Science.gov

Sample records for fluorescence depolarization measurements

  1. Fluorescence depolarization measurements under shock compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jue; Banishev, Alexandr; Bassett, Will P.; Dlott, Dana D.

    2017-01-01

    Measurements of the time-dependent fluorescence depolarization of emissive probe molecules enable real-time observations of molecular rotations in shocked materials. In shocked solids, molecular rotations occur as a result of shear deformations. An apparatus is described to measure time-dependent fluorescence depolarization of shocked materials using laser-driven flyer plates and either a picosecond or a nanosecond probe laser. The emission was separated into parallel and perpendicular channels and imaged onto a streak camera. Time-dependent fluorescence depolarization of rhodamine 6G (R6G) dye dissolved in poly-methyl methacrylate (PMMA) was measured with a 16 ns duration impact at 1 km s-1. A partial depolarization of the dye emission was observed to occur during a 150 ns period after the shock.

  2. Reexamination of depolarization in lidar measurements.

    PubMed

    Gimmestad, Gary G

    2008-07-20

    Almost all of the depolarization papers in the lidar literature employ a physically inappropriate notation and they use a definition of the depolarization ratio that is not linear in the quantity of interest. This depolarization lidar legacy is misleading and confusing. In particular, subscripts meaning parallel and perpendicular do not apply to atmospheric parameters, such as the volume backscatter coefficient, because (for linear polarization) the two components of the backscattered light are polarized in the transmitted sense and completely unpolarized; the unpolarized component is not "perpendicular." An analysis of lidar depolarization measurements with a particle scattering matrix recently provided in the literature yields algorithms for retrieving the depolarization parameter from either linear or circular depolarization lidar measurements. The analysis, notation, and definitions recommended here harmonize lidar depolarization analysis with radiative transfer theory, particle scattering theory, and standard polarization measurement techniques.

  3. Identifiability analysis of rotational diffusion tensor and electronic transition moments measured in time-resolved fluorescence depolarization experiment.

    PubMed

    Szubiakowski, Jacek P

    2014-06-14

    The subject of this paper is studies of the deterministic identifiability of molecular parameters, such as rotational diffusion tensor components and orientation of electronic transition moments, resulting from the time-resolved fluorescence anisotropy experiment. In the most general case considered, a pair of perpendicularly polarized emissions enables the unique determination of all the rotational diffusion tensor's principal components. The influence of the tensor's symmetry and the associated degeneration of its eigenvalues on the identifiability of the electronic transitions moments is systematically investigated. The analysis reveals that independently of the rotational diffusion tensor's symmetry, the transition moments involved in photoselection and emission processes cannot be uniquely identified without a priori information about their mutual orientation or their orientation with respect to the principal axes of the tensor. Moreover, it is shown that increasing the symmetry of the rotational diffusion tensor deteriorates the degree of the transition moments identifiability. To obtain these results analytically, a novel approach to solve bilinear system of equations for Markov parameters is applied. The effect of the additional information, obtained from fluorescence measurements for different molecular mobilities, to improve the identifiability at various levels of analysis is shown. The effectiveness and reliability of the target analysis method for experimental determination of the molecular parameters is also discussed.

  4. Identifiability analysis of rotational diffusion tensor and electronic transition moments measured in time-resolved fluorescence depolarization experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Szubiakowski, Jacek P.

    2014-06-14

    The subject of this paper is studies of the deterministic identifiability of molecular parameters, such as rotational diffusion tensor components and orientation of electronic transition moments, resulting from the time-resolved fluorescence anisotropy experiment. In the most general case considered, a pair of perpendicularly polarized emissions enables the unique determination of all the rotational diffusion tensor's principal components. The influence of the tensor's symmetry and the associated degeneration of its eigenvalues on the identifiability of the electronic transitions moments is systematically investigated. The analysis reveals that independently of the rotational diffusion tensor's symmetry, the transition moments involved in photoselection and emission processes cannot be uniquely identified without a priori information about their mutual orientation or their orientation with respect to the principal axes of the tensor. Moreover, it is shown that increasing the symmetry of the rotational diffusion tensor deteriorates the degree of the transition moments identifiability. To obtain these results analytically, a novel approach to solve bilinear system of equations for Markov parameters is applied. The effect of the additional information, obtained from fluorescence measurements for different molecular mobilities, to improve the identifiability at various levels of analysis is shown. The effectiveness and reliability of the target analysis method for experimental determination of the molecular parameters is also discussed.

  5. Improved calibration method for depolarization lidar measurement.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bo; Wang, Zhien

    2013-06-17

    An improved calibration method for lidar depolarization measurement is described. With this method the system constants including the electronic gain ratio of the parallel and perpendicular channels, the optical reflectance and transmission parameters of the polarizing beam splitter, and the linear polarization ratio of the emitting laser beam can be determined conveniently by using lidar measurements with a half-wave plate oriented at selected angles.

  6. Effect of multiple scattering on depolarization measurements with spaceborne lidars.

    PubMed

    Reichardt, Susanne; Reichardt, Jens

    2003-06-20

    An analytical model based on the integration of the scattering-angle and light-path manifold has been developed to quantify the effect of multiple scattering on cirrus measurements obtained with elastic polarization lidars from space. Light scattering by molecules and by a horizontally homogeneous cloud is taken into account. Lidar parameter, including laser beam divergence, can be freely chosen. Up to 3 orders of scattering are calculated. Furthermore, an inversion technique for the retrieval of cloud extinction profiles from measurements with elastic-backscatter lidars is proposed that explicitly takes multiple scattering into account. It is found that for typical lidar system parameters such as those of the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) instrument multiple scattering does not significantly affect depolarization-ratio measurements in cirrus clouds with small to moderate optical depths. For all simulated clouds, the absolute value of the difference between measured and single-scattering volume depolarization ratio is < 0.006. The particle depolarization ratio can be calculated from the measured volume depolarization ratio and the retrieved backscatter ratio without degradation of accuracy; thus characterization of the various cirrus categories in terms of the particle depolarization ratio and retrieval of cloud microphysical properties is feasible from space. The results of this study apply to polar stratospheric clouds as well.

  7. Depolarization of Surface-Enhanced Fluorescence: An Approach to Fluorescence Polarization Assays

    PubMed Central

    Szmacinski, Henryk; Lakowicz, Joseph R.

    2009-01-01

    Localized surface plasmons of metallic particles of sub-wavelength sizes strongly modify the spectral properties of nearby fluorophores. The enhanced radiative decay rate leads to high fluorescence efficiencies and decreased fluorescence lifetimes. In this report we show that metal-enhanced fluorescence generated by the presence of the silver islands on the glass substrate displays high depolarization. Intensities, lifetimes, and emission anisotropies of several fluorophore protein conjugates have been studied in the absence and presence of metallic nanostructures. Despite highly decreased lifetimes of about 10-fold and immobilization of conjugates on the solid substrate, the observed emission anisotropies for all fluorophores on the metal-enhanced substrate decreased 300–500% compared to that in solution. This observation implies a new generation of fluorescence polarization immunoassays with broad applications because of no restrictions to the lifetime of the probe and the size of labeled biomolecules. The changes in polarization are due to binding that occur on the bioactive surface localized near the metal particles. PMID:18627176

  8. Developing Ocean Subsurface Data Record from CALIPSO Depolarization Ratio Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Y.; Rodier, S. D.; Zhai, P.; Josset, D. B.; Omar, A. H.

    2012-12-01

    CALIOP, the dual wavelength, polarization sensitive lidar flying aboard the CALIPSO satellite, has been operating since June 2006 and is expected to continue for several more years. CALIOP's depolarization ratio is one of the best calibrated measurements made by the A-Train sensors. Over the life of the CALIPSO mission, the stability of the CALIOP depolarization ratio calibration has remained within 1%. CALIOP's depolarization ratio measurements can be used for studying changes in the backscatter of ocean subsurface particulates. The ocean surface/subsurface depolarization ratio measurements from CALIOP together with collocated A-train instruments can be used for estimating the subsurface particulate backscatter coefficient (bbp) and the cross polarization component of the column integrated ocean subsurface backscatter signal. To derive the cross component of inte¬grated ocean subsurface backscatter signal from the depolarization ratio of CALIOP integrated ocean surface/subsurface range bins, we need theoretical estimates of the ocean surface back¬scatter cross section, which can be derived accurately from CloudSat ocean surface backscatter measurements or from AMSR-E wind speeds. Using the CALIOP cross component of the integrated ocean subsurface backscatter together with diffuse attenuation coefficient derived from MODIS, bbp can be estimated. Preliminary CALIOP data analysis shows that in the Southern Oceans, ocean subsurface backscatter has increased by about 5% since the beginning of the CALIPSO mission in June 2006. This study will: (1) introduce the CALIPSO ocean subsurface backscatter data products; (2) assess the uncertainties in the data products and comparing with in situ optics measurements, radiative transfer modeling and aircraft lidar measurements; and (3) summarize the global and regional (e.g., Gulf of Mexico region) statistics and temporal variations of the ocean subsurface backscatter from CALIPSO measurements.

  9. Fluorescence imaging of heat-stress induced mitochondrial long-term depolarization in breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Dressler, Cathrin; Beuthan, Juergen; Mueller, Gerhard; Zabarylo, Urszula; Minet, Olaf

    2006-09-01

    Various thermotherapies are based on the induction of lethal heat in target tissues. Spatial and temporal instabilities of elevated temperatures induced in therapy targets require optimized treatment protocols and reliable temperature control methods during thermotherapies. Heat-stress induced effects on mitochondrial transmembrane potentials were analyzed in breast cancer cells, species MX1, using the potential sensor JC-1 (Molecular Probes, Invitrogen, Germany). Potential dependant labeling of heat-stressed cells was imaged and evaluated by fluorescence microscopy and compared with control cells. JC-1 stains mitochondria in cells with high mitochondrial potentials by forming orange-red fluorescent J-aggregates while in cells with depolarized or damaged mitochondria the sensor dye exists as green fluorescent monomers. In MX1 cells orange-red and green fluorescence intensities were correlated with each other after various heat-stress treatments and states of mitochondrial membrane potentials were deduced from the image data. With increasing stress temperatures the intensity of red fluorescent J-aggregates decreased while the green fluorescence intensity of JC-1 monomers increased. This heat-stress response happened in a nonlinear manner with increasing temperatures resulting in a nonlinear increase of red/green fluorescence ratios. These data indicated that mitochondria in MX1 cells were increasingly depolarized in response to increasing ambient temperatures.

  10. A Critique of Asphaltene Fluorescence Decay and Depolarization-Based Claims about Molecular Weight and Molecular Architecture

    SciTech Connect

    Strausz,O.; Safarik, I.; Lown, E.; Morales-Izquierdo, A.

    2008-01-01

    Relying on experimental and theoretical data available from the literature, it is shown that the conclusions derived from measurements of fluorescence decay and depolarization kinetic times as reported in a series of papers over the past decade are egregiously wrong. To start with, the decay time measurements were done with inappropriate instrumentation which resulted in misleading results. Misinterpretation of the results led to the mistaken conclusion that bichromophoric type molecules are absent from petroleum asphaltene and therefore the architecture of the asphaltene molecule features a single condensed cyclic core spiked with some alkyl chains, in spite of irrefutable chemical evidence to the contrary. It was further concluded that if the asphaltene core is a single condensed ring, then the fluorescence depolarization with rotational correlation time method is applicable for the molecular weight determination of asphaltene. This is definitely not so, since, regardless of any other considerations, asphaltene is a mixture of a plethora of different, unknown components, with unknown concentrations along with innumerable different, unknown and some known chromophores portraying widely different absorption coefficients, fluorescence quantum yields, and kinetic decay times. Consequently, asphaltene fluorescence is a highly complex function of the above attributes and as such it is a totally unsuitable property for its molecular weight determination. The injection of an incorrect, single condensed ring core architecture for asphaltene has caused some confusion in asphaltene chemistry that has now hopefully been settled.

  11. Depolarization ratios retrieved by AERONET sun-sky radiometer data and comparison to depolarization ratios measured with lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noh, Youngmin; Müller, Detlef; Lee, Kyunghwa; Kim, Kwanchul; Lee, Kwonho; Shimizu, Atsushi; Kim, Sang-Woo; Sano, Itaru; Park, Chan Bong

    2017-05-01

    The linear particle depolarization ratios at 440, 675, 870, and 1020 nm were derived using data taken with the AERONET sun-sky radiometer at Seoul (37.45° N, 126.95° E), Kongju (36.47° N, 127.14° E), Gosan (33.29° N, 126.16° E), and Osaka (34.65° N, 135.59° E). The results are compared to the linear particle depolarization ratio measured by lidar at 532 nm. The correlation coefficient R2 between the linear particle depolarization ratio derived by AERONET data at 1020 nm and the linear particle depolarization ratio measured with lidar at 532 nm is 0.90, 0.92, 0.79, and 0.89 at Seoul, Kongju, Gosan, and Osaka, respectively. The correlation coefficients between the lidar-measured depolarization ratio at 532 nm and that retrieved by AERONET at 870 nm are 0.89, 0.92, 0.76, and 0.88 at Seoul, Kongju, Gosan, and Osaka, respectively. The correlation coefficients for the data taken at 675 nm are lower than the correlation coefficients at 870 and 1020 nm, respectively. Values are 0.81, 0.90, 0.64, and 0.81 at Seoul, Kongju, Gosan, and Osaka, respectively. The lowest correlation values are found for the AERONET-derived linear particle depolarization ratio at 440 nm, i.e., 0.38, 0.62, 0.26, and 0.28 at Seoul, Kongju, Gosan, and Osaka, respectively. We should expect a higher correlation between lidar-measured linear particle depolarization ratios at 532 nm and the ones derived from AERONET at 675 and 440 nm as the lidar wavelength is between the two AERONET wavelengths. We cannot currently explain why we find better correlation between lidar and AERONET linear particle depolarization ratios for the case that the AERONET wavelengths (675, 870, and 1020 nm) are significantly larger than the lidar measurement wavelength (532 nm). The linear particle depolarization ratio can be used as a parameter to obtain insight into the variation of optical and microphysical properties of dust when it is mixed with anthropogenic pollution particles. The single-scattering albedo

  12. Depolarization after resonance energy transfer (DARET): a sensitive fluorescence-based assay for botulinum neurotoxin protease activity.

    PubMed

    Gilmore, Marcella A; Williams, Dudley; Okawa, Yumiko; Holguin, Bret; James, Nicholas G; Ross, Justin A; Roger Aoki, K; Jameson, David M; Steward, Lance E

    2011-06-01

    The DARET (depolarization after resonance energy transfer) assay is a coupled Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET)-fluorescence polarization assay for botulinum neurotoxin type A or E (BoNT/A or BoNT/E) proteolytic activity that relies on a fully recombinant substrate. The substrate consists of blue fluorescent protein (BFP) and green fluorescent protein (GFP) flanking SNAP-25 (synaptosome-associated protein of 25 kDa) residues 134-206. In this assay, the substrate is excited with polarized light at 387 nm, which primarily excites the BFP, whereas emission from the GFP is monitored at 509 nm. Energy transfer from the BFP to the GFP in the intact substrate results in a substantial depolarization of the GFP emission. The energy transfer is eliminated when the fluorescent domains separate on cleavage by the endopeptidase, and emission from the directly excited GFP product fragment is then highly polarized, resulting in an overall increase in polarization. This increase in polarization can be monitored to assay the proteolytic activity of BoNT/A and BoNT/E in real time. It allows determination of the turnover rate of the substrate and the kinetic constants (V(max) and k(cat)) based on the concentration of cleaved substrate determined directly from the measurements using the additivity properties of polarization. The assay is amenable to high-throughput applications.

  13. Local mobility of polymer chain grafted onto polyethylene monitored by fluorescence depolarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuneda, Satoshi; Endo, Toshihiro; Saito, Kyoichi; Sugita, Kazuyuki; Horie, Kazuyuki; Yamashita, Takashi; Sugo, Takanobu

    1997-08-01

    The fluorescence depolarization method was used for investigating the local mobility of polymer chains grafted onto a porous polyethylene membrane. The real value of the rotational diffusion coefficient of a dansyl probe attached to the grafted polymer chain was obtained by using a correction method which eliminated the effect of multiple scattering on fluorescence anisotropy. The rotational mobility of the dansyl probe attached to the grafted polymer chain was sensitive to both degree of grafting and solvent polarity, which indicated that the conformation of the grafted polymer chain and the pore size of the base membrane strongly governed the dynamic parameters of the grafted polymer chain.

  14. Fluorescence/depolarization lidar for mid-range stand-off detection of biological agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mierczyk, Z.; Kopczyński, K.; Zygmunt, M.; Wojtanowski, J.; Młynczak, J.; Gawlikowski, A.; Młodzianko, A.; Piotrowski, W.; Gietka, A.; Knysak, P.; Drozd, T.; Muzal, M.; Kaszczuk, M.; Ostrowski, R.; Jakubaszek, M.

    2011-06-01

    LIDAR system for real-time standoff detection of bio-agents is presented and preliminary experimental results are discussed. The detection approach is based on two independent physical phenomena: (1) laser induced fluorescence (LIF), (2) depolarization resulting from elastic scattering on non-spherical particles. The device includes three laser sources, two receiving telescopes, depolarization component and spectral signature analyzing spectrograph. It was designed to provide the stand-off detection capability at ranges from 200 m up to several kilometers. The system as a whole forms a mobile platform for vehicle or building installation. Additionally, it's combined with a scanning mechanics and advanced software, which enable to conduct the semi-automatic monitoring of a specified space sector. For fluorescence excitation, 3-rd (355 nm) and 4-th (266 nm) harmonics of Nd:YAG pulsed lasers are used. They emit short (~6 ns) pulses with the repetition rate of 20 Hz. Collecting optics for fluorescence echo detection and spectral content analysis includes 25 mm diameter f/4 Newton telescope, Czerny Turner spectrograph and 32-channel PMT. Depending on the grating applied, the spectral resolution from 20 nm up to 3 nm per channel can be achieved. The system is also equipped with an eye-safe (1.5 μm) Nd:YAG OPO laser for elastic backscattering/depolarization detection. The optical echo signal is collected by Cassegrain telescope with aperture diameter of 12.5 mm. Depolarization detection component based on polarizing beam-splitter serves as the stand-off particle-shape analyzer, which is very valuable in case of non-spherical bio-aerosols sensing.

  15. Depolarization of the intrinsic and extrinsic fluorescence of pepsinogen and pepsin

    PubMed Central

    Teale, F. W. J.; Badley, R. A.

    1970-01-01

    1. The effects on the intrinsic tryptophan emission anisotropy of pepsin and pepsinogen solutions produced by (a) changes in temperature, (b) increases in viscosity with added glycerol at constant temperature and (c) decreases in lifetime through collisional quenching by potassium iodide were measured at several excitation wavelengths. The rotational-relaxation times calculated from results provided by method (b) approximate to the theoretical values for the two proteins, on taking hydration and shape factors into account, on the basis of random orientation of the tryptophan groups within the macromolecules. Differences between the results provided by methods (b) and (c) are attributable to inter-tryptophan resonance-energy-transfer depolarization, and the anomalous values recorded in method (a) can be attributed to the temperature-dependence of the limiting anisotropies. 2. Two different monomeric conjugates of pepsin, each containing one extrinsic fluorescent group per macromolecule, gave widely different relaxation times. This difference may arise from a specific orientation of the emission dipole in the enzyme. In active-site-labelled pepsin (1-dimethylaminonaphthalene-5-sulphonylphenylalanine–pepsin) this orientation would be approximately parallel to the symmetry axis of the equivalent ellipsoid, whereas in the other conjugate (1-dimethylaminonaphthalene-5-sulphonyl-pepsin) the orientation may be roughly normal to this direction, or some independent rotation of parts of the protein molecule is possible. PMID:4907957

  16. Suppression of Rayleigh scattering noise in sodium laser guide stars by hyperfine depolarization of fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Guillet de Chatellus, Hugues; Moldovan, Ioana; Fesquet, Vincent; Pique, Jean-Paul

    2006-11-27

    We propose what we believe is a novel method for enabling the complete suppression of noise due to Rayleigh scattering in sodium laser guide star systems by means of selective discrimination between Rayleigh and fluorescence signals based on polarization properties. We show that, contrary to the nearly 100% polarized Rayleigh scattering, fluorescence from the D(2) sodium line is strongly depolarized under excitation by a modeless laser. This offers the possibility of completely cancelling the effects of the Rayleigh scattering background while preserving the fluorescence signal to about 40% of its maximal value, leading to an improvement of the signal-to-noise ratio by several orders of magnitude. Both theoretical and experimental data confirm this new proposal.

  17. Excited-state orientation-dependent irreversible interconversion and fluorescence depolarization in organized molecular media. I. Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisz, J. J.; Buczkowski, M.

    2001-10-01

    Fluorescence depolarization in organized molecular media probed by the fluorophores undergoing an excited-state orientation-dependent irreversible inter conversion is discussed. The effect of the angular dependence of the excited-state interconversion on the order parameters and correlation functions is examined in a systematic way by considering different angular dependence for the interconversion kinetic rate. The expected manifestation of this effect in the time-resolved fluorescence depolarization experiments is discussed on the basis of the synthetic decays for the experiments on membrane vesicles suspension and for variable-angle experiments on macroscopically ordered samples. The main properties of the model and its experimental applications are discussed.

  18. Bipolar and fixable probe targeting mitochondria to trace local depolarization via two-photon fluorescence lifetime imaging.

    PubMed

    Wang, Benlei; Zhang, Xinfu; Wang, Chao; Chen, Lingcheng; Xiao, Yi; Pang, Yi

    2015-08-21

    Polarization/depolarization levels of different single mitochondria in a cell are inhomogeneous, and always varying. Because depolarization is an indicator of mitochondrial dysfunction, tracing local depolarization is highly desirable. The existing fluorescent probes, however, are not well suited for this task, although they are applicable to assess the average polarization extents of whole cells. A multifunctional and bipolar probe MITFPS is thus developed, which includes a positively charged hydrophilic group and an environment sensitive fluorophore. In the probe design, the hydrophilic anchoring unit is chemically immobilized on a membrane protein, while the lipophilic fluorophore can be inserted deep into the phospholipid layer. The probe exhibits a sensitive response to the local variation in polarization by changing its fluorescence lifetime. MITFPS's applicability is confirmed by real-time in situ imaging of the complete process of an uncoupler-induced depolarization under a two-photon fluorescence lifetime microscope. The imaging result reveals that one mitochondrion could have quite different polarization than the other, even though they are in the same cell.

  19. Protecting quantum coherence and discord from decoherence of depolarizing noise via weak measurement and measurement reversal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basit, Abdul; Badshah, Fazal; Ali, Hamad; Ge, Guo-Qin

    2017-05-01

    Protection of the quantum coherence and discord in realistic quantum systems interacting with the environment of depolarizing noise is an important subject in quantum information processing. Weak measurement and measurement reversal can effectively suppress the amplitude damping-class decoherence. In this paper, we examine the effect of this protocol in the protection of quantum coherence and discord subjected to depolarizing noise environments. Our scheme consists of a prior weak measurement on each qubit before interacting with noisy channels followed by post measurement reversal. It is found that quantum coherence and discord can be enhanced to an optimal value by performing weak measurements and adjusting measurement parameters on each qubit. In addition, the maximal value of the quantum coherence and discord is found to be independent of the initial-state parameters.

  20. Aerosol Properties over Southeastern China from Multi-Wavelength Raman and Depolarization Lidar Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heese, Birgit; Althausen, Dietrich; Baars, Holger; Bohlmann, Stephanie; Deng, Ruru

    2016-06-01

    A dataset of particle optical properties of highly polluted urban aerosol over the Pearl River Delta, Guangzhou, China is presented. The data were derived from multi-wavelengths Raman and depolarization lidar PollyXT and AERONET sun photometer measurements. The measurement campaign was conducted from Nov 2011 to June 2012. High aerosol optical depth was observed in the polluted atmosphere over this megacity, with a mean value of 0.54 ± 0.33 and a peak value of even 1.9. For the particle characterization the lidar ratio and the linear particle depolarization ratio, both at 532 nm, were used. The mean values of these properties are 48.0 sr ± 10.7 sr for the lidar ratio and 4%+-4% for the particle depolarization ratio, which means most depolarization measurements stayed below 10%. So far, most of these results indicate urban pollution particles mixed with particles arisen from biomass and industrial burning.

  1. Neutron depolarization measurements of magnetite in chiton teeth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seifert, M.; Schulz, M.; Benka, G.; Pfleiderer, C.; Gilder, S.

    2017-06-01

    Magnetite constitutes one of the most abundant magnetic minerals in the Earth's crust. In the single domain state, magnetite often carries the magnetic remanence in rocks due to its stable and strong magnetic remanence. Hence it is of keen interest to paleomagnetists who study the ancient magnetic field preserved in the rock record. The extremely small size range and vulnerability to oxidation of single domain magnetite makes synthetization and preservation virtually impossible. Consequently, most experimental work on magnetite under pressure is carried out on multidomain magnetite. The radula of the marine mollusc chiton (Polyplacophora) is one of the few natural sources of single domain magnetite. We have performed a comparative study on samples of chiton radula in a vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) and with the newly evolving neutron depolarization imaging (NDI) technique. Despite a constant offset between the VSM and NDI data in the coercivity we find a good agreement between the two techniques.

  2. Three-Signal Method for Accurate Measurements of Depolarization Ratio with Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reichardt, Jens; Baumgart, Rudolf; McGee, Thomsa J.

    2003-01-01

    A method is presented that permits the determination of atmospheric depolarization-ratio profiles from three elastic-backscatter lidar signals with different sensitivity to the state of polarization of the backscattered light. The three-signal method is insensitive to experimental errors and does not require calibration of the measurement, which could cause large systematic uncertainties of the results, as is the case in the lidar technique conventionally used for the observation of depolarization ratios.

  3. Light depolarization measurements in malaria: A new job for an old friend.

    PubMed

    Rebelo, Maria; Tempera, Carolina; Bispo, Claudia; Andrade, Claudia; Gardner, Rui; Shapiro, Howard M; Hänscheid, Thomas

    2015-05-01

    The use of flow cytometry in malaria research has increased over the last decade. Most approaches use nucleic acid stains to detect parasite DNA and RNA and require complex multi-color, multi-parameter analysis to reliably detect infected red blood cells (iRBCs). We recently described a novel and simpler approach to parasite detection based on flow cytometric measurement of scattered light depolarization caused by hemozoin (Hz), a pigment formed by parasite digestion of hemoglobin in iRBCs. Depolarization measurement by flow cytometry was described in 1987; however, patent issues restricted its use to a single manufacturer's hematology analyzers until 2009. Although we recently demonstrated that depolarization measurement of Hz, easily implemented on a bench top flow cytometer (Cyflow), provided useful information for malaria work, doubts regarding its application and utility remain in both the flow cytometry and malaria communities, at least in part because instrument manufacturers do not offer the option of measuring depolarized scatter. Under such circumstances, providing other researchers with guidance as to how to do this seemed to offer the most expeditious way to resolve the issue. We accordingly examined how several commercially available flow cytometers (CyFlow SL, MoFLo, Attune and Accuri C6) could be modified to detect depolarization due to the presence of free Hz on solution, or of Hz in leukocytes or erythrocytes from rodent or human blood. All were readily adapted, with substantially equivalent results obtained with lasers emitting over a wide wavelength range. Other instruments now available may also be modifiable for Hz measurement. Cytometric detection of Hz using depolarization is useful to study different aspects of malaria. Adding additional parameters, such as DNA content and base composition and RNA content, can demonstrably provide improved accuracy and sensitivity of parasite detection and characterization, allowing malaria researchers and

  4. A New Technique for Measurements of Cloud Properties Using Lidar Depolarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCullough, E. M.; Perro, C. W.; Sica, R. J.; Duck, T.; Walker, K. A.; Drummond, J. R.

    2013-12-01

    The radiative behaviour of clouds is dependent on cloud particle phase. Water droplets can exist in temperatures well below 0° C for extended periods. Lidar depolarization ratio measurements allow liquid and solid states to be differentiated in individual clouds at high spatial-temporal resolution. The 2012 and 2013 Canadian Arctic ACE Validation Campaigns in Eureka, Nunavut, Canada (80°N, 86°W) provided an opportunity to make nearly continuous depolarization measurements using the CANDAC Rayleigh-Mie-Raman Lidar (CRL) in the troposphere. Depolarization ratio measurements using two techniques are presented here. The CRL transmits linearly polarized 532 nm laser pulses. The depolarizing effect of the cloud particles on the backscattered 532 nm photons is expressed as the linear depolarization ratio. A typical lidar uses two detection channels to determine the ratio: a 'Parallel' channel and a 'Perpendicular' channel. Backscattered photons may all remain polarized parallel to the transmitted beam (depol ratio = 0), or be depolarized, up to half parallel and half perpendicular (depol ratio = 1; light unpolarized). Thus, even before taking receiver optics into account, maximum possible count rates differ by a factor of two between the channels. In the CRL, optics further suppress perpendicular photons, reducing perpendicular rates to an order of magnitude smaller than the parallel rates, making the conventional retrieval technique challenging. To use the conventional technique, perpendicular signals require considerable co-adding to meet acceptable signal-to-noise thresholds, i.e. greater than 30 minutes even in ice clouds where signal rates are highest. Clear-sky retrievals are impossible. The CRL has been experimenting with an alternate approach: using the parallel channel in conjunction with the familiar polarization-insensitive Rayleigh Elastic channel. Sufficient parallel and Rayleigh elastic photons are recorded that depolarization ratio calculations with the

  5. Arctic polar stratospheric cloud measurements by means of a four wavelength depolarization lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stefanutti, L.; Castagnoli, F.; Delguasta, M.; Flesia, C.; Godin, S.; Kolenda, J.; Kneipp, H.; Kyro, Esko; Matthey, R.; Morandi, M.

    1994-01-01

    A four wavelength depolarization backscattering lidar has been operated during the European Arctic Stratospheric Ozone Experiment (EASOE) in Sodankyl, in the Finnish Arctic. The lidar performed measurements during the months of December 1991, January, February and March 1992. The Finnish Meteorological Institute during the same period launched regularly three Radiosondes per day, and three Ozone sondes per week. Both Mt. Pinatubo aerosols and Polar Stratospheric Clouds were measured. The use of four wavelengths, respectively at 355 nm, 532 nm , 750 nm, and 850 nm permits an inversion of the lidar data to determine aerosol particle size. The depolarization technique permits the identification of Polar Stratospheric Clouds. Frequent correlation between Ozone minima and peaks in the Mt. Pinatubo aerosol maxima were detected. Measurements were carried out both within and outside the Polar Vortex.

  6. Measurement of the depolarization ratio of Rayleigh scattering at absorption bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anglister, J.; Steinberg, I. Z.

    1981-01-01

    Measurements of the depolarization ratio ρv of light scattered by the pigments lycopene and β-carotene at the red part of their absorption bands yielded values which are very close to the theoretical value 1/3 of a fully anisotropic molecular polarizability, i.e., that due to an electric dipole moment. Measurements of ρv at the blue edge of the visible absorption band of pinacyanol chloride yielded a value of 0.75 at 472.2 nm, which is the maximum value that a depolarization ratio can assume, and is attained if the average molecular polarizability is zero. This is possible only if the diagonalized polarizability tensor has at least one negative element to counterbalance the positive ones. A negative refractive index at the blue edge of the absorption band is thus experimentally demonstrated.

  7. Detection of mitochondrial depolarization/recovery during ischaemia–reperfusion using spectral properties of confocally recorded TMRM fluorescence

    PubMed Central

    Venable, Paul W; Taylor, Tyson G; Sciuto, Katie J; Zhao, Jerry; Shibayama, Junko; Warren, Mark; Spitzer, Kenneth W; Zaitsev, Alexey V

    2013-01-01

    Timing and pattern of mitochondrial potential (ΔΨm) depolarization during no-flow ischaemia–reperfusion (I–R) remain controversial, at least in part due to difficulties in interpreting the changes in the fluorescence of ΔΨm-sensitive dyes such as TMRM. The objective of this study was to develop a new approach for interpreting confocal TMRM signals during I–R based on spatial periodicity of mitochondrial packaging in ventricular cardiomyocytes. TMRM fluorescence (FTMRM) was recorded from Langendorff-perfused rabbit hearts immobilized with blebbistatin using either a confocal microscope or an optical mapping system. The hearts were studied under normal conditions, during mitochondrial uncoupling using the protonophore FCCP, and during I–R. Confocal images of FTMRM were subjected to spatial Fourier transform which revealed distinct peaks at a spatial frequency of ∼2 μm−1. The area under the peak (MPA) progressively decreased upon application of increasing concentrations of FCCP (0.3–20 μm), becoming undetectable at 5–20 μm FCCP. During ischaemia, a dramatic decrease in MPA, reaching the low/undetectable level comparable to that induced by 5–20 μm FCCP, was observed between 27 and 69 min of ischaemia. Upon reperfusion, a heterogeneous MPA recovery was observed, but not a de novo MPA decrease. Both confocal and wide-field imaging registered a consistent decrease in spatially averaged FTMRM in the presence of 5 μm FCCP, but no consistent change in this parameter during I–R. We conclude that MPA derived from confocal images provides a sensitive and specific indicator of significant mitochondrial depolarization or recovery during I–R. In contrast, spatially averaged FTMRM is not a reliable indicator of ΔΨm changes during I–R. PMID:23529126

  8. Single ice crystal measurements during nucleation experiments with the depolarization detector IODE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicolet, M.; Stetzer, O.; Lüönd, F.; Möhler, O.; Lohmann, U.

    2010-01-01

    In order to determine the efficiency of different aerosol particles to nucleate ice, an Ice Optical DEpolarization detector (IODE) was developed to distinguish between water droplets and ice crystals in ice nucleation chambers. A laser beam polarized linearly (power: 50 mW, wavelength: 407 nm) is directed through the chamber. The scattered light intensity from particles is measured at a scattering angle of Θ=175° in both polarization components (parallel and perpendicular). The ratio between the perpendicular intensity over the total one yields the depolarization ratio δ. Single particle detection is possible, using a peak detection algorithm. For high particle concentrations, a real-time signal averaging method can also be run simultaneously. The IODE detector was used in connection with the Zurich ice nucleation chamber during the ICIS 2007 workshop where ice nucleation experiments were performed with several aerosol types. In presence of ice crystals, a depolarization ratio could be measured on a particle-by-particle basis. Mean values of δ ranged from 0.24 to 0.37 and agree well with theoretical calculations.

  9. Single ice crystal measurements during nucleation experiments with the depolarization detector IODE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicolet, M.; Stetzer, O.; Lohmann, U.; Möhler, O.

    2008-12-01

    In order to determine the efficiency of aerosol particles of several types to nucleate ice, an Ice Optical DEpolarization detector (IODE) was developed to distinguish between water droplets and ice crystals in ice nucleation chambers. A laser beam polarized linearly (power: 50 mW, wavelength: 407 nm) is directed through the chamber. The scattered light intensity from particles is measured at a scattering angle of Θ=175° in both polarization components (parallel and perpendicular). The ratio between the perpendicular intensity over the total one gives the depolarization ratio δ. Single particle detection is possible, using a peak detection algorithm. For high particle concentrations, a real-time signal averaging method can also be run simultaneously. The IODE detector was used in connection with the Zurich ice nucleation chamber during the ICIS 2007 workshop where ice nucleation experiments were performed with several aerosol types. In presence of ice crystals, peaks were detected in both channels, generating depolarization signals. Mean values of δ ranged from 0.24 to 0.37.

  10. Femtosecond fluorescence depolarization study of photosynthetic antenna proteins: observation of ultrafast energy transfer in trimeric C-phycocyanin and allophycocyanin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Sunney; Du, Mei; Mets, Laurens; Fleming, Graham R.

    1992-04-01

    C-phycocyanin (CPC) and Allophycocyanin (APC) are pigment-protein complexes isolated from antenna systems in cyanobacteria. The crystal structure of CPC has recently been solved and APC has a similar structure. CPC and APC have a trimeric structure, monomeric subunits are composed of an (alpha) and (beta) polypeptide chain, each has a tetrapyrrole chromophore chemically bound to position 84. In CPC and APC trimers, the (alpha) 84 and (beta) 84 chromophores in adjacent monomers are in close proximity, forming relatively strong coupled pairs. Calculation of pairwise energy transfer rates using Foerster theory has suggested an extremely fast transfer (> 1 ps-1) between the (alpha) 84 and (beta) 84 pair in CPC. A femtosecond fluorescence up-conversion apparatus was constructed which achieves subhundred femtosecond time resolution. This allows experimental observation of the fast energy transfer process between the (alpha) 84 and (beta) 84 pair in both CPC and APC. There was also a wavelength dependence of the fluorescence depolarization kinetics which is inconsistent with Foerster inductive resonance energy transfer theory.

  11. Impacts of depolarization calibration methods on cloud phase interpretation at Eureka during 2013 and 2014 CRL lidar measurement campaigns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCullough, E. M.; Perro, C. W.; Gamage, S. M.; Hopper, J.; Sica, R. J.; Duck, T.; Walker, K. A.; Drummond, J. R.

    2014-12-01

    The radiative behaviour of clouds is dependent on cloud particle phase. Water droplets can exist in temperatures well below 0° C for extended periods. Lidar depolarization measurements allow liquid and solid states to be differentiated in individual clouds at high spatial-temporal resolution. The 2012, 2013 and 2014 Canadian Arctic ACE Validation Campaigns in Eureka, Nunavut, Canada (80°N, 86°W) provided an opportunity to make extensive depolarization measurements using the CANDAC Rayleigh-Mie-Raman Lidar (CRL) in the troposphere.To date, most calibration methods in the literature are applicable to lidars which do not have non-ideal polarizing optics upstream of the polarizing analyzers in the receiver. We demonstrate a more complete matrix algebra calibration of the CRL to take the extra optics from six upstream lidar channels into account.Differences in depolarization parameter from 2013 and 2014 measurements show the advantage of the more extensive calibration for this lidar compared to the simpler traditional approach. The largest differences are found for depolarization parameter values around d = 0.50 (corresponding to δ = 0.33). Depolarization ratio values of δ = 0.2 to 0.3 are generally taken to be the cutoff between interpretations of ice (higher δ) or water (lower δ), and many CRL measurements lie in this particularly diagnostic range. An uncertainty analysis becomes important when extending the depolarization parameters to interpretation of the clouds in the atmosphere above Eureka.

  12. Fluorescence depolarization and contact angle investigation of dynamic and static interfacial tension of liquid crystal display materials.

    PubMed

    Quintella, Cristina M; Lima, Angelo M V; Gonçalves, Cristiane C; Watanabe, Yuji N; Mammana, Alaide P; Schreiner, Marcos A; Pepe, Iuri; Pizzo, Angela A

    2003-06-01

    Interfacial interactions control two processes empirically known to be critical for molecular anchoring in twisted nematic liquid crystal displays technology (TN-LCDs): surface treatment and filling procedure. Static and dynamical interfacial tensions (Gamma(SL)) between liquids and several substrates with similar roughness were observed respectively by contact angle (theta(c)) of sessile drops and by fluorescence depolarization of thin liquid films flowing at high velocity. Gamma(SL) decreased when glass was coated with tin dioxide and increased with polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) deposition. Drops were circular for all substrates except rubbed PVA, where they flowed spontaneously along the rubbing direction, reaching an oblong form that had theta(c) parallel and perpendicular to the rubbing direction respectively greater and smaller than theta(c) for non-rubbed PVA. This is attributed to polar group alignment generating an asymmetric Gamma(SL) distribution with nanometric preferential direction, inducing a capillary-like flow. Polarization and anisotropy maps for high-velocity flow parallel to the PVA rubbing direction showed an increase in the net alignment of molecular domains and a widening of the region where it occurred. This is attributed to preferential anchoring in the downstream direction, instead of in several directions, as for non-rubbed PVA. This explains why filling direction is crucial for TN-LCDs homogeneous behavior.

  13. Observation of wall wettability under imposed flow by fluorescence depolarization: dependence on surface oxygen content and degree of polymer branching.

    PubMed

    Quintella, Cristina M; Musse, Ana Paula S; Castro, Martha T P O; Gonçalves, Cristiane C; Watanabe, Yuji N

    2005-01-01

    This work was concerned with the dependence of the interfacial tension (Gamma(SL)) on surface degree of oxygen content and on polymer branching degree. The static Gamma(SL) was evaluated by contact angle (theta;(c)) and the dynamic Gamma(SL) by fluorescence depolarization of molecular probes seeded in induced flows of monoethylene glycol. The latter results were interpreted using statistical covariant analysis. Two different systems of flowing films were studied: free films flowing on the surfaces on which they impinge and films flowing inside 1-mm-thick microflow cells. The solid surfaces were polyethylene of low density, medium density, high density, and linear with low density, polypropylene, vinyl acetate co-polymer with oxygen content of 15% and 28%, borosilicate, and tin dioxide. Increase in oxygen content of the surface decreased both the static and the dynamic Gamma(SL), which demonstrated that the presence of oxygen atoms hindered wetting. Only the dynamical Gamma(SL) was sensitive to polymer branching, and it increased as branching degree decreased. This was attributed to the higher hydrogen-atom density at the surface, which favored temporary intermolecular bonds between the surface and the flowing liquid.

  14. Concept Design of a Multiwavelength Aerosol Lidar System With Mitigated Diattenuation Effects and Depolarization-Measurement Capability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Comerón, Adolfo; Sicard, Michaël; Vidal, Eric; Barragán, Rubén; Muñoz, Constantino; Rodríguez, Alejandro; Tiana-Alsina, Jordi; Rocadenbosch, Francesc; García-Vizcaíno, David

    2016-06-01

    It is known that the retrieval of aerosol extinction and backscatter coefficients from lidar data acquired through so-called total-power channels - intended to measure the backscattered power irrespective of the polarization - can be adversely affected by varying depolarization effects produced by the aerosol under measurement. This effect can be particularly noticeable in advanced multiwavelength systems, where different wavelengths are separated using a system of dichroic beam splitters, because in general the reflection and transmission coefficients of the beam splitters will be different for fields with polarization parallel or perpendicular to the incidence plane. Here we propose a setup for multiwavelength aerosol lidars alleviating diattenuation effects due to changing depolarization conditions while allowing measure linear depolarization.

  15. Backscatter and depolarization measurements of aerosolized biological simulants using a chamber lidar system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, David M.; Thrush, Evan P.; Thomas, Michael E.; Santarpia, Josh; Quizon, Jason; Carter, Christopher C.

    2010-04-01

    To ensure agent optical cross sections are well understood from the UV to the LWIR, volume integrated measurements of aerosolized agent material at a few key wavelengths is required to validate existing simulations. Ultimately these simulations will be used to assess the detection performance of various classes of lidar technology spanning the entire range of the optical spectrum. The present work demonstrates an optical measurement architecture based on lidar allowing the measurement of backscatter and depolarization ratio from biological aerosols released in a refereed, 1-m cubic chamber. During 2009, various upgrades have been made to the chamber LIDAR system, which operates at 1.064 μm with sub nanosecond pulses at a 120 Hz repetition rate. The first build of the system demonstrated a sensitivity of aerosolized Bacillus atrophaeus (BG) on the order of 5×105 ppl with 1 GHz InGaAs detectors. To increase the sensitivity and reduce noise, the InGaAs detectors were replaced with larger-area silicon avalanche photodiodes for the second build of the system. In addition, computer controlled step variable neutral density filters are now incorporated to facilitate calibrating the system for absolute back-scatter measurements. Calibrated hard target measurements will be combined with data from the ground truth instruments for cross-section determination of the material aerosolized in the chamber. Measured results are compared to theoretical simulations of cross-sections.

  16. Studying Photosynthesis by Measuring Fluorescence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanchez, Jose Francisco; Quiles, Maria Jose

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes an easy experiment to study the absorption and action spectrum of photosynthesis, as well as the inhibition by heat, high light intensity and the presence of the herbicide 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea (DCMU) on the photosynthetic process. The method involves measuring the chlorophyll fluorescence emitted by intact…

  17. Studying Photosynthesis by Measuring Fluorescence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanchez, Jose Francisco; Quiles, Maria Jose

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes an easy experiment to study the absorption and action spectrum of photosynthesis, as well as the inhibition by heat, high light intensity and the presence of the herbicide 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea (DCMU) on the photosynthetic process. The method involves measuring the chlorophyll fluorescence emitted by intact…

  18. Structure of the pyridine-chloranil complex in solution: a surprise from depolarized hyper-Rayleigh scattering measurements.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Ravindra; Mukhopadhyay, S; Ramasesha, S; Das, Puspendu K

    2011-12-01

    In this article, we report the structure of a 1:1 charge transfer complex between pyridine (PYR) and chloranil (CHL) in solution (CHCl(3)) from the measurement of hyperpolarizability (β(HRS)) and linear and circular depolarization ratios, D and D', respectively, by the hyper-Rayleigh scattering technique and state-of-the-art quantum chemical calculations. Using linearly (electric field vector along X) and circularly polarized incident light, respectively, we have measured two macroscopic depolarization ratios D = I(X,X)(2ω)/I(X,Z)(2ω) and D' = I(X,C)(2ω)/I(Z,C)(2ω) in the laboratory fixed XYZ frame by detecting the second harmonic (SH) scattered light in a polarization resolved fashion. The stabilization energy and the optical gap calculated through the MP2/cc-pVDZ method using Gaussian09 were not significantly different to distinguish between the cofacial and T-shape structures. Only when the experimentally obtained β(HRS) and the depolarization ratios, D and D', were matched with the theoretically computed values from single and double configuration interaction (SDCI) calculations performed using the ZINDO-SCRF technique, we concluded that the room temperature equilibrium structure of the complex is cofacial. This is in sharp contrast to an earlier theoretical prediction of the T-shape structure of the complex.

  19. Dynamic changes in cortical NADH fluorescence in rat focal ischemia: evaluation of the effects of hypothermia on propagation of peri-infarct depolarization by temporal and spatial analysis.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Toshihiro; Takeda, Yoshimasa; Taninishi, Hideki; Arai, Minako; Shiraishi, Kensuke; Morita, Kiyoshi

    2009-01-02

    Suppression of peri-infarct depolarizations (PIDs) is one of the major mechanisms of hypothermic protection against transient focal cerebral ischemia. Previous studies have shown the lack of hypothermic protection against permanent focal ischemia. We hypothesized the lack of hypothermic protection was due to the poor efficacy in suppression of PIDs. To examine the hypothesis, we elucidated the effects of hypothermia on the manner of propagation of PIDs with temporal and spatial resolutions using NADH (reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide) fluorescence images by illuminating the parietal-temporal cortex with ultraviolet light. Spontaneously hypertensive rats (n=14) were subjected to permanent focal ischemia by occlusion of the middle cerebral and left common carotid arteries. 2-h hypothermia (30 degrees C) was initiated before ischemia. Although hypothermia delayed the appearance of PIDs, it did not suppress their appearance. Furthermore, 54% of the PIDs enlarged the high-intensity area of NADH fluorescence in the hypothermia group, similar to the normothermia group (53%). The high-intensity area of NADH fluorescence widened by each PID was larger in the hypothermia group than in the normothermia group. These findings suggest that PIDs even in hypothermia are one of the major factors causing growth of infarction, emphasizing the importance of therapy that targets suppression of PIDs even during hypothermia.

  20. Dynamics of helical worm-like chains. VIII. Higher-order subspace approximations to dielectric and magnetic relaxation and fluorescence depolarization for flexible chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamakawa, Hiromi; Yoshizaki, Takenao; Fujii, Motoharu

    1986-04-01

    Following the general scheme developed in the preceding paper (paper VII), dielectric and magnetic relaxation and fluorescence depolarization for flexible chain polymers in dilute solution are reinvestigated on the basis of the discrete helical worm-like chain in the higher-order subspace approximation. A comparison of theory with experiment is made with respect to the dielectric correlation time τD, the spin-lattice relaxation time T1, the spin-spin relaxation time T2, the nuclear Overhauser enhancement (NOE), the fluorescence emission anisotropy r(t), the average fluorescence anisotropy r¯, and the fluorescence correlation time τF. It is found that there is agreement between the diameters of the chains determined from these dynamic properties and those from chemical structures, better than in the previous crude subspace approximation, indicating that the theory is remarkably improved in the present approximation. The magnetic correlation time τM is in general not an observable, and therefore an empirical equation to be used for its determination from the observed T1 is constructed. It is then found that there is good correlation between the dynamic chain stiffness τX/τ0X and the static chain stiffness λ-1, where τ0X is the correlation time of the isolated subbody (monomer unit) with X=D, M, and F; τX/τ0X is a monotonically increasing function of λ-1 nearly independent of X as far as perpendicular dipoles are concerned. An explanation of this result is given. However, the dependence of τX on temperature cannot be explained very satisfactorily.

  1. [Fluorescent probes for intracellular Mg2+ measurement].

    PubMed

    Komatsu, Hirokazu; Suzuki, Yoshio; Suzuki, Koji

    2004-08-01

    Recently, fluorescent probes are widely used as tools for dynamical measurement of ion distributions and concentrations in cells. They are highly sensitive, and offer imaging by the use of fluorescent microscopy in easily and less cell damaging way. This paper discusses the selectivity and optical character of the three novel Mg(2+) fluorescent probes. KMG-20AM offers ratiometric quantative measurement of Mg(2+), KMG-104 provides high-sensitive qualitative analysis and 3-D measurement. With those improved Mg(2+) fluorescent probes, the physiological and pathological role of Mg(2+) are going to be more and more clear.

  2. Ice crystal habits from cloud chamber studies obtained by in-line holographic microscopy related to depolarization measurements.

    PubMed

    Amsler, Peter; Stetzer, Olaf; Schnaiter, Martin; Hesse, Evelyn; Benz, Stefan; Moehler, Ottmar; Lohmann, Ulrike

    2009-10-20

    We investigate hydrometeor habits at the AIDA chamber with a newly developed in-line holographic microscope HOLographic Imager for Microscopic Objects (HOLIMO). Sizes and habits of ice crystals and droplets in a mixed-phase cloud experiment are related to relative humidity with respect to ice (RH(ice)), temperature (T), and experiment time. This experiment is initiated with supercooled water drops. As a result, ice crystals within a maximum particle diameter size range of 2 to 118 microm (average size of 19 microm) are detected and 63% of them reveal regular habits. The observed particle habits match those predicted for a given RH(ice) and T. Two different growth modes emerge from this cloud. The first one appears during water injection and reveals mainly optical particle sizes in the range of 5 to 250 microm. The second mode grows to sizes of 5 to 63 microm, just after the particles of the first one fall out. It is found that an increasing aspect ratio chi of maximum length over thickness from 2 to 20 as obtained by HOLIMO corresponds to a decreasing linear depolarization ratio from 0.1 to 0.04, as independently obtained by depolarization measurements.

  3. Depolarization ratio and attenuated backscatter for nine cloud types: analyses based on collocated CALIPSO lidar and MODIS measurements.

    PubMed

    Cho, Hyoun-Myoung; Yang, Ping; Kattawar, George W; Nasiri, Shaima L; Hu, Yongxiang; Minnis, Patrick; Trepte, Charles; Winker, David

    2008-03-17

    This paper reports on the relationship between lidar backscatter and the corresponding depolarization ratio for nine types of cloud systems. The data used in this study are the lidar returns measured by the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) aboard the Cloud- Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) satellite and the collocated cloud products derived from the observations made by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) aboard Aqua satellite. Specifically, the operational MODIS cloud optical thickness and cloud-top pressure products are used to classify cloud types on the basis of the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) cloud classification scheme. While the CALIPSO observations provide information for up to 10 cloud layers, in the present study only the uppermost clouds are considered. The layer-averaged attenuated backscatter (gamma') and layer-averaged depolarization ratio (delta) from the CALIPSO measurements show both water- and ice-phase features for global cirrus, cirrostratus, and deep convective cloud classes. Furthermore, we screen both the MODIS and CALIPSO data to eliminate cases in which CALIPSO detected two- or multi-layered clouds. It is shown that low gamma' values corresponding to uppermost thin clouds are largely eliminated in the CALIPSO delta-gamma' relationship for single-layered clouds. For mid-latitude and polar regions corresponding, respectively, to latitude belts 30 degrees -60 degrees and 60 degrees -90 degrees in both the hemispheres, a mixture of water and ice is also observed in the case of the altostratus class. MODIS cloud phase flags are also used to screen ice clouds. The resultant water clouds flagged by the MODIS algorithm show only water phase feature in the delta-gamma' relation observed by CALIOP; however, in the case of the ice clouds flagged by the MODIS algorithm, the co-existence of ice- and water-phase clouds is still observed in

  4. Containerless Atomic-Fluorescence Property Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nordine, P.; Schiffman, R.; Walker, C.

    1987-01-01

    Report describes studies conducted to establish and verify use of laser-induced fluorescence in monitoring and controlling high-temperature containerless processes. Specimens levitated by gas jets or electromagnetic fields and heated by laser beams or electromagnetic induction while being irradiated and detected by fluorescence technique. Makes quantitative and qualitative comparisons among three new methods of temperature measurement; all rely on laser-induced fluorescence. One method gas-density thermometry with seed gas. Other two methods involve measurements of velocities of evaporating atoms or of population ratios of different electronic states.

  5. Confined dynamics of a ribosome-bound nascent globin: Cone angle analysis of fluorescence depolarization decays in the presence of two local motions

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, Jamie P; Culviner, Peter H; Cavagnero, Silvia

    2009-01-01

    We still know very little about how proteins achieve their native three-dimensional structure in vitro and in the cell. Folding studies as proteins emerge from the mega Dalton-sized ribosome pose special challenges due to the large size and complicated nature of the ribosome-nascent chain complex. This work introduces a combination of three-component analysis of fluorescence depolarization decays (including the presence of two local motions) and in-cone analysis of diffusive local dynamics to investigate the spatial constraints experienced by a protein emerging from the ribosomal tunnel. We focus on E. coli ribosomes and an all-α-helical nascent globin in the presence and absence of the cotranslationally active chaperones DnaK and trigger factor. The data provide insights on the dynamic nature and structural plasticity of ribosome-nascent chain complexes. We find that the sub-ns motions of the N-terminal fluorophore, reporting on the globin dynamics in the vicinity of the N terminus, are highly constrained both inside and outside the ribosomal tunnel, resulting in high-order parameters (>0.85) and small cone semiangles (<30°). The shorter globin chains buried inside the tunnel are less spatially constrained than those of a reference sequence from a natively unfolded protein, suggesting either that the two nascent chain sequences have a different secondary structure and therefore sample different regions of the tunnel or that the tunnel undergoes local structural adjustments to accommodate the globin sequence. Longer globins emerging out of the ribosomal tunnel are also found to have highly spatially constrained slow (ns) motions. There are no observable spectroscopic changes in the absence of bound chaperones. PMID:19569194

  6. Ca transients in cardiac myocytes measured with a low affinity fluorescent indicator, furaptra.

    PubMed Central

    Konishi, M; Berlin, J R

    1993-01-01

    Intracellular calcium ion ([Ca2+]i) transients were measured in single rat ventricular myocytes with the fluorescent indicator furaptra. Cells were voltage clamped with a single patch electrode containing the K+ salt of furaptra and fluorescence at 500 nm was measured during illumination with 350 and 370 nm light. Depolarizing voltage-clamp pulses elicited [Ca2+]-dependent fluorescent transients in 30 of 33 cells tested. The peak change in [Ca2+]i elicited by 50-ms depolarizations from -70 to +10 mV was 1.52 +/- 0.25 microM (mean +/- SEM, n = 7). The size of the [Ca2+]i transient increased in response to 10 microM isoproterenol, prolongation of the depolarization, and increasing pipette [Na+]. Because furaptra is sensitive to Ca2+ and Mg2+, changes in [Mg2+]i during the [Ca2+]i transient could not be measured. Instead, a single-compartment model was developed to simulate changes in [Mg2+] during [Ca2+] transients. The simulations predicted that a 2 microM [Ca2+] transient was accompanied by a slow increase in [Mg2+] (14-29 microM), which became larger as basal [Mg2+] increased (0.5-2.0 mM). The [Mg2+] transient reached a peak approximately 1 s after the peak of the [Ca2+] transient with the slow changes in [Mg2+] dominated by competition at the Ca2+/Mg2+ sites of Troponin. These changes in [Mg2+], however, were so small and slow that they were unlikely to affect the furaptra fluorescence signal at the peak of the [Ca2+]i transient. The [Ca2+]i transient reported by furaptra appears to be larger than that reported by other Ca2+ indicators; however, we conclude this larger transient is at least as accurate as [Ca2+]i transients reported by the other indicators. PMID:8494988

  7. Calculations of Light Scattering Measurements Predicting Sensitivity of Depolarization to Shape Changes of Spores and Bacteria

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-04-01

    either spores or bacteria. 44 LITERATURE CITED 1. Grund, C.J; Brilliant, N.; Bjork, C.; Craig, T. Eyesafe, Multi-function Coherent Doppler Lidar for...an aerosol containing biological particles. This is of interest both for lidar backscatter and for point measurements where samples of the aerosol are... laser light. Each of the added spheres was tangent to the center sphere but did not overlap it. The scattering calculated for the cluster of seven

  8. Remote measurement of ocean temperature from depolarization in Raman scattering. [using laser beam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, C. H.; Young, L. A.

    1975-01-01

    Ocean temperatures may be mapped in three dimensions from an aircraft down to depths of 2 to 4 attenuation lengths by monitoring Raman radiation backscattered from a laser beam. This paper describes laboratory experiments on the temperature dependence of Raman spectra of saline solutions and calculations of the expected performance of a field system. The Raman technique is of greatest potential utility in coastal and estuarine waters where gradients are relatively high. It is estimated that seawater temperature may be measured to a statistical precision of 0.5 C at depths to four attenuation lengths in two meter water, using one Joule of transmitted laser energy.

  9. Rotational diffusion of receptors for epidermal growth factor measured by time-resolved phosphorescence depolarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zidovetzki, Raphael; Johnson, David A.; Arndt-Jovin, Donna J.; Jovin, Thomas M.

    1991-06-01

    The cell surface receptor for epidermal growth factor (EGFR) is one of the most studied integral membrane proteins. The receptor is widely distributed in cells and tissues of mammalian and avian tissues and plays an important role in growth control. Binding of the epidermal growth factor (EGF) to EGFR initiates a complex biological response, which includes self-phosphorylation of the receptor due to an intrinsic tyrosine kinase activity, phosphorylation of other membrane proteins, increased intake of metabolites, and increased proliferation. Complete amino acid sequence of EGFR revealed a high degree of homology with viral oncogenes and allowed tentative identification of an external hormone binding domain, a transmembrane domain, and a cytoplasmic domain that includes tyrosine kinase activity. EGF binding induces rapid aggregation of EGFR, a process which was also observed on other receptor systems. These and other observations led to a hypothesis that microaggregation of EGFR is a necessary prerequisite for the biological response of EGF. A direct approach to study the processes of oligomerization of cell membrane proteins is to measure their mobility under various conditions. The lateral mobility of the EGFR was studied on mouse 3T3 fibroblasts and on A431 cells. However, an examination of the equations for the lateral and rotational diffusion in membranes shows that only rotational diffusion is strongly dependent on the size of the diffusing entity. A method of measuring protein rotational diffusion by time-resolved phosphorescence has proved to be very useful in the analysis of both in vivo and in vitro systems. The authors apply this method to study the mobility of EGFR on living A431 cells and membrane preparations.

  10. Measurement of Rydberg positronium fluorescence lifetimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deller, A.; Alonso, A. M.; Cooper, B. S.; Hogan, S. D.; Cassidy, D. B.

    2016-06-01

    We report measurements of the fluorescence lifetimes of positronium (Ps) atoms with principal quantum numbers n =10 -19 . Ps atoms in Rydberg-Stark states were produced via a two-color two-step 1 3S→2 3P→n 3S/n measured time-of-flight distributions were used to determine the mean lifetimes of the Rydberg levels, yielding values ranging from 3 μ s to 26 μ s . Our data are in accord with the expected radiative lifetimes of Rydberg-Stark states of Ps.

  11. Plant stress detection by remote measurement of fluorescence

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McFarlane, J. C.; Watson, Robert D.; Theisen, Arnold F.; Jackson, R. D.; Ehrler, W. L.; Pinter, P. J.; Idso, S. B.; Reginato, R. J.

    1980-01-01

    Chlorophyll fluorescence of mature lemon trees was measured with a Fraunhofer line discriminator (FLD). An increase in fluorescence was correlated with plant water stress as measured by stomatal resistance and twig water potential.

  12. Laser-excited fluorescence for measuring atmospheric pollution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menzies, R. T.

    1975-01-01

    System measures amount of given pollutant at specific location. Infrared laser aimed at location has wavelength that will cause molecules of pollutant to fluoresce. Detector separates fluorescence from other radiation and measures its intensity to indicate concentration of pollutant.

  13. Measurement of cytosolic calcium: fluorescent calcium indicators.

    PubMed

    Rink, T J

    1988-01-01

    The invention of intracellularly trappable fluorescent indicators of [Ca2+i] has provided an important new way to answer many key questions about the role of Ca2+ and of other messengers in cell activation. Perhaps equally important, the results of these investigations have thrown up many interesting new questions. The suitability of this, or any other method of measuring [Ca2+]i, naturally depends on the tissue, the experimenter, the facilities available and the particular question to be asked. For simply measuring [Ca2+]i, fura-2 and indo-1 are likely to be preferable to quin2, although right now more is known about quin2, its behaviour and its calibration in cells. Anecdotal evidence suggests that indo-1 may have advantages over fura-2 although many more people are presently using fura-2. For manipulating [Ca2+]i by deliberately adding Ca2+ buffering power, quin2 may have advantages and is certainly the tried and tested method. For epithelial cell work, where the relation of the cells to the rest of the tissue and their polarity are critical, suspensions and even monolayer measurements will seldom be adequate. Calcium microelectrodes or single-cell fluorescence techniques will surely be required and rewarding.

  14. Oligomeric state of human erythrocyte band 3 measured by fluorescence resonance energy homotransfer.

    PubMed Central

    Blackman, S M; Piston, D W; Beth, A H

    1998-01-01

    The oligomeric state of the erythrocyte anion exchange protein, band 3, has been assayed by resonance energy homotransfer. Homotransfer between oligomeric subunits, labeled with eosin-5-maleimide at Lys430 in the transmembrane domain, has been demonstrated by steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy, and is readily observed by its depolarization of the eosin fluorescence. Polarized fluorescence measurements of HPLC-purified band 3 oligomers indicate that eosin homotransfer increases progressively with increasing species size. This shows that homotransfer also occurs between labeled band 3 dimers as well as within the dimers, making fluorescence anisotropy measurements sensitive to band 3 self-association. Treatment of ghost membranes with either Zn2+ or melittin, agents that cluster band 3, significantly decreases the anisotropy as a result of the increased homotransfer within the band 3 clusters. By comparison with the anisotropy of species of known oligomeric state, the anisotropy of erythrocyte ghost membranes at 37 degrees C is consistent with dimeric and/or tetrameric band 3, and does not require postulation of a fraction of large clusters. Proteolytic removal of the cytoplasmic domain of band 3, which significantly increases the rotational mobility of the transmembrane domain, does not affect its oligomeric state, as reported by eosin homotransfer. These results support a model in which interaction with the membrane skeleton restricts the mobility of band 3 without significantly altering its self-association state. PMID:9675213

  15. Fluorescence emission spectral shift measurements of membrane potential in single cells.

    PubMed

    Kao, W Y; Davis, C E; Kim, Y I; Beach, J M

    2001-08-01

    Previous measurements of transmembrane potential using the electrochromic probe di-8-ANEPPS have used the excitation spectral shift response by alternating excitation between two wavelengths centered at voltage-sensitive portions of the excitation spectrum and recording at a single wavelength near the peak of the emission spectrum. Recently, the emission spectral shift associated with the change in transmembrane potential has been used for continuous membrane potential monitoring. To characterize this form of the electrochromic response from di-8-ANEPPS, we have obtained fluorescence signals from single cells in response to step changes in transmembrane potentials set with a patch electrode, using single wavelength excitation near the peak of the dye absorption spectrum. Fluorescence changes at two wavelengths near voltage-sensitive portions of the emission spectrum and shifts in the complete emission spectrum were determined for emission from plasma membrane and internal membrane. We found that the fluorescence ratio from either dual-wavelength recordings, or from opposite sides of the emission spectrum, varied linearly with the amplitude of the transmembrane potential step between -80 and +60 mV. Voltage dependence of difference spectra exhibit a crossover point near the peak of the emission spectra with approximately equal gain and loss of fluorescence intensity on each side of the spectrum and equal response amplitude for depolarization and hyperpolarization. These results are consistent with an electrochromic mechanism of action and demonstrate how the emission spectral shift response can be used to measure the transmembrane potential in single cells.

  16. Measurement of ethanol using fluorescence quenching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Ashutosh; Quantrill, Nigel Stuart Michael

    1994-06-01

    A new assay procedure for the measurement of ethanol concentrations is described is based on fluorescence quenching of an indicator. The method makes use of the photo reaction between a fluorophore (thionine) and NADH. The latter is generated during an enzymic reaction between ethanol and alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) in the presence of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD +) cofactor. An empirical relation is used to analyse the observed quenching, and a quenching constant of 27.2(±2.8)M -1 is obtained for the substrate induced quenching (SIQ) of thionine by ethanol. The reported method is suitable over a range of 0-40 mM with a detection limit of 0.15 mM. A theoretical model for the overall ethanol assay is developed, and its validity is shown by comparison with the experimental results. Various applications of the reactions are discussed, including its use to construct a fibre optic biosensor for ethanol.

  17. Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence Measurements of High Explosives

    SciTech Connect

    Caggiano, Joseph A.; Warren, Glen A.; Korbly, Steve; Hasty, R.; Klimenko, A.; Park, William H.

    2007-12-31

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and Passport Systems have collaborated to perform Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence experiments using several high quality high-explosive simulant samples. These measurements were conducted to determine the feasibility of finding and characterizing high explosive material by NRF interrogation. Electron beams of 5.1, 5.3, 8, and 10 MeV were used to produce bremsstrahlung photon beams, which irradiated the samples. The gamma-ray spectra were collected using high-purity germanium detectors. Nitrogen-to-carbon ratios of the high-explosive simulants were extracted from the 5.1 and 5.3 MeV data and compare favorably with accepted values. Analysis of the 8 and 10 MeV data is in progress; preliminary isotopic comparisons within the samples are consistent with the expected results.

  18. Shape-induced Gravitational Sorting of Saharan Dust During Transatlantic Voyage: Evidence from CALIOP Lidar Depolarization Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Weidong; Marshak, Alexander; Kostinski, Alexander B.; Varnai, Tamas

    2013-01-01

    Motivated by the physical picture of shape-dependent air resistance and, consequently, shape-induced differential sedimentation of dust particles, we searched for and found evidence of dust particle asphericity affecting the evolution and distribution of dust-scattered light depolarization ratio (delta). Specifically, we examined a large data set of Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) observations of Saharan dust from June to August 2007. Observing along a typical transatlantic dust track, we find that (1) median delta is uniformly distributed between 2 and 5?km altitudes as the elevated dust leaves the west coast of Africa, thereby indicating uniformly random mixing of particle shapes with height; (2) vertical homogeneity of median delta breaks down during the westward transport: between 2 and 5?km delta increases with altitude and this increase becomes more pronounced with westward progress; (3) delta tends to increase at higher altitude (greater than 4?km) and decrease at lower altitude (less than 4?km) during the westward transport. All these features are captured qualitatively by a minimal model (two shapes only), suggesting that shape-induced differential settling and consequent sorting indeed contribute significantly to the observed temporal evolution and vertical stratification of dust properties. By implicating particle shape as a likely cause of gravitational sorting, these results will affect the estimates of radiative transfer through Saharan dust layers.

  19. Apparatus for eliminating background interference in fluorescence measurements

    DOEpatents

    Martin, J.C.; Jett, J.H.

    1984-01-06

    The disclosure is directed to an apparatus for eliminating background interference during fluorescence measurements in a multiple laser flow cytometer. A biological particle stained with fluorescent dyes is excited by a laser. A fluorescence detector detects the fluorescence. The particle scatters light and a gate signal is generated and delayed until the biological particle reaches the next laser. The delayed signal turns on this next laser which excites a different stained component of the same biological particle.

  20. Apparatus for eliminating background interference in fluorescence measurements

    DOEpatents

    Martin, J.C.; Jett, J.H.

    1986-03-04

    The disclosure is directed to an apparatus for eliminating background interference during fluorescence measurements in a multiple laser flow cytometer. A biological particle stained with fluorescent dyes is excited by a laser. A fluorescence detector detects the fluorescence. The particle scatters light and a gate signal is generated and delayed until the biological particle reaches the next laser. The delayed signal turns on this next laser, which excites a different stained component of the same biological particle. 8 figs.

  1. Apparatus for eliminating background interference in fluorescence measurements

    DOEpatents

    Martin, John C.; Jett, James H.

    1986-01-01

    The disclosure is directed to an apparatus for eliminating background interference during fluorescence measurements in a multiple laser flow cytometer. A biological particle stained with fluorescent dyes is excited by a laser. A fluorescence detector detects the fluorescence. The particle scatters light and a gate signal is generated and delayed until the biological particle reaches the next laser. The delayed signal turns on this next laser, which excites a different stained component of the same biological particle.

  2. Photon correlation system for fluorescence lifetime measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, C. G.; Murray, J. G.; Mitchell, A. C.

    1995-07-01

    The construction and testing of a dual-channel photon correlator is reported for the frequency domain imaging of fluorescence lifetimes using photon-counting detection. A light source modulated at radio frequency excites fluorescence, which is detected using an imaging single-photon detector. After discrimination, single-photon events are processed in parallel by the correlation circuit, the purpose of which is to allow both the mean phase delay and the demodulation of fluorescence to be calculated relative to a reference signal derived from the modulated excitation source. Outputs from the correlator are integrated in a computer, resulting in accumulation of images which have been statistically filtered by sine and cosine transforms, and which can be manipulated within the computer to generate a resultant image where contrast depends on fluorescence lifetime rather than fluorescence intensity.

