parameters describing the aromaticity of the humic materials seemed to be most useful for estimating effects of HS on the bioconcentration of pyrene and BaP.

  2. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS): Ultrasensitive measurements of molecular dynamics in vitro and in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwille, Petra

    1998-05-01

    FCS, a technique introduced in 1972 (Magde et al. 1972, Appl. Phys. Lett. 29:705), is currently being employed for ultrasensitive studies of molecular diffusion and aggregation, photophysical dynamics and fast chemical reactions. When performed in confocal geometries with one- or two-photon excitation (Denk et al. 1990, Science 248:73) of photostable dyes, its sensitivity enables us to follow the dynamics of sparse biologically relevant agents such as drugs and pathogens in solution as well as in living cells. Minimally interfering with biological functions of the observed system, FCS allows us to address a variety of important questions in molecular biology. We report that green fluorescent protein (GFP), a popular tool for in-vivo studies, is not only well suited for intracellular FCS, but moreover turned out to be a perfect candidate for the study of intramolecular dynamics. It exhibits a rapid flickering in the 100 μ s time range that we have identified to be due to reversible protonation of the chromophore. Supported by NIH-P41.RR04224, NSF-D1R 8800278, Alexander-von-Humboldt fellowship to PS.

  3. Local mobility in lipid domains of supported bilayers characterized by atomic force microscopy and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy.

    SciTech Connect

    Frankel, Daniel J.; Buranda, T.; Burns, Alan Richard

    2005-01-01

    Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) is used to examine mobility of labeled probes at specific sites in supported bilayers consisting of 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC) lipid domains in 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DOPC). Those sites are mapped beforehand with simultaneous atomic force microscopy and submicron confocal fluorescence imaging, allowing characterization of probe partitioning between gel DPPC and disordered liquid DOPC domains with corresponding topography of domain structure. We thus examine the relative partitioning and mobility in gel and disordered liquid phases for headgroup- and tailgroup-labeled GM1 ganglioside probes and for headgroup- and tailgroup-labeled phospholipid probes. For the GM1 probes, large differences in mobility between fluid and gel domains are observed; whereas unexpected mobility is observed in submicron gel domains for the phospholipid probes. We attribute the latter to domain heterogeneities that could be induced by the probe. Furthermore, fits to the FCS data for the phospholipid probes in the DOPC fluid phase require two components (fast and slow). Although proximity to the glass substrate may be a factor, local distortion of the probe by the fluorophore could also be important. Overall, we observe nonideal aspects of phospholipid probe mobility and partitioning that may not be restricted to supported bilayers.

  4. Correlative super-resolution fluorescence and metal replica transmission electron microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Sochacki, Kem A.; Shtengel, Gleb; van Engelenburg, Schuyler B.; Hess, Harald F.; Taraska, Justin W.

    2014-01-01

    Super-resolution localization microscopy is combined with a complementary imaging technique, transmission electron microscopy of metal replicas, to locate proteins on the landscape of the cellular plasma membrane at the nanoscale. Robust correlation on the scale of 20 nm is validated by imaging endogenous clathrin (with 2D and 3D PALM/TEM) and the method is further used to find the previously unknown 3D position of epsin on clathrin coated structures. PMID:24464288

  5. Real-time autocorrelator for fluorescence correlation spectroscopy based on graphical-processor-unit architecture: method, implementation, and comparative studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laracuente, Nicholas; Grossman, Carl

    2013-03-01

    We developed an algorithm and software to calculate autocorrelation functions from real-time photon-counting data using the fast, parallel capabilities of graphical processor units (GPUs). Recent developments in hardware and software have allowed for general purpose computing with inexpensive GPU hardware. These devices are more suited for emulating hardware autocorrelators than traditional CPU-based software applications by emphasizing parallel throughput over sequential speed. Incoming data are binned in a standard multi-tau scheme with configurable points-per-bin size and are mapped into a GPU memory pattern to reduce time-expensive memory access. Applications include dynamic light scattering (DLS) and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) experiments. We ran the software on a 64-core graphics pci card in a 3.2 GHz Intel i5 CPU based computer running Linux. FCS measurements were made on Alexa-546 and Texas Red dyes in a standard buffer (PBS). Software correlations were compared to hardware correlator measurements on the same signals. Supported by HHMI and Swarthmore College

  6. Solar-induced chlorophyll fluorescence that correlates with canopy photosynthesis on diurnal and seasonal scales in a temperate deciduous forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xi; Tang, Jianwu; Mustard, John F.; Lee, Jung-Eun; Rossini, Micol; Joiner, Joanna; Munger, J. William; Kornfeld, Ari; Richardson, Andrew D.

    2015-04-01

    Previous studies have suggested that solar-induced chlorophyll fluorescence (SIF) is correlated with Gross Primary Production (GPP). However, it remains unclear to what extent this relationship is due to absorbed photosynthetically active radiation (APAR) and/or light use efficiency (LUE). Here we present the first time series of near-surface measurement of canopy-scale SIF at 760 nm in temperate deciduous forests. SIF correlated with GPP estimated with eddy covariance at diurnal and seasonal scales (r2 = 0.82 and 0.73, respectively), as well as with APAR diurnally and seasonally (r2 = 0.90 and 0.80, respectively). SIF/APAR is significantly positively correlated with LUE and is higher during cloudy days than sunny days. Weekly tower-based SIF agreed with SIF from the Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment-2 (r2 = 0.82). Our results provide ground-based evidence that SIF is directly related to both APAR and LUE and thus GPP, and confirm that satellite SIF can be used as a proxy for GPP.

  7. Correlation of modified Shimada classification with MYCN and 1p36 status detected by fluorescence in situ hybridization in neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Altungoz, Oguz; Aygun, Nevim; Tumer, Sait; Ozer, Erdener; Olgun, Nur; Sakizli, Meral

    2007-01-15

    Neuroblastoma (NB) is a childhood cancer derived from neural crest cells, with a highly variable clinical course and biologic behavior. NB cells harbor complex genetic changes. Also, MYCN amplification is a well-known molecular marker for aggressive progression, and deletion of the short arm of chromosome 1 is frequently observed in NB. The aim of this study was to investigate the correlation between genetic markers and prognostic morphological parameters to address the biology and underlying the clinical complexity of NB. Therefore, we performed fluorescence in situ hybridization analyses of chromosome band 1p36 and MYCN in a series of tumors from 43 cases classified according to the recommendation of International Neuroblastoma Pathology Committee (modification of Shimada classification). The correlations of MYCN amplification status and two distinct types of 1p36 alterations (deletion and imbalance) with Shimada classification and histologic prognostic factors were statistically analyzed. Amplification of MYCN and 1p36 deletion was present in 14 (32.6%) and 18 (41.9%) cases, respectively. Sixteen cases (37.2%) displayed a favorable histology, while 27 (62.8%) had an unfavorable histology. The 1p36 deletion was found to be an independent predictor of unfavorable histology by multivariate analysis (logistic regression test, P = 0.03), but the 1p36 imbalance did not show any significance. Both 1p36 deletion and MYCN amplification showed significant correlation with undifferentiated tumors (chi-square test, P = 0.002 and 0.03, respectively). Highly significant correlation was found between the higher mitotic karyorrhectic index (MKI) and MYCN amplification (chi-square test, P < 0.001), whereas neither 1p36 deletion nor 1p36 imbalance significantly correlated with a higher MKI (chi-square test, P > 0.05). We conclude that 1p36 deletion may be a reliable parameter in determining unfavorable histology and predicting prognosis in NB. Further studies with prognostic data

  8. Rank correlation of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopic data for the identification of alloys used in jewelry manufacture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jurado-López, A.; Luque de Castro, M. D.

    2003-07-01

    The aim of the present study was the rapid identification of alloys used in the manufacture of jewelry pieces with the help of a spectral library. The laser-induced breakdown spectra of 32 alloys were stored, with 25 of them chosen as library standards; the remaining seven spectra were used as samples. The composition of the alloys was obtained by flame atomic absorption spectrometry. A rank correlation method was applied for comparison between spectra, providing good correlation coefficients for the alloys studied. The composition of the samples was also predicted by partial least-squares regression to demonstrate the capability of this technique for the rapid analysis of this type of material.

  9. Scattering through fruits during ripening: laser speckle technique correlated to biochemical and fluorescence measurements.

    PubMed

    Nassif, Rana; Pellen, Fabrice; Magné, Christian; Le Jeune, Bernard; Le Brun, Guy; Abboud, Marie

    2012-10-01

    This paper reports monitoring fruits maturation using speckle technique. Performed measurements aim the assessing of biological inner fruit variation effect on the speckle image. We show that the speckle grain size is both affected by the glucose level inside the fruits and by the chlorophyll content. Moreover, the determination of circular polarization degree and circular grain size indicate that a Rayleigh diffusion regime gradually becomes predominant in fruits. Principal component analysis is used to highlight high correlation between results and strengthen the establishment of speckle as a novel non invasive method to monitor fruits ripening. PMID:23188354

  10. Fluorescence detection of esophageal neoplasia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisova, E.; Vladimirov, B.; Avramov, L.

    2008-06-01

    White-light endoscopy is well-established and wide used modality. However, despite the many technological advances that have been occurred, conventional endoscopy is suboptimal and usually detects advanced stage lesions. The limitations of standard endoscopy initiate development of spectroscopic techniques, additional to standard endoscopic equipment. One of the most sensitive approaches is fluorescence spectroscopy of gastrointestinal mucosa for neoplasia detection. In the recent study delta-aminolevulinic acid/Protoporphyrin IX (5-ALA/PpIX) is used as fluorescent marker for dysplasia and tumor detection in esophagus. The 5-ALA is administered per os six hours before measurements at dose 20 mg/kg weight. Excitation source has max of emission at 405 nm and light is delivered by the standard light guide of the endoscopic equipment. Through endoscopic instrumental channel a fiber is applied to return information about fluorescence to microspectrometer. Spectral features observed during endoscopic investigations could be distinct as the next regions: 450-630 nm region, where tissue autofluorescence is observed; 630-710 nm region, where fluorescence of PpIX is clearly pronounced; 530-580 nm region, where minima in the autofluorescence signal are observed, related to reabsorption of blood. The lack of fluorescence peaks in the red spectral area for normal mucosa is an indication for selective accumulation of 5-ALA/PpIX only in abnormal sites Very good correlation between fluorescence signals and histology examination of the lesions investigated is achieved.

  11. Photon correlation spectroscopic and spectrophotometric studies of the formation of cadmium sulfide nanoparticles in ammonia-thiourea solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulavchenko, A. I.; Kolodin, A. N.; Podlipskaya, T. Yu.; Demidova, M. G.; Maksimovskii, E. A.; Beizel', N. F.; Larionov, S. V.; Okotrub, A. V.

    2016-05-01

    Nucleation of CdS in an aqueous ammonia solution of thiourea and cadmium chloride was studied by photon correlation spectroscopy (PCS), static light scattering, and spectrophotometry. The hydrodynamic diameter of nanoparticles, light scattering intensity, and optical density of the solutions increased with temperature and synthesis time. The processes of formation, growth, and coagulation of nanoparticles can be transferred from solution to the filter surface by continuously filtering the reaction mixture through a 200-nm filter.

  12. The clustering of galaxies in the completed SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey: Observational systematics and baryon acoustic oscillations in the correlation function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, Ashley J.; Beutler, Florian; Chuang, Chia-Hsun; Pellejero-Ibanez, Marcos; Seo, Hee-Jong; Vargas-Magaña, Mariana; Cuesta, Antonio J.; Percival, Will J.; Burden, Angela; Sánchez, Ariel G.; Grieb, Jan Niklas; Reid, Beth; Brownstein, Joel R.; Dawson, Kyle S.; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Ho, Shirley; Kitaura, Francisco-Shu; Nichol, Robert C.; Olmstead, Matthew D.; Prada, Francisco; Rodríguez-Torres, Sergio A.; Saito, Shun; Salazar-Albornoz, Salvador; Schneider, Donald P.; Thomas, Daniel; Tinker, Jeremy; Tojeiro, Rita; Wang, Yuting; White, Martin; Zhao, Gong-bo

    2016-09-01

    We present baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) scale measurements determined from the clustering of 1.2 million massive galaxies with redshifts 0.2 < z < 0.75 distributed over 9300 square degrees, as quantified by their redshift-space correlation function. In order to facilitate these measurements, we define, describe, and motivate the selection function for galaxies in the final data release (DR12) of the SDSS III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS). This includes the observational footprint, masks for image quality and Galactic extinction, and weights to account for density relationships intrinsic to the imaging and spectroscopic portions of the survey. We simulate the observed systematic trends in mock galaxy samples and demonstrate that they impart no bias on baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) scale measurements and have a minor impact on the recovered statistical uncertainty. We measure transverse and radial BAO distance measurements in 0.2 < z < 0.5, 0.5 < z < 0.75, and (overlapping) 0.4 < z < 0.6 redshift bins. In each redshift bin, we obtain a precision that is 2.7 per cent or better on the radial distance and 1.6 per cent or better on the transverse distance. The combination of the redshift bins represents 1.8 per cent precision on the radial distance and 1.1 per cent precision on the transverse distance. This paper is part of a set that analyses the final galaxy clustering dataset from BOSS. The measurements and likelihoods presented here are combined with others in Alam et al. (2016) to produce the final cosmological constraints from BOSS.

  13. Dual-channel red/blue fluorescence dosimetry with broadband reflectance spectroscopic correction measures protoporphyrin IX production during photodynamic therapy of actinic keratosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanick, Stephen Chad; Davis, Scott C.; Zhao, Yan; Hasan, Tayyaba; Maytin, Edward V.; Pogue, Brian W.; Chapman, M. Shane

    2014-07-01

    Dosimetry for aminolevulinic acid (ALA)-induced protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) photodynamic therapy of actinic keratosis was examined with an optimized fluorescence dosimeter to measure PpIX during treatment. While insufficient PpIX generation may be an indicator of incomplete response, there exists no standardized method to quantitate PpIX production at depths in the skin during clinical treatments. In this study, a spectrometer-based point probe dosimeter system was used to sample PpIX fluorescence from superficial (blue wavelength excitation) and deeper (red wavelength excitation) tissue layers. Broadband white light spectroscopy (WLS) was used to monitor aspects of vascular physiology and inform a correction of fluorescence for the background optical properties. Measurements in tissue phantoms showed accurate recovery of blood volume fraction and reduced scattering coefficient from WLS, and a linear response of PpIX fluorescence versus concentration down to 1.95 and 250 nM for blue and red excitations, respectively. A pilot clinical study of 19 patients receiving 1-h ALA incubation before treatment showed high intrinsic variance in PpIX fluorescence with a standard deviation/mean ratio of >0.9. PpIX fluorescence was significantly higher in patients reporting higher pain levels on a visual analog scale. These pilot data suggest that patient-specific PpIX quantitation may predict outcome response.

  14. Characterization of the fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) standard Rhodamine 6G and calibration of its diffusion coefficient in aqueous solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Majer, G.; Melchior, J. P.

    2014-03-07

    Precise diffusion measurements of rhodamine 6G (Rh6G) dissolved in D{sub 2}O at concentrations between 50 and 200 μM were carried out in the temperature range from 280 to 320 K using pulsed field gradient nuclear magnetic resonance (PFG-NMR). The obtained diffusion coefficients can be used as a calibration reference in fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS). Besides measuring the diffusivity of Rh6G, the diffusion coefficient of the solvent in the same system could be determined in parallel by PFG-NMR as the resonances of water and Rh6G are well separated in the {sup 1}H NMR spectrum. To analyze the differences due to the isotope effect of the solvent (D{sub 2}O vs. H{sub 2}O), the correlation time τ{sub D} of Rh6G was measured by FCS in both D{sub 2}O and H{sub 2}O. The obtained isotopic correction factor, τ{sub D}(D{sub 2}O)/τ{sub D}(H{sub 2}O) = 1.24, reflects the isotope effect of the solvent´s self-diffusion coefficients as determined previously by PFG-NMR.

  15. Correlating Fluorescence and Absorption Properties of Dissolved Organic Matter in Northern Peatland Soil Porewaters with Molecular Composition Information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tfaily, M. M.; D'Andrilli, J.; Corbett, J.; Chanton, J.; Cooper, W. T.

    2009-12-01

    Northern peatlands store roughly half as much carbon as is stored as CO2 in the atmosphere in the form of complex biogeopolymers. As climate change proceeds, increasing carbon release from these historically carbon-sequestering environments may represent an unidentified forcing stress on global temperatures. In this work, we have applied absorption spectroscopy, Excitation/Emission Matrix (EEM) spectroscopy and ultrahigh resolution Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry (FT-ICR-MS) to study the differences in composition of dissolved organic matter (DOM) in soil porewaters at varying depths from different sites (fens and bogs) within the Glacial Lake Agassiz Peatlands (GLAP) of northern Minnesota. UV/Vis absorbance and Excitation Emission Matrix Fluorescence Spectroscopy (EEMS) were used to identify changes in the optical properties associated with the chromophoric fractions of DOM (CDOM). Higher specific UV absorbance (SUVA) at 254 nm indicated relatively more aromatic content in the DOM in surface bog and deep fen horizons. EEMS results were also found to be in agreement with the absorption spectra and molecular characterization as determined by FT-ICR-MS. The strong correlations we have observed suggest that optical spectroscopy techniques represent an effective surrogate approach to characterizing the composition of DOM provided some detailed molecular information is available for calibrating the observed correlations.

  16. Fluorescence cross-correlation spectroscopy for time dependent flows: a numerical investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceffa, Nicolo'G.; Pozzi, Paolo; Bouzin, Margaux; Marquezin, Cassia A.; Sironi, Laura; D'Alfonso, Laura; Collini, Maddalena; Chirico, Giuseppe

    2015-03-01

    We have previously addressed experimentally blood fluidodynamics in microcapillaries by coupling optical microscopy to pixelated detection. By computing the Cross-Correlation Function (CCF) of signals coming from pixels at a distance along the flow we obtained information on the flow speed and direction. The extension of these experiments to more complex systems with high branching of capillaries and/or inverted flows needs a theoretical investigation that we present here. We focus first on straight capillaries and harmonic flows between a minimum Vmin ≠ 0 and a maximum Vmax flow speed. The CCF shows multiple peaks at lag times that correspond closely to the maximum and minimum flow speeds. The general analytical expression of the CCF is given, the position of its maxima are discussed by means of geometrical considerations and numerical analysis and an experimental validation are presented. The second case that we study is the flow in the branches of a y-shaped junction in a microcapillary. By simply modeling the branching in laminar flow (low Reynold numbers) and assuming a smooth transition of speeds along the branches we derive a simple numerical model to compute the trajectories of micro-beads. We estimate the flow speed in the branches by computing the CCFs between linear regions of interest set perpendicular to the axes of the branches.

  17. In vitro binding kinetics of DNA double strand break repair proteins Ku70/80 and DNA-PKcs quantified by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy and fluorescence cross-correlation spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdisalaam, Salim; Chen, David J.; Alexandrakis, George

    2012-02-01

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are one of the most lethal types of DNA damage that occurs in eukaryotic cells. There are two distinct pathways of repairing DSBs, homologous recombination (HR) and non-homologous end joining (NHEJ). In the NHEJ repairing pathway, DSB recognition and repair initiation is directed by the interaction of DNAbinding subunit Ku70/80 heterodimer with the DNA-PK protein catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs). Mutations in these proteins result in repair stalling and eventual DNA misrepair that may lead to genomic instability. Studying the binding kinetics of these repair proteins is therefore important for understanding the conditions under which DSB repair stalls. Currently open questions are, what is the minimum DNA length that this complex needs to get a foothold onto a DSB and how tightly does DNA-PKcs bind onto the DNA-Ku70/80 complex. Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy (FCS) and Fluorescence Cross-Correlation Spectroscopy (FCCS) techniques have the potential to give information about the binding kinetics of DNA-protein and protein-protein interactions at the single-molecule level. In this work, FCS/FCCS measurements were performed to explore the minimum DNA base-pair (bp) length that Ku70/80 needed as a foothold to bind effectively onto the tips of different lengths of double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) fragments that mimic DSBs. 25 bp, 33 bp and 50 bp of dsDNA were used for these experiments and binding was studied as a function of salt concentration in solution. It was found that the 25 bp binding was weak even at physiological salt concentrations while the dissociation constant (Kd) remained constant for 33 and 50 bp dsDNA strand lengths. These studies indicated that the minimum binding length for the Ku70/8 is in the vicinity of 25 bp. The specificity of binding of Ku70/80 was proven by competitive binding FCCS experiments between Cy5-labeled DNA, GFP-Ku70/80 and titrations of unlabeled Ku70/80. Finally, using FCCS it was possible to estimate

  18. Mutational definition of binding requirements of an hnRNP-like protein in Arabidopsis using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Leder, Verena; Lummer, Martina; Tegeler, Kathrin; Humpert, Fabian; Lewinski, Martin; Schüttpelz, Mark; Staiger, Dorothee

    2014-10-10

    Highlights: • We use FCS to investigate binding site requirements for the hnRNP-like protein AtGRP7. • We identify three nucleotides critical for AtGRP7 binding to its own intron. • Mutation of the conserved R{sup 49} abolishes binding altogether. • The paralogue AtGRP8 binds to an overlapping motif with different sequence requirement. • The glycine-rich stretch of a plant hnRNP-like protein contributes to binding. - Abstract: Arabidopsis thaliana glycine-rich RNA binding protein 7 (AtGRP7) is part of a negative feedback loop through which it regulates alternative splicing and steady-state abundance of its pre-mRNA. Here we use fluorescence correlation spectroscopy to investigate the requirements for AtGRP7 binding to its intron using fluorescently-labelled synthetic oligonucleotides. By systematically introducing point mutations we identify three nucleotides that lead to an increased K{sub d} value when mutated and thus are critical for AtGRP7 binding. Simultaneous mutation of all three residues abrogates binding. The paralogue AtGRP8 binds to an overlapping motif but with a different sequence preference, in line with overlapping but not identical functions of this protein pair. Truncation of the glycine-rich domain reduces the binding affinity of AtGRP7, showing for the first time that the glycine-rich stretch of a plant hnRNP-like protein contributes to binding. Mutation of the conserved R{sup 49} that is crucial for AtGRP7 function in pathogen defence and splicing abolishes binding.

  19. PCR-Free Detection of Genetically Modified Organisms Using Magnetic Capture Technology and Fluorescence Cross-Correlation Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xiaoming; Xing, Da; Tang, Yonghong; Chen, Wei R.

    2009-01-01

    The safety of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) has attracted much attention recently. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification is a common method used in the identification of GMOs. However, a major disadvantage of PCR is the potential amplification of non-target DNA, causing false-positive identification. Thus, there remains a need for a simple, reliable and ultrasensitive method to identify and quantify GMO in crops. This report is to introduce a magnetic bead-based PCR-free method for rapid detection of GMOs using dual-color fluorescence cross-correlation spectroscopy (FCCS). The cauliflower mosaic virus 35S (CaMV35S) promoter commonly used in transgenic products was targeted. CaMV35S target was captured by a biotin-labeled nucleic acid probe and then purified using streptavidin-coated magnetic beads through biotin-streptavidin linkage. The purified target DNA fragment was hybridized with two nucleic acid probes labeled respectively by Rhodamine Green and Cy5 dyes. Finally, FCCS was used to detect and quantify the target DNA fragment through simultaneously detecting the fluorescence emissions from the two dyes. In our study, GMOs in genetically engineered soybeans and tomatoes were detected, using the magnetic bead-based PCR-free FCCS method. A detection limit of 50 pM GMOs target was achieved and PCR-free detection of GMOs from 5 µg genomic DNA with magnetic capture technology was accomplished. Also, the accuracy of GMO determination by the FCCS method is verified by spectrophotometry at 260 nm using PCR amplified target DNA fragment from GM tomato. The new method is rapid and effective as demonstrated in our experiments and can be easily extended to high-throughput and automatic screening format. We believe that the new magnetic bead-assisted FCCS detection technique will be a useful tool for PCR-free GMOs identification and other specific nucleic acids. PMID:19956680

  20. PCR-free detection of genetically modified organisms using magnetic capture technology and fluorescence cross-correlation spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiaoming; Xing, Da; Tang, Yonghong; Chen, Wei R

    2009-11-26

    The safety of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) has attracted much attention recently. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification is a common method used in the identification of GMOs. However, a major disadvantage of PCR is the potential amplification of non-target DNA, causing false-positive identification. Thus, there remains a need for a simple, reliable and ultrasensitive method to identify and quantify GMO in crops. This report is to introduce a magnetic bead-based PCR-free method for rapid detection of GMOs using dual-color fluorescence cross-correlation spectroscopy (FCCS). The cauliflower mosaic virus 35S (CaMV35S) promoter commonly used in transgenic products was targeted. CaMV35S target was captured by a biotin-labeled nucleic acid probe and then purified using streptavidin-coated magnetic beads through biotin-streptavidin linkage. The purified target DNA fragment was hybridized with two nucleic acid probes labeled respectively by Rhodamine Green and Cy5 dyes. Finally, FCCS was used to detect and quantify the target DNA fragment through simultaneously detecting the fluorescence emissions from the two dyes. In our study, GMOs in genetically engineered soybeans and tomatoes were detected, using the magnetic bead-based PCR-free FCCS method. A detection limit of 50 pM GMOs target was achieved and PCR-free detection of GMOs from 5 microg genomic DNA with magnetic capture technology was accomplished. Also, the accuracy of GMO determination by the FCCS method is verified by spectrophotometry at 260 nm using PCR amplified target DNA fragment from GM tomato. The new method is rapid and effective as demonstrated in our experiments and can be easily extended to high-throughput and automatic screening format. We believe that the new magnetic bead-assisted FCCS detection technique will be a useful tool for PCR-free GMOs identification and other specific nucleic acids.

  1. Synthesis, spectroscopic and DFT studies of novel fluorescent dyes: 3-aminoimidazo[1,2-a]pyridines possessing 4-pyrone moieties.

    PubMed

    Shahrisa, Aziz; Safa, Kazem Dindar; Esmati, Somayeh

    2014-01-01

    A series of novel imidazo[1,2-a]pyridines possessing 4-pyrone ring were synthesized by three-component condensation of 4-pyrone carbaldehydes, 2-aminopyridines and isocyanides. Bismuth (III) chloride was used as a catalyst in these reactions and desired products were synthesized in good yields at a very short period of time under solvent free conditions. UV-Vis absorption and fluorescence emission spectra of these compounds were investigated. It shown that two of these compounds (10f and 10g) exhibit intense fluorescence in dichloromethane. Optimized ground-state molecular geometries and orbital distributions of these two fluorescent dyes were obtained using density functional theory (DFT). Thermogravimetric analysis and electrochemical properties of these compounds were also studied. PMID:24113013

  2. Cesium and cobalt adsorption on synthetic nano manganese oxide: A two dimensional infra-red correlation spectroscopic investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al Lafi, Abdul G.; Al Abdullah, Jamal

    2015-08-01

    Molecular scale information is of prime importance to understand ions coordination to mineral surfaces and consequently to aid in the design of improved ion exchange materials. This paper reports on the use of two-dimensional correlation infra-red spectroscopy (2D-COS-IR) to investigate the time dependent adsorptions of cesium and cobalt ions onto nano manganese oxide (NMO). The metal ions uptake was driven mainly by inner-sphere complex formation as demonstrated by the production of new absorption bands at 1160, 1100, 585 and 525 cm-1, which were assigned to the O-O bond vibration and the coupled vibrations of M-O and Mn-O bonds. The progressive development of the 3100 cm-1 band, which is attributed to the stretching vibration of the lattice-OH group, indicates an M+/H+ ion-exchange reaction. The new bands at 700 and 755 cm-1 in the case of cobalt ion adsorption and at 800 and 810 cm-1 in the case of cesium ion adsorption, and the splitting of other bands at 1135 and 875 cm-1 indicate the presence of different O-O bond lengths. This suggests different coordination of the two metal ions with oxygen. The infrared spectroscopy combined with 2D-COS provides a powerful tool to investigate the mechanism of interaction between heavy metals and manganese oxide.

  3. Spectroscopic correlates of antidepressant response to sleep deprivation and light therapy: a 3.0 Tesla study of bipolar depression.

    PubMed

    Benedetti, Francesco; Calabrese, Giovanna; Bernasconi, Alessandro; Cadioli, Marcello; Colombo, Cristina; Dallaspezia, Sara; Falini, Andrea; Radaelli, Daniele; Scotti, Giuseppe; Smeraldi, Enrico

    2009-09-30

    Glutamate is the primary excitatory neurotransmitter of the human brain, and recent findings suggest a role for the glutamatergic system in the pathophysiology and treatment of mood disorders. Single proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS) was used to study the relative in vivo levels of brain neural metabolites. We evaluated the effect of antidepressant treatments on the relative concentration of unresolved glutamate and glutamine (Glx) with GABA contamination (2.35 ppm peak) using single voxel 1H-MRS at 3.0 Tesla. We studied 19 inpatients (7 males, 12 females) affected by bipolar disorder type I, current depressive episode without psychotic features, before and after 1 week of treatment with repeated total sleep deprivation (TSD) combined with light therapy (LT). Chronobiological treatment caused a significant amelioration in mood levels. Changes in the brain Glx/creatine ratio followed a general trend toward decrease, with individual variability. We observed that the decrease in the Glx/creatine ratio significantly correlated with the improvement of both objective and subjective measures of depression.

  4. Nuclear magnetic resonance, fluorescence correlation spectroscopy and time-resolved fluorescence anisotropy studies of intermolecular interactions in bis(1-methyl-1H-imidazol-3-ium-3-yl)dihydroborate bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)amide and its mixtures with various cosolvents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahu, Prabhat Kumar; Nanda, Raju; Seth, Sudipta; Ghosh, Arindam; Sarkar, Moloy

    2016-09-01

    Keeping in mind the potential usefulness of mixed ionic liquid (IL)-cosolvents systems in several industrial applications, intermolecular interactions between a borate-based IL, bis(1-methyl-1H-imidazol-3-ium-3-yl)dihydroborate bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)amide ([BIMIMDBA][TF2N]), and its binary mixtures with several molecular solvents has been investigated through NMR and fluorescence spectroscopy. Analysis of the 1H chemical shifts (δ/ppm) and translational diffusion coefficients (D) of the IL in different solvent mixtures demonstrate interplay of nonspecific (ion-dipole) and specific (hydrogen bonding) interactions in governing the properties of these mixtures. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) and time-resolved fluorescence anisotropy data provide evidence in favour of different IL-solvent interaction for different IL-cosolvent systems.

  5. Room temperature synthesis of highly hemocompatible hydroxyapatite, study of their physical properties and spectroscopic correlation of particle size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puvvada, Nagaprasad; Panigrahi, Pravas Kumar; Pathak, Amita

    2010-12-01

    Needle shaped nanoparticles of hydroxyapatite (HA) have been synthesized at room temperature using orthophosphoric acid as the source of (PO4)3- ions, while calcium chloride, the calcium source, is suitably complexed with citric acid/tartaric acid/acetic acid. The presence of ligands inhibits the growth along [001] and [100] directions of the crystal and thus, helps in formation of needle shaped nanoparticles. The chemical compositions of the samples have been established through AAS and FTIR spectroscopy, while the crystallinity has been assessed through XRD and by the spectral changes in the υ1 and υ3 frequencies of the phosphate group in the respective FTIR spectra. The particle sizes of the samples have been determined from line broadening studies and correlations have been established between the curve fitted percentage area of FTIR and full width half height (FWHH) of the XRD peaks. TEM studies revealed the particle to be needle-shaped with a length and diameter in the range of 20-65 nm and 4-11 nm respectively. Changes in the surface charge of the water dispersed HA samples have been determined at different pH and the isoelectric point for the samples have been found in the range of 3.1-3.4. Finally, the morphology, surface area and hemocompatibility characteristics of the HA samples, prepared by using different complexing agents, have been compared.Needle shaped nanoparticles of hydroxyapatite (HA) have been synthesized at room temperature using orthophosphoric acid as the source of (PO4)3- ions, while calcium chloride, the calcium source, is suitably complexed with citric acid/tartaric acid/acetic acid. The presence of ligands inhibits the growth along [001] and [100] directions of the crystal and thus, helps in formation of needle shaped nanoparticles. The chemical compositions of the samples have been established through AAS and FTIR spectroscopy, while the crystallinity has been assessed through XRD and by the spectral changes in the υ1 and υ3

  6. Quantifying the diffusion of membrane proteins and peptides in black lipid membranes with 2-focus fluorescence correlation spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Weiß, Kerstin; Neef, Andreas; Van, Qui; Kramer, Stefanie; Gregor, Ingo; Enderlein, Jörg

    2013-07-16

    Protein diffusion in lipid membranes is a key aspect of many cellular signaling processes. To quantitatively describe protein diffusion in membranes, several competing theoretical models have been proposed. Among these, the Saffman-Delbrück model is the most famous. This model predicts a logarithmic dependence of a protein's diffusion coefficient on its inverse hydrodynamic radius (D ∝ ln 1/R) for small radius values. For large radius values, it converges toward a D ∝ 1/R scaling. Recently, however, experimental data indicate a Stokes-Einstein-like behavior (D ∝ 1/R) of membrane protein diffusion at small protein radii. In this study, we investigate protein diffusion in black lipid membranes using dual-focus fluorescence correlation spectroscopy. This technique yields highly accurate diffusion coefficients for lipid and protein diffusion in membranes. We find that despite its simplicity, the Saffman-Delbrück model is able to describe protein diffusion extremely well and a Stokes-Einstein-like behavior can be ruled out.

  7. Analysis of ER-mitochondria contacts using correlative fluorescence microscopy and soft X-ray tomography of mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Elgass, Kirstin D; Smith, Elizabeth A; LeGros, Mark A; Larabell, Carolyn A; Ryan, Michael T

    2015-08-01

    Mitochondrial fission is important for organelle transport, quality control and apoptosis. Changes to the fission process can result in a wide variety of neurological diseases. In mammals, mitochondrial fission is executed by the GTPase dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1; encoded by DNM1L), which oligomerizes around mitochondria and constricts the organelle. The mitochondrial outer membrane proteins Mff, MiD49 (encoded by MIEF2) and MiD51 (encoded by MIEF1) are involved in mitochondrial fission by recruiting Drp1 from the cytosol to the organelle surface. In addition, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) tubules have been shown to wrap around and constrict mitochondria before a fission event. Up to now, the presence of MiD49 and MiD51 at ER-mitochondrial division foci has not been established. Here, we combine confocal live-cell imaging with correlative cryogenic fluorescence microscopy and soft x-ray tomography to link MiD49 and MiD51 to the involvement of the ER in mitochondrial fission. We gain further insight into this complex process and characterize the 3D structure of ER-mitochondria contact sites.

  8. Quantifying the Diffusion of Membrane Proteins and Peptides in Black Lipid Membranes with 2-Focus Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Weiß, Kerstin; Neef, Andreas; Van, Qui; Kramer, Stefanie; Gregor, Ingo; Enderlein, Jörg

    2013-01-01

    Protein diffusion in lipid membranes is a key aspect of many cellular signaling processes. To quantitatively describe protein diffusion in membranes, several competing theoretical models have been proposed. Among these, the Saffman-Delbrück model is the most famous. This model predicts a logarithmic dependence of a protein’s diffusion coefficient on its inverse hydrodynamic radius (D ∝ ln 1/R) for small radius values. For large radius values, it converges toward a D ∝ 1/R scaling. Recently, however, experimental data indicate a Stokes-Einstein-like behavior (D ∝ 1/R) of membrane protein diffusion at small protein radii. In this study, we investigate protein diffusion in black lipid membranes using dual-focus fluorescence correlation spectroscopy. This technique yields highly accurate diffusion coefficients for lipid and protein diffusion in membranes. We find that despite its simplicity, the Saffman-Delbrück model is able to describe protein diffusion extremely well and a Stokes-Einstein-like behavior can be ruled out. PMID:23870266

  9. Scanning fluorescence correlation spectroscopy as a versatile tool to measure static and dynamic properties of soft matter systems.

    PubMed

    Nepal, Manish; Oyler-Yaniv, Alon; Krichevsky, Oleg

    2015-12-14

    We present the formalism and experimental implementation of scanning fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (SFCS) for the measurements of soft matter system structure and dynamics. We relate the SFCS function Fourier transform to the system intermediate scattering function and demonstrate how SFCS can be combined with specific labelling to measure the desired statistical and kinetic features of the system. Using DNA as a model polymer, we demonstrate the application of SFCS to measure (1) the static structure factor of the system, (2) polymer end-to-end distance distribution, and (3) polymer segmental dynamics in dilute and in dense solutions. The measured DNA end-to-end distance distributions are close to Gaussian. Implementing SFCS we obtain reliable data on segmental mean-square displacement kinetics in dense solutions, where the static FCS approach fails because of dye photobleaching. For moderate concentrations in the semidilute regime (at ∼7 overlap concentrations) segmental dynamics exhibit only weak entanglements. Both of these experimental findings are consistent with theoretical predictions of the weakness of excluded interactions in semiflexible polymers.

  10. Scanning fluorescence correlation spectroscopy as a versatile tool to measure static and dynamic properties of soft matter systems.

    PubMed

    Nepal, Manish; Oyler-Yaniv, Alon; Krichevsky, Oleg

    2015-12-14

    We present the formalism and experimental implementation of scanning fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (SFCS) for the measurements of soft matter system structure and dynamics. We relate the SFCS function Fourier transform to the system intermediate scattering function and demonstrate how SFCS can be combined with specific labelling to measure the desired statistical and kinetic features of the system. Using DNA as a model polymer, we demonstrate the application of SFCS to measure (1) the static structure factor of the system, (2) polymer end-to-end distance distribution, and (3) polymer segmental dynamics in dilute and in dense solutions. The measured DNA end-to-end distance distributions are close to Gaussian. Implementing SFCS we obtain reliable data on segmental mean-square displacement kinetics in dense solutions, where the static FCS approach fails because of dye photobleaching. For moderate concentrations in the semidilute regime (at ∼7 overlap concentrations) segmental dynamics exhibit only weak entanglements. Both of these experimental findings are consistent with theoretical predictions of the weakness of excluded interactions in semiflexible polymers. PMID:26406382

  11. Deoxycholate induced tetramer of αA-crystallin and sites of phosphorylation: Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy and femtosecond solvation dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chowdhury, Aritra; Mojumdar, Supratik Sen; Choudhury, Aparajita; Banerjee, Rajat; Das, Kali Pada; Sasmal, Dibyendu Kumar; Bhattacharyya, Kankan

    2012-04-01

    Structure and dynamics of acrylodan labeled αA-crystallin tetramer formed in the presence of a bile salt (sodium deoxycholate, NaDC) has been studied using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) and femtosecond up-conversion techniques. Using FCS it is shown that, the diffusion constant (Dt) of the αA-crystallin oligomer (mass ˜800 kDa) increases from ˜35 μm2 s-1 to ˜68 μm2 s-1. This corresponds to a decrease in hydrodynamic radius (rh) from ˜6.9 nm to ˜3.3 nm. This corresponds to about 10-fold decrease in molecular mass to ˜80 kDa and suggests formation of a tetramer (since mass of αA-crystallin monomer is ˜20 kDa). The steady state emission maximum and average solvation time (<τs>) of acrylodan labeled at cysteine 131 position of αA-crystallin is markedly affected on addition of NaDC, while the tryptophan (trp-9) becomes more exposed. This suggests that NaDC binds near the cys-131 and makes the terminal region of αA-crystallin exposed. This may explain the enhanced auto-phosphorylation activity of αA-crystallin near the terminus of the 173 amino acid protein (e.g., at the threonine 13, serine 45, or serine 169 and 172) and suggests that phosphorylation at ser-122 (close to cys-131) is relatively less important.

  12. The oligomeric state and stability of the mannitol transporter, EnzymeIImtl, from Escherichia coli: A fluorescence correlation spectroscopy study

    PubMed Central

    Veldhuis, Gertjan; Hink, Mark; Krasnikov, Victor; van den Bogaart, Geert; Hoeboer, Jeroen; Visser, Antonie J.W.G.; Broos, Jaap; Poolman, Bert

    2006-01-01

    Numerous membrane proteins function as oligomers both at the structural and functional levels. The mannitol transporter from Escherichia coli, EnzymeIImtl, is a member of the phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent phosphotransferase system. During the transport cycle, mannitol is phosphorylated and released into the cytoplasm as mannitol-1-phosphate. Several studies have shown that EIImtl functions as an oligomeric species. However, the oligomerization number and stability of the oligomeric complex during different steps of the catalytic cycle, e.g., substrate binding and/or phosphorylation of the carrier, is still under discussion. In this paper, we have addressed the oligomeric state and stability of EIImtl using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy. A functional double-cysteine mutant was site-specifically labeled with either Alexa Fluor 488 or Alexa Fluor 633. The subunit exchange of these two batches of proteins was followed in time during different steps of the catalytic cycle. The most important conclusions are that (1) in a detergent-solubilized state, EIImtl is functional as a very stable dimer; (2) the stability of the complex can be manipulated by changing the intermicellar attractive forces between PEG-based detergent micelles; (3) substrate binding destabilizes the complex whereas phosphorylation increases the stability; and (4) substrate binding to the phosphorylated species partly antagonizes the stabilizing effect. PMID:16823033

  13. Analysis of ER–mitochondria contacts using correlative fluorescence microscopy and soft X-ray tomography of mammalian cells

    PubMed Central

    Elgass, Kirstin D.; Smith, Elizabeth A.; LeGros, Mark A.; Larabell, Carolyn A.; Ryan, Michael T.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Mitochondrial fission is important for organelle transport, quality control and apoptosis. Changes to the fission process can result in a wide variety of neurological diseases. In mammals, mitochondrial fission is executed by the GTPase dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1; encoded by DNM1L), which oligomerizes around mitochondria and constricts the organelle. The mitochondrial outer membrane proteins Mff, MiD49 (encoded by MIEF2) and MiD51 (encoded by MIEF1) are involved in mitochondrial fission by recruiting Drp1 from the cytosol to the organelle surface. In addition, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) tubules have been shown to wrap around and constrict mitochondria before a fission event. Up to now, the presence of MiD49 and MiD51 at ER–mitochondrial division foci has not been established. Here, we combine confocal live-cell imaging with correlative cryogenic fluorescence microscopy and soft x-ray tomography to link MiD49 and MiD51 to the involvement of the ER in mitochondrial fission. We gain further insight into this complex process and characterize the 3D structure of ER–mitochondria contact sites. PMID:26101352

  14. Electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopic measurement of Mn2+ binding affinities to the hammerhead ribozyme and correlation with cleavage activity.

    PubMed

    Horton, T E; Clardy, D R; DeRose, V J

    1998-12-22

    Efficient phosphodiester bond cleavage activity by the hammerhead ribozyme requires divalent cations. Toward understanding this metal ion requirement, the Mn2+-binding properties of hammerhead model ribozymes have been investigated under dilute solution conditions, using electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy (EPR) to detect free Mn2+ in the presence of added ribozyme. Numbers and affinities of bound Mn2+ were obtained at pH 7.8 (5 mM triethanolamine) in the presence of 0, 0.1, and 1.0 M NaCl for an RNA-DNA model consisting of a 13-nucleotide DNA "substrate" hybridized to a 34-nucleotide RNA "enzyme" [Pley, H. W., Flaherty, K. M., and McKay, D. B. (1994) Nature 372, 68-74]. In 0.1 M NaCl, two classes of Mn2+ sites are found with n1 = 3.7 +/- 0.4, Kd(1) = 4 +/- 1 microM (type 1) and n2 = 5.2 +/- 0.4, Kd(2) = 460 +/- 130 microM (type 2). The high-affinity type 1 sites are confirmed for an active RNA-RNA hybrid (34-nucleotide RNA enzyme:13-nucleotide RNA substrate) by EPR measurements at low Mn2+ concentrations. Decreasing NaCl concentration results in an increased number of bound Mn2+ per hammerhead. By contrast, a binding titration in 1 M NaCl indicates that a single Mn2+ site with apparent Kd approximately 10 microM is populated in low concentrations of Mn2+, and apparent cooperative effects at higher Mn2+ concentrations result in population of a similar total number of Mn2+ sites (n1 = 8-10) as found in 0.1 M NaCl. Mn2+-dependent activity profiles are similar for the active RNA-RNA hybrid in 0.1 and 1 M NaCl. Correlation with binding affinities determined by EPR indicates that hammerhead activity in 0.1 M NaCl is only observed after all four of the high-affinity Mn2+ sites are occupied, rises with population of the type 2 sites, and is independent of Mn2+ concentrations corresponding to > 8-9 Mn2+ bound per hammerhead. Equivalent measurements in 1 M NaCl demonstrate a rise in activity with the cooperative transition observed in the Mn2+ binding curve. These

  15. Correlated matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry and fluorescent imaging of photocleavable peptide-coded random bead-arrays

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Mark J; Liu, Ziying; Braunschweiger, Karen I; Awad, Amany; Rothschild, Kenneth J

    2013-01-01

    RATIONALE Rapidly performing global proteomic screens is an important goal in the post-genomic era. Correlated matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) and fluorescent imaging of photocleavable peptide-coded random bead-arrays was evaluated as a critical step in a new method for proteomic screening that combines many of the advantages of MS with fluorescence-based microarrays. METHODS Small peptide-coded model bead libraries containing up to 20 different bead species were constructed by attaching peptides to 30–34 µm diameter glass, agarose or TentaGel® beads using photocleavable biotin or a custom-designed photocleavable linker. The peptide-coded bead libraries were randomly arrayed into custom gold-coated micro-well plates with 45 µm diameter wells and subjected to fluorescence and MALDI mass spectrometric imaging (MALDI-MSI). RESULTS Photocleavable mass-tags from individual beads in these libraries were spatially localized as ∼65 µm spots using MALDI-MSI with high sensitivity and mass resolution. Fluorescently tagged beads were identified and correlated with their matching photocleavable mass-tags by comparing the fluorescence and MALDI-MS images of the same bead-array. Post-translational modification of the peptide Kemptide was also detected on individual beads in a photocleavable peptide-coded bead-array by MALDI-MSI alone, after exposure of the beads to protein kinase A (PKA). CONCLUSIONS Correlated MALDI-MS and fluorescent imaging of photocleavable peptide-coded random bead-arrays can provide a basis for performing global proteomic screening. © 2013 The Authors. Rapid Communications in Mass Spectrometry published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:24285390

  16. Airborne simultaneous spectroscopic detection of laser-induced water Raman backscatter and fluorescence from chlorophyll a and other naturally occurring pigments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoge, F. E.; Swift, R. N.

    1981-01-01

    The airborne laser-induced spectral emission bands obtained simultaneously from water Raman backscatter and the fluorescence of chlorophyll and other naturally occurring waterborne pigments are reported here for the first time. The importance of this type data lies not only in its single-shot multispectral character but also in the application of the Raman line for correction or calibration of the spatial variation of the laser penetration depth without the need for in situ water attenuation measurements. The entire laser-induced fluorescence and Raman scatter emissions resulting from each separate 532-nm 10-nsec laser pulse are collected and spectrally dispersed in a diffraction grating spectrometer having forty photomultiplier tube detectors. Results from field experiments conducted in the North Sea and the Chesapeake Bay/Potomac River are presented. Difficulties involving the multispectral resolution of the induced emissions are addressed, and feasible solutions are suggested together with new instrument configurations and future research directions.

  17. Spectroscopic investigation on interaction and sonodynamic damage of Riboflavin to DNA under ultrasonic irradiation by using Methylene Blue as fluorescent probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qi; Wu, Qiong; Wang, Jun; Chen, Dandan; Fan, Ping; Wang, Baoxin

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, the Riboflavin (RF) as a sonosensitizer and Methylene Blue (MB) as a fluorescent probe were used to study the interaction and sonodynamic damage to Deoxyribonucleic Acid (DNA) by fluorescence and UV-vis spectroscopy. The results showed that the RF could efficiently bind to DNA in aqueous solution and exchange with the MB through competing reaction. And then, under ultrasonic irradiation, the RF could obviously damage the DNA. In addition, the influencing factors such as ultrasonic irradiation time and RF concentration on the sonodynamic damage to DNA were also considered. The experimental results showed that the sonodynamic damage degree increase with the increase of ultrasonic irradiation time and RF concentration. Perhaps, this paper may offer some important subjects for broadening the application of RF in sonodynamic therapy (SDT) technologies for tumor treatment.

  18. Tumor Angiogenesis Change Estimated by Using Diffuse Optical Spectroscopic Tomography: Demonstrated Correlation in Women Undergoing Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy for Invasive Breast Cancer?

    PubMed Central

    Pakalniskis, Marius G.; Schwab, Mary C.; Froehlich, Heather M.; Jiang, Shudong; Li, Zhongze; Tosteson, Tor D.; Poplack, Steven P.; Kaufman, Peter A.; Pogue, Brian W.; Paulsen, Keith D.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate if changes in tumor angiogenesis associated with complete pathologic response (pCR) or partial pathologic response (pPR) to treatment can be demonstrated by using diffuse optical spectroscopic (DOS) tomography. Materials and Methods: All participants in this prospective, HIPAA-compliant, institutional review board–approved study provided written informed consent. Eleven women with invasive breast carcinoma were imaged with DOS tomography prior to, during, and at completion of neoadjuvant chemotherapeutic regimens. By using region of interest (ROI) analysis, the DOS measure of total tissue hemoglobin (HbT) was temporally correlated with quantitative measures of existing (CD31-expressing) and tumor-induced (CD105-expressing) vessels, in pretreatment and posttreatment tissue specimens, to assess change. Results: Quantified angiogenesis alone in pretreatment core biopsy specimens did not predict treatment response, but mean vessel density (MVD) and mean vessel area (MVA) of CD105-expressing vessels were significantly decreased in women with pCR (n = 7) (P < .001 and P = .003, respectively). MVA of CD105-expressing vessels was also significantly reduced at comparison of pre- and posttreatment residual tumor for women with pPR (n = 4) (P = .033). A longitudinal analysis showed significant decreases (P = .001) in mean HbT levels during neoadjuvant chemotherapy in breast abnormality ROIs for women with pCR but not women with pPR. For women with pCR, but not women with pPR, pretreatment MVD of CD105-expressing vessels correlated with pretreatment HbT (P ≤ .001). Conclusion: DOS tomographic examinations in women with breast cancer who are receiving neoadjuvant chemotherapy show a mean decrease in HbT with time in patients with pCR only. Observed pretreatment and posttreatment correlates with quantified angiogenesis markers confirm the likely biologic origin for this DOS signature and support its potential to predict angiogenic tissue response

  19. Live-cell fluorescence correlation spectroscopy dissects the role of coregulator exchange and chromatin binding in retinoic acid receptor mobility

    PubMed Central

    Brazda, Peter; Szekeres, Tibor; Bravics, Balázs; Tóth, Katalin; Vámosi, György; Nagy, Laszlo

    2011-01-01

    The retinoic acid receptor (RAR) is a member of the nuclear receptor superfamily. This ligand-inducible transcription factor binds to DNA as a heterodimer with the retinoid X receptor (RXR) in the nucleus. The nucleus is a dynamic compartment and live-cell imaging techniques make it possible to investigate transcription factor action in real-time. We studied the diffusion of EGFP–RAR by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) to uncover the molecular interactions determining receptor mobility. In the absence of ligand, we identified two distinct species with different mobilities. The fast component has a diffusion coefficient of D1=1.8–6.0 μm2/second corresponding to small oligomeric forms, whereas the slow component with D2=0.05–0.10 μm2/second corresponds to interactions of RAR with the chromatin or other large structures. The RAR ligand-binding-domain fragment also has a slow component, probably as a result of indirect DNA-binding through RXR, with lower affinity than the intact RAR–RXR complex. Importantly, RAR-agonist treatment shifts the equilibrium towards the slow population of the wild-type receptor, but without significantly changing the mobility of either the fast or the slow population. By using a series of mutant forms of the receptor with altered DNA- or coregulator-binding capacity we found that the slow component is probably related to chromatin binding, and that coregulator exchange, specifically the binding of the coactivator complex, is the main determinant contributing to the redistribution of RAR during ligand activation. PMID:22045737

  20. Investigation of the Dimerization of Proteins from the Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Family by Single Wavelength Fluorescence Cross-Correlation Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ping; Sudhaharan, Thankiah; Koh, Rosita M. L.; Hwang, Ling C.; Ahmed, Sohail; Maruyama, Ichiro N.; Wohland, Thorsten

    2007-01-01

    Single wavelength fluorescence cross-correlation spectroscopy (SW-FCCS), introduced to study biomolecular interactions, has recently been reported to monitor enzyme activity by using a newly developed fluorescent protein variant together with cyan fluorescent protein. Here, for the first time to our knowledge, SW-FCCS is applied to detect interactions between membrane receptors in vivo by using the widely used enhanced green fluorescent protein and monomeric red fluorescent protein. The biological system studied here is the epidermal growth factor/ErbB receptor family, which plays pivotal roles in the development of organisms ranging from worms to humans. It is widely thought that a ligand binds to the monomeric form of the receptor and induces its dimeric form for activation. By using SW-FCCS and Förster resonance energy transfer, we show that the epidermal growth factor receptor and ErbB2 have preformed homo- and heterodimeric structures on the cell surface and quantitation of dimer fractions is performed by SW-FCCS. These receptors are major targets of anti-cancer drug development, and the receptors' homo- and heterodimeric structures are relevant for such developments. PMID:17468161

  1. Spectroscopic investigation of fluorescence quenching agents. Part III: Effect of solvent polarity on the selectivity of nitromethane for discriminating between alternate versus nonalternant polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Tucker, S.A.; Acree, W.E. Jr. ); Fetzer, J.C. ); Harvey, R.G. ); Tanga, M.J. ); Cheng, P.C.; Scott, L.T. )

    1993-06-01

    To better assess the applicability of nitromethane as a selective quenching agent for alternant versus nonalternant polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in HPLC, TLC, and HPTLC analysis, the authors measured the effect that it has on the fluorescence emission behavior of 96 different polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons dissolved in binary toluene/acetonitrile solvent mixtures. Results of these measurements revealed that the [open quotes]selective quenching[close quotes] rule is obeyed for the vast majority of PAHs, with the coronene derivatives being the only major exceptions. Fluorescence emission spectra are also reported for benzo[g]chrysene, naphtho[2,3g]chrysene, 4H-benzo[c]cyclo-penta[mno]chrysene, dibenzo[ghi,mno]fluoranthene (commonly called corannulene), rubicene, diacenaphtho[1,2j:1',2']fluoranthene, 10-methyl-benzo[b]fluoranthene, 3-methoxybenzo[k]fluoranthene, and 3-hydroxy-benzo[k]fluoranthene in organic nonelectrolyte solvents of varying polarity. Calculated emission intensity ratios failed to vary systematically with solvent polarity, and all nine of the aforementioned solutes were thus classified as nonprobe molecules. 63 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. Absorption and fluorescence emission spectroscopic characters of naphtho-homologated yy-DNA bases and effect of methanol solution and base pairing.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Laibin; Li, Huifang; Li, Jilai; Chen, Xiaohua; Bu, Yuxiang

    2010-03-01

    A comprehensive theoretical study of electronic transitions of naphtho-homologated base analogs, namely, yy-T, yy-C, yy-A, and yy-G, was performed. The nature of the low-lying excited states is discussed, and the results are compared with those from experiment and also with those of y-bases. Geometrical characteristics of the lowest excited singlet pipi* and npi* states were explored using the CIS method, and the effects of methanol solution and paring with their complementary natural bases on the relevant absorption and emission spectra of these modified bases were examined. The calculated excitation and emission energies agree well with the measured data, where experimental results are available. In methanol solution, the fluorescence from yy-A and yy-G would be expected to occur around 539 and 562 nm, respectively, suggesting that yy-A is a green-colored fluorophore, whereas yy-G is a yellow-colored fluorophore. The methanol solution was found to red-shift both the absorption and emission maxima of yy-A, yy-T, and yy-C, but blue-shift those for yy-G. Generally, though base pairing has no significant effects on the absorption and fluorescence maxima of yy-A, yy-C, and yy-T, it blue-shifts those for yy-G.

  3. Fate of biopolymers during rapeseed meal and wheat bran composting as studied by two-dimensional correlation spectroscopy in combination with multiple fluorescence labeling techniques.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li-Ping; Shen, Qi-Rong; Yu, Guang-Hui; Ran, Wei; Xu, Yang-Chun

    2012-02-01

    Detailed knowledge of the molecular events during composting is important in improving the efficiency of this process. By combining two-dimensional Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) correlation spectroscopy and multiple fluorescent labeling, it was possible to study the degradation of biopolymers during rapeseed meal and wheat bran composting. Two-dimensional FTIR correlation spectroscopy provided structural information and was used to deconvolute overlapping bands found in the compost FTIR spectra. The degradation of biopolymers in rapeseed meal and wheat bran composts followed the sequence: cellulose, heteropolysaccharides, and proteins. Fluorescent labeling suggested that cellulose formed an intact network-like structure and the other biopolymers were embedded in the core of this structure. The sequence of degradation of biopolymers during composting was related to their distribution patterns.

  4. Solvents effect on the absorption and fluorescence spectra of 7-diethylamino-3-thenoylcoumarin: Evaluation and correlation between solvatochromism and solvent polarity parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basavaraja, Jana; Inamdar, S. R.; Suresh Kumar, H. M.

    2015-02-01

    Effect of solvents of varying polarities on absorption and fluorescence spectra and dipole moment of laser dye: 7-diethylamino-3-thenoylcoumarin (DETC) has been investigated. A small band shift is obtained in the absorption spectra compared to emission spectra. The spectral shifts were correlated with Catalan's parameters using linear solvation energy relationship. It reveals that non-specific interaction measured by solvent polarity has more influence on absorption and solvent dipolarity contribution is significant in case of fluorescence. A bathochromic shift observed in absorption and emission spectra with increasing solvent polarity, which implied that the transition involved is π → π∗. The solvatochromic correlations were used to estimate the excited state dipole moment using experimentally determined ground state dipole moment. The observed single-state excited state dipole moment is found to be greater than the ground state.

  5. Fate of biopolymers during rapeseed meal and wheat bran composting as studied by two-dimensional correlation spectroscopy in combination with multiple fluorescence labeling techniques.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li-Ping; Shen, Qi-Rong; Yu, Guang-Hui; Ran, Wei; Xu, Yang-Chun

    2012-02-01

    Detailed knowledge of the molecular events during composting is important in improving the efficiency of this process. By combining two-dimensional Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) correlation spectroscopy and multiple fluorescent labeling, it was possible to study the degradation of biopolymers during rapeseed meal and wheat bran composting. Two-dimensional FTIR correlation spectroscopy provided structural information and was used to deconvolute overlapping bands found in the compost FTIR spectra. The degradation of biopolymers in rapeseed meal and wheat bran composts followed the sequence: cellulose, heteropolysaccharides, and proteins. Fluorescent labeling suggested that cellulose formed an intact network-like structure and the other biopolymers were embedded in the core of this structure. The sequence of degradation of biopolymers during composting was related to their distribution patterns. PMID:22182472

  6. Correlative and integrated light and electron microscopy of in-resin GFP fluorescence, used to localise diacylglycerol in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Peddie, Christopher J; Blight, Ken; Wilson, Emma; Melia, Charlotte; Marrison, Jo; Carzaniga, Raffaella; Domart, Marie-Charlotte; O'Toole, Peter; Larijani, Banafshe; Collinson, Lucy M

    2014-08-01

    Fluorescence microscopy of GFP-tagged proteins is a fundamental tool in cell biology, but without seeing the structure of the surrounding cellular space, functional information can be lost. Here we present a protocol that preserves GFP and mCherry fluorescence in mammalian cells embedded in resin with electron contrast to reveal cellular ultrastructure. Ultrathin in-resin fluorescence (IRF) sections were imaged simultaneously for fluorescence and electron signals in an integrated light and scanning electron microscope. We show, for the first time, that GFP is stable and active in resin sections in vacuo. We applied our protocol to study the subcellular localisation of diacylglycerol (DAG), a modulator of membrane morphology and membrane dynamics in nuclear envelope assembly. We show that DAG is localised to the nuclear envelope, nucleoplasmic reticulum and curved tips of the Golgi apparatus. With these developments, we demonstrate that integrated imaging is maturing into a powerful tool for accurate molecular localisation to structure.

  7. Critical step-by-step approaches toward correlative fluorescence/soft X-ray cryo-microscopy of adherent mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Dent, Kyle C; Hagen, Christoph; Grünewald, Kay

    2014-01-01

    Soft X-ray cryo-microscopy/tomography with its extraordinary capability to map vitreous cells with high absorption contrast in their full three-dimensional extent, and at a resolution exceeding super-resolution fluorescence microscopy, is a valuable tool for integrative structural cell biology. Focusing on cell biological applications, its ongoing methodological development gained momentum by combining it with fluorescence cryo-microscopy, thus correlating highly resolved structural and specific information in situ. In this chapter, we provide a basic description of the techniques, as well as an overview of equipment and methods available to carry out correlative soft X-ray cryo-tomography experiments on frozen-hydrated cells grown on a planar support. Our aim here is to suggest ways that biologically representative data can be recorded to the highest possible resolution, while also keeping in mind the limitations of the technique during data acquisition and analysis. We have written from our perspective as electron cryo-microscopists/structural cell biologists who have experience using correlative fluorescence/cryoXM/T at synchrotron beamlines presently available for external users in Europe (HZB TXM at U41-FSGM, BESSY II, Berlin/Germany; Carl Zeiss TXMs at MISTRAL, ALBA, Barcelona/Spain, and B24, DLS, Oxfordshire, UK). PMID:25287842

  8. Super-resolution Stimulated Emission Depletion-Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy Reveals Nanoscale Membrane Reorganization Induced by Pore-Forming Proteins.

    PubMed

    Sarangi, Nirod Kumar; P, Ilanila I; Ayappa, K G; Visweswariah, Sandhya S; Basu, Jaydeep Kumar

    2016-09-20

    Membrane-protein interactions play a central role in membrane mediated cellular processes ranging from signaling, budding, and fusion, to transport across the cell membrane. Of particular significance is the process of efficient protein olgomerization and transmembrane pore formation on the membrane surface; the primary virulent pathway for the action of antimicrobial peptides and pore forming toxins (PFTs). The suggested nanoscopic length scales and dynamic nature of such membrane lipid-protein interactions makes their detection extremely challenging. Using a combination of super-resolution stimulated emission depletion nanoscopy with fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (STED-FCS) we unravel the emergence of nanoscale lateral heterogeneity in supported bilayer membranes made up of 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DOPC) and cholesterol upon interaction with the PFT, listeriolysin O (LLO). A distinct length scale-dependent dynamical crossover (<200 nm) from a Brownian diffusive regime is observed at 33 and 50% cholesterol compositions, indicating the partitioning of lipids into domains with variable cholesterol content. At 25% cholesterol content, this dyamical crossover is observed only in bilayers incubated with LLO providing evidence for the existence of sub ∼100 nm dynamical lipid nanodomains bound to LLO pore assemblies. By introducing asymmetry in cholesterol composition across the bilayer leaflets we infer that this domain formation is driven largely due to active cholesterol sequestration and transient trapping of lipids to the membrane bound motifs present in the toxins, en route to LLO oligomerization and subsequent pore formation. Bilayers prepared with labeled lipids present in either the proximal or distal leaflet allow us to track the dynamical perturbation in a leaflet-dependent manner upon LLO incubation. From the differences in the extent and intensity of the dynamical crossover as observed with STED-FCS, these experiments reveal that

  9. A spectroscopic proton-exchange membrane fuel cell test setup allowing fluorescence x-ray absorption spectroscopy measurements during state-of-the-art cell tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrova, Olga; Kulp, Christian; van den Berg, Maurits W. E.; Klementiev, Konstantin V.; Otto, Bruno; Otto, Horst; Lopez, Marco; Bron, Michael; Grünert, Wolfgang

    2011-04-01

    A test setup for membrane-electrode-assemblies (MEAs) of proton exchange membrane fuel cells which allows in situ fluorescence x-ray absorption spectroscopy studies of one electrode with safe exclusion of contributions from the counter electrode is described. Interference by the counter electrode is excluded by a geometry including a small angle of incidence (< 6°) between primary beam and electrode layer. The cell has been constructed by introducing just minor modifications to an electrochemical state-of-the-art MEA test setup, which ensures realistic electrochemical test conditions. This is at the expense of significant intensity losses in the path of the incident beam, which calls for the brilliance of third-generation synchrotrons to provide meaningful data. In measurements on Pt/C and Pt-Co/C cathodes combined with Pt-C anodes (H2/O2 feed), good data quality was demonstrated both for the majority element Pt as well as for Co despite of a low areal Co density in the order of 0.02 mg/cm2.

  10. Synthesis, crystal structure, spectroscopic, fluorescent, thermal properties and EPR spectra of doped Cu2+ ions in [Cd(sac)2(H2O)2(meim)2] single crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fidan, M.; Semerci, F.; Şahin, E.; Yeşilel, O. Z.; Tapramaz, R.; Şahin, Y.

    2013-06-01

    The crystal structures of the six-coordinate complexes [Cd(sac)2(H2O)2(meim)2] (complex 1) formed by reaction of 4-methylimidazole(meim) with [Cd(sac)2(H2O)4]·2H2O (saccharinate = sac), was synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, infrared (IR) and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy, thermal analysis and X-ray single crystal diffraction. X-ray diffraction analysis revealed that complex 1 crystallized in the monoclinic crystal system with space group P21/c. The Cd(II) center was six-coordinated with four nitrogen atoms from two sac and two 4-meim ligands, two oxygen atoms from two aqua ligands. Spectral and thermal analysis data for complex 1 was in agreement with the crystal structures. In addition complex 1 displayed blue fluorescent emission in the solid state at room temperature. Single crystal EPR spectra at room temperature are resolved and have exhibited that two different Cu2+ complexes were located in different chemical environments which contained two magnetically nonequivalent Cu2+ sites. In low temperature EPR spectra down to 110 °C did show no considerable change. At higher temperatures, however, both thermo gravimetric analyses (TGA) and EPR spectra showed detectable changes around 140 °C; the causes and the mechanisms of changes are discussed.

  11. Structural alterations induced by photodynamic action of hematoporphyrin derivative (HpD) in plasma membrane of glioblastoma (U-87MG) cells: time dependent fluorescence spectroscopic study.

    PubMed

    Joshi, K; Joshi, P G; Joshi, N B

    1995-08-01

    Photodynamic action of hematoporphyrin derivative (HpD) on the plasma membrane of human glioblastoma U-87MG cells was investigated using lipid and protein specific fluorescent probes trimethylammonium-1,6-diphenyl 1,3,5-hexatriene (TMA-DPH) and N-(1-pyrene)-maleimide (PM) respectively. Steady state anisotropy, decay time and time dependent anisotropy of these probes in U-87MG cells were measured. Light irradiation caused an increase in the steady state anisotropy of TMA-DPH in cells treated with HpD; however, no change in decay time was observed. Time dependent anisotropy measurements were performed and the data were analyzed using wobbling in cone model. A decrease in the rotational relaxation time (phi) as well as the cone angle (theta(c)) and an increase in the order parameter (S) of TMA-DPH were observed on photosensitization of cells. A decrease in the order parameter (S) of TMA-DPH were observed on photosensitization of cells. A decrease in the steady rate anisotropy and the rotational relaxation time (phi) of PM and enhancement in the lipid peroxidation were also observed. Our results show that the photodynamic action of HpD increases the order in the lipid bilayer and the mobility of the proteins in the plasma membrane of cells. PMID:8655188

  12. DNA cleavage, antimicrobial, spectroscopic and fluorescence studies of Co(II), Ni(II) and Cu(II) complexes with SNO donor coumarin Schiff bases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patil, Sangamesh A.; Naik, Vinod H.; Kulkarni, Ajaykumar D.; Badami, Prema S.

    2010-01-01

    A series of Co(II), Ni(II) and Cu(II) complexes of the type ML 2 have been synthesized with Schiff bases derived from methylthiosemicarbazone and 5-formyl-6-hydroxy coumarin/8-formyl-7-Hydroxy-4-methylcoumarin. The complexes are insoluble in common organic solvents but soluble in DMF and DMSO. The measured molar conductance values in DMF indicate that, the complexes are non-electrolytes in nature. In view of analytical, spectral (IR, UV-vis, ESR, FAB-mass and fluorescence), magnetic and thermal studies, it has been concluded that, all the metal complexes possess octahedral geometry in which ligand is coordinated to metal ion through azomethine nitrogen, thione sulphur and phenolic oxygen atom via deprotonation. The redox behavior of the metal complexes was investigated by using cyclic voltammetry. The Schiff bases and their complexes have been screened for their antibacterial ( Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Salmonella typhi) and antifungal activities ( Aspergillus niger, Aspergillus flavus and Cladosporium) by Minimum Inhibitory Concentration method. The DNA cleavage is studied by agarose gel electrophoresis method.