  3. Depolarization in polarizing supermirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klauser, Christine; Bigault, Thierry; Böni, Peter; Courtois, Pierre; Devishvili, Anton; Rebrova, Nataliya; Schneider, Michael; Soldner, Torsten

    2016-12-01

    We present data on depolarizing effects in polarizing mirrors. At typical magnetizing field strengths used in polarizing devices, depolarizations rise up to the percent level in the specular region and are shown to be successfully suppressed to 10-4 when increasing the magnetizing field. We show evidence linking a part of this depolarization to lateral correlation of the magnetization fluctuations in the ferromagnetic layers. Effects of the supermirror factor (m), wavelength and incidence angle are studied. The findings are applied to a crossed supermirror geometry and we report a neutron beam polarization of 99.97(1)% for a beam of wavelength λ = 5.3 Å, Δλ/λ = 0.1 (FWHM).

  4. Time-resolved fluorescence decay measurements for flowing particles

    DOEpatents

    Deka, C.; Steinkamp, J.A.

    1999-06-01

    Time-resolved fluorescence decay measurements are disclosed for flowing particles. An apparatus and method for the measurement and analysis of fluorescence for individual cells and particles in flow are described, wherein the rapid measurement capabilities of flow cytometry and the robust measurement and analysis procedures of time-domain fluorescence lifetime spectroscopy are combined. A pulse-modulated CW laser is employed for excitation of the particles. The characteristics and the repetition rate of the excitation pulses can be readily adjusted to accommodate for fluorescence decays having a wide range of lifetimes. 12 figs.

  5. Time-resolved fluorescence decay measurements for flowing particles

    DOEpatents

    Deka, Chiranjit; Steinkamp, John A.

    1999-01-01

    Time-resolved fluorescence decay measurements for flowing particles. An apparatus and method for the measurement and analysis of fluorescence for individual cells and particles in flow are described, wherein the rapid measurement capabilities of flow cytometry and the robust measurement and analysis procedures of time-domain fluorescence lifetime spectroscopy are combined. A pulse-modulated cw laser is employed for excitation of the particles. The characteristics and the repetition rate of the excitation pulses can be readily adjusted to accommodate for fluorescence decays having a wide range of lifetimes.

  6. Depolarizing differential Mueller matrices.

    PubMed

    Ortega-Quijano, Noé; Arce-Diego, José Luis

    2011-07-01

    The evolution of a polarized beam can be described by the differential formulation of Mueller calculus. The nondepolarizing differential Mueller matrices are well known. However, they only account for 7 out of the 16 independent parameters that are necessary to model a general anisotropic depolarizing medium. In this work we present the nine differential Mueller matrices for general depolarizing media, highlighting the physical implications of each of them. Group theory is applied to establish the relationship between the differential matrix and the set of transformation generators in the Minkowski space, of which Lorentz generators constitute a particular subgroup.

  7. Fluorescent Protein Based FRET Pairs with Improved Dynamic Range for Fluorescence Lifetime Measurements

    PubMed Central

    George Abraham, Bobin; Sarkisyan, Karen S.; Mishin, Alexander S.; Santala, Ville; Tkachenko, Nikolai V.; Karp, Matti

    2015-01-01

    Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) using fluorescent protein variants is widely used to study biochemical processes in living cells. FRET detection by fluorescence lifetime measurements is the most direct and robust method to measure FRET. The traditional cyan-yellow fluorescent protein based FRET pairs are getting replaced by green-red fluorescent protein variants. The green-red pair enables excitation at a longer wavelength which reduces cellular autofluorescence and phototoxicity while monitoring FRET. Despite the advances in FRET based sensors, the low FRET efficiency and dynamic range still complicates their use in cell biology and high throughput screening. In this paper, we utilized the higher lifetime of NowGFP and screened red fluorescent protein variants to develop FRET pairs with high dynamic range and FRET efficiency. The FRET variations were analyzed by proteolytic activity and detected by steady-state and time-resolved measurements. Based on the results, NowGFP-tdTomato and NowGFP-mRuby2 have shown high potentials as FRET pairs with large fluorescence lifetime dynamic range. The in vitro measurements revealed that the NowGFP-tdTomato has the highest Förster radius for any fluorescent protein based FRET pairs yet used in biological studies. The developed FRET pairs will be useful for designing FRET based sensors and studies employing Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy (FLIM). PMID:26237400

  8. Models of fluorescence and photosynthesis for interpreting measurements of solar-induced chlorophyll fluorescence

    PubMed Central

    van der Tol, C; Berry, J A; Campbell, P K E; Rascher, U

    2014-01-01

    We have extended a conventional photosynthesis model to simulate field and laboratory measurements of chlorophyll fluorescence at the leaf scale. The fluorescence paramaterization is based on a close nonlinear relationship between the relative light saturation of photosynthesis and nonradiative energy dissipation in plants of different species. This relationship diverged only among examined data sets under stressed (strongly light saturated) conditions, possibly caused by differences in xanthophyll pigment concentrations. The relationship was quantified after analyzing data sets of pulse amplitude modulated measurements of chlorophyll fluorescence and gas exchange of leaves of different species exposed to different levels of light, CO2, temperature, nitrogen fertilization treatments, and drought. We used this relationship in a photosynthesis model. The coupled model enabled us to quantify the relationships between steady state chlorophyll fluorescence yield, electron transport rate, and photosynthesis in leaves under different environmental conditions. Key Points Light saturation of photosynthesis determines quenching of leaf fluorescence We incorporated steady state leaf fluorescence in a photosynthesis model PMID:27398266

  9. Liquid temperature measurement method in microchannels by using fluorescence polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tatsumi, Kazuya; Hsu, Chi Hsuan; Suzuki, Atsushi; Nakabe, Kazuyoshi

    2017-07-01

    A novel optical method that can measure fluid temperature at the microscopic scale by measuring fluorescence polarization is described in this paper. The measurement is much less influenced by fluorescence quenching effects, which is a significant issue in conventional laser-induced fluorescence methods. Therefore, the effects of the other properties of the fluid can be reduced considerably in the proposed method, thus has the potential of leading to greater reliability in measuring the temperature. An experiment was performed in a microchannel flow by using fluorescent molecule probes. The relationship between the fluid temperature and the measured fluorescence polarization degree is evaluated to derive the correlation curve. In addition, the effects of the fluid viscosity and fluid pH on the fluorescence polarization degree are discussed to evaluate the influence of the quenching effects. The results showed that the fluorescence polarization is considerably less sensitive to the quenching factors as compared with the fluorescence intensity measurements. Furthermore, a strong linear correlation between the polarization degree and the fluid temperature was obtained. This relationship agreed well with the theoretical one qualitatively and confirmed the validity of the measurements and feasibility of the proposed method.

  10. One year of urban background fluorescent aerosol measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pope, Francis

    2016-04-01

    Online aerosol fluorescence is a popular methodology for detecting bioaerosols in the atmosphere. In recent years there has been considerable effort into refining the technique to be able to distinguish between different bioaerosol classes such as pollen, spores and bacteria. A near continuous record of aerosol fluorescence measurements has been recorded at an urban background observation site in Birmingham, UK for the year 2015. Fluorescence measurements were performed using the Biral aerosol fluorescence spectrometer (AFS) which measures both UV and visible fluorescence resulting from the excitation of aerosol particles at 280 nm. Speciation of the fluorescent particles into different bioaerosol class is possible with the AFS but the lack of particle sizing makes the task difficult compared to other techniques. In addition to the fluorescence measurements, further campaign mode measurements were also generated for size segregated total particle numbers, ozone, nitrogen oxides and other chemical species. These measurements allow for the influence of road traffic on the concentration of fluorescent particle to be determined. This presentation will provide an in depth look into how bioaerosol concentrations and speciation (pollen, spores and bacteria) change throughout the year. These changes will be linked to local and regional meteorology and climate. In particular, the consequences of the unusually warm UK winter upon bioaerosol concentrations will be highlighted.

  11. SIMULTANEOUS MEASUREMENT OF CIRCULAR DICHROISM AND FLUORESCENCE POLARIZATION ANISOTROPY.

    SciTech Connect

    SUTHERLAND,J.C.

    2002-01-19

    Circular dichroism and fluorescence polarization anisotropy are important tools for characterizing biomolecular systems. Both are used extensively in kinetic experiments involving stopped- or continuous flow systems as well as titrations and steady-state spectroscopy. This paper presents the theory for determining circular dichroism and fluorescence polarization anisotropy simultaneously, thus insuring the two parameters are recorded under exactly the same conditions and at exactly the same time in kinetic experiments. The approach to measuring circular dichroism is that used in almost all conventional dichrographs. Two arrangements for measuring fluorescence polarization anisotropy are described. One uses a single fluorescence detector and signal processing with a lock-in amplifier that is similar to the measurement of circular dichroism. The second approach uses classic ''T'' format detection optics, and thus can be used with conventional photon-counting detection electronics. Simple extensions permit the simultaneous measurement of the absorption and excitation intensity corrected fluorescence intensity.

  12. Laser-fluorescence measurement of marine algae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Browell, E. V.

    1980-01-01

    Progress in remote sensing of algae by laser-induced fluorescence is subject of comprehensive report. Existing single-wavelength and four-wavelength systems are reviewed, and new expression for power received by airborne sensor is derived. Result differs by as much as factor of 10 from those previously reported. Detailed error analysis evluates factors affecting accuracy of laser-fluorosensor systems.

  13. Intracellular distribution of fluorescent copper and zinc bis(thiosemicarbazonato) complexes measured with fluorescence lifetime spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Hickey, James L; James, Janine L; Henderson, Clare A; Price, Katherine A; Mot, Alexandra I; Buncic, Gojko; Crouch, Peter J; White, Jonathan M; White, Anthony R; Smith, Trevor A; Donnelly, Paul S

    2015-10-05

    The intracellular distribution of fluorescently labeled copper and zinc bis(thiosemicarbazonato) complexes was investigated in M17 neuroblastoma cells and primary cortical neurons with a view to providing insights into the neuroprotective activity of a copper bis(thiosemicarbazonato) complex known as Cu(II)(atsm). Time-resolved fluorescence measurements allowed the identification of the Cu(II) and Zn(II) complexes as well as the free ligand inside the cells by virtue of the distinct fluorescence lifetime of each species. Confocal fluorescent microscopy of cells treated with the fluorescent copper(II)bis(thiosemicarbazonato) complex revealed significant fluorescence associated with cytoplasmic puncta that were identified to be lysosomes in primary cortical neurons and both lipid droplets and lysosomes in M17 neuroblastoma cells. Fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy confirmed that the fluorescence signal emanating from the lipid droplets could be attributed to the copper(II) complex but also that some degree of loss of the metal ion led to diffuse cytosolic fluorescence that could be attributed to the metal-free ligand. The accumulation of the copper(II) complex in lipid droplets could be relevant to the neuroprotective activity of Cu(II)(atsm) in models of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and Parkinson's disease.

  14. Gravitational depolarization of ultracold neutrons: Comparison with data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afach, S.; Ayres, N. J.; Baker, C. A.; Ban, G.; Bison, G.; Bodek, K.; Fertl, M.; Franke, B.; Geltenbort, P.; Green, K.; Griffith, W. C.; van der Grinten, M.; Grujić, Z. D.; Harris, P. G.; Heil, W.; Hélaine, V.; Iaydjiev, P.; Ivanov, S. N.; Kasprzak, M.; Kermaidic, Y.; Kirch, K.; Koch, H.-C.; Komposch, S.; Kozela, A.; Krempel, J.; Lauss, B.; Lefort, T.; Lemière, Y.; Musgrave, M.; Naviliat-Cuncic, O.; Pendlebury, J. M.; Piegsa, F. M.; Pignol, G.; Plonka-Spehr, C.; Prashanth, P. N.; Quéméner, G.; Rawlik, M.; Rebreyend, D.; Ries, D.; Roccia, S.; Rozpedzik, D.; Schmidt-Wellenburg, P.; Severijns, N.; Shiers, D.; Thorne, J. A.; Weis, A.; Wursten, E.; Zejma, J.; Zenner, J.; Zsigmond, G.

    2015-09-01

    We compare the expected effects of so-called gravitationally enhanced depolarization of ultracold neutrons to measurements carried out in a spin-precession chamber exposed to a variety of vertical magnetic-field gradients. In particular, we have investigated the dependence upon these field gradients of spin-depolarization rates and also of shifts in the measured neutron Larmor precession frequency. We find excellent qualitative agreement, with gravitationally enhanced depolarization accounting for several previously unexplained features in the data.

  15. Double-excitation fluorescence spectral imaging: eliminating tissue auto-fluorescence from in vivo PPIX measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torosean, Sason; Flynn, Brendan; Samkoe, Kimberley S.; Davis, Scott C.; Gunn, Jason; Axelsson, Johan; Pogue, Brian W.

    2012-02-01

    An ultrasound coupled handheld-probe-based optical fluorescence molecular tomography (FMT) system has been in development for the purpose of quantifying the production of Protoporphyrin IX (PPIX) in aminolevulinic acid treated (ALA), Basal Cell Carcinoma (BCC) in vivo. The design couples fiber-based spectral sampling of PPIX fluorescence emission with a high frequency ultrasound imaging system, allowing regionally localized fluorescence intensities to be quantified [1]. The optical data are obtained by sequential excitation of the tissue with a 633nm laser, at four source locations and five parallel detections at each of the five interspersed detection locations. This method of acquisition permits fluorescence detection for both superficial and deep locations in ultrasound field. The optical boundary data, tissue layers segmented from ultrasound image and diffusion theory are used to estimate the fluorescence in tissue layers. To improve the recovery of the fluorescence signal of PPIX, eliminating tissue autofluorescence is of great importance. Here the approach was to utilize measurements which straddled the steep Qband excitation peak of PPIX, via the integration of an additional laser source, exciting at 637 nm; a wavelength with a 2 fold lower PPIX excitation value than 633nm.The auto-fluorescence spectrum acquired from the 637 nm laser is then used to spectrally decouple the fluorescence data and produce an accurate fluorescence emission signal, because the two wavelengths have very similar auto-fluorescence but substantially different PPIX excitation levels. The accuracy of this method, using a single source detector pair setup, is verified through animal tumor model experiments, and the result is compared to different methods of fluorescence signal recovery.

  16. Practical aspects of measuring intracellular calcium signals with fluorescent indicators.

    PubMed

    Kao, Joseph P Y; Li, Gong; Auston, Darryl A

    2010-01-01

    The use of fluorescent indicators for monitoring calcium (Ca(2+)) signals and for measuring Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]) in living cells is described. The following topics are covered in detail: (1) ratiometric and nonratiometric fluorescent indicators and the principles underlying their use, (2) techniques for loading Ca(2+) indicators and Ca(2+) buffers into living cells, (3) calibration of indicator fluorescence intensity measurements to yield values of intracellular [Ca(2+)], (4) analysis of nonratiometric fluorescence intensity data and caveats relating to their interpretation, (5) techniques for manipulating intracellular and extracellular [Ca(2+)], and (6) the use of fluorescent indicators to monitor Ca(2+) signals in mitochondria. The chapter aims to present these fundamental topics in a manner that is practically useful and intuitively accessible. The origins of key mathematical equations used in the article are outlined in two appendices.

  17. Multiparameter analysis of a screen for progesterone receptor ligands: comparing fluorescence lifetime and fluorescence polarization measurements.

    PubMed

    Marks, Bryan D; Qadir, Naveeda; Eliason, Hildegard C; Shekhani, Mohammed Saleh; Doering, Klaus; Vogel, Kurt W

    2005-12-01

    Direct measurement of the fluorescence lifetime (FLT) of a fluorescent label is an emerging method for high-throughput screening. Changes in the fluorescence lifetime can be correlated to changes in the non-radiative relaxation pathway(s) for the excited state of the label. These pathways can be environmentally sensitive, such as when a labeled analyte is free in solution versus bound to a receptor. Because lifetime is an intrinsic property of a fluorophore, it is not concentration dependent, and therefore has advantages similar to those of ratiometric fluorescent techniques such as fluorescence resonance energy transfer or fluorescence polarization. We have applied the FLT measurement technique to a screen of a small compound library in order to identify compounds that bind to the progesterone receptor, and compared the results to those obtained by performing the assay in fluorescence polarization mode. Each readout modality showed excellent Z'; values, with the FLT readout performing slightly better in this respect. Interfering compounds could be rapidly identified for either assay format by comparing the results between the two formats.

  18. System and method for measuring fluorescence of a sample

    DOEpatents

    Riot, Vincent J

    2015-03-24

    The present disclosure provides a system and a method for measuring fluorescence of a sample. The sample may be a polymerase-chain-reaction (PCR) array, a loop-mediated-isothermal amplification array, etc. LEDs are used to excite the sample, and a photodiode is used to collect the sample's fluorescence. An electronic offset signal is used to reduce the effects of background fluorescence and the noises from the measurement system. An integrator integrates the difference between the output of the photodiode and the electronic offset signal over a given period of time. The resulting integral is then converted into digital domain for further processing and storage.

  19. Finding of Optimal Calcium Ion Probes for Fluorescence Lifetime Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshiki, Keisuke; Azuma, Hiroki; Yoshioka, Kazuhiko; Hashimoto, Mamoru; Araki, Tsutomu

    We have investigated the fluorescence lifetime properties of 8 calcium ion probes, calcium-green-1, calcium green-2, calcium green-5N, calcium orange, oregon green 488 BAPTA-6F, fluo-3, fluo-4, and fluo-5N. We found that the decay time of calcium green-5N varied more sensitively with calcium concentration than calcium green-1 which was known to be a highly sensitive probe. We have also found that the center of observable range of calcium concentration by fluorescence lifetime measurement is lower than that by fluorescence intensity measurement.

  20. System and method for measuring fluorescence of a sample

    DOEpatents

    Riot, Vincent J.

    2017-06-27

    The present disclosure provides a system and a method for measuring fluorescence of a sample. The sample may be a polymerase-chain-reaction (PCR) array, a loop-mediated-isothermal amplification array, etc. LEDs are used to excite the sample, and a photodiode is used to collect the sample's fluorescence. An electronic offset signal is used to reduce the effects of background fluorescence and the noises from the measurement system. An integrator integrates the difference between the output of the photodiode and the electronic offset signal over a given period of time. The resulting integral is then converted into digital domain for further processing and storage.

  1. Models of fluorescence and photosynthesis for interpreting measurements of solar-induced chlorophyll fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Tol, C.; Berry, J. A.; Campbell, P. K. E.; Rascher, U.

    2014-12-01

    We have extended a conventional photosynthesis model to simulate field and laboratory measurements of chlorophyll fluorescence at the leaf scale. The fluorescence paramaterization is based on a close nonlinear relationship between the relative light saturation of photosynthesis and nonradiative energy dissipation in plants of different species. This relationship diverged only among examined data sets under stressed (strongly light saturated) conditions, possibly caused by differences in xanthophyll pigment concentrations. The relationship was quantified after analyzing data sets of pulse amplitude modulated measurements of chlorophyll fluorescence and gas exchange of leaves of different species exposed to different levels of light, CO2, temperature, nitrogen fertilization treatments, and drought. We used this relationship in a photosynthesis model. The coupled model enabled us to quantify the relationships between steady state chlorophyll fluorescence yield, electron transport rate, and photosynthesis in leaves under different environmental conditions.

  2. Models of fluorescence and photosynthesis for interpreting measurements of solar-induced chlorophyll fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tol, C.; Berry, J. A.; Campbell, P. K. E.; Rascher, U.

    2014-12-01

    We have extended a conventional photosynthesis model to simulate field and laboratory measurements of chlorophyll fluorescence at the leaf scale. The fluorescence paramaterization is based on a close nonlinear relationship between the relative light saturation of photosynthesis and nonradiative energy dissipation in plants of different species. This relationship diverged only among examined data sets under stressed (strongly light saturated) conditions, possibly caused by differences in xanthophyll pigment concentrations. The relationship was quantified after analyzing data sets of pulse amplitude modulated measurements of chlorophyll fluorescence and gas exchange of leaves of different species exposed to different levels of light, CO2, temperature, nitrogen fertilization treatments, and drought. We used this relationship in a photosynthesis model. The coupled model enabled us to quantify the relationships between steady state chlorophyll fluorescence yield, electron transport rate, and photosynthesis in leaves under different environmental conditions.

  3. Optical and microphysical characterization of aerosol layers over South Africa by means of multi-wavelength depolarization and Raman lidar measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giannakaki, Elina; van Zyl, Pieter G.; Müller, Detlef; Balis, Dimitris; Komppula, Mika

    2016-07-01

    Optical and microphysical properties of different aerosol types over South Africa measured with a multi-wavelength polarization Raman lidar are presented. This study could assist in bridging existing gaps relating to aerosol properties over South Africa, since limited long-term data of this type are available for this region. The observations were performed under the framework of the EUCAARI campaign in Elandsfontein. The multi-wavelength PollyXT Raman lidar system was used to determine vertical profiles of the aerosol optical properties, i.e. extinction and backscatter coefficients, Ångström exponents, lidar ratio and depolarization ratio. The mean microphysical aerosol properties, i.e. effective radius and single-scattering albedo, were retrieved with an advanced inversion algorithm. Clear differences were observed for the intensive optical properties of atmospheric layers of biomass burning and urban/industrial aerosols. Our results reveal a wide range of optical and microphysical parameters for biomass burning aerosols. This indicates probable mixing of biomass burning aerosols with desert dust particles, as well as the possible continuous influence of urban/industrial aerosol load in the region. The lidar ratio at 355 nm, the lidar ratio at 532 nm, the linear particle depolarization ratio at 355 nm and the extinction-related Ångström exponent from 355 to 532 nm were 52 ± 7 sr, 41 ± 13 sr, 0.9 ± 0.4 % and 2.3 ± 0.5, respectively, for urban/industrial aerosols, while these values were 92 ± 10 sr, 75 ± 14 sr, 3.2 ± 1.3 % and 1.7 ± 0.3, respectively, for biomass burning aerosol layers. Biomass burning particles are larger and slightly less absorbing compared to urban/industrial aerosols. The particle effective radius were found to be 0.10 ± 0.03, 0.17 ± 0.04 and 0.13 ± 0.03 µm for urban/industrial, biomass burning, and mixed aerosols, respectively, while the single-scattering albedo at 532 nm was 0.87 ± 0.06, 0.90 ± 0.06, and 0.88 ± 0.07 (at 532

  4. Optical and microphysical characterization of aerosol layers over South Africa by means of multi-wavelength depolarization and Raman lidar measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giannakaki, E.; van Zyl, P. G.; Müller, D.; Balis, D.; Komppula, M.

    2015-12-01

    Optical and microphysical properties of different aerosol types over South Africa measured with a multi-wavelength polarization Raman lidar are presented. This study could assist in bridging existing gaps relating to aerosol properties over South Africa, since limited long-term data of this type is available for this region. The observations were performed under the framework of the EUCAARI campaign in Elandsfontein. The multi-wavelength PollyXT Raman lidar system was used to determine vertical profiles of the aerosol optical properties, i.e. extinction and backscatter coefficients, Ångström exponents, lidar ratio and depolarization ratio. The mean microphysical aerosol proper ties, i.e. effective radius and single scattering, albedo were retrieved with an advanced inversion algorithm. Clear differences were observed for the intensive optical properties of atmospheric layers of biomass burning and urban/industrial aerosols. Our results reveal a wide range of optical and microphysical parameters for biomass burning aerosols. This indicates probable mixing of biomass burning aerosols with desert dust particles, as well as the possible continuous influence of urban/industrial aerosol load in the region. The lidar ratio at 355 nm, the linear particle depolarization ratio at 355 nm and the extinction-related Ångström exponent from 355 to 532 nm were 52 ± 7 sr; 0.9 ± 0.4 % and 2.3 ± 0.5, respectively for urban/industrial aerosols, while these values were 92 ± 10 sr; 3.2 ± 1.3 %; 2.0 ± 0.4 respectively for biomass burning aerosols layers. Biomass burning particles are larger and slightly less absorbing compared to urban/industrial aerosols. The particle effective radius were found to be 0.10 ± 0.03, 0.17 ± 0.04 and 0.13 ± 0.03 μm for urban/industrial, biomass burning, and mixed biomass burning and desert dust aerosols, respectively, while the single scattering albedo at 532 nm were 0.87 ± 0.06, 0.90 ± 0.06, and 0.88 ± 0.07 (at 532 nm), respectively for

  5. Effect of pre-ischaemic conditioning on hypoxic depolarization of dopamine efflux in the rat caudate brain slice measured in real-time with fast cyclic voltammetry.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Colin; Coomber, Ben; Gibson, Claire L; Young, Andrew M J

    2011-10-01

    Fast cyclic voltammetry can be used to measure dopamine release after oxygen and glucose deprivation (OGD) induced anoxic depolarization in vitro. Here we measure dopamine efflux with 1s time resolution, which is appropriate to measure OGD-evoked dopamine efflux accurately. In the present study, we examined whether OGD-evoked dopamine efflux could be used to show pre-ischaemic conditioning in the rat caudate brain slice. Caudate slices were exposed to 0, 2, or 10 min OGD pre-ischaemic conditioning, then 60 min later exposed to a second OGD event of 15 min duration. We measured the OGD-evoked dopamine efflux using fast cyclic voltammetry and in some experiments caudate dopamine and DOPAC tissue levels were measured using HPLC and 20 μm cryostat sections were Nissl stained to indicate neuronal loss. We found that 10 but not 2 min OGD pre-ischaemic conditioning resulted in a longer time to onset of OGD-evoked dopamine efflux on the main OGD event (475 ± 31 and 287 ± 30 s for 10 Vs 0 min pre-ischaemic conditioning respectively). Further, 10 min OGD pre-ischaemic conditioning resulted in less dopamine efflux on the second OGD event (4.23 ± 1.12 and 8.14 ± 0.82 μM for 10 Vs 0 min pre-ischaemic conditioning respectively), despite these slices having similar tissue dopamine content and DOPAC/DA ratio, and the rate of dopamine release was slower in the main OGD event (21 ± 5 and 74 ± 8 nM/s for 10 Vs 0 min pre-ischaemic conditioning respectively). These data suggest that 10 min OGD pre-ischaemic conditioning can evoke tolerance to a second OGD event and that voltammetric recording of OGD-evoked dopamine efflux is a useful model of pre-ischaemic conditioning in neuronal tissue.

  6. Fluorescence cross section measurements of biological agent simulants

    SciTech Connect

    Stephens, J.R.

    1996-11-01

    Fluorescence is a powerful technique that has potential uses in detection and characterization of biological aerosols both in the battlefield and in civilian environments. Fluorescence techniques can be used with ultraviolet (UV) light detection and ranging (LIDAR) equipment to detect biological aerosol clouds at a distance, to provide early warning of a biological attack, and to track an potentially noxious cloud. Fluorescence can also be used for detection in a point sensor to monitor biological materials and to distinguish agents from benign aerosols. This work is part of a continuing program by the Army`s Chemical and Biological Defense Command to characterized the optical properties of biological agents. Reported here are ultraviolet fluorescence measurements of Bacillus megaterium and Bacillus Globigii aerosols suspended in an electrodynamic particle trap. Fluorescence spectra of a common atmospheric aerosol, pine pollen, are also presented.

  7. Laser-saturated fluorescence measurements in laminar sooting diffusion flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wey, Changlie

    1993-01-01

    The hydroxyl radical is known to be one of the most important intermediate species in the combustion processes. The hydroxyl radical has also been considered a dominant oxidizer of soot particles in flames. In this investigation the hydroxyl concentration profiles in sooting diffusion flames were measured by the laser-saturated fluorescence (LSF) method. The temperature distributions in the flames were measured by the two-line LSF technique and by thermocouple. In the sooting region the OH fluorescence was too weak to make accurate temperature measurements. The hydroxyl fluorescence profiles for all four flames presented herein show that the OH fluorescence intensities peaked near the flame front. The OH fluorescence intensity dropped sharply toward the dark region of the flame and continued declining to the sooting region. The OH fluorescence profiles also indicate that the OH fluorescence decreased with increasing height in the flames for all flames investigated. Varying the oxidizer composition resulted in a corresponding variation in the maximum OH concentration and the flame temperature. Furthermore, it appears that the maximum OH concentration for each flame increased with increasing flame temperature.

  8. Measurement of the fluorescence quantum yield of bis-MSB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Xue-Feng; Wen, Liang-Jian; Zhou, Xiang; Ding, Ya-Yun; Ye, Xing-Chen; Zhou, Li; Liu, Meng-Chao; Cai, Hao; Cao, Jun

    2015-12-01

    The fluorescence quantum yield of bis-MSB, a widely used liquid scintillator wavelength shifter, was measured to study the photon absorption and re-emission processes in a liquid scintillator. The re-emission process affects the photoelectron yield and distribution, especially in a large liquid scintillator detector, thus must be understood to optimize the liquid scintillator for good energy resolution and to precisely simulate the detector with Monte Carlo. In this study, solutions of different bis-MSB concentration were prepared for absorption and fluorescence emission measurements to cover a broad range of wavelengths. Harmane was used as a standard reference to obtain the absolution fluorescence quantum yield. For the first time we measured the fluorescence quantum yield of bis-MSB up to 430 nm as inputs required by Monte Carlo simulation, which is 0.926±0.053 at λex=350 nm. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11205183, 11225525, 11390381)

  9. Spin rotation and depolarization of high-energy particles in crystals at LHC and FCC energies. The possibility to measure the anomalous magnetic moments of short-lived particles and quadrupole moment of Ω -hyperon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baryshevsky, V. G.

    2017-07-01

    The phenomena of spin rotation and depolarization of high-energy particles in crystals in the range of high energies that will be available at Hadron Collider (LHC) and Future Circular Collider (FCC) provides a unique possibility of measuring the anomalous magnetic moment of charged and neutral charm and beauty hyperons and quadrupole moment of Ω -hyperon. Crystals with polarized nuclei give opportunities for measuring spin-dependent interactions of short lived particles with nuclei and measurement of a particle polarization.

  10. Measurement of Sun Induced Chlorophyll Fluorescence Using Hyperspectral Satellite Imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irteza, S. M.; Nichol, J. E.

    2016-06-01

    Solar Induced Chlorophyll Fluorescence (SIF), can be used as an indicator of stress in vegetation. Several scientific approaches have been made and there is considerable evidence that steady state Chlorophyll fluorescence is an accurate indicator of plant stress hence a reliable tool to monitor vegetation health status. Retrieval of Chlorophyll fluorescence provides an insight into photochemical and carbon sequestration processes within vegetation. Detection of Chlorophyll fluorescence has been well understood in the laboratory and field measurement. Fluorescence retrieval methods were applied in and around the atmospheric absorption bands 02B (Red wavelength) approximately 690 nm and 02A (Far red wavelengths) 740 nm. Hyperion satellite images were acquired for the years 2012 to 2015 in different seasons. Atmospheric corrections were applied using the 6S Model. The Fraunhofer Line Discrimanator (FLD) method was applied for retrieval of SIF from the Hyperion images by measuring the signal around the absorption bands in both vegetated and non vegetated land cover types. Absorption values were extracted in all the selected bands and the fluorescence signal was detected. The relationships between NDVI and Fluorescence derived from the satellite images are investigated to understand vegetation response within the absorption bands.

  11. Measurement of changes in cell volume based on fluorescence quenching

    PubMed Central

    SRINIVAS, S. P.; BONANNO, JOSEPH A.

    2014-01-01

    The intracellular fluorescence of 6-methoxy-N-(3-sulfopropyl)- quinolinium (SPQ), a Cl−-sensitive fluorescent dye, is quenched by intracellular organic anions and proteins of unknown identity. The concentration of these intracellular quenchers (ICQs), however, is dependent on cell volume. In the absence of Cl−, changes in the observed SPQ fluorescence may therefore reflect changes in cell volume. This concept has been applied to determine relative changes in cell volume of cultured corneal endothelium in response to anisosmotic shocks, using NO3− as the Cl− substituent. SPQ fluorescence increased with decreasing osmolarity and vice versa. A 20 mosM hypertonic shock was needed to detect a change in SPQ fluorescence with a signal-to-noise ratio of >25. Assuming dynamic quenching by ICQs, we applied an extension of the Stern-Volmer equation to develop a simple relationship between the measured SPQ fluorescence and relative changes in cell volume. For large hyposmotic shocks, regulatory volume decrease (RVD) was observed. The rate of RVD could be enhanced by exposure to 0.5 μM gramicidin in low-Na+ Ringer solution (i.e., K+­NO3− efflux), indicating that K+ conductance is rate limiting for RVD. These results demonstrate the principle of using fluorescence quenching to measure changes in cell volume in real time. Because SPQ is sensitive to Cl−, its usefulness as a quenching probe is limited. However, a structure-activity study can be expected to yield useful Cl−-insensitive analogs. PMID:12937987

  12. Multiple scattering effects on the Linear Depolarization Ratio (LDR) measured during CaPE by a Ka-band air-borne radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iguchi, Toshio; Meneghini, Robert

    1993-01-01

    Air-borne radar measurements of thunderstorms were made as part of the CaPE (Convection and Precipitation/Electrification) experiment in Florida in July 1991. The radar has two channels, X-band (10 GHz) and Ka-band (34.5 GHz), and is capable of measuring cross-polarized returns as well as co-polarized returns. In stratiform rain, the cross-polarized components can be observed only at the bright band region and from the surface reflection. The linear depolarization ratios (LDR's) measured at X-band and Ka-band at the bright band are nearly equal. In convective rain, however, the LDR in Ka-band often exceeds the X-band LDR by several dB, and sometimes by more than 10 dB, reaching LDR values of up to -5 dB over heavy convective rain. For randomly oriented hydrometeors, such high LDR values cannot be explained by single scattering from non-spherical scattering particles alone. Because the LDR by single backscatter depends weakly on the wavelength, the difference between the Ka-band and X-band LDR's suggests that multiple scattering effects prevail in the Ka-band LDR. In order to test this inference, the magnitude of the cross-polarized component created by double scattering was calculated using the parameters of the airborne radar, which for both frequencies has beamwidths of 5.1 degrees and pulse widths of 0.5 microsecond. Uniform rain beyond the range of 3 km is assumed.

  13. X-ray fluorescence measurements of dissolved gas and cavitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duke, Daniel J.; Kastengren, Alan L.; Swantek, Andrew B.; Matusik, Katarzyna E.; Powell, Christopher F.

    2016-10-01

    The dynamics of dissolved gas and cavitation are strongly coupled, yet these phenomena are difficult to measure in-situ. Both create voids in the fluid that can be difficult to distinguish. We present an application of X-ray fluorescence in which liquid density and total noncondensible gas concentration (both dissolved and nucleated) are simultaneously measured. The liquid phase is doped with 400 ppm of a bromine tracer, and dissolved air is removed and substituted with krypton. Fluorescent emission at X-ray wavelengths is simultaneously excited from the Br and Kr with a focused monochromatic X-ray beam from a synchrotron source. We measure the flow in a cavitating nozzle 0.5 mm in diameter. From Br fluorescence, total displacement of the liquid is measured. From Kr fluorescence, the mass fraction of both dissolved and nucleated gas is measured. Volumetric displacement of liquid due to both cavitation and gas precipitation can be separated through estimation of the local equilibrium dissolved mass fraction. The uncertainty in the line of sight projected densities of the liquid and gas phases is 4-6 %. The high fluorescence yields and energies of Br and Kr allow small mass fractions of gas to be measured, down to 10-5, with an uncertainty of 8 %. These quantitative measurements complement existing optical diagnostic techniques and provide new insight into the diffusion of gas into cavitation bubbles, which can increase their internal density, pressure and lifetimes by orders of magnitude.

  14. X-ray fluorescence measurements of dissolved gas and cavitation

    SciTech Connect

    Duke, Daniel J.; Kastengren, Alan L.; Swantek, Andrew B.; Matusik, Katarzyna E; Powell, Christopher F.

    2016-09-28

    The dynamics of dissolved gas and cavitation are strongly coupled, yet these phenomena are difficult to measure in-situ. Both create voids in the fluid that can be difficult to distinguish. In this paper, we present an application of X-ray fluorescence in which liquid density and total noncondensible gas concentration (both dissolved and nucleated) are simultaneously measured. The liquid phase is doped with 400 ppm of a bromine tracer, and dissolved air is removed and substituted with krypton. Fluorescent emission at X-ray wavelengths is simultaneously excited from the Br and Kr with a focused monochromatic X-ray beam from a synchrotron source. We measure the flow in a cavitating nozzle 0.5 mm in diameter. From Br fluorescence, total displacement of the liquid is measured. From Kr fluorescence, the mass fraction of both dissolved and nucleated gas is measured. Volumetric displacement of liquid due to both cavitation and gas precipitation can be separated through estimation of the local equilibrium dissolved mass fraction. The uncertainty in the line of sight projected densities of the liquid and gas phases is 4–6 %. The high fluorescence yields and energies of Br and Kr allow small mass fractions of gas to be measured, down to 10-5, with an uncertainty of 8 %. Finally, these quantitative measurements complement existing optical diagnostic techniques and provide new insight into the diffusion of gas into cavitation bubbles, which can increase their internal density, pressure and lifetimes by orders of magnitude.

  15. X-ray fluorescence measurements of dissolved gas and cavitation

    SciTech Connect

    Duke, Daniel J.; Kastengren, Alan L.; Swantek, Andrew B.; Matusik, Katarzyna E.; Powell, Christopher F.

    2016-09-28

    The dynamics of dissolved gas and cavitation are strongly coupled, yet these phenomena are difficult to measure in-situ. Both create voids in the fluid that can be difficult to distinguish. In this paper, we present an application of X-ray fluorescence in which liquid density and total noncondensible gas concentration (both dissolved and nucleated) are simultaneously measured. The liquid phase is doped with 400 ppm of a bromine tracer, and dissolved air is removed and substituted with krypton. Fluorescent emission at X-ray wavelengths is simultaneously excited from the Br and Kr with a focused monochromatic X-ray beam from a synchrotron source. We measure the flow in a cavitating nozzle 0.5 mm in diameter. From Br fluorescence, total displacement of the liquid is measured. From Kr fluorescence, the mass fraction of both dissolved and nucleated gas is measured. Volumetric displacement of liquid due to both cavitation and gas precipitation can be separated through estimation of the local equilibrium dissolved mass fraction. The uncertainty in the line of sight projected densities of the liquid and gas phases is 4–6 %. The high fluorescence yields and energies of Br and Kr allow small mass fractions of gas to be measured, down to 10-5, with an uncertainty of 8 %. Finally, these quantitative measurements complement existing optical diagnostic techniques and provide new insight into the diffusion of gas into cavitation bubbles, which can increase their internal density, pressure and lifetimes by orders of magnitude.

  16. Spreading depolarization monitoring in neurocritical care of acute brain injury.

    PubMed

    Hartings, Jed A

    2017-04-01

    Spreading depolarizations are unique in being discrete pathologic entities that are well characterized experimentally and also occur commonly in patients with substantial acute brain injury. Here, we review essential concepts in depolarization monitoring, highlighting its clinical significance, interpretation, and future potential. Cortical lesion development in diverse animal models is mediated by tissue waves of mass spreading depolarization that cause the toxic loss of ion homeostasis and limit energy substrate supply through associated vasoconstriction. The signatures of such deterioration are observed in electrocorticographic recordings from perilesional cortex of patients with acute stroke or brain trauma. Experimental work suggests that depolarizations are triggered by energy supply-demand mismatch in focal hotspots of the injury penumbra, and depolarizations are usually observed clinically when other monitoring variables are within recommended ranges. These results suggest that depolarizations are a sensitive measure of relative ischemia and ongoing secondary injury, and may serve as a clinical guide for personalized, mechanistically targeted therapy. Both existing and future candidate therapies offer hope to limit depolarization recurrence. Electrocorticographic monitoring of spreading depolarizations in patients with acute brain injury provides a sensitive measure of relative energy shortage in focal, vulnerable brains regions and indicates ongoing secondary damage. Depolarization monitoring holds potential for targeted clinical trial design and implementation of precision medicine approaches to acute brain injury therapy.

  17. Collisional depolarization of OH(A) with Ar: Experiment and theory.

    PubMed

    Brouard, M; Bryant, A; Chang, Y-P; Cireasa, R; Eyles, C J; Green, A M; Marinakis, S; Aoiz, F J; Kłos, J

    2009-01-28

    Zeeman quantum beat spectroscopy has been used to measure the 300 K rate constants for the angular momentum depolarization of OH(A (2)Sigma(+)) in the presence of Ar. We show that the beat amplitude at short times, in the absence of collisions, is well described by previously developed line strength theory for (1+1) laser induced fluorescence. The subsequent pressure dependent decay of the beat amplitude is used to extract depolarization rate constants and estimates of collisional depolarization cross sections. Depolarization accompanies both inelastic collisions, giving rise to rotational energy transfer, and elastic collisions, which change m(j) but conserve j. Previous experimental studies, as well as classical theory, suggest that elastic scattering contributes around 20% to the observed total depolarization rate at low j. Simulation of the experimental beat amplitudes, using theoretical calculations presented in the preceding paper, reveals that depolarization of OH(A) by Ar has a rate constant comparable to, if not larger than, that for energy transfer. This is consistent with a significant tilting or realignment of j(') away from j on collision. The experimental data are used to provide a detailed test of quantum mechanical and quasiclassical trajectory scattering calculations performed on a recently developed ab initio potential energy surface of Kłos et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 129, 054301 (2008)]. The calculations and simulations account well for the observed cross sections at high N, but underestimate the experimental results by between 10% and 20% at low N, possibly due to remaining inaccuracies in the potential energy surface or perhaps to limitations in the dynamical approximations made, particularly the freezing of the OH(A) bond.

  18. Integrating fluorescence and interactance measurements to improve apple maturity assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noh, Hyun Kwon; Lu, Renfu

    2006-10-01

    Fluorescence and reflectance (or interactance) are promising techniques for measuring fruit quality and condition. Our previous research showed that a hyperspectral imaging technique integrating fluorescence and reflectance could improve predictions of selected quality parameters compared to single sensing techniques. The objective of this research was to use a low cost spectrometer for rapid acquisition of fluorescence and interactance spectra from apples and develop an algorithm integrating the two types of data for predicting skin and flesh color, fruit firmness, starch index, soluble solids content, and titratable acid. Experiments were performed to measure UV light induced transient fluorescence and interactance spectra from 'Golden Delicious' apples that were harvested over a period of four weeks during the 2005 harvest season. Standard destructive tests were performed to measure maturity parameters from the apples. Principal component (PC) analysis was applied to the interactance and fluorescence data. A back-propagation feedforward neural network with the inputs of PC data was used to predict individual maturity parameters. Interactance mode was consistently better than fluorescence mode in predicting the maturity parameters. Integrating interactance and fluorescence improved predictions of all parameters except flesh chroma; values of the correlation coefficient for firmness, soluble solids content, starch index, and skin and flesh hue were 0.77, 0.77, 0.89, 0.99, and 0.96 respectively, with the corresponding standard errors of 6.93 N, 0.90%, 0.97 g/L, 0.013 rad, and 0.013 rad. These results represented 4.1% to 23.5% improvements in terms of standard error, in comparison with the better results from the two single sensing methods. Integrating interactance and fluorescence can better assess apple maturity and quality.

  19. Molecular anisotropy effects in carbon K-edge scattering: depolarized diffuse scattering and optical anisotropy

    SciTech Connect

    Stone, Kevin H.

    2014-07-14

    Some polymer properties, such as conductivity, are very sensitive to short- and intermediate-range orientational and positional ordering of anisotropic molecular functional groups, and yet means to characterize orientational order in disordered systems are very limited. We demonstrate that resonant scattering at the carbon K-edge is uniquely sensitive to short-range orientation correlations in polymers through depolarized scattering at high momentum transfers, using atactic polystyrene as a well-characterized test system. Depolarized scattering is found to coexist with unpolarized fluorescence, and to exhibit pronounced anisotropy. We also quantify the spatially averaged optical anisotropy from low-angle reflectivity measurements, finding anisotropy consistent with prior visible, x-ray absorption, and theoretical studies. The average anisotropy is much smaller than that in the depolarized scattering and the two have different character. Both measurements exhibit clear spectral signatures from the phenyl rings and the polyethylene-like backbone. Discussion focuses on analysis considerations and prospects for using this depolarized scattering for studies of disorder in soft condensed matter.

  20. Molecular anisotropy effects in carbon K-edge scattering: Depolarized diffuse scattering and optical anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stone, Kevin H.; Kortright, Jeffrey B.

    2014-09-01

    Some polymer properties, such as conductivity, are very sensitive to short- and intermediate-range orientational and positional ordering of anisotropic molecular functional groups, and yet means to characterize orientational order in disordered systems are very limited. We demonstrate that resonant scattering at the carbon K edge is uniquely sensitive to short-range orientation correlations in polymers through depolarized scattering at high momentum transfers, using atactic polystyrene as a well-characterized test system. Depolarized scattering is found to coexist with unpolarized fluorescence and to exhibit pronounced anisotropy. We also quantify the spatially averaged optical anisotropy from low-angle reflectivity measurements, finding anisotropy consistent with prior visible, x-ray absorption, and theoretical studies. The average anisotropy is much smaller than that in the depolarized scattering and the two have different character. Both measurements exhibit clear spectral signatures from the phenyl rings and the polyethylenelike backbone. Discussion focuses on analysis considerations and prospects for using this depolarized scattering for studies of disorder in soft condensed matter.

  1. Fluorescent-Antibody Measurement Of Cancer-Cell Urokinase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, Dennis R.

    1993-01-01

    Combination of laboratory techniques provides measurements of amounts of urokinase in and between normal and cancer cells. Includes use of fluorescent antibodies specific against different forms of urokinase-type plasminogen activator, (uPA), fluorescence microscopy, quantitative analysis of images of sections of tumor tissue, and flow cytometry of different uPA's and deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) found in suspended-tumor-cell preparations. Measurements provide statistical method for indicating or predicting metastatic potentials of some invasive tumors. Assessments of metastatic potentials based on such measurements used in determining appropriate follow-up procedures after surgical removal of tumors.

  2. Fluorescent-Antibody Measurement Of Cancer-Cell Urokinase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, Dennis R.

    1993-01-01

    Combination of laboratory techniques provides measurements of amounts of urokinase in and between normal and cancer cells. Includes use of fluorescent antibodies specific against different forms of urokinase-type plasminogen activator, (uPA), fluorescence microscopy, quantitative analysis of images of sections of tumor tissue, and flow cytometry of different uPA's and deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) found in suspended-tumor-cell preparations. Measurements provide statistical method for indicating or predicting metastatic potentials of some invasive tumors. Assessments of metastatic potentials based on such measurements used in determining appropriate follow-up procedures after surgical removal of tumors.

  3. Breast cancer: in vitro measurements of native fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lohmann, Wolfgang; Bohle, Rainer M.; Dreyer, Thomas; Haas, Sabine; Wallenfels, Heike; Schwemmle, Konrad; Schill, Wolf-Bernhard

    1996-12-01

    Unfixed, HE stained cryosections of breast tissue obtained from 67 patients during surgery were illuminated with 395 - 440 nm and their fluorescence response as well as the 2- dimensional fluorophore distribution were measured. The histological evaluation of the same cryosection, illuminated as usual with a transmitted light obtained from a halogen lamp, revealed 9 patients with healthy tissue, 11 with benign epithelial hyperplasia, 4 with ductal carcinoma in situ, 35 with invasive ductal carcinoma, 7 with invasive lobular carcinoma, and one with invasive tubular carcinoma. A comparison between the fluorescence and the HE images shows that both match very nicely and that the fluorescence images are also characteristic for the different pathological condition of the biopsy sample. Moreover, benign tumors e.g. fibroadenomas, exhibit a fluorescence response different from cancer and healthy tissue.

  4. Measuring and interpreting X-ray fluorescence from planetary surfaces.

    PubMed

    Owens, Alan; Beckhoff, Burkhard; Fraser, George; Kolbe, Michael; Krumrey, Michael; Mantero, Alfonso; Mantler, Michael; Peacock, Anthony; Pia, Maria-Grazia; Pullan, Derek; Schneider, Uwe G; Ulm, Gerhard

    2008-11-15

    As part of a comprehensive study of X-ray emission from planetary surfaces and in particular the planet Mercury, we have measured fluorescent radiation from a number of planetary analog rock samples using monochromatized synchrotron radiation provided by the BESSY II electron storage ring. The experiments were carried out using a purpose built X-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectrometer chamber developed by the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Germany's national metrology institute. The XRF instrumentation is absolutely calibrated and allows for reference-free quantitation of rock sample composition, taking into account secondary photon- and electron-induced enhancement effects. The fluorescence data, in turn, have been used to validate a planetary fluorescence simulation tool based on the GEANT4 transport code. This simulation can be used as a mission analysis tool to predict the time-dependent orbital XRF spectral distributions from planetary surfaces throughout the mapping phase.

  5. Marine fluorescence from high spectrally resolved satellite measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolanin, Aleksandra; Dinter, Tilman; Rozanov, Vladimir; Noël, Stefan; Vountas, Marco; Burrows, John P.; Bracher, Astrid

    2014-05-01

    When chlorophyll molecules absorb light, most of this energy is transformed into chemical energy in a process of photosynthesis. However, a fraction of the energy absorbed is reemitted as fluorescence. As a result of its relationship to photosynthetic e?ciency, information about chlorophyll fluorescence can be used to assess the physiological state of phytoplankton (Falkowski and Kolber,1995). In-situ measurements of chlorophyll fluorescence are widespread in physiological and ecophysiological studies. When retrieved from space, chlorophyll fluorescence can improve our knowledge of global biogeochemical cycles and phytoplankton productivity (Behrenfeld et al., 2009; Huot et al., 2013) by providing high coverage and periodicity. So far, the only satellite retrieval of sun-induced marine fluorescence, Fluorescence Line Height (FLH), was designed for MODIS (Abbott and Letelier, 1999), and later also applied to the similar sensor MERIS (Gower et al., 2004). However, it could so far not be evaluated on global scale. Here, we present a different approach to observe marine chlorophyll fluorescence, based on the Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) technique (Perner and Platt, 1979) applied to the hyperspectral data from Scanning Imaging Absorption Spectrometer for Atmospheric Chartography (SCIAMACHY) and Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment-2 (GOME-2). Since fluorescence, as a trans-spectral process, leads to the shift of the wavelength of the radiation, it can be observed in the filling-in of Fraunhofer lines. In our retrieval, we evaluate the filling-in of the Zeeman triplet Fraunhofer line FeI at 684.3 nm, which is located very close to the emission peak of marine fluorescence (~685 nm). In order to conduct the chlorophyll fluorescence retrieval with the DOAS method, we calculated the reference spectra for chlorophyll fluorescence, based on simulations performed with the coupled ocean-atmosphere radiative transfer model SCIATRAN (Rozanov et al., 2014

  6. Fluorescence lifetime measurements of boronate derivatives to determine glucose concentration

    SciTech Connect

    Gable, J H

    2000-06-01

    A novel investigation into the fluorescence lifetimes of molecules, both established and newly designed, was performed. These molecules are the basis of a continuous, minimally invasive, glucose sensor based on fluorescence lifetime measurements. This sensor, if coupled with an automated insulin delivery device, would effectively create an artificial pancreas allowing for the constant monitoring and control of glucose levels in a person with diabetes. The proposed sensor includes a fluorescent molecule that changes its' fluorescence properties upon binding selectively and reversibly to glucose. One possible sensor molecule is N-methyl-N-(9-methylene anthryl)-2-methylenephenylboronic acid (AB). The fluorescence intensity of AB was shown to change in response to changing glucose concentrations. (James, 1994) James proposed that when glucose binds to AB the fluorescence intensity increases due to an enhancement of the N{yields}B dative bond which prevents photoinduced electron transfer (PET). PET from the amine (N) to the fluorophore (anthracene) quenches the fluorescence. The dative bond between the boron and the amine can prevent PET by involving the lone pair of electrons on the amine in interactions with the boron rather than allowing them to be transferred to the fluorophore. Results of this research show the average fluorescence lifetime of AB also changes with glucose concentration. It is proposed that fluorescence is due to two components: (1) AB with an enhanced N{yields}B interaction, and no PET, and (2) AB with a weak N{yields}B interaction, resulting in fluorescence quenching by PET. Lifetime measurements of AB as a function of both the pH of the solvent and glucose concentration in the solution were made to characterize this two component system and investigate the nature of the N{yields}B bond. Measurements of molecules similar to AB were also performed in order to isolate behavior of specific AB constituents. These molecules are 9-(Methylaminomethyl

  7. Biochip Image Grid Normalization Absolute Signal Fluorescence Measurement Using

    SciTech Connect

    Alferov, Oleg

    2001-04-17

    This software was developed to measure absolute fluorescent intensities of gel pads on a microchip in units defined by a standard fluorescent slide. It can accomodate varying measurement conditions (e.g. exposure time, sensitivity of detector, resolution of detector, etc.) as well as fluorescent microscopes with non-uniform sensitivity across their field of view allowing the user to compare measurements done on different detectors with varying exposure times, sensitivities, and resolutions. The software is designed both to operate Roper Scientific, Inc. cameras and to use image files produced by the program supplied with that equipment for its calculations. the intensity of the gel pad signal is computed so as to reduce background influence.

  8. Mercury mass measurement in fluorescent lamps via neutron activation analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viererbl, L.; Vinš, M.; Lahodová, Z.; Fuksa, A.; Kučera, J.; Koleška, M.; Voljanskij, A.

    2015-11-01

    Mercury is an essential component of fluorescent lamps. Not all fluorescent lamps are recycled, resulting in contamination of the environment with toxic mercury, making measurement of the mercury mass used in fluorescent lamps important. Mercury mass measurement of lamps via instrumental neutron activation analysis (NAA) was tested under various conditions in the LVR-15 research reactor. Fluorescent lamps were irradiated in different positions in vertical irradiation channels and a horizontal channel in neutron fields with total fluence rates from 3×108 cm-2 s-1 to 1014 cm-2 s-1. The 202Hg(n,γ)203Hg nuclear reaction was used for mercury mass evaluation. Activities of 203Hg and others induced radionuclides were measured via gamma spectrometry with an HPGe detector at various times after irradiation. Standards containing an Hg2Cl2 compound were used to determine mercury mass. Problems arise from the presence of elements with a large effective cross section in luminescent material (europium, antimony and gadolinium) and glass (boron). The paper describes optimization of the NAA procedure in the LVR-15 research reactor with particular attention to influence of neutron self-absorption in fluorescent lamps.

  9. Measurements of extrinsic fluorescence in Intralipid and polystyrene microspheres.

    PubMed

    Du Le, Vinh Nguyen; Nie, Zhaojun; Hayward, Joseph E; Farrell, Thomas J; Fang, Qiyin

    2014-08-01

    The fluorescence of Intralipid and polystyrene microspheres with sphere diameter of 1 µm at a representative lipid and microsphere concentration for simulation of mucosal tissue scattering has not been a subject of extensive experimental study. In order to elucidate the quantitative relationship between lipid and microsphere concentration and the respective fluorescent intensity, the extrinsic fluorescence spectra between 360 nm and 650 nm (step size of 5 nm) were measured at different lipid concentrations (from 0.25% to 5%) and different microsphere concentrations (0.00364, 0.0073, 0.0131 spheres per cubic micrometer) using laser excitation at 355 nm with pulse energy of 2.8 µJ. Current findings indicated that Intralipid has a broadband emission between 360 and 650 nm with a primary peak at 500 nm and a secondary peak at 450 nm while polystyrene microspheres have a single peak at 500 nm. In addition, for similar scattering properties the fluorescence of Intralipid solutions is approximately three-fold stronger than that of the microsphere solutions. Furthermore, Intralipid phantoms with lipid concentrations ~2% (simulating the bottom layer of mucosa) produce up to seven times stronger fluorescent emission than phantoms with lipid concentration ~0.25% (simulating the top layer of mucosa). The fluoresence decays of Intralipid and microsphere solutions were also recorded for estimation of fluorescence lifetime.

  10. Velocity measurements by laser resonance fluorescence. [single atom diffusional motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    She, C. Y.; Fairbank, W. M., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    The photonburst correlation method was used to detect single atoms in a buffer gas. Real time flow velocity measurements with laser induced resonance fluorescence from single or multiple atoms was demonstrated and this method was investigated as a tool for wind tunnel flow measurement. Investigations show that single atoms and their real time diffusional motion on a buffer gas can be measured by resonance fluorescence. By averaging over many atoms, flow velocities up to 88 m/s were measured in a time of 0.5 sec. It is expected that higher flow speeds can be measured and that the measurement time can be reduced by a factor of 10 or more by careful experimental design. The method is clearly not ready for incorporation in high speed wind tunnels because it is not yet known whether the stray light level will be higher or lower, and it is not known what detection efficiency can be obtained in a wind tunnel situation.

  11. Characterization of porous media by means of the depolarization metrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savenkov, S.; Priezzhev, A.; Oberemok, Ye.; Silfsten, P.; Ervasti, T.; Ketolainen, J.; Peiponen, K.-E.

    2012-12-01

    In this paper Mueller polarimetry is applied to study the samples with different porosity compacted from microcrystalline cellulose. We measure the whole Mueller matrices of the samples as a function of the incident angle at a wavelength of 632.8 nm. To quantify separability of the different porous samples based on differences in their Mueller matrix behavior we apply depolarization and anisotropy analysis to measured Mueller matrices by calculating parameters characterizing depolarization (depolarization index, Q(M)-metric, first and second Lorenz indices, Cloude and Lorenz entropy) and anisotropy (values and azimuths of phase and amplitude anisotropy) properties of a sample. The results show that anisotropy parameters are almost completely insensitive to the range of porosity at least at 632.8 nm. Whereas, all depolarization metrics considered are sensitive to the range of porosity. Most sensitive (not worst than 5%) among depolarization metrics are the Lorenz entropy and Q(M)-metric.

  12. X-ray fluorescence measurements of dissolved gas and cavitation

    DOE PAGES

    Duke, Daniel J.; Kastengren, Alan L.; Swantek, Andrew B.; ...

    2016-09-28

    The dynamics of dissolved gas and cavitation are strongly coupled, yet these phenomena are difficult to measure in-situ. Both create voids in the fluid that can be difficult to distinguish. In this paper, we present an application of X-ray fluorescence in which liquid density and total noncondensible gas concentration (both dissolved and nucleated) are simultaneously measured. The liquid phase is doped with 400 ppm of a bromine tracer, and dissolved air is removed and substituted with krypton. Fluorescent emission at X-ray wavelengths is simultaneously excited from the Br and Kr with a focused monochromatic X-ray beam from a synchrotron source.more » We measure the flow in a cavitating nozzle 0.5 mm in diameter. From Br fluorescence, total displacement of the liquid is measured. From Kr fluorescence, the mass fraction of both dissolved and nucleated gas is measured. Volumetric displacement of liquid due to both cavitation and gas precipitation can be separated through estimation of the local equilibrium dissolved mass fraction. The uncertainty in the line of sight projected densities of the liquid and gas phases is 4–6 %. The high fluorescence yields and energies of Br and Kr allow small mass fractions of gas to be measured, down to 10-5, with an uncertainty of 8 %. Finally, these quantitative measurements complement existing optical diagnostic techniques and provide new insight into the diffusion of gas into cavitation bubbles, which can increase their internal density, pressure and lifetimes by orders of magnitude.« less

  13. Depolarization of diffusely reflecting man-made objects.

    PubMed

    DeBoo, Brian J; Sasian, Jose M; Chipman, Russell A

    2005-09-10

    The polarization properties of light scattered or diffusely reflected from seven different man-made samples are studied. For each diffusely reflecting sample an in-plane Mueller matrix bidirectional reflectance distribution function is measured at a fixed bistatic angle using a Mueller matrix imaging polarimeter. The measured profile of depolarization index with changing scattering geometry for most samples is well approximated by an inverted Gaussian function. Depolarization is minimum for specular reflection and increases asymptotically in a Gaussian fashion as the angles of incidence and scatter increase. Parameters of the Gaussian profiles fitted to the depolarization data are used to compare samples. The dependence of depolarization on the incident polarization state is compared for each Stokes basis vector: horizontal, vertical, 45 degrees, 135 degrees, and right- and left-circular polarized light. Linear states exhibit similar depolarization profiles that typically differ in value by less than 0.06 (where 1.0 indicates complete depolarization). Circular polarization states are depolarized more than linear states for all samples tested, with the output degree of polarization reduced from that of linear states by as much as 0.15. The depolarization difference between linear and circular states varies significantly between samples.

  14. Photoinhibition of Photosystems I and II Using Chlorophyll Fluorescence Measurements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quiles, Maria Jose

    2005-01-01

    In this study the photoinhibition of photosystems (PS) I and II caused by exposure to high intensity light in oat ("Avena sativa," var Prevision) is measured by the emission of chlorophyll fluorescence in intact leaves adapted to darkness. The maximal quantum yield of PS II was lower in plants grown under high light intensity than in plants grown…

  15. Kr II laser-induced fluorescence for measuring plasma acceleration.

    PubMed

    Hargus, W A; Azarnia, G M; Nakles, M R

    2012-10-01

    We present the application of laser-induced fluorescence of singly ionized krypton as a diagnostic technique for quantifying the electrostatic acceleration within the discharge of a laboratory cross-field plasma accelerator also known as a Hall effect thruster, which has heritage as spacecraft propulsion. The 728.98 nm Kr II transition from the metastable 5d(4)D(7/2) to the 5p(4)P(5/2)(∘) state was used for the measurement of laser-induced fluorescence within the plasma discharge. From these measurements, it is possible to measure velocity as krypton ions are accelerated from near rest to approximately 21 km/s (190 eV). Ion temperature and the ion velocity distributions may also be extracted from the fluorescence data since available hyperfine splitting data allow for the Kr II 5d(4)D(7/2)-5p(4)P(5/2)(∘) transition lineshape to be modeled. From the analysis, the fluorescence lineshape appears to be a reasonable estimate for the relatively broad ion velocity distributions. However, due to an apparent overlap of the ion creation and acceleration regions within the discharge, the distributed velocity distributions increase ion temperature determination uncertainty significantly. Using the most probable ion velocity as a representative, or characteristic, measure of the ion acceleration, overall propellant energy deposition, and effective electric fields may be calculated. With this diagnostic technique, it is possible to nonintrusively characterize the ion acceleration both within the discharge and in the plume.

  16. Kr II laser-induced fluorescence for measuring plasma acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hargus, W. A.; Azarnia, G. M.; Nakles, M. R.

    2012-10-01

    We present the application of laser-induced fluorescence of singly ionized krypton as a diagnostic technique for quantifying the electrostatic acceleration within the discharge of a laboratory cross-field plasma accelerator also known as a Hall effect thruster, which has heritage as spacecraft propulsion. The 728.98 nm Kr II transition from the metastable 5d4D7/2 to the 5p ^4P^circ _{5/2} state was used for the measurement of laser-induced fluorescence within the plasma discharge. From these measurements, it is possible to measure velocity as krypton ions are accelerated from near rest to approximately 21 km/s (190 eV). Ion temperature and the ion velocity distributions may also be extracted from the fluorescence data since available hyperfine splitting data allow for the Kr II 5d4D7/2-5p ^4P^circ _{5/2} transition lineshape to be modeled. From the analysis, the fluorescence lineshape appears to be a reasonable estimate for the relatively broad ion velocity distributions. However, due to an apparent overlap of the ion creation and acceleration regions within the discharge, the distributed velocity distributions increase ion temperature determination uncertainty significantly. Using the most probable ion velocity as a representative, or characteristic, measure of the ion acceleration, overall propellant energy deposition, and effective electric fields may be calculated. With this diagnostic technique, it is possible to nonintrusively characterize the ion acceleration both within the discharge and in the plume.

  17. Photoinhibition of Photosystems I and II Using Chlorophyll Fluorescence Measurements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quiles, Maria Jose

    2005-01-01

    In this study the photoinhibition of photosystems (PS) I and II caused by exposure to high intensity light in oat ("Avena sativa," var Prevision) is measured by the emission of chlorophyll fluorescence in intact leaves adapted to darkness. The maximal quantum yield of PS II was lower in plants grown under high light intensity than in plants grown…

  18. Fluorescence microscopy for measuring fibril angles in pine tracheids

    Treesearch

    Ralph O. Marts

    1955-01-01

    Observation and measurement of fibril angles in increment cores or similar small samples from living pine trees was facilitated by the use of fluorescence microscopy. Although some autofluorescence was present, brighter images could be obtained by staining the specimens with a 0.1% aqueous solution of a fluorochrome (Calcozine flavine TG extra concentrated, Calcozine...

  19. Pulse train fluorescence technique for measuring triplet state dynamics.

    PubMed

    De Boni, Leonardo; Franzen, Paulo L; Gonçalves, Pablo J; Borissevitch, Iouri E; Misoguti, Lino; Mendonça, Cleber R; Zilio, Sergio C

    2011-05-23

    We report on a method to study the dynamics of triplet formation based on the fluorescence signal produced by a pulse train. Basically, the pulse train acts as sequential pump-probe pulses that precisely map the excited-state dynamics in the long time scale. This allows characterizing those processes that affect the population evolution of the first excited singlet state, whose decay gives rise to the fluorescence. The technique was proven to be valuable to measure parameters of triplet formation in organic molecules. Additionally, this single beam technique has the advantages of simplicity, low noise and background-free signal detection.

  20. Intracellular pH-determination by fluorescence measurements.

    PubMed

    Visser, J W; Jongeling, A A; Tanke, H J

    1979-01-01

    A method was developed to determine the intracellular pH (pHi) of individual cells by use of fluorescence measurements. The method is based on the observation that the fluorescence excitation spectrum of fluorescein is pH-dependent. Fluorescence excitation spectra from individual rat bone marrow cells treated with fluorescein diacetate (FDA) were compared with those of fluorescein solutions of known pH values. Cells which were suspended in media of pH between 4.0 and 8.1 with high to normal buffering capacities had pHi values equal to those of the media. Cells suspended in media with low buffering capacities maintained a pH,i of 6.7 +/- 0.2. Preliminary results indicated that the pHi of individual cells may also be determined by using flow cytometry.

  1. Developing and Testing a Bayesian Analysis of Fluorescence Lifetime Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Needleman, Daniel J.

    2017-01-01

    FRET measurements can provide dynamic spatial information on length scales smaller than the diffraction limit of light. Several methods exist to measure FRET between fluorophores, including Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy (FLIM), which relies on the reduction of fluorescence lifetime when a fluorophore is undergoing FRET. FLIM measurements take the form of histograms of photon arrival times, containing contributions from a mixed population of fluorophores both undergoing and not undergoing FRET, with the measured distribution being a mixture of exponentials of different lifetimes. Here, we present an analysis method based on Bayesian inference that rigorously takes into account several experimental complications. We test the precision and accuracy of our analysis on controlled experimental data and verify that we can faithfully extract model parameters, both in the low-photon and low-fraction regimes. PMID:28060890

  2. Fluorescence based Measurement of Mixing in a Microscale Mixer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Truesdell, Richard; Bartsch, Joe; Tione, Buranda; Larry, Sklar; Andrea, Mammoli

    2004-11-01

    We present an experimental investigation of a micromixer that uses pulsatile action to mix two streams entering a tube from two separate branches of a bifurcation (Y-connection) at low Reynolds numbers. The pulsatile action is provided by two pinch valves, which deform flexible tubing immediately upstream of the connection. The pinch valve action is controlled using a master-slave pulse generator setup. The quality of mixing is evaluated directly by measuring the fluorescence that results from the chemical reaction of species transported in the two streams, one containing native biotin and the other, fluorescein biotin bound to streptavidin. The reaction kinetics are accounted for by normalization using fluorescence measurements on well mixed solutions at the same residence time. The results show that the pulsatile micromixer provides almost complete mixing. Furthermore, the present measurements match results obtained in a previous experiment where flow visualization and image analysis were used to measure mixing quality in a scaled-up model.

  3. Fluorescence quantum yield measurements of fluorescent proteins: a laboratory experiment for a biochemistry or molecular biophysics laboratory course.

    PubMed

    Wall, Kathryn P; Dillon, Rebecca; Knowles, Michelle K

    2015-01-01

    Fluorescent proteins are commonly used in cell biology to assess where proteins are within a cell as a function of time and provide insight into intracellular protein function. However, the usefulness of a fluorescent protein depends directly on the quantum yield. The quantum yield relates the efficiency at which a fluorescent molecule converts absorbed photons into emitted photons and it is necessary to know for assessing what fluorescent protein is the most appropriate for a particular application. In this work, we have designed an upper-level, biochemistry laboratory experiment where students measure the fluorescence quantum yields of fluorescent proteins relative to a standard organic dye. Four fluorescent protein variants, enhanced cyan fluorescent protein (ECFP), enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP), mCitrine, and mCherry, were used, however the methods described are useful for the characterization of any fluorescent protein or could be expanded to fluorescent quantum yield measurements of organic dye molecules. The laboratory is designed as a guided inquiry project and takes two, 4 hr laboratory periods. During the first day students design the experiment by selecting the excitation wavelength, choosing the standard, and determining the concentration needed for the quantum yield experiment that takes place in the second laboratory period. Overall, this laboratory provides students with a guided inquiry learning experience and introduces concepts of fluorescence biophysics into a biochemistry laboratory curriculum.

  4. Depolarization of polarized light caused by high altitude clouds. 1: Depolarization of lidar induced by cirrus.

    PubMed

    Sun, Y Y; Li, Z P; Bösenberg, J

    1989-09-01

    A scattering model is described for the investigation of depolarization of polarized light caused by ice clouds. The scattering by a single particle is described by refraction, reflection, and diffraction. The ice cloud is assumed to be a random mixture of hexagonal columns and plates of random orientation and size. Multiple scattering effects are included by means of a Monte Carlo method, where single photon histories are constructed from random samples of the distributions governing the basic scattering parameters. The dependence of depolarization on cloud extinction coefficient, receiver field of view, and mixing ratio of columns to plates are studied. Lidar measurements of depolarization by a high altitude cirrus cloud are presented and discussed within the frame of the present model. Good agreement can be obtained assuming a variation of crystal shape distribution with height.

  5. Elastic depolarization of OH(A) by He and Ar: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Costen, M L; Livingstone, R; McKendrick, K G; Paterson, G; Brouard, M; Chadwick, H; Chang, Y-P; Eyles, C J; Aoiz, F J; Kłos, J

    2009-12-31

    Two color polarization spectroscopy has been employed to measure the collisional depolarization of OH(A(2)Sigma(+), v = 1) by He and Ar. Complementary experiments using Zeeman quantum beat spectroscopy have also been performed to determine separately the cross sections for rotational energy transfer (RET) out of selected rotational levels of OH(A, v = 0) + Ar, as well as those for elastic depolarization. This has been achieved by dispersing the emission, so as to observe a single fluorescence transition. Elastic depolarization of OH(A) by Ar is found to be significant with that for loss of rotational alignment exceeding that for loss of orientation. In the case of OH(A) + He, the polarization spectroscopy measurements suggest that elastic depolarization plays a relatively minor role in the loss of the polarization signal compared with RET. The experimental data for OH(A) + Ar are compared in detail with the results of quasi-classical trajectory calculations that accommodate the effects of electron spin. These classical calculations are assessed against the results obtained using full close-coupled open shell quantum mechanical scattering methods. Overall the level of agreement between the two experiments, and between experiment and theory, is very reasonable. Surprisingly, at low N the elastic depolarization cross sections for OH(A) + Ar are found to be quite similar in magnitude to those observed for OH(X) + Ar despite the fact that the well depth in the latter system is considerably smaller than that for OH(A)-Ar. However, for OH(A) + Ar the depolarization cross sections are insensitive to N in the range 1-14. It is proposed that this behavior partly reflects the relatively anisotropic nature of the potential energy surface, which exhibits deep wells of different depths at the two linear configurations OH(A)-Ar and Ar-OH(A), and partly the nature of elastic depolarizing collisions, which must occur with a velocity component perpendicular to the plane of rotation

  6. Photosensitivity spectrum of crayfish rhodopsin measured using fluorescence of metarhodopsin

    PubMed Central

    1982-01-01

    Discrepancies exist among spectral measurements of sensitivity of crayfish photoreceptors, their absorption in situ, and the number and absorption spectra of crayfish photopigments that are extracted by digitonin solutions. We have determined the photosensitivity spectrum of crayfish rhodopsin in isolated rhabdoms using long wavelength fluorescence emission from crayfish metarhodopsin as an intrinsic probe. There is no measurable metarhodopsin in the dark-adapted receptor, so changes in the emission level are directly proportional to metarhodopsin concentration. We therefore used changes in metarhodopsin fluorescence to construct relaxation and saturation ("photoequilibrium") spectra, from which the photosensitivity spectrum of crayfish rhodopsin was calculated. This spectrum peaks at or approximately 530 nm and closely resembles the previously measured difference spectrum for total bleaches of dark-adapted rhabdoms. Measurements of the kinetics of changes in rhabdom fluorescence and in transmittance at 580 nm were compared with predictions derived from several model systems containing one or two photopigments. The comparison shows that only a single rhodopsin and its metarhodopsin are present in the main rhabdom of crayfish, and that other explanations must be sought for the multiple pigments seen in digitonin solution. The same analysis shows that there is no detectable formation of isorhodopsin in the rhabdom. PMID:7057163

  7. Measurements of Solar Induced Chlorophyll Fluorescence at 685 nm by Airborne Plant Fluorescence Sensor (APFS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, F.; Yee, J. H.; Boldt, J.; Cook, W. B.; Corp, L. A.

    2015-12-01

    Solar-induced chlorophyll fluorescence (ChlF) by terrestrial vegetation is linked closely to photosynthetic efficiency that can be exploited to monitor the plant health status and to assess the terrestrial carbon budget from space. The weak, broad continuum ChlF signal can be detected from the fill-in of strong O2 absorption lines or solar Fraunhofer lines in the reflected spectral radiation. The Johns Hopkins University, Applied Physics Laboratory (JHU/APL) Airborne Plant Fluorescence Sensor (APFS) is a triple etalon Fabry-Perot interferometer designed and optimized specifically for the ChlF sensing from an airborne platform using this line fill-in technique. In this paper, we will present the results of APFS ChlF measurements obtained from a NASA Langley King Air during two airborne campaigns (12/12 in 2014 and 5/20 in 2015) over various land, river, and vegetated targets in Virginia during stressed and growth seasons.

  8. Blind deconvolution estimation of fluorescence measurements through quadratic programming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campos-Delgado, Daniel U.; Gutierrez-Navarro, Omar; Arce-Santana, Edgar R.; Skala, Melissa C.; Walsh, Alex J.; Jo, Javier A.

    2015-07-01

    Time-deconvolution of the instrument response from fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) data is usually necessary for accurate fluorescence lifetime estimation. In many applications, however, the instrument response is not available. In such cases, a blind deconvolution approach is required. An iterative methodology is proposed to address the blind deconvolution problem departing from a dataset of FLIM measurements. A linear combination of a base conformed by Laguerre functions models the fluorescence impulse response of the sample at each spatial point in our formulation. Our blind deconvolution estimation (BDE) algorithm is formulated as a quadratic approximation problem, where the decision variables are the samples of the instrument response and the scaling coefficients of the basis functions. In the approximation cost function, there is a bilinear dependence on the decision variables. Hence, due to the nonlinear nature of the estimation process, an alternating least-squares scheme iteratively solves the approximation problem. Our proposal searches for the samples of the instrument response with a global perspective, and the scaling coefficients of the basis functions locally at each spatial point. First, the iterative methodology relies on a least-squares solution for the instrument response, and quadratic programming for the scaling coefficients applied just to a subset of the measured fluorescence decays to initially estimate the instrument response to speed up the convergence. After convergence, the final stage computes the fluorescence impulse response at all spatial points. A comprehensive validation stage considers synthetic and experimental FLIM datasets of ex vivo atherosclerotic plaques and human breast cancer cell samples that highlight the advantages of the proposed BDE algorithm under different noise and initial conditions in the iterative scheme and parameters of the proposal.

  9. Measurements of Fluorescent Bioaerosol Particles in the Colorado Front Range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perring, A. E.; Emerson, J. B.; Fierer, N.; Schwarz, J. P.; Fahey, D. W.

    2013-12-01

    Bioaerosols are of atmospheric interest due to their potential importance as cloud condensation and heterogeneous ice nuclei and because they represent a sizeable fraction of coarse mode aerosol in some locations. Relatively little data exists, however, regarding diurnal, seasonal and annual cycles of bioaerosols and the meteorological processes that control them. Newly developed real-time instrumentation allows for sensitive, high time resolution detection of fluorescent bioaerosols and is uniquely suited to address key uncertainties in the sources, distributions and behavior of these particles in the atmosphere. Here we present observations of ambient fluorescent biological aerosol made on the Front Range of Colorado using a custom-modified Wideband Integrated Bioaerosol Sensor (WIBS) during the summer and fall of 2013. The summertime measurements were made from the roof of the NOAA ESRL David Skaggs Research Center in Boulder and the fall measurements were made both at the surface and aloft at the Boulder Atmospheric Observatory Tall Tower. We examine diurnal variations in loading and size distribution of fluorescent bioaerosol at the two locations. We also investigate the relationship between meteorological events and fluorescent bioaerosol. For example, we observe higher concentrations and markedly different number distributions associated with precipitation events. Simultaneous filter samples were collected for DNA sequencing and flow cytometry. To our knowledge this represents the first such comparison for the WIBS under ambient conditions and the microbial identification accomplished with the filters adds significantly to the analysis. This data set will provide useful insight into the sources, loadings and properties of fluorescent bioaerosol and the local and regional processes that drive them.

  10. Blind deconvolution estimation of fluorescence measurements through quadratic programming.

    PubMed

    Campos-Delgado, Daniel U; Gutierrez-Navarro, Omar; Arce-Santana, Edgar R; Skala, Melissa C; Walsh, Alex J; Jo, Javier A

    2015-07-01

    Time-deconvolution of the instrument response from fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) data is usually necessary for accurate fluorescence lifetime estimation. In many applications, however, the instrument response is not available. In such cases, a blind deconvolution approach is required. An iterative methodology is proposed to address the blind deconvolution problem departing from a dataset of FLIM measurements. A linear combination of a base conformed by Laguerre functions models the fluorescence impulse response of the sample at each spatial point in our formulation. Our blind deconvolution estimation (BDE) algorithm is formulated as a quadratic approximation problem, where the decision variables are the samples of the instrument response and the scaling coefficients of the basis functions. In the approximation cost function, there is a bilinear dependence on the decision variables. Hence, due to the nonlinear nature of the estimation process, an alternating least-squares scheme iteratively solves the approximation problem. Our proposal searches for the samples of the instrument response with a global perspective, and the scaling coefficients of the basis functions locally at each spatial point. First, the iterative methodology relies on a least-squares solution for the instrument response, and quadratic programming for the scaling coefficients applied just to a subset of the measured fluorescence decays to initially estimate the instrument response to speed up the convergence. After convergence, the final stage computes the fluorescence impulse response at all spatial points. A comprehensive validation stage considers synthetic and experimental FLIM datasets of ex vivo atherosclerotic plaques and human breast cancer cell samples that highlight the advantages of the proposed BDE algorithm under different noise and initial conditions in the iterative scheme and parameters of the proposal.

  11. Measurement of Nanoparticle Magnetic Hyperthermia Using Fluorescent Microthermal Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Xiaowan; van Keuren, Edward

    Nanoparticle magnetic hyperthermia uses the application of an AC magnetic field to ferromagnetic nanoparticles to elevate the temperature of cancer cells. The principle of hyperthermia as a true cell-specific therapy is that tumor cells are more sensitive to high temperature, so it is of great importance to control the locality and magnitude of the temperature differences. One technique to measure temperature variations on microscopic length scales is fluorescent microthermal imaging (FMI). Since it is the local temperature that is measured in FMI, effects such as heating due to nearby field coils can be accounted for. A dye, the rare earth chelate europium thenoyltrifluoroacetonate (Eu:TTA), with a strong temperature-dependent fluorescence emission has been incorporated into magnetic nanoparticles dispersed in a polymer films. FMI experiments were carried out on these samples under an applied high frequency magnetic field. Preliminary results show that FMI is a promising technique for characterizing the local generation of heat in nanoparticle magnetic hyperthermia.

  12. Collisional Effects On Laser-Induced Fluorescence Flame Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crosley, David R.

    1981-08-01

    Abstract. Laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) is a method of considerable utility for the measurement of the transient free radicals which are the keys to the chemistry of flames. Collisions experienced by the electronically excited state can alter the magnitude and the spectral form of the fluorescence signals. Recent studies on both quenching and energy transfer collisions, and their influence on LIF measurements, are treated in this review; special emphasis is given to the important and popular OH molecule. Different solutions to the problem of accounting for quenching are considered, and both effects and exploitation of energy transfer within the excited state are discussed. Although further research is needed to better quantify these collisional effects, LIF can currently provide data significant for the understanding of combustion chemistry.

  13. Kr II laser-induced fluorescence for measuring plasma acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Hargus, W. A. Jr.

    2012-10-15

    We present the application of laser-induced fluorescence of singly ionized krypton as a diagnostic technique for quantifying the electrostatic acceleration within the discharge of a laboratory cross-field plasma accelerator also known as a Hall effect thruster, which has heritage as spacecraft propulsion. The 728.98 nm Kr II transition from the metastable 5d{sup 4}D{sub 7/2} to the 5p{sup 4}P{sub 5/2}{sup Ring-Operator} state was used for the measurement of laser-induced fluorescence within the plasma discharge. From these measurements, it is possible to measure velocity as krypton ions are accelerated from near rest to approximately 21 km/s (190 eV). Ion temperature and the ion velocity distributions may also be extracted from the fluorescence data since available hyperfine splitting data allow for the Kr II 5d{sup 4}D{sub 7/2}-5p{sup 4}P{sub 5/2}{sup Ring-Operator} transition lineshape to be modeled. From the analysis, the fluorescence lineshape appears to be a reasonable estimate for the relatively broad ion velocity distributions. However, due to an apparent overlap of the ion creation and acceleration regions within the discharge, the distributed velocity distributions increase ion temperature determination uncertainty significantly. Using the most probable ion velocity as a representative, or characteristic, measure of the ion acceleration, overall propellant energy deposition, and effective electric fields may be calculated. With this diagnostic technique, it is possible to nonintrusively characterize the ion acceleration both within the discharge and in the plume.

  14. Fluorescence decay time measurement - a new optical sensing scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Draxler, Sonja; Lippitsch, Max E.

    1994-02-01

    Optical sensors often suffer from poor long-term stability. This drawback can be overcome by using fluorescence decay-time measurement as the sensing principle. In this way calibration- free chemical sensors can be developed. The sensing scheme has been used so far mainly in connection with dynamic quenching, for example in oxygen sensors. We have succeeded in extending it to ground-state indicator-analyte reactions, thus obtaining stable optical sensors for decay-time sensing of various analytes.

  15. Investigations on exponential lifetime measurements for fluorescence thermometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernicola, V. C.; Rosso, L.; Galleano, R.; Sun, T.; Zhang, Z. Y.; Grattan, K. T. V.

    2000-07-01

    Lifetime-based methods have been, on the whole, one of the most successful schemes for fiber optic temperature sensing, using fluorescent materials whose response is intensity independent. Several approaches for determining the fluorescence lifetime, and with that the measurand, have been investigated. An experimental comparison of direct and indirect measurement methods, i.e., involving actual signals from representative optical media instead of simply using Monte Carlo simulations, has been carried out. Direct fitting methods, including Marquardt, log-fit and Prony, were used to estimate the fluorescence lifetime of a Cr3+:YAG-based sensor system and the results were compared. An agreement to better than 0.5% between Marquardt and log-fit algorithms and an agreement of about 1.5% between Marquardt and Prony approaches was found. Thus, a temperature reproducibility, of 0.5 and 1.2 °C, respectively, can be obtained with the Cr3+:YAG sensor system. An indirect measurement approach based on a phase-locked (analog-to-digital signal processor) (A-DSP) was also tested. It was found that when the A-DSP output is used to estimate the lifetime, it performs only slightly better than using direct fitting methods. On the contrary, when the whole A-DSP sensor system was directly calibrated against temperature, the measurement accuracy improves by at least a factor of 10.

  16. Nanoscale measurements of proton tracks using fluorescent nuclear track detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Sawakuchi, Gabriel O. Sahoo, Narayan; Ferreira, Felisberto A.; McFadden, Conor H.; Hallacy, Timothy M.; Granville, Dal A.; Akselrod, Mark S.

    2016-05-15

    Purpose: The authors describe a method in which fluorescence nuclear track detectors (FNTDs), novel track detectors with nanoscale spatial resolution, are used to determine the linear energy transfer (LET) of individual proton tracks from proton therapy beams by allowing visualization and 3D reconstruction of such tracks. Methods: FNTDs were exposed to proton therapy beams with nominal energies ranging from 100 to 250 MeV. Proton track images were then recorded by confocal microscopy of the FNTDs. Proton tracks in the FNTD images were fit by using a Gaussian function to extract fluorescence amplitudes. Histograms of fluorescence amplitudes were then compared with LET spectra. Results: The authors successfully used FNTDs to register individual proton tracks from high-energy proton therapy beams, allowing reconstruction of 3D images of proton tracks along with delta rays. The track amplitudes from FNTDs could be used to parameterize LET spectra, allowing the LET of individual proton tracks from therapeutic proton beams to be determined. Conclusions: FNTDs can be used to directly visualize proton tracks and their delta rays at the nanoscale level. Because the track intensities in the FNTDs correlate with LET, they could be used further to measure LET of individual proton tracks. This method may be useful for measuring nanoscale radiation quantities and for measuring the LET of individual proton tracks in radiation biology experiments.

  17. Latrunculin A depolarizes starfish oocytes.

    PubMed

    Moccia, F

    2007-12-01

    Depolymerization of the actin cytoskeleton may liberate Ca2+ from InsP3-sensitive stores in some cell types, including starfish oocytes, while inhibiting Ca2+ influx in others. However, no information is available on the modulation of membrane potential (V(m)) by actin. The present study was aimed to ascertain whether the widely employed actin depolymerizing drug, latrunculin A (Lat A), affects V(m) in mature oocytes of the starfish Astropecten aranciacus. Lat A induced a membrane depolarization which was mimicked by cytochalasin D, another popular actin disruptor, and prevented by jasplakinolide, a stabilizer of the actin network. Lat A-elicited depolarization consisted in a positive shift in V(m) which reached the threshold of activation of voltage-gated Ca2+ channels (VGCC), thus triggering an action potential. Lat A-promoted depolarization lacked the action potential in Ca2+-free sea water, while it was abolished upon removal of external Na+. Moreover, membrane depolarization was prevented by pre-injection of BAPTA and heparin, but not ryanodine. These data indicate that Lat A induces a membrane depolarization by releasing Ca2+ from InsP3Rs. The Ca2+ signal in turn activates a Ca2+-dependent Na+ entry, which causes the positive shift in V(m) and stimulates the VGCC.

  18. MiniFluo fluorescence sensor, advances in FDOM Ocean Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cyr, Frédéric; Tedetti, Marc; Goutx, Madeleine

    2017-04-01

    As part of the European project "Next generation Low-Cost Multifunctional Web Enabled Ocean Sensor Systems Empowering Marine, Maritime and Fisheries Management (NeXOS)", we developed the MiniFluo, a glider-compatible optical sensor for measurements of fluorescent dissolved organic matter (FDOM). In situ applications of the MiniFluo are presented here. The configuration used targets both natural (Tryptophan) and an anthropogenic (Phenanthrene) DOM fluorophores. Observations from three glider campaigns in the NW Mediterranean (Fall 2015 and Spring and Summer 2016) are presented. It is shown that the use of the Minifluo highlights new features of DOM dynamics in the region. For example, the Tryptophan (an amino-acid traditionally used as a tracer for waste waters) is found here closely related to open sea Chl-a fluorescence. Differences between Chl-a and Tryptophan fluorescence also give subtle information on seasonal changes in ecosystem structure and DOM release that could not be observed with traditional glider measurements. The study also highlights the presence of phenanthrene (an anthropogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) in the surface and sub-surface waters of the Mediterranean. Implications of these finding will be put in the context of both the Mediterranean Sea DOM dynamics and also the ocean carbon cycle, from which the Dissolved Organic Carbon pool remains qualitatively unknown.

  19. Cell-free measurements of brightness of fluorescently labeled antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Haiying; Tourkakis, George; Shi, Dennis; Kim, David M.; Zhang, Hairong; Du, Tommy; Eades, William C.; Berezin, Mikhail Y.

    2017-01-01

    Validation of imaging contrast agents, such as fluorescently labeled imaging antibodies, has been recognized as a critical challenge in clinical and preclinical studies. As the number of applications for imaging antibodies grows, these materials are increasingly being subjected to careful scrutiny. Antibody fluorescent brightness is one of the key parameters that is of critical importance. Direct measurements of the brightness with common spectroscopy methods are challenging, because the fluorescent properties of the imaging antibodies are highly sensitive to the methods of conjugation, degree of labeling, and contamination with free dyes. Traditional methods rely on cell-based assays that lack reproducibility and accuracy. In this manuscript, we present a novel and general approach for measuring the brightness using antibody-avid polystyrene beads and flow cytometry. As compared to a cell-based method, the described technique is rapid, quantitative, and highly reproducible. The proposed method requires less than ten microgram of sample and is applicable for optimizing synthetic conjugation procedures, testing commercial imaging antibodies, and performing high-throughput validation of conjugation procedures. PMID:28150730

  20. Translational Diffusion in Phospholipid Monolayers Measured by Fluorescence Microphotolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, Reiner; Beck, Konrad

    1983-12-01

    A method is described that eliminates surface flow in monolayers at the air-water interface and makes possible diffusion measurements by fluorescence microphotolysis (``photobleaching''). In contrast to previous studies that did not account for surface flow, lipid probe diffusion has been found to be similar in densely packed monolayers and in related bilayers. Furthermore, it seems that lipid diffusion is based on the same molecular mechanism in monolayers, bilayers, and potentially also cell membranes. In monolayers of L-α -dilauroylphosphatidylcholine (Lau2-PtdCho) the translational diffusion coefficient D of the fluorescent lipid probe N-4-nitrobenzo-2-oxa-1,3 diazole egg phosphatidylethanolamine decreased from 110 μ m2/s at a surface pressure Pi =1 mN/m to 15 μ m2/s at Pi =38 mN/m (T = 21-22 degrees C). Data could be fitted by the ``free volume model.'' In monolayers of L-α -dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (Pam2-PtdCho) D decreased by >3 orders of magnitude upon increasing Pi at constant temperature, thus indicating a fluid-to-crystalline phase transition. In Lau2-PtdCho/Pam2-PtdCho monolayers phase separation has been visualized in the fluorescence microscope and the effect on D measured. These results suggest that monolayers are a promising model system for studying the molecular mobility of lipids and other cell membrane components.

  1. Cell-free measurements of brightness of fluorescently labeled antibodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Haiying; Tourkakis, George; Shi, Dennis; Kim, David M.; Zhang, Hairong; Du, Tommy; Eades, William C.; Berezin, Mikhail Y.

    2017-02-01

    Validation of imaging contrast agents, such as fluorescently labeled imaging antibodies, has been recognized as a critical challenge in clinical and preclinical studies. As the number of applications for imaging antibodies grows, these materials are increasingly being subjected to careful scrutiny. Antibody fluorescent brightness is one of the key parameters that is of critical importance. Direct measurements of the brightness with common spectroscopy methods are challenging, because the fluorescent properties of the imaging antibodies are highly sensitive to the methods of conjugation, degree of labeling, and contamination with free dyes. Traditional methods rely on cell-based assays that lack reproducibility and accuracy. In this manuscript, we present a novel and general approach for measuring the brightness using antibody-avid polystyrene beads and flow cytometry. As compared to a cell-based method, the described technique is rapid, quantitative, and highly reproducible. The proposed method requires less than ten microgram of sample and is applicable for optimizing synthetic conjugation procedures, testing commercial imaging antibodies, and performing high-throughput validation of conjugation procedures.

  2. Influence of the surface hydrophobicity on fluorescence correlation spectroscopy measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boutin, Céline; Jaffiol, Rodolphe; Plain, Jérome; Royer, Pascal

    2007-02-01

    Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) is a powerful experimental technique used to analyze the diffusion at the single molecule level in solution. FCS is based on the temporal autocorrelation of fluorescent signal generated by dye molecules diffusing through a small confocal volume. These measurements are mostly carried out in a chambered coverglass, close to the glass substrate. In this report, we discuss how the chemical nature of the glass-water interface may interact with the free diffusion of molecules. Our results reveal a strong influence, up to a few μm from the interface, of the surface hydrophobicity degree. This influence is assessed through the relative weight of the two dimension diffusion process observed at the vicinity of the surface.

  3. Containerless high temperature property measurements by atomic fluorescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nordine, P. C.; Schiffman, R. A.

    1982-01-01

    Laser induced fluorescence techniques were developed for the containerless study of high temperature processes, material properties, levitation, and heating techniques for containerless earth-based experimentation. Experiments were performed in which fluorescence of atomic aluminum, mercury, or tungsten were studied. These experiments include measurements of: (1) Al atom evaporation from CW CO2 laser heated and aerodynamically levitated sapphire and alumina spheres, and self-supported sapphire filaments, (2) Al atom reaction with ambient oxygen in the wake of a levitated specimen, (3) Hg atom concentrations in the wake of levitated alumina and sapphire spheres, relative to the ambient Hg atom concentration, (4) Hg atom concentrations in supersonic levitation jets, and (5) metastable, electronically excited W atom concentrations produced by evaporation of an electrically heated tungsten filament.

  4. Measure of K and L X-ray fluorescence yield

    SciTech Connect

    Hallak, A.B.; Saleh, N.S.; Shabaro, K.M.

    1986-01-01

    K and L X-ray fluorescence (XRF) yield for elements 16 less than or equal to Z less than or equal to 64 and 42 less than or equal to Z less than or equal to 83 have been measured respectively using three excitation energies corresponding to /sup 55/Fe, /sup 109/Cd, and /sup 241/Am radioisotopes. The samples used constitute stable chemical compounds pressed in the form of infinitely thick pellets. The measured yield values are compared with those obtained from theoretical considerations.

  5. Automated spectrometer for pressure measurement using ruby fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitmore, J. E.; Bruzzone, C. L.; Ingalls, R.

    1982-10-01

    A scanning fluorescence spectrophotometer intended for measurement of the ruby R1 lines in a high-pressure diamond anvil cell is described. A rigid framework supports the electronic and optical components and an XYZ translation stage to hold the pressure cell. Innovations include a digital monochromator scan controller, the automatic placement of tick marks on the recorder output at 0.1 nm intervals, and light detection with a photodiode. The unit is compact, weighs 50 kg, and requires only a chart recorder for operation as an automated high-pressure measurement station. These features allow easy shipment and reassembly at remote experimental sites.

  6. Bloodstain age analysis: toward solid state fluorescent lifetime measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Kevin; Zhegalova, Natalia; Achilefu, Samuel; Berezin, Mikhail Y.

    2013-03-01

    One of the most pressing unsolved challenges in forensic science is the determination of time since deposition (TSD) of bloodstains at crime scenes. Despite a number of high profile cases over the past couple hundred years involving controversy over TSD methods, no reliable quantitative method has been established. We present here an approach that has yet to be explored by forensic scientist: measuring the fluorescence lifetime of solid-state blood. Such a method would allow for on-site measurements of bloodstains utilizing the appropriate device, and would allow for rapid results returned in real-time to investigators.

  7. Compton effect thermally activated depolarization dosimeter

    DOEpatents

    Moran, Paul R.

    1978-01-01

    A dosimetry technique for high-energy gamma radiation or X-radiation employs the Compton effect in conjunction with radiation-induced thermally activated depolarization phenomena. A dielectric material is disposed between two electrodes which are electrically short circuited to produce a dosimeter which is then exposed to the gamma or X radiation. The gamma or X-radiation impinging on the dosimeter interacts with the dielectric material directly or with the metal composing the electrode to produce Compton electrons which are emitted preferentially in the direction in which the radiation was traveling. A portion of these electrons becomes trapped in the dielectric material, consequently inducing a stable electrical polarization in the dielectric material. Subsequent heating of the exposed dosimeter to the point of onset of ionic conductivity with the electrodes still shorted through an ammeter causes the dielectric material to depolarize, and the depolarization signal so emitted can be measured and is proportional to the dose of radiation received by the dosimeter.

  8. Remote chlorophyll fluorescence measurements with the laser-induced fluorescence transient approach.

    PubMed

    Pieruschka, Roland; Klimov, Denis; Berry, Joseph A; Osmond, C Barry; Rascher, Uwe; Kolber, Zbigniew S

    2012-01-01

    The interaction of plants with their environment is very dynamic. Studying the underlying processes is important for understanding and modeling plant response to changing environmental conditions. Photosynthesis varies largely between different plants and at different locations within a canopy of a single plant. Thus, continuous and spatially distributed monitoring is necessary to assess the dynamic response of photosynthesis to the environment. Limited scale of observation with portable instrumentation makes it difficult to examine large numbers of plants under different environmental conditions. We report here on the application of a recently developed technique, laser-induced fluorescence transient (LIFT), for continuous remote measurement of photosynthetic efficiency of selected leaves at a distance of up to 50 m. The ability to make continuous, automatic, and remote measurements of photosynthetic efficiency of leaves with the LIFT provides a new approach for studying the interaction of plants with the environment and may become an important tool in phenotyping photosynthetic properties in field applications.

  9. Containerless high temperature property measurements by atomic fluorescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schiffman, R. A.; Walker, C. A.

    1984-01-01

    Laser induced fluorescence (LIF) techniques for containerless study of high temperature processes and material properties was studied. Gas jet and electromagnetic levitation and electromagnetic and laser heating techniques are used with LIF in earth-based containerless high temperature experiments. Included are the development of an apparatus and its use in the studies of (1) chemical reactions on Al2O3, molybdenum, tungsten and LaB6 specimens, (2) methods for noncontact specimen temperature measurement, (3) levitation jet properties and (4) radiative lifetime and collisional energy transfer rates for electronically excited atoms.

  10. Measuring Phagosomal pH by Fluorescence Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Canton, Johnathan; Grinstein, Sergio

    2017-01-01

    Dual wavelength ratiometric imaging has become a powerful tool for the study of pH in intracellular compartments. It allows for the dynamic imaging of live cells while accounting for changes in the focal plane, differential loading of the fluorescent probe, and photobleaching caused by repeated image acquisitions. Ratiometric microscopic imaging has the added advantage over whole population methods of being able to resolve individual cells and even individual organelles. In this chapter we provide a detailed discussion of the basic principles of ratiometric imaging and its application to the measurement of phagosomal pH, including probe selection, the necessary instrumentation, and calibration methods.

  11. Containerless high temperature property measurements by atomic fluorescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    The use of laser induced fluorescence (LIF) techniques for containerless study of high temperature processes and material properties is studied. Gas jet and electromagnetic levitation and electromagnetic and laser heating techniques are used with LIF in Earth-based containerless high temperature experiments. The work to date includes development of an apparatus and its use in studies of chemical reactions on Al2O3, molybdenum, and tungsten specimens, novel methods for noncontact specimen temperature measurement, and levitation jet properties. Brief summaries of these studies are given. The apparatus is described and detailed results for the current reporting period are presented.

  12. Time-resolved fluorescence measurements of actin-phalloidin interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helms, Michael K.; French, Todd E.

    2000-03-01

    Compounds that interact with the cytoskeleton affect mobility and division, making them useful for treatment of certain types of cancer. Actin binding drugs such as the phallotoxins (small, bicyclic peptides) bind to and stabilize actin polymers (F-actin) without binding to actin monomers (G-actin). It has been shown that the intensity of fluorescently labeled phallotoxins such as fluorescein- phalloidin and rhodamine-phalloidin increases upon bind F- actin. We used LJL BioSystems' new FLAReTM technology to measure excited state lifetime changes of fluorescein- phalloidin and rhodamine-phalloidin upon binding to F- actin.

  13. Toward instrument-independent quantitative measurement of fluorescence intensity in fiber-optic spectrometer systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jianhua; Lui, Harvey; McLean, David I.; Zeng, Haishan

    2007-10-01

    Fluorescence has been widely used in biological research and clinical diagnosis. One challenge facing the rapid growth of fluorescence application is the inability to make comparable fluorescence intensity measurements during a long period of clinical study and across laboratories. We propose a method to implement system-independent fluorescence intensity calibration in fiber-optic fluorescence spectrometer systems. This method is based on a National Institute for Standards and Technology traceable standard light source for system spectral response calibration, and a fluorescence reference standard for fluorescence intensity calibration. Human skin in vivo and a fluorescence phantom made of fluorescent microspheres were measured with two different system configurations and at different probe-sample distances. Experimental results showed very good agreement with theory after system-independent fluorescence intensity calibration.

  14. Assessment of Vegetation Stress Using Reflectance or Fluorescence Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, P. K. E.; Middleton, E. M.; McMurtrey, J. E.; Corp, L. A.; Chappelle, E. W.

    2007-01-01

    Current methods for large-scale vegetation monitoring rely on multispectral remote sensing, which has serious limitation for the detection of vegetation stress. To contribute to the establishment of a generalized spectral approach for vegetation stress detection, this study compares the ability of high-spectral resolution reflectance (R) and fluorescence (F) foliar measurements to detect vegetation changes associated with common environmental factors affecting plant growth and productivity. To obtain a spectral dataset from a broad range of species and stress conditions, plant material from three experiments was examined, including (i) corn, nitrogen (N) deficiency/excess; (ii) soybean, elevated carbon dioxide, and ozone levels; and (iii) red maple, augmented ultraviolet irradiation. Fluorescence and R spectra (400-800 nm) were measured on the same foliar samples in conjunction with photosynthetic pigments, carbon, and N content For separation of a wide range of treatment levels, hyperspectral (5-10 nm) R indices were superior compared with F or broadband R indices, with the derivative parameters optimal results. For the detection of changes in vegetation physiology, hyperspectral indices can provide a significant improvement over broadband indices. The relationship of treatment levels to R was linear, whereas that to F was curvilinear. Using reflectance measurements, it was not possible to identify the unstressed vegetation condition, which was accomplished in all three experiments using F indices. Large-scale monitoring of vegetation condition and the detection of vegetation stress could be improved by using hyperspectral R and F information, a possible strategy for future remote sensing missions.

  15. Assessment of Vegetation Stress Using Reflectance or Fluorescence Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, P. K. E.; Middleton, E. M.; McMurtrey, J. E.; Corp, L. A.; Chappelle, E. W.

    2007-01-01

    Current methods for large-scale vegetation monitoring rely on multispectral remote sensing, which has serious limitation for the detection of vegetation stress. To contribute to the establishment of a generalized spectral approach for vegetation stress detection, this study compares the ability of high-spectral resolution reflectance (R) and fluorescence (F) foliar measurements to detect vegetation changes associated with common environmental factors affecting plant growth and productivity. To obtain a spectral dataset from a broad range of species and stress conditions, plant material from three experiments was examined, including (i) corn, nitrogen (N) deficiency/excess; (ii) soybean, elevated carbon dioxide, and ozone levels; and (iii) red maple, augmented ultraviolet irradiation. Fluorescence and R spectra (400-800 nm) were measured on the same foliar samples in conjunction with photosynthetic pigments, carbon, and N content For separation of a wide range of treatment levels, hyperspectral (5-10 nm) R indices were superior compared with F or broadband R indices, with the derivative parameters optimal results. For the detection of changes in vegetation physiology, hyperspectral indices can provide a significant improvement over broadband indices. The relationship of treatment levels to R was linear, whereas that to F was curvilinear. Using reflectance measurements, it was not possible to identify the unstressed vegetation condition, which was accomplished in all three experiments using F indices. Large-scale monitoring of vegetation condition and the detection of vegetation stress could be improved by using hyperspectral R and F information, a possible strategy for future remote sensing missions.

  16. Bone lead measured by X-ray fluorescence: epidemiologic methods.

    PubMed Central

    Hu, H; Aro, A; Rotnitzky, A

    1995-01-01

    In vivo X-ray fluorescence (XRF) measurement of bone lead concentration (XRF) has emerged as an important technique for future epidemiological studies of long-term toxicity. Several issues germane to epidemiologic methodology need to be addressed, however. First, sources of variability in measurements of bone lead need to be quantified, including imprecision related to the physical measurement itself and the variability of lead deposition over the two main compartments of bones (cortical vs. trabecular) and within each compartment. Imprecision related to the physical measurement can be estimated for each individual measurement based on the variability of the signal and background. Second, approaches to low-level data need to be debated. We argue for using the minimal detection limit (MDL) to compare instruments and interpret individual measurements; however, with regard to epidemiologic studies, we would abandon the MDL in favor of using all point estimates. In analyses using bone lead as an independent variable, statistical techniques can be used to adjust regression estimates based on estimates of measurement uncertainty and bone lead variability. Third, factors that can be expected to modify the relationship between bone lead and toxicity such as gravida history, endocrinological states, nutrition, and other important influences on bone metabolism, need to be identified and measured in epidemiologic studies. By addressing these issues, investigators will be able to maximize the utility of XRF measurements in environmental epidemiologic studies. Images Figure 2. PMID:7621788

  17. Radiometric calibration to consider in quantitative clinical fluorescence imaging measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litorja, M.; Urbas, A.; Zong, Y.

    2015-03-01

    The fluorescent light detected by a clinical imager is assumed to be proportional only to the amount of fluorescent substance present in the sample and the level of excitation. Unfortunately, there are many factors that can add or subtract to the light signal directly attributable to the desired fluorescence emission, especially with fluorescence from inside the body imaged remotely. The quantification of fluorescence emission is feasible by calibrating the imager using international system of units (SI)-traceable physical and material calibration artifacts such that the detector's digital numbers (DN) can be converted to radiometric units. Here we discuss three calibration methods for quantitative clinical fluorescence imaging systems.

  18. Quantitation of carcinogen bound protein adducts by fluorescence measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gan, Liang-Shang; Otteson, Michael S.; Doxtader, Mark M.; Skipper, Paul L.; Dasari, Ramachandra R.; Tannenbaum, Steven R.

    1989-01-01

    A highly significant correlation of aflatoxin B 1 serum albumin adduct level with daily aflatoxin B 1 intake was observed in a molecular epidemiological study of aflatoxin carcinogenesis which used conventional fluorescence spectroscopy methods for adduct quantitation. Synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy and laser induced fluorescence techniques have been employed to quantitate antibenzo[ a]pyrene diol epoxide derived globin peptide adducts. Fast and efficient methods to isolate the peptide adducts as well as eliminate protein fluorescence background are described. A detection limit of several femtomoles has been achieved. Experimental and technical considerations of low temperature synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy and fluorescence line narrowing to improve the detection sensitivities are also presented.

  19. Containerless high temperature property measurements by atomic fluorescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nordine, Paul C.; Shiffman, Robert A.

    1987-01-01

    Containerless high temperature processing and material property measurements are discussed. Researchers developed methods for non-contact suspension, heating, and property measurement for materials at temperatures up to 3,680K, the melting point of tungsten. New, scientifically interesting results were obtained in Earth-based research. These results and the demonstration of new methods and techniques form a basis for further advances under the low gravity environment of space where containerless conditions are more easily achieved. Containerless high temperature material property investigations that have been completed in this and our earlier projects include measurements of fluorine LaB sub 6 reaction kinetics at 1,000 to 1,500K; optical property measurements on sapphire (Al2O3) at temperatures up to the melting point (2,327K); and vapor pressure measurements for LaB sub 6 at 2,000 to 2,500K, for molybdenum up to 2,890K and for tungsten up to 3,680K. Gas jet levitation which is applicable to any solid material, and electromagnetic levitation of electrical conductors were used to suspend the materials of interest. Non-contact heating and property measurements were achieved by optical techniques, i.e., laser heating, laser induced fluorescence measurements of vapor concentrations, and optical pyrometry for specimen temperatures.

  20. Fluorescent measurements of Zn2+ on a smartphone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hossain, Md. Arafat; Ast, Sandra; Canning, John; Cook, Kevin; Rutledge, Peter J.; Jamalipour, Abbas

    2015-07-01

    Using a smartphone-based portable spectrofluorimeter, measurement of metal ion concentration in water is reported. A UV LED (λex ~ 370 nm), which is powered by the internal source of the smartphone was implemented to function as the excitation source. The emission peak of the UV LED overlaps well with the absorption peak of the Zn2+-responsive molecular probe 6-(1,4,8,11-cyclam-1-yl)ethyl-1,2,3-triazol-4-yl)2-ethyl-naphthalimide fluoro-ionophore (λabs ~ 358 nm). The fluorescence emission of this dye at λem ~ 458 nm is enhanced upon coordination of Zn2+. A customized Android application digitally processes the image from a nano-imprinted polymer diffraction grating and analyses the spectral changes. Zn2+ concentration in water samples were measured with a detection limit of δ ~ 5 μM.

  1. Polarized fluorescence measurements on ordered photosynthetic antenna complexes

    PubMed Central

    van Amerongen, H.; van Haeringen, B.; van Gurp, M.; van Grondelle, R.

    1991-01-01

    We have used a new and relatively easy approach to study the pigment-organization in chlorosomes from the photosynthetic bacterium Chloroflexus aurantiacus and in B800-850 antenna complexes of the photosynthetic purple bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides. These particles were embedded in compressed and uncompressed gels and the polarized fluorescence was determined in a 90° setup. Assuming both a rotational symmetric distribution of the particles in the gel and of the transition dipole moments in the particles, the order parameters and , describing the orientation of the symmetry axis of the particles with respect to the direction of gel expansion can be determined. Moreover, the direction parameters, describing the orientation of the absorption and emission dipole moments with respect to the symmetry axis of the particles can be obtained. The value of is essential for quantitative interpretation of linear dichroism measurements and usually it is estimated from theoretical approaches, which may lead to incorrect results. For the rod-like chlorosomes the value of appears to be the same as predicted by the theoretical approach of Ganago, A. O., M. V. Fok, I. A. Abdourakhmanov, A. A. Solov'ev, and Yu. E. Erokhin (1980. Mol. Biol. [Mosc.]. 14:381-389). The agreement with linear dichroism results, analyzed with this theoretical approach shows that the transition dipole moments are indeed in good approximation distributed in a rotationally symmetric way around the long axis of the chlorosomes. Moreover, it appears those BChl c molecules, which fluoresce, are oriented in the same way with respect to the symmetry axis as the rest of these pigments, with the dipole moments close to parallel to the long axis. The B800-850 complexes appear to orient like discs, whereas the transition dipoles of the BChl a 800- and 850-nm bands are oriented almost perpendicular to the symmetry axis. These findings are in agreement with the minimal model for these complexes

  2. Fluorescence quantum yield measurement in nanoparticle-fluorophore systems by thermal lens spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira, M.; Piscitelli, V.

    2016-04-01

    Metallic nanoparticles have been used as a way to tailor the fluorescence properties like quantum yield, but regular fluorescence quantum yield measurements have to counter the reflection and dispersion of a sample for an accurate result. Thermal lens spectroscopy is a good alternative to resolve this problem because doesn't measure the fluorescence intensity but the heat generated by absorption. We studied the changes induced by silver nanoparticles, generated by laser ablation, in the fluorescence peak and quantum yield of Rhodamine B. We fund that the silver nanoparticles lowered the fluorescence peak and quenched the fluorescence of the Rhodamine B and how much is quenched also depends on its concentration.

  3. Oxygen availability and spreading depolarizations provide complementary prognostic information in neuromonitoring of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage patients.

    PubMed

    Winkler, Maren Kl; Dengler, Nora; Hecht, Nils; Hartings, Jed A; Kang, Eun J; Major, Sebastian; Martus, Peter; Vajkoczy, Peter; Woitzik, Johannes; Dreier, Jens P

    2017-05-01

    Multimodal neuromonitoring in neurocritical care increasingly includes electrocorticography to measure epileptic events and spreading depolarizations. Spreading depolarization causes spreading depression of activity (=isoelectricity) in electrically active tissue. If the depression is long-lasting, further spreading depolarizations occur in still isoelectric tissue where no activity can be suppressed. Such spreading depolarizations are termed isoelectric and are assumed to indicate energy compromise. However, experimental and clinical recordings suggest that long-lasting spreading depolarization-induced depression and isoelectric spreading depolarizations are often recorded outside of the actual ischemic zones, allowing the remote diagnosis of delayed cerebral ischemia after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage. Here, we analyzed simultaneous electrocorticography and tissue partial pressure of oxygen recording in 33 aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage patients. Multiple regression showed that both peak total depression duration per recording day and mean baseline tissue partial pressure of oxygen were independent predictors of outcome. Moreover, tissue partial pressure of oxygen preceding spreading depolarization was similar and differences in tissue partial pressure of oxygen responses to spreading depolarization were only subtle between isoelectric spreading depolarizations and spreading depressions. This further supports that, similar to clustering of spreading depolarizations, long spreading depolarization-induced periods of isoelectricity are useful to detect energy compromise remotely, which is valuable because the exact location of future developing pathology is unknown at the time when the neurosurgeon implants recording devices.

  4. Localization of subsurface fluorescent lesions using surface spectral measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolste, Kolbein

    Localization of Subsurface Fluorescent Lesions using Surface Spectral Measurements Sponsored by the National Institute of Health, Bethesda, Maryland Kolbein Kolste, Ph.D. Keith Paulsen In neurosurgical tumor resection, maximizing extent of resection plays a major role in the care of cancer patients. To date, ALA is being researched as a technique to guide tumor resection by inducing the accumulation of the endogenous fluorophore PpIX. Most research has focused on the use of blue light excitation of PpIX to visual the tumor. However, due to the high attenuation of blue light by in vivo chromophores, such as oxy- and deoxy-hemoglobin, the source of collected fluorescence emissions is confined to the top layer of cells, and the signal is subject to masking by blood on the surface of the surgical field of view. This issue is particularly a problem at the end of the resection, when the surgeon is evaluating the margin for remaining tumor, but the blue-signal is insensitive to residual tumor that may be located several millimeters beneath the surface. PpIX has an absorption band in the near infrared (NIR), where the absorption due to blood is orders of magnitude lower, enabling the excitation of a fluorophore at depth. In this work, we created a hyperspectral imaging system that attaches to a neurosurgical microscope and is capable of detecting PpIX fluorescence that has been excited at 635 nm. We utilize a dual-waveband technique from the hyperspectral to estimate depth of fluorescence origin and characterize the inherent limitations of the estimated depth. One of the major benefits of this technique is that the estimation is independent of the concentration and size of the fluorophore. This is first demonstrated in phantom studies, where the depths of multiple separate inclusions at various depths are accurately estimated. The technique is verified in animal tumor models and translated into the clinical theater, with pilot data showing the first estimation of depth of

  5. Depolarization of light by rough surface of scattering phantoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tchvialeva, Lioudmila; Markhvida, Igor; Lee, Tim K.; Doronin, Alexander; Meglinski, Igor

    2013-02-01

    The growing interest in biomedical optics to the polarimetric methods push researchers to better understand of light depolarization during scattering in and on the surface of biological tissues. Here we study the depolarization of light propagated in silicone phantoms. The phantoms with variety of surface roughness and bulk optical properties are designed to imitate human skin. Free-space speckle patterns in parallel (III) and perpendicular (I⊥) direction in respect to incident polarization are used to get the depolarization ratio of backscattered light DR = (III - I⊥)/( III + I⊥). The Monte Carlo model developed in house is also applied to compare simulated DR with experimentally measured. DR dependence on roughness, concentration and size of scattering particles is analysed. A weak depolarization and negligible response to scattering of the medium are observed for phantoms with smooth surfaces, whereas for the surface roughness in order to the mean free path the depolarization ratio decreases and reveals dependence on the bulk scattering coefficient. In is shown that the surface roughness could be a key factor triggering the ability of tissues' characterization by depolarization ratio.

  6. [In vivo fluorescence spectroscopy of human skin: principles and application to penetration measurements].

    PubMed

    Harendt, N; Giese, K; Kölmel, K

    1994-08-01

    The fluorescence properties of untreated human skin and the penetration of topically applied drugs were measured in vivo using a commercially available fluorescence spectrometer which was adapted to in vivo-measurements on skin by means of optical fibres and a remote viewing head. The intensity and characteristics of the intrinsic fluorescences of human skin and their dependences upon several parameters like pigmentation, water content of the skin or depth of the horny layer are shown. The principles of the penetration measurements based on the fluorescence of the skin or the fluorescence of the drug topically applied to the skin are described and measurements of the penetration of some drugs are reported.

  7. Rapid measurement of meat spoilage using fluorescence spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Binlin; Dahlberg, Kevin; Gao, Xin; Smith, Jason; Bailin, Jacob

    2017-02-01

    Food spoilage is mainly caused by microorganisms, such as bacteria. In this study, we measure the autofluorescence in meat samples longitudinally over a week in an attempt to develop a method to rapidly detect meat spoilage using fluorescence spectroscopy. Meat food is a biological tissue, which contains intrinsic fluorophores, such as tryptophan, collagen, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) and flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) etc. As meat spoils, it undergoes various morphological and chemical changes. The concentrations of the native fluorophores present in a sample may change. In particular, the changes in NADH and FAD are associated with microbial metabolism, which is the most important process of the bacteria in food spoilage. Such changes may be revealed by fluorescence spectroscopy and used to indicate the status of meat spoilage. Therefore, such native fluorophores may be unique, reliable and nonsubjective indicators for detection of spoiled meat. The results of the study show that the relative concentrations of all above fluorophores change as the meat samples kept in room temperature ( 19° C) spoil. The changes become more rapidly after about two days. For the meat samples kept in a freezer ( -12° C), the changes are much less or even unnoticeable over a-week-long storage.

  8. Quantitative Fluorescent Speckle Microscopy (QFSM) to Measure Actin Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Mendoza, Michelle C.; Besson, Sebastien; Danuser, Gaudenz

    2012-01-01

    Quantitative Fluorescent Speckle Microscopy (QFSM) is a live cell imaging method to analyze the dynamics of macromolecular assemblies with high spatial and temporal resolution. Its greatest successes were in the analysis of actin filament and adhesion dynamics in the context of cell migration and microtubule dynamics in interphase and the meotic/mitotic spindle. Here, we focus on the former application to illustrate the procedures of FSM imaging and the computational image processing that extracts quantitative information from these experiments. QFSM is advantageous over other methods because it measures the movement and turnover kinetics of the actin filament (F-actin) network in living cells across the entire field of view. Experiments begin with microinjection of fluorophore-labeled actin into cells, which generate a low ratio of fluorescently-labeled:endogenous unlabeled actin monomers. Spinning disk confocal or wide-field imaging then visualizes fluorophore clusters (2–8 actin monomers) within the assembled F-actin network as speckles. QFSM software identifies and computationally tracks and utilizes the location, appearance, and disappearance of speckles to derive network flows and maps of the rate of filament assembly and disassembly. PMID:23042526

  9. Depolarizing field in ultrathin electrocalorics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glazkova, E.; Chang, C.-M.; Lisenkov, S.; Mani, B. K.; Ponomareva, I.

    2015-08-01

    Ferroelectric thin films are considered to be among the top candidates for room-temperature electrocaloric materials as they exhibit excellent electric properties and allow application of record high electric fields. At the same time, downsizing of ferroelectric electrocalorics brings about an unwanted but unavoidable depolarizing field that could critically alter or even destroy the films' electrocaloric properties. We use an atomistic first-principles-based computational approach that does not rely on the use of Maxwell relations (i) to reveal the critical role of the depolarizing field on the electrocaloric properties of ferroelectric ultrathin films, (ii) to demonstrate the contribution of nanodomains to the electrocaloric effect in such films, and (iii) to revisit the potential limitations of the indirect approach to study electrocaloric effect in nanoscale ferroelectrics.

  10. Rotation of plasma membrane proteins measured by polarized fluorescence depletion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barisas, B. George; Rahman, Noorul A.; Yoshida, Thomas M.; Roess, Deborah A.

    1990-05-01

    We have implemented a new laser microscopic method, polarized fluorescence depletion (PFD), for measuring the rotational dynamics of functional membrane proteins on individual, microscopically selected cells under physiological conditions. This method combines the long lifetimes of triplet-state probes with the sensitivity of fluorescence detection to measure macromolecular rotational correlation times from 10 microsec to > 1 ms. As examples, the rotational correlation time of Fc receptors (FcR) on the surface of 2H3 rat basophilic leukemia cells is 79.9 4.4 microsec at 4°C when labeled with eosin conjugates of IgE. This value is consistent with the known 100 kDa receptor size. When labeled with intact F4 anti-FcR monoclonal antibody, the rotational correlation time for FcER is increased about 2-fold to 170.8 +/- 6.5 microsec, consistent with receptor dimer formation on the plasma membrane and with the ability of this antibody to form FcER dimers on 2H3 cell surfaces. We have also examined the rotational diffusion of the luteinizing hormone receptor on plasma membranes of small ovine luteal cells. Luteinizing hormone receptors (LHR), when occupied by ovine luteinizing hormone (oLH), have a rotational correlation time of 20.5 +/- 0.1 microsec at 4°C. When occupied by human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG), LHR have a rotational correlation time of 46.2 +/- 0.4 microsec suggesting that binding of hCG triggers additional LHR interactions with plasma membrane proteins. Together these studies suggest the utility of PFD measurements in assessing molecular size and molecular association of membrane proteins on individual cells. Relative advantages of time- and frequency-domain implementations of PFD are also discussed.

  11. Limitation of fluorescence spectrophotometry in the measurement of naphthenic acids in oil sands process water.

    PubMed

    Lu, Weibing; Ewanchuk, Andrea; Perez-Estrada, Leonidas; Sego, Dave; Ulrich, Ania

    2013-01-01

    Fluorescence spectrophotometry has been proposed as a quick screening technique for the measurement of naphthenic acids (NAs). To evaluate the feasibility of this application, the fluorescence emission spectra of NAs extracted from three oil sands process water sources were compared with that of commercial NAs. The NAs resulting from the bitumen extraction process cannot be differentiated because of the similarity of the fluorescence spectra. Separation of the fluorescent species in NAs using high performance liquid chromatography with fluorescence detector proved unsuccessful. The acidic fraction of NAs is fluorescent but the basic fraction of NAs is not fluorescent, implying that aromatic acids in NAs give rise to the fluorescent signals. The concentrations of NAs in oil sands process water were measured by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), fluorescence spectrophotometry and ultra high performance liquid chromatography-time of flight/mass spectrometry (UPLC-TOF/MS). Commercial Merichem and Kodak NAs are the best standards to use when measuring NAs concentration with FTIR and fluorescence spectrophotometry. In addition, the NAs concentrations measured by fluorescence spectrophotometry are about 30 times higher than those measured by FTIR and UPLC-TOF/MS. The findings in this study underscore the limitation of fluorescence spectrophotometry in the measurement of NAs.

  12. Analysis of Antimicrobial-Triggered Membrane Depolarization Using Voltage Sensitive Dyes

    PubMed Central

    te Winkel, J. Derk; Gray, Declan A.; Seistrup, Kenneth H.; Hamoen, Leendert W.; Strahl, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    The bacterial cytoplasmic membrane is a major inhibitory target for antimicrobial compounds. Commonly, although not exclusively, these compounds unfold their antimicrobial activity by disrupting the essential barrier function of the cell membrane. As a consequence, membrane permeability assays are central for mode of action studies analysing membrane-targeting antimicrobial compounds. The most frequently used in vivo methods detect changes in membrane permeability by following internalization of normally membrane impermeable and relatively large fluorescent dyes. Unfortunately, these assays are not sensitive to changes in membrane ion permeability which are sufficient to inhibit and kill bacteria by membrane depolarization. In this manuscript, we provide experimental advice how membrane potential, and its changes triggered by membrane-targeting antimicrobials can be accurately assessed in vivo. Optimized protocols are provided for both qualitative and quantitative kinetic measurements of membrane potential. At last, single cell analyses using voltage-sensitive dyes in combination with fluorescence microscopy are introduced and discussed. PMID:27148531

  13. Measuring Agarwood Formation Ratio Quantitatively by Fluorescence Spectral Imaging Technique.

    PubMed

    Huang, Botao; Nguyen, Duykien; Liu, Tianyi; Jiang, Kaibin; Tan, Jinfen; Liu, Chunxin; Zhao, Jing; Huang, Shaowei

    2015-01-01

    Agarwood is a kind of important and precious traditional Chinese medicine. With the decreasing of natural agarwood, artificial cultivation has become more and more important in recent years. Quantifying the formation of agarwood is an essential work which could provide information for guiding cultivation and controlling quality. But people only can judge the amount of agarwood qualitatively by experience before. Fluorescence multispectral imaging method is presented to measure the agarwood quantitatively in this paper. A spectral cube from 450 nm to 800 nm was captured under the 365 nm excitation sources. The nonagarwood, agarwood, and rotten wood in the same sample were distinguished based on analyzing the spectral cube. Then the area ratio of agarwood to the whole sample was worked out, which is the quantitative information of agarwood area percentage. To our knowledge, this is the first time that the formation of agarwood was quantified accurately and nondestructively.

  14. Measuring Agarwood Formation Ratio Quantitatively by Fluorescence Spectral Imaging Technique

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Botao; Nguyen, Duykien; Jiang, Kaibin; Tan, Jinfen; Liu, Chunxin; Zhao, Jing; Huang, Shaowei

    2015-01-01

    Agarwood is a kind of important and precious traditional Chinese medicine. With the decreasing of natural agarwood, artificial cultivation has become more and more important in recent years. Quantifying the formation of agarwood is an essential work which could provide information for guiding cultivation and controlling quality. But people only can judge the amount of agarwood qualitatively by experience before. Fluorescence multispectral imaging method is presented to measure the agarwood quantitatively in this paper. A spectral cube from 450 nm to 800 nm was captured under the 365 nm excitation sources. The nonagarwood, agarwood, and rotten wood in the same sample were distinguished based on analyzing the spectral cube. Then the area ratio of agarwood to the whole sample was worked out, which is the quantitative information of agarwood area percentage. To our knowledge, this is the first time that the formation of agarwood was quantified accurately and nondestructively. PMID:26089935

  15. Application of fluorescence lifetime imaging of enhanced green fluorescent protein to intracellular pH measurements.

    PubMed

    Nakabayashi, Takakazu; Wang, Hui-Ping; Kinjo, Masataka; Ohta, Nobuhiro

    2008-06-01

    We have shown that the intracellular pH of a single HeLa cell expressing the enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) can be imaged using the fluorescence lifetime of EGFP, which can be interpreted in terms of the pH-dependent ionic equilibrium of the p-hydroxybenzylidene-imidazolidinone structure of the chromophore of EGFP.

  16. An advanced fluorescence LIDAR system for the acquisition of interleaved active (LIF) and passive (SIF) fluorescence measurements on vegetation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raimondi, Valentina; Palombi, Lorenzo; Di Ninni, Paola

    2015-10-01

    Fluorescence is regarded as a valuable tool to investigate the eco-physiological status of vegetation. Chlorophyll a, which emits a typical fluorescence in the red/far-red region of the e.m. spectrum, plays a key role in the photosynthetic process and its fluorescence is considered an effective proxy of photosynthetic activity of plants. Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF) has been studied for several decades both at leaf- and canopy-level by means of optical fibers-coupled instrumentation and fluorescence LIDAR systems. On the other hand, Solar-Induced Fluorescence (SIF) has been the object of several scientific studies quite recently, with the aim to investigate the feasibility of measuring the fluorescence of vegetation using passive spectroradiometers in view of global scale monitoring from satellite platforms. This paper presents the main technical features and preliminary tests of a fluorescence LIDAR, recently upgraded to acquire maps of interleaved LIF and SIF measurements at canopy level. In-house developed electronics and software permits the acquisition of interleaved LIF and SIF spectra by switching on/off the laser, the selection of the suitable grating, the setting of the integration time and the synchronization of the Intensified CCD (ICCD) gate opening time. For each pixel of the map, a fluorescence dataset can be acquired containing a LIF spectrum - from 570 nm to 830 nm with a spectral resolution of 0.5 nm - and radiance spectra from 685.53 nm to 690.30 nm with subnanometric spectral resolution containing the molecular oxygen O2-B telluric absorption band. The latter can be exploited for polynomial regression data fit and SIF retrieval.

  17. Critical assessment of fluorescence polarization measurements with a FACS IV cell sorter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muller, Claude P.; Krabichler, Gert

    1988-09-01

    The usefulness and limitations of the Becton-Dickinson fluorescence-activated cell sorter FACS IV for fluorescence polarization measurements were examined. A set of tests to determine the characteristics of the detection geometry, the optical properties of the beam splitter, and the capability to process fluorescence polarization data is presented. Recommendations are provided for correcting instrumental deficiencies.

  18. Nonspherical nanoparticles characterization by partially depolarized dynamic light scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levin, Alexander D.; Shmytkova, Ekaterina A.

    2015-06-01

    The realization of improved depolarized dynamic light scattering method is presented. This technique supports measurement of non-spherical nanoparticals dimensions in liquids. The relations between translational and rotational diffusion coefficients and autocorrelation function of scattered light with polarized and depolarized components in various proportions are derived. Thus measurement of very weak cross-polarized component can be avoided. This improvement permits to reduce measurement time, to improve signal to noise ratio and results precision. The technique was applied for sizing of gold nanorods and multiwalled carbon nanotubes in liquids.

  19. Azadioxatriangulenium: exploring the effect of a 20 ns fluorescence lifetime in fluorescence anisotropy measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogh, Sidsel A.; Bora, Ilkay; Rosenberg, Martin; Thyrhaug, Erling; Laursen, Bo W.; Just Sørensen, Thomas

    2015-12-01

    Azaoxatriangulenium (ADOTA) has been shown to be highly emissive despite a moderate molar absorption coefficient of the primary electronic transition. As a result, the fluorescence lifetime is ~20 ns, longer than all commonly used red fluorescent organic probes. The electronic transitions in ADOTA are highly polarised (r 0  =  0.38), which in combination with the long fluorescence lifetime extents the size-range of biomolecular weights that can be detected in fluorescence polarisation-based experiments. Here, the rotational dynamics of bovine serum albumin (BSA) are monitored with three different ADOTA derivatives, differing only in constitution of the reactive linker. A detailed study of the degree of labelling, the steady-state anisotropy, and the time-resolved anisotropy of the three different ADOTA-BSA conjugates are reported. The fluorescence quantum yields (ϕ fl) of the free dyes in PBS solution are determined to be ~55%, which is reduced to ~20% in the ADOTA-BSA conjugates. Despite the reduction in ϕ fl, a ~20 ns intensity averaged lifetime is maintained, allowing for the rotational dynamics of BSA to be monitored for up to 100 ns. Thus, ADOTA can be used in fluorescence polarisation assays to fill the gap between commonly used organic dyes and the long luminescence lifetime transition metal complexes. This allows for efficient steady-state fluorescence polarisation assays for detecting binding of analytes with molecular weights of up to 100 kDa.

  20. Acute Ethanol Causes Hepatic Mitochondrial Depolarization in Mice: Role of Ethanol Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Zhi; Ramshesh, Venkat K.; Rehman, Hasibur; Liu, Qinlong; Theruvath, Tom P.; Krishnasamy, Yasodha; Lemasters, John J.

    2014-01-01

    Background/Aims An increase of ethanol metabolism and hepatic mitochondrial respiration occurs in vivo after a single binge of alcohol. Here, our aim was to determine how ethanol intake affects hepatic mitochondrial polarization status in vivo in relation to ethanol metabolism and steatosis. Methods Hepatic mitochondrial polarization, permeability transition (MPT), and reduce pyridine nucleotides, and steatosis in mice were monitored by intravital confocal/multiphoton microscopy of the fluorescence of rhodamine 123 (Rh123), calcein, NAD(P)H, and BODIPY493/503, respectively, after gavage with ethanol (1–6 g/kg). Results Mitochondria depolarized in an all-or-nothing fashion in individual hepatocytes as early as 1 h after alcohol. Depolarization was dose- and time-dependent, peaked after 6 to 12 h and maximally affected 94% of hepatocytes. This mitochondrial depolarization was not due to onset of the MPT. After 24 h, mitochondria of most hepatocytes recovered normal polarization and were indistinguishable from untreated after 7 days. Cell death monitored by propidium iodide staining, histology and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) was low throughout. After alcohol, mitochondrial NAD(P)H autofluorescence increased and decreased, respectively, in hepatocytes with polarized and depolarized mitochondria. Ethanol also caused steatosis mainly in hepatocytes with depolarized mitochondria. Depolarization was linked to ethanol metabolism, since deficiency of alcohol dehydrogenase and cytochrome-P450 2E1 (CYP2E1), the major ethanol-metabolizing enzymes, decreased mitochondrial depolarization by ∼70% and ∼20%, respectively. Activation of aldehyde dehydrogenase decreased depolarization, whereas inhibition of aldehyde dehydrogenase enhanced depolarization. Activation of aldehyde dehydrogenase also markedly decreased steatosis. Conclusions Acute ethanol causes reversible hepatic mitochondrial depolarization in vivo that may contribute to

  1. Characterization of natural and irradiated nails by means of the depolarization metrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savenkov, Sergey; Priezzhev, Alexander; Oberemok, Yevgen; Sholom, Sergey; Kolomiets, Ivan; Chunikhina, Kateryna

    2016-07-01

    Mueller polarimetry is applied to study the samples of nails: natural (or reference) and irradiated to 2 Gy ionizing radiation dose. We measure the whole Mueller matrices of the samples as a function of the scattering angle at a wavelength of 632.8 nm. We apply depolarization analysis to measured Mueller matrices by calculating the depolarization metrics [depolarization index, Q(M)-metric, first and second Lorenz indices, Cloude and Lorenz entropy] to quantify separability of the different samples of nails under study based on differences in their Mueller matrix. The results show that nail samples strongly depolarize the output light in backscattering, and irradiation in all cases results in increasing of depolarization. Most sensitive among depolarization metrics are the Lorenz entropy and Q(M)-metric.

  2. Note: Rapid measurement of fluorescence lifetimes using SiPM detection and waveform sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, H.-M.; Souris, J. S.; Kim, H.-J.; Cheng, S.-H.; Chen, L.; Lo, L.-W.; Chen, C.-T.; Kao, C.-M.

    2017-09-01

    In fluorescence spectroscopy and imaging, fluorescence lifetime measurement—assessing the average time fluorophores spend in their excited state before returning to their ground state—offers a number of advantages over quantifying fluorescence intensities that include resistance to photo-bleaching and independence from fluorophore concentration, excitation intensity, and measurement methodology. Despite growing interest, fluorescence lifetime techniques frequently mandate relatively complex instrumentation, slow data acquisition rates, and significant data analyses. In this work, we demonstrate the feasibility of measuring fluorescence lifetimes using off-the-shelf analog silicon photomultipliers and switched-capacitor array waveform sampling techniques, with precision matching that of much larger and more elaborate commercial instruments.

  3. Influence of dental materials used for sealing caries lesions on laser fluorescence measurements.

    PubMed

    Celiberti, Paula; Carvalho, Thiago S; Raggio, Daniela P; Mendes, Fausto M

    2012-03-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the influence of thickness and aging on the intrinsic fluorescence of sealing materials and their ability to block fluorescence from the underlying surface as assessed using a laser fluorescence device. Cavities of 0.5 mm and 1 mm depth were drilled into acrylic boards which were placed over two surfaces with different fluorescence properties: a low-fluorescence surface, to assess the intrinsic fluorescence of the sealing materials, and a high-fluorescence surface, to assess the fluorescence-blocking ability of the sealing materials. Ten cavities of each depth were filled with different sealing materials: Adper Scotchbond Multi-Purpose, Adper Single Bond 2, FluroShield, Conseal f and UltraSeal XT Plus. Fluorescence was measured with a DIAGNOdent pen at five different time points: empty cavity, after polymerization, and 1 day, 1 week and 1 month after filling. The individual values after polymerization, as well as the area under the curve for the different periods were submitted to ANOVA and the Tukey test (p < 0.05). At 0.5 mm, Scotchbond, FluroShield and UltraSeal showed insignificant changes in intrinsic fluorescence with aging and lower fluorescence after polymerization than Single Bond and Conseal. At 1 mm, Scotchbond and FluroShield showed the lowest intrinsic fluorescence, but only Scotchbond showed no chagnes in fluorescence with aging. At both depths, Scotchbond blocked significantly less fluorescence. All sealing materials blocked more fluorescence when applied to a depth of 1 mm. At 0.5 mm, fissure sealants blocked more fluorescence than adhesives, and did not show significant changes with aging. Scotchbond had the least affect on the fluorescence from the underlying surface and would probably have the least affect on the monitoring of sealed dental caries by laser fluorescence.

  4. Distinct characteristics of Ca(2+)-induced depolarization of isolated brain and liver mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Vergun, Olga; Reynolds, Ian J

    2005-09-05

    Ca(2+)-induced mitochondrial depolarization was studied in single isolated rat brain and liver mitochondria. Digital imaging techniques and rhodamine 123 were used for mitochondrial membrane potential measurements. Low Ca(2+) concentrations (about 30--100 nM) initiated oscillations of the membrane potential followed by complete depolarization in brain mitochondria. In contrast, liver mitochondria were less sensitive to Ca(2+); 20 microm Ca(2+) was required to depolarize liver mitochondria. Ca(2+) did not initiate oscillatory depolarizations in liver mitochondria, where each individual mitochondrion depolarized abruptly and irreversibly. Adenine nucleotides dramatically reduced the oscillatory depolarization in brain mitochondria and delayed the onset of the depolarization in liver mitochondria. In both type of mitochondria, the stabilizing effect of adenine nucleotides completely abolished by an inhibition of adenine nucleotide translocator function with carboxyatractyloside, but was not sensitive to bongkrekic acid. Inhibitors of mitochondrial permeability transition cyclosporine A and bongkrekic acid also delayed Ca(2+)-depolarization. We hypothesize that the oscillatory depolarization in brain mitochondria is associated with the transient conformational change of the adenine nucleotide translocator from a specific transporter to a non-specific pore, whereas the non-oscillatory depolarization in liver mitochondria is caused by the irreversible opening of the pore.

  5. Electron beam fluorescence measurements in the Boeing hypersonic shock tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Price, Linwood L.; Williams, W. Dan; Powell, H. M.

    1992-01-01

    The Calspan electron beam fluorescence (EBF) measurement system is described along with the results of measurements made in hypersonic flow. Numerous self-emitting metallic species were identified, many of which may be associated with an aging/erosion process within the B30HST. Because there were only 16 tunnel runs, it was only possible to obtain spectral measurements over a limited range of wavelengths and time sampling periods. Many spectral features of the flow remain uninvestigated. Because flow self-emission is important to all optical diagnostic techniques, it is recommended that additional spectral studies by performed. The three electron beam-excited species that were identified are nitrogen, helium, and nitric oxide. The high metallic radiation background interfered with attempts to obtain the time-wise variation of N2 density and He radiation with the optical fiber/PMT channels. In the case of the N2 density measurements the result of interference was increased uncertainty. Unfortunately, the interference caused the time-wise He measurements to fail completely. It is recommended that the electron beam be modulated to provide discrimination against the background radiation in future N2 density measurements. Careful data reduction produced useful measurements of N2 vibrational temperature, even though the high background from metallic species significantly increased measurement uncertainty. Perhaps the recommended additional spectral studies would reveal N2(+) First Negative System band-pair regions having less background. Detection of the He arrival was easily accomplished with the spectrometer/array detector system. Because of this, it is recommended that this means of detecting He arrival be used in the future. With proper calibrations of the system an He number density could be obtained. Although the flow conditions were out of limits for the run in which the NO spectrum was recorded, the usefulness of the NO spectrum for determination of free

  6. Nonlinearity in giant depolarizing potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakatani, Hironori; Khalilov, Ilgam; Gong, Pulin; van Leeuwen, Cees

    2003-12-01

    Synchronous population discharges in immature neurons, or giant depolarizing potentials (GDPs), are considered to have an important role in the development of the functional network in hippocampus and other neural tissue before or briefly after birth. Recently, theoretical models have emphasized the possible role of chaotic, nonlinear activity at circuit level in establishing functional connectivity in neural tissue. Combining these two hypotheses leads to the prediction that GDPs have chaotic characteristics. We tested nonlinearity in GDPs recorded from transverse hippocampal slices of neonatal Wistar rats. Our results provide evidence of nonlinearity in GDP activity at circuit level.