  13. Comparison of one-particle basis set extrapolation to explicitly correlated methods for the calculation of accurate quartic force fields, vibrational frequencies, and spectroscopic constants: application to H2O, N2H+, NO2+, and C2H2.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xinchuan; Valeev, Edward F; Lee, Timothy J

    2010-12-28

    One-particle basis set extrapolation is compared with one of the new R12 methods for computing highly accurate quartic force fields (QFFs) and spectroscopic data, including molecular structures, rotational constants, and vibrational frequencies for the H(2)O, N(2)H(+), NO(2)(+), and C(2)H(2) molecules. In general, agreement between the spectroscopic data computed from the best R12 and basis set extrapolation methods is very good with the exception of a few parameters for N(2)H(+) where it is concluded that basis set extrapolation is still preferred. The differences for H(2)O and NO(2)(+) are small and it is concluded that the QFFs from both approaches are more or less equivalent in accuracy. For C(2)H(2), however, a known one-particle basis set deficiency for C-C multiple bonds significantly degrades the quality of results obtained from basis set extrapolation and in this case the R12 approach is clearly preferred over one-particle basis set extrapolation. The R12 approach used in the present study was modified in order to obtain high precision electronic energies, which are needed when computing a QFF. We also investigated including core-correlation explicitly in the R12 calculations, but conclude that current approaches are lacking. Hence core-correlation is computed as a correction using conventional methods. Considering the results for all four molecules, it is concluded that R12 methods will soon replace basis set extrapolation approaches for high accuracy electronic structure applications such as computing QFFs and spectroscopic data for comparison to high-resolution laboratory or astronomical observations, provided one uses a robust R12 method as we have done here. The specific R12 method used in the present study, CCSD(T)(R12), incorporated a reformulation of one intermediate matrix in order to attain machine precision in the electronic energies. Final QFFs for N(2)H(+) and NO(2)(+) were computed, including basis set extrapolation, core-correlation, scalar

  14. Note: A 4 ns hardware photon correlator based on a general-purpose field-programmable gate array development board implemented in a compact setup for fluorescence correlation spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalinin, Stanislav; Kühnemuth, Ralf; Vardanyan, Hayk; Seidel, Claus A. M.

    2012-09-01

    We present a fast hardware photon correlator implemented in a field-programmable gate array (FPGA) combined with a compact confocal fluorescence setup. The correlator has two independent units with a time resolution of 4 ns while utilizing less than 15% of a low-end FPGA. The device directly accepts transistor-transistor logic (TTL) signals from two photon counting detectors and calculates two auto- or cross-correlation curves in real time. Test measurements demonstrate that the performance of our correlator is comparable with the current generation of commercial devices. The sensitivity of the optical setup is identical or even superior to current commercial devices. The FPGA design and the optical setup both allow for a straightforward extension to multi-color applications. This inexpensive and compact solution with a very good performance can serve as a versatile platform for uses in education, applied sciences, and basic research.

  15. Multimodal nanoparticles as alignment and correlation markers in fluorescence/soft X-ray cryo-microscopy/tomography of nucleoplasmic reticulum and apoptosis in mammalian cells

    PubMed Central

    Hagen, Christoph; Werner, Stephan; Carregal-Romero, Susana; N. Malhas, Ashraf; G. Klupp, Barbara; Guttmann, Peter; Rehbein, Stefan; Henzler, Katja; C. Mettenleiter, Thomas; J. Vaux, David; J. Parak, Wolfgang; Schneider, Gerd; Grünewald, Kay

    2014-01-01

    Correlative fluorescence and soft X-ray cryo-microscopy/tomography on flat sample holders is perfectly suited to study the uncompromised physiological status of adherent cells at its best possible preservation by imaging after fast cryo-immobilization. To understand the mechanism by which herpesviruses induce nucleoplasmic reticulum, i.e. invaginations of the nuclear envelope, during their egress from the host cell nucleus, morphologically similar structures found in laminopathies and after chemical induction were investigated as a potentially more easily accessible model system. For example, anti-retroviral protease inhibitors like Saquinavir also induce invaginations of the nuclear membranes. With the help of newly designed multimodal nanoparticles as alignment and correlation markers, and by optimizing fluorescence cryo-microscopy data acquisition, an elaborate three-dimensional network of nucleoplasmic reticulum was demonstrated in nuclei of Saquinavir-treated rabbit kidney cells expressing a fluorescently labeled inner nuclear membrane protein. In part of the protease inhibitor-treated samples, nuclei exhibited dramatic ultrastructural changes indicative of programmed cell death/apoptosis. This unexpected observation highlights another unique feature of soft X-ray microscopy, i.e. high absorption contrast information not relying on labeled cellular components, at a 3D resolution of approximately 40 nm (half-pitch) and through a sample thickness of several micrometers. These properties make it a valuable part of the cell biology imaging toolbox to visualize the cellular ultrastructure in its completeness. PMID:24973653

  16. Multimodal nanoparticles as alignment and correlation markers in fluorescence/soft X-ray cryo-microscopy/tomography of nucleoplasmic reticulum and apoptosis in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Hagen, Christoph; Werner, Stephan; Carregal-Romero, Susana; N Malhas, Ashraf; G Klupp, Barbara; Guttmann, Peter; Rehbein, Stefan; Henzler, Katja; C Mettenleiter, Thomas; J Vaux, David; J Parak, Wolfgang; Schneider, Gerd; Grünewald, Kay

    2014-11-01

    Correlative fluorescence and soft X-ray cryo-microscopy/tomography on flat sample holders is perfectly suited to study the uncompromised physiological status of adherent cells at its best possible preservation by imaging after fast cryo-immobilization. To understand the mechanism by which herpesviruses induce nucleoplasmic reticulum, i.e. invaginations of the nuclear envelope, during their egress from the host cell nucleus, morphologically similar structures found in laminopathies and after chemical induction were investigated as a potentially more easily accessible model system. For example, anti-retroviral protease inhibitors like Saquinavir also induce invaginations of the nuclear membranes. With the help of newly designed multimodal nanoparticles as alignment and correlation markers, and by optimizing fluorescence cryo-microscopy data acquisition, an elaborate three-dimensional network of nucleoplasmic reticulum was demonstrated in nuclei of Saquinavir-treated rabbit kidney cells expressing a fluorescently labeled inner nuclear membrane protein. In part of the protease inhibitor-treated samples, nuclei exhibited dramatic ultrastructural changes indicative of programmed cell death/apoptosis. This unexpected observation highlights another unique feature of soft X-ray microscopy, i.e. high absorption contrast information not relying on labeled cellular components, at a 3D resolution of approximately 40 nm (half-pitch) and through a sample thickness of several micrometers. These properties make it a valuable part of the cell biology imaging toolbox to visualize the cellular ultrastructure in its completeness.

  17. In-cylinder temperature measurements via time-correlated single-photon counting of toluene laser-induced fluorescence through a fiber-based sensor.

    PubMed

    Friesen, Eugen; Gessenhardt, Christopher; Kaiser, Sebastian A; Dreier, Thomas; Schulz, Christof

    2012-12-15

    In a near-production internal combustion engine, the effective fluorescence lifetime of toluene was determined by time-correlated single-photon counting with a minimally invasive fiber-optic spark-plug sensor. The lifetime measurement provided continuous crank-angle-resolved measurements of gas temperature. Proof-of-concept experiments in a motored four-cylinder spark-ignition engine were evaluated with a time resolution of 500 μs, yielding temperature precision of 25 K (standard deviation) at top-dead center. In these experiments, 10% toluene was added to the nonfluorescent base fuel iso-octane. Fluorescence lifetimes were related to temperature via calibration measurements in a high temperature pressure vessel, with the data fitted to a functional dependence derived from a previously published phenomenological model. PMID:23258066

  18. In-cylinder temperature measurements via time-correlated single-photon counting of toluene laser-induced fluorescence through a fiber-based sensor.

    PubMed

    Friesen, Eugen; Gessenhardt, Christopher; Kaiser, Sebastian A; Dreier, Thomas; Schulz, Christof

    2012-12-15

    In a near-production internal combustion engine, the effective fluorescence lifetime of toluene was determined by time-correlated single-photon counting with a minimally invasive fiber-optic spark-plug sensor. The lifetime measurement provided continuous crank-angle-resolved measurements of gas temperature. Proof-of-concept experiments in a motored four-cylinder spark-ignition engine were evaluated with a time resolution of 500 μs, yielding temperature precision of 25 K (standard deviation) at top-dead center. In these experiments, 10% toluene was added to the nonfluorescent base fuel iso-octane. Fluorescence lifetimes were related to temperature via calibration measurements in a high temperature pressure vessel, with the data fitted to a functional dependence derived from a previously published phenomenological model.

  19. Ionic liquid-based zinc oxide nanofluid for vortex assisted liquid liquid microextraction of inorganic mercury in environmental waters prior to cold vapor atomic fluorescence spectroscopic detection.

    PubMed

    Amde, Meseret; Liu, Jing-Fu; Tan, Zhi-Qiang; Bekana, Deribachew

    2016-01-01

    Zinc oxide nanofluid (ZnO-NF) based vortex assisted liquid liquid microextraction (ZnO-NF VA-LLME) was developed and employed in extraction of inorganic mercury (Hg(2+)) in environmental water samples, followed by cold vapor atomic fluorescence spectrometry (CV-AFS). Unlike other dispersive liquid liquid microextraction techniques, ZnO-NF VA-LLME is free of volatile organic solvents and dispersive solvent consumption. Analytical signals were obtained without back-extraction from the ZnO-NF phase prior to CV-AFS determination. Some essential parameters of the ZnO-NF VA-LLME and cold vapor generation such as composition and volume of the nanofluid, vortexing time, pH of the sample solution, amount of the chelating agent, ionic strength and matrix interferences have been studied. Under optimal conditions, efficient extraction of 1ng/mL of Hg(2+) in 10mL of sample solution was achieved using 50μL of ZnO-NF. The enrichment factor before dilution, detection limits and limits of quantification of the method were about 190, 0.019 and 0.064ng/mL, respectively. The intra and inter days relative standard deviations (n=8) were found to be 4.6% and 7.8%, respectively, at 1ng/mL spiking level. The accuracy of the current method was also evaluated by the analysis of certified reference materials, and the measured Hg(2+) concentration of GBW08603 (9.6ng/mL) and GBW(E)080392 (8.9ng/mL) agreed well with their certified value (10ng/mL). The method was applied to the analysis of Hg(2+) in effluent, influent, lake and river water samples, with recoveries in the range of 79.8-92.8% and 83.6-106.1% at 1ng/mL and 5ng/mL spiking levels, respectively. Overall, ZnO-NF VA-LLME is fast, simple, cost-effective and environmentally friendly and it can be employed for efficient enrichment of the analyte from various water samples.

  20. Ionic liquid-based zinc oxide nanofluid for vortex assisted liquid liquid microextraction of inorganic mercury in environmental waters prior to cold vapor atomic fluorescence spectroscopic detection.

    PubMed

    Amde, Meseret; Liu, Jing-Fu; Tan, Zhi-Qiang; Bekana, Deribachew

    2016-03-01

    Zinc oxide nanofluid (ZnO-NF) based vortex assisted liquid liquid microextraction (ZnO-NF VA-LLME) was developed and employed in extraction of inorganic mercury (Hg(2+)) in environmental water samples, followed by cold vapor atomic fluorescence spectrometry (CV-AFS). Unlike other dispersive liquid liquid microextraction techniques, ZnO-NF VA-LLME is free of volatile organic solvents and dispersive solvent consumption. Analytical signals were obtained without back-extraction from the ZnO-NF phase prior to CV-AFS determination. Some essential parameters of the ZnO-NF VA-LLME and cold vapor generation such as composition and volume of the nanofluid, vortexing time, pH of the sample solution, amount of the chelating agent, ionic strength and matrix interferences have been studied. Under optimal conditions, efficient extraction of 1ng/mL of Hg(2+) in 10mL of sample solution was achieved using 50μL of ZnO-NF. The enrichment factor before dilution, detection limits and limits of quantification of the method were about 190, 0.019 and 0.064ng/mL, respectively. The intra and inter days relative standard deviations (n=8) were found to be 4.6% and 7.8%, respectively, at 1ng/mL spiking level. The accuracy of the current method was also evaluated by the analysis of certified reference materials, and the measured Hg(2+) concentration of GBW08603 (9.6ng/mL) and GBW(E)080392 (8.9ng/mL) agreed well with their certified value (10ng/mL). The method was applied to the analysis of Hg(2+) in effluent, influent, lake and river water samples, with recoveries in the range of 79.8-92.8% and 83.6-106.1% at 1ng/mL and 5ng/mL spiking levels, respectively. Overall, ZnO-NF VA-LLME is fast, simple, cost-effective and environmentally friendly and it can be employed for efficient enrichment of the analyte from various water samples. PMID:26717850

  1. Spectroscopic characterization of C7H3(+) and C7H3˙: electronic absorption and fluorescence in 6 K neon matrices.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Arghya; Fulara, Jan; Dietsche, Rainer; Maier, John P

    2014-04-21

    Mass selective deposition of C7H3(+) (m/z = 87) into solid neon reveals the 1(1)A1←X(1)A1 electronic absorption system of hepta-1,2,3,4,5,6-heptahexaenylium cation B(+) [H2CCCCCCCH](+) with an origin band at 441.3 nm, 1(1)A'←X(1)A' transition of 2,4-pentadiynylium,1-ethynyl cation C(+) [HCCCHCCCCH](+) starting at 414.6 nm and the 1(1)A1←X(1)A1 one of cyclopropenylium,1,3-butadiynyl cation A(+) [HCCCCC<(CH=CH)](+) with an onset at 322.2 nm. Vibrationally resolved fluorescence was observed for isomer B(+) upon laser excitation of the absorption bands in the 1(1)A1←X(1)A1 transition. After neutralization of the cations in the matrix five absorption systems of the C7H3 neutral radicals starting at 530.3, 479.4, 482.3, 325.0 and 302.5 nm were detected. These were identified as the 1(2)A'←X(2)A' and 2(2)A'←X(2)A' electronic transitions of 2-(buta-1,3-diynyl)cycloprop-2yl-1-1ylidene E˙ [HCCCCC<(C=CH2)]˙, 1(2)B1←X(2)B1 of 1,2,3,4,5,6-heptahexaenyl B˙ [H2CCCCCCCH]˙, 3(2)B1←X(2)B1 of 3-buta-1,3-diynyl-cyclopropenyl A˙ [HCCCCC<(CH=CH)]˙ and 2(2)B1←X(2)A2 transition of 1,2-divinylidene-cyclopropanyl radical F˙ [HCC-cyc-(CCHC)-CCH]˙, respectively. The assignment is based on calculated vertical excitation energies using the CASPT2 method. Comparison of the calculated harmonic vibrational frequencies with those inferred from the spectra supports the assignment.

  2. Monolithic time-to-digital converter chips for time-correlated single-photon counting and fluorescence lifetime measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markovic, Bojan; Tamborini, Davide; Bellisai, Simone; Bassi, Andrea; Pifferi, Antonio; Villa, Federica; Padovini, Giorgio M.; Tosi, Alberto

    2013-01-01

    We present a low-power Time-to-Digital Converter (TDC) chip, fabricated in a standard cost-effective 0.35 μm CMOS technology, which provides 160 ns dynamic range, 10 ps timing resolution and Differential Non-Linearity better than 0.01 LSB rms. This chip is the core of a compact TDC module equipped with an USB 2.0 interface for user-friendly control and data-acquisition. The TDC module is suitable for a wide variety of applications such as Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging (FLIM), time-resolved spectroscopy, Diffuse Optical Spectroscopy (DOS), Optical Time-Domain Reflectometry (OTDR), quantum optics, etc. In particular, we show the application of our TDC module to fluorescence lifetime measurements.

  3. Unraveling the time cross correlations of an emitter switching between two states with the same fluorescence intensity.

    PubMed

    Eloi, F; Frederich, H; Leray, A; Buil, S; Quélin, X; Ji, B; Giovanelli, E; Lequeux, N; Dubertret, B; Hermier, J-P

    2015-11-16

    The autocorrelation function of the fluorescence intensity of a nanoemitter is measured with the standard Hanbury-Brown and Twiss setup. Time-tagging of the photodetection events during all the experiment has opened new possibilities in terms of post-selection techniques that enable to go beyond the blinking and antibunching characterization. Here, we first present a new method developed to investigate in detail the antibunching of a fluorophore switching between two emitting states. Even if they exhibit the same fluorescence intensity, their respective amount of antibunching can be measured using the gap between their respective decay rates. The method is then applied to a nanoemitter consisting in a colloidal quantum dot coupled to a plasmonic resonator. The relative quantum efficiency of the charged and neutral biexcitons are determined.

  4. Quantitative In Vivo Fluorescence Cross-Correlation Analyses Highlight the Importance of Competitive Effects in the Regulation of Protein-Protein Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Sadaie, Wakako; Harada, Yoshie; Matsuda, Michiyuki

    2014-01-01

    Computer-assisted simulation is a promising approach for clarifying complicated signaling networks. However, this approach is currently limited by a deficiency of kinetic parameters determined in living cells. To overcome this problem, we applied fluorescence cross-correlation spectrometry (FCCS) to measure dissociation constant (Kd) values of signaling molecule complexes in living cells (in vivo Kd). Among the pairs of fluorescent molecules tested, that of monomerized enhanced green fluorescent protein (mEGFP) and HaloTag-tetramethylrhodamine was most suitable for the measurement of in vivo Kd by FCCS. Using this pair, we determined 22 in vivo Kd values of signaling molecule complexes comprising the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)–Ras–extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase pathway. With these parameters, we developed a kinetic simulation model of the EGFR-Ras-ERK MAP kinase pathway and uncovered a potential role played by stoichiometry in Shc binding to EGFR during the peak activations of Ras, MEK, and ERK. Intriguingly, most of the in vivo Kd values determined in this study were higher than the in vitro Kd values reported previously, suggesting the significance of competitive bindings inside cells. These in vivo Kd values will provide a sound basis for the quantitative understanding of signal transduction. PMID:24958104

  5. Quantitative in vivo fluorescence cross-correlation analyses highlight the importance of competitive effects in the regulation of protein-protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Sadaie, Wakako; Harada, Yoshie; Matsuda, Michiyuki; Aoki, Kazuhiro

    2014-09-01

    Computer-assisted simulation is a promising approach for clarifying complicated signaling networks. However, this approach is currently limited by a deficiency of kinetic parameters determined in living cells. To overcome this problem, we applied fluorescence cross-correlation spectrometry (FCCS) to measure dissociation constant (Kd) values of signaling molecule complexes in living cells (in vivo Kd). Among the pairs of fluorescent molecules tested, that of monomerized enhanced green fluorescent protein (mEGFP) and HaloTag-tetramethylrhodamine was most suitable for the measurement of in vivo Kd by FCCS. Using this pair, we determined 22 in vivo Kd values of signaling molecule complexes comprising the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-Ras-extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase pathway. With these parameters, we developed a kinetic simulation model of the EGFR-Ras-ERK MAP kinase pathway and uncovered a potential role played by stoichiometry in Shc binding to EGFR during the peak activations of Ras, MEK, and ERK. Intriguingly, most of the in vivo Kd values determined in this study were higher than the in vitro Kd values reported previously, suggesting the significance of competitive bindings inside cells. These in vivo Kd values will provide a sound basis for the quantitative understanding of signal transduction.

  6. Applications of fluorescence spectroscopy to problems of food safety: detection of fecal contamination and of the presence of central nervous system tissue and diagnosis of neurological disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adhikary, Ramkrishna; Bose, Sayantan; Casey, Thomas A.; Gapsch, Al; Rasmussen, Mark A.; Petrich, Jacob W.

    2010-02-01

    Applications of fluorescence spectroscopy that enable the real-time or rapid detection of fecal contamination on beef carcasses and the presence of central nervous system tissue in meat products are discussed. The former is achieved by employing spectroscopic signatures of chlorophyll metabolites; the latter, by exploiting the characteristic structure and intensity of lipofuscin in central nervous system tissue. The success of these techniques has led us to investigate the possibility of diagnosing scrapie in sheep by obtaining fluorescence spectra of the retina. Crucial to this diagnosis is the ability to obtain baseline correlations of lipofuscin fluorescence with age. A murine model was employed as a proof of principle of this correlation.

  7. Registration procedure for spatial correlation of physical energy deposition of particle irradiation and cellular response utilizing cell-fluorescent ion track hybrid detectors.

    PubMed

    Niklas, M; Zimmermann, F; Schlegel, J; Schwager, C; Debus, J; Jäkel, O; Abdollahi, A; Greilich, S

    2016-09-01

    The hybrid technology cell-fluorescent ion track hybrid detector (Cell-Fit-HD) enables the investigation of radiation-related cellular events along single ion tracks on the subcellular scale in clinical ion beams. The Cell-Fit-HD comprises a fluorescent nuclear track detector (FNTD, the physical compartment), a device for individual particle detection and a substrate for viable cell-coating, i.e. the biological compartment. To date both compartments have been imaged sequentially in situ by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). This is yet in conflict with a functional read-out of the Cell-Fit-HD utilizing a fast live-cell imaging of the biological compartment with low phototoxicity on greater time scales. The read-out of the biological from the physical compartment was uncoupled. A read-out procedure was developed to image the cell layer by conventional widefield microscopy whereas the FNTD was imaged by CLSM. Point mapping registration of the confocal and widefield imaging data was performed. Non-fluorescent crystal defects (spinels) visible in both read-outs were used as control point pairs. The accuracy achieved was on the sub-µm scale. The read-out procedure by widefield microscopy does not impair the unique ability of spatial correlation by the Cell-Fit-HD. The uncoupling will enlarge the application potential of the hybrid technology significantly. The registration allows for an ultimate correlation of microscopic physical beam parameters and cell kinetics on greater time scales. The method reported herein will be instrumental for the introduction of a novel generation of compact detectors facilitating biodosimetric research towards high-throughput analysis.

  8. Registration procedure for spatial correlation of physical energy deposition of particle irradiation and cellular response utilizing cell-fluorescent ion track hybrid detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niklas, M.; Zimmermann, F.; Schlegel, J.; Schwager, C.; Debus, J.; Jäkel, O.; Abdollahi, A.; Greilich, S.

    2016-09-01

    The hybrid technology cell-fluorescent ion track hybrid detector (Cell-Fit-HD) enables the investigation of radiation-related cellular events along single ion tracks on the subcellular scale in clinical ion beams. The Cell-Fit-HD comprises a fluorescent nuclear track detector (FNTD, the physical compartment), a device for individual particle detection and a substrate for viable cell-coating, i.e. the biological compartment. To date both compartments have been imaged sequentially in situ by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). This is yet in conflict with a functional read-out of the Cell-Fit-HD utilizing a fast live-cell imaging of the biological compartment with low phototoxicity on greater time scales. The read-out of the biological from the physical compartment was uncoupled. A read-out procedure was developed to image the cell layer by conventional widefield microscopy whereas the FNTD was imaged by CLSM. Point mapping registration of the confocal and widefield imaging data was performed. Non-fluorescent crystal defects (spinels) visible in both read-outs were used as control point pairs. The accuracy achieved was on the sub-µm scale. The read-out procedure by widefield microscopy does not impair the unique ability of spatial correlation by the Cell-Fit-HD. The uncoupling will enlarge the application potential of the hybrid technology significantly. The registration allows for an ultimate correlation of microscopic physical beam parameters and cell kinetics on greater time scales. The method reported herein will be instrumental for the introduction of a novel generation of compact detectors facilitating biodosimetric research towards high-throughput analysis.

  9. Registration procedure for spatial correlation of physical energy deposition of particle irradiation and cellular response utilizing cell-fluorescent ion track hybrid detectors.

    PubMed

    Niklas, M; Zimmermann, F; Schlegel, J; Schwager, C; Debus, J; Jäkel, O; Abdollahi, A; Greilich, S

    2016-09-01

    The hybrid technology cell-fluorescent ion track hybrid detector (Cell-Fit-HD) enables the investigation of radiation-related cellular events along single ion tracks on the subcellular scale in clinical ion beams. The Cell-Fit-HD comprises a fluorescent nuclear track detector (FNTD, the physical compartment), a device for individual particle detection and a substrate for viable cell-coating, i.e. the biological compartment. To date both compartments have been imaged sequentially in situ by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). This is yet in conflict with a functional read-out of the Cell-Fit-HD utilizing a fast live-cell imaging of the biological compartment with low phototoxicity on greater time scales. The read-out of the biological from the physical compartment was uncoupled. A read-out procedure was developed to image the cell layer by conventional widefield microscopy whereas the FNTD was imaged by CLSM. Point mapping registration of the confocal and widefield imaging data was performed. Non-fluorescent crystal defects (spinels) visible in both read-outs were used as control point pairs. The accuracy achieved was on the sub-µm scale. The read-out procedure by widefield microscopy does not impair the unique ability of spatial correlation by the Cell-Fit-HD. The uncoupling will enlarge the application potential of the hybrid technology significantly. The registration allows for an ultimate correlation of microscopic physical beam parameters and cell kinetics on greater time scales. The method reported herein will be instrumental for the introduction of a novel generation of compact detectors facilitating biodosimetric research towards high-throughput analysis. PMID:27499388

  10. Solar Induced Vegetation Fluorescence Retrieval Using SCIAMACHY and GOME-2 Measurements And Its Correlation To GPP And FAPAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vountas, M.; Khosravi, N.; Rozanov, V. V.; Burrows, J. P.

    2015-12-01

    Global carbon cycle is connected to terrestrial vegetation as an important sink of CO2. Plants contribute to the global carbon cycle both through photosynthesis and respiration processes. Fluorescence is a fraction of surplus energy, emitted to the environment by Chlorophyll molecules as a side-product of photosynthesis. As a result, Sun-Induced plant Fluorescence (SIF) is a reliable indicator of photosynthesis efficiency and therefore, important for vegetation observation, forest monitoring, global carbon uptake formulation and even agriculture.In our study, a newly developed retrieval scheme is used to quantify SIF from non-invasive satellite measurements of Top of Atmosphere (TOA) Earthshine radiances. Our method has been developed and tested on simulated data, created by the comprehensive radiative transfer model, SCIATRAN. Sensitivity studies showed that the method is capable of assessing SIF. The method is then applied on long-term data of 10 years from SCIAMACHY (Scanning Imaging Absorption Spectrometer for Atmospheric Chartography) and GOME-2 (Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment-2) instruments and produced promising results.Furthermore, the relationship between the retrieved SIF values and vegetation's contribution to the global CO2 uptake is investigated by comparing monthly variation of SIF against GPP (Gross Primary Production) and FAPAR (Fraction of Absorbed Photosynthetically Active Radiation) for selected regions.

  11. Spectroscopic detection

    DOEpatents

    Woskov, Paul P.; Hadidi, Kamal

    2003-01-01

    In embodiments, spectroscopic monitor monitors modulated light signals to detect low levels of contaminants and other compounds in the presence of background interference. The monitor uses a spectrometer that includes a transmissive modulator capable of causing different frequency ranges to move onto and off of the detector. The different ranges can include those with the desired signal and those selected to subtract background contributions from those with the desired signal. Embodiments of the system are particularly useful for monitoring metal concentrations in combustion effluent.

  12. Application of correlation constrained multivariate curve resolution alternating least-squares methods for determination of compounds of interest in biodiesel blends using NIR and UV-visible spectroscopic data.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Rodrigo Rocha; de Lima, Kássio Michell Gomes; Tauler, Romà; de Juan, Anna

    2014-07-01

    This study describes two applications of a variant of the multivariate curve resolution alternating least squares (MCR-ALS) method with a correlation constraint. The first application describes the use of MCR-ALS for the determination of biodiesel concentrations in biodiesel blends using near infrared (NIR) spectroscopic data. In the second application, the proposed method allowed the determination of the synthetic antioxidant N,N'-Di-sec-butyl-p-phenylenediamine (PDA) present in biodiesel mixtures from different vegetable sources using UV-visible spectroscopy. Well established multivariate regression algorithm, partial least squares (PLS), were calculated for comparison of the quantification performance in the models developed in both applications. The correlation constraint has been adapted to handle the presence of batch-to-batch matrix effects due to ageing effects, which might occur when different groups of samples were used to build a calibration model in the first application. Different data set configurations and diverse modes of application of the correlation constraint are explored and guidelines are given to cope with different type of analytical problems, such as the correction of matrix effects among biodiesel samples, where MCR-ALS outperformed PLS reducing the relative error of prediction RE (%) from 9.82% to 4.85% in the first application, or the determination of minor compound with overlapped weak spectroscopic signals, where MCR-ALS gave higher (RE (%)=3.16%) for prediction of PDA compared to PLS (RE (%)=1.99%), but with the advantage of recovering the related pure spectral profile of analytes and interferences. The obtained results show the potential of the MCR-ALS method with correlation constraint to be adapted to diverse data set configurations and analytical problems related to the determination of biodiesel mixtures and added compounds therein.

  13. Application of correlation constrained multivariate curve resolution alternating least-squares methods for determination of compounds of interest in biodiesel blends using NIR and UV-visible spectroscopic data.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Rodrigo Rocha; de Lima, Kássio Michell Gomes; Tauler, Romà; de Juan, Anna

    2014-07-01

    This study describes two applications of a variant of the multivariate curve resolution alternating least squares (MCR-ALS) method with a correlation constraint. The first application describes the use of MCR-ALS for the determination of biodiesel concentrations in biodiesel blends using near infrared (NIR) spectroscopic data. In the second application, the proposed method allowed the determination of the synthetic antioxidant N,N'-Di-sec-butyl-p-phenylenediamine (PDA) present in biodiesel mixtures from different vegetable sources using UV-visible spectroscopy. Well established multivariate regression algorithm, partial least squares (PLS), were calculated for comparison of the quantification performance in the models developed in both applications. The correlation constraint has been adapted to handle the presence of batch-to-batch matrix effects due to ageing effects, which might occur when different groups of samples were used to build a calibration model in the first application. Different data set configurations and diverse modes of application of the correlation constraint are explored and guidelines are given to cope with different type of analytical problems, such as the correction of matrix effects among biodiesel samples, where MCR-ALS outperformed PLS reducing the relative error of prediction RE (%) from 9.82% to 4.85% in the first application, or the determination of minor compound with overlapped weak spectroscopic signals, where MCR-ALS gave higher (RE (%)=3.16%) for prediction of PDA compared to PLS (RE (%)=1.99%), but with the advantage of recovering the related pure spectral profile of analytes and interferences. The obtained results show the potential of the MCR-ALS method with correlation constraint to be adapted to diverse data set configurations and analytical problems related to the determination of biodiesel mixtures and added compounds therein. PMID:24840439

  14. Role of ionic liquid on the conformational dynamics in the native, molten globule, and unfolded states of cytochrome c: a fluorescence correlation spectroscopy study.

    PubMed

    Sen Mojumdar, Supratik; Chowdhury, Rajdeep; Chattoraj, Shyamtanu; Bhattacharyya, Kankan

    2012-10-11

    The role of a room temperature ionic liquid (RTIL, [pmim][Br]) on the size and conformational dynamics of a protein, horse heart cytochrome c (Cyt C) in its native, molten globule (MG-I and II), and unfolded states is studied using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS). For this purpose, the protein was covalently labeled by a fluorescent dye, Alexa Fluor 488. It is observed that the addition of the RTIL leads to an increase in the hydrodynamic radius (r(H)) of the protein, Cyt C in the native or MG-I state. In contrast, the addition of RTIL causes a decrease in the size (hydrodynamic radius, r(H)) of Cyt C unfolded by GdnHCl or MG-II state. The decrease in size indicates the formation of a relatively compact structure. We detected two types of conformational relaxation of the protein. The shorter relaxation time component (~3-5.5 μs) corresponds to the protein folding or intrachain contact formation, while the relatively longer time component (~63-122 μs) may be assigned to the motion of the protein side chains or concerted chain dynamics. The burst integrated fluorescence lifetime histograms indicate that the increase in size of the protein is accompanied by an increase in the contribution of the shorter component (~0.3-0.4 ns) with a concomitant decrease of the contribution of the longer component (~2.8-3.6 ns). An opposite trend is observed during the decrease in size of the protein. PMID:22989328

  15. Correlative Fluorescence and Scanning Electron Microscopy of Labelled Core Fucosylated Glycans Using Cryosections Mounted on Carbon-Patterned Glass Slides

    PubMed Central

    Vancová, Marie; Nebesářová, Jana

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study is co-localization of N-glycans with fucose attached to N-acetylglucosamine in α1,3 linkage, that belong to immunogenic carbohydrate epitopes in humans, and N-glycans with α1,6-core fucose typical for mammalian type of N-linked glycosylation. Both glycan epitopes were labelled in cryosections of salivary glands isolated from the tick Ixodes ricinus. Salivary glands secrete during feeding many bioactive molecules and influence both successful feeding and transmission of tick-borne pathogens. For accurate and reliable localization of labelled glycans in both fluorescence and scanning electron microscopes, we used carbon imprints of finder or indexed EM grids on glass slides. We discuss if the topographical images can provide information about labelled structures, the working setting of the field-emission scanning electron microscope and the influence of the detector selection (a below-the-lens Autrata improved YAG detector of back-scattered electrons; in-lens and conventional Everhart-Thornley detectors of secondary electrons) on the imaging of gold nanoparticles, quantum dots and osmium-stained membranes. PMID:26690057

  16. Correlation between the fluorescent response of microfluidity probes and the water content and viscosity of ionic liquid and water mixtures.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Siddharth; Fletcher, Kristin A; Baker, Sheila N; Baker, Gary A

    2004-07-01

    Accurate data on transport properties such as viscosity are essential in plant and process design involving ionic liquids. In this study, we determined the absolute viscosity of the ionic liquid + water system at water mole fractions from 0 to 0.25 for three 1-alkyl-3-methylimidazolium ionic liquids: 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate, 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethane sulfonyl)imide and 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethane sulfonyl)imide. In each case, the excimer to monomer ratio for 1,m-bis(1-pyrenyl)alkanes (m= 3 or 10) was found to increase linearly with the mole fraction of water. Of the probes studied only PRODAN and rhodamine 6G, both of which have the ability to participate in hydrogen bonding, exhibited Perrin hydrodynamic behavior in the lower viscosity bis(trifluoromethane sulfonyl)imides. As a result, these probes allow for the extrapolation of the absolute viscosity of the ionic liquid mixture from the experimental fluorescence steady-state polarization values.

  17. Exhaustive mutation scanning by fluorescence-assisted mismatch analysis discloses new genotype-phenotype correlations in angiodema.

    PubMed Central

    Verpy, E.; Biasotto, M.; Brai, M.; Misiano, G.; Meo, T.; Tosi, M.

    1996-01-01

    A complete mutational scan of the gene coding for the serpin C1 inhibitor, comprising all eight exons and adjacent intron sequences and 550 bp preceding the transcription start site, was rapidly accomplished in 36 unrelated angioedema patients by using fluorescence-assisted mismatch analysis (FAMA). Mutations accounting for C1 inhibitor deficiency were identified in every one of 34 patients, with two failures turning out to be spurious cases. Two new substitution dimorphisms were also detected in introns. Changes affecting the C1 inhibitor protein, distributed throughout the seven coding exons, provide new insights into the molecular pathology of serpins. Six different splice-site and two promoter mutations were also found. Among the latter, a C-->T transition within one of two putative CAAT boxes of this TATA-less promoter, the sole idiomorphic nucleotide change in this kindred, was found homozygous in the proband, at variance with the dominant mode of transmission observed for structural mutations. FAMA, in the chemical probes configuration used in this study, is a rapid and robust mutation-scanning procedure, applicable to large DNA segments or transcripts and proved capable of 100% detection. Moreover, it provides accurate positional information--and hence recognition of multiple substitutions, precise relationship with those already known, and often immediate identification of the nucleotide change. Images Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:8755917

  18. Correlative Fluorescence and Scanning Electron Microscopy of Labelled Core Fucosylated Glycans Using Cryosections Mounted on Carbon-Patterned Glass Slides.