  7. Geometry of generalized depolarizing channels

    SciTech Connect

    Burrell, Christian K.

    2009-10-15

    A generalized depolarizing channel acts on an N-dimensional quantum system to compress the 'Bloch ball' in N{sup 2}-1 directions; it has a corresponding compression vector. We investigate the geometry of these compression vectors and prove a conjecture of Dixit and Sudarshan [Phys. Rev. A 78, 032308 (2008)], namely, that when N=2{sup d} (i.e., the system consists of d qubits), and we work in the Pauli basis then the set of all compression vectors forms a simplex. We extend this result by investigating the geometry in other bases; in particular we find precisely when the set of all compression vectors forms a simplex.

  8. Phytoplankton photocompensation from space-based fluorescence measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrison, J. Ruairidh; Goodwin, Deborah S.

    2010-03-01

    Recent satellite-derived observations linked global scale phytoplankton fluorescence variability with iron stress and hinted at photophysiological responses associated with changing light levels. These photocompensation reactions, the sum of photoacclimation and photoadaptation, were examined with climatological data for the Gulf of Maine. Significant seasonal variability was observed in the fluorescence quantum yield that was unrelated to patterns of biomass. Up to 89% of the variability in the fluorescence quantum yield was explained by a physiology-based photocompensation model. Spatial variability in seasonal patterns was associated with differing hydrodynamic regimes. This variability in the quantum yield demonstrates that satellite-based fluorescence is inappropriate for phytoplankton biomass determinations. More importantly, the work presented here provides the modeling foundation for fluorescence-based investigations of temporal and spatial variability in phytoplankton physiology associated with growth irradiance. These space-based physiological observations have the potential to decrease uncertainties in future ocean color derived primary productivity estimates.

  9. A depolarization and attenuation experiment using the CTS satellite. Volume 1: Experiment description

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bostian, C. W.; Holt, S. B., Jr.; Kauffman, S. R.; Manus, E. A.; Marshall, R. E.; Stutzman, W. L.; Wiley, P. H.

    1976-01-01

    An experiment for measuring precipitation attenuation and depolarization on the Communications Technology Satellite (CTS) 11.7 GHz downlink is described. Attenuation and depolarization of the signal received from the spacecraft is monitored on a 24 hour basis. Data is correlated with ground weather conditions. Theoretical models for millimeter wave propagation through rain are refined for maximum agreement with observed data. Techniques are developed for predicting and mimimizing the effects of rain scatter and depolarization on future satellite communication systems.

  10. Results of the VPI&SU Comstar experiment. [depolarization and attenuation due to rain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andrews, J. H.; Ozbay, C.; Pratt, T.; Bostian, C. W.; Manus, E. A.; Gaines, J. M.; Marshall, R. E.; Stutzman, W. L.; Wiley, P. H.

    1982-01-01

    This paper summarizes annual and cumulative attenuation data, depolarization data, and associated local rain rate distributions obtained with the Comstar family of 19.04- and 28.56-GHz satellite beacons during the years 1977-1981. It discusses the relationships between attenuation and rain rate and between attenuation and depolarization, compares measured data on the joint distribution of attenuation and depolarization, and examines the limitations that propagation effects will impose on future 20/30-GHz satellite communications systems.

  11. Fluorescence anisotropy of DNA/DAPI complex: torsional dynamics and geometry of the complex.

    PubMed Central

    Barcellona, M L; Gratton, E

    1996-01-01

    Fluorescence depolarization of synthetic polydeoxynucleotide/4'-6-diamidino-2-phenylindole dihydrochloride complexes has been investigated as a function of dye/polymer coverage. At low coverage, fluorescence depolarization is due to local torsional motions of the DNA segment where the dye resides. At relatively high coverage, fluorescence depolarization is dominated by energy transfer to other dye molecules along the DNA. The extent of the observed depolarization due to torsional motion depends on the angle the dye molecule forms with the DNA helical axis. A large torsional motion and a small angle produce the same depolarization as a small torsional motion and a large projection angle. Furthermore, the extent of transfer critically depends on the relative orientation of dye molecules along the DNA. The effect of multiple transfer is examined using a Monte Carlo approach. The measurement of depolarization with transfer, at high coverage, allows determination of the dye orientation about the DNA helical axis. The value of the torsional spring constant is then determined, at very low coverage, for few selected polydeoxynucleotides. Images FIGURE 3 PMID:9172758

  12. In situ measurements of phytoplankton fluorescence using low cost electronics.

    PubMed

    Leeuw, Thomas; Boss, Emmanuel S; Wright, Dana L

    2013-06-19

    Chlorophyll a fluorometry has long been used as a method to study phytoplankton in the ocean. In situ fluorometry is used frequently in oceanography to provide depth-resolved estimates of phytoplankton biomass. However, the high price of commercially manufactured in situ fluorometers has made them unavailable to some individuals and institutions. Presented here is an investigation into building an in situ fluorometer using low cost electronics. The goal was to construct an easily reproducible in situ fluorometer from simple and widely available electronic components. The simplicity and modest cost of the sensor makes it valuable to students and professionals alike. Open source sharing of architecture and software will allow students to reconstruct and customize the sensor on a small budget. Research applications that require numerous in situ fluorometers or expendable fluorometers can also benefit from this study. The sensor costs US$150.00 and can be constructed with little to no previous experience. The sensor uses a blue LED to excite chlorophyll a and measures fluorescence using a silicon photodiode. The sensor is controlled by an Arduino microcontroller that also serves as a data logger.

  13. Telescope Array UHECR composition measurement via stereoscopic fluorescence observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stroman, Thomas; Bergman, Douglas; Telescope Array Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    When entering Earth's atmosphere at ultra-high energies, cosmic rays (UHECRs) produce extensive air showers whose longitudinal development is influenced by the incident primary particle's mass. Each longitudinal shower profile reaches its maximum particle count at an atmospheric slant depth Xmax, and the distributions of observed Xmax values can be compared to those predicted by detailed simulations of the air-shower physics and the detector; accurately simulated compositions that most closely resemble that found in nature will produce the best agreement between predicted and observed Xmax distributions. This is the basis of composition measurement at the Telescope Array experiment, the largest and most sensitive UHECR detector in the northern hemisphere. At the perimeter of a large surface-detector array are three fluorescence telescope stations, whose overlapping apertures enable high-precision reconstruction of Xmax from stereoscopic observation of air-shower longitudinal profiles. We present the distribution of Xmax observed during eight years of operation, and from comparisons with several simulated combinations of composition and high-energy hadronic physics, we show that a low primary mass is favored at E >10 18 . 2 eV.

  14. In situ Measurements of Phytoplankton Fluorescence Using Low Cost Electronics

    PubMed Central

    Leeuw, Thomas; Boss, Emmanuel S.; Wright, Dana L.

    2013-01-01

    Chlorophyll a fluorometry has long been used as a method to study phytoplankton in the ocean. In situ fluorometry is used frequently in oceanography to provide depth-resolved estimates of phytoplankton biomass. However, the high price of commercially manufactured in situ fluorometers has made them unavailable to some individuals and institutions. Presented here is an investigation into building an in situ fluorometer using low cost electronics. The goal was to construct an easily reproducible in situ fluorometer from simple and widely available electronic components. The simplicity and modest cost of the sensor makes it valuable to students and professionals alike. Open source sharing of architecture and software will allow students to reconstruct and customize the sensor on a small budget. Research applications that require numerous in situ fluorometers or expendable fluorometers can also benefit from this study. The sensor costs US$150.00 and can be constructed with little to no previous experience. The sensor uses a blue LED to excite chlorophyll a and measures fluorescence using a silicon photodiode. The sensor is controlled by an Arduino microcontroller that also serves as a data logger. PMID:23783738

  15. Novel fluo-4 analogs for fluorescent calcium measurements.

    PubMed

    Martin, Vladimir V; Beierlein, Michael; Morgan, Josh L; Rothe, Anca; Gee, Kyle R

    2004-12-01

    We report new fluorescent calcium indicators based on fluo-4. Attachment of a carboxamide or methylenecarboxamide moiety to the BAPTA chelator portion of fluo-4 allowed for the attachment of dextrans, protein-reactive moieties, and biotin. In particular, a high affinity fluo-4 dextran conjugate was prepared and shown to be functional in brain slices. All new probes were characterized spectroscopically and exhibited large fluorescence increases upon calcium-binding. The biotinylated version of fluo-4 formed a persistent streptavidin complex which still responded to increasing calcium concentrations with a large fluorescence increase.

  16. Laser-induced fluorescence, dispersed fluorescence and lifetime measurements of jet-cooled chloro-substituted benzyl radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamatani, Satoshi; Tsuji, Kazuhide; Kawai, Akio; Shibuya, Kazuhiko

    2002-07-01

    We measured the laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) and dispersed fluorescence (DF) spectra of jet-cooled α-, o- and m-chlorobenzyl radicals after they were generated by the 193 nm photolysis of the corresponding parent molecules. The vibronically resolved spectra were obtained to analyze their D1-D0 transitions. The fluorescence lifetimes of α-, o-, m- and p-chlorobenzyls in the zeroth vibrational levels of the D1 states were measured to estimate the oscillator strengths of a series of benzyl derivatives. It was found that the α-substitution is inefficient to break the `accidental forbiddenness' of the D1-D0 transition of benzyl, while the ring-substitution enhances the oscillator strength by 50%.

  17. Depolarization on Earth-space paths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Sources of depolarization effects on the propagation paths of orthogonally-polarized information channels are considered. The main sources of depolarization at millimeter wave frequencies are hydrometeor absorption and scattering in the troposphere. Terms are defined. Mathematical formulations for the effects of the propagation medium characteristics and antenna performance on signals in dual polarization Earth-space links are presented. Techniques for modeling rain and ice depolarization are discussed.

  18. Electron beam dispersion measurements in nitrogen using two-dimensional imaging of N2(+) fluorescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clapp, L. H.; Twiss, R. G.; Cattolica, R. J.

    1991-01-01

    Experimental results are presented related to the radial spread of fluorescence excited by 10 and 20 KeV electron beams passing through nonflowing rarefied nitrogen at 293 K. An imaging technique for obtaining species distributions from measured beam-excited fluorescence is described, based on a signal inversion scheme mathematically equivalent to the inversion of the Abel integral equation. From fluorescence image data, measurements of beam radius, integrated signal intensity, and spatially resolved distributions of N2(+) first-negative-band fluorescence-emitting species have been made. Data are compared with earlier measurements and with an heuristic beam spread model.

  19. Fluorescence measurements of the thermal control experiments coatings on LDEF S0069 and A0114

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zwiener, J. M.; Mell, R. J.; Peters, P. N.; Gregory, J. C.; Wilkes, D. R.; Miller, E. R.

    1993-01-01

    Fluorescence measurements were made on the thermal control coatings from the Long Duration Experiment Facility (LDEF) S0069, Thermal Control Surfaces Experiment (TCSE); and the A0114, Interaction of Atomic Oxygen with Material Surfaces in Low Earth orbit. Fluorescence was observed in two types of thermal control coatings and is attributed to pigments or binders. In addition, fluorescence measurement on the silver Teflon from the front cover of TCSE led to confirmation of damage (cracking) to the metal layers during application.

  20. Improving membrane voltage measurements using FRET with new fluorescent proteins.

    PubMed

    Tsutsui, Hidekazu; Karasawa, Satoshi; Okamura, Yasushi; Miyawaki, Atsushi

    2008-08-01

    We used two new coral fluorescent proteins as fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) donor and acceptor to develop a voltage sensor, named Mermaid, that displays approximately 40% changes in emission ratio per 100 mV, allowing for direct visualization of electrical activities in cultured excitable cells. Notably, Mermaid has fast on-off kinetics at warm (approximately 33 degrees C) temperatures and can report voltage spikes comparable to action potentials.

  1. Color measurements on prints containing fluorescent whitening agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersson, Mattias; Norberg, Ole

    2007-01-01

    Papers with a slightly blue shade are, at least among a majority of observers being perceived as whiter than papers having a more neutral color1. Therefore, practically all commercially available printing papers contain bluish dyes and fluorescent whitening agents (FWA) to give the paper a whiter appearance. Furthermore, in the paper industry, the most frequently used measure for paper whiteness is the CIE-whiteness. The CIE Whiteness formula, does in turn, also favor slightly bluish papers. Excessive examples of high CIE-whiteness values can be observed in the office-paper segment where a high CIE-whiteness value is an important sales argument. As an effect of the FWA, spectrophotometer measurements of optical properties such as paper whiteness are sensitive to the ultraviolet (UV) content of the light source used in the instrument. To address this, the standard spectrophotometers used in the paper industry are equipped with an adjustable filter for calibrating the UV-content of the illumination. In the paper industry, spectrophotometers with d/0 measurement geometry and a light source of type C are used. The graphical arts industry on the other hand, typically measures with spectrophotometers having 45/0 geometry and a light source of type A. Moreover, these instruments have only limited possibilities to adjust the UV-content by the use of different weighting filters. The standard for color measurements in the paper industry governs that measurements should be carried out using D65 standard illumination and the 10 ° standard observer. The corresponding standard for the graphic arts industry specify D50 standard illumination and the 2 ° standard observer. In both cases, the standard illuminants are simulated from the original light source by spectral weighting functions. However, the activation of FWA, which will impact the measured spectral reflectance, depends on the actual UV-content of the illumination used. Therefore, comparisons between measurements on

  2. A study of the fluorescence measurement using a 96-well microplate by a remodelled parallel luminescent measuring system.

    PubMed

    Kumae, T

    1999-01-01

    To develop an index to measure alveolar macrophage activity, the fluorescent technique for detection of calcium flux was paid special attention. In this study, a parallel luminescence measuring system was remodelled for fluorescence measurement using a 96-well microplate. The fluorescence indicators widely used to measure cytosolic free calcium ion concentration require excitation at ultraviolet (UV) wavelengths. Instruments to produce UV wavelengths are expensive compared to those used to produce visible wavelengths, and UV wavelengths are potentially injurious to cells. To avoid these problems, Fluo 3 (excitation wavelength in the visible range) was used as the fluorescent dye for detecting calcium ions. The parallel luminometer was remodelled successfully for fluorescent measurement as assessed by the results obtained from the measurements of a common fluorescent dye, fluorescein. Concentrations of free calcium ions were measured using Fluo 3 at 37 degrees C to consider the measurement of calcium flux in living cells. Although a linear relationship between concentrations of free calcium ions and fluorescence were observed, a diminution of fluorescence over time was also observed. To measure calcium flux in living cells, further instrumental and experimental improvements are thus needed. Copyright 1999 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Measuring solar induced chlorophyll fluorescence (SIF) in the Amazon rainforest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kornfeld, A.; Stutz, J.; Berry, J. A.

    2016-12-01

    Measurement of solar induced chlorophyll fluorescence (SIF) has, in our hands, been fraught with missteps and puzzling problems. Here we describe lessons we have learned and the resulting novel system recently installed in the Amazon rainforest near Manaus, Brazil. The system is designed to measure light from 740 - 780 nm, enabling us to compare SIF computed from Fraunhofer lines in an optically transparent band of the atmosphere (745 - 759 nm) with SIF computed using the telluric O2A band (760 - 770 nm). Fraunhofer line analysis requires high optical resolution (better than 0.2 nm) to detect the relatively narrow lines, but we discovered that fiber-optic diffraction-grating spectrometers are sensitive to very small inhomogeneities in the lighting. Errors resulting from this autocorrelated but random noise were similar in magnitude to the SIF signal itself. Optical diffusers reduce this problem, leading to our final design: a sealed cylinder, dubbed Rotaprism, in which a rotatable prism selects whether light from upward- or downward-looking windows enters an axially-placed optical fiber. Cosine-correcting opal glass covering the windows not only solves the noise issue but also makes the measurements correspond to photon flux. Rotaprism also maximizes the amount of light reaching the spectrometer - maximizing the signal:noise ratio - by avoiding the need for lossy optical switches and fiber splitters. Rotaprism is driven by a pneumatic actuator that is controlled by electronic valves attached to a pressurized N2 source. The gas exhausts into the temperature-controlled spectrometer enclosure to help purge the optics. Finally, custom software provides fault-tolerant control and data acquisition, ensuring that measurements continue with little or no intervention at the remote field site despite unreliable power. Analysis of initial data demonstrates the advantage of Fraunhofer line SIF analysis: due to the atmosphere transparency in this band, the results are more

  4. X-ray Fluorescence Measurements of Turbulent Methane-Oxygen Shear Coaxial Flames (Briefing Charts)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-01

    Briefing Charts 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) March 2015-May 2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE X-ray Fluorescence Measurements of Turbulent Methane -Oxygen Shear...1 DISTRIBUTION A: Approved for public release; distribution unlimited. Clearance # X-ray Fluorescence Measurements of Turbulent Methane -Oxygen Shear

  5. Determination of biological activity from fluorescence-lifetime measurements in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudek, F.; Baselt, T.; Lempe, B.; Taudt, C.; Hartmann, P.

    2015-03-01

    The importance of fluorescence lifetime measurement as an optical analysis tool is growing. Many applications already exist in order to determine the fluorescence lifetime, but the majority of these require the addition of fluorescence-active substances to enable measurements. Every usage of such foreign materials has an associated risk. This paper investigates the use of auto-fluorescing substances in Saccharomyces cerevisiae (Baker's yeast) as a risk free alternative to fluorescence-active substance enabled measurements. The experimental setup uses a nitrogen laser with a pulse length of 350 ps and a wavelength of 337 nm. The excited sample emits light due to fluorescence of NADH/NADPH and collagen. A fast photodiode collects the light at the output of an appropriate high-pass edge-filter at 400 nm. Fluorescence lifetimes can be determined from the decay of the measurement signals, which in turn characterizes the individual materials and their surrounding environment. Information about the quantity of the fluorescence active substances can also be measured based on the received signal intensity. The correlation between the fluorescence lifetime and the metabolic state of Saccharomyces cerevisiae was investigated and is presented here.

  6. Wavelength-resolved measurements of fluorescence lifetime of indocyanine green

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerega, Anna; Zolek, Norbert; Soltysinski, Tomasz; Milej, Daniel; Sawosz, Piotr; Toczylowska, Beata; Liebert, Adam

    2011-06-01

    We study fluorescence lifetime of indocyanine green (ICG) using femtosecond laser and sensitive detection based on time-correlated single-photon counting. A time-resolved multichannel spectral system is constructed and applied for determination of the fluorescence lifetime of the ICG in different solvents. Emission properties of ICG in water, milk, and 1% intralipid solution are investigated. Fluorescence of the fluorophore of different concentrations (in a range of 1.7-160 μM) dissolved in different solutions is excited by femtosecond pulses generated with the use of Ti:Sa laser tuned within the range of 740-790 nm. It is observed that fluorescence lifetime of ICG in water is 0.166 +/- 0.02 ns and does not depend on excitation and emission wavelengths. We also show that for the diffusely scattering solvents (milk and intralipid), the lifetime may depend on the dye concentration (especially for large concentrations of ICG). This effect should be taken into account when analyzing changes in the mean time of arrival of fluorescence photons excited in ICG dissolved in such optically turbid media.

  7. Temperature measurement by two-line laser-saturated OH fluorescence in flames.

    PubMed

    Lucht, R P; Laurendeau, N M; Sweeney, D W

    1982-10-15

    A technique is proposed and demonstrated for measuring combustion temperatures using two-line laser-saturated fluorescence. The rotational temperature of OH is determined by saturating two different rotational transitions in the (0,0) band of the A(2)Sigma(+)-X(2)II electronic system and detecting fluorescence emission which originates from the laser-pumped upper rotational levels. Temperature is calculated from the ratio of the fluorescence intensities for the two different excitation-emission pairs. The method is demonstrated by measuring temperature profiles in subatmospheric H(2)/O(2)/Ar flat flames. Temperatures measured by two-line saturated fluorescence are compared with temperatures measured by coated thermocouples and OH absorption and with predictions from an elementary chemical kinetics code. The temperatures measured by the two-line fluorescence technique are accurate to 3-5% and exhibit low random error.

  8. High precision optical fiber fluorescent temperature measurement system and data processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yutian; Bo, Xiaoxu; Gui, Feifei

    2010-08-01

    Generally, the theoretical analysis of the fluorescent life time temperature measurement is based on the assumption of the exponential life time characteristic, but in practice, the actual curve of the fluorescence are different from exponential. This is the key-influence on the stability of the high precision fluorescent measurement system. The differences are analyzed base on the theoretical mechanism of fluorescent, and a cutting and normalized method is given to describe the degree of the non-exponent of the actual fluorescent curve defer from the exponential curve. Several kinds of typical fluorescence materials spectrum and its cutting and normalized experiment results verify this theoretical analysis. Some effective measures to improve the non-exponent of the system are taken and are applied to a temperature measurement system based on actual fluorescent curve analysis with resolution 0.1°C, precisions +/-0.2°C, and real-time calibration is carried on. Based the theory base and the actuality of fluorescence optical fiber temperature sensor, two methods about fluorescence decay time constant are proposed. In the mean time, the mathematic model has been formed and analysis, so that the different schemes are selected in different situation.

  9. Repetitive Transient Depolarizations of the Inner Mitochondrial Membrane Induced by Proton Pumping

    PubMed Central

    Hattori, Tomohiro; Watanabe, Koichi; Uechi, Yukiko; Yoshioka, Hisashi; Ohta, Yoshihiro

    2005-01-01

    Single mitochondria show the spontaneous fluctuations of ΔΨm. In this study, to examine the mechanism of the fluctuations, we observed ΔΨm in single isolated heart mitochondria using time-resolved fluorescence microscopy. Addition of malate, succinate, or ascorbate plus TMPD to mitochondria induced polarization of the inner membrane followed by repeated cycles of rapid depolarizations and immediate repolarizations. ADP significantly decreased the frequency of the rapid depolarizations, but the ADP effect was counteracted by oligomycin. On the other hand, the rapid depolarizations did not occur when mitochondria were polarized by the efflux of K+ from the matrix. The rapid depolarizations became frequent with the increase in the substrate concentration or pH of the buffer. These results suggest that the rapid depolarizations depend on the net translocation of protons from the matrix. The frequency of the rapid depolarizations was not affected by ROS scavengers, Ca2+, CsA, or BA. In addition, the obvious increase in the permeability of the inner membrane to calcein (MW 623) that was entrapped in the matrix was not observed upon the transient depolarization. The mechanisms of the spontaneous oscillations of ΔΨm are discussed in relation to the matrix pH and the permeability transitions. PMID:15653749

  10. Frequency domain fluorescence lifetime microwell-plate platform for respirometry measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatni, M. R.; Yale, G.; Van Ryckeghem, A.; Porterfield, D. M.

    2010-04-01

    Traditionally micro-well plate based platforms used in biology utilize fluorescence intensity based methods to measure processes of biological relevance. However, fluorescence intensity measurements suffer from calibration drift due to a variety of factors. Photobleaching and self-quenching of the fluorescent dyes cause the intensity signal to drop over the lifetime of sensor immobilized inside the well. Variation in turbidity of the sample during the course of the measurement affects the measured fluorescence intensity. In comparison, fluorescence lifetime measurements are not significantly affected by these factors because fluorescence lifetime is a physico-chemical property of the fluorescent dye. Reliable and inexpensive frequency domain fluorescence lifetime instrumentation platforms are possible because the greater tolerance for optical alignment, and because they can be performed using inexpensive light sources such as LEDs. In this paper we report the development of a frequency domain fluorescence lifetime well-plate platform utilizing an oxygen sensitive transition-metal ligand complex fluorophore with a lifetime in the microsecond range. The fluorescence lifetime dye is incorporated in a polymer matrix and immobilized on the base of micro-well of a 60 well micro-well plate. Respiration measurements are performed in both aqueous and non-aqueous environment. Respirometry measurements were recorded from single Daphnia magna egg in hard water. Daphnia is an aquatic organism, important in environmental toxicology as a standard bioassay and early warning indicator for water quality monitoring. Also respirometry measurements were recorded from Tribolium castaneum eggs, which are common pests in the processed flour industry. These eggs were subjected to mitochondrial electron transport chain inhibitor such as potassium cyanide (KCN) and its effects on egg respiration were measured in real-time.

  11. Application of Atomic Fluorescence to Measurement of Combustion Temperature in Solid Propellants.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-12-04

    NO. NO. NO. .TITLE (Incdlude Secu,,ty CaaafiagonA .* . 11 2308 A3 11. App1 IcWtjon of Atomic Fluorescence to Measurement of Combustion...34"." . " Section 1 INTRODUCTION ~ This report describes experimental and theoretical investigations of laser-induced fluorescence as a diagnostic technique for...state. Through radiative and nonradiative decay processes, the F- and G- fluorescence levels become populated. The lifetime of the levels decreases

  12. Measurement of protein-like fluorescence in river and waste water using a handheld spectrophotometer.

    PubMed

    Baker, Andy; Ward, David; Lieten, Shakti H; Periera, Ryan; Simpson, Ellie C; Slater, Malcolm

    2004-07-01

    Protein-like fluorescence intensity in rivers increases with increasing anthropogenic DOM inputs from sewerage and farm wastes. Here, a portable luminescence spectrophotometer was used to investigate if this technology could be used to provide both field scientists with a rapid pollution monitoring tool and process control engineers with a portable waste water monitoring device, through the measurement of river and waste water tryptophan-like fluorescence from a range of rivers in NE England and from effluents from within two waste water treatment plants. The portable spectrophotometer determined that waste waters and sewerage effluents had the highest tryptophan-like fluorescence intensity, urban streams had an intermediate tryptophan-like fluorescence intensity, and the upstream river samples of good water quality the lowest tryptophan-like fluorescence intensity. Replicate samples demonstrated that fluorescence intensity is reproducible to +/- 20% for low fluorescence, 'clean' river water samples and +/- 5% for urban water and waste waters. Correlations between fluorescence measured by the portable spectrophotometer with a conventional bench machine were 0.91; (Spearman's rho, n = 143), demonstrating that the portable spectrophotometer does correlate with tryptophan-like fluorescence intensity measured using the bench spectrophotometer.

  13. Dynamic measurement of the height and volume of migrating cells by a novel fluorescence microscopy technique.

    PubMed

    Bottier, Céline; Gabella, Chiara; Vianay, Benoît; Buscemi, Lara; Sbalzarini, Ivo F; Meister, Jean-Jacques; Verkhovsky, Alexander B

    2011-11-21

    We propose a new technique to measure the volume of adherent migrating cells. The method is based on a negative staining where a fluorescent, non-cell-permeant dye is added to the extracellular medium. The specimen is observed with a conventional fluorescence microscope in a chamber of uniform height. Given that the fluorescence signal depends on the thickness of the emitting layer, the objects excluding the fluorescent dye (i.e., cells) appear dark, and the decrease of the fluorescent signal with respect to the background is expected to give information about the height and the volume of the object. Using a glass microfabricated pattern with steps of defined heights, we show that the drop in fluorescence intensity is indeed proportional to the height of the step and obtain calibration curves relating fluorescence intensity to height. The technique, termed the fluorescence displacement method, is further validated by comparing our measurements with the ones obtained by atomic force microscopy (AFM). We apply our method to measure the real-time volume dynamics of migrating fish epidermal keratocytes subjected to osmotic stress. The fluorescence displacement technique allows fast and precise monitoring of cell height and volume, thus providing a valuable tool for characterizing the three-dimensional behaviour of migrating cells.

  14. Depolarization Diffusion During Weak Suprathreshold Stimulation of Cardiac Tissue

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-10-25

    DEPOLARIZATION DIFFUSION DURING WEAK SUPRATHRESHOLD STIMULATION OF CARDIAC TISSUE Vladimir Nikolski, Aleksandre Sambelashvili, and Igor R. Efimov...the depolarized regions. Such an activation pattern appears similar to break activation. The effect of the depolarization diffusion from depolarized...Subtitle Depolarization Diffusion During Weak Suprathreshold Stimulation of Cardiac Tissue Contract Number Grant Number Program Element Number Author(s

  15. A new methodology for PBL height estimations based on lidar depolarization measurements: analysis and comparison against MWR and WRF model-based results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bravo-Aranda, Juan Antonio; de Arruda Moreira, Gregori; Navas-Guzmán, Francisco; José Granados-Muñoz, María; Guerrero-Rascado, Juan Luis; Pozo-Vázquez, David; Arbizu-Barrena, Clara; José Olmo Reyes, Francisco; Mallet, Marc; Alados Arboledas, Lucas

    2017-06-01

    The automatic and non-supervised detection of the planetary boundary layer height (zPBL) by means of lidar measurements was widely investigated during the last several years. Despite considerable advances, the experimental detection still presents difficulties such as advected aerosol layers coupled to the planetary boundary layer (PBL) which usually produces an overestimation of the zPBL. To improve the detection of the zPBL in these complex atmospheric situations, we present a new algorithm, called POLARIS (PBL height estimation based on lidar depolarisation). POLARIS applies the wavelet covariance transform (WCT) to the range-corrected signal (RCS) and to the perpendicular-to-parallel signal ratio (δ) profiles. Different candidates for zPBL are chosen and the selection is done based on the WCT applied to the RCS and δ. We use two ChArMEx (Chemistry-Aerosol Mediterranean Experiment) campaigns with lidar and microwave radiometer (MWR) measurements, conducted in 2012 and 2013, for the POLARIS' adjustment and validation. POLARIS improves the zPBL detection compared to previous methods based on lidar measurements, especially when an aerosol layer is coupled to the PBL. We also compare the zPBL provided by the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) numerical weather prediction (NWP) model with respect to the zPBL determined with POLARIS and the MWR under Saharan dust events. WRF underestimates the zPBL during daytime but agrees with the MWR during night-time. The zPBL provided by WRF shows a better temporal evolution compared to the MWR during daytime than during night-time.

  16. Photonic reagents for concentration measurement of flu-orescent proteins with overlapping spectra

    PubMed Central

    Goun, Alexei; Bondar, Denys I.; Er, Ali O.; Quine, Zachary; Rabitz, Herschel A.

    2016-01-01

    By exploiting photonic reagents (i.e., coherent control by shaped laser pulses), we employ Optimal Dynamic Discrimination (ODD) as a novel means for quantitatively characterizing mixtures of fluorescent proteins with a large spectral overlap. To illustrate ODD, we simultaneously measured concentrations of in vitro mixtures of Enhanced Blue Fluorescent Protein (EBFP) and Enhanced Cyan Fluorescent Protein (ECFP). Building on this foundational study, the ultimate goal is to exploit the capabilities of ODD for parallel monitoring of genetic and protein circuits by suppressing the spectral cross-talk among multiple fluorescent reporters. PMID:27181496

  17. Photonic reagents for concentration measurement of flu-orescent proteins with overlapping spectra.

    PubMed

    Goun, Alexei; Bondar, Denys I; Er, Ali O; Quine, Zachary; Rabitz, Herschel A

    2016-05-16

    By exploiting photonic reagents (i.e., coherent control by shaped laser pulses), we employ Optimal Dynamic Discrimination (ODD) as a novel means for quantitatively characterizing mixtures of fluorescent proteins with a large spectral overlap. To illustrate ODD, we simultaneously measured concentrations of in vitro mixtures of Enhanced Blue Fluorescent Protein (EBFP) and Enhanced Cyan Fluorescent Protein (ECFP). Building on this foundational study, the ultimate goal is to exploit the capabilities of ODD for parallel monitoring of genetic and protein circuits by suppressing the spectral cross-talk among multiple fluorescent reporters.

  18. Photonic reagents for concentration measurement of flu-orescent proteins with overlapping spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goun, Alexei; Bondar, Denys I.; Er, Ali O.; Quine, Zachary; Rabitz, Herschel A.

    2016-05-01

    By exploiting photonic reagents (i.e., coherent control by shaped laser pulses), we employ Optimal Dynamic Discrimination (ODD) as a novel means for quantitatively characterizing mixtures of fluorescent proteins with a large spectral overlap. To illustrate ODD, we simultaneously measured concentrations of in vitro mixtures of Enhanced Blue Fluorescent Protein (EBFP) and Enhanced Cyan Fluorescent Protein (ECFP). Building on this foundational study, the ultimate goal is to exploit the capabilities of ODD for parallel monitoring of genetic and protein circuits by suppressing the spectral cross-talk among multiple fluorescent reporters.

  19. Intestine pH measurements using fluorescence imaging: an in-vivo preliminary study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marechal, Xavier-Marie; Mordon, Serge R.; Devoisselle, Jean-Marie; Begu, Sylvie; Mathieu, D.; Buys, Bruno; Dhelin, Guy; Lesage, Jean C.; Neviere, Remi; Chopin, Claude

    1999-02-01

    Measurement of gastrointestinal intramucosal pH has been recognized as an important factor in the detection of hypoxia-induced dysfunctions. However, current pH measurement techniques are limited in terms of time and spatial resolution. A major advance in accurate pH measurement was the development of the ratiometric fluorescent indicator dye, 2',7'-bis(carboxyethyl)-4,5- carboxyfluorescein (BCECF). This study aimed to demonstrate the feasibility of fluorescence imaging technique to measure in vivo the pH of intestine. The intestine was inserted in an optical chamber placed under a microscope. Animals were injected i.v. with the pH-sensitive fluorescent dye BCECF. Fluorescence was visualized by illuminating the intestine alternately at 490 and 470 nm. The emitted fluorescence was directed to an intensified camera. The ratio of emitted fluorescence at excitation wavelengths of 490 and 470 nm was measured, corrected and converted to pH by constructing a calibration curve. The pH controls were performed with a pH microelectrode correlated with venous blood gas sampling. We concluded that accurate pH measurements of rat intestine can be obtained by fluorescence imaging using BCECF. This technology could be easily adapted for endoscopic pH measurement.

  20. Boreal tree pollen sensed by polarization lidar: Depolarizing biogenic chaff

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sassen, Kenneth

    2008-09-01

    Polarization (0.694 μm) lidar measurements show that tree pollen can generate strong laser depolarization in the backscatter from the lower atmosphere. Examples are given illustrating that linear depolarization ratios up to 0.3 are measured in plumes of paper birch pollen at the onset of boreal forest green-out. These pollen are ~25 μm in diameter and near-spherical in shape, but with lobes protruding from a surface membrane, which appears to produce the depolarization. Similar lidar findings are frequently observed during the summer at Fairbanks, Alaska, indicating that various types of seasonal pollen releases may be identified by polarization lidar. This scattering behavior is likely a general attribute of pollen and other suspended biogenic debris, which has implications for benefiting human health. This source of laser depolarization should not be confused with the presence of airborne dust or certain pollution particles, but is a natural background aerosol component caused by plant reproduction, as should be recognized in current global polarization lidar aerosol research using the CALIPSO satellite.

  1. Physically Realizable Space for the Purity-Depolarization Plane for Polarized Light Scattering Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tariq, Aziz; Li, Pengcheng; Chen, Dongsheng; Lv, Donghong; Ma, Hui

    2017-07-01

    We propose a physically realizable space for the polarized light scattering measurement using the Stokes-Mueller formalism by a purity-index-depolarization-index (PI -PΔ ) plane. The parameter PI is defined from indices of polarimetric purity (IPP), which exhibits the overall magnitude of the polarimetric randomness of a medium, while the depolarization index (PΔ ) delineates a proper global degree of polarimetric purity and may also refer to the average measure of depolarization power of the scattering medium. Subregions and curves connecting the edge points in the plane are obtained by imposing certain constraints on the IPP; consequently any point on the subregion indicates the information related to a decomposition of the Mueller matrix into its components as a convex sum. From the same set of constraints, complete information about the depolarization index versus the entropy [S (M ) -PΔ ] diagram is recovered. This work provides a simple geometric representation and a deeper perceptivity of the light scattering media comprising depolarization.

  2. Investigation of Laser Induced Fluorescence for Concentration Measurements of Diatomic Sulfur.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-12-01

    Once the spectrum was obtained, it was calibrated with N2 laser scatter and a mercury reference run. Fluorescence peaks were identified by com... Freddie , Jr. The Measurement of Quenching Rate Constants Using Fluorescence Emission. MS Thesis. Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio: Air Force Institute

  3. Measuring actin dynamics during phagocytosis using photo-switchable fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovari, Daniel T.; Curtis, Jennifer E.

    2013-03-01

    Phagocytosis has traditionally been investigated in terms of the relevant biochemical signaling pathways. However, a growing number of studies investigating the physical aspects of phagocytosis have demonstrated that several distinct forces are exerted throughout particle ingestion. We use variations on FRAP (Fluorescence Recovery After Photobleaching) in combination with photo-switchable fluorescent protein to investigate actin dynamics as a phagocyte attempts to engulf its prey. The goal of our actin studies are to determine the recruitment and polymerization rate of actin in the forming phagosome and whether an organized contractile actin ring is present and responsible for phagosome closure, as proposed in the literature. These experiments are ongoing and contribute to our long term effort of developing a physics based model of phagocytosis.

  4. Dihydropyridine Receptors as Voltage Sensors for a Depolarization-evoked, IP3R-mediated, Slow Calcium Signal in Skeletal Muscle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Araya, Roberto; Liberona, José L.; Cárdenas, J. César; Riveros, Nora; Estrada, Manuel; Powell, Jeanne A.; Carrasco, M. Angélica; Jaimovich, Enrique

    2003-01-01

    The dihydropyridine receptor (DHPR), normally a voltage-dependent calcium channel, functions in skeletal muscle essentially as a voltage sensor, triggering intracellular calcium release for excitation-contraction coupling. In addition to this fast calcium release, via ryanodine receptor (RYR) channels, depolarization of skeletal myotubes evokes slow calcium waves, unrelated to contraction, that involve the cell nucleus (Jaimovich, E., R. Reyes, J.L. Liberona, and J.A. Powell. 2000. Am. J. Physiol. Cell Physiol. 278:C998–C1010). We tested the hypothesis that DHPR may also be the voltage sensor for these slow calcium signals. In cultures of primary rat myotubes, 10 μM nifedipine (a DHPR inhibitor) completely blocked the slow calcium (fluo-3-fluorescence) transient after 47 mM K+ depolarization and only partially reduced the fast Ca2+ signal. Dysgenic myotubes from the GLT cell line, which do not express the α1 subunit of the DHPR, did not show either type of calcium transient following depolarization. After transfection of the α1 DNA into the GLT cells, K+ depolarization induced slow calcium transients that were similar to those present in normal C2C12 and normal NLT cell lines. Slow calcium transients in transfected cells were blocked by nifedipine as well as by the G protein inhibitor, pertussis toxin, but not by ryanodine, the RYR inhibitor. Since slow Ca2+ transients appear to be mediated by IP3, we measured the increase of IP3 mass after K+ depolarization. The IP3 transient seen in control cells was inhibited by nifedipine and was absent in nontransfected dysgenic cells, but α1-transfected cells recovered the depolarization-induced IP3 transient. In normal myotubes, 10 μM nifedipine, but not ryanodine, inhibited c-jun and c-fos mRNA increase after K+ depolarization. These results suggest a role for DHPR-mediated calcium signals in regulation of early gene expression. A model of excitation-transcription coupling is presented in which both G proteins and IP

  5. Space-resolved fluorescence spectroscopic measurements with an optical fiber probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Enbang; Qiu, Hialin

    2008-12-01

    By monitoring of the emitted signal from a sample while varying the excitation wavelength, emission wavelength or both of them, fluorescence spectroscopy has become a powerful diagnostic technology. Fluorescence spectrometers can be used to measure and record the fluorescence spectra of a given sample, and have been successfully applied in different areas including biology, biochemistry, chemistry, medicine, environmental science, material science, food industry, and pharmaceutical industry. In order to increase the flexibility and applicability of conventional fluorescence spectrometers, we design an optic fiber probe for conducting the UV/Vis excitation light to a sample under study, and for collecting the fluorescence produced by the sample. Different excitation/emission fiber bundle arrangements have been fabricated and their performances have been evaluated and compared. Fiber adaptors which can be used for different commercial fluorescence spectrometers are also developed. In order to achieve space-resolved fluorescence spectroscopic measurements, we connect the fiber probe to a microscope which is mounted on a 3D traverse stage. Experiments and measurement results using the space-resolved fiber optic fluorescence spectrometer are presented in this paper.

  6. Differential matrix formalism for depolarizing anisotropic media.

    PubMed

    Ossikovski, Razvigor

    2011-06-15

    Azzam's differential matrix formalism [J. Opt. Soc. Am. 68, 1756 (1978)], originally developed for longitudinally inhomogeneous anisotropic nondepolarizing media, is extended to include depolarizing media. The generalization is physically interpreted in terms of means and uncertainties of the elementary optical properties of the medium, as well as of three anisotropy absorption parameters introduced to describe the depolarization. The formalism results in a particularly simple mathematical procedure for the retrieval of the elementary properties of a generally depolarizing anisotropic medium, assumed to be globally homogeneous, from its experimental Mueller matrix. The approach is illustrated on literature data and the conditions of its validity are identified and discussed.

  7. Red and far red Sun-induced chlorophyll fluorescence as a measure of plant photosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossini, M.; Nedbal, L.; Guanter, L.; Ač, A.; Alonso, L.; Burkart, A.; Cogliati, S.; Colombo, R.; Damm, A.; Drusch, M.; Hanus, J.; Janoutova, R.; Julitta, T.; Kokkalis, P.; Moreno, J.; Novotny, J.; Panigada, C.; Pinto, F.; Schickling, A.; Schüttemeyer, D.; Zemek, F.; Rascher, U.

    2015-03-01

    Remote estimation of Sun-induced chlorophyll fluorescence emitted by terrestrial vegetation can provide an unparalleled opportunity to track spatiotemporal variations of photosynthetic efficiency. Here we provide the first direct experimental evidence that the two peaks of the chlorophyll fluorescence spectrum can be accurately mapped from high-resolution radiance spectra and that the signal is linked to variations in actual photosynthetic efficiency. Red and far red fluorescence measured using a novel airborne imaging spectrometer over a grass carpet treated with an herbicide known to inhibit photosynthesis was significantly higher than the corresponding signal from an equivalent untreated grass carpet. The reflectance signal of the two grass carpets was indistinguishable, confirming that the fast dynamic changes in fluorescence emission were related to variations in the functional status of actual photosynthesis induced by herbicide application. Our results from a controlled experiment at the local scale illustrate the potential for the global mapping of terrestrial photosynthesis through space-borne measurements of chlorophyll fluorescence.

  8. Temperature dependent steady state and picosecond kinetic fluorescence measurements of a photosystem I preparation from spinach

    SciTech Connect

    Mukerji, I.; Sauer, K.

    1988-08-01

    The fluorescence properties of a photosystem I (PSI) preparation from spinach containing approximately 200 chlorophyll (Chl) per reaction center were investigated. The preparation, characterized both spectroscopically and biochemically, contained the peripheral light harvesting antenna associated with PSI. In this study steady state fluorescence measurements were performed as a function of temperature. An emission maximum at 690 nm and a long wavelength shoulder from 710 to 740 nm were observed. The fluorescence yield at 690 nm is temperature independent, while the yield of the long wavelength shoulder increases dramatically with decreasing temperature. Additionally, kinetic measurements using the technique of single photon counting were done at room temperature and 77K. At 295K a four component fit was needed to describe the fluorescence decay; whereas at 77K, an additional 40-50 ps rise component indicative of fluorescence induction was necessary. 28 refs., 13 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Measurements of the Ultraviolet Fluorescence Cross Sections and Spectra of Bacillus Anthracis Simulants

    SciTech Connect

    Stephens, J.R.

    1998-09-01

    Measurements of the ultraviolet autofluorescence spectra and absolute cross sections of the Bacillus anthracis (Ba) simulants Bacillus globigii (Bg), Bacillus megaterium (Bm), Bacillus subtilis (Bs), and Bacillus cereus (Bc) were measured. Fluorescence spectra and cross sections of pine pollen (Pina echinata) were measured for comparison. Both dried vegetative cells and spores separated from the sporulated vegetative material were studied. The spectra were obtained by suspending a small number (<10) of particles in air in our Single Particle Spectroscopy Apparatus (SPSA), illuminating the particles with light from a spectrally filtered arc lamp, and measuring the fluorescence spectra of the particles. The illumination was 280 nm (20 nm FWHM) and the fluorescence spectra was measured between 300 and 450 nm. The fluorescence cross section of vegetative Bg peaks at 320 nm with a maximum cross section of 5 X 10{sup -14} cm{sup 2}/sr-nm-particle while the Bg spore fluorescence peaks at 310 nm with peak fluorescence of 8 X 10{sup -15} cm{sup 2}/sr-nm-particle. Pine pollen particles showed a higher fluorescence peaking at 355 nm with a cross section of 1.7 X 10{sup -13} cm{sup 2}/sr-nm-particle. Integrated cross sections ranged from 3.0 X 10{sup -13} for the Bg spores through 2.25 X 10{sup -12} (cm{sup 2}/sr-particle) for the vegetative cells.

  10. Migraine prophylaxis, ischemic depolarizations and stroke outcomes in mice

    PubMed Central

    Eikermann-Haerter, Katharina; Lee, Jeong Hyun; Yalcin, Nilufer; Yu, Esther Sori; Daneshmand, Ali; Wei, Ying; Zheng, Yi; Can, Anil; Sengul, Buse; Ferrari, Michel D.; van den Maagdenberg, Arn M. J. M.; Ayata, Cenk

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose Migraine with aura is an established stroke risk factor, and excitatory mechanisms such as spreading depression are implicated in the pathogenesis of both migraine and stroke. Spontaneous spreading depression waves originate within the peri-infarct tissue and exacerbate the metabolic mismatch during focal cerebral ischemia. Genetically enhanced spreading depression susceptibility facilitates anoxic depolarizations and peri-infarct spreading depressions and accelerates infarct growth, suggesting that susceptibility to spreading depression is a critical determinant of vulnerability to ischemic injury. Because chronic treatment with migraine prophylactic drugs suppresses spreading depression susceptibility, we tested whether migraine prophylaxis can also suppress ischemic depolarizations and improve stroke outcome. Methods We measured the cortical susceptibility to spreading depression and ischemic depolarizations, and determined tissue and neurological outcome after middle cerebral artery occlusion in wild type and familial hemiplegic migraine type 1 knock-in mice treated with vehicle, topiramate or lamotrigine daily for 7 weeks or as a single dose shortly before testing. Results Chronic treatment with topiramate or lamotrigine reduces the susceptibility to KCl- or electrical stimulation-induced spreading depressions as well as ischemic depolarizations in both wild-type and familial hemiplegic migraine type 1 mutant mice. Consequently, both tissue and neurological outcomes are improved. Notably, treatment with a single dose of either drug is ineffective. Conclusions These data underscore the importance of hyperexcitability as a mechanism for increased stroke risk in migraineurs, and suggest that migraine prophylaxis may not only prevent migraine attacks but also protect migraineurs against ischemic injury. PMID:25424478

  11. Migraine prophylaxis, ischemic depolarizations, and stroke outcomes in mice.

    PubMed

    Eikermann-Haerter, Katharina; Lee, Jeong Hyun; Yalcin, Nilufer; Yu, Esther S; Daneshmand, Ali; Wei, Ying; Zheng, Yi; Can, Anil; Sengul, Buse; Ferrari, Michel D; van den Maagdenberg, Arn M J M; Ayata, Cenk

    2015-01-01

    Migraine with aura is an established stroke risk factor, and excitatory mechanisms such as spreading depression (SD) are implicated in the pathogenesis of both migraine and stroke. Spontaneous SD waves originate within the peri-infarct tissue and exacerbate the metabolic mismatch during focal cerebral ischemia. Genetically enhanced SD susceptibility facilitates anoxic depolarizations and peri-infarct SDs and accelerates infarct growth, suggesting that susceptibility to SD is a critical determinant of vulnerability to ischemic injury. Because chronic treatment with migraine prophylactic drugs suppresses SD susceptibility, we tested whether migraine prophylaxis can also suppress ischemic depolarizations and improve stroke outcome. We measured the cortical susceptibility to SD and ischemic depolarizations, and determined tissue and neurological outcomes after middle cerebral artery occlusion in wild-type and familial hemiplegic migraine type 1 knock-in mice treated with vehicle, topiramate or lamotrigine daily for 7 weeks or as a single dose shortly before testing. Chronic treatment with topiramate or lamotrigine reduced the susceptibility to KCl-induced or electric stimulation-induced SDs as well as ischemic depolarizations in both wild-type and familial hemiplegic migraine type 1 mutant mice. Consequently, both tissue and neurological outcomes were improved. Notably, treatment with a single dose of either drug was ineffective. These data underscore the importance of hyperexcitability as a mechanism for increased stroke risk in migraineurs, and suggest that migraine prophylaxis may not only prevent migraine attacks but also protect migraineurs against ischemic injury. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  12. Confidence Intervals for Concentration and Brightness from Fluorescence Fluctuation Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Pryse, Kenneth M.; Rong, Xi; Whisler, Jordan A.; McConnaughey, William B.; Jiang, Yan-Fei; Melnykov, Artem V.; Elson, Elliot L.; Genin, Guy M.

    2012-01-01

    The theory of photon count histogram (PCH) analysis describes the distribution of fluorescence fluctuation amplitudes due to populations of fluorophores diffusing through a focused laser beam and provides a rigorous framework through which the brightnesses and concentrations of the fluorophores can be determined. In practice, however, the brightnesses and concentrations of only a few components can be identified. Brightnesses and concentrations are determined by a nonlinear least-squares fit of a theoretical model to the experimental PCH derived from a record of fluorescence intensity fluctuations. The χ2 hypersurface in the neighborhood of the optimum parameter set can have varying degrees of curvature, due to the intrinsic curvature of the model, the specific parameter values of the system under study, and the relative noise in the data. Because of this varying curvature, parameters estimated from the least-squares analysis have varying degrees of uncertainty associated with them. There are several methods for assigning confidence intervals to the parameters, but these methods have different efficacies for PCH data. Here, we evaluate several approaches to confidence interval estimation for PCH data, including asymptotic standard error, likelihood joint-confidence region, likelihood confidence intervals, skew-corrected and accelerated bootstrap (BCa), and Monte Carlo residual resampling methods. We study these with a model two-dimensional membrane system for simplicity, but the principles are applicable as well to fluorophores diffusing in three-dimensional solution. Using simulated fluorescence fluctuation data, we find the BCa method to be particularly well-suited for estimating confidence intervals in PCH analysis, and several other methods to be less so. Using the BCa method and additional simulated fluctuation data, we find that confidence intervals can be reduced dramatically for a specific non-Gaussian beam profile. PMID:23009839

  13. 5-Aminolevulinic Acid-Induced Protoporphyrin IX Fluorescence in Meningioma: Qualitative and Quantitative Measurements In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Valdes, Pablo A.; Bekelis, Kimon; Harris, Brent T.; Wilson, Brian C.; Leblond, Frederic; Kim, Anthony; Simmons, Nathan E.; Erkmen, Kadir; Paulsen, Keith D.; Roberts, David W.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND The use of 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA)-induced protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) fluorescence has shown promise as a surgical adjunct for maximizing the extent of surgical resection in gliomas. To date, the clinical utility of 5-ALA in meningiomas is not fully understood, with most descriptive studies using qualitative approaches to 5-ALA-PpIX. OBJECTIVE To assess the diagnostic performance of 5-ALA-PpIX fluorescence during surgical resection of meningioma. METHODS ALA was administered to 15 patients with meningioma undergoing PpIX fluorescence-guided surgery at our institution. At various points during the procedure, the surgeon performed qualitative, visual assessments of fluorescence by using the surgical microscope, followed by a quantitative fluorescence measurement by using an intra-operative probe. Specimens were collected at each point for subsequent neuropathological analysis. Clustered data analysis of variance was used to ascertain a difference between groups, and receiver operating characteristic analyses were performed to assess diagnostic capabilities. RESULTS Red-pink fluorescence was observed in 80% (12/15) of patients, with visible fluorescence generally demonstrating a strong, homogenous character. Quantitative fluorescence measured diagnostically significant PpIX concentrations (CPpIx) in both visibly and nonvisibly fluorescent tissues, with significantly higher CPpIx in both visibly fluorescent (P < .001) and tumor tissue (P = .002). Receiver operating characteristic analyses also showed diagnostic accuracies up to 90% for differentiating tumor from normal dura. CONCLUSION ALA-induced PpIX fluorescence guidance is a potential and promising adjunct in accurately detecting neoplastic tissue during meningioma resective surgery. These results suggest a broader reach for PpIX as a biomarker for meningiomas than was previously noted in the literature. PMID:23887194

  14. Insect monitoring with fluorescence lidar techniques: field experiments.

    PubMed

    Guan, Zuguang; Brydegaard, Mikkel; Lundin, Patrik; Wellenreuther, Maren; Runemark, Anna; Svensson, Erik I; Svanberg, Sune

    2010-09-20

    Results from field experiments using a fluorescence lidar system to monitor movements of insects are reported. Measurements over a river surface were made at distances between 100 and 300 m, detecting, in particular, damselflies entering the 355 nm pulsed laser beam. The lidar system recorded the depolarized elastic backscattering and two broad bands of laser-induced fluorescence, with the separation wavelength at 500 nm. Captured species, dusted with characteristic fluorescent dye powders, could be followed spatially and temporally after release. Implications for ecological research are discussed.

  15. A unified planar measurement technique for compressible flows using laser-induced iodine fluorescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartfield, Roy J., Jr.; Hollo, Steven D.; Mcdaniel, James C.

    1992-01-01

    A unified laser-induced fluorescence technique for conducting planar measurements of temperature, pressure and velocity in nonreacting, highly compressible flows has been developed, validated and demonstrated. Planar fluorescence from iodine, seeded into air, was induced by an argon-ion laser and collected using a liquid-nitrogen cooled CCD camera. In the measurement technique, temperature is determined from the fluorescence induced with the laser operated broad band. Pressure and velocity are determined from the shape and position of the fluorescence excitation spectrum which is measured with the laser operated narrow band. The measurement approach described herein provides a means of obtaining accurate, spatially-complete maps of the primary flow field parameters in a wide variety of cold supersonic and transonic flows.

  16. A unified planar measurement technique for compressible flows using laser-induced iodine fluorescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartfield, Roy J., Jr.; Hollo, Steven D.; Mcdaniel, James C.

    1992-01-01

    A unified laser-induced fluorescence technique for conducting planar measurements of temperature, pressure and velocity in nonreacting, highly compressible flows has been developed, validated and demonstrated. Planar fluorescence from iodine, seeded into air, was induced by an argon-ion laser and collected using a liquid-nitrogen cooled CCD camera. In the measurement technique, temperature is determined from the fluorescence induced with the laser operated broad band. Pressure and velocity are determined from the shape and position of the fluorescence excitation spectrum which is measured with the laser operated narrow band. The measurement approach described herein provides a means of obtaining accurate, spatially-complete maps of the primary flow field parameters in a wide variety of cold supersonic and transonic flows.

  17. Platinum plasmonic nanostructure arrays for massively parallel single-molecule detection based on enhanced fluorescence measurements.

    PubMed

    Saito, Toshiro; Takahashi, Satoshi; Obara, Takayuki; Itabashi, Naoshi; Imai, Kazumichi

    2011-11-04

    We fabricated platinum bowtie nanostructure arrays producing fluorescence enhancement and evaluated their performance using two-photon photoluminescence and single-molecule fluorescence measurements. A comprehensive selection of suitable materials was explored by electromagnetic simulation and Pt was chosen as the plasmonic material for visible light excitation near 500 nm, which is preferable for multicolor dye-labeling applications like DNA sequencing. The observation of bright photoluminescence (λ = 500-600 nm) from each Pt nanostructure, induced by irradiation at 800 nm with a femtosecond laser pulse, clearly indicates that a highly enhanced local field is created near the Pt nanostructure. The attachment of a single dye molecule was attempted between the Pt triangles of each nanostructure by using selective immobilization chemistry. The fluorescence intensities of the single dye molecule localized on the nanostructures were measured. A highly enhanced fluorescence, which was increased by a factor of 30, was observed. The two-photon photoluminescence intensity and fluorescence intensity showed qualitatively consistent gap size dependence. However, the average fluorescence enhancement factor was rather repressed even in the nanostructure with the smallest gap size compared to the large growth of photoluminescence. The variation of the position of the dye molecule attached to the nanostructure may influence the wide distribution of the fluorescence enhancement factor and cause the rather small average value of the fluorescence enhancement factor.

  18. Intrinsic photosensitizer fluorescence measured using multi-diameter single-fiber spectroscopy in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Leeuwen-van Zaane, Floor; Gamm, Ute A.; van Driel, Pieter B. A. A.; Snoeks, Thomas J.; de Bruijn, Henriette S.; van der Ploeg-van den Heuvel, Angelique; Sterenborg, Henricus J. C. M.; Löwik, Clemens W.; Amelink, Arjen; Robinson, Dominic J.

    2014-01-01

    Quantification of fluorescence in vivo is complicated by the influence of tissue optical properties on the collected fluorescence signal. When tissue optical properties in the measurement volume are quantified, one can obtain the intrinsic fluorescence, which equals the product of fluorophore absorption coefficient and quantum yield. We applied this method to in vivo single-fiber fluorescence spectroscopy measurements on mouse tongue, skin, liver, and oral squamous cell carcinoma, where we detected intrinsic fluorescence spectra of the photosensitizers chlorin e6 and Bremachlorin at t=[3,4.5,6,24,48] h incubation time. We observed a tissue-dependent maximum of 35% variation in the total correction factor over the visible wavelength range. Significant differences in spectral shape over time between sensitizers were observed. Although the wavelength position of the fluorescence intensity maximum for ce6 shifted to the red, Bremachlorin showed a blue shift. Furthermore, the Bremachlorin peak appeared to be broader than the ce6 fluorescence peak. Intrinsic fluorescence intensity, which can be related to photosensitizer concentration, was decreasing for all time points but showed significantly more Bremachlorin present compared to ce6 at long incubation times. Results from this study can be used to define an optimal treatment protocol for Bremachlorin-based photodynamic therapy.

  19. Intrinsic photosensitizer fluorescence measured using multi-diameter single-fiber spectroscopy in vivo.

    PubMed

    van Leeuwen-van Zaane, Floor; Gamm, Ute A; van Driel, Pieter B A A; Snoeks, Thomas J; de Bruijn, Henriette S; van der Ploeg-van den Heuvel, Angelique; Sterenborg, Henricus J C M; Löwik, Clemens W; Amelink, Arjen; Robinson, Dominic J

    2014-01-01

    Quantification of fluorescence in vivo is complicated by the influence of tissue optical properties on the collected fluorescence signal. When tissue optical properties in the measurement volume are quantified, one can obtain the intrinsic fluorescence, which equals the product of fluorophore absorption coefficient and quantum yield. We applied this method to in vivo single-fiber fluorescence spectroscopy measurements on mouse tongue, skin, liver, and oral squamous cell carcinoma, where we detected intrinsic fluorescence spectra of the photosensitizers chlorin e6 and Bremachlorin at t=[3,4.5,6,24,48]  h incubation time. We observed a tissue-dependent maximum of 35% variation in the total correction factor over the visible wavelength range. Significant differences in spectral shape over time between sensitizers were observed. Although the wavelength position of the fluorescence intensity maximum for ce6 shifted to the red, Bremachlorin showed a blue shift. Furthermore, the Bremachlorin peak appeared to be broader than the ce6 fluorescence peak. Intrinsic fluorescence intensity, which can be related to photosensitizer concentration, was decreasing for all time points but showed significantly more Bremachlorin present compared to ce6 at long incubation times. Results from this study can be used to define an optimal treatment protocol for Bremachlorin-based photodynamic therapy.

  20. Measurement of the Fluorescence Quantum Yield Using a Spectrometer With an Integrating Sphere Detector

    PubMed Central

    Gaigalas, Adolfas K.; Wang, Lili

    2008-01-01

    A method is proposed for measuring the fluorescence quantum yield (QY) using a commercial spectrophotometer with a 150 mm integrating sphere (IS) detector. The IS detector is equipped with an internal cuvette holder so that absorbance measurements can be performed with the cuvette inside the IS. In addition, the spectrophotometer has a cuvette holder outside the IS for performing conventional absorbance measurements. It is shown that the fluorescence quantum yield can be obtained from a combination of absorbance measurements of the buffer and the analyte solution inside and outside the IS detector. Due to the simultaneous detection of incident and fluorescent photons, the absorbance measurements inside the IS need to be adjusted for the wavelength dependence of the photomultiplier detector and the wavelength dependence of the IS magnification factor. An estimate of the fluorescence emission spectrum is needed for proper application of the wavelength-dependent adjustments. Results are presented for fluorescein, quinine sulfate, myoglobin, rhodamine B and erythrosin B. The QY of fluorescein in 0.1 mol/L NaOH was determined as 0.90±0.02 where the uncertainty is equal to the standard deviation of three independent measurements. The method provides a convenient and rapid estimate of the fluorescence quantum yield. Refinements of the measurement model and the characteristics of the IS detector can in principle yield an accurate value of the absolute fluorescence quantum yield. PMID:27096110

  1. Optical fiber sensor system for oil contamination measurement based on 3D fluorescence spectrum parameterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shang, Liping; Shi, Jinshan

    2000-10-01

    In recent years oil contamination in water is more serious and destroys the mode of life and relation to water body environments. Excitation fluorescence method is one of the main approaches to monitor oil contamination on line. But average intensity of oil fluorescence only indicates its density, not indicates the type of contamination oil. Two-dimensional fluorescence spectrum is more difficult to determine the kind of oil, because the different oil has fluorescence spectrum overlapping to a great extent. In this paper, the 3D fluorescence spectrum parameterization is introduced. It can extract several characteristic parameters to measure the kid of oil to be measured. A prototype of optical fiber 3D fluorescence spectrum meter we developed carries out the identification of different oil types, such as crude oil, diesel oil and kerosene. The experiment arrangement conceived to measure pulse xenon lamp induced of oil component in water. The experiment results state clearly that the 3D fluorescence spectrum parameterization and software are successful to measure oil density and identify the type of oil in situ.

  2. Simulation of fluorescent measurements in the human skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meglinski, Igor V.; Sinichkin, Yurii P.; Utz, Sergei R.; Pilipenko, Helena A.

    1995-05-01

    Reflectance and fluorescence spectroscopy are successfully used for skin disease diagnostics. Human skin optical parameters are defined by its turbid, scattering properties with nonuniform absorption and fluorescence chromophores distribution, its multilayered structure, and variability under different physiological and pathological conditions. Theoretical modeling of light propagation in skin could improve the understanding of these condition and may be useful in the interpretation of in vivo reflectance and autofluorescence (AF) spectra. Laser application in medical optical tomography, tissue spectroscopy, and phototherapy stimulates the development of optical and mathematical light-tissue interaction models allowing to account the specific features of laser beam and tissue inhomogeneities. This paper presents the version of a Monte Carlo method for simulating of optical radiation propagation in biotissue and highly scattering media, allowing for 3D geometry of a medium. The simulation is based on use of Green's function of medium response to single external pulse. The process of radiation propagation is studied in the area with given boundary conditions, taking into account the processes of reflection and refraction at the boundaries of layers inside the medium under study. Results of Monte Carlo simulation were compared with experimental investigations and demonstrated good agreement.

  3. Tools and techniques to measure mitophagy using fluorescence microscopy.

    PubMed

    Dolman, Nick J; Chambers, Kevin M; Mandavilli, Bhaskar; Batchelor, Robert H; Janes, Michael S

    2013-11-01

    Mitophagy is a specialized form of autophagy that removes damaged mitochondria, thereby maintaining efficient cellular metabolism and reducing cellular stress caused by aberrant oxidative bursts. Deficits in mitophagy underlie several diseases, and a substantial body of research has elucidated key steps in the pathways that lead to and execute autophagic clearance of mitochondria. Many of these studies employ fluorescence microscopy to visualize mitochondrial morphology, mass, and functional state. Studies in this area also examine colocalization/recruitment of accessory factors, components of the autophagic machinery and signaling molecules to mitochondria. In this review, we provide a brief summary of the current understanding about the processes involved in mitophagy followed by a discussion of probes commonly employed and important considerations of the methodologies to study and analyze mitophagy using fluorescence microscopy. Representative data, where appropriate, are provided to highlight the use of key probes to monitor mitophagy. The review will conclude with a consideration of new possibilities for mitophagy research and a discussion of recently developed technologies for this emerging area of cell biology.

  4. Remote Sensing Plant Stress Using Combined Fluorescence and Reflectance Measurements for Early Detection of Defoliants within the Battlefield Environment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-10-02

    REPORT Remote sensing plant stress using combined fluorescence and reflectance measurements for early detection of defoliants within the battlefied...stress using combined fluorescence and reflectance measurements for early detection of defoliants within the battlefied environment Report Title...combined fluorescence and reflectance measurements for early detection of defoliants within the battlefield environment ARO Proposal # (49364-EV

  5. Measuring reactive oxygen and nitrogen species with fluorescent probes: challenges and limitations

    PubMed Central

    Kalyanaraman, Balaraman; Darley-Usmar, Victor; Davies, Kelvin J.A.; Dennery, Phyllis A.; Forman, Henry Jay; Grisham, Matthew B.; Mann, Giovanni E.; Moore, Kevin; Roberts, L. Jackson; Ischiropoulos, Harry

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this position paper is to present a critical analysis of the challenges and limitations of the most widely used fluorescent probes for detecting and measuring reactive oxygen and nitrogen species. Where feasible, we have made recommendations for the use of alternate probes and appropriate analytical techniques that measure the specific products formed from the reactions between fluorescent probes and reactive oxygen and nitrogen species. We have proposed guidelines that will help present and future researchers with regard to the optimal use of selected fluorescent probes and interpretation of results. PMID:22027063

  6. A bio-aerosol detection technique based on tryptophan intrinsic fluorescence measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Shuyao; Zhang, Pei; Zhu, Linglin; Zhao, Yongkai; Huang, Huijie

    2011-12-01

    Based on the measurement of intrinsic fluorescence, a set of bio-aerosol including virus aerosols detection instrument is developed, with which a method of calibration is proposed using tryptophan as the target. The experimental results show a good linear relationship between the fluorescence voltage of the instrument and the concentration of the tryptophan aerosol. An excellent correlation (R2>=0.99) with the sensitivity of 4000PPL is obtained. The research demonstrates the reliability of the bio-aerosol detection by measuring the content of tryptophan. Further more the feasibility of prejudgment to the species of bio-aerosol particles with the multi-channel fluorescence detection technology is discussed.

  7. Planar Laser-Induced Fluorescence fuel concentration measurements in isothermal Diesel sprays.

    PubMed

    Pastor, José; López, José; Juliá, J; Benajes, Jesús

    2002-04-08

    This paper presents a complete methodology to perform fuel concentration measurements of Diesel sprays in isothermal conditions using the Planar Laser-Induced Fluorescence (PLIF) technique. The natural fluorescence of a commercial Diesel fuel is used with an excitation wavelength of 355 nm. The correction and calibration procedures to perform accurate measurements are studied. These procedures include the study of the fluorescence characteristics of the fuel as well as the correction of the laser sheet non-homogeneities and the losses due to Mie scattering, absorption and autoabsorption. The results obtained are compared with theoretical models and other experimental techniques.

  8. Can Turbulence Dominate Depolarization of Optical Blazars?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Xiaotong; Mao, Jirong; Wang, Jiancheng

    2017-07-01

    We carefully examine the depolarization feature of blazars in the optical and near-infrared bands using the sample of Mead et al. Magnetohydrodynamics turbulence could be one possible reason for the depolarization of optical/infrared blazars when we apply the theoretical analysis of Lazarian & Pogosyan. We further identify in the sample that the depolarization results shown in most blazars roughly obey the form of the three-dimensional anisotropic Kolmogorov scaling. The effective Faraday rotation window length scale is not small enough to resolve the polarization correlation length scale in the blazar sample. The depolarization and the related turbulent features show diversities in different blazar sources. We suggest more simultaneous observations in both the optical/infrared and the high-energy bands for the study of the blazar polarization.

  9. Aberrations of a horizontal-vertical depolarizer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcclain, Stephen C.; Chipman, Russell A.; Hillman, Lloyd W.

    1992-01-01

    Ray-trace equations for uniaxial birefringent materials are used here to derive third-order estimates for aberrations that are produced in imaging through uniaxial plates and horizontal-vertical (HV) depolarizers. An HV depolarizer is a spatial pseudodepolarizer; it converts a uniform input polarization state into a continuum of spatially varying polarization states in an output beam. An HV depolarizer consists of two birefringent wedges whose crystal axes are crossed at 90 deg. The interface between the wedges is included, which leads to a spatially varying retardance that provides the spatial pseudodepolarization. In HV depolarizers, spherical aberration, astigmatism, and image doubling are the principal aberrations for on-axis objects. Only spherical aberration occurs in isotropic plates, while the presence of birefringent wedges introduces astigmatism and image doubling. It is shown that image separation is proportional to the magnitude of the retardance variation.

  10. Fluorescence coincidence spectroscopy for single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy-transfer measurements.

    PubMed

    Orte, Angel; Clarke, Richard W; Klenerman, David

    2008-11-15

    Single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) is commonly used to probe different conformations and conformational dynamics of single biomolecules. However, the analysis of raw burst traces is not always straightforward. The presence of a "zero peak" and the skewness of peaks at high and low FRET efficiencies in proximity ratio histograms make the accurate evaluation of the histogram a challenging task. This is further compounded by the difficulty associated with siting two fluorophores in optimal range of each other. Here we present an alternative method of analysis, based on handling coincident FRET photon bursts, that addresses these problems. In addition, we demonstrate methods to enhance coincidence levels and thus the accuracy of FRET determination: the use of dual-color excitation, including direct excitation of the acceptor fluorophore; the addition of a remote dye to the biomolecule, not involved in the FRET process; or a combination of the two. We show the advantages of dual excitation by studying several labeled double-stranded DNA samples as FRET models. This method extends the application of single-molecule FRET to more complicated biological systems where only a small fraction of complexes are fully assembled.

  11. On the Uncertainty in Single Molecule Fluorescent Lifetime and Energy Emission Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Emery N.; Zhang, Zhenhua; McCollom, Alex D.

    1996-01-01

    Time-correlated single photon counting has recently been combined with mode-locked picosecond pulsed excitation to measure the fluorescent lifetimes and energy emissions of single molecules in a flow stream. Maximum likelihood (ML) and least squares methods agree and are optimal when the number of detected photons is large, however, in single molecule fluorescence experiments the number of detected photons can be less than 20, 67 percent of those can be noise, and the detection time is restricted to 10 nanoseconds. Under the assumption that the photon signal and background noise are two independent inhomogeneous Poisson processes, we derive the exact joint arrival time probability density of the photons collected in a single counting experiment performed in the presence of background noise. The model obviates the need to bin experimental data for analysis, and makes it possible to analyze formally the effect of background noise on the photon detection experiment using both ML or Bayesian methods. For both methods we derive the joint and marginal probability densities of the fluorescent lifetime and fluorescent emission. The ML and Bayesian methods are compared in an analysis of simulated single molecule fluorescence experiments of Rhodamine 110 using different combinations of expected background noise and expected fluorescence emission. While both the ML or Bayesian procedures perform well for analyzing fluorescence emissions, the Bayesian methods provide more realistic measures of uncertainty in the fluorescent lifetimes. The Bayesian methods would be especially useful for measuring uncertainty in fluorescent lifetime estimates in current single molecule flow stream experiments where the expected fluorescence emission is low. Both the ML and Bayesian algorithms can be automated for applications in molecular biology.

  12. On the uncertainty in single molecule fluorescent lifetime and energy emission measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Emery N.; Zhang, Zhenhua; Mccollom, Alex D.

    1995-01-01

    Time-correlated single photon counting has recently been combined with mode-locked picosecond pulsed excitation to measure the fluorescent lifetimes and energy emissions of single molecules in a flow stream. Maximum likelihood (ML) and least square methods agree and are optimal when the number of detected photons is large however, in single molecule fluorescence experiments the number of detected photons can be less than 20, 67% of those can be noise and the detection time is restricted to 10 nanoseconds. Under the assumption that the photon signal and background noise are two independent inhomogeneous poisson processes, we derive the exact joint arrival time probably density of the photons collected in a single counting experiment performed in the presence of background noise. The model obviates the need to bin experimental data for analysis, and makes it possible to analyze formally the effect of background noise on the photon detection experiment using both ML or Bayesian methods. For both methods we derive the joint and marginal probability densities of the fluorescent lifetime and fluorescent emission. the ML and Bayesian methods are compared in an analysis of simulated single molecule fluorescence experiments of Rhodamine 110 using different combinations of expected background nose and expected fluorescence emission. While both the ML or Bayesian procedures perform well for analyzing fluorescence emissions, the Bayesian methods provide more realistic measures of uncertainty in the fluorescent lifetimes. The Bayesian methods would be especially useful for measuring uncertainty in fluorescent lifetime estimates in current single molecule flow stream experiments where the expected fluorescence emission is low. Both the ML and Bayesian algorithms can be automated for applications in molecular biology.

  13. Fluorescence measurement by a streak camera in a single-photon-counting mode.

    PubMed

    Komura, Masayuki; Itoh, Shigeru

    2009-01-01

    We describe here a recently developed fluorescence measurement system that uses a streak camera to detect fluorescence decay in a single photon-counting mode. This system allows for easy measurements of various samples and provides 2D images of fluorescence in the wavelength and time domains. The great advantage of the system is that the data can be handled with ease; furthermore, the data are amenable to detailed analysis. We describe the picosecond kinetics of fluorescence in spinach Photosystem (PS) II particles at 4-77 K as a typical experimental example. Through the global analysis of the data, we have identified a new fluorescence band (F689) in addition to the already established F680, F685, and F695 emission bands. The blue shift of the steady-state fluorescence spectrum upon cooling below 77 K can be interpreted as an increase of the shorter-wavelength fluorescence, especially F689, due to the slowdown of the excitation energy transfer process. The F685 and F695 bands seem to be thermally equilibrated at 77 K but not at 4 K. The simple and efficient photon accumulation feature of the system allows us to measure fluorescence from leaves, solutions, single colonies, and even single cells. The 2D fluorescence images obtained by this system are presented for isolated spinach PS II particles, intact leaves of Arabidopsis thaliana, the PS I super-complex of a marine centric diatom, Chaetoceros gracilis, isolated membranes of a purple photosynthetic bacterium, Acidiphilium rubrum, which contains Zn-BChl a, and a coral that contains a green fluorescent protein and an algal endosymbiont, Zooxanthella.

  14. A Depolarizing Electrogenic Pump in Frog Muscle

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-08-01

    mw copy AFRRI SR75-20 AUGUST 1975 AFRRI SCIENTIFIC REPORT O ■ to A DEPOLARIZING ELECTROGENIC PUMP IN FROG MUSCLE D. Geduldig D. R...Academy of Sciences - National Research Council. AFRRI SR75-20 August 1975 A DEPOLARIZING ELECTROGENIC PUMP IN FROG MUSCLE D. GEDULDIG* D. R...INTRODUCTION When Na-enriched frog muscles are bathed in Na- and K-free saline, the small amount of potassium which could accumulate outside of the membrane

  15. Lidar ratio and depolarization ratio for cirrus clouds.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei-Nai; Chiang, Chih-Wei; Nee, Jan-Bai

    2002-10-20

    We report on studies of the lidar and the depolarization ratios for cirrus clouds. The optical depth and effective lidar ratio are derived from the transmission of clouds, which is determined by comparing the backscattering signals at the cloud base and cloud top. The lidar signals were fitted to a background atmospheric density profile outside the cloud region to warrant the linear response of the return signals with the scattering media. An average lidar ratio, 29 +/- 12 sr, has been found for all clouds measured in 1999 and 2000. The height and temperature dependences ofthe lidar ratio, the optical depth, and the depolarization ratio were investigated and compared with results of LITE and PROBE. Cirrus clouds detected near the tropopause are usually optically thin and mostly subvisual. Clouds with the largest optical depths were found near 12 km with a temperature of approximately -55 degrees C. The multiple-scattering effect is considered for clouds with high optical depths, and this effect lowers the lidar ratios compared with a single-scattering condition. Lidar ratios are in the 20-40 range for clouds at heights of 12.5-15 km and are smaller than approximately 30 in height above 15 km. Clouds are usually optically thin for temperatures below approximately -65 degrees C, and in this region the optical depth tends to decrease with height. The depolarization ratio is found to increase with a height at 11-15 km and smaller than 0.3 above 16 km. The variation in the depolarization ratio with the lidar ratio was also reported. The lidar and depolarization ratios were discussed in terms of the types of hexagonal ice crystals.

  16. Fluorescence spectroscopy of kerosene vapour at high temperatures and pressures: potential for gas turbines measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orain, M.; Baranger, P.; Ledier, C.; Apeloig, J.; Grisch, F.

    2014-09-01

    Laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy of kerosene vapour was performed in a heated test cell operating between 450 and 900 K, at pressure from 0.1 to 3.0 MPa, for oxygen molar fraction between 0 and 21 %, with different laser excitation wavelengths (248, 266, 282 and 308 nm). Results show that, depending on the laser excitation scheme, kerosene fluorescence spectrum exhibits one or two fluorescence bands in the UV-visible range (attributed to aromatics naturally present in kerosene fuel). Fluorescence intensity of these bands decreases with increasing temperature, pressure and oxygen molar fraction. Different imaging strategies were derived from spectroscopic findings to simultaneously measure temperature and equivalence ratio fields in kerosene/air sprays, or flame structure and fuel spatial distribution in kerosene/air aeronautical combustors, by means of planar laser-induced fluorescence on kerosene vapour (K-PLIF).

  17. Subcellular localization-dependent changes in EGFP fluorescence lifetime measured by time-resolved flow cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Gohar, Ali Vaziri; Cao, Ruofan; Jenkins, Patrick; Li, Wenyan; Houston, Jessica P.; Houston, Kevin D.

    2013-01-01

    Intracellular protein transport and localization to subcellular regions are processes necessary for normal protein function. Fluorescent proteins can be fused to proteins of interest to track movement and determine localization within a cell. Currently, fluorescence microscopy combined with image processing is most often used to study protein movement and subcellular localization. In this contribution we evaluate a high-throughput time-resolved flow cytometry approach to correlate intracellular localization of human LC3 protein with the fluorescence lifetime of enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP). Subcellular LC3 localization to autophagosomes is a marker of the cellular process called autophagy. In breast cancer cells expressing native EGFP and EGFP-LC3 fusion proteins, we measured the fluorescence intensity and lifetime of (i) diffuse EGFP (ii) punctate EGFP-LC3 and (iii) diffuse EGFP-ΔLC3 after amino acid starvation to induce autophagy-dependent LC3 localization. We verify EGFP-LC3 localization with low-throughput confocal microscopy and compare to fluorescence intensity measured by standard flow cytometry. Our results demonstrate that time-resolved flow cytometry can be correlated to subcellular localization of EGFP fusion proteins by measuring changes in fluorescence lifetime. PMID:24010001

  18. [The analysis of sinusoidal modulated method used for measuring fluorescence lifetime].

    PubMed

    Feng, Ying; Huang, Shi-hua

    2007-12-01

    This paper has built a system with a sinusoidal modulated LED as the excitation source. Such exciter was used upon the sample Eu2 L'3 x nH2O (L' = C4H4O4). Both the excitation light and the 5Do-7F2 emission of Eu3+ ion were measured. Fluorescence lifetime, which approximate to 0.680 ms, can then be obtained from the measured excitation and fluorescence waveforms by non-linear least square curve fitting based on the principle of phase-shift measurement of fluorescence lifetime. Data processing methods considering respectively the high order harmonics in the modulation and multi-exponential decay of the fluorescence were discussed. A method of utilizing Fourier series expandedness to amendatory the result was put forward. Accordingly, the applicability for phase-shift method was expanded as well as a more exact result was acquired.

  19. Detecting and Quantifying Biomolecular Interactions of a Dendritic Polyglycerol Sulfate Nanoparticle Using Fluorescence Lifetime Measurements.

    PubMed

    Boreham, Alexander; Pikkemaat, Jens; Volz, Pierre; Brodwolf, Robert; Kuehne, Christian; Licha, Kai; Haag, Rainer; Dernedde, Jens; Alexiev, Ulrike

    2015-12-24

    Interactions of nanoparticles with biomaterials determine the biological activity that is key for the physiological response. Dendritic polyglycerol sulfates (dPGS) were found recently to act as an inhibitor of inflammation by blocking selectins. Systemic application of dPGS would present this nanoparticle to various biological molecules that rapidly adsorb to the nanoparticle surface or lead to adsorption of the nanoparticle to cellular structures such as lipid membranes. In the past, fluorescence lifetime measurements of fluorescently tagged nanoparticles at a molecular and cellular/tissue level have been proven to reveal valuable information on the local nanoparticle environment via characteristic fluorescent lifetime signatures of the nanoparticle bound dye. Here, we established fluorescence lifetime measurements as a tool to determine the binding affinity to fluorescently tagged dPGS (dPGS-ICC; ICC: indocarbocyanine). The binding to a cell adhesion molecule (L-selectin) and a human complement protein (C1q) to dPGS-ICC was evaluated by the concentration dependent change in the unique fluorescence lifetime signature of dPGS-ICC. The apparent binding affinity was found to be in the nanomolar range for both proteins (L-selectin: 87 ± 4 nM and C1q: 42 ± 12 nM). Furthermore, the effect of human serum on the unique fluorescence lifetime signature of dPGS-ICC was measured and found to be different from the interactions with the two proteins and lipid membranes. A comparison between the unique lifetime signatures of dPGS-ICC in different biological environments shows that fluorescence lifetime measurements of unique dPGS-ICC fluorescence lifetime signatures are a versatile tool to probe the microenvironment of dPGS in cells and tissue.

  20. Accurate modeling of fluorescence line narrowing difference spectra: Direct measurement of the single-site fluorescence spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reppert, Mike; Naibo, Virginia; Jankowiak, Ryszard

    2010-07-01

    Accurate lineshape functions for modeling fluorescence line narrowing (FLN) difference spectra (ΔFLN spectra) in the low-fluence limit are derived and examined in terms of the physical interpretation of various contributions, including photoproduct absorption and emission. While in agreement with the earlier results of Jaaniso [Proc. Est. Acad. Sci., Phys., Math. 34, 277 (1985)] and Fünfschilling et al. [J. Lumin. 36, 85 (1986)], the derived formulas differ substantially from functions used recently [e.g., M. Rätsep et al., Chem. Phys. Lett. 479, 140 (2009)] to model ΔFLN spectra. In contrast to traditional FLN spectra, it is demonstrated that for most physically reasonable parameters, the ΔFLN spectrum reduces simply to the single-site fluorescence lineshape function. These results imply that direct measurement of a bulk-averaged single-site fluorescence lineshape function can be accomplished with no complicated extraction process or knowledge of any additional parameters such as site distribution function shape and width. We argue that previous analysis of ΔFLN spectra obtained for many photosynthetic complexes led to strong artificial lowering of apparent electron-phonon coupling strength, especially on the high-energy side of the pigment site distribution function.

  1. Metal accumulation and toxicity measured by PAM--chlorophyll fluorescence in seven species of marine macroalgae.

    PubMed

    Baumann, Hans A; Morrison, Liam; Stengel, Dagmar B

    2009-05-01

    The effects of five metals, copper (Cu), chromium (Cr), Zinc (Zn), cadmium (Cd) and lead (Pb), on photosynthetic activity, measured as pulse amplitude modulation (PAM) chlorophyll fluorescence yield, was monitored in seven species of green, red and brown macroalgae over a 14d period. The 10micromoll(-1) of Cr and Zn reduced chlorophyll fluorescence of all species by day 4, and 10micromoll(-1) of Cu and Cd reduced the fluorescence of some species; however, fluorescence yields of all species were unaffected by 10micromoll(-1) of Pb. Metals were generally accumulated in the order of Cu>Pb>Zn>Cr>Cd. Ulva intestinalis accumulated the highest amounts of all metals, and Cladophora rupestris the lowest. A relationship between internal metal concentration and fluorescence was not always evident as in some cases fluorescence was reduced at low metal contents. In the case of Zn, fluorescence was lowest in plants which contained lowest concentrations after 14d-exposure, possibly because plants had died and Zn leached out of the algal cells. The relationship between internal metal concentration and fluorescence was algal species and metal-specific.

  2. Stimulation of high affinity gamma-aminobutyric acidB receptors potentiates the depolarization-induced increase of intraneuronal ionized calcium content in cerebellar granule neurons.

    PubMed

    De Erausquin, G; Brooker, G; Costa, E; Wojcik, W J

    1992-09-01

    In the treatment of spasticity, the therapeutic cerebrospinal fluid levels of (+/-)-baclofen, a gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)B receptor agonist, are below 1 microM. However, the mechanism of the therapeutic action of (+/-)-baclofen remains unknown, because, for the most part, the action of (+/-)-baclofen on GABAB receptors requires micromolar concentrations. Using fura-2 fluorescence microscopy, intracellular ionized calcium was measured in cerebellar granule neurons. Stimulation of a high affinity GABAB receptor potentiated by 2-3-fold the rise in intracellular calcium observed after depolarization of the cell with a Krebs Ringer's buffered solution containing 40 mM K+. Both GABA (100 nM) and (+/-)-baclofen (10-100 nM) stimulated this high affinity receptor. The potentiation of the depolarization-induced rise in intracellular calcium by (+/-)-baclofen (100 nM) was completely blocked by the GABAB receptor antagonist CGP 35348 (200 microM). Also, the intracellular calcium response induced by the activation of high affinity GABAB receptors was prevented by dantrolene (10 microM). The cerebellar granule neurons contained calcium-induced calcium release (CICR) stores. Caffeine (3 mM) and ryanodine (100 microM) potentiated the depolarization-induced rise in intracellular calcium, and this response to both drugs was blocked by dantrolene (10 microM). Because dantrolene does not prevent the rise in intracellular calcium after cell depolarization (this calcium originated from the influx of extracellular calcium), (+/-)-baclofen acting via the high affinity GABAB receptor indirectly activates the CICR stores, allowing the influx of extracellular calcium to trigger the release of calcium from these dantrolene-sensitive CICR stores. Thus, this high affinity GABAB receptor might become activated during persistent depolarization caused by pathological states and could be a mechanism to be studied for the therapeutic action of (+/-)-baclofen in spasticity.

  3. Fluorescence lifetime measurements in a flow cytometer by amplitude demodulation using digital data acquisition technique.

    PubMed

    Deka, C; Sklar, L A; Steinkamp, J A

    1994-09-01

    We have developed a method for fluorescence lifetime measurements in a flow cytometer based upon the amplitude demodulation of the fluorescence signals using digital data acquisition techniques. Amplitude demodulation is one of the two methods by which excited state lifetimes may be investigated in the frequency domain. The other method involves the phase-shift measurements. In frequency-domain measurement techniques, the amplitude-demodulation and phase-shift data serve mutually complementary roles to enhance the analytical capabilities of the measurements. The purpose of having amplitude demodulation measurement capability is to obtain information that supplements, rather than replaces, that obtained by the phase-shift method alone. Application of amplitude demodulation measurements has been widely explored in static, cuvette-based, frequency domain systems. However, due to time dependence of the amplitude of the modulated fluorescence signal in a flow cytometer, the amplitude demodulation measurements in flow turns out to be more complicated than similar measurements in a static system. The goal of the present work is to explore the problems involved in amplitude demodulation measurements in flow (using digital method), through detailed theoretical modeling and use the model to develop a practical method that can be incorporated into a flow cytometer to measure amplitude modulation lifetimes. We experimentally verify the amplitude demodulation measurement capability of this method using fluorescent microspheres. The experimental measurements show good agreement with static frequency-domain measurements on microspheres in bulk suspensions.

  4. DAPI-fluorescent fading: a problem in microscopy or a way to measure nuclear DNA content?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallardo-Escárate, Cristian; Álvarez-Borrego, Josué; Kober, V.; del Río-Portilla, Miguel Á.

    2006-01-01

    In observation by confocal or conventional fluorescence microscopy, the retardation of the lost in fluorescence, from highest signal of fluorescence to lowest intensity are important factors in order to obtain accurate images. This problem is very common in fluorochromes for nuclear DNA and especially for DAPI stain. The fluorescence of DAPI is rapidly lost when it is exposure to excitation by ultra violet (UV) light, and especially under optimal condition of observation. Although the fading process could be retardate by using of mounting medium with antifading solutions, the photochemical process underlying the fluorescence decay has not yet been fully explained. In addiction, neither relationship has been tested between the fluorescence fading and nuclear DNA content. However, the capacity of the DNA to absorb UV light is knows. In order to test this relationship we measured by means of image analysis the fluorescence intensity in several nuclei types during a fading period. The analysis was performed by an algorithm specifically built in MATLAB software. The relationship between nuclear DNA content and DAPI-fluorescence fading was found equal to 99%. This study demonstrates the feasibility for estimates genome size by quantification of fluorescence fading. In this context, the present method allows to measure nuclear DNA content in several medical applications (cancer, HIV, organ transplants, etc). Nowadays, for measuring DNA content, flow cytometry is widely used; however, with the flow cytometry method it is not possible to select a specific group of cells, such as from a specific region of a tumor. Moreover, the using of image analysis allows automatizing diagnostics procedures.

  5. Recording, analysis, and interpretation of spreading depolarizations in neurointensive care: Review and recommendations of the COSBID research group.

    PubMed

    Dreier, Jens P; Fabricius, Martin; Ayata, Cenk; Sakowitz, Oliver W; William Shuttleworth, C; Dohmen, Christian; Graf, Rudolf; Vajkoczy, Peter; Helbok, Raimund; Suzuki, Michiyasu; Schiefecker, Alois J; Major, Sebastian; Winkler, Maren Kl; Kang, Eun-Jeung; Milakara, Denny; Oliveira-Ferreira, Ana I; Reiffurth, Clemens; Revankar, Gajanan S; Sugimoto, Kazutaka; Dengler, Nora F; Hecht, Nils; Foreman, Brandon; Feyen, Bart; Kondziella, Daniel; Friberg, Christian K; Piilgaard, Henning; Rosenthal, Eric S; Westover, M Brandon; Maslarova, Anna; Santos, Edgar; Hertle, Daniel; Sánchez-Porras, Renán; Jewell, Sharon L; Balança, Baptiste; Platz, Johannes; Hinzman, Jason M; Lückl, Janos; Schoknecht, Karl; Schöll, Michael; Drenckhahn, Christoph; Feuerstein, Delphine; Eriksen, Nina; Horst, Viktor; Bretz, Julia S; Jahnke, Paul; Scheel, Michael; Bohner, Georg; Rostrup, Egill; Pakkenberg, Bente; Heinemann, Uwe; Claassen, Jan; Carlson, Andrew P; Kowoll, Christina M; Lublinsky, Svetlana; Chassidim, Yoash; Shelef, Ilan; Friedman, Alon; Brinker, Gerrit; Reiner, Michael; Kirov, Sergei A; Andrew, R David; Farkas, Eszter; Güresir, Erdem; Vatter, Hartmut; Chung, Lee S; Brennan, K C; Lieutaud, Thomas; Marinesco, Stephane; Maas, Andrew Ir; Sahuquillo, Juan; Dahlem, Markus A; Richter, Frank; Herreras, Oscar; Boutelle, Martyn G; Okonkwo, David O; Bullock, M Ross; Witte, Otto W; Martus, Peter; van den Maagdenberg, Arn Mjm; Ferrari, Michel D; Dijkhuizen, Rick M; Shutter, Lori A; Andaluz, Norberto; Schulte, André P; MacVicar, Brian; Watanabe, Tomas; Woitzik, Johannes; Lauritzen, Martin; Strong, Anthony J; Hartings, Jed A

    2017-05-01

    Spreading depolarizations (SD) are waves of abrupt, near-complete breakdown of neuronal transmembrane ion gradients, are the largest possible pathophysiologic disruption of viable cerebral gray matter, and are a crucial mechanism of lesion development. Spreading depolarizations are increasingly recorded during multimodal neuromonitoring in neurocritical care as a causal biomarker providing a diagnostic summary measure of metabolic failure and excitotoxic injury. Focal ischemia causes spreading depolarization within minutes. Further spreading depolarizations arise for hours to days due to energy supply-demand mismatch in viable tissue. Spreading depolarizations exacerbate neuronal injury through prolonged ionic breakdown and spreading depolarization-related hypoperfusion (spreading ischemia). Local duration of the depolarization indicates local tissue energy status and risk of injury. Regional electrocorticographic monitoring affords even remote detection of injury because spreading depolarizations propagate widely from ischemic or metabolically stressed zones; characteristic patterns, including temporal clusters of spreading depolarizations and persistent depression of spontaneous cortical activity, can be recognized and quantified. Here, we describe the experimental basis for interpreting these patterns and illustrate their translation to human disease. We further provide consensus recommendations for electrocorticographic methods to record, classify, and score spreading depolarizations and associated spreading depressions. These methods offer distinct advantages over other neuromonitoring modalities and allow for future refinement through less invasive and more automated approaches.

  6. Fluorescence techniques used to measure interactions between hydroxyapatite nanoparticles and epidermal growth factor receptors.

    PubMed

    Kathawala, Mustafa H; Khoo, Stella P K; Sudhaharan, Thankiah; Zhao, Xinxin; Say Chye Loo, Joachim; Ahmed, Sohail; Woei Ng, Kee

    2015-01-01

    The potential applications of nanomaterials in therapeutics are immense and to fully explore this potential, it is important to understand the interaction of nanoparticles with cellular components. To examine the interaction between nanoparticles and cell membrane receptors, this report describes the use of advanced fluorescence techniques to measure interactions between hydroxyapatite (HA) nanoparticles and epidermal growth factor receptors (EGFRs), as a model system. FITC-labelled HA nanoparticles and monomeric red fluorescent protein (mRFP)-conjugated EGFRs expressed in Chinese hamster ovary cells (CHO-K1) were generated and their interaction measured using acceptor photobleaching-fluorescence resonance energy transfer (AP-FRET) and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy-fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FLIM-FRET). Results confirmed that hydroxyapatite nanoparticles not only interacted with EGFR but also attenuated downstream EGFR signalling, possibly by hindering normal dimerization of EGFR. Furthermore, the extent of signal attenuation suggested correlation with specific surface area of the nanoparticles, whereby greater specific surface area resulted in greater downstream signal attenuation. This novel demonstration establishes fluorescence techniques as a viable method to study nanoparticle interactions with proteins such as cell surface receptors. The approach described herein can be extended to study interactions between any fluorescently labelled nanoparticle-biomolecule pair.

  7. Direct measurement of S2 -- S0 fluorescence lifetimes and anisotropy of tetraphenylporphyrins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurzadyan, Gagik G.; Tran-Thi, Thu-Hoa; Gustavsson, Thomas

    1999-12-01

    Various tetraphenylporphyrins (zinc, magnesium, free base) were excited to the upper electronic levels of the Soret band with the second harmonic of a mode-locked Ti-sapphire laser (394 nm). An up-conversion fluorescence set-up with the time resolution of 120 fs was used to measure the decay times of the S2 fluorescence in conjunction with the risetime of the S1 fluorescence. The depopulation of the excited electronic state S2 was studied as a function of the metal ion and the solvent. The lifetimes of the electronic S2 level, measured for ZnTPP and MgTPP in different solvents were (tau) equals 1.4 - 3.4 ps. The depopulation channel from S2 to S1 was studied by measuring simultaneously the decay of S2 and the rise of S1 fluorescence. The rate constant of the process can be correlated to the energy gap between the S2 and S1 levels, which depends on the nature of the metal ions and solvents. The rotational dynamics in the Soret band was also studied by measuring the anisotropy of S2 ---> S0 fluorescence. The anisotropy decay of S2 fluorescence was found to be biexponential, with a fast component around 100 fs and a slow one (t >> 10 ps), attributed to the partial dephasing of the degenerate energy levels of the S2 state and to rotational diffusion, respectively.

  8. Standard reference for instrument response function in fluorescence lifetime measurements in visible and near infrared

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chib, Rahul; Shah, Sunil; Gryczynski, Zygmunt; Fudala, Rafal; Borejdo, Julian; Zelent, Bogumil; Corradini, Maria G.; Ludescher, Richard D.; Gryczynski, Ignacy

    2016-02-01

    Allura red (AR) fluorophore, a common dye in the food industry, displays a broad emission spectrum in water (visible-to-near infrared region of the electromagnetic spectrum) and has a remarkably short fluorescence lifetime of about 10 ps. This short lifetime does not depend on the emission (observation) wavelength. We examined time responses of AR fluorescence across emission wavelengths from 550 nm to 750 nm and found that it is an ideal candidate for impulse response functions in fluorescence lifetime measurements.

  9. Non-intrusive temperature measurements using three-color laser-induced fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavieille, P.; Delconte, A.; Blondel, D.; Lebouché, M.; Lemoine, F.

    This paper presents a new temperature measurement technique in a liquid, based on laser-induced fluorescence of rhodamine B. The fluorescence intensity is detected on three spectral bands, where the ratios between the emission of each band determine the temperature while correcting for the effects of fluorescent re-absorption. In addition, the influence of parameters such as probe volume size, dye concentration, and Beer's absorption is removed. The principles of the technique are described in this paper, and the technique is demonstrated on a heated liquid jet studied under a constant and a spatially variable dye concentration.

  10. Quantification of in vivo fluorescence decoupled from the effects of tissue optical properties using fiber-optic spectroscopy measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Anthony; Khurana, Mamta; Moriyama, Yumi; Wilson, Brian C.

    2010-11-01

    We present a method for tissue fluorescence quantification in situ using a handheld fiber optic probe that measures both the fluorescence and diffuse reflectance spectra. A simplified method to decouple the fluorescence spectrum from distorting effects of the tissue optical absorption and scattering is developed, with the objective of accurately quantifying the fluorescence in absolute units. The primary motivation is measurement of 5-aminolevulinic acid-induced protoporphyrin IX (ALA-PpIX) concentration in tissue during fluorescence-guided resection of malignant brain tumors. This technique is validated in phantoms and ex vivo mouse tissues, and tested in vivo in a rabbit brain tumor model using ALA-PpIX fluorescence contrast.

  11. Quantitative measurement of density and velocity in compressible flows using laser-induced iodine fluorescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcdaniel, J. C.

    1983-01-01

    A nonintrusive optical technique for the quantitative measurement of molecular density and velocity at a point or in an entire cross-sectional plane of a compressible flowfield is reported. Iodine molecules, seeded into the flowfield reservoir, are excited by a tunable narrow-bandwidth laser and the resulting spatially-resolved fluorescence is collected by a single- or multiple-element detector. A theoretical model for the iodine laser-induced fluorescence process is essential for quantitative measurements and is developed using a rate-equation approach. Density measurements using laser-induced fluorescence are normally complicated by collisional quenching; however, the theory predicts that the off-resonant fluorescent signal is directly proportional to density. Velocity is directly related to the Doppler shift of the iodine absorption line, determined by monitoring the broadband fluorescent signal as the laser is tuned in frequency. Experiments in a steady supersonic flowfield are compared with numerical calculations to demonstrate the accuracy of the approach for density and velocity measurement and the lack of perturbation to the flowfield by the iodine seeding. Extensions of the current approach to density and velocity measurement in lower Mach number flows, to the measurement of pressure and temperature, and to temporally-resolved measurements are discussed.

  12. A fluorescence-based assay for measuring the redox potential of 5-lipoxygenase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sangchul; Park, Youngsam; Kim, Junghwan; Han, Sung-Jun

    2014-01-01

    The activities and side effects of 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO) inhibitors can be predicted by identifying their redox mechanisms. In this study, we developed a fluorescence-based method to measure the redox potential of 5-LO inhibitors and compared it to the conventional, absorbance-based method. After the pseudo-peroxidase reaction, the amount of remaining lipid peroxide was quantified using the H2DCFDA (2',7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate) fluorescence dye. Our method showed large signal windows and provided comparable redox potential values. Importantly, the redox mechanisms of known inhibitors were accurately measured with the fluorescence assay, whereas the conventional, absorbance-based method showed contradictory results. Our findings suggest that our developed method is a better alternative for classifying the redox potential of 5-LO inhibitors, and the fluorescence assay can be effectively used to study the mechanisms of action that are related to redox cycling.

  13. Depolarization of Cellular Resting Membrane Potential Promotes Neonatal Cardiomyocyte Proliferation In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Lan, Jen-Yu; Williams, Corin; Levin, Michael; Black, Lauren Deems

    2014-01-01

    Cardiomyocytes (CMs) undergo a rapid transition from hyperplastic to hypertrophic growth soon after birth, which is a major challenge to the development of engineered cardiac tissue for pediatric patients. Resting membrane potential (Vmem) has been shown to play an important role in cell differentiation and proliferation during development. We hypothesized that depolarization of neonatal CMs would stimulate or maintain CM proliferation in vitro. To test our hypothesis, we isolated postnatal day 3 neonatal rat CMs and subjected them to sustained depolarization via the addition of potassium gluconate or Ouabain to the culture medium. Cell density and CM percentage measurements demonstrated an increase in mitotic CMs along with a ~2 fold increase in CM numbers with depolarization. In addition, depolarization led to an increase in cells in G2 and S phase, indicating increased proliferation, as measured by flow cytometry. Surprisingly depolarization of Vmem with either treatment led to inhibition of proliferation in cardiac fibroblasts. This effect is abrogated when the study was carried out on postnatal day 7 neonatal CMs, which are less proliferative, indicating that the likely mechanism of depolarization is the maintenance of the proliferating CM population. In summary, our findings suggest that depolarization maintains postnatal CM proliferation and may be a novel approach to encourage growth of engineered tissue and cardiac regeneration in pediatric patients. PMID:25295125

  14. On-line measurement of lignin in wood pulp by color shift of fluorescence

    DOEpatents

    Jeffers, L.A.; Malito, M.L.

    1996-01-23

    Lignin concentrations from wood pulp samples are measured by applying an excitation light at a selected wavelength to the samples in order to cause the lignin to emit fluorescence. A spectral distribution of the fluorescence emission is then determined. The lignin concentration is then calculated based on the spectral distribution signal. The spectral distribution is quantified by either a wavelength centroid method or a band ratio method. 6 figs.

  15. On-line measurement of lignin in wood pulp by color shift of fluorescence

    DOEpatents

    Jeffers, Larry A.; Malito, Michael L.

    1996-01-01

    Lignin concentrations from wood pulp samples are measured by applying an excitation light at a selected wavelength to the samples in order to cause the lignin to emit fluorescence. A spectral distribution of the fluorescence emission is then determined. The lignin concentration is then calculated based on the spectral distribution signal. The spectral distribution is quantified by either a wavelength centroid method or a band ratio method.

  16. [The role of neuroglobin in oxygen-glucose deprivation and reoxygenation-induced mitochondrial depolarization and reactive oxygen species production in SH-SY5Y cells].

    PubMed

    Deng, S Y; Ai, Y H; Zhang, L N; Wu, L; Chen, C X; Wang, Y M; Liu, Z Y; Huang, L; Peng, Q Y

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the role of neuroglobin (NGB) in oxygen-glucose deprivation and reoxygenation (OGD/R) induced mitochondrial depolarization and reactive oxygen species (ROS)production in a human neuroblastoma cell line (SH-SY5Y). Methods: SH-SY5Y cells were transfected with lentivirus to establish a stable cell line of NGB knockdown (KD). After treated with OGD/R, cells were collected at different time points to analyze NGB mRNA and protein levels. Furthermore, cells were stained with JC-1 and DCFH-DA to evaluate mitochondrial depolarization and ROS production by inverted fluorescence microscope. Also, to determine the neurotoxicity, we measured the lactate dehydrogenase(LDH)level in the cell culture medium. Results: After the treatment of OGD/R, the NGB mRNA and protein started to elevate and peak at 4 h and 8 h (2.04±0.35 fold, 1.69±0.18 fold). Compared with the vector group, NGB KD group had much more mitochondrial depolarization [JC-1 red/green (1.10±0.10) vs (1.46±0.11), P<0.05] and ROS production [DCFH-DA fluorescence (36.30±5.32) vs (16.26±2.97), P<0.05]. Furthermore, NGB KD groups had a higher level of LDH release [(63.42±6.14)%vs (49.65±5.09)%, P<0.05]. Conclusions: NGB plays an important role in the homeostasis of mitochondria. Knockdown of NGB results in increased mitochondrial depolarization, ROS production and neurotoxicity under hypoxia circumstances.

  17. Absolute fluorescence measurements > 1000 nm: setup design, calibration and standards (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Resch-Genger, Ute; Würth, Christian; Pauli, Jutta; Hatami, Soheil; Kaiser, Martin

    2016-03-01

    There is an increasing interest in optical reporters like semiconductor quantum dots and upconversion nanophosphors with emission < 1000 nm for bioanalysis, medical diagnostics, and safety barcodes and hence, in reliable fluorescence measurements in this wavelength region, e.g., for the comparison of material performance and the rational design of new nanomaterials with improved properties [1-4]. The performance of fluorescence measurements < 800 nm and especially < 1000 nm is currently hampered by the lack of suitable methods and standards for the simple determination of the wavelength-dependent spectral responsivity of fluorescence measuring systems and the control of measured emission spectra and intensities [3-5]. This is of special relevance for nanocrystalline emitters like quantum dots and rods as well as for upconversion nanocrystals, where surface states and the accessibility of emissive states by quenchers largely control accomplishable quantum yields and hence, signal sizes and detection sensitivities from the reporter side. Here, we present the design of an integrating sphere setup for the absolute measurement of emission spectra and quantum yields in the wavelength region of 650 to 1600 nm and its calibration as well as examples for potential fluorescence standards from different reporter classes for the control of the reliability of such measurements [5]. This includes new spectral fluorescence standards for the wavelength region of 650 nm to 1000 nm as well as a set of quantum yield standards covering the wavelength region from 400 nm to 1000 nm.

  18. Spectrally resolved fluorescence lifetime imaging of Nile red for measurements of intracellular polarity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levitt, James A.; Chung, Pei-Hua; Suhling, Klaus

    2015-09-01

    Spectrally resolved confocal microscopy and fluorescence lifetime imaging have been used to measure the polarity of lipid-rich regions in living HeLa cells stained with Nile red. The emission peak from the solvatochromic dye in lipid droplets is at a shorter wavelength than other, more polar, stained internal membranes, and this is indicative of a low polarity environment. We estimate that the dielectric constant, ɛ, is around 5 in lipid droplets and 25<ɛ<40 in other lipid-rich regions. Our spectrally resolved fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) data show that intracellular Nile red exhibits complex, multiexponential fluorescence decays due to emission from a short lifetime locally excited state and a longer lifetime intramolecular charge transfer state. We measure an increase in the average fluorescence lifetime of the dye with increasing emission wavelength, as shown using phasor plots of the FLIM data. We also show using these phasor plots that the shortest lifetime decay components arise from lipid droplets. Thus, fluorescence lifetime is a viable contrast parameter for distinguishing lipid droplets from other stained lipid-rich regions. Finally, we discuss the FLIM of Nile red as a method for simultaneously mapping both polarity and relative viscosity based on fluorescence lifetime measurements.

  19. Quenching-independent measurement of species concentrations in flames by laser-induced fluorescence

    SciTech Connect

    Salmon, J.T.; Carter, C.D.; Laurendeau, N.M.

    1990-09-01

    This report describes work accomplished in the last two years on measurement of species concentrations in flames via laser-induced fluorescence. During this period, we have published absolute number densities of atomic hydrogen in subatmospheric, premixed C{sub 2}H{sub 4}/O{sub 2}/Ar flames at equivalence ratios of 1.0 and 1.7 via two-photon excited fluorescence. This work has led to the development of a new single-laser, two-step fluorescence method for the detection of atomic hydrogen in flames. Using photoionization controlled-loss spectroscopy (PICLS), we have verified the T{sup {minus}1/2} dependence of quenching on temperature for atomic hydrogen, in agreement with kinetic theory. Previous work on pyrometry using laser-saturated fluorescence (LSF) and the anomalous fluorescence from pyrene has evolved into publication of a major review paper on temperature measurements by light-scattering methods. Finally, we have demonstrated the feasibility of quantitative LSF measurements of NO concentration by obtaining relative saturation curves and NO fluorescence profiles. 25 refs.

  20. Dynamic measurement of fluorescent proteins spectral distribution on virus infected cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Ja-Yun; Wu, Ming-Xiu; Kao, Chia-Yun; Wu, Tzong-Yuan; Hsu, I.-Jen

    2006-09-01

    We constructed a dynamic spectroscopy system that can simultaneously measure the intensity and spectral distributions of samples with multi-fluorophores in a single scan. The system was used to monitor the fluorescence distribution of cells infected by the virus, which is constructed by a recombinant baculoviruses, vAcD-Rhir-E, containing the red and green fluorescent protein gene that can simultaneously produce dual fluorescence in recombinant virus-infected Spodoptera frugiperda 21 cells (Sf21) under the control of a polyhedrin promoter. The system was composed of an excitation light source, a scanning system and a spectrometer. We also developed an algorithm and fitting process to analyze the pattern of fluorescence distribution of the dual fluorescence produced in the recombinant virus-infected cells. All the algorithm and calculation are automatically processed in a visualized scanning program and can monitor the specific region of sample by calculating its intensity distribution. The spectral measurement of each pixel was performed at millisecond range and the two dimensional distribution of full spectrum was recorded within several seconds. We have constructed a dynamic spectroscopy system to monitor the process of virus-infection of cells. The distributions of the dual fluorescence were simultaneously measured at micrometer resolution.

  1. Is cold paresis related to axonal depolarization?

    PubMed

    Franssen, Hessel; Gebbink, Tineke A; Wokke, John H J; van den Berg, Leonard H; van Schelven, Leonard J

    2010-09-01

    Cold paresis may occur in multifocal motor neuropathy and lower motor neuron disease. It was proposed to reflect nerve lesions where axons are depolarized due to loss of Na/K-pump activity. In those circumstances, a further decrease in pump activity by cooling may induce extra depolarization, conduction block, and weakness. Evidence for this hypothesis is incomplete because it is unknown if cold induces depolarization in human motor axons and other factors may contribute to the symptoms. To solve these questions, we examined 10 normal subjects. At 37, 25, 20, and 15°C we assessed: excitability in the median nerve, decrement on 3-Hz stimulation, pulsed Doppler of a wrist artery, and thenar muscle strength. Cooling induced: (1) findings compatible with axonal depolarization on excitability testing (fanning-in of threshold electrotonus, steepened current threshold relation, increased refractory period, decreased super- and subexcitability), (2) decreased Doppler peak systolic velocity without causing ischemia, (3) decreased muscle strength and impaired muscle relaxation. Decrement tests and compound muscle action potential amplitude remained normal. The excitability findings induced by cooling were best explained by axonal depolarization due to the effect of temperature on Na/K-pump activity. The induced weakness may be explained not only by this mechanism but also by impaired muscle contraction. © 2010 Peripheral Nerve Society.

  2. Validation of fluorescent-labeled microspheres for measurement of relative blood flow in severely injured lungs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hubler, M.; Souders, J. E.; Shade, E. D.; Hlastala, M. P.; Polissar, N. L.; Glenny, R. W.

    1999-01-01

    The aim of the study was to validate a nonradioactive method for relative blood flow measurements in severely injured lungs that avoids labor-intensive tissue processing. The use of fluorescent-labeled microspheres was compared with the standard radiolabeled-microsphere method. In seven sheep, lung injury was established by using oleic acid. Five pairs of radio- and fluorescent-labeled microspheres were injected before and after established lung injury. Across all animals, 175 pieces were selected randomly. The radioactivity of each piece was determined by using a scintillation counter. The fluorescent dye was extracted from each piece with a solvent without digestion or filtering. The fluorescence was determined with an automated fluorescent spectrophotometer. Perfusion was calculated for each piece from both the radioactivity and fluorescence and volume normalized. Correlations between flow determined by the two methods were in the range from 0.987 +/- 0.007 (SD) to 0.991 +/- 0.002 (SD) after 9 days of soaking. Thus the fluorescent microsphere technique is a valuable tool for investigating regional perfusion in severely injured lungs and can replace radioactivity.

  3. Validation of fluorescent-labeled microspheres for measurement of relative blood flow in severely injured lungs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hubler, M.; Souders, J. E.; Shade, E. D.; Hlastala, M. P.; Polissar, N. L.; Glenny, R. W.

    1999-01-01

    The aim of the study was to validate a nonradioactive method for relative blood flow measurements in severely injured lungs that avoids labor-intensive tissue processing. The use of fluorescent-labeled microspheres was compared with the standard radiolabeled-microsphere method. In seven sheep, lung injury was established by using oleic acid. Five pairs of radio- and fluorescent-labeled microspheres were injected before and after established lung injury. Across all animals, 175 pieces were selected randomly. The radioactivity of each piece was determined by using a scintillation counter. The fluorescent dye was extracted from each piece with a solvent without digestion or filtering. The fluorescence was determined with an automated fluorescent spectrophotometer. Perfusion was calculated for each piece from both the radioactivity and fluorescence and volume normalized. Correlations between flow determined by the two methods were in the range from 0.987 +/- 0.007 (SD) to 0.991 +/- 0.002 (SD) after 9 days of soaking. Thus the fluorescent microsphere technique is a valuable tool for investigating regional perfusion in severely injured lungs and can replace radioactivity.

  4. DEVELOPMENT OF EVALUATION OF A QUANTITATIVE VIDEO-FLUORESCENCE IMAGING SYSTEM AND FLUORESCENT TRACER FOR MEASURING TRANSFER OF PESTICIDE RESIDUES FROM SURFACES TO HANDS WITH REPEATED CONTACTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A video imaging system and the associated quantification methods have been developed for measurement of the transfers of a fluorescent tracer from surfaces to hands. The highly fluorescent compound riboflavin (Vitamin B2), which is also water soluble and non-toxic, was chosen as...

  5. DEVELOPMENT OF EVALUATION OF A QUANTITATIVE VIDEO-FLUORESCENCE IMAGING SYSTEM AND FLUORESCENT TRACER FOR MEASURING TRANSFER OF PESTICIDE RESIDUES FROM SURFACES TO HANDS WITH REPEATED CONTACTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A video imaging system and the associated quantification methods have been developed for measurement of the transfers of a fluorescent tracer from surfaces to hands. The highly fluorescent compound riboflavin (Vitamin B2), which is also water soluble and non-toxic, was chosen as...

  6. Longitudinal polarization periodicity of unpolarized light passing through a double wedge depolarizer.

    PubMed

    de Sande, Juan Carlos G; Santarsiero, Massimo; Piquero, Gemma; Gori, Franco

    2012-12-03

    The polarization characteristics of unpolarized light passing through a double wedge depolarizer are studied. It is found that the degree of polarization of the radiation propagating after the depolarizer is uniform across transverse planes after the depolarizer, but it changes from one plane to another in a periodic way giving, at different distances, unpolarized, partially polarized, or even perfectly polarized light. An experiment is performed to confirm this result. Measured values of the Stokes parameters and of the degree of polarization are in complete agreement with the theoretical predictions.

  7. Characterization of homogenous depolarizing media based on Mueller matrix differential decomposition.

    PubMed

    Arteaga, Oriol; Kahr, Bart

    2013-04-01

    In a depolarizing medium in which the optical properties are uniformly distributed, the logarithm of the Mueller matrix can be used to calculate the differential Mueller matrix. From the differential Mueller matrix, the 10 optical properties of a homogeneous depolarizing medium are recovered. A modified calculation is introduced for media showing small time-irreversal depolarization events. The benefits of this method are illustrated in the determination of circular dichroism and circular birefringence of a nickel sulfate hexahydrate crystal from spectroscopic Mueller matrix measurements.

  8. Proximity to Intrinsic Depolarizing Resonances with a Partial Siberian Snake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crandell, D. A.; Alexeeva, L. V.; Anferov, V. A.; Blinov, B. B.; Chu, C. M.; Caussyn, D. D.; Courant, E. D.; Gladycheva, S. E.; Hu, S.; Krisch, A. D.; Nurushev, T. S.; Phelps, R. A.; Ratner, L. G.; Varzar, S. M.; Wong, V. K.; Derbenev, Ya. S.; Lee, S. Y.; Rinckel, T.; Schwandt, P.; Sperisen, F.; Stephenson, E. J.; von Przewoski, B.; Baiod, R.; Russell, A. D.; Ohmori, C.; Sato, H.

    1996-05-01

    Partial Siberian snakes are effective in overcoming imperfection depolarizing resonances, but they may also change the crossing energy for intrinsic depolarizing resonances. We experimentally investigated the effect of a partial Siberian snake near intrinsic depolarizing resonances with stored 140 MeV and 160 MeV polarized proton beams. Using various partial Siberian snake strengths up to 30%, depolarization was observed; this may be due to a change in the spin precession frequency which moves the energy of nearby intrinsic depolarizing resonances.

  9. An analysis of long term temperature measurement using laser induced fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaszczur, M.; Styszko, K.; Tomaszek, J.; Żurawska, K.

    2016-09-01

    The temperature measurement is extremely important because it occurs in many technical and engineering processes, including combustion chambers, mixers or chemical reactors as well as environmental flows. In contrast to the point measurement method, Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF) allows temperature determination in the whole plain 2D, or even 3D, domain. A major advantage of LIF is also its relatively high accuracy. This technique involves dissolving a temperature- sensitive fluorescence dye to a fluid. It is known that in LIF the fluorescent reemission is a function of temperature but, in many cases, it can also be a function of time, due to dye properties degradation. In the present research, a long-term temperature measurement using LIF was performed in order to analyse the method uncertainty related to time. The results of the stability of Rhodamine-B in nonisothermal experimental measurements in water solution, together with the chemical analysis using spectrophotometry, are presented.

  10. Understanding the contributions of NADH and collagen to cervical tissue fluorescence spectra: modeling, measurements, and implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drezek, Rebekah A.; Sokolov, Konstantin V.; Utzinger, Urs; Boiko, Iouri; Malpica, Anais; Follen, Michele; Richards-Kortum, Rebecca R.

    2001-10-01

    Objective: At 380 nm excitation, cervical tissue fluorescence spectra demonstrate characteristic changes with both patient age and the presence of dysplasia. A Monte Carlo model was developed in order to quantitatively examine how intrinsic NADH and collagen fluorescence, in combination with tissue scattering and absorption properties, yield measured tissue spectra. Methods: Excitation-emission matrices were measured for live cervical cells and collagen gel phantoms. Fluorescence microscopy of fresh tissue sections was performed to obtain the location and density of fluorophores as a function of patient age and the presence of dysplasia. A Monte Carlo model was developed which incorporated measurements of fluorophore line shapes and spatial distributions. Results: Modeled spectra were consistent with clinical measurements and indicate that an increase in NADH fluorescence and decrease in collagen fluorescence create clinically observed differences between normal and dysplastic tissue spectra. Model predictions were most sensitive to patient age and epithelial thickness. Conclusions: Monte Carlo techniques provide an important means to investigate the combined contributions of multiple fluorophores to measured emission spectra. The approach will prove increasingly valuable as a more sophisticated understanding of in vivo optical properties is developed.

  11. Measurement of Pressure Dependent Fluorescence Yield of Air: Calibration Factor for UHECR Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Belz, J.W.; Burt, G.W.; Cao, Z.; Chang, F.Y.; Chen, C.C.; Chen, C.W.; Chen, P.; Field, C.; Findlay, J.; Huntemeyer, Petra; Huang, M.A.; Hwang, W.-Y.P.; Iverson, R.; Jones, B.F.; Jui, C.C.H.; Kirn, M.; Lin, G.-L.; Loh, E.C.; Maestas, M.M.; Manago, N.; Martens, K.; /Montana U. /Utah U. /Taiwan, Natl. Taiwan U. /SLAC /Rutgers U., Piscataway

    2005-07-06

    In a test experiment at the Final Focus Test Beam of the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, the fluorescence yield of 28.5 GeV electrons in air and nitrogen was measured. The measured photon yields between 300 and 400 nm at 1 atm and 29 C are Y(760 Torr){sup air} = 4.42 {+-} 0.73 and Y(760 Torr){sup N{sub 2}} = 29.2 {+-} 4.8 photons per electron per meter. Assuming that the fluorescence yield is proportional to the energy deposition of a charged particle traveling through air, good agreement with measurements at lower particle energies is observed.

  12. Simultaneous one-dimensional fluorescence lifetime measurements of OH and CO in premixed flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jonsson, Malin; Ehn, Andreas; Christensen, Moah; Aldén, Marcus; Bood, Joakim

    2014-04-01

    A method for simultaneous measurements of fluorescence lifetimes of two species along a line is described. The experimental setup is based on picosecond laser pulses from two tunable optical parametric generator/optical parametric amplifier systems together with a streak camera. With an appropriate optical time delay between the two laser pulses, whose wavelengths are tuned to excite two different species, laser-induced fluorescence can be both detected temporally and spatially resolved by the streak camera. Hence, our method enables one-dimensional imaging of fluorescence lifetimes of two species in the same streak camera recording. The concept is demonstrated for fluorescence lifetime measurements of CO and OH in a laminar methane/air flame on a Bunsen-type burner. Measurements were taken in flames with four different equivalence ratios, namely ϕ = 0.9, 1.0, 1.15, and 1.25. The measured one-dimensional lifetime profiles generally agree well with lifetimes calculated from quenching cross sections found in the literature and quencher concentrations predicted by the GRI 3.0 mechanism. For OH, there is a systematic deviation of approximately 30 % between calculated and measured lifetimes. It is found that this is mainly due to the adiabatic assumption regarding the flame and uncertainty in H2O quenching cross section. This emphasizes the strength of measuring the quenching rates rather than relying on models. The measurement concept might be useful for single-shot measurements of fluorescence lifetimes of several species pairs of vital importance in combustion processes, hence allowing fluorescence signals to be corrected for quenching and ultimately yield quantitative concentration profiles.

  13. Zinc depolarized electrochemical CO2 concentration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woods, R. R.; Marshall, R. D.; Schubert, F. H.

    1975-01-01

    Two zinc depolarized electrochemical carbon dioxide concentrator concepts were analytically and experimentally evaluated for portable life support system carbon dioxide (CO2) removal application. The first concept, referred to as the zinc hydrogen generator electrochemical depolarized CO2 concentrator, uses a ZHG to generate hydrogen for direct use in an EDC. The second concept, referred to as the zinc/electrochemical depolarized concentrator, uses a standard EDC cell construction modified for use with the Zn anode. The Zn anode is consumed and subsequently regenerated, thereby eliminating the need to supply H2 to the EDC for the CO2 removal process. The evaluation was based primarily on an analytical evaluation of the two ZnDCs at projected end item performance and hardware design levels. Both ZnDC concepts for PLSS CO2 removal application were found to be noncompetitive in both total equivalent launch weight and individual extravehicular activity mission volume when compared to other candidate regenerable PLSS CO2 scrubbers.

  14. Spin depolarization in semiconductor spin detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, W. M.; Buyanova, I. A.; Oka, Y.; Abernathy, C. R.; Pearton, S. J.

    2006-02-01

    A brief review is given of our recent experimental results from in-depth investigations of spin depolarization and underlying physical mechanisms within semiconductor spin detectors based on II-VIs (e.g. Zn(Cd)Se quantum wells) and III-Vs (e.g. InGaN quantum wells), which are relevant to applications for spin-LEDs based on ZnMnSe/Zn(Cd)Se and GaMnN/InGaN structures. By employing cw and time-resolved magneto-optical and optical spin orientation spectroscopy in combination with tunable laser excitation, we show that spin depolarization within these spin detectors is very efficient and is an important factor limiting efficiency of spin detection. Detailed physical mechanisms leading to efficient spin depolarization will be discussed.

  15. UV light phototransduction depolarizes human melanocytes.

    PubMed

    Bellono, Nicholas W; Oancea, Elena

    2013-01-01

    Exposure of human skin to low doses of solar UV radiation (UVR) causes increased pigmentation, while chronic exposure is a powerful risk factor for skin cancers. The mechanisms mediating UVR detection in skin, however, remain poorly understood. Our recent studies revealed that UVR activates a retinal-dependent G protein-coupled signaling pathway in melanocytes. This phototransduction pathway leads to the activation of transient receptor potential A1 (TRPA1) ion channels, elevation of intracellular calcium (Ca( 2+)) and rapid increase in cellular melanin content. Here we report that physiological doses of solar-like UVR elicit a retinal-dependent membrane depolarization in human epidermal melanocytes. This transient depolarization correlates with delayed inactivation time of the UVR-evoked photocurrent and with sustained Ca( 2+) responses required for early melanin synthesis. Thus, the cellular depolarization induced by UVR phototransduction in melanocytes is likely to be a critical signaling mechanism necessary for the protective response represented by increased melanin content.

  16. Fluorescence Spectrum and Decay Measurement for Hsil VS Normal Cytology Differentiation in Liquid Pap Smear Supernatant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaitkuviene, A.; Gegzna, V.; Juodkazis, S.; Jursenas, S.; Miasojedovas, S.; Kurtinaitiene, R.; Rimiene, J.; Vaitkus, J.

    2009-06-01

    Cervical smear material contains endo and exocervical cells, mucus and inflammative, immune cells in cases of pathology. Just not destroyed keratinocytes lay on the glass for microscopy. Liquid cytology supernatant apart other diagnostics could be used for photodiagnostic. The spectroscopic parameters suitable for Normal and HSIL cytology groups supernatant differentiation are demonstrated. The dried liquid PAP supernatant fractions—sediment and liquid were investigated. Excitation and emission matrices (EEM), supernatant fluorescence decay measured under 280 nm diode short pulse excitation and fluorescence spectroscopy by excitation with 355 nm laser light were analyzed. The differences between Normal and HSIL groups were statistically proven in the certain spectral regions. Fluorescence decay peculiarities show spectral regions consisting of few fluorophores. Obtained results on fluorescence differences in Normal and HSIL groups' supernatant shows the potency of photodiagnosis application in cervical screening.

  17. Laser measurement of the spectral extinction coefficients of fluorescent, highly absorbing liquids. [crude petroleum oils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoge, F. E.

    1982-01-01

    A conceptual method is developed to deduce rapidly the spectral extinction coefficient of fluorescent, highly absorbing liquids, such as crude or refined petroleum oils. The technique offers the advantage of only requiring one laser wavelength and a single experimental assembly and execution for any specific fluorescent liquid. The liquid is inserted into an extremely thin wedge-shaped cavity for stimulation by a laser from one side and flurescence measurement on the other side by a monochromator system. For each arbitrarily selected extinction wavelength, the wedge is driven slowly to increasing thicknesses until the fluorescence extinguishes. The fluorescence as a function of wedge thickness permits a determination of the extinction coefficient using an included theoretical model. When the monochromator is set to the laser emission wavelength, the extinction coefficient is determined using the usual on-wavelength signal extinction procedure.

  18. Laser measurement of the spectral extinction coefficients of fluorescent, highly absorbing liquids. [crude petroleum oils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoge, F. E.

    1982-01-01

    A conceptual method is developed to deduce rapidly the spectral extinction coefficient of fluorescent, highly absorbing liquids, such as crude or refined petroleum oils. The technique offers the advantage of only requiring one laser wavelength and a single experimental assembly and execution for any specific fluorescent liquid. The liquid is inserted into an extremely thin wedge-shaped cavity for stimulation by a laser from one side and flurescence measurement on the other side by a monochromator system. For each arbitrarily selected extinction wavelength, the wedge is driven slowly to increasing thicknesses until the fluorescence extinguishes. The fluorescence as a function of wedge thickness permits a determination of the extinction coefficient using an included theoretical model. When the monochromator is set to the laser emission wavelength, the extinction coefficient is determined using the usual on-wavelength signal extinction procedure.

  19. Aerosol-fluorescence spectrum analyzer: real-time measurement of emission spectra of airborne biological particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, Steven C.; Pinnick, Ronald G.; Nachman, Paul; Chen, Gang; Chang, Richard K.; Mayo, Michael W.; Fernandez, Gilbert L.

    1995-10-01

    We have assembled an aerosol-fluorescence spectrum analyzer (AFS), which can measure the fluorescence spectra and elastic scattering of airborne particles as they flow through a laser beam. The aerosols traverse a scattering cell where they are illuminated with intense (50 kW/cm 2) light inside the cavity of an argon-ion laser operating at 488 nm. This AFS can obtain fluorescence spectra of individual dye-doped polystyrene microspheres as small as 0.5 mu m in diameter. The spectra obtained from microspheres doped with pink and green-yellow dyes are clearly different. We have also detected the fluorescence spectra of airborne particles (although not single particles) made from various

  20. Fluorescence based imaging for M-band drive symmetry measurement in hohlraum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qi; Yao, Li; Jing, Longfei; Hu, Zhimin; Huang, Chengwu; Yuan, Zheng; Zhao, Yang; Xiong, Gang; Qing, Bo; Lv, Min; Zhu, Tuo; Deng, Bo; Li, Jin; Wei, Minxi; Zhan, Xiayu; Li, Jun; Yang, Yimeng; Su, Chunxiao; Yang, Guohong; Zhang, Jiyan; Li, Sanwei; Yang, Jiamin; Ding, Yongkun

    2016-11-01

    We describe an experimental technique to measure the drive symmetry of M-band radiation on the capsule in hohlraum. M-band radiation from the corona of the laser-produced gold plasma, especially the laser spot regions in the cavity, was used to pump x-ray fluorescence of a thin layer of Si-tracer coated on a solid CH-ball. The fluorescence images were time resolvedly recorded by an x-ray framing camera and the drive asymmetry due to M-band radiation was deduced from these fluorescence images. Moreover, a Si-doped gold cavity was used with the initial purpose of maximizing the fluorescence signal through resonance transitions. Since the Si-plasma expands more rapidly than the gold-plasma, the evolution of drive asymmetry was accelerated in Si-doped hohlraum.

  1. Effect of biofilm on fluorescence measurements derived from fast repetition rate fluorometers.

    PubMed

    Patil, Jagadish S; Saino, Toshiro

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluates, for the first time, the influence of biofilms on single and double optical window (SOW and DOW, respectively) fast repetition rate fluorometer (FRRF) measurements of microalgal photosystem-II initial fluorescence (F0), maximum fluorescence (Fm), variable fluorescence (Fv = Fm - F0), quantum yield (Fv/Fm) and functional absorption cross section (σPSII)]. Biofilms with chlorophyll > 0.1 μg cm(-2) and > 0.3 μgcm(-2) on SOW and DOW, respectively, produced a substantial increase in fluorescence. However, the relative magnitude of biofouling effects depended on sample chlorophyll concentrations, being more critical at concentrations < 1 mg m(-3). In DOW-FRRF, biofilms affected F0 (increased) and Fv/Fm (decreased) but not Fv and σPSII, whereas in SOW-FRRF, biofilms increased fluorescence and showed a variable effect on Fv/Fm and σPSII, because only biofilms on SOW attained actual Fm. As a result, the biofilm effect was substantial on SOW-FRRF measurements. On the other hand, the neutral-density filters (representing non-chlorophyll containing biofilms) with different transmission levels reduced the fluorescence signal. Correction procedures for the above photosystem-II parameters are proposed here.

  2. Ruby crystal for demonstrating time- and frequency-domain methods of fluorescence lifetime measurements.

    PubMed

    Chandler, Danielle E; Majumdar, Zigurts K; Heiss, Gregor J; Clegg, Robert M

    2006-11-01

    We present experiments that are convenient and educational for measuring fluorescence lifetimes with both time- and frequency-domain methods. The sample is ruby crystal, which has a lifetime of about 3.5 milliseconds, and is easy to use as a class-room demonstration. The experiments and methods of data analysis are used in the lab section of a class on optical spectroscopy, where we go through the theory and applications of fluorescence. Because the fluorescence decay time of ruby is in the millisecond region, the instrumentation for this experiment can be constructed easily and inexpensively compared to the nanosecond-resolved instrumentation required for most fluorescent compounds, which have nanosecond fluorescence lifetimes. The methods are applicable to other luminescent compounds with decay constants from microseconds and longer, such as transition metal and lanthanide complexes and phosphorescent samples. The experiments, which clearly demonstrate the theory and methods of measuring temporally resolved fluorescence, are instructive and demonstrate what the students have learned in the lectures without the distraction of highly sophisticated instrumentation.

  3. Simultaneous Measurement of Oscillations in Oxygen Evolution and Chlorophyll a Fluorescence in Leaf Pieces 1

    PubMed Central

    Walker, David A.; Sivak, Mirta N.; Prinsley, Roslyn T.; Cheesbrough, John K.

    1983-01-01

    In spinach (Spinacia oleracea) and barley (Hordeum vulgare) leaves, chlorophyll a fluorescence and O2 evolution have been measured simultaneously following re-illumination after a dark interval or when steady state photosynthesis has been perturbed by changes in the gas phase. In high CO2 concentrations, both O2 and fluorescence can display marked dampening oscillations that are antiparallel but slightly out of phase (a rise or fall in fluorescence anticipating a corresponding fall or rise in O2 by about 10 to 15 seconds). Infrared gas analysis measurements showed that CO2 uptake behaved like O2 evolution both in the period of oscillation (about 1 minute) and in its relation to fluorescence. In the steady state, oscillations were initiated by increases in CO2 or by increases or decreases in O2. Oscillations in O2 or CO2 did not occur without associated oscillations in fluorescence and the latter were a sensitive indicator of the former. The relationship between such oscillations in photosynthetic carbon assimilation and chlorophyl a fluorescence is discussed in the context of the effect of ATP or NADPH consumption on known quenching mechanisms. PMID:16663255

  4. Simultaneous measurement of oscillations in oxygen evolution and chlorophyll a fluorescence in leaf pieces.

    PubMed

    Walker, D A; Sivak, M N; Prinsley, R T; Cheesbrough, J K

    1983-11-01

    In spinach (Spinacia oleracea) and barley (Hordeum vulgare) leaves, chlorophyll a fluorescence and O(2) evolution have been measured simultaneously following re-illumination after a dark interval or when steady state photosynthesis has been perturbed by changes in the gas phase. In high CO(2) concentrations, both O(2) and fluorescence can display marked dampening oscillations that are antiparallel but slightly out of phase (a rise or fall in fluorescence anticipating a corresponding fall or rise in O(2) by about 10 to 15 seconds). Infrared gas analysis measurements showed that CO(2) uptake behaved like O(2) evolution both in the period of oscillation (about 1 minute) and in its relation to fluorescence. In the steady state, oscillations were initiated by increases in CO(2) or by increases or decreases in O(2). Oscillations in O(2) or CO(2) did not occur without associated oscillations in fluorescence and the latter were a sensitive indicator of the former. The relationship between such oscillations in photosynthetic carbon assimilation and chlorophyl a fluorescence is discussed in the context of the effect of ATP or NADPH consumption on known quenching mechanisms.

  5. Laser-induced fluorescence measurement of the dynamics of a pulsed planar sheath

    SciTech Connect

    Goeckner, M.J.; Malik, S.M. ); Conrad, J.R. ); Breun, R.A. )

    1994-04-01

    Using laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) the ion density near the edge of an expanding plasma sheath has been measured. These measurements utilized a transition of N[sup +][sub 2] [the P12 component of the [ital X] [sup 2][Sigma][sup +][sub [ital g

  6. Plant Chlorophyll fluorescence: active and passive measurements at canopy and leaf scales with different nitrogen treatments

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Most studies assessing chlorophyll fluorescence (ChlF) have examined leaf responses to environmental stress conditions using active techniques. Alternatively, passive techniques are able to measure ChlF at both leaf and canopy scales. However, although the measurement principles of both techniques a...

  7. Fluorescence Quantum Yield Measurements of Fluorescent Proteins: A Laboratory Experiment for a Biochemistry or Molecular Biophysics Laboratory Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wall, Kathryn P.; Dillon, Rebecca; Knowles, Michelle K.

    2015-01-01

    Fluorescent proteins are commonly used in cell biology to assess where proteins are within a cell as a function of time and provide insight into intracellular protein function. However, the usefulness of a fluorescent protein depends directly on the quantum yield. The quantum yield relates the efficiency at which a fluorescent molecule converts…

  8. Fluorescence Quantum Yield Measurements of Fluorescent Proteins: A Laboratory Experiment for a Biochemistry or Molecular Biophysics Laboratory Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wall, Kathryn P.; Dillon, Rebecca; Knowles, Michelle K.

    2015-01-01

    Fluorescent proteins are commonly used in cell biology to assess where proteins are within a cell as a function of time and provide insight into intracellular protein function. However, the usefulness of a fluorescent protein depends directly on the quantum yield. The quantum yield relates the efficiency at which a fluorescent molecule converts…

  9. Measurement of diffusion of fluorescent compounds and autofluorescence in skin in vivo using a confocal instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buttenschoen, K. K.; Sutton, E. E.; Daly, D.; Girkin, J. M.

    2016-02-01

    Using compact and affordable instrumentation based upon fluorescent confocal imaging we have tracked the movement of autofluorescent compounds through skin in near real time with high temporal and spatial resolution and sensitivity. The ability to measure the diffusion of compounds through skin with such resolution plays an important role for applications such as monitoring the penetration of pharmaceuticals applied to skin and assessing the integrity of the skin barrier. Several measurement methods exist, but they suffer from a number of problems such as being slow, expensive, non-portable and lacking sensitivity. To address these issues, we adapted a technique that we previously developed for tracking fluorescent compounds in the eye to measure the autofluorescence and the diffusion of externally applied fluorescent compounds in skin in vivo. Results are presented that show the change in autofluorescence of the volar forearm over the course of a week. We furthermore demonstrate the ability of the instrument to measure the diffusion speed and depth of externally applied fluorescent compounds both in healthy skin and after the skin barrier function has been perturbed. The instrument is currently being developed further for increased sensitivity and multi-wavelength excitation. We believe that the presented instrument is suitable for a large number of applications in fields such as assessment of damage to the skin barrier, development of topical and systemic medication and tracking the diffusion of fluorescent compounds through skin constructs as well as monitoring effects of skin products and general consumer products which may come into contact with the skin.

  10. Capturing Depolarization Information in GPS Reflections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelly, Kenneth C.

    2000-01-01

    The state of the surface of the ocean has a prominent effect on the depolarization of the circularly polarized emissions of the GPS satellites. The system designers election to capture the important information carries with it the need to implement the data extraction in a cost efficient manner. Antenna components, and associated networks for deriving depolarization information are described. For typical sea states the polarization characteristics of the reflected GPS signal vary rapidly with time so various methods for recording the changes are discussed.

  11. Dynamics of Nanoconfined Fluids measured by combined Force Microscopy and Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subba Rao, Venkatesh; Pantea, Mircea; Grabowski, Christopher; Mukhopadhyay, Ashis; Hoffmann, Peter

    2009-03-01

    We present work performed on a model liquid, tetrakis(2-ethylhexoxy)silane (TEHOS), using Atomic Force microscopy (AFM) and Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy (FCS) to study its dynamical structure at the nanoscale. A novel homebuilt interferometer-based small amplitude AFM was used to measure directly the stiffness and damping coefficient of TEHOS film. Oscillations in stiffness and damping coefficient with period ˜1 nm (TEHOS molecular size) were observed. Translational diffusion in spin-coated TEHOS films was measured using Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy (FCS). Diffusion was found to be heterogeneous. Finally we present the ongoing work on an integrated platform of AFM and FCS to perform simultaneous measurements of nanoconfined fluids. Recent results using this new setup on a fluorescently labelled nanoparticle solution in confinement will be discussed.

  12. [The method of phytoplankton photosynthesis activity in-situ measurement based on light induced fluorescence].