    PubMed

    Vancová, Marie; Nebesářová, Jana

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study is co-localization of N-glycans with fucose attached to N-acetylglucosamine in α1,3 linkage, that belong to immunogenic carbohydrate epitopes in humans, and N-glycans with α1,6-core fucose typical for mammalian type of N-linked glycosylation. Both glycan epitopes were labelled in cryosections of salivary glands isolated from the tick Ixodes ricinus. Salivary glands secrete during feeding many bioactive molecules and influence both successful feeding and transmission of tick-borne pathogens. For accurate and reliable localization of labelled glycans in both fluorescence and scanning electron microscopes, we used carbon imprints of finder or indexed EM grids on glass slides. We discuss if the topographical images can provide information about labelled structures, the working setting of the field-emission scanning electron microscope and the influence of the detector selection (a below-the-lens Autrata improved YAG detector of back-scattered electrons; in-lens and conventional Everhart-Thornley detectors of secondary electrons) on the imaging of gold nanoparticles, quantum dots and osmium-stained membranes. PMID:26690057

  19. Photophysical Properties of Fluorescent Core Dendrimers Controlled by Size.

    PubMed

    Paolucci, Valentina; Mejlsøe, Søren L; Ficker, Mario; Vosch, Tom; Christensen, Jørn B

    2016-09-15

    A series of different generation PAMAM dendrimers with sulforhodamine B covalently attached to the dendrimer core was investigated regarding their optical properties. Steady-state and time-resolved spectroscopic techniques were used to determine the size influence of the dendrimers on the photophysical behavior of the luminescent core. New blue emissive species were formed as the generation increased from zero to four. The growth of the dendritic branches resulted in a rise of fluorescence quantum yield and fluorescence lifetime values. Rotational correlation times were used to determine the hydrodynamic diameters of the fluorescent-core dendrimers, and good accordance was found with the values previously reported for unlabeled PAMAM dendrimers, which makes them potentially suitable diagnostic tools for biomedical tracing.

  20. Photophysical Properties of Fluorescent Core Dendrimers Controlled by Size.

    PubMed

    Paolucci, Valentina; Mejlsøe, Søren L; Ficker, Mario; Vosch, Tom; Christensen, Jørn B

    2016-09-15

    A series of different generation PAMAM dendrimers with sulforhodamine B covalently attached to the dendrimer core was investigated regarding their optical properties. Steady-state and time-resolved spectroscopic techniques were used to determine the size influence of the dendrimers on the photophysical behavior of the luminescent core. New blue emissive species were formed as the generation increased from zero to four. The growth of the dendritic branches resulted in a rise of fluorescence quantum yield and fluorescence lifetime values. Rotational correlation times were used to determine the hydrodynamic diameters of the fluorescent-core dendrimers, and good accordance was found with the values previously reported for unlabeled PAMAM dendrimers, which makes them potentially suitable diagnostic tools for biomedical tracing. PMID:27552183

  1. The impact of cell-specific absorption properties on the correlation of electron transport rates measured by chlorophyll fluorescence and photosynthetic oxygen production in planktonic algae.

    PubMed

    Blache, Ulrich; Jakob, Torsten; Su, Wanwen; Wilhelm, Christian

    2011-08-01

    Photosynthesis-irradiance (P-E)-curves describe the photosynthetic performance of autotrophic organisms. From these P-E-curves the photosynthetic parameters α-slope, P(max), and E(k) can be deduced which are often used to characterize and to compare different organisms or organisms in acclimation to different environmental conditions. Particularly, for in situ-measurements of P-E curves of phytoplankton the analysis of variable chlorophyll fluorescence proved its potential as a sensitive and rapid method. By using Chlorella vulgaris (Trebouxiophyceae), Nannochloropsis salina (Eustigmatophyceae), Skeletonema costatum and Cyclotella meneghiniana (Bacillariophyceae), the present study investigated the influence of cellular bio-optical properties on the correlation of the photosynthetic parameters derived from fluorescence-based P-E-curves with photosynthetic parameters obtained from the measurement of oxygen evolution. It is demonstrated that small planktonic algae show a wide range of cellular absorptivity which was subject to species-specifity, growth stage and environmental conditions, e.g. nutrient limitation. This variability in bio-optical properties resulted in a great deviation of relative electron transport rates (rETRs) from oxygen-based photosynthesis rates. Thus, the photosynthetic parameters α-slope and P(max) derived from rETRs strongly depend on the specific cellular absorptivity and cannot be used to compare the photosynthetic performance of cells with different optical properties. However, it was shown that E(k) is independent of cellular absorptivity and could be used to compare samples with unknown optical properties. PMID:21571541

  2. The impact of cell-specific absorption properties on the correlation of electron transport rates measured by chlorophyll fluorescence and photosynthetic oxygen production in planktonic algae.

    PubMed

    Blache, Ulrich; Jakob, Torsten; Su, Wanwen; Wilhelm, Christian

    2011-08-01

    Photosynthesis-irradiance (P-E)-curves describe the photosynthetic performance of autotrophic organisms. From these P-E-curves the photosynthetic parameters α-slope, P(max), and E(k) can be deduced which are often used to characterize and to compare different organisms or organisms in acclimation to different environmental conditions. Particularly, for in situ-measurements of P-E curves of phytoplankton the analysis of variable chlorophyll fluorescence proved its potential as a sensitive and rapid method. By using Chlorella vulgaris (Trebouxiophyceae), Nannochloropsis salina (Eustigmatophyceae), Skeletonema costatum and Cyclotella meneghiniana (Bacillariophyceae), the present study investigated the influence of cellular bio-optical properties on the correlation of the photosynthetic parameters derived from fluorescence-based P-E-curves with photosynthetic parameters obtained from the measurement of oxygen evolution. It is demonstrated that small planktonic algae show a wide range of cellular absorptivity which was subject to species-specifity, growth stage and environmental conditions, e.g. nutrient limitation. This variability in bio-optical properties resulted in a great deviation of relative electron transport rates (rETRs) from oxygen-based photosynthesis rates. Thus, the photosynthetic parameters α-slope and P(max) derived from rETRs strongly depend on the specific cellular absorptivity and cannot be used to compare the photosynthetic performance of cells with different optical properties. However, it was shown that E(k) is independent of cellular absorptivity and could be used to compare samples with unknown optical properties.

  3. Imaging endosomes and autophagosomes in whole mammalian cells using correlative cryo-fluorescence and cryo-soft X-ray microscopy (cryo-CLXM).

    PubMed

    Duke, Elizabeth M H; Razi, Minoo; Weston, Anne; Guttmann, Peter; Werner, Stephan; Henzler, Katja; Schneider, Gerd; Tooze, Sharon A; Collinson, Lucy M

    2014-08-01

    Cryo-soft X-ray tomography (cryo-SXT) is a powerful imaging technique that can extract ultrastructural information from whole, unstained mammalian cells as close to the living state as possible. Subcellular organelles including the nucleus, the Golgi apparatus and mitochondria have been identified by morphology alone, due to the similarity in contrast to transmission electron micrographs. In this study, we used cryo-SXT to image endosomes and autophagosomes, organelles that are particularly susceptible to chemical fixation artefacts during sample preparation for electron microscopy. We used two approaches to identify these compartments. For early and recycling endosomes, which are accessible to externally-loaded markers, we used an anti-transferrin receptor antibody conjugated to 10nm gold particles. For autophagosomes, which are not accessible to externally-applied markers, we developed a correlative cryo-fluorescence and cryo-SXT workflow (cryo-CLXM) to localise GFP-LC3 and RFP-Atg9. We used a stand-alone cryo-fluorescence stage in the home laboratory to localise the cloned fluorophores, followed by cryo-soft X-ray tomography at the synchrotron to analyse cellular ultrastructure. We mapped the 3D ultrastructure of the endocytic and autophagic structures, and discovered clusters of omegasomes arising from 'hotspots' on the ER. Thus, immunogold markers and cryo-CLXM can be used to analyse cellular processes that are inaccessible using other imaging modalities.

  4. Imaging endosomes and autophagosomes in whole mammalian cells using correlative cryo-fluorescence and cryo-soft X-ray microscopy (cryo-CLXM)☆

    PubMed Central

    Duke, Elizabeth M.H.; Razi, Minoo; Weston, Anne; Guttmann, Peter; Werner, Stephan; Henzler, Katja; Schneider, Gerd; Tooze, Sharon A.; Collinson, Lucy M.

    2014-01-01

    Cryo-soft X-ray tomography (cryo-SXT) is a powerful imaging technique that can extract ultrastructural information from whole, unstained mammalian cells as close to the living state as possible. Subcellular organelles including the nucleus, the Golgi apparatus and mitochondria have been identified by morphology alone, due to the similarity in contrast to transmission electron micrographs. In this study, we used cryo-SXT to image endosomes and autophagosomes, organelles that are particularly susceptible to chemical fixation artefacts during sample preparation for electron microscopy. We used two approaches to identify these compartments. For early and recycling endosomes, which are accessible to externally-loaded markers, we used an anti-transferrin receptor antibody conjugated to 10 nm gold particles. For autophagosomes, which are not accessible to externally-applied markers, we developed a correlative cryo-fluorescence and cryo-SXT workflow (cryo-CLXM) to localise GFP-LC3 and RFP-Atg9. We used a stand-alone cryo-fluorescence stage in the home laboratory to localise the cloned fluorophores, followed by cryo-soft X-ray tomography at the synchrotron to analyse cellular ultrastructure. We mapped the 3D ultrastructure of the endocytic and autophagic structures, and discovered clusters of omegasomes arising from ‘hotspots’ on the ER. Thus, immunogold markers and cryo-CLXM can be used to analyse cellular processes that are inaccessible using other imaging modalities. PMID:24238600

  5. Correlating two-photon excited fluorescence imaging of breast cancer cellular redox state with seahorse flux analysis of normalized cellular oxygen consumption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Jue; Wright, Heather J.; Chan, Nicole; Tran, Richard; Razorenova, Olga V.; Potma, Eric O.; Tromberg, Bruce J.

    2016-06-01

    Two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) imaging of the cellular cofactors nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide and oxidized flavin adenine dinucleotide is widely used to measure cellular metabolism, both in normal and pathological cells and tissues. When dual-wavelength excitation is used, ratiometric TPEF imaging of the intrinsic cofactor fluorescence provides a metabolic index of cells-the "optical redox ratio" (ORR). With increased interest in understanding and controlling cellular metabolism in cancer, there is a need to evaluate the performance of ORR in malignant cells. We compare TPEF metabolic imaging with seahorse flux analysis of cellular oxygen consumption in two different breast cancer cell lines (MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231). We monitor metabolic index in living cells under both normal culture conditions and, for MCF-7, in response to cell respiration inhibitors and uncouplers. We observe a significant correlation between the TPEF-derived ORR and the flux analyzer measurements (R=0.7901, p<0.001). Our results confirm that the ORR is a valid dynamic index of cell metabolism under a range of oxygen consumption conditions relevant for cancer imaging.

  6. A new color correlation method applied to XRF Al/Si ratios and other lunar remote sensing data. [X Ray Fluorescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, P. E.; Andre, C. G.; Adler, I.; Eliason, E.

    1978-01-01

    Orbital X-ray fluorescence Al/Si intensity ratios, corrected for variations in solar activity, are correlated with normal albedo, elevation measurements from laser altimetry data, and gamma ray data in the 2.75-8.60 MeV range. Each of these data sets is placed into a digital array consisting of 1/4 deg latitude by 1/4 deg longitude pixels. Information relative to the correlation of Al/Si ratios with each of the other data sets is presented in the following forms: (1) histograms are given for each data set to show the frequency distribution within the areas of common coverage; (2) density plots are produced from the plot of a two-dimensional array consisting of the Al/Si ratio vs the other parameter value for each pixel; and (3) color correlation maps are produced by placing the two-dimensional array into a 3 x 3 matrix consisting of nine equal subarrays containing an equal number of data points.

  7. Imaging Fos-Jun Transcription Factor Mobility and Interaction in Live Cells by Single Plane Illumination-Fluorescence Cross Correlation Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Pernuš, Agata; Langowski, Jörg

    2015-01-01

    We collected mobility and interaction maps of c-Fos-eGFP and c-Jun-mRFP1 transcription factors within living cell nuclei. c-Fos dimerizes with c-Jun to form the transcription activator protein-1 (AP-1) which binds to the specific recognition site. To monitor this process, we used fluorescence cross-correlation spectroscopy on a single plane illumination microscope (SPIM-FCCS), which provides diffusion coefficient and protein-protein interaction data in the whole image plane simultaneously, instead of just one point on conventional confocal FCS. We find a strong correlation between diffusional mobility and interaction: regions of strong interaction show slow mobility. Controls containing either an eGFP-mRFP dimer, separately expressing eGFP and mRPF, or c-Fos-eGFP and c-Jun-mRFP1 mutants lacking dimerization and DNA-binding domains, showed no such correlation. These results extend our earlier findings from confocal FCCS to include spatial information. PMID:25875593

  8. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy in thin films at reflecting substrates as a means to study nanoscale structure and dynamics at soft-matter interfaces.

    PubMed

    Täuber, Daniela; Radscheit, Kathrin; von Borczyskowski, Christian; Schulz, Michael; Osipov, Vladimir Al

    2016-07-01

    Structure and dynamics at soft-matter interfaces play an important role in nature and technical applications. Optical single-molecule investigations are noninvasive and capable to reveal heterogeneities at the nanoscale. In this work we develop an autocorrelation function (ACF) approach to retrieve tracer diffusion parameters obtained from fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) experiments in thin liquid films at reflecting substrates. This approach then is used to investigate structure and dynamics in 100-nm-thick 8CB liquid crystal films on silicon wafers with five different oxide thicknesses. We find a different extension of the structural reorientation of 8CB at the solid-liquid interface for thin and for thick oxide. For the thin oxides, the perylenediimide tracer diffusion dynamics in general agrees with the hydrodynamic modeling using no-slip boundary conditions with only a small deviation close to the substrate, while a considerably stronger decrease of the interfacial tracer diffusion is found for the thick oxides. PMID:27575199

  9. Correlation between cross-bridge kinetics obtained from Trp fluorescence of myofibril suspensions and mechanical studies of single muscle fibers in rabbit psoas.

    PubMed

    Candau, Robin; Kawai, Masataka

    2011-12-01

    Our goal is to correlate kinetic constants obtained from fluorescence studies of myofibril suspension with those from mechanical studies of skinned muscle fibers from rabbit psoas. In myofibril studies, the stopped-flow technique with tryptophan fluorescence was used; in muscle fiber studies, tension transients with small amplitude sinusoidal length perturbations were used. All experiments were performed using the equivalent solution conditions (200 mM ionic strength, pH 7.00) at 10°C. The concentration of MgATP was varied to characterize kinetic constants of the ATP binding step 1 (K (1): dissociation constant), the binding induced cross-bridge detachment step 2 (k (2), k (-2): rate constants), and the ATP cleavage step 3 (k (3), k (-3)). In myofibrils we found that K (1) = 0.52 ± 0.08 mM (±95% confidence limits), k (2) = 242 ± 24 s(-1), and k (-2) ≈ 0; in muscle fibers, K (1) = 0.46 ± 0.06 mM, k (2) = 286 ± 32 s(-1), and k (-2) = 57 ± 21 s(-1). From these results, we conclude that myofibrils and muscle fibers exhibit nearly equal ATP binding step, and nearly equal ATP binding induced cross-bridge detachment step. Consequently, there is a good correlation between process C (phase 2 of step analysis) and the cross-bridge detachment step. The reverse detachment step is finite in fibers, but almost absent in myofibrils. We further studied partially cross-linked myofibrils and found little change in steps 2 and 3, indicating that cross-linking does not affect these steps. However, we found that K (1) is 2.5× of native myofibrils, indicating that MgATP binding is weakened by the presence of the extra load. We further studied the phosphate (Pi) effect in myofibrils, and found that Pi is a competitive inhibitor of MgATP, with the inhibitory dissociation constant of ~9 mM. Similar results were also deduced from fiber studies. To characterize the ATP cleavage step in myofibrils, we measured the slow rate constant in fluorescence, and

  10. Area correlation constraint for the MCR-ALS quantification of cholesterol using EEM fluorescence data: A new approach.

    PubMed

    Neves, Ana Carolina de Oliveira; Tauler, Romá; de Lima, Kássio Michell Gomes

    2016-09-21

    This work demonstrates the use of a new additional constraint for the Multivariate Curve Resolution-Alternating Least Squares (MCR-ALS) algorithm called "area correlation constraint", introduced to build calibration models for Excitation Emission Matrix (EEM) data. We propose the application of area correlation constraint MCR-ALS for the quantification of cholesterol using a simulated data set and an experimental data system (cholesterol in a ternary mixture). This new constraint includes pseudo-univariate local regressions using the area of resolved profiles against reference values during the alternating least squares optimization, to provide directly accurate quantifications of a specific analyte in concentration units. In the two datasets investigated in this work, the new constraint retrieved correctly the analyte and interference spectral profiles and performed accurate estimations of cholesterol concentrations in test samples. This the first study using the proposed area constraint using EEM measurements. This new constraint approach emerges as a new possibility to be tested in general cases of second-order multivariate calibration data in the presence of unknown interferents or in more involved higher order calibration cases.

  11. Correlation between diarrhea severity and oocyst count via quantitative PCR or fluorescence microscopy in experimental cryptosporidiosis in calves.

    PubMed

    Operario, Darwin J; Bristol, Lauren S; Liotta, Janice; Nydam, Daryl V; Houpt, Eric R

    2015-01-01

    Cryptosporidium is an important diarrhea-associated pathogen, however the correlation between parasite burden and diarrhea severity remains unclear. We studied this relationship in 10 experimentally infected calves using immunofluorescence microscopy and real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) (N = 124 fecal samples). The qPCR data were corrected for extraction/amplification efficiency and gene copy number to generate parasite counts. The qPCR and microscopic oocyst quantities exhibited significant correlation (R(2) = 0.33, P < 0.05), however qPCR had increased sensitivity. Upon comparison with diarrhea severity scores (from 0 to 3), a PCR-based count of ≥ 2.6 × 10(5) parasites or an immunofluorescence microscopy count of ≥ 4.5 × 10(4) oocysts were discriminatory predictors of moderate-to-severe diarrhea (versus no-to-mild diarrhea), with accuracies and predictive values of 72-82%. In summary, a quantitative approach for Cryptosporidium can refine predictive power for diarrhea and appears useful for distinguishing clinical cryptosporidiosis versus subclinical infection.

  12. Dual channel detection of ultra low concentration of bacteria in real time by scanning fluorescence correlation spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altamore, Ilaria; Lanzano, Luca; Gratton, Enrico

    2013-06-01

    We describe a novel method to detect very low concentrations of bacteria in water. Our device consists of a portable horizontal geometry small confocal microscope with large pinhole and a holder for cylindrical cuvettes containing the sample. Two motors provide fast rotational and slow vertical motion of the cuvette so the device looks like a simplified flow cytometer without flow. To achieve high sensitivity, the design has two detection channels. Bacteria are stained by two different nucleic acid dyes and excited with two different lasers. Data are analyzed with a correlation filter based on particle passage pattern recognition. The passage of a particle through the illumination volume is compared with a Gaussian pattern in both channels. The width of the Gaussian correlates with the time of passage of the particle so one particle is counted when the algorithm finds a match with a Gaussian in both channels. The concentration of particles in the sample is deduced from the total number of coincident hits and the total volume scanned. This portable setup provides higher sensitivity, low-cost advantage, and it can have a wide use ranging from clinical applications to pollution monitors and water and air quality control.

  13. Area correlation constraint for the MCR-ALS quantification of cholesterol using EEM fluorescence data: A new approach.

    PubMed

    Neves, Ana Carolina de Oliveira; Tauler, Romá; de Lima, Kássio Michell Gomes

    2016-09-21

    This work demonstrates the use of a new additional constraint for the Multivariate Curve Resolution-Alternating Least Squares (MCR-ALS) algorithm called "area correlation constraint", introduced to build calibration models for Excitation Emission Matrix (EEM) data. We propose the application of area correlation constraint MCR-ALS for the quantification of cholesterol using a simulated data set and an experimental data system (cholesterol in a ternary mixture). This new constraint includes pseudo-univariate local regressions using the area of resolved profiles against reference values during the alternating least squares optimization, to provide directly accurate quantifications of a specific analyte in concentration units. In the two datasets investigated in this work, the new constraint retrieved correctly the analyte and interference spectral profiles and performed accurate estimations of cholesterol concentrations in test samples. This the first study using the proposed area constraint using EEM measurements. This new constraint approach emerges as a new possibility to be tested in general cases of second-order multivariate calibration data in the presence of unknown interferents or in more involved higher order calibration cases. PMID:27590541

  14. Chemical correlation of some late Cenozoic tuffs of Northern and Central California by neutron activation analysis of glass and comparison with X-ray fluorescence analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sarna-Wojcicki, Andrei M.; Bowman, Harry W.; Russell, Paul C.

    1979-01-01

    Glasses separated from several dacitic and rhyolitic late Cenozoic tuffs of northern and central California were analyzed by neutron activation for more than 43 elemental abundances. Eighteen elements--scandiurn, manganese, iron, zinc, rubidium, cesium, barium, lanthanum, cerium, samarium, europium, terbiurn, dysprosiurn, ytterbiurn, hafniurn, tantalurn, thorium and uranium--were selected as most suitable for purposes of chemical correlation on the basis of their natural variability in silicic tuffs and the precision obtainable in analysis. Stratigraphic relations between tuffs and replicate chemical analyses on individual tuffs make it possib1e to calibrate a quantitative parameter, the similarity coefficient, which indicates the degree of correlation for the tuffs studied. The highest similarity coefficient (0.99) was obtained for analyses of two tuffs (potassium-argon dated at about' 6.0 m.y.) exposed in the Merced(?) and Petaluma Formations of Sonoma County, which represent different paleoenvironments, shallow-water marine and fresh water or brackish marine, respectively. Corre1ation of these formations on the basis of criteria other than tephrochronoloqy would be difficult. Results of neutron activation analysis in general confirm earlier correlations made on the basis of analysis by X-ray fluorescence but also make it possible to resolve small compositional differences between chemically simi1ar tuffs in stratigraphic proximity. The Lawlor Tuff (potassium-argon dated at about 4.0 m.y.) is identified at two new localities: in a core sample obtained from a bore hole east of Suisun Bay, and from the Kettleman Hills of western San Joaquin Valley. This identification permits correlation of the uppermost part of the marine Etchegoin Formation in the San Joaquin Valley with the continental Livermore Gravels of Clark, the Tassajara Formation, and the upper part of the Sonoma Volcanics in the cel1tral Coast Ranges of California. A younger tuff near the top of the

  15. On the influence of crosslinker on template complexation in molecularly imprinted polymers: a computational study of prepolymerization mixture events with correlations to template-polymer recognition behavior and NMR spectroscopic studies.

    PubMed

    Shoravi, Siamak; Olsson, Gustaf D; Karlsson, Björn C G; Nicholls, Ian A

    2014-06-12

    Aspects of the molecular-level basis for the function of ethylene glycol dimethacrylate and trimethylolproprane trimethacrylate crosslinked methacrylic acid copolymers molecularly imprinted with (S)-propranolol have been studied using a series of all-component and all-atom molecular dynamics studies of the corresponding prepolymerization systems. The crosslinking agents were observed to contribute to template complexation, and the results were contrasted with previously reported template-recognition behavior of the corresponding polymers. Differences in the extent to which the two crosslinkers interacted with the functional monomer were identified, and correlations were made to polymer-ligand recognition behavior and the results of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopic studies studies. This study demonstrates the importance of considering the functional monomer-crosslinker interaction when designing molecularly imprinted polymers, and highlights the often neglected general contribution of crosslinker to determining the nature of molecularly imprinted polymer-template selectivity.

  16. Spectroscopic and quantum chemical correlation for structural evaluation, chemical reactivity and non-linear optical property investigation of two chalcone having pyrrole moiety: A comparative study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, R. N.; Rawat, Poonam; Baboo, Vikas; Kumar, Yashvinder

    2015-04-01

    As part of study of pyrrole-chalcone, ethyl 4-[3-(4-chloro-phenyl)-acryloyl]-3,5-dimethyl-1H-pyrrole-2-carboxylate (ECADPC) and ethyl 3,5-dimethyl-4-[3-(3-nitro-phenyl)-acryloyl]-1H-pyrrole-2-carboxylate (EDNAPC) have been synthesized by Claisen-Schmidt condensation using chloro- and nitro- substituted aromatic aldehyde and ethyl 3,5-dimetyl-4-acetyl-1H-pyrrole-2-carboxylate. The products were characterized by 1H NMR, UV-Visible, FT-IR spectroscopic methods and Quantum chemical calculations. Conformational analysis, normal mode frequencies and corresponding vibrational assignments based on potential energy distribution study revealed that ECADPC and EDNAPC exist in dimer form in solid state. 'Quantum theory of Atoms in molecules' (QTAIM) analysis has been performed to know the strength of intra- and intermolecular interactions. The UV-Visible spectra study reveals that the compounds are almost transparent in the visible region. Angular distribution of the probability density for population conformational analysis of ECADPC and EDNAPC are determined by analysis of the potential energy surface (PES). The calculated static first hyperpolarizability (β0) value for monomers of ECADPC and EDNAPC are 17.078 × 10-30 and 2.344 × 10-30 esu respectively, infers ECADPC to be more suitable for non-linear optical (NLO) response than EDNAPC. The electronic descriptors analysis predicts the nature of local reactive sites within the molecule.

  17. Spectroscopic and Ab Initio Investigation of C-H⋅⋅⋅N Hydrogen-Bonded Complexes of Fluorophenylacetylenes: Frequency Shifts and Correlations.

    PubMed

    Dey, Arghya; Mondal, Sohidul Islam; Sen, Saumik; Patwari, G Naresh

    2016-08-18

    The C-H⋅⋅⋅N hydrogen-bonded complexes of several fluorophenyacetylenes with ammonia and methylamine were characterized by a redshift in the acetylenic C-H stretching vibration of the phenylacetylene moiety. These redshifts were linearly correlated with the stabilization energies calculated at the CCSD(T)/CBS//MP2-aug-cc-pVDZ level. Analysis of various components of the interaction energy indicated that the observed redshifts were weakly correlated with the electrostatic component. The weaker linear correlation between the frequency shifts and the electrostatic component between two data sets can perhaps be attributed to the marginal differences in the Stark tuning rate and zero-field shifts. The induction and exchange-repulsion components were linearly correlated. However, the dispersion component depends on the nature of the hydrogen-bond acceptor and shows a quantum jump when the hydrogen-bond acceptor is changed from ammonia to methylamine. The observed linear correlation between the redshifts in the C-H stretching frequencies and the total stabilization energies is due to mutual cancellation of deviations from linearity between various components. PMID:27146197

  18. Ultrasonic separation of a suspension for in situ spectroscopic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nogo, Kosuke; Qi, Wei; Mori, Keita; Ogawa, Satoshi; Inohara, Daichi; Hosono, Satsuki; Kawashima, Natsumi; Nishiyama, Akira; Wada, Kenji; Ishimaru, Ichiro

    2016-04-01

    Application of spectroscopic techniques to suspensions is difficult because optical scattering caused by solid particles reduces the accuracy. At the extreme, dense suspensions like blood cannot be analyzed by spectroscopic techniques. In the present study, an ultrasonic standing wave was used to agglomerate fluorescent particles in an aqueous ethanol suspension at the nodes of the standing wave. Relatively clear liquid regions, which contained few particles that could cause optical scattering, appeared around the anti-nodes and were used for spectroscopic imaging. This produced a spectrum that was similar to that of clear aqueous ethanol without any fluorescent particles.

  19. The application of k-shell x-ray fluorescence to determine bone lead burden and its correlation with hypertension among African Americans in Gadsden County, Florida

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson-Edwards, Patrice

    Photons from k shell x-ray fluorescence illuminates lead atoms by measuring the characteristic x-rays which indicate the abundance of 210Pb present in a sample. The measurement utilizes a 109Cd source and a low-energy germanium detector, which has emerged as the best available technique for estimating cumulative exposure to lead in adults and for predicting lead-associated risks for adult chronic disease outcomes such as hypertension. The main focus of this study, was to show the correlation between bone lead concentration at the tibia (mean +/- standard deviation of 7+/-1 ppm) and patella (mean +/- standard deviation of 6+/-1 ppm) bone sites and hypertension (mean +/- standard deviation of the systolic standing 143+/-18mmHg, systolic sitting 140+/-17mmHg, diastolic standing 88+/-14 mmHg, and diastolic sitting 81+/-9 mmHg), among the 67 Gadsden County subjects that participated in this study. This was accomplished using FAMU's setup for the detector. The gamma rays emitted by the 109Cd source are scattered by atomic electrons in the k-shell. Excited electrons in the k-shell then spontaneously fluoresce at 88 keV as a signature of lead in the bone. The 88 keV photons are then detected at an angle of 180 degrees with respect to the incident x-ray direction and are detected by the Canberra Germanium solid-state detector bathed in liquid nitrogen. Results show that in this population all lead biomarkers (tibia lead, patella lead, and blood lead) were not significant contributors to the occurrence of hypertension. In the final logistic regression analysis, age and gender were predictors for the occurrence of hypertension at the p<0.05 level in the overall population. This study will help contribute to the understanding of the body's management of lead toxicity and to KXRF techniques currently used in physics research.

  20. Spectroscopic Survey of Cool Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linsky, J.

    This program will obtain far-UV spectra of cool stars that span a broad range of spectral type and luminosity class. It is our intention to obtain these spectra early in the FUSE program and to provide the spectra quickly to the user community in order to guide potential guest investigators in designing their observing programs. The specific science objectives include: (1) studying transition region dynamics (winds and downflows), (2) modeling the thermal structure of transition regions, (3) measuring electron densities, (4) search for low temperature coronae, (5) studying molecular excitation and fluorescence processes, and (6) inferring how the transition regions of spectroscopic binary systems differ from those of single stars.

  1. Synthesis and spectroscopic properties of 4-amino-1,8-naphthalimide derivatives involving the carboxylic group: a new molecular probe for ZnO nanoparticles with unusual fluorescence features

    PubMed Central

    Bekere, Laura; Gachet, David; Lokshin, Vladimir; Marine, Wladimir

    2013-01-01

    Summary Of a series of 4-substituted 1,8-naphthalimides, fluorescent 4-(6-piperidinyl-1,3-dioxo-1H-benzo[de]isoquinolin-2(3H)-yl)benzoic acid (4) was found to be a sensitive molecular probe for ZnO nanoparticles. We investigated in detail one- and two-photon absorption properties of this fluorophore. In nonpolar solvents, the acid 4 absorbs at about 400 nm and fluoresces at 500 nm with a fluorescence lifetime of about 7 ns, similar to the ester 6 and typical of the lifetimes of other derivatives of this type. Although the anionic form of this acid is not fluorescent, partial ionization of 4 in polar solvents, such as ethanol and acetonitrile, is not only accompanied by the expected decrease in the fluorescence quantum yield, but also gives rise to bathochromic shifts of both absorption and fluorescence and dual fluorescence with lifetimes of 0.2–0.3 ns and 6 ns ascribed to the formation of anionic complexes. The interaction with the ZnO surface brings about further considerable changes in the fluorescence patterns. PMID:23843926

  2. Time-resolved non-contact fluorescence diffuse optical tomography measurements with ultra-fast time-correlated single photon counting avalanche photodiodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bérubé-Lauzière, Yves; Robichaud, Vincent; Lapointe, Éric

    2007-07-01

    The design and fabrication of time-correlated single photon counting (TCSPC) avalanche photodiodes (APDs) and associated quenching circuits have made significant progresses in recent years. APDs with temporal resolutions comparable to microchannel plate photomultiplier tubes (MCP-PMTs) are now available. MCP-PMTs were until these progresses the best TCSPC detectors with timing resolutions down to 30ps. APDs can now achieve these resolutions at a fraction of the cost. Work is under way to make the manufacturing of TCSPC APDs compatible with standard electronics fabrication practices. This should allow to further reduce their cost and render them easier to integrate in complex multi-channel TCSPC electronics, as needed in diffuse optical tomography (DOT) systems. Even if their sensitive area is much smaller than that of the ubiquitous PMT used in TCSPC, we show that with appropriate selection of optical components, TCSPC APDs can be used in time-domain DOT. To support this, we present experimental data and calculations clearly demonstrating that comparable measurements can be obtained with APDs and PMTs. We are, to our knowledge, the first group using APDs in TD DOT, in particular in non-contact TD fluorescence DOT.

  3. Determination of dissociation constant of the NFκB p50/p65 heterodimer using fluorescence cross-correlation spectroscopy in the living cell

    SciTech Connect

    Tiwari, Manisha; Mikuni, Shintaro; Muto, Hideki; Kinjo, Masataka

    2013-07-05

    Highlights: •We used two-laser-beam FCCS to determine the dissociation constant (K{sub d}) of IPT domain of p50/p65 heterodimer in living cell. •Interaction of p50 and p65 was analyzed in the cytoplasm and nucleus of single living cell. •Binding affinity of p50/p65 heterodimer is higher in cytoplasm than that of nucleus. -- Abstract: Two-laser-beam fluorescence cross-correlation spectroscopy (FCCS) is promising technique that provides quantitative information about the interactions of biomolecules. The p50/p65 heterodimer is the most abundant and well understood of the NFκB dimers in most cells. However, the quantitative value of affinity, namely the K{sub d}, for the heterodimer in living cells is not known yet. To quantify the heterodimerization of the IPT domain of p50/p65 in the living cell, we used two-laser-beam FCCS. The K{sub d} values of mCherry{sub 2}- and EGFP-fused p50 and p65 were determined to be 0.46 μM in the cytoplasm and 1.06 μM in the nucleus of the living cell. These results suggest the different binding affinities of the p50/p65 heterodimer in the cytoplasm and nucleus of the living cell and different complex formation in each region.