    PubMed

    Liu, Jing; Liu, Wen-qing; Zhao, Nan-jing; Zhang, Yu-jun; Ma, Ming-jun; Yin, Gao-fang; Dai, Pang-da; Wang, Zhi-gang; Wang, Chun-long; Duan, Jing-bo; Yu, Xiao-ya; Fang, Li

    2013-09-01

    According to the phytoplankton fluorescence induction characteristics under different light conditions, chlorophyll fluorescence as a probe for analysis of phytoplankton photosynthesis was studied. The present paper proposed a in-situ measurement method based on the chlorophyll fluorescence values Ft and Fm to get phytoplankton photosynthesis activity, Chlorella vulgaris, microcystis aeruginosa and Cyclotella meneghiniana Kiits were selected as experimental subjects, a comparison test was done between self-developed in-situ measurement system and Water PAM in lab, and the results showed that coefficients between the two methods were 0.9778, 0.8786 and 0.7953. This work provides a rapid and in-situ measurement method for phytoplankton photosynthesis activity.

  13. Calibration of the Pierre Auger Observatory fluorescence detectors and the effect on measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gookin, Ben

    The Pierre Auger Observatory is a high-energy cosmic ray observatory located in Malargue, Mendoza, Argentina. It is used to probe the highest energy particles in the Universe, with energies greater than 1018 eV, which strike the Earth constantly. The observatory uses two techniques to observe the air shower initiated by a cosmic ray: a surface detector composed of an array of more than 1600 water Cherenkov tanks covering 3000 km2, and 27 nitrogen fluorescence telescopes overlooking this array. The Cherenkov detectors run all the time and therefore have high statistics on the air showers. The fluorescence detectors run only on clear moonless nights, but observe the longitudinal development of the air shower and make a calorimetric measure of its energy. The energy measurement from the the fluorescence detectors is used to cross calibrate the surface detectors, and makes the measurements made by the Auger Observatory surface detector highly model-independent. The calibration of the fluorescence detectors is then of the utmost importance to the measurements of the Observatory. Described here are the methods of the absolute and multi-wavelength calibration of the fluorescence detectors, and improvements in each leading to a reduction in calibration uncertainties to 4% and 3.5%, respectively. Also presented here are the effects of introducing a new, and more detailed, multi-wavelength calibration on the fluorescence detector energy estimation and the depth of the air shower maximum measurement, leading to a change of 1+-0.03% in the absolute energy scale at 1018 eV, and a negligible change in the measurement on shower maximum.

  14. Peptide-based fluorescence biosensors for detection/measurement of nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Akinloye, Oluyemi; Krishnamurthy, Ramanarayan; Wishart, David; Goss, Greg G

    2017-02-01

    The ability to detect and quantify nanoparticles is essential but there is currently no simple, sensitive, and rapid method for the detection of nanomaterials. We have developed a novel peptide-based fluorescence-based biosensor for detection and measurement of negatively charged engineered nanoparticles (ENPs). A peptide biosensor (seven lysine residues linked to a cysteine through a three glycine residue linker) with attached fluorescent probes-fluorescein-5-maleimide (F5M) and tetramethylrhodamine-5-maleimide (TMR5M)-was constructed. The fluorescent probes allow close monitoring of the molecular interaction of the labeled peptide with ENPs. The ENP-peptide interaction induces the formation of agglomerates that can be detected and measured by changes in the fluorescence intensities of the labeled peptides or/and by differential light scattering. The relative fluorescence intensities of F5M and TMR5M decreased in a concentration-dependent manner on interaction with various types of negatively charged ENPs (ZnO, Fe3O4, CeO, and single-walled carbon nanotubes). Differential light scattering measurements also showed increases in the hydrodynamic size of the complex. The interactions were not affected by the pH of aqueous media, where humic acid (1 μg/mL) quenched the fluorescence intensity of F5M by approximately 25 %, whereas that of TMR5M was completely quenched. Interference by humic acid at lower concentrations was less prevalent. This novel method is a simple, rapid, and inexpensive in situ assay that shows promise as a primary-level testing technique for detection of ENPs in environmental samples. Graphical Abstract Detection of nanomaterials in aqueous solutions using fluorescently-labeled designer peptides.

  15. Fluorescent reports for detection and measurement of DNA damage

    SciTech Connect

    Uziel, M.; Houck, K. )

    1993-01-01

    Epidemiological studies of real populations are complicated by the inevitable coexistence of exposure to multiple agents within the target population. An alternative method for characterizing these types of exposures is to use the reactive chemical functional group as the toxic agent identify the corresponding classes (families) of damage as markers of effects. We have begun studies to develop spectrometric reporters of DNA damage that can be measured on intact DNA. The direct measurement of adducts on microgram levels of DNA from tissue biopsy may succeed because of the high sensitivity and selectivity of different reporter compounds. While one cannot readily distinguish between recent or persistent exposures, baseline values for individuals may be constructed. For example, normal oxidative metabolism and environmental radiation create oxidation processes that continually damage DNA. These reactions create lesions that can be measured with the reporter compound FABA [N- (5- fluoresceinyl), N[prime]-(3-boronatophenyl)thioureal]. We report preliminary observations with binding FABA (selective for cis, vicdiol structures) to damage sites present on intact nonirradiated and irradiated DNA from C3H10T[sub 1/2] cells. We have observed binding of 42,000 FABA per mouse tetraploid genome (9 billion base pairs) to the putative thymidylic glycol resulting from normal oxidative processes in nonirradiated DNA. Additional binding of FABA to DNA from cells exposed to 100, 300, and 500 rad shows an exponential increase in binding sites of up to 140,000 with 500 rad exposure. This damage reporter may prove useful in characterizing levels of nonovert and overt oxidative damage to DNA.

  16. Planar temperature measurement in compressible flows using laser-induced iodine fluorescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartfield, Roy J., Jr.; Hollo, Steven D.; Mcdaniel, James C.

    1991-01-01

    A laser-induced iodine fluorescence technique that is suitable for the planar measurement of temperature in cold nonreacting compressible air flows is investigated analytically and demonstrated in a known flow field. The technique is based on the temperature dependence of the broadband fluorescence from iodine excited by the 514-nm line of an argon-ion laser. Temperatures ranging from 165 to 245 K were measured in the calibration flow field. This technique makes complete, spatially resolved surveys of temperature practical in highly three-dimensional, low-temperature compressible flows.

  17. Planar temperature measurement in compressible flows using laser-induced iodine fluorescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartfield, Roy J., Jr.; Hollo, Steven D.; Mcdaniel, James C.

    1991-01-01

    A laser-induced iodine fluorescence technique that is suitable for the planar measurement of temperature in cold nonreacting compressible air flows is investigated analytically and demonstrated in a known flow field. The technique is based on the temperature dependence of the broadband fluorescence from iodine excited by the 514-nm line of an argon-ion laser. Temperatures ranging from 165 to 245 K were measured in the calibration flow field. This technique makes complete, spatially resolved surveys of temperature practical in highly three-dimensional, low-temperature compressible flows.

  18. Fast repetition rate (FRR) fluorometer and method for measuring fluorescence and photosynthetic parameters

    DOEpatents

    Kolber, Z.; Falkowski, P.

    1995-06-20

    A fast repetition rate fluorometer device and method for measuring in vivo fluorescence of phytoplankton or higher plants chlorophyll and photosynthetic parameters of phytoplankton or higher plants is revealed. The phytoplankton or higher plants are illuminated with a series of fast repetition rate excitation flashes effective to bring about and measure resultant changes in fluorescence yield of their Photosystem II. The series of fast repetition rate excitation flashes has a predetermined energy per flash and a rate greater than 10,000 Hz. Also, disclosed is a flasher circuit for producing the series of fast repetition rate flashes. 14 figs.

  19. Fast repetition rate (FRR) fluorometer and method for measuring fluorescence and photosynthetic parameters

    DOEpatents

    Kolber, Zbigniew; Falkowski, Paul

    1995-06-20

    A fast repetition rate fluorometer device and method for measuring in vivo fluorescence of phytoplankton or higher plants chlorophyll and photosynthetic parameters of phytoplankton or higher plants by illuminating the phytoplankton or higher plants with a series of fast repetition rate excitation flashes effective to bring about and measure resultant changes in fluorescence yield of their Photosystem II. The series of fast repetition rate excitation flashes has a predetermined energy per flash and a rate greater than 10,000 Hz. Also, disclosed is a flasher circuit for producing the series of fast repetition rate flashes.

  20. An assay to measure the affinity of proteins for microtubules by quantitative fluorescent microscopy.

    PubMed

    Graczyk, Beth; Davis, Trisha N

    2011-03-15

    We report a fluorescence-based assay for measuring the affinity of microtubule binding proteins for microtubules. The affinity of any fluorescently tagged protein for taxol-stabilized microtubules can be measured with this assay. We describe the assay and provide a detailed protocol. Using this assay, we found that the affinity of the Dam1 complex for microtubules is decreased by the presence of free unpolymerized tubulin and is sensitive to the salt concentration in the binding buffer. These effects may account for the previous differences in binding affinities reported. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Noninvasive measurement of pharmacokinetics by near-infrared fluorescence imaging in the eye of mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobosz, Michael; Strobel, Steffen; Stubenrauch, Kay-Gunnar; Osl, Franz; Scheuer, Werner

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: For generating preclinical pharmacokinetics (PKs) of compounds, blood is drawn at different time points and levels are quantified by different analytical methods. In order to receive statistically meaningful data, 3 to 5 animals are used for each time point to get serum peak-level and half-life of the compound. Both characteristics are determined by data interpolation, which may influence the accuracy of these values. We provide a method that allows continuous monitoring of blood levels noninvasively by measuring the fluorescence intensity of labeled compounds in the eye and other body regions of anesthetized mice. Procedures: The method evaluation was performed with four different fluorescent compounds: (i) indocyanine green, a nontargeting dye; (ii) OsteoSense750, a bone targeting agent; (iii) tumor targeting Trastuzumab-Alexa750; and (iv) its F(-alxea750 fragment. The latter was used for a direct comparison between fluorescence imaging and classical blood analysis using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Results: We found an excellent correlation between blood levels measured by noninvasive eye imaging with the results generated by classical methods. A strong correlation between eye imaging and ELISA was demonstrated for the F( fragment. Whole body imaging revealed a compound accumulation in the expected regions (e.g., liver, bone). Conclusions: The combination of eye and whole body fluorescence imaging enables the simultaneous measurement of blood PKs and biodistribution of fluorescent-labeled compounds.

  2. On the Use of Radar Depolarization Ratios for Estimating Shapes of Ice Hydrometeors in Winter Clouds.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matrosov, Sergey Y.; Reinking, Roger F.; Kropfli, Robert A.; Martner, Brooks E.; Bartram, B. W.

    2001-03-01

    An approach is suggested to relate measurements of radar depolarization ratios and aspect ratios of predominant hydrometeors in nonprecipitating and weakly precipitating layers of winter clouds. The trends of elevation angle dependencies of depolarization ratios are first used to distinguish between columnar-type and plate-type particles. For the established particle type, values of depolarization ratios observed at certain elevation angles, for which the influence of particle orientation is minimal, are then used to estimate aspect ratios when information on particle effective bulk density is assumed or inferred from other measurements. The use of different polarizations, including circular, slant-45° linear, and two elliptical polarizations, is discussed. These two elliptical polarizations are quasi-circular and quasi-linear slant-45° linear, and both are currently achievable with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Environmental Technology Laboratory's Ka-band radar. In comparison with the true circular and slant-45° linear polarizations, the discussed elliptical polarizations provide a stronger signal in the `weak' radar receiver channel; however, it is at the expense of diminished dynamic range of depolarization ratio variations. For depolarization measurements at the radar elevation angles that do not show much sensitivity to particle orientations, the available quasi-circular polarization provides a better depolarization contrast between nonspherical and spherical particles than does the available quasi-linear slant-45°polarization. The use of the proposed approach is illustrated with the experimental data collected during a recent field experiment. It is shown that it allows successful differentiation among pristine planar crystals, rimed planar crystals, long columns, blocky columns, and graupel. When a reasonable assumption about particle bulk density is made, quantitative estimates of particle aspect ratios from radar depolarization

  3. Laser induced fluorescence measurements and modeling of nitric oxide in high-pressure premixed flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reisel, John R.; Laurendeau, Normand M.

    1994-01-01

    Laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) has been applied to the quantitative measurement of nitric oxide (NO) in premixed, laminar, high-pressure flames. Their chemistry was also studied using three current kinetics schemes to determine the predictive capabilities of each mechanism with respect to NO concentrations. The flames studied were low-temperature (1600 less than T less than 1850K) C2H6/O2/N2 and C2H6/O2/N2 flames, and high temperature (2100 less than T less than 2300K) C2H6/O2/N2 flames. Laser-saturated fluorescence (LSF) was initially used to measure the NO concentrations. However, while the excitation transition was well saturated at atmospheric pressure, the fluorescence behavior was basically linear with respect to laser power at pressures above 6 atm. Measurements and calculations demonstrated that the fluorescence quenching rate variation is negligible for LIF measurements of NO at a given pressure. Therefore, linear LIF was used to perform quantitative measurements of NO concentration in these high-pressure flames. The transportability of a calibration factor from one set of flame conditions to another also was investigated by considering changes in the absorption and quenching environment for different flame conditions. The feasibility of performing LIF measurements of (NO) in turbulent flames was studied; the single-shot detection limit was determined to be 2 ppm.

  4. A portable time-domain LED fluorimeter for nanosecond fluorescence lifetime measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Hongtao; Salthouse, Christopher D.; Qi, Ying; Mountziaris, T. J.

    2014-05-15

    Fluorescence lifetime measurements are becoming increasingly important in chemical and biological research. Time-domain lifetime measurements offer fluorescence multiplexing and improved handling of interferers compared with the frequency-domain technique. In this paper, an all solid-state, filterless, and highly portable light-emitting-diode based time-domain fluorimeter (LED TDF) is reported for the measurement of nanosecond fluorescence lifetimes. LED based excitation provides more wavelengths options compared to laser diode based excitation, but the excitation is less effective due to the uncollimated beam, less optical power, and longer latency in state transition. Pulse triggering and pre-bias techniques were implemented in our LED TDF to improve the peak optical power to over 100 mW. The proposed pulsing circuit achieved an excitation light fall time of less than 2 ns. Electrical resetting technique realized a time-gated photo-detector to remove the interference of the excitation light with fluorescence. These techniques allow the LED fluorimeter to accurately measure the fluorescence lifetime of fluorescein down to concentration of 0.5 μM. In addition, all filters required in traditional instruments are eliminated for the non-attenuated excitation/emission light power. These achievements make the reported device attractive to biochemical laboratories seeking for highly portable lifetime detection devices for developing sensors based on fluorescence lifetime changes. The device was initially validated by measuring the lifetimes of three commercial fluorophores and comparing them with reported lifetime data. It was subsequently used to characterize a ZnSe quantum dot based DNA sensor.

  5. Dualex: A New Instrument for Field Measurements of Epidermal Ultraviolet Absorbance by Chlorophyll Fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goulas, Yves; Cerovic, Zoran G.; Cartelat, Aurélie; Moya, Ismaël

    2004-08-01

    Dualex (dual excitation) is a field-portable instrument, hereby described, for the assessment of polyphenolic compounds in leaves from the measurement of UV absorbance of the leaf epidermis by double excitation of chlorophyll fluorescence. The instrument takes advantage of a feedback loop that equalizes the fluorescence level induced by a reference red light to the UV-light-induced fluorescence level. This allows quick measurement from attached leaves even under field conditions. The use of light-emitting diodes and of a leaf-clip configuration makes Dualex a user-friendly instrument with potential applications in ecophysiological research, light climate analysis, agriculture, forestry, horticulture, pest management, selection of medicinal plants, and wherever accumulation of leaf polyphenolics is involved in plant responses to the environment.

  6. Ruby fluorescence lifetime measurements for temperature determinations at high (p, T)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, Johannes D.; Bayarjargal, Lkhamsuren; Winkler, Björn

    2012-06-01

    The lifetime of the ruby R1 fluorescence line was measured as a function of pressure (up to about 20 GPa) and temperature (550 K) in an externally heated diamond anvil cell (DAC). At constant temperatures, the lifetime is increasing linearly with increasing pressure. The slope of the pressure dependence is constant up to a temperature of 450 K and it is decreasing at higher temperatures. At constant pressure, the lifetime is exponentially decreasing with increasing temperature. The (p, T)-dependence can be parametrized by the combination of a linear and an exponential function. This allows an accurate p, T-determination by the combination of fluorescence spectroscopy using Sm2+-doped strontium tetraborate and lifetime measurements of ruby, as the energy of the Sm2+ fluorescence is nearly temperature-independent.

  7. Composition measurement of bicomponent droplets using laser-induced fluorescence of acetone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maqua, C.; Depredurand, V.; Castanet, G.; Wolff, M.; Lemoine, F.

    2007-12-01

    Commercial fuels are complex mixtures, the evaporation of which remains particularly difficult to model. Experimental characterization of the differential vaporization of the components is a problem that is seldom addressed. In this paper, the evaporation of binary droplets made of ethyl-alcohol and acetone is investigated using a technique of measurement of the droplet composition developed in purpose. This technique exploits the laser induced fluorescence of acetone which acts as a fluorescent tracer as well as the more volatile component of the fuel associated with an accurate measurement of the droplet diameter by forward scattering interferometry. A model of the fluorescence intensity of the binary mixture, taking into account the absorption of the acetone molecules, is proposed and validated. The sensitivity of the technique is discussed. Finally, the reliability of the technique is demonstrated on binary combusting droplets in linear stream.

  8. Monitoring dynamical vegetation processes with solar-induced chlorophyll fluorescence measurements from space (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno, J. F.; Guanter, L.; Alonso, L.; Gomez-Chova, L.; Drusch, M.; Kraft, S.; Carnicero, B.; Bezy, J.

    2009-12-01

    Fluorescence is a powerful non-invasive tool to track the status, resilience, and recovery of photochemical processes and moreover provides important information on overall vegetation photosynthetic performance with implications for related carbon sequestration, allowing to measure planetary photosynthesis by means of a global monitoring of steady-state chlorophyll fluorescence in terrestrial vegetation. The FLuorescence EXperiment (FLEX) is designed to observe the photosynthetic activity of the vegetation layer, by using a completely novel technique measuring the chlorophyll fluorescence signal that originates from the core of the photosynthetic machinery, i.e. the ‘breathing’ of the vegetation layer of the living planet. Conceived as a technology demonstration mission, it proposes a set of instruments for the measurement of the interrelated features of fluorescence, spectral reflectance, and canopy temperature, by using a dedicated small satellite flying in tandem with GMES Sentinel-3. This will provide a completely new possibility to quantify the photosynthetic efficiency of terrestrial ecosystems at the global scale, to improve the predictability of dynamical vegetation models on scales comprising canopies and biomes, and to provide an improved estimate of GPP for a better understanding of the global carbon cycle. It will also improve understanding of the role of vegetation in the coupled global carbon / water cycles, the global assessment of the vegetation health conditions and vegetation stress and the support the development of future crop production strategies in a changing climate. The measurement represent a challenge: the weak fluorescence signal is masked by the reflected background radiance, and accurate compensation of all perturbing effects becomes essential. Recent developments have demonstrated the feasibility of the measurements of canopy fluorescence from space. Recent model developments and data processing tools have made possible to

  9. A low cost fluorescence lifetime measurement system based on SPAD detectors and FPGA processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franch, N.; Alonso, O.; Canals, J.; Vilà, A.; Dieguez, A.

    2017-02-01

    This work presents a low cost fluorescence life time measurement system, aimed at carrying out fast diagnostic tests through label detection in a portable system so it can be used in a medical consultation, within a short time span. The system uses Time Correlated Single Photon Counting (TCSPC), measuring the arrival time of individual photons and building a histogram of those times, showing the fluorescence decay of the label which is characteristic of each fluorescent substance. The system is implemented using a Xilinx FPGA which controls the experiment and includes a Time to Digital Converter (TDC) to perform measurements with a resolution in the order of tenths of picoseconds. Also included are a laser diode and the driving electronics to generate short pulses as well as a HV-CMOS implemented Single Photon Avalanche Diode (SPAD) as a high gain sensor. The system is entirely configurable so it can easily be adapted to the target label molecule and measurement needs. The histogram is constructed within the FPGA and can then be read as convenient. Various performance parameters are also shown, as well as experimental measurements of a quantum dot fluorescence decay as a proof of concept.

  10. High microvascular endothelial water permeability in mouse lung measured by a pleural surface fluorescence method.

    PubMed Central

    Carter, E P; Olveczky, B P; Matthay, M A; Verkman, A S

    1998-01-01

    Transport of water between the capillary and airspace compartments in lung encounters serial barriers: the alveolar epithelium, interstitium, and capillary endothelium. We previously reported a pleural surface fluorescence method to measure net capillary-to-airspace water transport. To measure the osmotic water permeability across the microvascular endothelial barrier in intact lung, the airspace was filled with a water-immiscible fluorocarbon. The capillaries were perfused via the pulmonary artery with solutions of specified osmolalites containing a high-molecular-weight fluorescent dextran. An increase in perfusate osmolality produced a prompt decrease in surface fluorescence due to dye dilution in the capillaries, followed by a slower return to initial fluorescence as capillary and lung interstitial osmolality equilibrate. A mathematical model was developed to determine the osmotic water permeability coefficient (Pf) of lung microvessels from the time course of pleural surface fluorescence. As predicted, the magnitude of the prompt change in surface fluorescence increased with decreased pulmonary artery perfusion rate and increased osmotic gradient size. With raffinose used to induce the osmotic gradient, Pf was 0.03 cm/s at 23 degrees C and was reduced 54% by 0.5 mM HgCl2. Temperature dependence measurements gave an Arrhenius activation energy (Ea) of 5.4 kcal/mol (12-37 degrees C). The apparent Pf induced by the smaller osmolytes mannitol and glycine was 0.021 and 0.011 cm/s (23 degrees C). Immunoblot analysis showed approximately 1.4 x 10(12) aquaporin-1 water channels/cm2 of capillary surface, which accounted quantitatively for the high Pf. These results establish a novel method for measuring osmotically driven water permeability across microvessels in intact lung. The high Pf, low Ea, and mercurial inhibition indicate the involvement of molecular water channels in water transport across the lung endothelium. PMID:9545071

  11. Time resolved laser induced fluorescence measurements: Considerations when using Nd:YAG based system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabasovic, Maja S.; Sevic, Dragutin; Terzic, Mira; Marinkovic, Bratislav P.

    2012-05-01

    Time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence (TR-LIF) and the laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) have been shown to be methods which are fast and sensitive to provide information about the constituents in analyzed samples. TR-LIF and LIBS have similar hardware requirements. In this paper, we analyze some characteristics of TR-LIF/LIBS system implemented in our laboratory, considering the fact that the excitation part of the system is based on Nd:YAG laser and Optical Parametric Oscillator (OPO). The laser is more than powerful enough (365 mJ at 1064 nm, variable OPO output >5 mJ) for LIBS, but somehow slow (the length of fundamental laser harmonic output pulse is about 5 ns) for fluorescence measurements in our present area of interest, namely plants and food products. Fortunately, the pulse length of tunable OPO output (320-475 nm) is less then 1 ns, so by means of a correct deconvolution procedure it is possible to measure the fluorescence lifetimes in the range as small as a few nanoseconds. The fluorescence detection part of our system is based on picosecond streak camera. Using the fluorescent dyes (Rhodamine B and Fluorescein) ethanol solutions we verified the analyzing capabilities of our TR-LIF system.

  12. Prediction of myocardial damage depth induced by extracellular photosensitization reaction using fluorescence measurement in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, M.; Ogawa, E.; Nakamura, T.; Kawakami, H.; Machida, N.; Yajima, M.; Kurotsu, M.; Ito, A.; Kimura, T.; Arai, T.

    2014-03-01

    We experimentally studied the correlation between myocardial damage depth due to the extracellular photosensitization reaction (PR) using talaporfin sodium and fluorescence-fall amount (FA), which is calculated from the measured backscattering fluorescence intensity via a manipulatable 7 Fr. laser catheter during the PR operation in vivo to establish treatment depth predictor for a non-thermal tachyarrhythmia treatment. The PR was performed to left and/or right ventricle in the open-chest canine heart. The laser irradiation of 663+/-2 nm in wavelength via the laser catheter was operated 15 min after the intravenous administration of talaporfin sodium with concentration of 36.2+/-8.0 μg/ml in plasma. The irradiation was operated with irradiance of 5, 10, 20 W/cm2, and duration of 5, 10, 20 s. Backscattering fluorescence of 710+/-2 nm in wavelength was measured via the laser catheter during the PR. The FA was calculated multiplying the irradiation duration by the fluorescence-fall, which is subtraction of the fluorescence intensity at the kickoff and end of the irradiation. The canine heart was extracted 1 week after the PR and HE stained specimen was histologically evaluated. The correlation of the myocardial damage depth and FA was investigated. We found that FA obtained a logarithmic relation to the myocardial damage depth. We think that the FA might be available to predict the PR induced myocardial damage depth for the application of tachyarrhythmia treatment under catheterization in vivo.

  13. Site-specific multipoint fluorescence measurement system with end-capped optical fibers.

    PubMed

    Song, Woosub; Moon, Sucbei; Lee, Byoung-Cheol; Park, Chul-Seung; Kim, Dug Young; Kwon, Hyuk Sang

    2011-07-10

    We present the development and implementation of a spatially and spectrally resolved multipoint fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) system utilizing multiple end-capped optical fibers and an inexpensive laser source. Specially prepared end-capped optical fibers placed in an image plane were used to both collect fluorescence signals from the sample and to deliver signals to the detectors. The placement of independently selected optical fibers on the image plane was done by monitoring the end-capped fiber tips at the focus using a CCD, and fluorescence from specific positions of a sample were collected by an end-capped fiber, which could accurately represent light intensities or spectral data without incurring any disturbance. A fast multipoint spectroscopy system with a time resolution of ∼1.5 ms was then implemented using a prism and an electron multiplying charge coupled device with a pixel binning for the region of interest. The accuracy of our proposed system was subsequently confirmed by experimental results, based on an FCS analysis of microspheres in distilled water. We expect that the proposed multipoint site-specific fluorescence measurement system can be used as an inexpensive fluorescence measurement tool to study many intracellular and molecular dynamics in cell biology. © 2011 Optical Society of America

  14. Anisole fluorescence spectroscopy for temperature measurements with a Hg (Xe) arc lamp excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guibert, P.; Kanumuri, S. S.; Bonnety, J.; Tran, K.-H.; Serio, B.; Bonnet, D.; Luc, J.; Lavayssiere, M.

    2017-04-01

    The main contribution of this study is to propose time-resolved measurements to determine temperature with a novel source of continuous excitation for an induced fluorescence technique with laser diagnosis based on tracer-induced fluorescence, which has become a major tool for experimental studies of fluid dynamics in reaction flows. We use a Hg (Xe) arc lamp as a continuous light source that has a wide range of emissions in wavelength. With this setup, one can reach high spatial and temporal resolution (temperature, pressure, species concentration, and velocity) to acquire quantitative data for the control of fluid thermal systems, such as engines, combustion chambers, furnaces, and reactors. A fluorescence study was performed on various tracers and their configurations. We focus on an anisole tracer using a broad wavelength of excitations. We propose a calibration to achieve temperature measurements in the range of 493-773 K and from 0.2 to 3.5 MPa of pressure. The temperature-dependent fluorescence is based on a two-line technique. The results give a better understanding of the influence of temperature and pressure in a nitrogen bath gas on the fluorescence photophysics in the UV domain. High temporal resolution was acquired using a high-speed intensified camera setup. The application of the photomultipliers manages the time-scale evolution of the flow in continuous emission and this eliminates the signal-to-noise ratio impact.

  15. Atomic and Molecular Depolarizing Collision Rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bommier, V.

    2009-06-01

    This paper is divided in three parts: after having recalled the different types of collisions with the different types of perturbers and having provided rough orders of magnitude of the collision rates, three cases are discussed. Although the most frequent type of depolarizing collision is the one of the collisions with the surrounding Hydrogen atoms, we discuss in the first part a particular case where the depolarizing collision effect is due to collisions with electrons and protons. This is the case of the Hydrogen lines observed in solar prominences. We recall how the interpretation of polarization observations in two lines has led to the joint determination of the magnetic field vector and the electron and proton density, and we show that this density determination gives results in agreement with the densities determined by interpretation of the Stark effect, provided that this last effect be evaluated in the impact approximation scheme which is indeed more valid than the quasistatic approach at these densities. In the second part, we describe a method that has been recently developed for the computation of the depolarizing rates in the case of collisions with the neutral Hydrogen atom. The case of molecular lines is less favourable, because, even if depolarizing collision rates computation may be soon expected and begin to be done inside the ground level of the molecule, calculations inside the excited states are far from the present ability. In the third part, we present an example where the excited state depolarizing rates were evaluated together with the magnetic field through the differential Hanle effect interpretation, based on the fact that the molecule provides a series of lines of different sensitivities that can be compared. This led to an experimental/observational determination of these rates, waiting for future theoretical computations for comparison.

  16. Depolarized light scattering studies of the collision induced polarizability anisotropy of atoms and spherical top molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunmur, D. A.; Manterfield, M. R.; Robinson, D. J.

    New measurements are reported of the density dependent depolarization ratio for argon, krypton, xenon, methane and sulphur hexafluoride, and the results are analysed to provide values for the second and third depolarization virial coefficients. The relationships between the second depolarization virial coefficient, the zeroth moment of the two-body Rayleigh spectrum and the second Kerr virial coefficient are considered, and it is shown that they now provide consistent results for the collision-induced pair polarizability anisotropy. Former inconsistencies are attributed to insufficient allowance for the effects of three-body interactions. Calculations of the second and third depolarization virial coefficients based on the DID model and using the Maitland-Smith potential are in excellent agreement with the experimental results for argon, krypton and xenon.

  17. 10 CFR Appendix Q to Subpart B of... - Uniform Test Method for Measuring the Energy Consumption of Fluorescent Lamp Ballasts

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Uniform Test Method for Measuring the Energy Consumption... Appendix Q to Subpart B of Part 430—Uniform Test Method for Measuring the Energy Consumption of Fluorescent... reference; see § 430.3). The test for measuring standby mode energy consumption of fluorescent lamp ballasts...

  18. Filter-fluorescer measurement of low-voltage simulator x-ray energy spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Baldwin, G.T.; Craven, R.E.

    1986-01-01

    X-ray energy spectra of the Maxwell Laboratories MBS and Physics International Pulserad 737 were measured using an eight-channel filter-fluorescer array. The PHOSCAT computer code was used to calculate channel response functions, and the UFO code to unfold spectrum.

  19. Myoplasmic binding of fura-2 investigated by steady-state fluorescence and absorbance measurements.

    PubMed

    Konishi, M; Olson, A; Hollingworth, S; Baylor, S M

    1988-12-01

    Binding of the fluorescent Ca2+ indicator dye fura-2 by intracellular constituents has been investigated by steady-state optical measurements. Fura-2's (a) fluorescence intensity, (b) fluorescence emission anisotropy, (c) fluorescence emission spectrum, and (d) absorbance spectra were measured in glass capillary tubes containing solutions of purified myoplasmic proteins; properties b and c were also measured in frog skeletal muscle fibers microinjected with fura-2. The results indicate that more than half, and possibly as much as 85%, of fura-2 molecules in myoplasm are in a protein-bound form, and that the binding changes many properties of the dye. For example, in vitro characterization of the Ca2+-dye reaction indicates that when fura-2 is bound to aldolase (a large and abundant myoplasmic protein), the dissociation constant of the dye for Ca2+ is three- to fourfold larger than that measured in the absence of protein. The problems raised by intracellular binding of fura-2 to cytoplasmic proteins may well apply to cells other than skeletal muscle fibers.

  20. Fluorescence lifetime measurements of NADH and tryptophan in intact ischemic, intact rabbit myocardium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamburger, Adrian; Gryczynski, Zygmunt; Lakowicz, Joseph R.; Sommers, Keith

    1999-07-01

    Ischemia-reperfusion injury is the leading cause of early dysfunction following transplantation. Currently, there are no techniques available to accurately measure ischemic changes during organ storage. Therefore, the interest exists in developing non-invasive monitoring techniques. We used NADH and tryptophan as fluorescent markers, since both are intrinsic fluorophores and excellent indicators for levels of hypoxia and protein denaturation, respectively.

  1. Measurement of air and nitrogen fluorescence light yields induced by electron beam for UHECR experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colin, P.; Chukanov, A.; Grebenyuk, V.; Naumov, D.; Nédélec, P.; Nefedov, Y.; Onofre, A.; Porokhovoi, S.; Sabirov, B.; Tkatchev, L.; Macfly Collaboration

    2007-06-01

    Most of the Ultra High Energy Cosmic Ray (UHECR) experiments and projects (HiRes, AUGER, TA, EUSO, TUS, etc.) use air fluorescence to detect and measure extensive air showers (EAS). The precise knowledge of the Fluorescence Light Yield (FLY) is of paramount importance for the reconstruction of UHECR. The MACFLY—Measurement of Air Cherenkov and Fluorescence Light Yield—experiment has been designed to perform such FLY measurements. In this paper we will present the results of FLY in the 290-440 nm wavelength range for dry air and pure nitrogen, both excited by electrons with energy of 1.5 MeV, 20 GeV and 50 GeV. The experiment uses a 90Sr radioactive source for low energy measurement and a CERN SPS e - beam for high energy. We find that the FLY is proportional to the deposited energy ( Ed) in the gas and we show that the air fluorescence properties remain constant independently of the electron energy. At the reference point: atmospheric dry air at 1013 hPa and 23 °C, the ratio FLY/ Ed = 17.6 photon/MeV with a systematic error of 13.2%.

  2. Winter wheat GPC estimation with fluorescence-based sensor measurements of canopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Xiaoyu; Wang, Jihua; Gu, Xiaohe; Xu, Xingang

    2015-10-01

    This study focused on the wheat grain protein content (GPC) estimation based on wheat canopy chlorophyll parameters which acquired by hand-held instrument, Multiplex 3. Nine fluorescence spectral indices from Multiplex sensor were used in this study. The wheat GPC estimation experiment was conducted in 2012 at the National Experiment Station for Precision Agriculture in Changping district, Beijing. A square with area of 1.1 ha was selected and divided to 110 small plots by 10×10m in this study. In each plot, four 1-m2 area distributed in the square were selected for canopy fluorescence spectral measurements, physiological and biochemical analyses. Measurements were performed five times at wheat raising, jointing, heading stage, milking and ripening stage, respectively. The wheat plant samples for each plot were then collected after the measurement and sent to Lab for leaf N concentration (LNC) and canopy nitrogen density (CND) analyzed. GPC sampling for each plot was collected manually during the harvested season. Then, statistical analysis were performed to detect the correlation between fluorescence spectral indices and wheat CND for each growth stage, as well as GPC. The results indicate that two Nitrogen Balance Indices, NBI_G and NBI_R were more sensitive to wheat GPC than other fluorescence spectral indices at milking stage and ripening stage. Five linear regression models with GPC and fluorescence indices at different winter wheat growth stages were then established. The R2 of GPC estimated model increased form 0.312 at raising stage to 0.686 at ripening stage. The study reveals that canopy-level fluorescence spectral parameters were better indicators for the wheat group activity and could be demonstrated to be good indicators for winter wheat GPC estimation.

  3. Reliable measurement of E. coli single cell fluorescence distribution using a standard microscope set-up.

    PubMed

    Cortesi, Marilisa; Bandiera, Lucia; Pasini, Alice; Bevilacqua, Alessandro; Gherardi, Alessandro; Furini, Simone; Giordano, Emanuele

    2017-01-01

    Quantifying gene expression at single cell level is fundamental for the complete characterization of synthetic gene circuits, due to the significant impact of noise and inter-cellular variability on the system's functionality. Commercial set-ups that allow the acquisition of fluorescent signal at single cell level (flow cytometers or quantitative microscopes) are expensive apparatuses that are hardly affordable by small laboratories. A protocol that makes a standard optical microscope able to acquire quantitative, single cell, fluorescent data from a bacterial population transformed with synthetic gene circuitry is presented. Single cell fluorescence values, acquired with a microscope set-up and processed with custom-made software, are compared with results that were obtained with a flow cytometer in a bacterial population transformed with the same gene circuitry. The high correlation between data from the two experimental set-ups, with a correlation coefficient computed over the tested dynamic range > 0.99, proves that a standard optical microscope- when coupled with appropriate software for image processing- might be used for quantitative single-cell fluorescence measurements. The calibration of the set-up, together with its validation, is described. The experimental protocol described in this paper makes quantitative measurement of single cell fluorescence accessible to laboratories equipped with standard optical microscope set-ups. Our method allows for an affordable measurement/quantification of intercellular variability, whose better understanding of this phenomenon will improve our comprehension of cellular behaviors and the design of synthetic gene circuits. All the required software is freely available to the synthetic biology community (MUSIQ Microscope flUorescence SIngle cell Quantification).

  4. The retrieval of the Asian dust depolarization ratio in Korea with the correction of the polarization-dependent transmission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Sungkyun; Müller, Detlef; Kim, Y. J.; Tatarov, Boyan; Shin, Dongho; Seifert, Patric; Noh, Young Min

    2013-01-01

    The linear particle depolarization ratios were retrieved from the observation with a multiwavelength Raman lidar at the Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology (GIST), Korea (35.11°N, 126.54°E). The measurements were carried out in spring (March to May) 2011. The transmission ratio measurements were performed to solve problems of the depolarization-dependent transmission at a receiver of the lidar and applied to correct the retrieved depolarization ratio of Asian dust at first time in Korea. The analyzed data from the GIST multiwavelength Raman lidar were classified into three categories according to the linear particle depolarization ratios, which are pure Asian dust on 21 March, the intermediate case which means Asian dust mixed with urban pollution on 13 May, and haze case on 10 April. The measured transmission ratios were applied to these cases respectively. We found that the transmission ratio is needed to be used to retrieve the accurate depolarization ratio of Asian dust and also would be useful to distinguish the mixed dust particles between intermediate case and haze. The particle depolarization ratios of pure Asian dust were approximately 0.25 at 532 nm and 0.14 at 532 nm for the intermediate case. The linear particle depolarization ratios of pure Asian dust observed with the GIST multiwavelength Raman lidar were compared to the linear particle depolarization ratios of Saharan dust observed in Morocco and Asian dust observed both in Japan and China.

  5. Molecular diffusivity measurement through an alumina membrane using time-resolved fluorescence imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennard, Raymond; DeSisto, William J.; Mason, Michael D.

    2010-11-01

    We present a simple fluorescence imaging method for measuring the time-resolved concentration of a fluorescent molecule diffusing through an anodic alumina membrane with a pore diameter of 20 nm. From the concentration breakthrough curve, the molecular diffusivity of the fluorophore was extracted. The experimentally determined diffusivity was three orders of magnitude lower than reported bulk values. Due to the relative simplicity and ease of use, this method can be applied to provide fundamental information for biomolecular separations applications. One feature of this method is the high sensitivity at intercellular volumes broadening its application to drug delivery and controlled cell growth.

  6. Tumor detection in mice by measurement of fluorescence decay time matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cubeddu, R.; Pifferi, A.; Taroni, P.; Valentini, G.; Canti, G.

    1995-12-01

    An intensified CCD video camera has been used to measure the spatial distribution of the fluorescence decay time in tumor-bearing mice sensitized with hematoporphyrin derivative. Mice were injected with five doses of sensitizer, ranging from 0.1 to 10 mg / kg body weight. For any drug dose the decay time of the exogenous fluorescence in the tumor is always significantly longer than in normal tissues. The image created by associating a gray-shade scale to the decay time matrix of each mouse permits a reliable and precise detection of the neoplasia.

  7. A new method for measuring concentration of a fluorescent tracer in bubbly gas-liquid flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moghaddas, J. S.; Trägårdh, C.; Kovacs, T.; Östergren, K.

    2002-06-01

    A new experimental model, the two-tracer method (TTM), based on the planar laser-induced fluorescence technique (PLIF), is presented for the measurement of the local concentration of a fluorescent tracer in the liquid phase of a bubbly two-phase system. Light scattering and shading effects due to the bubbles were compensated for using the new model. The TTM results were found to give more accurate predictions of the local concentration than the normal PLIF method in a bubbly two-phase system.

  8. Diffusivity of asphaltene molecules by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Andrews, A Ballard; Guerra, Rodrigo E; Mullins, Oliver C; Sen, Pabitra N

    2006-07-06

    Using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) we measure the translational diffusion coefficient of asphaltene molecules in toluene at extremely low concentrations (0.03-3.0 mg/L): where aggregation does not occur. We find that the translational diffusion coefficient of asphaltene molecules in toluene is about 0.35 x 10(-5) cm(2)/s at room temperature. This diffusion coefficient corresponds to a hydrodynamic radius of approximately 1 nm. These data confirm previously estimated size from rotational diffusion studied using fluorescence depolarization. The implication of this concurrence is that asphaltene molecular structures are monomeric, not polymeric.

  9. Mueller matrix signature in advanced fluorescence microscopy imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazumder, Nirmal; Qiu, Jianjun; Kao, Fu-Jen; Diaspro, Alberto

    2017-02-01

    We have demonstrated the measurement and characterization of the polarization properties of a fluorescence signal using four-channel photon counting based Stokes-Mueller polarization microscopy. Thus, Lu-Chipman decomposition was applied to extract the critical polarization properties such as depolarization, linear retardance and the optical rotation of collagen type I fiber. We observed the spatial distribution of anisotropic and helical molecules of collagen from the reconstructed 2D Mueller images based on the fluorescence signal in a pixel-by-pixel manner.

  10. Patterning pallet arrays for cell selection based on high-resolution measurements of fluorescent biosensors.

    PubMed

    Shadpour, Hamed; Zawistowski, Jon S; Herman, Annadele; Hahn, Klaus; Allbritton, Nancy L

    2011-06-24

    Pallet arrays enable cells to be separated while they remain adherent to a surface and provide a much greater range of cell selection criteria relative to that of current technologies. However there remains a need to further broaden cell selection criteria to include dynamic intracellular signaling events. To demonstrate the feasibility of measuring cellular protein behavior on the arrays using high resolution microscopy, the surfaces of individual pallets were modified to minimize the impact of scattered light at the pallet edges. The surfaces of the three-dimensional pallets on an array were patterned with a coating such as fibronectin using a customized stamping tool. Micropatterns of varying shape and size were printed in designated regions on the pallets in single or multiple steps to demonstrate the reliability and precision of patterning molecules on the pallet surface. Use of a fibronectin matrix stamped at the center of each pallet permitted the localization of H1299 and mouse embryonic fibroblast (MEF) cells to the pallet centers and away from the edges. Compared to pallet arrays with fibronectin coating the entire top surface, arrays with a central fibronectin pattern increased the percentage of cells localized to the pallet center by 3-4-fold. Localization of cells to the pallet center also enabled the physical separation of cells from optical artifacts created by the rough pallet side walls. To demonstrate the measurement of dynamic intracellular signaling on the arrays, fluorescence measurements of high spatial resolution were performed using a RhoA GTPase biosensor. This biosensor utilized fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) between cyan fluorescent protein (CFP) and yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) to measure localized RhoA activity in cellular ruffles at the cell periphery. These results demonstrated the ability to perform spatially resolved measurements of fluorescence-based sensors on the pallet arrays. Thus, the patterned pallet arrays

  11. Patterning pallet arrays for cell selection based on high-resolution measurements of fluorescent biosensors

    PubMed Central

    Shadpour, Hamed; Zawistowski, Jon S.; Herman, Annadele; Hahn, Klaus; Allbritton, Nancy L.

    2011-01-01

    Pallet arrays enable cells to be separated while they remain adherent to a surface and provide a much greater range of cell selection criteria relative to that of current technologies. However there remains a need to further broaden cell selection criteria to include dynamic intracellular signaling events. To demonstrate the feasibility of measuring cellular protein behavior on the arrays using high resolution microscopy, the surfaces of individual pallets were modified to minimize the impact of scattered light at the pallet edges. The surfaces of the three-dimensional pallets on an array were patterned with a coating such as fibronectin using a customized stamping tool. Micropatterns of varying shape and size were printed in designated regions on the pallets in single or multiple steps to demonstrate the reliability and precision of patterning molecules on the pallet surface. Use of a fibronectin matrix stamped at the center of each pallet permitted the localization of H1299 and mouse embryonic fibroblast (MEF) cells to the pallet centers and away from the edges. Compared to pallet arrays with fibronection coating the entire top surface, arrays with a central fibronectin pattern increased the percentage of cells localized to the pallet center by 3-4 fold. Localization of cells to the pallet center also enabled the physical separation of cells from optical artifacts created by the rough pallet side walls. To demonstrate the measurement of dynamic intracellular signaling on the arrays, fluorescence measurements of high spatial resolution were performed using a RhoA GTPase biosensor. This biosensor utilized fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) between cyan fluorescent protein (CFP) and yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) to measure localized RhoA activity in cellular ruffles at the cell periphery. These results demonstrated the ability to perform spatially resolved measurements of fluorescence-based sensors on the pallet arrays. Thus, the patterned pallet

  12. Depolarization canals and interstellar turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fletcher, A.; Shukurov, A.

    Recent radio polarization observations have revealed a plethora of unexpected features in the polarized Galactic radio background that arise from propagation effects in the random (turbulent) interstellar medium. The canals are especially striking among them, a random network of very dark, narrow regions clearly visible in many directions against a bright polarized Galactic synchrotron background. There are no obvious physical structures in the ISM that may have caused the canals, and so they have been called Faraday ghosts. They evidently carry information about interstellar turbulence but only now is it becoming clear how this information can be extracted. Two theories for the origin of the canals have been proposed; both attribute the canals to Faraday rotation, but one invokes strong gradients in Faraday rotation in the sky plane (specifically, in a foreground Faraday screen) and the other only relies on line-of-sight effects (differential Faraday rotation). In this review we discuss the physical nature of the canals and how they can be used to explore statistical properties of interstellar turbulence. This opens studies of magnetized interstellar turbulence to new methods of analysis, such as contour statistics and related techniques of computational geometry and topology. In particular, we can hope to measure such elusive quantities as the Taylor microscale and the effective magnetic Reynolds number of interstellar MHD turbulence.

  13. Quantitative measurement of binary liquid distributions using multiple-tracer x-ray fluorescence and radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Halls, Benjamin R.; Meyer, Terrence R.; Kastengren, Alan L.

    2015-01-01

    The complex geometry and large index-of-refraction gradients that occur near the point of impingement of binary liquid jets present a challenging environment for optical interrogation. A simultaneous quadruple-tracer x-ray fluorescence and line-of-sight radiography technique is proposed as a means of distinguishing and quantifying individual liquid component distributions prior to, during, and after jet impact. Two different pairs of fluorescence tracers are seeded into each liquid stream to maximize their attenuation ratio for reabsorption correction and differentiation of the two fluids during mixing. This approach for instantaneous correction of x-ray fluorescence reabsorption is compared with a more time-intensive approach of using stereographic reconstruction of x-ray attenuation along multiple lines of sight. The proposed methodology addresses the need for a quantitative measurement technique capable of interrogating optically complex, near-field liquid distributions in many mixing systems of practical interest involving two or more liquid streams.

  14. Fluorescence measurements for evaluating the application of multivariate analysis techniques to optically thick environments.

    SciTech Connect

    Reichardt, Thomas A.; Timlin, Jerilyn Ann; Jones, Howland D. T.; Sickafoose, Shane M.; Schmitt, Randal L.

    2010-09-01

    Laser-induced fluorescence measurements of cuvette-contained laser dye mixtures are made for evaluation of multivariate analysis techniques to optically thick environments. Nine mixtures of Coumarin 500 and Rhodamine 610 are analyzed, as well as the pure dyes. For each sample, the cuvette is positioned on a two-axis translation stage to allow the interrogation at different spatial locations, allowing the examination of both primary (absorption of the laser light) and secondary (absorption of the fluorescence) inner filter effects. In addition to these expected inner filter effects, we find evidence that a portion of the absorbed fluorescence is re-emitted. A total of 688 spectra are acquired for the evaluation of multivariate analysis approaches to account for nonlinear effects.

  15. Experimental feasibility of the airborne measurement of absolute oil fluorescence spectral conversion efficiency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoge, F. E.; Swift, R. N.

    1983-01-01

    Airborne lidar oil spill experiments carried out to determine the practicability of the AOFSCE (absolute oil fluorescence spectral conversion efficiency) computational model are described. The results reveal that the model is suitable over a considerable range of oil film thicknesses provided the fluorescence efficiency of the oil does not approach the minimum detection sensitivity limitations of the lidar system. Separate airborne lidar experiments to demonstrate measurement of the water column Raman conversion efficiency are also conducted to ascertain the ultimate feasibility of converting such relative oil fluorescence to absolute values. Whereas the AOFSCE model is seen as highly promising, further airborne water column Raman conversion efficiency experiments with improved temporal or depth-resolved waveform calibration and software deconvolution techniques are thought necessary for a final determination of suitability.

  16. Quantitative measurement of binary liquid distributions using multiple-tracer x-ray fluorescence and radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Halls, Benjamin R.; Meyer, Terrence R.; Kastengren, Alan L.

    2015-01-23

    The complex geometry and large index-of-refraction gradients that occur near the point of impingement of binary liquid jets present a challenging environment for optical interrogation. A simultaneous quadruple-tracer x-ray fluorescence and line-of-sight radiography technique is proposed as a means of distinguishing and quantifying individual liquid component distributions prior to, during, and after jet impact. Two different pairs of fluorescence tracers are seeded into each liquid stream to maximize their attenuation ratio for reabsorption correction and differentiation of the two fluids during mixing. This approach for instantaneous correction of x-ray fluorescence reabsorption is compared with a more time-intensive approach of using stereographic reconstruction of x-ray attenuation along multiple lines of sight. The proposed methodology addresses the need for a quantitative measurement technique capable of interrogating optically complex, near-field liquid distributions in many mixing systems of practical interest involving two or more liquid streams.

  17. Experimental feasibility of the airborne measurement of absolute oil fluorescence spectral conversion efficiency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoge, F. E.; Swift, R. N.

    1983-01-01

    Airborne lidar oil spill experiments carried out to determine the practicability of the AOFSCE (absolute oil fluorescence spectral conversion efficiency) computational model are described. The results reveal that the model is suitable over a considerable range of oil film thicknesses provided the fluorescence efficiency of the oil does not approach the minimum detection sensitivity limitations of the lidar system. Separate airborne lidar experiments to demonstrate measurement of the water column Raman conversion efficiency are also conducted to ascertain the ultimate feasibility of converting such relative oil fluorescence to absolute values. Whereas the AOFSCE model is seen as highly promising, further airborne water column Raman conversion efficiency experiments with improved temporal or depth-resolved waveform calibration and software deconvolution techniques are thought necessary for a final determination of suitability.

  18. Quantitative measurement of intracellular protein dynamics using photobleaching or photoactivation of fluorescent proteins.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Tomoki; Nagai, Takeharu

    2014-12-01

    Unlike in vitro protein dynamics, intracellular protein dynamics are intricately regulated by protein-protein interactions or interactions between proteins and other cellular components, including nucleic acids, the plasma membrane and the cytoskeleton. Alteration of these dynamics plays a crucial role in physiological phenomena such as gene expression and cell division. Live-cell imaging via microscopy with the inherent properties of fluorescent proteins, i.e. photobleaching and photoconversion, or fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, provides insight into the movement of proteins and their interactions with cellular components. This article reviews techniques based on photo-induced changes in the physicochemical properties of fluorescent proteins to measure protein dynamics inside living cells, and it also discusses the strengths and weaknesses of these techniques. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Japanese Society of Microscopy. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Reflectance and fluorescence characterization of maize species using field laboratory measurements and lidar remote sensing.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Guangyu; Duan, Zheng; Ming, Lian; Li, Yiyun; Chen, Ruipeng; Hu, Jiandong; Svanberg, Sune; Han, Yanlai

    2016-07-01

    Laser-induced fluorescence is an important technique to study photosynthesis and plants. Information on chlorophyll and other pigments can be obtained. We have been using a mobile laboratory in a Chinese experimental farm setting to study maize (Zea mays L.) leaves by reflectance and fluorescence measurements and correlated the spectroscopic signals to the amount of fertilizer supplied. Further, we studied five different species of maize using the remote monitoring of the fluorescence signatures obtained with the same mobile laboratory, but now in a laser radar remote-sensing configuration. The system separation from the target area was 50 m, and 355 nm pulsed excitation using the frequency-tripled output from an Nd:YAG laser was employed. Principal component analysis and linear discriminant analysis were combined to identify the different maize species using their fluorescence spectra. Likewise, the spectral signatures in reflectance and fluorescence frequently allowed us to separate different fertilizer levels applied to plants of the same species.

  20. Measurement of fluorescent probes concentration ratio in the cerebrospinal fluid for early detection of Alzheimer's disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harbater, Osnat; Gannot, Israel

    2014-03-01

    The pathogenic process of Alzheimer's Disease (AD), characterized by amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles in the brain, begins years before the clinical diagnosis. Here, we suggest a novel method which may detect AD up to nine years earlier than current exams, minimally invasive, with minimal risk, pain and side effects. The method is based on previous reports which relate the concentrations of biomarkers in the Cerebrospinal Fluid (CSF) (Aβ and Tau proteins) to the future development of AD in mild cognitive impairment patients. Our method, which uses fluorescence measurements of the relative concentrations of the CSF biomarkers, replaces the lumbar puncture process required for CSF drawing. The process uses a miniature needle coupled trough an optical fiber to a laser source and a detector. The laser radiation excites fluorescent probes which were prior injected and bond to the CSF biomarkers. Using the ratio between the fluorescence intensities emitted from the two biomarkers, which is correlated to their concentration ratio, the patient's risk of developing AD is estimated. A theoretical model was developed and validated using Monte Carlo simulations, demonstrating the relation between fluorescence emission and biomarker concentration. The method was tested using multi-layered tissue phantoms simulating the epidural fat, the CSF in the sub-arachnoid space and the bone. These phantoms were prepared with different scattering and absorption coefficients, thicknesses and fluorescence concentrations in order to simulate variations in human anatomy and in the needle location. The theoretical and in-vitro results are compared and the method's accuracy is discussed.

  1. In vitro fluorescence measurements and Monte Carlo simulation of laser irradiation propagation in porcine skin tissue.

    PubMed

    Drakaki, E; Makropoulou, M; Serafetinides, A A

    2008-07-01

    In dermatology, the in vivo spectral fluorescence measurements of human skin can serve as a valuable supplement to standard non-invasive techniques for diagnosing various skin diseases. However, quantitative analysis of the fluorescence spectra is complicated by the fact that skin is a complex multi-layered and inhomogeneous organ, with varied optical properties and biophysical characteristics. In this work, we recorded, in vitro, the laser-induced fluorescence emission signals of healthy porcine skin, one of the animals, which is considered as one of the most common models for investigations related to medical diagnostics of human cutaneous tissues. Differences were observed in the form and intensity of the fluorescence signal of the porcine skin, which can be attributed to the different concentrations of the native fluorophores and the variable physical and biological conditions of the skin tissue. As the light transport in the tissue target is directly influencing the absorption and the fluorescence emission signals, we performed Monte Carlo simulation of the light distribution in a five-layer model of human skin tissue, with a pulsed ultraviolet laser beam.

  2. Method for qualitative determination of measurement errors caused by sample fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spooner, David L.

    1995-04-01

    Many of the papers and inks used to produce color hard copy products contain fluorescent materials. Most density and/or color instruments use the ratio of value of the light returned by the sample at each wavelength relative to that returned by a white calibration standard to derive the measurement value. Generally, no effort is made to differentiate between light reflected by the sample and light emitted by the sample due to fluorescence. The blue emitted light resulting from the inclusion of fluorescent whitening agents (FWA) in graphic arts materials is excited by violet and ultraviolet (UV) light in the instrument illumination source. Differences in instrument source UV intensity can cause significant differences in the blue reflectance values of FWA containing samples reported by the instrument measurement system. Standard reference materials (SRM) which contain known amounts of FWA are commercially available. These SRMs allow a semiquantitative assessment of the UV content of an instrument's illuminating source. A further refinement, using thin UV cutoff filters, allows the qualitative determination of the presence or absence of FWA in paper samples. We anticipate that with the use of other thin filters, measurement errors caused by visible light excited fluorescence of inks, particular yellows, will be possible.

  3. Yeast vitality determination based on intracellular NAD(P)H fluorescence measurement during aerobic-anaerobic transition.

    PubMed

    Kurec, M; Kuncová, G; Brányik, T

    2009-01-01

    This work presents a yeast-cell vitality-assessment method based on on-line intracellular fluorescence measurement. The intracellular NAD(P)H fluorescence of a cell suspension is recorded during transition from aerobic to anaerobic conditions and the output signal is evaluated as a measure of yeast vitality (quality). This fluorescence method showed a highly satisfactory correlation with even low dead cell numbers where the acidification power test could not be applied.

  4. Monitoring methanol-induced protein unfolding by fluorescence anisotropy measurements of covalently labelled rhodamine probe*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soleilhac, Antonin; Bertorelle, Franck; Dugourd, Philippe; Girod, Marion; Antoine, Rodolphe

    2017-06-01

    We describe the use of an extrinsic fluorophore (rhodamine B isothiocyanate) as a versatile probe to measure rotational motions of proteins. To illustrate the usefulness of this probe, we describe the fluorescence anisotropy values of this fluorophore covalently linked to myoglobin protein measured in aqueous solutions of increased methanol content. Methanol-induced unfolding is revealed by the transition from constrained to free rotation of the covalently attached rhodamine B fluorophore.

  5. Air fluorescence efficiency measurements for AIRWATCH based mission: Experimental set-up

    SciTech Connect

    Biondo, B.; Catalano, O.; Celi, F.; Fazio, G.; Giarrusso, S.; La Rosa, G.; Mangano, A.; Bonanno, G.; Cosentino, R.; Di Benedetto, R.; Scuderi, S.; Richiusa, G.; Gregorio, A.

    1998-06-15

    In the framework of the AIRWATCH project we present an experimental set-up to measure the efficiency of the UV fluorescence production of the air using hard X-ray stimulus. The measures will be carried out at different pressure and temperature to emulate the same condition of the upper layers of the atmosphere where X-ray and gamma ray photons of Gamma Ray Bursts are absorbed.

  6. Strain-independent temperature measurement by use of a fluorescence intensity ratio technique in optical fiber.

    PubMed

    Wade, S A; Collins, S F; Grattan, K T; Baxter, G W

    2000-06-20

    The strain sensitivity of the fluorescence intensity ratio temperature-sensing technique has been measured to be (2 +/- 3) x 10(-4)%/muepsilon in Yb3+-doped fiber, implying a temperature-to-strain cross sensitivity of (2 +/- 3) x 10(-4) degrees C/muepsilon. The near-zero strain sensitivity means that this optical-fiber sensor technique is well suited for temperature measurement in strain-affected environments.

  7. An extension to laser-induced fluorescence measures multiple velocity components simultaneously

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, T. J.; Newsham, D.; Rynn, N.

    1996-09-01

    An extension to laser-induced fluorescence is presented. The new technique, called intermodulated optical tagging, can be used to measure multidimensional velocity distribution functions directly as well as to tag ions in two velocity and three spatial coordinates. The first application makes the technique a possible replacement for tomography, the second makes it useful for heretofore difficult transport measurements. Application to velocity-space transport perpendicular to the magnetic field is discussed for a quiescent plasma.

  8. Quasi-continuous combined scattered light and fluorescence measurements: a novel measurement technique for shaken microtiter plates.

    PubMed

    Samorski, M; Müller-Newen, G; Büchs, J

    2005-10-05

    A novel quasi-continuous on-line measuring technique for shaken microtiter plates is presented. Light scattering as well as intracellular and/or protein fluorescence (e.g. NADH, YFP) is measured during the shaking procedure, thus allowing a process monitoring of 96 different simultaneous cultures in a microtiter plate. In contrast to existing measurement techniques, the shaking process does not have to be stopped to take the measurements, thus avoiding the corresponding interruption of the cultures' oxygen supply and any unpredictable effects on the cultures. Experiments were conducted with E. coli in LB, TB, and MOPS minimal medium and V. natriegens in modified LB and TB media. Intensity curves of scattered light and NADH fluorescence were used to distinguish different lag phases, growth velocities, or inoculation densities. Data from this new method corresponded well to the off-line measured optical densities and to the oxygen transfer rates of cultures run in simultaneously conducted shake flask experiments at equivalent oxygen transfer capacities. With the aid of yellow fluorescence protein fused to interleukin-6 the optimal induction time of an expressing E. coli strain could be determined by on-line monitoring of product formation. Thus, this measuring technique enables the researcher to evaluate and to discriminate different cultures on a screening level and to improve screening conditions, process development and scale-up.

  9. A scattering model for rain depolarization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiley, P. H.; Stutzman, W. L.; Bostian, C. W.

    1973-01-01

    A method is presented for calculating the amount of depolarization caused by precipitation for a propagation path. In the model the effects of each scatterer and their interactions are accounted for by using a series of simplifying steps. It is necessary only to know the forward scattering properties of a single scatterer. For the case of rain the results of this model for attenuation, differential phase shift, and cross polarization agree very well with the results of the only other model available, that of differential attenuation and differential phase shift. Calculations presented here show that horizontal polarization is more sensitive to depolarization than is vertical polarization for small rain drop canting angle changes. This effect increases with increasing path length.

  10. Electron beam depolarization in a damping ring

    SciTech Connect

    Minty, M.

    1993-04-01

    Depolarization of a polarized electron beam injected into a damping ring is analyzed by extending calculations conventionally applied to proton synchrotrons. Synchrotron radiation in an electron ring gives rise to both polarizing and depolarizing effects. In a damping ring, the beam is stored for a time much less than the time for self polarization. Spin flip radiation may therefore be neglected. Synchrotron radiation without spin flips, however, must be considered as the resonance strength depends on the vertical betatron oscillation amplitude which changes as the electron beam is radiation damped. An expression for the beam polarization at extraction is derived which takes into account radiation damping. The results are applied to the electron ring at the Stanford Linear Collider and are compared with numerical matrix formalisms.

  11. Time-autocorrelated two-photon counting technique for time-resolved fluorescence measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borst, Walter L.; Liu, Lin-I.

    1999-01-01

    We describe a new instrumental technique for the excitation, acquisition, and analysis of fluorescence decays from a variety of substances, in the present case plastic scintillators. The fluorescence is excited by β particles from a radioactive source (100 μCi Sr-90). A random photon from the resulting fluorescence decay provides a trigger pulse to start a time-to-amplitude converter (TAC), while another random photon from the same β-excitation event provides the stop pulse. The optical components and geometry for detecting these two photons, i.e., the two photomultipliers (PMT), the filters, and the pulse counting system, are identical. As a consequence, the measured fluorescence signal is the autocorrelation function of the fluorescence decay from the sample. A delay line of 50 ns is inserted between the "stop" signal PMT and the TAC so that those "stop" pulses which arrive before "start pulses" also are recorded. Thus the acquired fluorescence signal versus time is symmetric about the delay time and contains twice as many counts as without delay. We call the new technique the "time-autocorrelated two-photon counting technique" (TATPC) in distinction to the conventional "time-correlated single-photon counting technique" (TCSPC). We compared both techniques with the same equipment and scintillators, where in the TCSPC case, a β particle is used for the start of the TAC instead of a random photon in the TATPC technique. We find that under similar experimental circumstances, the signal count rate with TATPC is about 50 times larger than with TCSPC. The new method is well suited for obtaining fluorescence decay times from plastic scintillators, which we use in this article to exemplify the technique. More generally, β-particle excitation in combination with TATPC should prove useful for materials with high energy levels or band gaps, which cannot be excited with pulsed lasers in the visible region. The length of our excitation pulse is less than 20 ps and is

  12. Hyperpolarization/depolarization on human spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Calzada, L; Salazar, E L; Macias, H

    1991-01-01

    The accumulation of the lipophilic cation radiolabeled triphenylmethylphosphonium (TPMP+) was utilized to determine the resting membrane potential across the plasma membrane (psi) of human sperm. Washed sperm were suspended and incubated in low-K+ and high-K+ medium and allowed to take up the cation to a steady state (20 min at 37 degrees C). By using this differential, the value obtained was inserted in the Nernst equation and the value yielded a psi of -69 +/- 2 mV. When the Na+ or K+ concentration is high in the medium, the accumulation of TPMP+ in the membrane sperm cells was increased or decreased, respectively, inducing hyperpolarization and depolarization of the membrane 20% and 85%, respectively. The presence of divalent cations Zn++ and Mg++ in the incubation medium both induced a hyperpolarization of 10% and 8.6%, respectively. The addition of specific reagents such as p-chloromercuribenzenosulfonate and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid sodium salt both decreased the psi 35% and 58%, respectively. The agents acting on the sperm cell membrane, such as dithiothreitol and progesterone, both induced hyperpolarization and depolarization of the membrane 16% and 40%, respectively. The presence of propranolol and L-alpha-lysophosphatidylcholine, which affect the ionic gradients present across the plasma membrane, both induced a depolarization from 43% and 92%, respectively. Finally the psi was glucose-dependent. The result of these studies was that, by the use of agents causing hyperpolarization or depolarization, we obtained changes in the psi of -83.4 +/- 2.2 mV, until -6 +/- 0.6 mV changes of -76.8 +/- 2 mV translated across the sperm cell membrane.

  13. Time-Resolved Fluorescence Anisotropy of Bicyclo[1.1.1]pentane/Tolane-Based Molecular Rods Included in Tris(o-phenylenedioxy)cyclotriphosphazene (TPP).

    PubMed

    Cipolloni, Marco; Kaleta, Jiří; Mašát, Milan; Dron, Paul I; Shen, Yongqiang; Zhao, Ke; Rogers, Charles T; Shoemaker, Richard K; Michl, Josef

    2015-04-23

    We examine the fluorescence anisotropy of rod-shaped guests held inside the channels of tris(o-phenylenedioxy)cyclotriphosphazene (TPP) host nanocrystals, characterized by powder X-ray diffraction and solid state NMR spectroscopy. We address two issues: (i) are light polarization measurements on an aqueous colloidal solution of TPP nanocrystals meaningful, or is depolarization by scattering excessive? (ii) Can measurements of the rotational mobility of the included guests be performed at low enough loading levels to suppress depolarization by intercrystallite energy transfer? We find that meaningful measurements are possible and demonstrate that the long axis of molecular rods included in TPP channels performs negligible vibrational motion.

  14. Time-Resolved Fluorescence Anisotropy of Bicyclo[1.1.1]pentane/Tolane-Based Molecular Rods Included in Tris(o-phenylenedioxy)cyclotriphosphazene (TPP)

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We examine the fluorescence anisotropy of rod-shaped guests held inside the channels of tris(o-phenylenedioxy)cyclotriphosphazene (TPP) host nanocrystals, characterized by powder X-ray diffraction and solid state NMR spectroscopy. We address two issues: (i) are light polarization measurements on an aqueous colloidal solution of TPP nanocrystals meaningful, or is depolarization by scattering excessive? (ii) Can measurements of the rotational mobility of the included guests be performed at low enough loading levels to suppress depolarization by intercrystallite energy transfer? We find that meaningful measurements are possible and demonstrate that the long axis of molecular rods included in TPP channels performs negligible vibrational motion. PMID:25937858

  15. Aquatic and terrestrial optical measurements - laser induced fluorescence technique (ATOM-LIFT): Summer 1997 field measurement campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMurtrey, James E., III; Cecchi, Giovanna; Chappelle, Emmett W.; Kim, Moon S.; Bazzani, Marco; Corp, Lawrence A.

    1998-07-01

    A joint IROE-CNR, NASA/GSFC, and USDA/ARS measurement campaign was conducted in Italy for a three week period in July, 1997. The campaign was split into two parts: the first part for aquatic vegetation studies and the second part for terrestrial vegetation studies. The main objective of the campaign was to study optical properties of intact plant material as it relates to photosynthetic activity of living vegetation. The aquatic studies were carried out at an aquarium-laboratory in the seashore city of Livorno on the West coast of Italy. The investigations involved an important sea grass species that is native to the Mediterranean Sea. The terrestrial studies were carried out Northeast of the Town of St. Stefano di Cadore (Belluno), Italy. Measurements were taken in a wooded site at an Italian Department of Forestry Station on species of natural alpine vegetation. Instrumentation available for the studies were the Italian Fluorescence Light Detection And Ranging (FLIDAR) System, the NASA/USDA Fluorescence Imaging System (FIS), the Perkin Elmer Spectrofluorometer and LI-COR 6400 infrared gas exchange analyzer for photosynthesis measurements. Preliminary evaluations, analysis, and summaries were made by personnel from both Italian and United Sates groups on data collected during the measurement campaign. The joint Italian/American data collection effort with Aquatic and Terrestrial Optical Measurements produced a range of data for characterizing the relationships between fluorescence and the photosynthetic potentials of vegetative scenes.

  16. Time-resolved and temperature tuneable measurements of fluorescent intensity using a smartphone fluorimeter.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Md Arafat; Canning, John; Yu, Zhikang; Ast, Sandra; Rutledge, Peter J; Wong, Joseph K-H; Jamalipour, Abbas; Crossley, Maxwell J

    2017-05-30

    A smartphone fluorimeter capable of time-based fluorescence intensity measurements at various temperatures is reported. Excitation is provided by an integrated UV LED (λex = 370 nm) and detection obtained using the in-built CMOS camera. A Peltier is integrated to allow measurements of the intensity over T = 10 to 40 °C. All components are controlled using a smartphone battery powered Arduino microcontroller and a customised Android application that allows sequential fluorescence imaging and quantification every δt = 4 seconds. The temperature dependence of fluorescence intensity for four emitters (rhodamine B, rhodamine 6G, 5,10,15,20-tetraphenylporphyrin and 6-(1,4,8,11-tetraazacyclotetradecane)2-ethyl-naphthalimide) are characterised. The normalised fluorescence intensity over time of the latter chemosensor dye complex in the presence of Zn(2+) is observed to accelerate with an increasing rate constant, k = 1.94 min(-1) at T = 15 °C and k = 3.64 min(-1) at T = 30 °C, approaching a factor of ∼2 with only a change in temperature of ΔT = 15 °C. Thermally tuning these twist and bend associated rates to optimise sensor approaches and device applications is proposed.