  4. Adsorption Behavior of Extracellular Polymeric Substances on Graphene Materials Explored by Fluorescence Spectroscopy and Two-Dimensional Fourier Transform Infrared Correlation Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Bo-Mi; Hur, Jin

    2016-07-19

    Adsorption isotherms of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) on graphene oxide (GO) and reduced GO (rGO) were studied using fluorescence excitation-emission matrix-parallel factor analysis (EEM-PARAFAC) and two-dimensional correlation spectroscopy (2D-COS) combined with Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). Chemical reduction of GO resulted in a greater extent of carbon adsorption with a higher degree of isotherm nonlinearity, suggesting that heterogeneous adsorption sites were additionally created by GO reduction. Two protein-like and two humic-like components were identified from EPS by EEM-PARAFAC. Adsorption of protein-like components was greater than that of humic-like components, and the preferential adsorption was more pronounced for GO versus rGO. Adsorption of protein-like components was more governed by site-limiting mechanisms than humic-like components as shown by the higher isotherm nonlinearity. 2D-COS provided further information on the adsorption of secondary protein structures. Adsorption of the EPS structures related to amide I and aromatic C-C bands was greater for rGO versus GO. Protein structures of EPS were more favorable for adsorption in the order of α-helix → amide II → β-sheet structures with increasing site limitation. Our results revealed successful applicability of EEM-PARAFAC and 2D-COS in examining the adsorption behavior of heterogeneous biological materials on graphene materials.

  5. Characterizing the compositional variation of dissolved organic matter over hydrophobicity and polarity using fluorescence spectra combined with principal component analysis and two-dimensional correlation technique.

    PubMed

    Su, Ben-Sheng; Qu, Zhen; He, Xiao-Song; Song, Ying-Hao; Jia, Li-Min

    2016-05-01

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM) obtained from three leachates with different landfill ages was fractionated, and its compositional variation based on hydrophobicity and polarity was characterized by synchronous fluorescence spectra combined with principal component analysis (PCA) and two-dimensional correlation technique. The results showed that the bulk DOM and its fractions were comprised of tryosine-, tryptophan-, fulvic-, and humic-like substances. Tyrosine-like matter was dominant in the young leachate DOM and its fractions, while tryptophan-, fulvic-, and humic-like substances were the main components in the intermediate and old leachate DOMs and their fractions. Tryosine-, tryptophan-, fulvic-, and humic-like substances varied concurrently with the hydrophobicity and polarity. However, the change ratio of these substances was different for the three leachates. Tyrosine-like matter, humic-like materials, and fulvic-like substances were the most sensitive to the hydrophobicity and polarity in the young, intermediate, and old leachates, respectively. Such an integrated approach jointly enhances the characterization of the hydrophobicity- and polarity-dependent DOM fractions and provides a promising way to elucidate the environmental behaviors of different DOM species.

  6. Structural and spectroscopic characterization of methyl isocyanate, methyl cyanate, methyl fulminate, and acetonitrile N-oxide using highly correlated ab initio methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalbouha, S.; Senent, M. L.; Komiha, N.; Domínguez-Gómez, R.

    2016-09-01

    Various astrophysical relevant molecules obeying the empirical formula C2H3NO are characterized using explicitly correlated coupled cluster methods (CCSD(T)-F12). Rotational and rovibrational parameters are provided for four isomers: methyl isocyanate (CH3NCO), methyl cyanate (CH3OCN), methyl fulminate (CH3ONC), and acetonitrile N-oxide (CH3CNO). A CH3CON transition state is inspected. A variational procedure is employed to explore the far infrared region because some species present non-rigidity. Second order perturbation theory is used for the determination of anharmonic frequencies, rovibrational constants, and to predict Fermi resonances. Three species, methyl cyanate, methyl fulminate, and CH3CON, show a unique methyl torsion hindered by energy barriers. In methyl isocyanate, the methyl group barrier is so low that the internal top can be considered a free rotor. On the other hand, acetonitrile N-oxide presents a linear skeleton, C3v symmetry, and free internal rotation. Its equilibrium geometry depends strongly on electron correlation. The remaining isomers present a bend skeleton. Divergences between theoretical rotational constants and previous parameters fitted from observed lines for methyl isocyanate are discussed on the basis of the relevant rovibrational interaction and the quasi-linearity of the molecular skeleton.

  7. Differences in fluorescence profiles from breast cancer tissues due to changes in relative tryptophan content via energy transfer: tryptophan content correlates with histologic grade and tumor size but not with lymph node metastases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sordillo, Laura A.; Sordillo, Peter P.; Budansky, Yury; Pu, Yang; Alfano, Robert R.

    2014-12-01

    The correlation between histologic grade, an increasingly important measure of prognosis for patients with breast cancer, and tryptophan levels from tissues of 15 breast carcinoma patients was investigated. Changes in the relative content of key native organic biomolecule tryptophan were seen from the fluorescence spectra of cancerous and paired normal tissues with excitation wavelengths of 280 and 300 nm. Due to a large spectral overlap and matching excitation-emission spectra, fluorescence resonance energy transfer from tryptophan-donor to reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotides-acceptor was noted. We used the ratios of fluorescence intensities at their spectral emission peaks, or spectral fingerprint peaks, at 340, 440, and 460 nm. Higher ratios correlated strongly with high histologic grade, while lower-grade tumors had low ratios. Large tumor size also correlated with high ratios, while the number of lymph node metastases, a major factor in staging, was not correlated with tryptophan levels. High histologic grade correlates strongly with increased content of tryptophan in breast cancer tissues and suggests that measurement of tryptophan content may be useful as a part of the evaluation of these patients.

  8. Effects of essential oil treatments on the secondary protein structure of Vicia faba: a mid-infrared spectroscopic study supported by two-dimensional correlation analysis.

    PubMed

    Mecozzi, Mauro; Sturchio, Elena

    2015-02-25

    In this study we investigated the effects of essential oil treatments on the secondary protein structure of the Vicia faba roots, a bioindicator plant, in order to obtain information for the potential allelopathic uses of these oils as alternative to the use of pesticides in agriculture. We tested two mixtures of essential oils consisting of Tween 20-emulsions of tea tree oil (TTO) and Tween 20-emulsion of Clove and Rosemary (GARROM) essential oils respectively at three different oil concentrations each. The molecular modifications caused in Vicia faba by exposure to oil emulsions were investigated by FTIR spectroscopy in diffuse reflectance (DRIFT) mode. We considered the specific Amide I, Amide II and Amide VI bands by ordinary and second derivative spectroscopy and the results showed that both Tween 20-emulsion of GARROM and Tween 20-emulsion of TTO oils cause transitions among the secondary (α-helix, β-sheet and β-turn) structures with in addition the appearance of random coil structures in exposed samples. The Amide VI bands, placed between 500 and 600 cm(-1), confirmed the structural transitions observed for the Amide I bands. In addition we observed the presence of a protein oxidation effect for TTO treated samples, oxidation which resulted negligible instead for the GARROM oil samples. At last, FTIR spectra were also submitted to two-dimensional correlation analysis (2DCORR) and double two-dimensional correlation analysis (D2DCORR); the results confirmed the different effects caused by the two typologies of essential oils on the secondary protein structures of Vicia faba roots.

  9. Effects of essential oil treatments on the secondary protein structure of Vicia faba: A mid-infrared spectroscopic study supported by two-dimensional correlation analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mecozzi, Mauro; Sturchio, Elena

    2015-02-01

    In this study we investigated the effects of essential oil treatments on the secondary protein structure of the Vicia faba roots, a bioindicator plant, in order to obtain information for the potential allelopathic uses of these oils as alternative to the use of pesticides in agriculture. We tested two mixtures of essential oils consisting of Tween 20-emulsions of tea tree oil (TTO) and Tween 20-emulsion of Clove and Rosemary (GARROM) essential oils respectively at three different oil concentrations each. The molecular modifications caused in Vicia faba by exposure to oil emulsions were investigated by FTIR spectroscopy in diffuse reflectance (DRIFT) mode. We considered the specific Amide I, Amide II and Amide VI bands by ordinary and second derivative spectroscopy and the results showed that both Tween 20-emulsion of GARROM and Tween 20-emulsion of TTO oils cause transitions among the secondary (α-helix, β-sheet and β-turn) structures with in addition the appearance of random coil structures in exposed samples. The Amide VI bands, placed between 500 and 600 cm-1, confirmed the structural transitions observed for the Amide I bands. In addition we observed the presence of a protein oxidation effect for TTO treated samples, oxidation which resulted negligible instead for the GARROM oil samples. At last, FTIR spectra were also submitted to two-dimensional correlation analysis (2DCORR) and double two-dimensional correlation analysis (D2DCORR); the results confirmed the different effects caused by the two typologies of essential oils on the secondary protein structures of Vicia faba roots.

  10. Ground and excited state proton transfer of the bioactive plant flavonol robinetin in a protein environment: spectroscopic and molecular modeling studies.

    PubMed

    Pahari, Biswa Pathik; Chaudhuri, Sudip; Chakraborty, Sandipan; Sengupta, Pradeep K

    2015-02-12

    We performed spectroscopic and molecular modeling studies to explore the interaction of the bioactive plant flavonol robinetin (3,7,3',4',5'-OH flavone), with the carrier protein human serum albumin (HSA). Multiparametric fluorescence sensing, exploiting the intrinsic "two color" fluorescence of robinetin (comprising excited state intramolecular proton transfer (ESIPT) and charge transfer (CT) emissions) reveals that binding to HSA significantly affects the emission and excitation profiles, with strongly blue-shifted (∼29 nm) normal fluorescence and remarkable increase in the ESIPT fluorescence anisotropy (r) and lifetime (τ). Flavonol-induced HSA (tryptophan) fluorescence quenching data yield the dynamic quenching constant (KD) as 5.42 × 10(3) M(-1) and the association constant (Ks) as 5.59 × 10(4) M(-1). Time-resolved fluorescence anisotropy decay studies show dramatic (∼170 times) increase in the rotational correlation time (τ(rot)), reflecting greatly enhanced restrictions in motion of robinetin in the protein matrix. Furthermore, prominent induced circular dichroism (ICD) bands appear, indicating that the chiral environment of HSA strongly perturbs the electronic transitions of the intrinsically achiral robinetin molecule. Molecular docking calculations suggest that robinetin binds in subdomain IIA of HSA, where specific interactions with basic residues promote ground state proton abstraction and stabilize an anionic species, which is consistent with spectroscopic observations. PMID:25313717

  11. Spectroscopic characterization of coumarin-stained beads: quantification of the number of fluorophores per particle with solid-state 19F-NMR and measurement of absolute fluorescence quantum yields.

    PubMed

    Huber, Alexandra; Behnke, Thomas; Würth, Christian; Jaeger, Christian; Resch-Genger, Ute

    2012-04-17

    The rational design of nano- and micrometer-sized particles with tailor-made optical properties for biological, diagnostic, and photonic applications requires tools to characterize the signal-relevant properties of these typically scattering bead suspensions. This includes methods for the preferably nondestructive quantification of the number of fluorophores per particle and the measurement of absolute fluorescence quantum yields and absorption coefficients of suspensions of fluorescent beads for material performance optimization and comparison. Here, as a first proof-of-concept, we present the first time determination of the number of dye molecules per bead using nondestructive quantitative ((19)F) NMR spectroscopy and 1000 nm-sized carboxylated polystyrene particles loaded with varying concentrations of the laser dye coumarin 153 containing a CF(3) group. Additionally, the signal-relevant optical properties of these dye-loaded particles were determined in aqueous suspension in comparison to the free dye in solvents of different polarity with a custom-built integrating sphere setup that enables spectrally resolved measurements of emission, transmission, and reflectance as well absolute fluorescence quantum yields. These measurements present an important step toward absolute brightness values and quantitative fluorescence analysis with particle systems that can be exploited, for example, for optical imaging techniques and different fluorescence assays as well as for the metrological traceability of fluorescence methods. PMID:22404690

  12. Rapid identification of microorganisms by intrinsic fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhatta, Hemant; Goldys, Ewa M.; Learmonth, Robert

    2005-03-01

    Microbial contamination has serious consequences for the industries that use fermentation processes. Common contaminants such as faster growing lactic acid bacteria or wild yeast can rapidly outnumber inoculated culture yeast and produce undesirable end products. Our study focuses on a rapid method of identification of such contaminants based on autofluorescence spectroscopy of bacterial and yeast species. Lactic acid bacteria (Lac-tobacillus casei), and yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) were cultured under controlled conditions and studied for variations in their autofluorescence. We observed spectral differences in the spectral range representative of tryptophan residues of proteins, with excitation at 290 nm and emission scanned in the 300 nm - 440 nm range. Excitation scans between 240 nm and 310 nm were also performed for the emission at 340 nm. Moreover, we observed clearly pronounced differences in the excitation and emission in the visible range, with 410 nm excitation. These results demonstrate that bacterial and yeast species can be differentiated using their intrinsic fluorescence both in UV and in the visible region. The comparative spectroscopic study of selected strains of Saccharomyces yeast showed clear differences between strains. Spectrally-resolved laser scanning microscopy was carried out to link the results obtained using ensembles of cells with spectral properties of individual cells. Strongly fluorescent subpopulation were observed for all yeast strains with excitation at 405 nm. The fluorescence spectra showed variations correlated with cell brightness. The presented results demonstrate that using autofluorescence, it is possible to differentiate between yeast and lactic acid bacteria and between different yeast species.

  13. Optical spectroscopic studies of mononitrated benzo[a]pyrenes.

    PubMed

    Vyas, Shubham; Onchoke, Kefa K; Rajesh, Cheruvallil S; Hadad, Christopher M; Dutta, Prabir K

    2009-11-12

    Spectroscopic properties, including absorption, emission spectra, and excited-state lifetimes of the mononitrated benzo[a]pyrenes (NBaPs), specifically 1-, 3-, and 6-nitrobenzo[a]pyrenes (1-, 3-, and 6-NBaP), are reported, and correlations with structure are developed. With 1- and 3-NBaP, bathochromic shifts are observed in the absorption spectra. The quantum yields of emission display the following trend: BaP > 6-NBaP > 1-NBaP approximately 3-NBaP. Fluorescence lifetimes for nitrated BaPs were approximately 6 to 7 times shorter than that of BaP. With the help of time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT), assignments of the electronic transitions are proposed and are in good agreement with the electronic spectra for the NBaPs in methanol. On the basis of optimization of the triplet states, different photochemical consequences are discussed, and the observed fluorescence quenching is explained. Changes in the electron density distributions in the ground and excited states calculated at the second-order coupled-cluster level using the resolution-of-the-identity approximation (RI-CC2) provide information about the possible mechanism of photochemical reactions of NBaPs. Correlations between the orientation of the nitro group relative to the aromatic plane and the observed properties of the NBaP are discussed. PMID:19888776

  14. Correlation of polycrystalline Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} device efficiency with homojunction depth and interfacial structure: X-ray photoemission and positron annihilation spectroscopic characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, A.J.; Sobol, P.E.; Gabor, A.M.; Contreras, M.A.; Asoka-Kumar, P.; Lynn, K.G.

    1994-06-01

    Angled-resolved high resolution photoemission measurements on valence band electronic structure and Cu 2p, In 3d, Ga 2p, and Se 3d core lines were used to evaluate surface and near-surface chemistry of CuInSe{sub 2} and Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} device grade thin films. XPS compositional depth profiles were also acquired from the near-surface region, and bonding of the Cu, In, Ga, and Se was determined as a function of depth. A Cu-poor region was found, indicating CuIn{sub 5}Se{sub 8} or a CuIn{sub 3}Se{sub 5}-In{sub 2}Se{sub 3} mixture. Correlation between the depth of the Cu-poor region/bulk interface and device efficiency showed that the depth was 115 {angstrom} for a 16.4% CIGS device, 240 {angstrom} for a 15.0% CIGS, and 300 {angstrom} for 14.0% CIGS, with similar trends for CIS films. The surface region is n-type, the bulk is p-type, with a 0.5 eV valence band offset. Depth of homojunction may be the determining factor in device performance. Positron annihilation spectroscopy gave similarly illuminating results.

  15. Synthesis and fluorescence properties of Tb(III) complex with a novel β-diketone ligand as well as spectroscopic studies on the interaction between Tb(III) complex and bovine serum albumin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhenfeng; Tang, Ruiren

    2012-02-01

    A novel aromatic β-diketone ligand, 4-isopropyl-2,6-bisbenzoylactyl pyridine (L), and its corresponding Tb(III) complex Tb2(L)3·5H2O were synthesised in this paper. The ligand was characterized by FT-IR and 1H NMR. The complex was characterized with elemental analysis and FT-IR. The investigation of fluorescence property of the complex showed that the Tb(III) ion could be sensitized efficiently by the ligand. Furthermore, the interaction of Tb2(L)3·5H2O with bovine serum albumin (BSA) has been investigated by fluorescence quenching spectra, UV-vis absorbance and synchronous fluorescence spectra. The fluorescence quenching mechanism of BSA by Tb2(L)3·5H2O was analyzed. The binding constants, binding site number and the corresponding thermodynamic parameters at different temperatures were calculated. The results indicated that the Van der Waals and hydrogen bond interactions were the predominant intermolecular forces in stabilizing the complex. Moreover, the effect of Tb2(L)3·5H2O on the conformation of BSA was analyzed according to synchronous fluorescence.

  16. Development of novel fluorescent probe 3-perylene diphenylphosphine for determination of lipid hydroperoxide with fluorescent image analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Chotimarkorn, Chatchawan; Nagasaka, Reiko; Ushio, Hideki . E-mail: hushio@s.kaiyodai.ac.jp; Ohshima, Toshiaki; Matsunaga, Shigeki

    2005-12-16

    A novel fluorescent probe 3-perylene diphenylphosphine (3-PeDPP) was synthesized for the direct analysis of lipid hydroperoxides. The structure of 3-PeDPP was identified by the spectroscopic data, FAB-MS, {sup 1}H NMR, and {sup 13}C NMR. The reactivities of 3-PeDPP with lipid hydroperoxides were investigated in chloroform/MeOH homogeneous solutions and PC liposome model systems oxidized by either 2,2'-azobis(2-amidinopropane)dihydrochloride and photosensitized oxidation. The fluorescence intensity derived from 3-perylene diphenylphosphineoxide (3-PeDPPO) increased proportionally with amount of hydroperoxides produced in homogeneous solutions and liposome model systems. 3-PeDPP was easily incorporated into mouse myeloma SP2 cells and thin tissue section for dynamic membrane lipid peroxidation studies. Linear correlations between fluorescence intensity and amount of hydroperoxides in the cell membrane and tissue sections were obtained. The fluorescence intensity from 2-dimensional image analysis was also well correlated with lipid hydroperoxide level in these models. Thus, the novel probe 3-PeDPP is useful for the direct determination of lipid hydroperoxides in biological materials.

  17. A Combined Experimental and Computational Investigation on Spectroscopic and Photophysical Properties of a Coumarinyl Chalcone.

    PubMed

    Al-Sehemi, Abdullah G; Pannipara, Mehboobali; Kalam, Abul; Asiri, Abdullah M

    2016-07-01

    Here, we synthesized a new coumarinyl chalcone derivative 3-[3-(3-Methyl-thiophen-2-yl)-acryloyl]-chromen-2-one (MTC) by simple and proficient method. A comprehensive study on the photophysics of a coumarinyl chalcone derivative having pi-conjugated potential chromophore system 3-[3-(3-Methyl-thiophen-2-yl)-acryloyl]-chromen-2-one (MTC) has been carried out spectroscopically. The electronic absorption and emission characteristic of MTC were studied in different protic and aprotic solvents using absorption and steady-state fluorescence techniques. The spectral behavior of this compound is found to be extremely sensitive to the polarity and hydrogen bonding nature of the solvent. The compound shows very strong solvent polarity dependent changes in their photophysical characteristics, namely, remarkable red shift in the emission spectra with increasing solvent polarity, change in Stokes shift, significant reduction in the fluorescence quantum yield; indicating that the fluorescence states of these compounds are of intramolecular charge transfer (ICT) character. The solvent effect on the photophysical parameters such as singlet absorption, molar absorptivity, oscillator strength, dipole moment, fluorescence spectra, and fluorescence quantum yield of the compound has been investigated in detail. The difference between the excited and ground state dipole moments (Δμ) were estimated from solvatochromic methods using Lippert-Mataga and Reichardt's correlations. The prepared compound was also studied by density functional theory (DFT) and time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT). The results revealed that it could be easily reproduce by computational means. PMID:27307021

  18. Simultaneous spectroscopic measurements of the interior temperature and induced cargo release from pore-restricted mesoporous silica nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Dong, Juyao; Zink, Jeffrey I

    2016-05-19

    Temperature changes initiated within nano structures are being increasingly used to externally activate responsive delivery vehicles. Yet, the precise measurement of the nano environment temperature increase and its correlation with the induced macroscopic cargo release are difficult to achieve. In this study, we focus on a photothermally activated drug delivery system based on mesoporous silica nanoparticles, and use an optical nanothermometer - NaYF4:Yb(3+),Er(3+) crystals - for a ratiometric temperature measurement. Using fluorescent dyes as the payload molecule, both the nanoparticle interior temperature change and the macroscopic cargo release amount are monitored simultaneously by fluorescent spectroscopy. We found that the cargo release lags the temperature increase by about 5 min, revealing the threshold temperature that the particles have to reach before a substantial release could happen. Using this spectroscopic method, we are able to directly compare and correlate a nano environment event with its stimulated macroscopic results.

  19. Simultaneous spectroscopic measurements of the interior temperature and induced cargo release from pore-restricted mesoporous silica nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Juyao; Zink, Jeffrey I.

    2016-05-01

    Temperature changes initiated within nano structures are being increasingly used to externally activate responsive delivery vehicles. Yet, the precise measurement of the nano environment temperature increase and its correlation with the induced macroscopic cargo release are difficult to achieve. In this study, we focus on a photothermally activated drug delivery system based on mesoporous silica nanoparticles, and use an optical nanothermometer - NaYF4:Yb3+,Er3+ crystals - for a ratiometric temperature measurement. Using fluorescent dyes as the payload molecule, both the nanoparticle interior temperature change and the macroscopic cargo release amount are monitored simultaneously by fluorescent spectroscopy. We found that the cargo release lags the temperature increase by about 5 min, revealing the threshold temperature that the particles have to reach before a substantial release could happen. Using this spectroscopic method, we are able to directly compare and correlate a nano environment event with its stimulated macroscopic results.Temperature changes initiated within nano structures are being increasingly used to externally activate responsive delivery vehicles. Yet, the precise measurement of the nano environment temperature increase and its correlation with the induced macroscopic cargo release are difficult to achieve. In this study, we focus on a photothermally activated drug delivery system based on mesoporous silica nanoparticles, and use an optical nanothermometer - NaYF4:Yb3+,Er3+ crystals - for a ratiometric temperature measurement. Using fluorescent dyes as the payload molecule, both the nanoparticle interior temperature change and the macroscopic cargo release amount are monitored simultaneously by fluorescent spectroscopy. We found that the cargo release lags the temperature increase by about 5 min, revealing the threshold temperature that the particles have to reach before a substantial release could happen. Using this spectroscopic method, we are

  20. Spectroscopic characterization of Venus at the single molecule level.

    PubMed

    David, Charlotte C; Dedecker, Peter; De Cremer, Gert; Verstraeten, Natalie; Kint, Cyrielle; Michiels, Jan; Hofkens, Johan

    2012-02-01

    Venus is a recently developed, fast maturating, yellow fluorescent protein that has been used as a probe for in vivo applications. In the present work the photophysical characteristics of Venus were analyzed spectroscopically at the bulk and single molecule level. Through time-resolved single molecule measurements we found that single molecules of Venus display pronounced fluctuations in fluorescence emission, with clear fluorescence on- and off-times. These fluorescence intermittencies were found to occupy a broad range of time scales, ranging from milliseconds to several seconds. Such long off-times can complicate the analysis of single molecule counting experiments or single-molecule FRET experiments.

  1. Studies on the binding of a carditionic agent to human serum albumin by two-dimensional correlation fluorescence spectroscopy and molecular modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Teng; Xiang, Bing-Ren; Li, Yue; Chen, Chang-Yun; Zhou, Xiao-Hua; Wang, Zhi-Mei; Dong, Ying; Wang, Ying; Fang, Hui-Sheng

    2009-03-01

    The binding of a novel carditionic agent (2-amino-4-chloro- N-(4-(6-oxo-1,4,5,6-tetrahydropyridazin-3-yl)phenyl)benzamide (ACPB)) to human serum albumin (HSA) under physiological conditions has been investigated by using UV/vis absorption, fluorescence, circular dichroism (CD) and Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) in combination with protein-ligand docking study. It was observed that there was a prominent interaction between ACPB and HSA. The interaction was also confirmed by two-dimensional (2D) correction analysis based on the quenching perturbation on the fluorescence spectra and the order of the response of ACPB and HSA to the quenching perturbation was also elucidated based on Noda's rule. Fluorescence data revealed that the fluorescence quenching was a static quenching process and the binding constants were calculated to be 8.781 × 10 5, 7.310 × 10 5, and 5.358 × 10 5 M -1 at 290, 300, and 310 K, respectively. The thermodynamic parameters were calculated according to the Van't Hoff equation and the binding mode was determined. In addition, the alterations of protein secondary structure were qualitatively and quantitatively determined by the evidence from synchronous fluorescence, CD and FT-IR. Furthermore, docking studies that corroborate our experimental results revealed that the binding sites were located in subdomain IIA of HSA.

  2. Super-resolution spectroscopic microscopy via photon localization

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Biqin; Almassalha, Luay; Urban, Ben E.; Nguyen, The-Quyen; Khuon, Satya; Chew, Teng-Leong; Backman, Vadim; Sun, Cheng; Zhang, Hao F.

    2016-01-01

    Traditional photon localization microscopy analyses only the spatial distributions of photons emitted by individual molecules to reconstruct super-resolution optical images. Unfortunately, however, the highly valuable spectroscopic information from these photons have been overlooked. Here we report a spectroscopic photon localization microscopy that is capable of capturing the inherent spectroscopic signatures of photons from individual stochastic radiation events. Spectroscopic photon localization microscopy achieved higher spatial resolution than traditional photon localization microscopy through spectral discrimination to identify the photons emitted from individual molecules. As a result, we resolved two fluorescent molecules, which were 15 nm apart, with the corresponding spatial resolution of 10 nm—a four-fold improvement over photon localization microscopy. Using spectroscopic photon localization microscopy, we further demonstrated simultaneous multi-colour super-resolution imaging of microtubules and mitochondria in COS-7 cells and showed that background autofluorescence can be identified through its distinct emission spectra. PMID:27452975

  3. Super-resolution spectroscopic microscopy via photon localization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Biqin; Almassalha, Luay; Urban, Ben E.; Nguyen, The-Quyen; Khuon, Satya; Chew, Teng-Leong; Backman, Vadim; Sun, Cheng; Zhang, Hao F.

    2016-07-01

    Traditional photon localization microscopy analyses only the spatial distributions of photons emitted by individual molecules to reconstruct super-resolution optical images. Unfortunately, however, the highly valuable spectroscopic information from these photons have been overlooked. Here we report a spectroscopic photon localization microscopy that is capable of capturing the inherent spectroscopic signatures of photons from individual stochastic radiation events. Spectroscopic photon localization microscopy achieved higher spatial resolution than traditional photon localization microscopy through spectral discrimination to identify the photons emitted from individual molecules. As a result, we resolved two fluorescent molecules, which were 15 nm apart, with the corresponding spatial resolution of 10 nm--a four-fold improvement over photon localization microscopy. Using spectroscopic photon localization microscopy, we further demonstrated simultaneous multi-colour super-resolution imaging of microtubules and mitochondria in COS-7 cells and showed that background autofluorescence can be identified through its distinct emission spectra.

  4. [Spectroscopic and dynamical studies of highly energized small polyatomic molecules]. Technical progress report, February 1, 1990--June 30, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-31

    Stimulated emission pumping (SEP) spectroscopy was used on acetylene and on formyl radical. An attempt was made for pattern recognition based on statistics; a method was invented that combined CNPI (complete nuclear permutation-inversion) group theory and SCC (spectral cross-correlation). But the direction away from statistical pattern recognition back to traditional spectroscopic pattern recognition was taken. Vibrational states and quantum numbers are discussed. For the formyl radical, the fluorescence excitation spectrum was recorded and a rotational analysis of the 0{sup 0}{sub 0} band performed.

  5. The clustering of galaxies in the SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey: baryon acoustic oscillations in the correlation function of LOWZ and CMASS galaxies in Data Release 12

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuesta, Antonio J.; Vargas-Magaña, Mariana; Beutler, Florian; Bolton, Adam S.; Brownstein, Joel R.; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Gil-Marín, Héctor; Ho, Shirley; McBride, Cameron K.; Maraston, Claudia; Padmanabhan, Nikhil; Percival, Will J.; Reid, Beth A.; Ross, Ashley J.; Ross, Nicholas P.; Sánchez, Ariel G.; Schlegel, David J.; Schneider, Donald P.; Thomas, Daniel; Tinker, Jeremy; Tojeiro, Rita; Verde, Licia; White, Martin

    2016-04-01

    We present distance scale measurements from the baryon acoustic oscillation signal in the constant stellar mass and low-redshift sample samples from the Data Release 12 of the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey. The total volume probed is 14.5 Gpc3, a 10 per cent increment from Data Release 11. From an analysis of the spherically averaged correlation function, we infer a distance to z = 0.57 of D_V(z)r^fid_d/r_d = 2028± 21 Mpc and a distance to z = 0.32 of D_V(z)r^fid_d/r_d = 1264± 22 Mpc assuming a cosmology in which r^fid_d = 147.10 Mpc. From the anisotropic analysis, we find an angular diameter distance to z = 0.57 of D_A(z)r^fid_d/r_d = 1401± 21 Mpc and a distance to z = 0.32 of 981 ± 20 Mpc, a 1.5 and 2.0 per cent measurement, respectively. The Hubble parameter at z = 0.57 is H(z)r_d/r^fid_d = 100.3± 3.7 km s-1 Mpc-1 and its value at z = 0.32 is 79.2 ± 5.6 km s-1 Mpc-1, a 3.7 and 7.1 per cent measurement, respectively. These cosmic distance scale constraints are in excellent agreement with a Λ cold dark matter model with cosmological parameters released by the recent Planck 2015 results.

  6. Spectroscopic study of 2-[2-(4-cyclaminophenyl)ethen-1-yl] benzothiazoles and their N-allylbenzothiazolium bromides. Solvent and substituent effects on their ultraviolet-visible and fluorescence spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gáplovský, Anton; Donovalová, Jana; Magdolen, Peter; Toma, Štefan; Zahradník, Pavol

    2002-01-01

    UV-vis and fluorescence spectra of 2-[2-(4-cyclaminophenyl)ethen-1-yl] benzothiazoles 1 and their N-allylbenzothiazolium bromides 2 have been measured and interpreted. The substitution and solvent effects on electronic structure and spectra have been investigated. The benzothiazolium salts substituted with saturated cyclamines show strong push-pull character and can be used as potential NLO materials. Formation of aggregated structures was observed at higher concentrations of the benzothiazolium bromides.

  7. Probing the Aggregation Behavior of Neat Imidazolium-Based Alkyl Sulfate (Alkyl = Ethyl, Butyl, Hexyl, and Octyl) Ionic Liquids through Time Resolved Florescence Anisotropy and NMR and Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy Study.

    PubMed

    Majhi, Debashis; Pabbathi, Ashok; Sarkar, Moloy

    2016-01-14

    Aggregation behavior of a series of neat 1-ethyl 3-methylimidazolium alkyl sulfate (alkyl = ethyl, butyl, hexyl, and octyl) ionic liquids has been investigated through combined time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy, 1-D and 2-D NMR spectroscopy, and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS). Interestingly, experimentally measured rotational relaxation times (τr) for ethyl, butyl, hexyl and octyl systems are measured to be 2.25, 1.64, 1.36, and 1.32 times higher than the estimated (from Stokes-Einstein-Debye theory) values for the same respective systems. This indicates that the emitting species is not the monomeric imidazolium moiety rather an associated species, and volume of the rotating fluorescing species decreases even though the length of the alkyl moiety on the anions is increased. The shift in the (1)H proton signal as well as a change in the width of the same signal upon dilution of the neat ionic liquids indicates that ionic liquids exist in the aggregated form. Further investigation through the 2D-ROESY experiment shows that interaction between imidazolium and sulfate is relatively stronger in the ethyl system than that of the longer octyl system. FCS measurements independently show that the hydrodynamic volume decreases with an increase in the anion chain length. The NMR and FCS results are consistent with the findings of the fluorescence anisotropy study. PMID:26654730

  8. Time-resolved fluorescence anisotropies in mixed surfactant solutions

    SciTech Connect

    McCarroll, M.E.; Joly, A.G.; Wang, Z.; Friedrich, D.M.; Wandruszka, R. von

    1999-10-01

    Time-resolved fluorescence anisotropy decays of solutions of Triton X-114 (TX-114) with various amounts of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) were measured using the emission both from the surfactant itself and from added perylene. In the former case, the monomer and aggregate species of the surfactant were spectroscopically isolated and were shown to have significantly different rotational correlation times. The rotational diffusion of perylene in micellar TX-114 with small amounts of added SDS appeared to have a component with a very short correlation time. The anisotropy decay curves showed the existence of limiting anisotropies (r{sub {infinity}}), indicating hindered probe rotation in the micellar environment. At higher SDS concentrations, the fast-decaying component slowed down and the limiting anisotropy decreased substantially, suggesting some migration of the probe to the interior of the micelle.

  9. Integrated Fluorescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tuma, Margaret (Inventor); Gruhlke, Russell W. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    A detection method is integrated with a filtering method and an enhancement method to create a fluorescence sensor that can be miniaturized. The fluorescence sensor comprises a thin film geometry including a waveguide layer, a metal film layer and sensor layer. The thin film geometry of the fluorescence sensor allows the detection of fluorescent radiation over a narrow wavelength interval. This enables wavelength discrimination and eliminates the detection of unwanted light from unknown or spurious sources.

  10. Frequency-domain fluorescence spectroscopy of human stratum corneum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrison, Michael D.; Potts, Russell O.; Abraham, William

    1994-08-01

    The intercellular lipid lamellae of mammalian stratum corneum (SC) constitute the major barrier to percutaneous penetration of drugs and other solute molecules. In order to understand the barrier property of skin on a molecular level, we have initiated fluorescence spectroscopic investigation of the membranous structures of the SC and related model systems using the lipophilic probe 1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene (DPH). Incorporated into distearoylphosphatidylcholine and stratum corneum bilayers, DPH fluorescence reflected the change in lipid structure under thermal and chemical perturbations. Using a multiharmonic frequency approach, we measured the fluorescence lifetime and rotational correlation times for DPH in these systems. Our data indicated that a biexponential decay ((tau) 1 approximately equals 9 ns, (tau) 2 approximately equals 1.5 ns) described the intensity decay, while a hindered rotor model ((phi) approximately equals 5 ns, r(infinity ) approximately equals 0.3) described the anisotropy decay. These parameters reported the known thermotropic phase transition in porcine stratum corneum, and the influence of the penetration enhancer oleic acid in human epidermis. Thus, we have shown frequency- domain fluorescence spectroscopy to be a facile and powerful tool for monitoring the permeability of a solid tissue such as the SC.