  17. Measurement of drug-target engagement in live cells by two-photon fluorescence anisotropy imaging.

    PubMed

    Vinegoni, Claudio; Fumene Feruglio, Paolo; Brand, Christian; Lee, Sungon; Nibbs, Antoinette E; Stapleton, Shawn; Shah, Sunil; Gryczynski, Ignacy; Reiner, Thomas; Mazitschek, Ralph; Weissleder, Ralph

    2017-07-01

    The ability to directly image and quantify drug-target engagement and drug distribution with subcellular resolution in live cells and whole organisms is a prerequisite to establishing accurate models of the kinetics and dynamics of drug action. Such methods would thus have far-reaching applications in drug development and molecular pharmacology. We recently presented one such technique based on fluorescence anisotropy, a spectroscopic method based on polarization light analysis and capable of measuring the binding interaction between molecules. Our technique allows the direct characterization of target engagement of fluorescently labeled drugs, using fluorophores with a fluorescence lifetime larger than the rotational correlation of the bound complex. Here we describe an optimized protocol for simultaneous dual-channel two-photon fluorescence anisotropy microscopy acquisition to perform drug-target measurements. We also provide the necessary software to implement stream processing to visualize images and to calculate quantitative parameters. The assembly and characterization part of the protocol can be implemented in 1 d. Sample preparation, characterization and imaging of drug binding can be completed in 2 d. Although currently adapted to an Olympus FV1000MPE microscope, the protocol can be extended to other commercial or custom-built microscopes.

  18. Remote Sensing of Sun-induced Fluorescence to Measure the Functional Regulation of Photosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cendrero Mateo, M. D. P.; Damm, A.; Matveeva, M.; Pinto, F.; Rossini, M.; Schickling, A.; Rascher, U.

    2014-12-01

    Photosynthesis is the ultimate process that determines crop performance. Changes in environmental conditions subject vegetation to different stresses determining dynamics of photosynthetic rate. In this context, techniques that allow the quantification of spatial and temporal patterns of photosynthesis at different scales would be of great use. Hyperspectral reflectance techniques have often failed to quantify actual photosynthetic light use efficiency and only allow measuring pigment content and canopy structure. Alternatively passive detection of Sun Induced Chlorophyll Fluorescence (SIF) has the potential to be used in the quantification of the actual photosynthetic rate. Chlorophyll fluorescence is emitted from the core of the photosynthetic machinery and is closely related to vegetation stress, reflecting functional limitations of photosynthetic carbon gain. In this study we aim to assess the potential of SIF to quantify the functional status of photosynthesis in crops. Hereby we present a summary of results obtained at different vegetation levels. Applying the Fraunhofer Line Depth (FLD) principle we estimated SIF from point and imaging hyperspectral data at leaf and canopy level. For the larger scale, the data were collected using HyPlant, the high performance airborne imaging spectrometer. We expect that local and airborne measurements will greatly facility the development of a potential satellite mission FLEX (FLuorescence Explorer), which is currently under evaluation by the European Space Agency. The FLEX mission proposed to launch a satellite for the global monitoring of steady-state chlorophyll fluorescence in terrestrial vegetation.

  19. Dual-emissive fluorescence measurements of hydroxyl radicals using a coumarin-activated silica nanohybrid probe.

    PubMed

    Liu, Saisai; Zhao, Jun; Zhang, Kui; Yang, Lei; Sun, Mingtai; Yu, Huan; Yan, Yehan; Zhang, Yajun; Wu, Lijun; Wang, Suhua

    2016-04-07

    This work reports a novel dual-emissive fluorescent probe based on dye hybrid silica nanoparticles for ratiometric measurement of the hydroxyl radical (˙OH). In the probe sensing system, the blue emission of coumarin dye (coumarin-3-carboxylic acid, CCA) immobilized on the nanoparticle surface is selectively enhanced by ˙OH due to the formation of a coumarin hydroxylation product with strong fluorescence, whereas the emission of red fluorescent dye encapsulated in the silica nanoparticle is insensitive to ˙OH as a self-referencing signal, and so the probe provides a good quantitative analysis based on ratiometric fluorescence measurement with a detection limit of 1.65 μM. Moreover, the probe also shows high selectivity for ˙OH determination against metal ions, other reactive oxygen species and biological species. More importantly, it exhibits low cytotoxicity and high biocompatibility in living cells, and has been successfully used for cellular imaging of ˙OH, showing its promising application for monitoring of intracellular ˙OH signaling events.

  20. Development and use of chlorotetracycline fluorescence as a measurement assay of chloroplast envelope-bound mg.

    PubMed

    Gupta, A S; Berkowitz, G A

    1989-03-01

    Experiments were conducted to develop chlorotetracycline (CTC) fluorescence as an assay of Mg(2+) bound to the envelope of the intact chloroplast. This assay technique has been widely used to measure envelope associated divalent cations in animal cell and subcellular systems, but has not been used with chloroplasts. Chloroplast envelope-associated Mg(2+) was altered by pretreatment with Mg(2+) and divalent cation chelating agents and by additions of Mg(2+) to the CTC assay medium. Results indicated that for a given chloroplast preparation, relative changes in envelope-associated Mg(2+) can be effectively monitored with CTC fluorescence. It was concluded that the limitations of this assay system are: (a) chlorophyll strongly quenches CTC fluorescence signal, so a constant chlorophyll concentration must be maintained, (b) measurements must be made quickly, and (c) use of the technique to compare different chloroplast preparations may not be valid. Studies with (28)Mg(2+) confirmed our interpretation of the fluorescence results, and also suggested that the chloroplast envelope is fairly impermeable to Mg(2+). It was concluded that changes in Mg(2+) associated with the chloroplast due to incubation of plastids in solutions containing up to 5 millimolar Mg(2+) may be exclusively due to increased envelope-associated Mg(2+). The CTC assay was used in experiments to demonstrate that increases in chloroplast envelope-associated Mg(2+) inhibit photosynthetic capacity. This inhibition can be partially overcome by the presence of K(+) in the photosynthetic reaction media.

  1. Clay-vesicle interactions: fluorescence measurements and structural implications for slow release formulations of herbicides.

    PubMed

    Undabeytia, Tomas; Nir, Shlomo; Gomara, Maria Jose

    2004-08-03

    Clay-vesicle systems exhibit a potential for environmental applications, such as herbicide formulations for reduced leaching. Clay-vesicle interactions were addressed by combining adsorption and XRD measurements with fluorescence studies for didodecyldimethylammonium bromide (DDAB), dioctadecyldimethylammonium bromide (DDOB), and montmorillonite. XRD and adsorption data indicated that the adsorbing vesicles were transformed after 3 days into paraffinic and bilayer structures. Fluorescence studies revealed that adsorption was almost complete within 5 min for a loading below the cation exchange capacity (CEC). Aggregation and sedimentation of clay-surfactant particles occurred within several minutes. Fluorescent measurements of supernatants indicated decomposition of vesicles at a high clay/surfactant ratio due to rapidly adsorbing cationic monomers. The kinetics of energy transfer between vesicles labeled by NBD-PE (1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine-N-(7-nitro-2-1,3-benzoxadiazol-4-yl)) and montmorillonite labeled by rhodamine-B follows that of aggregation of surfactant-clay particles and structural changes of the vesicles at times of minutes to hours. Experiments following the reduction of NBD fluorescence by addition of dithionite indicate faster permeabilization of DDOB than DDAB vesicles, which was confirmed by leakage experiments. The faster permeabilization of DDOB vesicles in the presence of clay was correlated with their inferior suitability for the preparation of clay-based formulations of anionic herbicides for slow release.

  2. Very compact all solid state fluorescence lifetime measurement system: preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erdmann, Rainer; Kell, Gerald; Krahl, Rolf; Ortmann, Uwe; Becker, Wolfgang; Enderlein, Joerg; Klose, Edgar O.

    1994-12-01

    We will demonstrate the operation of the very compact all solid state fluorescence lifetime measurement system FLUO-TIME BQ 2759A. For this purpose we developed a new type of compact driving generator LD 4000 for a set of ps-laserdiodes with wavelengths between 630 nm and 690 nm, which will produce sub 50 ps pulses with up to 200 mW peak power and 3 MHz repetition rate. Using this miniaturized excitation source we are able to investigate a lot of red and NIR dyes. The fluorescence signal will be detected with single photon counting sensitivity by an ultrafast photomultiplier tube with only the size of the transistor (TO8 housing). Spectral resolution is given by a set of bandpass filters or a compact monochromator. With our recently introduced time correlated single photon counting (TCSPC) electronics SPC 300 (a PC-plug-in-card) we have a powerful instrument for data acquisition with highest data throughput. The instrumental response time (IRF) of the complete measurement system is less than 250 ps, allowing the investigation of fluorescence decay time components down to 25 ps using out deconvolution and analysis software package PHYSFIT. This performance can be improved to less than 90 ps IRF using a microchannel plate photomultiplier tube (MCP-PMT) detector. In this paper we demonstrate also the first practical application of this system to standard fluorescence dyes (oxazine, rhodamin).

  3. Fluorescence lifetime imaging to quantify sub-cellular oxygen measurements in live macrophage during bacterial invasion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dragavon, Joe; Amiri, Megdouda; Marteyn, Benoit; Sansonetti, Philipe; Shorte, Spencer

    2011-03-01

    Fluorophore concentration, the surrounding microenvironment, and photobleaching greatly influence the fluorescence intensity of a fluorophore, increasing the difficulty to directly observe micro-environmental factors such as pH and oxygen. However, the fluorescence lifetime of a fluorophore is essentially independent of both the fluorophore concentration and photobleaching, providing a viable alternative to intensity measurements. The development of fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLI) allows for the direct measurement of the microenvironment surrounding a fluorophore. Pt-porphyrin is a fluorophore whose optical properties include a very stable triplet excited state. This energy level overlaps strongly with the ground triplet state of oxygen, making the phosphorescent lifetime directly proportional to the surrounding oxygen concentration. Initial experiments using this fluorophore involved the use of individual microwells coated with the porphyrin. Cells were allowed to enter the micro-wells before being sealed to create a diffusionally isolated volume. The decrease in the extracellular oxygen concentration was observed using FLI. However, this isolation technique provides only the consumption rate but cannot indicate the subcellular oxygen distribution. To improve upon this, live macrophages are loaded with the porphyrin and the fluorescence lifetime determined using a Lambert Instruments Lifa-X FLI system. Initial results indicate that an increase in subcellular oxygen is observed upon initial exposure to invasive bacteria. A substantial decrease in oxygen is observed after about 1 hour of exposure. The cells remain in this deoxygenated state until the bacteria are removed or cell death occurs.

  4. Microlensed dual-fiber probe for depth-resolved fluorescence measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Hae Young; Ryu, Seon Young; Kim, Jae Young; Kim, Geon Hee; Park, Seong Jun; Lee, Byeong Ha; Chang, Ki Soo

    2011-07-01

    We propose and demonstrate a compact microlensed dual-fiber probe that has a good collection efficiency and a high depth-resolution ability for fluorescence measurements. The probe is formed with a conventional fusion splicer creating a common focusing lens on two fibers placed side by side. The collection efficiency of the fabricated probe was evaluated by measuring the fluorescence signal of a fresh ginkgo leaf. It was shown experimentally that the proposed probe could effectively collect the fluorescence signal with a six-fold increase compared to that of a general flat-tipped probe. The beam propagation method was used to design a probe with an optimized working distance and an improved resolving depth. It was found that the working distance depends mainly on the radius of curvature of the lens, whereas the resolving depth is determined by the core diameters of the illumination and collection fibers. The depth-resolved ability of probes with working distances of ~100 μm and 300 μm was validated by using a two-layer tissue phantom. The experimental results demonstrate that the microlensed dual-fiber probe has the potential to facilitate depth-resolved fluorescence detection of epithelial tissue.

  5. Measurements of temperature, density, pressure, and their fluctuations in supersonic turbulence using laser-induced fluorescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gross, K. P.; Mckenzie, R. L.; Logan, P.

    1987-01-01

    A laser-induced fluorescence method has been developed that provides simultaneous measurements of temperature, density, and their fluctuations owing to turbulence in unheated compressible flows. Pressure and its fluctuations are also deduced using the equation of state. Fluorescence is induced in nitric oxide that has been seeded into a nitrogen flow in concentrations of 100 ppm. Measurements are obtained from each laser pulse, with a spatial resolution of 1 mm and a temporal resolution of 125 ns. The method was applied to a supersonic, turbulent, boundary-layer flow with a free-stream Mach number of 2. For stream conditions in the range from 150-300 K and 0.3-1 atm, temperature is measured with an uncertainty of approximately 1 percent rms, while density and pressure uncertainties are approximately 2 percent rms.

  6. Experimental Test of New Technique to Overcome Spin Depolarizing Resonances

    SciTech Connect

    Raymond, R. S.; Chao, A. W.; Krisch, A. D.; Leonova, M. A.; Morozov, V. S.; Sivers, D. W.; Wong, V. K.; Ganshvili, A.; Gebel, R.; Lehrach, A.; Lorentz, B.; Maier, R.; Prasuhn, D.; Stockhorst, H.; Welsch, D.; Hinterberger, F.; Kondratenko, A. M.

    2009-08-04

    We recently tested a new spin resonance crossing technique, Kondratenko Crossing (KC) by sweeping an rf solenoid's frequency through an rf-induced spin resonance with both the KC an traditional Fast Crossing (FC) patterns. Using both rf bunched and unbunched 1.85 GeV/c polarized deuterons stored in COSY, we varied the parameters of both crossing patterns. Compared to FC with the same crossing speed, KC reduced the depolarization by measured factors of 4.7+-0.3 and 19+-{sub 5}{sup 12} for unbunched and bunched beams, respectively. This clearly showed the large potential benefit of Kondratenko Crossing over Fast Crossing.

  7. Excitation-emission matrices measurements of human cutaneous lesions: tool for fluorescence origin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhelyazkova, A.; Borisova, E.; Angelova, L.; Pavlova, E.; Keremedchiev, M.

    2013-11-01

    The light induced fluorescence (LIF) technique has the potential of providing real-time diagnosis of malignant and premalignant skin tissue; however, human skin is a multilayered and inhomogeneous organ with different optical properties that complicate the analysis of cutaneous fluorescence spectra. In spite of the difficulties related to the detection and analysis of fluorescent data from skin lesions, this technique is among the most widely applied techniques in laboratorial and pre-clinical investigations for early skin neoplasia diagnosis. The important point is to evaluate all sources of intrinsic fluorescence and find any significant alterations distinguishing the normal skin from a cancerous state of the tissue; this would make the autofluorescence signal obtained useful for the development of a non-invasive diagnostic tool for the dermatological practice. Our investigations presented here were based on ex vivo point-by-point measurements of excitation-emission matrices (EEM) from excised tumor lesions and the surrounding skin taken during the daily clinical practice of Queen Jiovanna- ISUL University Hospital, Sofia, the local Ethical Committee's approval having already been obtained. The fluorescence emission was measured between 300 nm and 800 nm using excitation in the 280-440 nm spectral range. In the process of excitation-emission matrices (EEM) measurements we could establish the origin of the autofluorescence and the compounds related by assigning the excitation and emission maxima obtained during the experiments. The EEM were compared for normal human skin, basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma, benign nevi and malignant melanoma lesions to obtain information for the most common skin malignancies and their precursors. The main spectral features and the applicability of the technique of autofluorescent spectroscopy of human skin in general as an initial diagnostic tool are discussed as well.

  8. Spatially resolved density and ionization measurements of shocked foams using x-ray fluorescence

    DOE PAGES

    MacDonald, M. J.; Keiter, P. A.; Montgomery, D. S.; ...

    2016-09-22

    We present experiments at the Trident laser facility demonstrating the use of x-ray fluorescence (XRF) to simultaneously measure density, ionization state populations, and electron temperature in shocked foams. An imaging x-ray spectrometer was used to obtain spatially-resolved measurements of Ti K-more » $$\\alpha$$ emission. Density profiles were measured from K-$$\\alpha$$ intensity. Ti ionization state distributions and electron temperatures were inferred by fitting K-$$\\alpha$$ spectra to spectra from CRETIN simulations. This study shows that XRF provides a powerful tool to complement other diagnostics to make equation of state measurements of shocked materials containing a suitable tracer element.« less

  9. Spatially resolved density and ionization measurements of shocked foams using x-ray fluorescence

    SciTech Connect

    MacDonald, M. J.; Keiter, P. A.; Montgomery, D. S.; Scott, H. A.; Biener, M. M.; Fein, J. R.; Fournier, K. B.; Gamboa, E. J.; Kemp, G. E.; Klein, S. R.; Kuranz, C. C.; LeFevre, H. J.; Manuel, M. J. -E.; Wan, W. C.; Drake, R. P.

    2016-09-22

    We present experiments at the Trident laser facility demonstrating the use of x-ray fluorescence (XRF) to simultaneously measure density, ionization state populations, and electron temperature in shocked foams. An imaging x-ray spectrometer was used to obtain spatially-resolved measurements of Ti K-$\\alpha$ emission. Density profiles were measured from K-$\\alpha$ intensity. Ti ionization state distributions and electron temperatures were inferred by fitting K-$\\alpha$ spectra to spectra from CRETIN simulations. This study shows that XRF provides a powerful tool to complement other diagnostics to make equation of state measurements of shocked materials containing a suitable tracer element.

  10. Spatially resolved density and ionization measurements of shocked foams using x-ray fluorescence

    SciTech Connect

    MacDonald, M. J.; Keiter, P. A.; Montgomery, D. S.; Scott, H. A.; Biener, M. M.; Fein, J. R.; Fournier, K. B.; Gamboa, E. J.; Kemp, G. E.; Klein, S. R.; Kuranz, C. C.; LeFevre, H. J.; Manuel, M. J. -E.; Wan, W. C.; Drake, R. P.

    2016-09-22

    We present experiments at the Trident laser facility demonstrating the use of x-ray fluorescence (XRF) to simultaneously measure density, ionization state populations, and electron temperature in shocked foams. An imaging x-ray spectrometer was used to obtain spatially-resolved measurements of Ti K-$\\alpha$ emission. Density profiles were measured from K-$\\alpha$ intensity. Ti ionization state distributions and electron temperatures were inferred by fitting K-$\\alpha$ spectra to spectra from CRETIN simulations. This study shows that XRF provides a powerful tool to complement other diagnostics to make equation of state measurements of shocked materials containing a suitable tracer element.

  11. Spatially resolved density and ionization measurements of shocked foams using x-ray fluorescence

    SciTech Connect

    MacDonald, M. J.; Keiter, P. A.; Montgomery, D. S.; Scott, H. A.; Biener, M. M.; Fein, J. R.; Fournier, K. B.; Gamboa, E. J.; Kemp, G. E.; Klein, S. R.; Kuranz, C. C.; LeFevre, H. J.; Manuel, M. J. -E.; Wan, W. C.; Drake, R. P.

    2016-09-28

    We present experiments at the Trident laser facility demonstrating the use of x-ray fluorescence (XRF) to simultaneously measure density, ionization state populations, and electron temperature in shocked foams. An imaging x-ray spectrometer obtained spatially resolved measurements of Ti K-α emission. Density profiles were measured from K-α intensity. Ti ionization state distributions and electron temperatures were inferred by fitting K-α spectra to spectra from CRETIN simulations. This work shows that XRF provides a powerful tool to complement other diagnostics to make equation of state measurements of shocked materials containing a suitable tracer element.

  12. Measuring protein dynamics in live cells: protocols and practical considerations for fluorescence fluctuation microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Youker, Robert T.; Teng, Haibing

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. Quantitative analysis of protein complex stoichiometries and mobilities are critical for elucidating the mechanisms that regulate cellular pathways. Fluorescence fluctuation spectroscopy (FFS) techniques can measure protein dynamics, such as diffusion coefficients and formation of complexes, with extraordinary precision and sensitivity. Complete calibration and characterization of the microscope instrument is necessary in order to avoid artifacts during data acquisition and to capitalize on the full capabilities of FFS techniques. We provide an overview of the theory behind FFS techniques, discuss calibration procedures, provide protocols, and give practical considerations for performing FFS experiments. One important parameter recovered from FFS measurements is the relative molecular brightness that can correlate with oligomerization. Three methods for measuring molecular brightness (fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, photon-counting histogram, and number and brightness analysis) recover similar values when measuring samples under ideal conditions in vitro. However, examples are given illustrating that these different methods used for calculating molecular brightness of fluorescent molecules in cells are not always equivalent. Methods relying on spot measurements are more prone to bleaching and movement artifacts that can lead to underestimation of brightness values. We advocate for the use of multiple FFS techniques to study molecular brightnesses to overcome and compliment limitations of individual techniques. PMID:25260867

  13. Molecular Diffusion in Plasma Membranes of Primary Lymphocytes Measured by Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Staaf, Elina; Bagawath-Singh, Sunitha; Johansson, Sofia

    2017-02-01

    Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) is a powerful technique for studying the diffusion of molecules within biological membranes with high spatial and temporal resolution. FCS can quantify the molecular concentration and diffusion coefficient of fluorescently labeled molecules in the cell membrane. This technique has the ability to explore the molecular diffusion characteristics of molecules in the plasma membrane of immune cells in steady state (i.e., without processes affecting the result during the actual measurement time). FCS is suitable for studying the diffusion of proteins that are expressed at levels typical for most endogenous proteins. Here, a straightforward and robust method to determine the diffusion rate of cell membrane proteins on primary lymphocytes is demonstrated. An effective way to perform measurements on antibody-stained live cells and commonly occurring observations after acquisition are described. The recent advancements in the development of photo-stable fluorescent dyes can be utilized by conjugating the antibodies of interest to appropriate dyes that do not bleach extensively during the measurements. Additionally, this allows for the detection of slowly diffusing entities, which is a common feature of proteins expressed in cell membranes. The analysis procedure to extract molecular concentration and diffusion parameters from the generated autocorrelation curves is highlighted. In summary, a basic protocol for FCS measurements is provided; it can be followed by immunologists with an understanding of confocal microscopy but with no other previous experience of techniques for measuring dynamic parameters, such as molecular diffusion rates.

  14. Measurements of fluorescence lifetimes by use of a hybrid time-correlated and multifrequency phase fluorometer.

    PubMed

    Hedstrom, J; Sedarous, S; Prendergast, F G

    1988-08-23

    Measurements of homogeneous and heterogeneous fluorescence intensity decays using a hybrid time-correlated single photon counting/multifrequency phase fluorometer are reported. A trio of fluorophores exhibiting a range of decay profiles was selected. p-Terphenyl, 1,4-bis[2-(4-methyl-5-phenyloxazolyl)]benzene [(Me)2POPOP], and p-bis[2-(5-phenyloxazolyl)]benzene (POPOP), commonly used reference fluorophores, were analyzed initially; their emissions were characterized by monoexponential decay functions. Additionally, emissions from two single tryptophan proteins with different decay profiles were measured. Scorpion neurotoxin variant 3 required three exponentials to fit the emission decay properly (average lifetime approximately 500 ps). At pH 5.5, the fluorescence emission of ribonuclease T1 showed a monoexponential decay with a measured lifetime of approximately 4.0 ns. Thus, in each case, the results from both measurements were consistent between the two detection systems, confirming the view that the two approaches for measuring fluorescence lifetimes are equivalent.

  15. Concentration Measurements in a Cold Flow Model Annular Combustor Using Laser Induced Fluorescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, Douglas C.

    1996-01-01

    A nonintrusive concentration measurement method is developed for determining the concentration distribution in a complex flow field. The measurement method consists of marking a liquid flow with a water soluble fluorescent dye. The dye is excited by a two dimensional sheet of laser light. The fluorescent intensity is shown to be proportional to the relative concentration level. The fluorescent field is recorded on a video cassette recorder through a video camera. The recorded images are analyzed with image processing hardware and software to obtain intensity levels. Mean and root mean square (rms) values are calculated from these intensity levels. The method is tested on a single round turbulent jet because previous concentration measurements have been made on this configuration by other investigators. The previous results were used to comparison to qualify the current method. These comparisons showed that this method provides satisfactory results. 'Me concentration measurement system was used to measure the concentrations in the complex flow field of a model gas turbine annular combustor. The model annular combustor consists of opposing primary jets and an annular jet which discharges perpendicular to the primary jets. The mixing between the different jet flows can be visualized from the calculated mean and rms profiles. Concentration field visualization images obtained from the processing provide further qualitative information about the flow field.

  16. Quantitative correlation between light depolarization and transport albedo of various porcine tissues.

    PubMed

    Alali, Sanaz; Ahmad, Manzoor; Kim, Anthony; Vurgun, Nasit; Wood, Michael F G; Vitkin, I Alex

    2012-04-01

    We present a quantitative study of depolarization in biological tissues and correlate it with measured optical properties (reduced scattering and absorption coefficients). Polarized light imaging was used to examine optically thick samples of both isotropic (liver, kidney cortex, and brain) and anisotropic (cardiac muscle, loin muscle, and tendon) pig tissues in transmission and reflection geometries. Depolarization (total, linear, and circular), as derived from polar decomposition of the measured tissue Mueller matrix, was shown to be related to the measured optical properties. We observed that depolarization increases with the transport albedo for isotropic and anisotropic tissues, independent of measurement geometry. For anisotropic tissues, depolarization was higher compared to isotropic tissues of similar transport albedo, indicating birefringence-caused depolarization effects. For tissues with large transport albedos (greater than ~0.97), backscattering geometry was preferred over transmission due to its greater retention of light polarization; this was not the case for tissues with lower transport albedo. Preferential preservation of linearly polarized light over circularly polarized light was seen in all tissue types and all measurement geometries, implying the dominance of Rayleigh-like scattering. The tabulated polarization properties of different tissue types and their links to bulk optical properties should prove useful in future polarimetric tissue characterization and imaging studies.

  17. Understanding Solar Induced Fluorescence: Building up from Leaf Scale Measurements (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berry, J. A.; Van der Tol, C.; Frankenberg, C.; Joiner, J.; Guanter, L.

    2013-12-01

    Measurements of chlorophyll fluorescence have long been a key method for probing the mechanisms of photosynthesis in laboratory studies. Recent advances in satellite spectroscopy have enabled retrieval of chlorophyll fluorescence from terrestrial ecosystems at a global scale. Analyses of these retrievals show promising potential as an indicator of photosynthetic rate and of its response to environmental stress. This talk will explore the mechanistic basis for interpreting and modeling of solar induced chlorophyll fluorescence ( SIF). SIF is essentially a leak of photons from photosynthetic membranes, and it is, therefore, related to the flux of photons absorbed by chlorophyll and to biochemical processes that regulate the processing of these photons in macromolecuar complexes associated with photosystem II. Thus: SIF = aPAR * φF, where aPAR is the flux of absorbed photosynthetically active radiation and φF, is the yield (light-use efficiency) of fluorescence. (For simplicity we will ignore the transport of fluorescence from its sources to the sensor for the moment). This expression for SIF is similar to a common expression for photosynthesis or gross primary productivity, GPP = aPAR * LUE, where LUE, is the light-use-efficiency for CO2 uptake. These equations can be combined and simplified to illustrate the relationship between SIF and GPP; GPP =SIF *LUE / φF. The extent to which GPP is proportional to SIF hinges on the stability of the ratio, LUE / φF, and it leads to the key question to be considered here. What is the relationship between the light-use-efficiency for photosynthesis and that for fluorescence? Satellite retrievals of SIF occur at mid-day, conditions where the capacity for CO2 fixation usually limits the rate of photosynthesis. Under this condition the rate of the photo-acts must be down-regulated to protect from photo-damage. This balancing the source with the sink is accomplished by opening non-photochemical trapping centers that compete with

  18. Role of membrane depolarization and extracellular calcium in increased complement receptor expression during neutrophil (PMN) activation

    SciTech Connect

    Berger, M.; Wetzler, E.; Birx, D.L.

    1986-03-05

    During PMN activation the surface expression of receptors (R) for C3b and C3bi increases rapidly. This is necessary for optimal cell adhesion, migration, and phagocytosis. Following stimulation with fMLP or LTB-4, the increased expression of C3bR depends only on the Ca/sup + +/ released from intracellular stores and is not inhibited by 5mM EDTA, while the increase in C3biR also requires extracellular Ca/sup + +/. CR expression also increases when the PMN are depolarized with 140 mM K/sup +/, but with this stimulus, EDTA inhibits C3bR by 67% and C3biR 100%, suggesting that intracellular Ca/sup + +/ stores may not be released. Pertussis toxin caused dose-dependent inhibition of both CR responses to fMLP and also inhibited the increases in both CR induced by K/sup +/. Membrane depolarization (monitored by di-O-C5 fluorescence) due to fMLP was similarly inhibited by toxin but the depolarization due to K/sup +/ was not. The dose of phorbol myristate acetate that maximally increased CR expression, 0.1 ng/ml, did not depolarize the membrane. These results suggest that membrane depolarization is neither necessary nor sufficient for increased CR expression. A Ca/sup + +/ and GTP binding protein-dependent enzyme such as phospholipase C is necessary to the amplify initial signals generated either by release of Ca/sup + +/ stores or by opening voltage dependent Ca/sup + +/ channels following membrane depolarization.

  19. Fluid shear stress induces calcium transients in osteoblasts through depolarization of osteoblastic membrane.

    PubMed

    Sun, Junqing; Liu, Xifang; Tong, Jie; Sun, Lijun; Xu, Hao; Shi, Liang; Zhang, Jianbao

    2014-12-18

    Intracellular calcium transient ([Ca(2+)]i transient) induced by fluid shear stress (FSS) plays an important role in osteoblastic mechanotransduction. Changes of membrane potential usually affect [Ca(2+)]i level. Here, we sought to determine whether there was a relationship between membrane potential and FSS-induced [Ca(2+)]i transient in osteoblasts. Fluorescent dyes DiBAC4(3) and fura-2AM were respectively used to detect membrane potential and [Ca(2+)]i. Our results showed that FSS firstly induced depolarization of membrane potential and then a transient rising of [Ca(2+)]i in osteoblasts. There was a same threshold for FSS to induce depolarization of membrane potential and [Ca(2+)]i transients. Replacing extracellular Na(+) with tetraethylammonium or blocking stretch-activated channels (SACs) with gadolinium both effectively inhibited FSS-induced membrane depolarization and [Ca(2+)]i transients. However, voltage-activated K(+) channel inhibitor, 4-Aminopyridine, did not affect these responses. Removing extracellular Ca(2+) or blocking of L-type voltage-sensitive Ca(2+) channels (L-VSCCs) with nifedipine inhibited FSS-induced [Ca(2+)]i transients in osteoblasts too. Quantifying membrane potential with patch clamp showed that the resting potential of osteoblasts was -43.3mV and the depolarization induced by FSS was about 44mV. Voltage clamp indicated that this depolarization was enough to activated L-VSCCs in osteoblasts. These results suggested a time line of Ca(2+) mobilization wherein FSS activated SACs to promote Na(+) entry to depolarize membrane that, in turn, activated L-VSCCs and Ca(2+) influx though L-VSCCs switched on [Ca(2+)]i response in osteoblasts.

  20. Neutron depolarization effects in a high-Tc superconductor (abstract)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nunes, A. C.; Pickart, S. J.; Crow, L.; Goyette, R.; McGuire, T. R.; Shinde, S.; Shaw, T. M.

    1988-11-01

    Using the polarized beam small-angle neutron scattering spectrometer at the Rhode Island Nuclear Science Center Reactor, we have observed significant depolarization of a neutron beam by passage through polycrystalline high-Tc superconductors, specifically 123 Y-Ba-Cu-O prepared and characterized at the IBM Watson Research Center. We believe that this technique will prove useful in studying aspects of these materials, such as the penetration depth of shielding currents, the presence and structure of trapped flux vortices, and grain size effects on the supercurrent distribution in polycrystalline samples. The two samples showed sharp transitions at 87 and 89 K, and have been studied at temperatures of 77 K; the second sample has also been studied at 4 K. The transition to the superconducting state was monitored by the shift in resonant frequency of a coil surrounding the sample. No measurable depolarization was observed in either sample at 77 K in both the field-cooled and zero-field-cooled states, using applied fields of 0 (nominal), 54, and 1400 Oe. This negative result may be connected with the fact that the material is still in the reversible region as indicated by susceptibility measurements, but it allows an estimate of the upper bound of possible inhomogeneous internal fields, assuming a distance scale for the superconducting regions. For the 10-μm grain size suggested by photomicrographs, this upper bound for the field turns out to be 1.2 kOe, which seems reasonable. At 4 K a significant depolarization was observed when the sample was cooled in low fields and a field of 1400 Oe was subsequently applied. This result suggests that flux lines are penetrating the sample. Further investigations are being carried out to determine the field and temperature dependence of the depolarization, and attempts will be made to model it quantitatively in terms of possible internal field distributions. We are also searching for possible diffraction effects from ordered vortex

  1. An Intelligent Optical Dissolved Oxygen Measurement Method Based on a Fluorescent Quenching Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Li, Fengmei; Wei, Yaoguang; Chen, Yingyi; Li, Daoliang; Zhang, Xu

    2015-12-09

    Dissolved oxygen (DO) is a key factor that influences the healthy growth of fishes in aquaculture. The DO content changes with the aquatic environment and should therefore be monitored online. However, traditional measurement methods, such as iodometry and other chemical analysis methods, are not suitable for online monitoring. The Clark method is not stable enough for extended periods of monitoring. To solve these problems, this paper proposes an intelligent DO measurement method based on the fluorescence quenching mechanism. The measurement system is composed of fluorescent quenching detection, signal conditioning, intelligent processing, and power supply modules. The optical probe adopts the fluorescent quenching mechanism to detect the DO content and solves the problem, whereas traditional chemical methods are easily influenced by the environment. The optical probe contains a thermistor and dual excitation sources to isolate visible parasitic light and execute a compensation strategy. The intelligent processing module adopts the IEEE 1451.2 standard and realizes intelligent compensation. Experimental results show that the optical measurement method is stable, accurate, and suitable for online DO monitoring in aquaculture applications.

  2. An Intelligent Optical Dissolved Oxygen Measurement Method Based on a Fluorescent Quenching Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Li, Fengmei; Wei, Yaoguang; Chen, Yingyi; Li, Daoliang; Zhang, Xu

    2015-01-01

    Dissolved oxygen (DO) is a key factor that influences the healthy growth of fishes in aquaculture. The DO content changes with the aquatic environment and should therefore be monitored online. However, traditional measurement methods, such as iodometry and other chemical analysis methods, are not suitable for online monitoring. The Clark method is not stable enough for extended periods of monitoring. To solve these problems, this paper proposes an intelligent DO measurement method based on the fluorescence quenching mechanism. The measurement system is composed of fluorescent quenching detection, signal conditioning, intelligent processing, and power supply modules. The optical probe adopts the fluorescent quenching mechanism to detect the DO content and solves the problem, whereas traditional chemical methods are easily influenced by the environment. The optical probe contains a thermistor and dual excitation sources to isolate visible parasitic light and execute a compensation strategy. The intelligent processing module adopts the IEEE 1451.2 standard and realizes intelligent compensation. Experimental results show that the optical measurement method is stable, accurate, and suitable for online DO monitoring in aquaculture applications. PMID:26690176

  3. [Measurement and analysis of lead in soil using X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rong; Zhang, Yu-Jun; Zhang, Wei; Chen, Dong; Yu, Xiao-Ya; Gao, Yan-Wei

    2013-02-01

    The present paper analyzed the characteristics of X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (XRF) of metal element lead in soil using the NITON XLt793 portable X-ray fluorescence spectra of heavy metal analyzer under laboratory conditions. The characteristic spectral lines of L(alpha) (energy: 10. 55 keV) and L(beta) (energy: 12. 61 keV) with different matrix elements were selected respectively for lead in the experiment. By measuring the intensities of the characteristic spectral line with different Pb concentration, the results demonstrate that the relation between concentration [mass fraction 10 x 10(-6) - 1 800 x 10(-6)] of Pb element and the intensity of the characteristic spectrum is well linear. The calibration curve of Pb was plotted based on the different concentration measurement results, and the limit of detection of 7.89 x 10(-6) was obtained for Pb in soil.

  4. Measurement of Small Molecule Diffusion in Carbon Dioxide Swollen Polymers using Fluorescence Nonradiative Energy Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watkins, James; Gupta, Ravi; Ramachandrarao, Vijay

    2001-03-01

    Diffusion coefficients of molecular probes in CO2-swollen polystyrene films were measured in situ using high-pressure fluorescence nonradiative energy transfer (NRET). Specifically, the diffusivities of decacyclene and BPEA (9,10- bis phenyl ethnyl Anthracene), relatively large fluorescence acceptor probes, were determined in real time using pyrene-labeled polystyrene as the corresponding energy donor in carbon dioxide-plasticized films. Decacyclene diffusivities were measured at 65 and 80 C and carbon dioxide pressures ranging from 62 to 144 bar, conditions near and well above the previously reported, solvent-depressed glass transition of polystyrene. Decacyclene diffusivity shows an increase of over 5 orders of magnitude upon CO2 sorption relative to the PS glass at ambient pressure and equivalent temperatures. BPEA exhibits similar behavior but diffuses about an order of magnitude faster than decacyclene in CO2 plasticized polystyrene under similar conditions.

  5. Microfiberoptic measurement of extracellular space volume in brain and tumor slices based on fluorescent dye partitioning.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hua; Verkman, A S

    2010-08-09

    The fractional volume occupied by extracellular space in tissues, termed alpha, is an important parameter of tissue architecture that affects cellular functions and drug delivery. We report a technically simple fluorescent dye partitioning method to measure alpha in tissue slices based on microfiberoptic detection of dye fluorescence in tissue versus overlying solution. Microfiberoptic tip geometry and dyes were selected for alpha determination from fluorescence intensity ratios, without the need to correct for illumination profile, light scattering/absorption, or dye binding. The method was validated experimentally using cell-embedded gels of specified alpha-values and optical properties. In mouse brain slices, alpha was strongly location-dependent, ranging from 0.16 in thalamus to 0.22 in brainstem, and was sensitive to cell volume changes. Aquaporin-4 water channel gene deletion caused significant extracellular space expansion, with alpha = 0.181 +/- 0.002 in cortex in wild-type mice and 0.211 +/- 0.003 in Aquaporin-4 knockout mice. In slices of LLC1 cell tumors grown in mice to approximately 5 mm diameter, alpha decreased remarkably from approximately 0.45 in superficial tumor to <0.25 in deeper (>100 mum) tumor. Fluorescent dye partitioning with microfiberoptic detection permits rapid, accurate, and anisotropy-insensitive determination of alpha-values in tissue slices. 2010 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Laser-Induced Fluorescence Measurements for Optical Single Atom Detection for Nuclear Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parzuchowski, Kristen; Singh, Jaideep; Wenzl, Jennifer; Frisbie, Dustin; Johnson, Maegan

    2016-09-01

    We propose a new highly selective detector to measure rare nuclear reactions relevant for nuclear astrophysics. Our primary interest is the 22Ne(α , n) 25Mg reaction, which is a primary source of neutrons for the s-process. Our proposed detector, in conjunction with a recoil separator, captures the recoil products resulting from the reaction in a cryogenically frozen thin film of solid neon. The fluorescence spectra of the captured atoms is shifted from the absorption spectra by hundreds of nanometers. This allows for the optical detection of individual fluorescence photons against a background of intense excitation light. We will describe our initial studies of laser-induced fluorescence of Yb and Mg in solid Ne. Neon is an attractive medium because it is optically transparent and provides efficient, pure, stable, & chemically inert confinement for a wide variety of atomic and molecular species. Yb is used as a test atom because of its similar atomic structure to Mg and much brighter fluorescence signal. This work is supported by funds from Michigan State University.

  7. Molecular rotor measures viscosity of live cells via fluorescence lifetime imaging.

    PubMed

    Kuimova, Marina K; Yahioglu, Gokhan; Levitt, James A; Suhling, Klaus

    2008-05-28

    The fluorescence intensity and lifetime of the 4,4'-difluoro-4-bora-5-(p-oxoalkyl)phenyl-3a,4a-diaza-s-indacene (1) show a strong correlation with the viscosity of the medium due to the viscosity-dependent twisting of the 5-phenyl group, which gives access to the dark nonemissive excited state. We propose a sensitive and versatile method for measuring the local microviscosity in biological systems, based on the determination of the fluorescence lifetime of 1. Fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) performed on live cells incubated with 1 demonstrates the distinct intracellular lifetime of the molecular rotor of 1.6 +/- 0.2 ns corresponding to the intracellular viscosity of ca. 140 cP. Time-resolved fluorescence anisotropy of 1 in cells confirms insignificant binding of the fluorophore. The viscosity value obtained in the present study is considerably higher than that of water and of cellular cytoplasm. The high viscosity of intracellular compartments is likely to play an important role in vital intracellular processes, including the rate of diffusion of reactive oxygen species, causing programmed cell destruction.

  8. Ischemia-induced spreading depolarization in the retina

    PubMed Central

    Srienc, Anja I; Biesecker, Kyle R; Shimoda, Angela M; Kur, Joanna

    2016-01-01

    Cortical spreading depolarization is a metabolically costly phenomenon that affects the brain in both health and disease. Following severe stroke, subarachnoid hemorrhage, or traumatic brain injury, cortical spreading depolarization exacerbates tissue damage and enlarges infarct volumes. It is not known, however, whether spreading depolarization also occurs in the retina in vivo. We report now that spreading depolarization episodes are generated in the in vivo rat retina following retinal vessel occlusion produced by photothrombosis. The properties of retinal spreading depolarization are similar to those of cortical spreading depolarization. Retinal spreading depolarization waves propagate at a velocity of 3.0 ± 0.1 mm/min and are associated with a negative shift in direct current potential, a transient cessation of neuronal spiking, arteriole constriction, and a decrease in tissue O2 tension. The frequency of retinal spreading depolarization generation in vivo is reduced by administration of the NMDA antagonist MK-801 and the 5-HT(1D) agonist sumatriptan. Branch retinal vein occlusion is a leading cause of vision loss from vascular disease. Our results suggest that retinal spreading depolarization could contribute to retinal damage in acute retinal ischemia and demonstrate that pharmacological agents can reduce retinal spreading depolarization frequency after retinal vessel occlusion. Blocking retinal spreading depolarization generation may represent a therapeutic strategy for preserving vision in branch retinal vein occlusion patients. PMID:27389181

  9. Delayed fluorescence spectra of intact leaves photoexcited by sunlight measured with a multichannel Fourier-transform chemiluminescence spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akita, Saeka; Yano, Ayako; Ishii, Hiroshi; Satoh, Chikahiro; Akai, Nobuyuki; Nakata, Munetaka

    2013-06-01

    Delayed fluorescence spectra of intact leaves of Green pak choi (Brassica rapa var. chinensis) were measured with a multichannel Fourier-transform chemiluminescence spectrometer, which we developed recently. The intact samples, photoexcited by sunlight without artificial light sources, showed delayed fluorescence around 740 nm with a lifetime of ˜6 s. The observed spectra were deconvoluted into two Gaussian bands: the delayed fluorescence from photosystem II and photosystem I complexes. Their relative intensities depended on the chlorophyll concentration, but their wavelengths were unchanged.

  10. Temperature measurements in hypersonic air flows using laser-induced O2 fluorescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laufer, Gabriel; Mckenzie, Robert L.

    1988-01-01

    An investigation is reported of the use of laser-induced fluorescence on oxygen for the measurement of air temperature and its fluctuations owing to turbulence in hypersonic wind tunnel flows. The results show that for temperatures higher than 60 K and densities higher than 0.01 amagat, the uncertainty in the temperature measurement can be less than 2 percent if it is limited by photon-statistical noise. The measurement is unaffected by collisional quenching and, if the laser fluence is kept below 1.5 J/sq cm, it is also unaffected by nonlinear effects which are associated with depletion of the absorbing states.

  11. Temperature measurements in hypersonic air flows using laser-induced O2 fluorescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laufer, Gabriel; Mckenzie, Robert L.

    1988-01-01

    An investigation is reported of the use of laser-induced fluorescence on oxygen for the measurement of air temperature and its fluctuations owing to turbulence in hypersonic wind tunnel flows. The results show that for temperatures higher than 60 K and densities higher than 0.01 amagat, the uncertainty in the temperature measurement can be less than 2 percent if it is limited by photon-statistical noise. The measurement is unaffected by collisional quenching and, if the laser fluence is kept below 1.5 J/sq cm, it is also unaffected by nonlinear effects which are associated with depletion of the absorbing states.

  12. In-Situ Silver Acetylide Silver Nitrate Explosive Deposition Measurements Using X-Ray Fluorescence.

    SciTech Connect

    Covert, Timothy Todd

    2014-09-01

    The Light Initiated High Explosive facility utilized a spray deposited coating of silver acetylide - silver nitrate explosive to impart a mechanical shock into targets of interest. A diagnostic was required to measure the explosive deposition in - situ. An X - ray fluorescence spectrometer was deployed at the facility. A measurement methodology was developed to measure the explosive quantity with sufficient accuracy. Through the use of a tin reference material under the silver based explosive, a field calibration relationship has been developed with a standard deviation of 3.2 % . The effect of the inserted tin material into the experiment configuration has been explored.

  13. Hyperfine structure measurements on some /sup 235/U levels by laser fluorescence spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Demers, Y.; Gagne, J.; Dreze, C.; Pianarosa, P.

    1986-12-01

    Laser induced fluorescence from radiatively and collisionally populated states following optical pumping of the resonant transition at 5915 A has been used to investigate the hyperfine structure (hfs) of some /sup 235/U levels. From the fitting of the measured spectra, the hfs constants A and B were obtained for the levels at 6249, 23 543, 22 918, 22 862, and 22 754 cm/sup -1/.

  14. Planar laser-induced fluorescence measurements of high-enthalpy free jet flow with nitric oxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palmer, Jennifer L.; Mcmillin, Brian K.; Hanson, Ronald K.

    1992-01-01

    Planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) measurements of property fields in a high-enthalpy, supersonic, underexpanded free jet generated in a reflection-type shock tunnel are reported. PLIF images showing velocity and temperature sensitivity are presented. The inferred radial velocity and relative rotational temperature fields are found to be in agreement with those predicted by a numerical simulation of the flowfield using the method of characteristics.

  15. Study of excitation transfer in laser dye mixtures by direct measurement of fluorescence lifetime

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, C.; Dienes, A.

    1973-01-01

    By directly measuring the donor fluorescence lifetime as a function of acceptor concentration in the laser dye mixture Rhodamine 6G-Cresyl violet, we found that the Stern-Volmer relation is obeyed, from which the rate of excitation transfer is determined. The experimental results indicate that the dominant mechanism responsible for the efficient excitation transfer is that of resonance transfer due to long range dipole-dipole interaction.

  16. Time-Synchronized Continuous Wave Laser Induced Fluorescence Velocity Measurements of a 600 Watt Hall Thruster

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-07-01

    Briefing Charts presented at The 34th International Electric Propulsion Conference; Kobe, Japan; 6- 10 July 2015. PA#15329 14. ABSTRACT A time...thruster plume. This method is capable of correlating measured fluorescence excitation line shapes with current fluctuations in a plasma discharge...International Symposium on Space Technology and Science, 34th International Electric Propulsion Conference and 6th Nano-satellite Symposium Hyogo-Kobe, Japan

  17. Evaluation of Portable X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) Analyzer for Zirconium-Thickness Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Glenn Moore

    2013-09-01

    This Technical Evaluation Report provides details of preliminary testing/experiments performed using a handheld X-ray fluorescence analyzer. The analyzer will be utilized in upcoming fuel-foil-rolling optimization studies at the INL. The studies are being performed in support of DOE’s Office of Global Threat Reduction -- Reactor Conversion Subprogram. Details of the equipment used, operating parameters, and measurement results are provided in this report.

  18. Front-face fluorescence measurement of photosensitizers and lipid oxidation products during the photooxidation of butter.

    PubMed

    Veberg, A; Olsen, E; Nilsen, A N; Wold, J P

    2007-05-01

    This paper shows that fluorescence spectroscopy can measure both degradation of photosensitizers and formation of lipid oxidation products in light-exposed butter. The photosensitizers were already notably degraded after 4 h of light exposure, whereas fluorescent lipid oxidation products were detected after 5 d. The fluorescence measurements were highly correlated with sensory assessments of acidic and rancid flavor. Photosensitizer degradation is therefore a promising indirect indicator of the onset of lipid oxidation in butter. Sensory analysis and measurement of peroxide value showed that the level of lipid oxidation was significantly higher for butter stored in air compared with butter stored in nitrogen (N2). This might be explained by the formation of singlet oxygen from direct photooxidation and type II photosensitized oxidation. Addition of the singlet oxygen quencher beta-carotene reduced the rancid flavor intensity in the air and N2 packages from 9.0 to 4.9 and from 6.5 to 4.7, respectively. Results indicate that lipid oxidation in the butter stored in N2 was mainly caused by type I photosensitized reactions, because addition of beta-carotene had little effect on the rancid flavor intensity.

  19. A fluorescence anisotropy method for measuring protein concentration in complex cell culture media.

    PubMed

    Groza, Radu Constantin; Calvet, Amandine; Ryder, Alan G

    2014-04-22

    The rapid, quantitative analysis of the complex cell culture media used in biopharmaceutical manufacturing is of critical importance. Requirements for cell culture media composition profiling, or changes in specific analyte concentrations (e.g. amino acids in the media or product protein in the bioprocess broth) often necessitate the use of complicated analytical methods and extensive sample handling. Rapid spectroscopic methods like multi-dimensional fluorescence (MDF) spectroscopy have been successfully applied for the routine determination of compositional changes in cell culture media and bioprocess broths. Quantifying macromolecules in cell culture media is a specific challenge as there is a need to implement measurements rapidly on the prepared media. However, the use of standard fluorescence spectroscopy is complicated by the emission overlap from many media components. Here, we demonstrate how combining anisotropy measurements with standard total synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy (TSFS) provides a rapid, accurate quantitation method for cell culture media. Anisotropy provides emission resolution between large and small fluorophores while TSFS provides a robust measurement space. Model cell culture media was prepared using yeastolate (2.5 mg mL(-1)) spiked with bovine serum albumin (0 to 5 mg mL(-1)). Using this method, protein emission is clearly discriminated from background yeastolate emission, allowing for accurate bovine serum albumin (BSA) quantification over a 0.1 to 4.0 mg mL(-1) range with a limit of detection (LOD) of 13.8 μg mL(-1). Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  20. Measuring precise diffusion coefficients with two-focus fluorescence correlation spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dertinger, Thomas; Gregor, Ingo; von der Hocht, Iris; Erdmann, Rainer; Krämer, Benedikt; Koberling, Felix; Hartmann, Rudolf; Enderlein, Jörg

    2006-02-01

    We present a new method for precisely measuring diffusion coefficients of fluorescent molecules at nanomolar concentrations. The method is based on a modified Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy (FCS)-setup which is robust against many artifacts that are inherent to standard FCS 1, 2. The core idea of the new method is the introduction of an external ruler by generating two laterally shifted and overlapping laser foci at a fixed and known distance. Data fitting is facilitated by ab initio calculations of resulting correlation curves and subsequent affine transformation of these curves to match the measured auto- and cross-correlation functions. The affine transformation coefficient along the time axis then directly yields the correct diffusion coefficient. This method is not relying on the rather inexact assumption of a 3D Gaussian shaped detection volume. We measured the diffusion coefficient of the red fluorescent dye Atto-655 (Atto-Tec GmbH) in water and compared the obtained value with results from Gradient Pulsed Field NMR (GPF-NMR).

  1. Fluorescence measurements of activity associated with a molecularly imprinted polymer imprinted to dipicolinic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, John; Pestov, Dmitry; Fischer, Robert L.; Webb, Stanley; Tepper, Gary C.

    2004-03-01

    Steady state and lifetime fluorescence measurements were acquired to measure the binding activity associated with molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) microparticles imprinted to dipicolinic acid. Dipicolinic acid is a unique compound associated with the sporulation phase of spore-forming bacteria (e.g., genus Bacillus and Clostridium). Vinylic monomers were polymerized in a dimethylformamide solution containing the dipicolinic acid as a template. The resulting MIP was then pulverized and size selected into small microscale particles. Samplers were adapted incorporating the MIP particles within a dialyzer (500 MW). Tests were run on replicate samples of biologically active cultures representing both stationary phase and sporulation post fermentation products in standard media. The permeability of the membrane permitted diffusion of lighter molecular weight constituents from media effluents to enter the dialyzer chamber and contact the MIP. Extractions of the media were measured using steady state and lifetime fluorescence. Results showed dramatic steady state fluorescence changes as a function of excitation, emission and intensity and an estimated lifetime of 5.8 ns.

  2. Measuring diffusion with polarization-modulation dual-focus fluorescence correlation spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Korlann, You; Dertinger, Thomas; Michalet, Xavier; Weiss, Shimon; Enderlein, Jörg

    2008-09-15

    We present a new technique, polarization-modulation dual-focus fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (pmFCS), based on the recently intro-duced dual-focus fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (2fFCS) to measure the absolute value of diffusion coefficients of fluorescent molecules at pico- to nanomolar concentrations. Analogous to 2fFCS, the new technique is robust against optical saturation in yielding correct values of the diffusion coefficient. This is in stark contrast to conventional FCS where optical saturation leads to an apparent decrease in the determined diffusion coefficient with increasing excitation power. However, compared to 2fFCS, the new technique is simpler to implement into a conventional confocal microscope setup and is compatible with cw-excitation, only needing as add-ons an electro-optical modulator and a differential interference contrast prism. With pmFCS, the measured diffusion coefficient (D) for Atto655 maleimide in water at 25?C is determined to be equal to (4.09 +/- 0.07) x 10(-6)cm(2)/s, in good agreement with the value of 4.04 x 10-6cm2/s as measured by 2fFCS.

  3. Oxygen plasma flow properties deduced from laser-induced fluorescence and probe measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Löhle, Stefan; Eichhorn, Christoph; Steinbeck, Andreas; Lein, Sebastian; Herdrich, Georg; Röser, Hans-Peter; Auweter-Kurtz, Monika

    2008-04-01

    Estimation of the local dissociation degree and the local mass-specific enthalpy of a pure oxygen plasma flow determined mainly from laser-induced fluorescence measurements are reported. Measurements have been conducted for several generator parameters in an inductively heated plasma wind tunnel. Additional probe measurements of total pressure together with the deduced translational temperature are used to estimate the local mass-specific enthalpy. For a reference condition, full dissociation has been measured. The measured translational temperature of atomic oxygen for this condition is T = 3500 K. Subsequently, the local mass-specific enthalpy has been derived using these local density and temperature measurements. For the reference condition the estimated value of h = 27 MJ/kg is in good agreement with the probe measurements and results from diode laser absorption spectroscopy.

  4. Dicarbocyanine dyes in methanol solution probed by depolarized Rayleigh and hyper-Rayleigh light scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Ok-Keun; Wang, C. H.

    1996-06-01

    The hyper-Rayleigh scattering (HRS) intensity of two symmetric carbocyanine dyes (1122 DEDC and 1144 DEDC, full names given in the text) in methanol is measured as a function of dye concentration. These dye molecules at equilibrium show a negligible permanent dipole moment. The low concentration data showing that the HRS intensity is proportional to the dye concentration are used to determine the first hyperpolarizability for each of these dyes. However, above a concentration ρb=0.1×10-3 M, the HRS intensity shows an anomalous concentration dependence. Above ρb, the HRS intensity shows a saturation behavior and it even decreases with increasing concentration at high dye concentration. The depolarization ratio of the HRS intensity is also measured as a function of dye concentration. At lowest concentration, the depolarization ratio is 0.18. As the dye concentration increases, the depolarization ratio also rapidly increases but the increase quickly saturates as the concentration exceeds ρb. The concentration dependence of the HRS intensity and depolarization ratio are interpreted as due to formation of molecular aggregates. The depolarized Rayleigh scattering (DRS) intensity is also measured as a function of dye concentration. The result of DRS corroborates well with that found in HRS.

  5. Modelling and measurement of solar induced fluorescence in a boreal scots pine canopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nichol, C. J.; Drolet, G.; Atherton, J.; Wade, T. J.; Porcar-Castell, A.; Levula, J.; Nikinmaa, E.; Vesala, T.

    2012-12-01

    Terrestrial sun induced chlorophyll fluorescence (Fs) is emitted by chlorophyll molecules in the photosystems of higher plants. The signal originates from the photosynthetic machinery and is thus expected to respond to changes in environmental conditions such as light and physiological stress. This therefore makes Fs an attractive tool to provide insight into a plants photosynthetic performance over traditional reflectance based approaches utilised in vegetation remote sensing applications. A number of Fs retrieval methods from optical data have been documented and these share a common basis; that the fractional depth of the Fraunhofer lines decreases due to infilling by solar induced fluorescence (Fs). Here we presents results from two (linked) studies that demonstrates the challenge of retrieving Fs from, firstly, continuous irradiance and radiance measurements collected over a boreal canopy from a custom built continuously operating optical system, and secondly, we present a coupled physiological-radiative transfer model that predicts changes in the apparent reflectance of a leaf, due to chlorophyll fluorescence that occur on timescales of seconds to minutes. The biochemical model is based on a detailed model of the dynamics of the fate of absorbed light energy through photosystem II. The radiative transfer component is derived from empirically obtained fluorescence excitation-emission matrices and the PROSPECT leaf model. A Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) algorithm was used to optimise biochemical model parameters by fitting model simulations of transient chlorophyll fluorescence to measured reflectance spectra. The model successfully simulated the transient fluorescence decay curve and reproduced yield estimates for photochemical and non-photochemical quenching when validated against an independent data-set. The biochemical model is driven solely by incident radiation, to scale to the canopy and to use the model on trans-seasonal time scales the effects of

  6. Retrievals of Aerosol and Cloud Particle Microphysics Using Polarization and Depolarization Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mishchenko, Michael; Hansen, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The recent availability of theoretical techniques for computing single and multiple scattering of light by realistic polydispersions of spherical and nonspherical particles and the strong dependence of the Stokes scattering matrix on particle size, shape, and refractive index make polarization and depolarization measurements a powerful particle characterization tool. In this presentation I will describe recent applications of photopolarimetric and lidar depolarization measurements to remote sensing characterization of tropospheric aerosols, polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs), and contrails. The talk will include (1) a short theoretical overview of the effects of particle microphysics on particle single-scattering characteristics; (2) the use of multi-angle multi-spectral photopolarimetry to retrieve the optical thickness, size distribution, refractive index, and number concentration of tropospheric aerosols over the ocean surface; and (3) the application of the T-matrix method to constraining the PSC and contrail particle microphysics using multi-spectral measurements of lidar backscatter and depolarization.

  7. Retrievals of Aerosol and Cloud Particle Microphysics Using Polarization and Depolarization Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mishchenko, Michael; Hansen, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The recent availability of theoretical techniques for computing single and multiple scattering of light by realistic polydispersions of spherical and nonspherical particles and the strong dependence of the Stokes scattering matrix on particle size, shape, and refractive index make polarization and depolarization measurements a powerful particle characterization tool. In this presentation I will describe recent applications of photopolarimetric and lidar depolarization measurements to remote sensing characterization of tropospheric aerosols, polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs), and contrails. The talk will include (1) a short theoretical overview of the effects of particle microphysics on particle single-scattering characteristics; (2) the use of multi-angle multi-spectral photopolarimetry to retrieve the optical thickness, size distribution, refractive index, and number concentration of tropospheric aerosols over the ocean surface; and (3) the application of the T-matrix method to constraining the PSC and contrail particle microphysics using multi-spectral measurements of lidar backscatter and depolarization.

  8. Measurement and quantification of fluorescent changes in ocular tissue using a novel confocal instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buttenschoen, Kim K.; Girkin, John M.; Daly, Daniel J.

    2014-05-01

    Our sight is a major contributor to our quality of life. The treatment of diseases like macular degeneration and glaucoma, however, presents a challenge as the delivery of medication to ocular tissue is not well understood. The instrument described here will help quantify targeted delivery by non-invasively and simultaneously measuring light reflected from and fluorescence excited in the eye, used as position marker and to track compounds respectively. The measurement concept has been proven by monitoring the diffusion of fluorescein and a pharmaceutical compound for treating open angle glaucoma in vitro in a cuvette and in ex vivo porcine eyes. To obtain a baseline of natural fluorescence we measured the change in corneal and crystalline lens autofluorescence in volunteers over a week. We furthermore present data on 3D ocular autofluorescence. Our results demonstrate the capability to measure the location and concentration of the compound of interest with high axial and temporal resolution of 178 μm and 0.6 s respectively. The current detection limit is 2 nM for fluorescein, and compounds with a quantum yield as low as 0.01 were measured to concentrations below 1 μM. The instrument has many applications in assessing the diffusion of fluorescent compounds through the eye and skin in vitro and in vivo, measuring autofluorescence of ocular tissues and reducing the number of animals needed for research. The instrument has the capability of being used both in the clinical and home care environment opening up the possibility of measuring controlled drug release in a patient friendly manner.

  9. The effects of opaque and clear pit and fissure sealants on infrared laser fluorescence measurements.

    PubMed

    Bahrololoomi, Z; Khodabakhsh, M; Khaksar, Y

    2014-06-01

    The purpose of placing sealants is to inhibit caries by physical closure of the pits and fissures of teeth. A device named DIAGNOdent is useful in detecting occlusal caries by employing laser fluorescence (LF). However, there are contradictory results in the influence of sealants on LF measurements. The aim of this study is to investigate the effects of two different types of fissure sealants on LF measurements. In this in vitro study, 86 extracted permanent third molars were divided randomly into two groups and clear or opaque sealant was applied on the occlusal surfaces. Two examiners performed pre- and post-seal fluorescence measurements twice with one week interval by employing DIAGNOdent device. Finally, measured values were evaluated through the statistical paired t-test by means of SPSS 17 software. The mean value of LF measurements increased significantly due to the application of clear sealant (p= 0.001) while the statistical changes in this measurement was negligible after applying opaque sealant (p= 0.311). Clear sealants increase the LF measured values but opaque sealants cause almost no changes. Therefore, DIAGNOdent device is not reliable for detecting caries beneath the clear sealant.

  10. The Effects of Opaque and Clear Pit and Fissure Sealants on Infrared Laser Fluorescence Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Bahrololoomi, Z.; Khodabakhsh, M.; Khaksar, Y.

    2014-01-01

    Statement of the Problem: The purpose of placing sealants is to inhibit caries by physical closure of the pits and fissures of teeth. A device named DIAGNOdent is useful in detecting occlusal caries by employing laser fluorescence (LF). However, there are contradictory results in the influence of sealants on LF measurements. Purpose: The aim of this study is to investigate the effects of two different types of fissure sealants on LF measurements. Materials and Method: In this in vitro study, 86 extracted permanent third molars were divided randomly into two groups and clear or opaque sealant was applied on the occlusal surfaces. Two examiners performed pre- and post-seal fluorescence measurements twice with one week interval by employing DIAGNOdent device. Finally, measured values were evaluated through the statistical paired t-test by means of SPSS 17 software. Results: The mean value of LF measurements increased significantly due to the application of clear sealant (p= 0.001) while the statistical changes in this measurement was negligible after applying opaque sealant (p= 0.311). Conclusion: Clear sealants increase the LF measured values but opaque sealants cause almost no changes. Therefore, DIAGNOdent device is not reliable for detecting caries beneath the clear sealant. PMID:24883342

  11. Fluorescence dilution technique for measurement of albumin reflection coefficient in isolated glomeruli.

    PubMed

    Fan, Fan; Chen, Chun Cheng Andy; Zhang, Jin; Schreck, Carlos M N; Roman, Eric A; Williams, Jan M; Hirata, Takashi; Sharma, Mukut; Beard, Daniel A; Savin, Virginia J; Roman, Richard J

    2015-12-15

    This study describes a high-throughput fluorescence dilution technique to measure the albumin reflection coefficient (σAlb) of isolated glomeruli. Rats were injected with FITC-dextran 250 (75 mg/kg), and the glomeruli were isolated in a 6% BSA solution. Changes in the fluorescence of the glomerulus due to water influx in response to an imposed oncotic gradient was used to determine σAlb. Adjustment of the albumin concentration of the bath from 6 to 5, 4, 3, and 2% produced a 10, 25, 35, and 50% decrease in the fluorescence of the glomeruli. Pretreatment of glomeruli with protamine sulfate (2 mg/ml) or TGF-β1 (10 ng/ml) decreased σAlb from 1 to 0.54 and 0.48, respectively. Water and solute movement were modeled using Kedem-Katchalsky equations, and the measured responses closely fit the predicted behavior, indicating that loss of albumin by solvent drag or diffusion is negligible compared with the movement of water. We also found that σAlb was reduced by 17% in fawn hooded hypertensive rats, 33% in hypertensive Dahl salt-sensitive (SS) rats, 26% in streptozotocin-treated diabetic Dahl SS rats, and 21% in 6-mo old type II diabetic nephropathy rats relative to control Sprague-Dawley rats. The changes in glomerular permeability to albumin were correlated with the degree of proteinuria in these strains. These findings indicate that the fluorescence dilution technique can be used to measure σAlb in populations of isolated glomeruli and provides a means to assess the development of glomerular injury in hypertensive and diabetic models. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  12. Fluorescence dilution technique for measurement of albumin reflection coefficient in isolated glomeruli

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Fan; Chen, Chun Cheng Andy; Zhang, Jin; Schreck, Carlos M. N.; Williams, Jan M.; Hirata, Takashi; Sharma, Mukut; Beard, Daniel A.; Savin, Virginia J.; Roman, Richard J.

    2015-01-01

    This study describes a high-throughput fluorescence dilution technique to measure the albumin reflection coefficient (σAlb) of isolated glomeruli. Rats were injected with FITC-dextran 250 (75 mg/kg), and the glomeruli were isolated in a 6% BSA solution. Changes in the fluorescence of the glomerulus due to water influx in response to an imposed oncotic gradient was used to determine σAlb. Adjustment of the albumin concentration of the bath from 6 to 5, 4, 3, and 2% produced a 10, 25, 35, and 50% decrease in the fluorescence of the glomeruli. Pretreatment of glomeruli with protamine sulfate (2 mg/ml) or TGF-β1 (10 ng/ml) decreased σAlb from 1 to 0.54 and 0.48, respectively. Water and solute movement were modeled using Kedem-Katchalsky equations, and the measured responses closely fit the predicted behavior, indicating that loss of albumin by solvent drag or diffusion is negligible compared with the movement of water. We also found that σAlb was reduced by 17% in fawn hooded hypertensive rats, 33% in hypertensive Dahl salt-sensitive (SS) rats, 26% in streptozotocin-treated diabetic Dahl SS rats, and 21% in 6-mo old type II diabetic nephropathy rats relative to control Sprague-Dawley rats. The changes in glomerular permeability to albumin were correlated with the degree of proteinuria in these strains. These findings indicate that the fluorescence dilution technique can be used to measure σAlb in populations of isolated glomeruli and provides a means to assess the development of glomerular injury in hypertensive and diabetic models. PMID:26447220

  13. Mathematical analysis of depolarization block mediated by slow inactivation of fast sodium channels in midbrain dopamine neurons

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Kun; Yu, Na; Tucker, Kristal R.; Levitan, Edwin S.

    2014-01-01

    Dopamine neurons in freely moving rats often fire behaviorally relevant high-frequency bursts, but depolarization block limits the maximum steady firing rate of dopamine neurons in vitro to ∼10 Hz. Using a reduced model that faithfully reproduces the sodium current measured in these neurons, we show that adding an additional slow component of sodium channel inactivation, recently observed in these neurons, qualitatively changes in two different ways how the model enters into depolarization block. First, the slow time course of inactivation allows multiple spikes to be elicited during a strong depolarization prior to entry into depolarization block. Second, depolarization block occurs near or below the spike threshold, which ranges from −45 to −30 mV in vitro, because the additional slow component of inactivation negates the sodium window current. In the absence of the additional slow component of inactivation, this window current produces an N-shaped steady-state current-voltage (I-V) curve that prevents depolarization block in the experimentally observed voltage range near −40 mV. The time constant of recovery from slow inactivation during the interspike interval limits the maximum steady firing rate observed prior to entry into depolarization block. These qualitative features of the entry into depolarization block can be reversed experimentally by replacing the native sodium conductance with a virtual conductance lacking the slow component of inactivation. We show that the activation of NMDA and AMPA receptors can affect bursting and depolarization block in different ways, depending upon their relative contributions to depolarization versus to the total linear/nonlinear conductance. PMID:25185810

  14. Linear depolarization of lidar returns by aged smoke particles.

    PubMed

    Mishchenko, Michael I; Dlugach, Janna M; Liu, Li

    2016-12-10

    We use the numerically exact (superposition) T-matrix method to analyze recent measurements of the backscattering linear depolarization ratio (LDR) for a plume of aged smoke at lidar wavelengths ranging from 355 to 1064 nm. We show that the unique spectral dependence of the measured LDRs can be modeled, but only by assuming expressly nonspherical morphologies of smoke particles containing substantial amounts of nonabsorbing (or weakly absorbing) refractory materials such as sulfates. Our results demonstrate that spectral backscattering LDR measurements can be indicative of the presence of morphologically complex smoke particles, but additional (e.g., passive polarimetric or bistatic lidar) measurements may be required for a definitive characterization of the particle morphology and composition.

  15. Determination of Enantiomeric Compositions of Analytes Using Novel Fluorescent Chiral Molecular Micelles and Steady State Fluorescence Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Alicia A.; Fakayode, Sayo O.; Alptürk, Onur; Jones, Christina M.; Lowry, Mark; Strongin, Robert M.