  11. Spectroscopic Signature of Aging in (delta)-Pu(Ga)

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, B W; Schwartz, A J; Ebbinghaus, B B; Fluss, M J; Haslam, J J; Blobaum, K M; Tobin, J G

    2005-04-15

    Resonant Photoemission, a variant of Photoelectron Spectroscopy, has been demonstrated to have sensitivity to aging of Pu samples. The spectroscopic results are correlated with resistivity measurements and are shown to be the fingerprint of mesoscopic or nanoscale internal damage in the Pu physical structure. This means that a spectroscopic signature of internal damage due to aging in Pu has been established.

  12. Optical Spectroscopic Monitoring of Parachute Yarn Aging

    SciTech Connect

    Tallant, D.R.; Garcia, M.J.; Simpson, R.L.; Behr, V.L.; Whinery, L.D.; Peng, L.W.

    1999-04-01

    Optical spectroscopic techniques were evaluated as nondestructive monitors of the aging of parachutes in nuclear weapons. We analyzed thermally aged samples of nylon and Kevlar webbing by photoluminescence spectroscopy and reflection spectroscopy. Infrared analysis was also performed to help understand the degradation mechanisms of the polymer materials in the webbing. The photoluminescence and reflection spectra were analyzed by chemometric data treatment techniques to see if aged-induced changes in the spectra correlated to changes in measured tensile strength. A correlation was found between the shapes of the photoluminescent bands and the measured tensile strengths. Photoluminescent spectra can be used to predict the tensile strengths of nylon and Kevlar webbing with sufficient accuracy to categorize the webbing sample as above rated tensile strength, marginal or below rated tensile strength. The instrumentation required to perform the optical spectroscopic measurement can be made rugged, compact and portable. Thus, optical spectroscopic techniques offer a means for nondestructive field monitoring of parachutes in the enduring stockpile/

  13. Time-Domain Microfluidic Fluorescence Lifetime Flow Cytometry for High-Throughput Förster Resonance Energy Transfer Screening

    PubMed Central

    Nedbal, Jakub; Visitkul, Viput; Ortiz-Zapater, Elena; Weitsman, Gregory; Chana, Prabhjoat; Matthews, Daniel R; Ng, Tony; Ameer-Beg, Simon M

    2015-01-01

    Sensing ion or ligand concentrations, physico-chemical conditions, and molecular dimerization or conformation change is possible by assays involving fluorescent lifetime imaging. The inherent low throughput of imaging impedes rigorous statistical data analysis on large cell numbers. We address this limitation by developing a fluorescence lifetime-measuring flow cytometer for fast fluorescence lifetime quantification in living or fixed cell populations. The instrument combines a time-correlated single photon counting epifluorescent microscope with microfluidics cell-handling system. The associated computer software performs burst integrated fluorescence lifetime analysis to assign fluorescence lifetime, intensity, and burst duration to each passing cell. The maximum safe throughput of the instrument reaches 3,000 particles per minute. Living cells expressing spectroscopic rulers of varying peptide lengths were distinguishable by Förster resonant energy transfer measured by donor fluorescence lifetime. An epidermal growth factor (EGF)-stimulation assay demonstrated the technique's capacity to selectively quantify EGF receptor phosphorylation in cells, which was impossible by measuring sensitized emission on a standard flow cytometer. Dual-color fluorescence lifetime detection and cell-specific chemical environment sensing were exemplified using di-4-ANEPPDHQ, a lipophilic environmentally sensitive dye that exhibits changes in its fluorescence lifetime as a function of membrane lipid order. To our knowledge, this instrument opens new applications in flow cytometry which were unavailable due to technological limitations of previously reported fluorescent lifetime flow cytometers. The presented technique is sensitive to lifetimes of most popular fluorophores in the 0.5–5 ns range including fluorescent proteins and is capable of detecting multi-exponential fluorescence lifetime decays. This instrument vastly enhances the throughput of experiments involving

  14. Time-domain microfluidic fluorescence lifetime flow cytometry for high-throughput Förster resonance energy transfer screening.

    PubMed

    Nedbal, Jakub; Visitkul, Viput; Ortiz-Zapater, Elena; Weitsman, Gregory; Chana, Prabhjoat; Matthews, Daniel R; Ng, Tony; Ameer-Beg, Simon M

    2015-02-01

    Sensing ion or ligand concentrations, physico-chemical conditions, and molecular dimerization or conformation change is possible by assays involving fluorescent lifetime imaging. The inherent low throughput of imaging impedes rigorous statistical data analysis on large cell numbers. We address this limitation by developing a fluorescence lifetime-measuring flow cytometer for fast fluorescence lifetime quantification in living or fixed cell populations. The instrument combines a time-correlated single photon counting epifluorescent microscope with microfluidics cell-handling system. The associated computer software performs burst integrated fluorescence lifetime analysis to assign fluorescence lifetime, intensity, and burst duration to each passing cell. The maximum safe throughput of the instrument reaches 3,000 particles per minute. Living cells expressing spectroscopic rulers of varying peptide lengths were distinguishable by Förster resonant energy transfer measured by donor fluorescence lifetime. An epidermal growth factor (EGF)-stimulation assay demonstrated the technique's capacity to selectively quantify EGF receptor phosphorylation in cells, which was impossible by measuring sensitized emission on a standard flow cytometer. Dual-color fluorescence lifetime detection and cell-specific chemical environment sensing were exemplified using di-4-ANEPPDHQ, a lipophilic environmentally sensitive dye that exhibits changes in its fluorescence lifetime as a function of membrane lipid order. To our knowledge, this instrument opens new applications in flow cytometry which were unavailable due to technological limitations of previously reported fluorescent lifetime flow cytometers. The presented technique is sensitive to lifetimes of most popular fluorophores in the 0.5-5 ns range including fluorescent proteins and is capable of detecting multi-exponential fluorescence lifetime decays. This instrument vastly enhances the throughput of experiments involving fluorescence

  15. Ultraviolet fluorescence monitor

    SciTech Connect

    Hargis, P.J. Jr.; Preppernau, B.L.; Aragon, B.P.

    1997-05-01

    A multispectral ultraviolet (UV) fluorescence imaging fluorometer and a pulsed molecular beam laser fluorometer were developed to detect volatile organic compounds of interest in environmental monitoring and drug interdiction applications. The UV fluorescence imaging fluorometer is a relatively simple instrument which uses multiple excitation wavelengths to measure the excitation/emission matrix for irradiated samples. Detection limits in the high part-per-million to low part-per-million range were measured for a number of volatile organic vapors in the atmosphere. Detection limits in the low part-per-million range were obtained using cryogenic cooling to pre-concentrate unknown samples before introducing them into the imaging fluorometer. A multivariate analysis algorithm was developed to analyze the excitation/emission matrix and used to determine the relative concentrations of species in computer synthesized mixtures containing up to five organic compounds. Analysis results demonstrated the utility of multispectral UV fluorescence in analytical measurements. A transportable UV fluorescence imaging fluorometer was used in two field tests. Field test results demonstrated that detection limits in the part-per-billion range were needed to reliably identify volatile organic compounds in realistic field test measurements. The molecular beam laser fluorometer, a more complex instrument with detection limits in the part-per-billion to part-per-trillion range, was therefore developed to satisfy detection sensitivity requirements for field test measurements. High-resolution spectroscopic measurements made with the molecular beam laser fluorometer demonstrated its utility in identifying volatile organic compounds in the atmosphere.

  16. Interactions of Isophorone Derivatives with DNA: Spectroscopic Studies

    PubMed Central

    Deiana, Marco; Matczyszyn, Katarzyna; Massin, Julien; Olesiak-Banska, Joanna; Andraud, Chantal; Samoc, Marek

    2015-01-01

    Interactions of three new isophorone derivatives, Isoa Isob and Isoc with salmon testes DNA have been investigated using UV-Vis, fluorescence and circular dichroism spectroscopic methods. All the studied compounds interact with DNA through intercalative binding mode. The stoichiometry of the isophorone/DNA adducts was found to be 1:1. The fluorescence quenching data revealed a binding interaction with the base pairs of DNA. The CD data indicate that all the investigated isophorones induce DNA modifications. PMID:26069963

  17. Nine New Fluorescent Probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Tsung-I.; Jovanovic, Misa V.; Dowben, Robert M.

    1989-06-01

    Absorption and fluorescence spectroscopic studies are reported here for nine new fluorescent probes recently synthesized in our laboratories: four pyrene derivatives with substituents of (i) 1,3-diacetoxy-6,8-dichlorosulfonyl, (ii) 1,3-dihydroxy-6,8-disodiumsulfonate, (iii) 1,3-disodiumsulfonate, and (iv) l-ethoxy-3,6,8-trisodiumsulfonate groups, and five [7-julolidino] coumarin derivatives with substituents of (v) 3-carboxylate-4-methyl, (vi) 3- methylcarboxylate, (vii) 3-acetate-4-methyl, (viii) 3-propionate-4-methyl, and (ix) 3-sulfonate-4-methyl groups. Pyrene compounds i and ii and coumarin compounds v and vi exhibit interesting absorbance and fluorescence properties: their absorption maxima are red shifted compared to the parent compound to the blue-green region, and the band width broadens considerably. All four blue-absorbing dyes fluoresce intensely in the green region, and the two pyrene compounds emit at such long wavelengths without formation of excimers. The fluorescence properties of these compounds are quite environment-sensitive: considerable spectral shifts and fluorescence intensity changes have been observed in the pH range from 3 to 10 and in a wide variety of polar and hydrophobic solvents with vastly different dielectric constants. The high extinction and fluorescence quantum yield of these probes make them ideal fluorescent labeling reagents for proteins, antibodies, nucleic acids, and cellular organelles. The pH and hydrophobicity-dependent fluorescence changes can be utilized as optical pH and/or hydrophobicity indicators for mapping environmental difference in various cellular components in a single cell. Since all nine probes absorb in the UV, but emit at different wavelengths in the visible, these two groups of compounds offer an advantage of utilizing a single monochromatic light source (e.g., a nitrogen laser) to achieve multi-wavelength detection for flow cytometry application. As a first step to explore potential application in

  18. [Effect freezing and thawing cycles on fluorescence characterization of black soil dissolved organic matter].

    PubMed

    Wang, Tai-Ming; Wang, Ye-Yao; Xiang, Bao; Hu, Yu

    2011-08-01

    Fluorescence characterization of soil dissolved organic matter (DOM), which is one of the most important indexes concerning study on soil organic matter, can be effected by freezing and thawing cycles. In this paper, the fluorescence characterization of black soil DOM under the effect of freezing and thawing cycles was studied, using three-dimensional excitation-emission-matrix fluorescence spectroscopic (EEM). Based on the transformation of fluorescence characterization, the influences of humification degree and active humus in black soil were analysed. The result showed, compared with untreated by freezing and thawing cycles, (1) The phenomena red-shift of UV fulvic-like was found in soil DOM. It meant that the aromatization and humification degree increased. (2) Protein-like fluorescence peak was observed in some soil samples, which meant microbial activity was enhanced. (3) Active humus and humification degree are the indexs of soil fertility. The content of TOC in the active humus rose, just the same as the value of humification degree. It meant that soil fertility was improved. (4) Compared with the ratio of UV: visible humic-like fluorescence (r(a,c)), there were positive correlations with the active humus and humification degree. It meant that r(a, c) of soil DOM was one of the indexs on active humus, humification degree and soil fertility effected by freezing and thawing cycles.

  19. Correlation of denitrification-accepted fraction of electrons with NAD(P)H fluorescence for Pseudomonas aeruginosa performing simultaneous denitrification and respiration at extremely low dissolved oxygen conditions.

    PubMed

    Chen, Fan; Xia, Qing; Ju, Lu-Kwang

    2004-01-01

    In cystic fibrosis airway infection, Pseudomonas aeruginosa forms a microaerobic biofilm and undergoes significant physiological changes. It is important to understand the bacterium's metabolism at microaerobic conditions. In this work, the culture properties and two indicators (the denitrification-accepted e- fraction and an NAD(P)H fluorescence fraction) for the culture's "fractional approach" to a fully anaerobic denitrifying state were examined in continuous cultures with practically zero DO but different aeration rates. With decreasing aeration, specific OUR decreased while specific NAR and NIR increased and kept Y(ATP/S) relatively constant. P. aeruginosa thus appeared to effectively compensate for energy generation at microaerobic conditions with denitrification. At the studied dilution rate of 0.06 h(-1), the maximum specific OUR was 2.8 mmol O2/g cells-h and the Monod constant for DO, in the presence of nitrate, was extremely low (<0.001 mg/L). The cell yield Y(X/S) increased significantly (from 0.24 to 0.34) with increasing aeration, attributed to a roughly opposite trend of Y(ATP/X) (ATP generation required for cell growth). As for the denitrification-accepted e- fraction and the fluorescence fraction, both decreased with increasing aeration as expected. The two fractions, however, were not directly proportional. The fluorescence fraction changed more rapidly than the e- fraction at very low aeration rates, whereas the opposite was true at higher aeration. The results demonstrated the feasibility of using online NAD(P)H fluorescence to monitor sensitive changes of cellular physiology and provided insights to the shift of e- -accepting mechanisms of P. aeruginosa under microaerobic conditions.

  20. Time-resolved fluorescence microscopy.

    PubMed

    Suhling, Klaus; French, Paul M W; Phillips, David

    2005-01-01

    In fluorescence microscopy, the fluorescence emission can be characterised not only by intensity and position, but also by lifetime, polarization and wavelength. Fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) can report on photophysical events that are difficult or impossible to observe by fluorescence intensity imaging, and time-resolved fluorescence anisotropy imaging (TR-FAIM) can measure the rotational mobility of a fluorophore in its environment. We compare different FLIM methods: a chief advantage of wide-field time-gating and phase modulation methods is the speed of acquisition whereas for time-correlated single photon counting (TCSPC) based confocal scanning it is accuracy in the fluorescence decay. FLIM has been used to image interactions between proteins such as receptor oligomerisation and to reveal protein phosphorylation by detecting fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). In addition, FLIM can also probe the local environment of fluorophores, reporting, for example, on the local pH, refractive index, ion or oxygen concentration without the need for ratiometric measurements.

  1. Fluorescent ligands for adenosine receptors.

    PubMed

    Kozma, Eszter; Jayasekara, P Suresh; Squarcialupi, Lucia; Paoletta, Silvia; Moro, Stefano; Federico, Stephanie; Spalluto, Giampiero; Jacobson, Kenneth A

    2013-01-01

    Interest is increasing in developing fluorescent ligands for characterization of adenosine receptors (ARs), which hold a promise of usefulness in the drug discovery process. The size of a strategically labeled AR ligand can be greatly increased after the attachment of a fluorophore. The choice of dye moiety (e.g. Alexa Fluor 488), attachment point and linker length can alter the selectivity and potency of the parent molecule. Fluorescent derivatives of adenosine agonists and antagonists (e.g. XAC and other heterocyclic antagonist scaffolds) have been synthesized and characterized pharmacologically. Some are useful AR probes for flow cytometry, fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, fluorescence microscopy, fluorescence polarization, fluorescence resonance energy transfer, and scanning confocal microscopy. Thus, the approach of fluorescent labeled GPCR ligands, including those for ARs, is a growing dynamic research field.

  2. Calibration method for spectroscopic systems

    DOEpatents

    Sandison, David R.

    1998-01-01

    Calibration spots of optically-characterized material placed in the field of view of a spectroscopic system allow calibration of the spectroscopic system. Response from the calibration spots is measured and used to calibrate for varying spectroscopic system operating parameters. The accurate calibration achieved allows quantitative spectroscopic analysis of responses taken at different times, different excitation conditions, and of different targets.

  3. Calibration method for spectroscopic systems

    DOEpatents

    Sandison, D.R.

    1998-11-17

    Calibration spots of optically-characterized material placed in the field of view of a spectroscopic system allow calibration of the spectroscopic system. Response from the calibration spots is measured and used to calibrate for varying spectroscopic system operating parameters. The accurate calibration achieved allows quantitative spectroscopic analysis of responses taken at different times, different excitation conditions, and of different targets. 3 figs.

  4. Spectroscopic chemical analysis methods and apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hug, William F. (Inventor); Reid, Ray D. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    Spectroscopic chemical analysis methods and apparatus are disclosed which employ deep ultraviolet (e.g. in the 200 nm to 300 nm spectral range) electron beam pumped wide bandgap semiconductor lasers, incoherent wide bandgap semiconductor light emitting devices, and hollow cathode metal ion lasers to perform non-contact, non-invasive detection of unknown chemical analytes. These deep ultraviolet sources enable dramatic size, weight and power consumption reductions of chemical analysis instruments. Chemical analysis instruments employed in some embodiments include capillary and gel plane electrophoresis, capillary electrochromatography, high performance liquid chromatography, flow cytometry, flow cells for liquids and aerosols, and surface detection instruments. In some embodiments, Raman spectroscopic detection methods and apparatus use ultra-narrow-band angle tuning filters, acousto-optic tuning filters, and temperature tuned filters to enable ultra-miniature analyzers for chemical identification. In some embodiments Raman analysis is conducted simultaneously with native fluorescence spectroscopy to provide high levels of sensitivity and specificity in the same instrument.

  5. Spectroscopic chemical analysis methods and apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hug, William F. (Inventor); Reid, Ray D. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    Spectroscopic chemical analysis methods and apparatus are disclosed which employ deep ultraviolet (e.g. in the 200 nm to 300 nm spectral range) electron beam pumped wide bandgap semiconductor lasers, incoherent wide bandgap semiconductor light emitting devices, and hollow cathode metal ion lasers to perform non-contact, non-invasive detection of unknown chemical analytes. These deep ultraviolet sources enable dramatic size, weight and power consumption reductions of chemical analysis instruments. Chemical analysis instruments employed in some embodiments include capillary and gel plane electrophoresis, capillary electrochromatography, high performance liquid chromatography, flow cytometry, flow cells for liquids and aerosols, and surface detection instruments. In some embodiments, Raman spectroscopic detection methods and apparatus use ultra-narrow-band angle tuning filters, acousto-optic tuning filters, and temperature tuned filters to enable ultra-miniature analyzers for chemical identification. In some embodiments Raman analysis is conducted simultaneously with native fluorescence spectroscopy to provide high levels of sensitivity and specificity in the same instrument.

  6. Alternative methods for estimating common descriptors for QSAR studies of dyes and fluorescent probes using molecular modeling software. 2. Correlations between log P and the hydrophilic/lipophilic index, and new methods for estimating degrees of amphiphilicity.

    PubMed

    Dapson, Richard W; Horobin, Richard W

    2013-11-01

    The log P descriptor, despite its usefulness, can be difficult to use, especially for researchers lacking skills in physical chemistry. Moreover this classic measure has been determined in numerous ways, which can result in inconsistant estimates of log P values, especially for relatively complex molecules such as fluorescent probes. Novel measures of hydrophilicity/lipophilicity (the Hydrophilic/Lipophilic Index, HLI) and amphiphilicity (hydrophilic/lipophilic indices for the head group and tail, HLIT and HLIHG, respectively) therefore have been devised. We compare these descriptors with measures based on log P, the standard method for quantitative structure activity relationships (QSAR) studies. HLI can be determined using widely available molecular modeling software, coupled with simple arithmetic calculations. It is based on partial atomic charges and is intended to be a stand-alone measure of hydrophilicity/lipophilicity. Given the wide application of log P, however, we investigated the correlation between HLI and log P using a test set of 56 fluorescent probes of widely different physicochemical character. Overall correlation was poor; however, correlation of HLI and log P for probes of narrowly specified charge types, i.e., non-ionic compounds, anions, conjugated cations, or zwitterions, was excellent. Values for probes with additional nonconjugated quaternary cations, however, were less well correlated. The newly devised HLI can be divided into domain-specific descriptors, HLIT and HLIHG in amphiphilic probes. Determinations of amphiphilicity, made independently by the authors using their respective methods, showed excellent agreement. Quantifying amphiphilicity from partial log P values of the head group (head group hydrophilicity; HGH) and tail (amphiphilicity index; AI) has proved useful for understanding fluorescent probe action. The same limitations of log P apply to HGH and AI, however. The novel descriptors, HLIT and HLIHG, offer analogous advantages

  7. Laser induced fluorescence lifetime characterization of Bacillus endospore species using time correlated single photon counting analysis with the multi-exponential fit method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Clint; Edwards, Jarrod; Fisher, Andmorgan

    2010-04-01

    Rapid detection of biological material is critical for determining presence/absence of bacterial endospores within various investigative programs. Even more critical is that if select material tests positive for bacillus endospores then tests should provide data at the species level. Optical detection of microbial endospore formers such as Bacillus sp. can be heavy, cumbersome, and may only identify at the genus level. Data provided from this study will aid in characterization needed by future detection systems for further rapid breakdown analysis to gain insight into a more positive signature collection of Bacillus sp. Literature has shown that fluorescence spectroscopy of endospores could be statistically separated from other vegetative genera, but could not be separated among one another. Results of this study showed endospore species separation is possible using laser-induce fluorescence with lifetime decay analysis for Bacillus endospores. Lifetime decays of B. subtilis, B. megaterium, B. coagulans, and B. anthracis Sterne strain were investigated. Using the Multi-Exponential fit method data showed three distinct lifetimes for each species within the following ranges, 0.2-1.3 ns; 2.5-7.0 ns; 7.5-15.0 ns, when laser induced at 307 nm. The four endospore species were individually separated using principle component analysis (95% CI).

  8. Instrumentation for multi-modal spectroscopic diagnosis of epithelial dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Tunnell, J W; Desjardins, A E; Galindo, L; Georgakoudi, I; McGee, S A; Mirkovic, J; Mueller, M G; Nazemi, J; Nguyen, F T; Wax, A; Zhang, Q; Dasari, R R; Feld, M S

    2003-12-01

    Reflectance and fluorescence spectroscopies have shown great promise for early detection of epithelial dysplasia. We have developed a clinical reflectance spectrofluorimeter for multimodal spectroscopic diagnosis of epithelial dysplasia. This clinical instrument, the FastEEM, collects white light reflectance and fluorescence excitation-emission matrices (EEM's) within a fraction of a second. In this paper we describe the FastEEM instrumentation, designed for collection of multi-modal spectroscopic data. We illustrate its performance using tissue phantoms with well defined optical properties and biochemicals of known fluorescence properties. In addition, we discuss our plans to develop a system that combines a multi-spectral imaging device for wide area surveillance with this contact probe device. PMID:14640762

  9. Rationalizing inter- and intracrystal heterogeneities in dealuminated acid mordenite zeolites by stimulated Raman scattering microscopy correlated with super-resolution fluorescence microscopy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Kuan-Lin; Kubarev, Alexey V; Van Loon, Jordi; Uji-i, Hiroshi; De Vos, Dirk E; Hofkens, Johan; Roeffaers, Maarten B J

    2014-12-23

    Dealuminated zeolites are widely used acid catalysts in research and the chemical industry. Bulk-level studies have revealed that the improved catalytic performance results from an enhanced molecular transport as well as from changes in the active sites. However, fully exploiting this information in rational catalyst design still requires insight in the intricate interplay between both. Here we introduce fluorescence and stimulated Raman scattering microscopy to quantify subcrystal reactivity as well as acid site distribution and to probe site accessibility in the set of individual mordenite zeolites. Dealumination effectively introduces significant heterogeneities between different particles and even within individual crystals. Besides enabling direct rationalization of the nanoscale catalytic performance, these observations reveal valuable information on the industrial dealumination process itself.

  10. Rationalizing Inter- and Intracrystal Heterogeneities in Dealuminated Acid Mordenite Zeolites by Stimulated Raman Scattering Microscopy Correlated with Super-resolution Fluorescence Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Dealuminated zeolites are widely used acid catalysts in research and the chemical industry. Bulk-level studies have revealed that the improved catalytic performance results from an enhanced molecular transport as well as from changes in the active sites. However, fully exploiting this information in rational catalyst design still requires insight in the intricate interplay between both. Here we introduce fluorescence and stimulated Raman scattering microscopy to quantify subcrystal reactivity as well as acid site distribution and to probe site accessibility in the set of individual mordenite zeolites. Dealumination effectively introduces significant heterogeneities between different particles and even within individual crystals. Besides enabling direct rationalization of the nanoscale catalytic performance, these observations reveal valuable information on the industrial dealumination process itself. PMID:25402756

  11. Spectroscopic imaging in electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Pennycook, Stephen J; Colliex, C.

    2012-01-01

    In the scanning transmission electron microscope, multiple signals can be simultaneously collected, including the transmitted and scattered electron signals (bright field and annular dark field or Z-contrast images), along with spectroscopic signals such as inelastically scattered electrons and emitted photons. In the last few years, the successful development of aberration correctors for the electron microscope has transformed the field of electron microscopy, opening up new possibilities for correlating structure to functionality. Aberration correction not only allows for enhanced structural resolution with incident probes into the sub-angstrom range, but can also provide greater probe currents to facilitate mapping of intrinsically weak spectroscopic signals at the nanoscale or even the atomic level. In this issue of MRS Bulletin, we illustrate the power of the new generation of electron microscopes with a combination of imaging and spectroscopy. We show the mapping of elemental distributions at atomic resolution and also the mapping of electronic and optical properties at unprecedented spatial resolution, with applications ranging from graphene to plasmonic nanostructures, and oxide interfaces to biology.

  12. Fluorescence enhancement of warfarin induced by interaction with beta-cyclodextrin.

    PubMed

    Vasquez, Jacob M; Vu, Andrew; Schultz, Jerome S; Vullev, Valentine I

    2009-01-01

    Warfarin is the most common agent used for control and prevention of venous as well as arterial thromboembolism (blood clots). In aqueous media, warfarin forms inclusion complexes with a family of cyclic oligosaccharides, alpha, beta, gamma-cyclodextrins (CD). The formation of these complexes results in enhancement of the fluorescence of warfarin. Such spectroscopic changes offer a venue for the development of bioanalytical methodologies for warfarin quantification in biological liquids. We characterized the photophysical properties of warfarin in solvents with varying polarity and viscosity. The fluorescence quantum yield of warfarin correlated: (1) strongly with the solvent viscosity (R = 0.979) and (2) weakly with the solvent polarity (R = 0.118). These findings indicate that it is the change of the viscosity, rather than polarity, of the microenvironment that causes the fluorescence enhancement of warfarin upon binding to beta-CD. Utilizing the observed fluorescence enhancement in fluorescence titration measurements, the binding constants of warfarin to beta-CD were obtained (2.6 x 10(2) M(-1)-3.7 x 10(2) M(-1)). Using multivariable linear analysis, we extracted the stoichiometry of warfarin-beta-CD interaction (1:1).

  13. Reflectance and fluorescence characterization of maize species using field laboratory measurements and lidar remote sensing.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Guangyu; Duan, Zheng; Ming, Lian; Li, Yiyun; Chen, Ruipeng; Hu, Jiandong; Svanberg, Sune; Han, Yanlai

    2016-07-01

    Laser-induced fluorescence is an important technique to study photosynthesis and plants. Information on chlorophyll and other pigments can be obtained. We have been using a mobile laboratory in a Chinese experimental farm setting to study maize (Zea mays L.) leaves by reflectance and fluorescence measurements and correlated the spectroscopic signals to the amount of fertilizer supplied. Further, we studied five different species of maize using the remote monitoring of the fluorescence signatures obtained with the same mobile laboratory, but now in a laser radar remote-sensing configuration. The system separation from the target area was 50 m, and 355 nm pulsed excitation using the frequency-tripled output from an Nd:YAG laser was employed. Principal component analysis and linear discriminant analysis were combined to identify the different maize species using their fluorescence spectra. Likewise, the spectral signatures in reflectance and fluorescence frequently allowed us to separate different fertilizer levels applied to plants of the same species. PMID:27409221

  14. Reflectance and fluorescence characterization of maize species using field laboratory measurements and lidar remote sensing.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Guangyu; Duan, Zheng; Ming, Lian; Li, Yiyun; Chen, Ruipeng; Hu, Jiandong; Svanberg, Sune; Han, Yanlai

    2016-07-01

    Laser-induced fluorescence is an important technique to study photosynthesis and plants. Information on chlorophyll and other pigments can be obtained. We have been using a mobile laboratory in a Chinese experimental farm setting to study maize (Zea mays L.) leaves by reflectance and fluorescence measurements and correlated the spectroscopic signals to the amount of fertilizer supplied. Further, we studied five different species of maize using the remote monitoring of the fluorescence signatures obtained with the same mobile laboratory, but now in a laser radar remote-sensing configuration. The system separation from the target area was 50 m, and 355 nm pulsed excitation using the frequency-tripled output from an Nd:YAG laser was employed. Principal component analysis and linear discriminant analysis were combined to identify the different maize species using their fluorescence spectra. Likewise, the spectral signatures in reflectance and fluorescence frequently allowed us to separate different fertilizer levels applied to plants of the same species.

  15. Fluorescent refrigeration

    DOEpatents

    Epstein, Richard I.; Edwards, Bradley C.; Buchwald, Melvin I.; Gosnell, Timothy R.

    1995-01-01

    Fluorescent refrigeration is based on selective radiative pumping, using substantially monochromatic radiation, of quantum excitations which are then endothermically redistributed to higher energies. Ultimately, the populated energy levels radiatively deexcite emitting, on the average, more radiant energy than was initially absorbed. The material utilized to accomplish the cooling must have dimensions such that the exciting radiation is strongly absorbed, but the fluorescence may exit the material through a significantly smaller optical pathlength. Optical fibers and mirrored glasses and crystals provide this requirement.

  16. MAMA Spectroscopic Throughputs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lennon, Daniel

    2009-07-01

    This activity sets new baseline post-SM4 sensitivity/throughput measurements for all the STIS/MAMA spectroscopic modes, and establishes if there changes with respect to perfomance prior to the LVPS failure. It also checks the NUV focus of STIS and its dependence on wavelength.

  17. Polarization properties of fluorescent BSA protected Au25 nanoclusters.

    PubMed

    Raut, Sangram; Chib, Rahul; Rich, Ryan; Shumilov, Dmytro; Gryczynski, Zygmunt; Gryczynski, Ignacy

    2013-04-21

    BSA protected gold nanoclusters (Au25) are attracting a great deal of attention due to their unique spectroscopic properties and possible use in biophysical applications. Although there are reports on synthetic strategies, spectroscopy and applications, little is known about their polarization behavior. In this study, we synthesized the BSA protected Au25 nanoclusters and studied their steady state and time resolved fluorescence properties including polarization behavior in different solvents: glycerol, propylene glycol and water. We demonstrated that the nanocluster absorption spectrum can be separated from the extinction spectrum by subtraction of Rayleigh scattering. The nanocluster absorption spectrum is well approximated by three Gaussian components. By a comparison of the emissions from BSA Au25 clusters and rhodamine B in water, we estimated the quantum yield of nanoclusters to be higher than 0.06. The fluorescence lifetime of BSA Au25 clusters is long and heterogeneous with an average value of 1.84 μs. In glycerol at -20 °C the anisotropy is high, reaching a value of 0.35. However, the excitation anisotropy strongly depends on the excitation wavelengths indicating a significant overlap of the different transition moments. The anisotropy decay in water reveals a correlation time below 0.2 μs. In propylene glycol the measured correlation time is longer and the initial anisotropy depends on the excitation wavelength. BSA Au25 clusters, due to long lifetime and high polarization, can potentially be used in studying large macromolecules such as protein complexes with large molecular weight.

  18. An AOTF-based dual-modality hyperspectral imaging system (DMHSI) capable of simultaneous fluorescence and reflectance imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Matthew E; Wabuyele, Musundi B; Panjehpour, Masoud {Nmn}; Overholt, Bergein F; Kennel, Steve J; Cunningham, Glenn; Vo Dinh, Tuan

    2006-03-01

    An acousto-optic tunable filter (AOTF)-based system for dual-modality hyperspectral imaging (DMHSI) has been developed for use in characterization of normal and malignant mouse tissue. The system consists of a laser, endoscope, AOTF, and two cameras coupled with optics and electronics. Initial results show that the system can delineate normal and malignant mouse tissues real-time. The analysis shows that malignant tissues consistently exhibit less fluorescent intensity in the wavelength band from 440 to 540nm with a peak intensity of around 490nm. The analysis also shows key spectroscopic differences between normal and malignant tissues. Further, these results are compared to real-time spectroscopic data and show good correlation.

  19. Spectroscopic characterization of dissolved organic matter derived from different biochars and their polycylic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) binding affinity.

    PubMed

    Tang, Jianfeng; Li, Xinhu; Luo, Yan; Li, Gang; Khan, Sardar

    2016-06-01

    In recent years, biochar has received a great attention due to its high application in different sectors of environment. The feasibility of biochar applications is depended on its physical and chemical properties and biochar-derived dissolved organic matter (DOM) characteristics. This study was conducted to investigate the spectroscopic characteristics of biochar-derived DOM and its binding capacity of hydrophobic organic chemicals (HOCs). DOM solutions were isolated from five different biochars prepared through pyrolysis and analyzed for dissolved organic carbon (DOC) contents. The optical analysis with UV-visible absorption and excitation-emission matrix (EEM) fluorescence spectroscopes and DOC water distribution coefficient (KDOC) were calculated in the presence of PAHs and DOM. The DOC contents and the estimated aromaticity (SUVA254) were different for selected biochars. The DOM derived from soybean straw biochar (SBBC) showed the highest DOC contents followed by rice straw biochar (RSBC). The SBBC and RSBC peak position in the fluorescence excitation/emission matrix at longer wavelength corresponded to the peak position of other three biochars indicating that SBBC and RSBC had relatively higher degree of humification. This was well correlated with the observed KDOC values, suggesting that the KDOC value(')s dominant factor was the degree of biochar-derived DOM humification. The results of this study indicate that the optical analysis may provide valuable information regarding the characteristics of biochar-derived DOM and its application as environmental amendments for minimization of toxic organic compounds. PMID:26994600

  20. Spectroscopic characterization of dissolved organic matter in coking wastewater during bio-treatment: full-scale plant study.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ronghua; Ou, Huase; Yu, Xubiao; He, Runsheng; Lin, Chong; Wei, Chaohai

    2015-01-01

    This paper taking a full-scale coking wastewater (CWW) treatment plant as a case study aimed to characterize removal behaviors of dissolved organic matter (DOM) by UV spectra and fluorescence excitation-emission matrix-parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC), and investigate the correlations between spectroscopic indices and water quality parameters. Efficient removal rates of chemical oxygen demand (COD), dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and total nitrogen (TN) after the bio-treatment were 91.3%, 87.3% and 69.1%, respectively. UV270 was proven to be a stable UV absorption peak of CWW that could reflect the mixture of phenols, heterocyclics, polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons and their derivatives. Molecular weight and aromaticity were increased, and also the content of polar functional groups was greatly reduced after bio-treatment. Three fluorescent components were identified by PARAFAC: C1 (tyrosine-like), C2 (tryptophan-like) and C3 (humic-like). The removal rate of protein-like was higher than that of humic-like and C1 was identified as biodegradable substance. Correlation analysis showed UV270 had an excellent correlation with COD (r=0.921, n=60, P<0.01) and DOC (r=0.959, n=60, P<0.01) and significant correlation (r=0.875, n=60, P<0.01) was also found between C2 and TN. Therefore, spectroscopic characterization could provide novel insights into removal behaviors of DOM and potential to monitor water quality real-time during CWW bio-treatment.

  1. Spectroscopic characterization of dissolved organic matter in coking wastewater during bio-treatment: full-scale plant study.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ronghua; Ou, Huase; Yu, Xubiao; He, Runsheng; Lin, Chong; Wei, Chaohai

    2015-01-01

    This paper taking a full-scale coking wastewater (CWW) treatment plant as a case study aimed to characterize removal behaviors of dissolved organic matter (DOM) by UV spectra and fluorescence excitation-emission matrix-parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC), and investigate the correlations between spectroscopic indices and water quality parameters. Efficient removal rates of chemical oxygen demand (COD), dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and total nitrogen (TN) after the bio-treatment were 91.3%, 87.3% and 69.1%, respectively. UV270 was proven to be a stable UV absorption peak of CWW that could reflect the mixture of phenols, heterocyclics, polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons and their derivatives. Molecular weight and aromaticity were increased, and also the content of polar functional groups was greatly reduced after bio-treatment. Three fluorescent components were identified by PARAFAC: C1 (tyrosine-like), C2 (tryptophan-like) and C3 (humic-like). The removal rate of protein-like was higher than that of humic-like and C1 was identified as biodegradable substance. Correlation analysis showed UV270 had an excellent correlation with COD (r=0.921, n=60, P<0.01) and DOC (r=0.959, n=60, P<0.01) and significant correlation (r=0.875, n=60, P<0.01) was also found between C2 and TN. Therefore, spectroscopic characterization could provide novel insights into removal behaviors of DOM and potential to monitor water quality real-time during CWW bio-treatment. PMID:26465313

  2. Detection of PLGA-based nanoparticles at a single-cell level by synchrotron radiation FTIR spectromicroscopy and correlation with X-ray fluorescence microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Pascolo, Lorella; Bortot, Barbara; Benseny-Cases, Nuria; Gianoncelli, Alessandra; Tosi, Giovanni; Ruozi, Barbara; Rizzardi, Clara; De Martino, Eleonora; Vandelli, Maria Angela; Severini, Giovanni Maria

    2014-01-01

    Poly-lactide-co-glycolide (PLGA) is one of the few polymers approved by the US Food and Drug Administration as a carrier for drug administration in humans; therefore, it is one of the most used materials in the formulation of polymeric nanoparticles (NPs) for therapeutic purposes. Because the cellular uptake of polymeric NPs is a hot topic in the nanomedicine field, the development of techniques able to ensure incontrovertible evidence of the presence of NPs in the cells plays a key role in gaining understanding of their therapeutic potential. On the strength of this premise, this article aims to evaluate the application of synchrotron radiation-based Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (SR-FTIR) spectromicroscopy and SR X-ray fluorescence (SR-XRF) microscopy in the study of the in vitro interaction of PLGA NPs with cells. To reach this goal, we used PLGA NPs, sized around 200 nm and loaded with superparamagnetic iron oxide NPs (PLGA-IO-NPs; Fe3O4; size, 10–15 nm). After exposing human mesothelial (MeT5A) cells to PLGA-IO-NPs (0.1 mg/mL), the cells were analyzed after fixation both by SR-FTIR spectromicroscopy and SR-XRF microscopy setups. SR-FTIR-SM enabled the detection of PLGA NPs at single-cell level, allowing polymer detection inside the biological matrix by the characteristic band in the 1,700–2,000 cm−1 region. The precise PLGA IR-signature (1,750 cm−1 centered pick) also was clearly evident within an area of high amide density. SR-XRF microscopy performed on the same cells investigated under SR-FTIR microscopy allowed us to put in evidence the Fe presence in the cells and to emphasize the intracellular localization of the PLGA-IO-NPs. These findings suggest that SR-FTIR and SR-XRF techniques could be two valuable tools to follow the PLGA NPs’ fate in in vitro studies on cell cultures. PMID:24944512

  3. Detection of PLGA-based nanoparticles at a single-cell level by synchrotron radiation FTIR spectromicroscopy and correlation with X-ray fluorescence microscopy.

    PubMed

    Pascolo, Lorella; Bortot, Barbara; Benseny-Cases, Nuria; Gianoncelli, Alessandra; Tosi, Giovanni; Ruozi, Barbara; Rizzardi, Clara; De Martino, Eleonora; Vandelli, Maria Angela; Severini, Giovanni Maria

    2014-01-01

    Poly-lactide-co-glycolide (PLGA) is one of the few polymers approved by the US Food and Drug Administration as a carrier for drug administration in humans; therefore, it is one of the most used materials in the formulation of polymeric nanoparticles (NPs) for therapeutic purposes. Because the cellular uptake of polymeric NPs is a hot topic in the nanomedicine field, the development of techniques able to ensure incontrovertible evidence of the presence of NPs in the cells plays a key role in gaining understanding of their therapeutic potential. On the strength of this premise, this article aims to evaluate the application of synchrotron radiation-based Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (SR-FTIR) spectromicroscopy and SR X-ray fluorescence (SR-XRF) microscopy in the study of the in vitro interaction of PLGA NPs with cells. To reach this goal, we used PLGA NPs, sized around 200 nm and loaded with superparamagnetic iron oxide NPs (PLGA-IO-NPs; Fe₃O₄; size, 10-15 nm). After exposing human mesothelial (MeT5A) cells to PLGA-IO-NPs (0.1 mg/mL), the cells were analyzed after fixation both by SR-FTIR spectromicroscopy and SR-XRF microscopy setups. SR-FTIR-SM enabled the detection of PLGA NPs at single-cell level, allowing polymer detection inside the biological matrix by the characteristic band in the 1,700-2,000 cm(-1) region. The precise PLGA IR-signature (1,750 cm(-1) centered pick) also was clearly evident within an area of high amide density. SR-XRF microscopy performed on the same cells investigated under SR-FTIR microscopy allowed us to put in evidence the Fe presence in the cells and to emphasize the intracellular localization of the PLGA-IO-NPs. These findings suggest that SR-FTIR and SR-XRF techniques could be two valuable tools to follow the PLGA NPs' fate in in vitro studies on cell cultures. PMID:24944512

  4. Contribution to the Wednesday afternoon discussion on spectroscopic factors

    SciTech Connect

    Barbieri, C.

    2005-10-14

    This part of the discussion would like to review the concept of spectroscopic factors and how they relate to measured cross sections and nuclear correlations. A profound knowledge of how correlations affect the spectral function can help to better understand transfer reactions. Nowadays, we have a fairly complete picture for protons in stable nuclei but a lot remain to be learned regarding exotic species.

  5. Investigating the correlation between white matter and microvasculature changes in aging using large scale optical coherence tomography and confocal fluorescence imaging combined with tissue sectioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castonguay, Alexandre; Avti, Pramod K.; Moeini, Mohammad; Pouliot, Philippe; Tabatabaei, Maryam S.; Bélanger, Samuel; Lesage, Frédéric

    2015-03-01

    Here, we present a serial OCT/confocal scanner for histological study of the mouse brain. Three axis linear stages combined with a sectioning vibratome allows to cut thru the entire biological tissue and to image every section at a microscopic resolution. After acquisition, each OCT volume and confocal image is re-stitched with adjacent acquisitions to obtain a reconstructed, digital volume of the imaged tissue. This imaging platform was used to investigate correlations between white matter and microvasculature changes in aging mice. Three age groups were used in this study (4, 12, 24 months). At sacrifice, mice were transcardially perfused with a FITC containing gel. The dual imaging capability of the system allowed to reveal different contrast information: OCT imaging reveals changes in refractive indices giving contrast between white and grey matter in the mouse brain, while transcardial perfusion of a FITC shows microsvasculature in the brain with confocal imaging.

  6. Fluorescent refrigeration

    DOEpatents

    Epstein, R.I.; Edwards, B.C.; Buchwald, M.I.; Gosnell, T.R.

    1995-09-05

    Fluorescent refrigeration is based on selective radiative pumping, using substantially monochromatic radiation, of quantum excitations which are then endothermically redistributed to higher energies. Ultimately, the populated energy levels radiatively deexcite emitting, on the average, more radiant energy than was initially absorbed. The material utilized to accomplish the cooling must have dimensions such that the exciting radiation is strongly absorbed, but the fluorescence may exit the material through a significantly smaller optical pathlength. Optical fibers and mirrored glasses and crystals provide this requirement. 6 figs.

  7. Spectroscopic Low Coherence Interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosschaart, Nienke; van Leeuwen, T. G.; Aalders, Maurice C.; Hermann, Boris; Drexler, Wolfgang; Faber, Dirk J.

    Low-coherence interferometry (LCI) allows high-resolution volumetric imaging of tissue morphology and provides localized optical properties that can be related to the physiological status of tissue. This chapter discusses the combination of spatial and spectroscopic information by means of spectroscopic OCT (sOCT) and low-coherence spectroscopy (LCS). We describe the theory behind these modalities for the assessment of spatially resolved optical absorption and (back)scattering coefficient spectra. These spectra can be used for the highly localized quantification of chromophore concentrations and assessment of tissue organization on (sub)cellular scales. This leads to a wealth of potential clinical applications, ranging from neonatology for the determination of billibrubin concentrations, to oncology for the optical assessment of the aggressiveness of a cancerous lesion.

  8. Spectroscopic Binary Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batten, A.; Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    Historically, spectroscopic binary stars were binary systems whose nature was discovered by the changing DOPPLER EFFECT or shift of the spectral lines of one or both of the component stars. The observed Doppler shift is a combination of that produced by the constant RADIAL VELOCITY (i.e. line-of-sight velocity) of the center of mass of the whole system, and the variable shift resulting from the o...

  9. Spectroscopically Unlocking Exoplanet Characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Nikole

    2016-05-01

    Spectroscopy plays a critical role in a number of areas of exoplanet research. The first exoplanets were detected by precisely measuring Doppler shifts in high resolution (R ~ 100,000) stellar spectra, a technique that has become known as the Radial Velocity (RV) method. The RV method provides critical constraints on exoplanet masses, but is currently limited to some degree by robust line shape predictions. Beyond the RV method, spectroscopy plays a critical role in the characterization of exoplanets beyond their mass and radius. The Hubble Space Telescope has spectroscopically observed the atmospheres of exoplanets that transit their host stars as seen from Earth giving us key insights into atmospheric abundances of key atomic and molecular species as well as cloud optical properties. Similar spectroscopic characterization of exoplanet atmospheres will be carried out at higher resolution (R ~ 100-3000) and with broader wavelength coverage with the James Webb Space Telescope. Future missions such as WFIRST that seek to the pave the way toward the detection and characterization of potentially habitable planets will have the capability of directly measuring the spectra of exoplanet atmospheres and potentially surfaces. Our ability to plan for and interpret spectra from exoplanets relies heavily on the fidelity of the spectroscopic databases available and would greatly benefit from further laboratory and theoretical work aimed at optical properties of atomic, molecular, and cloud/haze species in the pressure and temperature regimes relevant to exoplanet atmospheres.

  10. Quantitative determination of the lateral density and intermolecular correlation between proteins anchored on the membrane surfaces using grazing incidence small-angle X-ray scattering and grazing incidence X-ray fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abuillan, Wasim; Vorobiev, Alexei; Hartel, Andreas; Jones, Nicola G.; Engstler, Markus; Tanaka, Motomu

    2012-11-01

    As a physical model of the surface of cells coated with densely packed, non-crystalline proteins coupled to lipid anchors, we functionalized the surface of phospholipid membranes by coupling of neutravidin to biotinylated lipid anchors. After the characterization of fine structures perpendicular to the plane of membrane using specular X-ray reflectivity, the same membrane was characterized by grazing incidence small angle X-ray scattering (GISAXS). Within the framework of distorted wave Born approximation and two-dimensional Percus-Yevick function, we can analyze the form and structure factors of the non-crystalline, membrane-anchored proteins for the first time. As a new experimental technique to quantify the surface density of proteins on the membrane surface, we utilized grazing incidence X-ray fluorescence (GIXF). Here, the mean intermolecular distance between proteins from the sulfur peak intensities can be calculated by applying Abelé's matrix formalism. The characteristic correlation distance between non-crystalline neutravidin obtained by the GISAXS analysis agrees well with the intermolecular distance calculated by GIXF, suggesting a large potential of the combination of GISAXS and GIXF in probing the lateral density and correlation of non-crystalline proteins displayed on the membrane surface.

  11. A whole spectroscopic mapping approach for studying the spatial distribution of pigments in paintings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosca, S.; Alberti, R.; Frizzi, T.; Nevin, A.; Valentini, G.; Comelli, D.

    2016-09-01

    We propose a non-invasive approach for the identification and mapping of pigments in paintings. The method is based on three highly complementary imaging spectroscopy techniques, visible multispectral imaging, X-Ray fluorescence mapping and Raman mapping, combined with multivariate data analysis of multidimensional spectroscopic datasets for the extraction of key distribution information in a semi-automatic way. The proposed approach exploits a macro-Raman mapping device, capable of detecting Raman signals from non-perfectly planar surfaces without the need of refocusing. Here, we show that the presence of spatially correlated Raman signals, detected in adjacent points of a painted surface, reinforces the level of confidence for material identification with respect to single-point analysis, even in the presence of very weak and complex Raman signals. The new whole-mapping approach not only provides the identification of inorganic and organic pigments but also gives striking information on the spatial distribution of pigments employed in complex mixtures for achieving different hues. Moreover, we demonstrate how the synergic combination on three spectroscopic methods, characterized by highly different time consumption, yields maximum information.

  12. Correlative microscopy.

    PubMed

    Loussert Fonta, Céline; Humbel, Bruno M

    2015-09-01

    In recent years correlative microscopy, combining the power and advantages of different imaging system, e.g., light, electrons, X-ray, NMR, etc., has become an important tool for biomedical research. Among all the possible combinations of techniques, light and electron microscopy, have made an especially big step forward and are being implemented in more and more research labs. Electron microscopy profits from the high spatial resolution, the direct recognition of the cellular ultrastructure and identification of the organelles. It, however, has two severe limitations: the restricted field of view and the fact that no live imaging can be done. On the other hand light microscopy has the advantage of live imaging, following a fluorescently tagged molecule in real time and at lower magnifications the large field of view facilitates the identification and location of sparse individual cells in a large context, e.g., tissue. The combination of these two imaging techniques appears to be a valuable approach to dissect biological events at a submicrometer level. Light microscopy can be used to follow a labelled protein of interest, or a visible organelle such as mitochondria, in time, then the sample is fixed and the exactly same region is investigated by electron microscopy. The time resolution is dependent on the speed of penetration and fixation when chemical fixatives are used and on the reaction time of the operator for cryo-fixation. Light microscopy can also be used to identify cells of interest, e.g., a special cell type in tissue or cells that have been modified by either transfections or RNAi, in a large population of non-modified cells. A further application is to find fluorescence labels in cells on a large section to reduce searching time in the electron microscope. Multiple fluorescence labelling of a series of sections can be correlated with the ultrastructure of the individual sections to get 3D information of the distribution of the marked proteins: array

  13. Correlative microscopy.

    PubMed

    Loussert Fonta, Céline; Humbel, Bruno M

    2015-09-01

    In recent years correlative microscopy, combining the power and advantages of different imaging system, e.g., light, electrons, X-ray, NMR, etc., has become an important tool for biomedical research. Among all the possible combinations of techniques, light and electron microscopy, have made an especially big step forward and are being implemented in more and more research labs. Electron microscopy profits from the high spatial resolution, the direct recognition of the cellular ultrastructure and identification of the organelles. It, however, has two severe limitations: the restricted field of view and the fact that no live imaging can be done. On the other hand light microscopy has the advantage of live imaging, following a fluorescently tagged molecule in real time and at lower magnifications the large field of view facilitates the identification and location of sparse individual cells in a large context, e.g., tissue. The combination of these two imaging techniques appears to be a valuable approach to dissect biological events at a submicrometer level. Light microscopy can be used to follow a labelled protein of interest, or a visible organelle such as mitochondria, in time, then the sample is fixed and the exactly same region is investigated by electron microscopy. The time resolution is dependent on the speed of penetration and fixation when chemical fixatives are used and on the reaction time of the operator for cryo-fixation. Light microscopy can also be used to identify cells of interest, e.g., a special cell type in tissue or cells that have been modified by either transfections or RNAi, in a large population of non-modified cells. A further application is to find fluorescence labels in cells on a large section to reduce searching time in the electron microscope. Multiple fluorescence labelling of a series of sections can be correlated with the ultrastructure of the individual sections to get 3D information of the distribution of the marked proteins: array

  14. Spectroscopic evaluation of photodynamic therapy of the intraperitoneal cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finlay, Jarod C.; Sandell, Julia L.; Zhu, Timothy C.; Lewis, Robert; Cengel, Keith A.; Hahn, Stephen M.

    2010-02-01

    We present the results of spectroscopic measurements of diffuse reflectance and fluorescence before and after photodynamic therapy of healthy canine peritoneal cavity. Animals were treated intra-operatively after iv injection of the benzoporphyrin derivative (BPD). The small bowel was treated using a uniform light field projected by a microlens-tipped fiber. The cavity was then filled with scattering medium and the remaining organs were treated using a moving diffuser. Diffuse reflectance and fluorescence measurements were made using a multi-fiber optical probe positioned on the surface of various tissues within the cavity before and after illumination. The measured data were analyzed to quantify hemoglobin concentration and oxygenation and sensitizer concentration.

  15. SDSS spectroscopic survey of stars

    SciTech Connect

    Ivezic, Zeljko; Schlegel, D.; Uomoto, A.; Bond, N.; Beers, T.; Allende Prieto, C.; Wilhelm, R.; Lee, Y.Sun; Sivarani, T.; Juric, M.; Lupton, R.; /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept. /LBL, Berkeley /Johns Hopkins U. /Princeton U. /Michigan State U. /Texas U. /Texas Tech. /UC, Santa Cruz /Fermilab /Naval Observ., Flagstaff /Drexel U.

    2007-01-01

    In addition to optical photometry of unprecedented quality, the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) is also producing a massive spectroscopic database. They discuss determination of stellar parameters, such as effective temperature, gravity and metallicity from SDSS spectra, describe correlations between kinematics and metallicity, and study their variation as a function of the position in the Galaxy. They show that stellar parameter estimates by Beers et al. show a good correlation with the position of a star in the g-r vs. u-g color-color diagram, thereby demonstrating their robustness as well as a potential for photometric parameter estimation methods. Using Beers et al. parameters, they find that the metallicity distribution of the Milky Way stars at a few kpc from the galactic plane is bimodal with a local minimum at [Z/Z{sub {circle_dot}}] {approx} -1.3. The median metallicity for the low-metallicity [Z/Z{sub {circle_dot}}] < =1.3 subsample is nearly independent of Galactic cylindrical coordinates R and z, while it decreases with z for the high-metallicity [Z/Z{sub {circle_dot}}] > -1.3 sample. they also find that the low-metallicity sample has {approx} 2.5 times larger velocity dispersion and that it does not rotate (at the {approx} 10 km/s level), while the rotational velocity of the high-metallicity sample decreases smoothly with the height above the galactic plane.

  16. Variations in spectroscopic characteristics and disinfection byproduct formation potentials of dissolved organic matter for two contrasting storm events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Hang Vo-Minh; Lee, Mi-Hee; Hur, Jin; Schlautman, Mark A.

    2013-02-01

    SummaryChanges in disinfection byproduct (DBP) precursors during storm events have not been intensively studied to date despite their dramatic impact on downstream drinking water supplies. For this study, variations in dissolved organic matter (DOM) spectroscopic properties and DBP formation potentials (DBPFPs), and the correlations among these various parameters, were investigated in river water samples collected under two contrasting storm event conditions (a strong summer storm versus a weak fall event). Fluorescence excitation-emission matrices (EEMs) combined with parallel factor analysis revealed that a combination of two humic-like components (C1 and C2) dominated the EEM data of the storm samples. Measured DOM characteristics and DBPFPs varied over a wider range during the more intense summer storm, exhibiting higher values of specific ultraviolet absorbance and C1/C2 ratio at high flow conditions. Variations in the fluorescence index were less pronounced during the two storm events. The spectroscopic changes were well explained by the input of terrestrial DOM sources from the surrounding catchments during the storms. Different trends of the formation potentials for trihalomethanes and haloacetic acids on the recession limb of the hydrographs suggest that the structures responsible for DBP precursors during storm events may not be the same for the two classes of DBPs. The ultraviolet light-absorbing moieties in DOM appear to play major roles in generating DBPs, as evidenced by their strong positive correlations with DBPFPs. Higher correlations with DBPFP for C1 versus C2 suggest that humic-like substances associated with more aromatic and condensed structures have a greater proclivity to generate DBP upon chlorination.

  17. Monitoring of slaughterhouse wastewater biodegradation in a SBR using fluorescence and UV-Visible absorbance.

    PubMed

    Louvet, J N; Homeky, B; Casellas, M; Pons, M N; Dagot, C

    2013-04-01

    The aim of this study was to demonstrate that the effectiveness of slaughterhouse wastewater treatment by activated sludge could be enhanced through the use of optical techniques, such as UV-Visible absorbance and fluorescence spectroscopy, to estimate the hydraulic retention time necessary to remove the biodegradable chemical oxygen demand (COD). Two experiments were conducted. First, a batch aerobic degradation was performed on four wastewater samples collected from four different cattle processing sites in order to study the changes in the spectroscopic properties of wastewater during biodegradation. Second, a sequencing batch reactor was used in order to confirm that the wastewater fluorescence could be successfully used to monitor wastewater biodegradation in a pilot-scale experiment. Residual blood was the main source of organic matter in the wastewater samples. The absorbance at 416 nm, related to porphyrins, was correlated to the COD during wastewater biodegradation. The tryptophan-like/fulvic-like fluorescence intensity ratio was related to the extent of biodegradation. The COD removal efficiency ranged from 74% to 94% with an hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 23 h. A ratio of tryptophan-like/fulvic-like fluorescence intensities higher than 1.2 indicated incomplete biodegradation of the wastewater and the need to increase the HRT.

  18. Fluorescent sensors for specific RNA: a general paradigm using chemistry and combinatorial biology.

    PubMed

    Sparano, Brian A; Koide, Kazunori

    2007-04-18

    Here, we describe a new paradigm for the development of small molecule-based RNA sensors. We prepared a series of potential PET (photoinduced electron transfer) sensors on the basis of 2',7'-dichlorofluorescein (DCF) fluorophore conjugated with two aniline derivatives as electron donors (quenchers). NMR and fluorescent spectroscopic analyses of these DCF derivatives revealed the correlation between the conformations, the PET, and the fluorescent intensities of these DCF derivatives, enabling us to select a sensor candidate. RNA aptamers were raised against the aniline-based quencher via in vitro selection (SELEX). One of these aptamers enhanced the fluorescence intensity of the DCF-aniline conjugate in a concentration-dependent manner. To demonstrate the power and generality of this approach, additional in vitro selection was performed and aptamers from this selection were found to have similar activities. These results show that one can develop fluorescence-inducing reporter RNA and morph it into remotely related sequences without prior structural insight into RNA-ligand binding.

  19. Preferential binding of fisetin to the native state of bovine serum albumin: spectroscopic and docking studies.

    PubMed

    Singha Roy, Atanu; Pandey, Nitin Kumar; Dasgupta, Swagata

    2013-04-01

    We have investigated the binding of the biologically important flavonoid fisetin with the carrier protein bovine serum albumin using multi-spectroscopic and molecular docking methods. The binding constants were found to be in the order of 10(4) M(-1) and the number of binding sites was determined as one. MALDI-TOF analyses showed that one fisetin molecule binds to a single bovine serum albumin (BSA) molecule which is also supported by fluorescence quenching studies. The negative Gibbs free energy change (∆G°) values point to a spontaneous binding process which occurs through the presence of electrostatic forces with hydrophobic association that results in a positive entropy change (+51.69 ± 1.18 J mol(-1) K(-1)). The unfolding and refolding of BSA in urea have been studied in absence and presence of fisetin using steady-state fluorescence and lifetime measurements. Urea denaturation studies indicate that fisetin is gradually released from its binding site on the protein. In the absence of urea, an increase in temperature that causes denaturation of the protein results in the release of fisetin from its bound state indicating that fisetin binds only to the native state of the protein. The circular dichroism (CD) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopic studies showed an increase in % α-helix content of BSA after binding with fisetin. Site marker displacement studies in accordance with the molecular docking results suggested that fisetin binds in close proximity of the hydrophobic cavity in site 1 (subdomain IIA) of the protein. The PEARLS (Program of Energetic Analysis of Receptor Ligand System) has been used to estimate the interaction energy of fisetin with BSA and the results are in good correlation with the experimental findings.

  20. Fluorescence lifetime imaging of skin cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patalay, Rakesh; Talbot, Clifford; Munro, Ian; Breunig, Hans Georg; König, Karsten; Alexandrov, Yuri; Warren, Sean; Neil, Mark A. A.; French, Paul M. W.; Chu, Anthony; Stamp, Gordon W.; Dunsby, Chris

    2011-03-01

    Fluorescence intensity imaging and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) using two photon microscopy (TPM) have been used to study tissue autofluorescence in ex vivo skin cancer samples. A commercially available system (DermaInspect®) was modified to collect fluorescence intensity and lifetimes in two spectral channels using time correlated single photon counting and depth-resolved steady state measurements of the fluorescence emission spectrum. Uniquely, image segmentation has been used to allow fluorescence lifetimes to be calculated for each cell. An analysis of lifetime values obtained from a range of pigmented and non-pigmented lesions will be presented.

  1. Defect correlated fluorescent quenching and electron phonon coupling in the spectral transition of Eu{sup 3+} in CaTiO{sub 3} for red emission in display application

    SciTech Connect

    Som, S. E-mail: swarthc@ufs.ac.za; Kumar, Vinod; Kumar, Vijay; Terblans, J. J.; Swart, H. C. E-mail: swarthc@ufs.ac.za; Kunti, A. K.; Dutta, S.; Chowdhury, M.; Sharma, S. K.

    2014-05-21

    This paper reports on the defect correlated self-quenching and spectroscopic investigation of calcium titanate (CaTiO{sub 3}) phosphors. A series of CaTiO{sub 3} phosphors doped with trivalent europium (Eu{sup 3+}) and codoped with potassium (K{sup +}) ions were prepared by the solid state reaction method. The X-ray diffraction results revealed that the obtained powder phosphors consisted out of a single-phase orthorhombic structure and it also indicated that the incorporation of the dopants/co-dopants did not affect the crystal structure. The scanning electron microscopy images revealed the irregular morphology of the prepared phosphors consisting out of μm sized diameter particles. The Eu{sup 3+} doped phosphors illuminated with ultraviolet light showed the characteristic red luminescence corresponding to the {sup 5}D{sub 0}→{sup 7}F{sub J} transitions of Eu{sup 3+}. As a charge compensator, K{sup +} ions were incorporated into the CaTiO{sub 3}:Eu{sup 3+} phosphors, which enhanced the photoluminescence (PL) intensities depending on the doping concentration of K{sup +}. The concentration quenching of Eu{sup 3+} in this host is discussed in the light of ion-ion interaction, electron phonon coupling, and defect to ion energy transfer. The spectral characteristics and the Eu-O ligand behaviour were determined using the Judd-Ofelt theory from the PL spectra instead of the absorption spectra. The CIE (International Commission on Illumination) parameters were calculated using spectral energy distribution functions and McCamy's empirical formula. Photometric characterization indicated the suitability of K{sup +} compensated the CaTiO{sub 3}:Eu{sup 3+} phosphor for pure red emission in light-emitting diode applications.

  2. Spectroscopic survey of LAMOST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yongheng

    2014-07-01

    LAMOST is a special reflecting Schmidt telescope. LAMOST breaks through the bottleneck of the large scale spectroscopic survey observation with both large aperture (effective aperture of 3.6 - 4.9m) and wide field of view (5 degrees). It is an innovative active reflecting Schmidt configuration achieved by changing mirror surface continuously to achieve a series different reflecting Schmidt system in different moments. By using the parallel controllable fiber positioning technique, the focal surface of 1.75 meters in diameter accommodates 4000 optical fibers. Also, LAMOST has 16 spectrographs with 32 CCD cameras. LAMOST is the telescope of the highest spectrum acquiring rate. As a national large scientific project, LAMOST project was proposed formally in 1996. The construction was started in 2001 and completed in 2008. After commission period, LAMOST pilot survey was started in October 2011 and spectroscopic survey began in September 2012. From October 2011 to June 2013, LAMOST has obtained more than 2 million spectra of celestial objects. There are 1.7 million spectra of stars, in which the stellar parameters (effective temperature, surface gravity, metalicitiy and radial velocity) of more than 1 million stars was obtained. In the first period of spectroscopic survey of LAMOST, 5 million of stellar spectra will be obtained and will make substantial contribution to the study of the stellar astrophysics and the structure of the Galaxy, such as the spheroid substructure of the Galaxy, the galactic gravitational potential and the distribution of the dark matter in the Galaxy, the extremely metal poor stars and hypervelocity stars, the 3D extinction in the Galaxy, the structure of thin and thick disks of the Galaxy, and so on.

  3. Studies on the binding behavior of prodigiosin with bovine hemoglobin by multi-spectroscopic techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Jing; Yang, Chao; Zhou, Lin; Ma, Fei; Liu, Shuchao; Wei, Shaohua; Zhou, Jiahong; Zhou, Yanhuai

    2012-10-01

    In this article, the interaction mechanism of prodigiosin (PG) with bovine hemoglobin (BHb) is studied in detail using various spectroscopic technologies. UV-vis absorption and fluorescence spectra demonstrate the interaction process. The Stern-Volmer plot and the time-resolved fluorescence study suggest the quenching mechanism of fluorescence of BHb by PG is a static quenching procedure, and the hydrophobic interactions play a major role in binding of PG to BHb. Furthermore, synchronous fluorescence studies, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and circular dichroism (CD) spectra reveal that the conformation of BHb is changed after conjugation with PG.

  4. Studies on the binding behavior of prodigiosin with bovine hemoglobin by multi-spectroscopic techniques.

    PubMed

    Tang, Jing; Yang, Chao; Zhou, Lin; Ma, Fei; Liu, Shuchao; Wei, Shaohua; Zhou, Jiahong; Zhou, Yanhuai

    2012-10-01

    In this article, the interaction mechanism of prodigiosin (PG) with bovine hemoglobin (BHb) is studied in detail using various spectroscopic technologies. UV-vis absorption and fluorescence spectra demonstrate the interaction process. The Stern-Volmer plot and the time-resolved fluorescence study suggest the quenching mechanism of fluorescence of BHb by PG is a static quenching procedure, and the hydrophobic interactions play a major role in binding of PG to BHb. Furthermore, synchronous fluorescence studies, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and circular dichroism (CD) spectra reveal that the conformation of BHb is changed after conjugation with PG.

  5. Spectroscopic Parameters of Lumbar Intervertebral Disc Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terbetas, G.; Kozlovskaja, A.; Varanius, D.; Graziene, V.; Vaitkus, J.; Vaitkuviene, A.

    2009-06-01

    There are numerous methods of investigating intervertebral disc. Visualization methods are widely used in clinical practice. Histological, imunohistochemical and biochemical methods are more used in scientific research. We propose that a new spectroscopic investigation would be useful in determining intervertebral disc material, especially when no histological specimens are available. Purpose: to determine spectroscopic parameters of intervertebral disc material; to determine emission spectra common for all intervertebral discs; to create a background for further spectroscopic investigation where no histological specimen will be available. Material and Methods: 20 patients, 68 frozen sections of 20 μm thickness from operatively removed intervertebral disc hernia were excited by Nd:YAG microlaser STA-01-TH third harmonic 355 nm light throw 0, 1 mm fiber. Spectrophotometer OceanOptics USB2000 was used for spectra collection. Mathematical analysis of spectra was performed by ORIGIN multiple Gaussian peaks analysis. Results: In each specimen of disc hernia were found distinct maximal spectral peaks of 4 types supporting the histological evaluation of mixture content of the hernia. Fluorescence in the spectral regions 370-700 nm was detected in the disc hernias. The main spectral component was at 494 nm and the contribution of the components with the peak wavelength values at 388 nm, 412 nm and 435±5 nm were varying in the different groups of samples. In comparison to average spectrum of all cases, there are 4 groups of different spectral signatures in the region 400-500 nm in the patient groups, supporting a clinical data on different clinical features of the patients. Discussion and Conclusion: besides the classical open discectomy, new minimally invasive techniques of treating intervertebral disc emerge (PLDD). Intervertebral disc in these techniques is assessed by needle, no histological specimen is taken. Spectroscopic investigation via fiber optics through the

  6. Effect of anatomy on spectroscopic detection of cervical dysplasia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirkovic, Jelena; Lau, Condon; McGee, Sasha; Yu, Chung-Chieh; Nazemi, Jonathan; Galindo, Luis; Feng, Victoria; Darragh, Teresa; de Las Morenas, Antonio; Crum, Christopher; Stier, Elizabeth; Feld, Michael; Badizadegan, Kamran

    2009-07-01

    It has long been speculated that underlying variations in tissue anatomy affect in vivo spectroscopic measurements. We investigate the effects of cervical anatomy on reflectance and fluorescence spectroscopy to guide the development of a diagnostic algorithm for identifying high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (HSILs) free of the confounding effects of anatomy. We use spectroscopy in both contact probe and imaging modes to study patients undergoing either colposcopy or treatment for HSIL. Physical models of light propagation in tissue are used to extract parameters related to tissue morphology and biochemistry. Our results show that the transformation zone, the area in which the vast majority of HSILs are found, is spectroscopically distinct from the adjacent squamous mucosa, and that these anatomical differences can directly influence spectroscopic diagnostic parameters. Specifically, we demonstrate that performance of diagnostic algorithms for identifying HSILs is artificially enhanced when clinically normal squamous sites are included in the statistical analysis of the spectroscopic data. We conclude that underlying differences in tissue anatomy can have a confounding effect on diagnostic spectroscopic parameters and that the common practice of including clinically normal squamous sites in cervical spectroscopy results in artificially improved performance in distinguishing HSILs from clinically suspicious non-HSILs.

  7. Plant stress detection by remote measurement of fluorescence

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McFarlane, J. C.; Watson, Robert D.; Theisen, Arnold F.; Jackson, R. D.; Ehrler, W. L.; Pinter, P. J.; Idso, S. B.; Reginato, R. J.