    2009-01-01

    Novel fluorescent chiral molecular micelles (FCMMs) were synthesized, characterized, and employed as chiral selectors for enantiomeric recognition of non-fluorescent chiral molecules using steady state fluorescence spectroscopy. The sensitivity of the fluorescence technique allowed for investigation of low concentrations of chiral selector (3.0×10−5 M) and analyte (5.0×10−6 M) to be used in these studies. The chiral interactions of glucose, tartaric acid, and serine in the presence of FCMMs poly(sodium N-undecanoyl-L-tryptophanate) [poly-L-SUW], poly(sodium N-undecanoyl-L-tyrosinate) [poly-L-SUY], and poly(sodium N-undecanoyl-L-phenylalininate) [poly-SUF] were based on diastereomeric complex formation. Poly-L-SUW had a significant fluorescence emission spectral difference as compared to poly-L-SUY and poly-L-SUF for the enantiomeric recognition of glucose, tartaric acid, and serine. Studies with the hydrophobic molecule α-pinene suggested that poly-L-SUY and poly-L-SUF had better chiral discrimination ability for hydrophobic analytes as compared to hydrophilic analytes. Partial-least-squares regression modeling (PLS-1) was used to correlate changes in the fluorescence emission spectra of poly-L-SUW due to varying enantiomeric compositions of glucose, tartaric acid, and serine for a set of calibration samples. Validation of the calibration regression models was determined by use of a set of independently prepared samples of the same concentration of chiral selector and analyte with varying enantiomeric composition. Prediction ability was evaluated by use of the root-mean-square percent relative error (RMS%RE) and was found to range from 2.04 to 4.06%. PMID:17985217

  16. Fluorescence of tryptophan in designed hairpin and Trp-cage miniproteins: measurements of fluorescence yields and calculations by quantum mechanical molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    McMillan, Andrew W; Kier, Brandon L; Shu, Irene; Byrne, Aimee; Andersen, Niels H; Parson, William W

    2013-02-14

    The quantum yield of tryptophan (Trp) fluorescence was measured in 30 designed miniproteins (17 β-hairpins and 13 Trp-cage peptides), each containing a single Trp residue. Measurements were made in D(2)O and H(2)O to distinguish between fluorescence quenching mechanisms involving electron and proton transfer in the hairpin peptides, and at two temperatures to check for effects of partial unfolding of the Trp-cage peptides. The extent of folding of all the peptides also was measured by NMR. The fluorescence yields ranged from 0.01 in some of the Trp-cage peptides to 0.27 in some hairpins. Fluorescence quenching was found to occur by electron transfer from the excited indole ring of the Trp to a backbone amide group or the protonated side chain of a nearby histidine, glutamate, aspartate, tyrosine, or cysteine residue. Ionized tyrosine side chains quenched strongly by resonance energy transfer or electron transfer to the excited indole ring. Hybrid classical/quantum mechanical molecular dynamics simulations were performed by a method that optimized induced electric dipoles separately for the ground and excited states in multiple π-π* and charge-transfer (CT) excitations. Twenty 0.5 ns trajectories in the tryptophan's lowest excited singlet π-π* state were run for each peptide, beginning by projections from trajectories in the ground state. Fluorescence quenching was correlated with the availability of a CT or exciton state that was strongly coupled to the π-π* state and that matched or fell below the π-π* state in energy. The fluorescence yields predicted by summing the calculated rates of charge and energy transfer are in good accord with the measured yields.

  17. Fluorescence Recovery after Merging a Droplet to Measure the Two-dimensional Diffusion of a Phospholipid Monolayer.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Dae-Woong; Kim, KyuHan; Choi, Myung Chul; Choi, Siyoung Q

    2015-10-15

    We introduce a new method to measure the lateral diffusivity of a surfactant monolayer at the fluid-fluid interface, called fluorescence recovery after merging (FRAM). FRAM adopts the same principles as the fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) technique, especially for measuring fluorescence recovery after bleaching a specific area, but FRAM uses a drop coalescence instead of photobleaching dye molecules to induce a chemical potential gradient of dye molecules. Our technique has several advantages over FRAP: it only requires a fluorescence microscope rather than a confocal microscope equipped with high power lasers; it is essentially free from the selection of fluorescence dyes; and it has far more freedom to define the measured diffusion area. Furthermore, FRAM potentially provides a route for studying the mixing or inter-diffusion of two different surfactants, when the monolayers at a surface of droplet and at a flat air/water interface are prepared with different species, independently.

  18. Fluorescence Recovery after Merging a Droplet to Measure the Two-dimensional Diffusion of a Phospholipid Monolayer

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Dae-Woong; Kim, KyuHan; Choi, Myung Chul; Choi, Siyoung Q.

    2015-01-01

    We introduce a new method to measure the lateral diffusivity of a surfactant monolayer at the fluid-fluid interface, called fluorescence recovery after merging (FRAM). FRAM adopts the same principles as the fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) technique, especially for measuring fluorescence recovery after bleaching a specific area, but FRAM uses a drop coalescence instead of photobleaching dye molecules to induce a chemical potential gradient of dye molecules. Our technique has several advantages over FRAP: it only requires a fluorescence microscope rather than a confocal microscope equipped with high power lasers; it is essentially free from the selection of fluorescence dyes; and it has far more freedom to define the measured diffusion area. Furthermore, FRAM potentially provides a route for studying the mixing or inter-diffusion of two different surfactants, when the monolayers at a surface of droplet and at a flat air/water interface are prepared with different species, independently. PMID:26556128

  19. Quantification of fluorophore concentration in tissue-simulating media by fluorescence measurements with a single optical fiber.

    PubMed

    Diamond, Kevin R; Patterson, Michael S; Farrell, Thomas J

    2003-05-01

    Quantifying fluorescent compounds in turbid media such as tissue is made difficult by the effects of multiple scattering and absorption of the excitation and emission light. The approach that we used was to measure fluorescence using a single 200-microm optical fiber as both the illumination source and the detector. Fluorescence of aluminum phthalocyanine tetrasulfonate (AlPcS4) was measured over a wide range of fluorophore concentrations and optical properties in tissue-simulating phantoms. A root-mean-square accuracy of 10.6% in AlPcS4 concentration was attainable when fluorescence was measured either interstitially or at the phantom surface. The individual effects of scattering, absorption, and the scattering phase function on the fluorescence signal were also studied by experiments and Monte Carlo simulations.

  20. Application of dual-focus fluorescence correlation spectroscopy to microfluidic flow-velocity measurement.

    PubMed

    Arbour, Tyler J; Enderlein, Jörg

    2010-05-21

    Several methods exist to measure and map fluid velocities in microfluidic devices, which are vital to understanding properties on the micro- and nano-scale. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) is a method traditionally exploited for its ability to measure molecular diffusion coefficients. However, several reports during the past decade have shown that FCS can also be successfully used to measure precise flow rates in microfluidics with very high spatial resolution, making it a competitive alternative to other common flow-measurement methods. In 2007 we introduced a modified version of conventional FCS that overcomes many of the artifacts troubling the standard technique. Here we show how the advantages of this method, called dual-focus FCS, extend to flow measurements. To do so, we have measured the velocity flow profile along the cross-section of a square-bore microfluidic channel and compared the result to the theoretical prediction.

  1. Spontaneous mechanical activity in depolarized frog ventricle

    PubMed Central

    1976-01-01

    Spontaneous mechanical activity can be produced in depolarized frog ventricle by bathing the tissue in a solution with low Na, Iow Ca, and high K+. The contractions can be inhibited by depleting the tissue of Ca first, but they are relatively insensitive to changes in either extracellular [Ca++] or [Ca++]/[Na+]2. They are terminated very rapidly by raising [Na+] to 40 mM. Local anesthetics enhance the spontaneous activity in proportion to the concentration of their free base form. These contractions occur relatively rhythmically for several hours. Since the preparation is multicellular, this suggests a mechanism for intercellular communication without change in membrane potential. PMID:822122

  2. Resolution of heterogeneous fluorescence emission signals and decay lifetime measurement on fluorochrome-labeled cells by phase-sensitive FCM

    SciTech Connect

    Steinkamp, J.A.; Crissman, H.A.

    1993-01-01

    A phase-sensitive flow cytometer has been developed to resolve signals from heterogeneous fluorescence emission spectra and quantify fluorescence decay times on cells labeled with fluorescent dyes. This instrument combines flow cytometry (FCM) and fluorescence spectroscopy measurement principles to provide unique capabilities for making phase-resolved measurements on single cells in flow, while preserving conventional FCM measurement capabilities. Stained cells are analyzed as they pass through an intensity-modulated (sinusoid) laser excitation beam. Fluorescence is measured orthogonally using a s barrier filter to block scattered laser excitation light, and a photomultiplier tube detector output signals, which are shifted in phase from a reference signal and amplitude demodulated, are processed by phase-sensitive detection electronics to resolve signals from heterogeneous emissions and quantify decay lifetimes directly. The output signals are displayed as frequency distribution histograms and bivariate diagrams using a computer-based data acquisition system. Results have demonstrated signal phase shift, amplitude demodulation, and average measurement of fluorescence lifetimes on stained cells; a detection limit threshold of 300 to 500 fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC); fluorescence measurement precision of 1.3% on alignment fluorospheres and 3.4% on propidium iodide (PI)-stained cells; the resolution of PI and FITC signals from cells stainedin combination with PI and FITC, based on differences in their decay lifetimes; and the ability to measure single decay nines by the two-phase, phase comparator, method.

  3. Resolution of heterogeneous fluorescence emission signals and decay lifetime measurement on fluorochrome-labeled cells by phase-sensitive FCM

    SciTech Connect

    Steinkamp, J.A.; Crissman, H.A.

    1993-02-01

    A phase-sensitive flow cytometer has been developed to resolve signals from heterogeneous fluorescence emission spectra and quantify fluorescence decay times on cells labeled with fluorescent dyes. This instrument combines flow cytometry (FCM) and fluorescence spectroscopy measurement principles to provide unique capabilities for making phase-resolved measurements on single cells in flow, while preserving conventional FCM measurement capabilities. Stained cells are analyzed as they pass through an intensity-modulated (sinusoid) laser excitation beam. Fluorescence is measured orthogonally using a s barrier filter to block scattered laser excitation light, and a photomultiplier tube detector output signals, which are shifted in phase from a reference signal and amplitude demodulated, are processed by phase-sensitive detection electronics to resolve signals from heterogeneous emissions and quantify decay lifetimes directly. The output signals are displayed as frequency distribution histograms and bivariate diagrams using a computer-based data acquisition system. Results have demonstrated signal phase shift, amplitude demodulation, and average measurement of fluorescence lifetimes on stained cells; a detection limit threshold of 300 to 500 fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC); fluorescence measurement precision of 1.3% on alignment fluorospheres and 3.4% on propidium iodide (PI)-stained cells; the resolution of PI and FITC signals from cells stainedin combination with PI and FITC, based on differences in their decay lifetimes; and the ability to measure single decay nines by the two-phase, phase comparator, method.

  4. Nonlinear reconstruction of absorption and fluorescence contrast from measured diffuse transmittance and reflectance of a compressed-breast-simulating phantom.

    PubMed

    Ziegler, Ronny; Nielsen, Tim; Koehler, Thomas; Grosenick, Dirk; Steinkellner, Oliver; Hagen, Axel; Macdonald, Rainer; Rinneberg, Herbert

    2009-08-20

    We report on the nonlinear reconstruction of local absorption and fluorescence contrast in tissuelike scattering media from measured time-domain diffuse reflectance and transmittance of laser as well as laser-excited fluorescence radiation. Measurements were taken at selected source-detector offsets using slablike diffusely scattering and fluorescent phantoms containing fluorescent heterogeneities. Such measurements simulate in vivo data that would be obtained employing a scanning, time-domain fluorescence mammograph, where the breast is gently compressed between two parallel glass plates, and source and detector optical fibers scan synchronously at various source-detector offsets, allowing the recording of laser and fluorescence mammograms. The diffusion equations modeling the propagation of the laser and fluorescence radiation were solved in frequency domain by the finite element method simultaneously for several modulation frequencies using Fourier transformation and preprocessed experimental data. To reconstruct the concentration of the fluorescent contrast agent, the Born approximation including higher-order reconstructed photon densities at the excitation wavelength was used. Axial resolution was determined that can be achieved by various detection schemes. We show that remission measurements increase the depth resolution significantly.

  5. "Open-Box" Approach to Measuring Fluorescence Quenching Using an iPad Screen and Digital SLR Camera

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koenig, Michael H.; Yi, Eun P.; Sandridge, Matthew J.; Mathew, Alexander S.; Demas, James N.

    2015-01-01

    Fluorescence quenching is an analytical technique and a common undergraduate laboratory exercise. Unfortunately, a typical quenching experiment requires the use of an expensive fluorometer that measures the relative fluorescence intensity of a single sample in a closed compartment unseen by the experimenter. To overcome these shortcomings, we…

  6. Nonlinear reconstruction of absorption and fluorescence contrast from measured diffuse transmittance and reflectance of a compressed-breast-simulating phantom

    SciTech Connect

    Ziegler, Ronny; Nielsen, Tim; Koehler, Thomas; Grosenick, Dirk; Steinkellner, Oliver; Hagen, Axel; Macdonald, Rainer; Rinneberg, Herbert

    2009-08-20

    We report on the nonlinear reconstruction of local absorption and fluorescence contrast in tissuelike scattering media from measured time-domain diffuse reflectance and transmittance of laser as well as laser-excited fluorescence radiation. Measurements were taken at selected source-detector offsets using slablike diffusely scattering and fluorescent phantoms containing fluorescent heterogeneities. Such measurements simulate in vivo data that would be obtained employing a scanning, time-domain fluorescence mammograph, where the breast is gently compressed between two parallel glass plates, and source and detector optical fibers scan synchronously at various source-detector offsets, allowing the recording of laser and fluorescence mammograms. The diffusion equations modeling the propagation of the laser and fluorescence radiation were solved in frequency domain by the finite element method simultaneously for several modulation frequencies using Fourier transformation and preprocessed experimental data. To reconstruct the concentration of the fluorescent contrast agent, the Born approximation including higher-order reconstructed photon densities at the excitation wavelength was used. Axial resolution was determined that can be achieved by various detection schemes. We show that remission measurements increase the depth resolution significantly.

  7. "Open-Box" Approach to Measuring Fluorescence Quenching Using an iPad Screen and Digital SLR Camera

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koenig, Michael H.; Yi, Eun P.; Sandridge, Matthew J.; Mathew, Alexander S.; Demas, James N.

    2015-01-01

    Fluorescence quenching is an analytical technique and a common undergraduate laboratory exercise. Unfortunately, a typical quenching experiment requires the use of an expensive fluorometer that measures the relative fluorescence intensity of a single sample in a closed compartment unseen by the experimenter. To overcome these shortcomings, we…

  8. SmartFluo: A Method and Affordable Adapter to Measure Chlorophyll a Fluorescence with Smartphones

    PubMed Central

    Friedrichs, Anna; Busch, Julia Anke; van der Woerd, Hendrik Jan; Zielinski, Oliver

    2017-01-01

    In order to increase the monitoring capabilities of inland and coastal waters, there is a need for new, affordable, sensitive and mobile instruments that could be operated semi-automatically in the field. This paper presents a prototype device to measure chlorophyll a fluorescence: the SmartFluo. The device is a combination of a smartphone offering an intuitive operation interface and an adapter implying a cuvette holder, as well as a suitable illumination source. SmartFluo is based on stimulated fluorescence of water constituents such as chlorophyll a. The red band of the digital smartphone camera is sensitive enough to detect quantitatively the characteristic red fluorescence emission. The adapter contains a light source, a strong light emitting diode and additional filters to enhance the signal-to-noise ratio and to suppress the impact of scattering. A novel algorithm utilizing the red band of the camera is provided. Laboratory experiments of the SmartFluo show a linear correlation (R2 = 0.98) to the chlorophyll a concentrations measured by reference instruments, such as a high-performance benchtop laboratory fluorometer (LS 55, PerkinElmer). PMID:28346338

  9. Fluorescence and absorption characteristics of p-xylene: applicability for temperature measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qianlong; Zhang, Yuyin; Jiang, Liqiao; Zhao, Daiqing; Guibert, Philippe; Yang, Shunhua

    2017-09-01

    This paper explores the characteristics of absorption and fluorescence spectra of p-xylene within the temperature range that is frequently encountered during the mixture formation in internal combustion engines. At 266 nm wavelength, the p-xylene absorption cross section shows a mean value of (3.4 ± 0.2) × 10-19 cm2/molecule within the temperature range from 423 to 623 K in N2. As expected, fluorescence peak intensity decreases by a factor of 3 when the temperature increases by 100 K, due to a increasing non-radiative decay rate of excited state at increasing temperatures. In addition, the suitability of p-xylene for temperature measurements in the gas phase via the single-wavelength excitation (at 266 nm) two-color detection laser-induced fluorescence imaging is explored. Combinations of spectral detection bands were compared and the combination of 320/289 nm provides the best temperature performance with a relative error of 2.6% within the investigated temperature range. It is also shown that the temperature field measurement has not been strongly affected by the laser attenuation.

  10. A method of measuring gold nanoparticle concentrations by X-ray fluorescence for biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Wu, Di; Li, Yuhua; Wong, Molly D; Liu, Hong

    2013-05-01

    This paper reports a technique that enables the quantitative determination of the concentration of gold nanoparticles (GNPs) through the accurate detection of their fluorescence radiation in the diagnostic x-ray spectrum. Experimentally, x-ray fluorescence spectra of 1.9 and 15 nm GNP solutions are measured using an x-ray spectrometer, individually and within chicken breast tissue samples. An optimal combination of excitation and emission filters is determined to segregate the fluorescence spectra at 66.99 and 68.80 keV from the background scattering. A roadmap method is developed that subtracts the scattered radiation (acquired before the insertion of GNP solutions) from the signal radiation acquired after the GNP solutions are inserted. The methods effectively minimize the background scattering in the spectrum measurements, showing linear relationships between GNP solutions from 0.1% to 10% weight concentration and from 0.1% to 1.0% weight concentration inside a chicken breast tissue sample. The investigation demonstrated the potential of imaging gold nanoparticles quantitatively in vivo for in-tissue studies, but future studies will be needed to investigate the ability to apply this method to clinical applications.

  11. A method of measuring gold nanoparticle concentrations by x-ray fluorescence for biomedical applications

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Di; Li Yuhua; Wong, Molly D.; Liu Hong

    2013-05-15

    Purpose: This paper reports a technique that enables the quantitative determination of the concentration of gold nanoparticles (GNPs) through the accurate detection of their fluorescence radiation in the diagnostic x-ray spectrum. Methods: Experimentally, x-ray fluorescence spectra of 1.9 and 15 nm GNP solutions are measured using an x-ray spectrometer, individually and within chicken breast tissue samples. An optimal combination of excitation and emission filters is determined to segregate the fluorescence spectra at 66.99 and 68.80 keV from the background scattering. A roadmap method is developed that subtracts the scattered radiation (acquired before the insertion of GNP solutions) from the signal radiation acquired after the GNP solutions are inserted. Results: The methods effectively minimize the background scattering in the spectrum measurements, showing linear relationships between GNP solutions from 0.1% to 10% weight concentration and from 0.1% to 1.0% weight concentration inside a chicken breast tissue sample. Conclusions: The investigation demonstrated the potential of imaging gold nanoparticles quantitatively in vivo for in-tissue studies, but future studies will be needed to investigate the ability to apply this method to clinical applications.

  12. Measuring incidence angle for through-the-objective total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Abstract. Total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy has the exciting laser beam incident beyond critical angle from the glass side of a glass/aqueous interface formed by the coverslip and aqueous sample. The aqueous side evanescent field decays exponentially with distance from the interface with penetration depth depending on incidence angle. Through-the-objective TIRF has the exciting laser focused at the back focal plane (BFP) creating a refracted parallel beam approaching the interface in the small gap between objective and coverslip, making incidence angle challenging to measure. Objective axial scanning does not affect incidence angle but translates beam and interface intersection detected by the fluorescence center of mass from fluorescent spheres attached to the aqueous side of the interface. Center of mass translation divided by the axial translation is the tangent of the incidence angle that is sampled repeatedly over objective trajectory to obtain a best estimate. Incidence angle is measured for progressively larger radial positions of the focused beam on the BFP. A through-the-objective TIRF microscope, utilizing a micrometer and relay lenses to position the focused beam at the BFP, is calibrated for incidence angle. Calibration depends on microscope characteristics and TIRF objective and is applicable to any interface or sample. PMID:23208218

  13. Dual wavelength fluorescent ratiometric pH measurement by scanning near-field optical microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yongbo; Shinohara, Ryosuke; Iwami, Kentaro; Ohta, Yoshihiro; Umeda, Norihiro

    2010-08-01

    A novel method to observe pH distribution by dual wavelength fluorescent ratiometric pH measurement by scanning near-field optical microscopy (SNOM) is developed. In this method, in order to investigate not only the pH of mitochondrial membrane but also its distribution in the vicinity, a pH sensitive fluorescent reagent covers mitochondria instead of injecting it to mitochondria. This method utilizes a dual-emission pH sensitive dye and SNOM with a themally-pulled and metal-coated optical fiber to improve the spatial resolution. Time-dependence of Fluorescent intensity ratio (FIR) under acid addition is investigated. As the distances between the dropped point and the SNOM probe becomes closer, the time when FIR changes becomes earlier. The response of mitochondria under supplement of nutrition is studied by using this method. While the probe is near to mitochondria, the ratio quickly becomes to increase. In conclusion, it was confirmed that the temporal variation of pH can be detected by this method, and pH distribution in the vicinity of mitochondria is able to be measured by this method.

  14. Numerical analysis of quantitative measurement of hydroxyl radical concentration using laser-induced fluorescence in flame

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shuang, Chen; Tie, Su; Yao-Bang, Zheng; Li, Chen; Ting-Xu, Liu; Ren-Bing, Li; Fu-Rong, Yang

    2016-06-01

    The aim of the present work is to quantitatively measure the hydroxyl radical concentration by using LIF (laser-induced fluorescence) in flame. The detailed physical models of spectral absorption lineshape broadening, collisional transition and quenching at elevated pressure are built. The fine energy level structure of the OH molecule is illustrated to understand the process with laser-induced fluorescence emission and others in the case without radiation, which include collisional quenching, rotational energy transfer (RET), and vibrational energy transfer (VET). Based on these, some numerical results are achieved by simulations in order to evaluate the fluorescence yield at elevated pressure. These results are useful for understanding the real physical processes in OH-LIF technique and finding a way to calibrate the signal for quantitative measurement of OH concentration in a practical combustor. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11272338) and the Fund from the Science and Technology on Scramjet Key Laboratory, China (Grant No. STSKFKT2013004).

  15. SmartFluo: A Method and Affordable Adapter to Measure Chlorophyll a Fluorescence with Smartphones.

    PubMed

    Friedrichs, Anna; Busch, Julia Anke; van der Woerd, Hendrik Jan; Zielinski, Oliver

    2017-03-25

    In order to increase the monitoring capabilities of inland and coastal waters, there is a need for new, affordable, sensitive and mobile instruments that could be operated semi-automatically in the field. This paper presents a prototype device to measure chlorophyll a fluorescence: the SmartFluo. The device is a combination of a smartphone offering an intuitive operation interface and an adapter implying a cuvette holder, as well as a suitable illumination source. SmartFluo is based on stimulated fluorescence of water constituents such as chlorophyll a. The red band of the digital smartphone camera is sensitive enough to detect quantitatively the characteristic red fluorescence emission. The adapter contains a light source, a strong light emitting diode and additional filters to enhance the signal-to-noise ratio and to suppress the impact of scattering. A novel algorithm utilizing the red band of the camera is provided. Laboratory experiments of the SmartFluo show a linear correlation (R 2 = 0.98) to the chlorophyll a concentrations measured by reference instruments, such as a high-performance benchtop laboratory fluorometer (LS 55, PerkinElmer).

  16. Measurement of plutonium in spent nuclear fuel by self-induced x-ray fluorescence

    SciTech Connect

    Hoover, Andrew S; Rudy, Cliff R; Tobin, Steve J; Charlton, William S; Stafford, A; Strohmeyer, D; Saavadra, S

    2009-01-01

    Direct measurement of the plutonium content in spent nuclear fuel is a challenging problem in non-destructive assay. The very high gamma-ray flux from fission product isotopes overwhelms the weaker gamma-ray emissions from plutonium and uranium, making passive gamma-ray measurements impossible. However, the intense fission product radiation is effective at exciting plutonium and uranium atoms, resulting in subsequent fluorescence X-ray emission. K-shell X-rays in the 100 keV energy range can escape the fuel and cladding, providing a direct signal from uranium and plutonium that can be measured with a standard germanium detector. The measured plutonium to uranium elemental ratio can be used to compute the plutonium content of the fuel. The technique can potentially provide a passive, non-destructive assay tool for determining plutonium content in spent fuel. In this paper, we discuss recent non-destructive measurements of plutonium X-ray fluorescence (XRF) signatures from pressurized water reactor spent fuel rods. We also discuss how emerging new technologies, like very high energy resolution microcalorimeter detectors, might be applied to XRF measurements.

  17. Measurements of the OH radical in forested environments by laser-induced fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bottorff, B.; Lew, M.; Stevens, P. S.

    2016-12-01

    The hydroxyl radical (OH) is one of the most important oxidants in the atmosphere. The OH radical initiates the oxidation of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) which in the presence of nitrogen oxides (NOx) can lead to the production of ozone and secondary organic aerosols. Recent studies have shown discrepancies between measured and modeled OH concentrations, especially in forested, low-NOx environments. Therefore, additional measurements of OH radical concentrations in these environments are needed to provide a better understanding of the impact of BVOC emissions on the chemistry of the troposphere. In this study, measurements of OH were made using the Laser-Induced Fluorescence-Fluorescence Assay by Gas Ecpansion (LIF-FAGE) technique during two field campaigns: the Indiana Radical Reactivity and Ozone Production Intercomparison (IRRONIC) in Bloomington, Indiana during July 2015 and the Program for Research on Oxidants Photochemistry and Transport - Atmospheric Measurements of Oxidants in Summer (PROPHET-AMOS) in Pellston, Michigan during July 2016. Both campaigns were conducted in forested environments characterized by high isoprene emissions and low NOx mixing ratios. Ambient OH measurements from both campaigns, including measurements of unknown interferences, will be discussed and compared to modeled predictions.

  18. Mechanism of blue-light-induced plasma-membrane depolarization in etiolated cucumber hypocotyls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spalding, E. P.; Cosgrove, D. J.

    1992-01-01

    A large, transient depolarization of the plasma membrane precedes the rapid blue-light (BL)-induced growth suppression in etiolated seedlings of Cucumis sativus L. The mechanism of this voltage transient was investigated by applying inhibitors of ion channels and the plasma-membrane H(+)-ATPase, by manipulating extracellular ion concentrations, and by measuring cell input resistance and ATP levels. The depolarizing phase was not affected by Ca(2+)-channel blockers (verapamil, La3+) or by reducing extracellular free Ca2+ by treatment with ethylene glycol-bis(beta-aminoethyl ether)-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid (EGTA). However, these treatments did reduce the rate of repolarization, indicating an inward movement of Ca2+ is involved. No effects of the K(+)-channel blocker tetraethylammonium (TEA+) were detected. Vanadate and KCN, used to inhibit the H(+)-ATPase, reduced or completely inhibited the BL-induced depolarization. Levels of ATP increased by 11-26% after 1-2 min of BL. Input resistance of trichrome cells, measured with double-barreled microelectrodes, remained constant during the onset of the depolarization but decreased as the membrane voltage became more positive than -90 mV. The results indicate that the depolarization mechanism initially involves inactivation of the H(+)-ATPase with subsequent transient activation of one or more types of ion channels.

  19. Mechanism of blue-light-induced plasma-membrane depolarization in etiolated cucumber hypocotyls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spalding, E. P.; Cosgrove, D. J.

    1992-01-01

    A large, transient depolarization of the plasma membrane precedes the rapid blue-light (BL)-induced growth suppression in etiolated seedlings of Cucumis sativus L. The mechanism of this voltage transient was investigated by applying inhibitors of ion channels and the plasma-membrane H(+)-ATPase, by manipulating extracellular ion concentrations, and by measuring cell input resistance and ATP levels. The depolarizing phase was not affected by Ca(2+)-channel blockers (verapamil, La3+) or by reducing extracellular free Ca2+ by treatment with ethylene glycol-bis(beta-aminoethyl ether)-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid (EGTA). However, these treatments did reduce the rate of repolarization, indicating an inward movement of Ca2+ is involved. No effects of the K(+)-channel blocker tetraethylammonium (TEA+) were detected. Vanadate and KCN, used to inhibit the H(+)-ATPase, reduced or completely inhibited the BL-induced depolarization. Levels of ATP increased by 11-26% after 1-2 min of BL. Input resistance of trichrome cells, measured with double-barreled microelectrodes, remained constant during the onset of the depolarization but decreased as the membrane voltage became more positive than -90 mV. The results indicate that the depolarization mechanism initially involves inactivation of the H(+)-ATPase with subsequent transient activation of one or more types of ion channels.

  20. Simultaneous Measurement of Amyloid Fibril Formation by Dynamic Light Scattering and Fluorescence Reveals Complex Aggregation Kinetics

    PubMed Central

    Streets, Aaron M.; Sourigues, Yannick; Kopito, Ron R.; Melki, Ronald; Quake, Stephen R.

    2013-01-01

    An apparatus that combines dynamic light scattering and Thioflavin T fluorescence detection is used to simultaneously probe fibril formation in polyglutamine peptides, the aggregating subunit associated with Huntington's disease, in vitro. Huntington's disease is a neurodegenerative disorder in a class of human pathologies that includes Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease. These pathologies are all related by the propensity of their associated protein or polypeptide to form insoluble, β-sheet rich, amyloid fibrils. Despite the wide range of amino acid sequence in the aggregation prone polypeptides associated with these diseases, the resulting amyloids display strikingly similar physical structure, an observation which suggests a physical basis for amyloid fibril formation. Thioflavin T fluorescence reports β-sheet fibril content while dynamic light scattering measures particle size distributions. The combined techniques allow elucidation of complex aggregation kinetics and are used to reveal multiple stages of amyloid fibril formation. PMID:23349924

  1. Investigation of laser-induced iodine fluorescence for the measurement of density in compressible flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcdaniel, J. C., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    Laser induced fluorescence is an attractive nonintrusive approach for measuring molecular number density in compressible flows although this technique does not produce a signal that is directly related to the number density. Saturation and frequency detuned excitation are explored as means for minimizing the quenching effect using iodine as the molecular system because of its convenient absorption spectrum. Saturation experiments indicate that with available continuous wave laser sources of Gaussian transverse intensity distribution only partial saturation could be achieved in iodine at the pressures of interest in gas dynamics. Using a fluorescence lineshape theory, it is shown that for sufficiently large detuning of a narrow bandwidth laser from a molecular transition, the quenching can be cancelled by collisional broadening over a large range of pressures and temperatures. Experimental data obtained in a Mach 4.3 underexpanded jet of nitrogen seeded with iodine for various single mode argon laser detunings from a strong iodine transition at 5145 A are discussed.

  2. Determining a fluorophore's transition dipole moment from fluorescence lifetime measurements in solvents of varying refractive index.

    PubMed

    Chung, Pei-Hua; Tregidgo, Carolyn; Suhling, Klaus

    2016-11-11

    The transition dipole moment of organic dyes PM546 and rhodamine 123 is calculated from fluorescence lifetime measurements in solutions of different refractive index. A model proposed by Toptygin et al (2002 J. Phys. Chem. B 106 3724-34) provides a relationship between the radiative rate constant and refractive index of the solvent, and allows the electronic transition dipole moments to be found: it is (7.1  ±  1.1) D for PM546 which matches that found in the literature, and (8.1  ±  0.1) D for rhodamine 123. Toptygin's model goes further in predicting the shape of the fluorescent dye and here we predict the shape of PM546 and rhodamine 123 to be ellipsoidal.

  3. Laser-induced fluorescence diagnostic for temperature and velocity measurements in a hydrogen arcjet plume.

    PubMed

    Liebeskind, J G; Hanson, R K; Cappelli, M A

    1993-10-20

    A diagnostic has been developed to measure velocity and translational temperature in the plume of a 1-kW-class arcjet thruster operating on hydrogen. Laser-induced fluorescence with a narrow-band cw laser is used to probe the Balmer α transition of excited atomic hydrogen. The velocity is determined from the Doppler shift of the fluorescence excitation spectrum, whereas the temperature is inferred from the lineshape. Analysis shows that although Doppler broadening is the only significant broadening mechanism, the fine structure of the transition must be taken into account. Near the exit plane, axial velocities vary from 4 to 14 km/s, radial velocities vary from 0 to 4 km/s, and swirl velocities are shown to be relatively small. Temperatures from 1000 to 5000 K indicate high dissociation fractions.

  4. Fluorescence spectroscopy measures yeast PAH1-encoded phosphatidate phosphatase interaction with liposome membranes

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Zhi; Su, Wen-Min; Carman, George M.

    2012-01-01

    Phosphatidate (PA) phosphatase, the enzyme that catalyzes the penultimate step in triacylglycerol synthesis, is a cytosolic enzyme that must associate with the membrane where its substrate PA resides. Fluorescence spectroscopy was used to measure the interaction of yeast PAH1-encoded PA phosphatase with model liposome membranes. PA phosphatase contains five tryptophan residues and exhibited inherit fluorescence that increased upon interaction with phosphatidylcholine liposomes. The interaction was enhanced by inclusion of other phospholipids and especially the substrate PA. Interaction was dependent on both the concentration of phosphatidylcholine-PA liposomes as well as the surface concentration of PA in liposomes. Mg2+ ions, which were required for catalysis, did not affect PA phosphatase interaction with phosphatidylcholine-PA liposomes. PA phosphatase was a substrate for protein kinase A, protein kinase C, and casein kinase II, and these phosphorylations decreased PA phosphatase interaction with phosphatidylcholine-PA liposome membranes. PMID:22180632

  5. Immobilized fluorescent dyes for sensitive pH measurements on enamel surfaces with fiber optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rumphorst, A.; Seeger, Stefan; Duschner, H.

    1996-01-01

    Information on the pH directly on surfaces of dental enamel is an important aspect in research on tooth decay. As an alternative to pH-electrodes our approach to the problem is the optical determination of pH by pH sensitive fluorescent dyes immobilized to tooth surfaces. In this study a model for measuring pH either on aminated cellulose substrates or on enamel (in vitro) with a fluorescein type dye is presented. The experimental realization is a fiber optic sensor with a nitrogen-pumped dye laser system and photodiode for the detection of the emitted fluorescence light. The surface pH values in the range between 4 and 7 were derived from the ratios of the excitation bands at 490 nm and 460 nm.

  6. Stability of some Cactaceae proteins based on fluorescence, circular dichroism, and differential scanning calorimetry measurements.

    PubMed

    Gorinstein, S; Zemser, M; Vargas-Albores, F; Ochoa, J L; Paredes-Lopez, O; Scheler, C; Aksu, S; Salnikow, J

    1999-02-01

    Characterization of three cactus proteins (native and denatured) from Machaerocereus gummosus (Pitahaya agria), Lophocereu schottii (Garambullo), and Cholla opuntia (Cholla), was based on electrophoretic, fluorescence, CD (circular dichroism), DSC (differential scanning calorimetry), and FT-IR (Fourier transform infrared) measurements. The obtained results of intrinsic fluorescence, DSC, and CD were dissimilar for the three species of cactus, providing evidence of differences in secondary and tertiary structures. Cactus proteins may be situated in the following order corresponding to their relative stability: Machaerocereus gummosus (Pitahaya agria) > Cholla opuntia (Cholla) > Lophocereu schottii (Garambullo). Thermodynamic properties of proteins and their changes upon denaturation (temperature of denaturation, enthalphy, and the number of ruptured hydrogen bonds) were correlated with the secondary structure of proteins and disappearance of alpha-helix.

  7. Application of a pulsed laser for measurements of bathymetry and algal fluorescence.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hickman, G. D.; Hogg, J. E.; Friedman, E. J.; Ghovanlou, A. H.

    1973-01-01

    The technique of measuring water depths with an airborne pulsed dye laser is studied, with emphasis on the degrading effect of some environmental and operational parameters on the transmitted and reflected laser signals. Extrapolation of measurements of laser stimulated fluorescence, performed as a function of both the algal cell concentration and the distance between the algae and the laser/receiver, indicate that a laser system operating from a height of 500 m should be capable of detecting chlorophyll concentrations as low as 1.0 mg/cu m.-

  8. Application of a pulsed laser for measurements of bathymetry and algal fluorescence.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hickman, G. D.; Hogg, J. E.; Friedman, E. J.; Ghovanlou, A. H.

    1973-01-01

    The technique of measuring water depths with an airborne pulsed dye laser is studied, with emphasis on the degrading effect of some environmental and operational parameters on the transmitted and reflected laser signals. Extrapolation of measurements of laser stimulated fluorescence, performed as a function of both the algal cell concentration and the distance between the algae and the laser/receiver, indicate that a laser system operating from a height of 500 m should be capable of detecting chlorophyll concentrations as low as 1.0 mg/cu m.-

  9. Simultaneous measurement of position and color of single fluorescent emitters using diffractive optics.

    PubMed

    Broeken, Jordi; Rieger, Bernd; Stallinga, Sjoerd

    2014-06-01

    We propose a method for simultaneously measuring the position and emission color of single fluorescent emitters based on the use of a large pitch diffraction grating in the emission light path. The grating produces satellite spots adjacent to the main spot; the relative distance between the spots is a measure for the emission wavelength. We present proof-of-principle experiments on beads and mixtures of quantum dots using a spatial light modulator for making a programmable diffraction grating. A wavelength precision of around 10 nm can be achieved for 1000 signal photons and practical background levels, while maintaining a localization precision of around 10 nm.

  10. On the measurement of particle number and mobility in nonideal solutions by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Abney, J R; Scalettar, B A; Hackenbrock, C R

    1990-01-01

    Interparticle interactions are incorporated into the theoretical description of the initial amplitude, G(0), of the normalized fluorescence correlation spectroscopy autocorrelation function. Measurements of particle number, aggregate size, and interaction-dependent diffusion are then analyzed in the context of this generalized theory. It is shown that the neglect of interactions can introduce order-of-magnitude errors into estimates of particle number and aggregate size. It is also shown that measurement of G(0) provides an essentially unique method for testing the validity of theories of interaction-dependent membrane protein diffusion. PMID:2383634

  11. In situ measurement of airway surface liquid [K+] using a ratioable K+-sensitive fluorescent dye.

    PubMed

    Namkung, Wan; Song, Yuanlin; Mills, Aaron D; Padmawar, Prashant; Finkbeiner, Walter E; Verkman, A S

    2009-06-05

    The airway surface liquid (ASL) is the thin fluid layer lining airway surface epithelial cells, whose volume and composition are tightly regulated and may be abnormal in cystic fibrosis (CF). We synthesized a two-color fluorescent dextran to measure ASL [K(+)], TAC-Lime-dextran-TMR, consisting of a green-fluorescing triazacryptand K(+) ionophore-Bodipy conjugate, coupled to dextran, together with a red fluorescing tetramethylrhodamine reference chromophore. TAC-Lime-dextran-TMR fluorescence was K(+)-selective, increasing >4-fold with increasing [K(+)] from 0 to 40 mm. In well differentiated human airway epithelial cells, ASL [K(+)] was 20.8 +/- 0.3 mm and decreased by inhibition of the Na(+)/K(+) pump (ouabain), ENaC (amiloride), CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR(inh)-172), or K(+) channels (TEA or XE991). ASL [K(+)] was increased by forskolin but not affected by Na(+)/K(+)/2Cl(-) cotransporter inhibition (bumetanide). Functional and expression studies indicated the involvement of [K(+)] channels KCNQ1, KCNQ3, and KCNQ5 as determinants of ASL [K(+)]. [K(+)] in CF cultures was similar to that in non-CF cultures, suggesting that abnormal ASL [K(+)] is not a factor in CF lung disease. In intact airways, ASL [K(+)] was also well above extracellular [K(+)]: 22 +/- 1 mm in pig trachea ex vivo and 16 +/- 1 mm in mouse trachea in vivo. Our results provide the first noninvasive measurements of [K(+)] in the ASL and indicate the involvement of apical and basolateral membrane ion transporters in maintaining a high ASL [K(+)].

  12. Biodegradability of anthropogenic organic matter in polluted rivers using fluorescence, UV, and BDOC measurements.

    PubMed

    Knapik, Heloise G; Fernandes, Cristovão V S; de Azevedo, Julio Cesar R; dos Santos, Mauricius M; Dall'Agnol, Patrícia; Fontane, Darrell G

    2015-03-01

    The presence of highly urbanized and polluted areas affects both the quantity and the composition of organic matter in rivers through effluent loads and urban runoff discharges in watersheds. In such context, this paper aims to evaluate the biodegradability of anthropogenic organic matter in polluted rivers. Stream water samples were collected in three different sites considering a non-impacted area, a highly urbanized site located after a sewage treatment plant, and a site downstream of the watershed. For the biodegradation experiment, two adaptations of biodegradable dissolved organic carbon (BDOC) essay were evaluated to assess the decomposition rates between 10 days, with added nutrients, in the dark at 20 °C. The organic matter biodegradation was monitored by distinct parameters such as dissolved organic carbon (DOC), total organic carbon (TOC), particulate organic carbon (POC), fluorescence excitation-emission matrix (EEM), and UV absorbance measurements. The measured BDOC ranged from 0.8 mg/L at site IG01 (low anthropogenic occupation) to 4.2 mg/L at site IG02 (high impacted area), with averaged percentage of initial DOC ranging from 20 to 56 %, while an average of 28 % up to 95 % of POC can be considered as biodegradable. This pattern of biodegradation of fluorescent components was also observed through a decrease of tryptophan-like and tyrosine-like fluorescence peak intensity during the incubation time. The results also showed a higher decrease of humic-like fluorescence peak intensity at polluted sites (IG02 and IG05). Our experimental approach and monitoring strategy suggests that the evaluation of the organic matter biodegradability is essential to understand the fate and transformation mechanism of organic matter in urbanized and polluted rivers. And, considering a water quality planning and management perspective, this approach is important to identify the presence and location of organic compounds potentially important for dissolved oxygen

  13. FUNDAMENTAL AREAS OF PHENOMENOLOGY (INCLUDING APPLICATIONS): Enhanced Spin Depolarization and Storage Time in a Rb Vapor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Yue-Rong; Gao, Hong; Zhang, Shou-Gang

    2009-11-01

    The experiment of measuring the spin depolarized time and light storage time in a Rb vapor under different conditions is performed. Typically, these measurements are accomplished in three different containers: atoms in a bare glass cell, atoms in a buffer gas cell, and atoms in a tetracontane (C40H82) coating cell. The increasing depolarization and storage times are observed in both the buffer gas cell and the tetracontane coating cell. In the latter case, a storage time greater than 400 μs is obtained.

  14. Diode laser atomic fluorescence temperature measurements in low-pressure flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burns, I. S.; Lamoureux, N.; Kaminski, C. F.; Hult, J.; Desgroux, P.

    2008-12-01

    Temperature measurements have been performed in a low-pressure flame by the technique of diode laser induced atomic fluorescence. The experiments were done in a near-stoichiometric flat-flame of premixed methane, oxygen and nitrogen, at a pressure of 5.3 kPa. Indium atoms were seeded to the flame and probed using blue diode lasers; the lineshapes of the resulting fluorescence spectra were used to determine the flame temperature at a range of heights above the burner plate. The particular issues associated with the implementation of this measurement approach at low pressure are discussed, and it is shown to work especially well under these conditions. The atomic fluorescence lineshape thermometry technique is quicker to perform and requires less elaborate equipment than other methods that have previously been implemented in low-pressure flames, including OH-LIF and NO-LIF. There was sufficient indium present to perform measurements at all locations in the flame, including in the pre-heat zone close to the burner plate. Two sets of temperature measurements have been independently performed by using two different diode lasers to probe two separate transitions in atomic indium. The good agreement between the two sets of data provides a validation of the technique. By comparing thermocouple profiles recorded with and without seeding of the flame, we demonstrate that any influence of seeding on the flame temperature is negligible. The overall uncertainty of the measurements reported here is estimated to be ±2.5% in the burnt gas region.

  15. Relation between circular and linear depolarization ratios under multiple-scattering conditions.

    PubMed

    Roy, Gilles; Roy, Nathalie

    2008-12-10

    A simple relationship is established between the linear and the circular depolarization ratios averaged over the azimuth angle of clouds made of spherical particles. The relationship is validated theoretically using double-scattering calculations; in the framework, the measurements are performed with a multiple-field-of-view lidar (MFOV) lidar. The relationship is also validated using data obtained with MFOV lidar equipped with linear and circular polarization measurement capabilities. The experimental data support theoretical results for small optical depths. At higher optical depths and large fields of view, the contribution of multiple scatterings is important; experimental data suggest that the relationship established between the linear and circular depolarization stays valid as long as the main depolarization mechanism comes from one scattering (most likely a backscattering a few degrees away from 180 degrees ).

  16. Pyrene measurements in sooting low pressure methane flames by jet-cooled laser-induced fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Wartel, M; Pauwels, J-F; Desgroux, P; Mercier, X

    2011-12-15

    This paper presents in detail the study we carried out concerning the pyrene measurement by jet-cooled laser-induced fluorescence (JCLIF) in different sooting low pressure methane flames. The aim of this paper is both to demonstrate the potentialities of this technique for the measurement of such moderately sized polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons under sooting flame conditions and to provide new experimental data for the understanding and the development of chemical models of the soot formation processes. Several concentration profiles of pyrene measured in different sooting flame (various pressure and equivalence ratio) are presented. The validation of the JCLIF method for pyrene measurements is explained in detail as well as the calibration procedure, based on the standard addition method, which has been implemented for the quantification of the concentration profiles. Sensitivity lower than 1 ppb was obtained for the measurement of this species under sooting flame conditions.

  17. High speed velocimetry and concentration measurements in a microfluidic mixer using fluorescence confocal microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inguva, Venkatesh; Perot, Blair; Kathuria, Sagar; Rothstein, Jonathan; Bilsel, Osman

    2016-11-01

    This work experimentally examines the performance of a quasi-turbulent micro-mixer that was designed to produce rapid mixing for protein-folding experiments. The original design of the mixer was performed using Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) of the flow field and LES of the high Sc number scalar field representing the protein. The experimental work is designed to validate the DNS results. Both the velocity field and the protein concentration require validation. Different experiments were carried out to measure these two quantities. Concentration measurements are performed using a 488nm continuous wave laser coupled with a confocal microscope to measure fluorescence intensity during mixing. This is calibrated using the case where no mixing occurs. The velocity measurements use a novel high speed velocimetry technique capable of measuring speeds on the order of 10 m/s in a micro channel. The technique involves creating a pulsed confocal volume from a Ti-Sapphire laser with a pulse width of 260ns and observing the decay of fluorescence due to the fluid motion. Results from both experiments will be presented along with a comparison to the DNS results. The work is supported by NSF IDBR Award No. 1353942.

  18. Advantages of calcium green-1 over other fluorescent dyes in measuring cytosolic calcium in platelets.

    PubMed

    Lee, S K; Lee, J Y; Lee, M Y; Chung, S M; Chung, J H

    1999-09-10

    Fluorescent indicators are widely used in the measurements of cytosolic calcium in many cell types for many purposes because they are relatively easy to use. Notwithstanding, they have some defects to prevent accurate measurements under certain conditions, such as significant dye leakage and UV-quenching effect. Menadione, a representative quinone derivative with antiaggregating effect, is also UV-absorbent. To investigate whether menadione can affect the change of cytosolic calcium in platelets by agonist, we measured the change of cytosolic calcium level using calcium green-1. Since this dye has not been used previously in platelets, we determined that the optimal loading of calcium green-1 to platelets was achieved using 3 microM dye incubated for 60 min at 37 degrees C. Our study compared the use of calcium green-1 with fura-2 and fluo-3 (two widely used dyes) in measurements of cytosolic calcium. Fura-2 is UV-excited, so when menadione was treated in fura-2-loaded cells, it had a quenching effect. Fluo-3, the other visible fluorescent indicator, leaked from platelets very rapidly and required the use of anion channel blockers which are known to affect physiological response of platelets. Our study demonstrated that changes in cytosolic calcium levels can be accurately measured without these problems by using calcium green-1. We therefore were able to demonstrate that menadione inhibited calcium increase by thrombin in a dose-dependent manner similar to menadione's antiaggregating effect in platelets. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  19. Comparative evaluation of performance measures for shading correction in time-lapse fluorescence microscopy.

    PubMed

    Liu, L; Kan, A; Leckie, C; Hodgkin, P D

    2017-04-01

    Time-lapse fluorescence microscopy is a valuable technology in cell biology, but it suffers from the inherent problem of intensity inhomogeneity due to uneven illumination or camera nonlinearity, known as shading artefacts. This will lead to inaccurate estimates of single-cell features such as average and total intensity. Numerous shading correction methods have been proposed to remove this effect. In order to compare the performance of different methods, many quantitative performance measures have been developed. However, there is little discussion about which performance measure should be generally applied for evaluation on real data, where the ground truth is absent. In this paper, the state-of-the-art shading correction methods and performance evaluation methods are reviewed. We implement 10 popular shading correction methods on two artificial datasets and four real ones. In order to make an objective comparison between those methods, we employ a number of quantitative performance measures. Extensive validation demonstrates that the coefficient of joint variation (CJV) is the most applicable measure in time-lapse fluorescence images. Based on this measure, we have proposed a novel shading correction method that performs better compared to well-established methods for a range of real data tested. © 2016 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2016 Royal Microscopical Society.

  20. 3D ion velocity distribution function measurement in an electric thruster using laser induced fluorescence tomography.

    PubMed

    Elias, P Q; Jarrige, J; Cucchetti, E; Cannat, F; Packan, D

    2017-09-01

    Measuring the full ion velocity distribution function (IVDF) by non-intrusive techniques can improve our understanding of the ionization processes and beam dynamics at work in electric thrusters. In this paper, a Laser-Induced Fluorescence (LIF) tomographic reconstruction technique is applied to the measurement of the IVDF in the plume of a miniature Hall effect thruster. A setup is developed to move the laser axis along two rotation axes around the measurement volume. The fluorescence spectra taken from different viewing angles are combined using a tomographic reconstruction algorithm to build the complete 3D (in phase space) time-averaged distribution function. For the first time, this technique is used in the plume of a miniature Hall effect thruster to measure the full distribution function of the xenon ions. Two examples of reconstructions are provided, in front of the thruster nose-cone and in front of the anode channel. The reconstruction reveals the features of the ion beam, in particular on the thruster axis where a toroidal distribution function is observed. These findings are consistent with the thruster shape and operation. This technique, which can be used with other LIF schemes, could be helpful in revealing the details of the ion production regions and the beam dynamics. Using a more powerful laser source, the current implementation of the technique could be improved to reduce the measurement time and also to reconstruct the temporal evolution of the distribution function.

  1. Upgrade of goniospectrophtometer GEFE for near-field scattering and fluorescence radiance measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernad, Berta; Ferrero, Alejandro; Pons, Alicia; Hernanz, M. L.; Campos, Joaquín.

    2015-03-01

    The goniospectrophotometer GEFE, designed and developed at IO-CSIC (Instituto de Optica, Agencia Estatal Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas), was conceived to measure the spectral Bidirectional Reflectance Distribution Function (BRDF) at any pair of irradiation and detection directions. Although the potential of this instrument has largely been proved, it still required to be upgraded to deal with some important scattering features for the assessment of the appearance. Since it was not provided with a detector with spatial resolution, it simply could not measure spectrophotometric quantities to characterize texture through the Bidirectional Texture Function (BTF) or translucency through the more complex Bidirectional Scattering-Surface Reflectance Distribution Function (BSSRDF). Another requirement in the GEFE upgrading was to provide it with the capability of measuring fluorescence at different geometries, since some of the new pigments used in industry are fluorescent, which can have a non-negligible impact in the color of the product. Then, spectral resolution at irradiation and detection had to be available in GEFE. This paper describes the upgrading of the goniospectrophotometer GEFE, and its new capabilities through the presentation of sparkle and goniofluorescence measurements. In addition, the potential of the instrument to evaluate translucency by the measurement of the BSSRDF is briefly discussed.

  2. Multifaceted roles for astrocytes in spreading depolarization

    PubMed Central

    Seidel, Jessica L.; Escartin, Carole; Ayata, Cenk; Bonvento, Gilles; Shuttleworth, C. William

    2015-01-01

    Spreading depolarizations (SD) are coordinated waves of synchronous depolarization, involving large numbers of neurons and astrocytes as they spread slowly through brain tissue. The recent identification of SDs as likely contributors to pathophysiology in human subjects has led to a significant increase in interest in SD mechanisms, and possible approaches to limit the numbers of SDs or their deleterious consequences in injured brain. Astrocytes regulate many events associated with SD. SD initiation and propagation is dependent on extracellular accumulation of K+ and glutamate, both of which involve astrocytic clearance. SDs are extremely metabolically demanding events, and signaling through astrocyte networks is likely central to the dramatic increase in regional blood flow that accompanies SD in otherwise healthy tissues. Astrocytes may provide metabolic support to neurons following SD, and may provide a source of adenosine that inhibits neuronal activity following SD. It is also possible that astrocytes contribute to the pathophysiology of SD, as a consequence of excessive glutamate release, facilitation of NMDA receptor activation, brain edema due to astrocyte swelling, or disrupted coupling to appropriate vascular responses after SD. Direct or indirect evidence has accumulated implicating astrocytes in many of these responses, but much remains unknown about their specific contributions, especially in the context of injury. Conversion of astrocytes to a reactive phenotype is a prominent feature of injured brain, and recent work suggests that the different functional properties of reactive astrocytes could be targeted to limit SDs in pathophysiological conditions. PMID:26301517

  3. Depolarization Lidar Determination Of Cloud-Base Microphysical Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donovan, D. P.; Klein Baltink, H.; Henzing, J. S.; de Roode, S.; Siebesma, A. P.

    2016-06-01

    The links between multiple-scattering induced depolarization and cloud microphysical properties (e.g. cloud particle number density, effective radius, water content) have long been recognised. Previous efforts to use depolarization information in a quantitative manner to retrieve cloud microphysical cloud properties have also been undertaken but with limited scope and, arguably, success. In this work we present a retrieval procedure applicable to liquid stratus clouds with (quasi-)linear LWC profiles and (quasi-)constant number density profiles in the cloud-base region. This set of assumptions allows us to employ a fast and robust inversion procedure based on a lookup-table approach applied to extensive lidar Monte-Carlo multiple-scattering calculations. An example validation case is presented where the results of the inversion procedure are compared with simultaneous cloud radar observations. In non-drizzling conditions it was found, in general, that the lidar- only inversion results can be used to predict the radar reflectivity within the radar calibration uncertainty (2-3 dBZ). Results of a comparison between ground-based aerosol number concentration and lidar-derived cloud base number considerations are also presented. The observed relationship between the two quantities is seen to be consistent with the results of previous studies based on aircraft-based in situ measurements.

  4. Shifts in the fluorescence lifetime of EGFP during bacterial phagocytosis measured by phase-sensitive flow cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wenyan; Houston, Kevin D.; Houston, Jessica P.

    2017-01-01

    Phase-sensitive flow cytometry (PSFC) is a technique in which fluorescence excited state decay times are measured as fluorescently labeled cells rapidly transit a finely focused, frequency-modulated laser beam. With PSFC the fluorescence lifetime is taken as a cytometric parameter to differentiate intracellular events that are challenging to distinguish with standard flow cytometry. For example PSFC can report changes in protein conformation, expression, interactions, and movement, as well as differences in intracellular microenvironments. This contribution focuses on the latter case by taking PSFC measurements of macrophage cells when inoculated with enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP)-expressing E. coli. During progressive internalization of EGFP-E. coli, fluorescence lifetimes were acquired and compared to control groups. It was hypothesized that fluorescence lifetimes would correlate well with phagocytosis because phagosomes become acidified and the average fluorescence lifetime of EGFP is known to be affected by pH. We confirmed that average EGFP lifetimes consistently decreased (3 to 2 ns) with inoculation time. The broad significance of this work is the demonstration of how high-throughput fluorescence lifetime measurements correlate well to changes that are not easily tracked by intensity-only cytometry, which is affected by heterogeneous protein expression, cell-to-cell differences in phagosome formation, and number of bacterium engulfed. PMID:28091553

  5. Shifts in the fluorescence lifetime of EGFP during bacterial phagocytosis measured by phase-sensitive flow cytometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wenyan; Houston, Kevin D.; Houston, Jessica P.

    2017-01-01

    Phase-sensitive flow cytometry (PSFC) is a technique in which fluorescence excited state decay times are measured as fluorescently labeled cells rapidly transit a finely focused, frequency-modulated laser beam. With PSFC the fluorescence lifetime is taken as a cytometric parameter to differentiate intracellular events that are challenging to distinguish with standard flow cytometry. For example PSFC can report changes in protein conformation, expression, interactions, and movement, as well as differences in intracellular microenvironments. This contribution focuses on the latter case by taking PSFC measurements of macrophage cells when inoculated with enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP)-expressing E. coli. During progressive internalization of EGFP-E. coli, fluorescence lifetimes were acquired and compared to control groups. It was hypothesized that fluorescence lifetimes would correlate well with phagocytosis because phagosomes become acidified and the average fluorescence lifetime of EGFP is known to be affected by pH. We confirmed that average EGFP lifetimes consistently decreased (3 to 2 ns) with inoculation time. The broad significance of this work is the demonstration of how high-throughput fluorescence lifetime measurements correlate well to changes that are not easily tracked by intensity-only cytometry, which is affected by heterogeneous protein expression, cell-to-cell differences in phagosome formation, and number of bacterium engulfed.

  6. Effects of isoflurane on measurement of fluorescence spectra and CLSM imaging in Acetabularia acetabulum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, WenLi; Quan, Zhou; Xing, Da

    2007-05-01

    The volatile halogenated methyl ethyl ether is used as anesthetic to inhibit actin-based dynamics directly or indirectly in animal cells. In plant cells, most intracellular movements are related with actin pathways too. We utilized isoflurane to study the dynamic choloroplast organization in unicellular baby and adult alga Acetabularia acetabulum. Fluorescence spectra were measured and choloroplast movements were recorded by confocal laser scanning microscope (CLSM) imaging in in Acetabularia acetabulum. Isoflurane was effective in the unicellular baby and adult organisms and showed time- dependent actin-inhibition patterns. Acetabularia acetabulum cells were treated for different times with isoflurane saturated solutions in artificial seawater (it was defined to be 100% isoflurane). The intensity of fluorescence at 680nm and 730nm were progressively decreased at 100% isoflurane. It was remarkable difference between fluorescence spectra of baby and adult Acetabularia were inhibited by isoflurance, adult Acetabularia cells showed more sensitive. Whereas the choloroplast in Acetabularia acetabulum was commendably imaged by CLSM at 20 and 40 zoom.

  7. Effects of signal corrections on measurements of temperature and OH concentrations using laser-induced fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Zhiyao; Carter, Campbell D.; Lempert, Walter R.

    2014-07-01

    Temperature and OH concentrations derived from OH laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) are known to be susceptible to effects such as collisional quenching, laser absorption, and fluorescence trapping. In this paper, a set of analytical and easy-to-implement methods is presented for treating these effects. The significance of these signal corrections on inferred temperature and absolute OH concentration is demonstrated in an atmospheric-pressure, near-stoichiometric CH4-air flame stabilized on a Hencken burner, for laser excitation of both the A2Σ+←X2Π (0,0) and (1,0) bands. It is found that the combined effect of laser attenuation and fluorescence trapping can cause considerable error in the OH number density and temperature if not accounted for, even with A-X(1,0) excitation. The validity of the assumptions used in signal correction (that the excited-state distribution is either thermalized or frozen) is examined using time-dependent modeling of the ro-vibronic states during and after laser excitation. These assumptions are shown to provide good bounding approximations for treating transition-dependent issues in OH LIF, especially for an unknown collisional environment, and it is noted that the proposed methods are generally applicable to LIF-based measurements.

  8. A fluorescent assay to quantitatively measure in vitro acyl CoA:diacylglycerol acyltransferase activity.

    PubMed

    McFie, Pamela J; Stone, Scot J

    2011-09-01

    Triacylglycerols (TG) are the major storage form of energy in eukaryotic organisms and are synthesized primarily by acyl CoA:1,2-diacylglycerol acyltransferase (DGAT) enzymes. In vitro DGAT activity has previously been quantified by measuring the incorporation of either radiolabeled fatty acyl CoA or diacylglycerol (DG) into TG. We developed a modified acyltransferase assay using a fluorescent fatty acyl CoA substrate to accurately quantify in vitro DGAT activity. In the modified assay, radioactive fatty acyl CoA is replaced with fluorescent NBD-palmitoyl CoA, which is used as a substrate by DGAT with DG to produce NBD-TG. After extraction with organic solvents and separation by thin layer chromatography, NBD-TG formation can be detected and accurately quantified using a fluorescent imaging system. We demonstrate that this method can be adapted to detect other acyltransferase activities. Because NBD-palmitoyl CoA is commercially available at a much lower cost compared with radioactive acyl CoA substrates, it is a more economical alternative to radioactive tracers. In addition, the exposure of laboratory personnel to radioactivity is greatly reduced.

  9. Quantitative Laser-Saturated Fluorescence Measurements of Nitric Oxide in a Heptane Spray Flame

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, Clayton S.; Laurendeau, Normand M.; Lee, Chi (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    We report spatially resolved laser-saturated fluorescence measurements of NO concentration in a pre-heated, lean-direct injection (LDI) spray flame at atmospheric pressure. The spray is produced by a hollow-cone, pressure-atomized nozzle supplied with liquid heptane. NO is excited via the Q2(26.5) transition of the gamma(0,0) band. Detection is performed in a 2-nm region centered on the gamma(0,1) band. Because of the relatively close spectral spacing between the excitation (226 nm) and detection wavelengths (236 nm), the gamma(0,1) band of NO cannot be isolated from the spectral wings of the Mie scattering signal produced by the spray. To account for the resulting superposition of the fluorescence and scattering signals, a background subtraction method has been developed that utilizes a nearby non-resonant wavelength. Excitation scans have been performed to locate the optimum off-line wavelength. Detection scans have been performed at problematic locations in the flame to determine possible fluorescence interferences from UHCs and PAHs at both the on-line and off-line excitation wavelengths. Quantitative radial NO profiles are presented and analyzed so as to better understand the operation of lean-direct injectors for gas turbine combustors.

  10. Automatic measurement of compression wood cell attributes in fluorescence microscopy images.

    PubMed

    Selig, B; Luengo Hendriks, C L; Bardage, S; Daniel, G; Borgefors, G

    2012-06-01

    This paper presents a new automated method for analyzing compression wood fibers in fluorescence microscopy. Abnormal wood known as compression wood is present in almost every softwood tree harvested. Compression wood fibers show a different cell wall morphology and chemistry compared to normal wood fibers, and their mechanical and physical characteristics are considered detrimental for both construction wood and pulp and paper purposes. Currently there is the need for improved methodologies for characterization of lignin distribution in wood cell walls, such as from compression wood fibers, that will allow for a better understanding of fiber mechanical properties. Traditionally, analysis of fluorescence microscopy images of fiber cross-sections has been done manually, which is time consuming and subjective. Here, we present an automatic method, using digital image analysis, that detects and delineates softwood fibers in fluorescence microscopy images, dividing them into cell lumen, normal and highly lignified areas. It also quantifies the different areas, as well as measures cell wall thickness. The method is evaluated by comparing the automatic with a manual delineation. While the boundaries between the various fiber wall regions are detected using the automatic method with precision similar to inter and intra expert variability, the position of the boundary between lumen and the cell wall has a systematic shift that can be corrected. Our method allows for transverse structural characterization of compression wood fibers, which may allow for improved understanding of the micro-mechanical modeling of wood and pulp fibers.

  11. Use of a laser-induced fluorescence thermal imaging system for film cooling heat transfer measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Chyu, M.K.

    1995-10-01

    This paper describes a novel approach based on fluorescence imaging of thermographic phosphor that enables the simultaneous determination of both local film effectiveness and local heat transfer on a film-cooled surface. The film cooling model demonstrated consists of a single row of three discrete holes on a flat plate. The transient temperature measurement relies on the temperature-sensitive fluorescent properties of europium-doped lanthanum oxysulfide (La{sub 2}O{sub 2}S:EU{sup 3+}) thermographic phosphor. A series of full-field surface temperatures, mainstream temperatures, and coolant film temperatures were acquired during the heating of a test surface. These temperatures are used to calculate the heat transfer coefficients and the film effectiveness simultaneously. Because of the superior spatial resolution capability for the heat transfer data reduced from these temperature frames, the laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) imaging system, the present study observes the detailed heat transfer characteristics over a film-protected surface. The trend of the results agrees with those obtained using other conventional thermal methods, as well as the liquid crystal imaging technique. One major advantage of this technique is the capability to record a large number of temperature frames over a given testing period. This offers multiple-sample consistency.

  12. Multiple Velocity Profile Measurements in Hypersonic Flows using Sequentially-Imaged Fluorescence Tagging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bathel, Brett F.; Danehy, Paul M.; Inmian, Jennifer A.; Jones, Stephen B.; Ivey, Christopher B.; Goyne, Christopher P.

    2010-01-01

    Nitric-oxide planar laser-induced fluorescence (NO PLIF) was used to perform velocity measurements in hypersonic flows by generating multiple tagged lines which fluoresce as they convect downstream. For each laser pulse, a single interline, progressive scan intensified CCD camera was used to obtain separate images of the initial undelayed and delayed NO molecules that had been tagged by the laser. The CCD configuration allowed for sub-microsecond acquisition of both images, resulting in sub-microsecond temporal resolution as well as sub-mm spatial resolution (0.5-mm x 0.7-mm). Determination of axial velocity was made by application of a cross-correlation analysis of the horizontal shift of individual tagged lines. Quantification of systematic errors, the contribution of gating/exposure duration errors, and influence of collision rate on fluorescence to temporal uncertainty were made. Quantification of the spatial uncertainty depended upon the analysis technique and signal-to-noise of the acquired profiles. This investigation focused on two hypersonic flow experiments: (1) a reaction control system (RCS) jet on an Orion Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV) wind tunnel model and (2) a 10-degree half-angle wedge containing a 2-mm tall, 4-mm wide cylindrical boundary layer trip. The experiments were performed at the NASA Langley Research Center's 31-inch Mach 10 wind tunnel.

  13. Use of a laser-induced fluorescence thermal imaging system for film cooling heat transfer measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Chyu, M.K.

    1996-04-01

    This paper describes a novel approach based on fluorescence imaging of thermographic phosphor that enables the simultaneous determination of both local film effectiveness and local heat transfer on a film-cooled surface. The film cooling model demonstrated consists of a single row of three discrete holes on a flat plate. The transient temperature measurement relies on the temperature-sensitive fluorescent properties of europium-doped lanthanum oxysulfide (La{sub 2}O{sub 2}S:Eu{sup +3}) thermographic phosphor. A series of full-field surface temperatures, mainstream temperatures, and coolant film temperatures were acquired during the heating of a test surface. These temperatures are used to calculate the heat transfer coefficients and the film effectiveness simultaneously. Because of the superior spatial resolution capability for the heat transfer data reduced from these temperature frames, the laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) imaging system, the present study observes the detailed heat transfer characteristics over a film-protected surface. The trend of the results agrees with those obtained using other conventional thermal methods, as well as the liquid crystal imaging technique. One major advantage of this technique is the capability to record a large number of temperature frames over a given testing period. This offers multiple-sample consistency.

  14. Quantitative measurement of binary liquid distributions using multiple-tracer x-ray fluorescence and radiography

    DOE PAGES

    Halls, Benjamin R.; Meyer, Terrence R.; Kastengren, Alan L.

    2015-01-23

    The complex geometry and large index-of-refraction gradients that occur near the point of impingement of binary liquid jets present a challenging environment for optical interrogation. A simultaneous quadruple-tracer x-ray fluorescence and line-of-sight radiography technique is proposed as a means of distinguishing and quantifying individual liquid component distributions prior to, during, and after jet impact. Two different pairs of fluorescence tracers are seeded into each liquid stream to maximize their attenuation ratio for reabsorption correction and differentiation of the two fluids during mixing. This approach for instantaneous correction of x-ray fluorescence reabsorption is compared with a more time-intensive approach of usingmore » stereographic reconstruction of x-ray attenuation along multiple lines of sight. The proposed methodology addresses the need for a quantitative measurement technique capable of interrogating optically complex, near-field liquid distributions in many mixing systems of practical interest involving two or more liquid streams.« less

  15. Quantitative measurement of binary liquid distributions using multiple-tracer x-ray fluorescence and radiography

    DOE PAGES

    Halls, Benjamin R.; Meyer, Terrence R.; Kastengren, Alan L.

    2015-01-23

    The complex geometry and large index-of-refraction gradients that occur near the point of impingement of binary liquid jets present a challenging environment for optical interrogation. A simultaneous quadruple-tracer x-ray fluorescence and line-of-sight radiography technique is proposed as a means of distinguishing and quantifying individual liquid component distributions prior to, during, and after jet impact. Two different pairs of fluorescence tracers are seeded into each liquid stream to maximize their attenuation ratio for reabsorption correction and differentiation of the two fluids during mixing. This approach for instantaneous correction of x-ray fluorescence reabsorption is compared with a more time-intensive approach of usingmore » stereographic reconstruction of x-ray attenuation along multiple lines of sight. The proposed methodology addresses the need for a quantitative measurement technique capable of interrogating optically complex, near-field liquid distributions in many mixing systems of practical interest involving two or more liquid streams.« less

  16. A novel fluorescence imaging approach for comparative measurements of pancreatic islet function in vitro.

    PubMed

    Corbin, Kathryn L; Hall, Thomas E; Haile, Ruth; Nunemaker, Craig S

    2011-01-01

    Pancreatic islet dysfunction is a key element in the development of type 2 diabetes. Determining possible early warning signs of dysfunction is thus important to determining the underlying causes of diabetes. We describe an improved fluorescent imaging approach to detect potential islet dysfunction. Using Cell Tracker Red (CTR, a mildly thiol-reactive fluorescent probe) to positively label particular islets, we measured intracel