    1980-01-01

    Chlorophyll fluorescence of mature lemon trees was measured with a Fraunhofer line discriminator (FLD). An increase in fluorescence was correlated with plant water stress as measured by stomatal resistance and twig water potential.

  8. Spectroscopic survey of LAMOST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yongheng

    2015-08-01

    LAMOST is a special reflecting Schmidt telescope. LAMOST breaks through the bottleneck of the large scale spectroscopic survey observation with both large aperture (effective aperture of 3.6 - 4.9m) and wide field of view (5 degrees). It is an innovative active reflecting Schmidt configuration achieved by changing mirror surface continuously to achieve a series different reflecting Schmidt system in different moments. By using the parallel controllable fiber positioning technique, the focal surface of 1.75 meters in diameter accommodates 4000 optical fibers. Also, LAMOST has 16 spectrographs with 32 CCD cameras. LAMOST is the telescope of the highest spectrum acquiring rate.In the spectroscopic survey of LAMOST from October 2011 to June 2014, LAMOST has obtained more than 4.13 million spectra of celestial objects. There are 3.27 million spectra of stars, in which the stellar parameters of 2.16 million stars were obtained.In the five-year regular survey upto 2017, LAMOST will obtaine 5 million stellar spectra, which would make substantial contribution to the study of the stellar astrophysics and the structure of the Galaxy, such as the spheroid substructure of the Galaxy, the galactic gravitational potential and the distribution of the dark matter in the Galaxy, the extremely metal poor stars and hypervelocity stars, the 3D extinction in the Galaxy, the structure of thin and thick disks of the Galaxy, and so on.

  9. Mobile Spectroscopic Instrumentation in Archaeometry Research.

    PubMed

    Vandenabeele, Peter; Donais, Mary Kate

    2016-01-01

    Mobile instrumentation is of growing importance to archaeometry research. Equipment is utilized in the field or at museums, thus avoiding transportation or risk of damage to valuable artifacts. Many spectroscopic techniques are nondestructive and micro-destructive in nature, which preserves the cultural heritage objects themselves. This review includes over 160 references pertaining to the use of mobile spectroscopy for archaeometry. Following a discussion of terminology related to mobile instrumental methods, results of a literature survey on their applications for cultural heritage objects is presented. Sections devoted to specific techniques are then provided: Raman spectroscopy, X-ray fluorescence spectrometry, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy, and less frequently used techniques. The review closes with a discussion of combined instrumental approaches.

  10. Spectroscopic Chemical Analysis Methods and Apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hug, William F.; Reid, Ray D.

    2012-01-01

    This invention relates to non-contact spectroscopic methods and apparatus for performing chemical analysis and the ideal wavelengths and sources needed for this analysis. It employs deep ultraviolet (200- to 300-nm spectral range) electron-beam-pumped wide bandgap semiconductor lasers, incoherent wide bandgap semiconductor lightemitting devices, and hollow cathode metal ion lasers. Three achieved goals for this innovation are to reduce the size (under 20 L), reduce the weight [under 100 lb (.45 kg)], and reduce the power consumption (under 100 W). This method can be used in microscope or macroscope to provide measurement of Raman and/or native fluorescence emission spectra either by point-by-point measurement, or by global imaging of emissions within specific ultraviolet spectral bands. In other embodiments, the method can be used in analytical instruments such as capillary electrophoresis, capillary electro-chromatography, high-performance liquid chromatography, flow cytometry, and related instruments for detection and identification of unknown analytes using a combination of native fluorescence and/or Raman spectroscopic methods. This design provides an electron-beampumped semiconductor radiation-producing method, or source, that can emit at a wavelength (or wavelengths) below 300 nm, e.g. in the deep ultraviolet between about 200 and 300 nm, and more preferably less than 260 nm. In some variations, the method is to produce incoherent radiation, while in other implementations it produces laser radiation. In some variations, this object is achieved by using an AlGaN emission medium, while in other implementations a diamond emission medium may be used. This instrument irradiates a sample with deep UV radiation, and then uses an improved filter for separating wavelengths to be detected. This provides a multi-stage analysis of the sample. To avoid the difficulties related to producing deep UV semiconductor sources, a pumping approach has been developed that uses

  11. Spectroscopic detection of chemotherapeutics and antioxidants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latka, Ines; Grüner, Roman; Matthäus, Christian; Dietzek, Benjamin; Werncke, W.; Lademann, Jürgen; Popp, Jürgen

    2012-06-01

    The hand-foot-syndrome presents a severe dermal side-effect of chemotherapeutic cancer treatment. The cause of this side-effect is the elimination of systemically administered chemotherapeutics with the sweat. Transported to the skin surface, the drugs subsequently penetrate into the skin in the manner of topically applied substances. Upon accumulation of the chemotherapeutics in the skin the drugs destroy cells and tissue - in the same way as they are supposed to act in cancer cells. Aiming at the development of strategies to illuminate the molecular mechanism underlying the handfoot- syndrome (and, in a second step, strategies to prevent this severe side-effect), it might be important to evaluate the concentration and distribution of chemotherapeutics and antioxidants in the human skin. The latter can be estimated by the carotenoid concentration, as carotenoids serve as marker substances for the dermal antioxidative status.Following the objectives outlined above, this contribution presents a spectroscopic study aiming at the detection and quantification of carotenoids and selected chemotherapeutics in human skin. To this end, spontaneous Raman scattering and coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microspectroscopy are combined with two-photon excited fluorescence. While the latter technique is Please verify that (1) all pages are present, (2) all figures are correct, (3) all fonts and special characters are correct, and (4) all text and figures fit within the red margin lines shown on this review document. Complete formatting information is available at http://SPIE.org/manuscripts Return to your MySPIE To Do List at http://myspie.org and approve or disapprove this submission. Your manuscript will not be published without this approval.restricted to the detection of fluorescent chemotherapeutics, e.g., doxorubicin, the vibrational spectroscopic techniques can - in principle - be applied to any type of analyte molecules. Furthermore, we will present the

  12. Spectroscopic chemical analysis methods and apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hug, William F. (Inventor); Reid, Ray D. (Inventor); Bhartia, Rohit (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    Spectroscopic chemical analysis methods and apparatus are disclosed which employ deep ultraviolet (e.g. in the 200 nm to 300 nm spectral range) electron beam pumped wide bandgap semiconductor lasers, incoherent wide bandgap semiconductor light emitting devices, and hollow cathode metal ion lasers to perform non-contact, non-invasive detection of unknown chemical analytes. These deep ultraviolet sources enable dramatic size, weight and power consumption reductions of chemical analysis instruments. Chemical analysis instruments employed in some embodiments include capillary and gel plane electrophoresis, capillary electrochromatography, high performance liquid chromatography, flow cytometry, flow cells for liquids and aerosols, and surface detection instruments. In some embodiments, Raman spectroscopic detection methods and apparatus use ultra-narrow-band angle tuning filters, acousto-optic tuning filters, and temperature tuned filters to enable ultra-miniature analyzers for chemical identification. In some embodiments Raman analysis is conducted along with photoluminescence spectroscopy (i.e. fluorescence and/or phosphorescence spectroscopy) to provide high levels of sensitivity and specificity in the same instrument.

  13. Recoil splitting of x-ray-induced optical fluorescence

    SciTech Connect

    Gavrilyuk, S.; Aagren, H.; Gel'mukhanov, F.; Sun, Y.-P.; Levin, S.

    2010-03-15

    We show that the anisotropy of the recoil velocity distribution of x-ray-ionized atoms or molecules leads to observable splittings in subsequent optical fluorescence or absorption when the polarization vector of the x rays is parallel to the momentum of the fluorescent photons. The order of the magnitude of the recoil-induced splitting is about 10 {mu}eV, which can be observed using Fourier or laser-absorption spectroscopic techniques.

  14. An Internal LLNL Report: Spectroscopic Signature of Aging in (Delta)-Pu(Ga)

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, B W; Fluss, M J; Haslam, J J; Schwartz, A J; Tobin, J G

    2004-12-29

    Resonant Photoemission, a variant of Photoelectron Spectroscopy, has been demonstrated to have sensitivity to aging of Pu samples. The spectroscopic results are correlated with resistivity measurements and are shown to be the fingerprint of mesoscopic or nanoscale internal damage in the Pu physical structure. This means that a spectroscopic signature of internal damage due to aging in Pu has been established.

  15. Combined fluorescence and phosphorescence lifetime imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shcheslavskiy, V. I.; Neubauer, A.; Bukowiecki, R.; Dinter, F.; Becker, W.

    2016-02-01

    We present a lifetime imaging technique that simultaneously records the fluorescence and phosphorescence lifetime images in confocal laser scanning systems. It is based on modulating a high-frequency pulsed laser synchronously with the pixel clock of the scanner, and recording the fluorescence and phosphorescence signals by multidimensional time-correlated single photon counting board. We demonstrate our technique on the recording of the fluorescence/phosphorescence lifetime images of human embryonic kidney cells at different environmental conditions.

  16. Spectral variation of fluorescence lifetime near single metal nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jia; Krasavin, Alexey V.; Webster, Linden; Segovia, Paulina; Zayats, Anatoly V.; Richards, David

    2016-02-01

    We explore the spectral dependence of fluorescence enhancement and the associated lifetime modification of fluorescent molecules coupled to single metal nanoparticles. Fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy and single-particle dark-field spectroscopy are combined to correlate the dependence of fluorescence lifetime reduction on the spectral overlap between the fluorescence emission and the localised surface plasmon (LSP) spectra of individual gold nanoparticles. A maximum lifetime reduction is observed when the fluorescence and LSP resonances coincide, with good agreement provided by numerical simulations. The explicit comparison between experiment and simulation, that we obtain, offers an insight into the spectral engineering of LSP mediated fluorescence and may lead to optimized application in sensing and biomedicine.

  17. Correlation-Peak Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziegler, A.; Metzler, A.; Köckenberger, W.; Izquierdo, M.; Komor, E.; Haase, A.; Décorps, M.; von Kienlin, M.

    1996-08-01

    Identification and quantitation in conventional1H spectroscopic imagingin vivois often hampered by the small chemical-shift range. To improve the spectral resolution of spectroscopic imaging, homonuclear two-dimensional correlation spectroscopy has been combined with phase encoding of the spatial dimensions. From the theoretical description of the coherence-transfer signal in the Fourier-transform domain, a comprehensive acquisition and processing strategy is presented that includes optimization of the width and the position of the acquisition windows, matched filtering of the signal envelope, and graphical presentation of the cross peak of interest. The procedure has been applied to image the spatial distribution of the correlation peaks from specific spin systems in the hypocotyl of castor bean (Ricinus communis) seedlings. Despite the overlap of many resonances, correlation-peak imaging made it possible to observe a number of proton resonances, such as those of sucrose, β-glucose, glutamine/glutamate, lysine, and arginine.

  18. Comprehensive Spectroscopic Characterization of Model Aromatic Substituents of Lignin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dean, Jacob C.; Vara, Vanesa Vaquero; Hotopp, Kelly M.; Dian, Brian C.; Zwier, Timothy S.

    2012-06-01

    2,6-Dimethoxyphenol (2,6-DMP) is a model compound with aromatic substitution similar to that in sinapyl alcohol, one of the three monomers that make up lignin. 2,6-DMP has been studied combining several spectroscopic techniques that span the microwave, infrared and ultraviolet regions. Spectra from laser-induced fluorescence excitation, IR-UV hole-burning, fluorescence dip IR, dispersed fluorescence and rotational spectra have allowed us to develop more insight to the structural details, intramolecular H-bonding and electronic excited states of this sinapyl alcohol analog. Coupling in the CH stretch region, broadening effects in the IR spectra and Coriolis coupling due to the OH tunneling coordinate in the rotational spectrum will be shown as we present this diverse set of experimental data involving transitions between different vibronic, vibrational and rotational levels of the molecule. These features will be compared to those in 2-methoxyphenol and 4-methyl-2,6-DMP during the discussion.

  19. Spectroscopic characterization of matrix isolated transient species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lue, Christopher J.

    short lived fluorescence was assigned to UCl 4, and the long-lived fluorescence was assigned to UOCl x. A low resolution map for the electronic levels in UOCl x was created. One of the first LIF studies of actinide containing molecules was performed by Grzybowski and Andrews[1] for UF6. While, the same group later recorded IR spectra for the UFx fragements[2], no fluorescence spectra were recorded. Spectra were recorded here of UF x fragments trapped in solid formed by either passing UF 6 through a microwave discharge or ablating U atoms into an F2 /Ar mixture. At the time of these experiments, the IR spectrometer was not available, and the molecules producing the fluorescence could not be deduced solely from the LIF spectra. A comparison with previous IR spectra[2] gave some indication of possible candidates. In all the experiments that investigated uranium containing matrices with IR spectroscopy, UN2 was observed. A search was undertaken to observe fluorescence from UN2. To insure a good yield of UN 2, 1% N2 was added to the carrier gas. The fluorescence spectra observed in these experiments was very intriguing, but was determined not to be coming from UN2, rather it appears to be coming from U atom clusters. However further experiments are necessary to confirm how many atoms are in the clusters. The final part of this thesis focuses on the electronic spectra of Xe-OH isolated solid Ar. Rare gas radical systems (Rg-X) such as Rg-OH are a good model system for studying weak, long range intermolecular interactions. It is known that when Rg=Xe, the strength of the interaction is much larger. For most Rg-OH complexes, the spectroscopic constants have been determined previously[3]. However, the constants for Xe-OH ares currently undetermined. Gas-phase studies were undertaken to determined these constants.[4] However, these experiments were in conflict with previous LIF spectra recorded in a matrix in which Goodman and Brus[5] observed that the A → X emission band for

  20. Fluorescent spectroscopy, a technique for characterizing surface films

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Goldberg, Marvin C.; Devonald, David H.

    1973-01-01

    A relationship is established between fluorescent spectra obtained by using a light path through the liquid solution and the fluorescent spectra obtained by a direct reading of surface reflection (remote sensing). A brief review of quantum fundamentals provides the necessary information to conclude that "see-through" and reflectance spectra are identical in wavelength response. Many floating films contain fluorescent materials; thus fluorescent spectroscopic techniques were used to obtain the fluorescent spectra of lube oil, crude oil, andlignosulfonie acid in an effort to detect, identify, and quantify these representative fluorescent materials in water solutions. For each material tested the emission maximum was established. The emission maximum was then held constant while the absorption spectrum was recorded and the absorption maximum established. The complete spectral curves are presented.

  1. Moving Towards a Technical Specification for Fluorescence Excitation-Emission Mapping and Absorbance Analysis of Colored Dissolved Organic Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilmore, A. M.

    2010-12-01

    Colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM) measurements with fluorescence and absorbance are important for evaluating a wide variety natural and industrial water sources. However, uncertainties and ambiguities continue to be propagated regarding interpretation of CDOM spectral data due to the variety of instruments, sampling chemistry conditions and types of analysis algorithms. Recent efforts have focused on standardization and interlaboratory comparisons of CDOM samples with respect to preparation, spectroscopic evaluation and mathematical analysis. This study deals with correlating absorbance and fluorescence data measured with the same sample to minimize interlaboratory variation. The theoretical significance of true simultaneous acquisition of the corrected (NIST Traceable) absorbance spectrum and fluorescence excitation spectral profile and excitation emission map is discussed as a means to provide the least ambiguous spectral data. Key issues considered are the variations introduced by ‘serial’ acquisitions of absorbance and fluorescence data. Variation can be caused by the different light-exposure history (especially UV) in the instruments, dissolved oxygen content associated with temperature changes and oxidation kinetics of the CDOM and in many cases concentration- and pH-related changes associated with diluting and pH buffering of the CDOM sample, respectively. Concentration changes in CDOM can be associated with optical anomalies including self-quenching and -absorption which systematically alter the fluorescence spectrum. Clearly, monitoring the absorbance and fluorescence simultaneously would deal with the above sampling variations and facilitate correcting the absorbance based fluorescence anomalies. The proposed method(s) described will be discussed in view of their potential to serve as the basis for an international technical specification in terms of the optical instrument and sampling conditions for CDOM analysis and reporting.

  2. Characterization of used mineral oil condition by spectroscopic techniques.

    PubMed

    Vanhanen, Jarmo; Rinkiö, Marcus; Aumanen, Jukka; Korppi-Tommola, Jouko; Kolehmainen, Erkki; Kerkkänen, Tuula; Törmä, Päivi

    2004-08-20

    Optical absorption, fluorescence, and quantitative 13C NMR spectroscopy have been used to study the degradation of mineral gearbox oil. Samples of used oil were collected from field service. Measured absorption, fluorescence, and quantitative 13C NMR spectra of used oils show characteristic changes from the spectra of a fresh oil sample. A clearly observable, approximately 20-nm blueshift of the fluorescence emission occurs during the early stages of oil use and correlates with changes in intensity of some specific 13C NMR resonance lines. These changes correlate with oil age because of the connection between the blueshift and breaking of the larger conjugated hydrocarbons of oil as a result of use.

  3. Fluorescent noble metal nanoclusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Jie

    Water-soluble fluorescent metallic clusters at sizes comparable to the Fermi wavelength of an electron (˜0.5 nm for gold and silver) were created and their photophysical properties were investigated at the bulk and single molecule levels. We employed biocompatible dendrimer and peptide to prepare a series of strong fluorescent gold and silver clusters with chemical or photo reduction methods. Facilitated by the well-defined dendrimer size, electrospray ionization mass spectrometry indicates that the fluorescent silver nanocluster size ranges from 2 to 8 Ag atoms. The correlation of emission energy with the number of atoms, N, in each gold nanocluster is quantitatively fit for the smallest nanoclusters with no adjustable parameters by the simple scaling relation of EFermi/N1/3, in which EFermi is the Fermi energy of bulk gold. The transition energy scaling inversely with cluster radius indicates that electronic structure can be well described with the spherical jellium model and further demonstrates that these nanomaterials are "multi-electron artificial atoms". Fluorescence from these small metal clusters can be considered protoplasmonic, molecular transitions of the free conduction electrons before the onset of collective dipole oscillations occurring when a continuous density of states is reached. In addition, very strong single molecular Stokes and anti-Stokes Raman enhancement by fluorescent silver clusters was observed. Pushing to larger sizes, we also created ˜2nm diameter glutathione encapsulated luminescent gold nanoparticles. Distinct from similarly sized but nonluminescent gold nanoparticles, these 2 nm gold nanoparticles show bright, long lifetime emission but no plasmon absorption. The emission might arise from charge transfer between gold atoms and the thiol ligand. Providing the "missing link" between atomic and nanoparticle behavior in noble metals, these highly fluorescent, water-soluble gold and silver nanoclusters offer complementary transition

  4. Complex Coacervate Core Micelles with Spectroscopic Labels for Diffusometric Probing of Biopolymer Networks.

    PubMed

    Bourouina, Nadia; de Kort, Daan W; Hoeben, Freek J M; Janssen, Henk M; Van As, Henk; Hohlbein, Johannes; van Duynhoven, John P M; Kleijn, J Mieke

    2015-11-24

    We present the design, preparation, and characterization of two types of complex coacervate core micelles (C3Ms) with cross-linked cores and spectroscopic labels and demonstrate their use as diffusional probes to investigate the microstructure of percolating biopolymer networks. The first type consists of poly(allylamine hydrochloride) (PAH) and poly(ethylene oxide)-poly(methacrylic acid) (PEO-b-PMAA), labeled with ATTO 488 fluorescent dyes. We show that the size of these probes can be tuned by choosing the length of the PEO-PMAA chains. ATTO 488-labeled PEO113-PMAA15 micelles are very bright with 18 dye molecules incorporated into their cores. The second type is a (19)F-labeled micelle, for which we used PAH and a (19)F-labeled diblock copolymer tailor-made from poly(ethylene oxide)-poly(acrylic acid) (mPEO79-b-PAA14). These micelles contain approximately 4 wt % of (19)F and can be detected by (19)F NMR. The (19)F labels are placed at the end of a small spacer to allow for the necessary rotational mobility. We used these ATTO- and (19)F-labeled micelles to probe the microstructures of a transient gel (xanthan gum) and a cross-linked, heterogeneous gel (κ-carrageenan). For the transient gel, sensitive optical diffusometry methods, including fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, fluorescence recovery after photobleaching, and super-resolution single nanoparticle tracking, allowed us to measure the diffusion coefficient in networks with increasing density. From these measurements, we determined the diameters of the constituent xanthan fibers. In the heterogeneous κ-carrageenan gels, bimodal nanoparticle diffusion was observed, which is a signpost of microstructural heterogeneity of the network.

  5. Complex Coacervate Core Micelles with Spectroscopic Labels for Diffusometric Probing of Biopolymer Networks.

    PubMed

    Bourouina, Nadia; de Kort, Daan W; Hoeben, Freek J M; Janssen, Henk M; Van As, Henk; Hohlbein, Johannes; van Duynhoven, John P M; Kleijn, J Mieke

    2015-11-24

    We present the design, preparation, and characterization of two types of complex coacervate core micelles (C3Ms) with cross-linked cores and spectroscopic labels and demonstrate their use as diffusional probes to investigate the microstructure of percolating biopolymer networks. The first type consists of poly(allylamine hydrochloride) (PAH) and poly(ethylene oxide)-poly(methacrylic acid) (PEO-b-PMAA), labeled with ATTO 488 fluorescent dyes. We show that the size of these probes can be tuned by choosing the length of the PEO-PMAA chains. ATTO 488-labeled PEO113-PMAA15 micelles are very bright with 18 dye molecules incorporated into their cores. The second type is a (19)F-labeled micelle, for which we used PAH and a (19)F-labeled diblock copolymer tailor-made from poly(ethylene oxide)-poly(acrylic acid) (mPEO79-b-PAA14). These micelles contain approximately 4 wt % of (19)F and can be detected by (19)F NMR. The (19)F labels are placed at the end of a small spacer to allow for the necessary rotational mobility. We used these ATTO- and (19)F-labeled micelles to probe the microstructures of a transient gel (xanthan gum) and a cross-linked, heterogeneous gel (κ-carrageenan). For the transient gel, sensitive optical diffusometry methods, including fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, fluorescence recovery after photobleaching, and super-resolution single nanoparticle tracking, allowed us to measure the diffusion coefficient in networks with increasing density. From these measurements, we determined the diameters of the constituent xanthan fibers. In the heterogeneous κ-carrageenan gels, bimodal nanoparticle diffusion was observed, which is a signpost of microstructural heterogeneity of the network. PMID:26535962

  6. Fluorescence spectroscopy as an aid to imaging latent fingermarks in the ultraviolet.

    PubMed

    Bramble, S K

    1996-11-01

    Two- and three-dimensional fluorescence spectroscopic data have been recorded from sebum-rich latent fingermarks on quartz and white card. The fingermark residue was found to fluoresce between 310 to 380 nm and have an excitation range between 260 to 300 nm. The data are used to describe the results observed when imaging the inherent ultraviolet photoluminescence of latent fingermarks.

  7. Fluorescence spectroscopy as an aid to imaging latent fingermarks in the ultraviolet.

    PubMed

    Bramble, S K

    1996-11-01

    Two- and three-dimensional fluorescence spectroscopic data have been recorded from sebum-rich latent fingermarks on quartz and white card. The fingermark residue was found to fluoresce between 310 to 380 nm and have an excitation range between 260 to 300 nm. The data are used to describe the results observed when imaging the inherent ultraviolet photoluminescence of latent fingermarks. PMID:8914294

  8. Quantification of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 immunohistochemistry using the Ventana Image Analysis System: correlation with gene amplification by fluorescence in situ hybridization: the importance of instrument validation for achieving high (>95%) concordance rate.

    PubMed

    Dennis, Jake; Parsa, Rezvaneh; Chau, Donnie; Koduru, Prasad; Peng, Yan; Fang, Yisheng; Sarode, Venetia Rumnong

    2015-05-01

    The use of computer-based image analysis for scoring human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) immunohistochemistry (IHC) has gained a lot of interest recently. We investigated the performance of the Ventana Image Analysis System (VIAS) in HER2 quantification by IHC and its correlation with fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). We specifically compared the 3+ IHC results using the manufacturer's machine score cutoffs versus laboratory-defined cutoffs with the FISH assay. Using the manufacturer's 3+ cutoff (VIAS score; 2.51 to 3.5), 181/536 (33.7%) were scored 3+, and FISH was positive in 147/181 (81.2%), 2 (1.1%) were equivocal, and 32 (17.6%) were FISH (-). Using the laboratory-defined 3+ cutoff (VIAS score 3.5), 52 (28.7%) cases were downgraded to 2+, of which 29 (55.7%) were FISH (-), and 23 (44.2%) were FISH (+). With the revised cutoff, there were improvements in the concordance rate from 89.1% to 97.0% and in the positive predictive value from 82.1% to 97.6%. The false-positive rate for 3+ decreased from 9.0% to 0.8%. Six of 175 (3.4%) IHC (-) cases were FISH (+). Three cases with a VIAS score 3.5 showed polysomy of chromosome 17. In conclusion, the VIAS may be a valuable tool for assisting pathologists in HER2 scoring; however, the positive cutoff defined by the manufacturer is associated with a high false-positive rate. This study highlights the importance of instrument validation/calibration to reduce false-positive results.

  9. Polarization properties of fluorescent BSA protected Au25 nanoclusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raut, Sangram; Chib, Rahul; Rich, Ryan; Shumilov, Dmytro; Gryczynski, Zygmunt; Gryczynski, Ignacy

    2013-03-01

    BSA protected gold nanoclusters (Au25) are attracting a great deal of attention due to their unique spectroscopic properties and possible use in biophysical applications. Although there are reports on synthetic strategies, spectroscopy and applications, little is known about their polarization behavior. In this study, we synthesized the BSA protected Au25 nanoclusters and studied their steady state and time resolved fluorescence properties including polarization behavior in different solvents: glycerol, propylene glycol and water. We demonstrated that the nanocluster absorption spectrum can be separated from the extinction spectrum by subtraction of Rayleigh scattering. The nanocluster absorption spectrum is well approximated by three Gaussian components. By a comparison of the emissions from BSA Au25 clusters and rhodamine B in water, we estimated the quantum yield of nanoclusters to be higher than 0.06. The fluorescence lifetime of BSA Au25 clusters is long and heterogeneous with an average value of 1.84 μs. In glycerol at -20 °C the anisotropy is high, reaching a value of 0.35. However, the excitation anisotropy strongly depends on the excitation wavelengths indicating a significant overlap of the different transition moments. The anisotropy decay in water reveals a correlation time below 0.2 μs. In propylene glycol the measured correlation time is longer and the initial anisotropy depends on the excitation wavelength. BSA Au25 clusters, due to long lifetime and high polarization, can potentially be used in studying large macromolecules such as protein complexes with large molecular weight.BSA protected gold nanoclusters (Au25) are attracting a great deal of attention due to their unique spectroscopic properties and possible use in biophysical applications. Although there are reports on synthetic strategies, spectroscopy and applications, little is known about their polarization behavior. In this study, we synthesized the BSA protected Au25 nanoclusters and

  10. Distinguishability of Biological Material Using Ultraviolet Multi-Spectral Fluorescence

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, P.C.; Heinen, R.J.; Rigdon, L.D.; Rosenthal, S.E.; Shokair, I.R.; Siragusa, G.R.; Tisone, G.C.; Wagner, J.S.

    1998-10-14

    Recent interest in the detection and analysis of biological samples by spectroscopic methods has led to questions concerning the degree of distinguishability and biological variability of the ultraviolet (W) fluorescent spectra from such complex samples. We show that the degree of distinguishability of such spectra is readily determined numerically.

  11. Targeted thiazole orange derivative with folate: synthesis, fluorescence and in vivo fluorescence imaging.

    PubMed

    Fei, Xuening; Gu, Yingchun; Wang, Yiqi; Meng, Qingyang; Zhang, Baolian

    2010-10-11

    A Thiazole Orange conjugated with folate derivative was synthesized in two steps. Firstly, folate was coupled with 1-(3-aminopropyl)-4-methylquinolinium bromide to afford folate-methylquinolinium bromide, which then reacted with benzothiazolium to obtain the title folate-conjugated compound. The compound was evaluated by ¹H-NMR MS, TG/DTA and fluorescence spectroscopic methods. The title compound could selectively target folate receptor expressing tumors according to the in vivo fluorescence imaging preliminarily performed on nude mice with breast tumors.

  12. A 10-A spectroscopic ruler applied to short polyprolines.

    PubMed

    Sahoo, Harekrushna; Roccatano, Danilo; Hennig, Andreas; Nau, Werner M

    2007-08-01

    Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) from the amino acid tryptophan (Trp) as donor and a 2,3-diazabicyclo[2.2.2]oct-2-ene-labeled asparagine (Dbo) as acceptor in peptides of the general structure Trp-(Pro)n-Dbo-NH2 (n = 1-6) was investigated by steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence, CD, and NMR spectroscopy as well as by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations (GROMOS96 force field). The Trp/Dbo FRET pair is characterized by a very short Förster radius (R0 ca. 9 A), which allowed distance determinations in such short peptides. Water and propylene glycol were investigated as solvents. The peptides were designed to show an early nucleation of the poly(Pro)II (PPII) secondary helix structure for n > or = 2, which was confirmed by their CD spectra. The shortest peptide (n = 1) adopts preferentially the trans conformation about the Trp-Pro bond, as confirmed by NMR spectra. The FRET efficiencies ranged 2-72% and were found to depend sensitively on the peptide length, i.e., the number of intervening proline residues. The analysis of the FRET data at different levels of theory (assuming either a fixed distance or distance distributions according to a wormlike chain or Gaussian model) afforded donor-acceptor distances between ca. 8 A (n = 1) and ca. 16 A (n = 6) in water, which were found to be similar or slightly higher in propylene glycol. The distances afforded by the Trp/Dbo FRET pair were found to be reasonable in comparison to literature data, expectations from the PPII helix structure, and the results from MD simulations. The persistence lengths for the longer peptides were found to lie at 30-70 A in water and 220 +/- 40 A in propylene glycol, suggesting a more rigid PPII helical structure in propylene glycol. A detailed comparison with literature data on FRET in polyprolines demonstrates that the donor-acceptor distances extracted by FRET are correlated with the Förster radii of the employed FRET pairs. This demonstrates the limitations of using FRET

  13. Monitoring dynamic systems with multiparameter fluorescence imaging.

    PubMed

    Kudryavtsev, Volodymyr; Felekyan, Suren; Woźniak, Anna K; König, Marcelle; Sandhagen, Carl; Kühnemuth, Ralf; Seidel, Claus A M; Oesterhelt, Filipp

    2007-01-01

    A new general strategy based on the use of multiparameter fluorescence detection (MFD) to register and quantitatively analyse fluorescence images is introduced. Multiparameter fluorescence imaging (MFDi) uses pulsed excitation, time-correlated single-photon counting and a special pixel clock to simultaneously monitor the changes in the eight-dimensional fluorescence information (fundamental anisotropy, fluorescence lifetime, fluorescence intensity, time, excitation spectrum, fluorescence spectrum, fluorescence quantum yield, distance between fluorophores) in real time. The three spatial coordinates are also stored. The most statistically efficient techniques known from single-molecule spectroscopy are used to estimate fluorescence parameters of interest for all pixels, not just for the regions of interest. Their statistical significance is judged from a stack of two-dimensional histograms. In this way, specific pixels can be selected for subsequent pixel-based subensemble analysis in order to improve the statistical accuracy of the parameters estimated. MFDi avoids the need for sequential measurements, because the registered data allow one to perform many analysis techniques, such as fluorescence-intensity distribution analysis (FIDA) and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS), in an off-line mode. The limitations of FCS for counting molecules and monitoring dynamics are discussed. To demonstrate the ability of our technique, we analysed two systems: (i) interactions of the fluorescent dye Rhodamine 110 inside and outside of a glutathione sepharose bead, and (ii) microtubule dynamics in live yeast cells of Schizosaccharomyces pombe using a fusion protein of Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) with Minichromosome Altered Loss Protein 3 (Mal3), which is involved in the dynamic cycle of polymerising and depolymerising microtubules. PMID:17160654

  14. Classroom Demonstrations of Concepts in Molecular Fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blitz, Jonathan P.; Sheeran, Daniel J.; Becker, Thomas L.

    2006-05-01

    A multichannel CCD-array spectrophotometer and handheld UV lamp are utilized to acquire and project in real-time the fluorescence emission spectra of quinine, fluorescein, eosin yellow, and rhodamine B. Instrumental concepts of fluorescence are illustrated based on the setup of the demonstration. The emission spectra of the fluorophores are correlated with the visual color of the luminescence. The absorbance and fluorescence emission spectra of quinine in tonic water, along with the Hg source spectrum, are visually compared. This demonstration provides a framework for describing the transitions involved in fluorescence spectroscopy.

  15. Spectroscopic optical coherence elastography

    PubMed Central

    Adie, Steven G.; Liang, Xing; Kennedy, Brendan F.; John, Renu; Sampson, David D.; Boppart, Stephen A.

    2010-01-01

    We present an optical technique to image the frequency-dependent complex mechanical response of a viscoelastic sample. Three-dimensional hyperspectral data, comprising two-dimensional B-mode images and a third dimension corresponding to vibration frequency, were acquired from samples undergoing external mechanical excitation in the audio-frequency range. We describe the optical coherence tomography (OCT) signal when vibration is applied to a sample and detail the processing and acquisition techniques used to extract the local complex mechanical response from three-dimensional data that, due to a wide range of vibration frequencies, possess a wide range of sample velocities. We demonstrate frequency-dependent contrast of the displacement amplitude and phase of a silicone phantom containing inclusions of higher stiffness. Measurements of an ex vivo tumor margin demonstrate distinct spectra between adipose and tumor regions, and images of displacement amplitude and phase demonstrated spatially-resolved contrast. Contrast was also observed in displacement amplitude and phase images of a rat muscle sample. These results represent the first demonstration of mechanical spectroscopy based on B-mode OCT imaging. Spectroscopic optical coherence elastography (S-OCE) provides a high-resolution imaging capability for the detection of tissue pathologies that are characterized by a frequency-dependent viscoelastic response. PMID:21164898

  16. Spectroscopic Detection of Pathogens

    SciTech Connect

    ALAM,M. KATHLEEN; TIMLIN,JERILYN A.; MARTIN,LAURA E.; HJELLE,DRIAN; LYONS,RICK; GARRISON,KRISTIN

    2000-11-01

    The goal of this LDRD Research project was to provide a preliminary examination of the use of infrared spectroscopy as a tool to detect the changes in cell cultures upon activation by an infectious agent. Due to a late arrival of funding, only 5 months were available to transfer and setup equipment at UTTM,develop cell culture lines, test methods of in-situ activation and collect kinetic data from activated cells. Using attenuated total reflectance (ATR) as a sampling method, live cell cultures were examined prior to and after activation. Spectroscopic data were collected from cells immediately after activation in situ and, in many cases for five successive hours. Additional data were